Science.gov

Sample records for causa externa tempo

  1. Tempo, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cannon, Michael, Ed.

    1999-01-01

    This document consists of the four issues of "Tempo," the newsletter of the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented (TAGT), published during 1999. Each issue focuses on a specific theme, including distinguished achievement programs, Hispanic issues in gifted education, creativity, and gifted children in the new millennium. Articles include:…

  2. TEMPO machine

    SciTech Connect

    Rohwein, G.J.; Lancaster, K.T.; Lawson, R.N.

    1986-06-01

    TEMPO is a transformer powered megavolt pulse generator with an output pulse of 100 ns duration. The machine was designed for burst mode operation at pulse repetition rates up to 10 Hz with minimum pulse-to-pulse voltage variations. To meet the requirement for pulse duration a nd a 20-..omega.. output impedance within reasonable size constraints, the pulse forming transmission line was designed as two parallel water-insulated, strip-type Blumleins. Stray capacitance and electric fields along the edges of the line elements were controlled by lining the tank with plastic sheet.

  3. Ophthalmomyiasis Externa Caused by Oestrus ovis

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Mahesh Kumar; Diddapur, Seethalakshmi Krishnamurthy; Nadagir, Shobha Dhruv; Kota, Subramanya Giliyar

    2012-01-01

    A 50-year-old male presented with foreign body sensation, pain, and redness in left eye. Slit-lamp biomicroscopy revealed tiny larvae crawling around the conjunctival sac. The larvae, numbering 13, were mechanically removed under topical anesthesia and identified under light microscope as first-stage larvae of Oestrus ovis causing ophthalmomyiasis externa. PMID:22923922

  4. Heterotopic ossification in chronic fibrosing otitis externa

    PubMed Central

    Maughan, Elizabeth F.; Bhutta, Mahmood F.; Lavy, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    Acquired external auditory canal atresia is a rare complication of chronic inflammatory otitis, and is generally fibrous or soft tissue in nature. Here, we present the first reported case of heterotopic ossification within chronic fibrosing otitis externa in a 25-year-old male patient with a childhood history of granular myringitis and failed tympanoplasty. A calcified mass was demonstrated adjacent to the tympanic membrane on CT imaging, and surgical exploration revealed a cohesive bar of bone traversing the medial external auditory canal. Drill canaloplasty and split-thickness skin graft coverage of the lateral tympanic membrane resulted in an improvement in the pure tone average from 79 to 55 dB. As the treatment for chronic fibrosing otitis externa involves the surgical widening of the external auditory canal, we alert surgeons to the possibility of cohesive bone formation as a potential cause of navigational confusion and inadvertent over- or under-drilling of the canal stenosis. PMID:26429555

  5. Experimental treatment of recurrent otitis externa.

    PubMed

    Mileva, M H; Pencheva, D V; Bryaskova, R G; Genova-Kalou, P D; Kantardjiev, T V

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research is to determine the effect of the hybrid material based on polyvinyl alcohol and silver nanoparticles (PVA/AgNps) in the treatment of the otitis externa as an additional component in the commercial product "Betazon Trio". It was established that the experimental creamy formula with silver concentration 600 mg/L is suitable for recovery of the microbial homeostasis when it is administrated once daily in dose 1 ml over a period of 14 days. PMID:26623362

  6. Experimental treatment of recurrent otitis externa

    PubMed Central

    Mileva, M.H.; Pencheva, D.V.; Bryaskova, R.G.; Genova-Kalou, P.D.; Kantardjiev, T.V.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research is to determine the effect of the hybrid material based on polyvinyl alcohol and silver nanoparticles (PVA/AgNps) in the treatment of the otitis externa as an additional component in the commercial product “Betazon Trio”. It was established that the experimental creamy formula with silver concentration 600 mg/L is suitable for recovery of the microbial homeostasis when it is administrated once daily in dose 1 ml over a period of 14 days. PMID:26623362

  7. Tempo2: Pulsar Timing Package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, George; Edwards, Russell

    2012-10-01

    Tempo2 is a pulsar timing package developed to be used both for general pulsar timing applications and also for pulsar timing array research in which data-sets from multiple pulsars need to be processed simultaneously. It was initially developed by George Hobbs and Russell Edwards as part of the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array project. Tempo2 is based on the original Tempo (ascl:1509.002) code and can be used (from the command-line) in a similar fashion. It is very versatile and can be extended by plugins.

  8. TEMPO-oxidized cellulose nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isogai, Akira; Saito, Tsuguyuki; Fukuzumi, Hayaka

    2011-01-01

    Native wood celluloses can be converted to individual nanofibers 3-4 nm wide that are at least several microns in length, i.e. with aspect ratios >100, by TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl radical)-mediated oxidation and successive mild disintegration in water. Preparation methods and fundamental characteristics of TEMPO-oxidized cellulose nanofibers (TOCN) are reviewed in this paper. Significant amounts of C6 carboxylate groups are selectively formed on each cellulose microfibril surface by TEMPO-mediated oxidation without any changes to the original crystallinity (~74%) or crystal width of wood celluloses. Electrostatic repulsion and/or osmotic effects working between anionically-charged cellulose microfibrils, the ζ-potentials of which are approximately -75 mV in water, cause the formation of completely individualized TOCN dispersed in water by gentle mechanical disintegration treatment of TEMPO-oxidized wood cellulose fibers. Self-standing TOCN films are transparent and flexible, with high tensile strengths of 200-300 MPa and elastic moduli of 6-7 GPa. Moreover, TOCN-coated poly(lactic acid) films have extremely low oxygen permeability. The new cellulose-based nanofibers formed by size reduction process of native cellulose fibers by TEMPO-mediated oxidation have potential application as environmentally friendly and new bio-based nanomaterials in high-tech fields.

  9. Effects of Tempo, Musical Experience, and Listening Modes on Tempo Modulation Perception.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheldon, Deborah A.

    1994-01-01

    Reports on the effects of tempo direction, listening mode, and level of musical experience on speed and accuracy in tempo change among 160 music majors and nonmajors. Finds that music majors more accurately detected tempo changes than did nonmajors. (CFR)

  10. Personality Correlates of Conceptual Tempo.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bomba, Anne K.; And Others

    Temperament characteristics of 63 4- and 5-year-olds were assessed for the purpose of investigating the relationship between classifications of conceptual tempo and underlying personality factors. Subjects were classified as impulsive, reflective, fast accurate, and slow accurate on the basis of performance on Form A of Wright's (1971) Kansas…

  11. Operation of the TEMPO machine

    SciTech Connect

    Rohwein, G.J.; Lawson, R.N.; Lancaster, K.T.

    1987-01-01

    The TEMPO machine is a repetitively pulsed, high-voltage driver for experimental microwave generating devices. Three units have been built. TEMPO has a transformer-charged, water-insulated Blumlein directly coupled to the vacuum diode. The Blumlein has a relatively high impedance (20-..cap omega..) strip-type, pulse-forming transmission line (PFL) designed to minimize size. Stray capacitance and enhanced electric fields along the edges of the PFL are controlled by lining the tank in which the Blumlein is housed with polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plastic sheet. During the initial stage of operation, problems with breakdowns in the plastic occurred that necessitated replacing the liner with either polyethylene or polypropylene. During the same period, problems with the power supplies and high voltage switch performance were addressed. These modifications and their results are discussed in the following sections.

  12. Modeling the perception of tempo.

    PubMed

    Elowsson, Anders; Friberg, Anders

    2015-06-01

    A system is proposed in which rhythmic representations are used to model the perception of tempo in music. The system can be understood as a five-layered model, where representations are transformed into higher-level abstractions in each layer. First, source separation is applied (Audio Level), onsets are detected (Onset Level), and interonset relationships are analyzed (Interonset Level). Then, several high-level representations of rhythm are computed (Rhythm Level). The periodicity of the music is modeled by the cepstroid vector-the periodicity of an interonset interval (IOI)-histogram. The pulse strength for plausible beat length candidates is defined by computing the magnitudes in different IOI histograms. The speed of the music is modeled as a continuous function on the basis of the idea that such a function corresponds to the underlying perceptual phenomena, and it seems to effectively reduce octave errors. By combining the rhythmic representations in a logistic regression framework, the tempo of the music is finally computed (Tempo Level). The results are the highest reported in a formal benchmarking test (2006-2013), with a P-Score of 0.857. Furthermore, the highest results so far are reported for two widely adopted test sets, with an Acc1 of 77.3% and 93.0% for the Songs and Ballroom datasets. PMID:26093407

  13. Tempo Preferences of Different Age Music Listeners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeBlanc, Albert; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Measures the effect of four levels of tempo on the self-reported preferences of six different age-groups for traditional jazz music listening examples. Stated that listener age exerted a strong influence on overall preference scores. Reported an analysis of variance showing that there is a significant preference for increasingly faster tempo at…

  14. Effect of Tempo on Pitch Perception.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duke, Robert A.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Presents a study which investigated the perception of music majors and nonmusic majors concerning their ability to discriminate the way in which altered musical excerpts differed in pitch or tempo (or both) from preceding presentations. Concludes that both groups responded similarly across conditions and replications, and that tempo changes were…

  15. Cardiovascular response to punching tempo.

    PubMed

    Kravitz, Len; Greene, Larry; Burkett, Zachary; Wongsathikun, Jataporn

    2003-02-01

    Eighteen trained volunteers (12 men and 6 women: age = 22.0 +/- 2.8 years, height = 170.79 +/- 7.67 cm, weight = 71.54 +/- 12.63 kg) participated in 2-minute, randomized fitness boxing trials, wearing 0.34-kg punching gloves, at various tempos (60, 72, 84, 96, 108, and 120 b.min(-1)). During each trial, oxygen uptake (VO(2)), heart rate (HR), and ventilation (VE) were measured continuously. A rating of perceived exertion (RPE) was attained at the conclusion of each trial. Subjects were able to attain VO(2) values ranging from 26.83 to 29.75 ml.kg(-1).min(-1), which correspond to 67.7-72.5% of VO(2)max. The HR responses yielded results ranging from 167.4 to 182.2 b.min(-1), or 85 to 93% of HRmax. No significant difference (p > 0.05) was seen with VO(2) between trials, although a significant difference (p < 0.05) was observed with HR, VE, and RPE. It appears that boxing speed is associated with increased VE, HR response, and perceived effort but not with VO(2). Energy expenditure values ranged from 9.8 to 11.2 kcal.min(-1) for the boxing trials. These results suggest that fitness boxing programs compare favorably with other exercise modalities in cardiovascular response and caloric expenditure. PMID:12580664

  16. Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chance, Kelly; Liu, Xiong; Suleiman, Raid M.; Flittner, David E.; Al-Saadi, Jassim; Janz, Scott J.

    2014-06-01

    TEMPO, selected by NASA as the first Earth Venture Instrument, will measure atmospheric pollution for greater North America from space using ultraviolet and visible spectroscopy. TEMPO measures from Mexico City to the Canadian oil sands, and from the Atlantic to the Pacific, hourly and at high spatial resolution. TEMPO provides a tropospheric measurement suite that includes the key elements of tropospheric air pollution chemistry. Measurements are from geostationary (GEO) orbit, to capture the inherent high variability in the diurnal cycle of emissions and chemistry. The small product spatial footprint resolves pollution sources at sub-urban scale. Together, this temporal and spatial resolution improves emission inventories, monitors population exposure, and enables effective emission-control strategies. TEMPO takes advantage of a GEO host spacecraft to provide a modest-cost mission that measures the spectra required to retrieve O3, NO2, SO2, H2CO, C2H2O2, H2O, aerosols, cloud parameters, and UVB radiation. TEMPO thus measures the major elements, directly or by proxy, in the tropospheric O3 chemistry cycle. Multi-spectral observations provide sensitivity to O3 in the lowermost troposphere, reducing uncertainty in air quality predictions by 50 %. TEMPO quantifies and tracks the evolution of aerosol loading. It provides near-real-time air quality products that will be made widely, publicly available. TEMPO makes the first tropospheric trace gas measurements from GEO, by building on the heritage of five spectrometers flown in low-earth-orbit (LEO). These LEO instruments measure the needed spectra, although at coarse spatial and temporal resolutions, to the precisions required for TEMPO and use retrieval algorithms developed for them by TEMPO Science Team members and currently running in operational environments. This makes TEMPO an innovative use of a well-proven technique, able to produce a revolutionary data set. TEMPO provides much of the atmospheric measurement

  17. Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chance, K.; Liu, X.; Suleiman, R. M.; Flittner, D. E.; Janz, S. J.

    2012-12-01

    TEMPO is a proposed concept to measure pollution for greater North America using ultraviolet/visible spectroscopy. TEMPO measures from Mexico City to the Canadian tar/oil sands, and from the Atlantic to the Pacific, hourly and at high spatial resolution (9 km2). TEMPO provides a tropospheric measurement suite that includes the key elements of tropospheric air pollution chemistry. Measurements are from geostationary (GEO) orbit, to capture the inherent high variability in the diurnal cycle of emissions and chemistry. The small product spatial footprint resolves pollution sources at sub-urban scale. Together, this temporal and spatial resolution improves emission inventories, monitors population exposure, and enables effective emission-control strategies. TEMPO takes advantage of a GEO host spacecraft to provide a modest cost mission that measures the spectra required to retrieve O3, NO2, SO2, H2CO, C2H2O2, H2O, aerosols, cloud parameters, and UVB radiation. TEMPO thus measures the major elements, directly or by proxy, in the tropospheric O3 chemistry cycle. Multi-spectral observations provide sensitivity to O3 in the lowermost troposphere, reducing uncertainty in air quality predictions by 50%. TEMPO quantifies and tracks the evolution of aerosol loading. It provides near-real-time air quality products that will be made widely, publicly available. TEMPO makes the first tropospheric trace gas measurements from GEO, by building on the heritage of five spectrometers flown in low-earth-orbit (LEO). These LEO instruments measure the needed spectra, although at coarse spatial and temporal resolutions, to the precisions required for TEMPO and use retrieval algorithms developed for them by TEMPO Science Team members and currently running in operational environments. This makes TEMPO an innovative use of a well proven technique, able to produce a revolutionary data set. TEMPO provides much of the atmospheric measurement capability recommended for GEO-CAPE in the 2007

  18. Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chance, K.; Liu, X.; Suleiman, R. M.; Flittner, D. E.; Al-Saadi, J. A.; Janz, S. J.; Tempo Science Team

    2013-05-01

    TEMPO has been selected by NASA as the first Earth Venture Instrument. It will measure atmospheric pollution for greater North America from space using ultraviolet/visible spectroscopy. TEMPO measures from Mexico City to the Canadian tar/oil sands, and from the Atlantic to the Pacific, hourly and at high spatial resolution (Mexico City is measured at 1.6 km N/S by 4.5 km E/W). TEMPO provides a tropospheric measurement suite that includes the key elements of tropospheric air pollution chemistry. Measurements are from geostationary (GEO) orbit, to capture the inherent high variability in the diurnal cycle of emissions and chemistry. The small product spatial footprint resolves pollution sources at sub-urban scale. Together, this temporal and spatial resolution improves emission inventories, monitors population exposure, and enables effective emission-control strategies. TEMPO takes advantage of a GEO host spacecraft to provide a modest cost mission that measures the spectra required to retrieve O3, NO2, SO2, H2CO, C2H2O2, H2O, aerosols, cloud parameters, and UVB radiation. TEMPO thus measures the major elements, directly or by proxy, in the tropospheric O3 chemistry cycle. Multi-spectral observations provide sensitivity to O3 in the lowermost troposphere, reducing uncertainty in air quality predictions by 50%. TEMPO quantifies and tracks the evolution of aerosol loading. It provides near-real-time air quality products that will be made widely, publicly available. TEMPO makes the first tropospheric trace gas measurements from GEO, by building on the heritage of five spectrometers flown in low-earth-orbit (LEO). These LEO instruments measure the needed spectra, although at coarse spatial and temporal resolutions, to the precisions required for TEMPO and use retrieval algorithms developed for them by TEMPO Science Team members and currently running in operational environments. This makes TEMPO an innovative use of a well proven technique, able to produce a revolutionary

  19. Effects of Some Aspects of Rhythm on Tempo Perception.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Cecilia Chu

    1984-01-01

    Results indicated that significantly more time is needed to perceive tempo increase than tempo decrease, uneven rhythm then even rhythm, and melody alone than melody with accompaniment. Furthermore, significant interaction effects involving beat locations of tempo change suggest that differential groupings may be a factor in tempo discrimination.…

  20. Scedosporium apiospermum: a rare cause of malignant otitis externa.

    PubMed

    McLaren, Oliver; Potter, Christian

    2016-01-01

    A 79-year-old man, with a history of well-controlled diabetes mellitus, presented with left-sided otalgia. With an initial diagnosis of simple otitis externa, he was discharged on topical drops. He represented 2 months later with worsening otalgia and discharge. A diagnosis of malignant otitis externa was made based on clinical and radiological findings. Intravenous Tazocin and Gentamicin were given based on previous bacterial culture from ear swabs. The patient failed to improve and developed left-sided facial nerve palsy. His condition stabilised following a change in antimicrobial therapy and his management continued in the community on intravenous Meropenem with twice weekly aural toilet. Repeated nuclear medicine imaging failed to demonstrate resolution. A bony sequestration was removed from the external auditory canal in the outpatient clinic, which following extended culture grew Scedosporium apiospermum; his management was subsequently changed to oral Voriconazole. This led to rapid clinical improvement and disease resolution over a 6 -week period. PMID:27613266

  1. Fractal Tempo Fluctuation and Pulse Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Rankin, Summer K.; Large, Edward W.; Fink, Philip W.

    2010-01-01

    WE INVESTIGATED PEOPLES’ ABILITY TO ADAPT TO THE fluctuating tempi of music performance. In Experiment 1, four pieces from different musical styles were chosen, and performances were recorded from a skilled pianist who was instructed to play with natural expression. Spectral and rescaled range analyses on interbeat interval time-series revealed long-range (1/f type) serial correlations and fractal scaling in each piece. Stimuli for Experiment 2 included two of the performances from Experiment 1, with mechanical versions serving as controls. Participants tapped the beat at ¼- and ⅛-note metrical levels, successfully adapting to large tempo fluctuations in both performances. Participants predicted the structured tempo fluctuations, with superior performance at the ¼-note level. Thus, listeners may exploit long-range correlations and fractal scaling to predict tempo changes in music. PMID:25190901

  2. The TEMPO Instrument: It's About Time!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicks, D. K., Jr.; Baker, B.; Hale, L.; Chance, K.; Liu, X.; Suleiman, R. M.; Flittner, D. E.; Al-Saadi, J. A.; Rosenbaum, D. M.; Pennington, W. F.; Janz, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    The Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO) instrument is part of NASA's Earth Venture Instrument (EVI) program, and will be the first hosted payload sensor to make tropospheric gas observations from geostationary (GEO) orbit using an ultraviolet/visible spectrometer. The instrument is designed to provide key trace gas measurements important to understanding tropospheric air pollution chemistry. The baseline data products are ozone (O3), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and formaldehyde (H2CO). The TEMPO instrument will provide hourly daylight measurements of these trace gases on urban-regional spatial scales. These remote sensing measurements augment current ground-based air quality measurements and enable improvements in air quality modeling and prediction. The TEMPO project recently completed its Preliminary Design Review (PDR). Current design parameters, instrument performance estimates and technical challenges will be presented.

  3. The Effect of Repetition on Tempo Preferences of Elementary Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moskovitz, Elisa M.

    1992-01-01

    Reports on a study of children's preferences between slow and fast tempo classical music excerpts. Finds that students preferred music with a slow tempo. Concludes that repetition had a positive effect on children's preferences. (CFR)

  4. Nonhuman Primates Prefer Slow Tempos but Dislike Music Overall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDermott, Josh; Hauser, Marc D.

    2007-01-01

    Human adults generally find fast tempos more arousing than slow tempos, with tempo frequently manipulated in music to alter tension and emotion. We used a previously published method [McDermott, J., & Hauser, M. (2004). Are consonant intervals music to their ears? Spontaneous acoustic preferences in a nonhuman primate. Cognition, 94(2), B11-B21]…

  5. The Effect of Speed Alterations on Tempo Note Selection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madsen, Clifford K.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Investigated the tempo note preferences of 100 randomly selected college-level musicians using familiar orchestral music as stimuli. Subjects heard selections at increased, decreased, and unaltered tempi. Results showed musicians were not accurate in estimating original tempo and showed consistent preference for faster than actual tempo.…

  6. Discrimination of Modulated Music Tempo by String Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Cecilia Chu; Salzberg, Rita S.

    1984-01-01

    Both musical training and age were found to influence the ability of string students to discriminate tempo change. The musical variables of speed, style, and direction also affected tempo perception. However, the music variables explained less than one-third of the total variance. Tempo perception is an extremely complex phenomenon. (Author/RM)

  7. Effects of Tempo and Context on Transfer of Performance Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duke, Robert A.; Pierce, Michael A.

    1991-01-01

    Discusses research that examined the effects of melodic content and performance tempo on the ability of university music majors to perform previously learned music passages in new settings. Finds tempo accuracy and pitch accuracy were adversely affected by differences between originally learned tempo and tempi at which works were later performed.…

  8. A rare and sinister variant of a common ailment: Fungal malignant otitis externa

    PubMed Central

    Lilic, N; Mowjood, MT; Wong, MHW

    2012-01-01

    A recent case report in this journal highlighted the pathophysiology and management of bacterial malignant otitis externa (MOE) (1). We describe the case of an elderly gentleman who had a delayed diagnosis of fungal MOE with advanced diseased at time of diagnosis. This case highlights the changing microbiology of this serious disease and the difficulty in diagnosis given the rarity of this form of otitis externa relative to its uncomplicated form. PMID:24960790

  9. The Effect of Melodic Activity, Tempo Change, and Audible Beat on Tempo Perception of Elementary School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuhn, Terry Lee; Booth, Gregory D.

    1988-01-01

    Investigated the influence of melodic activity (ornamented and plain) on students' perception of tempo. Third, fifth, and sixth graders indicated whether the tempo of the second example in each paired comparison item was faster, slower, or stayed the same. Suggests that tempo perception lessons be preceded by instruction on melodic activity and…

  10. Malignant otitis externa in a healthy non-diabetic patient.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Long; Peng, Hong; Mo, Ting-Ting; Liang, Yong

    2016-08-01

    A healthy 60-year-old male was initially treated for external otitis, and subsequently received multiple surgeries including abscess drainage, temporal bone debridement, canaloplasty of the external auditory meatus, and fistula excision and was treated with numerous antibiotics at another hospital over a 1-year period. He was seen at our hospital on February 14, 2014 with a complaint of a non-healing wound behind the left ear and drainage of purulent fluid. He had no history of diabetes mellitus or compromised immune function. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies at our hospital showed osteomyelitis involving the left temporal, occipital, and sphenoid bones, the mandible, and an epidural abscess. Routine blood testing and tests of immune function were normal, and no evidence of other infectious processes was found. He was diagnosed with malignant otitis externa (MOE). Bone debridement and incision and drainage of the epidural abscess were performed, and vancomycin was administered because culture results revealed Corynebacterium jeikeium, Corynebacterium xerosis, and Enterococcus faecalis. MOE should be considered in healthy patients with external otitis who fail initial treatment. PMID:26233245

  11. Deep brain stimulation in the globus pallidus externa promotes sleep.

    PubMed

    Qiu, M H; Chen, M C; Wu, J; Nelson, D; Lu, J

    2016-05-13

    The basal ganglia, a network of subcortical structures, play a critical role in movements, sleep and mental behavior. Basal ganglia disorders such as Parkinson's disease and Huntington's disease affect sleep. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) to treat motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease can ameliorate sleep disturbances. Our series of previous studies lead the hypothesis that dopamine, acting on D2 receptors on the striatopallidal terminals, enhances activity in the globus pallidus externa (GPe) and promotes sleep. Here, we tested if DBS in the GPe promotes sleep in rats. We found that unilateral DBS (180Hz at 100μA) in the GPe in rats significantly increased both non-rapid eye movement and rapid eye movement sleep compared to sham DBS stimulation. The EEG power spectrum of sleep induced by DBS was similar to that of the baseline sleep, and sleep latency was not affected by DBS. The GPe is potentially a better site for DBS to treat both insomnia and motor disorders caused by basal ganglia dysfunction. PMID:26917269

  12. Control region sequences indicate that multiple externae represent multiple infections by Sacculina carcini (Cirripedia: Rhizocephala).

    PubMed

    Rees, David; Glenner, Henrik

    2014-08-01

    The rhizocephalan barnacle, Sacculina carcini, is a common parasite of the European shore crab, Carcinus maenas, in which it causes significant detrimental physical and behavioral modifications. In the vast majority of cases, the external portion of the parasite is present in the form of a single sac-like externa; in rare cases, double or even triple externae may occur on the same individual host. Here, we use a highly variable DNA marker, the mitochondrial control region (CR), to investigate whether multiple externae in S. carcini represent infection by multiple parasites or asexual cloning developed by a single parasite individual. Sequences for multiple externae from C. maenas hosts from the Danish inlet, Limfjorden, and from the mud flates at Roscoff, France, were compared. In almost all cases, double or triple externae from an individual host yielded different haplotypes. In the few cases where identical haplotypes were identified from externae on a multiple-infected host, this always represented the most commonly found haplotype in the population. This indicates that in Sacculina carcini, the presence of multiple externae on a single host reflects infection by different individual parasites. A haplotype network of CR sequences also suggests a degree of geographical partitioning, with no shared haplotypes between the Limfjorden and Roscoff. Our data represent the first complete CR sequences for a rhizocephalan, and a unique gene order was also revealed. Although the utility of CR sequences for population-level work must be investigated further, the CR has proved a simple to use and highly variable marker for studies of S. carcini and can easily be applied to a variety of studies in this important parasite. PMID:25473481

  13. [N. Leonicenus interpretes of Galen on causa coniuncta].

    PubMed

    Mugnai, Daniela

    2010-01-01

    The philosopher and physician Nicolò Leoniceno, one of the most important members of the Medical Humanism, in the N. Leoniceni in libros Galeni e Graeca in linguam Latinam a se translatos Praefatio communis (1508) discusses his emendation to Galens's Ars Medicinalis (28, 4 Boudon = I 381 Kühn, [see text]). In spite of the debatable conjecture, it is a significant effort to solve a serious contradiction in Galen's text. Leoniceno rejects the solutions proposed by the Arabic and Medieval Latin commentators and offers the right interpretation of causa coniuncta in Galen's concept of disease. PMID:21563489

  14. Longitudinal trends in speech tempo: the case of Queen Beatrix.

    PubMed

    Quené, Hugo

    2013-06-01

    Older talkers speak slower than young ones, but speech tempo has increased in the last decades. Have present-day older talkers slowed down with age or have they sped up with their community? This study investigates longitudinal patterns in articulation rate in formal speeches presented annually by Queen Beatrix between her ages 42 and 74. Her tempo decreased first and then increased in the last decade. Within a speech, acceleration and shortening increased longitudinally. These results suggest that this talker's preferred tempo has not decreased but increased longitudinally, presumably in accommodation to an increasing tempo in the Dutch language community. PMID:23742439

  15. Cognitive tempo and cognitive level relationships among mentally retarded children.

    PubMed

    Sternberg, L; Waldron, P; Miller, T L

    1982-10-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to ascertain predictive relationships between and within cognitive tempo and cognitive level characteristics of 33 moderately retarded junior high school children. The Matching Familiar Figures Test was used to establish cognitive tempo characteristics and the Essential Math and Language Skills Inventory was used to determine cognitive level characteristics. A multiple regression analysis indicated no significant predictive relationship from elements of cognitive tempo to elements of cognitive level. Elements of cognitive level, however, could predict elements of cognitive tempo. Implications for future research were discussed. Cross-validation on a larger sample is required. PMID:7155745

  16. The currency and tempo of extinction.

    PubMed

    Regan, H M; Lupia, R; Drinnan, A N; Burgman, M A

    2001-01-01

    This study examines estimates of extinction rates for the current purported biotic crisis and from the fossil record. Studies that compare current and geological extinctions sometimes use metrics that confound different sources of error and reflect different features of extinction processes. The per taxon extinction rate is a standard measure in paleontology that avoids some of the pitfalls of alternative approaches. Extinction rates reported in the conservation literature are rarely accompanied by measures of uncertainty, despite many elements of the calculations being subject to considerable error. We quantify some of the most important sources of uncertainty and carry them through the arithmetic of extinction rate calculations using fuzzy numbers. The results emphasize that estimates of current and future rates rely heavily on assumptions about the tempo of extinction and on extrapolations among taxa. Available data are unlikely to be useful in measuring magnitudes or trends in current extinction rates. PMID:18707231

  17. Sympathetic Tone Induced by High Acoustic Tempo Requires Fast Respiration.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Ken; Ooishi, Yuuki; Kashino, Makio

    2015-01-01

    Many studies have revealed the influences of music, and particularly its tempo, on the autonomic nervous system (ANS) and respiration patterns. Since there is the interaction between the ANS and the respiratory system, namely sympatho-respiratory coupling, it is possible that the effect of musical tempo on the ANS is modulated by the respiratory system. Therefore, we investigated the effects of the relationship between musical tempo and respiratory rate on the ANS. Fifty-two healthy people aged 18-35 years participated in this study. Their respiratory rates were controlled by using a silent electronic metronome and they listened to simple drum sounds with a constant tempo. We varied the respiratory rate-acoustic tempo combination. The respiratory rate was controlled at 15 or 20 cycles per minute (CPM) and the acoustic tempo was 60 or 80 beats per minute (BPM) or the environment was silent. Electrocardiograms and an elastic chest band were used to measure the heart rate and respiratory rate, respectively. The mean heart rate and heart rate variability (HRV) were regarded as indices of ANS activity. We observed a significant increase in the mean heart rate and the low (0.04-0.15 Hz) to high (0.15-0.40 Hz) frequency ratio of HRV, only when the respiratory rate was controlled at 20 CPM and the acoustic tempo was 80 BPM. We suggest that the effect of acoustic tempo on the sympathetic tone is modulated by the respiratory system. PMID:26284521

  18. Sympathetic Tone Induced by High Acoustic Tempo Requires Fast Respiration

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Ken; Ooishi, Yuuki; Kashino, Makio

    2015-01-01

    Many studies have revealed the influences of music, and particularly its tempo, on the autonomic nervous system (ANS) and respiration patterns. Since there is the interaction between the ANS and the respiratory system, namely sympatho-respiratory coupling, it is possible that the effect of musical tempo on the ANS is modulated by the respiratory system. Therefore, we investigated the effects of the relationship between musical tempo and respiratory rate on the ANS. Fifty-two healthy people aged 18–35 years participated in this study. Their respiratory rates were controlled by using a silent electronic metronome and they listened to simple drum sounds with a constant tempo. We varied the respiratory rate—acoustic tempo combination. The respiratory rate was controlled at 15 or 20 cycles per minute (CPM) and the acoustic tempo was 60 or 80 beats per minute (BPM) or the environment was silent. Electrocardiograms and an elastic chest band were used to measure the heart rate and respiratory rate, respectively. The mean heart rate and heart rate variability (HRV) were regarded as indices of ANS activity. We observed a significant increase in the mean heart rate and the low (0.04–0.15 Hz) to high (0.15–0.40 Hz) frequency ratio of HRV, only when the respiratory rate was controlled at 20 CPM and the acoustic tempo was 80 BPM. We suggest that the effect of acoustic tempo on the sympathetic tone is modulated by the respiratory system. PMID:26284521

  19. Discrimination of Modulated Music Tempo by Music Majors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Cecilia Chu

    1983-01-01

    The ability of university music majors to aurally perceive sudden and gradual tempo changes of various magnitudes was investigated. Subjects detected tempo changes better when the change was increased rather than decreased for one composition, sudden rather than gradual, greater rather than smaller in magnitude, and one-directional rather than…

  20. Risk of otitis externa after swimming in recreational fresh water lakes containing Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed Central

    van Asperen, I. A.; de Rover, C. M.; Schijven, J. F.; Oetomo, S. B.; Schellekens, J. F.; van Leeuwen, N. J.; Collé, C.; Havelaar, A. H.; Kromhout, D.; Sprenger, M. W.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine whether an outbreak of otitis externa was due to bathing in recreational fresh water lakes and to establish whether the outbreak was caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the water. DESIGN--Matched case-control study. SETTING--The Achterhoek area, the Netherlands. SUBJECTS--98 cases with otitis externa and 149 controls matched for age, sex, and place of residence. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Odds ratios for type of swimming water and frequency of swimming; presence of P aeruginosa in ear swabs and fresh water lakes. RESULTS--Otitis externa was strongly associated with swimming in recreational fresh water lakes in the previous two weeks (odds ratio 15.5 (95% confidence interval) 4.9 to 49.2) compared with non-swimming). The risk increased with the number of days of swimming, and subjects with recurrent ear disease had a greatly increased risk. The lakes met the Dutch bathing water standards and those set by the European Commission for faecal pollution in the summer of 1994, but P aeruginosa was isolated from all of them, as well as from the ear swabs of 78 (83%) of the cases and 3 (4%) of the controls. CONCLUSIONS--Even when current bathing water standards are met, swimming can be associated with a substantial risk of otitis externa because of exposure to P aeruginosa. People with recurrent ear disease should take special care when swimming in waters containing P aeruginosa. PMID:8520277

  1. Antibiotic plasma levels in dogs with otitis externa treated routinely with various topical preparations.

    PubMed

    Voget, Michael; Armbruster, Martin; Meyer, Michael

    2012-01-01

    We aimed to determine whether, and at what levels, topical antibiotics applied to treat Otitis externa in dogs are absorbed systemically, leading to an increased risk of antibiotic resistance. 75 dogs brought to a veterinarian for Otitis externa were recruited for a non-interventional study. Selection criteria included diagnosis of Otitis externa and owner consent.The animals were divided into five groups of 15 dogs each. Each group received one of five commonly prescribed topical medications for up to 14 days according to the labeled instructions. Development and validation of low residue detection methods (HPLC-MS/MS) for all active substances studied was performed. Plasma concentrations were evaluated for gentamicin (Otomax, Easotic), marbofloxacin (Aurizon), orbifloxacin (Posatex) and polymyxin B (Surolan). Low-level plasma concentrations of the topically applied antibiotics were detected after multiple administrations. In several samples, the concentrations detected were less than the limit of detection (LOD) of the corresponding analytical method. However, at the end of the treatment period, mean plasma concentrations were in the low pmol/ml range and exceeded the LOD for gentamicin, marbofloxacin and orbifloxacin. None of the plasma samples examined for polymyxin showed levels above the LOD. After routine topical antibiotic use in the treatment of Otitis externa in dogs, low systemic plasma concentrations are likely to develop.This low-level exposure may facilitate cellular changes that lead to an increased possibility for antibiotic resistance. These findings should provoke veterinary clinicians to optimise therapy for Otitis externa in light of minimising the development of antibiotic resistance. PMID:23227759

  2. Selectivity of Pesticides used in Integrated Apple Production to the Lacewing, Chrysoperla externa

    PubMed Central

    Moura, Alexandre Pinho; Carvalho, Geraldo Andrade; Moscardini, Valéria Fonseca; Lasmar, Olinto; Rezende, Denise Tourino; Marques, Márcio Candeias

    2010-01-01

    This research aimed to assess the toxicity of the pesticides abamectin 18 CE (0.02 g a.i. L-1), carbaryl 480 SC (1.73 g a.i. L-1), sulfur 800 GrDA (4.8 g a.i. L-1), fenitrothion 500 CE (0.75 g a.i. L-1), methidathion 400 CE (0.4 g a.i. L-1), and trichlorfon 500 SC (1.5 g a.i. L-1) as applied in integrated apple production in Brazil on the survival, oviposition capacity, and egg viability of the lacewing, Chrysoperla externa (Hagen) (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae) from Bento Gonçalves and Vacaria, Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil. An attempt was made to study morphological changes caused by some of these chemicals, by means of ultrastructural analysis, using a scanning electronic microscope. Carbaryl, fenitrothion, and methidathion caused 100% adult mortality for both populations, avoiding evaluation of pesticides' effects on predator reproductive parameters. Abamectin and sulfur also affected the survival of these individuals with mortality rates of 10% and 6.7%, respectively, for adults from Bento Gonçalves, and were harmless to those from Vacaria at the end of evaluation. Trichlorfon was also harmless to adults from both populations. No compound reduced oviposition capacity. C. externa from Vacaria presented higher reproductive potential than those from Bento Gonçalves. In relation to egg viability, sulfur was the most damaging compound to both populations of C. externa. Ultrastructural analyses showed morphological changes in the micropyle and the chorion of eggs laid by C. externa treated with either abamectin or sulfur. The treatment may have influenced the fertilization of C. externa eggs and embryonic development. Sulfur was responsible for malformations in the end region of the abdomen and genitals of treated females. When applied to adults, abamectin, sulfur, and trichlorfon were harmless, while carbaryl, fenitrothion, and methidathion were harmful, according to the IOBC classification. PMID:20879916

  3. Implementation of Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chance, K.; Liu, X.; Suleiman, R. M.; Flittner, D. E.; Al-Saadi, J. A.; Janz, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    The updated status of TEMPO, as it proceeds from formulation phase into implementation phase is presented. TEMPO, the first NASA Earth Venture Instrument, will measure atmospheric pollution for greater North America from space using ultraviolet and visible spectroscopy. TEMPO measures from Mexico City to the Canadian oil sands, and from the Atlantic to the Pacific, hourly and at high spatial resolution. TEMPO provides a tropospheric measurement suite that includes the key elements of tropospheric air pollution chemistry. Measurements are from geostationary (GEO) orbit, to capture the inherent high variability in the diurnal cycle of emissions and chemistry. The small product spatial footprint resolves pollution sources at sub-urban scale. Together, this temporal and spatial resolution improves emission inventories, monitors population exposure, and enables effective emission-control strategies. TEMPO takes advantage of a GEO host spacecraft to provide a modest cost mission that measures the spectra required to retrieve O3, NO2, SO2, H2CO, C2H2O2, H2O, aerosols, cloud parameters, and UVB radiation. TEMPO thus measures the major elements, directly or by proxy, in the tropospheric O3 chemistry cycle. Multi-spectral observations provide sensitivity to O3 in the lowermost troposphere, reducing uncertainty in air quality predictions by 50%. TEMPO quantifies and tracks the evolution of aerosol loading. It provides near-real-time air quality products that will be made widely, publicly available. TEMPO provides much of the atmospheric measurement capability recommended for GEO-CAPE in the 2007 National Research Council Decadal Survey, Earth Science and Applications from Space: National Imperatives for the Next Decade and Beyond. GEO-CAPE is not planned for implementation this decade. However, instruments from Europe (Sentinel 4) and Asia (GEMS) will form parts of a global GEO constellation for pollution monitoring later this decade, with a major focus on intercontinental

  4. Effect of music tempo on task performance.

    PubMed

    Mayfield, C; Moss, S

    1989-12-01

    Two studies were conducted to evaluate the effect of music tempo on task performance. In Study 1, 44 undergraduate business students were asked to be "workers" in a stock market project by collecting closing stock prices and calculating the percentage of change in the price from week to week. Subjects were randomly divided into groups such that they either listened to fast-paced music while they worked, to slow-paced music, or to no music. Analyses of variance and covariance were conducted on both the quantity and quality of the subjects' work, using music listening habits as a covariate. There were no differences in either the quantity or quality of the work produced by the groups. There were some methodological concerns regarding Study 1, so a second study was conducted. The 70 undergraduate business students in Study 2 completed the same task under the same music conditions as in Study 1. Analyses of variance indicated women performed significantly better than men, performance was significantly higher in the rock condition than in the heartbeat condition, and subjects in the rock condition had a significantly higher perceived level of distraction by the music. PMID:2623126

  5. Pubertal Timing and Tempo: Associations With Childhood Maltreatment

    PubMed Central

    Negriff, Sonya; Blankson, A. Nayena; Trickett, Penelope K.

    2014-01-01

    The present study examined pubertal timing and tempo in a sample of 445 adolescents (53% male), using both variable-centered (latent growth curve) and person-centered (latent class) approaches, to discern the pubertal development trajectories associated with the experience of maltreatment. Results from the variable-centered analyses indicated a slower initial tempo that increased later for boys who had experienced neglect. The person-centered results indicated three classes for boys that mainly differentiated tempo effects and two classes for girls primarily distinguishing timing differences. For girls, sexual abuse predicted membership in an earlier pubertal timing class. These findings enhance our knowledge of the variability in pubertal development as well as gender differences in maltreatment types that may alter pubertal timing and tempo. PMID:26146470

  6. Toy Play, Play Tempo, and Reaction to Frustration in Infants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longo, Josephine; And Others

    1982-01-01

    In two sessions, the duration and tempo of toy play of infants and reaction of frustration were measured. Correlations indicated a general relationship between response persistence during play and attempts to escape frustrating situations. (Author/CM)

  7. Effects of Tempo and Performing Medium on Children's Music Preference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeBlanc, Albert; Cote, Richard

    1983-01-01

    This study measured the effect of three levels of tempo and two levels of performing medium, vocal and instrumental, on the expressed preference of fifth- and sixth-grade students for traditional jazz music listening examples. (Author/SR)

  8. A fast electrochromic polymer based on TEMPO substituted polytriphenylamine.

    PubMed

    Ji, Lvlv; Dai, Yuyu; Yan, Shuanma; Lv, Xiaojing; Su, Chang; Xu, Lihuan; Lv, Yaokang; Ouyang, Mi; Chen, Zuofeng; Zhang, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    A novel strategy to obtain rapid electrochromic switching response by introducing 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinyloxy (TEMPO) moiety into polytriphenylamine backbone has been developed. The electrochromic properties of the integrated polymer film are investigated and a possible mechanism is proposed with TEMPO as a counterion-reservoir group to rapidly balance the charges during electrochromic switching, which leads to significantly improved electrochromism performance. PMID:27444398

  9. A fast electrochromic polymer based on TEMPO substituted polytriphenylamine

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Lvlv; Dai, Yuyu; Yan, Shuanma; Lv, Xiaojing; Su, Chang; Xu, Lihuan; Lv, Yaokang; Ouyang, Mi; Chen, Zuofeng; Zhang, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    A novel strategy to obtain rapid electrochromic switching response by introducing 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinyloxy (TEMPO) moiety into polytriphenylamine backbone has been developed. The electrochromic properties of the integrated polymer film are investigated and a possible mechanism is proposed with TEMPO as a counterion-reservoir group to rapidly balance the charges during electrochromic switching, which leads to significantly improved electrochromism performance. PMID:27444398

  10. Ophthalmomyiasis externa by Musca domestica in a case of orbital metastasis.

    PubMed

    Tomy, Rose Mary; Prabhu, Padma B

    2013-11-01

    Infestation of the living tissues of the eye, ocular adnexae or orbit by larvae of flies of the order Diptera is known as ophthalmomyiasis. Ophthalmomyiasis externa is a limited superficial infestation of external ocular structures such as conjunctiva and adnexae. A case of follicular carcinoma thyroid with orbital metastasis presenting as ophthalmomyiasis externa is reported. The patient presented with foul smelling ulcers of the medial and lateral orbital walls of the right eye extending into the lids and nose, teeming with maggots. Computerized Tomography (CT) showed widespread bone destruction with extension into surrounding sinuses. Over 200 maggots were manually removed after immobilisation with turpentine oil instillation. Entomological examination showed it to be a case of accidental myiasis caused by the common housefly Musca domestica. The patient was managed conservatively and the ulcer cavities filled up with healthy granulation tissue. This case is presented on account of its rarity. PMID:24145557

  11. Gentamicin iontophoresis in the treatment of bacterial otitis externa in the guinea pig model.

    PubMed

    King, D M; Estrem, S A

    1990-10-01

    Pseudomonas otitis externa is one of the most common infections treated by otolaryngologists. Infections induced in 30 guinea pigs appeared similar to that seen in humans. The ears were then placed into four treatment groups: group A, which received a single cleaning; group B, which received a single cleaning followed by gentamicin drops 4 times daily; group C, which received a single cleaning followed by a single gentamicin iontophoresis treatment; and group D, the control group, which received no treatment. Infections were analyzed by grading edema, purulence, and erythema. An average of 10.2 days was required for control group to return to normal appearance. Groups A, B, and C had mean resolution times of 5.9, 4.7, and 4.3 days, respectively. Gentamicin iontophoresis appears to be promising, with results as good as drop therapy in otitis externa in the guinea pig model. PMID:2215045

  12. Passive listening to preferred motor tempo modulates corticospinal excitability.

    PubMed

    Michaelis, Kelly; Wiener, Martin; Thompson, James C

    2014-01-01

    Rhythms are an essential characteristic of our lives, and auditory-motor coupling affects a variety of behaviors. Previous research has shown that the neural regions associated with motor system processing are coupled to perceptual rhythmic and melodic processing such that the perception of rhythmic stimuli can entrain motor system responses. However, the degree to which individual preference modulates the motor system is unknown. Recent work has shown that passively listening to metrically strong rhythms increases corticospinal excitability, as indicated by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Furthermore, this effect is modulated by high-groove music, or music that inspires movement, while neuroimaging evidence suggests that premotor activity increases with tempos occurring within a preferred tempo (PT) category. PT refers to the rate of a hypothetical endogenous oscillator that may be indicated by spontaneous motor tempo (SMT) and preferred perceptual tempo (PPT) measurements. The present study investigated whether listening to a rhythm at an individual's PT preferentially modulates motor system excitability. SMT was obtained in human participants through a tapping task in which subjects were asked to tap a response key at their most comfortable rate. Subjects listened a 10-beat tone sequence at 11 log-spaced tempos and rated their preference for each (PPT). We found that SMT and PPT measurements were correlated, indicating that preferred and produced tempos occurred at a similar rate. Crucially, single-pulse TMS delivered to left M1 during PPT judgments revealed that corticospinal excitability, measured by motor-evoked potentials (MEPs), was modulated by tempos traveling closer to individual PT. However, the specific nature of this modulation differed across individuals, with some exhibiting an increase in excitability around PT and others exhibiting a decrease. These findings suggest that auditory-motor coupling induced by rhythms is preferentially

  13. Status of Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suleiman, R. M.; Chance, K.; Liu, X.; Flittner, D. E.; Al-Saadi, J. A.; Janz, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    TEMPO is now well into its implementation phase, having passed both its Key Decision Point C and the Critical Design Review (CDR) for the instrument. The CDR for the ground systems will occur in March 2016 and the CDR for the Mission component at a later date, after the host spacecraft has been selected. TEMPO is on schedule to measure atmospheric pollution for greater North America from space using ultraviolet and visible spectroscopy. TEMPO measures from Mexico City to the Canadian oil sands, and from the Atlantic to the Pacific, hourly and at high spatial resolution. TEMPO provides a tropospheric measurement suite that includes the key elements of tropospheric air pollution chemistry. Measurements are from geostationary (GEO) orbit, to capture the inherent high variability in the diurnal cycle of emissions and chemistry. The small product spatial footprint resolves pollution sources at sub-urban scale. Together, this temporal and spatial resolution improves emission inventories, monitors population exposure, and enables effective emission-control strategies.TEMPO takes advantage of a GEO host spacecraft to provide a modest cost mission that measures the spectra required to retrieve O3, NO2, SO2, H2CO, C2H2O2, H2O, aerosols, cloud parameters, and UVB radiation. TEMPO thus measures the major elements, directly or by proxy, in the tropospheric O3 chemistry cycle. Multi-spectral observations provide sensitivity to O3 in the lowermost troposphere, substantially reducing uncertainty in air quality predictions by 50%. TEMPO quantifies and tracks the evolution of aerosol loading. It provides near-real-time air quality products that will be made widely, publicly available.TEMPO provides much of the atmospheric measurement capability recommended for GEO-CAPE in the 2007 National Research Council Decadal Survey, Earth Science and Applications from Space: National Imperatives for the Next Decade and Beyond. Instruments from Europe (Sentinel 4) and Asia (GEMS) will form

  14. Effects of timbre and tempo change on memory for music.

    PubMed

    Halpern, Andrea R; Müllensiefen, Daniel

    2008-09-01

    We investigated the effects of different encoding tasks and of manipulations of two supposedly surface parameters of music on implicit and explicit memory for tunes. In two experiments, participants were first asked to either categorize instrument or judge familiarity of 40 unfamiliar short tunes. Subsequently, participants were asked to give explicit and implicit memory ratings for a list of 80 tunes, which included 40 previously heard. Half of the 40 previously heard tunes differed in timbre (Experiment 1) or tempo (Experiment 2) in comparison with the first exposure. A third experiment compared similarity ratings of the tunes that varied in timbre or tempo. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) results suggest first that the encoding task made no difference for either memory mode. Secondly, timbre and tempo change both impaired explicit memory, whereas tempo change additionally made implicit tune recognition worse. Results are discussed in the context of implicit memory for nonsemantic materials and the possible differences in timbre and tempo in musical representations. PMID:19086302

  15. Mechanism of copper(I)/TEMPO-catalyzed aerobic alcohol oxidation.

    PubMed

    Hoover, Jessica M; Ryland, Bradford L; Stahl, Shannon S

    2013-02-13

    Homogeneous Cu/TEMPO catalyst systems (TEMPO = 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxyl) have emerged as some of the most versatile and practical catalysts for aerobic alcohol oxidation. Recently, we disclosed a (bpy)Cu(I)/TEMPO/NMI catalyst system (NMI = N-methylimidazole) that exhibits fast rates and high selectivities, even with unactivated aliphatic alcohols. Here, we present a mechanistic investigation of this catalyst system, in which we compare the reactivity of benzylic and aliphatic alcohols. This work includes analysis of catalytic rates by gas-uptake and in situ IR kinetic methods and characterization of the catalyst speciation during the reaction by EPR and UV-visible spectroscopic methods. The data support a two-stage catalytic mechanism consisting of (1) "catalyst oxidation" in which Cu(I) and TEMPO-H are oxidized by O(2) via a binuclear Cu(2)O(2) intermediate and (2) "substrate oxidation" mediated by Cu(II) and the nitroxyl radical of TEMPO via a Cu(II)-alkoxide intermediate. Catalytic rate laws, kinetic isotope effects, and spectroscopic data show that reactions of benzylic and aliphatic alcohols have different turnover-limiting steps. Catalyst oxidation by O(2) is turnover limiting with benzylic alcohols, while numerous steps contribute to the turnover rate in the oxidation of aliphatic alcohols. PMID:23317450

  16. Remembering the melody and timbre, forgetting the key and tempo.

    PubMed

    Schellenberg, E Glenn; Habashi, Peter

    2015-10-01

    The identity of a melody is independent of surface features such as key (pitch level), tempo (speed), and timbre (musical instrument). We examined the duration of memory for melodies (tunes) and whether such memory is affected by changes in key, tempo, or timbre. After listening to previously unfamiliar melodies twice, participants provided recognition ratings for the same (old) melodies as well as for an equal number of new melodies. The delay between initial exposure and test was 10 min, 1 day, or 1 week. In Experiment 1, half of the old melodies were transposed by six semitones or shifted in tempo by 64 beats per minute. In Experiment 2, half of the old melodies were changed in timbre (piano to saxophone, or vice versa). In both experiments, listeners remembered the melodies, and there was no forgetting over the course of a week. Changing the key or tempo from exposure to test had a detrimental impact on recognition after 10 min and 1 day, but not after 1 week. Changing the timbre affected recognition negatively after all three delays. Mental representations of unfamiliar melodies appear to be consolidated after only two presentations. These representations include surface information unrelated to a melody's identity, although information about key and tempo fades at a faster rate than information about timbre. PMID:25802029

  17. Spontaneous tempo and rhythmic entrainment in a bonobo (Pan paniscus).

    PubMed

    Large, Edward W; Gray, Patricia M

    2015-11-01

    The emergence of speech and music in the human species represent major evolutionary transitions that enabled the use of complex, temporally structured acoustic signals to coordinate social interaction. While the fundamental capacity for temporal coordination with complex acoustic signals has been shown in a few distantly related species, the extent to which nonhuman primates exhibit sensitivity to auditory rhythms remains controversial. In Experiment 1, we assessed spontaneous motor tempo and tempo matching in a bonobo (Pan paniscus), in the context of a social drumming interaction. In Experiment 2, the bonobo spontaneously entrained and synchronized her drum strikes within a range around her spontaneous motor tempo. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that the evolution of acoustic communication builds upon fundamental neurodynamic mechanisms that can be found in a wide range of species, and are recruited for social interactions. PMID:26147705

  18. The Tempo of Sexual Activity and Later Relationship Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sassler, Sharon; Addo, Fenaba R.; Lichter, Daniel T.

    2012-01-01

    Rapid sexual involvement may have adverse long-term implications for relationship quality. This study examined the tempo of sexual intimacy and subsequent relationship quality in a sample of married and cohabiting men and women. Data come from the Marital and Relationship Survey, which provides information on nearly 600 low- to moderate-income…

  19. The Effect of Articulation Style on Perception of Modulated Tempo

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geringer, John M.; Madsen, Clifford K.; MacLeod, Rebecca B.; Kevin Droe

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the effect of legato and staccato articulation styles on the perception of modulated tempos. Ninety music majors served as participants. Listeners heard music examples that had been selected from two pieces, each of which included staccato and legato passages. Excerpts were presented to listeners in three conditions of tempo…

  20. Examining infants' preferences for tempo in lullabies and playsongs.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Nicole J; Walsh, Jennifer; Allen, Jennifer M; Tsang, Christine D

    2011-09-01

    Caregivers around the world sing to their infants. Infants not only prefer to listen to infant-directed singing over adult-directed singing, but infant-directed singing also serves a function, communicating affective information to preverbal infants to aid in adjusting arousal levels. Pitch variation has previously been identified as one performance feature that may help to convey the message. Earlier research has indicated that infants' pitch preferences are context dependent, suggesting that infants are tuned in to the communicative intent of infant-directed singing. However, there are several other performance-based features present in infant-directed singing that may also contribute to the affective message. The current study examined the role of context on infants' tempo preferences in sung playsongs and lullabies. Using a head-turn preference procedure, we measured 24 preverbal infants' natural preferences for foreign language playsongs and lullabies as a function of tempo. Infants showed a preference for fast over slow tempo playsongs, but no such context dependent preference was found within lullabies. Results partially support the role of tempo as a communicative feature of infant directed singing. PMID:21639609

  1. Relationship between Exercise Heart Rate and Music Tempo Preference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karageorghis, Costas I.; Jones, Leighton; Low, Daniel C.

    2006-01-01

    The present study examined the predicted positive and linear relationship (Iwanaga, 1995a, 1995b) between exercise heart rate and music tempo preference. Initially, 128 undergraduate students (M age = 20.0 years, SD = 0.9) were surveyed to establish their three favorite music artists. A separate experimental group of 29 undergraduates (M age =…

  2. A Developmental Study of Conceptual Tempo, Concept Learning, and Abstraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juliano, Daniel

    1977-01-01

    Shows that age or conceptual tempo are not related to the number of trials needed to reach the criteria for a learning task. Impulsive responders performed more poorly than groups of slow-inaccurate, fast-accurate, and reflective responders on the transfer of learning task. (RL)

  3. Relationship of Children's Conceptual Tempo to Problem Solving and Creativity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenfield, Sylvia

    The present study examines the role of conceptual tempo on creativity and problem solving. It was hypothesized that reflective children would do well on tasks involving an evaluation component, while impulsive children would do well on typical creativity tasks. Measures of creativity, assessing fluency, flexibility, and originality, as well as…

  4. Mechanism of Copper(I)/TEMPO-Catalyzed Aerobic Alcohol Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Hoover, Jessica M.; Ryland, Bradford L.; Stahl, Shannon S.

    2013-01-01

    Homogeneous Cu/TEMPO catalyst systems (TEMPO = 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxyl) have emerged as some of the most versatile and practical catalysts for aerobic alcohol oxidation. Recently, we disclosed a (bpy)CuI/TEMPO/NMI catalyst system (NMI = N-methylimidazole) that exhibits fast rates and high selectivities, even with unactivated aliphatic alcohols. Here, we present a mechanistic investigation of this catalyst system, in which we compare the reactivity of benzylic and aliphatic alcohols. This work includes analysis of catalytic rates by gas-uptake and in situ IR kinetic methods and characterization of the catalyst speciation during the reaction by EPR and UV–visible spectroscopic methods. The data support a two-stage catalytic mechanism consisting of (1) “catalyst oxidation” in which CuI and TEMPO–H are oxidized by O2 via a binuclear Cu2O2 intermediate and (2) “substrate oxidation” mediated by CuII and the nitroxyl radical of TEMPO via a CuII-alkoxide intermediate. Catalytic rate laws, kinetic isotope effects, and spectroscopic data show that reactions of benzylic and aliphatic alcohols have different turnover-limiting steps. Catalyst oxidation by O2 is turnover limiting with benzylic alcohols, while numerous steps contribute to the turnover rate in the oxidation of aliphatic alcohols. PMID:23317450

  5. Changes in music tempo entrain movement related brain activity.

    PubMed

    Daly, Ian; Hallowell, James; Hwang, Faustina; Kirke, Alexis; Malik, Asad; Roesch, Etienne; Weaver, James; Williams, Duncan; Miranda, Eduardo; Nasuto, Slawomir J

    2014-01-01

    The neural mechanisms of music listening and appreciation are not yet completely understood. Based on the apparent relationship between the beats per minute (tempo) of music and the desire to move (for example feet tapping) induced while listening to that music it is hypothesised that musical tempo may evoke movement related activity in the brain. Participants are instructed to listen, without moving, to a large range of musical pieces spanning a range of styles and tempos during an electroencephalogram (EEG) experiment. Event-related desynchronisation (ERD) in the EEG is observed to correlate significantly with the variance of the tempo of the musical stimuli. This suggests that the dynamics of the beat of the music may induce movement related brain activity in the motor cortex. Furthermore, significant correlations are observed between EEG activity in the alpha band over the motor cortex and the bandpower of the music in the same frequency band over time. This relationship is observed to correlate with the strength of the ERD, suggesting entrainment of motor cortical activity relates to increased ERD strength. PMID:25571015

  6. Fungal Malignant Otitis Externa with Facial Nerve Palsy: Tissue Biopsy Aids Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Walton, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    Fungal malignant otitis externa (FMOE) is a serious and potentially life-threatening condition that is challenging to manage. Diagnosis is often delayed due to the low sensitivity of aural swabs and many antifungal drugs have significant side effects. We present a case of FMOE, where formal tissue sampling revealed the diagnosis and the patient was successfully treated with voriconazole, in addition to an up to date review of the current literature. We would recommend tissue biopsy of the external auditory canal in all patients with suspected FMOE in addition to routine microbiology swabs. PMID:24649388

  7. TEMPO: a mobile catalyst for rechargeable Li-O₂ batteries.

    PubMed

    Bergner, Benjamin J; Schürmann, Adrian; Peppler, Klaus; Garsuch, Arnd; Janek, Jürgen

    2014-10-22

    Nonaqueous Li-O2 batteries are an intensively studied future energy storage technology because of their high theoretical energy density. However, a number of barriers prevent a practical application, and one of the major challenges is the reduction of the high charge overpotential: Whereas lithium peroxide (Li2O2) is formed during discharge at around 2.7 V (vs Li(+)/Li), its electrochemical decomposition during the charge process requires potentials up to 4.5 V. This high potential gap leads to a low round-trip efficiency of the cell, and more importantly, the high charge potential causes electrochemical decomposition of other cell constituents. Dissolved oxidation catalysts can act as mobile redox mediators (RM), which enable the oxidation of Li2O2 particles even without a direct electric contact to the positive electrode. Herein we show that the addition of 10 mM TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidinyloxyl), homogeneously dissolved in the electrolyte, provides a distinct reduction of the charging potentials by 500 mV. Moreover, TEMPO enables a significant enhancement of the cycling stability leading to a doubling of the cycle life. The efficiency of the TEMPO mediated catalysis was further investigated by a parallel monitoring of the cell pressure, which excludes a considerable contribution of a parasitic shuttle (i.e., internal ionic short circuit) to the anode during cycling. We prove the suitability of TEMPO by a systematic study of the relevant physical and chemical properties, i.e., its (electro)chemical stability, redox potential, diffusion coefficient and the influence on the oxygen solubility. Furthermore, the charging mechanisms of Li-O2 cells with and without TEMPO were compared by combining different electrochemical and analytical techniques. PMID:25255228

  8. Pitch and Tempo Discrimination in Recorded Orchestral Music among Musicians and Nonmusicians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geringer, John M.; Madsen, Clifford K.

    1984-01-01

    Both musicians and nonmusicians identified correctly the examples of decreased pitch levels significantly more than pitch increase examples. However, tempo increase examples were identified more accurately than tempo decreases by each group. (Author/RM)

  9. The impact of basal ganglia lesions on sensorimotor synchronization, spontaneous motor tempo, and the detection of tempo changes.

    PubMed

    Schwartze, Michael; Keller, Peter E; Patel, Aniruddh D; Kotz, Sonja A

    2011-01-20

    The basal ganglia (BG) are part of extensive subcortico-cortical circuits that are involved in a variety of motor and non-motor cognitive functions. Accumulating evidence suggests that one specific function that engages the BG and associated cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical circuitry is temporal processing, i.e., the mechanisms that underlie the encoding, decoding and evaluation of temporal relations or temporal structure. In the current study we investigated the interplay of two processes that require precise representations of temporal structure, namely the perception of an auditory pacing signal and manual motor production by means of finger tapping in a sensorimotor synchronization task. Patients with focal lesions of the BG and healthy control participants were asked to align finger taps to tone sequences that either did or did not contain a tempo acceleration or tempo deceleration at a predefined position, and to continue tapping at the final tempo after the pacing sequence had ceased. Performance in this adaptive synchronization-continuation paradigm differed between the two groups. Selective damage to the BG affected the abilities to detect tempo changes and to perform attention-dependent error correction, particularly in response to tempo decelerations. An additional assessment of preferred spontaneous, i.e., unpaced but regular, production rates yielded more heterogeneous results in the patient group. Together these findings provide evidence for less efficient processing in the perception and the production of temporal structure in patients with focal BG lesions. The results also support the functional role of the BG system in attention-dependent temporal processing. PMID:20883725

  10. Treatment of acute otitis externa with ciprofloxacin otic 0.2% antibiotic ear solution

    PubMed Central

    Mösges, R; Nematian-Samani, M; Eichel, A

    2011-01-01

    Background/objective An inflammation of the cutis and subcutis of the external auditory canal is a primary symptom in cases of acute otitis externa. It is usually treated locally, since this type of therapy ensures a high concentration of the drug and interacts at the site of inflammation with no systemic effects. This systematic review compares the efficacy of treatment using a ciprofloxacin 0.2% solution with other therapeutic options. Methods After compiling a catalog of search terms, medical databases were searched systematically for randomized, controlled studies. This search initially yielded a total of 38 studies which were then evaluated by three independent reviewers. The number of studies was subsequently reduced to 14: six studies using a ciprofloxacin 0.2% solution, and eight studies using both 0.2% and 0.3% solutions. Results The studies included in the review demonstrate the statistical equivalence between the ciprofloxacin solution (0.2%) and the reference products PNH (a combination of polymyxin B, neomycin sulfate and hydrocortisone), auriculum powder, and a ciprofloxacin foam with respect to the cure rate. The research groups consistently observed high in vitro activity of ciprofloxacin against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Conclusion This systematic review confirms the hypothesis of ciprofloxacin’s noninferiority in the treatment of otitis externa, in terms of the cure rate and microbiological eradication. PMID:21845055

  11. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from dogs with otitis externa.

    PubMed

    Mekić, S; Matanović, K; Šeol, B

    2011-07-30

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common cause of otitis externa in dogs, and treatment of these infections is becoming problematic because of the increasing number of multiresistant strains. The aim of the present study was to compare the in vitro activities of cefepime, ceftazidime, enrofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, gentamicin and ticarcillin/clavulanic acid against 104 strains of P aeruginosa isolated from dogs with otitis externa. Antimicrobial susceptibility and minimum inhibitory concentrations, in µg/ml, were evaluated by the E test (bioMérieux). The most active compound was ceftazidime, with 100 per cent efficiency. The majority of tested strains were susceptible to ticarcillin/clavulanic acid (89.4 per cent), followed by ciprofloxacin (88.5 per cent) and cefepime (60.6 per cent). The highest resistance was observed to enrofloxacin (51.9 per cent) and gentamicin (43.3 per cent). Large numbers of strains were intermediately susceptible to antibiotics registered for use in veterinary medicine in Croatia--enrofloxacin (47.1 per cent) and gentamicin (41.3 per cent). PMID:21742683

  12. Temporal Bone Osteomyelitis: The Relationship with Malignant Otitis Externa, the Diagnostic Dilemma, and Changing Trends

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jia-Cheng; Yeh, Chien-Fu; Shiao, An-Suey; Tu, Tzong-Yang

    2014-01-01

    Fifty-five patients hospitalized for osteomyelitis of the temporal bone between 1990 and 2011 were divided into two study groups: group 1 was patients collected from 1990 to 2001 and group 2 was composed of patients between 2002 and 2011. Clinical diagnostic criteria and epidemiologic data were analyzed to illustrate the altering features of osteomyelitis of the temporal bone. Group 1 patients were characterized by high prevalence of diabetes and more commonly suffered from otalgia, otitis externa and granulation tissue in the external auditory canal and higher positive culture for Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Noticeable changing trends were found between both groups, including declining prevalence of diabetes, fewer patients complaining of pain or presenting with otitis externa, and canal granulation, and increased variety of pathogens in group 2. We should highlight the index of clinical suspicion for osteomyelitis of the temporal bone, even in nondiabetic or immunocompetent patients. Painless otorrhea patients were also at risk of osteomyelitis of the temporal bone, especially patients with previous otologic operation. Increased multiplicity of pathogens amplified the difficulty of diagnosis for osteomyelitis of the temporal bone. PMID:24963511

  13. The Effect of Concurrent Music Reading and Performance on the Ability to Detect Tempo Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Mark Carlton

    1989-01-01

    Measures the ability of three groups of musicians to detect tempo change while reading and performing music. Compares this ability with that of the same musicians to detect tempo change while listening only. Found that for all groups the ability to detect tempo changes was inhibited by the playing task, although to different degrees for each…

  14. Movement amplitude and tempo change in piano performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Caroline

    2001-05-01

    Music performance places stringent temporal and cognitive demands on individuals that should yield large speed/accuracy tradeoffs. Skilled piano performance, however, shows consistently high accuracy across a wide variety of rates. Movement amplitude may affect the speed/accuracy tradeoff, so that high accuracy can be obtained even at very fast tempi. The contribution of movement amplitude changes in rate (tempo) is investigated with motion capture. Cameras recorded pianists with passive markers on hands and fingers, who performed on an electronic (MIDI) keyboard. Pianists performed short melodies at faster and faster tempi until they made errors (altering the speed/accuracy function). Variability of finger movements in the three motion planes indicated most change in the plane perpendicular to the keyboard across tempi. Surprisingly, peak amplitudes of motion before striking the keys increased as tempo increased. Increased movement amplitudes at faster rates may reduce or compensate for speed/accuracy tradeoffs. [Work supported by Canada Research Chairs program, HIMH R01 45764.

  15. Tempo and walking speed with music in the urban context

    PubMed Central

    Franěk, Marek; van Noorden, Leon; Režný, Lukáš

    2014-01-01

    The study explored the effect of music on the temporal aspects of walking behavior in a real outdoor urban setting. First, spontaneous synchronization between the beat of the music and step tempo was explored. The effect of motivational and non-motivational music (Karageorghis et al., 1999) on the walking speed was also studied. Finally, we investigated whether music can mask the effects of visual aspects of the walking route environment, which involve fluctuation of walking speed as a response to particular environmental settings. In two experiments, we asked participants to walk around an urban route that was 1.8 km in length through various environments in the downtown area of Hradec Králové. In Experiment 1, the participants listened to a musical track consisting of world pop music with a clear beat. In Experiment 2, participants were walking either with motivational music, which had a fast tempo and a strong rhythm, or with non-motivational music, which was slower, nice music, but with no strong implication to movement. Musical beat, as well as the sonic character of the music listened to while walking, influenced walking speed but did not lead to precise synchronization. It was found that many subjects did not spontaneously synchronize with the beat of the music at all, and some subjects synchronized only part of the time. The fast, energetic music increases the speed of the walking tempo, while slower, relaxing music makes the walking tempo slower. Further, it was found that listening to music with headphones while walking can mask the influence of the surrounding environment to some extent. Both motivational music and non-motivational music had a larger effect than the world pop music from Experiment 1. Individual differences in responses to the music listened to while walking that were linked to extraversion and neuroticism were also observed. The findings described here could be useful in rhythmic stimulation for enhancing or recovering the features of

  16. Tempo and walking speed with music in the urban context.

    PubMed

    Franěk, Marek; van Noorden, Leon; Režný, Lukáš

    2014-01-01

    The study explored the effect of music on the temporal aspects of walking behavior in a real outdoor urban setting. First, spontaneous synchronization between the beat of the music and step tempo was explored. The effect of motivational and non-motivational music (Karageorghis et al., 1999) on the walking speed was also studied. Finally, we investigated whether music can mask the effects of visual aspects of the walking route environment, which involve fluctuation of walking speed as a response to particular environmental settings. In two experiments, we asked participants to walk around an urban route that was 1.8 km in length through various environments in the downtown area of Hradec Králové. In Experiment 1, the participants listened to a musical track consisting of world pop music with a clear beat. In Experiment 2, participants were walking either with motivational music, which had a fast tempo and a strong rhythm, or with non-motivational music, which was slower, nice music, but with no strong implication to movement. Musical beat, as well as the sonic character of the music listened to while walking, influenced walking speed but did not lead to precise synchronization. It was found that many subjects did not spontaneously synchronize with the beat of the music at all, and some subjects synchronized only part of the time. The fast, energetic music increases the speed of the walking tempo, while slower, relaxing music makes the walking tempo slower. Further, it was found that listening to music with headphones while walking can mask the influence of the surrounding environment to some extent. Both motivational music and non-motivational music had a larger effect than the world pop music from Experiment 1. Individual differences in responses to the music listened to while walking that were linked to extraversion and neuroticism were also observed. The findings described here could be useful in rhythmic stimulation for enhancing or recovering the features of

  17. Testing meter, rhythm, and tempo discriminations in pigeons.

    PubMed

    Hagmann, Carl Erick; Cook, Robert G

    2010-10-01

    Rhythmic grouping and discrimination is fundamental to music. When compared to the perception of pitch, rhythmic abilities in animals have received scant attention until recently. In this experiment, four pigeons were tested with three types of auditory rhythmic discriminations to investigate their processing of this aspect of sound and music. Two experiments examined a meter discrimination in which successively presented idiophonic sounds were repeated in meters of different lengths in a go/no-go discrimination task. With difficulty, the birds eventually learned to discriminate between 8/4 and 3/4 meters constructed from cymbal and tom drum sounds at 180 beats per minute. This discrimination subsequently transferred to faster tempos, but not to different drum sounds or their combination. Experiment 3 tested rhythmic and arrhythmic patterns of sounds. After 40 sessions of training, these same pigeons showed no discrimination. Experiment 4 tested repetitions of a piano sound at fast and slow tempos. This discrimination was readily learned and showed transfer to novel tempos. The pattern of results suggests that pigeons can time periodic auditory events, but their capacity to understand generalized rhythmic groupings appears limited. PMID:20600695

  18. Suitability of leguminous cover crop pollens as food source for the green lacewing Chrysoperla externa (Hagen) (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae).

    PubMed

    Venzon, Madelaine; Rosado, Maria C; Euzébio, Denise E; Souza, Brígida; Schoereder, José H

    2006-01-01

    Diversification of crops with species that provide suitable pollen for predators may reduce pest population on crops by enhancing predator effectiveness. In this paper we evaluated the suitability of leguminous cover crop pollens to the predatory green lacewing Chrysoperla externa (Hagen). The predator is commonly found in coffee agroecosystems and the plant species tested were pigeon pea and sunn hemp, which are used in organic coffee systems. Newly emerged females and males of C. externa were reared on diets containing pollen of pigeon pea, sunn hemp, or castor bean, used as a control. The reproductive success of C. externa was evaluated when females fed the pollen species and when honey was added to the diets, to verify the predator need for an extra carbohydrate source. Similar intrinsic growth rates were found for females fed on pigeon pea pollen and on sunn hemp pollen but these rates increased significantly when honey was added to the diets. Females fed with pigeon pea pollen plus honey and with sunn hemp pollen plus honey had higher intrinsic growth rates than those fed with castor bean pollen plus honey. Females fed on castor bean pollen only or on honey only, did not oviposit. Leguminous pollen species were equally suitable for C. externa especially when they were complemented with honey. The results suggest that to successfully enhance predator effectiveness, organic coffee plantation should be diversified with plant providing pollen in combination with plant providing nectar. PMID:18575698

  19. In vitro evaluation of the synergistic activity of neomycin-polymyxin B association against pathogens responsible for otitis externa.

    PubMed

    Tempera, G; Mangiafico, A; Genovese, C; Giudice, E; Mastrojeni, S; Nicolosi, D; Ferneri, P M

    2009-01-01

    The most recent guidelines recommend, for otitis externa antibiotic therapy, the use of topical formulations in that they are very safe, have a quicker effect and do not induce bacterial resistance compared to systemic therapy. The choice of the class of antibiotics in empiric therapy of otitis externa must take into consideration the polymicrobic nature of the infection that includes both bacteria (Grampositive and Gram-negative) and mycetes. For this reason, in this study we evaluated the synergic activity of neomycin in association with polymyxin B against the pathogens commonly responsible for otitis externa, compared to that of a single antibiotic (ciprofloxacin). The polymyxinB/neomycin association shows clear synergic effects with values of both Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) and Minimum Bactericidal Concentration (MBC) reduced by 3-4 times with respect to the single antibiotic; and in P. aeruginosa the synergistic effect of the neomycin/polymyxin B association with respect to neomycin was more evident (5-6 times), with an intrinsic in vitro activity constantly higher than that of ciprofloxacin alone or in association with hydrocortisone. From the analysis of the data obtained in vitro, we can conclude that the possibility of using a topical formulation containing a synergistic association of antibiotics, such as neomycin-polymyxin B, in such a way as to obtain the maximum effect in the minimum time with an increase in the spectrum of action of non-bacterial pathogens, is an optimal choice for the clinician for the empiric therapy of otitis externa. PMID:19505383

  20. Entomopathogenic Activity of a Variety of the Fungus, Colletotrichum acutatum, Recovered from the Elongate Hemlock Scale, Fiorinia externa

    PubMed Central

    Marcelino, José A. P.; Gouli, Svetlana; Parker, Bruce L; Skinner, Margaret; Giordano, Rosanna

    2009-01-01

    A fungal epizootic in populations of Fiorinia externa Ferris (Hemiptera: Diaspididae) infesting hemlock trees, Tsuga canadensis (L.) Carrière (Pinales: Pinaceae) in forests of the Northeastern US has been recently detected. The current known distribution of the epizootic spans 36 sites in New York, Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Connecticut. Colletotrichum acutatum Simmonds var. fioriniae Marcelino and Gouli var. nov. inedit. (Phyllachorales: Phyllachoraceae) was the most prevalent fungus recovered from infected scales. Bioassays indicated that this C. acutatum variety is highly pathogenic to F. externa. Mortality rates of >90 and >55% were obtained for F. externa crawlers and settlers, respectively. Significantly lower mortality levels, ≤ 22%, were obtained when three other species of insects were assayed. C. gleosporioides has also been shown to have pathogenic activity towards a scale insect. The data suggest that C. acutatum var. fioriniae from F. externa epizootics in the US, and the previously reported C. gloeosporioides f. sp. ortheziidae causing Orthezia praelonga epizootics in Brazil, may constitute distinct biotypes of Colletotrichum that have attained the ability to infect insects in addition to the commonly reported plant hosts. PMID:19613442

  1. Grover Cleveland High School Project CAUSA, 1985-1986. OEA Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn. Office of Educational Assessment.

    In 1985-86, Project CAUSA completed a three-year funding cycle at Grover Cleveland High School in Queens, New York. The project provided 132 newly arrived students from Italy and several Spanish-speaking countries with instruction in English as a second language (ESL), native language arts, and content areas. Basic goals were to help students…

  2. Grover Cleveland High School Project CAUSA 1983-1984. O.E.A. Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn. Office of Educational Assessment.

    This document evaluates Project CAUSA (Career Advancement Utilizing Student Abilities), which provides instruction in English as a Second Language (ESL), native language development, and content-area courses, in addition to a career and vocational training program, to 115 students of limited English proficiency (LEP) from Italy and Spanish…

  3. Narrative Report of the El Centro de la Causa Library Project, 1973-1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chicago Public Library, IL.

    El Centro de la Causa and the Chicago Public Library cooperated in a program to serve Chicago's Spanish speaking population. The project assessed needs and designed programs to meet those needs by establishing a library in El Centro's community center and some outreach programs. An active acquisitions program for Spanish language materials was…

  4. Grover Cleveland High School Project CAUSA 1984-1985. OEE Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn. Office of Educational Assessment.

    This program, Project CAUSA, provided instruction in English as a second language (ESL), native language arts, and content-area courses, in addition to a career and vocational training program focused on office and computer skills, to a selected group of 141 Hispanic and Italian immigrant students of limited English proficiency (LEP). Students…

  5. Testing the absolute-tempo hypothesis: context effects for familiar and unfamiliar songs.

    PubMed

    Rashotte, Matthew A; Wedell, Douglas H

    2014-11-01

    In two experiments, we investigated context effects on tempo judgments for familiar and unfamiliar songs performed by popular artists. In Experiment 1, participants made comparative tempo judgments to a remembered standard for song clips drawn from either a slow or a fast context, created by manipulating the tempos of the same songs. Although both familiar and unfamiliar songs showed significant shifts in their points of subjective equality toward the tempo context values, more-familiar songs showed significantly reduced contextual bias. In Experiment 2, tempo pleasantness ratings showed significant context effects in which the ordering of tempos on the pleasantness scale differed across contexts, with the most pleasant tempo shifting toward the contextual values, an assimilation of ideal points. Once again, these effects were significant but reduced for the more-familiar songs. The moderating effects of song familiarity support a weak version of the absolute-tempo hypothesis, in which long-term memory for tempo reduces but does not eliminate contextual effects. Thus, although both relative and absolute tempo information appear to be encoded in memory, the absolute representation may be subject to rapid revision by recently experienced tempo-altered versions of the same song. PMID:24972559

  6. Honoris Causa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cronin, Blaise

    2002-01-01

    A reasonable estimate puts the number of living American holders of honorary degrees at about 150,000. This inflated figure and a general lack of seriousness--Kermit the Frog, for instance, delivered the commencement address at Southampton College in 1996--trouble the author of this article. He suggests that the practice might somehow be adjusted…

  7. Accurate tempo estimation based on harmonic + noise decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso, Miguel; Richard, Gael; David, Bertrand

    2006-12-01

    We present an innovative tempo estimation system that processes acoustic audio signals and does not use any high-level musical knowledge. Our proposal relies on a harmonic + noise decomposition of the audio signal by means of a subspace analysis method. Then, a technique to measure the degree of musical accentuation as a function of time is developed and separately applied to the harmonic and noise parts of the input signal. This is followed by a periodicity estimation block that calculates the salience of musical accents for a large number of potential periods. Next, a multipath dynamic programming searches among all the potential periodicities for the most consistent prospects through time, and finally the most energetic candidate is selected as tempo. Our proposal is validated using a manually annotated test-base containing 961 music signals from various musical genres. In addition, the performance of the algorithm under different configurations is compared. The robustness of the algorithm when processing signals of degraded quality is also measured.

  8. Tempo and Mode in Evolution of Transcriptional Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Kacy L.; Ruvinsky, Ilya

    2012-01-01

    Perennial questions of evolutionary biology can be applied to gene regulatory systems using the abundance of experimental data addressing gene regulation in a comparative context. What is the tempo (frequency, rate) and mode (way, mechanism) of transcriptional regulatory evolution? Here we synthesize the results of 230 experiments performed on insects and nematodes in which regulatory DNA from one species was used to drive gene expression in another species. General principles of regulatory evolution emerge. Gene regulatory evolution is widespread and accumulates with genetic divergence in both insects and nematodes. Divergence in cis is more common than divergence in trans. Coevolution between cis and trans shows a particular increase over greater evolutionary timespans, especially in sex-specific gene regulation. Despite these generalities, the evolution of gene regulation is gene- and taxon-specific. The congruence of these conclusions with evidence from other types of experiments suggests that general principles are discoverable, and a unified view of the tempo and mode of regulatory evolution may be achievable. PMID:22291600

  9. Multi-scale Characterization of Cellulose TEMPO-Nanofiber Suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Yimin; Liu, Kai; Hsiao, Benjamin

    Cellulose nanofiber (CNF) suspensions were characterized at multiple length scales. CNF suspension was prepared by applying 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1- piperidinyloxy (TEMPO) oxidation method to dry wood pulp. TEMPO method was able to produce fine fibers with a cross section dimension being in the order of magnitude of several nanometers, and length being several hundred nanometers. The surface was negatively charged. Charge density was characterized by Zeta-potential measurement. Both small-angle X-ray (SAXS) and small-angle neutron (SANS) methods were employed to examine fiber dimensions in solution. Data fitting indicated that newly-developed ribbon model was able to capture the essence of CNF's geometry, which is also computationally economic. The rectangular-shaped cross section was consistent to cellulose's crystal structure; and was able to provide insights into how cellulose crystals were biologically synthesized and packed in nature. Multi-angle dynamic light scattering (DLS) was used to study CNF's diffusion properties. A strong scattering-angle dependence of auto-correlation function was observed. The characterization is useful to understanding suspension quality of CNF, and can provide guideline for follow-up research aimed for a variety of applications.

  10. Effects of music tempo upon submaximal cycling performance.

    PubMed

    Waterhouse, J; Hudson, P; Edwards, B

    2010-08-01

    In an in vivo laboratory controlled study, 12 healthy male students cycled at self-chosen work-rates while listening to a program of six popular music tracks of different tempi. The program lasted about 25 min and was performed on three occasions--unknown to the participants, its tempo was normal, increased by 10% or decreased by 10%. Work done, distance covered and cadence were measured at the end of each track, as were heart rate and subjective measures of exertion, thermal comfort and how much the music was liked. Speeding up the music program increased distance covered/unit time, power and pedal cadence by 2.1%, 3.5% and 0.7%, respectively; slowing the program produced falls of 3.8%, 9.8% and 5.9%. Average heart rate changes were +0.1% (faster program) and -2.2% (slower program). Perceived exertion and how much the music was liked increased (faster program) by 2.4% and 1.3%, respectively, and decreased (slower program) by 3.6% and 35.4%. That is, healthy individuals performing submaximal exercise not only worked harder with faster music but also chose to do so and enjoyed the music more when it was played at a faster tempo. Implications of these findings for improving training regimens are discussed. PMID:19793214

  11. Nitroxide TEMPO: a genotoxic and oxidative stress inducer in cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaoqing; Mittelstaedt, Roberta A; Guo, Lei; Shaddock, Joseph G; Heflich, Robert H; Bigger, Anita H; Moore, Martha M; Mei, Nan

    2013-08-01

    2,2,6,6-Tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO) is a low molecular weight nitroxide and stable free radical. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of TEMPO in mammalian cells using the mouse lymphoma assay (MLA) and in vitro micronucleus assay. In the absence of metabolic activation (S9), 3mM TEMPO produced significant cytotoxicity and marginal mutagenicity in the MLA; in the presence of S9, treatment of mouse lymphoma cells with 1-2mM TEMPO resulted in dose-dependent decreases of the relative total growth and increases in mutant frequency. Treatment of TK6 human lymphoblastoid cells with 0.9-2.3mM TEMPO increased the frequency of both micronuclei (a marker for clastogenicity) and hypodiploid nuclei (a marker of aneugenicity) in a dose-dependent manner; greater responses were produced in the presence of S9. Within the dose range tested, TEMPO induced reactive oxygen species and decreased glutathione levels in mouse lymphoma cells. In addition, the majority of TEMPO-induced mutants had loss of heterozygosity at the Tk locus, with allele loss of ⩽34Mbp. These results indicate that TEMPO is mutagenic in the MLA and induces micronuclei and hypodiploid nuclei in TK6 cells. Oxidative stress may account for part of the genotoxicity induced by TEMPO in both cell lines. PMID:23517621

  12. MUSIC TEMPO'S EFFECT ON EXERCISE PERFORMANCE: COMMENT ON DYER AND McKUNE.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Priscila Missaki

    2015-06-01

    Dyer and McKune (2013) stated that music tempo has no influence on performance, physiological, and psychophysical variables in well-trained cyclists during high intensity endurance tasks. However, there are important limitations in the methodology of the study. The participants' music preferences and tempo change were not well measured. It is not possible to affirm that music tempo does not influence athletes' performance. Potential areas of future research include: (a) use of instruments to assess the qualities of music; (b) standardizing music of tempo according to exercise type (e.g., running, cycling, etc.); PMID:26057422

  13. A Novel Mycobacterium cosmeticum-Like Bacterium Isolated from the Ear Swab of a Patient with Otitis Externa

    PubMed Central

    Teo, Jeanette W. P.; Cheng, Janet W. S.; Jureen, Roland; Lin, Raymond T. P.

    2015-01-01

    We describe the identification and characterization of a novel nontuberculous mycobacterium (NTM), isolated from an ear swab of an adult male patient with chronic otitis externa. Genetically, the bacterium is most closely related to Mycobacterium cosmeticum; however, growth and biochemical features indicate that it is distinctly different. Here, we highlight for the first time an unusual NTM that is a probable cause of ear infection. PMID:25866687

  14. Clinical evaluation of an antiinflammatory and antioxidant diet effect in 30 dogs affected by chronic otitis externa: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Di Cerbo, Alessandro; Centenaro, Sara; Beribè, Francesca; Laus, Fulvio; Cerquetella, Matteo; Spaterna, Andrea; Guidetti, Gianandrea; Canello, Sergio; Terrazzano, Giuseppe

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this evaluation study was to assess the possible role of a specific nutraceutical diet in relieving main clinical symptoms of chronic bilateral otitis externa (occlusion of ear canal, erythema, discharge quantity, and odor) in 30 adult dogs. Thirty dogs of different breeds (mean age ± SEM; 6.03 ± 0.15 years and mean weight ± SEM; 32.01 ± 1.17 Kg; 53.3% males, 46.6% females) with evident chronic clinical otitis symptoms were equally divided and randomly assigned to receive either the nutraceutical diet (ND group) or a standard diet (SD group) over a period of 90 days. In all cases a topical pharmacological treatment was given. The nutraceutical diet, also endowed with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities, significantly decreased the mean score intensity of all symptoms after 90 days of intervention (P < 0.0001) with the exception of Malassezia pachydermatis infection which was only slightly reduced. Our investigation is one of the few evidence-based results where a commercial nutraceutical diet has been proven effective, in combination with drugs, in relieving otitis externa-related symptoms. This study opens new insights into otitis externa clinical management providing evidence of efficacy of a combined therapy with drugs and a specific nutraceutical diet. PMID:26743397

  15. Use of ticarcillin in the management of canine otitis externa complicated by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Nuttall, T J

    1998-04-01

    Twelve dogs were referred with purulent and proliferative otitis externa. Prior treatment included fluoroquinolones, glucocorticoids and polyvalent ear drops over seven days to five months. In all cases the vertical and horizontal ear canals were inflamed and thickened, with ruptured tympanic membranes in four cases. No abnormalities were seen on radiography of the osseous bullae. Numerous rod bacilli and degenerate neutrophils were seen on cytology. Pseudomonas aeruginosa resistant to fluoroquinolones and gentamicin was cultured in all cases. Treatment was initiated with 1 to 2 mg/kg prednisolone per os once daily, and a cleansing and drying ear cleaner followed by topical administration of injectable ticarcillin solution four times daily. Cases with ruptured tympanae also received 15 to 25 mg/kg ticarcillin three times daily intravenously until the membranes had healed. All cases were anaesthetised for repeated saline ear flushes until no further discharge was evident and no rods were seen on cytology. Topical ticarcillin and the ear cleaner were continued twice daily for 14 days after clinical resolution. The duration of treatment ranged from 14 to 36 days. Treatment was withdrawn in one case which developed a drug reaction. All other cases responded well with no adverse effects. PMID:9577757

  16. Cellulose nanowhiskers extracted from TEMPO-oxidized jute fibers.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xinwang; Ding, Bin; Yu, Jianyong; Al-Deyab, Salem S

    2012-10-01

    Cellulose nanowhiskers is a kind of renewable and biocompatible nanomaterials evoke much interest because of its versatility in various applications. Here, for the first time, a novel controllable fabrication of cellulose nanowhiskers from jute fibers with a high yield (over 80%) via a 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl radical (TEMPO)/NaBr/NaClO system selective oxidization combined with mechanical homogenization is reported. The versatile jute cellulose nanowhiskers with ultrathin diameters (3-10 nm) and high crystallinity (69.72%), contains C6 carboxylate groups converted from C6 primary hydroxyls, which would be particularly useful for applications in the nanocomposites as reinforcing phase, as well as in tissue engineering, pharmaceutical and optical industries as additives. PMID:22840042

  17. Musicians' Preferences for Tempo and Pitch Levels in Recorded Orchestral Music

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geringer, John M.

    2010-01-01

    This study was designed to ascertain musicians' tempo and pitch level preferences when listening to orchestral music. Ninety graduate and undergraduate music major students were assigned randomly to one of three groups. Participants listened individually to recorded symphonic excerpts, 5 with relatively fast and 5 with relatively slow tempos.…

  18. Effects of Modeling and Tempo Patterns as Practice Techniques on the Performance of High School Instrumentalists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henley, Paul T.

    2001-01-01

    Examines the effect of modeling conditions and tempo patterns on high school instrumentalists' performance. Focuses on high school students (n=60) who play wind instruments. Reports that the with-model condition was superior in rhythm and tempo percentage gain when compared to the no-model condition. Includes references. (CMK)

  19. Should Sluggish Cognitive Tempo Symptoms Be Included in the Diagnosis of Attention-Deficit/hyperactivity Disorder?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todd, Richard D.; Rasmussen, Erik R.; Wood, Catherine; Levy, Florence; Hay, David A.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine the impact of including sluggish cognitive tempo items on the factor and latent class structure of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) subtypes in boys and girls. Method: Parent report of two sluggish cognitive tempo items on a population-based sample of 1,430 female twins and 1,414 male twins were analyzed…

  20. Control Over the Time Course of Cognition in the Tempo-Naming Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kello, Christopher T.

    2004-01-01

    Five experiments are reported in which standard naming and tempo-naming tasks were used to investigate mechanisms of control over the time course of lexical processing. The time course of processing was manipulated by asking participants to time their responses with an audiovisual metronome. As the tempo of the metronome increased, results showed…

  1. Children's Preference for Sequenced Accompaniments: The Influence of Style and Perceived Tempo.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brittin, Ruth V.

    2000-01-01

    Explores the influence of tempo on musical preference for students in grades 2-6, focusing on the effects of various styles using a MIDI keyboard. Explains that the students listened to 10 musical selections identifying their preferences and perceptions of tempo. Reveals that the preferred styles were Hip-Hop, Heavy Rock Shuffle, Samba, and Funk2.…

  2. Reaction time to changes in the tempo of acoustic pulse trains.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. P.; Warm, J. S.; Westendorf, D. H.

    1973-01-01

    Investigation of the ability of human observers to detect accelerations and decelerations in the rate of presentation of pulsed stimuli, i.e., changes in the tempo of acoustic pulse trains. Response times to accelerations in tempo were faster than to decelerations. Overall speed of response was inversely related to the pulse repetition rate.

  3. Cu-NHC-TEMPO catalyzed aerobic oxidation of primary alcohols to aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaolong; Xia, Qinqin; Zhang, Yuejiao; Chen, Congyan; Chen, Wanzhi

    2013-09-01

    Imidazolium salts bearing TEMPO groups react with commercially available copper powder affording Cu-NHC complexes. The in situ generated Cu-NHC-TEMPO complexes are quite efficient catalysts for aerobic oxidation of primary alcohols into aldehydes. The catalyst is easily available, and various primary alcohols were selectively converted to aldehydes in excellent yields. PMID:23944937

  4. Perception of Tempo Modulation by Listeners of Different Levels of Educational Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheldon, Deborah A.; Gregory, Diane

    1997-01-01

    Investigates the similarities and differences in how listeners with different levels of education experience demonstrate perception of tempo modulation in music. Reports that level of education may affect how listeners demonstrate differences and that responses depended on the direction of tempo change. Notes importance of the music education of…

  5. Does Listening to Slow Tempo Classical Music During Independent Writing Affect Children's On-Task Performance?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKnight, Rosemary

    This project explored the effects of slow tempo classical music on children's on-task performance during independent writing. The project sample consisted of 24 students from a first grade classroom in the New York City Public School System. The students' on-task behavior was observed with and without use of slow tempo classical music playing, and…

  6. Development's Tortoise and Hare: Pubertal Timing, Pubertal Tempo, and Depressive Symptoms in Boys and Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendle, Jane; Harden, K. Paige; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne; Graber, Julia A.

    2010-01-01

    Although the sequence of pubertal maturation remains consistent across most individuals, the timing and tempo of development fluctuate widely. While past research has largely focused on the sequelae of pubertal timing, a faster tempo of maturation might also present special challenges to children for acclimating to new biological and social…

  7. Status of the first NASA EV-I Project, Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chance, K.; Liu, X.; Suleiman, R. M.; Flittner, D. E.; Al-Saadi, J. A.; Janz, S. J.

    2013-12-01

    TEMPO is the first NASA Earth Venture Instrument. It will measure atmospheric pollution for greater North America from space using ultraviolet and visible spectroscopy. TEMPO measures from Mexico City to the Canadian tar sands, and from the Atlantic to the Pacific, hourly and at high spatial resolution (2 km N/S × 4.5 km E/W at the center of its field of regard). The status of TEMPO including progress in instrument definition and implementation of the ground system will be presented. TEMPO provides a minimally-redundant measurement suite that includes all key elements of tropospheric air pollution chemistry. Measurements are from geostationary (GEO) orbit, to capture the inherent high variability in the diurnal cycle of emissions and chemistry. The small spatial footprint resolves pollution sources at sub-urban scale. Together, this temporal and spatial resolution improves emission inventories, monitors population exposure, and enables effective emission-control strategies. TEMPO will be delivered in 2017 for integration onto a NASA-selected GEO host spacecraft for launch as early as 2018. It will provide the spectra required to retrieve O3, NO2, SO2, H2CO, C2H2O2, H2O, aerosols, cloud parameters, and UVB radiation. TEMPO thus measures the major elements, directly or by proxy, in the tropospheric O3 chemistry cycle. Multi-spectral observations provide sensitivity to O3 in the lowermost troposphere, substantially reducing uncertainty in air quality predictions. TEMPO quantifies and tracks the evolution of aerosol loading. It provides near-real-time air quality products that will be made widely, publicly available. Additional gases not central to air quality, including BrO, OClO, and IO will also be measured. TEMPO and its Asian (GEMS) and European (Sentinel-4) constellation partners make the first tropospheric trace gas measurements from GEO, building on the heritage of six spectrometers flown in low-earth-orbit (LEO). These LEO instruments measure the needed

  8. Tempo and mode in the macroevolutionary reconstruction of Darwinism.

    PubMed Central

    Gould, S J

    1994-01-01

    Among the several central meanings of Darwinism, his version of Lyellian uniformitarianism--the extrapolationist commitment to viewing causes of small-scale, observable change in modern populations as the complete source, by smooth extension through geological time, of all magnitudes and sequences in evolution--has most contributed to the causal hegemony of microevolution and the assumption that paleontology can document the contingent history of life but cannot act as a domain of novel evolutionary theory. G. G. Simpson tried to combat this view of paleontology as theoretically inert in his classic work, Tempo and Mode in Evolution (1944), with a brilliant argument that the two subjects of his title fall into a unique paleontological domain and that modes (processes and causes) can be inferred from the quantitative study of tempos (pattern). Nonetheless, Simpson did not cash out his insight to paleontology's theoretical benefit because he followed the strict doctrine of the Modern Synthesis. He studied his domain of potential theory and concluded that no actual theory could be found--and that a full account of causes could therefore be located in the microevolutionary realm after all. I argue that Simpson was unduly pessimistic and that modernism's belief in reductionistic unification (the conventional view of Western intellectuals from the 1920s to the 1950s) needs to be supplanted by a postmodernist commitment to pluralism and multiple levels of causation. Macro- and microevolution should not be viewed as opposed, but as truly complementary. I describe the two major domains where a helpful macroevolutionary theory may be sought--unsmooth causal boundaries between levels (as illustrated by punctuated equilibrium and mass extinction) and hierarchical expansion of the theory of natural selection to levels both below (gene and cell-line) and above organisms (demes, species, and clades). Problems remain in operationally defining selection at non-organismic levels

  9. Tempo and mode in the macroevolutionary reconstruction of Darwinism.

    PubMed

    Gould, S J

    1994-07-19

    Among the several central meanings of Darwinism, his version of Lyellian uniformitarianism--the extrapolationist commitment to viewing causes of small-scale, observable change in modern populations as the complete source, by smooth extension through geological time, of all magnitudes and sequences in evolution--has most contributed to the causal hegemony of microevolution and the assumption that paleontology can document the contingent history of life but cannot act as a domain of novel evolutionary theory. G. G. Simpson tried to combat this view of paleontology as theoretically inert in his classic work, Tempo and Mode in Evolution (1944), with a brilliant argument that the two subjects of his title fall into a unique paleontological domain and that modes (processes and causes) can be inferred from the quantitative study of tempos (pattern). Nonetheless, Simpson did not cash out his insight to paleontology's theoretical benefit because he followed the strict doctrine of the Modern Synthesis. He studied his domain of potential theory and concluded that no actual theory could be found--and that a full account of causes could therefore be located in the microevolutionary realm after all. I argue that Simpson was unduly pessimistic and that modernism's belief in reductionistic unification (the conventional view of Western intellectuals from the 1920s to the 1950s) needs to be supplanted by a postmodernist commitment to pluralism and multiple levels of causation. Macro- and microevolution should not be viewed as opposed, but as truly complementary. I describe the two major domains where a helpful macroevolutionary theory may be sought--unsmooth causal boundaries between levels (as illustrated by punctuated equilibrium and mass extinction) and hierarchical expansion of the theory of natural selection to levels both below (gene and cell-line) and above organisms (demes, species, and clades). Problems remain in operationally defining selection at non-organismic levels

  10. Paramagnetic carbon-13 shifts induced by the free radical tempo. 2. Nitrogen heterocycles

    SciTech Connect

    Qui, Z.W.; Grant, D.M.; Pugmire, R.J.

    1984-02-08

    With use of the free radical Tempo as a shift and relaxation reagent, both paramagnetic shifts and spin-lattice relaxation rates of nitrogen heterocycles are reported. Paramagnetic shifts of these compounds are larger than the corresponding shifts of the aromatic hydrocarbons, indicating a stronger interaction between nitrogen heterocyclic compounds and Tempo. Paramagnetic shifts increase with the number of nitrogen atoms per molecule. For pyridine type compounds, both shift and relaxation data show that the stronger interaction is not at the adjacent positions to the nitrogen atoms. It would appear in these heterocyclic complexes with Tempo that the nitrogen atoms tend to orient away from the N-O group in Tempo. In contrast, imidazole and indole exhibit a much stronger interaction with the Tempo due to hydrogen bond formation, and the positions near the N-H group exhibit larger paramagnetic shifts and relaxation rates. An approximate static model involving an indole-Tempo, hydrogen-bond complex accounts for the relaxation data from which both an equilibrium constant of complexation and a hydrogen-bond distance in the indole-Tempo complex could be estimated.

  11. Thermosetting polymer for dynamic nuclear polarization: Solidification of an epoxy resin mixture including TEMPO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noda, Yohei; Kumada, Takayuki; Yamaguchi, Daisuke; Shamoto, Shin-ichi

    2015-03-01

    We investigated the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of typical thermosetting polymers (two-component type epoxy resins; Araldite® Standard or Araldite® Rapid) doped with a (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-yl)oxy (TEMPO) radical. The doping process was developed by carefully considering the decomposition of TEMPO during the solidification of the epoxy resin. The TEMPO electron spin in each two-component paste decayed slowly, which was favorable for our study. Furthermore, despite the dissolved TEMPO, the mixture of the two-component paste successfully solidified. With the resulting TEMPO-doped epoxy-resin samples, DNP experiments at 1.2 K and 3.35 T indicated a magnitude of a proton-spin polarization up to 39%. This polarization is similar to that (35%) obtained for TEMPO-doped polystyrene (PS), which is often used as a standard sample for DNP. To combine this solidification of TEMPO-including mixture with a resin-casting technique enables a creation of polymeric target materials with a precise and complex structure.

  12. Memory for surface features of unfamiliar melodies: independent effects of changes in pitch and tempo.

    PubMed

    Schellenberg, E Glenn; Stalinski, Stephanie M; Marks, Bradley M

    2014-01-01

    A melody's identity is determined by relations between consecutive tones in terms of pitch and duration, whereas surface features (i.e., pitch level or key, tempo, and timbre) are irrelevant. Although surface features of highly familiar recordings are encoded into memory, little is known about listeners' mental representations of melodies heard once or twice. It is also unknown whether musical pitch is represented additively or interactively with temporal information. In two experiments, listeners heard unfamiliar melodies twice in an initial exposure phase. In a subsequent test phase, they heard the same (old) melodies interspersed with new melodies. Some of the old melodies were shifted in key, tempo, or key and tempo. Listeners' task was to rate how well they recognized each melody from the exposure phase while ignoring changes in key and tempo. Recognition ratings were higher for old melodies that stayed the same compared to those that were shifted in key or tempo, and detrimental effects of key and tempo changes were additive in between-subjects (Experiment 1) and within-subjects (Experiment 2) designs. The results confirm that surface features are remembered for melodies heard only twice. They also imply that key and tempo are processed and stored independently. PMID:23385775

  13. Influence of Tempo and Rhythmic Unit in Musical Emotion Regulation.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Sotos, Alicia; Fernández-Caballero, Antonio; Latorre, José M

    2016-01-01

    This article is based on the assumption of musical power to change the listener's mood. The paper studies the outcome of two experiments on the regulation of emotional states in a series of participants who listen to different auditions. The present research focuses on note value, an important musical cue related to rhythm. The influence of two concepts linked to note value is analyzed separately and discussed together. The two musical cues under investigation are tempo and rhythmic unit. The participants are asked to label music fragments by using opposite meaningful words belonging to four semantic scales, namely "Tension" (ranging from Relaxing to Stressing), "Expressiveness" (Expressionless to Expressive), "Amusement" (Boring to Amusing) and "Attractiveness" (Pleasant to Unpleasant). The participants also have to indicate how much they feel certain basic emotions while listening to each music excerpt. The rated emotions are "Happiness," "Surprise," and "Sadness." This study makes it possible to draw some interesting conclusions about the associations between note value and emotions. PMID:27536232

  14. Tempo and mode of climatic niche evolution in Primates.

    PubMed

    Duran, Andressa; Pie, Marcio R

    2015-09-01

    Climatic niches have increasingly become a nexus in our understanding of a variety of ecological and evolutionary phenomena, from species distributions to latitudinal diversity gradients. Despite the increasing availability of comprehensive datasets on species ranges, phylogenetic histories, and georeferenced environmental conditions, studies on the evolution of climate niches have only begun to understand how niches evolve over evolutionary timescales. Here, using primates as a model system, we integrate recently developed phylogenetic comparative methods, species distribution patterns, and climatic data to explore primate climatic niche evolution, both among clades and over time. In general, we found that simple, constant-rate models provide a poor representation of how climatic niches evolve. For instance, there have been shifts in the rate of climatic niche evolution in several independent clades, particularly in response to the increasingly cooler climates of the past 10 My. Interestingly, rate accelerations greatly outnumbered rate decelerations. These results highlight the importance of considering more realistic evolutionary models that allow for the detection of heterogeneity in the tempo and mode of climatic niche evolution, as well as to infer possible constraining factors for species distributions in geographical space. PMID:26178157

  15. Heliospheric Magnetic Field: The Bashful Ballerina dancing in Waltz Tempo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mursula, K.

    The recent developments in the long-term observations of the heliospheric magnetic field HMF observed at 1 AU have shown that the HMF sector coming from the northern solar hemisphere systematically dominates in the late declining to minimum phase of the solar cycle This leads to a persistent southward shift or coning of the heliospheric current sheet at these times that can be picturesquely described by the concept of the Bashful Ballerina This result has recently been verified by direct measurements of the solar magnetic field The average field intensity is smaller and the corresponding area is larger in the northern hemisphere Also ground-based observations of the HMF sector structure extend these results to 1920s Moreover it has been shown that the global HMF has persistent active longitudes whose dominance depicts an oscillation with a period of about 3 2 years Accordingly the Bashful Ballerina takes three such steps per activity cycle thus dancing in waltz tempo We discuss the implications of this behaviour

  16. Influence of Tempo and Rhythmic Unit in Musical Emotion Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Sotos, Alicia; Fernández-Caballero, Antonio; Latorre, José M.

    2016-01-01

    This article is based on the assumption of musical power to change the listener's mood. The paper studies the outcome of two experiments on the regulation of emotional states in a series of participants who listen to different auditions. The present research focuses on note value, an important musical cue related to rhythm. The influence of two concepts linked to note value is analyzed separately and discussed together. The two musical cues under investigation are tempo and rhythmic unit. The participants are asked to label music fragments by using opposite meaningful words belonging to four semantic scales, namely “Tension” (ranging from Relaxing to Stressing), “Expressiveness” (Expressionless to Expressive), “Amusement” (Boring to Amusing) and “Attractiveness” (Pleasant to Unpleasant). The participants also have to indicate how much they feel certain basic emotions while listening to each music excerpt. The rated emotions are “Happiness,” “Surprise,” and “Sadness.” This study makes it possible to draw some interesting conclusions about the associations between note value and emotions. PMID:27536232

  17. Peltogasterella sensuru n. sp. (Crustacea: Cirripedia: Rhizocephala) from off Okinawa Island (Ryukyu Archipelago, Japan) with remarks on its single brood externae.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Ryuta; Hirose, Mamiko; Hirose, Euichi

    2015-09-01

    Peltogasterella sensuru n. sp. infests Pagurixus hermit crabs inhabiting rocky shores off Okinawa Island (Ryukyu Archipelago, Japan). This species is clearly distinguishable from Peltogasterella gracilis (Boschma, 1927): the stalk emerges from the middle part of the externa in the present species and P. sulcata (Lilljeborg, 1859), while the stalk in P. gracilis emerges from the posterior end of the externae. The new species differs from P. sulcata based on the morphology of the mantle aperture. Peltogasterella sensuru n. sp. repeatedly produces single brood externae that have not been previously observed in species belonging to the suborder Kentrogonida Delage, 1884. We also determined partial sequences of the COI gene and 16S rRNA gene of the new species for use as molecular markers for species identification. PMID:26249520

  18. TEMPO-functionalized zinc phthalocyanine: synthesis, magnetic properties, and its utility for electrochemical sensing of ascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Korkut, Sibel Eken; Akyüz, Duygu; Özdoğan, Kemal; Yerli, Yusuf; Koca, Atıf; Şener, M Kasım

    2016-02-21

    Zinc(ii) phthalocyanine (TEMPO-ZnPc), peripherally functionalized with 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinyloxy (TEMPO) radicals is synthesized and its magneto structural and electrochemical behaviors are investigated. TEMPO-ZnPc shows multi-electron ring based reduction reactions and a TEMPO based oxidation reaction. Spectroelectrochemical measurements support these peak assignments. TEMPO-ZnPc is tested as a homogeneous and heterogeneous ascorbic acid (AA) sensor. Disappearance of TEMPO-ZnPc based reduction processes and the observation of new waves at around 0 and 1.20 V with respect to increasing AA concentration indicate the interaction of TEMPO-ZnPc with AA and usability of the complex as an electrochemical AA sensor. For practical usage as heterogeneous electrocatalysts for AA sensing, a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) is coated with TEMPO-ZnPc (GCE/TEMPO-ZnPc) and this modified electrode is tested as a heterogeneous AA sensor. The redox peak of GCE/TEMPO-ZnPc at 0.81 V decreases the peak current while a new wave is observed at 0.65 V during the titration of the electrolyte with AA. GCE/TEMPO-ZnPc sense AA with 1.75 × 10(-6) mol dm(-3) LOD with a sensitivity of 1.89 × 10(3) A cm mol(-1). PMID:26766137

  19. Electrocatalytic Alcohol Oxidation with TEMPO and Bicyclic Nitroxyl Derivatives: Driving Force Trumps Steric Effects.

    PubMed

    Rafiee, Mohammad; Miles, Kelsey C; Stahl, Shannon S

    2015-11-25

    Bicyclic nitroxyl derivatives, such as 2-azaadamantane N-oxyl (AZADO) and 9-azabicyclo[3.3.1]nonane N-oxyl (ABNO), have emerged as highly effective alternatives to TEMPO-based catalysts for selective oxidation reactions (TEMPO = 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidine N-oxyl). Their efficacy is widely attributed to their smaller steric profile; however, electrocatalysis studies described herein show that the catalytic activity of nitroxyls is more strongly affected by the nitroxyl/oxoammonium redox potential than by steric effects. The inexpensive, high-potential TEMPO derivative, 4-acetamido-TEMPO (ACT), exhibits higher electrocatalytic activity than AZADO and ABNO for the oxidation of primary and secondary alcohols. Mechanistic studies provide insights into the origin of these unexpected reactivity trends. The superior activity of ACT is especially noteworthy at high pH, where bicyclic nitroxyls are inhibited by formation of an oxoammonium hydroxide adduct. PMID:26505317

  20. TEMPO-based Catholyte for High Energy Density Nonaqueous Redox Flow Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Xiaoliang; Xu, Wu; Vijayakumar, M.; Cosimbescu, Lelia; Liu, Tianbiao L.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Wang, Wei

    2014-12-03

    We will present a novel design lithium-organic non-aqueous redox flow battery based on a TEMPO catholyte. This RFB produced desired electrochemical performance exceeding most of the currently reported nonaqueous RFB systems.

  1. Natural Changes in Brain Temperature Underlie Variations in Song Tempo during a Mating Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Aronov, Dmitriy; Fee, Michale S.

    2012-01-01

    The song of a male zebra finch is a stereotyped motor sequence whose tempo varies with social context – whether or not the song is directed at a female bird – as well as with the time of day. The neural mechanisms underlying these changes in tempo are unknown. Here we show that brain temperature recorded in freely behaving male finches exhibits a global increase in response to the presentation of a female bird. This increase strongly correlates with, and largely explains, the faster tempo of songs directed at a female compared to songs produced in social isolation. Furthermore, we find that the observed diurnal variations in song tempo are also explained by natural variations in brain temperature. Our findings suggest that brain temperature is an important variable that can influence the dynamics of activity in neural circuits, as well as the temporal features of behaviors that some of these circuits generate. PMID:23112858

  2. Studies on the Synergy of TEMPO/GEO-CAPE with GOES-R Advanced Baseline Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciren, P.; Kondragunta, S.

    2015-12-01

    TEMPO (Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution) is a space-borne UV-spectral radiometer to be flown in a geostationary orbit as part of NASA's Earth Venture program. NASA also is planning a decadal survey mission-The GEOstationary Coastal and Air Pollution Events (GEO-CAPE). However, NASA has initiated scientific studies to determine if TEMPO can meet both its and GEO-CAPE's requirements by synergistically retrieving aerosol properties using TEMPO and GOES-R Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) measurements. Because TEMPO does not have a cloud camera or needed spectral channels to identify clouds and a Shortwave IR band to characterize the surface that are essential for aerosol retrievals, GOES-R ABI can supplement those measurements. GOES-R aerosol team conducted a study to determine idealistic position of TEMPO and GOES-R (in its both east and west location) for scene overlap and projection of ABI Shortwave IR (2.25 um) reflectance and cloud mask to TEMPO pixels. The BRDF effect was taken into consideration in determining the spatial coverage of pixels ideal for aerosol retrievals using ABI shortwave IR reflectance in TEMPO pixels to extrapolate reflectance at visible spectral bands. Analysis shows that GOES-R (in its west location, 135W) and TEMPO do not overlap over eastern part of the United States (US) and Atlantic Ocean, while GOES-R (in its east location, 75W) overlaps with TEMPO over most part of the United States (US) except for small part of Pacific Ocean. In addition, retrievals in the early morning and late afternoon are not possible due to BRDF effects rendering the surface reflectance too bright. Cloud mask information from GOES-R observations in both its east and west location seems to be sufficient for TEMPO. In summary, GOES-R ABI Shortwave IR radiances and cloud mask information are adequate to be used with TEMPO measurements to retrieve aerosol optical depth product several times during the sunlit portion of the continental US.

  3. TEMPO-Mediated Aza-Diels-Alder Reaction: Synthesis of Tetrahydropyridazines Using Ketohydrazones and Olefins.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiu-Long; Peng, Xie-Xue; Chen, Fei; Han, Bing

    2016-05-01

    A novel, facile, and efficient method for the synthesis of tetrahydropyridazines by a one-pot tandem reaction of easily accessible ketohydrazones and olefins in the presence of 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO) has been successfully developed. The reaction involves the initial generation of azoalkenes from direct oxidative dehydrogenation of ketohydrazones using TEMPO as the commercially available oxidant, followed by a subsequent aza-Diels-Alder reaction with olefins. PMID:27120574

  4. ESR study of molecular orientation and dynamics of TEMPO derivatives in CLPOT 1D nanochannels.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Furuhashi, Yuta; Nakagawa, Haruka; Asaji, Tetsuo

    2016-08-01

    The molecular orientations and dynamics of 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinyloxyl (TEMPO) radical derivatives with large substituent groups at the 4-position (4-X-TEMPO) in the organic one-dimensional nanochannels within the nanosized molecular template 2,4,6-tris(4-chlorophenoxy)-1,3,5-triazine (CLPOT) were examined using ESR. The concentrations of guest radicals, including 4-methoxy-TEMPO (MeO-TEMPO) or 4-oxo-TEMPO (TEMPONE), in the CLPOT nanochannels in each inclusion compound (IC) were reduced by co-including 4-substituted-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine (4-R-TEMP) compounds at a ratio of 1 : 30-1 : 600. At higher temperatures, the guest radicals in each IC underwent anisotropic rotational diffusion in the CLPOT nanochannels. The rotational diffusion activation energy, Ea , associated with MeO-TEMPO or TEMPONE in the CLPOT nanochannels (6-7 kJ mol(-1) ), was independent of the size and type of substituent group and was similar to the Ea values obtained for TEMPO and 4- hydroxy-TEMPO (TEMPOL) in our previous study. However, in the case in which TEMP was used as a guest compound for dilution (spacer), the tilt of the rotational axis to the principal axis system of the g-tensor, and the rotational diffusion correlation time, τR , of each guest radical in the CLPOT nanochannels were different from the case with other 4-R-TEMP. These results indicate the possibility of controlling molecular orientation and dynamics of guest radicals in CLPOT ICs through the appropriate choice of spacer. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27001507

  5. Fluorescence quenching of 7-amino-4-methylcoumarin by different TEMPO derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Żamojć, Krzysztof; Wiczk, Wiesław; Zaborowski, Bartłomiej; Jacewicz, Dagmara; Chmurzyński, Lech

    2015-02-01

    The fluorescence quenching of 7-amino-4-methylcoumarin by different TEMPO derivatives was studied in aqueous solutions with the use of steady-state, time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy as well as UV-VIS absorption spectroscopy methods. In order to distinguish each TEMPO derivative from the others and to understand the mechanism of quenching, the absorption and fluorescence emission spectra as well as decays of the fluorescence of 7-amino-4-methylcoumarin were registered as a function of each TEMPO derivative concentration. There were no deviations from a linearity in the Stern-Volmer plots (determined from both, steady-state and time-resolved measurements). The fluorescence quenching mechanism was found to be entirely collisional, what was additionally confirmed by the registration of Stern-Volmer plots at 5 temperatures ranging from 15 to 55 °C. Based on theoretical calculations of molecular radii and ionization potentials of all TEMPO derivatives the mechanism of electron transfer was rejected. The fluorescence quenching which was being studied seems to be diffusion-limited and caused by the increase of non-radiative processes, such as an internal conversion and an intersystem crossing. The Stern-Volmer quenching constants and bimolecular quenching constants were determined at the room temperature for all TEMPO derivatives studied. Among all TEMPO derivatives studied TEMPO-4-amino-4-carboxylic acid (TOAC) was found to be the most effective quencher of 7-amino-4-methylcoumarin fluorescence (kq for TOAC was approximately 1.5 higher than kq for other TEMPO compounds studied). The findings demonstrate the possibility of developing an analytical method for the quantitative determination of TOAC, which incorporation into membrane proteins may provide a direct detection of peptide backbone dynamics.

  6. Predicting the similarity between expressive performances of music from measurements of tempo and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmers, Renee

    2005-01-01

    Measurements of tempo and dynamics from audio files or MIDI data are frequently used to get insight into a performer's contribution to music. The measured variations in tempo and dynamics are often represented in different formats by different authors. Few systematic comparisons have been made between these representations. Moreover, it is unknown what data representation comes closest to subjective perception. The reported study tests the perceptual validity of existing data representations by comparing their ability to explain the subjective similarity between pairs of performances. In two experiments, 40 participants rated the similarity between performances of a Chopin prelude and a Mozart sonata. Models based on different representations of the tempo and dynamics of the performances were fitted to these similarity ratings. The results favor other data representations of performances than generally used, and imply that comparisons between performances are made perceptually in a different way than often assumed. For example, the best fit was obtained with models based on absolute tempo and absolute tempo times loudness, while conventional models based on normalized variations, or on correlations between tempo profiles and loudness profiles, did not explain the similarity ratings well. .

  7. Role of tempo entrainment in psychophysiological differentiation of happy and sad music?

    PubMed

    Khalfa, Stéphanie; Roy, Mathieu; Rainville, Pierre; Dalla Bella, Simone; Peretz, Isabelle

    2008-04-01

    Respiration rate allows to differentiate between happy and sad excerpts which may be attributable to entrainment of respiration to the rhythm or the tempo rather than to emotions [Etzel, J.A., Johnsen, E.L., Dickerson, J., Tranel, D., Adolphs, R., 2006. Cardiovascular and respiratory responses during musical mood induction. Int. J. Psychophysiol. 61(1), 57-69]. In order to test for this hypothesis, this study intended to verify whether fast and slow rhythm, and/or tempo alone are sufficient to induce differential physiological effects. Psychophysiological responses (electrodermal responses, facial muscles activity, blood pressure, heart and respiration rate) were then measured in fifty young adults listening to fast/happy and slow/sad music, and to two control versions of these excerpts created by removing pitch variations (rhythmic version) and both pitch and temporal variations (beat-alone). The results indicate that happy and sad music are significantly differentiated (happy>sad) by diastolic blood pressure, electrodermal activity, and zygomatic activity, while the fast and slow rhythmic and tempo control versions did not elicit such differentiations. In contrast, respiration rate was faster with stimuli presented at fast tempi relative to slow stimuli in the beat-alone condition. It was thus demonstrated that the psychophysiological happy/sad distinction requires the tonal variations and cannot be explained solely by entrainment to tempo and rhythm. The tempo entrainment exists in the tempo alone condition but our results suggest this effect may disappear when embedded in music or with rhythm. PMID:18234381

  8. An Evaluation of the El Centro de la Causa Library and Information Center: August 1973 through July 1974. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michael, Mary Ellen; Encarnacion, Leticia

    An evaluation of Chicago's El Centro de la Causa Library and Information Center was undertaken by the University of Illinois Library Research Center in 1974. Evaluation methods included: (1) a survey of user and nonuser characteristics and attitudes concerning library services; (2) a survey of the needs and information-seeking behavior of people…

  9. Sensorimotor synchronization with tempo-changing auditory sequences: Modeling temporal adaptation and anticipation.

    PubMed

    van der Steen, M C Marieke; Jacoby, Nori; Fairhurst, Merle T; Keller, Peter E

    2015-11-11

    The current study investigated the human ability to synchronize movements with event sequences containing continuous tempo changes. This capacity is evident, for example, in ensemble musicians who maintain precise interpersonal coordination while modulating the performance tempo for expressive purposes. Here we tested an ADaptation and Anticipation Model (ADAM) that was developed to account for such behavior by combining error correction processes (adaptation) with a predictive temporal extrapolation process (anticipation). While previous computational models of synchronization incorporate error correction, they do not account for prediction during tempo-changing behavior. The fit between behavioral data and computer simulations based on four versions of ADAM was assessed. These versions included a model with adaptation only, one in which adaptation and anticipation act in combination (error correction is applied on the basis of predicted tempo changes), and two models in which adaptation and anticipation were linked in a joint module that corrects for predicted discrepancies between the outcomes of adaptive and anticipatory processes. The behavioral experiment required participants to tap their finger in time with three auditory pacing sequences containing tempo changes that differed in the rate of change and the number of turning points. Behavioral results indicated that sensorimotor synchronization accuracy and precision, while generally high, decreased with increases in the rate of tempo change and number of turning points. Simulations and model-based parameter estimates showed that adaptation mechanisms alone could not fully explain the observed precision of sensorimotor synchronization. Including anticipation in the model increased the precision of simulated sensorimotor synchronization and improved the fit of model to behavioral data, especially when adaptation and anticipation mechanisms were linked via a joint module based on the notion of joint internal

  10. Anatomy of virgin and mature externae of Loxothylacus texanus, parasitic on the dark blue crab Callinectes rathbunae (Crustacea: Cirripedia: Rhizocephala: Sacculinidae).

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Fernando; Bortolini, José Luis; Høeg, Jens T

    2010-02-01

    Rhizocephalan parasites are dioecious organisms, in that one or several dwarf males are implanted into the external part of the female parasite soon after it emerges from the interior of the host animal. The structure of the female externa and its resident males is crucial for understanding both the reproductive biology and the taxonomy of these specialized parasites. We use scanning electron microscopy and histological methods to study the anatomy of juvenile and the mature externae of the rhizocephalan barnacle Loxothylacus texanus parasitizing the blue crab Callinectes rathbunae. We put emphasis on the implantation of males and the histology of the female reproductive organs. In the virgin externae, male cyprids attach around a cuticular hood covering the mantle aperture, which is partially blocked by a plug of cuticle so only trichogon larvae, not cyprids, can access the mantle cavity. This resembles the situation known from Sacculina carcini. The mature externa is characterized by a visceral mass that contains the ovary, paired colleteric glands, a single male receptacle, but paired receptacle ducts. The proximal attachment of the visceral mass is located at some distance from the basal stalk, as is characteristic for the genus Loxothylacus. The internal anatomy of the mature externa of L. texanus is in most features similar to that seen in other species of the Sacculinidae, which comprises the majority of rhizocephalan species. However, the single receptacle creates a situation where the two implanted males cannot be kept separate as in most other rhizocephalans, but pass through spermatogenesis in a common chamber. This may have unknown effects on the reproductive biology such as male-male competition. PMID:19714752

  11. The efficacy of an antiseptic and microbial anti-adhesive ear cleanser in dogs with otitis externa.

    PubMed

    Rème, C A; Pin, D; Collinot, C; Cadiergues, M C; Joyce, J A; Fontaine, J

    2006-01-01

    A new antimicrobial ear cleanser was evaluated for the treatment of bacterial and yeast ear infection in dogs. Forty-five dogs with erythemato-ceruminous or purulent otitis externa were randomly allocated to two treatment groups: reference ear cleanser (Epiotic, Virbac) or test ear cleanser (Epiotic Advanced, Virbac). Ear cleansing was performed twice daily for 2 weeks, and no other treatment was allowed. By week 2, clinical (exudate quantity, erythema, stenosis, excoriation, and odor) and discomfort (pain, ear scratching, and head shaking) scores were significantly decreased (P < .0001 for all) and no microbial overgrowth could be detected in 25 (64.1%) and 32 (68.1%) ears treated with Epiotic and Epiotic Advanced, respectively. The new pH-balanced, propylene glycol-free test ear cleanser, which incorporates microbial adhesin-blocking carbohydrates, proved as effective as the reference acidic formula. PMID:16598680

  12. Modeling Pubertal Timing and Tempo and Examining Links to Behavior Problems

    PubMed Central

    Beltz, Adriene M.; Corley, Robin P.; Bricker, Josh B.; Wadsworth, Sally J.; Berenbaum, Sheri A.

    2014-01-01

    Research on the role of puberty in adolescent psychological development requires attention to the meaning and measurement of pubertal development. Particular questions concern the utility of self report, the need for complex models to describe pubertal development, the psychological significance of pubertal timing versus tempo, and sex differences in the nature and psychological significance of pubertal development. We used longitudinal self-report data to model linear and logistic trajectories of pubertal development, and used timing and tempo estimates from these models, and from traditional approaches (age at menarche and time from onset of breast development to menarche), to predict psychological outcomes of internalizing and externalizing behavior problems, and early sexual activity. Participants (738 girls, 781 boys) reported annually from ages 9 through 15 on their pubertal development, and they and their parents reported on their behavior in mid-to-late adolescence and early adulthood. Self reports of pubertal development provided meaningful data for both boys and girls, producing good trajectories, and estimates of individuals’ pubertal timing and tempo. A logistic model best fit the group data. Pubertal timing was estimated to be earlier in the logistic compared to linear model, but linear, logistic, and traditional estimates of pubertal timing correlated highly with each other and similarly with psychological outcomes. Pubertal tempo was not consistently estimated, and associations of tempo with timing and with behavior were model dependent. Advances in modeling facilitate the study of some questions about pubertal development, but assumptions of the models affect their utility in psychological studies. PMID:25437757

  13. The appropriate or optimal tempo for music: a comparison between non-musicians and musicians.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Sandra; Watt, Roger

    2013-01-01

    Musicians have enhanced skills that result from intensive training. Whilst musicians show enhanced auditory capabilities (Kraus and Chandrasekaran, 2010 Nature Reviews Neuroscience 11 599-605), non-musicians demonstrate an ability to perform musical tasks (eg listening, dancing, and singing). Non-musicians can also undertake tasks that would normally be reserved for musicians. For example, non-musicians can perceive optimal tempi (ie an appropriate speed) for music (Quinn and Watt, 2006 Perception 35 267-280; Quinn and Watt, 2012 Perception 41 236-238; Quinn et al, 2012 Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 131 3595-3598). This suggests that formalised musical training is not a prerequisite for developing a sense of the tempo that sounds right for a melody. The current studies examine this issue and compare the tempo that musicians choose to perform unfamiliar melodies with the tempo that non-musicians perceive to be optimal for the same melodies. The results demonstrate that the perceived optimal tempo is similar to the performed tempo. PMID:24422251

  14. Synthesis of Isoxazoline/Cyclic Nitrone-Featured Methylenes Using Unsaturated Ketoximes: A Dual Role of TEMPO.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fei; Yang, Xiu-Long; Wu, Zhi-Wei; Han, Bing

    2016-04-01

    A novel, metal-free, and regioselective approach for the synthesis of isoxazoline/cyclic nitrone-featured methylenes has been developed by the reaction of readily accessible β,γ- and γ,δ-unsaturated ketoximes with TEMPO via tandem iminoxyl radical-promoted cyclization/TEMPO-mediated Cope-like elimination, respectively. This protocol utilizes commercially available TEMPO as the iminoxyl radical initiator as well as the β-hydrogen acceptor in the Cope-like elimination. PMID:26954339

  15. Practical Aerobic Oxidations of Alcohols and Amines with Homogeneous Cu/TEMPO and Related Catalyst Systems

    PubMed Central

    Ryland, Bradford L.; Stahl, Shannon S.

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol and amine oxidations are common reactions in laboratory and industrial synthesis of organic molecules. Aerobic oxidation methods have long been sought for these transformations, but few practical methods exist that offer advantages over traditional oxidation methods. Recently developed homogeneous Cu/TEMPO (TEMPO = 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidinyl-N-oxyl) and related catalyst systems appear to fill this void. The reactions exhibit high levels of chemoselectivity and broad functional-group tolerance, and they often operate efficiently at room temperature with ambient air as the oxidant. These advances, together with their historical context and recent applications, are highlighted in this minireview. PMID:25044821

  16. Copper/TEMPO-Catalyzed Aerobic Alcohol Oxidation: Mechanistic Assessment of Different Catalyst Systems.

    PubMed

    Hoover, Jessica M; Ryland, Bradford L; Stahl, Shannon S

    2013-11-01

    Combinations of homogeneous Cu salts and TEMPO have emerged as practical and efficient catalysts for the aerobic oxidation of alcohols. Several closely related catalyst systems have been reported, which differ in the identity of the solvent, the presence of 2,2'-bipyridine as a ligand, the identity of basic additives, and the oxidation state of the Cu source. These changes have a significant influence on the reaction rates, yields, and substrate scope. In this report, we probe the mechanistic basis for differences among four different Cu/TEMPO catalyst systems and elucidate the features that contribute to efficient oxidation of aliphatic alcohols. PMID:24558634

  17. Speed on the dance floor: Auditory and visual cues for musical tempo.

    PubMed

    London, Justin; Burger, Birgitta; Thompson, Marc; Toiviainen, Petri

    2016-02-01

    Musical tempo is most strongly associated with the rate of the beat or "tactus," which may be defined as the most prominent rhythmic periodicity present in the music, typically in a range of 1.67-2 Hz. However, other factors such as rhythmic density, mean rhythmic inter-onset interval, metrical (accentual) structure, and rhythmic complexity can affect perceived tempo (Drake, Gros, & Penel, 1999; London, 2011 Drake, Gros, & Penel, 1999; London, 2011). Visual information can also give rise to a perceived beat/tempo (Iversen, et al., 2015), and auditory and visual temporal cues can interact and mutually influence each other (Soto-Faraco & Kingstone, 2004; Spence, 2015). A five-part experiment was performed to assess the integration of auditory and visual information in judgments of musical tempo. Participants rated the speed of six classic R&B songs on a seven point scale while observing an animated figure dancing to them. Participants were presented with original and time-stretched (±5%) versions of each song in audio-only, audio+video (A+V), and video-only conditions. In some videos the animations were of spontaneous movements to the different time-stretched versions of each song, and in other videos the animations were of "vigorous" versus "relaxed" interpretations of the same auditory stimulus. Two main results were observed. First, in all conditions with audio, even though participants were able to correctly rank the original vs. time-stretched versions of each song, a song-specific tempo-anchoring effect was observed, such that sped-up versions of slower songs were judged to be faster than slowed-down versions of faster songs, even when their objective beat rates were the same. Second, when viewing a vigorous dancing figure in the A+V condition, participants gave faster tempo ratings than from the audio alone or when viewing the same audio with a relaxed dancing figure. The implications of this illusory tempo percept for cross-modal sensory integration and

  18. Copper/TEMPO-Catalyzed Aerobic Alcohol Oxidation: Mechanistic Assessment of Different Catalyst Systems

    PubMed Central

    Hoover, Jessica M.; Ryland, Bradford L.; Stahl, Shannon S.

    2013-01-01

    Combinations of homogeneous Cu salts and TEMPO have emerged as practical and efficient catalysts for the aerobic oxidation of alcohols. Several closely related catalyst systems have been reported, which differ in the identity of the solvent, the presence of 2,2′-bipyridine as a ligand, the identity of basic additives, and the oxidation state of the Cu source. These changes have a significant influence on the reaction rates, yields, and substrate scope. In this report, we probe the mechanistic basis for differences among four different Cu/TEMPO catalyst systems and elucidate the features that contribute to efficient oxidation of aliphatic alcohols. PMID:24558634

  19. A causa das estações do ano: modelos mentais

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Campos, J. A. S.; de Araujo, J. F. S.

    2003-08-01

    A década de 70 do século passado foi marcada pelo estudo das concepções alternativas que os alunos trazem para a sala de aula. A identificação destas concepções foi o ponto de partida para promover a mudança conceitual, onde as pré-concepções seriam trocadas pelas concepções científicas. Na década seguinte, surgiram muitas propostas de estratégias educacionais para facilitar esta troca, na sua maioria baseadas na idéia do conflito cognitivo, proposta por Piaget. Entretanto, os resultados pouco animadores conduziram à percepção de que a mudança conceitual é um processo mais complexo. Pelas idéias da Ciência Cognitiva, a mudança conceitual é uma mudança progressiva dos modelos mentais que o aluno tem sobre o mundo físico, através de enriquecimento e revisão. A causa das Estações do Ano é um tópico sobre o qual a maioria dos estudantes apresenta concepções alternativas. Os autores fizeram um levantamento sobre as pré-concepções encontradas em trabalhos sobre o tema (16 referências), procurando encontrar elementos comuns que indicassem a presença de modelos mentais específicos. As pré-concepções encontradas na literatura foram obtidas usando-se diversas metodologias (desde entrevistas clínicas até questionários de múltipla escolha) e envolvendo alunos e professores de diferentes regiões geográficas. A partir de uma análise aprofundada de cada trabalho, e utilizando-se a técnica das Redes Sistêmicas, chegou-se a conclusão que as diversas pré-concepções identificadas (em torno de 50), poderiam ser representadas por 6 modelos mentais, onde a explicação da causa das estações do ano tem um mecanismo causal responsável. Os mecanismos causais identificados foram: a dependência da distância, a dependência da orientação, a dependência conjunta da distância e orientação, a dependência da obstrução, a dependência da velocidade e a dependência da inclinação dos raios solares. Foram ainda identificadas

  20. Timing and tempo: Exploring the complex association between pubertal development and depression in African American and European American girls.

    PubMed

    Keenan, Kate; Culbert, Kristen M; Grimm, Kevin J; Hipwell, Alison E; Stepp, Stephanie D

    2014-11-01

    The relative contribution of pubertal timing and tempo to the development of depression has not been tested in a large, representative sample, nor has the interface among pubertal maturation, depression, and race been tested. Participants were a community-based sample of 2,450 girls from the Pittsburgh Girls Study who were interviewed annually from ages 9 to 17 years. Pubertal timing and tempo were characterized as a unitary construct and also separately for pubic hair and breast development using child and maternal report. Depression symptoms were assessed annually. African American girls had higher depression symptoms and progressed through puberty earlier, but at a slower tempo than European American girls. Girls with earlier timing had higher levels of depression symptoms at age 10 years. Slower tempo was associated with higher depression symptoms at age 10, and faster tempo was associated with increases in depression from ages 10 to 13. As well, race moderated the associations among timing, tempo, and depression symptoms, and the association between race and depression was partially mediated by pubertal timing and tempo. Pubertal timing and tempo and race contribute to the developmental course of depression from early to late adolescence. The pattern of association varies as a function of the developmental window within which depression is assessed. Thus, repeated measures of depression symptoms and puberty across the span of pubertal development are necessary for exploring the relative importance of dimensions of pubertal development to depression etiology. PMID:25314262

  1. Metal-ligand synergistic effects in the complex Ni(η(2)-TEMPO)2: synthesis, structures, and reactivity.

    PubMed

    Isrow, Derek; DeYonker, Nathan J; Koppaka, Anjaneyulu; Pellechia, Perry J; Webster, Charles Edwin; Captain, Burjor

    2013-12-16

    In the current investigation, reactions of the "bow-tie" Ni(η(2)-TEMPO)2 complex with an assortment of donor ligands have been characterized experimentally and computationally. While the Ni(η(2)-TEMPO)2 complex has trans-disposed TEMPO ligands, proton transfer from the C-H bond of alkyne substrates (phenylacetylene, acetylene, trimethylsilyl acetylene, and 1,4-diethynylbenzene) produce cis-disposed ligands of the form Ni(η(2)-TEMPO)(κ(1)-TEMPOH)(κ(1)-R). In the case of 1,4-diethynylbenzene, a two-stage reaction occurs. The initial product Ni(η(2)-TEMPO)(κ(1)-TEMPOH)[κ(1)-CC(C6H4)CCH] is formed first but can react further with another equivalent of Ni(η(2)-TEMPO)2 to form the bridged complex Ni(η(2)-TEMPO)(κ(1)-TEMPOH)[κ(1)-κ(1)-CC(C6H4)CC]Ni(η(2)-TEMPO)(κ(1)-TEMPOH). The corresponding reaction with acetylene, which could conceivably also yield a bridging complex, does not occur. Via density functional theory (DFT), addition mechanisms are proposed in order to rationalize thermodynamic and kinetic selectivity. Computations have also been used to probe the relative thermodynamic stabilities of the cis and trans addition products and are in accord with experimental results. Based upon the computational results and the geometry of the experimentally observed product, a trans-cis isomerization must occur. PMID:24262003

  2. Timing and tempo: Exploring the complex association between pubertal development and depression in African American and European American girls

    PubMed Central

    Keenan, Kate; Culbert, Kristen; Grimm, Kevin J.; Hipwell, Alison; Stepp, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    The relative contribution of pubertal timing and tempo to the development of depression has not been tested in a large, representative sample, nor has the interface among pubertal maturation, depression, and race. Participants were a community-based sample of 2,450 girls from the Pittsburgh Girls Study (PGS) who were interviewed annually from ages 9 to 17 years. Pubertal timing and tempo were characterized as a unitary construct and also separately for pubic hair and breast development using child and maternal report. Depression symptoms were assessed annually. African-American females had higher depression symptoms and progressed through puberty earlier, but at a slower tempo than European American girls. Girls with earlier timing had higher levels of depression symptoms at age 10 years. Slower tempo was associated with higher depression symptoms at age 10, and faster tempo was associated with increases in depression from ages 10 to 13. As well, race moderated the associations among timing, tempo, and depression symptoms, and the association between race and depression was partially mediated by pubertal timing and tempo. Pubertal timing and tempo and race contribute to the developmental course of depression from early to late adolescence. The pattern of association varies as a function of the developmental window within which depression is assessed. Thus, repeated measures of depression symptoms and puberty across the span of pubertal development are necessary for exploring the relative importance of dimensions of pubertal development to depression etiology. PMID:25314262

  3. Revealing spatio-spectral electroencephalographic dynamics of musical mode and tempo perception by independent component analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Music conveys emotion by manipulating musical structures, particularly musical mode- and tempo-impact. The neural correlates of musical mode and tempo perception revealed by electroencephalography (EEG) have not been adequately addressed in the literature. Method This study used independent component analysis (ICA) to systematically assess spatio-spectral EEG dynamics associated with the changes of musical mode and tempo. Results Empirical results showed that music with major mode augmented delta-band activity over the right sensorimotor cortex, suppressed theta activity over the superior parietal cortex, and moderately suppressed beta activity over the medial frontal cortex, compared to minor-mode music, whereas fast-tempo music engaged significant alpha suppression over the right sensorimotor cortex. Conclusion The resultant EEG brain sources were comparable with previous studies obtained by other neuroimaging modalities, such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and positron emission tomography (PET). In conjunction with advanced dry and mobile EEG technology, the EEG results might facilitate the translation from laboratory-oriented research to real-life applications for music therapy, training and entertainment in naturalistic environments. PMID:24581119

  4. Why Should Speech Rate (Tempo) Be Integrated into Pronunciation Teaching Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yurtbasi, Meti

    2015-01-01

    The pace of speech i.e. tempo can be varied to our mood of the moment. Fast speech can convey urgency, whereas slower speech can be used for emphasis. In public speaking, orators produce powerful effects by varying the loudness and pace of their speech. The juxtaposition of very loud and very quiet utterances is a device often used by those trying…

  5. Do Symptoms of Sluggish Cognitive Tempo in Children with ADHD Symptoms Represent Comorbid Internalizing Difficulties?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garner, Annie A.; Mrug, Sylvie; Hodgens, Bart; Patterson, Cryshelle

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Symptoms of sluggish cognitive tempo (SCT) are correlated with inattention and internalizing difficulties. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether symptoms of SCT reflect comorbid internalizing disorder with ADHD or a separate syndrome. Method: Using a clinical sample of youth evaluated for behavioral and learning…

  6. Factor Structure of a Sluggish Cognitive Tempo Scale in Clinically-Referred Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Lisa A.; Murphy-Bowman, Sarah C.; Pritchard, Alison E.; Tart-Zelvin, Ariana; Zabel, T. Andrew; Mahone, E. Mark

    2012-01-01

    "Sluggish cognitive tempo" (SCT) is a construct hypothesized to describe a constellation of behaviors that includes daydreaming, lethargy, drowsiness, difficulty sustaining attention, and underactivity. Although the construct has been inconsistently defined, measures of SCT have shown associations with symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity…

  7. Dimensions and Correlates of Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and Sluggish Cognitive Tempo

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garner, Annie A.; Marceaux, Janice; Mrug, Sylvie; Patterson, Cryshelle; Hodgens, Bart

    2010-01-01

    The present study examined Sluggish Cognitive Tempo (SCT) in relation to ADHD symptoms, clinical diagnosis, and multiple aspects of adjustment in a clinical sample. Parent and teacher reports were gathered for 322 children and adolescents evaluated for behavioral, emotional, and/or learning problems at a university clinic. Confirmatory factor…

  8. The Relationship between Sluggish Cognitive Tempo, Subtypes of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, and Anxiety Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skirbekk, Benedicte; Hansen, Berit Hjelde; Oerbeck, Beate; Kristensen, Hanne

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to examine the relationship between sluggish cognitive tempo (SCT), subtypes of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and anxiety disorders (AnxDs). One hundred and forty-one children (90 males, 51 females) aged 7-13 years were assigned to four groups, i.e., referred children with comorbid AnxDs…

  9. Evaluating the Utility of Sluggish Cognitive Tempo in Discriminating among "DSM-IV" ADHD Subtypes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrington, Kelly M.; Waldman, Irwin D.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the current study was to evaluate how the inclusion of 3 Sluggish Cognitive Tempo (SCT) symptoms in Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) diagnostic criteria influences the external validity of the ADHD subtypes. The sample comprised 228 children (166 boys, 62 girls) ranging in age from 5-18 years who were referred to…

  10. Developing a Measure of Sluggish Cognitive Tempo for Children: Content Validity, Factor Structure, and Reliability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penny, Ann Marie; Waschbusch, Daniel A.; Klein, Raymond M.; Corkum, Penny; Eskes, Gail

    2009-01-01

    Sluggish cognitive tempo (SCT) is a construct that some researchers believe may be extremely useful in understanding the inattentive subtype of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and may even help define a completely new disorder. However, the construct of SCT is as yet inadequately operationally or theoretically defined. The authors took…

  11. Validity of the Sluggish Cognitive Tempo, Inattention, and Hyperactivity Symptom Dimensions: Neuropsychological and Psychosocial Correlates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauermeister, Jose J.; Barkley, Russell A.; Bauermeister, Jose A.; Martinez, Jose V.; McBurnett, Keith

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the latent structure and validity of inattention, hyperactivity-impulsivity, and sluggish cognitive tempo (SCT) symptomatology. We evaluated mother and teacher ratings of ADHD and SCT symptoms in 140 Puerto Rican children (55.7% males), ages 6 to 11 years, via factor and regression analyses. A three-factor model (inattention,…

  12. Distinguishing Sluggish Cognitive Tempo from ADHD in Children and Adolescents: Executive Functioning, Impairment, and Comorbidity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barkley, Russell A.

    2013-01-01

    Controversy continues as to whether sluggish cognitive tempo (SCT) is a subtype of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or a distinct disorder. This study examined differences between these disorders in demographics, executive functioning (EF), impairment, and prior professional diagnoses to address the issue. There were 1,800 children…

  13. Structured and Unstructured Musical Contexts and Children's Ability to Demonstrate Tempo and Dynamic Contrasts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flowers, Patricia J.; Wapnick, Joel; Ramsey, LaShell

    1997-01-01

    Tested 5- through 9-year-old children in structured and unstructured contexts to determine their ability to demonstrate contrasts in tempo and dynamics using a synthesizer keyboard. Shows that they were able to demonstrate contrasts in loudness and duration. Reports further results based on varied environmental situations. (DSK)

  14. Effects of Excerpt Tempo and Duration on Musicians' Ratings of High-Level Piano Performances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wapnick, Joel; Ryan, Charlene; Campbell, Louise; Deek, Patricia; Lemire, Renata; Darrow, Alice-Ann

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine how judgments of solo performances recorded at an international piano competition might be affected by excerpt duration (20 versus 60 seconds) and tempo (slow versus fast). Musicians rated performances on six test items. Results indicated that piano majors rated slow excerpts higher than they rated fast…

  15. Sluggish Cognitive Tempo among Young Adolescents with ADHD: Relations to Mental Health, Academic, and Social Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Stephen P.; Langberg, Joshua M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study investigated the role of sluggish cognitive tempo (SCT) in relation to externalizing and internalizing mental health problems, academic functioning, and social functioning among young adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Method: In all, 57 youth ages 10 to 14 participated in the study. Parents…

  16. Effects of Style, Tempo, and Performing Medium on Children's Music Preference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeBlanc, Albert

    1981-01-01

    Fifth-graders listened to a tape incorporating fast and slow vocal and instrumental excerpts within the generic styles of rock/pop, country, older jazz, newer jazz, art music, and band music. A preference hierarchy emerged favoring the popular styles. Across pooled styles, faster tempos and instrumentals were slightly preferred. (Author/SJL)

  17. The speed of our mental soundtracks: Tracking the tempo of involuntary musical imagery in everyday life.

    PubMed

    Jakubowski, Kelly; Farrugia, Nicolas; Halpern, Andrea R; Sankarpandi, Sathish K; Stewart, Lauren

    2015-11-01

    The study of spontaneous and everyday cognitions is an area of rapidly growing interest. One of the most ubiquitous forms of spontaneous cognition is involuntary musical imagery (INMI), the involuntarily retrieved and repetitive mental replay of music. The present study introduced a novel method for capturing temporal features of INMI within a naturalistic setting. This method allowed for the investigation of two questions of interest to INMI researchers in a more objective way than previously possible, concerning (1) the precision of memory representations within INMI and (2) the interactions between INMI and concurrent affective state. Over the course of 4 days, INMI tempo was measured by asking participants to tap to the beat of their INMI with a wrist-worn accelerometer. Participants documented additional details regarding their INMI in a diary. Overall, the tempo of music within INMI was recalled from long-term memory in a highly veridical form, although with a regression to the mean for recalled tempo that parallels previous findings on voluntary musical imagery. A significant positive relationship was found between INMI tempo and subjective arousal, suggesting that INMI interacts with concurrent mood in a similar manner to perceived music. The results suggest several parallels between INMI and voluntary imagery, music perceptual processes, and other types of involuntary memories. PMID:26122757

  18. Effects of Movement, Tempo, and Gender on Steady Beat Performance of Kindergarten Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Paige

    2016-01-01

    The purposes of this research were to discover the effects of manual (hand) and pedal (foot) movements, tempo, and gender on steady beat accuracy. Participants (N = 119) consisted of male (n = 63) and female (n = 56) kindergarten students randomly divided into two groups, counterbalanced with regard to school, homeroom, and gender. Participants…

  19. Revisiting the Relationship between Exercise Heart Rate and Music Tempo Preference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karageorghis, Costas I.; Jones, Leighton; Priest, David-Lee; Akers, Rose I.; Clarke, Adam; Perry, Jennifer M.; Reddick, Benjamin T.; Bishop, Daniel T.; Lim, Harry B. T.

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated a hypothesized quartic relationship (meaning three inflection points) between exercise heart rate (HR) and preferred music tempo. Initial theoretical predictions suggested a positive linear relationship (Iwanaga, 1995a, 1995b); however, recent experimental work has shown that as exercise HR increases, step…

  20. Modeling Pubertal Timing and Tempo and Examining Links to Behavior Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beltz, Adriene M.; Corley, Robin P.; Bricker, Josh B.; Wadsworth, Sally J.; Berenbaum, Sheri A.

    2014-01-01

    Research on the role of puberty in adolescent psychological development requires attention to the meaning and measurement of pubertal development. Particular questions concern the utility of self-report, the need for complex models to describe pubertal development, the psychological significance of pubertal timing vs. tempo, and sex differences in…

  1. Long-Term Memory for Music: Infants Remember Tempo and Timbre

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trainor, Laurel J.; Wu, Luann; Tsang, Christine D.

    2004-01-01

    We show that infants' long-term memory representations for melodies are not just reduced to the structural features of relative pitches and durations, but contain surface or performance tempo- and timbre-specific information. Using a head turn preference procedure, we found that after a one week exposure to an old English folk song, infants…

  2. Effects of Articulation Styles on Perception of Modulated Tempos in Violin Excerpts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geringer, John M.; Madsen, Clifford K.; Macleod, Rebecca B.

    2007-01-01

    We investigated effects of legato, staccato and pizzicato articulation styles on the perception of modulated tempos. Seventy-two music majors served as participants. Two solo violin excerpts were chosen with contrasting rhythmic rates and were recorded in all three articulation styles. Examples were presented to listeners in three conditions of…

  3. Acute otitis externa in divers working in the North Sea: a microbiological survey of seven saturation dives.

    PubMed Central

    Alcock, S. R.

    1977-01-01

    Saturation diving is an important and widely used technique in the Offshore Oil Industry. During 1974-5 two saturation dives in the North Sea were terminated because of outbreaks of incapacitating otitis externa, and others were disrupted. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was consistently isolated from the ears of affected divers. Because complex work schedules were threatened seven subsequent dives were subjected to microbiological monitoring and control. Colonization of ear canal with P. aeruginosa or with other gram-negative bacilli occurred in 39 (67%) of the 58 divers studied, usually within 7 days of starting the dive. Data obtained by serotyping this isolations of P. aeruginosa suggested that a single infected diver may be the source of organisms which rapidly spread to his colleagues and throughout the living chambers, that the living chambers may constitute a reservoir of infection during and between dives, and that certain serotypes of P. aeruginosa are more likely than others to colonize the ear canal in the conditions of a saturation dive. The control measures used during the dives were only partially effective, but none of the divers suffered severe pain and all the dives were an operational success. PMID:405421

  4. Serum Malassezia-specific IgE in dogs with recurrent Malassezia otitis externa without concurrent skin disease.

    PubMed

    Layne, Elizabeth A; DeBoer, Douglas J

    2016-08-01

    Immediate-type hypersensitivity (ITH), mediated by IgE, to Malassezia pachydermatis is recognized in atopic dogs with recurrent yeast dermatitis and otitis externa (OE). Malassezia-associated OE commonly occurs in dogs without other signs of atopic dermatitis (AD). The aim of this study was to detect Malassezia-specific IgE in the sera of dogs with recurrent Malassezia OE without concurrent skin disease. Sera from healthy dogs were used for comparison. An FcεRIα-based ELISA was used to measure Malassezia-specific IgE. There was no significant difference between number of positive affected dogs (6/21, 29%) and number of positive unaffected dogs (15/86, 17%) (P=0.36). There was also no significant difference in the concentrations of Malassezia-specific IgE between the two groups (P=0.97). Malassezia-specific IgE did not distinguish between patient groups so, as with other canine allergens, serum IgE reactivity for Malassezia could not be used to differentiate between diseased and healthy patients. The presence of Malassezia-specific IgE in some of the affected dogs might indicate ITH to Malassezia in those dogs. Evaluation of ITH via intradermal test reactivity and response to allergen-specific immunotherapy might clarify the role of Malassezia-associated ITH in similarly affected dogs. PMID:27288851

  5. Structural, thermal and photo-physical data of azo-aromatic TEMPO derivatives before and after their grafting to polyolefins.

    PubMed

    Cicogna, Francesca; Domenichelli, Ilaria; Coiai, Serena; Bellina, Fabio; Lessi, Marco; Spiniello, Roberto; Passaglia, Elisa

    2016-03-01

    The data reported in this paper are complementary to the characterization of 4-(phenylazo)-benzoyl-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl radical (AzO-TEMPO) and of the 4-(2-thienylazo)-benzoyl-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl radical (ThiO-TEMPO) before and after their grafting to two polyethylene matrices (a copolymer ethylene/α-olefin (co-EO) and a high density polyethylene (HDPE)). Particularly the data reported in this paper confirm the structure (FT-IR analysis), the thermal (TGA and EPR) and the photo-physical (UV-vis) properties of the RO-TEMPO derivatives before and after their grafting. Herein, the FT-IR spectrum and TGA thermogram of ThiO-TEMPO were compared with those of AzO-TEMPO. Moreover, the superimposition of UV-vis spectra collected during the irradiation under 366 or 254 nm emitting lamp of AzO-TEMPO and ThiO-TEMPO in acetonitrile solution are reported. Finally, a complete DSC characterization of the functionalized POs is shown. DOI of original article: 〈http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.polymer.2015.11.018〉 [1]. PMID:26909368

  6. The effects of tempo and familiarity on children's affective interpretation of music.

    PubMed

    Mote, Jasmine

    2011-06-01

    When and how does one learn to associate emotion with music? This study attempted to address this issue by examining whether preschool children use tempo as a cue in determining whether a song is happy or sad. Instrumental versions of children's songs were played at different tempos to adults and children ages 3 to 5 years. Familiar and unfamiliar songs were used to examine whether familiarity affected children's identification of emotion in music. The results indicated that adults, 4 year olds and 5 year olds rated fast songs as significantly happier than slow songs. However, 3 year olds failed to rate fast songs differently than slow songs at above-chance levels. Familiarity did not significantly affect children's identification of happiness and sadness in music. PMID:21668112

  7. Location of TEMPO derivatives in micelles: subtle effect of the probe orientation.

    PubMed

    Aliaga, Carolina; Bravo-Moraga, Felipe; Gonzalez-Nilo, Danilo; Márquez, Sebastián; Lühr, Susan; Mena, Geraldine; Rezende, Marcos Caroli

    2016-02-01

    Partition coefficients for six 4-substituted derivatives of the 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxyl (TEMPO) derivatives in aqueous solutions of reduced Triton X-100 (RTX-100) were determined by measurements of the probe EPR g-factor and of the fluorescence quenching of pyrene by the radical in the micelle. The partition constant attained a maximum value and then decreased with increasing probe hydrophobicity. Simulation of the probes inside the micelle showed that this trend could be rationalized by a change in the orientation of the 4-substituted TEMPO derivatives with the increasing substituent chain-length. The use of the EPR g-factor for the determination of partition constants of radicals in micellar systems was thus validated as a reliable and sensitive method, capable of describing the probe orientation in its microenvironment. PMID:26304365

  8. Cellulose nanocrystals prepared via formic acid hydrolysis followed by TEMPO-mediated oxidation.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Xu, Wenyang; Kronlund, Dennis; Määttänen, Anni; Liu, Jun; Smått, Jan-Henrik; Peltonen, Jouko; Willför, Stefan; Mu, Xindong; Xu, Chunlin

    2015-11-20

    Cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) as a renewable and biodegradable nanomaterial have wide application value. In this work, CNCs were extracted from bleached chemical pulp using two stages of isolation (i.e. formic acid (FA) hydrolysis and 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-piperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO) mediated oxidation) under mild conditions. In the first stage, FA was used to remove hemicellulose, swell cellulose fibers, and release CNCs. The FA could be readily recovered and reused. In the second stage, the CNCs isolated by FA were further modified by TEMPO-mediated oxidation to increase the surface charge of CNCs. It was found that the modified CNCs with more ordered crystal structure and higher surface charge had better redispersibility and higher viscosity in aqueous phase. Therefore, the modified CNCs could be more effective when used as rheology modifier in the fields of water based coating, paint, food etc. PMID:26344319

  9. A novel approach for grafting of β-cyclodextrin onto wool via laccase/TEMPO oxidation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yuanyuan; Wang, Qiang; Yuan, Jiugang; Fan, Xuerong; Wang, Ping

    2016-11-20

    This study demonstrated a new enzymatic methodology to graft β-cyclodextrin onto wool. The primary hydroxyl groups in β-cyclodextrin were oxidized to aldehyde groups using laccase/2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO), which reacted with the amino groups of wool to form Schiff bases. The effects of treatment conditions (treatment temperature, laccase dosage, TEMPO dosage, treatment time) on the aldehyde and carboxyl contents in β-cyclodextrin were studied. FTIR spectrum of oxidized β-cyclodextrin showed the presence of aldehyde and carboxyl groups. Results of MALDI-TOF mass spectroscopy confirmed the coupling of β-cyclodextrin to tyrosine, which was used as a model compound for wool. ATR-FTIR spectroscopy of the grafted wool confirmed the presence of β-cyclodextrin in grafted wool and the formation of a Schiff base between β-cyclodextrin and wool. PMID:27561518

  10. Description and operating instructions: TEMPO high-voltage microwave driver, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research

    SciTech Connect

    Rohwein, G.J.

    1988-06-01

    This manual describes the TEMPO high-voltage (HV) microwave driver and provides operating procedures and general maintenance requirements. It is intended as a guide for experienced personnel familiar with operating HV pulsed power equipment and not as a detailed instruction for inexperienced operators. For safety reasons, inexperienced personnel should never attempt to charge and fire HV pulsed power equipment. Serious personnel injury and damage to the machine can result from improper operation. 13 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO) - Status and Potential Science Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chance, Kelly

    2016-05-01

    TEMPO is the first NASA Earth Venture Instrument, to launch between 2019 and 2021. It measures atmospheric pollution from Mexico City and Cuba to the Canadian oil sands, and from the Atlantic to the Pacific, hourly at high spatial resolution, ~ 10 km2. It measures the key elements of air pollution chemistry. Geostationary (GEO) measurements capture the variability in the diurnal cycle of emissions and chemistry at sub-urban scale to improve emission inventories, monitor population exposure, and enable emission-control strategies. TEMPO measures the UV/visible spectra to retrieve O3, NO2, SO2, H2 CO, C2 H2 O2, H2 O, aerosols, cloud parameters, and UVB radiation. It tracks aerosol loading. It provides near-real-time air quality products. TEMPO is the North American component of the global geostationary constellation for pollution monitoring, with the European Sentinel-4 and the Korean GEMS. TEMPO studies may include: Solar-induced fluorescence from chlorophyll over land and in the ocean to study tropical dynamics, primary productivity, carbon uptake, to detect red tides, and to study phytoplankton; Measurements of stratospheric intrusions that cause air quality exceedances; Measurements at peaks in vehicle travel to capture the variability in emissions from mobile sources; Measurements of thunderstorm activity, including outflow regions to better quantify lightning NOx and O3 production; Cropland measurements follow the temporal evolution of emissions after fertilizer application and from rain-induced emissions from semi-arid soils; Measurements investigate the chemical processing of primary fire emissions and the secondary formation of VOCs and ozone; Measurements examine ocean halogen emissions and their impact on the oxidizing capacity of coastal environments; Spectra of nighttime lights are markers for human activity, energy conservation, and compliance with outdoor lighting standards intended to reduce light pollution.

  12. Analysis of fluorescence quenching of coumarin derivatives by 4-hydroxy-TEMPO in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Żamojć, Krzysztof; Wiczk, Wiesław; Zaborowski, Bartłomiej; Jacewicz, Dagmara; Chmurzyński, Lech

    2014-05-01

    The fluorescence quenching of different coumarin derivatives (7-hydroxy-4-methylcoumarin, 5,7-dimethoxycoumarin, 7-amino-4-methyl-3-coumarinylacetic acid, 7-ethoxy-4-methylcoumarin, 7-methoxycoumarin, 7-hydroxycoumarin, 7-hydroxy-4-methyl-3-coumarinylacetic acid and 7-amino-4-methylcoumarin) by 4-hydroxy-TEMPO in aqueous solutions at the room temperature was studied with the use of UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy as well as a steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. In order to understand the mechanism of quenching the absorption and fluorescence emission spectra of all coumarins along with fluorescence decays were recorded under the action of 4-hydroxy-TEMPO. The Stern-Volmer plots (both from time-averaged and time-resolved measurements) displayed no positive (upward) deviation from a linearity. The fluorescence quenching mechanism was found to be entirely dynamic, what was additionally confirmed by the registration of Stern-Volmer plots at different temperatures. The Stern-Volmer quenching constants and bimolecular quenching rate constants were obtained for all coumarins studied at the room temperature. The findings demonstrate the possibility of developing an analytical method for the quantitative determination of the free radicals' scavenger, 4-hydroxy-TEMPO. PMID:24337873

  13. Tempo and mode in fossil molluscs: Investigating organism-environment interactions, species, and speciation

    SciTech Connect

    Geary, D.H. )

    1992-01-01

    After 20 years of investigation into the tempo and mode of species-level change in the fossil record, it is clear that both punctuated equilibrium and phyletic gradualism occur, as do a variety of intermediate patterns. Important questions regarding the maintenance and diversification of species remain, however. The author documents a variety of evolutionary patterns from gastropods and bivalves, and uses these to discuss two basic issues: environment-organism interactions over time, and the importance of information on geographic variation. The tempo of morphological change is an expression of the interaction of organisms and their environment. The initial over which new species appear may be a geologic instant'' (Melanopsis gastropods), or may last 10[sup 4]--10[sup 5] years (Prunum gastropods), or 10[sup 6] years (Melanopsis). This wide range of intervals indicates a variety of tempos of environmental change, and/or different kinds of organismal responses. Analysis of geographic variation is of critical importance in understanding species and speciation, yet is lacking in many paleontological studies. An example of the utility of geographic information is a study of the muricid gastropod Acanthina, which demonstrates how a geographically localized form may spread through a species range. Another example involves a species of Pleuriocardia in stasis: geographic variation among roughly correlative samples greatly exceeds long-term temporal variation. Considerations of the mechanisms for stasis and change must take into account such intraspecific variation.

  14. One-sided surface modification of cellulose fabric by printing a modified TEMPO-mediated oxidant.

    PubMed

    Fitz-Binder, Christa; Bechtold, Thomas

    2014-06-15

    One-sided surface oxidation of lyocell type cellulose fabric can be achieved by use of a modified TEMPO-mediated oxidation system. A borate-based buffer was used to maintain stable pH conditions and screen printing was applied to achieve oxidation on the fabric surface only. To formulate an applicable procedure, the TEMPO/NaBr/NaOCl system was split into two treatment steps: firstly, the fabric was impregnated with a buffered TEMPO/NaBr solution and dried, then a thickened NaOCl paste was printed on the fabric. FTIR-ATR spectra and methylene blue sorption experiments demonstrated successful modification on the printed side of the fabric. Substantial increases in carboxylic group content and water retention value were observed. The higher concentration of carboxylic groups on the fabric surface also led to a localised increase in binding capacity for Ca(2+)-ions. This new concept permits controlled oxidation of cellulose surfaces by printing techniques. PMID:24721061

  15. Photodissociation of TEMPO-modified peptides: new approaches to radical-directed dissociation of biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Marshall, David L; Hansen, Christopher S; Trevitt, Adam J; Oh, Han Bin; Blanksby, Stephen J

    2014-03-14

    Radical-directed dissociation of gas phase ions is emerging as a powerful and complementary alternative to traditional tandem mass spectrometric techniques for biomolecular structural analysis. Previous studies have identified that coupling of 2-[(2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-1-oxyl)methyl]benzoic acid (TEMPO-Bz) to the N-terminus of a peptide introduces a labile oxygen-carbon bond that can be selectively activated upon collisional activation to produce a radical ion. Here we demonstrate that structurally-defined peptide radical ions can also be generated upon UV laser photodissociation of the same TEMPO-Bz derivatives in a linear ion-trap mass spectrometer. When subjected to further mass spectrometric analyses, the radical ions formed by a single laser pulse undergo identical dissociations as those formed by collisional activation of the same precursor ion, and can thus be used to derive molecular structure. Mapping the initial radical formation process as a function of photon energy by photodissociation action spectroscopy reveals that photoproduct formation is selective but occurs only in modest yield across the wavelength range (300-220 nm), with the photoproduct yield maximised between 235 and 225 nm. Based on the analysis of a set of model compounds, structural modifications to the TEMPO-Bz derivative are suggested to optimise radical photoproduct yield. Future development of such probes offers the advantage of increased sensitivity and selectivity for radical-directed dissociation. PMID:24473158

  16. Patient safety and the control of time in primary care: A review of the French tempos framework by the LINNEAUS collaboration on patient safety in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Brami, Jean; Amalberti, René; Wensing, Michel

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: The tempos framework provides GPs with a flexible and practical guide to reflect on their organization and practices in the analysis of adverse events and supplement existing classification systems. The tempos framework specifies five timescales that need to be managed by physicians: the disease's tempo (unexpected rapid changes, slow reaction to treatment); the office's tempo (day-to-day agenda and interruptions); the patient's tempo (time to express symptoms, compliance, and emotion); the system's tempo (time for appointments, exams, and feedback); and the time to access to knowledge. Objective: This paper reviews the tempos framework and two studies that underpin its conceptual development. Methods: Two databases were used. Results: The use of the framework as a mechanism for analysing insurance claims is described. A comparison of using the tempos framework and standard patient safety classifications for analysing insurance claims is also described and showed that the concordance among coders was better for the tempos framework. The tempos framework fits closely with key principles of general practice and has potentially high relevance for analysing a patient's journey and continuity of care. The tempos framework seems most useful for GPs when analysing adverse events in their practice. Conclusion: Further work needs to be done to assess its generalizability and to formally assess its validity and reliability. PMID:26339836

  17. Comparison of Boric Acid and Combination Drug of Polymyxin, Neomycin and Hydrocortisone (polymyxin NH) in the Treatment of Acute Otitis Externa

    PubMed Central

    Moeini, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Acute otitis externa is an inflammation of the external auditory canal known as "swimmer’s ear". Direct costs including medical treatment, painkillers, antibiotics, steroids or both and indirect costs are also remarkable. Aim The aim of this study was to compare the effect of boric acid and polymyxin, neomycin and hydrocortisone composition in the treatment of acute otitis externa. Materials and Methods This randomized clinical trial was carried out on 80 patients aged more than 17-year-old who were referred to Kashani hospital clinic with a diagnosis of acute otitis externa by otolaryngologist. The patients were randomly allocated to two groups (A: Boric acid and B: polymyxin NH ear drops) and Painkiller was prescribed and administered orally for all patients and in the presence of fever, cellulitis around the ears and neck adenopathy, broad-spectrum systemic antibiotics were used besides topical treatment. Symptoms of patients who were evaluated by a physician includes pain, discharge from the ear, swelling of the ear canal, auricle swelling, tenderness, and ear itching. In addition, pain was evaluated in patients and was recorded by Macgill Pain Questionnaire, in the first, third, seventh and tenth days. Results Results showed that itching on third day (p=0.007) and swelling of the ear canal in the examination of the third day (p=0.006) and the seventh day (p=0.001) in the polymyxin NH group was more than those of boric acid group. Overall mean pain based on McGill questionnaire was 11.10±1.49 in boric acid group in the examination on the first day and was 4.05±0.22 in the examination on the tenth day and in the polymyxin NH group, it was 10.9±0.99 on the first day and 4.20±0.40 on the tenth day. In both groups, pain relief was the same and there was no significant difference between two groups (p=0.075). Conclusion The findings of this study showed slight differences in the effectiveness of the boric acid drug and combination of polymyxin

  18. Tempo, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cannon, Michael, Ed.

    2000-01-01

    Each of the four issues of the newsletter of the Texas Association for the Gifted focuses on a theme: leadership, evaluation and assessment, curriculum issues, and accountability issues. Issues usually contain theme-related major articles, columns by the Association's president and executive director, a column examining related research, answers…

  19. Tempo, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cannon, Michael, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This document presents four issues of the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented's quarterly publication, each of which focused on a particular theme: (1) instructional grouping options; (2) humanities and gifted students; (3) math and science; and (4) a 25th anniversary issue, "Silver Legacy: Shining on the Future for Gifted Youth." Each…

  20. Tempo, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cannon, Michael, Ed.

    2001-01-01

    Each of the four issues of the newsletter of the Texas Association for the Gifted and Talented focus on a theme: guidance and counseling, continuing options for gifted learners, early childhood gifted, and gifted students in the global community. Issues usually contain theme-related major articles, columns by the Association's president and…

  1. Nap environment control considering respiration rate and music tempo by using sensor agent robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakaso, Sayaka; Mita, Akira

    2015-03-01

    We propose a system that controls a nap environment considering respiration rates and music tempo by using a sensor agent robot. The proposed system consists of two sub-systems. The first sub-system measures respiration rates using optical flow. We conducted preparatory experiments to verify the accuracy of this sub-system. The experimental results showed that this sub-system can measure the respiration rates accurately despite several positional relationships. It was also shown that the accuracy could be affected by clothes, movements and light. The second sub-system we constructed was the music play sub-system that chooses music with the certain tempo corresponding to the respiration rates measured by the first sub-system. We conducted verification experiments to verify the effectiveness of this music play sub-system. The experimental results showed the effectiveness of varying music tempo based on the respiration rates in taking a nap. We also demonstrated this system in a real environment; a subject entered into the room being followed by ebioNα. When the subject was considered sleeping, ebioNα started measuring respiration rates, controlling music based on the respiration rates. As a result, we showed that this system could be realized. As a next step, we would like to improve this system to a nap environment control system to be used in offices. To realize this, we need to update the first sub-system measuring respiration rates by removing disturbances. We also need to upgrade music play sub-system considering the numbers of tunes, the kinds of music and time to change music.

  2. Specific oxidation pattern of soluble starch with TEMPO-NaBr-NaClO system.

    PubMed

    Hao, Jie; Lu, Jiaojiao; Xu, Naiyu; Linhardt, Robert J; Zhang, Zhenqing

    2016-08-01

    Oxidized starch, one of the most important starch derivatives, has many different properties and applications. Currently, there are two ways to produce oxidized starch, through specific and nonspecific oxidation. Specific oxidation using the stable nitroxyl radical, 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl preparidinloxy (TEMPO), with NaBr and NaClO can produce oxidized starches with different properties under good quality control. In the current study, we examine the products of specifically oxidized starch. As the amount of oxidant and the temperature, two critical factors impacting the oxidation of starch were thoroughly investigated. Analysis of the molecular weight (MW), degree of oxidization (DO) and the detailed structures of corresponding products was accomplished using gel permeation chromatography with multi-angle laser light scattering (GPC-MALLS), infrared (IR) spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and quadrapole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (Q/TOF-MS). According to the analytical results, the oxidation patterns of starch treated with specific oxidant TEMPO-NaBr-NaClO were established. When high amounts of oxidant was applied, more glucose residues within starch were oxidized to glucuronic acids (higher DO) and substantial degradation to starch oligosaccharides was observed. By selecting a reaction temperature of 25°C a high DO could be obtained for a given amount of oxidant. The reducing end sugar residue within oxidized starch was itself oxidized and ring opened in all TEMPO-NaBr-NaClO reactions. Furthermore, extra oxidant generated additional novel structures in the reducing end residues of some products, particularly in low temperature reactions. PMID:27112871

  3. Transparent bionanocomposite films based on chitosan and TEMPO-oxidized cellulose nanofibers with enhanced mechanical and barrier properties.

    PubMed

    Soni, Bhawna; Hassan, El Barbary; Schilling, M Wes; Mahmoud, Barakat

    2016-10-20

    The development of biobased active films for use in food packaging is increasing due to low cost, environmental appeal, renewability and availability. The objective of this research was to develop an effective and complete green approach for the production of bionanocomposite films with enhanced mechanical and barrier properties. This was accomplished by incorporating TEMPO-oxidized cellulose nanofibers (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl radical) into a chitosan matrix. An aqueous suspension of chitosan (100-75wt%), sorbitol (25wt%) and TEMPO-oxidized cellulose nanofibers (TEMPO-CNFs, 0-25wt%) were cast in an oven at 40°C for 2-4days. Films were preconditioned at 25°C and 50% RH for characterization. The surface morphology of the films was revealed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The thermal properties and crystal structure of the films were evaluated by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA-DTG) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Incorporation of TEMPO-CNFs enhanced the mechanical strength of the films due to the high aspect ratio (3-20nm width, and 10-100nm length) of TEMPO-CNFs and strong interactions with the chitosan matrix. Oxygen and water vapor transmission rates for films that are prepared with chitosan and TEMPO-CNFs (15-25wt%) were significantly reduced. Furthermore, these bionanocomposite films had good thermal stability. Use of TEMPO-CNFs in this method makes it possible to produce bionanocomposite films that are flexible, transparent, and thus have potential in food packaging applications. PMID:27474625

  4. High prevalence of Fluoroquinolone- and Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius isolates from canine pyoderma and otitis externa in veterinary teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jong-Hyun; Yoon, Jang W; Lee, So-Young; Park, Hee-Myung

    2010-04-01

    Recently, a total of 74 Staphylococcus pseudintermedius isolates were collected from clinical cases of canine pyoderma and otitis externa in Korea. In this study, we examined in vitro fluoroquinolone resistance among those isolates using a standard disk diffusion technique. The results demonstrated that approximately 18.9% to 27.0% of the isolates possessed bacterial resistance to both veterinary- and human-licensed fluoroquinolones except one isolate, including moxifloxacin (18.9% resistance), levofloxacin (20.3% resistance), ofloxacin (24.3% resistance), ciprofloxacin (25.7% resistance), and enrofloxacin (27.0% resistance). Most surprisingly, 14 out of 74 (18.9%) isolates were resistant to all the five fluoroquinolones evaluated. Moreover, a PCR detection of the methicillin resistance gene (mecA) among the 74 isolates revealed that 13 out of 25 (52.0%) mecA-positive isolates, but only 7 out of 49 (14.3%) mecA-negative isolates, were resistant to one or more fluoroquinones. Taken together, our results imply that bacterial resistance to both veterinary- and human-use fluoroquinolones becomes prevalent among the S. pseudintermedius isolates from canine pyoderma and otitis externa in Korea as well as that the high prevalence of the mecA-positive S. pseudintermedius isolates carrying multiple fluoroquinolone resistance could be a potential public health problem. PMID:20467256

  5. Resection of sphenoidal crest, orbit and infratemporal fossa communicative meningioma through fronto-tempo-preauricular approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yue; Song, Xueming; An, Yihua; Hu, Shaoshan; Shi, Huaizhang; Wu, Huailan; Yang, Guoming; Cao, Xiangyi

    1999-09-01

    We reported our experience using diode laser under microscope to resect a sphenoidal crest, orbit and infratemporal fossa communicative meningioma through fronto-tempo-preauricular approach. We used contacting, un-contacting and inserting methods and the power was in the range of 5 - 30 watt. The tumor was totally removed and the patient received radiotherapy post- operation. Follow up showed that the patient survived for two years after operation. The result showed that combination of laser application during surgery and radiotherapy post-operation was an effective method to delay or prevent tumor recurrence.

  6. Investigation of Method for Changing Impression of Musical Piece by Changing its Tempo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukumoto, Makoto; Okamatsu, Keita; Matsuo, Kazuhisa

    We propose a simple method that changes impression of musical piece by changing its tempo and investigate psycho-physiological effects of the method with listening experiment. In the experiment, 8 subjects listened same musical pieces with various tempi, and analysis of heartbeat and Semantic-Differential method were used. In 6 out of 10 adjective pairs, inverted-U shapes were observed, and peak tempi of them were different. Moreover, “relaxed” evaluation might be related to listener's heart rate in rest. These results suggest possibility of constructing novel media player that changes impression of musical piece.

  7. An exploration of heart rate response to differing music rhythm and tempos.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Ariany G; Guida, Heraldo L; Antônio, Ana Márcia Dos S; Marcomini, Renata S; Fontes, Anne M G G; Carlos de Abreu, Luiz; Roque, Adriano L; Silva, Sidney B; Raimundo, Rodrigo D; Ferreira, Celso; Valenti, Vitor E

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate acute cardiac response and heart rate variability (HRV) when listening to differing forms of music. Eleven healthy men aged between 18 and 25 years old were included in the study. HRV was recorded at rest for ten minutes with no music, then were asked to listen to classical baroque or heavy metal music for a period of 20 min. It was noted that heart rate variability did not affect HRV indices for time and frequency. In conclusion, music with different tempos does not influence cardiac autonomic regulation in men. However more studies are suggested to explore this topic in greater detail. PMID:24767959

  8. Malignant otitis externa

    MedlinePlus

    ... destroy the bones. The infection may affect the cranial nerves, brain, or other parts of the body if ... nervous system (neurological) exam may show that the cranial nerves are affected. If there is any drainage, the ...

  9. Unidirectional adaptation in tempo in pairs of chimpanzees during simultaneous tapping movement: an examination under face-to-face setup.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lira; Tomonaga, Masaki

    2016-04-01

    Many studies have reported a spontaneous nature to synchronized movement in humans and in non-human primates. However, it is not yet clear whether individuals mutually adapt their movement to each other or whether one individual significantly changes to synchronize with the other. In the current study, we examined a directionality of the tempo adaptation to understand an introductive process of interactional synchrony in pairs of chimpanzees. Four pairs, consisting of five female chimpanzees, produced a finger-tapping movement under a face-to-face experimental setup where both auditory and visual cues of the partner's movement were available. Two test conditions were prepared: alone and paired. An analysis of the tapping tempo depending on condition showed that only one chimpanzee in each pair significantly changed their tapping tempo in the direction of the partner's tapping tempo in the paired condition compared with the alone condition. The current study demonstrated that unidirectional adaptation in tempo occurs in pairs of chimpanzees when they simultaneously produce the tapping movement under auditory and visual interaction. PMID:26795540

  10. Individual differences in the biomechanical effect of loudness and tempo on upper-limb movements during repetitive piano keystrokes.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Shinichi; Aoki, Tomoko; Nakahara, Hidehiro; Kinoshita, Hiroshi

    2012-02-01

    The present study addressed the effect of loudness and tempo on kinematics and muscular activities of the upper extremity during repetitive piano keystrokes. Eighteen pianists with professional music education struck two keys simultaneously and repetitively with a combination of four loudness levels and four tempi. The results demonstrated a significant interaction effect of loudness and tempo on peak angular velocity for the shoulder, elbow, wrist and finger joints, mean muscular activity for the corresponding flexors and extensors, and their co-activation level. The interaction effect indicated greater increases with tempo when eliciting louder tones for all joints and muscles except for the elbow velocity showing a greater decrease with tempo. Multiple-regression analysis and K-means clustering further revealed that 18 pianists were categorized into three clusters with different interaction effects on joint kinematics. These clusters were characterized by either an elbow-velocity decrease and a finger-velocity increase, a finger-velocity decrease with increases in shoulder and wrist velocities, or a large elbow-velocity decrease with a shoulder-velocity increase when increasing both loudness and tempo. Furthermore, the muscular load considerably differed across the clusters. These findings provide information to determine muscles with the greatest potential risk of playing-related disorders based on movement characteristics of individual pianists. PMID:21816497

  11. Human Brain Basis of Musical Rhythm Perception: Common and Distinct Neural Substrates for Meter, Tempo, and Pattern

    PubMed Central

    Thaut, Michael H.; Trimarchi, Pietro Davide; Parsons, Lawrence M.

    2014-01-01

    Rhythm as the time structure of music is composed of distinct temporal components such as pattern, meter, and tempo. Each feature requires different computational processes: meter involves representing repeating cycles of strong and weak beats; pattern involves representing intervals at each local time point which vary in length across segments and are linked hierarchically; and tempo requires representing frequency rates of underlying pulse structures. We explored whether distinct rhythmic elements engage different neural mechanisms by recording brain activity of adult musicians and non-musicians with positron emission tomography (PET) as they made covert same-different discriminations of (a) pairs of rhythmic, monotonic tone sequences representing changes in pattern, tempo, and meter, and (b) pairs of isochronous melodies. Common to pattern, meter, and tempo tasks were focal activities in right, or bilateral, areas of frontal, cingulate, parietal, prefrontal, temporal, and cerebellar cortices. Meter processing alone activated areas in right prefrontal and inferior frontal cortex associated with more cognitive and abstract representations. Pattern processing alone recruited right cortical areas involved in different kinds of auditory processing. Tempo processing alone engaged mechanisms subserving somatosensory and premotor information (e.g., posterior insula, postcentral gyrus). Melody produced activity different from the rhythm conditions (e.g., right anterior insula and various cerebellar areas). These exploratory findings suggest the outlines of some distinct neural components underlying the components of rhythmic structure. PMID:24961770

  12. Human brain basis of musical rhythm perception: common and distinct neural substrates for meter, tempo, and pattern.

    PubMed

    Thaut, Michael H; Trimarchi, Pietro Davide; Parsons, Lawrence M

    2014-01-01

    Rhythm as the time structure of music is composed of distinct temporal components such as pattern, meter, and tempo. Each feature requires different computational processes: meter involves representing repeating cycles of strong and weak beats; pattern involves representing intervals at each local time point which vary in length across segments and are linked hierarchically; and tempo requires representing frequency rates of underlying pulse structures. We explored whether distinct rhythmic elements engage different neural mechanisms by recording brain activity of adult musicians and non-musicians with positron emission tomography (PET) as they made covert same-different discriminations of (a) pairs of rhythmic, monotonic tone sequences representing changes in pattern, tempo, and meter, and (b) pairs of isochronous melodies. Common to pattern, meter, and tempo tasks were focal activities in right, or bilateral, areas of frontal, cingulate, parietal, prefrontal, temporal, and cerebellar cortices. Meter processing alone activated areas in right prefrontal and inferior frontal cortex associated with more cognitive and abstract representations. Pattern processing alone recruited right cortical areas involved in different kinds of auditory processing. Tempo processing alone engaged mechanisms subserving somatosensory and premotor information (e.g., posterior insula, postcentral gyrus). Melody produced activity different from the rhythm conditions (e.g., right anterior insula and various cerebellar areas). These exploratory findings suggest the outlines of some distinct neural components underlying the components of rhythmic structure. PMID:24961770

  13. Distribution of tempo-dichlorotriazine spin label on immunoglobulin molecule. Interpretation of ESR spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Nezlin, R.

    1986-03-05

    Spin label TEMPO-dichlorotriazine (DT) has been used previously for determination of the rotational relaxation times of immunoglobulin (Ig) molecules and evaluation of their flexibility. Well defined outer wide extrema as well as sharp inner extrema are characteristic for ESR spectra of spin labeled Ig molecules. Such patterns of the spectrum can be accounted for either by the existence of the spin label in two states, one corresponding to its rapid and another to its restricted rotation or by varying environments of the spin label located in different areas of the Ig molecule. To choose between these possibilities, the distribution of /sup 14/C-TEMPO-DT on human IgG1(k) was studied. The same amount of the label per mg of protein was found in H and L chains as well as in the Fab fragment, and a smaller amount in the pFc'. The label was detected in most of the L chain tryptic peptides. Thus, the spin label is distributed nearly uniformly on IgG molecule, which is due to the regular distribution of amino acid residues reacted with the spin label. ESR spectra can be interpreted as a sum of individual spectra.

  14. Intrasensory Redundancy Facilitates Infant Detection of Tempo: Extending Predictions of the Intersensory Redundancy Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Bahrick, Lorraine E.; Lickliter, Robert; Castellanos, Irina; Todd, James Torrence

    2015-01-01

    Research has demonstrated that intersensory redundancy (stimulation synchronized across multiple senses) is highly salient and facilitates processing of amodal properties in multimodal events, bootstrapping early perceptual development. The present study is the first to extend this central principle of the intersensory redundancy hypothesis (IRH) to certain types of intrasensory redundancy (stimulation synchronized within a single sense). Infants were habituated to videos of a toy hammer tapping silently (unimodal control), depicting intersensory redundancy (synchronized with a soundtrack) or intrasensory redundancy (synchronized with another visual event; light flashing or bat tapping). In Experiment 1, 2-month-olds showed both intersensory and intrasensory facilitation (with respect to the unimodal control) for detecting a change in tempo. However, intrasensory facilitation was found when the hammer was synchronized with the light flashing (different motion) but not with the bat tapping (same motion). Experiment 2 tested 3-month-olds using a somewhat easier tempo contrast. Results supported a similarity hypothesis: intrasensory redundancy between two dissimilar events was more effective than that between two similar events for promoting processing of amodal properties. These findings extend the IRH and indicate that in addition to intersensory redundancy, intrasensory redundancy between two synchronized dissimilar visual events is also effective in promoting perceptual processing of amodal event properties. PMID:26207101

  15. TEMPO-mediated oxidation on galactomannan: Gal/Man ratio and chain flexibility dependence.

    PubMed

    Sakakibara, Caroline Novak; Sierakowski, Maria Rita; Lucyszyn, Neoli; de Freitas, Rilton Alves

    2016-11-20

    Guar (GG) and locust bean (LBG) galactomannans (GMs) oxidation at C-6 was performed with catalyst TEMPO, in which the reaction progress was monitored by consume of NaOH solution. The products were characterized by spectroscopic analysis, infrared, and (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance, confirming the presence of aldehydes groups as intermediate of reaction to carboxylic acid. From high performance anion exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection Man/Gal molar ratio was determined and demonstrated a preference to oxidize Man during the reaction on both GMs, following a first order kinetics of oxidation. The comparative macromolecular behavior of native and oxidized GMs was obtained through the analysis by high performance size exclusion chromatography, and the persistence length (Lp) was 6nm and 4nm to native LBG and GG, respectively. A more accessible OH-6 at mannose residue in LBG could be related with a two times faster reaction than GG. The selective oxidation with catalyst TEMPO proved to be efficient to increase the flexibility of the GMs during oxidation. Short reaction time and β-elimination process were mainly observed to LBG, probably due to a more favorable oxidation access to the polysaccharide main chain. PMID:27561508

  16. Immediate Effects of Rhythmic Auditory Stimulation with Tempo Changes on Gait in Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Yuri; Kim, Young; Chung, Yijung

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of tempo changes in rhythmic auditory stimulation (RAS) on gait in stroke patients. [Subjects] Forty-one chronic stroke patients who had had a stroke with more than 6 months previously were recruited for this study. [Methods] All participants were asked to walk under 5 different conditions in random order: (1) no RAS (baseline); (2) baseline-matched RAS (0%); and (3) −10%, (4) +10%, and (5) +20% of the baseline. A GAITRite system was used to evaluate the spatial and temporal parameters of gait. [Results] Compared with under the RAS 0% conditions, the gait velocity, cadence, and stride length on the affected side were significantly decreased under the RAS −10% conditions. Gait velocity and cadence were significantly improved, but gait symmetry was significantly decreased under the RAS +10% and +20% conditions compared with under the RAS 0% conditions. [Conclusion] A faster RAS tempo significantly improved gait velocity and cadence, and applying RAS significantly improved the gait symmetry of stroke patients. PMID:24764615

  17. Disparate rates, differing fates: tempo and mode of evolution changed from the Precambrian to the Phanerozoic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schopf, J. W.

    1994-01-01

    Over the past quarter century, detailed genus- and species-level similarities in cellular morphology between described taxa of Precambrian microfossils and extant cyanobacteria have been noted and regarded as biologically and taxonomically significant by numerous workers world-wide. Such similarities are particularly well documented for members of the Oscillatoriaceae and Chroococcaceae, the two most abundant and widespread Precambrian cyanobacterial families. For species of two additional families, the Entophysalidaceae and Pleurocapsaceae, species-level morphologic similarities are supported by in-depth fossil-modern comparisons of environment, taphonomy, development, and behavior. Morphologically and probably physiologically as well, such cyanobacterial "living fossils" have exhibited an extraordinarily slow (hypobradytelic) rate of evolutionary change, evidently a result of the broad ecologic tolerance characteristic of many members of the group and a striking example of G. G. Simpson's [Simpson, G.G. (1944) Tempo and Mode in Evolution (Columbia Univ. Press, New York)] "rule of the survival of the relatively unspecialized." In both tempo and mode of evolution, much of the Precambrian history of life--that dominated by microscopic cyanobacteria and related prokaryotes--appears to have differed markedly from the more recent Phanerozoic evolution megascopic, horotelic, adaptationally specialized eukaryotes.

  18. When music tempo affects the temporal congruence between physical practice and motor imagery.

    PubMed

    Debarnot, Ursula; Guillot, Aymeric

    2014-06-01

    When people listen to music, they hear beat and a metrical structure in the rhythm; these perceived patterns enable coordination with the music. A clear correspondence between the tempo of actual movement (e.g., walking) and that of music has been demonstrated, but whether similar coordination occurs during motor imagery is unknown. Twenty participants walked naturally for 8m, either physically or mentally, while listening to slow and fast music, or not listening to anything at all (control condition). Executed and imagined walking times were recorded to assess the temporal congruence between physical practice (PP) and motor imagery (MI). Results showed a difference when comparing slow and fast time conditions, but each of these durations did not differ from soundless condition times, hence showing that body movement may not necessarily change in order to synchronize with music. However, the main finding revealed that the ability to achieve temporal congruence between PP and MI times was altered when listening to either slow or fast music. These data suggest that when physical movement is modulated with respect to the musical tempo, the MI efficacy of the corresponding movement may be affected by the rhythm of the music. Practical applications in sport are discussed as athletes frequently listen to music before competing while they mentally practice their movements to be performed. PMID:24681309

  19. Disparate rates, differing fates: tempo and mode of evolution changed from the Precambrian to the Phanerozoic.

    PubMed Central

    Schopf, J W

    1994-01-01

    Over the past quarter century, detailed genus- and species-level similarities in cellular morphology between described taxa of Precambrian microfossils and extant cyanobacteria have been noted and regarded as biologically and taxonomically significant by numerous workers world-wide. Such similarities are particularly well documented for members of the Oscillatoriaceae and Chroococcaceae, the two most abundant and widespread Precambrian cyanobacterial families. For species of two additional families, the Entophysalidaceae and Pleurocapsaceae, species-level morphologic similarities are supported by in-depth fossil-modern comparisons of environment, taphonomy, development, and behavior. Morphologically and probably physiologically as well, such cyanobacterial "living fossils" have exhibited an extraordinarily slow (hypobradytelic) rate of evolutionary change, evidently a result of the broad ecologic tolerance characteristic of many members of the group and a striking example of G. G. Simpson's [Simpson, G.G. (1944) Tempo and Mode in Evolution (Columbia Univ. Press, New York)] "rule of the survival of the relatively unspecialized." In both tempo and mode of evolution, much of the Precambrian history of life--that dominated by microscopic cyanobacteria and related prokaryotes--appears to have differed markedly from the more recent Phanerozoic evolution megascopic, horotelic, adaptationally specialized eukaryotes. Images PMID:8041691

  20. EPR spectroscopy applied to the study of the TEMPO mediated oxidation of nanocellulose.

    PubMed

    Buffa, Juan M; Grela, María Alejandra; Aranguren, Mirta I; Mucci, Verónica

    2016-01-20

    Two different methods of pH control were used in the synthesis of 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO) oxidized cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) and the reaction kinetics and degree of oxidation were investigated. In method I the media pH was controlled by addition of NaOH solution. The effect of the oxidant concentration (sodium hypochloride, NaClO) on the final degree of oxidation and crystallinity of the samples was investigated. Conditions for obtaining an optimum balance between high crystallinity and degree of oxidation were selected from those results. In method II, pH was fixed by using a buffer solution. Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy offered direct information of the decay of TEMPO concentration under these conditions. The kinetics of the reaction was determined, finding a direct correlation between these results and those corresponding to the decay of the NaClO concentration and the advance of the CNC degree of oxidation. Differences found between the two methods were analyzed. PMID:26572408

  1. TEMPO-oxidized Konjac glucomannan as appliance for the preparation of hard capsules.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuying; Zhao, Huiying; Liu, Xianwu; Li, Zusen; Liu, Bin; Wu, Jiande; Shi, Mengxuan; Norde, Willem; Li, Yuan

    2016-06-01

    TEMPO-oxidized Konjac glucomannan (OKGM) was developed as new material for preparing vegetarian hard capsules. OKGM of different degrees of oxidation: DO30%, DO50%, and DO80% were prepared to select optimum DO for capsule formation. FT-IR results proved that the primary alcohol groups on KGM were oxidized into carboxyl groups. XRD analysis suggested that TEMPO-oxidation decreased the crystallinity of KGM. DO80% was considered as the optimum candidate for capsule preparation owing to its superior solubility, transparency and reduced viscosity. The hydrophilicity of OKGM films, measured by contact angle measurement, increased with increasing DO. The elongation at break and tensile strength of the OKGM films enhanced with increasing DO. In vitro drug dissolution profile of OKGM capsules showed that the shell rupture time of DO80% capsule is about 5-10min, and 80% of the drugs were released within 30-45min. Thus DO80% OKGM was qualified to be used for gastric soluble hard capsules. PMID:27083368

  2. DFT studies on the mechanism of alcohol oxidation by the (bpy)Cu(I)-TEMPO/NMI catalytic system.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Lin; Li, Jie; Zhang, Qiancheng; Ma, Lisha; Yang, Jucai

    2015-04-28

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been performed to investigate the oxidation of alcohol to acetaldehyde, catalyzed by the (bpy)Cu(I)-TEMPO/NMI catalytic system. Three pathways (path A, path B and path C) are presented. Our calculations indicate that path B is the favourable pathway. In path B, the alcohol coordinating to the Cu(I) center provides a H atom to TEMPO to form TEMPOH. Another TEMPO then replaces TEMPOH to abstract the H atom from the Cα-H of the alcoholate (RCH2O(-)) to generate the aldehyde product. On the basis of the studied pathway, a possible mechanism is presented to explain the experimental observations. PMID:25799480

  3. First identification of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius strains among coagulase-positive staphylococci isolated from dogs with otitis externa in Trinidad, West Indies

    PubMed Central

    Dziva, Francis; Wint, Crystal; Auguste, Tennille; Heeraman, Carolyn; Dacon, Cherrelle; Yu, Priscilla; Koma, Lee M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Otitis externa is a common inflammatory ear disease in dogs caused by a variety of pathogens, and coagulase-positive staphylococci are frequently isolated from such infections. Objective To identify antimicrobial susceptibility profiles and methicillin-resistant strains among coagulase-positive staphylococci isolated from otitis externa in dogs. Methods A cross-sectional study was performed over 2 years on 114 client-owned dogs presented to the Veterinary Teaching Hospital with a primary complaint of ear infections. Swabs were obtained from both ears and cultured for staphylococci which were subsequently confirmed as coagulase-positive using rabbit plasma. Antimicrobial susceptibility assays were assessed on all isolates followed by subsequent genetic analysis for species identification and detection of the mecA gene. Results Sixty-five coagulase-positive staphylococci were isolated from 114 client-owned dogs. The isolates exhibited resistance against neomycin (58.5%), streptomycin (49.2%), penicillin (49.2%), polymyxin B (44.6%), tetracycline (36.9%), sulphamethoxazole/trimethoprim (33.8%), kanamycin (33.8%), doxycycline (32.3%), norfloxacin (23.1%), amoxicillin/clavulanate (20%), ciprofloxacin (20%), enrofloxacin (18.5%), gentamicin (16.9%), and cephalothin (9.2%). Forty (61.5%) of the isolates were resistant to at least three or more antimicrobials and 10 were sensitive to all. Using a multiplex polymerase chain reaction assay based on species-specific regions of the thermonuclease (nuc) gene, 38/65 (58.5%) isolates were classified as Staphylococcus aureus, 23/65 (35.4%) as S. pseudintermedius, 2/65 (3.1%) as S. intermedius, and 2/65 (3.1%) as S. schleiferi. Analysis for the mecA gene revealed two positive isolates of S. pseudintermedius which were oxacillin-resistant, representing a first report of such organisms in the Caribbean. Conclusion Despite the relatively high prevalence of multidrug-resistant coagulase-positive staphylococci in Trinidad

  4. Stable TEMPO and ABNO Catalyst Solutions for User-Friendly (bpy)Cu/Nitroxyl-Catalyzed Aerobic Alcohol Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Steves, Janelle E; Stahl, Shannon S

    2015-11-01

    Two solutions, one consisting of bpy/TEMPO/NMI and the other bpy/ABNO/NMI (bpy =2,2'-bipyridyl; TEMPO = 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine N-oxyl, ABNO = 9-azabicyclo[3.3.1]nonane N-oxyl; NMI = N-methylimidazole), in acetonitrile are shown to have good long-term stability (≥1 year) under air at 5 °C. The solutions may be combined in appropriate quantities with commercially available [Cu(MeCN)4]OTf to provide a convenient catalyst system for the aerobic oxidation of primary and secondary alcohols. PMID:26457658

  5. Continuous loudness response to acoustic intensity dynamics in melodies: effects of melodic contour, tempo, and tonality.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Kirk N; Stevens, Catherine J; Dean, Roger T; Bailes, Freya

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate perceived loudness change in response to melodies that increase (up-ramp) or decrease (down-ramp) in acoustic intensity, and the interaction with other musical factors such as melodic contour, tempo, and tonality (tonal/atonal). A within-subjects design manipulated direction of linear intensity change (up-ramp, down-ramp), melodic contour (ascending, descending), tempo, and tonality, using single ramp trials and paired ramp trials, where single up-ramps and down-ramps were assembled to create continuous up-ramp/down-ramp or down-ramp/up-ramp pairs. Twenty-nine (Exp 1) and thirty-six (Exp 2) participants rated loudness continuously in response to trials with monophonic 13-note piano melodies lasting either 6.4s or 12s. Linear correlation coefficients >.89 between loudness and time show that time-series loudness responses to dynamic up-ramp and down-ramp melodies are essentially linear across all melodies. Therefore, 'indirect' loudness change derived from the difference in loudness at the beginning and end points of the continuous response was calculated. Down-ramps were perceived to change significantly more in loudness than up-ramps in both tonalities and at a relatively slow tempo. Loudness change was also greater for down-ramps presented with a congruent descending melodic contour, relative to an incongruent pairing (down-ramp and ascending melodic contour). No differential effect of intensity ramp/melodic contour congruency was observed for up-ramps. In paired ramp trials assessing the possible impact of ramp context, loudness change in response to up-ramps was significantly greater when preceded by down-ramps, than when not preceded by another ramp. Ramp context did not affect down-ramp perception. The contribution to the fields of music perception and psychoacoustics are discussed in the context of real-time perception of music, principles of music composition, and performance of musical dynamics. PMID:24809252

  6. Transparent, conductive, and printable composites consisting of TEMPO-oxidized nanocellulose and carbon nanotube.

    PubMed

    Koga, Hirotaka; Saito, Tsuguyuki; Kitaoka, Takuya; Nogi, Masaya; Suganuma, Katsuaki; Isogai, Akira

    2013-04-01

    Ultrastrong, transparent, conductive and printable nanocomposites were successfully prepared by mixing single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO)-oxidized cellulose nanofibrils (TOCNs) with abundant sodium carboxyl groups on the crystalline nanocellulose surfaces. The surface-anionic cellulose nanofibrils had reinforcing and nanodispersing effects on the CNTs both in water used as the dispersed medium and in the dried composite film, providing highly conductive and printable nanocomposites with a small amount of CNTs. TOCNs are therefore expected as an effective flexible matrix that can be used as an alternative to conventional polymers for various electrical materials, when nanocomposited with CNTs and also graphene. Our findings provide a promising route to realize green and flexible electronics. PMID:23428212

  7. La relatività debole. La fisica dello spazio e del tempo senza paradossi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selleri, Franco

    2011-06-01

    Secondo Einstein e Poincaré la simultaneità di eventi che hanno luogo in punti diversi dello spazio può essere definita solo per convenzione. Dal punto di vista matematico si dimostra, quindi, che due diverse definizioni di simultaneità corrispondono a due diversi valori del coefficiente e1 della variabile spaziale x presente nelle trasformazioni di Lorentz. A partire da premesse normalmente accettate otterremo diverse dimostrazioni della necessità di reintrodurre il concetto di simultaneità assoluta. Le conseguenze cosmologiche della nuova struttura dello spazio e del tempo andranno contro la cosmologia del Big Bang. Inoltre, dopo questi risultati, il relativismo sopravviverà in una forma meno aspra ("relatività debole") perché risulter privo di quel campionario di paradossi portato dalla teoria della Relatività Speciale.

  8. Highly practical copper(I)/TEMPO catalyst system for chemoselective aerobic oxidation of primary alcohols.

    PubMed

    Hoover, Jessica M; Stahl, Shannon S

    2011-10-26

    Aerobic oxidation reactions have been the focus of considerable attention, but their use in mainstream organic chemistry has been constrained by limitations in their synthetic scope and by practical factors, such as the use of pure O(2) as the oxidant or complex catalyst synthesis. Here, we report a new (bpy)Cu(I)/TEMPO catalyst system that enables efficient and selective aerobic oxidation of a broad range of primary alcohols, including allylic, benzylic, and aliphatic derivatives, to the corresponding aldehydes using readily available reagents, at room temperature with ambient air as the oxidant. The catalyst system is compatible with a wide range of functional groups and the high selectivity for 1° alcohols enables selective oxidation of diols that lack protecting groups. PMID:21861488

  9. Simulation of existing gas-fuelled conventional steam power plant using Cycle Tempo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamel, M. S.; Abd Rahman, A.; Shamsuddin, A. H.

    2013-06-01

    Simulation of a 200 MW gas-fuelled conventional steam power plant located in Basra, Iraq was carried out. The thermodynamic performance of the considered power plant is estimated by a system simulation. A flow-sheet computer program, "Cycle-Tempo" is used for the study. The plant components and piping systems were considered and described in detail. The simulation results were verified against data gathered from the log sheet obtained from the station during its operation hours and good results were obtained. Operational factors like the stack exhaust temperature and excess air percentage were studied and discussed, as were environmental factors, such as ambient air temperature and water inlet temperature. In addition, detailed exergy losses were illustrated and describe the temperature profiles for the main plant components. The results prompted many suggestions for improvement of the plant performance.

  10. In situ growth of silver nanoparticles on TEMPO-oxidized jute fibers by microwave heating.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xinwang; Ding, Bin; Yu, Jianyong; Al-Deyab, Salem S

    2013-01-30

    Cellulose fibers deposited with metallic nanoparticles as one kind of renewable, biocompatible and antimicrobial nanomaterials evoke much interest because of their versatility in various applications. Herein, for the first time, a facile, simple and rapid method was developed to fabricate TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl radical) selectively oxidized jute fibers in situ deposited with silver nanoparticles in the absence of reducing reagents. The average size of silver nanoparticles deposited on the fibers is 50.0 ± 2.0 nm by microwave heating for 5 min and 90.0 ± 4.7 nm for 10 min heating sample, respectively. The versatile jute-silver nanoparticles nanocomposites with superior thermal stability and high crystallinity would be particularly useful for applications in the public health care and biomedical fields. PMID:23218337

  11. Melody recognition at fast and slow tempos: effects of age, experience, and familiarity.

    PubMed

    Dowling, W Jay; Bartlett, James C; Halpern, Andrea R; Andrews, W Melinda

    2008-04-01

    Eighty-one listeners defined by three age ranges (18-30, 31-59, and over 60 years) and three levels of musical experience performed an immediate recognition task requiring the detection of alterations in melodies. On each trial, a brief melody was presented, followed 5 sec later by a test stimulus that either was identical to the target or had two pitches changed, for a same-different judgment. Each melody pair was presented at 0.6 note/sec, 3.0 notes/sec, or 6.0 notes/sec. Performance was better with familiar melodies than with unfamiliar melodies. Overall performance declined slightly with age and improved substantially with increasing experience, in agreement with earlier results in an identification task. Tempo affected performance on familiar tunes (moderate was best), but not on unfamiliar tunes. We discuss these results in terms of theories of dynamic attending, cognitive slowing, and working memory in aging. PMID:18459260

  12. The road from Santa Rosalia: A faster tempo of evolution in tropical climates

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Shane; Keeling, Jeannette; Gillman, Len

    2006-01-01

    Using an appropriately designed and replicated study of a latitudinal influence on rates of evolution, we test the prediction by K. Rohde [(1992) Oikos 65, 514–527] that the tempo of molecular evolution in the tropics is greater than at higher latitudes. Consistent with this prediction we found tropical plant species had more than twice the rate of molecular evolution as closely related temperate congeners. Rohde’s climate-speciation hypothesis constitutes one explanation for the cause of that relationship. This hypothesis suggests that mutagenesis occurs more frequently as productivity and metabolic rates increase toward the equator. More rapid mutagenesis was then proposed as the mechanism that increases evolutionary tempo and rates of speciation. A second possible explanation is that faster rates of molecular evolution result from higher tropical speciation rates [e.g., Bromham, L. & Cardillo, M. (2003) J. Evol. Biol. 16, 200–207]. However, we found the relationship continued to hold for genera with the same number of, or more, species in temperate latitudes. This finding suggests that greater rates of speciation in the tropics do not cause higher rates of molecular evolution. A third explanation is that more rapid genetic drift might have occurred in smaller tropical species populations [Stevens, G. C. (1989) Am. Nat. 133, 240–256]. However, we targeted common species to limit the influence of genetic drift, and many of the tropical species we used, despite occurring in abundant populations, had much higher rates of molecular evolution. Nonetheless, this issue is not completely resolved by that precaution and requires further examination. PMID:16672371

  13. Surfactant-free emulsions stabilized by tempo-oxidized bacterial cellulose.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yuanyuan; Zhai, Xiaoli; Fu, Wei; Liu, Yang; Li, Fei; Zhong, Cheng

    2016-10-20

    In order to seek a safe, biodegradable, and sustainable solid stabilizer for food, topical and pharmaceutical emulsions, individualized cellulose nanofibers were prepared by oxidizing bacterial cellulose (BC) in a Tempo-mediated system; their ability to stabilize oil/water interface was investigated. Significant amounts of C6 carboxylate groups were selectively formed on each cellulose microfibril surface, so that the hydrophilicity was strengthened, leading to lower contact angles. Meanwhile, both the length and width of fibrils were decreased significantly, by partial cleavage of numerous numbers of inter- and intra-fibrillar hydrogen bonds. Tempo-oxidized BC (TOBC) was more effective than BC in stabilizing oil-water interface, attributing to the much smaller size. Fibril dosage and oxidation degree exerted a great influence on the stability and particle size distribution of emulsion samples. When the fibril dosage was 0.7wt.%, the sample was so stable that it did not experience creaming and coalescence over 8 months. The 2-TOBC coated droplets showed the greatest stability, although both the zeta potential and the electric repulsion were the largest for the 10-TOBC analogue, which was manipulated by the wettability of fibrils. In addition, the stability of samples was analyzed from the viewpoint of particle size distribution. Consequently, fibril size and wettability are two counterbalanced factors influencing the stability of TOBC-stabilized emulsions; a combination of suitable wettability and size imparts TOBC-stabilized emulsion high stability. As a kind of biomass-based particle stabilizer, TOBC showed great potential applications in food, topical and pharmaceutical formulations. PMID:27474639

  14. Selective Exposure to and Acquisition of Information from Educational Television Programs as a Function of Appeal and Tempo of Background Music.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wakshlag, Jacob J.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    The effect of educational television background music on selective exposure and information acquisition was studied. Background music of slow tempo, regardless of its appeal, had negligible effects on attention and information acquisition. Rhythmic, fast-tempo background music, especially when appealing, significantly reduced visual attention to…

  15. A filled duration illusion in music: Effects of metrical subdivision on the perception and production of beat tempo.

    PubMed Central

    Repp, Bruno H.; Bruttomesso, Meijin

    2010-01-01

    This study replicates and extends previous findings suggesting that metrical subdivision slows the perceived beat tempo (Repp, 2008). Here, musically trained participants produced the subdivisions themselves and were found to speed up, thus compensating for the perceived slowing. This was shown in a synchronization-continuation paradigm (Experiment 1) and in a reproduction task (Experiment 2a). Participants also judged the tempo of a subdivided sequence as being slower than that of a preceding simple beat sequence (Experiment 2b). Experiment 2 also included nonmusician participants, with similar results. Tempo measurements of famous pianists’ recordings of two variation movements from Beethoven sonatas revealed a strong tendency to play the first variation (subdivided beats) faster than the theme (mostly simple beats). A similar tendency was found in musicians’ laboratory performances of a simple theme and variations, despite instruc-tions to keep the tempo constant (Experiment 3a). When playing melodic sequences in which only one of three beats per measure was subdivided, musicians tended to play these beats faster and to perceive them as longer than adjacent beats, and they played the whole sequence faster than a sequence without any subdivisions (Experiments 3b and 3c). The results amply demonstrate a filled duration illusion in rhythm perception and music performance: Intervals containing events seem longer than empty intervals and thus must be shortened to be perceived as equal in duration. PMID:20689669

  16. A Study of Music Students' Tempo Changes of a Soloist's Performance of Mozart's 1st Horn Concerto

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Christopher M.; Madsen, Clifford K.; Geringer, John M.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to investigate music students' tempo changes of a soloist's performance in an excerpt from Mozart's "Concerto No. 1 in D Major for Horn and Orchestra." We then compared the composite rubato pattern to tendencies found in a previous investigation using Mozart's "Concerto No. 2 in E[flat] Major for Horn…

  17. The Relationship between Music Preferences of Different Mode and Tempo and Personality Traits--Implications for Music Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobrota, Snježana; Reic Ercegovac, Ina

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research was to examine the relationship between music preferences of different mode and tempo and personality traits. The survey included 323 students who had to fill out the following tests: questionnaire of music preferences, scale of optimism and pessimism and International Personality Item Pool for measuring Big Five…

  18. Selective Alcohol Oxidation by a Copper TEMPO Catalyst: Mechanistic Insights by Simultaneously Coupled Operando EPR/UV-Vis/ATR-IR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rabeah, Jabor; Bentrup, Ursula; Stößer, Reinhard; Brückner, Angelika

    2015-09-28

    The first coupled operando EPR/UV-Vis/ATR-IR spectroscopy setup for mechanistic studies of gas-liquid phase reactions is presented and exemplarily applied to the well-known copper/TEMPO-catalyzed (TEMPO=(2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-1-yl)oxyl) oxidation of benzyl alcohol. In contrast to previous proposals, no direct redox reaction between TEMPO and Cu(I) /Cu(II) has been detected. Instead, the role of TEMPO is postulated to be the stabilization of a (bpy)(NMI)Cu(II) -O2 (⋅-) -TEMPO (bpy=2,2'-bipyridine, NMI=N-methylimidazole) intermediate formed by electron transfer from Cu(I) to molecular O2 . PMID:26174141

  19. Analysis of surface EMG activation in hand percussion playing depending on the grasping type and the tempo

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Hyun Ju; Kim, Soo Ji; Lee, Eun Kyoung; Yoo, Ga Eul

    2015-01-01

    Although instrument playing-based training has been repeatedly reported to improve functional hand movements including grasping, the attempts to present quantitative information on physiological mechanism of grasping have been relatively insufficient to determine the type and the intensity of the exercises involved. This study aimed to examine the muscle activation during hand percussion playing depending on the grasping type and the playing tempo. A total of twelve healthy older adults with a mean age of 71.5 years participated in this study. Surface electrodes were placed on three grasping-related muscles: Flexor digitorum superficialis, extensor digitorum, and flexor pollicis brevis. Participants were instructed to play with the egg shaker, paddle drum mallet and clave involving different types of grasp at three different tempi (i.e., 80, 100, and 120 bpm) and sEMG data were collected during each playing. Significantly greater muscle activation was generated with the small sphere type of egg shaker, compared to the handle type of paddle drum mallet and the small cylinder type of clave. Playing at faster tempo also elicited significantly greater muscle activation than at slower tempo. With regard to the rise time of muscle activation, while tempo significantly affected the rise time, the time to peak muscle did not significantly change depending on the grasping type. This study confirmed that grasping pattern and the tempo of movement significantly influence the muscular activation of grasping involved in instrument playing. Based on these results, clinical implication for instrument selection and structured instrument playing would be suggested. PMID:26331139

  20. Analysis of surface EMG activation in hand percussion playing depending on the grasping type and the tempo.

    PubMed

    Chong, Hyun Ju; Kim, Soo Ji; Lee, Eun Kyoung; Yoo, Ga Eul

    2015-08-01

    Although instrument playing-based training has been repeatedly reported to improve functional hand movements including grasping, the attempts to present quantitative information on physiological mechanism of grasping have been relatively insufficient to determine the type and the intensity of the exercises involved. This study aimed to examine the muscle activation during hand percussion playing depending on the grasping type and the playing tempo. A total of twelve healthy older adults with a mean age of 71.5 years participated in this study. Surface electrodes were placed on three grasping-related muscles: Flexor digitorum superficialis, extensor digitorum, and flexor pollicis brevis. Participants were instructed to play with the egg shaker, paddle drum mallet and clave involving different types of grasp at three different tempi (i.e., 80, 100, and 120 bpm) and sEMG data were collected during each playing. Significantly greater muscle activation was generated with the small sphere type of egg shaker, compared to the handle type of paddle drum mallet and the small cylinder type of clave. Playing at faster tempo also elicited significantly greater muscle activation than at slower tempo. With regard to the rise time of muscle activation, while tempo significantly affected the rise time, the time to peak muscle did not significantly change depending on the grasping type. This study confirmed that grasping pattern and the tempo of movement significantly influence the muscular activation of grasping involved in instrument playing. Based on these results, clinical implication for instrument selection and structured instrument playing would be suggested. PMID:26331139

  1. Musicians are more consistent: Gestural cross-modal mappings of pitch, loudness and tempo in real-time.

    PubMed

    Küssner, Mats B; Tidhar, Dan; Prior, Helen M; Leech-Wilkinson, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Cross-modal mappings of auditory stimuli reveal valuable insights into how humans make sense of sound and music. Whereas researchers have investigated cross-modal mappings of sound features varied in isolation within paradigms such as speeded classification and forced-choice matching tasks, investigations of representations of concurrently varied sound features (e.g., pitch, loudness and tempo) with overt gestures-accounting for the intrinsic link between movement and sound-are scant. To explore the role of bodily gestures in cross-modal mappings of auditory stimuli we asked 64 musically trained and untrained participants to represent pure tones-continually sounding and concurrently varied in pitch, loudness and tempo-with gestures while the sound stimuli were played. We hypothesized musical training to lead to more consistent mappings between pitch and height, loudness and distance/height, and tempo and speed of hand movement and muscular energy. Our results corroborate previously reported pitch vs. height (higher pitch leading to higher elevation in space) and tempo vs. speed (increasing tempo leading to increasing speed of hand movement) associations, but also reveal novel findings pertaining to musical training which influenced consistency of pitch mappings, annulling a commonly observed bias for convex (i.e., rising-falling) pitch contours. Moreover, we reveal effects of interactions between musical parameters on cross-modal mappings (e.g., pitch and loudness on speed of hand movement), highlighting the importance of studying auditory stimuli concurrently varied in different musical parameters. Results are discussed in light of cross-modal cognition, with particular emphasis on studies within (embodied) music cognition. Implications for theoretical refinements and potential clinical applications are provided. PMID:25120506

  2. Tempo of the Deccan Traps eruptions in relation to events at the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renne, Paul; Sprain, Courtney; Pande, Kanchan; Richards, Mark; Vanderkluysen, Loyc; Self, Stephen

    2016-04-01

    It has been known for decades that the Deccan Traps (DT) continental flood basalts were erupted over an interval spanning the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary (KPB). Paleomagnetic data clearly show that the volumetric majority of preserved DT lavas were erupted during geomagnetic polarity chron 29r, hence over an interval <1 Ma. Until recently, radioisotope geochronology has failed to clarify the tempo of the eruptions or to delineate where the KPB age-equivalent horizon occurs within the eruptive sequence. An ongoing high-precision 40Ar/39Ar geochronologic study is providing the first indications of variable time-averaged eruption rates in the important Western Ghats region, in addition to providing the first precise location of the KPB within the Deccan pile. One to three samples from each of the ten geochemically-defined Jawhar through Mahabaleshwar Formations [Beane et al., 1986], sampled in seven stratigraphic sections, have been analyzed. Replicate analyses of plagioclase separates were conducted in as many as five incremental-heating experiments for each sample, yielding weighted mean plateau ages as precise as ±0.035 Ma with fully propagated systematic uncertainties as low as ±0.055 Ma. The accumulating data require abandoning several misconceptions about Deccan magmatism. Most importantly, the notion of several temporally discrete pulses of volcanism in the Western Ghats is unsupported by our data and should be abandoned. Despite changes in mean extrusion rates, volcanism was essentially continuous for 0.91 ±0.1 Ma, from 66.38 ±0.05 to 65.47 ±0.1 Ma, with no regional hiatuses >100 ka. A sharp increase in mean volumetric eruption rate commencing within the Poladpur or uppermost Bushe Fm., near the base of the laterally extensive Wai Subgroup, is now well-documented. Based on recent area-weighted volume estimates [Richards et al., 2015], the eruption rate tripled from 0.2 to 0.6 km^3/year at this transition. The transition coincided with increased mantle

  3. Supercritical carbon dioxide, a new medium for aerobic alcohol oxidations catalysed by copper-TEMPO.

    PubMed

    Herbert, Matthew; Montilla, Francisco; Galindo, Agustín

    2010-01-21

    The copper catalysed aerobic oxidation of selected alcohol substrates in supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO(2)), employing a range of simple copper(II) catalyst compounds, is here described. The copper acetate complex of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) functionalised pyridine (1), compound 2, has previously been synthesised and characterised by us and its solubility in scCO(2) demonstrated. Due to this solubility we anticipated that the selective aerobic oxidation of alcohols to aldehydes could be homogeneously catalysed by this compound in scCO(2) in combination with the co-catalyst 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-1-yloxy free radical (TEMPO). Our initial results showed that complete oxidation of 4-nitrobenzyl alcohol was achieved within 4 h of reaction. However, the activities of analogous copper derivatives containing simpler pyridine substituents, [Cu(AcO)(2)(py)](2) and [Cu(AcO)(2)(4VP)](2) (4VP = 4-vinylpyridine), were shown to be similar, in spite of their negligible solubility in scCO(2). When we repeated the reactions in highly non-polar hexane rather than scCO(2) similar observations were made. In both cases, as 2 is soluble and the pyridine analogues are not, a much higher reaction rate was anticipated for 2 as it is the only compound capable of homogeneous catalysis. However, in some cases slightly better activities were observed for [Cu(AcO)(2)(py)](2) rather than for the PDMS functionalised analogue, 2. Thus, despite poor catalyst solubility typically being very inhibitory in this type of catalytic process, in this system solubilisation of the catalyst is not necessary. In continuation the activity of silica supported copper complexes was therefore investigated. Employing such catalysts the 4-nitrobenzyl and benzyl alcohol substrates were completely oxidised to the corresponding aldehydes in scCO(2), this time employing lower catalyst loadings. Other types of alcohol substrate showed more limited conversions however. To conclude, alcohol oxidation in the non

  4. TEMPO-mediated oxidation of oat β-D-glucan and its influences on paper properties.

    PubMed

    Song, Xianliang; Hubbe, Martin A

    2014-01-01

    An enhanced bonding agent for papermaking was prepared by selective oxidation of a hemicellulose-rich byproduct of oat processing, which will be identified here by its primary component, β-D-glucan. The β-D-glucan was treated sequentially with (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-1-yl)oxyl (TEMPO) and sodium hypochlorite, or alternatively just with sodium hydroxide. When added to a slurry of unbleached softwood kraft fibers, in combination with an optimal dosage of aluminum sulfate, the oxidized β-D-glucan yielded greater increases in tensile strength and folding endurance in comparison to untreated β-D-glucan. NaOH treatment also improved dry-strength performance of the β-D-glucan, except for folding endurance. The improvements were attributed to increased charge density of the treated polyelectrolytes, leading to better distribution and retention on fibers prior to sheet formation. Modified β-D-glucan also enhanced the strength of recycled sheets when the treated paper was repulped and formed into recycled paper with no further chemical addition. PMID:24274551

  5. Catalytic N-radical cascade reaction of hydrazones by oxidative deprotonation electron transfer and TEMPO mediation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiao-Qiang; Qi, Xiaotian; Chen, Jia-Rong; Zhao, Quan-Qing; Wei, Qiang; Lan, Yu; Xiao, Wen-Jing

    2016-01-01

    Compared with the popularity of various C-centred radicals, the N-centred radicals remain largely unexplored in catalytic radical cascade reactions because of a lack of convenient methods for their generation. Known methods for their generation typically require the use of N-functionalized precursors or various toxic, potentially explosive or unstable radical initiators. Recently, visible-light photocatalysis has emerged as an attractive tool for the catalytic formation of N-centred radicals, but the pre-incorporation of a photolabile groups at the nitrogen atom largely limited the reaction scope. Here, we present a visible-light photocatalytic oxidative deprotonation electron transfer/2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO)-mediation strategy for catalytic N-radical cascade reaction of unsaturated hydrazones. This mild protocol provides a broadly applicable synthesis of 1,6-dihydropyradazines with complete regioselectivity and good yields. The 1,6-dihydropyradazines can be easily transformed into diazinium salts that showed promising in vitro antifungal activities against fungal pathogens. DFT calculations are conducted to explain the mechanism. PMID:27048886

  6. Slow sluggish cognitive tempo symptoms are associated with poorer academic performance in children with ADHD.

    PubMed

    Tamm, Leanne; Garner, Annie A; Loren, Richard E A; Epstein, Jeffery N; Vaughn, Aaron J; Ciesielski, Heather A; Becker, Stephen P

    2016-08-30

    Sluggish cognitive tempo (SCT) symptoms may confer risk for academic impairment in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). We investigated SCT in relation to academic performance and impairment in 252 children (ages 6-12, 67% boys) with ADHD. Parents and teachers completed SCT and academic impairment ratings, and achievement in reading, math, and spelling was assessed. Simultaneous regressions controlling for IQ, ADHD, and comorbidities were conducted. Total SCT predicted parent-rated impairments in writing, mathematics, and overall school but not reading. Parent-rated SCT Slow predicted poorer reading and spelling, but not math achievement. Teacher-rated SCT Slow predicted poorer spelling and math, but not reading achievement. Parent-rated SCT Slow predicted greater academic impairment ratings across all domains, whereas teacher-rated SCT Slow predicted greater impairment in writing only. Age and gender did not moderate these relationships with the exception of math impairment; SCT slow predicted math impairment for younger but not older children. Parent and teacher SCT Sleepy and Daydreamy ratings were not significant predictors. SCT Slow appears to be uniquely related to academic problems in ADHD, and may be important to assess and potentially target in intervention. More work is needed to better understand the nature of SCT Slow symptoms in relation to inattention and amotivation. PMID:27294799

  7. What distinguishes successful from unsuccessful tobacco smoking cessation? Data from a study of young adults (TEMPO)

    PubMed Central

    Khati, Inès; Menvielle, Gwenn; Chollet, Aude; Younès, Nadia; Metadieu, Brigitte; Melchior, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Smoking prevalence rates among young people are high in many countries. Although attempts to quit smoking increasingly occur in young adulthood, many former smokers relapse. We compared individuals who successfully quit smoking from those who relapsed on socio-demographic, psychological and health factors. Methods Data come from telephone interviews conducted in 2011 with participants of the TEMPO community-based study (ages 18–37 years, France). To study the likelihood of successful cessation vs. smoking relapse, we restricted the study sample to current or former smokers (n = 600) and conducted multinomial logistic regression analyses. Results 43% of participants were current smokers who never quit for an extended period and, 33% former smokers and 24% current smokers who relapsed after extended cessation. In multivariate analyses female sex, parental status and illegal drug use were associated with both successful and unsuccessful smoking cessation. Factors specifically associated with a low probability of smoking cessation were job strain and symptoms of hyperactivity/inattention, while occupational grade was associated with smoking relapse. Conclusions Work and family circumstances, co-occurring substance use and psychological difficulties may influence smoking cessation in young adults. These characteristics should be considered by individual and collective interventions aiming to help young smokers quit successfully. PMID:26844137

  8. Phylogeny and tempo of diversification in the superradiation of spiny-rayed fishes.

    PubMed

    Near, Thomas J; Dornburg, Alex; Eytan, Ron I; Keck, Benjamin P; Smith, W Leo; Kuhn, Kristen L; Moore, Jon A; Price, Samantha A; Burbrink, Frank T; Friedman, Matt; Wainwright, Peter C

    2013-07-30

    Spiny-rayed fishes, or acanthomorphs, comprise nearly one-third of all living vertebrates. Despite their dominant role in aquatic ecosystems, the evolutionary history and tempo of acanthomorph diversification is poorly understood. We investigate the pattern of lineage diversification in acanthomorphs by using a well-resolved time-calibrated phylogeny inferred from a nuclear gene supermatrix that includes 520 acanthomorph species and 37 fossil age constraints. This phylogeny provides resolution for what has been classically referred to as the "bush at the top" of the teleost tree, and indicates acanthomorphs originated in the Early Cretaceous. Paleontological evidence suggests acanthomorphs exhibit a pulse of morphological diversification following the end Cretaceous mass extinction; however, the role of this event on the accumulation of living acanthomorph diversity remains unclear. Lineage diversification rates through time exhibit no shifts associated with the end Cretaceous mass extinction, but there is a global decrease in lineage diversification rates 50 Ma that occurs during a period when morphological disparity among fossil acanthomorphs increases sharply. Analysis of clade-specific shifts in diversification rates reveal that the hyperdiversity of living acanthomorphs is highlighted by several rapidly radiating lineages including tunas, gobies, blennies, snailfishes, and Afro-American cichlids. These lineages with high diversification rates are not associated with a single habitat type, such as coral reefs, indicating there is no single explanation for the success of acanthomorphs, as exceptional bouts of diversification have occurred across a wide array of marine and freshwater habitats. PMID:23858462

  9. Catalytic N-radical cascade reaction of hydrazones by oxidative deprotonation electron transfer and TEMPO mediation

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiao-Qiang; Qi, Xiaotian; Chen, Jia-Rong; Zhao, Quan-Qing; Wei, Qiang; Lan, Yu; Xiao, Wen-Jing

    2016-01-01

    Compared with the popularity of various C-centred radicals, the N-centred radicals remain largely unexplored in catalytic radical cascade reactions because of a lack of convenient methods for their generation. Known methods for their generation typically require the use of N-functionalized precursors or various toxic, potentially explosive or unstable radical initiators. Recently, visible-light photocatalysis has emerged as an attractive tool for the catalytic formation of N-centred radicals, but the pre-incorporation of a photolabile groups at the nitrogen atom largely limited the reaction scope. Here, we present a visible-light photocatalytic oxidative deprotonation electron transfer/2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO)-mediation strategy for catalytic N-radical cascade reaction of unsaturated hydrazones. This mild protocol provides a broadly applicable synthesis of 1,6-dihydropyradazines with complete regioselectivity and good yields. The 1,6-dihydropyradazines can be easily transformed into diazinium salts that showed promising in vitro antifungal activities against fungal pathogens. DFT calculations are conducted to explain the mechanism. PMID:27048886

  10. On the morphology of cellulose nanofibrils obtained by TEMPO-mediated oxidation and mechanical treatment.

    PubMed

    Gamelas, José A F; Pedrosa, Jorge; Lourenço, Ana F; Mutjé, Peré; González, Israel; Chinga-Carrasco, Gary; Singh, Gurvinder; Ferreira, Paulo J T

    2015-05-01

    The morphological properties of cellulose nanofibrils obtained from eucalyptus pulp fibres were assessed. Two samples were produced with the same chemical treatment (NaClO/NaBr/TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl radical) oxidation), but distinct mechanical treatment intensities during homogenization. It was shown that the nanofibrils production yield increases with the mechanical energy. The effect of mechanical treatment on the yield was confirmed by laser profilometry of air-dried nanocellulose films. However, no significant differences were detected regarding the nanofibrils width as measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM) of air-dried films. On the other hand, differences in size were found either by laser diffraction spectroscopy or by dynamic light scattering (DLS) of the cellulose nanofibrils suspensions as a consequence of the differences in the length distribution of both samples. The nanofibrils length of the more nanofibrillated sample was calculated based on the width measured by AFM and the hydrodynamic diameter obtained by DLS. A length value of ca. 600 nm was estimated. The DLS hydrodynamic diameter, as an equivalent spherical diameter, was used to estimate the nanofibrils length assuming a cylinder with the same volume and with the diameter (width) assessed by AFM. A simple method is thus proposed to evaluate the cellulose nanofibrils length combining microscopy and light scattering methods. PMID:25768897

  11. TEMPO: a contemporary model for police education and training about mental illness.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Terry; Cotton, Dorothy

    2014-01-01

    Given the increasing number of interactions between police and people with mental illnesses (PMI), there has been widespread interest in the development of education for police about how best to interact with PMI. This paper reflects the review of current practice in a variety of jurisdictions across Canada as well as in the United States (U.S.), the United Kingdom (U.K.) and Australia; it proposes a comprehensive model of learning based on the literature that addresses not only the content in the narrow sense but also the importance of broader contextual knowledge and understanding in developing effective education and training. Embedded in the principles articulated in the Mental Health Strategy for Canada, the TEMPO (Training and Education about Mental illness for Police Organizations) model is a multilevel learning strategy for Canadian police personnel. Learning objectives and key principles are articulated in order to ensure the model is applicable to a wide range of police agencies and individual jurisdictional needs. In addition to providing a firm basis of factual knowledge for police personnel, the resultant model embraces a human rights/anti-stigma philosophy, provides for a range of education appropriate to diverse police audiences, emphasizes a systems approach to police/mental health liaison activities and addresses issues related to the delivery and implementation of police education and training. PMID:24720915

  12. Preparation of completely C6-carboxylated curdlan by catalytic oxidation with 4-acetamido-TEMPO.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Erika; Tamura, Naoyuki; Saito, Tsuguyuki; Habu, Naoto; Isogai, Akira

    2014-01-16

    Pure (1→3)-β-polyglucuronic acid sodium salt was prepared from curdlan by oxidation with 4-acetamido-TEMPO/NaClO/NaClO₂ in water at pH 4.7 and 35°C. The oxidation conditions, including the reaction time and amounts of reagents added, were optimized for the preparation of (1→3)-β-polyglucuronic acids with high molecular weights. The primary C6 hydroxyl groups of curdlan were completely oxidized to the corresponding C6-carboxylates using a one- or two-step reaction process by controlling the oxidation conditions, thus providing pure (1→3)-β-polyglucuronic acids consisting only of D-glucuronosyl units. Unfortunately, however, the increased amounts of reagents and long reaction time led to significant depolymerization of the curdlan during the oxidation process, and the resulting (1→3)-β-polyglucuronic acids had weight-average degrees of polymerization of 340-360. The (13)C and (1)H NMR chemical shifts of the products were successfully assigned using pure (1→3)-β-polyglucuronic acid. PMID:24188840

  13. Tempo and Mode of Gene Duplication in Mammalian Ribosomal Protein Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Gajdosik, Matthew D.; Simon, Amanda; Nelson, Craig E.

    2014-01-01

    Gene duplication has been widely recognized as a major driver of evolutionary change and organismal complexity through the generation of multi-gene families. Therefore, understanding the forces that govern the evolution of gene families through the retention or loss of duplicated genes is fundamentally important in our efforts to study genome evolution. Previous work from our lab has shown that ribosomal protein (RP) genes constitute one of the largest classes of conserved duplicated genes in mammals. This result was surprising due to the fact that ribosomal protein genes evolve slowly and transcript levels are very tightly regulated. In our present study, we identified and characterized all RP duplicates in eight mammalian genomes in order to investigate the tempo and mode of ribosomal protein family evolution. We show that a sizable number of duplicates are transcriptionally active and are very highly conserved. Furthermore, we conclude that existing gene duplication models do not readily account for the preservation of a very large number of intact retroduplicated ribosomal protein (RT-RP) genes observed in mammalian genomes. We suggest that selection against dominant-negative mutations may underlie the unexpected retention and conservation of duplicated RP genes, and may shape the fate of newly duplicated genes, regardless of duplication mechanism. PMID:25369106

  14. TEMPO: an ESA-funded project for uncovering significant features of the South Atlantic Anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavón-Carrasco, F. Javier; De Santis, Angelo

    2016-04-01

    In this work we provide the last results of the ESA (European Space Agency) funded project TEMPO ("Is The Earth's Magnetic field POtentially reversing? New insights from Swarm mission"). The mail goal of this project is to analyse the time and spatial evolution of one of the most important features of the present geomagnetic field, i.e. the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA). The region covered by this anomaly is characterized by values of geomagnetic field intensity around 30% lower than expected for those latitudes and extends over a large area in the South Atlantic Ocean, South America, South Africa and the Eastern Pacific Ocean. This large depression of the geomagnetic field strength has its origin in a prominent patch of reversed polarity flux in the Earth's outer core. The study of the SAA is an important challenge nowadays not only for the geomagnetic and paleomagnetic community, but also for other areas focused on the Earth Observation due to the protective role of this potential field against the charged particles forming the solar wind. A further increase of the SAA surface extent could have dramatic consequences for human health and technologies because a larger number of solar charged particles could reach the Earth's surface.

  15. Effects of instructed timing and tempo on snare drum sound in drum kit performance.

    PubMed

    Danielsen, Anne; Waadeland, Carl Haakon; Sundt, Henrik G; Witek, Maria A G

    2015-10-01

    This paper reports on an experiment investigating the expressive means with which performers of groove-based musics signal the intended timing of a rhythmic event. Ten expert drummers were instructed to perform a rock pattern in three different tempi and three different timing styles: "laid-back," "on-the-beat," and "pushed." The results show that there were systematic differences in the intensity and timbre (i.e., sound-pressure level, temporal centroid, and spectral centroid) of series of snare strokes played with these different timing styles at the individual level. A common pattern was found across subjects concerning the effect of instructed timing on sound-pressure level: a majority of the drummers played laid-back strokes louder than on-the-beat strokes. Furthermore, when the tempo increased, there was a general increase in sound-pressure level and a decrease in spectral centroid across subjects. The results show that both temporal and sound-related features are important in order to indicate that a rhythmic event has been played intentionally early, late, or on-the-beat, and provide insight into the ways in which musicians communicate at the microrhythmic level in groove-based musics. PMID:26520311

  16. Phylogeny and tempo of diversification in the superradiation of spiny-rayed fishes

    PubMed Central

    Near, Thomas J.; Dornburg, Alex; Eytan, Ron I.; Keck, Benjamin P.; Smith, W. Leo; Kuhn, Kristen L.; Moore, Jon A.; Price, Samantha A.; Burbrink, Frank T.; Friedman, Matt; Wainwright, Peter C.

    2013-01-01

    Spiny-rayed fishes, or acanthomorphs, comprise nearly one-third of all living vertebrates. Despite their dominant role in aquatic ecosystems, the evolutionary history and tempo of acanthomorph diversification is poorly understood. We investigate the pattern of lineage diversification in acanthomorphs by using a well-resolved time-calibrated phylogeny inferred from a nuclear gene supermatrix that includes 520 acanthomorph species and 37 fossil age constraints. This phylogeny provides resolution for what has been classically referred to as the “bush at the top” of the teleost tree, and indicates acanthomorphs originated in the Early Cretaceous. Paleontological evidence suggests acanthomorphs exhibit a pulse of morphological diversification following the end Cretaceous mass extinction; however, the role of this event on the accumulation of living acanthomorph diversity remains unclear. Lineage diversification rates through time exhibit no shifts associated with the end Cretaceous mass extinction, but there is a global decrease in lineage diversification rates 50 Ma that occurs during a period when morphological disparity among fossil acanthomorphs increases sharply. Analysis of clade-specific shifts in diversification rates reveal that the hyperdiversity of living acanthomorphs is highlighted by several rapidly radiating lineages including tunas, gobies, blennies, snailfishes, and Afro-American cichlids. These lineages with high diversification rates are not associated with a single habitat type, such as coral reefs, indicating there is no single explanation for the success of acanthomorphs, as exceptional bouts of diversification have occurred across a wide array of marine and freshwater habitats. PMID:23858462

  17. Left hand finger force in violin playing: tempo, loudness, and finger differences.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Hiroshi; Obata, Satoshi

    2009-07-01

    A three-dimensional force transducer was installed in the neck of a violin under the A string at the D5 position in order to study the force with which the violinist clamps the string against the fingerboard under normal playing conditions. Violinists performed repetitive sequences of open A- and fingered D-tones using the ring finger at tempi of 1, 2, 4, 8, and 16 notes/s at mezzo-forte. At selected tempi, the effects of dynamic level and the use of different fingers were investigated as well. The force profiles were clearly dependent on tempo and dynamic level. At slow tempi, the force profiles were characterized by an initial pulse followed by a level force to the end of the finger contact period. At tempi higher than 2 Hz, only pulsed profiles were observed. The peak force exceeded 4.5 N at 1 and 2 Hz and decreased to 1.7 N at 16 Hz. All force and impulse values were lower at softer dynamic levels, and when using the ring or little finger compared to the index finger. PMID:19603895

  18. Thermo-responsive and compression properties of TEMPO-oxidized cellulose nanofiber-modified PNIPAm hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jinguang; Chen, Yufei; Liu, Hongzhi; Du, Chungui; Yu, Huilong; Zhou, Zhongxi

    2016-08-20

    In this study, TEMPO-oxidized bamboo cellulose nanofibers (TO-CNF) with anionic carboxylate groups on the surfaces were in-situ incorporated into poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAm) matrix to improve its thermo-responsive and mechanical properties during the polymerization. The microstructure, swelling behaviors, and compressive strength of resultant PNIPAm composite hydrogels with varying contents of TO-CNFs (0-10wt%) were then examined, respectively. Modified hydrogels exhibited the similar light transparency to pure PNIPAm one due to the formation of semi-IPN structure between PNIPAm and TO-CNF. FT-IR spectra demonstrated that the presence of TO-CNF did not alter the position of characteristic peaks associated with PNIPAm. SEM observation suggested that the pore size of PNIPAm hydrogels was markedly increased after the incorporation of TO-CNF. Also, the composite hydrogels showed superior swelling behavior and much improved compression properties with respect to pure PNIPAm one. Thus, TO-CNF appeared to be a "green" nanofiller that can simultaneously improve swelling and mechanical properties of PNIPAm hydrogel. PMID:27178925

  19. The tempo and mode of molecular evolution of Mycobacterium tuberculosis at patient-to-patient scale.

    PubMed

    Schürch, Anita C; Kremer, Kristin; Kiers, Albert; Daviena, Olaf; Boeree, Martin J; Siezen, Roland J; Smith, Noel H; van Soolingen, Dick

    2010-01-01

    A total of six polymorphisms were identified by comparing the genomes of the first and the last isolate of a well-characterized transmission chain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis involving five patients over a 12 and a half year period. The six polymorphisms consisted of four single nucleotide changes (SNPs), a tandem repeat polymorphism (TRP) and a previously identified IS6110 transposition event. These polymorphic sites were surveyed in each of the isolates from the five patients in the transmission chain. Surprisingly, five of the six polymorphisms accumulated in a single patient in the transmission chain; this patient had been non-compliant to tuberculosis treatment. This first insight into the tempo and mode of molecular evolution in M. tuberculosis at the patient-to-patient level suggests that the molecular evolution of the pathogen in vivo is characterized by periods of relative genomic stability followed by bursts of mutation. Whatever the mechanism for the accumulation of mutations, this observation may have profound consequences for the application of vaccines and therapeutic drugs, the management and treatment of disease outbreaks of M. tuberculosis, the most important bacterial pathogen of humans. PMID:19835997

  20. Binding energies and 19F nuclear magnetic deshielding in paramagnetic halogen-bonded complexes of TEMPO with haloperfluorocarbons.

    PubMed

    Cavallotti, Carlo; Metrangolo, Pierangelo; Meyer, Franck; Recupero, Francesco; Resnati, Giuseppe

    2008-10-01

    19F NMR measurements and theoretical calculations were performed to study paramagnetic complexes of iodoperfluorocarbons with stable nitroxide radicals. Contrary to what is usually measured for diamagnetic halogen-bonded complexes involving iodoperfluorocarbons, it was found that the formation of complexes with the 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl(piperidin-1-yloxyl) (TEMPO) radical determines downfield shifts in the 19F NMR spectra. The experimental finding was confirmed by calculating nuclear shielding using density functional theory and correcting the isotropic diamagnetic (19)F chemical shift with contact interactions evaluated from the hyperfine coupling tensor. The computational analysis of the interaction between CF3I and TEMPO, by using DFT and MP2 theories, showed that the occurrence of the halogen bond between the interacting partners is associated with a significant charge transfer to CF3I and that the measured downfield shift is due to the occurring spin transfer. PMID:18795762

  1. Poly(TEMPO)/Zinc Hybrid-Flow Battery: A Novel, "Green," High Voltage, and Safe Energy Storage System.

    PubMed

    Winsberg, Jan; Janoschka, Tobias; Morgenstern, Sabine; Hagemann, Tino; Muench, Simon; Hauffman, Guillaume; Gohy, Jean-François; Hager, Martin D; Schubert, Ulrich S

    2016-03-16

    The combination of a polymer-based 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidinyl-N-oxyl (TEMPO) catholyte and a zinc anode, together with a cost-efficient size-exclusion membrane, builds a new type of semi-organic, "green," hybrid-flow battery, which features a high potential range of up to 2 V, high efficiencies, and a long life time. PMID:26810789

  2. TEMPO-catalyzed aerobic oxidation of alcohols to aldehydes and ketones in ionic liquid [bmim][PF6].

    PubMed

    Ansari, Imtiaz A; Gree, Rene

    2002-05-01

    [reaction: see text]. A simple and mild TEMPO-CuCl catalyzed aerobic oxidation of primary and secondary alcohols to the corresponding aldehydes and ketones in ionic liquid [bmim][PF6] with no trace of overoxidation to carboxylic acids has been developed. The product can be isolated by a simple extraction with organic solvent, and the ionic liquid can be recycled or reused. PMID:11975615

  3. Musicians are more consistent: Gestural cross-modal mappings of pitch, loudness and tempo in real-time

    PubMed Central

    Küssner, Mats B.; Tidhar, Dan; Prior, Helen M.; Leech-Wilkinson, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Cross-modal mappings of auditory stimuli reveal valuable insights into how humans make sense of sound and music. Whereas researchers have investigated cross-modal mappings of sound features varied in isolation within paradigms such as speeded classification and forced-choice matching tasks, investigations of representations of concurrently varied sound features (e.g., pitch, loudness and tempo) with overt gestures—accounting for the intrinsic link between movement and sound—are scant. To explore the role of bodily gestures in cross-modal mappings of auditory stimuli we asked 64 musically trained and untrained participants to represent pure tones—continually sounding and concurrently varied in pitch, loudness and tempo—with gestures while the sound stimuli were played. We hypothesized musical training to lead to more consistent mappings between pitch and height, loudness and distance/height, and tempo and speed of hand movement and muscular energy. Our results corroborate previously reported pitch vs. height (higher pitch leading to higher elevation in space) and tempo vs. speed (increasing tempo leading to increasing speed of hand movement) associations, but also reveal novel findings pertaining to musical training which influenced consistency of pitch mappings, annulling a commonly observed bias for convex (i.e., rising–falling) pitch contours. Moreover, we reveal effects of interactions between musical parameters on cross-modal mappings (e.g., pitch and loudness on speed of hand movement), highlighting the importance of studying auditory stimuli concurrently varied in different musical parameters. Results are discussed in light of cross-modal cognition, with particular emphasis on studies within (embodied) music cognition. Implications for theoretical refinements and potential clinical applications are provided. PMID:25120506

  4. EEG alpha desynchronization in musicians and nonmusicians in response to changes in melody, tempo, and key in classical music.

    PubMed

    Overman, Amy A; Hoge, Jessica; Dale, J Alexander; Cross, Jeffrey D; Chien, Alec

    2003-10-01

    Two experiments were performed to examine musicians' and nonmusicians' electroencephalographic (EEG) responses to changes in major dimensions (tempo, melody, and key) of classical music. In Exp. 1, 12 nonmusicians' and 12 musicians' EEGs during melody and tempo changes in classical music showed more alpha desynchronization in the left hemisphere (F3) for changes in tempo than in the right. For melody, the nonmusicians were more right-sided (F4) than left in activation, and musicians showed no left-right differences. In Exp. 2, 18 musicians' and 18 nonmusicians' EEG after a key change in classical music showed that distant key changes elicited more right frontal (F4) alpha desynchronization than left. Musicians showed more reaction to key changes than nonmusicians and instructions to attend to key changes had no significant effect. Classical music, given its well-defined structure, offers a unique set of stimuli to study the brain. Results support the concept of hierarchical modularity in music processing that may be automatic. PMID:14620240

  5. Quality of Early Family Relationships and the Timing and Tempo of Puberty: Effects Depend on Biological Sensitivity to Context

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Bruce J.; Shirtcliff, Elizabeth A.; Boyce, W. Thomas; Deardorff, Julianna; Essex, Marilyn J.

    2011-01-01

    Guided by evolutionary-developmental theories of biological sensitivity to context and reproductive development, the current research examined the interactive effects of early family environments and psychobiologic reactivity to stress on the subsequent timing and tempo of puberty. As predicted by the theory, among children displaying heightened biological sensitivity to context (i.e., higher stress reactivity), higher quality parent-child relationships forecast slower initial pubertal tempo and later pubertal timing while lower quality parent-child relationships forecast the opposite pattern. No such effects emerged among less context-sensitive children. Whereas sympathetic nervous system reactivity moderated the effects of parent-child relationships on both breast/genital and pubic hair development, adrenocortical activation only moderated the effect on pubic hair development. The current results build on previous research documenting what family contexts predict variation in pubertal timing by demonstrating for whom those contexts matter. In addition, the authors advance a new methodological approach for assessing pubertal tempo using piecewise growth curve analysis. PMID:21262041

  6. Recovery after aerobic exercise is manipulated by tempo change in a rhythmic sound pattern, as indicated by autonomic reaction on heart functioning

    PubMed Central

    Wallert, John; Madison, Guy

    2014-01-01

    Physical prowess is associated with rapid recovery from exhaustion. Here we examined whether recovery from aerobic exercise could be manipulated with a rhythmic sound pattern that either decreased or increased in tempo. Six men and six women exercised repeatedly for six minutes on a cycle ergometer at 60 percent of their individual maximal oxygen consumption, and then relaxed for six minutes while listening to one of two sound pattern conditions, which seemed to infinitely either decrease or increase in tempo, during which heart and breathing activity was measured. Participants exhibited more high-frequent heart rate variability when listening to decreasing tempo than when listening to increasing tempo, accompanied by a non-significant trend towards lower heart rate. The results show that neuropsychological entrainment to a sound pattern may directly affect the autonomic nervous system, which in turn may facilitate physiological recovery after exercise. Applications using rhythmic entrainment to aid physical recovery are discussed. PMID:25285076

  7. Inferring Plasmodium vivax Transmission Networks from Tempo-Spatial Surveillance Data

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Benyun; Liu, Jiming; Zhou, Xiao-Nong; Yang, Guo-Jing

    2014-01-01

    Background The transmission networks of Plasmodium vivax characterize how the parasite transmits from one location to another, which are informative and insightful for public health policy makers to accurately predict the patterns of its geographical spread. However, such networks are not apparent from surveillance data because P. vivax transmission can be affected by many factors, such as the biological characteristics of mosquitoes and the mobility of human beings. Here, we pay special attention to the problem of how to infer the underlying transmission networks of P. vivax based on available tempo-spatial patterns of reported cases. Methodology We first define a spatial transmission model, which involves representing both the heterogeneous transmission potential of P. vivax at individual locations and the mobility of infected populations among different locations. Based on the proposed transmission model, we further introduce a recurrent neural network model to infer the transmission networks from surveillance data. Specifically, in this model, we take into account multiple real-world factors, including the length of P. vivax incubation period, the impact of malaria control at different locations, and the total number of imported cases. Principal Findings We implement our proposed models by focusing on the P. vivax transmission among 62 towns in Yunnan province, People's Republic China, which have been experiencing high malaria transmission in the past years. By conducting scenario analysis with respect to different numbers of imported cases, we can (i) infer the underlying P. vivax transmission networks, (ii) estimate the number of imported cases for each individual town, and (iii) quantify the roles of individual towns in the geographical spread of P. vivax. Conclusion The demonstrated models have presented a general means for inferring the underlying transmission networks from surveillance data. The inferred networks will offer new insights into how to

  8. Convergent evolution, superefficient teams and tempo in Old and New World army ants

    PubMed Central

    Franks, N. R.; Sendova-Franks, A. B.; Simmons, J.; Mogie, M.

    1999-01-01

    Swarm raiding army ants, with hundreds of thousands or millions of workers per colony, have evolved convergently in the Old World and New World tropics. Here we demonstrate for the first time, to our knowledge, superefficient foraging teams in Old World army ants and we compare them quantitatively with such teams in New World army ants. Colonies of Dorylus wilverthi in the Old World and Eciton burchelli in the New World retrieve almost identical sizes of prey item and the overall size range of their workers is very similar. However, 98% of D. wilverthi workers are within the size range of the smallest 25% of E. burchelli workers. In E. burchelli larger workers specialize in prey retrieval, whereas in D. wilverthi workers form many more teams than in E. burchelli. Such teams compensate for the relative rarity of larger workers in Dorylus. The proportions of prey items retrieved by teams in Dorylus and Eciton are 39% and 5%, respectively. The percentages of all prey biomass retrieved by teams in Dorylus and Eciton are 64% and 13%, respectively. Working either as single porters or teams, Dorylus carry more per unit ant weight than do Eciton, but Eciton are swifter. However, these different ergonomic factors counterbalance one another, so that performance at the colony level is remarkably, although by no means completely, similar between the Old and New World species. The remaining differences are attributable to adaptations in worker and colony tempo associated with the recovery dynamics of their prey populations. Our comparative analysis provides a unique perspective on worker-level and colony-level adaptations and is a special test of the theory of worker caste distributions.

  9. Social and academic impairment in youth with ADHD, predominately inattentive type and sluggish cognitive tempo.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Stephen A; Evans, Steven W; Eiraldi, Ricardo B; Becker, Stephen P; Power, Thomas J

    2014-01-01

    Sluggish cognitive tempo (SCT) was originally identified as a construct that characterized the inattention problems of some children with attention deficit disorder (ADD). Research has indicated that using SCT symptoms to identify a subset of youth with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, predominately inattentive type (ADHD-IT) may elucidate distinct patterns of impairment and thereby improve the external validity of ADHD subtypes. The objective of the current study was to investigate whether youth with clinically-assessed ADHD-IT and high levels of SCT exhibit unique social and academic impairments. In a clinic-referred sample of youth (N = 209; 23 % female) aged 6 to 17 years, participants who met criteria for three different groups were identified: ADHD, Combined Type (ADHD-CT; n = 80), ADHD-IT with low SCT symptoms (n = 74), and ADHD-IT with high SCT symptoms (n = 55). These groups were compared on indicators of social and academic functioning while considering the effects of co-occurring internalizing and disruptive behavior disorders. Youth with ADHD-IT high in SCT exhibited uniquely elevated withdrawal, as well as low leadership and low peer-directed relational and overt aggression, which were not accounted for by co-occurring disorders. This high-SCT group was also the only group to have more homework problems than the ADHD-CT group, but only when other disruptive behavior disorders were absent. The distinctiveness of the high-SCT group, which was primarily evident in social as opposed to academic functioning, provides partial support for the external validity and clinical utility of SCT. PMID:23709343

  10. Mass spectrometric characterization of glucuronides formed by a new concept, combining Cunninghamella elegans with TEMPO.

    PubMed

    Rydevik, Axel; Bondesson, Ulf; Thevis, Mario; Hedeland, Mikael

    2013-10-01

    A new concept for the production of drug glucuronides is presented and the products formed were characterized using ultra high performance liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry (UPLC-HRMS). Glucuronic acid conjugates are important phase II metabolites of a wide range of drugs. There is a lack of commercially available glucuronides and classic synthetic methods are tedious and expensive. Thus, new methods of glucuronide synthesis are needed. Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) of the aryl propionamide class were used as model compounds and were incubated with the fungus Cunninghamella elegans which was previously known to conjugate drugs with glucose. The resulting glucoside metabolites were then oxidized with tetramethylpiperidinyl-1-oxy (TEMPO). UPLC-HRMS analysis showed that the peaks corresponding to the glucosides had disappeared after the reaction and were replaced by peaks with m/z consistent with the corresponding glucuronic acid conjugates. The MS/MS spectra of the reaction products were investigated and the observed fragment ion pattern corroborated the suggested structural change. A comparison in terms of retention times and product ion spectra between the glucuronides formed by the new method and those produced by liver microsomes indicated that the conjugates from the two different sources were identical, thus demonstrating the human relevance of the presented technique. Furthermore, the glucuronides formed by the presented method were readily hydrolyzed by β-glucuronidase which further gave evidence as to the fact that they were of β configuration. The investigated method was easy to perform, required a low input of work and had a low cost. PMID:23867089

  11. Plasma and ear tissue concentrations of enrofloxacin and its metabolite ciprofloxacin in dogs with chronic end-stage otitis externa after intravenous administration of enrofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Cole, Lynette K; Papich, Mark G; Kwochka, Kenneth W; Hillier, Andrew; Smeak, Daniel D; Lehman, Amy M

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the concentrations of enrofloxacin and its metabolite ciprofloxacin following intravenous administration of enrofloxacin in the plasma and ear tissue of dogs with chronic end-stage otitis undergoing a total ear canal ablation and lateral bulla osteotomy. The goals were to determine the relationship between the dose of enrofloxacin and the concentrations of enrofloxacin and ciprofloxacin, and determine appropriate doses of enrofloxacin for treatment of chronic otitis externa and media. Thirty dogs were randomized to an enrofloxacin-treatment group (5, 10, 15 or 20 mg kg(-1)) or control group (no enrofloxacin). After surgical removal, ear tissue samples (skin, vertical ear canal, horizontal ear canal, middle ear) and a blood sample were collected. Concentrations of enrofloxacin and ciprofloxacin in the plasma and ear tissue were measured by high performance liquid chromatography. Repeated measures models were applied to log-transformed data to assess dosing trends and Pearson correlations were calculated to assess concentration associations. Ear tissue concentrations of enrofloxacin and ciprofloxacin were significantly (P < 0.05) higher than plasma concentrations. Each 5 mg kg(-1 )increase in the dose of enrofloxacin resulted in a 72% and 37% increase in enrofloxacin and ciprofloxacin concentrations, respectively. For bacteria with an minimal inhibitory concentration of 0.12-0.15 or less, 0.19-0.24, 0.31-0.39 and 0.51-0.64 microg mL(-1), enrofloxacin should be dosed at 5, 10, 15 and 20 mg kg(-1), respectively. Treatment with enrofloxacin would not be recommended for a bacterial organism intermediate or resistant in susceptibility to enrofloxacin since appropriate levels of enrofloxacin would not be attained. PMID:19152587

  12. The joint in vitro action of polymyxin B and miconazole against pathogens associated with canine otitis externa from three European countries

    PubMed Central

    Pietschmann, Silvia; Meyer, Michael; Voget, Michael; Cieslicki, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Background Canine otitis externa, an inflammation of the external ear canal, can be maintained and worsened by bacterial or fungal infections. For topical treatment, combinations of anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial ingredients are mainly used. Hypothesis/Objectives This study was conducted to elucidate the in vitro activity of polymyxin B and miconazole against clinical bacterial isolates from three European countries, to investigate possible differences in sensitivity and to assess drug interactions. Animals Seventeen strains of Escherichia coli, 24 strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 24 strains of Proteus mirabilis and 25 strains of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius from dogs with diagnosed otitis externa had been isolated in Germany, France and Italy. Methods Drug activities were evaluated by minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal bactericidal concentration. The potentiation of polymyxin B plus miconazole was calculated using the fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI). An FICI ≤0.5 defined synergy. Furthermore, geographical variations in the FICI and MIC were assessed by statistical analysis. Results Bacterial susceptibilities were comparable in different European countries, because there were no significant MIC and FICI variations (P > 0.05). As a single agent, polymyxin B had bactericidal activity against most E. coli and P. aeruginosa strains and, in higher concentrations, against S. pseudintermedius strains. Miconazole was bactericidal against all Staphylococcus strains. Synergy was demonstrated against strains of E. coli and P. aeruginosa (FICI = 0.25 and 0.50, respectively), whereas overall there was no interaction against S. pseudintermedius strains (FICI = 1.25). Proteus mirabilis strains were not inhibited by each of the drugs individually or by their combination. Conclusions and clinical importance In vitro synergy of polymyxin B and miconazole against E. coli and P. aeruginosa isolates indicates a rationale

  13. Dissociation Behavior of a TEMPO-Active Ester Cross-Linker for Peptide Structure Analysis by Free Radical Initiated Peptide Sequencing (FRIPS) in Negative ESI-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hage, Christoph; Ihling, Christian H.; Götze, Michael; Schäfer, Mathias; Sinz, Andrea

    2016-07-01

    We have synthesized a homobifunctional amine-reactive cross-linking reagent, containing a TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxy) and a benzyl group (Bz), termed TEMPO-Bz-linker, to derive three-dimensional structural information of proteins. The aim for designing this novel cross-linker was to facilitate the mass spectrometric analysis of cross-linked products by free radical initiated peptide sequencing (FRIPS). In an initial study, we had investigated the fragmentation behavior of TEMPO-Bz-derivatized peptides upon collision activation in (+)-electrospray ionization collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-CID-MS/MS) experiments. In addition to the homolytic NO-C bond cleavage FRIPS pathway delivering the desired odd-electron product ions, an alternative heterolytic NO-C bond cleavage, resulting in even-electron product ions mechanism was found to be relevant. The latter fragmentation route clearly depends on the protonation of the TEMPO-Bz-moiety itself, which motivated us to conduct (-)-ESI-MS, CID-MS/MS, and MS3 experiments of TEMPO-Bz-cross-linked peptides to further clarify the fragmentation behavior of TEMPO-Bz-peptide molecular ions. We show that the TEMPO-Bz-linker is highly beneficial for conducting FRIPS in negative ionization mode as the desired homolytic cleavage of the NO-C bond is the major fragmentation pathway. Based on characteristic fragments, the isomeric amino acids leucine and isoleucine could be discriminated. Interestingly, we observed pronounced amino acid side chain losses in cross-linked peptides if the cross-linked peptides contain a high number of acidic amino acids.

  14. Cu(II) /TEMPO-promoted one-pot synthesis of highly substituted pyrimidines from amino acid esters.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Nini; Xie, Tao; Li, Zhongle; Xie, Zhixiang

    2014-12-22

    A novel, Cu(OAc)2/TEMPO promoted one-step approach for the preparation of fully substituted pyrimidines from readily available amino acid esters has been described. In this reaction, the amino acid esters act as the only N-C sources for the construction of corresponding pyrimidines. The mechanism of this process includes oxidative dehydrogenation, the generation of an imine radical, and a formal [3+3] cycloaddition. This methodology proves to be a high atom-economic and straightforward strategy for the synthesis of pyrimidines and diverse substrates which are substituted by various functional groups have been afforded in moderate to good yield. PMID:25377658

  15. Abrupt Changes at the Permian/Triassic Boundary: Tempo of Events from High-Resolution Cyclostratigraphy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rampino, M. R.; Prokoph, A.; Adler, A. C.

    2000-01-01

    the nearby Reppwand outcrop section, the same faunal changes occurs over only 0.8 m or about 8,000 years, close to the limit of time-resolution induced by bioturbation and reworking in these sediments. The sharp negative global carbon-isotope shift took place within less than or equal to 40,000 yr, and the isotope excursions persisted for approximately 480,000 yr into the Early Triassic. The results indicate that the severe marine faunal event that marks the P/Tr boundary was very sudden, perhaps less than the resolution window in the GK-1 core, and suggest a catastrophic cause. The wavelet-analysis approach to high-resolution cyclostratigraphy can be applied to other P/Tr boundary sections, and when combined with precise absolute dating and magnetostratigraphic methods promises a significant increase in resolution in determining the correlation and tempo of the end-Permian extinctions and related events worldwide.

  16. Characterization of starch films impregnated with starch nanoparticles prepared by 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO)-mediated oxidation.

    PubMed

    Fan, Haoran; Ji, Na; Zhao, Mei; Xiong, Liu; Sun, Qingjie

    2016-02-01

    In this work, we investigated the effects of adding different contents (0%, 0.5%, 1%, 2%, 5%, wt% based on maize starch, dsb) of starch nanoparticles prepared by the 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO)-mediated oxidation (TEMPO-SNPs) on the properties of maize starch films. Differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy and texture profile analysis were used to characterize the thermal properties, morphology and structure of the prepared films. As the content of TEMPO-SNPs increased, the water vapor permeability (WVP) of films reduced significantly from 4.21 × 10(-8) to 3.04 × 10(-8) gm(-1) s(-1) Pa(-1). Furthermore, elongation at break, tensile strength and Young's modulus of the films increased as the TEMPO-SNPs content increased. At the TEMPO-SNPs content of 1%, the elongation at break, the tensile strength and Young's modulus of the films peaked. SEM showed that the nanocomposite films had smoother surfaces and cross sections with no cracks or visible air pockets. PMID:26304422

  17. Behavioral effects of exposure to the TEMPO high-power microwave system. Interim report, January-June 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Klauenberg, B.J.; Merritt, J.H.; Erwin, D.N.

    1988-03-01

    Safety standards for exposure to radiofrequency radiation must be based upon biologic consequences of exposure to such environments. Behavioral-based measures are considered to be the most-sensitive indices of biological effects. Current safety guidelines are based upon average power density and may not be relevant to the high-peak-power, short pulse width microwave radiation produced by newly developed high peak power microwave sources. The effects of exposure to high-peak-power radiation on reflexive responding and motor function in Fischer 344/N rats were assessed by measuring startle and general activity, and disruption of on-going performance of a rotarod task, respectively. The emitter used was the TEMPO repeat pulse axially extracted vircator. Exposure to single pulses resulted in significant startle responses. Exposure to 1 pps for 10 s produced significant alterations in baseline activity and marked disruption of performance of the rotarod task. The apparently greater effect observed in the rotarod task is discussed in relation to the greater workload that task requires. Experiments are currently being conducted to identify the limits of detection and the quality of the sensory/perceptual experience of exposure to the TEMPO radiation.

  18. Effects of musical tempo on physiological, affective, and perceptual variables and performance of self-selected walking pace

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Flávia Angélica Martins; Nunes, Renan Felipe Hartmann; Ferreira, Sandro dos Santos; Krinski, Kleverton; Elsangedy, Hassan Mohamed; Buzzachera, Cosme Franklin; Alves, Ragami Chaves; Gregorio da Silva, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of musical tempo on physiological, affective, and perceptual responses as well as the performance of self-selected walking pace. [Subjects] The study included 28 adult women between 29 and 51 years old. [Methods] The subjects were divided into three groups: no musical stimulation group (control), and 90 and 140 beats per minute musical tempo groups. Each subject underwent three experimental sessions: involved familiarization with the equipment, an incremental test to exhaustion, and a 30-min walk on a treadmill at a self-selected pace, respectively. During the self-selected walking session, physiological, perceptual, and affective variables were evaluated, and walking performance was evaluated at the end. [Results] There were no significant differences in physiological variables or affective response among groups. However, there were significant differences in perceptual response and walking performance among groups. [Conclusion] Fast music (140 beats per minute) promotes a higher rating of perceived exertion and greater performance in self-selected walking pace without significantly altering physiological variables or affective response. PMID:26180303

  19. Differential effects of type of keyboard playing task and tempo on surface EMG amplitudes of forearm muscles.

    PubMed

    Chong, Hyun Ju; Kim, Soo Ji; Yoo, Ga Eul

    2015-01-01

    Despite increasing interest in keyboard playing as a strategy for repetitive finger exercises in fine motor skill development and hand rehabilitation, comparative analysis of task-specific finger movements relevant to keyboard playing has been less extensive. This study examined, whether there were differences in surface EMG activity levels of forearm muscles associated with different keyboard playing tasks. Results demonstrated higher muscle activity with sequential keyboard playing in a random pattern compared to individuated playing or sequential playing in a successive pattern. Also, the speed of finger movements was found as a factor that affect muscle activity levels, demonstrating that faster tempo elicited significantly greater muscle activity than self-paced tempo. The results inform our understanding of the type of finger movements involved in different types of keyboard playing at different tempi. This helps to consider the efficacy and fatigue level of keyboard playing tasks when being used as an intervention for amateur pianists or individuals with impaired fine motor skills. PMID:26388798

  20. Effects of musical tempo on physiological, affective, and perceptual variables and performance of self-selected walking pace.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Flávia Angélica Martins; Nunes, Renan Felipe Hartmann; Ferreira, Sandro Dos Santos; Krinski, Kleverton; Elsangedy, Hassan Mohamed; Buzzachera, Cosme Franklin; Alves, Ragami Chaves; Gregorio da Silva, Sergio

    2015-06-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of musical tempo on physiological, affective, and perceptual responses as well as the performance of self-selected walking pace. [Subjects] The study included 28 adult women between 29 and 51 years old. [Methods] The subjects were divided into three groups: no musical stimulation group (control), and 90 and 140 beats per minute musical tempo groups. Each subject underwent three experimental sessions: involved familiarization with the equipment, an incremental test to exhaustion, and a 30-min walk on a treadmill at a self-selected pace, respectively. During the self-selected walking session, physiological, perceptual, and affective variables were evaluated, and walking performance was evaluated at the end. [Results] There were no significant differences in physiological variables or affective response among groups. However, there were significant differences in perceptual response and walking performance among groups. [Conclusion] Fast music (140 beats per minute) promotes a higher rating of perceived exertion and greater performance in self-selected walking pace without significantly altering physiological variables or affective response. PMID:26180303

  1. Theoretical study of absorption of 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxoammonium cation (TEMPO) on TiO₂(110) rutile surface.

    PubMed

    Nieto-López, Israel; Hernández-García, Luis; Bonilla-Cruz, José; Sanchez, Mario

    2014-03-01

    We present a theoretical study of the adsorption of 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxoammonium cation (TEMPO) onto the TiO₂(110) surface rutile, investigating its bonding nature, electron properties and structural stability. Based on the results obtained with the PBE0/def2-SVP method, natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis suggests a bond order for the O--O bond in complexes 5 and 6, of 0.25 and 0.88, respectively. We also described NBOs for the main interactions of the TiO₂-TEMPO complexes. PMID:24567160

  2. "Swimmer's Ear" (Otitis Externa) Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Work: Healthy Swimming Policy & Recommendations Fast Facts Healthy Water Sites Healthy Water Drinking Water Healthy Swimming Global ... you requested has moved to Ear Infections. Healthy Water Sites Healthy Water Drinking Water Healthy Swimming Global ...

  3. TEMPO-oxidized cellulose nanofibers (TOCNs) as a green reinforcement for waterborne polyurethane coating (WPU) on wood.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Dong; Wen, Yangbing; An, Xingye; Zhu, Xuhai; Ni, Yonghao

    2016-10-20

    In this work, TEMPO-oxidized cellulose nanofibers (TOCNs) were investigated as a green additive to the waterborne polyurethane (WPU) based coating, for improving its mechanical properties. The structure, morphology, mechanical properties and performances of the WPU/TOCNs coating were determined. Results showed that TOCNs had good compatibility to the WPU coating, and significantly enhanced the mechanical properties of the coating. The Halpin-Tsai and Ouali models were used to fit for the Young's modulus of the resulting coating, and good agreements were found between the Ouali model and experimental results when the TOCNs content exceeded the critical percolation threshold (0.7vol% or 1.0wt%). It was also found that the pencil hardness of the coating was improved with the addition of TOCNs. However, AFM and pull-off test revealed the negative effects of the TOCNs addition on the surface roughness and adhesion strength of the coating to the wood surface. PMID:27474574

  4. Superior reinforcement effect of TEMPO-oxidized cellulose nanofibrils in polystyrene matrix: optical, thermal, and mechanical studies.

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, Shuji; Ikeuchi, Tomoyasu; Takeuchi, Miyuki; Saito, Tsuguyuki; Isogai, Akira

    2012-07-01

    Polystyrene (PS) composites reinforced with 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO)-oxidized cellulose nanofibrils (TOCNs) with various weight ratios were fabricated by casting and vacuum-drying mixtures of PS/N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) solution and TOCN/DMF dispersion. TOCNs of 3 to 4 nm width were dispersed homogeneously at the individual nanofibril level in the PS matrix, such that the TOCN/PS nanocomposite films exhibited high optical transparencies and their tensile strengths, elastic moduli, and thermal dimensional stabilities increased with increasing TOCN content. Dynamic mechanical analysis showed that the storage modulus of the TOCN/PS films increased significantly with TOCN content above the glass-transition temperature of PS by the formation of an interfibrillar network structure of TOCNs in the PS matrix, based on percolation theory. The outstanding and effective polymer reinforcement by TOCNs results from their high aspect ratio, high crystallinity, and nanodispersibility in the PS matrix. PMID:22642863

  5. Copper(I)/ABNO-catalyzed aerobic alcohol oxidation: alleviating steric and electronic constraints of Cu/TEMPO catalyst systems.

    PubMed

    Steves, Janelle E; Stahl, Shannon S

    2013-10-23

    Cu/TEMPO catalyst systems promote efficient aerobic oxidation of sterically unhindered primary alcohols and electronically activated substrates, but they show reduced reactivity with aliphatic and secondary alcohols. Here, we report a catalyst system, consisting of ((MeO)bpy)Cu(I)(OTf) and ABNO ((MeO)bpy = 4,4'-dimethoxy-2,2'-bipyridine; ABNO = 9-azabicyclo[3.3.1]nonane N-oxyl), that mediates aerobic oxidation of all classes of alcohols, including primary and secondary allylic, benzylic, and aliphatic alcohols with nearly equal efficiency. The catalyst exhibits broad functional group compatibility, and most reactions are complete within 1 h at room temperature using ambient air as the source of oxidant. PMID:24128057

  6. Controlling the structure and rheology of TEMPO-oxidized cellulose in zinc chloride aqueous suspensions for fabricating advanced nanopaper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Sha; Zhang, Xin; Hu, Liangbing; Briber, Robert; Wang, Howard; Zhong, Linxin

    Due to its abundance, low-cost, biocompatibility and renewability, cellulose has become an attractive candidate as a functional material for various advanced applications. A key to novel applications is the control of the structure and rheology of suspensions of fibrous cellulose. Among many different approaches of preparing cellulose suspensions, zinc chloride addition to aqueous suspensions is regarded an effective practice. In this study, effects of ZnCl2 concentration on TEMPO-oxidized cellulose (TOC) nanofiber suspensions have been investigated. Highly-transparent cellulose nanofiber suspension can be rapidly obtained by dissolving TOC in 65 wt.% zinc chloride aqueous solutions at room temperature, whereas a transparent zinc ion cross-linked TOC gel could be obtained with zinc chloride concentration as low as 10 wt. %. The structural and rheological characteristics of TOC/ZnCl2 suspensions have been measured to correlate to the performance of thetransparent and flexible nanocellulose paper subsequently produced via vacuum filtration or wet-casting processes.

  7. Dynamic 3D visual analytic tools: a method for maintaining situational awareness during high tempo warfare or mass casualty operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizotte, Todd E.

    2010-04-01

    Maintaining Situational Awareness (SA) is crucial to the success of high tempo operations, such as war fighting and mass casualty events (bioterrorism, natural disasters). Modern computer and software applications attempt to provide command and control manager's situational awareness via the collection, integration, interrogation and display of vast amounts of analytic data in real-time from a multitude of data sources and formats [1]. At what point does the data volume and displays begin to erode the hierarchical distributive intelligence, command and control structure of the operation taking place? In many cases, people tasked with making decisions, have insufficient experience in SA of high tempo operations and become overwhelmed easily as vast amounts of data begin to be displayed in real-time as an operation unfolds. In these situations, where data is plentiful and the relevance of the data changes rapidly, there is a chance for individuals to target fixate on those data sources they are most familiar. If these individuals fall into this type of pitfall, they will exclude other data that might be just as important to the success of the operation. To counter these issues, it is important that the computer and software applications provide a means for prompting its users to take notice of adverse conditions or trends that are critical to the operation. This paper will discuss a new method of displaying data called a Crisis ViewTM, that monitors critical variables that are dynamically changing and allows preset thresholds to be created to prompt the user when decisions need to be made and when adverse or positive trends are detected. The new method will be explained in basic terms, with examples of its attributes and how it can be implemented.

  8. TEMPO Monolayers on Si(100) Electrodes: Electrostatic Effects by the Electrolyte and Semiconductor Space-Charge on the Electroactivity of a Persistent Radical.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Long; Vogel, Yan Boris; Noble, Benjamin B; Gonçales, Vinicius R; Darwish, Nadim; Brun, Anton Le; Gooding, J Justin; Wallace, Gordon G; Coote, Michelle L; Ciampi, Simone

    2016-08-01

    This work demonstrates the effect of electrostatic interactions on the electroactivity of a persistent organic free radical. This was achieved by chemisorption of molecules of 4-azido-2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperdinyloxy (4-azido-TEMPO) onto monolayer-modified Si(100) electrodes using a two-step chemical procedure to preserve the open-shell state and hence the electroactivity of the nitroxide radical. Kinetic and thermodynamic parameters for the surface electrochemical reaction are investigated experimentally and analyzed with the aid of electrochemical digital simulations and quantum-chemical calculations of a theoretical model of the tethered TEMPO system. Interactions between the electrolyte anions and the TEMPO grafted on highly doped, i.e., metallic, electrodes can be tuned to predictably manipulate the oxidizing power of surface nitroxide/oxoammonium redox couple, hence showing the practical importance of the electrostatics on the electrolyte side of the radical monolayer. Conversely, for monolayers prepared on the poorly doped electrodes, the electrostatic interactions between the tethered TEMPO units and the semiconductor-side, i.e., space-charge, become dominant and result in drastic kinetic changes to the electroactivity of the radical monolayer as well as electrochemical nonidealities that can be explained as an increase in the self-interaction "a" parameter that leads to the Frumkin isotherm. PMID:27373457

  9. Efficient dye regeneration at low driving force achieved in triphenylamine dye LEG4 and TEMPO redox mediator based dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wenxing; Vlachopoulos, Nick; Hao, Yan; Hagfeldt, Anders; Boschloo, Gerrit

    2015-06-28

    Minimizing the driving force required for the regeneration of oxidized dyes using redox mediators in an electrolyte is essential to further improve the open-circuit voltage and efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Appropriate combinations of redox mediators and dye molecules should be explored to achieve this goal. Herein, we present a triphenylamine dye, LEG4, in combination with a TEMPO-based electrolyte in acetonitrile (E(0) = 0.89 V vs. NHE), reaching an efficiency of up to 5.4% under one sun illumination and 40% performance improvement compared to the previously and widely used indoline dye D149. The origin of this improvement was found to be the increased dye regeneration efficiency of LEG4 using the TEMPO redox mediator, which regenerated more than 80% of the oxidized dye with a driving force of only ∼0.2 eV. Detailed mechanistic studies further revealed that in addition to electron recombination to oxidized dyes, recombination of electrons from the conducting substrate and the mesoporous TiO2 film to the TEMPO(+) redox species in the electrolyte accounts for the reduced short circuit current, compared to the state-of-the-art cobalt tris(bipyridine) electrolyte system. The diffusion length of the TEMPO-electrolyte based DSSCs was determined to be ∼0.5 μm, which is smaller than the ∼2.8 μm found for cobalt-electrolyte based DSSCs. These results show the advantages of using LEG4 as a sensitizer, compared to previously record indoline dyes, in combination with a TEMPO-based electrolyte. The low driving force for efficient dye regeneration presented by these results shows the potential to further improve the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of DSSCs by utilizing redox couples and dyes with a minimal need of driving force for high regeneration yields. PMID:26016854

  10. How group size affects vigilance dynamics and time allocation patterns: the key role of imitation and tempo.

    PubMed

    Michelena, Pablo; Deneubourg, Jean-Louis

    2011-01-01

    In the context of social foraging, predator detection has been the subject of numerous studies, which acknowledge the adaptive response of the individual to the trade-off between feeding and vigilance. Typically, animals gain energy by increasing their feeding time and decreasing their vigilance effort with increasing group size, without increasing their risk of predation ('group size effect'). Research on the biological utility of vigilance has prevailed over considerations of the mechanistic rules that link individual decisions to group behavior. With sheep as a model species, we identified how the behaviors of conspecifics affect the individual decisions to switch activity. We highlight a simple mechanism whereby the group size effect on collective vigilance dynamics is shaped by two key features: the magnitude of social amplification and intrinsic differences between foraging and scanning bout durations. Our results highlight a positive correlation between the duration of scanning and foraging bouts at the level of the group. This finding reveals the existence of groups with high and low rates of transition between activities, suggesting individual variations in the transition rate, or 'tempo'. We present a mathematical model based on behavioral rules derived from experiments. Our theoretical predictions show that the system is robust in respect to variations in the propensity to imitate scanning and foraging, yet flexible in respect to differences in the duration of activity bouts. The model shows how individual decisions contribute to collective behavior patterns and how the group, in turn, facilitates individual-level adaptive responses. PMID:21525987

  11. Tempo-Spatial Variations of Ambient Ozone-Mortality Associations in the USA: Results from the NMMAPS Data.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; Zeng, Weilin; Lin, Hualiang; Rutherford, Shannon; Xiao, Jianpeng; Li, Xing; Li, Zhihao; Qian, Zhengmin; Feng, Baixiang; Ma, Wenjun

    2016-01-01

    Although the health effects of ambient ozone have been widely assessed, their tempo-spatial variations remain unclear. We selected 20 communities (ten each from southern and northern USA) based on the US National Morbidity, Mortality, and Air Pollution Study (NMMAPS) dataset. A generalized linear model (GLM) was used to estimate the season-specific association between each 10 ppb (lag0-2 day average) increment in daily 8 h maximum ozone concentration and mortality in every community. The results showed that in the southern communities, a 10 ppb increment in ozone was linked to an increment of mortality of -0.07%, -0.17%, 0.40% and 0.27% in spring, summer, autumn and winter, respectively. For the northern communities, the excess risks (ERs) were 0.74%, 1.21%, 0.52% and -0.65% in the spring, summer, autumn and winter seasons, respectively. City-specific ozone-related mortality effects were positively related with latitude, but negatively related with seasonal average temperature in the spring, summer and autumn seasons. However, a reverse relationship was found in the winter. We concluded that there were different seasonal patterns of ozone effects on mortality between southern and northern US communities. Latitude and seasonal average temperature were identified as modifiers of the ambient ozone-related mortality risks. PMID:27571094

  12. Mode and tempo in the evolution of socio-political organization: reconciling 'Darwinian' and 'Spencerian' evolutionary approaches in anthropology.

    PubMed

    Currie, Thomas E; Mace, Ruth

    2011-04-12

    Traditional investigations of the evolution of human social and political institutions trace their ancestry back to nineteenth century social scientists such as Herbert Spencer, and have concentrated on the increase in socio-political complexity over time. More recent studies of cultural evolution have been explicitly informed by Darwinian evolutionary theory and focus on the transmission of cultural traits between individuals. These two approaches to investigating cultural change are often seen as incompatible. However, we argue that many of the defining features and assumptions of 'Spencerian' cultural evolutionary theory represent testable hypotheses that can and should be tackled within a broader 'Darwinian' framework. In this paper we apply phylogenetic comparative techniques to data from Austronesian-speaking societies of Island South-East Asia and the Pacific to test hypotheses about the mode and tempo of human socio-political evolution. We find support for three ideas often associated with Spencerian cultural evolutionary theory: (i) political organization has evolved through a regular sequence of forms, (ii) increases in hierarchical political complexity have been more common than decreases, and (iii) political organization has co-evolved with the wider presence of hereditary social stratification. PMID:21357233

  13. Uncovering a clinical portrait of sluggish cognitive tempo within an evaluation for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: A case study.

    PubMed

    Becker, Stephen P; Ciesielski, Heather A; Rood, Jennifer E; Froehlich, Tanya E; Garner, Annie A; Tamm, Leanne; Epstein, Jeffery N

    2016-01-01

    Despite the burgeoning scientific literature examining the sluggish cognitive tempo (SCT) construct, very little is known about the clinical presentation of SCT. In clinical cases where SCT is suspected, it is critical to carefully assess not only for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) but also for other comorbidities that may account for the SCT-related behaviors, especially internalizing symptoms and sleep problems. The current case study provides a clinical description of SCT in a 7-year-old girl, offering a real-life portrait of SCT while also providing an opportunity to qualitatively differentiate between SCT and ADHD, other psychopathologies (e.g. depression, anxiety), and potentially related domains of functioning (e.g. sleep, executive functioning [EF]). "Jessica" was described by herself, parents, and teacher as being much slower than her peers in completing schoolwork, despite standardized testing showing Jessica to have above average intelligence and academic achievement. Jessica's parents completed rating scales indicating high levels of SCT symptoms and daytime sleepiness, as well as mildly elevated EF deficits. More research is needed to determine how to best conceptualize, assess, and treat SCT, and Jessica's case underscores the importance of further work in this area. PMID:25326531

  14. Studies on the tempo of bubble formation in recently cavitated vessels: a model to predict the pressure of air bubbles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yujie; Pan, Ruihua; Tyree, Melvin T

    2015-06-01

    A cavitation event in a vessel replaces water with a mixture of water vapor and air. A quantitative theory is presented to argue that the tempo of filling of vessels with air has two phases: a fast process that extracts air from stem tissue adjacent to the cavitated vessels (less than 10 s) and a slow phase that extracts air from the atmosphere outside the stem (more than 10 h). A model was designed to estimate how water tension (T) near recently cavitated vessels causes bubbles in embolized vessels to expand or contract as T increases or decreases, respectively. The model also predicts that the hydraulic conductivity of a stem will increase as bubbles collapse. The pressure of air bubbles trapped in vessels of a stem can be predicted from the model based on fitting curves of hydraulic conductivity versus T. The model was validated using data from six stem segments each of Acer mono and the clonal hybrid Populus 84 K (Populus alba × Populus glandulosa). The model was fitted to results with root mean square error less than 3%. The model provided new insight into the study of embolism formation in stem tissue and helped quantify the bubble pressure immediately after the fast process referred to above. PMID:25907963

  15. The tempo of trait divergence in geographic isolation: avian speciation across the Marañon Valley of Peru.

    PubMed

    Winger, Benjamin M; Bates, John M

    2015-03-01

    Geographic isolation is considered essential to most speciation events, but our understanding of what controls the pace and degree of phenotypic divergence among allopatric populations remains poor. Why do some taxa exhibit phenotypic differentiation across barriers to dispersal, whereas others do not? To test factors controlling phenotypic divergence in allopatry, we employed a comparative phylogeographic approach consisting of replicates of ecologically similar Andean bird species isolated across a major biogeographic barrier, the Marañon Valley of Peru. Our study design leverages variation among codistributed taxa in their degree of plumage, morphometric, and vocal differentiation across the Marañon to examine the tempo of phenotypic evolution. We found that substantial plumage differences between populations required roughly two million years to evolve. In contrast, morphometric trait evolution showed greater idiosyncrasy and stasis. Our results demonstrate that despite a large degree of idiosyncrasy in the relationship between genetic and phenotypic divergence across taxa and environments, comparative studies within regions may reveal predictability in the pace of phenotypic divergence. Our results also suggest that social selection is important for driving differentiation of populations found in similar environments. PMID:25611790

  16. Mercury bioaccumulation in the food web of Three Gorges Reservoir (China): Tempo-spatial patterns and effect of reservoir management.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Zhou, Qiong; Yuan, Gailing; He, Xugang; Xie, Ping

    2015-09-15

    Tempo-spatial patterns of mercury bioaccumulation and tropho-dynamics, and the potential for a reservoir effect were evaluated in the Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR, China) from 2011 to 2012, using total mercury concentrations (THg) and stable isotopes (δ(13)C and δ(15)N) of food web components (seston, aquatic invertebrates and fish). Hg concentrations in aquatic invertebrates and fish indicated a significant temporal trend associated with regular seasonal water-level manipulation. This includes water level lowering to allow for storage of water during the wet season (summer); a decrease of water levels from September to June providing a setting for flood storage. Hg concentrations in organisms were the highest after flooding. Higher Hg concentrations in fish were observed at the location farthest from the dam. Hg concentrations in water and sediment were correlated. Compared with the reservoirs of United States and Canada, TGR had lower trophic magnification factors (0.046-0.066), that are explained primarily by organic carbon concentrations in sediment, and the effect of "growth dilution". Based on comparison before and after the impoundment of TGR, THg concentration in biota did not display an obvious long-term reservoir effect due to (i) short time since inundation, (ii) regular water discharge associated with water-level regulation, and/or (iii) low organic matter content in the sediment. PMID:25958367

  17. Data in support of dual-functionalized cellulose nanofibrils prepared through TEMPO-mediated oxidation and surface-initiated ATRP

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Tzung-Yung; Huang, Chih-Feng

    2015-01-01

    We previously studied a suitably 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO)-oxidized cellulose nanofibrils (TOCNs) that can be further functionalized with initiating sites and overcame the obstacle of performing atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) in the presence of neutral carboxylic acid sodium salt groups [1]. Herein, characterization of the modified TOCNs and of the products from surface-initiated (SI) ATRP of the (nano)celluloses with styrene (St) was performed using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), gel permeation chromatography (GPC), and contact angle (CA) measurements. From the analysis of 1H NMR, a high purity of sacrificial initiator (i.e., 2-hydroxyethyl 2-bromoisobutyrate (HEBiB)) was confirmed. HEBiB was utilized to trace the SI ATRP with the generated free PSt. Gradually molecular weight evaluations were revealed from GPC analysis (ca. Mn=21,000 and Đ=1.10) using different TOCNs, implying the insignificant contribution to the kinetics from the grafted initiating sites. The TOCN-g-PSts were further characterized by contact angles and displayed an obvious reversibility between hydrophilicity and hydrophobicity in tens of minutes. These results illustrated a simple and facile approach for controlling the graft length and composition of TOCNs through SI ATRP. PMID:26217744

  18. Influence of 13C isotopic labeling location of 13C DNP of acetate using TEMPO free radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parish, Christopher; Niedbalski, Peter; Lumata, Lloyd

    2015-03-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) via the dissolution method enhances the liquid-state magnetic resonance (NMR or MRI) signals of insensitive nuclear spins by at least 10,000-fold. The basis for all these signal enhancements at room temperature is the polarization transfer from the electrons to nuclear spins at cryogenic temperature and high magnetic field. In this work, we have studied the influence of the location of 13C isotopic labeling on the DNP of sodium acetate at 3.35 T and 1.4 K using a wide ESR linewidth free radical 4-oxo-TEMPO. The carbonyl [1-13C]acetate spins produced a polarization level that is almost twice that of the methyl [2-13C]acetate spins. On the other hand, the polarization of the methyl 13C spins doubled to reach the level of [1-13C]acetate when the methyl group was deuterated. Meanwhile, the solid-state nuclear relaxation of these samples are the same and do not correlate with the polarization levels. These behavior implies that the nuclear relaxation for these samples is dominated by the contribution from the free radicals and the polarization levels can be explained by a thermodynamic picture of DNP.

  19. Sluggish cognitive tempo in psychiatrically hospitalized children: factor structure and relations to internalizing symptoms, social problems, and observed behavioral dysregulation.

    PubMed

    Becker, Stephen P; Luebbe, Aaron M; Fite, Paula J; Stoppelbein, Laura; Greening, Leilani

    2014-01-01

    As research examining sluggish cognitive tempo (SCT) advances, it is important to examine the structure and validity of SCT in a variety of samples, including samples of children who are clinically-distressed but not referred specifically for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The present study used a large sample of psychiatrically hospitalized children (N = 680; 73 % male; 66 % African American) between the ages of 6 and 12 to examine the latent structure of SCT, ADHD, oppositional defiant disorder (ODD), depression, and anxiety using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). Results of the CFA analyses demonstrated that SCT is distinct from these other dimensions of child psychopathology, including ADHD inattention, depression, and anxiety. Regression analyses indicated that SCT symptoms were positively associated with depression and, to a lesser degree, anxiety. SCT symptoms were also positively associated with children's general social problems, whereas SCT symptoms were negatively associated with an observational measure of behavioral dysregulation (i.e., frequency of time-outs received as a part of a manualized behavior modification program). These associations were significant above and beyond relevant child demographic variables (i.e., age, sex, race), children's other mental health symptoms (i.e., ADHD, ODD, depression, anxiety symptoms), and, for all relations except child anxiety, parents' own anxiety and depression symptoms. PMID:23359144

  20. Speech tempo and fundamental frequency patterns: a case study of male monozygotic twins and an age- and sex-matched sibling.

    PubMed

    Whiteside, Sandra P; Rixon, Emma

    2013-12-01

    This case study describes an investigation into the speaking characteristics of a set of male monozygotic (MZ) twins (T1 and T2) and an age- and sex-matched sibling (S). Measures of speech tempo and fundamental frequency (F0) were analysed in the speech samples of a reading passage. Results showed significant between-sibling differences for sentence durations and F0 parameters; however, Euclidean distance (ED) measures revealed the smallest distances between the F0 parameters of the MZ twins. The smallest ED values were also observed between T1 and T2 for word durations, pause durations, all-voiced sample durations, and all the all-voiced sample F0 parameters. Greater similarities were observed across all three siblings for the speech tempo and dynamic F0 parameters. PMID:23194081

  1. Organocatalytic Aerobic Oxidation of Benzylic sp(3) C-H Bonds of Ethers and Alkylarenes Promoted by a Recyclable TEMPO Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiguang; Gao, Yuan; Liu, Yuan; Li, Jianjun; Xie, Hexin; Li, Hao; Wang, Wei

    2015-11-01

    An entirely metal-free catalyst system consisting of an easily prepared recyclable new TEMPO derived sulfonic salt catalyst, and mineral acids (NaNO2 and HCl) has been developed for selective aerobic oxidation of structurally diverse benzylic sp(3) C-H bonds of ethers and alkylarenes. The mild reaction conditions allow for the generation of synthetically and biologically valued isochromanones and xanthones from readily accessible alkyl aromatic precursors in good yields. PMID:26513695

  2. Sluggish Cognitive Tempo and ADHD Inattention as Predictors of Externalizing, Internalizing, and Impairment Domains: A 2-Year Longitudinal Study.

    PubMed

    Bernad, Maria del Mar; Servera, Mateu; Becker, Stephen P; Burns, G Leonard

    2016-05-01

    Although sluggish cognitive tempo (SCT) is distinct from attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder inattention (ADHD-IN), few studies have examined whether SCT longitudinally predicts other symptom or impairment dimensions. This study used 4 sources (mothers, fathers, primary teachers, and secondary teachers) and 3 occasions of measurement (first, second, and third grades) with 758 first grade (55 % boys), 718 second grade (54 % boys), and 585 third grade (53 % boys) children from Spain to determine SCT's and ADHD-IN's unique longitudinal relationships with psychopathology, academic impairment, and social impairment over the 1- and 2-year intervals (i.e., first to third grade, second to third grade). For 1- and 2-year intervals using both mothers' and fathers' ratings, higher levels of SCT uniquely predicted higher levels of anxiety, depression, academic impairment, and social impairment whereas higher levels of ADHD-IN uniquely predicted higher levels of ADHD-HI, ODD, and academic impairment. For 1- and 2-year intervals across different primary and secondary teachers (i.e., first/second and third grade ratings were provided by different teachers), higher scores on ADHD-IN uniquely predicted poorer outcomes across domains whereas higher scores on SCT uniquely predicted lower levels of ADHD-HI and ODD for both intervals in addition to higher levels of depression (for primary teachers only), academic impairment (for 1-year interval only), and peer rejection (2-year interval only for primary teachers). Overall, SCT was significantly associated with important outcomes independent of ADHD-IN over 1- and 2-year intervals and across four different raters. This study provides further evidence for distinguishing between SCT and ADHD-IN in home and school settings. PMID:26278273

  3. Flexible Paper Electrodes for Li-Ion Batteries Using Low Amount of TEMPO-Oxidized Cellulose Nanofibrils as Binder.

    PubMed

    Lu, Huiran; Behm, Mårten; Leijonmarck, Simon; Lindbergh, Göran; Cornell, Ann

    2016-07-20

    Flexible Li-ion batteries attract increasing interest for applications in bendable and wearable electronic devices. TEMPO-oxidized cellulose nanofibrils (TOCNF), a renewable material, is a promising candidate as binder for flexible Li-ion batteries with good mechanical properties. Paper batteries can be produced using a water-based paper making process, avoiding the use of toxic solvents. In this work, finely dispersed TOCNF was used and showed good binding properties at concentrations as low as 4 wt %. The TOCNF was characterized using atomic force microscopy and found to be well dispersed with fibrils of average widths of about 2.7 nm and lengths of approximately 0.1-1 μm. Traces of moisture, trapped in the hygroscopic cellulose, is a concern when the material is used in Li-ion batteries. The low amount of binder reduces possible moisture and also increases the capacity of the electrodes, based on total weight. Effects of moisture on electrochemical battery performance were studied on electrodes dried at 110 °C in a vacuum for varying periods. It was found that increased drying time slightly increased the specific capacities of the LiFePO4 electrodes, whereas the capacities of the graphite electrodes decreased. The Coulombic efficiencies of the electrodes were not much affected by the varying drying times. Drying the electrodes for 1 h was enough to achieve good electrochemical performance. Addition of vinylene carbonate to the electrolyte had a positive effect on cycling for both graphite and LiFePO4. A failure mechanism observed at high TOCNF concentrations is the formation of compact films in the electrodes. PMID:27362635

  4. Autonomic Effects of Music in Health and Crohn's Disease: The Impact of Isochronicity, Emotional Valence, and Tempo

    PubMed Central

    Krabs, Roland Uwe; Enk, Ronny; Teich, Niels; Koelsch, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Background Music can evoke strong emotions and thus elicit significant autonomic nervous system (ANS) responses. However, previous studies investigating music-evoked ANS effects produced inconsistent results. In particular, it is not clear (a) whether simply a musical tactus (without common emotional components of music) is sufficient to elicit ANS effects; (b) whether changes in the tempo of a musical piece contribute to the ANS effects; (c) whether emotional valence of music influences ANS effects; and (d) whether music-elicited ANS effects are comparable in healthy subjects and patients with Crohn´s disease (CD, an inflammatory bowel disease suspected to be associated with autonomic dysfunction). Methods To address these issues, three experiments were conducted, with a total of n = 138 healthy subjects and n = 19 CD patients. Heart rate (HR), heart rate variability (HRV), and electrodermal activity (EDA) were recorded while participants listened to joyful pleasant music, isochronous tones, and unpleasant control stimuli. Results Compared to silence, both pleasant music and unpleasant control stimuli elicited an increase in HR and a decrease in a variety of HRV parameters. Surprisingly, similar ANS effects were elicited by isochronous tones (i.e., simply by a tactus). ANS effects did not differ between pleasant and unpleasant stimuli, and different tempi of the music did not entrain ANS activity. Finally, music-evoked ANS effects did not differ between healthy individuals and CD patients. Conclusions The isochronous pulse of music (i.e., the tactus) is a major factor of music-evoked ANS effects. These ANS effects are characterized by increased sympathetic activity. The emotional valence of a musical piece contributes surprisingly little to the ANS activity changes evoked by that piece. PMID:25955253

  5. The Child Concentration Inventory (CCI): Initial validation of a child self-report measure of sluggish cognitive tempo.

    PubMed

    Becker, Stephen P; Luebbe, Aaron M; Joyce, Ann Marie

    2015-09-01

    Sluggish cognitive tempo (SCT) is characterized by excessive daydreaming, mental confusion, slowness, and low motivation. Several teacher- and parent-report measures of SCT have recently been developed but a child self-report measure of SCT does not yet exist despite clear links between SCT and internalizing psychopathology (for which self-report is often desired). This study examined the initial reliability and validity of the Child Concentration Inventory (CCI), a child self-report measure of SCT symptoms, in a school-based sample of 124 children (ages 8-13; 55% female). Children completed the CCI and measures of academic/social functioning, emotion regulation, and self-esteem. Teachers completed measures of psychopathology symptoms (including SCT) and academic/social functioning. Although exploratory structural equation modeling (ESEM) supported a 3-factor model of the CCI (consisting of slow, sleepy, and daydreamer scales closely resembling the factor structure of the parent-report version of this measure), bifactor modeling and omega reliability indices indicated that the CCI is best conceptualized as unidimensional. CCI scores were significantly correlated with teacher-rated SCT and were statistically distinct from teacher-rated ADHD and child-rated anxiety/depression. After controlling for sex, grade, and other psychopathology symptoms, the CCI total score was significantly associated with poorer child-reported academic/social functioning and self-worth in addition to increased loneliness and emotion dysregulation. Child ratings on the CCI were moderately to strongly correlated with poorer teacher-rated academic/social functioning but these associations were reduced to nonsignificance after controlling for demographics and other psychopathology symptoms. Findings provide preliminary support for the CCI, and future directions include replication with adolescents and clinical samples in order to further examine the CCI's factor structure, reliability, validity

  6. Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and sluggish cognitive tempo dimensions in relation to executive functioning in adolescents with ADHD.

    PubMed

    Becker, Stephen P; Langberg, Joshua M

    2014-02-01

    Previous research has failed to find a consistent relation between Sluggish Cognitive Tempo (SCT) and executive function (EF) in youth with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) when laboratory-based neuropsychological tasks of EF are used, whereas recent research with youth and adults suggests a significant relation between SCT and ratings of EF. The purpose of this study was to examine ADHD dimensions and SCT symptoms in relation to ratings of EF in adolescents with ADHD. Fifty-two adolescents (ages 12-16; 70 % male) participated in this study. Parents and teachers completed validated measures of SCT, ADHD symptoms, and EF in daily life. Adolescents' intelligence and academic achievement were also assessed. ADHD and SCT symptoms were significantly correlated with ratings of EF. Regression analyses demonstrated that, as hypothesized, ADHD hyperactive-impulsive symptoms were strongly associated with behavioral regulation EF deficits, with ADHD inattentive and SCT symptoms unrelated to behavioral regulation EF when hyperactive-impulsivity symptoms were included in the model. The parent-reported SCT Slow scale measuring motivation, initiative, and apathy predicted both parent- and teacher-reported metacognitive EF deficits above and beyond youth characteristics and ADHD symptoms. In contrast, teacher-reported ADHD inattention was most clearly associated with teacher-reported metacognitive EF deficits. This study provides preliminary evidence for the importance of SCT symptoms in relation to metacognitive EF deficits among adolescents with ADHD and the need to further investigate the overlap and distinctiveness of SCT/ADHD. Further research is needed to replicate and extend these findings. PMID:23443466

  7. Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder dimensions and sluggish cognitive tempo symptoms in relation to college students' sleep functioning.

    PubMed

    Becker, Stephen P; Luebbe, Aaron M; Langberg, Joshua M

    2014-12-01

    This study examined separate inattentive, hyperactive, and impulsive dimensions of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), as well as sluggish cognitive tempo (SCT) symptoms, in relation to college students' sleep functioning. Participants were 288 college students (ages 17-24; 65 % female; 90 % non-Hispanic White; 12 % self-reported having an ADHD diagnoses) who completed measures of ADHD/SCT symptoms and sleep functioning. Participants reported obtaining an average of 6.8 h of sleep per night (only 26 % reported obtaining ≥8 h of sleep) and having a sleep onset latency of 25 min. 63 % were classified as "poor sleepers," and poor sleepers had higher rates of ADHD and SCT symptoms than "good sleepers". Path analysis controlling for ADHD status and psychiatric medication use was used to determine associations between psychopathology and sleep functioning domains. Above and beyond covariates and other psychopathologies, hyperactivity (but not impulsivity) was significantly associated with poorer sleep quality, longer sleep latency, shorter sleep duration, and more use of sleep medications. SCT symptoms (but not inattention) were significantly associated with poorer sleep quality and increased nighttime sleep disturbance (e.g., having bad dreams, waking up in the middle of the night, feeling too cold or too hot). Both inattention and SCT were associated with greater daytime dysfunction. Regression analyses demonstrated that hyperactivity predicted sleep quality above and beyond the influence of daytime dysfunction, and inattention and SCT predicted daytime dysfunction above and beyond sleep quality. Further studies are needed to examine the interrelations of nighttime sleep functioning, ADHD/SCT, and daytime dysfunction, as well to elucidate mechanisms contributing to related functional impairments. PMID:24515313

  8. Change Your Tempo

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poliniak, Susan

    2009-01-01

    It seems as though everyone has an overcrowded work schedule these days, and music teachers are no exception. There are some blessed souls for whom it all comes easily. They finish what they need to when they need to, or much earlier than it is required. Their work schedules are impeccably prepped, and they have time for dozens of other…

  9. Utilizing TEMPO surface estimates to determine changes in emissions, community exposure and environmental impacts from cement kilns across North America using alternative fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pegg, M. J.; Gibson, M. D.; Asamany, E.

    2015-12-01

    A major problem faced by all North American (NA) Governments is managing solid waste from residential and non-residential sources. One way to mitigate the need to expand landfill sites across NA is waste diversion for use as alternative fuel in industries such as cement manufacture. Currently, waste plastic, tires, waste shingles and other high carbon content waste destined for landfill are being explored, or currently used, as an alternative supplemental fuels for use in cement kilns across NA. While this is an attractive, environmentally sustainable solution, significant knowledge gaps remain in our fundamental understanding of whether these alternative fuels may lead to increased air pollution emissions from cement kilns across NA. The long-term objective of using TEMPO is to advance fundamental understanding of uncharacterized air pollution emissions and to assess the actual or potential environmental and health impacts of these emissions from cement kilns across NA. TEMPO measurements will be made in concert with in-situ observations augmented by air dispersion, land-use regression and receptor modelling. This application of TEMPO follows on from current research on a series of bench scale and pilot studies for Lafarge Canada Inc., that investigated the change in combustion emissions from various mixtures of coal (C), petroleum coke (PC) and non-recyclable alternative fuels. From our work we demonstrated that using an alternative fuel mixture in a cement kiln has potential to reduce emissions of CO2 by 34%; reduce NOx by 80%, and reduce fuel SO2 emissions by 98%. We also provided evidence that there would be a significant reduction in the formation of secondary ground-level ozone (O3) and secondary PM2.5 in downwind stack plumes if alternative waste derived fuels are used. The application of air dispersion, source apportionment, land use regression; together with remote sensing offers a powerful set of tools with the potential to improve air pollution

  10. Development of an LC-MS method for ultra trace-level determination of 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxl (TEMPO), a potential genotoxic impurity within active pharmaceutical ingredients.

    PubMed

    Pennington, Justin; Cohen, Ryan D; Tian, Ye; Boulineau, Fabien

    2015-10-10

    TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl) is a stable free radical which has been widely used for various research and industrial applications, including the manufacture of many active pharmaceutical ingredients. TEMPO has been identified as a potential genotoxic impurity resulting in the need for analytical methodology to accurately determine its level at several orders of magnitude less than typical impurity quantitation limits. TEMPO can undergo disproportionation to form both oxidized and reduced TEMPO, making individual determination unreliable. To overcome this challenge, all TEMPO related species were converted to the reduced form through reduction with sodium ascorbate. Given the ultra-trace (0.5 ppm) level requirements and the lack of UV response in the reduced form, a single quadrupole mass spectrometer (MS) was utilized. In order to implement a highly sensitive MS method in a GMP environment, several approaches were employed to optimize accuracy and robustness including: internal standard correction for drift elimination, six-level standard addition to reduce matrix effects, and weighted linear regression to cover a broad analytical range. The method was fully validated according to ICH guidelines. The method is specific, linear, accurate, precise, and robust within a range of 0.5-100 ppm. PMID:25921639

  11. Improvement of the Thermal Stability of TEMPO-Oxidized Cellulose Nanofibrils by Heat-Induced Conversion of Ionic Bonds to Amide Bonds.

    PubMed

    Lavoine, Nathalie; Bras, Julien; Saito, Tsuguyuki; Isogai, Akira

    2016-07-01

    Improving thermal stability of TEMPO-oxidized cellulose nanofibrils (TOCNs) is a major challenge for the development and preparation of new nanocomposites. However, thermal degradation of TOCNs occurs at 220 °C. The present study reports a simple way to improve thermal stability of TOCNs by the heat-induced conversion of ionic bonds to amide bonds. Coupling amine-terminated polyethylene glycol to the TOCNs is performed through ionic bond formation. Films are produced from the dispersions by the casting method. Infrared spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis confirm conversion of ionic bonds to amide bonds for the modified TOCN samples after heating. As a result, improvement of TOCNs' thermal stability by up to 90 °C is successfully achieved. PMID:27184669

  12. Stem Hydraulic Conductivity depends on the Pressure at Which It Is Measured and How This Dependence Can Be Used to Assess the Tempo of Bubble Pressurization in Recently Cavitated Vessels1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jinyu; Tyree, Melvin T.

    2015-01-01

    Cavitation of water in xylem vessels followed by embolism formation has been authenticated for more than 40 years. Embolism formation involves the gradual buildup of bubble pressure (air) to atmospheric pressure as demanded by Henry’s law of equilibrium between gaseous and liquid phases. However, the tempo of pressure increase has not been quantified. In this report, we show that the rate of pressurization of embolized vessels is controlled by both fast and slow kinetics, where both tempos are controlled by diffusion but over different spatial scales. The fast tempo involves a localized diffusion from endogenous sources: over a distance of about 0.05 mm from water-filled wood to the nearest embolized vessels; this process, in theory, should take <2 min. The slow tempo involves diffusion of air from exogenous sources (outside the stem). The latter diffusion process is slower because of the increased distance of diffusion of up to 4 mm. Radial diffusion models and experimental measurements both confirm that the average time constant is >17 h, with complete equilibrium requiring 1 to 2 d. The implications of these timescales for the standard methods of measuring percentage loss of hydraulic conductivity are discussed in theory and deserve more research in future. PMID:26468516

  13. Tempo-spatially resolved cellular dynamics of human immunodeficiency virus transacting activator of transcription (Tat) peptide-modified nanocargos in living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Lin; Yang, Qiaoyu; Xiao, Lehui

    2014-08-01

    Understanding the cellular uptake mechanism and intracellular fate of nanocarriers in living cells is of great importance for the rational design of efficient drug delivery cargos as well as the development of robust biomedical diagnostic probes. In present study, with a dual wavelength view darkfield microscope (DWVD), the tempo-spatially resolved dynamics of Tat peptide-functionalized gold nanoparticles (TGNPs, with size similar to viruses) in living HeLa cells were extensively explored. It was found that energy-dependent endocytosis (both clathrin- and caveolae-mediated processes were involved) was the prevailing pathway for the cellular uptake of TGNPs. The time-correlated dynamic spatial distribution information revealed that TGNPs could not actively target the cell nuclei, which is contrary to previous observations based on fixed cell results. More importantly, the inheritance of TGNPs to the daughter cells through mitosis was found to be the major route to metabolize TGNPs by HeLa cells. These understandings on the cellular uptake mechanism and intracellular fate of nanocargos in living cells would provide deep insight on how to improve and controllably manipulate their translocation efficiency for targeted drug delivery.Understanding the cellular uptake mechanism and intracellular fate of nanocarriers in living cells is of great importance for the rational design of efficient drug delivery cargos as well as the development of robust biomedical diagnostic probes. In present study, with a dual wavelength view darkfield microscope (DWVD), the tempo-spatially resolved dynamics of Tat peptide-functionalized gold nanoparticles (TGNPs, with size similar to viruses) in living HeLa cells were extensively explored. It was found that energy-dependent endocytosis (both clathrin- and caveolae-mediated processes were involved) was the prevailing pathway for the cellular uptake of TGNPs. The time-correlated dynamic spatial distribution information revealed that TGNPs

  14. A novel adsorbent TEMPO-mediated oxidized cellulose nanofibrils modified with PEI: Preparation, characterization, and application for Cu(II) removal.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nan; Zang, Guo-Long; Shi, Chen; Yu, Han-Qing; Sheng, Guo-Ping

    2016-10-01

    This study describes the preparation of a novel adsorbent based on cellulose nanofibrils by first TEMPO mediated oxidation and then PEI grafting (TOCN-PEI) for heavy metal removal. FTIR results demonstrated the successful introduction of the adsorption functional groups (carboxyl and amino groups), and the elemental analysis and acid base titration were used to quantify the contents of these introduced groups. The kinetics curve suited the pseudo-second-order model better and the equilibrium data well fitted the Langmuir model, with the maximum Cu(II) uptake of 52.32mgg(-1). Kinetic study showed that the PEI grafting increased the initial adsorption rate of the TOCN-PEI compared with the adsorbents without PEI. Thermodynamic study was carried out through isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) measurement and the binding reaction was found to be exothermic and driven by enthalpy change. The adsorption process by TOCN-PEI was pH dependent, and decreasing pH would lead to desorption of Cu(II) ions, thus make the reuse of the absorbent more convenient through adsorption-desorption cycles. PMID:27208612

  15. Salivary and plasma cortisol and testosterone responses to interval and tempo runs and a bodyweight-only circuit session in endurance-trained men.

    PubMed

    Tanner, Amy Vivien; Nielsen, Birthe Vejby; Allgrove, Judith

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the acute response to plasma and salivary cortisol and testosterone to three training protocols. Ten trained endurance athletes participated in three experimental trials, such as interval training (INT), tempo run (TEMP) and bodyweight-only circuit training (CIR), on separate days. Blood and saliva samples were collected pre- and 0, 15, 30 and 60 min post-exercise. Peak post-exercise salivary cortisol was higher than pre-exercise in all trials (P < 0.01). After INT, salivary cortisol remained elevated above pre-exercise than 60 min post-exercise. Salivary testosterone also increased post-exercise in all trials (P < 0.05). Plasma and salivary cortisol were correlated between individuals (r = 0.81, 0.73-0.88) and within individuals (r = 0.81, 0.73-0.87) (P < 0.01). Plasma and salivary testosterone was also correlated between (r = 0.57, 0.43-0.69) and within individuals (r = 0.60, 0.45-0.72), (P < 0.01). Peak cortisol and testosterone levels occurred simultaneously in plasma and saliva, but timing of post-exercise hormone peaks differed between trials and individuals. Further investigation is required to identify the mechanisms eliciting an increase in hormones in response to CIR. Furthermore, saliva is a valid alternative sampling technique for measurement of cortisol, although the complex, individual and situation dependent nature of the hormone response to acute exercise should be considered. PMID:24279436

  16. Sequential proteolysis and high-field FTICR MS to determine disulfide connectivity and 4-maleimide TEMPO spin-label location in L126C GM2 activator protein.

    PubMed

    Tipton, Jeremiah D; Carter, Jeffrey D; Mathias, Jordan D; Emmett, Mark R; Fanucci, Gail E; Marshall, Alan G

    2009-09-15

    The GM2 activator protein (GM2AP) is an 18 kDa nonenzymatic accessory protein involved in the degradation of neuronal gangliosides. Genetic mutations of GM2AP can disrupt ganglioside catabolism and lead to deadly lysosomal storage disorders. Crystallography of wild-type GM2AP reveals 4 disulfide bonds and multiple conformations of a flexible loop region that is thought to be involved in lipid binding. To extend the crystallography results, a cysteine construct (L126C) was expressed and modified with 4-maleimide TEMPO for electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies. However, because a ninth cysteine has been added by site-directed mutagenesis and the protein was expressed in E. coli in the form of inclusion bodies, the protein could misfold during expression. To verify correct protein folding and labeling, a sequential multiple-protease digestion, nano-liquid chromatograph (LC) electrospray ionization 14.5 T Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry assay was developed. High-magnetic field and robust automatic gain control results in subppm mass accuracy for location of the spin-labeled cysteine and verification of proper connectivity of the four disulfide bonds. The sequential multiple protease digestion strategy and ultrahigh mass accuracy provided by FTICR MS allow for rapid and unequivocal assignment of relevant peptides and provide a simple pipeline for analyzing other GM2AP constructs. PMID:19689113

  17. Effect of interfibrillar PVA bridging on water stability and mechanical properties of TEMPO/NaClO2 oxidized cellulosic nanofibril films.

    PubMed

    Hakalahti, Minna; Salminen, Arto; Seppälä, Jukka; Tammelin, Tekla; Hänninen, Tuomas

    2015-08-01

    TEMPO/NaClO2 oxidized cellulosic nanofibrils (TCNF) were covalently bonded with poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) to render water stable films. Pure TCNF films and TCNF-PVA films in dry state showed similar humidity dependent behavior in the elastic region. However, in wet films PVA had a significant effect on stability and mechanical characteristics of the films. When soaked in water, pure TCNF films exhibited strong swelling behavior and poor wet strength, whereas covalently bridged TCNF-PVA composite films remained intact and could easily be handled even after 24h of soaking. Wet tensile strength of the films was considerably enhanced with only 10 wt% PVA addition. At 25% PVA concentration wet tensile strengths were decreased and films were more yielding. This behavior is attributed to the ability of PVA to reinforce and plasticize TCNF-based films. The developed approach is a simple and straightforward method to produce TCNF films that are stable in wet conditions. PMID:25933525

  18. TEMPO-mediated oxidized winter melon-based carbonaceous aerogel as an ultralight 3D support for enhanced photodegradation of organic pollutants.

    PubMed

    Miao, Miao; Wang, Gangling; Cao, Shaomei; Feng, Xin; Fang, Jianhui; Shi, Liyi

    2015-10-14

    Natural biomass based carbonaceous aerogels are becoming promising lightweight, biodegradable matrices to supersede traditional support materials in realizing future sustainable photochemistry and environmental protection. Herein, flower-like BiOBr loaded onto an ultralight TEMPO-mediated oxidized carbonaceous aerogel (BOB@OWMCA) support was successfully prepared using the edible winter melon as source material via a simple solvothermal method. The three-dimensional sponge-like OWMCA with surface functionalization displayed an ultralow density (17.7 mg cm(-3)) and large special surface area (30.6 m(2) g(-1)). The BiOBr was homogeneously anchored on the surface of the hierarchical porous OWMCA and the material exhibited synergetic properties of the BiOBr photocatalyst and OWMCA support to strengthen its photodegradation capacity. The results indicated that the as-prepared BOB@OWMCA composite demonstrated an outstanding adsorption and photodegradation capacity for organic pollutants (rhodamine B) under visible light irradiation. Of importance here, the BOB@OWMCA composite showed a prominent advantage for easy collection and separation from the aqueous system, making it a promising candidate as a robust visible light responsive photocatalyst for a range of applications. PMID:26344492

  19. Mode and tempo in the evolution of socio-political organization: reconciling ‘Darwinian’ and ‘Spencerian’ evolutionary approaches in anthropology

    PubMed Central

    Currie, Thomas E.; Mace, Ruth

    2011-01-01

    Traditional investigations of the evolution of human social and political institutions trace their ancestry back to nineteenth century social scientists such as Herbert Spencer, and have concentrated on the increase in socio-political complexity over time. More recent studies of cultural evolution have been explicitly informed by Darwinian evolutionary theory and focus on the transmission of cultural traits between individuals. These two approaches to investigating cultural change are often seen as incompatible. However, we argue that many of the defining features and assumptions of ‘Spencerian’ cultural evolutionary theory represent testable hypotheses that can and should be tackled within a broader ‘Darwinian’ framework. In this paper we apply phylogenetic comparative techniques to data from Austronesian-speaking societies of Island South-East Asia and the Pacific to test hypotheses about the mode and tempo of human socio-political evolution. We find support for three ideas often associated with Spencerian cultural evolutionary theory: (i) political organization has evolved through a regular sequence of forms, (ii) increases in hierarchical political complexity have been more common than decreases, and (iii) political organization has co-evolved with the wider presence of hereditary social stratification. PMID:21357233

  20. iHeartLift: a closed loop system with bio-feedback that uses music tempo variability to improve heart rate variability.

    PubMed

    Ho, Thomas C T; Chen, Xiang

    2011-01-01

    "Musica delenit bestiam feram" translates into "Music soothes the savage beast". There is a hidden truth in this ancient quip passed down from generations. Besides soothing the heart, it also incites the heart to a healthier level of heart rate variability (HRV). In this paper, an approach to use and test music and biofeedback to increase the heart rate variability for people facing daily stress is discussed. By determining the music tempo variability (MTV) of a piece of music and current heart rate variability, iHeartLift is able to compare the 2 trends and locate a musical piece that is suited to increase the user's heart rate variability to a healthier level. With biofeedback, the 2 trends are continuously compared in real-time and the musical piece is changed in accordance with the current comparisons. A study was conducted and it was generally found that HRV can be uplifted by music regardless of language and meaning of musical lyrics but with limitations to musical genre. PMID:22254526

  1. Chiral tetranuclear and dinuclear copper(ii) complexes for TEMPO-mediated aerobic oxidation of alcohols: are four metal centres better than two?

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guoqi; Proni, Gloria; Zhao, Sherry; Constable, Edwin C; Housecroft, Catherine E; Neuburger, Markus; Zampese, Jennifer A

    2014-08-28

    The one-pot reaction of 3,5-di-tert-butyl-2-hydroxybenzaldehyde, (R)-2-aminoglycinol and Cu(OAc)2·2H2O in a 1 : 1 : 1 ratio in the presence of triethylamine led to the isolation of X-ray quality crystals of the chiral complex (R)- in high yield. The single crystal structure of (R)- reveals a tetranuclear copper(ii) complex that contains a {Cu4(μ-O)2(μ3-O)2N4O4} core. A reaction using (1S,2R)-2-amino-1,2-diphenylethanol as precursor under the same conditions generated the chiral complex (S,R)-; its structure was determined by single crystal X-ray crystallography and was found to contain a {Cu2(μ-O)2N2O2} core. Both (R)- and (S,R)- have been used for catalytic aerobic oxidation of benzylic alcohols in combination with the TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidinyl-1-oxyl) radical. (R)- selectively catalyses the conversion of various aromatic primary alcohols to the corresponding aldehydes with high yields (99%) and TONs (770) in the air, while (S,R)- exhibits less promising catalytic performance under the same reaction conditions. The role of the cluster structures in (R)- and (S,R)- in controlling the reactivity towards aerobic oxidation reactions is discussed. PMID:24986135

  2. An experimental NEXAFS and computational TDDFT and ΔDFT study of the gas-phase core excitation spectra of nitroxide free radical TEMPO and its analogues.

    PubMed

    Ljubić, Ivan; Kivimäki, Antti; Coreno, Marcello

    2016-04-21

    Core-hole spectroscopy adds to the fundamental understanding of the electronic structure of stable nitroxide free radicals thus paving way for a sensible design of new analogues with desired functionalities. We study the gas-phase C 1s, N 1s and O 1s excitation spectra of three nitroxide free radicals - TEMPO and two of its amide-substituted analogues - using the experimental NEXAFS technique and the theoretical TDDFT and ΔDFT methods in the unrestricted setting. The short-range corrected SRC1-BLYP and SRC2-BLYP exchange-correlation functionals are used with TDDFT, and the standard B3LYP functional with ΔDFT. The TDDFT-based detailed spectral assignment includes the valence, mixed valence-Rydberg and Rydberg portions of the spectra from the onset of absorptions to the vicinity of the core-ionization thresholds. The relative overlaps between the experimental and TDDFT-modelled spectra are reasonably good, in the range of 0.7-0.8, 0.6-0.8, and 0.7-0.8 for the C 1s, N 1s, and O 1s spectra, respectively. The extent of spin contamination within the unrestricted framework and its effect on the accuracy of the calculated excitation energies and dipole intensities are discussed in detail. It is concluded that, despite the sizeable spin contamination, the presently used methods are capable of predicting the core-excitation spectra of comparatively large free radical species fairly reliably over a wide spectral range. PMID:27020039

  3. Sluggish cognitive tempo in children referred to a pediatric Sleep Disorders Center: Examining possible overlap with sleep problems and associations with impairment.

    PubMed

    Becker, Stephen P; Garner, Annie A; Byars, Kelly C

    2016-06-01

    Research supports the distinctness of sluggish cognitive tempo (SCT) (e.g., mental confusion and slowed behavior/thinking) from other psychopathologies. However, the relation between SCT and sleep functioning has not been adequately studied. We examined the association between SCT and sleep functioning in 325 children (62% male) ages 6-10 years referred to a pulmonary-based, accredited Sleep Disorders Center. Correlations between caregiver ratings of SCT, other psychopathologies (i.e., inattention/hyperactivity, oppositionality, depression, anxiety), sleep functioning (both behavioral and organic symptoms), as well as sleep disorder diagnoses, were examined. Unique effects of SCT and other psychopathologies on sleep problem severity controlling for child demographics were assessed using regressions. Regression analyses were also conducted to examine the unique effects of SCT on impairment (i.e., academic difficulties, parenting stress, and other psychopathologies) controlling for child demographics, sleep problem severity, and other psychopathology symptoms. SCT was weakly to moderately correlated with most measures of sleep (rs = .07-.39) and moderately to strongly correlated with measures of daytime sleepiness (rs = .33 and .53). In the regression analyses, SCT was uniquely associated with greater sleep functioning severity and impairment in academic functioning. SCT was also uniquely associated with higher levels of depression and inattention/hyperactivity, but not anxiety, and negatively associated with oppositionality. Finally, SCT symptoms were uniquely associated with greater parent-child dysfunctional interaction. Findings demonstrate that SCT is related to, but not redundant with, sleep problems and daytime sleepiness specifically. Further, SCT remained associated with several domains of functional impairment in sleep-disordered children after controlling for clinically-relevant variables, highlighting the potential value in assessing SCT symptoms in

  4. Bifactor latent structure of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)/oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) symptoms and first-order latent structure of sluggish cognitive tempo symptoms.

    PubMed

    Lee, SoYean; Burns, G Leonard; Beauchaine, Theodore P; Becker, Stephen P

    2016-08-01

    The objective was to determine if the latent structure of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) symptoms is best explained by a general disruptive behavior factor along with specific inattention (IN), hyperactivity/impulsivity (HI), and ODD factors (a bifactor model) whereas the latent structure of sluggish cognitive tempo (SCT) symptoms is best explained by a first-order factor independent of the bifactor model of ADHD/ODD. Parents' (n = 703) and teachers' (n = 366) ratings of SCT, ADHD-IN, ADHD-HI, and ODD symptoms on the Child and Adolescent Disruptive Behavior Inventory (CADBI) in a community sample of children (ages 5-13; 55% girls) were used to evaluate 4 models of symptom organization. Results indicated that a bifactor model of ADHD/ODD symptoms, in conjunction with a separate first-order SCT factor, was the best model for both parent and teacher ratings. The first-order SCT factor showed discriminant validity with the general disruptive behavior and specific IN factors in the bifactor model. In addition, higher scores on the SCT factor predicted greater academic and social impairment, even after controlling for the general disruptive behavior and 3 specific factors. Consistent with predictions from the trait-impulsivity etiological model of externalizing liability, a single, general disruptive behavior factor accounted for nearly all common variance in ADHD/ODD symptoms, whereas SCT symptoms represented a factor different from the general disruptive behavior and specific IN factor. These results provide additional support for distinguishing between SCT and ADHD-IN. The study also demonstrates how etiological models can be used to predict specific latent structures of symptom organization. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26502205

  5. Cost effectiveness of etanercept (Enbrel) in combination with methotrexate in the treatment of active rheumatoid arthritis based on the TEMPO trial

    PubMed Central

    Kobelt, G; Lindgren, P; Singh, A; Klareskog, L

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To estimate the cost effectiveness of combination treatment with etanercept plus methotrexate in comparison with monotherapies in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis (RA) using a new model that incorporates both functional status and disease activity. Methods: Effectiveness data were based on a 2 year trial in 682 patients with active RA (TEMPO). Data on resource consumption and utility related to function and disease activity were obtained from a survey of 616 patients in Sweden. A Markov model was constructed with five states according to functional status (Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ)) subdivided into high and low disease activity. The cost for each quality adjusted life year (QALY) gained was estimated by Monte Carlo simulation. Results: Disease activity had a highly significant effect on utilities, independently of HAQ. For resource consumption, only HAQ was a significant predictor, with the exception of sick leave. Compared with methotrexate alone, etanercept plus methotrexate over 2 years increased total costs by €14 221 and led to a QALY gain of 0.38. When treatment was continued for 10 years, incremental costs were €42 148 for a QALY gain of 0.91. The cost per QALY gained was €37 331 and €46 494, respectively. The probability that the cost effectiveness ratio is below a threshold of €50 000/QALY is 88%. Conclusion: Incorporating the influence of disease activity into this new model allows better assessment of the effects of anti-tumour necrosis factor treatment on patients' general wellbeing. In this analysis, the cost per QALY gained with combination treatment with etanercept plus methotrexate compared with methotrexate alone falls within the acceptable range. PMID:15708879

  6. Conception et calibration d'un sonoreacteur pour l'oxydation de la cellulose par le systeme TEMPO/NaOCl/NaBr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paquin, Michel

    Avec le contexte economique actuel dans le domaine des pates et papiers au Canada, l'industrie se doit de diversifier ses produits mis en marche. La fermeture de plus de 20 usines depuis 2005, une baisse du PIB de l'industrie de 1,4 milliard CAD entre 1999--2008, une baisse de la demande de 2,4 %, une diminution du prix de la pate de 20,9 % depuis juillet 2009. La delocalisation du secteur vers l'Asie et l'hemisphere sud sont autant de raisons pour laquelle l'industrie se doit d'etre a l'avant plan de nouvelle technologie a base de fibre de bois. Pour augmenter leur rentabilite, l'industrie se doit de diversifier ses produits dans d'autres secteurs que le simple fabricant de papier impression-ecriture. Sa diversification passe par l'elaboration de nouveaux papiers a valeur ajoutee (papier conducteur, papier bioactif, etc.), par l'utilisation de la biomasse forestiere pour la production d'energie, par l'utilisation de la biomasse forestiere pour l'elaboration d'une plateforme de chimie verte, par l'utilisation de la lignine pour le developpement de polymeres et par l'utilisation de la fibre cellulosique pour la fabrication de nanomateriaux. La fabrication de nanofibrille de cellulose peut devenir un des produits qui servira a diversifier la production des usines de pates et papiers. Les nanofibrilles de cellulose possedent des proprietes mecaniques et chimiques exceptionnelles. Les nanofibrilles de cellulose sont fabriquees a partir d'une oxydation selective de la pate kraft de feuillu avec le systeme TEMPO-NaOCl-NaBr. L'oxydation selective de l'alcool primaire en C6 du monomere de glucose sous forme de carboxylates engendre une modification chimique de la cellulose qui accroit l'hydrophilicite des fibrilles. Suite a cette oxydation, nous devons effectuer une desintegration mecanique de la fibre kraft de feuillu oxydee pour separer les fibrilles. Le processus d'oxydation de la fibre par le systeme TEMPO-NaOCl-NaBr et sa defibrillation par la suite engendre une

  7. La Causa Chicana. The Movement for Justice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangold, Margaret M., Ed.

    The intent of this book is to present information about Chicanos to social workers and members of other helping professions so they may become involved in the Mexican Americans' movement to obtain first-class citizenship. Articles reflect the perspectives of persons working in various settings, geographical regions, and disciplines. Some of the…

  8. Observações simultâneas no óptico e infravermelho próximo dos BL Lacs PKS 2005-489 e PKS 2155-304 em diversas escalas de tempo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominici, T. P.; Abraham, Z.; Galo, A. L.

    2003-08-01

    A existência de variações rápidas de brilho em alguns blazares é um fenômeno bem comprovado, mas até agora não sabemos ao certo quais são os mecanismos físicos envolvidos. A maior dificuldade é a ausência de observações multibanda simultâneas que poderiam fornecer vínculos aos modelos. Buscando colaborar com a discussão estudamos o comportamento de dois BL Lacs, PKS 2005-489 e PKS 2155-304, em relação à variabilidade em diversas escalas de tempo, de poucos minutos até vários meses, com observações simultâneas em seis bandas espectrais (óptico e infravermelho próximo). Para tanto dois telescópios do LNA foram utilizados em conjunto nas campanhas observacionais realizadas em 2001 e 2002, cujos resultados são apresentados aqui. As duas fontes apresentaram características bastante diferentes, inclusive em relação à existência de variabilidade nos índices espectrais. Particularmente, registramos a primeira detecção de variações em escalas de tempo da ordem de poucos minutos em PKS 2005-489, com evidências da presença de um atraso entre as curvas de luz nas bandas V e R e a variação em R ocorrendo antes (o contrário do esperado no modelo de shock-in-jet). Em PKS 2155-304 detectamos pela primeira vez variabilidade em escalas de tempo de poucos minutos no infravermelho em um AGN. As observações indicam que as variações de brilho em blazares são o resultado da ação de mais de um fenômeno, especialmente em escalas de tempo muito curtas. Alguns cenários físicos são sugeridos para explicar os resultados observacionais.

  9. Dynamics of 4-oxo-TEMPO-d16-(15)N nitroxide-propylene glycol system studied by ESR and ESE in liquid and glassy state in temperature range 10-295K.

    PubMed

    Goslar, Janina; Hoffmann, Stanislaw K; Lijewski, Stefan

    2016-08-01

    ESR spectra and electron spin relaxation of nitroxide radical in 4-oxo-TEMPO-d16-(15)N in propylene glycol were studied at X-band in the temperature range 10-295K. The spin-lattice relaxation in the liquid viscous state determined from the resonance line shape is governed by three mechanisms occurring during isotropic molecular reorientations. In the glassy state below 200K the spin-lattice relaxation, phase relaxation and electron spin echo envelope modulations (ESEEM) were studied by pulse spin echo technique using 2-pulse and 3-pulse induced signals. Electron spin-lattice relaxation is governed by a single non-phonon relaxation process produced by localized oscillators of energy 76cm(-1). Electron spin dephasing is dominated by a molecular motion producing a resonance-type peak in the temperature dependence of the dephasing rate around 120K. The origin of the peak is discussed and a simple method for the peak shape analysis is proposed, which gives the activation energy of a thermally activated motion Ea=7.8kJ/mol and correlation time τ0=10(-8)s. The spin echo amplitude is strongly modulated and FT spectrum contains a doublet of lines centered around the (2)D nuclei Zeeman frequency. The splitting into the doublet is discussed as due to a weak hyperfine coupling of nitroxide unpaired electron with deuterium of reorienting CD3 groups. PMID:27323281

  10. Dynamics of 4-oxo-TEMPO-d16-15N nitroxide-propylene glycol system studied by ESR and ESE in liquid and glassy state in temperature range 10-295 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goslar, Janina; Hoffmann, Stanislaw K.; Lijewski, Stefan

    2016-08-01

    ESR spectra and electron spin relaxation of nitroxide radical in 4-oxo-TEMPO-d16-15N in propylene glycol were studied at X-band in the temperature range 10-295 K. The spin-lattice relaxation in the liquid viscous state determined from the resonance line shape is governed by three mechanisms occurring during isotropic molecular reorientations. In the glassy state below 200 K the spin-lattice relaxation, phase relaxation and electron spin echo envelope modulations (ESEEM) were studied by pulse spin echo technique using 2-pulse and 3-pulse induced signals. Electron spin-lattice relaxation is governed by a single non-phonon relaxation process produced by localized oscillators of energy 76 cm-1. Electron spin dephasing is dominated by a molecular motion producing a resonance-type peak in the temperature dependence of the dephasing rate around 120 K. The origin of the peak is discussed and a simple method for the peak shape analysis is proposed, which gives the activation energy of a thermally activated motion Ea = 7.8 kJ/mol and correlation time τ0 = 10-8 s. The spin echo amplitude is strongly modulated and FT spectrum contains a doublet of lines centered around the 2D nuclei Zeeman frequency. The splitting into the doublet is discussed as due to a weak hyperfine coupling of nitroxide unpaired electron with deuterium of reorienting CD3 groups.

  11. Externa otitis caused by the Graphium stage of Pseudallescheria apiosperma

    PubMed Central

    Neji, Sourour; Ines, Hadrich; Houaida, Trabelsi; Malek, Mnejja; Fatma, Cheikhrouhou; Hayet, Sellami; Fattouma, Makni; Mounôm, Ghorbel; Ali, Ayadi

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of otomycosis caused by the Graphium stage of Pseudallescheria apiosperma in an immunocompetent 32 years old man who was suffering from hypoacusia and purulent otorrhea. Isolates were identified as Graphium stage of Pseudallescheria sp. on the basis of macroscopic and microscopic characteristics. Pseudallescheria apiosperma was correctly identified by PCR sequencing of ITS regions and β-tubulin gene. In this case the contamination could be due to intensive activity of gardening with poor hygiene. PMID:24432231

  12. Elastase Deficiency Phenotype of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Canine Otitis Externa Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Petermann, Shana R.; Doetkott, Curt; Rust, Lynn

    2001-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa veterinary isolates were assayed for elastase and total matrix protease activity. The elastase activity of canine ear isolates was much less than that of strain PAO1 and that of all other veterinary isolates (P < 0.0001). The results indicate that canine ear isolates have a distinct elastase phenotype. PMID:11329471

  13. Evaluating Cognitive Tempo in the Digital Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenny, Robert

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, considerable attention has been paid to the alleged changes in the ways the so-called "digital generation" communicates and learns. Most of the commentary has been based on anecdotes, observations and opinions. The lack of empirical evidence in this matter suggests that it may be time to begin the process of gathering data to…

  14. Technique for Evaluating Multiple Probability Occurrences /TEMPO/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mezzacappa, M. A.

    1970-01-01

    Technique is described for adjustment of engineering response information by broadening the application of statistical subjective stimuli theory. The study is specifically concerned with a mathematical evaluation of the expected probability of relative occurrence which can be identified by comparison rating techniques.

  15. Tempo of gulf activity brightens outlook

    SciTech Connect

    Hagar, R. )

    1989-12-01

    Operators, mainly on the basis of oil and natural gas price expectations, plan to steadily boost their exploration and development work in the Gulf of Mexico. The increase in activity, however, isn't yet reflected in the gulf's rig count. An active rig tally shows the October average to be the second lowest for all the Octobers in the 1980s. Only during October 1986 were there fewer rigs working in the gulf during that month this decade. On an annual basis, however, the monthly active rig count in 1989 is higher than in 1986 and 1987, but short of 1988's average and less than one half the level recorded inn the peak year of 1981. The author discusses signs that activity is rebounding.

  16. Tempo and mode in human evolution.

    PubMed Central

    McHenry, H M

    1994-01-01

    The quickening pace of paleontological discovery is matched by rapid developments in geochronology. These new data show that the pattern of morphological change in the hominid lineage was mosaic. Adaptations essential to bipedalism appeared early, but some locomotor features changed much later. Relative to the highly derived postcrania of the earliest hominids, the craniodental complex was quite primitive (i.e., like the reconstructed last common ancestor with the African great apes). The pattern of craniodental change among successively younger species of Hominidae implies extensive parallel evolution between at least two lineages in features related to mastication. Relative brain size increased slightly among successively younger species of Australopithecus, expanded significantly with the appearance of Homo, but within early Homo remained at about half the size of Homo sapiens for almost a million years. Many apparent trends in human evolution may actually be due to the accumulation of relatively rapid shifts in successive species. PMID:8041697

  17. The shape and tempo of language evolution.

    PubMed

    Greenhill, S J; Atkinson, Q D; Meade, A; Gray, R D

    2010-08-22

    There are approximately 7000 languages spoken in the world today. This diversity reflects the legacy of thousands of years of cultural evolution. How far back we can trace this history depends largely on the rate at which the different components of language evolve. Rates of lexical evolution are widely thought to impose an upper limit of 6000-10,000 years on reliably identifying language relationships. In contrast, it has been argued that certain structural elements of language are much more stable. Just as biologists use highly conserved genes to uncover the deepest branches in the tree of life, highly stable linguistic features hold the promise of identifying deep relationships between the world's languages. Here, we present the first global network of languages based on this typological information. We evaluate the relative evolutionary rates of both typological and lexical features in the Austronesian and Indo-European language families. The first indications are that typological features evolve at similar rates to basic vocabulary but their evolution is substantially less tree-like. Our results suggest that, while rates of vocabulary change are correlated between the two language families, the rates of evolution of typological features and structural subtypes show no consistent relationship across families. PMID:20375050

  18. Cesar Chavez and La Causa: Books for Children and Teenagers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garza de Cortes, Oralia

    1995-01-01

    Evaluates biographies of Cesar Chavez for children and teenagers and provides descriptions of recent books on the children of migrant farm workers. The books, mostly published in the 1990s, cover Chavez's rise as a farm worker activist and include several new works that address the social history of Chavez and the farm workers' struggle. (GR)

  19. Effect of Conceptual Tempo on Kindergarten Reading Readiness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sousley, Sharon A.; Gargiulo, Richard M.

    1981-01-01

    Examined the relationship between cognitive style and reading readiness in 104 kindergarteners before and after a visual discrimination treatment designed to modify conceptual impulsivity. Correlations were also obtained between errors and latencies on the Matching Familiar Figures Test and performance on the Metropolitan Readiness Test. No…

  20. U.S. gas processing consolidates while world tempo increases

    SciTech Connect

    True, W.R.

    1996-07-01

    Consolidation characterized US gas processing in 1995, while plants in Canada, Western Europe, Middle East, and Asia displayed growth in capacities and NGL production. The US and Canada continued to lead the rest of the world in capacity, throughput, and NGL production, although by smaller margins. A rash of consolidations underway in the US among gatherers and processors, shrunk capacity by more than 1.8 bcfd ({minus}2.6%) and production by nearly 950,000 gpd ({minus}1.3%). US capacity stood at slightly more than 69 bcfd as of Jan. 1, 1996; throughput for 1995 averaged nearly 48.4 bcfd; and NGL production exceeded 74,550 gpd. Canada saw its gas-processing capacity increase last year by more than 2.3 bcfd (6.3%) led by a handful of major expansions at large Alberta scavenger plants that straddle major gas export pipelines to the US. Gas-processing capacity in Canada as of Jan. 1 was nearly 39 bcfd; throughput for 1995 averaged nearly 30.5 bcfd; NGL production fell to slightly more than 43,000 gpd. This paper discusses these trends in the US and Canada, and briefly world wide.

  1. Tempo of Argentinian oil and gas industry quickens

    SciTech Connect

    Aalund, L.R.

    1988-08-01

    Exploration and production programs that the Argentinian Government has set in motion are making the country, which will host the next World Petroleum Congress, a more active and visible member of the international oil industry. A high, but possibly diminishing, inflation rate of about 15%/month, external financial debt, and the depressed price of oil are still drags on progress. But there are positive factors at work too. The government has recognized that it is in the country's self interest to entice technologically experienced foreign oil companies to search for and exploit its probably abundant oil and gas resources. The government's primary objective is to add enough output to its some 430,000 b/d production to eliminate crude oil imports. A good start on this will be made early next year when the country's first offshore field begins production.

  2. Tempo and Mode of Transposable Element Activity in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Kofler, Robert; Nolte, Viola; Schlötterer, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The evolutionary dynamics of transposable element (TE) insertions have been of continued interest since TE activity has important implications for genome evolution and adaptation. Here, we infer the transposition dynamics of TEs by comparing their abundance in natural D. melanogaster and D. simulans populations. Sequencing pools of more than 550 South African flies to at least 320-fold coverage, we determined the genome wide TE insertion frequencies in both species. We suggest that the predominance of low frequency insertions in the two species (>80% of the insertions have a frequency <0.2) is probably due to a high activity of more than 58 families in both species. We provide evidence for 50% of the TE families having temporally heterogenous transposition rates with different TE families being affected in the two species. While in D. melanogaster retrotransposons were more active, DNA transposons showed higher activity levels in D. simulans. Moreover, we suggest that LTR insertions are mostly of recent origin in both species, while DNA and non-LTR insertions are older and more frequently vertically transmitted since the split of D. melanogaster and D. simulans. We propose that the high TE activity is of recent origin in both species and a consequence of the demographic history, with habitat expansion triggering a period of rapid evolution. PMID:26186437

  3. Prion disease tempo determined by host-dependent substrate reduction

    PubMed Central

    Mays, Charles E.; Kim, Chae; Haldiman, Tracy; van der Merwe, Jacques; Lau, Agnes; Yang, Jing; Grams, Jennifer; Di Bari, Michele A.; Nonno, Romolo; Telling, Glenn C.; Kong, Qingzhong; Langeveld, Jan; McKenzie, Debbie; Westaway, David; Safar, Jiri G.

    2014-01-01

    The symptoms of prion infection can take years or decades to manifest following the initial exposure. Molecular markers of prion disease include accumulation of the misfolded prion protein (PrPSc), which is derived from its cellular precursor (PrPC), as well as downregulation of the PrP-like Shadoo (Sho) glycoprotein. Given the overlapping cellular environments for PrPC and Sho, we inferred that PrPC levels might also be altered as part of a host response during prion infection. Using rodent models, we found that, in addition to changes in PrPC glycosylation and proteolytic processing, net reductions in PrPC occur in a wide range of prion diseases, including sheep scrapie, human Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, and cervid chronic wasting disease. The reduction in PrPC results in decreased prion replication, as measured by the protein misfolding cyclic amplification technique for generating PrPSc in vitro. While PrPC downregulation is not discernible in animals with unusually short incubation periods and high PrPC expression, slowly evolving prion infections exhibit downregulation of the PrPC substrate required for new PrPSc synthesis and as a receptor for pathogenic signaling. Our data reveal PrPC downregulation as a previously unappreciated element of disease pathogenesis that defines the extensive, presymptomatic period for many prion strains. PMID:24430187

  4. Proterozoic and early Cambrian protists: evidence for accelerating evolutionary tempo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knoll, A. H.

    1994-01-01

    In rocks of late Paleoproterozoic and Mesoproterozoic age (ca. 1700-1000 million years ago), probable eukaryotic microfossils are widespread and well preserved, but assemblage and global diversities are low and turnover is slow. Near the Mesoproterozoic-Neoproterozoic boundary (1000 million years ago), red, green, and chromophytic algae diversified; molecular phylogenies suggest that this was part of a broader radiation of "higher" eukaryotic phyla. Observed diversity levels for protistan microfossils increased significantly at this time, as did turnover rates. Coincident with the Cambrian radiation of marine invertebrates, protistan microfossils again doubled in diversity and rates of turnover increased by an order of magnitude. Evidently, the Cambrian diversification of animals strongly influenced evolutionary rates, within clades already present in marine communities, implying an important role for ecology in fueling a Cambrian explosion that extends across kingdoms.

  5. Diversification patterns in cosmopolitan earthworms: similar mode but different tempo.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Rosa; Novo, Marta; Marchán, Daniel F; Díaz Cosín, Darío J

    2016-01-01

    Comparative phylogeography of widespread species that span the same geographic areas can elucidate the influence of historical events on current patterns of biodiversity, identify patterns of co-vicariance, and therefore aid the understanding of general evolutionary processes. Soil-dwelling animals present characteristics that make them suitable for testing the effect of the palaeogeographical events on their distribution and diversification, such as their low vagility and population structure. In this study, we shed light on the spatial lineage diversification and cladogenesis of two widely-distributed cosmopolitan and invasive earthworms (Aporrectodea rosea and A. trapezoides) in their putative ancestral area of origin, the Western Palearctic, and a few populations in North America. Molecular analyses were conducted on mitochondrial and nuclear markers from 220 (A. rosea) and 198 (A. trapezoides) individuals collected in 56 and 57 localities, respectively. We compared the lineage diversification pattern, genetic variability and cladogenesis in both species. Our findings showed that both species underwent a similar diversification from the Western Mediterranean plates to (i) Northern Europe and (ii) the Iberian Peninsula, establishing their two main lineages. Their diversification was in concordance with the main palaeogeographical events in the Iberian Peninsula and Western Mediterranean, followed by a later colonization of North America from individuals derived exclusively from the Eurosiberian lineage. Their diversification occurred at different times, with the diversification of A. rosea being potentially more ancient. Cladogenesis in both species seems to have been modelled only by the Mediterranean plate shifts, ignoring historical climatic oscillations such as the Messinian salinity crisis. Their high genetic variability, strong population structure, lack of gene flow and stepping-stone-like cladogenesis suggest the existence of different cryptic lineages. Our results may indicate a recurrent event in invasive earthworms within their ancestral distribution areas in the Western Palearctic. PMID:26299880

  6. Proterozoic and early Cambrian protists: evidence for accelerating evolutionary tempo.

    PubMed Central

    Knoll, A H

    1994-01-01

    In rocks of late Paleoproterozoic and Mesoproterozoic age (ca. 1700-1000 million years ago), probable eukaryotic microfossils are widespread and well preserved, but assemblage and global diversities are low and turnover is slow. Near the Mesoproterozoic-Neoproterozoic boundary (1000 million years ago), red, green, and chromophytic algae diversified; molecular phylogenies suggest that this was part of a broader radiation of "higher" eukaryotic phyla. Observed diversity levels for protistan microfossils increased significantly at this time, as did turnover rates. Coincident with the Cambrian radiation of marine invertebrates, protistan microfossils again doubled in diversity and rates of turnover increased by an order of magnitude. Evidently, the Cambrian diversification of animals strongly influenced evolutionary rates, within clades already present in marine communities, implying an important role for ecology in fueling a Cambrian explosion that extends across kingdoms. Images PMID:8041692

  7. Commentary: tempo of evolutionary change in ecological systems.

    PubMed

    Collins, James P

    2015-04-01

    As ecology and evolutionary biology developed during the 20th century one thing that frustrated an integration of research programs in these areas was the assumption that ecological and evolutionary processes operated on very different time scales. In 1961 the ecologist Lawrence Slobodkin reflected this assumption in his distinction between "evolutionary time" and "ecological time." This commentary reflects on the four papers in this Special Section that advance our understanding of the history of research at the intersection of phenotypes, genotypes, ecology, and evolution using plants as study organisms. Early in the 20th century at least some researchers, especially in agricultural systems, were already using observations and experiments to show how natural selection could operate over relatively short time periods and small spatial scales. These four studies offer a more nuanced view of the history of our understanding of the rate of phenotypic change via natural selection and the use of experiments to study evolutionary change. They illuminate the route that has led to the current presumption that in many cases ecological and evolutionary processes may indeed operate on similar, not dissimilar, time scales. PMID:25708203

  8. Nucleosome Dancing at the Tempo of Histone Tail Acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Galvani, Angélique; Thiriet, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    The impact of histone acetylation on transcription was revealed over 50 years ago by Allfrey and colleagues. However, it took decades for an understanding of the fine mechanism by which this posttranslational modification affects chromatin structure and promotes transcription. Here, we review breakthroughs linking histone tail acetylation, histone dynamics, and transcription. We also discuss the histone exchange during transcription and highlight the important function of a pool of non-chromatinized histones in chromatin dynamics. PMID:26184324

  9. The Relationship between Conceptual Tempo and Depression in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Michael; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Compared the Matching Familiar Figures Test performances of 53 children in grades five and six, identified as being depressed, to performances of 53 nondepressed children. The depressed group had longer latencies, made more errors, and was less efficient, even when intellectual differences were taken into account. (Author)

  10. Action observation: mirroring across our spontaneous movement tempo

    PubMed Central

    Avanzino, Laura; Lagravinese, Giovanna; Bisio, Ambra; Perasso, Luisa; Ruggeri, Piero; Bove, Marco

    2015-01-01

    During action observation (AO), the activity of the “mirror system” is influenced by the viewer’s expertise in the observed action. A question that remains open is whether the temporal aspects of the subjective motor repertoire can influence the “mirror system” activation. PMID:25989029

  11. Evaluating synergy between marbofloxacin and gentamicin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains isolated from dogs with otitis externa.

    PubMed

    Jerzsele, Ákos; Pásztiné-Gere, Erzsébet

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine antimicrobial susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains to marbofloxacin and gentamicin, and investigate the possible synergistic, additive, indifferent or antagonistic effects between the two agents. P. aeruginosa strains can develop resistance quickly against certain antibiotics if used alone, thus the need emerges to find synergistic combinations. A total of 68 P. aeruginosa strains isolated from dogs were examined. In order to describe interactions between marbofloxacin and gentamicin the checkerboard microdilution method was utilized. The MICs (minimum inhibitory concentrations) for marbofloxacin and gentamicin were in the range 0.25-64 mg/L and 0.25-32 mg/L, respectively. The combination of marbofloxacin and gentamicin was more effective with a MIC range of 0.031-8 mg/L and a MIC90 of 1 mg/L, compared to 16 mg/L for marbofloxacin alone and 8 mg/L for gentamicin alone. The FIC (fractional inhibitory concentration) indices ranged from 0.0945 (pronounced synergy) to 1.0625 (indifference). Synergy between marbofloxacin and gentamicin was found in 33 isolates. The mean FIC index is 0.546, which represents a partial synergistic/additive effect close to the full synergy threshold. In vitro results indicate that marbofloxacin and gentamicin as partially synergistic agents may prove clinically useful in combination therapy against P. aeruginosa infections. Although marbofloxacin is not used in the human practice, the interactions between fluoroquinolones and aminoglycosides may have importance outside the veterinary field. PMID:25823453

  12. Study on human ophthalmomyiasis externa caused by Oestrus ovis larva, in Sirte-Libya: parasite features, clinical presentation and management.

    PubMed

    Fathy, Fouad M; El-Barghathi, Adam; El-Ahwal, Abdalla; El-Bagar, Shaban

    2006-04-01

    Oestrus ovis larva is by far the commonest cause of human ophthalmomyiasis. The larva usually limits it's activity to the conjunctiva and cornea, but, penetration of the eye is a potential complication. Misdiagnosis is common and the condition of acute catarrhal conjunctivitis is ascribed to other causes. The study included 20 patients referred to university hospital of Sirte, Libya. Results showed that the condition was more common among adult male shepherds and farmers in rural areas. Important criteria for diagnosis were; sudden mobile foreign body sensation with abrupt itching and lacrimation occurring in endemic area, in warm months even without history of fly strike. Effective treatment consisted of mechanical removal of the larva by the cotton swap mounting technique which resulted in rapid improvement. Suffocation of residual larvae was mediated by use of liberal amounts of topical antibiotics. Slit lamp examination of larva showed that it was small, translucent, avoid the light beam and easily overlooked. Detailed microscopic examination of larval surface structures revealed a multi-component attachment apparatus consisting of oral hooks, inter-segmental spines, caudal spines and a multi-layered spiny thoracic complex described for the first time. These injurious structures are believed to be responsible through inflicting direct mechanical damage for the observed haemorrhage, ulceration or even the potential invasion, as these changes were more obvious in neglected cases. So, early diagnosis and treatment are essential to avoid complications. PMID:16605116

  13. "Compromising "La Causa"?": The Ford Foundation and Chicano Intellectual Nationalism in the Creation of Chicano History, 1963-1977

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacDonald, Victoria-Maria; Hoffman, Benjamin Polk

    2012-01-01

    In the early 1970s the first large cohorts of Chicano PhD scholars entered academia, often hired into faculty positions at newly created Chicano departments or centers. The academic identities of the first Chicano PhD scholars were firmly grounded in "Chicanismo," a term which emphasizes ethnic nationalism, political and economic equity, and…

  14. Institutions and the transition to adulthood: Implications for fertility tempo in low-fertility settings

    PubMed Central

    Brauner-Otto, Sarah R.

    2010-01-01

    The number of countries experiencing very low fertility has been rising in recent years, garnering increasing academic, political and media attention. There is now widespread academic agreement that the postponement of fertility is a major contributing factor in the very low levels of fertility that have occurred, and yet most policy discussions have been devoted to increasing the numbers of children women have. We discuss factors in three institutions—the educational system, the labour market and the housing market—that may inadvertently have led to childbearing postponement. We highlight important components of the timing of childbearing, including its changing place within the transition to adulthood across countries and the significance of the demands of childbearing versus childrearing. Using illustrations from Europe, North America, Japan, Australia and New Zealand, we argue that the following all lead to younger childbearing: 1) an open education system whereby it is relatively easy to return to school after having dropped out for a while; 2) a shorter, smoother, easier school-to-work transition; 3) easier re-entry into the labour market after having taken time out for childrearing or any other reason; 4) greater capability of integrating childrearing into a career; 5) easier ability to obtain a mortgage with a moderately small down payment, moderately low interest rate and a long time period over which to repay the loan; and 6) easier ability to rent a dwelling unit at an affordable price. Conversely, reversing any or all of these factors would lead, other things being equal, to postponement of childbearing. PMID:20622992

  15. Tempo and mode of evolutionary radiation in Diabroticina beetles (genera Acalymma, Cerotoma, and Diabrotica)

    PubMed Central

    Eben, Astrid; Espinosa de los Monteros, Alejandro

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Adaptive radiation is an aspect of evolutionary biology encompassing microevolution and macroevolution, for explaining the principles of lineage divergence. There are intrinsic as well as extrinsic factors that can be postulated to explain that adaptive radiation has taken place in specific lineages. The Diabroticina beetles are a prominent example of differential diversity that could be examined in detail to explain the diverse paradigms of adaptive radiation. Macroevolutionary analyses must present the differential diversity patterns in a chronological framework. The current study reviews the processes that shaped the differential diversity of some Diabroticina lineages (i.e. genera Acalymma, Cerotoma, and Diabrotica). These diversity patterns and the putative processes that produced them are discussed within a statistically reliable estimate of time. This was achieved by performing phylogenetic and coalescent analyses for 44 species of chrysomelid beetles. The data set encompassed a total of 2,718 nucleotide positions from three mitochondrial and two nuclear loci. Pharmacophagy, host plant coevolution, competitive exclusion, and geomorphological complexity are discussed as putative factors that might have influenced the observed diversity patterns. The coalescent analysis concluded that the main radiation within Diabroticina beetles occurred between middle Oligocene and middle Miocene. Therefore, the radiation observed in these beetles is not recent (i.e. post-Panamanian uplift, 4 Mya). Only a few speciation events in the genus Diabrotica might be the result of the Pleistocene climatic oscillations. PMID:24163585

  16. What are mycoplasmas: the relationship of tempo and mode in bacterial evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woese, C. R.; Stackebrandt, E.; Ludwig, W.

    1984-01-01

    In phenotype the mycoplasmas are very different from ordinary bacteria. However, genotypically (i.e., phylogenetically) they are not. On the basis of ribosomal RNA homologies the mycoplasmas belong with the clostridia, and indeed have specific clostridial relatives. Mycoplasmas are, however, unlike almost all other bacteria in the evolutionary characteristics of their ribosomal RNAs. These RNAs contain relatively few of the highly conserved oligonucleotide sequences characteristic of normal eubacterial ribosomal RNAs. This is interpreted to be a reflection of an elevated mutation rate in mycoplasma lines of descent. A general consequence of this would be that the variation associated with a mycoplasma population is augmented both in number and kind, which in turn would lead to an unusual evolutionary course, one unique in all respects. Mycoplasmas, then, are actually tachytelic bacteria. The unusual evolutionary characteristics of their ribosomal RNAs are the imprints of their rapid evolution.

  17. Tempo and mode of genome evolution in a 50,000-generation experiment.

    PubMed

    Tenaillon, Olivier; Barrick, Jeffrey E; Ribeck, Noah; Deatherage, Daniel E; Blanchard, Jeffrey L; Dasgupta, Aurko; Wu, Gabriel C; Wielgoss, Sébastien; Cruveiller, Stéphane; Médigue, Claudine; Schneider, Dominique; Lenski, Richard E

    2016-08-11

    Adaptation by natural selection depends on the rates, effects and interactions of many mutations, making it difficult to determine what proportion of mutations in an evolving lineage are beneficial. Here we analysed 264 complete genomes from 12 Escherichia coli populations to characterize their dynamics over 50,000 generations. The populations that retained the ancestral mutation rate support a model in which most fixed mutations are beneficial, the fraction of beneficial mutations declines as fitness rises, and neutral mutations accumulate at a constant rate. We also compared these populations to mutation-accumulation lines evolved under a bottlenecking regime that minimizes selection. Nonsynonymous mutations, intergenic mutations, insertions and deletions are overrepresented in the long-term populations, further supporting the inference that most mutations that reached high frequency were favoured by selection. These results illuminate the shifting balance of forces that govern genome evolution in populations adapting to a new environment. PMID:27479321

  18. THE TEMPO AND MODE OF GOPHER MOUND PRODUCTION IN A TALLGRASS PRAIRIE REMNANT. (R825796)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  19. Auditory Discrimination of Anisochrony: Influence of the Tempo and Musical Backgrounds of Listeners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrle, N.; Samson, S.

    2005-01-01

    This study explored the influence of several factors, physical and human, on anisochrony's thresholds measured with an adaptive two alternative forced choice paradigm. The effect of the number and duration of sounds on anisochrony discrimination was tested in the first experiment as well as potential interactions between each of these factors and…

  20. Evidence for Tempo-Specific Timing in Music Using a Web-Based Experimental Setup

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honing, Henkjan

    2006-01-01

    Perceptual invariance has been studied and found in several domains of cognition, including those of speech, motor behavior, and object motion. It has also been the topic of several studies in music perception. However, the existing perceptual studies present rather inconclusive evidence with regard to the perceptual invariance of expressive…

  1. High Tempo Knowledge Collaboration in Wikipedia's Coverage of Breaking News Events

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keegan, Brian C.

    2012-01-01

    When major news breaks in our hyper-connected society, we increasingly turn to an encyclopedia for the latest information. Wikipedia's coverage of breaking news events attracts unique levels of attention; the articles with the most page views, edits, and contributors in any given month since 2003 are related to current events. Extant…

  2. What are mycoplasmas - The relationship of tempo and mode in bacterial evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woese, C. R.; Stackebrand, E.; Ludwig, W.

    1985-01-01

    In phenotype the mycoplasmas are very different from ordinary bacteria. However, genotypically (i.e., phylogenetically) they are not. On the basis of ribosomal RNA homologies the mycoplasmas belong with the clostridia, and indeed have specific clostridial relatives. Mycoplasmas are, however, unlike almost all other bacteria in the evolutionary characteristics of their ribosomal RNAs. These RNAs contain relatively few of the highly conserved oligonucleotide sequences characteristic of normal eubacterial ribosomal RNAs. This is interpreted to be a reflection of an elevated mutation rate in mycoplasma lines of descent. A general consequence of this would be that the variation associated with a mycoplasma population is augmented both in number and kind, which in turn would lead to an unusual evolutionary course, one unique in all respects. Mycoplasmas, then, are actually tachytelic bacteria. The unusual evolutionary characteristics of their ribosomal RNAs are the imprints of their rapid evolution.

  3. Synthesis and characterization of amorphous mesoporous silica using TEMPO-functionalized amphiphilic templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, Wilke; Doerenkamp, Carsten; Zeng, Zhaoyang; de Oliveira, Marcos; Niehaus, Oliver; Pöttgen, Rainer; Studer, Armido; Eckert, Hellmut

    2016-05-01

    Inorganic-organic hybrid materials based on amorphous mesoporous silica containing organized nitroxide radicals within its mesopores have been prepared using the micellar self-assembly of TEOS solutions containing the nitroxide functionalized amphiphile (4-(N,N-dimethyl-N-hexadecylammonium)-2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-piperidin-N-oxyl-iodide) (CAT-16). This template has been used both in its pure form and in various mixtures with cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). The samples have been characterized by chemical analysis, N2 sorption studies, magnetic susceptibility measurements, and various spectroscopic methods. While electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra indicate that the strength of the intermolecular spin-spin interactions can be controlled via the CAT-16/CTAB ratio, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data suggest that these interactions are too weak to facilitate cooperative magnetism.

  4. Institutions and the transition to adulthood: Implications for fertility tempo in low-fertility settings.

    PubMed

    Rindfuss, Ronald R; Brauner-Otto, Sarah R

    2008-01-01

    The number of countries experiencing very low fertility has been rising in recent years, garnering increasing academic, political and media attention. There is now widespread academic agreement that the postponement of fertility is a major contributing factor in the very low levels of fertility that have occurred, and yet most policy discussions have been devoted to increasing the numbers of children women have. We discuss factors in three institutions-the educational system, the labour market and the housing market-that may inadvertently have led to childbearing postponement. We highlight important components of the timing of childbearing, including its changing place within the transition to adulthood across countries and the significance of the demands of childbearing versus childrearing. Using illustrations from Europe, North America, Japan, Australia and New Zealand, we argue that the following all lead to younger childbearing: 1) an open education system whereby it is relatively easy to return to school after having dropped out for a while; 2) a shorter, smoother, easier school-to-work transition; 3) easier re-entry into the labour market after having taken time out for childrearing or any other reason; 4) greater capability of integrating childrearing into a career; 5) easier ability to obtain a mortgage with a moderately small down payment, moderately low interest rate and a long time period over which to repay the loan; and 6) easier ability to rent a dwelling unit at an affordable price. Conversely, reversing any or all of these factors would lead, other things being equal, to postponement of childbearing. PMID:20622992

  5. Task Structure and Cognitive Tempo Influence on Organizational Memory in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sola, Janet; Phye, Gary D.

    Forty reflective and 40 impulsive children were assigned to one of four treatment conditions. The learning task employed a list of 25 familiar objects, five instances from each of five categories. The four treatments were Randomized-No Instructions, Randomized-Instructed, Blocked-No Instructions, and Blocked-Instructed. Results support earlier…

  6. Timing, tempo and paleoenvironmental influence of Deccan volcanism relative to the KT extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adatte, Thierry; Keller, Gerta; Schoene, Blair; Khadri, Syed

    2015-04-01

    Deccan Traps erupted in three main phases with 6% total Deccan volume in phase-1 (base C30n), 80% in phase-2 (C29r) and 14% in phase-3 (C29n). Recent studies indicate that the bulk (80%) of Deccan trap eruptions (Phase-2) occurred over a relatively short time interval in magnetic polarity C29r (Chenet et al., 2008). Moreover, U-Pb zircon geochronology shows that the main Phase 2 began 250 ka before the Cretaceous-Tertiary (KT) mass extinction, suggesting a cause-and-effect relationship (Blair et al., 2015). In India a strong floral response is observed as a direct consequence of volcanic phase-2. In Lameta (infratrappean) sediments preceding the volcanic eruptions, palynoflora are dominated by gymnosperms and angiosperms (Samant and Mohabey, 2005). Shortly after the onset of Deccan phase-2, this floral association was decimated as indicated by a sharp decrease in pollen and spores coupled with the appearance of fungi, which mark increasing stress conditions apparently as a direct result of volcanic activity. The inter-trappean sediments corresponding to the Phases 2 and 3 are characterized by the highest alteration CIA index values suggesting increased acid rains due to SO2 emissions. Closer to the eruption center, the lava flows are generally separated by red weathered horizons known as red boles, marking a quiescent period between two basalt flows. Red boles consist mainly of red silty clays characterized by concentrations of immobile elements such as Al and Fe3+ ions, which provide indirect evidence of a primitive form of paleo-laterite that probably developed during the short periods of weathering between eruptions. There are at least 15 thick red bole layers in C29r below the KT boundary, and all were deposited in phase-2 volcanic eruptions that occurred over a time span of about 250 ky. These short duration exposures are reflected in the mineralogical and geochemical data that indicate rapid weathering (high CIA) but arid conditions. The arid conditions can be explained by acid rain, which accelerated the weathering process. These observations indicate that Deccan volcanism played a key role in increasing atmospheric CO2 and SO2 levels that resulted in global warming and acidified oceans, thus increasing biotic stress that predisposed faunas to eventual extinction at the KTB.

  7. Tempo-Spatial Impact of the 2011 M9 Tohoku-Oki Earthquake on Eastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lifeng; Liu, Jie; Zhao, Jing; Zhao, Jingui

    2016-01-01

    We investigate in this study the impact of the Tohoku-Oki earthquake on Eastern China, and particularly focus on postseismic relaxation processes. We first invert for postseismic slip on the fault plane based on the GPS measurements of GEONET in Japan. Then, we use a layered rheological model to theoretically investigate the deep viscoelastic relaxation process. The Tohoku-Oki mainshock produced significant strain changes in Eastern China, dominantly east-west-oriented extension with a level close to or higher than the tectonic strain rates at the east border of China. The strain due to the postseismic stress relaxations has similar patterns as those produced by the mainshock, but with smaller magnitudes. The Tohoku-Oki earthquake impacts Eastern China for decades, but dominantly in the first 2-3 years after the mainshock and caused an apparent displacements and decrease of seismicity rate in Northeast China. For a long-term of 100 years, the Tohoku-Oki earthquake produces about 10 % of the tectonic strain rates in Eastern China, due to viscoelastic relaxation at the deep depth.

  8. Multigene phylogeny of the Mustelidae: Resolving relationships, tempo and biogeographic history of a mammalian adaptive radiation

    PubMed Central

    Koepfli, Klaus-Peter; Deere, Kerry A; Slater, Graham J; Begg, Colleen; Begg, Keith; Grassman, Lon; Lucherini, Mauro; Veron, Geraldine; Wayne, Robert K

    2008-01-01

    Background Adaptive radiation, the evolution of ecological and phenotypic diversity from a common ancestor, is a central concept in evolutionary biology and characterizes the evolutionary histories of many groups of organisms. One such group is the Mustelidae, the most species-rich family within the mammalian order Carnivora, encompassing 59 species classified into 22 genera. Extant mustelids display extensive ecomorphological diversity, with different lineages having evolved into an array of adaptive zones, from fossorial badgers to semi-aquatic otters. Mustelids are also widely distributed, with multiple genera found on different continents. As with other groups that have undergone adaptive radiation, resolving the phylogenetic history of mustelids presents a number of challenges because ecomorphological convergence may potentially confound morphologically based phylogenetic inferences, and because adaptive radiations often include one or more periods of rapid cladogenesis that require a large amount of data to resolve. Results We constructed a nearly complete generic-level phylogeny of the Mustelidae using a data matrix comprising 22 gene segments (~12,000 base pairs) analyzed with maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference methods. We show that mustelids are consistently resolved with high nodal support into four major clades and three monotypic lineages. Using Bayesian dating techniques, we provide evidence that mustelids underwent two bursts of diversification that coincide with major paleoenvironmental and biotic changes that occurred during the Neogene and correspond with similar bursts of cladogenesis in other vertebrate groups. Biogeographical analyses indicate that most of the extant diversity of mustelids originated in Eurasia and mustelids have colonized Africa, North America and South America on multiple occasions. Conclusion Combined with information from the fossil record, our phylogenetic and dating analyses suggest that mustelid diversification may have been spurred by a combination of faunal turnover events and diversification at lower trophic levels, ultimately caused by climatically driven environmental changes. Our biogeographic analyses show Eurasia as the center of origin of mustelid diversity and that mustelids in Africa, North America and South America have been assembled over time largely via dispersal, which has important implications for understanding the ecology of mustelid communities. PMID:18275614

  9. The tempo and modes of evolution of reproductive isolation in fungi

    PubMed Central

    Giraud, T; Gourbière, S

    2012-01-01

    Reproductive isolation is an essential ingredient of speciation, and much has been learned in recent years about the evolution of reproductive isolation and the genetics of reproductive barriers in animals and plants. Fungi have been neglected on these aspects, despite being tractable model eukaryotes. Here, we used a model fitting approach to look at the importance of different barriers to gene flow to explain the decrease of reproductive compatibility with genetic distance in fungi. We found support for the occurrence of reinforcement in the presyngamy compatibility among basidiomycetes. In contrast, no evidence for reinforcement was detected in ascomycetes, concurring with the idea that host/habitat adaptation in this group can pleiotropically cause reproductive isolation. We found no evidence of a snowballing accumulation of postsyngamic reproductive incompatibilities in either ascomycetes or the complex of anther smut fungi. Together with previous studies, our results suggest that ecologically based barriers to gene flow and karyotypic differences may have an important role in hybrid inviability and sterility in fungi. Interestingly, hybrid sterility appeared to evolve faster than hybrid inviability in fungi. PMID:22669076

  10. The Effect of Modifying the Cognitive Tempo of Reading Disabled Children on Reading Comprehension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Learner, Kathy M.; Richman, Charles L.

    1984-01-01

    It was hypothesized that teaching poor readers to use a reflective cognitive style would facilitate their reading ability. An experimental group of children was taught to delay their responses and to use more efficient search and scanning techniques. Poor readers' vocabulary and comprehension scores and level of reflectivity improved following…

  11. Tempo and Mode of the Evolution of Venom and Poison in Tetrapods

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Richard J.; Arbuckle, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Toxic weaponry in the form of venom and poison has evolved in most groups of animals, including all four major lineages of tetrapods. Moreover, the evolution of such traits has been linked to several key aspects of the biology of toxic animals including life-history and diversification. Despite this, attempts to investigate the macroevolutionary patterns underlying such weaponry are lacking. In this study we analyse patterns of venom and poison evolution across reptiles, amphibians, mammals, and birds using a suite of phylogenetic comparative methods. We find that each major lineage has a characteristic pattern of trait evolution, but mammals and reptiles evolve under a surprisingly similar regime, whilst that of amphibians appears to be particularly distinct and highly contrasting compared to other groups. Our results also suggest that the mechanism of toxin acquisition may be an important distinction in such evolutionary patterns; the evolution of biosynthesis is far less dynamic than that of sequestration of toxins from the diet. Finally, contrary to the situation in amphibians, other tetrapod groups show an association between the evolution of toxic weaponry and higher diversification rates. Taken together, our study provides the first broad-scale analysis of macroevolutionary patterns of venom and poison throughout tetrapods. PMID:27348001

  12. Tempo and mode of antibat ultrasound production and sonar jamming in the diverse hawkmoth radiation.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Akito Y; Barber, Jesse R

    2015-05-19

    The bat-moth arms race has existed for over 60 million y, with moths evolving ultrasonically sensitive ears and ultrasound-producing organs to combat bat predation. The evolution of these defenses has never been thoroughly examined because of limitations in simultaneously conducting behavioral and phylogenetic analyses across an entire group. Hawkmoths include >1,500 species worldwide, some of which produce ultrasound using genital stridulatory structures. However, the function and evolution of this behavior remain largely unknown. We built a comprehensive behavioral dataset of hawkmoth hearing and ultrasonic reply to sonar attack using high-throughput field assays. Nearly half of the species tested (57 of 124 species) produced ultrasound to tactile stimulation or playback of bat echolocation attack. To test the function of ultrasound, we pitted big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus) against hawkmoths over multiple nights and show that hawkmoths jam bat sonar. Ultrasound production was immediately and consistently effective at thwarting attack and bats regularly performed catching behavior without capturing moths. We also constructed a fossil-calibrated, multigene phylogeny to study the evolutionary history and divergence times of these antibat strategies across the entire family. We show that ultrasound production arose in multiple groups, starting in the late Oligocene (∼ 26 Ma) after the emergence of insectivorous bats. Sonar jamming and bat-detecting ears arose twice, independently, in the Miocene (18-14 Ma) either from earless hawkmoths that produced ultrasound in response to physical contact only, or from species that did not respond to touch or bat echolocation attack. PMID:25941377

  13. Tempo-spatial characteristics of sub-daily temperature trends in mainland China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Yuyu; Parker, David; Ren, Guoyu; Dunn, Robert

    2016-05-01

    The spatial and temporal pattern of sub-daily temperature change in mainland China was analysed for the period from 1973 to 2011 using a 3-hourly dataset based on 408 stations. The increase in surface air temperature was more significant by night between 1973 and 1992, with the fastest upward trend around local midnight being about 0.27 °C/decade, while it was more significant by day between 1992 and 2011, with the fastest upward trend being about 0.46 °C/decade in mid-late morning. The season with rapid temperature increase also shifted from winter in 1973-1992 (the largest increase happened near midnight in December, 0.75 °C/decade) to spring in 1992-2011 (the largest increase happened at in the early afternoon in March, 0.82 °C/decade). The change in the spatial distributions of the sub-daily temperature trends shows that Northeast China warmed more significantly in 1973-1992 than elsewhere, but it cooled in 1992-2011, when Southwest China was the new focus of temperature increase whereas it had previously been cooling. A preliminary analysis of the possible causes implies that changes in solar radiation, cloud cover, aerosols and the observational environments near the stations might have contributed to these observed temperature changes.

  14. Group Progress of Community Elderly as Measured by Tape Recordings, Group Tempo and Group Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiner, Marcella Bakur; Weinstock, Comilda S.

    1979-01-01

    Geriatric outpatients were involved in a group resocialization program. Comparison is made between experimental groups whose leader used group intervention techniques, and groups where leader played a nonintervention role. Experimental group members showed changes toward more active problem-solving approaches, while group members remained fixed at…

  15. The variation in age at menarche: an indicator of historic developmental tempo.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Andreas; Scheffler, Christiane; Hermanussen, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Ample literature describes the history of the association between the advances in the health and wealth of people, and mortality rates, life expectancy and adult height. Twenty-nine German studies with n > 200 subjects published since 1848 on menarcheal age, were reanalyzed, and 101 studies from various other European and non-European countries. On average, mean age at menarche declined since the mid-19th century. Historic urban samples tended to decline earlier than rural groups, upper class women earlier than working class women. In Germany, minimum values for the age at menarche were seen already between the two World Wars (Leipzig 12.6 years in 1934, Halle 13.3 years in 1939). Values for mean age and SD for age at menarche were strongly associated. With improving historic circumstances, the two parameters declined in parallel. The standard deviation for menarcheal age dropped from over 2.5 years in mid-19" century France to little more or even less than 1 year in most modern countries. In the German studies the correlation between menarcheal age and SD was almost complete with r = 0.96 (y = 0.35x - 3.53). Similar associations between mean age at menarche and SD for age were found in other European countries. The obvious and immediate effects of historic events on menarcheal age, and particularly on the age distribution, indicate that menarche is a sensitive indicator of public health and wealth, and may be an appropriate estimator for the socio-economic background of historic populations. PMID:20954458

  16. Tempo discrimination of musical patterns: effects due to pitch and rhythmic structure.

    PubMed

    Boltz, M G

    1998-11-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate a set of factors that may influence the perceived rate of an auditory event. In a paired-comparison task, subjects were presented with a set of music-like patterns that differed in their relative number of contour changes and in the magnitude of pitch skips (Experiment 1) as well as in the compatibility of rhythmic accent structure with the arrangement of pitch relations (Experiment 2) Results indicated that, relative to their standard referents, comparison melodies were judged to unfold more slowly when they displayed more changes in pitch direction, greater pitch distances, and an incompatible rhythmic accent structure. These findings are suggested to stem from an imputed velocity hypothesis, in which people overgeneralize certain invariant relations that typically occur between melodic and temporal accent structure within Western music. PMID:9865077

  17. Contrasting modes and tempos of venom expression evolution in two snake species.

    PubMed

    Margres, Mark J; McGivern, James J; Seavy, Margaret; Wray, Kenneth P; Facente, Jack; Rokyta, Darin R

    2015-01-01

    Selection is predicted to drive diversification within species and lead to local adaptation, but understanding the mechanistic details underlying this process and thus the genetic basis of adaptive evolution requires the mapping of genotype to phenotype. Venom is complex and involves many genes, but the specialization of the venom gland toward toxin production allows specific transcripts to be correlated with specific toxic proteins, establishing a direct link from genotype to phenotype. To determine the extent of expression variation and identify the processes driving patterns of phenotypic diversity, we constructed genotype-phenotype maps and compared range-wide toxin-protein expression variation for two species of snake with nearly identical ranges: the eastern diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus adamanteus) and the eastern coral snake (Micrurus fulvius). We detected significant expression variation in C. adamanteus, identified the specific loci associated with population differentiation, and found that loci expressed at all levels contributed to this divergence. Contrary to expectations, we found no expression variation in M. fulvius, suggesting that M. fulvius populations are not locally adapted. Our results not only linked expression variation at specific loci to divergence in a polygenic, complex trait but also have extensive conservation and biomedical implications. C. adamanteus is currently a candidate for federal listing under the Endangered Species Act, and the loss of any major population would result in the irrevocable loss of a unique venom phenotype. The lack of variation in M. fulvius has significant biomedical application because our data will assist in the development of effective antivenom for this species. PMID:25387465

  18. TEMPO-oxidized nanocellulose participating as crosslinking aid for alginate-based sponges.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ning; Bruzzese, Cécile; Dufresne, Alain

    2012-09-26

    Crosslinked polysaccharide sponges have been prepared by freeze-drying of amorphous alginate-oxidized nanocellulose in the presence of a Ca(2+) ionic crosslinking agent. The new carboxyl groups on the surface of nanocellulose induced by the chemical oxidization provided the possibility of participating in the construction of an alginate-based sponge's structure and played a fundamental role in the structural and mechanical stability of ensuing sponges. Furthermore, enhanced mechanical strength induced by oxidized cellulose nanocrystals and the formation of a semi-interpenetrating polymer network from oxidized microfibrillated cellulose were reported. Together with the facile and ionic crosslinking process, the ultrahigh porosity, promising water absorption and retention, as well as the improved compression strength of the crosslinked sponges should significantly extend the use of this soft material in diverse practical applications. PMID:22950801

  19. Modes, tempo, and spatial variability of Cenozoic cratonic denudation: The West African example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beauvais, Anicet; Chardon, Dominique

    2013-05-01

    long-term erosion of tropical shields is crucial to constraining the role of lateritic regolith covers as prominent sinks and sources of CO2 and sediments in the context of long-term Cenozoic climate change. It is also a key to understanding long-term landform evolution processes operating over most of the continental surface and their control onto the sediment routing system. We study the surface evolution of West Africa over three erosion periods (~ 45-24, ~ 24-11 and ~ 11-0 Ma) recorded by relicts of three subcontinental-scale lateritic paleolandsurfaces whose age is bracketed by 39Ar/40Ar dating of lateritic K-Mn oxides. Denudation depths and rates compiled from 380 field stations show that despite heterogeneities confined to early-inherited reliefs, the subregion underwent low and homogeneous denudation (~ 2-20 m Ma-1) over most of its surface whatever the considered time interval. This homogeneity is further documented by a worldwide compilation of cratonic denudation rates, over long-term, intermediate and modern Cenozoic time scales (100-107 yr). These results allow defining a steady state cratonic denudation regime that is weathering-limited, i.e., controlled by the thickness of the (lateritic) regolith available for stripping. Steady state cratonic denudation regimes are enabled by maintained compartmentalization of the base levels between river knick points controlled by relief inheritance. Under such regimes, lowering of base levels and their fossilization are primarily imposed by long-term eustatic sea level fall and climate rather than by epeirogeny. The expression of steady state cratonic denudation regimes in clastic sedimentary fluxes remains to be investigated.

  20. Tempo and mode of antibat ultrasound production and sonar jamming in the diverse hawkmoth radiation

    PubMed Central

    Kawahara, Akito Y.; Barber, Jesse R.

    2015-01-01

    The bat–moth arms race has existed for over 60 million y, with moths evolving ultrasonically sensitive ears and ultrasound-producing organs to combat bat predation. The evolution of these defenses has never been thoroughly examined because of limitations in simultaneously conducting behavioral and phylogenetic analyses across an entire group. Hawkmoths include >1,500 species worldwide, some of which produce ultrasound using genital stridulatory structures. However, the function and evolution of this behavior remain largely unknown. We built a comprehensive behavioral dataset of hawkmoth hearing and ultrasonic reply to sonar attack using high-throughput field assays. Nearly half of the species tested (57 of 124 species) produced ultrasound to tactile stimulation or playback of bat echolocation attack. To test the function of ultrasound, we pitted big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus) against hawkmoths over multiple nights and show that hawkmoths jam bat sonar. Ultrasound production was immediately and consistently effective at thwarting attack and bats regularly performed catching behavior without capturing moths. We also constructed a fossil-calibrated, multigene phylogeny to study the evolutionary history and divergence times of these antibat strategies across the entire family. We show that ultrasound production arose in multiple groups, starting in the late Oligocene (∼26 Ma) after the emergence of insectivorous bats. Sonar jamming and bat-detecting ears arose twice, independently, in the Miocene (18–14 Ma) either from earless hawkmoths that produced ultrasound in response to physical contact only, or from species that did not respond to touch or bat echolocation attack. PMID:25941377

  1. SO2 and NO2 over major urban regions of India: a tempo-spatial perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallik, C.; Lal, S.

    2012-12-01

    Demographic projections show that by the year 2025, 16 of the world's 29 megacities will be located in Asia, many of which have very basic problems in terms of air quality. Apart from being home to a burgeoning population, these regions of the globe are also major players in atmospheric chemistry as a result of myriad emission patterns combined with intense photochemistry. Like most of these Asian megacities, fast-paced development in some of the Indian cities has ramifications in increased emissions from industrial and transport sectors. These emissions release sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2), in addition to several pollutants, into the ambient air and have the potential to impact the chemistry and radiative balance on a regional scale. Surface measurements of these two criteria pollutants by the Central Pollution Control Board (CPCB), India during 2005-2010 from 13 urban locations in India have been analyzed to get an insight into their temporal and spatial variability. Stations are chosen to represent the entire Indian region: Indo-Gangetic plain or 'IGP' (Jalandhar, Delhi, Kanpur, Durgapur, Kolkata, Guwahati), western India (Jodhpur, Ahmedabad, Surat), central India (Nagpur, Hyderabad) and southern India (Chennai, Trivandrum). The monthly averaged surface level SO2 and NO2 have also been compared with monthly columnar averages of these gases as detected by the Ozone monitoring Instrument (OMI) over these station grids. Mean SO2 concentrations are found to be the highest for Surat (7.5 ppbv), located in a highly industrialized region. Elevated levels of NO2, observed for Durgapur and Kolkata (31 ppbv each), are close to the 24-hour 'National Ambient Air Quality' standard (30 ppbv). The surface concentrations for both SO2 and NO2 concentrations are found to be the highest during winter. Columnar SO2 over many stations show a maximum during summer monsoon. For most IGP stations, columnar NO2 values are elevated during winter. Wavelet analyses revealed an annual periodicity in surface data for SO2 and NO2. Identifiable seasonality is found for NO2 (surface and column) over several stations using X-12-ARIMA monthly seasonal adjustment method. The ratios for different seasonal pairs vary between 0.6 to 2.0 for both SO2 and NO2 at the surface level. The winter to post-monsoon ratios are highest for columnar SO2 and minimum for columnar NO2. Significant correlations between SO2 and NO2 at surface are obtained for cities in industrial corridors viz. Surat and Durgapur, due to emissions from industries and power plants. For most of the stations analyzed, NO2 and CO (co-emitted with NO2 during combustion) columns show good correlation indicating anthropogenic influences. Statistically significant correlations between columnar-NO2 and surface-NO2 obtained for Delhi and Kolkata along with very low SO2 to NO2 ratios (<=0.2) indicate emissions from transport sector as major contributors to the ambient air over these regions. The findings are important and useful in the context of regional climate change occurring from anthropogenic emissions as well as from the perspective of emission inventories. These combined impacts of emissions, meteorology and transport on the air quality over this part of Asia would be explored in detail during the presentation.

  2. Social and emotional predictors of the tempo of puberty in female rhesus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Mark E; Bounar, Shannon; Godfrey, Jodi; Michopoulos, Vasiliki; Higgins, Melinda; Sanchez, Mar

    2012-01-01

    A cascade of neuroendocrine events regulates the initiation and progression of female puberty. However, the factors that determine the timing of these events across individuals are still uncertain. While the consequences of puberty on subsequent emotional development and adult behavior have received significant attention, what is less understood are the social and environmental factors that actually alter the initiation and progression of puberty. In order to more fully understand what factors influence pubertal timing in females, the present study quantified social and emotional behavior; stress physiology; and growth and activity measures in juvenile female rhesus monkeys to determine what best predicts eventual puberty. Based on previous reports, we hypothesized that increased agonistic behavior resulting from subordinate status in their natal group, in combination with slowed growth, reduced prosocial behavior, and increased emotional reactivity would predict delayed puberty. The analyses were restricted to behavioral and physiological measures obtained prior to the onset of puberty, defined as menarche. Together, our findings indicate that higher rates of aggression but lower rates of submission received from group mates; slower weight gain; and greater emotional reactivity, evidenced by higher anxiety, distress and appeasing behaviors, and lower cortisol responsivity in response to a potentially threatening situation, predicts delayed puberty. Together the combination of these variables accounted for 58% of the variance in the age of menarche, 71% in age at first ovulation, and 45% in the duration of adolescent sterility. While early puberty may be more advantageous for the individual from a fertility standpoint, it presents significant health risks, including increased risk for a number of estrogen dependent cancers and as well as the emergence of mood disorders during adulthood. On the other hand, it is possible that increased emotional reactivity associated with delayed puberty could persist, increasing the risk for emotional dysregulation to socially challenging situations. The data argue for prospective studies that will determine how emotional reactivity shown to be important for pubertal timing is affected by early social experience and temperament, and how these stress-related variables contribute to body weight accumulation, affecting the neuroendocrine regulation of puberty. PMID:22658962

  3. Contrasting Modes and Tempos of Venom Expression Evolution in Two Snake Species

    PubMed Central

    Margres, Mark J.; McGivern, James J.; Seavy, Margaret; Wray, Kenneth P.; Facente, Jack; Rokyta, Darin R.

    2015-01-01

    Selection is predicted to drive diversification within species and lead to local adaptation, but understanding the mechanistic details underlying this process and thus the genetic basis of adaptive evolution requires the mapping of genotype to phenotype. Venom is complex and involves many genes, but the specialization of the venom gland toward toxin production allows specific transcripts to be correlated with specific toxic proteins, establishing a direct link from genotype to phenotype. To determine the extent of expression variation and identify the processes driving patterns of phenotypic diversity, we constructed genotype-phenotype maps and compared range-wide toxin-protein expression variation for two species of snake with nearly identical ranges: the eastern diamondback rattlesnake (Crotalus adamanteus) and the eastern coral snake (Micrurus fulvius). We detected significant expression variation in C. adamanteus, identified the specific loci associated with population differentiation, and found that loci expressed at all levels contributed to this divergence. Contrary to expectations, we found no expression variation in M. fulvius, suggesting that M. fulvius populations are not locally adapted. Our results not only linked expression variation at specific loci to divergence in a polygenic, complex trait but also have extensive conservation and biomedical implications. C. adamanteus is currently a candidate for federal listing under the Endangered Species Act, and the loss of any major population would result in the irrevocable loss of a unique venom phenotype. The lack of variation in M. fulvius has significant biomedical application because our data will assist in the development of effective antivenom for this species. PMID:25387465

  4. Cognitive Tempo, Violent Video Games, and Aggressive Behavior in Young Boys.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irwin, A. Roland; Gross, Alan M.

    1995-01-01

    Assesses interpersonal aggression and aggression toward inanimate objects in a free-play setting where children played video games. Results indicated that subjects who played video games with aggressive content exhibited more object aggression during free-play and more interpersonal aggression during the frustrating situation than youngsters who…

  5. Tempo and mode of speciation in Holacanthus angelfishes based on RADseq markers.

    PubMed

    Tariel, Juliette; Longo, Gary C; Bernardi, Giacomo

    2016-05-01

    In this study we estimated the timing of speciation events in a group of angelfishes using 1186 RADseq markers corresponding to 94,880 base pairs. The genus Holacanthus comprises seven species, including two clades of Panama trans-Isthmian geminates, which diverged approximately 3-3.5Mya. These clades diversified within the Tropical Eastern Pacific (TEP, three species) and Tropical Western Atlantic (TWA, two species) which our data suggest to have occurred within the past 1.5My in both ocean basins, but may have proceeded via different mechanisms. In the TEP, speciation is likely to have followed a peripatric pathway, while in the TWA, sister species are currently partially sympatric, thus raising the possibility of sympatric speciation. This study highlights the use of RADseq markers for estimating both divergence times and modes of speciation at a 1-3My timescale. PMID:26876637

  6. Tempo and Mode of the Evolution of Venom and Poison in Tetrapods.

    PubMed

    Harris, Richard J; Arbuckle, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Toxic weaponry in the form of venom and poison has evolved in most groups of animals, including all four major lineages of tetrapods. Moreover, the evolution of such traits has been linked to several key aspects of the biology of toxic animals including life-history and diversification. Despite this, attempts to investigate the macroevolutionary patterns underlying such weaponry are lacking. In this study we analyse patterns of venom and poison evolution across reptiles, amphibians, mammals, and birds using a suite of phylogenetic comparative methods. We find that each major lineage has a characteristic pattern of trait evolution, but mammals and reptiles evolve under a surprisingly similar regime, whilst that of amphibians appears to be particularly distinct and highly contrasting compared to other groups. Our results also suggest that the mechanism of toxin acquisition may be an important distinction in such evolutionary patterns; the evolution of biosynthesis is far less dynamic than that of sequestration of toxins from the diet. Finally, contrary to the situation in amphibians, other tetrapod groups show an association between the evolution of toxic weaponry and higher diversification rates. Taken together, our study provides the first broad-scale analysis of macroevolutionary patterns of venom and poison throughout tetrapods. PMID:27348001

  7. Rigid Orthogonal bis-TEMPO Biradicals with Improved Solubility for Dynamic Nuclear Polarization

    PubMed Central

    Dane, Eric L.; Corzilius, Björn; Rizzato, Egon; Stocker, Pierre; Maly, Thorsten; Smith, Albert A.; Griffin, Robert G.; Ouari, Olivier; Tordo, Paul; Swager, Timothy M.

    2012-01-01

    The synthesis and characterization of oxidized bis-thioketal-trispiro dinitroxide biradicals that orient the nitroxides in a rigid, approximately orthogonal geometry is reported. The biradicals show better performance as polarizing agents in dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) NMR experiments as compared to biradicals lacking the constrained geometry. In addition, the biradicals display improved solubility in aqueous media due to the presence of polar sulfoxides. The results suggest that the orientation of the radicals is not dramatically affected by the oxidation state of the sulfur atoms in the biradical, and we conclude that a biradical polarizing agent containing a mixture of oxidation states can be used for improved solubility without a loss in performance. PMID:22304384

  8. Multi-locus phylogenetic analysis reveals the pattern and tempo of bony fish evolution

    PubMed Central

    Broughton, Richard E.; Betancur-R., Ricardo; Li, Chenhong; Arratia, Gloria; Ortí, Guillermo

    2013-01-01

    Over half of all vertebrates are “fishes”, which exhibit enormous diversity in morphology, physiology, behavior, reproductive biology, and ecology. Investigation of fundamental areas of vertebrate biology depend critically on a robust phylogeny of fishes, yet evolutionary relationships among the major actinopterygian and sarcopterygian lineages have not been conclusively resolved. Although a consensus phylogeny of teleosts has been emerging recently, it has been based on analyses of various subsets of actinopterygian taxa, but not on a full sample of all bony fishes. Here we conducted a comprehensive phylogenetic study on a broad taxonomic sample of 61 actinopterygian and sarcopterygian lineages (with a chondrichthyan outgroup) using a molecular data set of 21 independent loci. These data yielded a resolved phylogenetic hypothesis for extant Osteichthyes, including 1) reciprocally monophyletic Sarcopterygii and Actinopterygii, as currently understood, with polypteriforms as the first diverging lineage within Actinopterygii; 2) a monophyletic group containing gars and bowfin (= Holostei) as sister group to teleosts; and 3) the earliest diverging lineage among teleosts being Elopomorpha, rather than Osteoglossomorpha. Relaxed-clock dating analysis employing a set of 24 newly applied fossil calibrations reveals divergence times that are more consistent with paleontological estimates than previous studies. Establishing a new phylogenetic pattern with accurate divergence dates for bony fishes illustrates several areas where the fossil record is incomplete and provides critical new insights on diversification of this important vertebrate group. PMID:23788273

  9. THE COLORADO PLATEAU CORING PROJECT: THE TIMESCALE AND TEMPO OF BIOTIC CHANGE OF THE EARLY MESOZOIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, P. E.; Kent, D. V.; Mundil, R.; Irmis, R.; Geissman, J. W.; Martz, J.; Parker, W.

    2009-12-01

    The proposed Colorado Plateau Coring Project (CPCP) is an interdisciplinary, multi-institutional coring project designed to recover continuous core through mostly continental strata spanning ~100 million years of the Triassic and Jurassic. Its principal purpose is to tie the incredibly rich faunas, floras, and environmental record of this interval to a rigorously developed timescale and thus to biotic, environmental, and tectonic events at a global-scale. The overall strategy involves 3 long cores (~1000 m) and 2 shorter cores (300-500 m) intended to recover the full expression of the critical early Mesozoic transitions in clear superposition. The cores would span from the base of the Moenkopi to the top of the Morrison formations with sufficient overlap to splice the sections together without gaps and assess lateral facies variations, thickness changes, and stratigraphic completeness. The initial phase of the CPCP, currently under review, is a ~500 m core at Petrified Forest National Park (PFNP) that will recover virtually the entire pre-Owl Rock Mb. of the Late Triassic age Chinle and underlying Early-Middle Triassic age Moenkopi formations. Despite excellent outcrop and a long and distinguished history of study, striking ambiguities exist in local correlation, the temporal duration and resolution of biotic events, global correlations, and the paleolatitudinal position of the region that prevent tests of major competing climatic, biotic, and tectonic hypotheses of global significance. For example, correlations of existing paleomagnetic polarity data for the Chinle of PFNP (1) with the Newark basin astronomically tuned geomagnetic polarity timescale are consistent with new U-Pb dates from reworked volcanics in the Chinle, and result in three sets of implied hypotheses. First, most or all of the Chinle Fm. is Norian and younger in age (< ~ 220 Ma). Second, the supposed Carnian-Norian boundary in the Chinle is actually a late middle Norian extinction that may coincide with the 215.5 Ma Manicouagan impact (2). Third, tetrapod faunas of tropical Pangea (i.e., Colorado Plateau) were radically different than those from contemporary higher latitudes despite the apparent geographic contiguity. These hypotheses cannot be directly tested, however, because the outcrop data are fraught with numerous intrinsic ambiguities. Unambiguous testing of these ideas requires continuous coring, which promises to fundamentally change the certainty and specificity of addressing questions relating the rich surface record from the Chinle and Moenkopi to Earth system processes. 1, Steiner, M., Lucas, S.G., J.G.R. B, 105(11):25791; 2, Ramezani, J. et al., 2005, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 69(10):321 Suppl.

  10. How high is Hispanic/Mexican fertility in the united states? Immigration and tempo considerations.

    PubMed

    Parrado, Emilio A

    2011-08-01

    In this article, I demonstrate that the apparently much higher fertility of Hispanic/Mexican women in the United States is almost exclusively the product of period estimates obtained for immigrant women and that period measures of immigrant fertility suffer from three serious sources of bias that together significantly overstate fertility levels: difficulties in estimating the size of immigrant groups; the tendency for migration to occur at a particular stage in life; and, most importantly, the tendency for women to have a birth soon after migration. When these sources of bias are taken into consideration, the fertility of native Hispanic/Mexican women is very close to replacement level. In addition, the completed fertility of immigrant women in the United States is dramatically lower than the level obtained from period calculations. Findings are consistent with classical theories of immigrant assimilation but are a striking departure from the patterns found in previous studies and published statistics. The main implication is that without a significant change in immigration levels, current projections based on the premise of high Hispanic fertility are likely to considerably exaggerate Hispanic population growth, its impact on the ethno-racial profile of the country, and its potential to counteract population aging. PMID:21695573

  11. Tempo and mode of the multiple origins of salinity tolerance in a water beetle lineage.

    PubMed

    Arribas, Paula; Andújar, Carmelo; Abellán, Pedro; Velasco, Josefa; Millán, Andrés; Ribera, Ignacio

    2014-02-01

    Salinity is one of the most important drivers of the distribution, abundance and diversity of organisms. Previous studies on the evolution of saline tolerance have been mainly centred on marine and terrestrial organisms, while lineages inhabiting inland waters remain largely unexplored. This is despite the fact that these systems include a much broader range of salinities, going from freshwater to more than six times the salinity of the sea (i.e. >200 g/L). Here, we study the pattern and timing of the evolution of the tolerance to salinity in an inland aquatic lineage of water beetles (Enochrus species of the subgenus Lumetus, family Hydrophilidae), with the general aim of understanding the mechanisms by which it was achieved. Using a time-calibrated phylogeny built from five mitochondrial and two nuclear genes and information about the salinity tolerance and geographical distribution of the species, we found that salinity tolerance appeared multiple times associated with periods of global aridification. We found evidence of some accelerated transitions from freshwater directly to high salinities, as reconstructed with extant lineages. This, together with the strong positive correlation found between salinity tolerance and aridity of the habitats in which species are found, suggests that tolerance to salinity may be based on a co-opted mechanism developed originally for drought resistance. PMID:24372998

  12. Mechanisms and tempo of evolution in the African Guineo-Congolian rainforest.

    PubMed Central

    Plana, Vanessa

    2004-01-01

    This paper reviews how and when African rainforest diversity arose, presenting evidence from both plant and animal studies. Preliminary investigations show that these African forests are an assemblage of species of varying age. Phylogenetic evidence, from both African rainforest angiosperms and vertebrates, suggest a Tertiary origin for the major lineages in some of these groups. In groups where savannah species are well represented and rainforest species are a minority, the latter appear to be relics of a Mid-Tertiary rainforest. By contrast, species that are primarily adapted to rainforest have arisen in the past 10 Myr with the main morphological innovations dating from the Late Miocene, and Quaternary speciation dominating in large, morphologically homogeneous groups. The small number of species-level phylogenies for African rainforest plants hinders a more incisive and detailed study into the historical assembly of these continental forests. PMID:15519974

  13. [An information system for injuries from external causes (SILEX): a successful project in El Salvador].

    PubMed

    Salinas, Oscar; de Cosío, Gerardo; Clavel-Arcas, Carme; Montoya, Jeannette; Serpas, Mario; Morán de García, Silvia; Concha-Eastman, Alberto

    2008-12-01

    This article examines the stages in developing an information system for injuries from external causes (Sistema de Información de Lesiones de Causa Externa-SILEX), as well as its limitations and achievements. SILEX is a Web-based application for collection, quality control, presentation, and analysis of data available from the hospital system for surveillance of injuries from external causes created by Ministry of Health of El Salvador with data from the hospital emergency services. This system maintains comprehensive information on the injured person-type of injury, intention, injury site, activity being performed at the time of injury, risk factors, etc.-in the form of tables, graphs, and maps, which streamlines the development of intervention plans and prevention initiatives for these types of injuries in El Salvador. This experience is an example of what can be done to close the information gap on injuries by external causes in the Region of the Americas. PMID:19178778

  14. Apparent Motion of the Sun, Shadows of Objects and Measurement of Time in the View of Seventh Grade Students of Middle School. (Breton Title: Movimento Aparente do Sol, Sombras dos Objetos e Medição do Tempo na Visão de Alunos do Sétimo Ano do Ensino Fundamental.) Movimiento Aparente del Sol, Sombras de los Objetos y Medición del Tiempo en la Visión de Estudiantes del Séptimo Grado del Ciclo Pirmario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iria Machado, Daniel

    2013-07-01

    The apparent motion of the Sun on the celestial sphere and the behavior of the shadows of objects over time are observable phenomena in everyday life. However, students often do not have a proper understanding of such occurrences, and can even display misconceptions about them. Therefore, we performed a research in order to know students' notions about these subjects and to evaluate the contribution to their understanding brought about by an activity performed with an interactive sundial in an informal learning environment. We investigated the ideas of 43 students from the seventh grade of middle school by applying a test with open questions before and after an activity with an analemmatic sundial, conducted by a monitor. A significant proportion of students were initially unaware of most of the phenomena treated. The intervention performed helped the students to assimilate new concepts, providing the contact with new phenomena and to a lesser degree, the development of explanations about them, indicating an educational potential of this action. However, the contribution to the understanding of some of the ideas explored was small, pointing to the need to make additional observations, studies and discussions. O movimento aparente do Sol na esfera celeste e o comportamento das sombras dos objetos com o passar do tempo são fenômenos observáveis no dia a dia. No entanto, muitas vezes os estudantes não possuem uma compreensão adequada de tais ocorrências, podendo inclusive exibir concepções alternativas a seu respeito. Por isso, efetuou-se uma pesquisa com o intuito de conhecer as noções dos alunos sobre esses temas e avaliar a contribuição para seu entendimento propiciada por uma atividade feita com um relógio de Sol interativo, em um ambiente de ensino informal. Foram investigadas as ideias de 43 alunos do sétimo ano do Ensino Fundamental mediante a aplicação de um teste com questões abertas antes e depois de uma atividade com um relógio de Sol

  15. Individual Differences in Boys' and Girls' Timing and Tempo of Puberty: Modeling Development with Nonlinear Growth Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marceau, Kristine; Ram, Nilam; Houts, Renate M.; Grimm, Kevin J.; Susman, Elizabeth J.

    2011-01-01

    Pubertal development is a nonlinear process progressing from prepubescent beginnings through biological, physical, and psychological changes to full sexual maturity. To tether theoretical concepts of puberty with sophisticated longitudinal, analytical models capable of articulating pubertal development more accurately, we used nonlinear…

  16. TEMPO: a New Insertion Device Beamline at SOLEIL for Time Resolved Photoelectron Spectroscopy Experiments on Solids and Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Polack, F.; Silly, M.; Chauvet, C.; Lagarde, B.; Bergeard, N.; Izquierdo, M.; Chubar, O.; Krizmancic, D.; Ribbens, M.; Duval, J.-P.; Basset, C.; Kubsky, S.; Sirotti, F.

    2010-06-23

    A new insertion device beamline is now operational on straight section 8 at the SOLEIL synchrotron radiation source in France. The beamline and the experimental station were developed to optimize the study of the dynamics of electronic and magnetic properties of materials. Here we present the main technical characteristics of the installation and the general principles behind them. The source is composed of two APPLE II type insertion devices. The monochromator with plane gratings and spherical mirrors is working in the energy range 40-1500 eV. It is equipped with VLS, VGD gratings to allow the user optimization of flux or higher harmonics rejection. The observed resonance structures measured in gas phase enable us to determine the available energy resolution: a resolving power higher than 10000 is obtained at the Ar 2p, N 1s and Ne K-edges when using all the optical elements at full aperture. The total flux as a function of the measured photon energy and the characterization of the focal spot size complete the beamline characterization.

  17. Tempo-spatially resolved dynamics of elec- trons and holes in bilayer MoS2 -WS2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galicia-Hernandez, J. M.; Turkowski, V.; Hernandez-Cocoletzi, G.; Rahman, T. S.

    We have performed a Density-Matrix Time-Dependent Density-Functional Theory analysis of the response of bilayer MoS2-WS2 to external laser-pulse perturbations. Time-resolved study of the dynamics of electrons and holes, including formation and dissociation of strongly-bound intra- and inter-layer excitonic states, shows that the experimentally observed ultrafast inter-layer MoS2 to WS2 migration of holes may be attributed to unusually large delocalization of the hole state which extends far into the inter-layer region. We also argue that the velocity of the hole transfer may be further enhanced by its interaction with transfer phonon modes. We analyze other possible consequences of the hole delocalization in the system, including reduction of the effects of the electron-electron and hole-hole repulsion in the trions and biexcitons as compared to that in the monolayers Work supported in part by DOE Grant No. DOE-DE-FG02-07ER46354 and by CONACYT Scholarship No. 23210 (J.M.G.H.).

  18. Tempo-spatial analysis of water quality in tributary bays of the Three Gorges Reservoir region (China).

    PubMed

    Tang, Jialiang; Wang, Tao; Zhu, Bo; Zhao, Pei; Xiao, Yi; Wang, Rui

    2015-11-01

    As a giant newly built man-made canyon-shaped reservoir, the Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR) receives much attention around China and other parts of the world. Bays were deemed to be the most critical zone for water management of TGR; thus, a 3.5-year temporal and spatial investigation was performed to disclose water quality variation in TGR bays and to elucidate the potential affecting factors based on an integrated hydrographical analysis. The results showed that TGR bays had been moderately polluted with averaged nitrogen (N) concentration over 2 mg L(-1) and phosphorus (P) concentration less than 0.1 mg L(-1) in dry season and while high P over 0.2 mg L(-1) and low N of 1.54 mg L(-1) in average in flooding season. The interaction of dam regulation and flooding events influenced the temporal pattern of water quality in the TGR bays, in which particulate nutrients dynamic played an important role. Urban effluents and agricultural catchment area also influenced water quality in the bays, showing local spatial distribution characteristics via diffusion mechanism. Backwater ends might be the most critical areas of water quality degradation. Alleviation measures had been proposed for sustainable development of TGR region. PMID:26087927

  19. Tempo of speciation in a butterfly genus from the Southeast Asian tropics, inferred from mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequence data.

    PubMed

    Megens, Hendrik-Jan; van Moorsel, Coline H M; Piel, William H; Pierce, Naomi E; de Jong, Rienk

    2004-06-01

    Molecular systematics is frequently beset with phylogenetic results that are not fully resolved. Researchers either state that the absence of resolution is due to character conflict, explosive speciation, or some combination of the two, but seldom do they carefully examine their data to distinguish between these causes. In this study, we exhaustively analyze a set of nuclear and mitochondrial nucleotide data for the Asian tropical butterfly genus Arhopala so as to highlight the causes of polytomies in the phylogenetic trees, and, as a result, to infer important biological events in the history of this genus. We began by using non-parametric statistical methods to determine whether the ambiguously resolved regions in these trees represent hard or soft polytomies. In addition we determined how this correlated to number of inferred changes on branches, using parametric maximum likelihood estimations. Based on congruent patterns in both mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences, we concluded that at two stages in the history of Arhopala there have been accelerated instances of speciation. One event, at the base of the phylogeny, generated many of the groups and subgroups currently recognized in this genus, while a later event generated another major clade consisting of both Oriental and Papuan species groups. Based on comparisons of closely related taxa, the ratio of instantaneous rate of evolution between mitochondrial and nuclear DNA evolution is established at approximately 3:1. The earliest radiation is dated between 7 and 11 Ma by a molecular clock analysis, setting the events generating much of the diversity of Arhopala at well before the Pleistocene. Periodical flooding of the Sunda plateau during interglacial periods was, therefore, not responsible for generating the major divisions in the genus Arhopala. Instead, we hypothesize that large-scale climatic changes taking place in the Miocene have induced the early acceleration in speciation. PMID:15120408

  20. How Group Size Affects Vigilance Dynamics and Time Allocation Patterns: The Key Role of Imitation and Tempo

    PubMed Central

    Michelena, Pablo; Deneubourg, Jean-Louis

    2011-01-01

    In the context of social foraging, predator detection has been the subject of numerous studies, which acknowledge the adaptive response of the individual to the trade-off between feeding and vigilance. Typically, animals gain energy by increasing their feeding time and decreasing their vigilance effort with increasing group size, without increasing their risk of predation (‘group size effect’). Research on the biological utility of vigilance has prevailed over considerations of the mechanistic rules that link individual decisions to group behavior. With sheep as a model species, we identified how the behaviors of conspecifics affect the individual decisions to switch activity. We highlight a simple mechanism whereby the group size effect on collective vigilance dynamics is shaped by two key features: the magnitude of social amplification and intrinsic differences between foraging and scanning bout durations. Our results highlight a positive correlation between the duration of scanning and foraging bouts at the level of the group. This finding reveals the existence of groups with high and low rates of transition between activies, suggesting individual variations in the transition rate, or ‘tempo’. We present a mathematical model based on behavioral rules derived from experiments. Our theoretical predictions show that the system is robust in respect to variations in the propensity to imitate scanning and foraging, yet flexible in respect to differences in the duration of activity bouts. The model shows how individual decisions contribute to collective behavior patterns and how the group, in turn, facilitates individual-level adaptive responses. PMID:21525987

  1. Tempo-Spatial Patterns of Land Use Changes and Urban Development in Globalizing China: A Study of Beijing

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yichun; Fang, Chuanglin; Lin, George C.S.; Gong, Hongmian; Qiao, Biao

    2007-01-01

    This study examines the temporal and spatial changes in land use as a consequence of rapid urban development in the city of Beijing. Using a combination of techniques of remote sensing and GIS, the study identifies a substantial loss of plain dryland and a phenomenal expansion of urban construction land over the recent decade. Geographically, there is a clear shifting of urban construction land from the inner city to the outskirts as a consequence of suburbanization. The outward expansion of the ring-road system is found to be one of the most important driving forces explaining the temporal and spatial pattern of land use change. The uneven distribution of population stands as another factor with significant correlation with land use change. The application of the techniques of remote sensing and GIS can enhance the precision and comparability of research on land use change and urban transformation in China.

  2. Patient reported outcomes in a trial of combination therapy with etanercept and methotrexate for rheumatoid arthritis: the TEMPO trial

    PubMed Central

    van der Heijde, D; Klareskog, L; Singh, A; Tornero, J; Melo‐Gomes, J; Codreanu, C; Pedersen, R; Freundlich, B; Fatenejad, S

    2006-01-01

    Objective To compare patient reported measures of function, health related quality of life (QoL), and satisfaction with medication among patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treated with methotrexate (MTX), etanercept, or both for up to 1 year. Methods In a 52 week, double blind, clinical trial, patients with active RA were randomised to receive etanercept 25 mg twice weekly, methotrexate up to 20 mg weekly, or combination therapy. The Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) disability index, EuroQoL health status visual analogue scale (EQ‐5D VAS), patient global assessment, and patient general health VAS were administered at baseline and weeks 2, 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, 24, 32, 40, 48, and 52. Satisfaction with the medication was compared at 52 weeks. Results Of 682 enrolled patients, 522 completed 52 weeks of treatment. Mean improvement from baseline in HAQ score was 0.65, 0.70, and 1.0 for MTX, etanercept, and the combination, respectively. The mean percentage and absolute improvement in the HAQ was significantly higher (p<0.01) for combination therapy than for either of the monotherapies. Combination therapy produced significantly more rapid achievement of HAQ ⩽0.5 sustained for 6 months than either of the monotherapies (p<0.01). Compared with patients receiving monotherapy, those receiving combination therapy achieved a significantly better (p<0.05) health state as measured by the EQ‐5D VAS (mean (SD) 63.7 (3.2), 66.8 (3.2), 72.7 (3.1) for MTX, etanercept, and the combination, respectively). Results were similar for other assessments (p<0.01). Patients in combination and etanercept groups were significantly more likely (p<0.0001, p = 0.0009, respectively) to report satisfaction with the medication. Conclusions Combination therapy with etanercept and methotrexate improved function, QoL, and satisfaction with the medication significantly more than monotherapy. PMID:16079172

  3. The tempo and mode of New World monkey evolution and biogeography in the context of phylogenomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Jameson Kiesling, Natalie M; Yi, Soojin V; Xu, Ke; Gianluca Sperone, F; Wildman, Derek E

    2015-01-01

    The development and evolution of organisms is heavily influenced by their environment. Thus, understanding the historical biogeography of taxa can provide insights into their evolutionary history, adaptations and trade-offs realized throughout time. In the present study we have taken a phylogenomic approach to infer New World monkey phylogeny, upon which we have reconstructed the biogeographic history of extant platyrrhines. In order to generate sufficient phylogenetic signal within the New World monkey clade, we carried out a large-scale phylogenetic analysis of approximately 40 kb of non-genic genomic DNA sequence in a 36 species subset of extant New World monkeys. Maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference analysis all converged on a single optimal tree topology. Divergence dating and biogeographic analysis reconstruct the timing and geographic location of divergence events. The ancestral area reconstruction describes the geographic locations of the last common ancestor of extant platyrrhines and provides insight into key biogeographic events occurring during platyrrhine diversification. Through these analyses we conclude that the diversification of the platyrrhines took place concurrently with the establishment and diversification of the Amazon rainforest. This suggests that an expanding rainforest environment rather than geographic isolation drove platyrrhine diversification. PMID:24792088

  4. Estimating Tempo and Mode of Y Chromosome Turnover: Explaining Y Chromosome Loss With the Fragile Y Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Blackmon, Heath; Demuth, Jeffery P.

    2014-01-01

    Chromosomal sex determination is phylogenetically widespread, having arisen independently in many lineages. Decades of theoretical work provide predictions about sex chromosome differentiation that are well supported by observations in both XY and ZW systems. However, the phylogenetic scope of previous work gives us a limited understanding of the pace of sex chromosome gain and loss and why Y or W chromosomes are more often lost in some lineages than others, creating XO or ZO systems. To gain phylogenetic breadth we therefore assembled a database of 4724 beetle species’ karyotypes and found substantial variation in sex chromosome systems. We used the data to estimate rates of Y chromosome gain and loss across a phylogeny of 1126 taxa estimated from seven genes. Contrary to our initial expectations, we find that highly degenerated Y chromosomes of many members of the suborder Polyphaga are rarely lost, and that cases of Y chromosome loss are strongly associated with chiasmatic segregation during male meiosis. We propose the “fragile Y” hypothesis, that recurrent selection to reduce recombination between the X and Y chromosome leads to the evolution of a small pseudoautosomal region (PAR), which, in taxa that require XY chiasmata for proper segregation during meiosis, increases the probability of aneuploid gamete production, with Y chromosome loss. This hypothesis predicts that taxa that evolve achiasmatic segregation during male meiosis will rarely lose the Y chromosome. We discuss data from mammals, which are consistent with our prediction. PMID:24939995

  5. Estimating tempo and mode of Y chromosome turnover: explaining Y chromosome loss with the fragile Y hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Blackmon, Heath; Demuth, Jeffery P

    2014-06-01

    Chromosomal sex determination is phylogenetically widespread, having arisen independently in many lineages. Decades of theoretical work provide predictions about sex chromosome differentiation that are well supported by observations in both XY and ZW systems. However, the phylogenetic scope of previous work gives us a limited understanding of the pace of sex chromosome gain and loss and why Y or W chromosomes are more often lost in some lineages than others, creating XO or ZO systems. To gain phylogenetic breadth we therefore assembled a database of 4724 beetle species' karyotypes and found substantial variation in sex chromosome systems. We used the data to estimate rates of Y chromosome gain and loss across a phylogeny of 1126 taxa estimated from seven genes. Contrary to our initial expectations, we find that highly degenerated Y chromosomes of many members of the suborder Polyphaga are rarely lost, and that cases of Y chromosome loss are strongly associated with chiasmatic segregation during male meiosis. We propose the "fragile Y" hypothesis, that recurrent selection to reduce recombination between the X and Y chromosome leads to the evolution of a small pseudoautosomal region (PAR), which, in taxa that require XY chiasmata for proper segregation during meiosis, increases the probability of aneuploid gamete production, with Y chromosome loss. This hypothesis predicts that taxa that evolve achiasmatic segregation during male meiosis will rarely lose the Y chromosome. We discuss data from mammals, which are consistent with our prediction. PMID:24939995

  6. Transparent bionanocomposite films based on chitosan and tempo-oxidized cellulose nanofibers with enhanced mechanical and barrier properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The development of biobased active films for use in food packaging is increasing due to low cost, environmental appeal, renewability and availability. The objective of this research was to develop an effective and complete green approach for the production of bionanocomposite films with enhanced mec...

  7. Chronology of tectonic, geomorphic, and volcanic interactions and the tempo of fault slip near Little Lake, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amos, Colin B.; Brownlee, Sarah J.; Rood, Sylan H.; Fisher, G. Burch; Burgmann, Roland; Renne, Paul R.; Jayko, Angela S.

    2013-01-01

    New geochronologic and geomorphic constraints on the Little Lake fault in the Eastern California shear zone reveal steady, modest rates of dextral slip during and since the mid-to-late Pleistocene. We focus on a suite of offset fluvial landforms in the Pleistocene Owens River channel that formed in response to periodic interaction with nearby basalt flows, thereby recording displacement over multiple time intervals. Overlap between 40Ar/39Ar ages for the youngest intracanyon basalt flow and 10Be surface exposure dating of downstream terrace surfaces suggests widespread channel incision during a prominent outburst flood through the Little Lake channel at ca. 64 ka. Older basalt flows flanking the upper and lower canyon margins indicate localization of the Owens River in its current position between 212 ± 14 and 197 ± 11 ka. Coupled with terrestrial light detection and ranging (lidar) and digital topographic measurements of dextral offset, the revised Little Lake chronology indicates average dextral slip rates of at least ∼0.6–0.7 mm/yr and 4 to 105 yr. Despite previous geodetic observations of relatively rapid interseismic strain along the Little Lake fault, we find no evidence for sustained temporal fluctuations in slip rates over multiple earthquake cycles. Instead, our results indicate that accelerated fault loading may be transient over much shorter periods (∼101 yr) and perhaps indicative of time-dependent seismic hazard associated with Eastern California shear zone faults.

  8. Tempo of genetic diversification in southern African rodents: The role of Plio-Pleistocene climatic oscillations as drivers for speciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgelard, Claudine; Matthee, Conrad A.

    2012-07-01

    The evolution of the southern African faunal assemblages is thought to have been largely influenced by climatic oscillations of the Plio-Pleistocene. These fluctuations presumably had a major impact in the form of vicariant diversification of taxa by causing simultaneous speciation/cladogenetic events due to habitat fragmentation. We aimed to test this hypothesis by comparing the timing of diversification observed for several rodent lineages with three peaks of aridification described at approximately 2.8, 1.7 and 1.0 Mya. Our study included nine rodent taxa (Nannomys, Aethomys, Otomys, Myotomys, Rhabdomys and Mastomys for the Muridae, Saccostomus for the Nesomyidae, Cryptomys for the Bathyergidae, and Xerus for the Sciuridae) that showed intrageneric mitochondrial cytochrome b cladogenesis during the last 5 Ma. Phylogenetic analysis performed with maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods supported the monophyly of all subgenera and genera. Most diversifications are also well supported and in agreement with previously published studies. Divergence dates between lineages were estimated using a Bayesian relaxed molecular clock and the 7 Myr split between different Apodemus species as well as the divergence between Tatera and Gerbillurus at 6.3 Myr were used as calibration points. Our results did not provide any convincing evidence of a correspondence between rodent diversification events and peaks in aridity during the Plio-Pleistocene. The nearly perfect linear correlation between cladogenesis and time, during the last 5 Myr, strongly suggests that the diversification of southern African rodent lineages is driven by complex interactions between different factors, including life history, climatic changes, and topographic barriers.

  9. The Effects of Teaching and Learning Experiences, Tempo, and Mode on Undergraduates' and Children's Symphonic Music Preferences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flowers, Patricia J.

    1988-01-01

    Presents a study which assessed undergraduates' and children's music preferences for examples of symphonic music. Serving as a teaching and planning experience for undergraduates, the study revealed that children's preferences were increased through undergraduate presentations and that college students used larger vocabularies when describing…

  10. Tempo-spatial downscaling of multiple GCMs projections for soil erosion risk analysis at El Reno, Oklahoma, USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proper spatial and temporal treatments of climate change scenarios projected by General Circulation Models (GCMs) are critical to accurate assessment of climatic impacts on natural resources and ecosystems. For accurate prediction of soil erosion risk at a particular farm or field under climate cha...

  11. 21 CFR 524.1044d - Gentamicin sulfate, betamethasone valerate ointment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... treatment of acute and chronic canine otitis externa and canine infected superficial lesions caused by bacteria sensitive to gentamicin. (2)(i) For the treatment of acute and chronic canine otitis externa...

  12. 21 CFR 524.1484d - Neomycin, hydrocortisone, and tetracaine otic ointment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... other inflammatory conditions of the external ear canal, acute otitis externa and, to a lesser degree, chronic otitis externa. (3) Limitations. Federal law restricts this drug to use by or on the order of...

  13. 21 CFR 524.1484i - Neomycin sulfate, hydrocortisone acetate, sterile ointment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... canker and other inflammatory conditions of the external ear canal, fill external ear canal one to three..., conjunctivitis, acute otitis externa and, to a lesser degree, chronic otitis externa in dogs and cats.1...

  14. 21 CFR 524.1484i - Neomycin and hydrocortisone ointment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... inflammatory conditions of the external ear canal, fill external ear canal 1 to 3 times daily. (2) Indications... otitis externa and, to a lesser degree, chronic otitis externa. (3) Limitations. Federal law...

  15. 21 CFR 524.1484c - Neomycin, isoflupredone, and tetracaine ointment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    .... In treatment of otitis externa and other inflammatory conditions of the external ear canal, a...) Indications for use. For the treatment of acute otitis externa in dogs and to a lesser degree, chronic...

  16. 21 CFR 524.1484i - Neomycin sulfate, hydrocortisone acetate, sterile ointment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... canker and other inflammatory conditions of the external ear canal, fill external ear canal one to three..., conjunctivitis, acute otitis externa and, to a lesser degree, chronic otitis externa in dogs and cats.1...

  17. 21 CFR 524.1484i - Neomycin sulfate, hydrocortisone acetate, sterile ointment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... canker and other inflammatory conditions of the external ear canal, fill external ear canal one to three..., conjunctivitis, acute otitis externa and, to a lesser degree, chronic otitis externa in dogs and cats.1...

  18. Tempo and scale of biogenic effects on high-frequency acoustic propagation near the marine sediment-water interface in shallow water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jumars, Peter

    2003-04-01

    Organisms have natural scales, such as lifetimes, body sizes, frequencies of movement to new locations, and residence times of material in digestive systems, and each scale has potential implications for acoustic effects. The effects of groups of organisms, like organisms themselves, aggregate in space and time. This review, including an assortment of unpublished information, examines examples of such aggregations, many of them documented acoustically. Light synchronizes many activities. Macroscopic animals forage primarily under cover of darkness. This phasing applies both to animals that extend appendages above the sediment-water interface and to animals that leave the seabed at night. Whereas their bottom-modifying activities are concentrated in nocturnal or crepuscular fashion, the bottom-modifying activities of the visual feeders follow a different phasing and often dominate the rate of change in acoustic backscatter from the interface. Light also acts through its effects on primary production, often concentrated in a very thin surficial layer atop the seabed. The supersaturation of oxygen does, and microbubble nucleation may, result. Where tidal velocities are large, light-set patterns are often tidally modulated. Activities of animals living below the seabed, however, remain a mystery, whose primary hope for solution is acoustic. [Work supported by ONR and DEPSCoR.

  19. Dopamine D3 receptors modulate the rate of neuronal recovery, cell recruitment in Area X, and song tempo after neurotoxic damage in songbirds.

    PubMed

    Lukacova, Kristina; Pavukova, Eva; Kostal, Lubor; Bilcik, Boris; Kubikova, Lubica

    2016-09-01

    Songbirds, like humans, learn vocalizations and their striatum recruits new neurons in adulthood. Injury in striatal vocal nucleus Area X, involved in song learning and production in songbirds, is followed by massive regeneration. The newborn neurons arise from the subventricular zone (SVZ) rich in dopamine D3 receptors (D3Rs). The aim of this study was to investigate whether the D3Rs affect the rate of neuronal recovery in Area X. Male zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) received bilateral neurotoxic lesion of Area X and were implanted with osmotic minipumps containing D3R agonist 7-OH-DPAT, antagonist U99194, or saline. Treatment with 7-OH-DPAT but not U99194 led to significant reduction of lesion size and increased numbers of migrating neuroblasts and newborn cells in the Area X. These cells were detected in the lesion border as well as the lesion center. Lesion also led to increased mRNA expression of the D3Rs in the neurogenic SVZ and in the nucleus robustus arcopallialis (RA) involved in song production. Moreover, lesion alone prolonged the song duration and this may be facilitated by D3Rs in RA. Parallel lesion and stimulation of D3Rs prolonged it even more, while blocking of D3Rs abolished the lesion-induced effect. These data suggest that D3R stimulation after striatal injury accelerates the striatal recovery and can cause behavioral alterations. PMID:27339729

  20. Stem cell antigen-1 regulates the tempo of muscle repair through effects on proliferation of {alpha}7 integrin-expressing myoblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Epting, Conrad L.; Lopez, Javier E.; Pedersen, Anissa; Brown, Courtney; Spitz, Paul; Ursell, Philip C.; Bernstein, Harold S.

    2008-03-10

    Skeletal muscle repair occurs through a programmed series of events including myogenic precursor activation, myoblast proliferation, and differentiation into new myofibers. We previously identified a role for Stem cell antigen-1 (Sca-1) in myoblast proliferation and differentiation in vitro. We demonstrated that blocking Sca-1 expression resulted in sustained myoblast cell division. Others have since demonstrated that Sca-1-null myoblasts display a similar phenotype when cultured ex vivo. To test the importance of Sca-1 during myogenesis in vivo, we employed a myonecrotic injury model in Sca-1{sup -/-} and Sca-1{sup +/+} mice. Our results demonstrate that Sca-1{sup -/-} myoblasts exhibit a hyperproliferative response consisting of prolonged and accelerated cell division in response to injury. This leads to delayed myogenic differentiation and muscle repair. These data provide the first in vivo evidence for Sca-1 as a regulator of myoblast proliferation during muscle regeneration. These studies also suggest that the balance between myogenic precursor proliferation and differentiation is critical to normal muscle repair.

  1. Timing, tempo and paleoenvironmental implications of Deccan volcanism relative to the KTB extinction, what we can learn from the red bole record?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adatte, Thierry; Sordet, Valentin; Keller, Gerta; Schoene, Blair; Samperton, Kyle; Khadri, Syed

    2016-04-01

    Deccan Traps erupted in three main phases with 6% total Deccan volume in phase-1 (C30n), 80% in phase-2 (C29r) and 14% in phase-3 (C29n). Recent studies indicate that the bulk (80%) of Deccan trap eruptions (phase-2) occurred over a relatively short time interval in magnetic polarity C29r. U-Pb zircon geochronology shows that the main phase-2 began 250 ky before the Cretaceous-Tertiary (KT) mass extinction and continued into the early Danian suggesting a cause-and-effect relationship. In India a strong floral response is observed as a direct consequence of volcanic phase-2. Shortly after the onset of Deccan phase-2, the floral association dominated by gymnosperms and angiosperms was decimated as indicated by a sharp decrease in pollen and spores coupled with the appearance of fungi, which mark increasing stress conditions as a direct result of volcanic activity. The inter-trappean sediments deposited in phase-2 are characterized by the highest alteration CIA index values suggesting increased acid rains due to SO2 emissions. In addition, a sharp decrease in pollen and spores coupled with the appearance of fungi mark increasing stress conditions, which are likely a direct result of volcanic activity. Bulk organic geochemistry points to a strong degradation of the indigenous organic matter, suggesting that the biomass was oxidized in acidic conditions triggered by intense volcanic activity. Closer to the eruption center, the lava flows are generally separated by red weathered horizons known as red boles that mark quiescent periods between basalt flows. Red boles have increasingly attracted the attention of researchers to understand the climatic and paleoenvironmental impact of Continental Flood Basalts (CFB). Recent advances in U-Pb dating of Deccan lava flows, studies of weathering patterns and paleoclimatic information gained from multiproxy analyses of red bole beds (e.g., lithology, mineralogy, geochemistry) yield crucial evidence of environmental changes triggered by volcanic activity. Red boles consist mainly of red silty clays characterized by concentrations of immobile elements such as Al and Fe3+ ions that are typical of paleo-laterites which probably developed during the short periods of weathering between eruptions. At least 30 thick red bole layers are present in C29r below the KT boundary between lava flows of phase-2 that erupted over a time span of about 250 ky. The short duration exposures of these red boles are reflected in the mineralogical and geochemical data that indicate rapid weathering (high CIA) linked to increasing acid rains. ∂D and ∂18O measured on smectite clays from the red boles approximate the meteoric water composition that prevailed during Deccan eruptions. Preliminary isotopic data from red boles deposited during the main phase-2 suggest significant and rapid changes in rainfall intensity and/or altitude linked to the accumulation of a 3100m thick basalt pile that erupted over a short period of time.

  2. New Information on Tataouinea hannibalis from the Early Cretaceous of Tunisia and Implications for the Tempo and Mode of Rebbachisaurid Sauropod Evolution.

    PubMed

    Fanti, Federico; Cau, Andrea; Cantelli, Luigi; Hassine, Mohsen; Auditore, Marco

    2015-01-01

    The rebbachisaurid sauropod Tataouinea hannibalis represents the first articulated dinosaur skeleton from Tunisia and one of the best preserved in northern Africa. The type specimen was collected from the lower Albian, fluvio-estuarine deposits of the Ain el Guettar Formation (southern Tunisia). We present detailed analyses on the sedimentology and facies distribution at the main quarry and a revision of the vertebrate fauna associated with the skeleton. Data provide information on a complex ecosystem dominated by crocodilian and other brackish water taxa. Taphonomic interpretations indicate a multi-event, pre-burial history with a combination of rapid segregation in high sediment supply conditions and partial subaerial exposure of the carcass. After the collection in 2011 of the articulated sacrum and proximalmost caudal vertebrae, all showing a complex pattern of pneumatization, newly discovered material of the type specimen allows a detailed osteological description of Tataouinea. The sacrum, the complete and articulated caudal vertebrae 1-17, both ilia and ischia display asymmetrical pneumatization, with the left side of vertebrae and the left ischium showing a more extensive invasion by pneumatic features than their right counterparts. A pneumatic hiatus is present in caudal centra 7 to 13, whereas caudal centra 14-16 are pneumatised by shallow fossae. Bayesian inference analyses integrating morphological, stratigraphic and paleogeographic data support a flagellicaudatan-rebbachisaurid divergence at about 163 Ma and a South American ancestral range for rebbachisaurids. Results presented here suggest an exclusively South American Limaysaurinae and a more widely distributed Rebbachisaurinae lineage, the latter including the South American taxon Katepensaurus and a clade including African and European taxa, with Tataouinea as sister taxon of Rebbachisaurus. This scenario would indicate that South America was not affected by the end-Jurassic extinction of diplodocoids, and was most likely the centre of the rapid radiation of rebbachisaurids to Africa and Europe between 135 and 130 Ma. PMID:25923211

  3. Aerobic Alcohol Oxidation Using a Copper(I)/TEMPO Catalyst System: A Green, Catalytic Oxidation Reaction for the Undergraduate Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Nicholas J.; Hoover, Jessica M.; Stahl, Shannon S.

    2013-01-01

    Modern undergraduate organic chemistry textbooks provide detailed discussion of stoichiometric Cr- and Mn-based reagents for the oxidation of alcohols, yet the use of such oxidants in instructional and research laboratories, as well as industrial chemistry, is increasingly avoided. This work describes a laboratory exercise that uses ambient air as…

  4. Clinal morphological variation along a depth gradient in the living scleractinian reef coral Favia pallida: Effects on perceived evolutionary tempos in the fossil record

    SciTech Connect

    Cuffey, R.J. ); Pachut, J.F. )

    1990-12-01

    The Holocene reef-building coral Favia pallida was sampled at 4.5 m depth increments (to 40 m) from two reefs on Enewetak Atoll to examine intraspecific environmental effects. An exposed outer reef was massive and wall-like, whereas a sheltered lagoonal reef grew as a slender pinnacle. Corallite diameter and growth rate, two attributes retrievable in fossil corals, were measured with data partitioned into shallow (<20 m), intermediate (20 to 29 m), and deep-water (>29 m) subsets. Highly significant differences between depth zone populations were found for both corallite diameters and growth rates in analyses of individual and combined reef data sets. Canonical variates analyses (CVA) separated populations from depth zones along single, highly significant, functions. Centroids and 95% confidence intervals, calculated from CVA scores of colonies in each population, are widely separated for the lagoon reef and combined data sets. Conversely, populations from shallow and intermediate depths on the outer reef display overlapping confidence bars indicative of more gradational morphologic changes. When CV's were used to classify specimens to groups, misassignments of intermediate depth specimens to shallow or deep-water populations underscored the gradational nature of the environment. Completely intergrading populations of Favia pallida collected from different depths can be morphologically separated into statistically distinct groupings. A stratigraphic succession of such morphotypes might be interpreted as abruptly appearing separate species if sampling were not as uniform, systematic, and detailed as was possible on modern reefs. Analyses of evolutionary patterns must carefully assess potential effects of clinal variation if past evolutionary patterns are to be interpreted correctly.

  5. New Information on Tataouinea hannibalis from the Early Cretaceous of Tunisia and Implications for the Tempo and Mode of Rebbachisaurid Sauropod Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Fanti, Federico; Cau, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The rebbachisaurid sauropod Tataouinea hannibalis represents the first articulated dinosaur skeleton from Tunisia and one of the best preserved in northern Africa. The type specimen was collected from the lower Albian, fluvio-estuarine deposits of the Ain el Guettar Formation (southern Tunisia). We present detailed analyses on the sedimentology and facies distribution at the main quarry and a revision of the vertebrate fauna associated with the skeleton. Data provide information on a complex ecosystem dominated by crocodilian and other brackish water taxa. Taphonomic interpretations indicate a multi-event, pre-burial history with a combination of rapid segregation in high sediment supply conditions and partial subaerial exposure of the carcass. After the collection in 2011 of the articulated sacrum and proximalmost caudal vertebrae, all showing a complex pattern of pneumatization, newly discovered material of the type specimen allows a detailed osteological description of Tataouinea. The sacrum, the complete and articulated caudal vertebrae 1–17, both ilia and ischia display asymmetrical pneumatization, with the left side of vertebrae and the left ischium showing a more extensive invasion by pneumatic features than their right counterparts. A pneumatic hiatus is present in caudal centra 7 to 13, whereas caudal centra 14–16 are pneumatised by shallow fossae. Bayesian inference analyses integrating morphological, stratigraphic and paleogeographic data support a flagellicaudatan-rebbachisaurid divergence at about 163 Ma and a South American ancestral range for rebbachisaurids. Results presented here suggest an exclusively South American Limaysaurinae and a more widely distributed Rebbachisaurinae lineage, the latter including the South American taxon Katepensaurus and a clade including African and European taxa, with Tataouinea as sister taxon of Rebbachisaurus. This scenario would indicate that South America was not affected by the end-Jurassic extinction of diplodocoids, and was most likely the centre of the rapid radiation of rebbachisaurids to Africa and Europe between 135 and 130 Ma. PMID:25923211

  6. Tapping to a Slow Tempo in the Presence of Simple and Complex Meters Reveals Experience-Specific Biases for Processing Music

    PubMed Central

    Ullal-Gupta, Sangeeta; Hannon, Erin E.; Snyder, Joel S.

    2014-01-01

    Musical meters vary considerably across cultures, yet relatively little is known about how culture-specific experience influences metrical processing. In Experiment 1, we compared American and Indian listeners' synchronous tapping to slow sequences. Inter-tone intervals contained silence or to-be-ignored rhythms that were designed to induce a simple meter (familiar to Americans and Indians) or a complex meter (familiar only to Indians). A subset of trials contained an abrupt switch from one rhythm to another to assess the disruptive effects of contradicting the initially implied meter. In the unfilled condition, both groups tapped earlier than the target and showed large tap-tone asynchronies (measured in relative phase). When inter-tone intervals were filled with simple-meter rhythms, American listeners tapped later than targets, but their asynchronies were smaller and declined more rapidly. Likewise, asynchronies rose sharply following a switch away from simple-meter but not from complex-meter rhythm. By contrast, Indian listeners performed similarly across all rhythm types, with asynchronies rapidly declining over the course of complex- and simple-meter trials. For these listeners, a switch from either simple or complex meter increased asynchronies. Experiment 2 tested American listeners but doubled the duration of the synchronization phase prior to (and after) the switch. Here, compared with simple meters, complex-meter rhythms elicited larger asynchronies that declined at a slower rate, however, asynchronies increased after the switch for all conditions. Our results provide evidence that ease of meter processing depends to a great extent on the amount of experience with specific meters. PMID:25075514

  7. Erratum: 5aMU1. Movement amplitude and tempo change in piano performance [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 115, 2590 (2004)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Caroline; dalla Bella, Simone

    2004-09-01

    The correct authors and affiliations for this manuscript are Caroline Palmer, Dept. of Psychology, McGill Univ., 1205 Dr. Penfield Ave., Montreal, QC H3A 1B1, Canada, Caroline.palmeratmcgill.ca and Simone Dalla Bella, Kazimierz Wielki Univ., Bydgoszcz, 85-867 Poland.

  8. Microbial Metabolic Landscapes Derived from Complementary Mineralogical, Aqueous Geochemical, and Gas Data Associated with High pH, Actively Serpentinizing Springs in the Coast Range Ophiolite (CA,USA) and Zambales and Palawan Ophiolites (Philippines)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardace, D.; Meyer-Dombard, D. R.; Arcilla, C. A.; Hoehler, T. M.; McCollom, T. M.; Schrenk, M. O.

    2013-12-01

    We applied x-ray diffraction and thin section petrography to profile the mineralogy of serpentinites and relict peridotites pertinent to the Coast Range Ophiolite Microbiological Observatory (CROMO, an array of 8 water monitoring wells installed in serpentinizing ultramafic rocks, sited at the UC-Davis McLaughlin Natural Reserve, Lower Lake, CA) and Zambales and Palawan ophiolites in the Philippines. In general, serpentinization in near surface samples was extensive, obscuring many protolith characteristics, but relict olivine grains are apparent. Upwelling serpentinizing formation fluids react to varying degrees with shallow hydrological regimes impacted by meteoric inputs. In the vicinity of CROMO, modest pH (7 to 8.5) waters form spring deposits. In the Philippines ophiolites, high pH (10.8 to 11. 3) waters form extensive travertines near Manleluag Springs and newly faulted sections of the Poon Bato River. Travertine fabric and chemistry indicate episodic spring flow and suggest that ambient water chemistry shifts over time. A multiprobe meter simultaneously measured pH, temperature, conductivity, oxidation-reduction potential, and dissolved oxygen at selected springs. Filtered water samples from monitoring wells and springs were analyzed for major elements and some ions. Dissolved gases and gas bubbles were captured and transported for analysis of H2, CO, and CH4. Aqueous and gas geochemistry data were transformed into activity data using EQ3: A Computer Program for Geochemical Aqueous Speciation-Solubility Calculations (Wolery, 1992) and the Gibbs Energy values for selected metabolic reactions, given the environmental conditions, were calculated. Metabolisms considered were: methanogenesis, methane oxidation, ferric iron reduction, ferrous iron oxidation, oxidation of S in pyrite, nitrification, denitrification, and N-fixation. At all sites tapping waters sourced in actively serpentinizing systems, regardless of geography, ferrous iron oxidation was the most strongly favored of the modeled reactions, while methanogenesis and nitrification reactions were not thermodynamically feasible, under the modeled conditions. Indeed, the lack of favorable biological methanogenesis is consistent with microbiological studies at CROMO. Also, concentrations of aqueous ferrous iron may be extremely low at high pH, however, causing the amount of energy to be gained from the reaction to be very small. Taken together, data from CROMO formation fluids and deeply sourced springs at the Philippines Ophiolite sites describe a similar landscape of favorable microbial metabolisms that could be extended to other serpentinizing ecosystems. The recurrent problem of a disrupted nitrogen cycle in these ultramafic-hosted springs is discussed.

  9. DISYUNTIVAS EN LAS CONCEPCIONES SOBRE AUTONOMÍA Y BENEFICENCIA QUE AFECTAN LA TERAPÉUTICA DEL INTENTO SUICIDA1

    PubMed Central

    Mondragón, Liliana; Monroy, Zuraya; Ito, Ma. Emily; Medina-Mora, Dra. Ma. Elena

    2010-01-01

    El objetivo del trabajo es conocer las disyuntivas entre los principios de beneficencia y autonomía, que se presentan en la relación médico-paciente, durante la terapéutica del intento de suicidio. La investigación se realizó en dos hospitales psiquiátricos de la Ciudad de México. La muestra incluyó a tres sujetos con intento de suicidio, mayores de 18 años, que eran atendidos en consulta externa a causa de una lesión autoinfligida en el último año, y a tres psiquiatras que trataban a estos pacientes. La información se obtuvo previo consentimiento informado en entrevistas individuales. Se llevó a cabo un análisis de discurso argumentado para encontrar los significados que los participantes otorgaron a los principios bioéticos y las posibles disyuntivas entre éstos. Las discordancias entre la beneficencia y la autonomía estuvieron relacionadas con el beneficio del tratamiento, el respeto por los valores y las creencias de los pacientes, entre otros. Este trabajo presenta consideraciones éticas relevantes en el escenario clínico, al ofrecer al psiquiatra un análisis bioético que le permita actuar de acuerdo con la beneficencia y respetando la autonomía del paciente frente a casos de intento de suicidio y, de esta forma procurar una mejor atención para ellos. PMID:20830214

  10. 21 CFR 524.1484h - Neomycin, penicillin, polymyxin B, and hydrocortisone suspension.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., atopic dermatitis, interdigital eczema, and otitis externa caused by bacteria susceptible to neomycin... caused by bacteria susceptible to neomycin, penicillin, and polymyxin B. (3) Limitations. For use in...

  11. 75 FR 16346 - Ophthalmic and Topical Dosage Form New Animal Drugs; Orbifloxacin, Mometasone Furoate Monohydrate...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-01

    ... orbifloxacin, mometasone furoate monohydrate, and posaconazole for the treatment of otitis externa in dogs... of otitis externa in dogs associated with susceptible strains of yeast (Malassezia pachydermatis) and... posaconazole. (b) Sponsor. See No. 000061 in Sec. 510.600(c) of this chapter. (c) Conditions of use in...

  12. 75 FR 4692 - Ophthalmic and Topical Dosage Form New Animal Drugs; Miconazole, Polymixin B, and Prednisolone...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-29

    ... treatment of otitis externa in dogs. DATES: This rule is effective January 29, 2010. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION... prednisolone acetate) Otic Suspension in dogs for the treatment of otitis externa associated with ] susceptible... in 510.600(c) of this chapter. (c) Conditions of use in dogs--(1) Amount. Instill five drops in...

  13. 76 FR 78150 - Ophthalmic and Topical Dosage Form New Animal Drugs; Hydrocortisone Aceponate, Miconazole Nitrate...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-16

    ... externa in dogs. DATES: This rule is effective December 16, 2011. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Lisa M... treatment of otitis externa in dogs associated with susceptible strains of yeast (Malassezia pachydermatis...) of this chapter. (c) Conditions of use in dogs--(1) Amount. Instill 1.0 mL in the affected ear...

  14. DSN Network e-VLBI Calibration of Earth Orientation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Liwei Dennis; Steppe, A.; Lanyi, G.; Jacobs, C.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the calibration of the Earth's orientation by using the Deep Space Network (DSN) e Very Large Base Integration (VLBI). The topics include: 1) Background: TEMPO; 2) Background: UT1 Knowledge Error; 3) e-VLBI: WVSR TEMPO Overview; 4) e-VLBI: WVSR TEMPO Turnaround; 5) e-VLBI: WVSR TEMPO R&D Tests; and 6) WVSR TEMPO Test Conclusion.

  15. 31 CFR 315.22 - Payment or reissue pursuant to judgment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., rather than reissue, will be made if requested. (b) Gift causa mortis. A savings bond belonging solely to... by reason of a gift causa mortis from the sole owner. (c) Date for determining rights. When...

  16. 31 CFR 315.22 - Payment or reissue pursuant to judgment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., rather than reissue, will be made if requested. (b) Gift causa mortis. A savings bond belonging solely to... by reason of a gift causa mortis from the sole owner. (c) Date for determining rights. When...

  17. 31 CFR 353.22 - Payment or reissue pursuant to judgment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... agreement must be submitted. Payment, rather than reissue, will be made if requested. (b) Gift causa mortis... person found by a court to be entitled by reason of a gift causa mortis from the sole owner. (c) Date...

  18. 31 CFR 353.22 - Payment or reissue pursuant to judgment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... agreement must be submitted. Payment, rather than reissue, will be made if requested. (b) Gift causa mortis... person found by a court to be entitled by reason of a gift causa mortis from the sole owner. (c) Date...

  19. Otitis

    MedlinePlus

    Ear infection; Infection - ear ... affect the inner or outer parts of the ear. The condition is classified according to whether it ... long period of time (chronic). Otitis externa (swimmer's ear). Involves the outer ear and ear canal. A ...

  20. 21 CFR 524.1044b - Gentamicin and betamethasone otic solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... treatment of acute and chronic otitis externa caused by bacteria sensitive to gentamicin in dogs, instill... of infected superficial lesions caused by bacteria sensitive to gentamicin in dogs and cats, apply...

  1. 21 CFR 524.1044b - Gentamicin sulfate, betamethasone valerate otic solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... use—(i) For the treatment of acute and chronic otitis externa caused by bacteria sensitive to.... (ii) For the treatment of infected superficial lesions caused by bacteria sensitive to gentamicin...

  2. 21 CFR 524.1044b - Gentamicin sulfate, betamethasone valerate otic solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... use—(i) For the treatment of acute and chronic otitis externa caused by bacteria sensitive to.... (ii) For the treatment of infected superficial lesions caused by bacteria sensitive to gentamicin...

  3. 21 CFR 524.1044b - Gentamicin sulfate, betamethasone valerate otic solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... use—(i) For the treatment of acute and chronic otitis externa caused by bacteria sensitive to.... (ii) For the treatment of infected superficial lesions caused by bacteria sensitive to gentamicin...

  4. 21 CFR 524.1044b - Gentamicin sulfate, betamethasone valerate otic solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... use—(i) For the treatment of acute and chronic otitis externa caused by bacteria sensitive to.... (ii) For the treatment of infected superficial lesions caused by bacteria sensitive to gentamicin...

  5. 21 CFR 524.981b - Fluocinolone acetonide solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... inflammation associated with otitis externa and certain superficial acute and chronic dermatoses in the dog. It is also indicated for the relief of pruritus and inflammation associated with acute otitis...

  6. 21 CFR 524.981b - Fluocinolone acetonide solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... inflammation associated with otitis externa and certain superficial acute and chronic dermatoses in the dog. It is also indicated for the relief of pruritus and inflammation associated with acute otitis...

  7. 21 CFR 524.981b - Fluocinolone acetonide solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... inflammation associated with otitis externa and certain superficial acute and chronic dermatoses in the dog. It is also indicated for the relief of pruritus and inflammation associated with acute otitis...

  8. 21 CFR 524.981b - Fluocinolone acetonide solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... inflammation associated with otitis externa and certain superficial acute and chronic dermatoses in the dog. It is also indicated for the relief of pruritus and inflammation associated with acute otitis...

  9. 21 CFR 524.1484g - Neomycin, thiabendazole, and dexamethasone solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... should be well moistened (2 to 4 drops per square inch) twice daily. In treating otitis externa, instill 5 to 15 drops in the ear twice daily. Treat for up to 7 days. (2) Indications for use. As an aid...

  10. 21 CFR 524.1484g - Neomycin sulfate-thiabendazole-dexamethasone solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., the surface of the lesions should be well moistened (two to four drops per square inch) twice daily. In treating otitis externa, five to 15 drops of the drug should be instilled in the ear twice...

  11. Inventario mundial de la calidad del carbon mineral (WoCQI) [The world coal quality inventory (WoCQI)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Finkelman, R.B.; Lovern, V.S.

    2001-01-01

    Los oficiales encargados de la politica comercial de cada pais requieren informacion clara y precisa sobre el recurso del carbon mineral, particularmente sobre sus propiedades y caracteristicas, para tomar decisiones bien fundamentadas con respecto al mejor uso de los recursos naturales, necesidades de importacion y oportunidades de exportacion, objetivos de politica interna y externa, oportunidades de transferencia tecnologica, posibilidades de inversion externa, estudios ambientales y de salud, y asuntos relacionados con el uso de productos secundarios y su disposicion.

  12. Simultaneous evaluation of one-electron reducing systems and radical reactions in cells by nitroxyl biradical as probe.

    PubMed

    Araki, Yoko; Koshiishi, Ichiro

    2016-07-01

    In the present study, a novel probe for the simultaneous evaluation of one-electron reducing systems (electron transport chain) and one-electron oxidizing systems (free radical reactions) in cells by electron chemical detection was developed. Six-membered cyclic nitroxyl radicals (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl; TEMPO series) are sensitive to one-electron redox systems, generating the hydroxylamine form [TEMPO(H)] via one-electron reduction, and the secondary amine form [TEMPO(N)] via one-electron oxidation in the presence of thiols. In contrast, the sensitivities of five-membered cyclic nitroxyl radicals (2,2,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolidine-1-oxyl; PROXYL series) to the one-electron redox systems are comparatively low. The electron chemical detector can detect 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO), TEMPO(H) and PROXYL but not TEMPO(N). Therefore, nitroxyl biradical, TEMPO-PROXYL, as a probe for the evaluation of one-electron redox systems was employed. TEMPO-PROXYL was synthesized by the conjunction of 4-amino-TEMPO with 3-carboxyl-PROXYL via the conventional dicyclohexyl carbodiimide reaction. TEMPO-PROXYL, TEMPO(H)-PROXYL and TEMPO(N)-PROXYL were simultaneously quantified by HPLC with Coularray detection. Calibration curves for the quantification of TEMPO-PROXYL, TEMPO(H)-PROXYL and TEMPO(N)-PROXYL were linear in the range from 80 nm to 80 μm, and the lowest quantification limit of each molecule was estimated to be <80 nm. The relative standard deviations at 0.8 and 80 μm were within 10% (n = 5). Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26613564

  13. Background music for repetitive task performance of severely retarded individuals.

    PubMed

    Richman, J S

    1976-11-01

    Environmental manipulation in the form of specific tempo background music was used to assist in the habilitation of severely retarded persons. Thirty institutionalized retarded males were tested on a repetitive manual performance task judged to be similar to the type of tasks found in sheltered workshops. Each subject received each of the background treatments noncontingently: no music, slow tempo music, regular tempo music, fast tempo music. The results indicated that the regular tempo of background music facilitated the greatest improvement in performance, suggesting that the effect of music on performance is more complex than the issue of contingent presentation. PMID:998661

  14. Genotyping and characterisation of the secretory lipolytic enzymes of Malassezia pachydermatis isolates collected from dogs

    PubMed Central

    Teramoto, Hideshi; Kumeda, Yuko; Yokoigawa, Kumio; Hosomi, Koji; Kozaki, Shunji; Mukamoto, Masafumi; Kohda, Tomoko

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Malassezia species are commensals of normal skin microbial flora of humans and animals. These may become pathogenic under certain conditions such as those associated with atopic dermatitis or otitis externa in dogs. Material and methods Isolates of Malassezia pachydermatis were obtained from 27 dogs with healthy external ears and 32 dogs with otitis externa. Isolates were characterised on the basis of their first internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and internal spacer 1 (IGS1) sequences. Their extracellular lipase and phospholipase activity were also analysed. Three types of phospholipase inhibitor were used to identify the subclasses of phospholipase associated with otitis externa. Results The clinical isolates were classified into three ITS and three IGS1 sequence types. No significant differences in pathogenicity were detected among the ITS or IGS1 genotypes, and all of the isolates exhibited similar levels of lipase activity. The isolates derived from the dogs with otitis externa showed significantly higher phospholipase activity than those obtained from the dogs with healthy external ears. A phospholipase D inhibitor reduced the phospholipase activity of the isolates obtained from the dogs with otitis externa. Conclusions This study did not show any significant differences in pathogenicity among the ITS or IGS1 genotypes but does suggest that phospholipase D might be one of the virulence factors involved in the inflammation of the external ear caused by M. pachydermatis. PMID:26392911

  15. ‘Tempos’ management in primary care: a key factor for classifying adverse events, and improving quality and safety

    PubMed Central

    Brami, J

    2012-01-01

    Background The role of time management in safe and efficient medicine is important but poorly incorporated into the taxonomies of error in primary care. This paper addresses the lack of time management, presenting a framework integrating five time scales termed ‘Tempos’ requiring parallel processing by GPs: the disease's tempo (unexpected rapid evolutions, slow reaction to treatment); the office's tempo (day-to-day agenda and interruptions); the patient's tempo (time to express symptoms, compliance, emotion); the system's tempo (time for appointments, exams, and feedback); and the time to access to knowledge. The art of medicine is to control all of these tempos in parallel and simultaneously. Method Two qualified physicians reviewed a sample of 1046 malpractice claims from one liability insurer to determine whether a medical injury had occurred and, if so, whether it was due to one or more tempo-related problems. 623 of these reports were analysed in greater detail to identify the prevalence and characteristics of claims and related time management errors. Results The percentages of contributing factors were as follows: disease tempo, 37.9%; office tempo, 13.2%; patient tempo, 13.8%; out-of-office coordination tempo, 22.6%; and GP's access to knowledge tempo, 33.2%. Conclusion Although not conceptualised in most error taxonomies, the disease and patient tempos are cornerstones in risk management in primary care. Traditional taxonomies describe events from an analytical perspective of care at the system level and offer opportunities to improve organisation, process, and evidence-based medicine. The suggested classification describes events in terms of (unsafe) dynamic control of parallel constraints from the carer's perspective, namely the GP, and offers improvement on how to self manage and coordinate different contradictory tempos and day-to-day activities. Further work is needed to test the validity and usefulness of this approach. PMID:22927486

  16. Hyperparasitism of the cryptoniscid isopod Liriopsis pygmaea on the lithodid Paralomis granulosa from the Beagle Channel, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Lovrich, Gustavo A; Roccatagliata, Daniel; Peresan, Laura

    2004-01-28

    A total of 29,570 false king crab Paralomis granulosa were sampled from the Beagle Channel (54 degrees 51'S, 68 degrees 12'W), Tierra del Fuego, Argentina, between July 1996 and August 1998. Crab size varied from 6.8 to 111.2 mm carapace length (CL). A few crabs parasitized by the rhizocephalan Briarosaccus callosus were found; prevalences of externae (the rhizocephalan reproductive body) and scars (the mark left on the host after the death of the parasite) were 0.28 and 0.16%, respectively. Of 85 externae examined, 55 were non-ovigerous and 30 ovigerous. The cryptoniscid isopod Liriopsis pygmaea infested 36.5% of the B. callosus examined. The most abundant stage was the cryptonicus larva, accounting for 208 of the 238 L. pygmaea recovered. Cryptonisci showed a highly aggregated distribution. A total of 92.7% of cryptonicsci were recovered inside empty externae, suggesting that the latter were attractive to cryptonisci. Early subadult females of L. pygmaea were rare; only 3 individuals occurred inside 1 ovigerous externa. Eight late subadult and 18 adult females were found on 3 and 7 non-ovigerous externae, respectively; in addition, 1 aberrant late subadult was found on 1 ovigerous externa. In the Beagle Channel, the population of P. granulosa harbours 3 different parasites: the bopyrid isopod Pseudione tuberculata, which reaches highest prevalence at 10 to 20 mm CL, the rhizocephalan B. callosus, with highest prevalence at 20 to 40 mm CL, and the cryptoniscid isopod L. pygmaea, which mainly infests rhizocephalan on crabs >40 mm CL. PMID:15038454

  17. Effect of background music on maximum acceptable weight of manual lifting tasks.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ruifeng

    2014-01-01

    This study used the psychophysical approach to investigate the impact of tempo and volume of background music on the maximum acceptable weight of lift (MAWL), heart rate (HR) and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) of participants engaged in lifting. Ten male college students participated in this study. They lifted a box from the floor, walked 1-2 steps as required, placed the box on a table and walked back twice per minute. The results showed that the tempo of music had a significant effect on both MAWL and HR. Fast tempo background music resulted in higher MAWL and HR values than those resulting from slow tempo music. The effects of both the tempo and volume on the RPE were insignificant. The results of this study suggest fast tempo background music may be used in manual materials handling tasks to increase performance without increasing perceived exertion because of its ergogenic effect on human psychology and physiology. PMID:25189748

  18. Laser assisted Drug Delivery: Grundlagen und Praxis.

    PubMed

    Braun, Stephan Alexander; Schrumpf, Holger; Buhren, Bettina Alexandra; Homey, Bernhard; Gerber, Peter Arne

    2016-05-01

    Die topische Applikation von Wirkstoffen ist eine zentrale Therapieoption der Dermatologie. Allerdings mindert die effektive Barrierefunktion der Haut die Bioverfügbarkeit der meisten Externa. Fraktionierte ablative Laser stellen ein innovatives Verfahren dar, um die epidermale Barriere standardisiert, kontaktfrei zu überwinden. Die Bioverfügbarkeit im Anschluss applizierter Externa wird im Sinne einer laser assisted drug delivery (LADD) signifikant gesteigert. Das Prinzip der LADD wird bereits in einigen Bereichen der Dermatologie erfolgreich eingesetzt. Die vorliegende Übersichtsarbeit soll einen Überblick über die aktuellen aber auch perspektivischen Einsatzmöglichkeiten der LADD bieten. PMID:27119467

  19. Spin-labelled photo-cytotoxic diazido platinum(iv) anticancer complex.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, V; Wedge, Christopher J; Romero-Canelón, Isolda; Habtemariam, Abraha; Sadler, Peter J

    2016-08-16

    We report the synthesis and characterisation of the nitroxide spin-labelled photoactivatable Pt(iv) prodrug trans,trans,trans-[Pt(N3)2(OH)(OCOCH2CH2CONH-TEMPO)(Py)2] (Pt-TEMPO, where TEMPO = 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine 1-oxyl). Irradiation with blue visible light gave rise to Pt(ii) and azidyl as well as nitroxyl radicals. Pt-TEMPO exhibited low toxicity in the dark, but on photoactivation was as active towards human ovarian cancer cells as the clinical photosensitizer chlorpromazine and much more active than the anticancer drug cisplatin under the conditions used. PMID:27189101

  20. 21 CFR 524.1484d - Neomycin sulfate, hydrocortisone acetate, tetracaine hydrochloride ear ointment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., tetracaine hydrochloride ear ointment. 524.1484d Section 524.1484d Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG..., tetracaine hydrochloride ear ointment. (a) Specifications. The product contains 5 milligrams of neomycin... a lesser degree, chronic otitis externa in dogs and cats. In treatment of ear canker and...

  1. 21 CFR 524.1484d - Neomycin sulfate, hydrocortisone acetate, tetracaine hydrochloride ear ointment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., tetracaine hydrochloride ear ointment. 524.1484d Section 524.1484d Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG..., tetracaine hydrochloride ear ointment. (a) Specifications. The product contains 5 milligrams of neomycin... a lesser degree, chronic otitis externa in dogs and cats. In treatment of ear canker and...

  2. 21 CFR 524.1484d - Neomycin sulfate, hydrocortisone acetate, tetracaine hydrochloride ear ointment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., tetracaine hydrochloride ear ointment. 524.1484d Section 524.1484d Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG..., tetracaine hydrochloride ear ointment. (a) Specifications. The product contains 5 milligrams of neomycin... a lesser degree, chronic otitis externa in dogs and cats. In treatment of ear canker and...

  3. 21 CFR 524.1484d - Neomycin sulfate, hydrocortisone acetate, tetracaine hydrochloride ear ointment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., tetracaine hydrochloride ear ointment. 524.1484d Section 524.1484d Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG..., tetracaine hydrochloride ear ointment. (a) Specifications. The product contains 5 milligrams of neomycin... a lesser degree, chronic otitis externa in dogs and cats. In treatment of ear canker and...

  4. Incidence and burden of earaches due to recreational swimming: Results from a nationwide study ofover 50,000 respondents

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Earaches and ear pain due to outer ear infections (otitis externa) are common following swimming and can result in time lost from work and school and visits to the physician or hospital. Objectives: Determine the proportion of self-reported earache attributable to ma...

  5. 21 CFR 524.1484f - Neomycin sulfate, prednisolone acetate, tetracaine hydrochloride eardrops.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Neomycin sulfate, prednisolone acetate, tetracaine hydrochloride eardrops. 524.1484f Section 524.1484f Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF...-susceptible organisms and/or allergy. In otitis externa, 2 to 6 drops may be placed in the external ear...

  6. 21 CFR 524.1484f - Neomycin sulfate, prednisolone acetate, tetracaine hydrochloride eardrops.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Neomycin sulfate, prednisolone acetate, tetracaine hydrochloride eardrops. 524.1484f Section 524.1484f Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF...-susceptible organisms and/or allergy. In otitis externa, 2 to 6 drops may be placed in the external ear...

  7. 21 CFR 524.1484f - Neomycin sulfate, prednisolone acetate, tetracaine hydrochloride eardrops.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Neomycin sulfate, prednisolone acetate, tetracaine hydrochloride eardrops. 524.1484f Section 524.1484f Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF...-susceptible organisms and/or allergy. In otitis externa, 2 to 6 drops may be placed in the external ear...

  8. Organic synthesis via magnetic attraction: benign and sustainable protocols using magnetic nanoferrites

    EPA Science Inventory

    Magnetic nano-catalysts have been prepared using simple modification of iron ferrites wherein their quasi-homogeneous state, because of nm size range, facilitates the catalysis process as increased surface is available for reaction; the easy separation of the catalysts by externa...

  9. Effects of hemlock woolly adelgid and elongate hemlock scale on eastern hemlock growth and foliar chemistry.

    PubMed

    Miller-Pierce, Mailea R; Orwig, David A; Preisser, Evan

    2010-04-01

    In the eastern United States, two invasive specialist insects share a native host plant, Eastern hemlock, Tsuga canadensis. In recent years, much research has focused on the impacts of the hemlock woolly adelgid (Adelges tsugae) because of the detrimental effects it has on hemlock growth and survival. In contrast, the invasive elongate hemlock scale (Fiorinia externa) is thought to have only minor impacts on hemlock. We infested hemlock saplings with each insect and compared them with control (i.e., neither insect herbivore) saplings to assess how early infestations impact Eastern hemlock health (measured using new branch growth, foliar %N, and C:N ratio). Our study showed that, at equal densities, the two insects differed in their effect on Eastern hemlock. F. externa did not impact plant growth or foliar chemistry over the course of the 2-yr experiment. A. tsugae significantly reduced plant growth and caused a reduction of %N in the first year of the experiment. By the end of the experiment, A. tsugae trees had the same %N in their foliage as control and F. externa trees but drastically reduced growth patterns. The most likely explanation for this result is the greater growth in control and F. externa saplings during the second year resulted in the dilution of available foliar N over a larger amount of newly produced plant tissue. For early infestations of both insects, our study suggests that management plans should focus on the more detrimental A. tsugae. PMID:20388282

  10. Fast and Loud Background Music Disrupts Reading Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, William Forde; Schellenberg, E. Glenn; Letnic, Adriana Katharine

    2012-01-01

    We examined the effect of background music on reading comprehension. Because the emotional consequences of music listening are affected by changes in tempo and intensity, we manipulated these variables to create four repeated-measures conditions: slow/low, slow/high, fast/low, fast/high. Tempo and intensity manipulations were selected to be…

  11. 75 FR 4537 - Notice of Public Hearings for the Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Silver Strand...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-28

    ... published in the Federal Register on August 6, 2001 (66 FR 41009). The Navy will conduct two public hearings... baseline levels. SSTC would not accommodate an increase in training tempo or type required to execute the... operational training requirements. Under Alternative 1, the Navy would increase the tempo and types...

  12. Universal Developmental Screening: Preliminary Studies in Galicia, Spain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarmiento Campos, Jose A.; Squires, Jane; Ponte, Jaime

    2011-01-01

    "A_Tempo" is a research project that is currently under development in Galicia, an autonomous community of Spain. Its main aim is to propose an effective universal screening procedure for early identification of developmental disorders in children from zero to three years of age who attend Galician pre-primary schools. "A_Tempo" includes a…

  13. 76 FR 24534 - Columbia Forest Products, Inc., Presque Isle Division, Including On-Site Leased Workers From...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-02

    ... produce hardwood veneer. The notice was published in the Federal Register on April 7, 2011 (76 FR 19474...-Site Leased Workers From Tempo, Presque Isle, Maine; Amended Revised Determination on Reconsideration... subject firm. The company reports that workers leased from TEMPO were employed on-site at the Presque...

  14. Development of temporal structure in zebra finch song

    PubMed Central

    Troyer, Todd W.

    2013-01-01

    Zebra finch song has provided an excellent case study in the neural basis of sequence learning, with a high degree of temporal precision and tight links with precisely timed bursting in forebrain neurons. To examine the development of song timing, we measured the following four aspects of song temporal structure at four age ranges between 65 and 375 days posthatch: the mean durations of song syllables and the silent gaps between them, timing variability linked to song tempo, timing variability expressed independently across syllables and gaps, and transition probabilities between consecutive syllable pairs. We found substantial increases in song tempo between 65 and 85 days posthatch, due almost entirely to a shortening of gaps. We also found a decrease in tempo variability, also specific to gaps. Both the magnitude of the increase in tempo and the decrease in tempo variability were correlated on gap-by-gap basis with increases in the reliability of corresponding syllable transitions. Syllables had no systematic increase in tempo or decrease in tempo variability. In contrast to tempo parameters, both syllables and gaps showed an early sharp reduction in independent variability followed by continued reductions over the first year. The data suggest that links between syllable-based representations are strengthened during the later parts of the traditional period of song learning and that song rhythm continues to become more regular throughout the first year of life. Similar learning patterns have been identified in human sequence learning, suggesting a potentially rich area of comparative research. PMID:23175805

  15. Perceptions of Conducting: Accuracy in Detecting Modulated Beat.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brittin, Ruth V.

    1992-01-01

    Presents findings of a study of viewers' ability to detect changes in conducting beat patterns. Reports that music education majors were significantly better able to detect tempo decreases than increases and better able than nonmajors to detect decreases. Indicates that nonmajors were better able than majors to identify tempo increases. (SG)

  16. Musically induced arousal affects pain perception in females but not in males: a psychophysiological examination.

    PubMed

    Kenntner-Mabiala, Ramona; Gorges, Susanne; Alpers, Georg W; Lehmann, Andreas C; Pauli, Paul

    2007-04-01

    The present study investigated affective and physiological responses to changes of tempo and mode in classical music and their effects on heat pain perception. Thirty-eight healthy non-musicians (17 female) listened to sequences of 24 music stimuli which were variations of 4 pieces of classical music. Tempo (46, 60, and 95 beats/min) and mode (major and minor) were manipulated digitally, all other musical elements were held constant. Participants rated valence, arousal, happiness and sadness of the musical stimuli as well as the intensity and the unpleasantness of heat pain stimuli which were applied during music listening. Heart rate, respiratory rate and end-tidal PCO(2) were recorded. Pain ratings were highest for the fastest tempo. Also, participants' arousal ratings, their respiratory rate and heart rate were accelerated by the fastest tempo. The modulation of pain perception by the tempo of music seems to be mediated by the listener's arousal. PMID:17118518

  17. Core-shell hybrid upconversion nanoparticles carrying stable nitroxide radicals as potential multifunctional nanoprobes for upconversion luminescence and magnetic resonance dual-modality imaging.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chuan; Kang, Ning; Xu, Ting; Wang, Dong; Ren, Lei; Guo, Xiangqun

    2015-03-12

    Nitroxide radicals, such as 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine 1-oxyl (TEMPO) and its derivatives, have recently been used as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI). However, their rapid one-electron bioreduction to diamagnetic N-hydroxy species when administered intravenously has limited their use in in vivo applications. In this article, a new approach of silica coating for carrying stable radicals was proposed. A 4-carboxyl-TEMPO nitroxide radical was covalently linked with 3-aminopropyl-trimethoxysilane to produce a silanizing TEMPO radical. Utilizing a facile reaction based on the copolymerization of silanizing TEMPO radicals with tetraethyl orthosilicate in reverse microemulsion, a TEMPO radicals doped SiO2 nanostructure was synthesized and coated on the surface of NaYF4:Yb,Er/NaYF4 upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) to generate a novel multifunctional nanoprobe, PEGylated UCNP@TEMPO@SiO2 for upconversion luminescence (UCL) and magnetic resonance dual-modality imaging. The electron spin resonance (ESR) signals generated by the TEMPO@SiO2 show an enhanced reduction resistance property for a period of time of up to 1 h, even in the presence of 5 mM ascorbic acid. The longitudinal relaxivity of PEGylated UCNPs@TEMPO@SiO2 nanocomposites is about 10 times stronger than that for free TEMPO radicals. The core-shell NaYF4:Yb,Er/NaYF4 UCNPs synthesized by this modified user-friendly one-pot solvothermal strategy show a significant enhancement of UCL emission of up to 60 times more than the core NaYF4:Yb,Er. Furthermore, the PEGylated UCNP@TEMPO@SiO2 nanocomposites were further used as multifunctional nanoprobes to explore their performance in the UCL imaging of living cells and T1-weighted MRI in vitro and in vivo. PMID:25716884

  18. A METHODOLOGY FOR INFERRING THE CAUSES OF OBSERVED IMPAIRMENTS IN AQUATIC ECOSYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biological surveys have become a common technique for determining whether aquatic communities have been injured. However, their results are not useful for identifying management options until the causes of apparent injuries have been identified. Techniques for determining causa...

  19. Very high frequency electron paramagnetic resonance of 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinyloxy in 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine liposomes: partitioning and molecular dynamics.

    PubMed Central

    Smirnov, A I; Smirnova, T I; Morse, P D

    1995-01-01

    Partitioning and molecular dynamics of 2,2,6,6,-tetramethylpiperedine-1-oxyl (TEMPO) nitroxide radicals in large unilamellar liposomes (LUV) composed from 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine were investigated by using very high frequency electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. Experiments carried out at a microwave frequency of 94.3 GHz completely resolved the TEMPO EPR spectrum in the aqueous and hydrocarbon phases. An accurate computer simulation method combined with Levenberg-Marquardt optimization was used to analyze the TEMPO EPR spectra in both phases. Spectral parameters extracted from the simulations gave the actual partitioning of the TEMPO probe between the LUV hydrocarbon and aqueous phases and allowed analysis of picosecond rotational dynamics of the probe in the LUV hydrocarbon phase. In very high frequency EPR experiments, phase transitions in the LUV-TEMPO system were observed as sharp changes in both partitioning and rotational correlation times of the TEMPO probe. The phase transition temperatures (40.5 +/- 0.2 and 32.7 +/- 0.5 degrees C) are in agreement with previously reported differential scanning microcalorimetry data. Spectral line widths were analyzed by using existing theoretical expressions for motionally narrowed nitroxide spectra. It was found that the motion of the small, nearly spherical, TEMPO probe can be well described by anisotropic Brownian diffusion in isotropic media and is not restricted by the much larger hydrocarbon chains existing in ripple structure (P beta') or fluid bilayer structure (L alpha) phases. PMID:7647239

  20. Electrical conductivity in two mixed-valence liquids.

    PubMed

    Yao, Wenzhi; Kelley, Steven P; Rogers, Robin D; Vaid, Thomas P

    2015-06-01

    Two different room-temperature liquid systems were investigated, both of which conduct a DC electrical current without decomposition or net chemical transformation. DC electrical conductivity is possible in both cases because of the presence of two different oxidation states of a redox-active species. One system is a 1 : 1 molar mixture of n-butylferrocene (BuFc) and its cation bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonimide salt, [BuFc(+)][NTf2(-)], while the other is a 1 : 1 molar mixture of TEMPO and its cation bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonimide salt, [TEMPO(+)][NTf2(-)]. The TEMPO-[TEMPO(+)][NTf2(-)] system is notable in that it is an electrically conducting liquid in which the conductivity originates from an organic molecule in two different oxidation states, with no metals present. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction of [TEMPO(+)][NTf2(-)] revealed a complex structure with structurally different cation-anion interactions for cis- and trans [NTf2(-)] conformers. The electron transfer self-exchange rate constant for BuFc/BuFc(+) in CD3CN was determined by (1)H NMR spectroscopy to be 5.4 × 10(6) M(-1) s(-1). The rate constant allowed calculation of an estimated electrical conductivity of 7.6 × 10(-5)Ω(-1) cm(-1) for BuFc-[BuFc(+)][NTf2(-)], twice the measured value of 3.8 × 10(-5)Ω(-1) cm(-1). Similarly, a previously reported self-exchange rate constant for TEMPO/TEMPO(+) in CH3CN led to an estimated conductivity of 1.3 × 10(-4)Ω(-1) cm(-1) for TEMPO-[TEMPO(+)][NTf2(-)], a factor of about 3 higher than the measured value of 4.3 × 10(-5)Ω(-1) cm(-1). PMID:25960288

  1. Correlation between inter-spin interaction and molecular dynamics of organic radicals in organic 1D nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Hirokazu

    2015-12-01

    One-dimensional (1D) molecular chains of 4-substituted-2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinyloxyl (4-X-TEMPO) radicals were constructed in the crystalline 1D nanochannels of 2,4,6-tris(4-chlorophenoxy)-1,3,5-triazine (CLPOT) used as a template. The ESR spectra of CLPOT inclusion compounds (ICs) using 4-X-TEMPO were examined on the basis of spectral simulation using EasySpin program package for simulating and fitting ESR spectra. The ESR spectra of [(CLPOT)2-(TEMPO)1.0] IC were isotropic in the total range of temperatures. The peak-to-peak line width (ΔBpp) became monotonically narrower from 2.8 to 1.3 mT with increase in temperature in the range of 4.2-298 K. The effect of the rotational diffusion motion of TEMPO radicals in the CLPOT nanochannels for the inter-spin interaction of the [(CLPOT)2-(TEMPO)1.0] IC was found to be smaller than the case of [(TPP)2-(TEMPO)1.0] IC (TPP = tris(o-phenylenedioxy)cyclotriphosphazene) reported in our previous study. The ΔBpp of the [(CLPOT)2-(TEMPO)1.0] IC in the whole range of temperatures was much narrower than the estimation to be based on the Van Vleck's formula for the second moment of the rigid lattice model where the electron spin can be considered as fixed; 11 mT of Gaussian line-width component. This suggests the possibility of exchange narrowing in the 1D organic-radical chains of the [(CLPOT)2-(TEMPO)1.0] IC. On the other hand, the ESR spectra of [(CLPOT)2-(MeO-TEMPO)0.41] IC (MeO-TEMPO = 4-methoxy-TEMPO) were reproduced by a superposition of major broad isotropic adsorption line and minor temperature-dependent modulated triplet component. This suggests that the IC has the part of 1D organic-radical chains and MeO-TEMPO molecules isolated in the CLPOT nanochannels.

  2. The JPL near-real-time VLBI system and its application to clock synchronization and earth orientation measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callahan, P. S.; Eubanks, T. M.; Roth, M. G.; Steppe, J. A.; Esposito, P. B.

    1983-01-01

    The JPL near-real-time VLBI system called Block I is discussed. The hardware and software of the system are described, and the Time and Earth Motion Precision Observations (TEMPO) which utilize Block I are discussed. These observations are designed to provide interstation clock synchronization to 10 nsec and to determine earth orientation (UT1 and polar motion - UTPM) to 30 cm or better in each component. TEMPO results for clock synchronization and UTPM are presented with data from the July 1980-August 1981 analyzed using the most recent JPL solution software and source catalog. Future plans for TEMPO and Block I are discussed.

  3. PINT, a New Pulsar Timing Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Jing; Jenet, Fredrick A.; Ransom, Scott M.; Demorest, Paul; Van Haasteren, Rutger; Archibald, Anne

    2015-01-01

    We are presenting a new pulsar timing software PINT. The current pulsar timing group are heavily depending on Tempo/Tempo2, a package for analysis pulsar data. However, for a high accuracy pulsar timing related project, such as pulsar timing for gravitational waves, an alternative software is needed for the purpose of examing the results. We are developing a Tempo independent software with a different structure. Different modules is designed to be more isolated and easier to be expanded. Instead of C, we are using Python as our programming language for the advantage of flexibility and powerful docstring. Here, we are presenting the detailed design and the first result of the software.

  4. Correlation between inter-spin interaction and molecular dynamics of organic radicals in organic 1D nanochannels

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Hirokazu

    2015-12-31

    One-dimensional (1D) molecular chains of 4-substituted-2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinyloxyl (4-X-TEMPO) radicals were constructed in the crystalline 1D nanochannels of 2,4,6-tris(4-chlorophenoxy)-1,3,5-triazine (CLPOT) used as a template. The ESR spectra of CLPOT inclusion compounds (ICs) using 4-X-TEMPO were examined on the basis of spectral simulation using EasySpin program package for simulating and fitting ESR spectra. The ESR spectra of [(CLPOT){sub 2}-(TEMPO){sub 1.0}] IC were isotropic in the total range of temperatures. The peak-to-peak line width (ΔB{sub pp}) became monotonically narrower from 2.8 to 1.3 mT with increase in temperature in the range of 4.2–298 K. The effect of the rotational diffusion motion of TEMPO radicals in the CLPOT nanochannels for the inter-spin interaction of the [(CLPOT){sub 2}-(TEMPO){sub 1.0}] IC was found to be smaller than the case of [(TPP){sub 2}−(TEMPO){sub 1.0}] IC (TPP = tris(o-phenylenedioxy)cyclotriphosphazene) reported in our previous study. The ΔB{sub pp} of the [(CLPOT){sub 2}-(TEMPO){sub 1.0}] IC in the whole range of temperatures was much narrower than the estimation to be based on the Van Vleck’s formula for the second moment of the rigid lattice model where the electron spin can be considered as fixed; 11 mT of Gaussian line-width component. This suggests the possibility of exchange narrowing in the 1D organic-radical chains of the [(CLPOT){sub 2}-(TEMPO){sub 1.0}] IC. On the other hand, the ESR spectra of [(CLPOT){sub 2}-(MeO-TEMPO){sub 0.41}] IC (MeO-TEMPO = 4-methoxy-TEMPO) were reproduced by a superposition of major broad isotropic adsorption line and minor temperature-dependent modulated triplet component. This suggests that the IC has the part of 1D organic-radical chains and MeO-TEMPO molecules isolated in the CLPOT nanochannels.

  5. Enantioselective synthesis and antioxidant activity of 3,4,5-substituted piperidine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Ho; Shyam, Pranab K; Kim, Mi Jeong; Lee, Hwa-Jung; Lee, Jeong Tae; Jang, Hye-Young

    2016-07-01

    In this study, 3,4,5-trisubstituted piperidines were synthesized enantioselectively, and their antioxidant activity was evaluated. The 3,4,5-trisubstituted piperidines containing TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl) and a spatially proximal hydroxy group showed good antioxidant activity. Some of these compounds showed IC50 values in a nanomolar range, comparable to that of TEMPO. Probably the TEMPO generated from the homolysis of the CON bond of 3,4,5-trisubstituted piperidines functions as a radical-scavenging entity, and the hydroxy group of piperidines has a synergistic effect to the antioxidant activity. PMID:27177825

  6. Otalgia in children.

    PubMed Central

    Leung, A. K.; Fong, J. H.; Leong, A. G.

    2000-01-01

    Otalgia is a common symptom in the pediatric age group. The most common cause is acute otitis media, followed by otitis externa. In the majority of cases, the diagnosis can be established by a thorough history and a careful otologic examination. When the otologic findings are normal and the etiology is obscure, a thorough work-up to determine the source of referred pain is essential. Laboratory investigations are usually not necessary. Treatment should always be directed at the underlying cause. PMID:10881475

  7. Differential immune and genetic responses in rat models of Crohn's colitis and ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xuan-Zheng; Winston, John H.

    2011-01-01

    Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are clinically, immunologically, and morphologically distinct forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, smooth muscle function is impaired similarly in both diseases, resulting in diarrhea. We tested the hypothesis that differential cellular, genetic, and immunological mechanisms mediate smooth muscle dysfunction in two animal models believed to represent the two diseases. We used the rat models of trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)- and dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colonic inflammations, which closely mimic the clinical and morphological features of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, respectively. DSS inflammation induced oxidative stress initially in mucosa/submucosa, which then propagated to the muscularis externa to impair smooth muscle function. The muscularis externa showed no increase of cytokines/chemokines. On the other hand, TNBS inflammation almost simultaneously induced oxidative stress, recruited or activated immune cells, and generated cytokines/chemokines in both mucosa/submucosa and muscularis externa. The generation of cytokines/chemokines did not correlate with the recruitment and activation of immune cells. Consequently, the impairment of smooth muscle function in DSS inflammation was primarily due to oxidative stress, whereas that in TNBS inflammation was due to both oxidative stress and proinflammatory cytokines. The impairment of smooth muscle function in DSS inflammation was due to suppression of Gαq protein of the excitation-contraction coupling. In TNBS inflammation, it was due to suppression of the α1C1b subunit of Cav1.2b channels, CPI-17 and Gαq. TNBS inflammation increased IGF-1 and TGF-β time dependently in the muscularis externa. IGF-1 induced smooth muscle hyperplasia; both IGF-1 and TGF-β induced hypertrophy. In conclusion, both TNBS and DSS induce transmural inflammation, albeit with different types of inflammatory mediators. The recruitment or activation of

  8. Photoinduced electron transfer from dialkyl nitroxides to halogenated solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Chateauneuf, J. ); Lusztyk, J.; Ingold, K.U. )

    1990-02-02

    Laser flash photolysis (LFP) at wavelengths within the charge-transfer absorption present in CCl{sub 4} solutions of 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxyl (TEMPO) yields the oxoammonium chloride of TEMPO, 1 ({lambda}{sub max} = 460 nm), and the trichloromethyl radical in an essentially instantaneous ({le}18 ps) process. The primary photochemical event is an electron transfer from TEMPO to CCl{sub 4}, and this is followed by immediate decomposition of the CCl{sub 4}{sup {sm bullet}{minus}} radical anion to Cl{sup {minus}} and Cl{sub 3}C{sup {sm bullet}}. An independent synthesis of 1 confirmed that the absorption attributed to this species has been correctly assigned. The formation of Cl{sub 3}C{sup {sm bullet}} was inferred by its trapping by molecular oxygen. LFP of TEMPO in other halogenated solvents and of other nitroxides in halogenated solvents has confirmed the generality of these photoreactions.

  9. Tuning into the Music of Groups: A Metaphor for Team-Based Learning in Management Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fairfield, Kent D.; London, Michael B.

    2003-01-01

    Uses the metaphor of music to explore the dynamics of team-based learning. Suggests creative ways to diagnose team problems using melody, harmony, dynamics, tempo, and rhythm. Appendices provide a diagnostic instrument and interventions for various attributes. (SK)

  10. Enhancing the User-Friendliness of Macintosh Foreign Character Fonts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Donald A.

    1988-01-01

    Suggests some ways to enhance the user-friendliness of many Macintosh (personal computer) foreign language character fonts with the aid of three commercial programs: MacKeymeleon; FONTastic Plus; and Tempo. (Author/CB)

  11. Modeling Modes of Evolution: Comparing Phyletic Gradualism & Punctuated Equilibrium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McComas, William F.; Alters, Brian J.

    1994-01-01

    Presents an activity that provides students an opportunity to explore the tempo and mode of evolution by analyzing data and constructing two evolutionary trees, one gradualistic and one punctuated. (ZWH)

  12. GROUNDWATER QUALITY MONITORING OF WESTERN COAL STRIP MINING: PRELIMINARY DESIGNS FOR ACTIVE MINE SOURCES OF POLLUTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three potential pollution source categories have been identified for Western coal strip mines. These sources include mine stockpiles, mine waters, and miscellaneous active mine sources. TEMPO's stepwise monitoring methodology (Todd et al., 1976) is used to develop groundwater qua...

  13. 78 FR 46928 - Meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-02

    ... peacetime rotation force to support operational tempo goals of 1:2 for regular members of the Air Forces and... statement in writing and submit with their registration. The Commission's staff will assign time to...

  14. Concert Programming: Tips from the Broadcasting Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinney, Guy

    1978-01-01

    The author explains how music broadcasters codify musical selections by mood, tempo, and instrumentation, then arrange a sequence designed to maintain audience interest with a variety of listening experiences. Similar techniques are suggested for planning school concerts. (SJL)

  15. SMALL-SCALE HETEROGENEITY IN THE GEOCHEMISTRY OF SEAGRASS VEGETATED AND NON-VEGETATIVE SEDIMENTS: CAUSES AND CONSEQUENCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    In addition to nutrient and light availability, sedimentary biogeochemical processes can play an essential role in seagrass productivity. Previous investigations of the interactions between seagrasses and their underlying sediments have failed to clearly identify the spatio-tempo...

  16. Metabolic effects of parasitization by the barnacle Polyascus plana (Cirripedia: Rhizocephala: Sacculinidae) on a grapsid host, Metopograpsus thukuhar.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Chia-Jen; Wu, Yen-I; Tung, Tzu-An; Wang, Guan-Yi; Toullec, Jean-Yves; Liu, Shih-Ting; Huang, Wen-San; Lee, Chi-Ying

    2016-05-26

    Pathophysiological studies of rhizocephalan infections are rare. We describe differences in the levels of tissue and hemolymph metabolites between Polyascus plana-parasitized and unparasitized individuals of Metopograpsus thukuhar. Crabs were assigned to either a parasitized (carrying at least 1 externa, i.e. a protruding reproductive body) or an unparasitized (not carrying externae and determined to be rootlet-free by a barnacle 18S rRNA-based polymerase chain reaction) group. Quantification of metabolites showed that muscle glycogen levels were significantly lower and hepatopancreas levels were significantly higher in parasitized crabs compared to unparasitized crabs; hepatopancreas triacylglycerol levels were significantly higher and hemolymph levels significantly lower in parasitized hosts, and there was no significant difference in muscle triacylglycerol levels between unparasitized and parasitized animals. Glucose levels in the hepatopancreas, muscle, and hemolymph were all significantly higher in parasitized hosts. Significant levels of glucose, triacylglycerol, and glycogen were present in the barnacle externae. In addition, levels of crustacean hyperglycemic hormone in the sinus glands were not significantly different between unparasitized and parasitized animals. Glucose mobilized from the muscle is likely converted to glycogen and triacylglycerol in the rootlet-infiltrated hepatopancreas of parasitized hosts, and the eyestalk neuroendocrine system appears not to be significantly impaired, in terms of hormone production and storage, by parasitization. PMID:27225203

  17. Ear Mite Removal in the Santa Catalina Island Fox (Urocyon littoralis catalinae): Controlling Risk Factors for Cancer Development

    PubMed Central

    Moriarty, Megan E.; Vickers, T. Winston; Clifford, Deana L.; Garcelon, David K.; Gaffney, Patricia M.; Lee, Kenneth W.; King, Julie L.; Duncan, Calvin L.; Boyce, Walter M.

    2015-01-01

    Ear mites (Otodectes cynotis) and ear canal tumors are highly prevalent among federally endangered Island foxes (Urocyon littoralis catalinae) living on Santa Catalina Island off the coast of Southern California. Since studies began in the 1990s, nearly all foxes examined were found to be infected with ear mites, and ceruminous gland tumors (carcinomas and adenomas) were detected in approximately half of all foxes ≥ 4 years of age. We hypothesized that reduction of ear mite infection would reduce otitis externa and ceruminous gland hyperplasia, a risk factor for tumor development. In this study, we conducted a randomized field trial to assess the impact of acaricide treatment on ear mite prevalence and intensity of infection, otitis externa, ceruminous gland hyperplasia, and mite-specific IgG and IgE antibody levels. Treatment was highly effective at eliminating mites and reducing otitis externa and ceruminous gland hyperplasia, and mite-specific IgG antibody levels were significantly lower among uninfected foxes. Ceruminous gland hyperplasia increased in the chronically infected, untreated foxes during the six month study. Our results provide compelling evidence that acaricide treatment is an effective means of reducing ear mites, and that mite removal in turn reduces ear lesions and mite-specific IgG antibody levels in Santa Catalina Island foxes. This study has advanced our understanding of the underlying pathogenesis which results in ceruminous gland tumors, and has helped inform management decisions that impact species conservation. PMID:26641820

  18. Studies in auditory timing: 2. Rhythm patterns.

    PubMed

    Monahan, C B; Hirsh, I J

    1990-03-01

    Listeners discriminated between 6-tone rhythmic patterns that differed only in the delay of the temporal position of one of the tones. On each trial, feedback was given and the subject's performance determined the amount of delay on the next trial. The 6 tones of the patterns marked off 5 intervals. In the first experiment, patterns comprised 3 "short" and 2 "long" intervals: 12121, 21121, and so forth, where the long (2) was twice the length of a short (1). In the second experiment, patterns were the complements of the patterns in the first experiment and comprised 2 shorts and 3 longs: 21212, 12212, and so forth. Each pattern was tested 45 times (5 positions of the delayed tone x 3 tempos x 3 replications). Consistent with previous work on simple interval discrimination, absolute discrimination (delta t in milliseconds) was poorer the longer the intervals (i.e., the slower the tempo). Measures of relative discrimination (delta t/t, where t was the short interval, the long interval, or the average of 2 intervals surrounding the delayed tone) were better the slower the tempo. Beyond these global results, large interactions of pattern with position of the delayed tone and tempo suggest that different models of performance are needed to explain behavior at the different tempos. A Weber's law model fit the slow-tempo data better than did a model based on positions of "natural accent" (Povel & Essens, 1985). PMID:2326146

  19. Stabilization of reactive nitroxides using invasomes to allow prolonged electron paramagnetic resonance measurements.

    PubMed

    Haag, S F; Taskoparan, B; Bittl, R; Teutloff, C; Wenzel, R; Fahr, A; Chen, M; Lademann, J; Schäfer-Korting, M; Meinke, M C

    2011-01-01

    The detection of the antioxidative capacity of the skin is of great practical relevance since free radicals are involved in many skin damaging processes, including aging and inflammation. The nitroxide TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinyloxyl) in combination with electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy was found suitable for measuring the antioxidative capacity since its reaction with reducing agents is considerably fast. Yet, in order to achieve longer measurement times, e.g. in inflammatory skin diseases, the stabilizing effect of an invasome (ultraflexible vesicle/liposome) suspension with TEMPO was investigated ex vivo on porcine skin and in vivo on human skin. Invasomes increased the measurement time ex vivo 2-fold and the reduction was significantly slowed down in vivo, which is due to membrane-associated and therefore protected TEMPO. Furthermore, TEMPO accumulation in the membrane phase as well as the decreasing polarity of the ultimate surroundings of TEMPO during skin penetration explains the stabilizing effect. Thus, an invasome suspension with TEMPO exhibits stabilizing effects ex vivo and in vivo. PMID:21822032

  20. Sad and happy emotion discrimination in music by children with cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Hopyan, Talar; Manno, Francis A M; Papsin, Blake C; Gordon, Karen A

    2016-01-01

    Children using cochlear implants (CIs) develop speech perception but have difficulty perceiving complex acoustic signals. Mode and tempo are the two components used to recognize emotion in music. Based on CI limitations, we hypothesized children using CIs would have impaired perception of mode cues relative to their normal hearing peers and would rely more heavily on tempo cues to distinguish happy from sad music. Study participants were children with 13 right CIs and 3 left CIs (M = 12.7, SD = 2.6 years) and 16 normal hearing peers. Participants judged 96 brief piano excerpts from the classical genre as happy or sad in a forced-choice task. Music was randomly presented with alterations of transposed mode, tempo, or both. When music was presented in original form, children using CIs discriminated between happy and sad music with accuracy well above chance levels (87.5%) but significantly below those with normal hearing (98%). The CI group primarily used tempo cues, whereas normal hearing children relied more on mode cues. Transposing both mode and tempo cues in the same musical excerpt obliterated cues to emotion for both groups. Children using CIs showed significantly slower response times across all conditions. Children using CIs use tempo cues to discriminate happy versus sad music reflecting a very different hearing strategy than their normal hearing peers. Slower reaction times by children using CIs indicate that they found the task more difficult and support the possibility that they require different strategies to process emotion in music than normal. PMID:25562621

  1. Core-shell hybrid upconversion nanoparticles carrying stable nitroxide radicals as potential multifunctional nanoprobes for upconversion luminescence and magnetic resonance dual-modality imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chuan; Kang, Ning; Xu, Ting; Wang, Dong; Ren, Lei; Guo, Xiangqun

    2015-03-01

    Nitroxide radicals, such as 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine 1-oxyl (TEMPO) and its derivatives, have recently been used as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI). However, their rapid one-electron bioreduction to diamagnetic N-hydroxy species when administered intravenously has limited their use in in vivo applications. In this article, a new approach of silica coating for carrying stable radicals was proposed. A 4-carboxyl-TEMPO nitroxide radical was covalently linked with 3-aminopropyl-trimethoxysilane to produce a silanizing TEMPO radical. Utilizing a facile reaction based on the copolymerization of silanizing TEMPO radicals with tetraethyl orthosilicate in reverse microemulsion, a TEMPO radicals doped SiO2 nanostructure was synthesized and coated on the surface of NaYF4:Yb,Er/NaYF4 upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) to generate a novel multifunctional nanoprobe, PEGylated UCNP@TEMPO@SiO2 for upconversion luminescence (UCL) and magnetic resonance dual-modality imaging. The electron spin resonance (ESR) signals generated by the TEMPO@SiO2 show an enhanced reduction resistance property for a period of time of up to 1 h, even in the presence of 5 mM ascorbic acid. The longitudinal relaxivity of PEGylated UCNPs@TEMPO@SiO2 nanocomposites is about 10 times stronger than that for free TEMPO radicals. The core-shell NaYF4:Yb,Er/NaYF4 UCNPs synthesized by this modified user-friendly one-pot solvothermal strategy show a significant enhancement of UCL emission of up to 60 times more than the core NaYF4:Yb,Er. Furthermore, the PEGylated UCNP@TEMPO@SiO2 nanocomposites were further used as multifunctional nanoprobes to explore their performance in the UCL imaging of living cells and T1-weighted MRI in vitro and in vivo.Nitroxide radicals, such as 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine 1-oxyl (TEMPO) and its derivatives, have recently been used as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and electron

  2. A demographic explanation for the recent rise in European fertility.

    PubMed

    Bongaarts, John; Sobotka, Tomáš

    2012-01-01

    Between 1998 and 2008 European countries experienced the first continent-wide increase in the period total fertility rate (TFR) since the 1960s. After discussing period and cohort influences on fertility trends, we examine the role of tempo distortions of period fertility and different methods for removing them. We highlight the usefulness of a new indicator: the tempo- and parity-adjusted total fertility rate (TFRp*). This variant of the adjusted total fertility rate proposed by Bongaarts and Feeney also controls for the parity composition of the female population and provides more stable values than the indicators proposed in the past. Finally, we estimate levels and trends in tempo and parity distribution distortions in selected countries in Europe. Our analysis of period and cohort fertility indicators in the Czech Republic, Netherlands, Spain, and Sweden shows that the new adjusted measure gives a remarkable fit with the completed fertility of women in prime childbearing years in a given period, which suggests that it provides an accurate adjustment for tempo and parity composition distortions. Using an expanded dataset for ten countries, we demonstrate that adjusted fertility as measured by TFRp* remained nearly stable since the late 1990s. This finding implies that the recent upturns in the period TFR in Europe are largely explained by a decline in the pace of fertility postponement. Other tempo-adjusted fertility indicators have not indicated such a large role for the diminishing tempo effect in these TFR upturns. As countries proceed through their postponement transitions, tempo effects will decline further and eventually disappear, thus putting continued upward pressure on period fertility. However, such an upward trend may be obscured for a few years by the effects of economic recession. PMID:22833865

  3. Core-shell hybrid upconversion nanoparticles carrying stable nitroxide radicals as potential multifunctional nanoprobes for upconversion luminescence and magnetic resonance dual-modality imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chuan; Kang, Ning; Xu, Ting; Wang, Dong; Ren, Lei; Guo, Xiangqun

    2015-03-01

    Nitroxide radicals, such as 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine 1-oxyl (TEMPO) and its derivatives, have recently been used as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and electron paramagnetic resonance imaging (EPRI). However, their rapid one-electron bioreduction to diamagnetic N-hydroxy species when administered intravenously has limited their use in in vivo applications. In this article, a new approach of silica coating for carrying stable radicals was proposed. A 4-carboxyl-TEMPO nitroxide radical was covalently linked with 3-aminopropyl-trimethoxysilane to produce a silanizing TEMPO radical. Utilizing a facile reaction based on the copolymerization of silanizing TEMPO radicals with tetraethyl orthosilicate in reverse microemulsion, a TEMPO radicals doped SiO2 nanostructure was synthesized and coated on the surface of NaYF4:Yb,Er/NaYF4 upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) to generate a novel multifunctional nanoprobe, PEGylated UCNP@TEMPO@SiO2 for upconversion luminescence (UCL) and magnetic resonance dual-modality imaging. The electron spin resonance (ESR) signals generated by the TEMPO@SiO2 show an enhanced reduction resistance property for a period of time of up to 1 h, even in the presence of 5 mM ascorbic acid. The longitudinal relaxivity of PEGylated UCNPs@TEMPO@SiO2 nanocomposites is about 10 times stronger than that for free TEMPO radicals. The core-shell NaYF4:Yb,Er/NaYF4 UCNPs synthesized by this modified user-friendly one-pot solvothermal strategy show a significant enhancement of UCL emission of up to 60 times more than the core NaYF4:Yb,Er. Furthermore, the PEGylated UCNP@TEMPO@SiO2 nanocomposites were further used as multifunctional nanoprobes to explore their performance in the UCL imaging of living cells and T1-weighted MRI in vitro and in vivo.Nitroxide radicals, such as 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine 1-oxyl (TEMPO) and its derivatives, have recently been used as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and electron

  4. Visual tuning and metrical perception of realistic point-light dance movements.

    PubMed

    Su, Yi-Huang

    2016-01-01

    Humans move to music spontaneously, and this sensorimotor coupling underlies musical rhythm perception. The present research proposed that, based on common action representation, different metrical levels as in auditory rhythms could emerge visually when observing structured dance movements. Participants watched a point-light figure performing basic steps of Swing dance cyclically in different tempi, whereby the trunk bounced vertically at every beat and the limbs moved laterally at every second beat, yielding two possible metrical periodicities. In Experiment 1, participants freely identified a tempo of the movement and tapped along. While some observers only tuned to the bounce and some only to the limbs, the majority tuned to one level or the other depending on the movement tempo, which was also associated with individuals' preferred tempo. In Experiment 2, participants reproduced the tempo of leg movements by four regular taps, and showed a slower perceived leg tempo with than without the trunk bouncing simultaneously in the stimuli. This mirrors previous findings of an auditory 'subdivision effect', suggesting the leg movements were perceived as beat while the bounce as subdivisions. Together these results support visual metrical perception of dance movements, which may employ similar action-based mechanisms to those underpinning auditory rhythm perception. PMID:26947252

  5. The fertility impact of changes in the timing of childbearing in the developing world.

    PubMed

    Bongaarts, J

    1999-11-01

    This study examines the role of tempo effects in the fertility declines of less developed countries. These effects temporarily inflate the total fertility of a population during periods when the age at childbearing declines and deflate it when childbearing is postponed. An analysis of data from the World Fertility Surveys and the Demographic and Health Surveys demonstrates that fertility trends observed in many less developed countries are likely to be distorted by changes in the timing of childbearing. In most countries women are delaying childbearing, which implies that observed fertility is lower than it would have been without tempo changes. This pattern is most clearly documented in Taiwan, where accurate birth statistics from a vital registration system make it possible to estimate the tempo components of fertility annually from 1978 to 1993. The small but unexpected rise in the total fertility of Colombia in the early 1990s is attributed to a decline in the negative tempo distortion that prevailed in the 1980s. Similar interruptions of ongoing fertility declines may occur in the future in other countries when existing negative tempo effects are removed. PMID:11624022

  6. Music, emotion, and time perception: the influence of subjective emotional valence and arousal?

    PubMed Central

    Droit-Volet, Sylvie; Ramos, Danilo; Bueno, José L. O.; Bigand, Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    The present study used a temporal bisection task with short (<2 s) and long (>2 s) stimulus durations to investigate the effect on time estimation of several musical parameters associated with emotional changes in affective valence and arousal. In order to manipulate the positive and negative valence of music, Experiments 1 and 2 contrasted the effect of musical structure with pieces played normally and backwards, which were judged to be pleasant and unpleasant, respectively. This effect of valence was combined with a subjective arousal effect by changing the tempo of the musical pieces (fast vs. slow) (Experiment 1) or their instrumentation (orchestral vs. piano pieces). The musical pieces were indeed judged more arousing with a fast than with a slow tempo and with an orchestral than with a piano timbre. In Experiment 3, affective valence was also tested by contrasting the effect of tonal (pleasant) vs. atonal (unpleasant) versions of the same musical pieces. The results showed that the effect of tempo in music, associated with a subjective arousal effect, was the major factor that produced time distortions with time being judged longer for fast than for slow tempi. When the tempo was held constant, no significant effect of timbre on the time judgment was found although the orchestral music was judged to be more arousing than the piano music. Nevertheless, emotional valence did modulate the tempo effect on time perception, the pleasant music being judged shorter than the unpleasant music. PMID:23882233

  7. Emotional responses to Hindustani raga music: the role of musical structure.

    PubMed

    Mathur, Avantika; Vijayakumar, Suhas H; Chakrabarti, Bhismadev; Singh, Nandini C

    2015-01-01

    In Indian classical music, ragas constitute specific combinations of tonic intervals potentially capable of evoking distinct emotions. A raga composition is typically presented in two modes, namely, alaap and gat. Alaap is the note by note delineation of a raga bound by a slow tempo, but not bound by a rhythmic cycle. Gat on the other hand is rendered at a faster tempo and follows a rhythmic cycle. Our primary objective was to (1) discriminate the emotions experienced across alaap and gat of ragas, (2) investigate the association of tonic intervals, tempo and rhythmic regularity with emotional response. 122 participants rated their experienced emotion across alaap and gat of 12 ragas. Analysis of the emotional responses revealed that (1) ragas elicit distinct emotions across the two presentation modes, and (2) specific tonic intervals are robust predictors of emotional response. Specifically, our results showed that the 'minor second' is a direct predictor of negative valence. (3) Tonality determines the emotion experienced for a raga where as rhythmic regularity and tempo modulate levels of arousal. Our findings provide new insights into the emotional response to Indian ragas and the impact of tempo, rhythmic regularity and tonality on it. PMID:25983702

  8. Effects of contaminants on bait acceptance by Solenopsis invicta (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).

    PubMed

    Benson, Eric P; Zungoli, Patricia A; Riley, Melissa B

    2003-02-01

    Three commonly used fire ant baits, Amdro (0.73% hydramethylnon [AI]), Ascend (0.011% abamectins [AI]), and Maxforce (1.0% hydramethylnon [AI]), were exposed to potential, volatile contaminants. The contaminants included the insecticides Orthene Fire Ant Killer (75.0% acephate [AI] ), Cyren (44.6% chlorpyrifos [AI]), and Tempo 2 (24.3% cyfluthrin [AI]); cigarette smoke; gasoline (unleaded, 89 octane); and fertilizer (10-10-10). Fire ant baits previously exposed for 48 h to these contaminants were analyzed using gas chromatography analysis. Orthene Fire Ant Killer, Cyren, Tempo 2, cigarette smoke, and gasoline had volatile components transferred to the baits. Baits exposed to these products were used in a field evaluation of bait acceptance by Solenopisis invicta Buren, the red imported fire ant. Uncontaminated Amdro was significantly preferred by S. invicta over Amdro contaminated by smoke, Cyren, Tempo 2, and gasoline. Uncontaminated Maxforce was significantly preferred over Maxforce contaminated by Tempo 2, Cyren, and gasoline, and uncontaminated Ascend was preferred over Tempo 2- and Cyren-contaminated Ascend. Orthene-exposed Amdro, Maxforce, and Ascend baits, and smoke-exposed Maxforce and Ascend baits were not significantly different from the control. These results indicate that volatile insecticides and products can contaminate fire ant baits. Some insecticides and products, such as gasoline, can significantly affect bait palatability and may adversely impact control. PMID:12650350

  9. Visual tuning and metrical perception of realistic point-light dance movements

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yi-Huang

    2016-01-01

    Humans move to music spontaneously, and this sensorimotor coupling underlies musical rhythm perception. The present research proposed that, based on common action representation, different metrical levels as in auditory rhythms could emerge visually when observing structured dance movements. Participants watched a point-light figure performing basic steps of Swing dance cyclically in different tempi, whereby the trunk bounced vertically at every beat and the limbs moved laterally at every second beat, yielding two possible metrical periodicities. In Experiment 1, participants freely identified a tempo of the movement and tapped along. While some observers only tuned to the bounce and some only to the limbs, the majority tuned to one level or the other depending on the movement tempo, which was also associated with individuals’ preferred tempo. In Experiment 2, participants reproduced the tempo of leg movements by four regular taps, and showed a slower perceived leg tempo with than without the trunk bouncing simultaneously in the stimuli. This mirrors previous findings of an auditory ‘subdivision effect’, suggesting the leg movements were perceived as beat while the bounce as subdivisions. Together these results support visual metrical perception of dance movements, which may employ similar action-based mechanisms to those underpinning auditory rhythm perception. PMID:26947252

  10. Emotional responses to Hindustani raga music: the role of musical structure

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Avantika; Vijayakumar, Suhas H.; Chakrabarti, Bhismadev; Singh, Nandini C.

    2015-01-01

    In Indian classical music, ragas constitute specific combinations of tonic intervals potentially capable of evoking distinct emotions. A raga composition is typically presented in two modes, namely, alaap and gat. Alaap is the note by note delineation of a raga bound by a slow tempo, but not bound by a rhythmic cycle. Gat on the other hand is rendered at a faster tempo and follows a rhythmic cycle. Our primary objective was to (1) discriminate the emotions experienced across alaap and gat of ragas, (2) investigate the association of tonic intervals, tempo and rhythmic regularity with emotional response. 122 participants rated their experienced emotion across alaap and gat of 12 ragas. Analysis of the emotional responses revealed that (1) ragas elicit distinct emotions across the two presentation modes, and (2) specific tonic intervals are robust predictors of emotional response. Specifically, our results showed that the ‘minor second’ is a direct predictor of negative valence. (3) Tonality determines the emotion experienced for a raga where as rhythmic regularity and tempo modulate levels of arousal. Our findings provide new insights into the emotional response to Indian ragas and the impact of tempo, rhythmic regularity and tonality on it. PMID:25983702

  11. The effect of exercise-induced arousal on chosen tempi for familiar melodies.

    PubMed

    Jakubowski, Kelly; Halpern, Andrea R; Grierson, Mick; Stewart, Lauren

    2015-04-01

    Many previous studies have shown that arousal affects time perception, suggesting a direct influence of arousal on the speed of the pacemaker of the internal clock. However, it is unknown whether arousal influences the mental representation of tempo (speed) for highly familiar and complex stimuli, such as well-known melodies, that have long-term representations in memory. Previous research suggests that mental representations of the tempo of familiar melodies are stable over time; the aim of the present study was to investigate whether these representations can be systematically altered via an increase in physiological arousal. Participants adjusted the tempo of 14 familiar melodies in real time until they found a tempo that matched their internal representation of the appropriate tempo for that piece. The task was carried out before and after a physiologically arousing (exercise) or nonarousing (anagrams) manipulation. Participants completed this task both while hearing the melodies aloud and while imagining them. Chosen tempi increased significantly following exercise-induced arousal, regardless of whether a melody was heard aloud or imagined. These findings suggest that a change in internal clock speed affects temporal judgments even for highly familiar and complex stimuli such as music. PMID:25056004

  12. El dolor y el cáncer (PDQ®)—Versión para profesionales de salud

    Cancer.gov

    Resumen de información revisada por expertos acerca del dolor como una complicación a causa del cáncer o su tratamiento. Se discuten enfoques sobre el manejo y tratamiento del dolor relacionado con el cáncer.

  13. Prurito (PDQ®)—Versión para profesionales de salud

    Cancer.gov

    Resumen de información revisada por expertos acerca del prurito (picazón de la piel) como complicación a causa del cáncer y su tratamiento. Se discuten los enfoques del manejo y tratamiento del prurito.

  14. Detection of Pantoea stewartii ssp. stewartii from maize seeds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter is one of 52 that will compose the second edition of the Laboratory Manual for the Detection of Plant Pathogenic Bacteria from Seeds and other Planting Material, to be published by the American Phytopathological Society. The chapter presents a description of Pantoea stewartii, the causa...

  15. Cáncer de cuello uterino—Versión para pacientes

    Cancer.gov

    Información del Instituto Nacional del Cáncer sobre el tratamiento, la prevención, las causas y los exámenes de detección del cáncer de cuello uterino, así como referencias a estudios clínicos, investigación, estadísticas y otros temas relacionados.

  16. Cáncer de útero—Versión para pacientes

    Cancer.gov

    Información del Instituto Nacional del Cáncer sobre el tratamiento, la prevención, las causas y los exámenes de detección del cáncer uterino, así como referencias a estudios clínicos, investigación, estadísticas y otros temas relacionados.

  17. El Plan de Santa Barbara; A Chicano Plan for Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chicano Coordinating Council on Higher Education, Santa Barbara, CA.

    Published by La Causa Publications, the document is a Chicano plan for higher education in the universities and colleges in California. The manifesto found in the booklet states that "the self-determination of our community is now the only acceptable mandate for social and political action; it is the essence of Chicano commitment....Chicanos…

  18. Prurito (PDQ®)—Versión para pacientes

    Cancer.gov

    Resumen de información revisada por expertos acerca del prurito (picazón de la piel) como complicación a causa del cáncer y su tratamiento. Se discuten los enfoques del manejo y tratamiento del prurito.

  19. Cáncer colorrectal—Versión para pacientes

    Cancer.gov

    Información del Instituto Nacional del Cáncer sobre el tratamiento, la prevención, las causas y los exámenes de detección del cáncer de colon y recto, así como referencias a estudios clínicos, estadísticas y otros temas relacionados.

  20. Cáncer de piel (incluye el melanoma)—Versión para pacientes

    Cancer.gov

    Información del Instituto Nacional del Cáncer sobre el tratamiento, la prevención, las causas, los exámenes de detección y los estudios clínicos del cáncer de piel, así como referencias a otros temas relacionados con este tipo de cáncer.