Science.gov

Sample records for cavitation bubble growth

  1. Birth and Growth of Cavitation Bubbles within Water under Tension Confined in a Simple Synthetic Tree

    E-print Network

    Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    pulse. The dynamics of the nucleated bubble and hydrogel cavity are recorded with a high-speed cameraBirth and Growth of Cavitation Bubbles within Water under Tension Confined in a Simple Synthetic 2012) Water under tension, as can be found in several systems including tree vessels, is metastable

  2. Mechanics of collapsing cavitation bubbles.

    PubMed

    van Wijngaarden, Leen

    2016-03-01

    A brief survey is given of the dynamical phenomena accompanying the collapse of cavitation bubbles. The discussion includes shock waves, microjets and the various ways in which collapsing bubbles produce damage. PMID:25890856

  3. Particle Motion Induced by Bubble Cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulain, Stéphane; Guenoun, Gabriel; Gart, Sean; Crowe, William; Jung, Sunghwan

    2015-05-01

    Cavitation bubbles induce impulsive forces on surrounding substrates, particles, or surfaces. Even though cavitation is a traditional topic in fluid mechanics, current understanding and studies do not capture the effect of cavitation on suspended objects in fluids. In the present work, the dynamics of a spherical particle due to a cavitation bubble is experimentally characterized and compared with an analytical model. Three phases are observed: the growth of the bubble where the particle is pushed away, its collapse where the particle approaches the bubble, and a longer time scale postcollapse where the particle continues to move toward the collapsed bubble. The particle motion in the longer time scale presumably results from the asymmetric cavitation evolution at an earlier time. Our theory considering the asymmetric bubble dynamics shows that the particle velocity strongly depends on the distance from the bubble as an inverse-fourth-power law, which is in good agreement with our experimentation. This study sheds light on how small free particles respond to cavitation bubbles in fluids.

  4. Effect of dissolved gases in water on acoustic cavitation and bubble growth rate in 0.83 MHz megasonic of interest to wafer cleaning.

    PubMed

    Kang, Bong-Kyun; Kim, Min-Su; Park, Jin-Goo

    2014-07-01

    Changes in the cavitation intensity of gases dissolved in water, including H2, N2, and Ar, have been established in studies of acoustic bubble growth rates under ultrasonic fields. Variations in the acoustic properties of dissolved gases in water affect the cavitation intensity at a high frequency (0.83 MHz) due to changes in the rectified diffusion and bubble coalescence rate. It has been proposed that acoustic bubble growth rates rapidly increase when water contains a gas, such as hydrogen faster single bubble growth due to rectified diffusion, and a higher rate of coalescence under Bjerknes forces. The change of acoustic bubble growth rate in rectified diffusion has an effect on the damping constant and diffusivity of gas at the acoustic bubble and liquid interface. It has been suggested that the coalescence reaction of bubbles under Bjerknes forces is a reaction determined by the compressibility and density of dissolved gas in water associated with sound velocity and density in acoustic bubbles. High acoustic bubble growth rates also contribute to enhanced cavitation effects in terms of dissolved gas in water. On the other hand, when Ar gas dissolves into water under ultrasound field, cavitation behavior was reduced remarkably due to its lower acoustic bubble growth rate. It is shown that change of cavitation intensity in various dissolved gases were verified through cleaning experiments in the single type of cleaning tool such as particle removal and pattern damage based on numerically calculated acoustic bubble growth rates. PMID:24529613

  5. Sonoporation from Jetting Cavitation Bubbles

    PubMed Central

    Ohl, Claus-Dieter; Arora, Manish; Ikink, Roy; de Jong, Nico; Versluis, Michel; Delius, Michael; Lohse, Detlef

    2006-01-01

    The fluid dynamic interaction of cavitation bubbles with adherent cells on a substrate is experimentally investigated. We find that the nonspherical collapse of bubbles near to the boundary is responsible for cell detachment. High-speed photography reveals that a wall bounded flow leads to the detachment of cells. Cells at the edge of the circular area of detachment are found to be permanently porated, whereas cells at some distance from the detachment area undergo viable cell membrane poration (sonoporation). The wall flow field leading to cell detachment is modeled with a self-similar solution for a wall jet, together with a kinetic ansatz of adhesive bond rupture. The self-similar solution for the ?-type wall jet compares very well with the full solution of the Navier-Stokes equation for a jet of finite thickness. Apart from annular sites of sonoporation we also find more homogenous patterns of molecule delivery with no cell detachment. PMID:16950843

  6. Dynamic behaviors of cavitation bubble for the steady cavitating flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Jun; Huai, Xiulan; Li, Xunfeng

    2009-12-01

    In this paper, by introducing the flow velocity item into the classical Rayleigh-Plesset dynamic equation, a new equation, which does not involve the time term and can describe the motion of cavitation bubble in the steady cavitating flow, has been obtained. By solving the new motion equation using Runge-Kutta fourth order method with adaptive step size control, the dynamic behaviors of cavitation bubble driven by the varying pressure field downstream of a venturi cavitation reactor are numerically simulated. The effects of liquid temperature (corresponding to the saturated vapor pressure of liquid), cavitation number and inlet pressure of venturi on radial motion of bubble and pressure pulse due to the radial motion are analyzed and discussed in detail. Some dynamic behaviors of bubble different from those in previous papers are displayed. In addition, the internal relationship between bubble dynamics and process intensification is also discussed. The simulation results reported in this work reveal the variation laws of cavitation intensity with the flow conditions of liquid, and will lay a foundation for the practical application of hydrodynamic cavitation technology.

  7. Cavitation inception by the backscattering of pressure waves from a bubble interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahira, Hiroyuki; Ogasawara, Toshiyuki; Mori, Naoto; Tanaka, Moe

    2015-10-01

    The secondary cavitation that occurs by the backscattering of focused ultrasound from a primary cavitation bubble caused by the negative pressure part of the ultrasound (Maxwell, et al., 2011) might be useful for the energy exchange due to bubble oscillations in High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU). The present study is concerned with the cavitation inception by the backscattering of ultrasound from a bubble. In the present experiment, a laser-induced bubble which is generated by a pulsed focused laser beam with high intensity is utilized as a primary cavitation bubble. After generating the bubble, focused ultrasound is emitted to the bubble. The acoustic field and the bubble motion are observed with a high-speed video camera. It is confirmed that the secondary cavitation bubble clouds are generated by the backscattering from the laser-induced bubble. The growth of cavitation bubble clouds is analyzed with the image processing method. The experimental results show that the height and width of the bubble clouds grow in stepwise during their evolution. The direct numerical simulations are also conducted for the backscattering of incident pressure waves from a bubble in order to evaluate a pressure field near the bubble. It is shown that the ratio of a bubble collapse time t0 to a characteristic time of wave propagation tS, ? = t0/ts, is an important determinant for generating negative pressure region by backscattering. The minimum pressure location by the backscattering in simulations is in good agreement with the experiment.

  8. Sonoluminescence, sonochemistry and bubble dynamics of single bubble cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatanaka, Shin-ichi

    2012-09-01

    The amount of hydroxyl radicals produced from a single cavitation bubble was quantified by terephthalate dosimetry at various frequencies and pressure amplitudes, while the dynamics of the single bubble was observed by stroboscopic and light-scattering methods. Also, sonoluminescence (SL), sonochemiluminescence (SCL) of luminol, and sodium atom emission (Na*) in the cavitation field were observed. The amount of hydroxyl radicals per cycle as well as the intensity of SL was proportional to pressure amplitude at every frequency performed, and it decreased with increasing frequency. When the single bubble was dancing with a decrease in pressure amplitude, however, the amount of hydroxyl radicals was greater than that for the stable bubble at the higher pressure amplitude and did not significantly decrease with frequency. Furthermore, SCL and Na* were detected only under unstable bubble conditions. These results imply that the instability of bubbles significantly enhances sonochemical efficiency for non-volatile substances in liquid phase.

  9. Modeling of surface cleaning by cavitation bubble dynamics and collapse.

    PubMed

    Chahine, Georges L; Kapahi, Anil; Choi, Jin-Keun; Hsiao, Chao-Tsung

    2016-03-01

    Surface cleaning using cavitation bubble dynamics is investigated numerically through modeling of bubble dynamics, dirt particle motion, and fluid material interaction. Three fluid dynamics models; a potential flow model, a viscous model, and a compressible model, are used to describe the flow field generated by the bubble all showing the strong effects bubble explosive growth and collapse have on a dirt particle and on a layer of material to remove. Bubble deformation and reentrant jet formation are seen to be responsible for generating concentrated pressures, shear, and lift forces on the dirt particle and high impulsive loads on a layer of material to remove. Bubble explosive growth is also an important mechanism for removal of dirt particles, since strong suction forces in addition to shear are generated around the explosively growing bubble and can exert strong forces lifting the particles from the surface to clean and sucking them toward the bubble. To model material failure and removal, a finite element structure code is used and enables simulation of full fluid-structure interaction and investigation of the effects of various parameters. High impulsive pressures are generated during bubble collapse due to the impact of the bubble reentrant jet on the material surface and the subsequent collapse of the resulting toroidal bubble. Pits and material removal develop on the material surface when the impulsive pressure is large enough to result in high equivalent stresses exceeding the material yield stress or its ultimate strain. Cleaning depends on parameters such as the relative size between the bubble at its maximum volume and the particle size, the bubble standoff distance from the particle and from the material wall, and the excitation pressure field driving the bubble dynamics. These effects are discussed in this contribution. PMID:25982895

  10. On thermonuclear processes in cavitation bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nigmatulin, R. I.; Lahey, R. T., Jr.; Taleyarkhan, R. P.; West, C. D.; Block, R. C.

    2014-09-01

    The theoretical and experimental foundations of so-called bubble nuclear fusion are reviewed. In the nuclear fusion process, a spherical cavitation cluster ˜ 10-2 m in diameter is produced of spherical bubbles at the center of a cylindrical chamber filled with deuterated acetone using a focused acoustic field having a resonant frequency of about 20 kHz. The acoustically-forced bubbles effectuate volume oscillations with sharp collapses during the compression stage. At the final stages of collapse, the bubble cluster emits 2.5 MeV D-D fusion neutron pulses at a rate of ˜ 2000 per second. The neutron yield is ˜ 10^5 s -1. In parallel, tritium nuclei are produced at the same yield. It is shown numerically that, for bubbles having sufficient molecular mass, spherical shock waves develop in the center of the cluster and that these spherical shock waves (microshocks) produce converging shocks within the interior bubbles, which focus energy on the centers of the bubbles. When these shock waves reflect from the centers of the bubbles, extreme conditions of temperature ( ˜ 10^8 K) and density ( ˜ 10^4 kg m -3) arise in a (nano)spherical region ( ˜ 10-7 m in size) that last for ˜ 10-12 s, during which time about ten D-D fusion neutrons and tritium nuclei are produced in the region. A paradoxical result in our experiments is that it is bubble cluster (not streamer) cavitation and the sufficiently high molecular mass of (and hence the low sound speed in) D-acetone ( C3D6O) vapor (as compared, for example, to deuterated water D2O) which are necessary conditions for the formation of convergent spherical microshock waves in central cluster bubbles. It is these waves that allow the energy to be sufficiently focused in the nanospherical regions near the bubble centers for fusion events to occur. The criticism to which the concept of 'bubble fusion' has been subjected in the literature, in particular, most recently in Uspekhi Fizicheskikh Nauk (Physics - Uspekhi) journal, is discussed.

  11. Cavitation Bubble Cluster Activity in the Breakage of Kidney Stones by Lithotripter Shock Waves

    PubMed Central

    Pishchalnikov, Yuriy A.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Bailey, Michael R.; Williams, James C.; Cleveland, Robin O.; Colonius, Tim; Crum, Lawrence A.; Evan, Andrew P.; McAteer, James A.

    2008-01-01

    High-speed photography was used to analyze cavitation bubble activity at the surface of artificial and natural kidney stones during exposure to lithotripter shock waves in vitro. Numerous individual bubbles formed at the surface of stones, but these bubbles did not remain independent and combined with one another to form bubble clusters. Bubble clusters formed at the proximal end, the distal end, and at the sides of stones. Each cluster collapsed to a narrow point of impact. Collapse of the proximal cluster caused erosion at the leading face of the stone and the collapse of clusters at the sides of stones appeared to contribute to the growth of cracks. Collapse of the distal cluster caused minimal damage. We conclude that cavitation-mediated damage to stones was due not to the action of solitary bubbles, but to the growth and collapse of bubble clusters. PMID:14565872

  12. Modeling of interaction between therapeutic ultrasound propagation and cavitation bubbles.

    PubMed

    Liebler, Marko; Dreyer, Thomas; Riedlinger, Rainer E

    2006-12-22

    In medical applications of high intense focused ultrasound the mechanism of interaction between ultrasound waves and cavitation bubbles is responsible for several therapeutic effects as well as for undesired side effects. Based on a two-phase continuum approach for bubbly liquids, in this paper a numerical model is presented to simulate these interactions. The numerical results demonstrate the influence of the cavitation bubble cloud on ultrasound propagation. In the case of a lithotripter pulse an increased bubble density leads to significant changes in the tensile part of the pressure waveform. The calculations are verified by measurements with a fiber optical hydrophone and by experimental results of the bubble cloud dynamics. PMID:16908041

  13. Cavitation Bubble Nucleation by Energetic Particles

    SciTech Connect

    West, C.D.

    1998-12-01

    In the early sixties, experimental measurements using a bubble chamber confirmed quantitatively the thermal spike theory of bubble nucleation by energetic particles: the energy of the slow, heavy alpha decay recoils used in those experiments matched the calculated bubble nucleation energy to within a few percent. It was a triumph, but was soon to be followed by a puzzle. Within a couple of years, experiments on similar liquids, but well below their normal boiling points, placed under tensile stress showed that the calculated bubble nucleation energy was an order of magnitude less than the recoil energy. Why should the theory work so well in the one case and so badly in the other? How did the liquid, or the recoil particle, "know" the difference between the two experiments? Another mathematical model of the same physical process, introduced in 1967, showed qualitatively why different analyses would be needed for liquids with high and low vapor pressures under positive or negative pressures. But, the quantitative agreement between the calculated nucleation energy and the recoil energy was still poor--the former being smaller by a factor of two to three. In this report, the 1967 analysis is extended and refined: the qualitative understanding of the difference between positive and negative pressure nucleation, "boiling" and "cavitation" respectively, is retained, and agreement between the negative pressure calculated to be needed for nucleation and the energy calculated to be available is much improved. A plot of the calculated negative pressure needed to induce bubble formation against the measured value now has a slope of 1.0, although there is still considerable scatter in the individual points.

  14. Comparison of numerical simulations and laboratory studies of shock waves and cavitation bubble growth produced by optical breakdown in water

    SciTech Connect

    Chapyak, E.J.; Godwin, R.P.; Vogel, A.

    1997-04-01

    In numerical calculations of idealized bubble dynamics test problems, Los Alamos computational tools perform well. A realistic equation of state must be used and geometrical features must be carefully modeled to simulate experiments accurately. In this work, we compare numerical simulations taking these features into account with experiments performed at the Medizinisches Laserzentrum Lubeck. We compare the measured and calculated positions of the shock front and of the bubble wall as a function of time in the laser optical breakdown of water produced by 30-ps 1-mJ Nd:YAG laser pulses.

  15. Acoustic streaming and bubble translation at a cavitating ultrasonic horn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, Till; Cairós, Carlos; Batyrshin, Eduard; Mettin, Robert

    2015-10-01

    Acoustic cavitation at a 20 kHz ultrasonic horn is investigated by means of high-speed imaging and particle image velocimetry. In one experimental set-up, bubble dynamics is visualized synchronously with the acoustic streaming liquid flow to reveal their connection. By switching an elevated static pressure, cavitation can be turned off and on for otherwise identical conditions. If cavitation is present, an average increase of liquid streaming velocities by a factor of 30 is found as compared to the non-cavitating case, and high flow velocities are well confined to the bubbly regions. Further results show that individual bubble trajectories do not always coincide with the liquid flow direction, but can even run in opposite direction. This is highlighted in a second set-up where the periodic back-and-forth translation of a single bubble near the horn tip in phosphoric acid is analyzed. It is concluded that translation of larger cavitation bubbles is mainly determined by acoustic forces, even in the presence of moderate bulk flow speeds.

  16. Dual pulses for cavitation control in lithotripsy: Shock wave-bubble interactions and bioeffects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, Dahlia L.

    2002-08-01

    Cavitation, the growth and collapse of gas/vapor bubbles, appears to play an important role in both stone comminution and tissue injury during shock wave lithotripsy, the clinical treatment in which focused, high amplitude shock pulses are used to comminute kidney stones. The goal of this research was to characterize in vitro cavitation activity and stone and cell damage in a novel system that uses converging dual pulses, produced by two identical, confocal lithotripters, to modify the cavitation field. The cavitation bubble dynamics were numerically calculated, and experiments were performed in a research electrohydraulic shock wave lithotripter to determine bubble size, lifetime, and pit depth created in aluminum foils by cavitation collapse. Furthermore, damage to model stones and to red blood cells was measured for both single and dual-pulses. A single shock pulse creates a ˜15 x 100 mm cloud of bubbles in water. The greatest cavitation activity and stone damage from single-pulses was found to occur 2 cm proximal to the geometric focus, F2, where the stone is normally aligned. Therefore, a 2 cm shift in stone alignment may potentially improve stone comminution and reduce tissue injury in clinical treatment. The dual-pulse lithotripter, on the other hand, generates a localized and intensified cavitation field that increased stone comminution efficiency at F2 by at least three times the maximum values achieved by single-pulses. At F2, acoustic pressure approximately doubled, as did bubble size, collapse time, and pit depth on foils. A significant reduction in comminution of stones suspended in glycerol indicates that cavitation activity, not the doubling of acoustic pressure, explains the increased comminution. On either side of F2, the second delayed pulse mitigated bubble collapse, resulting in little or no pitting on foils and reduced hemolysis, even when compared with single pulses. Numerical calculations of radial dynamics agreed with experimental findings. No significant bubble translation was observed or calculated. The data support the conclusion that cavitation plays an important role in efficient stone comminution and hemolysis. The dual-pulse lithotripter, because of its localized and intensified cavitation field, yields the promise of improved stone comminution efficiency, reduced tissue damage, and accelerated treatment.

  17. The disappearance of ultrasound contrast bubbles: observations of bubble dissolution and cavitation nucleation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen Shiang; Matula, Thomas J; Crum, Lawrence A

    2002-06-01

    The destruction process of biSphere and Optison ultrasound (US) contrast microbubbles were studied at 1.1 MHz. High-amplitude tone bursts caused shell disruption and/or fragmentation of the microbubbles, leading to dissolution of the freed gas. The bubble destruction and subsequent dissolution process was imaged with a high pulse-repetition frequency (PRF) 10-cycle, 5-MHz bistatic transducer configuration. Three types of dissolution profiles were measured: In one case, biSphere microbubbles showed evidence of dissolution through resonance, during which a temporary increase in the scattering amplitude was observed. In another case, both biSphere and Optison microbubbles showed evidence of fragmentation, during which the scattering amplitude decreased rapidly. Finally, in some cases, we observed the impulsive growth and subsequent rapid decay of signals that appear to be due to cavitation nucleation. Simulations of bubble dissolution curves show good agreement with experiments. PMID:12113792

  18. Quantitative assessment of reactive oxygen sonochemically generated by cavitation bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Jun; Miyashita, Takuya; Taguchi, Kei; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2015-07-01

    Acoustic cavitation bubbles can induce not only a thermal bioeffect but also a chemical bioeffect. When cavitation bubbles collapse and oscillate violently, they produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) that cause irreversible changes to the tissue. A sonosensitizer can promote such ROS generation. A treatment method using a sonosensitizer is called sonodynamic treatment. Rose bengal (RB) is one of the sonosensitizers whose in vivo and in vitro studies have been reported. In sonodynamic treatment, it is important to produce ROS at a high efficiency. For the efficient generation of ROS, a triggered high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) sequence has been proposed. In this study, cavitation bubbles were generated in a chamber where RB solution was sealed, and a high-speed camera captured the behavior of these cavitation bubbles. The amount of ROS was also quantified by a potassium iodide (KI) method and compared with high-speed camera pictures to investigate the effectiveness of the triggered HIFU sequence. As a result, ROS could be obtained efficiently by this sequence.

  19. Cavitation and bubble dynamics: the Kelvin impulse and its applications.

    PubMed

    Blake, John R; Leppinen, David M; Wang, Qianxi

    2015-10-01

    Cavitation and bubble dynamics have a wide range of practical applications in a range of disciplines, including hydraulic, mechanical and naval engineering, oil exploration, clinical medicine and sonochemistry. However, this paper focuses on how a fundamental concept, the Kelvin impulse, can provide practical insights into engineering and industrial design problems. The pathway is provided through physical insight, idealized experiments and enhancing the accuracy and interpretation of the computation. In 1966, Benjamin and Ellis made a number of important statements relating to the use of the Kelvin impulse in cavitation and bubble dynamics, one of these being 'One should always reason in terms of the Kelvin impulse, not in terms of the fluid momentum…'. We revisit part of this paper, developing the Kelvin impulse from first principles, using it, not only as a check on advanced computations (for which it was first used!), but also to provide greater physical insights into cavitation bubble dynamics near boundaries (rigid, potential free surface, two-fluid interface, flexible surface and axisymmetric stagnation point flow) and to provide predictions on different types of bubble collapse behaviour, later compared against experiments. The paper concludes with two recent studies involving (i) the direction of the jet formation in a cavitation bubble close to a rigid boundary in the presence of high-intensity ultrasound propagated parallel to the surface and (ii) the study of a 'paradigm bubble model' for the collapse of a translating spherical bubble, sometimes leading to a constant velocity high-speed jet, known as the Longuet-Higgins jet. PMID:26442141

  20. Dynamics of a single cavitating and reacting bubble.

    PubMed

    Hauke, Guillermo; Fuster, Daniel; Dopazo, Cesar

    2007-06-01

    Some of the studies on the dynamics of cavitating bubbles often consider simplified submodels assuming uniform fluid properties within the gas bubbles, ignoring chemical reactions, or suppressing fluid transport phenomena across the bubble interface. Another group of works, to which the present contribution belongs, includes the radial dependence of the fluid variables. Important fluid processes that occur inside the gas bubble, such as chemical reactions, and across the bubble interface, such as heat and mass transfer phenomena, are here considered also. As a consequence, this model should yield more realistic results. In particular, it is found that water evaporation and condensation are fundamental transport phenomena in estimating the dissociation reactions of water into OH. The thermal and mass boundary layers and the radial variation of the chemical concentrations also seem essential for accurate predictions. PMID:17677360

  1. Effect of supercritical water shell on cavitation bubble dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Wei-Hang; Chen, Wei-Zhong

    2015-05-01

    Based on reported experimental data, a new model for single cavitation bubble dynamics is proposed considering a supercritical water (SCW) shell surrounding the bubble. Theoretical investigations show that the SCW shell apparently slows down the oscillation of the bubble and cools the gas temperature inside the collapsing bubble. Furthermore, the model is simplified to a Rayleigh-Plesset-like equation for a thin SCW shell. The dependence of the bubble dynamics on the thickness and density of the SCW shell is studied. The results show the bubble dynamics depends on the thickness but is insensitive to the density of the SCW shell. The thicker the SCW shell is, the smaller are the wall velocity and the gas temperature in the bubble. In the authors’ opinion, the SCW shell works as a buffering agent. In collapsing, it is compressed to absorb a good deal of the work transformed into the bubble internal energy during bubble collapse so that it weakens the bubble oscillations. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11174145 and 11334005).

  2. A Study of Cavitation-Ignition Bubble Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Quang-Viet; Jacqmin, David A.

    2005-01-01

    We present the results of an experimental and computational study of the physics and chemistry of cavitation-ignition bubble combustion (CIBC), a process that occurs when combustible gaseous mixtures are ignited by the high temperatures found inside a rapidly collapsing bubble. The CIBC process was modeled using a time-dependent compressible fluid-dynamics code that includes finite-rate chemistry. The model predicts that gas-phase reactions within the bubble produce CO and other gaseous by-products of combustion. In addition, heat and mechanical energy release through a bubble volume-expansion phase are also predicted by the model. We experimentally demonstrate the CIBC process using an ultrasonically excited cavitation flow reactor with various hydrocarbon-air mixtures in liquid water. Low concentrations (< 160 ppm) of carbon monoxide (CO) emissions from the ultrasonic reactor were measured, and found to be proportional to the acoustic excitation power. The results of the model were consistent with the measured experimental results. Based on the experimental findings, the computational model, and previous reports of the "micro-diesel effect" in industrial hydraulic systems, we conclude that CIBC is indeed possible and exists in ultrasonically- and hydrodynamically-induced cavitation. Finally, estimates of the utility of CIBC process as a means of powering an idealized heat engine are also presented.

  3. Evidence for liquid phase reactions during single bubble acoustic cavitation.

    PubMed

    Troia, A; Madonna Ripa, D; Lago, S; Spagnolo, R

    2004-07-01

    We extended the recent experiment by Lepoint et al. [Sonochemistry and Sonoluminescence, NATO ASI Series, Series C 524, Kluwer Academic Publishers, Dordrecht/Boston/London, 1999, p. 285], involving a so-called single bubble sonochemistry process, to a three-phase system. We have found experimental evidence that a single cavitating bubble can activate the oxidation of I- ions after the injection of a CCl4 liquid drop in the bubble trapping apparatus. The solvent drop (CCl4 is almost water insoluble) is pushed towards the bubble position and forms a thin film on the bubble surface. When the acoustic pressure drive is increased above 100 kPa, the three-phase system gives rise to a dark filament, indicating the complexation reaction between starch (added to the water phase) and I2. I2 species is the product of surface reactions involving bubble-induced decomposition of CCl4. Further increase of the acoustic drive causes the thin CCl4 film to separate from the bubble and stops I2 production. The study of the chemical activity of this three-phase system could give new advances on dynamics of the bubble collapse. PMID:15157862

  4. Influence of the bubbles on the turbulence in the liquid in hydrodynamic cavitation through a venturi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuzier, Sylvie; Coutier Delgosha, Olivier; Coudert, S. Ébastien; Dazin, Antoine

    2011-11-01

    The physical description of hydrodynamic cavitation is complex as it includes strongly unsteady, turbulent and phase change phenomena. Because the bubbles in the cavitation area render this zone opaque, nonintrusive experimental observation inside this zone is difficult and little is known about the detailed bubble, flow structure and physics inside. A novel approach using LIF-PIV to investigate the dynamics inside the cavitation area generated through a venturi is presented. The velocity in the liquid and of the bubbles are measured simultaneously and correlated with areas of various bubble structure. The influence of the bubble structure on the turbulence in the liquid is also studied.

  5. Effect of laser-induced cavitation bubble on a thin elastic membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orthaber, U.; Petkovšek, R.; Schille, J.; Hartwig, L.; Hawlina, G.; Drnovšek-Olup, B.; Vre?ko, A.; Poberaj, I.

    2014-12-01

    A study of the effects of a cavitation bubble on a thin elastic membrane is presented. A cavitation bubble was produced by focusing a high-energy laser beam near an elastic membrane submerged in water, which corresponds to conditions often encountered in ophthalmology. The bubble effects on the membrane were studied as a function of distance between the bubble and membrane and laser pulse energy. Recordings of bubble dynamics with an ultra-high-speed camera were performed on both sides of the membrane, providing better insight into the mechanisms of membrane rupture. Observations have revealed distinct bubble behavior regimes with respect to coefficient ?. Cavitation bubbles centered on the membrane produce less damage than bubbles shifted slightly away. Significant damages were observed at intermediate distances between the bubble and membrane after bubble collapse, while weaker interactions were recorded at larger distances with less or no damaging effect to the membrane.

  6. Observation of cavitation bubbles and acoustic streaming in high intensity ultrasound fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uemura, Yuuki; Sasaki, Kazuma; Minami, Kyohei; Sato, Toshio; Choi, Pak-Kon; Takeuchi, Shinichi

    2015-07-01

    We observed the behavior of acoustic cavitation by sonochemical luminescence and ultrasound B-mode imaging with ultrasound diagnostic equipment in a standing-wave ultrasound field and focused ultrasound field. Furthermore, in order to investigate the influence of acoustic streaming on acoustic cavitation bubbles, we performed flow analysis of the sound field using particle image velocimetry. We found that acoustic cavitation bubbles are stirred by circulating acoustic streaming and local vortexes occurring in the water tank of the standing-wave ultrasound exposure system. We considered that the acoustic cavitation bubbles are carried away by acoustic streaming due to the high ultrasound pressure in the focused ultrasound field.

  7. Hysteresis of inertial cavitation activity induced by fluctuating bubble size distribution.

    PubMed

    Muleki Seya, Pauline; Desjouy, Cyril; Béra, Jean-Christophe; Inserra, Claude

    2015-11-01

    Amongst the variety of complex phenomena encountered in nonlinear physics, a hysteretic effect can be expected on ultrasound cavitation due to the intrinsic nonlinearity of bubble dynamics. When applying successive ultrasound shots for increasing and decreasing acoustic intensities, a hysteretic behaviour is experimentally observed on inertial cavitation activity, with a loop area sensitive to the inertial cavitation threshold. To get a better insight of the phenomena underlying this hysteretic effect, the evolution of the bubble size distribution is studied numerically by implementing rectified diffusion, fragmentation process, rising and dissolution of bubbles from an initial bubble size distribution. When applying increasing and decreasing acoustic intensities, the numerical distribution exhibits asymmetry in bubble number and distribution. The resulting inertial cavitation activity is assessed through the numerical broadband noise of the emitted acoustic radiation of the bubble cloud dynamics. This approach allows obtaining qualitatively the observed hysteretic effect and its interest in terms of control is discussed. PMID:26186844

  8. Efficient Generation of Cavitation Bubbles in Gel Phantom by Ultrasound Exposure with Negative-Followed by Positive-Peak-Pressure-Emphasized Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Jun; Asai, Ayumu; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2013-07-01

    Cavitation bubbles have much potential for emphasizing therapeutic treatments such as high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment, histotripsy, and sonodynamic therapy. Their highly efficient as well as controlled generation is important to utilize them effectively as well as safely. However, producing negative pressure over the cavitation threshold by focused ultrasound is difficult because of the nonlinear propagation combined with the focal phase shift. We have suggested a dual-frequency ultrasound exposure method, in which N- and P-waves emphasizing either the peak negative or positive pressure, respectively, are synthesized by superimposing the second harmonic onto the fundamental frequency. In this study, high-speed camera observation demonstrated that the exposure with N-waves immediately followed by P-waves could generate cavitation bubbles most efficiently in gel phantom. Furthermore, the measured negative and positive pressure distributions of the N- and P-wave fields, respectively, agreed well with the optically observed distributions of cavitation inception and cavitation cloud growth.

  9. The detection and control of stable and transient acoustic cavitation bubbles.

    PubMed

    Ashokkumar, Muthupandian; Lee, Judy; Iida, Yasuo; Yasui, Kyuichi; Kozuka, Teruyuki; Tuziuti, Toru; Towata, Atsuya

    2009-11-21

    Acoustic cavitation plays a significant role in many applications that include therapeutic medicine, sonochemsitry and materials processing. The type of cavitation bubbles generated, namely transient or stable (repetitive transient), is important for optimizing the efficiency of these applications. We report on a multibubble sonoluminescence (MBSL)-based experimental technique for the detection and the control of type of cavitation at low and high ultrasound frequencies. It is observed that the use of a horn-type sonicator operating at 20 kHz primarily generates transient cavitation bubbles, as reported earlier. However, the use of plate type transducers at low frequencies (25 and 37 kHz) generates a significant amount of stable cavitation, as evidenced from the quenching of sonoluminescence by volatile solutes. Evidence for the existence of transient cavitation at a higher ultrasound frequency (440 kHz) is also provided. PMID:19865767

  10. Vol. 22, No. 3, Aug. 1, 2002 Scientists measure energy dissipation in a single cavitating bubble

    E-print Network

    Suslick, Kenneth S.

    and implosive collapse of small gas bubbles in a liquid blasted with sound. The collapse of these cavitating reactions occurring within the tiny furnace is a challenge. To measure chemical properties, the researchers

  11. Effect of Power and Frequency on Bubble-Size Distributions in Acoustic Cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brotchie, Adam; Grieser, Franz; Ashokkumar, Muthupandian

    2009-02-01

    Acoustic bubble-size distributions have been determined using a pulsed ultrasound method at different ultrasound powers and frequencies. It was observed that the mean bubble size increased with increasing acoustic power and decreased with increasing ultrasound frequency. It was also recognized that the mean size of bubbles emitting sonoluminescence was greater than those producing sonochemiluminescence indicating that the two processes take place in different populations of cavitation bubbles in the system.

  12. Optical measurements of gas bubbles in oil behind a cavitating micro-orifice flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iben, Uwe; Wolf, Fabian; Freudigmann, Hans-Arndt; Fröhlich, Jochen; Heller, Winfried

    2015-06-01

    In hydraulic systems, it is common for air release to occur behind valves or throttles in the form of bubbles. These air bubbles can affect the behavior and the performance of these systems to a substantial extent. In the paper, gas release in a liquid flow behind an orifice is analyzed by optical methods for various operation points. The bubbles are observed with a digital camera, and a detection algorithm based on the Hough transformation is used to determine their number and size. The appearance of gas bubbles is very sensitive to the inlet and outlet pressure of the orifice. Gas bubbles are only observed if choking cavitation occurs. An empirical relationship between an adjusted cavitation number and the appearance of gas release is presented. It is assumed that the observed bubbles contain mostly air. With the applied pressure differences, up to 30 % of the dissolved air was degassed in the form of bubbles.

  13. Influence of a low flow rate on an acoustic cavitation bubble cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seck, A.; Inserra, C.; Ollivier, S.; Bra, J.-C.; Blanc-Benon, P.

    2015-10-01

    The impact of a low flow rate on a acoustic cavitation bubble cloud is studied experimentally and analytically. Experimentally, a bubble cloud induced by an ultrasonic wave is submitted to several low flow rates. An annular piezoelectric transducer is used to generate the ultrasonic acoustic field in a cylindrical geometry. It is observed the radial narrowing and the axial extension decreasing of the bubble cloud when increasing flow rate. Analytically, in case of a single bubble, it is shown that the equilibrium locations of the bubble is impacted by the flow involving a competition between acoustic and hydrodynamic forces. This competition between forces could turn into selecting bubble location according to their sizes.

  14. Initial growth of sonochemically active and sonoluminescence bubbles at various frequencies.

    PubMed

    Babgi, Bandar; Zhou, Meifang; Aksu, Mecit; Alghamdi, Yousef; Ashokkumar, Muthupandian

    2016-03-01

    The initial growth of acoustic cavitation activity is important in some applications such as therapeutic and diagnostic medicine. The initial growth of cavitation activity has been investigated using sonoluminescence and sonochemical activity (sonochemiluminescence) at 358kHz, 647kHz and 1062kHz and at 5W, 15W and 30W applied power levels. The growth of sonochemically active bubble population is found to be much faster than that of sonoluminescence bubble population at 358kHz and 647kHz whereas almost similar growth rate is observed at 1062kHz for both bubble populations. This suggests that the cavitation bubble resonance size ranges of sonoluminescence and sonochemically active bubbles are different at 358kHz and 647kHz, whereas they have similar size range at 1062kHz. At 358kHz and 647kHz, relatively smaller bubbles become chemically active. Possible reasons for such observations have been discussed. The data presented and discussed in this study may be useful in controlling the growth of cavitation bubble population in addition to enhancing the knowledge base in cavitation science. PMID:26584984

  15. A New Active Cavitation Mapping Technique for Pulsed HIFU Applications – Bubble Doppler

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tong; Khokhlova, Tatiana; Sapozhnikov, Oleg; Hwang, Joo Ha; Sapozhnikov, Oleg; O’Donnell, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    In this work, a new active cavitation mapping technique for pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound (pHIFU) applications termed bubble Doppler is proposed and its feasibility tested in tissue-mimicking gel phantoms. pHIFU therapy uses short pulses, delivered at low pulse repetition frequency, to cause transient bubble activity that has been shown to enhance drug and gene delivery to tissues. The current gold standard for detecting and monitoring cavitation activity during pHIFU treatments is passive cavitation detection (PCD), which provides minimal information on the spatial distribution of the bubbles. B-mode imaging can detect hyperecho formation, but has very limited sensitivity, especially to small, transient microbubbles. The bubble Doppler method proposed here is based on a fusion of the adaptations of three Doppler techniques that had been previously developed for imaging of ultrasound contrast agents – color Doppler, pulse inversion Doppler, and decorrelation Doppler. Doppler ensemble pulses were interleaved with therapeutic pHIFU pulses using three different pulse sequences and standard Doppler processing was applied to the received echoes. The information yielded by each of the techniques on the distribution and characteristics of pHIFU-induced cavitation bubbles was evaluated separately, and found to be complementary. The unified approach - bubble Doppler – was then proposed to both spatially map the presence of transient bubbles and to estimate their sizes and the degree of nonlinearity. PMID:25265178

  16. The fast dynamics of cavitation bubbles within water confined in elastic solids.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Olivier; Marmottant, Philippe; Gonzalez-Avila, S Roberto; Ando, Keita; Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2014-03-14

    Many applications such as ultrasonic cleaning or sonochemistry use the ability of bubbles to oscillate and drive liquid flow. But bubbles have also received attention in porous media, where drying may cause cavitation, a phenomenon occurring in plant tissues. Here we explore the dynamics of cavitation bubbles when the liquid is fully entrapped in an elastic solid, using light scattering, laser strobe photography and high speed camera recordings. Our experiments show unexpectedly fast bubble oscillations in volume. They depend on the confinement size and elasticity, which we explain with a simple model where liquid compressibility is a key parameter. We also observe rich non-spherical dynamics, with ejection away from the walls and bubble fragmentation, which reveal extreme fluid motion at short timescales. PMID:24795983

  17. Analysis of Temperature Rise Induced by High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound in Tissue-Mimicking Gel Considering Cavitation Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asai, Ayumu; Okano, Hiroki; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2013-07-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) causes a selective temperature rise in tissue and is used as a noninvasive method for tumor treatment. However, there is a problem in that it typically takes several hours to treat a large tumor. The development of a highly efficient method is required to shorten the treatment time. It is known that cavitation bubbles generated by HIFU enhance HIFU heating. In this study, the enhancement of the heating effect by cavitation was estimated in a numerical simulation solving a bio-heat transfer equation (BHTE) by increasing the absorption coefficients in and out of the volume of cavitation bubbles. The absorption coefficients were obtained by a curve fitting the temperature rise near the focal point between experiment and simulation. The results show that cavitation bubbles caused the increase in ultrasonic absorption not only in but also near the volume of cavitation bubbles.

  18. A reduced-order, single-bubble cavitation model with applications to therapeutic ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Kreider, Wayne; Crum, Lawrence A.; Bailey, Michael R.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.

    2011-01-01

    Cavitation often occurs in therapeutic applications of medical ultrasound such as shock-wave lithotripsy (SWL) and high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). Because cavitation bubbles can affect an intended treatment, it is important to understand the dynamics of bubbles in this context. The relevant context includes very high acoustic pressures and frequencies as well as elevated temperatures. Relative to much of the prior research on cavitation and bubble dynamics, such conditions are unique. To address the relevant physics, a reduced-order model of a single, spherical bubble is proposed that incorporates phase change at the liquid-gas interface as well as heat and mass transport in both phases. Based on the energy lost during the inertial collapse and rebound of a millimeter-sized bubble, experimental observations were used to tune and test model predictions. In addition, benchmarks from the published literature were used to assess various aspects of model performance. Benchmark comparisons demonstrate that the model captures the basic physics of phase change and diffusive transport, while it is quantitatively sensitive to specific model assumptions and implementation details. Given its performance and numerical stability, the model can be used to explore bubble behaviors across a broad parameter space relevant to therapeutic ultrasound. PMID:22088026

  19. Bubble Growth in Lunar Basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.

    2009-05-01

    Although Moon is usually said to be volatile-"free", lunar basalts are often vesicular with mm-size bubbles. The vesicular nature of the lunar basalts suggests that they contained some initial gas concentration. A recent publication estimated volatile concentrations in lunar basalts (Saal et al. 2008). This report investigates bubble growth on Moon and compares with that on Earth. Under conditions relevant to lunar basalts, bubble growth in a finite melt shell (i.e., growth of multiple regularly-spaced bubbles) is calculated following Proussevitch and Sahagian (1998) and Liu and Zhang (2000). Initial H2O content of 700 ppm (Saal et al. 2008) or lower is used and the effect of other volatiles (such as carbon dioxide, halogens, and sulfur) is ignored. H2O solubility at low pressures (Liu et al. 2005), concentration-dependent diffusivity in basalt (Zhang and Stolper 1991), and lunar basalt viscosity (Murase and McBirney 1970) are used. Because lunar atmospheric pressure is essentially zero, the confining pressure on bubbles is completely supplied by the overlying magma. Due to low H2O content in lunar basaltic melt (700 ppm H2O corresponds to a saturation pressure of 75 kPa), H2O bubbles only grow in the upper 16 m of a basalt flow or lake. A depth of 20 mm corresponds to a confining pressure of 100 Pa. Hence, vesicular lunar rocks come from very shallow depth. Some findings from the modeling are as follows. (a) Due to low confining pressure as well as low viscosity, even though volatile concentration is very low, bubble growth rate is extremely high, much higher than typical bubble growth rates in terrestrial melts. Hence, mm-size bubbles in lunar basalts are not strange. (b) Because the pertinent pressures are so low, bubble pressure due to surface tension plays a main role in lunar bubble growth, contrary to terrestrial cases. (c) Time scale to reach equilibrium bubble size increases as the confining pressure increases. References: (1) Liu Y, Zhang YX (2000) Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 181, 251. (2) Liu Y, Zhang YX, Behrens H (2005) J. Volcanol. Geotherm. Res. 143, 219. (3) Murase T, McBirney A (1970) Science 167, 1491. (4) Proussevitch AA, Sahagian DL (1998) J. Geophys. Res. 103, 18223. (5) Saal AE, Hauri EH, Cascio ML, et al. (2008) Nature 454, 192. (6) Zhang YX, Stolper EM (1991) Nature 351, 306.

  20. Computation of bubbly cavitating flow in shock wave lithotripsy Michel Tanguay

    E-print Network

    Colonius, Tim

    . iii #12;Abstract Lithotripsy is at the forefront of treatment of kidney stones. By firing shock wavesComputation of bubbly cavitating flow in shock wave lithotripsy Thesis by Michel Tanguay In Partial at the stone, it can be broken down into small fragments. Although the treatment is non-invasive, both short

  1. acoustic cavitation of slightly subcritical bubbles of Mathematics, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215

    E-print Network

    Harkin, Anthony

    On acoustic cavitation of slightly subcritical bubbles Anthony ¡ Harkin Department radii are slightly less than the Blake critical radius, in the presence of time-periodic acoustic for acoustic pressure fields that consist of two frequencies © will be discussed. © 1999 American Institute

  2. TEXTURE-INDUCED CAVITATION BUBBLES AND FRICTION REDUCTION IN THE ELROD-ADAMS MODEL

    E-print Network

    Buscaglia, Gustavo C.

    sinusoidal textures. The analysis method consists of time- and mesh-resolved simulations with a finite volumeTEXTURE-INDUCED CAVITATION BUBBLES AND FRICTION REDUCTION IN THE ELROD-ADAMS MODEL Hugo M. Checoa approximation of the Elrod- Adams model. Friction and clearance contours as functions of the texture depth

  3. Localized removal of layers of metal, polymer, or biomaterial by ultrasound cavitation bubbles

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez Rivas, David; Verhaagen, Bram; Seddon, James R. T.; Zijlstra, Aaldert G.; Jiang, Lei-Meng; van der Sluis, Luc W. M.; Versluis, Michel; Lohse, Detlef; Gardeniers, Han J. G. E.

    2012-01-01

    We present an ultrasonic device with the ability to locally remove deposited layers from a glass slide in a controlled and rapid manner. The cleaning takes place as the result of cavitating bubbles near the deposited layers and not due to acoustic streaming. The bubbles are ejected from air-filled cavities micromachined in a silicon surface, which, when vibrated ultrasonically at a frequency of 200 kHz, generate a stream of bubbles that travel to the layer deposited on an opposing glass slide. Depending on the pressure amplitude, the bubble clouds ejected from the micropits attain different shapes as a result of complex bubble interaction forces, leading to distinct shapes of the cleaned areas. We have determined the removal rates for several inorganic and organic materials and obtained an improved efficiency in cleaning when compared to conventional cleaning equipment. We also provide values of the force the bubbles are able to exert on an atomic force microscope tip. PMID:23964308

  4. Dynamics of silver nanoparticle formation and agglomeration inside the cavitation bubble after pulsed laser ablation in liquid.

    PubMed

    Wagener, Philipp; Ibrahimkutty, Shyjumon; Menzel, Andreas; Plech, Anton; Barcikowski, Stephan

    2013-03-01

    The formation of nanoparticles within the laser-induced cavitation bubble is studied in situ using small angle X-ray scattering with high spatiotemporal resolution. Directly after laser ablation, two different particle fractions consisting of compact primary particles of 8-10 nm size and agglomerates of 40-60 nm size are formed. The abundance of these species is strongly influenced by the dynamics of the oscillating cavitation bubble. Primary particle mass is most abundant during maximal expansion of the first bubble and reappears a little weaker in the rebound. In contrast to this, the mass abundance of agglomerates is relatively low in the first bubble but strongly increases during first bubble collapse and following rebound. Although most of the ablated material is trapped inside the bubble and follows its oscillation, a minor fraction of both species could be detected outside the cavitation bubble even before its final collapse. PMID:23183423

  5. Cavitations Development In a Liquid Behind Strong Acoustic Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronin, D. V.; Teslenko, V. S.

    2008-06-01

    The generation of bubbles behind an acoustic pulse is theoretically and experimentally investigated in the paper. It was found out that at growth of the amplitude of falling wave two different modes of cavitations development occur: "chain" mechanism of duplication of cavitations germs is replaced by mechanism of "real" liquid cavitations, when the liquid is initially filled with a set of cavitations nuclei and apparent bubble occurrence is caused by different periods of nucleus growth from them.

  6. Sonoporation from Jetting Cavitation Bubbles Claus-Dieter Ohl,* Manish Arora,* Roy Ikink,* Nico de Jong,*y

    E-print Network

    Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    of renal stones (shock wave lithotripsy), have proven to reach sufficient tensile stress. Other methods, a laser- induced cavitation bubble was generated near to a substrate with adherent rat kidney cells (20

  7. Ultrasonic emissions reveal individual cavitation bubbles in water-stressed wood

    PubMed Central

    Ponomarenko, A.; Vincent, O.; Pietriga, A.; Cochard, H.; Badel, É.; Marmottant, P.

    2014-01-01

    Under drought conditions, the xylem of trees that conducts ascending sap produces ultrasonic emissions whose exact origin is not clear. We introduce a new method to record simultaneously both acoustic events and optical observation of the xylem conduits within slices of wood that were embedded in a transparent material setting a hydric stress. In this article, we resolved the rapid development of all cavitation bubbles and demonstrated that each ultrasound emission was linked to the nucleation of one single bubble, whose acoustic energy is an increasing function of the size of the conduit where nucleation occurred and also of the hydric stress. We modelled these observations by the fact that water columns in conduits store elastic energy and release it into acoustic waves when they are broken by cavitation bubbles. Water columns are thus elastic, and not rigid, ‘wires of water’ set under tension by hydric stresses. Cavitation bubbles are at the origin of an embolism, whose development was followed in our experiments. Such an embolism of sap circulation can result in a fatal condition for living trees. These findings provide new insights for the non-destructive monitoring of embolisms within trees, and suggest a new approach to study porous media under hydric stress. PMID:25056212

  8. Reduction of Bubble Cavitation by Modifying the Diffraction Wave from a Lithotripter Aperture

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Purpose A new method was devised to suppress the bubble cavitation in the lithotripter focal zone to reduce the propensity of shockwave-induced renal injury. Materials and Methods An edge extender was designed and fabricated to fit on the outside of the ellipsoidal reflector of an electrohydraulic lithotripter to disturb the generation of diffraction wave at the aperture, but with little effect on the acoustic field inside the reflector. Results Although the peak negative pressures at the lithotripter focus using the edge extender at 20?kV were similar to that of the original configuration (-11.1±0.9 vs ?10.6±0.7?MPa), the duration of the tensile wave was shortened significantly (3.2±0.54 vs 5.83±0.56??s, P<0.01). There is no difference, however, in both the amplitude and duration of the compressive shockwaves between these two configurations as well as the ?6 dB beam width in the focal plane. The significant suppression effect of bubble cavitation was confirmed by the measured bubble collapse time using passive cavitation detection. At the lithotripter focus, while only about 30 shocks were needed to rupture a blood vessel phantom using the original HM-3 reflector at 20?kV, no damage could be produced after 300 shocks using the edge extender. Meanwhile, the original HM-3 lithotripter at 20?kV can achieve a stone comminution efficiency of 50.4±2.0% on plaster-of-Paris stone phantom after 200 shocks, which is comparable to that of using the edge extender (46.8±4.1%, P=0.005). Conclusions Modifying the diffraction wave at the lithotripter aperture can suppress the shockwave-induced bubble cavitation with significant reduced damage potential on the vessel phantom but satisfactory stone comminution ability. PMID:22332839

  9. Holmium laser ablation of cartilage: effects of cavitation bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asshauer, Thomas; Jansen, Thomas; Oberthur, Thorsten; Delacretaz, Guy P.; Gerber, Bruno E.

    1995-05-01

    The ablation of fresh harvested porcine femur patellar groove cartilage by a 2.12 micrometers Cr:Tm:Ho:YAG laser in clinically used irradiation conditions was studied. Laser pulses were delivered via a 600 micrometers diameter fiber in isotonic saline. Ablation was investigated as a function of the angle of incidence of the delivery fiber with respect to the cartilage surface (0-90 degrees) and of radiant exposure. Laser pulses with energies of 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 J and a duration of 250 microseconds were used. A constant fiber tip-tissue distance of 1 mm was maintained for all experiments. The dynamics of the induced vapor bubble and of the ablation process was monitored by time resolved flash videography with a 1 microseconds illumination. Acoustic transients were measured with a piezoelectric PVDF needle probe hydrophone. Bubble attachment to the cartilage surface during the collapse phase, leading to the direct exposition of the cartilage surface to the maximal pressure generated, was observed in all investigated irradiation conditions. Maximal pressure transients of up to 200 bars (at 1 mm distance from the collapse center) were measured at the bubble collapse at irradiation angles >= 60 degrees. No significant pressure variation was observed in perpendicular irradiation conditions as a function of radiant exposure. A significant reduction of the induced pressure for irradiation angles

  10. Water Treatment using Discharge Generated in Cavitation Field with Micro Bubble Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihara, Satoshi; Hirohata, Taiki; Kominato, Yuichi; Yamabe, Chobei; Ike, Hideaki; Hakiai, Kazunori; Hirabayashi, Kazuya; Tamagawa, Masaaki

    New method of water treatment for wastewater using discharge in water cavitation field, in which numerous micro bubbles were generated by high-speed water flow, was proposed in this paper. Indigo carmine solution, which is a type of dye, with a concentration of 9mg/Liter was used as a specimen for demonstration of water treatment. The total volume of solution and average speed of solution in the cavitation field was 20 Liter and about 7.4 m/s, respectively. A reduction ratio of absorbance of 96% was obtained in 50 min of treatment time at an electrode distance of 2 mm and a discharge power of 16 W. Also it was found that the efficiency of decolorization was improved by changing the electrode location.

  11. Interaction Mechanisms of Cavitation Bubbles Induced by Spatially and Temporally Separated fs-Laser Pulses

    PubMed Central

    Tinne, Nadine; Kaune, Brigitte; Krüger, Alexander; Ripken, Tammo

    2014-01-01

    The emerging use of femtosecond lasers with high repetition rates in the MHz regime together with limited scan speed implies possible mutual optical and dynamical interaction effects of the individual cutting spots. In order to get more insight into the dynamics a time-resolved photographic analysis of the interaction of cavitation bubbles is presented. Particularly, we investigated the influence of fs-laser pulses and their resulting bubble dynamics with various spatial as well as temporal separations. Different time courses of characteristic interaction effects between the cavitation bubbles were observed depending on pulse energy and spatio-temporal pulse separation. These ranged from merely no interaction to the phenomena of strong water jet formation. Afterwards, the mechanisms are discussed regarding their impact on the medical application of effective tissue cutting lateral to the laser beam direction with best possible axial precision: the mechanical forces of photodisruption as well as the occurring water jet should have low axial extend and a preferably lateral priority. Furthermore, the overall efficiency of energy conversion into controlled mechanical impact should be maximized compared to the transmitted pulse energy and unwanted long range mechanical side effects, e.g. shock waves, axial jet components. In conclusion, these experimental results are of great importance for the prospective optimization of the ophthalmic surgical process with high-repetition rate fs-lasers. PMID:25502697

  12. Theoretical model of ice nucleation induced by acoustic cavitation. Part 1: Pressure and temperature profiles around a single bubble.

    PubMed

    Cogné, C; Labouret, S; Peczalski, R; Louisnard, O; Baillon, F; Espitalier, F

    2016-03-01

    This paper deals with the inertial cavitation of a single gas bubble in a liquid submitted to an ultrasonic wave. The aim was to calculate accurately the pressure and temperature at the bubble wall and in the liquid adjacent to the wall just before and just after the collapse. Two different approaches were proposed for modeling the heat transfer between the ambient liquid and the gas: the simplified approach (A) with liquid acting as perfect heat sink, the rigorous approach (B) with liquid acting as a normal heat conducting medium. The time profiles of the bubble radius, gas temperature, interface temperature and pressure corresponding to the above models were compared and important differences were observed excepted for the bubble size. The exact pressure and temperature distributions in the liquid corresponding to the second model (B) were also presented. These profiles are necessary for the prediction of any physical phenomena occurring around the cavitation bubble, with possible applications to sono-crystallization. PMID:26044460

  13. Study on the spatial distribution of the liquid temperature near a cavitation bubble wall.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yang; Yasui, Kyuichi; Sun, Zhicheng; Mei, Bin; You, Meiyan; Zhu, Tong

    2016-03-01

    A simple new model of the spatial distribution of the liquid temperature near a cavitation bubble wall (Tli) is employed to numerically calculate Tli. The result shows that Tli is almost same with the ambient liquid temperature (T0) during the bubble oscillations except at strong collapse. At strong collapse, Tli can increase to about 1510K, the same order of magnitude with that of the maximum temperature inside the bubble, which means that the chemical reactions occur not only in gas-phase inside the collapsing bubble but also in liquid-phase just outside the collapsing bubble. Four factors (ultrasonic vibration amplitude, ultrasonic frequency, the surface tension and the viscosity) are considered to study their effects for the thin liquid layer. The results show that for the thin layer, the thickness and the temperature increase as the ultrasonic vibration amplitude rise; conversely, the thickness and the temperature decrease with the increase of the ultrasonic frequency, the surface tension or the viscosity. PMID:26585020

  14. Stress wave emission and cavitation bubble dynamics by nanosecond optical breakdown in a tissue phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brujan, Emil-Alexandru; Vogel, Alfred

    2006-07-01

    Stress wave emission and cavitation bubble dynamics after optical breakdown in water and a tissue phantom with Nd: YAG laser pulses of 6 ns duration were investigated both experimentally and numerically to obtain a better understanding of the physical mechanisms involved in plasma-mediated laser surgery. Experimental tools were high-speed photography with 50000 frames s(-1) , and acoustic measurements. The tissue phantom consisted of a transparent polyacrylamide (PAA) gel, the elastic properties of which can be controlled by modifying the water content. Breakdown in water produced a purely compressive stress wave. By contrast, in stiff PAA samples and for sufficiently large pulse energies, the compression wave was followed by an intense tensile wave, similar to the behaviour previously observed in cornea. The elastic/plastic response of the medium led to a significant decrease of the maximum size of the cavitation bubble and to a shortening of its oscillation period which was found to be related to the generation of the tensile stress wave upon breakdown. For increasing elastic modulus of the PAA, both the amplitudes of the bubble oscillation and of the stress wave emitted during bubble collapse decreased until the bubble oscillation was so strongly damped that no collapse stress wave was emitted. Numerical simulations were performed using a spherical model of bubble dynamics which includes the compressibility and elastic/plastic behaviour of the medium, viscosity, density and surface tension. The calculations revealed that consideration of the elastic/plastic behaviour of the medium surrounding the bubble is essential to describe the experimentally observed bipolar shape of the stress wave emitted upon optical breakdown. Water is a poor tissue model because the shape of the emitted stress waves and the bubble dynamics differ strongly for both materials. The mechanical properties of PAA were also found to be quite different from those of tissues. Experimental and numerical results provided evidence that the dynamic mechanical properties relevant for optical breakdown in PAA and tissue differ by as much as two orders of magnitude from the static values. The discovery of a tensile stress wave after optical breakdown in tissue-like media is of great importance for the assessment of collateral damage in laser surgery because biological tissues are much more susceptible to tensile stress than to compressive stress.

  15. Real-Time Monitoring and Quantitative Evaluation of Cavitation Bubbles Induced by High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Using B-Mode Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jie; Chen, Chu-Yi; Chen, Gong; Guo, Xia-Sheng; Ma, Yong; Tu, Juan; Zhang, Dong

    2014-03-01

    A software-based method is proposed to eliminate the flooding interference strips in B-mode images, and to evaluate the cavitation bubbles generated during high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) exposures. In vitro tissue phantoms are exposed to 1.12 MHz HIFU pulses with a fixed 100 Hz pulse repetition frequency. HIFU-induced cavitation bubbles are detected as hyperechoic regions in B-mode images. The temporal evolution of cavitation bubbles, generated by HIFU pulses with varying driving amplitude and pulse length, is analyzed by measuring the time-varying area of the hyperechoic region. The results show that: first, it is feasible to monitor HIFU-induced cavitation bubble activity in real-time using B-mode imaging; second, more cavitation bubbles can be generated with higher acoustic energy delivered; third, the hyperechoic region is observed to shrink gradually after ceasing the HIFU pulses, which indicates the dissolution of cavitation bubbles. This work will be helpful for developing an effective tool to realize real-time monitoring and quantitative evaluation of HIFU-induced cavitation bubble activity using a current commercialized B-mode machine.

  16. Bubble Proliferation or Dissolution of Cavitation Nuclei in the Beam Path of a Shock-Wave Lithotripter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Spencer; Lautz, Jaclyn; Sankin, Georgy N.; Szeri, Andrew J.; Zhong, Pei

    2015-03-01

    It is hypothesized that the decreased treatment efficiency in contemporary shock-wave lithotripters is related to tensile wave attenuation due to cavitation in the prefocal beam path. Utilizing high-speed imaging of the beam path and focal pressure waveform measurements, tensile attenuation is associated with bubble proliferation. By systematically testing different combinations of pulse-repetition frequency and gas concentration, we modulate the bubble-dissolution time to identify which conditions lead to bubble proliferation and show that reducing bubble proliferation in the beam path significantly improves acoustic transmission and stone comminution efficiency in vitro. In addition to experiments, a bubble-proliferation model is developed that takes gas diffusion across the bubble wall and bubble fragmentation into account. By aligning the model with experimental observations, the number of daughter bubbles produced after a single lithotripter bubble collapse is estimated to be in the range of 253 ˜510 . This finding is on the same order of magnitude with previous measurements of an isolated bubble collapse in a lithotripter field by Pishchalnikov, McAteer, and Williams [BJU Int. 102, 1681 (2008), 10.1111/j.1464-410X.2008.07896.x], and this estimate improves the general understanding of lithotripsy bubble dynamics in the beam path.

  17. Bubble growth and rise in soft sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudreau, Bernard P.; Algar, Chris; Johnson, Bruce D.; Croudace, Ian; Reed, Allen; Furukawa, Yoko; Dorgan, Kelley M.; Jumars, Peter A.; Grader, Abraham S.; Gardiner, Bruce S.

    2005-06-01

    The mechanics of uncemented soft sediments during bubble growth are not widely understood and no rheological model has found wide acceptance. We offer definitive evidence on the mode of bubble formation in the form of X-ray computed tomographic images and comparison with theory. Natural and injected bubbles in muddy cohesive sediments are shown to be highly eccentric oblate spheroids (disks) that grow either by fracturing the sediment or by reopening preexisting fractures. In contrast, bubbles in soft sandy sediment tend to be spherical, suggesting that sand acts fluidly or plastically in response to growth stresses. We also present bubble-rise results from gelatin, a mechanically similar but transparent medium, that suggest that initial rise is also accomplished by fracture. Given that muddy sediments are elastic and yield by fracture, it becomes much easier to explain physically related phenomena such as seafloor pockmark formation, animal burrowing, and gas buildup during methane hydrate melting.

  18. CO2 bubbling-based 'Nanobomb' System for Targetedly Suppressing Panc-1 Pancreatic Tumor via Low Intensity Ultrasound-activated Inertial Cavitation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kun; Xu, Huixiong; Chen, Hangrong; Jia, Xiaoqing; Zheng, Shuguang; Cai, Xiaojun; Wang, Ronghui; Mou, Juan; Zheng, Yuanyi; Shi, Jianlin

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive and targeted physical treatment is still desirable especially for those cancerous patients. Herein, we develop a new physical treatment protocol by employing CO2 bubbling-based 'nanobomb' system consisting of low-intensity ultrasound (1.0 W/cm2) and a well-constructed pH/temperature dual-responsive CO2 release system. Depending on the temperature elevation caused by exogenous low-intensity therapeutic ultrasound irradiation and the low pH caused by the endogenous acidic-environment around/within tumor, dual-responsive CO2 release system can quickly release CO2 bubbles, and afterwards, the generated CO2 bubbles waves will timely explode before dissolution due to triggering by therapeutic ultrasound waves. Related bio-effects (e.g., cavitation, mechanical, shock waves, etc) caused by CO2 bubbles' explosion effectively induce instant necrosis of panc-1 cells and blood vessel destruction within panc-1 tumor, and consequently inhibit the growth of panc-1 solid tumor, simultaneously minimizing the side effects to normal organs. This new physiotherapy employing CO2 bubbling-based 'nanobomb' system promises significant potentials in targetedly suppressing tumors, especially for those highly deadly cancers. PMID:26379793

  19. Bubble growth in rhyolitic melt Yang Liu, Youxue Zhang *

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Youxue

    Bubble growth in rhyolitic melt Yang Liu, Youxue Zhang * The Department of Geological Sciences rhyolitic melt with 1.4^2.0 wt% initial total H2O at 0.1 MPa and 500^600³C. Growth of many bubbles. The average growth rate for bubbles growing in an infinite rhyolitic melt at a bubble radius of 25 Wm is V0

  20. A Thermodynamic Cavitation Model for Cavitating Flow Simulation in a Wide Range of Water Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yao; Luo, Xian-Wu; Jibin; Liu, Shu-Hong; Wu, Yu-Lin; Xu, Hong-Yuan

    2010-01-01

    A thermodynamic cavitation model is developed to simulate the cavitating water flow in a wide temperature range. The thermal effect on bubble growth during cavitation is introduced in the developed model by considering both pressure difference and heat transfer between the vapor and liquid phase. The cavitating turbulent flow over a NACA0015 hydrofoil has been simulated at various temperatures from room temperature to 150°C by using the present cavitation model, which has been validated by the experimental data. It is seen that the thermodynamic effects of cavitation, vapor depression and temperature depression are much more predominant in high temperature water compared with those in room temperature water. These results indicate that the proposed thermodynamic cavitation model is reasonably applicable to the cavitating water flow in a wide temperature range.

  1. Contribution of stress wave and cavitation bubble in evaluation of cell-cell adhesion by femtosecond laser-induced impulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iino, Takanori; Li, Po-Lin; Wang, Wen-Zhe; Deng, Jia-Huei; Lu, Yun-Chang; Kao, Fu-Jen; Hosokawa, Yoichiroh

    2014-10-01

    When an intense femtosecond laser is focused in a cell culture medium, shock wave, stress wave, and cavitation bubble are generated at the laser focal point. Cell-cell adhesion can be broken at the cellular level by the impacts of these factors. We have applied this breaking of the adhesion to an estimation of the cell-cell adhesion strength. In this application, it is important to identify which of these factors is the dominant factor that breaks the adhesion. Here we investigated this issue using streptavidin-coated microbeads adhering to a biotin-coated substrate as a mimic of the cell-cell adhesion. The results indicated that the break was induced mainly by the stress wave, not by the impact of the cavitation bubble.

  2. Some problems of the theory of bubble growth and condensation in bubble chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tkachev, L. G.

    1988-01-01

    This work is an attempt to explain the reasons for the discrepancies between the theoretical and experimental values of bubble growth rate in an overheated liquid, and to provide a brief formulation of the main premises of the theory on bubble growth in liquid before making a critical analysis. To simplify the problem, the floating upward of bubbles is not discussed; moreover, the study is based on the results of the theory of the behavior of fixed bubbles.

  3. Small Gas Bubble Experiment for Mitigation of Cavitation Damage and Pressure Waves in Short-pulse Mercury Spallation Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Wendel, Mark W; Felde, David K; Sangrey, Robert L; Abdou, Ashraf A; West, David L; Shea, Thomas J; Hasegawa, Shoichi; Kogawa, Hiroyuki; Naoe, Dr. Takashi; Farny, Dr. Caleb H.; Kaminsky, Andrew L

    2014-01-01

    Populations of small helium gas bubbles were introduced into a flowing mercury experiment test loop to evaluate mitigation of beam-pulse induced cavitation damage and pressure waves. The test loop was developed and thoroughly tested at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) prior to irradiations at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center - Weapons Neutron Research Center (LANSCE-WNR) facility. Twelve candidate bubblers were evaluated over a range of mercury flow and gas injection rates by use of a novel optical measurement technique that accurately assessed the generated bubble size distributions. Final selection for irradiation testing included two variations of a swirl bubbler provided by Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) collaborators and one orifice bubbler developed at SNS. Bubble populations of interest consisted of sizes up to 150 m in radius with achieved gas void fractions in the 10^-5 to 10^-4 range. The nominal WNR beam pulse used for the experiment created energy deposition in the mercury comparable to SNS pulses operating at 2.5 MW. Nineteen test conditions were completed each with 100 pulses, including variations on mercury flow, gas injection and protons per pulse. The principal measure of cavitation damage mitigation was surface damage assessment on test specimens that were manually replaced for each test condition. Damage assessment was done after radiation decay and decontamination by optical and laser profiling microscopy with damaged area fraction and maximum pit depth being the more valued results. Damage was reduced by flow alone; the best mitigation from bubble injection was between half and a quarter that of flow alone. Other data collected included surface motion tracking by three laser Doppler vibrometers (LDV), loop wall dynamic strain, beam diagnostics for charge and beam profile assessment, embedded hydrophones and pressure sensors, and sound measurement by a suite of conventional and contact microphones.

  4. Theoretical model of ice nucleation induced by inertial acoustic cavitation. Part 2: Number of ice nuclei generated by a single bubble.

    PubMed

    Cogné, C; Labouret, S; Peczalski, R; Louisnard, O; Baillon, F; Espitalier, F

    2016-01-01

    In the preceding paper (part 1), the pressure and temperature fields close to a bubble undergoing inertial acoustic cavitation were presented. It was shown that extremely high liquid water pressures but quite moderate temperatures were attained near the bubble wall just after the collapse providing the necessary conditions for ice nucleation. In this paper (part 2), the nucleation rate and the nuclei number generated by a single collapsing bubble were determined. The calculations were performed for different driving acoustic pressures, liquid ambient temperatures and bubble initial radius. An optimal acoustic pressure range and a nucleation temperature threshold as function of bubble radius were determined. The capability of moderate power ultrasound to trigger ice nucleation at low undercooling level and for a wide distribution of bubble sizes has thus been assessed on the theoretical ground. PMID:26384898

  5. Numerical simulation of the nonlinear ultrasonic pressure wave propagation in a cavitating bubbly liquid inside a sonochemical reactor.

    PubMed

    Dogan, Hakan; Popov, Viktor

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the acoustic wave propagation in bubbly liquid inside a pilot sonochemical reactor which aims to produce antibacterial medical textile fabrics by coating the textile with ZnO or CuO nanoparticles. Computational models on acoustic propagation are developed in order to aid the design procedures. The acoustic pressure wave propagation in the sonoreactor is simulated by solving the Helmholtz equation using a meshless numerical method. The paper implements both the state-of-the-art linear model and a nonlinear wave propagation model recently introduced by Louisnard (2012), and presents a novel iterative solution procedure for the nonlinear propagation model which can be implemented using any numerical method and/or programming tool. Comparative results regarding both the linear and the nonlinear wave propagation are shown. Effects of bubble size distribution and bubble volume fraction on the acoustic wave propagation are discussed in detail. The simulations demonstrate that the nonlinear model successfully captures the realistic spatial distribution of the cavitation zones and the associated acoustic pressure amplitudes. PMID:26611813

  6. Lithotripter shock waves with cavitation nucleation agents produce tumor growth reduction and gene transfer in vivo.

    PubMed

    Miller, Douglas L; Song, Jianming

    2002-10-01

    Cavitation nucleation agents (CNA) can greatly enhance DNA transfer and cell killing for therapeutically useful applications of nonthermal bioeffects of ultrasound (US). Renal carcinoma (RENCA) tumor cells were implanted and grown to about 400 microL tumor volumes on the hind legs of syngeneic Balb/c mice. Before treatment, mice were anesthetized, the tumor region was shaved and depilated, and a DNA plasmid coding for marker proteins was injected into the tumor. Two sets of tests were completed: the first set involved measurement of tumor growth for 4 days and use of a beta-galactosidase marker plasmid for localization of transfection, and the second set involved 2 days of growth and use of a luciferase marker plasmid for assessing overall protein expression. Either saline, Optison US contrast agent, a vaporizing perfluoropentane droplet suspension (SDS) or air bubble was also injected intratumorally at 10% of tumor volume as a CNA. In some tests, droplets or contrast agent were injected IV. Shock waves (SW) were generated from a spark-gap lithotripter at 7.4 MPa peak negative pressure amplitude. For sham exposure, tumor volume increased by a factor of 3.6 in 4 days. With 500-SW treatment, all the CNA reduced 4-day tumor growth about the same amount (to factors of 1.2 to 1.9). Marker gene expression was generally localized to the region around the needle injection path. All the agents, except saline, produced statistically significant increases of 11.8- to 14.6-fold in luciferase expression after 2 days, relative to sham exposure. IV injection of Optison or droplet nucleation agents before SW treatment reduced tumor growth to factors of 1.0 and 0.7, but did not increase transfection. These results demonstrate the efficacy of CNA in vivo and should lead to improved strategies for simultaneous SW tumor ablation and cancer gene therapy. PMID:12467861

  7. Evaluation of the physical forces exerted on a spherical bubble inside the nozzle in a cavitating flow with an Eulerian/Lagrangian approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javad Zeidi, Seyed Mohammad; Mahdi, Miralam

    2015-11-01

    An Eulerian/Lagrangian approach is used to calculate the physical forces acting on a spherical bubble. Reynolds average Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations for the Eulerian approach are solved with a finite volume scheme. The SIMPLE algorithm is utilized for pressure and velocity linkage. To model convective fluxes, an upwind scheme is used. The Reynolds stress transport model (RSTM) is used to calculate the turbulent parameters. In the Lagrangian approach, a modified form of the Reyleigh-Plesset (RP) and Maxey equations are solved with MATLAB programming software for evaluation of bubble motion and bubble dynamics. The carrying fluid in this study is diesel fuel. Continuous filter white noise (CFWN) is solved parallel to the Maxey and RP equations to calculate fluctuating terms of velocity in x and y directions. Six forces exerted on the bubble during its motion are investigated inside the cavitating flow regime. The cavitating regime can be extremely effective on bubble force and increase bubble forces up to several thousand times. Added mass force in the y direction has the highest value among all forces exerted on the bubble during its motion inside the nozzle.

  8. Dynamics of shock waves and cavitation bubbles in bilinear elastic-plastic media, and the implications to short-pulsed laser surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brujan, E.-A.

    2005-01-01

    The dynamics of shock waves and cavitation bubbles generated by short laser pulses in water and elastic-plastic media were investigated theoretically in order to get a better understanding of their role in short-pulsed laser surgery. Numerical simulations were performed using a spherical model of bubble dynamics which include the elastic-plastic behaviour of the medium surrounding the bubble, compressibility, viscosity, density and surface tension. Breakdown in water produces a monopolar acoustic signal characterized by a compressive wave. Breakdown in an elastic-plastic medium produces a bipolar acoustic signal, with a leading positive compression wave and a trailing negative tensile wave. The calculations revealed that consideration of the tissue elasticity is essential to describe the bipolar shape of the shock wave emitted during optical breakdown. The elastic-plastic response of the medium surrounding the bubble leads to a significant decrease of the maximum size of the cavitation bubble and pressure amplitude of the shock wave emitted during bubble collapse, and shortening of the oscillation period of the bubble. The results are discussed with respect to collateral damage in short-pulsed laser surgery.

  9. Generation of laser-induced cavitation bubbles with a digital hologram

    E-print Network

    Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    & Materials Science and Laser Microbeam and Medical Program, Beckman Laser Institute, University of California. D. Ohl, "Cavitation based micropump," Lab Chip, (to be published). 14. P. A. Quinto-Su, H. H. Lai, H. H. Yoon, C. E. Sims, N. L. Allbritton, V. Venugopalan, "Examination of laser microbeam cell lysis

  10. K.S. Suslick, W.B. McNamara III, Y. Didenko; "Hot Spot Conditions During Multi-Bubble Cavitation" in Sonochemistry and Sonoluminescence, Crum, L. A.; Mason, T. J.; Reisse, J.; Suslick, K.S., eds.

    E-print Network

    Suslick, Kenneth S.

    " in Sonochemistry and Sonoluminescence, Crum, L. A.; Mason, T. J.; Reisse, J.; Suslick, K.S., eds. Kluwer Publishers Multi-Bubble Cavitation" in Sonochemistry and Sonoluminescence, Crum, L. A.; Mason, T. J.; Reisse, J

  11. Numerical estimation of cavitation intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krumenacker, L.; Fortes-Patella, R.; Archer, A.

    2014-03-01

    Cavitation may appear in turbomachinery and in hydraulic orifices, venturis or valves, leading to performance losses, vibrations and material erosion. This study propose a new method to predict the cavitation intensity of the flow, based on a post-processing of unsteady CFD calculations. The paper presents the analyses of cavitating structures' evolution at two different scales: • A macroscopic one in which the growth of cavitating structures is calculated using an URANS software based on a homogeneous model. Simulations of cavitating flows are computed using a barotropic law considering presence of air and interfacial tension, and Reboud's correction on the turbulence model. • Then a small one where a Rayleigh-Plesset software calculates the acoustic energy generated by the implosion of the vapor/gas bubbles with input parameters from macroscopic scale. The volume damage rate of the material during incubation time is supposed to be a part of the cumulated acoustic energy received by the solid wall. The proposed analysis method is applied to calculations on hydrofoil and orifice geometries. Comparisons between model results and experimental works concerning flow characteristic (size of cavity, pressure,velocity) as well as pitting (erosion area, relative cavitation intensity) are presented.

  12. Cavitation of spherical bubbles: closed-form, parametric, and numerical solutions

    E-print Network

    Mancas, S C

    2015-01-01

    We present an analysis of the Rayleigh-Plesset equation for a three dimensional vacuous bubble in water. When the effects of surface tension are neglected we find the radius and time of the evolution of the bubble as parametric closed-form solutions in terms of hypergeometric functions. A simple novel particular solution is obtained by integration of Rayleigh-Plesset equation and we also find the collapsing time of the bubble. By including capillarity we show the connection between the Rayleigh-Plesset equation and Abel's equation, and we present parametric rational Weierstrass periodic solutions for nonzero surface tension. In the same Abel approach, we also provide a discussion of the nonintegrable case of nonzero viscosity for which we perform a numerical integration

  13. Sonoporation of suspension cells with a single cavitation bubble in a microfluidic confinement

    E-print Network

    Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    alternative to electroporation. Introduction Pore formation (poration) in cell membranes is a key is an alternative technique that uses acoustic- driven bubble pulsations to create pores in the membrane.6 Most and transfected with a GFP fusion protein.3 Yang et al.14 and Eriksson et al.15 reported on the response

  14. Numerical study on the effective heating due to inertial cavitation in microbubble-enhanced HIFU therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okita, Kohei; Sugiyama, Kazuyasu; Takagi, Shu; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2015-10-01

    The enhancement of heating due to inertial cavitation was focused in high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy. The influences of the rectified diffusion on microbubble-enhanced HIFU were examined numerically. A bubble dynamics equation in consideration of the spherical shell bubble and the elasticity of surrounding tissue was employed. Mass and heat transfer between the surrounding medium and the bubble were considered. The basic equations were discretized by finite difference method. The mixture phase and bubbles are coupled by the Euler-Lagrange method to take into account the interaction between ultrasound and bubbles. The mass transfer rate of gas from the surrounding medium to the bubble was examined as function of the initial bubble radius and the driving pressure amplitude. As the results, the pressure required to bubble growth was decreases with increasing the initial bubble radius. Thus, the injection of microbubble reduces the cavitation threshold pressure. On the other hand, the influence of the rectified diffusion on the triggered HIFU therapy which generates cavitation bubbles by high-intensity burst and induces the localized heating owing to cavitation bubble oscillation by low-intensity continuous waves. The calculation showed that the localized heating was enhanced by the increase of the equilibrium bubble size due to the rectified diffusion.

  15. Theoretical and experimental comparison of vapor cavitation in dynamically loaded journal bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewe, D. E.; Hamrock, B. J.; Jacobson, B. A.

    1985-01-01

    Vapor cavitation for a submerged journal bearing under dynamically loaded conditions was investigated. The observation of vapor cavitation in the laboratory was done by high-speed photography. It was found that vapor cavitation occurs when the tensile stress applied to the oil exceeded the tensile strength of the oil or the binding of the oil to the surface. The theoretical solution to the Reynolds equation is determined numerically using a moving boundary algorithm. This algorithm conserves mass throughout the computational domain including the region of cavitation and its boundaries. An alternating direction implicit (MDI) method is used to effect the time march. A rotor undergoing circular whirl was studied. Predicted cavitation behavior was analyzed by three-dimensional computer graphic movies. The formation, growth, and collapse of the bubble in response to the dynamic conditions is shown. For the same conditions of dynamic loading, the cavitation bubble was studied in the laboratory using high-speed photography.

  16. Analogy between fluid cavitation and fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Mullen, R. L.; Braun, M. J.

    1983-01-01

    When the stresses imposed on a fluid are sufficiently large, rupture or cavitation can occur. Such conditions can exist in many two-phase flow applications, such as the choked flows, which can occur in seals and bearings. Nonspherical bubbles with large aspect ratios have been observed in fluids under rapid acceleration and high shear fields. These bubbles are geometrically similar to fracture surface patterns (Griffith crack model) existing in solids. Analogies between crack growth in solid and fluid cavitation are proposed and supported by analysis and observation (photographs). Healing phenomena (void condensation), well accepted in fluid mechanics, have been observed in some polymers and hypothesized in solid mechanics. By drawing on the strengths of the theories of solid mechanics and cavitation, a more complete unified theory can be developed.

  17. Enhancement and quenching of high-intensity focused ultrasound cavitation activity via short frequency sweep gaps.

    PubMed

    Hallez, Loïc; Lee, Judy; Touyeras, Francis; Nevers, Aymeric; Ashokkumar, Muthupandian; Hihn, Jean-Yves

    2016-03-01

    This letter reports on the use of frequency sweeps to probe acoustic cavitation activity generated by high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). Unprecedented enhancement and quenching of HIFU cavitation activity were observed when short frequency sweep gaps were applied in negative and positive directions, respectively. It was revealed that irrespective of the frequency gap, it is the direction and frequency sweep rate that govern the cavitation activity. These effects are related to the response of bubbles generated by the starting frequency to the direction of the frequency sweep, and the influence of the sweep rate on growth and coalescence of bubbles, which in turn affects the active bubble population. These findings are relevant for the use of HIFU in chemical and therapeutic applications, where greater control of cavitation bubble population is critical. PMID:26584998

  18. Optimization of centrifugal pump cavitation performance based on CFD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, S. F.; Wang, Y.; Liu, Z. C.; Zhu, Z. T.; Ning, C.; Zhao, L. F.

    2015-01-01

    In order to further improve the cavitation performance of a centrifugal pump, slots on impeller blade near inlet were studied and six groups of hydraulic model were designed. Base on cavitating flow feature inside a centrifugal pump, bubble growth and implosion are calculated from the Rayleigh-Plesset equation which describes the dynamic behavior of spherical bubble and RNG ?-epsilon model was employed to simulate and analyze the internal two-phase flow of the model pump under the same conditions. The simulation results show that slots on blade near inlet could improve the cavitation performance and cavitation performance improvement of the second group was more obvious. Under the same conditions, the pressure on the back of blade near inlet was higher than the pressure on the back of unmodified blade near inlet, and energy distribution in the flow channel between the two blades was more uniform with a small change of head.

  19. Aspherical bubble dynamics and oscillation times

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, A.; Noack, J.; Chapyak, E.J.; Godwin, R.P.

    1999-06-01

    The cavitation bubbles common in laser medicine are rarely perfectly spherical and are often located near tissue boundaries, in vessels, etc., which introduce aspherical dynamics. Here, novel features of aspherical bubble dynamics are explored by time-resolved photography and numerical simulations. The growth-collapse period of cylindrical bubbles of large aspect ratio (length:diameter {approximately}20) differs only slightly from twice the Rayleigh collapse time for a spherical bubble with an equivalent maximum volume. This fact justifies using the temporal interval between the acoustic signals emitted upon bubble creation and collapse to estimate the maximum bubble volume. As a result, hydrophone measurements can provide an estimate of the bubble size and energy even for aspherical bubbles. The change of the oscillation period of bubbles near solid walls and elastic (tissue-like) boundaries relative to that of isolated spherical bubbles is also investigated.

  20. Cavitation luminescence of argon-saturated alkali-metal solutions from a conical bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Ha; Jie He, Shou; Fang, Wang; Min, Song Jian

    2008-10-01

    In 1,2-propanediol solutions containing sodium chloride, spectra of luminescence from a collapsed conical bubble have been detected. Results show that the spectra consist of a broad continuum background, on which a resonance line arising from de-excitation of sodium atom at 589 nm and two satellite diffuse bands at ~554 nm and 620 nm respectively are superimposed. These are confirmed to be the emission from alkali-metal-argon exciplexes and are suggested to occur when the mixtures of alkali metal vapour and argon are rapidly compressed. The intracavity density of argon deduced from the line shift of Na resonance line data is estimated to be about 2 × 1026 m-3.

  1. Nucleation and cavitation of spherical, cylindrical, and slablike droplets and bubbles in small systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDowell, Luis G.; Shen, Vincent K.; Errington, Jeffrey R.

    2006-07-01

    Computer simulations are employed to obtain subcritical isotherms of small finite sized systems inside the coexistence region. For all temperatures considered, ranging from the triple point up to the critical point, the isotherms gradually developed a sequence of sharp discontinuities as the system size increased from ˜8 to ˜21 molecular diameters. For the smallest system sizes, and more so close to the critical point, the isotherms appeared smooth, resembling the continuous van der Waals loop obtained from extrapolation of an analytic equation of state outside the coexistence region. As the system size was increased, isotherms in the chemical potential-density plane developed first two, then four, and finally six discontinuities. Visual inspection of selected snapshots revealed that the observed discontinuities are related to structural transitions between droplets (on the vapor side) and bubbles (on the liquid side) of spherical, cylindrical, and tetragonal shapes. A capillary drop model was developed to qualitatively rationalize these observations. Analytic results were obtained and found to be in full agreement with the computer simulation results. The analysis shows that the shape of the subcritical isotherms is dictated by a single characteristic volume (or length scale), which depends on the surface tension, compressibility, and coexistence densities. For small reduced system volumes, the model predicts that a homogeneous fluid is stable across the whole coexistence region, thus explaining the continuous van der Waals isotherms observed in the simulations. When the liquid and vapor free energies are described by means of an accurate mean-field equation of state and surface tensions from simulation are employed, the capillary model is found to describe the simulated isotherms accurately, especially for large systems (i.e., larger than about 15 molecular diameters) at low temperature (lower than about 0.85 times the critical temperature). This implies that the Laplace pressure differences can be predicted for drops as small as five molecular diameters, and as few as about 500molecules. The theoretical study also shows that the extrema or apparent spinodal points of the finite size loops are more closely related to (finite system size) bubble and dew points than to classical spinodals. Our results are of relevance to phase transitions in nanopores and show that first order corrections to nucleation energies in finite closed systems are power laws of the inverse volume.

  2. Nucleation and cavitation of spherical, cylindrical, and slablike droplets and bubbles in small systems.

    PubMed

    MacDowell, Luis G; Shen, Vincent K; Errington, Jeffrey R

    2006-07-21

    Computer simulations are employed to obtain subcritical isotherms of small finite sized systems inside the coexistence region. For all temperatures considered, ranging from the triple point up to the critical point, the isotherms gradually developed a sequence of sharp discontinuities as the system size increased from approximately 8 to approximately 21 molecular diameters. For the smallest system sizes, and more so close to the critical point, the isotherms appeared smooth, resembling the continuous van der Waals loop obtained from extrapolation of an analytic equation of state outside the coexistence region. As the system size was increased, isotherms in the chemical potential-density plane developed first two, then four, and finally six discontinuities. Visual inspection of selected snapshots revealed that the observed discontinuities are related to structural transitions between droplets (on the vapor side) and bubbles (on the liquid side) of spherical, cylindrical, and tetragonal shapes. A capillary drop model was developed to qualitatively rationalize these observations. Analytic results were obtained and found to be in full agreement with the computer simulation results. The analysis shows that the shape of the subcritical isotherms is dictated by a single characteristic volume (or length scale), which depends on the surface tension, compressibility, and coexistence densities. For small reduced system volumes, the model predicts that a homogeneous fluid is stable across the whole coexistence region, thus explaining the continuous van der Waals isotherms observed in the simulations. When the liquid and vapor free energies are described by means of an accurate mean-field equation of state and surface tensions from simulation are employed, the capillary model is found to describe the simulated isotherms accurately, especially for large systems (i.e., larger than about 15 molecular diameters) at low temperature (lower than about 0.85 times the critical temperature). This implies that the Laplace pressure differences can be predicted for drops as small as five molecular diameters, and as few as about 500 molecules. The theoretical study also shows that the extrema or apparent spinodal points of the finite size loops are more closely related to (finite system size) bubble and dew points than to classical spinodals. Our results are of relevance to phase transitions in nanopores and show that first order corrections to nucleation energies in finite closed systems are power laws of the inverse volume. PMID:16863371

  3. Cavitation in medicine.

    PubMed

    Brennen, Christopher Earls

    2015-10-01

    We generally think of bubbles as benign and harmless and yet they can manifest the most remarkable range of physical effects. Some of those effects are the stuff of our everyday experience as in the tinkling of a brook or the sounds of breaking waves at the beach. But even these mundane effects are examples of the ability of bubbles to gather, focus and radiate energy (acoustic energy in the above examples). In other contexts that focusing of energy can lead to serious technological problems as when cavitation bubbles eat great holes through ships' propeller blades or cause a threat to the integrity of the spillways at the Hoover Dam. In liquid-propelled rocket engines, bubbles pose a danger to the stability of the propulsion system, and in artificial heart valves they can cause serious damage to the red blood cells. In perhaps the most extraordinary example of energy focusing, collapsing cavitation bubbles can emit not only sound, but also light with black body radiation temperatures equal to that of the sun (Brennen 1995 Cavitation and bubble dynamics). But, harnessed carefully, this almost unique ability to focus energy can also be put to remarkably constructive use. Cavitation bubbles are now used in a remarkable range of surgical and medical procedures, for example to emulsify tissue (most commonly in cataract surgery or in lithotripsy procedures for the reduction of kidney and gall stones) or to manipulate the DNA in individual cells. By creating cavitation bubbles non-invasively thereby depositing and focusing energy non-intrusively, one can generate minute incisions or target cancer cells. This paper will begin by briefly reviewing the history of cavitation phenomena and will end with a vision of the new horizons for the amazing cavitation bubble. PMID:26442145

  4. Percolation models for boiling and bubble growth in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Yortsos, Y.C.

    1991-05-01

    We analyze the liquid-to-vapor phase change in single-component fluids in porous media at low superheats. Conditions typical to steam injection in porous media are taken. We examine nucleation, phase equilibria and their stability, and the growth of vapor bubbles. Effects of pore structure are emphasized. It is shown that at low supersaturations, bubble growth can be described as a percolation process. In the absence of spatial gradients, macroscopic flow properties are calculated in terms of nucleation parameters. A modification of gradient percolation is also proposed in the case of spatial temperature gradients, when solid conduction predominates. 22 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  5. RESEARCH ARTICLE Bubble growth in visco-elastic magma: implications

    E-print Network

    Lyakhovsky, Vladimir

    may be dissolved back into the melt. The elastic response in magmas with low shear modulus resultsRESEARCH ARTICLE Bubble growth in visco-elastic magma: implications to magma fragmentation: 22 August 2010 /Published online: 9 September 2010 # Springer-Verlag 2010 Abstract We present a visco-elastic

  6. Cavitation in a metallic liquid: Homogeneous nucleation and growth of nanovoids

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Wu, H. A.; Luo, S. N.

    2014-06-07

    Large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are performed to investigate homogeneous nucleation and growth of nanovoids during cavitation in liquid Cu. We characterize in detail the atomistic cavitation processes by following the temporal evolution of cavities or voids, analyze the nucleation behavior with the mean first-passage time (MFPT) and survival probability (SP) methods, and discuss the results against classical nucleation theory (CNT), the Tolman equation for surface energy, independent calculation of surface tension via integrating the stress profiles, the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (JMA) growth law, and the power law for nucleus size distributions. Cavitation in this representative metallic liquid is a high energy barrier Poisson processes, and the steady-state nucleation rates obtained from statistical runs with the MFPT and SP methods are in agreement. The MFPT method also yields the critical nucleus size and the Zeldovich factor. Fitting with the Tolman's equation to the MD simulations yields the surface energy of a planar interface (?0.9 J m{sup ?2}) and the Tolman length (0.4–0.5 Å), and those values are in accord with those from integrating the stress profiles of a planar interface. Independent CNT predictions of the nucleation rate (10{sup 33?34} s{sup ?1} m{sup ?3}) and critical size (3–4 Å in radius) are in agreement with the MFPT and SP results. The JMA law can reasonably describe the nucleation and growth process. The size distribution of subcritical nuclei appears to follow a power law with an exponent decreasing with increasing tension owing to coupled nucleation and growth, and that of the supercritical nuclei becomes flattened during further stress relaxation due to void coalescence.

  7. Vulnerability to cavitation, hydraulic efficiency, growth and survival in an insular pine (Pinus canariensis)

    PubMed Central

    López, Rosana; López de Heredia, Unai; Collada, Carmen; Cano, Francisco Javier; Emerson, Brent C.; Cochard, Hervé; Gil, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims It is widely accepted that hydraulic failure due to xylem embolism is a key factor contributing to drought-induced mortality in trees. In the present study, an attempt is made to disentangle phenotypic plasticity from genetic variation in hydraulic traits across the entire distribution area of a tree species to detect adaptation to local environments. Methods A series of traits related to hydraulics (vulnerability to cavitation and hydraulic conductivity in branches), growth performance and leaf mass per area were assessed in eight Pinus canariensis populations growing in two common gardens under contrasting environments. In addition, the neutral genetic variability (FST) and the genetic differentiation of phenotypic variation (QST) were compared in order to identify the evolutionary forces acting on these traits. Key Results The variability for hydraulic traits was largely due to phenotypic plasticity. Nevertheless, the vulnerability to cavitation displayed a significant genetic variability (approx. 5 % of the explained variation), and a significant genetic × environment interaction (between 5 and 19 % of the explained variation). The strong correlation between vulnerability to cavitation and survival in the xeric common garden (r = –0·81; P < 0·05) suggests a role for the former in the adaptation to xeric environments. Populations from drier sites and higher temperature seasonality were less vulnerable to cavitation than those growing at mesic sites. No trade-off between xylem safety and efficiency was detected. QST of parameters of the vulnerability curve (0·365 for P50 and the slope of the vulnerability curve and 0·452 for P88) differed substantially from FST (0·091), indicating divergent selection. In contrast, genetic drift alone was found to be sufficient to explain patterns of differentiation for xylem efficiency and growth. Conclusions The ability of P. canariensis to inhabit a wide range of ecosystems seemed to be associated with high phenotypic plasticity and some degree of local adaptations of xylem and leaf traits. Resistance to cavitation conferred adaptive potential for this species to adapt successfully to xeric conditions. PMID:23644361

  8. Manipulation and Microrheology of Carbon Nanotubes with Laser-Induced Cavitation Bubbles P. A. Quinto-Su, X. H. Huang, S. R. Gonzalez-Avila, T. Wu, and C. D. Ohl

    E-print Network

    Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    Manipulation and Microrheology of Carbon Nanotubes with Laser-Induced Cavitation Bubbles P. A studies geared towards manipulation [3­6] and measuring their mechanical prop- erties (rheology) [7 is a challenge. The manipulation of nanostruc- tures is typically done in a liquid environment in order to avoid

  9. Generation and control of acoustic cavitation structure.

    PubMed

    Bai, Lixin; Xu, Weilin; Deng, Jingjun; Li, Chao; Xu, Delong; Gao, Yandong

    2014-09-01

    The generation and control of acoustic cavitation structure are a prerequisite for application of cavitation in the field of ultrasonic sonochemistry and ultrasonic cleaning. The generation and control of several typical acoustic cavitation structures (conical bubble structure, smoker, acoustic Lichtenberg figure, tailing bubble structure, jet-induced bubble structures) in a 20-50 kHz ultrasonic field are investigated. Cavitation bubbles tend to move along the direction of pressure drop in the region in front of radiating surface, which are the premise and the foundation of some strong acoustic cavitation structure formation. The nuclei source of above-mentioned acoustic cavitation structures is analyzed. The relationship and mutual transformation of these acoustic cavitation structures are discussed. PMID:24650609

  10. A cavitation model for computations of unsteady cavitating flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yu; Wang, Guoyu; Huang, Biao

    2015-08-01

    A local vortical cavitation (LVC) model for the computation of unsteady cavitation is proposed. The model is derived from the Rayleigh-Plesset equations, and takes into account the relations between the cavitation bubble radius and local vortical effects. Calculations of unsteady cloud cavitating flows around a Clark-Y hydrofoil are performed to assess the predictive capability of the LVC model using well-documented experimental data. Compared with the conventional Zwart's model, better agreement is observed between the predictions of the LVC model and experimental data, including measurements of time-averaged flow structures, instantaneous cavity shapes and the frequency of the cloud cavity shedding process. Based on the predictions of the LVC model, it is demonstrated that the evaporation process largely concentrates in the core region of the leading edge vorticity in accordance with the growth in the attached cavity, and the condensation process concentrates in the core region of the trailing edge vorticity, which corresponds to the spread of the rear component of the attached cavity. When the attached cavity breaks up and moves downstream, the condensation area fully transports to the wake region, which is in accordance with the dissipation of the detached cavity. Furthermore, using vorticity transport equations, we also find that the periodic formation, breakup, and shedding of the sheet/cloud cavities, along with the associated baroclinic torque, are important mechanisms for vorticity production and modification. When the attached cavity grows, the liquid-vapour interface that moves towards the trailing edge enhances the vorticity in the attached cavity closure region. As the re-entrant jet moves upstream, the wavy/bubbly cavity interface enhances the vorticity near the trailing edge. At the end of the cycle, the break-up of the stable attached cavity is the main reason for the vorticity enhancement near the suction surface.

  11. Osmotic pressure-triggered cavitation in microcapsules.

    PubMed

    Shang, Luoran; Cheng, Yao; Wang, Jie; Yu, Yunru; Zhao, Yuanjin; Chen, Yongping; Gu, Zhongze

    2016-01-01

    A cavitation system was found in solid microcapsules with a membrane shell and a liquid core. By simply treating these microcapsules with hypertonic solutions, cavitation could be controllably triggered without special equipment or complex operations. A cavitation-formed vapor bubble was fully entrapped within the microcapsules, thus providing an advantageous method for fabricating encapsulated microbubbles with controllable dimensions and functional components. PMID:26659708

  12. Taming Acoustic Cavitation

    E-print Network

    Rivas, David Fernandez; Enriquez, Oscar R; Versluis, Michel; Prosperetti, Andrea; Gardeniers, Han; Lohse, Detlef

    2012-01-01

    In this fluid dynamics video we show acoustic cavitation occurring from pits etched on a silicon surface. By immersing the surface in a liquid, gas pockets are entrapped in the pits which upon ultrasonic insonation, are observed to shed cavitation bubbles. Modulating the driving pressure it is possible to induce different behaviours based on the force balance that determines the interaction among bubbles and the silicon surface. This system can be used for several applications like sonochemical water treatment, cleaning of surfaces with deposited materials such as biofilms.

  13. Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosperetti, Andrea

    2004-06-01

    Vanitas vanitatum et omnia vanitas: bubbles are emptiness, non-liquid, a tiny cloud shielding a mathematical singularity. Born from chance, a violent and brief life ending in the union with the (nearly) infinite. But a wealth of phenomena spring forth from this nothingness: underwater noise, sonoluminescence, boiling, and many others. Some recent results on a "blinking bubble" micropump and vapor bubbles in sound fields are outlined. The last section describes Leonardo da Vinci's observation of the non-rectlinear ascent of buoyant bubbles and justifies the name Leonardo's paradox recently attributed to this phenomenon.

  14. Plasma and Cavitation Dynamics during Pulsed Laser Microsurgery in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Hutson, M. Shane; Ma Xiaoyan

    2007-10-12

    We compare the plasma and cavitation dynamics underlying pulsed laser microsurgery in water and in fruit fly embryos (in vivo)--specifically for nanosecond pulses at 355 and 532 nm. We find two key differences. First, the plasma-formation thresholds are lower in vivo --especially at 355 nm--due to the presence of endogenous chromophores that serve as additional sources for plasma seed electrons. Second, the biological matrix constrains the growth of laser-induced cavitation bubbles. Both effects reduce the disrupted region in vivo when compared to extrapolations from measurements in water.

  15. Behavior of bubbles in glassmelts. III - Dissolution and growth of a rising bubble containing a single gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Onorato, P. I. K.; Weinberg, M. C.; Uhlmann, D. R.

    1981-01-01

    Finite difference solutions of the mass transport equations governing the dissolution (growth) of a rising gas bubble, containing a single gas, in a glassmelt were obtained. These solutions were compared with those obtained from an approximate procedure for a range of the controlling parameters. Applications were made to describe various aspects of O2 and CO2 gas-bubble behavior in a soda-lime-silicate melt.

  16. A new model for bubble growth, deformation and coalescence for conduit dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, C.; Nguyen, C.; Dufek, J.; Gonnermann, H. M.

    2011-12-01

    The buoyancy of bubbles and the conditions under which they grow (equilibrium vs disequilibrium) control the behavior of the magma during volcanic eruptions. The high vesicularity measured in pumices deposited during explosive eruptions indicates that fragmentation generally occurs at high bubble volume fractions (>0.6). It therefore suggests that dynamical processes associated with high bubble volume fraction, such as bubble-bubble hydrodynamic interactions (deformation), coalescence, and differential bubble growth, can exert an important control on the eruption. We propose a new bubble dynamics model that focuses on bubble growth, bubble-bubble interactions and coalescence at high vesicularity. This model is based on multiphase flow calculations using a free surface lattice Boltzmann model. At the present time, the model is 2D and allows us to track the evolution of a few hundred bubbles distributed heterogeneously in space and growing from a supersaturated melt (sudden or continuous decompression are possible). A key feature of the model is its ability to accurately solve bubble deformation and coalescence under decompression and/or shear flow conditions. Coalescence, in our model, is calibrated against new laboratory experiments of bubble ascent under a free surface (see Chinh et al. abstract, this AGU meeting). We present numerical results for the evolution of the bubble size distribution (and its different statistical moments) as a consequence of decompression, as well as shear deformation. We also compute the distribution of gas pressure in the heterogeneous bubble population. The model is used to construct a new parameterizations to account for (1) hydrodynamic forces resulting from bubble interactions applied on the silicate melt (drag), and, (2) the evolution of the heterogeneous distribution of bubble size and pressure. Lastly, we discuss how these parameterizations can be incorporated in conduit flow models to solve for the evolution of the multiphase magma mixture more accurately, as it approaches fragmentation conditions.

  17. Effect of surfactants on inertial cavitation activity in a pulsed acoustic field.

    PubMed

    Lee, Judy; Kentish, Sandra; Matula, Thomas J; Ashokkumar, Muthupandian

    2005-09-01

    It has previously been reported that the addition of low concentrations of ionic surfactants enhances the steady-state sonoluminescence (SL) intensity relative to water (Ashokkumar; et al. J. Phys. Chem. B 1997, 101, 10845). In the current study, both sonoluminescence and passive cavitation detection (PCD) were used to examine the acoustic cavitation field generated at different acoustic pulse lengths in the presence of an anionic surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). A decrease in the SL intensity was observed in the presence of low concentrations of SDS and short acoustic pulse lengths. Under these conditions, the inhibition of bubble coalescence by SDS leads to a population of smaller bubbles, which dissolve during the pulse "off time". As the concentration of surfactant was increased at this pulse length, an increase in the acoustic cavitation activity was observed. This increase is partly attributed to enhanced growth rate of the bubbles by rectified diffusion. Conversely, at long pulse lengths acoustic cavitation activity was enhanced at low SDS concentrations as a larger number of the smaller bubbles could survive the pulse "off time". The effect of reduced acoustic shielding and an increase in the "active" bubble population due to electrostatic repulsion between bubbles are also significant in this case. Finally, as the surfactant concentration was increased further, the effect of electrostatic induced impedance shielding or reclustering dominates, resulting in a decrease in the SL intensity. PMID:16853145

  18. Cavitating vortex generation by a submerged jet

    SciTech Connect

    Belyakov, G. V.; Filippov, A. N.

    2006-05-15

    The surface geometry of a cavitating vortex is determined in the limit of inviscid incompressible flow. The limit surface is an ovaloid of revolution with an axis ratio of 5: 3. It is shown that a cavitating vortex ring cannot develop if the cavitation number is lower than a certain critical value. Experiments conducted at various liquid pressures and several jet exit velocities confirm the existence of a critical cavitation number close to 3. At cavitation numbers higher than the critical one, the cavitating vortex ring does not develop. At substantially lower cavitation numbers (k {<=} 0.1), an elongated asymmetric cavitation bubble is generated, with an axial reentrant jet whose length can exceed the initial jet length by several times. This flow structure is called an asymmetric cavitating vortex, even though steady motion of this structure has not been observed.

  19. Aspherical bubble dynamics and oscillation times

    SciTech Connect

    Godwin, R.P.; Chapyak, E.J.; Noack, J.; Vogel, A.

    1999-03-01

    The cavitation bubbles common in laser medicine are rarely perfectly spherical and are often located near tissue boundaries, in vessels, etc., which introduce aspherical dynamics. Here, novel features of aspherical bubble dynamics are explored. Time-resolved experimental photographs and simulations of large aspect ratio (length:diameter {approximately}20) cylindrical bubble dynamics are presented. The experiments and calculations exhibit similar dynamics. A small high-pressure cylindrical bubble initially expands radially with hardly any axial motion. Then, after reaching its maximum volume, a cylindrical bubble collapses along its long axis with relatively little radial motion. The growth-collapse period of these very aspherical bubbles differs only sightly from twice the Rayleigh collapse time for a spherical bubble with an equivalent maximum volume. This fact justifies using the temporal interval between the acoustic signals emitted upon bubble creation and collapse to estimate the maximum bubble volume. As a result, hydrophone measurements can provide an estimate of the bubble energy even for aspherical bubbles. The prolongation of the oscillation period of bubbles near solid boundaries relative to that of isolated spherical bubbles is also discussed.

  20. Dynamics of cavitation bubble induced by 193 nm ArF excimer laser in concentrated sodium chloride solutions

    E-print Network

    Palanker, Daniel

    of pulsed lasers for ablation, drilling, and cutting of soft tissues in liquid environments are accompanied with microsecond time resolution the dynamics of bubbles produced by ArF excimer laser pulses in a highly absorbing been studied in detail only for mechanisms based on pulsed laser induced dielectric break- down

  1. Kinetics and dynamics of mass-transfer-controlled mineral and bubble dissolution or growth: a review

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Youxue

    Kinetics and dynamics of mass-transfer-controlled mineral and bubble dissolution or growth, kinetics and dynamics of particle (including crystal, droplet, and bubble) dissolution or growth either by mass or heat transfer or by interface reaction. In this paper, recent advances in kinetics

  2. Experimental Study of Bubble Growth in Stromboli Basait Melts at 1 Atmosphere

    E-print Network

    growth. The 3D bubble size distributions in the quenched samples were then studied with synchrotron X from it may be printed or otherwise reproduced without the author's permission. ln compliance no significant effect on bubble formation and growth because of low CO2 concentrations. Multiple nucleation

  3. Numerical prediction of impact force in cavitating flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, B.; Wang, H.

    2010-08-01

    An analytical method including a macroscopic cavitation model based on the homogeneous flow theory and a microscopic cavitation model based on the bubble dynamic was proposed for the prediction of the impact force caused by cavitation bubbles collapse in cavitating flows. A Large Eddy Simulation (LES) solver incorporated the macroscopic cavitation model was applied to simulate the unsteady cavitating flows. Based on the simulated flow field, the evolution of the cavitation bubbles was determined by a microscopic cavitation model from the resolution of a Rayleigh-Plesset equation including of the effects of the surface tension, the viscosity and compressibility of fluid, thermal conduction and radiation, the phase transition of water vapor at interface and chemical reactions. The cavitation flow around a hydrofoil was simulated to validate the macroscopic cavitation model. A good quantitative agreement was obtained between the prediction and the experiment. The proposed analytical method was applied to predict the impact force at cavitation bubbles collapse on a KT section in cavitating flows. It was found that the shock pressure caused by cavitation bubble collapse is very high. The impact force was predicted accurately comparing with the experimental data.

  4. Why Are Short Pulses More Efficient in Tissue Erosion Using Pulsed Cavitational Ultrasound Therapy (Histotripsy)?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tzu-Yin; Maxwell, Adam D.; Park, Simone; Xu, Zhen; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Cain, Charles A.

    2010-03-01

    Histotripsy produces mechanical tissue fractionation through controlled cavitation. The histotripsy induced tissue erosion is more efficient with shorter (i.e., 3-6 cycles) rather than longer (i.e. 24 cycles) pulses. In this study, we investigated the reasons behind this observation by studying dynamics of the cavitating bubble clouds and individual bubbles during and after a therapy pulse. Bubble clouds were generated at a gel-water interface using 5 to 30-cycle 1 MHz pulses at P-/P+>19/125-MPa pressure and 1-kHz pulse repetition frequency. The evolution of the overall bubble cloud and individual bubbles were studied using high speed photography. Results show that: 1) within the first 10-15 cycles, the overall cloud grew to its maximum size; the individual bubbles underwent violent expansion and collapse, and grew in size with each cycle of ultrasound; 2) between the 15th cycle and the end of the pulse, the overall cloud size did not change even if further cycles of ultrasound were delivered; the individual bubbles no longer underwent violent collapse; 3) after the pulse, the overall cloud gradually dissolved; the individual bubbles may coalesce into larger bubbles for 0-40 ?s, and then gradually dissolved. These observations suggest that violent growth and collapse of individual bubbles occur within the first few cycles of ultrasound pulse most often. This may explain why extremely short pulses are more energy efficient in histotripsy-induced tissue erosion.

  5. Cavitation in shock wave lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Michael R.; Crum, Lawrence A.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Evan, Andrew P.; McAteer, James A.; Colonius, Tim; Cleveland, Robin O.

    2003-10-01

    A case is presented for the important role of cavitation in stone comminution and tissue injury in shock wave lithotripsy (SWL). Confocal hydrophones and a coincidence algorithm were used to detect cavitation in kidney parenchyma. Elevated hydrostatic pressure dissolved cavitation nuclei and suppressed cell injury and stone comminution in vitro. A low-insertion-loss, thin, mylar film nearly eliminated stone erosion and crack formation only when in direct contact with the stone. This result indicates not only that cavitation is important in both cracking and erosion but also that bubbles act at the surface. Time inversion of the shock wave by use of a pressure-release reflector reduced the calculated pressure at bubble collapse and the measured depth of bubble-induced pits in aluminum. Correspondingly tissue injury in vivo was nearly eliminated. Cavitation was localized and intensified by the use of synchronously triggered, facing lithotripters. This dual pulse lithotripter enhanced comminution at its focus and reduced lysis in surrounding blood samples. The enhancement of comminution was lost when stones were placed in glycerol, which retarded bubble implosion. Thus, cavitation is important in comminution and injury and can be controlled to optimize efficacy and safety. [Work supported by NIH DK43381, DK55674, and FIRCA.

  6. A New Unsteady Model for Dense Cloud Cavitation in Cryogenic Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hosangadi, A.; Ahuja, V.

    2005-01-01

    A new unsteady, cavitation model is presented wherein the phase change process (bubble growth/collapse) is coupled to the acoustic field in a cryogenic fluid. It predicts the number density and radius of bubbles in vapor clouds by tracking both the aggregate surface area and volume fraction of the cloud. Hence, formulations for the dynamics of individual bubbles (e.g. Rayleigh-Plesset equation) may be integrated within the macroscopic context of a dense vapor cloud i.e. a cloud that occupies a significant fraction of available volume and contains numerous bubbles. This formulation has been implemented within the CRUNCH CFD, which has a compressible real fluid formulation, a multi-element, unstructured grid framework, and has been validated extensively for liquid rocket turbopump inducers. Detailed unsteady simulations of a cavitating ogive in liquid nitrogen are presented where time-averaged mean cavity pressure and temperature depressions due to cavitation are compared with experimental data. The model also provides the spatial and temporal history of the bubble size distribution in the vapor clouds that are shed, an important physical parameter that is difficult to measure experimentally and is a significant advancement in the modeling of dense cloud cavitation.

  7. Combined effect of viscosity and vorticity on single mode Rayleigh-Taylor instability bubble growth

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Rahul; Mandal, Labakanta; Roy, S.; Khan, M.; Gupta, M. R.

    2011-02-15

    The combined effect of viscosity and vorticity on the growth rate of the bubble associated with single mode Rayleigh-Taylor instability is investigated. It is shown that the effect of viscosity on the motion of the lighter fluid associated with vorticity accumulated inside the bubble due to mass ablation may be such as to reduce the net viscous drag on the bubble exerted by the upper heavier fluid as the former rises through it.

  8. Electron irradiation effect on bubble formation and growth in a sodium borosilicate glass

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, X.; Birtcher, R. C.; Donnelly, S. E.

    2000-02-08

    In this study, the authors studied simultaneous and intermittent electron irradiation effects on bubble growth in a simple sodium borosilicate glass during Xe ion implantation at 200 C. Simultaneous electron irradiation increases the average bubble size in the glass. This enhanced diffusion is also shown by the migration of Xe from bubbles into the matrix when the sample is irradiated by an electron beam after the Xe implantation.

  9. Gas-bubble growth mechanisms in the analysis of metal fuel swelling

    SciTech Connect

    Gruber, E.E.; Kramer, J.M.

    1986-06-01

    During steady-state irradiation, swelling rates associated with growth of fission-gas bubbles in metallic fast reactor fuels may be expected to remain small. As a consequence, bubble-growth mechanisms are not a major consideration in modeling the steady-state fuel behavior, and it is usually adequate to consider the gas pressure to be in equilibrium with the external pressure and surface tension restraint. On transient time scales, however, various bubble-growth mechanisms become important components of the swelling rate. These mechanisms include growth by diffusion, for bubbles within grains and on grain boundaries; dislocation nucleation at the bubble surface, or ''punchout''; and bubble growth by creep. Analyses of these mechanisms are presented and applied to provide information on the conditions and the relative time scales for which the various processes should dominate fuel swelling. The results are compared to a series of experiments in which the swelling of irradiated metal fuel was determined after annealing at various temperatures and pressures. The diffusive growth of bubbles on grain boundaries is concluded to be dominant in these experiments.

  10. In situ study on growth behavior of interfacial bubbles and its effect on interfacial reaction during a soldering process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, L.; Ma, H. T.; Zhao, H. J.; Kunwar, Anil; Zhao, N.

    2014-06-01

    The growth behavior of interfacial bubbles and the effect of bubbles on interfacial reaction during a soldering process were in situ studied by the synchrotron radiation real-time imaging technology. It was found that the bubbles at the solid/liquid interface were heterogeneous nucleation. The heterogeneous nucleation energy of bubbles at the interface was one-tenth of the homogeneity nucleation energy at 250 °C. At the interface, each bubble grew into spherical finally and its volume increased with the rise of temperature. Annexations between adjacent bubbles occurred, during which the bigger bubbles moved toward the smaller ones. The bubbles at the solid/liquid interface affected the dissolution behavior of Cu substrate greatly, i.e., the closer to the bubble bottom the less the Cu dissolution was, since the less the solder and the easier the saturation were. Moreover, the effect of bubbles on the growth behavior of interfacial intermetallic compound (IMC) was also discussed.

  11. Blood vessel rupture by cavitation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong; Brayman, Andrew A; Bailey, Michael R; Matula, Thomas J

    2010-08-01

    Cavitation is thought to be one mechanism for vessel rupture during shock wave lithotripsy treatment. However, just how cavitation induces vessel rupture remains unknown. In this work, a high-speed photomicrography system was set up to directly observe the dynamics of bubbles inside blood vessels in ex vivo rat mesenteries. Vascular rupture correlating to observed bubble dynamics were examined by imaging bubble extravasation and dye leakage. The high-speed images show that bubble expansion can cause vessel distention, and bubble collapse can lead to vessel invagination. Liquid jets were also observed to form. Our results suggest that all three mechanisms, vessel distention, invagination and liquid jets, can contribute to vessel rupture. PMID:20680255

  12. Blood vessel rupture by cavitation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hong; Brayman, Andrew A.; Bailey, Michael R.

    2011-01-01

    Cavitation is thought to be one mechanism for vessel rupture during shock wave lithotripsy treatment. However, just how cavitation induces vessel rupture remains unknown. In this work, a high-speed photomicrography system was set up to directly observe the dynamics of bubbles inside blood vessels in ex vivo rat mesenteries. Vascular rupture correlating to observed bubble dynamics were examined by imaging bubble extravasation and dye leakage. The high-speed images show that bubble expansion can cause vessel distention, and bubble collapse can lead to vessel invagination. Liquid jets were also observed to form. Our results suggest that all three mechanisms, vessel distention, invagination and liquid jets, can contribute to vessel rupture. PMID:20680255

  13. A suppressor to prevent direct wave-induced cavitation in shock wave therapy devices.

    PubMed

    Matula, Thomas J; Hilmo, Paul R; Bailey, Michael R

    2005-07-01

    Cavitation plays a varied but important role in lithotripsy. Cavitation facilitates stone comminution, but can also form an acoustic barrier that may shield stones from subsequent shock waves. In addition, cavitation damages tissue. Spark-gap lithotripters generate cavitation with both a direct and a focused wave. The direct wave propagates as a spherically diverging wave, arriving at the focus ahead of the focused shock wave. It can be modeled with the same waveform (but lower amplitude) as the focused wave. We show with both simulations and experiments that bubbles are forced to grow in response to the direct wave, and that these bubbles can still be large when the focused shock wave arrives. A baffle or "suppressor" that blocks the propagation of the direct wave is shown to significantly reduce the direct wave pressure amplitude, as well as direct wave-induced bubble growth. These results are applicable to spark-gap lithotripters and extracorporeal shock wave therapy devices, where cavitation from the direct wave may interfere with treatment. A simple direct-wave suppressor might therefore be used to improve the therapeutic efficacy of these devices. PMID:16119340

  14. Simulation of algae growth in a bench-scale bubble column reactor.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaoxi; Merchuk, Jose C

    2002-10-20

    The growth of the marine red microalga Porphyridium sp. in a bubble-column photobioreactor was simulated. The proposed model constitutes a dynamic integration of the kinetics of photosynthesis and photoinhibition with the fluid dynamics of the bubble column, including the effects of shear stress on the kinetics of growth. The kinetic data used in the model were obtained in independent experiments run in a thin-film photobioreactor with defined light/dark cycles. The maintenance term was modified to take into account the effects of liquid flow in the bioreactor on the growth rate. A hybrid method proposed for the approximate solution of the equations gave an appreciable reduction of the calculation time. Extrapolations of the model indicated the possibility of predicting the optimal diameter for an assembly of bubble column photobioreactors. Satisfactory fit was found with the experimental results of biomass growth in a 13-liter bubble column. PMID:12209771

  15. Aerator Combined With Bubble Remover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreschel, Thomas W.

    1993-01-01

    System produces bubble-free oxygen-saturated water. Bubble remover consists of outer solid-walled tube and inner hydrophobic, porous tube. Air bubbles pass from water in outer tube into inner tube, where sucked away. Developed for long-term aquaculture projects in space. Also applicable to terrestrial equipment in which entrained bubbles dry membranes or give rise to cavitation in pumps.

  16. The dissolution or growth of a gas bubble inside a drop in zero gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kondos, Pericles A.; Subramanian, R. Shankar; Weinberg, Michael C.

    1987-01-01

    The radius-time history of a gas bubble located concentrically within a spherical liquid drop in a space laboratory is analyzed within the framework of the quasi-stationary approximation. Illustrative results are calculated from the theory which demonstrate interesting qualitative features. For instance, when a pure gas bubble dissolves within a liquid drop in an environment containing the same gas and some inert species, the dissolution can be more or less rapid than that in an unbounded liquid depending on the initial relative size of the drop. Further, given a similar growth situation, indefinite growth is not possible, and the bubble will initially grow, but always dissolve in the end.

  17. Evaporation-induced cavitation in nanofluidic channels

    E-print Network

    Karnik, Rohit

    Cavitation, known as the formation of vapor bubbles when liquids are under tension, is of great interest both in condensed matter science as well as in diverse applications such as botany, hydraulic engineering, and medicine. ...

  18. Acoustic cavitation and its chemical consequences

    E-print Network

    Suslick, Kenneth S.

    Acoustic cavitation and its chemical consequences By Kenneth S. Suslick, Yuri Didenko, Ming M. Fang Acoustic cavitation is responsible for both sonochemistry and sonoluminescence. Bubble collapse in liquids not derive from a direct coupling of the acoustic field with chemical species on a molecular level. Instead

  19. Micropumping of liquid by directional growth and selective venting of gas bubbles.

    PubMed

    Meng, Dennis Desheng; Kim, Chang-Jin C J

    2008-06-01

    We introduce a new mechanism to pump liquid in microchannels based on the directional growth and displacement of gas bubbles in conjunction with the non-directional and selective removal of the bubbles. A majority of the existing bubble-driven micropumps employs boiling despite the unfavorable scaling of energy consumption for miniaturization because the vapor bubbles can be easily removed by condensation. Other gas generation methods are rarely suitable for micropumping applications because it is difficult to remove the gas bubbles promptly from a pump loop. In order to eradicate this limitation, the rapid removal of insoluble gas bubbles without liquid leakage is achieved with hydrophobic nanopores, allowing the use of virtually any kind of bubbles. In this paper, electrolysis and gas injection are demonstrated as two distinctively different gas sources. The proposed mechanism is first proved by circulating water in a looped microchannel. Using H(2) and O(2) gas bubbles continuously generated by electrolysis, a prototype device with a looped channel shows a volumetric flow rate of 4.5-13.5 nL s(-1) with a direct current (DC) power input of 2-85 mW. A similar device with an open-ended microchannel gives a maximum flow rate of approximately 65 nL s(-1) and a maximum pressure head of approximately 195 Pa with 14 mW input. The electrolytic-bubble-driven micropump operates with a 10-100 times higher power efficiency than its thermal-bubble-driven counterparts and exhibits better controllability. The pumping mechanism is then implemented by injecting nitrogen gas bubbles to demonstrate the flexibility of bubble sources, which would allow one to choose them for specific needs (e.g., energy efficiency, thermal sensitivity, biocompatibility, and adjustable flow rate), making the proposed mechanism attractive for many applications including micro total analysis systems (microTAS) and micro fuel cells. PMID:18497918

  20. Deformed bubble growth and coalescence in polymer foam processing 

    E-print Network

    Allaboun, Hussein Raji

    1996-01-01

    the geometrical constraints imposed by the existence of neighboring growing bubbles. The viscoelastic behavior of the polymer melt as well as the effect of the intermolecular forces on foam stability are investigated. An analysis of the results indicates...

  1. Experimental Study of Heat Transfer Induced by a Single Vapor Bubble Growth: Influence of Liquid Subcooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthes, Magali; Reynard, Christelle; Santini, Robert; Tadrist, Lounès

    2004-02-01

    Heat exchanges during boiling are of high interest for cooling systems. The objective of this work is to investigate heat transfer around a single vapor bubble, the influence of the liquid subcooling and of the heat flux applied on the nucleation surface. Experiments on subcooled pool boiling at atmospheric pressure for a single vapor bubble were conducted and the obtained results are presented. The bubble was created on a downward facing heating element. Generation of the single bubble was achieved on an artificial cavity; the indentation was made on a fluxmeter (Captec Entreprise®). FC-72 was used as the test liquid, and its subcooling was maintained to 8 and 14K. Two heating powers were applied on the nucleation surface, and maintained constant during each experiment. Evolutions of bubble size and shape, as a function of wall superheat and liquid subcooling, were followed and studied using a 25 fps video camera. The effect of heating power and subcooling on growth periods were found to be significant. Total heat fluxes during bubble growth were measured using the fluxmeter, for different levels of subcooling and heating powers. Image and data processing has enabled us to show up influence of bubble growth on heat transfer and to determine nucleation periodicity. These preliminary results are discussed.

  2. Formation and Growth of Micro and Macro Bubbles on Copper-Graphite Composite Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, David F.; Sankovic, John M.; Motil, Brian J.; Zhang, Nengli

    2007-01-01

    Micro scale boiling behavior in the vicinity of graphite micro-fiber tips on the coppergraphite composite boiling surfaces is investigated. It is discovered that a large number of micro bubbles are formed first at the micro scratches and cavities on the copper matrix in pool boiling. In virtue of the non-wetting property of graphite, once the growing micro bubbles touch the graphite tips, the micro bubbles are sucked by the tips and merged into larger micro bubbles sitting on the tips. The micro bubbles grow rapidly and coalesce to form macro bubbles, each of which sitting on several tips. The growth processes of the micro and macro bubbles are analyzed and formulated followed by an analysis of bubble departure on the composite surfaces. Based on these analyses, the enhancement mechanism of the pool boiling heat transfer on the composite surfaces is clearly revealed. Experimental results of pool boiling heat transfer both for water and Freon-113 on the composite surfaces convincingly demonstrate the enhancement effects of the unique structure of Cu-Gr composite surfaces on boiling heat transfer.

  3. Observations and measurements in cloud cavitating flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, G. H.; Wang, G. Y.; Hu, C. L.; Huang, B.; Zhang, M. D.

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to shed light on the cloud cavitating flow and associated characteristic of pressure fluctuation near wall. A simultaneous sampling technique is used to synchronize the observations of cavitation instantaneous behaviour and the measurements of pressure signals near wall in a convergent-divergent channel. The results show that, a typical quasi-periodical sheet/cloud cavitation can be categorized into three stages: (1) the growth of attached cavity; (2) the shedding of the attached cavity; (3) the development and collapse of the detached cavities. At the stage one, the magnitudes of pressure fluctuation under the attached cavity are limited. However, they become significant in the closure region of attached cavity, especially, when attached cavity reaches its maximum length. At the stage two, the attached cavity begins to shed small detached cavity, leading to the generation of small local pressure fluctuations with higher frequency. At the stage three, a large detached cavity is gradually formed in the rear of the channel. When it collapses rapidly in the downstream, pressure pulses with the magnitudes of the order of several atmospheres are detected. The propagation speeds of pressure pulses in different region are found to be related with the bubble density in the flow field.

  4. Cavitation inception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acosta, Allan J.

    1987-12-01

    The present research effort on a special topic of Cavitation Inception was initiated on 1 July 1983 and was continued through June 30, 1987. This special area of interest was specifically directed towards the observation of microparticulates and microbubbles in the natural waters of the ocean. The motivation for this example of field work in the study of cavitation inception is that there is, even today, a great scarcity of information about the concentrations of microparticulates of all types in the natural waters that ships and all naval equipment may be expected to operate within. This is an important issue for several reasons; first of all it is known that an absence of microbubbles in laboratory cavitation test facilities leads to erroneous estimates of the inception of cavitation itself and the form and extent of the patterns that develop subsequent to the onset of cavitation. These kinds of laboratory cavitation scaling problems were beautifully exemplified in cavitation tests in the Netherlands vacuum towing tank where to achieve even rough cavitation similarity with prototypical propeller cavitation performance the waters of the towing tank had to be seeded with microbubbles formed by electrolysis.

  5. Bubble Growth and Dynamics in a Strongly Superheated Electrolyte within a Solid-State Nanopore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, Edlyn; Nagashima, Gaku; Burns, Michael; Golovchenko, Jene

    2015-03-01

    Extreme localized superheating and homogeneous vapor bubble nucleation have recently been demonstrated in a single nanopore in thin, solid state membranes. Aqueous electrolytic solution within the pore is superheated to well above its boiling point by Joule heating from ionic current driven through the pore. Continued heating of the metastable liquid leads to nucleation of a vapor bubble in the pore followed by explosive growth. Here we report on the growth dynamics of the vapor bubble after nucleation in the strongly superheated liquid. The process is modeled by numerically solving the Rayleigh-Plesset equation coupled with energy conservation and a Stefan boundary condition. The initial temperature distribution, peaked at the pore center, is taken to be radially symmetric. Energy conservation includes a Joule heating source term dependent on the bubble radius, which grows to constrict ionic current through the nanopore. Temperature-dependent properties of the electrolyte and the vapor are incorporated in the calculation. Comparison of the model to experimental results shows an initial bubble growth velocity of 50m/s and total bubble lifetime of 16ns. This work was supported by NIH Grant #5R01HG003703 to J.A. Golovchenko.

  6. Vapor Cavitation in Dynamically Loaded Journal Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, B. O.; Hamrock, B. J.

    1983-01-01

    High speed motion camera experiments were performed on dynamically loaded journal bearings. The length to diameter ratio of the bearing, the speed of the roller and the tube, the surface material of the roller, and the static and dynamic eccentricity of the bearing were varied. One hundred and thirty-four cases were filmed. The occurrence of vapor cavitation was clearly evident in the films and figures presented. Vapor cavitation was found to occur when the tensile stress applied to the oil exceeded the tensile strength of the oil or the binding of the oil to the surface. The physical situation in which vapor cavitation occurs is during the squeezing and sliding motion within a bearing. Besides being able to accurately capture the vapor cavitation on film, an analysis of the formation and collapse of the cavitation bubbles and characteristics of the bubble content are presented.

  7. Cavitation effects of therapeutic ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bader, Kenneth; Gipson, Karen

    2005-04-01

    In order to model possible effects of cavitation on bone structure, the formation of cavitation along an acoustically reflective PVC surface was studied. The bubbles were generated by a commerical therapeutic transducer (1 MHz), for both water and agar gel mediums. Bubble formation and activity were monitored using light scattering techniques: a HeNe laser was directed through the medium, and the transmitted light was detected using an optical power meter. The data show a decline in cavitation activity further from the surface and offer suggestive evidence of a boundary layer. Temporal saturation is also evident in both mediums, though an anomalous increase in transmitted light for the agar medium suggests the possibility of pressure variations due to microstreaming. Analysis of the microstreaming pattern was subsequently performed at lower frequencies in order to allow visualization with a standard laboratory microscope.

  8. Plastron-Mediated Growth of Captive Bubbles on Superhydrophobic Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Huynh, So Hung; Zahidi, Alifa Afiah Ahmad; Muradoglu, Murat; Cheong, Brandon Huey-Ping; Ng, Tuck Wah

    2015-06-23

    Captive bubbles on a superhydrophobic (SH) surface have been shown to increase in volume via injection of air through the surrounding plastron. The experimental contact diameter against volume trends were found to follow that predicted by the Surface Evolver simulation generally but corresponded with the simulated data at contact angle (CA) = 158° when the volume was 20 ?L but that at CA = 170° when the volume was increased to 180 ?L. In this regime, there was a simultaneous outward movement of the contact line as well as a small reduction in the slope that the liquid-air interface makes with the horizontal as air was injected. At volumes higher than 180 ?L, air injection caused the diameter to reduce progressively until detachment. The inward movement of the contact line in this regime allowed the bubble body to undergo shape deformations to stay attached onto the substrate with larger volumes (300 ?L) than predicted (220 ?L at CA = 170°) using simulation. In experiments to investigate the effect of translating the SH surface, movement of captive bubbles was possible with 280 ?L volume but not with 80 ?L volume. This pointed to the possibility of transporting gas-phase samples on SH surfaces using larger captive bubble volumes. PMID:25986160

  9. Effects of FLIRT on bubble growth in man.

    PubMed

    Winkler, B E; Koch, A; Schoeppenthau, H; Ludwig, T; Tetzlaff, K; Hartig, F; Kaehler, W; Koehler, A; Kanstinger, A; Ciscato, W; Muth, C-M

    2012-11-01

    Recompression during decompression has been suggested to possibly reduce the risk of decompression sickness (DCS). The main objective of the current study was to investigate the effects of FLIRT (First Line Intermittent Recompression Technique) on bubble detection in man. 29 divers underwent 2 simulated dives in a dry recompression chamber to a depth of 40 msw (500 kPa ambient pressure) in random order. A Buehlmann-based decompression profile served as control and was compared to an experimental profile with intermittent recompression during decompression (FLIRT). Circulating bubbles in the right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) were monitored by Doppler ultrasound and quantified using the Spencer scoring algorithm. Heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), thrombocytes, D-Dimers and serum osmolarity were analyzed before and 120 min after the dive. Both dive profiles elicited bubbles in most subjects (range Spencer 0-4). However, no statistically significant difference was found in bubble scores between the control and the experimental dive procedure. There was no significant change in either HSP70, thrombocytes, and D-Dimers. None of the divers had clinical signs or symptoms suggestive of DCS. We conclude that FLIRT did not significantly alter the number of microbubbles and thus may not be considered superior to classical decompression in regards of preventing DCS. PMID:22706940

  10. Simulation of cryogenic liquid flows with vapor bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Jong, Frederik J.; Sabnis, Jayant S.

    1991-01-01

    Liquid flows in rocket engine components (such as bearings, seals, and pumps) often involve the formation of vapor bubbles due to local superheating of the fluid (either boiling or cavitation). Under the present effort, an analysis has been developed for liquid flows with vapor bubbles, based on a combined Eulerian-Lagrangian technique, in which the continuous (liquid) phase is treated by solving a system of Eulerian conservation equations, while the discrete (vapor bubble) phase is dealt with by integrating Lagrangian equations of motion in computational coordinates. Vapor bubbles of changing size can be accommodated easily by this analysis, and models for the simulation of bubble formation, growth, and motion have been included. The effect of bubble motion and other bubble processes on the continuous (liquid) phase has been accounted for by appropriate bubble mass, momentum, and energy interchange source terms in the Eulerian conservation equations. To demonstrate the viability of the resulting procedure, the cavitating flow of liquid oxygen through a simplified model of a labyrinth seal has been successfully calculated.

  11. Simulation of cryogenic liquid flows with vapor bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, Frederik J.; Sabnis, Jayant S.

    1991-06-01

    Liquid flows in rocket engine components (such as bearings, seals, and pumps) often involve the formation of vapor bubbles due to local superheating of the fluid (either boiling or cavitation). Under the present effort, an analysis has been developed for liquid flows with vapor bubbles, based on a combined Eulerian-Lagrangian technique, in which the continuous (liquid) phase is treated by solving a system of Eulerian conservation equations, while the discrete (vapor bubble) phase is dealt with by integrating Lagrangian equations of motion in computational coordinates. Vapor bubbles of changing size can be accommodated easily by this analysis, and models for the simulation of bubble formation, growth, and motion have been included. The effect of bubble motion and other bubble processes on the continuous (liquid) phase has been accounted for by appropriate bubble mass, momentum, and energy interchange source terms in the Eulerian conservation equations. To demonstrate the viability of the resulting procedure, the cavitating flow of liquid oxygen through a simplified model of a labyrinth seal has been successfully calculated.

  12. Intense cavitation at extreme static pressure.

    PubMed

    Pishchalnikov, Yuri A; Gutierrez, Joel; Dunbar, Wylene W; Philpott, Richard W

    2016-02-01

    Cavitation is usually performed at hydrostatic pressures at or near 0.1MPa. Higher static pressure produces more intense cavitation, but requires an apparatus that can build high amplitude acoustic waves with rarefactions exceeding the cavitation threshold. The absence of such an apparatus has prevented the achievement of intense acoustic cavitation, hindering research and the development of new applications. Here we describe a new high-pressure spherical resonator system, as well as experimental and modeling results in water and liquid metal (gallium), for cavitation at hydrostatic pressures between 10 and 150MPa. Our computational data, using HYADES plasma hydrodynamics code, show the formation of dense plasma that, under these conditions, reaches peak pressures of about three to four orders of magnitude greater than the hydrostatic pressure in the bulk liquid and temperatures in the range of 100,000K. Passive cavitation detection (PCD) data validate both a linear increase in shock wave amplitude and the production of highly intense concentrations of mechanical energy in the collapsing bubbles. High-speed camera observations show the formation of bubble clusters from single bubbles. The increased shock wave amplitude produced by bubble clusters, measured using PCD and fiber optic probe hydrophone, was consistent with current understanding that bubble clusters enable amplification of energy produced. PMID:26341849

  13. The origin of the dynamic growth of vapor bubbles associated with vapor explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H.S.; Merte, H. Jr.

    1996-12-31

    An explosive type of vapor bubble growth was observed during pool boiling experiments in microgravity using R-113, where heater surface superheats as high as 70 C were attained at nucleation. This corresponds to approximately 65% of the computed superheat limit of the fluid, compared to the approximate 30% observed at earth gravity for the same system. Photographs and measurements of the vapor bubble growth provide evidence for rates of growth not accountable by conventional models. The photographs reveal that the liquid-vapor interface of the explosive bubbles become wrinkled and corrugated, leading to the conclusion that some type of instability mechanism is acting. The classical hydrodynamic instability theories of Landau and Rayleigh-Taylor, used in conjunction with a model of the early growth of spherical vapor bubbles developed by the authors, predict that the early growth should be stable. These theories do not consider the effects of heat transfer at the interface, which is believed responsible for the observed instability of the evaporating surface. This was confirmed by the mechanisms proposed by Prosperetti and Plesset which, although including the effects of heat transfer, required that the unperturbed liquid temperature distribution be known at the moment of onset of the instability. This is generally unknown, so that no comparisons with experiments were possible up to this point. The present pool boiling experiments conducted in microgravity, some of which result in the explosive vapor bubble growth referred to, permit the precise determination of the unperturbed liquid temperature distribution using a model of the early vapor bubble growth along with the measurement of heater surface temperature at nucleation. The limited results to date provide good agreement with the mechanisms proposed by Prosperetti and Plesset.

  14. The microjetting behavior from single laser-induced bubbles generated above a solid boundary with a through hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abboud, Jack E.; Oweis, Ghanem F.

    2012-12-01

    An inertial bubble collapsing near a solid boundary generates a fast impulsive microjet directed toward the boundary. The jet impacts the solid boundary at a high velocity, and this effect has been taken advantage of in industrial cleaning such as when tiny bubbles are driven ultrasonically to cavitate around machined parts to produce jets that are believed to induce the cleaning effect. In this experimental investigation, we are interested in the jetting from single cavities near a boundary. By introducing a through hole in the boundary beneath a laser-induced bubble, it is hypothesized that the forming jet, upon bubble implosion, will proceed to penetrate through the hole to the other side and that it may be utilized in useful applications such as precise surgeries. It was found that the growth of the bubble induced a fast flow through the hole and lead to the formation of secondary hydrodynamic cavitation. The experiments also showed the formation of a counter jet directed away from the hole and into the bubble. During the growth phase of the bubble, and near the point of maximum expansion, the bubble wall bulged out toward the hole in a `bulb' like formation, which sometimes resulted in the pinching-off of a secondary small bubble. This was ensued by the inward recoiling of the primary bubble wall near the pinch-off spot, which developed into a counter jet seen to move away from the hole and inward into the bubble.

  15. The microjetting behavior from single laser-induced bubbles generated above a solid boundary with a through hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abboud, Jack E.; Oweis, Ghanem F.

    2013-01-01

    An inertial bubble collapsing near a solid boundary generates a fast impulsive microjet directed toward the boundary. The jet impacts the solid boundary at a high velocity, and this effect has been taken advantage of in industrial cleaning such as when tiny bubbles are driven ultrasonically to cavitate around machined parts to produce jets that are believed to induce the cleaning effect. In this experimental investigation, we are interested in the jetting from single cavities near a boundary. By introducing a through hole in the boundary beneath a laser-induced bubble, it is hypothesized that the forming jet, upon bubble implosion, will proceed to penetrate through the hole to the other side and that it may be utilized in useful applications such as precise surgeries. It was found that the growth of the bubble induced a fast flow through the hole and lead to the formation of secondary hydrodynamic cavitation. The experiments also showed the formation of a counter jet directed away from the hole and into the bubble. During the growth phase of the bubble, and near the point of maximum expansion, the bubble wall bulged out toward the hole in a `bulb' like formation, which sometimes resulted in the pinching-off of a secondary small bubble. This was ensued by the inward recoiling of the primary bubble wall near the pinch-off spot, which developed into a counter jet seen to move away from the hole and inward into the bubble.

  16. Bubble Proliferation in Shock Wave Lithotripsy Occurs during Inertial Collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pishchalnikov, Yuri A.; McAteer, James A.; Pishchalnikova, Irina V.; Williams, James C.; Bailey, Michael R.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.

    2008-06-01

    In shock wave lithotripsy (SWL), firing shock pulses at slow pulse repetition frequency (0.5 Hz) is more effective at breaking kidney stones than firing shock waves (SWs) at fast rate (2 Hz). Since at fast rate the number of cavitation bubbles increases, it appears that bubble proliferation reduces the efficiency of SWL. The goal of this work was to determine the basis for bubble proliferation when SWs are delivered at fast rate. Bubbles were studied using a high-speed camera (Imacon 200). Experiments were conducted in a test tank filled with nondegassed tap water at room temperature. Acoustic pulses were generated with an electromagnetic lithotripter (DoLi-50). In the focus of the lithotripter the pulses consisted of a ˜60 MPa positive-pressure spike followed by up to -8 MPa negative-pressure tail, all with a total duration of about 7 ?s. Nonlinear propagation steepened the shock front of the pulses to become sufficiently thin (˜0.03 ?m) to impose differential pressure across even microscopic bubbles. High-speed camera movies showed that the SWs forced preexisting microbubbles to collapse, jet, and break up into daughter bubbles, which then grew rapidly under the negative-pressure phase of the pulse, but later coalesced to re-form a single bubble. Subsequent bubble growth was followed by inertial collapse and, usually, rebound. Most, if not all, cavitation bubbles emitted micro-jets during their first inertial collapse and re-growth. After jetting, these rebounding bubbles could regain a spherical shape before undergoing a second inertial collapse. However, either upon this second inertial collapse, or sometimes upon the first inertial collapse, the rebounding bubble emerged from the collapse as a cloud of smaller bubbles rather than a single bubble. These daughter bubbles could continue to rebound and collapse for a few cycles, but did not coalesce. These observations show that the positive-pressure phase of SWs fragments preexisting bubbles but this initial fragmentation does not yield bubble proliferation, as the daughter bubbles coalesce to reform a single bubble. Instead, bubble proliferation is the product of the subsequent inertial collapses.

  17. Bubble Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corrigan, Jackie

    2004-01-01

    A method of energy production that is capable of low pollutant emissions is fundamental to one of the four pillars of NASA s Aeronautics Blueprint: Revolutionary Vehicles. Bubble combustion, a new engine technology currently being developed at Glenn Research Center promises to provide low emissions combustion in support of NASA s vision under the Emissions Element because it generates power, while minimizing the production of carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitrous oxides (NOx), both known to be Greenhouse gases. and allows the use of alternative fuels such as corn oil, low-grade fuels, and even used motor oil. Bubble combustion is analogous to the inverse of spray combustion: the difference between bubble and spray combustion is that spray combustion is spraying a liquid in to a gas to form droplets, whereas bubble combustion involves injecting a gas into a liquid to form gaseous bubbles. In bubble combustion, the process for the ignition of the bubbles takes place on a time scale of less than a nanosecond and begins with acoustic waves perturbing each bubble. This perturbation causes the local pressure to drop below the vapor pressure of the liquid thus producing cavitation in which the bubble diameter grows, and upon reversal of the oscillating pressure field, the bubble then collapses rapidly with the aid of the high surface tension forces acting on the wall of the bubble. The rapid and violent collapse causes the temperatures inside the bubbles to soar as a result of adiabatic heating. As the temperatures rise, the gaseous contents of the bubble ignite with the bubble itself serving as its own combustion chamber. After ignition, this is the time in the bubble s life cycle where power is generated, and CO2, and NOx among other species, are produced. However, the pollutants CO2 and NOx are absorbed into the surrounding liquid. The importance of bubble combustion is that it generates power using a simple and compact device. We conducted a parametric study using CAVCHEM, a computational model developed at Glenn, that simulates the cavitational collapse of a single bubble in a liquid (water) and the subsequent combustion of the gaseous contents inside the bubble. The model solves the time-dependent, compressible Navier-Stokes equations in one-dimension with finite-rate chemical kinetics using the CHEMKIN package. Specifically, parameters such as frequency, pressure, bubble radius, and the equivalence ratio were varied while examining their effect on the maximum temperature, radius, and chemical species. These studies indicate that the radius of the bubble is perhaps the most critical parameter governing bubble combustion dynamics and its efficiency. Based on the results of the parametric studies, we plan on conducting experiments to study the effect of ultrasonic perturbations on the bubble generation process with respect to the bubble radius and size distribution.

  18. Arresting bubble coarsening: A model for stopping grain growth with interfacial elasticity

    E-print Network

    Anniina Salonen; Cyprien Gay; Armando Maestro; Wiebke Drenckhan; Emmanuelle Rio

    2015-05-22

    Many two-phase materials suffer from grain-growth due to the energy cost which is associated with the interface that separates both phases. While our understanding of the driving forces and the dynamics of grain growth in different materials is well advanced by now, current research efforts address the question of how this process may be slowed down, or, ideally, arrested. We use a model system of two bubbles to explore how the presence of an interfacial elasticity may interfere with the coarsening process and the final grain size distribution. Combining experiments and modelling in the analysis of the evolution of two bubbles, we show that clear relationships can be predicted between the interfacial tension, the interfacial elasticity and the change in bubble polydispersity. Despite its general interest, the presented results have direct implications for our understanding of foam stability.

  19. The importance of control over bubble size distribution in pulsed megasonic cleaning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauptmann, Marc; Struyf, Herbert; Mertens, Paul; Heyns, Marc; De Gendt, Stefan; Glorieux, Christ; Brems, Steven

    2012-05-01

    The presence of acoustic cavitation in the cleaning liquid is a crucial precondition for cleaning action. One can achieve enhanced cleaning by periodically switching the ultrasonic agitation on and off rather than sonicating the liquid in a continuous fashion. The physical effects leading to that improvement are investigated experimentally with a dedicated setup and correlated to cleaning results obtained in an experimental cleaning tank. With the first setup, sonoluminescence and cavitation noise are measured simultaneously while imaging the nucleation and the interaction of the bubbles with the sound field using Hi-Speed Stroboscopic Schlieren Imaging. In this way it is possible to identify the role of streamer bubbles and transient cavitation. Furthermore, the attenuation of the sound field due to the highly efficient bubble induced acoustic scattering and the growth of bubbles due to coalescence is investigated. The results give an idea of the stability of the bubble size distribution during and after the nucleation process. The measurements obtained for pulsed megasonic agitation are compared to that obtained while sonicating the liquid continuously. They are further correlated to experimental data on particle removal efficiency for varying pulse duration, and corresponding cavitation noise measurements. Here, the latter proves to be a suitable and easy-to-do method to identify cleaning regimes beforehand.

  20. Experimental and Theoretical Investigations of Cavitation in Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackeret, J.

    1945-01-01

    The cavitation in nozzles on airfoils of various shape and on a sphere are experimentally investigated. The limits of cavitation and the extension of the zone of the bubbles in different stages of cavitation are photographically established. The pressure in the bubble area is constant and very low, jumping to high values at the end of the area. The analogy with the gas compression shock is adduced and discussed. The collapse of the bubbles under compression shock produces very high pressures internally, which must be contributory factors to corrosion. The pressure required for purely mechanical corrosion is also discussed.

  1. Mechanisms of thrombolysis acceleration by cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Hope; Selvaraj, Prashanth; Ahadi, Golnaz; Voie, Arne; Hoelscher, Thilo; Okita, Kohei; Matsumoto, Yoichiro; Szeri, Andrew

    2012-11-01

    Recent studies, in vitro and in vivo, have shown that High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) accelerates thrombolysis, the dissolution of blood clots, for ischemic stroke. Although the mechanisms are not fully understood, cavitation is thought to play an important role in sonothrombolysis. The damage to a blood clot's fibrin fiber network from cavitation in a HIFU field is studied using two independent approaches for an embedded bubble. One method is extended to the more important scenario of a bubble outside a blood clot that collapses asymmetrically creating a jet towards the clot. There is significantly more damage potential from a bubble undergoing cavitation collapse outside the clot compared to a rapidly expanding bubble embedded within the clot structure. Also, the effects of the physical properties of skull bone when a HIFU wave propagates through it are examined by use of computer simulation. The dynamics of a test bubble placed at the focus is used in understanding of the pressure field. All other things being equal, the analysis suggests that skull thickness can alter the wave at the focus, which in turn can change the nature of cavitation bubble dynamics and the amount of energy available for clot damage. Now at MSOE.

  2. Three-Dimensional Bubble Size Distributions From Growth at High Water Supersaturation: X-ray Microtomographic Investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert, G.; Allard, E.; Jeff, L.; Rivers, M.; Baker, D. R.

    2004-05-01

    The growth of bubbles and exsolution of water from molten rocks is responsible for most volcanic eruptions on Earth. Rapid bubble growth without formation of an interconnected, percolating, cluster of bubbles can create a volcanic eruption, whereas slower bubble growth and a high enough (but still quantitatively unknown) bubble density results in more passive volcanic degassing. Understanding the rates and mechanisms of water exsolution provides better insight into volcanic eruptions and can lead to mitigation of their potentially devastating effects. In order to better understand the mechanisms of volcanic eruptions we are investigating the formation of water bubbles by heating previously hydrated silicate melts at 1 atm pressure and using x-ray microtomography to study the bubble size distribution. Hydrous silicate melts spanning a wide range of composition and physical properties were prepared by dissolving water into silicate melts at high temperatures and high pressure by melting glasses with water in sealed capsules at 500 MPa and 1100 oC in a piston-cylinder apparatus followed by rapid quenching to room temperature and pressure. Chips of these glasses were heated at 1 atm and temperatures up to 1000 oC. Most chips of samples were heated under an optical microscope at 1 atm in the laboratory at McGill University to make bubble-bearing samples, whereas a few chips were degassed a custom-designed, boron-nitride furnace on a bending magnet beamline at the Advanced Photon Source and observed with x-rays during bubble growth. In some cases the chips were heated to sufficiently high temperatures and for durations long enough to grow many large bubbles and convert the sample into a foam; in other cases the samples were only partially degassed so that we could observe the development of bubble formation and possible coalescence prior to foam formation. The bubble-bearing glasses formed during the heating experiment were imaged by x-ray microtomography performed on the GSECARS beamline BM-13 at the Advanced Photon Source. Spatial resolution typically was better than 10 ? m. Reconstruction of the tomographic images was performed using the Gridrec Fourier Transform algorithm. Three-dimensional bubble size distributions were determined for the samples using the Blob3D image analysis software. We plotted the cumulative distribution of bubble volumes and determined that in many, but not all, cases the distribution is well described by a power law distribution. In particular, our results for bubble growth of an albite melt initially containing 11 wt% water produced a power law with an exponent of 0.84. This value is consistent with previous studies of bubbles found in natural lavas and in organic liquids used to simulate explosive volcanic eruptions.

  3. Modèle multi-bulles pour la cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adama Maiga, Mahamadou; Buisine, Daniel

    2009-11-01

    In this study we propose new multi-bubble model for cavitation, in which, to simulate the interactions within a cloud of cavitation at the initial stage, the dynamic behaviour of two nonidentical bubbles localised in a volume of control is studied. The presence of two bubbles introduces an instability in which the exchange of volume seems an additional degree of freedom. Depending on the conditions of expansion, the small bubble can disappear or not. If the small bubble disappears, the volume of control is readjusted to introduce a new small bubble and to continue calculation in a new sequence. The model makes it possible for many small bubbles to disappear as in the appearance of cavitation, which is at the origin of certain phenomena observed in the zone of the appearance, such as emission of the noise. The model reveals especially the pressure rather like a result than a datum. The comparison of the size of the bubbles and the pressure varying in time, obtained with the model are coherent with the measurements taken by Ohl [Phys. Fluids 14 (10) (2002) 3512-3521]. To cite this article: M. Adama Maiga, D. Buisine, C. R. Mecanique 337 (2009).

  4. Enhanced Generic Phase-field Model of Irradiation Materials: Fission Gas Bubble Growth Kinetics in Polycrystalline UO2

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yulan; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Montgomery, Robert O.; Gao, Fei; Sun, Xin

    2012-05-30

    Experiments show that inter-granular and intra-granular gas bubbles have different growth kinetics which results in heterogeneous gas bubble microstructures in irradiated nuclear fuels. A science-based model predicting the heterogeneous microstructure evolution kinetics is desired, which enables one to study the effect of thermodynamic and kinetic properties of the system on gas bubble microstructure evolution kinetics and morphology, improve the understanding of the formation mechanisms of heterogeneous gas bubble microstructure, and provide the microstructure to macroscale approaches to study their impact on thermo-mechanical properties such as thermo-conductivity, gas release, volume swelling, and cracking. In our previous report 'Mesoscale Benchmark Demonstration, Problem 1: Mesoscale Simulations of Intra-granular Fission Gas Bubbles in UO2 under Post-irradiation Thermal Annealing', we developed a phase-field model to simulate the intra-granular gas bubble evolution in a single crystal during post-irradiation thermal annealing. In this work, we enhanced the model by incorporating thermodynamic and kinetic properties at grain boundaries, which can be obtained from atomistic simulations, to simulate fission gas bubble growth kinetics in polycrystalline UO2 fuels. The model takes into account of gas atom and vacancy diffusion, vacancy trapping and emission at defects, gas atom absorption and resolution at gas bubbles, internal pressure in gas bubbles, elastic interaction between defects and gas bubbles, and the difference of thermodynamic and kinetic properties in matrix and grain boundaries. We applied the model to simulate gas atom segregation at grain boundaries and the effect of interfacial energy and gas mobility on gas bubble morphology and growth kinetics in a bi-crystal UO2 during post-irradiation thermal annealing. The preliminary results demonstrate that the model can produce the equilibrium thermodynamic properties and the morphology of gas bubbles at grain boundaries for given grain boundary properties. More validation of the model capability in polycrystalline is underway.

  5. Cavitation-Induced Fusion: Proof of Concept

    E-print Network

    Max I. Fomitchev-Zamilov

    2012-09-09

    Cavitation-induced fusion (also known as bubble fusion or sonofusion) has been a topic of much debate and controversy and is generally (albeit incorrectly) perceived as unworkable. In this paper we present the theoretical foundations of cavitation-induced fusion and summarize the experimental results of the research conducted in the past 20 years. Based on the systematic study of all available data we conclude that the cavitation-induced fusion is feasible, doable, and can be used for commercial power generation. We present the results of our own research and disclose a commercial reactor prototype.

  6. Dissolved water distribution in vesicular magmatic glass records both decompressive bubble growth and quench resorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, I. M.; Llewellin, E.; Humphreys, M.; Nichols, A. R.; Burgisser, A.; Schipper, C.

    2013-12-01

    Water distribution in magma varies over the lifetime of an eruption due to a variety of processes, including decompressive degassing of the melt, cooling during the quench from melt to glass, and post-emplacement hydration under ambient conditions. Correct interpretation of water distributions in erupted pyroclasts can therefore offer crucial insights into the dynamics of eruption mechanisms and emplacement histories. Volcanic eruptions are driven by the nucleation and growth of bubbles in magma. Bubbles grow as volatile species in the melt, of which water is volumetrically the most important, diffuse down a concentration gradient towards and across the bubble wall. On cooling, the melt quenches to glass, preserving the spatial distribution of water concentration around the bubbles (now vesicles). We use Backscatter Scanning Electron Microscopy (BSEM), Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) and Fourier Transform Infra-Red spectroscopy (FTIR) to measure the spatial distribution of water around vesicles in experimentally-vesiculated samples. We find that, contrary to expectation, the total water concentration increases (by up to 2 wt.%) in the ~30 microns closest to the vesicle wall. Our samples record significant resorption of water back into the melt around bubbles during the quench process, a process which represents ';regassing' of the magma. We propose that the observed total water resorption profiles result from the increase in the equilibrium solubility of water as temperature decreases during the quench to glass, and that this resorption locally overprints the pre-existing concentration total water profile resulting from bubble growth during decompression. This resorption occurs over the very short timescales of rapid experimental quench (3-10 seconds) resulting in strongly disequilibrium water speciation. Water re-enters the melt as molecular water leading to enrichment in molecular water around vesicles, while the distribution of hydroxyl groups remains relatively unaltered during quench, thus preserving information about syn-experimental (or syn-eruptive) degassing. Our work demonstrates the effectiveness of two tools for deciphering the water contents of pyroclasts. BSEM imaging of glassy pyroclasts offers an easy, qualitative assessment of whether glass has been affected by quench resorption or secondary alteration processes, which becomes quantitative if calibrated by a technique such as SIMS. FTIR speciation data, meanwhile, enables the cause of bubble resorption to be identified, since resorption caused by pressure increase and by temperature decrease will result in distinctly different distributions of water species. We present here data extracted using these tools that demonstrate the potential impact of temperature-controlled quench resorption, which can reduce bubble volumes and sample porosities by a factor of two and reintroduce significant amounts of water back into the melt, with implications for obsidian and rheomorphic flow mechanisms.

  7. Enhancement of heat and mass transfer by cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. N.; Zhang, Y. N.; Du, X. Z.; Xian, H. Z.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a brief summary of effects of cavitation on the heat and mass transfer are given. The fundamental studies of cavitation bubbles, including its nonlinearity, rectified heat and mass diffusion, are initially introduced. Then selected topics of cavitation enhanced heat and mass transfer were discussed in details including whales stranding caused by active sonar activity, pool boiling heat transfer, oscillating heat pipe and high intensity focused ultrasound treatment.

  8. In situ TEM observation of growth behavior of Kr bubbles in zirconium alloy during post-implantation annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ran, Guang; Xu, Jiangkun; Shen, Qiang; Zhang, Jian; Li, Ning; Wang, Lumin

    2013-07-01

    The growth behavior of the Kr bubbles in Kr+ irradiated Zr-1.1Nb-1.51Fe-0.26Cu-0.72Ni alloy was studied by in situ transmission electron microscopy. Results show that the distributions of Kr bubbles are not uniform in the zirconium alloy matrix after annealing at 700 K, 875 K, 1025 K, 1125 K and 1225 K, respectively. The Kr bubbles started to grow slowly when the sample was annealed at a temperature below 1025 K. The average sizes of the gas bubbles were observed to grow only about 0.4 nm in diameter at 700 K for 170 min and 0.9 nm at 875 K for 240 min, respectively. However, gas bubbles grew very quickly at 1225 K. The largest size of the gas bubbles is over 200 nm after 180 min annealing. The relationship between the bubble size and the annealing time was obtained at the designed annealing temperature. An empirical formula for calculating the bubble size was suggested by fitting equations derived from the experiment data. Finally, the growth mechanism of the bubbles in the zirconium alloy was discussed.

  9. Radiation induced cavitation: A possible phenomenon in liquid targets?

    SciTech Connect

    West, C.D.

    1998-07-01

    The proposed design of a new, short-pulse spallation neutron source includes a liquid mercury target irradiated with a 1 GeV proton beam. This paper explores the possibility that cavitation bubbles may be formed in the mercury and briefly discusses some design features that could avoid harmful effects should cavitation take place.

  10. Simultaneous pressure measurement and high-speed photography study of cavitation in a dynamically loaded journal bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, D. C.; Brewe, D. E.; Abel, P. B.

    1993-01-01

    Cavitation of the oil film in a dynamically loaded journal bearing was studied using high-speed photography and pressure measurement simultaneously. Comparison of the visual and pressure data provided considerable insight into the occurence and non-occurrence of cavitation. It was found that (1), cavitation typically occurred in the form of one bubble with the pressure in the cavitation bubble close to the absolute zero; and (2), for cavitation-producing operating conditions, cavitation did not always occur; with the oil film then supporting a tensile stress.

  11. Simultaneous pressure measurement and high-speed photography study of cavitation in a dynamically loaded journal bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, D. C.; Brewe, David E.; Abel, Philip B.

    1994-01-01

    Cavitation of the oil film in a dynamically loaded journal bearing was studied using high-speed photography and pressure measurement simultaneously. Comparison of the visual and pressure data provided considerable insight into the occurrence and nonoccurrence of cavitation. It was found that (1) for the submerged journal bearing, cavitation typically occurred in the form of one bubble with the pressure in the cavitation bubble close to the absolute zero; and (2) for cavitation-producing operating conditions, cavitation did not always occur; with the oil film then supporting a tensile stress.

  12. Measuring cavitation and its cleaning effect.

    PubMed

    Verhaagen, Bram; Fernández Rivas, David

    2016-03-01

    The advantages and limitations of techniques for measuring the presence and amount of cavitation, and for quantifying the removal of contaminants, are provided. After reviewing chemical, physical, and biological studies, a universal cause for the cleaning effects of bubbles cannot yet be concluded. An "ideal sensor" with high spatial and temporal resolution is proposed. Such sensor could be used to investigate bubble jetting, shockwaves, streaming, and even chemical effects, by correlating cleaning processes with cavitation effects, generated by hydrodynamics, lasers or ultrasound. PMID:25819680

  13. Quantitative assessment of reactive oxygen species generation by cavitation incepted efficiently using nonlinear propagation effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Jun; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2015-10-01

    Sonodynamic treatment is a treatment method that uses chemical bio-effect of cavitation bubbles. Reactive oxygen species that can kill cancerous tissue is induced by such chemical effect of cavitation bubbles and it is important to generate them efficiently for effective sonodynamic treatment. Cavitation cloud can be formed by an effect of nonlinear propagation and focus and in this study, it was experimentally investigated if cavitation cloud was useful for efficient generation of reactive oxygen species. As a result, it was demonstrated that cavitation cloud would be useful for efficient generation of reactive oxygen species.

  14. What controls Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth rate and the formation of bubbles?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yizengaw, E.; Moldwin, M.; Zesta, E.; Damtie, B.; Rabiu, B.; Valladares, C. E.; Stoneback, R.

    2014-12-01

    According to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) growth rate mathematical expression, the vertical drift is supposed to be the primary component that controls the RTI growth rate. However, in the African sector that does not seem to be the case. In this paper we present independent ground- and space-based observations that consistently show weaker vertical drift (both dayside and evening sector) in the African sector compared with the American sector. On the other hand, observations from both satellite and recently deployed ground-based instruments have shown that the African sector is home to stronger and year-round ionospheric bubbles/irregularities and scintillations compared to the American and Asian sectors. The question is if the drift is weaker in the African sector, what causes these strong bubbles that have been observed in the African sector almost throughout the night and during all seasons? Are there other mechanisms that initiate RTI growth other than vertical drift? Would it be the neutral winds that cause the long lasting bubbles in Africa? If it is the neutral wind, why are the winds unique in terms of orientation and magnitude in the African sector compared to other longitudinal sectors?

  15. Bubble formation in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antar, Basil N.

    1996-01-01

    An extensive experimental program was initiated for the purpose of understanding the mechanisms leading to bubble generation during fluid handling procedures in a microgravity environment. Several key fluid handling procedures typical for PCG experiments were identified for analysis in that program. Experiments were designed to specifically understand how such procedures can lead to bubble formation. The experiments were then conducted aboard the NASA KC-135 aircraft which is capable of simulating a low gravity environment by executing a parabolic flight attitude. However, such a flight attitude can only provide a low gravity environment of approximately 10-2go for a maximum period of 30 seconds. Thus all of the tests conducted for these experiments were designed to last no longer than 20 seconds. Several experiments were designed to simulate some of the more relevant fluid handling procedures during protein crystal growth experiments. These include submerged liquid jet cavitation, filling of a cubical vessel, submerged surface scratch, attached drop growth, liquid jet impingement, and geysering experiments. To date, four separate KC-135 flight campaigns were undertaken specifically for performing these experiments. However, different experiments were performed on different flights.

  16. A universal bubble-growth equation for pure liquids and binary solutions with a non-volatile solute

    SciTech Connect

    Miyatake, Osamu; Tanaka, Itsuo; Lior, N.

    1996-12-31

    A simple equation suitable for predicting the growth rate of a vapor bubble in uniformly-superheated pure liquids and in binary solutions with a non-volatile solute was developed. The equation also improves on the popular pure-liquid bubble growth expression of Mikie et al. (1970) in that it is valid throughout the bubble growth history, i.e., in the surface-tension-, inertia-, and heat-transfer-controlled regimes, it accounts for bubble growth acceleration effects, and uses correctly-related and variable fluid properties. It was found to agree very well with experimental data for pure water and for aqueous NaCl solutions. As the bubble growth in superheated solutions with a non-volatile solute was found to be quite insensitive to diffusion and non-equilibrium effects in a broad range of common solution properties, this equation is likely to be universally valid for many liquids and solutions. Bubble growth in superheated fluids is of key interest in boiling phenomena in general and in flash evaporation in particular. Applications include a wide variety of separation processes such as water desalination, and energy conversion processes such as ocean-thermal energy conversion, geothermal power generation, and nuclear reactor safety.

  17. Simulations and Analytic Calculations of Bubble Growth During Hydrogen Reionization

    E-print Network

    Oliver Zahn; Adam Lidz; Matthew McQuinn; Suvendra Dutta; Lars Hernquist; Matias Zaldarriaga; Steven R. Furlanetto

    2010-03-17

    We present results from a large volume simulation of Hydrogen reionization. We combine 3d radiative transfer calculations and an N-body simulation, describing structure formation in the intergalactic medium, to detail the growth of HII regions around high redshift galaxies. Our simulation tracks 1024^3 dark matter particles, in a box of co-moving side length 65.6 Mpc/h. This large volume allows us to accurately characterize the size distribution of HII regions throughout most of the reionization process. At the same time, our simulation resolves many of the small galaxies likely responsible for reionization. It confirms a picture anticipated by analytic models: HII regions grow collectively around highly-clustered sources, and have a well-defined characteristic size, which evolves from a sub-Mpc scale at the beginning of reionization to R > 10 Mpc towards the end. We present a detailed statistical description of our results, and compare them with a numerical scheme based on the analytic model by Furlanetto, Zaldarriaga, and Hernquist. We find that the analytic calculation reproduces the size distribution of HII regions and the 21 cm power spectrum of the radiative transfer simulation remarkably well. The ionization field from the simulation, however, has more small scale structure than the analytic calculation, owing to Poisson scatter in the simulated abundance of galaxies on small scales. We propose and validate a simple scheme to incorporate this scatter into our calculations. Our results suggest that analytic calculations are sufficiently accurate to aid in predicting and interpreting the results of future 21 cm surveys. In particular, our fast numerical scheme is useful for forecasting constraints from future 21 cm surveys, and in constructing mock surveys to test data analysis procedures.

  18. Detecting cavitation in mercury exposed to a high-energy pulsed proton beam

    SciTech Connect

    Manzi, Nicholas J; Chitnis, Parag V; Holt, Ray G; Roy, Ronald A; Cleveland, Robin O; Riemer, Bernie; Wendel, Mark W

    2010-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Spallation Neutron Source employs a high-energy pulsed proton beam incident on a mercury target to generate short bursts of neutrons. Absorption of the proton beam produces rapid heating of the mercury, resulting in the formation of acoustic shock waves and the nucleation of cavitation bubbles. The subsequent collapse of these cavitation bubbles promote erosion of the steel target walls. Preliminary measurements using two passive cavitation detectors (megahertz-frequency focused and unfocused piezoelectric transducers) installed in a mercury test target to monitor cavitation generated by proton beams with charges ranging from 0.041 to 4.1 C will be reported on. Cavitation was initially detected for a beam charge of 0.082 C by the presence of an acoustic emission approximately 250 s after arrival of the incident proton beam. This emission was consistent with an inertial cavitation collapse of a bubble with an estimated maximum bubble radius of 0.19 mm, based on collapse time. The peak pressure in the mercury for the initiation of cavitation was predicted to be 0.6 MPa. For a beam charge of 0.41 C and higher, the lifetimes of the bubbles exceeded the reverberation time of the chamber (~300 s), and distinct windows of cavitation activity were detected, a phenomenon that likely resulted from the interaction of the reverberation in the chamber and the cavitation bubbles.

  19. Shock-wave model of acoustic cavitation.

    PubMed

    Peshkovsky, Sergei L; Peshkovsky, Alexey S

    2008-04-01

    Shock-wave model of liquid cavitation due to an acoustic wave was developed, showing how the primary energy of an acoustic radiator is absorbed in the cavitation region owing to the formation of spherical shock-waves inside each gas bubble. The model is based on the concept of a hypothetical spatial wave moving through the cavitation region. It permits using the classical system of Rankine-Hugoniot equations to calculate the total energy absorbed in the cavitation region. Additionally, the model makes it possible to explain some newly discovered properties of acoustic cavitation that occur at extremely high oscillatory velocities of the radiators, at which the mode of bubble oscillation changes and the bubble behavior approaches that of an empty Rayleigh cavity. Experimental verification of the proposed model was conducted using an acoustic calorimeter with a set of barbell horns. The maximum amplitude of the oscillatory velocity of the horns' radiating surfaces was 17 m/s. Static pressure in the calorimeter was varied in the range from 1 to 5 bars. The experimental data and the results of the calculations according to the proposed model were in good agreement. Simple algebraic expressions that follow from the model can be used for engineering calculations of the energy parameters of the ultrasonic radiators used in sonochemical reactors. PMID:17869158

  20. Rayleigh scattering on the cavitation region emerging in liquids

    E-print Network

    Shneider, M N

    2015-01-01

    It is shown that the scattering of laser radiation on cavitation ruptures in fluids is similar to the scattering by gas particles. When the characteristic dimensions of microscopic voids and bubbles are considerably smaller than the laser wavelength, the scattered light is in the Rayleigh regime and allows detecting cavitation in the very early stages of its inception. The simple estimates of the scattered radiation intensity and the dynamics of its changes in connection with the generation of cavitation in the test volume are obtained, allowing us to find the critical conditions for the cavitation inception.

  1. Pore-network study of bubble growth in porous media driven by heat transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Satik, C.; Yortsos, Y.C.

    1996-05-01

    We present experimental and theoretical investigations of vapor phase growth in pore-network models of porous media. Visualization experiments of boiling of ethyl alcohol in horizontal etched-glass micromodels were conducted. The vapor phase was observed to grow into a disordered pattern following a sequence of pressurization and pore-filling steps. At sufficiently small cluster sizes, growth occurred `one pore at a time,` leading to invasion percolation patterns. Single-bubble (cluster) growth was next simulated with a pore-network simulator that includes heat transfer (convection and conduction), and capillary and viscous forces, although not gravity. A boundary in the parameter space was delineated that separates patterns of growth dictated solely by capillarity (invasion percolation) from other patterns. The region of validity of invasion percolation was found to decrease as the supersaturation (heat flux), the capillary number, the thermal diffusivity, and the vapor cluster size increase. Implications to continuum models are discussed. 33 refs., 9 figs.

  2. Stem Hydraulic Conductivity depends on the Pressure at Which It Is Measured and How This Dependence Can Be Used to Assess the Tempo of Bubble Pressurization in Recently Cavitated Vessels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yujie; Liu, Jinyu; Tyree, Melvin T

    2015-12-01

    Cavitation of water in xylem vessels followed by embolism formation has been authenticated for more than 40 years. Embolism formation involves the gradual buildup of bubble pressure (air) to atmospheric pressure as demanded by Henry's law of equilibrium between gaseous and liquid phases. However, the tempo of pressure increase has not been quantified. In this report, we show that the rate of pressurization of embolized vessels is controlled by both fast and slow kinetics, where both tempos are controlled by diffusion but over different spatial scales. The fast tempo involves a localized diffusion from endogenous sources: over a distance of about 0.05 mm from water-filled wood to the nearest embolized vessels; this process, in theory, should take <2 min. The slow tempo involves diffusion of air from exogenous sources (outside the stem). The latter diffusion process is slower because of the increased distance of diffusion of up to 4 mm. Radial diffusion models and experimental measurements both confirm that the average time constant is >17 h, with complete equilibrium requiring 1 to 2 d. The implications of these timescales for the standard methods of measuring percentage loss of hydraulic conductivity are discussed in theory and deserve more research in future. PMID:26468516

  3. Improvement of growth rate of plants by bubble discharge in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahata, Junichiro; Takaki, Koichi; Satta, Naoya; Takahashi, Katsuyuki; Fujio, Takuya; Sasaki, Yuji

    2015-01-01

    The effect of bubble discharge in water on the growth rate of plants was investigated experimentally for application to plant cultivation systems. Spinach (Spinacia oleracea), radish (Raphanus sativus var. sativus), and strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) were used as specimens to clarify the effect of the discharge treatment on edible parts of the plants. The specimens were cultivated in pots filled with artificial soil, which included chicken manure charcoal. Distilled water was sprayed on the artificial soil and drained through a hole in the pots to a water storage tank. The water was circulated from the water storage tank to the cultivation pots after 15 or 30 min discharge treatment on alternate days. A magnetic compression-type pulsed power generator was used to produce the bubble discharge with a repetition rate of 250 pps. The plant height in the growth phase and the dry weight of the harvested plants were improved markedly by the discharge treatment in water. The soil and plant analyzer development (SPAD) value of the plants also improved in the growth phase of the plants. The concentration of nitrate nitrogen, which mainly contributed to the improvement of the growth rate, in the water increased with the discharge treatment. The Brix value of edible parts of Fragaria × ananassa increased with the discharge treatment. The inactivation of bacteria in the water was also confirmed with the discharge treatment.

  4. Numerical modeling of bubble dynamics in viscoelastic media with relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warnez, M. T.; Johnsen, E.

    2015-06-01

    Cavitation occurs in a variety of non-Newtonian fluids and viscoelastic materials. The large-amplitude volumetric oscillations of cavitation bubbles give rise to high temperatures and pressures at collapse, as well as induce large and rapid deformation of the surroundings. In this work, we develop a comprehensive numerical framework for spherical bubble dynamics in isotropic media obeying a wide range of viscoelastic constitutive relationships. Our numerical approach solves the compressible Keller-Miksis equation with full thermal effects (inside and outside the bubble) when coupled to a highly generalized constitutive relationship (which allows Newtonian, Kelvin-Voigt, Zener, linear Maxwell, upper-convected Maxwell, Jeffreys, Oldroyd-B, Giesekus, and Phan-Thien-Tanner models). For the latter two models, partial differential equations (PDEs) must be solved in the surrounding medium; for the remaining models, we show that the PDEs can be reduced to ordinary differential equations. To solve the general constitutive PDEs, we present a Chebyshev spectral collocation method, which is robust even for violent collapse. Combining this numerical approach with theoretical analysis, we simulate bubble dynamics in various viscoelastic media to determine the impact of relaxation time, a constitutive parameter, on the associated physics. Relaxation time is found to increase bubble growth and permit rebounds driven purely by residual stresses in the surroundings. Different regimes of oscillations occur depending on the relaxation time.

  5. Effect of vibration amplitude on vapor cavitation in journal bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewe, D. E.; Jacobson, B. O.

    1986-01-01

    Computational movies were used to analyze the formation and collapse of vapor cavitation bubbles in a submerged journal bearing. The effect of vibration amplitude on vapor cavitation was studied for a journal undergoing circular whirl. The boundary conditions were implemented using Elrod's algorithm, which conserves mass flow through the cavitation bubble as well as through the oil-film region of the bearing. The vibration amplitudes for the different cases studied resulted in maximum eccentricity ratios ranging from 0.4 to 0.9. The minimum eccentricity ratio reached in each case was 0.1. For the least vibration amplitude studied in which the eccentricity ratio varied between 0.1 and 0.4, no vapor cavitation occurred. The largest vibration amplitude (i.e., eccentricity ratios of 0.1 to 0.9) resulted in vapor cavitation present 76 percent of one complete orbit.

  6. On fiber optic probe hydrophone measurements in a cavitating liquid.

    PubMed

    Zijlstra, Aaldert; Ohl, Claus Dieter

    2008-01-01

    The measurement of high-pressure signals is often hampered by cavitation activity. The usage of a fiber optic probe hydrophone possesses advantages over other hydrophones, yet when measuring in a cavitating liquid large variations in the signal amplitude are found; in particular when the pressure signal recovers back to positive values. With shadowgraphy the wave propagation and cavity dynamics are imaged and the important contributions of secondary shock waves emitted from collapsing cavitation bubbles are revealed. Interestingly, just adding a small amount of acidic acid reduces the cavitation activity to a large extent. With this treatment an altered primary pressure profile which does not force the cavitation bubbles close to fiber tip into collapse has been found. Thereby, the shot-to-shot variations are greatly reduced. PMID:18177133

  7. Evolution of Plasma-Exposed Tungsten Surfaces Due to Helium Diffusion and Bubble Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, Karl; Hu, Lin; Maroudas, Dimitrios; Wirth, Brian; PSI-SciDAC Team

    2013-10-01

    Helium from linear plasma devices and tokamak plasmas causes the formation of microscopic features, termed ``fuzz'' or ``coral,'' on the surface of plasma-exposed materials after only a few hours of plasma exposure. The details of such surface modifications are only beginning to be understood. This study examines the initial and intermediate stages of fuzz formation by large-length-scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of helium-implanted tungsten over time scales of up to microseconds using single-crystalline and polycrystalline supercell models of tungsten. The large-scale MD simulations employ state-of-the-art many-body interatomic potentials and implantation depth distributions for the insertion of helium atoms into the tungsten matrix constructed based on MD simulations of helium-atom impingement onto tungsten surfaces under prescribed thermal and implantation conditions. The large-scale MD simulations reveal surface features formed via the sequence of helium implantation, diffusion of helium atoms and their aggregation to form bubbles, growth of bubbles and consequent production of tungsten self-interstitial atoms, organization of those atoms into prismatic loops, glide of those loops to the surface, and bubble rupture.

  8. Inertial confinement fusion based on the ion-bubble trigger

    SciTech Connect

    Jafari, S. Nilkar, M.; Ghasemizad, A.; Mehdian, H.

    2014-10-15

    Triggering the ion-bubble in an inertial confinement fusion, we have developed a novel scheme for the fast ignition. This scheme relies on the plasma cavitation by the wake of an intense laser pulse to generate an ion-bubble. The bubble acts both as an intense electron accelerator and as an electron wiggler. Consequently, the accelerated electrons trapped in the bubble can emit an intense tunable laser light. This light can be absorbed by an ablation layer on the outside surface of the ignition capsule, which subsequently drills it and thereby produces a guide channel in the pellet. Finally, the relativistic electron beam created in the bubble is guided through the channel to the high density core igniting the fusion fuel. The normalized beam intensity and beam energy required for triggering the ignition have been calculated when core is heated by the e-beam. In addition, through solving the momentum transfer, continuity and wave equations, a dispersion relation for the electromagnetic and space-charge waves has been analytically derived. The variations of growth rate with the ion-bubble density and electron beam energy have been illustrated. It is found that the growth rates of instability are significantly controlled by the ions concentration and the e-beam energy in the bubble.

  9. Dynamic response of ducted bubbly flows to turbomachinery-induced perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    D`Auria, F.; D`Agostino, L.; Brennen, C.E.

    1996-09-01

    The present work investigates the dynamics of the three-dimensional, unsteady flow of a bubbly mixture in a cylindrical duct subject to a periodic pressure excitation at one end. One of the purposes is to investigate the bubbly or cavitating flow at inlet to or discharge from a pump whose blade motions would provide such excitation. The flow displays various regimes with radically different wave propagation characteristics. The dynamic effects due to the bubble response may radically alter the fluid behavior depending on the void fraction of the bubbly mixture, the mean bubble size, the pipe diameter, the angular speed of the turbomachine and the mean flow Mach number. This simple linearized analysis illustrates the importance of the complex interactions of the dynamics of the bubbles with the average flow, and provides information on the propagation and growth of the turbopump-induced disturbances in the feed lines operating with bubbly or cavitating liquids. Examples are presented to illustrate the influence of the relevant flow parameters. Finally, the limitations of the theory are outlined.

  10. Experimental investigation of remote seismic triggering by gas bubble growth in groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crews, J. B.; Cooper, C. A.

    2014-12-01

    Remotely triggered seismicity is the process by which an earthquake at one location initiates others after a time delay ranging from seconds to days, over distances up to thousands of kilometers. Candidate mechanisms have been proposed, but none specifically address the role of carbon dioxide (CO2) gas bubble growth in groundwater as a driver of remote seismic triggering in active volcanic and geothermal regions, where shallow crustal CO2 gas is abundant. In the present study, we hypothesize that a seismic wave from a distant source can initiate rapid gas bubble growth in CO2-rich groundwater, resulting in a persistent increase in pore fluid pressure and a reduction of effective stress, which can trigger failure on a critically loaded geologic fault. Under conditions representative of a confined aquifer, a Berea sandstone core flooded with an aqueous CO2 solution was subjected to a six-period burst of 0.05-0.3 Hz, 0.1-0.4 MPa confining stress oscillations. After the oscillations were terminated, the pore fluid pressure exceeded its initial value by 13-60 cm equivalent freshwater head, scaling with the amplitude and frequency - a surplus that is consistent with borehole water level changes [Roeloffs et al. (1995) USGS Open File Report, 95-42] observed in response to the June 28 1992 MW 7.3 Landers, California earthquake Rayleigh wave in Parkfield and Long Valley caldera, California, where remotely triggered earthquakes occurred [Hill et al. (1993) Science, 260(5114); Hill et al. (1995) Journal of Geophysical Research, 100(B7)]. Our experimental results indicate that seismically initiated gas bubble growth in groundwater is a physically plausible mechanism for remote seismic triggering in active volcanic and geothermal regions, suggesting that the aqueous CO2 saturation state in a confined aquifer may be used to assess susceptibility to remote seismic triggering.

  11. Synchronised electrical monitoring and high speed video of bubble growth associated with individual discharges during plasma electrolytic oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troughton, S. C.; Nominé, A.; Nominé, A. V.; Henrion, G.; Clyne, T. W.

    2015-12-01

    Synchronised electrical current and high speed video information are presented from individual discharges on Al substrates during PEO processing. Exposure time was 8 ?s and linear spatial resolution 9 ?m. Image sequences were captured for periods of 2 s, during which the sample surface was illuminated with short duration flashes (revealing bubbles formed where the discharge reached the surface of the coating). Correlations were thus established between discharge current, light emission from the discharge channel and (externally-illuminated) dimensions of the bubble as it expanded and contracted. Bubbles reached radii of 500 ?m, within periods of 100 ?s, with peak growth velocity about 10 m/s. It is deduced that bubble growth occurs as a consequence of the progressive volatilisation of water (electrolyte), without substantial increases in either pressure or temperature within the bubble. Current continues to flow through the discharge as the bubble expands, and this growth (and the related increase in electrical resistance) is thought to be responsible for the current being cut off (soon after the point of maximum radius). A semi-quantitative audit is presented of the transformations between different forms of energy that take place during the lifetime of a discharge.

  12. Removal of Residual Nuclei Following a Cavitation Event using Low-Amplitude Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Duryea, Alexander P.; Cain, Charles A.; Tamaddoni, Hedieh A.; Roberts, William W.; Hall, Timothy L.

    2014-01-01

    Microscopic residual bubble nuclei can persist on the order of 1 second following a cavitation event. These bubbles can limit the efficacy of ultrasound therapies such as shock wave lithotripsy and histotripsy, as they attenuate pulses that arrive subsequent to their formation and seed repetitive cavitation activity at a discrete set of sites (cavitation memory). Here, we explore a strategy for the removal of these residual bubbles following a cavitation event, using low amplitude ultrasound pulses to stimulate bubble coalescence. All experiments were conducted in degassed water and monitored using high speed photography. In each case, a 2 MHz histotripsy transducer was used to initiate cavitation activity (a cavitational bubble cloud), the collapse of which generated a population of residual bubble nuclei. This residual nuclei population was then sonicated using a 1 ms pulse from a separate 500 kHz transducer, which we term the ‘bubble removal pulse.’ Bubble removal pulse amplitudes ranging from 0 to 1.7 MPa were tested, and the backlit area of shadow from bubbles remaining in the field following bubble removal was calculated to quantify efficacy. It was found that an ideal amplitude range exists (roughly 180 – 570 kPa) in which bubble removal pulses stimulate the aggregation and subsequent coalescence of residual bubble nuclei, effectively removing them from the field. Further optimization of bubble removal pulse sequences stands to provide an adjunct to cavitation-based ultrasound therapies such as shock wave lithotripsy and histotripsy, mitigating the effects of residual bubble nuclei that currently limit their efficacy. PMID:25265172

  13. Regulating Ultrasound Cavitation in order to Induce Reproducible Sonoporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mestas, J.-L.; Alberti, L.; El Maalouf, J.; Béra, J.-C.; Gilles, B.

    2010-03-01

    Sonoporation would be linked to cavitation, which generally appears to be a non reproducible and unstationary phenomenon. In order to obtain an acceptable trade-off between cell mortality and transfection, a regulated cavitation generator based on an acoustical cavitation measurement was developed and tested. The medium to be sonicated is placed in a sample tray. This tray is immersed in in degassed water and positioned above the face of a flat ultrasonic transducer (frequency: 445 kHz; intensity range: 0.08-1.09 W/cm2). This technical configuration was admitted to be conducive to standing-wave generation through reflection at the air/medium interface in the well thus enhancing the cavitation phenomenon. Laterally to the transducer, a homemade hydrophone was oriented to receive the acoustical signal from the bubbles. From this spectral signal recorded at intervals of 5 ms, a cavitation index was calculated as the mean of the cavitation spectrum integration in a logarithmic scale, and the excitation power is automatically corrected. The device generates stable and reproducible cavitation level for a wide range of cavitation setpoint from stable cavitation condition up to full-developed inertial cavitation. For the ultrasound intensity range used, the time delay of the response is lower than 200 ms. The cavitation regulation device was evaluated in terms of chemical bubble collapse effect. Hydroxyl radical production was measured on terephthalic acid solutions. In open loop, the results present a great variability whatever the excitation power. On the contrary the closed loop allows a great reproducibility. This device was implemented for study of sonodynamic effect. The regulation provides more reproducible results independent of cell medium and experimental conditions (temperature, pressure). Other applications of this regulated cavitation device concern internalization of different particles (Quantum Dot) molecules (SiRNA) or plasmids (GFP, DsRed) into different types of cells (AT2, RL, LLC…). Preliminary results are presented.

  14. Measuring bubbles in a bubbly wake flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung-Jae; Kawakami, Ellison; Arndt, Roger E. A.

    2012-11-01

    This paper presents measurements of the velocity and size distribution of bubbles in a bubbly wake. This was carried out by utilizing particle shadow velocimetry (PSV). This technique is a non-scattering approach that relies on direct in-line volume illumination by a pulsed source such as a light-emitting diode (LED). A narrow depth-of-field (DoF) is required for imaging a 2-dimensional plane within a flow volume. Shadows of the bubbles were collected by a high-speed camera. Once a reference image, taken when no bubbles were present in the flow, was subtracted from the images, the image was segmented using an edge detection technique. The Canny algorithm was determined to be best suited for this application. A curvature profile method was employed to distinguish individual bubbles within a cluster of highly overlapping bubbles. The utilized algorithm was made to detect partly overlapping bubbles and reconstruct the missing parts. The movement of recognized individual bubbles was tracked on a two dimensional plane within a flow volume. In order to obtain quantitative results, the wake of a ventilated hydrofoil was investigated by applying the shadowgraphy technique and the described bubble detection algorithm. These experiments were carried out in the high speed cavitation tunnel at Saint Anthony Falls Laboratory (SAFL) of the University of Minnesota. This research is jointly sponsored by the Office of Naval Re- search, Dr. Ron Joslin, program manager, and the Department of Energy, Golden Field Office.

  15. Optic cavitation with CW lasers: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilla-Martinez, J. P.; Berrospe-Rodriguez, C.; Aguilar, G.; Ramirez-San-Juan, J. C.; Ramos-Garcia, R.

    2014-12-01

    The most common method to generate optic cavitation involves the focusing of short-pulsed lasers in a transparent liquid media. In this work, we review a novel method of optic cavitation that uses low power CW lasers incident in highly absorbing liquids. This novel method of cavitation is called thermocavitation. Light absorbed heats up the liquid beyond its boiling temperature (spinodal limit) in a time span of microseconds to milliseconds (depending on the optical intensity). Once the liquid is heated up to its spinodal limit (˜300 °C for pure water), the superheated water becomes unstable to random density fluctuations and an explosive phase transition to vapor takes place producing a fast-expanding vapor bubble. Eventually, the bubble collapses emitting a strong shock-wave. The bubble is always attached to the surface taking a semi-spherical shape, in contrast to that produced by pulsed lasers in transparent liquids, where the bubble is produced at the focal point. Using high speed video (105 frames/s), we study the bubble's dynamic behavior. Finally, we show that heat diffusion determines the water superheated volume and, therefore, the amplitude of the shock wave. A full experimental characterization of thermocavitation is described.

  16. Towards numerical prediction of cavitation erosion.

    PubMed

    Fivel, Marc; Franc, Jean-Pierre; Chandra Roy, Samir

    2015-10-01

    This paper is intended to provide a potential basis for a numerical prediction of cavitation erosion damage. The proposed method can be divided into two steps. The first step consists in determining the loading conditions due to cavitation bubble collapses. It is shown that individual pits observed on highly polished metallic samples exposed to cavitation for a relatively small time can be considered as the signature of bubble collapse. By combining pitting tests with an inverse finite-element modelling (FEM) of the material response to a representative impact load, loading conditions can be derived for each individual bubble collapse in terms of stress amplitude (in gigapascals) and radial extent (in micrometres). This step requires characterizing as accurately as possible the properties of the material exposed to cavitation. This characterization should include the effect of strain rate, which is known to be high in cavitation erosion (typically of the order of several thousands s(-1)). Nanoindentation techniques as well as compressive tests at high strain rate using, for example, a split Hopkinson pressure bar test system may be used. The second step consists in developing an FEM approach to simulate the material response to the repetitive impact loads determined in step 1. This includes a detailed analysis of the hardening process (isotropic versus kinematic) in order to properly account for fatigue as well as the development of a suitable model of material damage and failure to account for mass loss. Although the whole method is not yet fully operational, promising results are presented that show that such a numerical method might be, in the long term, an alternative to correlative techniques used so far for cavitation erosion prediction. PMID:26442139

  17. Degradation of carbamazepine in environmentally relevant concentrations in water by Hydrodynamic-Acoustic-Cavitation (HAC).

    PubMed

    Braeutigam, Patrick; Franke, Marcus; Schneider, Rudolf J; Lehmann, Andreas; Stolle, Achim; Ondruschka, Bernd

    2012-05-01

    The antiepileptic drug carbamazepine is one of the most abundant pharmaceuticals in the German aquatic environment. The effect of low carbamazepine concentrations (1-50 ?g L(-1)) is discussed controversially, but ecotoxicological studies revealed reproduction toxicity, decreased enzymatic activity and bioaccumulation in different test organisms. Therefore, as a preventive step, an efficient and cost-effective technique for wastewater treatment plants is needed to stop the entry of pharmaceuticals into the aquatic environment. Cavitation, the formation, growth, and subsequent collapse of gas- or vapor-filled bubbles in fluids, was applied to solve this problem. The technique of Hydrodynamic-Acoustic-Cavitation was used showing high synergistic effect. Under optimized conditions carbamazepine (5 ?g L(-1)) was transformed by pseudo-first order kinetics to an extent of >96% within 15 min (27% by hydrodynamic cavitation, 33% by acoustic cavitation). A synergistic effect of 63% based on the sum of the single methods was calculated. Carbamazepine concentrations were monitored by a sensitive and selective immunoassay and after 60 min no known metabolites were detectable by LC-MS/MS. PMID:22365175

  18. Growth characteristics of Chlorella sorokiniana in airlift and bubble column photobioreactors.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Kanhaiya; Das, Debabrata

    2012-07-01

    The present study investigated the feasibility of bioCO(2) sequestration using Chlorella sorokiniana. It was found that 5% CO(2) (v/v) in air was the most suitable concentration for the growth of this organism. At this concentration, the maximum rate of CO(2) sequestered and the biomass obtained were found to be 1.21 g L(-1)d(-1) and 4.4 g L(-1) respectively. Modeling and simulation of the growth profile was obtained using the logistic equation. Further, at higher CO(2) concentrations, pH drop in the growth media, TAP [-acetate], was prevented by replacing NH(4)Cl by NaNO(3.) Additionally, the study evaluated the performance of two reactors namely: bubble column and airlift reactor based on their growth profile and transport properties like K(L)a and mixing time. The growth profile was better in airlift reactor and it provides cyclic axial mixing of media. K(L)a of downcomer was significantly lower than the riser in airlift reactor. PMID:22525259

  19. High-speed motion picture camera experiments of cavitation in dynamically loaded journal bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, B. O.; Hamrock, B. J.

    1982-01-01

    A high-speed camera was used to investigate cavitation in dynamically loaded journal bearings. The length-diameter ratio of the bearing, the speeds of the shaft and bearing, the surface material of the shaft, and the static and dynamic eccentricity of the bearing were varied. The results reveal not only the appearance of gas cavitation, but also the development of previously unsuspected vapor cavitation. It was found that gas cavitation increases with time until, after many hundreds of pressure cycles, there is a constant amount of gas kept in the cavitation zone of the bearing. The gas can have pressures of many times the atmospheric pressure. Vapor cavitation bubbles, on the other hand, collapse at pressures lower than the atmospheric pressure and cannot be transported through a high-pressure zone, nor does the amount of vapor cavitation in a bearing increase with time. Analysis is given to support the experimental findings for both gas and vapor cavitation.

  20. Influence of the empirical coefficients of cavitation model on predicting cavitating flow in the centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hou-lin; Wang, Jian; Wang, Yong; Zhang, Hua; Huang, Haoqin

    2014-03-01

    The phenomenon of cavitation is an unsteady flow, which is nearly inevitable in pump. It would degrade the pump performance, produce vibration and noise and even damage the pump. Hence, to improve accuracy of the nu¬merical prediction of the pump cavitation performance is much desirable. In the present work, a homogenous model, the Zwart-Gerber-Belamri cavitation model, is considered to investigate the influence of the empirical coefficients on predicting the pump cavitation performance, concerning a centrifugal pump. Three coefficients are analyzed, namely the nucleation site radius, evaporation and condensation coefficients. Also, the experiments are carried out to validate the numerical simulations. The results indicate that, to get a precise prediction, the approaches of declining the initial bubble radius, the condensation coefficient or increasing the evaporation coefficient are all feasible, especially for de¬clining the condensation coefficient, which is the most effective way.

  1. Numerical Simulation of Bubble Dynamics in Deformable Vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coralic, Vedran; Colonius, Tim

    2011-11-01

    The growth and collapse of cavitation bubbles has been implicated as a potential damage mechanism leading to the rupture of blood vessels in shock wave lithotripsy (SWL). While this phenomenon has been investigated numerically, the resulting simulations have often assumed some degree of symmetry and have often failed to include a large number of influential physics, such as viscosity, compressibility, surface tension, phase change and fluid-structure interactions. We present here our efforts to explore the role that cavitation bubbles play in the rupture of blood vessels in SWL and to improve upon the current state of the numerical approach. We have developed a three-dimensional, high-order accurate, shock- and interface-capturing, multicomponent flow algorithm that accounts for the effects of viscosity and surface tension. At this time, we omit any effects due to elasticity and instead, as a first step, model tissue as a viscous and stiffened gas. We discuss preliminary results for the Rayleigh and shock-induced collapse of a gas bubble within a blood vessel and characterize the increase in vessel deformation with increasing bubble confinement and proximity to the vessel wall. This research was supported by the National Institutes of Health grant No. 2PO1DK43881.

  2. Reactor internal pump behavior during cavitation

    SciTech Connect

    Komita, Hideo; Usuki, Shouji; Fukuda, Shinichi )

    1989-11-01

    The characteristics of reactor internal pumps (RIPs) under cavitation conditions were experimentally evaluated in full scale with different water temperature parameters. The hydraulic performance and vibration behavior under cavitation conditions were clarified. An advanced boiling water reactor is equipped with RIPs for coolant recirculation. The RIP is a vertical, single-stage, mixed-flow pump that is mounted in the annular downcomer of the reactor pressure vessel. In general, when a pump operates under cavitation conditions, the pump total head decreases, and the appearance and collapse of vapor bubbles induce vibration and noise, causing damage to components. Various reports have been made on centrifugal pump behavior in cold water, but very few have discussed the characteristics of a mixed-flow pump like the RIP in hot water. Very few have measured impeller vibration in hot water, which is significantly influenced by cavitation. Therefore, it is difficult to precisely determine RIP behavior under cavitation conditions. Hydraulic performance and vibration behavior under cavitation conditions are experimentally clarified in this paper.

  3. Numerical study of nucleation and growth of bubbles in viscous magmas

    SciTech Connect

    Toramaru, A.

    1995-02-01

    The nucleation and growth processes of bubbles in viscous magmas with a constant decompression rate have been numerically investigated based on a formation which accounts for effects of viscosity, as well as diffusivity, interfacial tension, and decompression rate. The numerical solutions show two regimes in the nucleation and growth process, a diffusion-controlled regime and a viscosity-controlled regime, mainly depending on the decompression rate, initial saturation pressure and viscosity. The basic mechanism common to both regimes is that growth governs nucleation through depletion of degassing components. In basaltic eruptions the vesiculation is essentially controlled by diffusion, and the viscosity-controlled regime is limited to very high decompression rate and very small water content. When andesitic magma saturated by water at 10 MPa is decompressed through the propagation of rarefraction wave induced by a landslide, as took place in the Mount St. Helens 1980 eruption, the vesiculation is controlled by the viscosity up to 100 m depth. On the other hand, in a rhyolitic magma for the same situation, vesiculation is controlled by the viscosity over the whole depth of the magma column. In the viscosity-controlled regime, the vesicularity may be 90% or less as seen in silicic pumice, whereas in the diffusion-controlled regime the vesicularity equals or exceeds 98% such as in reticulite in Hawaiian basalt. An observed variation of the number density of bubbles by several orders of magnitude in plinian eruptions and the correlation with the SiO2 content can be attributed approximately to the dependence of diffusivity of viscosity on SiO2 content and temperature, assuming the apparent correlation between SiO2 content and temperature of magma.

  4. Effects of acoustic parameters on bubble cloud dynamics in ultrasound tissue erosion (histotripsy)

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhen; Hall, Timothy L.; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Cain, Charles A.

    2009-01-01

    High intensity pulsed ultrasound can produce significant mechanical tissue fractionation with sharp boundaries (“histotripsy”). At a tissue-fluid interface, histotripsy produces clearly demarcated tissue erosion and the erosion efficiency depends on pulse parameters. Acoustic cavitation is believed to be the primary mechanism for the histotripsy process. To investigate the physical basis of the dependence of tissue erosion on pulse parameters, an optical method was used to monitor the effects of pulse parameters on the cavitating bubble cloud generated by histotripsy pulses at a tissue-water interface. The pulse parameters studied include pulse duration, peak rarefactional pressure, and pulse repetition frequency (PRF). Results show that the duration of growth and collapse (collapse cycle) of the bubble cloud increased with increasing pulse duration, peak rarefactional pressure, and PRF when the next pulse arrived after the collapse of the previous bubble cloud. When the PRF was too high such that the next pulse arrived before the collapse of the previous bubble cloud, only a portion of histotripsy pulses could effectively create and collapse the bubble cloud. The collapse cycle of the bubble cloud also increased with increasing gas concentration. These results may explain previous in vitro results on effects of pulse parameters on tissue erosion. PMID:17614482

  5. Cavitation milling of natural cellulose to nanofibrils.

    PubMed

    Pinjari, Dipak Vitthal; Pandit, Aniruddha B

    2010-06-01

    Cavitation holds the promise of a new and exciting approach to fabricate both top down and bottom up nanostructures. Cavitation bubbles are created when a liquid boils under less than atmospheric pressure. The collapse process occurs supersonically and generates a host of physical and chemical effects. We have made an attempt to fabricate natural cellulose material using hydrodynamic as well as acoustic cavitation. The cellulose material having initial size of 63 micron was used for the experiments. 1% (w/v) slurry of cellulose sample was circulated through the hydrodynamic cavitation device or devices (orifice) for 6h. The average velocity of the fluid through the device was 10.81m/s while average pressure applied was 7.8 kg/cm(2). Cavitation number was found to be 2.61. The average particle size obtained after treatment was 1.36 micron. This hydrodynamically processed sample was sonicated for 1h 50 min. The average size of ultrasonically processed particles was found to be 301 nm. Further, the cellulose particles were characterized with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to see the effect of cavitation on crystallinity (X(c)) as well as on melting temperature (T(m)). Cellulose structures consist of amorphous as well as crystalline regions. The initial raw sample was 86.56% crystalline but due to the effect of cavitation, the crystallinity reduced to 37.76%. Also the melting temperature (T(m)) was found to be reduced from 101.78 degrees C of the original to 60.13 degrees C of the processed sample. SEM images for the cellulose (processed and unprocessed) shows the status and fiber-fiber alignment and its orientation with each other. Finally cavitation has proved to be very efficient tool for reduction in size from millimeter to nano scale for highly crystalline materials. PMID:20362487

  6. Understanding crack versus cavitation in pressure-sensitive adhesives: the role of kinetics

    E-print Network

    Jérémie Teisseire; F. Nallet; P. Fabre; Cyprien Gay

    2006-09-18

    We perform traction experiments on viscous liquids highly confined between parallel plates, a geometry known as the probe-tack test in the adhesion community. Direct observation during the experiment coupled to force measurement shows the existence of several mechanisms for releasing the stress. Bubble nucleation and instantaneous growth had been observed in a previous work. Upon increasing further the traction velocity or the viscosity, the bubble growth is progressively delayed. At high velocities, cracks at the interface between the plate and the liquid appear before the bubbles have grown to their full size. Bubbles and cracks are thus observed concomitantly. At even higher velocities, cracks develop fully so early that the bubbles are not even visible. We present a theoretical model that describes these regimes, using a Maxwell fluid as a model for the actual fluid, a highly viscous silicon oil. We present the resulting phase diagramme for the different force peak regimes. The predictions are compatible with the data. Our results show that in addition to cavitation, interfacial cracks are encountered in a probe-tack traction test with viscoelastic, \\emph{liquid} materials and not solely with viscoelastic solids like adhesives.

  7. FOREWORD: International Symposium of Cavitation and Multiphase Flow (ISCM 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yulin

    2015-01-01

    The International Symposium on Cavitation and Multiphase Flow (ISCM 2014) was held in Beijing, China during 18th-21st October, 2014, which was jointly organized by Tsinghua University, Beijing, China and Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, China. The co-organizer was the State Key Laboratory of Hydroscience and Engineering, Beijing, China. Cavitation and multiphase flow is one of paramount topics of fluid mechanics with many engineering applications covering a broad range of topics, e.g. hydraulic machinery, biomedical engineering, chemical and process industry. In order to improve the performances of engineering facilities (e.g. hydraulic turbines) and to accelerate the development of techniques for medical treatment of serious diseases (e.g. tumors), it is essential to improve our understanding of cavitation and Multiphase Flow. For example, the present development towards the advanced hydrodynamic systems (e.g. space engine, propeller, hydraulic machinery system) often requires that the systems run under cavitating conditions and the risk of cavitation erosion needs to be controlled. The purpose of the ISCM 2014 was to discuss the state-of-the-art cavitation and multiphase flow research and their up-to-date applications, and to foster discussion and exchange of knowledge, and to provide an opportunity for the researchers, engineers and graduate students to report their latest outputs in these fields. Furthermore, the participants were also encouraged to present their work in progress with short lead time and discuss the encountered problems. ISCM 2014 covers all aspects of cavitation and Multiphase Flow, e.g. both fundamental and applied research with a focus on physical insights, numerical modelling and applications in engineering. Some specific topics are: Cavitating and Multiphase Flow in hydroturbines, pumps, propellers etc. Numerical simulation techniques Cavitation and multiphase flow erosion and anti-erosion techniques Measurement techniques for cavitation and multiphase flow detection Fluid-structure interaction induced by cavitation and multiphase flow Multi-scale modelling of cavitating flows and Multiphase Flow Cavitation nuclei: theory and experiments Supercavitation and its applications Synergetic effects of cavitation and silt-laden erosion Shock waves and microjets generated by cavitation Nonlinear oscillations of gas and vapour bubbles Fundamentals of physics of acoustic cavitation Sonochemistry and sonoluminescence Biomedical applications of cavitation effects Ultrasonic cavitation for molten metal treatment Cavitation for enhanced heat transfer The ISCM 2014 brought together 95 scientists, researchers and graduate students from 11 countries, affiliated with universities, technology centers and industrial firms to debate topics related to advanced technologies for cavitation and Multiphase Flow, which would enhance the sustainable development of cavitation and Multiphase Flow in interdisciplinary sciences and technology. The technical committee selected 54 technical papers on the following topics: (i) Hydrodynamic Cavitation, (ii) Super Cavitation, (iii) Pump Cavitation, (iv) Acoustic Cavitation, (v) Interdisciplinary Research of Cavitation and Multi-Phase Flows, and 13 invited plenary and invited forum lectures, which were presented at the symposium, to be included in the proceedings. All the papers of ISCM 2014, which are published in this Volume of IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering, had been peer reviewed through processes administered by the editors of the ISCM 2014, those are Yulin WU, Shouqi YUAN, Zhengwei WANG, Shuhong LIU, Xingqi LUO, Fujun WANG and Guoyu WANG. The papers published in this Volume include 54 technical papers and 3 full length texts of the invited lectures. We sincerely hope that the International Symposium on Cavitation and Multiphase Flow is a significant step forward in the world wide efforts to address the present challenges in the modern science and technology. Professor Yulin WU Chairman of the Local Organizing Committee International Symposium on Cavitat

  8. Probability of cavitation for single ultrasound pulses applied to tissues and tissue-mimicking materials

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, Adam D.; Cain, Charles A.; Hall, Timothy L.; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Xu, Zhen

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the negative pressure values at which inertial cavitation consistently occurs in response to a single, 2-cycle, focused ultrasound pulse were measured in several media relevant to cavitation-based ultrasound therapy. The pulse was focused into a chamber containing one of the media, which included liquids, tissue-mimicking materials, and ex-vivo canine tissue. Focal waveforms were measured by two separate techniques using a fiber-optic hydrophone. Inertial cavitation was identified by high-speed photography in optically transparent media and an acoustic passive cavitation detector. The probability of cavitation (Pcav) for a single pulse as a function of peak negative pressure (p?) followed a sigmoid curve, with the probability approaching 1 when the pressure amplitude was sufficient. The statistical threshold (defined as Pcav = 0.5) was between p? = 26.0–30.0 MPa in all samples with a high water content, but varied between p? = 13.7 to > 36 MPa for other media. A model for radial cavitation bubble dynamics was employed to evaluate the behavior of cavitation nuclei at these pressure levels. A single bubble nucleus with an inertial cavitation threshold of p? = 28.2 MPa was estimated to have a 2.5 nm radius in distilled water. These data may be valuable for cavitation-based ultrasound therapy to predict the likelihood of cavitation at different pressure levels and dimensions of cavitation-induced lesions in tissue. PMID:23380152

  9. Probability of cavitation for single ultrasound pulses applied to tissues and tissue-mimicking materials.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Adam D; Cain, Charles A; Hall, Timothy L; Fowlkes, J Brian; Xu, Zhen

    2013-03-01

    In this study, the negative pressure values at which inertial cavitation consistently occurs in response to a single, two-cycle, focused ultrasound pulse were measured in several media relevant to cavitation-based ultrasound therapy. The pulse was focused into a chamber containing one of the media, which included liquids, tissue-mimicking materials, and ex vivo canine tissue. Focal waveforms were measured by two separate techniques using a fiber-optic hydrophone. Inertial cavitation was identified by high-speed photography in optically transparent media and an acoustic passive cavitation detector. The probability of cavitation (P(cav)) for a single pulse as a function of peak negative pressure (p(-)) followed a sigmoid curve, with the probability approaching one when the pressure amplitude was sufficient. The statistical threshold (defined as P(cav) = 0.5) was between p(-) = 26 and 30 MPa in all samples with high water content but varied between p(-) = 13.7 and >36 MPa in other media. A model for radial cavitation bubble dynamics was employed to evaluate the behavior of cavitation nuclei at these pressure levels. A single bubble nucleus with an inertial cavitation threshold of p(-) = 28.2 megapascals was estimated to have a 2.5 nm radius in distilled water. These data may be valuable for cavitation-based ultrasound therapy to predict the likelihood of cavitation at various pressure levels and dimensions of cavitation-induced lesions in tissue. PMID:23380152

  10. Sonochemistry and bubble dynamics.

    PubMed

    Mettin, Robert; Cairós, Carlos; Troia, Adriano

    2015-07-01

    The details of bubble behaviour in chemically active cavitation are still not sufficiently well understood. Here we report on experimental high-speed observations of acoustically driven single-bubble and few-bubble systems with the aim of clarification of the connection of their dynamics with chemical activity. Our experiment realises the sonochemical isomerization reaction of maleic acid to fumaric acid, mediated by bromine radicals, in a bubble trap set-up. The main result is that the reaction product can only be observed in a parameter regime where a small bubble cluster occurs, while a single trapped bubble stays passive. Evaluations of individual bubble dynamics for both cases are given in form of radius-time data and numerical fits to a bubble model. A conclusion is that a sufficiently strong collapse has to be accompanied by non-spherical bubble dynamics for the reaction to occur, and that the reason appears to be an efficient mixing of liquid and gas phase. This finding corroborates previous observations and literature reports on high liquid phase sonochemical activity under distinct parameter conditions than strong sonoluminescence emissions. PMID:25194210

  11. Bursting Bubbles and Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Wrenn, Steven P.; Dicker, Stephen M.; Small, Eleanor F.; Dan, Nily R.; Mleczko, Micha?; Schmitz, Georg; Lewin, Peter A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses various interactions between ultrasound, phospholipid monolayer-coated gas bubbles, phospholipid bilayer vesicles, and cells. The paper begins with a review of microbubble physics models, developed to describe microbubble dynamic behavior in the presence of ultrasound, and follows this with a discussion of how such models can be used to predict inertial cavitation profiles. Predicted sensitivities of inertial cavitation to changes in the values of membrane properties, including surface tension, surface dilatational viscosity, and area expansion modulus, indicate that area expansion modulus exerts the greatest relative influence on inertial cavitation. Accordingly, the theoretical dependence of area expansion modulus on chemical composition - in particular, poly (ethylene glyclol) (PEG) - is reviewed, and predictions of inertial cavitation for different PEG molecular weights and compositions are compared with experiment. Noteworthy is the predicted dependence, or lack thereof, of inertial cavitation on PEG molecular weight and mole fraction. Specifically, inertial cavitation is predicted to be independent of PEG molecular weight and mole fraction in the so-called mushroom regime. In the “brush” regime, however, inertial cavitation is predicted to increase with PEG mole fraction but to decrease (to the inverse 3/5 power) with PEG molecular weight. While excellent agreement between experiment and theory can be achieved, it is shown that the calculated inertial cavitation profiles depend strongly on the criterion used to predict inertial cavitation. This is followed by a discussion of nesting microbubbles inside the aqueous core of microcapsules and how this significantly increases the inertial cavitation threshold. Nesting thus offers a means for avoiding unwanted inertial cavitation and cell death during imaging and other applications such as sonoporation. A review of putative sonoporation mechanisms is then presented, including those involving microbubbles to deliver cargo into a cell, and those - not necessarily involving microubbles - to release cargo from a phospholipid vesicle (or reverse sonoporation). It is shown that the rate of (reverse) sonoporation from liposomes correlates with phospholipid bilayer phase behavior, liquid-disordered phases giving appreciably faster release than liquid-ordered phases. Moreover, liquid-disordered phases exhibit evidence of two release mechanisms, which are described well mathematically by enhanced diffusion (possibly via dilation of membrane phospholipids) and irreversible membrane disruption, whereas liquid-ordered phases are described by a single mechanism, which has yet to be positively identified. The ability to tune release kinetics with bilayer composition makes reverse sonoporation of phospholipid vesicles a promising methodology for controlled drug delivery. Moreover, nesting of microbubbles inside vesicles constitutes a truly “theranostic” vehicle, one that can be used for both long-lasting, safe imaging and for controlled drug delivery. PMID:23382772

  12. Influence of cathodic and anodic currents on cavitation erosion

    SciTech Connect

    Auret, J.G.; Damm, O.F.R.A.; Wright, G.J. . Div. of Materials Science and Technology); Robinson, F.P.A. . Dept. of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering)

    1993-11-01

    A vibratory-type cavitation test rig was constructed to study the effect of polarizing currents applied to a cavitating body. The generation of gas by electrolysis reduced mechanical damage suffered by a cavitating body because of bubble collapse cushioning. However, the net effect on overall damage depended on several factors, including the intensity of mechanical attack, corrosion rate, and surface geometrical effects. A cathodic current was shown to always decrease the total volume loss rate, but the volume loss rate sometimes was increased and sometimes was reduced in the anodic current range.

  13. AN EFFICIENT TREATMENT STRATEGY FOR HISTOTRIPSY BY REMOVING CAVITATION MEMORY

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tzu-Yin; Xu, Zhen; Hall, Timothy L.; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Cain, Charles A.

    2012-01-01

    Cavitation memory effects occur when remnants of cavitation bubbles (nuclei) persist in the host medium and act as seeds for subsequent events. In pulsed cavitational ultrasound therapy, or histotripsy, this effect may cause cavitation to repeatedly occur at these seeded locations within a target volume, producing inhomogeneous tissue fractionation or requiring an excess number of pulses to completely homogenize the target volume. We hypothesized that by removing the cavitation memory, i.e., the persistent nuclei, the cavitation bubbles could be induced at random locations in response to each pulse; therefore, complete disruption of a tissue volume may be achieved with fewer pulses. To test the hypothesis, the cavitation memory was passively removed by increasing the intervals between successive pulses, ?t, from 2, 10, 20, 50 and 100, to 200 ms. Histotripsy treatments were performed in red blood cell tissue phantoms and ex vivo livers using 1-MHz ultrasound pulses of 10 cycles at P?/P+ pressure of 21/59 MPa. The phantom study allowed for direct visualization of the cavitation patterns and the lesion development process in real time using high-speed photography; the ex vivo tissue study provided validation of the memory effect in real tissues. Results of the phantom study showed an exponential decrease in the correlation coefficient between cavitation patterns in successive pulses from 0.5 ± 0.1 to 0.1 ± 0.1 as ?t increased from 2–200 ms; correspondingly, the lesion was completely fractionated with significantly fewer pulses for longer ?ts. In the tissue study, given the same number of therapy pulses, complete and homogeneous tissue fractionation with well-defined lesion boundaries was achieved only for ?t ? 100 ms. These results indicated that the removal of the cavitation memory resulted in more efficient treatments and homogeneous lesions. PMID:22402025

  14. Ultrasound imaging for cavitation detection during HIFU ablation in brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Tao; Amin, Viren; McClure, Scott; Roberts, Ronald; Wu, Liangshou; Heise, Matthew; Ryken, Timothy

    2007-03-01

    High intensity focused ultrasound (abbreviated as HIFU) has its potential in tumor treatment due to its non-invasive benefits. During HIFU exposure, cavitation (generation of gas bubbles) is often observed, which can be an indication of potential lesion created by HIFU power. Due to a large difference in ultrasound acoustic properties between the gas bubble and surrounding tissues, ultrasonic energy is reflected and scattered at the HIFU focus, thus indicating activity around the focal area and often interfering HIFU dosage delivery. A good understanding and control of cavitation phenomenon could potentially enhance the HIFU delivery and treatment outcomes. Quantifying the onset timing and extent of the cavitation could be potentially used for detecting HIFU effects and therapy guidance. In this paper, we study the relationships among HIFU parameters, the characteristics of cavitation quantified from ultrasound imaging, and characteristics of the final tissue lesion created by HIFU. In our study, we used 12 freshly excised pig brains in vitro for observation and analysis of cavitation activities during HIFU exposure with different HIFU parameters. Final lesions were examined by slicing the brain tissues into thin slices and 3D volume was constructed with segmentation of the lesion. HIFU parameters, cavitation activities through image processing and lesion characterization were correlated. We also present our initial understanding of the process of cavitation activities under certain HIFU parameters and control of such activities that could lead to optimal lesion

  15. The Role of Acoustic Cavitation in Ultrasound-triggered Drug Release from Echogenic Liposomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopechek, Jonathan A.

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in the United States and globally. CVD-related mortality, including coronary heart disease, heart failure, or stroke, generally occurs due to atherosclerosis, a condition in which plaques build up within arterial walls, potentially causing blockage or rupture. Targeted therapies are needed to achieve more effective treatments. Echogenic liposomes (ELIP), which consist of a lipid membrane surrounding an aqueous core, have been developed to encapsulate a therapeutic agent and/or gas bubbles for targeted delivery and ultrasound image enhancement. Under certain conditions ultrasound can cause nonlinear bubble growth and collapse, known as "cavitation." Cavitation activity has been associated with enhanced drug delivery across cellular membranes. However, the mechanisms of ultrasound-mediated drug release from ELIP have not been previously investigated. Thus, the objective of this dissertation is to elucidate the role of acoustic cavitation in ultrasound-mediated drug release from ELIP. To determine the acoustic and physical properties of ELIP, the frequency-dependent attenuation and backscatter coefficients were measured between 3 and 30 MHz. The results were compared to a theoretical model by measuring the ELIP size distribution in order to determine properties of the lipid membrane. It was found that ELIP have a broad size distribution and can provide enhanced ultrasound image contrast across a broad range of clinically-relevant frequencies. Calcein, a hydrophilic fluorescent dye, and papaverine, a lipophilic vasodilator, were separately encapsulated in ELIP and exposed to color Doppler ultrasound pulses from a clinical diagnostic ultrasound scanner in a flow system. Spectrophotometric techniques (fluorescence and absorbance measurements) were used to detect calcein or papaverine release. As a positive control, Triton X-100 (a non-ionic detergent) was added to ELIP samples not exposed to ultrasound in order to release encapsulated agents completely. Also, sham samples without Triton X-100 or ultrasound exposure were used as negative controls. Color Doppler ultrasound did not release encapsulated calcein or papaverine from ELIP even though there was a complete loss of echogenicity. In subsequent experiments, calcein and rosiglitazone, a hydrophobic anti-diabetic drug, were separately encapsulated in ELIP and exposed to pulsed Doppler ultrasound in a flow system while monitoring cavitation. Samples were exposed to ultrasound pressures above and below cavitation thresholds. In addition, Triton X-100 was used for positive control samples and sham samples were also tested without ultrasound exposure. Adding Triton X-100 resulted in complete release of encapsulated calcein or rosiglitzone. However, Doppler ultrasound exposure did not induce calcein or rosiglitazone release from ELIP in the flow system even when there was persistent cavitation activity and a loss of echogenicity. The results of this dissertation indicate that cavitation of encapsulated bubbles in ELIP solutions is not sufficient to induce drug release. It is possible that ultrasoundmediated thermal processes may have a stronger effect on ELIP permeability than cavitation activity. Perhaps ultrasound-triggered drug release will be possible by improving the ELIP formulation or encapsulating a different gas instead of air. However, cavitation is not a reliable indicator of ultrasound-mediated drug release with the ELIP formulations used in this dissertation.

  16. Air emission into a water shear layer through porous media. Part 2: Cavitation induced pressure attenuation

    SciTech Connect

    Myer, E.C.; Marboe, R.C.

    1994-12-31

    Cavitation near the casing of a hydroturbine can lead to damage through both cavitation erosion and mechanical vibration of the casing and the associated piping. Cavitation erosion results from the collapse of cavitation bubbles on or near a surface such as the casing wall. Mechanical vibrations transmitted to the casing directly through the collapse of bubbles on the casing wall indirectly through a coupling of the acoustic pressure pulse due to a nearby collapse on the turbine blade. Air emission along the casing can reduce the intensity of the tip vortex and the gap cavitation through ventilation of the cavity. Reduction in the machinery vibration is obtained by reduction of the intensity of cavitation bubble collapse and attenuation and scattering of the radiated acoustic pressure. This requires a bubble layer which may be introduced in the vicinity of the turbine blade tips. This layer remains for some distance downstream of the blades and is effective for attenuation of tip vortex induced noise and blade surface cavitation noise. For the purpose of characterizing this bubble layer within a water pipe, the authors spanned a pipe with a two dimensional hydrofoil and emitted air through porous media (20 and 100 micron porosity sintered stainless steel) into the shear flow over the hydrofoil. This paper is limited to an investigation of the attenuation of acoustic pressure propagating to the casing rather than the reduction in acoustic source level due to collapse cushioning effects.

  17. Computational fluid dynamic study on cavitation in liquid nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. B.; Qiu, L. M.; Gao, Y.; Zhang, X. J.

    2008-09-01

    Cavitation is the formation of vapor bubbles within a liquid where flow dynamics cause the local static pressure to drop below the vapor pressure. This paper presents the steady computational fluid dynamic (CFD) results of cavitation in liquid nitrogen flow through hydrofoils and ogives with so-called "full cavitation model". The model is reexamined to assess the performance prediction from the standpoint of cryogenic fluids with the assumption of thermal equilibrium between vapor phase and liquid phase. The fluid thermodynamic properties are specified along the saturation line using the "Gaspak 3.2" databank. The thermal effects and accompanying property variations due to phase change are modeled rigorously. The thermodynamic cavitation framework is validated against experimental data of NASA hydrofoil and ogive. The global sensibility of the cavitation solution with respect to the cavitation model coefficients and the free-stream velocity is investigated in detail and the choking phenomenon is reported with high Mach number. The full cavitation model with the default coefficients is applicable for cavitation prediction in liquid nitrogen, taking into account of the thermodynamic effects.

  18. Feasibility of noninvasive cavitation-guided blood-brain barrier opening using focused ultrasound and microbubbles in nonhuman primates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Yao-Sheng; Marquet, Fabrice; Teichert, Tobias; Ferrera, Vincent; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2011-04-01

    In vivo transcranial and noninvasive cavitation detection with blood-brain barrier (BBB) opening in nonhuman primates is hereby reported. The BBB in monkeys was opened transcranically using focused ultrasound (FUS) in conjunction with microbubbles. A passive cavitation detector, confocal with the FUS transducer, was used to identify and monitor the bubble behavior. During sonication, the cavitation spectrum, which was found to be region-, pressure-, and bubble-dependent, provided real-time feedback regarding the opening occurrence and its properties. These findings demonstrate feasibility of transcranial, cavitation-guided BBB opening using FUS and microbubbles in noninvasive human applications.

  19. Vapor-Gas Bubble Evolution and Growth in Extremely Viscous Fluids Under Vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kizito, John; Balasubramaniam, R.; Nahra, Henry; Agui, Juan; Truong, Duc

    2008-01-01

    Formation of vapor and gas bubbles and voids is normal and expected in flow processes involving extremely viscous fluids in normal gravity. Practical examples of extremely viscous fluids are epoxy-like filler materials before the epoxy fluids cure to their permanent form to create a mechanical bond between two substrates. When these fluids flow with a free liquid interface exposed to vacuum, rapid bubble expansion process may ensue. Bubble expansion might compromise the mechanical bond strength. The potential sources for the origin of the gases might be incomplete out-gassing process prior to filler application; regasification due to seal leakage in the filler applicator; and/or volatiles evolved from cure reaction products formed in the hardening process. We embarked on a study that involved conducting laboratory experiments with imaging diagnostics in order to deduce the seriousness of bubbling caused by entrained air and volatile fluids under space vacuum and low gravity environment. We used clear fluids with the similar physical properties as the epoxy-like filler material to mimic the dynamics of bubbles. Another aspect of the present study was to determine the likelihood of bubbling resulting from dissolved gases nucleating from solution. These experimental studies of the bubble expansion are compared with predictions using a modified Rayleigh- Plesset equation, which models the bubble expansion.

  20. Modeling of Vapor Bubble Growth Under Nucleate Boiling Conditions in Reduced Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buyevich, Yu A.; Webbon, Bruce W.

    1995-01-01

    A dynamic model is developed to describe the evolution of a vapor bubble growing at a nucleation site on a superheated surface under arbitrary gravity. The bubble is separated from the surface by a thin microlayer and grows due to the evaporation from the microlayer interface. The average thickness of the microlayer increases as the bubble expands along the surface if the evaporation rate is lower than some critical value. The corresponding threshold value of the surface temperature has to be associated with the burn-out crisis. Two main reasons make for bubble separation, which are the buoyancy force and a force caused by the vapor momentum that comes to the bubble with vapor molecules. The latter force is somewhat diminished if condensation takes place at the upper bubble surface in subcooled liquids. The action of the said forces is opposed by inertia of the additional mass of liquid as the bubble center rises above the surface and by inertia of liquid being expelled by the growing bubble in radial directions. An extra pressure force arises due to the liquid inflow into the microlayer with a finite velocity. The last force helps in holding the bubble close to the surface during an initial stage of bubble evolution. Two limiting regimes with distinctly different properties can be singled out, depending on which of the forces that favor bubble detachment dominates. Under conditions of moderately reduced gravity, the situation is much the same as in normal gravity, although the bubble detachment volume increases as gravity diminishes. In microgravity, the buoyancy force is negligible. Then the bubble is capable of staying near the surface for a long time, with intensive evaporation from the microlayer. It suggests a drastic change in the physical mechanism of heat removal as gravity falls below a certain sufficiently low level. Inferences of the model and conclusions pertaining to effects caused on heat transfer processes by changes in bubble hydrodynamics induced by gravity are discussed in connection with experimental evidence, both available in current and in as yet unpublished literature.

  1. The effects of orientation angle, subcooling, heat flux, mass flux, and pressure on bubble growth and detachment in subcooled flow boiling

    E-print Network

    Sugrue, Rosemary M

    2012-01-01

    The effects of orientation angle, subcooling, heat flux, mass flux, and pressure on bubble growth and detachment in subcooled flow boiling were studied using a high-speed video camera in conjunction with a two-phase flow ...

  2. Experimental study and modeling of swelling and bubble growth in carbon nanofiber filled mesophase pitch during carbonization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calebrese, Christopher

    Graphite and all carbon bipolar plates show corrosion resistance in fuel cells and provide good electrical conductivity. These materials typically need to be individually machined, a time consuming and costly process. Mesophase pitch is used to manufacture carbon fibers and carbon-carbon composites. This material provides a good starting point for the production of a moldable, all carbon bipolar plate. However, processing of mesophase pitch to produce all carbon materials requires a time intensive oxidation step to prevent swelling during carbonization. In this work, carbon nanofibers were used to reduce swelling in mesophase pitch. It was found that the increase in viscosity with the addition of carbon nanofibers was responsible for the reduction in swelling. The influence of the filler became apparent above the percolation threshold. At loadings below the percolation threshold, the swelling of the mesophase pitch was not reduced after carbonization. The swelling of the mesophase pitch at a given carbon nanofiber loading was also dependent on the length of the carbon nanofibers. Longer carbon nanofibers led to greater increases in the viscosity of the melt and thus led to greater reduction in swelling. The final carbon product was evaluated for use as a low temperature fuel cell bipolar plate material. Constraining the mesophase pitch during carbonization led to a final product with strength and electrical conductivity comparable to current composite bipolar plate materials. The addition of micron size chopped glass fibers with a softening point near 850°C and carbon nanofibers led to a final product with air permeability less than that of graphite. A spherically symmetric, single bubble growth model was also developed. The model included temperature dependence, liquid to bubble mass transfer and reactions in the system. Results from simulations showed that that the increase in viscosity due to the addition of carbon nanofibers slows the growth of bubbles, but that the time scale of single bubble growth is much shorter than the time over which the foam grows. The single bubble growth model was deemed to be applicable to low loadings of carbon nanofiber, where the bubble size distribution in the final foam is narrow.

  3. Modeling of helium bubble nucleation and growth in austenitic stainless steels using an Object Kinetic Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Backer, A.; Adjanor, G.; Domain, C.; Lescoat, M. L.; Jublot-Leclerc, S.; Fortuna, F.; Gentils, A.; Ortiz, C. J.; Souidi, A.; Becquart, C. S.

    2015-06-01

    Implantation of 10 keV helium in 316L steel thin foils was performed in JANNuS-Orsay facility and modeled using a multiscale approach. Density Functional Theory (DFT) atomistic calculations [1] were used to obtain the properties of He and He-vacancy clusters, and the Binary Collision Approximation based code MARLOWE was applied to determine the damage and He-ion depth profiles as in [2,3]. The processes involved in the homogeneous He bubble nucleation and growth were defined and implemented in the Object Kinetic Monte Carlo code LAKIMOCA [4]. In particular as the He to dpa ratio was high, self-trapping of He clusters and the trap mutation of He-vacancy clusters had to be taken into account. With this multiscale approach, the formation of bubbles was modeled up to nanometer-scale size, where bubbles can be observed by Transmission Electron Microscopy. Their densities and sizes were studied as functions of fluence (up to 5 × 1019 He/m2) at two temperatures (473 and 723 K) and for different sample thicknesses (25-250 nm). It appears that the damage is not only due to the collision cascades but is also strongly controlled by the He accumulation in pressurized bubbles. Comparison with experimental data is discussed and sensible agreement is achieved.

  4. Modelling cavitation erosion using fluid-material interaction simulations.

    PubMed

    Chahine, Georges L; Hsiao, Chao-Tsung

    2015-10-01

    Material deformation and pitting from cavitation bubble collapse is investigated using fluid and material dynamics and their interaction. In the fluid, a novel hybrid approach, which links a boundary element method and a compressible finite difference method, is used to capture non-spherical bubble dynamics and resulting liquid pressures efficiently and accurately. The bubble dynamics is intimately coupled with a finite-element structure model to enable fluid/structure interaction simulations. Bubble collapse loads the material with high impulsive pressures, which result from shock waves and bubble re-entrant jet direct impact on the material surface. The shock wave loading can be from the re-entrant jet impact on the opposite side of the bubble, the fast primary collapse of the bubble, and/or the collapse of the remaining bubble ring. This produces high stress waves, which propagate inside the material, cause deformation, and eventually failure. A permanent deformation or pit is formed when the local equivalent stresses exceed the material yield stress. The pressure loading depends on bubble dynamics parameters such as the size of the bubble at its maximum volume, the bubble standoff distance from the material wall and the pressure driving the bubble collapse. The effects of standoff and material type on the pressure loading and resulting pit formation are highlighted and the effects of bubble interaction on pressure loading and material deformation are preliminarily discussed. PMID:26442140

  5. Application of computational fluid dynamics on cavitation in journal bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedel, Marco; Schmidt, Marcus; Reinke, Peter; Nobis, Matthias; Redlich, Marcel

    2014-03-01

    Journal bearings are applied in internal combustion engines due to their favourable wearing quality and operating characteristics. Under certain operating conditions damage of the journal bearing can occur caused by cavitation. The cavitation reduces the load capacity and leads to material erosion. Experimental investigations of cavitating flows in dimension of real journal bearing are difficult to realize or almost impossible caused by the small gap and transient flow conditions. Therefore numerical simulation is a very helpful engineering tool to research the cavitation behaviour. The CFD-Code OpenFOAM is used to analyse the flow field inside the bearing. The numerical cavitation model based on a bubble dynamic approach and requires necessary initial parameter for the calculation, such as nuclei bubble diameter, the number of nuclei and two empirical constants. The first part of this paper shows the influence of these parameters on the solution. For the adjustment of the parameters an experiment of Jakobsson et.al. [1] was used to validate the numerical flow model. The parameters have been varied according to the method Design of Experiments (DoE). With a defined model equation the parameters determined, to identify the parameter for CFD-calculations in comparison to the experimental values. The second part of the paper presents investigations on different geometrical changes in the bearing geometry. The effect of these geometrical changes on cavitation was compared with experimental results from Wollfarth [2] and Garner et.al. [3].

  6. Nonlinear dynamics of gas bubbles in viscoelastic media

    E-print Network

    Yang, Xinmai; Church, Charles C.

    2005-04-11

    experimentally determined values, the effects of elasticity on bubble oscillations are studied. Inertial cavitation thresholds are determined using Rmax/R0=2, and subharmonic emissions are also estimated. The elasticity increases the threshold pressure...

  7. Elasticity effects on cavitation in a squeeze film damper undergoing noncentered circular whirl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewe, David E.

    1988-01-01

    Elasticity of the liner and its effects on cavitation were numerically determined for a squeeze film damper subjected to dynamic loading. The loading was manifested as a prescribed motion of the rotor undergoing noncentered circular whirl. The boundary conditions were implemented using Elrod's algorithm which conserves lineal mass flux through the moving cavitation bubble as well as the oil film region of the damper. Computational movies were used to analyze the rapidly changing pressures and vapor bubble dynamics throughout the dynamic cycle for various flexibilities in the damper liner. The effects of liner elasticity on cavitation were only noticeable for the intermediate and high values of viscosity used in this study.

  8. Removal of Residual Nuclei Following a Cavitation Event: A Parametric Study

    PubMed Central

    Duryea, Alexander P.; Tamaddoni, Hedieh A.; Cain, Charles A.; Roberts, William W.; Hall, Timothy L.

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of ultrasound therapies such as shock wave lithotripsy and histotripsy can be compromised by residual cavitation bubble nuclei that persist following the collapse of primary cavitation. In our previous work, we have developed a unique strategy for mitigating the effects of these residual bubbles using low amplitude ultrasound pulses to stimulate their aggregation and subsequent coalescence—effectively removing them from the field. Here, we further develop this bubble removal strategy through an investigation of the effect of frequency on the consolidation process. Bubble removal pulses ranging from 0.5 – 2 MHz were used to sonicate the population of residual nuclei produced upon collapse of a histotripsy bubble cloud. For each frequency, mechanical index (MI) values ranging from 0 to approximately 1.5 were tested. Results indicated that, when evaluated as a function of bubble removal pulse MI, the efficacy of bubble removal shows markedly similar trends for all frequencies tested. This behavior divides into three distinct regimes (with provided cutoffs being approximate): (1) MI < 0.2: Minimal effect on the population of remnant cavitation nuclei; (2) 0.2 < MI < 1: Aggregation and subsequent coalescence of residual bubbles, the extent of which trends toward a maximum; (3) MI > 1: Bubble coalescence is compromised as bubble removal pulses induce high magnitude inertial cavitation of residual bubbles. The major distinction in these trends came for bubble removal pulses applied at 2 MHz, which were observed to generate the most effective bubble coalescence of all frequencies tested. We hypothesize that this is a consequence of the secondary Bjerknes force being the major facilitator of the consolidation process, the magnitude of which increases when the bubble size distribution is far from resonance such that the phase difference of oscillation of individual bubbles is minimal. PMID:26719861

  9. Cavitation microjets as a contributory mechanism for renal calculi disintegration in ESWL.

    PubMed

    Crum, L A

    1988-12-01

    The rarefaction shock wave produced by an extracorporeal shockwave lithotripter can result in liquid failure at numerous discrete sites near the second focus. When the liquid fails, vapor-filled cavities can grow to relatively large sizes and subsequently collapse with enormous violence. This phenomenon, called acoustic cavitation, has been shown to cause severe erosion in materials exposed to cavitation fields. It is proposed in this paper that ESWL devices generate acoustic cavitation in vivo and that the high speed liquid microjets produced during cavitation bubble collapse play an important role in renal calculi disintegration. PMID:3057239

  10. Cavitational hydrothermal oxidation: A new remediation process. Annual progress report, September 1996--August 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Suslick, K.S.

    1997-11-21

    'During the past year, the authors have continued to make substantial scientific progress on the understanding of cavitation phenomena in aqueous media and applications of cavitation to remediation processes. The efforts have focused on three separate areas: sonoluminescence as a probe of conditions created during cavitational collapse in aqueous media, the use of cavitation for remediation of contaminated water, and an addition of the use of ultrasound in the synthesis of novel heterogeneous catalysts for hydrodehalogenation of halocarbons under mild conditions. In order to gain further understanding of the conditions present during cavitation, the author has continued his studies of sonoluminescence. He has made recent breakthroughs in the use of emission spectroscopy for temperature and pressure measurement of cavitation events, which he expects to publish shortly. He has been able to measure for the first time the temperature of cavitation in water during multi-bubble cavitation in the presence of aromatic hydrocarbons. The emission from excited states of C{sub 2} in water gives temperatures that are consistent with adiabatic compressional heating, with maximum temperatures of 4,300 K. Prior measurements of cavitation temperatures in low vapor pressure nonaqueous media gave somewhat higher temperatures of 5,000 K. This work lays permanently to rest exotic mechanisms for cavitational chemistry, at least for cavitation fields.'

  11. Modelling of flow with cavitation in centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homa, D.; Wróblewski, W.

    2014-08-01

    The paper concerns flow modelling in centrifugal pump with special consideration of cavitation phenomena. Cavitation occurs when local pressure drops below the saturation pressure according to the temperature of the flow. Vapour bubbles are created and then they flow through the areas with higher pressure. The bubbles collapse rapidly generating pressure wave, noise and vibration. Working under cavitation condition is very dangerous to a pump and can significantly shorten its lifetime. The investigated centrifugal pump consists of three two-flow rotors and stators working on a single shaft. The modelling process started with grid independence study. When the grid was chosen, the pump performance curve was obtained using the single phase fluid model. Next, using the results from pump performance curve calculations, the cavitation characteristic was obtained. The constant capacity was held when the pressure at the inlet was reduced. The two - phase model was used with Zwart cavitation model. The results indicate that the pump work in safe range of parameters. The analysis also provides wide range of information about the areas of vapour appearance. The most endangered regions are leading edges of rotor. When pressure at the inlet drops to about one third of pressure that calculations started from the cavitation cloud appears in whole rotor. The intense of vapour bubbles creation is greater near the shroud of the pump, rather than near the hub. As cavitation is strongly unsteady phenomena, the transient calculations were performed to check if the results are close to those obtained using the steady state type. The differences are not significant.

  12. The Numerical Simulation of Unsteady Cavitation Evolution Induced by Pressure Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoo, B. C.; Zheng, J. G.

    2014-11-01

    The present study is focused on the numerical simulation of pressure wave propagation through the cavitating compressible liquid flow, its interaction with cavitation bubble and the resulting unsteady cavitation evolution. The compressibility effects of liquid water are taken into account and the cavitating flow is governed by one-fluid cavitation model which is based on the compressible Euler equations with the assumption that the cavitation is the homogeneous mixture of liquid and vapour which are locally under both kinetic and thermodynamic equilibrium. Several aspects of the method employed to solve the governing equations are outlined. The unsteady features of cavitating flow due to the external perturbation, such as the cavitation deformation and collapse and consequent pressure increase are resolved numerically and discussed in detail. It is observed that the cavitation bubble collapse is accompanied by the huge pressure surge of order of 100 bar, which is thought to be responsible for the material erosion, noise, vibration and loss of efficiency of operating underwater devices.

  13. Sound field measurement in a double layer cavitation cluster by rugged miniature needle hydrophones.

    PubMed

    Koch, Christian

    2016-03-01

    During multi-bubble cavitation the bubbles tend to organize themselves into clusters and thus the understanding of properties and dynamics of clustering is essential for controlling technical applications of cavitation. Sound field measurements are a potential technique to provide valuable experimental information about the status of cavitation clouds. Using purpose-made, rugged, wide band, and small-sized needle hydrophones, sound field measurements in bubble clusters were performed and time-dependent sound pressure waveforms were acquired and analyzed in the frequency domain up to 20MHz. The cavitation clusters were synchronously observed by an electron multiplying charge-coupled device (EMCCD) camera and the relation between the sound field measurements and cluster behaviour was investigated. Depending on the driving power, three ranges could be identified and characteristic properties were assigned. At low power settings no transient and no or very low stable cavitation activity can be observed. The medium range is characterized by strong pressure peaks and various bubble cluster forms. At high power a stable double layer was observed which grew with further increasing power and became quite dynamic. The sound field was irregular and the fundamental at driving frequency decreased. Between the bubble clouds completely different sound field properties were found in comparison to those in the cloud where the cavitation activity is high. In between the sound field pressure amplitude was quite small and no collapses were detected. PMID:24953962

  14. Removal of Residual Cavitation Nuclei to Enhance Histotripsy Erosion of Model Urinary Stones

    PubMed Central

    Duryea, Alexander P.; Roberts, William W.; Cain, Charles A.; Hall, Timothy L.

    2015-01-01

    Histotripsy has been shown to be an effective treatment for model kidney stones, eroding their surface to tiny particulate debris via a cavitational bubble cloud. However, similar to shock wave lithotripsy, histotripsy stone treatments display a rate-dependent efficacy with pulses applied at low rate generating more efficient stone erosion in comparison to those applied at high rate. This is hypothesized to be the result of residual cavitation bubble nuclei generated by bubble cloud collapse. While the histotripsy bubble cloud only lasts on the order of 100 µs, these microscopic remnant bubbles can persist on the order of 1 second—inducing direct attenuation of subsequent histotripsy pulses and influencing bubble cloud dynamics. In an effort to mitigate these effects, we have developed a novel strategy to actively remove residual cavitation nuclei from the field using low-amplitude ultrasound pulses. Previous work has demonstrated that with selection of the appropriate acoustic parameters these bubble removal pulses can stimulate the aggregation and subsequent coalescence of microscopic bubble nuclei—effectively deleting them from the target volume. Here, we incorporate bubble removal pulses in histotripsy treatment of model kidney stones. It was found that when histotripsy is applied at low rate (1 Hz), bubble removal does not produce a statistically significant change in erosion. At higher pulse rates of 10, 100, and 500 Hz, incorporating bubble removal results in 3.7-, 7.5-, and 2.7-fold increases in stone erosion, respectively. High speed imaging indicates that the introduction of bubble removal pulses allows bubble cloud dynamics resulting from high pulse rates to more closely approximate those generated at the low rate of 1 Hz. These results corroborate previous work in the field of shock wave lithotripsy regarding the ill-effects of residual bubble nuclei, and suggest that high treatment efficiency can be recovered at high pulse rates through appropriate manipulation of the cavitation environment surrounding the stone. PMID:25965682

  15. The influence of air content in water on ultrasonic cavitation field.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liyan; Yang, Yang; Liu, Penghong; Tan, Wei

    2014-03-01

    Cavitation is a complex physical phenomenon affected by many factors, one of which is the gas dissolved in the medium. Researchers have given some efforts to the influence of gas content on sonoluminescence or some specific chemical reactions in and around the bubble, but limited work has been reported about the influence on the ultrasonic cavitation field distribution. In this work, the intensity distribution of the ultrasound field in a cleaning tank has been measured with the hydrophone. After analysed and visualised by MATLAB software, it was found that the cavitation intensity distribution in degassed water was much better than that in tap water. And further study proved that degassing process can improve the cavitation effect dramatically both in intensity and scope. Finally, the cavitation fields in mediums with different gas content were measured and the specific influence of air content on cavitation field was discussed. PMID:24230967

  16. Formulation of multibubble cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Yu

    2011-06-01

    With the appropriate approximation, we have formulated the equation of multibubble motion for two cases: a filament of bubbles and a small spherical cluster of bubbles. Our results have yielded a collective mode of bubble motion in which individual bubbles of similar size expand and compress almost simultaneously. Each vibrating bubble radiates sound waves and originates the radiation sound pressure, which affects the motion of the other bubbles. The numerical simulation has revealed that this interaction suppresses single-bubble motion and tends to homogeneously spread the energy of the acoustic standing wave to each individual bubble.

  17. Removal of Residual Cavitation Nuclei to Enhance Histotripsy Fractionation of Soft Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Duryea, Alexander P.; Cain, Charles A.; Roberts, William W.; Hall, Timothy L.

    2015-01-01

    Remnant bubble nuclei generated by primary cavitation collapse can limit the efficiency of histotripsy soft tissue fractionation. When these residual bubbles persist from one histotripsy pulse to the next, they can seed the repetitive nucleation of cavitation bubbles at a discrete set of sites within the focal volume. This effect—referred to as cavitation memory—manifests in inefficient lesion formation, as certain sites within the focal volume are overtreated while others remain undertreated. While the cavitation memory effect can be passively mitigated by using a low pulse repetition frequency (PRF) that affords remnant nuclei sufficient time for dissolution between successive pulses, this low PRF also results in slow lesion production. As such, it would be highly desirable to maintain the high per-pulse efficiency associated with low pulse rates when much higher PRFs are utilized. In this vein we have developed a strategy for the active removal of the remnant bubble nuclei following primary cavitation collapse, using low amplitude ultrasound sequences (termed bubble removal sequences) to stimulate the aggregation and subsequent coalescence of these bubbles. In this study, bubble removal sequences were incorporated in high-PRF histotripsy treatment (100 Hz) of a red blood cell tissue-mimicking phantom that allows for the visualization of lesion development in real-time. A series of reference treatments were also conducted at the low PRF of 1 Hz in order to provide a point of comparison when cavitation memory effects are minimal. It was found that bubble removal sequences as short as 1 ms are capable of maintaining the efficacious lesion development characteristics associated with the low PRF of 1 Hz when the much higher pulse rate of 100 Hz is used. These results were then extended to the treatment of a large volume within the tissue phantom, and optimal bubble removal sequences identified for the single-focal-spot case were utilized to homogenize a 10 × 10 mm region at high rate. PMID:26670848

  18. Experiments in thermosensitive cavitation of a cryogenic rocket propellant surrogate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Sean Benjamin

    Cavitation is a phase-change phenomenon that may appear in practical devices, often leading to loss of performance and possible physical damage. Of particular interest is the presence of cavitation in rocket engine pumps as the cryogenic fluids cavitate in impellers and inducers. Unlike water, which has been studied exhaustively, cryogenic fluids undergo cavitation with significant thermal effect. Past attempts at analyzing this behavior in water have led to poor predictive capability due to the lack of data in the regime defined as thermosensitive cavitation. Fluids flowing near their thermodynamic critical point have a liquid-vapor density ratio that is orders of magnitude less than typical experimental fluids, so that the traditional equation-of-state and cavitation models do not apply. Thermal effects in cavitation have not been fully investigated due to experimental difficulties handling cryogenics. This work investigates the physical effects of thermosensitive cavitation in a model representative of a turbopump inducer in a modern rocket engine. This is achieved by utilizing a room-temperature testing fluid that exhibits a thermal effect equivalent to that experienced by cryogenic propellants. Unsteady surface pressures and high speed imaging collected over the span of thermophysical regimes ranging from thermosensitive to isothermal cavitation offer both quantitative and qualitative insight into the physical process of thermal cavitation. Physical and thermodynamic effects are isolated to identify the source of cavity conditions, oscillations and growth/collapse behavior. Planar laser imaging offers an instantaneous look inside the vapor cavity and at the behavior of the boundary between the two-phase region and freestream liquid. Nondimensional parameters are explored, with cavitation numbers, Reynolds Numbers, coefficient of pressure and nondimensional temperature in a broad range. Results in the form of cavitation regime maps, Strouhal Number of cavity collapse, and cavity length offer a mechanistic analysis of the phenomenon. Linear stability analysis of the boundary is performed, as well as analysis of the thermal effects in the cavity and the oscillatory behavior of the cavity and reentrant jet.

  19. Summary Xylem vulnerability to cavitation is a promising criterion for identifying trees with high drought tolerance, but

    E-print Network

    Mencuccini, Maurizio

    Summary Xylem vulnerability to cavitation is a promising criterion for identifying trees with high cavitation resistance and aboveground biomass production, indicating a possible trade- off between xylem safety and growth potential. Keywords: drought resistance, embolism, genotypic variabil- ity, xylem

  20. Evaluation and interpretation of bubble size distributions in pulsed megasonic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauptmann, M.; Struyf, H.; De Gendt, S.; Glorieux, C.; Brems, S.

    2013-05-01

    The occurrence of acoustic cavitation is incorporating a multitude of interdependent effects that strongly depend on the bubble size. Therefore, bubble size control would be beneficial for biological and industrial processes that rely on acoustic cavitation. A pulsed acoustic field can result in bubble size control and the repeated dissolution and reactivation ("recycling") of potentially active bubbles. As a consequence, a pulsed field can strongly enhance cavitation activity. In this paper, we present a modified methodology for the evaluation of the active bubble size distribution by means of a combination of cavitation noise measurements and ultrasonic pulsing. The key component of this modified methodology is the definition of an upper size limit, below which bubbles—in between subsequent pulses—have to dissolve, in order to be sustainably recycled. This upper limit makes it possible to explain and link the enhancement of cavitation activity to a bubble size distribution. The experimentally determined bubble size distributions for different power densities are interpreted in the frame of numerical calculations of the oscillatory responses of the bubbles to the intermittent driving sound field. The distributions are found to be shaped by the size dependent interplay between bubble pulsations, rectified diffusion, coalescence, and the development of parametrically amplified shape instabilities. Also, a phenomenological reactivation-deactivation model is proposed to explain and quantify the observed enhancement of cavitation activity under pulsed, with respect to continuous sonication. In this model, the pulse-duration determines the magnitude of the reactivation of partially dissolved bubbles and the deactivation of activated bubbles by coalescence. It is shown that the subsequent recycling of previously active bubbles leads to an accumulation of cavitation activity, which saturates after a certain number of pulses. The model is fitted to the experimental data for the cavitation activity measured by means of ultraharmonic cavitation noise as a function of the pulse duration. Measurements of the development of the cavitation noise and sonochemiluminescence over a sequence of pulses for different pulse durations and separations confirm the general validity of the proposed model. Size distributions of the larger, inactive bubbles that were extracted from High-speed images of the cavitation field, relate the deactivation of activated bubbles by coalescence to the increase in volume concentrations of larger bubbles as observed by others.

  1. Can Cavitation Be Anticipated?

    SciTech Connect

    Allgood, G.O.; Dress, W.B.; Hylton, J.O.; Kercel, S.W.

    1999-04-25

    The major problem with cavitation in pumps and hydraulic systems is that there is no effective (conventional) method for detecting or predicting its inception. The traditional method of recognizing cavitation in a pump is to declare the event occurring when the total head drops by some arbitrary value (typically 3%) in response to a pressure reduction at the pump inlet. However, the device is already seriously cavitating when this happens. What is actually needed is a practical method to detect impending rather than incipient cavitation. Whereas the detection of incipient cavitation requires the detection of features just after cavitation starts, the anticipation of cavitation requires the detection and identification of precursor features just before it begins. Two recent advances that make this detection possible. The first is acoustic sensors with a bandwidth of 1 MHz and a dynamic range of 80 dB that preserve the fine details of the features when subjected to coarse vibrations. The second is the application of Bayesian parameter estimation which makes it possible to separate weak signals, such as those present in cavitation precursors, from strong signals, such as pump vibration. Bayesian parameter estimation derives a model based on cavitation hydrodynamics and produces a figure of merit of how well it fits the acquired data. Applying this model to an anticipatory engine should lead to a reliable method of anticipating cavitation before it occurs. This paper reports the findings of precursor features using high-performance sensors and Bayesian analysis of weak acoustic emissions in the 100-1000kHz band from an experimental flow loop.

  2. PIV in the two phases of hydrodynamic cavitation in a venturi type section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuzier, Sylvie; Coudert, Sébastien; Coutier Delgosha, Olivier

    2012-11-01

    The presence of cavitation can affect the performance of turbomachinery. Attached sheet cavities on the blades induce modifications of flow dynamics and turbulence properties. This phenomenon is studied here in a configuration of 2D flow in a venturi type section. Images of the bubbles as well as of the light emitted by fluorescent particles placed in the liquid are recorded simultaneously. Velocities of the bubbles and of the liquid phase are obtained by PIV. The slip velocity is analyzed function of the number of cavitation and other physical parameters. Different levels of turbulence are correlated with different bubble structures in the dipahasic cavity.

  3. Effect of Noble Gases on Sonoluminescence Temperatures during Multibubble Cavitation

    SciTech Connect

    Didenko, Yuri T.; McNamara, William B. III; Suslick, Kenneth S.

    2000-01-24

    Sonoluminescence spectra were collected from Cr(CO){sub 6} solutions in octanol and dodecane saturated with various noble gases. The emission from excited-state metal atoms serves as an internal thermometer of cavitation. The intensity and temperature of sonoluminescence increases from He to Xe. The intensity of the underlying continuum, however, grows faster with increasing temperature than the line emission. Dissociation of solvent molecules within the bubble consumes a significant fraction of the energy generated by the collapsing bubble, which can limit the final temperature inside the bubble. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  4. Voltammetric exploration and applications of ultrasonic cavitation.

    PubMed

    Banks, Craig E; Compton, Richard G

    2003-02-17

    Voltammetric measurements carried out in the presence of power ultrasound are reviewed, and the physical processes responsible for the observed substantial augmentation of mass transport identified as resulting from a mixture of acoustic streaming and cavitation. The benefits conferred in electroanalysis or electrosynthesis of insonation simultaneous with electrolysis are summarised. The use of ultrafast ("nanosecond") voltammetric measurements to probe the nature of the interfacial cavitational bubble dynamics is described and shown to provide information not readily accessed by other experiments. Lastly, voltammetry in acoustically emulsified (organic/aqueous) media is discussed. This has considerable "green" potential for electrosynthesis, whilst the use of nanosecond voltammetry to probe the charge transferred as emulsion droplets impinge on the electrode allows a generic approach to the determination of the potential of zero charge of the latter. PMID:12619416

  5. Cavitation in metastable liquid nitrogen confined to nanoscale pores.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Christopher J; Vishnyakov, Aleksey; Thommes, Matthias; Smarsly, Bernd M; Kleitz, Freddy; Neimark, Alexander V

    2010-06-15

    We studied cavitation in metastable fluids drawing on the example of liquid nitrogen confined to spheroidal pores of specially prepared well-characterized mesoporous silica materials with mean pore diameters ranging from approximately 6 to approximately 35 nm. Cavitation was monitored in the process of evaporation/desorption from fully saturated samples with gradually decreasing vapor pressure at the isothermal conditions. The onset of cavitation was displayed by a sharp step on the desorption isotherm. We found that the vapor pressure at the onset of cavitation depended on the pore size for the samples with pores smaller than approximately 11 nm and remained practically unchanged for the samples with larger pores. We suggest that the observed independence of the cavitation pressure on the size of confinement indicates that the conditions of bubble nucleation in pores larger than approximately 11 nm approach the nucleation conditions in the bulk metastable liquid. To test this hypothesis and to evaluate the nucleation barriers, we performed grand canonical and gauge cell Monte Carlo simulations of nitrogen adsorption and desorption in spherical silica pores ranging from 5.5 to 10 nm in diameter. Simulated and experimental adsorption isotherms were in good agreement. Exploiting the correlation between the experimental cavitation pressure and the simulated nucleation barrier, we found that the nucleation barrier increased almost linearly from approximately 40 to approximately 70 k(B)T in the range of pores from approximately 6 to approximately 11 nm, and varied in diapason of 70-75 k(B)T in larger pores, up to 35 nm. We constructed the dependence of the nucleation barrier on the vapor pressure, which asymptotically approaches the predictions of the classical nucleation theory for the metastable bulk liquid at larger relative pressures (>0.6). Our findings suggest that there is a limit to the influence of the confinement on the onset of cavitation, and thus, cavitation of nanoconfined fluids may be employed to explore cavitation in macroscopic systems. PMID:20210340

  6. Comparison between phase field simulations and experimental data from intragranular bubble growth in UO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Tonks, M. R.; Biner, S. B.; Mille, P. C.; Andersson, D. A.

    2013-07-01

    In this work, we used the phase field method to simulate the post-irradiation annealing of UO{sub 2} described in the experimental work by Kashibe et al., 1993 [1]. The simulations were carried out in 2D and 3D using the MARMOT FEM-based phase-field modeling framework. The 2-D results compared fairly well with the experiments, in spite of the assumptions made in the model. The 3-D results compare even more favorably to experiments, indicating that diffusion in all three directions must be considered to accurate represent the bubble growth. (authors)

  7. Acoustic cavitation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crum, L. A.

    1981-09-01

    The primary thrust of this study was toward a more complete understanding of general aspects of acoustic cavitation. The effect of long-chain polymer additives on the cavitation threshold was investigated to determine if they reduced the acoustic cavitation threshold in a similar manner to the observed reduction in the cavitation index in hydrodynamic cavitation. Measurements were made of the acoustic cavitation threshold as a function of polymer concentration for additives such as guar gum and polyethelene oxide. The measurements were also made as a function of dissolved gas concentration, surface tension and viscosity. It was determined that there was a significant increase in the acoustic cavitation threshold for increased concentrations of the polymer additives (measurable effects could be obtained for concentrations as low as a few parts per million). One would normally expect that an additive that reduces surface tension to decrease the pressure required to cause a cavity to grow and thus these additives, at first thought, should reduce the threshold. However, even in the hydrodynamic case, the threshold was increased. In both of the hydrodynamic cases considered, the explanation for the increased threshold was given in terms of changed fluid dynamics rather than changed physical properties of the fluid.

  8. Nonequilibrium thermodynamics of transport through moving interfaces with application to bubble growth and collapse

    E-print Network

    Kjelstrup, Signe

    Nonequilibrium thermodynamics of transport through moving interfaces with application to bubble the thermodynamic theory should be invariant. The thermodynamic framework provides a complete set of evolution In the description of transport through, into, and along interfaces using nonequilibrium thermodynamics, one may use

  9. Removal of residual cavitation nuclei to enhance histotripsy fractionation of soft tissue.

    PubMed

    Duryea, Alexander P; Cain, Charles A; Roberts, William W; Hall, Timothy L; Duryea, Alexander P; Cain, Charles A; Roberts, William W; Hall, Timothy L

    2015-12-01

    Remanent bubble nuclei generated by primary cavitation collapse can limit the efficiency of histotripsy softtissue fractionation. When these residual bubbles persist from one histotripsy pulse to the next, they can seed the repetitive nucleation of cavitation bubbles at a discrete set of sites within the focal volume. This effect-referred to as cavitation memory- manifests in inefficient lesion formation, because certain sites within the focal volume are overtreated whereas others remain undertreated. Although the cavitation memory effect can be passively mitigated by using a low pulse repetition frequency (PRF) that affords remanent nuclei sufficient time for dissolution between successive pulses, this low PRF also results in slow lesion production. As such, it would be highly desirable to maintain the high per-pulse efficiency associated with low pulse rates when much higher PRFs are utilized. In this vein, we have developed a strategy for the active removal of the remanent bubble nuclei following primary cavitation collapse, using low-amplitude ultrasound sequences (termed bubble-removal sequences) to stimulate the aggregation and subsequent coalescence of these bubbles. In this study, bubbleremoval sequences were incorporated in high-PRF histotripsy treatment (100 Hz) of a red blood cell tissue-mimicking phantom that allows for the visualization of lesion development in real time. A series of reference treatments were also conducted at the low PRF of 1 Hz to provide a point of comparison for which cavitation memory effects are minimal. It was found that bubble-removal sequences as short as 1 ms are capable of maintaining the efficacious lesion development characteristics associated with the low PRF of 1 Hz when the much higher pulse rate of 100 Hz is used. These results were then extended to the treatment of a large volume within the tissue phantom, and optimal bubble-removal sequences identified for the singlefocal- spot case were utilized to homogenize a 10 × 10 mm region at high rate. PMID:26670848

  10. Temperature measurement and visualization study of liquid helium cavitation flow through Venturi channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, T.; Murakami, M.

    2002-05-01

    In the present experiment, the cavitation flow of liquid helium is generated downstream of the throat in a Venturi channel with a rectangular cross section. We measured the temperature variation induced by cavitation, and took visualization pictures of cavitation flow to examine the general feature of liquid helium cavitation flow. It is found that there are some definite differences in the appearance of cavitation between He I and He II flows, and that the phase transition from He I to He II is sometimes induced because of the temperature drop in cavitating He I flow. In He I, large temperature drop produced in the vicinity of the throat rapidly becomes diminishes with the distance from the throat, while in He II it still develops in the upper half of the downstream region of the channel. Visualization pictures show that in the case of He I the bubbly portion is composed of numerous small vapor bubbles, and then in the downstream region they disappear rapidly. But in He II the bubbly flow portion is composed of large scale bubbles.

  11. Cavitation erosion: Using the target material as a pressure sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Samir Chandra; Franc, Jean-Pierre; Fivel, Marc

    2015-10-01

    Numerical prediction of mass loss due to cavitation erosion requires the knowledge of the hydrodynamic impact loads generated by cavitation bubble collapses. Experimental measurements of such impact loads using conventional pressure sensors are not reliable (if not impossible) due to the micron size and the very small duration of the loading. In this paper, a new method to estimate these loading conditions is proposed based on cavitation pitting tests and an iterative inverse finite element modeling. The principle of the method is as follows. First, numerous pits corresponding to localized plastically deformed regions are identified from a cavitation test performed in a dedicated tunnel. Then each pit is numerically reproduced by finite element simulations of the material response to a representative Gaussian pressure field supposed to mimic a single bubble collapse. This gives the size and pressure distribution of the bubble impacts. The prime objective of this study is to find out if the target material itself could be used as a pressure sensor or not, i.e., if the cavitation pits left on the surface of the tested specimen could provide the characteristics of the cavitating flow in terms of pressure fields independently of the target material. Pitting tests were done on three materials, namely, 7075 Aluminum alloy (Al-7075), 2205 duplex stainless steel (A-2205), and Nickel-Aluminum Bronze (NAB) at three different flow conditions and the impact loads have been estimated for each identified pit. Very interestingly, a statistical analysis shows that the estimated impact loads are material independent at all flow conditions, provided the material properties are characterized properly. It is also shown that for some materials, the constitutive parameters obtained from compression tests are not satisfactory.

  12. Interaction of two differently sized oscillating bubbles in a free field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chew, Lup Wai; Klaseboer, Evert; Ohl, Siew-Wan; Khoo, Boo Cheong

    2011-12-01

    Most real life bubble dynamics applications involve multiple bubbles, for example, in cavitation erosion prevention, ultrasonic baths, underwater warfare, and medical applications involving microbubble contrast agents. Most scientific dealings with bubble-bubble interaction focus on two similarly sized bubbles. In this study, the interaction between two oscillating differently sized bubbles (generated in tap water) is studied using high speed photography. Four types of bubble behavior were observed, namely, jetting toward each other, jetting away from each other, bubble coalescence, and a behavior termed the “catapult” effect. In-phase bubbles jet toward each other, while out-of-phase bubbles jet away from each other. There exists a critical phase difference that separates the two regimes. The behavior of the bubbles is fully characterized by their dimensionless separation distance, their phase difference, and their size ratio. It is also found that for bubbles with large size difference, the smaller bubble behaves similarly to a single bubble oscillating near a free surface.

  13. Effects of the use of ultrasonic waves on biodiesel production in alkaline transesterification of bleached tallow and vegetable oils: Cavitation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alape Benitez, Fabio

    Experiments of biodiesel production via methanolysis were performed at methanol/triglyceride molar ratios of 3, 4.5, and 6 and temperatures of 25°C, 40°C and 60°C; the reaction was monitored by HPLC, X-Ray, and GC-MS until equilibrium. A mathematical model called CAVITATION MODEL was developed to deal with mass transfer aspects of the alkaline transesterification reaction of vegetable oils; a comparison between the cavitation model and diffusion through spherical pores was made. Gas-vapor bubble dynamics for the methanol-soybean oil and methanol-tallow system were examined at 40°C and 42°C, respectively. The Rayleight-Plesset equations were used to describe the isothermal growth and adiabatic collapse of the bubble formed when a field of ultrasound at 20 KHz is applied. Temperatures of 2265 K and 426 K were estimated for a bubble in soybean oil-methanol and tallow-methanol systems, respectively. These "Hot Spots" could be responsible for the increment of the temperature occurred and the acoustic streaming observed during the alkaline transesterification reaction. Also, a diffusion analysis with the pore model was made to predict the concentration profile of the triglycerides within the liquid drops of alcohol created after the collapse of the gas-vapor bubbles; spherical shapes were studied. A computational model was made in MathCad to evaluate the effectiveness at different Thiele modulus values in order to estimate mass transfer coefficients for the most critical conditions of pure diffusion and these coefficients were compared with those found by the cavitation model estimation. Pictures of the reactant system soybean oil-methanol-potassium hydroxide, with the red dyed methanol using phenolphthalein, showed that the alkalinity of the system represented by potassium hydroxide remains in the interface alcohol-oil and then is displaced into the glycerol or down layer. The present study serves as a basis for the analysis of heterogeneous reactions with immiscible liquids using ultrasonic agitation.

  14. Cavitating flow investigation inside centrifugal impellers for a condensate pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, W.; Luo, X. W.; Ji, B.; Zhuang, B. T.; Xu, H. Y.

    2012-11-01

    In order to investigate the effect of blade inlet angle on centrifugal pump cavitation performance, numerical simulation of cavitating turbulent flow is conducted for a condensate pump with different impellers based on SST k-? turbulence model and a mixture cavitation model. The results indicate that for a condensate pump having meridional section with larger area at blade leading edge compared with conventional pumps, the reverse flows inside the blade-to-blade channels are not negligible. It is noted that large incidence at blade leading edge is helpful to improve the cavitation performance for the pump. The possible reason may be the growth of cavities inside the impeller has less influence on the flow in the channel between two neighboring blades. Further, uniform incidence angle along the blade leading edge is preferable for the improvement of cavitation performance.

  15. Detection of cystic structures using pulsed ultrasonically induced resonant cavitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph (Inventor); Kovach, John S. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Apparatus and method for early detection of cystic structures indicative of ovarian and breast cancers uses ultrasonic wave energy at a unique resonance frequency for inducing cavitation in cystic fluid characteristic of cystic structures in the ovaries associated with ovarian cancer, and in cystic structures in the breast associated with breast cancer. Induced cavitation bubbles in the cystic fluid implode, creating implosion waves which are detected by ultrasonic receiving transducers attached to the abdomen of the patient. Triangulation of the ultrasonic receiving transducers enables the received signals to be processed and analyzed to identify the location and structure of the cyst.

  16. Velocimetry in cavitating flows by X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutier-Delgosha, Olivier; Hocevar, Marko; Khlifa, Ilyass; Fuzier, Sylvie; Vabre, Alexandre; Fezzaa, Kamel; Lee, Wah-Keat; Laboratorywater; turbine machines, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, University of Ljubljan Collaboration; CEA LIST Collaboration; X-ray Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory Collaboration

    2011-11-01

    A promising method to measure velocity fields in a cavitating flow is presented. Dynamics of the liquid phase and of the bubbles are both investigated. The measurements are based on ultra fast X-ray imaging performed at the APS (Advanced Photon Source) of the Argonne National Laboratory. The experimental device consists of a millimetric Venturi test section associated with a transportable hydraulic loop. Various configurations of velocity, pressure, and temperature have been investigated. The slip velocity between vapor and liquid is calculated everywhere both velocities can be obtained. Reynolds stresses are also calculated, and compared with the ones obtained in non-cavitating conditions.

  17. Cavitation: Hydrofoils. Citations from the NTIS data base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habercom, G. E., Jr.

    1980-05-01

    Studies are presented on the cavitation characteristics of various classes of hydrofoils such as fully submerged, ventilated, high speed, supercavitating, and jet flapped. Surface piercing struts are studies. Test facilities, models, and test methods are described. Lift, drag, oscillation, flutter, heaving, hydroelasticity, and loading are discussed. Other topics include entrainment, bubbles, unsteady forces, flow fields, sea states, cavitation noise, mathematical models, and boundary layers, along with investigations of hydrofoil craft performance. This updated bibliography contains 194 abstracts, 9 of which are new entries to the previous edition.

  18. A generalized Eulerian-Lagrangian analysis, with application to liquid flows with vapor bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dejong, Frederik J.; Meyyappan, Meyya

    1993-07-01

    Under a NASA MSFC SBIR Phase 2 effort an analysis has been developed for liquid flows with vapor bubbles such as those in liquid rocket engine components. The analysis is based on a combined Eulerian-Lagrangian technique, in which Eulerian conservation equations are solved for the liquid phase, while Lagrangian equations of motion are integrated in computational coordinates for the vapor phase. The novel aspect of the Lagrangian analysis developed under this effort is that it combines features of the so-called particle distribution approach with those of the so-called particle trajectory approach and can, in fact, be considered as a generalization of both of those traditional methods. The result of this generalization is a reduction in CPU time and memory requirements. Particle time step (stability) limitations have been eliminated by semi-implicit integration of the particle equations of motion (and, for certain applications, the particle temperature equation), although practical limitations remain in effect for reasons of accuracy. The analysis has been applied to the simulation of cavitating flow through a single-bladed section of a labyrinth seal. Models for the simulation of bubble formation and growth have been included, as well as models for bubble drag and heat transfer. The results indicate that bubble formation is more or less 'explosive'. for a given flow field, the number density of bubble nucleation sites is very sensitive to the vapor properties and the surface tension. The bubble motion, on the other hand, is much less sensitive to the properties, but is affected strongly by the local pressure gradients in the flow field. In situations where either the material properties or the flow field are not known with sufficient accuracy, parametric studies can be carried out rapidly to assess the effect of the important variables. Future work will include application of the analysis to cavitation in inducer flow fields.

  19. Dynamics of vapor bubbles growth at boiling resulting from enthalpy excess of the surrounding superheated liquid and sound pulses generated by bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorofeev, B. M.; Volkova, V. I.

    2015-10-01

    The results of experiments investigating the exponential dependence of the vapor bubble radius on time at saturated boiling are generalized. Three different methods to obtain this dependence are suggested: (1) by the application of the transient heat conduction equation, (2) by using the correlations of energy conservation, and (3) by solving a similar electrodynamic problem. Based on the known experimental data, the accuracy of the dependence up to one percent and a few percent accuracy of its description based on the sound pressure generated by a vapor bubble have been determined. A significant divergence of the power dependence of the vapor bubble radius on time (with an exponent of 1/2) with the experimental results and its inadequacy for the description of the sound pulse generated by the bubble have been demonstrated.

  20. Processing of Microalgae: Acoustic Cavitation and Hydrothermal Conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenly, Justin Michael

    The production of energy dense fuels from renewable algal biomass feedstocks -- if sustainably developed at a sufficiently large scale -- may reduce the consumption of petroleum from fossil fuels and provide many environmental benefits. Achieving economic feasibility has several technical engineering challenges that arise from dilute concentration of growing algae in aqueous media, small cell sizes, and durable cell walls. For microalgae to be a sustainable source of biofuels and co-products, efficient fractionation and conversion of the cellular contents is necessary. Research was carried out to address two processing options for efficient microalgae biofuel production: 1. Ultrasonic cavitation for cell disruption and 2. Hydrothermal conversion of a model algal triglyceride. 1. Ultrasonic cell disruption, which relies on cavitating bubbles in the suspension to produce damaging shock waves, was investigated experimentally over a range of concentrations and species types. A few seconds of high intensity sonication at fixed frequency yielded significant cell disruption, even for the more durable cells. At longer exposure times, effectiveness was seen to decline and was attributed, using acoustic measurements, to ultrasonic power attenuation in the ensuing cloud of cavitating bubbles. Processing at higher cell concentrations slowed cell disintegration marginally, but increased the effectiveness of dissipating ultrasonic energy. A theoretical study effectively predicted optimal conditions for a variety of parameters that were inaccessible in this experimental investigation. In that study, single bubble collapse was modeled to identify operating conditions that would increase cavitation, and thus cell disruption. Simulations were conducted by varying frequency and pressure amplitude of the ultrasound wave, and initial bubble size. The simulation results indicated that low frequency, high sound wave amplitudes, and small initial bubble size generate the highest shock wave pressures. 2. Hydrolysis of a pure model triglyceride compound was experimentally examined for the first time at hydrothermal conditions -- from 225 to 300°C. Lipid product composition assessed by GC-FID was compared to previous studies with mixed vegetable oils and used to develop a kinetic model for this oil phase reaction.

  1. Cavitation Simulation with Consideration of the Viscous Effect at Large Liquid Temperature Variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, An; Luo, Xian-Wu; Ji, Bin; Huang, Ren-Fang; Hidalgo, Victor; Kim, Song Hak

    2014-08-01

    The phase change due to cavitation is not only driven by the pressure difference between the local pressure and vapor saturated pressure, but also affected by the physical property changes in the case of large liquid temperature variation. The present work simulates cavitation with consideration of the viscous effect as well as the local variation of vapor saturated pressure, density, etc. A new cavitation model is developed based on the bubble dynamics, and is applied to analyze the cavitating flow around an NACA0015 hydrofoil at different liquid temperatures from 25°C to 150°C. The results by the proposed model, such as the pressure distribution along the hydrofoil wall surface, vapor volume fraction, and source term of the mass transfer rate due to cavitation, are compared with the available experimental data and the numerical results by an existing thermodynamic model. It is noted that the numerical results by the proposed cavitation model have a slight discrepancy from the experimental results at room temperature, and the accuracy is better than the existing thermodynamic cavitation model. Thus the proposed cavitation model is acceptable for the simulation of cavitating flows at different liquid temperatures.

  2. Cavitation guide for control valves

    SciTech Connect

    Tullis, J.P.

    1993-04-01

    This guide teaches the basic fundamentals of cavitation to provide the reader with an understanding of what causes cavitation, when it occurs, and the potential problems cavitation can cause to a valve and piping system. The document provides guidelines for understanding how to reduce the cavitation and/or select control valves for a cavitating system. The guide provides a method for predicting the cavitation intensity of control valves, and how the effect of cavitation on a system will vary with valve type, valve function, valve size, operating pressure, duration of operation and details of the piping installation. The guide defines six cavitation limits identifying cavitation intensities ranging from inception to the maximum intensity possible. The intensity of the cavitation at each limit Is described, including a brief discussion of how each level of cavitation influences the valve and system. Examples are included to demonstrate how to apply the method, including making both size and pressure scale effects corrections. Methods of controlling cavitation are discussed providing information on various techniques which can be used to design a new system or modify an existing one so it can operate at a desired level of cavitation.

  3. Investigation of a Method to Reduce Cavitation in Diesel Engine Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Honaker, Robert W.

    1998-01-01

    Sonoluminescence is the effect of producing light from sound and occurs when a gas bubble is trapped in a fluid filled cavity and is forced to collapse under a barrage of sound waves. Frenzel and Schultes discovered this phenomenon in 1934 while exposing acoustic waves to photographic plates. This effect was not well understood until 1988 when Crum and Gaitan discovered the necessary conditions for producing single bubble sonoluminescence in the laboratory. The luminescence is a result of the bubble violently collapsing from sound waves and this shares a close association with vibratory cavitation. Cavitation erosion is known to cause damage to rotational machinery when the collapse is near to surfaces due to the high pressures associated with bubble collapse. With these high pressures and temperatures there is a considerable amount of damage to the outside layer of a bearing, thereby, reducing its useful life. An experiment was constructed to generate sonoluminescence in the laboratory in order to obtain a greater understanding of this phenomenon and its association with bubble cavitation. Most of the research was done to investigate how to obtain single bubble sonoluminescence under different conditions and to determine how to detect it. Success in this has inspired several theories on how to use the methods for generating sonoluminescence to control cavitation in fluids under industrial conditions.

  4. Cavitation erosion of silver plated coating at different temperatures and pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Hattori, Shuji; Motoi, Yoshihiro; Kikuta, Kengo; Tomaru, Hiroshi

    2014-04-11

    Cavitation often occurs in inducer pumps used for space rockets. Silver plated coating on the inducer liner faces the damage of cavitation. Therefore, it is important to study about the cavitation erosion resistance for silver plated coating at several operating conditions in the inducer pumps. In this study, the cavitation erosion tests were carried for silver plated coating in deionized water and ethanol at several liquid temperatures (273K–400K) and pressures (0.10MPa–0.48MPa). The mass loss rate is evaluated in terms of thermodynamic parameter ? proposed by Brennen [9], suppression pressure p–p{sub v} (p{sub v}: saturated vapor pressure) and acoustic impedance ?c (?: density and c: sound speed). Cavitation bubble behaviors depending on the thermodynamic effect and the liquid type were observed by high speed video camera. The mass loss rate is formulated by thermodynamic parameter ?, suppression pressure p–p{sub v} and acoustic impedance ?c.

  5. A High-Speed Imaging and Modeling Study of Dendrite Fragmentation Caused by Ultrasonic Cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Da; Sun, Baode; Mi, Jiawei; Grant, Patrick S.

    2012-10-01

    The dynamic behavior of ultrasound-induced cavitation bubbles and their effect on the fragmentation of dendritic grains of a solidifying succinonitrile 1 wt pct camphor organic transparent alloy have been studied experimentally using high-speed digital imaging and complementary numerical analysis of sound wave propagation, cavitation dynamics, and the velocity field in the vicinity of an imploding cavitation bubble. Real-time imaging and analysis revealed that the violent implosion of bubbles created local shock waves that could shatter dendrites nearby into small pieces in a few tens of milliseconds. These catastrophic events were effective in breaking up growing dendritic grains and creating abundant fragmented crystals that may act as embryonic grains; therefore, these events play an important role in grain refinement of metallurgical alloys.

  6. Evaluation of a shock wave induced cavitation activity both in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Tu, Juan; Matula, Thomas J; Bailey, Michael R; Crum, Lawrence A

    2007-10-01

    This study evaluated the cavitation activity induced by shock wave (SW) pulses, both in vitro and in vivo, based on the area measurements of echogenic regions observed in B-mode ultrasound images. Residual cavitation bubble clouds induced by SW pulses were detected as echogenic regions in B-mode images. The temporal evolution of residual bubble clouds, generated by SWs with varying lithotripter charging voltage and pulse repetition frequency (PRF), was analyzed by measuring the time-varying behaviors of the echogenic region areas recorded in B-mode images. The results showed that (1) the area of SW-induced echogenic regions enlarged with increased SW pulse number; (2) echogenic regions in the B-mode images dissipated gradually after ceasing the SWs, which indicated the dissolution of the cavitation bubbles; and (3) larger echogenic regions were generated with higher charging voltage or PRF. PMID:17881810

  7. A detector for monitoring the onset of cavitation during therapy-level measurements of ultrasonic power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodnett, M.; Zeqiri, B.

    2004-01-01

    Acoustic cavitation occurring in the water path between a transducer and the target of a radiation force balance can provide a significant source of error during measurements of ultrasonic power. These problems can be particularly acute at physiotherapy levels (>1 W), and low frequencies (leq 1 MHz). The cavitating bubbles can absorb and scatter incident ultrasound, leading to an underestimate in the measured power. For these reasons, International Specification standards demand the use of degassed water. This imposes requirements that may actually be difficult to meet, for example, in the case of hospitals. Also, initially degassed water will rapidly re-gas, increasing the likelihood of cavitation occurring. For these reasons, NPL has developed a device that monitors acoustic emissions generated by bubble activity, for detecting the onset of cavitation during power measurements. A commercially available needle hydrophone is used to detect these emissions. The acoustic signals are then monitored using a Cavitation Detector (CD) unit, comprising an analogue electrical filter that may be tuned to detect frequency components generated by cavitating bubbles, and which provides an indication of when the measured level exceeds a pre-defined threshold. This paper describes studies to establish a suitable detection scheme, the principles of operation of the CD unit, and the performance tests carried out with a range of propagation media.

  8. Bubble formation in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antar, Basil N.

    1994-01-01

    Two KC-135 flight campaigns have been conducted to date which are specifically dedicated to study bubble formation in microgravity. The first flight was conducted during March 14-18, 1994, and the other during June 20-24, 1994. The results from the June 1994 flight have not been analyzed yet, while the results from the March flight have been partially analyzed. In the first flight three different experiments were performed, one with the specific aim at determining whether or not cavitation can take place during any of the fluid handling procedures adopted in the shuttle bioprocessing experiments. The other experiments were concerned with duplicating some of the procedures that resulted in bubble formation, namely the NCS filling procedure and the needle scratch of a solid surface. The results from this set of experiments suggest that cavitation did not take place during any of the fluid handling procedures. The results clearly indicate that almost all were generated as a result of the breakup of the gas/liquid interface. This was convincingly demonstrated in the scratch tests as well as in the liquid fill tests.

  9. Adaptation of the advanced spray combustion code to cavitating flow problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Pak-Yan

    1993-07-01

    A very important consideration in turbopump design is the prediction and prevention of cavitation. Thus far conventional CFD codes have not been generally applicable to the treatment of cavitating flows. Taking advantage of its two-phase capability, the Advanced Spray Combustion Code is being modified to handle flows with transient as well as steady-state cavitation bubbles. The volume-of-fluid approach incorporated into the code is extended and augmented with a liquid phase energy equation and a simple evaporation model. The strategy adopted also successfully deals with the cavity closure issue. Simple test cases will be presented and remaining technical challenges will be discussed.

  10. Numerical investigation on cavitation in pressure relief valve for coal liquefaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, G. F.; Li, W. Z.; Xiao, D. H.; Zheng, Z. J.; Dou, H. S.; Wang, C.

    2015-01-01

    The pressure relief valve for regulating the level of the high-pressure separator works under a pressure difference up to 15 MPa in the temperature of 415 °C. Severe cavitation erosion and particle impact lead to the valve disc's mass loss. In this paper, three-dimensional turbulent cavitating flows in the pressure relief valve are numerically simulated to reveal the mechanism of mass loss at valve disc. The RNG k-epsilon turbulence model and the mixture model with a mass transfer for cavitation are employed to simulate the cavitating flow in the pressure relief valve. The result shows that there is phase change in the pressure relief process and cavitation bubbles would be transported by high-velocity backflow to the head of valve disc. For the local pressure higher than the saturated vapor pressure, the bubbles collapse at the head of disc and cavitation erosion is formed at the head of the disc. By comparing the cases of opening of 40%, 50%, and 60%, backflow velocity and cavitation region in front of the disc decrease with the opening increase. Therefore, during the actual operation, the pressure relief valve should be kept to a relatively large opening.

  11. Transient cavitation in high-quality-factor resonators at high static pressures.

    PubMed

    Gaitan, D Felipe; Tessien, Ross A; Hiller, Robert A; Gutierrez, Joel; Scott, Corey; Tardif, Henry; Callahan, Brant; Matula, Thomas J; Crum, Lawrence A; Holt, R Glynn; Church, Charles C; Raymond, Jason L

    2010-06-01

    It is well known that cavitation collapse can generate intense concentrations of mechanical energy, sufficient to erode even the hardest metals and to generate light emissions visible to the naked eye [sonoluminescence (SL)]. Considerable attention has been devoted to the phenomenon of "single bubble sonoluminescence" (SBSL) in which a single stable cavitation bubble radiates light flashes each and every acoustic cycle. Most of these studies involve acoustic resonators in which the ambient pressure is near 0.1 MPa (1 bar), and with acoustic driving pressures on the order of 0.1 MPa. This study describes a high-quality factor, spherical resonator capable of achieving acoustic cavitation at ambient pressures in excess of 30 MPa (300 bars). This system generates bursts of violent inertial cavitation events lasting only a few milliseconds (hundreds of acoustic cycles), in contrast with the repetitive cavitation events (lasting several minutes) observed in SBSL; accordingly, these events are described as "inertial transient cavitation." Cavitation observed in this high pressure resonator is characterized by flashes of light with intensities up to 1000 times brighter than SBSL flashes, as well as spherical shock waves with amplitudes exceeding 30 MPa at the resonator wall. Both SL and shock amplitudes increase with static pressure. PMID:20550245

  12. The Influence of Dissolved Carbon Dioxide on Cavitation Intensity in Ultrasound Cleaning Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brems, Steven; Hauptmann, Marc; Camerotto, Elisabeth; Pacco, Antoine; Struyf, Herbert; Mertens, Paul; Gottschalk, Christiane; De Gendt, Stefan

    2013-06-01

    A study is made of the effect of dissolved CO2 on cavitation inception and activity in an ultrasound system with a sound frequency of 928 kHz. It is shown that measurable cavitation activity is completely absent at moderate acoustic power densities (?1.7 W cm-2) when only CO2 is dissolved in ultra pure water. It is suggested that the enhanced stability of CO2 bubbles against coalescence might be the origin of the delayed cavitation inception when compared to other dissolved gases. A combination of dissolved O2 and CO2 can lead to a measurable cavitation activity at an acoustic power of 420 mW cm-2, but an increase of the dissolved CO2 level reduces, in general, the observed cavitation activity. In order to compare results with different dissolved gas concentrations, measurements are performed with acoustic pulses and the pulse off time is varied. An optimal pulse-off time exists, where a maximum of cavitation activity is observed. However, the pulse-off time interval with enhanced cavitation activity is narrowed with increasing dissolved CO2 concentrations. Again, a decrease in bubble coalescence might explain the narrowing of the “enhancement peak”.

  13. Detecting vapour bubbles in simulations of metastable water

    SciTech Connect

    González, Miguel A.; Abascal, Jose L. F.; Valeriani, Chantal E-mail: cvaleriani@quim.ucm.es; Menzl, Georg; Geiger, Philipp; Dellago, Christoph E-mail: cvaleriani@quim.ucm.es; Aragones, Juan L.; Caupin, Frederic

    2014-11-14

    The investigation of cavitation in metastable liquids with molecular simulations requires an appropriate definition of the volume of the vapour bubble forming within the metastable liquid phase. Commonly used approaches for bubble detection exhibit two significant flaws: first, when applied to water they often identify the voids within the hydrogen bond network as bubbles thus masking the signature of emerging bubbles and, second, they lack thermodynamic consistency. Here, we present two grid-based methods, the M-method and the V-method, to detect bubbles in metastable water specifically designed to address these shortcomings. The M-method incorporates information about neighbouring grid cells to distinguish between liquid- and vapour-like cells, which allows for a very sensitive detection of small bubbles and high spatial resolution of the detected bubbles. The V-method is calibrated such that its estimates for the bubble volume correspond to the average change in system volume and are thus thermodynamically consistent. Both methods are computationally inexpensive such that they can be used in molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations of cavitation. We illustrate them by computing the free energy barrier and the size of the critical bubble for cavitation in water at negative pressure.

  14. Detecting vapour bubbles in simulations of metastable water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, Miguel A.; Menzl, Georg; Aragones, Juan L.; Geiger, Philipp; Caupin, Frederic; Abascal, Jose L. F.; Dellago, Christoph; Valeriani, Chantal

    2014-11-01

    The investigation of cavitation in metastable liquids with molecular simulations requires an appropriate definition of the volume of the vapour bubble forming within the metastable liquid phase. Commonly used approaches for bubble detection exhibit two significant flaws: first, when applied to water they often identify the voids within the hydrogen bond network as bubbles thus masking the signature of emerging bubbles and, second, they lack thermodynamic consistency. Here, we present two grid-based methods, the M-method and the V-method, to detect bubbles in metastable water specifically designed to address these shortcomings. The M-method incorporates information about neighbouring grid cells to distinguish between liquid- and vapour-like cells, which allows for a very sensitive detection of small bubbles and high spatial resolution of the detected bubbles. The V-method is calibrated such that its estimates for the bubble volume correspond to the average change in system volume and are thus thermodynamically consistent. Both methods are computationally inexpensive such that they can be used in molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations of cavitation. We illustrate them by computing the free energy barrier and the size of the critical bubble for cavitation in water at negative pressure.

  15. Histotripsy-Induced Cavitation Cloud Initiation Thresholds in Tissues of Different Mechanical Properties

    PubMed Central

    Vlaisavljevich, Eli; Maxwell, Adam; Warnez, Matthew; Johnsen, Eric; Cain, Charles A.; Xu, Zhen

    2014-01-01

    Histotripsy is an ultrasound ablation method that depends on the initiation and maintenance of a cavitation bubble cloud to fractionate soft tissue. This paper studies how tissue properties impact the pressure threshold to initiate the cavitation bubble cloud. Our previous study showed that shock scattering off one or more initial bubbles, expanded to sufficient size in the focus, plays an important role in initiating a dense cavitation cloud. In this process, the shock scattering causes the positive pressure phase to be inverted, resulting in a scattered wave that has the opposite polarity of the incident shock. The inverted shock is superimposed on the incident negative pressure phase to form extremely high negative pressures, resulting in a dense cavitation cloud growing toward the transducer. We hypothesize that increased tissue stiffness impedes the expansion of initial bubbles, reducing the scattered tensile pressure, and thus requiring higher initial intensities for cloud initiation. To test this hypothesis, 5-cycle histotripsy pulses at pulse repetition frequencies (PRFs) of 10, 100, or 1000 Hz were applied by a 1-MHz transducer focused inside mechanically tunable tissue-mimicking agarose phantoms and various ex vivo porcine tissues covering a range of Young’s moduli. The threshold to initiate a cavitation cloud and resulting bubble expansion were recorded using acoustic backscatter detection and optical imaging. In both phantoms and ex vivo tissue, results demonstrated a higher cavitation cloud initiation threshold for tissues of higher Young’s modulus. Results also demonstrated a decrease in bubble expansion in phantoms of higher Young’s modulus. These results support our hypothesis, improve our understanding of the effect of histotripsy in tissues with different mechanical properties, and provide a rational basis to tailor acoustic parameters for fractionation of specific tissues. PMID:24474139

  16. A model for the dynamics of gas bubbles in soft tissue

    E-print Network

    Yang, Xinmai; Church, Charles C.

    2005-01-01

    of elasticity. With experiment determined viscoelasticproperties, the effects of elasticity on bubble oscillations are studied. Specifically, the inertial cavitation thresholds are determined using Rmax?R0, and subharmonic signals from the emission...

  17. Fuel Performance Experiments and Modeling: Fission Gas Bubble Nucleation and Growth in Alloy Nuclear Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    McDeavitt, Sean; Shao, Lin; Tsvetkov, Pavel; Wirth, Brian; Kennedy, Rory

    2014-04-07

    Advanced fast reactor systems being developed under the DOE's Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative are designed to destroy TRU isotopes generated in existing and future nuclear energy systems. Over the past 40 years, multiple experiments and demonstrations have been completed using U-Zr, U-Pu-Zr, U-Mo and other metal alloys. As a result, multiple empirical and semi-empirical relationships have been established to develop empirical performance modeling codes. Many mechanistic questions about fission as mobility, bubble coalescience, and gas release have been answered through industrial experience, research, and empirical understanding. The advent of modern computational materials science, however, opens new doors of development such that physics-based multi-scale models may be developed to enable a new generation of predictive fuel performance codes that are not limited by empiricism.

  18. Nucleation threshold and deactivation mechanisms of nanoscopic cavitation nuclei

    E-print Network

    Borkent, Bram M; Prosperetti, Andrea; Lohse, Detlef

    2009-01-01

    The acoustic nucleation threshold for bubbles trapped in cavities has theoretically been predicted within the crevice theory by Atchley & Prosperetti [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 86, 1065-1084 (1989)]. Here, we determine this threshold experimentally, by applying a single pressure pulse to bubbles trapped in cylindrical nanoscopic pits ("artificial crevices") with radii down to 50 nm. By decreasing the minimum pressure stepwise, we observe the threshold for which the bubbles start to nucleate. The experimental results are quantitatively in excellent agreement with the theoretical predictions of Atchley & Prosperetti. In addition, we provide the mechanism which explains the deactivation of cavitation nuclei: gas diffusion together with an aspherical bubble collapse. Finally, we present superhydrophobic nuclei which cannot be deactivated, unless with a high-speed liquid jet directed into the pit.

  19. Stable tridimensional bubble clusters in multi-bubble sonoluminescence (MBSL).

    PubMed

    Rosselló, J M; Dellavale, D; Bonetto, F J

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, stable clusters made of multiple sonoluminescent bubbles are experimentally and theoretically studied. Argon bubbles were acoustically generated and trapped using bi-frequency driving within a cylindrical chamber filled with a sulfuric acid aqueous solution (SA85w/w). The intensity of the acoustic pressure field was strong enough to sustain, during several minutes, a large number of positionally and spatially fixed (without pseudo-orbits) sonoluminescent bubbles over an ellipsoidally-shaped tridimensional array. The dimensions of the ellipsoids were studied as a function of the amplitude of the applied low-frequency acoustic pressure (PAc(LF)) and the static pressure in the fluid (P0). In order to explain the size and shape of the bubble clusters, we performed a series of numerical simulations of the hydrodynamic forces acting over the bubbles. In both cases the observed experimental behavior was in excellent agreement with the numerical results. The simulations revealed that the positionally stable region, mainly determined by the null primary Bjerknes force (F?Bj), is defined as the outer perimeter of an axisymmetric ellipsoidal cluster centered in the acoustic field antinode. The role of the high-frequency component of the pressure field and the influence of the secondary Bjerknes force are discussed. We also investigate the effect of a change in the concentration of dissolved gas on the positional and spatial instabilities through the cluster dimensions. The experimental and numerical results presented in this paper are potentially useful for further understanding and modeling numerous current research topics regarding multi-bubble phenomena, e.g. forces acting on the bubbles in multi-frequency acoustic fields, transient acoustic cavitation, bubble interactions, structure formation processes, atomic and molecular emissions of equal bubbles and nonlinear or unsteady acoustic pressure fields in bubbly media. PMID:24974006

  20. Computation of Cavitating Flow in a Francis Hydroturbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, Daniel; Lindau, Jay

    2013-11-01

    In an effort to improve cavitation characteristics at off-design conditions, a steady, periodic, multiphase, RANS CFD study of an actual Francis hydroturbine was conducted and compared to experimental results. It is well-known that operating hydroturbines at off-design conditions usually results in the formation of large-scale vaporous cavities. These cavities, and their subsequent collapse, reduce efficiency and cause damage and wear to surfaces. The conventional hydro community has expressed interest in increasing their turbine's operating ranges, improving their efficiencies, and reducing damage and wear to critical turbine components. In this work, mixing planes were used to couple rotating and stationary stages of the turbine which have non-multiple periodicity, and provide a coupled solution for the stay vanes, wicket gates, runner blades, and draft tube. The mixture approach is used to simulate the multiphase flow dynamics, and cavitation models were employed to govern the mass transfer between liquid and gas phases. The solution is compared with experimental results across a range of cavitation numbers which display all the major cavitation features in the machine. Unsteady computations are necessary to capture inherently unsteady cavitation phenomena, such as the precessing vortex rope, and the shedding of bubbles from the wicket gates and their subsequent impingement upon the leading edge of the runner blades. To display these features, preliminary unsteady simulations of the full machine are also presented.

  1. A Study of Cavitation Erosion

    SciTech Connect

    Hiromu Isaka; Masatsugu Tsutsumi; Tadashi Shiraishi; Hiroyuki Kobayashi

    2002-07-01

    The authors performed experimental study for the purpose of the following two items from a viewpoint of cavitation erosion of a cylindrical orifice in view of a problem at the letdown orifice in PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor). 1. To get the critical cavitation parameter of the cylindrical orifice to establish the design criteria for prevention of cavitation erosion, and 2. to ascertain the erosion rate in such an eventuality that the cavitation erosion occurs with the orifice made of stainless steel with precipitation hardening (17-4-Cu hardening type stainless steel), so that we confirm the appropriateness of the design criteria. Regarding the 1. item, we carried out the cavitation tests to get the critical cavitation parameters inside and downstream of the orifice. The test results showed that the cavitation parameter at inception is independent of the length or the diameter of the orifice. Moreover, the design criteria of cavitation erosion of cylindrical orifices have been established. Regarding the 2. item, we tested the erosion rate under high-pressure conditions. The cavitation erosion actually occurred in the cylindrical orifice at the tests that was strongly resemble to the erosion occurred at the plant. It will be seldom to reproduce resemble cavitation erosion in a cylindrical orifice with the hard material used at plants. We could establish the criteria for preventing the cavitation erosion from the test results. (authors)

  2. Shock-induced collapse of a bubble inside a deformable vessel

    PubMed Central

    Coralic, Vedran; Colonius, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Shockwave lithotripsy repeatedly focuses shockwaves on kidney stones to induce their fracture, partially through cavitation erosion. A typical side effect of the procedure is hemorrhage, which is potentially the result of the growth and collapse of bubbles inside blood vessels. To identify the mechanisms by which shock-induced collapse could lead to the onset of injury, we study an idealized problem involving a preexisting bubble in a deformable vessel. We utilize a high-order accurate, shock- and interface-capturing, finite-volume scheme and simulate the three-dimensional shock-induced collapse of an air bubble immersed in a cylindrical water column which is embedded in a gelatin/water mixture. The mixture is a soft tissue simulant, 10% gelatin by weight, and is modeled by the stiffened gas equation of state. The bubble dynamics of this model configuration are characterized by the collapse of the bubble and its subsequent jetting in the direction of the propagation of the shockwave. The vessel wall, which is defined by the material interface between the water and gelatin/water mixture, is invaginated by the collapse and distended by the impact of the jet. The present results show that the highest measured pressures and deformations occur when the volumetric confinement of the bubble is strongest, the bubble is nearest the vessel wall and/or the angle of incidence of the shockwave reduces the distance between the jet tip and the nearest vessel surface. For a particular case considered, the 40 MPa shockwave utilized in this study to collapse the bubble generated a vessel wall pressure of almost 450 MPa and produced both an invagination and distention of nearly 50% of the initial vessel radius on a 𝒪(10) ns timescale. These results are indicative of the significant potential of shock-induced collapse to contribute to the injury of blood vessels in shockwave lithotripsy. PMID:24015027

  3. Shock-induced collapse of a bubble inside a deformable vessel.

    PubMed

    Coralic, Vedran; Colonius, Tim

    2013-07-01

    Shockwave lithotripsy repeatedly focuses shockwaves on kidney stones to induce their fracture, partially through cavitation erosion. A typical side effect of the procedure is hemorrhage, which is potentially the result of the growth and collapse of bubbles inside blood vessels. To identify the mechanisms by which shock-induced collapse could lead to the onset of injury, we study an idealized problem involving a preexisting bubble in a deformable vessel. We utilize a high-order accurate, shock- and interface-capturing, finite-volume scheme and simulate the three-dimensional shock-induced collapse of an air bubble immersed in a cylindrical water column which is embedded in a gelatin/water mixture. The mixture is a soft tissue simulant, 10% gelatin by weight, and is modeled by the stiffened gas equation of state. The bubble dynamics of this model configuration are characterized by the collapse of the bubble and its subsequent jetting in the direction of the propagation of the shockwave. The vessel wall, which is defined by the material interface between the water and gelatin/water mixture, is invaginated by the collapse and distended by the impact of the jet. The present results show that the highest measured pressures and deformations occur when the volumetric confinement of the bubble is strongest, the bubble is nearest the vessel wall and/or the angle of incidence of the shockwave reduces the distance between the jet tip and the nearest vessel surface. For a particular case considered, the 40 MPa shockwave utilized in this study to collapse the bubble generated a vessel wall pressure of almost 450 MPa and produced both an invagination and distention of nearly 50% of the initial vessel radius on a (10) ns timescale. These results are indicative of the significant potential of shock-induced collapse to contribute to the injury of blood vessels in shockwave lithotripsy. PMID:24015027

  4. Assessment of shock wave lithotripters via cavitation potential

    PubMed Central

    Iloreta, Jonathan I.; Zhou, Yufeng; Sankin, Georgy N.; Zhong, Pei; Szeri, Andrew J.

    2008-01-01

    A method to characterize shock wave lithotripters by examining the potential for cavitation associated with the lithotripter shock wave (LSW) has been developed. The method uses the maximum radius achieved by a bubble subjected to a LSW as a representation of the cavitation potential for that region in the lithotripter. It is found that the maximum radius is determined by the work done on a bubble by the LSW. The method is used to characterize two reflectors: an ellipsoidal reflector and an ellipsoidal reflector with an insert. The results show that the use of an insert reduced the ?6 dB volume (with respect to peak positive pressure) from 1.6 to 0.4 cm3, the ?6 dB volume (with respect to peak negative pressure) from 14.5 to 8.3 cm3, and reduced the volume characterized by high cavitation potential (i.e., regions characterized by bubbles with radii larger than 429 µm) from 103 to 26 cm3. Thus, the insert is an effective way to localize the potentially damaging effects of shock wave lithotripsy, and suggests an approach to optimize the shape of the reflector. PMID:19865493

  5. Theory of supercompression of vapor bubbles and nanoscale thermonuclear fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Nigmatulin, Robert I.; Akhatov, Iskander Sh.; Topolnikov, Andrey S.; Bolotnova, Raisa Kh.; Vakhitova, Nailya K.; Lahey, Richard T. Jr.; Taleyarkhan, Rusi P.

    2005-10-01

    This paper provides the theoretical basis for energetic vapor bubble implosions induced by a standing acoustic wave. Its primary goal is to describe, explain, and demonstrate the plausibility of the experimental observations by Taleyarkhan et al. [Science 295, 1868 (2002); Phys. Rev. E 69, 036109 (2004)] of thermonuclear fusion for imploding cavitation bubbles in chilled deuterated acetone. A detailed description and analysis of these data, including a resolution of the criticisms that have been raised, together with some preliminary HYDRO code simulations, has been given by Nigmatulin et al. [Vestnik ANRB (Ufa, Russia) 4, 3 (2002); J. Power Energy 218-A, 345 (2004)] and Lahey et al. [Adv. Heat Transfer (to be published)]. In this paper a hydrodynamic shock (i.e., HYDRO) code model of the spherically symmetric motion for a vapor bubble in an acoustically forced liquid is presented. This model describes cavitation bubble cluster growth during the expansion period, followed by a violent implosion during the compression period of the acoustic cycle. There are two stages of the bubble dynamics process. The first, low Mach number stage, comprises almost all the time of the acoustic cycle. During this stage, the radial velocities are much less than the sound speeds in the vapor and liquid, the vapor pressure is very close to uniform, and the liquid is practically incompressible. This process is characterized by the inertia of the liquid, heat conduction, and the evaporation or condensation of the vapor. The second, very short, high Mach number stage is when the radial velocities are the same order, or higher, than the sound speeds in the vapor and liquid. In this stage high temperatures, pressures, and densities of the vapor and liquid take place. The model presented herein has realistic equations of state for the compressible liquid and vapor phases, and accounts for nonequilibrium evaporation/condensation kinetics at the liquid/vapor interface. There are interacting shock waves in both phases, which converge toward and reflect from the center of the bubble, causing dissociation, ionization, and other related plasma physics phenomena during the final stage of bubble collapse. For a vapor bubble in a deuterated organic liquid (e.g., acetone), during the final stage of collapse there is a nanoscale region (diameter {approx}100 nm) near the center of the bubble in which, for a fraction of a picosecond, the temperatures and densities are extremely high ({approx}10{sup 8} K and {approx}10 g/cm{sup 3}, respectively) such that thermonuclear fusion may take place. To quantify this, the kinetics of the local deuterium/deuterium (D/D) nuclear fusion reactions was used in the HYDRO code to determine the intensity of the fusion reactions. Numerical HYDRO code simulations of the bubble implosion process have been carried out for the experimental conditions used by Taleyarkhan et al. [Science 295, 1868 (2002); Phys. Rev. E 69, 036109 (2004)] at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The results show good agreement with the experimental data on bubble fusion that was measured in chilled deuterated acetone.

  6. Ozone and Cavitation Combination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carreon, Ernestina; Traversoni, Leonardo

    2009-09-01

    From laboratory measurements it is well known that the addition of ozone and cavitation enhances the properties of both, understanding for that the ones related to disinfection and carbon removal from waste water. This paper shows modeling of such phenomena that gives some light to the understanding of it and also provides the opportunity to improve the effectiveness of the current procedures.

  7. The effects of total dissolved gas on chum salmon fry survival, growth, gas bubble disease, and seawater tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Geist, David R.; Linley, Timothy J.; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Deng, Zhiqun

    2013-02-01

    Chum salmon Oncorhynchus keta alevin developing in gravel habitats downstream of Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River are exposed to elevated levels of total dissolved gas (TDG) when water is spilled at the dam to move migrating salmon smolts downstream to the Pacific Ocean. Current water quality criteria for the management of dissolved gas in dam tailwaters were developed primarily to protect salmonid smolts and are assumed to be protective of alevin if adequate depth compensation is provided. We studied whether chum salmon alevin exposed to six levels of dissolved gas ranging from 100% to 130% TDG at three development periods between hatch and emergence (hereafter early, middle, and late stage) suffered differential mortality, growth, gas bubble disease, or seawater tolerance. Each life stage was exposed for 50 d (early stage), 29 d (middle stage), or 16 d (late stage) beginning at 13, 34, and 37 d post-hatch, respectively, through 50% emergence. The mortality for all stages from exposure to emergence was estimated to be 8% (95% confidence interval (CI) of 4% to 12%) when dissolved gas levels were between 100% and 117% TDG. Mortality significantly increased as dissolved gas levels rose above 117% TDG,; with the lethal concentration that produced 50% mortality (LC50 ) was estimated to be 128.7% TDG (95% CI of 127.2% to 130.2% TDG) in the early and middle stages. By contrast, there was no evidence that dissolved gas level significantly affected growth in any life stage except that the mean wet weight at emergence of early stage fish exposed to 130% TDG was significantly less than the modeled growth of unexposed fish. The proportion of fish afflicted with gas bubble disease increased with increasing gas concentrations and occurred most commonly in the nares and gastrointestinal tract. Early stage fish exhibited higher ratios of filament to lamellar gill chloride cells than late stage fish, and these ratios increased and decreased for early and late stage fish, respectively, as gas levels increased; however, there were no significant differences in mortality between life stages after 96 h in seawater. The study results suggest that current water quality guidelines for the management of dissolved gas appear to offer a conservative level of protection to chum salmon alevin incubating in gravel habitat downstream of Bonneville Dam.

  8. Cavitation on a semicircular leading-edge plate and NACA0015 hydrofoil: Visualization and velocity measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravtsova, A. Yu.; Markovich, D. M.; Pervunin, K. S.; Timoshevskii, M. V.; Hanjali?, K.

    2014-12-01

    Using high-speed visualization and particle image velocimetry (PIV), cavitating flows near a plane plate with a rounded leading edge and NACA0015 hydrofoil at angles of attack from 0° to 9° are studied. In the experiments, several known types of cavitation, as well as some differences, were detected with variation of the cavitation number. In particular, at small angles of attack (up to 3°), cavitation on the plate appears in the form of a streak array; on the hydrofoil, it appears in the form of individual bubbles. For the NACA0015 hydrofoil, isolated and intermittent streaks are divided and grow in regimes with developed cavitation; then, however, they merge in bubble clouds and form an extremely regular cellular structure. With an increase in the angle of attack to 9°, the structure of the cavitation cavity on the hydrofoil is changed by the streak structure, like in the case with the plate. In this work, it is shown that PIV permits one to measure the velocity in cavitating flows, in particular, within the gas-vapor phase. It was established from the analysis of distributions of the average flow velocity and moments of velocity fluctuations that the cavitation generation is caused by the development of the carrier fluid flow near the leading edge of the hydrofoil. Down the stream, however, the flow structure strongly depends on the cavitation regime, which is seen from the comparison of the distributions with the case of a single-phase flow. The presented measurements qualitatively verify general trends and show some quantitative distinctions for the two considered flowpast bodies.

  9. Growth control of sessile microbubbles in PDMS devices

    E-print Network

    Volk, Andreas; Kähler, Christian J; Hilgenfeldt, Sascha; Marin, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    In a microfluidic environment, the presence of bubbles is often detrimental to the functionality of the device, leading to clogging or cavitation, but microbubbles can also be an indispensable asset in other applications such as microstreaming. In either case, it is crucial to understand and control the growth or shrinkage of these bodies of air, in particular in common soft-lithography devices based on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), which is highly permeable to gases. In this work, we study the gas transport into and out of a bubble positioned in a microfluidic device, taking into account the direct gas exchange through PDMS as well as the transport of gas through the liquid in the device. Hydrostatic pressure regulation allows for the quantitative control of growth, shrinkage, or the attainment of a stable equilibrium bubble size. We find that the vapor pressure of the liquid plays an important role for the balance of gas transport, accounting for variability in experimental conditions and suggesting addition...

  10. Interaction of Two Differently Sized Bubbles in a Free Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chew, Lup Wai; Khoo, Boo Cheong; Klaseboer, Evert; Ohl, Siew-Wan

    The interaction between two different sized (spark created, non-equilibrium) bubbles is studied by using high speed photography. The bubble size ranges from 2 to 7 mm. The experimental results are compared to that of the similar sized bubbles reported in the literature. Interestingly, all the four major behaviors of bubble-bubble interactions (i.e. 'bubble-collapsed' induced liquid jets directed away from each other, liquid jets directed towards each other, bubble coalescence and the 'catapult' effect) are observed which bear much similarity to that found for similar sized bubbles' interaction. The main parameters studied/varied are the size of the bubbles, the dimensionless separation distance and the phase difference between the two bubbles. The results obtained are consistent with the cases of similar sized bubbles reported in the literature, with each type of behavior occupying a distinct region in the graphical plot. This indicates that the results for the (special) similar sized bubbles can be generalized to cases with different sized bubbles. Many of the real life applications such as cavitations corrosions often involve bubbles with significant size difference, thus the present findings are useful in predicting the behavior of multiple bubbles in many situations.

  11. Correlation between simulations and cavitation-induced erosion damage in Spallation Neutron Source target modules after operation

    SciTech Connect

    Riemer, Bernie; McClintock, David A; Kaminskas, Saulius; Abdou, Ashraf A

    2014-01-01

    An explicit finite element (FE) technique developed for estimating dynamic strain in the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) mercury target module vessel is now providing insight into cavitation damage patterns observed in used targets. The technique uses an empirically developed material model for the mercury that describes liquid-like volumetric stiffness combined with a tensile pressure cut-off limit that approximates cavitation. The longest period each point in the mercury is at the tensile cut-off threshold is denoted its saturation time. Now, the pattern of saturation time can be obtained from these simulations and is being positively correlated with observed damage patterns and is interpreted as a qualitative measure of damage potential. Saturation time has been advocated by collaborators at J-Parc as a factor in predicting bubble nuclei growth and collapse intensity. The larger the ratio of maximum bubble size to nucleus, the greater the bubble collapse intensity to be expected; longer saturation times result in greater ratios. With the recent development of a user subroutine for the FE solver saturation time is now provided over the entire mercury domain. Its pattern agrees with spots of damage seen above and below the beam axis on the SNS inner vessel beam window and elsewhere. The other simulation result being compared to observed damage patterns is mercury velocity at the wall. Related R&D has provided evidence for the damage mitigation that higher wall velocity provides. In comparison to observations in SNS targets, inverse correlation of high velocity to damage is seen. In effect, it is the combination of the patterns of saturation time and low velocity that seems to match actual damage patterns.

  12. Characterization of the HIFU-induced cloud cavitation for the optimization of high pressure concentration for lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Teiichiro; Yoshizawa, Shin; Kaneko, Yukio; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2006-05-01

    The bubble cloud is a highly scattering object; to the contrary, it is also a strong pressure wave enhancer, if the wavelength and amplitude of the wave is appropriate ones. We've been investigated the stone erosion enhancement in the existence of bubble cloud on the stone surface by using high frequency waveform that immediately followed by low frequency trailing pulse (C-C waveform; Cavitation Control waveform). For the optimization of the high pressure concentration it is needed to know, "how the enhancement of the pressure wave through the bubble cloud" and "how we can estimate the efficiency thorough the passive detection of the reflected signal from the bubble cloud". We measured the "Transmittance" and "Reflection" by two types of acoustic emission sensors, PCD (Passive Cavitation Detector) and DCD (Direct Collapse Detector). The results well depict the characteristics of the HIFU-induced bubble cloud responses. The response curves reveal that the local maxima of the "Transmittance" and "Reflection" occur at the different bubble cloud volume. The PCD signal is higher in the larger bubble cloud band. The DCD signal is larger in the smaller bubble cloud band. These tendencies imply the therapeutic effect through the bubble cloud is optimized in the small bubble cloud region and too much bubbles scatter the incoming ultrasound wave and the ultrasound wave does not efficiently propagates inward the bubble cloud. Thus, for the optimization of the bubble cloud collapse, the cavitation threshold can be the lower limit and the large scattering amplitude from bubble cloud can be the upper limit of the ultrasound conditions.

  13. Attached cavitation at a small diameter ultrasonic horn tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žnidar?i?, Anton; Mettin, Robert; Cairós, Carlos; Dular, Matevž

    2014-02-01

    Ultrasonic horn transducers are frequently used in applications of acoustic cavitation in liquids, for instance, for cell disruption or sonochemical reactions. They are operated typically in the frequency range up to about 50 kHz and have tip diameters from some mm to several cm. It has been observed that if the horn tip is sufficiently small and driven at high amplitude, cavitation is very strong, and the tip can be covered entirely by the gas/vapor phase for longer time intervals. A peculiar dynamics of the attached cavity can emerge with expansion and collapse at a self-generated frequency in the subharmonic range, i.e., below the acoustic driving frequency. Here, we present a systematic study of the cavitation dynamics in water at a 20 kHz horn tip of 3 mm diameter. The system was investigated by high-speed imaging with simultaneous recording of the acoustic emissions. Measurements were performed under variation of acoustic power, air saturation, viscosity, surface tension, and temperature of the liquid. Our findings show that the liquid properties play no significant role in the dynamics of the attached cavitation at the small ultrasonic horn. Also the variation of the experimental geometry, within a certain range, did not change the dynamics. We believe that the main two reasons for the peculiar dynamics of cavitation on a small ultrasonic horn are the higher energy density on a small tip and the inability of the big tip to "wash" away the gaseous bubbles. Calculation of the somewhat adapted Strouhal number revealed that, similar to the hydrodynamic cavitation, values which are relatively low characterize slow cavitation structure dynamics. In cases where the cavitation follows the driving frequency this value lies much higher - probably at Str > 20. In the spirit to distinguish the observed phenomenon with other cavitation dynamics at ultrasonic transducer surfaces, we suggest to term the observed phenomenon of attached cavities partly covering the full horn tip as "acoustic supercavitation." This reflects the conjecture that not the sound field in terms of acoustic (negative) pressure in the liquid is responsible for nucleation, but the motion of the transducer surface.

  14. Characteristics and detecting of laser-induced single bubble collapse noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiumei; He, Jie; Li, Wenhua; Jiao, Mingli; Liu, Xiaochen; Wang, Haibing; Wang, Bingyang; Li, Beibei

    2015-05-01

    Shock waves emission after collapse of a laser-induced bubble in the liquid was studied experimentally by using a PTZ hydrophone. An experimental method and a Cavitation detection system was designed to investigate bubble collapse noise in this article. When a focused short laser pulse was focused in a liquid near a solid wall, it induced optical breakdown, the emission of shock waves and the generation of cavitation bubbles. A PZT hydrophone was used to detect the shock wave emitted during bubble oscillations. In addition, a software based on MATLAB was designed for analyzing cavitation noise. The software system had multiple functionalities, namely signal reading, noise reduction, signal analysis in frequency domain, and display. The results showed that the software can not only reflect the spectral characteristics of the noise quickly but also can interpret the current cavitation station according to the changing rules of different cavitation station. The results of the research have strong implications for cavitation phenomena analysis and cavitation warning systems in turbines, propellers, and other irrigation machinery.

  15. Can diving-induced tissue nitrogen supersaturation increase the chance of acoustically driven bubble growth in marine mammals?

    PubMed

    Houser, D S; Howard, R; Ridgway, S

    2001-11-21

    The potential for acoustically mediated causes of stranding in cetaceans (whales and dolphins) is of increasing concern given recent stranding events associated with anthropogenic acoustic activity. We examine a potentially debilitating non-auditory mechanism called rectified diffusion. Rectified diffusion causes gas bubble growth, which in an insonified animal may produce emboli, tissue separation and high, localized pressure in nervous tissue. Using the results of a dolphin dive study and a model of rectified diffusion for low-frequency exposure, we demonstrate that the diving behavior of cetaceans prior to an intense acoustic exposure may increase the chance of rectified diffusion. Specifically, deep diving and slow ascent/descent speed contributes to increased gas-tissue saturation, a condition that amplifies the likelihood of rectified diffusion. The depth of lung collapse limits nitrogen uptake per dive and the surface interval duration influences the amount of nitrogen washout from tissues between dives. Model results suggest that low-frequency rectified diffusion models need to be advanced, that the diving behavior of marine mammals of concern needs to be investigated to identify at-risk animals, and that more intensive studies of gas dynamics within diving marine mammals should be undertaken. PMID:11894990

  16. Trans-Stent B-Mode Ultrasound and Passive Cavitation Imaging.

    PubMed

    Haworth, Kevin J; Raymond, Jason L; Radhakrishnan, Kirthi; Moody, Melanie R; Huang, Shao-Ling; Peng, Tao; Shekhar, Himanshu; Klegerman, Melvin E; Kim, Hyunggun; McPherson, David D; Holland, Christy K

    2016-02-01

    Angioplasty and stenting of a stenosed artery enable acute restoration of blood flow. However, restenosis or a lack of re-endothelization can subsequently occur depending on the stent type. Cavitation-mediated drug delivery is a potential therapy for these conditions, but requires that particular types of cavitation be induced by ultrasound insonation. Because of the heterogeneity of tissue and stochastic nature of cavitation, feedback mechanisms are needed to determine whether the sustained bubble activity is induced. The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of passive cavitation imaging through a metal stent in a flow phantom and an animal model. In this study, an endovascular stent was deployed in a flow phantom and in porcine femoral arteries. Fluorophore-labeled echogenic liposomes, a theragnostic ultrasound contrast agent, were injected proximal to the stent. Cavitation images were obtained by passively recording and beamforming the acoustic emissions from echogenic liposomes insonified with a low-frequency (500 kHz) transducer. In vitro experiments revealed that the signal-to-noise ratio for detecting stable cavitation activity through the stent was greater than 8 dB. The stent did not significantly reduce the signal-to-noise ratio. Trans-stent cavitation activity was also detected in vivo via passive cavitation imaging when echogenic liposomes were insonified by the 500-kHz transducer. When stable cavitation was detected, delivery of the fluorophore into the arterial wall was observed. Increased echogenicity within the stent was also observed when echogenic liposomes were administered. Thus, both B-mode ultrasound imaging and cavitation imaging are feasible in the presence of an endovascular stent in vivo. Demonstration of this capability supports future studies to monitor restenosis with contrast-enhanced ultrasound and pursue image-guided ultrasound-mediated drug delivery to inhibit restenosis. PMID:26547633

  17. Numerical investigation on the cavitating flow in Annular Jet Pump under different flow rate ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, L. Z.; Long, X. P.; Lyu, Q.; Hu, Y.; Wang, Q. Q.

    2014-03-01

    The nozzle of annular jet pump (AJP) is annular and the secondary flow is encircled by the primary flow which is of great differences with that of central jet pump (CJP). Since the high velocity working flow soaring out the annular nozzle adheres to the inner wall, the cavitation is considerably easy to be induced at the intersection of the suction chamber and the throat. This paper mainly investigated the inception and development of the cavitation in an AJP under different flow rate ratio q by numerical methods and the results was validated by the experimentation. The turbulent model is set as Realizable k-? model, which combined with the mixture multiphase model and the Schnerr-Sauer cavitation model. The SIMPLEC algorithm is applied to solve the coupling of pressure and velocity. The simulated results confirms well with experimental data. As the working condition varies, specifically when the pressure of the outlet decreases to a certain value, the intersection of the suction chamber and the throat sees the inception and development of the cavitation and the bubble generates there adheres to the inner wall. With the decreasing outlet pressure, the cavitation region expands to the diffuser along the inner wall, and also to the axis. When the cavitation region develops to the axis and the pressure there reaches to the critical cavitation pressure (generally vapor pressure), the pump turns into the operation limits and the efficiency drops abruptly. Furthermore, when the flow rate ratio q is considerably low (generally <0.2), the shearing layer and the center of the recirculation also experience the cavitation inception. It is for this reason that the relationship between the critical cavitation number qc and the cavitation flow rate ratio qc can be divided into two parts. When ?c<0.31, it varies little with the increasing qc, while it increases linearly with the increasing qc when ranging from 0.31 to 1.58.

  18. Numerical investigation of unsteady cavitation around a NACA 66 hydrofoil using OpenFOAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo, V. H.; Luo, X. W.; Escaler, X.; Ji, J.; Aguinaga, A.

    2014-03-01

    The prediction and control of cavitation damage in pumps, propellers, hydro turbines and fluid machinery in general is necessary during the design stage. The present paper deals with a numerical investigation of unsteady cloud cavitation around a NACA 66 hydrofoil. The current study is focused on understanding the dynamic pressures generated during the cavity collapses as a fundamental characteristic in cavitation erosion. A 2D and 3D unsteady flow simulation has been carried out using OpenFOAM. Then, Paraview and Python programming language have been used to characterize dynamic pressure field. Adapted Large Eddy Simulation (LES) and Zwart cavitation model have been implemented to improve the analysis of cloud motion and to visualize the bubble expansions. Additional results also confirm the correlation between cavity formation and generated pressures.

  19. Laser-induced cavitation in nanoemulsion with gold nanospheres for blood clot disruption: in vitro results.

    PubMed

    Wei, Chen-wei; Xia, Jinjun; Lombardo, Michael; Perez, Camilo; Arnal, Bastien; Larson-Smith, Kjersta; Pelivanov, Ivan; Matula, Thomas; Pozzo, Lilo; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2014-05-01

    Optically activated cavitation in a nanoemulsion contrast agent is proposed for therapeutic applications. With a 56°C boiling point perfluorohexane core and highly absorptive gold nanospheres at the oil-water interface, cavitation nuclei in the core can be efficiently induced with a laser fluence below medical safety limits (70 mJ/cm2 at 1064 nm). This agent is also sensitive to ultrasound (US) exposure and can induce inertial cavitation at a pressure within the medical diagnostic range. Images from a high-speed camera demonstrate bubble formation in these nanoemulsions. The potential of using this contrast agent for blood clot disruption is demonstrated in an in vitro study. The possibility of simultaneous laser and US excitation to reduce the cavitation threshold for therapeutic applications is also discussed. PMID:24784055

  20. Effect of Nuclei Concentration on Cavitation Cluster Dynamics C.D. Ohl, and D. Lohse

    E-print Network

    Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    with a piezoelectric shock wave generator. It is a modified source from the commercial lithotripter Piezolith 3000 of the methods to generate clusters of bubbles is to apply a single,intensive, pulsed pressure wave. In its in sonochemistry16,17 . II. CAVITATION CLUSTER EXPERIMENTS A single pressure pulse is generated

  1. Analysis of cavitation behaviour in a centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, M.; Fu, L. P.; Zhou, L. J.; Guo, Q.; Wang, Z. W.

    2012-11-01

    Cavitation is a well-known problem in centrifugal pumps, causing serious damage and substantial head losses. However, the reason for the sudden head drop in cavitation curves is not fully understood. In this paper, the transient three-dimensional cavitating flow field in a centrifugal pump was calculated using RNG k-? turbulence model and Rayleigh Plesset cavitation model. The NPSH-H curve and the cavitation development in the whole passage were predicted. The blade loading and energy transfer are analyzed for various cavitation conditions. The results show that the existing of the cavities changes the load distribution on blades. With the decrease of NPSH the loads on blades tend to increases in the rear part but decreases in the front part. If NPSH is not so low, sometimes the overall torque may increase slightly, thus the head may also increase slightly. But if the NPSH become low and reach a threshold value, the overall torque will also decrease. At the same time, the energy dissipation in the vortices increases greatly because of the growth of the cavities. These two reasons make the head drop rapidly.

  2. DNA denaturation bubbles at criticality

    E-print Network

    Theodorakopoulos, Nikos

    2008-01-01

    The equilibrium statistical properties of DNA denaturation bubbles are examined in detail within the framework of the Peyrard-Bishop-Dauxois model. Bubble formation in homogeneous DNA is found to depend crucially on the presence of nonlinear base-stacking interactions. Small bubbles extending over less than 10 base pairs are associated with much larger free energies of formation per site than larger bubbles. As the critical temperature is approached, the free energy associated with further bubble growth becomes vanishingly small. An analysis of average displacement profiles of bubbles of varying sizes at different temperatures reveals almost identical scaled shapes in the absence of nonlinear stacking; nonlinear stacking leads to distinct scaled shapes of large and small bubbles.

  3. Photodistruptive laser nucleation of ultrasonic cavitation for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Doug L.; Spooner, Greg J.; Williams, Alun R.

    2001-07-01

    Pulses of high intensity laser light, when focused into transparent materials, may produce localized electron-ion plasmas through optical breakdown. By simultaneously incorporating the resulting volume of vaporized material within the focal volume of a high intensity ultrasound source, the photodisruption (1.05 micrometers wavelength) void served as a nucleation site for ultrasonic cavitation. Dilute suspensions of canine erythrocytes in phosphate buffered saline were exposed in a flow-through exposure chamber and the percentage of lysed cells was used as a measure of the biologically effective cavitation activity produced in the chamber. Brief (about 30 microsecond(s) ) acoustic emissions were detected from the photodisruption alone (indicating laser nucleation of bubbles), but the cell lysis produced was undetectable against the background. However, combined exposure greatly increased both the duration of the acoustic emissions (up to 1.5 ms) and the amount of cell lysis above an ultrasonic pressure amplitude threshold of about 4.3 MPa at 2.5 MHz. The amount of cell lysis (sometimes approaching 100%) increased with increasing ultrasonic intensity, laser pulse energy and laser PRF. Addition of 5% serum albumin enhanced the effect, apparently by stabilizing bubbles and nuclei. Photodisruptive laser nucleation of ultrasonic cavitation can provide controlled and synergistic enhancement of bioeffects.

  4. Periodic shock-emission from acoustically driven cavitation clouds: a source of the subharmonic signal.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Keith; Tapia-Siles, Cecilia; Gerold, Bjoern; Postema, Michiel; Cochran, Sandy; Cuschieri, Alfred; Prentice, Paul

    2014-12-01

    Single clouds of cavitation bubbles, driven by 254kHz focused ultrasound at pressure amplitudes in the range of 0.48-1.22MPa, have been observed via high-speed shadowgraphic imaging at 1×10(6) frames per second. Clouds underwent repetitive growth, oscillation and collapse (GOC) cycles, with shock-waves emitted periodically at the instant of collapse during each cycle. The frequency of cloud collapse, and coincident shock-emission, was primarily dependent on the intensity of the focused ultrasound driving the activity. The lowest peak-to-peak pressure amplitude of 0.48MPa generated shock-waves with an average period of 7.9±0.5?s, corresponding to a frequency of f0/2, half-harmonic to the fundamental driving. Increasing the intensity gave rise to GOC cycles and shock-emission periods of 11.8±0.3, 15.8±0.3, 19.8±0.2?s, at pressure amplitudes of 0.64, 0.92 and 1.22MPa, corresponding to the higher-order subharmonics of f0/3, f0/4 and f0/5, respectively. Parallel passive acoustic detection, filtered for the fundamental driving, revealed features that correlated temporally to the shock-emissions observed via high-speed imaging, p(two-tailed) < 0.01 (r=0.996, taken over all data). Subtracting the isolated acoustic shock profiles from the raw signal collected from the detector, demonstrated the removal of subharmonic spectral peaks, in the frequency domain. The larger cavitation clouds (>200?m diameter, at maximum inflation), that developed under insonations of peak-to-peak pressure amplitudes >1.0MPa, emitted shock-waves with two or more fronts suggesting non-uniform collapse of the cloud. The observations indicate that periodic shock-emissions from acoustically driven cavitation clouds provide a source for the cavitation subharmonic signal, and that shock structure may be used to study intra-cloud dynamics at sub-microsecond timescales. PMID:25015000

  5. Real-Time Visualization of Joint Cavitation

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Lindsay

    2015-01-01

    Cracking sounds emitted from human synovial joints have been attributed historically to the sudden collapse of a cavitation bubble formed as articular surfaces are separated. Unfortunately, bubble collapse as the source of joint cracking is inconsistent with many physical phenomena that define the joint cracking phenomenon. Here we present direct evidence from real-time magnetic resonance imaging that the mechanism of joint cracking is related to cavity formation rather than bubble collapse. In this study, ten metacarpophalangeal joints were studied by inserting the finger of interest into a flexible tube tightened around a length of cable used to provide long-axis traction. Before and after traction, static 3D T1-weighted magnetic resonance images were acquired. During traction, rapid cine magnetic resonance images were obtained from the joint midline at a rate of 3.2 frames per second until the cracking event occurred. As traction forces increased, real-time cine magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated rapid cavity inception at the time of joint separation and sound production after which the resulting cavity remained visible. Our results offer direct experimental evidence that joint cracking is associated with cavity inception rather than collapse of a pre-existing bubble. These observations are consistent with tribonucleation, a known process where opposing surfaces resist separation until a critical point where they then separate rapidly creating sustained gas cavities. Observed previously in vitro, this is the first in-vivo macroscopic demonstration of tribonucleation and as such, provides a new theoretical framework to investigate health outcomes associated with joint cracking. PMID:25875374

  6. Real-time visualization of joint cavitation.

    PubMed

    Kawchuk, Gregory N; Fryer, Jerome; Jaremko, Jacob L; Zeng, Hongbo; Rowe, Lindsay; Thompson, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Cracking sounds emitted from human synovial joints have been attributed historically to the sudden collapse of a cavitation bubble formed as articular surfaces are separated. Unfortunately, bubble collapse as the source of joint cracking is inconsistent with many physical phenomena that define the joint cracking phenomenon. Here we present direct evidence from real-time magnetic resonance imaging that the mechanism of joint cracking is related to cavity formation rather than bubble collapse. In this study, ten metacarpophalangeal joints were studied by inserting the finger of interest into a flexible tube tightened around a length of cable used to provide long-axis traction. Before and after traction, static 3D T1-weighted magnetic resonance images were acquired. During traction, rapid cine magnetic resonance images were obtained from the joint midline at a rate of 3.2 frames per second until the cracking event occurred. As traction forces increased, real-time cine magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated rapid cavity inception at the time of joint separation and sound production after which the resulting cavity remained visible. Our results offer direct experimental evidence that joint cracking is associated with cavity inception rather than collapse of a pre-existing bubble. These observations are consistent with tribonucleation, a known process where opposing surfaces resist separation until a critical point where they then separate rapidly creating sustained gas cavities. Observed previously in vitro, this is the first in-vivo macroscopic demonstration of tribonucleation and as such, provides a new theoretical framework to investigate health outcomes associated with joint cracking. PMID:25875374

  7. Dynamics of two interacting hydrogen bubbles in liquid aluminum under the influence of a strong acoustic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebon, Gerard S. B.; Pericleous, Koulis; Tzanakis, Iakovos; Eskin, Dmitry G.

    2015-10-01

    Ultrasonic melt processing significantly improves the properties of metallic materials. However, this promising technology has not been successfully transferred to the industry because of difficulties in treating large volumes of melt. To circumvent these difficulties, a fundamental understanding of the efficiency of ultrasonic treatment of liquid metals is required. In this endeavor, the dynamics of two interacting hydrogen bubbles in liquid aluminum are studied to determine the effect of a strong acoustic field on their behavior. It is shown that coalescence readily occurs at low frequencies in the range of 16 to 20 kHz; forcing frequencies at these values are likely to promote degassing. Emitted acoustic pressures from relatively isolated bubbles that resonate with the driving frequency are in the megapascal range and these cavitation shock waves are presumed to promote grain refinement by disrupting the growth of the solidification front.

  8. Cavitation instabilities in hydraulic machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujimoto, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Cavitation instabilities in hydraulic machines, hydro turbines and turbopump inducers, are reviewed focusing on the cause of instabilities. One-dimensional model of hydro turbine system shows that the overload surge is caused by the diffuser effect of the draft tube. Experiments show that this effect also causes the surge mode oscillations at part load. One dimensional model of a cavitating turbopump inducer shows that the mass flow gain factor, representing the cavity volume increase caused by the incidence angle increase is the cause of cavitation surge and rotating cavitation. Two dimensional model of a cavitating turbopump inducer shows that various modes of cavitation instabilities start to occur when the cavity length becomes about 65% of the blade spacing. This is caused by the interaction of the local flow near the cavity trailing edge with the leading edge of the next blade. It was shown by a 3D CFD that this is true also for real cases with tip cavitation. In all cases, it was shown that cavitation instabilities are caused by the fundamental characteristics of cavities that the cavity volume increases with the decrease of ambient pressure or the increase of the incidence angle.

  9. Recalcitrant bubbles.

    PubMed

    Shanahan, Martin E R; Sefiane, Khellil

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate that thermocapillary forces may drive bubbles against liquid flow in 'anomalous' mixtures. Unlike 'ordinary' liquids, in which bubbles migrate towards higher temperatures, we have observed vapour bubbles migrating towards lower temperatures, therefore against the flow. This unusual behaviour may be explained by the temperature dependence of surface tension of these binary mixtures. Bubbles migrating towards their equilibrium position follow an exponential trend. They finally settle in a stationary position just 'downstream' of the minimum in surface tension. The exponential trend for bubbles in 'anomalous' mixtures and the linear trend in pure liquids can be explained by a simple model. For larger bubbles, oscillations were observed. These oscillations can be reasonably explained by including an inertial term in the equation of motion (neglected for smaller bubbles). PMID:24740256

  10. Recalcitrant bubbles

    PubMed Central

    Shanahan, Martin E. R.; Sefiane, Khellil

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate that thermocapillary forces may drive bubbles against liquid flow in ‘anomalous' mixtures. Unlike ‘ordinary' liquids, in which bubbles migrate towards higher temperatures, we have observed vapour bubbles migrating towards lower temperatures, therefore against the flow. This unusual behaviour may be explained by the temperature dependence of surface tension of these binary mixtures. Bubbles migrating towards their equilibrium position follow an exponential trend. They finally settle in a stationary position just ‘downstream' of the minimum in surface tension. The exponential trend for bubbles in ‘anomalous' mixtures and the linear trend in pure liquids can be explained by a simple model. For larger bubbles, oscillations were observed. These oscillations can be reasonably explained by including an inertial term in the equation of motion (neglected for smaller bubbles). PMID:24740256

  11. Measurement of the resonance frequency of single bubbles using a laser Doppler vibrometer

    E-print Network

    Wilson, Preston S.

    of bubbles confined in tubes and channels is im- portant in medical and industrial applications of this measurement technique. The precision of the technique is similar to the precision of traditional acoustic, sonochemistry, and cavitation,3­6 to medical acoustics.7­9 Understanding the behavior of single bubbles

  12. Three types of cavitation caused by air seeding.

    PubMed

    Shen, Fanyi; Wang, Yuansheng; Cheng, Yanxia; Zhang, Li

    2012-11-01

    There are different opinions of the dynamics of an air bubble entering a xylem conduit. In this paper, we present a thorough mechanical analysis and conclude that there are three types of cavitation caused by air seeding. After an air seed enters a conduit at high xylem pressure P'(1), along with the drop of the water potential, it will expand gradually to a long-shaped bubble and extend continually. This is the first type of air seeding, or the type of expanding gradually. When the xylem pressure is moderate, right after an air seed enters a conduit, it will expand first. Then, as soon as the pressure reaches a threshold the bubble will blow up to form a bubble in long shape, accompanied by acoustic (or ultra-acoustic) emission. It will extend further as xylem pressure decreases continually. This is the second type of air seeding, or the type of expanding-exploding, becoming a long-shaped bubble-lengthening by degrees. In the range of P'(1) ? - 3P(o) (P(o) is atmospheric pressure), soon after an air seed is sucked into a conduit it will explode immediately and the conduit will be full of the gas of the bubble instantly. This is the third type of air seeding, or the type of sudden exploding and filling conduit instantly. The third type is the frequent event in daily life of plant. PMID:23100258

  13. Acoustic and Cavitation Fields of Shock Wave Therapy Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitnis, Parag V.; Cleveland, Robin O.

    2006-05-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) is considered a viable treatment modality for orthopedic ailments. Despite increasing clinical use, the mechanisms by which ESWT devices generate a therapeutic effect are not yet understood. The mechanistic differences in various devices and their efficacies might be dependent on their acoustic and cavitation outputs. We report acoustic and cavitation measurements of a number of different shock wave therapy devices. Two devices were electrohydraulic: one had a large reflector (HMT Ossatron) and the other was a hand-held source (HMT Evotron); the other device was a pneumatically driven device (EMS Swiss DolorClast Vet). Acoustic measurements were made using a fiber-optic probe hydrophone and a PVDF hydrophone. A dual passive cavitation detection system was used to monitor cavitation activity. Qualitative differences between these devices were also highlighted using a high-speed camera. We found that the Ossatron generated focused shock waves with a peak positive pressure around 40 MPa. The Evotron produced peak positive pressure around 20 MPa, however, its acoustic output appeared to be independent of the power setting of the device. The peak positive pressure from the DolorClast was about 5 MPa without a clear shock front. The DolorClast did not generate a focused acoustic field. Shadowgraph images show that the wave propagating from the DolorClast is planar and not focused in the vicinity of the hand-piece. All three devices produced measurable cavitation with a characteristic time (cavitation inception to bubble collapse) that varied between 95 and 209 ?s for the Ossatron, between 59 and 283 ?s for the Evotron, and between 195 and 431 ?s for the DolorClast. The high-speed camera images show that the cavitation activity for the DolorClast is primarily restricted to the contact surface of the hand-piece. These data indicate that the devices studied here vary in acoustic and cavitation output, which may imply that the mechanisms by which they generate therapeutic effects are different.

  14. Mapping of cavitational activity in a pilot plant dyeing equipment.

    PubMed

    Actis Grande, G; Giansetti, M; Pezzin, A; Rovero, G; Sicardi, S

    2015-11-01

    A large number of papers of the literature quote dyeing intensification based on the application of ultrasound (US) in the dyeing liquor. Mass transfer mechanisms are described and quantified, nevertheless these experimental results in general refer to small laboratory apparatuses with a capacity of a few hundred millilitres and extremely high volumetric energy intensity. With the strategy of overcoming the scale-up inaccuracy consequent to the technological application of ultrasounds, a dyeing pilot-plant prototype of suitable liquor capacity (about 40 L) and properly simulating several liquor to textile hydraulic relationships was designed by including US transducers with different geometries. Optimal dyeing may be obtained by optimising the distance between transducer and textile material, the liquid height being a non-negligible operating parameter. Hence, mapping the cavitation energy in the machinery is expected to provide basic data on the intensity and distribution of the ultrasonic field in the aqueous liquor. A flat ultrasonic transducer (absorbed electrical power of 600 W), equipped with eight devices emitting at 25 kHz, was mounted horizontally at the equipment bottom. Considering industrial scale dyeing, liquor and textile substrate are reciprocally displaced to achieve a uniform colouration. In this technology a non uniform US field could affect the dyeing evenness to a large extent; hence, mapping the cavitation energy distribution in the machinery is expected to provide fundamental data and define optimal operating conditions. Local values of the cavitation intensity were recorded by using a carefully calibrated Ultrasonic Energy Meter, which is able to measure the power per unit surface generated by the cavitation implosion of bubbles. More than 200 measurements were recorded to define the map at each horizontal plane positioned at a different distance from the US transducer; tap water was heated at the same temperature used for dyeing tests (60°C). Different liquid flow rates were tested to investigate the effect of the hydrodynamics characterising the equipment. The mapping of the cavitation intensity in the pilot-plant machinery was performed to achieve with the following goals: (a) to evaluate the influence of turbulence on the cavitation intensity, and (b) to determine the optimal distance from the ultrasound device at which a fabric should be positioned, this parameter being a compromise between the cavitation intensity (higher next to the transducer) and the US field uniformity (achieved at some distance from this device). By carrying out dyeing tests of wool fabrics in the prototype unit, consistent results were confirmed by comparison with the mapping of cavitation intensity. PMID:26186865

  15. Bubble dynamics under acoustic excitation with multiple frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. N.; Zhang, Y. N.; Li, S. C.

    2015-01-01

    Because of its magnificent mechanical and chemical effects, acoustic cavitation plays an important role in a broad range of biomedical, chemical and mechanical engineering problems. Particularly, irradiation of the multiple frequency acoustic wave could enhance the effects of cavitation. The advantages of employment of multi-frequency ultrasonic field include decreasing the cavitation thresholds, promoting cavitation nuclei generation, increasing the mass transfer and improving energy efficiency. Therefore, multi-frequency ultrasonic systems are employed in a variety of applications, e.g., to enhance the intensity of sonoluminenscence, to increase efficiency of sonochemical reaction, to improve the accuracy of ultrasound imaging and the efficiency of tissue ablation. Compared to single-frequency systems, a lot of new features of bubble dynamics exist in multi-frequency systems, such as special properties of oscillating bubbles, unique resonances in the bubble response curves, and unusual chaotic behaviours. In present paper, the underlying mechanisms of the cavitation effects under multi-frequency acoustical excitation are also briefly introduced.

  16. Enhancing gas-liquid mass transfer rates in non-newtonian fermentations by confining mycelial growth to microbeads in a bubble column

    SciTech Connect

    Gbewonyo, K.; Wang, D.I.C.

    1983-12-01

    The performance of a penicillin fermentation was assessed in a laboratory-scale bubble column fermentor, with mycelial growth confined to the pore matrix of celite beads. Final cell densities of 29 g/L and penicillin titres of 5.5 g/L were obtained in the confined cell cultures. In comparison, cultures of free mycelial cells grown in the absence of beads experienced dissolved oxygen limitations in the bubble column, giving only 17 g/L final cell concentrations with equally low penicillin titres of 2 g/L. The better performance of the confined cell cultures was attributed to enhanced gas liquid mass transfer rates, with mass transfer coefficients (k /SUB L/ a) two to three times higher than those determined in the free cell cultures. Furthermore, the confined cell cultures showed more efficient utilization of power input for mass transfer, providing up to 50% reduction in energy requirements for aeration.

  17. Cavitation-resistant inducer

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, C.; Subbaraman, M.R.

    1989-06-13

    An improvement in an inducer for a pump is disclosed wherein the inducer includes a hub, a plurality of radially extending substantially helical blades and a wall member extending about and encompassing an outer periphery of the blades. The improvement comprises forming adjacent pairs of blades and the hub to provide a substantially rectangular cross-sectional flow area which cross-sectional flow area decreases from the inlet end of the inducer to a discharge end of the inducer, resulting in increased inducer efficiency improved suction performance, reduced susceptibility to cavitation, reduced susceptibility to hub separation and reduced fabrication costs. 11 figs.

  18. Cavitation instability in bulk metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, L. H.; Huang, X.; Ling, Z.

    2015-09-01

    Recent experiments have shown that fracture surfaces of bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) usually exhibit an intriguing nanoscale corrugation like fractographic feature mediated by nanoscale void formation. We attribute the onset of this nanoscale corrugation to TTZs (tension transformation zones) mediated cavitation. In our recent study, the spall experiments of Zr-based BMG using a single-stage light gas gun were performed. To uncover the mechanisms of the spallation damage nucleation and evolution, the samples were designed to be subjected to dynamic tensile loadings of identical amplitude but with different durations by making use of the multi-stress pulse and the double-flyer techniques. It is clearly revealed that the macroscopic spall fracture in BMGs originates from the nucleation, growth and coalescence of micro-voids. Then, a microvoid nucleation model of BMGs based on free volume theory is proposed, which indicates that the nucleation of microvoids at the early stage of spallation in BMGs is resulted from diffusion and coalescence of free volume. Furthermore, a theoretical model of void growth in BMGs undergoing remote dynamic hydrostatic tension is developed. The critical condition of cavitation instability is obtained. It is found that dynamic void growth in BMGs can be well controlled by a dimensionless inertial number characterizing the competition between intrinsic and extrinsic time scales. To unveil the atomic-level mechanism of cavitation, a systematic molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of spallation behaviour of a binary metallic glass with different impact velocities was performed. It is found that micro-void nucleation is determined TTZs while the growth is controlled by shear transformation zones (STZs) at atomic scale.

  19. Etiology of gas bubble disease

    SciTech Connect

    Bouck, G.R.

    1980-11-01

    Gas bubble disease is a noninfectious, physically induced process caused by uncompensated hyperbaric pressure of total dissolved gases. When pressure compensation is inadequate, dissolved gases may form emboli (in blood) and emphysema (in tissues). The resulting abnormal physical presence of gases can block blood vessels (hemostasis) or tear tissues, and may result in death. Population mortality is generally skewed, in that the median time to death occurs well before the average time to death. Judged from mortality curves, three stages occur in gas bubble disease: (1) a period of gas pressure equilibrium, nonlethal cavitation, and increasing morbidity; (2) a period of rapid and heavy mortality; and (3) a period of protracted survival, despite lesions, and dysfunction that eventually terminates in total mortality. Safe limits for gas supersaturation depend on species tolerance and on factors that differ among hatcheries and rivers, between continuous and intermittent exposures, and across ranges of temperature and salinity.

  20. Modeling bubble dynamics and radical kinetics in ultrasound induced microalgal cell disruption.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meng; Yuan, Wenqiao

    2016-01-01

    Microalgal cell disruption induced by acoustic cavitation was simulated through solving the bubble dynamics in an acoustical field and their radial kinetics (chemical kinetics of radical species) occurring in the bubble during its oscillation, as well as calculating the bubble wall pressure at the collapse point. Modeling results indicated that increasing ultrasonic intensity led to a substantial increase in the number of bubbles formed during acoustic cavitation, however, the pressure generated when the bubbles collapsed decreased. Therefore, cumulative collapse pressure (CCP) of bubbles was used to quantify acoustic disruption of a freshwater alga, Scenedesmus dimorphus, and a marine alga, Nannochloropsis oculata and compare with experimental results. The strong correlations between CCP and the intracellular lipid fluorescence density, chlorophyll-a fluorescence density, and cell particle/debris concentration were found, which suggests that the developed models could accurately predict acoustic cell disruption, and can be utilized in the scale up and optimization of the process. PMID:26384877

  1. Electric discharge-induced cavitation: a competing approach to pulsed lasers for performing microsurgery in liquid media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palanker, Daniel V.; Turovets, Igor; Lewis, Aaron

    1997-06-01

    Cavitation bubbles generated by fast overheating of water during pulsed laser applications in liquid medium have been shown to be a driving force of the soft tissue cutting. An alternative approach proposed in this paper is the generation of cavitation bubbles by fast overheating of liquid conductive medium by a short pulse of electric current. An electrical system based on a tapered microelectrode has been developed for generation of a high voltage sub-microsecond discharge in physiological medium. A highly localized ozone of power dissipation - about 20 micrometers in size - results in a low threshold energy of cavitation bubble generation - about 3 (mu) J. Efficiency of the pulse energy conversion to the bubble energy is about 12 percent, which is lower than the best results obtained with laser- based instrumentation. In spite of this, due to the low threshold energy, the cavitation bubbles that are required for effective cutting of soft tissue are generated at a lower energy than has been achieved with the laser-based instrumentation. The prospects and limitations of this newly developed technology are compared to the present applications of fiber-delivered pulsed lasers in microsurgery.

  2. Optimization of parameters for photodisruptively nucleated ultrasonic cavitation in water and tissue models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spooner, Greg J. R.; Marre, Gabrielle; Miller, Doug L.; Williams, A. R.

    2000-06-01

    Laser induced optical breakdown (LIOB) in fluids produces a localized plasma, an expanding radial shock wave front, heat transfer from the plasma to the fluid, and the formation of cavitation bubbles. Collectively these phenomena are referred to as photodisruption. Subjecting photodisruptively produced cavitation bubble nuclei to an ultrasonic field can result in strong cavitation and local cellular destruction. The ability of ultrafast lasers to produce spatially localized photodisruptions with microJoule pulse energies in combination with the possibility of larger scale tissue destruction using ultrasound presents an attractive and novel technique for selective and non-invasive tissue modification, referred to as photodisruptively nucleated ultrasonic cavitation (PNUC). Optimization of PNUC parameters in a confocal laser and ultrasound geometry is presented. The cavitation signal as measured with an ultrasound receiver was maximized to determine optimal laser and ultrasound spatial overlap in water. A flow chamber was used to evaluate the effect of the laser and ultrasound parameters on the lysis of whole canine red blood cells in saline. Parameters evaluated included laser pulse energy and ultrasound pressure amplitude.

  3. The flow structure in the near field of jets and its effect on cavitation inception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalan, Shridhar; Katz, Joseph; Knio, Omar

    1999-11-01

    Cavitation experiments performed in the near field of a 50 mm diameter (D) jet at ReD = 5 × 105, showed inception in the form of inclined ‘cylindrical’ bubbles at axial distances (x/D) less than 0.55, with indices of 2.5. On tripping the boundary layer, cavitation inception occurred at x/D [approximate] 2, as distorted ‘spherical’ bubbles with inception indices of 1.7. To investigate these substantial differences, the near field of the jet was measured using PIV. Data on the primary flow, the strength distribution of the ‘streamwise’ vortices and the velocity profiles within the initial boundary layers were obtained. The untripped case showed a direct transition to three-dimensional flow in the near field (x/D < 0.7) even before rolling up to distinct vortex rings. Strong ‘streamwise’ vortices with strengths up to 25% of the jet velocity times the characteristic wavelength were seen. Cavitation inception occurred in the core of these vortices. In contrast, in the tripped jet the vortex sheet rolled up to the familiar Kelvin Helmholtz vortex rings with weak secondary vortices. Using the measured nuclei distribution, strengths and straining of the ‘streamwise’ structures, the rates of cavitation events were estimated. The estimated results match very well the measured cavitation rates. Also, the Reynolds stresses in the near field of the jet show similar trends and magnitudes to those of Browand & Latigo (1979) and Bell & Mehta (1990) for a plane shear layer.

  4. Influence of surface tension on cavitation noise spectra and particle removal efficiency in high frequency ultrasound fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camerotto, Elisabeth; Brems, Steven; Hauptmann, Marc; Pacco, Antoine; Struyf, Herbert; Mertens, Paul W.; De Gendt, Stefan

    2012-12-01

    Physical cleaning methods are applied in the semiconductor industry and have become increasingly challenging due to the continued scaling of semiconductors device elements. Cavitation and acoustic phenomena are known to play a fundamental role in megasonic cleaning. Hence, a better understanding of cavitation phenomena in multi-bubble systems is crucial. Here, a study on the effects of lower bulk surface tension and different O2 concentrations on the bubble activity in the megahertz range is presented. A lower bulk surface tension (45 mN/m) with respect to ultra pure water (72 mN/m) is obtained by adding a non-ionic surface-active agent (Triton X-100). After a thorough surfactant characterization, a Triton X-100-containing cleaning solution is investigated under pulsed and continuous acoustic fields, for different acoustic amplitudes and gas concentrations. It is demonstrated that cavitation activity, measured by means of ultraharmonic cavitation noise, is enhanced in presence of a lower surface tension, under continuous acoustic fields. In addition, cavitation measurements performed under pulsed fields reveal the existence of optimal pulse-off times, for which a maximum of activity is observed. These optimal pulse-off time values are linked to the bubble dissolution theoretical times and experimentally verified. To end, cavitation noise measurements are correlated to cleaning performance in megasonic fields by means of particle removal and damage tests on patterned wafers. A clear increase in particle removal efficiency of 78 nm SiO2 particles is obtained when Triton X-100 is employed, at the optimized process conditions. In addition, the number of defects due to cavitation bubbles is significantly reduced for lower surface tension, at particle removal efficiencies <60%. The results here reported constitute a different approach towards more efficient megasonic cleaning processes.

  5. Dynamic response of cavitating turbomachines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, S. L.

    1976-01-01

    Stimulated by the pogo instability encountered in many liquid propellant rockets, the dynamic behavior of cavitating inducers is discussed. An experimental facility where the upstream and downstream flows of a cavitating inducer could be perturbed was constructed and tested. The upstream and downstream pressure and mass flow fluctuations were measured. Matrices representing the transfer functions across the inducer pump were calculated from these measurements and from the hydraulic system characteristics for two impellers in various states of cavitation. The transfer matrices when plotted against the perturbing frequency showed significant departure from steady state or quasi-steady predictions especially at higher frequencies.

  6. A simple model of ultrasound propagation in a cavitating liquid. Part I: Theory, nonlinear attenuation and traveling wave generation

    E-print Network

    Louisnard, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    The bubbles involved in sonochemistry and other applications of cavitation oscillate inertially. A correct estimation of the wave attenuation in such bubbly media requires a realistic estimation of the power dissipated by the oscillation of each bubble, by thermal diffusion in the gas and viscous friction in the liquid. Both quantities and calculated numerically for a single inertial bubble driven at 20 kHz, and are found to be several orders of magnitude larger than the linear prediction. Viscous dissipation is found to be the predominant cause of energy loss for bubbles small enough. Then, the classical nonlinear Caflish equations describing the propagation of acoustic waves in a bubbly liquid are recast and simplified conveniently. The main harmonic part of the sound field is found to fulfill a nonlinear Helmholtz equation, where the imaginary part of the squared wave number is directly correlated with the energy lost by a single bubble. For low acoustic driving, linear theory is recovered, but for larger ...

  7. Plastic deformation of a magnesium oxide 001-plane surface produced by cavitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hattori, S.; Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.; Okada, T.

    1986-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to examine plastic deformation of a cleaved single-crystal magnesium oxide 001-plane surface exposed to cavitation. Cavitation damage experiments were carried out in distilled water at 25 C by using a magnetostrictive oscillator in close proximity (2 mm) to the surface of the cleaved specimen. The dislocation-etch-pit patterns induced by cavitation were examined and compared with that of microhardness indentations. The results revealed that dislocation-etch-pit patterns around hardness indentations contain both screw and edge dislocations, while the etch-pit patterns on the surface exposed to cavitation contain only screw dislocations. During cavitation, deformation occurred in a thin surface layer, accompanied by work-hardening of the ceramic. The row of screw dislocations underwent a stable growth, which was analyzed crystallographically.

  8. Application of two turbulence models for computation of cavitating flows in a centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, M.; Guo, Q.; Zhou, L. J.; Wang, Z. W.; Wang, X.

    2013-12-01

    To seek a better numerical method to simulate the cavitating flow field in a centrifugal pump, the applications between RNG k- ? and LES turbulence model were compared by using the Zwart-Gerber-Belamri cavitation model. It was found that both the models give almost the same results with respect to pump performance and cavitation evolutions including growth, local contraction, stability and separation in the impeller passage. But the LES model can not only capture the pump suction recirculation and the low frequency fluctuation caused by it, but also combine the changes of the shaft frequency amplitude acting on the impeller with the cavitation unstable characteristics. Thus the LES model has more advantages than RNG k- ? model in calculating the unsteady cavitating flow in a centrifugal pump.

  9. Current research in cavitating fluid films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewe, D. E. (editor); Ball, J. H. (editor); Khonsari, M. M. (editor)

    1990-01-01

    A review of the current research of cavitation in fluid films is presented. Phenomena and experimental observations include gaseous cavitation, vapor cavitation, and gas entrainment. Cavitation in flooded, starved, and dynamically loaded journal bearings, as well as squeeze films are reviewed. Observations of cavitation damage in bearings and the possibility of cavitation between parallel plates with microasperities were discussed. The transcavity fluid transport process, meniscus motion and geometry or form of the film during rupture, and reformation were summarized. Performance effects were related to heat transfer models in the cavitated region and hysteresis influence on rotor dynamics coefficients. A number of cavitation algorithms was presented together with solution procedures using the finite difference and finite element methods. Although Newtonian fluids were assumed in most of the discussions, the effect of non-Newtonian fluids on cavitation was also discussed.

  10. Design approach for cavitation tolerant hydrofoils and blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amromin, E. L.

    2014-02-01

    Cavitation inception and growth on conventional shape hydrofoils and blades leads initially to a jump of their flow-induced noise, further to an amplification of flow-induced vibration with frequently assisted erosion and finally, to a lift/thrust decrease combined with the drag increase. These undesirable cavitation effects can be mitigated or even suppressed for stable partial cavities experiencing no tail pulsations. A design approach enhancing performance of cavitating hydrofoils/blades by maintaining stable partial cavities is described. Experimental data manifesting an increase of hydrofoil lift with reduction of its drag and of force pulsations by such design are provided. Application of this design approach to propeller/turbine blades and advantages of its employment for blades operating in non-uniform incoming flows are analyzed. The possibility of an increase of the lift to drag ratio and of a reduction of the cavity volume oscillation in gust flows for blade sections is numerically manifested.

  11. Measurements of Gas Bubble Size Distributions in Flowing Liquid Mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Wendel, Mark W; Riemer, Bernie; Abdou, Ashraf A

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pressure waves created in liquid mercury pulsed spallation targets have been shown to induce cavitation damage on the target container. One way to mitigate such damage would be to absorb the pressure pulse energy into a dispersed population of small bubbles, however, measuring such a population in mercury is difficult since it is opaque and the mercury is involved in a turbulent flow. Ultrasonic measurements have been attempted on these types of flows, but the flow noise can interfere with the measurement, and the results are unverifiable and often unrealistic. Recently, a flow loop was built and operated at Oak Ridge National Labarotory to assess the capability of various bubbler designs to deliver an adequate population of bubbles to mitigate cavitation damage. The invented diagnostic technique involves flowing the mercury with entrained gas bubbles in a steady state through a horizontal piping section with a glass-window observation port located on the top. The mercury flow is then suddenly stopped and the bubbles are allowed to settle on the glass due to buoyancy. Using a bright-field illumination and a high-speed camera, the arriving bubbles are detected and counted, and then the images can be processed to determine the bubble populations. After using this technique to collect data on each bubbler, bubble size distributions were built for the purpose of quantifying bubbler performance, allowing the selection of the best bubbler options. This paper presents the novel procedure, photographic technique, sample visual results and some example bubble size distributions. The best bubbler options were subsequently used in proton beam irradiation tests performed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The cavitation damage results from the irradiated test plates in contact with the mercury are available for correlation with the bubble populations. The most effective mitigating population can now be designed into prototypical geometries for implementation into an actual SNS target.

  12. Universal scaling law for jets of collapsing bubbles.

    PubMed

    Obreschkow, D; Tinguely, M; Dorsaz, N; Kobel, P; de Bosset, A; Farhat, M

    2011-11-11

    Cavitation bubbles collapsing and rebounding in a pressure gradient ?p form a "microjet" enveloped by a "vapor jet." This Letter presents unprecedented observations of the vapor jets formed in a uniform gravity-induced ?p, modulated aboard parabolic flights. The data uncover that the normalized jet volume is independent of the liquid density and viscosity and proportional to ? ? |?p|R(0)/?p, where R(0) the maximal bubble radius and ?p is the driving pressure. A derivation inspired by "Kelvin-Blake" considerations confirms this law and reveals its negligible dependence of surface tension. We further conjecture that the jet only pierces the bubble boundary if ? ? 4 × 10(-4). PMID:22181734

  13. Bubble, Bubble, Toil and Trouble.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Bubbles are a fun way to introduce the concepts of surface tension, intermolecular forces, and the use of surfactants. Presents two activities in which students add chemicals to liquid dishwashing detergent with water in order to create longer lasting bubbles. (ASK)

  14. The role of acoustic cavitation in liquid pressurization in narrow tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, S.; Hatakeyama, M.

    2013-04-01

    The liquid pressurization mechanism in narrow tubes as a result of high intensity ultrasonic field along the irradiation direction is discussed, with a focus on the physical behavior of acoustic cavitation bubbles formed at the tube's open end. The acoustic energy dissipated at the surface of the bubbles results in radiation pressure with a second harmonic frequency (2f). We show here that during the phenomenon, which resembles the functioning an ultrasonic pump, cyclical pressure fluctuations with the second harmonic frequency 2f are observed using a high-response pressure transducer. The maximum value of accumulating pressure is equivalent to the positive peak of the sound pressure in the tube without acoustic cavitation. It can be thought that the cyclic collapse and expansion of acoustic cavitation bubbles at the tube's open end contribute to the control of the inrushing sound pressure. In particular, the transmission behavior of the received pressure in a viscous liquid containing gas bubbles with high number density near the tube's open end (a quantity that is related to the kinematic viscosity of the medium liquid) plays an important role in this pressure accumulation mechanism. A dynamic model of this pressurization phenomenon is also discussed.

  15. Experimental evidence for seismically initiated gas bubble nucleation and growth in groundwater as a mechanism for coseismic borehole water level rise and remotely triggered seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crews, Jackson B.; Cooper, Clay A.

    2014-09-01

    Changes in borehole water levels and remotely triggered seismicity occur in response to near and distant earthquakes at locations around the globe, but the mechanisms for these phenomena are not well understood. Experiments were conducted to show that seismically initiated gas bubble growth in groundwater can trigger a sustained increase in pore fluid pressure consistent in magnitude with observed coseismic borehole water level rise, constituting a physically plausible mechanism for remote triggering of secondary earthquakes through the reduction of effective stress in critically loaded geologic faults. A portion of the CO2 degassing from the Earth's crust dissolves in groundwater where seismic Rayleigh and P waves cause dilational strain, which can reduce pore fluid pressure to or below the bubble pressure, triggering CO2 gas bubble growth in the saturated zone, indicated by a spontaneous buildup of pore fluid pressure. Excess pore fluid pressure was measured in response to the application of 0.1-1.0 MPa, 0.01-0.30 Hz confining stress oscillations to a Berea sandstone core flooded with initially subsaturated aqueous CO2, under conditions representative of a confined aquifer. Confining stress oscillations equivalent to the dynamic stress of the 28 June 1992 Mw 7.3 Landers, California, earthquake Rayleigh wave as it traveled through the Long Valley caldera, and Parkfield, California, increased the pore fluid pressure in the Berea core by an average of 36 ± 15 cm and 23 ± 15 cm of equivalent freshwater head, respectively, in agreement with 41.8 cm and 34 cm rises recorded in wells at those locations.

  16. High-speed jetting and spray formation from bubble collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karri, Badarinath; Avila, Silvestre Roberto Gonzalez; Loke, Yee Chong; O'Shea, Sean J.; Klaseboer, Evert; Khoo, Boo Cheong; Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2012-01-01

    A method to create impacting jets at the micrometer length scale by means of a collapsing cavitation bubble is presented. A focused shock wave from a lithotripter leads to the nucleation of a cavitation bubble below a hole of 25 ?m diameter etched in a silicon plate. The plate is placed at an air-water interface. The expansion and collapse of the bubble leads to two separate jets—an initial slow jet of velocity ˜10 m/s and a later faster jet of velocity ˜50 m/s. The jets subsequently impact coaxially, resulting in a circular sheet of liquid in the plane perpendicular to their axis. The sheet is characterized by a ring of droplets at its rim and breaks up into a spray as the shock pressure is increased. The results demonstrate an approach to create a high-speed jet and fine spray on demand at the micrometer scale.

  17. Scaling model for laser-produced bubbles in soft tissue

    SciTech Connect

    London, R. A., LLNL

    1998-03-12

    The generation of vapor-driven bubbles is common in many emerging laser-medical therapies involving soft tissues. To successfully apply such bubbles to processes such as tissue break-up and removal, it is critical to understand their physical characteristics. To complement previous experimental and computational studies, an analytic mathematical model for bubble creation and evolution is presented. In this model, the bubble is assumed to be spherically symmetric, and the laser pulse length is taken to be either very short or very long compared to the bubble expansion timescale. The model is based on the Rayleigh cavitation bubble model. In this description, the exterior medium is assumed to be an infinite incompressible fluid, while the bubble interior consists of a mixed liquid-gas medium which is initially heated by the laser. The heated interior provides the driving pressure which expands the bubble. The interior region is assumed to be adiabatic and is described by the standard water equation-of-state, available in either tabular, or analytic forms. Specifically, we use adiabats from the equation-of-state to describe the evolution of the interior pressure with bubble volume. Analytic scaling laws are presented for the maximum size, the duration, and the energy of bubbles as functions of the laser energy and initially heated volume. Of particular interest, is the efficiency of converting laser energy into bubble motion.

  18. Cavitation-induced ignition of cryogenic hydrogen-oxygen fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osipov, V. V.; Muratov, C. B.; Ponizovskaya-Devine, E.; Foygel, M.; Smelyanskiy, V. N.

    2011-03-01

    The Challenger disaster and purposeful experiments with liquid hydrogen (H2) and oxygen (Ox) tank breaches demonstrated that cryogenic H2/Ox fluids always self-ignite in the process of their sudden mixing. Here, we propose a cavitation-induced self-ignition mechanism that may be realized under these conditions. In one possible scenario, self-ignition is caused by the strong shock waves generated by the collapse of pure Ox vapor bubble near the surface of the Ox liquid that may initiate detonation of the gaseous H2/Ox mixture next to the gas-liquid interface. This effect is further enhanced by H2/Ox combustion inside the collapsing bubble in the presence of admixed H2 gas.

  19. Cavitation in a Mercury Target

    SciTech Connect

    West, C.D.

    2000-09-01

    Recent theoretical work on the formation of bubble nucleation centers by energetic particles leads to some reasonably credible calculations of the maximum negative pressure that might be sustained without bubble formation in the mercury target of the Spallation Neutron Source.

  20. "Cavitation in a Mercury Target"

    SciTech Connect

    West, C.D.

    2000-09-06

    Recent theoretical work on the formation of bubble nucleation centers by energetic particles leads to some reasonably credible calculations of the maximum negative pressure that might be sustained without bubble formation in the mercury target of the Spallation Neutron Source.

  1. Effect of controlled offset of focal position in cavitation-enhanced high-intensity focused ultrasound treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Kota; Takagi, Ryo; Miyashita, Takuya; Jimbo, Hayato; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2015-07-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a noninvasive treatment for tumors such as cancer. In this method, ultrasound is generated outside the body and focused to the target tissue. Therefore, physical and mental stresses on the patient are minimal. A drawback of the HIFU treatment is a long treatment time for a large tumor due to the small therapeutic volume by a single exposure. Enhancing the heating effect of ultrasound by cavitation bubbles may solve this problem. However, this is rather difficult because cavitation clouds tend to be formed backward from the focal point while ultrasonic intensity for heating is centered at the focal point. In this study, the focal points of the trigger pulses to generate cavitation were offset forward from those of the heating ultrasound to match the cavitation clouds with the heating patterns. Results suggest that the controlled offset of focal points makes the thermal coagulation more predictable.

  2. Effects of cavitation-enhanced heating in high-intensity focused ultrasound treatment on shear wave imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, Ryosuke; Nagaoka, Ryo; Takagi, Ryo; Goto, Kota; Yoshizawa, Shin; Saijo, Yoshifumi; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2015-07-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy is a less invasive method of cancer treatment, in which ultrasound is generated outside the body and focused at the tumor tissue to be thermally coagulated. To enhance the safety, accuracy, and efficiency of HIFU therapy, “multiple-triggered HIFU” has been proposed as a method of cavitation-enhanced heating to shorten treatment time. In this study, we also propose shear wave elastography (SWE) to noninvasively monitor the cavitation-enhanced heating. Results show that the increase in shear wave velocity was observed in the coagulation area, but it was significantly slower when cavitation occurred. This suggests that the cavitation-enhanced heating requires a significantly longer cooling time before the accurate measurement of shear modulus than heating without generating bubbles.

  3. Red blood cell rheology using single controlled laser-induced cavitation Pedro A. Quinto-Su,*a

    E-print Network

    Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    Red blood cell rheology using single controlled laser-induced cavitation bubbles Pedro A. Quinto 2010 DOI: 10.1039/c0lc00182a The deformability of red blood cells (RBCs) is an important property with no pre-treatment. Introduction Elastic properties of red blood cells (RBCs) serve as an indicator

  4. Prediction of shock-induced cavitation in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brundage, A.

    2014-05-01

    Fluid-structure interaction problems that require estimating the response of thin structures within fluids to shock loading have wide applicability. For example, these problems may include underwater explosions and the dynamic response of ships and submarines; and biological applications such as Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and wound ballistics. In all of these applications the process of cavitation, where small cavities with dissolved gases or vapor are formed as the local pressure drops below the vapor pressure due to shock hydrodynamics, can cause significant damage to the surrounding thin structures or membranes if these bubbles collapse, generating additional shock loading. Hence, a two-phase equation of state (EOS) with three distinct regions of compression, expansion, and tension was developed to model shock-induced cavitation. This EOS was evaluated by comparing data from pressure and temperature shock Hugoniot measurements for water up to 400 kbar, and data from ultrasonic pressure measurements in tension to -0.3 kbar, to simulated responses from CTH, an Eulerian, finite volume shock code. The new EOS model showed significant improvement over preexisting CTH models such as the SESAME EOS for capturing cavitation.

  5. Prediction of Shock-Induced Cavitation in Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brundage, Aaron

    2013-06-01

    Fluid-structure interaction problems that require estimating the response of thin structures within fluids to shock loading has wide applicability. For example, these problems may include underwater explosions and the dynamic response of ships and submarines; and biological applications such as Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and wound ballistics. In all of these applications the process of cavitation, where small cavities with dissolved gases or vapor are formed as the local pressure drops below the vapor pressure due to shock hydrodynamics, can cause significant damage to the surrounding thin structures or membranes if these bubbles collapse, generating additional shock loading. Hence, a two-phase equation of state (EOS) with three distinct regions of compression, expansion, and tension was developed to model shock-induced cavitation. This EOS was evaluated by comparing data from pressure and temperature shock Hugoniot measurements for water up to 400 kbar, and data from ultrasonic pressure measurements in tension to -0.3 kbar, to simulated responses from CTH, an Eulerian, finite volume shock code. The new EOS model showed significant improvement over pre-existing CTH models such as the SESAME EOS for capturing cavitation. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy/NNSA under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  6. Spatial control of cavitation in therapeutic ultrasound

    E-print Network

    Gauthier, Thomas P., 1980-

    2005-01-01

    Inertial cavitation has been implicated as the primary mechanism for a host of emerging applications. In all these applications, the main concern is to induce cavitation in perfectly controlled locations in the field; this ...

  7. Numerical and experimental investigations on cavitation erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortes Patella, R.; Archer, A.; Flageul, C.

    2012-11-01

    A method is proposed to predict cavitation damage from cavitating flow simulations. For this purpose, a numerical process coupling cavitating flow simulations and erosion models was developed and applied to a two-dimensional (2D) hydrofoil tested at TUD (Darmstadt University of Technology, Germany) [1] and to a NACA 65012 tested at LMH-EPFL (Lausanne Polytechnic School) [2]. Cavitation erosion tests (pitting tests) were carried out and a 3D laser profilometry was used to analyze surfaces damaged by cavitation [3]. The method allows evaluating the pit characteristics, and mainly the volume damage rates. The paper describes the developed erosion model, the technique of cavitation damage measurement and presents some comparisons between experimental results and numerical damage predictions. The extent of cavitation erosion was correctly estimated in both hydrofoil geometries. The simulated qualitative influence of flow velocity, sigma value and gas content on cavitation damage agreed well with experimental observations.

  8. Effect of shaft frequency on cavitation in a journal bearing for noncentered circular whirl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewe, David E.; Khonsari, M. M.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of shaft frequency on the performance of a submerged journal undergoing noncentered circular whirl is examined. The main emphasis of the paper is on the behavior of the vapor cavitation bubble and its effect on the bearing performance as a function of frequency. A cavitation algorithm due to Elrod was implemented in a computer program which solves a time-dependent Reynolds equation. This algorithm automatically handles the boundary conditions by using a switch function and a control volume approach which conserves mass throughout the entire flow. The shaft frequencies in this investigation ranged from 0 rad/s (squeeze-film damper) to -104 rad/s (a case in which oil-whip condition was produced momentarily). For the particular vibration amplitude chosen in this investigation it was observed that vapor cavitation had an effect on the load components for the full range of shaft frequencies investigated.

  9. Cavitation and Wake Structure of Unsteady Tip Vortex Flows.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, Douglas Payton

    Unsteady flows are prevalent in virtually every fluid application yet, because of their intrinsic complexity, few attempts have been made to measure them or explain their behavior. This thesis presents an experimental study of one of the simplest unsteady flow induced effects, the periodic change in angle of attack of a lifting surface. Of particular interest is the influence this effect has on the tip vortex structure of a finite aspect ratio hydrofoil and the part it plays in the inception of cavitation. An aspect ratio 2.3 hydrofoil was reflection-plane mounted to the test section floor of the Caltech Low Turbulence Water Tunnel and harmonically oscillated in pitch near its center of pressure. Observations of the growth and collapse of surface and tip vortex cavitation were made along with detailed observations of the interaction of the tip vortex formation with the spanwise wake structure. Measurements of the cavitation inception number for surface cavitation and tip vortex cavitation were made relative to the phase of the hydrofoil and the reduced frequency, k = omegac/2U_{infty }, of oscillation. Studies of the oscillation -induced spanwise trailing vortex structures and the Karman vortex street generated by the boundary layer were made of a two-dimensional hydrofoil. Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) measurements were taken of the tip vortex velocity profile and the flow at the trailing edge of both the two - and the three-dimensional hydrofoils at reduced frequencies ranging from 0.5 to 2.0. Dynamic changes in bound circulation and shed vorticity in the streamwise and spanwise directions relative to the freestream were calculated from these measurements at three locations along the span of the foil. The results of these measurements are compared to theoretical flow calculations and related to measurements of the cavitation inception number in the tip vortex region of the three -dimensional foil.

  10. Bubble diagnostics

    DOEpatents

    Visuri, Steven R. (Livermore, CA); Mammini, Beth M. (Walnut Creek, CA); Da Silva, Luiz B. (Danville, CA); Celliers, Peter M. (Berkeley, CA)

    2003-01-01

    The present invention is intended as a means of diagnosing the presence of a gas bubble and incorporating the information into a feedback system for opto-acoustic thrombolysis. In opto-acoustic thrombolysis, pulsed laser radiation at ultrasonic frequencies is delivered intraluminally down an optical fiber and directed toward a thrombus or otherwise occluded vessel. Dissolution of the occlusion is therefore mediated through ultrasonic action of propagating pressure or shock waves. A vapor bubble in the fluid surrounding the occlusion may form as a result of laser irradiation. This vapor bubble may be used to directly disrupt the occlusion or as a means of producing a pressure wave. It is desirable to detect the formation and follow the lifetime of the vapor bubble. Knowledge of the bubble formation and lifetime yields critical information as to the maximum size of the bubble, density of the absorbed radiation, and properties of the absorbing material. This information can then be used in a feedback system to alter the irradiation conditions.

  11. Development of Liposomal Bubbles with Perfluoropropane Gas as Gene Delivery Carriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruyama, Kazuo; Suzuki, Ryo; Sawamura, Kaori; Takizawa, Tomoko; Utoguchi, Naoki; Negishi, Yoichi

    2007-05-01

    Liposomes have some advantages as drug, antigen and gene delivery carriers. Their size can be easily controlled and they can be modified to add a targeting function. Based on liposome technology, we developed novel liposomal bubbles (Bubble liposomes) containing the ultrasound imaging gas, perfluoropropane. We assessed the feasibility of Bubble liposomes as carriers for gene delivery after cavitation induced by ultrasound. At first, we investigated their ability to deliver genes with Bubble liposomes and ultrasound to various types of cells such as mouse sarcoma cells, mouse melanoma cells, human T cell line and human umbilical vein endothelial cells. The results showed that the Bubble liposomes could deliver plasmid DNA to many cell types without cytotoxicity. In addition, we found that Bubble liposomes could effectively deliver plasmid DNA into mouse femoral artery in vivo. The gene transduction with Bubble liposomes was more effectively than conventional lipofection. We conclude that Bubble liposomes are unique and efficient gene delivery carriers in vitro and in vivo.

  12. Bubbles with shock waves and ultrasound: a review.

    PubMed

    Ohl, Siew-Wan; Klaseboer, Evert; Khoo, Boo Cheong

    2015-10-01

    The study of the interaction of bubbles with shock waves and ultrasound is sometimes termed 'acoustic cavitation'. It is of importance in many biomedical applications where sound waves are applied. The use of shock waves and ultrasound in medical treatments is appealing because of their non-invasiveness. In this review, we present a variety of acoustics-bubble interactions, with a focus on shock wave-bubble interaction and bubble cloud phenomena. The dynamics of a single spherically oscillating bubble is rather well understood. However, when there is a nearby surface, the bubble often collapses non-spherically with a high-speed jet. The direction of the jet depends on the 'resistance' of the boundary: the bubble jets towards a rigid boundary, splits up near an elastic boundary, and jets away from a free surface. The presence of a shock wave complicates the bubble dynamics further. We shall discuss both experimental studies using high-speed photography and numerical simulations involving shock wave-bubble interaction. In biomedical applications, instead of a single bubble, often clouds of bubbles appear (consisting of many individual bubbles). The dynamics of such a bubble cloud is even more complex. We shall show some of the phenomena observed in a high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) field. The nonlinear nature of the sound field and the complex inter-bubble interaction in a cloud present challenges to a comprehensive understanding of the physics of the bubble cloud in HIFU. We conclude the article with some comments on the challenges ahead. PMID:26442143

  13. Detection of cavitation vortex in hydraulic turbines using acoustic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candel, I.; Bunea, F.; Dunca, G.; Bucur, D. M.; Ioana, C.; Reeb, B.; Ciocan, G. D.

    2014-03-01

    Cavitation phenomena are known for their destructive capacity in hydraulic machineries and are caused by the pressure decrease followed by an implosion when the cavitation bubbles find an adverse pressure gradient. A helical vortex appears in the turbine diffuser cone at partial flow rate operation and can be cavitating in its core. Cavity volumes and vortex frequencies vary with the under-pressure level. If the vortex frequency comes close to one of the eigen frequencies of the turbine, a resonance phenomenon may occur, the unsteady fluctuations can be amplified and lead to important turbine and hydraulic circuit damage. Conventional cavitation vortex detection techniques are based on passive devices (pressure sensors or accelerometers). Limited sensor bandwidths and low frequency response limit the vortex detection and characterization information provided by the passive techniques. In order to go beyond these techniques and develop a new active one that will remove these drawbacks, previous work in the field has shown that techniques based on acoustic signals using adapted signal content to a particular hydraulic situation, can be more robust and accurate. The cavitation vortex effects in the water flow profile downstream hydraulic turbines runner are responsible for signal content modifications. Basic signal techniques use narrow band signals traveling inside the flow from an emitting transducer to a receiving one (active sensors). Emissions of wide band signals in the flow during the apparition and development of the vortex embeds changes in the received signals. Signal processing methods are used to estimate the cavitation apparition and evolution. Tests done in a reduced scale facility showed that due to the increasing flow rate, the signal -- vortex interaction is seen as modifications on the received signal's high order statistics and bandwidth. Wide band acoustic transducers have a higher dynamic range over mechanical elements; the system's reaction time is reduced, resulting in a faster detection of the unwanted effects. The paper will present an example of this new investigation technique on a vortex generator in the test facility that belongs to ICPE- CA.

  14. Anti-tumor efficacy of ultrasonic cavitation is potentiated by concurrent delivery of anti-angiogenic drug in colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Huang, Pintong; Zhang, Ying; Chen, Jian; Shentu, Weihui; Sun, Yu; Yang, Zhijian; Chen, Shuyuan

    2014-05-28

    This study investigated the efficacy of concurrent delivery of an anti-angiogenic drug and ultrasonic cavitation therapy in a mouse model of human colon cancer. A biotinylated form of the anti-angiogenic drug Endostar was conjugated to a streptavidin-coated microbubble (MB). Mice bearing subcutaneous tumors (HT29) were divided into 4 groups. Group 1 served as an untreated control. Group 2 served as a cavitation control and received naked microbubbles and sham ultrasonic cavitation (MB+sham cavitation). Group 3 received naked microbubbles and ultrasonic cavitation (MB+cavitation). Group 4 received Endostar loaded microbubbles and ultrasonic cavitation (Endostar-MB+cavitation). Ultrasonic cavitation was performed using a high-power custom built sonicator. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging (CEUS) was used to measure tumor blood flow before and after ultrasonic cavitation. In vivo fluorescence imaging was performed to monitor changes in tumor volume. Immunohistochemistry was performed to assess CD31, VEGFR-2 and alpha-v beta-3 integrin expression within the tumor. Apoptosis of the tumor cells was determined by TUNEL assay, and ultrastructural changes within the tumor were examined by electron microcopy. Ultrasonic cavitation with Endostar-MB demonstrated a significantly greater inhibition of tumor blood flow on day 7 and tumor growth on day 16 compared with naked MB and control groups. The Endostar-MB treated mice showed significantly decreased expression VEGFR-2 and alpha-v beta-3 integrin, and increased apoptosis of tumor cells and degradation of the tumor ultrastructure. Our findings indicated that the anti-vascular and anti-tumor effects of ultrasonic cavitation could be potentiated by simultaneously delivering an anti-angiogenic drug in colon cancer. PMID:24530229

  15. The Speed of Axial Propagation of a Cylindrical Bubble Through a Cylindrical Vortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shariff, Karim; Mansour, Nagi N. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Inspired by the rapid elongation of air columns injected into vortices by dolphins, we present an exact inviscid solution for the axial speed (assumed steady) of propagation of the tip of a semi-infinite cylindrical bubble along the axis of a cylindrical vortex. The bubble is assumed to be held at constant pressure by being connected to a reservoir, the lungs of the dolphin, say. For a given bubble pressure, there is a modest critical rotation rate above which steadily propagating bubbles exist. For a bubble at ambient pressure, the propagation speed of the bubble (relative to axial velocity within the vortex) varies between 0.5 and 0.6 of the maximum rotational speed of the vortex. Surprisingly, the bubble tip can propagate (almost as rapidly) even when the pressure minimum in the vortex core is greater than the bubble pressure; in this case, solutions exhibit a dimple on the nose of the bubble. A situation important for incipient vortex cavitation, and one which dolphins also demonstrate, is elongation of a free bubble, i.e., one whose internal pressure may vary. Under the assumption that the acceleration term is small (checked a posteriori), the steady solution is applied at each instant during the elongation. Three types of behavior are then possible depending on physical parameters and initial conditions: (A) Unabated elongation with slowly increasing bubble pressure, and nearly constant volume. Volume begins to decrease in the late stages. (B1) Elongation with decreasing bubble pressure. A limit point of the steady solution is encountered at a finite bubble length. (B2) Unabated elongation with decreasing bubble pressure and indefinite creation of volume. This is made possible by the existence of propagating solutions at bubble pressures below the minimum vortex pressure. As the bubble stretches, its radius initially decreases but then becomes constant; this is also observed in experiments on incipient vortex cavitation.

  16. Cavitation bubble behavior inside a liquid jet Etienne Robert,1,

    E-print Network

    McDonald, Kirk

    Research (CERN), CH - 1211 Geneva 23, Switzerland 3 Laboratory for hydraulic machines (LMH), EPFL, CH-1015 mercury jet hit by a pulsed proton beam, a candidate configuration for future accelerator based facilities as a novel target design for secondary particle production to be used in future accelerator based facilities1

  17. On acoustic cavitation of slightly subcritical bubbles Anthony Harkin

    E-print Network

    Kaper, Tasso J.

    . When the mean pressure in the liquid is reduced to a value below the vapor pressure, the Blake analysis than the Blake critical radius, in the presence of time-periodic acoustic pressure fields the accuracy of these predictions. Finally, the implications of these findings for acoustic pressure fields

  18. Properties of sound attenuation around a two-dimensional underwater vehicle with a large cavitation number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Peng-Cheng; Pan, Guang

    2015-06-01

    Due to the high speed of underwater vehicles, cavitation is generated inevitably along with the sound attenuation when the sound signal traverses through the cavity region around the underwater vehicle. The linear wave propagation is studied to obtain the influence of bubbly liquid on the acoustic wave propagation in the cavity region. The sound attenuation coefficient and the sound speed formula of the bubbly liquid are presented. Based on the sound attenuation coefficients with various vapor volume fractions, the attenuation of sound intensity is calculated under large cavitation number conditions. The result shows that the sound intensity attenuation is fairly small in a certain condition. Consequently, the intensity attenuation can be neglected in engineering. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51279165 and 51479170) and the National Defense Basic Scientific Research Program of China (Grant No. B2720133014).

  19. Physical and chemical effects of acoustic cavitation in selected ultrasonic cleaning applications.

    PubMed

    Yusof, Nor Saadah Mohd; Babgi, Bandar; Alghamdi, Yousef; Aksu, Mecit; Madhavan, Jagannathan; Ashokkumar, Muthupandian

    2016-03-01

    Acoustic cavitation in a liquid medium generates several physical and chemical effects. The oscillation and collapse of cavitation bubbles, driven at low ultrasonic frequencies (e.g., 20kHz), can generate strong shear forces, microjets, microstreaming and shockwaves. Such strong physical forces have been used in cleaning and flux improvement of ultrafiltration processes. These physical effects have also been shown to deactivate pathogens. The efficiency of deactivation of pathogens is not only dependent on ultrasonic experimental parameters, but also on the properties of the pathogens themselves. Bacteria with thick shell wall are found to be resistant to ultrasonic deactivation process. Some evidence does suggest that the chemical effects (radicals) of acoustic cavitation are also effective in deactivating pathogens. Another aspect of cleaning, namely, purification of water contaminated with organic and inorganic pollutants, has also been discussed in detail. Strong oxidising agents produced within acoustic cavitation bubbles could be used to degrade organic pollutants and convert toxic inorganic pollutants to less harmful substances. The effect of ultrasonic frequency and surface activity of solutes on the sonochemical degradation efficiency has also been discussed in this overview. PMID:26142078

  20. Study of cavitating inducer instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, W. E.; Murphy, R.; Reddecliff, J. M.

    1972-01-01

    An analytic and experimental investigation into the causes and mechanisms of cavitating inducer instabilities was conducted. Hydrofoil cascade tests were performed, during which cavity sizes were measured. The measured data were used, along with inducer data and potential flow predictions, to refine an analysis for the prediction of inducer blade suction surface cavitation cavity volume. Cavity volume predictions were incorporated into a linearized system model, and instability predictions for an inducer water test loop were generated. Inducer tests were conducted and instability predictions correlated favorably with measured instability data.

  1. Preventing cavitation in butterfly valves

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, H.D.

    1985-03-18

    Some of the mechanical problems that plagued butterfly valves in the past are discussed. The authors suggest integrated packages to alleviate these problems. These packages include such innovations as backlash-free stem connections, allenclosed actuator packages, and torque-compensated vanes. Some disadvantages to these packages are outlined and examined, including: high noise levels with compressible fluids, and an increased tendency to cavitate with liquids. A discussion follows on cavitation--how it is caused, just how much of it can be tolerated, and how it can be avoided or reduced.

  2. Transient cavitation produced by extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cioanta, Iulian

    1998-12-01

    Two decades ago, a new medical procedure was introduced, allowing the fragmentation of kidney stones from outside the human body (noninvasively) using a shock wave device termed lithotripter ('stone crusher'). Considered as one of the most important medical inventions of this century, lithotripsy is currently used in more than 80% of urolithiasis cases. Experimental studies have shown that transient or inertial cavitation is generated by this procedure near the stones and in renal tissue. To find a correlation between the number of shocks delivered and the treatment efficiency, the acoustic emission (AE) generated by the oscillation of cavitation bubbles, and its relation with stone fragmentation and tissue damage during shock wave lithotripsy were studied. In vitro experiments were carried out to identify the correlation between the AE signals and the expansion and collapse of cavitation bubbles, which were captured by high-speed photography (20,000 frames per second). This correlation has been verified on four different electrohydraulic lithotripters, under multiple experimental conditions. The effects of tissue attenuation on AE and stone fragmentation were also studied. The in vitro results have further allowed the interpretation of AE signals from in vivo experiments with pigs. Although similar in general trend, in vivo AE signals are found to be shorter in expansion and longer in the total ringing times (including the rebound phenomenon) than for in vitro AE signals, indicating a tissue constraining effect on bubble oscillation. Based on this observation a new mechanism for renal vascular and tubular injury is proposed. In addition, changes in AE signals have been observed as the total number of shocks increases, and this dose dependence feature has allowed the determination of a threshold value for extended tissue injury at 20 kV. This result has been confirmed by histological analysis and by results of a theoretical model study of bubble oscillation in a tissue mimicking membrane structure. To improve the efficiency of stone fragmentation and to reduce tissue injury, a new design for lithotripters shock wave reflector has been proposed and tested in vitro.

  3. Nonlinear interaction of air bubbles and ultrasonic field: An analysis of some physical aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanhille, Christian; Campos-Pozuelo, Cleofé

    2015-10-01

    This paper deals with the propagation of finite-amplitude ultrasonic signals in bubbly liquids. The study of the nonlinear interaction of ultrasonic waves and bubble oscillations is a theoretical challenge. Moreover, this analysis may be useful for some industrial and medical applications for which this nonlinear interaction plays a fundamental role. Some physical aspects are addressed here via numerical simulations: multi-dimensional simulations, focused waves, primary Bjerknes force, frequency mixing, cavitation, diode, and switch. An experimental demonstration of inertial cavitation at high frequency is presented as well.

  4. Time-resolved analysis of cavitation induced by CW lasers in absorbing liquids.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-San-Juan, J C; Rodriguez-Aboytes, E; Martinez-Canton, A E; Baldovino-Pantaleon, O; Robledo-Martinez, A; Korneev, N; Ramos-Garcia, R

    2010-04-26

    We present novel results on thermocavitation using a CW medium-power near infrared laser (lambda=975 nm) focused into a saturated copper nitrate saline solution. Due to the large absorption coefficient at the laser wavelength, the solution can be heated to its superheat limit (T(sh) approximately 270-300 degrees C). Superheated water undergoes explosive phase transition around T(sh) producing approximately half-hemispheric bubbles (gamma approximately 0.5) in close contact with the substrate. We report the temporal dynamic of the cavitation bubble, which is much shorter than previously reported under similar conditions. It was found that the bubble radius and pressure wave amplitude emitted on bubble collapse decreases exponentially with the power laser. Thermocavitation can be a useful tool for the generation of ultrasonic waves and controlled ablation for use in high-resolution lithography. PMID:20588717

  5. Simulation of the effects of cavitation and anatomy in the shock path of model lithotripters

    PubMed Central

    Krimmel, Jeff; Colonius, Tim; Tanguay, Michel

    2011-01-01

    We report on recent efforts to develop predictive models for the pressure and other flow variables in the focal region of shock wave lithotripters. Baseline simulations of three representative lithotripters (electrohydraulic, electromagnetic, and piezoelectric) compare favorably with in vitro experiments (in a water bath). We proceed to model and investigate how shock focusing is altered by the presence of material interfaces associated with different types of tissue encountered along the shock path, and by the presence of cavitation bubbles that are excited by tensile pressures associated with the focused shock wave. We use human anatomical data, but simplify the description by assuming that the tissue behaves as a fluid, and by assuming cylindrical symmetry along the shock path. Scattering by material interfaces is significant, and regions of high pressure amplitudes (both compressive and tensile) are generated almost 4 cm postfocus. Bubble dynamics generate secondary shocks whose strength depends on the density of bubbles and the pulse repetition frequency (PRF). At sufficiently large densities, the bubbles also attenuate the shock. Together with experimental evidence, the simulations suggest that high PRF may be counter-productive for stone comminution. Finally, we discuss how the lithotripter simulations can be used as input to more detailed physical models that attempt to characterize the mechanisms by which collapsing cavitation models erode stones, and by which shock waves and bubbles may damage tissue. PMID:21063697

  6. High speed observation of HIFU-induced cavitation cloud near curved rigid boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Z. G.; Wang, F. B.; Liu, S. H.; Wu, S. J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on the experimental study of the influence of surface curvature to the behaviour of HIFU-induced cavitation cloud. A Q-switched ruby pulse laser is used to induce cavitation nuclei in deionized water. A piezoelectric ultrasonic transducer (1.7 MHz) provides a focused ultrasound field to inspire the nucleus to cavitation cloud. A PZT probe type hydrophone is applied for measuring the HIFU sound field. It was observed that the motion of cavitation cloud located near the boundary is significantly influenced by the distance between cloud and boundary, as well as the curvature of the boundary. The curvature was defined by parameters ? and ?. Convex boundary, concave boundary, and flat boundary correspond to ? <1, ? >1 and ? = 1, respectively. Different behaviours of the cloud, including the migration of the cloud, the characteristics of oscillation, etc., were observed under different boundary curvatures by high-speed photography. Sonoluminescence of the acoustic cavitation bubble clouds were also studied to illustrate the characteristics of acoustic streaming.

  7. Dynamics of Vapour Bubbles in Nucleate Boiling. 2; Evolution of Thermally Controlled Bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buyevich, Yu A.; Webbon, Bruce W.; Callaway, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The previously developed dynamic theory of growth and detachment of vapour bubbles under conditions of nucleate pool boiling is applied to study motion and deformation of a bubble evolving at a single nucleation site. The bubble growth is presumed to be thermally controlled, and two components of heat transfer to the bubble are accounted of: the one from the bulk of surrounding liquid and the one due to heat conduction across a liquid microlayer formed underneath the bubble. Bubble evolution is governed by the buoyancy and an effective surface tension force, both the forces making the bubble centre of mass move away from the wall and, thus, assisting its detachment. Buoyancy-controlled and surface-tension-controlled regimes are considered separately in a meticulous way. The duration of the whole process of bubble evolution till detachment, the rate of growth, and the bubble departure size are found as functions of time and physical and operating parameters. Some repeatedly observed phenomena, such as an influence of gravity on the growth rate, are explained. Inferences of the model agree qualitatively with available experimental evidence, and conclusions pertaining to the dependence on gravity of the bubble radius at detachment and the whole time of the bubble development when being attached to the wall are confirmed quantitatively.

  8. Optical and acoustic monitoring of bubble cloud dynamics at a tissue-fluid interface in ultrasound tissue erosion

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhen; Hall, Timothy L.; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Cain, Charles A.

    2009-01-01

    Short, high-intensity ultrasound pulses have the ability to achieve localized, clearly demarcated erosion in soft tissue at a tissue-fluid interface. The primary mechanism for ultrasound tissue erosion is believed to be acoustic cavitation. To monitor the cavitating bubble cloud generated at a tissue-fluid interface, an optical attenuation method was used to record the intensity loss of transmitted light through bubbles. Optical attenuation was only detected when a bubble cloud was seen using high speed imaging. The light attenuation signals correlated well with a temporally changing acoustic backscatter which is an excellent indicator for tissue erosion. This correlation provides additional evidence that the cavitating bubble cloud is essential for ultrasound tissue erosion. The bubble cloud collapse cycle and bubble dissolution time were studied using the optical attenuation signals. The collapse cycle of the bubble cloud generated by a high intensity ultrasound pulse of 4–14 ?s was ~40–300 ?s depending on the acoustic parameters. The dissolution time of the residual bubbles was tens of ms long. This study of bubble dynamics may provide further insight into previous ultrasound tissue erosion results. PMID:17471753

  9. Interaction of two differently sized oscillating bubbles in a free field.

    PubMed

    Chew, Lup Wai; Klaseboer, Evert; Ohl, Siew-Wan; Khoo, Boo Cheong

    2011-12-01

    Most real life bubble dynamics applications involve multiple bubbles, for example, in cavitation erosion prevention, ultrasonic baths, underwater warfare, and medical applications involving microbubble contrast agents. Most scientific dealings with bubble-bubble interaction focus on two similarly sized bubbles. In this study, the interaction between two oscillating differently sized bubbles (generated in tap water) is studied using high speed photography. Four types of bubble behavior were observed, namely, jetting toward each other, jetting away from each other, bubble coalescence, and a behavior termed the "catapult" effect. In-phase bubbles jet toward each other, while out-of-phase bubbles jet away from each other. There exists a critical phase difference that separates the two regimes. The behavior of the bubbles is fully characterized by their dimensionless separation distance, their phase difference, and their size ratio. It is also found that for bubbles with large size difference, the smaller bubble behaves similarly to a single bubble oscillating near a free surface. PMID:22304190

  10. In vivo effects of cavitation alone or in combination with chemotherapy in a peritoneal carcinomatosis in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Prat, F.; Chapelon, J. Y.; el Fadil, F. A.; Theillère, Y.; Ponchon, T.; Cathignol, D.

    1993-01-01

    Cavitation (volume oscillations and collapse of gas bubbles), as generated by a co-administration of shockwaves (SW) and microbubbles (SWB), induces cytotoxicity in vitro. Moreover, cavitation potentiates the effects of Fluorouracil (FUra) on colon cancer cells. We aimed at reproducing such effects in vivo. A peritoneal carcinomatosis was induced in BDIX rats by intraperitoneal (IP) injection of DHDK12PROb cells. Cavitation was produced by various SW regimens (250 to 750SW) combined with bubbles (air/gelatin emulsion) infused through an IP catheter. In two consecutive experiments, microtumours (day 3 after cell injection) were submitted to various combinations of cavitation and/or Fluorouracil (FUra) and Cisplatinum (CDDP) at either high or low doses. After 30 days, 100% of control animals were dead or presented carcinomatosis with ascites, vs 60% after FUra 5 mg kg dy, day 4 through 8, and 0% after 250 SWB, day 4 and 6 + FUra 5 mg kg dy, day 4 through 8 (P < 0.001); similar differences were found with CDDP. Survival after low dose FUra + SWB was comparable to high dose FUra (25 mg kg dy day through 8) and was improved as compared to low-dose FUra alone. Only a high dose FUra + SWB schedule induced 40% long term (> 150 days) disease-free survival, but also a higher undesirable toxicity (40% toxic deaths within 1 month). It is concluded that cavitation is cytotoxic in vivo and that it potentiates the effects of FUra and CDDP in this animal model. PMID:8318402

  11. Mechanistic analysis of cavitation assisted transesterification on biodiesel characteristics.

    PubMed

    Sajjadi, Baharak; Abdul Aziz, A R; Ibrahim, Shaliza

    2015-01-01

    The influence of sonoluminescence transesterification on biodiesel physicochemical properties was investigated and the results were compared to those of traditional mechanical stirring. This study was conducted to identify the mechanistic features of ultrasonication by coupling statistical analysis of the experiments into the simulation of cavitation bubble. Different combinations of operational variables were employed for alkali-catalysis transesterification of palm oil. The experimental results showed that transesterification with ultrasound irradiation could change the biodiesel density by about 0.3kg/m(3); the viscosity by 0.12mm(2)/s; the pour point by about 1-2°C and the flash point by 5°C compared to the traditional method. Furthermore, 93.84% of yield with alcohol to oil molar ratio of 6:1 could be achieved through ultrasound assisted transesterification within only 20min. However, only 89.09% of reaction yield was obtained by traditional macro mixing/heating under the same condition. Based on the simulated oscillation velocity value, the cavitation phenomenon significantly contributed to generation of fine micro emulsion and was able to overcome mass transfer restriction. It was found that the sonoluminescence bubbles reached the temperature of 758-713K, pressure of 235.5-159.55bar, oscillation velocity of 3.5-6.5cm/s, and equilibrium radius of 17.9-13.7 times greater than its initial size under the ambient temperature of 50-64°C at the moment of collapse. This showed that the sonoluminescence bubbles were in the condition in which the decomposition phenomena were activated and the reaction rate was accelerated together with a change in the biodiesel properties. PMID:24981808

  12. Stochastic-field cavitation model

    SciTech Connect

    Dumond, J.; Magagnato, F.; Class, A.

    2013-07-15

    Nonlinear phenomena can often be well described using probability density functions (pdf) and pdf transport models. Traditionally, the simulation of pdf transport requires Monte-Carlo codes based on Lagrangian “particles” or prescribed pdf assumptions including binning techniques. Recently, in the field of combustion, a novel formulation called the stochastic-field method solving pdf transport based on Eulerian fields has been proposed which eliminates the necessity to mix Eulerian and Lagrangian techniques or prescribed pdf assumptions. In the present work, for the first time the stochastic-field method is applied to multi-phase flow and, in particular, to cavitating flow. To validate the proposed stochastic-field cavitation model, two applications are considered. First, sheet cavitation is simulated in a Venturi-type nozzle. The second application is an innovative fluidic diode which exhibits coolant flashing. Agreement with experimental results is obtained for both applications with a fixed set of model constants. The stochastic-field cavitation model captures the wide range of pdf shapes present at different locations.

  13. Stochastic-field cavitation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumond, J.; Magagnato, F.; Class, A.

    2013-07-01

    Nonlinear phenomena can often be well described using probability density functions (pdf) and pdf transport models. Traditionally, the simulation of pdf transport requires Monte-Carlo codes based on Lagrangian "particles" or prescribed pdf assumptions including binning techniques. Recently, in the field of combustion, a novel formulation called the stochastic-field method solving pdf transport based on Eulerian fields has been proposed which eliminates the necessity to mix Eulerian and Lagrangian techniques or prescribed pdf assumptions. In the present work, for the first time the stochastic-field method is applied to multi-phase flow and, in particular, to cavitating flow. To validate the proposed stochastic-field cavitation model, two applications are considered. First, sheet cavitation is simulated in a Venturi-type nozzle. The second application is an innovative fluidic diode which exhibits coolant flashing. Agreement with experimental results is obtained for both applications with a fixed set of model constants. The stochastic-field cavitation model captures the wide range of pdf shapes present at different locations.

  14. Bubble cloud dynamics in a high-pressure spherical resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Phillip Andrew

    A bubble cloud is a population of bubbles confined to a region within a fluid. Bubble clouds play a large role in a variety of naturally occurring phenomena and man-made applications (e.g., ocean noise, cavitation damage, sonoluminescence, ultrasonic cleaning, drug delivery, lithotripsy). It is important, therefore, to understand the behavior of bubble clouds so that their effects may be enhanced or diminished as desired. This work explores and characterizes the properties of bubble clouds nucleated inside a high-pressure spherical acoustic resonator, in connection with recent interest in acoustic inertial confinement fusion (acoustic ICF). A laser system was developed to repeatably nucleate a cloud of bubbles inside the resonator. The resulting events were then observed, primarily with schlieren imaging methods. Preliminary studies of the bubble cloud dynamics showed the sensitivity of the initial cloud to nucleation parameters including the phase of nucleation, the laser energy, and the acoustic power. After many acoustic cycles, some bubble clouds are observed to evolve into a tight cluster. The formation of these clusters correlates with initial bubble distributions which have a large cloud interaction parameter, ?. Cluster dynamics are seen to be largely driven by reconverging shock waves from previous collapses reflected from the resonator's interior surface. Initial expansion of the cluster boundary is on the order of 8 mm/µs and the maximum radius approaches 3 mm. Shock pressures are estimated to be > 10 GPa at a radius of 100 µm using weak shock theory.

  15. Seismically Initiated Carbon Dioxide Gas Bubble Growth in Groundwater: A Mechanism for Co-seismic Borehole Water Level Rise and Remotely Triggered Secondary Seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crews, Jackson B.

    Visualization experiments, core-scale laboratory experiments, and numerical simulations were conducted to examine the transient effect of dilational seismic wave propagation on pore fluid pressure in aquifers hosting groundwater that is near saturation with respect to dissolved carbon dioxide (CO2) gas. Groundwater can become charged with dissolved CO2 through contact with gas-phase CO2 in the Earth's crust derived from magma degasing, metamorphism, and biogenic processes. The propagation of dilational seismic waves (e.g., Rayleigh and p-waves) causes oscillation of the mean normal confining stress and pore fluid pressure. When the amplitude of the pore fluid pressure oscillation is large enough to drive the pore fluid pressure below the bubble pressure, an aqueous-to-gas-phase transition can occur in the pore space, which causes a buildup of pore fluid pressure and reduces the inter-granular effective stress under confined conditions. In visualization experiments conducted in a Hele-Shaw cell representing a smooth-walled, vertically oriented fracture, millisecond-scale pressure perturbations triggered bubble nucleation and growth lasting tens of seconds, with resulting pore fluid overpressure proportional to the magnitude of the pressure perturbation. In a Berea sandstone core flooded with initially under-saturated aqueous CO2 under conditions representative of a confined aquifer, rapid reductions in confining stress triggered transient pore pressure rise up to 0.7 MPa (100 psi) overpressure on a timescale of ~10 hours. The rate of pore pressure buildup in the first 100 seconds was proportional to the saturation with respect to dissolved CO 2 at the pore pressure minimum. Sinusoidal confining stress oscillations on a Berea sandstone core produced excess pore fluid pressure after the oscillations were terminated. Confining stress oscillations in the 0.1-0.4 MPa (15-60 psi) amplitude range and 0.05-0.30 Hz frequency band increased the pore fluid pressure by 13-60 cm of freshwater. Co-seismic borehole water level increases of the same magnitude were observed in Parkfield, California, and Long Valley caldera, California, in response to the propagation of a Rayleigh wave in the same amplitude and frequency range produced by the June 28, 1992 MW 7.3 Landers, California, earthquake. Co-seismic borehole water level rise is well documented in the literature, but the mechanism is not well understood, and the results of core-scale experiments indicate that seismically initiated CO2 gas bubble nucleation and growth in groundwater is a reasonable mechanism. Remotely triggered secondary seismicity is also well documented, and the reduction of effective stress due to CO2 bubble nucleation and growth in critically loaded faults may potentially explain how, for example, the June 28, 1992 MW 7.3 Landers, California, earthquake triggered seismicity as far away as Yellowstone, Wyoming, 1250 km from the hypocenter. A numerical simulation was conducted using Euler's method and a first-order kinetic model to compute the pore fluid pressure response to confining stress excursions on a Berea sandstone core flooded with initially under-saturated aqueous CO2. The model was calibrated on the pore pressure response to a rapid drop and later recovery of the confining stress. The model predicted decreasing overpressure as the confining stress oscillation frequency increased from 0.05 Hz to 0.30 Hz, in contradiction with the experimental results and field observations, which exhibit larger excess pore fluid pressure in response to higher frequency oscillations. The limitations of the numerical model point to the important influence of non-ideal behavior arising from a discontinuous gas phase and complex dynamics at the gas-liquid interface.

  16. Tiny Bubbles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Hy

    1985-01-01

    A simple oxygen-collecting device (easily constructed from glass jars and a lid) can show bubbles released by water plants during photosynthesis. Suggestions are given for: (1) testing the collected gas; (2) using various carbon dioxide sources; and (3) measuring respiration. (DH)

  17. Development of the Liposomes Entrapped Ultrasound Imaging Gas (``Bubble Liposomes'') as Novel Gene Delivery Carriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Ryo; Tanaka, Kumiko; Sawamura, Kaori; Takizawa, Tomoko; Utoguchi, Naoki; Negishi, Yoichi; Hagisawa, Kohsuke; Nishioka, Toshihiko; Maruyama, Kazuo

    2006-05-01

    Recently, microbubbles and ultrasound have been investigated with a view to improving the transfection efficiency of nonviral delivery systems for gene by cavitation. However, microbubbles had some problems in terms of stability and targeting ability. To solve these problems, we paid attention to liposomes that had many advantages such as stable and safe in vivo and easy to modify targeting ligand. Previously, we have represented that liposomes are good drug and gene delivery carriers. In addition, we developed that the liposomes ("Bubble liposomes") were entrapped with perfluoropropane known as ultrasound imaging gas. In this study, we assessed about feasibility of "Bubble liposomes" as gene delivery tool utilized cavitation by ultrasound irradiation. "Bubble liposomes" could effectively deliver plasmid DNA to cells by combination of ultrasound irradiation without cyototoxicity. This result suggested that "Bubble liposomes" might be a new class of tool for gene delivery.

  18. Numerical Simulation of Cavitation Characteristics for Pump-jet Propeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yao; Pan, Guang; Huang, Qiaogao; Du, Xiaoxu

    2015-09-01

    With k — ? turbulent model, non-cavitating performance of a pump-jet propeller was obtained by calculating RANS equations. The comparison between calculation results and experiment data shown that the numerical model and method was reliable. The cavitating hydrodynamic performance of it was calculated and analyzed with mixture homogeneous flow cavitation model based on Rayleigh-Plesset equations and sliding mesh. The effects of different inlet velocity ratio, cavitation number and flow velocity on cavitation characteristics of pump-jet were studied. When the cavitation occurred on the blades, the propeller thrust and torque decreased significantly, thereby causing open water efficiency reduced 15%. For the same cavitation number, as the inlet velocity ratio decreased, the pump-jet propeller blade cavitation phenomenon was more obvious. While for the same ratio, the smaller the number of cavitation, cavitation phenomenon was more remarkable. The more significant was that while the cavitation number was greater than a certain value, the blade cavitation phenomenon disappeared.

  19. Shadowgraph, Schlieren and interferometry in a 2D cavitating channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauger, Cyril; Méès, Loïc; Michard, Marc; Azouzi, Alexandre; Valette, Stéphane

    2012-12-01

    Cavitation plays an important role in fuel atomization mechanisms, but the physics of cavitation and its impact on spray formation and injector efficiency are not well documented yet. Experimental investigations are required to support the development and the validation of numerical models and the design of tomorrow's injectors, in the context of pollutant and fuel consumption reduction. The complexity of modern injectors and the extreme conditions of injection do not facilitate experimental investigations. In this paper, experiments are conducted in a simplified geometry. The model nozzle consists of a transparent 2D micro-channel supplied with a test oil (ISO 4113). Three different optical techniques are proposed to investigate the channel flow, with the pressure drop between upstream and downstream chambers as a parameter. A shadowgraph-like imaging technique allows the observation of cavitation inception and vapor cavities development throughout the channel. The technique also reveals the presence of density gradients (pressure or temperature) in the channel flow. However, this additional information is balanced by difficulties in image interpretation, which are discussed in the paper. In addition, a combination of Schlieren technique and interferometric imaging is used to measure the density fields inside the channel. The three techniques results are carefully analyzed and confronted. These results reveal a wealth of information on the flow, with pressure waves generated by bubble collapses, turbulence in the wake of vapor cavities and bubble survival in flow regions of high pressure. Our results also show that cavitation inception is located in the shear layers between the recirculation zones and the main flow, relatively far from the inlet corner, where the pressure is minimum in average. To explain this behavior, we propose a scenario of cavitation inception based on the occurrence and the growing of instabilities in the shear layers.

  20. Acoustic bubble removal to enhance SWL efficacy at high shock rate: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Duryea, Alexander P; Roberts, William W; Cain, Charles A; Tamaddoni, Hedieh A; Hall, Timothy L

    2014-01-01

    Rate-dependent efficacy has been extensively documented in shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) stone comminution, with shock waves (SWs) delivered at a low rate producing more efficient fragmentation in comparison to those delivered at high rates. Cavitation is postulated to be the primary source underlying this rate phenomenon. Residual bubble nuclei that persist along the axis of SW propagation can drastically attenuate the waveform's negative phase, decreasing the energy which is ultimately delivered to the stone and compromising comminution. The effect is more pronounced at high rates, as residual nuclei have less time to passively dissolve between successive shocks. In this study, we investigate a means of actively removing such nuclei from the field using a low-amplitude acoustic pulse designed to stimulate their aggregation and subsequent coalescence. To test the efficacy of this bubble removal scheme, model kidney stones were treated in vitro using a research electrohydraulic lithotripter. SWL was applied at rates of 120, 60, or 30?SW/min with or without the incorporation of bubble removal pulses. Optical images displaying the extent of cavitation in the vicinity of the stone were also collected for each treatment. Results show that bubble removal pulses drastically enhance the efficacy of stone comminution at the higher rates tested (120 and 60?SW/min), while optical images show a corresponding reduction in bubble excitation along the SW axis when bubble removal pulses are incorporated. At the lower rate of 30?SW/min, no difference in stone comminution or bubble excitation was detected with the addition of bubble removal pulses, suggesting that remnant nuclei had sufficient time for more complete dissolution. These results corroborate previous work regarding the role of cavitation in rate-dependent SWL efficacy, and suggest that the effect can be mitigated via appropriate control of the cavitation environment surrounding the stone. PMID:23957846

  1. Suppressing bubble shielding effect in shock wave lithotripsy by low intensity pulsed ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jen-Chieh; Zhou, Yufeng

    2015-01-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) has been used as an effective modality to fragment kidney calculi. Because of the bubble shielding effect in the pre-focal region, the acoustic energy delivered to the focus is reduced. Low pulse repetition frequency (PRF) will be applied to dissolve these bubbles for better stone comminution efficiency. In this study, low intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) beam was aligned perpendicular to the axis of a shock wave (SW) lithotripter at its focus. The light transmission was used to evaluate the compressive wave and cavitation induced by SWs without or with a combination of LIPUS for continuous sonication. It is found that bubble shielding effect becomes dominated with the SW exposure and has a greater significant effect on cavitation than compressive wave. Using the combined wave scheme, the improvement began at the 5th pulse and gradually increased. Suppression effect on bubble shielding is independent on the trigger delay, but increases with the acoustic intensity and pulse duration of LIPUS. The peak negative and integral area of light transmission signal, which present the compressive wave and cavitation respectively, using our strategy at PRF of 1 Hz are comparable to those using SW alone at PRF of 0.1 Hz. In addition, high-speed photography confirmed the bubble activities in both free field and close to a stone surface. Bubble motion in response to the acoustic radiation force by LIPUS was found to be the major mechanism of suppressing bubble shielding effect. There is a 2.6-fold increase in stone fragmentation efficiency after 1000 SWs at PRF of 1 Hz in combination with LIPUS. In summary, combination of SWs and LIPUS is an effective way of suppressing bubble shielding effect and, subsequently, improving cavitation at the focus for a better outcome. PMID:25173067

  2. Acoustic Bubble Removal to Enhance SWL Efficacy at High Shock Rate: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, William W.; Cain, Charles A.; Tamaddoni, Hedieh A.; Hall, Timothy L.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Rate-dependent efficacy has been extensively documented in shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) stone comminution, with shock waves (SWs) delivered at a low rate producing more efficient fragmentation in comparison to those delivered at high rates. Cavitation is postulated to be the primary source underlying this rate phenomenon. Residual bubble nuclei that persist along the axis of SW propagation can drastically attenuate the waveform's negative phase, decreasing the energy which is ultimately delivered to the stone and compromising comminution. The effect is more pronounced at high rates, as residual nuclei have less time to passively dissolve between successive shocks. In this study, we investigate a means of actively removing such nuclei from the field using a low-amplitude acoustic pulse designed to stimulate their aggregation and subsequent coalescence. To test the efficacy of this bubble removal scheme, model kidney stones were treated in vitro using a research electrohydraulic lithotripter. SWL was applied at rates of 120, 60, or 30?SW/min with or without the incorporation of bubble removal pulses. Optical images displaying the extent of cavitation in the vicinity of the stone were also collected for each treatment. Results show that bubble removal pulses drastically enhance the efficacy of stone comminution at the higher rates tested (120 and 60?SW/min), while optical images show a corresponding reduction in bubble excitation along the SW axis when bubble removal pulses are incorporated. At the lower rate of 30?SW/min, no difference in stone comminution or bubble excitation was detected with the addition of bubble removal pulses, suggesting that remnant nuclei had sufficient time for more complete dissolution. These results corroborate previous work regarding the role of cavitation in rate-dependent SWL efficacy, and suggest that the effect can be mitigated via appropriate control of the cavitation environment surrounding the stone. PMID:23957846

  3. Gas-vapor bubble dynamics in therapeutic ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreider, Wayne

    In applications of therapeutic ultrasound such as shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) and high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU), cavitation and the associated bubble dynamics play an important role. Moreover, bubble dynamics have not been fully studied in the context of the large acoustic excitations, elevated temperatures, and gas-saturated conditions that characterize therapeutic ultrasound treatments. Because acoustic cavitation has been typically explored in the context of bubbles containing only non-condensable gases, relatively little is understood about the role of vapor under relevant conditions. Accordingly, the primary goal of this effort is to elucidate the role of vapor in the dynamics of gas-vapor bubbles. Given the large acoustic excitations of SWL and HIFU, the dynamics of violent inertial collapses are of particular interest. To investigate the impact of vapor, both numerical modeling and experiments were utilized. The model was developed for a single, spherical bubble and was designed to capture behavior associated with the collapse and rebound of a gas-vapor bubble. Numerical difficulties in modeling violent collapses were addressed by using scaling principles to approximate the spatial gradients used for estimating heat and mass transport in both liquid and gaseous phases, Model predictions demonstrate thermal effects from vapor transport through the coupling of the saturated vapor pressure to temperature changes in the surrounding liquid. Also, the model suggests that vapor transport affects the dynamics mechanically when vapor is diffusively trapped in the bubble interior. Moreover, predictions imply that the collapses of millimeter-sized lithotripsy bubbles are principally governed by the aforementioned mechanical effects. To test the model, collapses and rebounds of lithotripsy bubbles were experimentally observed using high-speed photography. Although bubble asymmetries added scatter to the data, experimental observations agree very well with the range of model predictions obtained with feasible length scales for mass diffusion in the bubble interior. Statistically significant variations observed in the experimental data imply that both temperature and dissolved gas concentration in the surrounding liquid affect mass diffusion inside the bubble. To complement experimental observations, bubble clusters in an incompressible liquid were modeled; simulations yielded insights related to bubble collapse times.

  4. Cavitation in transiently operating centrifugal pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Lefebvre, P.J.; Barker, W.P.

    1994-12-31

    The effect of transient operation on a centrifugal pump`s cavitation performance was investigated experimentally in the Naval Undersea Warfare Center`s Impeller Test Facility. For low facility pressures where cavitation occurred, its inception and desinence during the transient were determined by acoustic and visualization methods whose results agreed closely with predicted values based on quasi-steady analysis. The minimum facility pressure for cavitation-free operation also correlated well with quasi-steady predictions. Impeller suction performance continuously degraded (i.e., reduced suction pressure) as facility pressure was lowered from the minimum non-cavitating pressure and as the severity of cavitation increased. This degradation was actually a redistribution of pressure across the impeller since the total head rise was unaffected. The appearance of suction pressure degradation can be used as an alternate means of determining the minimum facility pressure for cavitation-free operation.

  5. Observing multi-bubble sonoluminescence in phosphoric acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kai, Yang; Maimaitiming, Maimaititusong; Ying, Zhang Cui; Rong, Zhu Qi; Yu, An

    2012-09-01

    We investigated multi-bubble sonoluminescence produced in phosphoric acid by intense acoustic standing-wave fields. Using a photomultiplier tube, we observed that flash times from these bubbles vary. This phenomenon can be interpreted qualitatively by numerically solving the cavitation dynamic equation together with the bubble-pulsation equation. In addition, we also observed phenomena that for the present are unexplainable. Dissolving sodium phosphate in phosphoric acid, we find that light intensities from sonoluminescence dramatically weaken. In a layer of phosphoric acid just a few millimeters thick, we observed multi-bubble sonoluminescence which was synchronous with twice the frequency of the driving acoustic wave, and found that the appearance of the phenomenon depends sensitively on the thickness of the liquid layer.

  6. Cavitation Fatigue. Embolism and Refilling Cycles Can Weaken the Cavitation Resistance of Xylem1

    E-print Network

    Stiller, Volker

    Cavitation Fatigue. Embolism and Refilling Cycles Can Weaken the Cavitation Resistance of Xylem1 of xylem. Stem or petiole segments were tested for cavitation resistance before and after a controlled versus xylem pressure. Two responses were observed. "Resilient" xylem (Acer negundo and Alnus incana

  7. Growth control of sessile microbubbles in PDMS devices.

    PubMed

    Volk, Andreas; Rossi, Massimiliano; Kähler, Christian J; Hilgenfeldt, Sascha; Marin, Alvaro

    2015-12-21

    In a microfluidic environment, the presence of bubbles is often detrimental to the functionality of the device, leading to clogging or cavitation, but microbubbles can also be an indispensable asset in other applications such as microstreaming. In either case, it is crucial to understand and control the growth or shrinkage of these bodies of air, in particular in common soft-lithography devices based on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), which is highly permeable to gases. In this work, we study the gas transport into and out of a bubble positioned in a microfluidic device, taking into account the direct gas exchange through PDMS as well as the transport of gas through the liquid in the device. Hydrostatic pressure regulation allows for the quantitative control of growth, shrinkage, or the attainment of a stable equilibrium bubble size. We find that the vapor pressure of the liquid plays an important role for the balance of gas transport, accounting for variability in experimental conditions and suggesting additional means of bubble size control in applications. PMID:26517506

  8. Controlled vesicle deformation and lysis by single oscillating bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marmottant, Philippe; Hilgenfeldt, Sascha

    2003-05-01

    The ability of collapsing (cavitating) bubbles to focus and concentrate energy, forces and stresses is at the root of phenomena such as cavitation damage, sonochemistry or sonoluminescence. In a biomedical context, ultrasound-driven microbubbles have been used to enhance contrast in ultrasonic images. The observation of bubble-enhanced sonoporation-acoustically induced rupture of membranes-has also opened up intriguing possibilities for the therapeutic application of sonoporation as an alternative to cell-wall permeation techniques such as electroporation and particle guns. However, these pioneering experiments have not been able to pinpoint the mechanism by which the violently collapsing bubble opens pores or larger holes in membranes. Here we present an experiment in which gentle (linear) bubble oscillations are sufficient to achieve rupture of lipid membranes. In this regime, the bubble dynamics and the ensuing sonoporation can be accurately controlled. The use of microbubbles as focusing agents makes acoustics on the micrometre scale (microacoustics) a viable tool, with possible applications in cell manipulation and cell-wall permeation as well as in microfluidic devices.

  9. Design and application of cavitation flow image program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Min-di; Wang, Guo-yu; Li, Xiang-bin

    2008-03-01

    The cavitation flow images are always used to research cavitation phenomena. A cavitation flow image program is developed, which introduces many self-designing image processing functions different from the general ones and overcome the restrictions of the commercial softwares. By employing the program, the outline, boundary, gray level and area of the flow images around a super-cavitation hydrofoil in the cavitation zone can be extracted successfully. Moreover, the evolutional period of cavitation can be estimated based on image gray, so that the cavity configuration and transformation can be researched quantificationally. The reliability and frequency of the processing cavitation have been improved in order to understand the mechanism of cavitation flow.

  10. Cavitating Langmuir turbulence in the terrestrial aurora.

    PubMed

    Isham, B; Rietveld, M T; Guio, P; Forme, F R E; Grydeland, T; Mjølhus, E

    2012-03-01

    Langmuir cavitons have been artificially produced in Earth's ionosphere, but evidence of naturally occurring cavitation has been elusive. By measuring and modeling the spectra of electrostatic plasma modes, we show that natural cavitating, or strong, Langmuir turbulence does occur in the ionosphere, via a process in which a beam of auroral electrons drives Langmuir waves, which in turn produce cascading Langmuir and ion-acoustic excitations and cavitating Langmuir turbulence. The data presented here are the first direct evidence of cavitating Langmuir turbulence occurring naturally in any space or astrophysical plasma. PMID:22463417

  11. Measuring the surface tension of soap bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, Carl D.

    1992-01-01

    The objectives are for students to gain an understanding of surface tension, to see that pressure inside a small bubble is larger than that inside a large bubble. These concepts can be used to explain the behavior of liquid foams as well as precipitate coarsening and grain growth. Equipment, supplies, and procedures are explained.

  12. The birth of a bubble: A molecular simulation study Alexander V. Neimarka)

    E-print Network

    Muzzio, Fernando J.

    ,4 or explosive boiling of cryogenic liquids,5 this role is negative. In other cases, such as sonoluminescence6.1063/1.1829040 I. INTRODUCTION Spontaneous formation of bubbles in metastable liquids, known as cavitation, plays a critical role in various techno- logical and natural phenomena which involve liquid­vapor phase

  13. Time resolved PIV and flow visualization of 3D sheet cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foeth, E. J.; van Doorne, C. W. H.; van Terwisga, T.; Wieneke, B.

    2006-04-01

    Time-resolved PIV was applied to study fully developed sheet cavitation on a hydrofoil with a spanwise varying angle of attack. The hydrofoil was designed to have a three-dimensional cavitation pattern closely related to propeller cavitation, studied for its adverse effects as vibration, noise, and erosion production. For the PIV measurements, fluorescent tracer particles were applied in combination with an optical filter, in order to remove the reflections of the laser lightsheet by the cavitation. An adaptive mask was developed to find the interface between the vapor and liquid phase. The velocity at the interface of the cavity was found to be very close to the velocity predicted by a simple streamline model. For a visualization of the global flow dynamics, the laser beam was expanded and used to illuminate the entire hydrofoil and cavitation structure. The time-resolved recordings reveal the growth of the attached cavity and the cloud shedding. Our investigation proves the viability of accurate PIV measurements around developed sheet cavitation. The presented results will further be made available as a benchmark for the validation of numerical simulations of this complicated flow.

  14. Additional evidence of nuclear emissions during acoustic cavitation.

    PubMed

    Taleyarkhan, R P; Cho, J S; West, C D; Lahey, R T; Nigmatulin, R I; Block, R C

    2004-03-01

    Time spectra of neutron and sonoluminescence emissions were measured in cavitation experiments with chilled deuterated acetone. Statistically significant neutron and gamma ray emissions were measured with a calibrated liquid-scintillation detector, and sonoluminescence emissions were measured with a photomultiplier tube. The neutron and sonoluminescence emissions were found to be time correlated over the time of significant bubble cluster dynamics. The neutron emission energy was less than 2.5 MeV and the neutron emission rate was up to approximately 4 x 10(5) n/s. Measurements of tritium production were also performed and these data implied a neutron emission rate due to D-D fusion which agreed with what was measured. In contrast, control experiments using normal acetone did not result in statistically significant tritium activity, or neutron or gamma ray emissions. PMID:15089363

  15. THE ROLE OF INERTIAL CAVITATION IN ACOUSTIC DROPLET VAPORIZATION

    PubMed Central

    Fabiilli, Mario L.; Haworth, Kevin J.; Fakhri, Nasir H.; Kripfgans, Oliver D.; Carson, Paul L.; Fowlkes, J. Brian

    2011-01-01

    The vaporization of a superheated droplet emulsion into gas bubbles using ultrasound – termed acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV) – has potential therapeutic applications in embolotherapy and drug delivery. The optimization of ADV for therapeutic applications can be enhanced by understanding the physical mechanisms underlying ADV, which are currently not clearly elucidated. Acoustic cavitation is one possible mechanism. This paper investigates the relationship between the ADV and inertial cavitation (IC) thresholds (measured as peak rarefactional pressures) by studying parameters that are known to influence the IC threshold. These parameters include bulk fluid properties such as gas saturation, temperature, viscosity, and surface tension; droplet parameters such as degree of superheat, surfactant type, and size; and acoustic properties such as pulse repetition frequency and pulse width. In all cases the ADV threshold occurred at a lower rarefactional pressure than the IC threshold indicating that the phase-transition occurs before IC events. The viscosity and temperature of the bulk fluid are shown to influence both thresholds directly and inversely, respectively. An inverse trend is observed between threshold and diameter for droplets in the 1 to 2.5 ? range. Based on a choice of experimental parameters, it is possible to achieve ADV with or without IC. PMID:19473917

  16. Generation of cavitation luminescence by laser-induced exothermic chemical reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung Park, Han; Diebold, Gerald J.

    2013-08-01

    Absorption of high power laser radiation by aqueous carbon suspensions is known to result in the formation of highly compressed bubbles of hydrogen and carbon monoxide through the endothermic carbon-steam reaction. The bubbles expand rapidly, overreaching their equilibrium diameter, and then collapse tens to hundreds of microseconds after formation to give a flash of radiation. Here we report on the effects of laser-initiated exothermic chemical reaction on cavitation luminescence. Experiments with hydrogen peroxide added to colloidal carbon suspensions show that both the time of the light flash following the laser pulse and the intensity of luminescence increase with hydrogen peroxide concentration, indicating that large, highly energetic gas bubbles are produced. Additional experiments with colloidal carbon suspensions show the effects of high pressure on the luminescent intensity and its time of appearance following firing of the laser.

  17. Generation of cavitation luminescence by laser-induced exothermic chemical reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Jung Park, Han; Diebold, Gerald J.

    2013-08-14

    Absorption of high power laser radiation by aqueous carbon suspensions is known to result in the formation of highly compressed bubbles of hydrogen and carbon monoxide through the endothermic carbon-steam reaction. The bubbles expand rapidly, overreaching their equilibrium diameter, and then collapse tens to hundreds of microseconds after formation to give a flash of radiation. Here we report on the effects of laser-initiated exothermic chemical reaction on cavitation luminescence. Experiments with hydrogen peroxide added to colloidal carbon suspensions show that both the time of the light flash following the laser pulse and the intensity of luminescence increase with hydrogen peroxide concentration, indicating that large, highly energetic gas bubbles are produced. Additional experiments with colloidal carbon suspensions show the effects of high pressure on the luminescent intensity and its time of appearance following firing of the laser.

  18. Physical and numerical investigation of cavitating flows around a pitching hydrofoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Biao; Ducoin, Antoine; Young, Yin Lu

    2013-10-01

    The objective of this paper is to investigate cavitating flows around a pitching hydrofoil via combined physical and numerical studies. The aims are to (1) improve the understanding of the interplay between unsteady cavitating flow, hydrofoil motion, and hydrodynamic performance, (2) quantify the influence of pitching rate on subcavitating and cavitating responses, and (3) quantify the influence of cavitation on the hydrodynamic load coefficients and surrounding flow structures. Results are presented for a NACA66 hydrofoil undergoing controlled, slow (dot ? = 6^circ /s) and fast (dot ? = 63^circ /s) pitching motions from ? = 0° to ? = 15° and back to ? = 0° for both subcavitating and cavitating conditions at a moderate Reynolds number of Re = 750 000. The experimental studies were conducted in a cavitation tunnel at the French Naval Academy, France. The numerical simulations are performed by solving the incompressible, multiphase Unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes Equations via the commercial code CFX using a transport equation-based cavitation model; a modified k-? SST turbulence model is used to account for the effect of local compressibility on the turbulent eddy viscosity. The results showed that increases in the pitching rate suppressed laminar to turbulent transition, delayed stall, and significantly modified post-stall behavior. Cavitation inception at the leading edge modified the pressure distribution, which in turn significantly changed the interaction between leading edge and trailing edge vortices, and hence the magnitude as well as the frequency of the load fluctuations. For a fixed cavitation number, increases in pitching rate lead to increase in cavitation volume, which in turn changed the cavity shedding frequencies and significantly modified the hydrodynamic loads. Inversely, the leading edge cavitation observed for the low pitching velocity case tends to stabilize the stall because of the decrease of the pressure gradient due to the formation of the cavity. The results showed strong correlation between the cavity and vorticity structures, which suggest that the inception, growth, collapse and shedding of sheet/cloud cavities are important mechanisms for vorticity production and modification.

  19. A numerical and experimental study on the drag of a cavitating underwater vehicle in cavitation tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jung-Kyu; Ahn, Byoung-Kwon; Kim, Hyoung-Tae

    2015-09-01

    For Super-Cavitating Underwater Vehicles (SCUV), the numerical analyses and experiments in a large cavitation tunnel are carried out at relatively large Reynolds numbers. The numerical results agree well with experiments and the drag coefficient of SCUV is rarely changed by the Reynolds number. As the cavitation number is decreased, the cavity occurs and grows, the cavitator drag decreases and the body drag is affected by the degree of covering the body with the cavity. The tunnel effects, i.e. the blockage and the friction pressure drop of the tunnel, on the drag and the cavitation of SCUV are examined from the numerical results in between the tunnel and unbounded flows. In the tunnel, a minimum cavitation number exists and the drag of SCUV appears larger than that in unbounded flow. When the super-cavity covers the entire body, the friction drag almost disappears and the total drag of SCUV can be regarded as the pressure drag of cavitator.

  20. Acoustic cavitation-based monitoring of the reversibility and permeability of ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Tao; Samiotaki, Gesthimani; Wang, Shutao; Acosta, Camilo; Chen, Cherry C.; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2015-12-01

    Cavitation events seeded by microbubbles have been previously reported to be associated with MR- or fluorescent-contrast enhancement after focused ultrasound (FUS)-induced blood-brain barrier (BBB) opening. However, it is still unknown whether bubble activity can be correlated with the reversibility (the duration of opening and the likelihood of safe reinstatement) and the permeability of opened BBB, which is critical for the clinical translation of using passive cavitation detection to monitor, predict and control the opening. In this study, the dependence of acoustic cavitation on the BBB opening duration, permeability coefficient and histological damage occurrence were thus investigated. Transcranial pulsed FUS at 1.5 MHz in the presence of systemically circulating microbubbles was applied in the mouse hippocampi (n??=??60). The stable and inertial cavitation activities were monitored during sonication. Contrast-enhanced MRI was performed immediately after sonication and every 24?h up to 6 d thereafter, to assess BBB opening, brain tissue permeability and potential edema. Histological evaluations were used to assess the occurrence of neurovascular damages. It was found that stable cavitation was well correlated with: (1) the duration of the BBB opening (r2??=??0.77) (2) the permeability of the opened BBB (r2??=??0.82) (3) the likelihood of safe opening (P??cavitation dose was correlated with the resulting BBB permeability (r2??=??0.72). Stable cavitation was found to be more reliable than inertial cavitation at assessing the BBB opening within the pressure range used in this study. This study demonstrates that the stable cavitation response during BBB opening holds promise for predicting and controlling the restoration and pharmacokinetics of FUS-opened BBB. The stable cavitation response therefore showed great promise in predicting the BBB opening duration, enabling thus control of opening according to the drug circulation time. In addition, avoiding adverse effects in the brain and assessing the pharmacokinetics of the compounds delivered can also be achieved by monitoring and controlling the stable cavitation emissions.

  1. Acoustic cavitation-based monitoring of the reversibility and permeability of ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening.

    PubMed

    Sun, Tao; Samiotaki, Gesthimani; Wang, Shutao; Acosta, Camilo; Chen, Cherry C; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2015-12-01

    Cavitation events seeded by microbubbles have been previously reported to be associated with MR- or fluorescent-contrast enhancement after focused ultrasound (FUS)-induced blood-brain barrier (BBB) opening. However, it is still unknown whether bubble activity can be correlated with the reversibility (the duration of opening and the likelihood of safe reinstatement) and the permeability of opened BBB, which is critical for the clinical translation of using passive cavitation detection to monitor, predict and control the opening. In this study, the dependence of acoustic cavitation on the BBB opening duration, permeability coefficient and histological damage occurrence were thus investigated. Transcranial pulsed FUS at 1.5 MHz in the presence of systemically circulating microbubbles was applied in the mouse hippocampi (n??=??60). The stable and inertial cavitation activities were monitored during sonication. Contrast-enhanced MRI was performed immediately after sonication and every 24?h up to 6 d thereafter, to assess BBB opening, brain tissue permeability and potential edema. Histological evaluations were used to assess the occurrence of neurovascular damages. It was found that stable cavitation was well correlated with: (1) the duration of the BBB opening (r(2)??=??0.77); (2) the permeability of the opened BBB (r(2)??=??0.82); (3) the likelihood of safe opening (P??cavitation dose was correlated with the resulting BBB permeability (r(2)??=??0.72). Stable cavitation was found to be more reliable than inertial cavitation at assessing the BBB opening within the pressure range used in this study. This study demonstrates that the stable cavitation response during BBB opening holds promise for predicting and controlling the restoration and pharmacokinetics of FUS-opened BBB. The stable cavitation response therefore showed great promise in predicting the BBB opening duration, enabling thus control of opening according to the drug circulation time. In addition, avoiding adverse effects in the brain and assessing the pharmacokinetics of the compounds delivered can also be achieved by monitoring and controlling the stable cavitation emissions. PMID:26562661

  2. BUBBLE DYNAMICS AT GAS-EVOLVING ELECTRODES

    SciTech Connect

    Sides, Paul J.

    1980-12-01

    Nucleation of bubbles, their growth by diffusion of dissolved gas to the bubble surface and by coalescence, and their detachment from the electrode are all very fast phenomena; furthermore, electrolytically generated bubbles range in size from ten to a few hundred microns; therefore, magnification and high speed cinematography are required to observe bubbles and the phenomena of their growth on the electrode surface. Viewing the action from the front side (the surface on which the bubbles form) is complicated because the most important events occur close to the surface and are obscured by other bubbles passing between the camera and the electrode; therefore, oxygen was evolved on a transparent tin oxide "window" electrode and the events were viewed from the backside. The movies showed that coalescence of bubbles is very important for determining the size of bubbles and in the chain of transport processes; growth by diffusion and by coalescence proceeds in series and parallel; coalescing bubbles cause significant fluid motion close to the electrode; bubbles can leave and reattach; and bubbles evolve in a cycle of growth by diffusion and different modes of coalescence. An analytical solution for the primary potential and current distribution around a spherical bubble in contact with a plane electrode is presented. Zero at the contact point, the current density reaches only one percent of its undisturbed value at 30 percent of the radius from that point and goes through a shallow maximum two radii away. The solution obtained for spherical bubbles is shown to apply for the small bubbles of electrolytic processes. The incremental resistance in ohms caused by sparse arrays of bubbles is given by {Delta}R = 1.352 af/kS where f is the void fraction of gas in the bubble layer, a is the bubble layer thickness, k is the conductivity of gas free electrolyte, and S is the electrode area. A densely populated gas bubble layer on an electrode was modeled as a hexagonal array of dielectric spheres. Accurately machined lucite spheres were placed one at a time in one end of a hexagonal cell which simulated the unit cell of such an array. The resistance as a function of gas bubble layer packing density sharply increased as close packing was approached. Because the interaction of the fields around bubbles closely spaced in the direction perpendicular to the current dominates the added resistance, and because there is a tri-modal distribution of bubble sizes in a bubble layer, the Distribution Model of Meredith and Tobias (16), derived for three dimensional gas dispersions, approximately predicted the conductivity of a bubble layer at void fractions greater than 0.3. At moderate-to-high current densities, the bubble layer in a cell having an interelectrode gap of half a centimeter could increase the ohmic resistance by as much as 20 percent.

  3. Dynamics of Single Hydrogen Bubbles at a Platinum Microelectrode.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xuegeng; Karnbach, Franziska; Uhlemann, Margitta; Odenbach, Stefan; Eckert, Kerstin

    2015-07-28

    Bubble dynamics, including the formation, growth, and detachment, of single H2 bubbles was studied at a platinum microelectrode during the electrolysis of 1 M H2SO4 electrolyte. The bubbles were visualized through a microscope by a high-speed camera. Electrochemical measurements were conducted in parallel to measure the transient current. The periodic current oscillations, resulting from the periodic formation and detachment of single bubbles, allow the bubble lifetime and size to be predicted from the transient current. A comparison of the bubble volume calculated from the current and from the recorded bubble image shows a gas evolution efficiency increasing continuously with the growth of the bubble until it reaches 100%. Two different substrates, glass and epoxy, were used to embed the Pt wire. While nearly no difference was found with respect to the growth law for the bubble radius, the contact angle differs strongly for the two types of cell. Data provided for the contact point evolution further complete the image of single hydrogen bubble growth. Finally, the velocity field driven by the detached bubble was measured by means of PIV, and the effects of the convection on the subsequent bubble were evaluated. PMID:26133052

  4. Study on the bubble transport mechanism in an acoustic standing wave field.

    PubMed

    Xi, Xiaoyu; Cegla, Frederic B; Lowe, Michael; Thiemann, Andrea; Nowak, Till; Mettin, Robert; Holsteyns, Frank; Lippert, Alexander

    2011-12-01

    The use of bubbles in applications such as surface chemistry, drug delivery, and ultrasonic cleaning etc. has been enormously popular in the past two decades. It has been recognized that acoustically-driven bubbles can be used to disturb the flow field near a boundary in order to accelerate physical or chemical reactions on the surface. The interactions between bubbles and a surface have been studied experimentally and analytically. However, most of the investigations focused on violently oscillating bubbles (also known as cavitation bubble), less attention has been given to understand the interactions between moderately oscillating bubbles and a boundary. Moreover, cavitation bubbles were normally generated in situ by a high intensity laser beam, little experimental work has been carried out to study the translational trajectory of a moderately oscillating bubble in an acoustic field and subsequent interactions with the surface. This paper describes the design of an ultrasonic test cell and explores the mechanism of bubble manipulation within the test cell. The test cell consists of a transducer, a liquid medium and a glass backing plate. The acoustic field within the multi-layered stack was designed in such a way that it was effectively one dimensional. This was then successfully simulated by a one dimensional network model. The model can accurately predict the impedance of the test cell as well as the mode shape (distribution of particle velocity and stress/pressure field) within the whole assembly. The mode shape of the stack was designed so that bubbles can be pushed from their injection point onto a backing glass plate. Bubble radial oscillation was simulated by a modified Keller-Miksis equation and bubble translational motion was derived from an equation obtained by applying Newton's second law to a bubble in a liquid medium. Results indicated that the bubble trajectory depends on the acoustic pressure amplitude and initial bubble size: an increase of pressure amplitude or a decrease of bubble size forces bubbles larger than their resonant size to arrive at the target plate at lower heights, while the trajectories of smaller bubbles are less influenced by these factors. The test cell is also suitable for testing the effects of drag force on the bubble motion and for studying the bubble behavior near a surface. PMID:21719064

  5. Numerical investigation of three-dimensional cloud cavitation with special emphasis on collapse induced shock dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnerr, Günter H.; Sezal, Ismail H.; Schmidt, Steffen J.

    2008-04-01

    The aim of the present investigation is to model and analyze compressible three-dimensional (3D) cavitating liquid flows with special emphasis on the detection of shock formation and propagation. We recently developed the conservative finite volume method CATUM (Cavitation Technische Universität München), which enables us to simulate unsteady 3D liquid flows with phase transition at all Mach numbers. The compressible formulation of the governing equations together with the thermodynamic closure relations are solved by a modified Riemann approach by using time steps down to nanoseconds. This high temporal resolution is necessary to resolve the wave dynamics that leads to acoustic cavitation as well as to detect regions of instantaneous high pressure loads. The proposed two-phase model based on the integral average properties of thermodynamic quantities is first validated against the solution of the Rayleigh-Plesset equation for the collapse of a single bubble. The computational fluid dynamics tool CATUM is then applied to the numerical simulation of the highly unsteady two-phase flow around a 3D twisted hydrofoil. This specific hydrofoil allows a detailed study of sheet and cloud cavitation structures related to 3D shock dynamics emerging from collapsing vapor regions. The time dependent development of vapor clouds, their shedding mechanism, and the resulting unsteady variation of lift and drag are discussed in detail. We identify instantaneous local pressure peaks of the order of 100bar, which are thought to be responsible for the erosive damage of the surface of the hydrofoil.

  6. Cavitation inception during the interaction of a pair of counter-rotating vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Natasha A.; Choi, Jaehyug; Yakushiji, Ryo; Ceccio, Steven L.

    2012-01-01

    Pairs of unequal strength, counter-rotating vortices were produced to examine the inception and dynamics of vortex cavitation as the vortices undergo a long-wavelength instability. The instability causes the weaker, secondary vortex to be turned and stretched by the stronger primary vortex. Folding and stretching of the secondary vortices result in sharp reductions of the core pressure. Here, these sharp and transient reductions in the secondary vortex core pressure produced incipient cavitation at static pressures that were as much as 20 times higher than that required for inception in the core of the unstretched secondary vortex. In addition, the majority of nuclei measured was of the order of 1 ?m in size, which requires tension on the order of 100 kPa for cavitation inception to occur. The flow parameters that lead to the instability and cavitation inception in the secondary vortex are examined, and the measured event rates are correlated to freestream nuclei populations and static pressure. These measurements, combined with observations of the elongated bubbles themselves, suggest that stretching produced large tensions in the core of the secondary vortex due to both a reduction in the secondary vortex core size and the creation of a jetting flow in the vortex core.

  7. ULTRASONIC CAVITATION IN FREON AT ROOM TEMPERATURE

    E-print Network

    Caupin, Frédéric

    ULTRASONIC CAVITATION IN FREON AT ROOM TEMPERATURE FR´ED´ERIC CAUPIN AND VINCENT FOURMOND on ultrasonic cavitation in freon (1,1,2-trichloro 1,2,2-trifluoro ethane). We use a high intensity 1 MHz acoustic wave produced by a hemispherical transducer to quench a small volume of liquid in the negative

  8. Observation of cavitation during shock wave lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Michael R.; Crum, Lawrence A.; Pishchalnikov, Yuri A.; McAteer, James A.; Pishchalnikova, Irina V.; Evan, Andrew P.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Cleveland, Robin O.

    2005-04-01

    A system was built to detect cavitation in pig kidney during shock wave lithotripsy (SWL) with a Dornier HM3 lithotripter. Active detection, using echo on B-mode ultrasound, and passive cavitation detection (PCD), using coincident signals on confocal, orthogonal receivers, were equally sensitive and were used to interrogate the renal collecting system (urine) and the kidney parenchyma (tissue). Cavitation was detected in urine immediately upon SW administration in urine or urine plus X-ray contrast agent, but in tissue, cavitation required hundreds of SWs to initiate. Localization of cavitation was confirmed by fluoroscopy, sonography, and by thermally marking the kidney using the PCD receivers as high intensity focused ultrasound sources. Cavitation collapse times in tissue and native urine were about the same but less than in urine after injection of X-ray contrast agent. Cavitation, especially in the urine space, was observed to evolve from a sparse field to a dense field with strong acoustic collapse emissions to a very dense field that no longer produced detectable collapse. The finding that cavitation occurs in kidney tissue is a critical step toward determining the mechanisms of tissue injury in SWL. [Work sup ported by NIH (DK43881, DK55674, FIRCA), ONRIFO, CRDF and NSBRI SMS00203.

  9. Cavitation in liquid cryogens. 1: Venturi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hord, J.; Anderson, L. M.; Hall, W. J.

    1972-01-01

    The results of continuing cavitation studies are reported. The cavitation characteristics of liquid hydrogen and liquid nitrogen flowing in a transparent plastic Venturi are discussed. Thermodynamic data, consisting of pressure and temperature measurements within fully developed hydrogen cavities, are reported. Details concerning test apparatus, test procedure, and data correlation techniques are given.

  10. New tools and techniques for controlling cavitation

    SciTech Connect

    Fulton, E.

    1996-08-01

    This article presents case studies of the use of new tools, techniques, and products for controlling cavitation problems. Acoustic monitoring equipment is highlighted. Mechanical design, installation, and repair methods for cavitation control are also discussed. The use of new alloys and other materials, and welding techniques are described.

  11. Feedback loop process to control acoustic cavitation.

    PubMed

    Sabraoui, Abbas; Inserra, Claude; Gilles, Bruno; Béra, Jean-Christophe; Mestas, Jean-Louis

    2011-03-01

    Applications involving acoustic cavitation mechanisms, such as sonoporation, are often poorly reproducible because of the unstationary behavior of cavitation. For this purpose, this study proposes to work at a fixed cavitation level instead of a fixed acoustic intensity. A regulated cavitation generator has been developed in an in vitro configuration of standing wave field. This system implements the regulation of the cavitation level during sonication by modulating the applied acoustic intensity with a feedback loop based on acoustic measurements. The experimental setup consists of a plane piezoelectric transducer for sonication (continuous wave, frequency 445 kHz) and a hydrophone pointing to the sonicated medium. The cavitation level is quantified every 5 ms from a spectral analysis of the acoustic signal. The results show that the regulation device generates reproducible mean cavitation levels with a standard deviation lower than 1.6% in the applied intensity range (from 0.12 to 3.44 W/cm(2)), while this standard deviation can reach 76% without regulation. The feedback loop process imposes precise cavitation level even in low applied acoustic intensity. PMID:20843725

  12. Cavitation: Cavitation flow. Citations from the NTIS data base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habercom, G. E., Jr.

    1980-05-01

    Reports on general aspects of cavitating flow are included. A wide range of theoretical, analytical, and experimental information is presented involving mathematical analysis, computer programs, and testing. Topics include marine engineering, hydrodynamic and aerodynamic configurations, symmetric and nonaxisymmetric shapes, and measuring technology. Data is given on surface piercing struts, helical inducers, pumps, liquid metal systems, and venturi tubes. Applications include dam outlets and spillways, vertical conduits, deep rock drilling, heat pipe stability, water entry, and liquid cryogenic systems. Discussions are made of flow characteristics, noise, nucleate boiling, perturbation problems, and allied subjects. This updated bibliography contains 253 abstracts.

  13. Study of physical and biological factors involved in the disruption of E. coli by hydrodynamic cavitation.

    PubMed

    Balasundaram, B; Harrison, S T L

    2006-01-01

    Hydrodynamic cavitation results in flow restriction in a flow system causing rapid pressure fluctuations and significant fluid forces. These can be harnessed to mediate microbial cell damage. Hydrodynamic cavitation was studied for the partial disruption of E. coli and selective release of specific proteins relative to the total soluble protein. The effects of the cavitation number, the number of passes, and the specific growth rate of E. coli on the release of periplasmic and cytoplasmic proteins were studied. At the optimum cavitation number of 0.17 for this experimental configuration, 48% of the total soluble protein, 88% of acid phosphatase, and 67% of beta-galactosidase were released by hydrodynamic cavitation in comparison with the maximum release attained using multiple passes through the French Press. The higher release of the acid phosphatase over the total soluble protein suggested preferred release of periplasmic compounds. This was supported by SDS-PAGE analysis. The absence of micronization of cell material resulting in the potential for ease of solid-liquid separation downstream of the cell disruption operation was confirmed by TEM microscopy. E. coli cells cultivated at a higher specific growth rate (0.36 h(-1)) were more easily disrupted than slower grown cells (0.11 h(-1)). The specific activity of the enzyme of interest released by hydrodynamic cavitation, defined as the units of enzyme in solution per milligram of total soluble protein, was greater than that obtained on release by the French Press, high-pressure homogenization, osmotic shock, and EDTA treatment. The selectivity offered indicates the potential of enzyme release by hydrodynamic cavitation to ease the purification in the subsequent downstream processing. PMID:16739979

  14. Radial oscillation of a gas bubble in a fluid as a problem in canonical perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, James

    2006-11-01

    The oscillation of a gas bubble is in a fluid is of interest in many areas of physics and technology. Lord Rayleigh treated the pressure developed in the collapse of cavitation bubbles and developed an expression for the collapse period. Minnaert developed a harmonic oscillator approximation to bubble oscillation in his study of the sound produced by running water. Besides recent interest in bubble oscillation in connection to sonoluminescence, an understanding of oscillating bubbles is of important to oceanographers studying the sound spectrum produced by water waves, geophysicists employing air guns as acoustic probes, mechanical engineers concerned with erosion of turbine blades, and military engineers concerned with the acoustic signatures developed by the propeller screws of ships and submarines. For the oceanographer, Minnaert's approximation is useful, for the latter two examples, Lord Rayleigh's analysis is appropriate. For the case of the airgun, a period of twice Rayleigh's period for the ``total collapse'' of the cavitation bubble is often cited as a good approximation for the period of an air bubble ejected from an air gun port, typically at ˜2000 psi), however for the geophysical example, numerical integration is employed from the outset to determine the dynamics of the bubble and the emitted acoustic energy. On the one hand, a bubble can be treated as a harmonic oscillator in the small amplitude regime, whereas even in the relatively moderate pressure regime characteristic of air guns the oscillation is strongly nonlinear and amplitude dependent. Is it possible to develop an analytic approximation that affords insight into the behavior of a bubble beyond the harmonic approximation of Minnaert? In this spirit, the free radial oscillation of a gas bubble in a fluid is treated as a problem in canonical perturbation theory. Several orders of the expansion are determined in order to explore the dependence of the oscillation frequency with bubble amplitude. The expansion to second order is inverted to express the time dependence of the oscillation.

  15. Large Volume Coagulation Utilizing Multiple Cavitation Clouds Generated by Array Transducer Driven by 32 Channel Drive Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Kotaro; Asai, Ayumu; Sasaki, Hiroshi; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2013-07-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment is a noninvasive treatment, in which focused ultrasound is generated outside the body and coagulates a diseased tissue. The advantage of this method is minimal physical and mental stress to the patient, and the disadvantage is the long treatment time caused by the smallness of the therapeutic volume by a single exposure. To improve the efficiency and shorten the treatment time, we are focusing attention on utilizing cavitation bubbles. The generated microbubbles can convert the acoustic energy into heat with a high efficiency. In this study, using the class D amplifiers, which we have developed, to drive the array transducer, we demonstrate a new method to coagulate a large volume by a single HIFU exposure through generating cavitation bubbles distributing in a large volume and vibrating all of them. As a result, the coagulated volume by the proposed method was 1.71 times as large as that of the conventional method.

  16. J-2X Turbopump Cavitation Diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santi, I. Michael; Butas, John P.; Tyler, Thomas R., Jr.; Aguilar, Robert; Sowers, T. Shane

    2010-01-01

    The J-2X is the upper stage engine currently being designed by Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR) for the Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV). Propellant supply requirements for the J-2X are defined by the Ares Upper Stage to J-2X Interface Control Document (ICD). Supply conditions outside ICD defined start or run boxes can induce turbopump cavitation leading to interruption of J-2X propellant flow during hot fire operation. In severe cases, cavitation can lead to uncontained engine failure with the potential to cause a vehicle catastrophic event. Turbopump and engine system performance models supported by system design information and test data are required to predict existence, severity, and consequences of a cavitation event. A cavitation model for each of the J-2X fuel and oxidizer turbopumps was developed using data from pump water flow test facilities at Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR) and Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) together with data from Powerpack 1A testing at Stennis Space Center (SSC) and from heritage systems. These component models were implemented within the PWR J-2X Real Time Model (RTM) to provide a foundation for predicting system level effects following turbopump cavitation. The RTM serves as a general failure simulation platform supporting estimation of J-2X redline system effectiveness. A study to compare cavitation induced conditions with component level structural limit thresholds throughout the engine was performed using the RTM. Results provided insight into system level turbopump cavitation effects and redline system effectiveness in preventing structural limit violations. A need to better understand structural limits and redline system failure mitigation potential in the event of fuel side cavitation was indicated. This paper examines study results, efforts to mature J-2X turbopump cavitation models and structural limits, and issues with engine redline detection of cavitation and the use of vehicle-side abort triggers to augment the engine redline system.

  17. Prediction of the acoustic and bubble fields in insonified freeze-drying vials.

    PubMed

    Louisnard, O; Cogné, C; Labouret, S; Montes-Quiroz, W; Peczalski, R; Baillon, F; Espitalier, F

    2015-09-01

    The acoustic field and the location of cavitation bubble are computed in vials used for freeze-drying, insonified from the bottom by a vibrating plate. The calculations rely on a nonlinear model of sound propagation in a cavitating liquid [Louisnard, Ultrason. Sonochem., 19, (2012) 56-65]. Both the vibration amplitude and the liquid level in the vial are parametrically varied. For low liquid levels, a threshold amplitude is required to form a cavitation zone at the bottom of the vial. For increasing vibration amplitudes, the bubble field slightly thickens but remains at the vial bottom, and the acoustic field saturates, which cannot be captured by linear acoustics. On the other hand, increasing the liquid level may promote the formation of a secondary bubble structure near the glass wall, a few centimeters below the free liquid surface. These predictions suggest that rather complex acoustic fields and bubble structures can arise even in such small volumes. As the acoustic and bubble fields govern ice nucleation during the freezing step, the final crystal's size distribution in the frozen product may crucially depend on the liquid level in the vial. PMID:25800984

  18. A body force model for cavitating inducers in rocket engine turbopumps

    E-print Network

    Sorensen, William Alarik

    2014-01-01

    Modern rocket engine turbopumps utilize cavitating inducers to meet mass and volume requirements. Rotating cavitation and higher order cavitation instabilities have frequently been observed during inducer testing and ...

  19. In vivo bubble nucleation probability in sheep brain tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gateau, J.; Aubry, J.-F.; Chauvet, D.; Boch, A.-L.; Fink, M.; Tanter, M.

    2011-11-01

    Gas nuclei exist naturally in living bodies. Their activation initiates cavitation activity, and is possible using short ultrasonic excitations of high amplitude. However, little is known about the nuclei population in vivo, and therefore about the rarefaction pressure required to form bubbles in tissue. A novel method dedicated to in vivo investigations was used here that combines passive and active cavitation detection with a multi-element linear ultrasound probe (4-7 MHz). Experiments were performed in vivo on the brain of trepanated sheep. Bubble nucleation was induced using a focused single-element transducer (central frequency 660 kHz, f-number = 1) driven by a high power (up to 5 kW) electric burst of two cycles. Successive passive recording and ultrafast active imaging were shown to allow detection of a single nucleation event in brain tissue in vivo. Experiments carried out on eight sheep allowed statistical studies of the bubble nucleation process. The nucleation probability was evaluated as a function of the peak negative pressure. No nucleation event could be detected with a peak negative pressure weaker than -12.7 MPa, i.e. one order of magnitude higher than the recommendations based on the mechanical index. Below this threshold, bubble nucleation in vivo in brain tissues is a random phenomenon.

  20. Combined passive detection and ultrafast active imaging of cavitation events induced by short pulses of high-intensity ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Gateau, Jérôme; Aubry, Jean-François; Pernot, Mathieu; Fink, Mathias; Tanter, Mickaël

    2011-01-01

    The activation of natural gas nuclei to induce larger bubbles is possible using short ultrasonic excitations of high amplitude, and is required for ultrasound cavitation therapies. However, little is known about the distribution of nuclei in tissues. Therefore, the acoustic pressure level necessary to generate bubbles in a targeted zone and their exact location are currently difficult to predict. In order to monitor the initiation of cavitation activity, a novel all-ultrasound technique sensitive to single nucleation events is presented here. It is based on combined passive detection and ultrafast active imaging over a large volume and with the same multi-element probe. Bubble nucleation was induced with a focused transducer (660kHz, f#=1) driven by a high power (up to 300 W) electric burst of one to two cycles. Detection was performed with a linear array (4–7MHz) aligned with the single-element focal point. In vitro experiments in gelatin gel and muscular tissue are presented. The synchronized passive detection enabled radio-frequency data to be recorded, comprising high-frequency coherent wave fronts as signatures of the acoustic emissions linked to the activation of the nuclei. Active change detection images were obtained by subtracting echoes collected in the unucleated medium. These indicated the appearance of stable cavitating regions. Thanks to the ultrafast frame rate, active detection occurred as soon as 330 ?s after the high amplitude excitation and the dynamics of the induced regions were studied individually. PMID:21429844

  1. A simple model of ultrasound propagation in a cavitating liquid. Part I: Theory, nonlinear attenuation and traveling wave generation.

    PubMed

    Louisnard, O

    2012-01-01

    The bubbles involved in sonochemistry and other applications of cavitation oscillate inertially. A correct estimation of the wave attenuation in such bubbly media requires a realistic estimation of the power dissipated by the oscillation of each bubble, by thermal diffusion in the gas and viscous friction in the liquid. Both quantities and calculated numerically for a single inertial bubble driven at 20 kHz, and are found to be several orders of magnitude larger than the linear prediction. Viscous dissipation is found to be the predominant cause of energy loss for bubbles small enough. Then, the classical nonlinear Caflish equations describing the propagation of acoustic waves in a bubbly liquid are recast and simplified conveniently. The main harmonic part of the sound field is found to fulfill a nonlinear Helmholtz equation, where the imaginary part of the squared wave number is directly correlated with the energy lost by a single bubble. For low acoustic driving, linear theory is recovered, but for larger drivings, namely above the Blake threshold, the attenuation coefficient is found to be more than 3 orders of magnitude larger then the linear prediction. A huge attenuation of the wave is thus expected in regions where inertial bubbles are present, which is confirmed by numerical simulations of the nonlinear Helmholtz equation in a 1D standing wave configuration. The expected strong attenuation is not only observed but furthermore, the examination of the phase between the pressure field and its gradient clearly demonstrates that a traveling wave appears in the medium. PMID:21764348

  2. Simulations of Cavitating Cryogenic Inducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorney, Dan (Technical Monitor); Hosangadi, Ashvin; Ahuja, Vineet; Ungewitter, Ronald J.

    2004-01-01

    Simulations of cavitating turbopump inducers at their design flow rate are presented. Results over a broad range of Nss, numbers extending from single-phase flow conditions through the critical head break down point are discussed. The flow characteristics and performance of a subscale geometry designed for water testing are compared with the fullscale configuration that employs LOX. In particular, thermal depression effects arising from cavitation in cryogenic fluids are identified and their impact on the suction performance of the inducer quantified. The simulations have been performed using the CRUNCH CFD[R] code that has a generalized multi-element unstructured framework suitable for turbomachinery applications. An advanced multi-phase formulation for cryogenic fluids that models temperature depression and real fluid property variations is employed. The formulation has been extensively validated for both liquid nitrogen and liquid hydrogen by simulating the experiments of Hord on hydrofoils; excellent estimates of the leading edge temperature and pressure depression were obtained while the comparisons in the cavity closure region were reasonable.

  3. An Anticipatory Model of Cavitation

    SciTech Connect

    Allgood, G.O.; Dress, W.B., Jr.; Hylton, J.O.; Kercel, S.W.

    1999-04-05

    The Anticipatory System (AS) formalism developed by Robert Rosen provides some insight into the problem of embedding intelligent behavior in machines. AS emulates the anticipatory behavior of biological systems. AS bases its behavior on its expectations about the near future and those expectations are modified as the system gains experience. The expectation is based on an internal model that is drawn from an appeal to physical reality. To be adaptive, the model must be able to update itself. To be practical, the model must run faster than real-time. The need for a physical model and the requirement that the model execute at extreme speeds, has held back the application of AS to practical problems. Two recent advances make it possible to consider the use of AS for practical intelligent sensors. First, advances in transducer technology make it possible to obtain previously unavailable data from which a model can be derived. For example, acoustic emissions (AE) can be fed into a Bayesian system identifier that enables the separation of a weak characterizing signal, such as the signature of pump cavitation precursors, from a strong masking signal, such as a pump vibration feature. The second advance is the development of extremely fast, but inexpensive, digital signal processing hardware on which it is possible to run an adaptive Bayesian-derived model faster than real-time. This paper reports the investigation of an AS using a model of cavitation based on hydrodynamic principles and Bayesian analysis of data from high-performance AE sensors.

  4. VOLUME 78, NUMBER 2 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 13 JANUARY 1997 The Role of Surface Tension in Stable Single-Bubble Sonoluminescence

    E-print Network

    Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    includes rectified diffusion, surface tension, dis- solved gas, thermoconductivity, acoustic radiation for the generation of stable cavitation bubbles are rectified diffusion, surface tension, and shape oscilla- tions diffusion and surface tension on the stability of small bubbles in a sound field. Without external sound

  5. Simple improvements to classical bubble nucleation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Kyoko K.; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Angélil, Raymond; Diemand, Jürg

    2015-08-01

    We revisit classical nucleation theory (CNT) for the homogeneous bubble nucleation rate and improve the classical formula using a correct prefactor in the nucleation rate. Most of the previous theoretical studies have used the constant prefactor determined by the bubble growth due to the evaporation process from the bubble surface. However, the growth of bubbles is also regulated by the thermal conduction, the viscosity, and the inertia of liquid motion. These effects can decrease the prefactor significantly, especially when the liquid pressure is much smaller than the equilibrium one. The deviation in the nucleation rate between the improved formula and the CNT can be as large as several orders of magnitude. Our improved, accurate prefactor and recent advances in molecular dynamics simulations and laboratory experiments for argon bubble nucleation enable us to precisely constrain the free energy barrier for bubble nucleation. Assuming the correction to the CNT free energy is of the functional form suggested by Tolman, the precise evaluations of the free energy barriers suggest the Tolman length is ?0.3 ? independently of the temperature for argon bubble nucleation, where ? is the unit length of the Lennard-Jones potential. With this Tolman correction and our prefactor one gets accurate bubble nucleation rate predictions in the parameter range probed by current experiments and molecular dynamics simulations.

  6. The influence of initial pressure on the characteristics of conical bubble sonoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Shoujie; Ha, Jing; Duan, Pingguang

    2015-12-01

    Based on a conical bubble U-tube, conical bubble sonoluminescence was investigated by using pure water as the working medium. Intense cavitation luminescence can be obtained. With the decrease in initial pressure inside the bubble, the intensity and duration of light emission increased. The spectrum is mainly composed of the spectral bands of H2O at the initial pressure of 1000 Pa. With the decrease in initial pressure, a broad continuum background spectrum that is well fitted by blackbody radiation can be detected, on which several spectral bands emitted by water molecules are superimposed. A higher temperature inside the bubble can be obtained with the decrease in initial pressure. Moreover, the intensity of the continuum background spectrum becomes more dominant compared with that of H2O emission bands. Finally, we conclude that blackbody radiation and molecular emission contribute to luminescence of conical bubble cavitation. Moreover, the initial pressure inside the conical bubble significantly affects the emission mechanism of conical bubble sonoluminescence.

  7. Bubbles and Superbubbles

    E-print Network

    Y. -H. Chu; M. A. Guerrero; R. A. Gruendl

    2003-10-10

    An isolated massive star can blow a bubble, while a group of massive stars can blow superbubbles. In this paper, we examine three intriguing questions regarding bubbles and superbubbles: (1) why don't we see interstellar bubbles around every O star? (2) how hot are the bubble interiors? and (3) what is going on at the hot/cold gas interface in a bubble?

  8. Cavitation erosion prediction based on analysis of flow dynamics and impact load spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihatsch, Michael S.; Schmidt, Steffen J.; Adams, Nikolaus A.

    2015-10-01

    Cavitation erosion is the consequence of repeated collapse-induced high pressure-loads on a material surface. The present paper assesses the prediction of impact load spectra of cavitating flows, i.e., the rate and intensity distribution of collapse events based on a detailed analysis of flow dynamics. Data are obtained from a numerical simulation which employs a density-based finite volume method, taking into account the compressibility of both phases, and resolves collapse-induced pressure waves. To determine the spectrum of collapse events in the fluid domain, we detect and quantify the collapse of isolated vapor structures. As reference configuration we consider the expansion of a liquid into a radially divergent gap which exhibits unsteady sheet and cloud cavitation. Analysis of simulation data shows that global cavitation dynamics and dominant flow events are well resolved, even though the spatial resolution is too coarse to resolve individual vapor bubbles. The inviscid flow model recovers increasingly fine-scale vapor structures and collapses with increasing resolution. We demonstrate that frequency and intensity of these collapse events scale with grid resolution. Scaling laws based on two reference lengths are introduced for this purpose. We show that upon applying these laws impact load spectra recorded on experimental and numerical pressure sensors agree with each other. Furthermore, correlation between experimental pitting rates and collapse-event rates is found. Locations of high maximum wall pressures and high densities of collapse events near walls obtained numerically agree well with areas of erosion damage in the experiment. The investigation shows that impact load spectra of cavitating flows can be inferred from flow data that captures the main vapor structures and wave dynamics without the need for resolving all flow scales.

  9. Observations on Rotating Cavitation and Cavitation Surge from the Development of the Fastrac Engine Turbopump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoladz, Thomas F.

    2000-01-01

    Observations regarding rotating cavitation and cavitation surge experienced during the development of the Fastrac engine turbopump are discussed. Detailed observations acquired from the analysis of both water flow and liquid oxygen test data are offered in this paper. Scaling and general comparison of rotating cavitation between water flow and liquid oxygen testing are discussed. Complex data features linking the localized rotating cavitation mechanism of the inducer to system surge components are described in detail. Finally a description of a lumped-parameter hydraulic system model developed to better understand observed data is given.

  10. Overview of Rotating Cavitation and Cavitation Surge in the Fastrac Engine LOX Turbopump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoladz, Thomas; Turner, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Observations regarding rotating cavitation and cavitation surge experienced during the development of the Fastrac 60 Klbf engine turbopump are discussed. Detailed observations from the analysis of both water flow and liquid oxygen test data are offered. Scaling and general comparison of rotating cavitation between water flow and liquid oxygen testing are discussed. Complex data features linking the localized rotating cavitation mechanism of the inducer to system surge components are described in detail. Finally a description of a simple lumped-parameter hydraulic system model developed to better understand observed data is given.

  11. Dynamics in reactive bubbly flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundararajan, Pavithra; Koch, Donald; Stroock, Abraham

    2010-11-01

    Multiphase flow in microfluidic channels encompasses a rich collection of phenomena of widespread interest in both fundamental and technological context. While studies on non reactive multiphase flow focus on the dynamics of bubble breakup, coalescence and stability, a reactive multiphase flow opens up a broader spectrum of dynamics, like nucleation, growth and detachment of bubbles as well as the secondary mixing in the slugs during these processes. Our interest lies in the flow in an electrochemical microfluidic fuel cell with liquid reactants reacting at catalyst walls producing gaseous products which choke the fuel cell efficiency due to uncontrolled bubbly flow. This challenge is an opportunity in itself provided the multiphase flow dynamics can be characterized to achieve a stable Taylor regime. Taylor regime allows for promisingly high efficiencies due to improved mass transfer of reactants to the concentration boundary layer of the electrodes achieved by the secondary flow in the liquid phase present between bubbles. Here, I will experimentally explore the different regimes of reactive bubbly flow in a microchannel. The phase diagram of the reactive multiphase flows would be used to identify the stable regime for efficient fuel cell operation. Further, I will study the mass transfer in the presence of multiphase flow to regimes of enhanced mass transfer, and compare it with numerical models.

  12. Kinetics of Bubble Generation in Mafic Enclaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, B. A.; Gardner, J. E.

    2014-12-01

    Volcanically erupted mafic enclaves are typically vesicular, with the bubbles forming when the mafic magma cools after it is injected and disaggregated into a cooler silicic magma. This study uses hydrothermal experiments to investigate the kinetics of pre-eruptive bubble nucleation and growth within mafic magmas, focused on the efficiency of nucleation on different minerals, and to quantify the growth rate of bubbles with varying cooling rates. Starting materials are natural mafic enclaves from Southwest Trident, Alaska. Experiments were initially equilibrated with H2O at 85 MPa and 1065 °C for 2 hours, producing a melt with blocky crystals of plagioclase and pyroxene, and spherical bubbles with a mean 30 ?m diameter and number density (Nv) of 7.2x104 cm-3. Upon cooling to 1015 °C at 2 °C/h, the mineralogy and Nv did not change (although total crystallinity increased), while the mean bubble diameter increased to 90 ?m. Cooling further to 985 °C at 2 °C/h, resulted in the crystallization of Fe-Ti oxides, along with an abrupt Nv increase (3.0x105 cm-3) of bubbles with a mean diameter of 60 ?m. This abrupt bubble nucleation event, coinciding with the formation of Fe-Ti oxides, suggests that plagioclase and pyroxene are poor bubble nucleation sites in mafic melts, and that Fe-Ti oxides are good bubble nucleation sites, similar to previous results using rhyolite melts. Additionally, the occurrence of this nucleation event suggests that cooling related diffusive growth of bubbles in mafic enclaves, under magma chamber conditions, is too slow to keep up with increasing volatile saturation in the melt, and that the melt may become supersaturated until nucleation sites for new bubbles become available. Rapid cooling (1065-985 °C at 110 °C/h) produced abundant acicular plagioclase and pyroxene crystals (no Fe-Ti oxides), and bubbles with a nearly identical mean diameter and Nv to experiments equilibrated at 1065 °C. It is therefore likely that bubbles will not nucleate or grow significantly during rapid cooling and crystallization of mafic enclaves until Fe-Ti oxide nucleation sites are available. Overall, these experimental results indicate that cooling and crystallization induced pre-eruptive bubble generation in mafic enclaves is strongly controlled by the availability of Fe-Ti oxide nucleation sites.

  13. Energetic Cavitation Collapse Generates 3.2 Mbar Plasma with a 1.4 J Driver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsey, Marc C.; Pitz, Robert W.

    2013-04-01

    A tabletop device uses 1.4 J to drive the symmetric collapse of a 1.8 mm radius vapor bubble in water at 22 bar. Single shot streak imaging reveals a stagnation plasma of 28 micron radius at over 12 000 K and an unprecedented pressure of 3.2 Mbar. Compared to sonoluminescence, the most commonly studied cavitation mechanism, this event is greater by factors of 30-40 in size, 1 000 000 in energy, and 100 in stagnation pressure. This regime of high energy density has previously been accessible only in massive facilities with very low repetition rates.

  14. Theoretical modeling of the vapor cavitation in dynamically loaded journal bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewe, D. E.

    1985-01-01

    A theoretical investigation is made of the evolution of a vapor-bubble for a submerged journal bearing under dynamically loaded conditions using the Elrod algorithm. This method conserves mass throughout the computational domain. A comparison study is performed to determine some of the consequences of applying a nonconservative theory (pseudo-Gumbel BC) to a dynamic problem. A complete dynamic cycle of a journal whirling in a circular path is chosen for the basis of comparison. Significant differences are observed in the load components near the end of the cycle. Further, good agreement with experiment is found for stationary and nonstationary cavitation.

  15. Unseeded Inertial Cavitation for Enhancing the Delivery of Chemotherapies: A Safety Study.

    PubMed

    Lafond, Maxime; Mestas, Jean-Louis; Prieur, Fabrice; Chettab, Kamel; Geraci, Sandra; Clézardin, Philippe; Lafon, Cyril

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic cavitation can improve local drug delivery in tumors. Without injected external nucleation agents, initiating inertial cavitation requires high negative pressures, which can lead to biological damage. In the present study, unseeded inertial cavitation was obtained in vivo using confocal beams, and the effect of these exposure conditions was assessed on drug structure and activity, shallow tissues and growth of breast tumors. No change was observed in the structure and cytotoxicity of doxorubicin. Experiments were conducted on healthy rats, exposing the thigh and abdomen. Histologic analyses at 72 h and 2 weeks post-treatment demonstrated a modest impact on tissues. Syngeneic 4 T1 breast tumors in mice were sonicated. Immunohistochemical analyses showed that ultrasound did not impact vascular density, proliferation and apoptosis of cancer cells. In addition, ultrasound did not negatively modify cancer cell spreading to the lungs and bone marrow. This provides evidence that these particular parameters can be used safely in vivo. PMID:26478278

  16. CAVITATIONAL HYDROTHERMAL OXIDATION: A NEW REMEDIATION PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research will explore the emerging science of sonochemistry and its technological applications for organic waste remediation, particularly for water and soil purification. Ultrasound can induce unusual high-energy chemistry through the process of acoustic cavitation: the for...

  17. Numerical calculation for cavitation flow of inducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, C.; Wang, Y.; Zhu, Z. T.; Xie, S. F.; Zhao, L. F.; Liu, Z. C.

    2015-01-01

    Inducer has significant effect on improving the cavitation characteristic of centrifugal pump. Several inducers were designed and modeled by Pro/E software. The mesh of flow field was done by ICEM and then was imported to ANSYS CFX to analyze the inducer's cavitation characteristic. Effects of the blade number on the performance of an inducer are investigated in the present paper. The inducers were designed on the basis of identical design flow rate and identical pressure elevation at nominal flow rate. The study focuses on the steady behavior of the inducers in cavitating conditions. Evolutions of performance, torque, mass flow rate, and amplitude of radial forces on the shaft according to the inlet pressure are considered. Furthermore, cavitation instabilities are analyzed in the study. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the pressure distribution and vapour volume fraction distribution through numerical simulations using the Navier-stokes solver with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code.

  18. Thermodynamic effects on developed cavitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holl, J. W.; Billet, M. L.; Weir, D. S.

    1975-01-01

    The results of an investigation of thermodynamic effects are presented. Distributions of temperature and pressure in a developed cavity were measured for zero- and quarter-caliber ogives. A semiempirical entrainment theory was developed to correlate the measured temperature depression in the cavity. This theory correlates the maximum temperature depression expressed in dimensionless form as the Jakob number in terms of the dimensionless numbers of Nusselt, Reynolds, Froude, and Peclet, and dimensionless cavity length, L/D. The results show that in general, the temperature depression increases with L/D and temperature and the cavitation number based on measured cavity pressure is a function of L/D for a given model contour, independent of the thermodynamic effect.

  19. Bubble motion near a two-fluid interface.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtiss, Geoffrey; Blake, John; Leppinen, David; Wang, Quan Xi

    2007-11-01

    The interaction between a cavitation bubble and the interface between two incompressible fluids of different densities is investigated. Applications abound, ranging from industrial processes involving bubble assisted mixing, to biomedical procedures for tissue damage via laser ablation techniques and gene-transfection via sonoporation. The system is investigated numerically, by means of a boundary integral approach in both exterior fluids. The code is verified by comparison with theoretical and experimental studies of the density ratios ?=0,1,?, representative of a free surface, Rayleigh bubble and rigid boundary respectively. Small standoff distances are investigated for a range of density ratios. Results show drastic lessening of the interfacial spiking for ?>0.3 in comparison to free surface motion. Bubble jetting also appears to be always in the direction of the denser fluid. For ?>1 the bubble remains entrained in the depressed fluid-fluid interface throughout the collapse phase. Surface tension effects on both the bubble surface and the fluid-fluid interface are also investigated and compared to the purely inertial motion.

  20. Measuring Cavitation with Synchrotron X-Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duke, Daniel; Kastengren, Alan; Powell, Chris; X-Ray Fuel Spray Group, Energy Systems Division Team

    2012-11-01

    Cavitation plays an important role in the formation of sprays from small nozzles such as those found in fuel injection systems. A sharp-edged inlet from the sac into the nozzle of a diesel fuel injector is shown to inititate a strong sheet-like cavitation along the boundary layer of the nozzle throat, which is difficult to measure and can lead to acoustic damage. To investigate this phenomenon, a diagnostic technique capable of mapping the density field of the nozzle through regions of intense cavitation is required. Available visible-light techniques are limited to qualitative observations of the outer extent of cavitation zones. However, brilliant X-rays from a synchrotron source have negligible refraction and are capable of penetrating the full extent of cavitation zones. We present the early results of a novel application of line-of-sight, time-resolved X-ray radiography on a cavitating model nozzle. Experiments were conducted at Sector 7-BM of the Advanced Photon Source. Density and vapor distribution are measured from the quantitative absorption of monochromatic X-rays. The density field can then be tomographically reconstructed from the projections. The density is then validated against a range of compressible and incompressible numerical simulations. This research was performed at the 7-BM beamline of the Advanced Photon Source. We acknowledge the support of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357 and the DOE Vehicle Technologies Program (DOE-EERE).

  1. Research on cavitation characteristic of inducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, N.; Wang, L. Q.; Y Kong, F.; Wu, D. Z.

    2013-12-01

    The inducer has significant effect on improving the cavitation characteristic of a centrifugal pump. The fact which can not be neglected is that the inducer itself is a kind of axial pump. Research on inducer's cavitation characteristic is very important. Several inducers were designed and modeled by Pro/E software. The mesh of flow field was done by ICEM and imported to ANSYS CFX to analyze the inducer's cavitation characteristic. The relationship between cavity length and head breakdown was discussed. With the decrease of NPSH, there is a slight increase in the head just prior to the decrease associated with head breakdown. This conclusion coincides with experimental results. The influence of backflow eddy on the inducer's cavitation characteristic was analyzed, and the change of backflow eddy in the process of cavitation was illustrated. It can be concluded that the correlation between the inducer head breakdown and the relative cavity length is very close which agrees well with the theoretical and experimental results. As the inlet pressure is decreased, inception almost always occurs in the tip vortex generated by the corner where the leading edge meets the tip. And backflow vortex gradually disappears in the process of cavitation.

  2. Observations on Rotating Cavitation and Cavitation Surge From The Development of the Fastrac Engine Turbopump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoladz, Thomas F.; Turner, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The effects of rotating cavitation and cavitation surges on the Fastrac Engine Turbopump are described in a viewgraph presentation format. The bent inducer blade dilemma and observations of unsteady data and oscillation components are discussed. The pump-feed system stability modeling assessment is outlined. Recommendations are made urging further investigation.

  3. From rational bubbles to crashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sornette, D.; Malevergne, Y.

    2001-10-01

    We study and generalize in various ways the model of rational expectation (RE) bubbles introduced by Blanchard and Watson in the economic literature. Bubbles are argued to be the equivalent of Goldstone modes of the fundamental rational pricing equation, associated with the symmetry-breaking introduced by non-vanishing dividends. Generalizing bubbles in terms of multiplicative stochastic maps, we summarize the result of Lux and Sornette that the no-arbitrage condition imposes that the tail of the return distribution is hyperbolic with an exponent ?<1. We then outline the main results of Malevergne and Sornette, who extend the RE bubble model to arbitrary dimensions d: a number d of market time series are made linearly interdependent via d× d stochastic coupling coefficients. We derive the no-arbitrage condition in this context and, with the renewal theory for products of random matrices applied to stochastic recurrence equations, we extend the theorem of Lux and Sornette to demonstrate that the tails of the unconditional distributions associated with such d-dimensional bubble processes follow power laws, with the same asymptotic tail exponent ?<1 for all assets. The distribution of price differences and of returns is dominated by the same power-law over an extended range of large returns. Although power-law tails are a pervasive feature of empirical data, the numerical value ?<1 is in disagreement with the usual empirical estimates ??3. We then discuss two extensions (the crash hazard rate model and the non-stationary growth rate model) of the RE bubble model that provide two ways of reconciliation with the stylized facts of financial data.

  4. Computational modelling of the interaction of shock waves with multiple gas-filled bubbles in a liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betney, M. R.; Tully, B.; Hawker, N. A.; Ventikos, Y.

    2015-03-01

    This study presents a computational investigation of the interactions of a single shock wave with multiple gas-filled bubbles in a liquid medium. This work illustrates how multiple bubbles may be used in shock-bubble interactions to intensify the process on a local level. A high resolution front-tracking approach is used, which enables explicit tracking of the gas-liquid interface. The collapse of two identical bubbles, one placed behind the other is investigated in detail, demonstrating that peak pressures in a two bubble arrangement can exceed those seen in single bubble collapse. Additionally, a parametric investigation into the effect of bubble separation is presented. It is found that the separation distance has a significant effect on both the shape and velocity of the main transverse jet of the second bubble. Extending this analysis to effects of relative bubble size, we show that if the first bubble is sufficiently small relative to the second, it may become entirely entrained in the second bubble main transverse jet. In contrast, if the first bubble is substantially larger than the second, it may offer it significant protection from the incident shock. This protection is utilised in the study of a triangular array of three bubbles, with the central bubble being significantly smaller than the outer bubbles. It is demonstrated that, through shielding of bubbles until later in the collapse process, pressures over five times higher than the maximum pressure observed in the single bubble case may be achieved. This corresponds to a peak pressure that is approximately 40 times more intense than the incident shock wave. This work has applications in a number of different fields, including cavitation erosion, explosives, targeted drug delivery/intensification, and shock wave lithotripsy.

  5. Inertial cavitation threshold of nested microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Wallace, N; Dicker, S; Lewin, Peter; Wrenn, S P

    2015-04-01

    Cavitation of ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) promotes both beneficial and detrimental bioeffects in vivo (Radhakrishnan et al., 2013) [1]. The ability to determine the inertial cavitation threshold of UCA microbubbles has potential application in contrast imaging, development of therapeutic agents, and evaluation of localized effects on the body (Ammi et al., 2006) [2]. This study evaluates a novel UCA and its inertial cavitation behavior as determined by a home built cavitation detection system. Two 2.25 MHz transducers are placed at a 90° angle to one another where one transducer is driven by a high voltage pulser and the other transducer receives the signal from the oscillating microbubble. The sample chamber is placed in the overlap of the focal region of the two transducers where the microbubbles are exposed to a pulser signal consisting of 600 pulse trains per experiment at a pulse repetition frequency of 5 Hz where each train has four pulses of four cycles. The formulation being analyzed is comprised of an SF6 microbubble coated by a DSPC PEG-3000 monolayer nested within a poly-lactic acid (PLA) spherical shell. The effect of varying shell diameters and microbubble concentration on cavitation threshold profile for peak negative pressures ranging from 50 kPa to 2 MPa are presented and discussed in this paper. The nesting shell decreases inertial cavitation events from 97.96% for an un-nested microbubble to 19.09% for the same microbubbles nested within a 2.53 ?m shell. As shell diameter decreases, the percentage of inertially cavitating microbubbles also decreases. For nesting formulations with average outer capsule diameters of 20.52, 14.95, 9.95, 5.55, 2.53, and 1.95 ?m, the percentage of sample destroyed at 1 MPa was 51.02, 38.94, 33.25, 25.27, 19.09, and 5.37% respectively. PMID:25620709

  6. Cavitation dynamics of laser ablation of bulk and wire-shaped metals in water during nanoparticles production.

    PubMed

    De Giacomo, A; Dell'Aglio, M; Santagata, A; Gaudiuso, R; De Pascale, O; Wagener, P; Messina, G C; Compagnini, G; Barcikowski, S

    2013-03-01

    Although the first nanoseconds to microseconds rule the resulting process yield of laser ablation in liquid, a comprehensive view involving combination of time-resolved measurement techniques is still lacking. In this paper, fundamental aspects of laser ablation of metals in water during the production of nanoparticles are discussed. Three fast diagnostic methods have been applied simultaneously. These are Optical Emission Spectroscopy for the plasma characterization, fast shadowgraph for plasma and cavitation bubble dynamics and laser scattering for the mechanisms of delivery of the produced materials in the liquid. Moreover, in order to validate the discussion, the effect on cavitation dynamics of the ablation of bulk and wire-shaped targets has been investigated together with the relative nanoparticles production yield. Unusual arrow-bow ejection phenomena between the cavitation bubble and the wire result in suppressed material back-deposition, causing efficient ejection of ablated matter into the liquid. The presented nanosecond and microsecond-resolved analysis allows estimating the timescale and role of the basic mechanisms involved in laser ablation in liquids as well as the thermodynamic characteristics of the processes. PMID:23198287

  7. The effects of long-chain polymers on tip vortex flow and cavitation inception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Quan; Hsiao, Chao-Tsung; Chahine, Georges L.

    2011-11-01

    Experiments have shown that propeller/hydrofoil tip vortex cavitation can be suppressed by properly injecting dilute polymer solutions at the tip. However, the mechanisms for this phenomenon are not well understood yet. To understand better the underlying flow physics the tip vortex flow generated by a rotating propeller in water and a dilute polymer solution (FENE-P model) was numerically simulated. It is found that the vortex flow structure is changed by the non-Newtonian features of polymers. Phenomenally the vortical rotation in a polymer solution is slower and the vortex center pressure is higher than in water. The non-Newtonian stress is much stronger than the Newtonian stresses in water. To further understand the non-Newtonian stresses contribution, the FENE-P model is also applied to a simplified quasi-cylindrical vortex. It is found analytically that in addition to the three normal stresses that are expected to be quadratic in the shear rate, one of the shear components is also quadratic. We also studied polymer effects on the dynamics of a bubble nucleus in the tip vortex. The bubble was found to grow to an elongated large cavity in water while it collapses in the polymer solution for the same cavitation number. This work was supported by the Office of Naval Research, Contract N00014-04-C-0110, monitored by Dr. Ki-Han Kim.

  8. Studies reveal effects of pipe bends on fluid flow cavitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stonemetz, R. E.

    1966-01-01

    Incipient cavitation in liquids flowing in pipes curved in one plane are affected by the pipe bend radii and pipe diameters, but little by pipe bend angles ranging from 60 to 120 degrees. Critical cavitation indices decrease with higher Reynolds number and pressure ratio. Bulk liquid temperature increase lowers the mean critical velocity at which cavitation occurs.

  9. Static and Transient Cavitation Threshold Measurements for Mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Moraga, F.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.

    1999-11-14

    Transient and static cavitation thresholds for mercury as a function of the cover gas (helium or air), and pressure are reported. Both static and transient cavitation onset pressure thresholds increase linearly with cover gas pressure. Additionally, the cavitation thresholds as a function of dissolved gases were also measured and are reported.

  10. Release of multiple bubbles from cohesive sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Algar, Christopher K.; Boudreau, Bernard P.; Barry, Mark A.

    2011-04-01

    Methane is a strong greenhouse gas, and marine and wetland sediments constitute significant sources to the atmosphere. This flux is dominated by the release of bubbles, and quantitative prediction of this bubble flux has been elusive because of the lack of a mechanistic model. Our previous work has shown that sediments behave as elastic fracturing solids during bubble growth and rise. We now further argue that bubbles can open previously formed, partially annealed, rise tracts (fractures) and that this mechanism can account for the observed preferential release at low tides in marine settings. When this mechanical model is applied to data from Cape Lookout Bight, NC (USA), the results indicate that methanogenic bubbles released at this site do indeed follow previously formed rise tracts and that the calculated release rates are entirely consistent with the rise of multiple bubbles on tidal time scales. Our model forms a basis for making predictions of future bubble fluxes from warming sediments under the influence of climate change.

  11. SIMULATION AND MOCKUP OF SNS JET-FLOW TARGET WITH WALL JET FOR CAVITATION DAMAGE MITIGATION

    SciTech Connect

    Wendel, Mark W; Geoghegan, Patrick J; Felde, David K

    2014-01-01

    Pressure waves created in liquid mercury pulsed spallation targets at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory induce cavitation damage on the stainless steel target container. The cavitation damage is thought to limit the lifetime of the target for power levels at and above 1 MW. Severe through-wall cavitation damage on an internal wall near the beam entrance window has been observed in spent-targets. Surprisingly though, there is very little damage on the walls that bound an annular mercury channel that wraps around the front and outside of the target. The mercury flow through this channel is characterized by smooth, attached streamlines. One theory to explain this lack of damage is that the uni-directional flow biases the direction of the collapsing cavitation bubble, reducing the impact pressure and subsequent damage. The theory has been reinforced by in-beam separate effects data. For this reason, a second-generation SNS mercury target has been designed with an internal wall jet configuration intended to protect the concave wall where damage has been observed. The wall jet mimics the annular flow channel streamlines, but since the jet is bounded on only one side, the momentum is gradually diffused by the bulk flow interactions as it progresses around the cicular path of the target nose. Numerical simulations of the flow through this jet-flow target have been completed, and a water loop has been assembled with a transparent test target in order to visualize and measure the flow field. This paper presents the wall jet simulation results, as well as early experimental data from the test loop.

  12. Experimental study of the types of cavitation by air seeding using light microscopy.

    PubMed

    Shen, Fanyi; Cheng, Yanxia; Zhang, Li; Gao, Rongfu; Shao, Xuemeng

    2015-12-01

    Recently, three types of cavitation: (i) expanding gradually; (ii) expanding-exploding, becoming a long-shaped bubble-lengthening by degrees; (iii) suddenly exploding and fully filling the conduit instantly, were proposed. Directed by this theory, experiments were performed using light microscopy to study the natural drying processes of xylem sections of Platycladus orientalis (L.) Franco. Three different phenomena of gas filling process in conduits were captured by replaying recorded videos. The first phenomenon is that a bubble emerging in a conduit expands and elongates gradually to fill the conduit. The second phenomenon is that a bubble emerging in a conduit expands gradually, and then suddenly becomes long-shaped, and extends continuously. The third phenomenon is that a bubble instantly fully fills a conduit. This paper suggests in these experiments that after losing the bulk water of a section, as the water stress of that section became more severe, the water pressures of different conduits of the section were not necessarily the same, and as time went on, the water pressures decreased constantly. Considering some practical factors, the three phenomena captured in our experiment are explained by our theory. PMID:26338303

  13. The speed of sound in a gas-vapour bubbly liquid.

    PubMed

    Prosperetti, Andrea

    2015-10-01

    In addition to the vapour of the liquid, bubbles in cavitating flows usually contain also a certain amount of permanent gas that diffuses out of the liquid as they grow. This paper presents a simplified linear model for the propagation of monochromatic pressure waves in a bubbly liquid with these characteristics. Phase change effects are included in detail, while the gas is assumed to follow a polytropic law. It is shown that even a small amount of permanent gas can have a major effect on the behaviour of the system. Particular attention is paid to the low-frequency range, which is of special concern in flow cavitation. Numerical results for water and liquid oxygen illustrate the implications of the model. PMID:26442146

  14. Inducer Hydrodynamic Forces in a Cavitating Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skelley, Stephen E.

    2004-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center has developed and demonstrated a measurement device for sensing and resolving the hydrodynamic loads on fluid machinery. The device - a derivative of the six-component wind tunnel balance - senses the forces and moments on the rotating device through a weakened shaft section instrumented with a series of strain gauges. This rotating balance was designed to directly measure the steady and unsteady hydrodynamic loads on an inducer, thereby defining the amplitude and frequency content associated with operating in various cavitation modes. The rotating balance was calibrated statically using a dead-weight load system in order to generate the 6 x 12 calibration matrix later used to convert measured voltages to engineering units. Structural modeling suggested that the rotating assembly first bending mode would be significantly reduced with the balance s inclusion. This reduction in structural stiffness was later confirmed experimentally with a hammer-impact test. This effect, coupled with the relatively large damping associated with the rotating balance waterproofing material, limited the device s bandwidth to approximately 50 Hertz Other pre-test validations included sensing the test article rotating assembly built-in imbalance for two configurations and directly measuring the assembly mass and buoyancy while submerged under water. Both tests matched predictions and confirmed the device s sensitivity while stationary and rotating. The rotating balance was then demonstrated in a water test of a full-scale Space Shuttle Main Engine high-pressure liquid oxygen pump inducer. Experimental data was collected a scaled operating conditions at three flow coefficients across a range of cavitation numbers for the single inducer geometry and radial clearance. Two distinct cavitation modes were observed symmetric tip vortex cavitation and alternate-blade cavitation. Although previous experimental tests on the same inducer demonstrated two additional cavitation modes at lower inlet pressures, these conditions proved unreachable with the rotating balance installed due to the intense dynamic environment. The sensed radial load was less influenced by flow coefficient than by cavitation number or cavitation mode although the flow coefficient range was relatively narrow. Transition from symmetric tip vortex to alternate-blade cavitation corresponded to changes in both radial load magnitude and radial load orientation relative to the inducer. Sensed moments indicated that the effective load center moved downstream during this change in cavitation mode. An occurrence of "higher+rdex cavitation" was also detected in both the stationary pressures and the rotating balance data although the frequency of the phenomena was well above the reliable bandwidth of the rotating balance. In summary the experimental tests proved both the concept and device s capability despite the limitations and confirmed that hydrodynamically-induced forces and moments develop in response to the unbalanced pressure field, which is, in turn, a product of the cavitation environment.

  15. Cavitation research from an intetrnational perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arndt, R. E. A.

    2012-11-01

    This paper reviews some current research at the Saint Anthony Falls Laboratory from the perspective of the experience gained from cooperative research in other laboratories that the author has had the opportunity to participate in for several decades. Examples are drawn from the author's experience with collaborative efforts in China, Germany, Japan, Netherlands, Norway, and the US. Emphasis is placed on the progress in our understanding of the physics of cavitation as influenced by water quality, i.e. the strength of the water as influenced by the concentration of free and dissolved gas and complex fluid dynamic factors such as turbulence. The shift from experimental research to studies involving an integrated experimental/numerical approach is also underscored. Examples are drawn from early studies of inception and acoustics, vortex cavitation and more recent research on sheet/cloud cavitation and supercavitation. Some thoughts on new directions are also presented.

  16. Ideas in action: Solving a cavitation mystery

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    Cavitation caused significant erosion from 1985 through 1990 on turbine runners at the 970-MW Murray 1 Power Station operated by Snowy Mountains Hydro-Electric Authority (SMHEA) in Australia. The problem was perplexing because no obvious cause could be found. Investigation eventually showed the problems stemmed form the runners sagging slightly from the correct height. Corrective measures, which included adjustment of runners and new control settings for the units, appear to have relieved the cavitation. The adjustments also reduced stress on the unit thrust-bearings, eliminating a future maintenance headache.

  17. Correlations of thermodynamic effects for developed cavitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billet, M. L.; Holl, J. W.; Weir, D. S.

    1978-01-01

    The net positive suction head (NPSH) requirements for a pump are determined by the combined effects of cavitation, fluid properties, pump geometry, and pump operating point. An important part of this determination is the temperature depression (Delta T). Correlations are presented of the temperature depression for various degrees of developed cavitation on venturis and ogives. These correlations, based on a semi-empirical entrainment theory, express Delta T in terms of the dimensionless numbers of Nusselt, Reynolds, Froude, Weber, and Peclet, and dimensionless cavity length (L/D). The Delta T data were obtained in Freon 114, hydrogen and nitrogen for the venturis and in Freon 113 and water for the ogives.

  18. Centrifugal pump performance drop due to leading edge cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X. J.; Pan, Z. Y.; Zhang, D. Q.; Yuan, S. Q.

    2012-11-01

    This paper deals with the leading edge cavitation of the impeller of a single stage centrifugal pump. A centrifugal pump with and without inducer is investigated by numerical simulation. The simulation results of the pump with inducer were compared with experimental data under cavitating and non-cavitating situation. An acceptable agreement has been obtained for the overall performance. Cavitation phenomena are found in varied area near the impeller inlet at the condition in the impeller flow passage and induce unexpected head drop and blade load for the pump without inducer. Violent excitement of cavitation appears at conditions of low partial flow rate and low inlet pressure. As to that with inducer, through obvious cavitation occurs in the inducer passage, no violent cavitation is found in the impeller passage. The overall performance curves are also different between the two conditions.

  19. Experimental investigation of cavitation behavior in valveless micropumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrasekaran, Arvind; Packirisamy, Muthukumaran

    2012-12-01

    Recently, there have been several reports on the observation of cavitation in microfluidics and in micropumps. Though cavitation is a common occurrence in micropumping, this is one of the least understood of all micropumping phenomena, and very limited progress has been made to study the behavior of cavitation in micropumps. Hence, a dedicated study on cavitation in micropumps and its effects on the performance of the micropump would be very useful. This work presents an experimental study on the behavior of cavitation in valveless micropump. The mechanism of cavitation occurrence in valveless micropumps has been explained by applying macroscale pumping principles to suit micropumping. The different stages of micropump cavitation have been defined through suitably conducted experiments and the results have been presented.

  20. Numerical study of cavitation flows inside a tubular pumping station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, X. L.; Huang, W.; Wang, F. J.; Yang, W.; Wu, Y. L.

    2012-11-01

    Based on RNG k-epsilon turbulence model and the full cavitation model, the cavitation flows inside a low-head tubular-pump model were predicted by using the FLUENT software. For a operating case of given flow rate, cavitation happens near the inlet on the suction surfaces of the impeller blades at the initial cavitating stage, and the cavitating area spreads to the impeller passage and hub as NPSH (net positive suction head) decreases, which will affect energy transformation. For various operating cases of cavitation flows at the given flow rates, the predicted velocity and pressure distributions as well as the vapor volumetric fraction are systematically analyzed. Finally, the cavitation performance curve of the tubular-pump model is obtained by means of the further post-processing. All the comparisons and analysis can be further employed to optimize the hydraulic and structural design of the tubular pump and to guide its safe operation.

  1. Simulation of shock-induced bubble collapse with application to vascular injury in shockwave lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coralic, Vedran

    Shockwave lithotripsy is a noninvasive medical procedure wherein shockwaves are repeatedly focused at the location of kidney stones in order to pulverize them. Stone comminution is thought to be the product of two mechanisms: the propagation of stress waves within the stone and cavitation erosion. However, the latter mechanism has also been implicated in vascular injury. In the present work, shock-induced bubble collapse is studied in order to understand the role that it might play in inducing vascular injury. A high-order accurate, shock- and interface-capturing numerical scheme is developed to simulate the three-dimensional collapse of the bubble in both the free-field and inside a vessel phantom. The primary contributions of the numerical study are the characterization of the shock-bubble and shock-bubble-vessel interactions across a large parameter space that includes clinical shockwave lithotripsy pressure amplitudes, problem geometry and tissue viscoelasticity, and the subsequent correlation of these interactions to vascular injury. Specifically, measurements of the vessel wall pressures and displacements, as well as the finite strains in the fluid surrounding the bubble, are utilized with available experiments in tissue to evaluate damage potential. Estimates are made of the smallest injurious bubbles in the microvasculature during both the collapse and jetting phases of the bubble's life cycle. The present results suggest that bubbles larger than one micrometer in diameter could rupture blood vessels under clinical SWL conditions.

  2. Radial oscillation of a gas bubble in a fluid as a problem in canonical perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, James

    2005-11-01

    The oscillation of a gas bubble is in a fluid is of interest in many areas of physics and technology. Lord Rayleigh treated the pressure developed in the collapse of cavitation bubbles and developed an expression for the collapse period. Minnaert developed a harmonic oscillator approximation to bubble oscillation in his study of the sound produced by running water. Oscillating bubbles are important to oceanographers studying the sound spectrum produced by water waves, geophysicists employing air guns as acoustic probes, mechanical engineers concerned with erosion of turbine blades, and military engineers concerned with the acoustic signatures developed by the propeller screws of ships and submarines. For the oceanographer, Minnaert's approximation is useful, for the latter two examples, Lord Rayleigh's analysis is appropriate. On the one hand, a bubble can be treated as a harmonic oscillator in the small amplitude regime, whereas even in the relatively moderate pressure regime characteristic of air guns the oscillation is strongly nonlinear and amplitude dependent. Is it possible to develop an analytic approximation that affords insight into the behavior of a bubble beyond the harmonic approximation of Minnaert? In this spirit, the free radial oscillation of a gas bubble in a fluid is treated as a problem in canonical perturbation theory. Several orders of the expansion are determined in order to explore the dependence of the oscillation frequency with bubble amplitude. The expansion to second order is inverted to express the time dependence of the oscillation.

  3. CHARACTERISTICS OF THE SECONDARY BUBBLE CLUSTER PRODUCED BY AN ELECTROHYDRAULIC SHOCK WAVE LITHOTRIPTER

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yufeng; Qin, Jun; Zhong, Pei

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the characteristics of the secondary bubble cluster produced by an electrohydraulic lithotripter using high-speed imaging and passive cavitation detection techniques. The results showed that (i) the discrepancy of the collapse time between near a flat rigid boundary and in a free field of the secondary bubble cluster was not as significant as that by the primary one; (ii) the secondary bubble clusters were small but in a high bubble density and nonuniform in distribution, and they did not expand and aggregate significantly near a rigid boundary; and (iii) the corresponding bubble collapse was weaker with few microjet formation and bubble rebound. By applying a strong suction flow near the electrode tip, the production of the secondary shock wave (SW) and induced bubble cluster could be disturbed significantly, but without influence on the primary ones. Consequently, stone fragmentation efficiency was reduced from 41.2 ± 7.1% to 32.2 ± 3.5% after 250 shocks (p <0.05). Altogether, these observations suggest that the secondary bubble cluster produced by an electrohydraulic lithotripter may contribute to its ability for effective stone fragmentation. PMID:22390990

  4. BUBBLE ENTRAINMENT AND LIQUID-BUBBLE INTERACTION UNDER UNSTEADY BREAKING

    E-print Network

    Kirby, James T.

    BUBBLE ENTRAINMENT AND LIQUID-BUBBLE INTERACTION UNDER UNSTEADY BREAKING WAVES BY MORTEZA DERAKHTI And Enstrophy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 4.6 Reynolds Stress- and bubble-induced dissipation . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 4.7.2 Time dependent breaking parameter, b

  5. Gas bubble detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mount, Bruce E. (Inventor); Burchfield, David E. (Inventor); Hagey, John M. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A gas bubble detector having a modulated IR source focused through a bandpass filter onto a venturi, formed in a sample tube, to illuminate the venturi with modulated filtered IR to detect the presence of gas bubbles as small as 0.01 cm or about 0.004 in diameter in liquid flowing through the venturi. Means are provided to determine the size of any detected bubble and to provide an alarm in the absence of liquid in the sample tube.

  6. Film temperatures in the presence of cavitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elrod, Harold G.; Vijayaraghavan, D.

    1995-01-01

    Numerical algorithms are developed and implemented for the treatment of laminar lubricating-film temperatures associated with cavitated regions. The reformation front, with its film-content discontinuity and flow reversal, is given special attention. Computational economy is achieved through the use of Lobatto-point locations for flow-property determinations.

  7. Flow field measurement around vortex cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennings, P. C.; Westerweel, J.; van Terwisga, T. J. C.

    2015-11-01

    Models for the center frequency of cavitating-vortex induced pressure-fluctuations, in a flow around propellers, require knowledge of the vortex strength and vapor cavity size. For this purpose, stereoscopic particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements were taken downstream of a fixed half-wing model. A high spatial resolution is required and was obtained via correlation averaging. This reduces the interrogation area size by a factor of 2-8, with respect to conventional PIV measurements. Vortex wandering was accounted for by selecting PIV images for a given vortex position, yielding sufficient data to obtain statistically converged and accurate results, both with and without a vapor-filled vortex core. Based on these results, the low-order Proctor model was applied to describe the tip vortex velocity outside the viscous core, and the cavity size as a function of cavitation number. The flow field around the vortex cavity shows, in comparison with a flow field without cavitation, a region of retarded flow. This layer around the cavity interface is similar to the viscous core of a vortex without cavitation.

  8. Scale effect on unsteady cloud cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dular, M.; Khlifa, I.; Fuzier, S.; Adama Maiga, M.; Coutier-Delgosha, O.

    2012-11-01

    No experiment was conducted, yet, to investigate the scale effects on the dynamics of developed cavitating flow with periodical cloud shedding. The present study was motivated by the unclear results obtained from the experiments in a Venturi-type section that was scaled down 10 times for the purpose of measurements by ultra-fast X-ray imaging (Coutier-Delgosha et al. 2009). Cavitation in the original size scale section (Stutz and Reboud in Exp Fluids 23:191-198, 1997, Exp Fluids 29:545-552 2000) always displays unsteady cloud separation. However, when the geometry was scaled down, the cavitation became quasi steady although some oscillations still existed. To investigate this phenomenon more in detail, experiments were conducted in six geometrically similar Venturi test sections where either width or height or both were scaled. Various types of instabilities are obtained, from simple oscillations of the sheet cavity length to large vapor cloud shedding when the size of the test section is increased. It confirms that small scale has a significant influence on cavitation. Especially the height of the test section plays a major role in the dynamics of the re-entrant jet that drives the periodical shedding observed at large scale. Results suggest that the sheet cavity becomes stabile when the section is scaled down to a certain point because re-entrant jet cannot fully develop.

  9. Solve valve noise and cavitation problems

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, H.D.

    1997-03-01

    A clear understanding of aerodynamic noise theory and cavitation will avoid most major valve problems in process plants and allow the valve engineer to design out potential problems. On the other hand, the plant owner has to recognize that such valves may require a cost premium. However, such a premium will be recovered in a small amount of time because of the savings from reduced downtime and lower maintenance costs. Pressure reducing valves used on gases or high pressure steam valves, such as turbine bypass valves, convert substantial energy into heat and a lower pressure level. Unfortunately, this can only be done by accelerating the gas in one or more orifices and then decelerating it rapidly again through a turbulence mechanism or super-sonic shock cells. This causes a lot of noise and vibration. Valve engineering science has made substantial strides in the past few years, and one is now able to predict cavitation and aerodynamic sound levels before a valve is purchased. Similarly, newer valve sizes incorporate features that reduce noise and cavitation effects. Some other minor problems are resonant plug vibration and flashing. The paper discusses how to predict aerodynamic sound, how close can one estimate the sound level, cavitation, and incorrect installation.

  10. Relating xylem cavitation to transpiration in cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Acoustic emmisions (AEs) from xylem cavitation events are characteristic of transpiration processes. Even though a body of work employing AE exists with a large number of species, cotton and other agronomically important crops have either not been investigated, or limited information exists. A few s...

  11. Size scale effect in cavitation erosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, P. V.; Rao, B. C.; Buckley, D. H.

    1982-01-01

    An overview and data analyses pertaining to cavitation erosion size scale effects are presented. The exponents n in the power law relationship are found to vary from 1.7 to 4.9 for venturi and rotating disk devices supporting the values reported in the literature. Suggestions for future studies were made to arrive at further true scale effects.

  12. Prospects for bubble fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Nigmatulin, R.I.; Lahey, R.T. Jr.

    1995-09-01

    In this paper a new method for the realization of fusion energy is presented. This method is based on the superhigh compression of a gas bubble (deuterium or deuterium/thritium) in heavy water or another liquid. The superhigh compression of a gas bubble in a liquid is achieved through forced non-linear, non-periodic resonance oscillations using moderate amplitudes of forcing pressure. The key feature of this new method is a coordination of the forced liquid pressure change with the change of bubble volume. The corresponding regime of the bubble oscillation has been called {open_quotes}basketball dribbling (BD) regime{close_quotes}. The analytical solution describing this process for spherically symmetric bubble oscillations, neglecting dissipation and compressibility of the liquid, has been obtained. This solution shown no limitation on the supercompression of the bubble and the corresponding maximum temperature. The various dissipation mechanisms, including viscous, conductive and radiation heat losses have been considered. It is shown that in spite of these losses it is possible to achieve very high gas bubble temperatures. This because the time duration of the gas bubble supercompression becomes very short when increasing the intensity of compression, thus limiting the energy losses. Significantly, the calculated maximum gas temperatures have shown that nuclear fusion may be possible. First estimations of the affect of liquid compressibility have been made to determine possible limitations on gas bubble compression. The next step will be to investigate the role of interfacial instability and breaking down of the bubble, shock wave phenomena around and in the bubble and mutual diffusion of the gas and the liquid.

  13. Instability of the cavitating flow in a venturi reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayyaadi, Hoseyn

    2010-10-01

    The instability characteristics of cavitating flow were experimentally investigated in a venturi tube in a recirculating flow loop. The fluctuation process of cavitation flow in the venturi was observed using high-speed photography. The sequential images were analyzed using the light intensity comparison technique and the cavitation length for each image was evaluated. The temporal cavitation length fluctuation vectors were determined at the specified operating condition (the cavitation number and operating pressure). The frequency components of oscillation were obtained using the fast Fourier transform (FFT) method. The effects of cavitation number and operating pressure on the Strouhal numbers and amplitudes of fluctuations were obtained. It was found that cavitation number has a major effect on the fluctuation characteristics of the cavitating flow in comparison with the effect of operating pressure. It was observed that at lower cavitation numbers, periodic separation, shedding and collapsing of the cloud-like cavities are observed together with the re-entrant jet motion. At higher cavitation numbers, the simple fluctuation mode with a sinusoidal pattern is observed.

  14. Investigation of the cavitation fluctuation characteristics in a Venturi injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yuncheng; Chen, Yan; Wang, Zijun; Zhou, Lingjiu; Yan, Haijun

    2015-04-01

    The suction flow rate in a Venturi injector increases to a maximum and appears to be unstable when critical cavitation occurs. This study analyzes changes in the cavitation length in high-speed videos of a Venturi injector with critical cavitation to find periodic fluctuations in the cavitation cloud. Pressure fluctuation measurements show a dominant low frequency fluctuation that is almost as large as the oscillation frequency seen visually for the same conditions. The variation of the cavitation numbers and the measured transient outlet pressure show that critical cavitation occurs in the Venturi injector when the peak-to-peak pressure difference is greater than a critical value. Moreover, when the cavitation numbers become very small in the cavitation areas, the peak-to-peak pressures begin to decrease. The relationship between the suction performance and the outlet pressure fluctuations has a significant inflection point which can be used to determine proper working conditions. These experimental statistics provide a pressure range based on the inlet and outlet pressures for which the improvement of suction performance will not substantially change the outlet pressure fluctuations. Both the high-speed photography and the pressure measurement show the periodic oscillations of the cavitation cloud in a Venturi injector and can be used to detect the occurrence of critical cavitation.

  15. The effect of cavitation on the hydrofoil dynamic characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J.; Zhou, L. J.; Wang, Z. W.; Zhi, F. L.

    2013-12-01

    Cavitation in hydraulic machinery usually causes a change of fluid dynamic characteristics. In order to predict the effect of cavitation on hydrofoil characteristics, the cavitation around a hydrofoil was studied numerically. The full cavitation model and a modified RNG k ?-turbulence model were used. The finite volume method with the SIMPLEC scheme was used to discretize the time-dependent equations. The second-order upwind scheme was used for the convection terms with the central difference scheme used for the diffusion terms. Fluid dynamic characteristics including cavity's length, shedding frequency, pressure coefficient and lift and drag force coefficients features in a range of cavitation number were analyzed. Computations were made on the three-dimensional flow field around a NACA66 hydrofoil at 8° angle of attack. The recording force signals exhibit periodic behaviours with the time. And the cavity shedding frequency increases with the cavitation number, however the length of cavity decreases with the cavitation number, which result in changing of lift-drag ratio. Especially for larger cavitation numbers, the lift drag ratio of cavitation field is getting closer and closer to that of non-cavitation field.

  16. Choked-Flow Inlet Orifice Bubbler for Creating Small Bubbles in Mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Wendel, Mark W; Abdou, Ashraf A; Riemer, Bernie

    2013-01-01

    Pressure waves created in liquid mercury pulsed spallation targets like the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, induce cavitation damage on the target container. The cavitation damage is thought to limit the lifetime of the target for power levels at and above 1 MW. One way to mitigate the damage would be to absorb the pressure pulse energy into a dispersed population of small bubbles, however, creating a bubble size distribution that is sufficiently large and disperse in mercury is challenging due to the high surface tension. Also, measuring the population is complicated by the opacity and the high level of turbulent mixing. Recent advances in bubble diagnostics by batch sampling the mercury made it possible to compare bubble populations for different techniques in a SNS-1/20th scale test loop. More than 10 bubblers were tested and the most productive bubblers were taken for in-beam testing at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) WNR user facility. One bubbler design, referred to as the inlet-orifice bubbler, that showed moderate success in creating populations also has an added advantage that it could easily be included in the existing SNS full-scale mercury target configuration. Improvements to the bubbler were planned including a reduction of the nozzle size to choke the gas injection, thus steadying the injected mass flow and allowing multiple nozzles to work off of a common plenum. For the first time, reliable bubble population data are available in the prototypical target geometry and can be compared with populations that mitigated cavitation damage. This paper presents those experimental results.

  17. Bubble dynamics in a compressible liquid in contact with a rigid boundary.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qianxi; Liu, Wenke; Zhang, A M; Sui, Yi

    2015-10-01

    A bubble initiated near a rigid boundary may be almost in contact with the boundary because of its expansion and migration to the boundary, where a thin layer of water forms between the bubble and the boundary thereafter. This phenomenon is modelled using the weakly compressible theory coupled with the boundary integral method. The wall effects are modelled using the imaging method. The numerical instabilities caused by the near contact of the bubble surface with the boundary are handled by removing a thin layer of water between them and joining the bubble surface with its image to the boundary. Our computations correlate well with experiments for both the first and second cycles of oscillation. The time history of the energy of a bubble system follows a step function, reducing rapidly and significantly because of emission of shock waves at inception of a bubble and at the end of collapse but remaining approximately constant for the rest of the time. The bubble starts being in near contact with the boundary during the first cycle of oscillation when the dimensionless stand-off distance ? = s/R m < 1, where s is the distance of the initial bubble centre from the boundary and R m is the maximum bubble radius. This leads to (i) the direct impact of a high-speed liquid jet on the boundary once it penetrates through the bubble, (ii) the direct contact of the bubble at high temperature and high pressure with the boundary, and (iii) the direct impingement of shock waves on the boundary once emitted. These phenomena have clear potential to damage the boundary, which are believed to be part of the mechanisms of cavitation damage. PMID:26442148

  18. Interspecific variation in xylem vulnerability to cavitation among tropical tree and shrub species.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Omar R; Kursar, Thomas A; Cochard, Hervé; Tyree, Melvin T

    2005-12-01

    In tropical moist forests, seasonal drought limits plant survival, productivity and diversity. Drought-tolerance mechanisms of tropical species should reflect the maximum seasonal water deficits experienced in a particular habitat. We investigated stem xylem vulnerability to cavitation in nine tropical species with different life histories and habitat associations. Stem xylem vulnerability was scored as the xylem water potential causing 50 and 75% loss of hydraulic conductivity (P50 and P75, respectively). Four shade-tolerant shrubs ranged from moderately resistant (P50=-1.9 MPa for Ouratea lucens Kunth. Engl.) to highly resistant to cavitation (P50=-4.1 MPa for Psychotria horizontalis Sw.), with shallow-rooted species being the most resistant. Among the tree species, those characteristic of waterlogged soils, Carapa guianensis Aubl., Prioria copaifera Griseb. and Ficus citrifolia Mill., were the most vulnerable to cavitation (P50=-0.8 to -1.6 MPa). The wet-season, deciduous tree, Cordia alliodora (Ruiz and Pav.) Oken., had resistant xylem (P50=-3.2 MPa), whereas the dry-season, deciduous tree, Bursera simaruba (L.) Sarg. was among the most vulnerable to cavitation (P50=-0.8 MPa) of the species studied. For eight out of the nine study species, previously reported minimum seasonal leaf water potentials measured in the field during periods of drought correlated with our P50 and P75 values. Rooting depth, deciduousness, soil type and growth habit might also contribute to desiccation tolerance. Our results support the functional dependence of drought tolerance on xylem resistance to cavitation. PMID:16137941

  19. Gases in Tektite Bubbles.

    PubMed

    O'keefe, J A; Lowman, P D; Dunning, K L

    1962-07-20

    Spectroscopic analysis of light produced by electrodeless discharge in a tektite bubble showed the main gases in the bubble to be neon, helium, and oxygen. The neon and helium have probably diffused in from the atmosphere, while the oxygen may be atmospheric gas incorporated in the tektite during its formation. PMID:17801113

  20. Let Them Blow Bubbles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korenic, Eileen

    1988-01-01

    Describes a series of activities and demonstrations involving the science of soap bubbles. Starts with a recipe for bubble solution and gives instructions for several activities on topics such as density, interference colors, optics, static electricity, and galaxy formation. Contains some background information to help explain some of the effects.…

  1. The Vacuum Bubble Nucleation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Bum-Hoon; Lee, Wonwoo

    2009-07-10

    We study the nucleation of a vacuum bubble via the vacuum-to-vacuum tunneling transition in curved spacetime. We consider Coleman-de Luccia's semiclassical approximation at zero temperature in pure Einstein theory of gravity and the theory with nonminimal coupling. We discuss the dynamics of a nucleated vacuum bubble.

  2. Evaporation, Boiling and Bubbles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Evaporation and boiling are both terms applied to the change of a liquid to the vapour/gaseous state. This article argues that it is the formation of bubbles of vapour within the liquid that most clearly differentiates boiling from evaporation although only a minority of chemistry textbooks seems to mention bubble formation in this context. The…

  3. Dynamics of bubble oscillation in constrained media and mechanisms of vessel rupture in SWL.

    PubMed

    Zhong, P; Zhou, Y; Zhu, S

    2001-01-01

    Rupture of small blood vessels is a primary feature of the vascular injury associated with shock-wave lithotripsy (SWL) and cavitation has been implicated as a potential mechanism. To understand more precisely the underlying mechanical cause of the injury, the dynamics of SWL-induced bubble dynamics in constrained media were investigated. Silicone tubing and regenerated cellulose hollow fibers of various inner diameters (0.2 to 1.5 mm) were used to fabricate vessel phantoms, which were placed in a test chamber filled with castor oil so that cavitation outside the phantom could be suppressed. Degassed water seeded with 0.2% Albunex contrast agent was circulated inside the vessel phantom, and intraluminal bubble dynamics during SWL were examined by high-speed shadowgraph imaging and passive cavitation detection via a 20-MHz focused transducer. It was observed that, in contrast to the typical large and prolonged expansion and violent inertial collapse of SWL-induced bubbles in a free field, the expansion of the bubbles inside the vessel phantom was significantly constrained, leading to asymmetric elongation of the bubbles along the vessel axis and, presumably, much weakened collapse. The severity of the constraint is vessel-size dependent, and increases dramatically when the inner diameter of the vessel becomes smaller than 300 microm. Conversely, the rapid, large intraluminal expansion of the bubbles causes a significant dilation of the vessel wall, leading to consistent rupture of the hollow fibers (i.d. = 200 microm) after less than 20 pulses of shock wave exposure in a XL-1 lithotripter. The rupture is dose-dependent, and varies with the spatial location of the vessel phantom in the lithotripter field. Further, when the large intraluminal bubble expansion was suppressed by inversion of the lithotripter pressure waveform, rupture of the hollow fiber could be avoided even after 100 shocks. Theoretical calculation of SWL-induced bubble dynamics in blood confirms that the propensity of vascular injury due to intraluminal bubble expansion increases with the tensile pressure of the lithotripter shock wave, and with the reduction of the inner diameter of the vessel. It is suggested that selective truncation of the tensile pressure of the shock wave may reduce tissue injury without compromising the fragmentation capability of the lithotripter pulse. PMID:11295278

  4. Studying bubble-particle interactions by zeta potential distribution analysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chendi; Wang, Louxiang; Harbottle, David; Masliyah, Jacob; Xu, Zhenghe

    2015-07-01

    Over a decade ago, Xu and Masliyah pioneered an approach to characterize the interactions between particles in dynamic environments of multicomponent systems by measuring zeta potential distributions of individual components and their mixtures. Using a Zetaphoremeter, the measured zeta potential distributions of individual components and their mixtures were used to determine the conditions of preferential attachment in multicomponent particle suspensions. The technique has been applied to study the attachment of nano-sized silica and alumina particles to sub-micron size bubbles in solutions with and without the addition of surface active agents (SDS, DAH and DF250). The degree of attachment between gas bubbles and particles is shown to be a function of the interaction energy governed by the dispersion, electrostatic double layer and hydrophobic forces. Under certain chemical conditions, the attachment of nano-particles to sub-micron size bubbles is shown to be enhanced by in-situ gas nucleation induced by hydrodynamic cavitation for the weakly interacting systems, where mixing of the two individual components results in negligible attachment. Preferential interaction in complex tertiary particle systems demonstrated strong attachment between micron-sized alumina and gas bubbles, with little attachment between micron-sized alumina and silica, possibly due to instability of the aggregates in the shear flow environment. PMID:25731913

  5. The pulse length-dependence of inertial cavitation dose and hemolysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen-Shiang; Brayman, Andrew A; Matula, Thomas J; Crum, Lawrence A; Miller, Morton W

    2003-05-01

    Gas-based ultrasound (US) contrast agents increase erythrocyte sonolysis, presumably via enhancing inertial cavitation (IC) activity. The amount of IC activity (IC "dose") and hemolysis generated by exposure to 1.15 MHz US were examined with different US pulse lengths, but with the same delivered acoustic energy, for Optison and Albunex. The hypotheses were that 1. at longer pulse lengths, IC would generate more bubbles that could nucleate additional IC activity; 2. if the interval between pulse pairs were short enough for the next pulse to hit derivative bubbles before their dissolution, more IC could be induced; and 3. hemolysis would be proportional to IC activity. Two types of studies were performed. In the first, bubble generation after each burst of IC activity was quantified using an active cavitation detector (ACD), for different pulse lengths (5, 10, 20, 30, 50, 100 or 200 cycles), but the same pressure level (3 MPa) and total "on" time (173.16 ms). Low concentrations of either Optison or Albunex were added into the tank with high-intensity and interrogating transducers orthogonal to each other. For pulse lengths > 100 cycles, and pulse repetition intervals < 5 ms, a "cascade" effect (explosive bubble generation) was observed. In the second, IC was measured by passive detection methods. IC dose and hemolysis were determined in whole blood samples at a pressure level (3 MPa) and interpulse interval (5 ms) that induced the "cascade" effect. Each blood sample was mixed with the same number of contrast microbubbles (Optison approximately 0.3 v/v % and Albunex approximately 0.5 v/v %), but exposed to different pulse lengths (5, 10, 20, 30, 50, 100 or 200 cycles). With Optison, up to 60% hemolysis was produced with long pulses (100 and 200 cycles), compared with < 10% with short pulses (5 and 10 cycles). Albunex generated considerably less IC activity and hemolysis. The r(2) value was 0.99 for the correlation between hemolysis and IC dose. High pulse-repetition frequency (PRF) (500 Hz) generated more hemolysis than the low PRF (200 Hz) at 3 MPa. All experimental results could be explained by the dissolution times of IC-generated bubbles. PMID:12754073

  6. Demonstrating the Importance of Bubbles and Viscosity on Volcanic Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namiki, A.

    2005-12-01

    The behavior of bubbles (exsolved volatile from magma) and viscosity of magma are important parameters that influence volcanic eruptions. Exsolved volatiles increase the volume of magma and reduce its density so that magma has sufficient volume and buoyancy force to erupt. Volatiles exsolve through nucleation and growth by diffusion and bubbles can expand as pressure is reduced. The time scale of diffusion depends on the viscosity of surrounding magma, and the expansion time scale of a bubble is also depends on the viscosity of magma. These control the time scale for volume change. If bubbles segregate from magma and collapse, the magma might not able to expand sufficiently to erupt violently. Whether a bubble can segregate from the liquid part of magma is also depends on viscosity of magma. In this poster, I introduce a straightforward demonstration to show the importance of bubbles and viscosity of magma on volcanic eruptions. To make bubbles, I use baking soda (NaHCO3) and citric acid. Reaction between them generates carbon dioxide (CO2) to make bubbles. I make citric acid solution gel by using agar at the bottom of a transparent glass and pour baking soda disolved corn syrup on top of the agar. This situation is a model of basally heated magma chamber. When water disolved magma (baking soda disolved corn syrup) receives sufficient heat (citric acid) bubbles are generated. I can change viscosity of corn syrup by varying the concentration of water. This demonstration shows how viscosity controls the time scale of volume change of bubbly magma and the distribution of bubbles in the fluid. In addition it helps to understand the important physical processes in volcanic eruption: bubble nucleation, diffusion grows, expansion, and bubble driving convection. I will perform a live demonstration at the site of the poster.

  7. Cavitation and non-cavitation regime for large-scale ultrasonic standing wave particle separation systems--In situ gentle cavitation threshold determination and free radical related oxidation.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Linda; Singh, Tanoj; Leong, Thomas; Mawson, Raymond; McArthur, Sally; Manasseh, Richard; Juliano, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    We here suggest a novel and straightforward approach for liter-scale ultrasound particle manipulation standing wave systems to guide system design in terms of frequency and acoustic power for operating in either cavitation or non-cavitation regimes for ultrasound standing wave systems, using the sonochemiluminescent chemical luminol. We show that this method offers a simple way of in situ determination of the cavitation threshold for selected separation vessel geometry. Since the pressure field is system specific the cavitation threshold is system specific (for the threshold parameter range). In this study we discuss cavitation effects and also measure one implication of cavitation for the application of milk fat separation, the degree of milk fat lipid oxidation by headspace volatile measurements. For the evaluated vessel, 2 MHz as opposed to 1 MHz operation enabled operation in non-cavitation or low cavitation conditions as measured by the luminol intensity threshold method. In all cases the lipid oxidation derived volatiles were below the human sensory detection level. Ultrasound treatment did not significantly influence the oxidative changes in milk for either 1 MHz (dose of 46 kJ/L and 464 kJ/L) or 2 MHz (dose of 37 kJ/L and 373 kJ/L) operation. PMID:26384918

  8. Simulation of cavitating flow around a 2-D hydrofoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Sheng; He, Miao; Wang, Chao; Chang, Xin

    2010-03-01

    In order to predict the effects of cavitation on a hydrofoil, the state equations of the cavitation model were combined with a linear viscous turbulent method for mixed fluids in the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software FLUENT to simulate steady cavitating flow. At a fixed attack angle, pressure distributions and volume fractions of vapor at different cavitation numbers were simulated, and the results on foil sections agreed well with experimental data. In addition, at the various cavitation numbers, the vapor fractions at different attack angles were also predicted. The vapor region moved towards the front of the airfoil and the length of the cavity grew with increased attack angle. The results show that this method of applying FLUENT to simulate cavitation is reliable.

  9. Observations of the cavitating jet in a narrow watercourse

    SciTech Connect

    Soyama, H.; Ikohagi, T.; Oba, R.

    1994-12-31

    Highspeed submerged water-jets ar very often successfully applied for peening and cleaning. And such a jet-working-capacity closely depends on the shedding of cavitation clouds. In order to make clear the shedding mechanism of the clouds, the authors systematically observe the aspects of a two-dimensional jet in a 0.35mm-thin narrow watercourse, ejecting from the nozzle whose throat is 4mm long and 1mm wide. The cavitating jet is carefully observed by means of a highspeed photography and a digital image processing technique. The cavitating jet is very rapidly changing with time, and the clouds associated with the highly erosive cavitation are periodically shedding, whose frequency is about 800 Hz. The vortex cavitation around the jet is also shedding in 3kHz. The acceleration levels associated with high cavitation-erosion-energy are also measured.

  10. A Study of Micro-bubble Enhanced Sonoporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, A.; Tachibana, R.; Yoshinaka, K.; Osada, K.; Takagi, S.; Kataoka, K.; Chung, U.; Matsumoto, Y.

    2011-09-01

    Sonoporation is a recently developed system for gene induction that uses ultrasound. Micro-bubbles are known to aid gene transfection through the introduction of genes into cells by the collapse of cavitation-bubbles (or micro-bubbles). However, the underlying mechanism and optimal introduction conditions have not been clarified in detail. In this research, we improved the gene introduction rate by forming DNA/Block copolymer micelles. Micelle formation compacts the DNA and enhances its stability, thereby facilitating the passage of greater amounts of DNA through holes in the cell surface and improving gene expression. Cells were exposed to ultrasonic plane waves from a piezoceramic transducer with a frequency of 2.0 MHz and a duty cycle of 10% (400/3600). Mouse fibroblast cells (NIH3T3) were cultured on the bottom of 24-well plates. Plasmid DNA and Sonazoid® (micro-bubbles) were added to the culture media and the cells were subsequently exposed to ultrasound. In the system described herein, micelles are formed by combining DNA and block copolymer. Block copolymer is composed of polyethyleneglycol-group and poly-lysine. Naked DNA and polymer micelles are added to culture media with micro-bubbles, and then exposed to ultrasound. The experimental conditions were as follows: plasmid density of 15 ?g/ml, micro-bubble density of 1.7×105/mm3, ultrasound intensity of 5.08 W/cm2, ultrasound exposure time of 60 seconds, and a sample number of 12. Our results show that the gene induction ratio is doubled by the formation of polymer micelles (from ˜1% to ˜2%), thereby confirming that the system is capable of generating polymer micelles for introducing DNA into cells.

  11. L-Area Cavitation Tests Final Analysis - Limits Application

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, D.C.

    2001-06-26

    The L-Area cavitation test was designed to better define the onset of cavitation in the reactor system. The onset of gas evolution in the effluent piping and pump cavitation was measured using state-of-the-art equipment to provide data with a high confidence and low uncertainty level. The limits calculated from the new data will allow an approximate two percent increase in reactor power if the reactor is effluent temperature-limited with no compromise in reactor safety.

  12. Preparation of graphene by jet cavitation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhigang; Li, Jinzhi; Yi, Min; Zhang, Xiaojing; Ma, Shulin

    2011-09-01

    Despite its bright prospects, graphene faces challenges including issues concerning mass production. Here we present a totally green approach whereby common crystal graphite can be exfoliated into graphene sheets in aqueous solution by jet cavitation. This is possible mainly because the tensile stress caused by graphite-solution interfacial reflection of compressive waves acts an intensive 'suction disk' on the graphite flakes. We confirm the presence of graphene sheets by diverse characterizations. The graphene yield by our method is estimated as ? 4 wt%, which could potentially be improved by further processing. The method, of a mechanical nature, is powerful compared to the traditional low-throughput micromechanical cleavage. Our work here illustrates jet cavitation as a facile, low cost, timesaving and laborsaving route, which can potentially be scaled up to mass production of graphene. PMID:21844642

  13. High-harmonic generation in cavitated plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Comier-Michel, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2008-05-15

    A method is proposed for producing coherent x-rays via high-harmonic generation using ultraintense lasers interacting with highly stripped ions in cavitated plasmas. This method relies on plasma cavitation by the wake of an intense drive beam (laser or electron beam) to produce an ion cavity. An ultrashort pulse laser propagating in the plasma-electron-free ion cavity generates laser harmonics. The longitudinal electron motion, which inhibits high-harmonic generation at high laser intensities, can be suppressed by the space-charge field in the ion cavity or by using a counterpropagating laser pulse. Periodic suppression of the longitudinal electron motion may also be used to quasi-phase-match. This method enables harmonic generation to be extended to the sub-A regime.

  14. Preventing cavitation in high energy centrifugal pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Garbers, A.W.F.; Wasfi, A.K. Ltd. )

    1990-07-01

    Large-eye impellers for high energy centrifugal pumps were developed to meet the specification of reduced NPSH{sub r} at rated flow conditions. Unfortunately, this improved NPSH performance was not without adverse tradeoffs because an abnormal increase in noise, vibration and cavitation erosion were experienced at low flows. Centrifugal pumps are often used under widely varying and adverse conditions, and in the case of high energy and large-eye impeller pumps, these conditions should be evaluated very carefully. At petrochemical complexes in Secunda in the Republic of South Africa, a centrifugal pump application for lean carbonate solution experienced frequent failures. An investigation and literature survey indicated the cause was low flow cavitation. The purpose of this article is but to give design guidelines as obtained from literature and experience.

  15. Cavitation in liquid cryogens. 3: Ogives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hord, J.

    1973-01-01

    Experimental results for three, scaled, quarter-caliber ogives are given. Both desinent and developed cavity data, using liquid hydrogen and liquid nitrogen, are reported. The desinent data do not exhibit a consistent ogive size effect, but the developed cavity data were consistently influenced by ogive size; B-factor increases with increasing ogive diameter. The developed cavity data indicated that stable thermodynamic equilibrium exists throughout the vaporous cavities. These data were correlated by using the extended theory derived in NASA-CR-2156 (volume II of this report series). The new correlating parameter MTWO, improves data correlation for the ogives, hydrofoil, and venturi and appears attractive for future predictive applications. The cavitation coefficient and equipment size effects are shown to vary with specific equipment-fluid combinations. A method of estimating cavitation coefficient from knowledge of the noncavitating pressure coefficient is suggested.

  16. Tribonucleation of bubbles

    PubMed Central

    Wildeman, Sander; Lhuissier, Henri; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef; Prosperetti, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    We report on the nucleation of bubbles on solids that are gently rubbed against each other in a liquid. The phenomenon is found to depend strongly on the material and roughness of the solid surfaces. For a given surface, temperature, and gas content, a trail of growing bubbles is observed if the rubbing force and velocity exceed a certain threshold. Direct observation through a transparent solid shows that each bubble in the trail results from the early coalescence of several microscopic bubbles, themselves detaching from microscopic gas pockets forming between the solids. From a detailed study of the wear tracks, with atomic force and scanning electron microscopy imaging, we conclude that these microscopic gas pockets originate from a local fracturing of the surface asperities, possibly enhanced by chemical reactions at the freshly created surfaces. Our findings will be useful either for preventing undesired bubble formation or, on the contrary, for “writing with bubbles,” i.e., creating controlled patterns of microscopic bubbles. PMID:24982169

  17. Propeller sheet cavitation noise source modeling and inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Keunhwa; Lee, Jaehyuk; Kim, Dongho; Kim, Kyungseop; Seong, Woojae

    2014-02-01

    Propeller sheet cavitation is the main contributor to high level of noise and vibration in the after body of a ship. Full measurement of the cavitation-induced hull pressure over the entire surface of the affected area is desired but not practical. Therefore, using a few measurements on the outer hull above the propeller in a cavitation tunnel, empirical or semi-empirical techniques based on physical model have been used to predict the hull-induced pressure (or hull-induced force). In this paper, with the analytic source model for sheet cavitation, a multi-parameter inversion scheme to find the positions of noise sources and their strengths is suggested. The inversion is posed as a nonlinear optimization problem, which is solved by the optimization algorithm based on the adaptive simplex simulated annealing algorithm. Then, the resulting hull pressure can be modeled with boundary element method from the inverted cavitation noise sources. The suggested approach is applied to the hull pressure data measured in a cavitation tunnel of the Samsung Heavy Industry. Two monopole sources are adequate to model the propeller sheet cavitation noise. The inverted source information is reasonable with the cavitation dynamics of the propeller and the modeled hull pressure shows good agreement with cavitation tunnel experimental data.

  18. Experimental Investigation of Cavitation Induced Feedline Instability from an Orifice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hitt, Matthew A.; Lineberry, David M.; Ahuja, Vineet; Frederick, Robert A,

    2012-01-01

    This paper details the results of an experimental investigation into the cavitation instabilities created by a circular orifice conducted at the University of Alabama in Huntsville Propulsion Research Center. This experiment was conducted in concert with a computational simulation to serve as a reference point for the simulation. Testing was conducted using liquid nitrogen as a cryogenic propellant simulant. A 1.06 cm diameter thin orifice with a rounded inlet was tested in an approximately 1.25 kg/s flow with inlet pressures ranging from 504.1 kPa to 829.3 kPa. Pressure fluctuations generated by the orifice were measured using a high frequency pressure sensor located 0.64 tube diameters downstream of the orifice. Fast Fourier Transforms were performed on the high frequency data to determine the instability frequency. Shedding resulted in a primary frequency with a cavitation related subharmonic frequency. For this experiment, the cavitation instability ranged from 153 Hz to 275 Hz. Additionally, the strength of the cavitation occur red as a function of cavitation number. At lower cavitation numbers, the strength of the cavitation instability ranged from 2.4 % to 7 % of the inlet pressure. However, at higher cavitation numbers, the strength of the cavitation instability ranged from 0.6 % to 1 % of the inlet pressure.

  19. Impact of acoustic cavitation on food emulsions.

    PubMed

    Krasulya, Olga; Bogush, Vladimir; Trishina, Victoria; Potoroko, Irina; Khmelev, Sergey; Sivashanmugam, Palani; Anandan, Sambandam

    2016-05-01

    The work explores the experimental and theoretical aspects of emulsification capability of ultrasound to deliver stable emulsions of sunflower oil in water and meat sausages. In order to determine optimal parameters for direct ultrasonic emulsification of food emulsions, a model was developed based on the stability of emulsion droplets in acoustic cavitation field. The study is further extended to investigate the ultrasound induced changes to the inherent properties of raw materials under the experimental conditions of sono-emulsification. PMID:26603612

  20. Turbulence Model Study for Unsteady Cavitating Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decaix, Jean; Goncalvès, Eric

    2010-09-01

    A compressible, multiphase, one-fluid RANS solver was developed to study cavitating flows. The interaction between turbulence and two-phase structures is complex and not well known. This constitutes a critical point to accurately simulate unsteady behaviours of cavity sheets. In the present study, different transport-equation turbulence models are investigated. Numerical results are given for a Venturi geometry and comparisons are made with experimental data.

  1. Development of bubble microstructure in ErT2 films during aging

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, Gillian; Snow, Clark

    2010-01-01

    Helium bubbles form in metal tritide films as tritium decays into 3He, influencing mechanical properties and long-term film stability. The bubble nucleation and growth mechanisms comprise an active research area, but there has been only one previous systematic experimental study of helium bubble growth in metal tritides, on zirconium tritides. There have been no such studies on tritides such as ErT2 that form plate-like bubbles and lack a secondary bubble population on a network of line dislocations, and yet such a study is needed to inform the modeling of helium-bubble microstructure development in a broader range of metal tritides. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been used to study the growth and evolution of helium bubbles in ErT2 films over a four-year period. The results have been used to test the present models of helium bubble nucleation and growth in metal tritides, particularly those forming plate-like bubbles. The results support the models of Trinkaus and Cowgill. The observations of non-uniform bubble thicknesses and the pattern of grain-boundary bubble formation, however, indicate that these models could be strengthened by closer attention to details of interfacial energy. It is strongly recommended that efforts be made (either experimentally or by calculation) to determine anisotropy of tritide/helium interfacial energy, both for clean, stoichiometric interfaces, and also allowing for such factors as non-stoichiometry and segregation.

  2. Helium nano-bubble evolution in aging metal tritides.

    SciTech Connect

    Cowgill, Donald F.

    2004-05-01

    A continuum-scale, evolutionary model of helium (He) nano-bubble nucleation, growth and He release for aging bulk metal tritides is presented which accounts for major features of the experimental database. Bubble nucleation, modeled as self-trapping of interstitially diffusing He atoms, is found to occur during the first few days following tritium introduction into the metal and is sensitive to the He diffusivity and pairing energy. An effective helium diffusivity of 0.3 x 10{sup -16} cm{sup 2}/s at 300 K is required to generate the average bubble density of 5x 1017 bubbles/cm3 observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Early bubble growth by dislocation loop punching with a l/radius bubble pressure dependence produces good agreement with He atomic volumes and bubble pressures determined from swelling data, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements, and hydride pressure-composition-temperature (PCT) shifts. The model predicts that later in life neighboring bubble interactions may first lower the loop punching pressure through cooperative stress effects, then raise the pressure by partial blocking of loops. It also accounts for the shape of the bubble spacing distribution obtained from NMR data. This distribution is found to remain fixed with age, justifying the separation of nucleation and growth phases, providing a sensitive test of the growth formulation, and indicating that further significant bubble nucleation does not occur throughout life. Helium generated within the escape depth of surfaces and surface-connected porosity produces the low-level early helium release. Accelerated or rapid release is modeled as inter-bubble fracture using an average ligament stress criterion. Good agreement is found between the predicted onset of fracture and the observed He-metal ratio (HeM) for rapid He release from bulk palladium tritide. An examination of how inter-bubble fracture varies over the bubble spacing distribution shows that the critical Hem will be lower for thin films or small particle material. It is concluded that control of He retention can be accomplished through control of bubble nucleation.

  3. Tuberculosis, Pulmonary Cavitation, and Matrix Metalloproteinases

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Catherine W. M.; Elkington, Paul T.

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB), a chronic infectious disease of global importance, is facing the emergence of drug-resistant strains with few new drugs to treat the infection. Pulmonary cavitation, the hallmark of established disease, is associated with very high bacillary burden. Cavitation may lead to delayed sputum culture conversion, emergence of drug resistance, and transmission of the infection. The host immunological reaction to Mycobacterium tuberculosis is implicated in driving the development of TB cavities. TB is characterized by a matrix-degrading phenotype in which the activity of proteolytic matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) is relatively unopposed by the specific tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases. Proteases, in particular MMPs, secreted from monocyte-derived cells, neutrophils, and stromal cells, are involved in both cell recruitment and tissue damage and may cause cavitation. MMP activity is augmented by proinflammatory chemokines and cytokines, is tightly regulated by complex signaling paths, and causes matrix destruction. MMP concentrations are elevated in human TB and are closely associated with clinical and radiological markers of lung tissue destruction. Immunomodulatory therapies targeting MMPs in preclinical and clinical trials are potential adjuncts to TB treatment. Strategies targeting patients with cavitary TB have the potential to improve cure rates and reduce disease transmission. PMID:24713029

  4. Computational fluid dynamic modelling of cavitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deshpande, Manish; Feng, Jinzhang; Merkle, Charles L.

    1993-01-01

    Models in sheet cavitation in cryogenic fluids are developed for use in Euler and Navier-Stokes codes. The models are based upon earlier potential-flow models but enable the cavity inception point, length, and shape to be determined as part of the computation. In the present paper, numerical solutions are compared with experimental measurements for both pressure distribution and cavity length. Comparisons between models are also presented. The CFD model provides a relatively simple modification to an existing code to enable cavitation performance predictions to be included. The analysis also has the added ability of incorporating thermodynamic effects of cryogenic fluids into the analysis. Extensions of the current two-dimensional steady state analysis to three-dimensions and/or time-dependent flows are, in principle, straightforward although geometrical issues become more complicated. Linearized models, however offer promise of providing effective cavitation modeling in three-dimensions. This analysis presents good potential for improved understanding of many phenomena associated with cavity flows.

  5. Cavitation effects in ultrasonic cleaning baths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glasscock, Barbara H.

    1995-01-01

    In this project, the effect of cavitation from aqueous ultrasonic cleaning on the surfaces of metal and non-metal sample coupons was studied. After twenty cleaning cycles, the mass loss from the aluminum coupons averaged 0.22 mg/sq cm surface area and 0.014 mg/sq cm for both stainless steel and titanium. The aluminum coupons showed visual evidence of minor cavitation erosion in regions of previously existing surface irregularities. The non-metal samples showed some periods of mass gain. These effects are believed to have minor impact on hardware being cleaned, but should be evaluated in the context of specific hardware requirements. Also the ultrasonic activity in the large cleaning baths was found to be unevenly distributed as measured by damage to sheets of aluminum foil. It is therefore recommended that items being cleaned in an ultrasonic bath be moved or conveyed during the cleaning to more evenly distribute the cavitation action provide more uniform cleaning.

  6. The effect of hydrodynamic cavitation on Microcystis aeruginosa: Physical and chemical factors.

    PubMed

    Li, Pan; Song, Yuan; Yu, Shuili; Park, Hee-Deung

    2015-10-01

    The various effects of hydrodynamic cavitation (HC) on algal growth inhibition were investigated. The gas-vacuolate species Microcystis aeruginosa responded differently to the gas-vacuole-negative alga Chlorella sp. When M. aeruginosa was subjected to HC, both its cell density and photosynthetic activity were subsequently reduced by nearly 90% after three days culture. However, the cell density of Chlorella sp. was reduced by only 63%, and its final photosynthetic activity was unaffected. Electron microscopy confirmed that HC had a minimal impact on algal cells that lack gas vacuoles. Shear stress during recirculation only modestly inhibited the growth of M. aeruginosa. The relative malondialdehyde (MDA) content, a quantitative indicator of lipid peroxidation, increased significantly during HC treatment, indicating the production of free radicals. Accordingly, the addition of H2O2 to the HC process promoted the production of free radicals, which also improved algal reduction. A comparison of the outcomes and energy efficiency of HC and ultrasonic cavitation indicated that HC gives the best performance: under 10 min cavitation treatment, the algal removal rate of HC could reach 88% while that of sonication was only 39%. PMID:26026840

  7. Trap Activation Energy and Transport Parameters of HgI$_2$ Crystals for Bubble-Plasma Diagnostics

    E-print Network

    M. B. Miller; V. F. Kushniruk; A. V. Sermyagin

    2003-01-13

    In recent data on neutron induced acoustic cavitation in deuterium--containing liquids obtained by neutron measurements it was shown that very high temperatures could arise in some special cases. To study temperature of so--called bubble plasma it is desirable to have micro--detectors of X-rays, which can be prepared on the basis of room--temperature semiconductor detectors, in particular on mercuric iodide ($\\alpha$--HgI$_2$) crystals. Having in view this aim, the properties of gel--grown ($\\alpha$--HgI$_2$) crystals was studied by means of isothermal currents, and trap parameters was estimated. Results are promising for special aim of preparing X-ray detectors with moderate energy resolution needed in bubble--plasma diagnostic, though improving of crystal growing technology is necessary. {\\it PACS:} 29.40.Wk; 52.70.La {\\it Keywords:} X-ray and gamma--ray measurements; semiconductor detectors; mercuric iodide; plasma diagnostics; cavitation

  8. Twin pregnancy in an accessory cavitated non-communicating uterus

    PubMed Central

    Alkhateeb, Harith M.; Yaseen, Enas M.

    2015-01-01

    Background A uterine malformation is a type of female genital malformation resulting from abnormal development of the Mullerian duct(s) during embryogenesis. The type and degree of uterine malformation depends on the level at which the fusion process of the two Mullerian ducts stops; thus, there is a wide variety of malformations. A newly described deformity called accessory cavitated uterine mass (ACUM) has been increasingly reported. The case We report this deformity (in a 20-year-old married woman) which appears to be an additional incompletely developed, cavitated and presumably non-communicating uterus in addition to a normally shaped and developed uterus. The former uterus became impregnated with twins that died in a missed abortion at 13 weeks of gestation. Before discovering the presence of the deformity, three attempts were made to evacuate the dead fetuses by cervical dilatation and curettage of the normal empty uterus. These attempts resulted in perforation of its fundus, a laparotomy was performed to repair the uterus. During the laparotomy, the pregnant accessory uterus was discovered and was excised with the dead twins. Discussion The lack of good medical history was a cause of the mismanagement of this patient. Most probably, the origin of ACUM is a growth from the right Mullerian duct. The ovum has entered the ACUM through the rudimentary tube and has been fertilized by a sperm travelled either through the normal vaginal and uterine cavities or through the lymphatics. Conclusions (1) A detailed case history is important. (2) An ACUM can be impregnated. PMID:25813124

  9. Synthesis of magnetic GdC2 nanoparticles using cavitation plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhary, Rakesh; Koymen, Ali R.

    2015-03-01

    Gadolinium dicarbide (GdC2) nanoparticles were synthesized using Gd electrodes in toluene. Gd nanoparticles are formed in plasma caused due to collapse of cavitation bubbles using ultrasonication in electric field between Gd wire electrodes. The presence of a single phase of GdC2 nanocrystals have been determined by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM). The GdC2 nanoparticles have tetragonal crystal structure. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) shows that the nanoparticles range in size of 4-45 nm in diameter. Magnetization measurements performed using a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) magnetometer shows GdC2nanoparticles are paramagnetic in nature. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first synthesis of GdC2 in single phase form, allowing further characterization of physical properties.

  10. Density and Cavitating Flow Results from a Full-Scale Optical Multiphase Cryogenic Flowmeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korman, Valentin

    2007-01-01

    Liquid propulsion systems are hampered by poor flow measurements. The measurement of flow directly impacts safe motor operations, performance parameters as well as providing feedback from ground testing and developmental work. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, in an effort to improve propulsion sensor technology, has developed an all optical flow meter that directly measures the density of the fluid. The full-scale sensor was tested in a transient, multiphase liquid nitrogen fluid environment. Comparison with traditional density models shows excellent agreement with fluid density with an error of approximately 0.8%. Further evaluation shows the sensor is able to detect cavitation or bubbles in the flow stream and separate out their resulting effects in fluid density.

  11. Chemistry in Soap Bubbles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Albert W. M.; Wong, A.; Lee, H. W.; Lee, H. Y.; Zhou, Ning-Huai

    2002-01-01

    Describes a laboratory experiment in which common chemical gases are trapped inside soap bubbles. Examines the physical and chemical properties of the gases such as relative density and combustion. (Author/MM)

  12. What's in a Bubble?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunderson, Megan

    2000-01-01

    Describes a unit on detergents and bubbles that establishes an interest in the properties of materials and focuses on active learning involving both hands- and minds-on learning rather than passive learning. (ASK)

  13. Quantitative measurement by artificial vision of small bubbles in flowing mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Paquit, Vincent C; Wendel, Mark W; Felde, David K; Riemer, Bernie

    2011-01-01

    At the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), an accelerator-based neutron source located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (Tennessee, USA), the production of neutrons is obtained by accelerating protons against a mercury target. This self-cooling target, however, suffers rapid heat deposition by the beam pulse leading to large pressure changes and thus to cavitations that may be damaging to the container. In order to locally compensate for pressure increases, a small-bubble population is added to the mercury flow using gas bubblers. The geometry of the bubblers being unknown, we are testing several bubblers configurations and are using machine vision techniques to characterize their efficiency by quantitative measurement of the created bubble population. In this paper we thoroughly detail the experimental setup and the image processing techniques used to quantitatively assess the bubble population. To support this approach we are comparing our preliminary results for different bubblers and operating modes, and discuss potential improvements.

  14. Computational techniques and analysis of cavitating-fluid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinzel, Michael P.

    A new numerical approach is presented and validated for valid for compressible-cavitating-fluid flows. The method employs modern interface capturing and computational mesh methods that improve the accuracy and enable a complex simulation capability. Specifically, the overset-mesh method is applied to facilitate complex and dynamic-multibody cavitating-vehicle simulations. In addition, a conforming, adaptive-mesh method is explored for a more efficient free-surface prediction capability. A numerical-sharpening scheme based on the level-set method is developed; the approach is valid for multiphase-compressible flows, accommodates phase change, and implements an efficient reinitialization scheme that is better suited for cavitating-fluid flows. The numerical methods are validated over a wide range of multiphase flows that include vaporous cavitation in water and cryogenic liquids, artificial cavitation, cavitating-body free-surface interactions, and dynamic-body multiphase simulations. The numerical schemes developed in this thesis are shown to improve the computational efficiency, the accuracy of the predicted flows, and the simulation capability for real-world multiphase computational-fluid-dynamics analysis. Using the developed tools, a number of physical aspects of cavitating-fluid flows are investigated. The modeling approaches for partial cavitation simulations are evaluated and lead to conclusions regarding physical modeling requirements for accurate predictions. Finally, the physical behavior of cavitating flows is examined. Insight into cavity-air entrainment mechanisms, cavitating-oscillating hydrofoils, and cavitating-bodies near a free surface are obtained based on the validated methods and models.

  15. Cloud cavitation control for lithotripsy using high intensity focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Teiichiro; Yoshizawa, Shin; Tosaki, Masataka; Allen, John S; Takagi, Shu; Ohta, Nobutaka; Kitamura, Tadaichi; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2006-09-01

    Cloud cavitation is potentially the most destructive form of cavitation. When the cloud cavitation is acoustically forced into a collapse, it has the potential to concentrate a very high pressure, more than 100 times the acoustic pressure, at its center. We experimentally investigate a method to control the collapse of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU)-induced cloud cavitation to fragment kidney stones. Our study examines a novel two-frequency wave designed to control the cloud cavitation (cavitation control [C-C] waveform); a high-frequency ultrasound pulse (1 to 4 MHz) to create the cloud cavitation and a low-frequency trailing pulse (545 kHz) following the high-frequency pulse to force the cloud into collapse. High-speed photography has revealed that a localized distribution of the cloud cavitation can be produced within 1 mm on the solid surface by the high-frequency pulse. The low-frequency ultrasound was irradiated to the high-frequency-induced cloud cavitation. A subsequent shock wave emitted from the cloud cavitation was observed both in the shadowgraph photography and the remote hydrophone measurement. Furthermore, in vitro erosion tests of model and natural stones were conducted. In the case of model stones, the erosion rate of the C-C waveform showed a distinct advantage with the combined high- and low-frequency waves over either wave alone. Natural stones were eroded and most of the resulting fragments were less than 1 mm in diameter. The results show that the control of the cloud cavitation has untapped potential for the lithotripsy applications upon further optimization of the ultrasound parameters and complementary in vivo studies. PMID:16965979

  16. 2012 Problem 8: Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Kejing; Xia, Qing; Wang, Sihui; Zhou, Huijun

    2015-10-01

    When a large number of bubbles exist in the water, an object may float on the surface or sink. The assumption of equivalent density is proposed in this article to explain the concrete example. According to the assumption, an object is floatable only if its density is less than the equivalent density of the water-bubble mixture. This conclusion is supported by the floating experiment and by measuring the pressure underwater to a satisfactory approximation.

  17. Bubble coalescence in magmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herd, Richard A.; Pinkerton, Harry

    1993-01-01

    The most important factors governing the nature of volcanic eruptions are the primary volatile contents, the ways in which volatiles exsolve, and how the resulting bubbles grow and interact. In this contribution we assess the importance of bubble coalescence. The degree of coalescence in alkali basalts has been measured using Image Analysis techniques and it is suggested to be a process of considerable importance. Binary coalescence events occur every few minutes in basaltic melts with vesicularities greater than around 35 percent.

  18. Bubble Departure from Metal-Graphite Composite Surfaces and Its Effects on Pool Boiling Heat Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, David F.; Sankovic, John M.; Motil, Brian J.; Yang, W-J.; Zhang, Nengli

    2010-01-01

    The formation and growth processes of a bubble in the vicinity of graphite micro-fiber tips on metal-graphite composite boiling surfaces and their effects on boiling behavior are investigated. It is discovered that a large number of micro bubbles are formed first at the micro scratches and cavities on the metal matrix in pool boiling. By virtue of the non-wetting property of graphite, once the growing micro bubbles touch the graphite tips, the micro bubbles are sucked by the tips and merged into larger micro bubbles sitting on the end of the tips. The micro bubbles grow rapidly and coalesce to form macro bubbles, each spanning several tips. The necking process of a detaching macro bubble is analyzed. It is revealed that a liquid jet is produced by sudden break-off of the bubble throat. The composite surfaces not only have higher temperatures in micro- and macrolayers but also make higher frequency of the bubble departure, which increase the average heat fluxes in both the bubble growth stage and in the bubble departure period. Based on these analyses, the enhancement mechanism of pool boiling heat transfer on composite surfaces is clearly revealed.

  19. The Impact of Bubbles on Measurement of Drug Release from Echogenic Liposomes

    PubMed Central

    Kopechek, Jonathan A.; Haworth, Kevin J.; Radhakrishnan, Kirthi; Huang, Shaoling; Klegerman, Melvin E.; McPherson, David D.; Holland, Christy K.

    2013-01-01

    Echogenic liposomes (ELIP) encapsulate gas bubbles and drugs within lipid vesicles, but the mechanisms of ultrasound-mediated drug release from ELIP are not well understood. The effect of cavitation activity on drug release from ELIP was investigated in flowing solutions using two fluorescent molecules: a lipophilic drug (rosiglitazone) and a hydrophilic drug substitute (calcein). ELIP samples were exposed to pulsed Doppler ultrasound from a clinical diagnostic ultrasound scanner at pressures above and below the inertial and stable cavitation thresholds. Control samples were exposed to a surfactant, Triton X-100 (positive control), or to flow alone (negative control). Fluorescence techniques were used to detect release. Encapsulated microbubbles reduced the measured fluorescence intensity and this effect should be considered when assessing drug release from ELIP. The origin of this effect is not specific to ELIP. Release of rosiglitazone or calcein compared to the negative control was only observed with detergent treatment, but not with ultrasound exposure, despite the presence of stable and inertial cavitation activity. Release of rosiglitazone or calcein from ELIP exposed to diagnostic ultrasound was not observed, even in the presence of cavitation activity. Ultrasound-mediated drug delivery strategies with ELIP will thus rely on passage of the drug-loaded liposomes to target tissues. PMID:23357288

  20. d Original Contribution IDENTIFYING THE INERTIAL CAVITATION THRESHOLD AND SKULL

    E-print Network

    Konofagou, Elisa E.

    d Original Contribution IDENTIFYING THE INERTIAL CAVITATION THRESHOLD AND SKULL EFFECTS IN AVESSEL length: 100 cycles; PRF: 10 Hz; sonication duration: 2 s) through an excised mouse skull. The acoustic, with or without the skull present. Mouse skulls did not affect the threshold of inertial cavitation but resulted