Sample records for cavitation bubble growth

  1. A consideration of thermal effect on cavitation bubble growth

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, H.; Kayano, H.; Kageyama, Y. [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering

    1994-12-31

    The partial differential equation of heat transfer was solved by finite difference scheme with momentum equation (Rayleigh`s equation) for a spherical bubble. Cavitation bubble growth and development of thermal boundary layer were calculated for hot water, liquid hydrogen, and liquid nitrogen. The result agreed well both with Plesset and Zwick`s result and with Birkhoff`s result for a stepwise pressure change. Bubble growth under a sinusoidal pressure change was also calculated which was more complex and temperature in the boundary layer didn`t change monotonously. The analysis was extended to cluster bubbles. Calculation showed D / Ja (D: thermal diffusivity of liquid and Ja: Jakob number) was a governing parameter to judge whether the bubbles collide each other or not.

  2. Bubble cavitation noise and cavitation noise spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Latorre, R. [Univ. of New Orleans, LA (United States). School of Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering

    1994-12-31

    Cavitaton noise from collapsing bubbles generates noise pulses and a cavitation noise spectrum. This paper examines the relationship of cavitation bubble noise pulse and the noise spectra. The scaling relationships are developed from the transformation relationships of bubble potential energy into bubble noise. The resulting scaling relationships allow the bubble cavitation noise spectra to be reduced to a single curve. The analysis leads to a second relationship for sheet cavitation noise spectrum.

  3. Particle Motion Induced by Bubble Cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulain, Stéphane; Guenoun, Gabriel; Gart, Sean; Crowe, William; Jung, Sunghwan

    2015-05-01

    Cavitation bubbles induce impulsive forces on surrounding substrates, particles, or surfaces. Even though cavitation is a traditional topic in fluid mechanics, current understanding and studies do not capture the effect of cavitation on suspended objects in fluids. In the present work, the dynamics of a spherical particle due to a cavitation bubble is experimentally characterized and compared with an analytical model. Three phases are observed: the growth of the bubble where the particle is pushed away, its collapse where the particle approaches the bubble, and a longer time scale postcollapse where the particle continues to move toward the collapsed bubble. The particle motion in the longer time scale presumably results from the asymmetric cavitation evolution at an earlier time. Our theory considering the asymmetric bubble dynamics shows that the particle velocity strongly depends on the distance from the bubble as an inverse-fourth-power law, which is in good agreement with our experimentation. This study sheds light on how small free particles respond to cavitation bubbles in fluids.

  4. Particle Motion Induced by Bubble Cavitation.

    PubMed

    Poulain, Stéphane; Guenoun, Gabriel; Gart, Sean; Crowe, William; Jung, Sunghwan

    2015-05-29

    Cavitation bubbles induce impulsive forces on surrounding substrates, particles, or surfaces. Even though cavitation is a traditional topic in fluid mechanics, current understanding and studies do not capture the effect of cavitation on suspended objects in fluids. In the present work, the dynamics of a spherical particle due to a cavitation bubble is experimentally characterized and compared with an analytical model. Three phases are observed: the growth of the bubble where the particle is pushed away, its collapse where the particle approaches the bubble, and a longer time scale postcollapse where the particle continues to move toward the collapsed bubble. The particle motion in the longer time scale presumably results from the asymmetric cavitation evolution at an earlier time. Our theory considering the asymmetric bubble dynamics shows that the particle velocity strongly depends on the distance from the bubble as an inverse-fourth-power law, which is in good agreement with our experimentation. This study sheds light on how small free particles respond to cavitation bubbles in fluids. PMID:26066438

  5. Birth and growth of cavitation bubbles within water under tension confined in a simple synthetic tree.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Olivier; Marmottant, Philippe; Quinto-Su, Pedro A; Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2012-05-01

    Water under tension, as can be found in several systems including tree vessels, is metastable. Cavitation can spontaneously occur, nucleating a bubble. We investigate the dynamics of spontaneous or triggered cavitation inside water filled microcavities of a hydrogel. Results show that a stable bubble is created in only a microsecond time scale, after transient oscillations. Then, a diffusion driven expansion leads to filling of the cavity. Analysis reveals that the nucleation of a bubble releases a tension of several tens of MPa, and a simple model captures the different time scales of the expansion process. PMID:22681081

  6. Birth and Growth of Cavitation Bubbles within Water under Tension Confined in a Simple Synthetic Tree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, Olivier; Marmottant, Philippe; Quinto-Su, Pedro A.; Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2012-05-01

    Water under tension, as can be found in several systems including tree vessels, is metastable. Cavitation can spontaneously occur, nucleating a bubble. We investigate the dynamics of spontaneous or triggered cavitation inside water filled microcavities of a hydrogel. Results show that a stable bubble is created in only a microsecond time scale, after transient oscillations. Then, a diffusion driven expansion leads to filling of the cavity. Analysis reveals that the nucleation of a bubble releases a tension of several tens of MPa, and a simple model captures the different time scales of the expansion process.

  7. Level set method for numerical simulation of a cavitation bubble, its growth, collapse and rebound near a rigid wall

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Juntao Huang; Huisheng Zhang

    2007-01-01

    A level set method of non-uniform grids is used to simulate the whole evolution of a cavitation bubble, including its growth,\\u000a collapse and rebound near a rigid wall. Single-phase Navier–Stokes equation in the liquid region is solved by MAC projection\\u000a algorithm combined with second-order ENO scheme for the advection terms. The moving interface is captured by the level set\\u000a function,

  8. Interaction mechanism of double bubbles in hydrodynamic cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fengchao; Cai, Jun; Huai, Xiulan; Liu, Bin

    2013-06-01

    Bubble-bubble interaction is an important factor in cavitation bubble dynamics. In this paper, the dynamic behaviors of double cavitation bubbles driven by varying pressure field downstream of an orifice plate in hydrodynamic cavitation reactor are examined. The bubble-bubble interaction between two bubbles with different radii is considered. We have shown the different dynamic behaviors between double cavitation bubbles and a single bubble by solving two coupling nonlinear equations using the Runge-Kutta fourth order method with adaptive step size control. The simulation results indicate that, when considering the role of the neighbor smaller bubble, the oscillation of the bigger bubble gradually exhibits a lag in comparison with the single-bubble case, and the extent of the lag becomes much more obvious as time goes by. This phenomenon is more easily observed with the increase of the initial radius of the smaller bubble. In comparison with the single-bubble case, the oscillation of the bigger bubble is enhanced by the neighbor smaller bubble. Especially, the pressure pulse of the bigger bubble rises intensely when the sizes of two bubbles approach, and a series of peak values for different initial radii are acquired when the initial radius ratio of two bubbles is in the range of 0.9˜1.0. Although the increase of the center distance between two bubbles can weaken the mutual interaction, it has no significant influence on the enhancement trend. On the one hand, the interaction between two bubbles with different radii can suppress the growth of the smaller bubble; on the other hand, it also can enhance the growth of the bigger one at the same time. The significant enhancement effect due to the interaction of multi-bubbles should be paid more attention because it can be used to reinforce the cavitation intensity for various potential applications in future.

  9. Stationary cavitation bubbles forming on a delta wing vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesh, Harish; Schot, Joost; Ceccio, Steven L.

    2014-12-01

    Vortex cavitation forming in the leading-edge vortices of a delta wing was examined to determine how the individual cavitation bubbles incepted, grew, interacted with the underlying vortical flow and produced acoustic tones. The non-cavitating vortical flow over the delta wing was chosen to be similar to those previously reported in the literature. It was found that vortex breakdown was unaffected by the presence of incipient and developed vortex cavitation bubbles in the vortex core. While some cavitation bubbles incepted, grew, and collapsed relatively quickly, others reached an equilibrium position wherein the bubble tip was stationary in the laboratory frame at a particular location along the vortex axis. For a given attack angle, the equilibrium location moved upstream with a reduction in free stream cavitation number. It is shown that the existence of these stationary vortex bubbles is possible when there is a balance between the axial growth of the bubble along the vortex axis and the opposite motion of the axial jetting flow in the vortex core, and only a single equilibrium position is possible along the axially evolving vortex for a given free stream cavitation number. These transient and stationary vortex bubbles emit significant cavitation noise upon inception, growth, and collapse. The spectral content of the noise produced was expected to be related to the interaction of the bubble with the surrounding vortical flow in a manner similar to that reported in previous studies, where sustained tones were similar to the underlying vortex frequency. However, in the present study, the dominant frequency and higher harmonics of the tones occur at a higher frequency than that of the underlying vortex. Hence, it is likely that the highly elongated stationary bubbles have higher-order volume oscillations compared to the two-dimensional radial mode of the vortex cores of vortex cavitation bubbles with much smaller diameter-to-length ratios.

  10. Acoustic Shielding by Cavitation Bubbles in Shock Wave Lithotripsy (SWL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pishchalnikov, Yuri A.; McAteer, James A.; Bailey, Michael R.; Pishchalnikova, Irina V.; Williams, James C.; Evan, Andrew P.

    2006-05-01

    Lithotripter pulses (˜7-10 ?s) initiate the growth of cavitation bubbles, which collapse hundreds of microseconds later. Since the bubble growth-collapse cycle trails passage of the pulse, and is ˜1000 times shorter than the pulse interval at clinically relevant firing rates, it is not expected that cavitation will affect pulse propagation. However, pressure measurements with a fiber-optic hydrophone (FOPH-500) indicate that bubbles generated by a pulse can, indeed, shield the propagation of the negative tail. Shielding was detected within 1 ?s of arrival of the negative wave, contemporaneous with the first observation of expanding bubbles by high-speed camera. Reduced negative pressure was observed at 2 Hz compared to 0.5 Hz firing rate, and in water with a higher content of dissolved gas. We propose that shielding of the negative tail can be attributed to loss of acoustic energy into the expansion of cavitation bubbles.

  11. Dynamic behaviors of cavitation bubble for the steady cavitating flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Jun; Huai, Xiulan; Li, Xunfeng

    2009-12-01

    In this paper, by introducing the flow velocity item into the classical Rayleigh-Plesset dynamic equation, a new equation, which does not involve the time term and can describe the motion of cavitation bubble in the steady cavitating flow, has been obtained. By solving the new motion equation using Runge-Kutta fourth order method with adaptive step size control, the dynamic behaviors of cavitation bubble driven by the varying pressure field downstream of a venturi cavitation reactor are numerically simulated. The effects of liquid temperature (corresponding to the saturated vapor pressure of liquid), cavitation number and inlet pressure of venturi on radial motion of bubble and pressure pulse due to the radial motion are analyzed and discussed in detail. Some dynamic behaviors of bubble different from those in previous papers are displayed. In addition, the internal relationship between bubble dynamics and process intensification is also discussed. The simulation results reported in this work reveal the variation laws of cavitation intensity with the flow conditions of liquid, and will lay a foundation for the practical application of hydrodynamic cavitation technology.

  12. Noise from tip vortex and bubble cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sponagle, Neil C.

    1990-03-01

    This paper presents results from experiments designed to study the sound from different types of propeller cavitation. The propellers used in the tests produced tip vortex and travelling bubble cavitation. The spectral content, directivity, and waveform of the far-field sound were measured, in essentially free-field conditions up to 100 kHz. These data were then correlated with information about the cavity dynamics, obtained from visual observations. Vibrational modes on the tip vortex cavities produced sound at characteristic frequencies. Bubble cavitation by itself produced very broadband noise, and strongly affected the vortex cavitation noise mechanisms if the free bubbles entered the tip vortices. The noise from both kinds of cavitation was directional.

  13. Mixture segregation by an inertial cavitation bubble

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Grossier; O. Louisnard; Y. Vargas

    2007-01-01

    Pressure diffusion is a mass diffusion process forced by pressure gradients. It has the ability to segregate two species of a mixture, driving the densest species toward high pressure zones, but requires very large pressure gradients to become noticeable. An inertial cavitation bubble develops large pressure gradients in its vicinity, especially as the bubble rebounds at the end of its

  14. Noise from tip vortex and bubble cavitation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Neil C. Sponagle

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents results from experiments designed to study the sound from different types of propeller cavitation. The propellers used in the tests produced tip vortex and travelling bubble cavitation. The spectral content, directivity, and waveform of the far-field sound were measured, in essentially free-field conditions up to 100 kHz. These data were then correlated with information about the cavity

  15. Observation of Microhollows Produced by Bubble Cloud Cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamakoshi, Yoshiki; Miwa, Takashi

    2012-07-01

    When an ultrasonic wave with sound pressure less than the threshold level of bubble destruction irradiates microbubbles, the microbubbles aggregate by an acoustic radiation force and form bubble clouds. The cavitation of bubble clouds produces a large number of microhollows (microdips) on the flow channel wall. In this study, microhollow production by bubble cloud cavitation is evaluated using a blood vessel phantom made of N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPA) gel. Microbubble dynamics in bubble cloud cavitation is observed by a microscope with a short pulse light emitted diode (LED) light source. Microhollows produced on the flow channel wall are evaluated by a confocal laser microscope with a water immersion objective. It is observed that a mass of low-density bubbles (bubble mist) is formed by bubble cloud cavitation. The spatial correlation between the bubble mist and the microhollows shows the importance of the bubble mist in microhollow production by bubble cloud cavitation.

  16. Enhancing acoustic cavitation using artificial crevice bubbles.

    PubMed

    Zijlstra, Aaldert; Fernandez Rivas, David; Gardeniers, Han J G E; Versluis, Michel; Lohse, Detlef

    2015-02-01

    We study the response of pre-defined cavitation nuclei driven continuously in the kHz regime (80, 100 and 200 kHz). The nuclei consist of stabilized gaspockets in cylindrical pits of 30 ?m diameter etched in silicon or glass substrates. It is found that above an acoustic pressure threshold the dynamics of the liquid-gas meniscus switches from a stable drum-like vibration to expansion and deformation, frequently resulting in detachment of microbubbles. Just above this threshold small bubbles are continuously and intermittently ejected. At elevated input powers bubble detachment becomes more frequent and cavitation bubble clouds are formed and remain in the vicinity of the pit bubble. Surprisingly, the resulting loss of gas does not lead to deactivation of the pit which can be explained by a rectified gas diffusion process. PMID:25455191

  17. Ultrasound induced by CW laser cavitation bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korneev, N.; Rodriguez Montero, P.; Ramos-García, R.; Ramirez-San-Juan, J. C.; Padilla-Martinez, J. P.

    2011-01-01

    The generation of ultrasound by a collapsing single cavitation bubble in a strongly absorbing liquid illuminated with a moderate power CW laser is described. The ultrasound shock wave is detected with hydrophone and interferometric device. To obtain a stronger pulse it is necessary to adjust a liquid absorption and a beam diameter. Their influence can be qualitatively understood with a simple model.

  18. Multiscale Modeling of Cavitating Bubbly Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, J.; Hsiao, C.-T.; Chahine, G. L.

    2013-03-01

    Modeling of cavitating bubbly flows is challenging due to the wide range of characteristic lengths of the physics at play: from micrometers (e.g., bubble nuclei radius) to meters (e.g., propeller diameter or sheet cavity length). To address this, we present here a multiscale approach which integrates a Discrete Bubble Model for dispersed microbubbles and a level set N-S solver for macro cavities, along with a mesoscale transition model to bridge the two. This approach was implemented in 3DYNAFScopyright and used to simulate sheet-to-cloud cavitation over a hydrofoil. The hybrid model captures well the full cavitation process starting from free field nuclei and nucleation from solid surfaces. In low pressure region of the foil small nuclei are seen to grow large and eventually merge to form a large scale sheet cavity. A reentrant jet forms under the cavity, travels upstream, and breaks it, resulting in a bubble cloud of a large amount of microbubbles as the broken pockets shrink and travel downstream. This is in good agreement with experimental observations based of sheet lengths and frequency of lift force oscillation. Modeling of cavitating bubbly flows is challenging due to the wide range of characteristic lengths of the physics at play: from micrometers (e.g., bubble nuclei radius) to meters (e.g., propeller diameter or sheet cavity length). To address this, we present here a multiscale approach which integrates a Discrete Bubble Model for dispersed microbubbles and a level set N-S solver for macro cavities, along with a mesoscale transition model to bridge the two. This approach was implemented in 3DYNAFScopyright and used to simulate sheet-to-cloud cavitation over a hydrofoil. The hybrid model captures well the full cavitation process starting from free field nuclei and nucleation from solid surfaces. In low pressure region of the foil small nuclei are seen to grow large and eventually merge to form a large scale sheet cavity. A reentrant jet forms under the cavity, travels upstream, and breaks it, resulting in a bubble cloud of a large amount of microbubbles as the broken pockets shrink and travel downstream. This is in good agreement with experimental observations based of sheet lengths and frequency of lift force oscillation. DOE-SBIR, ONR (monitored by Dr. Ki-Han Kim)

  19. How Snapping Shrimp Snap: Through Cavitating Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Versluis, Michel; Schmitz, Barbara; von der Heydt, Anna; Lohse, Detlef

    2000-09-01

    The snapping shrimp (Alpheus heterochaelis) produces a loud snapping sound by an extremely rapid closure of its snapper claw. One of the effects of the snapping is to stun or kill prey animals. During the rapid snapper claw closure, a high-velocity water jet is emitted from the claw with a speed exceeding cavitation conditions. Hydrophone measurements in conjunction with time-controlled high-speed imaging of the claw closure demonstrate that the sound is emitted at the cavitation bubble collapse and not on claw closure. A model for the bubble dynamics based on a Rayleigh-Plesset-type equation quantitatively accounts for the time dependence of the bubble radius and for the emitted sound.

  20. Mixture segregation by an inertial cavitation bubble.

    PubMed

    Grossier, R; Louisnard, O; Vargas, Y

    2007-04-01

    Pressure diffusion is a mass diffusion process forced by pressure gradients. It has the ability to segregate two species of a mixture, driving the densest species toward high pressure zones, but requires very large pressure gradients to become noticeable. An inertial cavitation bubble develops large pressure gradients in its vicinity, especially as the bubble rebounds at the end of its collapse, and it is therefore expected that a liquid mixture surrounding such a bubble would become segregated. Theory developed in an earlier paper shows that this is indeed the case for sufficiently large molecules or nano-particles. The main theoretical results are recalled and a possible implication of this segregation phenomenon on the well-known cavitation-enhanced crystals nucleation is proposed. PMID:17208505

  1. Observations of the interaction of cavitation bubbles with attached cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Li, C.Y.; Ceccio, S. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The inception and form of attached cavitation can be significantly effected by the presence of traveling bubbles. Traveling bubbles may induce transient regions of incipient attached cavitation. Furthermore, traveling bubbles may sweep away regions of developed attached cavitation. The number and size of traveling bubbles which will occur in a flow is strongly dependent on the freestream nuclei distribution. Consequently, bubble/attached cavity interaction provide a mechanism whereby the freestream nuclei distribution can significantly influence the inception and form of attached cavitation. Experiments were performed onto rectangular platform hydrofoils to investigate this phenomena. Individual cavitation nuclei were created in the flow via a focused laser beam to create individual traveling bubbles. These bubbles were observed as they interacted with the flow near the foils and as they interacted with developed attached cavitation present at the foil midcord.

  2. Bubble-bubble interaction: A potential source of cavitation noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ida, Masato

    2009-01-01

    The interaction between microbubbles through pressure pulses has been studied to show that it can be a source of cavitation noise. A recent report demonstrated that the acoustic noise generated by a shrimp originates from the collapse of a cavitation bubble produced when the shrimp closes its snapper claw. The recorded acoustic signal contains a broadband noise that consists of positive and negative pulses, but a theoretical model for single bubbles fails to reproduce the negative ones. Using a nonlinear multibubble model, we have shown here that the negative pulses can be explained by considering the interaction of microbubbles formed after the cavitation bubble has collapsed and fragmented: Positive pulses produced at the collapse of the microbubbles hit and impulsively compress neighboring microbubbles to generate reflected pulses whose amplitudes are negative. Discussing the details of the noise generation process, we have found that no negative pulses are generated if the internal pressure of the reflecting bubble is very high when hit by a positive pulse.

  3. Bubble proliferation in the cavitation field of a shock wave lithotripter

    PubMed Central

    Pishchalnikov, Yuri A.; Williams, James C.; McAteer, James A.

    2011-01-01

    Lithotripter shock waves (SWs) generated in non-degassed water at 0.5 and 2 Hz pulse repetition frequency (PRF) were characterized using a fiber-optic hydrophone. High-speed imaging captured the inertial growth-collapse-rebound cycle of cavitation bubbles, and continuous recording with a 60 fps camcorder was used to track bubble proliferation over successive SWs. Microbubbles that seeded the generation of bubble clouds formed by the breakup of cavitation jets and by bubble collapse following rebound. Microbubbles that persisted long enough served as cavitation nuclei for subsequent SWs, as such bubble clouds were enhanced at fast PRF. Visual tracking suggests that bubble clouds can originate from single bubbles. PMID:21877776

  4. Bubble proliferation in the cavitation field of a shock wave lithotripter.

    PubMed

    Pishchalnikov, Yuri A; Williams, James C; McAteer, James A

    2011-08-01

    Lithotripter shock waves (SWs) generated in non-degassed water at 0.5 and 2 Hz pulse repetition frequency (PRF) were characterized using a fiber-optic hydrophone. High-speed imaging captured the inertial growth-collapse-rebound cycle of cavitation bubbles, and continuous recording with a 60 fps camcorder was used to track bubble proliferation over successive SWs. Microbubbles that seeded the generation of bubble clouds formed by the breakup of cavitation jets and by bubble collapse following rebound. Microbubbles that persisted long enough served as cavitation nuclei for subsequent SWs, as such bubble clouds were enhanced at fast PRF. Visual tracking suggests that bubble clouds can originate from single bubbles. PMID:21877776

  5. Cavitation erosion by single laser-produced bubbles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Philipp; W. Lauterborn

    1998-01-01

    In order to elucidate the mechanism of cavitation erosion, the dynamics of a single laser-generated cavitation bubble in water and the resulting surface damage on a flat metal specimen are investigated in detail. The characteristic effects of bubble dynamics, in particular the formation of a high-speed liquid jet and the emission of shock waves at the moment of collapse are

  6. Cavitation Bubble Cluster Activity in the Breakage of Kidney Stones by Lithotripter Shock Waves

    PubMed Central

    Pishchalnikov, Yuriy A.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Bailey, Michael R.; Williams, James C.; Cleveland, Robin O.; Colonius, Tim; Crum, Lawrence A.; Evan, Andrew P.; McAteer, James A.

    2008-01-01

    High-speed photography was used to analyze cavitation bubble activity at the surface of artificial and natural kidney stones during exposure to lithotripter shock waves in vitro. Numerous individual bubbles formed at the surface of stones, but these bubbles did not remain independent and combined with one another to form bubble clusters. Bubble clusters formed at the proximal end, the distal end, and at the sides of stones. Each cluster collapsed to a narrow point of impact. Collapse of the proximal cluster caused erosion at the leading face of the stone and the collapse of clusters at the sides of stones appeared to contribute to the growth of cracks. Collapse of the distal cluster caused minimal damage. We conclude that cavitation-mediated damage to stones was due not to the action of solitary bubbles, but to the growth and collapse of bubble clusters. PMID:14565872

  7. Electrochemical investigations of stable cavitation from bubbles generated during reduction of water

    E-print Network

    Deymier, Pierre

    Electrochemical investigations of stable cavitation from bubbles generated during reduction April 2014 Keywords: Megasonic cleaning Stable cavitation Microstreaming Hydrogen bubbles Water on wafers without affect- ing the transient cavitation responsible for feature damage. Ó 2014 Elsevier B

  8. Importance of the implosion of ESWL-induced cavitation bubbles.

    PubMed

    Delacrétaz, G; Rink, K; Pittomvils, G; Lafaut, J P; Vandeursen, H; Boving, R

    1995-01-01

    The damage induced by an extracorporeal shock wave lithotripter is observed with a fiber optic stress sensing technique. When a stone is placed in the focus, besides the expected stress induced by the incoming shock wave emitted by the ESWL apparatus, a second delayed stress is observed some hundreds of microseconds later. The second stress is induced by a shock wave generated at the collapse of a cavitation bubble. Partial reflection of the incoming shock wave at the stone boundary is at the origin of the large cavitation bubble formation. Sensing fiber fracture results always from the second shock wave due to the collapse of the cavitation bubble. Thus the largest stress is generated at the collapse. When no target is placed in the focus of the lithotripter, no large cavitation bubble is formed and no delayed shock wave is observed. Our results demonstrate unambiguously the decisive role of cavitation in ESWL procedures. PMID:7754583

  9. Modeling of interaction between therapeutic ultrasound propagation and cavitation bubbles.

    PubMed

    Liebler, Marko; Dreyer, Thomas; Riedlinger, Rainer E

    2006-12-22

    In medical applications of high intense focused ultrasound the mechanism of interaction between ultrasound waves and cavitation bubbles is responsible for several therapeutic effects as well as for undesired side effects. Based on a two-phase continuum approach for bubbly liquids, in this paper a numerical model is presented to simulate these interactions. The numerical results demonstrate the influence of the cavitation bubble cloud on ultrasound propagation. In the case of a lithotripter pulse an increased bubble density leads to significant changes in the tensile part of the pressure waveform. The calculations are verified by measurements with a fiber optical hydrophone and by experimental results of the bubble cloud dynamics. PMID:16908041

  10. Dynamics of cavitational bubbles and design of a hydrodynamic cavitational reactor: cluster approach.

    PubMed

    Kanthale, Parag M; Gogate, Parag R; Pandit, Aniruddha B; Wilhelm, Anne Marie

    2005-08-01

    In the present work, a cavity cluster of predetermined size has been considered to study the bubble dynamics in the hydrodynamic cavitation reactor. The effect of different operating and system parameters on the cavitational intensity has been numerically investigated. The yield of any cavitationally induced physical/chemical transformations depends not only on the collapse pressure of the cavities but also on the active volume of cavitation within the reactor. Empirical correlations have been developed to predict the collapse pressure and the active volume of cavitation as a function of different operating parameters based on the bubble dynamics studies. Recommendations are made for designing a cavitational reactor on the basis of the proposed empirical correlations. This work is a first step towards the designing and optimization of hydrodynamic cavitational reactor with cluster approach. PMID:15848106

  11. Controlled permeation of cell membrane by single bubble acoustic cavitation

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Y.; Yang, K.; Cui, J.; Ye, J. Y.; Deng, C. X.

    2011-01-01

    Sonoporation is the membrane disruption generated by ultrasound and has been exploited as a non-viral strategy for drug and gene delivery. Acoustic cavitation of microbubbles has been recognized to play an important role in sonoporation. However, due to the lack of adequate techniques for precise control of cavitation activities and real-time assessment of the resulting sub-micron process of sonoporation, limited knowledge has been available regarding the detail processes and correlation of cavitation with membrane disruption at the single cell level. In the current study, we developed a combined approach including optical, acoustic, and electrophysiological techniques to enable synchronized manipulation, imaging, and measurement of cavitation of single bubbles and the resulting cell membrane disruption in real-time. Using a self-focused femtosecond laser and high frequency (7.44 MHz) pulses, a single microbubble was generated and positioned at a desired distance from the membrane of a Xenopus oocyte. Cavitation of the bubble was achieved by applying a low frequency (1.5 MHz) ultrasound pulse (duration 13.3 or 40 µs) to induce bubble collapse. Disruption of the cell membrane was assessed by the increase in the transmembrane current (TMC) of the cell under voltage clamp. Simultaneous high-speed bright field imaging of cavitation and measurements of the TMC were obtained to correlate the ultrasound-generated bubble activities with the cell membrane poration. The change in membrane permeability was directly associated with the formation of a sub-micrometer pore from a local membrane rupture generated by bubble collapse or bubble compression depending on ultrasound amplitude and duration. The impact of the bubble collapse on membrane permeation decreased rapidly with increasing distance (D) between the bubble (diameter d) and the cell membrane. The effective range of cavitation impact on membrane poration was determined to be D/d = 0.75. The maximum mean radius of the pores was estimated from the measured TMC to be 0.106 ± 0.032 µm (n = 70) for acoustic pressure of 1.5 MPa (duration 13.3 µs), and increased to 0.171 ± 0.030 µm (n = 125) for acoustic pressure of 1.7 MPa and to 0.182 ± 0.052 µm (n=112) for a pulse duration of 40 µs (1.5 MPa). These results from controlled cell membrane permeation by cavitation of single bubbles revealed insights and key factors affecting sonoporation at the single cell level. PMID:21945682

  12. The disappearance of ultrasound contrast bubbles: observations of bubble dissolution and cavitation nucleation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen Shiang; Matula, Thomas J; Crum, Lawrence A

    2002-06-01

    The destruction process of biSphere and Optison ultrasound (US) contrast microbubbles were studied at 1.1 MHz. High-amplitude tone bursts caused shell disruption and/or fragmentation of the microbubbles, leading to dissolution of the freed gas. The bubble destruction and subsequent dissolution process was imaged with a high pulse-repetition frequency (PRF) 10-cycle, 5-MHz bistatic transducer configuration. Three types of dissolution profiles were measured: In one case, biSphere microbubbles showed evidence of dissolution through resonance, during which a temporary increase in the scattering amplitude was observed. In another case, both biSphere and Optison microbubbles showed evidence of fragmentation, during which the scattering amplitude decreased rapidly. Finally, in some cases, we observed the impulsive growth and subsequent rapid decay of signals that appear to be due to cavitation nucleation. Simulations of bubble dissolution curves show good agreement with experiments. PMID:12113792

  13. Trapping cavitation bubbles with a self-focused laser beam

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jing Yong Ye; Guoqing Chang; Theodore B. Norris; Christine Tse; Marwa J. Zohdy; Kyle W. Hollman; Matthew O'Donnell; James R. Baker Jr.

    2004-01-01

    We observed that laser-induced cavitation bubbles in water can be trapped in a self-focused laser beam. Both optical imaging and acoustic detection have been utilized to confirm bubble trapping. Transverse and longitudinal trapping forces were measured to be as large as 87 and 11 pN, respectively. This result is contrary to conventional wisdom, since the mechanism of trapping in conventional

  14. On acoustic cavitation of slightly subcritical bubbles Anthony Harkin

    E-print Network

    Kaper, Tasso J.

    On acoustic cavitation of slightly subcritical bubbles Anthony Harkin Department of Mathematics than the Blake critical radius, in the presence of time-periodic acoustic pressure fields the accuracy of these predictions. Finally, the implications of these findings for acoustic pressure fields

  15. Quantitative assessment of reactive oxygen sonochemically generated by cavitation bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Jun; Miyashita, Takuya; Taguchi, Kei; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2015-07-01

    Acoustic cavitation bubbles can induce not only a thermal bioeffect but also a chemical bioeffect. When cavitation bubbles collapse and oscillate violently, they produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) that cause irreversible changes to the tissue. A sonosensitizer can promote such ROS generation. A treatment method using a sonosensitizer is called sonodynamic treatment. Rose bengal (RB) is one of the sonosensitizers whose in vivo and in vitro studies have been reported. In sonodynamic treatment, it is important to produce ROS at a high efficiency. For the efficient generation of ROS, a triggered high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) sequence has been proposed. In this study, cavitation bubbles were generated in a chamber where RB solution was sealed, and a high-speed camera captured the behavior of these cavitation bubbles. The amount of ROS was also quantified by a potassium iodide (KI) method and compared with high-speed camera pictures to investigate the effectiveness of the triggered HIFU sequence. As a result, ROS could be obtained efficiently by this sequence.

  16. A review of recent theoretical investigations on acoustic cavitation bubbles and their implications on detection of cavitation in pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. N.

    2013-12-01

    Detection of cavitation in pumps is one of the essential topics in hydraulic machinery research and has been intensively investigated for several decades. In the literature, a technique based on analysis of acoustic signals generated by cavitation bubbles in the pumps has been proposed to detect cavitation activities especially incipient cavitation. In present paper, recent theoretical investigations by the author and his collaborators on acoustic cavitation bubbles (e.g. damping mechanisms, heat and mass transfer) together with their associated acoustical signals have been briefly reviewed to advance above technique.

  17. Cavitation in confined water: ultra-fast bubble dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, Olivier; Marmottant, Philippe

    2012-02-01

    In the hydraulic vessels of trees, water can be found at negative pressure. This metastable state, corresponding to mechanical tension, is achieved by evaporation through a porous medium. It can be relaxed by cavitation, i.e. the sudden nucleation of vapor bubbles. Harmful for the tree due to the subsequent emboli of sap vessels, cavitation is on the contrary used by ferns to eject spores very swiftly. We will focus here on the dynamics of the cavitation bubble, which is of primary importance to explain the previously cited natural phenomena. We use the recently developed method of artificial tress, using transparent hydrogels as the porous medium. Our experiments, on water confined in micrometric hydrogel cavities, show an extremely fast dynamics: bubbles are nucleated at the microsecond timescale. For cavities larger than 100 microns, the bubble ``rings'' with damped oscillations at MHz frequencies, whereas for smaller cavities the oscillations become overdamped. This rich dynamics can be accounted for by a model we developed, leading to a modified Rayleigh-Plesset equation. Interestingly, this model predicts the impossibility to nucleate bubbles above a critical confinement that depends on liquid negative pressure and corresponds to approximately 100 nm for 20 MPa tensions.

  18. Plasma Line Emission during Single-Bubble Cavitation David J. Flannigan and Kenneth S. Suslick*

    E-print Network

    Suslick, Kenneth S.

    Plasma Line Emission during Single-Bubble Cavitation David J. Flannigan and Kenneth S. Suslick-bubble cavitation in sulfuric acid are reported. The excited states responsible for these emission lines range 8.3 e the plasma generated during cavitation is comprised of highly energetic particles. DOI: 10.1103/Phys

  19. Unsteady translation and repetitive jetting of acoustic cavitation bubbles.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Till; Mettin, Robert

    2014-09-01

    High-speed recordings reveal peculiar details of the oscillation and translation behavior of cavitation bubbles in the vicinity of an ultrasonic horn tip driven at 20 kHz. In particular, a forward jump during collapse that is due to the rapid reduction of virtual mass is observed. Furthermore, frequently a jetting in the translation direction during the collapse phase is resolved. In spite of strong aspherical deformations and frequent splitting, these bubbles survive the jetting collapse, and they rebound recollecting fragments. Because of incomplete restoration of the spherical shape within the following driving period, higher periodic volume oscillations can occur. This is recognized as a yet unknown source of subharmonic acoustic emission by cavitation bubbles. Numerical modeling can capture the essentials of the unsteady translation. PMID:25314538

  20. TEXTURE-INDUCED CAVITATION BUBBLES AND FRICTION REDUCTION IN THE ELROD-ADAMS MODEL

    E-print Network

    Buscaglia, Gustavo C.

    TEXTURE-INDUCED CAVITATION BUBBLES AND FRICTION REDUCTION IN THE ELROD-ADAMS MODEL Hugo M. Checoa, Friction reduction, Cavitation, Numerical simulation. Symbol Description a, b the pad occupies the region of textures µ dynamic viscosity cavitation boundary 0 cavitated region + pressurized region 1 INTRODUCTION

  1. Molecular dynamics simulations of cavitation bubble collapse and sonoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schanz, Daniel; Metten, Burkhard; Kurz, Thomas; Lauterborn, Werner

    2012-11-01

    The dynamics of the medium within a collapsing and rebounding cavitation bubble is investigated by means of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations adopting a hard sphere model for the species inside the bubble. The dynamics of the surrounding liquid (water) is modelled using a Rayleigh-Plesset (RP)-type equation coupled to the bubble interior by the gas pressure at the wall obtained from the MD calculations. Water vapour and vapour chemistry are included in the RP-MD model as well as mass and energy transfer through the bubble wall. The calculations reveal the evolution of temperature, density and pressure within a bubble at conditions typical of single-bubble sonoluminescence and predict how the particle numbers and densities of different vapour dissociation and reaction products in the bubble develop in space and time. Among the parameters varied are the sound pressure amplitude of a sonoluminescence bubble in water, the noble gas mixture in the bubble and the accommodation coefficients for mass and energy exchange through the bubble wall. Simulation particle numbers up to 10 million are used; most calculations, however, are performed with one million particles to save computer run time. Validation of the MD code was done by comparing MD results with solutions obtained by continuum mechanics calculations for the Euler equations.

  2. Effect of supercritical water shell on cavitation bubble dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Wei-Hang; Chen, Wei-Zhong

    2015-05-01

    Based on reported experimental data, a new model for single cavitation bubble dynamics is proposed considering a supercritical water (SCW) shell surrounding the bubble. Theoretical investigations show that the SCW shell apparently slows down the oscillation of the bubble and cools the gas temperature inside the collapsing bubble. Furthermore, the model is simplified to a Rayleigh–Plesset-like equation for a thin SCW shell. The dependence of the bubble dynamics on the thickness and density of the SCW shell is studied. The results show the bubble dynamics depends on the thickness but is insensitive to the density of the SCW shell. The thicker the SCW shell is, the smaller are the wall velocity and the gas temperature in the bubble. In the authors’ opinion, the SCW shell works as a buffering agent. In collapsing, it is compressed to absorb a good deal of the work transformed into the bubble internal energy during bubble collapse so that it weakens the bubble oscillations. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11174145 and 11334005).

  3. Numerical simulation of cavitation bubble dynamics induced by ultrasound waves in a high frequency reactor.

    PubMed

    Servant, G; Caltagirone, J P; Gérard, A; Laborde, J L; Hita, A

    2000-10-01

    The use of high frequency ultrasound in chemical systems is of major interest to optimize chemical procedures. Characterization of an open air 477 kHz ultrasound reactor shows that, because of the collapse of transient cavitation bubbles and pulsation of stable cavitation bubbles, chemical reactions are enhanced. Numerical modelling is undertaken to determine the spatio-temporal evolution of cavitation bubbles. The calculus of the emergence of cavitation bubbles due to the acoustic driving (by taking into account interactions between the sound field and bubbles' distribution) gives a cartography of bubbles' emergence within the reactor. Computation of their motion induced by the pressure gradients occurring in the reactor show that they migrate to the pressure nodes. Computed bubbles levitation sites gives a cartography of the chemical activity of ultrasound. Modelling of stable cavitation bubbles' motion induced by the motion of the liquid gives some insight on degassing phenomena. PMID:11062879

  4. Single cavitation bubble generation and observation of the bubble collapse flow induced by a pressure wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Sheng-Hsueh; Jaw, Shenq-Yuh; Yeh, Keh-Chia

    2009-08-01

    This study utilizes a U-shape platform device to generate a single cavitation bubble for a detailed analysis of the flow field characteristics and the cause of the counter jet during the process of bubble collapse caused by sending a pressure wave. A high speed camera is used to record the flow field of the bubble collapse at different distances from a solid boundary. It is found that a Kelvin-Helmholtz vortex is formed when a liquid jet penetrates the bubble surface after the bubble is compressed and deformed. If the bubble center to the solid boundary is within one to three times the bubble’s radius, a stagnation ring will form on the boundary when impinged by the liquid jet. The fluid inside the stagnation ring will be squeezed toward the center of the ring to form a counter jet after the bubble collapses. At the critical position, where the bubble center from the solid boundary is about three times the bubble’s radius, the bubble collapse flow will vary. Depending on the strengths of the pressure waves applied, the collapse can produce a Kelvin-Helmholtz vortex, the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability, or the generation of a counter jet flow. If the bubble surface is in contact with the solid boundary, the liquid jet can only move inside-out without producing the stagnation ring and the counter jet; thus, the bubble collapses along the radial direction. The complex phenomenon of cavitation bubble collapse flows is clearly manifested in this study.

  5. Plasma formation and temperature measurement during single-bubble cavitation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David J. Flannigan; Kenneth S. Suslick

    2005-01-01

    Single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL1-5) results from the extreme\\u000a temperatures and pressures achieved during bubble compression;\\u000a calculations have predicted(6,7) the existence of a hot, optically\\u000a opaque plasma core(8) with consequent bremsstrahlung radiation(9,10).\\u000a Recent controversial reports(11,12) claim the observation of neutrons\\u000a from deuterium - deuterium fusion during acoustic cavitation(11,12.)\\u000a However, there has been previously no strong experimental evidence for\\u000a the existence of a

  6. Acoustic cavitation and its chemical consequences

    E-print Network

    Suslick, Kenneth S.

    Acoustic cavitation and its chemical consequences By Kenneth S. Suslick, Yuri Didenko, Ming M. Fang Acoustic cavitation is responsible for both sonochemistry and sonoluminescence. Bubble collapse in liquids, sonochemistry and sonoluminescence derive principally from acoustic cavitation: the formation, growth

  7. Cavitation clouds created by shock scattering from bubbles during histotripsy.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Adam D; Wang, Tzu-Yin; Cain, Charles A; Fowlkes, J Brian; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A; Bailey, Michael R; Xu, Zhen

    2011-10-01

    Histotripsy is a therapy that focuses short-duration, high-amplitude pulses of ultrasound to incite a localized cavitation cloud that mechanically breaks down tissue. To investigate the mechanism of cloud formation, high-speed photography was used to observe clouds generated during single histotripsy pulses. Pulses of 5-20 cycles duration were applied to a transparent tissue phantom by a 1-MHz spherically focused transducer. Clouds initiated from single cavitation bubbles that formed during the initial cycles of the pulse, and grew along the acoustic axis opposite the propagation direction. Based on these observations, we hypothesized that clouds form as a result of large negative pressure generated by the backscattering of shockwaves from a single bubble. The positive-pressure phase of the wave inverts upon scattering and superimposes on the incident negative-pressure phase to create this negative pressure and cavitation. The process repeats with each cycle of the incident wave, and the bubble cloud elongates toward the transducer. Finite-amplitude propagation distorts the incident wave such that the peak-positive pressure is much greater than the peak-negative pressure, which exaggerates the effect. The hypothesis was tested with two modified incident waves that maintained negative pressure but reduced the positive pressure amplitude. These waves suppressed cloud formation which supported the hypothesis. PMID:21973343

  8. Particle removal by a single cavitation bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ming; Ji, Chen; Zou, Jun; Ruan, XiaoDong; Fu, Xin

    2014-04-01

    In the paper, the behavior of the particle acted by the oscillating bubble is studied using a high-speed video camera. The bubble is generated using a very low voltage of 55 V. Images are captured at a speed of 15000 fps (frames per second). It is found that the velocity of the particle is dependent on the liquid viscosity, particle size, and tube diameter. Particle velocity decreases with the increase of the glycron-water mixture viscosity. A model is presented to predict the velocity and verified by experimental results. These observations may be beneficial for the application in medical treatment.

  9. Numerical Computation of Shock Waves in a Spherical Cloud of Cavitation Bubbles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yi-Chun Wang; Christopher E. Brennen

    1999-01-01

    The nonlinear dynamics of a spherical cloud of cavitation bubbles have been simulated numerically in order to learn more about the physical phenomena occurring in cloud cavitation. A finite cloud of nuclei is subject to a de- crease in the ambient pressure which causes the cloud to cavitate. A subsequent pressure recovery then causes the cloud to collapse. This is

  10. Observation of cavitation bubbles and acoustic streaming in high intensity ultrasound fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uemura, Yuuki; Sasaki, Kazuma; Minami, Kyohei; Sato, Toshio; Choi, Pak-Kon; Takeuchi, Shinichi

    2015-07-01

    We observed the behavior of acoustic cavitation by sonochemical luminescence and ultrasound B-mode imaging with ultrasound diagnostic equipment in a standing-wave ultrasound field and focused ultrasound field. Furthermore, in order to investigate the influence of acoustic streaming on acoustic cavitation bubbles, we performed flow analysis of the sound field using particle image velocimetry. We found that acoustic cavitation bubbles are stirred by circulating acoustic streaming and local vortexes occurring in the water tank of the standing-wave ultrasound exposure system. We considered that the acoustic cavitation bubbles are carried away by acoustic streaming due to the high ultrasound pressure in the focused ultrasound field.

  11. Hysteresis of inertial cavitation activity induced by fluctuating bubble size distribution.

    PubMed

    Muleki Seya, Pauline; Desjouy, Cyril; Béra, Jean-Christophe; Inserra, Claude

    2015-11-01

    Amongst the variety of complex phenomena encountered in nonlinear physics, a hysteretic effect can be expected on ultrasound cavitation due to the intrinsic nonlinearity of bubble dynamics. When applying successive ultrasound shots for increasing and decreasing acoustic intensities, a hysteretic behaviour is experimentally observed on inertial cavitation activity, with a loop area sensitive to the inertial cavitation threshold. To get a better insight of the phenomena underlying this hysteretic effect, the evolution of the bubble size distribution is studied numerically by implementing rectified diffusion, fragmentation process, rising and dissolution of bubbles from an initial bubble size distribution. When applying increasing and decreasing acoustic intensities, the numerical distribution exhibits asymmetry in bubble number and distribution. The resulting inertial cavitation activity is assessed through the numerical broadband noise of the emitted acoustic radiation of the bubble cloud dynamics. This approach allows obtaining qualitatively the observed hysteretic effect and its interest in terms of control is discussed. PMID:26186844

  12. Cavitation bubble behavior and bubble-shock wave interaction near a gelatin surface as a study of in vivo bubble dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodama, T.; Tomita, Y.

    The collapse of a single cavitation bubble near a gelatin surface, and the interaction of an air bubble attached to a gelatin surface with a shock wave, were investigated. These events permitted the study of the behavior of in vivo cavitation bubbles and the subsequent tissue damage mechanism during intraocular surgery, intracorporeal and extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy. Results were obtained with high-speed framing photography. The cavitation bubbles near the gelatin surface did not produce significant liquid jets directed at the surface, and tended to migrate away from it. The period of the motion of a cavitation bubble near the gelatin surface was longer than that of twice the Rayleigh's collapse time for a wide range of relative distance, L/Rmax, excepting for very small L/Rmax values (L was the stand-off distance between the gelatin surface and the laser focus position, and Rmax was the maximum bubble radius). The interaction of an air bubble with a shock wave yielded a liquid jet inside the bubble, penetrating into the gelatin surface. The liquid jet had the potential to damage the gelatin. The results predicted that cavitation-bubble-induced tissue damage was closely related to the oscillatory bubble motion, the subsequent mechanical tissue displacement, and the liquid jet penetration generated by the interaction of the remaining gas bubbles with subsequent shock waves. The characteristic bubble motion and liquid jet formation depended on the tissue's mechanical properties, resulting in different damage mechanisms from those observed on hard materials.

  13. Interactions of Cavitation Bubbles Observed by High-Speed Imaging in Shock Wave Lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pishchalnikov, Yuri A.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Bailey, Michael R.; McAteer, James A.; Williams, James C.; Evan, Andrew P.; Cleveland, Robin O.; Crum, Lawrence A.

    2006-05-01

    A multi-frame high-speed photography was used to investigate the dynamics of cavitation bubbles induced by a passage of a lithotripter shock wave in a water tank. Solitary bubbles in the free field each radiated a shock wave upon collapse, and typically emitted a micro-jet on the rebound following initial collapse. For bubbles in clouds, emitted jets were directed toward neighboring bubbles and could break the spherical symmetry of the neighboring bubbles before they in turn collapsed. Bubbles at the periphery of a cluster underwent collapse before the bubbles at the center. Observations with high-speed imaging confirm previous predictions that bubbles in a cavitation cloud do not cycle independently of one another but instead interact as a dynamic bubble cluster.

  14. LES numerical simulation of cavitation Bubble shedding on ALE 25 and ALE 15 hydrofoils

    Microsoft Academic Search

    De-min LIU; Shu-hong LIU; Yu-lin WU; Hong-yuan XU

    2009-01-01

    A cavitation calculation scheme is developed and applied to ALE 15 and ALE 25 hydrofoils, based on the Bubble Two-phase Flow (BTF) cavity model with a Large Eddy Simulation (LES) methodology. The Navier-Stokes equations including cavitation bubble clusters are solved through the finite-volume approach with a time-marching scheme. Simulations are carried out in a 3-D field with a hydrofoil ALE

  15. Optical measurements of gas bubbles in oil behind a cavitating micro-orifice flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iben, Uwe; Wolf, Fabian; Freudigmann, Hans-Arndt; Fröhlich, Jochen; Heller, Winfried

    2015-06-01

    In hydraulic systems, it is common for air release to occur behind valves or throttles in the form of bubbles. These air bubbles can affect the behavior and the performance of these systems to a substantial extent. In the paper, gas release in a liquid flow behind an orifice is analyzed by optical methods for various operation points. The bubbles are observed with a digital camera, and a detection algorithm based on the Hough transformation is used to determine their number and size. The appearance of gas bubbles is very sensitive to the inlet and outlet pressure of the orifice. Gas bubbles are only observed if choking cavitation occurs. An empirical relationship between an adjusted cavitation number and the appearance of gas release is presented. It is assumed that the observed bubbles contain mostly air. With the applied pressure differences, up to 30 % of the dissolved air was degassed in the form of bubbles.

  16. THE TEMPERATURE OF CAVITATION

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. B. FLINT; K. S. SUSLICK

    1991-01-01

    Ultrasonic irradiation of liquids causes acoustic cavitation: the\\u000a formation, growth, and implosive collapse of bubbles. Bubble collapse\\u000a during cavitation generates transient hot spots responsible for\\u000a high-energy chemistry and emission of light. Determination of the\\u000a temperatures reached in a cavitating bubble has remained a difficult\\u000a experimental problem. As a spectroscopic probe of the cavitation event,\\u000a sonoluminescence provides a solution. Sonoluminescence spectra

  17. Luminescence from acoustic-driven laser-induced cavitation bubbles Claus-Dieter Ohl*

    E-print Network

    Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    Luminescence from acoustic-driven laser-induced cavitation bubbles Claus-Dieter Ohl* Drittes second harmonic driving. However, the need to levitate a bubble by the same sound field may limit at infinity is P P0 Pa(t), where Pa(t) is the imposed acoustic driving term. We assume a sinusoidal

  18. Visualization of ultrasound induced cavitation bubbles using the synchrotron x-ray Analyzer Based Imaging technique.

    PubMed

    Izadifar, Zahra; Belev, George; Izadifar, Mohammad; Izadifar, Zohreh; Chapman, Dean

    2014-12-01

    Observing cavitation bubbles deep within tissue is very difficult. The development of a method for probing cavitation, irrespective of its location in tissues, would improve the efficiency and application of ultrasound in the clinic. A synchrotron x-ray imaging technique, which is capable of detecting cavitation bubbles induced in water by a sonochemistry system, is reported here; this could possibly be extended to the study of therapeutic ultrasound in tissues. The two different x-ray imaging techniques of Analyzer Based Imaging (ABI) and phase contrast imaging (PCI) were examined in order to detect ultrasound induced cavitation bubbles. Cavitation was not observed by PCI, however it was detectable with ABI. Acoustic cavitation was imaged at six different acoustic power levels and six different locations through the acoustic beam in water at a fixed power level. The results indicate the potential utility of this technique for cavitation studies in tissues, but it is time consuming. This may be improved by optimizing the imaging method. PMID:25401957

  19. A numerical method for the dynamics of non-spherical cavitation bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucca, G.; Prosperetti, A.

    1982-01-01

    A boundary integral numerical method for the dynamics of nonspherical cavitation bubbles in inviscid incompressible liquids is described. Only surface values of the velocity potential and its first derivatives are involved. The problem of solving the Laplace equation in the entire domain occupied by the liquid is thus avoided. The collapse of a bubble in the vicinity of a solid wall and the collapse of three bubbles with collinear centers are considered.

  20. A simple mathematical approach for bubble cavitation flows

    SciTech Connect

    Al Assa`ad, A.A. [Al Assa`ad (A.), Orsay (France)

    1994-12-31

    This paper deals with the study of the flow of a liquid containing small gas bubbles around a thin body. It begins with a brief development of field equations. For the sake of simplicity, the authors restrict their attention to the case of plane-parallel flow, with the aim of assessing the dynamic effects of the bubble growth. Limiting themselves to first order terms, a fourth-order linear equation governing the flow is obtained, and the boundary value problem in the velocity potential is presented. Then a linearized Korteweg-de Vries equation is derived for steady-wave solutions and their typical features are outlined, to determine the general qualitative nature of the flow behind the body.

  1. The fast dynamics of cavitation bubbles within water confined in elastic solids.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Olivier; Marmottant, Philippe; Gonzalez-Avila, S Roberto; Ando, Keita; Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2014-03-14

    Many applications such as ultrasonic cleaning or sonochemistry use the ability of bubbles to oscillate and drive liquid flow. But bubbles have also received attention in porous media, where drying may cause cavitation, a phenomenon occurring in plant tissues. Here we explore the dynamics of cavitation bubbles when the liquid is fully entrapped in an elastic solid, using light scattering, laser strobe photography and high speed camera recordings. Our experiments show unexpectedly fast bubble oscillations in volume. They depend on the confinement size and elasticity, which we explain with a simple model where liquid compressibility is a key parameter. We also observe rich non-spherical dynamics, with ejection away from the walls and bubble fragmentation, which reveal extreme fluid motion at short timescales. PMID:24795983

  2. The influence of viscoelasticity on the collapse of cavitation bubbles near a rigid boundary

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. J. Lind; T. N. Phillips

    An understanding of the phenomena associated with cavitation is important in many areas of science and engineering. This paper\\u000a is concerned with the influence of viscoelasticity on the dynamics of cavitation bubbles near rigid boundaries. Viscoelastic\\u000a effects are modelled using a Maxwell constitutive equation, and a generalized Bernoulli equation is derived. The governing\\u000a equations are solved using the boundary element

  3. Stability of bubbly liquids and its connection to the process of cavitation inception D. Fuster, K. Pham, and S. Zaleski

    E-print Network

    Fuster, Daniel

    Stability of bubbly liquids and its connection to the process of cavitation inception D. Fuster, K://scitation.aip.org/content/aip/journal/pof2/26/4?ver=pdfcov Published by the AIP Publishing Articles you may be interested in Cavitation.1063/1.3674299 Multibubble cavitation inception Phys. Fluids 21, 113302 (2009); 10.1063/1.3265547 Noise due to extreme bubble

  4. Size measurement of bubbles in a cavitation tunnel by digital in-line holography.

    PubMed

    Lebrun, Denis; Allano, Daniel; Méès, Loïc; Walle, Françoise; Corbin, Frédéric; Boucheron, Romuald; Fréchou, Didier

    2011-12-01

    Digital in-line holography (DIH) with a divergent beam is used to measure size and concentration of cavitation bubbles (6-100 ?m) in hydrodynamic facilities. A sampling probe is directly inserted in the cavitation tunnel, and the holograms of the bubbles are recorded through a transparent test section specially designed for DIH measurements. The recording beam coming from a fiber-coupled laser diode illuminates the sample volume, and holograms are recorded by a CMOS camera. From each hologram, the sampling volume can be reconstructed slice by slice by applying a wavelet-based reconstruction method. Because of the geometry of the recording beam, a magnification ratio must be introduced for recovering the 3D location and size of each bubble. The method used for processing holograms recorded in such a configuration is presented. Then, statistical results obtained from 5000 holograms recorded under different pressures in the cavitation tunnel are compared and discussed. PMID:22192994

  5. Motion characteristics of cavitation bubble near the rigid wall with the driving of acoustic wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Xi; Zhang, A.-man; Zeng, Dong-rui

    2015-03-01

    The dynamics of cavitation bubble is analyzed in the compressible fluid by use of the boundary integral equation considering the compressibility. After the vertical incidence of plane wave to the rigid wall, the motion characteristics of single cavitation bubble near the rigid wall with initial equilibrium state are researched with different parameters. The results show that after the driving of acoustic wave, the cavitation bubble near the rigid wall will expand or contract, and generate the jet pointing to the wall. Also, the existence of the wall will elongate time for one oscillation. With the compressible model, the oscillation amplitude is reduced, as well as the peak value of inner pressure and jet tip velocity. The effect of the wall on oscillation amplitude is limited. However with the increment of initial vertical distance, the effect of wall on the jet velocity is from acceleration to limitation, and finally to acceleration again.

  6. Optical observation of shock waves and cavitation bubbles in high intensity laser-induced shock processes

    SciTech Connect

    Marti-Lopez, L.; Ocana, R.; Porro, J. A.; Morales, M.; Ocana, J. L.

    2009-07-01

    We report an experimental study of the temporal and spatial dynamics of shock waves, cavitation bubbles, and sound waves generated in water during laser shock processing by single Nd:YAG laser pulses of nanosecond duration. A fast ICCD camera (2 ns gate time) was employed to record false schlieren photographs, schlieren photographs, and Mach-Zehnder interferograms of the zone surrounding the laser spot site on the target, an aluminum alloy sample. We recorded hemispherical shock fronts, cylindrical shock fronts, plane shock fronts, cavitation bubbles, and phase disturbance tracks.

  7. A reduced-order, single-bubble cavitation model with applications to therapeutic ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Kreider, Wayne; Crum, Lawrence A.; Bailey, Michael R.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.

    2011-01-01

    Cavitation often occurs in therapeutic applications of medical ultrasound such as shock-wave lithotripsy (SWL) and high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). Because cavitation bubbles can affect an intended treatment, it is important to understand the dynamics of bubbles in this context. The relevant context includes very high acoustic pressures and frequencies as well as elevated temperatures. Relative to much of the prior research on cavitation and bubble dynamics, such conditions are unique. To address the relevant physics, a reduced-order model of a single, spherical bubble is proposed that incorporates phase change at the liquid-gas interface as well as heat and mass transport in both phases. Based on the energy lost during the inertial collapse and rebound of a millimeter-sized bubble, experimental observations were used to tune and test model predictions. In addition, benchmarks from the published literature were used to assess various aspects of model performance. Benchmark comparisons demonstrate that the model captures the basic physics of phase change and diffusive transport, while it is quantitatively sensitive to specific model assumptions and implementation details. Given its performance and numerical stability, the model can be used to explore bubble behaviors across a broad parameter space relevant to therapeutic ultrasound. PMID:22088026

  8. High Speed Imaging of Bubble Clouds Generated in Pulsed Ultrasound Cavitational Therapy—Histotripsy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhen; Raghavan, Mekhala; Hall, Timothy L.; Chang, Ching-Wei; Mycek, Mary-Ann; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Cain, Charles A.

    2009-01-01

    Our recent studies have demonstrated that mechanical fractionation of tissue structure with sharply demarcated boundaries can be achieved using short (<20 ?s), high intensity ultrasound pulses delivered at low duty cycles. We have called this technique histotripsy. Histotripsy has potential clinical applications where noninvasive tissue fractionation and/or tissue removal are desired. The primary mechanism of histotripsy is thought to be acoustic cavitation, which is supported by a temporally changing acoustic backscatter observed during the histotripsy process. In this paper, a fast-gated digital camera was used to image the hypothesized cavitating bubble cloud generated by histotripsy pulses. The bubble cloud was produced at a tissue-water interface and inside an optically transparent gelatin phantom which mimics bulk tissue. The imaging shows the following: 1) Initiation of a temporally changing acoustic backscatter was due to the formation of a bubble cloud; 2) The pressure threshold to generate a bubble cloud was lower at a tissue-fluid interface than inside bulk tissue; and 3) at higher pulse pressure, the bubble cloud lasted longer and grew larger. The results add further support to the hypothesis that the histotripsy process is due to a cavitating bubble cloud and may provide insight into the sharp boundaries of histotripsy lesions. PMID:18019247

  9. Studies on the tempo of bubble formation in recently cavitated vessels: a model to predict the pressure of air bubbles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yujie; Pan, Ruihua; Tyree, Melvin T

    2015-06-01

    A cavitation event in a vessel replaces water with a mixture of water vapor and air. A quantitative theory is presented to argue that the tempo of filling of vessels with air has two phases: a fast process that extracts air from stem tissue adjacent to the cavitated vessels (less than 10 s) and a slow phase that extracts air from the atmosphere outside the stem (more than 10 h). A model was designed to estimate how water tension (T) near recently cavitated vessels causes bubbles in embolized vessels to expand or contract as T increases or decreases, respectively. The model also predicts that the hydraulic conductivity of a stem will increase as bubbles collapse. The pressure of air bubbles trapped in vessels of a stem can be predicted from the model based on fitting curves of hydraulic conductivity versus T. The model was validated using data from six stem segments each of Acer mono and the clonal hybrid Populus 84K (Populus alba × Populus glandulosa). The model was fitted to results with root mean square error less than 3%. The model provided new insight into the study of embolism formation in stem tissue and helped quantify the bubble pressure immediately after the fast process referred to above. PMID:25907963

  10. A New Unsteady Model for Dense Cloud Cavitation in Cryogenic Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hosangadi, Ashvin; Ahuja, Vineet

    2005-01-01

    Contents include the following: Background on thermal effects in cavitation. Physical properties of hydrogen. Multi-phase cavitation with thermal effect. Solution procedure. Cavitation model overview. Cavitation source terms. New cavitation model. Source term for bubble growth. One equation les model. Unsteady ogive simulations: liquid nitrogen. Unsteady incompressible flow in a pipe. Time averaged cavity length for NACA15 flowfield.

  11. Molecular dynamics simulations of bubble formation and cavitation in liquid metals.

    SciTech Connect

    Insepov, Z.; Hassanein, A.; Bazhirov, T. T.; Norman, G. E.; Stegailov, V. V.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Inst. for High Energy Densities of Joint Inst. for High Temperatures of RAS

    2007-11-01

    Thermodynamics and kinetics of nano-scale bubble formation in liquid metals such as Li and Pb were studied by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations at pressures typical for magnetic and inertial fusion. Two different approaches to bubble formation were developed. In one method, radial densities, pressures, surface tensions, and work functions of the cavities in supercooled liquid lithium were calculated and compared with the surface tension experimental data. The critical radius of a stable cavity in liquid lithium was found for the first time. In the second method, the cavities were created in the highly stretched region of the liquid phase diagram; and then the stability boundary and the cavitation rates were calculated in liquid lead. The pressure dependences of cavitation frequencies were obtained over the temperature range 700-2700 K in liquid Pb. The results of MD calculations for cavitation rate were compared with estimates of classical nucleation theory (CNT).

  12. acoustic cavitation of slightly subcritical bubbles of Mathematics, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215

    E-print Network

    Harkin, Anthony

    On acoustic cavitation of slightly subcritical bubbles Anthony ¡ Harkin Department radii are slightly less than the Blake critical radius, in the presence of time-periodic acoustic for acoustic pressure fields that consist of two frequencies © will be discussed. © 1999 American Institute

  13. Cavitation and bubble collapse in hot asymmetric nuclear matter

    SciTech Connect

    Kolomietz, V.M. [Physik-Department TU Muenchen, 85747 Garching (Germany)

    2004-10-01

    The dynamics of embryonic bubbles in overheated, viscous, and non-Markovian nuclear matter is studied. We show that the memory and the Fermi surface distortions significantly affect the hindrance of bubble collapse and determine characteristic oscillations of the bubble radius. These oscillations occur due to the additional elastic force induced by the memory integral.

  14. Analytical expressions for primary Bjerknes force on inertial cavitation bubbles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Olivier Louisnard

    2008-01-01

    The primary Bjerknes force is responsible for the quick translational motion of radially oscillating bubbles in a sound field. The problem is classical in the case of small-amplitude oscillations, for which an analytical expression of the force can be easily obtained, and predicts attraction of sub-resonant bubbles by pressure antinodes. But for high-amplitude sound fields the bubbles undergo large-amplitude nonlinear

  15. K.S. Suslick, W.B. McNamara III, Y. Didenko; "Hot Spot Conditions During Multi-Bubble Cavitation" in Sonochemistry and Sonoluminescence, Crum, L. A.; Mason, T. J.; Reisse, J.; Suslick, K.S., eds.

    E-print Network

    Suslick, Kenneth S.

    K.S. Suslick, W.B. McNamara III, Y. Didenko; "Hot Spot Conditions During Multi-Bubble Cavitation: Dordrecht, Netherlands, 1999, pp. 191-204. p. 191 HOT SPOT CONDITIONS DURING MULTI-BUBBLE CAVITATION K probe of the conditions created during cavitation bubble collapse. Acoustic cavitation is the origin

  16. Effects of tissue stiffness, ultrasound frequency, and pressure on histotripsy-induced cavitation bubble behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlaisavljevich, Eli; Lin, Kuang-Wei; Warnez, Matthew T.; Singh, Rahul; Mancia, Lauren; Putnam, Andrew J.; Johnsen, Eric; Cain, Charles; Xu, Zhen

    2015-03-01

    Histotripsy is an ultrasound ablation method that controls cavitation to fractionate soft tissue. In order to effectively fractionate tissue, histotripsy requires cavitation bubbles to rapidly expand from nanometer-sized initial nuclei into bubbles often larger than 50?µm. Using a negative pressure high enough to initiate a bubble cloud and expand bubbles to a sufficient size, histotripsy has been shown capable of completely fractionating soft tissue into acelluar debris resulting in effective tissue removal. Previous work has shown that the histotripsy process is affected by tissue mechanical properties with stiffer tissues showing increased resistance to histotripsy fractionation, which we hypothesize to be caused by impeded bubble expansion in stiffer tissues. In this study, the hypothesis that increases in tissue stiffness cause a reduction in bubble expansion was investigated both theoretically and experimentally. High speed optical imaging was used to capture a series of time delayed images of bubbles produced inside mechanically tunable agarose tissue phantoms using histotripsy pulses produced by 345?kHz, 500?kHz, 1.5?MHz, and 3?MHz histotripsy transducers. The results demonstrated a significant decrease in maximum bubble radius (Rmax) and collapse time (tc) with both increasing Young’s modulus and increasing frequency. Furthermore, results showed that Rmax was not increased by raising the pressure above the intrinsic threshold. Finally, this work demonstrated the potential of using a dual-frequency strategy to modulate the expansion of histotripsy bubbles. Overall, the results of this study improve our understanding of how tissue stiffness and ultrasound parameters affect histotripsy-induced bubble behavior and provide a rational basis to tailor acoustic parameters for treatment of the specific tissues of interest.

  17. Effects of tissue stiffness, ultrasound frequency, and pressure on histotripsy-induced cavitation bubble behavior.

    PubMed

    Vlaisavljevich, Eli; Lin, Kuang-Wei; Warnez, Matthew T; Singh, Rahul; Mancia, Lauren; Putnam, Andrew J; Johnsen, Eric; Cain, Charles; Xu, Zhen

    2015-03-21

    Histotripsy is an ultrasound ablation method that controls cavitation to fractionate soft tissue. In order to effectively fractionate tissue, histotripsy requires cavitation bubbles to rapidly expand from nanometer-sized initial nuclei into bubbles often larger than 50?µm. Using a negative pressure high enough to initiate a bubble cloud and expand bubbles to a sufficient size, histotripsy has been shown capable of completely fractionating soft tissue into acelluar debris resulting in effective tissue removal. Previous work has shown that the histotripsy process is affected by tissue mechanical properties with stiffer tissues showing increased resistance to histotripsy fractionation, which we hypothesize to be caused by impeded bubble expansion in stiffer tissues. In this study, the hypothesis that increases in tissue stiffness cause a reduction in bubble expansion was investigated both theoretically and experimentally. High speed optical imaging was used to capture a series of time delayed images of bubbles produced inside mechanically tunable agarose tissue phantoms using histotripsy pulses produced by 345?kHz, 500?kHz, 1.5?MHz, and 3?MHz histotripsy transducers. The results demonstrated a significant decrease in maximum bubble radius (Rmax) and collapse time (tc) with both increasing Young's modulus and increasing frequency. Furthermore, results showed that Rmax was not increased by raising the pressure above the intrinsic threshold. Finally, this work demonstrated the potential of using a dual-frequency strategy to modulate the expansion of histotripsy bubbles. Overall, the results of this study improve our understanding of how tissue stiffness and ultrasound parameters affect histotripsy-induced bubble behavior and provide a rational basis to tailor acoustic parameters for treatment of the specific tissues of interest. PMID:25715732

  18. Ultrasonic emissions reveal individual cavitation bubbles in water-stressed wood.

    PubMed

    Ponomarenko, A; Vincent, O; Pietriga, A; Cochard, H; Badel, É; Marmottant, P

    2014-10-01

    Under drought conditions, the xylem of trees that conducts ascending sap produces ultrasonic emissions whose exact origin is not clear. We introduce a new method to record simultaneously both acoustic events and optical observation of the xylem conduits within slices of wood that were embedded in a transparent material setting a hydric stress. In this article, we resolved the rapid development of all cavitation bubbles and demonstrated that each ultrasound emission was linked to the nucleation of one single bubble, whose acoustic energy is an increasing function of the size of the conduit where nucleation occurred and also of the hydric stress. We modelled these observations by the fact that water columns in conduits store elastic energy and release it into acoustic waves when they are broken by cavitation bubbles. Water columns are thus elastic, and not rigid, 'wires of water' set under tension by hydric stresses. Cavitation bubbles are at the origin of an embolism, whose development was followed in our experiments. Such an embolism of sap circulation can result in a fatal condition for living trees. These findings provide new insights for the non-destructive monitoring of embolisms within trees, and suggest a new approach to study porous media under hydric stress. PMID:25056212

  19. Spatial-temporal ultrasound imaging of residual cavitation bubbles around a fluid-tissue interface in histotripsy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hong; Xu, Shanshan; Yuan, Yuan; Liu, Runna; Wang, Supin; Wan, Mingxi

    2015-05-01

    Cavitation is considered as the primary mechanism of soft tissue fragmentation (histotripsy) by pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound. The residual cavitation bubbles have a dual influence on the histotripsy pulses: these serve as nuclei for easy generation of new cavitation, and act as strong scatterers causing energy "shadowing." To monitor the residual cavitation bubbles in histotripsy, an ultrafast active cavitation imaging method with relatively high signal-to-noise ratio and good spatial-temporal resolution was proposed in this paper, which combined plane wave transmission, minimum variance beamforming, and coherence factor weighting. The spatial-temporal evolutions of residual cavitation bubbles around a fluid-tissue interface in histotripsy under pulse duration (PD) of 10-40??s and pulse repetition frequency (PRF) of 0.67-2?kHz were monitored by this method. The integrated bubble area curves inside the tissue interface were acquired from the bubble image sequence, and the formation process of histotripsy damage was estimated. It was observed that the histotripsy efficiency decreased with both longer PDs and higher PRFs. A direct relationship with a coefficient of 1.0365 between histotripsy lesion area and inner residual bubble area was found. These results can assist in monitoring and optimization of the histotripsy treatment further. PMID:25994689

  20. Acoustic cavitation bubbles in the kidney induced by focused shock waves in extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwahara, M.; Ioritani, N.; Kambe, K.; Taguchi, K.; Saito, T.; Igarashi, M.; Shirai, S.; Orikasa, S.; Takayama, K.

    1990-07-01

    On an ultrasonic imaging system a hyperechoic region was observed in a focal area of fucused shock waves in the dog kidney. This study was performed to learn whether cavitation bubbles are responsible for this hyperechoic region. The ultrasonic images in water of varying temperatures were not markedly different. In the flowing stream of distilled water, the stream was demonstrated as a hyperechoic region only with a mixture of air bubbles. Streams of 5%-50% glucose solutions were also demonstrated as a hyperechoic region. However, such concentration changes in living tissue, as well as thermal changes, are hardly thought to be induced. The holographic interferometry showed that the cavitation bubbles remained for more than 500 msec. in the focal area in water. This finding indicate that the bubble can remain for longer period than previously supposed. These results support the contentions that cavitation bubbles are responsible for the hyperechoic region in the kidney in situ.

  1. Linearized dynamics of bubbly and cavitating flows in cylindrical ducts

    SciTech Connect

    d`Auria, F.; d`Agostino, L. [Universita degli Studi di Pisa (Italy). Dipartimento di Ingegneria Aerospaziale; Brennen, C.E. [Californai Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States). Division of Engineering and Applied Science

    1994-12-31

    The present work investigates the dynamics of the three-dimensional, unsteady flow of a bubbly mixture in a cylindrical duct subject to a periodic pressure excitation at one end. The results are then applied to the case of the idealized pressure excitation generated by the rotor stage of a turbomachine with the objective of understanding the dynamics of an inlet or discharge duct filled with bubbly liquid. The flow displays various regimes (subsonic, supersonic and super-resonant), with radically different propagation characteristics. Depending on the dispersion of the gaseous phase in the bubbly mixture and the angular speed of the turbomachine, the dynamic effects due to the bubble response can be significant, and the flow no longer behaves as a homogeneous barotropic fluid, as is commonly assumed. Examples are presented to illustrate the influence of various flow parameters.

  2. Analytical expressions for primary Bjerknes force on inertial cavitation bubbles.

    PubMed

    Louisnard, Olivier

    2008-09-01

    The primary Bjerknes force is responsible for the quick translational motion of radially oscillating bubbles in a sound field. The problem is classical in the case of small-amplitude oscillations, for which an analytical expression of the force can be easily obtained, and predicts attraction of sub-resonant bubbles by pressure antinodes. But for high-amplitude sound fields the bubbles undergo large-amplitude nonlinear oscillations, so that no analytical expression for the force is available in this case. The bubble dynamics is approximated on physical grounds, following the method of Hilgenfeldt [J. Fluid Mech. 365, 171 (1998)], but carefully accounting for surface tension. The analytical expression of the maximum radius of the bubble is recovered, the time of maximum expansion is noticeably refined, and an estimation of the collapse time is found. An analytical expression for the time-varying bubble volume is deduced, and the Bjerknes force is obtained in closed form. The result is valid for any shape of the sound field, including purely standing or purely traveling waves, and is ready to use in a theoretical model of bubble cloud evolution. In addition, the well-known sign inversion of the Bjerknes force for large standing waves is recovered and the inversion threshold in the parameter space is obtained analytically. The results are in good agreement with numerical simulations and allow a quantitative assessment of the effects of physical parameters. It is found that either reduction of the surface tension or increase in the static pressure should produce a widening of the bubble-free region near high-amplitude pressure antinodes. PMID:18851158

  3. Analytical expressions for primary Bjerknes force on inertial cavitation bubbles

    E-print Network

    Louisnard, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    The primary Bjerknes force is responsible for the quick translational motion of radially oscillating bubbles in a sound field. The problem is classical in the case of small-amplitude oscillations, for which an analytical expression of the force can be easily obtained, and predicts attraction of sub- resonant bubbles by pressure antinodes. But for high-amplitude sound fields, the bubbles undergo large amplitude nonlinear oscillations, so that no analytical expression of the force is available in this case. The bubble dynamics is approximated on physical grounds, following the method of Hilgenfeldt et al. [J. Fluid Mech., 365, 171 (1998)], but carefully accounting for surface tension. The analytical expression of the maximum radius of the bubble is recovered, the time of maximum expansion is noticeably refined, and an estimation of the collapse-time is found. An analytical expression for the time-varying bubble volume is deduced, and the Bjerknes force is obtained in closed form. The result is valid for any sha...

  4. An Acoustofluidic Micromixer via Bubble Inception and Cavitation from Microchannel Sidewalls

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    During the deep reactive ion etching process, the sidewalls of a silicon mold feature rough wavy structures, which can be transferred onto a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchannel through the soft lithography technique. In this article, we utilized the wavy structures of PDMS microchannel sidewalls to initiate and cavitate bubbles in the presence of acoustic waves. Through bubble cavitation, this acoustofluidic approach demonstrates fast, effective mixing in microfluidics. We characterized its performance by using viscous fluids such as poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG). When two PEG solutions with a resultant viscosity 54.9 times higher than that of water were used, the mixing efficiency was found to be 0.92, indicating excellent, homogeneous mixing. The acoustofluidic micromixer presented here has the advantages of simple fabrication, easy integration, and capability to mix high-viscosity fluids (Reynolds number: ?0.01) in less than 100 ms. PMID:24754496

  5. Recent theories of cavitation damage including non-symmetrical bubble collapse effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammitt, F. G.

    1974-01-01

    Theories of cavitation damage mechanisms are discussed. Photographic evidence has shown that the actual collapse of bubbles near a symmetry-destroying feature such as a nearby wall results in a toroidal-like collapse, with the final generation of a liquid microjet oriented toward the wall. Numerical analyses indicate that the shock wave intensity emitted during collapse is not likely to be strong enough to be damaging to most materials. It has been determined that actual damage is usually a result of a combination of impact effect of the microjet and the shock wave pressures generated by bubble rebounds.

  6. Reduction of Bubble Cavitation by Modifying the Diffraction Wave from a Lithotripter Aperture

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Purpose A new method was devised to suppress the bubble cavitation in the lithotripter focal zone to reduce the propensity of shockwave-induced renal injury. Materials and Methods An edge extender was designed and fabricated to fit on the outside of the ellipsoidal reflector of an electrohydraulic lithotripter to disturb the generation of diffraction wave at the aperture, but with little effect on the acoustic field inside the reflector. Results Although the peak negative pressures at the lithotripter focus using the edge extender at 20?kV were similar to that of the original configuration (-11.1±0.9 vs ?10.6±0.7?MPa), the duration of the tensile wave was shortened significantly (3.2±0.54 vs 5.83±0.56??s, P<0.01). There is no difference, however, in both the amplitude and duration of the compressive shockwaves between these two configurations as well as the ?6 dB beam width in the focal plane. The significant suppression effect of bubble cavitation was confirmed by the measured bubble collapse time using passive cavitation detection. At the lithotripter focus, while only about 30 shocks were needed to rupture a blood vessel phantom using the original HM-3 reflector at 20?kV, no damage could be produced after 300 shocks using the edge extender. Meanwhile, the original HM-3 lithotripter at 20?kV can achieve a stone comminution efficiency of 50.4±2.0% on plaster-of-Paris stone phantom after 200 shocks, which is comparable to that of using the edge extender (46.8±4.1%, P=0.005). Conclusions Modifying the diffraction wave at the lithotripter aperture can suppress the shockwave-induced bubble cavitation with significant reduced damage potential on the vessel phantom but satisfactory stone comminution ability. PMID:22332839

  7. Incubation pit analysis and calculation of the hydrodynamic impact pressure from the implosion of an acoustic cavitation bubble.

    PubMed

    Tzanakis, I; Eskin, D G; Georgoulas, A; Fytanidis, D K

    2014-03-01

    An experimental study to evaluate cavitation bubble dynamics is conducted. The aim is to predict the magnitude and statistical distribution of hydrodynamic impact pressure generated from the implosion of various individual acoustic cavitation bubbles near to a rigid boundary, considering geometrical features of the pitted area. A steel sample was subjected to cavitation impacts by an ultrasonic transducer with a 5mm diameter probe. The pitted surface was then examined using high-precision 3D optical interferometer techniques. Only the incubation period where surface is plastically deformed without material loss is taken into account. The exposure time was adjusted in the range of 3-60 s to avoid pit overlapping and a special procedure for pit analysis and characterisation was then followed. Moreover, a high-speed camera device was deployed to capture the implosion mechanisms of cavitation bubbles near to the surface. The geometrical characteristics of single incubation pits as well as pit clusters were studied and their deformation patterns were compared. Consequently, a reverse engineering approach was applied in order the hydrodynamic impact pressure from the implosion of an individual cavitation bubble to be determined. The characteristic parameters of the cavitation implosion process such as hydrodynamic impact pressure and liquid micro-jet impact velocity as well as the hydrodynamic severity of the cavitation impacts were quantified. It was found that the length of the hypotenuse of the orthographic projections from the center of the pit, which basically represents the deformed area of the pit, increases with the hydrodynamic impact aggressiveness in a linear rate. Majority of the hydrodynamic impacts were in the range of 0.4-1 GPa while the corresponding micro-jet velocities were found to be in the range of 200-700 m/s. Outcomes of this study, contribute to further understanding the cavitation intensity from the implosion of acoustically generated bubbles and could certainly represent a significant step towards developing more accurate cavitation models. PMID:24176799

  8. Helium Bubble Injection Solution To The Cavitation Damage At The Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, M. W.; Ruggles, A. E. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee 315 Pasqua Engineering Building, Knoxville, TN 37996-2300 (United States)

    2009-03-10

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is one of the largest science projects in the United States, with total cost near 1.4 Billion Dollars. The limiting factor of the facility had always been assumed to be the lifetime of the target window due to radiation damage. After further investigation, the lifetime of the target was determined not to be limited by radiation damage but by cavitation damage. The cavitation damage derives from pressure waves caused by the beam energy deposition. Vapor bubbles form when low to negative pressures occur in the mercury near the stainless steel target window due to wave interaction with the structure. Collapse of these bubbles can focus wave energy in small liquid jets that erode the window surface. Compressibility of the mercury can be enhanced to reduce the amplitude of the pressure wave caused by the beam energy deposition. To enhance compressibility, small (10 to 30 micron diameter) gas bubbles could be injected into the bulk of the mercury. Solubility and diffusivity parameters of inert gas in mercury are required for a complete mechanical simulation and engineering of these strategies. Using current theoretical models, one obtains a theoretical Henry coefficient of helium in mercury on the order of 3.9E15 Pa-molHg/molHe at 300 K. This low solubility was confirmed by a direct, offline experimental method. Mercury was charged with helium and any pressure change was recorded. Any pressure change was attributed to gas going into solution. Therefore, with the sensitivity of the experiment, a lower limit of 9E12 Pa-molHg/molHe was placed on the mercury-helium system. These values guarantee a stable bubble lifetime needed within the SNS mercury target to mitigate cavitation issues.

  9. Helium Bubble Injection Solution To The Cavitation Damage At The Spallation Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, M. W.; Ruggles, A. E.

    2009-03-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is one of the largest science projects in the United States, with total cost near 1.4 Billion Dollars. The limiting factor of the facility had always been assumed to be the lifetime of the target window due to radiation damage. After further investigation, the lifetime of the target was determined not to be limited by radiation damage but by cavitation damage. The cavitation damage derives from pressure waves caused by the beam energy deposition. Vapor bubbles form when low to negative pressures occur in the mercury near the stainless steel target window due to wave interaction with the structure. Collapse of these bubbles can focus wave energy in small liquid jets that erode the window surface. Compressibility of the mercury can be enhanced to reduce the amplitude of the pressure wave caused by the beam energy deposition. To enhance compressibility, small (10 to 30 micron diameter) gas bubbles could be injected into the bulk of the mercury. Solubility and diffusivity parameters of inert gas in mercury are required for a complete mechanical simulation and engineering of these strategies. Using current theoretical models, one obtains a theoretical Henry coefficient of helium in mercury on the order of 3.9E15 Pa-molHg/molHe at 300 K. This low solubility was confirmed by a direct, offline experimental method. Mercury was charged with helium and any pressure change was recorded. Any pressure change was attributed to gas going into solution. Therefore, with the sensitivity of the experiment, a lower limit of 9E12 Pa-molHg/molHe was placed on the mercury-helium system. These values guarantee a stable bubble lifetime needed within the SNS mercury target to mitigate cavitation issues.

  10. Ultrasonic cavitation erosion of Ti in 0.35% NaCl solution with bubbling oxygen and nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Li, D G; Wang, J D; Chen, D R; Liang, P

    2015-09-01

    The influences of oxygen and nitrogen on the ultrasonic cavitation erosion of Ti in 0.35%NaCl solution at room temperature, were investigated using a magnetostrictive-induced ultrasonic cavitation erosion (CE) facility and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The roles of oxygen and nitrogen in the composition and the electronic property of the passive film on Ti, were studied by Mott-Schottky plot and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results showed that the mass loss of Ti in 0.35%NaCl solution increased with increasing cavitation time. Bubbling oxygen can evidently increase the resistance of ultrasonic cavitation erosion comparing with bubbling nitrogen. XPS results showed that the thickness of the passive film on Ti in 0.35%NaCl solution in the case of bubbling oxygen for 3weeks, was about 7nm, and the passive film was mainly composed of TiO2 with an anatase structure. While TiO2 with a rutile structure was found to be the major component of the passive film on Ti in 0.35%NaCl solution in the case of bubbling nitrogen for 3weeks, and the film thickness was 5nm. The results extracted from Mott-Schottky plot showed that the passive film on Ti in the case of bubbling oxygen had more donor density than the passive film on Ti in the case of bubbling nitrogen. PMID:25818362

  11. Interaction Mechanisms of Cavitation Bubbles Induced by Spatially and Temporally Separated fs-Laser Pulses

    PubMed Central

    Tinne, Nadine; Kaune, Brigitte; Krüger, Alexander; Ripken, Tammo

    2014-01-01

    The emerging use of femtosecond lasers with high repetition rates in the MHz regime together with limited scan speed implies possible mutual optical and dynamical interaction effects of the individual cutting spots. In order to get more insight into the dynamics a time-resolved photographic analysis of the interaction of cavitation bubbles is presented. Particularly, we investigated the influence of fs-laser pulses and their resulting bubble dynamics with various spatial as well as temporal separations. Different time courses of characteristic interaction effects between the cavitation bubbles were observed depending on pulse energy and spatio-temporal pulse separation. These ranged from merely no interaction to the phenomena of strong water jet formation. Afterwards, the mechanisms are discussed regarding their impact on the medical application of effective tissue cutting lateral to the laser beam direction with best possible axial precision: the mechanical forces of photodisruption as well as the occurring water jet should have low axial extend and a preferably lateral priority. Furthermore, the overall efficiency of energy conversion into controlled mechanical impact should be maximized compared to the transmitted pulse energy and unwanted long range mechanical side effects, e.g. shock waves, axial jet components. In conclusion, these experimental results are of great importance for the prospective optimization of the ophthalmic surgical process with high-repetition rate fs-lasers. PMID:25502697

  12. Stress wave emission and cavitation bubble dynamics by nanosecond optical breakdown in a tissue phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brujan, Emil-Alexandru; Vogel, Alfred

    2006-07-01

    Stress wave emission and cavitation bubble dynamics after optical breakdown in water and a tissue phantom with Nd: YAG laser pulses of 6 ns duration were investigated both experimentally and numerically to obtain a better understanding of the physical mechanisms involved in plasma-mediated laser surgery. Experimental tools were high-speed photography with 50000 frames s(-1) , and acoustic measurements. The tissue phantom consisted of a transparent polyacrylamide (PAA) gel, the elastic properties of which can be controlled by modifying the water content. Breakdown in water produced a purely compressive stress wave. By contrast, in stiff PAA samples and for sufficiently large pulse energies, the compression wave was followed by an intense tensile wave, similar to the behaviour previously observed in cornea. The elastic/plastic response of the medium led to a significant decrease of the maximum size of the cavitation bubble and to a shortening of its oscillation period which was found to be related to the generation of the tensile stress wave upon breakdown. For increasing elastic modulus of the PAA, both the amplitudes of the bubble oscillation and of the stress wave emitted during bubble collapse decreased until the bubble oscillation was so strongly damped that no collapse stress wave was emitted. Numerical simulations were performed using a spherical model of bubble dynamics which includes the compressibility and elastic/plastic behaviour of the medium, viscosity, density and surface tension. The calculations revealed that consideration of the elastic/plastic behaviour of the medium surrounding the bubble is essential to describe the experimentally observed bipolar shape of the stress wave emitted upon optical breakdown. Water is a poor tissue model because the shape of the emitted stress waves and the bubble dynamics differ strongly for both materials. The mechanical properties of PAA were also found to be quite different from those of tissues. Experimental and numerical results provided evidence that the dynamic mechanical properties relevant for optical breakdown in PAA and tissue differ by as much as two orders of magnitude from the static values. The discovery of a tensile stress wave after optical breakdown in tissue-like media is of great importance for the assessment of collateral damage in laser surgery because biological tissues are much more susceptible to tensile stress than to compressive stress.

  13. Bubble Growth and Detachment from a Needle

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael Shusser; Edmond Rambod; Morteza Gharib

    1999-01-01

    The release of bubbles from an underwater nozzle or orifice occurs in large number of applications, such as perforated plate columns, blood oxygenators and various methods of water treatment. It is also a widely used method in laboratory research on multiphase flow and acoustics for generating small bubbles in a controlled fashion. We studied experimentally the growth and pinch-off of

  14. Cavitation in fluid machinery and hydraulic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arndt, R. E. A.

    Cavitation and its effects on fluid machinery and hydraulic structures were reviewed with emphasis on the mechanics of inception, the thermodynamic and gaseous diffusion factors on bubble growth, and resulting cavitation. Small amounts of free gas can change the water bulk modulus, with the speed of sound dropping to 15 m/s; this affects pump performance and stability. Most of the cavitation theory was formulated from experimental data which requires analysis of separation and transition to turbulence results; the influence of nuclei size and number density are important, along with the cavitation nuclei appearing in the form of small gas bubbles or solid particles with small quantities of gas.

  15. Cavitations synthesis of carbon nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voropaev, S.

    2011-04-01

    Originally an idea of diamonds production by hydrodynamical cavitation was presented by academician E M Galimov. He supposed the possibility of nature diamonds formation at fast magma flowing in kimberlitic pipes during bubbles collapse. This hypothesis assumes a number of processes, which were not under consideration until now. It concerns cavitation under high pressure, growth and stability of the gas- and vapors bubbles, their evolution, and corresponding physical- and chemical processes inside. Experimental setup to reproduce the high pressure and temperature reaction centers by means of the cavitation following the above idea was created. A few crystalline nanocarbon forms were successfully recovered after treatment of benzene (C6H6).

  16. Bubble growth in rhyolitic melt Yang Liu, Youxue Zhang *

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Youxue

    Bubble growth in rhyolitic melt Yang Liu, Youxue Zhang * The Department of Geological Sciences rhyolitic melt with 1.4^2.0 wt% initial total H2O at 0.1 MPa and 500^600³C. Growth of many bubbles. The average growth rate for bubbles growing in an infinite rhyolitic melt at a bubble radius of 25 Wm is V0

  17. Cavitation bubble dynamics and acoustic transient generation in ocular surgery with pulsed neodymium: YAG lasers.

    PubMed

    Vogel, A; Hentschel, W; Holzfuss, J; Lauterborn, W

    1986-10-01

    The authors have investigated the application of mode-locked and Q-switched Neodymium:YAG (Nd:YAG) lasers in ocular surgery by means of high-speed photography and hydrophone measurements. The incisive effect relies on the optical breakdown at the laser focus. Cavitation bubbles and acoustic transients are thereby generated. Their size and pressure amplitude have been measured at various laser-pulse energies. With a pulse energy of 5 mJ, the bubble is 1.5 to 2.3 mm in diameter and the pressure of the acoustic transient is 9 to 16 bar (130 to 230 psi) at a distance of 18 mm from the focal point. Bubble size and amplitude of the pressure pulse are always approximately 50% higher with a Q-switched laser than with a mode-locked laser. However, the size of the ruptures produced in a polyethylene membrane by the laser pulses is the same for both modes of operation. The energy balance shows that not only mechanical effects, but also thermal mechanisms are responsible for photodisruption. PMID:3785885

  18. Cavitation in fluid machinery and hydraulic structures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. E. A. Arndt

    1981-01-01

    Cavitation and its effects on fluid machinery and hydraulic structures were reviewed with emphasis on the mechanics of inception, the thermodynamic and gaseous diffusion factors on bubble growth, and resulting cavitation. Small amounts of free gas can change the water bulk modulus, with the speed of sound dropping to 15 m\\/s; this affects pump performance and stability. Most of the

  19. Water at the cavitation limit: Density of the metastable liquid and size of the critical bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davitt, Kristina; Arvengas, Arnaud; Caupin, Frédéric

    2010-04-01

    The ability of a liquid to sustain mechanical tension is a spectacular manifestation of the cohesion of matter. Water is a paradigmatic example, because of its high cohesion due to hydrogen bonds. The knowledge of its limit of rupture by cavitation can bring valuable information about its structure. Up to now, this limit has been obscured by the diversity of experimental results based on different physical measures of the degree of metastability of the liquid. We have built a fiber optic probe hydrophone to provide the missing data on the density of the liquid at the acoustic cavitation limit. Our measurements between 0 and 50°C allow a clear-cut comparison with another successful method where tension is produced in micron-sized inclusions of water in quartz. We also extend previous acoustic measurements of the limiting pressure to 190°C, and we consider a simple modification of classical nucleation theory to describe our data. Applying the nucleation theorem gives the first experimental value for the size of the critical bubble, which lies in the nanometer range. The results suggest the existence of either a stabilizing impurity in the inclusion experiments, or an ubiquitous impurity essential to the physics of water.

  20. Growth by rectified diffusion of strongly acoustically forced gas bubbles in nearly saturated liquids.

    PubMed

    Louisnard, Olivier; Gomez, Francisco

    2003-03-01

    The growth or dissolution of small gas bubbles (R0<15 microm) by rectified diffusion in nearly saturated liquids, subject to low frequencies (20 kHzbubble is also an inertially oscillating bubble. On the assumption that such a bubble keeps its integrity up to the shape instability threshold predicted by single-bubble theory, a numerical estimation and a fully analytical approximation of its growth rate are derived. On the one hand, the merging of the two thresholds raises the problem of the construction and self-sustainment of acoustic cavitation fields. On the other hand, the lifetime of the growing inertial bubbles calculated within the present theory is found to be much shorter than the time necessary to rectify argon. This allows an alternative interpretation of the absence of single-bubble sonoluminescence emission in multibubble fields, without resorting to the conventional picture of shape instabilities caused by the presence of other bubbles. PMID:12689182

  1. Simulations of shock waves and cavitation bubbles produced in water by picosecond and nanosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Scammon, R.J.; Chapyak, E.J.; Godwin, R.P. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Vogel, A. [Medizinisches Laserzentrum Lueebeck GmbH (Germany)

    1998-12-01

    The authors compare numerical simulations of bubble dynamics in water with experiments performed at the Medizinisches Laserzentrum Luebeck. Spatial and temporal features of the laser beam were modeled. Plasma growth was predicted using a moving breakdown model. The authors compare the measured and calculated positions of the shock front and the bubble wall as a function of time after optical breakdown in water. Nd:YAG laser pulses of 30-ps 1-mJ and 6-ns 10-mJ were simulated. The authors have extended previous work in which picosecond deposition was modeled as temporally instantaneous and spatially uniform.

  2. Simulations of shock waves and cavitation bubbles produced in water by picosecond and nanosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scammon, Richard J.; Chapyak, Edward J.; Godwin, Robert P.; Vogel, Alfred

    1998-05-01

    We compare numerical simulations of bubble dynamics in water with experiments performed at the Medizineisches Laserzentrum Lubeck. Spatial and temporal features of the laser beam were modeled. Plasma growth was predicted using a moving breakdown model. We compare the measured and calculated positions of the shock front and the bubble wall as a function of time after optical breakdown in water. Nd:YAG laser pulses of 30-ps 1-mJ and 6-ns 10-mJ were simulated. We have extended previous work in which picosecond deposition was modeled at temporally instantaneous and spatially uniform.

  3. Effects of an acoustic diode on the pressure waveform and cavitation bubble dynamics produced by a piezoelectric shock wave generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Songlin; Zhong, Pei

    2003-10-01

    High-speed schlieren imaging, combined with fiber optical probe hydrophone (FOPH) and passive cavitation detection (PCD) were used to access the effects of an acoustic diode (AD) on the pressure waveform and associated cavitation activities produced by a piezoelectric shock wave (PSW) generator. Without the AD, a typical pressure waveform at the focus of the PSW generator consists of a leading shock wave, followed by a tensile wave and several oscillation waves (OWs) of gradually reduced amplitudes. When the AD was placed 30 mm in front of the focus, the amplitude of the tensile wave was reduced and the subsequent OWs were removed. The pulse intensity integral of the tensile wave was reduced by 58%, and subsequently, PSW-induced bubble dynamics were altered significantly. Based on PCD data, the collapse time of cavitation bubble(s) was reduced by about 11%. Although intensive collapse of microbubbles was observed in about 10 ?s following the shock front of the original PSW, the forced collapse of microbubbles was not observed when the AD was used, presumably due to the removal of the OWs. Theoretical calculation based on the Gilmore model confirmed these experimental observations. [Work supported by the Whitaker Foundation and NIH.

  4. Characterization and modification of cavitation pattern in shock wave lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, Manish; Ohl, Claus Dieter; Liebler, Marko

    2004-01-01

    The temporal and spatial dynamics of cavitation bubble cloud growth and collapse in extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) is studied experimentally. The first objective is obtaining reproducible cloud patterns experimentally and comparing them with FDTD-calculations. Second, we describe a method to modify the cavitation pattern by timing two consecutive pressure waves at variable delays. It is found that the spatial and temporal dynamics of the cavitation bubble can be varied in large ranges. The ability to control cavitation dynamics allows discussing strategies for improvement of medical and biological applications of shock waves such as cell membrane poration and stone fragmentation.

  5. Jet formation and shock wave emission during collapse of ultrasound-induced cavitation bubbles and their role in the therapeutic applications of high-intensity focused ultrasound

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Ikeda; Y. Matsumoto

    2005-01-01

    The dynamics of inertial cavitation bubbles produced by short pulses of high-intensity focused ultrasound near a rigid boundary are studied to get a better understanding of the role of jet formation and shock wave emission during bubble collapse in the therapeutic applications of ultrasound. The bubble dynamics are investigated by high-speed photography with up to 2 million frames\\/s and acoustic

  6. Bioeffects caused by changes in acoustic cavitation bubble density and cell concentration: a unified explanation based on cell-to-bubble ratio and blast radius.

    PubMed

    Guzmán, Héctor R; McNamara, Andrew J; Nguyen, Daniel X; Prausnitz, Mark R

    2003-08-01

    Acoustic cavitation has been shown to load drugs, proteins and DNA into viable cells as a complex function of acoustic and nonacoustic parameters. To better understand and quantify this functionality, DU145 prostate cancer cell suspensions at different cell concentrations (2.5 x 10(5) to 4.0 x 10(7) cells/mL) were exposed to 500 kHz ultrasound (US) over a range of acoustic energy exposures (2 to 817 J/cm(2); peak negative pressures of 0.64 to 2.96 MPa; exposure times of 120 to 2000 ms) in the presence of different initial concentrations of Optison contrast agent bubbles (3.6 x 10(4) to 9.3 x 10(7) bubbles/mL). As determined by flow cytometry, molecular uptake of calcein and cell viability both increased with increasing cell density; viability decreased and uptake was unaffected by increasing initial contrast agent concentration. When normalized relative to the initial contrast agent concentration (e.g., cells killed per bubble), bioeffects increased with increasing cell density and decreased with increasing bubble concentration. These varying effects of contrast agent concentration and cell density were unified through an overall correlation with cell-to-bubble ratio. Additional analysis led to estimation of "blast radii" over which bubbles killed or permeabilized cells; these radii were as much as 3 to 90 times the bubble radius. Combined, these results suggest that extensive molecular uptake into cells at high viability occurs for low-energy exposure US applied at a high cell-to-bubble ratio. PMID:12946524

  7. Volatile bubble growth in a decompressing magmatic system: A many-bubble model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ivan L'Heureux

    2009-01-01

    Recently, a new model of volatile bubble growth in magma with coupling to the melt advection field was proposed. In that model, the competitive effects of the other (randomly located) bubbles on the growth dynamics were treated in a mean-field sense. That model predicts the possibility of dynamical transitions to or from inflationary regimes, whereby the growth rate and the

  8. Extensional flow of liquid jets formed by bubble collapse in oils under cavitation-generated pressure waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrow, M. S.; Brown, S. W. J.; Williams, P. R.

    We report a study of liquid jets which are formed by bubble collapse under cavitation-generated pressure waves. The results obtained for jets formed from samples of a multigrade motor oil provide the first evidence that such jets experience a significant degree of extensional deformation, at high rates of extension. The results support the conclusion that the reduced velocity and final length of such jets, relative to their Newtonian counterparts, is due to an increased resistance to extensional flow. Insofar as the multigrade oils studied here are made viscoelastic by polymer additives and evidently possess significant levels of resistance to extension, the results provide evidence in support of a mitigating effect of viscoelasticity on a cavitation damage mechanism, as mooted by Berker et al. (J Non Newton Fluid Mech 56:333, 1995).

  9. Logistic Growth Models for Analysis of Stocks Markets Bubbles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stasys Girdzijauskas; Dalia Streimikiene

    2008-01-01

    The article deals with stock markets bubbles and analyses the ?rigin of their formation. The well-known and widely discussed burbles in assets markets were analysed and compared trying to define the main features, causes and signals of such bubbles creation: Dotcom, Telecom, Health South Corporation, NASDAQ etc. For the analysis of stock market bubbles formation mechanism the logistic growth models

  10. Current Status in Cavitation Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singhal, Ashok K.; Avva, Ram K.

    1993-01-01

    Cavitation is a common problem for many engineering devices in which the main working fluid is in liquid state. In turbomachinery applications, cavitation generally occurs on the inlet side of pumps. The deleterious effects of cavitation include: lowered performance, load asymmetry, erosion and pitting of blade surfaces, vibration and noise, and reduction of the overall machine life. Cavitation models in use today range from rather crude approximations to sophisticated bubble dynamics models. Details about bubble inception, growth and collapse are relevant to the prediction of blade erosion, but are not necessary to predict the performance of pumps. An engineering model of cavitation is proposed to predict the extent of cavitation and performance. The vapor volume fraction is used as an indicator variable to quantify cavitation. A two-phase flow approach is employed with the assumption of the thermal equilibrium between liquid and vapor. At present velocity slip between the two phases is selected. Preliminary analyses of 2D flows shows qualitatively correct results.

  11. Bubble growth in visco-elastic magma: implications to magma fragmentation and bubble nucleation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kurzon Ittai; Lyakhovsky Vladimir; Navon Oded

    2011-01-01

    We present a visco-elastic bubble growth model, accounting for viscous and elastic deformations and for volatile mass transfer\\u000a between bubbles and melt. We define the borders between previous bubble growth models accounting for incompressible viscous\\u000a melt, and our new model accounting also for elastic deformation; this is done by a set of end-member analytical solutions\\u000a and numerical simulations. Elastic deformation

  12. Using cavitation for delignification of wood.

    PubMed

    Baxi, Pranav B; Pandit, Aniruddha B

    2012-04-01

    The Kraft process is the most widely used chemical process for the removal of lignin and other polymers from wood to obtain cellulosic pulp fibres. In the present study, the effect of cavitation (growth and violent collapse of vapour bubbles in a liquid) on delignification of wood was investigated. Steam was introduced in the reactor in order to study the effect of steam driven hybrid cavitation on delignification. The results obtained were subjected to kinetic analysis. The rates of delignification obtained using hydrodynamic cavitation were about 4-5 orders of magnitude greater than those obtained using acoustic cavitation (rate constants for delignification were 9.78×10(-6) and 6.8×10(-1)min(-1) for acoustic and hydrodynamic cavitation, respectively). The energy imparted by the pump in the hydrodynamic cavitation reactor was much higher than that imparted by the acoustic devices and this was considered to be the cause of the higher delignification rates. PMID:22325900

  13. A dual passive cavitation detector for localized detection of lithotripsy-induced cavitation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Cleveland, R O; Sapozhnikov, O A; Bailey, M R; Crum, L A

    2000-03-01

    A passive cavitation detector (PCD) identifies cavitation events by sensing acoustic emissions generated by the collapse of bubbles. In this work, a dual passive cavitation detector (dual PCD), consisting of a pair of orthogonal confocal receivers, is described for use in shock wave lithotripsy. Cavitation events are detected by both receivers and can be localized to within 5 mm by the nature of the small intersecting volume of the focal areas of the two receivers in association with a coincidence detection algorithm. A calibration technique, based on the impulse response of the transducer, was employed to estimate radiated pressures at collapse near the bubble. Results are presented for the in vitro cavitation fields of both a clinical and a research electrohydraulic lithotripter. The measured lifetime of the primary growth-and-collapse of the cavitation bubbles increased from 180 to 420 microseconds as the power setting was increased from 12 to 24 kV. The measured lifetime compared well with calculations based on the Gilmore-Akulichev formulation for bubble dynamics. The radiated acoustic pressure 10 mm from the collapsing cavitation bubble was measured to vary from 4 to 16 MPa with increasing power setting; although the trends agreed with calculations, the predicted values were four times larger than measured values. The axial length of the cavitation field correlated well with the 6-dB region of the acoustic field. However, the width of the cavitation field (10 mm) was significantly narrower than the acoustic field (25 mm) as bubbles appeared to be drawn to the acoustic axis during the collapse. The dual PCD also detected signals from "rebounds," secondary and tertiary growth-and-collapse cycles. The measured rebound time did not agree with calculations from the single-bubble model. The rebounds could be fitted to a Rayleigh collapse model by considering the entire bubble cloud as an effective single bubble. The results from the dual PCD agreed well with images from high-speed photography. The results indicate that single-bubble theory is sufficient to model lithotripsy cavitation dynamics up to time of the main collapse, but that upon collapse bubble cloud dynamics becomes important. PMID:10738826

  14. A simple model of ultrasound propagation in a cavitating liquid. Part II: Primary Bjerknes force and bubble structures

    E-print Network

    Louisnard, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    In a companion paper, a reduced model for propagation of acoustic waves in a cloud of inertial cavitation bubbles was proposed. The wave attenuation was calculated directly from the energy dissipated by a single bubble, the latter being estimated directly from the fully nonlinear radial dynamics. The use of this model in a mono-dimensional configuration has shown that the attenuation near the vibrating emitter was much higher than predictions obtained from linear theory, and that this strong attenuation creates a large traveling wave contribution, even for closed domain where standing waves are normally expected. In this paper, we show that, owing to the appearance of traveling waves, the primary Bjerknes force near the emitter becomes very large and tends to expel the bubbles up to a stagnation point. Two-dimensional axi-symmetric computations of the acoustic field created by a large area immersed sonotrode are also performed, and the paths of the bubbles in the resulting Bjerknes force field are sketched. C...

  15. A simple model of ultrasound propagation in a cavitating liquid. Part II: Primary Bjerknes force and bubble structures.

    PubMed

    Louisnard, O

    2012-01-01

    In a companion paper, a reduced model for propagation of acoustic waves in a cloud of inertial cavitation bubbles was proposed. The wave attenuation was calculated directly from the energy dissipated by a single bubble, the latter being estimated directly from the fully nonlinear radial dynamics. The use of this model in a mono-dimensional configuration has shown that the attenuation near the vibrating emitter was much higher than predictions obtained from linear theory, and that this strong attenuation creates a large traveling wave contribution, even for closed domain where standing waves are normally expected. In this paper, we show that, owing to the appearance of traveling waves, the primary Bjerknes force near the emitter becomes very large and tends to expel the bubbles up to a stagnation point. Two-dimensional axi-symmetric computations of the acoustic field created by a large area immersed sonotrode are also performed, and the paths of the bubbles in the resulting Bjerknes force field are sketched. Cone bubble structures are recovered and compare reasonably well to reported experimental results. The underlying mechanisms yielding such structures is examined, and it is found that the conical structure is generic and results from the appearance a sound velocity gradient along the transducer area. Finally, a more complex system, similar to an ultrasonic bath, in which the sound field results from the flexural vibrations of a thin plate, is also simulated. The calculated bubble paths reveal the appearance of other commonly observed structures in such configurations, such as streamers and flare structures. PMID:21764349

  16. The growth of fission gas bubbles in irradiated uranium dioxide

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. M. Cornell

    1969-01-01

    The growth of fission gas bubbles from supersaturated solution in irradiated uranium dioxide has been studied by electron microscopy under isothermal annealing conditions between 1300° and 1500°C. Measurements of the kinetics of bubble growth have enabled the diffusion coefficients of atomic xenon and krypton in irradiated uranium dioxide to be determined. The diffusion coefficients obtained may be expressed by the

  17. Control of acoustic cavitation with application to lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Michael Rollins

    Control of acoustic cavitation, which is sound-induced growth and collapse of bubbles, is the subject of this dissertation. Application is to extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL), used to treat kidney stones. Cavitation is thought to help comminute stones yet may damage tissue. Can cavitation be controlled? The acoustic source in a widely used clinical lithotripter is an electrical spark at the near focus of an underwater ellipsoidal reflector. To control cavitation, we used rigid reflectors, pressure release reflectors, and pairs of reflectors aligned to have a common focus and a controlled delay between sparks. Cavitation was measured with aluminum foil, which was placed along the axis at the far focus of the reflector(s). Collapsing bubbles pitted the foil. Pit depth measured with a profilometer provided a relative measure of cavitation intensity. Cavitation was also measured with a focused hydrophone, which detected the pressure pulse radiated in bubble collapse. Acoustic pressure signals produced by the reflectors were measured with a PVdF membrane hydrophone, digitally recorded, and input into a numerical version of the Gilmore equation (F. R. Gilmore, 'The growth or collapse of a spherical bubble in a viscous compressible liquid,' Rep#26-4, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena (1952), pp.1-40.). Maximum pressure produced in a spherical bubble was calculated and employed as a relative measure of collapse intensity. Experimental and numerical results demonstrate cavitation can be controlled by an appropriately delayed auxiliary pressure pulse. When two rigid-reflector pulses are used, a long interpulse delay (150-200 ?s) of the second pulse 'kicks' the collapsing bubble and intensifies cavitation. Foil pit depth and computed pressure three times single pulse values were obtained. Conversely, a short delay (<90 ?s) 'stifles' bubble growth and weakens cavitation. A single pressure release reflector time- reverses the rigid-reflector waveform-a positive pressure spike follows a shallow negative phase-and thus inherently stifles cavitation. Additional configurations and waveforms were explored, and localization of an intensified cavitation region surrounded by a tempered cavitation region was realized. The general methods of control and their specific implementations provide tools for assessment of cavitation's role in, and for improvement of, ESWL.

  18. Characterization of the shock pulse-induced cavitation bubble activities recorded by an optical fiber hydrophone.

    PubMed

    Kang, Gwansuk; Cho, Sung Chan; Coleman, Andrew John; Choi, Min Joo

    2014-03-01

    A shock pressure pulse used in an extracorporeal shock wave treatment has a large negative pressure (<-5?MPa) which can produce cavitation. Cavitation cannot be measured easily, but may have known therapeutic effects. This study considers the signal recorded for several hundred microseconds using an optical hydrophone submerged in water at the focus of shock pressure field. The signal is characterized by shock pulse followed by a long tail after several microseconds; this signal is regarded as a cavitation-related signal (CRS). An experimental investigation of the CRS was conducted in the shock pressure field produced in water using an optical hydrophone (FOPH2000, RP Acoustics, Germany). The CRS was found to contain characteristic information about the shock pulse-induced cavitation. The first and second collapse times (t1 and t2) were identified in the CRS. The collapse time delay (tc?=?t2 - t1) increased with the driving shock pressures. The signal amplitude integrated for time from t1 to t2 was highly correlated with tc (adjusted R(2)?=?0.990). This finding suggests that a single optical hydrophone can be used to measure shock pulse and to characterize shock pulse-induced cavitation. PMID:24606257

  19. Helium bubble growth at BCC twist grain boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hetherly, J.; Martinez, E.; Nastasi, M.; Caro, A.

    2011-12-01

    We study the growth of helium bubbles in ?-Fe at low angle twist grain boundaries and in bulk using molecular dynamics and Metropolis Monte Carlo simulations. We describe the pressures and volumes of the helium bubbles and analyze the maximum pressure a bubble can sustain before emitting interstitial loops. We give a quantitative analysis of how these emitted loops behave differently in the bulk and at the grain boundary.

  20. Dynamics of shock waves and cavitation bubbles in bilinear elastic-plastic media, and the implications to short-pulsed laser surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brujan, E.-A.

    2005-01-01

    The dynamics of shock waves and cavitation bubbles generated by short laser pulses in water and elastic-plastic media were investigated theoretically in order to get a better understanding of their role in short-pulsed laser surgery. Numerical simulations were performed using a spherical model of bubble dynamics which include the elastic-plastic behaviour of the medium surrounding the bubble, compressibility, viscosity, density and surface tension. Breakdown in water produces a monopolar acoustic signal characterized by a compressive wave. Breakdown in an elastic-plastic medium produces a bipolar acoustic signal, with a leading positive compression wave and a trailing negative tensile wave. The calculations revealed that consideration of the tissue elasticity is essential to describe the bipolar shape of the shock wave emitted during optical breakdown. The elastic-plastic response of the medium surrounding the bubble leads to a significant decrease of the maximum size of the cavitation bubble and pressure amplitude of the shock wave emitted during bubble collapse, and shortening of the oscillation period of the bubble. The results are discussed with respect to collateral damage in short-pulsed laser surgery.

  1. Cavitation inception on microparticles: a self-propelled particle accelerator.

    PubMed

    Arora, Manish; Ohl, Claus-Dieter; Mørch, Knud Aage

    2004-04-30

    Corrugated, hydrophilic particles with diameters between 30 and 150 microm are found to cause cavitation inception at their surfaces when they are exposed to a short, intensive tensile stress wave. The growing cavity accelerates the particle into translatory motion until the tensile stress decreases, and subsequently the particle separates from the cavity. The cavity growth and particle detachment are modeled by considering the momentum of the particle and the displaced liquid. The analysis suggests that all particles which cause cavitation are accelerated into translatory motion, and separate from the cavities they themselves nucleate. Thus, in the research of cavitation nuclei the link is established between developed cavitation bubbles and their origin. PMID:15169155

  2. Unorthodox bubbles when boiling in cold water.

    PubMed

    Parker, Scott; Granick, Steve

    2014-01-01

    High-speed movies are taken when bubbles grow at gold surfaces heated spotwise with a near-infrared laser beam heating water below the boiling point (60-70?°C) with heating powers spanning the range from very low to so high that water fails to rewet the surface after bubbles detach. Roughly half the bubbles are conventional: They grow symmetrically through evaporation until buoyancy lifts them away. Others have unorthodox shapes and appear to contribute disproportionately to heat transfer efficiency: mushroom cloud shapes, violently explosive bubbles, and cavitation events, probably stimulated by a combination of superheating, convection, turbulence, and surface dewetting during the initial bubble growth. Moreover, bubbles often follow one another in complex sequences, often beginning with an unorthodox bubble that stirs the water, followed by several conventional bubbles. This large dataset is analyzed and discussed with emphasis on how explosive phenomena such as cavitation induce discrepancies from classical expectations about boiling. PMID:24580324

  3. Unorthodox bubbles when boiling in cold water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Scott; Granick, Steve

    2014-01-01

    High-speed movies are taken when bubbles grow at gold surfaces heated spotwise with a near-infrared laser beam heating water below the boiling point (60-70 °C) with heating powers spanning the range from very low to so high that water fails to rewet the surface after bubbles detach. Roughly half the bubbles are conventional: They grow symmetrically through evaporation until buoyancy lifts them away. Others have unorthodox shapes and appear to contribute disproportionately to heat transfer efficiency: mushroom cloud shapes, violently explosive bubbles, and cavitation events, probably stimulated by a combination of superheating, convection, turbulence, and surface dewetting during the initial bubble growth. Moreover, bubbles often follow one another in complex sequences, often beginning with an unorthodox bubble that stirs the water, followed by several conventional bubbles. This large dataset is analyzed and discussed with emphasis on how explosive phenomena such as cavitation induce discrepancies from classical expectations about boiling.

  4. Vol. 22, No. 3, Aug. 1, 2002 Scientists measure energy dissipation in a single cavitating bubble

    E-print Network

    Suslick, Kenneth S.

    -Champaign have now quantified those effects in a single bubble. "During compression, the gas inside the bubble is heated, just like the heating when a tire is pumping up. This energy is converted into light emission applications, such as the breakdown of pollutants, development of medical imaging agents, and making catalysts

  5. Dynamic Nucleation of Ice Induced by a Single Stable Cavitation Bubble

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohsaka, Kenichi; Trinh, Eugene H.

    1997-01-01

    Dynamic nucleation of ice induced by caviation bubble in undercooled water is observed using an acoustic levitation technique. The observation indicates that a high pressure pulse associated with a collapsing bubble is indeed responsible for the nucleation of a high pressure phase of ice.

  6. Deformed bubble growth and coalescence in polymer foam processing

    E-print Network

    Allaboun, Hussein Raji

    1996-01-01

    A framework for describing growth of the deformed bubbles and thinning of the interstitial films during the late stages of the foaming process of a viscoelastic foam cell is established. A two-dimensional cell model is proposed to depict...

  7. Nucleate boiling bubble growth and departure

    E-print Network

    Staniszewski, Bogumil E.

    1959-01-01

    The vapor bubble formation on the heating surface during pool boiling has been studied experimentally. Experiments were made at the atmospheric pressure 28 psi and 40 psi, using degassed distilled water and ethanol. The ...

  8. Theoretical and experimental comparison of vapor cavitation in dynamically loaded journal bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewe, D. E.; Hamrock, B. J.; Jacobson, B. A.

    1985-01-01

    Vapor cavitation for a submerged journal bearing under dynamically loaded conditions was investigated. The observation of vapor cavitation in the laboratory was done by high-speed photography. It was found that vapor cavitation occurs when the tensile stress applied to the oil exceeded the tensile strength of the oil or the binding of the oil to the surface. The theoretical solution to the Reynolds equation is determined numerically using a moving boundary algorithm. This algorithm conserves mass throughout the computational domain including the region of cavitation and its boundaries. An alternating direction implicit (MDI) method is used to effect the time march. A rotor undergoing circular whirl was studied. Predicted cavitation behavior was analyzed by three-dimensional computer graphic movies. The formation, growth, and collapse of the bubble in response to the dynamic conditions is shown. For the same conditions of dynamic loading, the cavitation bubble was studied in the laboratory using high-speed photography.

  9. Numerical estimation of cavitation intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krumenacker, L.; Fortes-Patella, R.; Archer, A.

    2014-03-01

    Cavitation may appear in turbomachinery and in hydraulic orifices, venturis or valves, leading to performance losses, vibrations and material erosion. This study propose a new method to predict the cavitation intensity of the flow, based on a post-processing of unsteady CFD calculations. The paper presents the analyses of cavitating structures' evolution at two different scales: • A macroscopic one in which the growth of cavitating structures is calculated using an URANS software based on a homogeneous model. Simulations of cavitating flows are computed using a barotropic law considering presence of air and interfacial tension, and Reboud's correction on the turbulence model. • Then a small one where a Rayleigh-Plesset software calculates the acoustic energy generated by the implosion of the vapor/gas bubbles with input parameters from macroscopic scale. The volume damage rate of the material during incubation time is supposed to be a part of the cumulated acoustic energy received by the solid wall. The proposed analysis method is applied to calculations on hydrofoil and orifice geometries. Comparisons between model results and experimental works concerning flow characteristic (size of cavity, pressure,velocity) as well as pitting (erosion area, relative cavitation intensity) are presented.

  10. Jet formation and shock wave emission during collapse of ultrasound-induced cavitation bubbles and their role in the therapeutic applications of high-intensity focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Brujan, E A; Ikeda, T; Matsumoto, Y

    2005-10-21

    The dynamics of inertial cavitation bubbles produced by short pulses of high-intensity focused ultrasound near a rigid boundary are studied to get a better understanding of the role of jet formation and shock wave emission during bubble collapse in the therapeutic applications of ultrasound. The bubble dynamics are investigated by high-speed photography with up to 2 million frames/s and acoustic measurements, as well as by numerical calculations. The significant parameter of this study is the dimensionless stand-off, gamma, which is defined as the distance of the bubble centre at its maximum expansion scaled by the maximum bubble radius. High-speed photography is applied to observe the bubble motion and the velocity of the liquid jet formed during bubble collapse. Hydrophone measurements are used to determine the pressure and the duration of the shock wave emitted during bubble rebound. Calculations yield the variation with time of the bubble wall, the maximum velocity and the kinetic energy of the re-entrant jet. The comparisons between experimental and numerical data are favourable with regard to both shape history and translational motion of the bubble. The acoustic energy constitutes the largest individual amount in the energy balance of bubble collapse. The ratio of the shock wave energy, measured at 10 mm from the emission centre, to the cavitation bubble energy was 1:2.4 at gamma = 1.55 and 1:3.5 at gamma = 1. At this distance, the shock wave pressure ranges from 0.122 MPa, at gamma = 1, to 0.162 MPa, at gamma = 1.55, and the temporal duration at the half maximum level is 87 ns. The maximum jet velocity ranges from 27 m s(-1), at gamma = 1, to 36 m s(-1), at gamma = 1.55. For gamma < 1.2, the re-entrant jet can generate an impact pressure on the nearby boundary larger than 50 MPa. We discuss the implications of the results for the therapeutic applications of high-intensity focused ultrasound. PMID:16204873

  11. Jet formation and shock wave emission during collapse of ultrasound-induced cavitation bubbles and their role in the therapeutic applications of high-intensity focused ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brujan, E. A.; Ikeda, T.; Matsumoto, Y.

    2005-10-01

    The dynamics of inertial cavitation bubbles produced by short pulses of high-intensity focused ultrasound near a rigid boundary are studied to get a better understanding of the role of jet formation and shock wave emission during bubble collapse in the therapeutic applications of ultrasound. The bubble dynamics are investigated by high-speed photography with up to 2 million frames/s and acoustic measurements, as well as by numerical calculations. The significant parameter of this study is the dimensionless stand-off, ?, which is defined as the distance of the bubble centre at its maximum expansion scaled by the maximum bubble radius. High-speed photography is applied to observe the bubble motion and the velocity of the liquid jet formed during bubble collapse. Hydrophone measurements are used to determine the pressure and the duration of the shock wave emitted during bubble rebound. Calculations yield the variation with time of the bubble wall, the maximum velocity and the kinetic energy of the re-entrant jet. The comparisons between experimental and numerical data are favourable with regard to both shape history and translational motion of the bubble. The acoustic energy constitutes the largest individual amount in the energy balance of bubble collapse. The ratio of the shock wave energy, measured at 10 mm from the emission centre, to the cavitation bubble energy was 1:2.4 at ? = 1.55 and 1:3.5 at ? = 1. At this distance, the shock wave pressure ranges from 0.122 MPa, at ? = 1, to 0.162 MPa, at ? = 1.55, and the temporal duration at the half maximum level is 87 ns. The maximum jet velocity ranges from 27 m s-1, at ? = 1, to 36 m s-1, at ? = 1.55. For ? < 1.2, the re-entrant jet can generate an impact pressure on the nearby boundary larger than 50 MPa. We discuss the implications of the results for the therapeutic applications of high-intensity focused ultrasound.

  12. Cavitation in elastomeric solids: I--A defect-growth theory Oscar Lopez-Pamies a,, Martin I. Idiart b,c

    E-print Network

    Nakamura, Toshio

    Cavitation in elastomeric solids: I--A defect-growth theory Oscar Lopez-Pamies a,Ã, Marti´n I. The occurrence of such instabilities, commonly referred to as cavitation, can be attributed to the growth of pre-existing defects into finite sizes. This paper introduces a new theory to study the phenomenon of cavitation

  13. EXPERIMENTS AND SIMULATIONS WITH LARGE GAS BUBBLES IN MERCURY TOWARDS ESTABLISHING A GAS LAYER TO MITIGATE CAVITATION DAMAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Wendel, Mark W [ORNL; Riemer, Bernie [ORNL; Felde, David K [ORNL; Ruggles, Arthur [ORNL; Karnowski, Thomas Paul [ORNL

    2006-01-01

    One of several options that shows promise for protecting solid surfaces from cavitation damage in liquid metal spallation targets, involves introducing an interstitial gas layer between the liquid metal and the containment vessel wall. Several approaches toward establishing such a protective gas layer are being investigated at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory including large bubble injection, and methods that involve stabilization of the layer by surface modifications to enhance gas hold-up on the wall or by inserting a porous media. It has previously been reported that using a gas layer configuration in a test target showed an order-of-magnitude decrease in damage for an in-beam experiment. Video images that were taken of the successful gas/mercury flow configuration have been analyzed and correlated. The results show that the success was obtained under conditions where only 60% of the solid wall was covered with gas. Such a result implies that this mitigation scheme may have much more potential. Additional experiments with gas injection into water are underway. Multi-component flow simulations are also being used to provide direction for these new experiments. These simulations have been used to size the gas layer and position multiple inlet nozzles.

  14. Cavitation Thermometry Using Molecular and Continuum Sonoluminescence Lawrence S. Bernstein* and Mitchell R. Zakin

    E-print Network

    Suslick, Kenneth S.

    Cavitation Thermometry Using Molecular and Continuum Sonoluminescence Lawrence S. Bernstein (SB) sonoluminescence (SL) is explored as a probe of bubble temperature during cavitational collapse discrete intervals along the cavitational collapse time line, thus yielding different cavitation

  15. Optimization of centrifugal pump cavitation performance based on CFD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, S. F.; Wang, Y.; Liu, Z. C.; Zhu, Z. T.; Ning, C.; Zhao, L. F.

    2015-01-01

    In order to further improve the cavitation performance of a centrifugal pump, slots on impeller blade near inlet were studied and six groups of hydraulic model were designed. Base on cavitating flow feature inside a centrifugal pump, bubble growth and implosion are calculated from the Rayleigh-Plesset equation which describes the dynamic behavior of spherical bubble and RNG ?-epsilon model was employed to simulate and analyze the internal two-phase flow of the model pump under the same conditions. The simulation results show that slots on blade near inlet could improve the cavitation performance and cavitation performance improvement of the second group was more obvious. Under the same conditions, the pressure on the back of blade near inlet was higher than the pressure on the back of unmodified blade near inlet, and energy distribution in the flow channel between the two blades was more uniform with a small change of head.

  16. Vortex cavitation: A progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Arndt, R.E.A.; Maines, B.H. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States). St. Anthony Falls Hydraulic Lab.

    1994-12-31

    Cavitation in vortical flows is a significant problem. An important aspect is the need for a better understanding of the physics of cavitation in the vortices tailing from lifting surfaces such as propellers and hydrofoils. This is a review of experimental and numerical research that has been recently carried out with a series of hydrofoils. This is a review of experimental and numerical research that has been recently carried out with a series of hydrofoils. This research was aimed at investigating the interrelated effects of vortex structure, including the details of the vortex roll-up process close to the tip, dissolved gas content, and water quality as it related to the amount of tension that can be sustained in the vortex before cavitation occurs. The experimental phase includes lift and drag measurements, oil flow visualization of the boundary layer flow on the lifting surfaces, and observation of both cavitation inception and desinence in strong and weak water. An improved photographic technique has been developed to study the complex bubble dynamics inherent in the inception process. Preliminary results indicate that the bubble growth process is strongly dependent on the size and number of nuclei in the free stream. Numerical simulations indicate that the minimum pressure in the vortex is very close to the tip of the lifting surface, in agreement with the observation that the inception process also occurs very close to the tip under most conditions.

  17. Cavitation luminescence of argon-saturated alkali-metal solutions from a conical bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Ha; Jie He, Shou; Fang, Wang; Min, Song Jian

    2008-10-01

    In 1,2-propanediol solutions containing sodium chloride, spectra of luminescence from a collapsed conical bubble have been detected. Results show that the spectra consist of a broad continuum background, on which a resonance line arising from de-excitation of sodium atom at 589 nm and two satellite diffuse bands at ~554 nm and 620 nm respectively are superimposed. These are confirmed to be the emission from alkali-metal-argon exciplexes and are suggested to occur when the mixtures of alkali metal vapour and argon are rapidly compressed. The intracavity density of argon deduced from the line shift of Na resonance line data is estimated to be about 2 × 1026 m-3.

  18. Bubble growth in rhyolitic melts: experimental and numerical investigation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vladimir Lyakhovsky; Shaul Hurwitz; Oded Navon

    1996-01-01

    Bubble growth controlled by mass transfer of water from hydrated rhyolitic melts at high pressures and temperatures was studied\\u000a experimentally and simulated numerically. Rhyolitic melts were hydrated at 150?MPa, 780–850??C to uniform water content of\\u000a 5.5–5.3?wt%. The pressure was then dropped and held constant at 15–145?MPa. Upon the drop bubbles nucleated and were allowed\\u000a to grow for various periods of

  19. Cavitation Research and Ship Propeller Design

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Kuiper

    1997-01-01

    The role of cavitation research in the design of ship propellers and the influence of research on propeller design is reviewed. The historical development of research on bubble cavitation is an example of a lack of communication between research and design. Research on sheet cavitation is starting now and simplifications such as two dimensional cavitation are being made. It is

  20. The dynamics of histotripsy bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreider, Wayne; Bailey, Michael R.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Khokhlova, Vera A.; Crum, Lawrence A.

    2011-09-01

    Histotripsy describes treatments in which high-amplitude acoustic pulses are used to excite bubbles and erode tissue. Though tissue erosion can be directly attributed to bubble activity, the genesis and dynamics of bubbles remain unclear. Histotripsy lesions that show no signs of thermal coagulative damage have been generated with two different acoustic protocols: relatively long acoustic pulses that produce local boiling within milliseconds and relatively short pulses that are higher in amplitude but likely do not produce boiling. While these two approaches are often distinguished as `boiling' versus `cavitation', such labels can obscure similarities. In both cases, a bubble undergoes large changes in radius and vapor is transported into and out of the bubble as it oscillates. Moreover, observations from both approaches suggest that bubbles grow to a size at which they cease to collapse violently. In order to better understand the dynamics of histotripsy bubbles, a single-bubble model has been developed that couples acoustically excited bubble motions to the thermodynamic state of the surrounding liquid. Using this model for bubbles exposed to histotripsy sound fields, simulations suggest that two mechanisms can act separately or in concert to lead to the typically observed bubble growth. First, nonlinear acoustic propagation leads to the evolution of shocks and an asymmetry in the positive and negative pressures that drive bubble motion. This asymmetry can have a rectifying effect on bubble oscillations whereby the bubble grows on average during each acoustic cycle. Second, vapor transport to/from the bubble tends to produce larger bubbles, especially at elevated temperatures. Vapor transport by itself can lead to rectified bubble growth when the ambient temperature exceeds 100 °C (`boiling') or local heating in the vicinity of the bubble leads to a superheated boundary layer.

  1. Single Cavitation Bubble Dynamics in Shear Flow of Water and Dilute Polymer Solution Near a Solid Boundary

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Martin Robert Wittmann

    1992-01-01

    Cavitation in hydraulic machinery and in marine applications produces noise, destructive erosion and loss of efficiency. Their fundamental mechanisms, particularly of erosive damage, are not well established. High molecular weight polymer solutions at drag-reducing concentrations substantially alter macroscopic cavitation behaviors such as the inception point, the noise spectrum and the rate of damage. Again, causes are poorly understood. To examine

  2. Gold nanoparticle targeted photoacoustic cavitation for potential deep tissue imaging and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Hengyi; Roy, Ronald A.; Murray, Todd W.

    2012-01-01

    The laser generation of vapor bubbles around plasmonic nanoparticles can be enhanced through the application of an ultrasound field; a technique referred to as photoacoustic cavitation. The combination of light and ultrasound allows for bubble formation at lower laser fluence and peak negative ultrasound pressure than can be achieved using either modality alone. The growth and collapse of these bubbles leads to local mechanical disruption and acoustic emission, and can potentially be used to induce and monitor tissue therapy. Photoacoustic cavitation is investigated for a broad range of ultrasound pressures and nanoparticle concentrations for gold nanorods and nanospheres. The cavitation threshold fluences for both nanoparticle types are found to drastically reduce in the presence of an ultrasound field. The results indicate that photoacoustic cavitation can potentially be produced at depth in biological tissue without exceeding the safety limits for ultrasound or laser radiation at the tissue surface. PMID:23304648

  3. Loop punching and bubble rupture causing surface roughening -a model for W fuzz growth

    E-print Network

    Nordlund, Kai

    epl draft Loop punching and bubble rupture causing surface roughening - a model for W fuzz growth A growth by loop punching. The bubbles close to the surface rupture. The balance between these processes]. Instead, we show that the balance between loop punching and bubble rupture cause the kinetic surface

  4. Multimode analysis of bubble growth in saturated film boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomar, G.; Biswas, G.; Sharma, A.; Welch, S. W. J.

    2008-09-01

    The bubble formation sites in film boiling are the nodes of the instability occurring at the liquid-vapor interface. We perform a linear stability analysis with a time dependent base state, accounting for the growth of the film due to evaporation, in order to identify the most dominant wavelength. Choosing a domain size of five times the wavelength predicted by Berenson [ASME J. Heat Transfer 83, 351 (1961)] and an initial liquid-vapor interface profile having a spectrum of wave numbers, we perform numerical simulations to address the effects of decay and growth of the wave numbers on bubble spacing. Numerical simulations have been performed using a coupled level set and volume of fluid algorithm.

  5. Dynamics of bubble growth for Rayleigh--Taylor unstable interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, C.L.; Glimm, J.; McBryan, O.; Menikoff, R.; Sharp, D.H.; Zhang, Q.

    1988-03-01

    A statistical model is analyzed for the growth of bubbles in a Rayleigh--Taylor unstable interface. The model is compared to solutions of the full Euler equations for compressible two phase flow, using numerical solutions based on the method of front tracking. The front tracking method has the distinguishing feature of being a predominantly Eulerian method in which sharp interfaces are preserved with zero numerical diffusion. Various regimes in the statistical model exhibiting qualitatively distinct behavior are explored.

  6. Bubble evolution and properties in homogeneous nucleation simulations.

    PubMed

    Angélil, Raymond; Diemand, Jürg; Tanaka, Kyoko K; Tanaka, Hidekazu

    2014-12-01

    We analyze the properties of naturally formed nanobubbles in Lennard-Jones molecular dynamics simulations of liquid-to-vapor nucleation in the boiling and the cavitation regimes. The large computational volumes provide a realistic environment at unchanging average temperature and liquid pressure, which allows us to accurately measure properties of bubbles from their inception as stable, critically sized bubbles, to their continued growth into the constant speed regime. Bubble gas densities are up to 50% lower than the equilibrium vapor densities at the liquid temperature, yet quite close to the gas equilibrium density at the lower gas temperatures measured in the simulations: The latent heat of transformation results in bubble gas temperatures up to 25% below those of the surrounding bulk liquid. In the case of rapid bubble growth-typical for the cavitation regime-compression of the liquid outside the bubble leads to local temperature increases of up to 5%, likely significant enough to alter the surface tension as well as the local viscosity. The liquid-vapor bubble interface is thinner than expected from planar coexistence simulations by up to 50%. Bubbles near the critical size are extremely nonspherical, yet they quickly become spherical as they grow. The Rayleigh-Plesset description of bubble-growth gives good agreement in the cavitation regime. PMID:25615216

  7. Bubble evolution and properties in homogeneous nucleation simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angélil, Raymond; Diemand, Jürg; Tanaka, Kyoko K.; Tanaka, Hidekazu

    2014-12-01

    We analyze the properties of naturally formed nanobubbles in Lennard-Jones molecular dynamics simulations of liquid-to-vapor nucleation in the boiling and the cavitation regimes. The large computational volumes provide a realistic environment at unchanging average temperature and liquid pressure, which allows us to accurately measure properties of bubbles from their inception as stable, critically sized bubbles, to their continued growth into the constant speed regime. Bubble gas densities are up to 50 % lower than the equilibrium vapor densities at the liquid temperature, yet quite close to the gas equilibrium density at the lower gas temperatures measured in the simulations: The latent heat of transformation results in bubble gas temperatures up to 25 % below those of the surrounding bulk liquid. In the case of rapid bubble growth—typical for the cavitation regime—compression of the liquid outside the bubble leads to local temperature increases of up to 5 %, likely significant enough to alter the surface tension as well as the local viscosity. The liquid-vapor bubble interface is thinner than expected from planar coexistence simulations by up to 50 % . Bubbles near the critical size are extremely nonspherical, yet they quickly become spherical as they grow. The Rayleigh-Plesset description of bubble-growth gives good agreement in the cavitation regime.

  8. Unidirectional bubble growth in microchannels with asymmetric surfacefeatures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Steffen Hardt; Stefan Herbert; Christian Kunkelmann; ShadiMahjoob; Peter Stephan

    2012-01-01

    The growth of vapor bubbles is studied numerically in a microchannel\\u000d\\u000a\\u0009with asymmetric surface features. The channel design is chosen such\\u000d\\u000a\\u0009that evaporation results in vapor bubbles growing only along a predefined\\u000d\\u000a\\u0009direction. The principle relies on capillary forces and the pinning\\/depinning\\u000d\\u000a\\u0009of three-phase contact lines at sharp edges of the wall geometry.\\u000d\\u000a\\u0009Analytical expressions are derived predicting the direction

  9. Vulnerability to cavitation, hydraulic efficiency, growth and survival in an insular pine (Pinus canariensis)

    PubMed Central

    López, Rosana; López de Heredia, Unai; Collada, Carmen; Cano, Francisco Javier; Emerson, Brent C.; Cochard, Hervé; Gil, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims It is widely accepted that hydraulic failure due to xylem embolism is a key factor contributing to drought-induced mortality in trees. In the present study, an attempt is made to disentangle phenotypic plasticity from genetic variation in hydraulic traits across the entire distribution area of a tree species to detect adaptation to local environments. Methods A series of traits related to hydraulics (vulnerability to cavitation and hydraulic conductivity in branches), growth performance and leaf mass per area were assessed in eight Pinus canariensis populations growing in two common gardens under contrasting environments. In addition, the neutral genetic variability (FST) and the genetic differentiation of phenotypic variation (QST) were compared in order to identify the evolutionary forces acting on these traits. Key Results The variability for hydraulic traits was largely due to phenotypic plasticity. Nevertheless, the vulnerability to cavitation displayed a significant genetic variability (approx. 5 % of the explained variation), and a significant genetic × environment interaction (between 5 and 19 % of the explained variation). The strong correlation between vulnerability to cavitation and survival in the xeric common garden (r = –0·81; P < 0·05) suggests a role for the former in the adaptation to xeric environments. Populations from drier sites and higher temperature seasonality were less vulnerable to cavitation than those growing at mesic sites. No trade-off between xylem safety and efficiency was detected. QST of parameters of the vulnerability curve (0·365 for P50 and the slope of the vulnerability curve and 0·452 for P88) differed substantially from FST (0·091), indicating divergent selection. In contrast, genetic drift alone was found to be sufficient to explain patterns of differentiation for xylem efficiency and growth. Conclusions The ability of P. canariensis to inhabit a wide range of ecosystems seemed to be associated with high phenotypic plasticity and some degree of local adaptations of xylem and leaf traits. Resistance to cavitation conferred adaptive potential for this species to adapt successfully to xeric conditions. PMID:23644361

  10. Cavitation and new blade sections

    SciTech Connect

    Kuiper, G. [MARIN/Technical Univ., Delft (Netherlands)

    1994-12-31

    The prediction of cavitation and its behavior on ship propellers is generally derived from cavitation observations at model scale. Characteristics of traditional and new blade sections are reviewed. The traditional guidelines about cavitation are critically reviewed on the basis of full scale observations. Laminar boundary layer flow at full scale seems possible as a tool to delay inception. Bubble cavitation seems less erosive than assumed. Cloud cavitation seems to be generated by the cavity contour rather than by unsteady behavior. These considerations open new possibilities for control or erosion.

  11. Quantum Cavitation

    E-print Network

    Paola Zizzi; Eliano Pessa; Fabio Cardone

    2010-06-05

    We consider the theoretical setting of a superfluid like 3He in a rotating container, which is set between the two layers of a type-II superconductor. We describe the superfluid vortices as a 2-dimensional Ising-like model on a triangular lattice in presence of local magnetic fields. The interaction term of the superfluid vortices with the Abrikosov vortices of the superconductor appears then as a symmetry breaking term in the free energy. Such a term gives a higher probability of quantum tunnelling across the potential barrier for bubbles nucleation, thus favouring quantum cavitation.

  12. Membrane disruption by optically controlled microbubble cavitation

    E-print Network

    Loss, Daniel

    LETTERS Membrane disruption by optically controlled microbubble cavitation PAUL PRENTICE1 , ALFRED October 2005; doi:10.1038/nphys148 I n fluids, pressure-driven cavitation bubbles have a nonlinear underpinning phenomena such as sonoluminescence1 and plasma formation2 . If cavitation occurs near a rigid

  13. ULTRASONIC CAVITATION IN FREON AT ROOM TEMPERATURE

    E-print Network

    Caupin, Frédéric

    ULTRASONIC CAVITATION IN FREON AT ROOM TEMPERATURE FR´ED´ERIC CAUPIN AND VINCENT FOURMOND on ultrasonic cavitation in freon (1,1,2-trichloro 1,2,2-trifluoro ethane). We use a high intensity 1 MHz observe the nucleation of bubbles. We describe the three different methods we use to detect cavitation

  14. Computations of the growth of hadronic bubbles during the cosmological quark-hadron transition

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. C. Miller; O. Pantano

    1990-01-01

    In a previous paper, we presented an analysis of the hydrodynamics of bubble growth during the cosmological quark-hadron transition. After a brief review of the relevant system of equations, we here describe computations which follow the growth of a single spherical hadron bubble within an initially uniform quark medium. Our computer code uses a standard Lagrangian finite-difference scheme for flow

  15. Thresholds of Transient Cavitation Produced by Pulsed Ultrasound in a Controlled Nuclei Environment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, Christy Katherine Smith

    The possibility of hazardous bioeffects from medical ultrasound examinations and therapy, although not demonstrated in current epidemiologic data, is still of interest to the medical community. In particular, concern persists over the potential of damage at the cellular level due to transient cavitation produced by diagnostic and high intensity therapeutic ultrasound. Transient cavitation is a discrete phenomenon which relies on the existence of stabilized nuclei, or pockets of gas within a host fluid, for its genesis. A convenient descriptor for assessing the likelihood of transient cavitation is the threshold pressure, or the minimum acoustic pressure necessary to initiate bubble growth and subsequent collapse. Experimental measurements of cavitation thresholds are presented here which elucidate the importance of ultrasound host fluid and nuclei parameters in determining these thresholds. These results are interpreted in the context of an approximate theory, included as an appendix, describing the relationship between these parameters and cavitation threshold pressures. An automated experimental apparatus has been developed to determine thresholds for cavitation produced in a fluid by short tone bursts of ultrasound at 0.76, 0.99, and 2.30 MHz. A fluid jet was used to convect potential cavitation nuclei through the focal region of the insonifying transducer. Potential nuclei tested include 1mum polystyrene spheres, microbubbles in the 1-10 ?m range that are stabilized with human serum albumin, and whole blood constituents. Cavitation was detected by a passive acoustical technique which is sensitive to sound scattered from cavitation bubbles. Measurements of the transient cavitation threshold in water, in a fluid of higher viscosity, and in diluted whole blood are presented. Results from these experiments which permit the control of nuclei and host fluid properties are compared to the approximate analytical theory for the prediction of the onset of cavitation.

  16. Observations of bubble growth in rhyolite using hot-stage microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browning, J.; Tuffen, H.; James, M. R.

    2012-12-01

    Bubble growth in rhyolitic melts is a primary control on some of the largest explosive eruptions, but growth dynamics remain controversial. We have used hot-stage microscopy to directly observe vesiculation of a Chaiten rhyolite melt (containing ~1.38 wt. % H 2O) at atmospheric pressure. Thin wafers of obsidian were held from 5 minutes up to 2 days in the hot-stage at temperatures between 575 oC and 875 oC. The growth of many individual bubbles was measured using image tracking code within MATLAB. We found that bubble growth rates increased with both temperature and bubble size. The average growth rate at the highest temperature of 875 oC is ~1.27 ?m s-1, compared with the lowest observed growth rate of ~0.02 ?m s-1 at 725 oC; below this temperature no growth was observed. Average growth rate V r follows an exponential relationship with temperature and melt viscosity where V r ~ exp (0.0169T) and V r ~ exp (-1.202?). Comparison of these measured rates with existing bubble growth models (e.g. Navon, Proussevitch and Sahagian) indicates slower growth than expected at the highest temperatures. The extent of diffusive degassing of H 2O and OH- from wafer surfaces during experiments was estimated with simple diffusion models. It was found to be negligible during brief high-temperature experiments but became increasingly important for slower, lower-temperature experiments. Several stages of bubble growth were directly observed, including initial relaxation of deformed existing bubbles into spheres, extensive growth of spheres, and, at higher temperatures, close packing and foam formation. An advantage of the imaging techniques used here is that bubble-bubble interactions can be observed in-situ at relatively high resolution. Bubble deformation due to bubble-bubble interaction and coalescence was observed in most experiments. Evolving bubble number densities (BND) with time were determined, allowing nucleation rates to be estimated. Maximum observed BNDs were 3.4 x 1012 m-3 with maximum increases of around 143 % observed in samples with a lower initial vesicularity <5.7 x 1011 m-3. The experiments described can be used to effectively retrace the vesiculation history of samples, providing a useful tool for aiding in the interpretation of end member products. Figure 1. Nucleation, growth and coalescence of bubbles Summary of findings from vesiculation experiments;

  17. Harness cavitation to improve processing

    SciTech Connect

    Pandit, A.G.; Moholkar, V.S. [Univ. of Bombay (India)

    1996-07-01

    Mention cavitation to most chemical engineers, and they undoubtedly think of it as an operational problem. Indeed, the rapid creation and then collapse of bubbles, which is after all what cavitation involves, can destroy pumps and erode other equipment. Cavitation, however, also can have a positive side--presuming it is designed for and not unplanned. In this article, the authors look at how cavitation can be harnessed to improve processes, and the mechanisms for inducing cavitation--ultrasonics and hydrodynamics--and their likely roles. Sonication, that is, the use of ultrasound, is the conventional approach for creating cavitation, and so they turn to it first. Over the past few years, a number of groups have attempted to solve the problem of scale-up and design of ultrasonic reactors. The authors review the systems that already exist and also explore a simpler and efficient alternative to the ultrasonic reactor, the hydrodynamic cavitation reactor.

  18. Comparison and Validation of Compressible Flow Simulations of Laser-Induced Cavitation

    E-print Network

    Comparison and Validation of Compressible Flow Simulations of Laser-Induced Cavitation Bubbles)). The validation is performed for the case of laser-induced cavitation bubbles collapsing in an infinite medium

  19. Vortex cavitation and oscillation in a double-suction volute pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, T.; Nagahara, T.; Tanaka, K.; Fuchiwaki, M.; Shimizu, F.

    2010-08-01

    In recent years, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes have been utilized actively in the early part of the product development cycle. Numerical analysis models have also been developed rapidly and have added cavitation flow analysis functions peculiar to hydraulic machines, in which the flow analysis has been developed remarkably with high-precision and high-reliability. On the other hand, it is well known that three kinds of cavitation, such as vortex cavitation, reverse flow cavitation and cloud cavitation appear in a double-suction volute pump. We have much interest in a relationship among the cavitating flows, pump oscillation and noise. In this study, full 3D numerical simulations have been performed using a commercial code inside the pump from the inlet of suction duct to the outlet of delivery duct. The numerical model is based on a combination of multiphase flow equations with the truncated version of the Rayleigh-Plesset model predicting the complicated growth and collapse process of cavity bubbles. This study highlights especially the mechanism of vortex cavitation occurrence from the end of the suction duct in the pump and pump oscillation which causes cavitation noise from the pump. The experimental investigations have also been performed on the cavitating flow with flow visualization to evaluate the numerical results.

  20. Combined effect of viscosity and vorticity on single mode Rayleigh-Taylor instability bubble growth

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Rahul; Mandal, Labakanta; Roy, S.; Khan, M.; Gupta, M. R. [Department of Instrumentation Science and Centre for Plasma Studies, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700032 (India)

    2011-02-15

    The combined effect of viscosity and vorticity on the growth rate of the bubble associated with single mode Rayleigh-Taylor instability is investigated. It is shown that the effect of viscosity on the motion of the lighter fluid associated with vorticity accumulated inside the bubble due to mass ablation may be such as to reduce the net viscous drag on the bubble exerted by the upper heavier fluid as the former rises through it.

  1. Cavitation and multiphase-flow 1994. FED Volume 194

    SciTech Connect

    Furuya, Okitsugu; Katz, J. [eds.

    1994-12-31

    This book covers a broad spectrum of subjects, including bubble dynamics and associated noise, bubbly flows, numerical methods for modeling bubbly and cavitating flows, cavitation and multiphase flows in a variety of applications, as well as cases involving phase changes. Separate abstracts were prepared for 21 papers in this book.

  2. Cavitating vortex generation by a submerged jet

    SciTech Connect

    Belyakov, G. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Dynamics of Geospheres (Russian Federation); Filippov, A. N. [Moscow State University of Food Production (Russian Federation)], E-mail: a.filippov@mgupp.ru

    2006-05-15

    The surface geometry of a cavitating vortex is determined in the limit of inviscid incompressible flow. The limit surface is an ovaloid of revolution with an axis ratio of 5: 3. It is shown that a cavitating vortex ring cannot develop if the cavitation number is lower than a certain critical value. Experiments conducted at various liquid pressures and several jet exit velocities confirm the existence of a critical cavitation number close to 3. At cavitation numbers higher than the critical one, the cavitating vortex ring does not develop. At substantially lower cavitation numbers (k {<=} 0.1), an elongated asymmetric cavitation bubble is generated, with an axial reentrant jet whose length can exceed the initial jet length by several times. This flow structure is called an asymmetric cavitating vortex, even though steady motion of this structure has not been observed.

  3. Bubble Bubble

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mercer Mayer

    2009-11-11

    With magic bubble solution, a boy discovers that he can blow any kind of bubble imaginable: a kangaroo, a bird, a car, or a boat. Mercer Mayer's colorful illustrations enliven this engaging tale of mysterious bubbles.

  4. Dynamics of sonoporation correlated with acoustic cavitation activities.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yun; Cui, Jianmin; Deng, Cheri X

    2008-04-01

    Sonoporation has been exploited as a promising nonviral strategy for intracellular delivery of drugs and genes. The technique utilizes ultrasound application, often facilitated by the presence of microbubbles, to generate transient, nonspecific pores on the cell membrane. However, due to the complexity and transient nature of ultrasound-mediated bubble interaction with cells, no direct correlation of sonoporation with bubble activities such as acoustic cavitation, i.e., the ultrasound-driven growth and violent collapse of bubbles, has been obtained. Using Xenopus oocytes as a model system, this study investigated sonoporation in a single cell affected by colocalized cavitation in real time. A confocally and collinearly-aligned dual-frequency ultrasound transducer assembly was used to generate focused ultrasound pulses (1.5 MHz) to induce focal sonoporation while detecting the broadband cavitation acoustic emission within the same focal zone. Dynamic sonoporation of the single cell was monitored via the transmembrane current of the cell under voltage-clamp. Our results demonstrate for the first time, to our knowledge, the spatiotemporal correlation of sonoporation with cavitation at the single-cell level. PMID:18212008

  5. Dynamics of Sonoporation Correlated with Acoustic Cavitation Activities

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yun; Cui, Jianmin; Deng, Cheri X.

    2008-01-01

    Sonoporation has been exploited as a promising nonviral strategy for intracellular delivery of drugs and genes. The technique utilizes ultrasound application, often facilitated by the presence of microbubbles, to generate transient, nonspecific pores on the cell membrane. However, due to the complexity and transient nature of ultrasound-mediated bubble interaction with cells, no direct correlation of sonoporation with bubble activities such as acoustic cavitation, i.e., the ultrasound-driven growth and violent collapse of bubbles, has been obtained. Using Xenopus oocytes as a model system, this study investigated sonoporation in a single cell affected by colocalized cavitation in real time. A confocally and collinearly-aligned dual-frequency ultrasound transducer assembly was used to generate focused ultrasound pulses (1.5 MHz) to induce focal sonoporation while detecting the broadband cavitation acoustic emission within the same focal zone. Dynamic sonoporation of the single cell was monitored via the transmembrane current of the cell under voltage-clamp. Our results demonstrate for the first time, to our knowledge, the spatiotemporal correlation of sonoporation with cavitation at the single-cell level. PMID:18212008

  6. An arbitrary Lagrangian–Eulerian method for simulating bubble growth in polymer foaming

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pengtao Yue; James J. Feng; Christopher A. Bertelo; Howard H. Hu

    2007-01-01

    We present a sharp-interface algorithm for simulating the diffusion-driven bubble growth in polymer foaming. A moving mesh of unstructured triangular elements tracks the expanding and deforming bubble surface. In the interior of the liquid, the mesh velocity is determined by solving a Laplace equation to ensure spatially smooth mesh movement. When mesh distortion becomes severe, remeshing and interpolation are performed.

  7. Bubble growth and ink ejection process of a thermal ink jet printhead

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ping-Hei Chen; Wen-Cheng Chen; S.-H. Chang

    1997-01-01

    The present study investigated bubble growth and the ink ejection process of a thermal ink jet (TIJ) printhead with a thin-film heater on the bottom-wall of the ink nozzle. Numerical predictions are presented for bubble volume, temperature, and pressure, and ink jet ejection length under various heating conditions. An inexpensive optical system was set up to visualize the transient ink

  8. Gas-bubble growth mechanisms in the analysis of metal fuel swelling

    SciTech Connect

    Gruber, E.E.; Kramer, J.M.

    1986-06-01

    During steady-state irradiation, swelling rates associated with growth of fission-gas bubbles in metallic fast reactor fuels may be expected to remain small. As a consequence, bubble-growth mechanisms are not a major consideration in modeling the steady-state fuel behavior, and it is usually adequate to consider the gas pressure to be in equilibrium with the external pressure and surface tension restraint. On transient time scales, however, various bubble-growth mechanisms become important components of the swelling rate. These mechanisms include growth by diffusion, for bubbles within grains and on grain boundaries; dislocation nucleation at the bubble surface, or ''punchout''; and bubble growth by creep. Analyses of these mechanisms are presented and applied to provide information on the conditions and the relative time scales for which the various processes should dominate fuel swelling. The results are compared to a series of experiments in which the swelling of irradiated metal fuel was determined after annealing at various temperatures and pressures. The diffusive growth of bubbles on grain boundaries is concluded to be dominant in these experiments.

  9. Visual Experiments of Bubble Growth and Departure at the Tip of Inclined Capillary Tubes in a Stagnant Liquid

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Q. Liao; X. Zhu; H. Wang; L. J. Bao; J. Xie; C. X. Lin

    2010-01-01

    The bubble growth and departure at the tip of inclined glass capillary tubes in stagnant fluid is experimentally investigated\\u000a by using a high-speed visual system. The visual experiments show that the bubble growth experiences a sphere-like growth stage\\u000a and the asymmetric growth stage at the tip of an inclined capillary tube. In the asymmetric growth stage, the bubble firstly\\u000a gets

  10. A New Unsteady Model for Dense Cloud Cavitation in Cryogenic Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hosangadi, A.; Ahuja, V.

    2005-01-01

    A new unsteady, cavitation model is presented wherein the phase change process (bubble growth/collapse) is coupled to the acoustic field in a cryogenic fluid. It predicts the number density and radius of bubbles in vapor clouds by tracking both the aggregate surface area and volume fraction of the cloud. Hence, formulations for the dynamics of individual bubbles (e.g. Rayleigh-Plesset equation) may be integrated within the macroscopic context of a dense vapor cloud i.e. a cloud that occupies a significant fraction of available volume and contains numerous bubbles. This formulation has been implemented within the CRUNCH CFD, which has a compressible real fluid formulation, a multi-element, unstructured grid framework, and has been validated extensively for liquid rocket turbopump inducers. Detailed unsteady simulations of a cavitating ogive in liquid nitrogen are presented where time-averaged mean cavity pressure and temperature depressions due to cavitation are compared with experimental data. The model also provides the spatial and temporal history of the bubble size distribution in the vapor clouds that are shed, an important physical parameter that is difficult to measure experimentally and is a significant advancement in the modeling of dense cloud cavitation.

  11. Simulation of algae growth in a bench-scale bubble column reactor.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaoxi; Merchuk, Jose C

    2002-10-20

    The growth of the marine red microalga Porphyridium sp. in a bubble-column photobioreactor was simulated. The proposed model constitutes a dynamic integration of the kinetics of photosynthesis and photoinhibition with the fluid dynamics of the bubble column, including the effects of shear stress on the kinetics of growth. The kinetic data used in the model were obtained in independent experiments run in a thin-film photobioreactor with defined light/dark cycles. The maintenance term was modified to take into account the effects of liquid flow in the bioreactor on the growth rate. A hybrid method proposed for the approximate solution of the equations gave an appreciable reduction of the calculation time. Extrapolations of the model indicated the possibility of predicting the optimal diameter for an assembly of bubble column photobioreactors. Satisfactory fit was found with the experimental results of biomass growth in a 13-liter bubble column. PMID:12209771

  12. Study of bubble growth in water pool boiling through synchronized, infrared thermometry and high-speed video

    E-print Network

    Gerardi, Craig

    High-speed video and infrared thermometry were used to obtain time- and space-resolved information on bubble nucleation and heat transfer in pool boiling of water. The bubble departure diameter and frequency, growth and ...

  13. Aerator Combined With Bubble Remover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreschel, Thomas W.

    1993-01-01

    System produces bubble-free oxygen-saturated water. Bubble remover consists of outer solid-walled tube and inner hydrophobic, porous tube. Air bubbles pass from water in outer tube into inner tube, where sucked away. Developed for long-term aquaculture projects in space. Also applicable to terrestrial equipment in which entrained bubbles dry membranes or give rise to cavitation in pumps.

  14. The effect of bubble growth dynamics on the performance of a gas evolving electrode 

    E-print Network

    Haque, Mohammad Shamsul

    1967-01-01

    : , ) / ( Wch i t' c~itt ()member) AUGUST 1967 CDQP45 111 ACKNDWLEDGhiE", ITS TIIe aut!Ior vIishes to exoress his sincere thanks to Dr. Ronald Darby, Ctla1n~lan of the Grad, Iate Coalslittee? for h'is capa'11e guidance and valuable help in this researc!1... V11 1 16 28 41 58 64 67 73 77 Table LIST OF TABLES Page 1 BUBBLE NO. 1 GROWTH DATA. 2 BUBBLE NO. 2 GROMTH DATA. 3 BUBBLE NO. 3 GROWTH DATA 80 81 82 4 DATA ON SULFURIC ACID AS A FUNCTION OF CONCENTRATION. . . 83 V1 LIST OF FIGURES...

  15. Cavitation within a dropletCavitation within a droplet G. L. Heijnen1,2, P. A. Quinto-Su2, X. Zhao2, C. D. Ohl1,2

    E-print Network

    Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    Cavitation within a dropletCavitation within a droplet G. L. Heijnen1,2, P. A. Quinto-Su2, X. Zhao2 University, Singapore. A cavitation bubble expanding and collapsing inside a liquid droplet creates two high jets taken 400µs after the cavitation bubble has been created. The central jet is surrounded

  16. Cavitation studies in microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobel, Philippe; Obreschkow, Danail; Farhat, Mohamed; Dorsaz, Nicolas; de Bosset, Aurele

    The hydrodynamic cavitation phenomenon is a major source of erosion for many industrial systems such as cryogenic pumps for rocket propulsion, fast ship propellers, hydraulic pipelines and turbines. Erosive processes are associated with liquid jets and shockwaves emission fol-lowing the cavity collapse. Yet, fundamental understanding of these processes requires further cavitation studies inside various geometries of liquid volumes, as the bubble dynamics strongly depends the surrounding pressure field. To this end, microgravity represents a unique platform to produce spherical fluid geometries and remove the hydrostatic pressure gradient induced by gravity. The goal of our first experiment (flown on ESA's parabolic flight campaigns 2005 and 2006) was to study single bubble dynamics inside large spherical water drops (having a radius between 8 and 13 mm) produced in microgravity. The water drops were created by a micro-pump that smoothly expelled the liquid through a custom-designed injector tube. Then, the cavitation bubble was generated through a fast electrical discharge between two electrodes immersed in the liquid from above. High-speed imaging allowed to analyze the implications of isolated finite volumes and spherical free surfaces on bubble evolution, liquid jets formation and shock wave dynamics. Of particular interest are the following results: (A) Bubble lifetimes are shorter than in extended liquid volumes, which could be explain by deriving novel corrective terms to the Rayleigh-Plesset equation. (B) Transient crowds of micro-bubbles (smaller than 1mm) appeared at the instants of shockwaves emission. A comparison between high-speed visualizations and 3D N-particle simulations of a shock front inside a liquid sphere reveals that focus zones within the drop lead to a significantly increased density of induced cavitation. Considering shock wave crossing and focusing may hence prove crucially useful to understand the important process of cavitation erosion. The aim of our future microgravity experiment is to assess the direct effects of gravity on cavitation bubble collapse through a comparison of single cavitation bubbles collapsing in mi-crogravity, normal gravity, and hypergravity. In particular, we shall investigate the shape of the bubble in its final collapse stage and the amount of energy dissipated in the dominant collapse channels, such as liquid jet, shock wave, and rebound bubble. The highly spherical bubbles will be produced via a point-like plasma generated by a high power laser beam. One major hypothesis that we will test is an increase in shock wave energy with decreasing gravity as a consequence of the higher final sphericity and suppression of liquid jets. To support this, we introduce an analytical model for the gravity-perturbed asymmetric collapse of spherical bubbles, and demonstrate that all initially spherical bubbles develop a gravity-related vertical jet along their collapse.

  17. Deformed bubble growth and coalescence in polymer foam processing 

    E-print Network

    Allaboun, Hussein Raji

    1996-01-01

    the geometrical constraints imposed by the existence of neighboring growing bubbles. The viscoelastic behavior of the polymer melt as well as the effect of the intermolecular forces on foam stability are investigated. An analysis of the results indicates...

  18. A suppressor to prevent direct wave-induced cavitation in shock wave therapy devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matula, Thomas J.; Hilmo, Paul R.; Bailey, Michael R.

    2005-07-01

    Cavitation plays a varied but important role in lithotripsy. Cavitation facilitates stone comminution, but can also form an acoustic barrier that may shield stones from subsequent shock waves. In addition, cavitation damages tissue. Spark-gap lithotripters generate cavitation with both a direct and a focused wave. The direct wave propagates as a spherically diverging wave, arriving at the focus ahead of the focused shock wave. It can be modeled with the same waveform (but lower amplitude) as the focused wave. We show with both simulations and experiments that bubbles are forced to grow in response to the direct wave, and that these bubbles can still be large when the focused shock wave arrives. A baffle or ``suppressor'' that blocks the propagation of the direct wave is shown to significantly reduce the direct wave pressure amplitude, as well as direct wave-induced bubble growth. These results are applicable to spark-gap lithotripters and extracorporeal shock wave therapy devices, where cavitation from the direct wave may interfere with treatment. A simple direct-wave suppressor might therefore be used to improve the therapeutic efficacy of these devices.

  19. Cavitation in elastomeric solids: II--Onset-of-cavitation surfaces for Neo-Hookean materials

    E-print Network

    Nakamura, Toshio

    Cavitation in elastomeric solids: II--Onset-of-cavitation surfaces for Neo-Hookean materials Oscar of cavitation in elastomeric solids based on the sudden growth of pre-existing defects. In this article, the theory is used to determine onset-of-cavitation surfaces for Neo-Hookean solids where the defects

  20. Cavitation in elastomeric solids: II--Onset-of-cavitation surfaces for Neo-Hookean materials

    E-print Network

    Lopez-Pamies, Oscar

    Cavitation in elastomeric solids: II--Onset-of-cavitation surfaces for Neo-Hookean materials Oscar a fairly general theory of cavitation in elastomeric solids based on the sudden growth of pre-existing defects. In this article, the theory is used to determine onset-of-cavitation surfaces for Neo

  1. Cavitation Generation and Usage Without Ultrasound: Hydrodynamic Cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogate, Parag R.; Pandit, Aniruddha B.

    Hydrodynamic Cavitation, which was and is still looked upon as an unavoidable nuisance in the flow systems, can be a serious contender as an alternative to acoustic cavitation for harnessing the spectacular effects of cavitation in physical and chemical processing. The present chapter covers the basics of hydrodynamic cavitation including the considerations for the bubble dynamics analysis, reactor designs and recommendations for optimum operating parameters. An overview of applications in different areas of physical, chemical and biological processing on scales ranging from few grams to several hundred kilograms has also been presented. Since hydrodynamic cavitation was initially proposed as an alternative to acoustic cavitation, it is necessary to compare the efficacy of both these modes of cavitations for a variety of applications and hence comparisons have been discussed either on the basis of energy efficiency or based on the scale of operation. Overall it appears that hydrodynamic cavitation results in conditions similar to those generated using acoustic cavitation but at comparatively much larger scale of operation and with better energy efficiencies.

  2. Formation and Growth of Micro and Macro Bubbles on Copper-Graphite Composite Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, David F.; Sankovic, John M.; Motil, Brian J.; Zhang, Nengli

    2007-01-01

    Micro scale boiling behavior in the vicinity of graphite micro-fiber tips on the coppergraphite composite boiling surfaces is investigated. It is discovered that a large number of micro bubbles are formed first at the micro scratches and cavities on the copper matrix in pool boiling. In virtue of the non-wetting property of graphite, once the growing micro bubbles touch the graphite tips, the micro bubbles are sucked by the tips and merged into larger micro bubbles sitting on the tips. The micro bubbles grow rapidly and coalesce to form macro bubbles, each of which sitting on several tips. The growth processes of the micro and macro bubbles are analyzed and formulated followed by an analysis of bubble departure on the composite surfaces. Based on these analyses, the enhancement mechanism of the pool boiling heat transfer on the composite surfaces is clearly revealed. Experimental results of pool boiling heat transfer both for water and Freon-113 on the composite surfaces convincingly demonstrate the enhancement effects of the unique structure of Cu-Gr composite surfaces on boiling heat transfer.

  3. In situ observations of bubble growth in basaltic, andesitic and rhyodacitic melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masotta, M.; Ni, H.; Keppler, H.

    2014-02-01

    Bubble growth strongly affects the physical properties of degassing magmas and their eruption dynamics. Natural samples and products from quench experiments provide only a snapshot of the final state of volatile exsolution, leaving the processes occurring during its early stages unconstrained. In order to fill this gap, we present in situ high-temperature observations of bubble growth in magmas of different compositions (basalt, andesite and rhyodacite) at 1,100 to 1,240 °C and 0.1 MPa (1 bar), obtained using a moissanite cell apparatus. The data show that nucleation occurs at very small degrees of supersaturaturation (<60 MPa in basalt and andesite, 200 MPa in rhyodacite), probably due to heterogeneous nucleation of bubbles occurring simultaneously with the nucleation of crystals. During the early stages of exsolution, melt degassing is the driving mechanism of bubble growth, with coalescence becoming increasingly important as exsolution progresses. Ostwald ripening occurs only at the end of the process and only in basaltic melt. The average bubble growth rate ( G R) ranges from 3.4 × 10-6 to 5.2 × 10-7 mm/s, with basalt and andesite showing faster growth rates than rhyodacite. The bubble number density ( N B) at nucleation ranges from 7.9 × 104 mm-3 to 1.8 × 105 mm-3 and decreases exponentially over time. While the rhyodacite melt maintained a well-sorted bubble size distribution (BSD) through time, the BSDs of basalt and andesite are much more inhomogeneous. Our experimental observations demonstrate that bubble growth cannot be ascribed to a single mechanism but is rather a combination of many processes, which depend on the physical properties of the melt. Depending on coalescence rate, annealing of bubbles following a single nucleation event can produce complex bubble size distributions. In natural samples, such BSDs may be misinterpreted as resulting from several separate nucleation events. Incipient crystallization upon cooling of a magma may allow bubble nucleation already at very small degrees of supersaturation and could therefore be an important trigger for volatile release and explosive eruptions.

  4. In-situ observations of bubble growth in basaltic, andesitic and rhyodacitic melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masotta, M.; Ni, H.; Keppler, H.

    2013-12-01

    Bubble growth strongly affects the physical properties of degassing magmas and their eruption dynamics. Natural samples and products from quench experiments provide only a snapshot of the final state of volatile exsolution, leaving the processes occurring during its early stages unconstrained. In order to fill this gap, we present in-situ high-temperature observations of bubble growth in magmas of different compositions (basalt, andesite and rhyodacite) at 1100 to 1240 °C and 1 bar, obtained using a moissanite cell apparatus. The data show that nucleation occurs at very small degrees of supersaturaturation (<20 MPa in basalt and andesite, ca. 100 MPa in rhyodacite), probably due to heterogeneous nucleation of bubbles occurring simultaneously with the nucleation of crystals. During the early stages of exsolution, melt degassing is the driving mechanism of bubble growth, with coalescence becoming increasingly important as exsolution progresses. Ostwald ripening occurs only at the end of the process and only in basaltic melt. The average bubble growth rate (GR) ranges from 3.4*10-6 to 5.2*10-7 mm/s, with basalt and andesite showing faster growth rates than rhyodacite. The bubble number density (NB) at nucleation ranges from 1.8*108 to 7.9*107 cm-3 and decreases exponentially over time. While the rhyodacite melt maintained a well-sorted bubble-size distribution (BSD) through time, the BSD's of basalt and andesite are much more inhomogeneous. Our experimental observations demonstrate that bubble growth cannot be ascribed to a single mechanism but is rather a combination of many processes, which depend on the physical properties of the melt. Depending on coalescence rate, annealing of bubbles following a single nucleation event can produce complex bubble size distributions. In natural samples, such BSD's may be misinterpreted as resulting from several separate nucleation events. Incipient crystallization upon cooling of a magma may allow bubble nucleation already at very small degrees of supersaturation and could therefore be an important trigger for volatile release and explosive eruptions.

  5. Growth by rectified diffusion of strongly acoustically forced gas bubbles in nearly saturated liquids

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Olivier Louisnard; Francisco Gomez

    2003-01-01

    The growth or dissolution of small gas bubbles (R0<15 mum) by rectified diffusion in nearly saturated liquids, subject to low frequencies (20 kHzbubble is

  6. Birth and Growth of Cavitation Bubbles within Water under Tension Confined in a Simple Synthetic Tree

    E-print Network

    Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    is created in only a microsecond time scale, after transient oscillations. Then, a diffusion driven expansion circulation of water in the vessels of real trees [1,2] or in synthetic ones that are used for micro- fluidic

  7. Nonequilibrium bubbles in a flowing langmuir monolayer.

    PubMed

    Muruganathan, Rm; Khattari, Z; Fischer, Th M

    2005-11-24

    We investigate the nonequilibrium behavior of two-dimensional gas bubbles in Langmuir monolayers. A cavitation bubble is induced in liquid expanded phase by locally heating a Langmuir monolayer with an IR-laser. At low IR-laser power the cavitation bubble is immersed in quiescent liquid expanded monolayer. At higher IR-laser power thermo capillary flow around the laser-induced cavitation bubble sets in. The thermo capillary flow is caused by a temperature dependence of the gas/liquid line tension. The slope of the line tension with temperature is determined by measuring the thermo capillary flow velocity. Thermodynamically stable satellite bubbles are generated by increasing the surface area of the monolayer. Those satellite bubbles collide with the cavitation bubble. Upon collision the satellite bubbles either coalesce with the cavitation bubble or slide past the cavitation bubble. Moreover we show that the satellite bubbles can also be produced by the emission from the laser-induced cavitation bubbles. PMID:16853828

  8. Taxing the Rich: Recombinations and Bubble Growth During Reionization

    E-print Network

    Steven R. Furlanetto; S. Peng Oh

    2005-08-16

    Reionization is inhomogeneous for two reasons: the clumpiness of the intergalactic medium (IGM) and clustering of the discrete ionizing sources. While numerical simulations can in principle take both into account, they are at present limited by small box sizes. On the other hand, analytic models have only examined the limiting cases of a clumpy IGM (with uniform ionizing emissivity) and clustered sources (embedded in a uniform IGM). Here, we present an analytic model for the evolving topology of reionization that includes both factors. At first, recombinations can be ignored and ionized bubbles grow primarily through major mergers. As a result, reionization resembles "punctuated equilibrium," with a series of well-separated sharp jumps in the ionizing background. These features are local effects and do not reflect similar jumps in the global ionized fraction. We then combine our bubble model with a simple description of recombinations in the IGM. We show that the bubbles stop growing when recombinations balance ionizations. If the IGM density structure is similar to that at moderate redshifts, this limits the bubble radii to ~20 comoving Mpc; however, it may be much smaller if the IGM is significantly clumpier at higher redshifts. Once a bubble reaches saturation, that region of the universe has for all intents and purposes entered the "post-overlap" stage, so the overlap epoch actually has a finite width. This picture naturally explains the substantial large-scale variation in Lyman-series opacity along the lines of sight to the known z>6 quasars. More quasar spectra will shed light on the transition between the "bubble-dominated" topology characteristic of reionization and the "web-dominated" topology characteristic of the later universe. [Abridged

  9. Bubble Growth and Dynamics in a Strongly Superheated Electrolyte within a Solid-State Nanopore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, Edlyn; Nagashima, Gaku; Burns, Michael; Golovchenko, Jene

    2015-03-01

    Extreme localized superheating and homogeneous vapor bubble nucleation have recently been demonstrated in a single nanopore in thin, solid state membranes. Aqueous electrolytic solution within the pore is superheated to well above its boiling point by Joule heating from ionic current driven through the pore. Continued heating of the metastable liquid leads to nucleation of a vapor bubble in the pore followed by explosive growth. Here we report on the growth dynamics of the vapor bubble after nucleation in the strongly superheated liquid. The process is modeled by numerically solving the Rayleigh-Plesset equation coupled with energy conservation and a Stefan boundary condition. The initial temperature distribution, peaked at the pore center, is taken to be radially symmetric. Energy conservation includes a Joule heating source term dependent on the bubble radius, which grows to constrict ionic current through the nanopore. Temperature-dependent properties of the electrolyte and the vapor are incorporated in the calculation. Comparison of the model to experimental results shows an initial bubble growth velocity of 50m/s and total bubble lifetime of 16ns. This work was supported by NIH Grant #5R01HG003703 to J.A. Golovchenko.

  10. Heterogeneous cavitation in liquid helium 4 near a glass plate

    E-print Network

    Caupin, Frédéric

    Heterogeneous cavitation in liquid helium 4 near a glass plate X. Chavanne, S. Balibar and F wave to study cavitation, i.e. the nucleation of bubbles, in liquid helium 4 near a clean glass plate and threshold pressures in the range 0 to -3 bar, significantly less negative than for homogeneous cavitation

  11. Cavitation level-acoustic intensity hysteresis: experimental and numerical characterization

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    Cavitation level-acoustic intensity hysteresis: experimental and numerical characterization P such as sonoporation, inertial cavitation is commonly considered as the main candidate inducing membrane poration. Thus, characterizing inertial cavitation, as related to bubble size distribution and medium history, is of great

  12. Extreme conditions during multibubble cavitation: Sonoluminescence as a spectroscopic probe

    E-print Network

    Suslick, Kenneth S.

    Extreme conditions during multibubble cavitation: Sonoluminescence as a spectroscopic probe Kenneth Cavitation MBSL Plasma a b s t r a c t We review recent work on the use of sonoluminescence (SL) to probe spectroscopically the conditions created during cavitation, both in clouds of collapsing bubbles (multibubble

  13. Development of Cavitation in Refrigerant (R-123) Flow Inside Rudimentary Microfluidic Systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chandan Mishra; Yoav Peles

    2006-01-01

    The existence of hydrodynamic cavitation in the flow of refrigerant (R-123) through micro-Venturis has been viewed in the form of a bubbly cavitating regime. Flow visualization discloses inchoate cavitation bubbles\\/bubble clouds emerging from the inside of the micro-Venturi throat egress. The bubble density decreases when the flow passes through the diffuser section and further downstream into the microchannel owing to

  14. Cavitation propagation in water under tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noblin, Xavier; Yip Cheung Sang, Yann; Pellegrin, Mathieu; Materials and Complex Fluids Team

    2012-11-01

    Cavitation appears when pressure decreases below vapor pressure, generating vapor bubbles. It can be obtain in dynamical ways (acoustic, hydraulic) but also in quasi-static conditions. This later case is often observed in nature, in trees, or during the ejection of ferns spores. We study the cavitation bubbles nucleation dynamics and its propagation in a confined microfabricated media. This later is an ordered array of microcavities made in hydrogel filled with water. When the system is put into dry air, it dehydrates, water leaves the cavities and tension (negative pressure) builds in the cavities. This can be sustained up to a critical pressure (of order -20 MPa), then cavitation bubbles appear. We follow the dynamics using ultra high speed imaging. Events with several bubbles cavitating in a few microseconds could be observed along neighboring cells, showing a propagation phenomenon that we discuss. ANR CAVISOFT 2010-JCJC-0407 01.

  15. Plastron-Mediated Growth of Captive Bubbles on Superhydrophobic Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Huynh, So Hung; Zahidi, Alifa Afiah Ahmad; Muradoglu, Murat; Cheong, Brandon Huey-Ping; Ng, Tuck Wah

    2015-06-23

    Captive bubbles on a superhydrophobic (SH) surface have been shown to increase in volume via injection of air through the surrounding plastron. The experimental contact diameter against volume trends were found to follow that predicted by the Surface Evolver simulation generally but corresponded with the simulated data at contact angle (CA) = 158° when the volume was 20 ?L but that at CA = 170° when the volume was increased to 180 ?L. In this regime, there was a simultaneous outward movement of the contact line as well as a small reduction in the slope that the liquid-air interface makes with the horizontal as air was injected. At volumes higher than 180 ?L, air injection caused the diameter to reduce progressively until detachment. The inward movement of the contact line in this regime allowed the bubble body to undergo shape deformations to stay attached onto the substrate with larger volumes (300 ?L) than predicted (220 ?L at CA = 170°) using simulation. In experiments to investigate the effect of translating the SH surface, movement of captive bubbles was possible with 280 ?L volume but not with 80 ?L volume. This pointed to the possibility of transporting gas-phase samples on SH surfaces using larger captive bubble volumes. PMID:25986160

  16. Acoustically driven cavitation cluster collapse in planar geometry Ivan van der Kroon,1

    E-print Network

    Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    Acoustically driven cavitation cluster collapse in planar geometry Ivan van der Kroon,1 Pedro A the dynamics of arrays of transient cavitation bubbles exposed to a sound field in a planar geometry. Single, double, and complex configurations of cavitation bubbles are obtained by shaping a pulsed laser beam

  17. Cavitation induced by explosion in an ideal fluid model Christophe Josserand*

    E-print Network

    Cavitation induced by explosion in an ideal fluid model Christophe Josserand* The James Franck a cavitation bubble for large enough energy. This gives a consistent view for rebound bubbles in superfluid.55.Bx, 67.55.Fa, 64.70.Fx I. INTRODUCTION Cavitation is a physical process involving such aspects

  18. Prevention of tissue damage by water jet during cavitation Daniel Palanker,a)

    E-print Network

    Palanker, Daniel

    Prevention of tissue damage by water jet during cavitation Daniel Palanker,a) Alexander Vankov Cavitation bubbles accompany explosive vaporization of water following pulsed energy deposition in liquid can produce tissue damage at a distance exceeding the radius of the cavitation bubble by a factor of 4

  19. Nonequilibrium statistical theory of bubble nucleation and growth under neutron and proton irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, J.; Sommer, W.F.; Bradbury, J.N.

    1986-01-01

    Microstructural evolution in metals under particle irradiation is described by a non-equilibrium statistics method. This method gives a set of equations for the evolution of bubbles and an approximate solution for a distribution function of bubble size as a function of fluence and temperature. The distribution function gives the number of bubbles of radius r at time t, N(r,t)dr, as a function of size, r/r/sub 0/(r/sub 0/ is the radius of a bubble nucleus). It is found that N(r,t)dr increases with fluence. Also, the peak value of N(r,t)dt shifts to higher r/r/sub 0/ with increasing fluence. Nucleation depends mainly on helium concentration and defect cluster concentration while bubble growth is controlled mainly by the vacancy concentration and a fluctuation coefficient. If suitable material parameters are chosen, a reasonable distribution function for bubble size is obtained. The helium diffusion coefficient is found to be less than that for vacancies by five orders of magnitude. The fraction of helium remaining in matrix is less than 10/sup -2/; the majority of the helium is associated with the bubbles.

  20. Modeling methane bubble growth in fine-grained muddy aquatic sediments: correlation with sediment properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsman, Regina

    2015-04-01

    Gassy sediments contribute to destabilization of aquatic infrastructure, air pollution, and global warming. In the current study a precise shape and size of the buoyant mature methane bubble in fine-grained muddy aquatic sediment is defined by numerical and analytical modeling, their results are in a good agreement. A closed-form analytical solution defining the bubble parameters is developed. It is found that the buoyant mature bubble is elliptical in its front view and resembles an inverted tear drop in its cross-section. The size and shape of the mature bubble strongly correlate with sediment fracture toughness. Bubbles formed in the weaker sediments are smaller and characterized by a larger surface-to volume ratio that induces their faster growth and may lead to their faster dissolution below the sediment-water interface. This may prevent their release to the water column and to the atmosphere. Shapes of the bubbles in the weaker sediments deviate further from the spherical configuration, than those in the stronger sediments. Modeled bubble characteristics, important for the acoustic applications, are in a good agreement with field observations and lab experiments.

  1. Cavitation in normal liquid helium 3 F. Caupin, P. Roche, S. Marchand and S. Balibar

    E-print Network

    Caupin, Frédéric

    Cavitation in normal liquid helium 3 F. Caupin, P. Roche, S. Marchand and S. Balibar Laboratoire de 24 rue Lhomond 75231 Paris Cedex 05, France We have studied cavitation, i.e. bubble nucleation, cavitation is found to be stochastic, with a cavitation probability 0.5 at a given value of the sound

  2. Using cavitation to measure statistics of low-pressure events in large-Reynolds-number turbulence

    E-print Network

    La Porta, Arthur

    Using cavitation to measure statistics of low-pressure events in large-Reynolds-number turbulence A is studied using cavitation. The flow is seeded with microscopic gas bubbles and the hydrostatic pressure is reduced until large negative pressure fluctuations trigger cavitation. Cavitation is detected via light

  3. PEEN FORMING OF DURALUMIN PLATE BY USING A CAVITATING JET IN AIR

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kenichi Saito

    Cavitation impacts at bubble collapse normally cause severe damage in hydraulic machineries. However, cavitation impact can be utilized to improve fatigue strength the same way as shot peening. In the present paper, the possibility of cavitation impact for peen forming was investigated. Peen forming is used to make curvature of main wing of airplanes. Cavitation impacts were produced by a

  4. Bubble Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corrigan, Jackie

    2004-01-01

    A method of energy production that is capable of low pollutant emissions is fundamental to one of the four pillars of NASA s Aeronautics Blueprint: Revolutionary Vehicles. Bubble combustion, a new engine technology currently being developed at Glenn Research Center promises to provide low emissions combustion in support of NASA s vision under the Emissions Element because it generates power, while minimizing the production of carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitrous oxides (NOx), both known to be Greenhouse gases. and allows the use of alternative fuels such as corn oil, low-grade fuels, and even used motor oil. Bubble combustion is analogous to the inverse of spray combustion: the difference between bubble and spray combustion is that spray combustion is spraying a liquid in to a gas to form droplets, whereas bubble combustion involves injecting a gas into a liquid to form gaseous bubbles. In bubble combustion, the process for the ignition of the bubbles takes place on a time scale of less than a nanosecond and begins with acoustic waves perturbing each bubble. This perturbation causes the local pressure to drop below the vapor pressure of the liquid thus producing cavitation in which the bubble diameter grows, and upon reversal of the oscillating pressure field, the bubble then collapses rapidly with the aid of the high surface tension forces acting on the wall of the bubble. The rapid and violent collapse causes the temperatures inside the bubbles to soar as a result of adiabatic heating. As the temperatures rise, the gaseous contents of the bubble ignite with the bubble itself serving as its own combustion chamber. After ignition, this is the time in the bubble s life cycle where power is generated, and CO2, and NOx among other species, are produced. However, the pollutants CO2 and NOx are absorbed into the surrounding liquid. The importance of bubble combustion is that it generates power using a simple and compact device. We conducted a parametric study using CAVCHEM, a computational model developed at Glenn, that simulates the cavitational collapse of a single bubble in a liquid (water) and the subsequent combustion of the gaseous contents inside the bubble. The model solves the time-dependent, compressible Navier-Stokes equations in one-dimension with finite-rate chemical kinetics using the CHEMKIN package. Specifically, parameters such as frequency, pressure, bubble radius, and the equivalence ratio were varied while examining their effect on the maximum temperature, radius, and chemical species. These studies indicate that the radius of the bubble is perhaps the most critical parameter governing bubble combustion dynamics and its efficiency. Based on the results of the parametric studies, we plan on conducting experiments to study the effect of ultrasonic perturbations on the bubble generation process with respect to the bubble radius and size distribution.

  5. Cavitation bubble dynamics in microfluidic gaps of variable height Pedro A. Quinto-Su, Kang Y. Lim, and Claus-Dieter Ohl

    E-print Network

    Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    . Yet, it has been only until recently that this technique has been combined with micro- fluidic chips 5 of the microfluidic environment on the bubble oscillation. The bubbles are created with a fixed laser energy inside

  6. Formation of methane nano-bubbles during hydrate decomposition and their effect on hydrate growth.

    PubMed

    Bagherzadeh, S Alireza; Alavi, Saman; Ripmeester, John; Englezos, Peter

    2015-06-01

    Molecular dynamic simulations are performed to study the conditions for methane nano-bubble formation during methane hydrate dissociation in the presence of water and a methane gas reservoir. Hydrate dissociation leads to the quick release of methane into the liquid phase which can cause methane supersaturation. If the diffusion of methane molecules out of the liquid phase is not fast enough, the methane molecules agglomerate and form bubbles. Under the conditions of our simulations, the methane-rich quasi-spherical bubbles grow to become cylindrical with a radius of ?11 Å. The nano-bubbles remain stable for about 35 ns until they are gradually and homogeneously dispersed in the liquid phase and finally enter the gas phase reservoirs initially set up in the simulation box. We determined that the minimum mole fraction for the dissolved methane in water to form nano-bubbles is 0.044, corresponding to about 30% of hydrate phase composition (0.148). The importance of nano-bubble formation to the mechanism of methane hydrate formation, growth, and dissociation is discussed. PMID:26049510

  7. Formation of methane nano-bubbles during hydrate decomposition and their effect on hydrate growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagherzadeh, S. Alireza; Alavi, Saman; Ripmeester, John; Englezos, Peter

    2015-06-01

    Molecular dynamic simulations are performed to study the conditions for methane nano-bubble formation during methane hydrate dissociation in the presence of water and a methane gas reservoir. Hydrate dissociation leads to the quick release of methane into the liquid phase which can cause methane supersaturation. If the diffusion of methane molecules out of the liquid phase is not fast enough, the methane molecules agglomerate and form bubbles. Under the conditions of our simulations, the methane-rich quasi-spherical bubbles grow to become cylindrical with a radius of ˜11 Å. The nano-bubbles remain stable for about 35 ns until they are gradually and homogeneously dispersed in the liquid phase and finally enter the gas phase reservoirs initially set up in the simulation box. We determined that the minimum mole fraction for the dissolved methane in water to form nano-bubbles is 0.044, corresponding to about 30% of hydrate phase composition (0.148). The importance of nano-bubble formation to the mechanism of methane hydrate formation, growth, and dissociation is discussed.

  8. Vapor Cavitation in Dynamically Loaded Journal Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, B. O.; Hamrock, B. J.

    1983-01-01

    High speed motion camera experiments were performed on dynamically loaded journal bearings. The length to diameter ratio of the bearing, the speed of the roller and the tube, the surface material of the roller, and the static and dynamic eccentricity of the bearing were varied. One hundred and thirty-four cases were filmed. The occurrence of vapor cavitation was clearly evident in the films and figures presented. Vapor cavitation was found to occur when the tensile stress applied to the oil exceeded the tensile strength of the oil or the binding of the oil to the surface. The physical situation in which vapor cavitation occurs is during the squeezing and sliding motion within a bearing. Besides being able to accurately capture the vapor cavitation on film, an analysis of the formation and collapse of the cavitation bubbles and characteristics of the bubble content are presented.

  9. CAVITATION DAMAGE STUDY VIA A NOVEL REPETITIVE PRESSURE PULSE APPROACH

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL; Ren, Fei [ORNL; Wang, Hong [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    Cavitation damage can significantly affect system performance. Thus, there is great interest in characterizing cavitation damage and improving materials resistance to cavitation damage. In this paper, we present a novel methodology to simulate cavitation environment. A pulsed laser is utilized to induce optical breakdown in the cavitation media, with the emission of shock wave and the generation of bubbles. The pressure waves induced by the optical breakdown fluctuate/propagate within the media, which enables the cavitation to occur and to further develop cavitation damage at the solid boundary. Using the repetitive pulsed-pressure apparatus developed in the current study, cavitation damage in water media was verified on stainless steel and aluminum samples. Characteristic cavitation damages such as pitting and indentation are observed on sample surfaces using scanning electron microscopy.

  10. Numerical simulation of aeration bubble growth in a plug-flow aeration tank used in wastewater treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H. R.; Li, Y. P.

    2010-03-01

    The micro-scale hydrodynamics of bubbles growth by aeration is related to the oxygen transfer efficiency and the overall performance of the activated sludge wastewater treatment process. To gain a deeper insight on the micro-scale phenomena of dispersed bubble in this process, a three-dimensional direct simulation method is developed to study the effects of the liquid cross-flow on micro-scale behavior of bubble growth in a plug-flow aeration tank. The numerical simulations are performed using the level set method coupling with the governing equations of a single fluid with variable properties. The governing equations are solved using the finite-volume projection technique. The simulation results are compared with the experimental observations and theoretical relations. The simulated results show that water cross-flow in plug-flow type aeration tank has a strong impact on the bubble growth process. Compared to that generated under quiescent water conditions used in mixing type aeration tank, the bubble under water cross-flow conditions grows downstream along the tilted axis, and the bubble generation time tends to decrease noticeably and the bubble at detachment has significantly smaller size. The dynamic characteristics of the bubble growth through two orifices are also numerically studied. The effect of water cross-flow on the bubbling synchronicity is finally discussed.

  11. Use of Dual-Pulse Lithotripter to Generate a Localized Intensified Cavitation Field

    SciTech Connect

    Sokolov, Dihlia L.(Washington University) [Washington University; Bailey, Michael R.(8408) [8408; Crum, Lawrence A.(Washington University) [Washington University

    2001-09-01

    Localizing cavitation to the kidney stone in extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy may be desirable since cavitation appears to play a major role in both stone comminution and renal tissue damage. A method has been developed to localize and intensify cavitation damage in vitro. Cavitation fields in water were filmed with a high-speed digital video camera. In a conventional lithotripter (CL), the shock wave produced by a single source creates a 2 x 10 cm cylindrical cloud of bubbles in water. Bubbles in the CL field collapse simultaneously along the focal axis to produce a nearly uniform 1-mm x 8-cm line of pits in 25- mm-thick aluminum foil. Our dual-pulse lithotripter (DPL) uses two shock wave sources, facing each other, confocal, and triggered simultaneously to create a 4 x 5 cm cylindrical cloud of bubbles that collapse over a range of times and strengths such that the greatest pit damage on foils is contained within a few square millimeters of the focus. The time for bubbles to grow and collapse was measured with a focused hydrophone and compared with calculations based on the Gilmore equation. Pressure doubling due to synchronous arrival of the two pulses at the focus created increased bubble growth and increased foil pit depth. Asynchronous timing between the two pulses elsewhere in the DPL field resulted in disruption of radial dynamics and negligible pitting to foils. Translation of bubbles was also investigated, both numerically and experimentally. While net translation was calculated to be ,0.3 mm in all cases, the rapid

  12. Analysis of the cavitating flow induced by an ultrasonic horn - Experimental investigation on the influence of actuation phase, amplitude and geometrical boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Saskia; Fischper, Maurice; Mottyll, Stephan; Skoda, Romuald; Hussong, Jeanette

    2014-03-01

    Till today, factors influencing the formation and collapse of densely distributed, interacting cavitation bubbles are only qualitatively understood. The aim of the present study is to investigate experimentally the influence of selected boundary conditions on the number and size distribution of cavitation bubbles created by an ultrasonic horn (sonotrode). Cavitation bubble clouds below the sonotrode were recorded by means of phase-locked shadowgraphy imaging. The time integrated number of cavitation bubbles was found to decrease exponentially with growing bubble radius. The number of bubbles was increased with growing actuation amplitude and gap width between the sonotrode tip and an opposing solid wall. Furthermore, it could be shown that the number of cavitation bubbles depends on the actuation phase. Future investigations will focus on establishing a statistical relation between the number and size distribution of cavitation bubbles in the near wall region and the resulting cavitation erosion on solid surfaces.

  13. Cavitation inception following shock wave passage Department of Applied Physics, TU Twente, Postbus 217, 7500 AE Enschede, The Netherlands

    E-print Network

    Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    Cavitation inception following shock wave passage C. D. Ohl Department of Applied Physics, TU; published 5 September 2002 Cavitation bubble nucleation following the passage of an extracorporeal shock of the bubble center; however, considerable disagreement between a simple cavitation inception theory

  14. NUMERICAL STUDY OF THE EFFECT OF SURFACE TENSION ON VAPOR BUBBLE GROWTH DURING FLOW BOILING IN MICROCHANNELS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Abhijit Mukherjee; Satish G Kandlikar

    Microchannel heat sinks typically consist of parallel channels connected through a common header. During flow boiling random temporal and spatial formation of vapor bubbles may lead to reversed flow in certain channels which causing an early CHF condition. Inside the microchannels the liquid surface tension forces is expected to play an important role and impact the vapor bubble growth and

  15. Effect of liquid properties on the growth and motion characteristics of micro-bubbles induced by electric fields in confined liquid films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, G. X.; Luo, J. B.; Liu, S. H.; Guo, D.; Li, G.; Zhang, C. H.

    2009-06-01

    The effect of liquid properties on gas bubble growth and motion characteristics in liquid films confined within a nanogap between a highly polished steel ball and a smooth glass disc under an electric field is reported. Experimental results show that the critical voltage for the appearance of bubbles has insignificant dependence on liquid viscosity and surface tension. The bubble size after detachment increases with liquid viscosity, and bubble instability and coalescence tend to occur when bubbles move some distance away from where they were formed. An increase in liquid surface tension results in larger bubbles at the growth stage. Also, the bubble motion characteristics are greatly influenced by liquid viscosity, and the dielectrophoresis force is demonstrated to be the dominant driving force for bubble movement. Theoretical models and analyses have been used to discuss the bubble formation and describe the bubble movement characteristics.

  16. Dissolved water distribution in vesicular magmatic glass records both decompressive bubble growth and quench resorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, I. M.; Llewellin, E.; Humphreys, M.; Nichols, A. R.; Burgisser, A.; Schipper, C.

    2013-12-01

    Water distribution in magma varies over the lifetime of an eruption due to a variety of processes, including decompressive degassing of the melt, cooling during the quench from melt to glass, and post-emplacement hydration under ambient conditions. Correct interpretation of water distributions in erupted pyroclasts can therefore offer crucial insights into the dynamics of eruption mechanisms and emplacement histories. Volcanic eruptions are driven by the nucleation and growth of bubbles in magma. Bubbles grow as volatile species in the melt, of which water is volumetrically the most important, diffuse down a concentration gradient towards and across the bubble wall. On cooling, the melt quenches to glass, preserving the spatial distribution of water concentration around the bubbles (now vesicles). We use Backscatter Scanning Electron Microscopy (BSEM), Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) and Fourier Transform Infra-Red spectroscopy (FTIR) to measure the spatial distribution of water around vesicles in experimentally-vesiculated samples. We find that, contrary to expectation, the total water concentration increases (by up to 2 wt.%) in the ~30 microns closest to the vesicle wall. Our samples record significant resorption of water back into the melt around bubbles during the quench process, a process which represents ';regassing' of the magma. We propose that the observed total water resorption profiles result from the increase in the equilibrium solubility of water as temperature decreases during the quench to glass, and that this resorption locally overprints the pre-existing concentration total water profile resulting from bubble growth during decompression. This resorption occurs over the very short timescales of rapid experimental quench (3-10 seconds) resulting in strongly disequilibrium water speciation. Water re-enters the melt as molecular water leading to enrichment in molecular water around vesicles, while the distribution of hydroxyl groups remains relatively unaltered during quench, thus preserving information about syn-experimental (or syn-eruptive) degassing. Our work demonstrates the effectiveness of two tools for deciphering the water contents of pyroclasts. BSEM imaging of glassy pyroclasts offers an easy, qualitative assessment of whether glass has been affected by quench resorption or secondary alteration processes, which becomes quantitative if calibrated by a technique such as SIMS. FTIR speciation data, meanwhile, enables the cause of bubble resorption to be identified, since resorption caused by pressure increase and by temperature decrease will result in distinctly different distributions of water species. We present here data extracted using these tools that demonstrate the potential impact of temperature-controlled quench resorption, which can reduce bubble volumes and sample porosities by a factor of two and reintroduce significant amounts of water back into the melt, with implications for obsidian and rheomorphic flow mechanisms.

  17. Thrombus rupture via cavitation.

    PubMed

    Volokh, K Y

    2015-07-16

    Aneurysm growth is accompanied by formation of intraluminal thrombus. The onset of thrombus rupture via unstable void growth is studied in the present note. The experimentally calibrated constitutive model of thrombus developed by Wang et al. (2001) is enhanced with a failure description and used for analysis of cavitation. It is found that unstable cavity growth can start at hydrostatic tension of 0.18MPa which lies within the physiological range of stresses in the arterial wall. PMID:26001987

  18. Dynamics of diffusive bubble growth and pressure recovery in a bubbly rhyolitic melt embedded in an elastic solid

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bernard Chouet; Phillip Dawson; Masaru Nakano

    2006-01-01

    We present a model of gas exsolution and bubble expansion in a melt supersaturated in response to a sudden pressure drop. In our model, the melt contains a suspension of gas bubbles of identical sizes and is encased in a penny-shaped crack embedded in an elastic solid. The suspension is modeled as a three-dimensional lattice of spherical cells with slight

  19. Experimental investigation of cavitation in pump inlet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikora, Roman; Bure?ek, Adam; Hružík, Lumír; Vašina, Martin

    2015-05-01

    The article deals with experimental research of cavitation development in inlet tube of hydraulic pump. The pressures in inlet and outlet tube of the pump and flow rate were measured. Mineral oil was used as working fluid. The cavitation was visually evaluated in transparent inlet tube. The inlet tube underpressure was achieved by throttle valve. The relationship between the generation of bubbles and the inlet pressure is evaluated.

  20. Sonoluminescing Gas Bubbles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. Scott; H.-Th. Elze; T. Kodama; J. Rafelski

    1998-01-01

    We draw attention to the fact that the popular but unproven hypothesis of shock-driven sonoluminescence is incompatible with the reported synchronicity of the single bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) phenomenon. Moreover, it is not a necessary requirement, since we show that the sub-shock dynamic heating in gas bubble cavitation can lead to conditions required to generate intense 100ps light pulses. To wit

  1. Simulations and Analytic Calculations of Bubble Growth During Hydrogen Reionization

    E-print Network

    Oliver Zahn; Adam Lidz; Matthew McQuinn; Suvendra Dutta; Lars Hernquist; Matias Zaldarriaga; Steven R. Furlanetto

    2010-03-17

    We present results from a large volume simulation of Hydrogen reionization. We combine 3d radiative transfer calculations and an N-body simulation, describing structure formation in the intergalactic medium, to detail the growth of HII regions around high redshift galaxies. Our simulation tracks 1024^3 dark matter particles, in a box of co-moving side length 65.6 Mpc/h. This large volume allows us to accurately characterize the size distribution of HII regions throughout most of the reionization process. At the same time, our simulation resolves many of the small galaxies likely responsible for reionization. It confirms a picture anticipated by analytic models: HII regions grow collectively around highly-clustered sources, and have a well-defined characteristic size, which evolves from a sub-Mpc scale at the beginning of reionization to R > 10 Mpc towards the end. We present a detailed statistical description of our results, and compare them with a numerical scheme based on the analytic model by Furlanetto, Zaldarriaga, and Hernquist. We find that the analytic calculation reproduces the size distribution of HII regions and the 21 cm power spectrum of the radiative transfer simulation remarkably well. The ionization field from the simulation, however, has more small scale structure than the analytic calculation, owing to Poisson scatter in the simulated abundance of galaxies on small scales. We propose and validate a simple scheme to incorporate this scatter into our calculations. Our results suggest that analytic calculations are sufficiently accurate to aid in predicting and interpreting the results of future 21 cm surveys. In particular, our fast numerical scheme is useful for forecasting constraints from future 21 cm surveys, and in constructing mock surveys to test data analysis procedures.

  2. Controlled Multibubble Surface Cavitation Nicolas Bremond,* Manish Arora, Claus-Dieter Ohl, and Detlef Lohse

    E-print Network

    Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    Controlled Multibubble Surface Cavitation Nicolas Bremond,* Manish Arora, Claus-Dieter Ohl been notorious because of its irreproducibility. Here controlled multibubble surface cavitation of the cavitation events where the inner bubbles in the two- dimensional cluster are shielded by the outer ones

  3. Ultrafast active cavitation imaging with enhanced cavitation to tissue ratio based on wavelet transform and pulse inversion.

    PubMed

    Liu, Runna; Hu, Hong; Xu, Shanshan; Huo, Rui; Wang, Supin; Wan, Mingxi

    2015-06-01

    The quality of ultrafast active cavitation imaging (UACI) using plane wave transmission is hindered by low transmission pressure, which is necessary to prevent bubble destruction. In this study, a UACI method that combined wavelet transform with pulse inversion (PI) was proposed to enhance the contrast between the cavitation bubbles and surrounding tissues. The main challenge in using wavelet transform is the selection of the optimum mother wavelet. A mother wavelet named "cavitation bubble wavelet" and constructed according to Rayleigh-Plesset-Noltingk-Neppiras-Poritsky model was expected to obtain a high correlation between the bubbles and beamformed echoes. The method was validated by in vitro experiments. Results showed that the image quality was associated with the initial radius of bubble and the scale. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the best optimum cavitation bubble wavelet transform (CBWT) mode image was improved by 3.2?dB compared with that of the B-mode image in free-field experiments. The cavitation-to-tissue ratio of the best optimum PI-based CBWT mode image was improved by 2.3?dB compared with that of the PI-based B-mode image in tissue experiments. Furthermore, the SNR versus initial radius curve had the potential to estimate the size distribution of cavitation bubbles. PMID:26093401

  4. Enhancement of heat and mass transfer by cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. N.; Zhang, Y. N.; Du, X. Z.; Xian, H. Z.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a brief summary of effects of cavitation on the heat and mass transfer are given. The fundamental studies of cavitation bubbles, including its nonlinearity, rectified heat and mass diffusion, are initially introduced. Then selected topics of cavitation enhanced heat and mass transfer were discussed in details including whales stranding caused by active sonar activity, pool boiling heat transfer, oscillating heat pipe and high intensity focused ultrasound treatment.

  5. Simultaneous pressure measurement and high-speed photography study of cavitation in a dynamically loaded journal bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, D. C.; Brewe, David E.; Abel, Philip B.

    1994-01-01

    Cavitation of the oil film in a dynamically loaded journal bearing was studied using high-speed photography and pressure measurement simultaneously. Comparison of the visual and pressure data provided considerable insight into the occurrence and nonoccurrence of cavitation. It was found that (1) for the submerged journal bearing, cavitation typically occurred in the form of one bubble with the pressure in the cavitation bubble close to the absolute zero; and (2) for cavitation-producing operating conditions, cavitation did not always occur; with the oil film then supporting a tensile stress.

  6. Simultaneous pressure measurement and high-speed photography study of cavitation in a dynamically loaded journal bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, D. C.; Brewe, David E.; Abel, Philip B.

    1994-02-01

    Cavitation of the oil film in a dynamically loaded journal bearing was studied using high-speed photography and pressure measurement simultaneously. Comparison of the visual and pressure data provided considerable insight into the occurrence and nonoccurrence of cavitation. It was found that (1) for the submerged journal bearing, cavitation typically occurred in the form of one bubble with the pressure in the cavitation bubble close to the absolute zero; and (2) for cavitation-producing operating conditions, cavitation did not always occur; with the oil film then supporting a tensile stress.

  7. Simultaneous pressure measurement and high-speed photography study of cavitation in a dynamically loaded journal bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, D. C.; Brewe, D. E.; Abel, P. B.

    1993-01-01

    Cavitation of the oil film in a dynamically loaded journal bearing was studied using high-speed photography and pressure measurement simultaneously. Comparison of the visual and pressure data provided considerable insight into the occurence and non-occurrence of cavitation. It was found that (1), cavitation typically occurred in the form of one bubble with the pressure in the cavitation bubble close to the absolute zero; and (2), for cavitation-producing operating conditions, cavitation did not always occur; with the oil film then supporting a tensile stress.

  8. Improvement of growth rate of plants by bubble discharge in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahata, Junichiro; Takaki, Koichi; Satta, Naoya; Takahashi, Katsuyuki; Fujio, Takuya; Sasaki, Yuji

    2015-01-01

    The effect of bubble discharge in water on the growth rate of plants was investigated experimentally for application to plant cultivation systems. Spinach (Spinacia oleracea), radish (Raphanus sativus var. sativus), and strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) were used as specimens to clarify the effect of the discharge treatment on edible parts of the plants. The specimens were cultivated in pots filled with artificial soil, which included chicken manure charcoal. Distilled water was sprayed on the artificial soil and drained through a hole in the pots to a water storage tank. The water was circulated from the water storage tank to the cultivation pots after 15 or 30 min discharge treatment on alternate days. A magnetic compression-type pulsed power generator was used to produce the bubble discharge with a repetition rate of 250 pps. The plant height in the growth phase and the dry weight of the harvested plants were improved markedly by the discharge treatment in water. The soil and plant analyzer development (SPAD) value of the plants also improved in the growth phase of the plants. The concentration of nitrate nitrogen, which mainly contributed to the improvement of the growth rate, in the water increased with the discharge treatment. The Brix value of edible parts of Fragaria × ananassa increased with the discharge treatment. The inactivation of bacteria in the water was also confirmed with the discharge treatment.

  9. Numerical modeling of bubble dynamics in viscoelastic media with relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warnez, M. T.; Johnsen, E.

    2015-06-01

    Cavitation occurs in a variety of non-Newtonian fluids and viscoelastic materials. The large-amplitude volumetric oscillations of cavitation bubbles give rise to high temperatures and pressures at collapse, as well as induce large and rapid deformation of the surroundings. In this work, we develop a comprehensive numerical framework for spherical bubble dynamics in isotropic media obeying a wide range of viscoelastic constitutive relationships. Our numerical approach solves the compressible Keller-Miksis equation with full thermal effects (inside and outside the bubble) when coupled to a highly generalized constitutive relationship (which allows Newtonian, Kelvin-Voigt, Zener, linear Maxwell, upper-convected Maxwell, Jeffreys, Oldroyd-B, Giesekus, and Phan-Thien-Tanner models). For the latter two models, partial differential equations (PDEs) must be solved in the surrounding medium; for the remaining models, we show that the PDEs can be reduced to ordinary differential equations. To solve the general constitutive PDEs, we present a Chebyshev spectral collocation method, which is robust even for violent collapse. Combining this numerical approach with theoretical analysis, we simulate bubble dynamics in various viscoelastic media to determine the impact of relaxation time, a constitutive parameter, on the associated physics. Relaxation time is found to increase bubble growth and permit rebounds driven purely by residual stresses in the surroundings. Different regimes of oscillations occur depending on the relaxation time.

  10. Activating molecules, ions, and solid particles with acoustic cavitation.

    PubMed

    Pflieger, Rachel; Chave, Tony; Virot, Matthieu; Nikitenko, Sergey I

    2014-01-01

    The chemical and physical effects of ultrasound arise not from a direct interaction of molecules with sound waves, but rather from the acoustic cavitation: the nucleation, growth, and implosive collapse of microbubbles in liquids submitted to power ultrasound. The violent implosion of bubbles leads to the formation of chemically reactive species and to the emission of light, named sonoluminescence. In this manuscript, we describe the techniques allowing study of extreme intrabubble conditions and chemical reactivity of acoustic cavitation in solutions. The analysis of sonoluminescence spectra of water sparged with noble gases provides evidence for nonequilibrium plasma formation. The photons and the "hot" particles generated by cavitation bubbles enable to excite the non-volatile species in solutions increasing their chemical reactivity. For example the mechanism of ultrabright sonoluminescence of uranyl ions in acidic solutions varies with uranium concentration: sonophotoluminescence dominates in diluted solutions, and collisional excitation contributes at higher uranium concentration. Secondary sonochemical products may arise from chemically active species that are formed inside the bubble, but then diffuse into the liquid phase and react with solution precursors to form a variety of products. For instance, the sonochemical reduction of Pt(IV) in pure water provides an innovative synthetic route for monodispersed nanoparticles of metallic platinum without any templates or capping agents. Many studies reveal the advantages of ultrasound to activate the divided solids. In general, the mechanical effects of ultrasound strongly contribute in heterogeneous systems in addition to chemical effects. In particular, the sonolysis of PuO2 powder in pure water yields stable colloids of plutonium due to both effects. PMID:24747272

  11. Inertial confinement fusion based on the ion-bubble trigger

    SciTech Connect

    Jafari, S., E-mail: SJafari@guilan.ac.ir; Nilkar, M.; Ghasemizad, A. [Department of Physics, University of Guilan, Rasht 41335-1914 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mehdian, H. [Department of Physics and Institute for Plasma Research, Tarbiat Moallem University, Tehran 15614 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Triggering the ion-bubble in an inertial confinement fusion, we have developed a novel scheme for the fast ignition. This scheme relies on the plasma cavitation by the wake of an intense laser pulse to generate an ion-bubble. The bubble acts both as an intense electron accelerator and as an electron wiggler. Consequently, the accelerated electrons trapped in the bubble can emit an intense tunable laser light. This light can be absorbed by an ablation layer on the outside surface of the ignition capsule, which subsequently drills it and thereby produces a guide channel in the pellet. Finally, the relativistic electron beam created in the bubble is guided through the channel to the high density core igniting the fusion fuel. The normalized beam intensity and beam energy required for triggering the ignition have been calculated when core is heated by the e-beam. In addition, through solving the momentum transfer, continuity and wave equations, a dispersion relation for the electromagnetic and space-charge waves has been analytically derived. The variations of growth rate with the ion-bubble density and electron beam energy have been illustrated. It is found that the growth rates of instability are significantly controlled by the ions concentration and the e-beam energy in the bubble.

  12. Inertial confinement fusion based on the ion-bubble trigger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafari, S.; Nilkar, M.; Ghasemizad, A.; Mehdian, H.

    2014-10-01

    Triggering the ion-bubble in an inertial confinement fusion, we have developed a novel scheme for the fast ignition. This scheme relies on the plasma cavitation by the wake of an intense laser pulse to generate an ion-bubble. The bubble acts both as an intense electron accelerator and as an electron wiggler. Consequently, the accelerated electrons trapped in the bubble can emit an intense tunable laser light. This light can be absorbed by an ablation layer on the outside surface of the ignition capsule, which subsequently drills it and thereby produces a guide channel in the pellet. Finally, the relativistic electron beam created in the bubble is guided through the channel to the high density core igniting the fusion fuel. The normalized beam intensity and beam energy required for triggering the ignition have been calculated when core is heated by the e-beam. In addition, through solving the momentum transfer, continuity and wave equations, a dispersion relation for the electromagnetic and space-charge waves has been analytically derived. The variations of growth rate with the ion-bubble density and electron beam energy have been illustrated. It is found that the growth rates of instability are significantly controlled by the ions concentration and the e-beam energy in the bubble.

  13. Cavitation-Induced Reactions in High-Pressure Carbon Dioxide

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. W. A. Kuijpers; D. van Eck; M. F. Kemmere; J. T. F. Keurentjes

    2002-01-01

    The feasibility of ultrasound-induced in situ radical formation in liquid carbon dioxide was demonstrated. The required threshold pressure for cavitation could be exceeded at a relatively low acoustic intensity, as the high vapor pressure of CO2 counteracts the hydrostatic pressure. With the use of a dynamic bubble model, the formation of hot spots upon bubble collapse was predicted. Cavitation-induced radical

  14. Experimental investigation of remote seismic triggering by gas bubble growth in groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crews, J. B.; Cooper, C. A.

    2014-12-01

    Remotely triggered seismicity is the process by which an earthquake at one location initiates others after a time delay ranging from seconds to days, over distances up to thousands of kilometers. Candidate mechanisms have been proposed, but none specifically address the role of carbon dioxide (CO2) gas bubble growth in groundwater as a driver of remote seismic triggering in active volcanic and geothermal regions, where shallow crustal CO2 gas is abundant. In the present study, we hypothesize that a seismic wave from a distant source can initiate rapid gas bubble growth in CO2-rich groundwater, resulting in a persistent increase in pore fluid pressure and a reduction of effective stress, which can trigger failure on a critically loaded geologic fault. Under conditions representative of a confined aquifer, a Berea sandstone core flooded with an aqueous CO2 solution was subjected to a six-period burst of 0.05-0.3 Hz, 0.1-0.4 MPa confining stress oscillations. After the oscillations were terminated, the pore fluid pressure exceeded its initial value by 13-60 cm equivalent freshwater head, scaling with the amplitude and frequency - a surplus that is consistent with borehole water level changes [Roeloffs et al. (1995) USGS Open File Report, 95-42] observed in response to the June 28 1992 MW 7.3 Landers, California earthquake Rayleigh wave in Parkfield and Long Valley caldera, California, where remotely triggered earthquakes occurred [Hill et al. (1993) Science, 260(5114); Hill et al. (1995) Journal of Geophysical Research, 100(B7)]. Our experimental results indicate that seismically initiated gas bubble growth in groundwater is a physically plausible mechanism for remote seismic triggering in active volcanic and geothermal regions, suggesting that the aqueous CO2 saturation state in a confined aquifer may be used to assess susceptibility to remote seismic triggering.

  15. Cavitation dynamics on the nanoscale

    SciTech Connect

    Kotaidis, Vassilios; Plech, Anton [Fachbereich Physik der Universitaet Konstanz, Universitaetsstr. 10, D-78457 Constance (Germany)

    2005-11-21

    The ultrafast excitation of gold nanoparticle sols causes a strong nonequilibrium heating of the particle lattice and subsequently of the water shell close to the particle surface. Above a threshold in laser fluence, which is defined by the onset of homogeneous nucleation, nanoscale vapor bubbles develop around the particles, expand and collapse again within the first nanosecond after excitation. We show the existence of cavitation on the nanometer and subnanosecond time scale, described within the framework of continuum thermodynamics.

  16. The dynamics of bubble growth for Rayleigh-Taylor unstable interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, C.; Glimm, J.; McBryan, O.; Menikoff, R.; Sharp, D.; Zhang, Q.

    1987-05-01

    A statistical model is analyzed for the growth of bubbles in a Rayleigh-Taylor unstable interface. The model is compared to solutions of the full Euler equations for compressible two phase flow, using numerical solutions based on the method of front tracking. The front tracking method has the distinguishing feature of being a predominantly Eulerian method in which sharp interfaces are preserved with zero numerical diffusion. Various regimes in the statistical model exhibiting qualitatively distinct behavior are explored. It appears that the parameters in the statistical model can be set from first principles on the basis of comparison with numerical solutions of the full Euler equation.

  17. Measuring bubbles in a bubbly wake flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung-Jae; Kawakami, Ellison; Arndt, Roger E. A.

    2012-11-01

    This paper presents measurements of the velocity and size distribution of bubbles in a bubbly wake. This was carried out by utilizing particle shadow velocimetry (PSV). This technique is a non-scattering approach that relies on direct in-line volume illumination by a pulsed source such as a light-emitting diode (LED). A narrow depth-of-field (DoF) is required for imaging a 2-dimensional plane within a flow volume. Shadows of the bubbles were collected by a high-speed camera. Once a reference image, taken when no bubbles were present in the flow, was subtracted from the images, the image was segmented using an edge detection technique. The Canny algorithm was determined to be best suited for this application. A curvature profile method was employed to distinguish individual bubbles within a cluster of highly overlapping bubbles. The utilized algorithm was made to detect partly overlapping bubbles and reconstruct the missing parts. The movement of recognized individual bubbles was tracked on a two dimensional plane within a flow volume. In order to obtain quantitative results, the wake of a ventilated hydrofoil was investigated by applying the shadowgraphy technique and the described bubble detection algorithm. These experiments were carried out in the high speed cavitation tunnel at Saint Anthony Falls Laboratory (SAFL) of the University of Minnesota. This research is jointly sponsored by the Office of Naval Re- search, Dr. Ron Joslin, program manager, and the Department of Energy, Golden Field Office.

  18. Detecting cavitation in mercury exposed to a high-energy pulsed proton beam

    SciTech Connect

    Manzi, Nicholas J [ORNL; Chitnis, Parag V [ORNL; Holt, Ray G [ORNL; Roy, Ronald A [ORNL; Cleveland, Robin O [ORNL; Riemer, Bernie [ORNL; Wendel, Mark W [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Spallation Neutron Source employs a high-energy pulsed proton beam incident on a mercury target to generate short bursts of neutrons. Absorption of the proton beam produces rapid heating of the mercury, resulting in the formation of acoustic shock waves and the nucleation of cavitation bubbles. The subsequent collapse of these cavitation bubbles promote erosion of the steel target walls. Preliminary measurements using two passive cavitation detectors (megahertz-frequency focused and unfocused piezoelectric transducers) installed in a mercury test target to monitor cavitation generated by proton beams with charges ranging from 0.041 to 4.1 C will be reported on. Cavitation was initially detected for a beam charge of 0.082 C by the presence of an acoustic emission approximately 250 s after arrival of the incident proton beam. This emission was consistent with an inertial cavitation collapse of a bubble with an estimated maximum bubble radius of 0.19 mm, based on collapse time. The peak pressure in the mercury for the initiation of cavitation was predicted to be 0.6 MPa. For a beam charge of 0.41 C and higher, the lifetimes of the bubbles exceeded the reverberation time of the chamber (~300 s), and distinct windows of cavitation activity were detected, a phenomenon that likely resulted from the interaction of the reverberation in the chamber and the cavitation bubbles.

  19. Effect of flour minor components on bubble growth in bread dough during proofing assessed by magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Rouillé, J; Bonny, J-M; Della Valle, G; Devaux, M F; Renou, J P

    2005-05-18

    Fermentation of dough made from standard flour for French breadmaking was followed by nuclear magnetic resonance imaging at 9.4 T. The growth of bubbles (size > 117 microm) was observed for dough density between 0.8 and 0.22 g cm(-3). Cellular structure was assessed by digital image analysis, leading to the definition of fineness and rate of bubble growth. Influence of composition was studied through fractionation by extraction of soluble fractions (6% db), by defatting (< 1% db) and by puroindolines (Pin) addition (< or = 0.1%). Addition of the soluble fraction increased the dough specific volume and bubble growth rate but decreased fineness, whereas defatting and Pin addition only increased fineness. The role of molecular components of each fraction could be related to dough elongational properties. A final comparison with baking results confirmed that the crumb cellular structure was largely defined after fermentation. PMID:15884828

  20. Cavitation effects on the confinement/deconfinement transition

    E-print Network

    Alex Buchel; Xian O. Camanho; Jose D. Edelstein

    2014-05-23

    Cavitation is a process where the viscous terms in a relativistic fluid result in reducing the effective pressure, thus facilitating the nucleation of bubbles of a stable phase. The effect is particularly pronounced in the vicinity of a (weak) first-order phase transition. We use the holographic correspondence to study cavitation in a strongly coupled planar cascading gauge theory plasma close to the confinement/deconfinement phase transition. While in this particular model the shift of the deconfinement temperature due to cavitation does not exceed 5%, we speculate that cavitation might be important near the QCD critical point.

  1. Stem xylem resistance to cavitation is related to xylem structure but not to growth and water-use efficiency at the within-population level in Populus nigra L.

    PubMed

    Guet, Justine; Fichot, Régis; Lédée, Camille; Laurans, Françoise; Cochard, Hervé; Delzon, Sylvain; Bastien, Catherine; Brignolas, Franck

    2015-08-01

    Xylem resistance to drought-induced cavitation is a key trait of plant water relations. This study assesses the genetic variation expressed for stem cavitation resistance within a population of a riparian species, the European black poplar (Populus nigra L.), and explores its relationships with xylem anatomy, water-use efficiency (WUE), and growth. Sixteen structural and physiological traits related to cavitation resistance, xylem anatomy, growth, bud phenology, and WUE were measured on 33 P. nigra genotypes grown under optimal irrigation in a 2-year-old clonal experiment in a nursery. Significant genetic variation was expressed for the xylem tension inducing 50% loss of hydraulic conductivity (?50) within the studied population, as attested by the high value of broad-sense heritability estimated for this trait (H (2) ind = 0.72). Stem cavitation resistance was associated with xylem structure: the more cavitation-resistant genotypes exhibited lower hydraulic efficiency and higher mechanical reinforcement as assessed from stem xylem cross sections. By contrast, ?50 was not significantly related to shoot height increment, total above-ground dry mass, or bulk leaf carbon isotope discrimination, a proxy for intrinsic WUE. These findings indicate that the trade-offs between xylem resistance to cavitation, hydraulic efficiency, and mechanical reinforcement can occur at the within-population level. Given that the studied genotypes were exposed to the same environmental conditions and evolutionary drivers in situ, the trade-offs detected at this scale are expected to reflect true functional relationships. PMID:25979998

  2. On fiber optic probe hydrophone measurements in a cavitating liquid.

    PubMed

    Zijlstra, Aaldert; Ohl, Claus Dieter

    2008-01-01

    The measurement of high-pressure signals is often hampered by cavitation activity. The usage of a fiber optic probe hydrophone possesses advantages over other hydrophones, yet when measuring in a cavitating liquid large variations in the signal amplitude are found; in particular when the pressure signal recovers back to positive values. With shadowgraphy the wave propagation and cavity dynamics are imaged and the important contributions of secondary shock waves emitted from collapsing cavitation bubbles are revealed. Interestingly, just adding a small amount of acidic acid reduces the cavitation activity to a large extent. With this treatment an altered primary pressure profile which does not force the cavitation bubbles close to fiber tip into collapse has been found. Thereby, the shot-to-shot variations are greatly reduced. PMID:18177133

  3. Acoustic Cavitation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Olivier Louisnard; José González-García

    2011-01-01

    \\u000a The benefit of acoustic cavitation owes to its ability to concentrate acoustic energy in small volumes. This results in temperatures\\u000a of thousands of kelvin, pressures of GPa, local accelerations 12 orders of magnitude higher than gravity, shockwaves, and\\u000a photon emission. In a few words, it converts acoustics into extreme physics.

  4. Detection of cavitation in hydraulic turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escaler, Xavier; Egusquiza, Eduard; Farhat, Mohamed; Avellan, François; Coussirat, Miguel

    2006-05-01

    An experimental investigation has been carried out in order to evaluate the detection of cavitation in actual hydraulic turbines. The methodology is based on the analysis of structural vibrations, acoustic emissions and hydrodynamic pressures measured in the machine. The proposed techniques have been checked in real prototypes suffering from different types of cavitation. In particular, one Kaplan, two Francis and one Pump-Turbine have been investigated in the field. Additionally, one Francis located in a laboratory has also been tested. First, a brief description of the general features of cavitation phenomenon is given as well as of the main types of cavitation occurring in hydraulic turbines. The work presented here is focused on the most important ones which are the leading edge cavitation due to its erosive power, the bubble cavitation because it affects the machine performance and the draft tube swirl that limits the operation stability. Cavitation detection is based on the previous understanding of the cavity dynamics and its location inside the machine. This knowledge has been gained from flow visualisations and measurements in laboratory devices such as a high-speed cavitation tunnel and a reduced scale turbine test rig. The main techniques are the study of the high frequency spectral content of the signals and of their amplitude demodulation for a given frequency band. Moreover, low frequency spectral content can also be used in certain cases. The results obtained for the various types of cavitation found in the selected machines are presented and discussed in detail in the paper. Conclusions are drawn about the best sensor, measuring location, signal processing and analysis for each type of cavitation, which serve to validate and to improve the detection techniques.

  5. Removal of Residual Nuclei Following a Cavitation Event using Low-Amplitude Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Duryea, Alexander P.; Cain, Charles A.; Tamaddoni, Hedieh A.; Roberts, William W.; Hall, Timothy L.

    2014-01-01

    Microscopic residual bubble nuclei can persist on the order of 1 second following a cavitation event. These bubbles can limit the efficacy of ultrasound therapies such as shock wave lithotripsy and histotripsy, as they attenuate pulses that arrive subsequent to their formation and seed repetitive cavitation activity at a discrete set of sites (cavitation memory). Here, we explore a strategy for the removal of these residual bubbles following a cavitation event, using low amplitude ultrasound pulses to stimulate bubble coalescence. All experiments were conducted in degassed water and monitored using high speed photography. In each case, a 2 MHz histotripsy transducer was used to initiate cavitation activity (a cavitational bubble cloud), the collapse of which generated a population of residual bubble nuclei. This residual nuclei population was then sonicated using a 1 ms pulse from a separate 500 kHz transducer, which we term the ‘bubble removal pulse.’ Bubble removal pulse amplitudes ranging from 0 to 1.7 MPa were tested, and the backlit area of shadow from bubbles remaining in the field following bubble removal was calculated to quantify efficacy. It was found that an ideal amplitude range exists (roughly 180 – 570 kPa) in which bubble removal pulses stimulate the aggregation and subsequent coalescence of residual bubble nuclei, effectively removing them from the field. Further optimization of bubble removal pulse sequences stands to provide an adjunct to cavitation-based ultrasound therapies such as shock wave lithotripsy and histotripsy, mitigating the effects of residual bubble nuclei that currently limit their efficacy. PMID:25265172

  6. Numerical study of nucleation and growth of bubbles in viscous magmas

    SciTech Connect

    Toramaru, A. [Kanazawa Univ., Kanazawa, Ishikawa (Japan)] [Kanazawa Univ., Kanazawa, Ishikawa (Japan)

    1995-02-01

    The nucleation and growth processes of bubbles in viscous magmas with a constant decompression rate have been numerically investigated based on a formation which accounts for effects of viscosity, as well as diffusivity, interfacial tension, and decompression rate. The numerical solutions show two regimes in the nucleation and growth process, a diffusion-controlled regime and a viscosity-controlled regime, mainly depending on the decompression rate, initial saturation pressure and viscosity. The basic mechanism common to both regimes is that growth governs nucleation through depletion of degassing components. In basaltic eruptions the vesiculation is essentially controlled by diffusion, and the viscosity-controlled regime is limited to very high decompression rate and very small water content. When andesitic magma saturated by water at 10 MPa is decompressed through the propagation of rarefraction wave induced by a landslide, as took place in the Mount St. Helens 1980 eruption, the vesiculation is controlled by the viscosity up to 100 m depth. On the other hand, in a rhyolitic magma for the same situation, vesiculation is controlled by the viscosity over the whole depth of the magma column. In the viscosity-controlled regime, the vesicularity may be 90% or less as seen in silicic pumice, whereas in the diffusion-controlled regime the vesicularity equals or exceeds 98% such as in reticulite in Hawaiian basalt. An observed variation of the number density of bubbles by several orders of magnitude in plinian eruptions and the correlation with the SiO2 content can be attributed approximately to the dependence of diffusivity of viscosity on SiO2 content and temperature, assuming the apparent correlation between SiO2 content and temperature of magma.

  7. Effects of acoustic parameters on bubble cloud dynamics in ultrasound tissue erosion (histotripsy)

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhen; Hall, Timothy L.; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Cain, Charles A.

    2009-01-01

    High intensity pulsed ultrasound can produce significant mechanical tissue fractionation with sharp boundaries (“histotripsy”). At a tissue-fluid interface, histotripsy produces clearly demarcated tissue erosion and the erosion efficiency depends on pulse parameters. Acoustic cavitation is believed to be the primary mechanism for the histotripsy process. To investigate the physical basis of the dependence of tissue erosion on pulse parameters, an optical method was used to monitor the effects of pulse parameters on the cavitating bubble cloud generated by histotripsy pulses at a tissue-water interface. The pulse parameters studied include pulse duration, peak rarefactional pressure, and pulse repetition frequency (PRF). Results show that the duration of growth and collapse (collapse cycle) of the bubble cloud increased with increasing pulse duration, peak rarefactional pressure, and PRF when the next pulse arrived after the collapse of the previous bubble cloud. When the PRF was too high such that the next pulse arrived before the collapse of the previous bubble cloud, only a portion of histotripsy pulses could effectively create and collapse the bubble cloud. The collapse cycle of the bubble cloud also increased with increasing gas concentration. These results may explain previous in vitro results on effects of pulse parameters on tissue erosion. PMID:17614482

  8. Bubbles and Market Crashes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael Youssefmir; Bernardo A. Huberman; Tad Hogg

    1998-01-01

    We present a dynamical theory of asset price bubbles that exhibits the appearance of bubbles and their subsequent crashes. We show that when speculative trends dominate over fundamental beliefs, bubbles form, leading to the growth of asset prices away from their fundamental value. This growth makes the system increasingly susceptible to any exogenous shock, thus eventually precipitating a crash. We

  9. Bubbles and Market Crashes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael Youssefmir; Bernardo A. Huberman; Tad Hogg

    1994-01-01

    We present a dynamical theory of asset price bubbles that exhibits the appearance of bubbles and their subsequent crashes. We show that when speculative trends dominate over fundamental beliefs, bubbles form, leading to the growth of asset prices away from their fundamental value. This growth makes the system increasingly susceptible to any exogenous shock, thus eventually precipitating a crash. We

  10. Passive cavitation imaging with ultrasound arrays Vasant A. Salgaonkar, Saurabh Datta, Christy K. Holland, and T. Douglas Masta

    E-print Network

    Mast, T. Douglas

    Passive cavitation imaging with ultrasound arrays Vasant A. Salgaonkar, Saurabh Datta, Christy K September 2009 A method is presented for passive imaging of cavitational acoustic emissions using, stable and inertial cavitation was passively imaged in saline solution sonicated at 520 kHz. Bubble

  11. JOURNAL OF MICROELECTROMECHANICAL SYSTEMS, VOL. 15, NO. 5, OCTOBER 2006 1319 Development of Cavitation in Refrigerant (R-123)

    E-print Network

    Peles, Yoav

    of Cavitation in Refrigerant (R-123) Flow Inside Rudimentary Microfluidic Systems Chandan Mishra and Yoav Peles Abstract--The existence of hydrodynamic cavitation in the flow of refrigerant (R-123) through micro-Venturis has been viewed in the form of a bubbly cavitating regime. Flow visualization discloses inchoate

  12. PIV Analysis of Cavitation Flow Characteristics of He II

    SciTech Connect

    Harada, K.; Murakami, M. [Graduate School of Systems and Information Engineering, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, 305-8573 (Japan)

    2006-04-27

    In the present experimental study cavitation phenomena in both He I and He II flows were investigated through the application of the PIV technique and visual observation under the saturated vapor pressure condition. The cavitation flow was generated in the downstream regions of a Venturi channel and a converging jet nozzle driven by a contracting metal bellows. It is seen that cavitation inception is a kind of stochastic process and has definite temperature dependence. The spatial distribution of the cavitation bubble velocity is measured by using the PIV technique. Some differences in the cavitating flow pattern and the void fraction are found between He II and He I cavitating flows. The PIV result indicates that the void fraction for He II flow is larger than that for He I flow.

  13. NUMERICAL ANALYSIS OF VAPOR BUBBLE GROWTH AND WALL HEAT TRANSFER DURING FLOW BOILING OF WATER IN A MICROCHANNEL

    E-print Network

    Kandlikar, Satish

    in various applications such as electronic chip cooling. At sufficiently high wall superheats, flow boilingNUMERICAL ANALYSIS OF VAPOR BUBBLE GROWTH AND WALL HEAT TRANSFER DURING FLOW BOILING OF WATER, the convective boiling is diminished in microchannels and nucleate boiling plays a major role with periodic flow

  14. Regulating Ultrasound Cavitation in order to Induce Reproducible Sonoporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mestas, J.-L.; Alberti, L.; El Maalouf, J.; Béra, J.-C.; Gilles, B.

    2010-03-01

    Sonoporation would be linked to cavitation, which generally appears to be a non reproducible and unstationary phenomenon. In order to obtain an acceptable trade-off between cell mortality and transfection, a regulated cavitation generator based on an acoustical cavitation measurement was developed and tested. The medium to be sonicated is placed in a sample tray. This tray is immersed in in degassed water and positioned above the face of a flat ultrasonic transducer (frequency: 445 kHz; intensity range: 0.08-1.09 W/cm2). This technical configuration was admitted to be conducive to standing-wave generation through reflection at the air/medium interface in the well thus enhancing the cavitation phenomenon. Laterally to the transducer, a homemade hydrophone was oriented to receive the acoustical signal from the bubbles. From this spectral signal recorded at intervals of 5 ms, a cavitation index was calculated as the mean of the cavitation spectrum integration in a logarithmic scale, and the excitation power is automatically corrected. The device generates stable and reproducible cavitation level for a wide range of cavitation setpoint from stable cavitation condition up to full-developed inertial cavitation. For the ultrasound intensity range used, the time delay of the response is lower than 200 ms. The cavitation regulation device was evaluated in terms of chemical bubble collapse effect. Hydroxyl radical production was measured on terephthalic acid solutions. In open loop, the results present a great variability whatever the excitation power. On the contrary the closed loop allows a great reproducibility. This device was implemented for study of sonodynamic effect. The regulation provides more reproducible results independent of cell medium and experimental conditions (temperature, pressure). Other applications of this regulated cavitation device concern internalization of different particles (Quantum Dot) molecules (SiRNA) or plasmids (GFP, DsRed) into different types of cells (AT2, RL, LLC…). Preliminary results are presented.

  15. Optic cavitation with CW lasers: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilla-Martinez, J. P.; Berrospe-Rodriguez, C.; Aguilar, G.; Ramirez-San-Juan, J. C.; Ramos-Garcia, R.

    2014-12-01

    The most common method to generate optic cavitation involves the focusing of short-pulsed lasers in a transparent liquid media. In this work, we review a novel method of optic cavitation that uses low power CW lasers incident in highly absorbing liquids. This novel method of cavitation is called thermocavitation. Light absorbed heats up the liquid beyond its boiling temperature (spinodal limit) in a time span of microseconds to milliseconds (depending on the optical intensity). Once the liquid is heated up to its spinodal limit (˜300 °C for pure water), the superheated water becomes unstable to random density fluctuations and an explosive phase transition to vapor takes place producing a fast-expanding vapor bubble. Eventually, the bubble collapses emitting a strong shock-wave. The bubble is always attached to the surface taking a semi-spherical shape, in contrast to that produced by pulsed lasers in transparent liquids, where the bubble is produced at the focal point. Using high speed video (105 frames/s), we study the bubble's dynamic behavior. Finally, we show that heat diffusion determines the water superheated volume and, therefore, the amplitude of the shock wave. A full experimental characterization of thermocavitation is described.

  16. Implementation of two-phase tritium models for helium bubbles in HCLL breeding blanket modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fradera, J.; Sedano, L.; Mas de les Valls, E.; Batet, L.

    2011-10-01

    Tritium self-sufficiency requirement of future DT fusion reactors involves large helium production rates in the breeding blankets; this might impact on the conceptual design of diverse fusion power reactor units, such as Liquid Metal (LM) blankets. Low solubility, long residence-times and high production rates create the conditions for Helium nucleation, which could mean effective T sinks in LM channels. A model for helium nano-bubble formation and tritium conjugate transport phenomena in liquid Pb17.5Li and EUROFER is proposed. In a first approximation, it has been considered that He bubbles can be represented as a passive scalar. The nucleation model is based on the classical theory and includes a simplified bubble growth model. The model captures the interaction of tritium with bubbles and tritium diffusion through walls. Results show the influence of helium cavitation on tritium inventory and the importance of simulating the system walls instead of imposing fixed boundary conditions.

  17. Bursting Bubbles and Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Wrenn, Steven P.; Dicker, Stephen M.; Small, Eleanor F.; Dan, Nily R.; Mleczko, Micha?; Schmitz, Georg; Lewin, Peter A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses various interactions between ultrasound, phospholipid monolayer-coated gas bubbles, phospholipid bilayer vesicles, and cells. The paper begins with a review of microbubble physics models, developed to describe microbubble dynamic behavior in the presence of ultrasound, and follows this with a discussion of how such models can be used to predict inertial cavitation profiles. Predicted sensitivities of inertial cavitation to changes in the values of membrane properties, including surface tension, surface dilatational viscosity, and area expansion modulus, indicate that area expansion modulus exerts the greatest relative influence on inertial cavitation. Accordingly, the theoretical dependence of area expansion modulus on chemical composition - in particular, poly (ethylene glyclol) (PEG) - is reviewed, and predictions of inertial cavitation for different PEG molecular weights and compositions are compared with experiment. Noteworthy is the predicted dependence, or lack thereof, of inertial cavitation on PEG molecular weight and mole fraction. Specifically, inertial cavitation is predicted to be independent of PEG molecular weight and mole fraction in the so-called mushroom regime. In the “brush” regime, however, inertial cavitation is predicted to increase with PEG mole fraction but to decrease (to the inverse 3/5 power) with PEG molecular weight. While excellent agreement between experiment and theory can be achieved, it is shown that the calculated inertial cavitation profiles depend strongly on the criterion used to predict inertial cavitation. This is followed by a discussion of nesting microbubbles inside the aqueous core of microcapsules and how this significantly increases the inertial cavitation threshold. Nesting thus offers a means for avoiding unwanted inertial cavitation and cell death during imaging and other applications such as sonoporation. A review of putative sonoporation mechanisms is then presented, including those involving microbubbles to deliver cargo into a cell, and those - not necessarily involving microubbles - to release cargo from a phospholipid vesicle (or reverse sonoporation). It is shown that the rate of (reverse) sonoporation from liposomes correlates with phospholipid bilayer phase behavior, liquid-disordered phases giving appreciably faster release than liquid-ordered phases. Moreover, liquid-disordered phases exhibit evidence of two release mechanisms, which are described well mathematically by enhanced diffusion (possibly via dilation of membrane phospholipids) and irreversible membrane disruption, whereas liquid-ordered phases are described by a single mechanism, which has yet to be positively identified. The ability to tune release kinetics with bilayer composition makes reverse sonoporation of phospholipid vesicles a promising methodology for controlled drug delivery. Moreover, nesting of microbubbles inside vesicles constitutes a truly “theranostic” vehicle, one that can be used for both long-lasting, safe imaging and for controlled drug delivery. PMID:23382772

  18. Evaporation-induced cavitation in nanofluidic channels

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Chuanhua; Karnik, Rohit; Lu, Ming-Chang; Majumdar, Arun

    2012-01-01

    Cavitation, known as the formation of vapor bubbles when liquids are under tension, is of great interest both in condensed matter science as well as in diverse applications such as botany, hydraulic engineering, and medicine. Although widely studied in bulk and microscale-confined liquids, cavitation in the nanoscale is generally believed to be energetically unfavorable and has never been experimentally demonstrated. Here we report evaporation-induced cavitation in water-filled hydrophilic nanochannels under enormous negative pressures up to -7 MPa. As opposed to receding menisci observed in microchannel evaporation, the menisci in nanochannels are pinned at the entrance while vapor bubbles form and expand inside. Evaporation in the channels is found to be aided by advective liquid transport, which leads to an evaporation rate that is an order of magnitude higher than that governed by Fickian vapor diffusion in macro- and microscale evaporation. The vapor bubbles also exhibit unusual motion as well as translational stability and symmetry, which occur because of a balance between two competing mass fluxes driven by thermocapillarity and evaporation. Our studies expand our understanding of cavitation and provide new insights for phase-change phenomena at the nanoscale. PMID:22343530

  19. Interaction of two bubbles produced with time difference

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Kotaro [Osaka Univ., Toyonaka (Japan); Tomita, Yukio [Hokkaido Univ. of Education, Hakodate (Japan); Shima, Akira [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Institute of Fluid Science

    1994-12-31

    Some aspects of the bubble-bubble interaction were simulated experimentally. Two cavitation bubbles were generated in water by focusing two beams released from a twin pulsed ruby laser which has a couple of ruby rods. Time deference between the former generated bubble and the latter one was controlled with a delay circuit and their dynamic behaviors were investigated by means of high-speed photography. Consequently, it is found that the bubble-bubble interaction is influenced not only by the relative size of two bubbles but also by the time difference between two bubble generations.

  20. Hydrate film growth on the surface of a gas bubble suspended in water.

    PubMed

    Peng, B Z; Dandekar, A; Sun, C Y; Luo, H; Ma, Q L; Pang, W X; Chen, G J

    2007-11-01

    The lateral film growth rate of CH4, C2H4, CO2, CH4 + C2H4, and CH4 + C3H8 hydrates in pure water were measured at four fixed temperatures of 273.4, 275.4, 277.4, and 279.4 K by means of suspending a single gas bubble in water. The results showed that the lateral growth rates of mixed-gas CH4 + C2H4 hydrate films were slower than that of pure gas (CH4 or C2H4) for the same driving force and that of mixed-gas CH4 + C3H8 hydrate film growth was the slowest. The dependence of the thickness of hydrate film on the driving force was investigated, and it was demonstrated that the thickness of hydrate film was inversely proportional to the driving force. It was found that the convective heat transfer control model reported in the literature could be used to formulate the lateral film growth rate v(f) with the driving force DeltaT perfectly for all systems after introduction of the assumption that the thickness of hydrate films is inversely proportional to the driving force DeltaT; i.e., v(f) = psiDeltaT(5/2) is correct and independent of the composition of gas and the type of hydrate. The thicknesses of different gas hydrate films were estimated, and it is demonstrated that the thicknesses of mixed-gas hydrate films were thicker than those of pure gases, which was qualitatively consistent with the experimental result. PMID:17929860

  1. The Dynamics of Bubbles and Bubble Clouds.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smereka, Peter Stenberg

    In an effort to understand acoustic cavitation noise the dynamics of periodically driven single bubbles and bubble clouds are examined. The single bubble equations are written as a perturbation of a Hamiltonian system and the conditions for resonances to occur are found, these can interact with the nonresonant orbit to produce jump and period-doubling bifurcations. To study the chaotic behavior a map which approximates the Poincare map in the resonant band is derived. The Poincare map is computed numerically which shows the formation of strange attractors which suddenly disappear leaving behind Smale horseshoe maps. The bubble cloud is studied using an averaged two-fluid model for bubbly flow with periodic driving at the boundary. The equations are examined both analytically and numerically. Local and global existence of solutions is proved and the existence of an absorbing set is established. An analysis of the linearized equations combined with estimates on the nonlinearity is used to prove the existence of nonlinear periodic orbit. This periodic orbit is a fixed point of the Poincare map and its stability is determined by finding the spectrum of the linearized Poincare map. This calculation combined with the absorbing set proves that the long term dynamics of the bubble cloud is finite dimensional. Numerical computations show the important attractors are a periodic -two orbit and a quasi-periodic orbit.

  2. Probability of cavitation for single ultrasound pulses applied to tissues and tissue-mimicking materials.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Adam D; Cain, Charles A; Hall, Timothy L; Fowlkes, J Brian; Xu, Zhen

    2013-03-01

    In this study, the negative pressure values at which inertial cavitation consistently occurs in response to a single, two-cycle, focused ultrasound pulse were measured in several media relevant to cavitation-based ultrasound therapy. The pulse was focused into a chamber containing one of the media, which included liquids, tissue-mimicking materials, and ex vivo canine tissue. Focal waveforms were measured by two separate techniques using a fiber-optic hydrophone. Inertial cavitation was identified by high-speed photography in optically transparent media and an acoustic passive cavitation detector. The probability of cavitation (P(cav)) for a single pulse as a function of peak negative pressure (p(-)) followed a sigmoid curve, with the probability approaching one when the pressure amplitude was sufficient. The statistical threshold (defined as P(cav) = 0.5) was between p(-) = 26 and 30 MPa in all samples with high water content but varied between p(-) = 13.7 and >36 MPa in other media. A model for radial cavitation bubble dynamics was employed to evaluate the behavior of cavitation nuclei at these pressure levels. A single bubble nucleus with an inertial cavitation threshold of p(-) = 28.2 megapascals was estimated to have a 2.5 nm radius in distilled water. These data may be valuable for cavitation-based ultrasound therapy to predict the likelihood of cavitation at various pressure levels and dimensions of cavitation-induced lesions in tissue. PMID:23380152

  3. Probability of cavitation for single ultrasound pulses applied to tissues and tissue-mimicking materials

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, Adam D.; Cain, Charles A.; Hall, Timothy L.; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Xu, Zhen

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the negative pressure values at which inertial cavitation consistently occurs in response to a single, 2-cycle, focused ultrasound pulse were measured in several media relevant to cavitation-based ultrasound therapy. The pulse was focused into a chamber containing one of the media, which included liquids, tissue-mimicking materials, and ex-vivo canine tissue. Focal waveforms were measured by two separate techniques using a fiber-optic hydrophone. Inertial cavitation was identified by high-speed photography in optically transparent media and an acoustic passive cavitation detector. The probability of cavitation (Pcav) for a single pulse as a function of peak negative pressure (p?) followed a sigmoid curve, with the probability approaching 1 when the pressure amplitude was sufficient. The statistical threshold (defined as Pcav = 0.5) was between p? = 26.0–30.0 MPa in all samples with a high water content, but varied between p? = 13.7 to > 36 MPa for other media. A model for radial cavitation bubble dynamics was employed to evaluate the behavior of cavitation nuclei at these pressure levels. A single bubble nucleus with an inertial cavitation threshold of p? = 28.2 MPa was estimated to have a 2.5 nm radius in distilled water. These data may be valuable for cavitation-based ultrasound therapy to predict the likelihood of cavitation at different pressure levels and dimensions of cavitation-induced lesions in tissue. PMID:23380152

  4. Hydrodynamic cavitation kills prostate cells and ablates benign prostatic hyperplasia tissue.

    PubMed

    Itah, Zeynep; Oral, Ozlem; Perk, Osman Yavuz; Sesen, Muhsincan; Demir, Ebru; Erbil, Secil; Dogan-Ekici, A Isin; Ekici, Sinan; Kosar, Ali; Gozuacik, Devrim

    2013-11-01

    Hydrodynamic cavitation is a physical phenomenon characterized by vaporization and bubble formation in liquids under low local pressures, and their implosion following their release to a higher pressure environment. Collapse of the bubbles releases high energy and may cause damage to exposed surfaces. We recently designed a set-up to exploit the destructive nature of hydrodynamic cavitation for biomedical purposes. We have previously shown that hydrodynamic cavitation could kill leukemia cells and erode kidney stones. In this study, we analyzed the effects of cavitation on prostate cells and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) tissue. We showed that hydrodynamic cavitation could kill prostate cells in a pressure- and time-dependent manner. Cavitation did not lead to programmed cell death, i.e. classical apoptosis or autophagy activation. Following the application of cavitation, we observed no prominent DNA damage and cells did not arrest in the cell cycle. Hence, we concluded that cavitation forces directly damaged the cells, leading to their pulverization. Upon application to BPH tissues from patients, cavitation could lead to a significant level of tissue destruction. Therefore similar to ultrasonic cavitation, we propose that hydrodynamic cavitation has the potential to be exploited and developed as an approach for the ablation of aberrant pathological tissues, including BPH. PMID:24047796

  5. Cell growth-promoting activity of fluid from eye sacs of the bubble-eye goldfish (Carassius auratus).

    PubMed

    Sawatari, Etsuko; Hashimoto, Hisashi; Matsumura, Takaharu; Iwata, Yasuhiro; Yamamoto, Naoki; Yokoyama, Yoshihiro; Wakamatsu, Yuko

    2009-04-01

    The growth-promoting effects of fish body fluids, such as serum and embryonic extract, on fish cell cultures have been widely demonstrated. The bubble-eye variety of aquarium goldfish is characterized as having a large sac filled with fluid (sac fluid) under each eye. These sacs are believed to contain lymph, which is similar in composition to serum or blood plasma. In order to test whether the sac fluid can be used as an additive for fetal bovine serum (FBS) in growth factor supplements, we compared cell growth in media containing FBS together with different concentrations of sac fluid. A dose-dependent growth-promotion effect was observed in early passage caudal fin cells from both medaka and zebrafish. Cell-growth promotion was also confirmed in early passage medaka blastula cells and in a zebrafish embryonic cell line (ZF4). Replacement of the fluid in the eye sacs of bubble-eyes occurs within a couple of months after the sac fluid has been harvested, and the cell-growth promoting activity of the new fluid is similar to that of the fluid that was tapped initially. These findings suggest that sac fluid can be used as a growth-promoting supplement for fish cell culture. Importantly, the ability of the goldfish to replace the fluid combined with the fact that equipotent fluid can be repeatedly harvested from the eye sacs means that a sustainable source of the fluid can be obtained without needing to sacrifice the fish. PMID:19798918

  6. Cavitation erosion as a kind of dynamic damage

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. N. Buravova; Yu. A. Gordopolov

    The purpose of this work is to show that the spherical shock waves arising in a liquid during cavitation bubble collapse can\\u000a lead to formation of deep needle-like pits on the solid surface. The nature of dynamic damage during cavitation erosion is\\u000a the spallation caused by interference of rarefaction waves. Rarefaction at spherical wave impact arises when the velocity\\u000a of

  7. Observation of a cavitation cloud in tissue using correlation between ultrafast ultrasound images.

    PubMed

    Prieur, Fabrice; Zorgani, Ali; Catheline, Stefan; Souchon, Remi; Mestas, Jean-Louis; Lafond, Maxime; Lafon, Cyril

    2015-07-01

    The local application of ultrasound is known to improve drug intake by tumors. Cavitating bubbles are one of the contributing effects. A setup in which two ultrasound transducers are placed confocally is used to generate cavitation in ex vivo tissue. As the transducers emit a series of short excitation bursts, the evolution of the cavitation activity is monitored using an ultrafast ultrasound imaging system. The frame rate of the system is several thousands of images per second, which provides several tens of images between consecutive excitation bursts. Using the correlation between consecutive images for speckle tracking, a decorrelation of the imaging signal appears due to the creation, fast movement, and dissolution of the bubbles in the cavitation cloud. By analyzing this area of decorrelation, the cavitation cloud can be localized and the spatial extent of the cavitation activity characterized. PMID:26168172

  8. FOREWORD: International Symposium of Cavitation and Multiphase Flow (ISCM 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yulin

    2015-01-01

    The International Symposium on Cavitation and Multiphase Flow (ISCM 2014) was held in Beijing, China during 18th-21st October, 2014, which was jointly organized by Tsinghua University, Beijing, China and Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, China. The co-organizer was the State Key Laboratory of Hydroscience and Engineering, Beijing, China. Cavitation and multiphase flow is one of paramount topics of fluid mechanics with many engineering applications covering a broad range of topics, e.g. hydraulic machinery, biomedical engineering, chemical and process industry. In order to improve the performances of engineering facilities (e.g. hydraulic turbines) and to accelerate the development of techniques for medical treatment of serious diseases (e.g. tumors), it is essential to improve our understanding of cavitation and Multiphase Flow. For example, the present development towards the advanced hydrodynamic systems (e.g. space engine, propeller, hydraulic machinery system) often requires that the systems run under cavitating conditions and the risk of cavitation erosion needs to be controlled. The purpose of the ISCM 2014 was to discuss the state-of-the-art cavitation and multiphase flow research and their up-to-date applications, and to foster discussion and exchange of knowledge, and to provide an opportunity for the researchers, engineers and graduate students to report their latest outputs in these fields. Furthermore, the participants were also encouraged to present their work in progress with short lead time and discuss the encountered problems. ISCM 2014 covers all aspects of cavitation and Multiphase Flow, e.g. both fundamental and applied research with a focus on physical insights, numerical modelling and applications in engineering. Some specific topics are: Cavitating and Multiphase Flow in hydroturbines, pumps, propellers etc. Numerical simulation techniques Cavitation and multiphase flow erosion and anti-erosion techniques Measurement techniques for cavitation and multiphase flow detection Fluid-structure interaction induced by cavitation and multiphase flow Multi-scale modelling of cavitating flows and Multiphase Flow Cavitation nuclei: theory and experiments Supercavitation and its applications Synergetic effects of cavitation and silt-laden erosion Shock waves and microjets generated by cavitation Nonlinear oscillations of gas and vapour bubbles Fundamentals of physics of acoustic cavitation Sonochemistry and sonoluminescence Biomedical applications of cavitation effects Ultrasonic cavitation for molten metal treatment Cavitation for enhanced heat transfer The ISCM 2014 brought together 95 scientists, researchers and graduate students from 11 countries, affiliated with universities, technology centers and industrial firms to debate topics related to advanced technologies for cavitation and Multiphase Flow, which would enhance the sustainable development of cavitation and Multiphase Flow in interdisciplinary sciences and technology. The technical committee selected 54 technical papers on the following topics: (i) Hydrodynamic Cavitation, (ii) Super Cavitation, (iii) Pump Cavitation, (iv) Acoustic Cavitation, (v) Interdisciplinary Research of Cavitation and Multi-Phase Flows, and 13 invited plenary and invited forum lectures, which were presented at the symposium, to be included in the proceedings. All the papers of ISCM 2014, which are published in this Volume of IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering, had been peer reviewed through processes administered by the editors of the ISCM 2014, those are Yulin WU, Shouqi YUAN, Zhengwei WANG, Shuhong LIU, Xingqi LUO, Fujun WANG and Guoyu WANG. The papers published in this Volume include 54 technical papers and 3 full length texts of the invited lectures. We sincerely hope that the International Symposium on Cavitation and Multiphase Flow is a significant step forward in the world wide efforts to address the present challenges in the modern science and technology. Professor Yulin WU Chairman of the Local Organizing Committee International Symposium on Cavitat

  9. Synchronized passive imaging of single cavitation events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gateau, Jérôme; Aubry, Jean-François; Pernot, Mathieu; Chauvet, Daurian; Boch, Anne-Laure; Fink, Mathias; Tanter, Mickaël

    2011-09-01

    Passive cavitation detection techniques are usually of relatively low sensitivity to single cavitation events. Moreover, a single-element transducer is generally used, so that the spatial localization of these cavitation events is not possible, or is limited to the probing volume. To both detect and localize single cavitation events over an extended volume, the following experimental set-up has been used and validated: cavitation is induced with a focused single-element transducer (mean frequency 660 kHz, f? = 1) driven by a high power (up to 5 kW) electric burst of a few cycles, and the acoustic emission of the bubbles is recorded on a standard linear array (4-7 MHz), mounted on the side of the single element to probe its focal spot. Both the frequencies and the geometry used are appropriate to in vivo implementation. The recording of ultrasonic radio-frequency (RF) data was performed simultaneously on 64 channels of the array and was synchronized with the pulsed excitation. A single cavitation event results in a high frequency and coherent wave front on the RF data. Thanks to synchronization, these RF data are beam-formed to localize the event with a axial resolution of 0.3 mm. A small number of discrete events could also be separated with this method. Besides, B-mode images obtained with the linear array prior to passive detection allowed the positioning of the events within the tissue structure. This technique has been used first ex vivo on freshly harve pig and sheep thigh muscle: with a two cycle excitation, a 9 MPa cavitation threshold was found. Cavitation detection was also achieved in vivo with a five cycle burst excitation in sheep thigh muscle for a peak acoustic pressure of 11MPa. This technique could provide useful information in order to better understand, control and monitor the initiation phase of the histotripsy process.

  10. The effects of orientation angle, subcooling, heat flux, mass flux, and pressure on bubble growth and detachment in subcooled flow boiling

    E-print Network

    Sugrue, Rosemary M

    2012-01-01

    The effects of orientation angle, subcooling, heat flux, mass flux, and pressure on bubble growth and detachment in subcooled flow boiling were studied using a high-speed video camera in conjunction with a two-phase flow ...

  11. In situ high-pressure and high-temperature bubble growth in silicic melts

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    in a superheated infinite one-phase system [2] to many identical cells of one bubble surrounded by melt, in which diffusion in the melt, viscous deformation of the melt, and mass balance of volatiles at the bubble temperature using heating stage devices [8, 9 and 10]. These in situ methods allow the direct observation

  12. Repeated growth and bubbling transfer of graphene with millimetre-size single-crystal grains using platinum

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Libo Gao; Wencai Ren; Huilong Xu; Li Jin; Zhenxing Wang; Teng Ma; Lai-Peng Ma; Zhiyong Zhang; Qiang Fu; Lian-Mao Peng; Xinhe Bao; Hui-Ming Cheng

    2012-01-01

    Large single-crystal graphene is highly desired and important for the applications of graphene in electronics, as grain boundaries between graphene grains markedly degrade its quality and properties. Here we report the growth of millimetre-sized hexagonal single-crystal graphene and graphene films joined from such grains on Pt by ambient-pressure chemical vapour deposition. We report a bubbling method to transfer these single

  13. A second order coupled level set and volume-of-fluid method for computing growth and collapse of vapor bubbles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark Sussman

    2003-01-01

    We present a coupled level set\\/volume-of-fluid method for computing growth and collapse of vapor bubbles. The liquid is assumed incompressible and the vapor is assumed to have constant pressure in space. Second order algorithms are used for finding “mass conserving” extension velocities, for discretizing the local interfacial curvature and also for the discretization of the cell-centered projection step. Convergence studies

  14. Experimental study and modeling of swelling and bubble growth in carbon nanofiber filled mesophase pitch during carbonization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calebrese, Christopher

    Graphite and all carbon bipolar plates show corrosion resistance in fuel cells and provide good electrical conductivity. These materials typically need to be individually machined, a time consuming and costly process. Mesophase pitch is used to manufacture carbon fibers and carbon-carbon composites. This material provides a good starting point for the production of a moldable, all carbon bipolar plate. However, processing of mesophase pitch to produce all carbon materials requires a time intensive oxidation step to prevent swelling during carbonization. In this work, carbon nanofibers were used to reduce swelling in mesophase pitch. It was found that the increase in viscosity with the addition of carbon nanofibers was responsible for the reduction in swelling. The influence of the filler became apparent above the percolation threshold. At loadings below the percolation threshold, the swelling of the mesophase pitch was not reduced after carbonization. The swelling of the mesophase pitch at a given carbon nanofiber loading was also dependent on the length of the carbon nanofibers. Longer carbon nanofibers led to greater increases in the viscosity of the melt and thus led to greater reduction in swelling. The final carbon product was evaluated for use as a low temperature fuel cell bipolar plate material. Constraining the mesophase pitch during carbonization led to a final product with strength and electrical conductivity comparable to current composite bipolar plate materials. The addition of micron size chopped glass fibers with a softening point near 850°C and carbon nanofibers led to a final product with air permeability less than that of graphite. A spherically symmetric, single bubble growth model was also developed. The model included temperature dependence, liquid to bubble mass transfer and reactions in the system. Results from simulations showed that that the increase in viscosity due to the addition of carbon nanofibers slows the growth of bubbles, but that the time scale of single bubble growth is much shorter than the time over which the foam grows. The single bubble growth model was deemed to be applicable to low loadings of carbon nanofiber, where the bubble size distribution in the final foam is narrow.

  15. Numerical simulation of viscous cavitating flow around a ship propeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhi-Feng; Fang, Shi-Liang; Wang, Xiao-Yan; Meng, Zhao-Wen; Liu, Ping-Xiang; Du, Xuan-Min

    2011-09-01

    In the present study, cavitation and a ship propeller wake are reported by computed fluid dynamics based on viscous multiphase flow theory. Some recent validation results with a hybrid grid based on unsteady Navier-Stokes (N-S) and bubble dynamics equations are presented to predict velocity, pressure and vapor volume fraction in propeller wake in a uniform inflow. Numerical predictions of sheet cavitation, tip vortex cavitation and hub vortex cavitation are in agreement with the experimental data, same as numerical predictions of longitudinal and transversal evolution of the axial velocity. Blade and shaft rate frequency of propeller is well predicted by the computed results of pressure, and tip vortex is the most important to generate the pressure field within the near wake. The overall results indicate that the present approach is reliable for prediction of cavitation and propeller wake on the condition of uniform inflow.

  16. Numerical prediction of impacts of cavitation in pumps for power generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedlá?, M.; Šoukal, J.; Krátký, T.; Vyroubal, M.

    2015-06-01

    The article describes the possibilities of the numerical modelling of cavitating flow in high-performance pumps for power generation. Three main adverse effects of cavitation and their analysis are discussed with some practical examples. Numerical analysis is based both on the commercial CFD code and the inhouse software solving the Rayleigh-Plesset equation along flow trajectories. Cavitation bubbles at the same time are presented as active (not passive) impurity which interacts with fluid during the phase transitions.

  17. Characteristics of mechanical heart valve cavitation in a pneumatic ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hwansung; Taenaka, Yoshiyuki

    2008-06-01

    In previous studies, we investigated the mechanism of mechanical heart valve (MHV) cavitation and cavitation intensity with a nonsynchronized experiment system. Our group is currently developing a pneumatic ventricular assist device (PVAD), and in this study we investigated MHV cavitation intensity in the PVAD using a synchronized analysis of the cavitation images and the acoustic signal of cavitation bubbles. A 23-mm Medtronic Hall valve with an opening angle of 70 degrees was mounted in the mitral position of the PVAD after removing the sewing ring. A function generator provided a square signal, which used the trigger signal of the electrocardiogram R wave (ECG-R) mode of the control-drive console for circulatory support. This square signal was delayed by a delay circuit and was then used as the trigger signal for a pressure sensor and a high-speed video camera. The data were stored using a digital oscilloscope at a 1-MHz sampling rate, and then the pressure signal was band-pass filtered between 35 and 200 kHz using a digital filter. The band-pass filtered root mean squared (RMS) pressure and cavitation cycle duration were used as an index of cavitation intensity. The cavitation bubbles were concentrated at the valve stop, and the cavitation cycle duration and RMS pressure increased as the heart rate and driving pressure increased. At the low valve-closing velocity, bubble cavitation was observed near the valve stop. However, at the fast valve-closing velocity, cloud cavitation was observed. A high-frequency signal wave was generated when the bubbles collapsed. The cavitation cycle duration and RMS pressure increased as the valve-closing velocity increased linearly. PMID:18422801

  18. Character of the cavitation erosion on selected metallic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mlkvik, Marek; Olšiak, Róbert; Knížat, Branislav; Jedelský, Jan

    2014-03-01

    It's well known, that the imploding cavitation bubbles causes the damage on the solid surfaces. This process is then dangerous for the mechanical parts of the hydraulic machines. Proposed article dealing with the analysis of the type of the damage caused by the cavitation erosion according to the selected metallic material of the specimen. As is shown in the article, the type of the damage has a realtion to the hydraulic parameters of the flow (velocity, cavitation number). The optical and weight measerument methods will be used for the anlysis.

  19. An efficient treatment strategy for histotripsy by removing cavitation memory.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tzu-Yin; Xu, Zhen; Hall, Timothy L; Fowlkes, J Brian; Cain, Charles A

    2012-05-01

    Cavitation memory effects occur when remnants of cavitation bubbles (nuclei) persist in the host medium and act as seeds for subsequent events. In pulsed cavitational ultrasound therapy, or histotripsy, this effect may cause cavitation to repeatedly occur at these seeded locations within a target volume, producing inhomogeneous tissue fractionation or requiring an excess number of pulses to completely homogenize the target volume. We hypothesized that by removing the cavitation memory, i.e., the persistent nuclei, the cavitation bubbles could be induced at random locations in response to each pulse; therefore, complete disruption of a tissue volume may be achieved with fewer pulses. To test the hypothesis, the cavitation memory was passively removed by increasing the intervals between successive pulses, ?t, from 2, 10, 20, 50 and 100, to 200 ms. Histotripsy treatments were performed in red blood cell tissue phantoms and ex vivo livers using 1-MHz ultrasound pulses of 10 cycles at P-/P+ pressure of 21/59 MPa. The phantom study allowed for direct visualization of the cavitation patterns and the lesion development process in real time using high-speed photography; the ex vivo tissue study provided validation of the memory effect in real tissues. Results of the phantom study showed an exponential decrease in the correlation coefficient between cavitation patterns in successive pulses from 0.5 ± 0.1 to 0.1 ± 0.1 as ?t increased from 2-200 ms; correspondingly, the lesion was completely fractionated with significantly fewer pulses for longer ?ts. In the tissue study, given the same number of therapy pulses, complete and homogeneous tissue fractionation with well-defined lesion boundaries was achieved only for ?t ? 100 ms. These results indicated that the removal of the cavitation memory resulted in more efficient treatments and homogeneous lesions. PMID:22402025

  20. AN EFFICIENT TREATMENT STRATEGY FOR HISTOTRIPSY BY REMOVING CAVITATION MEMORY

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tzu-Yin; Xu, Zhen; Hall, Timothy L.; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Cain, Charles A.

    2012-01-01

    Cavitation memory effects occur when remnants of cavitation bubbles (nuclei) persist in the host medium and act as seeds for subsequent events. In pulsed cavitational ultrasound therapy, or histotripsy, this effect may cause cavitation to repeatedly occur at these seeded locations within a target volume, producing inhomogeneous tissue fractionation or requiring an excess number of pulses to completely homogenize the target volume. We hypothesized that by removing the cavitation memory, i.e., the persistent nuclei, the cavitation bubbles could be induced at random locations in response to each pulse; therefore, complete disruption of a tissue volume may be achieved with fewer pulses. To test the hypothesis, the cavitation memory was passively removed by increasing the intervals between successive pulses, ?t, from 2, 10, 20, 50 and 100, to 200 ms. Histotripsy treatments were performed in red blood cell tissue phantoms and ex vivo livers using 1-MHz ultrasound pulses of 10 cycles at P?/P+ pressure of 21/59 MPa. The phantom study allowed for direct visualization of the cavitation patterns and the lesion development process in real time using high-speed photography; the ex vivo tissue study provided validation of the memory effect in real tissues. Results of the phantom study showed an exponential decrease in the correlation coefficient between cavitation patterns in successive pulses from 0.5 ± 0.1 to 0.1 ± 0.1 as ?t increased from 2–200 ms; correspondingly, the lesion was completely fractionated with significantly fewer pulses for longer ?ts. In the tissue study, given the same number of therapy pulses, complete and homogeneous tissue fractionation with well-defined lesion boundaries was achieved only for ?t ? 100 ms. These results indicated that the removal of the cavitation memory resulted in more efficient treatments and homogeneous lesions. PMID:22402025

  1. Quantitative observations of cavitation activity in a viscoelastic medium.

    PubMed

    Collin, Jamie R T; Coussios, Constantin C

    2011-11-01

    Quantitative experimental observations of single-bubble cavitation in viscoelastic media that would enable validation of existing models are presently lacking. In the present work, single bubble cavitation is induced in an agar gel using a 1.15 MHz high intensity focused ultrasound transducer, and observed using a focused single-element passive cavitation detection (PCD) transducer. To enable quantitative observations, a full receive calibration is carried out of a spherically focused PCD system by a bistatic scattering substitution technique that uses an embedded spherical scatterer and a hydrophone. Adjusting the simulated pressure received by the PCD by the transfer function on receive and the frequency-dependent attenuation of agar gel enables direct comparison of the measured acoustic emissions with those predicted by numerical modeling of single-bubble cavitation using a modified Keller-Miksis approach that accounts for viscoelasticity of the surrounding medium. At an incident peak rarefactional pressure near the cavitation threshold, period multiplying is observed in both experiment and numerical model. By comparing the two sets of results, an estimate of the equilibrium bubble radius in the experimental observations can be made, with potential for extension to material parameter estimation. Use of these estimates yields good agreement between model and experiment. PMID:22088001

  2. Gauging the likelihood of stable cavitation from ultrasound contrast agents

    PubMed Central

    Bader, Kenneth B; Holland, Christy K

    2015-01-01

    The mechanical index (MI) was formulated to gauge the likelihood of adverse bioeffects from inertial cavitation. However, the MI formulation did not consider bubble activity from stable cavitation. This type of bubble activity can be readily nucleated from ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) and has the potential to promote beneficial bioeffects. Here, the presence of stable cavitation is determined numerically by tracking the onset of subharmonic oscillations within a population of bubbles for frequencies up to 7 MHz and peak rarefactional pressures up to 3 MPa. In addition, the acoustic pressure rupture threshold of an UCA population was determined using the Marmottant model. The threshold for subharmonic emissions of optimally sized bubbles was found to be lower than the inertial cavitation threshold for all frequencies studied. The rupture thresholds of optimally sized UCAs were found to be lower than the threshold for subharmonic emissions for either single cycle or steady state acoustic excitations. Because the thresholds of both subharmonic emissions and UCA rupture are linearly dependent on frequency, an index of the form ICAV = Pr/f (where Pr is the peak rarefactional pressure in MPa and f is the frequency in MHz) was derived to gauge the likelihood of subharmonic emissions due to stable cavitation activity nucleated from UCAs. PMID:23221109

  3. Creation of cavitation activity in a microfluidic device through acoustically driven capillary waves

    E-print Network

    Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    devices. The substrate to which the PDMS is bonded was forced into oscillation with a simple piezoelectric approach is through intense ultrasound to induce cavitation in the micro- fluidic channels. So far, few oscillating bubbles attached to walls. Reports on violent acoustic cavitation extending to the bulk

  4. The Role of Acoustic Cavitation in Ultrasound-triggered Drug Release from Echogenic Liposomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopechek, Jonathan A.

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in the United States and globally. CVD-related mortality, including coronary heart disease, heart failure, or stroke, generally occurs due to atherosclerosis, a condition in which plaques build up within arterial walls, potentially causing blockage or rupture. Targeted therapies are needed to achieve more effective treatments. Echogenic liposomes (ELIP), which consist of a lipid membrane surrounding an aqueous core, have been developed to encapsulate a therapeutic agent and/or gas bubbles for targeted delivery and ultrasound image enhancement. Under certain conditions ultrasound can cause nonlinear bubble growth and collapse, known as "cavitation." Cavitation activity has been associated with enhanced drug delivery across cellular membranes. However, the mechanisms of ultrasound-mediated drug release from ELIP have not been previously investigated. Thus, the objective of this dissertation is to elucidate the role of acoustic cavitation in ultrasound-mediated drug release from ELIP. To determine the acoustic and physical properties of ELIP, the frequency-dependent attenuation and backscatter coefficients were measured between 3 and 30 MHz. The results were compared to a theoretical model by measuring the ELIP size distribution in order to determine properties of the lipid membrane. It was found that ELIP have a broad size distribution and can provide enhanced ultrasound image contrast across a broad range of clinically-relevant frequencies. Calcein, a hydrophilic fluorescent dye, and papaverine, a lipophilic vasodilator, were separately encapsulated in ELIP and exposed to color Doppler ultrasound pulses from a clinical diagnostic ultrasound scanner in a flow system. Spectrophotometric techniques (fluorescence and absorbance measurements) were used to detect calcein or papaverine release. As a positive control, Triton X-100 (a non-ionic detergent) was added to ELIP samples not exposed to ultrasound in order to release encapsulated agents completely. Also, sham samples without Triton X-100 or ultrasound exposure were used as negative controls. Color Doppler ultrasound did not release encapsulated calcein or papaverine from ELIP even though there was a complete loss of echogenicity. In subsequent experiments, calcein and rosiglitazone, a hydrophobic anti-diabetic drug, were separately encapsulated in ELIP and exposed to pulsed Doppler ultrasound in a flow system while monitoring cavitation. Samples were exposed to ultrasound pressures above and below cavitation thresholds. In addition, Triton X-100 was used for positive control samples and sham samples were also tested without ultrasound exposure. Adding Triton X-100 resulted in complete release of encapsulated calcein or rosiglitzone. However, Doppler ultrasound exposure did not induce calcein or rosiglitazone release from ELIP in the flow system even when there was persistent cavitation activity and a loss of echogenicity. The results of this dissertation indicate that cavitation of encapsulated bubbles in ELIP solutions is not sufficient to induce drug release. It is possible that ultrasoundmediated thermal processes may have a stronger effect on ELIP permeability than cavitation activity. Perhaps ultrasound-triggered drug release will be possible by improving the ELIP formulation or encapsulating a different gas instead of air. However, cavitation is not a reliable indicator of ultrasound-mediated drug release with the ELIP formulations used in this dissertation.

  5. Bubble size distribution in acoustic droplet vaporization via dissolution using an ultrasound wide-beam method.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shanshan; Zong, Yujin; Li, Wusong; Zhang, Siyuan; Wan, Mingxi

    2014-05-01

    Performance and efficiency of numerous cavitation enhanced applications in a wide range of areas depend on the cavitation bubble size distribution. Therefore, cavitation bubble size estimation would be beneficial for biological and industrial applications that rely on cavitation. In this study, an acoustic method using a wide beam with low pressure is proposed to acquire the time intensity curve of the dissolution process for the cavitation bubble population and then determine the bubble size distribution. Dissolution of the cavitation bubbles in saline and in phase-shift nanodroplet emulsion diluted with undegassed or degassed saline was obtained to quantify the effects of pulse duration (PD) and acoustic power (AP) or peak negative pressure (PNP) of focused ultrasound on the size distribution of induced cavitation bubbles. It was found that an increase of PD will induce large bubbles while AP had only a little effect on the mean bubble size in saline. It was also recognized that longer PD and higher PNP increases the proportions of large and small bubbles, respectively, in suspensions of phase-shift nanodroplet emulsions. Moreover, degassing of the suspension tended to bring about smaller mean bubble size than the undegassed suspension. In addition, condensation of cavitation bubble produced in diluted suspension of phase-shift nanodroplet emulsion was involved in the calculation to discuss the effect of bubble condensation in the bubble size estimation in acoustic droplet vaporization. It was shown that calculation without considering the condensation might underestimate the mean bubble size and the calculation with considering the condensation might have more influence over the size distribution of small bubbles, but less effect on that of large bubbles. Without or with considering bubble condensation, the accessible minimum bubble radius was 0.4 or 1.7 ?m and the step size was 0.3 ?m. This acoustic technique provides an approach to estimate the size distribution of cavitation bubble population in opaque media and might be a promising tool for applications where it is desirable to tune the ultrasound parameters to control the size distribution of cavitation bubbles. PMID:24360840

  6. Cavitation phenomena in extracorporeal microexplosion lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomita, Y.; Obara, T.; Takayama, K.; Kuwahara, M.

    1994-09-01

    An experimental investigation was made of cavitation phenomena induced by underwater shock wave focusing applied to the extracorporeal microexplosion lithotripsy (microexplosion ESWL). Firstly an underwater microexplosion generated by detonation of a 10 mg silver azide pellet was studied and secondly underwater shock focusing and its induced cavitation phenomena were investgated. Underwater shock wave was focused by using a semi-ellipsoidal reflector in which a shock wave generated at the first focal point of the reflector was reflected and focused at the second focal point. It is found that an explosion product gas bubble did not produce any distinct rebound shocks. Meantime cavitation appeared after shock focusing at the second focal point where expansion waves originated at the exit of the reflector were simultaneously collected. A shock/bubble interaction is found to contribute not only to urinary tract stone disintegration but also tissue damage. The cavitation effect associated with the microexplosion ESWL was weaker in comparison with a spark discharge ESWL. The microexplosion ESWL is an effective method which can minimize the number of shock exposures hence decreasing tissue damage by conducting precise positioning of urinary tract stones.

  7. Analytical and experimental study of the acoustics and the flow field characteristics of cavitating self-resonating water jets

    SciTech Connect

    Chahine, G.L.; Genoux, P.F.; Johnson, V.E. Jr.; Frederick, G.S.

    1984-09-01

    Waterjet nozzles (STRATOJETS) have been developed which achieve passive structuring of cavitating submerged jets into discrete ring vortices, and which possess cavitation incipient numbers six times higher than obtained with conventional cavitating jet nozzles. In this study we developed analytical and numerical techniques and conducted experimental work to gain an understanding of the basic phenomena involved. The achievements are: (1) a thorough analysis of the acoustic dynamics of the feed pipe to the nozzle; (2) a theory for bubble ring growth and collapse; (3) a numerical model for jet simulation; (4) an experimental observation and analysis of candidate second-generation low-sigma STRATOJETS. From this study we can conclude that intensification of bubble ring collapse and design of highly resonant feed tubes can lead to improved drilling rates. The models here described are excellent tools to analyze the various parameters needed for STRATOJET optimizations. Further analysis is needed to introduce such important factors as viscosity, nozzle-jet interaction, and ring-target interaction, and to develop the jet simulation model to describe the important fine details of the flow field at the nozzle exit.

  8. Non-Newtonian effects on flow-generated cavitation and on cavitation in a pressure field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, A. T.; Ting, R. Y.

    1974-01-01

    Observations are presented which show that the stresses in a flow field of very dilute polymer are not well enough described by the Navier-Stokes equations to accurately predict cavitation. The contitutive equation for the particular polymer and concentration used is needed. The second-order fluid form in which accelerations are relatively important appears capable of explaining observed cavitation suppression by changing the pressure field due to flow. Bubble dynamics in stationary dilute polymer solutions are also examined and found to be little different from those in water.

  9. On the origin and acoustical behaviour of cloud cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buist, Jakob

    Cavitation noise, produced by ship propellers, is addressed. Here, cavitation is defined as the occurrence and physical behavior of vapor filled voids in a fluid flow. These cavities, which arise in low pressure areas, are carried with the flow and implode in high pressure regions. The subsequent oscillations produce high noise levels both on-board the ship concerned and in the far field. In particular, an investigation into the problem of how to provide rules for the prediction of cavitation noise, based upon measurements on model scale, is made. On model scale, all similarity conditions cannot be satisfied simultaneously, and hence, scaling rules are needed. Up to now the scaling rules, which are given in the literature, are obtained by considering the behavior of individual bubbles. In practical situations, however, bubble clouds are observed, in which interactions between bubbles are of utmost importance. The issues addressed cover: the prediction of cloud cavitation noise; the relative importance of cluster formation in bubble mixtures; and the origin of bubble clouds.

  10. OPTIC CAVITATION W. Lauterborn

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    OPTIC CAVITATION W. Lauterborn Drittes Physikaliseh.es Institute Universitat Gottingen, Bifrgerstr cavitation, i.e. the formation of cavities in* liquids by light and their dynamics. 1. Introduction.- The phenomenon of cavitation has a long history. Perhaps the first to care about this effect, the rupture

  11. Bubble dynamics in N dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klotz, Alexander R.

    2013-08-01

    Cavitation and bubble dynamics are central concepts in engineering, the natural sciences, and the mathematics of fluid mechanics. Due to the nonlinear nature of their dynamics, the governing equations are not fully solvable. Here, the dynamics of a spherical bubble in an N-dimensional fluid are discussed in the hope that examining bubble behavior in N dimensions will add insight to their behavior in three dimensions. Several canonical results in bubble dynamics are re-derived, including the Rayleigh collapse time, the Rayleigh-Plesset equation, and the Minnaert frequency. Recent analytical approximations to the Rayleigh collapse are discussed, and the N-dimensional generalization is used to resolve a known discrepancy. Numerical simulations are used to examine the onset of nonlinear behavior. Overall, the dynamics of bubbles are faster at higher dimensions, with nonlinear behavior occurring at lower strain. Several features are found to be unique to three dimensions, including the trend of nonlinear behavior and apparent coincidences in timescales.

  12. Formation, growth and dissociation of He bubbles in Al 2O 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Huis, M. A.; van Veen, A.; Labohm, F.; Fedorov, A. V.; Schut, H.; Kooi, B. J.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.

    2004-02-01

    The formation and dissociation of helium bubbles and helium desorption are investigated in sapphire Al 2O 3(0 0 0 1) implanted with 30 keV He ions to four different doses of 0.1, 0.3, 1.0 and 2.0 × 10 16 ions cm -2. The samples were annealed isochronally up to 1850 K in steps of 100 K. The techniques of Doppler broadening positron beam analysis (PBA) and neutron depth profiling (NDP) were used to investigate defect evolution and helium retention, respectively, during the annealing procedure. It was observed that the maximum bubble volume is found after 1250 K annealing, after which a process of bubble shrinkage sets in. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM) was performed on the sample that was implanted with the highest-dose (2.0 × 10 16 He ions cm -2) after annealing at 1250 K. It was found that the bubbles are shaped as discs lying parallel with the surface and that the average bubble size is 5.5 nm. In all samples, helium is released mainly at a temperature of 1750 K. The desorption curves were analyzed by means of a permeation model. The activation energy for permeation was found as 4.0 eV.

  13. Elasticity effects on cavitation in a squeeze film damper undergoing noncentered circular whirl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewe, David E.

    1988-01-01

    Elasticity of the liner and its effects on cavitation were numerically determined for a squeeze film damper subjected to dynamic loading. The loading was manifested as a prescribed motion of the rotor undergoing noncentered circular whirl. The boundary conditions were implemented using Elrod's algorithm which conserves lineal mass flux through the moving cavitation bubble as well as the oil film region of the damper. Computational movies were used to analyze the rapidly changing pressures and vapor bubble dynamics throughout the dynamic cycle for various flexibilities in the damper liner. The effects of liner elasticity on cavitation were only noticeable for the intermediate and high values of viscosity used in this study.

  14. Impact of bubble size on growth and CO2 uptake of Arthrospira (Spirulina) platensis KMMCC CY-007.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kisok; Choi, Jaeho; Ji, Yosep; Park, Soyoung; Do, Hyungki; Hwang, Cherwon; Lee, Bongju; Holzapfel, Wilhelm

    2014-10-01

    Optimisation of cyanobacterial cell productivity should consider the key factors light cycle and carbon source. We studied the influence of CO2 bubble size on carbon uptake and fixation, on basis of mRNA expression levels in Arthrospira platensis KMMCC CY-007 at 30°C (light intensity: 40?molm(-2)s(-1); 1% CO2). Growth rate, carbon fixation and lipid accumulation were examined over 7days under fine bubble (FB) (100?m Ø) bulk bubble (BB) (5000?m Ø) and non-CO2 (NB) aeration. The low affinity CO2 uptake mRNA (NDH-I4 complex) was stronger expressed than the high affinity NDH-I3 complex (bicA and sbtA) under 1% CO2 and FB conditions, with no expression of bicA1 and sbtA1 after 4days. The high affinity CO2 uptake mRNA levels corresponded to biomass, carbon content and lipid accumulation, and increase in NDH-I3 complex (9.72-fold), bicA (5.69-fold), and sbtA (10.61-fold), compared to NB, or BB conditions. PMID:25151075

  15. Evaluation and interpretation of bubble size distributions in pulsed megasonic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauptmann, M.; Struyf, H.; De Gendt, S.; Glorieux, C.; Brems, S.

    2013-05-01

    The occurrence of acoustic cavitation is incorporating a multitude of interdependent effects that strongly depend on the bubble size. Therefore, bubble size control would be beneficial for biological and industrial processes that rely on acoustic cavitation. A pulsed acoustic field can result in bubble size control and the repeated dissolution and reactivation ("recycling") of potentially active bubbles. As a consequence, a pulsed field can strongly enhance cavitation activity. In this paper, we present a modified methodology for the evaluation of the active bubble size distribution by means of a combination of cavitation noise measurements and ultrasonic pulsing. The key component of this modified methodology is the definition of an upper size limit, below which bubbles—in between subsequent pulses—have to dissolve, in order to be sustainably recycled. This upper limit makes it possible to explain and link the enhancement of cavitation activity to a bubble size distribution. The experimentally determined bubble size distributions for different power densities are interpreted in the frame of numerical calculations of the oscillatory responses of the bubbles to the intermittent driving sound field. The distributions are found to be shaped by the size dependent interplay between bubble pulsations, rectified diffusion, coalescence, and the development of parametrically amplified shape instabilities. Also, a phenomenological reactivation-deactivation model is proposed to explain and quantify the observed enhancement of cavitation activity under pulsed, with respect to continuous sonication. In this model, the pulse-duration determines the magnitude of the reactivation of partially dissolved bubbles and the deactivation of activated bubbles by coalescence. It is shown that the subsequent recycling of previously active bubbles leads to an accumulation of cavitation activity, which saturates after a certain number of pulses. The model is fitted to the experimental data for the cavitation activity measured by means of ultraharmonic cavitation noise as a function of the pulse duration. Measurements of the development of the cavitation noise and sonochemiluminescence over a sequence of pulses for different pulse durations and separations confirm the general validity of the proposed model. Size distributions of the larger, inactive bubbles that were extracted from High-speed images of the cavitation field, relate the deactivation of activated bubbles by coalescence to the increase in volume concentrations of larger bubbles as observed by others.

  16. Repeated growth and bubbling transfer of graphene with millimetre-size single-crystal grains using platinum

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Libo; Ren, Wencai; Xu, Huilong; Jin, Li; Wang, Zhenxing; Ma, Teng; Ma, Lai-Peng; Zhang, Zhiyong; Fu, Qiang; Peng, Lian-Mao; Bao, Xinhe; Cheng, Hui-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Large single-crystal graphene is highly desired and important for the applications of graphene in electronics, as grain boundaries between graphene grains markedly degrade its quality and properties. Here we report the growth of millimetre-sized hexagonal single-crystal graphene and graphene films joined from such grains on Pt by ambient-pressure chemical vapour deposition. We report a bubbling method to transfer these single graphene grains and graphene films to arbitrary substrate, which is nondestructive not only to graphene, but also to the Pt substrates. The Pt substrates can be repeatedly used for graphene growth. The graphene shows high crystal quality with the reported lowest wrinkle height of 0.8 nm and a carrier mobility of greater than 7,100 cm2 V?1 s?1 under ambient conditions. The repeatable growth of graphene with large single-crystal grains on Pt and its nondestructive transfer may enable various applications. PMID:22426220

  17. Comparison between phase field simulations and experimental data from intragranular bubble growth in UO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Tonks, M. R.; Biner, S. B.; Mille, P. C. [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625 MS 3830, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Andersson, D. A. [MST-8, Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    In this work, we used the phase field method to simulate the post-irradiation annealing of UO{sub 2} described in the experimental work by Kashibe et al., 1993 [1]. The simulations were carried out in 2D and 3D using the MARMOT FEM-based phase-field modeling framework. The 2-D results compared fairly well with the experiments, in spite of the assumptions made in the model. The 3-D results compare even more favorably to experiments, indicating that diffusion in all three directions must be considered to accurate represent the bubble growth. (authors)

  18. Multi-resolution analysis of passive cavitation detector signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haqshenas, S. R.; Saffari, N.

    2015-01-01

    Passive cavitation detectors are widely used for measuring acoustic emissions from cavitating bubbles. Acoustic emissions related to the dynamics of oscillating bubbles contain complex time and frequency domain information. Signal processing techniques traditionally used to analyse transient and stationary signals may be of limited value when analysing such acoustic emissions. This paper describes a multi-resolution approach developed for processing acoustic emissions data. The technique consists of the combination of a discrete wavelet transform and of the statistical and spectral analysis to extract cavitation features. These features include broadband emissions and harmonic, sub-harmonic and ultra-harmonic information. The implementation of the technique on experimental datasets demonstrates that this approach provides detailed information about key features of the acoustic signal, especially in complex situations where different types of cavitation occur simultaneously. Furthermore, statistical metrics used in this technique can provide a quantitative means for classifying signatures of cavitation, particularly the broadband segment of the spectrum created by inertial cavitation, which constitutes novel work.

  19. Application of computational fluid dynamics on cavitation in journal bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedel, Marco; Schmidt, Marcus; Reinke, Peter; Nobis, Matthias; Redlich, Marcel

    2014-03-01

    Journal bearings are applied in internal combustion engines due to their favourable wearing quality and operating characteristics. Under certain operating conditions damage of the journal bearing can occur caused by cavitation. The cavitation reduces the load capacity and leads to material erosion. Experimental investigations of cavitating flows in dimension of real journal bearing are difficult to realize or almost impossible caused by the small gap and transient flow conditions. Therefore numerical simulation is a very helpful engineering tool to research the cavitation behaviour. The CFD-Code OpenFOAM is used to analyse the flow field inside the bearing. The numerical cavitation model based on a bubble dynamic approach and requires necessary initial parameter for the calculation, such as nuclei bubble diameter, the number of nuclei and two empirical constants. The first part of this paper shows the influence of these parameters on the solution. For the adjustment of the parameters an experiment of Jakobsson et.al. [1] was used to validate the numerical flow model. The parameters have been varied according to the method Design of Experiments (DoE). With a defined model equation the parameters determined, to identify the parameter for CFD-calculations in comparison to the experimental values. The second part of the paper presents investigations on different geometrical changes in the bearing geometry. The effect of these geometrical changes on cavitation was compared with experimental results from Wollfarth [2] and Garner et.al. [3].

  20. ON THE DYNAMICS AND ACOUSTICS OF CLOUD CAVITATION ON AN OSCILLATING HYDROFOIL

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. A. McKenney; Christopher E. Brennen

    Observations have been made of the growth and collapse of surface and cloud cavitation on a finite aspect ratio hydrofoil oscillating in pitch. The cavitation was recorded using both still and high-speed motion picture photography, and the variations with cavitation number and reduced frequency of oscillation were investigated. The noise generated by the cavity collapse was also measured and analyzed.

  1. Cavitational hydrothermal oxidation: A new remediation process. Annual progress report, September 1996--August 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Suslick, K.S.

    1997-11-21

    'During the past year, the authors have continued to make substantial scientific progress on the understanding of cavitation phenomena in aqueous media and applications of cavitation to remediation processes. The efforts have focused on three separate areas: sonoluminescence as a probe of conditions created during cavitational collapse in aqueous media, the use of cavitation for remediation of contaminated water, and an addition of the use of ultrasound in the synthesis of novel heterogeneous catalysts for hydrodehalogenation of halocarbons under mild conditions. In order to gain further understanding of the conditions present during cavitation, the author has continued his studies of sonoluminescence. He has made recent breakthroughs in the use of emission spectroscopy for temperature and pressure measurement of cavitation events, which he expects to publish shortly. He has been able to measure for the first time the temperature of cavitation in water during multi-bubble cavitation in the presence of aromatic hydrocarbons. The emission from excited states of C{sub 2} in water gives temperatures that are consistent with adiabatic compressional heating, with maximum temperatures of 4,300 K. Prior measurements of cavitation temperatures in low vapor pressure nonaqueous media gave somewhat higher temperatures of 5,000 K. This work lays permanently to rest exotic mechanisms for cavitational chemistry, at least for cavitation fields.'

  2. Cavitational hydrothermal oxidation: A new remediation process. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Suslick, K.S.

    1998-06-01

    'The primary goal is to develop a quantitative understanding of cavitation phenomena in aqueous media and the development of applications of cavitation to remediation processes. Efforts have focused on three separate areas: sonoluminescence as a probe of conditions created during cavitational collapse in aqueous media, the use of cavitation for remediation of contaminated water, and an addition of the use of ultrasound in the synthesis of novel heterogeneous catalysts for hydrodehalogenation of halocarbons under mild conditions. This report summarizes work after one year of a three year project. In order to gain further understanding of the conditions present during cavitation, the author has continued his studies of sonoluminescence. He has made recent breakthroughs in the use of emission spectroscopy for temperature and pressure measurement of cavitation events, which he expects to publish shortly. He has been able to measure for the first time the temperature of cavitation in water during multi-bubble cavitation in the presence of aromatic hydrocarbons. The emission from excited states of C{sub 2} in water gives temperatures that are consistent with adiabatic compressional heating, with maximum temperatures of 4,300 K. Prior measurements of cavitation temperatures in low vapor pressure nonaqueous media gave somewhat higher temperatures of 5,000 K. This work lays permanently to rest exotic mechanisms for cavitational chemistry, at least for cavitation fields.'

  3. Removal of residual cavitation nuclei to enhance histotripsy erosion of model urinary stones.

    PubMed

    Duryea, Alexander P; Roberts, William W; Cain, Charles A; Hall, Timothy L

    2015-05-01

    Histotripsy has been shown to be an effective treatment for model kidney stones, eroding their surface to tiny particulate debris via a cavitational bubble cloud. However, similar to shock wave lithotripsy, histotripsy stone treatments display a rate-dependent efficacy, with pulses applied at a low rate generating more efficient stone erosion in comparison with those applied at a high rate. This is hypothesized to be the result of residual cavitation bubble nuclei generated by bubble cloud collapse. Although the histotripsy bubble cloud only lasts on the order of 100 ?s, these microscopic remnant bubbles can persist on the order of 1 s, inducing direct attenuation of subsequent histotripsy pulses and influencing bubble cloud dynamics. In an effort to mitigate these effects, we have developed a novel strategy to actively remove residual cavitation nuclei from the field using low-amplitude ultrasound pulses. Previous work has demonstrated that with selection of the appropriate acoustic parameters these bubble removal pulses can stimulate the aggregation and subsequent coalescence of microscopic bubble nuclei, effectively deleting them from the target volume. Here, we incorporate bubble removal pulses in histotripsy treatment of model kidney stones. It was found that when histotripsy is applied at low rate (1 Hz), bubble removal does not produce a statistically significant change in erosion. At higher pulse rates of 10, 100, and 500 Hz, incorporating bubble removal results in 3.7-, 7.5-, and 2.7-fold increases in stone erosion, respectively. High-speed imaging indicates that the introduction of bubble removal pulses allows bubble cloud dynamics resulting from high pulse rates to more closely approximate those generated at the low rate of 1 Hz. These results corroborate previous work in the field of shock wave lithotripsy regarding the ill effects of residual bubble nuclei, and suggest that high treatment efficiency can be recovered at high pulse rates through appropriate manipulation of the cavitation environment surrounding the stone. PMID:25965682

  4. Study on effect of microparticle's size on cavitation erosion in solid-liquid system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Haosheng; Liu, Shihan; Wang, Jiadao; Chen, Darong

    2007-05-01

    Five different solutions containing microparticles in different sizes were tested in a vibration cavitation erosion experiment. After the experiment, the number of erosion pits on sample surfaces, free radicals HO• in solutions, and mass loss all show that the cavitation erosion strength is strongly related to the particle size, and 500nm particles cause more severe cavitation erosion than other smaller or larger particles do. A model is presented to explain such result considering both nucleation and bubble-particle collision effects. Particle of a proper size will increase the number of heterogeneous nucleation and at the same time reduce the number of bubble-particle combinations, which results in more free bubbles in the solution to generate stronger cavitation erosion.

  5. Sound field measurement in a double layer cavitation cluster by rugged miniature needle hydrophones.

    PubMed

    Koch, Christian

    2014-06-01

    During multi-bubble cavitation the bubbles tend to organize themselves into clusters and thus the understanding of properties and dynamics of clustering is essential for controlling technical applications of cavitation. Sound field measurements are a potential technique to provide valuable experimental information about the status of cavitation clouds. Using purpose-made, rugged, wide band, and small-sized needle hydrophones, sound field measurements in bubble clusters were performed and time-dependent sound pressure waveforms were acquired and analyzed in the frequency domain up to 20MHz. The cavitation clusters were synchronously observed by an electron multiplying charge-coupled device (EMCCD) camera and the relation between the sound field measurements and cluster behaviour was investigated. Depending on the driving power, three ranges could be identified and characteristic properties were assigned. At low power settings no transient and no or very low stable cavitation activity can be observed. The medium range is characterized by strong pressure peaks and various bubble cluster forms. At high power a stable double layer was observed which grew with further increasing power and became quite dynamic. The sound field was irregular and the fundamental at driving frequency decreased. Between the bubble clouds completely different sound field properties were found in comparison to those in the cloud where the cavitation activity is high. In between the sound field pressure amplitude was quite small and no collapses were detected. PMID:24953962

  6. Time-resolved imaging of cavitation effects during laser lithotripsy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Siano; Roberto Pini; Renzo Salimbeni; Matteo Vannini

    1995-01-01

    We devised a diagnostic technique based on a pump-and-probe scheme that provided time- resolved imaging of photofragmentation effects during laser lithotripsy. The evolution of the cavitation bubble induced on kidney stone samples by underwater irradiation with a XeCl excimer laser is presented and analyzed.

  7. VOLUME 84, NUMBER 4 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 24 JANUARY 2000 Effect of Noble Gases on Sonoluminescence Temperatures during Multibubble Cavitation

    E-print Network

    Suslick, Kenneth S.

    on Sonoluminescence Temperatures during Multibubble Cavitation Yuri T. Didenko, William B. McNamara III, and Kenneth S atoms serves as an internal thermome- ter of cavitation. The intensity and temperature occur during acoustic cavitation [1,2]. This highly nonlinear bubble motion is accompanied

  8. Bubbles of Metamorphosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Manu

    2011-11-01

    Metamorphosis presents a puzzling challenge where, triggered by a signal, an organism abruptly transforms its entire shape and form. Here I describe the role of physical fluid dynamic processes during pupal metamorphosis in flies. During early stages of pupation of third instar larvae into adult flies, a physical gas bubble nucleates at a precise temporal and spatial location, as part of the normal developmental program in Diptera. Although its existence has been known for the last 100 years, the origin and control of this ``cavitation'' event has remained completely mysterious. Where does the driving negative pressure for bubble nucleation come from? How is the location of the bubble nucleation site encoded in the pupae? How do molecular processes control such a physical event? What is the role of this bubble during development? Via developing in-vivo imaging techniques, direct bio-physical measurements in live insect pupal structures and physical modeling, here I elucidate the physical mechanism for appearance and disappearance of this bubble and predict the site of nucleation and its exact timing. This new physical insight into the process of metamorphosis also allows us to understand the inherent design of pupal shell architectures in various species of insects. Milton Award, Harvard Society of Fellows; Terman Fellowship, Stanford

  9. Characterization of acoustic cavitation in water and molten aluminum alloy.

    PubMed

    Komarov, Sergey; Oda, Kazuhiro; Ishiwata, Yasuo; Dezhkunov, Nikolay

    2013-03-01

    High-intensive ultrasonic vibrations have been recognized as an attractive tool for refining the grain structure of metals in casting technology. However, the practical application of ultrasonics in this area remains rather limited. One of the reasons is a lack of data needed to optimize the ultrasonic treatment conditions, particularly those concerning characteristics of cavitation zone in molten aluminum. The main aim of the present study was to investigate the intensity and spectral characteristics of cavitation noise generated during radiation of ultrasonic waves into water and molten aluminum alloys, and to establish a measure for evaluating the cavitation intensity. The measurements were performed by using a high temperature cavitometer capable of measuring the level of cavitation noise within five frequency bands from 0.01 to 10MHz. The effect of cavitation treatment was verified by applying high-intense ultrasonic vibrations to a DC caster to refine the primary silicon grains of a model Al-17Si alloy. It was found that the level of high frequency noise components is the most adequate parameter for evaluating the cavitation intensity. Based on this finding, it was concluded that implosions of cavitation bubbles play a decisive role in refinement of the alloy structure. PMID:23141190

  10. Detecting cavitation in vivo from shock-wave therapy devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matula, Thomas J.; Yu, Jinfei; Bailey, Michael R.

    2005-04-01

    Extracorporeal shock-wave therapy (ESWT) has been used as a treatment for plantar faciitis, lateral epicondylitis, shoulder tendonitis, non-unions, and other indications where conservative treatments have been unsuccessful. However, in many areas, the efficacy of SW treatment has not been well established, and the mechanism of action, particularly the role of cavitation, is not well understood. Research indicates cavitation plays an important role in other ultrasound therapies, such as lithotripsy and focused ultrasound surgery, and in some instances, cavitation has been used as a means to monitor or detect a biological effect. Although ESWT can generate cavitation easily in vitro, it is unknown whether or not cavitation is a significant factor in vivo. The purpose of this investigation is to use diagnostic ultrasound to detect and monitor cavitation generated by ESWT devices in vivo. Diagnostic images are collected at various times during and after treatment. The images are then post-processed with image-processing algorithms to enhance the contrast between bubbles and surrounding tissue. The ultimate goal of this research is to utilize cavitation as a means for optimizing shock wave parameters such as amplitude and pulse repetition frequency. [Work supported by APL internal funds and NIH DK43881 and DK55674.

  11. Inducer Design to Avoid Cavitation Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Donghyuk; Watanabe, Toshifumi; Yonezawa, Koichi; Horiguchi, Hironori; Kawata, Yutaka; Tsujimoto, Yoshinobu

    2010-06-01

    Three inducers were designed to avoid cavitation instabilities. This was accomplished by avoiding the interaction of tip cavity with the leading edge of the opposing blade. The first one applied extremely larger leading edge sweep, the second and third ones applied smaller incidence angle by reducing the inlet blade angle or increasing the design flow rate, respectively. The inducer with larger design flow rate has larger outlet blade angle to obtain sufficient pressure rise. The inducer with larger sweep could suppress the cavitation instabilities in wide ranges of cavitation number and flow rate, owing to weaker tip leakage vortex cavity with stronger disturbance by backflow vortices. The inducer with larger outlet blade angle could avoid the cavitation instabilities at higher flow rates owing to the extension of the tip cavity along the suction surface of the blade. The inducer with smaller inlet blade angle could avoid the cavitation instabilities at the flow rates larger than the design flow coefficient, owing to the occurrence of the cavity first in the blade passage and its extension upstream. The cavity shape and suction performance were reasonably simulated by three dimensional CFD computations under the steady cavitating condition, except for the backflow vortex cavity. The difference in the growth of cavity for each inducer is explained from the difference of the pressure distribution on the suction side of the blades.

  12. PIV in the two phases of hydrodynamic cavitation in a venturi type section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuzier, Sylvie; Coudert, Sébastien; Coutier Delgosha, Olivier

    2012-11-01

    The presence of cavitation can affect the performance of turbomachinery. Attached sheet cavities on the blades induce modifications of flow dynamics and turbulence properties. This phenomenon is studied here in a configuration of 2D flow in a venturi type section. Images of the bubbles as well as of the light emitted by fluorescent particles placed in the liquid are recorded simultaneously. Velocities of the bubbles and of the liquid phase are obtained by PIV. The slip velocity is analyzed function of the number of cavitation and other physical parameters. Different levels of turbulence are correlated with different bubble structures in the dipahasic cavity.

  13. Fast X-ray tomography analysis of bubble growth and foam setting during breadmaking

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Babin; G. Della Valle; H. Chiron; P. Cloetens; J. Hoszowska; P. Pernot; A. L. Réguerre; L. Salvo; R. Dendievel

    2006-01-01

    The use of fast X-ray computed microtomography (CMT) shows that the development of gas cell structures during fermentation first depends on a critical time, t1, determined by overall expansion and before which bubbles grow freely according to a simple exponential law. Afterwards, coalescence rapidly prevails and then leads to a heterogeneous structure, for t?t2, characterized by a continuous void phase

  14. Cavitation pressure in liquid helium

    E-print Network

    Frederic Caupin; Sebastien Balibar

    2001-09-19

    Recent experiments have suggested that, at low enough temperature, the homogeneous nucleation of bubbles occurs in liquid helium near the calculated spinodal limit. This was done in pure superfluid helium 4 and in pure normal liquid helium 3. However, in such experiments, where the negative pressure is produced by focusing an acoustic wave in the bulk liquid, the local amplitude of the instantaneous pressure or density is not directly measurable. In this article, we present a series of measurements as a function of the static pressure in the experimental cell. They allowed us to obtain an upper bound for the cavitation pressure P_cav (at low temperature, P_cav -3.0 bar in helium 3, P_cav > - 10.4 bar in helium 4). In this article we thus present quantitative evidence that cavitation occurs at low temperature near the calculated spinodal limit (-3.1 bar in helium 3 and -9.5 bar in helium 4). Further information is also obtained on the comparison between the two helium isotopes. We finally discuss the magnitude of nonlinear effects in the focusing of a sound wave in liquid helium, where the pressure dependence of the compressibility is large.

  15. Dynamical response of a bubble submitted to two following shock waves

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marie-Caroline Jullien

    2002-01-01

    A numerical study of the dynamical response of a bubble submitted to two following shock waves is reported. After the passage of a shock wave, a micron-size bubble expands enormously, reaching millimeter size, and then inertially collapses; this is the so-called cavitation phenomenon. The influence of the passage of a second shock wave on the bubble inertial collapse control is

  16. Onset of cavitation in the quark-gluon plasma

    E-print Network

    Mathis Habich; Paul Romatschke

    2014-07-11

    We study the onset of bubble formation (cavitation) in the quark-gluon plasma as a result of the reduction of the effective pressure from bulk-viscous corrections. By calculating velocity gradients in typical models for quark-gluon plasma evolution in heavy-ion collisions, we obtain results for the critical bulk viscosity above which cavitation occurs. Since present experimental data for heavy-ion collisions seems inconsistent with the presence of bubbles above the phase transition temperature of QCD, our results may be interpreted as an upper limit of the bulk viscosity in nature. Our results indicate that bubble formation is consistent with the expectation of hadronisation in low-temperature QCD.

  17. Onset of cavitation in the quark-gluon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habich, Mathis; Romatschke, Paul

    2014-12-01

    We study the onset of bubble formation (cavitation) in the quark-gluon plasma as a result of the reduction of the effective pressure from bulk-viscous corrections. By calculating velocity gradients in typical models for quark-gluon plasma evolution in heavy-ion collisions, we obtain results for the critical bulk viscosity above which cavitation occurs. Since present experimental data for heavy-ion collision seems inconsistent with the presence of bubbles above the phase transition temperature of QCD, our results may be interpreted as an upper limit of the bulk viscosity in nature. Our results indicate that bubble formation is consistent with the expectation of hadronisation in low-temperature QCD.

  18. Onset of cavitation in the quark-gluon plasma

    E-print Network

    Habich, Mathis

    2014-01-01

    We study the onset of bubble formation (cavitation) in the quark-gluon plasma as a result of the reduction of the effective pressure from bulk-viscous corrections. By calculating velocity gradients in typical models for quark-gluon plasma evolution in heavy-ion collisions, we obtain results for the critical bulk viscosity above which cavitation occurs. Since present experimental data for heavy-ion collisions seems inconsistent with the presence of bubbles above the phase transition temperature of QCD, our results may be interpreted as an upper limit of the bulk viscosity in nature. Our results indicate that bubble formation must occur at temperatures below 140 MeV, consistent with the expectation of hadronisation in low temperature QCD.

  19. Experimental determination of cavitation thresholds in liquid water and mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Gulec, K.; West, C.D.; Haines, J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1998-09-01

    It is well-known that fluids (like solids) will break apart or form voids when put under sufficient tension. The present study has been motivated by the need to evaluate the impact of fluid cavitation in spallation neutron source target systems, more specifically for the proposed 1-MW Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) project, which is being designed in collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, and Argonne National Laboratory. Indeed, results of SNS-specific simulations have indicated that the onset of cavitation could play a very significant role in reducing imposed stresses in structural components of the SNS. In general, the cavitation of fluids is target systems is important to consider for a variety of reasons. Its occurrence can have significant impact on heat transfer, pressure pulse generation, fluid jetting on to structures, surface erosion, stresses induced in enclosures, etc. Therefore, it is important to evaluate the threshold pressure under which the fluid in tension will undergo cavitation. Another major aspect concerns the possible onset of cavitation in an oscillating pressure field; i.e., one would need to know if fluids such as mercury and water will cavitate if the imposed tensile pressure in the fluid is of short duration. If indeed it takes sufficiently long for cavitation bubbles to nucleate, then it would be possible to disregard the complexities involved with addressing cavitation-related issues. This paper provides an overview of preliminary work done to date to derive information on cavitation onset in a relatively static and in a high-frequency environment.

  20. Bubble formation in Rangely Field, Colorado 

    E-print Network

    Wood, J. W

    1953-01-01

    ) '2(l. 417 Schweitzer, P. H. and Szebehely, V. G. : ?Gas Evolution in Liquids and Cavitation" J. Clf A lied Ph s, (Dec. , 1950) 21. 1218 Gersh, I. , Hawkinson, G. E. , and Rathbun, E. N. & "Tissue and Vascular Bubbles after Decompression from High...

  1. Cavitation studies in microgravity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Philippe Kobel; Danail Obreschkow; Mohamed Farhat; Nicolas Dorsaz; Aurele de Bosset

    2010-01-01

    The hydrodynamic cavitation phenomenon is a major source of erosion for many industrial systems such as cryogenic pumps for rocket propulsion, fast ship propellers, hydraulic pipelines and turbines. Erosive processes are associated with liquid jets and shockwaves emission fol-lowing the cavity collapse. Yet, fundamental understanding of these processes requires further cavitation studies inside various geometries of liquid volumes, as the

  2. Current status in cavitation modeling

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ashok K. Singhal; Ram K. Avva

    1993-01-01

    Cavitation is a common problem for many engineering devices in which the main working fluid is in liquid state. In turbomachinery applications, cavitation generally occurs on the inlet side of pumps. The deleterious effects of cavitation include: lowered performance, load asymmetry, erosion and pitting of blade surfaces, vibration and noise, and reduction of the overall machine life. Cavitation models in

  3. Cavitation by spall fracture of solid walls in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikulich, V.; Brücker, Ch.

    2014-07-01

    Experiments are carried out to investigate the cavitation process induced by the spill-off from material from a surface in a liquid environment. Therefore, a simplified physical model was designed which allows the optical observation of the process next to a transparent glass rod submerged in a liquid where the rod is forced to fracture at a pre-defined groove. High-speed shadow-imaging and refractive index matching allow observation of the dynamics of the cavitation generation and cavitation bubble breakdown together with the flow. The results show that the initial phase of spill-off is a vertical lift-off of the rod from the surface that is normal to the direction of pendulum impact. A cavitation bubble is immediately formed during spill-off process and grows in size until lateral motion of the rod sets in. While the rod is transported away, the bubble shrinks into hyperbolic shape and finally collapses. This process is regarded as one contributing factor to the high efficiency of hydro-abrasive wear.

  4. Bubble formation in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antar, Basil N.

    1994-01-01

    Two KC-135 flight campaigns have been conducted to date which are specifically dedicated to study bubble formation in microgravity. The first flight was conducted during March 14-18, 1994, and the other during June 20-24, 1994. The results from the June 1994 flight have not been analyzed yet, while the results from the March flight have been partially analyzed. In the first flight three different experiments were performed, one with the specific aim at determining whether or not cavitation can take place during any of the fluid handling procedures adopted in the shuttle bioprocessing experiments. The other experiments were concerned with duplicating some of the procedures that resulted in bubble formation, namely the NCS filling procedure and the needle scratch of a solid surface. The results from this set of experiments suggest that cavitation did not take place during any of the fluid handling procedures. The results clearly indicate that almost all were generated as a result of the breakup of the gas/liquid interface. This was convincingly demonstrated in the scratch tests as well as in the liquid fill tests.

  5. Can Cavitation Be Anticipated?

    SciTech Connect

    Allgood, G.O.; Dress, W.B.; Hylton, J.O.; Kercel, S.W.

    1999-04-25

    The major problem with cavitation in pumps and hydraulic systems is that there is no effective (conventional) method for detecting or predicting its inception. The traditional method of recognizing cavitation in a pump is to declare the event occurring when the total head drops by some arbitrary value (typically 3%) in response to a pressure reduction at the pump inlet. However, the device is already seriously cavitating when this happens. What is actually needed is a practical method to detect impending rather than incipient cavitation. Whereas the detection of incipient cavitation requires the detection of features just after cavitation starts, the anticipation of cavitation requires the detection and identification of precursor features just before it begins. Two recent advances that make this detection possible. The first is acoustic sensors with a bandwidth of 1 MHz and a dynamic range of 80 dB that preserve the fine details of the features when subjected to coarse vibrations. The second is the application of Bayesian parameter estimation which makes it possible to separate weak signals, such as those present in cavitation precursors, from strong signals, such as pump vibration. Bayesian parameter estimation derives a model based on cavitation hydrodynamics and produces a figure of merit of how well it fits the acquired data. Applying this model to an anticipatory engine should lead to a reliable method of anticipating cavitation before it occurs. This paper reports the findings of precursor features using high-performance sensors and Bayesian analysis of weak acoustic emissions in the 100-1000kHz band from an experimental flow loop.

  6. Dynamic Bubble Behaviour during Microscale Subcooled Boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hao; Peng, Xiao-Feng; David, Christopher M.

    2005-11-01

    Bubble cycles, including initiation, growth and departure, are the physical basis of nucleate boiling. The present investigation, however, reveals unusual bubble motions during subcooled nucleate boiling on microwires 25 or 100 ?m in diameter. Two types of bubble motions, bubble sweeping and bubble return, are observed in the experiments. Bubble sweeping describes a bubble moving back and forth along the wire, which is motion parallel to the wire. Bubble return is the bubble moving back to the wire after it has detached or leaping above the wire. Theoretical analyses and numerical simulations are conducted to investigate the driving mechanisms for both bubble sweeping and return. Marangoni flow from warm to cool regions along the bubble interface is found to produce the shear stresses needed to drive these unusual bubble movements.

  7. Cavitation in flowing superfluid helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daney, D. E.

    1988-01-01

    Flowing superfluid helium cavitates much more readily than normal liquid helium, and there is a marked difference in the cavitation behavior of the two fluids as the lambda point is traversed. Examples of cavitation in a turbine meter and centrifugal pump are given, together with measurements of the cavitation strength of flowing superfluid helium. The unusual cavitation behavior of superfluid helium is attributed to its immense thermal conductivity .

  8. Cavitating flow investigation inside centrifugal impellers for a condensate pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, W.; Luo, X. W.; Ji, B.; Zhuang, B. T.; Xu, H. Y.

    2012-11-01

    In order to investigate the effect of blade inlet angle on centrifugal pump cavitation performance, numerical simulation of cavitating turbulent flow is conducted for a condensate pump with different impellers based on SST k-? turbulence model and a mixture cavitation model. The results indicate that for a condensate pump having meridional section with larger area at blade leading edge compared with conventional pumps, the reverse flows inside the blade-to-blade channels are not negligible. It is noted that large incidence at blade leading edge is helpful to improve the cavitation performance for the pump. The possible reason may be the growth of cavities inside the impeller has less influence on the flow in the channel between two neighboring blades. Further, uniform incidence angle along the blade leading edge is preferable for the improvement of cavitation performance.

  9. Stable tridimensional bubble clusters in multi-bubble sonoluminescence (MBSL).

    PubMed

    Rosselló, J M; Dellavale, D; Bonetto, F J

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, stable clusters made of multiple sonoluminescent bubbles are experimentally and theoretically studied. Argon bubbles were acoustically generated and trapped using bi-frequency driving within a cylindrical chamber filled with a sulfuric acid aqueous solution (SA85w/w). The intensity of the acoustic pressure field was strong enough to sustain, during several minutes, a large number of positionally and spatially fixed (without pseudo-orbits) sonoluminescent bubbles over an ellipsoidally-shaped tridimensional array. The dimensions of the ellipsoids were studied as a function of the amplitude of the applied low-frequency acoustic pressure (PAc(LF)) and the static pressure in the fluid (P0). In order to explain the size and shape of the bubble clusters, we performed a series of numerical simulations of the hydrodynamic forces acting over the bubbles. In both cases the observed experimental behavior was in excellent agreement with the numerical results. The simulations revealed that the positionally stable region, mainly determined by the null primary Bjerknes force (F?Bj), is defined as the outer perimeter of an axisymmetric ellipsoidal cluster centered in the acoustic field antinode. The role of the high-frequency component of the pressure field and the influence of the secondary Bjerknes force are discussed. We also investigate the effect of a change in the concentration of dissolved gas on the positional and spatial instabilities through the cluster dimensions. The experimental and numerical results presented in this paper are potentially useful for further understanding and modeling numerous current research topics regarding multi-bubble phenomena, e.g. forces acting on the bubbles in multi-frequency acoustic fields, transient acoustic cavitation, bubble interactions, structure formation processes, atomic and molecular emissions of equal bubbles and nonlinear or unsteady acoustic pressure fields in bubbly media. PMID:24974006

  10. Fuel Performance Experiments and Modeling: Fission Gas Bubble Nucleation and Growth in Alloy Nuclear Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    McDeavitt, Sean; Shao, Lin; Tsvetkov, Pavel; Wirth, Brian; Kennedy, Rory

    2014-04-07

    Advanced fast reactor systems being developed under the DOE's Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative are designed to destroy TRU isotopes generated in existing and future nuclear energy systems. Over the past 40 years, multiple experiments and demonstrations have been completed using U-Zr, U-Pu-Zr, U-Mo and other metal alloys. As a result, multiple empirical and semi-empirical relationships have been established to develop empirical performance modeling codes. many mechamistic questions about fission as mobility, bubble coalescience, and gas release have been answered through industrial experience, reearch, and empirical understanding. The advent of modern computational materials science, however, opens new doors of development such that physics-based multi-scale models may be developed to enable a new generation of predictive fuel performance codes that are not limited by empiricism.

  11. Shock-induced collapse of a bubble inside a deformable vessel

    PubMed Central

    Coralic, Vedran; Colonius, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Shockwave lithotripsy repeatedly focuses shockwaves on kidney stones to induce their fracture, partially through cavitation erosion. A typical side effect of the procedure is hemorrhage, which is potentially the result of the growth and collapse of bubbles inside blood vessels. To identify the mechanisms by which shock-induced collapse could lead to the onset of injury, we study an idealized problem involving a preexisting bubble in a deformable vessel. We utilize a high-order accurate, shock- and interface-capturing, finite-volume scheme and simulate the three-dimensional shock-induced collapse of an air bubble immersed in a cylindrical water column which is embedded in a gelatin/water mixture. The mixture is a soft tissue simulant, 10% gelatin by weight, and is modeled by the stiffened gas equation of state. The bubble dynamics of this model configuration are characterized by the collapse of the bubble and its subsequent jetting in the direction of the propagation of the shockwave. The vessel wall, which is defined by the material interface between the water and gelatin/water mixture, is invaginated by the collapse and distended by the impact of the jet. The present results show that the highest measured pressures and deformations occur when the volumetric confinement of the bubble is strongest, the bubble is nearest the vessel wall and/or the angle of incidence of the shockwave reduces the distance between the jet tip and the nearest vessel surface. For a particular case considered, the 40 MPa shockwave utilized in this study to collapse the bubble generated a vessel wall pressure of almost 450 MPa and produced both an invagination and distention of nearly 50% of the initial vessel radius on a 𝒪(10) ns timescale. These results are indicative of the significant potential of shock-induced collapse to contribute to the injury of blood vessels in shockwave lithotripsy. PMID:24015027

  12. Shock-induced collapse of a bubble inside a deformable vessel.

    PubMed

    Coralic, Vedran; Colonius, Tim

    2013-07-01

    Shockwave lithotripsy repeatedly focuses shockwaves on kidney stones to induce their fracture, partially through cavitation erosion. A typical side effect of the procedure is hemorrhage, which is potentially the result of the growth and collapse of bubbles inside blood vessels. To identify the mechanisms by which shock-induced collapse could lead to the onset of injury, we study an idealized problem involving a preexisting bubble in a deformable vessel. We utilize a high-order accurate, shock- and interface-capturing, finite-volume scheme and simulate the three-dimensional shock-induced collapse of an air bubble immersed in a cylindrical water column which is embedded in a gelatin/water mixture. The mixture is a soft tissue simulant, 10% gelatin by weight, and is modeled by the stiffened gas equation of state. The bubble dynamics of this model configuration are characterized by the collapse of the bubble and its subsequent jetting in the direction of the propagation of the shockwave. The vessel wall, which is defined by the material interface between the water and gelatin/water mixture, is invaginated by the collapse and distended by the impact of the jet. The present results show that the highest measured pressures and deformations occur when the volumetric confinement of the bubble is strongest, the bubble is nearest the vessel wall and/or the angle of incidence of the shockwave reduces the distance between the jet tip and the nearest vessel surface. For a particular case considered, the 40 MPa shockwave utilized in this study to collapse the bubble generated a vessel wall pressure of almost 450 MPa and produced both an invagination and distention of nearly 50% of the initial vessel radius on a (10) ns timescale. These results are indicative of the significant potential of shock-induced collapse to contribute to the injury of blood vessels in shockwave lithotripsy. PMID:24015027

  13. Mercury Cavitation Phenomenon in Pulsed Spallation Neutron Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Futakawa, Masatoshi; Naoe, Takashi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki-ken, 319-1195 (Japan); Kawai, Masayoshi [KEK Tsukuba-shi, Ibaraki-ken, 305-0801 (Japan)

    2008-06-24

    Innovative researches will be performed at Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility in J-PARC, in which a mercury target system will be installed as MW-class pulse spallation neutron sources. Proton beams will be injected into mercury target to induce the spallation reaction. At the moment the intense proton beam hits the target, pressure waves are generated in the mercury because of the abrupt heat deposition. The pressure waves interact with the target vessel leading to negative pressure that may cause cavitation along the vessel wall. Localized impacts by micro-jets and/or shock waves which are caused by cavitation bubble collapse impose pitting damage on the vessel wall. The pitting damage which degrades the structural integrity of target vessels is a crucial issue for high power mercury targets. Micro-gas-bubbles injection into mercury may be useful to mitigate the pressure wave and the pitting damage. The visualization of cavitation-bubble and gas-bubble collapse behaviors was carried out by using a high-speed video camera. The differences between them are recognized.

  14. Processing of Microalgae: Acoustic Cavitation and Hydrothermal Conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenly, Justin Michael

    The production of energy dense fuels from renewable algal biomass feedstocks -- if sustainably developed at a sufficiently large scale -- may reduce the consumption of petroleum from fossil fuels and provide many environmental benefits. Achieving economic feasibility has several technical engineering challenges that arise from dilute concentration of growing algae in aqueous media, small cell sizes, and durable cell walls. For microalgae to be a sustainable source of biofuels and co-products, efficient fractionation and conversion of the cellular contents is necessary. Research was carried out to address two processing options for efficient microalgae biofuel production: 1. Ultrasonic cavitation for cell disruption and 2. Hydrothermal conversion of a model algal triglyceride. 1. Ultrasonic cell disruption, which relies on cavitating bubbles in the suspension to produce damaging shock waves, was investigated experimentally over a range of concentrations and species types. A few seconds of high intensity sonication at fixed frequency yielded significant cell disruption, even for the more durable cells. At longer exposure times, effectiveness was seen to decline and was attributed, using acoustic measurements, to ultrasonic power attenuation in the ensuing cloud of cavitating bubbles. Processing at higher cell concentrations slowed cell disintegration marginally, but increased the effectiveness of dissipating ultrasonic energy. A theoretical study effectively predicted optimal conditions for a variety of parameters that were inaccessible in this experimental investigation. In that study, single bubble collapse was modeled to identify operating conditions that would increase cavitation, and thus cell disruption. Simulations were conducted by varying frequency and pressure amplitude of the ultrasound wave, and initial bubble size. The simulation results indicated that low frequency, high sound wave amplitudes, and small initial bubble size generate the highest shock wave pressures. 2. Hydrolysis of a pure model triglyceride compound was experimentally examined for the first time at hydrothermal conditions -- from 225 to 300°C. Lipid product composition assessed by GC-FID was compared to previous studies with mixed vegetable oils and used to develop a kinetic model for this oil phase reaction.

  15. An Experimental Study of Cavitation Detection in a Centrifugal Pump Using Envelope Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Chek Zin; Leong, M. Salman

    Cavitation represents one of the most common faults in pumps and could potentially lead to a series of failure in mechanical seal, impeller, bearing, shaft, motor, etc. In this work, an experimental rig was setup to investigate cavitation detection using vibration envelope analysis method, and measured parameters included sound, pressure and flow rate for feasibility of cavitation detection. The experiment testing included 3 operating points of the centrifugal pump (B.E.P, 90% of B.E.P and 80% of B.E.P). Suction pressure of the centrifugal pump was decreased gradually until the inception point of cavitation. Vibration measurements were undertaken at various locations including casing, bearing, suction and discharge flange of the centrifugal pump. Comparisons of envelope spectrums under cavitating and non-cavitating conditions were presented. Envelope analysis was proven useful in detecting cavitation over the 3 testing conditions. During the normal operating condition, vibration peak synchronous to rotational speed was more pronounced. It was however during cavitation condition, the half order sub-harmonic vibration component was clearly evident in the envelope spectrums undertaken at all measurement locations except at the pump bearing. The possible explanation of the strong sub-harmonic (½ of BPF) during cavitation existence in the centrifugal pump was due to insufficient time for the bubbles to collapse completely before the end of the single cycle.

  16. Cavitation Simulation with Consideration of the Viscous Effect at Large Liquid Temperature Variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, An; Luo, Xian-Wu; Ji, Bin; Huang, Ren-Fang; Hidalgo, Victor; Kim, Song Hak

    2014-08-01

    The phase change due to cavitation is not only driven by the pressure difference between the local pressure and vapor saturated pressure, but also affected by the physical property changes in the case of large liquid temperature variation. The present work simulates cavitation with consideration of the viscous effect as well as the local variation of vapor saturated pressure, density, etc. A new cavitation model is developed based on the bubble dynamics, and is applied to analyze the cavitating flow around an NACA0015 hydrofoil at different liquid temperatures from 25°C to 150°C. The results by the proposed model, such as the pressure distribution along the hydrofoil wall surface, vapor volume fraction, and source term of the mass transfer rate due to cavitation, are compared with the available experimental data and the numerical results by an existing thermodynamic model. It is noted that the numerical results by the proposed cavitation model have a slight discrepancy from the experimental results at room temperature, and the accuracy is better than the existing thermodynamic cavitation model. Thus the proposed cavitation model is acceptable for the simulation of cavitating flows at different liquid temperatures.

  17. Investigation of a Method to Reduce Cavitation in Diesel Engine Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Honaker, Robert W.

    1998-01-01

    Sonoluminescence is the effect of producing light from sound and occurs when a gas bubble is trapped in a fluid filled cavity and is forced to collapse under a barrage of sound waves. Frenzel and Schultes discovered this phenomenon in 1934 while exposing acoustic waves to photographic plates. This effect was not well understood until 1988 when Crum and Gaitan discovered the necessary conditions for producing single bubble sonoluminescence in the laboratory. The luminescence is a result of the bubble violently collapsing from sound waves and this shares a close association with vibratory cavitation. Cavitation erosion is known to cause damage to rotational machinery when the collapse is near to surfaces due to the high pressures associated with bubble collapse. With these high pressures and temperatures there is a considerable amount of damage to the outside layer of a bearing, thereby, reducing its useful life. An experiment was constructed to generate sonoluminescence in the laboratory in order to obtain a greater understanding of this phenomenon and its association with bubble cavitation. Most of the research was done to investigate how to obtain single bubble sonoluminescence under different conditions and to determine how to detect it. Success in this has inspired several theories on how to use the methods for generating sonoluminescence to control cavitation in fluids under industrial conditions.

  18. The cavitating submerged jet

    SciTech Connect

    Franklin, R.E. [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom). Engineering Lab.

    1994-12-31

    This paper reviews the results of a long-term program of research into the inception and development of cavitation in the submerged jet, the diagnostic for the cavitation being the pressure fluctuations in the near field of the jet. A revised and extended theoretical analysis is presented which shows that the cavitation does not depend simply on the cavitation number of the flow, but also on a Weber number based on the ambient pressure and the jet diameter, and the total dissolved gas content measured relative to the saturation concentration at the ambient pressure. The analysis not only predicts the nondimensional numbers which correlate the experimental data over wide ranges of the principal variables, but also the form of the curve to which the data collapse.

  19. Combined passive detection and ultrafast active imaging of cavitation events induced by short pulses of high-intensity ultrasound

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jérôme Gateau; Jean-François Aubry; Mathieu Pernot; Mathias Fink; Mickaël Tanter

    2011-01-01

    The activation of natural gas nuclei to induce larger bubbles is possible using short ultrasonic excitations of high amplitude, and is required for ultrasound cavitation ther- apies. However, little is known about the distribution of nuclei in tissues. Therefore, the acoustic pressure level necessary to generate bubbles in a targeted zone and their exact location are currently difficult to predict.

  20. The nature of the flow following jet impact during the collapse of a bubble near a rigid boundary

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert Tong

    1996-01-01

    A study is presented of the final stage in the collapse of a bubble near a rigid boundary. The collapse is accompanied by a high speed liquid jet which threads the bubble, generating high pressures on the boundary after impact. This aspect of bubble dynamics is associated with the damage to hydraulic machinery caused by cavitation, or the large scale

  1. A detector for monitoring the onset of cavitation during therapy-level measurements of ultrasonic power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodnett, M.; Zeqiri, B.

    2004-01-01

    Acoustic cavitation occurring in the water path between a transducer and the target of a radiation force balance can provide a significant source of error during measurements of ultrasonic power. These problems can be particularly acute at physiotherapy levels (>1 W), and low frequencies (leq 1 MHz). The cavitating bubbles can absorb and scatter incident ultrasound, leading to an underestimate in the measured power. For these reasons, International Specification standards demand the use of degassed water. This imposes requirements that may actually be difficult to meet, for example, in the case of hospitals. Also, initially degassed water will rapidly re-gas, increasing the likelihood of cavitation occurring. For these reasons, NPL has developed a device that monitors acoustic emissions generated by bubble activity, for detecting the onset of cavitation during power measurements. A commercially available needle hydrophone is used to detect these emissions. The acoustic signals are then monitored using a Cavitation Detector (CD) unit, comprising an analogue electrical filter that may be tuned to detect frequency components generated by cavitating bubbles, and which provides an indication of when the measured level exceeds a pre-defined threshold. This paper describes studies to establish a suitable detection scheme, the principles of operation of the CD unit, and the performance tests carried out with a range of propagation media.

  2. Cavitation selectively reduces the negative-pressure phase of lithotripter shock pulses.

    PubMed

    Pishchalnikov, Yuri A; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A; Bailey, Michael R; Pishchalnikova, Irina V; Williams, James C; McAteer, James A

    2005-11-01

    Measurements using a fiber-optic probe hydrophone, high-speed camera, and B-mode ultrasound showed attenuation of the trailing negative-pressure phase of a lithotripter shock pulse under conditions that favor generation of cavitation bubbles, such as in water with a high content of dissolved gas or at high pulse repetition rate where more cavitation nuclei persisted between pulses. This cavitation-mediated attenuation of the acoustic pulse was also observed to increase with increasing amplitude of source discharge potential, such that the negative-pressure phase of the pulse can remain fixed in amplitude even with increasing source discharge potential. PMID:19756170

  3. The effect of gas diffusion on the nuclei population downstream of a cavitation zone

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Masao; Prosperetti, A. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1994-12-31

    A calculation is given of the amount of dissolved gas that diffuses into a cavitating nucleus in travelling-bubble cavitation. The results indicate that a substantial increase in the nucleus gas content takes place in typical cases. This conclusion is substantiated by simple estimates. With a model of the break-up process in the region of pressure recovery, it is possible to estimate the nuclei population downstream of the cavitating region. A very large increase of the total number of nuclei and a profound modification of the initial distribution function are found.

  4. Cavitation selectively reduces the negative-pressure phase of lithotripter shock pulses

    PubMed Central

    Pishchalnikov, Yuri A.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Bailey, Michael R.; Pishchalnikova, Irina V.; Williams, James C.; McAteer, James A.

    2009-01-01

    Measurements using a fiber-optic probe hydrophone, high-speed camera, and B-mode ultrasound showed attenuation of the trailing negative-pressure phase of a lithotripter shock pulse under conditions that favor generation of cavitation bubbles, such as in water with a high content of dissolved gas or at high pulse repetition rate where more cavitation nuclei persisted between pulses. This cavitation-mediated attenuation of the acoustic pulse was also observed to increase with increasing amplitude of source discharge potential, such that the negative-pressure phase of the pulse can remain fixed in amplitude even with increasing source discharge potential. PMID:19756170

  5. Low frequency cavitation erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pardue, Sally J.; Chandekar, Gautam

    2002-11-01

    Damage of diesel engine piston sleeve liners due to cavitation of the coolant fluid can be severe. Coolant fluid additives are used to inhibit cavitation damage, and are evaluated by industry suppliers using ASTM G32-98 Standard Test Method for Cavitation Erosion Using Vibratory Apparatus. The ASTM G32-98 test procedure uses an ultrasonic horn at 20 kHz to vibrate a test button in the coolant. The test button mass loss and surface appearance are studied to sort the performance of new coolant additives. Mismatch between good lab performers and actual engine test runs has raised concerns over the current lab test. The frequency range of the current test has been targeted for investigation. A low frequency, less than 2000 Hz, test rig was built to explore the cavitation damage. The test system did produce cavitation on the surface of the test button for a period of 36 h, with minimal mass loss. The test rig experienced cyclic fatigue when test times were extended. The work is now focusing on designing a better test rig for long duration tests and on developing numerical models in order to explore the effects of cavitation excitation frequency on surface erosion.

  6. Possibility of quantitative prediction of cavitation erosion without model test

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Hiroharu; Konno, Akihisa; Maeda, Masatsugu; Yamaguchi, Hajime [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering

    1996-09-01

    A scenario for quantitative prediction of cavitation erosion was proposed. The key value is the impact force/pressure spectrum on a solid surface caused by cavitation bubble collapse. As the first step of prediction, the authors constructed the scenario from an estimation of the cavity generation rate to the prediction of impact force spectrum, including the estimations of collapsing cavity number and impact pressure. The prediction was compared with measurements of impact force spectra on a partially cavitating hydrofoil. A good quantitative agreement was obtained between the prediction and the experiment. However, the present method predicted a larger effect of main flow velocity than that observed. The present scenario is promising as a method of predicting erosion without using a model test.

  7. Buoyant Bubbles

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Lawrence Hall of Science

    2009-01-01

    What keeps bubbles and other things, like airplanes, floating or flying in the air? In this activity, learners blow bubbles and wave 3x5 cards above, below and on different sides of the bubbles to keep them afloat as long as possible. The Did You Know section explains the Bernoulli principle: how waving cards above the bubbles helps keep them afloat because faster moving air exerts less pressure to push the bubbles down. The activity can be extended by having learners wave their bubbles through an obstacle course they design themselves.

  8. Velocity field analysis in an experimental cavitating mixing layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aeschlimann, Vincent; Barre, Stéphane; Djeridi, Henda

    2011-05-01

    The purpose of this experimental study was to analyze a two-dimensional cavitating shear layer. The global aim of this work was to improve understanding and modeling of cavitation phenomena, from a 2D turbulent shear flow to rocket engine turbopomp inducers. This 2D mixing layer flow provided us with a well documented test case to be used for comparisons between behavior with and without cavitation. Similarities and differences enabled us to characterize the effects of cavitation on flow dynamics. The experimental facility enabled us to set up a mixing layer configuration with different cavitation levels. The development of a velocity gradient was observed inside a liquid water flow using PIV-LIF (particle image velocimetry-laser induced fluorescence). Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities developed at the interface and vaporizations and implosions of cavitating structures inside the vortices were observed. The mixing area grew linearly, showing a constant growth rate, for the range of cavitation levels studied. The spatial development of the mixing area seemed hardly to be affected by cavitation. Particularly, the self-similar behavior of the mean flow was preserved despite the presence of the vapor phase. Successive vaporizations and condensations of the fluid particles inside the turbulent area generated additional velocity fluctuations due to the strong density changes. Moreover, when cavitation developed, the Kelvin-Helmholtz vortex shape was modified, inducing a strong anisotropy (vortex distortion as ellipsoidal form) due to the vapor phase. The main results of this study clearly showed that the turbulence-cavitation relationship inside a mixing layer was not simply a change of compressibility properties of the fluid in the turbulent field, but a mutual interaction between large and small scales of the flow due to the presence of a two-phase flow.

  9. Inter-asperity cavitation and global cavitation in seals

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Susan R. Harp; Richard F. Salant

    2002-01-01

    A universal, average Reynolds equation was previously developed to model the combined effects of inter-asperity cavitation and global cavitation in lubricating films between rough surfaces. In this study, the universal, average Reynolds equation is applied to two types of rotating shaft seals: lip seals and mechanical face seals. Inter-asperity cavitation is shown to affect the sealing mechanism of lip seals

  10. Bubblebubbles — boiling

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Johannes Straub

    2005-01-01

    A short overview of boiling research in microgravity performed during the past two decades is subject of this presentation.\\u000a The research was concentrated on pool boiling without applying any external forces. The objective of this research was to\\u000a answer the questions: Is boiling an appropriate mechanism of heat transfer in space applications, and how do heat transfer\\u000a and bubble dynamics

  11. Amyloid fibril disruption by ultrasonic cavitation: nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Hisashi; Itoh, Satoru G

    2014-07-30

    We describe the disruption of amyloid fibrils of Alzheimer's amyloid-? peptides by ultrasonic cavitation. For this purpose, we performed nonequilibrium all-atom molecular dynamics simulations with sinusoidal pressure and visualized the process with movies. When the pressure is negative, a bubble is formed, usually at hydrophobic residues in the transmembrane region. Most ?-strands maintain their secondary structures in the bubble. When the pressure becomes positive, the bubble collapses, and water molecules crash against the hydrophilic residues in the nontransmembrane region to disrupt the amyloid. Shorter amyloids require longer sonication times for disruption because they do not have enough hydrophobic residues to serve as a nucleus to form a bubble. These results agree with experiments in which monodispersed amyloid fibrils were obtained by ultrasonication. PMID:24987794

  12. Homogeneous cavitation in microfluidics: a record high dynamic tensile threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Keita; Liu, Ai-Qun; Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2011-11-01

    An experimental technique is presented which allows one to measure the rupture strength of water using a microfluidic approach. A transparent microfluidic channel is filled with clean water, partially leaving an air-water interface. A focused infrared laser pulse within the liquid creates a spherical shock wave near the interface. The shock reflects, due to acoustic impedance mismatch, as a strong tension wave with high negative pressures. The liquid becomes stretched and at the homogeneous cavitation threshold ruptures with the nucleation of vapor bubbles. These bubbles are captured using an optical delay and very short exposure times. Reproducible observations of the bubble nucleation are obtained, supporting our claim of homogeneous bubble nucleation. Multicomponent Euler flow simulation estimates a tensile stress threshold of -60 MPa, which is the largest reported tension for dynamic measurements.

  13. Physics of laser-induced stress wave propagation, cracking, and cavitation in biological tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perelman, Lev T.; Albagli, Douglas; Dark, Marta; Schaffer, Jonathan; von Rosenberg, Charles; Itzkan, Irving; Feld, Michael S.

    1994-08-01

    In the regime where the specific time for propagation of stress waves is longer than the laser pulse duration, but shorter than the heat dissipation time, stress can be one of the governing mechanisms of laser-induced ablation of biological tissue. In such inertially confined regimes, knowing the mechanical properties of biological tissue an the kinetics of cracking (in hard tissue represented by bone) and cavitation (in soft tissue represented by meniscus) are important to understand the ablation process. An experimental technique has been developed to study laser-induced stress generation and mechanical properties of tissue in such regimes. This technique is based on monitoring the tissue surface after laser irradiation, using an interferometer that can measure submicron surface displacements on a nanosecond time scale. The subablation threshold laser-induced surface displacements can be related to the stress within the tissue and mechanical properties of the tissue. The surface movement of aqueous solution and meniscus tissue irradiated by 7.5-ns pulses of 355 nm light was consistent with growth and collapse of cavitation bubble. Bone movement was qualitatively consistent with theoretical predictions obtained by solving the equation of motion both analytically and numerically. In the regime where laser beam radius and optical absorption depth are comparable, it is shown that a full 3D analysis is necessary to understand the observed results.

  14. Bubble dielectrophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, T. B.; Bliss, G. W.

    1977-01-01

    The theoretical principles related to bubble dielectrophoresis are examined, taking into account the polarization force, aspects of bubble deformation, the electrostatic bubble levitation theorem, and the equation of motion. The measurement of the dielectrophoretic force on static and dynamic bubbles represents a convenient experimental method for the study of the general problem of dielectrophoresis. The experiments reported include static-force measurements, static-levitation experiments, and dynamic-force measurements.

  15. Detecting Cavitation Pitting Without Disassembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barkhoudarian, S.

    1986-01-01

    Technique for detecting cavitation pitting in pumps, turbines, and other machinery uses low-level nuclear irradiation. Isotopes concentrated below surface emit gamma radiation, a portion of which is attenuated by overlying material. Where there are cavitation pits, output of gamma-ray detector fluctuates as detector is scanned near pits. Important to detect cavitation pits because nozzle, turbine blade, or other pump component weakened by cavitation could fail catastrophically and cause machine to explode.

  16. Prediction of pump cavitation performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. D.

    1974-01-01

    A method for predicting pump cavitation performance with various liquids, liquid temperatures, and rotative speeds is presented. Use of the method requires that two sets of test data be available for the pump of interest. Good agreement between predicted and experimental results of cavitation performance was obtained for several pumps operated in liquids which exhibit a wide range of properties. Two cavitation parameters which qualitatively evaluate pump cavitation performance are also presented.

  17. Modeling of turbulent cavitating flows

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chien-Chou Tseng

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this dissertation is to establish a predictive tool for turbulent cavitating flows, including those under cryogenic conditions with noticeable thermal effects. The modeling framework consists of a transport-based cavitation model with ensemble-averaged fluid dynamics equations and turbulence closures. The cavitation models used in this study include a phenomenological model with empirical supports and an interfacial dynamics model

  18. Effect of tensile stress on cavitation damage formation in mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naoe, Takashi; Kogawa, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Yoshihito; Futakawa, Masatoshi

    2010-03-01

    Cavitation erosion or so called pitting damage was investigated under tensile stress conditions in mercury. In MW-class liquid metal spallation targets, pitting damage is a critical issue to satisfy required power and/or lifetime of the target vessel. Cavitation occurs by negative pressure which is induced through pressure wave propagation due to proton beam injection. Pitting damage is formed by microjet and/or shock wave during cavitation bubble collapse. A mercury target vessel suffers tensile stress due to thermal stress or welding. In order to investigate the effect of tensile stress on pitting damage formation, cavitation erosion tests were performed using stress imposed specimens in mercury. An ultrasonic vibratory horn and electro-Magnetic IMpact Testing Machine (MIMTM) were used to vary the cavitation intensity. In the incubation period of pitting damage, damaged area was slightly increased with increasing imposed tensile stress. In the steady state period, a mean depth of erosion was increased by the tensile stress. Additionally, in order to quantitatively evaluate the effect of tensile stress, an indentation test with Vickers indenter was carried out to quasi-statically simulate the impact load. From the measurement of the diagonal length of the indent aspect ratio and hardness, it is recognized that the threshold of the deformation, i.e. pitting damage formation, was decreased by the tensile stress.

  19. Hydrodynamic cavitation in microsystems. II. Simulations and optical observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medrano, M.; Pellone, C.; Zermatten, P. J.; Ayela, F.

    2012-04-01

    Numerical calculations in the single liquid phase and optical observations in the two-phase cavitating flow regime have been performed on microdiaphragms and microventuris fed with deionized water. Simulations have confirmed the influence of the shape of the shrinkage upon the contraction of the jet, and so on the localisation of possible cavitating area downstream. Observations of cavitating flow patterns through hybrid silicon-pyrex microdevices have been performed either via a laser excitation with a pulse duration of 6 ns, or with the help of a high-speed camera. Recorded snapshots and movies are presented. Concerning microdiaphragms, it is confirmed that very high shear rates downstream the diaphragms are the cause of bubbly flows. Concerning microventuris, a gaseous cavity forms on a boundary downstream the throat. As a consequence of a microsystem instability, the cavity displays a high frequency pulsation. Low values Strouhal numbers are associated to such a sheet cavitation. Moreover, when the intensity of the cavitating flow is reduced, there is a mismatch between the frequency of the pulsation of the cavity and the frequency of shedded clouds downstream the channel. That may be the consequence of viscous effects limiting the impingement of a re-entrant liquid jet on the attached cavity.

  20. Assessment of shock wave lithotripters via cavitation potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iloreta, Jonathan I.; Zhou, Yufeng; Sankin, Georgy N.; Zhong, Pei; Szeri, Andrew J.

    2007-08-01

    A method to characterize shock wave lithotripters by examining the potential for cavitation associated with the lithotripter shock wave (LSW) has been developed. The method uses the maximum radius achieved by a bubble subjected to a LSW as a representation of the cavitation potential for that region in the lithotripter. It is found that the maximum radius is determined by the work done on a bubble by the LSW. The method is used to characterize two reflectors: an ellipsoidal reflector and an ellipsoidal reflector with an insert. The results show that the use of an insert reduced the -6dB volume (with respect to peak positive pressure) from 1.6 to 0.4cm3, the -6dB volume (with respect to peak negative pressure) from 14.5 to 8.3cm3, and reduced the volume characterized by high cavitation potential (i.e., regions characterized by bubbles with radii larger than 429?m) from 103 to 26cm3. Thus, the insert is an effective way to localize the potentially damaging effects of shock wave lithotripsy, and suggests an approach to optimize the shape of the reflector.

  1. Tandem shock wave cavitation enhancement for extracorporeal lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loske, Achim M.; Prieto, Fernando E.; Fernández, Francisco; van Cauwelaert, Javier

    2002-11-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) has been successful for more than twenty years in treating patients with kidney stones. Hundreds of underwater shock waves are generated outside the patient's body and focused on the kidney stone. Stones fracture mainly due to spalling, cavitation and layer separation. Cavitation bubbles are produced in the vicinity of the stone by the tensile phase of each shock wave. Bubbles expand, stabilize and finally collapse violently, creating stone-damaging secondary shock waves and microjets. Bubble collapse can be intensified by sending a second shock wave a few hundred microseconds after the first. A novel method of generating two piezoelectrically generated shock waves with an adjustable time delay between 50 and 950 µs is described and tested. The objective is to enhance cavitation-induced damage to kidney stones during ESWL in order to reduce treatment time. In vitro kidney stone model fragmentation efficiency and pressure measurements were compared with those for a standard ESWL system. Results indicate that fragmentation efficiency was significantly enhanced at a shock wave delay of about 400 and 250 µs using rectangular and spherical stone phantoms, respectively. The system presented here could be installed in clinical devices at relatively low cost, without the need for a second shock wave generator.

  2. Assessment of shock wave lithotripters via cavitation potential

    PubMed Central

    Iloreta, Jonathan I.; Zhou, Yufeng; Sankin, Georgy N.; Zhong, Pei; Szeri, Andrew J.

    2008-01-01

    A method to characterize shock wave lithotripters by examining the potential for cavitation associated with the lithotripter shock wave (LSW) has been developed. The method uses the maximum radius achieved by a bubble subjected to a LSW as a representation of the cavitation potential for that region in the lithotripter. It is found that the maximum radius is determined by the work done on a bubble by the LSW. The method is used to characterize two reflectors: an ellipsoidal reflector and an ellipsoidal reflector with an insert. The results show that the use of an insert reduced the ?6 dB volume (with respect to peak positive pressure) from 1.6 to 0.4 cm3, the ?6 dB volume (with respect to peak negative pressure) from 14.5 to 8.3 cm3, and reduced the volume characterized by high cavitation potential (i.e., regions characterized by bubbles with radii larger than 429 µm) from 103 to 26 cm3. Thus, the insert is an effective way to localize the potentially damaging effects of shock wave lithotripsy, and suggests an approach to optimize the shape of the reflector. PMID:19865493

  3. Characteristics and detecting of laser-induced single bubble collapse noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiumei; He, Jie; Li, Wenhua; Jiao, Mingli; Liu, Xiaochen; Wang, Haibing; Wang, Bingyang; Li, Beibei

    2015-05-01

    Shock waves emission after collapse of a laser-induced bubble in the liquid was studied experimentally by using a PTZ hydrophone. An experimental method and a Cavitation detection system was designed to investigate bubble collapse noise in this article. When a focused short laser pulse was focused in a liquid near a solid wall, it induced optical breakdown, the emission of shock waves and the generation of cavitation bubbles. A PZT hydrophone was used to detect the shock wave emitted during bubble oscillations. In addition, a software based on MATLAB was designed for analyzing cavitation noise. The software system had multiple functionalities, namely signal reading, noise reduction, signal analysis in frequency domain, and display. The results showed that the software can not only reflect the spectral characteristics of the noise quickly but also can interpret the current cavitation station according to the changing rules of different cavitation station. The results of the research have strong implications for cavitation phenomena analysis and cavitation warning systems in turbines, propellers, and other irrigation machinery.

  4. Cavitation on a semicircular leading-edge plate and NACA0015 hydrofoil: Visualization and velocity measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravtsova, A. Yu.; Markovich, D. M.; Pervunin, K. S.; Timoshevskii, M. V.; Hanjali?, K.

    2014-12-01

    Using high-speed visualization and particle image velocimetry (PIV), cavitating flows near a plane plate with a rounded leading edge and NACA0015 hydrofoil at angles of attack from 0° to 9° are studied. In the experiments, several known types of cavitation, as well as some differences, were detected with variation of the cavitation number. In particular, at small angles of attack (up to 3°), cavitation on the plate appears in the form of a streak array; on the hydrofoil, it appears in the form of individual bubbles. For the NACA0015 hydrofoil, isolated and intermittent streaks are divided and grow in regimes with developed cavitation; then, however, they merge in bubble clouds and form an extremely regular cellular structure. With an increase in the angle of attack to 9°, the structure of the cavitation cavity on the hydrofoil is changed by the streak structure, like in the case with the plate. In this work, it is shown that PIV permits one to measure the velocity in cavitating flows, in particular, within the gas-vapor phase. It was established from the analysis of distributions of the average flow velocity and moments of velocity fluctuations that the cavitation generation is caused by the development of the carrier fluid flow near the leading edge of the hydrofoil. Down the stream, however, the flow structure strongly depends on the cavitation regime, which is seen from the comparison of the distributions with the case of a single-phase flow. The presented measurements qualitatively verify general trends and show some quantitative distinctions for the two considered flowpast bodies.

  5. A Study of Cavitation Erosion

    SciTech Connect

    Hiromu Isaka [Kansai Electric Power Company (Japan); Masatsugu Tsutsumi; Tadashi Shiraishi [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd. (Japan); Hiroyuki Kobayashi [Japan Atomic Power Company (Japan)

    2002-07-01

    The authors performed experimental study for the purpose of the following two items from a viewpoint of cavitation erosion of a cylindrical orifice in view of a problem at the letdown orifice in PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor). 1. To get the critical cavitation parameter of the cylindrical orifice to establish the design criteria for prevention of cavitation erosion, and 2. to ascertain the erosion rate in such an eventuality that the cavitation erosion occurs with the orifice made of stainless steel with precipitation hardening (17-4-Cu hardening type stainless steel), so that we confirm the appropriateness of the design criteria. Regarding the 1. item, we carried out the cavitation tests to get the critical cavitation parameters inside and downstream of the orifice. The test results showed that the cavitation parameter at inception is independent of the length or the diameter of the orifice. Moreover, the design criteria of cavitation erosion of cylindrical orifices have been established. Regarding the 2. item, we tested the erosion rate under high-pressure conditions. The cavitation erosion actually occurred in the cylindrical orifice at the tests that was strongly resemble to the erosion occurred at the plant. It will be seldom to reproduce resemble cavitation erosion in a cylindrical orifice with the hard material used at plants. We could establish the criteria for preventing the cavitation erosion from the test results. (authors)

  6. A review and assessment of hydrodynamic cavitation as a technology for the future.

    PubMed

    Gogate, Parag R; Pandit, Aniruddha B

    2005-01-01

    In the present work, the current status of the hydrodynamic cavitation reactors has been reviewed discussing the bubble dynamics analysis, optimum design considerations, design correlations for cavitational intensity (in terms of collapse pressure)/cavitational yield and different successful chemical synthesis applications clearly illustrating the utility of these types of reactors. The theoretical discussion based on the modeling of the bubble dynamics equations aims at understanding the design information related to the dependency of the cavitational intensity on the operating parameters and recommendations have been made for the choice of the optimized conditions of operating parameters. The design information based on the theoretical analysis has also been supported with some experimental illustrations concentrating on the chemical synthesis applications. Assessment of the hydrodynamic cavitation reactors and comparison with the sonochemical reactors has been done by citing the different industrially important reactions (oxidation of toluene, o-xylene, m-xylene, p-xylene, mesitylene, o-nitrotoluene, p-nitrotoluene, m-nitrotoluene, o-chlorotoluene and p-chlorotoulene, and trans-esterification reaction i.e., synthesis of bio-diesel). Some recommendations have also been made for the future work to be carried out as well as the choice of the operating conditions for realizing the dream of industrial scale applications of the cavitational reactors. PMID:15474948

  7. Bubble Suspension

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Exploratorium

    2011-10-11

    In this activity, learners observe as soap bubbles float on a cushion of carbon dioxide gas. Learners blow bubbles into an aquarium filled with a slab of dry ice. Learners will be amazed as the bubbles hover on the denser layer of carbon dioxide gas, then begin to expand and sink before freezing on the dry ice. Use this activity to discuss sublimation, density, and osmosis as well as principles of buoyancy, semipermeability, and interference.

  8. Big Bubbles

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Lawrence Hall of Science

    2010-01-01

    How do you measure a bubble when it's floating? You can't really, but in this activity, learners can measure the diameter of the ring of suds a bubble leaves on a flat surface. The fun is blowing up the bubbles as big as possible with a straw. Then comes the measuring. This activity can be used to connect science and math, and makes a great rainy day or indoor lunch activity.

  9. Etiology of gas bubble disease

    SciTech Connect

    Bouck, G.R.

    1980-11-01

    Gas bubble disease is a noninfectious, physically induced process caused by uncompensated hyperbaric pressure of total dissolved gases. When pressure compensation is inadequate, dissolved gases may form emboli (in blood) and emphysema (in tissues). The resulting abnormal physical presence of gases can block blood vessels (hemostasis) or tear tissues, and may result in death. Population mortality is generally skewed, in that the median time to death occurs well before the average time to death. Judged from mortality curves, three stages occur in gas bubble disease: (1) a period of gas pressure equilibrium, nonlethal cavitation, and increasing morbidity; (2) a period of rapid and heavy mortality; and (3) a period of protracted survival, despite lesions, and dysfunction that eventually terminates in total mortality. Safe limits for gas supersaturation depend on species tolerance and on factors that differ among hatcheries and rivers, between continuous and intermittent exposures, and across ranges of temperature and salinity.

  10. A multiphase model for compressible flows with interfaces, shocks, detonation waves and cavitation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard Saurel; Olivier Lemetayer

    2001-01-01

    A compressible multiphase unconditionally hyperbolic model is proposed. It is able to deal with a wide range of applications: interfaces between compressible materials, shock waves in condensed multiphase mixtures, homogeneous two-phase flows (bubbly and droplet flows) and cavitation in liquids. Here we focus on the generalization of the formulation to an arbitrary number of fluids, and to mass and energy

  11. CAVITATION AND CETACEAN

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Timothy G. Leighton

    Bubbles are the most acoustically active naturally occurring entities in the ocean, and cetaceans are the most intelligent. Having evolved over tens of millions of years to cope with the underwater acoustic environment, cetaceans may have developed techniques from which we could learn. This paper outlines some of the possible interactions, ranging from the exploitation of acoustics in bubble nets

  12. Attached cavitation at a small diameter ultrasonic horn tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žnidar?i?, Anton; Mettin, Robert; Cairós, Carlos; Dular, Matevž

    2014-02-01

    Ultrasonic horn transducers are frequently used in applications of acoustic cavitation in liquids, for instance, for cell disruption or sonochemical reactions. They are operated typically in the frequency range up to about 50 kHz and have tip diameters from some mm to several cm. It has been observed that if the horn tip is sufficiently small and driven at high amplitude, cavitation is very strong, and the tip can be covered entirely by the gas/vapor phase for longer time intervals. A peculiar dynamics of the attached cavity can emerge with expansion and collapse at a self-generated frequency in the subharmonic range, i.e., below the acoustic driving frequency. Here, we present a systematic study of the cavitation dynamics in water at a 20 kHz horn tip of 3 mm diameter. The system was investigated by high-speed imaging with simultaneous recording of the acoustic emissions. Measurements were performed under variation of acoustic power, air saturation, viscosity, surface tension, and temperature of the liquid. Our findings show that the liquid properties play no significant role in the dynamics of the attached cavitation at the small ultrasonic horn. Also the variation of the experimental geometry, within a certain range, did not change the dynamics. We believe that the main two reasons for the peculiar dynamics of cavitation on a small ultrasonic horn are the higher energy density on a small tip and the inability of the big tip to "wash" away the gaseous bubbles. Calculation of the somewhat adapted Strouhal number revealed that, similar to the hydrodynamic cavitation, values which are relatively low characterize slow cavitation structure dynamics. In cases where the cavitation follows the driving frequency this value lies much higher - probably at Str > 20. In the spirit to distinguish the observed phenomenon with other cavitation dynamics at ultrasonic transducer surfaces, we suggest to term the observed phenomenon of attached cavities partly covering the full horn tip as "acoustic supercavitation." This reflects the conjecture that not the sound field in terms of acoustic (negative) pressure in the liquid is responsible for nucleation, but the motion of the transducer surface.

  13. Highly time-resolved measurement for bubble nucleation induced by femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizushima, Yuki; Saito, Takayuki

    2012-11-01

    Femtosecond laser pulses (fs pulses) lead very interesting phenomena due to their extremely high energy density. The effects on substances are not thermal, but are multi-photon absorption. When this multi-photon absorption of fs pulses operates on water, extraordinary phenomena different from laser-induced cavitation by a usual laser such as nano-pulse laser are induced. In this study, fs pulses were focused on ultra-purified water in a glass cell through several types of lens. Some fs pulses split from original beams through a beam splitter were used as probing light of femtosecond order. Femtosecond-order time-resolved optical measurement was realized by adjusting a light path length of the probing light. We found out strange time-series process of refraction index changes of the water irradiated by the fs pulses, and the bubble nucleation and bubble growth, and the interesting bubble properties. Based on these results, we discuss a relation between those and fs-pulse peak intensity. Further, we discuss the nucleation and growth process from femtoseconds to picoseconds.

  14. Laser-induced cavitation in nanoemulsion with gold nanospheres for blood clot disruption: in vitro results.

    PubMed

    Wei, Chen-wei; Xia, Jinjun; Lombardo, Michael; Perez, Camilo; Arnal, Bastien; Larson-Smith, Kjersta; Pelivanov, Ivan; Matula, Thomas; Pozzo, Lilo; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2014-05-01

    Optically activated cavitation in a nanoemulsion contrast agent is proposed for therapeutic applications. With a 56°C boiling point perfluorohexane core and highly absorptive gold nanospheres at the oil-water interface, cavitation nuclei in the core can be efficiently induced with a laser fluence below medical safety limits (70 mJ/cm2 at 1064 nm). This agent is also sensitive to ultrasound (US) exposure and can induce inertial cavitation at a pressure within the medical diagnostic range. Images from a high-speed camera demonstrate bubble formation in these nanoemulsions. The potential of using this contrast agent for blood clot disruption is demonstrated in an in vitro study. The possibility of simultaneous laser and US excitation to reduce the cavitation threshold for therapeutic applications is also discussed. PMID:24784055

  15. Numerical investigation of unsteady cavitation around a NACA 66 hydrofoil using OpenFOAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo, V. H.; Luo, X. W.; Escaler, X.; Ji, J.; Aguinaga, A.

    2014-03-01

    The prediction and control of cavitation damage in pumps, propellers, hydro turbines and fluid machinery in general is necessary during the design stage. The present paper deals with a numerical investigation of unsteady cloud cavitation around a NACA 66 hydrofoil. The current study is focused on understanding the dynamic pressures generated during the cavity collapses as a fundamental characteristic in cavitation erosion. A 2D and 3D unsteady flow simulation has been carried out using OpenFOAM. Then, Paraview and Python programming language have been used to characterize dynamic pressure field. Adapted Large Eddy Simulation (LES) and Zwart cavitation model have been implemented to improve the analysis of cloud motion and to visualize the bubble expansions. Additional results also confirm the correlation between cavity formation and generated pressures.

  16. DNS of Separation Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildings, Casper; Henningson, Dan

    1996-11-01

    Separation bubbles in laminar flow over a flat plate have been investigated using a modified version of the spectral DNS-code developed at FFA/KTH. By prescribing the velocity at the free-stream boundary, a varying pressure gradient was introduced, sufficiently strong to form a separation bubble. The numerical method chosen uses the so called ``fringe region'' technique to damp outflowing disturbances and return the flow to a prescribed inlet state. A detailed investigation of the efficiency of the disturbance damping has been made, since separation bubbles amplify disturbances several orders of magnitude. If these disturbances are not adequately damped they may reenter at the inflow and corrupt the computation. Guidelines to find the most efficient fringe are presented. Initially the 2D separation bubble investigated by Rist and Maucher (Rist, U., Maucher, U. AGARD-Symposium, 1994, Chania, Crete.) was calculated in order to verify the code. The characteristics of this bubble, including length and height as well as the growth rate of small disturbances compare well with those of Rist and Maucher. Presently a corresponding experimental study of separation bubbles is made at KTH. Comparisons between the ongoing numerical work and the experiments will be presented.

  17. In vivo bubble nucleation probability in sheep brain tissue

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Gateau; J.-F. Aubry; D. Chauvet; A.-L. Boch; M. Fink; M. Tanter

    2011-01-01

    Gas nuclei exist naturally in living bodies. Their activation initiates cavitation activity, and is possible using short ultrasonic excitations of high amplitude. However, little is known about the nuclei population in vivo, and therefore about the rarefaction pressure required to form bubbles in tissue. A novel method dedicated to in vivo investigations was used here that combines passive and active

  18. Analysis of cavitation behaviour in a centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, M.; Fu, L. P.; Zhou, L. J.; Guo, Q.; Wang, Z. W.

    2012-11-01

    Cavitation is a well-known problem in centrifugal pumps, causing serious damage and substantial head losses. However, the reason for the sudden head drop in cavitation curves is not fully understood. In this paper, the transient three-dimensional cavitating flow field in a centrifugal pump was calculated using RNG k-? turbulence model and Rayleigh Plesset cavitation model. The NPSH-H curve and the cavitation development in the whole passage were predicted. The blade loading and energy transfer are analyzed for various cavitation conditions. The results show that the existing of the cavities changes the load distribution on blades. With the decrease of NPSH the loads on blades tend to increases in the rear part but decreases in the front part. If NPSH is not so low, sometimes the overall torque may increase slightly, thus the head may also increase slightly. But if the NPSH become low and reach a threshold value, the overall torque will also decrease. At the same time, the energy dissipation in the vortices increases greatly because of the growth of the cavities. These two reasons make the head drop rapidly.

  19. Bubble Tray

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Exploratorium

    2012-06-26

    In this activity, learners use simple materials to create giant bubbles. Learners will explore what gives bubbles their shape, what makes them break or last, what causes the colors and patterns in the soap film, and why do they change? Use this activity to introduce the concepts of surface tension and interference.

  20. Bubble Trouble

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    American Chemical Society

    2011-01-01

    In this activity on page 15 of the PDF, learners measure the amount of bubbles that they make using a detergent. Learners investigate whether adding Epsom salt to the solution affects its "sudsiness"--an important attribute of soap, since sudsy bubbles help soap clean greasy dirt. Use this activity to explore how chemicals can change a material's properties and how substances dissolve.

  1. Passive cavitation imaging with ultrasound arrays

    PubMed Central

    Salgaonkar, Vasant A.; Datta, Saurabh; Holland, Christy K.; Mast, T. Douglas

    2009-01-01

    A method is presented for passive imaging of cavitational acoustic emissions using an ultrasound array, with potential application in real-time monitoring of ultrasound ablation. To create such images, microbubble emissions were passively sensed by an imaging array and dynamically focused at multiple depths. In this paper, an analytic expression for a passive image is obtained by solving the Rayleigh–Sommerfield integral, under the Fresnel approximation, and passive images were simulated. A 192-element array was used to create passive images, in real time, from 520-kHz ultrasound scattered by a 1-mm steel wire. Azimuthal positions of this target were accurately estimated from the passive images. Next, stable and inertial cavitation was passively imaged in saline solution sonicated at 520 kHz. Bubble clusters formed in the saline samples were consistently located on both passive images and B-scans. Passive images were also created using broadband emissions from bovine liver sonicated at 2.2 MHz. Agreement was found between the images and source beam shape, indicating an ability to map therapeutic ultrasound beams in situ. The relation between these broadband emissions, sonication amplitude, and exposure conditions are discussed. PMID:20000921

  2. A method for predicting the number of active bubbles in sonochemical reactors.

    PubMed

    Merouani, Slimane; Ferkous, Hamza; Hamdaoui, Oualid; Rezgui, Yacine; Guemini, Miloud

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the number of active bubbles in acoustic cavitation field is very important for the prediction of the performance of ultrasonic reactors toward most chemical processes induced by ultrasound. The literature in this field is scarce, probably due to the complicated nature of the phenomena. We introduce here a relatively simple semi-empirical method for predicting the number of active bubbles in an acoustic cavitation field. By coupling the bubble dynamics in an acoustical field with chemical kinetics occurring in the bubble during oscillation, the amount of the radical species OH and HO2 and molecular H2O2 released by a single bubble was estimated. Knowing that the H2O2 measured experimentally during sonication of water comes from the recombination of hydroxyl (OH) and perhydroxyl (HO2) radicals in the liquid phase and assuming that in sonochemistry applications, the cavitation is transient and the bubble fragments at the first collapse, the number of bubbles formed per unit time per unit volume is then easily determined using material balances for H2O2, OH and HO2 in the liquid phase. The effect of ultrasonic frequency on the number of active bubbles was examined. It was shown that increasing ultrasonic frequency leads to a substantial increase in the number of bubbles formed in the reactor. PMID:25127247

  3. Effects of viscoelasticity on cavitation in drag reducing fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, R. Y.

    1974-01-01

    To study cavitation inception in polymer solutions, a blow-down water tunnel with short running times was used. Tests were made using 1/4 and 1/2 inch diameter models of hemispherical-nose cylinders. To accurately detect the inception of cavitation, a reliable technique was developed using a continuously operating He-Ne gas laser. The laser beam was adjusted to grazing incidence with the model at the minimum pressure point where cavitation inception was to be expected. A sensitive photocell was placed at ninety degrees to detect the beam. As incipient cavitation occurred, the bubbles caused scattering of the laser beam which was picked up by the photocell. Static pressure near the model in the working section of the tunnel was measured using a solid-state pressure pick-up. The signals from the photocell and the pressure pick-up were recorded on an oscillograph. Velocity field visualization was achieved using one microsecond duration light pulses scattered by small polystryrene latex spheres in the flow.

  4. Three types of cavitation caused by air seeding.

    PubMed

    Shen, Fanyi; Wang, Yuansheng; Cheng, Yanxia; Zhang, Li

    2012-11-01

    There are different opinions of the dynamics of an air bubble entering a xylem conduit. In this paper, we present a thorough mechanical analysis and conclude that there are three types of cavitation caused by air seeding. After an air seed enters a conduit at high xylem pressure P'(1), along with the drop of the water potential, it will expand gradually to a long-shaped bubble and extend continually. This is the first type of air seeding, or the type of expanding gradually. When the xylem pressure is moderate, right after an air seed enters a conduit, it will expand first. Then, as soon as the pressure reaches a threshold the bubble will blow up to form a bubble in long shape, accompanied by acoustic (or ultra-acoustic) emission. It will extend further as xylem pressure decreases continually. This is the second type of air seeding, or the type of expanding-exploding, becoming a long-shaped bubble-lengthening by degrees. In the range of P'(1) ? - 3P(o) (P(o) is atmospheric pressure), soon after an air seed is sucked into a conduit it will explode immediately and the conduit will be full of the gas of the bubble instantly. This is the third type of air seeding, or the type of sudden exploding and filling conduit instantly. The third type is the frequent event in daily life of plant. PMID:23100258

  5. The role of cavitation microjets in the therapeutic applications of ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Brujan, E A

    2004-03-01

    The dynamics of a gas bubble situated in a sound-irradiated liquid and near a rigid boundary was studied theoretically to get a better understanding of the role of cavitation microjets in the therapeutic applications of ultrasound (US). The boundary integral method was adopted to simulate the temporal development of the bubble shape, jet formation during bubble collapse and bubble migration. It was found that the dynamic behaviour of the jet and the migratory characteristics of the bubble depend not only on the distance between bubble and boundary but, also, on the properties of the acoustic field. For frequencies of sound fields smaller than or equal to the resonance frequency of the bubble, jet formation and bubble migration toward the boundary are the main features of the interaction. No jet formation was observed for frequencies of sound fields larger than the resonance frequency of the bubble, and the bubble kept its initial position from the boundary throughout its motion. The pressure generated by the impact of the jet developed during bubble collapse close to the boundary may result in the fragmentation of brittle objects, such as renal calculi, dental tartar or intraocular lens. PMID:15063520

  6. Noise and vibration generated by cavitation in an axial-flow pump

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, Sumio [Ebara Research Company, Limited, Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Hydrodynamics Research and Development

    1994-12-31

    The relationship between pump performance and noise and vibration generated by cavitation was investigated using an axial-flow impeller. At first, the cavitation pattern was classified into four types which are concerned with the area of cavitation occurrence and pump operating conditions relative to pump performance. Pump performance, especially changes in the pump head and the shaft power curves are clearly related to the extent of cavitation growth on the suction side of the blades. The spectrum of pressure measured on the impeller casing depends mainly on the tip clearance cavitation development. Levels of high frequency component over 1 kHz increase remarkable as cavitation grows, and there are no discrete components in the high frequency range. Casing vibration and cavitation noise are concluded to be brought about by pressure fluctuations. From the total point of view of cavitation shock pressure, pressure fluctuation, casing vibration and air-borne noise, one type of index is proposed for the limitation of pump operation under cavitation conditions instead of the 3% head drop point.

  7. Universal scaling law for jets of collapsing bubbles.

    PubMed

    Obreschkow, D; Tinguely, M; Dorsaz, N; Kobel, P; de Bosset, A; Farhat, M

    2011-11-11

    Cavitation bubbles collapsing and rebounding in a pressure gradient ?p form a "microjet" enveloped by a "vapor jet." This Letter presents unprecedented observations of the vapor jets formed in a uniform gravity-induced ?p, modulated aboard parabolic flights. The data uncover that the normalized jet volume is independent of the liquid density and viscosity and proportional to ? ? |?p|R(0)/?p, where R(0) the maximal bubble radius and ?p is the driving pressure. A derivation inspired by "Kelvin-Blake" considerations confirms this law and reveals its negligible dependence of surface tension. We further conjecture that the jet only pierces the bubble boundary if ? ? 4 × 10(-4). PMID:22181734

  8. Two reference time scales for studying the dynamic cavitation of liquid films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, D. C.; Brewe, D. E.

    1992-01-01

    Two formulas, one for the characteristic time of filling a void with the vapor of the surrounding liquid, and one of filling the void by diffusion of the dissolved gas in the liquid, are derived. By comparing these time scales with that of the dynamic operation of oil film bearings, it is concluded that the evaporation process is usually fast enough to fill the cavitation bubble with oil vapor; whereas the diffusion process is much too slow for the dissolved air to liberate itself and enter the cavitation bubble. These results imply that the formation of a two phase fluid in dynamically loaded bearings, as often reported in the literature, is caused by air entrainment. They further indicate a way to simplify the treatment of the dynamic problem of bubble evolution.

  9. Experimental evidence for seismically initiated gas bubble nucleation and growth in groundwater as a mechanism for coseismic borehole water level rise and remotely triggered seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crews, Jackson B.; Cooper, Clay A.

    2014-09-01

    Changes in borehole water levels and remotely triggered seismicity occur in response to near and distant earthquakes at locations around the globe, but the mechanisms for these phenomena are not well understood. Experiments were conducted to show that seismically initiated gas bubble growth in groundwater can trigger a sustained increase in pore fluid pressure consistent in magnitude with observed coseismic borehole water level rise, constituting a physically plausible mechanism for remote triggering of secondary earthquakes through the reduction of effective stress in critically loaded geologic faults. A portion of the CO2 degassing from the Earth's crust dissolves in groundwater where seismic Rayleigh and P waves cause dilational strain, which can reduce pore fluid pressure to or below the bubble pressure, triggering CO2 gas bubble growth in the saturated zone, indicated by a spontaneous buildup of pore fluid pressure. Excess pore fluid pressure was measured in response to the application of 0.1-1.0 MPa, 0.01-0.30 Hz confining stress oscillations to a Berea sandstone core flooded with initially subsaturated aqueous CO2, under conditions representative of a confined aquifer. Confining stress oscillations equivalent to the dynamic stress of the 28 June 1992 Mw 7.3 Landers, California, earthquake Rayleigh wave as it traveled through the Long Valley caldera, and Parkfield, California, increased the pore fluid pressure in the Berea core by an average of 36 ± 15 cm and 23 ± 15 cm of equivalent freshwater head, respectively, in agreement with 41.8 cm and 34 cm rises recorded in wells at those locations.

  10. Mapping of cavitational activity in a pilot plant dyeing equipment.

    PubMed

    Actis Grande, G; Giansetti, M; Pezzin, A; Rovero, G; Sicardi, S

    2015-11-01

    A large number of papers of the literature quote dyeing intensification based on the application of ultrasound (US) in the dyeing liquor. Mass transfer mechanisms are described and quantified, nevertheless these experimental results in general refer to small laboratory apparatuses with a capacity of a few hundred millilitres and extremely high volumetric energy intensity. With the strategy of overcoming the scale-up inaccuracy consequent to the technological application of ultrasounds, a dyeing pilot-plant prototype of suitable liquor capacity (about 40L) and properly simulating several liquor to textile hydraulic relationships was designed by including US transducers with different geometries. Optimal dyeing may be obtained by optimising the distance between transducer and textile material, the liquid height being a non-negligible operating parameter. Hence, mapping the cavitation energy in the machinery is expected to provide basic data on the intensity and distribution of the ultrasonic field in the aqueous liquor. A flat ultrasonic transducer (absorbed electrical power of 600W), equipped with eight devices emitting at 25kHz, was mounted horizontally at the equipment bottom. Considering industrial scale dyeing, liquor and textile substrate are reciprocally displaced to achieve a uniform colouration. In this technology a non uniform US field could affect the dyeing evenness to a large extent; hence, mapping the cavitation energy distribution in the machinery is expected to provide fundamental data and define optimal operating conditions. Local values of the cavitation intensity were recorded by using a carefully calibrated Ultrasonic Energy Meter, which is able to measure the power per unit surface generated by the cavitation implosion of bubbles. More than 200 measurements were recorded to define the map at each horizontal plane positioned at a different distance from the US transducer; tap water was heated at the same temperature used for dyeing tests (60°C). Different liquid flow rates were tested to investigate the effect of the hydrodynamics characterising the equipment. The mapping of the cavitation intensity in the pilot-plant machinery was performed to achieve with the following goals: (a) to evaluate the influence of turbulence on the cavitation intensity, and (b) to determine the optimal distance from the ultrasound device at which a fabric should be positioned, this parameter being a compromise between the cavitation intensity (higher next to the transducer) and the US field uniformity (achieved at some distance from this device). By carrying out dyeing tests of wool fabrics in the prototype unit, consistent results were confirmed by comparison with the mapping of cavitation intensity. PMID:26186865

  11. Acoustic and Cavitation Fields of Shock Wave Therapy Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitnis, Parag V.; Cleveland, Robin O.

    2006-05-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) is considered a viable treatment modality for orthopedic ailments. Despite increasing clinical use, the mechanisms by which ESWT devices generate a therapeutic effect are not yet understood. The mechanistic differences in various devices and their efficacies might be dependent on their acoustic and cavitation outputs. We report acoustic and cavitation measurements of a number of different shock wave therapy devices. Two devices were electrohydraulic: one had a large reflector (HMT Ossatron) and the other was a hand-held source (HMT Evotron); the other device was a pneumatically driven device (EMS Swiss DolorClast Vet). Acoustic measurements were made using a fiber-optic probe hydrophone and a PVDF hydrophone. A dual passive cavitation detection system was used to monitor cavitation activity. Qualitative differences between these devices were also highlighted using a high-speed camera. We found that the Ossatron generated focused shock waves with a peak positive pressure around 40 MPa. The Evotron produced peak positive pressure around 20 MPa, however, its acoustic output appeared to be independent of the power setting of the device. The peak positive pressure from the DolorClast was about 5 MPa without a clear shock front. The DolorClast did not generate a focused acoustic field. Shadowgraph images show that the wave propagating from the DolorClast is planar and not focused in the vicinity of the hand-piece. All three devices produced measurable cavitation with a characteristic time (cavitation inception to bubble collapse) that varied between 95 and 209 ?s for the Ossatron, between 59 and 283 ?s for the Evotron, and between 195 and 431 ?s for the DolorClast. The high-speed camera images show that the cavitation activity for the DolorClast is primarily restricted to the contact surface of the hand-piece. These data indicate that the devices studied here vary in acoustic and cavitation output, which may imply that the mechanisms by which they generate therapeutic effects are different.

  12. CAV2001 Fourth International Symposium on Cavitation Cavitation and the state of stress

    E-print Network

    Joseph, Daniel D.

    CAV2001 Fourth International Symposium on Cavitation Cavitation and the state of stress/2001/paper/Cavitation/cavupdate.tex ca Abstract The problem of the inception of cavitation is formulated in terms of a comparison of the breaking strength or cavitation threshold at each point

  13. A simple model of ultrasound propagation in a cavitating liquid. Part I: Theory, nonlinear attenuation and traveling wave generation

    E-print Network

    Louisnard, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    The bubbles involved in sonochemistry and other applications of cavitation oscillate inertially. A correct estimation of the wave attenuation in such bubbly media requires a realistic estimation of the power dissipated by the oscillation of each bubble, by thermal diffusion in the gas and viscous friction in the liquid. Both quantities and calculated numerically for a single inertial bubble driven at 20 kHz, and are found to be several orders of magnitude larger than the linear prediction. Viscous dissipation is found to be the predominant cause of energy loss for bubbles small enough. Then, the classical nonlinear Caflish equations describing the propagation of acoustic waves in a bubbly liquid are recast and simplified conveniently. The main harmonic part of the sound field is found to fulfill a nonlinear Helmholtz equation, where the imaginary part of the squared wave number is directly correlated with the energy lost by a single bubble. For low acoustic driving, linear theory is recovered, but for larger ...

  14. Cavitation instabilities in hydraulic machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujimoto, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Cavitation instabilities in hydraulic machines, hydro turbines and turbopump inducers, are reviewed focusing on the cause of instabilities. One-dimensional model of hydro turbine system shows that the overload surge is caused by the diffuser effect of the draft tube. Experiments show that this effect also causes the surge mode oscillations at part load. One dimensional model of a cavitating turbopump inducer shows that the mass flow gain factor, representing the cavity volume increase caused by the incidence angle increase is the cause of cavitation surge and rotating cavitation. Two dimensional model of a cavitating turbopump inducer shows that various modes of cavitation instabilities start to occur when the cavity length becomes about 65% of the blade spacing. This is caused by the interaction of the local flow near the cavity trailing edge with the leading edge of the next blade. It was shown by a 3D CFD that this is true also for real cases with tip cavitation. In all cases, it was shown that cavitation instabilities are caused by the fundamental characteristics of cavities that the cavity volume increases with the decrease of ambient pressure or the increase of the incidence angle.

  15. A study on measurement technique for amount of generated acoustic cavitation-investigation of broadband integrated voltage by comparing with sound pressure and sonochemical luminescence-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Takeyoshi; Takeuchi, Shinichi; Kikuchi, Tsuneo

    2012-05-01

    We have been studying a quantitative technique for measuring the amount of generated acoustic cavitation. Cavitation plays a key role in several fields. Therefore, a precise technique for measuring the amount of generated cavitation is required in order to attain a balance between safety and effectiveness. Hence, we have been investigating a measurement technique based on broadband integrated voltage (BIV). BIV is a value integrated from the high-frequency components of broadband noise in frequency spectra of a signal received from a cavitation sensor. Broadband noise is changed by the production of cavitation bubbles. In previous studies, we reported that BIV is a parameter which reflects the energy of broadband noise generated by cavitation. In this study, the spatial distribution of cavitation generation in a water vessel was measured in terms of BIV. As a result, the respective peak positions of BIV and the acoustic pressure differed in the horizontal direction. Although the acoustic pressure showed a peak at the center position, BIV was low at the same position, and the peaks of BIV were found on both sides of the acoustic pressure peak. The reason for this was the absence of cavitation bubbles at the center due to the flow of cavitation bubbles towards the water surface induced by acoustic streaming. Also, BIV was higher around the water surface in the vertical direction. The results revealed a correlation with the emission distribution of sonochemical luminescence. As a consequence, BIV has the potential to become an accurate tool for measuring the spatial distribution of cavitation generation in a water vessel.

  16. The flow structure in the near field of jets and its effect on cavitation inception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalan, Shridhar; Katz, Joseph; Knio, Omar

    1999-11-01

    Cavitation experiments performed in the near field of a 50 mm diameter (D) jet at ReD = 5 × 105, showed inception in the form of inclined ‘cylindrical’ bubbles at axial distances (x/D) less than 0.55, with indices of 2.5. On tripping the boundary layer, cavitation inception occurred at x/D [approximate] 2, as distorted ‘spherical’ bubbles with inception indices of 1.7. To investigate these substantial differences, the near field of the jet was measured using PIV. Data on the primary flow, the strength distribution of the ‘streamwise’ vortices and the velocity profiles within the initial boundary layers were obtained. The untripped case showed a direct transition to three-dimensional flow in the near field (x/D < 0.7) even before rolling up to distinct vortex rings. Strong ‘streamwise’ vortices with strengths up to 25% of the jet velocity times the characteristic wavelength were seen. Cavitation inception occurred in the core of these vortices. In contrast, in the tripped jet the vortex sheet rolled up to the familiar Kelvin Helmholtz vortex rings with weak secondary vortices. Using the measured nuclei distribution, strengths and straining of the ‘streamwise’ structures, the rates of cavitation events were estimated. The estimated results match very well the measured cavitation rates. Also, the Reynolds stresses in the near field of the jet show similar trends and magnitudes to those of Browand & Latigo (1979) and Bell & Mehta (1990) for a plane shear layer.

  17. Application of salicylic acid dosimetry to evaluate hydrodynamic cavitation as an advanced oxidation process.

    PubMed

    Arrojo, S; Nerín, C; Benito, Y

    2007-03-01

    The generation of OH* radicals inside hydrodynamic cavitation bubbles was monitored using a salicylic acid dosimeter. The reaction of this scavenger with OH* produces 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (2,5-DHB) and, to a lesser degree, 2,3-DHB. The former, is a specific reaction product that can be determined with a very high sensitivity using HPLC-IF. This method has been applied to study the influence of the flow-rate and the solution pH for a given cavitation chamber geometry. The salicylic dosimetry has proven especially suitable for the characteristic time scales of hydrodynamic cavitation (higher than those of ultrasonic cavitation), which usually gives rise to recombination of radicals before they can reach the liquid-phase. Working at low pH the hydrophobic salicylic acid migrates to the gas-liquid interface and reacts with the OH* radicals, increasing the trapping efficiency of the dosimeter. Hydrodynamic cavitation works as a very low frequency sonochemical reactor, and therefore its potential as an Advanced Oxidation Process might be limited to reactions at the gas-liquid interface and inner bubble (i.e. with volatiles and/or hydrophobic substances). PMID:17027314

  18. Numerical simulation of shock and bubble dynamics in shockwave lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colonius, Tim; Tanguay, Michel

    2002-11-01

    Theoretical evaluation of the efficacy of stone comminution (and potential for tissue damage) during shockwave lithotripsy requires knowledge of the complex stress fields associated with both the incident focussing shock and the dynamics of cavitation bubbles that it induces. While simple models from geometrical acoustics and subsequent modeling of spherical bubbles in isolation (Gilmore equation) can provide estimates, high-speed photography in vitro reveals a far more complex flow with bubble number densities that are sufficiently high such that collective effects associated with a cloud of bubbles are important. This talk will describe a modeling effort aimed at estimating stresses from these complex lithotripter generated flow fields. We compute the time-dependent, compressible, ensemble-averaged two-phase flow equations with a finite-difference scheme. Detailed modeling of the dynamics of bubbles (on the microscale) and high-order weighted essentially nonoscillatory shock-capturing schemes are employed. The model is compared to hydrophone and passive cavitation detection measurements, as well as qualitative comparison with high-speed photography. Finally, we explore collective bubble mechanisms ranging from defocusing and shielding of the stone (for high bubble densities in the focal region) to enhanced stresses due to concerted cloud collapse in a dual-pulse lithotripsy configuration. [Work supported by NIH P01 DK-43881 and NSF under grant CTS-9979258.

  19. Nutty Bubbles

    E-print Network

    A. M. Ghezelbash; R. B. Mann

    2002-07-12

    We investigate the various time-dependent bubble spacetimes that can be obtained from double analytic continuation of asymptotically locally flat/AdS spacetimes with NUT charge. We find different time-dependent explicit solutions of general relativity from double analytic continuations of Taub-Nut(-AdS) and Kerr-Nut(-AdS) spacetimes. One solution in particular has Milne-like evolution throughout, and another is a NUT-charged generalization of the AdS soliton. These solutions are all four dimensional. In certain situations the NUT charge induces an ergoregion into the bubble spacetime and in other situations it quantitatively modifies the evolution of the bubble, as when rotation is present. In dimensions greater than four, no consistent bubble solutions are found that have only one timelike direction.

  20. Synchronized passive imaging of single cavitation events

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jean-François Aubry; Mathieu Pernot; Daurian Chauvet; Anne-Laure Boch; Mathias Fink; Mickaël Tanter

    2011-01-01

    Passive cavitation detection techniques are usually of relatively low sensitivity to single cavitation events. Moreover, a single-element transducer is generally used, so that the spatial localization of these cavitation events is not possible, or is limited to the probing volume. To both detect and localize single cavitation events over an extended volume, the following experimental set-up has been used and

  1. Exploring Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Geary, Melissa A.

    Bubbles provide an enjoyable and festive medium through which to teach many concepts within the science topics of light, color, chemistry, force, air pressure, electricity, buoyancy, floating, density, among many others. In order to determine the nature of children's engagement within a museum setting and the learning opportunities of playing with bubbles, I went to a children's interactive museum located in a metropolitan city in the Northeastern part of the United States.

  2. Interstellar bubbles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. I. Castor; R. McCray; R. Weaver

    1975-01-01

    Early-type stars blow bubbles in the interstellar medium. The radii of the bubbles are typically 30 pc. Typical conditions in their interiors are temperatures of about 1 million K and densities of about 0.01 per cu cm. The dense shell of swept-up interstellar gas that surrounds them is likely to trap the ionization front and may also have an outer

  3. Bubble diagnostics

    DOEpatents

    Visuri, Steven R. (Livermore, CA); Mammini, Beth M. (Walnut Creek, CA); Da Silva, Luiz B. (Danville, CA); Celliers, Peter M. (Berkeley, CA)

    2003-01-01

    The present invention is intended as a means of diagnosing the presence of a gas bubble and incorporating the information into a feedback system for opto-acoustic thrombolysis. In opto-acoustic thrombolysis, pulsed laser radiation at ultrasonic frequencies is delivered intraluminally down an optical fiber and directed toward a thrombus or otherwise occluded vessel. Dissolution of the occlusion is therefore mediated through ultrasonic action of propagating pressure or shock waves. A vapor bubble in the fluid surrounding the occlusion may form as a result of laser irradiation. This vapor bubble may be used to directly disrupt the occlusion or as a means of producing a pressure wave. It is desirable to detect the formation and follow the lifetime of the vapor bubble. Knowledge of the bubble formation and lifetime yields critical information as to the maximum size of the bubble, density of the absorbed radiation, and properties of the absorbing material. This information can then be used in a feedback system to alter the irradiation conditions.

  4. Could Sonic Cavitation Drive Fusion Reactions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mead, William C.; Gaitan, D. F.

    2000-10-01

    Sonoluminescence (SL) has received much attention in recent years as a fascinating physical phenomenon.^1,2 We have begun to explore the possibility that sonic cavitation reactors could be designed to drive fusion. We discuss key physical processes and present calculations performed to date using the HYADES 1-D hydrodynamics code.^3 Our HYADES calculations have been built on the foundation of a number of hydrodynamics test cases and a representative sonoluminescent bubble example, discussed in a separate report.^4 We present intriguing results of preliminary simulations indicating that achieving detectable fusion yields in the laboratory might be feasible. ^1D. F. Gaitan, L. A. Crum, C. C. Church, and R. A. Roy, J. Acoust. Soc. Amer. 91, 3166 (1992). ^2W. C. Moss, D. B. Clarke, J. W. White, and D. A. Young, Phys. Fluids 6, 2979 (1994). ^3J. T. Larsen and S. M. Lane, JQSRT 51, 179 (1994). ^4"Hydrodynamic Simulations for a Prototypical Sonoluminescent Air-Bubble-in-Water Example," W. C. Mead, Adaptive Network Solutions Research Rpt. SL_Ex1 (July, 2000).

  5. Could Sonic Cavitation Drive Fusion Reactions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mead, William C.; Gaitan, D. F.

    2001-04-01

    Sonoluminescence (SL) has received much attention in recent years as a fascinating physical phenomenon.^1,2 We have begun to explore the possibility that sonic cavitation reactors could be designed to drive fusion. We discuss key physical processes and present calculations performed to date using the HYADES 1-D hydrodynamics code.^3 Our HYADES calculations have been built on the foundation of a number of hydrodynamics test cases and a representative sonoluminescent bubble example, discussed in a separate report.^4 We present intriguing results of preliminary simulations indicating that achieving detectable fusion yields in the laboratory might be feasible. ^1D. F. Gaitan, L. A. Crum, C. C. Church, and R. A. Roy, J. Acoust. Soc. Amer. 91, 3166 (1992). ^2W. C. Moss, D. B. Clarke, J. W. White, and D. A. Young, Phys. Fluids 6, 2979 (1994). ^3J. T. Larsen and S. M. Lane, JQSRT 51, 179 (1994). ^4"Hydrodynamic Simulations for a Prototypical Sonoluminescent Air-Bubble-in-Water Example," W. C. Mead, Adaptive Network Solutions Research Rpt. SL_Ex1 (July, 2000).

  6. Drying by Cavitation and Poroelastic Relaxations in Porous Media with Macroscopic Pores Connected by Nanoscale Throats

    E-print Network

    Olivier Vincent; David A. Sessoms; Erik J. Huber; Jules Guioth; Abraham D. Stroock

    2014-09-30

    We investigate the drying dynamics of porous media with two pore diameters separated by several orders of magnitude. Nanometer-sized pores at the edge of our samples prevent air entry, while drying proceeds by heterogeneous nucleation of vapor bubbles (cavitation) in the liquid in micrometer-sized voids within the sample. We show that the dynamics of cavitation and drying are set by the interplay of the deterministic poroelastic mass transport in the porous medium and the stochastic nucleation process. Spatio-temporal patterns emerge in this unusual reaction-diffusion system, with temporal oscillations in the drying rate and variable roughness of the drying front.

  7. Cavitation-resistant inducer

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, C.; Subbaraman, M.R.

    1989-06-13

    An improvement in an inducer for a pump is disclosed wherein the inducer includes a hub, a plurality of radially extending substantially helical blades and a wall member extending about and encompassing an outer periphery of the blades. The improvement comprises forming adjacent pairs of blades and the hub to provide a substantially rectangular cross-sectional flow area which cross-sectional flow area decreases from the inlet end of the inducer to a discharge end of the inducer, resulting in increased inducer efficiency improved suction performance, reduced susceptibility to cavitation, reduced susceptibility to hub separation and reduced fabrication costs. 11 figs.

  8. Cavitation-resistant inducer

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, Charlton (Calabasas, CA); Subbaraman, Maria R. (Canoga Park, CA)

    1989-01-01

    An improvement in an inducer for a pump wherein the inducer includes a hub, a plurality of radially extending substantially helical blades and a wall member extending about and encompassing an outer periphery of the blades. The improvement comprises forming adjacent pairs of blades and the hub to provide a substantially rectangular cross-sectional flow area which cross-sectional flow area decreases from the inlet end of the inducer to a discharge end of the inducer, resulting in increased inducer efficiency improved suction performance, reduced susceptibility to cavitation, reduced susceptibility to hub separation and reduced fabrication costs.

  9. Measurement Of Gas Bubbles In Mercury Using Proton Radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Riemer, Bernie [ORNL] [ORNL; Bingham, Philip R [ORNL] [ORNL; Mariam, Fesseha G [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Merrill, Frank E [ORNL] [ORNL

    2007-01-01

    An experiment using proton radiography on a small mercury loop for testing gas bubble injection was conducted at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) in December 2006. Small gas bubble injection is one of the approaches under development to reduce cavitation damage in the U.S. Spallation Neutron Source mercury target vessel. Several hundred radiograph images were obtained as the test loop was operated over range of conditions that included two jet type bubble generators, two needle type bubble generators, various mercury flow speeds and gas injection rates, and use of helium, argon and xenon. This paper will describe the analysis of the radiograph images and present the obtained bubble measurement data.

  10. Cavitation Inception on Microparticles: A Self-Propelled Particle Accelerator

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Manish Arora; Claus-Dieter Ohl; Knud Aage Mørch

    2004-01-01

    Corrugated, hydrophilic particles with diameters between 30 and 150 mum are found to cause cavitation inception at their surfaces when they are exposed to a short, intensive tensile stress wave. The growing cavity accelerates the particle into translatory motion until the tensile stress decreases, and subsequently the particle separates from the cavity. The cavity growth and particle detachment are modeled

  11. The Speed of Axial Propagation of a Cylindrical Bubble Through a Cylindrical Vortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shariff, Karim; Mansour, Nagi N. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Inspired by the rapid elongation of air columns injected into vortices by dolphins, we present an exact inviscid solution for the axial speed (assumed steady) of propagation of the tip of a semi-infinite cylindrical bubble along the axis of a cylindrical vortex. The bubble is assumed to be held at constant pressure by being connected to a reservoir, the lungs of the dolphin, say. For a given bubble pressure, there is a modest critical rotation rate above which steadily propagating bubbles exist. For a bubble at ambient pressure, the propagation speed of the bubble (relative to axial velocity within the vortex) varies between 0.5 and 0.6 of the maximum rotational speed of the vortex. Surprisingly, the bubble tip can propagate (almost as rapidly) even when the pressure minimum in the vortex core is greater than the bubble pressure; in this case, solutions exhibit a dimple on the nose of the bubble. A situation important for incipient vortex cavitation, and one which dolphins also demonstrate, is elongation of a free bubble, i.e., one whose internal pressure may vary. Under the assumption that the acceleration term is small (checked a posteriori), the steady solution is applied at each instant during the elongation. Three types of behavior are then possible depending on physical parameters and initial conditions: (A) Unabated elongation with slowly increasing bubble pressure, and nearly constant volume. Volume begins to decrease in the late stages. (B1) Elongation with decreasing bubble pressure. A limit point of the steady solution is encountered at a finite bubble length. (B2) Unabated elongation with decreasing bubble pressure and indefinite creation of volume. This is made possible by the existence of propagating solutions at bubble pressures below the minimum vortex pressure. As the bubble stretches, its radius initially decreases but then becomes constant; this is also observed in experiments on incipient vortex cavitation.

  12. Plastic deformation of a magnesium oxide 001-plane surface produced by cavitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hattori, S.; Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.; Okada, T.

    1986-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to examine plastic deformation of a cleaved single-crystal magnesium oxide 001-plane surface exposed to cavitation. Cavitation damage experiments were carried out in distilled water at 25 C by using a magnetostrictive oscillator in close proximity (2 mm) to the surface of the cleaved specimen. The dislocation-etch-pit patterns induced by cavitation were examined and compared with that of microhardness indentations. The results revealed that dislocation-etch-pit patterns around hardness indentations contain both screw and edge dislocations, while the etch-pit patterns on the surface exposed to cavitation contain only screw dislocations. During cavitation, deformation occurred in a thin surface layer, accompanied by work-hardening of the ceramic. The row of screw dislocations underwent a stable growth, which was analyzed crystallographically.

  13. Application of two turbulence models for computation of cavitating flows in a centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, M.; Guo, Q.; Zhou, L. J.; Wang, Z. W.; Wang, X.

    2013-12-01

    To seek a better numerical method to simulate the cavitating flow field in a centrifugal pump, the applications between RNG k- ? and LES turbulence model were compared by using the Zwart-Gerber-Belamri cavitation model. It was found that both the models give almost the same results with respect to pump performance and cavitation evolutions including growth, local contraction, stability and separation in the impeller passage. But the LES model can not only capture the pump suction recirculation and the low frequency fluctuation caused by it, but also combine the changes of the shaft frequency amplitude acting on the impeller with the cavitation unstable characteristics. Thus the LES model has more advantages than RNG k- ? model in calculating the unsteady cavitating flow in a centrifugal pump.

  14. real-world economics review, issue no. 46 The housing bubble and the financial crisis

    E-print Network

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    in the current financial crisis is the housing bubble. The irrational exuberance surrounding this bubble created bubble in the United States grew up alongside the stock bubble in the mid-90s. The logic of the growth-prices-is-it-real-or-is-it-another-bubble/]. 2 Shiller, R. 2006. Irrational Exuberance (2 nd edition). Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press

  15. Dynamics of Vapour Bubbles in Nucleate Boiling. 2; Evolution of Thermally Controlled Bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buyevich, Yu A.; Webbon, Bruce W.; Callaway, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The previously developed dynamic theory of growth and detachment of vapour bubbles under conditions of nucleate pool boiling is applied to study motion and deformation of a bubble evolving at a single nucleation site. The bubble growth is presumed to be thermally controlled, and two components of heat transfer to the bubble are accounted of: the one from the bulk of surrounding liquid and the one due to heat conduction across a liquid microlayer formed underneath the bubble. Bubble evolution is governed by the buoyancy and an effective surface tension force, both the forces making the bubble centre of mass move away from the wall and, thus, assisting its detachment. Buoyancy-controlled and surface-tension-controlled regimes are considered separately in a meticulous way. The duration of the whole process of bubble evolution till detachment, the rate of growth, and the bubble departure size are found as functions of time and physical and operating parameters. Some repeatedly observed phenomena, such as an influence of gravity on the growth rate, are explained. Inferences of the model agree qualitatively with available experimental evidence, and conclusions pertaining to the dependence on gravity of the bubble radius at detachment and the whole time of the bubble development when being attached to the wall are confirmed quantitatively.

  16. Design approach for cavitation tolerant hydrofoils and blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amromin, E. L.

    2014-02-01

    Cavitation inception and growth on conventional shape hydrofoils and blades leads initially to a jump of their flow-induced noise, further to an amplification of flow-induced vibration with frequently assisted erosion and finally, to a lift/thrust decrease combined with the drag increase. These undesirable cavitation effects can be mitigated or even suppressed for stable partial cavities experiencing no tail pulsations. A design approach enhancing performance of cavitating hydrofoils/blades by maintaining stable partial cavities is described. Experimental data manifesting an increase of hydrofoil lift with reduction of its drag and of force pulsations by such design are provided. Application of this design approach to propeller/turbine blades and advantages of its employment for blades operating in non-uniform incoming flows are analyzed. The possibility of an increase of the lift to drag ratio and of a reduction of the cavity volume oscillation in gust flows for blade sections is numerically manifested.

  17. Dynamic response of cavitating turbomachines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, S. L.

    1976-01-01

    Stimulated by the pogo instability encountered in many liquid propellant rockets, the dynamic behavior of cavitating inducers is discussed. An experimental facility where the upstream and downstream flows of a cavitating inducer could be perturbed was constructed and tested. The upstream and downstream pressure and mass flow fluctuations were measured. Matrices representing the transfer functions across the inducer pump were calculated from these measurements and from the hydraulic system characteristics for two impellers in various states of cavitation. The transfer matrices when plotted against the perturbing frequency showed significant departure from steady state or quasi-steady predictions especially at higher frequencies.

  18. Analysis of freeze-thaw embolism in conifers. The interaction between cavitation pressure and tracheid size.

    PubMed

    Pittermann, Jarmila; Sperry, John S

    2006-01-01

    Ice formation in the xylem sap produces air bubbles that under negative xylem pressures may expand and cause embolism in the xylem conduits. We used the centrifuge method to evaluate the relationship between freeze-thaw embolism and conduit diameter across a range of xylem pressures (Px) in the conifers Pinus contorta and Juniperus scopulorum. Vulnerability curves showing loss of conductivity (embolism) with Px down to -8 MPa were generated with versus without superimposing a freeze-thaw treatment. In both species, the freeze-thaw plus water-stress treatment caused more embolism than water stress alone. We estimated the critical conduit diameter (Df) above which a tracheid will embolize due to freezing and thawing and found that it decreased from 35 microm at a Px of -0.5 MPa to 6 microm at -8 MPa. Further analysis showed that the proportionality between diameter of the air bubble nucleating the cavitation and the diameter of the conduit (kL) declined with increasingly negative Px. This suggests that the bubbles causing cavitation are smaller in proportion to tracheid diameter in narrow tracheids than in wider ones. A possible reason for this is that the rate of dissolving increases with bubble pressure, which is inversely proportional to bubble diameter (La Place's law). Hence, smaller bubbles shrink faster than bigger ones. Last, we used the empirical relationship between Px and Df to model the freeze-thaw response in conifer species. PMID:16377751

  19. Tiny Bubbles

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Glenn Dolphin

    In this activity, which can be performed as a demonstration by the teacher or by the students themselves, carbon dioxide is generated in a fish tank using sodium bicarbonate and vinegar. The students can observe as the accumulating carbon dioxide extinguishes candles of different heights, marking rising levels of CO2 in the tank. They can also blow soap bubbles (which contain air) into the tank and observe them floating on the denser CO2 at first, then sinking as the gas diffuses through the soap film that forms the bubbles.

  20. Title: Combined passive detection and ultrafast active imaging of cavitation events induced by short pulses of high intensity

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    ;58(3):517-32" DOI : 10.1109/TUFFC.2011.1836 #12;2 Bubble nucleation was induced with a focused transducer (660kHz, f is possible using short ultrasonic excitations of high amplitude, and is required for ultrasound cavitation1-10Jul2011 Author manuscript, published in "IEEE Trans Ultrason Ferroelectr Freq Control 2011

  1. Current research in cavitating fluid films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewe, D. E.; Ball, J. H.; Khonsari, M. M.

    1990-07-01

    A review of the current research of cavitation in fluid films is presented. Phenomena and experimental observations include gaseous cavitation, vapor cavitation, and gas entrainment. Cavitation in flooded, starved, and dynamically loaded journal bearings, as well as squeeze films are reviewed. Observations of cavitation damage in bearings and the possibility of cavitation between parallel plates with microasperities were discussed. The transcavity fluid transport process, meniscus motion and geometry or form of the film during rupture, and reformation were summarized. Performance effects were related to heat transfer models in the cavitated region and hysteresis influence on rotor dynamics coefficients. A number of cavitation algorithms was presented together with solution procedures using the finite difference and finite element methods. Although Newtonian fluids were assumed in most of the discussions, the effect of non-Newtonian fluids on cavitation was also discussed.

  2. Effects of cavitation-enhanced heating in high-intensity focused ultrasound treatment on shear wave imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, Ryosuke; Nagaoka, Ryo; Takagi, Ryo; Goto, Kota; Yoshizawa, Shin; Saijo, Yoshifumi; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2015-07-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy is a less invasive method of cancer treatment, in which ultrasound is generated outside the body and focused at the tumor tissue to be thermally coagulated. To enhance the safety, accuracy, and efficiency of HIFU therapy, “multiple-triggered HIFU” has been proposed as a method of cavitation-enhanced heating to shorten treatment time. In this study, we also propose shear wave elastography (SWE) to noninvasively monitor the cavitation-enhanced heating. Results show that the increase in shear wave velocity was observed in the coagulation area, but it was significantly slower when cavitation occurred. This suggests that the cavitation-enhanced heating requires a significantly longer cooling time before the accurate measurement of shear modulus than heating without generating bubbles.

  3. Effect of controlled offset of focal position in cavitation-enhanced high-intensity focused ultrasound treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Kota; Takagi, Ryo; Miyashita, Takuya; Jimbo, Hayato; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2015-07-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a noninvasive treatment for tumors such as cancer. In this method, ultrasound is generated outside the body and focused to the target tissue. Therefore, physical and mental stresses on the patient are minimal. A drawback of the HIFU treatment is a long treatment time for a large tumor due to the small therapeutic volume by a single exposure. Enhancing the heating effect of ultrasound by cavitation bubbles may solve this problem. However, this is rather difficult because cavitation clouds tend to be formed backward from the focal point while ultrasonic intensity for heating is centered at the focal point. In this study, the focal points of the trigger pulses to generate cavitation were offset forward from those of the heating ultrasound to match the cavitation clouds with the heating patterns. Results suggest that the controlled offset of focal points makes the thermal coagulation more predictable.

  4. Optical and acoustic monitoring of bubble cloud dynamics at a tissue-fluid interface in ultrasound tissue erosion

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhen; Hall, Timothy L.; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Cain, Charles A.

    2009-01-01

    Short, high-intensity ultrasound pulses have the ability to achieve localized, clearly demarcated erosion in soft tissue at a tissue-fluid interface. The primary mechanism for ultrasound tissue erosion is believed to be acoustic cavitation. To monitor the cavitating bubble cloud generated at a tissue-fluid interface, an optical attenuation method was used to record the intensity loss of transmitted light through bubbles. Optical attenuation was only detected when a bubble cloud was seen using high speed imaging. The light attenuation signals correlated well with a temporally changing acoustic backscatter which is an excellent indicator for tissue erosion. This correlation provides additional evidence that the cavitating bubble cloud is essential for ultrasound tissue erosion. The bubble cloud collapse cycle and bubble dissolution time were studied using the optical attenuation signals. The collapse cycle of the bubble cloud generated by a high intensity ultrasound pulse of 4–14 ?s was ~40–300 ?s depending on the acoustic parameters. The dissolution time of the residual bubbles was tens of ms long. This study of bubble dynamics may provide further insight into previous ultrasound tissue erosion results. PMID:17471753

  5. Cavitation erosion behaviour of niobium

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. F. Brunatto; A. N. Allenstein; C. L. M. Allenstein; A. J. A. Buschinelli

    Cavitation erosion behaviour of niobium was investigated by means of a 20kHz ultrasonic vibrator at peak-to-peak amplitude of 50?m, aiming to determine the niobium potential as a material for the manufacturing of hydraulic machine components. The study was emphasized for the three first cavitation stages of the cumulative erosion–time curve. The modification of the niobium surface morphology as a function

  6. Modeling of Bubble Oscillations Induced by a Lithotripter Pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreider, Wayne; Bailey, Michael R.; Crum, Lawrence A.

    2006-05-01

    In therapeutic applications of biomedical ultrasound, it is important to understand the behavior of cavitation bubbles. Herein, the dynamics of a single, spherical bubble in water are modeled using the Gilmore equation closed by an energy balance on bubble contents for calculation of pressures inside the bubble. Moreover, heat and mass transfer at the bubble wall are incorporated using the Eller-Flynn zeroth-order approximation for gas diffusion, an estimation of non-equilibrium phase change based on the kinetic theory of gases, and assumed shapes for the spatial temperature distribution in the surrounding liquid. Bubble oscillations predicted by this model are investigated in response to a lithotripter shock wave. Model results indicate that vapor trapped inside the bubble during collapse plays a significant role in the afterbounce behavior and is sensitively dependent upon the ambient liquid temperature. Initial experiments have been conducted to quantify the afterbounce behavior of a single bubble as a function of ambient temperature; however, the results imply that many bubbles are present and collectively determine the collapse characteristics.

  7. Bubble cloud dynamics in a high-pressure spherical resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Phillip Andrew

    A bubble cloud is a population of bubbles confined to a region within a fluid. Bubble clouds play a large role in a variety of naturally occurring phenomena and man-made applications (e.g., ocean noise, cavitation damage, sonoluminescence, ultrasonic cleaning, drug delivery, lithotripsy). It is important, therefore, to understand the behavior of bubble clouds so that their effects may be enhanced or diminished as desired. This work explores and characterizes the properties of bubble clouds nucleated inside a high-pressure spherical acoustic resonator, in connection with recent interest in acoustic inertial confinement fusion (acoustic ICF). A laser system was developed to repeatably nucleate a cloud of bubbles inside the resonator. The resulting events were then observed, primarily with schlieren imaging methods. Preliminary studies of the bubble cloud dynamics showed the sensitivity of the initial cloud to nucleation parameters including the phase of nucleation, the laser energy, and the acoustic power. After many acoustic cycles, some bubble clouds are observed to evolve into a tight cluster. The formation of these clusters correlates with initial bubble distributions which have a large cloud interaction parameter, ?. Cluster dynamics are seen to be largely driven by reconverging shock waves from previous collapses reflected from the resonator's interior surface. Initial expansion of the cluster boundary is on the order of 8 mm/µs and the maximum radius approaches 3 mm. Shock pressures are estimated to be > 10 GPa at a radius of 100 µm using weak shock theory.

  8. Cavitation Foil Damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stringham, Roger

    2006-03-01

    We have developed a much improved cavitation system for sonofusion, compared to our initial systems. The new system is a low mass 1.6 MHz unit that produces 40 watts of excess heat with an acoustic input power of 17 watts. The increase in frequency (to 1.6 MHz from 40 KHz) increases the heat, improves the performance, shows reproducible results, and indicates durability. The calorimetry is a simple in flow through system. The difference between output and input temperature (Tout - Tin) at steady- state, times the flow gives the power (calories/s) output of the sonofusion reactor. The energy density of this system is of the order of commercial energy suppliers.

  9. Effect of shaft frequency on cavitation in a journal bearing for noncentered circular whirl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewe, David E.; Khonsari, M. M.

    The effect of shaft frequency on the performance of a submerged journal undergoing noncentered circular whirl is examined. The main emphasis of the paper is on the behavior of the vapor cavitation bubble and its effect on the bearing performance as a function of frequency. A cavitation algorithm due to Elrod was implemented in a computer program which solves a time-dependent Reynolds equation. This algorithm automatically handles the boundary conditions by using a switch function and a control volume approach which conserves mass throughout the entire flow. The shaft frequencies in this investigation ranged from 0 rad/s (squeeze-film damper) to -104 rad/s (a case in which oil-whip condition was produced momentarily). For the particular vibration amplitude chosen in this investigation it was observed that vapor cavitation had an effect on the load components for the full range of shaft frequencies investigated.

  10. Incidence of cavitation in the fragmentation process of extracorporeal shock wave lithotriptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rink, K.; Delacrétaz, G.; Pittomvils, G.; Boving, R.; Lafaut, J. P.

    1994-05-01

    The fragmentation mechanism occurring in extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) is investigated using a fiber optic stress sensing technique. With our technique, we demonstrate that cavitation is a major cause of fragmentation in ESWL procedures. When a target is placed in the operating area of the lithotriptor, two shock waves are detected. The first detected shock wave corresponds to the incoming shock wave generated by the lithotriptor. The second shock wave, detected some hundreds of microseconds later, is generated in situ. It results from the collapse of a cavitation bubble, formed by the reflection of the incoming shock wave at the target boundary. This cavitation induced shock wave generates the largest stress in the target area according to our stress sensing measurements.

  11. Noninvasive thrombolysis using pulsed ultrasound cavitation therapy - histotripsy.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Adam D; Cain, Charles A; Duryea, Alexander P; Yuan, Lingqian; Gurm, Hitinder S; Xu, Zhen

    2009-12-01

    Clinically available thrombolysis techniques are limited by either slow reperfusion (drugs) or invasiveness (catheters) and carry significant risks of bleeding. In this study, the feasibility of using histotripsy as an efficient and noninvasive thrombolysis technique was investigated. Histotripsy fractionates soft tissue through controlled cavitation using focused, short, high-intensity ultrasound pulses. In vitro blood clots formed from fresh canine blood were treated by histotripsy. The treatment was applied using a focused 1-MHz transducer, with five-cycle pulses at a pulse repetition rate of 1kHz. Acoustic pressures varying from 2 to 12MPa peak negative pressure were tested. Our results show that histotripsy can perform effective thrombolysis with ultrasound energy alone. Histotripsy thrombolysis only occurred at peak negative pressure >or=6MPa when initiation of a cavitating bubble cloud was detected using acoustic backscatter monitoring. Blood clots weighing 330mg were completely broken down by histotripsy in 1.5 to 5min. The clot was fractionated to debris with >96% weight smaller than 5mum diameter. Histotripsy thrombolysis treatment remained effective under a fast, pulsating flow (a circulatory model) as well as in static saline. Additionally, we observed that fluid flow generated by a cavitation cloud can attract, trap and further break down clot fragments. This phenomenon may provide a noninvasive method to filter and eliminate hazardous emboli during thrombolysis. PMID:19854563

  12. Non-Invasive Thrombolysis Using Pulsed Ultrasound Cavitation Therapy – Histotripsy

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, Adam D.; Cain, Charles A.; Duryea, Alexander P.; Yuan, Lingqian; Gurm, Hitinder S.; Xu, Zhen

    2009-01-01

    Clinically available thrombolysis techniques are limited by either slow reperfusion (drugs) or invasiveness (catheters), and carry significant risks of bleeding. In this study, the feasibility of using histotripsy as an efficient and non-invasive thrombolysis technique was investigated. Histotripsy fractionates soft tissue through controlled cavitation using focused, short, high-intensity ultrasound pulses. In-vitro blood clots formed from fresh canine blood were treated by histotripsy. The treatment was applied using a focused 1-MHz transducer, with 5-cycle pulses at a pulse repetition rate of 1 kHz. Acoustic pressures varying from 2 – 12 MPa peak negative pressure were tested. Our results show that histotripsy can perform effective thrombolysis with ultrasound energy alone. Histotripsy thrombolysis only occurred at peak negative pressure ?6 MPa when initiation of a cavitating bubble cloud was detected using acoustic backscatter monitoring. Blood clots weighing 330 mg were completely broken down by histotripsy in 1.5 – 5 minutes. The clot was fractionated to debris with >96% weight smaller than 5 ?m diameter. Histotripsy thrombolysis treatment remained effective under a fast, pulsating flow (a circulatory model) as well as in static saline. Additionally, we observed that fluid flow generated by a cavitation cloud can attract, trap, and further break down clot fragments. This phenomenon may provide a non-invasive method to filter and eliminate hazardous emboli during thrombolysis. PMID:19854563

  13. "Cavitation in a Mercury Target"

    SciTech Connect

    West, C.D.

    2000-09-06

    Recent theoretical work on the formation of bubble nucleation centers by energetic particles leads to some reasonably credible calculations of the maximum negative pressure that might be sustained without bubble formation in the mercury target of the Spallation Neutron Source.

  14. On the dynamics and acoustics of cloud cavitation on an oscillating hydrofoil

    SciTech Connect

    McKenney, E.A.; Brennen, C.E. [California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1994-12-31

    Observations have been made of the growth and collapse of surface and cloud cavitation on a finite aspect ratio hydrofoil oscillating in pitch. The cavitation was recorded using both still and high-speed motion picture photography, and the variations with cavitation number and reduced frequency of oscillation were investigated. The noise generated by the cavity collapse was also measured and analyzed. The acoustic signals associated with individual cavity collapse events have been synchronized with the motion pictures, providing insights into the correspondence between the flow structures involved in the cavity collapse process and the sound generated by them.

  15. Effects of ultrasound frequency and tissue stiffness on the histotripsy intrinsic threshold for cavitation.

    PubMed

    Vlaisavljevich, Eli; Lin, Kuang-Wei; Maxwell, Adam; Warnez, Matthew T; Mancia, Lauren; Singh, Rahul; Putnam, Andrew J; Fowlkes, Brian; Johnsen, Eric; Cain, Charles; Xu, Zhen

    2015-06-01

    Histotripsy is an ultrasound ablation method that depends on the initiation of a cavitation bubble cloud to fractionate soft tissue. Previous work has indicated that a cavitation cloud can be formed by a single pulse with one high-amplitude negative cycle, when the negative pressure amplitude directly exceeds a pressure threshold intrinsic to the medium. We hypothesize that the intrinsic threshold in water-based tissues is determined by the properties of the water inside the tissue, and changes in tissue stiffness or ultrasound frequency will have a minimal impact on the histotripsy intrinsic threshold. To test this hypothesis, the histotripsy intrinsic threshold was investigated both experimentally and theoretically. The probability of cavitation was measured by subjecting tissue phantoms with adjustable mechanical properties and ex vivo tissues to a histotripsy pulse of 1-2 cycles produced by 345-kHz, 500-kHz, 1.5-MHz and 3-MHz histotripsy transducers. Cavitation was detected and characterized by passive cavitation detection and high-speed photography, from which the probability of cavitation was measured versus pressure amplitude. The results revealed that the intrinsic threshold (the negative pressure at which probability = 0.5) is independent of stiffness for Young's moduli (E) <1 MPa, with only a small increase (?2-3 MPa) in the intrinsic threshold for tendon (E = 380 MPa). Additionally, results for all samples revealed only a small increase of ?2-3 MPa when the frequency was increased from 345 kHz to 3 MHz. The intrinsic threshold was measured to be between 24.7 and 30.6 MPa for all samples and frequencies tested in this study. Overall, the results of this study indicate that the intrinsic threshold to initiate a histotripsy bubble cloud is not significantly affected by tissue stiffness or ultrasound frequency in the hundreds of kilohertz to megahertz range. PMID:25766571

  16. EXPERIMENTS AND MODELLING OF CAVITATING FLOWS IN VENTURI: ATTACHED SHEET CAVITATION

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 EXPERIMENTS AND MODELLING OF CAVITATING FLOWS IN VENTURI: ATTACHED SHEET CAVITATION S. Barre* , J and numerical studies were carried out to analyse cavitating flows and to describe the two- phase flow structures of attached sheet cavitation in Venturi geometries. New double optical probe measurements were

  17. CFD VALIDATION OF HYDROFOIL PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS IN CAVITATING AND NON-CAVITATING FLOWS

    E-print Network

    CFD VALIDATION OF HYDROFOIL PERFORMANCE CHARACTERISTICS IN CAVITATING AND NON-CAVITATING FLOWS 6102 Dear Sir: I submit this report entitled "CFD Validation of Hydrofoil Performance CharacteristicsFOAM to assess the performance characteristics of a hydrofoil in both sub-cavitating and fully cavitating flows

  18. Cavitation effect of holmium laser pulse applied to ablation of hard tissue underwater.

    PubMed

    Lü, Tao; Xiao, Qing; Xia, Danqing; Ruan, Kai; Li, Zhengjia

    2010-01-01

    To overcome the inconsecutive drawback of shadow and schlieren photography, the complete dynamics of cavitation bubble oscillation or ablation products induced by a single holmium laser pulse [2.12 microm, 300 micros (FWHM)] transmitted in different core diameter (200, 400, and 600 microm) fibers is recorded by means of high-speed photography. Consecutive images from high-speed cameras can stand for the true and complete process of laser-water or laser-tissue interaction. Both laser pulse energy and fiber diameter determine cavitation bubble size, which further determines acoustic transient amplitudes. Based on the pictures taken by high-speed camera and scanned by an optical coherent microscopy (OCM) system, it is easily seen that the liquid layer at the distal end of the fiber plays an important role during the process of laser-tissue interaction, which can increase ablation efficiency, decrease heat side effects, and reduce cost. PMID:20799845

  19. Properties of sound attenuation around a two-dimensional underwater vehicle with a large cavitation number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Peng-Cheng; Pan, Guang

    2015-06-01

    Due to the high speed of underwater vehicles, cavitation is generated inevitably along with the sound attenuation when the sound signal traverses through the cavity region around the underwater vehicle. The linear wave propagation is studied to obtain the influence of bubbly liquid on the acoustic wave propagation in the cavity region. The sound attenuation coefficient and the sound speed formula of the bubbly liquid are presented. Based on the sound attenuation coefficients with various vapor volume fractions, the attenuation of sound intensity is calculated under large cavitation number conditions. The result shows that the sound intensity attenuation is fairly small in a certain condition. Consequently, the intensity attenuation can be neglected in engineering. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51279165 and 51479170) and the National Defense Basic Scientific Research Program of China (Grant No. B2720133014).

  20. Importance of the implosion of ESWL-induced cavitation bubbles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Delacrétaz; K. Rink; G. Pittomvils; J. P. Lafaut; H. Vandeursen; R. Boving

    1995-01-01

    The damage induced by an extracorporeal shock wave lithotripter is observed with a fiber optic stress sensing technique. When a stone is placed in the focus, besides the expected stress induced by the incoming shock wave emitted by the ESWL apparatus, a second delayed stress is observed some hundreds of microseconds later. The second stress is induced by a shock

  1. Quasiconformal Hyperelasticity Cavitation is not Allowed

    E-print Network

    Kovalev, Leonid

    Quasiconformal Hyperelasticity when Cavitation is not Allowed Tadeusz Iwaniec Jani Onninen Abstract that the lower bound at (3) prevents all sorts of cavitation from growing to higher dimensions. For instance

  2. Spatial control of cavitation in therapeutic ultrasound

    E-print Network

    Gauthier, Thomas P., 1980-

    2005-01-01

    Inertial cavitation has been implicated as the primary mechanism for a host of emerging applications. In all these applications, the main concern is to induce cavitation in perfectly controlled locations in the field; this ...

  3. Numerical and experimental investigations on cavitation erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortes Patella, R.; Archer, A.; Flageul, C.

    2012-11-01

    A method is proposed to predict cavitation damage from cavitating flow simulations. For this purpose, a numerical process coupling cavitating flow simulations and erosion models was developed and applied to a two-dimensional (2D) hydrofoil tested at TUD (Darmstadt University of Technology, Germany) [1] and to a NACA 65012 tested at LMH-EPFL (Lausanne Polytechnic School) [2]. Cavitation erosion tests (pitting tests) were carried out and a 3D laser profilometry was used to analyze surfaces damaged by cavitation [3]. The method allows evaluating the pit characteristics, and mainly the volume damage rates. The paper describes the developed erosion model, the technique of cavitation damage measurement and presents some comparisons between experimental results and numerical damage predictions. The extent of cavitation erosion was correctly estimated in both hydrofoil geometries. The simulated qualitative influence of flow velocity, sigma value and gas content on cavitation damage agreed well with experimental observations.

  4. Cavitation effect of holmium laser pulse applied to ablation of hard tissue underwater

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tao Lü; Qing Xiao; Danqing Xia; Kai Ruan; Zhengjia Li

    2010-01-01

    To overcome the inconsecutive drawback of shadow and schlieren photography, the complete dynamics of cavitation bubble oscillation or ablation products induced by a single holmium laser pulse [2.12 mum, 300 mus (FWHM)] transmitted in different core diameter (200, 400, and 600 mum) fibers is recorded by means of high-speed photography. Consecutive images from high-speed cameras can stand for the true

  5. Detection of cavitation vortex in hydraulic turbines using acoustic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candel, I.; Bunea, F.; Dunca, G.; Bucur, D. M.; Ioana, C.; Reeb, B.; Ciocan, G. D.

    2014-03-01

    Cavitation phenomena are known for their destructive capacity in hydraulic machineries and are caused by the pressure decrease followed by an implosion when the cavitation bubbles find an adverse pressure gradient. A helical vortex appears in the turbine diffuser cone at partial flow rate operation and can be cavitating in its core. Cavity volumes and vortex frequencies vary with the under-pressure level. If the vortex frequency comes close to one of the eigen frequencies of the turbine, a resonance phenomenon may occur, the unsteady fluctuations can be amplified and lead to important turbine and hydraulic circuit damage. Conventional cavitation vortex detection techniques are based on passive devices (pressure sensors or accelerometers). Limited sensor bandwidths and low frequency response limit the vortex detection and characterization information provided by the passive techniques. In order to go beyond these techniques and develop a new active one that will remove these drawbacks, previous work in the field has shown that techniques based on acoustic signals using adapted signal content to a particular hydraulic situation, can be more robust and accurate. The cavitation vortex effects in the water flow profile downstream hydraulic turbines runner are responsible for signal content modifications. Basic signal techniques use narrow band signals traveling inside the flow from an emitting transducer to a receiving one (active sensors). Emissions of wide band signals in the flow during the apparition and development of the vortex embeds changes in the received signals. Signal processing methods are used to estimate the cavitation apparition and evolution. Tests done in a reduced scale facility showed that due to the increasing flow rate, the signal -- vortex interaction is seen as modifications on the received signal's high order statistics and bandwidth. Wide band acoustic transducers have a higher dynamic range over mechanical elements; the system's reaction time is reduced, resulting in a faster detection of the unwanted effects. The paper will present an example of this new investigation technique on a vortex generator in the test facility that belongs to ICPE- CA.

  6. Simulation of the effects of cavitation and anatomy in the shock path of model lithotripters

    PubMed Central

    Krimmel, Jeff; Colonius, Tim; Tanguay, Michel

    2011-01-01

    We report on recent efforts to develop predictive models for the pressure and other flow variables in the focal region of shock wave lithotripters. Baseline simulations of three representative lithotripters (electrohydraulic, electromagnetic, and piezoelectric) compare favorably with in vitro experiments (in a water bath). We proceed to model and investigate how shock focusing is altered by the presence of material interfaces associated with different types of tissue encountered along the shock path, and by the presence of cavitation bubbles that are excited by tensile pressures associated with the focused shock wave. We use human anatomical data, but simplify the description by assuming that the tissue behaves as a fluid, and by assuming cylindrical symmetry along the shock path. Scattering by material interfaces is significant, and regions of high pressure amplitudes (both compressive and tensile) are generated almost 4 cm postfocus. Bubble dynamics generate secondary shocks whose strength depends on the density of bubbles and the pulse repetition frequency (PRF). At sufficiently large densities, the bubbles also attenuate the shock. Together with experimental evidence, the simulations suggest that high PRF may be counter-productive for stone comminution. Finally, we discuss how the lithotripter simulations can be used as input to more detailed physical models that attempt to characterize the mechanisms by which collapsing cavitation models erode stones, and by which shock waves and bubbles may damage tissue. PMID:21063697

  7. Suppressing bubble shielding effect in shock wave lithotripsy by low intensity pulsed ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jen-Chieh; Zhou, Yufeng

    2015-01-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) has been used as an effective modality to fragment kidney calculi. Because of the bubble shielding effect in the pre-focal region, the acoustic energy delivered to the focus is reduced. Low pulse repetition frequency (PRF) will be applied to dissolve these bubbles for better stone comminution efficiency. In this study, low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) beam was aligned perpendicular to the axis of a shock wave (SW) lithotripter at its focus. The light transmission was used to evaluate the compressive wave and cavitation induced by SWs without or with a combination of LIPUS for continuous sonication. It is found that bubble shielding effect becomes dominated with the SW exposure and has a greater significant effect on cavitation than compressive wave. Using the combined wave scheme, the improvement began at the 5th pulse and gradually increased. Suppression effect on bubble shielding is independent on the trigger delay, but increases with the acoustic intensity and pulse duration of LIPUS. The peak negative and integral area of light transmission signal, which present the compressive wave and cavitation respectively, using our strategy at PRF of 1 Hz are comparable to those using SW alone at PRF of 0.1 Hz. In addition, high-speed photography confirmed the bubble activities in both free field and close to a stone surface. Bubble motion in response to the acoustic radiation force by LIPUS was found to be the major mechanism of suppressing bubble shielding effect. There is a 2.6-fold increase in stone fragmentation efficiency after 1000 SWs at PRF of 1 Hz in combination with LIPUS. In summary, combination of SWs and LIPUS is an effective way of suppressing bubble shielding effect and, subsequently, improving cavitation at the focus for a better outcome. PMID:25173067

  8. The dynamics of single bubble sonoluminescence

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gerardo Adrian Delgadino

    1999-01-01

    Ultrafast compressions and expansions may occur in microbubbles undergoing forced oscillations. For certain conditions ultra high temperatures are produced. In a spherically symmetric stationary acoustic field, a gas bubble about ten micrometers in diameter was levitated. Bubble volume oscillations caused by the varying pressure field were excited. The non-linear oscillations were characterized by a slow growth, up to ten times

  9. The CFD Analysis of Propeller Sheet Cavitation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dengcheng Liu; Fangwen Hong; Feng Zhao; Zhirong Zhang

    Cavitating flows are highly complicated because it is a rapid phase change phenomenon, which often occurs in the high-speed or rotating fluid machineries. It is well known that the cavitating flows raise up the vibration, the noise and the erosion. Therefore, the research on the cavitating flows is of great interest. Numerical method is highly important approach for studying the

  10. Cavitation Vibration Monitoring in the Kaplan Turbine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Liangliang Zhan; Yucheng Peng; Xiyang Chen

    2009-01-01

    Cavitation is a common damage phenomenon in running hydraulic turbines. In order to meets the needs of hydraulic turbine cavitation monitoring, an experimental investigation, which according to high frequency vibration induced by cavitation, has been carried out on a Kaplan turbine. Four high-level accelerometers with 53 kHz natural frequency have been mounted on the turbine, and four data acquisition channels

  11. VISUALIZATION MONITORING OF CAVITATION IN WATER TURBINES

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Širok; M. Novak; M. Ho?evar; J. Prost

    Present methods for cavitation detection in water turbines are based on observation of pressure pulsations, acoustic emission and mechanical vibrations on the turbine casing. In the following a new method of cavitation monitoring, which offers real time evaluation of the cavitation topological structures in the turbine flow field, will be presented. In the paper the application of the method on

  12. Compressible fluid model for hydrodynamic lubrication cavitation

    E-print Network

    Sart, Remi

    Compressible fluid model for hydrodynamic lubrication cavitation G. Bayada L. Chupin I.C.J. UMR.chupin@math.univ-bpclermont.fr Keywords: cavitation, compressible Reynolds equation Date: april 2013 Summary In this paper, it is shown how vaporous cavitation in lubricant films can be modelled in a physically justified manner through

  13. Superplasticity and cavitation in an aluminum-magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Donghyun

    2000-10-01

    Fundamental issues related to the forming performance of superplastic metals include the mechanisms of flow and cavitation occurring during the forming process. Cavitation beyond a critical amount is damaging to the mechanical behavior of fabricated parts. Therefore, the role of process parameters which influence cavitation must be precisely documented and understood. In this study, (1) the mechanism of deformation, (2) cavity formation and growth, and (3) the effect of forming parameters on cavitation are systematically investigated in a fine grain Al-4.7%Mg-0.8%Mn-0.4%Cu alloy. The mechanical flow response of the alloy is characterized by a new type of step strain-rate test which preserves the initial microstructure of the alloy. Under isostructural condition, sigmoidal log s vs. log 3? relationship is determined and then analyzed by using a grain-mantle based quantitative model1 for superplastic flow. The activation energies in both grain-mantle creep and core creep are analyzed, and the overall controlling mechanism is found to be dislocation glide and climb. Grain-mantle creep rate in the low strain-rate region is found to be enhanced many times due to a high concentration of vacancies near grain boundaries. Cavitation caused by superplastic straining under uniaxial tension is evaluated by the SEM (for < 0.5mum size) and the number and size of cavities are monitored by image analysis through optical microscopy. Growth of pre-existing cavities and nucleation and growth of new cavities at grain boundary particles are monitored with increasing strain. Cavity nucleation and growth occur in two stages: crack-like growth along the particle-matrix interface by a constrained growth process, and beyond complete debonding growth via plastic deformation of the matrix which is modeled here. Stresses and strain-rates near the void are intensified due to the perturbed flow field near the void, and not relaxed during the time frame associated with superplastic deformation. In the model, faster cavity growth is predicted for lower m and for smaller cavity density when cavity stress fields are not overlapping. Observed cavitation quantitatively agrees with the present model, but diffusional growth is found to be too slow, which cannot explain the observed nanoscale void growth behavior. Another parameter affecting the degree of cavitation is the imposed stress-state. Cavity growth rate as well as cavity nucleation rate increase with the level of mean hydrostatic tension. For a fixed cavitation volume fraction, V, the principal surface strains, 31 and 32 , for the various stress-states can be empirically given by: 31=aVb -a32 , where a and b are constants determined from 31 values for plane-strain 32=0 . The value of b is found to be 0.2 ˜ 0.3, and alpha is 0.4 ˜ 1. 1 A. K. Ghosh, Mat. Sci. Forum, Trans. Tech. Publications, Switzerland, 170--172, 39 (1994).

  14. Transient cavitation produced by extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cioanta, Iulian

    1998-12-01

    Two decades ago, a new medical procedure was introduced, allowing the fragmentation of kidney stones from outside the human body (noninvasively) using a shock wave device termed lithotripter ('stone crusher'). Considered as one of the most important medical inventions of this century, lithotripsy is currently used in more than 80% of urolithiasis cases. Experimental studies have shown that transient or inertial cavitation is generated by this procedure near the stones and in renal tissue. To find a correlation between the number of shocks delivered and the treatment efficiency, the acoustic emission (AE) generated by the oscillation of cavitation bubbles, and its relation with stone fragmentation and tissue damage during shock wave lithotripsy were studied. In vitro experiments were carried out to identify the correlation between the AE signals and the expansion and collapse of cavitation bubbles, which were captured by high-speed photography (20,000 frames per second). This correlation has been verified on four different electrohydraulic lithotripters, under multiple experimental conditions. The effects of tissue attenuation on AE and stone fragmentation were also studied. The in vitro results have further allowed the interpretation of AE signals from in vivo experiments with pigs. Although similar in general trend, in vivo AE signals are found to be shorter in expansion and longer in the total ringing times (including the rebound phenomenon) than for in vitro AE signals, indicating a tissue constraining effect on bubble oscillation. Based on this observation a new mechanism for renal vascular and tubular injury is proposed. In addition, changes in AE signals have been observed as the total number of shocks increases, and this dose dependence feature has allowed the determination of a threshold value for extended tissue injury at 20 kV. This result has been confirmed by histological analysis and by results of a theoretical model study of bubble oscillation in a tissue mimicking membrane structure. To improve the efficiency of stone fragmentation and to reduce tissue injury, a new design for lithotripters shock wave reflector has been proposed and tested in vitro.

  15. Cavitation damage experiments for mercury spallation targets at the LANSCE WNR in 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riemer, B.; Haines, J.; Wendel, M.; Bauer, G.; Futakawa, M.; Hasegawa, S.; Kogawa, H.

    2008-06-01

    In-beam experiments investigating cavitation damage in short pulse mercury spallation targets were performed at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center - Weapons Neutron Research (LANSCE - WNR) facility in 2005. Two main areas were investigated. First, damage dependence on three mercury conditions - stagnant, flowing, and flowing with bubble injection - was investigated by employing a small mercury target loop with replaceable damage test specimens. One hundred beam pulses were passed through the loop mercury and specimen pair for each test condition. Damage with flowing mercury ( V = 0.4 m/s) was less than half that which was incurred with stagnant mercury. Gas bubble injection added into the flow further reduced damage to about one-fourth that of stagnant mercury. Acoustic emissions from cavitation bubble collapse were concurrently measured on the exterior of the loop using a laser Doppler vibrometer and were correlated to the observed damage. The second area of experimentation was erosion rate dependence on proton beam intensity. Prior research had indicated that incubation-phase cavitation erosion rate is strongly dependent on beam intensity, by a power law with the exponent perhaps as large as 4. The 2005 results are inconsistent with earlier in-beam test results and do not support the power law dependence. This paper will provide a detailed description of the experiment, present results and discuss the findings.

  16. COSI's Bubble Recipe

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-06-26

    Everybody loves bubbles, and this is the best bubble recipe ever! Included as part of one of COSI's Family Science Quests, this COSI favorite invites learners to make bubbles and suggests a variety of ways to explore and experiment.

  17. Mechanistic analysis of cavitation assisted transesterification on biodiesel characteristics.

    PubMed

    Sajjadi, Baharak; Abdul Aziz, A R; Ibrahim, Shaliza

    2015-01-01

    The influence of sonoluminescence transesterification on biodiesel physicochemical properties was investigated and the results were compared to those of traditional mechanical stirring. This study was conducted to identify the mechanistic features of ultrasonication by coupling statistical analysis of the experiments into the simulation of cavitation bubble. Different combinations of operational variables were employed for alkali-catalysis transesterification of palm oil. The experimental results showed that transesterification with ultrasound irradiation could change the biodiesel density by about 0.3kg/m(3); the viscosity by 0.12mm(2)/s; the pour point by about 1-2°C and the flash point by 5°C compared to the traditional method. Furthermore, 93.84% of yield with alcohol to oil molar ratio of 6:1 could be achieved through ultrasound assisted transesterification within only 20min. However, only 89.09% of reaction yield was obtained by traditional macro mixing/heating under the same condition. Based on the simulated oscillation velocity value, the cavitation phenomenon significantly contributed to generation of fine micro emulsion and was able to overcome mass transfer restriction. It was found that the sonoluminescence bubbles reached the temperature of 758-713K, pressure of 235.5-159.55bar, oscillation velocity of 3.5-6.5cm/s, and equilibrium radius of 17.9-13.7 times greater than its initial size under the ambient temperature of 50-64°C at the moment of collapse. This showed that the sonoluminescence bubbles were in the condition in which the decomposition phenomena were activated and the reaction rate was accelerated together with a change in the biodiesel properties. PMID:24981808

  18. Sonodynamic Cytotoxicity In Controlled Cavitation Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Maalouf, Jhony; Salvador, Arnaud; Alberti, Laurent; Chesnais, Sabrina; Saletes, Izella; Béra, Jean-Christophe; Mestas, Jean-Louis

    2009-04-01

    Sonodynamic cytotoxicity was always linked to the inertial cavitation phenomenon. In this work, sonodynamic effects with Photofrin® were evaluated in controlled cavitation conditions. Photofrin® potentiated significantly the cavitation cytoxicity even for low setpoints where no inertial cavitation appeared. Moreover, the use of antioxidant histidine (10 mM) did not prevent the sonodynamic toxicity when inertial cavitation was preponderant. This was confirmed by mass spectrometry data showing no histidine transformation due to reactive oxygen species during sonodynamic experiments. The results show that sonodynamic mechanism would be principally mechanical, facilitated by the Photofrin® insertion in cellular cytoplasmic membranes.

  19. Cavitation erosion size scale effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, P. V.; Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    Size scaling in cavitation erosion is a major problem confronting the design engineers of modern high speed machinery. An overview and erosion data analysis presented in this paper indicate that the size scale exponent n in the erosion rate relationship as a function of the size or diameter can vary from 1.7 to 4.9 depending on the type of device used. There is, however, a general agreement as to the values of n if the correlations are made with constant cavitation number.

  20. Study of cavitating inducer instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, W. E.; Murphy, R.; Reddecliff, J. M.

    1972-01-01

    An analytic and experimental investigation into the causes and mechanisms of cavitating inducer instabilities was conducted. Hydrofoil cascade tests were performed, during which cavity sizes were measured. The measured data were used, along with inducer data and potential flow predictions, to refine an analysis for the prediction of inducer blade suction surface cavitation cavity volume. Cavity volume predictions were incorporated into a linearized system model, and instability predictions for an inducer water test loop were generated. Inducer tests were conducted and instability predictions correlated favorably with measured instability data.

  1. Preventing cavitation in butterfly valves

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, H.D.

    1985-03-18

    Some of the mechanical problems that plagued butterfly valves in the past are discussed. The authors suggest integrated packages to alleviate these problems. These packages include such innovations as backlash-free stem connections, allenclosed actuator packages, and torque-compensated vanes. Some disadvantages to these packages are outlined and examined, including: high noise levels with compressible fluids, and an increased tendency to cavitate with liquids. A discussion follows on cavitation--how it is caused, just how much of it can be tolerated, and how it can be avoided or reduced.

  2. A study of pump cavitation damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brophy, M. C.; Stinebring, D. R.; Billet, M. L.

    1983-11-01

    The cavitation assessment for the space shuttle main engine high pressure oxidizer turbopump is documented. A model of the flow through the pump was developed. Initially, a computational procedure was used to analyze the flow through the inlet casing including the prediction of wakes downstream of the casing vanes. From these flow calculations, cavitation patterns on the inducer blades were approximated and the damage rate estimated. The model correlates the heavy damage on the housing and over the inducer with unsteady blade surface cavitation. The unsteady blade surface cavitation is due to the large incidence changes caused by the wakes of the upstream vanes. Very high cavitation damage rates are associated with this type of cavitation. Design recommendations for reducing the unsteady cavitation include removing the set of vanes closest to the inducer and modifying the remaining vanes.

  3. Cavitation data for hydraulic equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hord, J.; Voth, R. O.

    1972-01-01

    Development of cavitation B-factors for helium, parahydrogen, nitrogen, fluorine, oxygen, refrigerant 114, and water is discussed. B-factor is defined and numerical relationships are established. Mathematical models are included and alternative methods of determining B-factor are explained.

  4. The quest for the most spherical bubble: experimental setup and data overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obreschkow, Danail; Tinguely, Marc; Dorsaz, Nicolas; Kobel, Philippe; de Bosset, Aurele; Farhat, Mohamed

    2013-04-01

    We describe a recently realized experiment producing the most spherical cavitation bubbles today. The bubbles grow inside a liquid from a point plasma generated by a nanosecond laser pulse. Unlike in previous studies, the laser is focussed by a parabolic mirror, resulting in a plasma of unprecedented symmetry. The ensuing bubbles are sufficiently spherical that the hydrostatic pressure gradient caused by gravity becomes the dominant source of asymmetry in the collapse and rebound of the cavitation bubbles. To avoid this natural source of asymmetry, the whole experiment is therefore performed in microgravity conditions (ESA, 53rd and 56th parabolic flight campaign). Cavitation bubbles were observed in microgravity (˜0 g), where their collapse and rebound remain spherical, and in normal gravity (1 g) to hyper-gravity (1.8 g), where a gravity-driven jet appears. Here, we describe the experimental setup and technical results, and overview the science data. A selection of high-quality shadowgraphy movies and time-resolved pressure data is published online.

  5. In vivo bubble nucleation probability in sheep brain tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gateau, J.; Aubry, J.-F.; Chauvet, D.; Boch, A.-L.; Fink, M.; Tanter, M.

    2011-11-01

    Gas nuclei exist naturally in living bodies. Their activation initiates cavitation activity, and is possible using short ultrasonic excitations of high amplitude. However, little is known about the nuclei population in vivo, and therefore about the rarefaction pressure required to form bubbles in tissue. A novel method dedicated to in vivo investigations was used here that combines passive and active cavitation detection with a multi-element linear ultrasound probe (4-7 MHz). Experiments were performed in vivo on the brain of trepanated sheep. Bubble nucleation was induced using a focused single-element transducer (central frequency 660 kHz, f-number = 1) driven by a high power (up to 5 kW) electric burst of two cycles. Successive passive recording and ultrafast active imaging were shown to allow detection of a single nucleation event in brain tissue in vivo. Experiments carried out on eight sheep allowed statistical studies of the bubble nucleation process. The nucleation probability was evaluated as a function of the peak negative pressure. No nucleation event could be detected with a peak negative pressure weaker than -12.7 MPa, i.e. one order of magnitude higher than the recommendations based on the mechanical index. Below this threshold, bubble nucleation in vivo in brain tissues is a random phenomenon.

  6. In vivo bubble nucleation probability in sheep brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Gateau, J; Aubry, J-F; Chauvet, D; Boch, A-L; Fink, M; Tanter, M

    2011-11-21

    Gas nuclei exist naturally in living bodies. Their activation initiates cavitation activity, and is possible using short ultrasonic excitations of high amplitude. However, little is known about the nuclei population in vivo, and therefore about the rarefaction pressure required to form bubbles in tissue. A novel method dedicated to in vivo investigations was used here that combines passive and active cavitation detection with a multi-element linear ultrasound probe (4-7 MHz). Experiments were performed in vivo on the brain of trepanated sheep. Bubble nucleation was induced using a focused single-element transducer (central frequency 660 kHz, f-number = 1) driven by a high power (up to 5 kW) electric burst of two cycles. Successive passive recording and ultrafast active imaging were shown to allow detection of a single nucleation event in brain tissue in vivo. Experiments carried out on eight sheep allowed statistical studies of the bubble nucleation process. The nucleation probability was evaluated as a function of the peak negative pressure. No nucleation event could be detected with a peak negative pressure weaker than -12.7 MPa, i.e. one order of magnitude higher than the recommendations based on the mechanical index. Below this threshold, bubble nucleation in vivo in brain tissues is a random phenomenon. PMID:22015981

  7. Generation of cavitation luminescence by laser-induced exothermic chemical reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Jung Park, Han; Diebold, Gerald J. [Department of Chemistry, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02912 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02912 (United States)

    2013-08-14

    Absorption of high power laser radiation by aqueous carbon suspensions is known to result in the formation of highly compressed bubbles of hydrogen and carbon monoxide through the endothermic carbon-steam reaction. The bubbles expand rapidly, overreaching their equilibrium diameter, and then collapse tens to hundreds of microseconds after formation to give a flash of radiation. Here we report on the effects of laser-initiated exothermic chemical reaction on cavitation luminescence. Experiments with hydrogen peroxide added to colloidal carbon suspensions show that both the time of the light flash following the laser pulse and the intensity of luminescence increase with hydrogen peroxide concentration, indicating that large, highly energetic gas bubbles are produced. Additional experiments with colloidal carbon suspensions show the effects of high pressure on the luminescent intensity and its time of appearance following firing of the laser.

  8. Dependence of the drag of a conical axisymmetric cavitation body on the cone angle and the cavitation number

    SciTech Connect

    Khomyakov, A.N.

    1995-11-01

    Numerical investigations of flow past axisymmetric conical cavitation bodies have shown that the drag coefficient of the cavitation body, calculated from the maximum cross-sectional area of the cavity (midsection), depends on the cavitation number and the cone angle.

  9. Hydrodynamic Cavitation for Food and Water Processing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Parag R. Gogate

    2011-01-01

    Hydrodynamic cavitation, which was and is still looked upon as an unavoidable nuisance in the flow systems, can be a serious\\u000a contender as an alternative to acoustic cavitation for intensification of different physical and chemical processing applications.\\u000a Hydrodynamic cavitation results in the generation of hot spots, highly reactive free radicals and turbulence associated with\\u000a liquid circulation currents, which can result

  10. Measuring Dynamic Transfer Functions of Cavitating Pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baun, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    A water-flow test facility has been built to enable measurement of dynamic transfer functions (DTFs) of cavitating pumps and of inducers in such pumps. Originally, the facility was intended for use in an investigation of the effects of cavitation in a rocket-engine low-pressure oxygen turbopump. The facility can also be used to measure DTFs of cavitating pumps in general

  11. In vivo detection of ultrasonically induced cavitation by a fibre-optic technique.

    PubMed

    Huber, P; Debus, J; Peschke, P; Hahn, E W; Lorenz, W J

    1994-01-01

    The measurement of cavitation events in tissue in vivo would greatly assist us to better understand how pulsed high energy ultrasound (PHEUS) interacts with living tissues, especially with regard to cancer therapy. To accomplish this, we designed and built a fibre-optic hydrophone. The principle was to couple the light of a laser diode into a lightfibre and to register the ultrasound induced modification of the refractive index in tissue. In this manner, the cavitation event could be quantitatively investigated both in water and in vivo. The structure of the bubble dynamic is in reasonable agreement with theoretical predictions, and in vitro measurements. With the fibre-optic set-up, the pressure signal can also be detected. PHEUS was generated by an electromagnetic source adapted from a commercial lithotripter (Lithostar Siemens). As biological tissue we used the experimental R3327-AT1 Dunning prostate tumor growing subcutaneously in the thigh of male Copenhagen rats. The lifetime of the cavitation bubble in water increased with the energy level of the ultrasonic pulse from 250 microseconds at 13 kV capacitor voltage to 750 microseconds at 21 kV, while the lifetime inside the tumor tissue in vivo increased only from 100 microseconds at 13 kV to 220 microseconds at 21 kV capacitor voltage. PMID:7863570

  12. Cavitation damage prediction for spallation target vessels by assessment of acoustic vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Futakawa, Masatoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA); Kogawa, Hiroyuki [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA); Hasegawa, Shoichi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA); Ikeda, Dr. Yujiro [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA); Riemer, Bernie [ORNL; Wendel, Mark W [ORNL; Haines, John R [ORNL; Bauer, Guenter [Forschungszentrum Julich, Julich, Germany; Naoe, Dr. Takashi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA); Okita, Dr. Kohei [RIKEN, Japan; Fujiwara, Dr. Akiko [University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan; Matsumoto, Dr. Yoichiro [University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan; Tanaka, Dr. Nobuatsu [Ibaraki University, Japan

    2008-01-01

    Liquid-mercury target systems for MW-class spallation neutron sources are being developed around the world. Proton beams are used to induce the spallation reaction. At the moment the proton beam hits the target, pressure waves are generated in the mercury because of the abrupt heat deposition. The pressure waves interact with the target vessel leading to negative pressure that may cause cavitation along the vessel wall. In order to estimate the cavitation erosion, i.e. the pitting damage formed by the collapse of cavitation bubbles, off-beam tests were performed by using an electric magnetic impact testing machine (MIMTM), which can impose equivalent pressure pulses in mercury. The damage potential was defined based on the relationship between the pitting damage and the time-integrated acoustic vibration induced by impact due to the bubble collapses. Additionally, the damage potential was measured in on-beam tests carried out by using the proton beam at WNR (Weapons Neutron Research) facility in Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). In this paper, the concept of the damage potential, the relationship between the pitting damage formation and the damage potential both in off-beam and on-beam tests is shown.

  13. Cavitation damage prediction for spallation target vessels by assessment of acoustic vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Futakawa, Masatoshi; Kogawa, Hiroyuki; Hasegawa, Shoichi; Ikeda, Yujiro; Riemer, Bernie; Wendel, Mark; Haines, John; Bauer, Günter; Naoe, Takashi; Okita, Kohei; Fujiwara, Akiko; Matsumoto, Yoichiro; Tanaka, Nobuatsu

    2008-06-01

    Liquid-mercury target systems for MW-class spallation neutron sources are being developed around the world. Proton beams are used to induce the spallation reaction. At the moment the proton beam hits the target, pressure waves are generated in the mercury because of the abrupt heat deposition. The pressure waves interact with the target vessel leading to negative pressure that may cause cavitation along the vessel wall. In order to estimate the cavitation erosion, i.e. the pitting damage formed by the collapse of cavitation bubbles, off-beam tests were performed by using an electric magnetic impact testing machine (MIMTM), which can impose equivalent pressure pulses in mercury. The damage potential was defined based on the relationship between the pitting damage and the time-integrated acoustic vibration induced by impact due to the bubble collapses. Additionally, the damage potential was measured in on-beam tests carried out by using the proton beam at WNR (Weapons Neutron Research) facility in Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). In this paper, the concept of the damage potential, the relationship between the pitting damage formation and the damage potential both in off-beam and on-beam tests is shown.

  14. THE ROLE OF INERTIAL CAVITATION IN ACOUSTIC DROPLET VAPORIZATION

    PubMed Central

    Fabiilli, Mario L.; Haworth, Kevin J.; Fakhri, Nasir H.; Kripfgans, Oliver D.; Carson, Paul L.; Fowlkes, J. Brian

    2011-01-01

    The vaporization of a superheated droplet emulsion into gas bubbles using ultrasound – termed acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV) – has potential therapeutic applications in embolotherapy and drug delivery. The optimization of ADV for therapeutic applications can be enhanced by understanding the physical mechanisms underlying ADV, which are currently not clearly elucidated. Acoustic cavitation is one possible mechanism. This paper investigates the relationship between the ADV and inertial cavitation (IC) thresholds (measured as peak rarefactional pressures) by studying parameters that are known to influence the IC threshold. These parameters include bulk fluid properties such as gas saturation, temperature, viscosity, and surface tension; droplet parameters such as degree of superheat, surfactant type, and size; and acoustic properties such as pulse repetition frequency and pulse width. In all cases the ADV threshold occurred at a lower rarefactional pressure than the IC threshold indicating that the phase-transition occurs before IC events. The viscosity and temperature of the bulk fluid are shown to influence both thresholds directly and inversely, respectively. An inverse trend is observed between threshold and diameter for droplets in the 1 to 2.5 ? range. Based on a choice of experimental parameters, it is possible to achieve ADV with or without IC. PMID:19473917

  15. Regulating valve cavitation in the power station

    SciTech Connect

    Jozsa, I.; Kiss, J. [Paks Nuclear Power Plant Ltd. (Hungary). Technical Division Diagnostic Dept.; Sebestyen, G. [Technical Univ., Budapest (Hungary). Dept. of Fluid Machinery

    1994-12-31

    The present paper will deal with the cavitation measurement of the regulating valve in the feedwater system (secondary circuit) of NPP Paks and also with the elimination of pipe vibration caused by cavitation. The cavitation measurements were made during normal operation of the nuclear power plant. The range of measurements, the technological scope were confined by the safety margins of operation. In spite of this fact the authors managed to determine the cavitation characteristics of the regulating vale almost full scale. On basis of the measurements they concluded that the regulating valve is hydraulically misfitted to the technological circle. This fact causes vibration and damaged not only the valve but also the pipeline.

  16. Experimental and analytical study of rotating cavitation

    SciTech Connect

    Kamijo, Kenjiro; Shimura, Takashi; Tsujimoto, Yoshinobu [National Aerospace Lab., Miyagi (Japan). Kakuda Research Center

    1994-12-31

    This paper describes experimental and analytical results of rotating cavitation. There are four major sections in this paper. The first section presents the main characteristics of rotating cavitation which was found in the inducer test using a water tunnel. The second section describes the rotating cavitation which occurred in the development test of an LE-7 liquid oxygen pump for the H-II rocket. Also described in this section is how the rotating cavitation was suppressed. The rotating cavitation was the cause of both super synchronous shaft vibration and an unstable head coefficient curve. The third section presents how the theory of rotating cavitation was developed. The final section shows the measured cavitation compliance and mass flow gain factor of the LE-7 pump inducer for comparison of the experimental and analytical results of the rotating cavitation of the LE-7 pump inducer. Almost all the information presented in this paper has already been reported by Kamijo et al. (1977, 1980, 1993, 1993) and by Shimura (1993). In the present paper, the authors attempt to combine and give a clear overview of the experimental and analytical results described in the previous papers to systematically show their experience and findings on rotating cavitation.

  17. Cavitating Langmuir turbulence in the terrestrial aurora.

    PubMed

    Isham, B; Rietveld, M T; Guio, P; Forme, F R E; Grydeland, T; Mjølhus, E

    2012-03-01

    Langmuir cavitons have been artificially produced in Earth's ionosphere, but evidence of naturally occurring cavitation has been elusive. By measuring and modeling the spectra of electrostatic plasma modes, we show that natural cavitating, or strong, Langmuir turbulence does occur in the ionosphere, via a process in which a beam of auroral electrons drives Langmuir waves, which in turn produce cascading Langmuir and ion-acoustic excitations and cavitating Langmuir turbulence. The data presented here are the first direct evidence of cavitating Langmuir turbulence occurring naturally in any space or astrophysical plasma. PMID:22463417

  18. Numerical investigation of three-dimensional cloud cavitation with special emphasis on collapse induced shock dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnerr, Günter H.; Sezal, Ismail H.; Schmidt, Steffen J.

    2008-04-01

    The aim of the present investigation is to model and analyze compressible three-dimensional (3D) cavitating liquid flows with special emphasis on the detection of shock formation and propagation. We recently developed the conservative finite volume method CATUM (Cavitation Technische Universität München), which enables us to simulate unsteady 3D liquid flows with phase transition at all Mach numbers. The compressible formulation of the governing equations together with the thermodynamic closure relations are solved by a modified Riemann approach by using time steps down to nanoseconds. This high temporal resolution is necessary to resolve the wave dynamics that leads to acoustic cavitation as well as to detect regions of instantaneous high pressure loads. The proposed two-phase model based on the integral average properties of thermodynamic quantities is first validated against the solution of the Rayleigh-Plesset equation for the collapse of a single bubble. The computational fluid dynamics tool CATUM is then applied to the numerical simulation of the highly unsteady two-phase flow around a 3D twisted hydrofoil. This specific hydrofoil allows a detailed study of sheet and cloud cavitation structures related to 3D shock dynamics emerging from collapsing vapor regions. The time dependent development of vapor clouds, their shedding mechanism, and the resulting unsteady variation of lift and drag are discussed in detail. We identify instantaneous local pressure peaks of the order of 100bar, which are thought to be responsible for the erosive damage of the surface of the hydrofoil.

  19. Cavitation Rheology of Polyacrylamide Hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Santanu; Zimberlin, Jessica; Crosby, Alfred

    2008-03-01

    Cavitation rheology is a new characterization technique for the measurement of mechanical properties on small length scales, e.g. 10 -100 ?m, at any arbitrary location within a soft material. The technique involves growing a cavity at the tip of a syringe needle and monitoring the pressure of the cavity at the onset of instability. This critical pressure is directly related to the local modulus of the material. We used this technique to characterize the network mechanics of polyacrylamide hydrogel materials, a common material used in many biological applications. We compared the cavitation rheology results with that obtained from shear rheometry. This technique was used to investigate the rheological properties of gels with different dimensions and different moduli, which were obtained by varying initial monomer to water ratio. These results provide a quantitative foundation for the extension of this technique to in vivo characterization of biological tissues.

  20. Stalking cavitation in the lab

    SciTech Connect

    March, P.A.; Jones, R.K.

    1993-10-01

    This article describes laboratory equipment for acoustic monitoring of cavitation in hydraulic turbines. The system uses acoustic transducers. The signals from the transducers are filtered and amplified, then analyzed and recorded with a computer using an 8-bit analog-to-digital waveform acquisition board. The signal are also provided to a wideband converter chip. The chip produces an directly related to the power of the signal. Erosion rates are determined from the signal output.

  1. Enhancing cavitation with micromachined surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez Rivas, David; Stricker, Laura; Zijlstra, Aaldert G.; Gardeniers, Han; Lohse, Detlef; Prosperetti, Andrea; Mesoscale Chemical System Group Collaboration; Physics of Fluids Group Collaboration; Department of Mechanical Engineering Collaboration

    2012-11-01

    When a silicon surface with micromachined pits submerged in a liquid is exposed to continuous ultrasound at 200 kHz, bubbles are ejected from the air filled cavities. Depending on the pressure amplitude different scenarios are observed, as the bubbles ejected from the micropits interact in complex ways with each other, and with the silicon surface. We have determined the size distribution of bubbles ejected from one, two and three pits for three different electrical power settings, and correlated them with sonochemical OH* radical production. Numerical simulations of the sonochemical conversion reaction rates were obtained using the empirical bubble size distributions and are compared with experimental results. Experimental evidence of shock wave emission from the microbubble clusters, deformed microbubble shapes, jetting and surface erosion are also presented. Financially supported through the project 07391 of the Technology Foundation STW, The Netherlands.

  2. Cavitation fatigue. Embolism and refilling cycles can weaken the cavitation resistance of xylem.

    PubMed

    Hacke, U G; Stiller, V; Sperry, J S; Pittermann, J; McCulloh, K A

    2001-02-01

    Although cavitation and refilling cycles could be common in plants, it is unknown whether these cycles weaken the cavitation resistance of xylem. Stem or petiole segments were tested for cavitation resistance before and after a controlled cavitation-refilling cycle. Cavitation was induced by centrifugation, air drying of shoots, or soil drought. Except for droughted plants, material was not significantly water stressed prior to collection. Cavitation resistance was determined from "vulnerability curves" showing the percentage loss of conductivity versus xylem pressure. Two responses were observed. "Resilient" xylem (Acer negundo and Alnus incana stems) showed no change in cavitation resistance after a cavitation-refilling cycle. In contrast, "weakened" xylem (Populus angustifolia, P. tremuloides, Helianthus annuus stems, and Aesculus hippocastanum petioles) showed considerable reduction in cavitation resistance. Weakening was observed whether cavitation was induced by centrifugation, air dehydration, or soil drought. Observations from H. annuus showed that weakening was proportional to the embolism induced by stress. Air injection experiments indicated that the weakened response was a result of an increase in the leakiness of the vascular system to air seeding. The increased air permeability in weakened xylem could result from rupture or loosening of the cellulosic mesh of interconduit pit membranes during the water stress and cavitation treatment. PMID:11161035

  3. Implosion of an underwater spark-generated bubble and acoustic energy evaluation using the Rayleigh model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Silvano Buogo; Giovanni B. Cannelli

    2002-01-01

    The growth, collapse, and rebound of a vapor bubble generated by an underwater spark is studied by means of high-speed cinematography, simultaneously acquiring the emitted acoustic signature. Video recordings show that the growth and collapse phases are nearly symmetrical during the first two or three cycles, the bubble shape being approximately spherical. After 2-3 cycles the bubble behavior changes from

  4. A simple model of ultrasound propagation in a cavitating liquid. Part I: Theory, nonlinear attenuation and traveling wave generation.

    PubMed

    Louisnard, O

    2012-01-01

    The bubbles involved in sonochemistry and other applications of cavitation oscillate inertially. A correct estimation of the wave attenuation in such bubbly media requires a realistic estimation of the power dissipated by the oscillation of each bubble, by thermal diffusion in the gas and viscous friction in the liquid. Both quantities and calculated numerically for a single inertial bubble driven at 20 kHz, and are found to be several orders of magnitude larger than the linear prediction. Viscous dissipation is found to be the predominant cause of energy loss for bubbles small enough. Then, the classical nonlinear Caflish equations describing the propagation of acoustic waves in a bubbly liquid are recast and simplified conveniently. The main harmonic part of the sound field is found to fulfill a nonlinear Helmholtz equation, where the imaginary part of the squared wave number is directly correlated with the energy lost by a single bubble. For low acoustic driving, linear theory is recovered, but for larger drivings, namely above the Blake threshold, the attenuation coefficient is found to be more than 3 orders of magnitude larger then the linear prediction. A huge attenuation of the wave is thus expected in regions where inertial bubbles are present, which is confirmed by numerical simulations of the nonlinear Helmholtz equation in a 1D standing wave configuration. The expected strong attenuation is not only observed but furthermore, the examination of the phase between the pressure field and its gradient clearly demonstrates that a traveling wave appears in the medium. PMID:21764348

  5. Circulatory bubble dynamics: from physical to biological aspects.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulou, Virginie; Tang, Meng-Xing; Balestra, Costantino; Eckersley, Robert J; Karapantsios, Thodoris D

    2014-04-01

    Bubbles can form in the body during or after decompression from pressure exposures such as those undergone by scuba divers, astronauts, caisson and tunnel workers. Bubble growth and detachment physics then becomes significant in predicting and controlling the probability of these bubbles causing mechanical problems by blocking vessels, displacing tissues, or inducing an inflammatory cascade if they persist for too long in the body before being dissolved. By contrast to decompression induced bubbles whose site of initial formation and exact composition are debated, there are other instances of bubbles in the bloodstream which are well-defined. Gas emboli unwillingly introduced during surgical procedures and ultrasound microbubbles injected for use as contrast or drug delivery agents are therefore also discussed. After presenting the different ways that bubbles can end up in the human bloodstream, the general mathematical formalism related to the physics of bubble growth and detachment from decompression is reviewed. Bubble behavior in the bloodstream is then discussed, including bubble dissolution in blood, bubble rheology and biological interactions for the different cases of bubble and blood composition considered. PMID:24534474

  6. From rational bubbles to crashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sornette, D.; Malevergne, Y.

    2001-10-01

    We study and generalize in various ways the model of rational expectation (RE) bubbles introduced by Blanchard and Watson in the economic literature. Bubbles are argued to be the equivalent of Goldstone modes of the fundamental rational pricing equation, associated with the symmetry-breaking introduced by non-vanishing dividends. Generalizing bubbles in terms of multiplicative stochastic maps, we summarize the result of Lux and Sornette that the no-arbitrage condition imposes that the tail of the return distribution is hyperbolic with an exponent ?<1. We then outline the main results of Malevergne and Sornette, who extend the RE bubble model to arbitrary dimensions d: a number d of market time series are made linearly interdependent via d× d stochastic coupling coefficients. We derive the no-arbitrage condition in this context and, with the renewal theory for products of random matrices applied to stochastic recurrence equations, we extend the theorem of Lux and Sornette to demonstrate that the tails of the unconditional distributions associated with such d-dimensional bubble processes follow power laws, with the same asymptotic tail exponent ?<1 for all assets. The distribution of price differences and of returns is dominated by the same power-law over an extended range of large returns. Although power-law tails are a pervasive feature of empirical data, the numerical value ?<1 is in disagreement with the usual empirical estimates ??3. We then discuss two extensions (the crash hazard rate model and the non-stationary growth rate model) of the RE bubble model that provide two ways of reconciliation with the stylized facts of financial data.

  7. Fiber optic probe hydrophone for the study of acoustic cavitation in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arvengas, Arnaud; Davitt, Kristina; Caupin, Frédéric

    2011-03-01

    We use focused ultrasound bursts to submit a liquid to mechanical tension. When the pressure in the sound wave reaches a sufficiently low value, vapor bubbles are nucleated in the bulk liquid. According to nucleation theory, increasing the ultrasound frequency increases the cavitation threshold by a calculable amount. To check this, we have built a fiber optic probe hydrophone based on one originally proposed by Staudenraus and Eisenmenger [Ultrasonics 31, 267 (1993)]. We have adapted the pressure calibration and data analysis of this tool to make it appropriate for precise measurements of tension in liquids. We are able to resolve the fractional change in the pressure threshold for cavitation in water that results from a twofold increase in the frequency. This provides a test of nucleation theory in general.

  8. Fiber optic probe hydrophone for the study of acoustic cavitation in water.

    PubMed

    Arvengas, Arnaud; Davitt, Kristina; Caupin, Frédéric

    2011-03-01

    We use focused ultrasound bursts to submit a liquid to mechanical tension. When the pressure in the sound wave reaches a sufficiently low value, vapor bubbles are nucleated in the bulk liquid. According to nucleation theory, increasing the ultrasound frequency increases the cavitation threshold by a calculable amount. To check this, we have built a fiber optic probe hydrophone based on one originally proposed by Staudenraus and Eisenmenger [Ultrasonics 31, 267 (1993)]. We have adapted the pressure calibration and data analysis of this tool to make it appropriate for precise measurements of tension in liquids. We are able to resolve the fractional change in the pressure threshold for cavitation in water that results from a twofold increase in the frequency. This provides a test of nucleation theory in general. PMID:21456781

  9. Combined passive detection and ultrafast active imaging of cavitation events induced by short pulses of high-intensity ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Gateau, Jérôme; Aubry, Jean-François; Pernot, Mathieu; Fink, Mathias; Tanter, Mickaël

    2011-03-01

    The activation of natural gas nuclei to induce larger bubbles is possible using short ultrasonic excitations of high amplitude, and is required for ultrasound cavitation therapies. However, little is known about the distribution of nuclei in tissues. Therefore, the acoustic pressure level necessary to generate bubbles in a targeted zone and their exact location are currently difficult to predict. To monitor the initiation of cavitation activity, a novel all-ultrasound technique sensitive to single nucleation events is presented here. It is based on combined passive detection and ultrafast active imaging over a large volume using the same multi-element probe. Bubble nucleation was induced using a focused transducer (660 kHz, f-number = 1) driven by a high-power electric burst (up to 300 W) of one to two cycles. Detection was performed with a linear array (4 to 7 MHz) aligned with the single-element focal point. In vitro experiments in gelatin gel and muscular tissue are presented. The synchronized passive detection enabled radio-frequency data to be recorded, comprising high-frequency coherent wave fronts as signatures of the acoustic emissions linked to the activation of the nuclei. Active change detection images were obtained by subtracting echoes collected in the unnucleated medium. These indicated the appearance of stable cavitating regions. Because of the ultrafast frame rate, active detection occurred as quickly as 330 ?s after the high-amplitude excitation and the dynamics of the induced regions were studied individually. PMID:21429844

  10. Combined passive detection and ultrafast active imaging of cavitation events induced by short pulses of high-intensity ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Gateau, Jérôme; Aubry, Jean-François; Pernot, Mathieu; Fink, Mathias; Tanter, Mickaël

    2011-01-01

    The activation of natural gas nuclei to induce larger bubbles is possible using short ultrasonic excitations of high amplitude, and is required for ultrasound cavitation therapies. However, little is known about the distribution of nuclei in tissues. Therefore, the acoustic pressure level necessary to generate bubbles in a targeted zone and their exact location are currently difficult to predict. In order to monitor the initiation of cavitation activity, a novel all-ultrasound technique sensitive to single nucleation events is presented here. It is based on combined passive detection and ultrafast active imaging over a large volume and with the same multi-element probe. Bubble nucleation was induced with a focused transducer (660kHz, f#=1) driven by a high power (up to 300 W) electric burst of one to two cycles. Detection was performed with a linear array (4–7MHz) aligned with the single-element focal point. In vitro experiments in gelatin gel and muscular tissue are presented. The synchronized passive detection enabled radio-frequency data to be recorded, comprising high-frequency coherent wave fronts as signatures of the acoustic emissions linked to the activation of the nuclei. Active change detection images were obtained by subtracting echoes collected in the unucleated medium. These indicated the appearance of stable cavitating regions. Thanks to the ultrafast frame rate, active detection occurred as soon as 330 ?s after the high amplitude excitation and the dynamics of the induced regions were studied individually. PMID:21429844

  11. Detection of cavitation in hydraulic turbines

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xavier Escaler; Eduard Egusquiza; Mohamed Farhat; François Avellan; Miguel Coussirat

    2006-01-01

    An experimental investigation has been carried out in order to evaluate the detection of cavitation in actual hydraulic turbines. The methodology is based on the analysis of structural vibrations, acoustic emissions and hydrodynamic pressures measured in the machine. The proposed techniques have been checked in real prototypes suffering from different types of cavitation. In particular, one Kaplan, two Francis and

  12. INTRODUCTION TO CAVITATION IN HYDRAULIC MACHINERY

    Microsoft Academic Search

    WC U

    Design, operation and refurbishment of hydraulic turbines, pumps or pump-turbine are strongly related to cavitation flow phenomena, which may occur in either the rotating runner-impeller or the stationary parts of the machine. The paper presents the cavitation phenomena featured by fluid machinery including type of cavity development related to the specific speed of machines in both pump and turbine mode,

  13. Instrument system for monitoring cavitation noise

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. K. De; F. G. Hammitt

    1982-01-01

    The aim of this work is to contribute toward the development of a monitoring system for cavitation damage prediction in hydraulic machinery particularly high performance centrifugal pumps. A high-frequency pressure-bar probe and digital acquisition and processing system have therefore been designed to measure the characteristics of damaging pressure pulses from cavitation in a venturi which simulates conditions in hydraulic machinery.

  14. Cavitation inception criteria for hydrokinetic turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedyalkov, Ivaylo; Wosnik, Martin

    2011-11-01

    Cavitation can adversely affect the performance of hydrokinetic turbines, and cause noise, vibration and even erosion. In some cases, unstable operation can be caused by cavitation-induced flow instabilities. A theoretical model for cavitation inception criteria on the blades of hydrokinetic turbines was developed by deriving cavitation numbers using turbine momentum theory and Airy wave theory. The cavitation number on a turbine blade element is calculated as a function of tip speed ratio, axial and angular induction factors at the rotor - which depend on the turbine's operating condition - and location on the blade, blade rotation angle, free stream velocity, wave-induced pressure oscillation, wave-induced velocities, time-dependent turbine hub submergence, vapor pressure, and free stream turbulence. With cavitation maps for specific hydrofoil shapes, which exist for some basic foil shapes, or can be obtained from inexpensive experiments in a small high-speed water tunnel where velocity and pressure can be controlled independently, the physical cavitation inception limits ?i and (? / 2 ?) i can be determined. With this model, safe deployment depths and safe tip speed ratios for specific turbines installed at a given site can be predicted. The model is compared to the common cavitation inception scaling with lift coefficient or Reynolds number.

  15. Soap Bubbles and Logic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Shellie-helane; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Introduces questions and activities involving soap bubbles which provide students with experiences in prediction and logic. Examines commonly held false conceptions related to the shapes that bubbles take and provides correct explanations for the phenomenon. (ML)

  16. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF CAVITATION IN A KAPLAN MODEL TURBINE

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mikael Grekula; Goran Bark

    2001-01-01

    The cavitation processes present in a Kaplan model turbine was studied with the aim to identify mechanisms that promote erosive cavitation. The studies were carried out with high-speed filming, video filming and visual observations with stroboscopic light. A periodic pattern of the cavitating tip vortex was observed. The main feature of this pattern is that the cavitating vortex is bent

  17. Cavitation in an Orifice Flow , W. A. Sirignano

    E-print Network

    Joseph, Daniel D.

    Cavitation in an Orifice Flow S. Dabiri , W. A. Sirignano Department of Mechanical and Aerospace the potential locations for cavitation induced by total stress on the flow of a liquid through an orifice. The total-stress criterion for cavitation is applied to find the regions where cavitation is likely to occur

  18. Investigation of noninertial cavitation produced by an ultrasonic horn

    E-print Network

    Sóbester, András

    Investigation of noninertial cavitation produced by an ultrasonic horn Peter R. Birkin,a) Douglas G; accepted 22 September 2011) This paper reports on noninertial cavitation that occurs beyond the zone close to the horn tip to which the inertial cavitation is confined. The noninertial cavitation is characterized

  19. Numerical modeling of natural and ventilated cavitating flows

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Qiao Qin

    2004-01-01

    Cavitation is a phenomenon that frequently occurs in fluid-handling machinery, ranging from all types of pumps, turbines, and propellers to various piping systems and hydraulic structures. Cavitation research has been pursued for over a century and an enormous quantity of literature on cavitation has been generated. Cavitation modeling is challenging and is still in the development stage due to its

  20. Noise from cavitation in Venturi-type sections

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. A. Lush

    1975-01-01

    As part of an investigation of the noise produced by cavitation in hydraulic machinery, we have studied the general characteristics of the cavitation noise produced in Venturi-type sections. The flow and cavitation in a Venturi have features in common with the flow and cavitation occurring on the suction side of pump impeller blades. The noise has been measured by means