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Sample records for cavernous sinus

  1. Cavernous sinus gas.

    PubMed

    Chen, S S; Shao, K N; Chiang, J H; Chang, C Y; Luo, C B; Lirng, J F; Teng, M M

    2000-07-01

    Gas within the cavernous sinus is an unusual finding. We report three patients who demonstrated gas in the cavernous sinus on computerized tomography (CT). The clinical information of these patients was reviewed for the possible source of the gas and the symptoms induced by the gas. Cavernous sinus gas was seen in two patients with sphenoid sinus fracture and in one patient after intravenous fluid infusion. None of the patients had symptoms referable to the cavernous sinus gas, but one patient had a grave prognosis due to trauma. Identification of cavernous sinus gas on CT and correlation with the clinical information is mandatory for further management. PMID:10934814

  2. Cavernous sinus thrombosis revisited.

    PubMed Central

    Yarington, C T

    1977-01-01

    In summary, cavernous sinus thrombosis is still with us. Patients now survive the disease more often than not, and therapy and diagnosis are reasonably clear cut. An increasing array of antibiotic-resistant bacteria have been balanced by an increasing army of antibiotics. The controversy over anticoagulation has not changed since reviewed by Parsons (1967). Ancillary measures remain more of value in diagnosis than in therapy. It is a disease primarily diagnosed by physical signs and symptoms, which requires prompt treatment. In our modern age of computerization and laboratory-based medical care, cavernous sinus thrombosis demands the diagnostic skill of the clinician, whose prompt ministrations should usually yield a favourable result. PMID:331338

  3. Interdural cavernous sinus epidermoid cyst.

    PubMed

    Bonde, Vivek; Goel, Atul

    2008-02-01

    We report a patient with an uncommon interdural epidermoid tumor, located within the confines of dural layers of the lateral wall of the cavernous sinus. The tumor was resected by a basal subtemporal extradural-interdural approach. Following the surgery, the 45-year-old female patient recovered completely from her symptoms of atypical neuralgic facial pains. PMID:18083573

  4. Cavernous Carotid Artery Pseudoaneurysm Following a Radical Cavernous Sinus Resection

    PubMed Central

    Katzir, Miki; Gil, Ziv; Cohen, José Enrique; Sviri, Gill Efraim

    2016-01-01

    Iatrogenic cavernous carotid pseudoaneurysms are a special group among other intracranial aneurysms. They can occur during the dissection phase of the surgery if the tumor encases a vessel. Complications of their rupture as hemorrhage or stroke are life threatening. Early recognition and treatment is mandatory to avoid catastrophic sequelae. We present the successful diagnosis and endovascular treatment of a postoperative cavernous carotid pseudoaneurysm following radical cavernous sinus resection. PMID:27330923

  5. Cavernous sinus thrombosis progression from trismus

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jin Yong; Kim, Hyeon Min

    2015-01-01

    In the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, patients with trismus can be easily identified. If the cause of trismus is infection of the masticatory space near the pterygoid plexus, the possibility of cavernous sinus thrombosis should be considered. We report the case of a patient who presented with limited mouth opening and progressed to cavernous sinus thrombosis, along with a review of the relevant literature. PMID:25741468

  6. Cavernous sinus syndrome: need for early diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Toro, Jaime; Burbano, Lisseth Estefania; Reyes, Saúl; Barreras, Paula

    2015-01-01

    Cavernous sinus syndrome (CSS) is a rare condition characterised by ophthalmoplegia, proptosis, ocular and conjunctival congestion, trigeminal sensory loss and Horner's syndrome. These signs and symptoms result from the involvement of the cranial nerves passing through the cavernous sinus. We report the case of a 53-year-old man with a history of daily stabbing headache associated with dizziness, progressive blurred vision, right ocular pain, ptosis and ophthalmoplegia. After working up the patient, a meningioma was identified as the cause of the CSS. Despite advances in neuroimaging techniques, in some cases, the aetiology of CSS remains difficult to determine. We highlight the clinical and radiological features of a meningioma, one of the causes of CSS. Early diagnosis and treatment of CSS play a key role in a better prognosis. PMID:25819816

  7. Endovascular treatment of carotid cavernous sinus fistula: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Korkmazer, Bora; Kocak, Burak; Tureci, Ercan; Islak, Civan; Kocer, Naci; Kizilkilic, Osman

    2013-01-01

    Carotid cavernous sinus fistulas are abnormal communications between the carotid system and the cavernous sinus. Several classification schemes have described carotid cavernous sinus fistulas according to etiology, hemodynamic features, or the angiographic arterial architecture. Increased pressure within the cavernous sinus appears to be the main factor in pathophysiology. The clinical features are related to size, exact location, and duration of the fistula, adequacy and route of venous drainage and the presence of arterial/venous collaterals. Noninvasive imaging (computed tomography, magnetic resonance, computed tomography angiography, magnetic resonance angiography, Doppler) is often used in the initial work-up of a possible carotid cavernous sinus fistulas. Cerebral angiography is the gold standard for the definitive diagnosis, classification, and planning of treatment for these lesions. The endovascular approach has evolved as the mainstay therapy for definitive treatment in situations including clinical emergencies. Conservative treatment, surgery and radiosurgery constitute other management options for these lesions. PMID:23671750

  8. No more fear of the cavernous sinuses!

    PubMed

    Charbonneau, F; Williams, M; Lafitte, F; Héran, F

    2013-10-01

    After a review of the anatomy of the cavernous sinuses (CS), this work presents the clinical picture and imaging protocol of lesions which occur in this area. It outlines extension and imaging features of these lesions. It emphasises MRI appearance, such as T1, T2 and diffusion signal, type of contrast medium uptake. A complementary CT scan is performed if an associated abnormality of the base of the skull is suspected on MRI (lysis, condensation). This paper proposes a straightforward classification system depending on imaging and sets out the principal symptoms of the main aetiologies of CS lesions which are represented by various diseases such as tumours, inflammations, vascular abnormalities. Complementary to imaging, their diagnosis is based on clinical data i.e. known cancer, signs suggesting inflammation. Its rich iconography allows this article to be used as a reference in current clinical practice. PMID:24099909

  9. Malignant fungal infection of the cavernous sinus: case report.

    PubMed

    Neil, Jayson A; Orlandi, Richard R; Couldwell, William T

    2016-03-01

    Intracranial spread of fungal infection is a life-threatening condition that usually affects immunocompromised patients. Here the authors present a case of biopsy-proven Aspergillus fumigatus infection of the paranasal sinuses in an immunocompetent patient with documented spread to the orbit, cavernous sinus, and petrous apex despite medical antifungal treatment. As a life-saving treatment, cavernous sinus resection with external carotid artery-middle cerebral artery bypass was performed. The authors discuss the literature regarding the intracranial spread of paranasal sinus fungal infections in immunocompetent patients and management strategies. PMID:26315007

  10. Burkitt leukemia with numb chin syndrome and cavernous sinus involvement.

    PubMed

    Seixas, Daniela Vasconcelos; Lobo, Ana Luísa; Farinha, Nuno Jorge; Cavadas, Laurentina; Campos, Maria Manuel; Ayres-Basto, Margarida; Pimenta, Maria Teresa Lavandeira

    2006-05-01

    Cavernous sinus syndrome is a rare event. Non-Hodgkin lymphomas, are one possible cause. Neurological presentation of these lymphomas is also exceptional. We report the case of an 11-year-old boy that developed a right third cranial nerve palsy and numbness in the distribution of the right mental nerve, with normal CSF, and enlargement of cavernous sinus on the same side, who was diagnosed Burkitt leukemia. PMID:16621630

  11. Configuration of Fibrous and Adipose Tissues in the Cavernous Sinus

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Liang; Gao, Fei; Xu, Qunyuan; Zhang, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Objective Three-dimensional anatomical appreciation of the matrix of the cavernous sinus is one of the crucial necessities for a better understanding of tissue patterning and various disorders in the sinus. The purpose of this study was to reveal configuration of fibrous and adipose components in the cavernous sinus and their relationship with the cranial nerves and vessels in the sinus and meningeal sinus wall. Materials and Methods Nineteen cadavers (8 females and 11 males; age range, 54–89 years; mean age, 75 years) were prepared as transverse (6 sets), coronal (3 sets) and sagittal (10 sets) plastinated sections that were examined at both macroscopic and microscopic levels. Results Two types of the web-like fibrous networks were identified and localized in the cavernous sinus. A dural trabecular network constituted a skeleton-frame in the sinus and contributed to the sleeves of intracavernous cranial nerves III, IV, V1, V2 and VI. A fine trabecular network, or adipose tissue, was the matrix of the sinus and was mainly distributed along the medial side of the intracavernous cranial nerves, forming a dumbbell-shaped adipose zone in the sinus. Conclusions This study revealed the nature, fine architecture and localization of the fine and dural trabecular networks in the cavernous sinus and their relationship with intracavernous cranial nerves and vessels. The results may be valuable for better understanding of tissue patterning in the cranial base and better evaluation of intracavernous disorders, e.g. the growth direction and extent of intracavernous tumors. PMID:24586578

  12. Tolerance of cranial nerves of the cavernous sinus to radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Tishler, R.B.; Loeffler, J.S.; Alexander, E. III; Kooy, H.M. ); Lunsford, L.D.; Duma, C.; Flickinger, J.C. )

    1993-09-20

    Stereotactic radiosurgery is becoming a more accepted treatment option for benign, deep seated intracranial lesions. However, little is known about the effects of large single fractions of radiation on cranial nerves. This study was undertaken to assess the effect of radiosurgery on the cranial nerves of the cavernous sinus. The authors examined the tolerance of cranial nerves (II-VI) following radiosurgery for 62 patients (42/62 with meningiomas) treated for lesions within or near the cavernous sinus. Twenty-nine patients were treated with a modified 6 MV linear accelerator (Joint Center for Radiation Therapy) and 33 were treated with the Gamma Knife (University of Pittsburgh). Three-dimensional treatment plans were retrospectively reviewed and maximum doses were calculated for the cavernous sinus and the optic nerve and chiasm. Median follow-up was 19 months (range 3-49). New cranial neuropathies developed in 12 patients from 3-41 months following radiosurgery. Four of these complications involved injury to the optic system and 8 (3/8 transient) were the result of injury to the sensory or motor nerves of the cavernous sinus. There was no clear relationship between the maximum dose to the cavernous sinus and the development of complications for cranial nerves III-VI over the dose range used (1000-4000 cGy). For the optic apparatus, there was a significantly increased incidence of complications with dose. Four of 17 patients (24%) receiving greater than 800 cGy to any part of the optic apparatus developed visual complications compared with 0/35 who received less than 800 cGy (p = 0.009). Radiosurgery using tumor-controlling doses of up to 4000 cGy appears to be a relatively safe technique in treating lesions within or near the sensory and motor nerves (III-VI) of the cavernous sinus. The dose to the optic apparatus should be limited to under 800 cGy. 21 refs., 4 tabs.

  13. Cavernous Sinus Dural Fistula Treated by Transvenous Facial Vein Approach

    PubMed Central

    Prochazka, V.; Cizek, V.; Kacirova, R.

    2004-01-01

    Summary We report on the endovascular treatment of the spontaneous indirect dural carotid cavernous sinus type D fistula in a 60-year-old woman, in whom ipsilateral facial, angular and superior ophthalmic veins catheterization was performed to get access to the fistula site for embolization treatment. Approach via the facial vein is helpful after inferior petrosal sinus treatment failure. Although this technique requires caution in the angular vein region it allows a safe and effective treatment of these lesions. 3D rotational digital angiography can obtain more information of the angioarchitecture of the cavernous plexus and venous outflow for the catheter navigation. PMID:20587267

  14. Endonasal Endoscopic Management of Parasellar and Cavernous Sinus Meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Bjorn; Zhang, Xin; Barkhoudarian, Garni; Griffiths, Chester F; Kelly, Daniel F

    2015-07-01

    The management of cavernous sinus and invasive parasellar meningiomas often requires a multimodality treatment approach. Early attempts at complete or near-complete removal of parasellar meningiomas involving the cavernous sinus, Meckel cave, clivus, and sella using anterolateral or lateral skull base approaches were typically unsuccessful and yielded high rates of new cranial neuropathy and other complications. This article presents a strategy of endonasal endoscopic parasellar skull base bony decompression and limited tumor removal followed by stereotactic radiotherapy, stereotactic radiosurgery, or observation. Patient selection, technical nuances, potential complications, and initial outcomes in a small series of patients are discussed. PMID:26141358

  15. Fractionated Proton Radiotherapy for Benign Cavernous Sinus Meningiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, Jerry D.; Loredo, Lilia N.; Chung, Arthur; Bush, David A.; Patyal, Baldev; Johnson, Walter D.; Hsu, Frank P.K.; Slater, James M.

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of fractionated proton radiotherapy for a population of patients with benign cavernous sinus meningiomas. Methods and Materials: Between 1991 and 2002, 72 patients were treated at Loma Linda University Medical Center with proton therapy for cavernous sinus meningiomas. Fifty-one patients had biopsy or subtotal resection; 47 had World Health Organization grade 1 pathology. Twenty-one patients had no histologic verification. Twenty-two patients received primary proton therapy; 30 had 1 previous surgery; 20 had more than 1 surgery. The mean gross tumor volume was 27.6 cm{sup 3}; mean clinical target volume was 52.9 cm{sup 3}. Median total doses for patients with and without histologic verification were 59 and 57 Gy, respectively. Mean and median follow-up periods were 74 months. Results: The overall 5-year actuarial control rate was 96%; the control rate was 99% in patients with grade 1 or absent histologic findings and 50% for those with atypical histology. All 21 patients who did not have histologic verification and 46 of 47 patients with histologic confirmation of grade 1 tumor demonstrated disease control at 5 years. Control rates for patients without previous surgery, 1 surgery, and 2 or more surgeries were 95%, 96%, and 95%, respectively. Conclusions: Fractionated proton radiotherapy for grade 1 cavernous sinus meningiomas achieves excellent control rates with minimal toxicities, regardless of surgical intervention or use of histologic diagnosis. Disease control for large lesions can be achieved by primary fractionated proton therapy.

  16. Transarterial and Transvenous Embolization for Cavernous Sinus Dural Arteriovenous Fistulae

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, J.; Lv, X.; Jiang, C.; Li, Y.; Yang, X.; Wu, Z.

    2010-01-01

    Summary We report on the safety and efficacy of transarterial and transvenous Onyx embolization in the treatment of dural arteriovenous fistulae (DAVFs) of the cavernous sinus. We reviewed the findings from a retrospectively database for 22 patients with cavernous sinus DAVFs who were treated with either transarterial Onyx embolization alone (n = 8) or transarterial and transvenous Onyx embolization (n = 14) over a four year period. The mean follow-up period after endovascular treatment was 21.6 months (range 3-42 mths). Total number of embolizations was 27 for 22 patients. Two patients were treated transvenously after transarterial embolization. All 22 patients (100%) experienced improvement of their clinical symptoms. All 22 patients (100%) experienced total obliteration of their DAVFs, as documented by angiography performed at a mean follow-up of 5.8 months after the last treatment. No patient experienced a recurrence of symptoms after angiography showed DAVF obliteration. One patient exhibited temporary deterioration of ocular symptoms secondary to venous hypertension after near total obliteration; one had transient V cranial nerve deficit related to transarterial embolization, and two patients exhibited transient III and VI cranial nerve weakness related to transvenous embolization. Two patients experienced recurrent symptoms after incomplete transarterial embolization and underwent transvenous embolization at three and four months. Both patients achieved clinical and angiographic cures. Transarterial and transvenous embolization with Onyx, whenever possible, proved to be a safe and effective management for patients with cavernous sinus DAVFs. PMID:20977859

  17. Bilateral Persistent Trigeminal Arteries with Unilateral Trigeminal Artery to Cavernous Sinus Fistula

    PubMed Central

    Chen, David; Chen, Chi-Jen; Chen, Jiann-Jy; Tseng, Ying-Chi; Hsu, Hui-Ling; Ku, Jan-Wen

    2013-01-01

    Summary A 59-year-old man who denied a history of trauma presented with left pulsatile tinnitus and left orbital swelling for six months. Digital subtraction angiography showed a left persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) with a trigeminal artery to cavernous sinus (trigeminal-cavernous sinus) fistula and a right PTA. Transarterial detachable coil embolization of the left trigeminal-cavernous sinus fistula was performed, and the symptoms subsided. There has been no report of bilateral PTAs with a spontaneous fistula connected from one PTA to the ipsilateral cavernous sinus. This paper reports such a rare circumstance. PMID:24070083

  18. Bilateral persistent trigeminal arteries with unilateral trigeminal artery to cavernous sinus fistula. A case report.

    PubMed

    Chen, David; Chen, Chi-Jen; Chen, Jiann-Jy; Tseng, Ying-Chi; Hsu, Hui-Ling; Ku, Jan-Wen

    2013-09-01

    A 59-year-old man who denied a history of trauma presented with left pulsatile tinnitus and left orbital swelling for six months. Digital subtraction angiography showed a left persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) with a trigeminal artery to cavernous sinus (trigeminal-cavernous sinus) fistula and a right PTA. Transarterial detachable coil embolization of the left trigeminal-cavernous sinus fistula was performed, and the symptoms subsided. There has been no report of bilateral PTAs with a spontaneous fistula connected from one PTA to the ipsilateral cavernous sinus. This paper reports such a rare circumstance. PMID:24070083

  19. Balloon-Assisted Coiling of the Cavernous Sinus to Treat Direct Carotid Cavernous Fistula

    PubMed Central

    De Renzis, Alioscia.; Nappini, Sergio.; Consoli, Arturo; Renieri, Leonardo; Limbucci, Nicola; Rosi, Andrea; Vignoli, Chiara; Pellicanò, Giannantonio; Mangiafico, Salvatore

    2013-01-01

    Summary This study evaluated clinical and neuroradiological results in 13 consecutive patients with spontaneous and traumatic direct carotid cavernous fistulas treated at our center between January 2006 and September 2012. All patients were treated by coiling of the cavernous sinus. Coiling was always performed while a semi-compliant non-detachable balloon was temporarily inflated in the internal carotid artery. This technique (balloon-assisted coiling) permitted a clear visualization of the fistula, facilitated coil positioning and protected the patency of the artery. All patients’ clinical data and radiological examinations were reviewed; nine patients underwent radiological and clinical follow-up, with a mean duration of 3.8 years (range: six months-six years). Overall results at discharge showed a complete occlusion of the fistula in seven patients (7/13, 54%) and a resolution of symptoms in eight patients (8/12, 67%). Radiological follow-up showed complete occlusion of the fistula in all patients (9/9, 100%) and clinical follow-up showed a resolution of symptoms in eight patients (8/9, 89%) and persistent symptoms in one (1/9, 11%). No procedure-related complications occurred. Balloon-assisted coiling of the cavernous sinus for the treatment of direct carotid cavernous fistulas proved an effective and safe technique, both in angiographic and clinical terms, and may be considered a technical improvement. PMID:24070084

  20. Bilateral cavernous sinus and superior ophthalmic vein thrombosis in the setting of facial cellulitis

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Bruce; Hise, Joseph; Philip, Joseph; Spak, Cedric; Opatowsky, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Cavernous sinus thrombosis is a rare, potentially fatal cause of cerebral venous thrombosis. Infectious causes typically arise from the mid face, orbit, or sinonasal region. We present a case of bilateral cavernous sinus and superior ophthalmic thrombosis secondary to an extreme case of facial cellulitis. PMID:26722163

  1. Late intracranial haemorrhage and subsequent carotid-cavernous sinus fistula after fracture of the facial bones.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chien-Ming; Cheng, Chi-Sheng

    2013-12-01

    Carotid-cavernous sinus fistula is an arteriovenous fistula between the internal carotid artery and the cavernous sinus, and is usually caused by a traumatic tear or a ruptured aneurysm of the cavernous segment of the internal carotid artery. We describe a rare case of delayed intracranial haemorrhage and carotid-cavernous sinus fistula that presented 3 weeks after fracture of the facial bones. The patient developed orbital apex syndrome including ptosis of upper eyelid, pulsatile exophthalmos, chemosis, loss of ocular motility, monocular blindness on the right, and numbness of the right infraorbital region. After transcatheter intra-arterial embolisation, the ptosis and chemosis improved. PMID:23958350

  2. Cavernous sinus thrombosis caused by a dental infection: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Gi-Sung; Kim, Hyun Young; Kwak, Eun-Jung; Jung, Young-Soo; Park, Hyung-Sik

    2014-01-01

    Cavernous sinus thrombosis not only presents with constitutional symptoms including fever, pain and swelling but also with specific findings such as proptosis, chemosis, periorbital swelling, and cranial nerve palsies. It is known to occur secondary to the spread of paranasal sinus infections in the nose, ethmoidal and sphenoidal sinuses. However, paranasal sinus infection of dental origin is rare. The following is a case of cavernous sinus thrombosis due to the spread of an abscess in the buccal and pterygomandibular spaces via buccal mucosal laceration. PMID:25247150

  3. Traumatic Persistent Trigeminal Artery - Cavernous Sinus Fistula Treated by Transcatheter Arterial Embolization

    PubMed Central

    Asai, K.; Hasuo, K.; Hara, T.; Miyagishima, T.; Terano, N.

    2010-01-01

    Summary We describe a rare case of traumatic persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) - cavernous sinus fistula. Cerebral angiography showed direct communication between the right PTA and the cavernous sinus which was treated by transcathether arterial embolization. Although previous reports have indicated the use of more coils to treat this condition, we successfully treated the patient with only two coils placed near the orifice of the fistula after sufficient anatomical evaluation. PMID:20377986

  4. Traumatic persistent trigeminal artery--cavernous sinus fistula treated by transcatheter arterial embolization. A case report.

    PubMed

    Asai, K; Hasuo, K; Hara, T; Miyagishima, T; Terano, N

    2010-03-01

    We describe a rare case of traumatic persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) - cavernous sinus fistula. Cerebral angiography showed direct communication between the right PTA and the cavernous sinus which was treated by transcathether arterial embolization. Although previous reports have indicated the use of more coils to treat this condition, we successfully treated the patient with only two coils placed near the orifice of the fistula after sufficient anatomical evaluation. PMID:20377986

  5. [Plea for a unifying concept of the cavernous sinus and the trigeminal cavity].

    PubMed

    Bataille, B; Sakka, M; Lapierre, F

    The object of this study is a scientific research in human and compared anatomy of the cavernous sinus and Meckel's cave. The observations made in the foetus and human adult are compared to these made in non human primates and domestic mammals, the cavernous sinus and the Meckel's cave contribute to realize a entirety that we call "a morphological and functional anatomical system". The human cavernous sinus and Meckel's cave are described as an indissociable parasellar space representing a heavy traffic area for vascular and nervous structures. In the human and non human primates, the authors observe a parasellar space which agreed with the concept of "trigeminal-cavernous anatomical system". In the cat, the same observations are made and an osseous outline closing the roof of the parasellar space is observed; this is the evidence of a more ancient osseous or cartilaginous wall. The authors demonstrate in the last part of this study that the morphogenesis of this trigeminal-cavernous system is in relation with the phylogenic development of its morphological and functional environment, that we call the "externation". This study is of interest: to a best understanding of the tumors involving the cavernous sinus, to a semantic point of view: an attempt to a review of the terminology applied to the cavernous sinus and Meckel's cave. PMID:7729219

  6. Cavernous sinus syndrome, an atypical presentation of tertiary syphilis: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Noel, Colin B; Moeketsi, Khulile; Kies, Bryan

    2011-01-01

    Cavernous sinus syndrome is rarely caused by tertiary syphilitic infection. To our knowledge only two other cases of cavernous sinus syndrome caused by syphilis have been reported in the literature. We report a case of a 62-year-old female who presented with a mass in the cavernous sinus, which was initially diagnosed as a meningioma radiologically, necessitating a biopsy for diagnostic confirmation. Clinical features of syphilitic aortitis and subsequent positive neurosyphilis laboratory results lead to the suspicion of a gumma infiltrating the cavernous sinus. Empirical treatment with penicillin in an attempt to defer the need for biopsy led to both significant clinical improvement and radiological resolution. This confirmed the diagnosis of a syphilitic gumma in the cavernous sinus. In this paper we emphasize the rarity of cavernous sinus syndrome as a result of syphilitic infection, highlight the diagnostic difficulties using current serological and radiological measures, and propose treating intracerebral mass lesions in serum positive cases empirically prior to more invasive measures. PMID:20884116

  7. Morphological Characteristics of the Sphenoid Sinus and Endoscopic Localization of the Cavernous Sinus.

    PubMed

    Yang, Youxiong; Zhan, Guowen; Liao, Jianchun; Dang, Ruishan; Wang, Hongli; Li, Yang; Zhang, Xiaote

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the morphological characteristics of the sphenoid sinus and endoscopic localization of the cavernous sinus (CS) using an extended endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach. Thirty sides of CS in 15 adult cadaver heads were dissected to simulate the extended endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach, and the morphology of the sphenoid sinus and anatomic structures of CS were observed. The opticocarotid recess (OCR), ophthalmomaxillary recess (V1V2R), and maxillomandibular recess (V2V3R) in the lateral wall of the sphenoid sinus were presented in 16 sides (53.3%), 6 sides (20%), and 4 sides (13.3%) of the 30 sides, respectively. OCR is a constant anatomic landmark in endoscopy and coincides with the anterior portion of the clinoidal triangle. The C-shaped internal carotid artery (ICA) in the lateral wall of the sphenoid sinus was presented in 11 sides (36.7%), the upper one-third of which corresponds to the middle portion of the clinoidal triangle, and the lower two-thirds of which correlates to the supratrochlear triangle, infratrochlear triangle, and ophthalmic nerve in CS, around which the medial, lateral, and anteroinferior interspaces are distributed. From a front-to-behind perspective, the C-shaped ICA consists of inferior horizontal segment, anterior vertical segment, clinoidal segment as well as partial subarachnoid segment of the ICA. OCR and C-shaped ICA in the lateral wall of the sphenoid sinus are the 2 reliable anatomic landmarks in the intraoperative location of the parasellar region of CS. PMID:26221856

  8. Gamma Knife radiosurgery for the treatment of cavernous sinus hemangiomas

    PubMed Central

    XU, QINGSHENG; SHEN, JIAN; FENG, YIPING; ZHAN, RENYA

    2016-01-01

    The present retrospective study aimed to analyze the outcome of patients with cavernous sinus hemangioma (CSH) treated with Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKS). Between August 2011 and April 2014, 7 patients with CSHs underwent GKS. GKS was performed as the sole treatment option in 5 patients, whilst partial resection had been performed previously in 1 patient and biopsy had been performed in 1 patient. The mean volume of the tumors at the time of GKS was 12.5±10.2 cm3 (range, 5.3–33.2 cm3), and the median prescription of peripheral dose was 14.0 Gy (range, 10.0–15.0 Gy). The mean follow-up period was 20 months (range, 6–40 months). At the last follow-up, the lesion volume had decreased in all patients, and all cranial neuropathies observed prior to GKS had improved. There were no radiation-induced neuropathies or complications during the follow-up period. GKS appears to be an effective and safe treatment modality for the management of CSHs. PMID:26893777

  9. A singular case of cavernous internal carotid artery aneurysm in patient with cavernous sinus syndrome and bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Sacchetti, Federico; Stagni, Silvia; Spinardi, Luca; Raumer, Luigi; Dentale, Nicola; Cirillo, Luigi

    2016-09-01

    We report the uncommon case of an acute cavernous sinus syndrome in a patient who was consequently discovered to have both a cavernous internal carotid artery aneurysm and bacterial meningitis. Which came first, the chicken or the egg? Which of the two, the aneurysm or the meningitis, gave rise to the patient's symptoms? We briefly reviewed the literature of similar cases and tried to analyze the possible pathophysiological relationship between these findings. Moreover, this case highlights the importance of a multidisciplinary management of these patients to better decide between a medical and a surgical and/or endovascular treatment. PMID:27594955

  10. Transvenous embolization of a dural carotid-cavernous sinus fistula via the inferior ophthalmic vein.

    PubMed

    Michels, Kevin S; Ng, John D; Falardeau, Julie; Roberts, Warren G; Petersen, Bryan; Nesbit, Gary M; Barnwell, Stanley L

    2007-01-01

    A 76-year-old woman presented with an acute onset of right periocular pain, diplopia, ocular injection, progressive proptosis, and periocular swelling. She had an unremarkable past medical history, and the erythrocyte sedimentation rate and complete blood count were normal. A carotid-cavernous sinus fistula was suspected, and an MRI demonstrated enlargement of the superior ophthalmic vein posterior to the globe and enlargement of the inferior ophthalmic vein throughout its entire course. Cerebral arteriography demonstrated a dural cavernous sinus fistula. The inferior ophthalmic vein was accessed via the inferonasal orbital space and was catheterized for delivery of multiple platinum coils to the cavernous sinus fistula. Follow-up venograms demonstrated occlusion of the fistula. At 2-month follow-up, there was a residual sixth nerve palsy and resolution of symptoms, including proptosis and periocular swelling. PMID:18030122

  11. Heavily T2-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Landmarks of the Cavernous Sinus and Paracavernous Region

    PubMed Central

    Hermann, M.; Bobek-Billewicz, B.; Sloniewski, P.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the magnetic resonance anatomy of the cavernous sinus. Heavily T2-weighted submillimetric sequence in sagittal, coronal, and axial planes was performed in 16 healthy patients. The sequence provides high contrast between fluid and other structures of the cavernous sinus. High signal intensity of the venous spaces of the cavernous sinus provides a kind of a background for internal carotid artery, cranial nerves, and meninges, as well as bony and fibrous structures. The study was performed with the help of an anatomic atlas. Different magnetic resonance (MR) landmarks of the cavernous and parasellar region were introduced and demonstrated. MR images, superior to computer tomography, allow a detailed assessment of the cavernous sinus anatomy. Delineation by magnetic resonance of tiny anatomical structures may help the neurosurgeon trace the exact outline of a tumor and help to plan an adequate strategy if complete resection is attempted. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 8 PMID:17171105

  12. Onyx embolization of dural arteriovenous fistulas of the cavernous sinus through the superior pharyngeal branch of the ascending pharyngeal artery

    PubMed Central

    Pero, Guglielmo; Quilici, Luca; Piano, Mariangela; Valvassori, Luca; Boccardi, Edoardo

    2014-01-01

    We report three cases of dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) of the cavernous sinus treated by Onyx injection through the superior pharyngeal branch of the ascending pharyngeal artery. The treatment of choice of DAVFs of the cavernous sinus is endovascular, and it is preferentially done via transvenous occlusion of the cavernous sinus. The cavernous sinus can be reached through either the inferior petrosal sinus or the superior ophthalmic vein. When these venous routes are occluded, the first attempt is to pass through the occluded inferior petrosal sinus, but sometimes this attempt can fail. In some cases there are small transosseous feeders to the fistula arising from the superior pharyngeal branch of the ascending pharyngeal artery. When all of the more conventional approaches are unattainable, this route can be attempted. In our experience, it allowed safe and rapid occlusion of the fistula. PMID:24759156

  13. Rapid-developed primary malignant myoepithelioma in the cavernous sinus: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Malignant myoepithelioma is a relatively rare malignant tumor occurring most frequently in the salivary glands. A few isolated cases have been described in other locations, including soft tissue, bone, lung, bronchus, oral cavity, nasopharynx, larynx, and maxillary sinus. Malignant myoepithelioma, however, is uncommonly involved within the cavernous sinus. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of malignant myoepithelioma arising from within the cavernous sinus. Case presentation Herein, we report a case of a 48-year-old woman who presented a 1-month history of diplopia and blepharoptosis as well as radiological evidence of a rapidly developing cavernous sinus tumor. The patient underwent a trans-sphenoidal biopsy and a histological diagnosis indicated a malignant myoepithelioma. After diagnosis, the tumor grew rapidly and her clinical condition deteriorated progressively. Therefore, a pterional craniotomy with partial tumor removal was performed. The patient’s clinical state was worsened, and she died two months after the initial operation. Because the malignant myoepithelioma could not be traced to an organ of origin, other than the cavernous sinus, this case was diagnosed as a primary intracranial malignant myoepithelioma. Conclusion The purpose of presenting this case report is to raise awareness among clinicians to consider malignant myoepithelioma as a differential diagnosis when a cavernous sinus mass is identified. Furthermore, an ideal management strategy for malignant myoepithelioma is not known and the prognosis seems to be unfavorable; therefore, more cases are needed to enhance our knowledge of the diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of this rare intracranial lesion. PMID:23642050

  14. [A case with both infectious cavernous sinus thrombosis and Lemierre syndrome due to intraoral resident flora].

    PubMed

    Nishida, Akihiro; Ogata, Toshiyasu; Kudo, Masataka; Fukuhara, Kousuke; Fukae, Jiro; Tsuboi, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    The present report describes a 54-year-old woman with cavernous sinus thrombosis (CST) presenting with fever, and marked periorbital swelling. There is a history of untreated periodontal disease. On initial examination, periorbital pain associated with bilateral blephaloptosis, chemosis, and disturbed eye movement was present. The laboratory evaluation showed significant elevations in inflammatory and fibrinolytic markers. Diffusion-weighted MRI revealed high signal intensities in the bilateral superior ophthalmic veins (SOV). Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) of the cranium showed an enlarged right SOV and a non-enhancing lesion within the right SOV and bilateral cavernous sinus, indicating cavernous sinus thrombosis with diffuse SOV thrombosis. Blood culture performed on admission showed bacterial infection by intraoral resident flora; therefore, the CST was attributed to untreated periodontal disease. Contrast-enhanced CT of the case also revealed the presence of thrombosis in the jugular vein associated with micropulmonary embolus, indicating co-occurrence of Lemierre's syndrome. Antibiotic and anticoagulant treatment were initiated, and the tooth decay was treated; all clinical symptoms and signs subsequently improved. Additional neuroimaging showed that the thrombus was absent from both SOV and the cavernous sinus. Infectious CST is life threatening; therefore, laboratory and imaging examination should be performed quickly, and antibiotic and anticoagulant therapy administrated immediately. PMID:26041393

  15. Cavernous sinus thrombosis secondary to aspergillus granuloma: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Brenet, Esteban; Boulagnon-Rombi, Camille; N'guyen, Yohan; Litré, Claude-Fabien

    2016-10-01

    Cavernous sinus thrombosis is a rare but serious complication of sphenoid aspergillosis. The rarity of this pathology makes its diagnostic very difficult on a clinical, biological and radiological sense. The authors present a case of cavernous sinus thrombosis with ipsilateral internal carotid artery thrombosis secondary to a non-invasive sphenoid aspergillosis in an immunocompetent host, responsible of a cavernous syndrome associated to a Claude Bernard Horner syndrome. One year after surgery, the patient is still asymptomatic without recurrence. Diagnostic modalities are detailed and several management of this pathology are compared. Surgery is essential in a diagnostic and therapeutic sense. There is no evidence of the interest of adjuvant therapies such as antibiotic and anticoagulation. Concerning the antifungal treatment, the attitude towards a non-invasive sphenoid aspergillosis in an immunocompetent host is unclear. PMID:26860234

  16. The Role of Palliative Radiosurgery When Cancer Invades the Cavernous Sinus

    SciTech Connect

    Kano, Hideyuki; Niranjan, Ajay; Kondziolka, Douglas; Flickinger, John C.; Lunsford, L. Dade

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: Involvement of the cavernous sinus by direct invasion from skull base cancer or from metastatic spread of cancers is a challenging problem. We evaluated the role of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) in the treatment of patients who developed cavernous sinus metastases or direct invasion. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the data from 37 patients who had cavernous sinus metastases or had cavernous sinus invasion from adjacent skull base cancers and who underwent SRS between 1992 and 2006 at University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. The median patient age was 57.8 years. Previous adjuvant management included fractionated radiotherapy in 8, chemotherapy in 16, and both radiotherapy and chemotherapy in 5. The primary sites of metastases or invasion were nasopharyngeal carcinoma (n = 7), parotid gland carcinoma (n = 7), and metastases from systemic cancer (n = 23). The median target volume was 6.3 cm{sup 3} (range, 0.3-33.6), and the median margin dose was 14 Gy (range, 12-20). Results: At a mean of 12.9 months (range, 0.8-63.9), 32 patients had died and 5 were living. The overall survival rate after SRS was 36.6% and 19.4% at 1 and 2 years, respectively. Progression-free survival was related to a greater marginal dose. After SRS, 12 (35.3%) of 34 patients with neurologic symptoms exhibited improvement. SRS early after diagnosis was significantly associated with improvement of cranial nerve dysfunction. Conclusion: SRS is a minimally invasive palliative option for patients whose cancer has invaded the cavernous sinus. The benefits for cranial nerve deficits are best when SRS is performed early.

  17. Phase II Study to Assess the Efficacy of Hypofractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy in Patients With Large Cavernous Sinus Hemangiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xin; Liu Xiaoxia; Mei Guanghai; Dai Jiazhong; Pan Li; Wang Enmin

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: Cavernous sinus hemangioma is a rare vascular tumor. The direct microsurgical approach usually results in massive hemorrhage. Although radiosurgery plays an important role in managing cavernous sinus hemangiomas as a treatment alternative to microsurgery, the potential for increased toxicity with single-session treatment of large tumors is a concern. The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy in patients with large cavernous sinus hemangiomas. Methods: Fourteen patients with large (volume >20 cm{sup 3}) cavernous sinus hemangiomas were enrolled in a prospective Phase II study between December 2007 and December 2010. The hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy dose was 21 Gy delivered in 3 fractions. Results: After a mean follow-up of 15 months (range, 6-36 months), the magnetic resonance images showed a mean of 77% tumor volume reduction (range, 44-99%). Among the 6 patients with cranial nerve impairments before hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy, 1 achieved symptomatic complete resolution and 5 had improvement. No radiotherapy-related complications were observed during follow-up. Conclusion: Our current experience, though preliminary, substantiates the role of hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for large cavernous sinus hemangiomas. Although a longer and more extensive follow-up is needed, hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy of 21 Gy delivered in 3 fractions is effective in reducing the tumor volume without causing any new deficits and can be considered as a treatment modality for large cavernous sinus hemangiomas.

  18. Aseptic cavernous sinus thrombosis after internal carotid arterial occlusion in polycythaemia vera.

    PubMed Central

    Melamed, E; Rachmilewitz, E A; Reches, A; Lavy, S

    1976-01-01

    Two patients with untreated polycythaemia vera developed intracranial internal carotid arterial occlusion followed by monocular blindness and the characteristic features of ipsilateral cavernous sinus thrombosis. Primary septic source and signs of systemic infection were absent. It is suggested that the predisposing factors in this unusual syndrome were hyperviscosity and venous sludging induced by the basic haematological disorder and progression of the thrombotic process within the internal carotid artery towards its intracavernous portion with occlusion of the ophthalmic artery and of the arterial branches which supply the walls of the sinus. Images PMID:932749

  19. Gamma knife surgery for a hemangioma of the cavernous sinus in a child.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Rory K J; Reynolds, Matthew R; Mansur, David B; Smyth, Matthew D

    2013-01-01

    Cavernous sinus (CS) hemangiomas are rare vascular abnormalities that constitute 0.4%-2% of all lesions within the CS. Cavernous sinus hemangiomas are high-flow vascular tumors that tend to hemorrhage profusely during resection, leading to incomplete resection and high morbidity and mortality. While Gamma Knife surgery (GKS) has proven to be an effective treatment of CS hemangiomas in the adult population, few reports of GKS for treatment of CS hemangiomas exist in the pediatric literature. Here, the authors present the first case of a 15-year-old girl with a biopsy-proven CS hemangioma who achieved complete resolution of her symptoms and a complete imaging-defined response following GKS. If suspicion for a CS hemangioma is high in a pediatric patient, GKS may be considered as an effective treatment modality, thus avoiding the morbidities of open resection. PMID:23082966

  20. Medial portion of the cavernous sinus: quantitative analysis of the medial wall.

    PubMed

    Yilmazlar, Selcuk; Kocaeli, Hasan; Aydiner, Fatma; Korfali, Ender

    2005-09-01

    Pituitary tumors invade the cavernous sinus via the medial wall. Researchers have speculated that this wall is composed of dura and that substances secreted by tumors might damage this barrier. In contrast to the lateral wall, little is known about the structure of the medial wall of the cavernous sinus (MWCS). This study provides the first detailed quantitative (thickness) and qualitative (histological) assessment of the MWCS. Eighteen sellar-parasellar tissue blocks were obtained from adult human autopsies. Ten specimens were used for microsurgical dissection and macroscopic anatomical description. Eight specimens were used for histopathological study and for recording computer measurements of MWCS thickness. Each of these eight specimens was divided into three approximately equal-sized pieces, with cuts made in the coronal plane from posterior to anterior starting at the anterior level of the pituitary stalk. Wall thicknesses were compared in the three different regions (posterior, middle, anterior), and also on the left vs. the right sides. The investigations showed that the MWCS is a distinct dural layer that forms a barrier between the medial venous space of the cavernous sinus and the pituitary gland. The mean thickness of the 48 total (left and right) MWCS observed in the 24 sections examined was 0.195 +/- 0.066 mm (range = 0.080-0.387 mm). This wall is composed of loosely arranged collagen fibers that comprise a specific layer known as "meningeal dura." The posterior third of the MWCS was significantly thinner than the middle third (P = 0.0014) or anterior third (P = 0.0001). No macro- or microscopic defects were observed in any of the MWCS in the 18 specimens. The thinness of the posterior MWCS suggests that this is the most likely path for extension of pituitary tumors into the cavernous sinus. PMID:16015624

  1. Carotid artery stenoses and thrombosis secondary to cavernous sinus thromboses in Fusobacterium necrophorum meningitis.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, T. H.; Bergvall, V.; Bradshaw, J. P.

    1990-01-01

    We report the case of a young man with Fusobacterium necrophorum meningitis who developed bilateral carotid artery stenosis associated with thrombosis of the cavernous sinuses. Intraluminal clot was present in the region of the stenoses for which he was anticoagulated. The clinical presentation, problems with diagnosis, the use of anticoagulation and the need for prolonged treatment with metronidazole are discussed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:2235810

  2. Results of stereotactic radiosurgery for patients with imaging defined cavernous sinus meningiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Pollock, Bruce E. . E-mail: pollock.bruce@mayo.edu; Stafford, Scott L.

    2005-08-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of stereotactic radiosurgery as primary management for patients with imaging defined cavernous sinus meningiomas. Methods: Between 1992 and 2001, 49 patients had radiosurgery for dural-based masses of the cavernous sinus presumed to be meningiomas. The mean patient age was 55.5 years. The mean tumor volume was 10.2 mL; the mean tumor margin dose was 15.9 Gy. The mean follow-up was 58 months (range, 16-144 months). Results: No tumor enlarged after radiosurgery. Twelve of 38 patients (26%) with preexisting diplopia or facial numbness/pain had improvement in cranial nerve function. Five patients (10%) had new (n = 3) or worsened (n = 2) trigeminal dysfunction; 2 of these patients (4%) underwent surgery at 20 and 25 months after radiosurgery despite no evidence of tumor progression. Neither patient improved after partial tumor resection. One patient (2%) developed an oculomotor nerve injury. One patient (2%) had an ischemic stroke related to occlusion of the cavernous segment of the internal carotid artery. Event-free survival was 98%, 85%, and 80% at 1, 3, and 7 years after radiosurgery, respectively. Univariate analysis of patient and dosimetric factors found no analyzed factor correlated with postradiosurgical morbidity. Conclusions: Radiosurgery was an effective primary management strategy for patients with an imaging defined cavernous sinus meningioma. Except in situations of symptomatic mass effect, unusual clinical presentation, or atypical imaging features, surgery to confirm the histologic diagnosis is unlikely to provide clinical benefit.

  3. Multiple Unilateral Traumatic Carotid-Cavernous Sphenoid Sinus Fistulas with Associated Massive Epistaxis: A Consequence of Parkour

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Jason F.; Vega, Rafael A.; Machinis, Theofilos G.; Reavey-Cantwell, John F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Traumatic carotid-cavernous fistulas (CCFs) present the clinician with diagnostic and surgical challenges. Extension of a CCF into the sphenoid sinus presents additional management difficulties. Endovascular interventions using various thrombogenic materials such as balloons, coils, or liquids are effective treatment strategies. Ideally, these techniques are used to obliterate the fistula while maintaining the patency of the parent artery. Case Report We present a rare case of traumatic carotid-cavernous sphenoid sinus fistulas complicated by multiple tears in the internal carotid artery with direct communication to the cavernous and sphenoid sinus. As a result, the patient developed massive epistaxis requiring emergent endovascular intervention. A total of 87 detachable coils were placed into the cavernous and sphenoid sinuses via transarterial and transvenous routes in a staged procedure, resulting in complete obliteration of the patient's multiple fistulas. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of multiple fistulous tears in the internal carotid artery with extension to the cavernous and sphenoid sinus. This report emphasizes the importance of early diagnosis and neurosurgical intervention. PMID:25829888

  4. Metalloproteinases ADAM12 and MMP-14 are associated with cavernous sinus invasion in pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junwen; Voellger, Benjamin; Benzel, Julia; Schlomann, Uwe; Nimsky, Christopher; Bartsch, Jörg W; Carl, Barbara

    2016-09-15

    Invasion of tumor cells critically depends on cell-cell or cell-extracellular matrix interactions. Enzymes capable of modulating these interactions belong to the proteinase families of ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloprotease) and MMP (matrix metalloprotease) proteins. Our objective is to examine their expression levels and evaluate the relationship between expression levels and cavernous sinus invasion in pituitary adenomas. Tissue samples from 35 patients with pituitary adenomas were analyzed. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) was employed to assess mRNA expression levels for ADAM and MMP genes. Protein levels were examined using immunohistochemistry and Western Blot. Correlation analyses between expression levels and clinical parameters were performed. By silencing ADAM12 and MMP-14 with siRNA in a mouse pituitary adenoma cell line (TtT/GF), their cellular effects were investigated. In our study, nine women and 26 men were included, with a mean age of 53.1 years (range 15-84 years) at the time of surgery. There were 19 cases with cavernous sinus invasion. The proteins ADAM12 and MMP-14 were significantly up-regulated in invasive adenomas compared to noninvasive adenomas. Both human isoforms of ADAM12 (ADAM12L and ADAM12s) were involved in tumor invasion; moreover, ADAM12L was found to correlate positively with Ki-67 proliferation index in pituitary adenomas. In TtT/GF pituitary adenoma cells, silencing of ADAM12 and MMP-14 significantly inhibited cell invasion and migration, respectively, whereas only silencing of ADAM12 suppressed cell proliferation. We conclude that ADAM12 and MMP-14 are associated with cavernous sinus invasion in pituitary adenomas, which qualifies these proteins in diagnosis and therapy. PMID:27144841

  5. Lateral sellar compartment O.T. (cavernous sinus): history, anatomy, terminology.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, D

    1998-08-01

    Claudios Galen (119-199 a.d.) dissected lower animals with parasellar carotid retia bathed in venous blood and transposed his findings to human anatomy. Andreas Vesalius (1514-1564) corrected most of Galen's errors but apparently never looked into this small, extradural compartment, nor, apparently, did Winslow (Exposition Anatomique de la Structure du Corps Humain. London: N. Prevast, 1734), who christened it the "cavernous sinus," (CS) presumably thinking that it would resemble the corpora cavernosa of the penis. Multiple surgical explorations, gross dissections, microscopic views, and vascular casts from early fetuses to an 81 year old have been examined and reviewed. The CS is not a dural sinus nor is it cavernous. The compartment is extradural, and the venous structures contained within consist of a greatly variable plexus of extremely thin-walled veins. The name, CS, is a barrier to the understanding of the structure and function of this extradural anatomical jewel box, which contains fat, myelinated and nonmyelinated nerves, arteries, and a plexus of veins. It is proposed that this name be changed, because it is inaccurate and misleading. The replacement should leave no doubt about its meaning. The lateral sellar compartment is descriptive and accurate. The veins within are a parasellar plexus. PMID:9713986

  6. A Case of Cavernous Sinus Thrombophlebitis and Meningitis as a Complication in Osteopetrosis

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Hyun Chul; Park, So Hyun; Kim, Eun Sook; Kim, Young Il; Lee, Sun Ho

    2014-01-01

    Osteopetrosis is a rare genetic bone disease characterized by increased bone density but prone to breakage due to defective osteoclastic function. Among two primary types of autosomal dominant osteopetrosis (ADO), osteopetrosis type II is characterized by sclerosis of bones, predominantly involving the spine, the pelvis, and the skull base. Fragility of bones and dental abscess are leading complications. This report presents a case of osteopetrosis in a 52-years-old female, which was complicated by the development of cavernous sinus thrombophlebitis and meningitis. She was suffered from multiple fractures since one year ago. Laboratory data revealed elevated serum levels of tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) without carbonic anhydrase II DNA mutation. A thoracolumbar spine X-ray showed, typical findings of ADO type II (ADO II; Albers-Schönberg disease), prominent vertebral endplates so called the 'rugger jersey spine'. Her older sister also showed same typical spine appearance. We report a case of ADO II with cavernous sinus thrombophlebitis and meningitis that was successfully treated with long-term antibiotics with right sphenoidotomy. PMID:25247162

  7. Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy Treatment of Cavernous Sinus Meningiomas: A Study of 100 Cases

    SciTech Connect

    Litre, Claude Fabien Colin, Philippe; Noudel, Remy; Peruzzi, Philippe; Bazin, Arnaud; Sherpereel, Bernard; Bernard, Marie Helene; Rousseaux, Pascal

    2009-07-15

    Purpose: We discuss our experiences with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSR) in the treatment of cavernous sinus meningiomas. Methods and Materials: From 1995 to 2006, we monitored 100 patients diagnosed with cavernous sinus meningiomas; 84 female and 16 male patients were included. The mean patient age was 56 years. The most common symptoms were a reduction in visual acuity (57%), diplopia (50%), exophthalmy (30%), and trigeminal neuralgia (34%). Surgery was initially performed on 26 patients. All patients were treated with FSR. A total of 45 Gy was administered to the lesion, with 5 fractions of 1.8 Gy completed each week. Patient treatment was performed using a Varian Clinac linear accelerator used for cranial treatments and a micro-multileaf collimator. Results: No side effects were reported. Mean follow-up period was 33 months, with 20% of patients undergoing follow-up evaluation of more than 4 years later. The tumor control rate at 3 years was 94%. Three patients required microsurgical intervention because FSR proved ineffective. In terms of functional symptoms, an 81% improvement was observed in patients suffering from exophthalmy, with 46% of these patients being restored to full health. A 52% improvement was observed in diplopia, together with a 67% improvement in visual acuity and a 50% improvement in type V neuropathy. Conclusions: FSR facilitates tumor control, either as an initial treatment option or in combination with microsurgery. In addition to being a safe procedure with few side effects, FSR offers the significant benefit of superior functional outcomes.

  8. Cavernous sinus lesions biopsy with neuronavigation and tip-cut needle

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzetti, Martin; Carvalho, Herculano; Cattoni, Maria; Gonçalves-Ferreira, Antonio; Pimentel, José; Antuñes, Joao

    2014-01-01

    Background: Transoval biopsy of cavernous sinus (CS) lesions is the last non-invasive diagnostic option in those 15% of patients in whom etiology remains unclear in spite of extensive neuroradiological imaging, clinical assessment, and laboratory evaluation. However, there are no guidelines defining indications and the most appropriate technique for this procedure. Case Description: We present four patients in whom we performed X-ray and neuronavigation-assisted transoval CS biopsies using tip-cut needles. Conclusion: The technique described allows the operator to determine the optimal angle for entering the CS, avoiding the complications due to distorted anatomy, and facilitating orientation once inside the CS. It reduces both radiation exposure as well as general anesthesia duration. PMID:25593783

  9. Cavernous sinus thrombosis syndrome and brainstem involvement in patient with leptospirosis: Two rare complications of leptospirosis.

    PubMed

    Alian, Shahriyar; Taghipour, Mehrdad; Sharifian, Rayka; Fereydouni, Mohammad Amin

    2014-09-01

    Leptospirosis is a bacterial disease that is caused by pathogenic spirochetes of the genus Leptospira. It can affect humans and animals. In humans, it can lead to a wide spectrum of symptoms. It is known as the most common zoonosis in the world. The typical presentation of the disease is an acute biphasic febrile illness with or without jaundice. Less common clinical manifestations may result from involvement of different human body systems. In many places, this disease may be under-diagnosed, especially when associated with neurological complications. Moreover, without treatment, leptospirosis can lead to organ damages, and even death. Neurological complications are uncommon and are reported in a few cases. Cavernous sinus thrombosis syndrome and brainstem involvement are rare complications of leptospirosis and are associated with a high mortality risk. To our knowledge, no such cases have been reported in the literature. PMID:25535508

  10. Cavernous sinus thrombosis syndrome and brainstem involvement in patient with leptospirosis: Two rare complications of leptospirosis

    PubMed Central

    Alian, Shahriyar; Taghipour, Mehrdad; Sharifian, Rayka; Fereydouni, Mohammad Amin

    2014-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a bacterial disease that is caused by pathogenic spirochetes of the genus Leptospira. It can affect humans and animals. In humans, it can lead to a wide spectrum of symptoms. It is known as the most common zoonosis in the world. The typical presentation of the disease is an acute biphasic febrile illness with or without jaundice. Less common clinical manifestations may result from involvement of different human body systems. In many places, this disease may be under-diagnosed, especially when associated with neurological complications. Moreover, without treatment, leptospirosis can lead to organ damages, and even death. Neurological complications are uncommon and are reported in a few cases. Cavernous sinus thrombosis syndrome and brainstem involvement are rare complications of leptospirosis and are associated with a high mortality risk. To our knowledge, no such cases have been reported in the literature. PMID:25535508

  11. Lacrimal Sac Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma with Metastases to the Cavernous Sinus Following Dacryocystorhinostomy Treated with Stereotactic Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Roos, Jonathan C.P.; Beigi, Bijan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We report a very good outcome in a 44-year-old woman in whom cancer was missed as the cause of nasolacrimal duct obstruction and dacryocystitis and which was deemed inoperable after spreading to the cavernous sinus. Case Report The patient was referred to our unit 12 months following uneventful right dacryocystorhinostomy for nasolacrimal duct obstruction. This had been complicated by the formation of a significant canthal swelling 6 months later, which had been excised at that time. The symptom of nasolacrimal duct obstruction and scar recurrence prompted the referral to our unit. Examination and biopsy confirmed a malignancy. Despite extensive surgery, including concurrent radical neck dissection and parotidectomy, within 6 months, her mucoepidermoid carcinoma was found to have spread to the cavernous sinus, restricting blood flow from the carotid and causing an abducens nerve palsy. Though deemed inoperable at first, Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery was sought as treatment for her disease, resulting in a good outcome 4 years after surgery. Conclusion Experience from this case suggests the importance of considering malignancy as a cause in young patients when presenting with nasolacrimal duct obstruction. In such cases, and perhaps for all patients, biopsy specimens should be submitted as many tumours are found incidentally at the time of dacryocystorhinostomy. Whilst the external approach to dacryocystorhinostomy may identify abnormal anatomy intraoperatively, prompting biopsy, this is less likely with an endonasal approach where osteotomy precedes sac visualisation. The endonasal approach may therefore be less appropriate in such cases where malignancy is suspected as osteotomy may aid in the spread. PMID:27462255

  12. Effects of anesthesia with isoflurane on plasma concentrations of adrenocorticotropic hormone in samples obtained from the cavernous sinus and jugular vein of horses.

    PubMed

    Carmalt, James L; Duke-Novakovski, Tanya; Schott, Harold C; van der Kolk, Johannes H

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine effects of anesthesia on plasma concentrations and pulsatility of ACTH in samples obtained from the cavernous sinus and jugular vein of horses. ANIMALS 6 clinically normal adult horses. PROCEDURES Catheters were placed in a jugular vein and into the cavernous sinus via a superficial facial vein. The following morning (day 1), cavernous sinus blood samples were collected every 5 minutes for 1 hour (collection of first sample = time 0) and jugular venous blood samples were collected at 0, 30, and 60 minutes. On day 2, horses were sedated with xylazine hydrochloride and anesthesia was induced with propofol mixed with ketamine hydrochloride. Horses were positioned in dorsal recumbency. Anesthesia was maintained with isoflurane in oxygen and a continuous rate infusion of butorphanol tartrate. One hour after anesthesia was induced, the blood sample protocol was repeated. Plasma ACTH concentrations were quantified by use of a commercially available sandwich assay. Generalized estimating equations that controlled for horse and an expressly automated deconvolution algorithm were used to determine effects of anesthesia on plasma ACTH concentrations and pulsatility, respectively. RESULTS Anesthesia significantly reduced the plasma ACTH concentration in blood samples collected from the cavernous sinus. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Mean plasma ACTH concentrations in samples collected from the cavernous sinus of anesthetized horses were reduced. Determining the success of partial ablation of the pituitary gland in situ for treatment of pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction may require that effects of anesthesia be included in interpretation of plasma ACTH concentrations in cavernous sinus blood. PMID:27347826

  13. Surgical Outcomes Using a Medial-to-Lateral Endonasal Endoscopic Approach to Pituitary Adenomas Invading the Cavernous Sinus

    PubMed Central

    Woodworth, Graeme F.; Patel, Kunal S.; Shin, Benjamin; Burkhardt, Jan-Karl; Tsouris, A. John; McCoul, Edward D.; Anand, Vijay K.; Schwartz, Theodore H.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECT To detail the extent of resection and complications with endonasal endoscopic surgery for pituitary tumors invading the cavernous sinus (CS) using a moderately aggressive approach to maximize extent of resection through the medial cavernous sinus wall while minimizing the risk of cranial neuropathy and blood loss. Tumor in the medical cavernous sinus was aggressively pursued while tumor in the lateral cavernous sinus was debulked in preparation for radiosurgery. METHODS A prospective surgical database of consecutive endonasal pituitary surgeries with verified CS invasion on intraoperative visual inspection was reviewed. The extent of resection as a whole and within the CS was assessed by an independent neuroradiologist using pre- and post-operative Knosp-Steiner (KS) categorization and volumetrics of the respective magnetic resonance images. The extent of resection and clinical outcomes were compared for medial (KS1-2) and lateral (KS3-4) lesions. RESULTS Thirty-six consecutive patients with pituitary adenomas involving the CS who had surgery via an endonasal endoscopic approach were identified. The extent of resection was 84.6% for KS 1–2 and 66.6% for KS 3–4 (p=.04). Gross-total resection was 53.8% for KS 1–2 and 8.7% for KS 3–4 (p=.0006). Of six patients (16.8%) with pre-operative cranial neuropathies, all showed subjective improvement after surgery. Surgical complications included 2 transient post-operative cranial neuropathies (5.6%), 1 postoperative CSF leak (2.8%), 1 reoperation for mucocele (2.8%) and 1 infection (2.8%). CONCLUSIONS The endoscopic endonasal “medial-to-lateral” approach permits safe debulking of tumors in the medial and lateral CS. Although GTR rates are moderate, particularly in the lateral CS, the risk of permanent cranial neuropathy is extremely low with a high chance of improvement of pre-existing deficits. This approach can also facilitate targeting for post-operative radiosurgery. PMID:24527820

  14. Cavernous Sinus: A Comprehensive Review of its Anatomy, Pathologic Conditions, and Imaging Features.

    PubMed

    Bakan, A A; Alkan, A; Kurtcan, S; Aralaşmak, A; Tokdemir, S; Mehdi, E; Özdemir, H

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this article was to review the anatomy of the cavernous sinus (CS), illustrate numerous lesions that can affect the CS, and emphasize the imaging characteristics for each lesion to further refine the differential diagnoses. The CS, notwithstanding its small size, contains a complicated and crucial network that consists of the carotid artery, the venous plexus, and cranial nerves. The wide-ranging types of pathologies that can involve the CS can be roughly classified as tumoral, congenital, infectious/inflammatory/granulomatous, and vascular. Conditions that affect the CS usually lead to symptoms that are similar to each other; thus, for diagnosis, imaging procedures are required. Radiological evaluations are also required to detect pre- and postoperative CS invasion. Magnetic resonance imaging, which can be supplemented with thin-section contrast-enhanced sequences, is the preferred imaging technique for evaluating the CS. For correct diagnosis of CS lesions and accurate evaluations of CS invasions, it is essential to carefully analyze the anatomical structures within the CS and to acquire precise knowledge about the imaging features of CS lesions, which may frequently overlap. PMID:25410584

  15. New Anatomical Description of the Cavernous Sinus Surface and Its Significance in Microsurgery

    PubMed Central

    Prescher, Andreas; Brors, Dominik; von Ammon, Klaus

    1997-01-01

    The anatomical and surgical approach to the sella region is of special interest for microsurgeons involved in ear, nose, and throat surgery, neurosurgery, ophthalmology, maxillofacial surgery, and skull base surgery. We investigated the surface morphology of the cavernous sinus and the sella turcica in 48 adult and 2 neonate specimens. To simplify the morphometric recording, distances between anatomical landmarks were defined. In addition, three triangles—the preinfundibular, the parasellar, and the internal carotid artery triangle—are introduced. These triangles are defined in order to determine the location where cranial nerves III, IV, V, and VI penetrate the dura with respect to the anterior and posterior clinoid processes and the tuberculum and dorsum sellae. The triangles were found to be symmetrical, with identical bilateral measurements, and the entry points of the cranial nerves were found to be constant. In 17 cases (34%), we found a dehiscence of the sellar diaphragm, and in 15 cases (30%), rope-like adhesions at the pituitary stalk. ImagesFigure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9 PMID:17171029

  16. Intractable Posterior Epistaxis due to a Spontaneous Low-Flow Carotid-Cavernous Sinus Fistula: A Case Report and a Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Giotakis, A.; Kral, F.; Riechelmann, H.; Freund, M.

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a 90-year-old patient with intractable posterior epistaxis presenting as the only symptom of a nontraumatic low-flow carotid-cavernous sinus fistula. Purpose of this case report is to introduce low-flow carotid-cavernous sinus fistula in the differential diagnosis of intractable posterior epistaxis. We provide a literature review for the sequence of actions for the confrontation of posterior epistaxis. We also emphasize the significance of the radiological diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in the management of posterior epistaxis due to pathology of the cavernous sinus. The gold-standard diagnostic procedure of carotid-cavernous sinus fistula is digital subtraction angiography (DSA). DSA with coils is also the state-of-the-art therapy. By failure of DSA, neurosurgery or stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) may be used as alternatives. SRS may also be used as enhancement procedure of the DSA. Considering the prognosis of a successfully closed carotid-cavernous sinus fistula, recanalization occurs only in a minority of patients. Close follow-up is advised. PMID:26839726

  17. Cavernous Sinus Dural Arteriovenous Fistula Patients Presenting With Headache as an Initial Symptom

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, Motohiro; Mori, Kentaro; Tamase, Akira; Kamide, Tomoya; Seki, Syunsuke; Iida, Yu; Kawabata, Yuichi; Nakano, Tatsu; Shima, Hiroshi; Taguchi, Hiroki

    2016-01-01

    Cavernous sinus (CS) dural arteriovenous fistula (dAVF) patients presenting with only headache as an initial symptom are not common. Patients with CS-dAVF commonly present with symptoms related to their eyes. In all three patients, headache was the initial symptom. Other symptoms related to the eyes developed 1 - 7 months after headache. In one patient, headache was controlled by sumatriptan succinate, but not diclofenac sodium or loxoprofen sodium. In another patient, headache was controlled by loxoprofen sodium. In the third patient, headache was improved by stellate ganglion block. In all patients, magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) in the early stage of the clinical course showed abnormal blood flow in the CS. However, reflux to the superior ophthalmic vein (SOV) was not detected. As treatment, transarterial and transvenous embolizations were necessary for one patient, and transvenous embolization was performed for another patient with significant blood flow to the SOV and cortical veins. On the other hand, manual compression of the bilateral carotid arteries at the neck resulted in disappearance of the fistula in the third patient. In all patients, the symptoms improved after the disappearance of blood reflux to the CS. The refluxed blood to the CS might cause elevation of the CS pressure and stimulate the trigeminal nerve in the dural membrane, resulting in headache before developing reflux in an anterior direction. CS-dAVF could induce both migraine and common headache. In cases with blood reflux to the CS on magnetic resonance imaging and/or MRA even without eye symptoms, a differential diagnosis of CS-dAVF should be taken into consideration. PMID:26985257

  18. Long-Term Outcomes of Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Treatment of Cavernous Sinus Meningiomas

    SciTech Connect

    Santos, Marcos Antonio dos; Calvo, Felipe A.; Samblas, Jose; Marsiglia, Hugo

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: Patients with cavernous sinus meningiomas (CSM) have an elevated risk of surgical morbidity and mortality. Recurrence is often observed after partial resection. Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), either alone or combined with surgery, represents an important advance in CSM management, but long-term results are lacking. Methods and Materials: A total of 88 CSM patients, treated from January 1991 to December 2005, were retrospectively reviewed. The mean follow-up was 86.8 months (range, 17.1-179.4 months). Among the patients, 22 were followed for more than 10 years. There was a female predominance (84.1%). The age varied from 16 to 90 years (mean, 51.6). In all, 47 patients (53.4%) received SRS alone, and 41 patients (46.6%) had undergone surgery before SRS. A dose of 14 Gy was prescribed to isodose curves from 50% to 90%. In 25 patients (28.4%), as a result of the proximity to organs at risk, the prescribed dose did not completely cover the target. Results: After SRS, 65 (73.8%) patients presented with tumor volume reduction; 14 (15.9%) remained stable, and 9 (10.2%) had tumor progression. The progression-free survival was 92.5% at 5 years, and 82.5% at 10 years. Age, sex, maximal diameter of the treated tumor, previous surgery, and complete target coverage did not show significant associations with prognosis. Among the 88 treated patients, 17 experienced morbidity that was related to SRS, and 6 of these patients spontaneously recovered. Conclusions: SRS is an effective and safe treatment for CSM, feasible either in the primary or the postsurgical setting. Incomplete coverage of the target did not worsen outcomes. More than 80% of the patients remained free of disease progression during long-term follow-up.

  19. Microsurgical resectability, outcomes, and tumor control in meningiomas occupying the cavernous sinus.

    PubMed

    Nanda, Anil; Thakur, Jai Deep; Sonig, Ashish; Missios, Symeon

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE Cavernous sinus meningiomas (CSMs) represent a cohort of challenging skull base tumors. Proper management requires achieving a balance between optimal resection, restoration of cranial nerve (CN) function, and maintaining or improving quality of life. The objective of this study was to assess the pre-, intra-, and postoperative factors related to clinical and neurological outcomes, morbidity, mortality, and tumor control in patients with CSM. METHODS A retrospective review of a single surgeon's experience with microsurgical removal of CSM in 65 patients between January 1996 and August 2013 was done. Sekhar's classification, modified Kobayashi grading, and the Karnofsky Performance Scale were used to define tumor extension, tumor removal, and clinical outcomes, respectively. RESULTS Preoperative CN dysfunction was evident in 64.6% of patients. CN II deficits were most common. The greatest improvement was seen for CN V deficits, whereas CN II and CN IV deficits showed the smallest degree of recovery. Complete resection was achieved in 41.5% of cases and was not significantly associated with functional CN recovery. Internal carotid artery encasement significantly limited the complete microscopic resection of CSM (p < 0.0001). Overall, 18.5% of patients showed symptomatic recurrence after their initial surgery (mean follow-up 60.8 months [range 3-199 months]). The use of adjuvant stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) after microsurgery independently decreased the recurrence rate (p = 0.009; OR 0.036; 95% CI 0.003-0.430). CONCLUSIONS Modified Kobayashi tumor resection (Grades I-IIIB) was possible in 41.5% of patients. CN recovery and tumor control were independent of extent of tumor removal. The combination of resection and adjuvant SRS can achieve excellent tumor control. Furthermore, the use of adjuvant SRS independently decreases the recurrence rates of CSM. PMID:26745483

  20. Hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for benign intracranial tumours of the cavernous sinus.

    PubMed

    Haghighi, Neda; Seely, Anna; Paul, Eldho; Dally, Michael

    2015-09-01

    We present our experience with hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (HSRT) using 15 fractions to treat benign conditions of the cavernous sinus (CS) and emphasise the outcome in terms of cranial nerve (CN) function and toxicity for long term safety and efficacy. We performed a retrospective review of prospectively collected data on 112 patients with benign tumours of the CS treated with HSRT between 1 January 1998 and 31 December 2009. While all tumours involved the CS, a separate analysis was undertaken for meningiomas and pituitary adenomas. The median follow-up was 77 months (range: 2.3-177). Fifty-seven patients (51%) had a diagnosis of meningioma and 55 (49%) had pituitary adenomas. Prior to HSRT, 82 patients (73%) underwent microsurgery. The median tumour volume was 6.6 cm(3) for meningiomas and 3.4 cm(3) for pituitary adenomas (interquartile range: 2.8-7.9), and the mean prescribed dose was 38 Gy (range: 37.5-40.0) to the tumour margin, delivered in 15 fractions. After HSRT, 57% of all preexisting cranial neuropathies either resolved or improved and 38% remained stable, whereas 5% deteriorated. The diagnosis of meningioma was the only variable associated with recovery of cranial neuropathy (p<0.001). Permanent CN complications occurred in three patients (3%). The 5 and 10 year actuarial freedom from progression for patients with meningiomas was 98% and 93%, respectively, and for patients with pituitary adenomas this was 96% and 96%, respectively. We demonstrate low rates of CN morbidity after HSRT and the possibility of resolution or improvement in CN function for common histologies involving the CS. PMID:26113003

  1. Cavernous Sinus Dural Arteriovenous Fistula Patients Presenting With Headache as an Initial Symptom.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Motohiro; Mori, Kentaro; Tamase, Akira; Kamide, Tomoya; Seki, Syunsuke; Iida, Yu; Kawabata, Yuichi; Nakano, Tatsu; Shima, Hiroshi; Taguchi, Hiroki

    2016-04-01

    Cavernous sinus (CS) dural arteriovenous fistula (dAVF) patients presenting with only headache as an initial symptom are not common. Patients with CS-dAVF commonly present with symptoms related to their eyes. In all three patients, headache was the initial symptom. Other symptoms related to the eyes developed 1 - 7 months after headache. In one patient, headache was controlled by sumatriptan succinate, but not diclofenac sodium or loxoprofen sodium. In another patient, headache was controlled by loxoprofen sodium. In the third patient, headache was improved by stellate ganglion block. In all patients, magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) in the early stage of the clinical course showed abnormal blood flow in the CS. However, reflux to the superior ophthalmic vein (SOV) was not detected. As treatment, transarterial and transvenous embolizations were necessary for one patient, and transvenous embolization was performed for another patient with significant blood flow to the SOV and cortical veins. On the other hand, manual compression of the bilateral carotid arteries at the neck resulted in disappearance of the fistula in the third patient. In all patients, the symptoms improved after the disappearance of blood reflux to the CS. The refluxed blood to the CS might cause elevation of the CS pressure and stimulate the trigeminal nerve in the dural membrane, resulting in headache before developing reflux in an anterior direction. CS-dAVF could induce both migraine and common headache. In cases with blood reflux to the CS on magnetic resonance imaging and/or MRA even without eye symptoms, a differential diagnosis of CS-dAVF should be taken into consideration. PMID:26985257

  2. Arterial spin-labeling imaging at 3-T in dural arteriovenous fistulas of cavernous sinus before and after endovascular treatment.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Shigeyuki; Kiura, Yoshihiro; Okazaki, Takahito; Shinagawa, Katsuhiro; Miyoshi, Hiroyuki; Kurisu, Kaoru

    2012-12-01

    A 72-year-old man presented with chemosis and ophthalmoplegia due to dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVF) of the cavernous sinus (CS). Preoperative arterial spin-labeling (ASL) image showed visible vein in the bilateral superior ophthalmic vein (SOV). Endovascular transvenous embolization of the shunting points of the CS-DAVF was performed, and the postoperative angiogram showed complete obliteration of the CS-DAVF. Postoperative ASL showed no visible vein in the bilateral SOV. ASL in CS-DAVF was proved to have shown retrograde venous drainage from the CS-DAVF by comparing ASL before and after treatment. PMID:23342828

  3. Sphenoid and cavernous sinuses involvement as first site of metastasis from a fallopian tube carcinoma. Case report.

    PubMed

    Merimsky, O; Inbar, M; Groswasser-Reider, I; Neudorfer, M; Chaitchik, S

    1993-12-31

    The occurrence of central nervous system metastases in ovarian cancer patients ranges from 0.88 to 4.5%. Centra nervous system involvement in a fallopian tube carcinoma is extremely rare. A 77-year-old woman with an invasive tubal carcinoma was admitted because of ophthalmoplegia, sparing the lateral rectus muscle of the left eye, a decreased left corneal reflex and hypoesthesia along the distribution of the ophthalmic and maxillary branches of the left trigeminal nerve. CT scan showed a space occupying lesion in the left sphenoid sinus invading the left cavernous sinus and the submucosa of the left lateral wall of the nasopharynx, proven histologically to be a metastasis from her primary cancer. Attention should be paid to the possibility of distant and unusual metastases associated with tubal cancer in order to treat the patients promptly. PMID:8171748

  4. Dural Venous System in the Cavernous Sinus: A Literature Review and Embryological, Functional, and Endovascular Clinical Considerations

    PubMed Central

    MITSUHASHI, Yutaka; HAYASAKI, Koji; KAWAKAMI, Taichiro; NAGATA, Takashi; KANESHIRO, Yuta; UMABA, Ryoko; OHATA, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    The cavernous sinus (CS) is one of the cranial dural venous sinuses. It differs from other dural sinuses due to its many afferent and efferent venous connections with adjacent structures. It is important to know well about its complex venous anatomy to conduct safe and effective endovascular interventions for the CS. Thus, we reviewed previous literatures concerning the morphological and functional venous anatomy and the embryology of the CS. The CS is a complex of venous channels from embryologically different origins. These venous channels have more or less retained their distinct original roles of venous drainage, even after alterations through the embryological developmental process, and can be categorized into three longitudinal venous axes based on their topological and functional features. Venous channels medial to the internal carotid artery “medial venous axis” carry venous drainage from the skull base, chondrocranium and the hypophysis, with no direct participation in cerebral drainage. Venous channels lateral to the cranial nerves “lateral venous axis” are exclusively for cerebral venous drainage. Venous channels between the internal carotid artery and cranial nerves “intermediate venous axis” contribute to all the venous drainage from adjacent structures, directly from the orbit and membranous skull, indirectly through medial and lateral venous axes from the chondrocranium, the hypophysis, and the brain. This concept of longitudinal venous axes in the CS may be useful during endovascular interventions for the CS considering our better understandings of its functions in venous drainage. PMID:27063146

  5. Dural Venous System in the Cavernous Sinus: A Literature Review and Embryological, Functional, and Endovascular Clinical Considerations.

    PubMed

    Mitsuhashi, Yutaka; Hayasaki, Koji; Kawakami, Taichiro; Nagata, Takashi; Kaneshiro, Yuta; Umaba, Ryoko; Ohata, Kenji

    2016-06-15

    The cavernous sinus (CS) is one of the cranial dural venous sinuses. It differs from other dural sinuses due to its many afferent and efferent venous connections with adjacent structures. It is important to know well about its complex venous anatomy to conduct safe and effective endovascular interventions for the CS. Thus, we reviewed previous literatures concerning the morphological and functional venous anatomy and the embryology of the CS. The CS is a complex of venous channels from embryologically different origins. These venous channels have more or less retained their distinct original roles of venous drainage, even after alterations through the embryological developmental process, and can be categorized into three longitudinal venous axes based on their topological and functional features. Venous channels medial to the internal carotid artery "medial venous axis" carry venous drainage from the skull base, chondrocranium and the hypophysis, with no direct participation in cerebral drainage. Venous channels lateral to the cranial nerves "lateral venous axis" are exclusively for cerebral venous drainage. Venous channels between the internal carotid artery and cranial nerves "intermediate venous axis" contribute to all the venous drainage from adjacent structures, directly from the orbit and membranous skull, indirectly through medial and lateral venous axes from the chondrocranium, the hypophysis, and the brain. This concept of longitudinal venous axes in the CS may be useful during endovascular interventions for the CS considering our better understandings of its functions in venous drainage. PMID:27063146

  6. Sinusitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... my acute sinusitis is caused by viruses or bacteria? Acute viral sinusitis is likely if you have ... to tell if my sinusitis is caused by bacteria? Because sinusitis is treated differently based on cause. ...

  7. Sinusitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... you can get from viral sinusitis or allergic rhinitis (inflammation of the nose and sinuses due to ... doctor just in case. Viral sinusitis and allergic rhinitis are more common, but bacterial sinusitis often needs ...

  8. Traumatic carotid-cavernous sinus fistula accompanying abducens nerve (VI) palsy in blowout fractures: missed diagnosis of 'white-eyed shunt'.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin-Woo; Kim, Sun-Jong; Kim, Myung-Rae

    2013-04-01

    We report the case of a 32-year-old woman with bilateral blowout fractures. She presented with diplopia showing impaired abduction of the left eye soon after trauma. No other orbito-ocular signs, such as exophthalmos, ptosis, or chemosis, were found. Orbital reconstruction was performed, but no improvement in her ophthalmoplegia was observed after surgery. A carotid angiography showed that she was suffering from a posteriorly draining carotid-cavernous sinus fistula with isolated abducens nerve palsy. Coil embolization was conducted under the consultation of a neurosurgeon, after which her ophthalmoplegia resolved fully. This is a rare case of posteriorly draining carotid-cavernous sinus fistula without classic orbito-ocular signs, the absence of which may cause diagnostic confusion. PMID:23415244

  9. Lemierre Syndrome Secondary to Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Infection Associated with Cavernous Sinus Thromboses

    PubMed Central

    Stauffer, Craig; Josiah, Anne F.; Fortes, Manuel; Menaker, Jay; Cole, John W.

    2012-01-01

    Background Lemierre’s Syndrome (LS) is a highly aggressive rare disease process with a predilection for young, healthy adolescents. Often beginning with a primary cervicofacial infection, LS rapidly progresses to thrombophlebitis of the cerebral vasculature, metastatic infection, and septicemia. Untreated LS can be rapidly fatal. Thrombus within the cerebral vasculature can have devastating neurological effects. Advances in antibacterial therapy have resulted in a global decline in the incidence of LS, and clinicians may not consider LS early in the disease process. While the mortality of LS has declined, the morbidity associated with the disease has increased, particularly the neurological sequelae. Objectives This report will provide readers with a better understanding of the etiology, clinical presentation, evaluation methods, and appropriate treatment of LS. Case Report We present an atypical case of LS secondary to community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection progressing to bilateral cavernous sinus and ophthalmic vein thromboses with resultant binocular vision loss secondary to optic nerve and retinal ischemia. Conclusion This case highlights the importance of early recognition of LS in the setting of a community-acquired MRSA infection as the unifying condition in a young patient with multiple acute neurologic impairments. PMID:22989693

  10. Ten Triangles around Cavernous Sinus for Surgical Approach, Described by Schematic Diagram and Three Dimensional Models with the Sectioned Images.

    PubMed

    Chung, Beom Sun; Ahn, Young Hwan; Park, Jin Seo

    2016-09-01

    For the surgical approach to lesions around the cavernous sinus (CS), triangular spaces around CS have been devised. However, educational materials for learning the triangles were insufficient. The purpose of this study is to present educational materials about the triangles, consisting of a schematic diagram and 3-dimensional (3D) models with sectioned images. To achieve the purposes, other studies were analyzed to establish new definitions and names of the triangular spaces. Learning materials including schematic diagrams and 3D models with cadaver's sectioned images were manufactured. Our new definition was attested by observing the sectioned images and 3D models. The triangles and the four representative surgical approaches were stereoscopically indicated on the 3D models. All materials of this study were put into Portable Document Format file and were distributed freely at our homepage (anatomy.dongguk.ac.kr/triangles). By using our schematic diagram and the 3D models with sectioned images, ten triangles and the related structures could be understood and observed accurately. We expect that our data will contribute to anatomy education, surgery training, and radiologic understanding of the triangles and related structures. PMID:27510391

  11. Preoperative Lateralization Modalities for Cushing Disease: Is Dynamic Magnetic Resonance Imaging or Cavernous Sinus Sampling More Predictive of Intraoperative Findings?

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hai; Yedinak, Chris; Ozpinar, Alp; Anderson, Jim; Dogan, Aclan; Delashaw, Johnny; Fleseriu, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Objective To analyze whether cavernous sinus sampling (CSS) and dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) are consistent with intraoperative findings in Cushing disease (CD) patients. Design Retrospective outcomes study. Setting Oregon Health & Science University; 2006 and 2013. Participants A total of 37 CD patients with preoperative dMRI and CSS to confirm central adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) hypersecretion. Patients were 78% female; mean age was 41 years (at diagnosis), and all had a minimum of 6 months of follow-up. Main Outcome Measures Correlations among patient characteristics, dMRI measurements, CSS results, and intraoperative findings. Results All CSS indicated presence of CD. Eight of 37 patients had no identifiable tumor on dMRI. Three of 37 patients had no tumor at surgery. dMRI tumor size was inversely correlated with age (rs = − 0.4; p = 0.01) and directly correlated to intraoperative lateralization (rs = 0.3; p < 0.05). Preoperative dMRI was directly correlated to intraoperative lateralization (rs = 0.5; p < 0.002). CSS lateralization showed no correlation with intraoperative findings (rs = 0.145; p = 0.40) or lateralization observed on preoperative dMRI (rs = 0.17; p = 0.29). Postoperative remission rate was 68%. Conclusion dMRI localization was most consistent with intraoperative findings; CSS results were less reliable. Results suggest that small ACTH-secreting tumors continue to pose a challenge to reliable preoperative localization. PMID:26225305

  12. Changes in melatonin synthesis parameters after carbon monoxide concentration increase in the cavernous sinus.

    PubMed

    Romerowicz-Misielak, M; Oren, D A; Sowa-Kucma, M; Tabecka-Lonczynska, A; Gilun, P; Stefanczyk-Krzymowska, S; Koziorowski, M

    2015-08-01

    Previous studies indicate that the gaseous messenger carbon monoxide (CO) is released from the eye into the ophthalmic venous blood depending on the intensity of sunlight. This study was designed to determine whether the increased concentration of CO in ophthalmic venous blood affects the synthesis of melatonin and therefore, whether CO released from the eye under normal lighting conditions can be a carrier of light intensity information. Thirty six mature male wild boar and pig crossbreeds (n = 36) were studied. We measured the difference in the scotophase melatonin pathway response in terms of mean concentration of increased melatonin levels after 48 hours infusion of autologous blood plasma with an experimentally induced approximately 3-fold increase in the concentration of CO into the ophthalmic venous sinus. We demonstrated in this crossbreed a marked variation in the duration and amplitude of nocturnal melatonin peak in response to increased concentration of CO in ophthalmic venous blood. During the winter this treatment limited the nocturnal melatonin rise. During the summer this same experimental treatment enhanced the nocturnal melatonin rise. Changes in melatonin levels were always associated with parallel changes in AANAT protein levels. This work demonstrates that non-physiological changes in CO concentration in ophthalmic venous blood can have an acute impact on the systemic melatonin level. These results support humoral phototransduction as a mechanism for some of bright light's effects in animal chronobiology and treatment of winter seasonal affective disorder. PMID:26348075

  13. Lemierre syndrome complicated by cavernous sinus thrombosis, the development of subdural empyemas, and internal carotid artery narrowing without cerebral infarction. Case report.

    PubMed

    Westhout, Franklin; Hasso, Anton; Jalili, Mehrdad; Afghani, Behnoosh; Armstrong, William; Nwagwu, Chiedozie; Ackerman, Laurie L

    2007-01-01

    Lemierre syndrome is an extremely rare complication of mild-to-moderate pharyngeal infections. The authors present an unusual case of Lemierre syndrome in a 16-year-old boy with cavernous sinus thrombosis and right internal carotid artery narrowing without neurological sequelae, right subdural empyema, and cerebritis in the right temporal and occipital lobes. Neuroimaging also demonstrated right jugular vein thrombosis. Cultures of samples from the blood proved positive for the presence of Fusobacterium necrophorum. The patient underwent unilateral tonsillectomy, drainage of the peritonsillar abscess, and a myringotomy on the right side. Postoperatively the patient was treated conservatively with antibiotic therapy resulting in an excellent outcome. PMID:17233314

  14. Sinusitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... will develop sinusitis: Allergic rhinitis or hay fever Cystic fibrosis Going to day care Diseases that prevent the ... Nasal culture Nasal cytology Sweat chloride tests for cystic fibrosis Treatment SELF CARE Try the following steps to ...

  15. Intraprocedural Angiographic CT as a Valuable Tool in the Course of Endovascular Treatment of Direct Sinus Cavernous Fistulas

    PubMed Central

    Gölitz, P.; Struffert, T.; Arc Saake, M.; Knossalla, F.; Doerfler, A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary This investigation aimed to demonstrate the potential of intraprocedural angiographic CT in monitoring complex endovascular coil embolization of direct carotid cavernous fistulas. Angiographic CT was performed as a dual rotational 5 s run with intraarterial contrast medium injection in two patients during endovascular coil embolization of direct carotid cavernous fistulas. Intraprocedural angiographic CT was considered helpful if conventional 2D series were not conclusive concerning coil position or if a precise delineation of the parent artery was impossible due to a complex anatomy or overlying coil material. During postprocessing multiplanar reformatted and dual volume images of angiographic CT were reconstructed. Angiographic CT turned out to be superior in the intraprocedural visualization of accidental coil migration into the parent artery where conventional 2D-DSA series failed to reliably detect coil protrusion. The delineation of coil protrusion by angiographic CT allowed immediate correct coil repositioning to prevent parent artery compromising. Angiographic CT can function as a valuable intraprocedurally feasible tool during complex coil embolizations of direct carotid cavernous fistulas. It allows the precise visualization of the cerebral vasculature and any accidental coil protrusion can be determined accurately in cases where conventional 2D-DSA series are unclear or compromised. Thus angiographic CT might contribute substantially to reduce procedural complications and to increase safety in the management of endovascular treatment of direct carotid cavernous fistulas. PMID:22958773

  16. Sinusitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the brow area Ethmoid sinuses—just behind the bridge of the nose, between the eyes Maxillary sinuses—inside each cheekbone Sphenoid sinuses—behind the ethmoids in the upper region of the nose and behind the eyes There are two basic types of sinusitis: Acute, which lasts up to 4 ...

  17. Unilateral Direct Carotid Cavernous Fistula Causing Bilateral Ocular Manifestation

    PubMed Central

    Demartini Jr., Zeferino; Liebert, Fernando; Gatto, Luana Antunes Maranha; Jung, Thiago Simiano; Rocha Jr., Carlos; Santos, Alex Marques Borges; Koppe, Gelson Luis

    2015-01-01

    Unilateral carotid cavernous fistula presents with ipsilateral ocular findings. Bilateral presentation is only seen in bilateral fistulas, usually associated with indirect (dural) carotid cavernous fistulas. Direct carotid cavernous fistulas are an abnormal communication between the internal carotid artery and the cavernous sinus. They typically begin with a traumatic disruption in the artery wall into the cavernous sinus, presenting with a classic triad of unilateral pulsatile exophthalmos, cranial bruit and episcleral venous engorgement. We report the case of a 38-year-old male with traumatic right carotid cavernous sinus fistula and bilateral ocular presentation successfully treated by interventional neuroradiology. PMID:26955353

  18. Limestone Caverns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Richard L.

    1970-01-01

    Describes the origin of limestone caverns, using Mammoth Cave as an example, with particular reference to the importance of groundwater information of caverns, the present condition of groundwater, and how caverns develop within fluctuating groundwater zones. (BR)

  19. Fractionated Conformal Radiotherapy in the Management of Cavernous Sinus Meningiomas: Long-Term Functional Outcome and Tumor Control at a Single Institution

    SciTech Connect

    Metellus, Philippe; Batra, Sachin; Karkar, Siddharth; Kapoor, Sumit; Weiss, Stephanie; Kleinberg, Lawrence; Rigamonti, Danielle

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate long-term outcome of cavernous sinus meningioma (CSM) treated with fractionated conformal radiotherapy (FCR). Patients and Methods: Fifty-three patients with CSMs (16 men [30.2%], 37 women [69.8%], aged 53 {+-} 13.0 years [mean {+-} SD]) were treated by FCR. In 28 patients (52.8%) FCR was performed as first-line treatment and in 25 patients (47.2%) as adjuvant treatment. All patients received FCR with a dose of 52.9 {+-} 1.8 Gy in 29.4 {+-} 1.0 fractions over 6 weeks. Dose per fraction was 1.9 {+-} 0.1 Gy. Radiotherapy was delivered stereotactically in 47 cases (88.7%) and conformally in 6 (11.3%) Results: The median follow-up was 6.9 years (range, 3-19 years). According to Sekhar's classification, 19 patients (35.8%) were Grade 1-2, 30 patients (56.6%) were Grade 3-4, and 4 patients (7.6%) were Grade 5. Pretreatment tumor volume was determined in 46 patients, and tumor volume was 12.6 {+-} 8.2 cm{sup 3}. In these patients, the distance between tumor and optic apparatus was 1.62 {+-} 1.2 mm. Actuarial 5- and 10-year progression-free survival rates were 98.1% and 95.8%, respectively. Clinical improvement was observed in 31 patients (58.5%), and 20 patients (37.7%) remained unchanged. Radiologic response was observed in 18 patients (30.2%), and 35 patients (66.0%) showed stable lesions. Two patients (3.8%) showed tumor progression during follow-up. Transient morbidity was observed in 3 patients (5.7%) and permanent morbidity in 1 (1.9%). Conclusion: Fractionated conformal radiotherapy affords satisfactory long-term tumor control and low treatment morbidity.

  20. Microanatomical study of the extradural middle fossa approach to the petroclival and posterior cavernous sinus region: description of the rhomboid construct.

    PubMed

    Day, J D; Fukushima, T; Giannotta, S L

    1994-06-01

    The extradural middle fossa transpetrosal approach has been used to access lesions of the petroclival and posterior cavernous sinus regions by several neurosurgical groups, including our own. This is a technically demanding approach that provides a relatively wide extradural corridor interposed between the 5th cranial nerve and the cranial nerve VII-VIII complex, which minimizes brain retraction. We performed a microanatomical study to determine the limits of this exposure and in particular how the removal of the petrous bone could be maximized through this approach. Dissection of 15 fixed human cadaveric heads and 8 isolated temporal bones was performed to yield 38 sides studied. We identified a rhomboid-shaped construct of middle fossa landmarks that serve as a guide to maximally removing the petrous apex. The points defining this construct are as follows: 1) the junction of the greater superficial petrosal nerve and the trigeminal nerve; 2) the lateral edge of the porus trigeminus; 3) the intersection of the petrous ridge and arcuate eminence; and 4) the intersection of the lines extended along the axes of the greater superficial petrosal nerve and arcuate eminence. A morphometric analysis determined the average lengths of the respective sides of the complex to be 13.2 mm +/- 2.6 x 22.2 mm +/- 2.8 x 16.4 mm +/- 3.4 x 16.6 mm +/- 1.5 (beginning at "1" and proceeding sequentially), with an approximate area of the construct equal to 2.9 square centimeters.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8084385

  1. [Trigeminal-cavernous fistula. Report of a case and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Santos Franco, Jorge; Sánchez Olivera, Carlos; Saavedra Andrade, Rafael; Sandoval Balanzario, Miguel Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Persistent primitive trigeminal artery is a rare anatomical variant resulting from the absence of obliteration of the embryonic trigeminal artery. The shunt between the persistent primitive trigeminal artery and the cavernous sinus is called trigeminal-cavernous fistula. We report the case of a woman with a trigeminal-cavernous fistula secondary to head trauma who was treated by transarterial embolization. PMID:24108341

  2. Spontaneous closure of posttraumatic high-flow carotid-cavernous fistula following cerebral angiography

    PubMed Central

    Meena, Ugan Singh; Gupta, Pankaj; Shrivastava, Trilochan; Purohit, Devendra

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic carotid-cavernous fistula (TCCF) is a direct communication between cavernous portion of the internal carotid artery (ICA) and cavernous sinus due to tear in ICA. Most of the cases are treated by endovascular embolization. Spontaneous resolution of high-flow TCCFs is extremely rare. We report a case of posttraumatic, direct, high-flow carotid cavernous fistula (Barrow type A) that resolved spontaneously after cerebral angiography. PMID:27057229

  3. Spontaneous closure of posttraumatic high-flow carotid-cavernous fistula following cerebral angiography.

    PubMed

    Meena, Ugan Singh; Gupta, Pankaj; Shrivastava, Trilochan; Purohit, Devendra

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic carotid-cavernous fistula (TCCF) is a direct communication between cavernous portion of the internal carotid artery (ICA) and cavernous sinus due to tear in ICA. Most of the cases are treated by endovascular embolization. Spontaneous resolution of high-flow TCCFs is extremely rare. We report a case of posttraumatic, direct, high-flow carotid cavernous fistula (Barrow type A) that resolved spontaneously after cerebral angiography. PMID:27057229

  4. Changes in gonadotropin-releasing hormone and gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor gene expression after an increase in carbon monoxide concentration in the cavernous sinus of male wild boar and pig crossbread.

    PubMed

    Romerowicz-Misielak, M; Tabecka-Lonczynska, A; Koziol, K; Gilun, P; Stefanczyk-Krzymowska, S; Och, W; Koziorowski, M

    2016-06-01

    Previous studies indicate that there are at least a few regulatory systems involved in photoperiodic synchronisation of reproductive activity, which starts with the retina and ends at the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) pulse generator. Recently we have shown indicated that the amount of carbon monoxide (CO) released from the eye into the ophthalmic venous blood depends on the intensity of sunlight. The aim of this study was to test whether changes in the concentration of carbon monoxide in the ophthalmic venous blood may modulate reproductive activity, as measured by changes in GnRH and GnRH receptor gene expression. The animal model used was mature male swine crossbred from wild boars and domestic sows (n = 48). We conducted in vivo experiments to determine the effect of increased CO concentrations in the cavernous sinus of the mammalian perihypophyseal vascular complex on gene expression of GnRH and GnRH receptors as well as serum luteinizing hormone (LH) levels. The experiments were performed during long photoperiod days near the summer solstice (second half of June) and short photoperiod days near the winter solstice (second half of December). These crossbred swine demonstrated a seasonally-dependent marked variation in GnRH and GnRH receptor gene expression and systemic LH levels in response to changes in CO concentration in ophthalmic venous blood. These results seem to confirm the hypothesis of humoral phototransduction as a mechanism for some of bright light's effects in animal chronobiology and the effect of CO on GnRH and GnRH receptor gene expression. PMID:27512004

  5. Indocyanine Green Fluorescence Endoscopy at Endonasal Transsphenoidal Surgery for an Intracavernous Sinus Dermoid Cyst: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    HIDE, Takuichiro; YANO, Shigetoshi; KURATSU, Jun-ichi

    2014-01-01

    The complete resection of intracavernous sinus dermoid cysts is very difficult due to tumor tissue adherence to important anatomical structures such as the internal carotid artery (ICA), cavernous sinus, and cranial nerves. As residual dermoid cyst tissue sometimes induces symptoms and repeat surgery may be required after cyst recurrence, minimal invasiveness is an important consideration when selecting the surgical approach to the lesion. We addressed a recurrent intracavernous sinus dermoid cyst by the endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach assisted by neuronavigation and indocyanine green (ICG) endoscopy to confirm the ICA and patency of the cavernous sinus. The ICG endoscope detected the fluorescence signal from the ICA and cavernous sinus; its intensity changed with the passage of time. The ICG endoscope was very useful for real-time imaging, and its high spatial resolution facilitated the detection of the ICA and the patent cavernous sinus. We found it to be of great value for successful endonasal transsphenoidal surgery. PMID:25446381

  6. Sinus Anatomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... ARS HOME ANATOMY Nasal Anatomy Sinus Anatomy Nasal Physiology Nasal Endoscopy Skull Base Anatomy Virtual Anatomy Disclosure ... ANATOMY > Sinus Anatomy Nasal Anatomy Sinus Anatomy Nasal Physiology Nasal Endoscopy Skull Base Anatomy Virtual Anatomy Disclosure ...

  7. Acute abducens nerve palsy as a presenting feature in carotid-cavernous fistula in a 6-year-old girl

    PubMed Central

    Pawar, Neelam; Ramakrishanan, R.; Maheshwari, Devendra; Ravindran, Meenakshi

    2013-01-01

    Carotid-cavernous fistulas (CCF) are abnormal communications between the internal carotid artery and the cavernous sinus. Traumatic carotid-cavernous fistulae are rare potential complications of craniofacial trauma. Typical findings of CCF are proptosis, chemosis, headache, oculomotor or abducens nerve palsy, trigeminal pain and pulsating bruit over the temporal skull and the bulb. CCF are reported very rarely in childhood. This report describes the clinical and radiological findings of a pediatric patient presented with CCF.

  8. Septic cerebral venous sinus thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Ismail A; Wasay, Mohammad

    2016-03-15

    Septic cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, once a common and deadly disease, has fortunately become rare now. Not only that the incidence has fallen significantly after the antibiotic era, the morbidity and mortality has also decreased substantially. Cavernous sinus thrombosis is by far the commonest form of septic cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. Due to its rare occurrence, a lot of current generation clinicians have not encountered the entity in person. Despite all the advances in diagnostic modalities, a high index of clinical suspicion remains the mainstay in prompt diagnosis and management of this potentially lethal condition. Keeping this in view, the authors have reviewed the subject including the old literature and have summarized the current approach to diagnosis and management. Septic cavernous thrombosis is a fulminant disease with dramatic presentation in most cases comprised of fever, periorbital pain and swelling, associated with systemic symptoms and signs. The preceding infection is usually in the central face or paranasal sinuses. The disease rapidly spreads to contralateral side and if remains undiagnosed and untreated can result in severe complications or even death. Prompt diagnosis using radiological imaging in suspected patient, early use of broad spectrum antibiotics, and judicial use of anticoagulation may save the life and prevent disability. Surgery is used only to treat the nidus of infection. PMID:26944152

  9. Sinus Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tumors Nasal Deformities Choanal Atresia Epiphora (Excessive Tearing) Disclosure Statement Printer Friendly Sinus Tumors Abtin Tabaee, MD Introduction Tumors of the nose and paranasal sinuses are rare, accounting for fewer than 1% of all tumors. These ...

  10. Adult Sinusitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hay Fever) Headaches and Sinus Disease Disorders of Smell & Taste Upper Respiratory Infections Nasal Congestion & Snoring CSF ... Hay Fever) Headaches and Sinus Disease Disorders of Smell & Taste Upper Respiratory Infections Nasal Congestion & Snoring CSF ...

  11. Sinusitis: Overview

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Sinusitis Overview What are sinuses? Sinuses are the air chambers in the bone behind your cheeks, eyebrows and jaw. They make mucus, a fluid that cleans bacteria and other particles out of the air you breathe. Tiny hairs called cilia (say: “sill-ee-ah”) sweep mucus out of your ...

  12. Pediatric Sinusitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... scan may help to determine how completely your child's sinuses are developed, where any blockage has occurred, and confirm the diagnosis of sinusitis. The doctor may look for factors that make your child more likely to get sinus infection, including structural ...

  13. Giant cavernous carotid artery aneurysm mimicking a fungal granuloma and presenting with massive epistaxis

    PubMed Central

    Roopesh Kumar, V R; Madhugiri, Venkatesh S; Sasidharan, Gopalakrishnan M; Gundamaneni, Sudheer K

    2012-01-01

    A 42-year-old man presented with frequent minor nasal bleeds since 1 month. He was undergoing chemotherapy for pulmonary tuberculosis. MRI brain revealed a space occupying lesion in the right cavernous sinus extending to sphenoid sinus, with T2 inversion. An initial diagnosis of fungal granuloma was made and endoscopic trans-nasal biopsy was attempted. During surgery, a pink pulsating mass was seen in the sphenoid sinus and the procedure was abandoned. A cerebral CT-angiography done subsequently revealed a giant right cavernous segment internal carotid artery (ICA) aneurysm. He was then referred to our centre and upon admission he collapsed secondary to a major bout of epistaxis. An emergency cervical carotid artery ligation resulted in transient control of epistaxis. Owing to recurrence of bleed, trapping of the aneurysm was done resulting in cure. The present case shows that a giant cavernous ICA aneurysm can occasionally be erroneously diagnosed as fungal granuloma. PMID:23010464

  14. About Cavernous Angioma

    MedlinePlus

    ... and School CCM3 Mutation Resources Our Videos Angioma Alliance Night at the Cincinnati Reds Cavernous Angioma and Children Dr. Issam Awad at the Angioma Alliance Family Conference info@AngiomaAlliance.org | © Angioma Alliance | Disclaimer | ...

  15. Jejunal cavernous lymphangioma

    PubMed Central

    Morris-Stiff, Gareth; Falk, Gavin A; El-Hayek, Kevin; Vargo, John; Bronner, Mary; Vogt, David P

    2011-01-01

    Cavernous lymphangiomas are usually identified in infants and children with the majority of lesions found around the head and neck, trunk or extremities. Tumours affecting the intra-abdominal organs are rare. The authors report a case of small bowel cavernous lymphangioma arising within the jejunum of a 34-year-old woman presenting with dyspnoea and anaemia, and review the existing literature relating to this uncommon tumour. PMID:22696733

  16. Posttraumatic carotid-cavernous fistula: Pathogenetic mechanisms, diagnostic management and proper treatment. A case report

    PubMed Central

    Marín-Fernández, Ana-Belén; Román-Ramos, María; Fernandez-Solis, José; Martínez-Lara, Ildefonso

    2016-01-01

    Carotid-cavernous fistulas are an uncommon diseases characterized by abnormal communications between arteries and veins located in the cavernous sinus. According with Barrow´s classification they could be divided in two groups: direct and indirect. The typical symptoms showed by theses pathologies are: pulsating exophthalmos and orbital blow. The present study describes a case of direct posttraumatic carotid-cavernous fistula in a 26 years old man. Furthermore, we present the images that we used to make the diagnosis. In this light, we decided to treat this case with endovascular approach after considering several therapeutic options. The aim of the present report is twofold. First, we examine the importance of the proper management of the direct posttraumatic carotid-cavernous fistula. Second, we describe this rare syndrome with the goal of proposing suitable treatments. Key words:Carotid cavernous fistulas, pulsating exophthalmos, orbital blow, endovascular approach, Barrow´s classification. PMID:27034767

  17. Spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage due to ruptured cavernous internal carotid artery aneurysm after medical prolactinoma treatment.

    PubMed

    Khalsa, Siri Sahib; Hollon, Todd C; Shastri, Ravi; Trobe, Jonathan D; Gemmete, Joseph J; Pandey, Aditya S

    2016-01-01

    Aneurysms of the cavernous segment of the internal carotid artery (ICA) are believed to have a low risk of subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH), given the confines of the dural rings and the anterior clinoid process. The risk may be greater when the bony and dural protection has been eroded. We report a case of spontaneous SAH from rupture of a cavernous ICA aneurysm in a patient whose large prolactinoma had markedly decreased in size as the result of cabergoline treatment. After passing a balloon test occlusion, the patient underwent successful endovascular vessel deconstruction. This case suggests that an eroding skull base lesion may distort normal anterior cranial base anatomy and allow communication between the cavernous ICA and subarachnoid space. The potential for SAH due to cavernous ICA aneurysm rupture should be recognised in patients with previous pituitary or other skull base lesions adjacent to the cavernous sinus. PMID:27277584

  18. Abducens Nerve Palsy and Ipsilateral Horner Syndrome in a Patient With Carotid-Cavernous Fistula.

    PubMed

    Kal, Ali; Ercan, Zeynep E; Duman, Enes; Arpaci, Enver

    2015-10-01

    The combination of abducens nerve palsy and ipsilateral Horner syndrome was first described by Parkinson and considered as a localizing sign of posterior cavernous sinus lesions. The authors present a case with right abducens nerve palsy with ipsilateral Horner syndrome in a patient with carotid-cavernous fistula because of head trauma. The patient was referred to the ophthalmology clinic with diplopia complaint after suffering a head trauma during a motorcycle accident. Cerebral angiography showed low-flow carotid-cavernous fistula. PMID:26468854

  19. Sinus pericranii.

    PubMed

    Jones, Tammy L

    2012-01-01

    Sinus pericranii is a rare anomaly that occurs when there is communication between the intracranial and extracranial venous systems. Accurate diagnosis is complicated because several other cranial masses can mimic sinus pericranii. Clinical, laboratory, and imaging assessments are all essential for identifying the anomaly. This article examines the comparative advantages of various diagnostic imaging modalities, current imaging techniques, and typical findings associated with sinus pericranii. Treatment and management options also are discussed. PMID:22461344

  20. Gas intrusion into SPR caverns

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkebein, T.E.; Bauer, S.J.; Ehgartner, B.L.; Linn, J.K.; Neal, J.T.; Todd, J.L.; Kuhlman, P.S.; Gniady, C.T.; Giles, H.N.

    1995-12-01

    The conditions and occurrence of gas in crude oil stored in Strategic Petroleum Reserve, SPR, caverns is characterized in this report. Many caverns in the SPR show that gas has intruded into the oil from the surrounding salt dome. Historical evidence and the analyses presented here suggest that gas will continue to intrude into many SPR caverns in the future. In considering why only some caverns contain gas, it is concluded that the naturally occurring spatial variability in salt permeability can explain the range of gas content measured in SPR caverns. Further, it is not possible to make a one-to-one correlation between specific geologic phenomena and the occurrence of gas in salt caverns. However, gas is concluded to be petrogenic in origin. Consequently, attempts have been made to associate the occurrence of gas with salt inhomogeneities including anomalies and other structural features. Two scenarios for actual gas intrusion into caverns were investigated for consistency with existing information. These scenarios are gas release during leaching and gas permeation through salt. Of these mechanisms, the greater consistency comes from the belief that gas permeates to caverns through the salt. A review of historical operating data for five Bryan Mound caverns loosely supports the hypothesis that higher operating pressures reduce gas intrusion into caverns. This conclusion supports a permeability intrusion mechanism. Further, it provides justification for operating the caverns near maximum operating pressure to minimize gas intrusion. Historical gas intrusion rates and estimates of future gas intrusion are given for all caverns.

  1. Hemangioma of the Maxillary Sinus Presenting as a Mass: CT and MR Features

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Won Sang; Yoo, Chang Young; Park, Yong-Jin; Ihn, Yon Kwon

    2015-01-01

    Hemangiomas of the sinonasal tract are rare, and because these lesions lack the typical signs or symptoms, they can be confused with other malignant conditions. We report a case of cavernous hemangioma of the maxillary sinus in a 68-year-old man that was completely resected by endoscopic sinus surgery. Although computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed several enhancing areas within the tumor, the substantial bone erosion and remodeling made it difficult to differentiate this cavernous hemangioma from other expansile maxillary sinus lesions. We present the CT and MR findings of this lesion and discuss the differential diagnoses and potential therapeutic approaches. PMID:25901262

  2. Post-Traumatic Cavernous Fistula Fed by Persistent Trigeminal Artery: Treatment by GDC Embolisation

    PubMed Central

    Deol, P.S.; Mishra, N.K.; Gupta, V.; Gaikwad, S.B.; Garg, A.; Singh, N.

    2001-01-01

    Summary A case of traumatic persistent primitive trigeminal artery (PPTA) cavernous sinus fistula treated with GDC embolisation is reported. Because of the small lumen of PPTA, posteriorly directed course and flow contribution from the posterior circulation, balloon embolisation via the carotid system was not considered appropriate. The fistula was successfully closed by GDC embolisation. PMID:20663331

  3. Cavernous Angioma and Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... neurologist to see if there might be an alternative medication. Children with even mild muscle weakness or decreased coordination resulting from a cavernous malformation bleed often have reduced physical stamina. It simply requires more energy to use legs that feel heavy or that ...

  4. Sinus aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    De Foer, C; Fossion, E; Vaillant, J M

    1990-01-01

    The prevalence of Aspergillus sinusitis is often underestimated because the vast majority of cases are classified as "unspecified sinusitis". Two possible aetio-pathogenic mechanisms can be involved in the development of this fungal infection. Traditionally, the literature emphasised the "anglophone" hypothesis which is based on the inhalation of spores. More recently, the "french" model, based on oro-sinusal fistula and/or the perforation of the maxillary sinus by root canal-filling material, is believed to explain the majority of cases in our industrialised environments. Still, neither model explains the totality of cases and several remain beyond comprehension. The disease most commonly presents as a chronic bacterial sinusitis. The process can however become invasive, thus resembling malignancy, with eventually a fatal outcome. Doctors and dentists should know the possible danger, presented by zinc-oxide-eugenol-paste in the sinus. Radical surgery is the treatment of choice, since a prolonged conservative approach (antibiotics, corticosteroids) can only worsen the prognosis. This paper discusses different aspects of the disease, and presents 10 cases, observed at the University Hospitals of Paris (France) and Leuven (Belgium). PMID:2406288

  5. Diagnosis and management of trigemino-cavernous fistulas: case reports and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Miller, Timothy R; Jindal, Gaurav; Mohan, Suyash; Fortes, Manuel; Hurst, Robert; Pukenas, Bryan; Gandhi, Dheeraj

    2015-01-01

    Although usually asymptomatic, a persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) can rarely be associated with a direct fistula to the cavernous sinus (ie, trigemino-cavernous fistula). We present three patients with trigemino-cavernous fistulas; two were subsequently treated using modern endovascular techniques while the third initially declined therapy. We then review the literature of reported cases of this unusual entity. The aberrant anatomy associated with a PTA presents unique challenges to the management of these lesions, and must be well delineated prior to treatment. Finally, conservative management of trigemino-cavernous fistulas, either de novo or recurrent, may be considered if they demonstrate no evidence of cortical venous reflux and patient symptoms are tolerable. PMID:24394154

  6. Sinus CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - sinus; Computed axial tomography scan - sinus; Computed tomography scan - sinus; CT scan - sinus ... 2014:chap 67. Shaw AS, Dixon AK. Multidetector computed tomography. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, eds. Grainger & Allison's ...

  7. Glaucoma Management in Carotid Cavernous Fistula

    PubMed Central

    Calafiore, Silvia; Perdicchi, Andrea; Scuderi, Gianluca; Contestabile, Maria Teresa; Abdolrahimzadeh, Solmaz; Recupero, Santi Maria

    2016-01-01

    Carotid cavernous fistulas (CCF) are vascular communications between the carotid artery and the cavernous sinus. Ophthalmologists are called to diagnose and manage the condition in cases that present with ocular features. A 73-year-old female was referred to our glaucoma center clinic. Eight years before, she had started receiving medication for glaucoma and had undergone laser iridotomy, but a satisfactory management of intraocular pressure (IOP) had not been achieved. The patient was complaining of intermittent diplopia, bilateral proptosis, and conjunctival chemosis over the past 6 months. Best-corrected visual acuity in the right (OD) and left eye (OS) was 9/10 and 10/10, respectively. Visual field testing showed slight paracentral field defects mostly in OS. IOP was 20 mm Hg in OD and 34 mm Hg in OS. We referred the patient to neuroradiology, and MRI angiography revealed a CCF with angiographic classification of Cognard grade 2. Closure of the CCF by transarterial embolization was performed in the neuroradiology department. One week following the procedure, the clinical signs of diplopia, proptosis, and conjunctival chemosis had greatly improved, and IOP was reduced to 12 mm Hg OD and 19 mm Hg in OS. Glaucoma treatment was maintained with topical brimatoprost, brinzolamide, and timolol. Owing to the risk of vision loss associated with vascular stasis, retinal ischemia, and high IOP, ophthalmologists must be aware of the clinical features of CCF and should request appropriate imaging studies such as MRI angiography in order to confirm the diagnosis and plan multidisciplinary treatment. PMID:27462258

  8. Glaucoma Management in Carotid Cavernous Fistula.

    PubMed

    Calafiore, Silvia; Perdicchi, Andrea; Scuderi, Gianluca; Contestabile, Maria Teresa; Abdolrahimzadeh, Solmaz; Recupero, Santi Maria

    2016-01-01

    Carotid cavernous fistulas (CCF) are vascular communications between the carotid artery and the cavernous sinus. Ophthalmologists are called to diagnose and manage the condition in cases that present with ocular features. A 73-year-old female was referred to our glaucoma center clinic. Eight years before, she had started receiving medication for glaucoma and had undergone laser iridotomy, but a satisfactory management of intraocular pressure (IOP) had not been achieved. The patient was complaining of intermittent diplopia, bilateral proptosis, and conjunctival chemosis over the past 6 months. Best-corrected visual acuity in the right (OD) and left eye (OS) was 9/10 and 10/10, respectively. Visual field testing showed slight paracentral field defects mostly in OS. IOP was 20 mm Hg in OD and 34 mm Hg in OS. We referred the patient to neuroradiology, and MRI angiography revealed a CCF with angiographic classification of Cognard grade 2. Closure of the CCF by transarterial embolization was performed in the neuroradiology department. One week following the procedure, the clinical signs of diplopia, proptosis, and conjunctival chemosis had greatly improved, and IOP was reduced to 12 mm Hg OD and 19 mm Hg in OS. Glaucoma treatment was maintained with topical brimatoprost, brinzolamide, and timolol. Owing to the risk of vision loss associated with vascular stasis, retinal ischemia, and high IOP, ophthalmologists must be aware of the clinical features of CCF and should request appropriate imaging studies such as MRI angiography in order to confirm the diagnosis and plan multidisciplinary treatment. PMID:27462258

  9. Worsening angle closure glaucoma and choroidal detachments subsequent to closure of a carotid cavernous fistula

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Carotid cavernous fistulas are abnormal communications between the cavernous sinus and the external or internal carotid arteries. Although rare, closure of carotid cavernous fistulas can lead to immediate ocular complications. To our knowledge, our case represents the first report of worsening angle closure glaucoma and choroidal detachments over an extended period of two months subsequent to closure of a carotid cavernous fistula. Case presentation A 70-year-old female with a history of primary angle closure glaucoma presented with 4 mm of proptosis, resistance to retropulsion, tortuous corkscrew blood vessels and an orbital bruit of the right eye. Diagnostic cerebral angiogram showed a small indirect Barrow type D right carotid cavernous fistula. Transarterial embolization was planned but repeat cerebral angiography prior to the procedure demonstrated spontaneous partial closure of the carotid cavernous fistula and the procedure was aborted. One month later, our patient was noted to have worsening vision and choroidal detachments of the right eye. She declined further testing and was thus started on self-administered manual carotid jugular compressions. One month later, she developed progressive worsening of her choroidal detachments and angle closure. She eventually opted for surgical intervention but repeat cerebral angiography showed significant thrombosis of the carotid cavernous fistula and no intervention was warranted. Examination two months later showed complete resolution of the choroidal detachments and open angles of both eyes. Conclusions Our patient demonstrated worsening angle closure glaucoma and choroidal detachments after spontaneous closure of her carotid cavernous fistula had been noted. Ocular complications, including acute angle closure, have been reported to occur immediately after closure of carotid cavernous fistulas, but not over months as in our patient. It is imperative that individuals who have undergone apparent closure

  10. Manufactured caverns in carbonate rock

    DOEpatents

    Bruce, David A.; Falta, Ronald W.; Castle, James W.; Murdoch, Lawrence C.

    2007-01-02

    Disclosed is a process for manufacturing underground caverns suitable in one embodiment for storage of large volumes of gaseous or liquid materials. The method is an acid dissolution process that can be utilized to form caverns in carbonate rock formations. The caverns can be used to store large quantities of materials near transportation facilities or destination markets. The caverns can be used for storage of materials including fossil fuels, such as natural gas, refined products formed from fossil fuels, or waste materials, such as hazardous waste materials. The caverns can also be utilized for applications involving human access such as recreation or research. The method can also be utilized to form calcium chloride as a by-product of the cavern formation process.

  11. 3-D Cavern Enlargement Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    EHGARTNER, BRIAN L.; SOBOLIK, STEVEN R.

    2002-03-01

    Three-dimensional finite element analyses simulate the mechanical response of enlarging existing caverns at the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). The caverns are located in Gulf Coast salt domes and are enlarged by leaching during oil drawdowns as fresh water is injected to displace the crude oil from the caverns. The current criteria adopted by the SPR limits cavern usage to 5 drawdowns (leaches). As a base case, 5 leaches were modeled over a 25 year period to roughly double the volume of a 19 cavern field. Thirteen additional leaches where then simulated until caverns approached coalescence. The cavern field approximated the geometries and geologic properties found at the West Hackberry site. This enabled comparisons are data collected over nearly 20 years to analysis predictions. The analyses closely predicted the measured surface subsidence and cavern closure rates as inferred from historic well head pressures. This provided the necessary assurance that the model displacements, strains, and stresses are accurate. However, the cavern field has not yet experienced the large scale drawdowns being simulated. Should they occur in the future, code predictions should be validated with actual field behavior at that time. The simulations were performed using JAS3D, a three dimensional finite element analysis code for nonlinear quasi-static solids. The results examine the impacts of leaching and cavern workovers, where internal cavern pressures are reduced, on surface subsidence, well integrity, and cavern stability. The results suggest that the current limit of 5 oil drawdowns may be extended with some mitigative action required on the wells and later on to surface structure due to subsidence strains. The predicted stress state in the salt shows damage to start occurring after 15 drawdowns with significant failure occurring at the 16th drawdown, well beyond the current limit of 5 drawdowns.

  12. [Post-traumatic carotid cavernous fistula: report of two cases].

    PubMed

    Pons, Y; Ukkola-Pons, E; Hunkemöller, I; Raynal, M; Lepage, P; Blondet, E; Rigal-Sastourne, J C; Héran, F; Kossowski, M

    2010-01-01

    Carotid cavernous fistula (CCF) is an abnormal communication between the cavernous sinus and the carotid arterial system. The authors reported the clinical presentation and therapeutic procedure of two cases. The physician has to be aware of this diagnosis when a patient is referred for a posttraumatic exophthalmia. The medical behaviour is multidisciplinary (ENT, ophthalmologist, radiologist and neurosurgeon). The imaging of choice is the angiography but angio-MRI and angio-CT can help to confirm the diagnosis. The endovascular embolization is the treatment of choice. It presents an acceptable risk of complication and a low risk of failure. In this paper the authors report 2 posttraumatic CCF cases treated with success by endovascular embolization. PMID:21491776

  13. Cataract surgery in a case of carotid cavernous fistula

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Akshay Gopinathan; Praveen, Smita Vittal; Noronha, Veena Olma

    2014-01-01

    A carotid-cavernous fistula (CCF) is an abnormal communication between the cavernous sinus and the carotid arterial system. The ocular manifestations include conjunctival chemosis, proptosis, globe displacement, raised intraocular pressure and optic neuropathy. Although management of CCF in these patients is necessary, the ophthalmologist may also have to treat other ocular morbidities such as cataract. Cataract surgery in patients with CCF may be associated with many possible complications, including suprachoroidal hemorrhage. We describe cataract extraction surgery in 60-year-old female with bilateral spontaneous low-flow CCF. She underwent phacoemulsification via a clear corneal route under topical anesthesia and had an uneventful postoperative phase and recovered successfully. Given the various possible ocular changes in CCF, one must proceed with an intraocular surgery with caution. In this communication, we wish to describe the surgical precautions and the possible pitfalls in cataract surgery in patients with CCF. PMID:25370401

  14. Sinusitis (acute)

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Acute sinusitis is defined pathologically, by transient inflammation of the mucosal lining of the paranasal sinuses lasting less than 4 weeks. Clinically, it is characterised by nasal congestion, rhinorrhoea, facial pain, hyposmia, sneezing, and, if more severe, additional malaise and fever. It affects 1−5% of the adult population each year in Europe. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments in people with clinically diagnosed acute sinusitis, and with radiologically or bacteriologically confirmed acute sinusitis? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library and other important databases up to August 2007 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 19 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antibiotics (amoxicillin, co-amoxiclav, doxycycline, cephalosporins, macrolides, different doses [amoxicillin, co-amoxiclav, doxycycline, cephalosporins, macrolides], long-course regimens), antihistamines, cephalosporins or macrolides, decongestants (xylometazoline, phenylephrine, pseudoephedrine), doxycycline, saline nasal washes, steam inhalation, and topical corticosteroids (intra-nasal). PMID:19450327

  15. Sinusitis (acute)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Acute sinusitis is defined pathologically, by transient inflammation of the mucosal lining of the paranasal sinuses lasting less than 4 weeks. Clinically, it is characterised by nasal congestion, rhinorrhoea, facial pain, hyposmia, sneezing, and, if more severe, additional malaise and fever. It affects 1% to 5% of the adult population each year in Europe. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments in people with clinically diagnosed acute sinusitis, and in people with radiologically or bacteriologically confirmed acute sinusitis? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to June 2011 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 19 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antibiotics (amoxicillin, amoxicillin–clavulanic acid [co-amoxiclav], doxycycline, cephalosporins, macrolides; different doses, long-course regimens), antihistamines, decongestants (xylometazoline, phenylephrine, pseudoephedrine), saline nasal washes, steam inhalation, and topical corticosteroids (intranasal). PMID:22189346

  16. Giant Cardiac Cavernous Hemangioma.

    PubMed

    Unger, Eric; Costic, Joseph; Laub, Glenn

    2015-07-01

    We report the case of an asymptomatic giant cardiac cavernous hemangioma in a 71-year-old man. The intracardiac mass was discovered incidentally during surveillance for his prostate cancer; however, the patient initially declined intervention. On presentation to our institution 7 years later, the lesion had enlarged significantly, and the patient consented to excision. At surgery, an 8 × 6.5 × 4.8 cm intracardiac mass located on the inferior heart border was excised with an intact capsule through a median sternotomy approach. The patient had an uneventful postoperative course. We discuss the diagnostic workup, treatment, and characteristics of this rare cardiac tumor. PMID:26140782

  17. Saline Sinus Rinse Recipe

    MedlinePlus

    ... Saline Sinus Rinse Recipe Share | Saline Sinus Rinse Recipe Saline sinus rinses can bring relief to patients ... at a fraction of the cost. Saline Rinse Recipe Ingredients 1. Pickling or canning salt-containing no ...

  18. Sick sinus syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... chambers is a common cause of sick sinus syndrome. Coronary artery disease , high blood pressure, and aortic and ... pressure may be normal or low. Sick sinus syndrome may cause symptoms of heart failure to start or get worse. Sick sinus ...

  19. The silent sinus syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sheikhi, Mahnaz; Jalalian, Faranak

    2013-01-01

    The silent sinus syndrome (SSS) involves painless facial asymmetry and enophthalmos, which is the result of chronic maxillary sinus atelectasis. In most cases, it is diagnosed clinically, however, using the characteristic imaging features including maxillary sinus outlet obstruction, sinus opacification, and sinus volume loss caused by inward retraction of the sinus walls. Obstruction of the maxillary ostium appears to play a critical role in the development of SSS. Treatment involves functional endoscopic surgery. PMID:23946747

  20. Superior sagittal sinus thrombosis complicating typhoid Fever in a teenager.

    PubMed

    Okunola, P O; Ofovwe, G E; Abiodun, M T; Azunna, C P

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral venous sinus (sinovenous) thrombosis (CSVT) is a rare life-threatening disorder in childhood that is often misdiagnosed. CSVT encompasses cavernous sinus thrombosis, lateral sinus thrombosis, and superior sagittal sinus thrombosis (SSST). We present an adolescent girl who was well until two weeks earlier when she had a throbbing frontal headache and fever with chills; she later had dyspnoea, jaundice, melena stool, multiple seizures, nuchal rigidity, and monoparesis of the right lower limb a day before admission. Urine test for Salmonella typhi Vi antigen was positive, and Widal reaction was significant. Serial cranial computerized tomography scans revealed an expanding hypodense lesion in the parafalcine region consistent with SSST or a parasagittal abscess. Inadvertent left parietal limited craniectomy confirmed SSST. She recovered completely with subsequent conservative management. Beyond neuropsychiatric complications of Typhoid fever, CSVT should be highly considered when focal neurologic deficits are present. PMID:23227403

  1. Cavernous lymphangioma: Two case reports

    PubMed Central

    Sargunam, Cynthia; Thomas, Jayakar; Raneesha, P. K.

    2013-01-01

    Lymphangiomas are congenital malformation of the lymphatic system that involve the skin and subcutaneous tissues. We are reporting two cases of cavernous lymphangioma. These cases are presented for their rarity. PMID:23984237

  2. Rare dural arteriovenous fistula of the lesser sphenoid wing sinus.

    PubMed

    Khadavi, Nicole M; Mancini, Ronald; Nakra, Tanuj; Tsirbas, Angelo C; Douglas, Raymond S; Goldberg, Robert A; Duckwiler, Gary R

    2009-01-01

    A fistula of the lesser sphenoid wing sinus is a rare dural arteriovenous fistula resulting from a connection between the middle meningeal artery and recipient vein in the sinus of the lesser sphenoid wing. In this report, MRI/magnetic resonance angiography of a 54-year-old man who presented with sudden-onset glaucoma and proptosis revealed a fistula in this anatomic location. Drainage patterns here may account for the absence of serious complications and optimistic prognosis following embolization. Care in diagnosis is required to avoid superfluous procedures, because classic signs of the more common carotid-cavernous fistula are absent. PMID:19966661

  3. Carotid Cavernous Fistula Associated with Persistent Trigeminal Artery

    PubMed Central

    Hurst, Robert W.; Howard, Robert S.; Zager, Eric

    1998-01-01

    Carotid-cavernous fistula (CCF) associated with persistent trigeminal artery (PTA) is a rare but important clinical entity. We present a case treated by microcoil embolization with preservation of internal carotid, PTA, and hasilar artery flow following embolization. A 62-year-old female developed pulsatile tinnitus followed by left eye proptosis and diplopia. Examination revealed a cranial nerve VI palsy and an objective bruit over the left orbit. Angiographic evaluation revealed a carotid cavernous fistula originating from a persistent trigeminal artery. Placement of a detachable balloon across the fistula site while preserving the PTA proved impossible, and the fistula was treated with microcoils following placement of a microcatheter across the fistula into the cavernous sinus. Complete closure of the fistula was followed by resolution of the patient's symptoms. Preservation of all major vessels including the PTA was accomplished through the use of coil embolization. Careful evaluation of the angiogram is necessary to identify PTA associated with a CCF. Previous reports have described treatment of CCF with PTA by surgical or balloon ocolusion, some involving sacrifice of the PTA. Examination of the relevant embryology and anatomy reveals, however, that occlusion of the PTA must be approached with caution due to potential supply to the posterior circulation. ImagesFigure 1 PMID:17171071

  4. Interaction effects of storage caverns in salt

    SciTech Connect

    Hilton, P.D.; Tillerson, J.R.; Benzley, S.E.; Gubbels, M.H.

    1980-08-01

    The US Strategic Petroleum Reserve program for crude oil stockpiling utilizes some existing solution mined caverns in Gulf Coast salt domes. Geomechanical analyses are impotant tools used to assess the structural stability of these caverns. This report addresses the ineractions between adjacent caverns which result from maintaining different pressures in the caverns. Finite element models of two adjacent caverns are analyzed for four different cavern spacings. The brine pressure is simulated in one cavern while the pressure in the adjacent cavern ranges from that of the oil head to atmospheric conditions. Stress distributions and deformed profiles of the caverns are plotted for the conditions simulated. Since the tensile strength of salt is low (typically 100 to 300 psi), regions in which tensile stresses occur are considered to have a significant probability of slabbing. A preliminary recommendation is made to maintain similar pressures to adjacent caverns in which the pillar thickness/cavern diameter ratio of the web between caverns is less than 0.5 unless cavern specific assessments indicate that the potential for pillar slabbing is minimal.

  5. Vascular Complications of Intercavernous Sinuses during Transsphenoidal Surgery: An Anatomical Analysis Based on Autopsy and Magnetic Resonance Venography

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Ya; Song, Wen; Chen, Yongchao; Li, Dongxue; Han, Hui; Liu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Vascular complications induced by intercavernous sinus injury during dural opening in the transsphenoidal surgery may contribute to incomplete tumour resections. Preoperative neuro-imaging is of crucial importance in planning surgical approach. The aim of this study is to correlate the microanatomy of intercavernous sinuses with its contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance venography (CE-MRV). Methods Eighteen human adult cadavers and 24 patients were examined based on autopsy and CE-MRV. Through dissection of the cadavers and CE-MRV, the location, shape, number, diameter and type of intercavernous sinuses were measured and compared. Results Different intercavernous sinuses were identified by their location and shape in all the cadavers and CE-MRV. Compared to the cadavers, CE-MRV revealed 37% of the anterior intercavernous sinus, 48% of the inferior intercavernous sinus, 30% of the posterior intercavernous sinus, 30% of the dorsum sellae sinus and 100% of the basilar sinus. The smaller intercavernous sinuses were not seen in the neuro-images. According to the presence of the anterior and inferior intercavernous sinus, four types of the intercavernous sinuses were identified in cadavers and CE-MRV, and the corresponding operative space in the transsphenoidal surgical approach was implemented. Conclusion The morphology and classification of the cavernous sinus can be identified by CE-MRV, especially for the larger vessels, which cause bleeding more easily. Therefore, CE-MRV provides a reliable measure for individualized preoperative planning during transsphenoidal surgery. PMID:26658152

  6. Carotid-cavernous fistula caused by rupture of persistent primitive trigeminal artery trunk aneurysm--case report.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Masahiro; Ezura, Masayuki; Mino, Masaki

    2011-01-01

    A 60-year-old female presented with a carotid-cavernous fistula (CCF) manifesting as left abducens nerve palsy. Left internal carotid digital subtraction angiography showed a persistent primitive trigeminal artery (PPTA) near the CCF. Super-selective angiography showed direct shunt flow between the PPTA trunk aneurysm and the left cavernous sinus. The aneurysm was successfully occluded with detachable coils. The CCF disappeared and the PPTA was preserved. The abducens nerve paralysis had disappeared 6 months later. CCF caused by a PPTA trunk aneurysm is extremely rare. We speculate that the PPTA trunk aneurysm formed and then ruptured due to hemodynamic stress caused by hypoplasia of the basilar artery. PMID:21785245

  7. [Maxillary sinus hypoplasia].

    PubMed

    Plaza, G; Ferrando, J; Martel, J; Toledano, A; de los Santos, G

    2001-03-01

    Maxillary sinus hypoplasia is rare, with an estimated prevalence of 1-5%. Out of the CT scans performed in sinusal patients between March 1998 and June 1999, we report on 4 isolated maxillary sinus hypoplasia, 4 maxillary sinus hypoplasia associated to concha bullosa, and 10 isolated conchae bullosas. All cases were evaluated by nasosinusal endoscopy and CT scan. Size, location and uni/bilateral presentation of concha bullosa is correlated to maxillary sinus hypoplasia presence, specially with regards to uncinate process presence, medial or lateral retraction. The pathogenesis of maxillary sinus hypoplasia is reviewed, and its relation to concha bullosa, evaluating how this could explain some cases of the so called chronic maxillary sinus atelectasia, as an acquired and progressive variant of maxillary sinus hypoplasia in adults. PMID:11428268

  8. Approaching chronic sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Sarber, Kathleen M; Dion, Gregory Robert; Weitzel, Erik K; McMains, Kevin C

    2013-11-01

    Chronic sinusitis is a common disease that encompasses a number of syndromes that are characterized by sinonasal mucosal inflammation. Chronic sinusitis can be defined as two or more of the following symptoms lasting for more than 12 consecutive weeks: discolored rhinorrhea, postnasal drip, nasal obstruction, facial pressure or pain, or decreased sense of smell. Chronic sinusitis is further classified as chronic sinusitis with polyposis, chronic sinusitis without polyposis, or allergic fungal sinusitis using physical examination, and histologic and radiographic findings. Treatment methods for chronic sinusitis are based upon categorization of the disease and include oral and inhaled corticosteroids, nasal saline irrigations, and antibiotics in selected patients. Understanding the various forms of chronic sinusitis and managing and ruling out comorbidities are key to successful management of this common disorder. PMID:24192597

  9. Complications of Sinusitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hay Fever) Headaches and Sinus Disease Disorders of Smell & Taste Upper Respiratory Infections Nasal Congestion & Snoring CSF ... Hay Fever) Headaches and Sinus Disease Disorders of Smell & Taste Upper Respiratory Infections Nasal Congestion & Snoring CSF ...

  10. Sinus x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    Paranasal sinus radiography; X-ray - sinuses ... sinus x-ray is taken in a hospital radiology department. Or the x-ray may be taken ... Brown J, Rout J. ENT, neck, and dental radiology. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH Schaefer- ...

  11. Carotid sinus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mallet, Mark

    2003-02-01

    This article reviews the recent literature about carotid sinus syndrome. It looks principally at the various ways in which it may present, the limited knowledge of its pathophysiology, and the role of carotid sinus massage in the investigation of carotid sinus syndrome. PMID:12619336

  12. Effects of cavern spacing on the performance and stability of gas-filled storage caverns

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E.L.

    1993-04-01

    Three-dimensional finite element analyses of gas-filled storage caverns in domal salt were performed to investigate the effects of cavern spacing on surface subsidence, storage loss, and cavern stability. The finite element model used for this study models a seven cavern storage field with one center cavern and six hexagonally spaced surrounding caverns. Cavern spacing is described in terms of the P/D ratio which is the pillar thickness (the width between two caverns) divided by the cavern diameter. With the stratigraphy and cavern size held constant, simulations were performed for P/D ratios of 6.0, 3.0, 2.0, 1.0, and 0.5. Ten year simulations were performed modeling a constant 400 psi gas pressure applied to the cavern lining. The calculations were performed using JAC3D, a three dimensional finite element analysis code for nonlinear quasistatic solids. For the range of P/D ratios studied, cavern deformation and storage volume were relatively insensitive to P/D ratio, while subsidence volume increased with increasing P/D ratio. A stability criterion which describes stability in terms of a limiting creep strain was used to investigate cavern stability. The stability criterion indicated that through-pillar instability was possible for the cases of P/D = 0.5 and 1.0.

  13. New public information resources on salt caverns.

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasko, D.; Veil, J. A.

    1999-08-25

    For the past decade, interest has been growing in using underground salt caverns for disposing of wastes. The Railroad Commission of Texas has permitted a few caverns for disposal of nonhazardous oil field waste (NOW) and one cavern for disposal of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) from oil field activities. Several salt caverns in Canada have also been permitted for disposal of NOW. In addition, oil and gas agencies in Louisiana and New Mexico are developing cavern disposal regulations. The US Department of Energy (DOE) has funded several studies to evaluate the technical feasibility, legality, economic viability, and risk of disposing of NOW and NORM in caverns. The results of these studies have been disseminated to the scientific and regulatory communities. However, as use of caverns for waste disposal increases, more government and industry representatives and members of the public will become aware of this practice and will need adequate information about how disposal caverns operate and the risks they pose. In anticipation of this need, DOE has fi.mded Argonne National Laboratory to develop a salt cavern public outreach program. Key components of this program are an informational brochure designed for nontechnical persons and a website that provides greater detail on cavern operations and allows downloadable access to the reports on the topic funded by DOE. This paper provides an overview of the public outreach program.

  14. New public information resources on salt caverns.

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasko, D.; Veil, J. A.

    1999-08-25

    For the past decade, interest has been growing in using underground salt caverns for disposing of wastes. The Railroad Commission of Texas has permitted a few caverns for disposal of nonhazardous oil field waste (NOW) and one cavern for disposal of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) from oil field activities. Several salt caverns in Canada have also been permitted for disposal of NOW. In addition, oil and gas agencies in Louisiana and New Mexico are developing cavern disposal regulations. The US Department of Energy (DOE) has funded several studies to evaluate the technical feasibility, legality, economic viability, and risk of disposing of NOW and NORM in caverns. The results of these studies have been disseminated to the scientific and regulatory communities. However, as use of caverns for waste disposal increases, more government and industry representatives and members of the public will become aware of this practice and will need adequate information about how disposal caverns operate and the risks they pose. In anticipation of this need, DOE has funded Argonne National Laboratory to develop a salt cavern public outreach program. Key components of this program are an informational brochure designed for nontechnical persons and a website that provides greater detail on cavern operations and allows downloadable access to the reports on the topic funded by DOE. This paper provides an overview of the public outreach program.

  15. Extensive complex odontoma in the maxillary sinus pushing 3rd molar near the orbital floor causing transient diplopia and chronic sinusitis: a rare presentation and surgical management.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Monika; Das, Debdutta

    2015-03-01

    Odontoma is a mixed odontogenic hamartoma involving both epithelial and mesenchymal tissues. If left untreated, it can lead to complications in certain conditions. Here is a rare presentation of an extensive complex odontoma in maxillary sinus pushing third molar near the orbital floor causing transient diplopia in upward gaze occasionally and chronic sinusitis. Although odontomata are not uncommon and are familiar to practitioners, but some aggressive cases may cause problematic sequelae. Even postoperative complications may result if oral surgeons are not aware of the potential pitfalls associated with the surgical removal of large maxillary antrum odontomata. This article reports a rare presentation which can be considered unique because when obstruction of sinus drainage is evident, serious complications such as orbital infections, epidural and subdural empyema, meningitis, cerebritis, cavernous sinus thrombosis, brain abscess and death can occur. It also addresses points and pitfalls concerning surgery to remove odontoma. PMID:25848139

  16. Cavernous angioma of the pineal region.

    PubMed

    Donati, P; Maiuri, F; Gangemi, M; Gallicchio, B; Sigona, L

    1992-01-01

    The pineal region is one of the most rare localizations of intracranial cavernous angiomas, with only 8 cases reported up today. The Authors report a case of cavernous angioma of such localization and review the pertinent literature. Magnetic resonance allows the correct diagnosis of cavernous malformations on the basis of their typical aspect, even in the absence of histological verification. We suggest that this imaging technique will allow to identify more frequently pineal cavernomas preoperatively, thus avoiding useless irradiation. PMID:1484302

  17. Salt caverns for oil field waste disposal.

    SciTech Connect

    Veil, J.; Ford, J.; Rawn-Schatzinger, V.; Environmental Assessment; RMC, Consultants, Inc.

    2000-07-01

    Salt caverns used for oil field waste disposal are created in salt formations by solution mining. When created, caverns are filled with brine. Wastes are introduced into the cavern by pumping them under low pressure. Each barrel of waste injected to the cavern displaces a barrel of brine to the surface. The brine is either used for drilling mud or is disposed of in an injection well. Figure 8 shows an injection pump used at disposal cavern facilities in west Texas. Several types of oil field waste may be pumped into caverns for disposal. These include drilling muds, drill cuttings, produced sands, tank bottoms, contaminated soil, and completion and stimulation wastes. Waste blending facilities are constructed at the site of cavern disposal to mix the waste into a brine solution prior to injection. Overall advantages of salt cavern disposal include a medium price range for disposal cost, large capacity and availability of salt caverns, limited surface land requirement, increased safety, and ease of establishment of individual state regulations.

  18. Effects of cavern depth on surface subsidence and storage loss of oil-filled caverns

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E L

    1992-01-01

    Finite element analyses of oil-filled caverns were performed to investigate the effects of cavern depth on surface subsidence and storage loss, a primary performance criteria of SPR caverns. The finite element model used for this study was axisymmetric, approximating an infinite array of caverns spaced at 750 ft. The stratigraphy and cavern size were held constant while the cavern depth was varied between 1500 ft and 3000 ft in 500 ft increments. Thirty year simulations, the design life of the typical SPR cavern, were performed with boundary conditions modeling the oil pressure head applied to the cavern lining. A depth dependent temperature gradient of 0.012{degrees}F/ft was also applied to the model. The calculations were performed using ABAQUS, a general purpose of finite element analysis code. The user-defined subroutine option in ABAQUS was used to enter an elastic secondary creep model which includes temperature dependence. The calculations demonstrated that surface subsidence and storage loss rates increase with increasing depth. At lower depths the difference between the lithostatic stress and the oil pressure is greater. Thus, the effective stresses are greater, resulting in higher creep rates. Furthermore, at greater depths the cavern temperatures are higher which also produce higher creep rates. Together, these factors result in faster closure of the cavern. At the end of the 30 year simulations, a 1500 ft-deep cavern exhibited 4 percent storage loss and 4 ft of subsidence while a 3000 ft-deep cavern exhibited 33 percent storage loss and 44 ft of subsidence. The calculations also demonstrated that surface subsidence is directly related to the amount of storage loss. Deeper caverns exhibit more subsidence because the caverns exhibit more storage loss. However, for a given amount of storage loss, nearly the same magnitude of surface subsidence was exhibited, independent of cavern depth.

  19. Proapoptotic effect and the mechanism of action of pingyangmycin on cavernous hemangiomas

    PubMed Central

    HUANG, YIDENG; LI, PING; XIA, SIWEN; ZHUO, YANG; WU, LONGJUN

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the proapoptotic effects and the mechanism of action of pingyangmycin (PY) on cavernous hemangioma. The rat spleen was used as a model of cavernous hemangioma. PY was injected into the spleen and the pathological changes were observed at different time-points. Apoptosis was detected using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The expression levels of the apoptosis-related protein, caspase-3, were determined using immunohistochemistry and image analysis. Rats injected with normal saline were the control group. Injection of normal saline did not damage rat spleens. On days 2 and 5 following PY injection, the spleens exhibited slight swelling. On days 8 and 14, atrophic changes were observed and the splenic sinus endothelial cells were damaged. At various time-points following PY injection, the apoptotic cells were observed by TEM. The TUNEL assay showed that apoptosis occurred widely among the splenic sinus endothelial cells and other splenic cells. The apoptotic rate and caspase-3 expression levels increased with prolonged PY exposure. PY induced apoptosis of splenic sinus endothelial cells through the caspase-3 activation pathway, and resulted in endothelial cell necrosis and fibroblast hyperplasia. PMID:24396428

  20. Microbiology of sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Brook, Itzhak

    2011-03-01

    Most sinus infections are viral, and only a small proportion develops a secondary bacterial infection. Rhinoviruses, influenza viruses, and parainfluenza viruses are the most common causes of sinusitis. The most common bacteria isolated from pediatric and adult patients with community-acquired acute purulent sinusitis are Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis, and Streptococcus pyogenes. Staphylococcus aureus and anaerobic bacteria (Prevotella and Porphyromonas, Fusobacterium and Peptostreptococcus spp.) are the main isolates in chronic sinusitis. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and other aerobic and facultative gram-negative rods are commonly isolated from patients with nosocomial sinusitis, the immunocompromised host, those with HIV infection, and in cystic fibrosis. Fungi and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are the most common isolates in neutropenic patients. The microbiology of sinusitis is influenced by the previous antimicrobial therapy, vaccinations, and the presence of normal flora capable of interfering with the growth of pathogens. PMID:21364226

  1. Giant Cavernous Haemangioma of the Anterior Mediastinum

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Seyda Ors; Samancılar, Ozgur; Usluer, Ozan; Acar, Tuba; Yener, Ali Galip

    2015-01-01

    Cavernous hemangiomas of the anterior mediastinum is rare. We present a case of a 56-year-old male patient with a giant cavernous hemangioma of the anterior mediastinum, 18 cm in diameters, approached by left posterolateral thoracotomy. To the best of our knowledge, such a unique case has not been previously presented in the literature. PMID:26644773

  2. Genetics Home Reference: cerebral cavernous malformation

    MedlinePlus

    ... R, Awad IA, Ginsberg MH. Cerebral cavernous malformations proteins inhibit Rho kinase to stabilize vascular integrity. J Exp Med. 2010 Apr 12;207(4):881-96. doi: 10.1084/jem.20091258. Epub 2010 Mar 22. Citation on ... CCM1 and CCM2 protein interactions in cell signaling: implications for cerebral cavernous ...

  3. Disposal of NORM waste in salt caverns

    SciTech Connect

    Veil, J.A.; Smith, K.P.; Tomasko, D.; Elcock, D.; Blunt, D.; Williams, G.P.

    1998-07-01

    Some types of oil and gas production and processing wastes contain naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM). If NORM is present at concentrations above regulatory levels in oil field waste, the waste requires special disposal practices. The existing disposal options for wastes containing NORM are limited and costly. This paper evaluates the legality, technical feasibility, economics, and human health risk of disposing of NORM-contaminated oil field wastes in salt caverns. Cavern disposal of NORM waste is technically feasible and poses a very low human health risk. From a legal perspective, there are no fatal flaws that would prevent a state regulatory agency from approving cavern disposal of NORM. On the basis of the costs charged by caverns currently used for disposal of nonhazardous oil field waste (NOW), NORM waste disposal caverns could be cost competitive with existing NORM waste disposal methods when regulatory agencies approve the practice.

  4. A 12-year cavern abandonment test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bérest, P.; Brouard, B.; Hévin, G.

    2010-06-01

    In 1997-1998, an abandonment test was performed in a 950-m deep, 8000-m3 salt cavern operated by GDF SUEZ at Etrez, France. In this relatively small brine-filled cavern, which had been kept idle for 15 years before the test, thermal equilibrium was reached. A special system was designed to monitor leaks, which proved to be exceedingly small. In these conditions, brine permeation and cavern creep closure are the only factors to play significant roles in pressure evolution. This test strongly suggested that obtaining an equilibrium pressure such that the effects of these two factors were exactly equal would be reached in the long term. Four years later, pressure monitoring in the closed cavern resumed. Pressure evolution during the 2002-2009 period confirmed that cavern brine pressure will remain constant and significantly smaller than geostatic pressure in the long term, precluding any risk of fracturing and brine seepage to the overburden layers.

  5. Primary non-Hodgkin lymphoma of the sphenoid sinus with visual disturbance: A report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    YE, HUIPING; GONG, ZHENGPENG; YANG, WEN; DAI, YUBING

    2016-01-01

    Primary non-Hodgkin lymphoma (PNHL) of the sphenoid sinus is a rare neoplasm that poses a diagnostic challenge to clinicians. The proximity of the optical nerve and canal to the sphenoid sinus is accountable for the high incidence of visual disturbance in PNHL of the sphenoid sinus. In particular, patients whose radiologic diagnosis reveals bone destruction in the lateral wall involved with optical-nerve-canals or cavernous sinus present a high risk of rapidly developing unilateral blindness. The present study reports 2 rare cases of PNHL of the sphenoid sinus. Sudden sight loss may follow minimally invasive biopsy. In such cases, the measures that must be taken for the prevention of permanent sight loss are limited in the absence of the final pathologic diagnosis. PMID:27313774

  6. Interior cavern conditions and salt fall potential

    SciTech Connect

    Munson, D.E.; Molecke, M.A.; Myers, R.E.

    1998-03-01

    A relatively large number of salt caverns are used for fluid hydrocarbon storage, including an extensive set of facilities in the Gulf Coast salt domes for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) Program. Attention is focused on the SPR caverns because of available histories that detail events involving loss and damage of the hanging string casing. The total number of events is limited, making the database statistically sparse. The occurrence of the events is not evenly distributed, with some facilities, and some caverns, more susceptible than others. While not all of these events could be attributed to impacts from salt falls, many did show the evidence of such impacts. As a result, a study has been completed to analyze the potential for salt falls in the SPR storage caverns. In this process, it was also possible to deduce some of the cavern interior conditions. Storage caverns are very large systems in which many factors could possibly play a part in casing damage. In this study, all of the potentially important factors such as salt dome geology, operational details, and material characteristics were considered, with all being logically evaluated and most being determined as secondary in nature. As a result of the study, it appears that a principal factor in determining a propensity for casing damage from salt falls is the creep and fracture characteristics of salt in individual caverns. In addition the fracture depends strongly upon the concentration of impurity particles in the salt. Although direct observation of cavern conditions is not possible, the average impurity concentration and the accumulation of salt fall material can be determined. When this is done, there is a reasonable correlation between the propensity for a cavern to show casing damage events and accumulation of salt fall material. The accumulation volumes of salt fall material can be extremely large, indicating that only a few of the salt falls are large enough to cause impact damage.

  7. Multiphase Flow and Cavern Abandonment in Salt

    SciTech Connect

    Ehgartner, Brian; Tidwell, Vince

    2001-02-13

    This report will explore the hypothesis that an underground cavity in gassy salt will eventually be gas filled as is observed on a small scale in some naturally occurring salt inclusions. First, a summary is presented on what is known about gas occurrences, flow mechanisms, and cavern behavior after abandonment. Then, background information is synthesized into theory on how gas can fill a cavern and simultaneously displace cavern fluids into the surrounding salt. Lastly, two-phase (gas and brine) flow visualization experiments are presented that demonstrate some of the associated flow mechanisms and support the theory and hypothesis that a cavity in salt can become gas filled after plugging and abandonment

  8. Management of a complex cavern storage facility for natural gas

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    The Epe cavern storage facility operated by Ruhrgas AG has developed into one of the largest gas cavern storage facilities in the world. Currently, there are 32 caverns and 18 more are planned in the future. Working gas volume will increase from approximately 1.5 {times} 10{sup 9} to 2 {times} 10{sup 9} m{sup 3}. The stratified salt deposit containing the caverns has a surface area of approximately 7 km{sup 2} and is 250 m thick at the edge and 400 m thick in the center. Caverns are leached by a company that uses the recovered brine in the chlorine industry. Cavern dimensions are determined before leaching. The behavior of each cavern, as well as the thermodynamic properties of natural gas must be considered in cavern management. The full-length paper presents the components of a complex management system covering the design, construction, and operation of the Epe gas-storage caverns.

  9. Bayou Choctaw Caverns 15 and 17 web analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ehgartner, B.

    1993-01-01

    The relatively thin web of salt that separates Bayou Choctaw Caverns 15 and 17 was evaluated using the finite-element method. The stability calculations provided insight as to whether or not any operationrestrictions or recommendations are necessary. Because of the uncertainty in the exact dimensions of the salt web, various web thicknesses were examined under different operating scenarios that included individual cavern workovers and drawdowns. Cavern workovers were defined by a sudden drop in the oil side pressure at the wellhead to atmospheric. Workovers represent periods of low cavern pressure. Cavern drawdowns were simulated by enlargening the cavern diameters, thus decreasing the thickness of the web. The calculations predict that Cavern 15 dominates the behavior of the web because of its larger diameter. Thus, giventhe choice of caverns, Cavern 17 should be used for oil withdrawal in order to minimize the adverse impacts on web resulting from pressure drops or cavern enlargement. From a stability point of view, maintaining normal pressures in Cavern 15 was found to be more important than operating the caverns as a gallery where both caverns are maintained at the same pressure. However, during a workover, it may be prudent to operate the caverns under similar pressures to avoid the possibility of a sudden pressure surge at the wellhead should the web fail.

  10. Endoscopic Sinus Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... The nasal endoscope is a small, lighted metal telescope placed into the nostril. The endoscope allows the ... sinus surgery involves the use of a small telescope (nasal endoscope) that is inserted through the nostril ...

  11. How Is Sinusitis Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... a blood test to rule out cystic fibrosis Tests on the material inside the sinuses to detect a bacterial or fungal infection An aspirin challenge to test for aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease. In an aspirin ...

  12. Complications of Sinus Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... further intracranial surgeries. Impaired sense of taste or smell : The sense of smell usually improves after the procedure because airflow is ... in their voice after sinus surgery. Impairment of smell or taste: (see above) Infection: The most common ...

  13. Sinusitis Q and A

    MedlinePlus

    ... and hydration. Medications, such as decongestants, mucolytics and pain relievers, may be offered by your physician to help decrease the severity of your symptoms. The mainstay of treatment for acute bacterial sinusitis is an appropriate antibiotic, ...

  14. Cavernous hemangioma of the glans penis

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Soumya; Biswal, Deepak Kumar; Pal, Dilip Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Cavernous hemangioma of the glans penis is a very rare lesion, and only a few cases are reported in the literature. Urologists are in a dilemma to treat such lesion with cosmetic and to obtain good functional outcome. Here, we report a case of cavernous hemangioma of the glans penis in a 22-year-old boy with a successful outcome by intralesional sclerotherapy with 3% sodium tetradecyl sulfate with a review of the literature on the subject. PMID:26229337

  15. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Allroggen, H.; Abbott, R.

    2000-01-01

    Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is a challenging condition because of its variability of clinical symptoms and signs. It is very often unrecognised at initial presentation. All age groups can be affected. Large sinuses such as the superior sagittal sinus are most frequently involved. Extensive collateral circulation within the cerebral venous system allows for a significant degree of compensation in the early stages of thrombus formation. Systemic inflammatory diseases and inherited as well as acquired coagulation disorders are frequent causes, although in up to 30% of cases no underlying cause can be identified. The oral contraceptive pill appears to be an important additional risk factor. The spectrum of clinical presentations ranges from headache with papilloedema to focal deficit, seizures and coma. Magnetic resonance imaging with venography is the investigation of choice; computed tomography alone will miss a significant number of cases. It has now been conclusively shown that intravenous heparin is the first-line treatment for cerebral venous sinus thrombosis because of its efficacy, safety and feasability. Local thrombolysis may be indicated in cases of deterioration, despite adequate heparinisation. This should be followed by oral anticoagulation for 3-6 months. The prognosis of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is generally favourable. A high index of clinical suspicion is needed to diagnose this uncommon condition so that appropriate treatment can be initiated.


Keywords: cerebral venous sinus thrombosis PMID:10622773

  16. Modified three-dimensional skull base model with artificial dura mater, cranial nerves, and venous sinuses for training in skull base surgery: technical note.

    PubMed

    Mori, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Takuji; Oyama, Kazutaka; Ueno, Hideaki; Nakao, Yasuaki; Honma, Keiichirou

    2008-12-01

    Experience with dissection of the cavernous sinus and the temporal bone is essential for training in skull base surgery, but the opportunities for cadaver dissection are very limited. A modification of a commercially available prototype three-dimensional (3D) skull base model, made by a selective laser sintering method and incorporating surface details and inner bony structures such as the inner ear structures and air cells, is proposed to include artificial dura mater, cranial nerves, venous sinuses, and the internal carotid artery for such surgical training. The transpetrosal approach and epidural cavernous sinus surgery (Dolenc's technique) were performed on this modified model using a high speed drill or ultrasonic bone curette under an operating microscope. The model could be dissected in almost the same way as a real cadaver. The modified 3D skull base model provides a good educational tool for training in skull base surgery. PMID:19106500

  17. [Sinus barotrauma and the functional endoscopic sinus surgery].

    PubMed

    Hermanowski, Maciej; Jurkiewicz, Dariusz; Adamiak, Grzegorz; Grochulska, Ewa

    2003-12-01

    Sinus barotrauma is quite common illness, which affects the passengers of the planes and the air staff. The authors describe possibilities of the course of treatment these patients with special regard to the functional endoscopic sinus surgery. PMID:15058260

  18. Traumatic Dural Venous Sinus Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kim, You-Sub; Jung, Seung-Hoon; Lim, Dong-Ho; Kim, Tae-Sun; Kim, Jae-Hyoo

    2015-01-01

    Objective The importance of traumatic dural venous sinus injury lies in the probability of massive blood loss at the time of trauma or emergency operation resulting in a high mortality rate during the perioperative period. We considered the appropriate methods of treatment that are most essential in the overall management of traumatic dural venous sinus injuries. Methods We conducted a retrospective review of all cases involving patients with dural venous sinus injury who presented to our hospital between January 1999 and December 2014. Results Between January 1999 and December 2014, 20 patients with a dural venous sinus injury out of the 1,200 patients with severe head injuries who had been operated upon in our clinic were reviewed retrospectively. There were 17 male and 3 female patients. In 11 out of the 13 patients with a linear skull fracture crossing the dural venous sinus, massive blood loss from the injured sinus wall could be controlled by simple digital pressure using Gelfoam. All 5 patients with a linear skull fracture parallel to the sinus over the venous sinus developed massive sinus bleeding that could not be controlled by simple digital pressure. Conclusion When there is a linear skull fracture parallel to the sinus over the dural venous sinus or a depressed skull fracture penetrating the sinus, the surgeon should be prepared for the possibility of potentially fatal venous sinus injury, even in the absence of a hematoma. PMID:27169076

  19. Traumatic posterior communicating artery-cavernous fistula, angioarchitecture, and possible pathogenesis: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Du, Bin; Zhang, Meng; Liu, Qing-Lin; Shen, Jie; Wang, Yun-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Carotid-cavernous fistulas (CCFs) are an abnormal vascular shunt between the carotid artery and the cavernous sinus, and were traditionally classified into four subtypes based on the detailed fistulas anatomy and arterial supply. CCFs are frequently encountered in patients with traumatic skull base fractures. In this report, we present one such case caused by two head traumas. Computed tomography and digital subtraction angiography confirmed that this CCF arose from posterior communicating artery of the internal carotid artery, which is not included in the traditional Barrow et al’s categorization. The possible mechanisms include laceration of dural mater of posterior clinoid process and laceration or pseudoaneurysm formation of posterior communicating artery. This case was successfully treated with endovascular coil embolization. PMID:27099501

  20. Cystic Fibrosis Sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Le, Christopher; McCrary, Hilary C; Chang, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator gene(CFTR) resulting in impaired ion transport. Nearly all people with CF will develop chronic rhino-sinusitis (CRS) and present with the characteristic viscous mucus, impaired mucociliary clearance and chronic inflammation/infection of the sinonasal cavity. While some individuals with CF can appear relatively asymptomatic in terms of their sinus disease, commonly reported symptoms include anosmia, headache, facial pain, nasal obstruction, chronic congestion and nasal discharge. Nasal endoscopy typically reveals mucosal edema, purulent discharge and nasal polyposis. Computed tomography (CT) imaging classically demonstrates the distinguishing findings of sinus hypoplasia or aplasia with generalized opacification, medial bulging of the lateral sinonasal sidewall and a demineralized uncinate process. Current treatment for CF sinusitis includes the use of hypertonic saline, topical and systemic steroids, antibiotics and endoscopic surgery. Research investigating novel therapies designed at targeting the primary defect of CF is showing promise for reversal of CF sinus disease, in addition to potential for disease prevention. PMID:27466844

  1. Unruptured sinus of Valsalva aneurysm involving all three sinuses.

    PubMed

    Altarabsheh, Salah Eldien I; Araoz, Philip A; Deo, Salil V; Sundt, Thoralf M

    2011-02-01

    In contrast to generalized aneurysmal dilatation of the aortic root, discrete sinus of Valsalva aneurysm is an uncommon condition most often affecting the right coronary sinus. We recently treated a patient without the known connective tissue disorder having discrete aneurysms of all three sinuses. PMID:21256260

  2. Analysis of cavern stability at the West Hackberry SPR site.

    SciTech Connect

    Ehgartner, Brian L.; Sobolik, Steven Ronald

    2009-05-01

    This report presents computational analyses that simulate the structural response of caverns at the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) West Hackberry site. The cavern field comprises 22 caverns. Five caverns (6, 7, 8, 9, 11) were acquired from industry and have unusual shapes and a history dating back to 1946. The other 17 caverns (101-117) were leached according to SPR standards in the mid-1980s and have tall cylindrical shapes. The history of the caverns and their shapes are simulated in a three-dimensional geomechanics model of the site that predicts deformations, strains, and stresses. Future leaching scenarios corresponding to oil drawdowns using fresh water are also simulated by increasing the volume of the caverns. Cavern pressures are varied in the model to capture operational practices in the field. The results of the finite element model are interpreted to provide information on the current and future status of subsidence, well integrity, and cavern stability. The most significant results in this report are relevant to Cavern 6. The cavern is shaped like a bowl with a large ceiling span and is in close proximity to Cavern 9. The analyses predict tensile stresses at the edge of the ceiling during repressuization of Cavern 6 following workover conditions. During a workover the cavern is at low pressure to service a well. The wellhead pressures are atmospheric. When the workover is complete, the cavern is repressurized. The resulting elastic stresses are sufficient to cause tension around the edge of the large ceiling span. With time, these stresses relax to a compressive state because of salt creep. However, the potential for salt fracture and propagation exists, particularly towards Cavern 9. With only 200 ft of salt between the caverns, the operational consequences must be examined if the two caverns become connected. A critical time may be during a workover of Cavern 9 in part because of the operational vulnerabilities, but also because dilatant damage is

  3. Hemangioma of the maxillary sinus.

    PubMed

    Most, D S

    1985-11-01

    Hemangiomas of the maxillary sinus are rare. Hemangiomas of the maxillary sinus with an associated phlebolith have not been previously reported. Severe bleeding can occur upon surgical removal of hemangiomas. PMID:3864111

  4. Experience in testing of a solution mined storage cavern

    SciTech Connect

    Goin, K.L.

    1982-01-01

    Recertification tests were made of the U.S. Department of Energy/Strategic Petroleum Reserve oil storage cavern No. 6 in the West Hackberry, LA, salt dome. The cavern has a volume of 8,600,000 bbl. Tests included hydrostatic tests of the brine filled cavern and nitrogen leak tests of the 3 wells entering the cavern. Test procedures are described and test results are discussed.

  5. Mucopyocele of the maxillary sinus.

    PubMed

    Kshar, Avinash; Patil, Abhijeet; Umarji, Hemant; Kadam, Sonali

    2014-01-01

    Mucoceles are defined as chronic, cystic lesions in the paranasal sinuses. When the mucocele content becomes infected, the lesion is defined as mucopyocele. Most mucoceles are located in the frontal and anterior ethmoid sinuses and normally they involve the frontal-ethmoid complex, expanding to the superior-medial region of the orbit, leading to ocular disorders; maxillary sinus presentation is rare. In the present article, the authors described a rare case of mucopyocele in the maxillary sinus. PMID:24688571

  6. Mucopyocele of the maxillary sinus

    PubMed Central

    Kshar, Avinash; Patil, Abhijeet; Umarji, Hemant; Kadam, Sonali

    2014-01-01

    Mucoceles are defined as chronic, cystic lesions in the paranasal sinuses. When the mucocele content becomes infected, the lesion is defined as mucopyocele. Most mucoceles are located in the frontal and anterior ethmoid sinuses and normally they involve the frontal-ethmoid complex, expanding to the superior-medial region of the orbit, leading to ocular disorders; maxillary sinus presentation is rare. In the present article, the authors described a rare case of mucopyocele in the maxillary sinus. PMID:24688571

  7. Analysis of cavern stability at the Bryan Mound SPR site.

    SciTech Connect

    Ehgartner, Brian L.; Sobolik, Steven Ronald

    2009-04-01

    This report presents computational analyses that simulate the structural response of caverns at the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Bryan Mound site. The cavern field comprises 20 caverns. Five caverns (1, 2, 4, and 5; 3 was later plugged and abandoned) were acquired from industry and have unusual shapes and a history dating back to 1946. The other 16 caverns (101-116) were leached according to SPR standards in the mid-1980s and have tall cylindrical shapes. The history of the caverns and their shapes are simulated in a 3-D geomechanics model of the site that predicts deformations, strains, and stresses. Future leaching scenarios due to oil drawdowns using fresh water are also simulated by increasing the volume of the caverns. Cavern pressures are varied in the model to capture operational practices in the field. The results of the finite element model are interpreted to provide information on the current and future status of subsidence, well integrity, and cavern stability. The most significant result in this report is relevant to caverns 1, 2, and 5. The caverns have non-cylindrical shapes and have potential regions where the surrounding salt may be damaged during workover procedures. During a workover the normal cavern operating pressure is lowered to service a well. At this point the wellhead pressures are atmospheric. When the workover is complete, the cavern is repressurized. The resulting elastic stresses are sufficient to cause tension and large deviatoric stresses at several locations. With time, these stresses relax to a compressive state due to salt creep. However, the potential for salt damage and fracturing exists. The analyses predict tensile stresses at locations with sharp-edges in the wall geometry, or in the case of cavern 5, in the neck region between the upper and lower lobes of the cavern. The effects do not appear to be large-scale, however, so the only major impact is the potential for stress-induced salt falls in cavern 5, potentially leading to

  8. Overfilling of cavern blamed for LPG blasts

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-06

    Three explosions and a fire Apr. 7 at an LPG salt dome storage cavern near Brenham, Tex., were triggered when the cavern was overfilled, the Texas Railroad Commission (TRC) has reported. This paper reports that a TRC investigation found that LPG escaped to the surface at the Brenham site through brine injection tubing after excessive fill from an LPG line forced the cavern's water level below the brine tubing's bottom. At the surface, LPG was released into a brine storage pit where it turned into a dense, explosive vapor. At 7:08 a.m., the vapor was ignited by an unknown source. The resulting blast killed three persons and injured 19 and brought operations at the site to a halt.

  9. Analysis of cavern shapes for the strategic petroleum reserve.

    SciTech Connect

    Ehgartner, Brian L.; Sobolik, Steven Ronald

    2006-07-01

    This report presents computational analyses to determine the structural integrity of different salt cavern shapes. Three characteristic shapes for increasing cavern volumes are evaluated and compared to the baseline shape of a cylindrical cavern. Caverns with enlarged tops, bottoms, and mid-sections are modeled. The results address pillar to diameter ratios of some existing caverns in the system and will represent the final shape of other caverns if they are repeatedly drawn down. This deliverable is performed in support of the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve. Several three-dimensional models using a close-packed arrangement of 19 caverns have been built and analyzed using a simplified symmetry involving a 30-degree wedge portion of the model. This approach has been used previously for West Hackberry (Ehgartner and Sobolik, 2002) and Big Hill (Park et al., 2005) analyses. A stratigraphy based on the Big Hill site has been incorporated into the model. The caverns are modeled without wells and casing to simplify the calculations. These calculations have been made using the power law creep model. The four cavern shapes were evaluated at several different cavern radii against four design factors. These factors included the dilatant damage safety factor in salt, the cavern volume closure, axial well strain in the caprock, and surface subsidence. The relative performance of each of the cavern shapes varies for the different design factors, although it is apparent that the enlarged bottom design provides the worst overall performance. The results of the calculations are put in the context of the history of cavern analyses assuming cylindrical caverns, and how these results affect previous understanding of cavern behavior in a salt dome.

  10. A lymph nodal capillary-cavernous hemangioma.

    PubMed

    Dellachà, A; Fulcheri, E; Campisi, C

    1999-09-01

    A capillary-cavernous hemangioma in an obturator lymph node was found incidentally in a 64 year-old woman who had undergone unilateral salpingo-oophorectomy and lymphadenectomy for an ovarian neoplasm. Vascular tumors of lymph nodes are briefly reviewed including eight previously described nodal capillary-cavernous hemangiomas. The association with other splanchnic hemangiomas is pointed out and the likelihood that the lesion is a hamartoma rather than a true neoplasm is addressed. Despite its rarity, this entity needs to be recognized by lymphologists who image lymph nodes by lymphangiography as well as by lymph nodal pathologists. PMID:10494525

  11. Congenital sternoclavicular dermoid sinus.

    PubMed

    Willaert, Annelore; Bruninx, Liesje; Hens, Greet; Hauben, Esther; Devriendt, Koen; Vander Poorten, Vincent

    2016-02-01

    We report a case series of 8 patients, presenting with a congenital sinus in the region of the sternoclavicular joint. This rare malformation has only been reported in the Japanese dermatological literature under the name of "congenital dermoid fistula of the anterior chest region". It has to be distinguished from other congenital anomalies and requires complete excision. PMID:26810293

  12. When Sinuses Attack!

    MedlinePlus

    ... you have a cold? continue When Good Sinuses Go Bad What about that cold that won't go away? A cold virus can: damage the delicate ... if you are feeling well enough, you can go to school or go outside and play. In ...

  13. Can Sinusitis Be Prevented?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NIAID Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases web site to work incorrectly. Please visit your browser settings and turn JavaScript on. Read more information on enabling JavaScript. Skip Content Marketing Share this: Main Content Area Sinusitis Prevention There ...

  14. How Is Sinusitis Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NIAID Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases web site to work incorrectly. Please visit your browser settings and turn JavaScript on. Read more information on enabling JavaScript. Skip Content Marketing Share this: Main Content Area Credit: NIAID Sinusitis ...

  15. Chronic odontogenic maxillary sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Ugincius, Paulius; Kubilius, Ricardas; Gervickas, Albinas; Vaitkus, Saulius

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to estimate average age of the patients in both sexes treated for MS, distribution by sex, amount of dexter and sinister MS with and without the fistulas into the maxillary sinus, with and without the foreign-bodies, length of stay in the Department of Maxillofacial Surgery at Kaunas Hospital of University of Medicine during the period from 1999 till 2004. The retrospective data analysis of the patients' treated from chronic MS was made. 346 patients (213 females and 133 males) were treated for chronic MS. 55 cases of chronic dexter MS with a fistula into maxillary sinus, 98 cases of chronic dexter MS without a fistula, 45 cases of chronic sinister MS with a fistula, 112 cases chronic sinister MS without a fistula, 16 cases of foreign-bodies in dexter maxillary sinus, 20 cases of foreign-bodies in sinister maxillary sinus have been detected. The main age of the female was 46.6+/-15.0, the main age of the men was 42.1+/-14.4. Statictically significant difference in the age difference of the women and the men was found (p=0.0024). It was determined, that females diagnosed and treated with chronic MS were 1.6 times more than males during the period from 1999 till 2004 in Kaunas Hospital of University of Medicine. Females treated for chronic MS were 4.5 years older than males. PMID:16861848

  16. 3-D Finite Element Analyses of the Egan Cavern Field

    SciTech Connect

    Klamerus, E.W.; Ehgartner, B.L.

    1999-02-01

    Three-dimensional finite element analyses were performed for the two gas-filled storage caverns at the Egan field, Jennings dome, Louisiana. The effects of cavern enlargement on surface subsidence, storage loss, and cavern stability were investigated. The finite element model simulated the leaching of caverns to 6 and 8 billion cubic feet (BCF) and examined their performance at various operating conditions. Operating pressures varied from 0.15 psi/ft to 0.9 psi/ft at the bottom of the lowest cemented casing. The analysis also examined the stability of the web or pillar of salt between the caverns under differential pressure loadings. The 50-year simulations were performed using JAC3D, a three dimensional finite element analysis code for nonlinear quasistatic solids. A damage criterion based on onset of dilatancy was used to evaluate cavern instability. Dilation results from the development of microfractures in salt and, hence, potential increases in permeability onset occurs well before large scale failure. The analyses predicted stable caverns throughout the 50-year period for the range of pressures investigated. Some localized salt damage was predicted near the bottom walls of the caverns if the caverns are operated at minimum pressure for long periods of time. Volumetric cavern closures over time due to creep were moderate to excessive depending on the salt creep properties and operating pressures. However, subsidence above the cavern field was small and should pose no problem, to surface facilities.

  17. Sonar surveys used in gas-storage cavern analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Crossley, N.G.

    1998-05-04

    Natural-gas storage cavern internal configuration, inspection information, and cavern integrity data can be obtained during high-pressure operations with specialized gas-sonar survey logging techniques. TransGas Ltd., Regina, Sask., has successfully performed these operations on several of its deepest and highest pressurized caverns. The data can determine gas-in-place inventory and assess changes in spatial volumes. These changes can result from cavern creep, shrinkage, or closure or from various downhole abnormalities such as fluid infill or collapse of the sidewall or roof. The paper discusses conventional surveys with sonar, running surveys in pressurized caverns, accuracy of the sonar survey, initial development of Cavern 5, a roof fall, Cavern 4 development, and a damaged string.

  18. Air quality in the Carlsbad cavern

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Yung-Seng; Chen, Tou-Rong; Wasiolek, P.T.

    1994-11-01

    The air quality in the Carlsbad Cavern has been investigated, but there are no reports on radon progeny and aerosols. The purpose of this experiment was to determine the activity size distribution of radon progeny and the air exchange rate inside the Cavern. Teams from ITRI and New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology (NMT) conducted the field study in July 1994. The ITRI graded diffusion battery (GDB) was used to determine the activity size distribution, progeny concentration, equilibrium factor, and unattached fraction of the radon progeny. The design, calibration, and performance of the GDB have been described. For this study, each stage of the GDB contained one stainless steel screen, with the mesh sizes arranged in a series of 30, 50, 145, 200, and 635 mesh from the air inlet to the outlet. A 47-nm type A/E glass fiber filter was used to collect all particles that penetrated the screens. The flow rate was 5 L/min. The average ventilation rate in the cavern is 0.0026 V/hr. Our results showed that the cavern atmosphere may be quite different from other underground environments. The atmosphere in the summer is stable and relatively free of airborne particles, partly due to the extremely slow air exchange rate.

  19. [One case of fungal sinusitis foreign body in nasal sinus].

    PubMed

    Yan, Xudong; Li, Na; Liu, Pei

    2015-08-01

    A young female complained repeated nasal discharge for over three months with discomfort of right cheek, and oral antibiotics had less effect. She has a history of "root canal therapy" five years before. Physical examination found purulent secretion in the right middle nasal meatus, and light tenderness in the right side of the maxillary sinus area. The CT scan of paranasal sinus shown possible fungal infection of right maxillary sinus. Finally the nasal endoscopic surgery confirmed the fungus ball of right maxillary sinus with foreign body (the root canal filling material). PMID:26685411

  20. Septic Lateral Sinus Thrombosis: Sinus Exploration Is Unnecessary

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Gautam Bir; Arora, Rubeena; Garg, Sunil; Kumar, Deepak; Ranjan, Shruti

    2016-01-01

    The algorithm of treatment of septic lateral sinus thrombosis (SLST) has undergone a paradigm shift with the understanding of the natural history of sigmoid sinus thrombosis. Thus, the recent medical literature promulgates the management of these cases with no sinus exploration. However, in view of marked paucity of literature on the cited subject, not much is known about this form of treatment. We present our experience of treating two paediatric cases of SLST with mastoid surgery and no sinus exploration: both cases had excellent recovery. Finally, conclusions are drawn in light of contemporary literature on this subject. PMID:26881164

  1. Sinus Sabaeus Scene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    25 October 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows old, light-toned, large ripples on a smoothly mantled surface in the Sinus Sabaeus region, south of Schiaparelli Basin. This image is located near 6.4oS, 341.8oW. The image covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.

  2. Anterior perineal sinus.

    PubMed

    Oliver, G C; Rubin, R J; Salvati, E P; Eisenstat, T E; Lott, J

    1991-09-01

    Each year we treat several patients with an anterior perineal sinus tract. They do not conform to commonly encountered perineal problems such as pilonidal disease, epidermal cysts, hidradenitis, fistulous abscess, or inflammatory bowel disease. In an effort to improve understanding of the problem and its clinical significance, we reviewed our practice records for the period from 1968 through 1988. Fifty-six patients underwent surgery for an anterior perineal sinus tract. In 31 patients, the clinical and pathologic condition defied classical diagnostic categorization. We have termed these lesions "anterior perineal sinuses." Their clinical characteristics, treatment, and pathologic assessment from the body of this report. Male predominance (87 percent) and midlife presentation (average age, 44 years) characterized this group. Local symptoms were present from several weeks to several years prior to treatment. Local anesthesia (74 percent) and limited surgery (100 percent) resulted in complete healing in all patients (average, 7 weeks). A 15 percent recurrence rate was noted. The pathologic evaluation demonstrated acute and chronic dermal and subcutaneous inflammation. The etiology of this process remains uncertain. Its predominance along the median raphe suggests a congenital midline inclusion disorder. PMID:1914743

  3. Bacteria in chronic maxillary sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Karma, P; Jokipii, L; Sipilä, P; Luotonen, J; Jokipii, A M

    1979-07-01

    Sixty-one chronically inflamed maxillary sinuses produced 131 bacterial strains from mucosal pieces that were taken during a Caldwell-Luc operation and cultured aerobically and anaerobically. Sinus secretions showed only 62 and nasal secretions 106 bacterial strains. Fourteen mucosal strains, including 11 Haemophilus influenzae, grew heavily. None of 24 mucosal anaerobes showed heavy growth. Of 52 antral mucosae with culturable bacteria, 37 disclosed mixed and 15 pure growth. The bacteriological characteristics of the diseased sinus and the nose did not correlate. The duration or extent of the disease, the macroscopic appearance of the diseased sinus, or the presence or absence of allergy were unrelated to bacteriological findings, except that H influenzae was concentrated in purulent sinuses. Intraoperative culture of antral mucosa seems to give the most reliable picture of the bacteriological condition in chronic maxillary sinusitis. PMID:313206

  4. Sinusitis. A review for generalists.

    PubMed Central

    Reuler, J B; Lucas, L M; Kumar, K L

    1995-01-01

    A frequent complication of the common cold, sinusitis is one of the most prevalent problems seen in general medical and emergency department practices. In addition, nosocomial sinus infection, particularly in intensive care units, is being recognized more frequently. Decision making about managing patients with sinusitis is based primarily on the history and, to a lesser extent, the findings of the physical examination. Images Figure 2. Figure 3. PMID:7667982

  5. Odontogenic maxillary sinusitis: a review.

    PubMed

    Simuntis, Regimantas; Kubilius, Ričardas; Vaitkus, Saulius

    2014-01-01

    Maxillary sinusitis of odontogenic origin is a well-known condition in both the dental and otolaryngology communities. It occurs when the Schneiderian membrane is violated by conditions arising from dentoalveolar unit. This type of sinusitis differs in its pathophysiology, microbiology, diagnostics and management from sinusitis of other causes, therefore, failure to accurately identify a dental cause in these patients usually lead to persistent symptomatology and failure of medical and surgical therapies directed toward sinusitis. Unilateral recalcitrant disease associated with foul smelling drainage is a most common feature of odontogenic sinusitis. Also, high-resolution CT scans and cone-beam volumetric computed tomography can assist in identifying dental disease. Sometimes dental treatment alone is adequate to resolve the odontogenic sinusitis and sometimes concomitant or subsequent functional endoscopic sinus surgery or Caldwell-Luc operation is required. The aim of this article is to give a review of the most common causes, symptoms, diagnostic and treatment methods of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis. Search on Cochrane Library, PubMed and Science Direct data bases by key words resulted in 35 articles which met our criteria. It can be concluded that the incidence of odontogenic sinusitis is likely underreported in the available literature. PMID:25209225

  6. Understanding Biofilms in Chronic Sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Tajudeen, Bobby A; Schwartz, Joseph S; Palmer, James N

    2016-02-01

    Chronic sinusitis is a burdensome disease that has substantial individual and societal impact. Although great advances in medical and surgical therapies have been made, some patients continue to have recalcitrant infections. Microbial biofilms have been implicated as a cause of recalcitrant chronic sinusitis, and recent studies have tried to better understand the pathogenesis of chronic sinusitis as it relates to microbial biofilms. Here, we provide an overview of biofilms in chronic sinusitis with emphasis on pathogenesis, treatment, and future directions. In addition, recent evidence is presented, elucidating the role of bitter taste receptors as a possible key factor leading to biofilm formation. PMID:26758863

  7. A Rare Cavernous Hemangioma of the Adrenal Gland

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Cheng; Wu, Pengjie; Zhu, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Adrenal cavernous hemangiomas are rare nonfunctioning benign tumors. This case report presents a patient with a huge nonfunctioning adrenal cavernous hemangioma presenting as an adrenal incidentaloma suspicious for adrenal myelolipoma. Although adrenal cavernous hemangiomas are rare, they should be considered as a part of the differential diagnosis of adrenal neoplasms. The proper treatment is surgical excision due the risk of spontaneous tumor rupture and the difficulty of ruling out malignancy. PMID:26793524

  8. [Cavernous hemangioma of the liver (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Lanuza, A; Olagüe, R; Vallcanera, A; Gracía, A; Páramo, C; Villanueva, A

    1978-02-01

    A three-month old asymptomatic infant was incidentally found to have an abdominal mass. Through standard radiological and vascular procedures it was defined as being of hepatic origin, vascular etiology and of benign prognosis. Differences among cavernous hemangioma, hepatoma, metastasis and hemangio-endothelioma are summarized. The importance of angiography is emphasized as an essential procedure previous to the surgical evaluation and therapy. PMID:566065

  9. Thoracic Cavernous Lymphangioma Provoking Massive Chyloptysis

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Robert; Hodges, Jeffrey; Harness-Brumley, Cayce; Girod, Carlos; Bartolome, Sonja

    2013-01-01

    Chyloptysis is a relatively rare embodiment of disease that encompasses a lengthy differential and provides many diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Presented here is the case of a young woman with massive chyloptysis due to a thoracic cavernous lymphangioma arising in the peripartum period. The severity of her condition mandated the use of cardiopulmonary bypass to resect her lymphangioma. We believe that the extent of her symptoms, etiology of disease, and surgical management represent a unique scenario in the literature. PMID:26425583

  10. Allowable pillar to diameter ratio for strategic petroleum reserve caverns.

    SciTech Connect

    Ehgartner, Brian L.; Park, Byoung Yoon

    2011-05-01

    This report compiles 3-D finite element analyses performed to evaluate the stability of Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) caverns over multiple leach cycles. When oil is withdrawn from a cavern in salt using freshwater, the cavern enlarges. As a result, the pillar separating caverns in the SPR fields is reduced over time due to usage of the reserve. The enlarged cavern diameters and smaller pillars reduce underground stability. Advances in geomechanics modeling enable the allowable pillar to diameter ratio (P/D) to be defined. Prior to such modeling capabilities, the allowable P/D was established as 1.78 based on some very limited experience in other cavern fields. While appropriate for 1980, the ratio conservatively limits the allowable number of oil drawdowns and hence limits the overall utility and life of the SPR cavern field. Analyses from all four cavern fields are evaluated along with operating experience gained over the past 30 years to define a new P/D for the reserve. A new ratio of 1.0 is recommended. This ratio is applicable only to existing SPR caverns.

  11. Strategic petroleum reserve (SPR): oil-storage cavern, Sulphur Mines 6 certification tests and analysis. [Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Beasley, R.R.

    1982-04-01

    Well leak tests and a cavern pressure test were conducted in June and July 1981 and indicated that oil leakage from the cavern is unlikely to exceed the DOE criterion if oil is stored at near atmospheric wellhead brine pressures and higher pressures are only used for short periods of oil fill and withdrawal. The data indicate that cavern structural failure during oil storage is unlikely and that there was no leakage from cavern 6 to the adjacent cavern 7. Because of the proximity of cavern 6 to cavern 7, it is recommended that a similar type of oil be stored in these two caverns.

  12. Coronary Sinus Lead Extraction.

    PubMed

    Cronin, Edmond M; Wilkoff, Bruce L

    2015-12-01

    Expanded indications for cardiac resynchronization therapy and the increasing incidence of cardiac implantable electronic device infection have led to an increased need for coronary sinus (CS) lead extraction. The CS presents unique anatomical obstacles to successful lead extraction. Training and facility requirements for CS lead extraction should mirror those for other leads. Here we review the indications, technique, and results of CS lead extraction. Published success rates and complications are similar to those reported for other leads, although multiple techniques may be required. Re-implantation options may be limited, which should be incorporated into pre-procedural decision making. PMID:26596810

  13. Maxillary sinus carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, F.; Ogura, J.H.

    1981-01-01

    Primary site control, anatomical site of failure, survival, and complications of treatment were determined in a retrospective review of primary maxillary sinus carcinoma. Sixty-one patients were treated by radiation followed by surgery and 35 by radiation alone. Primary tumor control was achieved in 69% of patients receiving combined treatment, 14% of patients treated with radiation alone, and 49% of all patients. Local control did not differ with histological type. Virtually all epidermoid and undifferentiated carcinoma recurrences occurred within 2 years, but 27% of adenocarcinomas recurred after 2 years.

  14. Paranasal sinus cancer.

    PubMed

    Jégoux, F; Métreau, A; Louvel, G; Bedfert, C

    2013-12-01

    Paranasal sinus cancers are rare, aggressive tumours that are usually diagnosed at an advanced stage. They differ from other upper aerodigestive tract tumours in terms of risk factors (wood dust exposure) and premalignant lesions (inverted papillomas). The diagnosis should be suspected in the presence of unilateral and continuous nasal sinus symptoms or bone lysis or a heterogeneous opacity on imaging. The definitive positive diagnosis is based on histological examination. Staging must comprise face, brain, neck and chest CT as well as face and brain MRI. Tumours are stage T3-T4 in two-thirds of cases and are associated with cervical lymph node involvement in 10% of squamous cell carcinomas and 4% of adenocarcinomas. These tumours must be managed in reference centres experienced in all of the various treatment modalities. Treatment decisions must be based on a multidisciplinary approach comprising local, regional and national REFCOR expertise (French rare head and neck cancer network). Optimal treatment is surgical resection with clear margins associated with adjuvant intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Although it has been improved over recent decades, the prognosis remains poor with local recurrences occurring in 38% of cases and a five-year overall survival of about 63%. PMID:23523040

  15. Adult Burkitt lymphoma originating in the sphenoid sinus: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Chennupati, Sri Kiran; Govindaraj, Satish; Setzen, Gavin; Chiu, Alexander G

    2009-07-01

    Burkitt lymphoma is a high-grade B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma. The endemic form of this malignancy occurs primarily in children aged 5 to 7 years, and it presents with jaw and facial bone involvement. The sporadic form affects older children (mean age: 12.2 yr) and often manifests as an abdominal mass; it rarely involves the head and neck. The presence of any type of lymphoma in the paranasal sinuses is rare. We report a case of Burkitt lymphoma that originated in the sphenoid sinus in a 66-year-old white woman. The patient presented with hypoesthesia in the left V1 and V2 distributions and frequent left-sided headaches. Imaging revealed that the destructive lesion had spread into the cavernous sinus and infratemporal fossa. Repeat imaging showed progression of the lesion in just 1 month. An endoscopic sphenoidotomy was performed to obtain a tissue specimen, and a diagnosis of sporadic Burkitt lymphoma was established on the basis of its clinical, morphologic, and immunohistochemical characteristics. The patient underwent chemotherapy and radiation. Short-term follow-up imaging showed that the lesion had disappeared, and the patient remained disease-free at 3 years of follow-up. This case is one of the few reported cases of true adult Burkitt lymphoma originating in the sphenoid sinus. We discuss the rapid progression of the disease and the considerable amount of invasion that can occur with minimal symptoms. PMID:19623516

  16. Management of Frontal Sinus Tumors.

    PubMed

    Selleck, Anne Morgan; Desai, Dipan; Thorp, Brian D; Ebert, Charles S; Zanation, Adam M

    2016-08-01

    The most common primary tumors of the frontal sinus are osteomas and inverted papillomas, although a variety of other tumors involving this space have been reported. With the advent of new surgical techniques and instrumentation, an endoscopic approach to this region has become feasible. The preoperative assessment and decision making must take into account the complexity of frontal sinus anatomy, tumor type, tumor location, and associated attachments. These procedures allow adequate visualization, tumor removal, and postoperative monitoring, and preserve fairly normal sinus function. Open techniques may also be required and should be in the surgeon's armamentarium. PMID:27450620

  17. Maxillary sinusitis with pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, Rashmi; Prakash, Ved; Singh, Abhishek Bahadur; Saheer, S

    2014-01-01

    Tubercular infection of the nasal cavity is an infrequently encountered condition. More so, after the discovery of relevant antibiotics, nasal sinus tuberculosis is not commonly seen. Few cases have reported tuberculosis of the paranasal sinuses, nasopharynx and larynx. With the increasing incidence of HIV, these rare forms of infection have started re-emerging. We present a case of a middle aged man presenting with nasal cavity lesion along with pulmonary tuberculosis, which came to light only after the diagnosis of maxillary sinus tuberculosis. PMID:25085948

  18. Salt caverns show promise for nonhazardous oil field waste disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Veil, J.A.

    1996-11-18

    Salt caverns show promise for the disposal of non-hazardous oil field wastes, and there are no apparent regulatory barriers to this application. Solution-mined salt caverns have been used for many years for storing hydrocarbon products. Argonne National laboratory has reviewed the legality, technical suitability, and feasibility of disposing of nonhazardous oil and gas exploration and production wastes in salt caverns. An analysis of regulations indicates that there are no outright regulatory prohibitions on cavern disposal of oil field wastes at either the federal level or in the 11 oil-producing states that were studied (Kansas, Louisiana, Michigan, Mississippi, New Mexico, New York, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, and Texas). The paper discusses the two types of salt deposits in the US, regulatory concerns, wastes, cavern design, disposal operations, closure and remediation, and results of the feasibility study.

  19. Northern Sinus Meridiani Stereo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-341, 25 April 2003

    This is a stereo (3-d anaglyph) composite of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) wide angle images of northern Sinus Meridiani near 2oN, 0oW. The light-toned materials at the south (bottom) end of the picture are considered to be thick (100-200 meters; 300-600 ft) exposures of sedimentary rock. Several ancient meteor impact craters are being exhumed from within these layered materials. To view in stereo, use '3-d' glasses with red over the left eye, and blue over the right. The picture covers an area approximately 113 km (70 mi) wide; north is up.

  20. Paranasal sinus obliteration in Wegener granulomatosis

    SciTech Connect

    Paling, M.R.; Roberts, R.L.; Fauci, A.S.

    1982-08-01

    The authors report 14 cases of Wegener granulomatosis in which one or more paranasal sinuses were obliterated by bone. The maxillary antra were involved in all cases, with the other sinuses being affected less frequently. These changes are thought to result from chronic bacterial sinusitis superimposed on the granulomatous vasculitic process. Computed tomography dramatically demonstrated the bone changes, consisting of a combination of sinus wall thickening and trabeculated new bone formation within the sinuses.

  1. Superior Sagittal Sinus Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Nakase, Hiroyuki; Takeshima, Toshikazu; Sakaki, Toshisuke; Heimann, Axel; Kempski, Oliver

    1998-01-01

    Sinus-vein thrombosis is increasingly recognized as a much more frequent neurological disorder than was anticipated before. We examined the pathophysiology of superior sagittal sinus thrombosis (SSST) from 19 patients and a rat SSST model. We treated 19 cases with SSST who were diagnosed by angiography. The symptoms of nine patients, who suffered multiple intracerebral hemorrhage, were abrupt. In another ten patients who recovered satisfactorily, the condition progressed slowly and they were treated with heparin and urokinase. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that female, sudden onset (<24 hours) and posterior 1/3 occlusion are related to bad outcome. Experimentally, SSST was induced by ligation and slow injection of kaolin-cephalin suspension into SSS in rats. Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and tissue hemoglobin oxygen saturation (Hb Sao2) using a “scanning” technique were measured at 48 locations, and fluorescence angiography was performed before and until 90 min after SSST induction. After 48 hours the animals were sacrificed for histological studies. Decrease of rCBF and tissue Hb SO2 and brain damage were seen in group B (n = 10) with an extension of thrombosis from SSS into cortical veins. Brain injury was not observed in group A (n = 8) with SSS thrombus alone and sham-operated animals (n = 5). In conclusion, a brain with acute extension of thrombus from SSS into cortical veins becomes critical for cerebral blood supply and metabolism. CBF, tissue HbSO2 and repeated angiography can be helpful monitors for the early detection of critical conditions after SSST. As to the therapy, restraint on the ongoing thrombus is essential to protect the brain with SSST, and we encourage the use of combination therapy of heparin and urokinase as early as possible in cases without intracerebral hemorrhage. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2 PMID:17171061

  2. [A case of mediastinal cavernous hemangioma].

    PubMed

    Maebeya, S; Nishimura, O; Yokoi, H; Shimizu, T; Yoshimasu, T; Naito, Y

    1990-03-01

    A 6-year-old boy had an abnormal shadow on the chest X-ray film. It showed a tumor shadow with calcification on the right hilum. The plain CT scan showed an anterior mediastinal mass and its density was similar to that of large vessels. On the angio CT scan the lesion displayed a much lower enhancement than large vessels. The tumor was resected completely by median sternotomy. It was 5.6 X 3.6 X 3.0 cm in size and contained a phlebolith 5 mm in diameter. The histological diagnosis was cavernous hemangioma. PMID:2348129

  3. Primary Intraosseous Cavernous Hemangioma in the Skull.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Guan, Jian; Ma, Wenbin; Li, Yongning; Xing, Bing; Ren, Zuyuan; Su, Changbao; Wang, Renzhi

    2016-03-01

    Primary intraosseous cavernous hemangiomas (PICHs) are benign vascular tumors that may involve any part of the body. PICH occurs more frequently in the spine and less commonly in skull. The earliest description in the English literature was in 1845 by Toynbee, who reported a vascular tumor arising in the confines of the parietal bone. Skull PICHs do not always have typical radiologic features and should always be considered in the differential diagnosis of malignant skull lesions. We now reviewed and analyzed related literatures in detail with reporting a rare case of PICH in the left front bone that was surgically resected. PMID:26986133

  4. Primary Intraosseous Cavernous Hemangioma in the Skull

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi; Guan, Jian; Ma, Wenbin; Li, Yongning; Xing, Bing; Ren, Zuyuan; Su, Changbao; Wang, Renzhi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Primary intraosseous cavernous hemangiomas (PICHs) are benign vascular tumors that may involve any part of the body. PICH occurs more frequently in the spine and less commonly in skull. The earliest description in the English literature was in 1845 by Toynbee, who reported a vascular tumor arising in the confines of the parietal bone. Skull PICHs do not always have typical radiologic features and should always be considered in the differential diagnosis of malignant skull lesions. We now reviewed and analyzed related literatures in detail with reporting a rare case of PICH in the left front bone that was surgically resected. PMID:26986133

  5. Sinus Rinsing and Neti Pots

    MedlinePlus

    ... irrigate their sinuses (nose) 3-5 using contaminated tap water. If you are making a solution for irrigating, ... amebic meningoencephalitis death with culturable Naegleria fowleri in tap water from a U.S. treated public drinking water system. ...

  6. Sinus Balloon Dilation as Treatment for Acute Sphenoid Sinusitis with Impaired Vision for a Child

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yin; Chen, Kangbing; Wang, Zonggui

    2016-01-01

    This paper is about sinus balloon dilatation in treatment of acute left sphenoid sinusitis with left impaired vision in a child. Balloon catheter dilatation (BCD) of the sinus ostia is a new technique. It has been shown to be a minimally invasive technique to manage chronic sinusitis. However, this method is rarely used in the treatment of acute sinusitis. So far, we know of no reported cases of sinus balloon dilatation in treatment of this case, especially for children. PMID:27006660

  7. MC-19 Margaritifer Sinus Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Mars digital-image mosaic merged with color of the MC-19 quadrangle, Margaritifer Sinus region of Mars. Heavily cratered highlands, which dominate the Margaritifer Sinus quadrangle, are marked by large expanses of chaotic terrain. In the northwestern part, the major rift zone of Valles Marineris connects with a broad canyon filled with chaotic terrain. Latitude range -30 to 0, longitude range 0 to 45 degrees.

  8. MC-20 Sinus Sabeus Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Mars digital-image mosaic merged with color of the MC-20 quadrangle, Sinus Sabeus region of Mars. Heavily cratered highlands dominate the Sinus Sabeus quadrangle. The northern part is marked by a large impact crater, Schiaparelli. Schiaparelli is an ancient remnant of the many large impact events that occurred during the period of heavy bombardment. Latitude range -30 to 0 degrees, longitude range -45 to 0.

  9. Disposal of oil field wastes into salt caverns: Feasibility, legality, risk, and costs

    SciTech Connect

    Veil, J.A.

    1997-10-01

    Salt caverns can be formed through solution mining in the bedded or domal salt formations that are found in many states. Salt caverns have traditionally been used for hydrocarbon storage, but caverns have also been used to dispose of some types of wastes. This paper provides an overview of several years of research by Argonne National Laboratory on the feasibility and legality of using salt caverns for disposing of oil field wastes, the risks to human populations from this disposal method, and the cost of cavern disposal. Costs are compared between the four operating US disposal caverns and other commercial disposal options located in the same geographic area as the caverns. Argonne`s research indicates that disposal of oil field wastes into salt caverns is feasible and legal. The risk from cavern disposal of oil field wastes appears to be below accepted safe risk thresholds. Disposal caverns are economically competitive with other disposal options.

  10. Evaluating the effects of the number of caverns on the performance of underground oil storage facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E.L.; Ehgartner, B.L.

    1992-01-01

    Three dimensional finite element calculations were performed to investigate the effect field size, in terms of the number of caverns, on the performance of SPR oil storage caverns leached in domal salt (interms of surface subsidence, storage losses, and cavern integrity). The calculations were performed for cavern fields containing 1, 7, 19, and an infinite number of caverns. The magnitude and volume of subsidence was significantly affected by increasing the number of caverns (nearly an order of magnitude increase was predicted for each increase in field size), while the extent of subsidence (approximately 2000 m fromthe center of the field) and storage loss were not. Furthermore, the percentage of storage loss volume manifested as surface subsidence increased as the cavern field was enlarged. This was attributed to elasticvolumetric dilatation of overlying strata. The multiple cavern calculations demonstrate that storage losses are greater for caverns farther from the center of the caverns field. Based on an accumulated strain stability criteria, the larger cavern fields are predicted to have a shorter life. This criteria also indicates that caverns on the periphery of a field may show signs of instability before the inner caverns. The West Hackberry site (containing 22 caverns) subsidence data closely agrees with the 19 cavern model subsidence predictions, providing confidence in the calculations. Even a 19 cavern field, substantially large by SPR standards, does not approach the behavior predicted by infinite cavern models (which are frequently used because they are economical). This demonstrates that 3D modeling is required to accurately investigate the performance of a multi-cavern array. Although based on a typical SPR cavern design, the results of this study describe mechanics common to all multi-cavern fields and should, in general, be useful tocavern engineers and architects.

  11. CaveMan Version 3.0: A Software System for SPR Cavern Pressure Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    BALLARD,SANFORD; EHGARTNER,BRIAN L.

    2000-07-01

    The U. S. Department of Energy Strategic Petroleum Reserve currently has approximately 500 million barrels of crude oil stored in 62 caverns solution-mined in salt domes along the Gulf Coast of Louisiana and Texas. One of the challenges of operating these caverns is ensuring that none of the fluids in the caverns are leaking into the environment. The current approach is to test the mechanical integrity of all the wells entering each cavern approximately once every five years. An alternative approach to detecting cavern leaks is to monitor the cavern pressure, since leaking fluid would act to reduce cavern pressure. Leak detection by pressure monitoring is complicated by other factors that influence cavern pressure, the most important of which are thermal expansion and contraction of the fluids in the cavern as they come into thermal equilibrium with the host salt, and cavern volume reduction due to salt creep. Cavern pressure is also influenced by cavern enlargement resulting from salt dissolution following introduction of raw water or unsaturated brine into the cavern. However, this effect only lasts for a month or two following a fluid injection. In order to implement a cavern pressure monitoring program, a software program called CaveMan has been developed. It includes thermal, creep and salt dissolution models and is able to predict the cavern pressurization rate based on the operational history of the cavern. Many of the numerous thermal and mechanical parameters in the model have been optimized to produce the best match between the historical data and the model predictions. Future measurements of cavern pressure are compared to the model predictions, and significant differences in cavern pressure set program flags that notify cavern operators of a potential problem. Measured cavern pressures that are significantly less than those predicted by the model may indicate the existence of a leak.

  12. Strategic petroleum reserve caverns casing damage update 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Munson, D.E.; Molecke, M.A.; Neal, J.T.

    1998-01-01

    Hanging casing strings are used for oil and brine transfer in the domal salt storage caverns of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). Damage to these casings is of concern because hanging string replacement is costly and because of implications on cavern stability. Although the causes of casing damage are not always well defined, many events leading to damage are assumed to be the result of salt falls impacting the hanging strings. However, in some cases, operational aspects may be suspected. The history of damage to hanging strings is updated in this study to include the most recent events. Potential general domal and local operational and material factors that could influence the tendency for caverns to have salt falls are examined in detail. As a result of this examination, general factors, such as salt dome anomalies and crude type, and most of the operational factors, such as geometry, location and depressurizations, are not believed to be primary causes of casing damage. Further analysis is presented of the accumulation of insolubles during cavern solutioning and accumulation of salt fall material on the cavern floor. Inaccuracies in sump geometry probably make relative cavern insolubles contents uncertain. However, determination of the salt fall accumulations, which are more accurate, suggest that the caverns with the largest salt fall accumulations show the greatest number of hanging string events. There is good correlation between the accumulation rate and the number of events when the event numbers are corrected to an equivalent number for a single hanging string in a quiescent, operating cavern. The principal factor that determines the propensity for a cavern to exhibit this behavior is thought to be the effect of impurity content on the fracture behavior of salt.

  13. Disposal of nonhazardous oil field wastes into salt caverns

    SciTech Connect

    Veil, J.; Elcock, D.; Raivel, M.; Caudle, D.

    1996-12-31

    Bedded and domal salt deposits occur in many states. If salt deposits are thick enough, salt caverns can be formed through solution mining. These caverns are created either incidentally as a result of salt recovery or intentionally to create an underground chamber that can be used for storing hydrocarbon products or disposing of wastes. This paper evaluates the legality, feasibility, and suitability of disposing of nonhazardous oil and gas exploration, development, and production wastes (hereafter referred to as oil field wastes, unless otherwise noted) in salt caverns.

  14. Cerebral sinus venous thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Alvis-Miranda, Hernando Raphael; Milena Castellar-Leones, Sandra; Alcala-Cerra, Gabriel; Rafael Moscote-Salazar, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral sinus venous thrombosis (CSVT) is a rare phenomenon that can be seen with some frequency in young patients. CSVT is a multifactorial condition with gender-related specific causes, with a wide clinical presentation, the leading causes differ between developed and developing countries, converting CSVT in a condition characterized by a highly variable clinical spectra, difficult diagnosis, variable etiologies and prognosis that requires fine medical skills and a high suspicious index. Patients who presents with CSVT should underwent to CT-scan venography (CVT) and to the proper inquiry of the generating cause. This disease can affect the cerebral venous drainage and related anatomical structure. The symptoms may appear in relation to increased intracranial pressure imitating a pseudotumorcerebri. Prognosis depends on the early detection. Correcting the cause, generally the complications can be prevented. Mortality trends have diminished, and with the new technologies, surely it will continue. This work aims to review current knowledge about CSVT including its pathogenesis, etiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment. PMID:24347950

  15. Cerebral sinus venous thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Alvis-Miranda, Hernando Raphael; Milena Castellar-Leones, Sandra; Alcala-Cerra, Gabriel; Rafael Moscote-Salazar, Luis

    2013-10-01

    Cerebral sinus venous thrombosis (CSVT) is a rare phenomenon that can be seen with some frequency in young patients. CSVT is a multifactorial condition with gender-related specific causes, with a wide clinical presentation, the leading causes differ between developed and developing countries, converting CSVT in a condition characterized by a highly variable clinical spectra, difficult diagnosis, variable etiologies and prognosis that requires fine medical skills and a high suspicious index. Patients who presents with CSVT should underwent to CT-scan venography (CVT) and to the proper inquiry of the generating cause. This disease can affect the cerebral venous drainage and related anatomical structure. The symptoms may appear in relation to increased intracranial pressure imitating a pseudotumorcerebri. Prognosis depends on the early detection. Correcting the cause, generally the complications can be prevented. Mortality trends have diminished, and with the new technologies, surely it will continue. This work aims to review current knowledge about CSVT including its pathogenesis, etiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment. PMID:24347950

  16. Endoscopic sinus surgery for orbital subperiosteal abscess secondary to sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Bhargava, D; Sankhla, D; Ganesan, A; Chand, P

    2001-09-01

    Subperiosteal orbital abscess (SPA) is a serious complication of paranasal sinusitis, which can lead to blindness or even death. A quick response is necessary as this condition is treatable. Early surgical intervention is indicated if there is risk of visual loss, or if no improvement is observed within 48 hours of starting medical therapy. Three patients with orbital SPA secondary to sinusitis treated successfully by Functional Endoscopic Sinus Surgery (FESS) are presented in this case series. The surgical indications were impending visual loss with an abscess and cellulitis impinging on the optic nerve in one child and in the other two patients, a lack of clinical response within 48 hours after starting systemic antibiotic. CT scans, nasal endoscopy, and ophthalmologic examinations are mandatory during the evaluation process. The advantages of FESS in these patients were the avoidance of external ethmoidectomy and its external facial scar, an early drainage of the affected sinuses, SPA, and the eradication of the disease from the fronto-ethmoidal region leading to an enhanced recovery and a reduced hospital stay. FESS is also a safe, convenient and minimally invasive procedure in patients presenting with serious complications of sinusitis. PMID:11721506

  17. Economic implications of chronic sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Gliklich, R E; Metson, R

    1998-03-01

    An approach to cost analysis useful in understanding the economic implications of surgical intervention on chronic sinusitis is break-even time analysis. The break-even time is the time until cost savings associated with improved health status after surgery equal the up-front costs of the operation itself. Data from 100 consecutive patients undergoing sinus operation were obtained by survey before surgery and at quarterly intervals for 1 year with statistically validated outcome measures (Medical Outcome Study Short Form 36-Item Health Survey, Chronic Sinusitis Survey). Direct and indirect costs were obtained or derived for this cohort. The cost of sinus medications, including over-the-counter remedies, nasal steroid sprays, and antibiotics, averaged $1220 per patient per year before surgery and $629 after surgery (p < 0.0001), which is a 48% reduction. Surgical costs averaged $6490 per patient. Economic modeling predicted a break-even time of approximately 7 years assuming a 3% surgical revision rate per year, a 3% decrease in sickness-related disability, and a 5% discount rate. The model was sensitive to changes in the total cost of operation, the surgical revision rate, and the anticipated disability benefit. We conclude that significant direct and indirect medical cost savings may be achieved after surgical intervention for chronic sinusitis and these savings eventually break even with the total cost of surgery itself. PMID:9527115

  18. Progression of unilateral moyamoya disease resulted in spontaneous occlusion of ipsilateral cavernous dural arteriovenous fistula: Case report.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peng; Xu, Ya; Lv, Xianli; Ge, Huijian; Lv, Ming; Li, Youxiang

    2016-06-01

    The pathogenic association between cavernous dural arteriovenous fistula (CDAVF) and moyamoya disease remains unclear. This unusual case is the first report of a progression of unilateral moyamoya disease resulting in the spontaneous occlusion of ipsilateral CDAVF. A 52-year-old woman presented with two-week spontaneous exophthalmos, chemosis and tinnitus, and cerebral angiography showed a right CDAVF coexisting with ipsilateral moyamoya disease. Transvenous approaches through the inferior petrosal sinus and facial vein were attempted but failed. However, a progression of the moyamoya disease and disappearance of the CDAVF were observed on one month follow-up angiogram in accordance with the resolution of clinical symptoms. This extremely rare coincidental presentation may have deeper pathogenic implications. This case report may give a clue to the underlying mechanism of the progression of moyamoya disease and occlusion of the CDAVF. PMID:26916656

  19. [Cavernous hemangioma confined to the tongue].

    PubMed

    Galletti, C

    1988-12-01

    The authors relate on a case of an isolated cavernous haemangioma of the body of the tongue characterized by considerable size. Such neoplasms, usually described within the more extensive chapter of the more common angiomatous lesion of the oral cavity, are relatively rare. The authors describe a personal case discussing the diagnostic spects of such lesion and emphasizing the importance of the arteriography of the carotid artery and the of the selective arteriography of the lingual arteries, especially in considering surgery. Biopsies are not recommended. After discussing the histopathological and clinical aspects of such lesions the Authors emphasize the therapeutic ones. Even though radiotherapy, cryotherapy, laser therapy, medical treatment, injection of sclerosing substances and the selective embolization, of the lingual artery seem to have some efficacy, the authors conclude that surgery in the therapy of choice in the isolated vascular lesions of the body of the tongue. PMID:3274631

  20. Cerebral cavernous malformation proteins at a glance.

    PubMed

    Draheim, Kyle M; Fisher, Oriana S; Boggon, Titus J; Calderwood, David A

    2014-02-15

    Loss-of-function mutations in genes encoding KRIT1 (also known as CCM1), CCM2 (also known as OSM and malcavernin) or PDCD10 (also known as CCM3) cause cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs). These abnormalities are characterized by dilated leaky blood vessels, especially in the neurovasculature, that result in increased risk of stroke, focal neurological defects and seizures. The three CCM proteins can exist in a trimeric complex, and each of these essential multi-domain adaptor proteins also interacts with a range of signaling, cytoskeletal and adaptor proteins, presumably accounting for their roles in a range of basic cellular processes including cell adhesion, migration, polarity and apoptosis. In this Cell Science at a Glance article and the accompanying poster, we provide an overview of current models of CCM protein function focusing on how known protein-protein interactions might contribute to cellular phenotypes and highlighting gaps in our current understanding. PMID:24481819

  1. Reference value developed for mechanical integrity of storage caverns

    SciTech Connect

    Crotogino, F.

    1996-10-28

    A reference value to verify the mechanical integrity of salt-cavern wells used in hydrocarbon storage has been developed. Salt caverns play important roles in large-scale storage of hydrocarbon gases and liquids. Required for safe and economical operation of these storage caverns is verification of the external mechanical integrity of the access (injection and withdrawal) wells. This study had the following goals: Provision of an overview of current practice; and Development of a reference for external well mechanical-integrity testing with respect to performance, data evaluation, and assessment. The storage cavern operators expected to gain the following: Comparability between method and assessments; Aid in influencing the movement towards standardization by regulators; and A firm technical base for use in litigation between the operator and other parties.

  2. Optic chiasmal cavernous angioma: A rare suprasellar vascular malformation

    PubMed Central

    Abou-Al-Shaar, Hussam; Bahatheq, Ayman; Takroni, Radwan; Al-Thubaiti, Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Background: Suprasellar cavernous malformation in the optic pathway is not commonly encountered. To date, there are only few reports present in the literature. Case Description: The authors report a rare case of suprasellar optic pathway cavernous malformation in a 33-year-old female who presented with progressive visual loss. Her imaging revealed a large heterogeneous, hyperintense, hemorrhagic right suprasellar extra-axial complex cystic structure, causing mass effect on the adjacent hypothalamus and third ventricle displacing these structures. Gross total resection of the lesion was achieved utilizing a right frontal craniotomy approach. Histopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of suprasellar chiasmal cavernous malformation. Conclusion: Although visual pathway cavernous malformation is a rare event, it should be included in the differential diagnosis of lesions occurring suprasellarly in the visual pathway and hypothalamus. PMID:27583178

  3. Urethral cavernous hemangioma in a female patient: a rare entity

    PubMed Central

    Bolat, Mustafa Suat; Yüzüncü, Kubilay; Akdeniz, Ekrem; Demirdoven, Ayse Nurten

    2015-01-01

    Genitourinary hemangiomas are rare entities of the urinary system. We reported a female patient who suffered dyspareunia and intermitant hematuria that was proved as urethral cavernous hemangioma. Despite its benign nature, hemangiomas may recur due to incomplet excision. PMID:26985270

  4. Conventional management of inappropriate sinus tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Olshansky, Brian; Sullivan, Renee M

    2016-06-01

    Inappropriate sinus tachycardia is a challenging problem to manage. There are limited data on the best method to evaluate and treat the problem. Here, we consider a conventional approach to inappropriate sinus tachycardia. PMID:26164138

  5. Sinusitis: Special Considerations for Aging Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... Nasal crusting Vague facial pressure Decreased sense of smell and taste For the most part, sinusitis symptoms, ... to “sinus trouble”), and a decreased sense of smell and taste. However, it is a mistake to ...

  6. Oil field waste disposal in salt caverns: An information website

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasko, D.; Veil, J. A.

    1999-12-10

    Argonne National Laboratory has completed the construction of a Website for the US Department of Energy (DOE) that provides detailed information on salt caverns and their use for disposing of nonhazardous oil field wastes (NOW) and naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM). Specific topics in the Website include the following: descriptions of salt deposits and salt caverns within the US, salt cavern construction methods, potential types of wastes, waste emplacement, regulatory issues, costs, carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic human health risks associated with postulated cavern release scenarios, new information on cavern disposal (e.g., upcoming meetings, regulatory issues, etc.), other studies supported by the National Petroleum Technology Office (NPTO) (e.g., considerations of site location, cavern stability, development issues, and bedded salt characterization in the Midland Basin), and links to other associated Web sites. In addition, the Website allows downloadable access to reports prepared on the topic that were funded by DOE. Because of the large quantities of NOW and NORM wastes generated annually by the oil industry, information presented on this Website is particularly interesting and valuable to project managers, regulators, and concerned citizens.

  7. Giant cystic cerebral cavernous malformation with multiple calcification - case report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Il-Chun; Kwon, Ki-Young; Rhee, Jong-Joo; Lee, Jong-Won; Hur, Jin-Woo; Lee, Hyun-Koo

    2013-09-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformation with giant cysts is rare and literature descriptions of its clinical features are few. In this case study, the authors describe the clinical symptoms, radiological findings, and pathological diagnosis of cerebral cavernous malformations with giant cysts, reviewing the relevant literature to clearly differentiate this from other disease entities. The authors present a case of a 19-year-old male with a giant cystic cavernous malformation, who was referred to the division of neurosurgery due to right sided motor weakness (grade II/II). Imaging revealed a large homogenous cystic mass, 7.2×4.6×6 cm in size, in the left fronto-parietal lobe and basal ganglia. The mass had an intra-cystic lesion, abutting the basal portion of the mass. The initial diagnosis considered this mass a glioma or infection. A left frontal craniotomy was performed, followed by a transcortical approach to resect the mass. Total removal was accomplished without post-operative complications. An open biopsy and a histopathological exam diagnosed the mass as a giant cystic cavernous malformation. Imaging appearances of giant cavernous malformations may vary. The clinical features, radiological features, and management of giant cavernous malformations are described based on pertinent literature review. PMID:24167810

  8. Sudden Hemianopsia Secondary to Ethmoid Sinus Mucocele

    PubMed Central

    Morganti, Ligia; Evangelista, Leandro; Guimaraes, Roberto; Crosara, Paulo

    2014-01-01

    Paranasal sinus mucoceles are benign cystic lesions, filled with mucus, occurring due to an obstruction of involved sinus ostium. They are indolent, locally expansive, and destructive. Surgical treatment must be performed and, when done at the correct time, may prevent sequelae. We present a case of ethmoid sinus mucocele with orbit involvement and permanent optical nerve injury. PMID:25992113

  9. Sphenoid sinus barotrauma after free diving.

    PubMed

    Bourolias, Constantinos; Gkotsis, Antonios

    2011-01-01

    We report 2 cases of a 29- and a 37-year-old male patient both having sphenoid sinus barotrauma associated with free diving at about 12-m depth. A unilateral occupation of the sphenoid sinus was revealed in both cases by computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging examination of the paranasal sinuses. PMID:20022669

  10. Facial Sinuses from Dental Pathosis

    PubMed Central

    Ruprecht, A.; Chasmar, L. R.; Lanigan, D. T.

    1982-01-01

    Sinus tracts presenting on the face may be the result of dental pathosis. This etiologic possibility should be ruled out before such lesions are treated by prolonged antibiotic therapy or surgical excision. The diagnosis can often be confirmed by a good clinical intraoral examination supplemented by appropriate radiographs. Four cases are presented in which treatment of the underlying pathology resulted in resolution of the sinus tract. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9 PMID:21286180

  11. Idiopathic sphenoid sinus CSF rhinorrhoea.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Manish; Gupta, Monica; Bindra, Gavinder; Singh, Sunder

    2013-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rhinorrhoea results from a direct communication between the CSF-containing subarachnoid space and the mucosa-lined space of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses. We present a case of 40-year-old woman, presenting with clear, watery discharge through the right nostril spontaneously. The CT cisternography confirmed the diagnosis of sphenoid sinus CSF rhinorrhoea, with no intracranial pathology. The patient was managed by transnasal endoscopic procedure, wherein bath plug technique was followed using temporalis fascia and overlay grafting with fascia lata and fibrin glue. The patient has been symptom free for the last year. PMID:23616328

  12. ADVANCED UNDERGROUND GAS STORAGE CONCEPTS REFRIGERATED-MINED CAVERN STORAGE

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-01

    Limited demand and high cost has prevented the construction of hard rock caverns in this country for a number of years. The storage of natural gas in mined caverns may prove technically feasible if the geology of the targeted market area is suitable; and economically feasible if the cost and convenience of service is competitive with alternative available storage methods for peak supply requirements. It is believed that mined cavern storage can provide the advantages of high delivery rates and multiple fill-withdrawal cycles in areas where salt cavern storage is not possible. In this research project, PB-KBB merged advanced mining technologies and gas refrigeration techniques to develop conceptual designs and cost estimates to demonstrate the commercialization potential of the storage of refrigerated natural gas in hard rock caverns. Five regions of the U.S.A. were studied for underground storage development and PB-KBB reviewed the literature to determine if the geology of these regions was suitable for siting hard rock storage caverns. Area gas market conditions in these regions were also studied to determine the need for such storage. Based on an analysis of many factors, a possible site was determined to be in Howard and Montgomery Counties, Maryland. The area has compatible geology and a gas industry infrastructure for the nearby market populous of Baltimore and Washington D.C.. As Gas temperature is lowered, the compressibility of the gas reaches an optimum value. The compressibility of the gas, and the resultant gas density, is a function of temperature and pressure. This relationship can be used to commercial advantage by reducing the size of a storage cavern for a given working volume of natural gas. This study looks at this relationship and and the potential for commercialization of the process in a storage application. A conceptual process design, and cavern design were developed for various operating conditions. Potential site locations were considered

  13. Overview of Frontal Sinus Pathology and Management.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, Alejandro; Baredes, Soly; Setzen, Michael; Eloy, Jean Anderson

    2016-08-01

    The frontal sinus is the most complex of all paranasal sinuses. Given its proximity to the cranial vault and orbit, frontal sinus pathology can progress to involve these structures and lead to significant morbidity, or even mortality. Surgical management of the frontal sinus is technically challenging. Various open and endoscopic surgical techniques are available to the otolaryngologist. This article presents an overview of the major disease entities that affect the frontal sinus, with a special emphasis on treatment principles and surgical management. PMID:27329984

  14. Features of Bayou Choctaw SPR caverns and internal structure of the salt dome.

    SciTech Connect

    Munson, Darrell E.

    2007-07-01

    The intent of this study is to examine the internal structure of the Bayou Choctaw salt dome utilizing the information obtained from graphical representations of sonar survey data of the internal cavern surfaces. Many of the Bayou Choctaw caverns have been abandoned. Some existing caverns were purchased by the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) program and have rather convoluted histories and complex cavern geometries. In fact, these caverns are typically poorly documented and are not particularly constructive to this study. Only two Bayou Choctaw caverns, 101 and 102, which were constructed using well-controlled solutioning methods, are well documented. One of these was constructed by the SPR for their use while the other was constructed and traded for another existing cavern. Consequently, compared to the SPR caverns of the West Hackberry and Big Hill domes, it is more difficult to obtain a general impression of the stratigraphy of the dome. Indeed, caverns of Bayou Choctaw show features significantly different than those encountered in the other two SPR facilities. In the number of abandoned caverns, and some of those existing caverns purchased by the SPR, extremely irregular solutioning has occurred. The two SPR constructed caverns suggest that some sections of the caverns may have undergone very regular solutioning to form uniform cylindrical shapes. Although it is not usually productive to speculate, some suggestions that point to the behavior of the Bayou Choctaw dome are examined. Also the primary differences in the Bayou Choctaw dome and the other SPR domes are noted.

  15. Pneumatization of the sphenoid sinus.

    PubMed

    Terra, E R; Guedes, F R; Manzi, F R; Bóscolo, F N

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a case of pneumatization of the sphenoid sinus in the pterygoid process and greater wing of the sphenoid bone, observed on a panoramic radiograph. Conventional radiographs and computerized tomography in axial and coronal sections confirmed the presence of the pneumatization of these structures. PMID:16421265

  16. Complicated unroofed coronary sinus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sarwar, Ghulam; Ahmed, Bilal; Suleman, Naeem; Khan, Ghufranullah

    2005-03-01

    A young boy planned for the surgical closure of atrial septal defect (ASD) and mitral valve regurgitation (MR) was found peroperatively as having a complete unroofed coronary sinus (URCS). Intracardiac re-routing of left superior vena cava (LSVC) and mitral valve replacement (MVR) were performed concomitantly with success. PMID:15808100

  17. Origin of the sinus impulse.

    PubMed

    Schuessler, R B; Boineau, J P; Bromberg, B I

    1996-03-01

    It was generally accepted that the site of normal impulse origin within the atria was a single static focus within the sinus node. This review will examine how this model of impulse origin came about and has evolved. Early on, conflicting data suggested that the sinus node focus was not static and changed with interventions that changed heart rate, such as vagal stimulation. Furthermore, even with removal of the sinus node, a normal atrial rhythm was generated. High-resolution mapping in humans and dogs showed that the initiation of the impulse was dynamic and could be multicentric, with more than one focus initiating a single beat. Shifts in the site of origin correlated with changes in rate and were consistent with P wave changes routinely observed in the standard ECG. These studies suggested multiple pacemakers were responsible for impulse initiation. However, it was not clear how these widespread pacemakers were coordinated to function synchronously. Recent canine data suggest that the node may be partially insulated from the surrounding atrium, resulting in multicentric origin starting from a single site within the node. What has evolved is a model of impulse origin with a sinus node having discrete exit sites and a dominant pacemaker within the node that can shift to other nodal sites. Complex and changing conduction out of the node, coupled with extranodal pacemakers, which can assume dominance over the node, combine with the autonomic nervous system to control heart rate and the pattern of impulse origin within the atria. PMID:8867301

  18. Facial emphysema after sinus lift.

    PubMed

    Sakakibara, Akiko; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Yamashita, Atsuya; Hasegawa, Takumi; Minamikawa, Tsutomu; Furudoi, Shungo; Komori, Takahide

    2015-01-01

    An 80-year-old man with a history of en bloc resection of squamous cell carcinoma of the hard palate (T4aN0M0) was performed a lateral-window sinus lift of the edentulous area of the left maxillary molar region to facilitate future placement of dental implants.Two hours after the surgery, the patient complained of sudden malar swelling. Marked swelling was present from the left infraorbital region to the buccal region. The swelling was associated with air pockets at the alar base and in the angulus oculi medialis region and subcutaneous malar tissue. Emphysema appeared after the patient blew his nose. Therefore, the mucous membrane of the maxillary sinus might have had a small hole, and air might have entered the subcutaneous tissue via the bone window when the air pressure in the maxillary sinus increased with nose blowing. It is important to advise patients to avoid increasing the intraoral pressure after sinus-lift procedure. PMID:26088054

  19. Facial emphysema after sinus lift

    PubMed Central

    Sakakibara, Akiko; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Yamashita, Atsuya; Hasegawa, Takumi; Minamikawa, Tsutomu; Furudoi, Shungo; Komori, Takahide

    2015-01-01

    An 80-year-old man with a history of en bloc resection of squamous cell carcinoma of the hard palate (T4aN0M0) was performed a lateral-window sinus lift of the edentulous area of the left maxillary molar region to facilitate future placement of dental implants. Two hours after the surgery, the patient complained of sudden malar swelling. Marked swelling was present from the left infraorbital region to the buccal region. The swelling was associated with air pockets at the alar base and in the angulus oculi medialis region and subcutaneous malar tissue. Emphysema appeared after the patient blew his nose. Therefore, the mucous membrane of the maxillary sinus might have had a small hole, and air might have entered the subcutaneous tissue via the bone window when the air pressure in the maxillary sinus increased with nose blowing. It is important to advise patients to avoid increasing the intraoral pressure after sinus-lift procedure. PMID:26088054

  20. Sinus histiocytosis with massive lymphadenopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Pastakia, B.; Weiss, S.H.

    1987-11-01

    Gallium uptake corresponding to the extent of the disease in a patient with histologically proven sinus histiocytosis with massive lymphadenopathy (SHML) is reported. Computerized tomography confirmed the presence of bilateral retrobulbar masses, involvement of both lateral recti, erosion of the bony orbital floor with encroachment of tumor into the right maxillary antrum, and retropharyngeal involvement.

  1. Evidence for remotely triggered microearthquakes during salt cavern collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jousset, Philippe; Rohmer, Jérémy

    2012-10-01

    Microseismicity is a good indicator of spatio-temporal evolution of physical properties of rocks prior to catastrophic events like volcanic eruptions or landslides and may be triggered by a number of causes including dynamic characteristics of processes in play or/and external forces. We show evidence of triggered microseismicity observed in the vicinity of an underground salt cavern prone to collapse by a remote M˜ 7.2 earthquake, which occurred ˜12 000 km away. High-dynamic range broad-band records reveal the strong time-correlation between a dramatic change in the rate of local high-frequency microseismicity and the passage of low-frequency seismic waves, including body, Love and Rayleigh surface waves. Pressure was lowered in the cavern by pumping operations of brine out of the cavern. We demonstrate the near critical state of the cavern before the collapse by means of 2-D axisymmetric elastic finite-element simulations. On this basis, we show that the increment of stress necessary for the failure of the Dolomite layer, which ensures the stability of the whole system, is of the same order of magnitude as the maximum dynamic stress magnitude observed during the passage of the earthquakes waves. This suggests that the stress oscillations due to the seismic waves correlated with the recorded microearthquakes induced damage of the overburden, which eventually led to the collapse of the salt cavern. We show that the contribution of Rayleigh waves is the most efficient to trigger microseismicity at periods close to the natural fundamental frequency of the cavern system found at about 10-20 s by investigating the impulse response of the cavern + overburden + brine system.

  2. Evidence for remotely triggered microearthquakes during salt cavern collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jousset, Philippe; Rohmer, Jérémy

    2016-04-01

    Microseismicity is a good indicator of spatio-temporal evolution of physical properties of rocks prior to catastrophic events like volcanic eruptions or landslides and may be triggered by a number of causes including dynamic characteristics of processes in play or/and external forces. We show evidence of triggered microseismicity observed in the vicinity of an underground salt cavern prone to collapse by a remote M ˜ 7.2 earthquake, which occurred ˜12 000 km away. High-dynamic range broad-band records reveal the strong time-correlation between a dramatic change in the rate of local high-frequency microseismicity and the passage of low-frequency seismic waves, including body, Love and Rayleigh surface waves. Pressure was lowered in the cavern by pumping operations of brine out of the cavern. We demonstrate the near critical state of the cavern before the collapse by means of 2-D axisymmetric elastic finite-element simulations. On this basis, we show that the increment of stress necessary for the failure of the Dolomite layer, which ensures the stability of the whole system, is of the same order of magnitude as the maximum dynamic stress magnitude observed during the passage of the earthquakes waves. This suggests that the stress oscillations due to the seismic waves correlated with the recorded microearthquakes induced damage of the overburden, which eventually led to the collapse of the salt cavern. We show that the contribution of Rayleigh waves is the most efficient to trigger microseismicity at periods close to the natural fundamental frequency of the cavern system found at about 10-20 s by investigating the impulse response of the cavern + overburden + brine system.

  3. Lunar Holes and Their Associating Subsurface Caverns: From SELENE (Kaguya) to UZUME

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haruyama, J.; Kawano, I.; Nishibori, T.; Iwata, T.; Yamamoto, Y.; Shimada, K.; Yamamoto, K.; Hasenaka, T.; Morota, T.; Nishino, M. N.; Hashizume, K.; Shirao, M.; Komatsu, G.; Hasebe, N.; Shimizu, H.; Kobayashi, K.; Yokobori, S.; Miyake, Y.; Michikawa, Y.; Tsuji, T.; Shinoda, R.

    2016-05-01

    We present a summary of lunar holes and associated caverns. Furthermore, we also introduce the project Unprecedented Zipangu Underworld of the Moon/Mars Exploration (UZUME) to explore the holes and caverns.

  4. Treatment of Traumatic Carotid-Cavernous Fistula

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Z.; Zhang, Y.; Wang, C.; YANG, X.; Li, Y.

    2000-01-01

    Summary From 1986 to the end of 1998, 482 cases of traumatic carotid-cavernous fistula (TCCF) were treated by means of intravascular embolisation technique. The experience is overviewed in this article. Many kinds of detachable balloon catheters (including Chinese made detachable balloon catheters), coils and cyano aery late were used as embolic materials. Transcervical, transfemoral, anterior communicating artery, posterior communicating artery approach, or transvenous approach were selected according to conditions. A combination of different approaches or materials was used for complex TCCF. We found that the special sign, named “bileakage sign”, indicated multileakage of TCCF and was not mentioned before. All 482 cases of TCCF were embolised successfully, of which 405 cases maintained the patency of internal carotid artery (ICA). No death related to the treatment occurred in our group and the symptoms or signs in 462 cases were relieved after embolisation. Emergency embolisation was needed in some conditions such as serious epistaxis, delayed or repeatedly subdural haematoma and rapid visual impairment. Endovascular treatment of TCCF is a safe and efficient method. The time of operation, approach, and materials for embolisation must be carefully selected in order to obtain the best result. PMID:20667206

  5. Unusual Presentation of Cerebral Cavernous Malformation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Won-Hyung; Lim, Dong-Jun; Choi, Jong-Il; Ha, Sung-Kon; Kim, Sang-Dae; Kim, Se-Hoon

    2015-09-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CMs) are vascular malformations of the central nervous system, which can be detected in the absence of any clinical symptoms. Nodules and cysts with mixed signal intensity and a peripheral hemosiderin rim are considered brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings typical of CMs. A 48-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of abnormal MRI findings without significant neurological symptoms. A cyst with an internal fluid-fluid level was found in the left basal ganglia on the initial brain MRI. We decided to observe the natural course of the asymptomatic lesion with serial MRI follow-up. On MRI at the 5-month follow-up, the cystic mass was enlarged and showed findings consistent with those of cystic CM. Surgical resection was performed and the pathological diagnosis was CM. Our experience suggests that the initial presentation of a CM can be a pure cyst and neurosurgeons should consider the likelihood of CMs in cases of cystic cerebral lesions with intracystic hemorrhage. PMID:26523262

  6. Unusual Presentation of Cerebral Cavernous Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Won-Hyung; Choi, Jong-Il; Ha, Sung-Kon; Kim, Sang-Dae; Kim, Se-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CMs) are vascular malformations of the central nervous system, which can be detected in the absence of any clinical symptoms. Nodules and cysts with mixed signal intensity and a peripheral hemosiderin rim are considered brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings typical of CMs. A 48-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of abnormal MRI findings without significant neurological symptoms. A cyst with an internal fluid-fluid level was found in the left basal ganglia on the initial brain MRI. We decided to observe the natural course of the asymptomatic lesion with serial MRI follow-up. On MRI at the 5-month follow-up, the cystic mass was enlarged and showed findings consistent with those of cystic CM. Surgical resection was performed and the pathological diagnosis was CM. Our experience suggests that the initial presentation of a CM can be a pure cyst and neurosurgeons should consider the likelihood of CMs in cases of cystic cerebral lesions with intracystic hemorrhage. PMID:26523262

  7. CAVERN ROOF STABILITY FOR NATURAL GAS STORAGE IN BEDDED SALT

    SciTech Connect

    DeVries, Kerry L; Mellegard, Kirby D; Callahan, Gary D; Goodman, William M

    2005-06-01

    This report documents research performed to develop a new stress-based criterion for predicting the onset of damage in salt formations surrounding natural gas storage caverns. Laboratory tests were conducted to investigate the effects of shear stress, mean stress, pore pressure, temperature, and Lode angle on the strength and creep characteristics of salt. The laboratory test data were used in the development of the new criterion. The laboratory results indicate that the strength of salt strongly depends on the mean stress and Lode angle. The strength of the salt does not appear to be sensitive to temperature. Pore pressure effects were not readily apparent until a significant level of damage was induced and the permeability was increased to allow penetration of the liquid permeant. Utilizing the new criterion, numerical simulations were used to estimate the minimum allowable gas pressure for hypothetical storage caverns located in a bedded salt formation. The simulations performed illustrate the influence that cavern roof span, depth, roof salt thickness, shale thickness, and shale stiffness have on the allowable operating pressure range. Interestingly, comparison of predictions using the new criterion with that of a commonly used criterion indicate that lower minimum gas pressures may be allowed for caverns at shallow depths. However, as cavern depth is increased, less conservative estimates for minimum gas pressure were determined by the new criterion.

  8. Cavernous angioma of the optic chiasm--case report.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Y; Yamanaka, K; Nakajima, H; Miyaura, T

    1999-08-01

    A 31-year-old female presented with cavernous angioma originating from the optic chiasm manifesting as sudden onset of right retroorbital pain and right visual disturbance. She had a psychomotor seizure 10 years ago. Cavernous angioma at the right basal ganglia had been partially removed at that time. After the operation, the patient had left hemiparesis, but gradually improved. Neurological examination revealed decreased right visual acuity, left homonymous hemianopsia, and left hemiparesis. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a mixed signal intensity mass at the right optic nerve to the optic chiasm with a low signal intensity rim on T2-weighted imaging, situated at the right basal ganglia where the cavernous angioma had been partially resected. Right frontotemporal craniotomy was performed by the pterional approach. A subpial hematoma was situated at the right optic nerve to the optic chiasm. The hematoma with an angiomatous component was completely resected from the surrounding structure. Histological examination of the specimens confirmed cavernous angioma. Postoperatively, her right visual acuity was slightly improved, but the visual field defect was unchanged. We emphasize the importance of correct diagnosis by magnetic resonance imaging and subsequent resection for preserving and improving the visual function of patients with cavernous angiomas of the optic chiasm. PMID:10487042

  9. Beyond the sniffer: frontal sinuses in Carnivora.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Abigail A; Van Valkenburgh, Blaire

    2014-11-01

    Paranasal sinuses are some of the most poorly understood features of mammalian cranial anatomy. They are highly variable in presence and form among species, but their function is not well understood. The best-supported explanations for the function of sinuses is that they opportunistically fill mechanically unnecessary space, but that in some cases, sinuses in combination with the configuration of the frontal bone may improve skull performance by increasing skull strength and dissipating stresses more evenly. We used CT technology to investigate patterns in frontal sinus size and shape disparity among three families of carnivores: Canidae, Felidae, and Hyaenidae. We provide some of the first quantitative data on sinus morphology for these three families, and employ a novel method to quantify the relationship between three-dimensional sinus shape and skull shape. As expected, frontal sinus size and shape were more strongly correlated with frontal bone size and shape than with the morphology of the skull as a whole. However, sinus morphology was also related to allometric differences among families that are linked to biomechanical function. Our results support the hypothesis that frontal sinuses most often opportunistically fill space that is mechanically unnecessary, and they can facilitate cranial shape changes that reduce stress during feeding. Moreover, we suggest that the ability to form frontal sinuses allows species to modify skull function without compromising the performance of more functionally constrained regions such as the nasal chamber (heat/water conservation, olfaction), and braincase (housing the brain and sensory structures). PMID:25312364

  10. Adaptations in the structure and innervation of follicle-sinus complexes to an aquatic environment as seen in the Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris).

    PubMed

    Sarko, Diana K; Reep, Roger L; Mazurkiewicz, Joseph E; Rice, Frank L

    2007-09-20

    Florida manatees are large-bodied aquatic herbivores that use large tactile vibrissae for several purposes. Facial vibrissae are used to forage in a turbid water environment, and the largest perioral vibrissae can also grasp and manipulate objects. Other vibrissae distributed over the entire postfacial body appear to function as a lateral line system. All manatee vibrissae emanate from densely innervated follicle-sinus complexes (FSCs) like those in other mammals, although proportionately larger commensurate with the caliber of the vibrissae. As revealed by immunofluorescence, all manatee FSCs have many types of C, Adelta and Abeta innervation including Merkel, club, and longitudinal lanceolate endings at the level of the ring sinus, but they lack other types such as reticular and spiny endings at the level of the cavernous sinus. As in non-whisking terrestrial species, the inner conical bodies of facial FSCs are well innervated but lack Abeta-fiber terminals. Importantly, manatee FSCs have two unique types of Abeta-fiber endings. First, all of the FSCs have exceptionally large-caliber axons that branch to terminate as novel, gigantic spindle-like endings located at the upper ring sinus. Second, facial FSCs have smaller caliber Abeta fibers that terminate in the trabeculae of the cavernous sinus as an ending that resembles a Golgi tendon organ. In addition, the largest perioral vibrissae, which are used for grasping, have exceptionally well-developed medullary cores that have a structure and dense small-fiber innervation resembling that of tooth pulp. Other features of the epidermis and upper dermis structure and innervation differ from that seen in terrestrial mammals. PMID:17640045