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Sample records for cavitation bubble growth

  1. Experimental study of temperature effect on the growth and collapse of cavitation bubbles near a rigid boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiu-mei; Long, Zheng; He, Jie; Li, Bei-bei; Liu, Xin-hua; Zhao, Ji-yun; Lu, Jian; Ni, Xiao-wu

    2013-07-01

    The effect of temperature on the dynamics of a laser-induced cavitation bubble is studied experimentally. The growth and collapse of the cavitation bubble are measured by two sensitive fiber-optic sensors based on optical beam deflection (OBD). Cavitation bubble tests are performed in water at different temperatures, and the temperature ranges from freezing point (0C) to near boiling point. The results indicate that both the maximum bubble radius and bubble lifetime are increased with the increase of temperature. During the stage of bubble rapidly collapsing in the vicinity of a solid surface, besides laser ablation effect, both the first and second liquid-jet-induced impulses are also observed. They are both increased with liquid temperature increasing, and then reach a peak, followed by a decrease. The peak appears at the temperature which is approximately the average of freezing and boiling points. The mechanism of liquid temperature influence on cavitation erosion is also discussed.

  2. Mechanics of collapsing cavitation bubbles.

    PubMed

    van Wijngaarden, Leen

    2016-03-01

    A brief survey is given of the dynamical phenomena accompanying the collapse of cavitation bubbles. The discussion includes shock waves, microjets and the various ways in which collapsing bubbles produce damage. PMID:25890856

  3. Analysis of cavitation bubble dynamics in a liquid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fontenot, L. L.; Lee, Y. C.

    1971-01-01

    General differential equations governing the dynamics of the cavitation bubbles in a liquid were derived. With the assumption of spherical symmetry the governing equations were simplified. Closed form solutions were obtained for simple cases, and numerical solutions were calculated for complicated ones. The growth and the collapse of the bubble were analyzed, oscillations of the bubbles were studied, and the stability of the cavitation bubbles were investigated. The results show that the cavitation bubbles are unstable, and the oscillation is not sinusoidal.

  4. Particle Motion Induced by Bubble Cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulain, Stéphane; Guenoun, Gabriel; Gart, Sean; Crowe, William; Jung, Sunghwan

    2015-05-01

    Cavitation bubbles induce impulsive forces on surrounding substrates, particles, or surfaces. Even though cavitation is a traditional topic in fluid mechanics, current understanding and studies do not capture the effect of cavitation on suspended objects in fluids. In the present work, the dynamics of a spherical particle due to a cavitation bubble is experimentally characterized and compared with an analytical model. Three phases are observed: the growth of the bubble where the particle is pushed away, its collapse where the particle approaches the bubble, and a longer time scale postcollapse where the particle continues to move toward the collapsed bubble. The particle motion in the longer time scale presumably results from the asymmetric cavitation evolution at an earlier time. Our theory considering the asymmetric bubble dynamics shows that the particle velocity strongly depends on the distance from the bubble as an inverse-fourth-power law, which is in good agreement with our experimentation. This study sheds light on how small free particles respond to cavitation bubbles in fluids.

  5. Particle motion induced by bubble cavitation.

    PubMed

    Poulain, Stéphane; Guenoun, Gabriel; Gart, Sean; Crowe, William; Jung, Sunghwan

    2015-05-29

    Cavitation bubbles induce impulsive forces on surrounding substrates, particles, or surfaces. Even though cavitation is a traditional topic in fluid mechanics, current understanding and studies do not capture the effect of cavitation on suspended objects in fluids. In the present work, the dynamics of a spherical particle due to a cavitation bubble is experimentally characterized and compared with an analytical model. Three phases are observed: the growth of the bubble where the particle is pushed away, its collapse where the particle approaches the bubble, and a longer time scale postcollapse where the particle continues to move toward the collapsed bubble. The particle motion in the longer time scale presumably results from the asymmetric cavitation evolution at an earlier time. Our theory considering the asymmetric bubble dynamics shows that the particle velocity strongly depends on the distance from the bubble as an inverse-fourth-power law, which is in good agreement with our experimentation. This study sheds light on how small free particles respond to cavitation bubbles in fluids. PMID:26066438

  6. Birth and Growth of Cavitation Bubbles within Water under Tension Confined in a Simple Synthetic Tree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, Olivier; Marmottant, Philippe; Quinto-Su, Pedro A.; Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2012-05-01

    Water under tension, as can be found in several systems including tree vessels, is metastable. Cavitation can spontaneously occur, nucleating a bubble. We investigate the dynamics of spontaneous or triggered cavitation inside water filled microcavities of a hydrogel. Results show that a stable bubble is created in only a microsecond time scale, after transient oscillations. Then, a diffusion driven expansion leads to filling of the cavity. Analysis reveals that the nucleation of a bubble releases a tension of several tens of MPa, and a simple model captures the different time scales of the expansion process.

  7. Effect of dissolved gases in water on acoustic cavitation and bubble growth rate in 0.83 MHz megasonic of interest to wafer cleaning.

    PubMed

    Kang, Bong-Kyun; Kim, Min-Su; Park, Jin-Goo

    2014-07-01

    Changes in the cavitation intensity of gases dissolved in water, including H2, N2, and Ar, have been established in studies of acoustic bubble growth rates under ultrasonic fields. Variations in the acoustic properties of dissolved gases in water affect the cavitation intensity at a high frequency (0.83 MHz) due to changes in the rectified diffusion and bubble coalescence rate. It has been proposed that acoustic bubble growth rates rapidly increase when water contains a gas, such as hydrogen faster single bubble growth due to rectified diffusion, and a higher rate of coalescence under Bjerknes forces. The change of acoustic bubble growth rate in rectified diffusion has an effect on the damping constant and diffusivity of gas at the acoustic bubble and liquid interface. It has been suggested that the coalescence reaction of bubbles under Bjerknes forces is a reaction determined by the compressibility and density of dissolved gas in water associated with sound velocity and density in acoustic bubbles. High acoustic bubble growth rates also contribute to enhanced cavitation effects in terms of dissolved gas in water. On the other hand, when Ar gas dissolves into water under ultrasound field, cavitation behavior was reduced remarkably due to its lower acoustic bubble growth rate. It is shown that change of cavitation intensity in various dissolved gases were verified through cleaning experiments in the single type of cleaning tool such as particle removal and pattern damage based on numerically calculated acoustic bubble growth rates. PMID:24529613

  8. Cavitation inception from bubble nuclei.

    PubMed

    Mrch, K A

    2015-10-01

    The tensile strength of ordinary water such as tap water or seawater is typically well below 1 bar. It is governed by cavitation nuclei in the water, not by the tensile strength of the water itself, which is extremely high. Different models of the nuclei have been suggested over the years, and experimental investigations of bubbles and cavitation inception have been presented. These results suggest that cavitation nuclei in equilibrium are gaseous voids in the water, stabilized by a skin which allows diffusion balance between gas inside the void and gas in solution in the surrounding liquid. The cavitation nuclei may be free gas bubbles in the bulk of water, or interfacial gaseous voids located on the surface of particles in the water, or on bounding walls. The tensile strength of these nuclei depends not only on the water quality but also on the pressure-time history of the water. A recent model and associated experiments throw new light on the effects of transient pressures on the tensile strength of water, which may be notably reduced or increased by such pressure changes. PMID:26442138

  9. Dynamics and Noise Emission of Vortex Cavitation Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jaehyug

    2005-11-01

    The growth and collapse of a cavitation bubble forming within the core of a line vortex was examined experimentally. A steady line vortex was formed downstream of a hydrofoil mounted in the test section of a recirculating water channel. A focussed pulse of laser light was used to initiate a nulcei in the core of a vortex, allowing for the detailed examination of the growth, splitting and collapse of individual cavitation bubbles as they experience a reduction and recovery of the local static pressure. Images of single bubble dynamics were captured with two pulse-synchronize high-speed video camera. The shape and dynamics of single vortex cavitation bubbles are related to the original vortex properties and the local static pressure in the vortex core, and an analysis was performed to understand the relationship between the non-cavitating vortex properties and the diameter of the elongated cavitation bubble. Acoustic emissions from the bubbles were detected during growing, splitting and collapse, although the acoustic impulse created during collapse was four orders of magnitude higher than the growth and splitting noise. The dynamics and noise generation of the elongated bubbles are compared to that of spherical cavitation bubbles in quiescent flow.

  10. Sonoporation from Jetting Cavitation Bubbles

    PubMed Central

    Ohl, Claus-Dieter; Arora, Manish; Ikink, Roy; de Jong, Nico; Versluis, Michel; Delius, Michael; Lohse, Detlef

    2006-01-01

    The fluid dynamic interaction of cavitation bubbles with adherent cells on a substrate is experimentally investigated. We find that the nonspherical collapse of bubbles near to the boundary is responsible for cell detachment. High-speed photography reveals that a wall bounded flow leads to the detachment of cells. Cells at the edge of the circular area of detachment are found to be permanently porated, whereas cells at some distance from the detachment area undergo viable cell membrane poration (sonoporation). The wall flow field leading to cell detachment is modeled with a self-similar solution for a wall jet, together with a kinetic ansatz of adhesive bond rupture. The self-similar solution for the ?-type wall jet compares very well with the full solution of the Navier-Stokes equation for a jet of finite thickness. Apart from annular sites of sonoporation we also find more homogenous patterns of molecule delivery with no cell detachment. PMID:16950843

  11. Dynamic behaviors of cavitation bubble for the steady cavitating flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Jun; Huai, Xiulan; Li, Xunfeng

    2009-12-01

    In this paper, by introducing the flow velocity item into the classical Rayleigh-Plesset dynamic equation, a new equation, which does not involve the time term and can describe the motion of cavitation bubble in the steady cavitating flow, has been obtained. By solving the new motion equation using Runge-Kutta fourth order method with adaptive step size control, the dynamic behaviors of cavitation bubble driven by the varying pressure field downstream of a venturi cavitation reactor are numerically simulated. The effects of liquid temperature (corresponding to the saturated vapor pressure of liquid), cavitation number and inlet pressure of venturi on radial motion of bubble and pressure pulse due to the radial motion are analyzed and discussed in detail. Some dynamic behaviors of bubble different from those in previous papers are displayed. In addition, the internal relationship between bubble dynamics and process intensification is also discussed. The simulation results reported in this work reveal the variation laws of cavitation intensity with the flow conditions of liquid, and will lay a foundation for the practical application of hydrodynamic cavitation technology.

  12. Interaction of Cavitation Bubbles on Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, Manish

    2005-11-01

    Patterned structures on solid surfaces can be used as controlled nucleation sites for cavitation. Etched micro-pits on hydrophobic solid surfaces trap small amounts of gas during immersion in water, which--when lowering the pressure--serve as bubble nucleus. Using specifically patterned surfaces, the dynamics of a few bubbles with controlled distances is investigated. The temporal evolution of the cavitating bubbles is visualized stroboscopically and with high speed imaging. When the inter-bubble distance is sufficiently small, the bubbles merge through a series of fascinating intermediate 3d shapes. Morover, bubbles on the edge of the pattern `shield' the bubbles inside, thus delaying the collapse of the interior bubbles. The results are reproduced with the help of axis-symmetric boundary integral simulations.

  13. Sonoluminescence, sonochemistry and bubble dynamics of single bubble cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatanaka, Shin-ichi

    2012-09-01

    The amount of hydroxyl radicals produced from a single cavitation bubble was quantified by terephthalate dosimetry at various frequencies and pressure amplitudes, while the dynamics of the single bubble was observed by stroboscopic and light-scattering methods. Also, sonoluminescence (SL), sonochemiluminescence (SCL) of luminol, and sodium atom emission (Na*) in the cavitation field were observed. The amount of hydroxyl radicals per cycle as well as the intensity of SL was proportional to pressure amplitude at every frequency performed, and it decreased with increasing frequency. When the single bubble was dancing with a decrease in pressure amplitude, however, the amount of hydroxyl radicals was greater than that for the stable bubble at the higher pressure amplitude and did not significantly decrease with frequency. Furthermore, SCL and Na* were detected only under unstable bubble conditions. These results imply that the instability of bubbles significantly enhances sonochemical efficiency for non-volatile substances in liquid phase.

  14. Cavitation inception by the backscattering of pressure waves from a bubble interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahira, Hiroyuki; Ogasawara, Toshiyuki; Mori, Naoto; Tanaka, Moe

    2015-10-01

    The secondary cavitation that occurs by the backscattering of focused ultrasound from a primary cavitation bubble caused by the negative pressure part of the ultrasound (Maxwell, et al., 2011) might be useful for the energy exchange due to bubble oscillations in High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU). The present study is concerned with the cavitation inception by the backscattering of ultrasound from a bubble. In the present experiment, a laser-induced bubble which is generated by a pulsed focused laser beam with high intensity is utilized as a primary cavitation bubble. After generating the bubble, focused ultrasound is emitted to the bubble. The acoustic field and the bubble motion are observed with a high-speed video camera. It is confirmed that the secondary cavitation bubble clouds are generated by the backscattering from the laser-induced bubble. The growth of cavitation bubble clouds is analyzed with the image processing method. The experimental results show that the height and width of the bubble clouds grow in stepwise during their evolution. The direct numerical simulations are also conducted for the backscattering of incident pressure waves from a bubble in order to evaluate a pressure field near the bubble. It is shown that the ratio of a bubble collapse time t0 to a characteristic time of wave propagation tS, η = t0/ts, is an important determinant for generating negative pressure region by backscattering. The minimum pressure location by the backscattering in simulations is in good agreement with the experiment.

  15. Enhancing acoustic cavitation using artificial crevice bubbles.

    PubMed

    Zijlstra, Aaldert; Fernandez Rivas, David; Gardeniers, Han J G E; Versluis, Michel; Lohse, Detlef

    2015-02-01

    We study the response of pre-defined cavitation nuclei driven continuously in the kHz regime (80, 100 and 200 kHz). The nuclei consist of stabilized gaspockets in cylindrical pits of 30 μm diameter etched in silicon or glass substrates. It is found that above an acoustic pressure threshold the dynamics of the liquid-gas meniscus switches from a stable drum-like vibration to expansion and deformation, frequently resulting in detachment of microbubbles. Just above this threshold small bubbles are continuously and intermittently ejected. At elevated input powers bubble detachment becomes more frequent and cavitation bubble clouds are formed and remain in the vicinity of the pit bubble. Surprisingly, the resulting loss of gas does not lead to deactivation of the pit which can be explained by a rectified gas diffusion process. PMID:25455191

  16. Observation of Microhollows Produced by Bubble Cloud Cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamakoshi, Yoshiki; Miwa, Takashi

    2012-07-01

    When an ultrasonic wave with sound pressure less than the threshold level of bubble destruction irradiates microbubbles, the microbubbles aggregate by an acoustic radiation force and form bubble clouds. The cavitation of bubble clouds produces a large number of microhollows (microdips) on the flow channel wall. In this study, microhollow production by bubble cloud cavitation is evaluated using a blood vessel phantom made of N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPA) gel. Microbubble dynamics in bubble cloud cavitation is observed by a microscope with a short pulse light emitted diode (LED) light source. Microhollows produced on the flow channel wall are evaluated by a confocal laser microscope with a water immersion objective. It is observed that a mass of low-density bubbles (bubble mist) is formed by bubble cloud cavitation. The spatial correlation between the bubble mist and the microhollows shows the importance of the bubble mist in microhollow production by bubble cloud cavitation.

  17. Intensely oscillating cavitation bubble in microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siew-Wan, Ohl; Tandiono; Klaseboer, Evert; Dave, Ow; Choo, Andre; Claus-Dieter, Ohl

    2015-12-01

    This study reports the technical breakthrough in generating intense ultrasonic cavitation in the confinement of a microfluidics channel [1], and applications that has been developed on this platform for the past few years [2,3,4,5]. Our system consists of circular disc transducers (10-20 mm in diameter), the microfluidics channels on PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane), and a driving circuitry. The cavitation bubbles are created at the gas- water interface due to strong capillary waves which are generated when the system is driven at its natural frequency (around 100 kHz) [1]. These bubbles oscillate and collapse within the channel. The bubbles are useful for sonochemistry and the generation of sonoluminescence [2]. When we add bacteria (Escherichia coli), and yeast cells (Pichia pastoris) into the microfluidics channels, the oscillating and collapsing bubbles stretch and lyse these cells [3]. Furthermore, the system is effective (DNA of the harvested intracellular content remains largely intact), and efficient (yield reaches saturation in less than 1 second). In another application, human red blood cells are added to a microchamber. Cell stretching and rapture are observed when a laser generated cavitation bubble expands and collapses next to the cell [4]. A numerical model of a liquid pocket surrounded by a membrane with surface tension which was placed next to an oscillating bubble was developed using the Boundary Element Method. The simulation results showed that the stretching of the liquid pocket occurs only when the surface tension is within a certain range.

  18. Inside a Collapsing Bubble: Sonoluminescence and the Conditions During Cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suslick, Kenneth S.; Flannigan, David J.

    2008-05-01

    Acoustic cavitation, the growth and rapid collapse of bubbles in a liquid irradiated with ultrasound, is a unique source of energy for driving chemical reactions with sound, a process known as sonochemistry. Another consequence of acoustic cavitation is the emission of light [sonoluminescence (SL)]. Spectroscopic analyses of SL from single bubbles as well as a cloud of bubbles have revealed line and band emission, as well as an underlying continuum arising from a plasma. Application of spectrometric methods of pyrometry as well as tools of plasma diagnostics to relative line intensities, profiles, and peak positions have allowed the determination of intracavity temperatures and pressures. These studies have shown that extraordinary conditions (temperatures up to 20,000 K; pressures of several thousand bar; and heating and cooling rates of >1012 K s1) are generated within an otherwise cold liquid.

  19. Multiscale Modeling of Cavitating Bubbly Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, J.; Hsiao, C.-T.; Chahine, G. L.

    2013-03-01

    Modeling of cavitating bubbly flows is challenging due to the wide range of characteristic lengths of the physics at play: from micrometers (e.g., bubble nuclei radius) to meters (e.g., propeller diameter or sheet cavity length). To address this, we present here a multiscale approach which integrates a Discrete Bubble Model for dispersed microbubbles and a level set N-S solver for macro cavities, along with a mesoscale transition model to bridge the two. This approach was implemented in 3DYNAFScopyright and used to simulate sheet-to-cloud cavitation over a hydrofoil. The hybrid model captures well the full cavitation process starting from free field nuclei and nucleation from solid surfaces. In low pressure region of the foil small nuclei are seen to grow large and eventually merge to form a large scale sheet cavity. A reentrant jet forms under the cavity, travels upstream, and breaks it, resulting in a bubble cloud of a large amount of microbubbles as the broken pockets shrink and travel downstream. This is in good agreement with experimental observations based of sheet lengths and frequency of lift force oscillation. DOE-SBIR, ONR (monitored by Dr. Ki-Han Kim)

  20. Modeling of surface cleaning by cavitation bubble dynamics and collapse.

    PubMed

    Chahine, Georges L; Kapahi, Anil; Choi, Jin-Keun; Hsiao, Chao-Tsung

    2016-03-01

    Surface cleaning using cavitation bubble dynamics is investigated numerically through modeling of bubble dynamics, dirt particle motion, and fluid material interaction. Three fluid dynamics models; a potential flow model, a viscous model, and a compressible model, are used to describe the flow field generated by the bubble all showing the strong effects bubble explosive growth and collapse have on a dirt particle and on a layer of material to remove. Bubble deformation and reentrant jet formation are seen to be responsible for generating concentrated pressures, shear, and lift forces on the dirt particle and high impulsive loads on a layer of material to remove. Bubble explosive growth is also an important mechanism for removal of dirt particles, since strong suction forces in addition to shear are generated around the explosively growing bubble and can exert strong forces lifting the particles from the surface to clean and sucking them toward the bubble. To model material failure and removal, a finite element structure code is used and enables simulation of full fluid-structure interaction and investigation of the effects of various parameters. High impulsive pressures are generated during bubble collapse due to the impact of the bubble reentrant jet on the material surface and the subsequent collapse of the resulting toroidal bubble. Pits and material removal develop on the material surface when the impulsive pressure is large enough to result in high equivalent stresses exceeding the material yield stress or its ultimate strain. Cleaning depends on parameters such as the relative size between the bubble at its maximum volume and the particle size, the bubble standoff distance from the particle and from the material wall, and the excitation pressure field driving the bubble dynamics. These effects are discussed in this contribution. PMID:25982895

  1. On thermonuclear processes in cavitation bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nigmatulin, R. I.; Lahey, R. T., Jr.; Taleyarkhan, R. P.; West, C. D.; Block, R. C.

    2014-09-01

    The theoretical and experimental foundations of so-called bubble nuclear fusion are reviewed. In the nuclear fusion process, a spherical cavitation cluster 10-2 m in diameter is produced of spherical bubbles at the center of a cylindrical chamber filled with deuterated acetone using a focused acoustic field having a resonant frequency of about 20 kHz. The acoustically-forced bubbles effectuate volume oscillations with sharp collapses during the compression stage. At the final stages of collapse, the bubble cluster emits 2.5 MeV D-D fusion neutron pulses at a rate of 2000 per second. The neutron yield is 10^5 s -1. In parallel, tritium nuclei are produced at the same yield. It is shown numerically that, for bubbles having sufficient molecular mass, spherical shock waves develop in the center of the cluster and that these spherical shock waves (microshocks) produce converging shocks within the interior bubbles, which focus energy on the centers of the bubbles. When these shock waves reflect from the centers of the bubbles, extreme conditions of temperature ( 10^8 K) and density ( 10^4 kg m -3) arise in a (nano)spherical region ( 10-7 m in size) that last for 10-12 s, during which time about ten D-D fusion neutrons and tritium nuclei are produced in the region. A paradoxical result in our experiments is that it is bubble cluster (not streamer) cavitation and the sufficiently high molecular mass of (and hence the low sound speed in) D-acetone ( C3D6O) vapor (as compared, for example, to deuterated water D2O) which are necessary conditions for the formation of convergent spherical microshock waves in central cluster bubbles. It is these waves that allow the energy to be sufficiently focused in the nanospherical regions near the bubble centers for fusion events to occur. The criticism to which the concept of 'bubble fusion' has been subjected in the literature, in particular, most recently in Uspekhi Fizicheskikh Nauk (Physics - Uspekhi) journal, is discussed.

  2. Electric phenomena in multi-bubble cavitation fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margulis, M. A.

    2007-07-01

    The processes of formation and accumulation of electric charges in the splitting and deformation of cavitation bubbles in an ultrasonic wave field are considered in terms of the local electrification theory. The influence of different factors on the electrification of the bubble-liquid interface is discussed. It is established that, in the splitting of a cavitation bubble and, possibly, in its deformation, the local field strength near the bubble surface dramatically depends on the radius of the neck formed in the bubble. It is shown that, although the stationary concentration of cavitation bubbles may be very high (104 105 cm-3), the probability for several deformed cavitation bubbles of required size to emit luminescence at a given instant of time depends on the ultrasound intensity and other test conditions, a conclusion supported by experimental data.

  3. Nucleus factory on cavitation bubble for amyloid β fibril.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Kichitaro; Ogi, Hirotsugu; Adachi, Kanta; Noi, Kentaro; Hirao, Masahiko; Yagi, Hisashi; Goto, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    Structural evolution from monomer to fibril of amyloid β peptide is related to pathogenic mechanism of Alzheimer disease, and its acceleration is a long-running problem in drug development. This study reveals that ultrasonic cavitation bubbles behave as catalysts for nucleation of the peptide: The nucleation reaction is highly dependent on frequency and pressure of acoustic wave, and we discover an optimum acoustical condition, at which the reaction-rate constant for nucleation is increased by three-orders-of magnitudes. A theoretical model is proposed for explaining highly frequency and pressure dependent nucleation reaction, where monomers are captured on the bubble surface during its growth and highly condensed by subsequent bubble collapse, so that they are transiently exposed to high temperatures. Thus, the dual effects of local condensation and local heating contribute to dramatically enhance the nucleation reaction. Our model consistently reproduces the frequency and pressure dependences, supporting its essential applicability. PMID:26912021

  4. Nucleus factory on cavitation bubble for amyloid β fibril

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Kichitaro; Ogi, Hirotsugu; Adachi, Kanta; Noi, Kentaro; Hirao, Masahiko; Yagi, Hisashi; Goto, Yuji

    2016-02-01

    Structural evolution from monomer to fibril of amyloid β peptide is related to pathogenic mechanism of Alzheimer disease, and its acceleration is a long-running problem in drug development. This study reveals that ultrasonic cavitation bubbles behave as catalysts for nucleation of the peptide: The nucleation reaction is highly dependent on frequency and pressure of acoustic wave, and we discover an optimum acoustical condition, at which the reaction-rate constant for nucleation is increased by three-orders-of magnitudes. A theoretical model is proposed for explaining highly frequency and pressure dependent nucleation reaction, where monomers are captured on the bubble surface during its growth and highly condensed by subsequent bubble collapse, so that they are transiently exposed to high temperatures. Thus, the dual effects of local condensation and local heating contribute to dramatically enhance the nucleation reaction. Our model consistently reproduces the frequency and pressure dependences, supporting its essential applicability.

  5. Nucleus factory on cavitation bubble for amyloid β fibril

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Kichitaro; Ogi, Hirotsugu; Adachi, Kanta; Noi, Kentaro; Hirao, Masahiko; Yagi, Hisashi; Goto, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    Structural evolution from monomer to fibril of amyloid β peptide is related to pathogenic mechanism of Alzheimer disease, and its acceleration is a long-running problem in drug development. This study reveals that ultrasonic cavitation bubbles behave as catalysts for nucleation of the peptide: The nucleation reaction is highly dependent on frequency and pressure of acoustic wave, and we discover an optimum acoustical condition, at which the reaction-rate constant for nucleation is increased by three-orders-of magnitudes. A theoretical model is proposed for explaining highly frequency and pressure dependent nucleation reaction, where monomers are captured on the bubble surface during its growth and highly condensed by subsequent bubble collapse, so that they are transiently exposed to high temperatures. Thus, the dual effects of local condensation and local heating contribute to dramatically enhance the nucleation reaction. Our model consistently reproduces the frequency and pressure dependences, supporting its essential applicability. PMID:26912021

  6. Cavitation Bubble Nucleation by Energetic Particles

    SciTech Connect

    West, C.D.

    1998-12-01

    In the early sixties, experimental measurements using a bubble chamber confirmed quantitatively the thermal spike theory of bubble nucleation by energetic particles: the energy of the slow, heavy alpha decay recoils used in those experiments matched the calculated bubble nucleation energy to within a few percent. It was a triumph, but was soon to be followed by a puzzle. Within a couple of years, experiments on similar liquids, but well below their normal boiling points, placed under tensile stress showed that the calculated bubble nucleation energy was an order of magnitude less than the recoil energy. Why should the theory work so well in the one case and so badly in the other? How did the liquid, or the recoil particle, "know" the difference between the two experiments? Another mathematical model of the same physical process, introduced in 1967, showed qualitatively why different analyses would be needed for liquids with high and low vapor pressures under positive or negative pressures. But, the quantitative agreement between the calculated nucleation energy and the recoil energy was still poor--the former being smaller by a factor of two to three. In this report, the 1967 analysis is extended and refined: the qualitative understanding of the difference between positive and negative pressure nucleation, "boiling" and "cavitation" respectively, is retained, and agreement between the negative pressure calculated to be needed for nucleation and the energy calculated to be available is much improved. A plot of the calculated negative pressure needed to induce bubble formation against the measured value now has a slope of 1.0, although there is still considerable scatter in the individual points.

  7. Suppression of cavitation inception by gas bubble injection: a numerical study focusing on bubble-bubble interaction.

    PubMed

    Ida, Masato; Naoe, Takashi; Futakawa, Masatoshi

    2007-10-01

    The dynamic behavior of cavitation and gas bubbles under negative pressure has been studied numerically to evaluate the effect of gas bubble injection into a liquid on the suppression of cavitation inception. In our previous studies, it was demonstrated by direct observation that cavitation occurs in liquid mercury when mechanical impacts are imposed, and this will cause cavitation damage in spallation neutron sources, in which liquid mercury is bombarded by a high-power proton beam. In the present paper, we describe numerical investigations of the dynamics of cavitation bubbles in liquid mercury using a multibubble model that takes into account the interaction of a cavitation bubble with preexisting gas bubbles through bubble-radiated pressure waves. The numerical results suggest that, if the mercury includes gas bubbles whose equilibrium radius is much larger than that of the cavitation bubble, the explosive expansion of the cavitation bubble (i.e., cavitation inception) is suppressed by the positive-pressure wave radiated by the injected bubbles, which decreases the magnitude of the negative pressure in the mercury. PMID:17995108

  8. In Situ Synchrotron Radiography and Spectrum Analysis of Transient Cavitation Bubbles in Molten Aluminium Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzanakis, I.; Xu, W. W.; Lebon, G. S. B.; Eskin, D. G.; Pericleous, K.; Lee, P. D.

    The melt processing of conventional and advanced metallic materials with high-intensity ultrasonic vibrations significantly improves the quality and properties of molten metals during their solidification. These improvements are primarily attributed to ultrasonic cavitation: the creation, growth, pulsation, and collapse of bubbles in the liquid. However, the development of practical applications is limited by the lack of fundamental knowledge on the dynamics of the cavitation bubbles; it is very difficult to directly observe ultrasonic cavitation using conventional techniques in molten metals due their high temperature and opaqueness. In this study, an in situ synchrotron radiography experiment was performed to investigate bubble dynamics in an Al-10 wt.% Cu alloy under an external ultrasound field at 30 kHz. Radiographs with an exposure time of 78 ms were collected continuously during the sonication of molten alloys at temperatures of 66010 C. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that transient cavitation bubbles have been observed in liquid aluminium. Quantification of bubble parameters such as average size and time of collapse were evaluated from radiographs using advanced image analysis. Additionally, broadband noise associated with the acoustic emissions from shock waves of transient cavitation bubbles and estimation of the real-time acoustic pressure at the driving frequency were assessed using an advanced high-temperature cavitometer in separate bulk experiments.

  9. Cavitation bubble behavior inside a liquid jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert, Etienne; Lettry, Jacques; Farhat, Mohamed; Monkewitz, Peter A.; Avellan, Franois

    2007-06-01

    The growth and collapse of laser-induced vapor cavities inside axisymmetric free-falling liquid water jets have been studied. Bubbles of different size are generated at various distances from the jet axis and the effects on the jet interface are recorded by means of ultrafast cinematography. The configuration is characterized by two dimensionless parameters: the bubble to jet diameter ratio ? and the eccentricity coefficient ? defined as the radius of bubble generation divided by the jet radius. For high ? and ?, microjets and droplets are ejected from the liquid jet at speeds exceeding 100m/s. The observed jet fragmentation shows similarities with experiments conducted on a liquid mercury jet hit by a pulsed proton beam, a candidate configuration for future accelerator based facilities.

  10. Comparison of numerical simulations and laboratory studies of shock waves and cavitation bubble growth produced by optical breakdown in water

    SciTech Connect

    Chapyak, E.J.; Godwin, R.P.; Vogel, A.

    1997-04-01

    In numerical calculations of idealized bubble dynamics test problems, Los Alamos computational tools perform well. A realistic equation of state must be used and geometrical features must be carefully modeled to simulate experiments accurately. In this work, we compare numerical simulations taking these features into account with experiments performed at the Medizinisches Laserzentrum Lubeck. We compare the measured and calculated positions of the shock front and of the bubble wall as a function of time in the laser optical breakdown of water produced by 30-ps 1-mJ Nd:YAG laser pulses.

  11. Acoustic streaming and bubble translation at a cavitating ultrasonic horn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, Till; Cairs, Carlos; Batyrshin, Eduard; Mettin, Robert

    2015-10-01

    Acoustic cavitation at a 20 kHz ultrasonic horn is investigated by means of high-speed imaging and particle image velocimetry. In one experimental set-up, bubble dynamics is visualized synchronously with the acoustic streaming liquid flow to reveal their connection. By switching an elevated static pressure, cavitation can be turned off and on for otherwise identical conditions. If cavitation is present, an average increase of liquid streaming velocities by a factor of 30 is found as compared to the non-cavitating case, and high flow velocities are well confined to the bubbly regions. Further results show that individual bubble trajectories do not always coincide with the liquid flow direction, but can even run in opposite direction. This is highlighted in a second set-up where the periodic back-and-forth translation of a single bubble near the horn tip in phosphoric acid is analyzed. It is concluded that translation of larger cavitation bubbles is mainly determined by acoustic forces, even in the presence of moderate bulk flow speeds.

  12. Numerical Model and Validation for Cryogenic High-Speed Cavitating Flow Based on Bubble Size Distribution Model in Consideration of Rigorous Heat Transfer around Bubble and Bubble Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Yutaka

    A bubble size distribution model has been developed by the author for a cryogenic high-speed cavitating flow of a turbo-pump in a liquid fuel rocket engine. In this model, bubble growth/decay and bubble advection are solved for each class of the bubble size, strictly mass, when there are various mass bubbles in the same calculation region. The above calculations are treated as Eulerian approach with respect to the bubble mass. The numerical results based on this model have agreed with the experimental results as a whole, however, some inconsistency still remained. It is suspected that the model of the bubble growth/decay causes the difference between the numerical and experimental results because heat transfer around the bubble was approximately computed by an analytical solution of unsteady heat transfer based on the elapsed-time from the bubble nucleation. In this paper, a new bubble size distribution model was redeveloped, in which the bubble growth/decay calculations employ a new method combining two rigorous methods, namely, a Rayleigh-Plesset equation for bubble oscillation, and a heat conduction equation in a thermal boundary layer around the bubble to evaluate mass rate of evaporation/condensation.

  13. Synchrotron quantification of ultrasound cavitation and bubble dynamics in Al-10Cu melts.

    PubMed

    Xu, W W; Tzanakis, I; Srirangam, P; Mirihanage, W U; Eskin, D G; Bodey, A J; Lee, P D

    2016-07-01

    Knowledge of the kinetics of gas bubble formation and evolution under cavitation conditions in molten alloys is important for the control casting defects such as porosity and dissolved hydrogen. Using in situ synchrotron X-ray radiography, we studied the dynamic behaviour of ultrasonic cavitation gas bubbles in a molten Al-10wt%Cu alloy. The size distribution, average radius and growth rate of cavitation gas bubbles were quantified under an acoustic intensity of 800W/cm(2) and a maximum acoustic pressure of 4.5MPa (45atm). Bubbles exhibited a log-normal size distribution with an average radius of 15.3±0.5μm. Under applied sonication conditions the growth rate of bubble radius, R(t), followed a power law with a form of R(t)=αt(β), and α=0.0021 &β=0.89. The observed tendencies were discussed in relation to bubble growth mechanisms of Al alloy melts. PMID:26964960

  14. Cavitation erosion by single laser-produced bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philipp, A.; Lauterborn, W.

    1998-04-01

    In order to elucidate the mechanism of cavitation erosion, the dynamics of a single laser-generated cavitation bubble in water and the resulting surface damage on a flat metal specimen are investigated in detail. The characteristic effects of bubble dynamics, in particular the formation of a high-speed liquid jet and the emission of shock waves at the moment of collapse are recorded with high-speed photography with framing rates of up to one million frames/s. Damage is observed when the bubble is generated at a distance less than twice its maximum radius from a solid boundary ([gamma]=2, where [gamma]=s/Rmax, s is the distance between the boundary and the bubble centre at the moment of formation and Rmax is the maximum bubble radius). The impact of the jet contributes to the damage only at small initial distances ([gamma][less-than-or-eq, slant]0.7). In this region, the impact velocity rises to 83 m s[minus sign]1, corresponding to a water hammer pressure of about 0.1 GPa, whereas at [gamma]>1, the impact velocity is smaller than 25 m s[minus sign]1. The largest erosive force is caused by the collapse of a bubble in direct contact with the boundary, where pressures of up to several GPa act on the material surface. Therefore, it is essential for the damaging effect that bubbles are accelerated towards the boundary during the collapse phases due to Bjerknes forces. The bubble touches the boundary at the moment of second collapse when [gamma]<2 and at the moment of first collapse when [gamma]<1. Indentations on an aluminium specimen are found at the contact locations of the collapsing bubble. In the range [gamma]=1.7 to 2, where the bubble collapses mainly down to a single point, one pit below the bubble centre is observed. At [gamma][less-than-or-eq, slant]1.7, the bubble shape has become toroidal, induced by the jet flow through the bubble centre. Corresponding to the decay of this bubble torus into multiple tiny bubbles each collapsing separately along the circumference of the torus, the observed damage is circular as well. Bubbles in the ranges [gamma][less-than-or-eq, slant]0.3 and [gamma]=1.2 to 1.4 caused the greatest damage. The overall diameter of the damaged area is found to scale with the maximum bubble radius. Owing to the possibility of generating thousands of nearly identical bubbles, the cavitation resistance of even hard steel specimens can be tested.

  15. Role of thermal conduction in single-bubble cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moshaii, A.; Rezaei-Nasirabad, R.; Imani, Kh.; Silatani, M.; Sadighi-Bonabi, R.

    2008-02-01

    Effect of thermal conduction on radiation from a single cavitating bubble has been studied in a hydrochemical framework including variation of heat conductivity of noble gases up to 2500 K. Results of numerical simulation show that thermal conductivity plays an important role in determining ultimate cavitation temperature. Higher thermal conductivity of lighter noble gases causes to more thermal dissipation during the bubble collapse, leading to a lower peak temperature. Moreover, at the same driving conditions, radius of light emitting region is greater for heavier noble bubbles. Therefore, sonoluminescence radiation is more intensive from heavier noble gases. Phase diagrams of single-bubble sonoluminescence have also been calculated and in comparison with available experimental data, there is a relatively good agreement between the theory and experiment for noble gases.

  16. Quantitative assessment of reactive oxygen sonochemically generated by cavitation bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Jun; Miyashita, Takuya; Taguchi, Kei; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2015-07-01

    Acoustic cavitation bubbles can induce not only a thermal bioeffect but also a chemical bioeffect. When cavitation bubbles collapse and oscillate violently, they produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) that cause irreversible changes to the tissue. A sonosensitizer can promote such ROS generation. A treatment method using a sonosensitizer is called sonodynamic treatment. Rose bengal (RB) is one of the sonosensitizers whose in vivo and in vitro studies have been reported. In sonodynamic treatment, it is important to produce ROS at a high efficiency. For the efficient generation of ROS, a triggered high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) sequence has been proposed. In this study, cavitation bubbles were generated in a chamber where RB solution was sealed, and a high-speed camera captured the behavior of these cavitation bubbles. The amount of ROS was also quantified by a potassium iodide (KI) method and compared with high-speed camera pictures to investigate the effectiveness of the triggered HIFU sequence. As a result, ROS could be obtained efficiently by this sequence.

  17. Cavitation and bubble dynamics: the Kelvin impulse and its applications.

    PubMed

    Blake, John R; Leppinen, David M; Wang, Qianxi

    2015-10-01

    Cavitation and bubble dynamics have a wide range of practical applications in a range of disciplines, including hydraulic, mechanical and naval engineering, oil exploration, clinical medicine and sonochemistry. However, this paper focuses on how a fundamental concept, the Kelvin impulse, can provide practical insights into engineering and industrial design problems. The pathway is provided through physical insight, idealized experiments and enhancing the accuracy and interpretation of the computation. In 1966, Benjamin and Ellis made a number of important statements relating to the use of the Kelvin impulse in cavitation and bubble dynamics, one of these being 'One should always reason in terms of the Kelvin impulse, not in terms of the fluid momentum…'. We revisit part of this paper, developing the Kelvin impulse from first principles, using it, not only as a check on advanced computations (for which it was first used!), but also to provide greater physical insights into cavitation bubble dynamics near boundaries (rigid, potential free surface, two-fluid interface, flexible surface and axisymmetric stagnation point flow) and to provide predictions on different types of bubble collapse behaviour, later compared against experiments. The paper concludes with two recent studies involving (i) the direction of the jet formation in a cavitation bubble close to a rigid boundary in the presence of high-intensity ultrasound propagated parallel to the surface and (ii) the study of a 'paradigm bubble model' for the collapse of a translating spherical bubble, sometimes leading to a constant velocity high-speed jet, known as the Longuet-Higgins jet. PMID:26442141

  18. Cavitation in confined water: ultra-fast bubble dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, Olivier; Marmottant, Philippe

    2012-02-01

    In the hydraulic vessels of trees, water can be found at negative pressure. This metastable state, corresponding to mechanical tension, is achieved by evaporation through a porous medium. It can be relaxed by cavitation, i.e. the sudden nucleation of vapor bubbles. Harmful for the tree due to the subsequent emboli of sap vessels, cavitation is on the contrary used by ferns to eject spores very swiftly. We will focus here on the dynamics of the cavitation bubble, which is of primary importance to explain the previously cited natural phenomena. We use the recently developed method of artificial tress, using transparent hydrogels as the porous medium. Our experiments, on water confined in micrometric hydrogel cavities, show an extremely fast dynamics: bubbles are nucleated at the microsecond timescale. For cavities larger than 100 microns, the bubble ``rings'' with damped oscillations at MHz frequencies, whereas for smaller cavities the oscillations become overdamped. This rich dynamics can be accounted for by a model we developed, leading to a modified Rayleigh-Plesset equation. Interestingly, this model predicts the impossibility to nucleate bubbles above a critical confinement that depends on liquid negative pressure and corresponds to approximately 100 nm for 20 MPa tensions.

  19. Unsteady translation and repetitive jetting of acoustic cavitation bubbles.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Till; Mettin, Robert

    2014-09-01

    High-speed recordings reveal peculiar details of the oscillation and translation behavior of cavitation bubbles in the vicinity of an ultrasonic horn tip driven at 20 kHz. In particular, a forward jump during collapse that is due to the rapid reduction of virtual mass is observed. Furthermore, frequently a jetting in the translation direction during the collapse phase is resolved. In spite of strong aspherical deformations and frequent splitting, these bubbles survive the jetting collapse, and they rebound recollecting fragments. Because of incomplete restoration of the spherical shape within the following driving period, higher periodic volume oscillations can occur. This is recognized as a yet unknown source of subharmonic acoustic emission by cavitation bubbles. Numerical modeling can capture the essentials of the unsteady translation. PMID:25314538

  20. A review of recent theoretical investigations on acoustic cavitation bubbles and their implications on detection of cavitation in pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. N.

    2013-12-01

    Detection of cavitation in pumps is one of the essential topics in hydraulic machinery research and has been intensively investigated for several decades. In the literature, a technique based on analysis of acoustic signals generated by cavitation bubbles in the pumps has been proposed to detect cavitation activities especially incipient cavitation. In present paper, recent theoretical investigations by the author and his collaborators on acoustic cavitation bubbles (e.g. damping mechanisms, heat and mass transfer) together with their associated acoustical signals have been briefly reviewed to advance above technique.

  1. Simultaneous Observation of Bubble Clouds and Microhollows Produced by Bubble Cloud Cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamakoshi, Yoshiki; Yamaguchi, Jun; Ozawa, Tomoyuki; Isono, Tomoaki; Kanai, Takuya

    2013-07-01

    Sonoporation, which forms small pores through the cell membrane, is a useful method in ultrasonic-wave-mediated drug delivery systems. However, if microbubbles aggregate by acoustic radiation force and form bubble clouds, the mechanism of sonoporation becomes complicated. In this paper, bubble cloud cavitation is evaluated by simultaneous observation of bubble cloud motion and microhollows, which are produced on a flow channel wall. To observe the bubble cloud motion, three optical methods are adopted. Three-dimensional position measurement of bubble clouds using two cameras with different focal lengths, which is newly developed in this study, shows the three-dimensional motion of bubble clouds during cavitation. Microhollows on the flow channel wall are evaluated by confocal laser microscopy. It is found that bubble cloud cavitation can be classified into three stages. Among them, the first and second stages, which are characterized by both bubble cloud movement in the vicinity of the wall and the formation of large bubble clouds, play important roles in microhollow production.

  2. Dynamics of a single cavitating and reacting bubble.

    PubMed

    Hauke, Guillermo; Fuster, Daniel; Dopazo, Cesar

    2007-06-01

    Some of the studies on the dynamics of cavitating bubbles often consider simplified submodels assuming uniform fluid properties within the gas bubbles, ignoring chemical reactions, or suppressing fluid transport phenomena across the bubble interface. Another group of works, to which the present contribution belongs, includes the radial dependence of the fluid variables. Important fluid processes that occur inside the gas bubble, such as chemical reactions, and across the bubble interface, such as heat and mass transfer phenomena, are here considered also. As a consequence, this model should yield more realistic results. In particular, it is found that water evaporation and condensation are fundamental transport phenomena in estimating the dissociation reactions of water into OH. The thermal and mass boundary layers and the radial variation of the chemical concentrations also seem essential for accurate predictions. PMID:17677360

  3. A Study of Cavitation-Ignition Bubble Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Quang-Viet; Jacqmin, David A.

    2005-01-01

    We present the results of an experimental and computational study of the physics and chemistry of cavitation-ignition bubble combustion (CIBC), a process that occurs when combustible gaseous mixtures are ignited by the high temperatures found inside a rapidly collapsing bubble. The CIBC process was modeled using a time-dependent compressible fluid-dynamics code that includes finite-rate chemistry. The model predicts that gas-phase reactions within the bubble produce CO and other gaseous by-products of combustion. In addition, heat and mechanical energy release through a bubble volume-expansion phase are also predicted by the model. We experimentally demonstrate the CIBC process using an ultrasonically excited cavitation flow reactor with various hydrocarbon-air mixtures in liquid water. Low concentrations (< 160 ppm) of carbon monoxide (CO) emissions from the ultrasonic reactor were measured, and found to be proportional to the acoustic excitation power. The results of the model were consistent with the measured experimental results. Based on the experimental findings, the computational model, and previous reports of the "micro-diesel effect" in industrial hydraulic systems, we conclude that CIBC is indeed possible and exists in ultrasonically- and hydrodynamically-induced cavitation. Finally, estimates of the utility of CIBC process as a means of powering an idealized heat engine are also presented.

  4. Interaction dynamics of spatially separated cavitation bubbles in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinne, Nadine; Schumacher, Silvia; Nuzzo, Valeria; Arnold, Cord L.; Lubatschowski, Holger; Ripken, Tammo

    2010-11-01

    We present a high-speed photographic analysis of the interaction of cavitation bubbles generated in two spatially separated regions by femtosecond laser-induced optical breakdown in water. Depending on the relative energies of the femtosecond laser pulses and their spatial separation, different kinds of interactions, such as a flattening and deformation of the bubbles, asymmetric water flows, and jet formation were observed. The results presented have a strong impact on understanding and optimizing the cutting effect of modern femtosecond lasers with high repetition rates (>1 MHz).

  5. Shock wave emission during the collapse of cavitation bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garen, W.; Hegedűs, F.; Kai, Y.; Koch, S.; Meyerer, B.; Neu, W.; Teubner, U.

    2016-02-01

    Shock wave emission induced by intense laser pulses is investigated experimentally. The present work focuses on the conditions of shock wave emission in glycerine and distilled water during the first bubble collapse. Experimental investigations are carried out in liquids as a function of temperature and viscosity. Comparison is made with the theoretical work of Poritsky (Proc 1st US Natl Congress Appl Mech 813-821, 1952) and Brennen (Cavitation and bubble dynamics, Oxford University Press 1995). To the best knowledge of the authors, this is the first experimental verification of those theories.

  6. Evidence for liquid phase reactions during single bubble acoustic cavitation.

    PubMed

    Troia, A; Madonna Ripa, D; Lago, S; Spagnolo, R

    2004-07-01

    We extended the recent experiment by Lepoint et al. [Sonochemistry and Sonoluminescence, NATO ASI Series, Series C 524, Kluwer Academic Publishers, Dordrecht/Boston/London, 1999, p. 285], involving a so-called single bubble sonochemistry process, to a three-phase system. We have found experimental evidence that a single cavitating bubble can activate the oxidation of I- ions after the injection of a CCl4 liquid drop in the bubble trapping apparatus. The solvent drop (CCl4 is almost water insoluble) is pushed towards the bubble position and forms a thin film on the bubble surface. When the acoustic pressure drive is increased above 100 kPa, the three-phase system gives rise to a dark filament, indicating the complexation reaction between starch (added to the water phase) and I2. I2 species is the product of surface reactions involving bubble-induced decomposition of CCl4. Further increase of the acoustic drive causes the thin CCl4 film to separate from the bubble and stops I2 production. The study of the chemical activity of this three-phase system could give new advances on dynamics of the bubble collapse. PMID:15157862

  7. Particle removal by a single cavitation bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ming; Ji, Chen; Zou, Jun; Ruan, XiaoDong; Fu, Xin

    2014-04-01

    In the paper, the behavior of the particle acted by the oscillating bubble is studied using a high-speed video camera. The bubble is generated using a very low voltage of 55 V. Images are captured at a speed of 15000 fps (frames per second). It is found that the velocity of the particle is dependent on the liquid viscosity, particle size, and tube diameter. Particle velocity decreases with the increase of the glycron-water mixture viscosity. A model is presented to predict the velocity and verified by experimental results. These observations may be beneficial for the application in medical treatment.

  8. Fast on-demand droplet fusion using transient cavitation bubbles.

    PubMed

    Li, Z G; Ando, K; Yu, J Q; Liu, A Q; Zhang, J B; Ohl, C D

    2011-06-01

    A method for on-demand droplet fusion in a microfluidic channel is presented using the flow created from a single explosively expanding cavitation bubble. We test the technique for water-in-oil droplets, which are produced using a T-junction design in a microfluidic chip. The cavitation bubble is created with a pulsed laser beam focused into one droplet. High-speed photography of the dynamics reveals that the droplet fusion can be induced within a few tens of microseconds and is caused by the rapid thinning of the continuous phase film separating the droplets. The cavitation bubble collapses and re-condenses into the droplet. Droplet fusion is demonstrated for static and moving droplets, and for droplets of equal and unequal sizes. Furthermore, we reveal the diffusion dominated mixing flow and the transport of a single encapsulated cell into a fused droplet. This laser-based droplet fusion technique may find applications in micro-droplet based chemical synthesis and bioassays. PMID:21487578

  9. Bubbly flow model for the dynamic characteristics of cavitating pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brennen, C.

    1978-01-01

    The recent experimental transfer matrices obtained by Ng and Brennen (1978) for some axial flow pumps revealed some dynamic characteristics which were unaccounted for by any existing theoretical analysis; their visual observations suggested that the bubbly cavitating flow in the blade passages could be responsible for these effects. A theoretical model of the dynamic response of this bubbly blade-passage flow is described in the present paper. Void-fraction fluctuations in this flow result not only from pressure fluctuations but also because the fluctuating angle of attack causes fluctuations in the rate of production of bubbles near the leading edge. The latter causes kinematic waves which interact through the boundary conditions with the dynamic waves caused by pressure fluctuation. The resulting theoretical transfer functions which results are in good qualitative agreement with the experiments; with appropriate choices of two parameters good quantitative agreement is also obtained. The theoretical model also provides one possible explanation of the observation that the pump changes from an essentially passive dynamic element in the absence of cavitation to a progressively more active element as the extent of cavitation increases.

  10. Effect of Ultrasonic Wave Irradiation Sequence in Microhollow Production Produced by Bubble Cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamakoshi, Yoshiki; Miwa, Takashi

    2011-07-01

    Sonoporation, which makes micropores through a cell membrane by bubble cavitation, improves the efficacy in ultrasonic wave drug delivery systems. However, the effects of bubble cavitation are affected largely by bubble condition, such as bubble density and bubble aggregation, just before the irradiation of a high-intensity ultrasonic wave. Aiming at preparing a specific bubble condition in bubble cavitation, a method which uses the frequency modulation of a pumping ultrasonic wave was proposed. In this paper, the effects of the ultrasonic wave irradiation sequence are evaluated under different flow velocities and bubble densities. The spatial correlation between microbubble clouds produced by the pumping ultrasonic wave and the microhollows produced by the bubble cloud cavitation is also discussed.

  11. Interactions of Inertial Cavitation Bubbles with Stratum Corneum Lipid Bilayers during Low-Frequency Sonophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Tezel, Ahmet; Mitragotri, Samir

    2003-01-01

    Interactions of acoustic cavitation bubbles with biological tissues play an important role in biomedical applications of ultrasound. Acoustic cavitation plays a particularly important role in enhancing transdermal transport of macromolecules, thereby offering a noninvasive mode of drug delivery (sonophoresis). Ultrasound-enhanced transdermal transport is mediated by inertial cavitation, where collapses of cavitation bubbles microscopically disrupt the lipid bilayers of the stratum corneum. In this study, we describe a theoretical analysis of the interactions of cavitation bubbles with the stratum corneum lipid bilayers. Three modes of bubble-stratum corneum interactions including shock wave emission, microjet penetration into the stratum corneum, and impact of microjet on the stratum corneum are considered. By relating the mechanical effects of these events on the stratum corneum structure, the relationship between the number of cavitation events and collapse pressures with experimentally measured increase in skin permeability was established. Theoretical predictions were compared to experimentally measured parameters of cavitation events. PMID:14645045

  12. Influence of the bubbles on the turbulence in the liquid in hydrodynamic cavitation through a venturi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuzier, Sylvie; Coutier Delgosha, Olivier; Coudert, S. Ébastien; Dazin, Antoine

    2011-11-01

    The physical description of hydrodynamic cavitation is complex as it includes strongly unsteady, turbulent and phase change phenomena. Because the bubbles in the cavitation area render this zone opaque, nonintrusive experimental observation inside this zone is difficult and little is known about the detailed bubble, flow structure and physics inside. A novel approach using LIF-PIV to investigate the dynamics inside the cavitation area generated through a venturi is presented. The velocity in the liquid and of the bubbles are measured simultaneously and correlated with areas of various bubble structure. The influence of the bubble structure on the turbulence in the liquid is also studied.

  13. Effect of laser-induced cavitation bubble on a thin elastic membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orthaber, U.; Petkovšek, R.; Schille, J.; Hartwig, L.; Hawlina, G.; Drnovšek-Olup, B.; Vrečko, A.; Poberaj, I.

    2014-12-01

    A study of the effects of a cavitation bubble on a thin elastic membrane is presented. A cavitation bubble was produced by focusing a high-energy laser beam near an elastic membrane submerged in water, which corresponds to conditions often encountered in ophthalmology. The bubble effects on the membrane were studied as a function of distance between the bubble and membrane and laser pulse energy. Recordings of bubble dynamics with an ultra-high-speed camera were performed on both sides of the membrane, providing better insight into the mechanisms of membrane rupture. Observations have revealed distinct bubble behavior regimes with respect to coefficient γ. Cavitation bubbles centered on the membrane produce less damage than bubbles shifted slightly away. Significant damages were observed at intermediate distances between the bubble and membrane after bubble collapse, while weaker interactions were recorded at larger distances with less or no damaging effect to the membrane.

  14. Observation of cavitation bubbles and acoustic streaming in high intensity ultrasound fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uemura, Yuuki; Sasaki, Kazuma; Minami, Kyohei; Sato, Toshio; Choi, Pak-Kon; Takeuchi, Shinichi

    2015-07-01

    We observed the behavior of acoustic cavitation by sonochemical luminescence and ultrasound B-mode imaging with ultrasound diagnostic equipment in a standing-wave ultrasound field and focused ultrasound field. Furthermore, in order to investigate the influence of acoustic streaming on acoustic cavitation bubbles, we performed flow analysis of the sound field using particle image velocimetry. We found that acoustic cavitation bubbles are stirred by circulating acoustic streaming and local vortexes occurring in the water tank of the standing-wave ultrasound exposure system. We considered that the acoustic cavitation bubbles are carried away by acoustic streaming due to the high ultrasound pressure in the focused ultrasound field.

  15. Modeling and experimental analysis of acoustic cavitation bubbles for Burst Wave Lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Kazuki; Kreider, Wayne; Maxwell, Adam; Cunitz, Bryan; Colonius, Tim; Bailey, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Cavitation bubbles initiated by focused ultrasound waves are investigated through experiments and modeling. Pulses of focused ultrasound with a frequency of 335 kHz and a peak negative pressure of 8 MPa is generated in a water tank by a piezoelectric transducer to initiate cavitation. The pressure field is modeled by solving the Euler equations and used to simulate single bubble oscillation. The characteristics of cavitation bubbles observed by highspeed photography qualitatively agree with the simulation results. Finally, bubble clouds are captured using acoustic B-mode imaging that works synchronized with high-speed photography.

  16. Hysteresis of inertial cavitation activity induced by fluctuating bubble size distribution.

    PubMed

    Muleki Seya, Pauline; Desjouy, Cyril; Bra, Jean-Christophe; Inserra, Claude

    2015-11-01

    Amongst the variety of complex phenomena encountered in nonlinear physics, a hysteretic effect can be expected on ultrasound cavitation due to the intrinsic nonlinearity of bubble dynamics. When applying successive ultrasound shots for increasing and decreasing acoustic intensities, a hysteretic behaviour is experimentally observed on inertial cavitation activity, with a loop area sensitive to the inertial cavitation threshold. To get a better insight of the phenomena underlying this hysteretic effect, the evolution of the bubble size distribution is studied numerically by implementing rectified diffusion, fragmentation process, rising and dissolution of bubbles from an initial bubble size distribution. When applying increasing and decreasing acoustic intensities, the numerical distribution exhibits asymmetry in bubble number and distribution. The resulting inertial cavitation activity is assessed through the numerical broadband noise of the emitted acoustic radiation of the bubble cloud dynamics. This approach allows obtaining qualitatively the observed hysteretic effect and its interest in terms of control is discussed. PMID:26186844

  17. Cavitation bubble generation and control for HIFU transcranial adaptive focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gâteau, J.; Marsac, L.; Pernot, M.; Aubry, J.-F.; Tanter, M.; Fink, M.

    2009-04-01

    Brain treatment with High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) can be achieved by multichannel arrays through the skull using time-reversal focusing. Such a method requires a reference signal either sent by a real source embedded in brain tissues or computed from a virtual source, using the acoustic properties of the skull deduced from CT images. This noninvasive computational method allows precise focusing, but is time consuming and suffers from unavoidable modeling errors which reduce the accessible acoustic pressure at the focus in comparison with real experimental time-reversal using an implanted hydrophone. Ex vivo simulations with a half skull immersed in a water tank allow us to reach at low amplitude levels a pressure ratio of 83% of the reference pressure (real time reversal) at 1MHz. Using this method to transcranially focus a pulse signal in an agar gel (model for in vivo bubble formation), we induced a cavitation bubble that generated an ultrasonic wave received by the array. Selecting the 1MHz component, the signal was time reversed and re-emitted, allowing 97%±1.1% of pressure ratio to be restored. To target points in the vicinity of the geometrical focus, electronic steering from the reference signal has been achieved. Skull aberrations severely degrade the accessible pressure while moving away from the focus ( ˜90% at 10mm in the focal plane). Nevertheless, inducing cavitation bubbles close to the limit of the primary accessible zone allowed us to acquire multiple references signal to increase the electronic steering area by 50%.

  18. Hydrodynamics of an endothermic gas with application to bubble cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutsko, James F.

    2006-10-01

    The hydrodynamics for a gas of hard spheres which sometimes experience inelastic collisions resulting in the loss of a fixed, velocity-independent, amount of energy ? is investigated with the goal of understanding the coupling between hydrodynamics and endothermic chemistry. The homogeneous cooling state of a uniform system and the modified Navier-Stokes equations are discussed and explicit expressions given for the pressure, cooling rates, and all transport coefficients for D dimensions. The Navier-Stokes equations are solved numerically for the case of a two-dimensional gas subject to a circular piston so as to illustrate the effects of the enegy loss on the structure of shocks found in cavitating bubbles. It is found that the maximal temperature achieved is a sensitive function of ? with a minimum occurring near the physically important value of ? 12000K1eV.

  19. Shockwave and cavitation bubble dynamics of atmospheric air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leela, Ch.; Bagchi, S.; Tewari, Surya P.; Kiran, P. Prem

    2013-11-01

    The generation and evolution of laser induced shock waves (SWs) and the hot core plasma (HCP) created by focusing 7 ns, 532 nm laser pulses in ambient air is studied using time resolved shadowgraphic imaging technique. The dynamics of rapidly expanding plasma releasing SWs into the ambient atmosphere were studied for time delays ranging from nanoseconds to milliseconds with ns temporal resolution. The SW is observed to get detached from expanding HCP at around 3?s. Though the SWs were found to expand spherically following the Sedov-Taylor theory, the rapidly expanding HCP shows asymmetric expansion during both the expansion and cooling phase similar to that of inertial cavitation bubble (CB) dynamics. The asymmetric expansion of HCP leads to oscillation of the plasma boundary, eventually leading to collapse by forming vortices formed by the interaction of ambient air.

  20. Hydrodynamics of an endothermic gas with application to bubble cavitation.

    PubMed

    Lutsko, James F

    2006-10-28

    The hydrodynamics for a gas of hard spheres which sometimes experience inelastic collisions resulting in the loss of a fixed, velocity-independent, amount of energy Delta is investigated with the goal of understanding the coupling between hydrodynamics and endothermic chemistry. The homogeneous cooling state of a uniform system and the modified Navier-Stokes equations are discussed and explicit expressions given for the pressure, cooling rates, and all transport coefficients for D dimensions. The Navier-Stokes equations are solved numerically for the case of a two-dimensional gas subject to a circular piston so as to illustrate the effects of the energy loss on the structure of shocks found in cavitating bubbles. It is found that the maximal temperature achieved is a sensitive function of Delta with a minimum occurring near the physically important value of Delta approximately 12,000 K approximately 1 eV. PMID:17092085

  1. Relationship between thrombolysis efficiency induced by pulsed focused ultrasound and cavitation bubble size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, S.; Liu, X.; Wang, S.; Wan, M.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, the relationship between the efficiency of pulsed focused ultrasound (FUS)-induced thrombolysis and the size distribution of cavitation bubbles has been studied. Firstly, the thrombolysis efficiency, evaluated by degree of mechanical fragmentation was investigated with varying duty cycle. Secondly, the size distribution of cavitation bubbles after the 1st, 103th and 105th pulse during experiments for various duty cycles was studied. It was revealed that the thrombolysis efficiency was highest when the cavitation bubble size distribution was centred around linear resonance radius of the emission frequency of the FUS transducer. Therefore, in cavitation enhanced therapeutic applications, the essential of using a pulsed FUS may be controlling the size distribution of cavitation nuclei within an active size range so as to increase the treatment efficiency.

  2. Spatial distribution of sonoluminescence and sonochemiluminescence generated by cavitation bubbles in 1.2 MHz focused ultrasound field.

    PubMed

    Cao, Hua; Wan, Mingxi; Qiao, Yangzi; Zhang, Shusheng; Li, Ruixue

    2012-03-01

    An intensified charge coupled device (ICCD) camera was used to observe the spatial distribution of sonoluminescence (SL) and sonochemiluminescence (SCL) generated by cavitation bubbles in a 1.2 MHz focused ultrasound (FU) field in order to investigate the mechanisms of acoustic cavitation under different sonication conditions for FU therapeutic applications. It was found that SL emissions were located in the post-focal region. When the intensity of SL and SCL increased as the power rose, the growth of SCL was much higher than that of SL. In the post-focal region, the SCL emissions moved along specific paths and formed branch-like streamers. At the beginning of the ultrasound irradiation, cavitation bubbles generated SCL in both the pre-focal and the post-focal region. When the electrical power or the sonication time increased, the SCL in the post-focal region increased and became higher than that in the pre-focal region. The intensity of SCL in the focal region is usually the weakest because of "oversaturation". The spatial distribution of SCL near a tissue boundary differed from that obtained in free fields. It organized into special structures under different acoustic amplitudes. When the electrical power was relatively low, the SCL emission was conical shape which suggested a standing wave formation at the tissue-fluid boundary. When the electrical power exceeded a certain threshold, only a bright spot could be captured in the focus. The cavitation bubbles which centralized in the focus concentrated energy and hindered the formation of standing waves. With rising electrical power at high levels, besides a bright spot in the focus, there were some irregular light spots in pre-focal region, which indicated some cavitation bubbles or small bubble clusters achieved the threshold of SCL and induced the reaction with the luminol solution. PMID:21862375

  3. Electrochemical investigations of stable cavitation from bubbles generated during reduction of water.

    PubMed

    Keswani, M; Raghavan, S; Deymier, P

    2014-09-01

    Megasonic cleaning is traditionally used for removal of particles from wafer surfaces in semiconductor industry. With the advancement of technology node, the major challenge associated with megasonic cleaning is to be able to achieve high cleaning efficiency without causing damage to fragile features. In this paper, a method based on electrochemistry has been developed that allows controlled formation and growth of a hydrogen bubbles close to a solid surface immersed in an aqueous solution irradiated with ?1 MHz sound field. It has been shown that significant microstreaming from resonating size bubble can be induced by proper choice of transducer duty cycle. This method has the potential to significantly improve the performance of megasonic cleaning technology through generation of local microstreaming, interfacial and pressure gradient forces in close vicinity of conductive surfaces on wafers without affecting the transient cavitation responsible for feature damage. PMID:24798227

  4. Effect of Power and Frequency on Bubble-Size Distributions in Acoustic Cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brotchie, Adam; Grieser, Franz; Ashokkumar, Muthupandian

    2009-02-01

    Acoustic bubble-size distributions have been determined using a pulsed ultrasound method at different ultrasound powers and frequencies. It was observed that the mean bubble size increased with increasing acoustic power and decreased with increasing ultrasound frequency. It was also recognized that the mean size of bubbles emitting sonoluminescence was greater than those producing sonochemiluminescence indicating that the two processes take place in different populations of cavitation bubbles in the system.

  5. Effect of power and frequency on bubble-size distributions in acoustic cavitation.

    PubMed

    Brotchie, Adam; Grieser, Franz; Ashokkumar, Muthupandian

    2009-02-27

    Acoustic bubble-size distributions have been determined using a pulsed ultrasound method at different ultrasound powers and frequencies. It was observed that the mean bubble size increased with increasing acoustic power and decreased with increasing ultrasound frequency. It was also recognized that the mean size of bubbles emitting sonoluminescence was greater than those producing sonochemiluminescence indicating that the two processes take place in different populations of cavitation bubbles in the system. PMID:19257742

  6. Quantification of optison bubble size and lifetime during sonication dominant role of secondary cavitation bubbles causing acoustic bioeffects.

    PubMed

    Kamaev, Pavel P; Hutcheson, Joshua D; Wilson, Michelle L; Prausnitz, Mark R

    2004-04-01

    Acoustic cavitation has been shown to deliver molecules into viable cells, which is of interest for drug and gene delivery applications. To address mechanisms of these acoustic bioeffects, this work measured the lifetime of albumin-stabilized cavitation bubbles (Optison) and correlated it with desirable (intracellular uptake of molecules) and undesirable (loss of cell viability) bioeffects. Optison was exposed to 500 kHz ultrasound (acoustic pressures of 0.6-3.0 MPa and energy exposures of 0.2-200 J/cm2) either with or without the presence of DU145 prostate cancer cells (10(6) cells/ml) bathed in calcein, a cell-impermeant tracer molecule. Bubble lifetime was determined using a Coulter counter and flow cytometer, while bioeffects were evaluated by flow cytometry. The lifetime of Optison cavitation nuclei was found to decrease and bioeffects (molecular uptake and loss of cell viability) were found to increase with increasing acoustic energy exposure. These bioeffects correlated well with the disappearance of bubbles, suggesting that contrast agent destruction either directly or indirectly affected cells, probably involving unstabilized cavitation nuclei created upon the destruction of Optison. Because Optison solutions presonicated to destroy all detectable bubbles also caused significant bioeffects, the indirect mechanism involving secondary cavitation bubbles is more likely. PMID:15101659

  7. Quantitative ultrasound method to detect and monitor laser-induced cavitation bubbles

    PubMed Central

    Karpiouk, Andrei B.; Aglyamov, Salavat R.; Bourgeois, Frederic; Ben-Yakar, Adela; Emelianov, Stanislav Y.

    2008-01-01

    An ultrasound technique to measure the spatial and temporal behavior of the laser-induced cavitation bubble is introduced. The cavitation bubbles were formed in water and in gels using a nanosecond pulsed Nd:YAG laser operating at 532 nm. A focused, single-element, 25-MHz ultrasound transducer was employed both to detect the acoustic emission generated by plasma expansion and to acoustically probe the bubble at different stages of its evolution. The arrival time of the passive acoustic emission was used to estimate the location of the cavitation bubbles origin and the time of flight of the ultrasound pulse-echo signal was used to define its spatial extent. The results of ultrasound estimations of the bubble size were compared and found to be in agreement with both the direct optical measurements of the stationary bubble and the theoretical estimates of bubble dynamics derived from the well-known Rayleigh model of a cavity collapse. The results of this study indicate that the proposed quantitative ultrasound technique, capable of detecting and accurately measuring laser-induced cavitation bubbles in water and in a tissue-like medium, could be used in various biomedical and clinical applications. PMID:18601556

  8. Optical measurements of gas bubbles in oil behind a cavitating micro-orifice flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iben, Uwe; Wolf, Fabian; Freudigmann, Hans-Arndt; Fröhlich, Jochen; Heller, Winfried

    2015-06-01

    In hydraulic systems, it is common for air release to occur behind valves or throttles in the form of bubbles. These air bubbles can affect the behavior and the performance of these systems to a substantial extent. In the paper, gas release in a liquid flow behind an orifice is analyzed by optical methods for various operation points. The bubbles are observed with a digital camera, and a detection algorithm based on the Hough transformation is used to determine their number and size. The appearance of gas bubbles is very sensitive to the inlet and outlet pressure of the orifice. Gas bubbles are only observed if choking cavitation occurs. An empirical relationship between an adjusted cavitation number and the appearance of gas release is presented. It is assumed that the observed bubbles contain mostly air. With the applied pressure differences, up to 30 % of the dissolved air was degassed in the form of bubbles.

  9. Cloud cavitation induced by shock-bubble interaction in a viscoelastic solid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oguri, Ryota; Ando, Keita

    2015-12-01

    We experimentally study a shock-bubble interaction problem in a viscoelastic solid, which is relevant to shock wave lithotripsy. A gas bubble is produced by focusing an infrared laser pulse into gelatin. A spherical shock is then created, through rapid expansion of plasma that results from the laser focusing, in the vicinity of the gas bubble. The shock-bubble interaction is recorded by a CCD camera with flash illumination of a nanosecond green laser pulse. The observation captures cavitation inception in the gelatin under tension that results from acoustic impedance mismatching at the bubble wall. Namely, the shock reflects at the bubble interface as a rarefaction wave, which induces the nucleation of cavitation bubbles as a result of rupturing the gelatin.

  10. Influence of a low flow rate on an acoustic cavitation bubble cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seck, A.; Inserra, C.; Ollivier, S.; Bra, J.-C.; Blanc-Benon, P.

    2015-10-01

    The impact of a low flow rate on a acoustic cavitation bubble cloud is studied experimentally and analytically. Experimentally, a bubble cloud induced by an ultrasonic wave is submitted to several low flow rates. An annular piezoelectric transducer is used to generate the ultrasonic acoustic field in a cylindrical geometry. It is observed the radial narrowing and the axial extension decreasing of the bubble cloud when increasing flow rate. Analytically, in case of a single bubble, it is shown that the equilibrium locations of the bubble is impacted by the flow involving a competition between acoustic and hydrodynamic forces. This competition between forces could turn into selecting bubble location according to their sizes.

  11. Initial growth of sonochemically active and sonoluminescence bubbles at various frequencies.

    PubMed

    Babgi, Bandar; Zhou, Meifang; Aksu, Mecit; Alghamdi, Yousef; Ashokkumar, Muthupandian

    2016-03-01

    The initial growth of acoustic cavitation activity is important in some applications such as therapeutic and diagnostic medicine. The initial growth of cavitation activity has been investigated using sonoluminescence and sonochemical activity (sonochemiluminescence) at 358 kHz, 647 kHz and 1062 kHz and at 5 W, 15 W and 30 W applied power levels. The growth of sonochemically active bubble population is found to be much faster than that of sonoluminescence bubble population at 358 kHz and 647 kHz whereas almost similar growth rate is observed at 1062 kHz for both bubble populations. This suggests that the cavitation bubble resonance size ranges of sonoluminescence and sonochemically active bubbles are different at 358 kHz and 647 kHz, whereas they have similar size range at 1062 kHz. At 358 kHz and 647 kHz, relatively smaller bubbles become chemically active. Possible reasons for such observations have been discussed. The data presented and discussed in this study may be useful in controlling the growth of cavitation bubble population in addition to enhancing the knowledge base in cavitation science. PMID:26584984

  12. On the effect of microbubble injection on cavitation bubble dynamics in liquid mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ida, Masato; Naoe, Takashi; Futakawa, Masatoshi

    2009-03-01

    The effect of microbubble injection has been studied numerically to clarify the role of injected bubbles in the experimentally observed suppression of cavitation in liquid mercury. Recently, we attempted to inject gas microbubbles into liquid mercury in order to mitigate cavitation damage on mercury vessels, a critical issue in spallation neutron sources. From an experimental study using an electromagnetically driven impact test machine and a bubble generator, we found that by injecting microbubbles, the magnitude of the negative pressure generated in liquid mercury is slightly decreased and cavitation damage is remarkably reduced. In this paper, we have performed a numerical study using a multibubble model and experimentally obtained pressure-time curves in order to thoroughly explain the experimental findings. We have found that the observed slight change in negative pressure has a strong impact on cavitation bubble dynamics and was caused by the positive pressure wave that the injected bubbles radiated. Also, we have examined whether the injected microbubbles can cause significant erosion, and found that their collapse intensity is much smaller than that of cavitation bubbles since their expansion ratio is relatively small. Additionally we have examined high-frequency pressure pulses observed experimentally only when microbubbles were injected, and clarified that they are due to the free oscillation of injected bubbles.

  13. A two-dimensional nonlinear model for the generation of stable cavitation bubbles.

    PubMed

    Vanhille, Christian

    2016-07-01

    Bubbles appear by acoustic cavitation in a liquid when rarefaction pressures attain a specific threshold value in a liquid. Once they are created, the stable cavitation bubbles oscillate nonlinearly and affect the ultrasonic field. Here we present a model developed for the study of bubble generation in a liquid contained in a two-dimensional cavity in which a standing ultrasonic field is established. The model considers dissipation and dispersion due to the bubbles. It also assumes that both the ultrasonic field and the bubble oscillations are nonlinear. The numerical experiments predict where the bubbles are generated from a population of nuclei distributed in the liquid and show how they affect the ultrasonic field. PMID:26964990

  14. Two-dimensional direct numerical simulation of bubble cloud cavitation by front-tracking method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, G.; Tryggvason, G.; Shimizu, S.

    2015-01-01

    Unsteady bubble cloud cavitation phenomenon caused by negative pressure pulse has been treated numerically by applying a front tracking method. The behaviour of bubble cloud expanding and contracting is evaluated by tracking the motion of all bubble interfaces. Numerical investigation demonstrates that: (1) In the collapsing of bubble cloud micro liquid jets toward the inner bubbles are formed while the outer layer bubbles contract extremely, and then a high impact pressure is released when the inner central bubble contacts to its minimum. (2) The oscillation of bubble cloud depends upon the void fraction greatly. In the case of high void fraction, the frequency of cloud oscillation is lower than that of individual bubble and the decay of the oscillation becomes much slowly also.

  15. A numerical method for the dynamics of non-spherical cavitation bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucca, G.; Prosperetti, A.

    1982-01-01

    A boundary integral numerical method for the dynamics of nonspherical cavitation bubbles in inviscid incompressible liquids is described. Only surface values of the velocity potential and its first derivatives are involved. The problem of solving the Laplace equation in the entire domain occupied by the liquid is thus avoided. The collapse of a bubble in the vicinity of a solid wall and the collapse of three bubbles with collinear centers are considered.

  16. Visualization of ultrasound induced cavitation bubbles using the synchrotron x-ray Analyzer Based Imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izadifar, Zahra; Belev, George; Izadifar, Mohammad; Izadifar, Zohreh; Chapman, Dean

    2014-12-01

    Observing cavitation bubbles deep within tissue is very difficult. The development of a method for probing cavitation, irrespective of its location in tissues, would improve the efficiency and application of ultrasound in the clinic. A synchrotron x-ray imaging technique, which is capable of detecting cavitation bubbles induced in water by a sonochemistry system, is reported here; this could possibly be extended to the study of therapeutic ultrasound in tissues. The two different x-ray imaging techniques of Analyzer Based Imaging (ABI) and phase contrast imaging (PCI) were examined in order to detect ultrasound induced cavitation bubbles. Cavitation was not observed by PCI, however it was detectable with ABI. Acoustic cavitation was imaged at six different acoustic power levels and six different locations through the acoustic beam in water at a fixed power level. The results indicate the potential utility of this technique for cavitation studies in tissues, but it is time consuming. This may be improved by optimizing the imaging method.

  17. Bubble Growth in Lunar Basalts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.

    2009-05-01

    Although Moon is usually said to be volatile-"free", lunar basalts are often vesicular with mm-size bubbles. The vesicular nature of the lunar basalts suggests that they contained some initial gas concentration. A recent publication estimated volatile concentrations in lunar basalts (Saal et al. 2008). This report investigates bubble growth on Moon and compares with that on Earth. Under conditions relevant to lunar basalts, bubble growth in a finite melt shell (i.e., growth of multiple regularly-spaced bubbles) is calculated following Proussevitch and Sahagian (1998) and Liu and Zhang (2000). Initial H2O content of 700 ppm (Saal et al. 2008) or lower is used and the effect of other volatiles (such as carbon dioxide, halogens, and sulfur) is ignored. H2O solubility at low pressures (Liu et al. 2005), concentration-dependent diffusivity in basalt (Zhang and Stolper 1991), and lunar basalt viscosity (Murase and McBirney 1970) are used. Because lunar atmospheric pressure is essentially zero, the confining pressure on bubbles is completely supplied by the overlying magma. Due to low H2O content in lunar basaltic melt (700 ppm H2O corresponds to a saturation pressure of 75 kPa), H2O bubbles only grow in the upper 16 m of a basalt flow or lake. A depth of 20 mm corresponds to a confining pressure of 100 Pa. Hence, vesicular lunar rocks come from very shallow depth. Some findings from the modeling are as follows. (a) Due to low confining pressure as well as low viscosity, even though volatile concentration is very low, bubble growth rate is extremely high, much higher than typical bubble growth rates in terrestrial melts. Hence, mm-size bubbles in lunar basalts are not strange. (b) Because the pertinent pressures are so low, bubble pressure due to surface tension plays a main role in lunar bubble growth, contrary to terrestrial cases. (c) Time scale to reach equilibrium bubble size increases as the confining pressure increases. References: (1) Liu Y, Zhang YX (2000) Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 181, 251. (2) Liu Y, Zhang YX, Behrens H (2005) J. Volcanol. Geotherm. Res. 143, 219. (3) Murase T, McBirney A (1970) Science 167, 1491. (4) Proussevitch AA, Sahagian DL (1998) J. Geophys. Res. 103, 18223. (5) Saal AE, Hauri EH, Cascio ML, et al. (2008) Nature 454, 192. (6) Zhang YX, Stolper EM (1991) Nature 351, 306.

  18. Prediction method for cavitation erosion based on measurement of bubble collapse impact loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattori, S.; Hirose, T.; Sugiyama, K.

    2009-02-01

    The prediction of cavitation erosion rates is important in order to evaluate the exact life of components. The measurement of impact loads in bubble collapses helps to predict the life under cavitation erosion. In this study, we carried out erosion tests and the measurements of impact loads in bubble collapses with a vibratory apparatus. We evaluated the incubation period based on a cumulative damage rule by measuring the impact loads of cavitation acting on the specimen surface and by using the "constant impact load - number of impact loads curve" similar to the modified Miner's rule which is employed for fatigue life prediction. We found that the parameter Σ(Fiα×ni) (Fi: impact load, ni: number of impacts and α: constant) is suitable for the evaluation of the erosion life. Moreover, we propose a new method that can predict the incubation period under various cavitation conditions.

  19. The fast dynamics of cavitation bubbles within water confined in elastic solids.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Olivier; Marmottant, Philippe; Gonzalez-Avila, S Roberto; Ando, Keita; Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2014-03-14

    Many applications such as ultrasonic cleaning or sonochemistry use the ability of bubbles to oscillate and drive liquid flow. But bubbles have also received attention in porous media, where drying may cause cavitation, a phenomenon occurring in plant tissues. Here we explore the dynamics of cavitation bubbles when the liquid is fully entrapped in an elastic solid, using light scattering, laser strobe photography and high speed camera recordings. Our experiments show unexpectedly fast bubble oscillations in volume. They depend on the confinement size and elasticity, which we explain with a simple model where liquid compressibility is a key parameter. We also observe rich non-spherical dynamics, with ejection away from the walls and bubble fragmentation, which reveal extreme fluid motion at short timescales. PMID:24795983

  20. Transfection effect of microbubbles on cells in superposed ultrasound waves and behavior of cavitation bubble.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Tetsuya; Tomita, Yukio; Koshiyama, Ken-Ichiro; Blomley, Martin J K

    2006-06-01

    The combination of ultrasound and ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) is able to induce transient membrane permeability leading to direct delivery of exogenous molecules into cells. Cavitation bubbles are believed to be involved in the membrane permeability; however, the detailed mechanism is still unknown. In the present study, the effects of ultrasound and the UCAs, Optison on transfection in vitro for different medium heights and the related dynamic behaviors of cavitation bubbles were investigated. Cultured CHO-E cells mixed with reporter genes (luciferase or beta-gal plasmid DNA) and UCAs were exposed to 1 MHz ultrasound in 24-well plates. Ultrasound was applied from the bottom of the well and reflected at the free surface of the medium, resulting in the superposition of ultrasound waves within the well. Cells cultured on the bottom of 24-well plates were located near the first node (displacement node) of the incident ultrasound downstream. Transfection activity was a function determined with the height of the medium (wave traveling distance), as well as the concentration of UCAs and the exposure time was also determined with the concentration of UCAs and the exposure duration. Survival fraction was determined by MTT assay, also changes with these values in the reverse pattern compared with luciferase activity. With shallow medium height, high transfection efficacy and high survival fraction were obtained at a low concentration of UCAs. In addition, capillary waves and subsequent atomized particles became significant as the medium height decreased. These phenomena suggested cavitation bubbles were being generated in the medium. To determine the effect of UCAs on bubble generation, we repeated the experiments using crushed heat-treated Optison solution instead of the standard microbubble preparation. The transfection ratio and survival fraction showed no additional benefit when ultrasound was used. These results suggested that cavitation bubbles created by the collapse of UCAs were a key factor for transfection, and their intensities were enhanced by the interaction of the superpose ultrasound with the decreasing the height of the medium. Hypothesizing that free cavitation bubbles were generated from cavitation nuclei created by fragmented UCA shells, we carried out numerical analysis of a free spherical bubble motion in the field of ultrasound. Analyzing the interaction of the shock wave generated by a cavitation bubble and a cell membrane, we estimated the shock wave propagation distance that would induce cell membrane damage from the center of the cavitation bubble. PMID:16785012

  1. Size measurement of bubbles in a cavitation tunnel by digital in-line holography.

    PubMed

    Lebrun, Denis; Allano, Daniel; Méès, Loïc; Walle, Françoise; Corbin, Frédéric; Boucheron, Romuald; Fréchou, Didier

    2011-12-01

    Digital in-line holography (DIH) with a divergent beam is used to measure size and concentration of cavitation bubbles (6-100 μm) in hydrodynamic facilities. A sampling probe is directly inserted in the cavitation tunnel, and the holograms of the bubbles are recorded through a transparent test section specially designed for DIH measurements. The recording beam coming from a fiber-coupled laser diode illuminates the sample volume, and holograms are recorded by a CMOS camera. From each hologram, the sampling volume can be reconstructed slice by slice by applying a wavelet-based reconstruction method. Because of the geometry of the recording beam, a magnification ratio must be introduced for recovering the 3D location and size of each bubble. The method used for processing holograms recorded in such a configuration is presented. Then, statistical results obtained from 5000 holograms recorded under different pressures in the cavitation tunnel are compared and discussed. PMID:22192994

  2. Numerical simulation of cavitation erosion on a NACA0015 hydrofoil based on bubble collapse strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo, V.; Luo, X.; Escaler, X.; Huang, R.; Valencia, E.

    2015-12-01

    The prediction of erosion under unsteady cavitation is crucial to prevent damage in hydraulic machinery. The present investigation deals with the numerical simulation of erosive partial cavitation around a NACA0015 hydrofoil. The study presents the calculation of the bubble collapse strength, Sb, based on the bubble potential energy to identify the surface areas with highest risk of damage. The results are obtained with a numerical scheme assuming homogeneous mixture flow, implicit LES and Zwart cavitation model. The 3D unsteady flow simulation has been solved using OpenFOAM. Python language and OpenFOAM calculator (foamCalcEx) have been used to obtain and represent Sb. The obtained results clearly show the instants of erosive bubble collapse and the affected surface areas.

  3. Dependence of pulsed focused ultrasound induced thrombolysis on duty cycle and cavitation bubble size distribution.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shanshan; Zong, Yujin; Feng, Yi; Liu, Runna; Liu, Xiaodong; Hu, Yaxin; Han, Shimin; Wan, Mingxi

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the relationship between the efficiency of pulsed, focused ultrasound (FUS)-induced thrombolysis, the duty cycle (2.3%, 9%, and 18%) and the size distribution of cavitation bubbles. The efficiency of thrombolysis was evaluated through the degree of mechanical fragmentation, namely the number, mass, and size of clot debris particles. First, we found that the total number and mass of clot debris particles were highest when a duty cycle of 9% was used and that the mean diameter of clot debris particles was smallest. Second, we found that the size distribution of cavitation bubbles was mainly centered around the linear resonance radius (2.5?m) of the emission frequency (1.2MHz) of the FUS transducer when a 9% duty cycle was used, while the majority of cavitation bubbles became smaller or larger than the linear resonance radius when a 2.3% or 18% duty cycle was used. In addition, the inertial cavitation dose from the treatment performed at 9% duty cycle was much higher than the dose obtained with the other two duty cycles. The data presented here suggest that there is an optimal duty cycle at which the thrombolysis efficiency and cavitation activity are strongest. They further indicate that using a pulsed FUS may help control the size distribution of cavitation nuclei within an active size range, which we found to be near the linear resonance radius of the emission frequency of the FUS transducer. PMID:25043556

  4. Optical observation of shock waves and cavitation bubbles in high intensity laser-induced shock processes

    SciTech Connect

    Marti-Lopez, L.; Ocana, R.; Porro, J. A.; Morales, M.; Ocana, J. L.

    2009-07-01

    We report an experimental study of the temporal and spatial dynamics of shock waves, cavitation bubbles, and sound waves generated in water during laser shock processing by single Nd:YAG laser pulses of nanosecond duration. A fast ICCD camera (2 ns gate time) was employed to record false schlieren photographs, schlieren photographs, and Mach-Zehnder interferograms of the zone surrounding the laser spot site on the target, an aluminum alloy sample. We recorded hemispherical shock fronts, cylindrical shock fronts, plane shock fronts, cavitation bubbles, and phase disturbance tracks.

  5. Multifocal laser surgery: cutting enhancement by hydrodynamic interactions between cavitation bubbles.

    PubMed

    Toytman, I; Silbergleit, A; Simanovski, D; Palanker, D

    2010-10-01

    Transparent biological tissues can be precisely dissected with ultrafast lasers using optical breakdown in the tight focal zone. Typically, tissues are cut by sequential application of pulses, each of which produces a single cavitation bubble. We investigate the hydrodynamic interactions between simultaneous cavitation bubbles originating from multiple laser foci. Simultaneous expansion and collapse of cavitation bubbles can enhance the cutting efficiency, by increasing the resulting deformations in tissue, and the associated rupture zone. An analytical model of the flow induced by the bubbles is presented and experimentally verified. The threshold strain of the material rupture is measured in a model tissue. Using the computational model and the experimental value of the threshold strain one can compute the shape of the rupture zone in tissue resulting from application of multiple bubbles. With the threshold strain of 0.7 two simultaneous bubbles produce a continuous cut when applied at the distance 1.35 times greater than that required in sequential approach. Simultaneous focusing of the laser in multiple spots along the line of intended cut can extend this ratio to 1.7. Counterpropagating jets forming during collapse of two bubbles in materials with low viscosity can further extend the cutting zone-up to approximately a factor of 1.5. PMID:21230396

  6. Thermodynamic and kinetic considerations of nucleation and stabilization of acoustic cavitation bubbles in water.

    PubMed

    Bapat, Pratap S; Pandit, Aniruddha B

    2008-01-01

    Qualitative explanation for a homogeneous nucleation of acoustic cavitation bubbles in the incompressible liquid water with simple phenomenological approach has been provided via the concept of the desorbtion of the dissolved gas and the vaporization of local liquid molecules. The liquid medium has been viewed as an ensemble of lattice structures. Validity of the lattice structure approach against the Brownian motion of molecules in the liquid state has been discussed. Criterion based on probability for nucleus formation has been defined for the vaporization of local liquid molecules. Energy need for the enthalpy of vaporization has been considered as an energy criterion for the formation of a vaporous nucleus. Sound energy, thermal energy of the liquid bulk (Joule-Thomson effect) and free energy of activation, which is associated with water molecules in the liquid state (Brownian motion) as per the modified Eyring's kinetic theory of liquid are considered as possible sources for the enthalpy of vaporization of water molecules forming a single unit lattice. The classical nucleation theory has then been considered for expressing further growth of the vaporous nucleus against the surface energy barrier. Effect of liquid property (temperature), and effect of an acoustic parameter (frequency) on an acoustic cavitation threshold pressure have been discussed. Kinetics of nucleation has been considered. PMID:17368069

  7. A reduced-order, single-bubble cavitation model with applications to therapeutic ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Kreider, Wayne; Crum, Lawrence A.; Bailey, Michael R.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.

    2011-01-01

    Cavitation often occurs in therapeutic applications of medical ultrasound such as shock-wave lithotripsy (SWL) and high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). Because cavitation bubbles can affect an intended treatment, it is important to understand the dynamics of bubbles in this context. The relevant context includes very high acoustic pressures and frequencies as well as elevated temperatures. Relative to much of the prior research on cavitation and bubble dynamics, such conditions are unique. To address the relevant physics, a reduced-order model of a single, spherical bubble is proposed that incorporates phase change at the liquid-gas interface as well as heat and mass transport in both phases. Based on the energy lost during the inertial collapse and rebound of a millimeter-sized bubble, experimental observations were used to tune and test model predictions. In addition, benchmarks from the published literature were used to assess various aspects of model performance. Benchmark comparisons demonstrate that the model captures the basic physics of phase change and diffusive transport, while it is quantitatively sensitive to specific model assumptions and implementation details. Given its performance and numerical stability, the model can be used to explore bubble behaviors across a broad parameter space relevant to therapeutic ultrasound. PMID:22088026

  8. Cavitation and bubble collapse in hot asymmetric nuclear matter

    SciTech Connect

    Kolomietz, V.M.

    2004-10-01

    The dynamics of embryonic bubbles in overheated, viscous, and non-Markovian nuclear matter is studied. We show that the memory and the Fermi surface distortions significantly affect the hindrance of bubble collapse and determine characteristic oscillations of the bubble radius. These oscillations occur due to the additional elastic force induced by the memory integral.

  9. Molecular dynamics simulations of bubble formation and cavitation in liquid metals.

    SciTech Connect

    Insepov, Z.; Hassanein, A.; Bazhirov, T. T.; Norman, G. E.; Stegailov, V. V.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Inst. for High Energy Densities of Joint Inst. for High Temperatures of RAS

    2007-11-01

    Thermodynamics and kinetics of nano-scale bubble formation in liquid metals such as Li and Pb were studied by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations at pressures typical for magnetic and inertial fusion. Two different approaches to bubble formation were developed. In one method, radial densities, pressures, surface tensions, and work functions of the cavities in supercooled liquid lithium were calculated and compared with the surface tension experimental data. The critical radius of a stable cavity in liquid lithium was found for the first time. In the second method, the cavities were created in the highly stretched region of the liquid phase diagram; and then the stability boundary and the cavitation rates were calculated in liquid lead. The pressure dependences of cavitation frequencies were obtained over the temperature range 700-2700 K in liquid Pb. The results of MD calculations for cavitation rate were compared with estimates of classical nucleation theory (CNT).

  10. The penetration of acoustic cavitation bubbles into micrometer-scale cavities.

    PubMed

    Vaidya, Haresh Anant; Ertunç, Özgür; Lichtenegger, Thomas; Delgado, Antonio; Skupin, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    The penetration of acoustically induced cavitation bubbles in micrometer-scale cavities is investigated experimentally by means of high-speed photography and acoustic measurements. Micrometer-scale cavities of different dimensions (width=40μm, 80μm, 10mm and depth=50μm) are designed to replicate the cross section of microvias in a PCB. The aim here is to present a method for enhancing mass transfer due to the penetration of bubbles in such narrow geometries under the action of ultrasound. The micrometer-scale cavities are placed in a test-cell filled with water and subjected to an ultrasound excitation at 75kHz. A cavitation bubble cluster is generated at the mouth of the cavity which acts as a continuous source of bubbles that penetrate into the cavity. The radial oscillation characteristics and translation of these bubbles are investigated in detail here. It is observed that the bubbles arrange themselves into streamer-like structures inside the cavity. Parameters such as bubble population and size distribution and their correlation with the phase of the incident ultrasound radiation are investigated in detail here. This provides a valuable insight into the dynamics of bubbles in narrow confined spaces. Mass transfer investigations show that fresh liquid can be continuously introduced in the cavities under the action of ultrasound. Our findings may have important consequences in optimizing the filling processes for microvias with high aspect ratios. PMID:26763751

  11. Localized removal of layers of metal, polymer, or biomaterial by ultrasound cavitation bubbles.

    PubMed

    Fernandez Rivas, David; Verhaagen, Bram; Seddon, James R T; Zijlstra, Aaldert G; Jiang, Lei-Meng; van der Sluis, Luc W M; Versluis, Michel; Lohse, Detlef; Gardeniers, Han J G E

    2012-09-01

    We present an ultrasonic device with the ability to locally remove deposited layers from a glass slide in a controlled and rapid manner. The cleaning takes place as the result of cavitating bubbles near the deposited layers and not due to acoustic streaming. The bubbles are ejected from air-filled cavities micromachined in a silicon surface, which, when vibrated ultrasonically at a frequency of 200 kHz, generate a stream of bubbles that travel to the layer deposited on an opposing glass slide. Depending on the pressure amplitude, the bubble clouds ejected from the micropits attain different shapes as a result of complex bubble interaction forces, leading to distinct shapes of the cleaned areas. We have determined the removal rates for several inorganic and organic materials and obtained an improved efficiency in cleaning when compared to conventional cleaning equipment. We also provide values of the force the bubbles are able to exert on an atomic force microscope tip. PMID:23964308

  12. Localized removal of layers of metal, polymer, or biomaterial by ultrasound cavitation bubbles

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez Rivas, David; Verhaagen, Bram; Seddon, James R. T.; Zijlstra, Aaldert G.; Jiang, Lei-Meng; van der Sluis, Luc W. M.; Versluis, Michel; Lohse, Detlef; Gardeniers, Han J. G. E.

    2012-01-01

    We present an ultrasonic device with the ability to locally remove deposited layers from a glass slide in a controlled and rapid manner. The cleaning takes place as the result of cavitating bubbles near the deposited layers and not due to acoustic streaming. The bubbles are ejected from air-filled cavities micromachined in a silicon surface, which, when vibrated ultrasonically at a frequency of 200 kHz, generate a stream of bubbles that travel to the layer deposited on an opposing glass slide. Depending on the pressure amplitude, the bubble clouds ejected from the micropits attain different shapes as a result of complex bubble interaction forces, leading to distinct shapes of the cleaned areas. We have determined the removal rates for several inorganic and organic materials and obtained an improved efficiency in cleaning when compared to conventional cleaning equipment. We also provide values of the force the bubbles are able to exert on an atomic force microscope tip. PMID:23964308

  13. Interaction of lithotripter shockwaves with single inertial cavitation bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaseboer, Evert; Fong, Siew Wan; Turangan, Cary K.; Khoo, Boo Cheong; Szeri, Andrew J.; Calvisi, Michael L.; Sankin, Georgy N.; Zhong, Pei

    The dynamic interaction of a shockwave (modelled as a pressure pulse) with an initially spherically oscillating bubble is investigated. Upon the shockwave impact, the bubble deforms non-spherically and the flow field surrounding the bubble is determined with potential flow theory using the boundary-element method (BEM). The primary advantage of this method is its computational efficiency. The simulation process is repeated until the two opposite sides of the bubble surface collide with each other (i.e. the formation of a jet along the shockwave propagation direction). The collapse time of the bubble, its shape and the velocity of the jet are calculated. Moreover, the impact pressure is estimated based on water-hammer pressure theory. The Kelvin impulse, kinetic energy and bubble displacement (all at the moment of jet impact) are also determined. Overall, the simulated results compare favourably with experimental observations of lithotripter shockwave interaction with single bubbles (using laser-induced bubbles at various oscillation stages). The simulations confirm the experimental observation that the most intense collapse, with the highest jet velocity and impact pressure, occurs for bubbles with intermediate size during the contraction phase when the collapse time of the bubble is approximately equal to the compressive pulse duration of the shock wave. Under this condition, the maximum amount of energy of the incident shockwave is transferred to the collapsing bubble. Further, the effect of the bubble contents (ideal gas with different initial pressures) and the initial conditions of the bubble (initially oscillating vs. non-oscillating) on the dynamics of the shockwave-bubble interaction are discussed.

  14. Interaction of lithotripter shockwaves with single inertial cavitation bubbles.

    PubMed

    Klaseboer, Evert; Fong, Siew Wan; Turangan, Cary K; Khoo, Boo Cheong; Szeri, Andrew J; Calvisi, Michael L; Sankin, Georgy N; Zhong, Pei

    2007-01-01

    The dynamic interaction of a shockwave (modelled as a pressure pulse) with an initially spherically oscillating bubble is investigated. Upon the shockwave impact, the bubble deforms non-spherically and the flow field surrounding the bubble is determined with potential flow theory using the boundary-element method (BEM). The primary advantage of this method is its computational efficiency. The simulation process is repeated until the two opposite sides of the bubble surface collide with each other (i.e. the formation of a jet along the shockwave propagation direction). The collapse time of the bubble, its shape and the velocity of the jet are calculated. Moreover, the impact pressure is estimated based on water-hammer pressure theory. The Kelvin impulse, kinetic energy and bubble displacement (all at the moment of jet impact) are also determined. Overall, the simulated results compare favourably with experimental observations of lithotripter shockwave interaction with single bubbles (using laser-induced bubbles at various oscillation stages). The simulations confirm the experimental observation that the most intense collapse, with the highest jet velocity and impact pressure, occurs for bubbles with intermediate size during the contraction phase when the collapse time of the bubble is approximately equal to the compressive pulse duration of the shock wave. Under this condition, the maximum amount of energy of the incident shockwave is transferred to the collapsing bubble. Further, the effect of the bubble contents (ideal gas with different initial pressures) and the initial conditions of the bubble (initially oscillating vs. non-oscillating) on the dynamics of the shockwave-bubble interaction are discussed. PMID:19018296

  15. Interaction of lithotripter shockwaves with single inertial cavitation bubbles

    PubMed Central

    Klaseboer, Evert; Fong, Siew Wan; Turangan, Cary K.; Khoo, Boo Cheong; Szeri, Andrew J.; Calvisi, Michael L.; Sankin, Georgy N.; Zhong, Pei

    2008-01-01

    The dynamic interaction of a shockwave (modelled as a pressure pulse) with an initially spherically oscillating bubble is investigated. Upon the shockwave impact, the bubble deforms non-spherically and the flow field surrounding the bubble is determined with potential flow theory using the boundary-element method (BEM). The primary advantage of this method is its computational efficiency. The simulation process is repeated until the two opposite sides of the bubble surface collide with each other (i.e. the formation of a jet along the shockwave propagation direction). The collapse time of the bubble, its shape and the velocity of the jet are calculated. Moreover, the impact pressure is estimated based on water-hammer pressure theory. The Kelvin impulse, kinetic energy and bubble displacement (all at the moment of jet impact) are also determined. Overall, the simulated results compare favourably with experimental observations of lithotripter shockwave interaction with single bubbles (using laser-induced bubbles at various oscillation stages). The simulations confirm the experimental observation that the most intense collapse, with the highest jet velocity and impact pressure, occurs for bubbles with intermediate size during the contraction phase when the collapse time of the bubble is approximately equal to the compressive pulse duration of the shock wave. Under this condition, the maximum amount of energy of the incident shockwave is transferred to the collapsing bubble. Further, the effect of the bubble contents (ideal gas with different initial pressures) and the initial conditions of the bubble (initially oscillating vs. non-oscillating) on the dynamics of the shockwavebubble interaction are discussed. PMID:19018296

  16. Dependence of Cavitation Bubble Size on Pressure Amplitude at Therapeutic Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvell, Kelsey J.; Bigelow, Timothy A.

    2009-04-01

    High-intensity, focused ultrasound therapy is a minimally invasive therapy technique that is effective and relatively safe. It can be used in areas including histotripsy, thermal ablation, and administering medication. Inertial cavitation is used to improve these therapy methods. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of pressure amplitude on cavitation resonance frequency/bubble size at therapeutic field levels. Earlier work has indicated that the resonance size depends on pressure amplitude; however, the investigation only considered pressure amplitudes up to 1 MPa [1]. Our study was conducted by simulating the response of bubbles to linearly propagating sine waves using the Gilmore-Akulichev formulation to solve for the bubble response. The frequency of the sine wave varied from 1 to 5 MHz while the amplitude of the sine wave varied from 0.0001 to 9 MPa. The resonance size for a particular frequency of excitation and amplitude was determined by finding the initial bubble size that resulted in the maximum bubble expansion for an air bubble in water. The simulations demonstrated a downshift in resonance size with increasing pressure amplitude. Therefore, smaller bubbles will have a more dramatic response to ultrasound at therapeutic levels..

  17. Effect of static pressure on acoustic energy radiated by cavitation bubbles in viscous liquids under ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Yasui, Kyuichi; Towata, Atsuya; Tuziuti, Toru; Kozuka, Teruyuki; Kato, Kazumi

    2011-11-01

    The effect of static pressure on acoustic emissions including shock-wave emissions from cavitation bubbles in viscous liquids under ultrasound has been studied by numerical simulations in order to investigate the effect of static pressure on dispersion of nano-particles in liquids by ultrasound. The results of the numerical simulations for bubbles of 5 ?m in equilibrium radius at 20 kHz have indicated that the optimal static pressure which maximizes the energy of acoustic waves radiated by a bubble per acoustic cycle increases as the acoustic pressure amplitude increases or the viscosity of the solution decreases. It qualitatively agrees with the experimental results by Sauter et al. [Ultrason. Sonochem. 15, 517 (2008)]. In liquids with relatively high viscosity (?200 mPa s), a bubble collapses more violently than in pure water when the acoustic pressure amplitude is relatively large (?20 bar). In a mixture of bubbles of different equilibrium radius (3 and 5 ?m), the acoustic energy radiated by a 5 ?m bubble is much larger than that by a 3 ?m bubble due to the interaction with bubbles of different equilibrium radius. The acoustic energy radiated by a 5 ?m bubble is substantially increased by the interaction with 3 ?m bubbles. PMID:22087995

  18. Design of experimental setup for investigation of cavitation bubble collapse close to a solid wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mller, Milo; Zima, Patrik; Unger, Ji?; ivn, Martin

    2012-04-01

    The article describes experimental setup for investigation of the impact load from collapsing cavitation bubble on a solid wall. A vapour bubble is generated inside a cubic chamber by local heating of water inside a thin channel in a button. The bubble collapse is initiated by a piezoelectric actuator attached to the flexible wall of the chamber. A laser diode with a linear CCD sensor are used to detect the bubble position during its buoyancy-driven rise to the upper wall of the chamber. The bubble collapse impact load is measured using a PVDF piezoelectric transducer glued to the upper wall of the chamber and recorded by high-speed CCD camera illuminated by a high-power LED diode. The pressure inside the chamber is measured by the dynamic pressure transducer. All the system components are controlled and synchronized by an oscilloscope and pulse generator using the LabView software.

  19. Effects of tissue stiffness, ultrasound frequency, and pressure on histotripsy-induced cavitation bubble behavior.

    PubMed

    Vlaisavljevich, Eli; Lin, Kuang-Wei; Warnez, Matthew T; Singh, Rahul; Mancia, Lauren; Putnam, Andrew J; Johnsen, Eric; Cain, Charles; Xu, Zhen

    2015-03-21

    Histotripsy is an ultrasound ablation method that controls cavitation to fractionate soft tissue. In order to effectively fractionate tissue, histotripsy requires cavitation bubbles to rapidly expand from nanometer-sized initial nuclei into bubbles often larger than 50?m. Using a negative pressure high enough to initiate a bubble cloud and expand bubbles to a sufficient size, histotripsy has been shown capable of completely fractionating soft tissue into acelluar debris resulting in effective tissue removal. Previous work has shown that the histotripsy process is affected by tissue mechanical properties with stiffer tissues showing increased resistance to histotripsy fractionation, which we hypothesize to be caused by impeded bubble expansion in stiffer tissues. In this study, the hypothesis that increases in tissue stiffness cause a reduction in bubble expansion was investigated both theoretically and experimentally. High speed optical imaging was used to capture a series of time delayed images of bubbles produced inside mechanically tunable agarose tissue phantoms using histotripsy pulses produced by 345?kHz, 500?kHz, 1.5?MHz, and 3?MHz histotripsy transducers. The results demonstrated a significant decrease in maximum bubble radius (Rmax) and collapse time (tc) with both increasing Young's modulus and increasing frequency. Furthermore, results showed that Rmax was not increased by raising the pressure above the intrinsic threshold. Finally, this work demonstrated the potential of using a dual-frequency strategy to modulate the expansion of histotripsy bubbles. Overall, the results of this study improve our understanding of how tissue stiffness and ultrasound parameters affect histotripsy-induced bubble behavior and provide a rational basis to tailor acoustic parameters for treatment of the specific tissues of interest. PMID:25715732

  20. Effects of tissue stiffness, ultrasound frequency, and pressure on histotripsy-induced cavitation bubble behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlaisavljevich, Eli; Lin, Kuang-Wei; Warnez, Matthew T.; Singh, Rahul; Mancia, Lauren; Putnam, Andrew J.; Johnsen, Eric; Cain, Charles; Xu, Zhen

    2015-03-01

    Histotripsy is an ultrasound ablation method that controls cavitation to fractionate soft tissue. In order to effectively fractionate tissue, histotripsy requires cavitation bubbles to rapidly expand from nanometer-sized initial nuclei into bubbles often larger than 50 µm. Using a negative pressure high enough to initiate a bubble cloud and expand bubbles to a sufficient size, histotripsy has been shown capable of completely fractionating soft tissue into acelluar debris resulting in effective tissue removal. Previous work has shown that the histotripsy process is affected by tissue mechanical properties with stiffer tissues showing increased resistance to histotripsy fractionation, which we hypothesize to be caused by impeded bubble expansion in stiffer tissues. In this study, the hypothesis that increases in tissue stiffness cause a reduction in bubble expansion was investigated both theoretically and experimentally. High speed optical imaging was used to capture a series of time delayed images of bubbles produced inside mechanically tunable agarose tissue phantoms using histotripsy pulses produced by 345 kHz, 500 kHz, 1.5 MHz, and 3 MHz histotripsy transducers. The results demonstrated a significant decrease in maximum bubble radius (Rmax) and collapse time (tc) with both increasing Young’s modulus and increasing frequency. Furthermore, results showed that Rmax was not increased by raising the pressure above the intrinsic threshold. Finally, this work demonstrated the potential of using a dual-frequency strategy to modulate the expansion of histotripsy bubbles. Overall, the results of this study improve our understanding of how tissue stiffness and ultrasound parameters affect histotripsy-induced bubble behavior and provide a rational basis to tailor acoustic parameters for treatment of the specific tissues of interest.

  1. Ultrasonic emissions reveal individual cavitation bubbles in water-stressed wood

    PubMed Central

    Ponomarenko, A.; Vincent, O.; Pietriga, A.; Cochard, H.; Badel, É.; Marmottant, P.

    2014-01-01

    Under drought conditions, the xylem of trees that conducts ascending sap produces ultrasonic emissions whose exact origin is not clear. We introduce a new method to record simultaneously both acoustic events and optical observation of the xylem conduits within slices of wood that were embedded in a transparent material setting a hydric stress. In this article, we resolved the rapid development of all cavitation bubbles and demonstrated that each ultrasound emission was linked to the nucleation of one single bubble, whose acoustic energy is an increasing function of the size of the conduit where nucleation occurred and also of the hydric stress. We modelled these observations by the fact that water columns in conduits store elastic energy and release it into acoustic waves when they are broken by cavitation bubbles. Water columns are thus elastic, and not rigid, ‘wires of water’ set under tension by hydric stresses. Cavitation bubbles are at the origin of an embolism, whose development was followed in our experiments. Such an embolism of sap circulation can result in a fatal condition for living trees. These findings provide new insights for the non-destructive monitoring of embolisms within trees, and suggest a new approach to study porous media under hydric stress. PMID:25056212

  2. Interaction dynamics of temporal and spatial separated cavitation bubbles in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinne, N.; Ripken, T.; Lubatschowski, H.

    2010-02-01

    The LASIK procedure is a well established laser based treatment in ophthalmology. Nowadays it includes a cutting of the corneal tissue bases on ultra short pulses which are focused below the tissue surface to create an optical breakdown and hence a dissection of the tissue. The energy of the laser pulse is absorbed by non-linear processes that result in an expansion of a cavitation bubble and rupturing of the tissue. Due to a reduction of the duration of treatment the current development of ultra short laser systems points to higher repetition rates. This in turn results in a probable interaction between different cavitation bubbles of adjacent optical breakdowns. While the interaction of one single laser pulse with biological tissue is analyzed reasonably well experimentally and theoretically, the interaction of several spatial and temporal following pulses is scarcely determined yet. We present a high-speed photography analysis of cavitation bubble interaction for two spatial separated laser-induced optical breakdowns varying the laser pulse energy as well as the spatial distance. Depending on a change of these parameters different kinds of interactions such as a flattening and deformation of bubble shape, asymmetric water streams and jet formation were observed. The results of this research can be used to comprehend and optimize the cutting effect of ultra short pulse laser systems with high repetition rates (> 1 MHz).

  3. Ultrasonic emissions reveal individual cavitation bubbles in water-stressed wood.

    PubMed

    Ponomarenko, A; Vincent, O; Pietriga, A; Cochard, H; Badel, ; Marmottant, P

    2014-10-01

    Under drought conditions, the xylem of trees that conducts ascending sap produces ultrasonic emissions whose exact origin is not clear. We introduce a new method to record simultaneously both acoustic events and optical observation of the xylem conduits within slices of wood that were embedded in a transparent material setting a hydric stress. In this article, we resolved the rapid development of all cavitation bubbles and demonstrated that each ultrasound emission was linked to the nucleation of one single bubble, whose acoustic energy is an increasing function of the size of the conduit where nucleation occurred and also of the hydric stress. We modelled these observations by the fact that water columns in conduits store elastic energy and release it into acoustic waves when they are broken by cavitation bubbles. Water columns are thus elastic, and not rigid, 'wires of water' set under tension by hydric stresses. Cavitation bubbles are at the origin of an embolism, whose development was followed in our experiments. Such an embolism of sap circulation can result in a fatal condition for living trees. These findings provide new insights for the non-destructive monitoring of embolisms within trees, and suggest a new approach to study porous media under hydric stress. PMID:25056212

  4. Effects of cavitation bubble interaction with temporally separated fs-laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Tinne, Nadine; Knoop, Gesche; Kallweit, Nicole; Veith, Sonja; Bleeker, Sebastian; Lubatschowski, Holger; Krger, Alexander; Ripken, Tammo

    2014-04-01

    We present a time-resolved photographic analysis of the pulse-to-pulse interaction. In particular, we studied the influence of the cavitation bubble induced by a fs-pulse on the optical focusing of the consecutive pulse and its cavitation bubble dynamics in dependence on temporal pulse separation in water. As a first result, by decreasing the temporal separation of laser pulses, there is a diminishment of the laser-induced optical breakdown (LIOB) efficiency in terms of energy conversion, caused by disturbed focusing into persisting gas bubbles at the focal volume. A LIOB at the focal spot is finally suppressed by impinging the expanding or collapsing cavitation bubble of the preceding pulse. These results could be additionally confirmed in porcine gelatin solution with various concentrations. Hence, the interaction between the laser and transparent ophthalmic tissue may be accompanied by a raised central laser energy transmission, which could be observed in case of a temporal pulse overlap. In conclusion, our experimental results are of particular importance for the optimization of the prospective ophthalmic surgical process with future generation fs-lasers. PMID:24781592

  5. Single bubble perturbation in cavitation proximity of solid glass: hot spot versus distance.

    PubMed

    Radziuk, Darya; Möhwald, Helmuth; Suslick, Kenneth

    2014-02-28

    A systematic study of the energy loss of a cavitation bubble in a close proximity of a glass surface is introduced for the first time in a low acoustic field (1.2-2.4 bar). Single bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) is used as a tool to predict the temperature and pressure decrease of bubble (μm) versus surface distance. A glass as a model system is used to imitate the boundary conditions relevant for nano- or micromaterials. SBSL preequilibrated with 5% argon is perturbed by a glass rod with the tip (Z-perturbation) and with the long axis (X-perturbation) at a defined distance. From 2 mm to 500 μm argon-SBSL lines monotonically narrow and the effective emission temperature decreases from 9000 K to 6800 K comparable to multiple bubbles. The electron density decreases by two orders of magnitude in Z-perturbation and is by a factor of two higher in X-perturbation than the unperturbed cavitating bubble. The perturbed single bubble sonoluminescence pressure decreases from 2700 atm to 1200 atm at 2.4 bar. In water new non-SBSL SiO molecular emission lines are observed and OH emission disappears. PMID:24068109

  6. Dynamic and interaction of fs-laser induced cavitation bubbles for analyzing the cutting effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinne, N.; Schumacher, S.; Nuzzo, V.; Ripken, T.; Lubatschowski, H.

    2009-07-01

    A prominent laser based treatment in ophthalmology is the LASIK procedure which nowadays includes a cutting of the corneal tissue based on ultra short pulses. Focusing an ultra short laser pulse below the surface of biological tissue an optical breakdown is caused and hence a dissection is obtained. The laser energy of the laser pulses is absorbed by nonlinear processes. As a result a cavitation bubble expands and ruptures the tissue. Hence positioning of several optical breakdowns side by side generates an incision. Due to a reduction of the duration of the treatment the current development of ultra short laser systems points to higher repetition rates in the range of hundreds of KHz or even MHz instead of tens of kHz. This in turn results in a probable occurrence of interaction between different optical breakdowns and respectively cavitation bubbles of adjacent optical breakdowns. While the interaction of one single laser pulse with biological tissue is analyzed reasonably well experimentally and theoretically, the interaction of several spatial and temporal following pulses is scarcely determined yet. Thus the aim of this study is to analyse the dynamic and interaction of two cavitation bubbles by using high speed photography. The applied laser pulse energy, the energy ratio and the spot distance between different cavitation bubbles were varied. Depending on a change of these parameters different kinds of interactions such as a flattening and deformation of bubble shape or jet formation are observed. Based on these results a further research seems to be inevitable to comprehend and optimize the cutting effect of ultra short pulse laser systems with high (> 1 MHz) repetition rates.

  7. A New Unsteady Model for Dense Cloud Cavitation in Cryogenic Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hosangadi, Ashvin; Ahuja, Vineet

    2005-01-01

    Contents include the following: Background on thermal effects in cavitation. Physical properties of hydrogen. Multi-phase cavitation with thermal effect. Solution procedure. Cavitation model overview. Cavitation source terms. New cavitation model. Source term for bubble growth. One equation les model. Unsteady ogive simulations: liquid nitrogen. Unsteady incompressible flow in a pipe. Time averaged cavity length for NACA15 flowfield.

  8. Effect of picosecond laser induced cavitation bubbles generated on Au targets in a nanoparticle production set-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiberi, M.; Simonelli, A.; Cristoforetti, G.; Marsili, P.; Giammanco, F.; Giorgetti, E.

    2013-03-01

    This work is aimed at an analysis of the influence on the efficiency of nanoparticle production of a cavitation bubble (CB), which forms during the laser ablation process in high-fluence regime. The CB is produced on an Au metal target immersed in water by 1064 nm ps Nd:YAG laser pulses at different fluences. Its time-space evolution is monitored by a shadowgraphic set-up, while the Au nanoparticles production rate is tagged by the growth of the plasmon resonance, which is detected by measuring shot-by-shot the UV-Vis absorbance. We analyze the dependence of bubble size on the experimental parameters. Our results appear of interest to enhance the nanoparticle production efficiency in a liquid medium.

  9. Spatial-temporal ultrasound imaging of residual cavitation bubbles around a fluid-tissue interface in histotripsy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hong; Xu, Shanshan; Yuan, Yuan; Liu, Runna; Wang, Supin; Wan, Mingxi

    2015-05-01

    Cavitation is considered as the primary mechanism of soft tissue fragmentation (histotripsy) by pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound. The residual cavitation bubbles have a dual influence on the histotripsy pulses: these serve as nuclei for easy generation of new cavitation, and act as strong scatterers causing energy "shadowing." To monitor the residual cavitation bubbles in histotripsy, an ultrafast active cavitation imaging method with relatively high signal-to-noise ratio and good spatial-temporal resolution was proposed in this paper, which combined plane wave transmission, minimum variance beamforming, and coherence factor weighting. The spatial-temporal evolutions of residual cavitation bubbles around a fluid-tissue interface in histotripsy under pulse duration (PD) of 10-40??s and pulse repetition frequency (PRF) of 0.67-2?kHz were monitored by this method. The integrated bubble area curves inside the tissue interface were acquired from the bubble image sequence, and the formation process of histotripsy damage was estimated. It was observed that the histotripsy efficiency decreased with both longer PDs and higher PRFs. A direct relationship with a coefficient of 1.0365 between histotripsy lesion area and inner residual bubble area was found. These results can assist in monitoring and optimization of the histotripsy treatment further. PMID:25994689

  10. Cavitation bubbles induced by Erbium lasers: implications for dentistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verleng, Marja; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf; van der Veen, Albert; Lemberg, Vladimir; Boutoussov, Dmitri

    2014-02-01

    With new fiber systems available for 3 μm, Erbium lasers become more interesting for precise tissue ablation in a water environment enabling new application in e.g. dentistry. The dynamics of explosive bubble formation was investigated at 2.78 μm (Er,Cr;YSGG) and 2.94 μm (Er:YAG), in relation to energy (10-50 mJ), pulse length (20-150 μs) and fiber tip shape (flat or taper). The dynamics of exploding and imploding vapor bubbles were captured with high speed imaging (10 - 300 μs range). Increasing the pulse length and energy, the vapor bubble became more elongated with an opaque surface for flat tip fibers. Tapered fibers produced spherical vapor bubbles with an optically transparent surface expected to be more forceful for creating mechanical effects in both hard and soft tissues. There was no significant difference between bubbles formed at 2.78 μm (Er,Cr;YSGG) and 2.94 μm (Er:YAG).

  11. Acoustic cavitation bubbles in the kidney induced by focused shock waves in extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwahara, M.; Ioritani, N.; Kambe, K.; Taguchi, K.; Saito, T.; Igarashi, M.; Shirai, S.; Orikasa, S.; Takayama, K.

    1990-07-01

    On an ultrasonic imaging system a hyperechoic region was observed in a focal area of fucused shock waves in the dog kidney. This study was performed to learn whether cavitation bubbles are responsible for this hyperechoic region. The ultrasonic images in water of varying temperatures were not markedly different. In the flowing stream of distilled water, the stream was demonstrated as a hyperechoic region only with a mixture of air bubbles. Streams of 5%-50% glucose solutions were also demonstrated as a hyperechoic region. However, such concentration changes in living tissue, as well as thermal changes, are hardly thought to be induced. The holographic interferometry showed that the cavitation bubbles remained for more than 500 msec. in the focal area in water. This finding indicate that the bubble can remain for longer period than previously supposed. These results support the contentions that cavitation bubbles are responsible for the hyperechoic region in the kidney in situ.

  12. Recent theories of cavitation damage including non-symmetrical bubble collapse effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammitt, F. G.

    1974-01-01

    Theories of cavitation damage mechanisms are discussed. Photographic evidence has shown that the actual collapse of bubbles near a symmetry-destroying feature such as a nearby wall results in a toroidal-like collapse, with the final generation of a liquid microjet oriented toward the wall. Numerical analyses indicate that the shock wave intensity emitted during collapse is not likely to be strong enough to be damaging to most materials. It has been determined that actual damage is usually a result of a combination of impact effect of the microjet and the shock wave pressures generated by bubble rebounds.

  13. Reduction of Bubble Cavitation by Modifying the Diffraction Wave from a Lithotripter Aperture

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Purpose A new method was devised to suppress the bubble cavitation in the lithotripter focal zone to reduce the propensity of shockwave-induced renal injury. Materials and Methods An edge extender was designed and fabricated to fit on the outside of the ellipsoidal reflector of an electrohydraulic lithotripter to disturb the generation of diffraction wave at the aperture, but with little effect on the acoustic field inside the reflector. Results Although the peak negative pressures at the lithotripter focus using the edge extender at 20?kV were similar to that of the original configuration (-11.10.9 vs ?10.60.7?MPa), the duration of the tensile wave was shortened significantly (3.20.54 vs 5.830.56??s, P<0.01). There is no difference, however, in both the amplitude and duration of the compressive shockwaves between these two configurations as well as the ?6 dB beam width in the focal plane. The significant suppression effect of bubble cavitation was confirmed by the measured bubble collapse time using passive cavitation detection. At the lithotripter focus, while only about 30 shocks were needed to rupture a blood vessel phantom using the original HM-3 reflector at 20?kV, no damage could be produced after 300 shocks using the edge extender. Meanwhile, the original HM-3 lithotripter at 20?kV can achieve a stone comminution efficiency of 50.42.0% on plaster-of-Paris stone phantom after 200 shocks, which is comparable to that of using the edge extender (46.84.1%, P=0.005). Conclusions Modifying the diffraction wave at the lithotripter aperture can suppress the shockwave-induced bubble cavitation with significant reduced damage potential on the vessel phantom but satisfactory stone comminution ability. PMID:22332839

  14. Incubation pit analysis and calculation of the hydrodynamic impact pressure from the implosion of an acoustic cavitation bubble.

    PubMed

    Tzanakis, I; Eskin, D G; Georgoulas, A; Fytanidis, D K

    2014-03-01

    An experimental study to evaluate cavitation bubble dynamics is conducted. The aim is to predict the magnitude and statistical distribution of hydrodynamic impact pressure generated from the implosion of various individual acoustic cavitation bubbles near to a rigid boundary, considering geometrical features of the pitted area. A steel sample was subjected to cavitation impacts by an ultrasonic transducer with a 5mm diameter probe. The pitted surface was then examined using high-precision 3D optical interferometer techniques. Only the incubation period where surface is plastically deformed without material loss is taken into account. The exposure time was adjusted in the range of 3-60 s to avoid pit overlapping and a special procedure for pit analysis and characterisation was then followed. Moreover, a high-speed camera device was deployed to capture the implosion mechanisms of cavitation bubbles near to the surface. The geometrical characteristics of single incubation pits as well as pit clusters were studied and their deformation patterns were compared. Consequently, a reverse engineering approach was applied in order the hydrodynamic impact pressure from the implosion of an individual cavitation bubble to be determined. The characteristic parameters of the cavitation implosion process such as hydrodynamic impact pressure and liquid micro-jet impact velocity as well as the hydrodynamic severity of the cavitation impacts were quantified. It was found that the length of the hypotenuse of the orthographic projections from the center of the pit, which basically represents the deformed area of the pit, increases with the hydrodynamic impact aggressiveness in a linear rate. Majority of the hydrodynamic impacts were in the range of 0.4-1 GPa while the corresponding micro-jet velocities were found to be in the range of 200-700 m/s. Outcomes of this study, contribute to further understanding the cavitation intensity from the implosion of acoustically generated bubbles and could certainly represent a significant step towards developing more accurate cavitation models. PMID:24176799

  15. First Iterative Solution of the Thermal Behaviour of Acoustic Cavitation Bubbles in the Uniform Pressure Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delale, Can F.; Pasinlio?lu, ?enay

    2015-12-01

    The thermal behaviour of a spherical gas bubble in a liquid driven by an acoustic pressure is investigated in the uniform pressure approximation by employing an iterative method to solve the energy balance equations between the gas bubble and the surrounding liquid for the temperature distribution and the gas pressure inside the bubble. It is shown that the first iterative solution leads to the first order law of the gas pressure as a polytropic power law of the bubble wall temperature and of the bubble radius, with the polytropic index given as an explicit function of the isentropic exponent of the gas. The resulting first order law of the gas pressure reduces to the classical isothermal and adiabatic laws in the appropriate limits. The first order gas pressure law is then applied to an acoustically driven cavitation bubble by solving the Rayleigh-Plesset equation. Results obtained show that the bubble wall temperature pulsations during collapse and rebound can become a few orders of magnitude higher than the bulk liquid temperature.

  16. Acoustic transient generation by holmium-laser-induced cavitation bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asshauer, T.; Rink, K.; Delacretaz, G.

    1994-11-01

    The acoustic effects of free-running 2.12 micron Cr:Tm:Ho:YAG laser pulses delivered in water are studied. Laser pulses of 10 to 1200 mJ energy and 230 microsecs duration (full width at half-maximum) are used. Delivery fiber diameters of 200 - 600 microns are investigated. Combined fast flash video imaging and needle probe hydrophone pressure sensing are used. The experimental results show that the laser-induced water vapor bubbles can generate strong acoustic transients at the bubble collapse several hundreds of microsecs after the start of the laser pulse. Pressures of up to 3600 bar are measured. Above a laser fluence threshold of 40 J/sq cm the pressure amplitude increases sharply, reaching a maximum value between 100 and 200 J/sq cm. At higher fluences up to more than 1000 J/sq cm, the pressure amplitude is found to decrease again. A two-phase mechanism is proposed to describe the complex bubble dynamics generated by the free-running pulses: The isotropic expansion of an initially superheated water volume is followed by a continuous ablation phase. The results suggest a mechanism of possible unwanted acoustic damage during Holmium laser medical applications in a liquid environment.

  17. Holmium laser ablation of cartilage: effects of cavitation bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asshauer, Thomas; Jansen, Thomas; Oberthur, Thorsten; Delacretaz, Guy P.; Gerber, Bruno E.

    1995-05-01

    The ablation of fresh harvested porcine femur patellar groove cartilage by a 2.12 micrometers Cr:Tm:Ho:YAG laser in clinically used irradiation conditions was studied. Laser pulses were delivered via a 600 micrometers diameter fiber in isotonic saline. Ablation was investigated as a function of the angle of incidence of the delivery fiber with respect to the cartilage surface (0-90 degrees) and of radiant exposure. Laser pulses with energies of 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 J and a duration of 250 microseconds were used. A constant fiber tip-tissue distance of 1 mm was maintained for all experiments. The dynamics of the induced vapor bubble and of the ablation process was monitored by time resolved flash videography with a 1 microseconds illumination. Acoustic transients were measured with a piezoelectric PVDF needle probe hydrophone. Bubble attachment to the cartilage surface during the collapse phase, leading to the direct exposition of the cartilage surface to the maximal pressure generated, was observed in all investigated irradiation conditions. Maximal pressure transients of up to 200 bars (at 1 mm distance from the collapse center) were measured at the bubble collapse at irradiation angles >= 60 degrees. No significant pressure variation was observed in perpendicular irradiation conditions as a function of radiant exposure. A significant reduction of the induced pressure for irradiation angles

  18. Bubble-induced sheet cavitation inception on an isolated roughness element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Rijsbergen, Martijn; Slot, Jesse

    2015-12-01

    The nucleation process on an isolated roughness element, located at the point of minimum pressure of a NACA 0015 hydrofoil was studied experimentally and computationally. The objective of this study was to investigate the working mechanism of bubble-induced sheet cavitation inception. High-speed micro-scale observations show the generation of a streak of cavitation—attached to the roughness element—in the wake of the bubble. Below its critical diameter, the bubble can detach from the streak cavity and travel on while the streak cavity remains. The solutions of a Rayleigh-Plesset equation along a streamline extracted from a RANS calculation show strong similarities with the experimental observations, but a factor 5 to 10 higher frame rate is needed to validate the calculations.

  19. Helium Bubble Injection Solution To The Cavitation Damage At The Spallation Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, M. W.; Ruggles, A. E.

    2009-03-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is one of the largest science projects in the United States, with total cost near 1.4 Billion Dollars. The limiting factor of the facility had always been assumed to be the lifetime of the target window due to radiation damage. After further investigation, the lifetime of the target was determined not to be limited by radiation damage but by cavitation damage. The cavitation damage derives from pressure waves caused by the beam energy deposition. Vapor bubbles form when low to negative pressures occur in the mercury near the stainless steel target window due to wave interaction with the structure. Collapse of these bubbles can focus wave energy in small liquid jets that erode the window surface. Compressibility of the mercury can be enhanced to reduce the amplitude of the pressure wave caused by the beam energy deposition. To enhance compressibility, small (10 to 30 micron diameter) gas bubbles could be injected into the bulk of the mercury. Solubility and diffusivity parameters of inert gas in mercury are required for a complete mechanical simulation and engineering of these strategies. Using current theoretical models, one obtains a theoretical Henry coefficient of helium in mercury on the order of 3.9E15 Pa-molHg/molHe at 300 K. This low solubility was confirmed by a direct, offline experimental method. Mercury was charged with helium and any pressure change was recorded. Any pressure change was attributed to gas going into solution. Therefore, with the sensitivity of the experiment, a lower limit of 9E12 Pa-molHg/molHe was placed on the mercury-helium system. These values guarantee a stable bubble lifetime needed within the SNS mercury target to mitigate cavitation issues.

  20. Helium Bubble Injection Solution To The Cavitation Damage At The Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, M. W.; Ruggles, A. E.

    2009-03-10

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is one of the largest science projects in the United States, with total cost near 1.4 Billion Dollars. The limiting factor of the facility had always been assumed to be the lifetime of the target window due to radiation damage. After further investigation, the lifetime of the target was determined not to be limited by radiation damage but by cavitation damage. The cavitation damage derives from pressure waves caused by the beam energy deposition. Vapor bubbles form when low to negative pressures occur in the mercury near the stainless steel target window due to wave interaction with the structure. Collapse of these bubbles can focus wave energy in small liquid jets that erode the window surface. Compressibility of the mercury can be enhanced to reduce the amplitude of the pressure wave caused by the beam energy deposition. To enhance compressibility, small (10 to 30 micron diameter) gas bubbles could be injected into the bulk of the mercury. Solubility and diffusivity parameters of inert gas in mercury are required for a complete mechanical simulation and engineering of these strategies. Using current theoretical models, one obtains a theoretical Henry coefficient of helium in mercury on the order of 3.9E15 Pa-molHg/molHe at 300 K. This low solubility was confirmed by a direct, offline experimental method. Mercury was charged with helium and any pressure change was recorded. Any pressure change was attributed to gas going into solution. Therefore, with the sensitivity of the experiment, a lower limit of 9E12 Pa-molHg/molHe was placed on the mercury-helium system. These values guarantee a stable bubble lifetime needed within the SNS mercury target to mitigate cavitation issues.

  1. Bidirectional cinematography of steam-bubble growth

    SciTech Connect

    Deason, V.A.; Reynolds, L.D.

    1982-01-01

    Single steam bubbles were generated in superheated water in an optical cell. The growth process of the bubbles was recorded with a high-speed motion picture camera at 5000 and 10,000 frames per second. A technique was developed to simultaneously image two orthogonal views of the bubbles on each frame of film. The vertical and horizontal diameters of the bubbles were measured on a frame-by-frame basis, and the data analyzed to determine oscillatory frequencies. The analysis also attempted to determine whether the bubbles were undergoing volumetric oscillations during early growth or whether simple surface wave/rotational behavior caused the observed periodic variations in bubble dimensions. For the bubbles studied, typical oscillation frequencies for the diameters were in the range of 100 to 500 Hz.

  2. Single Cavitation Bubble Dynamics in Shear Flow of Water and Dilute Polymer Solution Near a Solid Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittmann, Martin Robert

    1992-01-01

    Cavitation in hydraulic machinery and in marine applications produces noise, destructive erosion and loss of efficiency. Their fundamental mechanisms, particularly of erosive damage, are not well established. High molecular weight polymer solutions at drag-reducing concentrations substantially alter macroscopic cavitation behaviors such as the inception point, the noise spectrum and the rate of damage. Again, causes are poorly understood. To examine the mechanisms underlying these phenomena, single vapor bubbles of up to 1 cm diameter were initiated by a laser pulse and photographed in collapse under 1 atm pressure near a solid wall. Experiments were conducted for 0<=gamma<=2.5, in which range a collapsing bubble may produce wall damage (gamma = distance from bubble to wall at inception divided by maximum bubble radius). A high speed film camera recorded the full growth and collapse and part of the rebound at 200,000 frames/s. A 1 mus rise time pressure transducer also recorded the pressure at the wall. Behavior in 200-250 s ^{-1} turbulent shear flow, generated in a large Couette flow cell with a rotating outer cylinder, and in initially quiescent fluid was observed. Water and 10 ppm (by weight) partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide (MW = 17cdot10^6) solution were tested. Both polymer and solution were 'well characterized.' Direct visual inspection and digital image processing were used to analyze the film. Detailed results on the bubble migration and deformation largely confirm and extend prior studies in quiescent water. Jet development and velocities of 110-180 m/s were observed, but the jet tip could not be reliably identified, indicating these and other investigators' jet velocities are lower bounds only. In shear flow, bubbles developed a substantial 'lean' in the downstream direction and apparently weaker jets developed at an angle. Otherwise, behavior vs. gamma was as for quiescent fluid. No distinguishing behaviors between water and polymer solution were found in shear flow or quiescent fluid under these conditions. The total energy lost in collapse was found to be least near gamma = 1, raising questions about energy transfer mechanisms leading to damage.

  3. Radiation-Induced Cavitation Process in a Metastable Superheated Liquid. I. Initial and Pre-bubble Formation Stages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y. Y.; Chu, B. T.; Apfel, R. E.

    1992-11-01

    The cavitation phenomenon in a superheated liquid following the irradiation of the medium by a flux of neutrons is studied from a macroscopic viewpoint. This is, essentially, the bubble chamber problem. The interaction between the neutron flux with the material medium is modeled here as a sudden deposition of energy along a straight line in a medium which may undergo phase transition. Mathematically the problem consists of solving the nonlinear fluid dynamic equations governing the motion of a viscous, heat-conducting, compressible fluid subjected to the singular initial condition of a sudden energy deposition along an infinite line. Time evolution of the resulting "thermal spike" and cylindrical shock wave produced is followed by numerical computations. A scaling transformation is used to resolve the initial development of the singularity. The leading term in the solution at the initial stage is in agreement with the solution which may be inferred by dimensional reasoning and obtained by the similarity method. Subsequent development of the flow field is first followed by the implicit donor-cell finite difference method and then by Miller's moving finite element method, to account for the multiple propagating steep gradients developed in the course of time. The necessity of using a combination of numerical and analytical techniques to solve such a complex problem is discussed. Part I of this paper is concerned with the development of the flow field leading to the incipient formation of an "embryonic" bubble. Part II discusses the growth of this "embryonic" bubble leading to cavitation or to its eventual collapse.

  4. Water Treatment using Discharge Generated in Cavitation Field with Micro Bubble Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihara, Satoshi; Hirohata, Taiki; Kominato, Yuichi; Yamabe, Chobei; Ike, Hideaki; Hakiai, Kazunori; Hirabayashi, Kazuya; Tamagawa, Masaaki

    New method of water treatment for wastewater using discharge in water cavitation field, in which numerous micro bubbles were generated by high-speed water flow, was proposed in this paper. Indigo carmine solution, which is a type of dye, with a concentration of 9mg/Liter was used as a specimen for demonstration of water treatment. The total volume of solution and average speed of solution in the cavitation field was 20 Liter and about 7.4 m/s, respectively. A reduction ratio of absorbance of 96% was obtained in 50 min of treatment time at an electrode distance of 2 mm and a discharge power of 16 W. Also it was found that the efficiency of decolorization was improved by changing the electrode location.

  5. Interaction Mechanisms of Cavitation Bubbles Induced by Spatially and Temporally Separated fs-Laser Pulses

    PubMed Central

    Tinne, Nadine; Kaune, Brigitte; Krüger, Alexander; Ripken, Tammo

    2014-01-01

    The emerging use of femtosecond lasers with high repetition rates in the MHz regime together with limited scan speed implies possible mutual optical and dynamical interaction effects of the individual cutting spots. In order to get more insight into the dynamics a time-resolved photographic analysis of the interaction of cavitation bubbles is presented. Particularly, we investigated the influence of fs-laser pulses and their resulting bubble dynamics with various spatial as well as temporal separations. Different time courses of characteristic interaction effects between the cavitation bubbles were observed depending on pulse energy and spatio-temporal pulse separation. These ranged from merely no interaction to the phenomena of strong water jet formation. Afterwards, the mechanisms are discussed regarding their impact on the medical application of effective tissue cutting lateral to the laser beam direction with best possible axial precision: the mechanical forces of photodisruption as well as the occurring water jet should have low axial extend and a preferably lateral priority. Furthermore, the overall efficiency of energy conversion into controlled mechanical impact should be maximized compared to the transmitted pulse energy and unwanted long range mechanical side effects, e.g. shock waves, axial jet components. In conclusion, these experimental results are of great importance for the prospective optimization of the ophthalmic surgical process with high-repetition rate fs-lasers. PMID:25502697

  6. Interaction mechanisms of cavitation bubbles induced by spatially and temporally separated fs-laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Tinne, Nadine; Kaune, Brigitte; Krüger, Alexander; Ripken, Tammo

    2014-01-01

    The emerging use of femtosecond lasers with high repetition rates in the MHz regime together with limited scan speed implies possible mutual optical and dynamical interaction effects of the individual cutting spots. In order to get more insight into the dynamics a time-resolved photographic analysis of the interaction of cavitation bubbles is presented. Particularly, we investigated the influence of fs-laser pulses and their resulting bubble dynamics with various spatial as well as temporal separations. Different time courses of characteristic interaction effects between the cavitation bubbles were observed depending on pulse energy and spatio-temporal pulse separation. These ranged from merely no interaction to the phenomena of strong water jet formation. Afterwards, the mechanisms are discussed regarding their impact on the medical application of effective tissue cutting lateral to the laser beam direction with best possible axial precision: the mechanical forces of photodisruption as well as the occurring water jet should have low axial extend and a preferably lateral priority. Furthermore, the overall efficiency of energy conversion into controlled mechanical impact should be maximized compared to the transmitted pulse energy and unwanted long range mechanical side effects, e.g. shock waves, axial jet components. In conclusion, these experimental results are of great importance for the prospective optimization of the ophthalmic surgical process with high-repetition rate fs-lasers. PMID:25502697

  7. Theoretical model of ice nucleation induced by acoustic cavitation. Part 1: Pressure and temperature profiles around a single bubble.

    PubMed

    Cogné, C; Labouret, S; Peczalski, R; Louisnard, O; Baillon, F; Espitalier, F

    2016-03-01

    This paper deals with the inertial cavitation of a single gas bubble in a liquid submitted to an ultrasonic wave. The aim was to calculate accurately the pressure and temperature at the bubble wall and in the liquid adjacent to the wall just before and just after the collapse. Two different approaches were proposed for modeling the heat transfer between the ambient liquid and the gas: the simplified approach (A) with liquid acting as perfect heat sink, the rigorous approach (B) with liquid acting as a normal heat conducting medium. The time profiles of the bubble radius, gas temperature, interface temperature and pressure corresponding to the above models were compared and important differences were observed excepted for the bubble size. The exact pressure and temperature distributions in the liquid corresponding to the second model (B) were also presented. These profiles are necessary for the prediction of any physical phenomena occurring around the cavitation bubble, with possible applications to sono-crystallization. PMID:26044460

  8. Ultrasonic cavitation erosion of Ti in 0.35% NaCl solution with bubbling oxygen and nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Li, D G; Wang, J D; Chen, D R; Liang, P

    2015-09-01

    The influences of oxygen and nitrogen on the ultrasonic cavitation erosion of Ti in 0.35%NaCl solution at room temperature, were investigated using a magnetostrictive-induced ultrasonic cavitation erosion (CE) facility and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The roles of oxygen and nitrogen in the composition and the electronic property of the passive film on Ti, were studied by Mott-Schottky plot and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results showed that the mass loss of Ti in 0.35%NaCl solution increased with increasing cavitation time. Bubbling oxygen can evidently increase the resistance of ultrasonic cavitation erosion comparing with bubbling nitrogen. XPS results showed that the thickness of the passive film on Ti in 0.35%NaCl solution in the case of bubbling oxygen for 3 weeks, was about 7 nm, and the passive film was mainly composed of TiO2 with an anatase structure. While TiO2 with a rutile structure was found to be the major component of the passive film on Ti in 0.35%NaCl solution in the case of bubbling nitrogen for 3 weeks, and the film thickness was 5 nm. The results extracted from Mott-Schottky plot showed that the passive film on Ti in the case of bubbling oxygen had more donor density than the passive film on Ti in the case of bubbling nitrogen. PMID:25818362

  9. Study on the spatial distribution of the liquid temperature near a cavitation bubble wall.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yang; Yasui, Kyuichi; Sun, Zhicheng; Mei, Bin; You, Meiyan; Zhu, Tong

    2016-03-01

    A simple new model of the spatial distribution of the liquid temperature near a cavitation bubble wall (Tli) is employed to numerically calculate Tli. The result shows that Tli is almost same with the ambient liquid temperature (T0) during the bubble oscillations except at strong collapse. At strong collapse, Tli can increase to about 1510 K, the same order of magnitude with that of the maximum temperature inside the bubble, which means that the chemical reactions occur not only in gas-phase inside the collapsing bubble but also in liquid-phase just outside the collapsing bubble. Four factors (ultrasonic vibration amplitude, ultrasonic frequency, the surface tension and the viscosity) are considered to study their effects for the thin liquid layer. The results show that for the thin layer, the thickness and the temperature increase as the ultrasonic vibration amplitude rise; conversely, the thickness and the temperature decrease with the increase of the ultrasonic frequency, the surface tension or the viscosity. PMID:26585020

  10. Stress wave emission and cavitation bubble dynamics by nanosecond optical breakdown in a tissue phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brujan, Emil-Alexandru; Vogel, Alfred

    2006-07-01

    Stress wave emission and cavitation bubble dynamics after optical breakdown in water and a tissue phantom with Nd: YAG laser pulses of 6 ns duration were investigated both experimentally and numerically to obtain a better understanding of the physical mechanisms involved in plasma-mediated laser surgery. Experimental tools were high-speed photography with 50000 frames s(-1) , and acoustic measurements. The tissue phantom consisted of a transparent polyacrylamide (PAA) gel, the elastic properties of which can be controlled by modifying the water content. Breakdown in water produced a purely compressive stress wave. By contrast, in stiff PAA samples and for sufficiently large pulse energies, the compression wave was followed by an intense tensile wave, similar to the behaviour previously observed in cornea. The elastic/plastic response of the medium led to a significant decrease of the maximum size of the cavitation bubble and to a shortening of its oscillation period which was found to be related to the generation of the tensile stress wave upon breakdown. For increasing elastic modulus of the PAA, both the amplitudes of the bubble oscillation and of the stress wave emitted during bubble collapse decreased until the bubble oscillation was so strongly damped that no collapse stress wave was emitted. Numerical simulations were performed using a spherical model of bubble dynamics which includes the compressibility and elastic/plastic behaviour of the medium, viscosity, density and surface tension. The calculations revealed that consideration of the elastic/plastic behaviour of the medium surrounding the bubble is essential to describe the experimentally observed bipolar shape of the stress wave emitted upon optical breakdown. Water is a poor tissue model because the shape of the emitted stress waves and the bubble dynamics differ strongly for both materials. The mechanical properties of PAA were also found to be quite different from those of tissues. Experimental and numerical results provided evidence that the dynamic mechanical properties relevant for optical breakdown in PAA and tissue differ by as much as two orders of magnitude from the static values. The discovery of a tensile stress wave after optical breakdown in tissue-like media is of great importance for the assessment of collateral damage in laser surgery because biological tissues are much more susceptible to tensile stress than to compressive stress.

  11. Real-Time Monitoring and Quantitative Evaluation of Cavitation Bubbles Induced by High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Using B-Mode Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jie; Chen, Chu-Yi; Chen, Gong; Guo, Xia-Sheng; Ma, Yong; Tu, Juan; Zhang, Dong

    2014-03-01

    A software-based method is proposed to eliminate the flooding interference strips in B-mode images, and to evaluate the cavitation bubbles generated during high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) exposures. In vitro tissue phantoms are exposed to 1.12 MHz HIFU pulses with a fixed 100 Hz pulse repetition frequency. HIFU-induced cavitation bubbles are detected as hyperechoic regions in B-mode images. The temporal evolution of cavitation bubbles, generated by HIFU pulses with varying driving amplitude and pulse length, is analyzed by measuring the time-varying area of the hyperechoic region. The results show that: first, it is feasible to monitor HIFU-induced cavitation bubble activity in real-time using B-mode imaging; second, more cavitation bubbles can be generated with higher acoustic energy delivered; third, the hyperechoic region is observed to shrink gradually after ceasing the HIFU pulses, which indicates the dissolution of cavitation bubbles. This work will be helpful for developing an effective tool to realize real-time monitoring and quantitative evaluation of HIFU-induced cavitation bubble activity using a current commercialized B-mode machine.

  12. Bubble Proliferation or Dissolution of Cavitation Nuclei in the Beam Path of a Shock-Wave Lithotripter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Spencer; Lautz, Jaclyn; Sankin, Georgy N.; Szeri, Andrew J.; Zhong, Pei

    2015-03-01

    It is hypothesized that the decreased treatment efficiency in contemporary shock-wave lithotripters is related to tensile wave attenuation due to cavitation in the prefocal beam path. Utilizing high-speed imaging of the beam path and focal pressure waveform measurements, tensile attenuation is associated with bubble proliferation. By systematically testing different combinations of pulse-repetition frequency and gas concentration, we modulate the bubble-dissolution time to identify which conditions lead to bubble proliferation and show that reducing bubble proliferation in the beam path significantly improves acoustic transmission and stone comminution efficiency in vitro. In addition to experiments, a bubble-proliferation model is developed that takes gas diffusion across the bubble wall and bubble fragmentation into account. By aligning the model with experimental observations, the number of daughter bubbles produced after a single lithotripter bubble collapse is estimated to be in the range of 253 510 . This finding is on the same order of magnitude with previous measurements of an isolated bubble collapse in a lithotripter field by Pishchalnikov, McAteer, and Williams [BJU Int. 102, 1681 (2008), 10.1111/j.1464-410X.2008.07896.x], and this estimate improves the general understanding of lithotripsy bubble dynamics in the beam path.

  13. Water at the cavitation limit: Density of the metastable liquid and size of the critical bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davitt, Kristina; Arvengas, Arnaud; Caupin, Frdric

    2010-04-01

    The ability of a liquid to sustain mechanical tension is a spectacular manifestation of the cohesion of matter. Water is a paradigmatic example, because of its high cohesion due to hydrogen bonds. The knowledge of its limit of rupture by cavitation can bring valuable information about its structure. Up to now, this limit has been obscured by the diversity of experimental results based on different physical measures of the degree of metastability of the liquid. We have built a fiber optic probe hydrophone to provide the missing data on the density of the liquid at the acoustic cavitation limit. Our measurements between 0 and 50C allow a clear-cut comparison with another successful method where tension is produced in micron-sized inclusions of water in quartz. We also extend previous acoustic measurements of the limiting pressure to 190C, and we consider a simple modification of classical nucleation theory to describe our data. Applying the nucleation theorem gives the first experimental value for the size of the critical bubble, which lies in the nanometer range. The results suggest the existence of either a stabilizing impurity in the inclusion experiments, or an ubiquitous impurity essential to the physics of water.

  14. Cavitation in fluid machinery and hydraulic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arndt, R. E. A.

    Cavitation and its effects on fluid machinery and hydraulic structures were reviewed with emphasis on the mechanics of inception, the thermodynamic and gaseous diffusion factors on bubble growth, and resulting cavitation. Small amounts of free gas can change the water bulk modulus, with the speed of sound dropping to 15 m/s; this affects pump performance and stability. Most of the cavitation theory was formulated from experimental data which requires analysis of separation and transition to turbulence results; the influence of nuclei size and number density are important, along with the cavitation nuclei appearing in the form of small gas bubbles or solid particles with small quantities of gas.

  15. Dynamics of dissolved gas in a cavitating fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastikhin, Igor V.; Newling, Benedict

    2008-12-01

    A strong acoustic field in a liquid separates the liquid and dissolved gases by the formation of bubbles (cavitation). Bubble growth and collapse is the result of active exchange of gas and vapor through the bubble walls with the surrounding liquid. This paper details a new approach to the study of cavitation, not as an evolution of discrete bubbles, but as the dynamics of molecules constituting both the bubbles and the fluid. We show, by direct, independent measurement of the liquid and the dissolved gas, that the motions of dissolved gas (freon-22, CHClF2 ) and liquid (water) can be quite different during acoustic cavitation and are strongly affected by filtration or previous cavitation of the solvent. Our observations suggest that bubbles can completely refresh their content within two acoustic cycles and that long-lived (˜minutes) microbubbles act as nucleation sites for cavitation. This technique is complementary to the traditional optical and acoustical techniques.

  16. CO2 bubbling-based 'Nanobomb' System for Targetedly Suppressing Panc-1 Pancreatic Tumor via Low Intensity Ultrasound-activated Inertial Cavitation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kun; Xu, Huixiong; Chen, Hangrong; Jia, Xiaoqing; Zheng, Shuguang; Cai, Xiaojun; Wang, Ronghui; Mou, Juan; Zheng, Yuanyi; Shi, Jianlin

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive and targeted physical treatment is still desirable especially for those cancerous patients. Herein, we develop a new physical treatment protocol by employing CO2 bubbling-based 'nanobomb' system consisting of low-intensity ultrasound (1.0 W/cm2) and a well-constructed pH/temperature dual-responsive CO2 release system. Depending on the temperature elevation caused by exogenous low-intensity therapeutic ultrasound irradiation and the low pH caused by the endogenous acidic-environment around/within tumor, dual-responsive CO2 release system can quickly release CO2 bubbles, and afterwards, the generated CO2 bubbles waves will timely explode before dissolution due to triggering by therapeutic ultrasound waves. Related bio-effects (e.g., cavitation, mechanical, shock waves, etc) caused by CO2 bubbles' explosion effectively induce instant necrosis of panc-1 cells and blood vessel destruction within panc-1 tumor, and consequently inhibit the growth of panc-1 solid tumor, simultaneously minimizing the side effects to normal organs. This new physiotherapy employing CO2 bubbling-based 'nanobomb' system promises significant potentials in targetedly suppressing tumors, especially for those highly deadly cancers. PMID:26379793

  17. Impact of shock wave pattern and cavitation bubble size on tissue damage during ureteroscopic electrohydraulic lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Vorreuther, R; Corleis, R; Klotz, T; Bernards, P; Engelmann, U

    1995-03-01

    It is known that electrohydraulic lithotripsy (EHL) during ureteroscopy may cause ureteral damage. To evaluate this trauma potential, find its mechanism and make it possible to avoid it, our research employed photographic evaluation, tissue studies, shock wave measurements and disintegration tests. The setup included a 3.3 F probe attached to an experimental generator with adjustable voltages and capacities providing energies from 25 mJ. to 1300 mJ. per pulse. In general, we distinguish between two traumatic mechanisms: (1) After placing the probe directly on the mucosa the rapid initial plasma penetrates the tissue resulting in a small, nonthermal, punched-like defect, whose depth depends on the energy applied. This trauma has minor clinical implications and is avoided by maintaining a minimum safety distance of 1 mm.; (2) According to physics, each plasma is followed by a cavitation bubble. The maximum size of this bubble depends on the energy applied and ranges from 3 mm. (25 mJ) to > 15 mm. (1300 mJ). In proportion to the bubble size, the ureteral wall may be distended or disrupted, even when the probe is not in direct contact with the mucosa. Therefore, the goal should be to obtain a low energy pressure pulse with high disintegration efficacy. Our evaluation of the pressure waves revealed that the selection of a high voltage and a low capacity leads to short and steep "laser-like" pulses. These pulses have a significant higher impact on stone disintegration than the broader pulses of the same energy provided by currently available generators. PMID:7861549

  18. Contribution of stress wave and cavitation bubble in evaluation of cell-cell adhesion by femtosecond laser-induced impulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iino, Takanori; Li, Po-Lin; Wang, Wen-Zhe; Deng, Jia-Huei; Lu, Yun-Chang; Kao, Fu-Jen; Hosokawa, Yoichiroh

    2014-10-01

    When an intense femtosecond laser is focused in a cell culture medium, shock wave, stress wave, and cavitation bubble are generated at the laser focal point. Cell-cell adhesion can be broken at the cellular level by the impacts of these factors. We have applied this breaking of the adhesion to an estimation of the cell-cell adhesion strength. In this application, it is important to identify which of these factors is the dominant factor that breaks the adhesion. Here we investigated this issue using streptavidin-coated microbeads adhering to a biotin-coated substrate as a mimic of the cell-cell adhesion. The results indicated that the break was induced mainly by the stress wave, not by the impact of the cavitation bubble.

  19. Evaluation of Acousto-Optic Effect on Size Distribution Measurement of Oscillating Cavitation Bubbles Using Optical Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroyama, Takanobu; Ebihara, Tadashi; Mizutani, Koichi; Ohbuchi, Takeshi

    2012-07-01

    A size distribution measurement method of the oscillating cavitation bubbles using the diffraction pattern of the bubbles has been studied by the authors. This method can measure the diameter distribution of the small oscillating bubbles. However, it has a disadvantage in that the measurement result of the method is disturbed by the acousto-optic effect. In this study, the influence of the acousto-optic effect on the measurement was experimentally investigated. As a result, it was found that the diffraction pattern tended to be disturbed along the direction of the ultrasound propagation. It was also recognized that the disturbance could be reduced using the diffraction pattern along the unsusceptible direction. Consequently, it was indicated that the diameter distribution of the oscillating bubbles was correctly measured using the diffraction pattern along the unsusceptible axis by comparison with the reference value measured by the stroboscopic imaging method.

  20. Simulations of shock waves and cavitation bubbles produced in water by picosecond and nanosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Scammon, R.J.; Chapyak, E.J.; Godwin, R.P.; Vogel, A.

    1998-12-01

    The authors compare numerical simulations of bubble dynamics in water with experiments performed at the Medizinisches Laserzentrum Luebeck. Spatial and temporal features of the laser beam were modeled. Plasma growth was predicted using a moving breakdown model. The authors compare the measured and calculated positions of the shock front and the bubble wall as a function of time after optical breakdown in water. Nd:YAG laser pulses of 30-ps 1-mJ and 6-ns 10-mJ were simulated. The authors have extended previous work in which picosecond deposition was modeled as temporally instantaneous and spatially uniform.

  1. Original flocculation technique via acoustic cavitation bubbles driven by 20.3-kHz ultrasound in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizushima, Yuki; Saito, Takayuki

    2013-11-01

    Strange flocculation mechanism of particles (up to 1.0mm) driven by the acoustic field (20.3-kHz) is observed in water. It is not well-known particle formation in acoustic field, like dust striation, but spherical agglomeration. Because kHz-order ultrasound is not acceptable for the separation technique due to its weak-directionality, applicable particle sizes are limited as similar size to a wavelength of the irradiated ultrasound or smaller than that. Hence, particles which are larger than mm-order in diameter are difficult to be manipulated with MHz-band ultrasound. However, our flocculation technique overcomes the limitation. It deeply relates to the motion of cavitation bubbles around the particles. First, in this study, we captured the particle motion and acoustic-cavitation-oriented bubble motion simultaneously by using a high-speed video camera. Second, we measured the distribution of the sound pressure in the water phase and discussed the relationship between that of the sound pressure and the motion of the particle and the acoustic cavitation bubble. Finally, we investigated the effects of the gravity force, the acoustic radiation force and the spatial heterogeneity of the pressure acting on the particle.

  2. Effects of an acoustic diode on the pressure waveform and cavitation bubble dynamics produced by a piezoelectric shock wave generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Songlin; Zhong, Pei

    2003-10-01

    High-speed schlieren imaging, combined with fiber optical probe hydrophone (FOPH) and passive cavitation detection (PCD) were used to access the effects of an acoustic diode (AD) on the pressure waveform and associated cavitation activities produced by a piezoelectric shock wave (PSW) generator. Without the AD, a typical pressure waveform at the focus of the PSW generator consists of a leading shock wave, followed by a tensile wave and several oscillation waves (OWs) of gradually reduced amplitudes. When the AD was placed 30 mm in front of the focus, the amplitude of the tensile wave was reduced and the subsequent OWs were removed. The pulse intensity integral of the tensile wave was reduced by 58%, and subsequently, PSW-induced bubble dynamics were altered significantly. Based on PCD data, the collapse time of cavitation bubble(s) was reduced by about 11%. Although intensive collapse of microbubbles was observed in about 10 ?s following the shock front of the original PSW, the forced collapse of microbubbles was not observed when the AD was used, presumably due to the removal of the OWs. Theoretical calculation based on the Gilmore model confirmed these experimental observations. [Work supported by the Whitaker Foundation and NIH.

  3. Fission gas bubble nucleated cavitational swelling of the alpha-uranium phase of irradiated U-Pu-Zr fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Rest, J.

    1992-04-01

    Cavitational swelling has been identified as a potential swelling mechanism for the alpha uranium phase of irradiated U-Pu-Zr metal fuels for the Integral Fast Reactor being developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The trends of U-Pu-Zr swelling data prior to fuel cladding contact can be interpreted in terms of unrestrained cavitational driven swelling. It is theorized that the swelling mechanisms at work in the alpha uranium phase can be modeled by single vacancy and single interstitial kinetics with intergranular gas bubbles providing the void nuclei, avoiding the use of complicated defect interaction terms required for the calculation of void nucleation. The focus of the kinetics of fission gas evolution as it relates to cavitational swelling is prior to the formation of a significant amount of interconnected porosity and is on the development of small intergranular gas bubbles which can act as void nuclei. Calculations for the evolution of intergranular fission gas bubbles show that they provide critical cavity sizes (i.e., the size above which the cavity will grow by bias-driven vacancy flux) consistent with the observed incubation dose for the onset of rapid swelling and gas release.

  4. Some problems of the theory of bubble growth and condensation in bubble chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tkachev, L. G.

    1988-01-01

    This work is an attempt to explain the reasons for the discrepancies between the theoretical and experimental values of bubble growth rate in an overheated liquid, and to provide a brief formulation of the main premises of the theory on bubble growth in liquid before making a critical analysis. To simplify the problem, the floating upward of bubbles is not discussed; moreover, the study is based on the results of the theory of the behavior of fixed bubbles.

  5. Three-dimensional bubble clusters: shape, packing, and growth rate.

    PubMed

    Cox, S J; Graner, F

    2004-03-01

    We consider three-dimensional clusters of equal-volume bubbles packed around a central bubble and calculate their energy and optimal shape. We obtain the surface area and bubble pressures to improve on existing growth laws for three-dimensional bubble clusters. We discuss the possible number of bubbles that can be packed around a central one: the "kissing problem," here adapted to deformable objects. PMID:15089296

  6. A Thermodynamic Cavitation Model for Cavitating Flow Simulation in a Wide Range of Water Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yao; Luo, Xian-Wu; Jibin; Liu, Shu-Hong; Wu, Yu-Lin; Xu, Hong-Yuan

    2010-01-01

    A thermodynamic cavitation model is developed to simulate the cavitating water flow in a wide temperature range. The thermal effect on bubble growth during cavitation is introduced in the developed model by considering both pressure difference and heat transfer between the vapor and liquid phase. The cavitating turbulent flow over a NACA0015 hydrofoil has been simulated at various temperatures from room temperature to 150C by using the present cavitation model, which has been validated by the experimental data. It is seen that the thermodynamic effects of cavitation, vapor depression and temperature depression are much more predominant in high temperature water compared with those in room temperature water. These results indicate that the proposed thermodynamic cavitation model is reasonably applicable to the cavitating water flow in a wide temperature range.

  7. Scaling in linear bubble models of grain growth

    SciTech Connect

    Mullins, W.W. . Dept. of Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science); Vinals, J. . Supercomputer Computation Research Inst. and Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1993-05-01

    The authors have numerically solved a linear bubble model of grain growth to study orientation effects in a polycrystal on power law growth of the average grain size and on the existence of a scaling form for the normalized grain size distribution function. The authors consider a binary linear bubble model such that the inter-bubble permeability between like bubbles (unity) is different from that (M) between unlike bubbles. The authors have also defined a continuous orientation linear bubble model that allows for a continuous distribution of orientations. The inter-bubble permeability in this case depends on the relative orientation of the two bubbles on either side. The results suggest that scaling and the exponent in the power growth law, in grain growth models that assume uniform grain boundaries, are not altered by introducing anisotropic grain boundary properties provided the initial distribution of orientations is random.

  8. Methane Bubble Growth in Muddy Aquatic Sediment: Insight from Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsman, Regina; Ostrovsky, Ilia; Makovsky, Yizhaq

    2013-04-01

    Methane (CH4) is the most abundant hydrocarbon and one of the most important greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. CH4 bubble growth and migration within muddy aquatic sediments are closely associated with sediment fracturing. We present the modeling results of buoyancy-driven CH4 bubble growth in fine-grained muddy aquatic sediment prior to the beginning of the bubble rise. The designed coupled mechanical/reaction-transport numerical model enables a differential fracturing over the bubble front, simulating the dynamics observed in the nature. We show that this differential fracturing over the bubble front controls bubble shape and size temporal evolution. The intercalated stages of elastic expansion and fracturing during the bubble growth subside with time as bubble approaches its terminal size prior to ascend. Our simulations reveal a high asymmetry in the bubble shape growing with time, with respect to its initial symmetric penny-shaped configuration. It is found that the bubble grows allometrically, when the importance of the bubble surface area growth with time, making it more sensitive to the ambient field of methane concentrations. We analyze the affect of the different sediment characteristics on the bubble shape and size evolution. Modeling of the terminal parameters of the mature bubble emitted from the sediment will permit predicting the delivery of gaseous methane to the atmosphere via the water column.

  9. Small Gas Bubble Experiment for Mitigation of Cavitation Damage and Pressure Waves in Short-pulse Mercury Spallation Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Wendel, Mark W; Felde, David K; Sangrey, Robert L; Abdou, Ashraf A; West, David L; Shea, Thomas J; Hasegawa, Shoichi; Kogawa, Hiroyuki; Naoe, Dr. Takashi; Farny, Dr. Caleb H.; Kaminsky, Andrew L

    2014-01-01

    Populations of small helium gas bubbles were introduced into a flowing mercury experiment test loop to evaluate mitigation of beam-pulse induced cavitation damage and pressure waves. The test loop was developed and thoroughly tested at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) prior to irradiations at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center - Weapons Neutron Research Center (LANSCE-WNR) facility. Twelve candidate bubblers were evaluated over a range of mercury flow and gas injection rates by use of a novel optical measurement technique that accurately assessed the generated bubble size distributions. Final selection for irradiation testing included two variations of a swirl bubbler provided by Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) collaborators and one orifice bubbler developed at SNS. Bubble populations of interest consisted of sizes up to 150 m in radius with achieved gas void fractions in the 10^-5 to 10^-4 range. The nominal WNR beam pulse used for the experiment created energy deposition in the mercury comparable to SNS pulses operating at 2.5 MW. Nineteen test conditions were completed each with 100 pulses, including variations on mercury flow, gas injection and protons per pulse. The principal measure of cavitation damage mitigation was surface damage assessment on test specimens that were manually replaced for each test condition. Damage assessment was done after radiation decay and decontamination by optical and laser profiling microscopy with damaged area fraction and maximum pit depth being the more valued results. Damage was reduced by flow alone; the best mitigation from bubble injection was between half and a quarter that of flow alone. Other data collected included surface motion tracking by three laser Doppler vibrometers (LDV), loop wall dynamic strain, beam diagnostics for charge and beam profile assessment, embedded hydrophones and pressure sensors, and sound measurement by a suite of conventional and contact microphones.

  10. Hemolytic potential of hydrodynamic cavitation.

    PubMed

    Chambers, S D; Bartlett, R H; Ceccio, S L

    2000-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the hemolytic potentials of discrete bubble cavitation and attached cavitation. To generate controlled cavitation events, a venturigeometry hydrodynamic device, called a Cavitation Susceptibility Meter (CSM), was constructed. A comparison between the hemolytic potential of discrete bubble cavitation and attached cavitation was investigated with a single-pass flow apparatus and a recirculating flow apparatus, both utilizing the CSM. An analytical model, based on spherical bubble dynamics, was developed for predicting the hemolysis caused by discrete bubble cavitation. Experimentally, discrete bubble cavitation did not correlate with a measurable increase in plasma-free hemoglobin (PFHb), as predicted by the analytical model. However, attached cavitation did result in significant PFHb generation. The rate of PFHb generation scaled inversely with the Cavitation number at a constant flow rate, suggesting that the size of the attached cavity was the dominant hemolytic factor. PMID:11036554

  11. A Eulerian-Lagrangian description of cavitating flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iben, U.; Ivanov, N. G.; Isaenko, I. I.; Schmidt, A. A.

    2015-12-01

    We propose a method of cavitating flow calculation that is based on the Eulerian-Lagrangian description of multiphase flows. The formation and growth of cavitation bubbles are described using the model of heterogeneous volume nucleation. Results of test calculations demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed model.

  12. Current Status in Cavitation Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singhal, Ashok K.; Avva, Ram K.

    1993-01-01

    Cavitation is a common problem for many engineering devices in which the main working fluid is in liquid state. In turbomachinery applications, cavitation generally occurs on the inlet side of pumps. The deleterious effects of cavitation include: lowered performance, load asymmetry, erosion and pitting of blade surfaces, vibration and noise, and reduction of the overall machine life. Cavitation models in use today range from rather crude approximations to sophisticated bubble dynamics models. Details about bubble inception, growth and collapse are relevant to the prediction of blade erosion, but are not necessary to predict the performance of pumps. An engineering model of cavitation is proposed to predict the extent of cavitation and performance. The vapor volume fraction is used as an indicator variable to quantify cavitation. A two-phase flow approach is employed with the assumption of the thermal equilibrium between liquid and vapor. At present velocity slip between the two phases is selected. Preliminary analyses of 2D flows shows qualitatively correct results.

  13. Growth of a supersymmetric bubble: Inhomogeneity effects

    SciTech Connect

    Clavelli, L.

    2005-09-01

    In a dense star, the Pauli exclusion principle functions as an enormous energy storage mechanism. Supersymmetry could provide a way to recapture this energy. If there is a transition to an exactly supersymmetric (SUSY) phase, the trapped energy can be released with consequences similar to gamma ray burst observations. Previous zeroth order calculations have been based on the behavior in a prototypical white dwarf of solar mass and earth radius (such as Sirius B) and have neglected density inhomogeneity. In this article we show that the effects of density inhomogeneity and of variations in masses and radii are substantial enough to encourage further exploration of the SUSY star model. In addition, the effects discussed here have possible applications to the growth of bubbles in other phase transition models in dense matter.

  14. Theoretical model of ice nucleation induced by inertial acoustic cavitation. Part 2: Number of ice nuclei generated by a single bubble.

    PubMed

    Cogn, C; Labouret, S; Peczalski, R; Louisnard, O; Baillon, F; Espitalier, F

    2016-01-01

    In the preceding paper (part 1), the pressure and temperature fields close to a bubble undergoing inertial acoustic cavitation were presented. It was shown that extremely high liquid water pressures but quite moderate temperatures were attained near the bubble wall just after the collapse providing the necessary conditions for ice nucleation. In this paper (part 2), the nucleation rate and the nuclei number generated by a single collapsing bubble were determined. The calculations were performed for different driving acoustic pressures, liquid ambient temperatures and bubble initial radius. An optimal acoustic pressure range and a nucleation temperature threshold as function of bubble radius were determined. The capability of moderate power ultrasound to trigger ice nucleation at low undercooling level and for a wide distribution of bubble sizes has thus been assessed on the theoretical ground. PMID:26384898

  15. Using cavitation for delignification of wood.

    PubMed

    Baxi, Pranav B; Pandit, Aniruddha B

    2012-04-01

    The Kraft process is the most widely used chemical process for the removal of lignin and other polymers from wood to obtain cellulosic pulp fibres. In the present study, the effect of cavitation (growth and violent collapse of vapour bubbles in a liquid) on delignification of wood was investigated. Steam was introduced in the reactor in order to study the effect of steam driven hybrid cavitation on delignification. The results obtained were subjected to kinetic analysis. The rates of delignification obtained using hydrodynamic cavitation were about 4-5 orders of magnitude greater than those obtained using acoustic cavitation (rate constants for delignification were 9.78×10(-6) and 6.8×10(-1)min(-1) for acoustic and hydrodynamic cavitation, respectively). The energy imparted by the pump in the hydrodynamic cavitation reactor was much higher than that imparted by the acoustic devices and this was considered to be the cause of the higher delignification rates. PMID:22325900

  16. Characterization of an acoustic cavitation bubble structure at 230 kHz.

    PubMed

    Thiemann, Andrea; Nowak, Till; Mettin, Robert; Holsteyns, Frank; Lippert, Alexander

    2011-03-01

    A generic bubble structure in a 230 kHz ultrasonic field is observed in a partly developed standing wave field in water. It is characterized by high-speed imaging, sonoluminescence recordings, and surface cleaning tests. The structure has two distinct bubble populations. Bigger bubbles (much larger than linear resonance size) group on rings in planes parallel to the transducer surface, apparently in locations of driving pressure minima. They slowly rise in a jittering, but synchronous way, and they can have smaller satellite bubbles, thus resembling the arrays of bubbles observed by Miller [D. Miller, Stable arrays of resonant bubbles in a 1-MHz standing-wave acoustic field, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 62 (1977) 12]. Smaller bubbles (below and near linear resonance size) show a fast "streamer" motion perpendicular to and away from the transducer surface. While the bigger bubbles do not emit light, the smaller bubbles in the streamers show sonoluminescence when they pass the planes of high driving pressure. Both bubble populations exhibit cleaning potential with respect to micro-particles attached to a glass substrate. The respective mechanisms of particle removal, though, might be different. PMID:21041109

  17. Numerical simulation of the nonlinear ultrasonic pressure wave propagation in a cavitating bubbly liquid inside a sonochemical reactor.

    PubMed

    Dogan, Hakan; Popov, Viktor

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the acoustic wave propagation in bubbly liquid inside a pilot sonochemical reactor which aims to produce antibacterial medical textile fabrics by coating the textile with ZnO or CuO nanoparticles. Computational models on acoustic propagation are developed in order to aid the design procedures. The acoustic pressure wave propagation in the sonoreactor is simulated by solving the Helmholtz equation using a meshless numerical method. The paper implements both the state-of-the-art linear model and a nonlinear wave propagation model recently introduced by Louisnard (2012), and presents a novel iterative solution procedure for the nonlinear propagation model which can be implemented using any numerical method and/or programming tool. Comparative results regarding both the linear and the nonlinear wave propagation are shown. Effects of bubble size distribution and bubble volume fraction on the acoustic wave propagation are discussed in detail. The simulations demonstrate that the nonlinear model successfully captures the realistic spatial distribution of the cavitation zones and the associated acoustic pressure amplitudes. PMID:26611813

  18. Shock wave emission upon spherical bubble collapse during cavitation-induced megasonic surface cleaning.

    PubMed

    Minsier, V; Proost, J

    2008-04-01

    When a gas bubble in a liquid interacts with an acoustic wave near a solid surface, the bubble first expands and then collapses. In this paper, a mathematical framework combining the Gilmore model and the method of characteristics is presented to model the shock wave emitted at the end of the bubble collapse. It allows to describe the liquid velocity at the shock front as a function of the radial distance to the bubble center in the case of spherical bubble collapse. Numerical calculations of the liquid velocity at the shock front have shown that this velocity increases with the acoustic amplitude and goes through a maximum as a function of the initial bubble radius. Calculations for different gas state equations inside the bubble show that the Van der Waals law predicts a slightly higher liquid velocity at the shock front than when considering a perfect gas law. Finally, decreasing the value of the surface tension at the bubble/liquid interface results in an increase of the liquid velocity at the shock front. Our calculations indicate that the strength of the shock waves emitted upon spherical bubble collapse can cause delamination of typical device structures used in microelectronics. PMID:17662636

  19. Evaluation of the physical forces exerted on a spherical bubble inside the nozzle in a cavitating flow with an Eulerian/Lagrangian approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javad Zeidi, Seyed Mohammad; Mahdi, Miralam

    2015-11-01

    An Eulerian/Lagrangian approach is used to calculate the physical forces acting on a spherical bubble. Reynolds average Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations for the Eulerian approach are solved with a finite volume scheme. The SIMPLE algorithm is utilized for pressure and velocity linkage. To model convective fluxes, an upwind scheme is used. The Reynolds stress transport model (RSTM) is used to calculate the turbulent parameters. In the Lagrangian approach, a modified form of the Reyleigh-Plesset (RP) and Maxey equations are solved with MATLAB programming software for evaluation of bubble motion and bubble dynamics. The carrying fluid in this study is diesel fuel. Continuous filter white noise (CFWN) is solved parallel to the Maxey and RP equations to calculate fluctuating terms of velocity in x and y directions. Six forces exerted on the bubble during its motion are investigated inside the cavitating flow regime. The cavitating regime can be extremely effective on bubble force and increase bubble forces up to several thousand times. Added mass force in the y direction has the highest value among all forces exerted on the bubble during its motion inside the nozzle.

  20. Dynamics of shock waves and cavitation bubbles in bilinear elastic-plastic media, and the implications to short-pulsed laser surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brujan, E.-A.

    2005-01-01

    The dynamics of shock waves and cavitation bubbles generated by short laser pulses in water and elastic-plastic media were investigated theoretically in order to get a better understanding of their role in short-pulsed laser surgery. Numerical simulations were performed using a spherical model of bubble dynamics which include the elastic-plastic behaviour of the medium surrounding the bubble, compressibility, viscosity, density and surface tension. Breakdown in water produces a monopolar acoustic signal characterized by a compressive wave. Breakdown in an elastic-plastic medium produces a bipolar acoustic signal, with a leading positive compression wave and a trailing negative tensile wave. The calculations revealed that consideration of the tissue elasticity is essential to describe the bipolar shape of the shock wave emitted during optical breakdown. The elastic-plastic response of the medium surrounding the bubble leads to a significant decrease of the maximum size of the cavitation bubble and pressure amplitude of the shock wave emitted during bubble collapse, and shortening of the oscillation period of the bubble. The results are discussed with respect to collateral damage in short-pulsed laser surgery.

  1. Dynamic Nucleation of Ice Induced by a Single Stable Cavitation Bubble

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohsaka, Kenichi; Trinh, Eugene H.

    1997-01-01

    Dynamic nucleation of ice induced by caviation bubble in undercooled water is observed using an acoustic levitation technique. The observation indicates that a high pressure pulse associated with a collapsing bubble is indeed responsible for the nucleation of a high pressure phase of ice.

  2. Kinetics of methane bubble growth in a 1020 steel

    SciTech Connect

    Panda, B.; Shewmon, P.

    1984-03-01

    A 1020 carbon steel and a sensitive dilatometer have been used to study the changes in the kinetics, and morphology, of methane bubbles with temperature, methane pressure, and bubble size. The transition from roughly spherical bubbles at low methane pressure to lenticular ones at high pressure, as predicted by theory, has been demonstrated along with the predicted change in pressure exponent and activation energy. That is, at high pressures the rate of bubble growth increases as (P /SUB CH4/ )/sup 3/ and exhibits an activation energy characteristic of surface diffusion, while at quite low pressures th pressure exponent is about 3/2 with an activation energy between that for grain boundary and lattice diffusion. When the lenticular bubbles grow to a diameter roughly equal to that of the grains, their growth kinetics change to be limited by the power law creep of the matrix.

  3. Interaction dynamics of fs-laser induced cavitation bubbles and their impact on the laser-tissue-interaction of modern ophthalmic laser systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinne, N.; Ripken, T.; Lubatschowski, H.; Heisterkamp, A.

    2011-07-01

    A today well-known laser based treatment in ophthalmology is the LASIK procedure which nowadays includes cutting of the corneal tissue with ultra-short laser pulses. Instead of disposing a microkeratome for cutting a corneal flap, a focused ultra-short laser pulse is scanned below the surface of biological tissue causing the effect of an optical breakdown and hence obtaining a dissection. Inside the tissue, the energy of the laser pulses is absorbed by non-linear processes; as a result a cavitation bubble expands and ruptures the tissue. Hence, positioning of several optical breakdowns side by side generates an incision. Due to a reduction of the amount of laser energy, with a moderate duration of treatment at the same time, the current development of ultra-short pulse laser systems points to higher repetition rates in the range of even Megahertz instead of tens or hundreds of Kilohertz. In turn, this results in a pulse overlap and therefor a probable occurrence of interaction between different optical breakdowns and respectively cavitation bubbles of adjacent optical breakdowns. While the interaction of one single laser pulse with biological tissue is analyzed reasonably well experimentally and theoretically, the interaction of several spatial and temporal following pulses is scarcely determined yet. Thus, the aim of this study is to analyse the dynamic and interaction of two cavitation bubbles by using high speed photography. The applied laser pulse energy, the energy ratio and the spot distance between different cavitation bubbles were varied. Depending on a change of these parameters different kinds of interactions such as a flattening and deformation of bubble shape or jet formation are observed. The effects will be discussed regarding the medical ophthalmic application of fs-lasers. Based on these results a further research seems to be inevitable to comprehend and optimize the cutting effect of ultra-short pulse laser systems with high (> 500 kHz) repetition rates.

  4. {open_quotes}Bubble fusion{close_quotes}: Preliminary estimates of spherical micro-implosions in cavitating liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Krakowski, R.A.

    1995-02-01

    Liquids irradiated with intense ultrasonic waves can generate small cavities or bubbles. Upon nonlinear expansion to a state of disequilibrium, wherein the externally imposed hydrostatic pressure far exceeds that of entrapped non-condensable gas, these bubbles undergo a rapid and violent collapse. This collapse, if symmetric, can generate high pressures and temperatures through a number of possible mechanisms. The simplest and oldest explanation suggests a focusing of the kinetic energy of all the surrounding liquid onto the collapsing bubble and the subsequent heating of entrapped gases under either adiabatic or isothermal conditions. Although induced by externally imposed millisecond pressure oscillations, these collapses can occur on sub-microsecond timescales and are accompanied by picosecond light emissions; this combination of sound and light is called sonoluminescence. Recent explanations of observed high temperatures and picosecond radiation pulses accompanying such collapses are based on the interaction of multiple shock waves that are launched off the inward cavity wall. Other potential explanations invoke dipole emissions induced by intermolecular collisions or the release of Casimir energy when a dielectric hole is filled. Conjectures have been made that the processes responsible for sonoluminescence may be extended to generated conditions where thermonuclear fusion might occur. Such an achievement would extend scientific interest in sonoluminescence out of a purely chemical context to include the study of matter subjected to more extreme conditions. The main goal of this {open_quotes}scoping{close_quotes} study is to understand better conditions where deuterium-tritium fusion might be observed in conjunction with micro-implosions in cavitating liquids; prognoses of fusion application at this point are unintended.

  5. Time-resolved monitoring of cavitation activity in megasonic cleaning systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauptmann, M.; Brems, S.; Struyf, H.; Mertens, P.; Heyns, M.; De Gendt, S.; Glorieux, C.

    2012-03-01

    The occurrence of acoustic cavitation in the cleaning liquid is a crucial precondition for the performance of megasonic cleaning systems. Hence, a fundamental understanding of the impact of different parameters of the megasonic process on cavitation activity is necessary. A setup capable of synchronously measuring sonoluminescence and acoustic emission originating from acoustically active bubbles is presented. The system also includes a high-speed-stroboscopic Schlieren imaging system to directly visualize the influence of cavitation activity on the Schlieren contrast and resolvable bubbles. This allows a thorough characterization of the mutual interaction of cavitation bubbles with the sound field and with each other. Results obtained during continuous sonication of argon-saturated water at various nominal power densities indicate that acoustic cavitation occurs in a cyclic manner, during which periods of stable and inertial cavitation activity alternate. The occurrence of higher and ultraharmonics in the acoustic emission spectra is characteristic for the stable cavitation state. The inertial cavitation state is characterized by a strong attenuation of the sound field, the explosive growth of bubbles and the occurrence of broadband components in the acoustic spectra. Both states can only be sustained at sufficiently high intensities of the sound field. At lower intensities, their occurrences are limited to short, random bursts. Cleaning activity can be linked to the cavitation activity through the measurement of particle removal on standard 200 mm silicon wafers. It is found that the particle removal efficiency is reduced, when a continuous state of cavitation activity ceases to exist.

  6. Time-resolved monitoring of cavitation activity in megasonic cleaning systems.

    PubMed

    Hauptmann, M; Brems, S; Struyf, H; Mertens, P; Heyns, M; De Gendt, S; Glorieux, C

    2012-03-01

    The occurrence of acoustic cavitation in the cleaning liquid is a crucial precondition for the performance of megasonic cleaning systems. Hence, a fundamental understanding of the impact of different parameters of the megasonic process on cavitation activity is necessary. A setup capable of synchronously measuring sonoluminescence and acoustic emission originating from acoustically active bubbles is presented. The system also includes a high-speed-stroboscopic Schlieren imaging system to directly visualize the influence of cavitation activity on the Schlieren contrast and resolvable bubbles. This allows a thorough characterization of the mutual interaction of cavitation bubbles with the sound field and with each other. Results obtained during continuous sonication of argon-saturated water at various nominal power densities indicate that acoustic cavitation occurs in a cyclic manner, during which periods of stable and inertial cavitation activity alternate. The occurrence of higher and ultraharmonics in the acoustic emission spectra is characteristic for the stable cavitation state. The inertial cavitation state is characterized by a strong attenuation of the sound field, the explosive growth of bubbles and the occurrence of broadband components in the acoustic spectra. Both states can only be sustained at sufficiently high intensities of the sound field. At lower intensities, their occurrences are limited to short, random bursts. Cleaning activity can be linked to the cavitation activity through the measurement of particle removal on standard 200 mm silicon wafers. It is found that the particle removal efficiency is reduced, when a continuous state of cavitation activity ceases to exist. PMID:22462949

  7. Evolution of spherical cavitation bubbles: Parametric and closed-form solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancas, Stefan C.; Rosu, Haret C.

    2016-02-01

    We present an analysis of the Rayleigh-Plesset equation for a three dimensional vacuous bubble in water. In the simplest case when the effects of surface tension are neglected, the known parametric solutions for the radius and time evolution of the bubble in terms of a hypergeometric function are briefly reviewed. By including the surface tension, we show the connection between the Rayleigh-Plesset equation and Abel's equation, and obtain the parametric rational Weierstrass periodic solutions following the Abel route. In the same Abel approach, we also provide a discussion of the nonintegrable case of nonzero viscosity for which we perform a numerical integration.

  8. Study on Prediction of Underwater Radiated Noise from Propeller Tip Vortex Cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Takuyoshi; Sato, Kei; Kawakita, Chiharu; Oshima, Akira

    2015-12-01

    The method to predict underwater radiated noise from tip vortex cavitation was studied. The growth of a single cavitation bubble in tip vortex was estimated by substituting the tip vortex to Rankine combined vortex. The ideal spectrum function for the sound pressure generated by a single cavitation bubble was used, also the empirical factor for the number of collapsed bubbles per unit time was introduced. The estimated noise data were compared with measured ship's ones and it was found out that this method can estimate noise data within 3dB difference.

  9. Jet formation and shock wave emission during collapse of ultrasound-induced cavitation bubbles and their role in the therapeutic applications of high-intensity focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Brujan, E A; Ikeda, T; Matsumoto, Y

    2005-10-21

    The dynamics of inertial cavitation bubbles produced by short pulses of high-intensity focused ultrasound near a rigid boundary are studied to get a better understanding of the role of jet formation and shock wave emission during bubble collapse in the therapeutic applications of ultrasound. The bubble dynamics are investigated by high-speed photography with up to 2 million frames/s and acoustic measurements, as well as by numerical calculations. The significant parameter of this study is the dimensionless stand-off, gamma, which is defined as the distance of the bubble centre at its maximum expansion scaled by the maximum bubble radius. High-speed photography is applied to observe the bubble motion and the velocity of the liquid jet formed during bubble collapse. Hydrophone measurements are used to determine the pressure and the duration of the shock wave emitted during bubble rebound. Calculations yield the variation with time of the bubble wall, the maximum velocity and the kinetic energy of the re-entrant jet. The comparisons between experimental and numerical data are favourable with regard to both shape history and translational motion of the bubble. The acoustic energy constitutes the largest individual amount in the energy balance of bubble collapse. The ratio of the shock wave energy, measured at 10 mm from the emission centre, to the cavitation bubble energy was 1:2.4 at gamma = 1.55 and 1:3.5 at gamma = 1. At this distance, the shock wave pressure ranges from 0.122 MPa, at gamma = 1, to 0.162 MPa, at gamma = 1.55, and the temporal duration at the half maximum level is 87 ns. The maximum jet velocity ranges from 27 m s(-1), at gamma = 1, to 36 m s(-1), at gamma = 1.55. For gamma < 1.2, the re-entrant jet can generate an impact pressure on the nearby boundary larger than 50 MPa. We discuss the implications of the results for the therapeutic applications of high-intensity focused ultrasound. PMID:16204873

  10. Jet formation and shock wave emission during collapse of ultrasound-induced cavitation bubbles and their role in the therapeutic applications of high-intensity focused ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brujan, E. A.; Ikeda, T.; Matsumoto, Y.

    2005-10-01

    The dynamics of inertial cavitation bubbles produced by short pulses of high-intensity focused ultrasound near a rigid boundary are studied to get a better understanding of the role of jet formation and shock wave emission during bubble collapse in the therapeutic applications of ultrasound. The bubble dynamics are investigated by high-speed photography with up to 2 million frames/s and acoustic measurements, as well as by numerical calculations. The significant parameter of this study is the dimensionless stand-off, ?, which is defined as the distance of the bubble centre at its maximum expansion scaled by the maximum bubble radius. High-speed photography is applied to observe the bubble motion and the velocity of the liquid jet formed during bubble collapse. Hydrophone measurements are used to determine the pressure and the duration of the shock wave emitted during bubble rebound. Calculations yield the variation with time of the bubble wall, the maximum velocity and the kinetic energy of the re-entrant jet. The comparisons between experimental and numerical data are favourable with regard to both shape history and translational motion of the bubble. The acoustic energy constitutes the largest individual amount in the energy balance of bubble collapse. The ratio of the shock wave energy, measured at 10 mm from the emission centre, to the cavitation bubble energy was 1:2.4 at ? = 1.55 and 1:3.5 at ? = 1. At this distance, the shock wave pressure ranges from 0.122 MPa, at ? = 1, to 0.162 MPa, at ? = 1.55, and the temporal duration at the half maximum level is 87 ns. The maximum jet velocity ranges from 27 m s-1, at ? = 1, to 36 m s-1, at ? = 1.55. For ? < 1.2, the re-entrant jet can generate an impact pressure on the nearby boundary larger than 50 MPa. We discuss the implications of the results for the therapeutic applications of high-intensity focused ultrasound.

  11. A scaling growth model for bubbles in basaltic lava flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaonac'h, H.; Lovejoy, S.; Stix, J.; Scherzter, D.

    1996-04-01

    Pahoehoe, an and massive lavas from Mount Etna show common statistical properties from one sample to another which are independent of scale/size over certain ranges. The gas vesicle distribution shows two scale-invariant regimes with number density n(V) ? V -B-1 where V is the volume and empirically B ? 0 for small bubbles and B ? 1 for medium to large bubbles. We introduce a bubble growth model which explains the B > 1 range by a strongly non-linear cascading growth regime dominated by a quasi-steady-state coalescence process. The small bubble region is dominated by diffusion; its role is to supply small bubbles to the coalescence regime. The presence of measured dissolved gas in the matrix glass is consistent with the notion that bubbles generally grow in quasi-steady-state conditions. The basic model assumptions are quite robust with respect to the action of a wide variety of processes, since we only require that the dynamics are scaled over the relevant range of scales, and that during the coalescence process, bubble volumes are (approximately) conserved. The model also predicts a decaying coalescence regime (with B > 1) associated with a depletion of the gas source or, alternatively, a loss of large vesicles through the surface of the flow. Our model thus explains the empirical evidence pointing to the coexistence of two different growth mechanisms in subsurface lava flows, but acting over distinct ranges of scale, with non-linear coalescence as the primary growth process. The total vesicularity of each sample can then be well estimated from the partial vesicularity of each growth regime without any outlier problems.

  12. EXPERIMENTS AND SIMULATIONS WITH LARGE GAS BUBBLES IN MERCURY TOWARDS ESTABLISHING A GAS LAYER TO MITIGATE CAVITATION DAMAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Wendel, Mark W; Riemer, Bernie; Felde, David K; Ruggles, Arthur; Karnowski, Thomas Paul

    2006-01-01

    One of several options that shows promise for protecting solid surfaces from cavitation damage in liquid metal spallation targets, involves introducing an interstitial gas layer between the liquid metal and the containment vessel wall. Several approaches toward establishing such a protective gas layer are being investigated at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory including large bubble injection, and methods that involve stabilization of the layer by surface modifications to enhance gas hold-up on the wall or by inserting a porous media. It has previously been reported that using a gas layer configuration in a test target showed an order-of-magnitude decrease in damage for an in-beam experiment. Video images that were taken of the successful gas/mercury flow configuration have been analyzed and correlated. The results show that the success was obtained under conditions where only 60% of the solid wall was covered with gas. Such a result implies that this mitigation scheme may have much more potential. Additional experiments with gas injection into water are underway. Multi-component flow simulations are also being used to provide direction for these new experiments. These simulations have been used to size the gas layer and position multiple inlet nozzles.

  13. Aspherical bubble dynamics and oscillation times

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, A.; Noack, J.; Chapyak, E.J.; Godwin, R.P.

    1999-06-01

    The cavitation bubbles common in laser medicine are rarely perfectly spherical and are often located near tissue boundaries, in vessels, etc., which introduce aspherical dynamics. Here, novel features of aspherical bubble dynamics are explored by time-resolved photography and numerical simulations. The growth-collapse period of cylindrical bubbles of large aspect ratio (length:diameter {approximately}20) differs only slightly from twice the Rayleigh collapse time for a spherical bubble with an equivalent maximum volume. This fact justifies using the temporal interval between the acoustic signals emitted upon bubble creation and collapse to estimate the maximum bubble volume. As a result, hydrophone measurements can provide an estimate of the bubble size and energy even for aspherical bubbles. The change of the oscillation period of bubbles near solid walls and elastic (tissue-like) boundaries relative to that of isolated spherical bubbles is also investigated.

  14. Numerical study on the effective heating due to inertial cavitation in microbubble-enhanced HIFU therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okita, Kohei; Sugiyama, Kazuyasu; Takagi, Shu; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2015-10-01

    The enhancement of heating due to inertial cavitation was focused in high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy. The influences of the rectified diffusion on microbubble-enhanced HIFU were examined numerically. A bubble dynamics equation in consideration of the spherical shell bubble and the elasticity of surrounding tissue was employed. Mass and heat transfer between the surrounding medium and the bubble were considered. The basic equations were discretized by finite difference method. The mixture phase and bubbles are coupled by the Euler-Lagrange method to take into account the interaction between ultrasound and bubbles. The mass transfer rate of gas from the surrounding medium to the bubble was examined as function of the initial bubble radius and the driving pressure amplitude. As the results, the pressure required to bubble growth was decreases with increasing the initial bubble radius. Thus, the injection of microbubble reduces the cavitation threshold pressure. On the other hand, the influence of the rectified diffusion on the triggered HIFU therapy which generates cavitation bubbles by high-intensity burst and induces the localized heating owing to cavitation bubble oscillation by low-intensity continuous waves. The calculation showed that the localized heating was enhanced by the increase of the equilibrium bubble size due to the rectified diffusion.

  15. The growth of vapor bubble and relaxation between two-phase bubble flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadein, S. A.; Subba Reddy Gorla, Rama

    2002-10-01

    This paper presents the behavior of the bubble growth and relaxation between vapor and superheated liquid. The growth and thermal relaxation time between the two-phases are obtained for different levels of superheating. The heat transfer problem is solved numerically by using the extended Scriven model. Results are compared with those of Scriven theory and MOBY DICK experiment with reasonably good agreement for lower values of superheating.

  16. Percolation models for boiling and bubble growth in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Yortsos, Y.C.

    1991-05-01

    We analyze the liquid-to-vapor phase change in single-component fluids in porous media at low superheats. Conditions typical to steam injection in porous media are taken. We examine nucleation, phase equilibria and their stability, and the growth of vapor bubbles. Effects of pore structure are emphasized. It is shown that at low supersaturations, bubble growth can be described as a percolation process. In the absence of spatial gradients, macroscopic flow properties are calculated in terms of nucleation parameters. A modification of gradient percolation is also proposed in the case of spatial temperature gradients, when solid conduction predominates. 22 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Numerical estimation of cavitation intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krumenacker, L.; Fortes-Patella, R.; Archer, A.

    2014-03-01

    Cavitation may appear in turbomachinery and in hydraulic orifices, venturis or valves, leading to performance losses, vibrations and material erosion. This study propose a new method to predict the cavitation intensity of the flow, based on a post-processing of unsteady CFD calculations. The paper presents the analyses of cavitating structures' evolution at two different scales: • A macroscopic one in which the growth of cavitating structures is calculated using an URANS software based on a homogeneous model. Simulations of cavitating flows are computed using a barotropic law considering presence of air and interfacial tension, and Reboud's correction on the turbulence model. • Then a small one where a Rayleigh-Plesset software calculates the acoustic energy generated by the implosion of the vapor/gas bubbles with input parameters from macroscopic scale. The volume damage rate of the material during incubation time is supposed to be a part of the cumulated acoustic energy received by the solid wall. The proposed analysis method is applied to calculations on hydrofoil and orifice geometries. Comparisons between model results and experimental works concerning flow characteristic (size of cavity, pressure,velocity) as well as pitting (erosion area, relative cavitation intensity) are presented.

  18. Theoretical and experimental comparison of vapor cavitation in dynamically loaded journal bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewe, D. E.; Hamrock, B. J.; Jacobson, B. A.

    1985-01-01

    Vapor cavitation for a submerged journal bearing under dynamically loaded conditions was investigated. The observation of vapor cavitation in the laboratory was done by high-speed photography. It was found that vapor cavitation occurs when the tensile stress applied to the oil exceeded the tensile strength of the oil or the binding of the oil to the surface. The theoretical solution to the Reynolds equation is determined numerically using a moving boundary algorithm. This algorithm conserves mass throughout the computational domain including the region of cavitation and its boundaries. An alternating direction implicit (MDI) method is used to effect the time march. A rotor undergoing circular whirl was studied. Predicted cavitation behavior was analyzed by three-dimensional computer graphic movies. The formation, growth, and collapse of the bubble in response to the dynamic conditions is shown. For the same conditions of dynamic loading, the cavitation bubble was studied in the laboratory using high-speed photography.

  19. Effects of system pressure and heat flux on bubble nucleation and growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Chao; Zhang, Huichen

    2015-09-01

    Characteristics of bubble nucleation and growth are critical for its application. It is affected by several factors including viscosity, surface tension and temperature. However, the effect of pressure on bubble nucleation and growth has been underreported, although it processes significant effect on above characteristics. In this work, a micro copper electrode is etched on a slab covered with copper to produce bubble on the surface by current input. The nucleation time of bubble is measured under different heat flux and system pressures. The nucleation and growth processes are recorded with a high speed camera in order to discuss the effects of heat flux and system pressure on bubble characteristics. The experiment results indicate that the micro electrode with higher heat flux produces more thermal energy, which makes the time of bubble nucleation shorter and the speed of bubble growth faster. Higher system pressure causes the increase of the critical nucleation temperature and also baffles the bubble nucleation and growth. Bubble growth includes the stages of rapid growth and dynamic equilibrium, with the speed being from fast to slow. In the former part of rapid growth, heat flux plays a dominant role in bubble growth. While the effect of system pressure on bubble growth becomes significant in the latter part of rapid growth. Both the nucleation time and bubble growth agree well with the theoretical analysis. The obtained results help to accurately control bubble nucleation and growth required in different application.

  20. Enhancement and quenching of high-intensity focused ultrasound cavitation activity via short frequency sweep gaps.

    PubMed

    Hallez, Loïc; Lee, Judy; Touyeras, Francis; Nevers, Aymeric; Ashokkumar, Muthupandian; Hihn, Jean-Yves

    2016-03-01

    This letter reports on the use of frequency sweeps to probe acoustic cavitation activity generated by high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). Unprecedented enhancement and quenching of HIFU cavitation activity were observed when short frequency sweep gaps were applied in negative and positive directions, respectively. It was revealed that irrespective of the frequency gap, it is the direction and frequency sweep rate that govern the cavitation activity. These effects are related to the response of bubbles generated by the starting frequency to the direction of the frequency sweep, and the influence of the sweep rate on growth and coalescence of bubbles, which in turn affects the active bubble population. These findings are relevant for the use of HIFU in chemical and therapeutic applications, where greater control of cavitation bubble population is critical. PMID:26584998

  1. Cavitation bubble-driven cell and particle behavior in an ultrasound standing wave.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsova, Larisa A; Khanna, Sanjay; Amso, Nazar N; Coakley, W Terence; Doinikov, Alexander A

    2005-01-01

    The behavior of human erythrocytes and 1-microm-diameter fluorescent latex beads in the presence of Optison contrast agent in a single half-wavelength (lambda/2) ultrasound standing wave (USSW) resonator has been studied. The particle movements were observed with an epi-fluorescent microscope and the velocity of the particles and cells was measured by particle image velocimetry (PIV). Acoustic emissions were monitored with a microphone and a spectrum analyzer. Optison contrast agent disintegrated immediately on exposure to ultrasound of 0.98-MPa acoustic pressure amplitude or higher in a chamber driven at its resonance frequency of 1.56 MHz. A discrete cloud of active microbubbles, detected at the pressure node plane, disappeared gradually and was completely lost within 15 s. The microscopy showed three-dimensional regions of circulation of both 1-microm tracer particles and erythrocytes in planes perpendicular to the pressure node plane. A numerical simulation showed that, for parameters that conform to the experimental conditions, a bubble of a subresonance size moves towards and translates about a pressure node plane. This result is in agreement with the experimental observation that the particle and cell circulation is induced by the presence and/or translational motion of microbubbles at the pressure node plane. PMID:15704403

  2. Analogy between fluid cavitation and fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Mullen, R. L.; Braun, M. J.

    1983-01-01

    When the stresses imposed on a fluid are sufficiently large, rupture or cavitation can occur. Such conditions can exist in many two-phase flow applications, such as the choked flows, which can occur in seals and bearings. Nonspherical bubbles with large aspect ratios have been observed in fluids under rapid acceleration and high shear fields. These bubbles are geometrically similar to fracture surface patterns (Griffith crack model) existing in solids. Analogies between crack growth in solid and fluid cavitation are proposed and supported by analysis and observation (photographs). Healing phenomena (void condensation), well accepted in fluid mechanics, have been observed in some polymers and hypothesized in solid mechanics. By drawing on the strengths of the theories of solid mechanics and cavitation, a more complete unified theory can be developed.

  3. Methane bubble growth in fine-grained muddy aquatic sediment: Insight from modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsman, Regina; Ostrovsky, Ilia; Makovsky, Yizhaq

    2013-09-01

    Methane (CH4) is the most abundant hydrocarbon and one of the most important greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. CH4 bubble growth and migration within muddy aquatic sediments are closely associated with sediment fracturing. In this paper we present the modeling of buoyancy-driven CH4 bubble growth in fine-grained muddy aquatic sediment prior to the beginning of its rise. We designed a coupled mechanical/reaction-transport numerical model that enables a differential fracturing over the bubble front (as it occurs in nature), when the fracturing increment stays constant at the bubble head and subsides towards bubble tail during bubble growth. We show that this differential fracturing over the bubble front controls the bubble shape and size temporal evolution, and is significantly affected by the critical stress intensity factor of the muddy sediment. The intercalated stages of elastic expansion and fracturing during the bubble growth shorten with time as the bubble approaches its terminal size (prior to its ascent). Our simulations reveal a high asymmetry in the bubble shape growing with time, with respect to its initial symmetric penny-shaped configuration. It was found that the bubble grows allometrically, while the importance of the bubble surface area growth with time. We also confirmed the earlier predictions about the "inverted tear-drop" bubble cross-section just prior to the beginning of its rise. Modeling of the terminal bubble characteristics will permit prediction of the delivery of gaseous methane from the sediment to the atmosphere via the water column.

  4. The dynamics of histotripsy bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreider, Wayne; Bailey, Michael R.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Khokhlova, Vera A.; Crum, Lawrence A.

    2011-09-01

    Histotripsy describes treatments in which high-amplitude acoustic pulses are used to excite bubbles and erode tissue. Though tissue erosion can be directly attributed to bubble activity, the genesis and dynamics of bubbles remain unclear. Histotripsy lesions that show no signs of thermal coagulative damage have been generated with two different acoustic protocols: relatively long acoustic pulses that produce local boiling within milliseconds and relatively short pulses that are higher in amplitude but likely do not produce boiling. While these two approaches are often distinguished as `boiling' versus `cavitation', such labels can obscure similarities. In both cases, a bubble undergoes large changes in radius and vapor is transported into and out of the bubble as it oscillates. Moreover, observations from both approaches suggest that bubbles grow to a size at which they cease to collapse violently. In order to better understand the dynamics of histotripsy bubbles, a single-bubble model has been developed that couples acoustically excited bubble motions to the thermodynamic state of the surrounding liquid. Using this model for bubbles exposed to histotripsy sound fields, simulations suggest that two mechanisms can act separately or in concert to lead to the typically observed bubble growth. First, nonlinear acoustic propagation leads to the evolution of shocks and an asymmetry in the positive and negative pressures that drive bubble motion. This asymmetry can have a rectifying effect on bubble oscillations whereby the bubble grows on average during each acoustic cycle. Second, vapor transport to/from the bubble tends to produce larger bubbles, especially at elevated temperatures. Vapor transport by itself can lead to rectified bubble growth when the ambient temperature exceeds 100 C (`boiling') or local heating in the vicinity of the bubble leads to a superheated boundary layer.

  5. Optimization of centrifugal pump cavitation performance based on CFD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, S. F.; Wang, Y.; Liu, Z. C.; Zhu, Z. T.; Ning, C.; Zhao, L. F.

    2015-01-01

    In order to further improve the cavitation performance of a centrifugal pump, slots on impeller blade near inlet were studied and six groups of hydraulic model were designed. Base on cavitating flow feature inside a centrifugal pump, bubble growth and implosion are calculated from the Rayleigh-Plesset equation which describes the dynamic behavior of spherical bubble and RNG ?-epsilon model was employed to simulate and analyze the internal two-phase flow of the model pump under the same conditions. The simulation results show that slots on blade near inlet could improve the cavitation performance and cavitation performance improvement of the second group was more obvious. Under the same conditions, the pressure on the back of blade near inlet was higher than the pressure on the back of unmodified blade near inlet, and energy distribution in the flow channel between the two blades was more uniform with a small change of head.

  6. Experimenting cavitation measuring instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toulouse, G.

    1988-09-01

    A calibrating method for measuring the volume of cavitation bubbles is presented and the results of open air experiments are given. The bubbles appearing on the surface of a marine rotating propeller are measured using CCD cameras and optical procedures. Square bubble section first approximations is used. The performance of cameras equipped with light amplifiers is studied in order to use them for real bubble cross section measurements.

  7. One-way-coupling simulation of cavitation accompanied by high-speed droplet impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Tomoki; Ando, Keita

    2016-03-01

    Erosion due to high-speed droplet impact is a crucial issue in industrial applications. The erosion is caused by the water-hammer loading on material surfaces and possibly by the reloading from collapsing cavitation bubbles that appear within the droplet. Here, we simulate the dynamics of cavitation bubbles accompanied by high-speed droplet impact against a deformable wall in order to see whether the bubble collapse is violent enough to give rise to cavitation erosion on the wall. The evolution of pressure waves in a single water (or gelatin) droplet to collide with a deformable wall at speed up to 110 m/s is inferred from simulations of multicomponent Euler flow where phase changes are not permitted. Then, we examine the dynamics of cavitation bubbles nucleated from micron/submicron-sized gas bubble nuclei that are supposed to exist inside the droplet. For simplicity, we perform Rayleigh-Plesset-type calculations in a one-way-coupling manner, namely, the bubble dynamics are determined according to the pressure variation obtained from the Euler flow simulation. In the simulation, the preexisting bubble nuclei whose size is either micron or submicron show large growth to submillimeters because tension inside the droplet is obtained through interaction of the pressure waves and the droplet interface; this supports the possibility of having cavitation due to the droplet impact. It is also found, in particular, for the case of cavitation arising from very small nuclei such as nanobubbles, that radiated pressure from the cavitation bubble collapse can overwhelm the water-hammer pressure directly created by the impact. Hence, cavitation may need to be accounted for when it comes to discussing erosion in the droplet impact problem.

  8. Cavitation in medicine.

    PubMed

    Brennen, Christopher Earls

    2015-10-01

    We generally think of bubbles as benign and harmless and yet they can manifest the most remarkable range of physical effects. Some of those effects are the stuff of our everyday experience as in the tinkling of a brook or the sounds of breaking waves at the beach. But even these mundane effects are examples of the ability of bubbles to gather, focus and radiate energy (acoustic energy in the above examples). In other contexts that focusing of energy can lead to serious technological problems as when cavitation bubbles eat great holes through ships' propeller blades or cause a threat to the integrity of the spillways at the Hoover Dam. In liquid-propelled rocket engines, bubbles pose a danger to the stability of the propulsion system, and in artificial heart valves they can cause serious damage to the red blood cells. In perhaps the most extraordinary example of energy focusing, collapsing cavitation bubbles can emit not only sound, but also light with black body radiation temperatures equal to that of the sun (Brennen 1995 Cavitation and bubble dynamics). But, harnessed carefully, this almost unique ability to focus energy can also be put to remarkably constructive use. Cavitation bubbles are now used in a remarkable range of surgical and medical procedures, for example to emulsify tissue (most commonly in cataract surgery or in lithotripsy procedures for the reduction of kidney and gall stones) or to manipulate the DNA in individual cells. By creating cavitation bubbles non-invasively thereby depositing and focusing energy non-intrusively, one can generate minute incisions or target cancer cells. This paper will begin by briefly reviewing the history of cavitation phenomena and will end with a vision of the new horizons for the amazing cavitation bubble. PMID:26442145

  9. Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosperetti, Andrea

    2004-06-01

    Vanitas vanitatum et omnia vanitas: bubbles are emptiness, non-liquid, a tiny cloud shielding a mathematical singularity. Born from chance, a violent and brief life ending in the union with the (nearly) infinite. But a wealth of phenomena spring forth from this nothingness: underwater noise, sonoluminescence, boiling, and many others. Some recent results on a "blinking bubble" micropump and vapor bubbles in sound fields are outlined. The last section describes Leonardo da Vinci's observation of the non-rectlinear ascent of buoyant bubbles and justifies the name Leonardo's paradox recently attributed to this phenomenon.

  10. Simulation of hydrogen bubble growth in tungsten by a hybrid model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sang, Chaofeng; Sun, Jizhong; Bonnin, Xavier; Wang, L.; Wang, Dezhen

    2015-08-01

    A two dimensional hybrid code (HIIPC-MC) joining rate-theory and Monte Carlo (MC) methods is developed in this work. We evaluate the cascade-coalescence mechanism contribution to the bubble growth by MC. First, effects of the starting radius and solute deuterium concentration on the bubble growth are studied; then the impacts of the wall temperature and implantation ion flux on the bubble growth are assessed. The simulation indicates that the migration-coalescence of the bubbles and the high pressure inside the bubbles are the main driving forces for the bubble growth, and that neglect of the migration and coalescence would lead to an underestimation of the bubble growth or blistering.

  11. Bubble guidance of tubular growth in reaction-precipitation systems.

    PubMed

    Thouvenel-Romans, Stephanie; Pagano, Jason J; Steinbock, Oliver

    2005-07-01

    Numerous types of reaction-precipitation systems involve the growth of tubular structures similar to those formed in "silica gardens". As a model case for this phenomenon, we investigate the rapid growth of hollow tubes in the reaction between sodium silicate and cupric sulfate. The latter solution is injected hydrodynamically at constant flow rates of 1-20 mL h(-1) into a large reservoir of waterglass. In this study, the growth is templated and guided by single, buoyant gas bubbles. The resulting tubes can be several decimetres long and have constant radii in the range of 100-600 microm. Systematic measurements show that bubble size governs the tube radius. According to this radius, the system selects its growth velocity following volume conservation of the injected solution. Moreover, scanning electron microscopy reveals intricate ring patterns on the tube walls. We also show evidence for the existence of a minimal and a maximal tube radius. Finally, we report an intriguing collapse of tubes created at high silicate concentrations, which yields twisted ribbon-like structures. Critical radii and tube collapse are discussed in terms of simple competing forces. PMID:16189571

  12. A theoretical model for bubble enhanced ultrasound heating due to time-dependent bubble size distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xinmai, Yang; Holt, R. Glynn; Edson, Patrick; Roy, Ronald A.

    2002-11-01

    Substantial in vitro and in vivo evidence shows that cavitation activity can affect tissue heating in focused ultrasound surgery and acoustic hemostasis applications. In particular, the heating rate in tissue increases significantly after cavitation sets in. Exploitation of this phenomenon for clinical use requires knowledge of, among other parameters, the time-dependent bubble size distribution sustained during insonation. Difficulties associated with the measurement of bubble sizes during in vitro or in vivo experiments call for a theoretical approach to the problem. We will present a theoretical model that estimates the time-dependent distribution of bubble equilibrium radii. Shape instability thresholds and rectified diffusion thresholds bound asymptotic bubble size distributions, and the instantaneous size distributions are governed by growth rates. The temperature rise caused by such bubble activity is calculated and compared with experimental data. [Work supported by DARPA and the U.S. Army.

  13. Water diffusion, Viscosity and Bubble Growth in Silicate Melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.

    2008-12-01

    For quantitative modeling of bubble growth and volcanic eruption dynamics, it is necessary to know H2O diffusivity in the melt. Over the years, we have been experimentally and systematically investigating H2O diffusion in rhyolite, dacite, andeside, basalt, and a per-alkaline rhyolite (1-7; as well as work in progress). We have also investigated viscosity of hydrous melts and developed a viscosity model for all natural silicate melts (8-10). In this report, we discuss the compositional dependence of H2O diffusivity and the relation between H2O diffusivity and viscosity. Furthermore, we explore how these parameters affect bubble growth rate in various melts. Experimental data show that in contrast to the large differences in viscosity of various melts, the variation of H2O diffusivity with melt composition is in general small, especially at super-liquidus temperatures. For example, when per-alkaline rhyolite is compared with calc-alkaline rhyolite, the viscosity difference is large but the diffusivity difference is small. Comparison between rhyolite and dacite is more complicated. At 1423 K (super-liquidus) and 1.0 wt percent total H2O, the viscosity decreases by a factor of 80 from rhyolite to dacite, but the diffusivity increases by less than a factor of 2. However, at 873 K (sub- liquidus) and 1.0 wt percent total H2O, the difference in the calculated viscosities of rhyolite and dacite is negligible, but the diffusivity decreases by a factor of 6 from rhyolite to dacite. Hence, there does not seem to be a consistent relation between viscosity and H2O diffusivity. When modeling bubble growth rate in different melts, the effect of viscosity variation can change bubble growth rate significantly, but the effect due to variation in diffusivity is small at super-liquidus temperatures. References: (1) Behrens et al. (2004) Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 68, 5139-5150. (2) Behrens et al. (2007) Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 254, 69-76. (3) Liu et al. (2004) Chem. Geol., 209, 327-340. (4) Ni and Zhang (2008) Chem. Geol., 250, 68-78. (5) Zhang et al. (1991) Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 55, 441-456. (6) Zhang and Stolper (1991) Nature, 351, 306-309. (7) Zhang and Behrens (2000) Chem. Geol., 169, 243-262. (8) Zhang et al. (2003) Am. Mineral., 88, 1741-1752. (9) Zhang and Xu (2007) Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 71, 5226-5232. (10) Hui and Zhang (2007) Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 71, 403-416.

  14. Bubble dynamics and size distributions during focused ultrasound insonation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinmai; Roy, Ronald A; Holt, R Glynn

    2004-12-01

    The deposition of ultrasonic energy in tissue can cause tissue damage due to local heating. For pressures above a critical threshold, cavitation will occur, inducing a much larger thermal energy deposition in a local region. The present work develops a nonlinear bubble dynamics model to numerically investigate bubble oscillations and bubble-enhanced heating during focused ultrasound (HIFU) insonation. The model is applied to calculate two threshold-dependent phenomena occurring for nonlinearly oscillating bubbles: Shape instability and growth by rectified diffusion. These instabilities in turn are shown to place physical boundaries on the time-dependent bubble size distribution, and thus the thermal energy deposition. PMID:15658693

  15. Cavitation in a metallic liquid: homogeneous nucleation and growth of nanovoids.

    PubMed

    Cai, Y; Wu, H A; Luo, S N

    2014-06-01

    Large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are performed to investigate homogeneous nucleation and growth of nanovoids during cavitation in liquid Cu. We characterize in detail the atomistic cavitation processes by following the temporal evolution of cavities or voids, analyze the nucleation behavior with the mean first-passage time (MFPT) and survival probability (SP) methods, and discuss the results against classical nucleation theory (CNT), the Tolman equation for surface energy, independent calculation of surface tension via integrating the stress profiles, the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (JMA) growth law, and the power law for nucleus size distributions. Cavitation in this representative metallic liquid is a high energy barrier Poisson processes, and the steady-state nucleation rates obtained from statistical runs with the MFPT and SP methods are in agreement. The MFPT method also yields the critical nucleus size and the Zeldovich factor. Fitting with the Tolman's equation to the MD simulations yields the surface energy of a planar interface (~0.9 J m?) and the Tolman length (0.4-0.5 ), and those values are in accord with those from integrating the stress profiles of a planar interface. Independent CNT predictions of the nucleation rate (10(33 - 34) s(-1) m(-3)) and critical size (3-4 in radius) are in agreement with the MFPT and SP results. The JMA law can reasonably describe the nucleation and growth process. The size distribution of subcritical nuclei appears to follow a power law with an exponent decreasing with increasing tension owing to coupled nucleation and growth, and that of the supercritical nuclei becomes flattened during further stress relaxation due to void coalescence. PMID:24908018

  16. Cavitation in a metallic liquid: Homogeneous nucleation and growth of nanovoids

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Wu, H. A.; Luo, S. N.

    2014-06-07

    Large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are performed to investigate homogeneous nucleation and growth of nanovoids during cavitation in liquid Cu. We characterize in detail the atomistic cavitation processes by following the temporal evolution of cavities or voids, analyze the nucleation behavior with the mean first-passage time (MFPT) and survival probability (SP) methods, and discuss the results against classical nucleation theory (CNT), the Tolman equation for surface energy, independent calculation of surface tension via integrating the stress profiles, the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (JMA) growth law, and the power law for nucleus size distributions. Cavitation in this representative metallic liquid is a high energy barrier Poisson processes, and the steady-state nucleation rates obtained from statistical runs with the MFPT and SP methods are in agreement. The MFPT method also yields the critical nucleus size and the Zeldovich factor. Fitting with the Tolman's equation to the MD simulations yields the surface energy of a planar interface (∼0.9 J m{sup −2}) and the Tolman length (0.4–0.5 Å), and those values are in accord with those from integrating the stress profiles of a planar interface. Independent CNT predictions of the nucleation rate (10{sup 33−34} s{sup −1} m{sup −3}) and critical size (3–4 Å in radius) are in agreement with the MFPT and SP results. The JMA law can reasonably describe the nucleation and growth process. The size distribution of subcritical nuclei appears to follow a power law with an exponent decreasing with increasing tension owing to coupled nucleation and growth, and that of the supercritical nuclei becomes flattened during further stress relaxation due to void coalescence.

  17. A new model for bubble growth, deformation and coalescence for conduit dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, C.; Nguyen, C.; Dufek, J.; Gonnermann, H. M.

    2011-12-01

    The buoyancy of bubbles and the conditions under which they grow (equilibrium vs disequilibrium) control the behavior of the magma during volcanic eruptions. The high vesicularity measured in pumices deposited during explosive eruptions indicates that fragmentation generally occurs at high bubble volume fractions (>0.6). It therefore suggests that dynamical processes associated with high bubble volume fraction, such as bubble-bubble hydrodynamic interactions (deformation), coalescence, and differential bubble growth, can exert an important control on the eruption. We propose a new bubble dynamics model that focuses on bubble growth, bubble-bubble interactions and coalescence at high vesicularity. This model is based on multiphase flow calculations using a free surface lattice Boltzmann model. At the present time, the model is 2D and allows us to track the evolution of a few hundred bubbles distributed heterogeneously in space and growing from a supersaturated melt (sudden or continuous decompression are possible). A key feature of the model is its ability to accurately solve bubble deformation and coalescence under decompression and/or shear flow conditions. Coalescence, in our model, is calibrated against new laboratory experiments of bubble ascent under a free surface (see Chinh et al. abstract, this AGU meeting). We present numerical results for the evolution of the bubble size distribution (and its different statistical moments) as a consequence of decompression, as well as shear deformation. We also compute the distribution of gas pressure in the heterogeneous bubble population. The model is used to construct a new parameterizations to account for (1) hydrodynamic forces resulting from bubble interactions applied on the silicate melt (drag), and, (2) the evolution of the heterogeneous distribution of bubble size and pressure. Lastly, we discuss how these parameterizations can be incorporated in conduit flow models to solve for the evolution of the multiphase magma mixture more accurately, as it approaches fragmentation conditions.

  18. Aspherical bubble dynamics and oscillation times

    SciTech Connect

    Godwin, R.P.; Chapyak, E.J.; Noack, J.; Vogel, A.

    1999-03-01

    The cavitation bubbles common in laser medicine are rarely perfectly spherical and are often located near tissue boundaries, in vessels, etc., which introduce aspherical dynamics. Here, novel features of aspherical bubble dynamics are explored. Time-resolved experimental photographs and simulations of large aspect ratio (length:diameter {approximately}20) cylindrical bubble dynamics are presented. The experiments and calculations exhibit similar dynamics. A small high-pressure cylindrical bubble initially expands radially with hardly any axial motion. Then, after reaching its maximum volume, a cylindrical bubble collapses along its long axis with relatively little radial motion. The growth-collapse period of these very aspherical bubbles differs only sightly from twice the Rayleigh collapse time for a spherical bubble with an equivalent maximum volume. This fact justifies using the temporal interval between the acoustic signals emitted upon bubble creation and collapse to estimate the maximum bubble volume. As a result, hydrophone measurements can provide an estimate of the bubble energy even for aspherical bubbles. The prolongation of the oscillation period of bubbles near solid boundaries relative to that of isolated spherical bubbles is also discussed.

  19. A cavitation model for computations of unsteady cavitating flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yu; Wang, Guoyu; Huang, Biao

    2015-08-01

    A local vortical cavitation (LVC) model for the computation of unsteady cavitation is proposed. The model is derived from the Rayleigh-Plesset equations, and takes into account the relations between the cavitation bubble radius and local vortical effects. Calculations of unsteady cloud cavitating flows around a Clark-Y hydrofoil are performed to assess the predictive capability of the LVC model using well-documented experimental data. Compared with the conventional Zwart's model, better agreement is observed between the predictions of the LVC model and experimental data, including measurements of time-averaged flow structures, instantaneous cavity shapes and the frequency of the cloud cavity shedding process. Based on the predictions of the LVC model, it is demonstrated that the evaporation process largely concentrates in the core region of the leading edge vorticity in accordance with the growth in the attached cavity, and the condensation process concentrates in the core region of the trailing edge vorticity, which corresponds to the spread of the rear component of the attached cavity. When the attached cavity breaks up and moves downstream, the condensation area fully transports to the wake region, which is in accordance with the dissipation of the detached cavity. Furthermore, using vorticity transport equations, we also find that the periodic formation, breakup, and shedding of the sheet/cloud cavities, along with the associated baroclinic torque, are important mechanisms for vorticity production and modification. When the attached cavity grows, the liquid-vapour interface that moves towards the trailing edge enhances the vorticity in the attached cavity closure region. As the re-entrant jet moves upstream, the wavy/bubbly cavity interface enhances the vorticity near the trailing edge. At the end of the cycle, the break-up of the stable attached cavity is the main reason for the vorticity enhancement near the suction surface.

  20. Osmotic pressure-triggered cavitation in microcapsules.

    PubMed

    Shang, Luoran; Cheng, Yao; Wang, Jie; Yu, Yunru; Zhao, Yuanjin; Chen, Yongping; Gu, Zhongze

    2016-01-01

    A cavitation system was found in solid microcapsules with a membrane shell and a liquid core. By simply treating these microcapsules with hypertonic solutions, cavitation could be controllably triggered without special equipment or complex operations. A cavitation-formed vapor bubble was fully entrapped within the microcapsules, thus providing an advantageous method for fabricating encapsulated microbubbles with controllable dimensions and functional components. PMID:26659708

  1. Electron irradiation effect on bubble formation and growth in a sodium borosilicate glass

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, X.; Birtcher, R. C.; Donnelly, S. E.

    2000-02-08

    In this study, the authors studied simultaneous and intermittent electron irradiation effects on bubble growth in a simple sodium borosilicate glass during Xe ion implantation at 200 C. Simultaneous electron irradiation increases the average bubble size in the glass. This enhanced diffusion is also shown by the migration of Xe from bubbles into the matrix when the sample is irradiated by an electron beam after the Xe implantation.

  2. Harness cavitation to improve processing

    SciTech Connect

    Pandit, A.G.; Moholkar, V.S.

    1996-07-01

    Mention cavitation to most chemical engineers, and they undoubtedly think of it as an operational problem. Indeed, the rapid creation and then collapse of bubbles, which is after all what cavitation involves, can destroy pumps and erode other equipment. Cavitation, however, also can have a positive side--presuming it is designed for and not unplanned. In this article, the authors look at how cavitation can be harnessed to improve processes, and the mechanisms for inducing cavitation--ultrasonics and hydrodynamics--and their likely roles. Sonication, that is, the use of ultrasound, is the conventional approach for creating cavitation, and so they turn to it first. Over the past few years, a number of groups have attempted to solve the problem of scale-up and design of ultrasonic reactors. The authors review the systems that already exist and also explore a simpler and efficient alternative to the ultrasonic reactor, the hydrodynamic cavitation reactor.

  3. Interface dynamics and coupled growth in directional solidification in presence of bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamgotchian, H.; Trivedi, R.; Billia, B.

    1993-12-01

    The formation and dynamics of gas bubbles in Bridgman growth of succinonitrile-acetone alloys is examined. The experimental results show for the first time the rich dynamics that are associated with the formation and propagation of bubbles during directional solidification of alloys. The strong coupling of bubbles with the solid-liquid interface is found to result in the growth of elongated bubbles, either attached to a flat solidification front or forming localized cellular as well as dendritic duplexes (bubbles wrapped by a solid envelope). The coupling of the bubble with the solidification front is shown to cause oscillations in the bubble, which are characterized by fast Fourier transforms. When several duplexes are formed, coupled growth and screening may occur. The basic factors that give rise to oscillations, namely competition between source and sink of acetone assisted by capillary convection at the bubble cap, are discussed qualitatively through the development of an internal oscillator model. Coherent sidebranching observed on dendritic duplexes is shown to be due to resonant modes between the bubble cap and the solid envelope.

  4. Towards the concept of hydrodynamic cavitation control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Dhiman; Arakeri, Vijay H.

    1997-02-01

    A careful study of the existing literature available in the field of cavitation reveals the potential of ultrasonics as a tool for controlling and, if possible, eliminating certain types of hydrodynamic cavitation through the manipulation of nuclei size present in a flow. A glass venturi is taken to be an ideal device to study the cavitation phenomenon at its throat and its potential control. A piezoelectric transducer, driven at the crystal resonant frequency, is used to generate an acoustic pressure field and is termed an ‘ultrasonic nuclei manipulator (UNM)’. Electrolysis bubbles serve as artificial nuclei to produce travelling bubble cavitation at the venturi throat in the absence of a UNM but this cavitation is completely eliminated when a UNM is operative. This is made possible because the nuclei, which pass through the acoustic field first, cavitate, collapse violently and perhaps fragment and go into dissolution before reaching the venturi throat. Thus, the potential nuclei for travelling bubble cavitation at the venturi throat seem to be systematically destroyed through acoustic cavitation near the UNM. From the solution to the bubble dynamics equation, it has been shown that the potential energy of a bubble at its maximum radius due to an acoustic field is negligible compared to that for the hydrodynamic field. Hence, even though the control of hydrodynamic macro cavitation achieved in this way is at the expense of acoustic micro cavitation, it can still be considered to be a significant gain. These are some of the first results in this direction.

  5. Gas-bubble growth mechanisms in the analysis of metal fuel swelling

    SciTech Connect

    Gruber, E.E.; Kramer, J.M.

    1986-06-01

    During steady-state irradiation, swelling rates associated with growth of fission-gas bubbles in metallic fast reactor fuels may be expected to remain small. As a consequence, bubble-growth mechanisms are not a major consideration in modeling the steady-state fuel behavior, and it is usually adequate to consider the gas pressure to be in equilibrium with the external pressure and surface tension restraint. On transient time scales, however, various bubble-growth mechanisms become important components of the swelling rate. These mechanisms include growth by diffusion, for bubbles within grains and on grain boundaries; dislocation nucleation at the bubble surface, or ''punchout''; and bubble growth by creep. Analyses of these mechanisms are presented and applied to provide information on the conditions and the relative time scales for which the various processes should dominate fuel swelling. The results are compared to a series of experiments in which the swelling of irradiated metal fuel was determined after annealing at various temperatures and pressures. The diffusive growth of bubbles on grain boundaries is concluded to be dominant in these experiments.

  6. Plasma and Cavitation Dynamics during Pulsed Laser Microsurgery in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Hutson, M. Shane; Ma Xiaoyan

    2007-10-12

    We compare the plasma and cavitation dynamics underlying pulsed laser microsurgery in water and in fruit fly embryos (in vivo)--specifically for nanosecond pulses at 355 and 532 nm. We find two key differences. First, the plasma-formation thresholds are lower in vivo --especially at 355 nm--due to the presence of endogenous chromophores that serve as additional sources for plasma seed electrons. Second, the biological matrix constrains the growth of laser-induced cavitation bubbles. Both effects reduce the disrupted region in vivo when compared to extrapolations from measurements in water.

  7. PHASE-FIELD SIMULATION OF INTERGRANULAR BUBBLE GROWTH AND PERCOLATION IN BICRYSTALS

    SciTech Connect

    Paul C. Millett; Michael Tonks; S. B. Biner; Liangzhe Zhang; K. Chockalingam; Yongfeng Zhang

    2012-06-01

    We present three-dimensional phase-field simulations of the growth and coalescence of intergranular bubbles in bicrystal grain geometries. We investigate the dependency of bubble percolation on two factors: the initial bubble density and the bubble shape, which is governed by the ratio of the grain boundary energy over the surface energy. We find that variations of each of these factors can lead to large discrepancies in the bubble coalescence rate, and eventual percolation, which may partially explain this observed occurrence in experimental investigations. The results presented here do not account for concurrent gas production and bubble resolution due to irradiation, therefore this simulation study is most applicable to post-irradiation annealing.

  8. Vortex cavitation and oscillation in a double-suction volute pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, T.; Nagahara, T.; Tanaka, K.; Fuchiwaki, M.; Shimizu, F.

    2010-08-01

    In recent years, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes have been utilized actively in the early part of the product development cycle. Numerical analysis models have also been developed rapidly and have added cavitation flow analysis functions peculiar to hydraulic machines, in which the flow analysis has been developed remarkably with high-precision and high-reliability. On the other hand, it is well known that three kinds of cavitation, such as vortex cavitation, reverse flow cavitation and cloud cavitation appear in a double-suction volute pump. We have much interest in a relationship among the cavitating flows, pump oscillation and noise. In this study, full 3D numerical simulations have been performed using a commercial code inside the pump from the inlet of suction duct to the outlet of delivery duct. The numerical model is based on a combination of multiphase flow equations with the truncated version of the Rayleigh-Plesset model predicting the complicated growth and collapse process of cavity bubbles. This study highlights especially the mechanism of vortex cavitation occurrence from the end of the suction duct in the pump and pump oscillation which causes cavitation noise from the pump. The experimental investigations have also been performed on the cavitating flow with flow visualization to evaluate the numerical results.

  9. Large Eddy Simulation of Cavitation Inception in a High Speed Flow Over an Open Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shams, Ehsan; Apte, Sourabh

    2009-11-01

    Large-eddy simulation of flow over an open cavity corresponding to the experimental setup of Liu and Katz [Liu & Katz, PoF 2008] is performed using a co-located grid finite-volume solver. The flow Reynolds number based on the cavity length and the free stream velocity is 170,000. The flow statistics, including mean and rms velocity fields and pressure coefficients, are compared with the experimental data to show good agreement. Cavitation inception was investigated using two approaches: (i) a discrete bubble model for gaseous cavitation based on solving the Rayleigh-Plesset equations using an adaptive time-stepping procedure, and (ii) a scalar transport based model for vaporous cavitation. Sensitivity to the model parameters was investigated by varying the model parameters and by changing the cavitation index. Both models predict that the cavitation inception occurs near the trailing edge similar to that observed in the experiments. A periodic growth and decay of bubble size and liquid vapor fraction is observed above the trailing edge owing to local variations in pressure minima. The probablity distribution functions and average number of bubbles undergoing cavitation predict an inception index of 0.9 that agrees well with the experimental data.

  10. Cavitating vortex generation by a submerged jet

    SciTech Connect

    Belyakov, G. V.; Filippov, A. N.

    2006-05-15

    The surface geometry of a cavitating vortex is determined in the limit of inviscid incompressible flow. The limit surface is an ovaloid of revolution with an axis ratio of 5: 3. It is shown that a cavitating vortex ring cannot develop if the cavitation number is lower than a certain critical value. Experiments conducted at various liquid pressures and several jet exit velocities confirm the existence of a critical cavitation number close to 3. At cavitation numbers higher than the critical one, the cavitating vortex ring does not develop. At substantially lower cavitation numbers (k {<=} 0.1), an elongated asymmetric cavitation bubble is generated, with an axial reentrant jet whose length can exceed the initial jet length by several times. This flow structure is called an asymmetric cavitating vortex, even though steady motion of this structure has not been observed.

  11. Simulation of algae growth in a bench-scale bubble column reactor.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaoxi; Merchuk, Jose C

    2002-10-20

    The growth of the marine red microalga Porphyridium sp. in a bubble-column photobioreactor was simulated. The proposed model constitutes a dynamic integration of the kinetics of photosynthesis and photoinhibition with the fluid dynamics of the bubble column, including the effects of shear stress on the kinetics of growth. The kinetic data used in the model were obtained in independent experiments run in a thin-film photobioreactor with defined light/dark cycles. The maintenance term was modified to take into account the effects of liquid flow in the bioreactor on the growth rate. A hybrid method proposed for the approximate solution of the equations gave an appreciable reduction of the calculation time. Extrapolations of the model indicated the possibility of predicting the optimal diameter for an assembly of bubble column photobioreactors. Satisfactory fit was found with the experimental results of biomass growth in a 13-liter bubble column. PMID:12209771

  12. Aerator Combined With Bubble Remover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreschel, Thomas W.

    1993-01-01

    System produces bubble-free oxygen-saturated water. Bubble remover consists of outer solid-walled tube and inner hydrophobic, porous tube. Air bubbles pass from water in outer tube into inner tube, where sucked away. Developed for long-term aquaculture projects in space. Also applicable to terrestrial equipment in which entrained bubbles dry membranes or give rise to cavitation in pumps.

  13. Molecular dynamics investigation of nanoscale cavitation dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasikumar, Kiran; Keblinski, Pawel

    2014-12-01

    We use molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the cavitation dynamics around intensely heated solid nanoparticles immersed in a model Lennard-Jones fluid. Specifically, we study the temporal evolution of vapor nanobubbles that form around the solid nanoparticles heated over ps time scale and provide a detail description of the following vapor formation and collapse. For 8 nm diameter nanoparticles we observe the formation of vapor bubbles when the liquid temperature 0.5-1 nm away from the nanoparticle surface reaches 90% of the critical temperature, which is consistent with the onset of spinodal decomposition. The peak heat flux from the hot solid to the surrounding liquid at the bubble formation threshold is 20 times higher than the corresponding steady state critical heat flux. Detailed analysis of the bubble dynamics indicates adiabatic formation followed by an isothermal final stage of growth and isothermal collapse.

  14. The role of gas in ultrasonically driven vapor bubble growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shpak, Oleksandr; Stricker, Laura; Versluis, Michel; Lohse, Detlef

    2013-04-01

    In this paper we study both experimentally and theoretically the dynamics of an ultrasound-driven vapor bubble of perfluoropentane (PFP) inside a droplet of the same liquid, immersed in a water medium superheated with respect to the PFP boiling point. We determine the temporal evolution of the bubble radius with ultra-high speed imaging at 20 million frames per second. In addition, we model the vapor-gas bubble dynamics, based on a Rayleigh-Plesset-type equation, including thermal and gas diffusion inside the liquid. We compare the numerical results with the experimental data and find good agreement. We underline the fundamental role of gas diffusion in order to prevent total recondensation of the bubble at collapse.

  15. The dissolution or growth of a gas bubble inside a drop in zero gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kondos, Pericles A.; Subramanian, R. Shankar; Weinberg, Michael C.

    1987-01-01

    The radius-time history of a gas bubble located concentrically within a spherical liquid drop in a space laboratory is analyzed within the framework of the quasi-stationary approximation. Illustrative results are calculated from the theory which demonstrate interesting qualitative features. For instance, when a pure gas bubble dissolves within a liquid drop in an environment containing the same gas and some inert species, the dissolution can be more or less rapid than that in an unbounded liquid depending on the initial relative size of the drop. Further, given a similar growth situation, indefinite growth is not possible, and the bubble will initially grow, but always dissolve in the end.

  16. Micropumping of liquid by directional growth and selective venting of gas bubbles.

    PubMed

    Meng, Dennis Desheng; Kim, Chang-Jin C J

    2008-06-01

    We introduce a new mechanism to pump liquid in microchannels based on the directional growth and displacement of gas bubbles in conjunction with the non-directional and selective removal of the bubbles. A majority of the existing bubble-driven micropumps employs boiling despite the unfavorable scaling of energy consumption for miniaturization because the vapor bubbles can be easily removed by condensation. Other gas generation methods are rarely suitable for micropumping applications because it is difficult to remove the gas bubbles promptly from a pump loop. In order to eradicate this limitation, the rapid removal of insoluble gas bubbles without liquid leakage is achieved with hydrophobic nanopores, allowing the use of virtually any kind of bubbles. In this paper, electrolysis and gas injection are demonstrated as two distinctively different gas sources. The proposed mechanism is first proved by circulating water in a looped microchannel. Using H(2) and O(2) gas bubbles continuously generated by electrolysis, a prototype device with a looped channel shows a volumetric flow rate of 4.5-13.5 nL s(-1) with a direct current (DC) power input of 2-85 mW. A similar device with an open-ended microchannel gives a maximum flow rate of approximately 65 nL s(-1) and a maximum pressure head of approximately 195 Pa with 14 mW input. The electrolytic-bubble-driven micropump operates with a 10-100 times higher power efficiency than its thermal-bubble-driven counterparts and exhibits better controllability. The pumping mechanism is then implemented by injecting nitrogen gas bubbles to demonstrate the flexibility of bubble sources, which would allow one to choose them for specific needs (e.g., energy efficiency, thermal sensitivity, biocompatibility, and adjustable flow rate), making the proposed mechanism attractive for many applications including micro total analysis systems (microTAS) and micro fuel cells. PMID:18497918

  17. Numerical prediction of impact force in cavitating flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, B.; Wang, H.

    2010-08-01

    An analytical method including a macroscopic cavitation model based on the homogeneous flow theory and a microscopic cavitation model based on the bubble dynamic was proposed for the prediction of the impact force caused by cavitation bubbles collapse in cavitating flows. A Large Eddy Simulation (LES) solver incorporated the macroscopic cavitation model was applied to simulate the unsteady cavitating flows. Based on the simulated flow field, the evolution of the cavitation bubbles was determined by a microscopic cavitation model from the resolution of a Rayleigh-Plesset equation including of the effects of the surface tension, the viscosity and compressibility of fluid, thermal conduction and radiation, the phase transition of water vapor at interface and chemical reactions. The cavitation flow around a hydrofoil was simulated to validate the macroscopic cavitation model. A good quantitative agreement was obtained between the prediction and the experiment. The proposed analytical method was applied to predict the impact force at cavitation bubbles collapse on a KT section in cavitating flows. It was found that the shock pressure caused by cavitation bubble collapse is very high. The impact force was predicted accurately comparing with the experimental data.

  18. Active cavitation detection of asymmetrical inertial cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everbach, E. Carr

    2001-05-01

    The active cavitation detector (ACD) developed in Bob Apfel's laboratory has often been employed to quantify pressure thresholds for inception of symmetrical inertial cavitation of microbubbles. In the current application, however, a 30-MHz ACD interrogates individual echo-contrast agent bubbles adhering to a Mylar(TM) sheet that are driven into asymmetrical (jet-producing) collapse by a 1-MHz toneburst (>1 MPa pp). The resulting ACD output suggests that asymmetrical bubble collapse is slower than symmetrical collapse, producing less total radiated acoustic power. ACD output mixed with reference sinusoids at 30 MHz and low pass filtered yields Doppler signals that may be useful in quantifying asymmetrical collapses under biomedically relevant conditions, such as on endothelial walls.

  19. A New Unsteady Model for Dense Cloud Cavitation in Cryogenic Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hosangadi, A.; Ahuja, V.

    2005-01-01

    A new unsteady, cavitation model is presented wherein the phase change process (bubble growth/collapse) is coupled to the acoustic field in a cryogenic fluid. It predicts the number density and radius of bubbles in vapor clouds by tracking both the aggregate surface area and volume fraction of the cloud. Hence, formulations for the dynamics of individual bubbles (e.g. Rayleigh-Plesset equation) may be integrated within the macroscopic context of a dense vapor cloud i.e. a cloud that occupies a significant fraction of available volume and contains numerous bubbles. This formulation has been implemented within the CRUNCH CFD, which has a compressible real fluid formulation, a multi-element, unstructured grid framework, and has been validated extensively for liquid rocket turbopump inducers. Detailed unsteady simulations of a cavitating ogive in liquid nitrogen are presented where time-averaged mean cavity pressure and temperature depressions due to cavitation are compared with experimental data. The model also provides the spatial and temporal history of the bubble size distribution in the vapor clouds that are shed, an important physical parameter that is difficult to measure experimentally and is a significant advancement in the modeling of dense cloud cavitation.

  20. Formation and Growth of Micro and Macro Bubbles on Copper-Graphite Composite Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, David F.; Sankovic, John M.; Motil, Brian J.; Zhang, Nengli

    2007-01-01

    Micro scale boiling behavior in the vicinity of graphite micro-fiber tips on the coppergraphite composite boiling surfaces is investigated. It is discovered that a large number of micro bubbles are formed first at the micro scratches and cavities on the copper matrix in pool boiling. In virtue of the non-wetting property of graphite, once the growing micro bubbles touch the graphite tips, the micro bubbles are sucked by the tips and merged into larger micro bubbles sitting on the tips. The micro bubbles grow rapidly and coalesce to form macro bubbles, each of which sitting on several tips. The growth processes of the micro and macro bubbles are analyzed and formulated followed by an analysis of bubble departure on the composite surfaces. Based on these analyses, the enhancement mechanism of the pool boiling heat transfer on the composite surfaces is clearly revealed. Experimental results of pool boiling heat transfer both for water and Freon-113 on the composite surfaces convincingly demonstrate the enhancement effects of the unique structure of Cu-Gr composite surfaces on boiling heat transfer.

  1. Cavitation studies in microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobel, Philippe; Obreschkow, Danail; Farhat, Mohamed; Dorsaz, Nicolas; de Bosset, Aurele

    The hydrodynamic cavitation phenomenon is a major source of erosion for many industrial systems such as cryogenic pumps for rocket propulsion, fast ship propellers, hydraulic pipelines and turbines. Erosive processes are associated with liquid jets and shockwaves emission fol-lowing the cavity collapse. Yet, fundamental understanding of these processes requires further cavitation studies inside various geometries of liquid volumes, as the bubble dynamics strongly depends the surrounding pressure field. To this end, microgravity represents a unique platform to produce spherical fluid geometries and remove the hydrostatic pressure gradient induced by gravity. The goal of our first experiment (flown on ESA's parabolic flight campaigns 2005 and 2006) was to study single bubble dynamics inside large spherical water drops (having a radius between 8 and 13 mm) produced in microgravity. The water drops were created by a micro-pump that smoothly expelled the liquid through a custom-designed injector tube. Then, the cavitation bubble was generated through a fast electrical discharge between two electrodes immersed in the liquid from above. High-speed imaging allowed to analyze the implications of isolated finite volumes and spherical free surfaces on bubble evolution, liquid jets formation and shock wave dynamics. Of particular interest are the following results: (A) Bubble lifetimes are shorter than in extended liquid volumes, which could be explain by deriving novel corrective terms to the Rayleigh-Plesset equation. (B) Transient crowds of micro-bubbles (smaller than 1mm) appeared at the instants of shockwaves emission. A comparison between high-speed visualizations and 3D N-particle simulations of a shock front inside a liquid sphere reveals that focus zones within the drop lead to a significantly increased density of induced cavitation. Considering shock wave crossing and focusing may hence prove crucially useful to understand the important process of cavitation erosion. The aim of our future microgravity experiment is to assess the direct effects of gravity on cavitation bubble collapse through a comparison of single cavitation bubbles collapsing in mi-crogravity, normal gravity, and hypergravity. In particular, we shall investigate the shape of the bubble in its final collapse stage and the amount of energy dissipated in the dominant collapse channels, such as liquid jet, shock wave, and rebound bubble. The highly spherical bubbles will be produced via a point-like plasma generated by a high power laser beam. One major hypothesis that we will test is an increase in shock wave energy with decreasing gravity as a consequence of the higher final sphericity and suppression of liquid jets. To support this, we introduce an analytical model for the gravity-perturbed asymmetric collapse of spherical bubbles, and demonstrate that all initially spherical bubbles develop a gravity-related vertical jet along their collapse.

  2. In situ observations of bubble growth in basaltic, andesitic and rhyodacitic melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masotta, M.; Ni, H.; Keppler, H.

    2014-02-01

    Bubble growth strongly affects the physical properties of degassing magmas and their eruption dynamics. Natural samples and products from quench experiments provide only a snapshot of the final state of volatile exsolution, leaving the processes occurring during its early stages unconstrained. In order to fill this gap, we present in situ high-temperature observations of bubble growth in magmas of different compositions (basalt, andesite and rhyodacite) at 1,100 to 1,240 C and 0.1 MPa (1 bar), obtained using a moissanite cell apparatus. The data show that nucleation occurs at very small degrees of supersaturaturation (<60 MPa in basalt and andesite, 200 MPa in rhyodacite), probably due to heterogeneous nucleation of bubbles occurring simultaneously with the nucleation of crystals. During the early stages of exsolution, melt degassing is the driving mechanism of bubble growth, with coalescence becoming increasingly important as exsolution progresses. Ostwald ripening occurs only at the end of the process and only in basaltic melt. The average bubble growth rate ( G R) ranges from 3.4 10-6 to 5.2 10-7 mm/s, with basalt and andesite showing faster growth rates than rhyodacite. The bubble number density ( N B) at nucleation ranges from 7.9 104 mm-3 to 1.8 105 mm-3 and decreases exponentially over time. While the rhyodacite melt maintained a well-sorted bubble size distribution (BSD) through time, the BSDs of basalt and andesite are much more inhomogeneous. Our experimental observations demonstrate that bubble growth cannot be ascribed to a single mechanism but is rather a combination of many processes, which depend on the physical properties of the melt. Depending on coalescence rate, annealing of bubbles following a single nucleation event can produce complex bubble size distributions. In natural samples, such BSDs may be misinterpreted as resulting from several separate nucleation events. Incipient crystallization upon cooling of a magma may allow bubble nucleation already at very small degrees of supersaturation and could therefore be an important trigger for volatile release and explosive eruptions.

  3. Effects of FLIRT on bubble growth in man.

    PubMed

    Winkler, B E; Koch, A; Schoeppenthau, H; Ludwig, T; Tetzlaff, K; Hartig, F; Kaehler, W; Koehler, A; Kanstinger, A; Ciscato, W; Muth, C-M

    2012-11-01

    Recompression during decompression has been suggested to possibly reduce the risk of decompression sickness (DCS). The main objective of the current study was to investigate the effects of FLIRT (First Line Intermittent Recompression Technique) on bubble detection in man. 29 divers underwent 2 simulated dives in a dry recompression chamber to a depth of 40 msw (500 kPa ambient pressure) in random order. A Buehlmann-based decompression profile served as control and was compared to an experimental profile with intermittent recompression during decompression (FLIRT). Circulating bubbles in the right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) were monitored by Doppler ultrasound and quantified using the Spencer scoring algorithm. Heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), thrombocytes, D-Dimers and serum osmolarity were analyzed before and 120 min after the dive. Both dive profiles elicited bubbles in most subjects (range Spencer 0-4). However, no statistically significant difference was found in bubble scores between the control and the experimental dive procedure. There was no significant change in either HSP70, thrombocytes, and D-Dimers. None of the divers had clinical signs or symptoms suggestive of DCS. We conclude that FLIRT did not significantly alter the number of microbubbles and thus may not be considered superior to classical decompression in regards of preventing DCS. PMID:22706940

  4. Bubble Growth and Dynamics in a Strongly Superheated Electrolyte within a Solid-State Nanopore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, Edlyn; Nagashima, Gaku; Burns, Michael; Golovchenko, Jene

    2015-03-01

    Extreme localized superheating and homogeneous vapor bubble nucleation have recently been demonstrated in a single nanopore in thin, solid state membranes. Aqueous electrolytic solution within the pore is superheated to well above its boiling point by Joule heating from ionic current driven through the pore. Continued heating of the metastable liquid leads to nucleation of a vapor bubble in the pore followed by explosive growth. Here we report on the growth dynamics of the vapor bubble after nucleation in the strongly superheated liquid. The process is modeled by numerically solving the Rayleigh-Plesset equation coupled with energy conservation and a Stefan boundary condition. The initial temperature distribution, peaked at the pore center, is taken to be radially symmetric. Energy conservation includes a Joule heating source term dependent on the bubble radius, which grows to constrict ionic current through the nanopore. Temperature-dependent properties of the electrolyte and the vapor are incorporated in the calculation. Comparison of the model to experimental results shows an initial bubble growth velocity of 50m/s and total bubble lifetime of 16ns. This work was supported by NIH Grant #5R01HG003703 to J.A. Golovchenko.

  5. Nonequilibrium statistical theory of bubble nucleation and growth under neutron and proton irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, J.; Sommer, W.F.; Bradbury, J.N.

    1986-01-01

    Microstructural evolution in metals under particle irradiation is described by a non-equilibrium statistics method. This method gives a set of equations for the evolution of bubbles and an approximate solution for a distribution function of bubble size as a function of fluence and temperature. The distribution function gives the number of bubbles of radius r at time t, N(r,t)dr, as a function of size, r/r/sub 0/(r/sub 0/ is the radius of a bubble nucleus). It is found that N(r,t)dr increases with fluence. Also, the peak value of N(r,t)dt shifts to higher r/r/sub 0/ with increasing fluence. Nucleation depends mainly on helium concentration and defect cluster concentration while bubble growth is controlled mainly by the vacancy concentration and a fluctuation coefficient. If suitable material parameters are chosen, a reasonable distribution function for bubble size is obtained. The helium diffusion coefficient is found to be less than that for vacancies by five orders of magnitude. The fraction of helium remaining in matrix is less than 10/sup -2/; the majority of the helium is associated with the bubbles.

  6. Modeling methane bubble growth in fine-grained muddy aquatic sediments: correlation with sediment properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsman, Regina

    2015-04-01

    Gassy sediments contribute to destabilization of aquatic infrastructure, air pollution, and global warming. In the current study a precise shape and size of the buoyant mature methane bubble in fine-grained muddy aquatic sediment is defined by numerical and analytical modeling, their results are in a good agreement. A closed-form analytical solution defining the bubble parameters is developed. It is found that the buoyant mature bubble is elliptical in its front view and resembles an inverted tear drop in its cross-section. The size and shape of the mature bubble strongly correlate with sediment fracture toughness. Bubbles formed in the weaker sediments are smaller and characterized by a larger surface-to volume ratio that induces their faster growth and may lead to their faster dissolution below the sediment-water interface. This may prevent their release to the water column and to the atmosphere. Shapes of the bubbles in the weaker sediments deviate further from the spherical configuration, than those in the stronger sediments. Modeled bubble characteristics, important for the acoustic applications, are in a good agreement with field observations and lab experiments.

  7. Nucleation and Growth of Bubbles in He Ion Implanted V/Ag Multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Q. M.; Wang, Y. Q.; Nastasi, Michael; Misra, A.

    2011-11-18

    Microstructures of He ion-implanted pure Ag, pure V and polycrystalline V/Ag multilayers with individual layer thickness ranging from 1 nm to 50 nm were investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The bubbles in the Ag layer were faceted and larger than the non-faceted bubbles in the V layer under the same implantation conditions for both pure metals and multilayers. The substantially higher single defects surviving the spike phase and lower mobility of trapped He in bcc than those in fcc could account for this difference. For multilayers, the bubbles nucleate at interfaces but grow preferentially in Ag layers due to high mobility of trapped He in fcc Ag. In addition, the He concentration above which bubbles can be detected in defocused TEM images increases with decreasing layer thickness, from 0 for pure Ag to 45 at. % for 1 nm V/1 nm Ag multilayers. In contrast, the bubble size decreases with decreasing layer thickness, from approximately 4 nm in diameter in pure Ag to 1 nm in the 1 nm V/1 nm Ag multilayers. Elongated bubbles confined in the Ag layer by the VAg interfaces were observed in 1 nm multilayers. These observations show that bubble nucleation and growth can be suppressed to high He concentrations in nanoscale composites with interfaces that have high He solubility.

  8. The origin of the dynamic growth of vapor bubbles associated with vapor explosions

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H.S.; Merte, H. Jr.

    1996-12-31

    An explosive type of vapor bubble growth was observed during pool boiling experiments in microgravity using R-113, where heater surface superheats as high as 70 C were attained at nucleation. This corresponds to approximately 65% of the computed superheat limit of the fluid, compared to the approximate 30% observed at earth gravity for the same system. Photographs and measurements of the vapor bubble growth provide evidence for rates of growth not accountable by conventional models. The photographs reveal that the liquid-vapor interface of the explosive bubbles become wrinkled and corrugated, leading to the conclusion that some type of instability mechanism is acting. The classical hydrodynamic instability theories of Landau and Rayleigh-Taylor, used in conjunction with a model of the early growth of spherical vapor bubbles developed by the authors, predict that the early growth should be stable. These theories do not consider the effects of heat transfer at the interface, which is believed responsible for the observed instability of the evaporating surface. This was confirmed by the mechanisms proposed by Prosperetti and Plesset which, although including the effects of heat transfer, required that the unperturbed liquid temperature distribution be known at the moment of onset of the instability. This is generally unknown, so that no comparisons with experiments were possible up to this point. The present pool boiling experiments conducted in microgravity, some of which result in the explosive vapor bubble growth referred to, permit the precise determination of the unperturbed liquid temperature distribution using a model of the early vapor bubble growth along with the measurement of heater surface temperature at nucleation. The limited results to date provide good agreement with the mechanisms proposed by Prosperetti and Plesset.

  9. Fighting fish (Betta splendens) bubble nests do not inhibit microbial growth.

    PubMed

    Brown, Alexandria C; Clotfelter, Ethan D

    2012-12-01

    Some organisms produce antimicrobial substances in nesting foam to favorably manipulate the environment to which their developing offspring are exposed. We tested if fighting fish Betta splendens foamy nest material, which is comprised of bubbles produced in the oral cavity of nesting males, has antimicrobial properties against a pathogenic bacteria (Edwardsiella tarda), a nonpathogenic bacteria (Escherichia coli), or a pathogenic oomycete (Saprolegnia parasitica). We also tested if exposure to nest material increases larval survival by performing in vitro fertilizations and individually incubating eggs in bubble nest extract or tank water (control). Our results show no evidence of antimicrobial properties of bubble nests. On the contrary, bubble nests provided favorable microenvironments for the growth of Saprolegnia parasitica. Our results confirm earlier work citing the importance of male nest attendance, and suggest that the mechanism responsible for decreased survival in the absence of attending males is pathogenic microbes. PMID:22753365

  10. Bubble Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corrigan, Jackie

    2004-01-01

    A method of energy production that is capable of low pollutant emissions is fundamental to one of the four pillars of NASA s Aeronautics Blueprint: Revolutionary Vehicles. Bubble combustion, a new engine technology currently being developed at Glenn Research Center promises to provide low emissions combustion in support of NASA s vision under the Emissions Element because it generates power, while minimizing the production of carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitrous oxides (NOx), both known to be Greenhouse gases. and allows the use of alternative fuels such as corn oil, low-grade fuels, and even used motor oil. Bubble combustion is analogous to the inverse of spray combustion: the difference between bubble and spray combustion is that spray combustion is spraying a liquid in to a gas to form droplets, whereas bubble combustion involves injecting a gas into a liquid to form gaseous bubbles. In bubble combustion, the process for the ignition of the bubbles takes place on a time scale of less than a nanosecond and begins with acoustic waves perturbing each bubble. This perturbation causes the local pressure to drop below the vapor pressure of the liquid thus producing cavitation in which the bubble diameter grows, and upon reversal of the oscillating pressure field, the bubble then collapses rapidly with the aid of the high surface tension forces acting on the wall of the bubble. The rapid and violent collapse causes the temperatures inside the bubbles to soar as a result of adiabatic heating. As the temperatures rise, the gaseous contents of the bubble ignite with the bubble itself serving as its own combustion chamber. After ignition, this is the time in the bubble s life cycle where power is generated, and CO2, and NOx among other species, are produced. However, the pollutants CO2 and NOx are absorbed into the surrounding liquid. The importance of bubble combustion is that it generates power using a simple and compact device. We conducted a parametric study using CAVCHEM, a computational model developed at Glenn, that simulates the cavitational collapse of a single bubble in a liquid (water) and the subsequent combustion of the gaseous contents inside the bubble. The model solves the time-dependent, compressible Navier-Stokes equations in one-dimension with finite-rate chemical kinetics using the CHEMKIN package. Specifically, parameters such as frequency, pressure, bubble radius, and the equivalence ratio were varied while examining their effect on the maximum temperature, radius, and chemical species. These studies indicate that the radius of the bubble is perhaps the most critical parameter governing bubble combustion dynamics and its efficiency. Based on the results of the parametric studies, we plan on conducting experiments to study the effect of ultrasonic perturbations on the bubble generation process with respect to the bubble radius and size distribution.

  11. Simulation of cryogenic liquid flows with vapor bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Jong, Frederik J.; Sabnis, Jayant S.

    1991-01-01

    Liquid flows in rocket engine components (such as bearings, seals, and pumps) often involve the formation of vapor bubbles due to local superheating of the fluid (either boiling or cavitation). Under the present effort, an analysis has been developed for liquid flows with vapor bubbles, based on a combined Eulerian-Lagrangian technique, in which the continuous (liquid) phase is treated by solving a system of Eulerian conservation equations, while the discrete (vapor bubble) phase is dealt with by integrating Lagrangian equations of motion in computational coordinates. Vapor bubbles of changing size can be accommodated easily by this analysis, and models for the simulation of bubble formation, growth, and motion have been included. The effect of bubble motion and other bubble processes on the continuous (liquid) phase has been accounted for by appropriate bubble mass, momentum, and energy interchange source terms in the Eulerian conservation equations. To demonstrate the viability of the resulting procedure, the cavitating flow of liquid oxygen through a simplified model of a labyrinth seal has been successfully calculated.

  12. Cavitation propagation in water under tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noblin, Xavier; Yip Cheung Sang, Yann; Pellegrin, Mathieu; Materials and Complex Fluids Team

    2012-11-01

    Cavitation appears when pressure decreases below vapor pressure, generating vapor bubbles. It can be obtain in dynamical ways (acoustic, hydraulic) but also in quasi-static conditions. This later case is often observed in nature, in trees, or during the ejection of ferns spores. We study the cavitation bubbles nucleation dynamics and its propagation in a confined microfabricated media. This later is an ordered array of microcavities made in hydrogel filled with water. When the system is put into dry air, it dehydrates, water leaves the cavities and tension (negative pressure) builds in the cavities. This can be sustained up to a critical pressure (of order -20 MPa), then cavitation bubbles appear. We follow the dynamics using ultra high speed imaging. Events with several bubbles cavitating in a few microseconds could be observed along neighboring cells, showing a propagation phenomenon that we discuss. ANR CAVISOFT 2010-JCJC-0407 01.

  13. Bubble Proliferation in Shock Wave Lithotripsy Occurs during Inertial Collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pishchalnikov, Yuri A.; McAteer, James A.; Pishchalnikova, Irina V.; Williams, James C.; Bailey, Michael R.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.

    2008-06-01

    In shock wave lithotripsy (SWL), firing shock pulses at slow pulse repetition frequency (0.5 Hz) is more effective at breaking kidney stones than firing shock waves (SWs) at fast rate (2 Hz). Since at fast rate the number of cavitation bubbles increases, it appears that bubble proliferation reduces the efficiency of SWL. The goal of this work was to determine the basis for bubble proliferation when SWs are delivered at fast rate. Bubbles were studied using a high-speed camera (Imacon 200). Experiments were conducted in a test tank filled with nondegassed tap water at room temperature. Acoustic pulses were generated with an electromagnetic lithotripter (DoLi-50). In the focus of the lithotripter the pulses consisted of a 60 MPa positive-pressure spike followed by up to -8 MPa negative-pressure tail, all with a total duration of about 7 ?s. Nonlinear propagation steepened the shock front of the pulses to become sufficiently thin (0.03 ?m) to impose differential pressure across even microscopic bubbles. High-speed camera movies showed that the SWs forced preexisting microbubbles to collapse, jet, and break up into daughter bubbles, which then grew rapidly under the negative-pressure phase of the pulse, but later coalesced to re-form a single bubble. Subsequent bubble growth was followed by inertial collapse and, usually, rebound. Most, if not all, cavitation bubbles emitted micro-jets during their first inertial collapse and re-growth. After jetting, these rebounding bubbles could regain a spherical shape before undergoing a second inertial collapse. However, either upon this second inertial collapse, or sometimes upon the first inertial collapse, the rebounding bubble emerged from the collapse as a cloud of smaller bubbles rather than a single bubble. These daughter bubbles could continue to rebound and collapse for a few cycles, but did not coalesce. These observations show that the positive-pressure phase of SWs fragments preexisting bubbles but this initial fragmentation does not yield bubble proliferation, as the daughter bubbles coalesce to reform a single bubble. Instead, bubble proliferation is the product of the subsequent inertial collapses.

  14. Visualization Study of Growth of Spherical Bubble in He II Boiling under Microgravity Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takada, Suguru; Kimura, Nobuhiro; Mamiya, Mikito; Nagai, Hideaki; Murakami, Masahide

    Under microgravityconditions, the heat transfer is considered to bedifferent from that in normal gravity becauseof zero subcooling due to zero hydrodynamic pressure in saturated He II. Thus the heat transfer in He II under microgravity is an interesting research target. Microgravity experiment is expected to reveal some hidden mechanism of boiling heat transfer acrossthe vapor-liquid interface because stable large-scale vapor bubblesare formed. In the present study, the behavior of a single spherical bubble generated by a micro heater was observed under microgravity conditionduring free fall in a drop tower for about 1.3 second. The visualized images taken by a high-speed camera were analyzed to examine the time variation of a large vapor bubble ofthe order of 10 mm. It was seen that the sizes of a single bubble increased with decreasing He II temperature for fixed heat input. The bubble size near the lambda temperature was smaller than that at 1.9 K though the effective thermal conductivity is quite small. The magnitude of the saturated vapor pressure seems to be a dominant factor to determine the bubble size. For the case of He I, the vapor bubble growth can be predicted by a simple consideration in terms of the latent heat and the gas density in film boiling state.

  15. Growth of multifractal tungsten nanostructure by He bubble induced directional swelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajita, Shin; Yoshida, Naoaki; Ohno, Noriyasu; Tsuji, Yoshiyuki

    2015-04-01

    Helium (He) plasma irradiation to tungsten (W) leads to morphology changes in nanometer scale by the formation and growth of He bubbles. Initially pinholes and protrusions are formed on the surface followed by the formation of nanostructures. In this study, based on experimental observation, the growth process of the fiberform nanostructures are revisited and the swelling process of the structure is discussed. The novel nanostructures are analyzed from the viewpoint of fractality. It is found that the number of the initially formed pinholes and its sizes have a fractal relation, indicating that the size and number of bubbles formed near the surface have fractality. The fractal dimension is estimated from the brightness variation of a transmission electron microscope (TEM) micrograph and gas adsorption property. Moreover, it is revealed from TEM image analysis that the nanostructure has multifractal feature, probably because of the fractality identified between the number and the size of bubbles near the surface.

  16. Stochastic field modeling of cavitating flows in OpenFOAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranft, Michael; Class, Andreas G.

    2013-11-01

    In analysis is presented for a fluidic diode with low/high pressure drop in forward/reverse flow direction. Accurate description of cavitation is needed due to the dominant effect of vapor bubbles on sound speed. The stochastic field method developed in represents the statistics of growing cavitation bubbles by a set of stochastic fields of vapor fraction which evolve according to the Rayleigh-Plesset equation and local instantaneous LES flow conditions. Cavitation may originate from nucleation sites in the core of turbulent vortices. In this work a RANS model is used instead of LES. Local turbulent pressure fluctuations are recovered based on kinetic energy k of turbulence and its Dissipation ?. In the Rayleigh-Plesset equation these fluctuations are represented by a Wiener process which is superimposed on the mean pressure. Usually a set of stochastic fields is introduced for each stochastic variable. Here two independent Wiener processes, both acting on the vapor-fraction stochastic fields, drive the evolution of vapor bubble growth, so that a single set of stochastic fields can be maintained. The proposed methodology is implemented in OpenFOAM and applied to verification cases including the fluidic diode. Funded by ANPS.

  17. Studies on pressure response of gas bubbles contributions of condensed droplets in bubbles generated by a uniform nucleation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsumoto, Y.

    1988-01-01

    The response of a tiny gas bubble under reduced pressure is investigated in its relation to cavitation. Equations of motion are formulated for gas mixtures inside the bubble and numerical calculations performed for several examples. The conclusions are as follows: (1) at the onset of bubble growth, the gas mixture inside it adiabatically expands and the temperature decreases. Condensed droplets appear inside the gas mixture due to a uniform nucleation and the temperature recovers, thus the motion of the bubble is apparently isothermal; (2) the evaporation and condensation coefficient largely affects bubble motions (maximum radius, period and rate of attenuation of the bubble oscillation) including the uniform contraction; (3) the oscillation period of the bubble is longer as the equilibrium bubble radius is larger when the surrounding pressure decreases stepwise. In this circumstance the temperature inside the bubble is kept constant due to condensation evaporation phenomena and is nearly isothermal; and (4) when the surrounding pressure decreases in a stepwise fashion, the critical pressure bubble radius relation becomes closer to that for the isothermal process if the bubble radius is larger than 8 microns.

  18. Scaling of bubble growth in a porous medium

    SciTech Connect

    Satik, C.; Li, X.; Yortsos, Y.C.

    1994-09-01

    Processes involving liquid-to-gas phase change in porous media are routinely encountered. Growth of a gas phase by solute diffusion in the liquid is typical of the `solution gas-drive` process for the recovery of oil. The growth of a single gas cluster in a porous medium driven by a constant supersaturation is examined. Patterns and rates of growth are derived. It is shown that the growth pattern is not compact and changes from pure percolation to pure Diffusion-Limited-Aggregation (DLA) as the size of the cluster increases. The scaling of the cluster sizes that delineate these patterns, with supersaturation and diffusivity is presented for the case of quasi-static diffusion. In 3-D, the diffusive growth law is found to be R{sub g} {approximately} t{sup 2/3}, which is different than the classical R{sub g} {approximately} t{sup 1/2}.

  19. Using a dynamic point-source percolation model to simulate bubble growth.

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, Jonathan A.; Zeigler, David A.; Cowgill, Donald F.

    2004-05-01

    Accurate modeling of nucleation, growth and clustering of helium bubbles within metal tritide alloys is of high scientific and technological importance. Of interest is the ability to predict both the distribution of these bubbles and the manner in which these bubbles interact at a critical concentration of helium-to-metal atoms to produce an accelerated release of helium gas. One technique that has been used in the past to model these materials, and again revisited in this research, is percolation theory. Previous efforts have used classical percolation theory to qualitatively and quantitatively model the behavior of interstitial helium atoms in a metal tritide lattice; however, higher fidelity models are needed to predict the distribution of helium bubbles and include features that capture the underlying physical mechanisms present in these materials. In this work, we enhance classical percolation theory by developing the dynamic point-source percolation model. This model alters the traditionally binary character of site occupation probabilities by enabling them to vary depending on proximity to existing occupied sites, i.e. nucleated bubbles. This revised model produces characteristics for one and two dimensional systems that are extremely comparable with measurements from three dimensional physical samples. Future directions for continued development of the dynamic model are also outlined.

  20. The importance of control over bubble size distribution in pulsed megasonic cleaning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauptmann, Marc; Struyf, Herbert; Mertens, Paul; Heyns, Marc; De Gendt, Stefan; Glorieux, Christ; Brems, Steven

    2012-05-01

    The presence of acoustic cavitation in the cleaning liquid is a crucial precondition for cleaning action. One can achieve enhanced cleaning by periodically switching the ultrasonic agitation on and off rather than sonicating the liquid in a continuous fashion. The physical effects leading to that improvement are investigated experimentally with a dedicated setup and correlated to cleaning results obtained in an experimental cleaning tank. With the first setup, sonoluminescence and cavitation noise are measured simultaneously while imaging the nucleation and the interaction of the bubbles with the sound field using Hi-Speed Stroboscopic Schlieren Imaging. In this way it is possible to identify the role of streamer bubbles and transient cavitation. Furthermore, the attenuation of the sound field due to the highly efficient bubble induced acoustic scattering and the growth of bubbles due to coalescence is investigated. The results give an idea of the stability of the bubble size distribution during and after the nucleation process. The measurements obtained for pulsed megasonic agitation are compared to that obtained while sonicating the liquid continuously. They are further correlated to experimental data on particle removal efficiency for varying pulse duration, and corresponding cavitation noise measurements. Here, the latter proves to be a suitable and easy-to-do method to identify cleaning regimes beforehand.

  1. Scaling of single-bubble growth in a porous medium

    SciTech Connect

    Satik, C.; Li, X.; Yortsos, Y.C.

    1995-04-01

    Mass-transfer driven growth of a single gas cluster in a porous medium under the application of a supersaturation in the far field is examined. We discuss the growth pattern and its growth rate. Contrary to compact (spherical) growth in the bulk, growth patterns in porous media are disordered and vary from percolation to diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) as the cluster size increases. At conditions of low supersaturation, scaling laws for the boundaries that delineate these patterns and of the corresponding growth rates are derived. In three dimensions (3D), it is found that the cluster grows as {ital R}{sub {ital g}}{similar_to}{ital t}{sup 1/({ital D}}{sub {ital f}}{minus}1), where {ital D}{sub {ital f}} is the pattern fractal dimension ({approx}2.50 for percolation or DLA). A similar result involving logarithmic corrections is found for 2D. These results generalize the classical scaling {ital R}{sub {ital g}}{similar_to}{ital t}{sup 1/2} to fractal clusters.

  2. Vapor Cavitation in Dynamically Loaded Journal Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, B. O.; Hamrock, B. J.

    1983-01-01

    High speed motion camera experiments were performed on dynamically loaded journal bearings. The length to diameter ratio of the bearing, the speed of the roller and the tube, the surface material of the roller, and the static and dynamic eccentricity of the bearing were varied. One hundred and thirty-four cases were filmed. The occurrence of vapor cavitation was clearly evident in the films and figures presented. Vapor cavitation was found to occur when the tensile stress applied to the oil exceeded the tensile strength of the oil or the binding of the oil to the surface. The physical situation in which vapor cavitation occurs is during the squeezing and sliding motion within a bearing. Besides being able to accurately capture the vapor cavitation on film, an analysis of the formation and collapse of the cavitation bubbles and characteristics of the bubble content are presented.

  3. Observations and measurements in cloud cavitating flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, G. H.; Wang, G. Y.; Hu, C. L.; Huang, B.; Zhang, M. D.

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to shed light on the cloud cavitating flow and associated characteristic of pressure fluctuation near wall. A simultaneous sampling technique is used to synchronize the observations of cavitation instantaneous behaviour and the measurements of pressure signals near wall in a convergent-divergent channel. The results show that, a typical quasi-periodical sheet/cloud cavitation can be categorized into three stages: (1) the growth of attached cavity; (2) the shedding of the attached cavity; (3) the development and collapse of the detached cavities. At the stage one, the magnitudes of pressure fluctuation under the attached cavity are limited. However, they become significant in the closure region of attached cavity, especially, when attached cavity reaches its maximum length. At the stage two, the attached cavity begins to shed small detached cavity, leading to the generation of small local pressure fluctuations with higher frequency. At the stage three, a large detached cavity is gradually formed in the rear of the channel. When it collapses rapidly in the downstream, pressure pulses with the magnitudes of the order of several atmospheres are detected. The propagation speeds of pressure pulses in different region are found to be related with the bubble density in the flow field.

  4. Cavitation due to an impacting sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Graaf, K. L.; Brandner, P. A.; Pearce, B. W.; Lee, J. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Cavitation associated with the impact of a sphere on a flat surface is investigated using high-speed photography. The sphere, of diameter 15 or 45 mm and made from Ertacetal® or stainless steel, was fully submerged and accelerated using a spring-loaded mechanism to achieve Reynolds numbers based on impact velocity and sphere radius of up to 7.2×104. The static pressure and impact velocity were varied to achieve cavitation numbers ranging from 8.9 to 120.9. High-speed photography of the impacting sphere and induced cavitation bubble was filmed at 105-140 kHz. A log law relationship was found between the non-dimensional maximum bubble radius and the cavitation number. The relationship was modulated by the material properties. Interaction between the sphere and the bubble was also noted.

  5. Intense cavitation at extreme static pressure.

    PubMed

    Pishchalnikov, Yuri A; Gutierrez, Joel; Dunbar, Wylene W; Philpott, Richard W

    2016-02-01

    Cavitation is usually performed at hydrostatic pressures at or near 0.1 MPa. Higher static pressure produces more intense cavitation, but requires an apparatus that can build high amplitude acoustic waves with rarefactions exceeding the cavitation threshold. The absence of such an apparatus has prevented the achievement of intense acoustic cavitation, hindering research and the development of new applications. Here we describe a new high-pressure spherical resonator system, as well as experimental and modeling results in water and liquid metal (gallium), for cavitation at hydrostatic pressures between 10 and 150 MPa. Our computational data, using HYADES plasma hydrodynamics code, show the formation of dense plasma that, under these conditions, reaches peak pressures of about three to four orders of magnitude greater than the hydrostatic pressure in the bulk liquid and temperatures in the range of 100,000 K. Passive cavitation detection (PCD) data validate both a linear increase in shock wave amplitude and the production of highly intense concentrations of mechanical energy in the collapsing bubbles. High-speed camera observations show the formation of bubble clusters from single bubbles. The increased shock wave amplitude produced by bubble clusters, measured using PCD and fiber optic probe hydrophone, was consistent with current understanding that bubble clusters enable amplification of energy produced. PMID:26341849

  6. CAVITATION DAMAGE STUDY VIA A NOVEL REPETITIVE PRESSURE PULSE APPROACH

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Ren, Fei; Wang, Hong

    2010-01-01

    Cavitation damage can significantly affect system performance. Thus, there is great interest in characterizing cavitation damage and improving materials resistance to cavitation damage. In this paper, we present a novel methodology to simulate cavitation environment. A pulsed laser is utilized to induce optical breakdown in the cavitation media, with the emission of shock wave and the generation of bubbles. The pressure waves induced by the optical breakdown fluctuate/propagate within the media, which enables the cavitation to occur and to further develop cavitation damage at the solid boundary. Using the repetitive pulsed-pressure apparatus developed in the current study, cavitation damage in water media was verified on stainless steel and aluminum samples. Characteristic cavitation damages such as pitting and indentation are observed on sample surfaces using scanning electron microscopy.

  7. Enhanced Generic Phase-field Model of Irradiation Materials: Fission Gas Bubble Growth Kinetics in Polycrystalline UO2

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yulan; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Montgomery, Robert O.; Gao, Fei; Sun, Xin

    2012-05-30

    Experiments show that inter-granular and intra-granular gas bubbles have different growth kinetics which results in heterogeneous gas bubble microstructures in irradiated nuclear fuels. A science-based model predicting the heterogeneous microstructure evolution kinetics is desired, which enables one to study the effect of thermodynamic and kinetic properties of the system on gas bubble microstructure evolution kinetics and morphology, improve the understanding of the formation mechanisms of heterogeneous gas bubble microstructure, and provide the microstructure to macroscale approaches to study their impact on thermo-mechanical properties such as thermo-conductivity, gas release, volume swelling, and cracking. In our previous report 'Mesoscale Benchmark Demonstration, Problem 1: Mesoscale Simulations of Intra-granular Fission Gas Bubbles in UO2 under Post-irradiation Thermal Annealing', we developed a phase-field model to simulate the intra-granular gas bubble evolution in a single crystal during post-irradiation thermal annealing. In this work, we enhanced the model by incorporating thermodynamic and kinetic properties at grain boundaries, which can be obtained from atomistic simulations, to simulate fission gas bubble growth kinetics in polycrystalline UO2 fuels. The model takes into account of gas atom and vacancy diffusion, vacancy trapping and emission at defects, gas atom absorption and resolution at gas bubbles, internal pressure in gas bubbles, elastic interaction between defects and gas bubbles, and the difference of thermodynamic and kinetic properties in matrix and grain boundaries. We applied the model to simulate gas atom segregation at grain boundaries and the effect of interfacial energy and gas mobility on gas bubble morphology and growth kinetics in a bi-crystal UO2 during post-irradiation thermal annealing. The preliminary results demonstrate that the model can produce the equilibrium thermodynamic properties and the morphology of gas bubbles at grain boundaries for given grain boundary properties. More validation of the model capability in polycrystalline is underway.

  8. Dissolved water distribution in vesicular magmatic glass records both decompressive bubble growth and quench resorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, I. M.; Llewellin, E.; Humphreys, M.; Nichols, A. R.; Burgisser, A.; Schipper, C.

    2013-12-01

    Water distribution in magma varies over the lifetime of an eruption due to a variety of processes, including decompressive degassing of the melt, cooling during the quench from melt to glass, and post-emplacement hydration under ambient conditions. Correct interpretation of water distributions in erupted pyroclasts can therefore offer crucial insights into the dynamics of eruption mechanisms and emplacement histories. Volcanic eruptions are driven by the nucleation and growth of bubbles in magma. Bubbles grow as volatile species in the melt, of which water is volumetrically the most important, diffuse down a concentration gradient towards and across the bubble wall. On cooling, the melt quenches to glass, preserving the spatial distribution of water concentration around the bubbles (now vesicles). We use Backscatter Scanning Electron Microscopy (BSEM), Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) and Fourier Transform Infra-Red spectroscopy (FTIR) to measure the spatial distribution of water around vesicles in experimentally-vesiculated samples. We find that, contrary to expectation, the total water concentration increases (by up to 2 wt.%) in the ~30 microns closest to the vesicle wall. Our samples record significant resorption of water back into the melt around bubbles during the quench process, a process which represents ';regassing' of the magma. We propose that the observed total water resorption profiles result from the increase in the equilibrium solubility of water as temperature decreases during the quench to glass, and that this resorption locally overprints the pre-existing concentration total water profile resulting from bubble growth during decompression. This resorption occurs over the very short timescales of rapid experimental quench (3-10 seconds) resulting in strongly disequilibrium water speciation. Water re-enters the melt as molecular water leading to enrichment in molecular water around vesicles, while the distribution of hydroxyl groups remains relatively unaltered during quench, thus preserving information about syn-experimental (or syn-eruptive) degassing. Our work demonstrates the effectiveness of two tools for deciphering the water contents of pyroclasts. BSEM imaging of glassy pyroclasts offers an easy, qualitative assessment of whether glass has been affected by quench resorption or secondary alteration processes, which becomes quantitative if calibrated by a technique such as SIMS. FTIR speciation data, meanwhile, enables the cause of bubble resorption to be identified, since resorption caused by pressure increase and by temperature decrease will result in distinctly different distributions of water species. We present here data extracted using these tools that demonstrate the potential impact of temperature-controlled quench resorption, which can reduce bubble volumes and sample porosities by a factor of two and reintroduce significant amounts of water back into the melt, with implications for obsidian and rheomorphic flow mechanisms.

  9. Nuclei and propeller cavitation inception

    SciTech Connect

    Gindroz, B.; Billet, M.L.

    1994-12-31

    Propeller cavitation inception tests were conducted in the Grand Tunnel Hydrodynamique (GTH) of the Bassin d`Essaid des Carenes. Both acoustic and visual cavitation inception were determined for leading-edge sheet, travelling bubble, and tip vortex. These data were obtained for specific water quality conditions. The water quality was determined from cavitation susceptibility meter measurements for degassed water (maximum liquid tension, few nuclei), low injection rate of microbubbles (medium liquid tension, low nuclei concentration), medium injection rate of microbubbles (medium liquid tension, high nuclei concentration) and high injection rate of microbubbles (minimum liquid tension, high nuclei concentration). Results clearly demonstrate a different influence of water quality for each type of cavitation. Little variation in cavitation inception index for a significant increase in liquid tension and microbubble size distribution was found for leading-edge sheet; however, tip vortex cavitation inception index decreased significantly for an increase in liquid tension. In addition, a dependency on event rate was determined for tip vortex cavitation inception.

  10. In situ TEM observation of growth behavior of Kr bubbles in zirconium alloy during post-implantation annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ran, Guang; Xu, Jiangkun; Shen, Qiang; Zhang, Jian; Li, Ning; Wang, Lumin

    2013-07-01

    The growth behavior of the Kr bubbles in Kr+ irradiated Zr-1.1Nb-1.51Fe-0.26Cu-0.72Ni alloy was studied by in situ transmission electron microscopy. Results show that the distributions of Kr bubbles are not uniform in the zirconium alloy matrix after annealing at 700 K, 875 K, 1025 K, 1125 K and 1225 K, respectively. The Kr bubbles started to grow slowly when the sample was annealed at a temperature below 1025 K. The average sizes of the gas bubbles were observed to grow only about 0.4 nm in diameter at 700 K for 170 min and 0.9 nm at 875 K for 240 min, respectively. However, gas bubbles grew very quickly at 1225 K. The largest size of the gas bubbles is over 200 nm after 180 min annealing. The relationship between the bubble size and the annealing time was obtained at the designed annealing temperature. An empirical formula for calculating the bubble size was suggested by fitting equations derived from the experiment data. Finally, the growth mechanism of the bubbles in the zirconium alloy was discussed.

  11. Cavitation inception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acosta, Allan J.

    1987-12-01

    The present research effort on a special topic of Cavitation Inception was initiated on 1 July 1983 and was continued through June 30, 1987. This special area of interest was specifically directed towards the observation of microparticulates and microbubbles in the natural waters of the ocean. The motivation for this example of field work in the study of cavitation inception is that there is, even today, a great scarcity of information about the concentrations of microparticulates of all types in the natural waters that ships and all naval equipment may be expected to operate within. This is an important issue for several reasons; first of all it is known that an absence of microbubbles in laboratory cavitation test facilities leads to erroneous estimates of the inception of cavitation itself and the form and extent of the patterns that develop subsequent to the onset of cavitation. These kinds of laboratory cavitation scaling problems were beautifully exemplified in cavitation tests in the Netherlands vacuum towing tank where to achieve even rough cavitation similarity with prototypical propeller cavitation performance the waters of the towing tank had to be seeded with microbubbles formed by electrolysis.

  12. Application of signal analysis to cavitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, C. S.; Veerabhadra Rao, P.

    1984-01-01

    The diagnostic facilities of the cross power spectrum and the coherence function have been employed to enhance the identification of not only the inception of cavitation, but also its level. Two piezoelectric pressure transducers placed in the downstream chamber of a model spool valve undergoing various levels of cavitation allowed for the use of both functions - the phase angle of the complex cross spectrum and the dimensionless coherence function - to sense clearly the difference between noise levels associated with a noncavitating jet from those once cavitation inception is attained. The cavitation noise within the chamber exhibited quite a regular character in terms of the phase difference between instruments for limited cavitation. Varying cavitation levels clearly illustrated the effect of bubble size on the attendant frequency range for which there was an extremely high coherence or nearly perfect causality.

  13. Helium defects interactions and mechanism of helium bubble growth in tungsten: A molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiao-Chun; Liu, Yi-Nan; Yu, Yi; Luo, Guang-Nan; Shu, Xiaolin; Lu, Guang-Hong

    2014-08-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to investigate the interactions between helium (He) and defects in tungsten (W). The binding energy between He and He cluster is shown to be positive, which increases with increasing He cluster size. Both the W self-interstitial atoms (SIAs) and the vacancy can promote the He cluster formation. The binding energies of a He, a vacancy and an SIA W to a He-vacancy cluster (HenVm) in W are also investigated, which depend on the n/m ratio. According to these results, we propose the formation and growth mechanism of He bubbles, which involves the procedures of He-vacancy cluster formation, the capturing of vacancies, then He atoms, and vacancies again. The mechanism provides a good reference to understand the initial stage of the He bubble formation and growth in W.

  14. What controls Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth rate and the formation of bubbles?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yizengaw, E.; Moldwin, M.; Zesta, E.; Damtie, B.; Rabiu, B.; Valladares, C. E.; Stoneback, R.

    2014-12-01

    According to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) growth rate mathematical expression, the vertical drift is supposed to be the primary component that controls the RTI growth rate. However, in the African sector that does not seem to be the case. In this paper we present independent ground- and space-based observations that consistently show weaker vertical drift (both dayside and evening sector) in the African sector compared with the American sector. On the other hand, observations from both satellite and recently deployed ground-based instruments have shown that the African sector is home to stronger and year-round ionospheric bubbles/irregularities and scintillations compared to the American and Asian sectors. The question is if the drift is weaker in the African sector, what causes these strong bubbles that have been observed in the African sector almost throughout the night and during all seasons? Are there other mechanisms that initiate RTI growth other than vertical drift? Would it be the neutral winds that cause the long lasting bubbles in Africa? If it is the neutral wind, why are the winds unique in terms of orientation and magnitude in the African sector compared to other longitudinal sectors?

  15. Exploring the limits of cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Stephen Day

    In acoustic cavitation, a sound field forces small gas bubbles in a fluid to oscillate in a non-linear fashion to produce high temperature, high pressure and even the emission of light---sonoluminescence (SL). These temperatures and pressures have fueled speculation that cavitation concentrates enough energy to initiate an acoustic inertial confinement fusion (AICF) reaction. This dissertation is dedicated to probing different systems in an attempt to observe evidence of a deuterium-deuterium (D-D) fusion reaction; consideration was always taken to choose systems that could simultaneously be probed for interesting concepts related to the basic understanding of cavitation. The primary system sought to increase the strength of the cavitation collapse by applying a larger force to the bubble radial motion; this research developed a resonator capable of increasing the acoustic pressure amplitude by a factor of 25 above typical SL resonators. A new nucleation method was discovered that allowed for a more authentic probe of the acoustical effect on the bubble with a reduced dependence on the nucleation. Restricting the vapor content through chemical means provides a second method of increasing the energy of the cavitation collapse. Previous experiments have shown increased SL emission intensities with lower vapor pressure fluids but these increases had not previously been correlated to the motion of the bubble. Radial motion measurements of a single bubble in aqueous sulfuric acid have shown a continuously changing radial profile for each acoustic cycle; this changing bubble radial motion prevents the bubble from remaining spatially located at the center of the sound field. Finally, both of these systems were studied in an attempt to observe evidence of an AICF reaction. When two deuterons are forced to fuse together, the detectable products are tritium and free neutrons; due to increased detection sensitivity, experiments were primarily centered on neutron detection. From all systems studied, no evidence of an AICF reaction was found. While no system tested provided evidence of AICF, many experimental conditions remain to be explored. This work has developed methodology that can easily be expanded to a wider range of cavitation conditions.

  16. Bubble formation in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antar, Basil N.

    1996-01-01

    An extensive experimental program was initiated for the purpose of understanding the mechanisms leading to bubble generation during fluid handling procedures in a microgravity environment. Several key fluid handling procedures typical for PCG experiments were identified for analysis in that program. Experiments were designed to specifically understand how such procedures can lead to bubble formation. The experiments were then conducted aboard the NASA KC-135 aircraft which is capable of simulating a low gravity environment by executing a parabolic flight attitude. However, such a flight attitude can only provide a low gravity environment of approximately 10-2go for a maximum period of 30 seconds. Thus all of the tests conducted for these experiments were designed to last no longer than 20 seconds. Several experiments were designed to simulate some of the more relevant fluid handling procedures during protein crystal growth experiments. These include submerged liquid jet cavitation, filling of a cubical vessel, submerged surface scratch, attached drop growth, liquid jet impingement, and geysering experiments. To date, four separate KC-135 flight campaigns were undertaken specifically for performing these experiments. However, different experiments were performed on different flights.

  17. A universal bubble-growth equation for pure liquids and binary solutions with a non-volatile solute

    SciTech Connect

    Miyatake, Osamu; Tanaka, Itsuo; Lior, N.

    1996-12-31

    A simple equation suitable for predicting the growth rate of a vapor bubble in uniformly-superheated pure liquids and in binary solutions with a non-volatile solute was developed. The equation also improves on the popular pure-liquid bubble growth expression of Mikie et al. (1970) in that it is valid throughout the bubble growth history, i.e., in the surface-tension-, inertia-, and heat-transfer-controlled regimes, it accounts for bubble growth acceleration effects, and uses correctly-related and variable fluid properties. It was found to agree very well with experimental data for pure water and for aqueous NaCl solutions. As the bubble growth in superheated solutions with a non-volatile solute was found to be quite insensitive to diffusion and non-equilibrium effects in a broad range of common solution properties, this equation is likely to be universally valid for many liquids and solutions. Bubble growth in superheated fluids is of key interest in boiling phenomena in general and in flash evaporation in particular. Applications include a wide variety of separation processes such as water desalination, and energy conversion processes such as ocean-thermal energy conversion, geothermal power generation, and nuclear reactor safety.

  18. Removal of nutrient limitations in forest gaps enhances growth rate and resistance to cavitation in subtropical canopy tree species differing in shade tolerance.

    PubMed

    Villagra, Mariana; Campanello, Paula I; Montti, Lia; Goldstein, Guillermo

    2013-03-01

    A 4-year fertilization experiment with nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) was carried out in natural gaps of a subtropical forest in northeastern Argentina. Saplings of six dominant canopy species differing in shade tolerance were grown in five control and five N?+?P fertilized gaps. Hydraulic architectural traits such as wood density, the leaf area to sapwood area ratio (LA : SA), vulnerability to cavitation (P50) and specific and leaf-specific hydraulic conductivity were measured, as well as the relative growth rate, specific leaf area (SLA) and percentage of leaf damage by insect herbivores. Plant growth rates and resistance to drought-induced embolisms increased when nutrient limitations were removed. On average, the P50 of control plants was -1.1 MPa, while the P50 of fertilized plants was -1.6 MPa. Wood density and LA : SA decreased with N?+?P additions. A trade-off between vulnerability to cavitation and efficiency of water transport was not observed. The relative growth rate was positively related to the total leaf surface area per plant and negatively related to LA : SA, while P50 was positively related to SLA across species and treatments. Plants with higher growth rates and higher total leaf area in fertilized plots were able to avoid hydraulic dysfunction by becoming less vulnerable to cavitation (more negative P50). Two high-light-requiring species exhibited relatively low growth rates due to heavy herbivore damage. Contrary to expectations, shade-tolerant plants with relatively high resistance to hydraulic dysfunction and reduced herbivory damage were able to grow faster. These results suggest that during the initial phase of sapling establishment in gaps, species that were less vulnerable to cavitation and exhibited reduced herbivory damage had faster realized growth rates than less shade-tolerant species with higher potential growth rates. Finally, functional relationships between hydraulic traits and growth rate across species and treatments were maintained regardless of soil nutrient status. PMID:23436182

  19. Experimental and Theoretical Investigations of Cavitation in Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackeret, J.

    1945-01-01

    The cavitation in nozzles on airfoils of various shape and on a sphere are experimentally investigated. The limits of cavitation and the extension of the zone of the bubbles in different stages of cavitation are photographically established. The pressure in the bubble area is constant and very low, jumping to high values at the end of the area. The analogy with the gas compression shock is adduced and discussed. The collapse of the bubbles under compression shock produces very high pressures internally, which must be contributory factors to corrosion. The pressure required for purely mechanical corrosion is also discussed.

  20. Numerical simulation of cavitating flow around a slender body with slip boundary condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hao; Li, DanDan; Xue, YaHui; Lü, PengYu; Shi, YiPeng; Duan, HuiLing

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we perform a numerical simulation of the cavitating flow around an underwater hemispherical-head slender body running at a high speed. For the first time, the slip boundary condition is introduced into this problem, and we find that the slip boundary condition has a big influence on the cavitation in the flow-separation zone. By simulating the cavitating flow under different cavitation numbers, we demonstrate that the slip boundary condition can effectively reduce the intensity of cavitation, as represented by the length of cavitation bubbles. The present paper provides a new method for utilization of new surface materials to control the cavitation on the underwater moving objects.

  1. POD study of aerated cavitation in a venturi nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomov, P.; Danlos, A.; Khelladi, S.; Ravelet, F.; Sarraf, C.; Bakir, F.

    2015-12-01

    The fact of injecting bubbles into a cavitating flow influences typical cavitating behavior. Cavitation and aerated cavitation experiments has been carried out on a symmetrical venturi nozzle with convergent/divergent angles of 18 and 8, respectively. A snapshot Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) technique is used to identify different modes in terms of discharge flow velocity, pressure and injected quantity of air. The energy spectrum per given mode is also presented. The first four modes are outlined in the present paper for an aerated and non-aerated cavitating flows.

  2. The explosive growth of small voids in vulnerable cap rupture; cavitation and interfacial debonding

    PubMed Central

    Maldonado, Natalia; Kelly-Arnold, Adreanne; Cardoso, Luis; Weinbaum, Sheldon

    2013-01-01

    While it is generally accepted that ruptures in fibrous cap atheromas cause most acute coronary deaths, and that plaque rupture occurs in the fibrous cap at the location where the tissue stress exceeds a certain critical peak circumferential stress, the exact mechanism of rupture initiation remains unclear. We recently reported the presence of multiple microcalcifications (μCalcs) < 50μm diameter embedded within the fibrous cap, μCalcs that could greatly increase cap instability by introducing up to a 5-fold increase in local tissue stress. Here, we explore the hypothesis that, aside from cap thickness, μCalc size and interparticle spacing are principal determinants of cap rupture risk. Also, we propose that cap rupture is initiated near the poles of the μCalcs due to the presence of tiny voids that explosively grow at a critical tissue stress and then propagate across the fibrous cap. We develop a theoretical model based on classic studies in polymeric materials by Gent (1980), which indicates that cavitation as opposed to interfacial debonding is the more likely mechanism for cap rupture produced by μCalcs < 65μm diameter. This analysis suggests that there is a critical μCalc size range, from 5μm to 65μm, in which cavitation should be prevalent. This hypothesis for cap rupture is strongly supported by our latest μCT studies in which we have observed trapped voids in the vicinity of μCalcs within fibrous caps in human coronaries. PMID:23218838

  3. Pore-network study of bubble growth in porous media driven by heat transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Satik, C.; Yortsos, Y.C.

    1996-05-01

    We present experimental and theoretical investigations of vapor phase growth in pore-network models of porous media. Visualization experiments of boiling of ethyl alcohol in horizontal etched-glass micromodels were conducted. The vapor phase was observed to grow into a disordered pattern following a sequence of pressurization and pore-filling steps. At sufficiently small cluster sizes, growth occurred `one pore at a time,` leading to invasion percolation patterns. Single-bubble (cluster) growth was next simulated with a pore-network simulator that includes heat transfer (convection and conduction), and capillary and viscous forces, although not gravity. A boundary in the parameter space was delineated that separates patterns of growth dictated solely by capillarity (invasion percolation) from other patterns. The region of validity of invasion percolation was found to decrease as the supersaturation (heat flux), the capillary number, the thermal diffusivity, and the vapor cluster size increase. Implications to continuum models are discussed. 33 refs., 9 figs.

  4. Improvement of growth rate of plants by bubble discharge in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahata, Junichiro; Takaki, Koichi; Satta, Naoya; Takahashi, Katsuyuki; Fujio, Takuya; Sasaki, Yuji

    2015-01-01

    The effect of bubble discharge in water on the growth rate of plants was investigated experimentally for application to plant cultivation systems. Spinach (Spinacia oleracea), radish (Raphanus sativus var. sativus), and strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) were used as specimens to clarify the effect of the discharge treatment on edible parts of the plants. The specimens were cultivated in pots filled with artificial soil, which included chicken manure charcoal. Distilled water was sprayed on the artificial soil and drained through a hole in the pots to a water storage tank. The water was circulated from the water storage tank to the cultivation pots after 15 or 30 min discharge treatment on alternate days. A magnetic compression-type pulsed power generator was used to produce the bubble discharge with a repetition rate of 250 pps. The plant height in the growth phase and the dry weight of the harvested plants were improved markedly by the discharge treatment in water. The soil and plant analyzer development (SPAD) value of the plants also improved in the growth phase of the plants. The concentration of nitrate nitrogen, which mainly contributed to the improvement of the growth rate, in the water increased with the discharge treatment. The Brix value of edible parts of Fragaria × ananassa increased with the discharge treatment. The inactivation of bacteria in the water was also confirmed with the discharge treatment.

  5. Cavitation damage reduction by microbubble injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naoe, Takashi; Ida, Masato; Futakawa, Masatoshi

    2008-03-01

    A series of experiments on cavitation caused by mechanically induced pressure pulses have been performed to provide experimental evidence that gas microbubbles injected into a liquid can reduce cavitation damage. The working fluid of the present study is liquid mercury as in spallation neutron sources to produce high-intensity neutron beams, and the experiments were conducted under three different flow conditions: single-phase static, single-phase flow, and bubbly flow conditions. The experiments suggested that compared to the static case, cavitation damage is reduced by flowing the mercury, and further remarkably reduced by injecting microbubbles into the mercury flow. A slight decrease in the magnitude of negative pressure found in the bubbly flow case appears to be a key to understanding the mechanism of the observed cavitation damage reduction.

  6. Fundamental study of cavitation in flotation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Z.A.; Xu, Z.; Finch, J.A.

    1995-12-31

    The generation of microscopic bubbles by cavitation may enhance particle-bubble attachment and improve flotation performance. It is shown in this paper that tiny bubbles or cavities can be generated by strong shear and turbulence in high speed liquid flows. These conditions create the necessary pressure fluctuations in the bulk water to cause the local pressure to drop below a critical value. The formation of bubbles is favored by high dissolved gas contents to promote gas diffusion into the cavities, and by the presence of surfactants to provide some mechanical strength due to the adsorbed film. Experimental results on bubble formation by cavitation and consequent flotation of fine silica (d{sub 50} = 1.6 {micro}m) are presented.

  7. Mechanisms of thrombolysis acceleration by cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Hope; Selvaraj, Prashanth; Ahadi, Golnaz; Voie, Arne; Hoelscher, Thilo; Okita, Kohei; Matsumoto, Yoichiro; Szeri, Andrew

    2012-11-01

    Recent studies, in vitro and in vivo, have shown that High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) accelerates thrombolysis, the dissolution of blood clots, for ischemic stroke. Although the mechanisms are not fully understood, cavitation is thought to play an important role in sonothrombolysis. The damage to a blood clot's fibrin fiber network from cavitation in a HIFU field is studied using two independent approaches for an embedded bubble. One method is extended to the more important scenario of a bubble outside a blood clot that collapses asymmetrically creating a jet towards the clot. There is significantly more damage potential from a bubble undergoing cavitation collapse outside the clot compared to a rapidly expanding bubble embedded within the clot structure. Also, the effects of the physical properties of skull bone when a HIFU wave propagates through it are examined by use of computer simulation. The dynamics of a test bubble placed at the focus is used in understanding of the pressure field. All other things being equal, the analysis suggests that skull thickness can alter the wave at the focus, which in turn can change the nature of cavitation bubble dynamics and the amount of energy available for clot damage. Now at MSOE.

  8. Modle multi-bulles pour la cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adama Maiga, Mahamadou; Buisine, Daniel

    2009-11-01

    In this study we propose new multi-bubble model for cavitation, in which, to simulate the interactions within a cloud of cavitation at the initial stage, the dynamic behaviour of two nonidentical bubbles localised in a volume of control is studied. The presence of two bubbles introduces an instability in which the exchange of volume seems an additional degree of freedom. Depending on the conditions of expansion, the small bubble can disappear or not. If the small bubble disappears, the volume of control is readjusted to introduce a new small bubble and to continue calculation in a new sequence. The model makes it possible for many small bubbles to disappear as in the appearance of cavitation, which is at the origin of certain phenomena observed in the zone of the appearance, such as emission of the noise. The model reveals especially the pressure rather like a result than a datum. The comparison of the size of the bubbles and the pressure varying in time, obtained with the model are coherent with the measurements taken by Ohl [Phys. Fluids 14 (10) (2002) 3512-3521]. To cite this article: M. Adama Maiga, D. Buisine, C. R. Mecanique 337 (2009).

  9. Observations of cavitation erosion pit formation.

    PubMed

    Dular, Matevž; Delgosha, Olivier Coutier; Petkovšek, Martin

    2013-07-01

    Previous investigations showed that a single cavitation bubble collapse can cause more than one erosion pit (Philipp & Lauterborn [1]). But our preliminary study showed just the opposite - that in some cases a single cavitation pit can result from more than one cavitation event. The present study shows deeper investigation of this phenomenon. An investigation of the erosion effects of ultrasonic cavitation on a thin aluminum foil was made. In the study we observed the formation of individual pits by means of high speed cameras (>1000 fps) and quantitatively evaluated the series of images by stereoscopy and the shape from shading method. This enabled the reconstruction of the time evolution of the pit shape. Results show how the foil is deformed several times before a hole is finally punctured. It was determined that larger single pits result from several impacts of shock waves on the same area, which means that they are merely special cases of pit clusters (pit clusters where pits overlap perfectly). Finally it was shown that a thin foil, which is subjected to cavitation, behaves as a membrane. It was concluded that the physics behind erosion depends significantly on the means of generating cavitation (acoustic, hydrodynamic, laser light) and the specimen characteristics (thin foil, massive specimen), which makes comparison of results of materials resistance to cavitation from different experimental set-ups questionable. Further development of the shape from shading method in the scope of cavitation erosion testing will enable better evaluation of cavitation erosion models. PMID:23403307

  10. Computational modeling of cavitated injector flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yongliang; Heister, Stephen D.

    1992-07-01

    A Navier-Stokes approach is used to model the attached cavitation bubble in the orifice flow. The MAC (Marker and Cell) method is shown to be a dependable approach for incompressible flows. Because of the assumptions of the cavitation model, the exact physical process cannot be simulated, but the current simulation does reflect the main features observed experimentally. The quasi-steady solution of the model should be dependable. However, further study is required for the unsteady properties.

  11. Quantum cavitation in superfluid Helium 4?

    SciTech Connect

    Balibar, S.; Guthmann, C.; Lambare, H.

    1995-10-01

    We have observed the nucleation of bubbles in superfluid helium-4 at negative pressure and at temperatures down to 65 mK. Cavitation is found to be a random process. Above 1 K, its probability varies with temperature in a manner consistent with classical activation by thermal fluctuations. Below 0.4 K, cavitation is still random but temperature independent, in agreement with a recent theory of quantum tunneling. We also consider another possible interpretation involving turbulence in the focal region.

  12. Experimental investigation of remote seismic triggering by gas bubble growth in groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crews, J. B.; Cooper, C. A.

    2014-12-01

    Remotely triggered seismicity is the process by which an earthquake at one location initiates others after a time delay ranging from seconds to days, over distances up to thousands of kilometers. Candidate mechanisms have been proposed, but none specifically address the role of carbon dioxide (CO2) gas bubble growth in groundwater as a driver of remote seismic triggering in active volcanic and geothermal regions, where shallow crustal CO2 gas is abundant. In the present study, we hypothesize that a seismic wave from a distant source can initiate rapid gas bubble growth in CO2-rich groundwater, resulting in a persistent increase in pore fluid pressure and a reduction of effective stress, which can trigger failure on a critically loaded geologic fault. Under conditions representative of a confined aquifer, a Berea sandstone core flooded with an aqueous CO2 solution was subjected to a six-period burst of 0.05-0.3 Hz, 0.1-0.4 MPa confining stress oscillations. After the oscillations were terminated, the pore fluid pressure exceeded its initial value by 13-60 cm equivalent freshwater head, scaling with the amplitude and frequency - a surplus that is consistent with borehole water level changes [Roeloffs et al. (1995) USGS Open File Report, 95-42] observed in response to the June 28 1992 MW 7.3 Landers, California earthquake Rayleigh wave in Parkfield and Long Valley caldera, California, where remotely triggered earthquakes occurred [Hill et al. (1993) Science, 260(5114); Hill et al. (1995) Journal of Geophysical Research, 100(B7)]. Our experimental results indicate that seismically initiated gas bubble growth in groundwater is a physically plausible mechanism for remote seismic triggering in active volcanic and geothermal regions, suggesting that the aqueous CO2 saturation state in a confined aquifer may be used to assess susceptibility to remote seismic triggering.

  13. Numerical modeling of bubble dynamics in viscoelastic media with relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warnez, M. T.; Johnsen, E.

    2015-06-01

    Cavitation occurs in a variety of non-Newtonian fluids and viscoelastic materials. The large-amplitude volumetric oscillations of cavitation bubbles give rise to high temperatures and pressures at collapse, as well as induce large and rapid deformation of the surroundings. In this work, we develop a comprehensive numerical framework for spherical bubble dynamics in isotropic media obeying a wide range of viscoelastic constitutive relationships. Our numerical approach solves the compressible Keller-Miksis equation with full thermal effects (inside and outside the bubble) when coupled to a highly generalized constitutive relationship (which allows Newtonian, Kelvin-Voigt, Zener, linear Maxwell, upper-convected Maxwell, Jeffreys, Oldroyd-B, Giesekus, and Phan-Thien-Tanner models). For the latter two models, partial differential equations (PDEs) must be solved in the surrounding medium; for the remaining models, we show that the PDEs can be reduced to ordinary differential equations. To solve the general constitutive PDEs, we present a Chebyshev spectral collocation method, which is robust even for violent collapse. Combining this numerical approach with theoretical analysis, we simulate bubble dynamics in various viscoelastic media to determine the impact of relaxation time, a constitutive parameter, on the associated physics. Relaxation time is found to increase bubble growth and permit rebounds driven purely by residual stresses in the surroundings. Different regimes of oscillations occur depending on the relaxation time.

  14. Measuring bubbles in a bubbly wake flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung-Jae; Kawakami, Ellison; Arndt, Roger E. A.

    2012-11-01

    This paper presents measurements of the velocity and size distribution of bubbles in a bubbly wake. This was carried out by utilizing particle shadow velocimetry (PSV). This technique is a non-scattering approach that relies on direct in-line volume illumination by a pulsed source such as a light-emitting diode (LED). A narrow depth-of-field (DoF) is required for imaging a 2-dimensional plane within a flow volume. Shadows of the bubbles were collected by a high-speed camera. Once a reference image, taken when no bubbles were present in the flow, was subtracted from the images, the image was segmented using an edge detection technique. The Canny algorithm was determined to be best suited for this application. A curvature profile method was employed to distinguish individual bubbles within a cluster of highly overlapping bubbles. The utilized algorithm was made to detect partly overlapping bubbles and reconstruct the missing parts. The movement of recognized individual bubbles was tracked on a two dimensional plane within a flow volume. In order to obtain quantitative results, the wake of a ventilated hydrofoil was investigated by applying the shadowgraphy technique and the described bubble detection algorithm. These experiments were carried out in the high speed cavitation tunnel at Saint Anthony Falls Laboratory (SAFL) of the University of Minnesota. This research is jointly sponsored by the Office of Naval Re- search, Dr. Ron Joslin, program manager, and the Department of Energy, Golden Field Office.

  15. Synchronised electrical monitoring and high speed video of bubble growth associated with individual discharges during plasma electrolytic oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troughton, S. C.; Nominé, A.; Nominé, A. V.; Henrion, G.; Clyne, T. W.

    2015-12-01

    Synchronised electrical current and high speed video information are presented from individual discharges on Al substrates during PEO processing. Exposure time was 8 μs and linear spatial resolution 9 μm. Image sequences were captured for periods of 2 s, during which the sample surface was illuminated with short duration flashes (revealing bubbles formed where the discharge reached the surface of the coating). Correlations were thus established between discharge current, light emission from the discharge channel and (externally-illuminated) dimensions of the bubble as it expanded and contracted. Bubbles reached radii of 500 μm, within periods of 100 μs, with peak growth velocity about 10 m/s. It is deduced that bubble growth occurs as a consequence of the progressive volatilisation of water (electrolyte), without substantial increases in either pressure or temperature within the bubble. Current continues to flow through the discharge as the bubble expands, and this growth (and the related increase in electrical resistance) is thought to be responsible for the current being cut off (soon after the point of maximum radius). A semi-quantitative audit is presented of the transformations between different forms of energy that take place during the lifetime of a discharge.

  16. Enhancement of heat and mass transfer by cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. N.; Zhang, Y. N.; Du, X. Z.; Xian, H. Z.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a brief summary of effects of cavitation on the heat and mass transfer are given. The fundamental studies of cavitation bubbles, including its nonlinearity, rectified heat and mass diffusion, are initially introduced. Then selected topics of cavitation enhanced heat and mass transfer were discussed in details including whales stranding caused by active sonar activity, pool boiling heat transfer, oscillating heat pipe and high intensity focused ultrasound treatment.

  17. Inertial confinement fusion based on the ion-bubble trigger

    SciTech Connect

    Jafari, S. Nilkar, M.; Ghasemizad, A.; Mehdian, H.

    2014-10-15

    Triggering the ion-bubble in an inertial confinement fusion, we have developed a novel scheme for the fast ignition. This scheme relies on the plasma cavitation by the wake of an intense laser pulse to generate an ion-bubble. The bubble acts both as an intense electron accelerator and as an electron wiggler. Consequently, the accelerated electrons trapped in the bubble can emit an intense tunable laser light. This light can be absorbed by an ablation layer on the outside surface of the ignition capsule, which subsequently drills it and thereby produces a guide channel in the pellet. Finally, the relativistic electron beam created in the bubble is guided through the channel to the high density core igniting the fusion fuel. The normalized beam intensity and beam energy required for triggering the ignition have been calculated when core is heated by the e-beam. In addition, through solving the momentum transfer, continuity and wave equations, a dispersion relation for the electromagnetic and space-charge waves has been analytically derived. The variations of growth rate with the ion-bubble density and electron beam energy have been illustrated. It is found that the growth rates of instability are significantly controlled by the ions concentration and the e-beam energy in the bubble.

  18. Simultaneous pressure measurement and high-speed photography study of cavitation in a dynamically loaded journal bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, D. C.; Brewe, D. E.; Abel, P. B.

    1993-01-01

    Cavitation of the oil film in a dynamically loaded journal bearing was studied using high-speed photography and pressure measurement simultaneously. Comparison of the visual and pressure data provided considerable insight into the occurence and non-occurrence of cavitation. It was found that (1), cavitation typically occurred in the form of one bubble with the pressure in the cavitation bubble close to the absolute zero; and (2), for cavitation-producing operating conditions, cavitation did not always occur; with the oil film then supporting a tensile stress.

  19. Simultaneous pressure measurement and high-speed photography study of cavitation in a dynamically loaded journal bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, D. C.; Brewe, David E.; Abel, Philip B.

    1994-01-01

    Cavitation of the oil film in a dynamically loaded journal bearing was studied using high-speed photography and pressure measurement simultaneously. Comparison of the visual and pressure data provided considerable insight into the occurrence and nonoccurrence of cavitation. It was found that (1) for the submerged journal bearing, cavitation typically occurred in the form of one bubble with the pressure in the cavitation bubble close to the absolute zero; and (2) for cavitation-producing operating conditions, cavitation did not always occur; with the oil film then supporting a tensile stress.

  20. Radiation induced cavitation: A possible phenomenon in liquid targets?

    SciTech Connect

    West, C.D.

    1998-07-01

    The proposed design of a new, short-pulse spallation neutron source includes a liquid mercury target irradiated with a 1 GeV proton beam. This paper explores the possibility that cavitation bubbles may be formed in the mercury and briefly discusses some design features that could avoid harmful effects should cavitation take place.

  1. Quantitative assessment of reactive oxygen species generation by cavitation incepted efficiently using nonlinear propagation effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Jun; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2015-10-01

    Sonodynamic treatment is a treatment method that uses chemical bio-effect of cavitation bubbles. Reactive oxygen species that can kill cancerous tissue is induced by such chemical effect of cavitation bubbles and it is important to generate them efficiently for effective sonodynamic treatment. Cavitation cloud can be formed by an effect of nonlinear propagation and focus and in this study, it was experimentally investigated if cavitation cloud was useful for efficient generation of reactive oxygen species. As a result, it was demonstrated that cavitation cloud would be useful for efficient generation of reactive oxygen species.

  2. Experimental investigation on noise of cavitation nozzle and its chaotic behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fenghua; Liu, Haifeng; Xu, Junchao; Tang, Chuanlin

    2013-07-01

    The researches of cavitation noise mainly focus on the incipiency and developing of cavitation to prevent the cavititation erosion in the hydraulic machinery, while there is few report about the collapse strength of cavitation bubbles produced by water jet through the cavitation nozzle to utilize efficiently the collapse energy of cavitation bubbles. The cavitation noise signals are collected with hydrophones for the cavitation nozzle and general nozzle at the target position and the nozzle exit separately in the conditions of different standoff distance. The features of signal's frequency spectrum and power spectrum are analyzed for various nozzles by way of classical methods. Meanwhile, based on chaotic theory, phase space reconstruction is processed and the maximum Lyapunov index is calculated separately for each cavitation signal's time series. The results of chaotic analysis are compared with the one of conventional analysis. The analyzed data show that there are the marked differences at the spectrum between the cavitation nozzle and general nozzle at the target position while the standoff distance is 35 mm, which mainly displays at the high frequency segment (60-120 kHz). The maximum Lyapunov index calculated appear at standoff distance 35 mm, which is an optimum standoff distance for the most bubbles to collapse at the target. At the nozzle exit, the noise signal of cavitation nozzle is different from the general nozzle, which also displays at the high frequency segment. The results demonstrate that the water jet modulated by the cavitation nozzle can produce effectually cavitation, and at the target position the amplitude and energy of noise spectrum in high frequency segment for cavitation nozzle are higher than conventional nozzle and the Lyapunov index of cavitation nozzle is larger than conventional nozzle as the standoff distance is less than 55 mm. The proposed research reveals that the cavitation noise produced by collapse of cavitation bubbles attributes mainly to the high frequency segment of the spectrum, which provides references for the research on cavitation noise.

  3. Measuring cavitation and its cleaning effect.

    PubMed

    Verhaagen, Bram; Fernández Rivas, David

    2016-03-01

    The advantages and limitations of techniques for measuring the presence and amount of cavitation, and for quantifying the removal of contaminants, are provided. After reviewing chemical, physical, and biological studies, a universal cause for the cleaning effects of bubbles cannot yet be concluded. An "ideal sensor" with high spatial and temporal resolution is proposed. Such sensor could be used to investigate bubble jetting, shockwaves, streaming, and even chemical effects, by correlating cleaning processes with cavitation effects, generated by hydrodynamics, lasers or ultrasound. PMID:25819680

  4. Modeling hydrodynamic nonequilibrium in cavitating flows

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.; Heister, S.D.

    1996-03-01

    A nonlinear numerical model has been developed to assess nonequilibrium effects in cavitating flows. The numerical implementation involves a two-phase treatment with the use of a pseudo-density which varies between the liquid and gas/vapor extremes. A new constitutive equation for the pseudo-density is derived based on the bubble response described by a modified form of the Rayleigh-Plesset equation. Use of this constitutive equation in a numerical procedure permits the assessment of nonequilibrium effects. This scheme provides a quantitative description of scaling effects in cavitated flows. With minimal modifications, the model can also be used for bubbly two-phase flows.

  5. Acoustic methods for cavitation mapping in biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, M.; Xu, S.; Ding, T.; Hu, H.; Liu, R.; Bai, C.; Lu, S.

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, cavitation is increasingly utilized in a wide range of applications in biomedical field. Monitoring the spatial-temporal evolution of cavitation bubbles is of great significance for efficiency and safety in biomedical applications. In this paper, several acoustic methods for cavitation mapping proposed or modified on the basis of existing work will be presented. The proposed novel ultrasound line-by-line/plane-by-plane method can depict cavitation bubbles distribution with high spatial and temporal resolution and may be developed as a potential standard 2D/3D cavitation field mapping method. The modified ultrafast active cavitation mapping based upon plane wave transmission and reception as well as bubble wavelet and pulse inversion technique can apparently enhance the cavitation to tissue ratio in tissue and further assist in monitoring the cavitation mediated therapy with good spatial and temporal resolution. The methods presented in this paper will be a foundation to promote the research and development of cavitation imaging in non-transparent medium.

  6. Cavitation dynamics on the nanoscale

    SciTech Connect

    Kotaidis, Vassilios; Plech, Anton

    2005-11-21

    The ultrafast excitation of gold nanoparticle sols causes a strong nonequilibrium heating of the particle lattice and subsequently of the water shell close to the particle surface. Above a threshold in laser fluence, which is defined by the onset of homogeneous nucleation, nanoscale vapor bubbles develop around the particles, expand and collapse again within the first nanosecond after excitation. We show the existence of cavitation on the nanometer and subnanosecond time scale, described within the framework of continuum thermodynamics.

  7. Stem Hydraulic Conductivity depends on the Pressure at Which It Is Measured and How This Dependence Can Be Used to Assess the Tempo of Bubble Pressurization in Recently Cavitated Vessels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yujie; Liu, Jinyu; Tyree, Melvin T

    2015-12-01

    Cavitation of water in xylem vessels followed by embolism formation has been authenticated for more than 40 years. Embolism formation involves the gradual buildup of bubble pressure (air) to atmospheric pressure as demanded by Henry's law of equilibrium between gaseous and liquid phases. However, the tempo of pressure increase has not been quantified. In this report, we show that the rate of pressurization of embolized vessels is controlled by both fast and slow kinetics, where both tempos are controlled by diffusion but over different spatial scales. The fast tempo involves a localized diffusion from endogenous sources: over a distance of about 0.05 mm from water-filled wood to the nearest embolized vessels; this process, in theory, should take <2 min. The slow tempo involves diffusion of air from exogenous sources (outside the stem). The latter diffusion process is slower because of the increased distance of diffusion of up to 4 mm. Radial diffusion models and experimental measurements both confirm that the average time constant is >17 h, with complete equilibrium requiring 1 to 2 d. The implications of these timescales for the standard methods of measuring percentage loss of hydraulic conductivity are discussed in theory and deserve more research in future. PMID:26468516

  8. Stem Hydraulic Conductivity depends on the Pressure at Which It Is Measured and How This Dependence Can Be Used to Assess the Tempo of Bubble Pressurization in Recently Cavitated Vessels1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jinyu; Tyree, Melvin T.

    2015-01-01

    Cavitation of water in xylem vessels followed by embolism formation has been authenticated for more than 40 years. Embolism formation involves the gradual buildup of bubble pressure (air) to atmospheric pressure as demanded by Henrys law of equilibrium between gaseous and liquid phases. However, the tempo of pressure increase has not been quantified. In this report, we show that the rate of pressurization of embolized vessels is controlled by both fast and slow kinetics, where both tempos are controlled by diffusion but over different spatial scales. The fast tempo involves a localized diffusion from endogenous sources: over a distance of about 0.05 mm from water-filled wood to the nearest embolized vessels; this process, in theory, should take <2 min. The slow tempo involves diffusion of air from exogenous sources (outside the stem). The latter diffusion process is slower because of the increased distance of diffusion of up to 4 mm. Radial diffusion models and experimental measurements both confirm that the average time constant is >17 h, with complete equilibrium requiring 1 to 2 d. The implications of these timescales for the standard methods of measuring percentage loss of hydraulic conductivity are discussed in theory and deserve more research in future. PMID:26468516

  9. Monitoring the Development of HIFU-Induced Cavitation Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farny, Caleb H.; Holt, R. Glynn; Roy, Ronald A.

    2006-05-01

    One of the limitations of HIFU treatment for tissue necrosis is the difficulty in achieving a predictable lesion shape and size in a short amount of time. Simply increasing the HIFU intensity cannot solve this problem, as it leads to the formation of a so-called "tadpole"shaped lesion. Bubble shielding of the incident HIFU is one of the mechanisms implicated in the development of these deformed lesions; at super-nucleation pressures inertial cavitation will commence and the scattering from bubbles in the path of the ultrasound propagation will reflect the HIFU energy back towards the transducer. In the past we have employed a single focused, passive broadband transducer (PCD) to detect inertial cavitation activity at the HIFU focus in agar-graphite tissue phantoms. At sufficiently-high pressures, the inertial cavitation signal decreases over time, giving rise to the notion that bubble shielding is at fault for the signal decrease. Here we present evidence that bubble shielding is not the only mechanism behind such a change in the signal. As the medium heats up, inertial bubble collapses are cushioned by vapor and a decrease in signal amplitude from cavitation is to be expected. In order to evaluate the relative effects of the temperature rise and bubble shielding on bubble activity, we positioned a second PCD to sense noise emissions from various locations in the pre-focal region along the HIFU axis. A decline in the cavitation signal from the focus was accompanied by an increase in pre-focal bubble activity. The timescale for these changes suggests that both temperature and bubble shielding effects play a role in the bubble activity at the focus, and may provide information on how best to monitor the cavitation signal and ultimately provide feedback information necessary to control the HIFU insonation parameters to avoid bubble shielding.

  10. Growth characteristics of Chlorella sorokiniana in airlift and bubble column photobioreactors.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Kanhaiya; Das, Debabrata

    2012-07-01

    The present study investigated the feasibility of bioCO(2) sequestration using Chlorella sorokiniana. It was found that 5% CO(2) (v/v) in air was the most suitable concentration for the growth of this organism. At this concentration, the maximum rate of CO(2) sequestered and the biomass obtained were found to be 1.21 g L(-1)d(-1) and 4.4 g L(-1) respectively. Modeling and simulation of the growth profile was obtained using the logistic equation. Further, at higher CO(2) concentrations, pH drop in the growth media, TAP [-acetate], was prevented by replacing NH(4)Cl by NaNO(3.) Additionally, the study evaluated the performance of two reactors namely: bubble column and airlift reactor based on their growth profile and transport properties like K(L)a and mixing time. The growth profile was better in airlift reactor and it provides cyclic axial mixing of media. K(L)a of downcomer was significantly lower than the riser in airlift reactor. PMID:22525259

  11. Numerical study of nucleation and growth of bubbles in viscous magmas

    SciTech Connect

    Toramaru, A.

    1995-02-01

    The nucleation and growth processes of bubbles in viscous magmas with a constant decompression rate have been numerically investigated based on a formation which accounts for effects of viscosity, as well as diffusivity, interfacial tension, and decompression rate. The numerical solutions show two regimes in the nucleation and growth process, a diffusion-controlled regime and a viscosity-controlled regime, mainly depending on the decompression rate, initial saturation pressure and viscosity. The basic mechanism common to both regimes is that growth governs nucleation through depletion of degassing components. In basaltic eruptions the vesiculation is essentially controlled by diffusion, and the viscosity-controlled regime is limited to very high decompression rate and very small water content. When andesitic magma saturated by water at 10 MPa is decompressed through the propagation of rarefraction wave induced by a landslide, as took place in the Mount St. Helens 1980 eruption, the vesiculation is controlled by the viscosity up to 100 m depth. On the other hand, in a rhyolitic magma for the same situation, vesiculation is controlled by the viscosity over the whole depth of the magma column. In the viscosity-controlled regime, the vesicularity may be 90% or less as seen in silicic pumice, whereas in the diffusion-controlled regime the vesicularity equals or exceeds 98% such as in reticulite in Hawaiian basalt. An observed variation of the number density of bubbles by several orders of magnitude in plinian eruptions and the correlation with the SiO2 content can be attributed approximately to the dependence of diffusivity of viscosity on SiO2 content and temperature, assuming the apparent correlation between SiO2 content and temperature of magma.

  12. Detecting cavitation in mercury exposed to a high-energy pulsed proton beam

    SciTech Connect

    Manzi, Nicholas J; Chitnis, Parag V; Holt, Ray G; Roy, Ronald A; Cleveland, Robin O; Riemer, Bernie; Wendel, Mark W

    2010-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Spallation Neutron Source employs a high-energy pulsed proton beam incident on a mercury target to generate short bursts of neutrons. Absorption of the proton beam produces rapid heating of the mercury, resulting in the formation of acoustic shock waves and the nucleation of cavitation bubbles. The subsequent collapse of these cavitation bubbles promote erosion of the steel target walls. Preliminary measurements using two passive cavitation detectors (megahertz-frequency focused and unfocused piezoelectric transducers) installed in a mercury test target to monitor cavitation generated by proton beams with charges ranging from 0.041 to 4.1 C will be reported on. Cavitation was initially detected for a beam charge of 0.082 C by the presence of an acoustic emission approximately 250 s after arrival of the incident proton beam. This emission was consistent with an inertial cavitation collapse of a bubble with an estimated maximum bubble radius of 0.19 mm, based on collapse time. The peak pressure in the mercury for the initiation of cavitation was predicted to be 0.6 MPa. For a beam charge of 0.41 C and higher, the lifetimes of the bubbles exceeded the reverberation time of the chamber (~300 s), and distinct windows of cavitation activity were detected, a phenomenon that likely resulted from the interaction of the reverberation in the chamber and the cavitation bubbles.

  13. Strongly interacting bubbles under an ultrasonic horn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasui, Kyuichi; Iida, Yasuo; Tuziuti, Toru; Kozuka, Teruyuki; Towata, Atsuya

    2008-01-01

    Numerical simulations of bubble pulsations have been performed for a system of two bubble clouds in order to study the experimentally observed bubble motion under an ultrasonic horn by high-speed video camera. The comparison between the calculated results and the experimental observation of the bubble pulsation has indicated that the bubble pulsation is strongly influenced by the interaction with surrounding bubbles. The expansion of a bubble during the rarefaction phase of ultrasound is strongly reduced by the bubble-bubble interaction. Some bubbles move toward the horn tip due to the secondary Bjerknes force acting from the bubbles near the horn tip. It has also been shown that the acoustic amplitude in the liquid is strongly reduced by cavitation due to the decrease in acoustic radiation resistance.

  14. Shock-wave model of acoustic cavitation.

    PubMed

    Peshkovsky, Sergei L; Peshkovsky, Alexey S

    2008-04-01

    Shock-wave model of liquid cavitation due to an acoustic wave was developed, showing how the primary energy of an acoustic radiator is absorbed in the cavitation region owing to the formation of spherical shock-waves inside each gas bubble. The model is based on the concept of a hypothetical spatial wave moving through the cavitation region. It permits using the classical system of Rankine-Hugoniot equations to calculate the total energy absorbed in the cavitation region. Additionally, the model makes it possible to explain some newly discovered properties of acoustic cavitation that occur at extremely high oscillatory velocities of the radiators, at which the mode of bubble oscillation changes and the bubble behavior approaches that of an empty Rayleigh cavity. Experimental verification of the proposed model was conducted using an acoustic calorimeter with a set of barbell horns. The maximum amplitude of the oscillatory velocity of the horns' radiating surfaces was 17 m/s. Static pressure in the calorimeter was varied in the range from 1 to 5 bars. The experimental data and the results of the calculations according to the proposed model were in good agreement. Simple algebraic expressions that follow from the model can be used for engineering calculations of the energy parameters of the ultrasonic radiators used in sonochemical reactors. PMID:17869158

  15. Experimental characterization of aviation-fuel cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, Patrick F.; Thomas, Flint O.; Davis, Michael P.; Dorofeeva, Irina E.

    2010-11-01

    The results of an experimental investigation of the gaseous cavitation of JP-8 aviation fuel in a converging-diverging nozzle are presented. Fuel cavitation is experimentally characterized by high-speed digital imaging, static pressure distributions, and nonintrusive void fraction and bubble velocity measurements. For comparative purposes, experiments were performed using distilled water and dodecane for the same nozzle and nozzle pressure ratios. Dodecane, the largest component of JP-8 by weight, served as its single-component surrogate. For each working fluid, the experiments examined two different flow regimes: an initially single-phase liquid flow in which no cavitation occurred and another that evolved into two-phase cavitating flow. Additional experiments were performed to study the effect of air bubbles injected into either water or JP-8 at the nozzle inlet. For a sufficiently low range of imposed back pressures, gaseous cavitation led to choked flow for each working fluid. The character of the cavitation in the three fluids was different. These differences are highlighted and plausible mechanisms responsible for the observed behavior are discussed.

  16. Rayleigh scattering on the cavitation region emerging in liquids.

    PubMed

    Shneider, M N; Pekker, M

    2016-03-15

    It is shown that the scattering of laser radiation off cavitation ruptures in fluids is similar to scattering by gas particles. When the characteristic dimensions of microscopic voids and bubbles are considerably smaller than the laser wavelength, the scattered light is in the Rayleigh regime, which allows for the detection of early stage cavitation. Simple estimates of the scattered radiation intensity and the dynamics of its changes in connection with the generation of cavitation in the test volume are obtained, allowing us to find the critical conditions for cavitation inception. PMID:26977641

  17. Photoacoustic cavitation for theranostics: mechanism, current progress and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Y.; Qin, D.; Wan, M.

    2015-12-01

    As an emerging cavitation technology, photoacoustic cavitation (PAC) means the formation of bubbles in liquids using focused laser and pre-established ultrasound synchronously. Its significant advantages include the decreased threshold of each modality and the precise location of cavitation determined by the focused laser. In this paper, a brief review of PAC is presented, including the physical mechanism description, the classic experimental technology, the representative results in variety of media, and its applications in biomedical imaging and therapy. Moreover, some preliminary results of PAC in perfluoropentane (PFP) liquid and PFP droplets investigated by passive cavitation detection (PCD) in our group are also presented.

  18. Role of bubble growth dynamics on microscale heat transfer events in microchannel flow boiling process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigham, Sajjad; Moghaddam, Saeed

    2015-12-01

    For nearly two decades, the microchannel flow boiling heat transfer process has been the subject of numerous studies. A plethora of experimental studies have been conducted to decipher the underlying physics of the process, and different hypotheses have been presented to describe its microscopic details. Despite these efforts, the underlying assumptions of the existing hypothesis have remained largely unexamined. Here, using data at the microscopic level provided by a unique measurement approach, we deconstruct the boiling heat transfer process into a set of basic mechanisms and explain their role in the overall surface heat transfer. We then show how this knowledge allows to relate the bubble growth and flow dynamics to the surface heat flux.

  19. Effect of vibration amplitude on vapor cavitation in journal bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewe, D. E.; Jacobson, B. O.

    1986-01-01

    Computational movies were used to analyze the formation and collapse of vapor cavitation bubbles in a submerged journal bearing. The effect of vibration amplitude on vapor cavitation was studied for a journal undergoing circular whirl. The boundary conditions were implemented using Elrod's algorithm, which conserves mass flow through the cavitation bubble as well as through the oil-film region of the bearing. The vibration amplitudes for the different cases studied resulted in maximum eccentricity ratios ranging from 0.4 to 0.9. The minimum eccentricity ratio reached in each case was 0.1. For the least vibration amplitude studied in which the eccentricity ratio varied between 0.1 and 0.4, no vapor cavitation occurred. The largest vibration amplitude (i.e., eccentricity ratios of 0.1 to 0.9) resulted in vapor cavitation present 76 percent of one complete orbit.

  20. Sonochemistry and bubble dynamics.

    PubMed

    Mettin, Robert; Cairs, Carlos; Troia, Adriano

    2015-07-01

    The details of bubble behaviour in chemically active cavitation are still not sufficiently well understood. Here we report on experimental high-speed observations of acoustically driven single-bubble and few-bubble systems with the aim of clarification of the connection of their dynamics with chemical activity. Our experiment realises the sonochemical isomerization reaction of maleic acid to fumaric acid, mediated by bromine radicals, in a bubble trap set-up. The main result is that the reaction product can only be observed in a parameter regime where a small bubble cluster occurs, while a single trapped bubble stays passive. Evaluations of individual bubble dynamics for both cases are given in form of radius-time data and numerical fits to a bubble model. A conclusion is that a sufficiently strong collapse has to be accompanied by non-spherical bubble dynamics for the reaction to occur, and that the reason appears to be an efficient mixing of liquid and gas phase. This finding corroborates previous observations and literature reports on high liquid phase sonochemical activity under distinct parameter conditions than strong sonoluminescence emissions. PMID:25194210

  1. Bubbly wake of surface vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caillé, François; Magnaudet, Jacques; Clanet, Christophe

    2006-11-01

    We study the length of the bubbly wake of surface vessels. This wake is important for the boat security since it can extend to several ship length and thus increases the detectability of the ship by torpedoes. The image analysis of the wake of real scale ships reveals the sensitivity of the length to propellers. We have thus conducted a systematic study in the laboratory of the interaction bubble/propeller, trying to address several questions:- what is the role of cavitation?- is the propeller able to attract the bubbles present along the ship at the sea surface?- if attracted, can these bubble be broken by the propeller?

  2. Numerical Simulation of Bubble Dynamics in Deformable Vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coralic, Vedran; Colonius, Tim

    2011-11-01

    The growth and collapse of cavitation bubbles has been implicated as a potential damage mechanism leading to the rupture of blood vessels in shock wave lithotripsy (SWL). While this phenomenon has been investigated numerically, the resulting simulations have often assumed some degree of symmetry and have often failed to include a large number of influential physics, such as viscosity, compressibility, surface tension, phase change and fluid-structure interactions. We present here our efforts to explore the role that cavitation bubbles play in the rupture of blood vessels in SWL and to improve upon the current state of the numerical approach. We have developed a three-dimensional, high-order accurate, shock- and interface-capturing, multicomponent flow algorithm that accounts for the effects of viscosity and surface tension. At this time, we omit any effects due to elasticity and instead, as a first step, model tissue as a viscous and stiffened gas. We discuss preliminary results for the Rayleigh and shock-induced collapse of a gas bubble within a blood vessel and characterize the increase in vessel deformation with increasing bubble confinement and proximity to the vessel wall. This research was supported by the National Institutes of Health grant No. 2PO1DK43881.

  3. Optical Measurements of Cavitation in Tribological Contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Tian; Morris, Nick; Coupland, Jeremy

    2015-12-01

    The paper describes the use of a white light interformeter to measure the cavitation bubble and oil film thickness in a tribological contact and compares the results to theory. It is found that oil film thickness is best predicted by the theory proposed by Coyne and Elrod.

  4. Detection of cavitation in hydraulic turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escaler, Xavier; Egusquiza, Eduard; Farhat, Mohamed; Avellan, François; Coussirat, Miguel

    2006-05-01

    An experimental investigation has been carried out in order to evaluate the detection of cavitation in actual hydraulic turbines. The methodology is based on the analysis of structural vibrations, acoustic emissions and hydrodynamic pressures measured in the machine. The proposed techniques have been checked in real prototypes suffering from different types of cavitation. In particular, one Kaplan, two Francis and one Pump-Turbine have been investigated in the field. Additionally, one Francis located in a laboratory has also been tested. First, a brief description of the general features of cavitation phenomenon is given as well as of the main types of cavitation occurring in hydraulic turbines. The work presented here is focused on the most important ones which are the leading edge cavitation due to its erosive power, the bubble cavitation because it affects the machine performance and the draft tube swirl that limits the operation stability. Cavitation detection is based on the previous understanding of the cavity dynamics and its location inside the machine. This knowledge has been gained from flow visualisations and measurements in laboratory devices such as a high-speed cavitation tunnel and a reduced scale turbine test rig. The main techniques are the study of the high frequency spectral content of the signals and of their amplitude demodulation for a given frequency band. Moreover, low frequency spectral content can also be used in certain cases. The results obtained for the various types of cavitation found in the selected machines are presented and discussed in detail in the paper. Conclusions are drawn about the best sensor, measuring location, signal processing and analysis for each type of cavitation, which serve to validate and to improve the detection techniques.

  5. Removal of Residual Nuclei Following a Cavitation Event using Low-Amplitude Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Duryea, Alexander P.; Cain, Charles A.; Tamaddoni, Hedieh A.; Roberts, William W.; Hall, Timothy L.

    2014-01-01

    Microscopic residual bubble nuclei can persist on the order of 1 second following a cavitation event. These bubbles can limit the efficacy of ultrasound therapies such as shock wave lithotripsy and histotripsy, as they attenuate pulses that arrive subsequent to their formation and seed repetitive cavitation activity at a discrete set of sites (cavitation memory). Here, we explore a strategy for the removal of these residual bubbles following a cavitation event, using low amplitude ultrasound pulses to stimulate bubble coalescence. All experiments were conducted in degassed water and monitored using high speed photography. In each case, a 2 MHz histotripsy transducer was used to initiate cavitation activity (a cavitational bubble cloud), the collapse of which generated a population of residual bubble nuclei. This residual nuclei population was then sonicated using a 1 ms pulse from a separate 500 kHz transducer, which we term the bubble removal pulse. Bubble removal pulse amplitudes ranging from 0 to 1.7 MPa were tested, and the backlit area of shadow from bubbles remaining in the field following bubble removal was calculated to quantify efficacy. It was found that an ideal amplitude range exists (roughly 180 570 kPa) in which bubble removal pulses stimulate the aggregation and subsequent coalescence of residual bubble nuclei, effectively removing them from the field. Further optimization of bubble removal pulse sequences stands to provide an adjunct to cavitation-based ultrasound therapies such as shock wave lithotripsy and histotripsy, mitigating the effects of residual bubble nuclei that currently limit their efficacy. PMID:25265172

  6. Cavitation nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crum, Lawrence A.

    2001-05-01

    For his dissertation research at Harvard, Bob Apfel chose the subject of homogeneous nucleation, and conceived of some ingenious experiments to test existing theories. By selecting a small microdroplet of liquid, he could make the reasonable assumption that no inhomogeneities were present to serve as preferential sites for liquid rupture. However, Bob also studied dirty liquids, as well as very clean ones, and wrote some seminal papers on inhomogeneous nucleation, in which he developed the Golden rule: Know thy liquid! Currently, considerable attention has been devoted to the study of cavitation generation in vivo, particularly in blood, and, for this case, the nucleation conditions are much different than those for normal liquids. In this presentation, I will review some of Bob's pioneering studies and present some of our latest studies of cavitation inception, both in vitro and in vivo.

  7. Bursting Bubbles and Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Wrenn, Steven P.; Dicker, Stephen M.; Small, Eleanor F.; Dan, Nily R.; Mleczko, Micha?; Schmitz, Georg; Lewin, Peter A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses various interactions between ultrasound, phospholipid monolayer-coated gas bubbles, phospholipid bilayer vesicles, and cells. The paper begins with a review of microbubble physics models, developed to describe microbubble dynamic behavior in the presence of ultrasound, and follows this with a discussion of how such models can be used to predict inertial cavitation profiles. Predicted sensitivities of inertial cavitation to changes in the values of membrane properties, including surface tension, surface dilatational viscosity, and area expansion modulus, indicate that area expansion modulus exerts the greatest relative influence on inertial cavitation. Accordingly, the theoretical dependence of area expansion modulus on chemical composition - in particular, poly (ethylene glyclol) (PEG) - is reviewed, and predictions of inertial cavitation for different PEG molecular weights and compositions are compared with experiment. Noteworthy is the predicted dependence, or lack thereof, of inertial cavitation on PEG molecular weight and mole fraction. Specifically, inertial cavitation is predicted to be independent of PEG molecular weight and mole fraction in the so-called mushroom regime. In the brush regime, however, inertial cavitation is predicted to increase with PEG mole fraction but to decrease (to the inverse 3/5 power) with PEG molecular weight. While excellent agreement between experiment and theory can be achieved, it is shown that the calculated inertial cavitation profiles depend strongly on the criterion used to predict inertial cavitation. This is followed by a discussion of nesting microbubbles inside the aqueous core of microcapsules and how this significantly increases the inertial cavitation threshold. Nesting thus offers a means for avoiding unwanted inertial cavitation and cell death during imaging and other applications such as sonoporation. A review of putative sonoporation mechanisms is then presented, including those involving microbubbles to deliver cargo into a cell, and those - not necessarily involving microubbles - to release cargo from a phospholipid vesicle (or reverse sonoporation). It is shown that the rate of (reverse) sonoporation from liposomes correlates with phospholipid bilayer phase behavior, liquid-disordered phases giving appreciably faster release than liquid-ordered phases. Moreover, liquid-disordered phases exhibit evidence of two release mechanisms, which are described well mathematically by enhanced diffusion (possibly via dilation of membrane phospholipids) and irreversible membrane disruption, whereas liquid-ordered phases are described by a single mechanism, which has yet to be positively identified. The ability to tune release kinetics with bilayer composition makes reverse sonoporation of phospholipid vesicles a promising methodology for controlled drug delivery. Moreover, nesting of microbubbles inside vesicles constitutes a truly theranostic vehicle, one that can be used for both long-lasting, safe imaging and for controlled drug delivery. PMID:23382772

  8. PIV Analysis of Cavitation Flow Characteristics of He II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, K.; Murakami, M.

    2006-04-01

    In the present experimental study cavitation phenomena in both He I and He II flows were investigated through the application of the PIV technique and visual observation under the saturated vapor pressure condition. The cavitation flow was generated in the downstream regions of a Venturi channel and a converging jet nozzle driven by a contracting metal bellows. It is seen that cavitation inception is a kind of stochastic process and has definite temperature dependence. The spatial distribution of the cavitation bubble velocity is measured by using the PIV technique. Some differences in the cavitating flow pattern and the void fraction are found between He II and He I cavitating flows. The PIV result indicates that the void fraction for He II flow is larger than that for He I flow.

  9. PIV Analysis of Cavitation Flow Characteristics of He II

    SciTech Connect

    Harada, K.; Murakami, M.

    2006-04-27

    In the present experimental study cavitation phenomena in both He I and He II flows were investigated through the application of the PIV technique and visual observation under the saturated vapor pressure condition. The cavitation flow was generated in the downstream regions of a Venturi channel and a converging jet nozzle driven by a contracting metal bellows. It is seen that cavitation inception is a kind of stochastic process and has definite temperature dependence. The spatial distribution of the cavitation bubble velocity is measured by using the PIV technique. Some differences in the cavitating flow pattern and the void fraction are found between He II and He I cavitating flows. The PIV result indicates that the void fraction for He II flow is larger than that for He I flow.

  10. Numerical simulation of bubble growth in film boiling using a coupled level-set and volume-of-fluid method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomar, G.; Biswas, G.; Sharma, A.; Agrawal, A.

    2005-11-01

    A coupled level-set and volume-of-fluid method is presented for modeling incompressible two-phase flows with surface tension. The coupled algorithm conserves mass and captures the complicated interfaces very accurately. A planar simulation of bubble growth is performed in water at near critical pressure for different degrees of superheat. The effect of superheat on the frequency of bubble formation has been analyzed. In addition, simulation of film boiling and bubble formation is performed in refrigerant R134a at near critical and far critical pressures. The effect of saturation pressure on the frequency of bubble formation has also been studied. A deviation from the periodic bubble release is observed in the case of superheat beyond 15K in water. The effect of heat flux on the instability has also been analyzed. It is found that for water at near critical condition, a decrease in superheat from 15to10K leads to oscillations with subharmonics influencing the time period of the ebullition cycle.

  11. Acoustical emission from bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longuet-Higgins, Michael S.

    1991-12-01

    The scientific objectives of this report are to investigate the dynamics of bubbles formed from a free surface (particularly the upper surface of the ocean) by breaking waves, and the resulting emission of underwater sound. The chief natural source of underwater sound in the ocean at frequencies from 0.5 to 50 kHz is known to be the acoustical emission from newly-formed bubbles and bubble clouds, particularly those created by breaking waves and rain. Attention has been drawn to the occurrence of high-speed jets directed into the bubble just after bubble closure. They have been observed both in rain-drop impacts and in the release of bubbles from an underwater nozzle. Qualitatively they are similar to the inward jets seen in the collapse of a cavitation bubble. There is also a similarity to the highly-accelerated upward jets in standing water waves (accelerations greater than 20g) or in bubbles bursting at a free surface. We have adopted a theoretical approach based on the dynamics of incompressible fluids with a free surface.

  12. Optic cavitation with CW lasers: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilla-Martinez, J. P.; Berrospe-Rodriguez, C.; Aguilar, G.; Ramirez-San-Juan, J. C.; Ramos-Garcia, R.

    2014-12-01

    The most common method to generate optic cavitation involves the focusing of short-pulsed lasers in a transparent liquid media. In this work, we review a novel method of optic cavitation that uses low power CW lasers incident in highly absorbing liquids. This novel method of cavitation is called thermocavitation. Light absorbed heats up the liquid beyond its boiling temperature (spinodal limit) in a time span of microseconds to milliseconds (depending on the optical intensity). Once the liquid is heated up to its spinodal limit (˜300 °C for pure water), the superheated water becomes unstable to random density fluctuations and an explosive phase transition to vapor takes place producing a fast-expanding vapor bubble. Eventually, the bubble collapses emitting a strong shock-wave. The bubble is always attached to the surface taking a semi-spherical shape, in contrast to that produced by pulsed lasers in transparent liquids, where the bubble is produced at the focal point. Using high speed video (105 frames/s), we study the bubble's dynamic behavior. Finally, we show that heat diffusion determines the water superheated volume and, therefore, the amplitude of the shock wave. A full experimental characterization of thermocavitation is described.

  13. Implementation of two-phase tritium models for helium bubbles in HCLL breeding blanket modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fradera, J.; Sedano, L.; Mas de les Valls, E.; Batet, L.

    2011-10-01

    Tritium self-sufficiency requirement of future DT fusion reactors involves large helium production rates in the breeding blankets; this might impact on the conceptual design of diverse fusion power reactor units, such as Liquid Metal (LM) blankets. Low solubility, long residence-times and high production rates create the conditions for Helium nucleation, which could mean effective T sinks in LM channels. A model for helium nano-bubble formation and tritium conjugate transport phenomena in liquid Pb17.5Li and EUROFER is proposed. In a first approximation, it has been considered that He bubbles can be represented as a passive scalar. The nucleation model is based on the classical theory and includes a simplified bubble growth model. The model captures the interaction of tritium with bubbles and tritium diffusion through walls. Results show the influence of helium cavitation on tritium inventory and the importance of simulating the system walls instead of imposing fixed boundary conditions.

  14. High intensity focused ultrasound lithotripsy with cavitating microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Yoshizawa, Shin; Ikeda, Teiichiro; Ito, Akira; Ota, Ryuhei; Takagi, Shu; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2009-08-01

    In the medical ultrasound field, microbubbles have recently been the subject of much interest. Controlling actively the effect of the microbubbles, a novel therapeutic method has been investigated. In this paper, our works on high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) lithotripsy with cavitating microbubbles are reviewed and the cavitation detection method to optimize the HIFU intensity is investigated. In the HIFU lithotripsy, collapse of the cloud cavitation is used to fragment kidney stones. Cloud cavitation is potentially the most destructive form of cavitation. When the cloud cavitation is acoustically forced into a collapse, it has the potential to concentrate a very high pressure. For the control of the cloud cavitation collapse, a novel two-frequency wave (cavitation control [C-C] waveform) is designed; a high-frequency ultrasound pulse (1-4 MHz) to create the cloud cavitation and a low-frequency trailing pulse (500 kHz) following the high-frequency pulse to force the cloud into collapse. High-speed photography showed the cavitation collapse on the stone and the shock-wave emission from the cloud. In vitro erosion tests of model and natural stones were also conducted. In the case of model stones, the erosion rate of the C-C waveform showed a distinct advantage with the combined high- and low-frequency waves over either wave alone. For the optimization of the high-frequency ultrasound intensity, the subharmonic acoustic pressure was examined. The results showed relationship between the subharmonic pressure from cavitating bubbles induced by the high-frequency ultrasound and eroded volume of the model stones. Natural stones were eroded and most of the resulting fragments were less than 1 mm in diameter. The method has the potential to provide a novel lithotripsy system with small fragments and localized cavitating bubbles on a stone. PMID:19360448

  15. Regulating Ultrasound Cavitation in order to Induce Reproducible Sonoporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mestas, J.-L.; Alberti, L.; El Maalouf, J.; Bra, J.-C.; Gilles, B.

    2010-03-01

    Sonoporation would be linked to cavitation, which generally appears to be a non reproducible and unstationary phenomenon. In order to obtain an acceptable trade-off between cell mortality and transfection, a regulated cavitation generator based on an acoustical cavitation measurement was developed and tested. The medium to be sonicated is placed in a sample tray. This tray is immersed in in degassed water and positioned above the face of a flat ultrasonic transducer (frequency: 445 kHz; intensity range: 0.08-1.09 W/cm2). This technical configuration was admitted to be conducive to standing-wave generation through reflection at the air/medium interface in the well thus enhancing the cavitation phenomenon. Laterally to the transducer, a homemade hydrophone was oriented to receive the acoustical signal from the bubbles. From this spectral signal recorded at intervals of 5 ms, a cavitation index was calculated as the mean of the cavitation spectrum integration in a logarithmic scale, and the excitation power is automatically corrected. The device generates stable and reproducible cavitation level for a wide range of cavitation setpoint from stable cavitation condition up to full-developed inertial cavitation. For the ultrasound intensity range used, the time delay of the response is lower than 200 ms. The cavitation regulation device was evaluated in terms of chemical bubble collapse effect. Hydroxyl radical production was measured on terephthalic acid solutions. In open loop, the results present a great variability whatever the excitation power. On the contrary the closed loop allows a great reproducibility. This device was implemented for study of sonodynamic effect. The regulation provides more reproducible results independent of cell medium and experimental conditions (temperature, pressure). Other applications of this regulated cavitation device concern internalization of different particles (Quantum Dot) molecules (SiRNA) or plasmids (GFP, DsRed) into different types of cells (AT2, RL, LLC). Preliminary results are presented.

  16. Micronecking and fracture in cavitated superplastic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Zaki, M.

    1996-04-01

    A model of cavity growth is used to describe neck development in the ligament between voids and fracture strain of cavitated superplastic materials. The results show that the strain-rate sensitivity index has an important effect on fracture strain only at low values of cavity growth rate. This is more appreciable for a lesser initial cavitation level. The initial cavitation level weakly influences the fracture strain, in contrast to the result for the cavity growth rate. It is seen that the present fracture criterion fits well the experimental results for several superplastic materials.

  17. Vapor-Gas Bubble Evolution and Growth in Extremely Viscous Fluids Under Vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kizito, John; Balasubramaniam, R.; Nahra, Henry; Agui, Juan; Truong, Duc

    2008-01-01

    Formation of vapor and gas bubbles and voids is normal and expected in flow processes involving extremely viscous fluids in normal gravity. Practical examples of extremely viscous fluids are epoxy-like filler materials before the epoxy fluids cure to their permanent form to create a mechanical bond between two substrates. When these fluids flow with a free liquid interface exposed to vacuum, rapid bubble expansion process may ensue. Bubble expansion might compromise the mechanical bond strength. The potential sources for the origin of the gases might be incomplete out-gassing process prior to filler application; regasification due to seal leakage in the filler applicator; and/or volatiles evolved from cure reaction products formed in the hardening process. We embarked on a study that involved conducting laboratory experiments with imaging diagnostics in order to deduce the seriousness of bubbling caused by entrained air and volatile fluids under space vacuum and low gravity environment. We used clear fluids with the similar physical properties as the epoxy-like filler material to mimic the dynamics of bubbles. Another aspect of the present study was to determine the likelihood of bubbling resulting from dissolved gases nucleating from solution. These experimental studies of the bubble expansion are compared with predictions using a modified Rayleigh- Plesset equation, which models the bubble expansion.

  18. DO NOT DROP: MECHANICAL SHOCK IN VIALS CAUSES CAVITATION, PROTEIN AGGREGATION AND PARTICLE FORMATION

    PubMed Central

    Randolph, Theodore W.; Schiltz, Elise; Sederstrom, Donn; Steinmann, Daniel; Mozziconacci, Olivier; Schneich, Christian; Freund, Erwin; Ricci, Margaret S.; Carpenter, John F.; Lengsfeld, Corrine S.

    2014-01-01

    Industry experience suggests that g-forces sustained when vials containing protein formulations are accidentally dropped can cause aggregation and particle formation. To study this phenomenon, a shock tower was used to apply controlled g-forces to glass vials containing formulations of two monoclonal antibodies and recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH). High-speed video analysis showed cavitation bubbles forming within 30 ?s and subsequently collapsing in the formulations. As a result of echoing shock waves, bubbles collapsed and reappeared periodically over a millisecond timecourse. Fluid mechanics simulations showed low-pressure regions within the fluid where cavitation would be favored. A hydroxyphenylfluorescein assay determined that cavitation produced hydroxyl radicals. When mechanical shock was applied to vials containing protein formulations, gelatinous particles appeared on the vial walls. Size exclusion chromatographic analysis of the formulations after shock did not detect changes in monomer or soluble aggregate concentrations. However, subvisible particle counts determined by microflow image analysis increased. The mass of protein attached to the vial walls increased with increasing drop height. Both protein in bulk solution and protein that became attached to the vial walls after shock were analyzed by mass spectrometry. rhGH recovered from the vial walls in some samples revealed oxidation of Met and/or Trp residues. PMID:25418950

  19. Do not drop: mechanical shock in vials causes cavitation, protein aggregation, and particle formation.

    PubMed

    Randolph, Theodore W; Schiltz, Elise; Sederstrom, Donn; Steinmann, Daniel; Mozziconacci, Olivier; Schöneich, Christian; Freund, Erwin; Ricci, Margaret S; Carpenter, John F; Lengsfeld, Corrine S

    2015-02-01

    Industry experience suggests that g-forces sustained when vials containing protein formulations are accidentally dropped can cause aggregation and particle formation. To study this phenomenon, a shock tower was used to apply controlled g-forces to glass vials containing formulations of two monoclonal antibodies and recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH). High-speed video analysis showed cavitation bubbles forming within 30 μs and subsequently collapsing in the formulations. As a result of echoing shock waves, bubbles collapsed and reappeared periodically over a millisecond time course. Fluid mechanics simulations showed low-pressure regions within the fluid where cavitation would be favored. A hydroxyphenylfluorescein assay determined that cavitation produced hydroxyl radicals. When mechanical shock was applied to vials containing protein formulations, gelatinous particles appeared on the vial walls. Size-exclusion chromatographic analysis of the formulations after shock did not detect changes in monomer or soluble aggregate concentrations. However, subvisible particle counts determined by microflow image analysis increased. The mass of protein attached to the vial walls increased with increasing drop height. Both protein in bulk solution and protein that became attached to the vial walls after shock were analyzed by mass spectrometry. rhGH recovered from the vial walls in some samples revealed oxidation of Met and/or Trp residues. PMID:25418950

  20. Growth and Collapse of a Single Bubble near a Plate by Spark Discharge in Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akcam, I.; Inaba, K.; Takahashi, K.; Kishimoto, K.

    2015-12-01

    Single bubble dynamics in the vicinity of a solid boundary submerged in water were studied experimentally. Single bubble inside a water tank was generated by a spark discharge of capacitor into a couple of copper wires closing a simple circuit. A circular polycarbonate plate was placed horizontally above the bubble creation site. Polycarbonate plates with two different thicknesses were tested by changing the distance between the plate and the creation site. The effects of distance to the wall and wall thickness on the bubble motion is observed by considering the fluid-structure interaction. It is shown that motion of the two boundaries during the bubble generation differ from each other. Jetting behavior of two cases is also different.

  1. Evaporation-induced cavitation in nanofluidic channels

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Chuanhua; Karnik, Rohit; Lu, Ming-Chang; Majumdar, Arun

    2012-01-01

    Cavitation, known as the formation of vapor bubbles when liquids are under tension, is of great interest both in condensed matter science as well as in diverse applications such as botany, hydraulic engineering, and medicine. Although widely studied in bulk and microscale-confined liquids, cavitation in the nanoscale is generally believed to be energetically unfavorable and has never been experimentally demonstrated. Here we report evaporation-induced cavitation in water-filled hydrophilic nanochannels under enormous negative pressures up to -7MPa. As opposed to receding menisci observed in microchannel evaporation, the menisci in nanochannels are pinned at the entrance while vapor bubbles form and expand inside. Evaporation in the channels is found to be aided by advective liquid transport, which leads to an evaporation rate that is an order of magnitude higher than that governed by Fickian vapor diffusion in macro- and microscale evaporation. The vapor bubbles also exhibit unusual motion as well as translational stability and symmetry, which occur because of a balance between two competing mass fluxes driven by thermocapillarity and evaporation. Our studies expand our understanding of cavitation and provide new insights for phase-change phenomena at the nanoscale. PMID:22343530

  2. Towards numerical prediction of cavitation erosion.

    PubMed

    Fivel, Marc; Franc, Jean-Pierre; Chandra Roy, Samir

    2015-10-01

    This paper is intended to provide a potential basis for a numerical prediction of cavitation erosion damage. The proposed method can be divided into two steps. The first step consists in determining the loading conditions due to cavitation bubble collapses. It is shown that individual pits observed on highly polished metallic samples exposed to cavitation for a relatively small time can be considered as the signature of bubble collapse. By combining pitting tests with an inverse finite-element modelling (FEM) of the material response to a representative impact load, loading conditions can be derived for each individual bubble collapse in terms of stress amplitude (in gigapascals) and radial extent (in micrometres). This step requires characterizing as accurately as possible the properties of the material exposed to cavitation. This characterization should include the effect of strain rate, which is known to be high in cavitation erosion (typically of the order of several thousands s(-1)). Nanoindentation techniques as well as compressive tests at high strain rate using, for example, a split Hopkinson pressure bar test system may be used. The second step consists in developing an FEM approach to simulate the material response to the repetitive impact loads determined in step 1. This includes a detailed analysis of the hardening process (isotropic versus kinematic) in order to properly account for fatigue as well as the development of a suitable model of material damage and failure to account for mass loss. Although the whole method is not yet fully operational, promising results are presented that show that such a numerical method might be, in the long term, an alternative to correlative techniques used so far for cavitation erosion prediction. PMID:26442139

  3. Degradation of carbamazepine in environmentally relevant concentrations in water by Hydrodynamic-Acoustic-Cavitation (HAC).

    PubMed

    Braeutigam, Patrick; Franke, Marcus; Schneider, Rudolf J; Lehmann, Andreas; Stolle, Achim; Ondruschka, Bernd

    2012-05-01

    The antiepileptic drug carbamazepine is one of the most abundant pharmaceuticals in the German aquatic environment. The effect of low carbamazepine concentrations (1-50 μg L(-1)) is discussed controversially, but ecotoxicological studies revealed reproduction toxicity, decreased enzymatic activity and bioaccumulation in different test organisms. Therefore, as a preventive step, an efficient and cost-effective technique for wastewater treatment plants is needed to stop the entry of pharmaceuticals into the aquatic environment. Cavitation, the formation, growth, and subsequent collapse of gas- or vapor-filled bubbles in fluids, was applied to solve this problem. The technique of Hydrodynamic-Acoustic-Cavitation was used showing high synergistic effect. Under optimized conditions carbamazepine (5 μg L(-1)) was transformed by pseudo-first order kinetics to an extent of >96% within 15 min (27% by hydrodynamic cavitation, 33% by acoustic cavitation). A synergistic effect of 63% based on the sum of the single methods was calculated. Carbamazepine concentrations were monitored by a sensitive and selective immunoassay and after 60 min no known metabolites were detectable by LC-MS/MS. PMID:22365175

  4. Spark bubble interaction with a suspended particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohl, Siew-Wan; Wu, Di Wei; Klaseboer, Evert; Cheong Khoo, Boo

    2015-12-01

    Cavitation bubble collapse is influenced by nearby surfaces or objects. A bubble near a rigid surface will move towards the surface and collapse with a high speed jet. When a hard particle is suspended near a bubble generated by electric spark, the bubble expands and collapses moving the particle. We found that within a limit of stand-off distance, the particle is propelled away from the bubble as it collapses. At a slightly larger stand-off distance, the bubble collapse causes the particle to move towards the bubble initially before moving away. The bubble does not move the particle if it is placed far away. This conclusion is important for applications such as drug delivery in which the particle is to be propelled away from the collapsing bubble.

  5. Detailed Jet Dynamics in a Collapsing Bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Supponen, Outi; Obreschkow, Danail; Kobel, Philippe; Farhat, Mohamed

    2015-12-01

    We present detailed visualizations of the micro-jet forming inside an aspherically collapsing cavitation bubble near a free surface. The high-quality visualizations of large and strongly deformed bubbles disclose so far unseen features of the dynamics inside the bubble, such as a mushroom-like flattened jet-tip, crown formation and micro-droplets. We also find that jetting near a free surface reduces the collapse time relative to the Rayleigh time.

  6. High-speed motion picture camera experiments of cavitation in dynamically loaded journal bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, B. O.; Hamrock, B. J.

    1982-01-01

    A high-speed camera was used to investigate cavitation in dynamically loaded journal bearings. The length-diameter ratio of the bearing, the speeds of the shaft and bearing, the surface material of the shaft, and the static and dynamic eccentricity of the bearing were varied. The results reveal not only the appearance of gas cavitation, but also the development of previously unsuspected vapor cavitation. It was found that gas cavitation increases with time until, after many hundreds of pressure cycles, there is a constant amount of gas kept in the cavitation zone of the bearing. The gas can have pressures of many times the atmospheric pressure. Vapor cavitation bubbles, on the other hand, collapse at pressures lower than the atmospheric pressure and cannot be transported through a high-pressure zone, nor does the amount of vapor cavitation in a bearing increase with time. Analysis is given to support the experimental findings for both gas and vapor cavitation.

  7. Experimental study and modeling of swelling and bubble growth in carbon nanofiber filled mesophase pitch during carbonization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calebrese, Christopher

    Graphite and all carbon bipolar plates show corrosion resistance in fuel cells and provide good electrical conductivity. These materials typically need to be individually machined, a time consuming and costly process. Mesophase pitch is used to manufacture carbon fibers and carbon-carbon composites. This material provides a good starting point for the production of a moldable, all carbon bipolar plate. However, processing of mesophase pitch to produce all carbon materials requires a time intensive oxidation step to prevent swelling during carbonization. In this work, carbon nanofibers were used to reduce swelling in mesophase pitch. It was found that the increase in viscosity with the addition of carbon nanofibers was responsible for the reduction in swelling. The influence of the filler became apparent above the percolation threshold. At loadings below the percolation threshold, the swelling of the mesophase pitch was not reduced after carbonization. The swelling of the mesophase pitch at a given carbon nanofiber loading was also dependent on the length of the carbon nanofibers. Longer carbon nanofibers led to greater increases in the viscosity of the melt and thus led to greater reduction in swelling. The final carbon product was evaluated for use as a low temperature fuel cell bipolar plate material. Constraining the mesophase pitch during carbonization led to a final product with strength and electrical conductivity comparable to current composite bipolar plate materials. The addition of micron size chopped glass fibers with a softening point near 850°C and carbon nanofibers led to a final product with air permeability less than that of graphite. A spherically symmetric, single bubble growth model was also developed. The model included temperature dependence, liquid to bubble mass transfer and reactions in the system. Results from simulations showed that that the increase in viscosity due to the addition of carbon nanofibers slows the growth of bubbles, but that the time scale of single bubble growth is much shorter than the time over which the foam grows. The single bubble growth model was deemed to be applicable to low loadings of carbon nanofiber, where the bubble size distribution in the final foam is narrow.

  8. Observation of cavitation in a mechanical heart valve in a total artificial heart.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hwansung; Tsukiya, Tomonori; Homma, Akihiko; Kamimura, Tadayuki; Takewa, Yoshiaki; Nishinaka, Tomohiro; Tatsumi, Eisuke; Taenaka, Yoshiyuki; Takano, Hisateru; Kitamura, Soichiro

    2004-01-01

    Recently, cavitation on the surface of mechanical heart valves has been studied as a cause of fractures occurring in implanted mechanical heart valves. The cause of cavitation in mechanical heart valves was investigated using the 25 mm Medtronic Hall valve and the 23 mm Omnicarbon valve. Closing of these valves in the mitral position was simulated in an electrohydraulic totally artificial heart. Tests were conducted under physiologic pressures at heart rates from 60 to 100 beats per minute with cardiac outputs from 4.8 to 7.7 L/min. The disk closing motion was measured by a laser displacement sensor. A high-speed video camera was used to observe the cavitation bubbles in the mechanical heart valves. The maximum closing velocity of the Omnicarbon valve was faster than that of the Medtronic Hall valve. In both valves, the closing velocity of the leaflet, used as the cavitation threshold, was approximately 1.3-1.5 m/s. In the case of the Medtronic Hall valve, cavitation bubbles were generated by the squeeze flow and by the effects of the venturi and the water hammer. With the Omnicarbon valve, the cavitation bubbles were generated by the squeeze flow and the water hammer. The mechanism leading to the development of cavitation bubbles depended on the valve closing velocity and the valve stop geometry. Most of the cavitation bubbles were observed around the valve stop and were generated by the squeeze flow. PMID:15171470

  9. Ray-based acoustic localization of cavitation in a highly reverberant environment.

    PubMed

    Chang, Natasha A; Dowling, David R

    2009-05-01

    Acoustic detection and localization of cavitation have inherent advantages over optical techniques because cavitation bubbles are natural sound sources, and acoustic transduction of cavitation sounds does not require optical access to the region of cavitating flow. In particular, near cavitation inception, cavitation bubbles may be visually small and occur infrequently, but may still emit audible sound pulses. In this investigation, direct-path acoustic recordings of cavitation events are made with 16 hydrophones mounted on the periphery of a water tunnel test section containing a low-cavitation-event-rate vortical flow. These recordings are used to localize the events in three dimensions via cross correlations to obtain arrival time differences. Here, bubble localization is hindered by reverberation, background noise, and the fact that both the pulse emission time and waveform are unknown. These hindrances are partially mitigated by a signal-processing scheme that incorporates straight-ray acoustic propagation and Monte-Carlo techniques for compensating ray-path, sound-speed, and hydrophone-location uncertainties. The acoustic localization results are compared to simultaneous optical localization results from dual-camera high-speed digital-video recordings. For 53 bubbles and a peak-signal to noise ratio frequency of 6.7 kHz, the root-mean-square spatial difference between optical and acoustic bubble location results was 1.94 cm. Parametric dependences in acoustic localization performance are also presented. PMID:19425652

  10. Influence of the empirical coefficients of cavitation model on predicting cavitating flow in the centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hou-lin; Wang, Jian; Wang, Yong; Zhang, Hua; Huang, Haoqin

    2014-03-01

    The phenomenon of cavitation is an unsteady flow, which is nearly inevitable in pump. It would degrade the pump performance, produce vibration and noise and even damage the pump. Hence, to improve accuracy of the numerical prediction of the pump cavitation performance is much desirable. In the present work, a homogenous model, the Zwart-Gerber-Belamri cavitation model, is considered to investigate the influence of the empirical coefficients on predicting the pump cavitation performance, concerning a centrifugal pump. Three coefficients are analyzed, namely the nucleation site radius, evaporation and condensation coefficients. Also, the experiments are carried out to validate the numerical simulations. The results indicate that, to get a precise prediction, the approaches of declining the initial bubble radius, the condensation coefficient or increasing the evaporation coefficient are all feasible, especially for declining the condensation coefficient, which is the most effective way.

  11. Modeling of helium bubble nucleation and growth in austenitic stainless steels using an Object Kinetic Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Backer, A.; Adjanor, G.; Domain, C.; Lescoat, M. L.; Jublot-Leclerc, S.; Fortuna, F.; Gentils, A.; Ortiz, C. J.; Souidi, A.; Becquart, C. S.

    2015-06-01

    Implantation of 10 keV helium in 316L steel thin foils was performed in JANNuS-Orsay facility and modeled using a multiscale approach. Density Functional Theory (DFT) atomistic calculations [1] were used to obtain the properties of He and He-vacancy clusters, and the Binary Collision Approximation based code MARLOWE was applied to determine the damage and He-ion depth profiles as in [2,3]. The processes involved in the homogeneous He bubble nucleation and growth were defined and implemented in the Object Kinetic Monte Carlo code LAKIMOCA [4]. In particular as the He to dpa ratio was high, self-trapping of He clusters and the trap mutation of He-vacancy clusters had to be taken into account. With this multiscale approach, the formation of bubbles was modeled up to nanometer-scale size, where bubbles can be observed by Transmission Electron Microscopy. Their densities and sizes were studied as functions of fluence (up to 5 1019 He/m2) at two temperatures (473 and 723 K) and for different sample thicknesses (25-250 nm). It appears that the damage is not only due to the collision cascades but is also strongly controlled by the He accumulation in pressurized bubbles. Comparison with experimental data is discussed and sensible agreement is achieved.

  12. FOREWORD: International Symposium of Cavitation and Multiphase Flow (ISCM 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yulin

    2015-01-01

    The International Symposium on Cavitation and Multiphase Flow (ISCM 2014) was held in Beijing, China during 18th-21st October, 2014, which was jointly organized by Tsinghua University, Beijing, China and Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, China. The co-organizer was the State Key Laboratory of Hydroscience and Engineering, Beijing, China. Cavitation and multiphase flow is one of paramount topics of fluid mechanics with many engineering applications covering a broad range of topics, e.g. hydraulic machinery, biomedical engineering, chemical and process industry. In order to improve the performances of engineering facilities (e.g. hydraulic turbines) and to accelerate the development of techniques for medical treatment of serious diseases (e.g. tumors), it is essential to improve our understanding of cavitation and Multiphase Flow. For example, the present development towards the advanced hydrodynamic systems (e.g. space engine, propeller, hydraulic machinery system) often requires that the systems run under cavitating conditions and the risk of cavitation erosion needs to be controlled. The purpose of the ISCM 2014 was to discuss the state-of-the-art cavitation and multiphase flow research and their up-to-date applications, and to foster discussion and exchange of knowledge, and to provide an opportunity for the researchers, engineers and graduate students to report their latest outputs in these fields. Furthermore, the participants were also encouraged to present their work in progress with short lead time and discuss the encountered problems. ISCM 2014 covers all aspects of cavitation and Multiphase Flow, e.g. both fundamental and applied research with a focus on physical insights, numerical modelling and applications in engineering. Some specific topics are: Cavitating and Multiphase Flow in hydroturbines, pumps, propellers etc. Numerical simulation techniques Cavitation and multiphase flow erosion and anti-erosion techniques Measurement techniques for cavitation and multiphase flow detection Fluid-structure interaction induced by cavitation and multiphase flow Multi-scale modelling of cavitating flows and Multiphase Flow Cavitation nuclei: theory and experiments Supercavitation and its applications Synergetic effects of cavitation and silt-laden erosion Shock waves and microjets generated by cavitation Nonlinear oscillations of gas and vapour bubbles Fundamentals of physics of acoustic cavitation Sonochemistry and sonoluminescence Biomedical applications of cavitation effects Ultrasonic cavitation for molten metal treatment Cavitation for enhanced heat transfer The ISCM 2014 brought together 95 scientists, researchers and graduate students from 11 countries, affiliated with universities, technology centers and industrial firms to debate topics related to advanced technologies for cavitation and Multiphase Flow, which would enhance the sustainable development of cavitation and Multiphase Flow in interdisciplinary sciences and technology. The technical committee selected 54 technical papers on the following topics: (i) Hydrodynamic Cavitation, (ii) Super Cavitation, (iii) Pump Cavitation, (iv) Acoustic Cavitation, (v) Interdisciplinary Research of Cavitation and Multi-Phase Flows, and 13 invited plenary and invited forum lectures, which were presented at the symposium, to be included in the proceedings. All the papers of ISCM 2014, which are published in this Volume of IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering, had been peer reviewed through processes administered by the editors of the ISCM 2014, those are Yulin WU, Shouqi YUAN, Zhengwei WANG, Shuhong LIU, Xingqi LUO, Fujun WANG and Guoyu WANG. The papers published in this Volume include 54 technical papers and 3 full length texts of the invited lectures. We sincerely hope that the International Symposium on Cavitation and Multiphase Flow is a significant step forward in the world wide efforts to address the present challenges in the modern science and technology. Professor Yulin WU Chairman of the Local Organizing Committee International Symposium on Cavitation and Multiphase Flow (ISCM 2014) October, 2014

  13. Synchronized passive imaging of single cavitation events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gateau, Jérôme; Aubry, Jean-François; Pernot, Mathieu; Chauvet, Daurian; Boch, Anne-Laure; Fink, Mathias; Tanter, Mickaël

    2011-09-01

    Passive cavitation detection techniques are usually of relatively low sensitivity to single cavitation events. Moreover, a single-element transducer is generally used, so that the spatial localization of these cavitation events is not possible, or is limited to the probing volume. To both detect and localize single cavitation events over an extended volume, the following experimental set-up has been used and validated: cavitation is induced with a focused single-element transducer (mean frequency 660 kHz, f♯ = 1) driven by a high power (up to 5 kW) electric burst of a few cycles, and the acoustic emission of the bubbles is recorded on a standard linear array (4-7 MHz), mounted on the side of the single element to probe its focal spot. Both the frequencies and the geometry used are appropriate to in vivo implementation. The recording of ultrasonic radio-frequency (RF) data was performed simultaneously on 64 channels of the array and was synchronized with the pulsed excitation. A single cavitation event results in a high frequency and coherent wave front on the RF data. Thanks to synchronization, these RF data are beam-formed to localize the event with a axial resolution of 0.3 mm. A small number of discrete events could also be separated with this method. Besides, B-mode images obtained with the linear array prior to passive detection allowed the positioning of the events within the tissue structure. This technique has been used first ex vivo on freshly harve pig and sheep thigh muscle: with a two cycle excitation, a 9 MPa cavitation threshold was found. Cavitation detection was also achieved in vivo with a five cycle burst excitation in sheep thigh muscle for a peak acoustic pressure of 11MPa. This technique could provide useful information in order to better understand, control and monitor the initiation phase of the histotripsy process.

  14. High Speed Imaging of Cavitation around Dental Ultrasonic Scaler Tips

    PubMed Central

    Vyas, Nina; Pecheva, Emilia; Dehghani, Hamid; Sammons, Rachel L.; Wang, Qianxi X.; Leppinen, David M.; Walmsley, A. Damien

    2016-01-01

    Cavitation occurs around dental ultrasonic scalers, which are used clinically for removing dental biofilm and calculus. However it is not known if this contributes to the cleaning process. Characterisation of the cavitation around ultrasonic scalers will assist in assessing its contribution and in developing new clinical devices for removing biofilm with cavitation. The aim is to use high speed camera imaging to quantify cavitation patterns around an ultrasonic scaler. A Satelec ultrasonic scaler operating at 29 kHz with three different shaped tips has been studied at medium and high operating power using high speed imaging at 15,000, 90,000 and 250,000 frames per second. The tip displacement has been recorded using scanning laser vibrometry. Cavitation occurs at the free end of the tip and increases with power while the area and width of the cavitation cloud varies for different shaped tips. The cavitation starts at the antinodes, with little or no cavitation at the node. High speed image sequences combined with scanning laser vibrometry show individual microbubbles imploding and bubble clouds lifting and moving away from the ultrasonic scaler tip, with larger tip displacement causing more cavitation. PMID:26934340

  15. High Speed Imaging of Cavitation around Dental Ultrasonic Scaler Tips.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Nina; Pecheva, Emilia; Dehghani, Hamid; Sammons, Rachel L; Wang, Qianxi X; Leppinen, David M; Walmsley, A Damien

    2016-01-01

    Cavitation occurs around dental ultrasonic scalers, which are used clinically for removing dental biofilm and calculus. However it is not known if this contributes to the cleaning process. Characterisation of the cavitation around ultrasonic scalers will assist in assessing its contribution and in developing new clinical devices for removing biofilm with cavitation. The aim is to use high speed camera imaging to quantify cavitation patterns around an ultrasonic scaler. A Satelec ultrasonic scaler operating at 29 kHz with three different shaped tips has been studied at medium and high operating power using high speed imaging at 15,000, 90,000 and 250,000 frames per second. The tip displacement has been recorded using scanning laser vibrometry. Cavitation occurs at the free end of the tip and increases with power while the area and width of the cavitation cloud varies for different shaped tips. The cavitation starts at the antinodes, with little or no cavitation at the node. High speed image sequences combined with scanning laser vibrometry show individual microbubbles imploding and bubble clouds lifting and moving away from the ultrasonic scaler tip, with larger tip displacement causing more cavitation. PMID:26934340

  16. Hydrodynamic Nuclei Concentration Technique in Cavitation Research and Comparison to Phase-Doppler Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebert, Eric; Kröger, Willfried; Damaschke, Nils

    2015-12-01

    Small particles, especially bubbles in the micro-meter range, influence the cavitation of the propellers. The prediction of cavitation inception and water quality measurements are important in cavitation research. The Hydrodynamic Nuclei Concentration (HDNC) technique can be used for reliable bubble concentration measurements in fluid flows. The HDNC technique bases on the analysis of scattered light from the cavitation nuclei in the water. The HDNC technique can distinguish between bubbles and solid particles. The particle type classification is important, because the number concentration of solid particles is often much higher than the nuclei concentration in cavitation tunnels and in seawater. Verification experiments show, that the HDNC technique reaches similar capabilities in number concentration estimation as Phase Doppler (PD) technique in much shorter acquisition time.

  17. Probability of cavitation for single ultrasound pulses applied to tissues and tissue-mimicking materials.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Adam D; Cain, Charles A; Hall, Timothy L; Fowlkes, J Brian; Xu, Zhen

    2013-03-01

    In this study, the negative pressure values at which inertial cavitation consistently occurs in response to a single, two-cycle, focused ultrasound pulse were measured in several media relevant to cavitation-based ultrasound therapy. The pulse was focused into a chamber containing one of the media, which included liquids, tissue-mimicking materials, and ex vivo canine tissue. Focal waveforms were measured by two separate techniques using a fiber-optic hydrophone. Inertial cavitation was identified by high-speed photography in optically transparent media and an acoustic passive cavitation detector. The probability of cavitation (P(cav)) for a single pulse as a function of peak negative pressure (p(-)) followed a sigmoid curve, with the probability approaching one when the pressure amplitude was sufficient. The statistical threshold (defined as P(cav) = 0.5) was between p(-) = 26 and 30 MPa in all samples with high water content but varied between p(-) = 13.7 and >36 MPa in other media. A model for radial cavitation bubble dynamics was employed to evaluate the behavior of cavitation nuclei at these pressure levels. A single bubble nucleus with an inertial cavitation threshold of p(-) = 28.2 megapascals was estimated to have a 2.5 nm radius in distilled water. These data may be valuable for cavitation-based ultrasound therapy to predict the likelihood of cavitation at various pressure levels and dimensions of cavitation-induced lesions in tissue. PMID:23380152

  18. Probability of cavitation for single ultrasound pulses applied to tissues and tissue-mimicking materials

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, Adam D.; Cain, Charles A.; Hall, Timothy L.; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Xu, Zhen

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the negative pressure values at which inertial cavitation consistently occurs in response to a single, 2-cycle, focused ultrasound pulse were measured in several media relevant to cavitation-based ultrasound therapy. The pulse was focused into a chamber containing one of the media, which included liquids, tissue-mimicking materials, and ex-vivo canine tissue. Focal waveforms were measured by two separate techniques using a fiber-optic hydrophone. Inertial cavitation was identified by high-speed photography in optically transparent media and an acoustic passive cavitation detector. The probability of cavitation (Pcav) for a single pulse as a function of peak negative pressure (p?) followed a sigmoid curve, with the probability approaching 1 when the pressure amplitude was sufficient. The statistical threshold (defined as Pcav = 0.5) was between p? = 26.030.0 MPa in all samples with a high water content, but varied between p? = 13.7 to > 36 MPa for other media. A model for radial cavitation bubble dynamics was employed to evaluate the behavior of cavitation nuclei at these pressure levels. A single bubble nucleus with an inertial cavitation threshold of p? = 28.2 MPa was estimated to have a 2.5 nm radius in distilled water. These data may be valuable for cavitation-based ultrasound therapy to predict the likelihood of cavitation at different pressure levels and dimensions of cavitation-induced lesions in tissue. PMID:23380152

  19. Hydrodynamic cavitation kills prostate cells and ablates benign prostatic hyperplasia tissue.

    PubMed

    Itah, Zeynep; Oral, Ozlem; Perk, Osman Yavuz; Sesen, Muhsincan; Demir, Ebru; Erbil, Secil; Dogan-Ekici, A Isin; Ekici, Sinan; Kosar, Ali; Gozuacik, Devrim

    2013-11-01

    Hydrodynamic cavitation is a physical phenomenon characterized by vaporization and bubble formation in liquids under low local pressures, and their implosion following their release to a higher pressure environment. Collapse of the bubbles releases high energy and may cause damage to exposed surfaces. We recently designed a set-up to exploit the destructive nature of hydrodynamic cavitation for biomedical purposes. We have previously shown that hydrodynamic cavitation could kill leukemia cells and erode kidney stones. In this study, we analyzed the effects of cavitation on prostate cells and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) tissue. We showed that hydrodynamic cavitation could kill prostate cells in a pressure- and time-dependent manner. Cavitation did not lead to programmed cell death, i.e. classical apoptosis or autophagy activation. Following the application of cavitation, we observed no prominent DNA damage and cells did not arrest in the cell cycle. Hence, we concluded that cavitation forces directly damaged the cells, leading to their pulverization. Upon application to BPH tissues from patients, cavitation could lead to a significant level of tissue destruction. Therefore similar to ultrasonic cavitation, we propose that hydrodynamic cavitation has the potential to be exploited and developed as an approach for the ablation of aberrant pathological tissues, including BPH. PMID:24047796

  20. Acoustic cavitation events during microsecond irradiation of aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amurthur, Badrinarayan S.; Viator, John A.; Prahl, Scott A.

    1997-05-01

    The acoustic boundary conditions at the site of laser irradiation affects the onset of cavitation when stress- confined laser pulses are used. This study reports the thresholds for cavitation when the laser pulse length exceeds the stress confinement time by a factor of eight. The cavitation threshold was defined as the loss of an acoustic signal from the collapse of the cavitation bubble in room temperature dye solutions. The threshold temperature increase for cavitation at a free surface was 13 plus or minus 3 degrees Celsius, at the tip of a 200 micrometer fiber in an aqueous solution was 17 plus or minus 2 degrees Celsius, and at the interface of two acoustically matched boundary materials was 80 plus or minus 20 degrees Celsius.

  1. Experimental investigation of the flow-induced vibration of hydrofoils in cavitating flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guoyu; Wu, Qin; Huang, Biao; Gao, Yuan

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this paper is to investigate the correlation between fluid induced vibration and unsteady cavitation behaviours. Experimental results are presented for a modified NACA66 hydrofoil, which is fixed at α=8°. The high-speed camera is synchronized with a single point Laser Doppler Vibrometer to analyze the transient cavitating flow structures and the corresponding structural vibration characteristics. The results showed that, with the decreasing of the cavitation number, the cavitating flows in a water tunnel display several types of cavitation patterns, such as incipient cavitation, sheet cavitation and cloud cavitation. The cavity shedding frequency reduces with the decrease of the cavitation number. As for the cloud cavitation regime, the trend of the vibration velocity goes up with the growth of the attached cavity, accompanied with small amplitude fluctuations. Then the collapse and shedding of the large-scale cloud cavities leads to substantial increase of the vibration velocity fluctuations.

  2. Modelling of single bubble-dynamics and thermal effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papoulias, D.; Gavaises, M.

    2015-12-01

    This paper evaluates the solution effects of different Rayleigh-Plesset models (R-P) for simulating the growth/collapse dynamics and thermal behaviour of homogeneous gas bubbles. The flow inputs used for the discrete cavitation bubble calculations are obtained from Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes simulations (RANS), performed in high-pressure nozzle holes. Parametric 1-D results are presented for the classical thermal R-P equation [1] as well as for refined models which incorporated compressibility corrections and thermal effects [2, 3]. The thermal bubble model is coupled with the energy equation, which provides the temperature of the bubble as a function of conduction/convection and radiation heat-transfer mechanisms. For approximating gas pressure variations a high-order virial equation of state (EOS) was used, based on Helmholtz free energy principle [4]. The coded thermal R-P model was validated against experimental measurements [5] and model predictions [6] reported in single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL).

  3. Prediction of cavitation erosion for marine applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maquil, T.; Yakubov, S.; Rung, T.

    2015-12-01

    The paper presents the development of a cavitation erosion prediction method. The approach is tailored to marine applications and embedded into a VoF-based procedure for the simulation of turbulent flows. Supplementary to the frequently employed Euler-Euler models, Euler-Lagrange approaches are employed to simulate cavitation. The study aims to convey the merits of an Euler-Lagrange approach for erosion simulations. Accordingly, the erosion model is able to separate different damage mechanisms, e.g. micro-jets, single and collective bubble collapse, and also quantifies their contribution to the total damage. Emphasis is devoted to the prediction of the cavitation extend, the influence of compressible effects and the performance of the material damage model in practical applications. Examples included refer to 2D validation test cases and reveal a fair predictive accuracy.

  4. Bubble size distribution in acoustic droplet vaporization via dissolution using an ultrasound wide-beam method.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shanshan; Zong, Yujin; Li, Wusong; Zhang, Siyuan; Wan, Mingxi

    2014-05-01

    Performance and efficiency of numerous cavitation enhanced applications in a wide range of areas depend on the cavitation bubble size distribution. Therefore, cavitation bubble size estimation would be beneficial for biological and industrial applications that rely on cavitation. In this study, an acoustic method using a wide beam with low pressure is proposed to acquire the time intensity curve of the dissolution process for the cavitation bubble population and then determine the bubble size distribution. Dissolution of the cavitation bubbles in saline and in phase-shift nanodroplet emulsion diluted with undegassed or degassed saline was obtained to quantify the effects of pulse duration (PD) and acoustic power (AP) or peak negative pressure (PNP) of focused ultrasound on the size distribution of induced cavitation bubbles. It was found that an increase of PD will induce large bubbles while AP had only a little effect on the mean bubble size in saline. It was also recognized that longer PD and higher PNP increases the proportions of large and small bubbles, respectively, in suspensions of phase-shift nanodroplet emulsions. Moreover, degassing of the suspension tended to bring about smaller mean bubble size than the undegassed suspension. In addition, condensation of cavitation bubble produced in diluted suspension of phase-shift nanodroplet emulsion was involved in the calculation to discuss the effect of bubble condensation in the bubble size estimation in acoustic droplet vaporization. It was shown that calculation without considering the condensation might underestimate the mean bubble size and the calculation with considering the condensation might have more influence over the size distribution of small bubbles, but less effect on that of large bubbles. Without or with considering bubble condensation, the accessible minimum bubble radius was 0.4 or 1.7 ?m and the step size was 0.3 ?m. This acoustic technique provides an approach to estimate the size distribution of cavitation bubble population in opaque media and might be a promising tool for applications where it is desirable to tune the ultrasound parameters to control the size distribution of cavitation bubbles. PMID:24360840

  5. Influence of cathodic and anodic currents on cavitation erosion

    SciTech Connect

    Auret, J.G.; Damm, O.F.R.A.; Wright, G.J. . Div. of Materials Science and Technology); Robinson, F.P.A. . Dept. of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering)

    1993-11-01

    A vibratory-type cavitation test rig was constructed to study the effect of polarizing currents applied to a cavitating body. The generation of gas by electrolysis reduced mechanical damage suffered by a cavitating body because of bubble collapse cushioning. However, the net effect on overall damage depended on several factors, including the intensity of mechanical attack, corrosion rate, and surface geometrical effects. A cathodic current was shown to always decrease the total volume loss rate, but the volume loss rate sometimes was increased and sometimes was reduced in the anodic current range.

  6. Character of the cavitation erosion on selected metallic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mlkvik, Marek; Olšiak, Róbert; Knížat, Branislav; Jedelský, Jan

    2014-03-01

    It's well known, that the imploding cavitation bubbles causes the damage on the solid surfaces. This process is then dangerous for the mechanical parts of the hydraulic machines. Proposed article dealing with the analysis of the type of the damage caused by the cavitation erosion according to the selected metallic material of the specimen. As is shown in the article, the type of the damage has a realtion to the hydraulic parameters of the flow (velocity, cavitation number). The optical and weight measerument methods will be used for the anlysis.

  7. Microbubble Cavitation Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Vignon, Francois; Shi, William T.; Powers, Jeffry E.; Everbach, E. Carr; Liu, Jinjin; Gao, Shunji; Xie, Feng; Porter, Thomas R.

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound cavitation of microbubble contrast agents has a potential for therapeutic applications such as sonothrombolysis (STL) in acute ischemic stroke. For safety, efficacy, and reproducibility of treatment, it is critical to evaluate the cavitation state (moderate oscillations, stable cavitation, and inertial cavitation) and activity level in and around a treatment area. Acoustic passive cavitation detectors (PCDs) have been used to this end but do not provide spatial information. This paper presents a prototype of a 2-D cavitation imager capable of producing images of the dominant cavitation state and activity level in a region of interest. Similar to PCDs, the cavitation imaging described here is based on the spectral analysis of the acoustic signal radiated by the cavitating microbubbles: ultraharmonics of the excitation frequency indicate stable cavitation, whereas elevated noise bands indicate inertial cavitation; the absence of both indicates moderate oscillations. The prototype system is a modified commercially available ultrasound scanner with a sector imaging probe. The lateral resolution of the system is 1.5 mm at a focal depth of 3 cm, and the axial resolution is 3 cm for a therapy pulse length of 20 s. The maximum frame rate of the prototype is 2 Hz. The system has been used for assessing and mapping the relative importance of the different cavitation states of a microbubble contrast agent. In vitro (tissue-mimicking flow phantom) and in vivo (heart, liver, and brain of two swine) results for cavitation states and their changes as a function of acoustic amplitude are presented. PMID:23549527

  8. Numerical prediction of impacts of cavitation in pumps for power generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedlář, M.; Šoukal, J.; Krátký, T.; Vyroubal, M.

    2015-06-01

    The article describes the possibilities of the numerical modelling of cavitating flow in high-performance pumps for power generation. Three main adverse effects of cavitation and their analysis are discussed with some practical examples. Numerical analysis is based both on the commercial CFD code and the inhouse software solving the Rayleigh-Plesset equation along flow trajectories. Cavitation bubbles at the same time are presented as active (not passive) impurity which interacts with fluid during the phase transitions.

  9. Ultrasound imaging for cavitation detection during HIFU ablation in brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Tao; Amin, Viren; McClure, Scott; Roberts, Ronald; Wu, Liangshou; Heise, Matthew; Ryken, Timothy

    2007-03-01

    High intensity focused ultrasound (abbreviated as HIFU) has its potential in tumor treatment due to its non-invasive benefits. During HIFU exposure, cavitation (generation of gas bubbles) is often observed, which can be an indication of potential lesion created by HIFU power. Due to a large difference in ultrasound acoustic properties between the gas bubble and surrounding tissues, ultrasonic energy is reflected and scattered at the HIFU focus, thus indicating activity around the focal area and often interfering HIFU dosage delivery. A good understanding and control of cavitation phenomenon could potentially enhance the HIFU delivery and treatment outcomes. Quantifying the onset timing and extent of the cavitation could be potentially used for detecting HIFU effects and therapy guidance. In this paper, we study the relationships among HIFU parameters, the characteristics of cavitation quantified from ultrasound imaging, and characteristics of the final tissue lesion created by HIFU. In our study, we used 12 freshly excised pig brains in vitro for observation and analysis of cavitation activities during HIFU exposure with different HIFU parameters. Final lesions were examined by slicing the brain tissues into thin slices and 3D volume was constructed with segmentation of the lesion. HIFU parameters, cavitation activities through image processing and lesion characterization were correlated. We also present our initial understanding of the process of cavitation activities under certain HIFU parameters and control of such activities that could lead to optimal lesion

  10. Quantitative observations of cavitation activity in a viscoelastic medium.

    PubMed

    Collin, Jamie R T; Coussios, Constantin C

    2011-11-01

    Quantitative experimental observations of single-bubble cavitation in viscoelastic media that would enable validation of existing models are presently lacking. In the present work, single bubble cavitation is induced in an agar gel using a 1.15 MHz high intensity focused ultrasound transducer, and observed using a focused single-element passive cavitation detection (PCD) transducer. To enable quantitative observations, a full receive calibration is carried out of a spherically focused PCD system by a bistatic scattering substitution technique that uses an embedded spherical scatterer and a hydrophone. Adjusting the simulated pressure received by the PCD by the transfer function on receive and the frequency-dependent attenuation of agar gel enables direct comparison of the measured acoustic emissions with those predicted by numerical modeling of single-bubble cavitation using a modified Keller-Miksis approach that accounts for viscoelasticity of the surrounding medium. At an incident peak rarefactional pressure near the cavitation threshold, period multiplying is observed in both experiment and numerical model. By comparing the two sets of results, an estimate of the equilibrium bubble radius in the experimental observations can be made, with potential for extension to material parameter estimation. Use of these estimates yields good agreement between model and experiment. PMID:22088001

  11. Gauging the likelihood of stable cavitation from ultrasound contrast agents

    PubMed Central

    Bader, Kenneth B; Holland, Christy K

    2015-01-01

    The mechanical index (MI) was formulated to gauge the likelihood of adverse bioeffects from inertial cavitation. However, the MI formulation did not consider bubble activity from stable cavitation. This type of bubble activity can be readily nucleated from ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) and has the potential to promote beneficial bioeffects. Here, the presence of stable cavitation is determined numerically by tracking the onset of subharmonic oscillations within a population of bubbles for frequencies up to 7 MHz and peak rarefactional pressures up to 3 MPa. In addition, the acoustic pressure rupture threshold of an UCA population was determined using the Marmottant model. The threshold for subharmonic emissions of optimally sized bubbles was found to be lower than the inertial cavitation threshold for all frequencies studied. The rupture thresholds of optimally sized UCAs were found to be lower than the threshold for subharmonic emissions for either single cycle or steady state acoustic excitations. Because the thresholds of both subharmonic emissions and UCA rupture are linearly dependent on frequency, an index of the form ICAV = Pr/f (where Pr is the peak rarefactional pressure in MPa and f is the frequency in MHz) was derived to gauge the likelihood of subharmonic emissions due to stable cavitation activity nucleated from UCAs. PMID:23221109

  12. AN EFFICIENT TREATMENT STRATEGY FOR HISTOTRIPSY BY REMOVING CAVITATION MEMORY

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tzu-Yin; Xu, Zhen; Hall, Timothy L.; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Cain, Charles A.

    2012-01-01

    Cavitation memory effects occur when remnants of cavitation bubbles (nuclei) persist in the host medium and act as seeds for subsequent events. In pulsed cavitational ultrasound therapy, or histotripsy, this effect may cause cavitation to repeatedly occur at these seeded locations within a target volume, producing inhomogeneous tissue fractionation or requiring an excess number of pulses to completely homogenize the target volume. We hypothesized that by removing the cavitation memory, i.e., the persistent nuclei, the cavitation bubbles could be induced at random locations in response to each pulse; therefore, complete disruption of a tissue volume may be achieved with fewer pulses. To test the hypothesis, the cavitation memory was passively removed by increasing the intervals between successive pulses, ?t, from 2, 10, 20, 50 and 100, to 200 ms. Histotripsy treatments were performed in red blood cell tissue phantoms and ex vivo livers using 1-MHz ultrasound pulses of 10 cycles at P?/P+ pressure of 21/59 MPa. The phantom study allowed for direct visualization of the cavitation patterns and the lesion development process in real time using high-speed photography; the ex vivo tissue study provided validation of the memory effect in real tissues. Results of the phantom study showed an exponential decrease in the correlation coefficient between cavitation patterns in successive pulses from 0.5 0.1 to 0.1 0.1 as ?t increased from 2200 ms; correspondingly, the lesion was completely fractionated with significantly fewer pulses for longer ?ts. In the tissue study, given the same number of therapy pulses, complete and homogeneous tissue fractionation with well-defined lesion boundaries was achieved only for ?t ? 100 ms. These results indicated that the removal of the cavitation memory resulted in more efficient treatments and homogeneous lesions. PMID:22402025

  13. Air emission into a water shear layer through porous media. Part 2: Cavitation induced pressure attenuation

    SciTech Connect

    Myer, E.C.; Marboe, R.C.

    1994-12-31

    Cavitation near the casing of a hydroturbine can lead to damage through both cavitation erosion and mechanical vibration of the casing and the associated piping. Cavitation erosion results from the collapse of cavitation bubbles on or near a surface such as the casing wall. Mechanical vibrations transmitted to the casing directly through the collapse of bubbles on the casing wall indirectly through a coupling of the acoustic pressure pulse due to a nearby collapse on the turbine blade. Air emission along the casing can reduce the intensity of the tip vortex and the gap cavitation through ventilation of the cavity. Reduction in the machinery vibration is obtained by reduction of the intensity of cavitation bubble collapse and attenuation and scattering of the radiated acoustic pressure. This requires a bubble layer which may be introduced in the vicinity of the turbine blade tips. This layer remains for some distance downstream of the blades and is effective for attenuation of tip vortex induced noise and blade surface cavitation noise. For the purpose of characterizing this bubble layer within a water pipe, the authors spanned a pipe with a two dimensional hydrofoil and emitted air through porous media (20 and 100 micron porosity sintered stainless steel) into the shear flow over the hydrofoil. This paper is limited to an investigation of the attenuation of acoustic pressure propagating to the casing rather than the reduction in acoustic source level due to collapse cushioning effects.

  14. Kidney stone erosion by micro scale hydrodynamic cavitation and consequent kidney stone treatment.

    PubMed

    Perk, Osman Yavuz; Şeşen, Muhsincan; Gozuacik, Devrim; Koşar, Ali

    2012-09-01

    The objective of this study is to reveal the potential of micro scale hydrodynamic bubbly cavitation for the use of kidney stone treatment. Hydrodynamically generated cavitating bubbles were targeted to the surfaces of 18 kidney stone samples made of calcium oxalate, and their destructive effects were exploited in order to remove kidney stones in in vitro experiments. Phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solution was used as the working fluid under bubbly cavitating conditions in a 0.75 cm long micro probe of 147 μm inner diameter at 9790 kPa pressure. The surface of calcium oxalate type kidney stones were exposed to bubbly cavitation at room temperature for 5 to 30 min. The eroded kidney stones were visually analyzed with a high speed CCD camera and using SEM (scanning electron microscopy) techniques. The experiments showed that at a cavitation number of 0.017, hydrodynamic bubbly cavitation device could successfully erode stones with an erosion rate of 0.31 mg/min. It was also observed that the targeted application of the erosion with micro scale hydrodynamic cavitation may even cause the fracture of the kidney stones within a short time of 30 min. The proposed treatment method has proven to be an efficient instrument for destroying kidney stones. PMID:22476893

  15. Characterization of periodic cavitation in optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Carmona-Sosa, Viridiana; Alba-Arroyo, José Ernesto; Quinto-Su, Pedro A

    2016-03-10

    Microscopic vapor explosions or cavitation bubbles can be generated repeatedly in optical tweezers with a microparticle that partially absorbs at the trapping laser wavelength. In this work we measure the size distribution and the production rate of cavitation bubbles for microparticles with a diameter of 3 μm using high-speed video recording and a fast photodiode. We find that there is a lower bound for the maximum bubble radius Rmax∼2  μm which can be explained in terms of the microparticle size. More than 94% of the measured Rmax are in the range between 2 and 6 μm, while the same percentage of the measured individual frequencies fi or production rates are between 10 and 200 Hz. The photodiode signal yields an upper bound for the lifetime of the bubbles, which is at most twice the value predicted by the Rayleigh equation. We also report empirical relations between Rmax, fi, and the bubble lifetimes. PMID:26974779

  16. Impact of bubble size on growth and CO2 uptake of Arthrospira (Spirulina) platensis KMMCC CY-007.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kisok; Choi, Jaeho; Ji, Yosep; Park, Soyoung; Do, Hyungki; Hwang, Cherwon; Lee, Bongju; Holzapfel, Wilhelm

    2014-10-01

    Optimisation of cyanobacterial cell productivity should consider the key factors light cycle and carbon source. We studied the influence of CO2 bubble size on carbon uptake and fixation, on basis of mRNA expression levels in Arthrospira platensis KMMCC CY-007 at 30C (light intensity: 40?molm(-2)s(-1); 1% CO2). Growth rate, carbon fixation and lipid accumulation were examined over 7days under fine bubble (FB) (100?m ) bulk bubble (BB) (5000?m ) and non-CO2 (NB) aeration. The low affinity CO2 uptake mRNA (NDH-I4 complex) was stronger expressed than the high affinity NDH-I3 complex (bicA and sbtA) under 1% CO2 and FB conditions, with no expression of bicA1 and sbtA1 after 4days. The high affinity CO2 uptake mRNA levels corresponded to biomass, carbon content and lipid accumulation, and increase in NDH-I3 complex (9.72-fold), bicA (5.69-fold), and sbtA (10.61-fold), compared to NB, or BB conditions. PMID:25151075

  17. Non-Newtonian effects on flow-generated cavitation and on cavitation in a pressure field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, A. T.; Ting, R. Y.

    1974-01-01

    Observations are presented which show that the stresses in a flow field of very dilute polymer are not well enough described by the Navier-Stokes equations to accurately predict cavitation. The contitutive equation for the particular polymer and concentration used is needed. The second-order fluid form in which accelerations are relatively important appears capable of explaining observed cavitation suppression by changing the pressure field due to flow. Bubble dynamics in stationary dilute polymer solutions are also examined and found to be little different from those in water.

  18. The Role of Acoustic Cavitation in Ultrasound-triggered Drug Release from Echogenic Liposomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopechek, Jonathan A.

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in the United States and globally. CVD-related mortality, including coronary heart disease, heart failure, or stroke, generally occurs due to atherosclerosis, a condition in which plaques build up within arterial walls, potentially causing blockage or rupture. Targeted therapies are needed to achieve more effective treatments. Echogenic liposomes (ELIP), which consist of a lipid membrane surrounding an aqueous core, have been developed to encapsulate a therapeutic agent and/or gas bubbles for targeted delivery and ultrasound image enhancement. Under certain conditions ultrasound can cause nonlinear bubble growth and collapse, known as "cavitation." Cavitation activity has been associated with enhanced drug delivery across cellular membranes. However, the mechanisms of ultrasound-mediated drug release from ELIP have not been previously investigated. Thus, the objective of this dissertation is to elucidate the role of acoustic cavitation in ultrasound-mediated drug release from ELIP. To determine the acoustic and physical properties of ELIP, the frequency-dependent attenuation and backscatter coefficients were measured between 3 and 30 MHz. The results were compared to a theoretical model by measuring the ELIP size distribution in order to determine properties of the lipid membrane. It was found that ELIP have a broad size distribution and can provide enhanced ultrasound image contrast across a broad range of clinically-relevant frequencies. Calcein, a hydrophilic fluorescent dye, and papaverine, a lipophilic vasodilator, were separately encapsulated in ELIP and exposed to color Doppler ultrasound pulses from a clinical diagnostic ultrasound scanner in a flow system. Spectrophotometric techniques (fluorescence and absorbance measurements) were used to detect calcein or papaverine release. As a positive control, Triton X-100 (a non-ionic detergent) was added to ELIP samples not exposed to ultrasound in order to release encapsulated agents completely. Also, sham samples without Triton X-100 or ultrasound exposure were used as negative controls. Color Doppler ultrasound did not release encapsulated calcein or papaverine from ELIP even though there was a complete loss of echogenicity. In subsequent experiments, calcein and rosiglitazone, a hydrophobic anti-diabetic drug, were separately encapsulated in ELIP and exposed to pulsed Doppler ultrasound in a flow system while monitoring cavitation. Samples were exposed to ultrasound pressures above and below cavitation thresholds. In addition, Triton X-100 was used for positive control samples and sham samples were also tested without ultrasound exposure. Adding Triton X-100 resulted in complete release of encapsulated calcein or rosiglitzone. However, Doppler ultrasound exposure did not induce calcein or rosiglitazone release from ELIP in the flow system even when there was persistent cavitation activity and a loss of echogenicity. The results of this dissertation indicate that cavitation of encapsulated bubbles in ELIP solutions is not sufficient to induce drug release. It is possible that ultrasoundmediated thermal processes may have a stronger effect on ELIP permeability than cavitation activity. Perhaps ultrasound-triggered drug release will be possible by improving the ELIP formulation or encapsulating a different gas instead of air. However, cavitation is not a reliable indicator of ultrasound-mediated drug release with the ELIP formulations used in this dissertation.

  19. Cavitation inception in a turbulent shear flow

    SciTech Connect

    O'Hern, T.J.

    1988-01-01

    Experimental investigations were made into the inception processes in a large turbulent free shear layer generated by a sharp edged plate in a water tunnel at Reynolds numbers up to 2 /times/ 10/sup 6/. Optical techniques were used to study the relation of cavitation inception to flow characteristics, in particular to the coherent vortices of the free shear layer turbulent structure. Two distinct types of vortex motion were evident, primary spanwise and secondary longitudinal vortices. Cavitation inception consistently occurs in the secondary shear layer vortices and more fully developed cavitation is visible in both structures, with the streamwise cavities typically confined to the braid regions between adjacent spanwise vortices. Measurements of fluctuating pressures in the turbulent shear layer were made by holographically monitoring the size of air bubbles injected into the non-cavitating flow, showing that pressure fluctuations were much stronger than previously reported, with positive and negative pressure peaks as high as 3 times the freestream dynamic pressure, sufficient to explain the occurrence of cavitation inception at high values of the inception index. The occurrence of inception in the secondary vortices of the shear layer, and previous reports of velocity dependence of these cores, may provide the key to explaining the commonly observed Reynolds number scaling of the inception index in shear flows. 20 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Comparison between phase field simulations and experimental data from intragranular bubble growth in UO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Tonks, M. R.; Biner, S. B.; Mille, P. C.; Andersson, D. A.

    2013-07-01

    In this work, we used the phase field method to simulate the post-irradiation annealing of UO{sub 2} described in the experimental work by Kashibe et al., 1993 [1]. The simulations were carried out in 2D and 3D using the MARMOT FEM-based phase-field modeling framework. The 2-D results compared fairly well with the experiments, in spite of the assumptions made in the model. The 3-D results compare even more favorably to experiments, indicating that diffusion in all three directions must be considered to accurate represent the bubble growth. (authors)

  1. Analytical and experimental study of the acoustics and the flow field characteristics of cavitating self-resonating water jets

    SciTech Connect

    Chahine, G.L.; Genoux, P.F.; Johnson, V.E. Jr.; Frederick, G.S.

    1984-09-01

    Waterjet nozzles (STRATOJETS) have been developed which achieve passive structuring of cavitating submerged jets into discrete ring vortices, and which possess cavitation incipient numbers six times higher than obtained with conventional cavitating jet nozzles. In this study we developed analytical and numerical techniques and conducted experimental work to gain an understanding of the basic phenomena involved. The achievements are: (1) a thorough analysis of the acoustic dynamics of the feed pipe to the nozzle; (2) a theory for bubble ring growth and collapse; (3) a numerical model for jet simulation; (4) an experimental observation and analysis of candidate second-generation low-sigma STRATOJETS. From this study we can conclude that intensification of bubble ring collapse and design of highly resonant feed tubes can lead to improved drilling rates. The models here described are excellent tools to analyze the various parameters needed for STRATOJET optimizations. Further analysis is needed to introduce such important factors as viscosity, nozzle-jet interaction, and ring-target interaction, and to develop the jet simulation model to describe the important fine details of the flow field at the nozzle exit.

  2. Repeated growth and bubbling transfer of graphene with millimetre-size single-crystal grains using platinum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Libo; Ren, Wencai; Xu, Huilong; Jin, Li; Wang, Zhenxing; Ma, Teng; Ma, Lai-Peng; Zhang, Zhiyong; Fu, Qiang; Peng, Lian-Mao; Bao, Xinhe; Cheng, Hui-Ming

    2012-02-01

    Large single-crystal graphene is highly desired and important for the applications of graphene in electronics, as grain boundaries between graphene grains markedly degrade its quality and properties. Here we report the growth of millimetre-sized hexagonal single-crystal graphene and graphene films joined from such grains on Pt by ambient-pressure chemical vapour deposition. We report a bubbling method to transfer these single graphene grains and graphene films to arbitrary substrate, which is nondestructive not only to graphene, but also to the Pt substrates. The Pt substrates can be repeatedly used for graphene growth. The graphene shows high crystal quality with the reported lowest wrinkle height of 0.8 nm and a carrier mobility of greater than 7,100 cm2 V-1 s-1 under ambient conditions. The repeatable growth of graphene with large single-crystal grains on Pt and its nondestructive transfer may enable various applications.

  3. Bubbly wake: the role of the propeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caille, Francois

    2005-11-01

    We study the length of the bubbly wake of surface vessels. This wake is important for the boat security since it can extend to several ship length and thus increases the detectability of the ship by torpedoes. The image analysis of the wake of real scale ships reveals the sensitivity of the length to propellers. We have thus conducted a systematic study in the laboratory of the interaction bubble/propeller, trying to address several questions:- what is the role of cavitation?- is the propeller able to attract the bubbles present along the ship at the sea surface?- if attracted, can these bubble be broken by the propeller?

  4. Computational fluid dynamic study on cavitation in liquid nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. B.; Qiu, L. M.; Gao, Y.; Zhang, X. J.

    2008-09-01

    Cavitation is the formation of vapor bubbles within a liquid where flow dynamics cause the local static pressure to drop below the vapor pressure. This paper presents the steady computational fluid dynamic (CFD) results of cavitation in liquid nitrogen flow through hydrofoils and ogives with so-called "full cavitation model". The model is reexamined to assess the performance prediction from the standpoint of cryogenic fluids with the assumption of thermal equilibrium between vapor phase and liquid phase. The fluid thermodynamic properties are specified along the saturation line using the "Gaspak 3.2" databank. The thermal effects and accompanying property variations due to phase change are modeled rigorously. The thermodynamic cavitation framework is validated against experimental data of NASA hydrofoil and ogive. The global sensibility of the cavitation solution with respect to the cavitation model coefficients and the free-stream velocity is investigated in detail and the choking phenomenon is reported with high Mach number. The full cavitation model with the default coefficients is applicable for cavitation prediction in liquid nitrogen, taking into account of the thermodynamic effects.

  5. Modelling cavitation erosion using fluid-material interaction simulations.

    PubMed

    Chahine, Georges L; Hsiao, Chao-Tsung

    2015-10-01

    Material deformation and pitting from cavitation bubble collapse is investigated using fluid and material dynamics and their interaction. In the fluid, a novel hybrid approach, which links a boundary element method and a compressible finite difference method, is used to capture non-spherical bubble dynamics and resulting liquid pressures efficiently and accurately. The bubble dynamics is intimately coupled with a finite-element structure model to enable fluid/structure interaction simulations. Bubble collapse loads the material with high impulsive pressures, which result from shock waves and bubble re-entrant jet direct impact on the material surface. The shock wave loading can be from the re-entrant jet impact on the opposite side of the bubble, the fast primary collapse of the bubble, and/or the collapse of the remaining bubble ring. This produces high stress waves, which propagate inside the material, cause deformation, and eventually failure. A permanent deformation or pit is formed when the local equivalent stresses exceed the material yield stress. The pressure loading depends on bubble dynamics parameters such as the size of the bubble at its maximum volume, the bubble standoff distance from the material wall and the pressure driving the bubble collapse. The effects of standoff and material type on the pressure loading and resulting pit formation are highlighted and the effects of bubble interaction on pressure loading and material deformation are preliminarily discussed. PMID:26442140

  6. Evaluation and interpretation of bubble size distributions in pulsed megasonic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauptmann, M.; Struyf, H.; De Gendt, S.; Glorieux, C.; Brems, S.

    2013-05-01

    The occurrence of acoustic cavitation is incorporating a multitude of interdependent effects that strongly depend on the bubble size. Therefore, bubble size control would be beneficial for biological and industrial processes that rely on acoustic cavitation. A pulsed acoustic field can result in bubble size control and the repeated dissolution and reactivation ("recycling") of potentially active bubbles. As a consequence, a pulsed field can strongly enhance cavitation activity. In this paper, we present a modified methodology for the evaluation of the active bubble size distribution by means of a combination of cavitation noise measurements and ultrasonic pulsing. The key component of this modified methodology is the definition of an upper size limit, below which bubblesin between subsequent pulseshave to dissolve, in order to be sustainably recycled. This upper limit makes it possible to explain and link the enhancement of cavitation activity to a bubble size distribution. The experimentally determined bubble size distributions for different power densities are interpreted in the frame of numerical calculations of the oscillatory responses of the bubbles to the intermittent driving sound field. The distributions are found to be shaped by the size dependent interplay between bubble pulsations, rectified diffusion, coalescence, and the development of parametrically amplified shape instabilities. Also, a phenomenological reactivation-deactivation model is proposed to explain and quantify the observed enhancement of cavitation activity under pulsed, with respect to continuous sonication. In this model, the pulse-duration determines the magnitude of the reactivation of partially dissolved bubbles and the deactivation of activated bubbles by coalescence. It is shown that the subsequent recycling of previously active bubbles leads to an accumulation of cavitation activity, which saturates after a certain number of pulses. The model is fitted to the experimental data for the cavitation activity measured by means of ultraharmonic cavitation noise as a function of the pulse duration. Measurements of the development of the cavitation noise and sonochemiluminescence over a sequence of pulses for different pulse durations and separations confirm the general validity of the proposed model. Size distributions of the larger, inactive bubbles that were extracted from High-speed images of the cavitation field, relate the deactivation of activated bubbles by coalescence to the increase in volume concentrations of larger bubbles as observed by others.

  7. Removal of residual nuclei following a cavitation event: a parametric study.

    PubMed

    Duryea, Alexander P; Tamaddoni, Hedieh A; Cain, Charles A; Roberts, William W; Hall, Timothy L

    2015-09-01

    The efficacy of ultrasound therapies such as hock-wave lithotripsy and histotripsy can be compromised by residual cavitation bubble nuclei that persist following the collapse of primary cavitation. In our previous work, we have developed a unique strategy for mitigating the effects of these residual bubbles using low-amplitude ultrasound pulses to stimulate their aggregation and subsequent coalescenceeffectively removing them from the field. Here, we further develop this bubble removal strategy through an investigation of the effect of frequency on the consolidation process. Bubble removal pulses ranging from 0.5 to 2 MHz were used to sonicate the population of residual nuclei produced upon collapse of a histotripsy bubble cloud. For each frequency, mechanical index(MI) values ranging from 0 to approximately 1.5 were tested.Results indicated that, when evaluated as a function of bubble removal pulse MI, the efficacy of bubble removal shows markedly similar trends for all frequencies tested. This behavior divides into three distinct regimes (with provided cutoffs being approximate): 1) MI < 0.2: Minimal effect on the population of remanent cavitation nuclei; 2) 0.2 < MI < 1: Aggregation and subsequent coalescence of residual bubbles, the extent of which trends toward a maximum; and 3) MI > 1: Bubble coalescence is compromised as bubble removal pulses induce high-magnitude inertial cavitation of residual bubbles. The major distinction in these trends came for bubble removal pulses applied at 2 MHz, which were observed to generate the most effective bubble coalescence of all frequencies tested. We hypothesize that this is a consequence of the secondary Bjerknes force being the major facilitator of the consolidation process, the magnitude of which increases when the bubble size distribution is far from resonance such that the phase difference of oscillation of individual bubbles is minimal. PMID:26719861

  8. Removal of Residual Nuclei Following a Cavitation Event: A Parametric Study

    PubMed Central

    Duryea, Alexander P.; Tamaddoni, Hedieh A.; Cain, Charles A.; Roberts, William W.; Hall, Timothy L.

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of ultrasound therapies such as shock wave lithotripsy and histotripsy can be compromised by residual cavitation bubble nuclei that persist following the collapse of primary cavitation. In our previous work, we have developed a unique strategy for mitigating the effects of these residual bubbles using low amplitude ultrasound pulses to stimulate their aggregation and subsequent coalescence—effectively removing them from the field. Here, we further develop this bubble removal strategy through an investigation of the effect of frequency on the consolidation process. Bubble removal pulses ranging from 0.5 – 2 MHz were used to sonicate the population of residual nuclei produced upon collapse of a histotripsy bubble cloud. For each frequency, mechanical index (MI) values ranging from 0 to approximately 1.5 were tested. Results indicated that, when evaluated as a function of bubble removal pulse MI, the efficacy of bubble removal shows markedly similar trends for all frequencies tested. This behavior divides into three distinct regimes (with provided cutoffs being approximate): (1) MI < 0.2: Minimal effect on the population of remnant cavitation nuclei; (2) 0.2 < MI < 1: Aggregation and subsequent coalescence of residual bubbles, the extent of which trends toward a maximum; (3) MI > 1: Bubble coalescence is compromised as bubble removal pulses induce high magnitude inertial cavitation of residual bubbles. The major distinction in these trends came for bubble removal pulses applied at 2 MHz, which were observed to generate the most effective bubble coalescence of all frequencies tested. We hypothesize that this is a consequence of the secondary Bjerknes force being the major facilitator of the consolidation process, the magnitude of which increases when the bubble size distribution is far from resonance such that the phase difference of oscillation of individual bubbles is minimal. PMID:26719861

  9. Bubbles of Metamorphosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Manu

    2011-11-01

    Metamorphosis presents a puzzling challenge where, triggered by a signal, an organism abruptly transforms its entire shape and form. Here I describe the role of physical fluid dynamic processes during pupal metamorphosis in flies. During early stages of pupation of third instar larvae into adult flies, a physical gas bubble nucleates at a precise temporal and spatial location, as part of the normal developmental program in Diptera. Although its existence has been known for the last 100 years, the origin and control of this ``cavitation'' event has remained completely mysterious. Where does the driving negative pressure for bubble nucleation come from? How is the location of the bubble nucleation site encoded in the pupae? How do molecular processes control such a physical event? What is the role of this bubble during development? Via developing in-vivo imaging techniques, direct bio-physical measurements in live insect pupal structures and physical modeling, here I elucidate the physical mechanism for appearance and disappearance of this bubble and predict the site of nucleation and its exact timing. This new physical insight into the process of metamorphosis also allows us to understand the inherent design of pupal shell architectures in various species of insects. Milton Award, Harvard Society of Fellows; Terman Fellowship, Stanford

  10. Dynamics of vapor bubbles growth at boiling resulting from enthalpy excess of the surrounding superheated liquid and sound pulses generated by bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorofeev, B. M.; Volkova, V. I.

    2015-10-01

    The results of experiments investigating the exponential dependence of the vapor bubble radius on time at saturated boiling are generalized. Three different methods to obtain this dependence are suggested: (1) by the application of the transient heat conduction equation, (2) by using the correlations of energy conservation, and (3) by solving a similar electrodynamic problem. Based on the known experimental data, the accuracy of the dependence up to one percent and a few percent accuracy of its description based on the sound pressure generated by a vapor bubble have been determined. A significant divergence of the power dependence of the vapor bubble radius on time (with an exponent of 1/2) with the experimental results and its inadequacy for the description of the sound pulse generated by the bubble have been demonstrated.

  11. Dynamics of vapor bubbles growth at boiling resulting from enthalpy excess of the surrounding superheated liquid and sound pulses generated by bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorofeev, B. M.; Volkova, V. I.

    2016-01-01

    The results of experiments investigating the exponential dependence of the vapor bubble radius on time at saturated boiling are generalized. Three different methods to obtain this dependence are suggested: (1) by the application of the transient heat conduction equation, (2) by using the correlations of energy conservation, and (3) by solving a similar electrodynamic problem. Based on the known experimental data, the accuracy of the dependence up to one percent and a few percent accuracy of its description based on the sound pressure generated by a vapor bubble have been determined. A significant divergence of the power dependence of the vapor bubble radius on time (with an exponent of 1/2) with the experimental results and its inadequacy for the description of the sound pulse generated by the bubble have been demonstrated.

  12. Elasticity effects on cavitation in a squeeze film damper undergoing noncentered circular whirl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewe, David E.

    1988-01-01

    Elasticity of the liner and its effects on cavitation were numerically determined for a squeeze film damper subjected to dynamic loading. The loading was manifested as a prescribed motion of the rotor undergoing noncentered circular whirl. The boundary conditions were implemented using Elrod's algorithm which conserves lineal mass flux through the moving cavitation bubble as well as the oil film region of the damper. Computational movies were used to analyze the rapidly changing pressures and vapor bubble dynamics throughout the dynamic cycle for various flexibilities in the damper liner. The effects of liner elasticity on cavitation were only noticeable for the intermediate and high values of viscosity used in this study.

  13. Interaction of two differently sized oscillating bubbles in a free field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chew, Lup Wai; Klaseboer, Evert; Ohl, Siew-Wan; Khoo, Boo Cheong

    2011-12-01

    Most real life bubble dynamics applications involve multiple bubbles, for example, in cavitation erosion prevention, ultrasonic baths, underwater warfare, and medical applications involving microbubble contrast agents. Most scientific dealings with bubble-bubble interaction focus on two similarly sized bubbles. In this study, the interaction between two oscillating differently sized bubbles (generated in tap water) is studied using high speed photography. Four types of bubble behavior were observed, namely, jetting toward each other, jetting away from each other, bubble coalescence, and a behavior termed the catapult effect. In-phase bubbles jet toward each other, while out-of-phase bubbles jet away from each other. There exists a critical phase difference that separates the two regimes. The behavior of the bubbles is fully characterized by their dimensionless separation distance, their phase difference, and their size ratio. It is also found that for bubbles with large size difference, the smaller bubble behaves similarly to a single bubble oscillating near a free surface.

  14. Molecular emission from single-bubble sonoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didenko, Yuri T.; McNamara, William B., III; Suslick, Kenneth S.

    2000-10-01

    Ultrasound can drive a single gas bubble in water into violent oscillation; as the bubble is compressed periodically, extremely short flashes of light (about 100ps) are generated with clock-like regularity. This process, known as single-bubble sonoluminescence, gives rise to featureless continuum emission in water (from 200 to 800nm, with increasing intensity into the ultraviolet). In contrast, the emission of light from clouds of cavitating bubbles at higher acoustic pressures (multi-bubble sonoluminescence) is dominated by atomic and molecular excited-state emission at much lower temperatures. These observations have spurred intense effort to uncover the origin of sonoluminescence and to generalize the conditions necessary for its creation. Here we report a series of polar aprotic liquids that generate very strong single-bubble sonoluminescence, during which emission from molecular excited states is observed. Previously, single-bubble sonoluminescence from liquids other than water has proved extremely elusive. Our results give direct proof of the existence of chemical reactions and the formation of molecular excited states during single-bubble cavitation, and provide a spectroscopic link between single- and multi-bubble sonoluminescence.

  15. Multi-resolution analysis of passive cavitation detector signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haqshenas, S. R.; Saffari, N.

    2015-01-01

    Passive cavitation detectors are widely used for measuring acoustic emissions from cavitating bubbles. Acoustic emissions related to the dynamics of oscillating bubbles contain complex time and frequency domain information. Signal processing techniques traditionally used to analyse transient and stationary signals may be of limited value when analysing such acoustic emissions. This paper describes a multi-resolution approach developed for processing acoustic emissions data. The technique consists of the combination of a discrete wavelet transform and of the statistical and spectral analysis to extract cavitation features. These features include broadband emissions and harmonic, sub-harmonic and ultra-harmonic information. The implementation of the technique on experimental datasets demonstrates that this approach provides detailed information about key features of the acoustic signal, especially in complex situations where different types of cavitation occur simultaneously. Furthermore, statistical metrics used in this technique can provide a quantitative means for classifying signatures of cavitation, particularly the broadband segment of the spectrum created by inertial cavitation, which constitutes novel work.

  16. Application of computational fluid dynamics on cavitation in journal bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedel, Marco; Schmidt, Marcus; Reinke, Peter; Nobis, Matthias; Redlich, Marcel

    2014-03-01

    Journal bearings are applied in internal combustion engines due to their favourable wearing quality and operating characteristics. Under certain operating conditions damage of the journal bearing can occur caused by cavitation. The cavitation reduces the load capacity and leads to material erosion. Experimental investigations of cavitating flows in dimension of real journal bearing are difficult to realize or almost impossible caused by the small gap and transient flow conditions. Therefore numerical simulation is a very helpful engineering tool to research the cavitation behaviour. The CFD-Code OpenFOAM is used to analyse the flow field inside the bearing. The numerical cavitation model based on a bubble dynamic approach and requires necessary initial parameter for the calculation, such as nuclei bubble diameter, the number of nuclei and two empirical constants. The first part of this paper shows the influence of these parameters on the solution. For the adjustment of the parameters an experiment of Jakobsson et.al. [1] was used to validate the numerical flow model. The parameters have been varied according to the method Design of Experiments (DoE). With a defined model equation the parameters determined, to identify the parameter for CFD-calculations in comparison to the experimental values. The second part of the paper presents investigations on different geometrical changes in the bearing geometry. The effect of these geometrical changes on cavitation was compared with experimental results from Wollfarth [2] and Garner et.al. [3].

  17. Quantitative evaluation of erosive cavitation pressure field from pits in material: fact or myth?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, J.-K.; Chahine, G. L.

    2015-12-01

    Material pitting in a cavitating flow has been used for a long time as an indicator of the vague cavitation intensity concept. Periodically, some researchers suggest pitting tests as a simple means to provide quantitative measurements of the amplitude of the impulsive pressures in the cavitation field, especially when combined with Tabor's formula or with simple finite element computations with static loads. This paper examines the viability of such a method using fully coupled bubble dynamics and material response, and strongly concludes that the commonly accepted idea is a myth, as different loading scenarios with the same amplitude of the cavitation impulsive pressure result in different pit aspect ratios.

  18. Removal of Residual Cavitation Nuclei to Enhance Histotripsy Erosion of Model Urinary Stones

    PubMed Central

    Duryea, Alexander P.; Roberts, William W.; Cain, Charles A.; Hall, Timothy L.

    2015-01-01

    Histotripsy has been shown to be an effective treatment for model kidney stones, eroding their surface to tiny particulate debris via a cavitational bubble cloud. However, similar to shock wave lithotripsy, histotripsy stone treatments display a rate-dependent efficacy with pulses applied at low rate generating more efficient stone erosion in comparison to those applied at high rate. This is hypothesized to be the result of residual cavitation bubble nuclei generated by bubble cloud collapse. While the histotripsy bubble cloud only lasts on the order of 100 µs, these microscopic remnant bubbles can persist on the order of 1 second—inducing direct attenuation of subsequent histotripsy pulses and influencing bubble cloud dynamics. In an effort to mitigate these effects, we have developed a novel strategy to actively remove residual cavitation nuclei from the field using low-amplitude ultrasound pulses. Previous work has demonstrated that with selection of the appropriate acoustic parameters these bubble removal pulses can stimulate the aggregation and subsequent coalescence of microscopic bubble nuclei—effectively deleting them from the target volume. Here, we incorporate bubble removal pulses in histotripsy treatment of model kidney stones. It was found that when histotripsy is applied at low rate (1 Hz), bubble removal does not produce a statistically significant change in erosion. At higher pulse rates of 10, 100, and 500 Hz, incorporating bubble removal results in 3.7-, 7.5-, and 2.7-fold increases in stone erosion, respectively. High speed imaging indicates that the introduction of bubble removal pulses allows bubble cloud dynamics resulting from high pulse rates to more closely approximate those generated at the low rate of 1 Hz. These results corroborate previous work in the field of shock wave lithotripsy regarding the ill-effects of residual bubble nuclei, and suggest that high treatment efficiency can be recovered at high pulse rates through appropriate manipulation of the cavitation environment surrounding the stone. PMID:25965682

  19. Magnetic susceptibility based magnetic resonance estimation of micro-bubble size for the vertically upward bubbly flow.

    PubMed

    Arbabi, A; Mastikhin, I V

    2012-12-01

    The approach originally developed for the Nuclear Magnetic Resonance analysis of stable micro-bubbles is applied to studies of vertical bubbly flows. A very fast dispersion (diffusion) of water in bubbly flows extends the fast diffusion limit down to short (2-10 ms) measurement times, permitting the use of the simplified analytical expression to extract the micro-bubble size information both in bulk and spatially resolved. The observed strong bubble-induced reduction in T(2)(*) necessitates the use of very short encoding times and pure phase encoding methods to accurately measure the void fraction. There was an expected underestimation of bubble sizes at faster flow rates due to the limitations of the theory derived for small bubble sizes and non-interacting spherical bubbles (low void fractions and slow flow rates). This approach lends itself to studies of bubbly flows and cavitating media characterized by small bubble sizes and low void fractions. PMID:23117260

  20. Magnetic susceptibility based magnetic resonance estimation of micro-bubble size for the vertically upward bubbly flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbabi, A.; Mastikhin, I. V.

    2012-12-01

    The approach originally developed for the Nuclear Magnetic Resonance analysis of stable micro-bubbles is applied to studies of vertical bubbly flows. A very fast dispersion (diffusion) of water in bubbly flows extends the fast diffusion limit down to short (2-10 ms) measurement times, permitting the use of the simplified analytical expression to extract the micro-bubble size information both in bulk and spatially resolved. The observed strong bubble-induced reduction in T2? necessitates the use of very short encoding times and pure phase encoding methods to accurately measure the void fraction. There was an expected underestimation of bubble sizes at faster flow rates due to the limitations of the theory derived for small bubble sizes and non-interacting spherical bubbles (low void fractions and slow flow rates). This approach lends itself to studies of bubbly flows and cavitating media characterized by small bubble sizes and low void fractions.

  1. Visualization and image processing of spray structure under the effect of cavitation phenomenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghorbani, M.; Alcan, G.; Yilmaz, D.; Unel, M.; Kosar, A.

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents visualization and image processing of spray structure affected by cavitation bubbles and cavitating flow patterns. Experiments were conducted for a better understanding of cavitation and resulting flow regimes. Cavitation is generated with sudden pressure drop across a 4.5 mm long short micro-channel with an inner diameter of 152 ?m connected to the setup using proper fittings. Generated cavitation bubbles and fluid flow patterns were observed by using a high speed camera. The spray structure was observed in four different segments and mainly the droplet evaluation in the lower segments for low upstream pressures was analyzed using several image processing techniques including contrast adjustments and morphological operators. Moreover, fluid flow regimes for different upstream pressures were investigated, and the flow patterns were analyzed in the separated regions of the spray.

  2. Cost versus Enrollment Bubbles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vedder, Richard K.; Gillen, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    The defining characteristic of a bubble is unsustainable growth that eventually reverses. Bubbles typically arise when uncertainty leads to unsustainable trends, and the authors argue that there are two areas in which higher education has experienced what appear to be unsustainable trends, namely, college costs (the costs to students, parents, and

  3. Cavitational hydrothermal oxidation: A new remediation process. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Suslick, K.S.

    1998-06-01

    'The primary goal is to develop a quantitative understanding of cavitation phenomena in aqueous media and the development of applications of cavitation to remediation processes. Efforts have focused on three separate areas: sonoluminescence as a probe of conditions created during cavitational collapse in aqueous media, the use of cavitation for remediation of contaminated water, and an addition of the use of ultrasound in the synthesis of novel heterogeneous catalysts for hydrodehalogenation of halocarbons under mild conditions. This report summarizes work after one year of a three year project. In order to gain further understanding of the conditions present during cavitation, the author has continued his studies of sonoluminescence. He has made recent breakthroughs in the use of emission spectroscopy for temperature and pressure measurement of cavitation events, which he expects to publish shortly. He has been able to measure for the first time the temperature of cavitation in water during multi-bubble cavitation in the presence of aromatic hydrocarbons. The emission from excited states of C{sub 2} in water gives temperatures that are consistent with adiabatic compressional heating, with maximum temperatures of 4,300 K. Prior measurements of cavitation temperatures in low vapor pressure nonaqueous media gave somewhat higher temperatures of 5,000 K. This work lays permanently to rest exotic mechanisms for cavitational chemistry, at least for cavitation fields.'

  4. Cavitational hydrothermal oxidation: A new remediation process. Annual progress report, September 1996--August 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Suslick, K.S.

    1997-11-21

    'During the past year, the authors have continued to make substantial scientific progress on the understanding of cavitation phenomena in aqueous media and applications of cavitation to remediation processes. The efforts have focused on three separate areas: sonoluminescence as a probe of conditions created during cavitational collapse in aqueous media, the use of cavitation for remediation of contaminated water, and an addition of the use of ultrasound in the synthesis of novel heterogeneous catalysts for hydrodehalogenation of halocarbons under mild conditions. In order to gain further understanding of the conditions present during cavitation, the author has continued his studies of sonoluminescence. He has made recent breakthroughs in the use of emission spectroscopy for temperature and pressure measurement of cavitation events, which he expects to publish shortly. He has been able to measure for the first time the temperature of cavitation in water during multi-bubble cavitation in the presence of aromatic hydrocarbons. The emission from excited states of C{sub 2} in water gives temperatures that are consistent with adiabatic compressional heating, with maximum temperatures of 4,300 K. Prior measurements of cavitation temperatures in low vapor pressure nonaqueous media gave somewhat higher temperatures of 5,000 K. This work lays permanently to rest exotic mechanisms for cavitational chemistry, at least for cavitation fields.'

  5. Effect of micro/nano-particles in cavitation erosion.

    PubMed

    Li, Y J; Chen, H S; Chen, D R; Wang, J D

    2009-02-01

    The tests in de-ionized water with micro/nano CeO2 particles are carried out to study the effect of the micro/nano particles in inception of cavitation erosion. The existence of micro/nano particles is found to be the requisite factor and the degree of cavitation erosion is related to the sizes of the particles. Particles in the micro/nano scale may act as the transporters of micro bubbles to keep or get close to the solid surface together and the pressure fluctuation induced by the surface roughness causes the collapse of bubbles and erosion of the surface. Discrete phase models are employed to simulation the moving tracks of the particles. The sizes of the particles affect their capabilities of keeping and getting close to the surface. The effect of the particles of a certain size in cavitation erosion is determined by the combinational action of the two. PMID:19441392

  6. Study on effect of microparticle's size on cavitation erosion in solid-liquid system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Haosheng; Liu, Shihan; Wang, Jiadao; Chen, Darong

    2007-05-01

    Five different solutions containing microparticles in different sizes were tested in a vibration cavitation erosion experiment. After the experiment, the number of erosion pits on sample surfaces, free radicals HO in solutions, and mass loss all show that the cavitation erosion strength is strongly related to the particle size, and 500nm particles cause more severe cavitation erosion than other smaller or larger particles do. A model is presented to explain such result considering both nucleation and bubble-particle collision effects. Particle of a proper size will increase the number of heterogeneous nucleation and at the same time reduce the number of bubble-particle combinations, which results in more free bubbles in the solution to generate stronger cavitation erosion.

  7. Sound field measurement in a double layer cavitation cluster by rugged miniature needle hydrophones.

    PubMed

    Koch, Christian

    2016-03-01

    During multi-bubble cavitation the bubbles tend to organize themselves into clusters and thus the understanding of properties and dynamics of clustering is essential for controlling technical applications of cavitation. Sound field measurements are a potential technique to provide valuable experimental information about the status of cavitation clouds. Using purpose-made, rugged, wide band, and small-sized needle hydrophones, sound field measurements in bubble clusters were performed and time-dependent sound pressure waveforms were acquired and analyzed in the frequency domain up to 20 MHz. The cavitation clusters were synchronously observed by an electron multiplying charge-coupled device (EMCCD) camera and the relation between the sound field measurements and cluster behaviour was investigated. Depending on the driving power, three ranges could be identified and characteristic properties were assigned. At low power settings no transient and no or very low stable cavitation activity can be observed. The medium range is characterized by strong pressure peaks and various bubble cluster forms. At high power a stable double layer was observed which grew with further increasing power and became quite dynamic. The sound field was irregular and the fundamental at driving frequency decreased. Between the bubble clouds completely different sound field properties were found in comparison to those in the cloud where the cavitation activity is high. In between the sound field pressure amplitude was quite small and no collapses were detected. PMID:24953962

  8. The Numerical Simulation of Unsteady Cavitation Evolution Induced by Pressure Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoo, B. C.; Zheng, J. G.

    2014-11-01

    The present study is focused on the numerical simulation of pressure wave propagation through the cavitating compressible liquid flow, its interaction with cavitation bubble and the resulting unsteady cavitation evolution. The compressibility effects of liquid water are taken into account and the cavitating flow is governed by one-fluid cavitation model which is based on the compressible Euler equations with the assumption that the cavitation is the homogeneous mixture of liquid and vapour which are locally under both kinetic and thermodynamic equilibrium. Several aspects of the method employed to solve the governing equations are outlined. The unsteady features of cavitating flow due to the external perturbation, such as the cavitation deformation and collapse and consequent pressure increase are resolved numerically and discussed in detail. It is observed that the cavitation bubble collapse is accompanied by the huge pressure surge of order of 100 bar, which is thought to be responsible for the material erosion, noise, vibration and loss of efficiency of operating underwater devices.

  9. Modelling of flow with cavitation in centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homa, D.; Wrblewski, W.

    2014-08-01

    The paper concerns flow modelling in centrifugal pump with special consideration of cavitation phenomena. Cavitation occurs when local pressure drops below the saturation pressure according to the temperature of the flow. Vapour bubbles are created and then they flow through the areas with higher pressure. The bubbles collapse rapidly generating pressure wave, noise and vibration. Working under cavitation condition is very dangerous to a pump and can significantly shorten its lifetime. The investigated centrifugal pump consists of three two-flow rotors and stators working on a single shaft. The modelling process started with grid independence study. When the grid was chosen, the pump performance curve was obtained using the single phase fluid model. Next, using the results from pump performance curve calculations, the cavitation characteristic was obtained. The constant capacity was held when the pressure at the inlet was reduced. The two - phase model was used with Zwart cavitation model. The results indicate that the pump work in safe range of parameters. The analysis also provides wide range of information about the areas of vapour appearance. The most endangered regions are leading edges of rotor. When pressure at the inlet drops to about one third of pressure that calculations started from the cavitation cloud appears in whole rotor. The intense of vapour bubbles creation is greater near the shroud of the pump, rather than near the hub. As cavitation is strongly unsteady phenomena, the transient calculations were performed to check if the results are close to those obtained using the steady state type. The differences are not significant.

  10. Removal of Residual Cavitation Nuclei to Enhance Histotripsy Fractionation of Soft Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Duryea, Alexander P.; Cain, Charles A.; Roberts, William W.; Hall, Timothy L.

    2015-01-01

    Remnant bubble nuclei generated by primary cavitation collapse can limit the efficiency of histotripsy soft tissue fractionation. When these residual bubbles persist from one histotripsy pulse to the next, they can seed the repetitive nucleation of cavitation bubbles at a discrete set of sites within the focal volume. This effect—referred to as cavitation memory—manifests in inefficient lesion formation, as certain sites within the focal volume are overtreated while others remain undertreated. While the cavitation memory effect can be passively mitigated by using a low pulse repetition frequency (PRF) that affords remnant nuclei sufficient time for dissolution between successive pulses, this low PRF also results in slow lesion production. As such, it would be highly desirable to maintain the high per-pulse efficiency associated with low pulse rates when much higher PRFs are utilized. In this vein we have developed a strategy for the active removal of the remnant bubble nuclei following primary cavitation collapse, using low amplitude ultrasound sequences (termed bubble removal sequences) to stimulate the aggregation and subsequent coalescence of these bubbles. In this study, bubble removal sequences were incorporated in high-PRF histotripsy treatment (100 Hz) of a red blood cell tissue-mimicking phantom that allows for the visualization of lesion development in real-time. A series of reference treatments were also conducted at the low PRF of 1 Hz in order to provide a point of comparison when cavitation memory effects are minimal. It was found that bubble removal sequences as short as 1 ms are capable of maintaining the efficacious lesion development characteristics associated with the low PRF of 1 Hz when the much higher pulse rate of 100 Hz is used. These results were then extended to the treatment of a large volume within the tissue phantom, and optimal bubble removal sequences identified for the single-focal-spot case were utilized to homogenize a 10 × 10 mm region at high rate. PMID:26670848

  11. Cell mechanics in biomedical cavitation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qianxi; Manmi, Kawa; Liu, Kuo-Kang

    2015-10-01

    Studies on the deformation behaviours of cellular entities, such as coated microbubbles and liposomes subject to a cavitation flow, become increasingly important for the advancement of ultrasonic imaging and drug delivery. Numerical simulations for bubble dynamics of ultrasound contrast agents based on the boundary integral method are presented in this work. The effects of the encapsulating shell are estimated by adapting Hoff's model used for thin-shell contrast agents. The viscosity effects are estimated by including the normal viscous stress in the boundary condition. In parallel, mechanical models of cell membranes and liposomes as well as state-of-the-art techniques for quantitative measurement of viscoelasticity for a single cell or coated microbubbles are reviewed. The future developments regarding modelling and measurement of the material properties of the cellular entities for cutting-edge biomedical applications are also discussed. PMID:26442142

  12. Outcomes following single bubble collapse in a rigid tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, C.; Li, B.; Lin, F. Y.; Zou, J.

    2015-12-01

    Following the collapse of a vapour bubble inside a rigid tube, various outcomes could be caused by the propagation and reflection of the shock wave. Using high-speed camera system and hydrophone, the secondary cavitation and acoustic pressure curve due to the collapse of single bubble in a rigid tube are studied experimentally. The secondary cavitation has a decisive effect on the pressure pulse sequence, which usually appears at a certain area symmetric to the first bubble. Two particular cases of first bubble generated near the midpoint and the endings of the tube are also investigated, where the strength, position and period of the secondary cavitation show different features. The mechanism behind these results are discussed briefly, which is related to the propagation and reflection of the shock wave.

  13. Characterization of acoustic cavitation in water and molten aluminum alloy.

    PubMed

    Komarov, Sergey; Oda, Kazuhiro; Ishiwata, Yasuo; Dezhkunov, Nikolay

    2013-03-01

    High-intensive ultrasonic vibrations have been recognized as an attractive tool for refining the grain structure of metals in casting technology. However, the practical application of ultrasonics in this area remains rather limited. One of the reasons is a lack of data needed to optimize the ultrasonic treatment conditions, particularly those concerning characteristics of cavitation zone in molten aluminum. The main aim of the present study was to investigate the intensity and spectral characteristics of cavitation noise generated during radiation of ultrasonic waves into water and molten aluminum alloys, and to establish a measure for evaluating the cavitation intensity. The measurements were performed by using a high temperature cavitometer capable of measuring the level of cavitation noise within five frequency bands from 0.01 to 10MHz. The effect of cavitation treatment was verified by applying high-intense ultrasonic vibrations to a DC caster to refine the primary silicon grains of a model Al-17Si alloy. It was found that the level of high frequency noise components is the most adequate parameter for evaluating the cavitation intensity. Based on this finding, it was concluded that implosions of cavitation bubbles play a decisive role in refinement of the alloy structure. PMID:23141190

  14. Bubble formation in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antar, Basil N.

    1994-01-01

    Two KC-135 flight campaigns have been conducted to date which are specifically dedicated to study bubble formation in microgravity. The first flight was conducted during March 14-18, 1994, and the other during June 20-24, 1994. The results from the June 1994 flight have not been analyzed yet, while the results from the March flight have been partially analyzed. In the first flight three different experiments were performed, one with the specific aim at determining whether or not cavitation can take place during any of the fluid handling procedures adopted in the shuttle bioprocessing experiments. The other experiments were concerned with duplicating some of the procedures that resulted in bubble formation, namely the NCS filling procedure and the needle scratch of a solid surface. The results from this set of experiments suggest that cavitation did not take place during any of the fluid handling procedures. The results clearly indicate that almost all were generated as a result of the breakup of the gas/liquid interface. This was convincingly demonstrated in the scratch tests as well as in the liquid fill tests.

  15. Predicting the growth of nanoscale nuclei by histotripsy pulses.

    PubMed

    Bader, Kenneth B; Holland, Christy K

    2016-04-01

    Histotripsy is a focused ultrasound therapy that ablates tissue through the mechanical action of cavitation. Histotripsy-initiated cavitation activity is generated from shocked ultrasound pulses that scatter from incidental nuclei (shock scattering histotripsy), or purely tensile ultrasound pulses (microtripsy). The Yang/Church model was numerically integrated to predict the behavior of the cavitation nuclei exposed to measured shock scattering histotripsy pulses. The bubble motion exhibited expansion only behavior, suggesting that the ablative action of a histotripsy pulse is related to the maximum size of the bubble. The analytic model of Holland and Apfel was extended to predict the maximum size of cavitation nuclei for both shock scattering histotripsy and microtripsy excitations. The predictions of the analytic model and the numerical model agree within 2% for fully developed shock scattering histotripsy pulses (>72 MPa peak positive pressure). For shock scattering histotripsy pulses that are not fully developed (<72 MPa), the analytic model underestimated the maximum size by less than 5%. The analytic model was also used to predict bubble growth nucleated from microtripsy insonations, and was found to be consistent with experimental observations. Based on the extended analytic model, metrics were developed to predict the extent of the treatment zone from histotripsy pulses. PMID:26988374

  16. PIV in the two phases of hydrodynamic cavitation in a venturi type section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuzier, Sylvie; Coudert, Sébastien; Coutier Delgosha, Olivier

    2012-11-01

    The presence of cavitation can affect the performance of turbomachinery. Attached sheet cavities on the blades induce modifications of flow dynamics and turbulence properties. This phenomenon is studied here in a configuration of 2D flow in a venturi type section. Images of the bubbles as well as of the light emitted by fluorescent particles placed in the liquid are recorded simultaneously. Velocities of the bubbles and of the liquid phase are obtained by PIV. The slip velocity is analyzed function of the number of cavitation and other physical parameters. Different levels of turbulence are correlated with different bubble structures in the dipahasic cavity.

  17. Generation and characterization of submicron size bubbles.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chendi; Nesset, Kirsten; Masliyah, Jacob; Xu, Zhenghe

    2012-11-01

    A baffled high intensity agitation (BHIA) cell was used to generate submicron size bubbles of an average diameter around 500nm by hydrodynamic cavitation. The generation of submicron size bubbles by BHIA cell was found to be largely dependent on the agitation speed of impellers. The duration of agitation and temperature showed only a marginal effect on generation of submicron size bubbles. Surface properties such as zeta-potential and stability of submicron size bubbles were found to be highly dependent on the chemistry of solutions in which the bubbles are generated. The presence of surfactant and frother in water was found to be beneficial for generating a larger number of submicron size bubbles that are more stable, having a life time of up to 24h. PMID:22824383

  18. Formulation of multibubble cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Yu

    2011-06-01

    With the appropriate approximation, we have formulated the equation of multibubble motion for two cases: a filament of bubbles and a small spherical cluster of bubbles. Our results have yielded a collective mode of bubble motion in which individual bubbles of similar size expand and compress almost simultaneously. Each vibrating bubble radiates sound waves and originates the radiation sound pressure, which affects the motion of the other bubbles. The numerical simulation has revealed that this interaction suppresses single-bubble motion and tends to homogeneously spread the energy of the acoustic standing wave to each individual bubble.

  19. Effect of Noble Gases on Sonoluminescence Temperatures during Multibubble Cavitation

    SciTech Connect

    Didenko, Yuri T.; McNamara, William B. III; Suslick, Kenneth S.

    2000-01-24

    Sonoluminescence spectra were collected from Cr(CO){sub 6} solutions in octanol and dodecane saturated with various noble gases. The emission from excited-state metal atoms serves as an internal thermometer of cavitation. The intensity and temperature of sonoluminescence increases from He to Xe. The intensity of the underlying continuum, however, grows faster with increasing temperature than the line emission. Dissociation of solvent molecules within the bubble consumes a significant fraction of the energy generated by the collapsing bubble, which can limit the final temperature inside the bubble. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  20. Fuel Performance Experiments and Modeling: Fission Gas Bubble Nucleation and Growth in Alloy Nuclear Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    McDeavitt, Sean; Shao, Lin; Tsvetkov, Pavel; Wirth, Brian; Kennedy, Rory

    2014-04-07

    Advanced fast reactor systems being developed under the DOE's Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative are designed to destroy TRU isotopes generated in existing and future nuclear energy systems. Over the past 40 years, multiple experiments and demonstrations have been completed using U-Zr, U-Pu-Zr, U-Mo and other metal alloys. As a result, multiple empirical and semi-empirical relationships have been established to develop empirical performance modeling codes. Many mechanistic questions about fission as mobility, bubble coalescience, and gas release have been answered through industrial experience, research, and empirical understanding. The advent of modern computational materials science, however, opens new doors of development such that physics-based multi-scale models may be developed to enable a new generation of predictive fuel performance codes that are not limited by empiricism.

  1. Large Bubble Growth Quantified By Video and Infrasound at Mount Erebus, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, A. J. C.; Johnson, J. B.

    2014-12-01

    Mount Erebus lava lake eruptions exhibit many characteristic strombolian attributes including the ascent of a large gas slug(s) through the magma column followed by its expansion and bursting at the surface. Strombolian explosions correspond to pressurized large (>10 m radius) bubbles, which distend the lava lake surface before bursting within a few tenths of a second thus generating infrasonic impulses followed by decaying oscillations. We quantify the dynamics of bubble evolution using infrasound and time synchronized video data recording at ~30 FPS. Video footage is used to synthesize pressure time series during eruptions assuming a simple acoustic source. These synthetic pressure records are directly compared to infrasound pressure records collected at two sites located ~300 m from the lava lake source. A scaled relationship exists between infrasound and video derived pressures where video generally overestimates the volumetrically expanding source. This scaling is due to the image processing routine, which tracks and models the ejection of ballistics during eruption as an expanding hemisphere and not necessarily the expansion of a translucent gas source that is not directly visible with optical imagery. Using both data sets, we describe Erebus lava lake eruptions in three phases with smooth distension of spherical cap (P1), followed by membrane fragmentation and violent gas expulsion (P2) and finally a contraction of the volumetric gas source due to an initial over-expansion followed by re-equilibration. (P3). Specifically, P3 is identified by decaying oscillations of the pressure record which has been well modeled in laboratory experiments but never described at Erebus.

  2. Cavitation: a contributory factor in the transition from symmetric to asymmetric jets in cross-flow nozzles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganippa, L. C.; Bark, G.; Andersson, S.; Chomiak, J.

    The structure and evolution of cavitation and its influence on jet patterns from two transparent cross-flow nozzles with holes inclined at 90 degrees (nozzle A) and 80 degrees (nozzle B) to the nozzle axis have been investigated using high-speed motion pictures, flash photography and stroboscopic visualization. At the onset, cavitation inception was in the form of travelling bubbles, which were transported along the flow and clearly detached from the wall. As the flow was increased the bubbles grew and merged into a dense group of bubbles (cloud cavitation), partly unsteady and shedding. Further increasing the flow caused the cavitation at the entrance to transform mainly into a glassy appearance and at this stage the cavitation was well inside the hole and the spray appeared symmetric. When the flow was increased beyond this stage, cavitation extended to the exit of the hole, occupying a significant part of the hole on one side, resulting in a jet that atomized on the side where cavitation was most extensive and a non-atomizing jet on the side with less cavitation. The distribution of cavitation in the hole is very sensitive to the nozzle geometry and it substantially influences the spray dispersion.

  3. Stable tridimensional bubble clusters in multi-bubble sonoluminescence (MBSL).

    PubMed

    Rosselló, J M; Dellavale, D; Bonetto, F J

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, stable clusters made of multiple sonoluminescent bubbles are experimentally and theoretically studied. Argon bubbles were acoustically generated and trapped using bi-frequency driving within a cylindrical chamber filled with a sulfuric acid aqueous solution (SA85w/w). The intensity of the acoustic pressure field was strong enough to sustain, during several minutes, a large number of positionally and spatially fixed (without pseudo-orbits) sonoluminescent bubbles over an ellipsoidally-shaped tridimensional array. The dimensions of the ellipsoids were studied as a function of the amplitude of the applied low-frequency acoustic pressure (PAc(LF)) and the static pressure in the fluid (P0). In order to explain the size and shape of the bubble clusters, we performed a series of numerical simulations of the hydrodynamic forces acting over the bubbles. In both cases the observed experimental behavior was in excellent agreement with the numerical results. The simulations revealed that the positionally stable region, mainly determined by the null primary Bjerknes force (F→Bj), is defined as the outer perimeter of an axisymmetric ellipsoidal cluster centered in the acoustic field antinode. The role of the high-frequency component of the pressure field and the influence of the secondary Bjerknes force are discussed. We also investigate the effect of a change in the concentration of dissolved gas on the positional and spatial instabilities through the cluster dimensions. The experimental and numerical results presented in this paper are potentially useful for further understanding and modeling numerous current research topics regarding multi-bubble phenomena, e.g. forces acting on the bubbles in multi-frequency acoustic fields, transient acoustic cavitation, bubble interactions, structure formation processes, atomic and molecular emissions of equal bubbles and nonlinear or unsteady acoustic pressure fields in bubbly media. PMID:24974006

  4. Preliminary wall heat transfer measurements and visualization of bubble growth and departure: Saturated nucleate boiling of FC-72

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, S.W.; Kim, J.; Mullen, J.D.; Kim, M.H.

    1999-07-01

    A visualization study of single bubbles growing on a microscale heater array kept at nominally constant temperature was performed. The heater array consisted of 96 heaters each 0.27 mm x 0.27 mm in size. The heater temperatures were kept constant using electronic feedback loops similar to those used in hot-wire anemometry and the power required to do this was measured throughout the bubble departure cycle for each heater in the array. Preliminary data taken at a wall superheat of 29 C resulted in boiling in the isolated bubble regime on the surface. A snapshot of boiling on the surface is seen in Figure A-1. Three types of bubble behavior were observed. The bubbles nucleating in the upper left and lower left corners of the array did not appear to be influenced by bubbles that had departed previously, nor by other bubbles on the heater (Type I behavior). The bubbles nucleating from the single site towards the center of the array were influenced by the wake of the bubble that had departed previously (Type II behavior). The bubbles nucleating in the upper and lower right corners nucleated and grew on separate sites, then merged to form a single large bubble that departed the surface (Type III behavior). Large amounts of heat transfer were associated with three processes during the bubble departure cycle-bubble nucleation, shrinking of the dry spot before departure, and merging of bubbles. The heat transfer mechanisms seen are often not accounted for in many of the current models.

  5. Detecting vapour bubbles in simulations of metastable water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzlez, Miguel A.; Menzl, Georg; Aragones, Juan L.; Geiger, Philipp; Caupin, Frederic; Abascal, Jose L. F.; Dellago, Christoph; Valeriani, Chantal

    2014-11-01

    The investigation of cavitation in metastable liquids with molecular simulations requires an appropriate definition of the volume of the vapour bubble forming within the metastable liquid phase. Commonly used approaches for bubble detection exhibit two significant flaws: first, when applied to water they often identify the voids within the hydrogen bond network as bubbles thus masking the signature of emerging bubbles and, second, they lack thermodynamic consistency. Here, we present two grid-based methods, the M-method and the V-method, to detect bubbles in metastable water specifically designed to address these shortcomings. The M-method incorporates information about neighbouring grid cells to distinguish between liquid- and vapour-like cells, which allows for a very sensitive detection of small bubbles and high spatial resolution of the detected bubbles. The V-method is calibrated such that its estimates for the bubble volume correspond to the average change in system volume and are thus thermodynamically consistent. Both methods are computationally inexpensive such that they can be used in molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations of cavitation. We illustrate them by computing the free energy barrier and the size of the critical bubble for cavitation in water at negative pressure.

  6. Detecting vapour bubbles in simulations of metastable water

    SciTech Connect

    González, Miguel A.; Abascal, Jose L. F.; Valeriani, Chantal E-mail: cvaleriani@quim.ucm.es; Menzl, Georg; Geiger, Philipp; Dellago, Christoph E-mail: cvaleriani@quim.ucm.es; Aragones, Juan L.; Caupin, Frederic

    2014-11-14

    The investigation of cavitation in metastable liquids with molecular simulations requires an appropriate definition of the volume of the vapour bubble forming within the metastable liquid phase. Commonly used approaches for bubble detection exhibit two significant flaws: first, when applied to water they often identify the voids within the hydrogen bond network as bubbles thus masking the signature of emerging bubbles and, second, they lack thermodynamic consistency. Here, we present two grid-based methods, the M-method and the V-method, to detect bubbles in metastable water specifically designed to address these shortcomings. The M-method incorporates information about neighbouring grid cells to distinguish between liquid- and vapour-like cells, which allows for a very sensitive detection of small bubbles and high spatial resolution of the detected bubbles. The V-method is calibrated such that its estimates for the bubble volume correspond to the average change in system volume and are thus thermodynamically consistent. Both methods are computationally inexpensive such that they can be used in molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations of cavitation. We illustrate them by computing the free energy barrier and the size of the critical bubble for cavitation in water at negative pressure.

  7. Removal of residual cavitation nuclei to enhance histotripsy fractionation of soft tissue.

    PubMed

    Duryea, Alexander P; Cain, Charles A; Roberts, William W; Hall, Timothy L; Duryea, Alexander P; Cain, Charles A; Roberts, William W; Hall, Timothy L

    2015-12-01

    Remanent bubble nuclei generated by primary cavitation collapse can limit the efficiency of histotripsy softtissue fractionation. When these residual bubbles persist from one histotripsy pulse to the next, they can seed the repetitive nucleation of cavitation bubbles at a discrete set of sites within the focal volume. This effect-referred to as cavitation memory- manifests in inefficient lesion formation, because certain sites within the focal volume are overtreated whereas others remain undertreated. Although the cavitation memory effect can be passively mitigated by using a low pulse repetition frequency (PRF) that affords remanent nuclei sufficient time for dissolution between successive pulses, this low PRF also results in slow lesion production. As such, it would be highly desirable to maintain the high per-pulse efficiency associated with low pulse rates when much higher PRFs are utilized. In this vein, we have developed a strategy for the active removal of the remanent bubble nuclei following primary cavitation collapse, using low-amplitude ultrasound sequences (termed bubble-removal sequences) to stimulate the aggregation and subsequent coalescence of these bubbles. In this study, bubbleremoval sequences were incorporated in high-PRF histotripsy treatment (100 Hz) of a red blood cell tissue-mimicking phantom that allows for the visualization of lesion development in real time. A series of reference treatments were also conducted at the low PRF of 1 Hz to provide a point of comparison for which cavitation memory effects are minimal. It was found that bubble-removal sequences as short as 1 ms are capable of maintaining the efficacious lesion development characteristics associated with the low PRF of 1 Hz when the much higher pulse rate of 100 Hz is used. These results were then extended to the treatment of a large volume within the tissue phantom, and optimal bubble-removal sequences identified for the singlefocal- spot case were utilized to homogenize a 10 10 mm region at high rate. PMID:26670848

  8. Pulsation of cavitating vortex rings in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teslenko, V. S.; Drozhzhin, A. P.; Medvedev, R. N.

    2014-11-01

    We present the results of experimental investigations of the cavitating vortex rings (CVRs) formed upon throwing a water column (jet) from an immersed cylindrical barrel with a diameter of 20-40 mm and a length of 30-100 mm. The dynamics of the CVR formation and propagation in water in the form of toroidal cavitation bubbles has been studied as dependent on the initial jet velocity. It is established that CVRs shaped as hollow tori are formed at a jet velocity above 2 m/s. At a jet velocity above 6 m/s, the CVRs exhibit radial pulsations, which have been observed for the first time with the aid of optical methods.

  9. Elastic cavitation and fracture via injection.

    PubMed

    Hutchens, Shelby B; Fakhouri, Sami; Crosby, Alfred J

    2016-02-23

    The cavitation rheology technique extracts soft materials mechanical properties through pressure-monitored fluid injection. Properties are calculated from the system's response at a critical pressure that is governed by either elasticity or fracture (or both); however previous elementary analysis has not been capable of accurately determining which mechanism is dominant. We combine analyses of both mechanisms in order to determine how the full system thermodynamics, including far-field compliance, dictate whether a bubble in an elastomeric solid will grow through either reversible or irreversible deformations. Applying these analyses to experimental data, we demonstrate the sensitivity of cavitation rheology to microstructural variation via a co-dependence between modulus and fracture energy. PMID:26837798

  10. Voltammetric exploration and applications of ultrasonic cavitation.

    PubMed

    Banks, Craig E; Compton, Richard G

    2003-02-17

    Voltammetric measurements carried out in the presence of power ultrasound are reviewed, and the physical processes responsible for the observed substantial augmentation of mass transport identified as resulting from a mixture of acoustic streaming and cavitation. The benefits conferred in electroanalysis or electrosynthesis of insonation simultaneous with electrolysis are summarised. The use of ultrafast ("nanosecond") voltammetric measurements to probe the nature of the interfacial cavitational bubble dynamics is described and shown to provide information not readily accessed by other experiments. Lastly, voltammetry in acoustically emulsified (organic/aqueous) media is discussed. This has considerable "green" potential for electrosynthesis, whilst the use of nanosecond voltammetry to probe the charge transferred as emulsion droplets impinge on the electrode allows a generic approach to the determination of the potential of zero charge of the latter. PMID:12619416

  11. Profile Measurements During Cavitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walchner, O.

    1944-01-01

    One of the problems of modern cavitation research is the experimental determination of the wing loads on airfoils during cavitation. Such experiments were made on various airfoils with the support of the naval ministry at the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Flow Research at Goettingen.

  12. Experiments in thermosensitive cavitation of a cryogenic rocket propellant surrogate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Sean Benjamin

    Cavitation is a phase-change phenomenon that may appear in practical devices, often leading to loss of performance and possible physical damage. Of particular interest is the presence of cavitation in rocket engine pumps as the cryogenic fluids cavitate in impellers and inducers. Unlike water, which has been studied exhaustively, cryogenic fluids undergo cavitation with significant thermal effect. Past attempts at analyzing this behavior in water have led to poor predictive capability due to the lack of data in the regime defined as thermosensitive cavitation. Fluids flowing near their thermodynamic critical point have a liquid-vapor density ratio that is orders of magnitude less than typical experimental fluids, so that the traditional equation-of-state and cavitation models do not apply. Thermal effects in cavitation have not been fully investigated due to experimental difficulties handling cryogenics. This work investigates the physical effects of thermosensitive cavitation in a model representative of a turbopump inducer in a modern rocket engine. This is achieved by utilizing a room-temperature testing fluid that exhibits a thermal effect equivalent to that experienced by cryogenic propellants. Unsteady surface pressures and high speed imaging collected over the span of thermophysical regimes ranging from thermosensitive to isothermal cavitation offer both quantitative and qualitative insight into the physical process of thermal cavitation. Physical and thermodynamic effects are isolated to identify the source of cavity conditions, oscillations and growth/collapse behavior. Planar laser imaging offers an instantaneous look inside the vapor cavity and at the behavior of the boundary between the two-phase region and freestream liquid. Nondimensional parameters are explored, with cavitation numbers, Reynolds Numbers, coefficient of pressure and nondimensional temperature in a broad range. Results in the form of cavitation regime maps, Strouhal Number of cavity collapse, and cavity length offer a mechanistic analysis of the phenomenon. Linear stability analysis of the boundary is performed, as well as analysis of the thermal effects in the cavity and the oscillatory behavior of the cavity and reentrant jet.

  13. Comparative CFD Investigation on the Performance of a New Family of Super-Cavitating Hydrofoils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brizzolara, S.; Bonfiglio, L.

    2015-12-01

    We present a CFD characterization of a new type of super-cavitating hydrofoil section designed to have optimal performance both in super-cavitating conditions and in sub-cavitating conditions (including transitional regime). The basic concepts of the new profile family are first introduced. Lift, drag and cavity shapes at different cavitation numbers are calculated for a new foil and compared with those of conventional sub-cavitating and super-cavitating profiles. Numerical calculations confirm the superior characteristics of the new hydrofoil family, which is able to attain high lift and efficiency both in sub-cavitating and super-cavitating conditions. Numerical calculations are based on a multi-phase fully turbulent URANSE solver with a bubble dynamic cavitation model to follow the generation and evaporation of the vapor phase. The new profile family, initially devised for ultra-high speed hydrofoil crafts, may result useful for diverse applications such as super-cavitating or surface-piercing propellers or high-speed sailing boats.

  14. Experimental determination of cavitation thresholds in liquid water and mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Gulec, K.; West, C.D.; Haines, J.

    1998-09-01

    It is well-known that fluids (like solids) will break apart or form voids when put under sufficient tension. The present study has been motivated by the need to evaluate the impact of fluid cavitation in spallation neutron source target systems, more specifically for the proposed 1-MW Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) project, which is being designed in collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, and Argonne National Laboratory. Indeed, results of SNS-specific simulations have indicated that the onset of cavitation could play a very significant role in reducing imposed stresses in structural components of the SNS. In general, the cavitation of fluids is target systems is important to consider for a variety of reasons. Its occurrence can have significant impact on heat transfer, pressure pulse generation, fluid jetting on to structures, surface erosion, stresses induced in enclosures, etc. Therefore, it is important to evaluate the threshold pressure under which the fluid in tension will undergo cavitation. Another major aspect concerns the possible onset of cavitation in an oscillating pressure field; i.e., one would need to know if fluids such as mercury and water will cavitate if the imposed tensile pressure in the fluid is of short duration. If indeed it takes sufficiently long for cavitation bubbles to nucleate, then it would be possible to disregard the complexities involved with addressing cavitation-related issues. This paper provides an overview of preliminary work done to date to derive information on cavitation onset in a relatively static and in a high-frequency environment.

  15. Transcranial Doppler and acoustic pressure fluctuations for the assessment of cavitation and thromboembolism in patients with mechanical heart valves.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Rosendo A; Ruel, Marc; Labrosse, Michel; Mesana, Thierry

    2008-04-01

    The formation and collapse of vapor-filled bubbles near a mechanical heart valve is called cavitation. Such microbubbles are suspected to have strong pro-coagulant effects. Therefore, cavitation may be a contributing factor to the pro-thrombotic effects of mechanical valves. Herein, we systematically review the available evidence linking cavitation and thrombosis. We also critically appraise the potential usefulness of transcranial Doppler and other new non-invasive diagnostic methods to study cavitation and cerebral embolism in mechanical valve patients. Experimental studies indicate that cavitation microbubbles cause platelet aggregation, complement-activation, fibrinolysis, release of tissue-factor, and endothelial damage. Administration of 100% oxygen to mechanical valve patients during transcranial Doppler examination can transiently decrease the counts of Doppler-detected cerebral microemboli compared with room air. This is associated with removal of most circulating gaseous emboli from cavitation. This method may therefore be applied to the study of cavitation and thromboembolism. Additionally, the analysis of high-frequency acoustic-pressure fluctuations detected from the implosion of cavitation bubbles is a promising method for assessment of cavitation in vivo; however, this requires further development. A better understanding of cavitation is important in order to adequately investigate its role in the overall pro-thrombotic effects in mechanical valve patients. Such studies may allow establishing guidelines for new valve designs. PMID:18056151

  16. Cavitation in trees monitored using simultaneously acoustics and optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomarenko, Alexandre; Vincent, Olivier; Marmottant, Philippe

    2013-03-01

    Under hydric stress, in dry weather conditions, the sap within trees may reach extreme negative pressures and cavitate: bubbles appear, which eventually causes an embolism in the circulation. It has been shown that cavitation is associated with short acoustic emissions, and they can be recorded in the ultrasound range. However the precise origin of each acoustic emission is still not clear. In particular, the acoustic emissions could be not only the consequence of cavitation, but also of the collapse of xylem conduits, or of fractures in the wood. Here we present an original set-up where we can simultaneously record (i) the acoustic emissions, (ii) the location of cavitation events, by imaging the sap channels under light transmission microscopy. We are then able to correlate the sounds to the visible changes in channels, such as the appearance of cavitation bubbles. We hope the results of the present study might help to better understand the acoustic signals emitted by trees, and to obtain further information in the evolution of wood under dry stress conditions.

  17. Can Cavitation Be Anticipated?

    SciTech Connect

    Allgood, G.O.; Dress, W.B.; Hylton, J.O.; Kercel, S.W.

    1999-04-25

    The major problem with cavitation in pumps and hydraulic systems is that there is no effective (conventional) method for detecting or predicting its inception. The traditional method of recognizing cavitation in a pump is to declare the event occurring when the total head drops by some arbitrary value (typically 3%) in response to a pressure reduction at the pump inlet. However, the device is already seriously cavitating when this happens. What is actually needed is a practical method to detect impending rather than incipient cavitation. Whereas the detection of incipient cavitation requires the detection of features just after cavitation starts, the anticipation of cavitation requires the detection and identification of precursor features just before it begins. Two recent advances that make this detection possible. The first is acoustic sensors with a bandwidth of 1 MHz and a dynamic range of 80 dB that preserve the fine details of the features when subjected to coarse vibrations. The second is the application of Bayesian parameter estimation which makes it possible to separate weak signals, such as those present in cavitation precursors, from strong signals, such as pump vibration. Bayesian parameter estimation derives a model based on cavitation hydrodynamics and produces a figure of merit of how well it fits the acquired data. Applying this model to an anticipatory engine should lead to a reliable method of anticipating cavitation before it occurs. This paper reports the findings of precursor features using high-performance sensors and Bayesian analysis of weak acoustic emissions in the 100-1000kHz band from an experimental flow loop.

  18. Cavitation by spall fracture of solid walls in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikulich, V.; Brcker, Ch.

    2014-07-01

    Experiments are carried out to investigate the cavitation process induced by the spill-off from material from a surface in a liquid environment. Therefore, a simplified physical model was designed which allows the optical observation of the process next to a transparent glass rod submerged in a liquid where the rod is forced to fracture at a pre-defined groove. High-speed shadow-imaging and refractive index matching allow observation of the dynamics of the cavitation generation and cavitation bubble breakdown together with the flow. The results show that the initial phase of spill-off is a vertical lift-off of the rod from the surface that is normal to the direction of pendulum impact. A cavitation bubble is immediately formed during spill-off process and grows in size until lateral motion of the rod sets in. While the rod is transported away, the bubble shrinks into hyperbolic shape and finally collapses. This process is regarded as one contributing factor to the high efficiency of hydro-abrasive wear.

  19. Estimation of mechanical heart valve cavitation in an electro-hydraulic total artificial heart.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hwansung; Taenaka, Yoshiyuki; Kitamura, Soichro

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish a method for estimating mechanical in vitro heart valve cavitation in an electro-hydraulic total artificial heart (EHTAH). The variations in the left driving pressure (LDP) slope of the EHTAH were used as an index of the cavitation intensity. The LDP slope was controlled by changing the stroke volume of the EHTAH. The stroke volume was changed from full-filling and full-eject to partial-filling and partial-eject conditions. A 25-mm Medtronic Hall valve was installed in the mitral position of the EHTAH. Cavitation bubbles were concentrated on the valve stop; the major cause of these cavitation bubbles was determined to be squeeze flow. The valve-closing velocity was found to be proportional to increases in the LDP slope and the stroke volume of the left blood pump. The cavitation intensity and the cavitation event rate increased with increases in the stroke volume of the EHTAH. A consistent correlation was observed between the valve-closing velocity and the cavitation intensity. The LDP slope of the EHTAH may play an important role in estimating the mechanical heart valve cavitation intensity. PMID:16409393

  20. Cavitation erosion: Using the target material as a pressure sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Samir Chandra; Franc, Jean-Pierre; Fivel, Marc

    2015-10-01

    Numerical prediction of mass loss due to cavitation erosion requires the knowledge of the hydrodynamic impact loads generated by cavitation bubble collapses. Experimental measurements of such impact loads using conventional pressure sensors are not reliable (if not impossible) due to the micron size and the very small duration of the loading. In this paper, a new method to estimate these loading conditions is proposed based on cavitation pitting tests and an iterative inverse finite element modeling. The principle of the method is as follows. First, numerous pits corresponding to localized plastically deformed regions are identified from a cavitation test performed in a dedicated tunnel. Then each pit is numerically reproduced by finite element simulations of the material response to a representative Gaussian pressure field supposed to mimic a single bubble collapse. This gives the size and pressure distribution of the bubble impacts. The prime objective of this study is to find out if the target material itself could be used as a pressure sensor or not, i.e., if the cavitation pits left on the surface of the tested specimen could provide the characteristics of the cavitating flow in terms of pressure fields independently of the target material. Pitting tests were done on three materials, namely, 7075 Aluminum alloy (Al-7075), 2205 duplex stainless steel (A-2205), and Nickel-Aluminum Bronze (NAB) at three different flow conditions and the impact loads have been estimated for each identified pit. Very interestingly, a statistical analysis shows that the estimated impact loads are material independent at all flow conditions, provided the material properties are characterized properly. It is also shown that for some materials, the constitutive parameters obtained from compression tests are not satisfactory.

  1. The effects of total dissolved gas on chum salmon fry survival, growth, gas bubble disease, and seawater tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Geist, David R.; Linley, Timothy J.; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Deng, Zhiqun

    2013-02-01

    Chum salmon Oncorhynchus keta alevin developing in gravel habitats downstream of Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River are exposed to elevated levels of total dissolved gas (TDG) when water is spilled at the dam to move migrating salmon smolts downstream to the Pacific Ocean. Current water quality criteria for the management of dissolved gas in dam tailwaters were developed primarily to protect salmonid smolts and are assumed to be protective of alevin if adequate depth compensation is provided. We studied whether chum salmon alevin exposed to six levels of dissolved gas ranging from 100% to 130% TDG at three development periods between hatch and emergence (hereafter early, middle, and late stage) suffered differential mortality, growth, gas bubble disease, or seawater tolerance. Each life stage was exposed for 50 d (early stage), 29 d (middle stage), or 16 d (late stage) beginning at 13, 34, and 37 d post-hatch, respectively, through 50% emergence. The mortality for all stages from exposure to emergence was estimated to be 8% (95% confidence interval (CI) of 4% to 12%) when dissolved gas levels were between 100% and 117% TDG. Mortality significantly increased as dissolved gas levels rose above 117% TDG,; with the lethal concentration that produced 50% mortality (LC50 ) was estimated to be 128.7% TDG (95% CI of 127.2% to 130.2% TDG) in the early and middle stages. By contrast, there was no evidence that dissolved gas level significantly affected growth in any life stage except that the mean wet weight at emergence of early stage fish exposed to 130% TDG was significantly less than the modeled growth of unexposed fish. The proportion of fish afflicted with gas bubble disease increased with increasing gas concentrations and occurred most commonly in the nares and gastrointestinal tract. Early stage fish exhibited higher ratios of filament to lamellar gill chloride cells than late stage fish, and these ratios increased and decreased for early and late stage fish, respectively, as gas levels increased; however, there were no significant differences in mortality between life stages after 96 h in seawater. The study results suggest that current water quality guidelines for the management of dissolved gas appear to offer a conservative level of protection to chum salmon alevin incubating in gravel habitat downstream of Bonneville Dam.

  2. Cavitation in flowing superfluid helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daney, D. E.

    1988-01-01

    Flowing superfluid helium cavitates much more readily than normal liquid helium, and there is a marked difference in the cavitation behavior of the two fluids as the lambda point is traversed. Examples of cavitation in a turbine meter and centrifugal pump are given, together with measurements of the cavitation strength of flowing superfluid helium. The unusual cavitation behavior of superfluid helium is attributed to its immense thermal conductivity .

  3. Detection of cystic structures using pulsed ultrasonically induced resonant cavitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph (Inventor); Kovach, John S. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Apparatus and method for early detection of cystic structures indicative of ovarian and breast cancers uses ultrasonic wave energy at a unique resonance frequency for inducing cavitation in cystic fluid characteristic of cystic structures in the ovaries associated with ovarian cancer, and in cystic structures in the breast associated with breast cancer. Induced cavitation bubbles in the cystic fluid implode, creating implosion waves which are detected by ultrasonic receiving transducers attached to the abdomen of the patient. Triangulation of the ultrasonic receiving transducers enables the received signals to be processed and analyzed to identify the location and structure of the cyst.

  4. Numerical Modelling and Prediction of Erosion Induced by Hydrodynamic Cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, A.; Lantermann, U.; el Moctar, O.

    2015-12-01

    The present work aims to predict cavitation erosion using a numerical flow solver together with a new developed erosion model. The erosion model is based on the hypothesis that collapses of single cavitation bubbles near solid boundaries form high velocity microjets, which cause sonic impacts with high pressure amplitudes damaging the surface. The erosion model uses information from a numerical Euler-Euler flow simulation to predict erosion sensitive areas and assess the erosion aggressiveness of the flow. The obtained numerical results were compared to experimental results from tests of an axisymmetric nozzle.

  5. Cavitation: Hydrofoils. Citations from the NTIS data base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habercom, G. E., Jr.

    1980-05-01

    Studies are presented on the cavitation characteristics of various classes of hydrofoils such as fully submerged, ventilated, high speed, supercavitating, and jet flapped. Surface piercing struts are studies. Test facilities, models, and test methods are described. Lift, drag, oscillation, flutter, heaving, hydroelasticity, and loading are discussed. Other topics include entrainment, bubbles, unsteady forces, flow fields, sea states, cavitation noise, mathematical models, and boundary layers, along with investigations of hydrofoil craft performance. This updated bibliography contains 194 abstracts, 9 of which are new entries to the previous edition.

  6. Velocimetry in cavitating flows by X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutier-Delgosha, Olivier; Hocevar, Marko; Khlifa, Ilyass; Fuzier, Sylvie; Vabre, Alexandre; Fezzaa, Kamel; Lee, Wah-Keat; Laboratorywater; turbine machines, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, University of Ljubljan Collaboration; CEA LIST Collaboration; X-ray Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory Collaboration

    2011-11-01

    A promising method to measure velocity fields in a cavitating flow is presented. Dynamics of the liquid phase and of the bubbles are both investigated. The measurements are based on ultra fast X-ray imaging performed at the APS (Advanced Photon Source) of the Argonne National Laboratory. The experimental device consists of a millimetric Venturi test section associated with a transportable hydraulic loop. Various configurations of velocity, pressure, and temperature have been investigated. The slip velocity between vapor and liquid is calculated everywhere both velocities can be obtained. Reynolds stresses are also calculated, and compared with the ones obtained in non-cavitating conditions.

  7. Shock-induced collapse of a bubble inside a deformable vessel

    PubMed Central

    Coralic, Vedran; Colonius, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Shockwave lithotripsy repeatedly focuses shockwaves on kidney stones to induce their fracture, partially through cavitation erosion. A typical side effect of the procedure is hemorrhage, which is potentially the result of the growth and collapse of bubbles inside blood vessels. To identify the mechanisms by which shock-induced collapse could lead to the onset of injury, we study an idealized problem involving a preexisting bubble in a deformable vessel. We utilize a high-order accurate, shock- and interface-capturing, finite-volume scheme and simulate the three-dimensional shock-induced collapse of an air bubble immersed in a cylindrical water column which is embedded in a gelatin/water mixture. The mixture is a soft tissue simulant, 10% gelatin by weight, and is modeled by the stiffened gas equation of state. The bubble dynamics of this model configuration are characterized by the collapse of the bubble and its subsequent jetting in the direction of the propagation of the shockwave. The vessel wall, which is defined by the material interface between the water and gelatin/water mixture, is invaginated by the collapse and distended by the impact of the jet. The present results show that the highest measured pressures and deformations occur when the volumetric confinement of the bubble is strongest, the bubble is nearest the vessel wall and/or the angle of incidence of the shockwave reduces the distance between the jet tip and the nearest vessel surface. For a particular case considered, the 40 MPa shockwave utilized in this study to collapse the bubble generated a vessel wall pressure of almost 450 MPa and produced both an invagination and distention of nearly 50% of the initial vessel radius on a 𝒪(10) ns timescale. These results are indicative of the significant potential of shock-induced collapse to contribute to the injury of blood vessels in shockwave lithotripsy. PMID:24015027

  8. Shock-induced collapse of a bubble inside a deformable vessel.

    PubMed

    Coralic, Vedran; Colonius, Tim

    2013-07-01

    Shockwave lithotripsy repeatedly focuses shockwaves on kidney stones to induce their fracture, partially through cavitation erosion. A typical side effect of the procedure is hemorrhage, which is potentially the result of the growth and collapse of bubbles inside blood vessels. To identify the mechanisms by which shock-induced collapse could lead to the onset of injury, we study an idealized problem involving a preexisting bubble in a deformable vessel. We utilize a high-order accurate, shock- and interface-capturing, finite-volume scheme and simulate the three-dimensional shock-induced collapse of an air bubble immersed in a cylindrical water column which is embedded in a gelatin/water mixture. The mixture is a soft tissue simulant, 10% gelatin by weight, and is modeled by the stiffened gas equation of state. The bubble dynamics of this model configuration are characterized by the collapse of the bubble and its subsequent jetting in the direction of the propagation of the shockwave. The vessel wall, which is defined by the material interface between the water and gelatin/water mixture, is invaginated by the collapse and distended by the impact of the jet. The present results show that the highest measured pressures and deformations occur when the volumetric confinement of the bubble is strongest, the bubble is nearest the vessel wall and/or the angle of incidence of the shockwave reduces the distance between the jet tip and the nearest vessel surface. For a particular case considered, the 40 MPa shockwave utilized in this study to collapse the bubble generated a vessel wall pressure of almost 450 MPa and produced both an invagination and distention of nearly 50% of the initial vessel radius on a (10) ns timescale. These results are indicative of the significant potential of shock-induced collapse to contribute to the injury of blood vessels in shockwave lithotripsy. PMID:24015027

  9. Theory of supercompression of vapor bubbles and nanoscale thermonuclear fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Nigmatulin, Robert I.; Akhatov, Iskander Sh.; Topolnikov, Andrey S.; Bolotnova, Raisa Kh.; Vakhitova, Nailya K.; Lahey, Richard T. Jr.; Taleyarkhan, Rusi P.

    2005-10-01

    This paper provides the theoretical basis for energetic vapor bubble implosions induced by a standing acoustic wave. Its primary goal is to describe, explain, and demonstrate the plausibility of the experimental observations by Taleyarkhan et al. [Science 295, 1868 (2002); Phys. Rev. E 69, 036109 (2004)] of thermonuclear fusion for imploding cavitation bubbles in chilled deuterated acetone. A detailed description and analysis of these data, including a resolution of the criticisms that have been raised, together with some preliminary HYDRO code simulations, has been given by Nigmatulin et al. [Vestnik ANRB (Ufa, Russia) 4, 3 (2002); J. Power Energy 218-A, 345 (2004)] and Lahey et al. [Adv. Heat Transfer (to be published)]. In this paper a hydrodynamic shock (i.e., HYDRO) code model of the spherically symmetric motion for a vapor bubble in an acoustically forced liquid is presented. This model describes cavitation bubble cluster growth during the expansion period, followed by a violent implosion during the compression period of the acoustic cycle. There are two stages of the bubble dynamics process. The first, low Mach number stage, comprises almost all the time of the acoustic cycle. During this stage, the radial velocities are much less than the sound speeds in the vapor and liquid, the vapor pressure is very close to uniform, and the liquid is practically incompressible. This process is characterized by the inertia of the liquid, heat conduction, and the evaporation or condensation of the vapor. The second, very short, high Mach number stage is when the radial velocities are the same order, or higher, than the sound speeds in the vapor and liquid. In this stage high temperatures, pressures, and densities of the vapor and liquid take place. The model presented herein has realistic equations of state for the compressible liquid and vapor phases, and accounts for nonequilibrium evaporation/condensation kinetics at the liquid/vapor interface. There are interacting shock waves in both phases, which converge toward and reflect from the center of the bubble, causing dissociation, ionization, and other related plasma physics phenomena during the final stage of bubble collapse. For a vapor bubble in a deuterated organic liquid (e.g., acetone), during the final stage of collapse there is a nanoscale region (diameter {approx}100 nm) near the center of the bubble in which, for a fraction of a picosecond, the temperatures and densities are extremely high ({approx}10{sup 8} K and {approx}10 g/cm{sup 3}, respectively) such that thermonuclear fusion may take place. To quantify this, the kinetics of the local deuterium/deuterium (D/D) nuclear fusion reactions was used in the HYDRO code to determine the intensity of the fusion reactions. Numerical HYDRO code simulations of the bubble implosion process have been carried out for the experimental conditions used by Taleyarkhan et al. [Science 295, 1868 (2002); Phys. Rev. E 69, 036109 (2004)] at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The results show good agreement with the experimental data on bubble fusion that was measured in chilled deuterated acetone.

  10. The role of acoustic cavitation in enhanced ultrasound- induced heating in a tissue-mimicking phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edson, Patrick Lee

    2001-07-01

    A complete understanding of high-intensity focused ultrasound-induced temperature changes in tissue requires insight into all potential mechanisms for heat deposition. Applications of therapeutic ultrasound often utilize acoustic pressures capable of producing cavitation activity. Recognizing the ability of bubbles to transfer acoustic energy into heat generation, a study of the role bubbles play in tissue hyperthermia becomes necessary. These bubbles are typically less than 50?m. This dissertation examines the contribution of bubbles and their motion to an enhanced heating effect observed in a tissue-mimicking phantom. A series of experiments established a relationship between bubble activity and an enhanced temperature rise in the phantom by simultaneously measuring both the temperature change and acoustic emissions from bubbles. It was found that a strong correlation exists between the onset of the enhanced heating effect and observable cavitation activity. In addition, the likelihood of observing the enhanced heating effect was largely unaffected by the insonation duration for all but the shortest of insonation times, 0.1 seconds. Numerical simulations were used investigate the relative importance of two candidate mechanisms for heat deposition from bubbles as a means to quantify the number of bubbles required to produce the enhanced temperature rise. The energy deposition from viscous dissipation and the absorption of radiated sound from bubbles were considered as a function of the bubble size and the viscosity of the surrounding medium. Although both mechanisms were capable of producing the level of energy required for the enhanced heating effect, it was found that inertial cavitation, associated with high acoustic radiation and low viscous dissipation, coincided with the nature of the cavitation best detected by the experimental system. The number of bubbles required to account for the enhanced heating effect was determined through the numerical study to be on the order of 150 or less.

  11. Effect of geometrical parameters on submerged cavitation jet discharged from profiled central-body nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Minguan; Xiao, Shengnan; Kang, Can; Wang, Yuli

    2013-05-01

    The flow characteristics of cavitation jets are essential issues among relevant studies. The physical properties of the jet are largely determined by the geometrical parameters of the nozzle. The structure and cavitation jets characteristics of the angular-nozzle and the self-resonating cavitation nozzle have been extensively studied, but little research is conducted in the central-body cavitation nozzle mainly because of its hard processing and the cavitation jet effect not satisfactory. In this paper, a novel central-body nozzle (a non-plunger central-body nozzle with square outlet) is studied to solve above problems. Submerged jets discharged from the novel central-body nozzle are simulated, employing the full cavitation model. The impact of nozzle configuration on jet properties is analyzed. The analysis results indicate that when central-body relative diameter keeps constant, there is an optimal contraction degree of nozzle's outlet, which can induce intense cavitation in the jet. The central-body relative diameter also affects jet profiles. In the case of large central-body relative diameter, most of the bubbles settle in the jet core. On the contrary, a smaller relative diameter makes bubbles concentrate in the interface between the jet and its surrounding fluid. Moreover, the shorter outlet part allows the cavitation zone further extend in both the axial and racial directions. The research results further consummate the study on the central-body nozzles and the correlation between cavitation jet and the structure, and elementarily reveal the mechanism of cavitation jet produced in a non-plunger novel central-body nozzle and the effect of the structure parameters on the cavitation jet, moreover, provide the theoretical basis for the optimal design of the nozzle.

  12. Numerical Study on the Inhibition of Cavitation in Piping Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byeon, Sun Seok; Lee, Sang Jun; Kim, Youn-Jea

    Abrupt closing valve in piping systems is sometimes resulted in cavitation due to the occurrence of high pressure difference. The bubbles generating by cavitation influence operating pressure and then those generate shock wave and vibration. These phenomena can consequentially cause to corrosion and erosion. So, the cavitation is the important factor to consider reliability of piping systems and mechanical lifetime. This paper investigated the various inhibition methods of cavitation in piping systems in which butterfly valves are installed. To prevent cavitation occurrence, it is desirable to analyze its characteristics between the upstream and downstream of process valve. Results show that the fluid velocity is fast when a working fluid passed through butterfly valve. The pressure of these areas was not only under saturation vapor pressure of water, but also cavitation was continuously occurred. We confirmed that the effect of existence of inserted orifice and influence to break condition under saturation vapor pressure of water. Results were graphically depicted by pressure distribution, velocity distribution, and vapor volume fraction.

  13. Interaction of Two Differently Sized Bubbles in a Free Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chew, Lup Wai; Khoo, Boo Cheong; Klaseboer, Evert; Ohl, Siew-Wan

    The interaction between two different sized (spark created, non-equilibrium) bubbles is studied by using high speed photography. The bubble size ranges from 2 to 7 mm. The experimental results are compared to that of the similar sized bubbles reported in the literature. Interestingly, all the four major behaviors of bubble-bubble interactions (i.e. 'bubble-collapsed' induced liquid jets directed away from each other, liquid jets directed towards each other, bubble coalescence and the 'catapult' effect) are observed which bear much similarity to that found for similar sized bubbles' interaction. The main parameters studied/varied are the size of the bubbles, the dimensionless separation distance and the phase difference between the two bubbles. The results obtained are consistent with the cases of similar sized bubbles reported in the literature, with each type of behavior occupying a distinct region in the graphical plot. This indicates that the results for the (special) similar sized bubbles can be generalized to cases with different sized bubbles. Many of the real life applications such as cavitations corrosions often involve bubbles with significant size difference, thus the present findings are useful in predicting the behavior of multiple bubbles in many situations.

  14. The dynamics of the aspheric encapsulated bubble.

    PubMed

    Shao, Weihang; Chen, Weizhong

    2013-01-01

    Based on hydrodynamics and elastic mechanics, a model is proposed for the aspheric encapsulated bubble (AEB) in liquid driven by a spherical ultrasound. The aspheric component of the bubble surfaces includes any complicated shape as a perturbation of the spherical symmetry. For example, the simple ovoid encapsulated bubble is studied numerically in the framework of this model. The results show that (1) the AEB will keep a stable aspheric oscillation under the spherical acoustic drive, which is impossible for the cavitation bubble; and (2) apart from the initial aspheric shape, the thickness distribution of the shell is an important factor to the AEB's oscillation. Apparently, the thinner shell is less stiff so that it has a relatively larger pulsation amplitude. Thereafter the dependence of the AEB's pressure resistance against rupture on its asphericity is presented. The asphericity is shown to degrade the encapsulated bubble's bearable driving pressure. PMID:23297888

  15. Mercury Cavitation Phenomenon in Pulsed Spallation Neutron Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Futakawa, Masatoshi; Naoe, Takashi; Kawai, Masayoshi

    2008-06-01

    Innovative researches will be performed at Materials & Life Science Experimental Facility in J-PARC, in which a mercury target system will be installed as MW-class pulse spallation neutron sources. Proton beams will be injected into mercury target to induce the spallation reaction. At the moment the intense proton beam hits the target, pressure waves are generated in the mercury because of the abrupt heat deposition. The pressure waves interact with the target vessel leading to negative pressure that may cause cavitation along the vessel wall. Localized impacts by micro-jets and/or shock waves which are caused by cavitation bubble collapse impose pitting damage on the vessel wall. The pitting damage which degrades the structural integrity of target vessels is a crucial issue for high power mercury targets. Micro-gas-bubbles injection into mercury may be useful to mitigate the pressure wave and the pitting damage. The visualization of cavitation-bubble and gas-bubble collapse behaviors was carried out by using a high-speed video camera. The differences between them are recognized.

  16. Mercury Cavitation Phenomenon in Pulsed Spallation Neutron Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Futakawa, Masatoshi; Naoe, Takashi; Kawai, Masayoshi

    2008-06-24

    Innovative researches will be performed at Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility in J-PARC, in which a mercury target system will be installed as MW-class pulse spallation neutron sources. Proton beams will be injected into mercury target to induce the spallation reaction. At the moment the intense proton beam hits the target, pressure waves are generated in the mercury because of the abrupt heat deposition. The pressure waves interact with the target vessel leading to negative pressure that may cause cavitation along the vessel wall. Localized impacts by micro-jets and/or shock waves which are caused by cavitation bubble collapse impose pitting damage on the vessel wall. The pitting damage which degrades the structural integrity of target vessels is a crucial issue for high power mercury targets. Micro-gas-bubbles injection into mercury may be useful to mitigate the pressure wave and the pitting damage. The visualization of cavitation-bubble and gas-bubble collapse behaviors was carried out by using a high-speed video camera. The differences between them are recognized.

  17. Acoustic cavitation: a possible consequence of biomedical uses of ultrasound.

    PubMed Central

    Apfel, R. E.

    1982-01-01

    Those concerned with acoustic cavitation often use different measures and nomenclature to those who employ ultrasound for medical purposes. After illustrating the connections between the two, acoustic cavitation phenomena are divided into two classes: (1) relatively moderate amplitude changes in the bubble size that occur during each acoustic cycle, as with rectified diffusion and resonant bubble motion, and (2) rather dramatic changes in the bubble radius that occur in one cycle. It is seen that pulse-echo diagnostic equipment can excite the dramatic changes whereas continuous wave therapeutic equipment will excite the slower, but no less important, changes. The ranges of the acoustic variables and material states for which these phenomena are possible are quantified. It is shown that whereas the concept of an ultrasonic (energy) dose may be appropriate for the effects of acoustically induced heating or resonant bubble motion. It is inappropriate when discussing the effects of the transient type of cavitation that can occur from short, high amplitude acoustic pulses. PMID:6950749

  18. Processing of Microalgae: Acoustic Cavitation and Hydrothermal Conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenly, Justin Michael

    The production of energy dense fuels from renewable algal biomass feedstocks -- if sustainably developed at a sufficiently large scale -- may reduce the consumption of petroleum from fossil fuels and provide many environmental benefits. Achieving economic feasibility has several technical engineering challenges that arise from dilute concentration of growing algae in aqueous media, small cell sizes, and durable cell walls. For microalgae to be a sustainable source of biofuels and co-products, efficient fractionation and conversion of the cellular contents is necessary. Research was carried out to address two processing options for efficient microalgae biofuel production: 1. Ultrasonic cavitation for cell disruption and 2. Hydrothermal conversion of a model algal triglyceride. 1. Ultrasonic cell disruption, which relies on cavitating bubbles in the suspension to produce damaging shock waves, was investigated experimentally over a range of concentrations and species types. A few seconds of high intensity sonication at fixed frequency yielded significant cell disruption, even for the more durable cells. At longer exposure times, effectiveness was seen to decline and was attributed, using acoustic measurements, to ultrasonic power attenuation in the ensuing cloud of cavitating bubbles. Processing at higher cell concentrations slowed cell disintegration marginally, but increased the effectiveness of dissipating ultrasonic energy. A theoretical study effectively predicted optimal conditions for a variety of parameters that were inaccessible in this experimental investigation. In that study, single bubble collapse was modeled to identify operating conditions that would increase cavitation, and thus cell disruption. Simulations were conducted by varying frequency and pressure amplitude of the ultrasound wave, and initial bubble size. The simulation results indicated that low frequency, high sound wave amplitudes, and small initial bubble size generate the highest shock wave pressures. 2. Hydrolysis of a pure model triglyceride compound was experimentally examined for the first time at hydrothermal conditions -- from 225 to 300°C. Lipid product composition assessed by GC-FID was compared to previous studies with mixed vegetable oils and used to develop a kinetic model for this oil phase reaction.

  19. Investigation of a Method to Reduce Cavitation in Diesel Engine Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Honaker, Robert W.

    1998-01-01

    Sonoluminescence is the effect of producing light from sound and occurs when a gas bubble is trapped in a fluid filled cavity and is forced to collapse under a barrage of sound waves. Frenzel and Schultes discovered this phenomenon in 1934 while exposing acoustic waves to photographic plates. This effect was not well understood until 1988 when Crum and Gaitan discovered the necessary conditions for producing single bubble sonoluminescence in the laboratory. The luminescence is a result of the bubble violently collapsing from sound waves and this shares a close association with vibratory cavitation. Cavitation erosion is known to cause damage to rotational machinery when the collapse is near to surfaces due to the high pressures associated with bubble collapse. With these high pressures and temperatures there is a considerable amount of damage to the outside layer of a bearing, thereby, reducing its useful life. An experiment was constructed to generate sonoluminescence in the laboratory in order to obtain a greater understanding of this phenomenon and its association with bubble cavitation. Most of the research was done to investigate how to obtain single bubble sonoluminescence under different conditions and to determine how to detect it. Success in this has inspired several theories on how to use the methods for generating sonoluminescence to control cavitation in fluids under industrial conditions.

  20. Recalcitrant bubbles

    PubMed Central

    Shanahan, Martin E. R.; Sefiane, Khellil

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate that thermocapillary forces may drive bubbles against liquid flow in anomalous' mixtures. Unlike ordinary' liquids, in which bubbles migrate towards higher temperatures, we have observed vapour bubbles migrating towards lower temperatures, therefore against the flow. This unusual behaviour may be explained by the temperature dependence of surface tension of these binary mixtures. Bubbles migrating towards their equilibrium position follow an exponential trend. They finally settle in a stationary position just downstream' of the minimum in surface tension. The exponential trend for bubbles in anomalous' mixtures and the linear trend in pure liquids can be explained by a simple model. For larger bubbles, oscillations were observed. These oscillations can be reasonably explained by including an inertial term in the equation of motion (neglected for smaller bubbles). PMID:24740256

  1. Recalcitrant bubbles.

    PubMed

    Shanahan, Martin E R; Sefiane, Khellil

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate that thermocapillary forces may drive bubbles against liquid flow in 'anomalous' mixtures. Unlike 'ordinary' liquids, in which bubbles migrate towards higher temperatures, we have observed vapour bubbles migrating towards lower temperatures, therefore against the flow. This unusual behaviour may be explained by the temperature dependence of surface tension of these binary mixtures. Bubbles migrating towards their equilibrium position follow an exponential trend. They finally settle in a stationary position just 'downstream' of the minimum in surface tension. The exponential trend for bubbles in 'anomalous' mixtures and the linear trend in pure liquids can be explained by a simple model. For larger bubbles, oscillations were observed. These oscillations can be reasonably explained by including an inertial term in the equation of motion (neglected for smaller bubbles). PMID:24740256

  2. Sonosensitive nanoparticles for controlled instigation of cavitation and drug delivery by ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagstaffe, Sarah J.; Schiffter, Heiko A.; Arora, Manish; Coussios, Constantin-C.

    2012-10-01

    Reliable instigation of cavitation in-vivo during ultrasound therapy is notoriously difficult. Lowering the peak rarefractional pressure required to initiate cavitation (the cavitation threshold) has been previously addressed using ultrasound contrast agents in the form of encapsulated stabilized micron scale bubbles. These agents lack stability and are generally too large to extravasate into tumours and other target tissues. Solid nanoparticles are proposed as novel cavitation nucleation agents, which overcome these limitations. Such agents are manufactured to achieve high surface roughness and hydrophobicity, facilitating air entrapment upon drying, thus harboring an abundance of cavitation nucleation sites. These nanoparticulate nucleating agents have been found to lower the cavitation threshold significantly in aqueous biological media, enabling reproducible cavitation activity during repeated exposure to therapeutic ultrasound. This paper investigates the engineering of core-shell nanoparticles and examines their ability to initiate inertial cavitation in the context of ultrasound-enhanced localized drug delivery for cancer. Core-shell nanoparticles have been found to decrease the peak focal pressure where the probability of cavitation is greater than 0.5, by factors of five- to ten-fold, dependent on particle size, total surface area and surface morphology.

  3. Cavitation Simulation with Consideration of the Viscous Effect at Large Liquid Temperature Variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, An; Luo, Xian-Wu; Ji, Bin; Huang, Ren-Fang; Hidalgo, Victor; Kim, Song Hak

    2014-08-01

    The phase change due to cavitation is not only driven by the pressure difference between the local pressure and vapor saturated pressure, but also affected by the physical property changes in the case of large liquid temperature variation. The present work simulates cavitation with consideration of the viscous effect as well as the local variation of vapor saturated pressure, density, etc. A new cavitation model is developed based on the bubble dynamics, and is applied to analyze the cavitating flow around an NACA0015 hydrofoil at different liquid temperatures from 25C to 150C. The results by the proposed model, such as the pressure distribution along the hydrofoil wall surface, vapor volume fraction, and source term of the mass transfer rate due to cavitation, are compared with the available experimental data and the numerical results by an existing thermodynamic model. It is noted that the numerical results by the proposed cavitation model have a slight discrepancy from the experimental results at room temperature, and the accuracy is better than the existing thermodynamic cavitation model. Thus the proposed cavitation model is acceptable for the simulation of cavitating flows at different liquid temperatures.

  4. Modeling algal growth in bubble columns under sparging with CO2-enriched air.

    PubMed

    Pegallapati, Ambica Koushik; Nirmalakhandan, Nagamany

    2012-11-01

    A theoretical model for predicting biomass growth in semi-continuous mode under sparging with CO(2)-enriched air was developed. The model includes gas-to-liquid mass transfer, algal uptake of carbon dioxide, algal growth kinetics, and light and temperature effects. The model was validated using experimental data on growth of two microalgal species in an internally illuminated photobioreactor: Nannochloropsis salina under gas flow rates of 800 and 1200 mL min(-1) and CO(2) enrichments of 0.5, 1, and 2%; and Scenedesmus sp. at a gas flow rate of 800 mL min(-1) and CO(2) enrichments of 3 and 4%. Temporal algal concentration profiles predicted by the model under semi-continuous mode with harvesting under the different test conditions agreed well with the measured data, with r(2) values ranging from 0.817 to 0.944, p<0.001. As demonstrated, this model can be beneficial in predicting temporal variations in algal concentration and in scheduling harvesting operations under semi-continuous cultivation mode. PMID:22989642

  5. Can diving-induced tissue nitrogen supersaturation increase the chance of acoustically driven bubble growth in marine mammals?

    PubMed

    Houser, D S; Howard, R; Ridgway, S

    2001-11-21

    The potential for acoustically mediated causes of stranding in cetaceans (whales and dolphins) is of increasing concern given recent stranding events associated with anthropogenic acoustic activity. We examine a potentially debilitating non-auditory mechanism called rectified diffusion. Rectified diffusion causes gas bubble growth, which in an insonified animal may produce emboli, tissue separation and high, localized pressure in nervous tissue. Using the results of a dolphin dive study and a model of rectified diffusion for low-frequency exposure, we demonstrate that the diving behavior of cetaceans prior to an intense acoustic exposure may increase the chance of rectified diffusion. Specifically, deep diving and slow ascent/descent speed contributes to increased gas-tissue saturation, a condition that amplifies the likelihood of rectified diffusion. The depth of lung collapse limits nitrogen uptake per dive and the surface interval duration influences the amount of nitrogen washout from tissues between dives. Model results suggest that low-frequency rectified diffusion models need to be advanced, that the diving behavior of marine mammals of concern needs to be investigated to identify at-risk animals, and that more intensive studies of gas dynamics within diving marine mammals should be undertaken. PMID:11894990

  6. Cavitation erosion of silver plated coating at different temperatures and pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattori, Shuji; Motoi, Yoshihiro; Kikuta, Kengo; Tomaru, Hiroshi

    2014-04-01

    Cavitation often occurs in inducer pumps used for space rockets. Silver plated coating on the inducer liner faces the damage of cavitation. Therefore, it is important to study about the cavitation erosion resistance for silver plated coating at several operating conditions in the inducer pumps. In this study, the cavitation erosion tests were carried for silver plated coating in deionized water and ethanol at several liquid temperatures (273K-400K) and pressures (0.10MPa-0.48MPa). The mass loss rate is evaluated in terms of thermodynamic parameter ? proposed by Brennen [9], suppression pressure p-pv (pv: saturated vapor pressure) and acoustic impedance ?c (?: density and c: sound speed). Cavitation bubble behaviors depending on the thermodynamic effect and the liquid type were observed by high speed video camera. The mass loss rate is formulated by thermodynamic parameter ?, suppression pressure p-pv and acoustic impedance ?c.

  7. A detector for monitoring the onset of cavitation during therapy-level measurements of ultrasonic power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodnett, M.; Zeqiri, B.

    2004-01-01

    Acoustic cavitation occurring in the water path between a transducer and the target of a radiation force balance can provide a significant source of error during measurements of ultrasonic power. These problems can be particularly acute at physiotherapy levels (>1 W), and low frequencies (leq 1 MHz). The cavitating bubbles can absorb and scatter incident ultrasound, leading to an underestimate in the measured power. For these reasons, International Specification standards demand the use of degassed water. This imposes requirements that may actually be difficult to meet, for example, in the case of hospitals. Also, initially degassed water will rapidly re-gas, increasing the likelihood of cavitation occurring. For these reasons, NPL has developed a device that monitors acoustic emissions generated by bubble activity, for detecting the onset of cavitation during power measurements. A commercially available needle hydrophone is used to detect these emissions. The acoustic signals are then monitored using a Cavitation Detector (CD) unit, comprising an analogue electrical filter that may be tuned to detect frequency components generated by cavitating bubbles, and which provides an indication of when the measured level exceeds a pre-defined threshold. This paper describes studies to establish a suitable detection scheme, the principles of operation of the CD unit, and the performance tests carried out with a range of propagation media.

  8. Adaptation of the advanced spray combustion code to cavitating flow problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Pak-Yan

    1993-07-01

    A very important consideration in turbopump design is the prediction and prevention of cavitation. Thus far conventional CFD codes have not been generally applicable to the treatment of cavitating flows. Taking advantage of its two-phase capability, the Advanced Spray Combustion Code is being modified to handle flows with transient as well as steady-state cavitation bubbles. The volume-of-fluid approach incorporated into the code is extended and augmented with a liquid phase energy equation and a simple evaporation model. The strategy adopted also successfully deals with the cavity closure issue. Simple test cases will be presented and remaining technical challenges will be discussed.

  9. Cavitation guide for control valves

    SciTech Connect

    Tullis, J.P.

    1993-04-01

    This guide teaches the basic fundamentals of cavitation to provide the reader with an understanding of what causes cavitation, when it occurs, and the potential problems cavitation can cause to a valve and piping system. The document provides guidelines for understanding how to reduce the cavitation and/or select control valves for a cavitating system. The guide provides a method for predicting the cavitation intensity of control valves, and how the effect of cavitation on a system will vary with valve type, valve function, valve size, operating pressure, duration of operation and details of the piping installation. The guide defines six cavitation limits identifying cavitation intensities ranging from inception to the maximum intensity possible. The intensity of the cavitation at each limit Is described, including a brief discussion of how each level of cavitation influences the valve and system. Examples are included to demonstrate how to apply the method, including making both size and pressure scale effects corrections. Methods of controlling cavitation are discussed providing information on various techniques which can be used to design a new system or modify an existing one so it can operate at a desired level of cavitation.

  10. A Study of Cavitation Activity in Ex vivo Tissue Exposed to High Intensity Focused Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaughlan, James; Rivens, Ian; ter Haar, Gail

    2007-05-01

    Cavitation is often avoided in Focused Ultrasound Surgery (FUS or HIFU) because it can render lesion formation unpredictable. However, cavitation is known to enhance heating. Emissions used as indicators for cavitation activity in ex vivo tissue are not fully understood. This study investigates a wide range of simultaneous acoustic emissions and other potential indicators of cavitation activity. A high frequency (?50MHz) data acquisition system is used to detect cavitation ex vivo. The passive cavitation detector (PCD) used is a broadband (0.1-10MHz) cavitation sensor. Its broadband nature allows simultaneous measurement of subharmonics, superharmonics and broadband emissions, all potential indicators of either inertial or both types of cavitation. The electrical impedance change of the transducer (1.69MHz, 15cm focal length, 1.79f-number), caused by backscattered ultrasound, has been monitored. Low frequency acoustic signals (<100kHz) have been recorded using a hydrophone (Reson TC4013, 1Hz-170kHz). The ultimate aim of this work is to investigate the possibility of detecting cavitation signals from HIFU during clinical treatments. Results of monitoring multiple cavitation signals during ex vivo HIFU exposure are presented. The relationship between impedance change and superharmonic emissions, indicating discrete acoustic emissions or scattering of ultrasound from bubbles, are discussed. Artefacts in B-mode ultrasound scans taken during HIFU exposures have been seen to correlate with impedance change and acoustic emissions. This is still under investigation. Cavitation thresholds in degassed water and ex vivo tissue have been investigated. This work paves the way for investigation of the enhancement of lesion formation from HIFU exposures by exploiting cavitation activity.

  11. Histotripsy-Induced Cavitation Cloud Initiation Thresholds in Tissues of Different Mechanical Properties

    PubMed Central

    Vlaisavljevich, Eli; Maxwell, Adam; Warnez, Matthew; Johnsen, Eric; Cain, Charles A.; Xu, Zhen

    2014-01-01

    Histotripsy is an ultrasound ablation method that depends on the initiation and maintenance of a cavitation bubble cloud to fractionate soft tissue. This paper studies how tissue properties impact the pressure threshold to initiate the cavitation bubble cloud. Our previous study showed that shock scattering off one or more initial bubbles, expanded to sufficient size in the focus, plays an important role in initiating a dense cavitation cloud. In this process, the shock scattering causes the positive pressure phase to be inverted, resulting in a scattered wave that has the opposite polarity of the incident shock. The inverted shock is superimposed on the incident negative pressure phase to form extremely high negative pressures, resulting in a dense cavitation cloud growing toward the transducer. We hypothesize that increased tissue stiffness impedes the expansion of initial bubbles, reducing the scattered tensile pressure, and thus requiring higher initial intensities for cloud initiation. To test this hypothesis, 5-cycle histotripsy pulses at pulse repetition frequencies (PRFs) of 10, 100, or 1000 Hz were applied by a 1-MHz transducer focused inside mechanically tunable tissue-mimicking agarose phantoms and various ex vivo porcine tissues covering a range of Youngs moduli. The threshold to initiate a cavitation cloud and resulting bubble expansion were recorded using acoustic backscatter detection and optical imaging. In both phantoms and ex vivo tissue, results demonstrated a higher cavitation cloud initiation threshold for tissues of higher Youngs modulus. Results also demonstrated a decrease in bubble expansion in phantoms of higher Youngs modulus. These results support our hypothesis, improve our understanding of the effect of histotripsy in tissues with different mechanical properties, and provide a rational basis to tailor acoustic parameters for fractionation of specific tissues. PMID:24474139

  12. Multiple Cavitation Detection Methods for Evaluating Tissue Mimicking Materials during HIFU Exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruvada, Subha; Liu, Yunbo; Herman, Bruce A.; Harris, Gerald R.

    2010-03-01

    Temperature rise during HIFU procedures and the possibility of cavitation activity during heating are important to quantify in planning a safe and effective treatment. Therefore, in pre-clinical testing it is essential to characterize clinical HIFU devices using tissue-mimicking materials (TMMs) with well known characteristics, including cavitation properties. The purpose of this study was to monitor cavitation behavior and determine its effect on temperature rise in a HIFU TMM containing an embedded thermocouple. A 50 μm fine wire thermocouple was embedded in a hydrogel-based TMM previously developed for HIFU. HIFU at 1.1 MHz was focused at the thermocouple junction. HIFU focal pressures from 1-5 MPa were applied and the temperature rise and decay were recorded. Three hydrophones were used to monitor cavitation activity during sonication. A hydrophone confocal with the HIFU transducer and a cylindrical hydrophone lateral to the HIFU beam were used as passive cavitation detectors for spectral analysis of cavitation signals, and a needle hydrophone placed beyond the HIFU focus was used to record changes in the pressure amplitude due to blockage by bubbles at or near the focus. B-mode imaging scans were employed to visualize bubble presence during sonication. Forward and reverse electrical powers also were measured. Temperature traces obtained at various pressure levels demonstrated a wide range of heating profiles in the TMM due to the occurrence of cavitation. Hydrophone and reflected power signals varied with focal pressure, and the signals could be correlated with suspected cavitation-induced anomalies of the temperature profile as well as B-mode images. Of the several methods studied for detecting cavitation, both the needle hydrophone and electrical power measurements were convenient adjuncts to spectral analysis for evaluating cavitation activity in the TMM.

  13. Wetting and cavitation pathways on nanodecorated surfaces.

    PubMed

    Amabili, Matteo; Lisi, Emanuele; Giacomello, Alberto; Casciola, Carlo Massimo

    2016-03-16

    In this contribution we study the wetting and nucleation of vapor bubbles on nanodecorated surfaces via free energy molecular dynamics simulations. The results shed light on the stability of superhydrophobicity in submerged surfaces with nanoscale corrugations. The re-entrant geometry of the cavities under investigation is capable of sustaining a confined vapor phase within the surface roughness (Cassie state) both for hydrophobic and hydrophilic combinations of liquid and solid. The atomistic system is of nanometric size; on this scale thermally activated events can play an important role ultimately determining the lifetime of the Cassie state. Such a superhydrophobic state can break down by full wetting of the texture at large pressures (Cassie-Wenzel transition) or by nucleating a vapor bubble at negative pressures (cavitation). Specialized rare event techniques show that several pathways for wetting and cavitation are possible, due to the complex surface geometry. The related free energy barriers are of the order of 100kBT and vary with pressure. The atomistic results are found to be in semi-quantitative accord with macroscopic capillarity theory. However, the latter is not capable of capturing the density fluctuations, which determine the destabilization of the confined liquid phase at negative pressures (liquid spinodal). PMID:26905783

  14. Modeling Fluid-Structure Interaction in Cavitation Erosion: Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paquette, Yves; Pellone, Christian; Fivel, Marc; Ghigliotti, Giovanni; Johnsen, Eric; Franc, Jean-Pierre

    2015-12-01

    This paper is devoted to cavitation erosion modeling. It presents some recent numerical developments made in the code initially developed in collaboration with E.Johnsen and collaborators at University of Michigan [1] in order to account for fluid-structure interaction. The considered test case is that of a single air bubble collapsing near a wall due to an incident shock wave in the surrounding water. In our investigation, we focus on the code implementation and optimization and the bubble implosion mechanism. The paper is focused on the various events occurring during bubble collapse and the computation of the time evolution of the pressure distribution. The influence of the amplitude of the incident wave and the distance of the bubble to the wall are investigated.

  15. Controlled effect of ultrasonic cavitation on hydrophobic/hydrophilic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Belova, Valentina; Gorin, Dmitry A; Shchukin, Dmitry G; Mhwald, Helmuth

    2011-02-01

    Controlling cavitation at the solid surface is of increasing interest, as it plays a major role in many physical and chemical processes related to the modification of solid surfaces and formation of multicomponent nanoparticles. Here, we show a selective control of ultrasonic cavitation on metal surfaces with different hydrophobicity. By applying a microcontact printing technique we successfully formed hydrophobic/hydrophilic alternating well-defined microstructures on aluminium surfaces. Fabrication of patterned surfaces provides the unique opportunity to verify a model of heterogeneous nucleation of cavitation bubbles near the solid/water interface by varying the wettability of the surface, temperature and ultrasonic power. At the initial stage of sonication (up to 30 min), microjets and shock waves resulting from the collapsing bubbles preferably impact the hydrophobic surface, whereas the hydrophilic areas of the patterned Al remain unchanged. Longer sonication periods affect both surfaces. These findings confirm the expectation that higher contact angle causes a lower energy barrier, thus cavitation dominates at the hydrophobic surfaces. Experimental results are in good agreement with expectations from nucleation theory. This paper illustrates a new approach to ultrasound induced modification of solid surfaces resulting in the formation of foam-structured metal surfaces. PMID:21280665

  16. Controlled effect of ultrasonic cavitation on hydrophobic/hydrophilic surfaces.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Belova V; Gorin DA; Shchukin DG; Möhwald H

    2011-02-01

    Controlling cavitation at the solid surface is of increasing interest, as it plays a major role in many physical and chemical processes related to the modification of solid surfaces and formation of multicomponent nanoparticles. Here, we show a selective control of ultrasonic cavitation on metal surfaces with different hydrophobicity. By applying a microcontact printing technique we successfully formed hydrophobic/hydrophilic alternating well-defined microstructures on aluminium surfaces. Fabrication of patterned surfaces provides the unique opportunity to verify a model of heterogeneous nucleation of cavitation bubbles near the solid/water interface by varying the wettability of the surface, temperature and ultrasonic power. At the initial stage of sonication (up to 30 min), microjets and shock waves resulting from the collapsing bubbles preferably impact the hydrophobic surface, whereas the hydrophilic areas of the patterned Al remain unchanged. Longer sonication periods affect both surfaces. These findings confirm the expectation that higher contact angle causes a lower energy barrier, thus cavitation dominates at the hydrophobic surfaces. Experimental results are in good agreement with expectations from nucleation theory. This paper illustrates a new approach to ultrasound induced modification of solid surfaces resulting in the formation of foam-structured metal surfaces.

  17. Prediction of pump cavitation performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. D.

    1974-01-01

    A method for predicting pump cavitation performance with various liquids, liquid temperatures, and rotative speeds is presented. Use of the method requires that two sets of test data be available for the pump of interest. Good agreement between predicted and experimental results of cavitation performance was obtained for several pumps operated in liquids which exhibit a wide range of properties. Two cavitation parameters which qualitatively evaluate pump cavitation performance are also presented.

  18. Detecting Cavitation Pitting Without Disassembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barkhoudarian, S.

    1986-01-01

    Technique for detecting cavitation pitting in pumps, turbines, and other machinery uses low-level nuclear irradiation. Isotopes concentrated below surface emit gamma radiation, a portion of which is attenuated by overlying material. Where there are cavitation pits, output of gamma-ray detector fluctuates as detector is scanned near pits. Important to detect cavitation pits because nozzle, turbine blade, or other pump component weakened by cavitation could fail catastrophically and cause machine to explode.

  19. Characteristics and detecting of laser-induced single bubble collapse noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiumei; He, Jie; Li, Wenhua; Jiao, Mingli; Liu, Xiaochen; Wang, Haibing; Wang, Bingyang; Li, Beibei

    2015-05-01

    Shock waves emission after collapse of a laser-induced bubble in the liquid was studied experimentally by using a PTZ hydrophone. An experimental method and a Cavitation detection system was designed to investigate bubble collapse noise in this article. When a focused short laser pulse was focused in a liquid near a solid wall, it induced optical breakdown, the emission of shock waves and the generation of cavitation bubbles. A PZT hydrophone was used to detect the shock wave emitted during bubble oscillations. In addition, a software based on MATLAB was designed for analyzing cavitation noise. The software system had multiple functionalities, namely signal reading, noise reduction, signal analysis in frequency domain, and display. The results showed that the software can not only reflect the spectral characteristics of the noise quickly but also can interpret the current cavitation station according to the changing rules of different cavitation station. The results of the research have strong implications for cavitation phenomena analysis and cavitation warning systems in turbines, propellers, and other irrigation machinery.

  20. Cavitation luminescence in a water hammer: Upscaling sonoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, C.-K.; Camara, C.; Kappus, B.; Putterman, S. J.

    2003-06-01

    Oscillatory acceleration and deceleration of a column of water leads to a pipe hammer as well as cavitation. With a small amount of xenon gas dissolved in the water, we can detect a stream of predominantly ultraviolet subnanosecond flashes of light which are attributed to collapsing bubbles. The observed emission can exceed 108 photons for a single collapse and has a peak power over 0.4 W.

  1. A Experimental Investigation of Acoustic Cavitation in Gaseous Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaitan, Dario Felipe

    1990-01-01

    High amplitude radial pulsations of a single gas bubble in several glycerine and water mixtures have been observed in an acoustic stationary wave system at acoustic pressure amplitudes as high as 1.5 bars. Using a laser scattering technique, radius-time curves have been obtained experimentally which confirm the absence of surface waves. Measurements of the pulsation amplitude, the timing of the major bubble collapse, and the number of rebounds have been made and compared with the theory. From these data, calculations of the internal gas temperature and pressure during the collapse have been performed. Values of at least 2,000 K and 2,000 bars have been obtained using a sophisticated model of spherically symmetric bubble dynamics. Simultaneously, sonoluminescence (SL), a phenomenon discovered in 1933 and attributed today to the high temperatures and pressures generated during the collapse of the bubbles, were observed as short light pulses occurring once every acoustic period. The light emissions can be seen to originate at the geometric center of the bubble when observed through a microscope. Also, the simultaneity of the light emissions and the collapse of the bubble has been confirmed with the aid of a photomultiplier tube. This is the first recorded observation of SL generated by a single bubble. Comparisons of the measured quantities have been made to those predicted by several models. In addition, the implications of this research on the current understanding of cavitation related phenomena such as rectified diffusion, surface wave excitation and sonoluminescence will be discussed. Some possible future experiments are suggested which could further increase our understanding of cavitation bubble dynamics.

  2. Dynamics of multiple bubbles, excited by a femtosecond filament in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potemkin, F. V.; Mareev, E. I.

    2015-01-01

    Using shadow photography we observed the evolution of multiple cavitation bubbles, excited by a femtosecond laser pulse in water, up to the microsecond time scale. In the tight focusing geometry a single filament is formed. The filament becomes the center of the cavitation region formation. When aberrations were added to the optical scheme, aberration hot spots along the filament axis are formed. At high energies (more than 40??J) the filaments in the aberration hot spots are fired. Thereby a complex pattern of the cavitation bubbles is created. The bubbles can be isolated from each other or can form an exotic drop-shaped cavitation region, whose evolution at the end of its life, before the final collapse, contains the jet emission. The dynamics of the cavitation pattern were investigated from the pulse energy and the focusing. An increase of the numerical aperture of the focusing optics leads to an increase of the cavitation area length. A strong interaction between the bubbles was also found. This leads to a significant change in the bubbles evolution, which is not yet in accordance with the Rayleigh model.

  3. Assessment of shock wave lithotripters via cavitation potential

    PubMed Central

    Iloreta, Jonathan I.; Zhou, Yufeng; Sankin, Georgy N.; Zhong, Pei; Szeri, Andrew J.

    2008-01-01

    A method to characterize shock wave lithotripters by examining the potential for cavitation associated with the lithotripter shock wave (LSW) has been developed. The method uses the maximum radius achieved by a bubble subjected to a LSW as a representation of the cavitation potential for that region in the lithotripter. It is found that the maximum radius is determined by the work done on a bubble by the LSW. The method is used to characterize two reflectors: an ellipsoidal reflector and an ellipsoidal reflector with an insert. The results show that the use of an insert reduced the ?6 dB volume (with respect to peak positive pressure) from 1.6 to 0.4 cm3, the ?6 dB volume (with respect to peak negative pressure) from 14.5 to 8.3 cm3, and reduced the volume characterized by high cavitation potential (i.e., regions characterized by bubbles with radii larger than 429 m) from 103 to 26 cm3. Thus, the insert is an effective way to localize the potentially damaging effects of shock wave lithotripsy, and suggests an approach to optimize the shape of the reflector. PMID:19865493

  4. Transient cavitation and acoustic emission produced by different laser lithotripters.

    PubMed

    Zhong, P; Tong, H L; Cocks, F H; Pearle, M S; Preminger, G M

    1998-08-01

    Transient cavitation and shockwave generation produced by pulsed-dye and holmium:YAG laser lithotripters were studied using high-speed photography and acoustic emission measurements. In addition, stone phantoms were used to compare the fragmentation efficiency of various laser and electrohydraulic lithotripters. The pulsed-dye laser, with a wavelength (504 nm) strongly absorbed by most stone materials but not by water, and a short pulse duration of approximately 1 microsec, induces plasma formation on the surface of the target calculi. Subsequently, the rapid expansion of the plasma forms a cavitation bubble, which expands spherically to a maximum size and then collapses violently, leading to strong shockwave generation and microjet impingement, which comprises the primary mechanism for stone fragmentation with short-pulse lasers. In contrast, the holmium laser, with a wavelength (2100 nm) most strongly absorbed by water as well as by all stone materials and a long pulse duration of 250 to 350 microsec, produces an elongated, pear-shaped cavitation bubble at the tip of the optical fiber that forms a vapor channel to conduct the ensuing laser energy to the target stone (Moss effect). The expansion and subsequent collapse of the elongated bubble is asymmetric, resulting in weak shockwave generation and microjet impingement. Thus, stone fragmentation in holmium laser lithotripsy is caused primarily by thermal ablation (drilling effect). PMID:9726407

  5. In vivo observation of cavitation on prosthetic heart valves.

    PubMed

    Zapanta, C M; Stinebring, D R; Sneckenberger, D S; Deutsch, S; Geselowitz, D B; Tarbell, J M; Synder, A J; Rosenberg, G; Weiss, W J; Pae, W E; Pierce, W S

    1996-01-01

    In this study, a method to determine the existence of prosthetic heart valve cavitation in vivo is presented. Pennsylvania State University Left Ventricular Assist Devices (LVADs) were implanted in two separate calves for this study. Bjrk-Shiley Monostrut (Irvine, CA) 27 mm and 25 mm valves with Delrin occluders were used in the mitral and aortic positions, respectively. A high fidelity, piezoelectric pressure transducer was mounted approximately 1.25 cm proximal to the mitral valve and measured the high frequency pressure fluctuations caused by cavitation bubble formation and collapse after valve closure. The root mean square (RMS) value of the mitral pressure signal during a 5 ms interval after valve closure was used as a measure of cavitation intensity. The pressure signals observed in vivo were similar to ones observed in vitro with the same type of pressure transducer and were associated with the visually observed cavitation. The percentage of beats with cavitation increased from 20.3% to 67.7% when pump filling was decreased by increasing beat rate. A blood test conducted during post-operative days 1-3 showed a significant increase in plasma hemoglobin during the low filling condition. However, blood tests conducted later (post-operative days 7-44) did not show a significant change in plasma hemoglobin during low filling conditions. PMID:8944940

  6. Determination of the in vivo cavitation nuclei characteristics of blood.

    PubMed

    Chambers, S D; Bartlett, R H; Ceccio, S L

    1999-01-01

    Cavitation has been documented in the in vitro testing of blood-handling devices. To predict whether cavitation will occur clinically, the nuclei content of blood and the threshold pressure for activation of the in situ nuclei must be characterized. A single-pass flow apparatus is described for determining the nuclei characteristics of blood. The flow apparatus consists of a syringe pump and a venturi-geometry hydrodynamic device, called a cavitation susceptibility meter (CSM). Blood is accelerated through the throat of the CSM, thus exposing the nuclei in the blood to a well-defined pressure profile. The apparatus was used in an ex vivo sheep model for the determination of the in vivo nuclei characteristics of blood. The active nuclei concentration of in vivo blood was measured to be at most 2.7 nuclei per liter of plasma at a minimum throat pressure of -1610 mm Hg gauge (i.e., tension of 900 mm Hg). At this pressure, bubble stability theory predicts the active nuclei to have a radius on the order of 0.3 microm. Based on these results, in vitro studies to determine the cavitation potential of blood-handling devices must utilize test fluids that contain a minimum nuclei size distribution and concentration. It cannot be assumed that in vivo blood is nuclei rich, such that it will cavitate at or near vapor pressure. PMID:10593684

  7. Computation of Cavitating Flow in a Francis Hydroturbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, Daniel; Lindau, Jay

    2013-11-01

    In an effort to improve cavitation characteristics at off-design conditions, a steady, periodic, multiphase, RANS CFD study of an actual Francis hydroturbine was conducted and compared to experimental results. It is well-known that operating hydroturbines at off-design conditions usually results in the formation of large-scale vaporous cavities. These cavities, and their subsequent collapse, reduce efficiency and cause damage and wear to surfaces. The conventional hydro community has expressed interest in increasing their turbine's operating ranges, improving their efficiencies, and reducing damage and wear to critical turbine components. In this work, mixing planes were used to couple rotating and stationary stages of the turbine which have non-multiple periodicity, and provide a coupled solution for the stay vanes, wicket gates, runner blades, and draft tube. The mixture approach is used to simulate the multiphase flow dynamics, and cavitation models were employed to govern the mass transfer between liquid and gas phases. The solution is compared with experimental results across a range of cavitation numbers which display all the major cavitation features in the machine. Unsteady computations are necessary to capture inherently unsteady cavitation phenomena, such as the precessing vortex rope, and the shedding of bubbles from the wicket gates and their subsequent impingement upon the leading edge of the runner blades. To display these features, preliminary unsteady simulations of the full machine are also presented.

  8. Multi million-to-Billion Atom Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Cavitation-Induced Damage on a Silica Slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shekhar, Adarsh; Nomura, Ken-Ichi; Kalia, Rajiv; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya

    2012-02-01

    Cavitation bubble collapse causes severe damage to materials. For example, cavitation erosion is a major threat to the safety of nuclear power plants. The cavitation bubbles may also be utilized for preventing stress corrosion cracking with water jet peening technology. We have performed multi million-to-billion atoms molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the shock-induced cavitation damage mechanism on an amorphous silica slab in water. The system consists of a 60nm thick silica slab immersed in water in an MD box of dimension 285 x 200 x 200 nm3. A nanobubble is created by removing water molecules within a sphere of radius 100 nm. To apply a planar shock, we assign a uniform particle velocity vp on the entire system towards a planar momentum mirror. We have performed the simulation with two kinds of bubbles, an empty bubble and a bubble filled with inert gas. The simulation results reveal nanojet formation during bubble collapse causing damage on the silica surface; however, the damage was significantly reduced in the case of the filled bubble. We will discuss the effect of the presence of inter gas inside the nanobubble on the pressure distribution, the extent of damage, and collapse behavior corresponding the shock front.

  9. Enhancing gas-liquid mass transfer rates in non-newtonian fermentations by confining mycelial growth to microbeads in a bubble column

    SciTech Connect

    Gbewonyo, K.; Wang, D.I.C.

    1983-12-01

    The performance of a penicillin fermentation was assessed in a laboratory-scale bubble column fermentor, with mycelial growth confined to the pore matrix of celite beads. Final cell densities of 29 g/L and penicillin titres of 5.5 g/L were obtained in the confined cell cultures. In comparison, cultures of free mycelial cells grown in the absence of beads experienced dissolved oxygen limitations in the bubble column, giving only 17 g/L final cell concentrations with equally low penicillin titres of 2 g/L. The better performance of the confined cell cultures was attributed to enhanced gas liquid mass transfer rates, with mass transfer coefficients (k /SUB L/ a) two to three times higher than those determined in the free cell cultures. Furthermore, the confined cell cultures showed more efficient utilization of power input for mass transfer, providing up to 50% reduction in energy requirements for aeration.

  10. Writing bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wildeman, Sander; Lhuissier, Henri; Sun, Chao; Prosperetti, Andrea; Lohse, Detlef

    2012-11-01

    We report on the nucleation of bubbles under a solid sphere immersed in a supersaturated liquid that is gently rubbed against a surface. For a fixed liquid supersaturation, bubbles are observed only above a certain rubbing velocity threshold. Above this threshold and provided that bubbles adhere better to the surface than to the sphere, a regularly spaced row of growing bubbles is left behind on the surface. Direct observation through a transparent sphere shows that each bubble in the row actually results from the early coalescence of several microscopic bubbles, which nucleate between the sphere and the surface. Together with the influence of the degree of supersaturation and the normal force between sphere and surface, we study the influence of the liquid itself (water or ethanol), the sphere material (glass, metal or Teflon) and of the surface roughness (polished or unpolished). Regardless of its precise origin, this method of ``writing bubbles'' also provides a simple way to spatially and temporally control the nucleation of bubbles on a surface and to study their interactions.

  11. Etiology of gas bubble disease

    SciTech Connect

    Bouck, G.R.

    1980-11-01

    Gas bubble disease is a noninfectious, physically induced process caused by uncompensated hyperbaric pressure of total dissolved gases. When pressure compensation is inadequate, dissolved gases may form emboli (in blood) and emphysema (in tissues). The resulting abnormal physical presence of gases can block blood vessels (hemostasis) or tear tissues, and may result in death. Population mortality is generally skewed, in that the median time to death occurs well before the average time to death. Judged from mortality curves, three stages occur in gas bubble disease: (1) a period of gas pressure equilibrium, nonlethal cavitation, and increasing morbidity; (2) a period of rapid and heavy mortality; and (3) a period of protracted survival, despite lesions, and dysfunction that eventually terminates in total mortality. Safe limits for gas supersaturation depend on species tolerance and on factors that differ among hatcheries and rivers, between continuous and intermittent exposures, and across ranges of temperature and salinity.

  12. High-speed motion picture camera experiments of cavitation in dynamically loaded journal bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.; Jacobson, B. O.

    1983-01-01

    A high-speed camera was used to investigate cavitation in dynamically loaded journal bearings. The length-diameter ratio of the bearing, the speeds of the shaft and bearing, the surface material of the shaft, and the static and dynamic eccentricity of the bearing were varied. The results reveal not only the appearance of gas cavitation, but also the development of previously unsuspected vapor cavitation. It was found that gas cavitation increases with time until, after many hundreds of pressure cycles, there is a constant amount of gas kept in the cavitation zone of the bearing. The gas can have pressures of many times the atmospheric pressure. Vapor cavitation bubbles, on the other hand, collapse at pressures lower than the atmospheric pressure and cannot be transported through a high-pressure zone, nor does the amount of vapor cavitation in a bearing increase with time. Analysis is given to support the experimental findings for both gas and vapor cavitation. Previously announced in STAR as N82-20543

  13. Complete Inhibition Of Ultrasound Induced Cytolysis In The Presence Of Inertial Cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sostaric, Joe Z.; Miyoshi, Norio; Riesz, Peter; De Graff, William G.; Mitchell, James B.

    2006-05-01

    The investigation of ultrasound for biotechnological applications including non-invasive surgery (HIFU), drug/gene delivery to cells (sonoporation) or through the skin (sonophoresis) and ultrasound assisted bioreactors has focused mainly on the physical effects of ultrasound. The beneficial effects of ultrasound rely on a number of application-dependent mechanisms, and may include tissue heating, acoustic streaming or cavitation. Although acoustic cavitation is necessary in some systems, cavitation bubbles simultaneously result in uncontrollable cell damage and cytolysis. Thus, the development of a number of biotechnological uses of ultrasound has been hampered by the necessity to constrain exposure parameters in order to prevent the occurrence of acoustic cavitation or to at least limit the detrimental effects of cavitation. The current study shows that non-toxic concentrations of specific n-alkyl solutes completely inhibit ultrasound induced cytolysis of in vitro suspensions of human leukemia cells (HL-60). Protection of the whole cell population from cytolysis is achieved even under extreme ultrasound exposure conditions that result in cytolysis of 100 % of the cell population in the absence of the n-alkyl solutes. Furthermore, the n-alkyl solutes did not hinder the process of inertial cavitation. This method may allow utilization of beneficial effects of ultrasound and cavitation while protecting cells from cavitation induced cytolysis and thereby presents new possibilities for ultrasound in medicine and biology.

  14. Vortex structure analysis of unsteady cloud cavitating flows around a hydrofoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yu; Wang, Guoyu; Huang, Biao

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, time dependent vortex structures are numerically analyzed for both noncavitating and cloud cavitating flows around a Clark-Y hydrofoil with angle of attack α = 8∘ at a moderate Reynolds number, Re = 7 × 105. The numerical simulations are performed using a transport equation-based cavitation model and the large eddy simulation (LES) approach with a classical eddy viscosity subgrid scale (SGS) model. Compared with experimental results, present numerical predictions are capable of capturing the initiation of cavity, growth toward the trailing edge and subsequent shedding process. Results indicate that in noncavitating conditions, the trailing edge vortex and induced positive vortex shed periodically into the wake region to form the vortex street. In cloud cavitating conditions, interrelations between cavity and vortex induce different vortex dynamics at different cavity developing stages. (i) As attached cavity grows, vorticity production is greatly enhanced by the favorable pressure gradient at the leading edge. The trailing edge flow does not have a direct impact on the attached cavity expansion process. Furthermore, the liquid-vapor interface that moves toward the trailing edge enhances the vorticity in the attached cavity closure region. (ii) When the stable attached sheet cavity grows to its maximum length, the accumulation process of vorticity is eventually interrupted by the formation of the re-entrant jet. Re-entrant jet’s moving upstream leads to a higher spreading rate of the attached cavity and the formation of a large coherent structure inside the attached cavity. Moreover, the wavy/bubbly cavity interface enhances the vorticity near the trailing edge. (iii) As the attached sheet cavity breaks up, this large vortex structure converts toward the trailing edge region, which will eventually couple with a trailing edge vortex shedding from the lower surface to form the cloud cavity. The breakup of the stable attached cavity is the main reason for the vorticity enhancement near the suction surface.

  15. A Study of Cavitation Erosion

    SciTech Connect

    Hiromu Isaka; Masatsugu Tsutsumi; Tadashi Shiraishi; Hiroyuki Kobayashi

    2002-07-01

    The authors performed experimental study for the purpose of the following two items from a viewpoint of cavitation erosion of a cylindrical orifice in view of a problem at the letdown orifice in PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor). 1. To get the critical cavitation parameter of the cylindrical orifice to establish the design criteria for prevention of cavitation erosion, and 2. to ascertain the erosion rate in such an eventuality that the cavitation erosion occurs with the orifice made of stainless steel with precipitation hardening (17-4-Cu hardening type stainless steel), so that we confirm the appropriateness of the design criteria. Regarding the 1. item, we carried out the cavitation tests to get the critical cavitation parameters inside and downstream of the orifice. The test results showed that the cavitation parameter at inception is independent of the length or the diameter of the orifice. Moreover, the design criteria of cavitation erosion of cylindrical orifices have been established. Regarding the 2. item, we tested the erosion rate under high-pressure conditions. The cavitation erosion actually occurred in the cylindrical orifice at the tests that was strongly resemble to the erosion occurred at the plant. It will be seldom to reproduce resemble cavitation erosion in a cylindrical orifice with the hard material used at plants. We could establish the criteria for preventing the cavitation erosion from the test results. (authors)

  16. Characterization of the HIFU-induced cloud cavitation for the optimization of high pressure concentration for lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Teiichiro; Yoshizawa, Shin; Kaneko, Yukio; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2006-05-01

    The bubble cloud is a highly scattering object; to the contrary, it is also a strong pressure wave enhancer, if the wavelength and amplitude of the wave is appropriate ones. We've been investigated the stone erosion enhancement in the existence of bubble cloud on the stone surface by using high frequency waveform that immediately followed by low frequency trailing pulse (C-C waveform; Cavitation Control waveform). For the optimization of the high pressure concentration it is needed to know, "how the enhancement of the pressure wave through the bubble cloud" and "how we can estimate the efficiency thorough the passive detection of the reflected signal from the bubble cloud". We measured the "Transmittance" and "Reflection" by two types of acoustic emission sensors, PCD (Passive Cavitation Detector) and DCD (Direct Collapse Detector). The results well depict the characteristics of the HIFU-induced bubble cloud responses. The response curves reveal that the local maxima of the "Transmittance" and "Reflection" occur at the different bubble cloud volume. The PCD signal is higher in the larger bubble cloud band. The DCD signal is larger in the smaller bubble cloud band. These tendencies imply the therapeutic effect through the bubble cloud is optimized in the small bubble cloud region and too much bubbles scatter the incoming ultrasound wave and the ultrasound wave does not efficiently propagates inward the bubble cloud. Thus, for the optimization of the bubble cloud collapse, the cavitation threshold can be the lower limit and the large scattering amplitude from bubble cloud can be the upper limit of the ultrasound conditions.

  17. Dynamics of two interacting hydrogen bubbles in liquid aluminum under the influence of a strong acoustic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebon, Gerard S. B.; Pericleous, Koulis; Tzanakis, Iakovos; Eskin, Dmitry G.

    2015-10-01

    Ultrasonic melt processing significantly improves the properties of metallic materials. However, this promising technology has not been successfully transferred to the industry because of difficulties in treating large volumes of melt. To circumvent these difficulties, a fundamental understanding of the efficiency of ultrasonic treatment of liquid metals is required. In this endeavor, the dynamics of two interacting hydrogen bubbles in liquid aluminum are studied to determine the effect of a strong acoustic field on their behavior. It is shown that coalescence readily occurs at low frequencies in the range of 16 to 20 kHz; forcing frequencies at these values are likely to promote degassing. Emitted acoustic pressures from relatively isolated bubbles that resonate with the driving frequency are in the megapascal range and these cavitation shock waves are presumed to promote grain refinement by disrupting the growth of the solidification front.

  18. Dynamics of two interacting hydrogen bubbles in liquid aluminum under the influence of a strong acoustic field.

    PubMed

    Lebon, Gerard S B; Pericleous, Koulis; Tzanakis, Iakovos; Eskin, Dmitry G

    2015-10-01

    Ultrasonic melt processing significantly improves the properties of metallic materials. However, this promising technology has not been successfully transferred to the industry because of difficulties in treating large volumes of melt. To circumvent these difficulties, a fundamental understanding of the efficiency of ultrasonic treatment of liquid metals is required. In this endeavor, the dynamics of two interacting hydrogen bubbles in liquid aluminum are studied to determine the effect of a strong acoustic field on their behavior. It is shown that coalescence readily occurs at low frequencies in the range of 16 to 20 kHz; forcing frequencies at these values are likely to promote degassing. Emitted acoustic pressures from relatively isolated bubbles that resonate with the driving frequency are in the megapascal range and these cavitation shock waves are presumed to promote grain refinement by disrupting the growth of the solidification front. PMID:26565329

  19. Bubble dynamics under acoustic excitation with multiple frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. N.; Zhang, Y. N.; Li, S. C.

    2015-01-01

    Because of its magnificent mechanical and chemical effects, acoustic cavitation plays an important role in a broad range of biomedical, chemical and mechanical engineering problems. Particularly, irradiation of the multiple frequency acoustic wave could enhance the effects of cavitation. The advantages of employment of multi-frequency ultrasonic field include decreasing the cavitation thresholds, promoting cavitation nuclei generation, increasing the mass transfer and improving energy efficiency. Therefore, multi-frequency ultrasonic systems are employed in a variety of applications, e.g., to enhance the intensity of sonoluminenscence, to increase efficiency of sonochemical reaction, to improve the accuracy of ultrasound imaging and the efficiency of tissue ablation. Compared to single-frequency systems, a lot of new features of bubble dynamics exist in multi-frequency systems, such as special properties of oscillating bubbles, unique resonances in the bubble response curves, and unusual chaotic behaviours. In present paper, the underlying mechanisms of the cavitation effects under multi-frequency acoustical excitation are also briefly introduced.

  20. Universality of Bubble-Jets in Gravitational Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obreschkow, Danail; Tinguely, Marc; Dorsaz, Nicolas; Kobel, Philippe; de Bosset, Aurele; Farhat, Mohamed

    2011-11-01

    Gravity matters: for us, as well as for small vapor bubbles in liquids. When cavitation bubbles collapse, they feel the presence of a faint hydrostatic pressure gradient caused by gravity -- an effect, which is widely neglected for the experimental difficulty of uncovering the weak action of gravity. We faced this challenge by designing an experiment able to generate uniquely spherical cavitation bubbles. Captivating high-speed movies showing the collapse of those bubbles manifest beautiful jets caused solely by gravity. These jets were studied systematically by running the experiment aboard an acrobatic aircraft (52nd ESA parabolic flight campaign), able to simulate the gravitational fields of the smallest moons and the largest planets in the solar system. The data reveals a clear connection between the size of the jets and the level of gravity. Further reduction and theoretical developments led to a universal scaling law between the size of jets emitted by cavitation bubbles and a single parameter, which only depends on the pressure field and the bubble volume.

  1. Investigation of cavitation as a possible damage mechanism in blast-induced traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Goeller, Jacques; Wardlaw, Andrew; Treichler, Derrick; O'Bruba, Joseph; Weiss, Greg

    2012-07-01

    Cavitation was investigated as a possible damage mechanism for war-related traumatic brain injury (TBI) due to an improvised explosive device (IED) blast. When a frontal blast wave encounters the head, a shock wave is transmitted through the skull, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and tissue, causing negative pressure at the contrecoup that may result in cavitation. Numerical simulations and shock tube experiments were conducted to determine the possibility of cranial cavitation from realistic IED non-impact blast loading. Simplified surrogate models of the head consisted of a transparent polycarbonate ellipsoid. The first series of tests in the 18-inch-diameter shock tube were conducted on an ellipsoid filled with degassed water to simulate CSF and tissue. In the second series, Sylgard gel, surrounded by a layer of degassed water, was used to represent the tissue and CSF, respectively. Simulated blast overpressure in the shock tube tests ranged from a nominal 10-25 pounds per square inch gauge (psig; 69-170 kPa). Pressure in the simulated CSF was determined by Kulite thin line pressure sensors at the coup, center, and contrecoup positions. Using video taken at 10,000 frames/sec, we verified the presence of cavitation bubbles at the contrecoup in both ellipsoid models. In all tests, cavitation at the contrecoup was observed to coincide temporally with periods of negative pressure. Collapse of the cavitation bubbles caused by the surrounding pressure and elastic rebound of the skull resulted in significant pressure spikes in the simulated CSF. Numerical simulations using the DYSMAS hydrocode to predict onset of cavitation and pressure spikes during cavity collapse were in good agreement with the tests. The numerical simulations and experiments indicate that skull deformation is a significant factor causing cavitation. These results suggest that cavitation may be a damage mechanism contributing to TBI that requires future study. PMID:22489674

  2. Flow visualization of cavitating flows through a rectangular slot micro-orifice ingrained in a microchannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Chandan; Peles, Yoav

    2005-11-01

    Multifarious hydrodynamic cavitating flow patterns have been detected in the flow of de-ionized water through a 40.5μm wide and 100.8μm deep rectangular slot micro-orifice established inside a 202.6μm wide and 20 000μm long microchannel. This article presents and discusses the flow patterns observed at various stages of cavitation in the aforementioned micrometer-sized silicon device. Cavitation inception occurs with the appearance of inchoate bubbles that emerge from two thin vapor cavities that emanate from the boundaries of the constriction element. A reduction in the cavitation number beyond inception results in the development of twin coherent unsteady large vapor cavities, which appear just downstream of the micro-orifice and engulf the liquid jet. The shedding of both spherical and nonspherical vapor bubbles and their subsequent collapse into vapor plumes downstream of the orifice occurs intermittently. A further reduction in the exit pressure only aids in the elongation of the two coherent cavities and produces two stable vapor pockets. Additionally, interference fringes are clearly observed, showing that the vapor pocket has a curved interface with liquid. At low cavitation numbers, the flow undergoes a flip downstream and the two vapor pockets coalesce and form a single vapor pocket that is encircled by the liquid and extends until the exit of the microchannel. The cavitating flow patterns are unique and are markedly different from those reported for their macroworld counterparts. Evidence of pitting due to cavitation has been observed on the silicon just downstream of the micro-orifice. It is therefore apparent that cavitation will continue to influence/impact the design of high-speed MEMS hydraulic machines, and the pernicious effects of cavitation in terms of erosion, choking, and a reduction in performance will persist in microfluidic systems if apposite hydrodynamic conditions develop.

  3. Cavitation on a semicircular leading-edge plate and NACA0015 hydrofoil: Visualization and velocity measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravtsova, A. Yu.; Markovich, D. M.; Pervunin, K. S.; Timoshevskii, M. V.; Hanjali?, K.

    2014-12-01

    Using high-speed visualization and particle image velocimetry (PIV), cavitating flows near a plane plate with a rounded leading edge and NACA0015 hydrofoil at angles of attack from 0 to 9 are studied. In the experiments, several known types of cavitation, as well as some differences, were detected with variation of the cavitation number. In particular, at small angles of attack (up to 3), cavitation on the plate appears in the form of a streak array; on the hydrofoil, it appears in the form of individual bubbles. For the NACA0015 hydrofoil, isolated and intermittent streaks are divided and grow in regimes with developed cavitation; then, however, they merge in bubble clouds and form an extremely regular cellular structure. With an increase in the angle of attack to 9, the structure of the cavitation cavity on the hydrofoil is changed by the streak structure, like in the case with the plate. In this work, it is shown that PIV permits one to measure the velocity in cavitating flows, in particular, within the gas-vapor phase. It was established from the analysis of distributions of the average flow velocity and moments of velocity fluctuations that the cavitation generation is caused by the development of the carrier fluid flow near the leading edge of the hydrofoil. Down the stream, however, the flow structure strongly depends on the cavitation regime, which is seen from the comparison of the distributions with the case of a single-phase flow. The presented measurements qualitatively verify general trends and show some quantitative distinctions for the two considered flowpast bodies.

  4. Bubble, Bubble, Toil and Trouble.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Bubbles are a fun way to introduce the concepts of surface tension, intermolecular forces, and the use of surfactants. Presents two activities in which students add chemicals to liquid dishwashing detergent with water in order to create longer lasting bubbles. (ASK)

  5. Correlation between simulations and cavitation-induced erosion damage in Spallation Neutron Source target modules after operation

    SciTech Connect

    Riemer, Bernie; McClintock, David A; Kaminskas, Saulius; Abdou, Ashraf A

    2014-01-01

    An explicit finite element (FE) technique developed for estimating dynamic strain in the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) mercury target module vessel is now providing insight into cavitation damage patterns observed in used targets. The technique uses an empirically developed material model for the mercury that describes liquid-like volumetric stiffness combined with a tensile pressure cut-off limit that approximates cavitation. The longest period each point in the mercury is at the tensile cut-off threshold is denoted its saturation time. Now, the pattern of saturation time can be obtained from these simulations and is being positively correlated with observed damage patterns and is interpreted as a qualitative measure of damage potential. Saturation time has been advocated by collaborators at J-Parc as a factor in predicting bubble nuclei growth and collapse intensity. The larger the ratio of maximum bubble size to nucleus, the greater the bubble collapse intensity to be expected; longer saturation times result in greater ratios. With the recent development of a user subroutine for the FE solver saturation time is now provided over the entire mercury domain. Its pattern agrees with spots of damage seen above and below the beam axis on the SNS inner vessel beam window and elsewhere. The other simulation result being compared to observed damage patterns is mercury velocity at the wall. Related R&D has provided evidence for the damage mitigation that higher wall velocity provides. In comparison to observations in SNS targets, inverse correlation of high velocity to damage is seen. In effect, it is the combination of the patterns of saturation time and low velocity that seems to match actual damage patterns.

  6. Modeling bubble dynamics and radical kinetics in ultrasound induced microalgal cell disruption.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meng; Yuan, Wenqiao

    2016-01-01

    Microalgal cell disruption induced by acoustic cavitation was simulated through solving the bubble dynamics in an acoustical field and their radial kinetics (chemical kinetics of radical species) occurring in the bubble during its oscillation, as well as calculating the bubble wall pressure at the collapse point. Modeling results indicated that increasing ultrasonic intensity led to a substantial increase in the number of bubbles formed during acoustic cavitation, however, the pressure generated when the bubbles collapsed decreased. Therefore, cumulative collapse pressure (CCP) of bubbles was used to quantify acoustic disruption of a freshwater alga, Scenedesmus dimorphus, and a marine alga, Nannochloropsis oculata and compare with experimental results. The strong correlations between CCP and the intracellular lipid fluorescence density, chlorophyll-a fluorescence density, and cell particle/debris concentration were found, which suggests that the developed models could accurately predict acoustic cell disruption, and can be utilized in the scale up and optimization of the process. PMID:26384877

  7. Cavitation of pulmonary metastases.

    PubMed

    Wolpowitz, A

    1975-02-01

    Although cavitation of pulmonary metastases is not as frequent as that of primary involvement, it should always be considered in the differential diagnosis of multiple cavitary lesions. The most frequent cause is squamous cell carcinoma, but it is by no means confined to this type of pathology. PMID:1124450

  8. Effects of local structure on helium bubble growth in bulk and at grain boundaries of bcc iron: A molecular dynamics study

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Li; Gao, Fei; Kurtz, Richard J.; Zu, Xiaotao; Peng, S. M.; Long, X. G.; Zhou, X. S.

    2015-07-15

    The nucleation and growth of helium (He) bubbles in the bulk and at Σ3 <110> {112} and Σ73b <110> {661} grain boundaries (GBs) in bcc iron have been investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. The results show that a 1/2 <111> {111} dislocation loop is formed with the sequential collection of <111> interstitial crowdions at the periphery of the He cluster and is eventually emitted from the He cluster. Insertion of 45 He atoms into a He cluster leads to the formation of a 1/2 <111> dislocation loop in Σ3 GB. It is of interest to notice that the transition of a dislocation segment through the GB leads to the formation of a step at the GB plane following the loop formation, accounting for the formation of a residual GB defect. A 1/2 <111> loop, with a {110} habit plane, is emitted with further increase of the He bubble size in the Σ3 GB. In contrast, the sequential insertion of He atoms in Σ73b GB continuously emits self-interstitial atoms (SIAs), but these SIAs rearrange at the core of the inherent GB dislocation, instead of forming a dislocation loop, which leads the GB dislocation to propagate along the [1¯1¯ 1 2] direction. In the bulk and Σ3 GB, the He bubble exhibits three-dimensionally spherical shape, but it forms longitudinal shape along the dislocation line in the Σ73 GB, a shape commonly observed at GBs in experiments.

  9. Development of an Acoustic Localization Method for Cavitation Experiments in Reverberant Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjeva, Minna; Thompson, Lee; Perlitz, Daniel; Bonness, William; Capone, Dean; Elbing, Brian

    2011-11-01

    Cavitation is a major concern for the US Navy since it can cause ship damage and produce unwanted noise. The ability to precisely locate cavitation onset in laboratory scale experiments is essential for proper design that will minimize this undesired phenomenon. Measuring the cavitation onset is more accurately determined acoustically than visually. However, if other parts of the model begin to cavitate prior to the component of interest the acoustic data is contaminated with spurious noise. Consequently, cavitation onset is widely determined by optically locating the event of interest. The current research effort aims at developing an acoustic localization scheme for reverberant environments such as water tunnels. Currently cavitation bubbles are being induced in a static water tank with a laser, allowing the localization techniques to be refined with the bubble at a known location. The source is located with the use of acoustic data collected with hydrophones and analyzed using signal processing techniques. To verify the accuracy of the acoustic scheme, the events are simultaneously monitored visually with the use of a high speed camera. Once refined testing will be conducted in a water tunnel. This research was sponsored by the Naval Engineering Education Center (NEEC).

  10. Cavitation behavior observed in three monoleaflet mechanical heart valves under accelerated testing conditions.

    PubMed

    Lo, Chi-Wen; Liu, Jia-Shing; Li, Chi-Pei; Lu, Po-Chien; Hwang, Ned H

    2008-01-01

    Accelerated testing provides a substantial amount of data on mechanical heart valve durability in a short period of time, but such conditions may not accurately reflect in vivo performance. Cavitation, which occurs during mechanical heart valve closure when local flow field pressure decreases below vapor pressure, is thought to play a role in valve damage under accelerated conditions. The underlying flow dynamics and mechanisms behind cavitation bubble formation are poorly understood. Under physiologic conditions, random perivalvular cavitation is difficult to capture. We applied accelerated testing at a pulse rate of 600 bpm and transvalvular pressure of 120 mm Hg, with synchronized videographs and high-frequency pressure measurements, to study cavitation of the Medtronic Hall Standard (MHS), Medtronic Hall D-16 (MHD), and Omni Carbon (OC) valves. Results showed cavitation bubbles between 340 and 360 micros after leaflet/housing impact of the MHS, MHD, and OC valves, intensified by significant leaflet rebound. Squeeze flow, Venturi, and water hammer effects each contributed to cavitation, depending on valve design. PMID:18356649

  11. Measurement of bubble size in fluidized beds

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, K.; Subba Rao, D.

    1984-07-01

    A simple method is developed to estimate bubble size variation with height in fluidized beds from axial pressure measurements. Experiments are performed and results are presented to indicate the procedure of using the method developed. Bubble sizes thus obtained compare reasonably well with available bubble growth correlations. The present method is expected to be useful for bubble size measurements at high temperatures and pressures and under complex reacting conditions.

  12. Exploring Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Geary, Melissa A.

    Bubbles provide an enjoyable and festive medium through which to teach many concepts within the science topics of light, color, chemistry, force, air pressure, electricity, buoyancy, floating, density, among many others. In order to determine the nature of children's engagement within a museum setting and the learning opportunities of playing with bubbles, I went to a children's interactive museum located in a metropolitan city in the Northeastern part of the United States.

  13. Bubble diagnostics

    DOEpatents

    Visuri, Steven R. (Livermore, CA); Mammini, Beth M. (Walnut Creek, CA); Da Silva, Luiz B. (Danville, CA); Celliers, Peter M. (Berkeley, CA)

    2003-01-01

    The present invention is intended as a means of diagnosing the presence of a gas bubble and incorporating the information into a feedback system for opto-acoustic thrombolysis. In opto-acoustic thrombolysis, pulsed laser radiation at ultrasonic frequencies is delivered intraluminally down an optical fiber and directed toward a thrombus or otherwise occluded vessel. Dissolution of the occlusion is therefore mediated through ultrasonic action of propagating pressure or shock waves. A vapor bubble in the fluid surrounding the occlusion may form as a result of laser irradiation. This vapor bubble may be used to directly disrupt the occlusion or as a means of producing a pressure wave. It is desirable to detect the formation and follow the lifetime of the vapor bubble. Knowledge of the bubble formation and lifetime yields critical information as to the maximum size of the bubble, density of the absorbed radiation, and properties of the absorbing material. This information can then be used in a feedback system to alter the irradiation conditions.

  14. Measurements of Gas Bubble Size Distributions in Flowing Liquid Mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Wendel, Mark W; Riemer, Bernie; Abdou, Ashraf A

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pressure waves created in liquid mercury pulsed spallation targets have been shown to induce cavitation damage on the target container. One way to mitigate such damage would be to absorb the pressure pulse energy into a dispersed population of small bubbles, however, measuring such a population in mercury is difficult since it is opaque and the mercury is involved in a turbulent flow. Ultrasonic measurements have been attempted on these types of flows, but the flow noise can interfere with the measurement, and the results are unverifiable and often unrealistic. Recently, a flow loop was built and operated at Oak Ridge National Labarotory to assess the capability of various bubbler designs to deliver an adequate population of bubbles to mitigate cavitation damage. The invented diagnostic technique involves flowing the mercury with entrained gas bubbles in a steady state through a horizontal piping section with a glass-window observation port located on the top. The mercury flow is then suddenly stopped and the bubbles are allowed to settle on the glass due to buoyancy. Using a bright-field illumination and a high-speed camera, the arriving bubbles are detected and counted, and then the images can be processed to determine the bubble populations. After using this technique to collect data on each bubbler, bubble size distributions were built for the purpose of quantifying bubbler performance, allowing the selection of the best bubbler options. This paper presents the novel procedure, photographic technique, sample visual results and some example bubble size distributions. The best bubbler options were subsequently used in proton beam irradiat