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Sample records for cavity-enhanced down-conversion high

  1. Bright source of indistinguishable photons based on cavity-enhanced parametric down-conversion utilizing the cluster effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahlrichs, Andreas; Benson, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    We present a bright, simple-to-setup, single-mode source of indistinguishable photon pairs at the cesium D1-line with a bandwidth of about 100 MHz. The source is based on degenerate, cavity enhanced spontaneous parametric down-conversion utilizing the cluster effect. The setup relies on a microcontroller-based digital locking system. A brightness of 1.1 ×103/(s m W ) detected, indistinguishable photon pairs could be measured.

  2. High-efficiency microwave photonic harmonic down-conversion with tunable and reconfigurable filtering.

    PubMed

    Liao, Jinxin; Zheng, Xiaoping; Li, Shangyuan; Zhang, Hanyi; Zhou, Bingkun

    2014-12-01

    A new optical-frequency comb-based microwave photonic harmonic down-convertor with tunable and reconfigurable filtering is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The coherent evenly spaced optical carriers offer harmonic down-conversion for ultrahigh radio frequency signals with low-frequency local oscillator, and construct a tunable and reconfigurable bandpass filter for the intermediate-frequency (IF) signal combined with dispersion. This implementation features high conversion efficiency. Experimental results show the filtered output IF signal has a clean spectrum with high quality. Measured conversion loss is 8.3 dB without extra electrical amplification. PMID:25490622

  3. High-Fidelity Down-Conversion Source for Secure Communications Using On-Demand Single Photons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Tony

    2015-01-01

    AdvR, Inc., has built an efficient, fully integrated, waveguide-based source of spectrally uncorrelated photon pairs that will accelerate research and development (R&D) in the emerging field of quantum information science. Key to the innovation is the use of submicron periodically poled waveguides to produce counter propagating photon pairs, which is enabled by AdvR's patented segmented microelectrode poling technique. This novel device will provide a high brightness source of down-conversion pairs with enhanced spectral properties and low attenuation, and it will operate in the visible to the mid-infrared spectral region. A waveguide-based source of spectrally and spatially pure heralded photons will contribute to a wide range of NASA's advanced technology development efforts, including on-demand single photon sources for high-rate spaced-based secure communications.

  4. Type I parametric down conversion of highly focused Gaussian beams in finite length crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeronimo-Moreno, Yasser; Jáuregui, R.

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents a study of the correlations in wave vector space of photon pairs generated by type I spontaneous parametric down conversion using a Gaussian pump beam. The analysis covers both moderate focused and highly focused regimes, paying special attention to the angular spectrum and the conditional angular spectrum. Simple analytic expressions are derived that allow a detailed study of the dependence of these spectra on the waist of the source and the length of the nonlinear crystal. These expressions are in good agreement with numerical expectations and reported experimental results. They are used to make a systematic search of optimization parameters that improve the feasibility of using highly focused Gaussian beams to generate idler and signal photons with predetermined mean values and spread of their transverse wave vectors.

  5. High efficiency light source using solid-state emitter and down-conversion material

    DOEpatents

    Narendran, Nadarajah; Gu, Yimin; Freyssinier, Jean Paul

    2010-10-26

    A light emitting apparatus includes a source of light for emitting light; a down conversion material receiving the emitted light, and converting the emitted light into transmitted light and backward transmitted light; and an optic device configured to receive the backward transmitted light and transfer the backward transmitted light outside of the optic device. The source of light is a semiconductor light emitting diode, a laser diode (LD), or a resonant cavity light emitting diode (RCLED). The down conversion material includes one of phosphor or other material for absorbing light in one spectral region and emitting light in another spectral region. The optic device, or lens, includes light transmissive material.

  6. Improving solar cell efficiencies by down-conversion of high-energy photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trupke, T.; Green, M. A.; Wurfel, P.

    2002-08-01

    One of the major loss mechanisms leading to low energy conversion efficiencies of solar cells is the thermalization of charge carriers generated by the absorption of high-energy photons. These losses can largely be reduced in a solar cell if more than one electron-hole pair can be generated per incident photon. A method to realize multiple electron-hole pair generation per incident photon is proposed in this article. Incident photons with energies larger than twice the band gap of the solar cell are absorbed by a luminescence converter, which transforms them into two or more lower energy photons. The theoretical efficiency limit of this system for nonconcentrated sunlight is determined as a function of the solar cell's band gap using detailed balance calculations. It is shown that a maximum conversion efficiency of 39.63% can be achieved for a 6000 K blackbody spectrum and for a luminescence converter with one intermediate level. This is a substantial improvement over the limiting efficiency of 30.9%, which a solar cell exposed directly to nonconcentrated radiation may have under the same assumption of radiative recombination only.

  7. Quantum-to-classical transition via fuzzy measurements on high-gain spontaneous parametric down-conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Vitelli, Chiara; Spagnolo, Nicolo; Toffoli, Lorenzo; Sciarrino, Fabio; De Martini, Francesco

    2010-03-15

    We consider the high-gain spontaneous parametric down-conversion in a noncollinear geometry as a paradigmatic scenario to investigate the quantum-to-classical transition by increasing the pump power, that is, the average number of generated photons. The possibility of observing quantum correlations in such a macroscopic quantum system through dichotomic measurement will be analyzed by addressing two different measurement schemes, based on different dichotomization processes. More specifically, we will investigate the persistence of nonlocality in an increasing size (n/2)-spin singlet state by studying the change in the correlations form as n increases, both in the ideal case and in presence of losses. We observe a fast decrease in the amount of Bell's inequality violation for increasing system size. This theoretical analysis is supported by the experimental observation of macro-macro correlations with an average number of photons of about 10{sup 3}. Our results shed light on the practical extreme difficulty of observing nonlocality by performing such a dichotomic fuzzy measurement.

  8. Supercontinuum high-speed cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy for sensitive multispecies detection.

    PubMed

    Werblinski, Thomas; Lämmlein, Bastian; Huber, Franz J T; Zigan, Lars; Will, Stefan

    2016-05-15

    Cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy is promising for many applications requiring a very high concentration sensitivity but often accompanied by low temporal resolution. In this Letter, we demonstrate a broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectrometer capable of detection rates of up to 50 kHz, based on a spatially coherent supercontinuum (SC) light source and an in-house-built, high-speed near-infrared spectrograph. The SC spectrometer allows for the simultaneous quantitative detection of CO2, C2H2, and H2O within a spectral range from 1420 to 1570 nm. Using cavity mirrors with a specified reflectivity of R=98.0±0.3% a minimal spectrally averaged absorption coefficient of αmin=1·10-5  cm-1 can be detected at a repetition rate of 50 kHz. PMID:27176993

  9. Optomechanical down-conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groeblacher, Simon; Hofer, Sebastian; Wieczorek, Witlef; Vanner, Michael; Hammerer, Klemens; Aspelmeyer, Markus

    2011-03-01

    One of the central interactions in quantum optics is two-mode squeezing, also known as down-conversion. It has been used in a multitude of pioneering experiments to demonstrate non-classical states of light and it is at the heart of generating quantum entanglement in optical fields. Here we demonstrate first experimental results towards the optomechanical analogue, in which an optical and a mechanical mode interact via a two-mode squeezing operation. In addition, we make use of the fact that large optomechanical coupling strengths provide access to an interaction regime beyond the rotating wave approximation. This allows for simultaneous cooling of the mechanical mode, which will eventually enable the preparation of pure initial mechanical states and is hence an important precondition to achieve the envisioned optomechanical entanglement.

  10. Cavity-Enhanced Field-Free Molecular Alignment at a High Repetition Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benko, Craig; Hua, Linqiang; Allison, Thomas K.; Labaye, François; Ye, Jun

    2015-04-01

    Extreme ultraviolet frequency combs are a versatile tool with applications including precision measurement, strong-field physics, and solid-state physics. Here we report on an application of extreme ultraviolet frequency combs and their driving lasers for studying strong-field effects in molecular systems. We perform field-free molecular alignment and high-order harmonic generation with aligned molecules in a gas jet at a repetition rate of 154 MHz using a high-powered optical frequency comb inside a femtosecond enhancement cavity. The cavity-enhanced system provides a means to reach suitable intensities to study field-free molecular alignment and enhance the observable effects of the molecule-field interaction. We observe modulations of the driving field, arising from the nature of impulsive stimulated Raman scattering responsible for coherent molecular rotations. We foresee the impact of this work on the study of molecule-based strong-field physics, with improved precision and a more fundamental understanding of the interaction effects on both the field and molecules.

  11. Tunable resonant-cavity-enhanced photodetector with double high-index-contrast grating mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Learkthanakhachon, Supannee; Yvind, Kresten; Chung, Il-Sug

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a broadband-tunable resonant-cavity-enhanced photodetector (RCE-PD) structure with double high-index-contrast grating (HCG) mirrors and numerically investigate its characteristics. The detector is designed to operate at 1550-nm wavelength. The detector structure consists of a top InP HCG mirror, a p-i-n photodiode embedding multiple quantum wells, and a Si HCG mirror formed in the Si layer of a silicon-on-insulator wafer. The detection wavelength can be changed by moving the top InP HCG mirror suspended in the air. High reflectivity and small penetration length of HCGs lead to a narrow absorption linewidth of 0.38 nm and a broad tuning range of 111 nm. The peak absorption efficiency is 76-84% within the tuning range. This broadband-tunable and narrow-absorption-linewidth RCE-PD is desirable for applications where selective wavelength demultiplexing is required. Furthermore, the fact that it can be fabricated on a silicon platform offers us a possibility of integration with electronics.

  12. Cavity-enhanced field-free molecular alignment at a high repetition rate.

    PubMed

    Benko, Craig; Hua, Linqiang; Allison, Thomas K; Labaye, François; Ye, Jun

    2015-04-17

    Extreme ultraviolet frequency combs are a versatile tool with applications including precision measurement, strong-field physics, and solid-state physics. Here we report on an application of extreme ultraviolet frequency combs and their driving lasers for studying strong-field effects in molecular systems. We perform field-free molecular alignment and high-order harmonic generation with aligned molecules in a gas jet at a repetition rate of 154 MHz using a high-powered optical frequency comb inside a femtosecond enhancement cavity. The cavity-enhanced system provides a means to reach suitable intensities to study field-free molecular alignment and enhance the observable effects of the molecule-field interaction. We observe modulations of the driving field, arising from the nature of impulsive stimulated Raman scattering responsible for coherent molecular rotations. We foresee the impact of this work on the study of molecule-based strong-field physics, with improved precision and a more fundamental understanding of the interaction effects on both the field and molecules. PMID:25933311

  13. High-fidelity frequency down-conversion of visible entangled photon pairs with superconducting single-photon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Ikuta, Rikizo; Kato, Hiroshi; Kusaka, Yoshiaki; Yamamoto, Takashi; Imoto, Nobuyuki; Miki, Shigehito; Yamashita, Taro; Terai, Hirotaka; Wang, Zhen; Fujiwara, Mikio; Sasaki, Masahide; Koashi, Masato

    2014-12-04

    We experimentally demonstrate a high-fidelity visible-to-telecommunicationwavelength conversion of a photon by using a solid-state-based difference frequency generation. In the experiment, one half of a pico-second visible entangled photon pair at 780 nm is converted to a 1522-nm photon. Using superconducting single-photon detectors with low dark count rates and small timing jitters, we observed a fidelity of 0.93±0.04 after the wavelength conversion.

  14. Very high finesse optical-feedback cavity-enhanced absorption spectrometer for low concentration water vapor isotope analyses.

    PubMed

    Landsberg, J; Romanini, D; Kerstel, E

    2014-04-01

    So far, cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS) has been based on optical cavities with a high finesse F that, however, has been limited by mirror reflectivity and by cavity transmission considerations to a few times 10,000. Here, we demonstrate a compact near-infrared optical-feedback CEAS instrument for water vapor isotope ratio measurements, with F>140,000. We show that this very high finesse can be effectively exploited to improve the detection sensitivity to the full extent predicted by the increased effective path length to reach a noise equivalent absorption sensitivity of 5.7×10(-11)  cm(-1) Hz(-1/2) for a full spectrum registration (including possible effects of interference fringes and fit model inadequacies). PMID:24686607

  15. High sensitivity liquid phase measurements using broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (BBCEAS) featuring a low cost webcam based prism spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Qu, Zhechao; Engstrom, Julia; Wong, Donald; Islam, Meez; Kaminski, Clemens F

    2013-11-01

    Cavity enhanced techniques enable high sensitivity absorption measurements in the liquid phase but are typically more complex, and much more expensive, to perform than conventional absorption methods. The latter attributes have so far prevented a wide spread use of these methods in the analytical sciences. In this study we demonstrate a novel BBCEAS instrument that is sensitive, yet simple and economical to set up and operate. We use a prism spectrometer with a low cost webcam as the detector in conjunction with an optical cavity consisting of two R = 0.99 dielectric mirrors and a white light LED source for illumination. High sensitivity liquid phase measurements were made on samples contained in 1 cm quartz cuvettes placed at normal incidence to the light beam in the optical cavity. The cavity enhancement factor (CEF) with water as the solvent was determined directly by phase shift cavity ring down spectroscopy (PS-CRDS) and also by calibration with Rhodamine 6G solutions. Both methods yielded closely matching CEF values of ~60. The minimum detectable change in absorption (αmin) was determined to be 6.5 × 10(-5) cm(-1) at 527 nm and was limited only by the 8 bit resolution of the particular webcam detector used, thus offering scope for further improvement. The instrument was used to make representative measurements on dye solutions and in the determination of nitrite concentrations in a variation of the widely used Griess Assay. Limits of detection (LOD) were ~850 pM for Rhodamine 6G and 3.7 nM for nitrite, respectively. The sensitivity of the instrument compares favourably with previous cavity based liquid phase studies whilst being achieved at a small fraction of the cost hitherto reported, thus opening the door to widespread use in the community. Further means of improving sensitivity are discussed in the paper. PMID:24049768

  16. High-resolution luminescence spectroscopy study of down-conversion routes in NaGdF4:Nd3+ and NaGdF4:Tm3+ using synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Kolk, E.; Dorenbos, P.; Krämer, K.; Biner, D.; Güdel, H. U.

    2008-03-01

    Down-conversion in lanthanide doped luminescent materials is a promising route to significantly enhance the energy efficiency of silicon solar cells, plasma display panels, or mercury-free lighting tubes because it results in the emission of two photons for each absorbed higher energy photon. The Gd3+/Eu3+ ion couple shows down-conversion of vacuum-ultraviolet light into visible light with an efficiency close to 190%. The low absorption strength of the G7/26 levels of Gd3+ (the starting point of the down-conversion process), however, prevents efficient excitation of the down-conversion process and therefore application. We have performed a high resolution luminescence spectroscopy study, using synchrotron radiation, in order to investigate the possibility to use the strong 4f→5d absorption transitions of Nd3+ and Tm3+ to sensitize the high energy G7/26 level of Gd3+ in the phosphors NaGdF4:2%Nd3+ and NaGdF4:2%Tm3+ . Tm3+ appears to be an efficient sensitizer of the G7/26 state of Gd3+ . It was also found that sensitization is followed by two successive energy transfer processes exciting two Tm3+ ions in the H43 state which results in the emission of two infrared photons for one absorbed vacuum-ultraviolet photon. Nd3+ is not a good sensitizer of the G7/26 state in NaGdF4 . Instead Nd3+ efficiently transfers its energy by cross relaxation to the lower energy DJ6 states of Gd3+ but leaving the Nd3+ ion excited in the F3/24 state. Successive energy transfer from Gd3+ back to Nd3+ excites a second Nd3+ ion in the F3/24 state. Also, in this case, two infrared photons can be emitted for one absorbed vacuum-ultraviolet photon.

  17. Fast cavity-enhanced atom detection with low noise and high fidelity

    PubMed Central

    Goldwin, J.; Trupke, M.; Kenner, J.; Ratnapala, A.; Hinds, E.A.

    2011-01-01

    Cavity quantum electrodynamics describes the fundamental interactions between light and matter, and how they can be controlled by shaping the local environment. For example, optical microcavities allow high-efficiency detection and manipulation of single atoms. In this regime, fluctuations of atom number are on the order of the mean number, which can lead to signal fluctuations in excess of the noise on the incident probe field. Here we demonstrate, however, that nonlinearities and multi-atom statistics can together serve to suppress the effects of atomic fluctuations when making local density measurements on clouds of cold atoms. We measure atom densities below 1 per cavity mode volume near the photon shot-noise limit. This is in direct contrast to previous experiments where fluctuations in atom number contribute significantly to the noise. Atom detection is shown to be fast and efficient, reaching fidelities in excess of 97% after 10 μs and 99.9% after 30 μs. PMID:21829180

  18. Resonant cavity enhanced InGaAs photodiodes for high speed detection of 1.55 μm infrared radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaniewski, J.; Muszalski, J.; Pawluczyk, J.; Piotrowski, J.

    2005-05-01

    Resonant cavity enhanced photodetectors are promising candidates for applications in high-speed optical communications due to their high quantum efficiency and large bandwidth. This is a consequence of placing the thin absorber of the photodetector inside a Fabry-Perot microcavity so the absorption could be enhanced by recycling the photons with resonance wavelength. The performance of uncooled resonant cavity enhanced InGaAs/InAlAs photovoltaic devices operating near 1.55 μm has been studied both theoretically and experimentally. The analyses include two different types of structures with cavity end mirrors made of semiconducting and metallic reflectors as well as semiconducting and hybrid (dielectric Si3N4/SiO2 + metal) Bragg reflectors. Optimization of the device design includes: absorption layer thickness, position of absorption layer within the cavity and number of layers in distributed Bragg reflectors. Dependence of absorption on wavelength and incidence angle are discussed. Various issues related to applications of resonance cavity enhanced photodiodes in optical systems are considered. Practical devices with metallic and hybrid mirrors were fabricated by molecular beam epitaxy and by microwave-compatible processing. A properly designed device of this type has potential for subpicosecond response time.

  19. Cavity enhanced atomic magnetometry

    PubMed Central

    Crepaz, Herbert; Ley, Li Yuan; Dumke, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Atom sensing based on Faraday rotation is an indispensable method for precision measurements, universally suitable for both hot and cold atomic systems. Here we demonstrate an all-optical magnetometer where the optical cell for Faraday rotation spectroscopy is augmented with a low finesse cavity. Unlike in previous experiments, where specifically designed multipass cells had been employed, our scheme allows to use conventional, spherical vapour cells. Spherical shaped cells have the advantage that they can be effectively coated inside with a spin relaxation suppressing layer providing long spin coherence times without addition of a buffer gas. Cavity enhancement shows in an increase in optical polarization rotation and sensitivity compared to single-pass configurations. PMID:26481853

  20. Cavity enhanced atomic magnetometry.

    PubMed

    Crepaz, Herbert; Ley, Li Yuan; Dumke, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Atom sensing based on Faraday rotation is an indispensable method for precision measurements, universally suitable for both hot and cold atomic systems. Here we demonstrate an all-optical magnetometer where the optical cell for Faraday rotation spectroscopy is augmented with a low finesse cavity. Unlike in previous experiments, where specifically designed multipass cells had been employed, our scheme allows to use conventional, spherical vapour cells. Spherical shaped cells have the advantage that they can be effectively coated inside with a spin relaxation suppressing layer providing long spin coherence times without addition of a buffer gas. Cavity enhancement shows in an increase in optical polarization rotation and sensitivity compared to single-pass configurations. PMID:26481853

  1. Cavity enhanced atomic magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crepaz, Herbert; Ley, Li Yuan; Dumke, Rainer

    2015-10-01

    Atom sensing based on Faraday rotation is an indispensable method for precision measurements, universally suitable for both hot and cold atomic systems. Here we demonstrate an all-optical magnetometer where the optical cell for Faraday rotation spectroscopy is augmented with a low finesse cavity. Unlike in previous experiments, where specifically designed multipass cells had been employed, our scheme allows to use conventional, spherical vapour cells. Spherical shaped cells have the advantage that they can be effectively coated inside with a spin relaxation suppressing layer providing long spin coherence times without addition of a buffer gas. Cavity enhancement shows in an increase in optical polarization rotation and sensitivity compared to single-pass configurations.

  2. Nonseparable Werner states in spontaneous parametric down-conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Caminati, Marco; De Martini, Francesco; Perris, Riccardo; Secondi, Veronica; Sciarrino, Fabio

    2006-03-15

    The multiphoton states generated by high-gain spontaneous parametric down-conversion (SPDC) in the presence of large losses are investigated theoretically and experimentally. The explicit form for the two-photon output state has been found to exhibit a Werner structure very resilient to losses for any value of the nonlinear gain parameter g. The theoretical results are found to be in agreement with experimental data obtained by 'entanglement witness' methods and by the quantum tomography of the state generated by a high-g SPDC.

  3. Influence of some design parameters on the efficiency of solar cells with down-conversion and down shifting of high-energy photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badescu, Viorel; De Vos, Alexis

    2007-10-01

    In this paper we analyze the system proposed by Trupke et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 92, 1668 (2002)] to increase solar cell efficiency. The system consists of adding to the solar cell a so-called down-converter, which is a device able to convert the high-energy incident photons into photons of lower energy. The contribution consists of taking account (i) the nonradiative recombination in both solar cell and converter, (ii) the refractive index of solar cell and converter materials, and (iii) the solar radiation concentration. Two configurations are studied: the cell and rear converter (C-RC) and front converter and cell (FC-C). The main conclusions of this work are as follow. (1) For ideal down-converters, with radiative recombination only, the solar energy conversion efficiency may be, or may not be, increased by adding a front (or a rear) down-converter to the cell, depending on the value of the solar cell refractive index. (2) More realistic systems, where nonradiative recombinations exist inside the converter, are also considered. The efficiency of the FC-C system is generally less than the efficiency of a single cell. C-RC systems perform better than the cell operating alone for some values of the refractive indices. (3) C-RC systems perform generally better than FC-C systems whatever the values of the refractive indices and the concentration ratio.

  4. Cavity enhanced terahertz modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Born, N.; Scheller, M.; Moloney, J. V.; Koch, M.

    2014-03-10

    We present a versatile concept for all optical terahertz (THz) amplitude modulators based on a Fabry-Pérot semiconductor cavity design. Employing the high reflectivity of two parallel meta-surfaces allows for trapping selected THz photons within the cavity and thus only a weak optical modulation of the semiconductor absorbance is required to significantly damp the field within the cavity. The optical switching yields to modulation depths of more than 90% with insertion efficiencies of 80%.

  5. Highly-precise measurements of ambient oxygen using near-infrared cavity-enhanced laser absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Manish

    2012-09-18

    Highly precise measurements of ambient oxygen have been used to constrain the carbon budget, study photosynthesis, estimate marine productivity, and prescribe individual pollution events to their point of origin. These studies require analyzers that can measure ambient oxygen with ppm-level precision. In this work, we utilize near-infrared off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (off-axis ICOS) to quantify ambient oxygen with a precision (1σ, 100s) of ±7 ppm. By periodically calibrating the instrument, the analyzer is capable of making oxygen measurements to better than ±1 ppm (1σ). The sensor is highly linear (R(2) > 0.9999) over a wide dynamic range (0-100% oxygen). The sensor was combined with a commercial CO(2)/CH(4)/H(2)O Analyzer, and used to make measurements of respiration and fossil fuel pollution events with oxidative ratios ranging from 1.15-1.60. Future improvements will increase the analyzer precision (1σ, 100s) to better than ±1.4 ppm, and decrease the periodic referencing interval to >1 h. By including an additional diode laser, the instrument can be extended to make simultaneous measurements of O(2), CO(2), and H(2)O to enable improved understanding of carbon dioxide production and loss. PMID:22924385

  6. Cavity-Enhanced Ultrafast Transient Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yuning; Reber, Melanie Roberts; Keleher, Kevin; Allison, Thomas K.

    2014-06-01

    We introduce cavity enhanced ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy, which employs frequency combs and high-finesse optical cavities. % The schematic of apparatus is shown in Figure 1. Sub-100 fs pulses with a repetition rate of 90 MHz are generated by a home-built Ytterbium fiber laser. The amplified light has a power up to 10 W, which is used to pump an optical parametric oscillator, followed by second-harmonic generation(SHG) that converts the wavelength from near-IR to visible. A pump comb at 530 nm is separately generated by SHG. Both pump and probe combs are coupled into high-finesse cavities. Compared to the conventional transient absorption spectroscopy method, the detection sensitivity can be improved by a factor of (F/π)^2 ˜ 10^5, where F is the finesse of cavity. This ultrasensitive technology enables the direct all-optical dynamics study in molecular beams. We will apply the cavity enhanced ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy to investigate the dynamics of visible chromophores and then extend the wavelength to mid-IR to study vibrational dynamics of small hydrogen-bonded clusters.

  7. Down-conversion IM-DD RF photonic link utilizing MQW MZ modulator.

    PubMed

    Xu, Longtao; Jin, Shilei; Li, Yifei

    2016-04-18

    We present the first down-conversion intensity modulated-direct detection (IM-DD) RF photonic link that achieves frequency down-conversion using the nonlinear optical phase modulation inside a Mach-Zehnder (MZ) modulator. The nonlinear phase modulation is very sensitive and it can enable high RF-to-IF conversion efficiency. Furthermore, the link linearity is enhanced by canceling the nonlinear distortions from the nonlinear phase modulation and the MZ interferometer. Proof-of-concept measurement was performed. The down-conversion IM-DD link demonstrated 28dB improvement in distortion levels over that of a conventional IM-DD link using a LiNbO3 MZ modulator. PMID:27137278

  8. Evaluation of multiphoton effects in down-conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshimi, Kazuyoshi; Koshino, Kazuki

    2010-04-15

    Multiphoton effects in down-conversion are investigated based on the full-quantum multimode formalism by considering a three-level system as a prototype nonlinear system. We analytically derive the three-photon output wave function for two input photons, where one of the two input photons is down-converted and the other one is not. Using this output wave function, we calculate the down-conversion probability, the purity, and the fidelity to evaluate the entanglement between a down-converted photon pair and a non-down-converted photon. It is shown that the saturation effect occurs by multiphoton input and that it affects both the down-conversion probability and the quantum correlation between the down-converted photon pair and the non-down-converted photon. We also reveal the necessary conditions for multiphoton effects to be strong.

  9. Atmospheric Measurements by Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Hongming; Wu, Tao; Coeur-Tourneur, Cécile; Fertein, Eric; Gao, Xiaoming; Zhao, Weixiong; Zhang, Weijun; Chen, Weidong

    2015-04-01

    Since the last decade, atmospheric environmental monitoring has benefited from the development of novel spectroscopic measurement techniques owing to the significant breakthroughs in photonic technology from the UV to the infrared spectral domain [1]. In this presentation, we will overview our recent development and applications of cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy techniques for in situ optical monitoring of chemically reactive atmospheric species (such as HONO, NO3, NO2, N2O5) in intensive campaigns [2] and/or in smog chamber studies [3]. These field deployments demonstrated that modern photonic technologies (newly emergent light sources combined with high sensitivity spectroscopic techniques) can provide a useful tool to improve our understanding of tropospheric chemical processes which affect climate, air quality, and the spread of pollution. Experimental detail and preliminary results will be presented. Acknowledgements. The financial support from the French Agence Nationale de la Recherche (ANR) under the NexCILAS (ANR-11-NS09-0002) and the CaPPA (ANR-10-LABX-005) contracts is acknowledged. References [1] X. Cui, C. Lengignon, T. Wu, W. Zhao, G. Wysocki, E. Fertein, C. Coeur, A. Cassez,L. Croisé, W. Chen, et al., "Photonic Sensing of the Atmosphere by absorption spectroscopy", J. Quant. Spectrosc. Rad. Transfer 113 (2012) 1300-1316 [2] T. Wu, Q. Zha, W. Chen, Z. XU, T. Wang, X. He, "Development and deployment of a cavity enhanced UV-LED spectrometer for measurements of atmospheric HONO and NO2 in Hong Kong", Atmos. Environ. 95 (2014) 544-551 [3] T. Wu, C. Coeur-Tourneur, G. Dhont,A. Cassez, E. Fertein, X. He, W. Chen,"Application of IBBCEAS to kinetic study of NO3 radical formation from O3 + NO2 reaction in an atmospheric simulation chamber", J. Quant. Spectrosc. Rad. Transfer 133 (2014)199-205

  10. Single-photon frequency down-conversion experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Takesue, Hiroki

    2010-07-15

    We report a single-photon frequency down-conversion experiment. Using the difference frequency generation process in a periodically poled lithium niobate waveguide, we successfully observed the phase-preserved frequency down-conversion of a coherent pulse train with an average photon number per pulse of <1, from the 0.7 {mu}m visible wavelength band to the 1.3 {mu}m telecom band. We expect this technology to become an important tool for flexible photonic quantum networking, including the realization of quantum repeater systems over optical fiber using atom-photon entanglement sources for the visible wavelength bands.

  11. Generalized parametric down conversion, many particle interferometry, and Bell's theorem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Hyung Sup

    1992-01-01

    A new field of multi-particle interferometry is introduced using a nonlinear optical spontaneous parametric down conversion (SPDC) of a photon into more than two photons. The study of SPDC using a realistic Hamiltonian in a multi-mode shows that at least a low conversion rate limit is possible. The down converted field exhibits many stronger nonclassical phenomena than the usual two photon parametric down conversion. Application of the multi-particle interferometry to a recently proposed many particle Bell's theorem on the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen problem is given.

  12. Tuning curve of type-0 spontaneous parametric down-conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerch, Stefan; Bessire, Bänz; Bernhard, Christof; Feurer, Thomas; Stefanov, André

    2013-04-01

    We study the tuning curve of entangled photons generated by type-0 spontaneous parametric down-conversion in a periodically poled KTP crystal. We demonstrate the X-shaped spatiotemporal structure of the spectrum by means of measurements and numerical simulations. Experiments for different pump waists, crystal temperatures, and crystal lengths are in good agreement with numerical simulations.

  13. New Developments of Broadband Cavity Enhanced Spectroscopic Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, A.; Zhao, D.; Linnartz, H.; Ubachs, W.

    2013-06-01

    In recent years, cavity enhanced spectroscopic techniques, such as cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS), cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS), and broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (BBCEAS), have been widely employed as ultra-sensitive methods for the measurement of weak absorptions and in the real-time detection of trace species. In this contribution, we introduce two new cavity enhanced spectroscopic concepts: a) Optomechanical shutter modulated BBCEAS, a variant of BBCEAS capable of measuring optical absorption in pulsed systems with typically low duty cycles. In conventional BBCEAS applications, the latter substantially reduces the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N), consequently also reducing the detection sensitivity. To overcome this, we incorporate a fast optomechanical shutter as a time gate, modulating the detection scheme of BBCEAS and increasing the effective duty cycle reaches a value close to unity. This extends the applications of BBCEAS into pulsed samples and also in time-resolved studies. b) Cavity enhanced self-absorption spectroscopy (CESAS), a new spectroscopic concept capable of studying light emitting matter (plasma, flames, combustion samples) simultaneously in absorption and emission. In CESAS, a sample (plasma, flame or combustion source) is located in an optically stable cavity consisting of two high reflectivity mirrors, and here it acts both as light source and absorbing medium. A high detection sensitivity of weak absorption is reached without the need of an external light source, such as a laser or broadband lamp. The performance is illustrated by the first CESAS result on a supersonically expanding hydrocarbon plasma. We expect CESAS to become a generally applicable analytical tool for real time and in situ diagnostics. A. Walsh, D. Zhao, W. Ubachs, H. Linnartz, J. Phys. Chem. A, {dx.doi.org/10.1021/jp310392n}, in press, 2013. A. Walsh, D. Zhao, H. Linnartz Rev. Sci. Instrum. {84}(2), 021608 2013. A. Walsh, D. Zhao

  14. Cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy with a ps-pulsed UV laser for sensitive, high-speed measurements in a shock tube.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shengkai; Sun, Kai; Davidson, David F; Jeffries, Jay B; Hanson, Ronald K

    2016-01-11

    We report the first application of cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS) with a ps-pulsed UV laser for sensitive and rapid gaseous species time-history measurements in a transient environment (in this study, a shock tube). The broadband nature of the ps pulses enabled instantaneous coupling of the laser beam into roughly a thousand cavity modes, which grants excellent immunity to laser-cavity coupling noise in environments with heavy vibrations, even with an on-axis alignment. In this proof-of-concept experiment, we demonstrated an absorption gain of 49, which improved the minimum detectable absorbance by ~20 compared to the conventional single-pass strategy at similar experimental conditions. For absorption measurements behind reflected shock waves, an effective time-resolution of ~2 μs was achieved, which enabled time-resolved observations of transient phenomena, such as the vibrational relaxation of O(2) demonstrated here. The substantial improvement in detection sensitivity, together with microsecond measurement resolution implies excellent potential for studies of transient physical and chemical processes in nonequilibrium situations, particularly via measurements of weak absorptions of trace species in dilute reactive systems. PMID:26832262

  15. Cavity-Enhanced Optical Frequency Comb Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Jun; Thorpe, Michael J.; Adler, Florian; Cossel, Kevin C.

    2009-06-01

    Cavity-enhanced optical frequency comb spectroscopy is a new technique that realizes simultaneously broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution provided by an optical frequency comb as well as ultrahigh detection sensitivities enabled with a high-finesse optical cavity [1]. These powerful capabilities have been demonstrated in a series of experiments where real-time detection and identification of many different molecular states or species are achieved in a massively parallel fashion [2,3]. We will discuss the principle, technical requirements, and various implementations for this spectroscopic approach, as well as applications that include trace gas detections, human breath analysis, and characterization of cold and ultracold molecules [4,5,6]. References: [1] M. J. Thorpe, K. D. Moll, B. Safdi, and J. Ye, Science 311, 1595 (2006). [2] M. J. Thorpe, D. D. Hudson, K. D. Moll, J. Lasri, and J. Ye, Opt. Lett. 32, 307 (2007). [3] C. Gohle, B. Stein, A. Schliesser, T. Udem, and T. W. Hänsch, Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 263902 (2007). [4] M. J. Thorpe, D. Balslev-Clausen, M. Kirchner, and J. Ye, Opt. Express. 16, 2387 (2008). [5] M. J. Thorpe and J. Ye, Appl. Phys. B 91, 397 (2008). [6] M. J. Thorpe, F. Adler, K. C. Cossel, M. H. G. de Miranda, and J. Ye, Chem. Phys. Lett. 468, 1 (2009).

  16. Practical quantum repeaters with parametric down-conversion sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krovi, Hari; Guha, Saikat; Dutton, Zachary; Slater, Joshua A.; Simon, Christoph; Tittel, Wolfgang

    2016-03-01

    Conventional wisdom suggests that realistic quantum repeaters will require quasi-deterministic sources of entangled photon pairs. In contrast, we here study a quantum repeater architecture that uses simple parametric down-conversion sources, as well as frequency-multiplexed multimode quantum memories and photon-number-resolving detectors. We show that this approach can significantly extend quantum communication distances compared to direct transmission. This shows that important trade-offs are possible between the different components of quantum repeater architectures.

  17. Schemes for realizing frequency up- and down-conversions in two-mode cavity QED

    SciTech Connect

    Zou Xubo; Dong Yuli; Guo Guangcang

    2006-02-15

    We propose experimental schemes for realizing frequency up- and down-conversion in two-mode cavity QED by considering the atom-cavity interaction in the presence of a strong driving classical field. In contrast to the recent paper based on dispersive atom-cavity interaction [Serra et al., Phys. Rev. A 71, 045802 (2005)], our scheme is based on resonant interaction of the cavity modes with a single driven three-level atom, so that the quantum dynamics operates at a high speed, which is important in view of decoherence. It is shown that, with the help of a strong driving classical field, frequency up- and down-conversion operations can be realized by initially preparing the atom in a certain state.

  18. Dynamic tracking down-conversion signal processing method based on reference signal for grating heterodyne interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guochao; Yan, Shuhua; Zhou, Weihong; Gu, Chenhui

    2012-08-01

    Traditional displacement measurement systems by grating, which purely make use of fringe intensity to implement fringe count and subdivision, have rigid demands for signal quality and measurement condition, so they are not easy to realize measurement with nanometer precision. Displacement measurement with the dual-wavelength and single-grating design takes advantage of the single grating diffraction theory and the heterodyne interference theory, solving quite well the contradiction between large range and high precision in grating displacement measurement. To obtain nanometer resolution and nanometer precision, high-power subdivision of interference fringes must be realized accurately. A dynamic tracking down-conversion signal processing method based on the reference signal is proposed. Accordingly, a digital phase measurement module to realize high-power subdivision on field programmable gate array (FPGA) was designed, as well as a dynamic tracking down-conversion module using phase-locked loop (PLL). Experiments validated that a carrier signal after down-conversion can constantly maintain close to 100 kHz, and the phase-measurement resolution and phase precision are more than 0.05 and 0.2 deg, respectively. The displacement resolution and the displacement precision, corresponding to the phase results, are 0.139 and 0.556 nm, respectively.

  19. Long Wave Infrared Cavity Enhanced Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Taubman, Matthew S.; Scott, David C.; Cannon, Bret D.; Myers, Tanya L.; Bonebrake, Christopher A.; Aker, Pam M.; Wojcik, Michael D.; Munley, John T.; Nguyen, Vinh T.; Schultz, John F.

    2004-10-01

    The principal goal of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL's) long wave infrared (LWIR) cavity enhanced sensor (CES) project is to explore ultra-sensitive spectroscopic techniques and apply them to the development of LWIR chemical sensors needed for detecting weapons proliferation. This includes detecting not only the weapons of mass destruction (WMDs) themselves, but also signatures of their production and/or detonation. The LWIR CES project is concerned exclusively with developing point sensors; other portions of PNNL's IR Sensors program address stand off detection. PNNL's LWIR CES research is distinguished from that done by others by the use quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) as the light source. QCLs are novel devices, and a significant fraction of our research has been devoted to developing the procedures and hardware required to implement them most effectively for chemical sensing. This report details the progress we have made on our LWIR CES sensor development. During FY02, PNNL investigated three LWIR CES implementations beginning with the easiest to implement, direct cavity-enhanced detection (simple CES), including a technique of intermediate difficulty, cavity-dithered phase-sensitive detection (FM recovery CES) through to the most complex technique, that of resonant sideband cavity-enhanced detection also known as noise-immune cavity-enhanced optical heterodyne molecular spectroscopy, or NICE-OHMS.

  20. Cavity-Enhanced Ultrafast Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Ultrafast optical spectroscopy methods, such as transient absorption spectroscopy and 2D-spectroscopy, are widely used across many disciplines. However, these techniques are typically restricted to optically thick samples, such as solids and liquid solutions. Using a frequency comb laser and optical cavities, we present a new technique for performing ultrafast optical spectroscopy with high sensitivity, enabling work in dilute gas-phase molecular beams. Resonantly enhancing the probe pulses, we demonstrate transient absorption measurements with a detection limit of ΔOD = 2 ×10-10 (1 ×10-9 /√{Hz}). Resonantly enhancing the pump pulses allows us to produce a high excitation fraction at high repetition-rate, so that signals can be recorded from samples with optical densities as low as OD 10-8 , or column densities < 1010 molecules/ cm2. To our knowledge, this represents a 5,000-fold improvement of the state-of-the-art. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Number 1404296.

  1. Long Wave Infrared Cavity Enhanced Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Taubman, Matthew S.; Cannon, Bret D.; Myers, Tanya L.; Bonebrake, Christopher A.; Aker, Pam M.; Schultz, John F.

    2003-10-01

    The LWIR-CES report details the progress made on development of cavity-enhanced chemical sensors operating in the long wave infrared during FY03. This includes confirmation of the operating sensitivities and a detailed investigation of the limitations of these techniques. The principal goal of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL's) long wave infrared (LWIR) cavity enhanced sensor (CES) project is to explore ultra-sensitive spectroscopic techniques and apply them to the development of LWIR chemical sensors needed for detecting signs of weapons proliferation and/or terrorist activities. This includes detecting not only the weapons of mass destruction (WMDs) themselves, but also signatures of their production and/or detonation. The LWIR CES project is concerned exclusively with developing point sensors; other portions of PNNL's IR Sensors program address stand off detection. PNNL's LWIR CES research is distinguished from that done by others by the use of quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) as the light source. QCLs are novel devices, and a significant fraction of our research has been devoted to developing the procedures and hardware required to implement them most effectively for chemical sensing. This report details the progress we have made on our LWIR CES sensor development.

  2. Significance of heralding in spontaneous parametric down-conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashkansky, Mark; Vurgaftman, Igor; Pipino, Andrew C. R.; Reintjes, J.

    2014-11-01

    Single photons exhibit nonclassical, counterintuitive behavior that can be exploited in the developing field of quantum technology. They are needed for various applications such as quantum key distribution, optical quantum information processing, quantum computing, intensity measurement standards, and others yet to be discovered in this developing field. This drives the current intensive research into the realization of true deterministic sources of single photons on demand. Lacking such a source, many researchers default to the well-established workhorse: spontaneous parametric down-conversion that generates entangled signal-idler pairs. Since this source is thermal statistical in nature, it is common to use a detected idler photon to herald the production of a signal photon. The need exists to determine the quality of the single photons generated in the heralded signal beam. Quite often, the literature reports a heralded second-order coherence function of the signal photons conditioned on the idler photons using readily available single-photon detectors. In this work we examine the applicability of this technique to single-photon characterization and the consequences of the fact that the most commonly used single-photon detectors are not photon-number resolving. Our results show that this method using non-photon-resolving detectors can only be used to characterize the signal-idler correlations rather than the nature of the signal-photon state alone.

  3. Long Wave Infrared Cavity Enhanced Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Taubman, Matthew S.; Scott, David C.; Cannon, Bret D.; Myers, Tanya L.; Munley, John T.; Nguyen, Vinh T.; Schultz, John F.

    2005-12-01

    The principal goal of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL's) long wave infrared (LWIR) cavity enhanced sensor (CES) task is to explore ultra-sensitive spectroscopic chemical sensing techniques and apply them to detecting proliferation of weapons of mass destruction (WMD). Our primary application is detecting signatures of WMD production, but LWIR CES techniques are also capable of detecting chemical weapons. The LWIR CES task is concerned exclusively with developing novel point sensors; stand-off detection is addressed by other PNNL tasks and projects. PNNL's LWIR CES research is distinguished from that done by others by the use quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) as the light source. QCLs are novel devices, and a significant fraction of our research has been devoted to developing the procedures and hardware required to implement them most effectively for chemical sensing. This report details the progress we have made on LWIR CES sensor development.

  4. Characterization of photons generated in spontaneous parametric down-conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashkansky, Mark; Vurgaftman, Igor; Reintjes, J.

    2014-05-01

    Low-photon-number sources can exhibit non-classical, counterintuitive behavior that can be exploited in the developing field of quantum technology. Single photons play a special role in this arena since they represent the ultimate lowphoton- number source. They are considered an important element in various applications such as quantum key distribution, optical quantum information processing, quantum computing, intensity measurement standards, and others yet to be discovered in this developing field. True deterministic sources of single photons on demand are currently an area of intensive research, but have not been demonstrated in a practical setting. As a result, researchers commonly default to the well-established workhorse: spontaneous parametric down-conversion generating entangled signal-idler pairs. Since this source is thermal-statistical in nature, it is common to use a detected idler photon to herald the production of a signal photon. The need exists to determine the quality of the single photons generated in the heralded signal beam. Quite often, the literature reports a "heralded second-order coherence function" of the signal photons conditioned on the idler photons using readily available single-photon detectors. In this work, we examine the applicability of this technique to single-photon characterization and the consequences of the fact that the most commonly used single-photon detectors are not photon-number resolving. Our results show that this method using non-photonresolving detectors can only be used to characterize the signal-idler correlations rather than the nature of the signalphoton state alone.

  5. Down conversion of Er3+-Yb3+ couple in Y2BaZnO5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Wenbin; Jin, Xiangliang; Yang, Xiaoliang; Xiao, Siguo

    2016-04-01

    Er3+-Yb3+ co-doped Y2BaZnO5 phosphors were synthesized via high temperature solid-state reaction method. The quantum cutting properties for Er3+-Yb3+ co-doped Y2BaZnO5 phosphors have been detailedly exploited under different wavelength excitation. Unlike in fluoride host, only the Er(4S3/2) + Yb(2F7/2) → Er(4I13/2) + Yb(2F5/2) energy transfer process in Y2BaZnO5 effectively performs the down-conversion, which can split an absorbed high-energy photon into two photons of 1000 nm and 1550 nm radiations. The quantum cutting properties of Er3+-Yb3+ couple in Y2BaZnO5 provides meaningful reference in search of new efficient Er3+-Yb3+ co-doped quantum cutting phosphors.

  6. Silicon coding-decoding photonic device by electron irradiation and light down conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malyutenko, V. K.; Tykhonov, A. N.; Malyutenko, O. Yu.; Rohutskii, I. S.; Danilchenko, B. A.

    2012-10-01

    We propose and demonstrate a coding-decoding procedure as an important step to realize one more Si-based photonic device. Low-fluence (<1014 e/cm2) high-energy (1 MeV) electron irradiation of a bulk Si matrix is used to code an information by forming local regions with lower free carrier lifetime that are hidden under the surface and invisible to the eye. Short-wavelength (<1 μm) free carrier generation stands for multiple, remote, and nondestructive decoding process, which makes it easy to dynamically (ms range) visualize a code by capturing two-dimensional pattern of thermal emission in the longer-wavelength (3-12 μm) band (light down conversion).

  7. Parameter Estimation with Entangled Photons Produced by Parametric Down-Conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cable, Hugo; Durkin, Gabriel A.

    2010-01-01

    We explore the advantages offered by twin light beams produced in parametric down-conversion for precision measurement. The symmetry of these bipartite quantum states, even under losses, suggests that monitoring correlations between the divergent beams permits a high-precision inference of any symmetry-breaking effect, e.g., fiber birefringence. We show that the quantity of entanglement is not the key feature for such an instrument. In a lossless setting, scaling of precision at the ultimate "Heisenberg" limit is possible with photon counting alone. Even as photon losses approach 100% the precision is shot-noise limited, and we identify the crossover point between quantum and classical precision as a function of detected flux. The predicted hypersensitivity is demonstrated with a Bayesian simulation.

  8. Cavity-enhanced Raman microscopy of individual carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hümmer, Thomas; Noe, Jonathan; Hofmann, Matthias S.; Hänsch, Theodor W.; Högele, Alexander; Hunger, David

    2016-07-01

    Raman spectroscopy reveals chemically specific information and provides label-free insight into the molecular world. However, the signals are intrinsically weak and call for enhancement techniques. Here, we demonstrate Purcell enhancement of Raman scattering in a tunable high-finesse microcavity, and utilize it for molecular diagnostics by combined Raman and absorption imaging. Studying individual single-wall carbon nanotubes, we identify crucial structural parameters such as nanotube radius, electronic structure and extinction cross-section. We observe a 320-times enhanced Raman scattering spectral density and an effective Purcell factor of 6.2, together with a collection efficiency of 60%. Potential for significantly higher enhancement, quantitative signals, inherent spectral filtering and absence of intrinsic background in cavity-vacuum stimulated Raman scattering render the technique a promising tool for molecular imaging. Furthermore, cavity-enhanced Raman transitions involving localized excitons could potentially be used for gaining quantum control over nanomechanical motion and open a route for molecular cavity optomechanics.

  9. Cavity-enhanced resonant tunneling photodetector at telecommunication wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Pfenning, Andreas Hartmann, Fabian; Langer, Fabian; Höfling, Sven; Kamp, Martin; Worschech, Lukas

    2014-03-10

    An AlGaAs/GaAs double barrier resonant tunneling diode (RTD) with a nearby lattice-matched GaInNAs absorption layer was integrated into an optical cavity consisting of five and seven GaAs/AlAs layers to demonstrate cavity enhanced photodetection at the telecommunication wavelength 1.3 μm. The samples were grown by molecular beam epitaxy and RTD-mesas with ring-shaped contacts were fabricated. Electrical and optical properties were investigated at room temperature. The detector shows maximum photocurrent for the optical resonance at a wavelength of 1.29 μm. At resonance a high sensitivity of 3.1×10{sup 4} A/W and a response up to several pA per photon at room temperature were found.

  10. Low-noise quantum frequency down-conversion of indistinguishable photons (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kambs, Benjamin; Kettler, Jan; Bock, Matthias; Becker, Jonas; Arend, Carsten; Jetter, Michael; Michler, Peter; Becher, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    Single-photon sources based on quantum dots have been shown to exhibit almost ideal properties such as high brightness and purity in terms of clear anti-bunching as well as high two-photon interference visibilities of the emitted photons, making them promising candidates for different quantum information applications such as quantum computing, quantum communication and quantum teleportation. However, as most single-photon sources also quantum dots typically emit light at wavelengths of electronic transitions within the visible or the near infrared range. In order to establish quantum networks with remote building blocks, low-loss single photons at telecom wavelengths are preferable, though. Despite recent progress on emitters of telecom-photons, the most efficient single-photon sources still work at shorter wavelengths. On that matter, quantum frequency down-conversion, being a nonlinear optical process, has been used in recent years to alter the wavelength of single photons to the telecom wavelength range while conserving their nonclassical properties. Characteristics such as lifetime, first-order coherence, anti-bunching and entanglement have been shown to be conserved or even improved due to background suppression during the conversion process, while the conservation of indistinguishability was yet to be shown. Here we present our experimental results on quantum frequency down-conversion of single photons emitted by an InAs/GaAs quantum dot at 903.6 nm following a pulsed excitation of a p-shell exciton at 884 nm. The emitted fluorescence photons are mixed with a strong pump-field at 2155 nm inside a periodically poled lithium niobate ridge waveguide and converted to 1557 nm. Common issues of a large background due to Raman-scattered pump-light photons spectrally overlapping with the converted single photons could largely be avoided, as the pump-wavelength was chosen to be fairly longer than the target wavelength. Additional narrowband spectral filtering at the

  11. Noise-Immune Cavity-Enhanced Optical Frequency Comb Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutkowski, Lucile; Khodabakhsh, Amir; Johanssson, Alexandra C.; Foltynowicz, Aleksandra

    2015-06-01

    We present noise-immune cavity-enhanced optical frequency comb spectroscopy (NICE-OFCS), a recently developed technique for sensitive, broadband, and high resolution spectroscopy. In NICE-OFCS an optical frequency comb (OFC) is locked to a high finesse cavity and phase-modulated at a frequency precisely equal to (a multiple of) the cavity free spectral range. Since each comb line and sideband is transmitted through a separate cavity mode in exactly the same way, any residual frequency noise on the OFC relative to the cavity affects each component in an identical manner. The transmitted intensity contains a beat signal at the modulation frequency that is immune to frequency-to-amplitude noise conversion by the cavity, in a way similar to continuous wave noise-immune cavity-enhanced optical heterodyne molecular spectroscopy (NICE-OHMS). The light transmitted through the cavity is detected with a fast-scanning Fourier-transform spectrometer (FTS) and the NICE-OFCS signal is obtained by fast Fourier transform of the synchronously demodulated interferogram. Our NICE-OFCS system is based on an Er:fiber femtosecond laser locked to a cavity with a finesse of ˜9000 and a fast-scanning FTS equipped with a high-bandwidth commercial detector. We measured NICE-OFCS signals from the 3νb{1}+νb{3} overtone band of CO_2 around 1.57 μm and achieved absorption sensitivity 6.4×10-11cm-1 Hz-1/2 per spectral element, corresponding to a minimum detectable CO_2 concentration of 25 ppb after 330 s integration time. We will describe the principles of the technique and its technical implementation, and discuss the spectral lineshapes of the NICE-OFCS signals. A. Khodabakhsh, C. Abd Alrahman, and A. Foltynowicz, Opt. Lett. 39, 5034-5037 (2014). J. Ye, L. S. Ma, and J. L. Hall, J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 15, 6-15 (1998). A. Khodabakhsh, A. C. Johansson, and A. Foltynowicz, Appl. Phys. B (2015) doi:10.1007/s00340-015-6010-7.

  12. Broadband Comb-Resolved Cavity Enhanced Spectrometer with Graphene Modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kevin; Mohr, Christian; Jiang, Jie; Fermann, Martin; Lee, Chien-Chung; Schibli, Thomas R.; Kowzan, Grzegorz; Maslowski, Piotr

    2015-06-01

    Optical cavities enhance sensitivity in absorption spectroscopy. While this is commonly done with single wavelengths, broad bandwidths can be coupled into the cavity using frequency combs. The combination of cavity enhancement and broad bandwidth allows simultaneous measurement of tens of transitions with high signal-to-noise for even weak near-infrared transitions. This removes the need for time-consuming sequencing acquisition or long-term averaging, so any systematic errors from long-term drifts of the experimental setup or slow changes of sample composition are minimized. Resolving comb lines provides a high accuracy, absolute frequency axis. This is of great importance for gas metrology and data acquisition for future molecular lines databases, and can be applied to simultaneous trace-gas detection of gas mixtures. Coupling of a frequency comb into a cavity can be complex, so we introduce and demonstrate a simplification. The Pound-Drever-Hall method for locking a cavity and a frequency comb together requires a phase modulation of the laser output. We use the graphene modulator that is already in the Tm fiber laser cavity for controlling the carrier envelope offset of the frequency comb, rather than adding a lossy external modulator. The graphene modulator can operate at frequencies of over 1~ MHz, which is sufficient for controlling the laser cavity length actuator which operates below 100~kHz. We match the laser cavity length to fast variations of the enhancement cavity length. Slow variations are stabilized by comparison of the pulse repetition rate to a GPS reference. The carrier envelope offset is locked to a constant value chosen to optimize the transmitted spectrum. The transmitted pulse train is a stable frequency comb suitable for long measurements, including the acquisition of comb-resolved Fourier transform spectra with a minimum absorption coefficient of about 2×10-7 wn. For our 38 cm long enhancement cavity, the comb spacing is 394~MHz. With our

  13. Applications of Cavity-Enhanced Direct Frequency Comb Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cossel, Kevin C.; Adler, Florian; Maslowski, Piotr; Ye, Jun

    2010-06-01

    Cavity-enhanced direct frequency comb spectroscopy (CE-DFCS) is a unique technique that provides broad bandwidth, high resolution, and ultra-high detection sensitivities. This is accomplished by combining a femtosecond laser based optical frequency comb with an enhancement cavity and a broadband, multichannel imaging system. These systems are capable of simultaneously recording many terahertz of spectral bandwidth with sub-gigahertz resolution and absorption sensitivities of 1×10-7 cm-1 Hz-1/2. In addition, the ultrashort pulses enable efficient nonlinear processes, which makes it possible to reach spectral regions that are difficult to access with conventional laser sources. We will present an application of CE-DFCS for trace impurity detection in the semiconductor processing gas arsine near 1.8 μm and the development of a high-power, mid-infrared frequency comb for breath analysis in the 2.8-4.8 μm region. M. J. Thorpe, K. D. Moll, R. J. Jones, B. Safdi, and J. Ye. Science 311, 1595-1599 (2006) F. Adler, M. J. Thorpe, K. C. Cossel, and J. Ye. Annu. Rev. Anal. Chem. 3, 175-205 (2010) F. Adler, K. C. Cossel, M. J. Thorpe, I. Hartl, M. E. Fermann, and J. Ye. Opt. Lett. 34, 1330-1332 (2009)

  14. Entangled photon pair generation by spontaneous parametric down-conversion in finite-length one-dimensional photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Centini, M.; Sciscione, L.; Sibilia, C.; Bertolotti, M.; Perina, J. Jr.; Scalora, M.; Bloemer, M.J.

    2005-09-15

    A description of spontaneous parametric down-conversion in finite-length one-dimensional nonlinear photonic crystals is developed using semiclassical and quantum approaches. It is shown that if a suitable averaging is added to the semiclassical model, its results are in very good agreement with the quantum approach. We propose two structures made with GaN/AlN that generate both degenerate and nondegenerate entangled photon pairs. Both structures are designed so as to achieve a high efficiency of the nonlinear process.

  15. A versatile design for resonant guided-wave parametric down-conversion sources for quantum repeaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brecht, Benjamin; Luo, Kai-Hong; Herrmann, Harald; Silberhorn, Christine

    2016-05-01

    Quantum repeaters—fundamental building blocks for long-distance quantum communication—are based on the interaction between photons and quantum memories. The photons must fulfil stringent requirements on central frequency, spectral bandwidth and purity in order for this interaction to be efficient. We present a design scheme for monolithically integrated resonant photon-pair sources based on parametric down-conversion in nonlinear waveguides, which facilitate the generation of such photons. We investigate the impact of different design parameters on the performance of our source. The generated photon spectral bandwidths can be varied between several tens of MHz up to around 1 GHz, facilitating an efficient coupling to different memories. The central frequency of the generated photons can be coarsely tuned by adjusting the pump frequency, poling period and sample temperature, and we identify stability requirements on the pump laser and sample temperature that can be readily fulfilled with off-the-shelf components. We find that our source is capable of generating high-purity photons over a wide range of photon bandwidths. Finally, the PDC emission can be frequency fine-tuned over several GHz by simultaneously adjusting the sample temperature and pump frequency. We conclude our study with demonstrating the adaptability of our source to different quantum memories.

  16. Spatial Symmetry and Conservation of Orbital Angular Momentum in Spontaneous Parametric Down-Conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Feng Sheng; Kumar, Prem

    2008-10-17

    Directly contradictory arguments coexist regarding the conservation rule of orbital angular momentum in spontaneous parametric down-conversion. We analytically show how this rule is decided by spatial symmetry. We discover that the down-converted photon pairs can carry non-negligible extrinsic orbital angular momentum in the degrees of relative-movement freedom due to spatial symmetry breaking, leading to nonconservation of total orbital angular momentum in type-II down-conversion. Also, we demonstrate that the traditional technique does not measure the extrinsic orbital angular momentum.

  17. Spatial symmetry and conservation of orbital angular momentum in spontaneous parametric down-conversion.

    PubMed

    Feng, Sheng; Kumar, Prem

    2008-10-17

    Directly contradictory arguments coexist regarding the conservation rule of orbital angular momentum in spontaneous parametric down-conversion. We analytically show how this rule is decided by spatial symmetry. We discover that the down-converted photon pairs can carry non-negligible extrinsic orbital angular momentum in the degrees of relative-movement freedom due to spatial symmetry breaking, leading to nonconservation of total orbital angular momentum in type-II down-conversion. Also, we demonstrate that the traditional technique does not measure the extrinsic orbital angular momentum. PMID:18999668

  18. Real-time multiplexed digital cavity-enhanced spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Boyson, Toby K; Dagdigian, Paul J; Pavey, Karl D; FitzGerald, Nicholas J; Spence, Thomas G; Moore, David S; Harb, Charles C

    2015-10-01

    Cavity-enhanced spectroscopy is a sensitive optical absorption technique but one where the practical applications have been limited to studying small wavelength ranges. This Letter shows that wideband operation can be achieved by combining techniques usually reserved for the communications community with that of cavity-enhanced spectroscopy, producing a multiplexed real-time cavity-enhanced spectrometer. We use multiple collinear laser sources operating asynchronously and simultaneously while being detected on a single photodetector. This is synonymous with radio frequency (RF) cellular systems in which signals are detected on a single antenna but decoded uniquely. Here, we demonstrate results with spectra of methyl salicylate and show parts-per-billion per root hertz sensitivity measured in real-time. PMID:26421581

  19. Real-time multiplexed digital cavity-enhanced spectroscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Boyson, Toby K.; Dagdigian, Paul J.; Pavey, Karl D.; Fitzgerald, Nicholas J.; Spence, Thomas G.; Moore, David S.; Harb, Charles C.

    2015-10-01

    Cavity-enhanced spectroscopy is a sensitive optical absorption technique but one where the practical applications have been limited to studying small wavelength ranges. In addition, this Letter shows that wideband operation can be achieved by combining techniques usually reserved for the communications community with that of cavity-enhanced spectroscopy, producing a multiplexed real-time cavity-enhanced spectrometer. We use multiple collinear laser sources operating asynchronously and simultaneously while being detected on a single photodetector. This is synonymous with radio frequency (RF) cellular systems in which signals are detected on a single antenna but decoded uniquely. Here, we demonstrate results with spectra of methyl salicylatemore » and show parts-per-billion per root hertz sensitivity measured in real-time.« less

  20. Real-time multiplexed digital cavity-enhanced spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Boyson, Toby K.; Dagdigian, Paul J.; Pavey, Karl D.; Fitzgerald, Nicholas J.; Spence, Thomas G.; Moore, David S.; Harb, Charles C.

    2015-10-01

    Cavity-enhanced spectroscopy is a sensitive optical absorption technique but one where the practical applications have been limited to studying small wavelength ranges. In addition, this Letter shows that wideband operation can be achieved by combining techniques usually reserved for the communications community with that of cavity-enhanced spectroscopy, producing a multiplexed real-time cavity-enhanced spectrometer. We use multiple collinear laser sources operating asynchronously and simultaneously while being detected on a single photodetector. This is synonymous with radio frequency (RF) cellular systems in which signals are detected on a single antenna but decoded uniquely. Here, we demonstrate results with spectra of methyl salicylate and show parts-per-billion per root hertz sensitivity measured in real-time.

  1. Cavity-enhanced Raman microscopy of individual carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Hümmer, Thomas; Noe, Jonathan; Hofmann, Matthias S.; Hänsch, Theodor W.; Högele, Alexander; Hunger, David

    2016-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy reveals chemically specific information and provides label-free insight into the molecular world. However, the signals are intrinsically weak and call for enhancement techniques. Here, we demonstrate Purcell enhancement of Raman scattering in a tunable high-finesse microcavity, and utilize it for molecular diagnostics by combined Raman and absorption imaging. Studying individual single-wall carbon nanotubes, we identify crucial structural parameters such as nanotube radius, electronic structure and extinction cross-section. We observe a 320-times enhanced Raman scattering spectral density and an effective Purcell factor of 6.2, together with a collection efficiency of 60%. Potential for significantly higher enhancement, quantitative signals, inherent spectral filtering and absence of intrinsic background in cavity-vacuum stimulated Raman scattering render the technique a promising tool for molecular imaging. Furthermore, cavity-enhanced Raman transitions involving localized excitons could potentially be used for gaining quantum control over nanomechanical motion and open a route for molecular cavity optomechanics. PMID:27402165

  2. Cavity-enhanced Raman microscopy of individual carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Hümmer, Thomas; Noe, Jonathan; Hofmann, Matthias S; Hänsch, Theodor W; Högele, Alexander; Hunger, David

    2016-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy reveals chemically specific information and provides label-free insight into the molecular world. However, the signals are intrinsically weak and call for enhancement techniques. Here, we demonstrate Purcell enhancement of Raman scattering in a tunable high-finesse microcavity, and utilize it for molecular diagnostics by combined Raman and absorption imaging. Studying individual single-wall carbon nanotubes, we identify crucial structural parameters such as nanotube radius, electronic structure and extinction cross-section. We observe a 320-times enhanced Raman scattering spectral density and an effective Purcell factor of 6.2, together with a collection efficiency of 60%. Potential for significantly higher enhancement, quantitative signals, inherent spectral filtering and absence of intrinsic background in cavity-vacuum stimulated Raman scattering render the technique a promising tool for molecular imaging. Furthermore, cavity-enhanced Raman transitions involving localized excitons could potentially be used for gaining quantum control over nanomechanical motion and open a route for molecular cavity optomechanics. PMID:27402165

  3. Nondestructive measurement of intensity of optical fields using spontaneous parametric down conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penin, A. N.; Kitaeva, G. KH.; Sergienko, A. V.

    1992-01-01

    Results of nondestructive measurements of intensity (photons per mode) of light from different sources are discussed. The procedure of measurement does not destroy the state of the optical field. The method is based on using the second order nonlinearity of crystal media lacking a center of symmetry and the nonclassical properties of the process of Spontaneous Parametric Down Conversion (SPDC).

  4. Simple class of nonclassical states generated by seeded down-conversion and imperfect photon detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Söderholm, Jonas; Inoue, Shuichiro

    2009-04-01

    We have analyzed a scheme employing seeded nondegenerate down-conversion and a single-photon threshold detector with non-unit quantum efficiency and finite dark-count probability. The single-mode state generated conditioned on the click of the detector is found to be easily expressed using the negative binomial distribution.

  5. Warm white LED light by frequency down-conversion of mixed yellow and red Lumogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosca, Mauro; Caruso, Fulvio; Zambito, Leandro; Seminara, Biagio; Macaluso, Roberto; Calı, Claudio; Feltin, Eric

    2013-05-01

    This work reports on the benefits and promising opportunities offered by white LED hybrid technology, based on a mixing perylene-based dyes in order to obtain a warm white light for frequency-down conversion. In a standard Ce:YAG-based white LED, the white light appears cold due to the weakness of red wavelength components in the emission spectrum. In order to obtain a warmer white, one possible solution is to add a red phosphor to the yellow one to move the chromatic coordinates properly, though the luminous efficiency drastically decreases due to the increased light absorption of the coating layer. It is generally believed that the low efficiency of warm white LEDs is the main issue today for LED-based lighting. Using photoluminescence of Lumogen® F Yellow 083, a perylene-based polymer dye commercialized by BASF, and adding a small quantity of another perylene-based dye, Lumogen® F Red 305 (BASF), we obtained high-efficiency warm white LEDs by yellow and red conversion from a standard 450 nm GaN/InGaN royal blue LED. Different weight proportions of dyes were dissolved in solutions with equal amounts of poly-methyl-methacrylate (PMMA) in ethyl acetate, then the LEDs were dip-coated in each solution and optically characterized. Record values of 8.03 lm of luminous flux and 116.11 lm/W of optical efficiency were achieved. Finally, the effects of both driving current, and pump wavelength on LED performances - such as chromatic coordinates, correlated color temperature, color rendering index (CRI), and optical efficiency - were investigated.

  6. Cavity Enhanced Ultrafast Transient Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, Thomas K.; Reber, Melanie Roberts; Chen, Yuning

    2015-06-01

    Ultrafast spectroscopy on gas phase systems is typically restricted to techniques involving photoionization, whereas solution phase experiments utilize the detection of light. At Stony Brook, we are developing new techniques for performing femtosecond time-resolved spectroscopy using frequency combs and high-finesse optical resonators. A large detection sensitivity enhancement over traditional methods enables the extension of all-optical ultrafast spectroscopies, such as broad-band transient absorption spectroscopy (TAS) and 2D spectroscopy, to dilute gas phase samples produced in molecular beams. Here, gas phase data can be directly compared to solution phase data. Initial demonstration experiments are focusing on the photodissociation of iodine in small neutral argon clusters, where cluster size strongly influences the effects solvent-caging and geminate recombination. I will discuss these initial results, our high power home-built Yb:fiber laser systems, and also extensions of the methods to the mid-IR to study the vibrational dynamics of hydrogen bonded clusters.

  7. Cavity-Enhanced Frequency-Agile Rapid Scanning (fars) Spectroscopy: Measurement Principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodges, Joseph T.; Long, David A.; Truong, Gar-Wing; Douglass, Kevin O.; Maxwell, Stephen E.; Zee, Roger Van; Plusquellic, David F.

    2013-06-01

    We present the principles of frequency-agile, rapid scanning (FARS) spectroscopy, a new technique for high-bandwidth, cavity-enhanced, laser absorption measurements. This method enables a visible or near-infrared probe laser beam to be frequency tuned over several tens of GHz using a microwave source, a waveguide phase modulator and a filter cavity. For the types of cavity-enhanced methods discussed here, the optical resonator itself is used to select a single sideband of the modulated laser spectrum, obviating the need for a separate filter cavity. FARS offers several important advantages over conventional cw laser tuning methods based on thermal or mechanical methods. These include, high speed tuning with sub-ms switching times, the ability to select arbitrary frequency steps or chirp rates, and the realization of a spectrum detuning axis with sub-kHz level precision. We discuss how FARS can be applied to cavity ring-down spectroscopy and other cavity-enhanced methods to enable rapid and accurate measurements of line parameters and to give noise-equivalent absorption coefficients at the 10^{-12} cm^{-1} Hz^{-1/2} level.

  8. Nanophotonics and nanochemistry: controlling the excitation dynamics for frequency up- and down-conversion in lanthanide-doped nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guanying; Yang, Chunhui; Prasad, Paras N

    2013-07-16

    Nanophotonics is an emerging science dealing with the interaction of light and matter on a nanometer scale and holds promise to produce new generation nanophosphors with highly efficient frequency conversion of infrared (IR) light. Scientists can control the excitation dynamics by using nanochemistry to produce hierarchically built nanostructures and tailor their interfaces. These nanophosphors can either perform frequency up-conversion from IR to visible or ultraviolet (UV) or down-conversion, which results in the IR light being further red shifted. Nanophotonics and nanochemistry open up numerous opportunities for these photon converters, including in high contrast bioimaging, photodynamic therapy, drug release and gene delivery, nanothermometry, and solar cells. Applications of these nanophosphors in these directions derive from three main stimuli. Light excitation and emission within the near-infrared (NIR) "optical transparency window" of tissues is ideal for high contrast in vitro and in vivo imaging. This is due to low natural florescence, reduced scattering background, and deep penetration in tissues. Secondly, the naked eye is highly sensitive in the visible range, but it has no response to IR light. Therefore, many scientists have interest in the frequency up-conversion of IR wavelengths for security and display applications. Lastly, frequency up-conversion can convert IR photons to higher energy photons, which can then readily be absorbed by solar materials. Current solar devices do not use abundant IR light that comprises almost half of solar energy. In this Account, we present our recent work on nanophotonic control of frequency up- and down-conversion in fluoride nanophosphors, and their biophotonic and nanophotonic applications. Through nanoscopic control of phonon dynamics, electronic energy transfer, local crystal field, and surface-induced non-radiative processes, we were able to produce new generation nanophosphors with highly efficient frequency

  9. Resonant cavity enhanced multi-analyte sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergstein, David Alan

    Biological research and medicine increasingly depend on interrogating binding interactions among small segments of DNA, RNA, protein, and bio-specific small molecules. Microarray technology, which senses the affinity for target molecules in solution for a multiplicity of capturing agents fixed to a surface, has been used in biological research for gene expression profiling and in medicine for molecular biomarker detection. Label-free affinity sensing is preferable as it avoids fluorescent labeling of the target molecules, reducing test cost and variability. The Resonant Cavity Imaging Biosensor (RCIB) is a label-free optical inference based technique introduced that scales readily to high throughput and employs an optical resonant cavity to enhance sensitivity by a factor of 100 or more. Near-infrared light centered at 1512.5 nm couples resonantly through a cavity constructed from Si/SiO2 Bragg reflectors, one of which serves as the binding surface. As the wavelength is swept 5 nm, an Indium-Gallium-Arsenide digital camera monitors cavity transmittance at each pixel with resolution 128 x 128. A wavelength shift in the local resonant response of the optical cavity indicates binding. Positioning the sensing surface with respect to the standing wave pattern of the electric field within the cavity, one can control the sensitivity of the measurement to the presence of bound molecules thereby enhancing or suppressing sensitivity where appropriate. Transmitted intensity at thousands of pixel locations are recorded simultaneously in a 10 s, 5 nm scan. An initial proof-of-principle setup was constructed. A sample was fabricated with 25, 100 mum wide square regions, each with a different density of 1 mum square depressions etched 12 nm into the S1O 2 surface. The average depth of each etched region was found with 0.05 nm RMS precision when the sample remains loaded in the setup and 0.3 nm RMS precision when the sample is removed and replaced. Selective binding of the protein

  10. Parametric down-conversion and polariton pair generation in optomechanical systems.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong-Chun; Xiao, Yun-Feng; Chen, You-Ling; Yu, Xiao-Chong; Gong, Qihuang

    2013-08-23

    We demonstrate that the nonlinear optomechanical interaction leads to parametric down-conversion, capable of generating polariton pairs formed by photons and phonons. The nonlinearity is resonantly enhanced through frequency matching, and such parametric down-conversion does not require the stringent condition that the single-photon optomechanical coupling strength g be on the order of the mechanical resonance frequency ω(m). We provide analytical results for the frequency matching condition and derive the nonlinear coefficient. Numerical simulations on polariton pair generation are presented, showing that photonlike polaritons, phononlike polaritons, and mixed photon-phonon polaritons can be selectively generated. Such nonlinear interaction offers a promising way for harnessing the optomechanical nonlinearity to manipulate photons and phonons. PMID:24010437

  11. Large-scale silicon photonic infrared scene projector by down conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malyutenko, V. K.

    2012-06-01

    Aimed to pursue the development of infrared scene projection technology beyond the current state-of-the-art, we consider advantages of all-silicon bulk pixelless photonic projectors by light down conversion in comparison with thermal emitter micromachining devices available in the market. There are several reasons for this. First, there are firm evidences that the technology and performance of thermal emitters have already plateaued and future advances in the field do not seem assured. Second, we show that photonic devices by light down conversion evolved from scientific curiosity into technology poised to offer new capabilities to broadband projector applications. Finally, we demonstrate that silicon becomes enabling material for emitting structures operating in the short, mid, and long wave IR spectral bands.

  12. Derivation of the density matrix of a single photon produced in parametric down-conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Kolenderski, Piotr; Wasilewski, Wojciech

    2009-07-15

    We discuss an effective numerical method of density matrix determination of fiber coupled single photon generated in process of spontaneous parametric down conversion in type I noncollinear configuration. The presented theory has been successfully applied in case of source utilized to demonstrate the experimental characterization of spectral state of single photon, what was reported in Wasilewski, Kolenderski, and Frankowski [Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 123601 (2007)].

  13. Frequency up- and down-conversions in two-mode cavity quantum electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Serra, R.M.; Villas-Boas, C.J.; Moussa, M.H.Y.; Almeida, N.G. de

    2005-04-01

    In this Brief Report we present a scheme for the implementation of frequency up- and down-conversion operations in two-mode cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED). This protocol for engineering bilinear two-mode interactions could enlarge perspectives for quantum-information manipulation and also be employed for fundamental tests of quantum theory in cavity QED. As an application we show how to generate a two-mode squeezed state in cavity QED (the original entangled state of Einstein, Podolsky, and Rosen)

  14. Two-Photon Entanglement and EPR Experiments Using Type-2 Spontaneous Parametric Down Conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sergienko, A. V.; Shih, Y. H.; Pittman, T. B.; Rubin, M. H.

    1996-01-01

    Simultaneous entanglement in spin and space-time of a two-photon quantum state generated in type-2 spontaneous parametric down-conversion is demonstrated by the observation of quantum interference with 98% visibility in a simple beam-splitter (Hanburry Brown-Twiss) anticorrelation experiment. The nonlocal cancellation of two-photon probability amplitudes as a result of this double entanglement allows us to demonstrate two different types of Bell's inequality violations in one experimental setup.

  15. Quadripartite continuous-variable entanglement via quadruply concurrent down-conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Midgley, S. L. W.; Olsen, M. K.; Bradley, A. S.; Pfister, O.

    2010-06-15

    We investigate an experimentally feasible intracavity coupled down-conversion scheme to generate quadripartite entanglement using concurrent nonlinearities. We verify that quadripartite entanglement is present in this system by calculating the output fluctuation spectra and then considering violations of optimized inequalities of the van Loock-Furusawa type. The entanglement characteristics both above and below the oscillation threshold are considered. We also present analytic solutions for the quadrature operators and the van Loock-Furusawa correlations in the undepleted pump approximation.

  16. Formalization and experimental evaluation of cavity-enhanced holographic readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Bo E.; Takashima, Yuzuru

    2014-09-01

    We formalize the theoretical effects of optical resonator enhancement on diffraction efficiency, read rate, and write rate of plane wave holograms, with a view toward page based holographic data storage. Trade-offs in cavity enhancement are also examined. Theory predicts ~160% of enhancement in diffraction efficiency is feasible when power loss of the hologram is ~8% and diffraction efficiency is ~8%. We report experimental verification of ~30% enhancement of diffraction efficiency for a hologram written in 0.03% Fe:LiNbO3 (Deltronic Crystal Industries, Inc.) with a 532 nm wavelength, pulsed, DPSS, Nd-YAG, laser and read by a red He-Ne laser. The Bragg selectivity width under the cavityenhanced readout is experimentally confirmed to be unaffected by cavity enhancement, and it agrees with theoretical prediction.

  17. Cavity-Enhanced Immunoassay Measurements in Microtiter Plates Using BBCEAS.

    PubMed

    Bajuszova, Zuzana; Ali, Zulfiqur; Scott, Simon; Seetohul, L Nitin; Islam, Meez

    2016-05-17

    We report on the first detailed use of broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (BBCEAS) as a detection system for immunoassay. A vertical R ≥ 0.99 optical cavity was integrated with a motorized XY stage, which functioned as a receptacle for 96-well microtiter plates. The custom-built cavity enhanced microplate reader was used to make measurements on a commercially available osteocalcin sandwich ELISA kit. A 30-fold increase in path length was obtained with a minimum detectable change in the absorption coefficient, αmin(t), of 5.3 × 10(-5) cm(-1) Hz(-1/2). This corresponded to a 39-fold increase in the sensitivity of measurement when directly compared to measurements in a conventional microplate reader. Separate measurements of a standard STREP-HRP colorimetric reaction in microtiter plates of differing optical quality produced an increase in sensitivity of up to 115-fold compared to a conventional microplate reader. The sensitivity of the developed setup compared favorably with previous liquid-phase cavity enhanced studies and approaches the sensitivity of typical fluorometric ELISAs. It could benefit any biochemical test which uses single pass absorption as a detection method, through either the label free detection of biologically important molecules at lower concentrations or the reduction in the amount of expensive biochemicals needed for a particular test, leading to cheaper tests. PMID:27089516

  18. Measurement of SFDR and noise in EDF amplified analog RF links using all-optical down-conversion and balanced receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middleton, Charles; Borbath, Michael; Wyatt, Jeff; DeSalvo, Richard

    2008-04-01

    Optical down-conversion techniques have become an increasingly popular architecture to realize Multi-band Enterprise Terminals (MET), Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR), Optical Arbitrary Waveform Generation (OAWG), RF Channelizers and other technologies that need rapid frequency agile tunability in the microwave and millimeter RF bands. We describe recent SFDR, NF, Gain, and Noise modeling and measurements of Erbium-doped-fiber amplified analog RF optical links implementing all-optical down-conversion and balanced photodiode receivers. We describe measurements made on our newly designed extensive test-bed utilizing a wide array of high powered single and balanced photodiodes, polarization preserving output LN modulators, EAMs, LIMs, tunable lasers, EDFAs, RF Amplifiers, and other components to fully characterize direct and coherent detection techniques. Additionally, we compare these experimental results to our comprehensive MATLAB system modeling and optimization software tools.

  19. The biaxial nonlinear crystal BiB₃O₆ as a polarization entangled photon source using non-collinear type-II parametric down-conversion.

    PubMed

    Halevy, A; Megidish, E; Dovrat, L; Eisenberg, H S; Becker, P; Bohatý, L

    2011-10-10

    We describe the full characterization of the biaxial nonlinear crystal BiB₃O₆ (BiBO) as a polarization entangled photon source using non-collinear type-II parametric down-conversion. We consider the relevant parameters for crystal design, such as cutting angles, polarization of the photons, effective nonlinearity, spatial and temporal walk-offs, crystal thickness and the effect of the pump laser bandwidth. Experimental results showing entanglement generation with high rates and a comparison to the well investigated β-BaB₂O₄ (BBO) crystal are presented as well. Changing the down-conversion crystal of a polarization entangled photon source from BBO to BiBO enhances the generation rate as if the pump power was increased by 2.5 times. Such an improvement is currently required for the generation of multiphoton entangled states. PMID:21997051

  20. Few-Cycle and Cavity-Enhanced Optical Parametric Amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqui, Aleem Mohammad

    Optical parametric amplifiers have emerged as important optical sources by extending the properties of few-cycle laser sources, which exist only in materials with sufficiently large gain bandwidths, to wide array of spectral ranges. The work reported in this thesis relates to two areas for the continued development of optical parametric amplification based sources. First, we present a white light seeded, carrier-envelope stable, degenerately pumped OPA producing near tranform-limited sub 7 fs, 3 microJ pulses at the driver wavelength from a long pulse, non-CEP stable Ti:sapphire regenerative amplifier. Problems to the spectral phase jump at the driver wavelength, 800 nm, were avoided by using a near infrared OPA to produce white light continuum down to 800 nm where the spectral phase is smooth. Secondly, enhancement cavities are used in conjunction with parametric amplifiers resulting in a new technique entitled, cavity-enhanced optical parametric chirped-pulse amplification (C-OPCPA). C-OPCPA increases the capabilities of nonlinear crystals and can allow continued scaling of parametric amplifier systems to high repetition rate. This work contains the first theoretical and experimental investigation of C-OPCPA. Numerically, passive pump pulse shaping of the intracavity pump power is shown to enable octave spanning gain. Experimentally, a first proof-of-principle experiment demonstrates a 78 MHz C-OPCPA with more than 50% conversion with under 1 W of incident pump power. A comparison to a single pass system shows improvements in the C-OPCPA of orders of magnitude in conversion efficiency and 3 fold increase in phase matching bandwidth in 10 and 20 mm periodically poled lithium niobate phase matched for parametric amplification with 1030 nm pump wavelength and a 1550 nm signal wavelength. A Yb-fiber laser based CPA system producing up to 5 W of 500 fs pulses comprises the pump source, and a Er-fiber laser the signal. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries

  1. Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy using a Prism Cavity and Supercontinuum Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehmann, Kevin K.; Johnston, Paul S.

    2010-03-01

    The multiplex advantage of current cavity enhanced spectrometers is limited by the limited high reflectivity bandwidth of the dielectric mirrors used to construct the high finesse cavity. We report on our development of a spectrometer that uses Brewster's angle retroreflectors that is excited with supercontinuum radiation generated by a 1.06 μm pumped photonic crystal fiber, which covers the 500-1800 nm spectral range. Recent progress will be discussed including modeling of the prism cavity losses, alternative prism materials for use in the UV and mid-IR, and a new higher power source pumped by a mode-locked laser.

  2. Pump Spectral Bandwidth, Birefringence, and Entanglement in Type-II Parametric Down Conversion

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Erenso, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    The twin photons produced by a type-II spontaneous parametric down conversion are well know as a potential source of photons for quantum teleportation due to the strong entanglement in polarization. This strong entanglement in polarization, however, depends on the spectral composition of the pump photon and the nature of optical isotropy of the crystal. By exact numerical calculation of the concurrence, we have shown that how pump photons spectral width and the birefringence nature of the crystal directly affect the degree of polarization entanglement of the twin photons.

  3. Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen-Bohm experiment and Bell inequality violation using Type 2 parametric down conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiess, Thomas E.; Shih, Yan-Hua; Sergienko, A. V.; Alley, Carroll O.

    1994-01-01

    We report a new two-photon polarization correlation experiment for realizing the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen-Bohm (EPRB) state and for testing Bell-type inequalities. We use the pair of orthogonally-polarized light quanta generated in Type 2 parametric down conversion. Using 1 nm interference filters in front of our detectors, we observe from the output of a 0.5mm beta - BaB2O4 (BBO) crystal the EPRB correlations in coincidence counts, and measure an associated Bell inequality violation of 22 standard deviations. The quantum state of the photon pair is a polarization analog of the spin-1/2 singlet state.

  4. Parametric down-conversion with optimized spectral properties in nonlinear photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Corona, Maria; U'Ren, Alfred B.

    2007-10-15

    We study the joint spectral properties of photon pairs generated by spontaneous parametric down-conversion in a one-dimensional nonlinear photonic crystal in a collinear, degenerate, type-II geometry. We show that the photonic crystal properties may be exploited to compensate for material dispersion and obtain photon pairs that are nearly factorable, in principle, for arbitrary materials and spectral regions, limited by the ability to fabricate the nonlinear crystal with the required periodic variation in the refractive indices for the ordinary and extraordinary waves.

  5. Towards correcting atmospheric beam wander via pump beam control in a down conversion process.

    PubMed

    Pugh, Christopher J; Kolenderski, Piotr; Scarcella, Carmelo; Tosi, Alberto; Jennewein, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    Correlated photon pairs produced by a spontaneous parametric down conversion (SPDC) process can be used for secure quantum communication over long distances including free space transmission over a link through turbulent atmosphere. We experimentally investigate the possibility to utilize the intrinsic strong correlation between the pump and output photon spatial modes to mitigate the negative targeting effects of atmospheric beam wander. Our approach is based on a demonstration observing the deflection of the beam on a spatially resolved array of single photon avalanche diodes (SPAD-array). PMID:27607697

  6. Time resolved imaging using non-collinear parametric down-conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jung-Rae

    In this thesis I present a method for measuring the time resolved spatial profile of a single laser pulse and its application to the semiconductor devices. In OMEGA laser system, spatial profile of a laser beam can change as a function of time due to spontaneous effects such as the B-integral or imposed effects such as smoothing by spectral dispersion. The method presented here uses a non-collinear parametric down-conversion process to multiply sample a single laser pulse. In the non-collinear parametric down-conversion process, an infrared laser beam at 1064 nm is mixed with an intense ultraviolet beam at 351 nm to generate the green signal beam at 524 nm. Calculations have been carried out to determine the threshold power of the infrared probe beam for generating a detectable signal beam. The generated green beam is captured by a cooled optical multichannel analyzer camera and the image of signal beam is analyzed. This temporal spatial measurement can also be applied to the dynamic image detection schemes of semiconductor devices.

  7. NO and N2O detection employing cavity enhanced technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojtas, J.; Medrzycki, R.; Rutecka, B.; Mikolajczyk, J.; Nowakowski, M.; Szabra, D.; Gutowska, M.; Stacewicz, T.; Bielecki, Z.

    2012-06-01

    The article describes an application of cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy for nitric oxide and nitrous oxide detection. Both oxides are important greenhouse gases that are of large influence on environment, living organisms and human health. These compounds are also biomarkers of some human diseases. They determine the level of acid rain, and can be used for characterization of specific explosive materials. Therefore the sensitive detectors of these gases are of great importance for many applications: from routine air monitoring in industrial and intensive traffic areas, to detection of explosives in airports, finally for medicine investigation, for health care, etc. Our compact detection system provides opportunity for simultaneous measure of both NO and N2O concentration at ppb level. Its sensitivity is comparable with sensitivities of instruments based on other methods, e.g. gas chromatography or mass spectrometry.

  8. Parametric down-conversion with nonideal and random quasi-phase-matching

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chun-Yao; Lin, Chun; Liljestrand, Charlotte; Su, Wei-Min; Canalias, Carlota; Chuu, Chih-Sung

    2016-01-01

    Quasi-phase-matching (QPM) has enriched the capacity of parametric down-conversion (PDC) in generating biphotons for many fundamental tests and advanced applications. However, it is not clear how the nonidealities and randomness in the QPM grating of a parametric down-converter may affect the quantum properties of the biphotons. This paper intends to provide insights into the interplay between PDC and nonideal or random QPM structures. Using a periodically poled nonlinear crystal with short periodicity, we conduct experimental and theoretical studies of PDC subject to nonideal duty cycle and random errors in domain lengths. We report the observation of biphotons emerging through noncritical birefringent-phasematching, which is impossible to occur in PDC with an ideal QPM grating, and a biphoton spectrum determined by the details of nonidealities and randomness. We also observed QPM biphotons with a diminished strength. These features are both confirmed by our theory. Our work provides new perspectives for biphoton engineering with QPM. PMID:27173482

  9. Parametric down-conversion with nonideal and random quasi-phase-matching.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chun-Yao; Lin, Chun; Liljestrand, Charlotte; Su, Wei-Min; Canalias, Carlota; Chuu, Chih-Sung

    2016-01-01

    Quasi-phase-matching (QPM) has enriched the capacity of parametric down-conversion (PDC) in generating biphotons for many fundamental tests and advanced applications. However, it is not clear how the nonidealities and randomness in the QPM grating of a parametric down-converter may affect the quantum properties of the biphotons. This paper intends to provide insights into the interplay between PDC and nonideal or random QPM structures. Using a periodically poled nonlinear crystal with short periodicity, we conduct experimental and theoretical studies of PDC subject to nonideal duty cycle and random errors in domain lengths. We report the observation of biphotons emerging through noncritical birefringent-phasematching, which is impossible to occur in PDC with an ideal QPM grating, and a biphoton spectrum determined by the details of nonidealities and randomness. We also observed QPM biphotons with a diminished strength. These features are both confirmed by our theory. Our work provides new perspectives for biphoton engineering with QPM. PMID:27173482

  10. Parametric down-conversion with nonideal and random quasi-phase-matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chun-Yao; Lin, Chun; Liljestrand, Charlotte; Su, Wei-Min; Canalias, Carlota; Chuu, Chih-Sung

    2016-05-01

    Quasi-phase-matching (QPM) has enriched the capacity of parametric down-conversion (PDC) in generating biphotons for many fundamental tests and advanced applications. However, it is not clear how the nonidealities and randomness in the QPM grating of a parametric down-converter may affect the quantum properties of the biphotons. This paper intends to provide insights into the interplay between PDC and nonideal or random QPM structures. Using a periodically poled nonlinear crystal with short periodicity, we conduct experimental and theoretical studies of PDC subject to nonideal duty cycle and random errors in domain lengths. We report the observation of biphotons emerging through noncritical birefringent-phasematching, which is impossible to occur in PDC with an ideal QPM grating, and a biphoton spectrum determined by the details of nonidealities and randomness. We also observed QPM biphotons with a diminished strength. These features are both confirmed by our theory. Our work provides new perspectives for biphoton engineering with QPM.

  11. Coordination polymer core/shell structures: Preparation and up/down-conversion luminescence.

    PubMed

    Li, Bingmei; Xu, Hualan; Xiao, Chen; Shuai, Min; Chen, Weimin; Zhong, Shengliang

    2016-10-01

    Coordination polymer (CP) core-shell nanoparticles with Gd-based CP (GdCP) as core and Eu-based CP (EuCP) as shell have been successfully prepared. Allantoin was employed as the organic building block without the assistance of any template. The composition, size and structure of the core-shell nanospheres were well characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX), powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), thermo-gravimetric analysis (TG). Results show that the resultant cores are uniform nanospheres with diameter of approximately 45nm, while the diameters of the core-shell nanospheres are increased to approximately 60nm. The core-shell products show enhanced luminescence efficiency than the core under 980nm laser excitation and decreased down-conversion luminescence when excited at 394nm. PMID:27344485

  12. Linear-optical qubit amplification with spontaneous parametric down-conversion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou-Yang, Yang; Feng, Zhao-Feng; Zhou, Lan; Sheng, Yu-Bo

    2016-01-01

    A single photon is the basic building block in quantum communication. However, it is sensitive to photon loss. In this paper, we discuss a linear-optical amplification protocol for protecting a single photon with a practical spontaneous parametric down-conversion (SPDC) source. Our protocol revealed that in a practical experimental condition, the amplification using entanglement as an auxiliary is more powerful than the amplification using a single photon as an auxiliary, for the vacuum state in the SPDC source does not disturb the amplification and can be eliminated automatically. Moreover, the weak SPDC source will become another advantage to benefit the amplification, as the double-pair emission error can be decreased. Our protocol may be useful in future quantum cryptography, especially in the device-independent quantum key distribution.

  13. Indistinguishability of orbital angular-momentum modes in spontaneous parametric down-conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Barbosa, Geraldo Alexandre

    2009-05-15

    Identification of light modes usually requires careful considerations of the collecting geometry. This is particularly true for states carrying orbital angular-momentum modes from spontaneous parametric down-conversion due to the entanglement of the signal and idler fields. A detailed understanding of the generated modes in a general case allows the design of efficient detection setups. This is true for distinct cases, e.g., when multiple samplings are performed by repeated state generation or in single-photon cryptography or quantum computation, where a photon state is generated within a short-time window and a single measurement is performed. Aspects of nonorthogonality of signal and idler modes and effects of restrictions on the collecting geometry are discussed in this work.

  14. Spatial correlation of photon pairs produced in spontaneous parametric down-conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Procopio, L. M.; Rosas-Ortiz, O.; Velázquez, V.

    2010-10-01

    We report the observation of spatial biphoton correlation in spontaneous parametric down conversion. The optical bench includes a type-I BBO crystal of effective length 2 mm, pumped by a 100 mW violet laser diode centered at 405.38 nm. Photon pairs are created with degenerate wavelength ≈810.76 nm. Once the horizontal counting rates have been measured, a simple geometrical recipe is shown to be useful in calculating bounds for the width of vertical counting rates. The spatial correlation between idler and signal photons is illustrated with a coincidence distribution of the coordinate pair (xs,xi), with xi,s the idler (signal) detector position in horizontal scan.

  15. Spatial correlation of photon pairs produced in spontaneous parametric down-conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Procopio, L. M.; Rosas-Ortiz, O.; Velazquez, V.

    2010-10-11

    We report the observation of spatial biphoton correlation in spontaneous parametric down conversion. The optical bench includes a type-I BBO crystal of effective length 2 mm, pumped by a 100 mW violet laser diode centered at 405.38 nm. Photon pairs are created with degenerate wavelength {approx_equal}810.76 nm. Once the horizontal counting rates have been measured, a simple geometrical recipe is shown to be useful in calculating bounds for the width of vertical counting rates. The spatial correlation between idler and signal photons is illustrated with a coincidence distribution of the coordinate pair (x{sub s},x{sub i}), with x{sub i,s} the idler (signal) detector position in horizontal scan.

  16. On the geometry of spatial biphoton correlation in spontaneous parametric down conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Procopio, L. M.; Rosas-Ortiz, O.; Velázquez, V.

    2015-07-01

    Analytical expressions are derived for the distribution rates of spatial coincidences in the counting of photons produced by spontaneous parametric down conversion (SPDC). Gaussian profiles are assumed for the wave function of the idler and signal light created in type-I SPDC. The distribution rates describe ellipses on the detection planes that are oriented at different angles according to the photon coincidences in either horizontal-horizontal, vertical-vertical, horizontal-vertical or vertical-horizontal position variables. The predictions are in agreement with the experimental data obtained with a type-I BBO crystal that is illuminated by a 100 mW violet pump laser as well as with the results obtained from the geometry defined by the phase-matching conditions.

  17. Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy Using a Broadband Prism Cavity and a Supercontinuum Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Paul S.; Lehmann, Kevin K.

    2009-06-01

    The multiplex advantage of current cavity enhanced spectrometers is limited by the high reflectivity bandwidth of the mirrors used to construct the high finesse cavity. Previously, we reported the design and construction of a new spectrometer that circumvents this limitation by utilizing Brewster^{,}s angle prism retroreflectors. The prisms, made from fused silica and combined with a supercontinuum source generated by pumping a highly nonlinear photonic crystal fiber, yields a spectral window ranging from 500 nm to 1750 nm. Recent progress in the instruments development will be discussed, including work on modeling the prism cavity losses, alternative prism material for use in the UV and mid-IR spectral regions, and a new high power supercontinuum source based on mode-locked picosecond laser.

  18. Localization of one-photon state in space and Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox in spontaneous parametric down conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penin, A. N.; Reutova, T. A.; Sergienko, A. V.

    1992-01-01

    An experiment on one-photon state localization in space using a correlation technique in Spontaneous Parametric Down Conversion (SPDC) process is discussed. Results of measurements demonstrate an idea of the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) paradox for coordinate and momentum variables of photon states. Results of the experiment can be explained with the help of an advanced wave technique. The experiment is based on the idea that two-photon states of optical electromagnetic fields arising in the nonlinear process of the spontaneous parametric down conversion (spontaneous parametric light scattering) can be explained by quantum mechanical theory with the help of a single wave function.

  19. Noise Immune Cavity Enhanced Optical Heterodyne Velocity Modulation Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siller, Brian; Mills, Andrew; Porambo, Michael; McCall, Benjamin

    2011-06-01

    The technique of Cavity Enhanced Velocity Modulation Spectroscopy (CEVMS) has recently been developed. By demodulating the detector signal at twice the plasma modulation frequency (2f), the velocity-modulated ionic absorption signal can be extracted. Although the concentration-modulated excited neutral molecules are also observed at 2f, the ion and neutral signals can be distinguished and separated with phase-sensitive demodulation. The optical cavity provides two major benefits. It increases both the optical path length and the intracavity laser power by a factor of 2×Finesse/π. The multipass advantage allows for much longer path length than was previously possible with unidirectional multipass White cells. The power enhancement combined with perfectly overlapped counterpropagating beams within the cavity allows for sub-Doppler spectroscopy. Although CEVMS showed much potential, its sensitivity was ultimately limited by electronic noise from the plasma interfering with the cavity-locking electronics. We have further improved upon CEVMS by combining it with Noise Immune Cavity Enhanced Optical Heterodyne Molecular Spectroscopy (NICE-OHMS). The laser is frequency modulated at precisely an integer multiple of the free spectral range of the optical cavity; this allows the heterodyne sidebands to be coupled into the optical cavity. Heterodyne detection of the cavity leak-out is immune to noise in the laser-cavity lock, and 2f demodulation further decreases electronic noise in the system and retains ion-neutral discrimination. The additional level of modulation beyond ordinary CEVMS has the added advantage of enabling the observation of both absorption and dispersion signals simultaneously by using two RF mixers, each driving its own lock-in amplifier. In a single scan, four distinct signals can be obtained: absorption and dispersion for ions and excited neutrals. The technique has been demonstrated in the near-IR for N_2^+. B. M. Siller, A. A. Mills and B. J. Mc

  20. Broadband Spectroscopy with Dual Combs and Cavity Enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzwarth, Ronald; Bernhardt, Birgitta; Ozawa, Akira; Udem, Thomas; Hänsch, Theodor W.; Jacquet, Patrick; Jacquey, Marion; Guelachvili, Guy; Kobayashi, Yohei; Picque, Nathalie

    2010-06-01

    Classical FTIRs handle the task of massively parallel spectroscopic probing by interferometric detection. In contrast a frequency comb Fourier transform spectrometer (FC-FTS) retains the principle of combining two interferometer beams but uses two inputs from two independent sources. Thus we can offset their frequencies to facilitate multifrequency heterodyne signal processing. The advantages of this spectrometer compared with the classical FTIR include ease of operation (no cumbersome moving delay lines), speed of acquisition (18 μs demonstrated), collimated long-distance propagation, possibly diffraction-limited microscopic probing, and mid infrared as well as THz operation if necessary. In a recent proof of principle experiment we have dramatically improved the sensitivity by the implementation of an enhancement cavity around the probing volume We recorded, within 18 μs, spectra of the ammonia 1.0 μm overtone bands comprising 1500 spectral elements and spanning 20 nm with 4.5 GHz resolution and a noise-equivalent-absorption at one-second-averaging of 1 10-10 cm-1Hz-1/2, thus opening a route to time-resolved spectroscopy of rapidly-evolving single-events. Since FC-FTS only needs one detector that is easily available in practically all spectral regions, it can be envisioned that cavity-enhanced FC-FTS will assume a position of dominance for the measurements of real-time ultra-sensitive spectra in the molecular fingerprint region. B. Bernhardt et. al., Nature Photonics, 4 (55), January 2010.

  1. Broadband cavity enhanced spectroscopy in the ultraviolet spectral region for measurements of nitrogen dioxide and formaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washenfelder, R. A.; Attwood, A. R.; Flores, J. M.; Rudich, Y.; Brown, S. S.

    2015-09-01

    Formaldehyde (CH2O) is the most abundant aldehyde in the atmosphere, and strongly affects photochemistry through its photolysis. We describe simultaneous measurements of CH2O and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) using broadband cavity enhanced spectroscopy in the ultraviolet spectral region. The light source consists of a continuous-wave diode laser focused into a Xenon bulb to produce a plasma that emits high-intensity, broadband light. The plasma discharge is optically filtered and coupled into a 1 m optical cavity. The reflectivity of the cavity mirrors is 0.99933 ± 0.00003 (670 ppm loss) at 338 nm, as determined from the known Rayleigh scattering of He and zero air. This mirror reflectivity corresponds to an effective path length of 1.49 km within the 1 m cell. We measure the cavity output over the 315-350 nm spectral region using a grating monochromator and charge-coupled device (CCD) array detector. We use published reference spectra with spectral fitting software to simultaneously retrieve CH2O and NO2 concentrations. Independent measurements of NO2 standard additions by broadband cavity enhanced spectroscopy and cavity ringdown spectroscopy agree within 2 % (slope for linear fit = 0.98 ± 0.03 with r2 = 0.998). Standard additions of CH2O measured by broadband cavity enhanced spectroscopy and calculated based on flow dilution are also well-correlated, with r2 = 0.9998. During constant, mixed additions of NO2 and CH2O, the 30 s measurement precisions (1σ) of the current configuration were 140 and 210 pptv, respectively. The current 1-min detection limit for extinction measurements at 315-350 nm provides sufficient sensitivity for measurement of trace gases in laboratory experiments and ground-based field experiments. Additionally, the instrument provides highly accurate, spectroscopically-based trace gas detection that may complement higher precision techniques based on non-absolute detection methods. In addition to trace gases, this approach will be appropriate for

  2. Modeling and optimization of photon pair sources based on spontaneous parametric down-conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Kolenderski, Piotr; Banaszek, Konrad; Wasilewski, Wojciech

    2009-07-15

    We address the problem of efficient modeling of photon pairs generated in spontaneous parametric down-conversion and coupled into single-mode fibers. It is shown that when the range of relevant transverse wave vectors is restricted by the pump and fiber modes, the computational complexity can be reduced substantially with the help of the paraxial approximation, while retaining the full spectral characteristics of the source. This approach can serve as a basis for efficient numerical calculations or can be combined with analytically tractable approximations of the phase-matching function. We introduce here a cosine-Gaussian approximation of the phase-matching function that works for a broader range of parameters than the Gaussian model used previously. The developed modeling tools are used to evaluate characteristics of the photon pair sources such as the pair production rate and the spectral purity quantifying frequency correlations. Strategies to generate spectrally uncorrelated photons, necessary in multiphoton interference experiments, are analyzed with respect to trade-offs between parameters of the source.

  3. A small-form-factor piezoelectric vibration energy harvester using a resonant frequency-down conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Kyung Ho; Kim, Young-Cheol; Kim, Jae Eun

    2014-10-01

    While environmental vibrations are usually in the range of a few hundred Hertz, small-form-factor piezoelectric vibration energy harvesters will have higher resonant frequencies due to the structural size effect. To address this issue, we propose a resonant frequency-down conversion based on the theory of dynamic vibration absorber for the design of a small-form-factor piezoelectric vibration energy harvester. The proposed energy harvester consists of two frequency-tuned elastic components for lowering the first resonant frequency of an integrated system but is so configured that an energy harvesting beam component is inverted with respect to the other supporting beam component for a small form factor. Furthermore, in order to change the unwanted modal characteristic of small separation of resonant frequencies, as is the case with an inverted configuration, a proof mass on the supporting beam component is slightly shifted toward a second proof mass on the tip of the energy harvesting beam component. The proposed small-form-factor design capability was experimentally verified using a fabricated prototype with an occupation volume of 20 × 39 × 6.9 mm3, which was designed for a target frequency of as low as 100 Hz.

  4. Spontaneous Parametric Down-Conversion to Create a Quantum Key Distribution System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salgado, Erik; Aragoneses, Andres, , Dr.

    Quantum Key Distribution (QKD) aims to share a secret key between two parties in a secure manner. It provides security benefits over classical communication systems. We have constructed a QKD system that uses quantum entanglement to ensure security against eavesdroppers. We use polarization to encode the binary information of an encryption key. This key is secure due to the quantum properties of light. We use the process of spontaneous parametric down-conversion (SPDC) to create entangled photon pairs. Experimentally, we fire pump (laser) photons through a nonlinear crystal, where there exists a probability of them being annihilated and spontaneously generating two entangled photons of lower energies. A coincidence measurement between two entangled photons indicates the successful transfer of one bit of information, and a coincidence measurement between two disparate photons indicates an error in data transfer. We aim to optimize data transfer rate and reduce error rate. The project is still in development and we look forward to collecting data in the near future.

  5. A small-form-factor piezoelectric vibration energy harvester using a resonant frequency-down conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Kyung Ho; Kim, Young-Cheol; Kim, Jae Eun

    2014-10-15

    While environmental vibrations are usually in the range of a few hundred Hertz, small-form-factor piezoelectric vibration energy harvesters will have higher resonant frequencies due to the structural size effect. To address this issue, we propose a resonant frequency-down conversion based on the theory of dynamic vibration absorber for the design of a small-form-factor piezoelectric vibration energy harvester. The proposed energy harvester consists of two frequency-tuned elastic components for lowering the first resonant frequency of an integrated system but is so configured that an energy harvesting beam component is inverted with respect to the other supporting beam component for a small form factor. Furthermore, in order to change the unwanted modal characteristic of small separation of resonant frequencies, as is the case with an inverted configuration, a proof mass on the supporting beam component is slightly shifted toward a second proof mass on the tip of the energy harvesting beam component. The proposed small-form-factor design capability was experimentally verified using a fabricated prototype with an occupation volume of 20 × 39 × 6.9 mm{sup 3}, which was designed for a target frequency of as low as 100 Hz.

  6. Aspects for efficient wide spectral band THz generation via CO2 laser down conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchenko, Yu. N.; Andreev, Yu. M.; Lanskii, G. V.; Losev, V. F.; Lubenko, D. M.

    2015-02-01

    Detailed model study of THz generation by CO2 laser down-conversion in pure and solid solution crystals GaSe1-xSx is carried out for the first time. Both forward and backward collinear interactions of common (eo-e, oe-e, oe-o, oo-e, ee-o) and original (ee-e, oo-o) types are considered. Possibility of realization, phase matching angles and figure of merits are estimated for line mixing within 9 μm and 10 μm emission bands, as well between them. Dispersion properties of o- and e-wave refractive indices and absorption coefficients for GaSe, GaS and GaSe1-xSx crystals were preliminary measured by THz-TDS, approximated in the equation form and then used in the study. Estimated results are presented in the form of 3-D figures that are suitable for rapid analyses of DFG parameters. The most efficient type of interaction is eo-o type. Optimally doped (x = 0.09-0.13) GaSe1-xSx crystals are from 4 to 5 times more efficient at limit pump intensity than not doped GaSe crystals.

  7. Quantitative determination of the O({sup 3}P) density via visible cavity-enhanced spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Manish; Owano, Thomas; Baer, Douglas; O'Keefe, Anthony

    2006-12-11

    A simple method has been developed to quantitatively measure the ground state oxygen atom, O({sup 3}P), density. The technique exploits cavity-enhanced spectroscopy to probe the relatively weak O({sup 1}D)(leftarrow)O({sup 3}P{sub 1}) transition near 636 nm. O({sup 3}P{sub 1}) densities of approximately 3.4x10{sup 14} at./cm{sup 3} were measured in an inductively coupled plasma produced within a high-finesse optical cavity, and a minimum detectable atom state density of 1.3x10{sup 12} at./cm{sup 3} was determined. The absorption profile yielded a translational temperature of 453 K. The technique can be readily extended to other atomic species.

  8. Cavity-Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy and Photoacoustic Spectroscopy for Human Breath Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojtas, J.; Tittel, F. K.; Stacewicz, T.; Bielecki, Z.; Lewicki, R.; Mikolajczyk, J.; Nowakowski, M.; Szabra, D.; Stefanski, P.; Tarka, J.

    2014-12-01

    This paper describes two different optoelectronic detection techniques: cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy and photoacoustic spectroscopy. These techniques are designed to perform a sensitive analysis of trace gas species in exhaled human breath for medical applications. With such systems, the detection of pathogenic changes at the molecular level can be achieved. The presence of certain gases (biomarkers), at increased concentration levels, indicates numerous human diseases. Diagnosis of a disease in its early stage would significantly increase chances for effective therapy. Non-invasive, real-time measurements, and high sensitivity and selectivity, capable of minimum discomfort for patients, are the main advantages of human breath analysis. At present, monitoring of volatile biomarkers in breath is commonly useful for diagnostic screening, treatment for specific conditions, therapy monitoring, control of exogenous gases (such as bacterial and poisonous emissions), as well as for analysis of metabolic gases.

  9. Optical re-injection in cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Leen, J. Brian; O’Keefe, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Non-mode-matched cavity-enhanced absorption spectrometry (e.g., cavity ringdown spectroscopy and integrated cavity output spectroscopy) is commonly used for the ultrasensitive detection of trace gases. These techniques are attractive for their simplicity and robustness, but their performance may be limited by the reflection of light from the front mirror and the resulting low optical transmission. Although this low transmitted power can sometimes be overcome with higher power lasers and lower noise detectors (e.g., in the near-infrared), many regimes exist where the available light intensity or photodetector sensitivity limits instrument performance (e.g., in the mid-infrared). In this article, we describe a method of repeatedly re-injecting light reflected off the front mirror of the optical cavity to boost the cavity's circulating power and deliver more light to the photodetector and thus increase the signal-to-noise ratio of the absorption measurement. We model and experimentally demonstrate the method's performance using off-axis cavity ringdown spectroscopy (OA-CRDS) with a broadly tunable external cavity quantum cascade laser. The power coupled through the cavity to the detector is increased by a factor of 22.5. The cavity loss is measured with a precision of 2 × 10−10 cm−1/\\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}$\\sqrt {{\\rm Hz;}}$\\end{document} Hz ; an increase of 12 times over the standard off-axis configuration without reinjection and comparable to the best reported sensitivities in the mid-infrared. Finally, the re-injected CRDS system is used to measure the spectrum of several volatile organic compounds, demonstrating the improved ability to resolve weakly absorbing spectroscopic features. PMID:25273701

  10. Optical re-injection in cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Leen, J Brian; O'Keefe, Anthony

    2014-09-01

    Non-mode-matched cavity-enhanced absorption spectrometry (e.g., cavity ringdown spectroscopy and integrated cavity output spectroscopy) is commonly used for the ultrasensitive detection of trace gases. These techniques are attractive for their simplicity and robustness, but their performance may be limited by the reflection of light from the front mirror and the resulting low optical transmission. Although this low transmitted power can sometimes be overcome with higher power lasers and lower noise detectors (e.g., in the near-infrared), many regimes exist where the available light intensity or photodetector sensitivity limits instrument performance (e.g., in the mid-infrared). In this article, we describe a method of repeatedly re-injecting light reflected off the front mirror of the optical cavity to boost the cavity's circulating power and deliver more light to the photodetector and thus increase the signal-to-noise ratio of the absorption measurement. We model and experimentally demonstrate the method's performance using off-axis cavity ringdown spectroscopy (OA-CRDS) with a broadly tunable external cavity quantum cascade laser. The power coupled through the cavity to the detector is increased by a factor of 22.5. The cavity loss is measured with a precision of 2 × 10(-10) cm(-1)/√Hz; an increase of 12 times over the standard off-axis configuration without reinjection and comparable to the best reported sensitivities in the mid-infrared. Finally, the re-injected CRDS system is used to measure the spectrum of several volatile organic compounds, demonstrating the improved ability to resolve weakly absorbing spectroscopic features. PMID:25273701

  11. Optical re-injection in cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Leen, J. Brian O’Keefe, Anthony

    2014-09-15

    Non-mode-matched cavity-enhanced absorption spectrometry (e.g., cavity ringdown spectroscopy and integrated cavity output spectroscopy) is commonly used for the ultrasensitive detection of trace gases. These techniques are attractive for their simplicity and robustness, but their performance may be limited by the reflection of light from the front mirror and the resulting low optical transmission. Although this low transmitted power can sometimes be overcome with higher power lasers and lower noise detectors (e.g., in the near-infrared), many regimes exist where the available light intensity or photodetector sensitivity limits instrument performance (e.g., in the mid-infrared). In this article, we describe a method of repeatedly re-injecting light reflected off the front mirror of the optical cavity to boost the cavity's circulating power and deliver more light to the photodetector and thus increase the signal-to-noise ratio of the absorption measurement. We model and experimentally demonstrate the method's performance using off-axis cavity ringdown spectroscopy (OA-CRDS) with a broadly tunable external cavity quantum cascade laser. The power coupled through the cavity to the detector is increased by a factor of 22.5. The cavity loss is measured with a precision of 2 × 10{sup −10} cm{sup −1}/√(Hz;) an increase of 12 times over the standard off-axis configuration without reinjection and comparable to the best reported sensitivities in the mid-infrared. Finally, the re-injected CRDS system is used to measure the spectrum of several volatile organic compounds, demonstrating the improved ability to resolve weakly absorbing spectroscopic features.

  12. Cavity Enhanced absorption spectroscopy with an Optical Comb: Detection of atmospheric radicals in the near UV.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Méjean, G.; Kassi, S.; Romanini, D.

    2009-04-01

    The atmospheric chemistry community suffers a lack of fast, reliable and space resolved measurement for a wide set of very reactive molecules (e.g. radicals such as OH, NO3, BrO, IO, etc.). Due to their high reactivity, these molecules largely control the lifetime and concentration of numerous key atmospheric species. The concentrations of radicals are extremely low (ppbv or less) and highly variable in time and space. Measuring their concentration is often extremely laborious, expensive and requires heavy equipment (chemical sampling and treatment followed by mass spectrometry and/or chromatography). We recently introduced an optical spectroscopy technique based on a femtosecond laser oscillator, "Mode-Locked Cavity-Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy", that we propose to develop into an instrument for in situ measurement of local concentration of traces of reactive molecules [1-3]. We have already demonstrated the possibility of measuring part in 1E12 by volume concentrations of radicals of high atmospheric interest, such as IO or BrO [4], as needed for monitoring these species in the environment. We apply cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy in the near UV range using a frequency-doubled Ti:Sa modelocked femtosecond laser. Efficient broadband injection of a high finesse cavity is obtained by matching this optical frequency-comb source to the comb of cavity transmission resonances. A grating spectrograph and a detector array disperse and detect the spectrum transmitted by the cavity carrying the absorption features of intracavity molecules. IO traces were obtained by mixing together controlled flows of gaseous iodine and ozone inside a high finesse cavity (F~6000). A Chameleon Ultra II ML-Laser (gracefully lent during 1 month by Coherent Inc.) was frequency doubled to address an absorption band of IO at 436 nm. A locking scheme allowed the cavity transmission to be smooth and stable. The transmitted light was dispersed using a high resolution (0.07nm) grating

  13. Hydrothermal synthesis, characterization and up/down-conversion luminescence of barium rare earth fluoride nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Li-Ping; Zhang, Qiang; Yan, Bing

    2014-07-01

    Graphical abstract: Lanthanide ions doped bare earth rare earth fluoride nanocrystals are synthesized by hydrothermal technology and characterized. The down/up-conversion luminescence of them are discussed. - Highlights: • Mixed hydrothermal system H{sub 2}O–OA (EDA)–O-A(LO-A) is used for synthesis. • Barium rare earth fluoride nanocrystals are synthesized comprehensively. • Luminescence for down-conversion and up-conversion are obtained for these systems. - Abstract: Mixed hydrothermal system H{sub 2}O–OA (EDA)–O-A(LO-A) is developed to synthesize barium rare earth fluorides nanocrystals (OA = oleylamine, EDA = ethylenediamine, O-A = oleic acid and LO-A = linoleic acid). They are presented as BaREF{sub 5} (RE = Ce, Pr, Nd, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Y, Tm, Lu) and Ba{sub 2}REF{sub 7} (RE = La, Sm, Ho, Er, Yb). The influence of reaction parameters (rare earth species, hydrothermal system and temperature) is checked on the phase and shape evolution of the fluoride nanocrystals. It is found that reaction time and temperature of these nanocrystals using EDA (180 °C, 6 h) is lower than those of them using OA (220 °C, 10 h). The photoluminescence properties of these fluorides activated by some rare earth ions (Nd{sup 3+}, Eu{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+}) are studied, and especially up-conversion luminescence of the four fluoride nanocrystal systems (Ba{sub 2}LaF{sub 7}:Yb, Tm(Er), Ba{sub 2}REF{sub 7}:Yb, Tm(Er) (RE = Gd, Y, Lu)) is observed.

  14. Full analysis of multi-photon pair effects in spontaneous parametric down conversion based photonic quantum information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeoka, Masahiro; Jin, Rui-Bo; Sasaki, Masahide

    2015-04-01

    In spontaneous parametric down conversion (SPDC) based quantum information processing (QIP) experiments, there is a tradeoff between the coincidence count rates (i.e. the pumping power of the SPDC), which limits the rate of the protocol, and the visibility of the quantum interference, which limits the quality of the protocol. This tradeoff is mainly caused by the multi-photon pair emissions from the SPDCs. In theory, the problem is how to model the experiments without truncating these multi-photon emissions while including practical imperfections. In this paper, we establish a method to theoretically simulate SPDC-based QIPs which fully incorporates the effect of multi-photon emissions and various practical imperfections. The key ingredient in our method is the application of the characteristic function formalism which has been used in continuous variable QIPs. We apply our method to three examples, the Hong-Ou-Mandel interference and the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen interference experiments, and the concatenated entanglement swapping protocol. For the first two examples, we show that our theoretical results quantitatively agree with the recent experimental results. Also we provide the closed expressions for these interference visibilities with the full multi-photon components and various imperfections. For the last example, we provide the general theoretical form of the concatenated entanglement swapping protocol in our method and show the numerical results up to five concatenations. Our method requires only a small computational resource (a few minutes by a commercially available computer), which was not possible in the previous theoretical approach. Our method will have applications in a wide range of SPDC-based QIP protocols with high accuracy and a reasonable computational resource.

  15. Molecular-like Ag clusters sensitized near-infrared down-conversion luminescence in oxyfluoride glasses for broadband spectral modification

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Hang; Chen, Daqin; Yu, Yunlong; Zhang, Rui; Wang, Yuansheng

    2013-08-26

    Molecular-like Ag clusters sized at 1–4 nm have been stabilized in Pb/Cd-free oxyfluoride glasses, showing broadband excitation/emission characteristics and unique wavelength-dependent luminescent performance with a maximal quantum yield of 26.9%. It was experimentally demonstrated that an energy transfer route of Ag clusters → Tb{sup 3+} → Yb{sup 3+} occurs in Ag{sup +}/Tb{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+} tri-doped sample, wherein Ag clusters act as sensitizers for near-infrared down-conversion spectral modification. Hopefully, the proposed strategy that noble metal clusters being applied for harvesting solar radiation may potentially solve the sticky problems of the narrow excitation bandwidth and the low excitation efficiency in rare earth ions doped down-conversion materials.

  16. Molecular-like Ag clusters sensitized near-infrared down-conversion luminescence in oxyfluoride glasses for broadband spectral modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hang; Chen, Daqin; Yu, Yunlong; Zhang, Rui; Wang, Yuansheng

    2013-08-01

    Molecular-like Ag clusters sized at 1-4 nm have been stabilized in Pb/Cd-free oxyfluoride glasses, showing broadband excitation/emission characteristics and unique wavelength-dependent luminescent performance with a maximal quantum yield of 26.9%. It was experimentally demonstrated that an energy transfer route of Ag clusters → Tb3+ → Yb3+ occurs in Ag+/Tb3+/Yb3+ tri-doped sample, wherein Ag clusters act as sensitizers for near-infrared down-conversion spectral modification. Hopefully, the proposed strategy that noble metal clusters being applied for harvesting solar radiation may potentially solve the sticky problems of the narrow excitation bandwidth and the low excitation efficiency in rare earth ions doped down-conversion materials.

  17. NO_2 Trace Measurements by Optical-Feedback Cavity-Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventrillard-Courtillot, I.; Desbois, Th.; Foldes, T.; Romanini, D.

    2009-06-01

    In order to reach the sub-ppb NO_2 detection level required for environmental applications in remote areas, we develop a spectrometer based on a technique introduced a few years ago, named Optical-Feedback Cavity-Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy (OF-CEAS) [1]. It allows very sensitive and selective measurements, together with the realization of compact and robust set-ups as was subsequently demonstrated during measurements campaigns in harsh environments [2]. OF-CEAS benefits from the optical feedback to efficiently inject a cw-laser in a V-shaped high finesse cavity (typically 10 000). Cavity-enhanced absorption spectra are acquired on a small spectral region (˜1 cm^{-1}) that enables selective and quantitative measurements at a fast acquisition rate with a detection limit of several 10^{-10} cm^{-1} as reported in this work. Spectra are obtained with high spectral definition (150 MHz highly precisely spaced data points) and are self calibrated by cavity rind-down measurements regularly performed (typically every second). NO_2 measurements are performed with a commercial extended cavity diode laser around 411 nm, spectral region where intense electronic transitions occur. We will describe the set-up developed for in-situ measurements allowing real time concentration measurements at typically 5 Hz; and then report on the measurements performed with calibrated NO_2 reference samples to evaluate the linearity of the apparatus. The minimum detectable absorption loss is estimated by considering the standard deviation of the residual of one spectrum. We achieved 2x10^{-10} cm^{-1} for a single spectrum recorded in less than 100 ms at 100 mbar. It leads to a potential detection limit of 3x10^8 molecules/cm^3, corresponding to about 150 pptv at this pressure. [1] J. Morville, S. Kassi, M. Chenevier, and D. Romanini, Appl. Phys. B, 80, 1027 (2005). [2] D. Romanini, M. Chenevrier, S. Kassi, M. Schmidt, C. Valant, M. Ramonet, J. Lopez, and H.-J. Jost, Appl. Phys. B, 83, 659

  18. Evidence of significant down-conversion in a Si-based solar cell using CuInS{sub 2}/ZnS core shell quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Gardelis, Spiros Nassiopoulou, Androula G.

    2014-05-05

    We report on the increase of up to 37.5% in conversion efficiency of a Si-based solar cell after deposition of light-emitting Cd-free, CuInS{sub 2}/ZnS core shell quantum dots on the active area of the cell due to the combined effect of down-conversion and the anti- reflecting property of the dots. We clearly distinguished the effect of down-conversion from anti-reflection and estimated an enhancement of up to 10.5% in the conversion efficiency due to down-conversion.

  19. Analysis of trace impurities in semiconductor gas via cavity-enhanced direct frequency comb spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cossel, K. C.; Adler, F.; Bertness, K. A.; Thorpe, M. J.; Feng, J.; Raynor, M. W.; Ye, J.

    2010-09-01

    Cavity-enhanced direct frequency comb spectroscopy (CE-DFCS) has demonstrated powerful potential for trace-gas detection based on its unique combination of high bandwidth, rapid data acquisition, high sensitivity, and high resolution, which is unavailable with conventional systems. However, previous demonstrations have been limited to proof-of-principle experiments or studies of fundamental laboratory science. Here, we present the development of CE-DFCS towards an industrial application—measuring impurities in arsine, an important process gas used in III-V semiconductor compound manufacturing. A strongly absorbing background gas with an extremely complex, congested, and broadband spectrum renders trace detection exceptionally difficult, but the capabilities of CE-DFCS overcome this challenge and make it possible to identify and quantify multiple spectral lines associated with water impurities. Further, frequency combs allow easy access to new spectral regions via efficient nonlinear optical processes. Here, we demonstrate detection of multiple potential impurities across 1.75-1.95 μm (5710-5130 cm-1), with a single-channel detection sensitivity (simultaneously over 2000 channels) of ˜4×10-8 cm-1 Hz-1/2 in nitrogen and, specifically, an absorption sensitivity of ˜4×10-7 cm-1 Hz-1/2 for trace water doped in arsine.

  20. Atmospheric HONO and NO2 measurement based on a broadband cavity enhanced UV-LED spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tao; Zha, Qiaozhi; Chen, Weidong; Xu, Zheng; Wang, Tao; He, Xingdao

    2015-04-01

    Nitrous acid (HONO) is a key component in tropospheric oxidant chemistry due to its contribution to the cycles of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and hydrogen oxides (HOx). Though numerous laboratory, field, and modeling studies were performed to explain the observed HONO concentrations in the atmosphere, the knowledge of atmospheric HONO chemistry is still not well understood and sometimes controversial [1]. Accurate measurements of HONO and its precursors with high precision should aid in understanding the HONO chemistry. In this paper we report on the measurements of HONO and NO2 concentrations at a suburban site of Tung Chung in Hong Kong during a field intercomparison campaign using a broadband cavity enhanced UV-LED spectrometer. 1σ detection limits of 0.3 ppbv for HONO and 1 ppbv for NO2 were achieved with an optimum acquisition time of 120 s. The measured HONO and NO2 concentrations were compared with the data from commercial HONO (LOPAP) and NO2 (NOX-analyzer) measurement instrument. Typical diurnal pattern of HONO have been observed and the potential formation sources have been analyzed [2]. Acknowledgements The supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 41265011), Educational Commission of Jiangxi Province of China (No.GJJ14548) and Environment and Conservation Fund of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (No. 7/2009). The support of the IRENI program of the Région Nord-Pas de Calaisn, is acknowledged. References [1] W. Chen, R. Maamary, X. Cui, T. Wu, E. Fertein, D. Dewaele, F. Cazier, Q. Zha, Z. Xu, T. Wang, Y. Wang, W. Zhang, X. Gao, W. Liu, F. Dong, 'Photonic Sensing of Environmental Gaseous Nitrous Acid (HONO): Opportunities and Challenges' in The Wonder of Nanotechnology: Quantum Optoelectronic Devices and Applications, M. Razeghi. L. Esaki, and K. von Klitzing, Eds., SPIE Press, Bellingham, WA, 2013, pp. 693-737 [2] T. Wu, Q. Zha, W. Chen, Z. XU, T. Wang, X. He, 'Development and deployment of a cavity enhanced UV

  1. Microwave cavity-enhanced transduction for plug and play nanomechanics at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Faust, T.; Krenn, P.; Manus, S.; Kotthaus, J.P.; Weig, E.M.

    2012-01-01

    Following recent insights into energy storage and loss mechanisms in nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS), nanomechanical resonators with increasingly high quality factors are possible. Consequently, efficient, non-dissipative transduction schemes are required to avoid the dominating influence of coupling losses. Here we present an integrated NEMS transducer based on a microwave cavity dielectrically coupled to an array of doubly clamped pre-stressed silicon nitride beam resonators. This cavity-enhanced detection scheme allows resolving of the resonators' Brownian motion at room temperature while preserving their high mechanical quality factor of 290,000 at 6.6 MHz. Furthermore, our approach constitutes an 'opto'-mechanical system in which backaction effects of the microwave field are employed to alter the effective damping of the resonators. In particular, cavity-pumped self-oscillation yields a linewidth of only 5 Hz. Thereby, an adjustement-free, all-integrated and self-driven nanoelectromechanical resonator array interfaced by just two microwave connectors is realised, which is potentially useful for applications in sensing and signal processing. PMID:22395619

  2. Title: Development of Single photon Quantum Optical Experiments using Type-I and Type-II Spontaneous Parametric Down Conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laugharn, Andrew; Maleki, Seyfollah

    We constructed a quantum optical apparatus to control and detect single photons. We generated these photons via Type-I and Type-II spontaneous parametric down conversion by pumping a GaN laser (405nm) incident on a BBO crystal. We detected the two down converted photons (810nm), denoted signal and idler, in coincidence so as to measure and control single photons. We implemented a coincidence counting unite onto an Altera DE2 board and used LabView for data acquisition. We used these photon pairs to demonstrate quantum entanglement and indistinguishability using multiple optical experiments.

  3. W-band OFDM Radio-over-Fiber system with power detector for vector signal down-conversion.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chun-Ting; Wu, Meng-Fan; Ho, Chun-Hung; Li, Che-Hao; Lin, Chi-Hsiang; Huang, Hou-Tzu

    2015-06-01

    This Letter proposes a W-band OFDM RoF system at 103.5 GHz employing power detector to support vector signal down-conversion. Additional RF tone is generated and transmitted from central office to replace the local oscillator at a wireless receiver. With a proper frequency gap and power ratio between the RF tone and the OFDM-modulated signal, the impact from signal-to-signal beating interference can be minimized. The data rate can achieve a 40 Gbps 16 QAM OFDM signal over 25 km fiber and 2 m wireless transmission. PMID:26030536

  4. Down-conversion photoluminescence sensitizing plasmonic silver nanoparticles on ZnO nanorods to generate hydrogen by water splitting photochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Kung, Po-Yen; Huang, Li-Wen; Shen, Tin-Wei; Wang, Wen-Lin; Su, Yen-Hsun; Lin, Melody I.

    2015-01-12

    Silver nanoparticles fabricated onto the surface of the ZnO nanorods form the photoanode and generate photoelectric current due to surface plasmon resonance, which serves as anode electrodes in photoelectrochemical hydrogen production. In order to increase the absorption spectrum of photoanode, organic pigments were utilized as photo-sensitizers to generate down-conversion photoluminescence to excite surface plasmon resonances of silver nanoparticles. The way of using light to carry the energy in electronic scattering regime runs the system for the enhancement of solar water splitting efficiency. It was significantly tuned in environmentally sustainable applications for power generation and development of alternative energy.

  5. Down-conversion photoluminescence sensitizing plasmonic silver nanoparticles on ZnO nanorods to generate hydrogen by water splitting photochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kung, Po-Yen; Huang, Li-Wen; Shen, Tin-Wei; Wang, Wen-Lin; Su, Yen-Hsun; Lin, Melody I.

    2015-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles fabricated onto the surface of the ZnO nanorods form the photoanode and generate photoelectric current due to surface plasmon resonance, which serves as anode electrodes in photoelectrochemical hydrogen production. In order to increase the absorption spectrum of photoanode, organic pigments were utilized as photo-sensitizers to generate down-conversion photoluminescence to excite surface plasmon resonances of silver nanoparticles. The way of using light to carry the energy in electronic scattering regime runs the system for the enhancement of solar water splitting efficiency. It was significantly tuned in environmentally sustainable applications for power generation and development of alternative energy.

  6. Measurements of the dependence of the photon-number distribution on the number of modes in parametric down-conversion.

    PubMed

    Dovrat, L; Bakstein, M; Istrati, D; Shaham, A; Eisenberg, H S

    2012-01-30

    Optical parametric down-conversion (PDC) is a central tool in quantum optics experiments. The number of collected down-converted modes greatly affects the quality of the produced photon state. We use Silicon Photomultiplier (SiPM) number-resolving detectors in order to observe the photon-number distribution of a PDC source, and show its dependence on the number of collected modes. Additionally, we show how the stimulated emission of photons and the partition of photons into several modes determine the overall photon number. We present a novel analytical model for the optical crosstalk effect in SiPM detectors, and use it to analyze the results. PMID:22330466

  7. Spatial and spectral properties of entangled photons from spontaneous parametric down-conversion with a focused pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jong-Chan; Kim, Yoon-Ho

    2016-05-01

    The spatial and spectral properties of entangled photons from spontaneous parametric down-conversion (SPDC) with a focused pump are investigated with theoretical analysis and numerical simulation. Here, the spatial and spectral properties of down-converted photons are fully calculated without using the transverse momentum conservation assumption. We have obtained the spatial and spectral properties of SPDC photons under focused pumping in various SPDC configurations, including type-I, type-II for both positive and negative uniaxial crystals. Our result not only helps to understand the effect of pump focusing in SPDC better but also can find use in application of SPDC in realizing quantum information protocols.

  8. Real-time trace gas sensor using a multimode diode laser and multiple-line integrated cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Karpf, Andreas; Rao, Gottipaty N

    2015-07-01

    We describe and demonstrate a highly sensitive trace gas sensor based on a simplified design that is capable of measuring sub-ppb concentrations of NO2 in tens of milliseconds. The sensor makes use of a relatively inexpensive Fabry-Perot diode laser to conduct off-axis cavity enhanced spectroscopy. The broad frequency range of a multimode Fabry-Perot diode laser spans a large number of absorption lines, thereby removing the need for a single-frequency tunable laser source. The use of cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy enhances the sensitivity of the sensor by providing a pathlength on the order of 1 km in a small volume. Off-axis alignment excites a large number of cavity modes simultaneously, thereby reducing the sensor's susceptibility to vibration. Multiple-line integrated absorption spectroscopy (where one integrates the absorption spectra over a large number of rovibronic transitions of the molecular species) further improves the sensitivity of detection. Relatively high laser power (∼400  mW) is used to compensate for the low coupling efficiency of a broad linewidth laser to the optical cavity. The approach was demonstrated using a 407 nm diode laser to detect trace quantities of NO2 in zero air. Sensitivities of 750 ppt, 110 ppt, and 65 ppt were achieved using integration times of 50 ms, 5 s, and 20 s respectively. PMID:26193156

  9. Cavity-enhanced parity-nonconserving optical rotation in metastable Xe and Hg.

    PubMed

    Bougas, L; Katsoprinakis, G E; von Klitzing, W; Sapirstein, J; Rakitzis, T P

    2012-05-25

    We propose the measurement of cavity-enhanced parity-nonconserving (PNC) optical rotation in several transitions of metastable Xe and Hg, including Xe (2P(3/2)(o))6s(2)[3/2](2)(o)→(2P(1/2)(o))6s(2)[1/2](1)(o) and Hg 6s6p (3)P(2)(o)→6s6p (1)P(1)(o), with calculated amplitude ratios of E(1)(PNC)/M1=11×10(-8) and 10×10(-8), respectively. We demonstrate the use of a high-finesse bow-tie cavity with counterpropagating beams and a longitudinal magnetic field, which allows the absolute measurement of chiral optical rotation, with a path length enhancement of about 10(4), necessary for PNC measurement from available column densities of 10(14) cm(-2) for metastable Xe or Hg. Rapid PNC-signal reversal, allowing robust background subtraction, is achieved by shifting the cavity resonance to an opposite polarization mode or by inverting the magnetic field. The precise measurement of isotope and nuclear-spin dependent E(1)(PNC) amplitudes provides a sensitive low-energy test of the standard model. PMID:23003234

  10. Aspects of the Application of Cavity Enhanced Spectroscopy to Nitrogen Oxides Detection

    PubMed Central

    Wojtas, Jacek; Mikolajczyk, Janusz; Bielecki, Zbigniew

    2013-01-01

    This article presents design issues of high-sensitive laser absorption spectroscopy systems for nitrogen oxides (NOx) detection. Examples of our systems and their investigation results are also described. The constructed systems use one of the most sensitive methods, cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS). They operate at different wavelength ranges using a blue—violet laser diode (410 nm) as well as quantum cascade lasers (5.27 μm and 4.53 μm). Each of them is configured as a one or two channel measurement device using, e.g., time division multiplexing and averaging. During the testing procedure, the main performance features such as detection limits and measurements uncertainties have been determined. The obtained results are 1 ppb NO2, 75 ppb NO and 45 ppb N2O. For all systems, the uncertainty of concentration measurements does not exceed a value of 13%. Some experiments with explosives are also discussed. A setup equipped with a concentrator of explosives vapours was used. The detection method is based either on the reaction of the sensors to the nitrogen oxides directly emitted by the explosives or on the reaction to the nitrogen oxides produced during thermal decomposition of explosive vapours. For TNT, PETN, RDX and HMX a detection limit better than 1 ng has been achieved. PMID:23752566

  11. Optical-feedback cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy in a linear cavity: model and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manfred, Katherine M.; Ciaffoni, Luca; Ritchie, Grant A. D.

    2015-08-01

    Optical-feedback cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy is a highly sensitive trace gas sensing technique that relies on feedback from a resonant intracavity field to successively lock the laser to the cavity as the wavelength is scanned across a molecular absorption with a comb of resonant frequencies. V-shaped optical cavities have been favoured in the past in order to avoid additional feedback fields from non-resonant reflections that potentially suppress the locking to the resonant cavity frequency. A model of the laser-cavity coupling demonstrates, however, that the laser can stably lock to a resonant linear cavity, within certain constraints on the relative intensity of the two feedback sources. By mode mismatching the field into the linear cavity, we have shown that it is theoretically and practically possible to spatially filter out the unwanted non-resonant component in order for the resonant field to dominate the feedback competition at the laser. A 5.3 cw quantum cascade laser scanning across a absorption feature demonstrated stable locking to achieve a minimum detectable absorption coefficient of for 1-s averaging. Detailed investigations of feedback effects on the laser output verified the validity of our theoretical models.

  12. Tm{sup 3+}-sensitized up- and down-conversions in nano-structured oxyfluoride glass ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Hang; Marqués-Hueso, José; Chen, Daqin; Wang, Yuansheng; Richards, Bryce S.

    2012-12-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► UC and DC are achieved in a single-ion sensitized phosphor for PV applications. ► The most intense fractions of AM 1.5G spectrum below/above c-Si bandgap are absorbed. ► The converted photons match the optimal spectral response of c-Si. -- Abstract: Tm{sup 3+}-sensitized up-conversion and down-conversion are studied in transparent glass ceramics embedded with β-YF{sub 3} nanocrystals. Upon excitation at 1220 nm, where crystalline silicon (c-Si) solar cells no longer absorb, the sub-bandgap photons could be converted to the higher-energy ones via up-conversion. In addition, under excitation at 468 nm (a wavelength close to the peak in the air-mass 1.5 global solar spectrum), one blue photon might be split in up to two near-infrared ones via down-conversion. In both cases, the frequency-converted photons match the spectral response of c-Si solar cell well. Hopefully, the investigated luminescent materials may act as the spectral conversion layers to reduce the sub-bandgap transmission and charge carrier thermalization losses of c-Si solar cells, and in turn, enhance the energy efficiency.

  13. Efficiency enhancement in dye-sensitized solar cells with down conversion material ZnO: Eu3+, Dy3+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Nannan; Huang, Jinzhao; Fu, Ke; Liu, Shiyou; E, Dong; Wang, Yanhao; Xu, Xijin; Zhu, Min; Cao, Bingqiang

    2014-12-01

    The down conversion (DC) material ZnO: Eu3+, Dy3+ are synthesized by precipitation method and used to prepare the photo anode of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The effects of down conversion material on the photoelectric performance of the DSSC were characterized by the X-ray diffraction (XRD), photoluminescence (PL), scanning electron microscope (SEM), current-voltage (I-V) curve, incident-photon-to-current conversion efficiency (IPCE) and UV-vis-NIR absorption spectroscopy. In this paper, Eu3+, Dy3+ codoped ZnO excited by from UV to blue light converts blue to red light emission, corresponding to the absorption region of the dye (N719). At the concentration 1.75% of ZnO: Eu3+, Dy3+ (weight ratio of DC to TiO2), the short-circuit current density and conversion efficiency of the DSSCs reached to the optimal values: 8.92 mA cm-2 and 4.48%, about 212% and 245% higher than with pure TiO2 and about 91.4% and 105% higher than with TiO2/graphene (G) structure, respectively. The research result reveals that the application of DC material can improve the efficiency of DSSCs.

  14. Cavity Enhanced Thomson Scattering for Low Temperature Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yalin, Azer; Friss, Adam; Lee, Brian; Franka, Isaiah

    2013-09-01

    This contribution describes the design, simulation, and initial experimental development of a novel laser Thomson scattering (LTS) system for measurement of weakly-ionized low temperature plasmas. The LTS approach uses a high power intra-cavity beam of power ~10-100 kW to provide increased scattered photon counts and sensitivity as compared to conventional LTS experiments that use light sources with orders of magnitude lower average power. The high power intra-cavity beam is generated by locking a narrow linewidth source laser to a high-finesse optical cavity via Pound-Drever-Hall locking. The plasma (to be studied) is housed with the high-finesse optical cavity. The high-power source is combined with a detection system comprised of a high-suppression triple monochromator and a low-noise photomultiplier tube used in photon counting mode. We present simulations of signal strengths and scattering spectra including elastic scatter background, detector dark counts, and random (counting) noise contributions. Expected experimental performance is assessed from fits to the simulated data. The number density and electron temperature of a 1010 cm-3 plasma should be accurately measurable with standard deviation of <5% in a measurement time of 5 minutes per wavelength channel. We also present experimental development including characterization of laser locking, and initial Rayleigh and Raman signals which will be used to calibrate the Thomson system.

  15. Heralded quantum repeater based on the scattering of photons off single emitters using parametric down-conversion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Guo-Zhu; Wu, Fang-Zhou; Zhang, Mei; Yang, Guo-Jian

    2016-06-01

    Quantum repeater is the key element in quantum communication and quantum information processing. Here, we investigate the possibility of achieving a heralded quantum repeater based on the scattering of photons off single emitters in one-dimensional waveguides. We design the compact quantum circuits for nonlocal entanglement generation, entanglement swapping, and entanglement purification, and discuss the feasibility of our protocols with current experimental technology. In our scheme, we use a parametric down-conversion source instead of ideal single-photon sources to realize the heralded quantum repeater. Moreover, our protocols can turn faulty events into the detection of photon polarization, and the fidelity can reach 100% in principle. Our scheme is attractive and scalable, since it can be realized with artificial solid-state quantum systems. With developed experimental technique on controlling emitter-waveguide systems, the repeater may be very useful in long-distance quantum communication.

  16. Effects of polarization mode dispersion on polarization-entangled photons generated via broadband pumped spontaneous parametric down-conversion

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Hyang-Tag; Hong, Kang-Hee; Kim, Yoon-Ho

    2016-01-01

    An inexpensive and compact frequency multi-mode diode laser enables a compact two-photon polarization entanglement source via the continuous wave broadband pumped spontaneous parametric down-conversion (SPDC) process. Entanglement degradation caused by polarization mode dispersion (PMD) is one of the critical issues in optical fiber-based polarization entanglement distribution. We theoretically and experimentally investigate how the initial entanglement is degraded when the two-photon polarization entangled state undergoes PMD. We report an effect of PMD unique to broadband pumped SPDC, equally applicable to pulsed pumping as well as cw broadband pumping, which is that the amount of the entanglement degradation is asymmetrical to the PMD introduced to each quantum channel. We believe that our results have important applications in long-distance distribution of polarization entanglement via optical fiber channels. PMID:27174100

  17. Effects of polarization mode dispersion on polarization-entangled photons generated via broadband pumped spontaneous parametric down-conversion.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hyang-Tag; Hong, Kang-Hee; Kim, Yoon-Ho

    2016-01-01

    An inexpensive and compact frequency multi-mode diode laser enables a compact two-photon polarization entanglement source via the continuous wave broadband pumped spontaneous parametric down-conversion (SPDC) process. Entanglement degradation caused by polarization mode dispersion (PMD) is one of the critical issues in optical fiber-based polarization entanglement distribution. We theoretically and experimentally investigate how the initial entanglement is degraded when the two-photon polarization entangled state undergoes PMD. We report an effect of PMD unique to broadband pumped SPDC, equally applicable to pulsed pumping as well as cw broadband pumping, which is that the amount of the entanglement degradation is asymmetrical to the PMD introduced to each quantum channel. We believe that our results have important applications in long-distance distribution of polarization entanglement via optical fiber channels. PMID:27174100

  18. Effects of polarization mode dispersion on polarization-entangled photons generated via broadband pumped spontaneous parametric down-conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Hyang-Tag; Hong, Kang-Hee; Kim, Yoon-Ho

    2016-05-01

    An inexpensive and compact frequency multi-mode diode laser enables a compact two-photon polarization entanglement source via the continuous wave broadband pumped spontaneous parametric down-conversion (SPDC) process. Entanglement degradation caused by polarization mode dispersion (PMD) is one of the critical issues in optical fiber-based polarization entanglement distribution. We theoretically and experimentally investigate how the initial entanglement is degraded when the two-photon polarization entangled state undergoes PMD. We report an effect of PMD unique to broadband pumped SPDC, equally applicable to pulsed pumping as well as cw broadband pumping, which is that the amount of the entanglement degradation is asymmetrical to the PMD introduced to each quantum channel. We believe that our results have important applications in long-distance distribution of polarization entanglement via optical fiber channels.

  19. Heralded quantum repeater based on the scattering of photons off single emitters using parametric down-conversion source

    PubMed Central

    Song, Guo-Zhu; Wu, Fang-Zhou; Zhang, Mei; Yang, Guo-Jian

    2016-01-01

    Quantum repeater is the key element in quantum communication and quantum information processing. Here, we investigate the possibility of achieving a heralded quantum repeater based on the scattering of photons off single emitters in one-dimensional waveguides. We design the compact quantum circuits for nonlocal entanglement generation, entanglement swapping, and entanglement purification, and discuss the feasibility of our protocols with current experimental technology. In our scheme, we use a parametric down-conversion source instead of ideal single-photon sources to realize the heralded quantum repeater. Moreover, our protocols can turn faulty events into the detection of photon polarization, and the fidelity can reach 100% in principle. Our scheme is attractive and scalable, since it can be realized with artificial solid-state quantum systems. With developed experimental technique on controlling emitter-waveguide systems, the repeater may be very useful in long-distance quantum communication. PMID:27350159

  20. Spontaneous parametric down conversion of vectorial beams: helicity effects on the orbital angular momentum of the photon pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jáuregui, R.

    2015-06-01

    We study the process of spontaneous parametric down conversion of a coherent structured electromagnetic (EM) field into a pair of photons that are also described by structured EM modes. We explore the relevance of a full vectorial description when the pump beam is outside the paraxial regime. A particularly interesting new phenomenon in such a regime corresponds to the conversion of angular momentum of the EM field associated with its polarization (usually referred to as spin angular momentum or SAM) into angular momentum related to optical vortices (usually referred to as orbital angular momentum or OAM). We show that such a conversion can take place using Bessel pump beams and standard nonlinear crystals with their birefringent axis parallel to the vector normal to its surface. Phase matching conditions are studied in detail for this configuration. Signatures of the conversion of SAM into OAM on the angular spectrum of the down converted photons are described.

  1. Third-order spontaneous parametric down-conversion in thin optical fibers as a photon-triplet source

    SciTech Connect

    Corona, Maria; Garay-Palmett, Karina; U'Ren, Alfred B.

    2011-09-15

    We study the third-order spontaneous parametric down-conversion (TOSPDC) process, as a means to generate entangled photon triplets. Specifically, we consider thin optical fibers as the nonlinear medium to be used as the basis for TOSPDC in configurations where phase matching is attained through the use of more than one fiber transverse modes. Our analysis in this paper, which follows from our earlier paper [Opt. Lett. 36, 190-192 (2011)], aims to supply experimentalists with the details required in order to design a TOSPDC photon-triplet source. Specifically, our analysis focuses on the photon triplet state, on the rate of emission, and on the TOSPDC phase-matching characteristics for the cases of frequency-degenerate and frequency nondegenerate TOSPDC.

  2. Fluorescent MoS2 Quantum Dots: Ultrasonic Preparation, Up-Conversion and Down-Conversion Bioimaging, and Photodynamic Therapy.

    PubMed

    Dong, Haifeng; Tang, Songsong; Hao, Yansong; Yu, Haizhu; Dai, Wenhao; Zhao, Guifeng; Cao, Yu; Lu, Huiting; Zhang, Xueji; Ju, Huangxian

    2016-02-10

    Small size molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) quantum dots (QDs) with desired optical properties were controllably synthesized by using tetrabutylammonium-assisted ultrasonication of multilayered MoS2 powder via OH-mediated chain-like Mo-S bond cleavage mode. The tunable up-bottom approach of precise fabrication of MoS2 QDs finally enables detailed experimental investigations of their optical properties. The synthesized MoS2 QDs present good down-conversion photoluminescence behaviors and exhibit remarkable up-conversion photoluminescence for bioimaging. The mechanism of the emerging photoluminescence was investigated. Furthermore, superior (1)O2 production ability of MoS2 QDs to commercial photosensitizer PpIX was demonstrated, which has great potential application for photodynamic therapy. These early affording results of tunable synthesis of MoS2 QDs with desired photo properties can lead to application in fields of biomedical and optoelectronics. PMID:26761391

  3. Heralded quantum repeater based on the scattering of photons off single emitters using parametric down-conversion source.

    PubMed

    Song, Guo-Zhu; Wu, Fang-Zhou; Zhang, Mei; Yang, Guo-Jian

    2016-01-01

    Quantum repeater is the key element in quantum communication and quantum information processing. Here, we investigate the possibility of achieving a heralded quantum repeater based on the scattering of photons off single emitters in one-dimensional waveguides. We design the compact quantum circuits for nonlocal entanglement generation, entanglement swapping, and entanglement purification, and discuss the feasibility of our protocols with current experimental technology. In our scheme, we use a parametric down-conversion source instead of ideal single-photon sources to realize the heralded quantum repeater. Moreover, our protocols can turn faulty events into the detection of photon polarization, and the fidelity can reach 100% in principle. Our scheme is attractive and scalable, since it can be realized with artificial solid-state quantum systems. With developed experimental technique on controlling emitter-waveguide systems, the repeater may be very useful in long-distance quantum communication. PMID:27350159

  4. Cavity-enhanced light emission from electrically driven carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyatkov, Felix; Fütterling, Valentin; Khasminskaya, Svetlana; Flavel, Benjamin S.; Hennrich, Frank; Kappes, Manfred M.; Krupke, Ralph; Pernice, Wolfram H. P.

    2016-06-01

    An important advancement towards optical communication on a chip would be the development of integratable, nanoscale photonic emitters with tailored optical properties. Here we demonstrate the use of carbon nanotubes as electrically driven high-speed emitters in combination with a nanophotonic cavity that allows for exceptionally narrow linewidths. The one-dimensional photonic crystal cavities are shown to spectrally select desired emission wavelengths, enhance intensity and efficiently couple light into the underlying photonic network with high reproducibility. Under pulsed voltage excitation, we realize on-chip modulation rates in the GHz range, compatible with active photonic networks. Because the linewidth of the molecular emitter is determined by the quality factor of the photonic crystal, our approach effectively eliminates linewidth broadening due to temperature, surface interaction and hot-carrier injection.

  5. Cavity-enhanced frequency up-conversion in rubidium vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Offer, Rachel F.; Conway, Johnathan W. C.; Riis, Erling; Franke-Arnold, Sonja; Arnold, Aidan S.

    2016-05-01

    We report the first use of a ring cavity to both enhance the output power and dramatically narrow the linewidth ($<1\\,$MHz) of blue light generated by four wave mixing in a rubidium vapour cell. We find that the high output power available in our cavity-free system leads to power broadening of the generated blue light linewidth. Our ring cavity removes this limitation, allowing high output power and narrow linewidth to be achieved concurrently. As the cavity blue light is widely tunable over the $^{85}$Rb 5S$_{1/2} \\,\\,F=3$ $\\rightarrow$ 6P$_{3/2}$ transition, this narrow linewidth light would be suitable for second-stage laser cooling, which could be valuable for efficient $^{85}$Rb BEC production.

  6. Cavity-enhanced frequency up-conversion in rubidium vapor.

    PubMed

    Offer, Rachel F; Conway, Johnathan W C; Riis, Erling; Franke-Arnold, Sonja; Arnold, Aidan S

    2016-05-15

    We report the first use of a ring cavity to both enhance the output power and dramatically narrow the linewidth (<1  MHz) of blue light generated by four-wave mixing in a rubidium vapor cell. We find that the high output power available in our cavity-free system leads to power broadening of the generated blue light linewidth. Our ring cavity removes this limitation, allowing high output power and narrow linewidth to be achieved concurrently. As the cavity blue light is widely tunable over the Rb855S1/2F=3→6P3/2 transition, this narrow linewidth light would be suitable for near-resonant rubidium studies including, for example, second-stage laser cooling. PMID:27176956

  7. A broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectrometer for aircraft measurements of glyoxal, methylglyoxal, nitrous acid, nitrogen dioxide, and water vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, K.-E.; Washenfelder, R. A.; Dubé, W. P.; Langford, A. O.; Edwards, P. M.; Zarzana, K. J.; Stutz, J.; Lu, K.; Rohrer, F.; Zhang, Y.; Brown, S. S.

    2016-02-01

    We describe a two-channel broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectrometer (BBCEAS) for aircraft measurements of glyoxal (CHOCHO), methylglyoxal (CH3COCHO), nitrous acid (HONO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and water (H2O). The instrument spans 361-389 and 438-468 nm, using two light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and a single grating spectrometer with a charge-coupled device (CCD) detector. Robust performance is achieved using a custom optical mounting system, high-power LEDs with electronic on/off modulation, high-reflectivity cavity mirrors, and materials that minimize analyte surface losses. We have successfully deployed this instrument during two aircraft and two ground-based field campaigns to date. The demonstrated precision (2σ) for retrievals of CHOCHO, HONO and NO2 are 34, 350, and 80 parts per trillion (pptv) in 5 s. The accuracy is 5.8, 9.0, and 5.0 %, limited mainly by the available absorption cross sections.

  8. The time-dependent emission of molecular iodine from Laminaria Digitata measured with incoherent broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixneuf, S.

    2009-04-01

    The release of molecular iodine (I2) from the oceans into the atmosphere has been recognized to correlate strongly with ozone depletion events and aerosol formation in the Marine Boundary Layer (MBL), which affects in turn global radiative forcing. The detailed mechanisms and dominant sources leading to the observed concentrations of I2 in the marine troposphere are still under intense investigation. In a recent campaign on the Irish west coast at Mace Head Atmospheric Research Station [1], it was found that significant levels of molecular iodine correlated with times of low tide, suggesting that the emission of air-exposed macro-algae may be a prime source of molecular iodine in coastal areas [2]. To further investigate this hypothesis we tried to detect the I2 emission of the brown seaweed Laminaria digitata, one of the most efficient iodine accumulators among living systems, directly by means of highly sensitive incoherent broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (IBBCEAS) [3]. IBBCEAS combines a good temporal and spatial resolution with high molecule-specific detection limits [4] comparable to that of typical LP-DOAS. IBBCEAS thus complements LP-DOAS in the search for sources of tropospheric trace gases. In this presentation the first direct observation of the time dependence of molecular iodine emission from Laminaria digitata will be shown. Plants were studied under naturally occurring stress for quasi in situ conditions for many hours. Surprisingly, the release of I2 occurs in short, strong bursts with quasi-oscillatory behaviour, bearing similarities to well known "iodine clock reactions". References [1] Saiz-Lopez A. & Plane, J. M. C. Novel iodine chemistry in the marine boundary layer. Geophys. Res. Lett. 31, L04112 (2004) doi:10.1029/2003GL019215. [2] McFiggans, G., Coe, H., Burgess, R., Allan, J., Cubison, M., Alfarra, M. R., Saunders, R., Saiz-Lopez, A., Plane, J. M. C., Wevill, D. J., Carpenter, L. J., Rickard, A. R. & Monks, P. S. Direct

  9. Broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy in the ultraviolet spectral region for measurements of nitrogen dioxide and formaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washenfelder, R. A.; Attwood, A. R.; Flores, J. M.; Zarzana, K. J.; Rudich, Y.; Brown, S. S.

    2016-01-01

    Formaldehyde (CH2O) is the most abundant aldehyde in the atmosphere, and it strongly affects photochemistry through its photolysis. We describe simultaneous measurements of CH2O and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) using broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy in the ultraviolet spectral region. The light source consists of a continuous-wave diode laser focused into a Xenon bulb to produce a plasma that emits high-intensity, broadband light. The plasma discharge is optically filtered and coupled into a 1 m optical cavity. The reflectivity of the cavity mirrors is 0.99930 ± 0.00003 (1- reflectivity = 700 ppm loss) at 338 nm, as determined from the known Rayleigh scattering of He and zero air. This mirror reflectivity corresponds to an effective path length of 1.43 km within the 1 m cell. We measure the cavity output over the 315-350 nm spectral region using a grating monochromator and charge-coupled device array detector. We use published reference spectra with spectral fitting software to simultaneously retrieve CH2O and NO2 concentrations. Independent measurements of NO2 standard additions by broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy and cavity ring-down spectroscopy agree within 2 % (slope for linear fit = 1.02 ± 0.03 with r2 = 0.998). Standard additions of CH2O measured by broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy and calculated based on flow dilution are also well correlated, with r2 = 0.9998. During constant mixed additions of NO2 and CH2O, the 30 s measurement precisions (1σ) of the current configuration were 140 and 210 pptv, respectively. The current 1 min detection limit for extinction measurements at 315-350 nm provides sufficient sensitivity for measurement of trace gases in laboratory experiments and ground-based field experiments. Additionally, the instrument provides highly accurate, spectroscopically based trace gas detection that may complement higher precision techniques based on non

  10. Cavity-Enhanced Room-Temperature Broadband Raman Memory.

    PubMed

    Saunders, D J; Munns, J H D; Champion, T F M; Qiu, C; Kaczmarek, K T; Poem, E; Ledingham, P M; Walmsley, I A; Nunn, J

    2016-03-01

    Broadband quantum memories hold great promise as multiplexing elements in future photonic quantum information protocols. Alkali-vapor Raman memories combine high-bandwidth storage, on-demand readout, and operation at room temperature without collisional fluorescence noise. However, previous implementations have required large control pulse energies and have suffered from four-wave-mixing noise. Here, we present a Raman memory where the storage interaction is enhanced by a low-finesse birefringent cavity tuned into simultaneous resonance with the signal and control fields, dramatically reducing the energy required to drive the memory. By engineering antiresonance for the anti-Stokes field, we also suppress the four-wave-mixing noise and report the lowest unconditional noise floor yet achieved in a Raman-type warm vapor memory, (15±2)×10^{-3} photons per pulse, with a total efficiency of (9.5±0.5)%. PMID:26991164

  11. Cavity-Enhanced Room-Temperature Broadband Raman Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, D. J.; Munns, J. H. D.; Champion, T. F. M.; Qiu, C.; Kaczmarek, K. T.; Poem, E.; Ledingham, P. M.; Walmsley, I. A.; Nunn, J.

    2016-03-01

    Broadband quantum memories hold great promise as multiplexing elements in future photonic quantum information protocols. Alkali-vapor Raman memories combine high-bandwidth storage, on-demand readout, and operation at room temperature without collisional fluorescence noise. However, previous implementations have required large control pulse energies and have suffered from four-wave-mixing noise. Here, we present a Raman memory where the storage interaction is enhanced by a low-finesse birefringent cavity tuned into simultaneous resonance with the signal and control fields, dramatically reducing the energy required to drive the memory. By engineering antiresonance for the anti-Stokes field, we also suppress the four-wave-mixing noise and report the lowest unconditional noise floor yet achieved in a Raman-type warm vapor memory, (15 ±2 )×10-3 photons per pulse, with a total efficiency of (9.5 ±0.5 )%.

  12. Complementary cavity-enhanced spectrometers to investigate the OH + CH combination band in trans-formic acid.

    PubMed

    Golebiowski, D; Földes, T; Vanfleteren, T; Herman, M; Perrin, A

    2015-07-01

    We have used continuous-wave cavity ring-down and femto-Fourier transform-cavity-enhanced absorption spectrometers to record the spectrum of the OH-stretching + CH-stretching (ν1 + ν2) combination band in trans-formic acid, with origin close to 6507 cm(-1). They, respectively, allowed resolving and simplifying the rotational structure of the band near its origin under jet-cooled conditions (Trot = 10 K) and highlighting the overview of the band under room temperature conditions. The stronger B-type and weaker A-type subbands close to the band origin could be assigned, as well as the main B-type Q branches. The high-resolution analysis was hindered by numerous, severe perturbations. Rotational constants are reported with, however, limited physical meaning. The ν1 + ν2 transition moment is estimated from relative intensities to be 24° away from the principal b-axis of inertia. PMID:26156476

  13. A broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectrometer for aircraft measurements of glyoxal, methylglyoxal, nitrous acid, nitrogen dioxide, and water vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, K.-E.; Washenfelder, R. A.; Dubé, W. P.; Langford, A. O.; Edwards, P. M.; Zarzana, K. J.; Stutz, J.; Lu, K.; Rohrer, F.; Zhang, Y.; Brown, S. S.

    2015-10-01

    We describe a two-channel broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectrometer (BBCEAS) for aircraft measurements of glyoxal (CHOCHO), methylglyoxal (CH3COCHO), nitrous acid (HONO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and water (H2O). The instrument spans 361-389 and 438-468 nm, using two light emitting diodes (LEDs) and a grating spectrometer with a charge-coupled device (CCD) detector. Robust performance is achieved using a custom optical mounting system, high power LEDs with electronic on/off modulation, state-of-the-art cavity mirrors, and materials that minimize analyte surface losses. We have successfully deployed this instrument during two aircraft and two ground-based field campaigns to date. The demonstrated precision (2σ) for retrievals of CHOCHO, HONO and NO2 are 34, 350 and 80 pptv in 5 s. The accuracy is 5.8, 9.0 and 5.0 % limited mainly by the available absorption cross sections.

  14. Design of diamond microcavities for single photon frequency down-conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Z.; Johnson, S. G.; Rodriguez, A. W.; Loncar, M.

    2015-09-01

    We propose monolithic diamond cavities that can be used to convert color-center Fock-state single photons from emission wavelengths to telecommunication bands. We present a detailed theoretical description of the conversion process, analyzing important practical concerns such as nonlinear phase shifts and frequency mismatch. Our analysis predicts sustainable power requirements ($ \\lesssim 1~\\mathrm{W}$) for a chipscale nonlinear device with high conversion efficiencies.

  15. Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy with a red LED source for NOx trace analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventrillard Courtillot, I.; Sciamma O'Brien, E.; Méjean, G.; Romanini, D.

    2009-04-01

    This study presents a high sensitivity absorption system using a red LED source emitting at 625 nm and a small CCD spectrometer as detector [1]. This system is based on IBB-CEAS (Incoherent Broad Band Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy). The expected application is the measurement of NO2 and NO3 in urban concentration (ppbv and ppmv levels). The IBB-CEAS was firstly developed with arc lamps and then with LED. Systems based on this technique are easy to use, highly sensitive, compact and robust. They also are inexpensive. Existent techniques to measure NO2 and NO3 are generally slow or not sensitive enough and need frequently calibrations (chemical luminescent) or are characterized by a low spatial resolution (Long Path Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy). Previous works based on diodes lasers emitting around 410 nm and coupled with High Finess Cavity proved a highest sensibility than ppbv and a time measurement of 0.1 s [2]. This sensibility is necessary for measurements in unpolluted environment but a more expensive and more complex system is needed. NO2 is chosen for testing as it is stable and available in calibrated diluted samples. An excellent agreement in the range from 610 nm to 630 nm was gotten between an absorption spectrum obtained by IBB-CEAS and a spectrum calculated using a reference NO2 absorption cross section by Voigt et al [3] (after convolution with a 2.05-nm FWHM Gaussian simulating our spectrometer response function). The reflectivity of the mirrors was determined with a commercial spectrophotometer and was used to deduce the absorption spectrum of NO2 from the transmission spectrum of the cavity. We obtained by estimating the sensitivity of our setup from the noise in a baseline measurement of absorption, (standard deviation = 2E-10 cm-1). This corresponds (under atmospheric conditions) to a sensitivity about 0.5 ppbv. NO3 cross-section absorption is 600 times higher than the NO2 (at 623 nm), so a detection limit of 1 pptv is

  16. Intrinsic upper bound on two-qubit polarization entanglement predetermined by pump polarization correlations in parametric down-conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Girish; Subrahmanyam, V.; Jha, Anand K.

    2016-06-01

    We study how one-particle correlations transfer to manifest as two-particle correlations in the context of parametric down-conversion (PDC), a process in which a pump photon is annihilated to produce two entangled photons. We work in the polarization degree of freedom and show that for any two-qubit generation process that is both trace-preserving and entropy-nondecreasing, the concurrence C (ρ ) of the generated two-qubit state ρ follows an intrinsic upper bound with C (ρ )≤(1 +P )/2 , where P is the degree of polarization of the pump photon. We also find that for the class of two-qubit states that is restricted to have only two nonzero diagonal elements such that the effective dimensionality of the two-qubit state is the same as the dimensionality of the pump polarization state, the upper bound on concurrence is the degree of polarization itself, that is, C (ρ )≤P . Our work shows that the maximum manifestation of two-particle correlations as entanglement is dictated by one-particle correlations. The formalism developed in this work can be extended to include multiparticle systems and can thus have important implications towards deducing the upper bounds on multiparticle entanglement, for which no universally accepted measure exists.

  17. Effect of annealing on down-conversion properties of monoclinic Gd2O3:Er3+ nanophosphors.

    PubMed

    Tamrakar, Raunak Kumar; Bisen, D P; Upadhyay, Kanchan

    2015-09-01

    Erbium-doped nano-sized Gd2O3 phosphor was prepared by a solution combustion method in the presence of urea as a fuel. The phosphor was characterized by X-ray diffractometry (XRD), Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results of the XRD shows that the phosphor has a monoclinic phase, which was further confirmed by the TEM results. Particle size was calculated by the Debye-Scherrer formula. The erbium-doped Gd2O3 nanophosphor was revealed to have good down-conversion (DC) properties and the intensity of phosphor could be modified by annealing. The effects of annealing at 900°C on the particle size and luminescence properties were studied and compared with freshly prepared Gd2O3:Er(3+) nanoparticles. The average particle sizes were calculated as 8 and 20 nm for the freshly prepared samples and samples annealed at 900°C for 1 h, respectively. The results show that both freshly prepared and annealed Gd2O3:Er(3+) have monoclinic structure. PMID:25529921

  18. Sensing atmospheric reactive species using light emitting diode by incoherent broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yi, Hongming; Wu, Tao; Wang, Guishi; Zhao, Weixiong; Fertein, Eric; Coeur, Cécile; Gao, Xiaoming; Zhang, Weijun; Chen, Weidong

    2016-05-16

    We overview our recent progress in the developments and applications of light emitting diode-based incoherent broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (LED-IBBCEAS) techniques for real-time optical sensing chemically reactive atmospheric species (HONO, NO3, NO2) in intensive campaigns and in atmospheric simulation chamber. New application of optical monitoring of NO3 concentration-time profile for study of the NO3-initiated oxidation process of isoprene in a smog chamber is reported. PMID:27409951

  19. Cavity-Enhanced Frequency-Agile Rapid Scanning (fars) Spectroscopy: Experimental Realizations and Measurement Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, David A.; Truong, Gar-Wing; Zee, Roger Van; Plusquellic, David F.; Hodges, Joseph T.

    2013-06-01

    We present a series of experimental realizations of cavity-enhanced, frequency-agile rapid scanning (FARS) spectroscopy using distributed feedback diode lasers, external cavity diode lasers, and ultra-narrow linewidth fiber lasers. FARS offers a scanning rate which is limited only by the cavity response time itself as well as a microwave-level frequency axis. Finally, it allows for an absorption sensitivity which is one of the highest ever reported. These realizations offer a range of applications from low-cost field measurements of trace gases to laboratory-based metrology.

  20. Ultrasensitive detection of waste products in water using fluorescence emission cavity-enhanced spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bixler, Joel N; Cone, Michael T; Hokr, Brett H; Mason, John D; Figueroa, Eleonora; Fry, Edward S; Yakovlev, Vladislav V; Scully, Marlan O

    2014-05-20

    Clean water is paramount to human health. In this article, we present a technique for detection of trace amounts of human or animal waste products in water using fluorescence emission cavity-enhanced spectroscopy. The detection of femtomolar concentrations of urobilin, a metabolic byproduct of heme metabolism that is excreted in both human and animal waste in water, was achieved through the use of an integrating cavity. This technique could allow for real-time assessment of water quality without the need for expensive laboratory equipment. PMID:24799690

  1. Ultrasensitive detection of waste products in water using fluorescence emission cavity-enhanced spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bixler, Joel N.; Cone, Michael T.; Hokr, Brett H.; Mason, John D.; Figueroa, Eleonora; Fry, Edward S.; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.; Scully, Marlan O.

    2014-01-01

    Clean water is paramount to human health. In this article, we present a technique for detection of trace amounts of human or animal waste products in water using fluorescence emission cavity-enhanced spectroscopy. The detection of femtomolar concentrations of urobilin, a metabolic byproduct of heme metabolism that is excreted in both human and animal waste in water, was achieved through the use of an integrating cavity. This technique could allow for real-time assessment of water quality without the need for expensive laboratory equipment. PMID:24799690

  2. Detection of nitric oxide in exhaled air using cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medrzycki, R.; Wojtas, J.; Rutecka, B.; Bielecki, Z.

    2013-07-01

    The article describes an application one of the most sensitive optoelectronic method - Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy in investigation of nitric oxide in exhaled breath. Measurement of nitric oxide concentration in exhaled breath is a quantitative, non-invasive, simple, and safe method of respiratory inflammation and asthma diagnosis. For detection of nitric oxide by developed optoelectronic sensor the vibronic molecular transitions were used. The wavelength ranges of these transitions are situated in the infrared spectral region. A setup consists of the optoelectronic nitric oxide sensor integrated with sampling and sample conditioning unit. The constructed detection system provides to measure nitric oxide in a sample of 0-97% relative humidity.

  3. Line-Parameter Measurements and Stringent Tests of Line-Shape Models Based on Cavity-Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bielska, Katarzyna; Fleisher, Adam J.; Hodges, Joseph T.; Lin, Hong; Long, David A.; Reed, Zachary D.; Sironneau, Vincent; Truong, Gar-Wing; Wójtewicz, Szymon

    2014-06-01

    Laser methods that are based on cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS) are well-suited for measuring molecular line parameters under conditions of low optical density, and as such they are complementary to broadband Fourier-transform spectroscopy (FTS) techniques. Attributes of CEAS include relatively low detection limits, accurate and precise detuning axes and high fidelity measurements of line shape. In many cases these performance criteria are superior to those obtained using direct laser absorption spectroscopy and FTS-based systems. In this presentation we will survey several examples of frequency-stabilized cavity ring-down spectroscopy (FS-CRDS)1 measurements obtained with laser spectrometers developed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in Gaithersburg Maryland. These experiments, which are motivated by atmospheric monitoring and remote-sensing applications that require high-precision and accuracy, involve nearinfrared transitions of carbon dioxide, water, oxygen and methane. We discuss spectra with signal-to-noise ratios exceeding 106, frequency axes with absolute uncertainties in the 10 kHz to 100 kHz range and linked to a Cs clock, line parameters with relative uncertainties at the 0.2 % level and isotopic ratios measured with a precision of 0.03 %. We also present FS-CRDS measurements of CO2 line intensities which are measured at atmospheric concentration levels and linked to gravimetric standards for CO2 in air, and we quantify pressure-dependent deviations between various theoretical line profiles and measured line shapes. Finally we also present recent efforts to increase data throughput and spectral coverage in CEAS experiments. We describe three new high-bandwidth CEAS techniques including frequency-agile, rapid scanning spectroscopy (FARS)2, which enables continuous-wave measurements of cavity mode linewidth and acquisition of ringdown decays with no dead time during laser frequency tuning, heterodyne

  4. Laser-induced down-conversion and infrared phosphorescence emissivity of novel ligand-free perovskite nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, M. A.; Khafagy, Rasha M.; El-sayed, O.

    2014-03-01

    For the first time, standalone and ligand-free series of novel rare-earth-based perovskite nanomaterials are used as near infrared (NIR) and mid infrared (MIR) emitters. Nano-sized La0.7Sr0.3M0.1Fe0.9O3; where M = 0, Mn2+, Co2+ or Ni2+ were synthesized using the flash auto-combustion method and characterized using FTIR, FT-Raman, SEM and EDX. Photoluminescence spectra were spontaneously recorded during pumping the samples with 0.5 mW of green laser emitting continuously at 532 nm. La0.7Sr0.3FeO3 (where M = 0) did not result in any infrared emissivity, while intense near and mid infrared down-converted phosphorescence was released from the M-doped samples. The released phosphorescence greatly shifted among the infrared spectral region with changing the doping cation. Ni2+-doped perovskite emitted at the short-wavelength near-infrared region, while Mn2+ and Co2+-doped perovskites emitted at the mid-wavelength infrared region. The detected laser-induced spontaneous parametric down-conversion phosphorescence (SPDC) occurred through a two-photon process by emitting two NIR or MIR photons among a cooperative energy transfer between the La3+ cations and the M2+ cations. Combining SrFeO3 ceramic with both a rare earth cation (RE3+) and a transition metal cation (Mn2+, Co2+ or Ni2+), rather than introducing merely RE3+ cations, greatly improved and controlled the infrared emissivity properties of synthesized perovskites through destroying their crystal symmetry and giving rise to asymmetrical lattice vibration and the nonlinear optical character. The existence of SPDC in the M2+-doped samples verifies their nonlinear character after the absence of this character in La0.7Sr0.3FeO3. Obtained results verify that, for the first time, perovskite nanomaterials are considered as nonlinear optical crystals with intense infrared emissivity at low pumping power of visible wavelengths, which nominates them for photonic applications and requires further studies regarding their lasing

  5. Development of a Near-Ir Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectrometer for the Detection of Atmospheric Oxidation Products and Organoamines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eddingsaas, Nathan C.; Jewell, Breanna; Thurnherr, Emily

    2014-06-01

    An estimated 10,000 to 100,000 different compounds have been measured in the atmosphere, each one undergoes many oxidation reactions that may or may not degrade air quality. To date, the fate of even some of the most abundant hydrocarbons in the atmosphere is poorly understood. One difficulty is the detection of atmospheric oxidation products that are very labile and decompose during analysis. To study labile species under atmospheric conditions, a highly sensitive, non-destructive technique is needed. Here we describe a near-IR incoherent broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (IBBCEAS) setup that we are developing to meet this end. We have chosen to utilize the near-IR, where vibrational overtone absorptions are observed, due to the clean spectral windows and better spectral separation of absorption features. In one spectral window we can simultaneously and continuously monitor the composition of alcohols, hydroperoxides, and carboxylic acids in an air mass. In addition, we have used our CEAS setup to detect organoamines. The long effective path length of CEAS allows for low detection limits, even of the overtone absorption features, at ppb and ppt levels.

  6. a New Broadband Cavity Enhanced Frequency Comb Spectroscopy Technique Using GHz Vernier Filtering.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morville, Jérôme; Rutkowski, Lucile; Dobrev, Georgi; Crozet, Patrick

    2015-06-01

    We present a new approach to Cavity Enhanced - Direct Frequency Comb Spectroscopy where the full emission bandwidth of a Titanium:Sapphire laser is exploited at GHz resolution. The technique is based on a low-resolution Vernier filtering obtained with an appreciable -actively stabilized- mismatch between the cavity Free Spectral Range and the laser repetition rate, using a diffraction grating and a split-photodiode. This particular approach provides an immunity to frequency-amplitude noise conversion, reaching an absorption baseline noise in the 10-9 cm-1 range with a cavity finesse of only 3000. Spectra covering 1800 cm-1 (˜ 55 THz) are acquired in recording times of about 1 second, providing an absorption figure of merit of a few 10-11 cm-1/√{Hz}. Initially tested with ambient air, we report progress in using the Vernier frequency comb method with a discharge source of small radicals. Rutkowski et al, Opt. Lett., 39(23)2014

  7. Cavity-enhanced spontaneous emission rates for rhodamine 6-G in levitated microdroplets

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, M.D.; Whitten, W.B.; Ramsey, J.M. ); Arnold, S. )

    1992-01-01

    Fluorescence decay kinetics of Rhodamine 6-G molecules in levitated glycerol microdroplets (4--20 microns in diameter) have been investigated to determine the effects of spherical cavity resonances on spontaneous emission rates. For droplet diameters greater than 10 microns, the fluorescence lifetime is essentially the same as in bulk glycerol. As the droplet diameter is decreased below 10 microns, bi-exponential decay behavior is observed with a slow component whose rate is similar to bulk glycerol, and a fast component whose rate is as much as a factor of 10 larger than the bulk decay rate. This fast component is attributed to cavity enhancement of the spontaneous emission rate and, within the weak coupling approximation, a value for the homogeneous linewidth at room temperature can be estimated from the fluorescence lifetime data.

  8. Cavity-enhanced spontaneous emission rates for rhodamine 6-G in levitated microdroplets

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, M.D.; Whitten, W.B.; Ramsey, J.M.; Arnold, S.

    1992-11-01

    Fluorescence decay kinetics of Rhodamine 6-G molecules in levitated glycerol microdroplets (4--20 microns in diameter) have been investigated to determine the effects of spherical cavity resonances on spontaneous emission rates. For droplet diameters greater than 10 microns, the fluorescence lifetime is essentially the same as in bulk glycerol. As the droplet diameter is decreased below 10 microns, bi-exponential decay behavior is observed with a slow component whose rate is similar to bulk glycerol, and a fast component whose rate is as much as a factor of 10 larger than the bulk decay rate. This fast component is attributed to cavity enhancement of the spontaneous emission rate and, within the weak coupling approximation, a value for the homogeneous linewidth at room temperature can be estimated from the fluorescence lifetime data.

  9. Time-resolved broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy for chemical kinetics.

    SciTech Connect

    Sheps, Leonid; Chandler, David W.

    2013-04-01

    Experimental measurements of elementary reaction rate coefficients and product branching ratios are essential to our understanding of many fundamentally important processes in Combustion Chemistry. However, such measurements are often impossible because of a lack of adequate detection techniques. Some of the largest gaps in our knowledge concern some of the most important radical species, because their short lifetimes and low steady-state concentrations make them particularly difficult to detect. To address this challenge, we propose a novel general detection method for gas-phase chemical kinetics: time-resolved broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (TR-BB-CEAS). This all-optical, non-intrusive, multiplexed method enables sensitive direct probing of transient reaction intermediates in a simple, inexpensive, and robust experimental package.

  10. Cavity-Enhanced Room-Temperature Magnetometry Using Absorption by Nitrogen-Vacancy Centers in Diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, K.; Leefer, N.; Jarmola, A.; Dumeige, Y.; Acosta, V. M.; Kehayias, P.; Patton, B.; Budker, D.

    2014-04-01

    We demonstrate a cavity-enhanced room-temperature magnetic field sensor based on nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond. Magnetic resonance is detected using absorption of light resonant with the 1042 nm spin-singlet transition. The diamond is placed in an external optical cavity to enhance the absorption, and significant absorption is observed even at room temperature. We demonstrate a magnetic field sensitivity of 2.5 nT/√Hz , and project a photon shot-noise-limited sensitivity of 70 pT/√Hz for a few mW of infrared light, and a quantum projection-noise-limited sensitivity of 250 fT/√Hz for the sensing volume of ˜90 μm ×90 μm×200 μm.

  11. Ultra-Trace Chemical Sensing with Long-Wave Infrared Cavity-Enhanced Spectroscopic Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Taubman, Matthew S.; Myers, Tanya L.; Cannon, Bret D.; Williams, Richard M.; Schultz, John F.

    2003-02-20

    The infrared sensors task of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL's) Remote Spectroscopy Project (Task B of Project PL211) is focused on the science and technology of remote and in-situ spectroscopic chemical sensors for detecting proliferation and coun-tering terrorism. Missions to be addressed by remote chemical sensor development in-clude detecting proliferation of nuclear or chemical weapons, and providing warning of terrorist use of chemical weapons. Missions to be addressed by in-situ chemical sensor development include countering terrorism by screening luggage, personnel, and shipping containers for explosives, firearms, narcotics, chemical weapons, or chemical weapons residues, and mapping contaminated areas. The science and technology is also relevant to chemical weapons defense, air operations support, monitoring emissions from chemi-cal weapons destruction or industrial activities, law enforcement, medical diagnostics, and other applications. Sensors for most of these missions will require extreme chemical sensitivity and selectiv-ity because the signature chemicals of importance are expected to be present in low con-centrations or have low vapor pressures, and the ambient air is likely to contain pollutants or other chemicals with interfering spectra. Cavity-enhanced chemical sensors (CES) that draw air samples into optical cavities for laser-based interrogation of their chemical content promise real-time, in-situ chemical detection with extreme sensitivity to specified target molecules and superb immunity to spectral interference and other sources of noise. PNNL is developing CES based on quantum cascade (QC) lasers that operate in the mid-wave infrared (MWIR - 3 to 5 microns) and long-wave infrared (LWIR - 8 to 14 mi-crons), and CES based on telecommunications lasers operating in the short-wave infrared (SWIR - 1 to 2 microns). All three spectral regions are promising because smaller mo-lecular absorption cross sections in the SWIR are offset

  12. Scheme for generating distillation-favorable continuous-variable entanglement via three concurrent parametric down-conversions in a single χ(2) nonlinear photonic crystal.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yan-Xiao; Zhang, ShengLi; Xu, P; Zhu, S N

    2016-03-21

    We propose to generate a single-mode-squeezing two-mode squeezed vacuum state via a single χ(2) nonlinear photonic crystal. The state is favorable for existing Gaussian entanglement distillation schemes, since local squeezing operations can enhance the final entanglement and the success probability. The crystal is designed for enabling three concurrent quasi-phase-matching parametric-down conversions, and hence relieves the auxiliary on-line bi-side local squeezing operations. The compact source opens up a way for continuous-variable quantum technologies and could find more potential applications in future large-scale quantum networks. PMID:27136831

  13. [Measurement of Trace C2H6 Based on Optical-Feedback Cavity-Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Wan, Fu; Chen, Wei-gen; Gu, Zhao-liang; Zou, Jing-xin; DU, Ling-Ling; Qi, Wei; Zhou, Qu

    2015-10-01

    Ethane is one of major fault characteristic gases dissolved in power transformer, the detection of Ethane with high accuracy and sensitivity is the key of dissolved gas analysis. In this paper, based on optical feedback theory and cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy, combined with quantum cascade laser, a detection system for dissolved gas C2 H6 in transformer oil was built up. Based on the symmetry of the individual cavity modes, the phase matching of returning light in resonance with the cavity was achieved through LabVIEW codes. The optical feedback effect that the emitted light return to the laser cavity after a small delay time and lock to the resonance frequency of cavity, even and odd modes effect that the higher modes and lower modes structure will build up alternatively, and threshold current lowering effect of about 1.2 mA were studied and achieved. By cavity ring-down spectroscopy, the effective reflectivity of 99.978% and cavity finesse of 7 138.4 is obtained respectively. The frequency selectivity is 0.005 2 cm(-1). With an acquisition time of 1s, this optical system allows detection for the PQ3 band of C2 H6 with high accuracy of 95.72% ± 0.17% and detection limit of (1.97 ± 0.06) x 10(-3) μL x L(-1) at atmospheric pressure and temperature of 20 degrees C, which lays a foundation for fault diagnose from dissolved gas analysis. PMID:26904820

  14. Chemical Sensing Using Infrared Cavity Enhanced Spectroscopy: Short Wave Infrared Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (SWIR CRDS) Sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Richard M.; Harper, Warren W.; Aker, Pam M.; Thompson, Jason S.; Stewart, Timothy L.

    2003-10-01

    The principal goal of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL's) Remote Spectroscopy Project is to explore and develop the science and technology behind point and stand off infrared (IR) spectroscopic chemical sensors that are needed for detecting weapons proliferation activity and countering terrorism. Missions addressed include detecting chemical, biological, and nuclear weapons and their production; counter terrorism measures that involve screening luggage, personnel, and shipping containers for explosives, firearms, narcotics, chemical weapons and/or their residues; and mapping of contaminated areas. The science and technology developed in this program is dual use in that it additionally supports progress in a diverse set of agendas that include chemical weapons defense programs, air operations activities, emissions monitoring, law enforcement, and medical diagnostics. Sensors for these missions require extremely low limits of detection because many of the targeted signature species are either present in low concentrations or have extremely low vapor pressures. The sensors also need to be highly selective as the environments that they will be operated in will contain a variety of interferent species and false positive detection is not an option. PNNL has been working on developing a class of sensors that draw vapor into optical cavities and use laser-based spectroscopy to identify and quantify the vapor chemical content. The cavity enhanced spectroscopies (CES) afford extreme sensitivity, excellent selectivity, noise immunity, and rapid, real-time, in-situ chemical characterization. PNNL's CES program is currently focused on developing two types of sensors. The first one, which is based on cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS), uses short wave infrared (SWIR) lasers to interrogate species. The second sensor, which is based on noise immune cavity-enhanced optical heterodyne molecular spectroscopy (NICE OHMS), uses long wave infrared (LWIR) quantum cascade

  15. Measurements of Iodine Monoxide Levels During the CAST Campaign Using Broadband Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, N. R. P.; Popoola, O. A.; McLeod, M.; Ouyang, B.; Jones, R. L.

    2014-12-01

    Iodine monoxide (IO) has been regarded as an important radical involved in the ozone destruction in the remote marine boundary layer. Here we presented the first in situ aircraft measurements of IO using broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy with 1s -sensitivity of ~1.5 ppt Hz-1/2 on the surface level during the Coordinated Airborne Studies in the Tropics (CAST) campaign between January - February 2014. IO was retrieved from analysis of absorption spectrum recorded between 415 nm - 452.5 nm. Instrument baseline corresponding to the "zero" signal of IO was obtained by injection of ~20 ppb of nitric oxide (NO) into the sample air at chosen frequency and period. No clear absorption feature was observable from the spectra by eye with up to 100 seconds averaging, pointing to very low mixing ratios (<~0.5 ppt) of IO over the sampled area. A small positive bias (~0.3 ppt) of IO (against the baseline signal during NO titration) was obtained in the statistical histogram of retrieved IO from average of each straight and level run, but little altitude dependence was noted. In summary, our observation appears to support the existence of IO in the remote marine boundary above the Pacific Ocean at sub ppt levels, but the limited sensitivity precludes us from quantifying spatial gradients more accurately.

  16. Broadband cavity-enhanced detection of magnetic field effects in chemical models of a cryptochrome magnetoreceptor.

    PubMed

    Neil, Simon R T; Li, Jing; Sheppard, Dean M W; Storey, Jonathan; Maeda, Kiminori; Henbest, Kevin B; Hore, P J; Timmel, Christiane R; Mackenzie, Stuart R

    2014-04-17

    Broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (BBCEAS) is shown to be a sensitive method for the detection of magnetic field effects (MFEs) in two flavin-based chemical reactions which are simple models for cryptochrome magnetoreceptors. The advantages of optical cavity-based detection and (pseudo-white-light) supercontinuum radiation have been combined to provide full spectral coverage across the whole of the visible spectrum (425 < λ < 700 nm). This region covers the absorbance spectra of flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) as well as their photogenerated radicals. To illustrate the power of this technique, BBCEAS has been used to record the spectral dependence of MFEs for photoinduced radical pairs formed in the intermolecular reaction of FMN with lysozyme and the intramolecular photochemistry of FAD. These reactions have been chosen for their photochemical similarities to cryptochrome proteins which have been proposed as key to the magnetic compass sense of many animals including birds. In experiments performed using low protein concentrations (10 μM) and 1 mm optical path-lengths, absorbance changes as small as 1 × 10(-7) (representing <0.1% MFEs) have been detected with good signal-to-noise offering the prospect of sensitive MFE detection in cryptochrome. PMID:24655160

  17. Absolute molecular transition frequencies measured by three cavity-enhanced spectroscopy techniques.

    PubMed

    Cygan, A; Wójtewicz, S; Kowzan, G; Zaborowski, M; Wcisło, P; Nawrocki, J; Krehlik, P; Śliwczyński, Ł; Lipiński, M; Masłowski, P; Ciuryło, R; Lisak, D

    2016-06-01

    Absolute frequencies of unperturbed (12)C(16)O transitions from the near-infrared (3-0) band were measured with uncertainties five-fold lower than previously available data. The frequency axis of spectra was linked to the primary frequency standard. Three different cavity enhanced absorption and dispersion spectroscopic methods and various approaches to data analysis were used to estimate potential systematic instrumental errors. Except for a well established frequency-stabilized cavity ring-down spectroscopy, we applied the cavity mode-width spectroscopy and the one-dimensional cavity mode-dispersion spectroscopy for measurement of absorption and dispersion spectra, respectively. We demonstrated the highest quality of the dispersion line shape measured in optical spectroscopy so far. We obtained line positions of the Doppler-broadened R24 and R28 transitions with relative uncertainties at the level of 10(-10). The pressure shifting coefficients were measured and the influence of the line asymmetry on unperturbed line positions was analyzed. Our dispersion spectra are the first demonstration of molecular spectroscopy with both axes of the spectra directly linked to the primary frequency standard, which is particularly desirable for the future reference-grade measurements of molecular spectra. PMID:27276950

  18. Near infrared cavity enhanced absorption spectra of atmospherically relevant ether-1, 4-Dioxane.

    PubMed

    Chandran, Satheesh; Varma, Ravi

    2016-01-15

    1, 4-Dioxane (DX) is a commonly found ether in industrially polluted atmosphere. The near infrared absorption spectra of this compound has been recorded in the region 5900-8230 cm(-1) with a resolution of 0.08 cm(-1) using a novel Fourier transform incoherent broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectrometer (FT-IBBCEAS). All recorded spectra were found to contain regions that are only weakly perturbed. The possible combinations of fundamental modes and their overtone bands corresponding to selected regions in the measured spectra are tabulated. Two interesting spectral regions were identified as 5900-6400 cm(-1) and 8100-8230 cm(-1). No significant spectral interference due to presence of water vapor was observed suggesting the suitability of these spectral signatures for spectroscopic in situ detection of DX. The technique employed here is much more sensitive than standard Fourier transform spectrometer measurements on account of long effective path length achieved. Hence significant enhancement of weaker absorption lines above the noise level was observed as demonstrated by comparison with an available measurement from database. PMID:26474242

  19. Absolute molecular transition frequencies measured by three cavity-enhanced spectroscopy techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cygan, A.; Wójtewicz, S.; Kowzan, G.; Zaborowski, M.; Wcisło, P.; Nawrocki, J.; Krehlik, P.; Śliwczyński, Ł.; Lipiński, M.; Masłowski, P.; Ciuryło, R.; Lisak, D.

    2016-06-01

    Absolute frequencies of unperturbed 12C16O transitions from the near-infrared (3-0) band were measured with uncertainties five-fold lower than previously available data. The frequency axis of spectra was linked to the primary frequency standard. Three different cavity enhanced absorption and dispersion spectroscopic methods and various approaches to data analysis were used to estimate potential systematic instrumental errors. Except for a well established frequency-stabilized cavity ring-down spectroscopy, we applied the cavity mode-width spectroscopy and the one-dimensional cavity mode-dispersion spectroscopy for measurement of absorption and dispersion spectra, respectively. We demonstrated the highest quality of the dispersion line shape measured in optical spectroscopy so far. We obtained line positions of the Doppler-broadened R24 and R28 transitions with relative uncertainties at the level of 10-10. The pressure shifting coefficients were measured and the influence of the line asymmetry on unperturbed line positions was analyzed. Our dispersion spectra are the first demonstration of molecular spectroscopy with both axes of the spectra directly linked to the primary frequency standard, which is particularly desirable for the future reference-grade measurements of molecular spectra.

  20. Interfacing whispering-gallery microresonators and free space light with cavity enhanced Rayleigh scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jiangang; Özdemir, Şahin K.; Yilmaz, Huzeyfe; Peng, Bo; Dong, Mark; Tomes, Matthew; Carmon, Tal; Yang, Lan

    2014-09-01

    Whispering gallery mode resonators (WGMRs) take advantage of strong light confinement and long photon lifetime for applications in sensing, optomechanics, microlasers and quantum optics. However, their rotational symmetry and low radiation loss impede energy exchange between WGMs and the surrounding. As a result, free-space coupling of light into and from WGMRs is very challenging. In previous schemes, resonators are intentionally deformed to break circular symmetry to enable free-space coupling of carefully aligned focused light, which comes with bulky size and alignment issues that hinder the realization of compact WGMR applications. Here, we report a new class of nanocouplers based on cavity enhanced Rayleigh scattering from nano-scatterer(s) on resonator surface, and demonstrate whispering gallery microlaser by free-space optical pumping of an Ytterbium doped silica microtoroid via the scatterers. This new scheme will not only expand the range of applications enabled by WGMRs, but also provide a possible route to integrate them into solar powered green photonics.

  1. Near infrared cavity enhanced absorption spectra of atmospherically relevant ether-1, 4-Dioxane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandran, Satheesh; Varma, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    1, 4-Dioxane (DX) is a commonly found ether in industrially polluted atmosphere. The near infrared absorption spectra of this compound has been recorded in the region 5900-8230 cm- 1 with a resolution of 0.08 cm- 1 using a novel Fourier transform incoherent broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectrometer (FT-IBBCEAS). All recorded spectra were found to contain regions that are only weakly perturbed. The possible combinations of fundamental modes and their overtone bands corresponding to selected regions in the measured spectra are tabulated. Two interesting spectral regions were identified as 5900-6400 cm- 1 and 8100-8230 cm- 1. No significant spectral interference due to presence of water vapor was observed suggesting the suitability of these spectral signatures for spectroscopic in situ detection of DX. The technique employed here is much more sensitive than standard Fourier transform spectrometer measurements on account of long effective path length achieved. Hence significant enhancement of weaker absorption lines above the noise level was observed as demonstrated by comparison with an available measurement from database.

  2. QCL - Optical-Feedback Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy For The Analysis Of Atmospheric 13CO2/12CO2 In Ice-Core Gas Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorrotxategi Carbajo, Paula; Romanini, Daniele; Maisons, Gregory; Carras, Mathieu; Chappellaz, Jerome; Kerstel, Erik

    2013-04-01

    In the context of a globally warming climate it is crucial to study the climate variability in the past and to understand the underlying mechanisms. The composition of gas stored in bubbles in polar ice presents a paleo-climate archive that provides a powerful means to study the exact mechanisms involved in the ~40% increase in the atmospheric CO2 concentration between glacial and interglacial climates. It is particularly important to understand such natural coupling between climate and the carbon cycle, as it will partly determine what natural feedback can be expected on the atmospheric CO2 concentration in a future warmer world. The source of the CO2 released into the atmosphere during previous deglaciations can be constrained from isotopic measurements by the fact that the different CO2 reservoirs (terrestrial biosphere, oceans) and associated mechanisms (biological or physical) have different isotopic signatures. Unfortunately, such isotope studies have been seriously hampered by the experimental difficulty of extracting the CO2 without contamination or fractionation, and measuring the isotope signal off-line on an isotope ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS). Here we present an alternative method that leverages the extreme sensitivity afforded by Optical Feedback Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy (OF-CEAS) in the Mid-Infrared [1]. This region of the spectrum is accessed by a custom-developed Quantum Cascade Laser operating near 4.35 µm. The feedback to the laser of light that has been spectrally filtered by a high-finesse, V-shaped enhancement cavity has the effect of spectrally narrowing the laser emission and to auto-lock the laser frequency to one of the cavity's longitudinal modes, with clear advantages in terms of acquisition time and signal-to-noise ratio of the measurement. The line strengths in this region are about 5 orders of magnitude higher than in the more easily accessible NIR region near 1.6 µm and about 1000 times higher than at 2 µm. The

  3. Noise-immune cavity-enhanced analytical atomic spectrometry - NICE-AAS - A technique for detection of elements down to zeptogram amounts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axner, Ove; Ehlers, Patrick; Hausmaninger, Thomas; Silander, Isak; Ma, Weiguang

    2014-10-01

    Noise-immune cavity-enhanced optical heterodyne molecular spectroscopy (NICE-OHMS) is a powerful technique for detection of molecular compounds in gas phase that is based on a combination of two important concepts: frequency modulation spectroscopy (FMS) for reduction of noise, and cavity enhancement, for prolongation of the interaction length between the light and the sample. Due to its unique properties, it has demonstrated unparalleled detection sensitivity when it comes to detection of molecular constituents in the gas phase. However, despite these, it has so far not been used for detection of atoms, i.e. for elemental analysis. The present work presents an assessment of the expected performance of Doppler-broadened (Db) NICE-OHMS for analytical atomic spectrometry, then referred to as noise-immune cavity-enhanced analytical atomic spectrometry (NICE-AAS). After a description of the basic principles of Db-NICE-OHMS, the modulation and detection conditions for optimum performance are identified. Based on a previous demonstrated detection sensitivity of Db-NICE-OHMS of 5 × 10- 12 cm- 1 Hz- 1/2 (corresponding to a single-pass absorbance of 7 × 10- 11 over 10 s), the expected limits of detection (LODs) of Hg and Na by NICE-AAS are estimated. Hg is assumed to be detected in gas phase directly while Na is considered to be atomized in a graphite furnace (GF) prior to detection. It is shown that in the absence of spectral interferences, contaminated sample compartments, and optical saturation, it should be feasible to detect Hg down to 10 zg/cm3 (10 fg/m3 or 10- 5 ng/m3), which corresponds to 25 atoms/cm3, and Na down to 0.5 zg (zg = zeptogram = 10- 21 g), representing 50 zg/mL (parts-per-sextillion, pps, 1:1021) in liquid solution (assuming a sample of 10 μL) or solely 15 atoms injected into the GF, respectively. These LODs are several orders of magnitude lower (better) than any previous laser-based absorption technique previously demonstrated under atmospheric

  4. Cavity-enhanced rotational Raman scattering in gases using a 20  mW near-infrared fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Friss, Adam J; Limbach, Christopher M; Yalin, Azer P

    2016-07-15

    A novel cavity-enhanced laser diagnostic has been developed to perform point measurements of spontaneous rotational Raman scattering. A narrow linewidth fiber laser source (1064 nm) is frequency locked to a high-finesse cavity containing the sample gas. Intracavity powers of 22 W are generated from 3.7 mW of incident laser power, corresponding to a buildup factor of 5900. A triple monochromator and a photomultiplier tube in counting mode are used to disperse and measure the scattering spectra. The system is demonstrated with rotational Raman spectra of nitrogen, oxygen, and carbon dioxide at atmospheric pressure. The approach will allow temporally and spatially resolved Raman measurements for combustion diagnostics and, by extending to higher power, Thomson scattering for diagnostics of low-density plasmas. PMID:27420493

  5. Understanding the sensitivity of cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy: pathlength enhancement versus noise suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, B.; Jones, R. L.

    2012-12-01

    Cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy is now widely used as an ultrasensitive technique in observing weak spectroscopic absorptions. Photons inside the cavity are reflected back and forth between the mirrors with reflectivities R close to one and thus (on average) exploit an absorption pathlength L that is 1/(1 - R) longer than a single pass measurement. As suggested by the Beer-Lambert law, this increase in L results in enhanced absorbance A (given by αL with α being the absorption coefficient) which in turn favours the detection of weak absorptions. At the same time, however, only (1 - R) of the incident light can enter the cavity [assuming that mirror transmission T is equal to (1 - R)], so that the reduction in transmitted light intensity Δ I caused by molecular absorption equates to that would be obtained if in fact no cavity were present. The enhancement in A = Δ I/ I, where I is the total transmitted light intensity, achievable from CEAS therefore comes not from an increase in Δ I, but a sharp decrease in I. In this paper, we calculate the magnitudes of these two terms before and after a cavity is introduced, and aim at interpreting the sensitivity improvement offered by cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy from this observable-oriented (i.e. Δ I and I) perspective. It is first shown that photon energy stored in the cavity is at best as intense as the input light source, implying that any absorbing sample within the cavity is exposed to the same or even lower light intensity after the cavity is formed. As a consequence, the intensity of the light absorbed or scattered by the sample, which corresponds to the Δ I term aforementioned, is never greater than would be the case in a single pass measurement. It is then shown that while this "numerator" term is not improved, the "denominator" term, I, is reduced considerably; therefore, the increase in contrast ratio Δ I/ I is solely contributed by the attenuation of transmitted background light I and is

  6. Sensitive and Instantaneous Molecular Detection from Broadband Cavity-Enhanced Dual Comb Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhardt, B.; Ozawa, A.; Jacquey, M.; Jacquet, P.; Guelachvili, G.; Udem, T.; Holzwarth, R.; Kobayashi, Y.; Hänsch, T. W.; Picqué, N.

    2010-06-01

    Recent experiments have demonstrated that the precisely spaced spectral lines of a laser frequency comb can be harnessed for new techniques of multi-heterodyne Fourier transform spectroscopy (also called dual-comb spectroscopy) of molecules. In one such experiment, an absorbing molecular gas was placed inside an optical cavity that is matched to the laser resonator so that it is resonant for each comb line. The sensitivity for weak absorption is much enhanced, as in cavity ring-down spectroscopy. The light transmitted by the cavity is superimposed on a second frequency comb with slightly different repetition frequency. A single fast photodetector then produces an output signal with a comb of radio frequencies due to interference between pairs of optical comb lines. The optical spectrum is thus effectively mapped into the radio frequency regime, where it becomes accessible to fast digital signal processing. Experimental proof-of-principle is carried out in the near-infrared 1 μm region. An Yb-doped fiber frequency comb is coherently coupled to a passive resonator with a finesse of 1200, resulting in an effective interaction length between the light and the gas enhanced to 880m. The weak 3ν1 band of ammonia is rotationally resolved for the first time to our knowledge. Recording times of 18 μs are enough to span 220 cm-1 with a resolution of 0.15 cm-1. The signal to noise ratio of 380 leads to a minimum-detectable-absorption coefficient αmin of 3×10-8 cm-1 . B. Bernhardt, A. Ozawa, P. Jacquet, M. Jacquey, Y. Kobayashi, T. Udem, R. Holzwarth, G. Guelachvili, T.W. Hänsch, N. Picqué, Cavity-enhanced dual-comb spectroscopy, Nature Photonics 4, 55-57 (2010),

  7. Broadband down-conversion based near infrared quantum cutting in Eu{sup 2+}–Yb{sup 3+} co-doped SrAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} for crystalline silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tai, Yuping; Zheng, Guojun; Wang, Hui; Bai, Jintao

    2015-03-15

    Near infrared (NIR) quantum cutting involving the down conversion of an absorbed visible photon to emission of two NIR photons was achieved in SrAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}:0.01Eu{sup 2+}, xYb{sup 3+} (x=0, 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, 30 mol%) samples. The photoluminescence properties of samples in visible and NIR regions were measured to verify the energy transfer (ET) from Eu{sup 2+} to Yb{sup 3+}. The results demonstrated that Eu{sup 2+} was an efficient sensitizer for Yb{sup 3+} in the SrAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} host lattice. According to Gaussian fitting analysis and temperature-dependent luminescence experiments, the conclusion was drawn that the cooperative energy transfer (CET) process dominated the ET process and the influence of charge transfer state (CTS) of Yb{sup 3+} could be negligible. As a result, the high energy transfer efficiency (ETE) and quantum yield (QY) have been acquired, the maximum value approached 73.68% and 147.36%, respectively. Therefore, this down-conversion material has potential application in crystalline silicon solar cells to improve conversion efficiency. - Graphical abstract: Near infrared quantum cutting was achieved in Eu{sup 2+}–Yb{sup 3+} co-doped SrAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} samples. The cooperative energy transfer process dominated energy transfer process and high energy transfer efficiency was acquired. - Highlights: • The absorption spectrum of Eu{sup 2+} ion is strong in intensity and broad in bandwidth. • The spectra of Eu{sup 2+} in SrAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} lies in the strongest region of solar spectrum. • The cooperative energy transfer (CET) dominated the energy transfer process. • The domination of CET is confirmed by experimental analysis. • SrAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}:Eu{sup 2+},Yb{sup 3+} show high energy transfer efficiency and long lifetime.

  8. Cavity-enhanced AlGaAs/GaAs resonant tunneling photodetectors for telecommunication wavelength light detection at 1.3 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfenning, Andreas; Hartmann, Fabian; Langer, Fabian; Kamp, Martin; Höfling, Sven; Worschech, Lukas

    2015-09-01

    We demonstrate a cavity-enhanced photodetector at the telecommunication wavelength of λ = 1.3 μm based on a resonant tunneling diode (RTD). The cavity-enhanced RTD photodetector consists of three integral parts: First, a Ga0.89In0.11N0.04As0.96 absorption layer that can be grown lattice-matched on GaAs and which is light-active in the near infrared spectral region due to its reduced bandgap energy. Second, an Al0.6Ga0.4As/GaAs double barrier resonant tunneling structure (RTS) that serves as high gain internal amplifier of weak electric signals caused by photogenerated electron-hole pairs within the GaInNAs absorption layer. Third, an optical distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) cavity consisting of five top and seven bottom alternating GaAs/AlAs mirror pairs, which provides an enhanced quantum efficiency at the resonance wavelength. The samples were grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Electro-optical properties of the RTDs were studied at room temperature. From the reflection-spectrum the optical resonance at λ = 1.29 μm was extracted. The current-voltage characteristics were studied in the dark and under illumination and a wellpronounced photo-response was found and is attributed to accumulation of photogenerated holes in the vicinity of the RTS. The maximum photocurrent was found at the optical resonance of 1.29 μm. At resonance, a sensitivity of S = 3.97 × 104 A/W was observed. From the sensitivity, a noise equivalent power of NEP = 1.18 × 10-16 W/Hz1/2, and a specific detectivity of D∗ ≅ 6.74 × 1012 cm Hz1/2/W were calculated. For a single absorbed photon a photocurrent of ISP = 50 pA was determined.

  9. Rapid monitoring of intermediate states and mass balance of nitrogen during denitrification by means of cavity enhanced Raman multi-gas sensing.

    PubMed

    Keiner, Robert; Herrmann, Martina; Küsel, Kirsten; Popp, Jürgen; Frosch, Torsten

    2015-03-15

    The comprehensive investigation of changes in N cycling has been challenging so far due to difficulties with measuring gases such as N2 and N2O simultaneously. In this study we introduce cavity enhanced Raman gas spectroscopy as a new analytical methodology for tracing the stepwise reduction of (15)N-labelled nitrate by the denitrifying bacteria Pseudomonas stutzeri. The unique capabilities of Raman multi-gas analysis enabled real-time, continuous, and non-consumptive quantification of the relevant gases ((14)N2, (14)N2O, O2, and CO2) and to trace the fate of (15)N-labeled nitrate substrate ((15)N2, (15)N2O) added to a P. stutzeri culture with one single measurement. Using this new methodology, we could quantify the kinetics of the formation and degradation for all gaseous compounds (educts and products) and thus study the reaction orders. The gas quantification was complemented with the analysis of nitrate and nitrite concentrations for the online monitoring of the total nitrogen element budget. The simultaneous quantification of all gases also enabled the contactless and sterile online acquisition of the pH changes in the P. stutzeri culture by the stoichiometry of the redox reactions during denitrification and the CO2-bicarbonate equilibrium. Continuous pH monitoring - without the need to insert an electrode into solution - elucidated e.g. an increase in the slope of the pH value coinciding with an accumulation of nitrite, which in turn led to a temporary accumulation of N2O, due to an inhibition of nitrous oxide reductase. Cavity enhanced Raman gas spectroscopy has a high potential for the assessment of denitrification processes and can contribute substantially to our understanding of nitrogen cycling in both natural and agricultural systems. PMID:25732425

  10. ELECTROMAGNETISM, OPTICS, ACOUSTICS, HEAT TRANSFER, CLASSICAL MECHANICS, AND FLUID DYNAMICS: Time Evolution and Squeezing of Degenerate and Non-degenerate Coupled Parametric Down-Conversion with Driving Term

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiang-Fan; Fang, Jia-Yuan; Xiao, Fu-Liang; Liu, Xin-Hai; Wang, Cheng-Zhi

    2009-03-01

    By properly selecting the time-dependent unitary transformation for the linear combination of the number operators, we construct a time-dependent invariant and derive the corresponding auxiliary equations for the degenerate and non-degenerate coupled parametric down-conversion system with driving term. By means of this invariant and the Lewis-Riesenfeld quantum invariant theory, we obtain closed formulae of the quantum state and the evolution operator of the system. We show that the time evolution of the quantum system directly leads to production of various generalized one- and two-mode combination squeezed states, and the squeezed effect is independent of the driving term of the Hamiltonian. In some special cases, the current solution can reduce to the results of the previous works.

  11. Single-Mode Parametric-Down-Conversion States with 50 Photons as a Source for Mesoscopic Quantum Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harder, Georg; Bartley, Tim J.; Lita, Adriana E.; Nam, Sae Woo; Gerrits, Thomas; Silberhorn, Christine

    2016-04-01

    We generate pulsed, two-mode squeezed states in a single spatiotemporal mode with mean photon numbers up to 20. We directly measure photon-number correlations between the two modes with transition edge sensors up to 80 photons per mode. This corresponds roughly to a state dimensionality of 6400. We achieve detection efficiencies of 64% in the technologically crucial telecom regime and demonstrate the high quality of our measurements by heralded nonclassical distributions up to 50 photons per pulse and calculated correlation functions up to 40th order.

  12. Single-Mode Parametric-Down-Conversion States with 50 Photons as a Source for Mesoscopic Quantum Optics.

    PubMed

    Harder, Georg; Bartley, Tim J; Lita, Adriana E; Nam, Sae Woo; Gerrits, Thomas; Silberhorn, Christine

    2016-04-01

    We generate pulsed, two-mode squeezed states in a single spatiotemporal mode with mean photon numbers up to 20. We directly measure photon-number correlations between the two modes with transition edge sensors up to 80 photons per mode. This corresponds roughly to a state dimensionality of 6400. We achieve detection efficiencies of 64% in the technologically crucial telecom regime and demonstrate the high quality of our measurements by heralded nonclassical distributions up to 50 photons per pulse and calculated correlation functions up to 40th order. PMID:27104708

  13. Synthesis and down-conversion luminescence properties of Er3+/Yb3+ co-doped AlF3-PbF2-CaF2 powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fangchao; Han, Qun; Liu, Tiegen; Chen, Yaofei; Du, Yang; Yao, Yunzhi

    2015-08-01

    Er3+/Yb3+ co-doped oxy-fluoride powders with varying Er/Yb concentration were prepared by a melt quenching method at various sintering temperature. The effect of the Er/Yb doped concentration and sintering temperature were analyzed by using optical absorption and emission techniques. The Judd-Ofelt theory has been used to evaluate the three intensity parameters (Ωλ, where λ = 2, 4 and 6) and calculate the oscillator strengths (fc). Ultraviolet-to-visible emissions were observed under the excitation of a 325 nm CW laser. It was found that the down-conversion fluorescence intensity changes with the sintering temperature and Er/Yb content ratio, the results were explained with the level transitions in Er3+/Yb3+ co-doped systems. The intensity ratios (intensity of 437 nm as reference) of the luminescence spectra that the samples sintered at various temperature are relevant to Ω6 parameter which indicates the vibration amplitude of the Er-O distance. The sintering temperature also has an influence on the intensity ratios via affecting the thermalization of the excited 4I15/2 level.

  14. Theory of filtered type-II parametric down-conversion in the continuous-variable domain: Quantifying the impacts of filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christ, Andreas; Lupo, Cosmo; Reichelt, Matthias; Meier, Torsten; Silberhorn, Christine

    2014-08-01

    Parametric down-conversion (PDC) forms one of the basic building blocks for quantum optical experiments. However, the intrinsic multimode spectral-temporal structure of pulsed PDC often poses a severe hindrance for the direct implementation of the heralding of pure single-photon states or, for example, continuous-variable entanglement distillation experiments. To get rid of multimode effects narrowband frequency filtering is frequently applied to achieve a single-mode behavior. A rigorous theoretical description to accurately describe the effects of filtering on PDC, however, is still missing. To date, the theoretical models of filtered PDC are rooted in the discrete-variable domain and only account for filtering in the low-gain regime, where only a few photon pairs are emitted at any single point in time. In this paper we extend these theoretical descriptions and put forward a simple model, which is able to accurately describe the effects of filtering on PDC in the continuous-variable domain. This developed straightforward theoretical framework enables us to accurately quantify the tradeoff between suppression of higher-order modes, reduced purity, and lowered Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen entanglement, when narrowband filters are applied to multimode type-II PDC.

  15. Progress towards practical device-independent quantum key distribution with spontaneous parametric down-conversion sources, on-off photodetectors, and entanglement swapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seshadreesan, Kaushik P.; Takeoka, Masahiro; Sasaki, Masahide

    2016-04-01

    Device-independent quantum key distribution (DIQKD) guarantees unconditional security of a secret key without making assumptions about the internal workings of the devices used for distribution. It does so using the loophole-free violation of a Bell's inequality. The primary challenge in realizing DIQKD in practice is the detection loophole problem that is inherent to photonic tests of Bell' s inequalities over lossy channels. We revisit the proposal of Curty and Moroder [Phys. Rev. A 84, 010304(R) (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevA.84.010304] to use a linear optics-based entanglement-swapping relay (ESR) to counter this problem. We consider realistic models for the entanglement sources and photodetectors: more precisely, (a) polarization-entangled states based on pulsed spontaneous parametric down-conversion sources with infinitely higher-order multiphoton components and multimode spectral structure, and (b) on-off photodetectors with nonunit efficiencies and nonzero dark-count probabilities. We show that the ESR-based scheme is robust against the above imperfections and enables positive key rates at distances much larger than what is possible otherwise.

  16. Improved Shock Tube Measurement of the CH4 + Ar = CH3 + H + Ar Rate Constant using UV Cavity-Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy of CH3.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shengkai; Davidson, David F; Hanson, Ronald K

    2016-07-21

    We report an improved measurement for the rate constant of methane dissociation in argon (CH4 + Ar = CH3 + H + Ar) behind reflected shock waves. The experiment was conducted using a sub-parts per million sensitivity CH3 diagnostic recently developed in our laboratory based on ultraviolet cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy. The high sensitivity of this diagnostic allowed for measurements of quantitatively resolved CH3 time histories during the initial stage of CH4 pyrolysis, where the reaction system is clean and free from influences of secondary reactions and temperature change. This high sensitivity also allowed extension of our measurement range to much lower temperatures (<1500 K). The current-reflected shock measurements were performed at temperatures between 1487 and 1866 K and pressures near 1.7 atm, resulting in the following Arrhenius rate constant expression for the title reaction: k(1.7 atm) = 3.7 × 10(16) exp(-42 200 K/T) cm(3)/mol·s, with a 2σ uncertainty factor of 1.25. The current data are in good consensus with various theoretical and review studies, but at the low temperature end they suggest a slightly higher (up to 35%) rate constant compared to these previous results. A re-evaluation of previous and current experimental data in the falloff region was also performed, yielding updated expressions for both the low-pressure limit and the high-pressure limit rate constants and improved agreement with all existing data. PMID:27380878

  17. Bromine Explosions In Smog Chamber Experiments: A comparison of Cavity-Enhanced (CE) and White-cell DOAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buxmann, J.; Hoch, D. J.; Sihler, H.; Pöhler, D.; Platt, U.; Bleicher, S.; Balzer, N.; Zetzsch, C.

    2011-12-01

    Reactive halogen species (RHS), such as Cl, Br or BrO, can significantly influence chemical processes in the troposphere, including the destruction of ozone, change in the chemical balance of hydrogen radicals (OH, HO2), increased deposition of toxic compounds (like mercury) with potential consequences for the global climate. Previous studies have shown that salt lakes can be significant sources for gaseous RHS. Environmental conditions such as salt composition, relative humidity (RH), pH, and temperature (T) can strongly influence reactive bromine levels, but are difficult to quantify in the field. Therefore, we conducted laboratory experiments by exposing NaCl salt containing 0.33% (by weight) NaBr to simulated sunlight in a Teflon smog-chamber under various conditions of RH and ozone concentrations. BrO levels were observed by a Differential-Optical-Absorption-Spectrometer (DOAS) in combination with a multi-reflection cell (White-cell). The concentrations of OH- and Cl- radicals were quantified by the radical clock method. We present the first direct observation of BrO from the "Bromine Explosion" (auto catalytic release of reactive bromine from salt surfaces - key to ozone destruction) in the laboratory above a simulated salt pan. The maximum BrO mixing ratio of 6419±71 ppt at 60% RH was observed to be one order of magnitude higher than at 37% RH and 2% RH. The release of RHS from the salt pan is possibly controlled by the thickness of the quasi liquid layer, covering the reactive surface of the halide crystals, as the layer thickness strongly depends on RH. Furthermore, a new cavity enhanced DOAS (CE-DOAS) instrument was designed and successfully used in chamber experiments. For the first time, such an instrument uses a spectral interval in the UV - wavelength range (325-365 nm) to identify BrO. We show a comparison of the CE-DOAS and White-cell DOAS instrument in a series of experiments, where e.g. a peak BrO mixing ratio up to 380 ppt within the first

  18. SPECIES: a versatile spectrometer based on optical-feedback cavity-enhanced absorption for in situ balloon-borne and airborne measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquet, Patrick; Catoire, Valery; Robert, Claude; Chartier, Michel; Huret, Nathalie; Desbois, Thibault; Marocco, Nicola; Kassi, Samir; Kerstel, Eric; Romanini, Daniele

    2015-04-01

    Over the last twenty years, thanks to significant technological advances in measurement techniques, our understanding of the chemistry and dynamics of the upper troposphere and stratosphere has progressed significantly. However some key questions remain unsolved, and new ones arise in the changing climate context. The full recovery of the ozone layer and the delay of recovery, the impact of the climate change on the stratosphere and the role of this one as a feedback are almost unknown. To address these challenges, one needs instruments able to measure a wide variety of trace gas species simultaneously with a wide vertical range. In this context, LPC2E and LIPHY are developing a new balloon-borne and airborne instrument: SPECIES (SPECtromètre Infrarouge à lasErs in Situ, i.e. in-Situ Infrared lasEr SPECtrometer). Based on the Optical Feedback Cavity Enhanced Spectroscopy technique, combined with mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers, this instrument will offer unprecedented performances in terms of the vertical extent of the measurements, from ground to the middle stratosphere, and the number of molecular species simultaneously measured with sub-ppb detection limits (among others: NO, N2O, HNO3, H2O2, HCl, HOCl, CH3Cl, COF2, HCHO, HCOOH, O3, NH3 NO2, H2O, OCS, SO2). Due to high frequency measurement (>0.5 Hz) it shall offer very high spatial resolution (a few meters).

  19. Characterization of the frequency stability of an optical frequency standard at 1.39 µm based upon noise-immune cavity-enhanced optical heterodyne molecular spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dinesan, H; Fasci, E; D'Addio, A; Castrillo, A; Gianfrani, L

    2015-01-26

    Frequency fluctuations of an optical frequency standard at 1.39 µm have been measured by means of a highly-sensitive optical frequency discriminator based on the fringe-side transmission of a high finesse optical resonator. Built on a Zerodur spacer, the optical resonator exhibits a finesse of 5500 and a cavity-mode width of about 120 kHz. The optical frequency standard consists of an extended-cavity diode laser that is tightly stabilized against the center of a sub-Doppler H(2) (18)O line, this latter being detected by means of noise-immune cavity-enhanced optical heterodyne molecular spectroscopy. The emission linewidth has been carefully determined from the frequency-noise power spectral density by using a rather simple approximation, known as β-line approach, as well as the exact method based on the autocorrelation function of the laser light field. It turns out that the linewidth of the optical frequency standard amounts to about 7 kHz (full width at half maximum) for an observation time of 1 ms. Compared to the free-running laser, the measured width corresponds to a line narrowing by a factor of ~220. PMID:25835931

  20. An off Axis Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectrometer and a Rapid Scan Spectrometer with a Room-Temperature External Cavity Quantum Cascade Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xunchen; Kang, Cheolhwa; Xu, Yunjie

    2009-06-01

    Quantum cascade laser (QCL) is a new type of mid-infrared tunable diode lasers with superior output power and mode quality. Recent developments, such as room temperature operation, wide frequency tunability, and narrow line width, make QCLs an ideal light source for high resolution spectroscopy. Two slit jet infrared spectrometers, namely an off-axis cavity enhanced absorption (CEA) spectrometer and a rapid scan spectrometer with an astigmatic multi-pass cell assembly, have been coupled with a newly purchased room temperature tunable mod-hop-free QCL with a frequency coverage from 1592 cm^{-1} to 1698 cm^{-1} and a scan rate of 0.1 cm^{-1}/ms. Our aim is to utilize these two sensitive spectrometers, that are equipped with a molecular jet expansion, to investigate the chiral molecules-(water)_n clusters. To demonstrate the resolution and sensitivity achieved, the rovibrational transitions of the static N_2O gas and the bending rovibrational transitions of the Ar-water complex, a test system, at 1634 cm^{-1} have been measured. D. Hofstetter and J. Faist in High performance quantum cascade lasers and their applications, Vol.89 Springer-Verlag Berlin & Heidelberg, 2003, pp. 61-98. Y. Xu, X. Liu, Z. Su, R. M. Kulkarni, W. S. Tam, C. Kang, I. Leonov and L. D'Agostino, Proc. Spie, 2009, 722208 (1-11). M. J. Weida and D. J. Nesbitt, J. Chem. Phys. 1997, 106, 3078-3089.

  1. Enhanced up/down-conversion luminescence and heat: Simultaneously achieving in one single core-shell structure for multimodal imaging guided therapy.

    PubMed

    He, Fei; Feng, Lili; Yang, Piaoping; Liu, Bin; Gai, Shili; Yang, Guixin; Dai, Yunlu; Lin, Jun

    2016-10-01

    Upon near-infrared (NIR) light irradiation, the Nd(3+) doping derived down-conversion luminescence (DCL) in NIR region and thermal effect are extremely fascinating in bio-imaging and photothermal therapy (PTT) fields. However, the concentration quenching induced opposite changing trend of the two properties makes it difficult to get desired DCL and thermal effect together in one single particle. In this study, we firstly designed a unique NaGdF4:0.3%Nd@NaGdF4@NaGdF4:10%Yb/1%Er@NaGdF4:10%Yb @NaNdF4:10%Yb multiple core-shell structure. Here the inert two layers (NaGdF4 and NaGdF4:10%Yb) can substantially eliminate the quenching effects, thus achieving markedly enhanced NIR-to-NIR DCL, NIR-to-Vis up-conversion luminescence (UCL), and thermal effect under a single 808 nm light excitation simultaneously. The UCL excites the attached photosensitive drug (Au25 nanoclusters) to generate singlet oxygen ((1)O2) for photodynamic therapy (PDT), while DCL with strong NIR emission serves as probe for sensitive deep-tissue imaging. The in vitro and in vivo experimental results demonstrate the excellent cancer inhibition efficacy of this platform due to a synergistic effect arising from the combined PTT and PDT. Furthermore, multimodal imaging including fluorescence imaging (FI), photothermal imaging (PTI), and photoacoustic imaging (PAI) has been obtained, which is used to monitor the drug delivery process, internal structure of tumor and photo-therapeutic process, thus achieving the target of imaging-guided cancer therapy. PMID:27512942

  2. Core-shell-like Y2O3:[(Tb3+-Yb3+), Li+]/CdZnS heterostructure synthesized by super-close-space sublimation for broadband down-conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaojie; Zhang, Zhenzhong; Meng, Fanzhi; Yu, Yingning; Han, Lin; Liu, Xiaojuan; Meng, Jian

    2014-04-01

    Combination with semiconductors is a promising approach to the realization of broadband excitation of light conversion materials based on rare earth compounds, to boost the energy efficiency of silicon solar cells. Cd1-xZnxS is a wide bandgap semiconductor with large exciton binding energy. By changing its composition, the bandgap of Cd1-xZnxS can be tuned to match the absorption of trivalent lanthanide (Ln) ions, which makes it a competent energy donor for the Ln3+-Yb3+ couple. In this work, we designed a clean route to a broadband down-converter based on a core-shell-like Y2O3:[(Tb3+-Yb3+), Li+]/Cd0.81Zn0.19S (CdZnS) heterostructure. By hot-pressing and subsequent annealing of a Y2O3:[(Tb3+-Yb3+), Li+]/CdZnS mixture, highly pure CdZnS was sublimated and deposited on the Y2O3:[(Tb3+-Yb3+), Li+] grains while maintaining the original composition of the precursor. The CdZnS shell acted as a light absorber and energy donor for the Tb3+-Yb3+ quantum cutting couple. Because the use of solvents was avoided during the formation of the heterostructures, few impurities were incorporated into the samples, and the non-radiative transition was therefore markedly suppressed. The Y2O3:[(Tb3+-Yb3+), Li+]/CdZnS heterostructures possess strong near-infrared (NIR) luminescence from Yb3+. Broadband down-conversion to the Yb3+ NIR emission was obtained in a wide range of 250-650 nm.

  3. Dilute nitride resonant cavity enhanced photodetector with internal gain for the λ ∼ 1.3 μm optical communications window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balkan, N.; Erol, A.; Sarcan, F.; Al-Ghuraibawi, L. F. F.; Nordin, M. S.

    2015-10-01

    We report on a novel dilute nitride-based resonant cavity enhanced photodetector (RCEPD) operating at 1.286 μm. The RCEPD was fabricated using 21 pairs top and 24 pairs bottom GaAs/AlGaAs distributed Bragg reflectors for mirrors and 7 nm thick nine GaAs/Ga0.65In0.35N0.02 As0.98 quantum wells as the absorption region. For a 15 μm diameter window, the photocurrent at 1.286 μm is 27 μA and 42 μA, at V = 0 and -1 V, respectively, whereas the dark current is as low as 1.7 nA at -1 V. At the operating wavelength, an excellent wavelength selectivity with a full width at half maximum (FWHM) of 5 nm, and a high quantum efficiency of 43% are demonstrated. The device exhibits significant internal gain at very small reverse bias voltages of V ⩾ -2 V with an overall quantum efficiency of 67%. These are the best ever recorded values for a dilute nitride RCEPD.

  4. Following interfacial kinetics in real time using broadband evanescent wave cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy: a comparison of light-emitting diodes and supercontinuum sources.

    PubMed

    van der Sneppen, Lineke; Hancock, Gus; Kaminski, Clemens; Laurila, Toni; Mackenzie, Stuart R; Neil, Simon R T; Peverall, Robert; Ritchie, Grant A D; Schnippering, Mathias; Unwin, Patrick R

    2010-01-01

    A white light-emitting diode (LED) with emission between 420 and 700 nm and a supercontinuum (SC) source with emission between 450 and 2500 nm have been compared for use in evanescent wave broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (EW-BB-CEAS). The method is calibrated using a dye with known absorbance. While the LED is more economic as an excitation source, the SC source is superior both in terms of baseline noise (noise equivalent absorbances lower than 10(-5) compared to 10(-4) absorbance units (a.u.)) and accuracy of the measurement; these baseline noise levels are comparable to evanescent wave cavity ringdown spectroscopy (EW-CRDS) studies while the accessible spectral region of EW-BB-CEAS is much larger (420-750 nm in this study, compared to several tens of nanometres for EW-CRDS). The improvements afforded by the use of an SC source in combination with a high sensitivity detector are demonstrated in the broadband detection of electrogenerated Ir(IV) complexes in a thin-layer electrochemical cell arrangement. Excellent signal to noise is achieved with 10 micros signal accumulation times at a repetition rate of 600 Hz, easily fast enough to follow, in real time, solution kinetics and interfacial processes. PMID:20024193

  5. Application of Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy to the Detection of Nitric Oxide, Carbonyl Sulphide, and Ethane--Breath Biomarkers of Serious Diseases.

    PubMed

    Wojtas, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents one of the laser absorption spectroscopy techniques as an effective tool for sensitive analysis of trace gas species in human breath. Characterization of nitric oxide, carbonyl sulphide and ethane, and the selection of their absorption lines are described. Experiments with some biomarkers showed that detection of pathogenic changes at the molecular level is possible using this technique. Thanks to cavity enhanced spectroscopy application, detection limits at the ppb-level and short measurements time (<3 s) were achieved. Absorption lines of reference samples of the selected volatile biomarkers were probed using a distributed feedback quantum cascade laser and a tunable laser system consisting of an optical parametric oscillator and difference frequency generator. Setup using the first source provided a detection limit of 30 ppb for nitric oxide and 250 ppb for carbonyl sulphide. During experiments employing a second laser, detection limits of 0.9 ppb and 0.3 ppb were obtained for carbonyl sulphide and ethane, respectively. The conducted experiments show that this type of diagnosis would significantly increase chances for effective therapy of some diseases. Additionally, it offers non-invasive and real time measurements, high sensitivity and selectivity as well as minimizing discomfort for patients. For that reason, such sensors can be used in screening for early detection of serious diseases. PMID:26091398

  6. Validation and application of cavity-enhanced, near-infrared tunable diode laser absorption spectrometry for measurements of methane carbon isotopes at ambient concentrations.

    PubMed

    Mortazavi, Behzad; Wilson, Benjamin J; Dong, Feng; Gupta, Manish; Baer, Doug

    2013-10-15

    Methane is an effective greenhouse gas but has a short residence time in the atmosphere, and therefore, reductions in emissions can alleviate its greenhouse gas warming effect within a decadal time frame. Continuous and high temporal resolution measurements of methane concentrations and carbon isotopic ratios (δ(13)CH4) can inform on mechanisms of formation, provide constraints on emissions sources, and guide future mitigation efforts. We describe the development, validation, and deployment of a cavity-enhanced, near-infrared tunable diode laser absorption spectrometry system capable of quantifying δ(13)CH4 at ambient methane concentrations. Laboratory validation and testing show that the instrument is capable of operating over a wide dynamic range of methane concentration and provides a measurement precision for δ(13)CH4 of better than ± 0.5 ‰ (1σ) over 1000 s of data averaging at ambient methane concentrations. The analyzer is accurate to better than ± 0.5 ‰, as demonstrated by measurements of characterized methane/air samples with minimal dependence (<1 ‰) of measured carbon isotope ratio on methane concentration. Deployment of the instrument at a marsh over multiple days demonstrated how methane fluxes varied by an order of magnitude over 2 day deployment periods, and showed a 17 ‰ variability in δ(13)CH4 of the emitted methane during the growing season. PMID:24025121

  7. Application of Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy to the Detection of Nitric Oxide, Carbonyl Sulphide, and Ethane—Breath Biomarkers of Serious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wojtas, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents one of the laser absorption spectroscopy techniques as an effective tool for sensitive analysis of trace gas species in human breath. Characterization of nitric oxide, carbonyl sulphide and ethane, and the selection of their absorption lines are described. Experiments with some biomarkers showed that detection of pathogenic changes at the molecular level is possible using this technique. Thanks to cavity enhanced spectroscopy application, detection limits at the ppb-level and short measurements time (<3 s) were achieved. Absorption lines of reference samples of the selected volatile biomarkers were probed using a distributed feedback quantum cascade laser and a tunable laser system consisting of an optical parametric oscillator and difference frequency generator. Setup using the first source provided a detection limit of 30 ppb for nitric oxide and 250 ppb for carbonyl sulphide. During experiments employing a second laser, detection limits of 0.9 ppb and 0.3 ppb were obtained for carbonyl sulphide and ethane, respectively. The conducted experiments show that this type of diagnosis would significantly increase chances for effective therapy of some diseases. Additionally, it offers non-invasive and real time measurements, high sensitivity and selectivity as well as minimizing discomfort for patients. For that reason, such sensors can be used in screening for early detection of serious diseases. PMID:26091398

  8. Intrinsic limitation of cavity-enhanced Faraday detection of spin noise in quantum wells and quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalbert, D.

    2016-04-01

    Spin noise spectroscopy is a quite attractive experimental tool for studying unperturbed spin dynamics and magnetic resonance in semiconductor nanostructures. However in some cases its practical interest maybe severely limited by the weakness of the spin noise signal to be detected. In this paper we examine by how much the detection of spin noise of magnetic atoms or of nuclei, in quantum wells or quantum dots, can be improved by making use of cavity-enhanced Faraday rotation. The conditions for optimized cavities are first determined. In reflection geometry it corresponds to tune the cavity to the critical point of impedance matching. It is shown that even for optimized cavities the enhancement in spin noise detection is intrinsically limited by absorption. It turns out that the cavity effect improves the spin noise detection only when the inhomogeneous broadening of the involved optical resonance is large compared to its radiative broadening.

  9. A broadband cavity-enhanced spectrometer for measuring the extinction of aerosols at blue and near-UV wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venables, Dean; Fullam, Donovan; Hoa Le, Phuoc; Chen, Jun; Böge, Olaf; Herrmann, Hartmut

    2016-04-01

    We describe a new broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectrometer for sensitive extinction measurements of aerosols. The instrument is distinguished by its broad and continuous spectral coverage from the near-UV to blue wavelengths (ca. 320 to 450 nm). The short wavelength region has been little explored compared to visible wavelengths, but is important because (1) brown carbon (BrC) absorbs strongly in this wavelength region, and (2) absorption of near-UV radiation in the atmosphere alters the photolysis rate of the key atmospheric species O3, NO2, and HONO, with implications for air quality and atmospheric oxidation capacity. The instrument performance and the effect of a switchable in-line filter are characterised. Early results using the instrument in the TROPOS atmospheric simulation chamber are presented. These experiments include studies of secondary organic aerosol formation (SOA), and biomass burning experiments of rice and wheat straw, followed by experiments simulating particle aging under daytime and nighttime conditions.

  10. Rapid, online quantification of H2S in JP-8 fuel reformate using near-infrared cavity-enhanced laser absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dong, Feng; Junaedi, Christian; Roychoudhury, Subir; Gupta, Manish

    2011-06-01

    One of the key challenges in reforming military fuels for use with fuel cells is their high sulfur content, which can poison the fuel cell anodes. Sulfur-tolerant fuel reformers can convert this sulfur into H(2)S and then use a desulfurizing bed to remove it prior to the fuel cell. In order to optimize and verify this desulfurization process, a gas-phase sulfur analyzer is required to measure H(2)S at low concentrations (<1 ppm(v)) in the presence of other reforming gases (e.g., 25-30% H(2), 10-15% H(2)O, 15% CO, 5% CO(2), 35-40% N(2), and trace amounts of light hydrocarbons). In this work, we utilize near-infrared cavity-enhanced optical absorption spectroscopy (off-axis ICOS) to quantify H(2)S in a JP-8 fuel reformer product stream. The sensor provides rapid (2 s), highly precise (±0.1 ppm(v)) measurements of H(2)S in reformate gases over a wide dynamic range (0-1000 ppm(v)) with a low detection limit (3σ = ±0.09 ppm(v) in 1 s) and minimal cross-interferences from other present species. It simultaneously quantifies CO(2) (±0.2%), CH(4) (±150 ppm(v)), C(2)H(4) (±30 ppm(v)), and H(2)O (±300 ppm(v)) in the reformed gas for a better characterization of the fuel reforming process. Other potential applications of this technology include measurement of coal syngas and H(2)S in natural gas. By including additional near-infrared, distributive feedback diode lasers, the instrument can also be extended to other reformate species, including CO and H(2). PMID:21486070

  11. Tunable cavity-enhanced photon pairs source in Hermite-Gaussian mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhi-Yuan; Li, Yan; Ding, Dong-Sheng; Zhang, Wei; Shi, Shuai; Shi, Bao-Sen; Guo, Guang-Can

    2016-02-01

    The spatial modes of light have grasped great research interests because of its great potentials in optical communications, optical manipulation and trapping, optical metrology and quantum information processing. Here we report on generating of photon pairs in Hermite-Gaussian (HG) mode in a type-I optical parametric oscillator operated far below threshold. The bandwidths of the photon pairs are 11.4 MHz and 20.8MHz for two different HG modes respectively, therefore the photons can be stored in cold Rubidium atomic ensembles. The non-classical properties of HG modes are clearly verified by the violation of Cauchy-Schwarz inequality. Our study provides an effective way to generate photon pairs with narrow bandwidth in high order spatial modes for high dimensional quantum communication.

  12. Optical feedback cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy with a 3.24 μm interband cascade laser

    SciTech Connect

    Manfred, K. M.; Ritchie, G. A. D.; Lang, N.; Röpcke, J.; Helden, J. H. van

    2015-06-01

    The development of interband cascade lasers (ICLs) has made the strong C-H transitions in the 3 μm spectral region increasingly accessible. We present the demonstration of a single mode distributed feedback ICL coupled to a V-shaped optical cavity in an optical feedback cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (OF-CEAS) experiment. We achieved a minimum detectable absorption coefficient, α{sub min}, of (7.1±0.2)×10{sup −8} cm{sup −1} for a spectrum of CH{sub 4} at 3.24 μm with a two second acquisition time (100 scans averaged). This corresponds to a detection limit of 3 ppb CH{sub 4} at atmospheric pressure, which is comparable to previously reported OF-CEAS instruments with diode lasers or quantum cascade lasers. The ability to frequency lock an ICL source in the important 3 μm region to an optical cavity holds great promise for future spectroscopic applications.

  13. REAL TIME CONTINUOUS MEASUREMENTS OF [CO2] AND δ13C AT MULTIPLE LOCATIONS USING CAVITY ENHANCED LASER ABSORPTION

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAlexander, W. I.; Rau, G. H.; Dobeck, L.; Spangler, L.

    2009-12-01

    A commercial instrument (Los Gatos Research, model 908-0003) utilizing Cavity Enhanced Laser Absorption Spectroscopy was deployed in 2009 at the ZERT carbon release site (Bozeman, MT) for real time measurement of above-ground CO2 concentration and isotope ratio (δ13C). An automated switching system sampled 13 different locations in the field, as well as two known references, over an 8 day period. Real-time Keeling plots were constructed showing distinct signatures of soil (-27.0 ‰) and fossil (-56.0 ‰) sources compared to background air (-8.2 ‰). Instrument performance gave 0.2 ‰ precision with only 100 seconds of averaging per inlet. Sequential sampling of the various inlets gave a temporal and physical mapping of the CO2 release plume that is difficult to obtain using more conventional techniques. The figures show the nature and quality of the data from one of the locations. Details concerning instrument performance, systematics, calibration, and data processing will be discussed. Fig1: Time chart of CO2 concentration and isotope ratio δ13C from one of 13 sample inlet locations at ZERT release field, July, 2009. Fig2: Keeling plot of data from Fig1 illustrating the two source mixing of soil (-27 ‰) and fossil (-56 ‰) CO2 with background air.

  14. Fast Carbon Isotope Analysis of CO2 Using Cavity Enhanced Laser Absorption: Water Effects and Extended Dynamic Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAlexander, W. I.; Fellers, R.; Owano, T. G.; Baer, D. S.

    2010-12-01

    Fast, precise, and accurate measurement of δ13C (13C / 12C in CO2) of carbon dioxide is desirable for a number of applications including atmospheric chemistry and carbon sequestering. Recent advances in laser absorption spectroscopy, such as cavity enhanced techniques, have enabled field portable instruments which have a number of advantages over traditional, laboratory-based mass spectroscopy systems. We report on the continued development of an analyzer, based on a patented laser absorption technique (off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy or Off-Axis ICOS), which measures CO2 concentration, δ13C, and H2O concentration. The analyzer operates at 1Hz and achieves an isotope precision of 0.25‰ (standard deviation) for δ13C with less than one minute of averaging. In addition, recent advances have allowed for the simultaneous measurement of water during the carbon isotope measurement. The instrument reports a dry mole fraction for CO2 and compensates for water broadening in the spectroscopic measurement of δ13C. A multi-point calibration routine has been developed to allow the instrument to fully realize an operational range of 300ppmV to 10% CO2 with a minimal number of reference gases. Details concerning these advances will be discussed.

  15. Cavity-enhanced quantum-cascade laser-based instrument for carbon monoxide measurements.

    PubMed

    Provencal, Robert; Gupta, Manish; Owano, Thomas G; Baer, Douglas S; Ricci, Kenneth N; O'Keefe, Anthony; Podolske, James R

    2005-11-01

    An autonomous instrument based on off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy has been developed and successfully deployed for measurements of carbon monoxide in the troposphere and tropopause onboard a NASA DC-8 aircraft. The instrument (Carbon Monoxide Gas Analyzer) consists of a measurement cell comprised of two high-reflectivity mirrors, a continuous-wave quantum-cascade laser, gas sampling system, control and data-acquisition electronics, and data-analysis software. CO measurements were determined from high-resolution CO absorption line shapes obtained by tuning the laser wavelength over the R(7) transition of the fundamental vibration band near 2172.8 cm(-1). The instrument reports CO mixing ratio (mole fraction) at a 1-Hz rate based on measured absorption, gas temperature, and pressure using Beer's Law. During several flights in May-June 2004 and January 2005 that reached altitudes of 41,000 ft (12.5 km), the instrument recorded CO values with a precision of 0.2 ppbv (1-s averaging time) and an accuracy limited by the reference CO gas cylinder (uncertainty < 1.0%). Despite moderate turbulence and measurements of particulate-laden airflows, the instrument operated consistently and did not require any maintenance, mirror cleaning, or optical realignment during the flights. PMID:16270560

  16. Long wave infrared cavity-enhanced sensors using quantum cascade lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taubman, Matthew S.; Scott, David C.; Myers, Tanya L.; Cannon, Bret D.

    2005-11-01

    Quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) are becoming well known as convenient and stable semiconductor laser sources operating in the mid- to long-wave infrared, and are able to be fabricated to operate virtually anywhere in the 3.5 to 25 micron region. This makes them an ideal choice for infrared chemical sensing, a topic of great interest at present, spanning at least three critical areas: national security, environmental monitoring and protection, and the early diagnosis of disease through breath analysis. There are many different laser-based spectroscopic chemical sensor architectures in use today, from simple direct detection through to more complex and highly sensitive systems. Many current sensor needs can be met by combining QCLs and appropriate sensor architectures, those needs ranging from UAV-mounted surveillance systems, through to larger ultra-sensitive systems for airport security. In this paper we provide an overview of various laser-based spectroscopic sensing techniques, pointing out advantages and disadvantages of each. As part of this process, we include our own results and observations for techniques under development at PNNL. We also present the latest performance of our ultra-quiet QCL control electronics now being commercialized, and explore how using optimized supporting electronics enables increased sensor performance and decreased sensor footprint for given applications.

  17. Long wave infrared cavity-enhanced sensors using quantum cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Taubman, Matthew S.; Scott, David C.; Myers, Tanya L.; Cannon, Bret D.

    2005-12-30

    Quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) are becoming well known as convenient and stable semiconductor laser sources operating in the mid- to long-wave infrared, and are able to be fabricated to operate virtually anywhere in the 3.5 to 25 micron region. This makes them an ideal choice for infrared chemical sensing, a topic of great interest at present, spanning at least three critical areas: national security, environmental monitoring and protection, and the early diagnosis of disease through breath analysis. There are many different laser-based spectroscopic chemical sensor architectures in use today, from simple direct detection through to more complex and highly sensitive systems. Many current sensor needs can be met by combining QCLs and appropriate sensor architectures, those needs ranging from UAV-mounted surveillance systems, through to larger ultra-sensitive systems for airport security. In this paper we provide an overview of various laser-based spectroscopic sensing techniques, pointing out advantages and disadvantages of each. As part of this process, we include our own results and observations for techniques under development at PNNL. We also present the latest performance of our ultra-quiet QCL control electronics now being commercialized, and explore how using optimized supporting electronics enables increased sensor performance and decreased sensor footprint for given applications.

  18. Time-resolved in situ detection of CO in a shock tube using cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy with a quantum-cascade laser near 4.6 µm.

    PubMed

    Sun, Kai; Wang, Shengkai; Sur, Ritobrata; Chao, Xing; Jeffries, Jay B; Hanson, Ronald K

    2014-10-01

    Cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS) using a mid-infrared DFB quantum-cascade laser is reported for sensitive time-resolved (10 μs) in situ CO measurements in a shock tube. Off-axis alignment and fast scanning of the laser wavelength were used to minimize coupling noise in a low-finesse cavity. An absorption gain factor of 91 was demonstrated, which enabled sub-ppm detection sensitivity for gas temperatures of 1000-2100K in a 15 cm diameter shock tube. This substantial improvement in detection sensitivity compared to conventional single-pass absorption measurements, shows great potential for the study of reaction pathways of high-temperature combustion kinetics mechanisms in shock tubes. PMID:25322031

  19. Molecular frequency reference at 1.56  μm using a 12C16O overtone transition with the noise-immune cavity-enhanced optical heterodyne molecular spectroscopy method.

    PubMed

    Saraf, Shailendhar; Berceau, Paul; Stochino, Alberto; Byer, Robert; Lipa, John

    2016-05-15

    We report on a molecular clock based on the interrogation of the 3ν rotational-vibrational combination band at 1563 nm of carbon monoxide C1612O. The laser stabilization scheme is based on the noise-immune cavity-enhanced optical heterodyne molecular spectroscopy (NICE-OHMS) technique in frequency modulation (FM) saturation spectroscopy. We use a high-finesse ultra-low expansion (ULE) glass optical cavity with CO as the molecular reference for long-term stabilization of the cavity resonance. We report an Allan deviation of 1.8×10-12 at 1 s that improves to ∼3.5×10-14 with 1000 s of averaging. PMID:27176959

  20. Using a fourth-generation cavity enhanced spectrometer to isotopically investigate nitrous oxide emissions from biochar amended soils.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabenhofer, Jutta; Dercon, Gerd; Heiling, Maria; Mayr, Leo; Resch, Christian; Hood-Nowotny, Rebecca

    2016-04-01

    Research into the impacts of biochar on key processes in the nitrogen cycle is important to understand biochar's potential role in sustainable agriculture. There is conflicting evidence that biochar can reduce globally significant greenhouse gas emissions, especially N2O, one of the most important greenhouse gases in agriculture. However to date there is little information on the mechanisms involved. The source of N2O is dependent on the physical, chemical and biological status of the soil at a microbial scale and we need to understand how biochar influences it. Using the 15N2O gas flux method combined with gross rate measurements of nitrification and modelling, it should be possible to determine the parameters which drive N2O emissions and to evaluate the specific impact of biochar on these important N loss processes. To date the scope of isotopic studies on nitrous oxide emissions have been limited, due in part to technical and infrastructural access to complex and expensive mass spectrometry. With the advent of laser based systems these logistical and analytical constraints could be overcome and allow for a deeper and geographically more representative, understanding and assessment of the role of biochar in reducing nitrous oxide emissions from soil. In this study we have developed a simple method for investigated nitrous oxide emissions from soils amended with biochar, employing state of the art stable isotope techniques, using a fourth-generation cavity enhanced absorption technique a variant of conventional Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy (CRDS) for measurement of isotopes of nitrous oxide. We will present methodologies used and results from these experiments, techniques that should path the way for a greater global understand nitrous oxide emissions from soils.

  1. Walk-Off-Induced Modulation Instability, Temporal Pattern Formation, and Frequency Comb Generation in Cavity-Enhanced Second-Harmonic Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leo, F.; Hansson, T.; Ricciardi, I.; De Rosa, M.; Coen, S.; Wabnitz, S.; Erkintalo, M.

    2016-01-01

    We derive a time-domain mean-field equation to model the full temporal and spectral dynamics of light in singly resonant cavity-enhanced second-harmonic generation systems. We show that the temporal walk-off between the fundamental and the second-harmonic fields plays a decisive role under realistic conditions, giving rise to rich, previously unidentified nonlinear behavior. Through linear stability analysis and numerical simulations, we discover a new kind of quadratic modulation instability which leads to the formation of optical frequency combs and associated time-domain dissipative structures. Our numerical simulations show excellent agreement with recent experimental observations of frequency combs in quadratic nonlinear media [Phys. Rev. A 91, 063839 (2015)]. Thus, in addition to unveiling a new, experimentally accessible regime of nonlinear dynamics, our work enables predictive modeling of frequency comb generation in cavity-enhanced second-harmonic generation systems. We expect our findings to have wide impact on the study of temporal and spectral dynamics in a diverse range of dispersive, quadratically nonlinear resonators.

  2. Light emitting diode cavity enhanced differential optical absorption spectroscopy (LED-CE-DOAS): a novel technique for monitoring atmospheric trace gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thalman, Ryan M.; Volkamer, Rainer M.

    2009-08-01

    The combination of Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy (CEAS) with broad-band light sources (e.g. Light- Emitting Diodes, LEDs) lends itself to the application of cavity enhanced DOAS (CE-DOAS) to perform sensitive and selective point measurements of multiple trace gases with a single instrument. In contrast to other broad-band CEAS techniques, CE-DOAS relies only on the measurement of relative intensity changes, i.e., does not require knowledge of the light intensity in the absence of trace gases and aerosols (I0). We have built a prototype LED-CE-DOAS instrument in the blue spectral range (420-490nm) to measure nitrogen dioxide (NO2), glyoxal (CHOCHO), iodine monoxide (IO), water (H2O) and oxygen dimers (O4). Aerosol extinction is retrieved at two wavelengths by means of observing water and O4 and measuring pressure, temperature and relative humidity independently. The instrument components are presented, and the approach to measure aerosol extinction is demonstrated by means of a set of experiments where laboratory generated monodisperse aerosols are added to the cavity. The aerosol extinction cross section agrees well with Mie calculations, demonstrating that our setup enables measurements of the above gases in open cavity mode.

  3. Optical rectification and down-conversion of fs pulses into mid-IR and THz range in GaSe1-xSx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, Yu. M.; Lanskii, G. V.; Kokh, K. A.; Svetlichnyi, V. A.

    2015-12-01

    Design of top S-doped GaSe growth technology is completed. New methods for characterization of high optical quality crystals are proposed that allowed selection optimally doped crystals. Frequency conversion of fs pulses into 6.5-35 μm and into 0.2-4.5 THz is realized. S-doped crystals demonstrated advantages from 50-70% in the first experiments up to 8.5-15 times in the following experiments depending on experimental conditions.

  4. Frequency down-conversion of solid-state laser sources to the mid-infrared spectral range using non-oxide nonlinear crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Valentin

    2015-07-01

    The development of parametric devices down-converting the laser frequency to the mid-infrared (3-30 μm) based on non-oxide nonlinear optical crystals is reviewed. Such devices, pumped by solid-state laser systems operating in the near-infrared, fill in this spectral gap where no such lasers exist, on practically all time scales, from continuous-wave to femtosecond regime. All important results obtained so far with difference-frequency generation, optical parametric oscillation, generation and amplification are presented in a comparative manner, illustrating examples of recent achievements are given in more detail, and some special issues such as continuum and frequency comb generation or pulse shaping are also discussed. The vital element in any frequency-conversion process is the nonlinear optical crystal and this represents one of the major limitations for achieving high energies and average powers in the mid-infrared although the broad spectral tunability seems not to be a problem. Hence, an overview of the available non-oxide nonlinear optical materials, emphasizing new developments such as wide band-gap, engineered (mixed), and quasi-phase-matched crystals, is also included.

  5. Controllable synthesis and down-conversion properties of flower-like NaY(MoO{sub 4}){sub 2} microcrystals via polyvinylpyrrolidone-mediated

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Han; Yan, Xiaohong; Wang, Xiangfu

    2013-08-15

    Double alkaline rare-earth molybdates NaY(MoO{sub 4}){sub 2} with multilayered flower-like architectures have been successfully synthesized via hydrothermal method in polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)-modified processes. The crystal structure and morphology of the obtained products were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It was found that reaction time and the amount of PVP have crucial influences on the morphology of the resulting novel microstructures. Under 450 nm excitation, Ho{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+} co-doped NaY(MoO{sub 4}){sub 2} samples exhibit 539 nm green emission and 960–1200 nm broadband near-infrared emission, corresponding to the characteristic lines of Ho{sup 3+} and Yb{sup 3+}, respectively. Moreover, increasing Yb{sup 3+} doping enhances the energy transfer efficiency from Ho{sup 3+} to Yb{sup 3+}. - Graphical abstract: Low and high-magnification SEM images demonstrate the perfect flower-like NaY(MoO{sub 4}){sub 2} prepared in the presence of PVP; Detailed TEM and HRTEM images further manifest the single-crystalline feature. Highlights: • NaY(MoO{sub 4}){sub 2} flower-like microstructures were synthesized by hydrothermal method using polyvinylpyrrolidone. • Polyvinylpyrrolidone induces the growth of the NaY(MoO{sub 4}){sub 2} to form multilayered architectures. • Flowerlike NaY(MoO{sub 4}){sub 2}: Ho{sup 3+}, Yb{sup 3+} phosphors were investigated as a downconversion layer candidate.

  6. The down-conversion and up-conversion photoluminescence properties of Na{sub 0.5}Bi{sub 0.5}TiO{sub 3}:Yb{sup 3+}/Pr{sup 3+} ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Yinpeng; Luo, Laihui Wang, Jia; Zuo, Qianghui; Yao, Yongjie; Li, Weiping

    2015-07-28

    Na{sub 0.5}Bi{sub 0.5−x−y}Yb{sub x}Pr{sub y}TiO{sub 3} (NBT:xYb/yPr) ceramics with different Yb and Pr contents are prepared. Both the down-conversion (DC) and up-conversion (UC) photoluminescence (PL) of the ceramics via 453 and 980 nm excitation, respectively, are investigated. The effect of Yb{sup 3+} and Pr{sup 3+} doping contents on the DC and UC PL is significantly different from each other. Furthermore, the UC PL of the ceramics as a function of temperatures is measured to investigate the UC process in detail. Based on energy level diagram of Pr{sup 3+} and Yb{sup 3+} ions and the DC and UC PL spectra, the DC and UC PL mechanisms of Pr{sup 3+} and Yb{sup 3+} ions are discussed. Especially, the UC PL mechanism is clarified, which is different from the previously reported literature. Also, the temperature sensing properties of the ceramics are studied based on the photoluminescence ratio technique, using the thermal coupling energy levels of Pr{sup 3+}.

  7. High purity bright single photon source.

    PubMed

    Neergaard-Nielsen, J S; Nielsen, B M; Takahashi, H; Vistnes, A I; Polzik, E S

    2007-06-25

    Using cavity-enhanced non-degenerate parametric down-conversion, we have built a frequency tunable source of heralded single photons with a narrow bandwidth of 8 MHz, making it compatible with atomic quantum memories. The photon state is 70% pure single photon as characterized by a tomographic measurement and reconstruction of the quantum state, revealing a clearly negative Wigner function. Furthermore, it has a spectral brightness of ~1,500 photons/s per MHz bandwidth, making it one of the brightest single photon sources available. We also investigate the correlation function of the down-converted fields using a combination of two very distinct detection methods; photon counting and homodyne measurement. PMID:19547121

  8. Ultrasensitive, real-time analysis of biomarkers in breath using tunable external cavity laser and off-axis cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayrakli, Ismail; Akman, Hatice

    2015-03-01

    A robust biomedical sensor for ultrasensitive detection of biomarkers in breath based on a tunable external cavity laser (ECL) and an off-axis cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (OA-CEAS) using an amplitude stabilizer is developed. A single-mode, narrow-linewidth, tunable ECL is demonstrated. A broadly coarse wavelength tuning range of 720 cm-1 for the spectral range between 6890 and 6170 cm-1 is achieved by rotating the diffraction grating forming a Littrow-type external-cavity configuration. A mode-hop-free tuning range of 1.85 cm-1 is obtained. The linewidths below 140 kHz are recorded. The ECL is combined with an OA-CEAS to perform laser chemical sensing. Our system is able to detect any molecule in breath at concentrations to the ppbv range that have absorption lines in the spectral range between 1450 and 1620 nm. Ammonia is selected as target molecule to evaluate the performance of the sensor. Using the absorption line of ammonia at 6528.76 cm-1, a minimum detectable absorption coefficient of approximately 1×10-8 cm-1 is demonstrated for 256 averages. This is achieved for a 1.4-km absorption path length and a 2-s data-acquisition time. These results yield a detection sensitivity of approximately 8.6×10-10 cm-1 Hz-1/2. Ammonia in exhaled breath is analyzed and found in a concentration of 870 ppb for our example.

  9. Mid-infrared concentration-modulated noise-immune cavity-enhanced optical heterodyne molecular spectroscopy of a continuous supersonic expansion discharge source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talicska, Courtney N.; Porambo, Michael W.; Perry, Adam J.; McCall, Benjamin J.

    2016-06-01

    Concentration-modulated noise-immune cavity-enhanced optical heterodyne molecular spectroscopy (NICE-OHMS) is implemented for the first time on a continuous gas-flow pinhole supersonic expansion discharge source for the study of cooled molecular ions. The instrument utilizes a continuous-wave optical parametric oscillator easily tunable from 2.5 to 3.9 μm and demonstrates a noise equivalent absorption of ˜1 × 10-9 cm-1. The effectiveness of concentration-modulated NICE-OHMS is tested through the acquisition of transitions in the ν1 fundamental band of HN2+ centered near 3234 cm-1, with a signal-to-noise of ˜40 obtained for the strongest transitions. The technique is used to characterize the cooling abilities of the supersonic expansion discharge source itself, and a Boltzmann analysis determines a rotational temperature of ˜29 K for low rotational states of HN2+. Further improvements are discussed that will enable concentration-modulated NICE-OHMS to reach its full potential for the detection of molecular ions formed in supersonic expansion discharges.

  10. Development of an airborne three-channel LED-based broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectrometer: towards an improved understanding of nighttime chemistry of NO3 and N2O5 in northwest Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Bin

    2015-04-01

    A three-channel cavity-enhanced absorption spectrometer capable of covering a broad UV-vis spectrum range has been developed in Cambridge for deployment on board the UK FAAM BAe-146 atmospheric research aircraft for measuring in situ concentrations of important atmospheric absorbers such as NO3, N2O5, NO2, IO and H2O and also aerosol extinction. So far this instrument has been deployed in two aircraft campaigns (the ROle of Nighttime chemistry in controlling the Oxidative Capacity of the atmOsphere, RONOCO, during July 2010 and January 2011; and the Coordinated Airborne Studies in the Tropics, CAST, during February 2014) with focuses on measuring NO2/NO3/N2O5 (for RONOCO) and IO (for CAST). In this talk, I will start by briefly presenting the working principle, design consideration, sensitivity test as well as intercomparison results of this novel aircraft instrument. I will then move on to present recent results from the analysis of the RONOCO campaign data, to illustrate the spatial and temporal variability of nighttime chemistry processes revealed by the high-resolution NO3 and N2O5 data collected. Significant improvements were made towards a better understanding of the oxidation of reactive VOCs by NO3 and O3 and the contribution of peroxy radicals (HO2 and RO2, of which only HO2 was successfully measured) to NO3 direct losses, and towards determining factors (organics and nitrate components of the aerosol particles, and relative humidity) that greatly influence the rate of N2O5 uptake by aerosol particles as well as directly probing the role of cloud, rain and ice scavenging in removing N2O5, in this typical northwest European environment.

  11. Adsorption of cytochrome c to silica surfaces studied using evanescent wave broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, L. J.; van der Sneppen, L.; Peverall, R.; Hancock, G.; Ritchie, G. A. D.

    2010-08-01

    The adsorption of cytochrome c (cyt c) to a silica surface has been studied by use of evanescent wave broadband cavityenhanced absorption spectroscopy (EW-BBCEAS). Visible radiation from a supercontinuum source is coupled into an optical cavity consisting of a pair of broadband high reflectivity mirrors, and a total internal reflection (TIR) event at the prism/water interface. Aqueous solutions of cyt c are placed onto the TIR footprint on the prism surface and the subsequent protein adsorption is probed by the resulting evanescent wave. The time integrated cavity output is directed into a spectrometer, where it is dispersed and analysed. The high spectral brilliance of the SC affords a baseline noise comparable to evanescent wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy (EW-CRDS), and the broadband nature of the source allows observation of a wide spectral range (ca 250 nm in the visible). The system is calibrated by measuring the absorption spectra of dyes of a known absorbance. Absorption spectra of cyt c are obtained for both S and P polarized radiation, allowing information about the orientation of the adsorbed protein to be extracted.

  12. Wavelength-resolved optical extinction measurements of aerosols using broad-band cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy over the spectral range of 445-480 nm.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Weixiong; Dong, Meili; Chen, Weidong; Gu, Xuejun; Hu, Changjin; Gao, Xiaoming; Huang, Wei; Zhang, Weijun

    2013-02-19

    Despite the significant progress in the measurements of aerosol extinction and absorption using spectroscopy approaches such as cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) and photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS), the widely used single-wavelength instruments may suffer from the interferences of gases absorption present in the real environment. A second instrument for simultaneous measurement of absorbing gases is required to characterize the effect of light extinction resulted from gases absorption. We present in this paper the development of a blue light-emitting diode (LED)-based incoherent broad-band cavity-enhanced spectroscopy (IBBCEAS) approach for broad-band measurements of wavelength-resolved aerosol extinction over the spectral range of 445-480 nm. This method also allows for simultaneous measurement of trace gases absorption present in the air sample using the same instrument. On the basis of the measured wavelength-dependent aerosol extinction cross section, the real part of the refractive index (RI) can be directly retrieved in a case where the RI does not vary strongly with the wavelength over the relevant spectral region. Laboratory-generated monodispersed aerosols, polystyrene latex spheres (PSL) and ammonium sulfate (AS), were employed for validation of the RI determination by IBBCEAS measurements. On the basis of a Mie scattering model, the real parts of the aerosol RI were retrieved from the measured wavelength-resolved extinction cross sections for both aerosol samples, which are in good agreement with the reported values. The developed IBBCEAS instrument was deployed for simultaneous measurements of aerosol extinction coefficient and NO(2) concentration in ambient air in a suburban site during two representative days. PMID:23320530

  13. Online investigation of respiratory quotients in Pinus sylvestris and Picea abies during drought and shading by means of cavity-enhanced Raman multi-gas spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hanf, Stefan; Fischer, Sarah; Hartmann, Henrik; Keiner, Robert; Trumbore, Susan; Popp, Jürgen; Frosch, Torsten

    2015-07-01

    Photosynthesis and respiration are major components of the plant carbon balance. During stress, like drought, carbohydrate supply from photosynthesis is reduced and the Krebs cycle respiration must be fueled with other stored carbon compounds. However, the dynamics of storage use are still unknown. The respiratory quotient (RQ, CO2 released per O2 consumed during respiration) is an excellent indicator of the nature of the respiration substrate. In plant science, however, online RQ measurements have been challenging or even impossible so far due to very small gas exchange fluxes during respiration. Here we apply cavity-enhanced multi-gas Raman spectrometry (CERS) for online in situ RQ measurements in drought-tolerant pine (Pinus sylvestris [L.]) and drought-intolerant spruce (Picea abies [L. H. Karst]). Two different treatments, drought and shading, were applied to reduce photosynthesis and force dependency on stored substrates. Changes in respiration rates and RQ values were continuously monitored over periods of several days with low levels of variance. The results show that both species switched from COH-dominated respiration (RQ = 1.0) to a mixture of substrates during shading (RQ = 0.77-0.81), while during drought only pine did so (RQ = 0.75). The gas phase measurements were complemented by concentration measurements of non-structural carbohydrates and lipids. These first results suggest a physiological explanation for greater drought tolerance in pine. CERS was proven as powerful technique for non-consumptive and precise real-time monitoring of respiration rates and respirational quotients for the investigation of plant metabolism under drought stress conditions that are predicted to increase with future climate change. PMID:26016682

  14. Feasibility Study of Using Breath Ammonia Analysis Based on Off-Axis Cavity-Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy with External Cavity Diode Laser for Noninvasive Real-Time Diagnosis of Helicobacter Pylori.

    PubMed

    Bayrakli, Ismail; Turkmen, Aysenur; Cem Kockar, Muhammet

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the feasibility of using breath ammonia analysis based on off-axis cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (OA-CEAS) with an external-cavity diode laser (ECL) for noninvasive, real-time diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection. Analyses are performed for the breath of 15 healthy volunteers, and eight children and 19 adults with HP infection. The range of ammonia levels for healthy participants is determined to be between 178 and 610 ppb, whereas the ranges for child and adult patients with HP infection are measured to be 457-2470 ppb and 450-2990 ppb, respectively. The ammonia concentrations for patients with HP infection are significantly higher than the concentrations for healthy volunteers. However, no sharp boundary between the ammonia concentrations in the breath of patients with HP infection and healthy volunteers is observed. No correlation between breath ammonia and either body mass index (BMI) or age is found. The reported results suggest that our breath ammonia measurement system has the potential for future use in easy, noninvasive diagnosis of HP infection. PMID:27296306

  15. Frequency-feedback cavity enhanced spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Hovde, David Christian; Gomez, Anthony

    2015-08-18

    A spectrometer comprising an optical cavity, a light source capable of producing light at one or more wavelengths transmitted by the cavity and with the light directed at the cavity, a detector and optics positioned to collect light transmitted by the cavity, feedback electronics causing oscillation of amplitude of the optical signal on the detector at a frequency that depends on cavity losses, and a sensor measuring the oscillation frequency to determine the cavity losses.

  16. Nonlocality of high-dimensional two-photon orbital angular momentum states

    SciTech Connect

    Aiello, A.; Oemrawsingh, S. S. R.; Eliel, E. R.; Woerdman, J. P.

    2005-11-15

    We propose an interferometric method to investigate the nonlocality of high-dimensional two-photon orbital angular momentum states generated by spontaneous parametric down conversion. We incorporate two half-integer spiral phase plates and a variable-reflectivity output beam splitter into a Mach-Zehnder interferometer to build an orbital angular momentum analyzer. This setup enables testing the nonlocality of high-dimensional two-photon states by repeated use of the Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt inequality.

  17. Hyperfine-resolved 3.4-{mu}m spectroscopy of CH{sub 3}I with a widely tunable difference frequency generation source and a cavity-enhanced cell: A case study of a local Coriolis interaction between the v{sub 1}=1 and (v{sub 2},v{sub 6}{sup l})=(1,2{sup 2}) states

    SciTech Connect

    Okubo, Sho; Nakayama, Hirotaka; Sasada, Hiroyuki

    2011-01-15

    Saturated absorption spectra of the {nu}{sub 1} fundamental band of CH{sub 3}I are recorded with a cavity-enhanced cell and a tunable difference frequency generation source having an 86-cm{sup -1} range. The recorded spectral lines are 250 kHz wide, and most of them are resolved into the individual hyperfine components. The Coriolis interaction between the v{sub 1}=1 and (v{sub 2},v{sub 6}{sup l})=(1,2{sup 2}) states locally perturbing the hyperfine structures is analyzed to yield the Coriolis and hyperfine coupling constants with uncertainties similar to those in typical microwave spectroscopy. The spectrometer has demonstrated the potential for precisely determining the energy structure in the vibrational excited states.

  18. High resolution BPMS with integrated gain correction system

    SciTech Connect

    Wendt, M.; Briegel, C.; Eddy, N.; Fellenz, B.; Gianfelice, E.; Prieto, P.; Rechenmacher, R.; Voy, D.; Terunuma, N.; Urakawa, J.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2009-08-01

    High resolution beam position monitors (BPM) are an essential tool to achieve and reproduce a low vertical beam emittance at the KEK Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) damping ring. The ATF damping ring (DR) BPMs are currently upgraded with new high resolution read-out electronics. Based on analog and digital down-conversion techniques, the upgrade includes an automatic gain calibration system to correct for slow drift effects and ensure high reproducible beam position readings. The concept and its technical realization, as well as preliminary results of beam studies are presented.

  19. Cavity-Enhanced Second-Order Nonlinear Photonic Logic Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trivedi, Rahul; Khankhoje, Uday K.; Majumdar, Arka

    2016-05-01

    A large obstacle for realizing photonic logic is the weak optical nonlinearity of available materials, which results in large power consumption. In this paper, we present the theoretical design of all-optical logic with second-order (χ(2 )) nonlinear bimodal cavities and their networks. Using semiclassical models derived from the Wigner quasiprobability distribution function, we analyze the power consumption and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of networks implementing an optical and gate and an optical latch. A comparison between the second- and third-order (χ(3 )) optical logic reveals that, while the χ(3 ) design outperforms the χ(2 ) design in terms of the SNR for the same input power, employing the χ(3 ) nonlinearity necessitates the use of cavities with ultrahigh-quality factors (Q ˜106) to achieve a gate power consumption comparable to that of the χ(2 ) design at significantly smaller quality factors (Q ˜104). Using realistic estimates of the χ(2 ) and χ(3 ) nonlinear susceptibilities of available materials, we show that, at achievable quality factors (Q ˜104), the χ(2 ) design is an order of magnitude more energy efficient than the corresponding χ(3 ) design.

  20. Cavity-Enhanced Measurements of Defect Spins in Silicon Carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calusine, Greg; Politi, Alberto; Awschalom, David D.

    2016-07-01

    The identification of new solid-state defect-qubit candidates in widely used semiconductors has the potential to enable the use of nanofabricated devices for enhanced qubit measurement and control operations. In particular, the recent discovery of optically active spin states in silicon carbide thin films offers a scalable route for incorporating defect qubits into on-chip photonic devices. Here, we demonstrate the use of 3C silicon carbide photonic crystal cavities for enhanced excitation of color-center defect spin ensembles in order to increase measured photoluminescence signal count rates, optically detected magnetic-resonance signal intensities, and optical spin initialization rates. We observe an up to a factor of 30 increase in the photoluminescence and optically detected magnetic-resonance signals from Ky5 color centers excited by cavity-resonant excitation and increase the rate of ground-state spin initialization by approximately a factor of 2. Furthermore, we show that the 705-fold reduction in excitation mode volume and enhanced excitation and collection efficiencies provided by the structures can be used to overcome inhomogenous broadening in order to facilitate the study of defect-qubit subensemble properties. These results highlight some of the benefits that nanofabricated devices offer for engineering the local photonic environment of color-center defect qubits to enable applications in quantum information and sensing.

  1. Cavity-enhanced coherent light scattering from a quantum dot

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Anthony J.; Lee, James P.; Ellis, David J. P.; Meany, Thomas; Murray, Eoin; Floether, Frederik F.; Griffths, Jonathan P.; Farrer, Ian; Ritchie, David A.; Shields, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    The generation of coherent and indistinguishable single photons is a critical step for photonic quantum technologies in information processing and metrology. A promising system is the resonant optical excitation of solid-state emitters embedded in wavelength-scale three-dimensional cavities. However, the challenge here is to reject the unwanted excitation to a level below the quantum signal. We demonstrate this using coherent photon scattering from a quantum dot in a micropillar. The cavity is shown to enhance the fraction of light that is resonantly scattered toward unity, generating antibunched indistinguishable photons that are 16 times narrower than the time-bandwidth limit, even when the transition is near saturation. Finally, deterministic excitation is used to create two-photon N00N states with which we make superresolving phase measurements in a photonic circuit. PMID:27152337

  2. Cavity-enhanced coherent light scattering from a quantum dot.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Anthony J; Lee, James P; Ellis, David J P; Meany, Thomas; Murray, Eoin; Floether, Frederik F; Griffths, Jonathan P; Farrer, Ian; Ritchie, David A; Shields, Andrew J

    2016-04-01

    The generation of coherent and indistinguishable single photons is a critical step for photonic quantum technologies in information processing and metrology. A promising system is the resonant optical excitation of solid-state emitters embedded in wavelength-scale three-dimensional cavities. However, the challenge here is to reject the unwanted excitation to a level below the quantum signal. We demonstrate this using coherent photon scattering from a quantum dot in a micropillar. The cavity is shown to enhance the fraction of light that is resonantly scattered toward unity, generating antibunched indistinguishable photons that are 16 times narrower than the time-bandwidth limit, even when the transition is near saturation. Finally, deterministic excitation is used to create two-photon N00N states with which we make superresolving phase measurements in a photonic circuit. PMID:27152337

  3. Artificial cavities enhance breeding bird densities in managed cottonwood forests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Twedt, D.J.; Henne-Kerr, J.L.

    2001-01-01

    The paucity of natural cavities within short-rotation hardwood agroforests restricts occupancy by cavity-nesting birds. However, providing 1.6 artificial nesting cavities (nest boxes)/ha within 3- to 10-year-old managed cottonwood forests in the Mississippi Alluvial Valley increased territory density of cavity-nesting birds. Differences in territory densities between forests with and without nest boxes increased as stands aged. Seven bird species initiated 38 nests in 173 boxes during 1997 and 39 nests in 172 boxes during 1998. Prothonotary warblers (Protonotaria citrea) and eastern bluebirds (Sialia sialis) accounted for 67% of nests; nearly all warbler nests were in 1.8-L, plastic-coated cardboard (paper) boxes, whereas bluebird nests were divided between paper boxes and 3.5-L wooden boxes. Larger-volume (16.5-L) wooden nest boxes were used by eastern screech owls (Otus asio) and great crested flycatchers (Myiarchus crinitus), but this box type often was usurped by honey bees (Apis mellifera). To enhance territory densities of cavity-nesting birds in cottonwood agroforests, we recommend placement of plastic-coated paper nest boxes, at a density of 0.5/ha, after trees are >4 years old but at least 2 years before anticipated timber harvest.

  4. Isotopic gas analysis through Purcell cavity enhanced Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrak, B.; Cooper, J.; Konthasinghe, K.; Peiris, M.; Djeu, N.; Hopkins, A. J.; Muller, A.

    2016-02-01

    Purcell enhanced Raman scattering (PERS) by means of a doubly resonant Fabry-Perot microcavity (mode volume ≈ 100 μm3 and finesse ≈ 30 000) has been investigated as a technique for isotopic ratio gas analysis. At the pump frequency, the resonant cavity supports a buildup of circulating power while simultaneously enabling Purcell spontaneous emission rate enhancement at the resonant Stokes frequency. The three most common isotopologues of CO2 gas were quantified, and a signal was obtained from 13C16O2 down to a partial pressure of 2 Torr. Due to its small size and low pump power needed (˜10 mW) PERS lends itself to miniaturization. Furthermore, since the cavity is resonant with the emission frequency, future improvements could allow it to serve as its own spectral analyzer and no separate spectroscopic device would be needed.

  5. Experimental demonstration of high two-photon time-energy entanglement

    SciTech Connect

    Ali Khan, Irfan; Howell, John C.

    2006-03-15

    We report on the experimental demonstration of high energy-time entanglement in two-photon states created in the process of spontaneous parametric down-conversion. We show that the classical variance product, which we violate by three orders of magnitude, actually represents a lower bound estimate of the number of information eigenmodes K. Explicit measurements estimate K to be greater than 100, with theoretical estimates predicting a value of as high as 1x10{sup 6}. These results provide incentive for the practical feasibility of large bandwidth quantum information processing, particularly in cryptography over large distances.

  6. Qutrits and ququarts in spontaneous parametric down-conversion, correlations and entanglement

    SciTech Connect

    Fedorov, M. V. Volkov, P. A.; Milhailova, J. M.

    2012-07-15

    We investigate features of biphoton qutrits and ququarts with the symmetry of biphoton wavefunctions fully taken into account. Entanglement quantifiers of such states are found as functions of qutrit and ququart parameters. For biphoton qutrits, a general relation between degrees of entanglement and polarization is established. In the case of biphoton ququarts, photon frequencies are considered as variables independent of polarization variables, with both polarization and frequency degrees of freedom equally contributing to the total ququart entanglement. Averaging over one of these two degrees of freedom is shown to reduce pure ququart states to mixed two-qubit states. The degree of polarization and degrees of correlations in mixed polarization states are investigated.

  7. Tunable frequency-up/down conversion in gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fibers.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Mohammed F; Biancalana, Fabio

    2015-09-15

    Based on the interplay between photoionization and Raman effects in gas-filled photonic crystal fibers, we propose a new optical device to control frequency conversion of ultrashort pulses. By tuning the input-pulse energy, the output spectrum can be either down-converted, up-converted, or even frequency-shift compensated. For low input energies, the Raman effect is dominant and leads to a redshift that increases linearly during propagation. For larger pulse energies, photoionization starts to take over the frequency-conversion process and induces a strong blueshift. The fiber-output pressure can be used as an additional degree of freedom to control the spectrum shift. PMID:26371900

  8. High speed readout electronics development for frequency-multiplexed kinetic inductance detector design optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourrion, O.; Vescovi, C.; Catalano, A.; Calvo, M.; D'Addabbo, A.; Goupy, J.; Boudou, N.; Macias-Perez, J. F.; Monfardini, A.

    2013-12-01

    Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors (MKID) are a promising solution for space-borne mm-wave astronomy. To optimize their design and make them insensitive to the ballistic phonons created by cosmic-ray interactions in the substrate, the phonon propagation in silicon must be studied. A dedicated fast readout electronics, using channelized Digital Down Conversion for monitoring up to 12 MKIDs over a 100 MHz bandwidth was developed. Thanks to the fast ADC sampling and steep digital filtering, In-phase and Quadrature samples, having a high dynamic range, are provided at ~ 2 Msps. This paper describes the technical solution chosen and the results obtained.

  9. Method to generate high efficient devices which emit high quality light for illumination

    DOEpatents

    Krummacher, Benjamin C.; Mathai, Mathew; Choong, Vi-En; Choulis, Stelios A.

    2009-06-30

    An electroluminescent apparatus includes an OLED device emitting light in the blue and green spectrums, and at least one down conversion layer. The down conversion layer absorbs at least part of the green spectrum light and emits light in at least one of the orange spectra and red spectra.

  10. Generation of high spectral purity photon-pairs with MgO-doped periodically poled lithium niobate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Mengying; Sun, Qichao; Xiang, Tong; Chen, Xianfeng

    2015-12-01

    We study the spectral correlation of photon pairs generated via type-II spontaneous parametric down conversion in periodically poled lithium niobate crystals. By performing Schmidt decomposition on the two-photon wavefunction, we calculate the spectral purity of the two-photon state under various pump laser characteristics and doping concentrations of MgO in lithium niobate crystals. Our results show that periodically poled 5% MgO doped lithium niobate is a good candidate to generate photon-pairs with high spectral purity at telecom wavelength.

  11. Highly stable piezoelectrically tunable optical cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möhle, Katharina; Kovalchuk, Evgeny V.; Döringshoff, Klaus; Nagel, Moritz; Peters, Achim

    2013-05-01

    We have implemented highly stable and tunable frequency references using optical high finesse cavities which incorporate a piezo actuator. As piezo material we used ceramic PZT, crystalline quartz, or PZN-PT single crystals. Lasers locked to these cavities show a relative frequency stability better than 1× 10^{-14}, which is most likely not limited by the piezo actuators. The piezo cavities can be electrically tuned over more than one free spectral range (>1.5 GHz) with only a minor decrease in frequency stability. Furthermore, we present a novel cavity design, where the piezo actuator is prestressed between the cavity spacer components. This design features a hermetically sealable intra cavity volume suitable for, e.g., cavity enhanced spectroscopy.

  12. Maintaining high-Q in an optical microresonator coated with high-aspect-ratio gold nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganta, D.; Dale, E. B.; Rosenberger, A. T.

    2013-10-01

    We report methods to coat fused-silica microresonators with solution-grown high-aspect-ratio (AR) gold nanorods (NRs). Microresonators coated using our method maintain an optical quality factor (Q) greater than 107 after coating. The more successful method involves silanization of the surface of the microresonator with 3-mercaptopropylmethyldimethoxysilane (MPMDMS), to enable the adhesion of gold NRs. The high-AR NR-coated microresonator combines the field enhancement of localized surface plasmon resonances with the cavity-enhanced evanescent components of high-Q whispering-gallery modes, making it useful for plasmonic sensing applications in the infrared. By coating with NRs having a different aspect ratio, the enhancement regime can be selected within a wide range of wavelengths.

  13. High-dimensional quantum nature of ghost angular Young's diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Lixiang; Leach, Jonathan; Jack, Barry; Padgett, Miles J.; Franke-Arnold, Sonja; She Weilong

    2010-09-15

    We propose a technique to characterize the dimensionality of entangled sources affected by any environment, including phase and amplitude masks or atmospheric turbulence. We illustrate this technique on the example of angular ghost diffraction using the orbital angular momentum (OAM) spectrum generated by a nonlocal double slit. We realize a nonlocal angular double slit by placing single angular slits in the paths of the signal and idler modes of the entangled light field generated by parametric down-conversion. Based on the observed OAM spectrum and the measured Shannon dimensionality spectrum of the possible quantum channels that contribute to Young's ghost diffraction, we calculate the associated dimensionality D{sub total}. The measured D{sub total} ranges between 1 and 2.74 depending on the opening angle of the angular slits. The ability to quantify the nature of high-dimensional entanglement is vital when considering quantum information protocols.

  14. Low Noise and Highly Linear Wideband CMOS RF Front-End for DVB-H Direct-Conversion Receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Ilku; Moon, Hyunwon; Woo, Doo Hyung

    In this paper, a wideband CMOS radio frequency (RF) front-end for digital video broadcasting-handheld (DVB-H) receiver is proposed. The RF front-end circuit is composed of a single-ended resistive feedback low noise amplifier (LNA), a single-to-differential amplifier, an I/Q down-conversion mixer with linearized transconductors employing third order intermodulation distortion cancellation, and a divide-by-two circuit with LO buffers. By employing a third order intermodulation (IMD3) cancellation technique and vertical NPN bipolar junction transistor (BJT) switching pair for an I/Q down-conversion mixer, the proposed RF front-end circuit has high linearity and low low-frequency noise performance. It is fabricated in a 0.18µm deep n-well CMOS technology and draws 12mA from a 1.8V supply voltage. It shows a voltage gain of 31dB, a noise figure (NF) lower than 2.6dB, and an IIP3 of -8dBm from 470MHz to 862MHz.

  15. High power narrowband 589 nm frequency doubled fibre laser source.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Luke; Feng, Yan; Calia, Domenico Bonaccini

    2009-08-17

    We demonstrate high-power high-efficiency cavity-enhanced second harmonic generation of an in-house built ultra-high spectral density (SBS-suppressed) 1178 nm narrowband Raman fibre amplifier. Up to 14.5 W 589 nm CW emission is achieved with linewidth Delta nu(589) < 7 MHz in a diffraction-limited beam, with peak external conversion efficiency of 86%. The inherently high spectral and spatial qualities of the 589 nm source are particularly suited to both spectroscopic and Laser Guide Star applications, given the seed laser can be easily frequency-locked to the Na D(2a) emission line. Further, we expect the technology to be extendable, at similar or higher powers, to wavelengths limited only by the seed-pump-pair availability. PMID:19687946

  16. Generating Periodic Terahertz Structures in a Relativistic Electron Beam through Frequency Down-Conversion of Optical Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Dunning, Michael

    2012-07-19

    We report generation of density modulation at terahertz (THz) frequencies in a relativistic electron beam through laser modulation of the beam longitudinal phase space. We show that by modulating the energy distribution of the beam with two lasers, density modulation at the difference frequency of the two lasers can be generated after the beam passes through a chicane. In this experiment, density modulation around 10 THz was generated by down-converting the frequencies of an 800 nm laser and a 1550 nm laser. The central frequency of the density modulation can be tuned by varying the laser wavelengths, beam energy chirp, or momentum compaction of the chicane. This technique can be applied to accelerator-based light sources for generation of coherent THz radiation and marks a significant advance toward tunable narrow-band THz sources.

  17. Introduction to the transverse spatial correlations in spontaneous parametric down-conversion through the biphoton birth zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneeloch, James; Howell, John C.

    2016-05-01

    As a tutorial to the spatial aspects of spontaneous parametric downconversion (SPDC), we present a detailed first-principles derivation of the transverse correlation width of photon pairs in degenerate collinear SPDC. This width defines the size of a biphoton birth zone, the region where the signal and idler photons are likely to be found when conditioning on the position of the destroyed pump photon. Along the way, we discuss the quantum-optical calculation of the amplitude for the SPDC process, as well as its simplified form for nearly collinear degenerate phase matching. Following this, we show how this biphoton amplitude can be approximated with a double-Gaussian wavefunction, and give a brief discussion of the measurement statistics (and subsequent convenience) of such double-Gaussian wavefunctions. Next, we use this approximation to get a simplified estimation of the transverse correlation width, and compare it to more accurate calculations as well as experimental results. We then conclude with a discussion of the concept of a biphoton birth zone, using it to develop intuition for the tradeoff between the first-order spatial coherence and bipohoton correlations in SPDC.

  18. Down-conversion luminescence and its temperature-sensing properties from Er3+-doped sodium bismuth titanate ferroelectric thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shanshan; Zheng, Shanshan; Zhou, Hong; Pan, Anlian; Wu, Guangheng; Liu, Jun-ming

    2015-11-01

    Here, we demonstrate outstanding temperature-sensing properties from Na0.5Bi0.49Er0.01TiO3 (NBT:Er) thin films. The perovskite phase for them is stable in the temperature range from 80 to 440 K. Interestingly, the Er doping enhances the ferroelectric polarization and introduces local dipolar, which are positive for temperature sensing. Pumped by a 488-nm laser, the NBT:Er thin films show strong green luminescence with two bands around 525 and 548 nm. The intensity ratio I 525/ I 548 can be used for temperature sensing, and the maximum sensitivity is about 2.3 × 10-3 K-1, higher than that from Er-doped silicon oxide. These suggest NBT:Er thin film is a promising candidate for temperature sensor.

  19. A 2-GHz Low-Power Down-Conversion Mixer in 0.18-μm CMOS Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jun-Da; Lin, Zhi-Ming; Row, Jeen-Sheen

    A low-voltage and low-power RF mixer for WCDMA applications is presented. The paper presents a novel topology mixer that leads to a better performance in terms of isolation and power consumption for low supply voltage. The measuring results of the proposed mixer achieve: 7dB power conversion gain, 10.4dB double side band (DSB) noise figure, -2dBm input third-order intercept point (IIP3), and the total dc power consumption of this mixer including output buffers is 2.2mW from a 1V supply voltage. The current output buffer is about 1.96mW, the excellent LO-RF, LO-IF and RF-IF isolation achieved up to 49dB, 39.5dB and 57.3dB, respectively.

  20. Time-Resolved Down-Conversion of 2-Aminopurine in a DNA Hairpin: Fluorescence Anisotropy and Solvent Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tourón Touceda, Patricia; Gelot, Thomas; Crégut, Olivier; Léonard, Jérémie; Haacke, Stefan

    2013-03-01

    Femtosecond fluorescence anisotropy decay measured by type II difference frequency generation provides new insight into the local structural dynamics of ΔP(-)PBS fragments of the HIV- 1 DNA primary binding sequence, labeled with 2-aminopurine.

  1. High Conversion Efficiency and Power Stability of 532 nm Generation from an External Frequency Doubling Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yang; Lin, Bai-Ke; Li, Ye; Zhang, Hong-Xi; Cao, Jian-Ping; Fang, Zhan-Jun; Li, Tian-Chu; Zang, Er-Jun

    2012-09-01

    We present a high-efficiency 532 nm green light conversion from an external cavity-enhanced second harmonic generation (SHG) with a periodically poled KTP crystal (PPKTP). The cavity is a bow-tie ring configuration with a unitized structure. When the impedance matching is optimized, the coupling efficiency of the fundamental is as high as 95%. Taking into account both the high power output of the second harmonic and the stability of the system, we obtain over 500 mW green passing through the output cavity mirror, corresponding to a net conversion efficiency higher than 75.2%. Under these operating conditions, the power stability is better than ±0.25% during 5 h. It is the highest conversion efficiency and power stability ever produced in the bow-tie ring cavity with PPKTP for 532 nm generation.

  2. Idler-free microwave photonic mixer integrated with a widely tunable and highly selective microwave photonic filter.

    PubMed

    Zou, Dan; Zheng, Xiaoping; Li, Shangyuan; Zhang, Hanyi; Zhou, Bingkun

    2014-07-01

    A novel structure consisting of an idler-free microwave photonic mixer integrated with a widely tunable and highly selective microwave photonic filter is presented, which is comprised of a spectrum-sliced broadband optical source, a dual-parallel Mach-Zehnder modulator (DPMZM), and a spatial light amplitude and phase processor (SLAPP). By adjusting the optical phase shift in the DPMZM, the dispersion-induced mixing power fading can be eliminated. By applying a phase processor with the SLAPP, the distortion of the mixing filter brought upon by third-order dispersion is also compensated. Experiments are performed and show that the up/down-conversion signal has a clean spectrum and the mixing filter can be tuned from 12 to 20 GHz without any change to the passband shape. The out-of-band suppression ratio of the mixing filter is more than 40 dB, and the 3 dB bandwidth is 140 MHz. PMID:24978780

  3. Realization and characterization of single-frequency tunable 637.2 nm high-power laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jieying; Bai, Jiandong; He, Jun; Wang, Junmin

    2016-07-01

    We report the preparation of narrow-linewidth 637.2 nm laser device by single-pass sum-frequency generation (SFG) of two infrared lasers at 1560.5 nm and 1076.9 nm in PPMgO:LN crystal. Over 8.75 W of single-frequency continuously tunable 637.2 nm laser is realized, and corresponding optical-optical conversion efficiency is 38.0%. We study the behavior of crystals with different poling periods. The detailed experiments show that the output red lasers have very good power stability and beam quality. This high-performance 637.2 nm laser is significant for the realization of high power ultra-violet (UV) 318.6 nm laser via cavity-enhanced frequency doubling. Narrow-linewidth 318.6 nm laser is important for Rydberg excitation of cesium atoms via single-photon transition.

  4. High-efficient near-infrared quantum cutting based on broadband absorption in Eu2+-Yb3+ co-doped glass for photovoltaic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zijun; Dai, Nengli; Yang, Luyun; Li, Jinyan

    2015-05-01

    We report that Eu2+-Yb3+ system with high luminescent quantum efficiency and broadband excitation could be playing a significant role in solar cells. This borosilicate glass used as conversion layer can efficiently minimize the energy loss of thermalization. The cooperative energy transfer between Eu2+ and Yb3+ realized the emission of greenish and near-infrared light simultaneously with the blue light of xenon lamp excitation. The emission peaks located at 980 nm and 1,030 nm are the characteristic emission of Yb3+ with the energy matches well with the bandgap of silicon solar cells. The luminescent quantum efficiency is up to 163.5 % with the radiation rate being considered. Given the broad excitation band, high quantum efficiency and excellent mechanical, thermal and chemical stability, this system can be useful as down-conversion layer for solar cells.

  5. Cavity-Enhanced Light Scattering in Optical Lattices to Probe Atomic Quantum Statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Mekhov, Igor B.; Maschler, Christoph; Ritsch, Helmut

    2007-03-09

    Different quantum states of atoms in optical lattices can be nondestructively monitored by off-resonant collective light scattering into a cavity. Angle resolved measurements of photon number and variance give information about atom-number fluctuations and pair correlations without single-site access. Observation at angles of diffraction minima provides information on quantum fluctuations insensitive to classical noise. For transverse probing, no photon is scattered into a cavity from a Mott insulator phase, while the photon number is proportional to the atom number for a superfluid.

  6. PCF-Based Cavity Enhanced Spectroscopic Sensors for Simultaneous Multicomponent Trace Gas Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Nakaema, Walter M.; Hao, Zuo-Qiang; Rohwetter, Philipp; Wöste, Ludger; Stelmaszczyk, Kamil

    2011-01-01

    A multiwavelength, multicomponent CRDS gas sensor operating on the basis of a compact photonic crystal fibre supercontinuum light source has been constructed. It features a simple design encompassing one radiation source, one cavity and one detection unit (a spectrograph with a fitted ICCD camera) that are common for all wavelengths. Multicomponent detection capability of the device is demonstrated by simultaneous measurements of the absorption spectra of molecular oxygen (spin-forbidden b-X branch) and water vapor (polyads 4v, 4v + δ) in ambient atmospheric air. Issues related to multimodal cavity excitation, as well as to obtaining the best signal-to-noise ratio are discussed together with methods for their practical resolution based on operating the cavity in a “quasi continuum” mode and setting long camera gate widths, respectively. A comprehensive review of multiwavelength CRDS techniques is also given. PMID:22319372

  7. An electrically driven cavity-enhanced source of indistinguishable photons with 61% overall efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlehahn, A.; Thoma, A.; Munnelly, P.; Kamp, M.; Höfling, S.; Heindel, T.; Schneider, C.; Reitzenstein, S.

    2016-04-01

    We report on an electrically driven efficient source of indistinguishable photons operated at pulse-repetition rates f up to 1.2 GHz. The quantum light source is based on a p-i-n-doped micropillar cavity with integrated self-organized quantum dots, which exploits cavity quantum electrodynamics effects in the weak coupling regime to enhance the emission of a single quantum emitter coupled to the cavity mode. We achieve an overall single-photon extraction efficiency of (61 ± 11) % for a device triggered electrically at f = 625 MHz. Analyzing the suppression of multi-photon emission events as a function of excitation repetition rate, we observe single-photon emission associated with g(2)HBT(0) values between 0.076 and 0.227 for f ranging from 373 MHz to 1.2 GHz. Hong-Ou-Mandel-type two-photon interference experiments under pulsed current injection at 487 MHz reveal a photon-indistinguishability of (41.1 ± 9.5) % at a single-photon emission rate of (92 ± 23) MHz.

  8. Resonant cavity enhanced optical microsensor for molecular interactions based on porous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Stefano, Luca; Rea, Ilaria; Rendina, Ivo; Rotiroti, Lucia; Rossi, Mosè; D'Auria, Sabato

    2006-04-01

    The molecular binding between the glutamine binding-protein (GlnBP) from Escherichia coli and L-glutamine (Gln) is detected by means of an optical biosensor based on porous silicon technology. The binding event is optically transduced in the wavelength shift of the porous silicon optical microcavity (PSMC) reflectivity spectrum. The hydrophobic interaction links the GlnBP, which acts as a molecular probe for Gln, to the hydrogenated porous silicon surface area. We can thus avoid any preliminary surface functionalization process. The protein infiltrated PSMC results stable to oxidation at least for few cycles of wet measurements. The penetration of the proteins into the pores of the porous silicon matrix has been optimized: a strong base post-etch process increases the pore size and removes any nanostructure on top and inside the porous silicon multilayer while does not degrade the optical response and the quality of the microcavity.

  9. Detection of a weak magnetic field via cavity-enhanced Faraday rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Keyu; Zhao, Nan; Twamley, Jason; EQuS Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    We study the sensitive detection of a weak static magnetic field via Faraday rotation induced by an ensemble of spins in a bimodal degenerate microwave cavity. We determine the limit of the resolution for the sensitivity of the magnetometry achieved using either single-photon or multiphoton inputs. For the case of a microwave cavity containing an ensemble of nitrogen-vacancy defects in diamond, we obtain a magnetometry sensitivity exceeding 5.2 n T /√{Hz } utilizing a single-photon probe field, while for a multiphoton input we achieve a subfemtotesla sensitivity using a coherent-probe microwave field with power of Pin=1 n W .

  10. Cavity enhancement of the magneto-optical Kerr effect of a magnetic cobalt nanowires array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi, Mehrdad; Ghanaatshoar, Majid

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the optimization and amplification of magneto-optical (MO) response of Silicon (Si)/Cobalt (Co)-nanowires (NWs) in the presence of zinc sulphide (ZnS) and SiO2 thin layers were investigated. The existence of ZnS layer with ideal thickness on the Si/Co structure, leads to an appropriate optical cavity which amplifies the MO Kerr signal (KS). In addition, the capping layer, SiO2, which is useful in manufacturing process, acts as a complementary layer for ZnS layer. The proposed structure Si/Co/ZnS/SiO2 with appropriate thicknesses enhances the KS of Si/Co-nanowire up to 20 times relative to same structure without covering layers.

  11. Homogeneous linewidths of Rhodamine 6G at room temperature from cavity-enhanced spontaneous emission rates

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, M.D.; Whitten, W.B.; Arnold, S.; Ramsey, J.M. )

    1992-11-15

    Fluorescence lifetimes of Rhodamine 6G in levitated micron-sized droplets have been measured using a time-correlated photon counting technique. The coupling of emission into spherical cavity modes of the droplet results in significant emission rate enhancements which allow estimation of the homogeneous linewidth at room temperature.

  12. Quantum noise limits in white-light-cavity-enhanced gravitational wave detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Minchuan; Zhou, Zifan; Shahriar, Selim M.

    2015-10-01

    Previously, we had proposed a gravitational wave detector that incorporates the white-light-cavity (WLC) effect using a compound cavity for signal recycling (CC-SR). Here, we first use an idealized model for the negative dispersion medium (NDM) and use the so-called Caves model for a phase-insensitive linear amplifier to account for the quantum noise (QN) contributed by the NDM, in order to determine the upper bound of the enhancement in the sensitivity-bandwidth product. We calculate the quantum noise limited sensitivity curves for the CC-SR design, and find that the broadening of sensitivity predicted by the classical analysis is also present in these curves, but is somewhat reduced. Furthermore, we find that the curves always stay above the standard quantum limit. To circumvent this limitation, we modify the dispersion to compensate the nonlinear phase variation produced by the optomechanical resonance effects. We find that the upper bound of the factor by which the sensitivity-bandwidth product is increased, compared to the highest-sensitivity result predicted by Bunanno and Chen [Phys. Rev. D 64, 042006 (2001)], is ˜14 . We also present a simpler scheme (WLC-SR), where a dispersion medium is inserted into the SR cavity. For this scheme, we found the upper bound of the enhancement factor to be ˜18 . We then consider an explicit system for realizing the NDM, which makes use of five energy levels in M configuration to produce gain, accompanied by electromagnetically induced transparency (the GEIT system). For this explicit system, we employ the rigorous approach based on Master Equation to compute the QN contributed by the NDM, thus enabling us to determine the enhancement in the sensitivity-bandwidth product definitively rather than the upper bound thereof. Specifically, we identify a set of parameters for which the sensitivity-bandwidth product is enhanced by a factor of 17.66.

  13. Communication: High precision sub-Doppler infrared spectroscopy of the HeH{sup +} ion

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, Adam J.; Hodges, James N.; Markus, Charles R.; Kocheril, G. Stephen; McCall, Benjamin J.

    2014-09-14

    The hydrohelium cation, HeH{sup +}, serves as an important benchmark for ab initio calculations that take into account non-adiabatic, relativistic, and quantum electrodynamic effects. Such calculations are capable of predicting molecular transitions to an accuracy of ∼300 MHz or less. However, in order to continue to push the boundaries on these calculations, new measurements of these transitions are required. Here we measure seven rovibrational transitions in the fundamental vibrational band to a precision of ∼1 MHz using the technique of Noise Immune Cavity Enhanced Optical Heterodyne Velocity Modulation Spectroscopy. These newly measured transitions are included in a fit to the rotation-vibration term values to derive refined spectroscopic constants in the v = 0 and v = 1 vibrational states, as well as to calculate rotation-vibration energy levels with high precision.

  14. The energy-time uncertainty principle and the EPR paradox: Experiments involving correlated two-photon emission in parametric down-conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiao, Raymond Y.; Kwiat, Paul G.; Steinberg, Aephraim M.

    1992-01-01

    The energy-time uncertainty principle is on a different footing than the momentum position uncertainty principle: in contrast to position, time is a c-number parameter, and not an operator. As Aharonov and Bohm have pointed out, this leads to different interpretations of the two uncertainty principles. In particular, one must distinguish between an inner and an outer time in the definition of the spread in time, delta t. It is the inner time which enters the energy-time uncertainty principle. We have checked this by means of a correlated two-photon light source in which the individual energies of the two photons are broad in spectra, but in which their sum is sharp. In other words, the pair of photons is in an entangled state of energy. By passing one member of the photon pair through a filter with width delta E, it is observed that the other member's wave packet collapses upon coincidence detection to a duration delta t, such that delta E(delta t) is approximately equal to planks constant/2 pi, where this duration delta t is an inner time, in the sense of Aharonov and Bohm. We have measured delta t by means of a Michelson interferometer by monitoring the visibility of the fringes seen in coincidence detection. This is a nonlocal effect, in the sense that the two photons are far away from each other when the collapse occurs. We have excluded classical-wave explanations of this effect by means of triple coincidence measurements in conjunction with a beam splitter which follows the Michelson interferometer. Since Bell's inequalities are known to be violated, we believe that it is also incorrect to interpret this experimental outcome as if energy were a local hidden variable, i.e., as if each photon, viewed as a particle, possessed some definite but unknown energy before its detection.

  15. Digital suppression of both cross and inter-modulation distortion in multi-carrier RF photonic link with down-conversion.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiaodong; Dai, Yitang; Yin, Feifei; Liang, Xi; Li, Jianqiang; Xu, Kun

    2014-11-17

    We propose and demonstrate a novel scheme to effectively suppress the cross modulation distortion (XMD) and the third-order inter-modulation distortion (IMD3) which exist in wide-band, multi-carrier analog photonic link (APL) system. Such nonlinearities, which are caused by the out-of-band and in-band signals, respectively, constrain the link's performance severely. Instead of building an extra nonlinear path in hardware, the XMD and IMD3 compensation information is extracted from the received distorted signal, and both distortions are then suppressed by digitally multiplying the distorted signal with the compensation information. After compensation in the digital domain, the down-converted XMD and IMD3 distortions are experimentally suppressed with 33 dB and 25 dB, respectively, resulting in an improved upper limit for the SFDR. PMID:25402066

  16. Near-infrared down-conversion and energy transfer mechanism in Yb(3+)-doped Ba2LaV3O11 phosphors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jin; Guo, Chongfeng; Li, Ting; Song, Dan; Su, Xiangying

    2015-10-21

    Yb(3+)-doped Ba2LaV3O11 vanadate phosphors with near-infrared (NIR) emission are synthesized via the sol-gel method. The phase purity and structure of samples are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The electronic structure of the self-activated phosphor host Ba2LaV3O11 is estimated by density functional theory (DFT) calculation, and the host absorption is mainly ascribed to the charge transition from the O-2p to V-3d states. Photoluminescence emission (PL) and excitation (PLE) spectra, decay curves, absorption spectra and theoretical quantum yields of samples are also investigated. Results indicate that Ba2LaV3O11:Yb(3+) phosphors have strong broad band absorption and efficient NIR emission, which matches well with the spectral response of the Si-based solar cells. The energy transfer processes from [VO4](3-) to Yb(3+) and possible transfer models are proposed based on the concentration of Yb(3+) ions. Results demonstrate that Ba2LaV3O11:Yb(3+) phosphors might act as a promising NIR DC solar spectral converter to enhance the efficiency of the silicon solar cells by utilizing broad band absorption of the solar spectrum. PMID:26388401

  17. Enhanced generation of twin single-photon states via quantum interference in parametric down-conversion: Application to two-photon quantum photolithography

    SciTech Connect

    Gerry, Christopher C.

    2003-04-01

    Two-photon interferometric quantum photon lithography for light of wavelength {lambda} is capable of beating the Rayleigh diffraction limit of resolution {lambda}/4 to the level of {lambda}/8. The required twin single-photon states |1>{sub a}|1>{sub b}, which are converted into maximally entangled states by a 50:50 beam splitter, can be generated from a nondegenerate parametric amplifier initially in vacuum states and with a weak pump field. Increasing the pump strength can slightly increase the production rate of the desired state and it will also increase the production of the twin two-photon states |2>{sub a}|2>{sub b}, which leads to an unwanted background term. In this paper we show that, assuming a weak pair coherent state as input to the amplifier, quantum interference can be used to quench the production of the |2>{sub a}|2>{sub b} state and to enhance the production of the |1>{sub a}|1>{sub b} state by almost sixfold.

  18. Enhanced visible light photocatalytic activity of ZnO doped with down-conversion NaSrBO3:Tb(3+) phosphors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinjuan; Wang, Xiaojun; Li, Huili; Li, Jinliang; Pan, Likun; Zhang, Jing; Min, Guoquan; Sun, Zhuo; Sun, Changqing

    2015-01-01

    ZnO-NaSrBO3:Tb(3+) (ZNT) composites were successfully synthesized via microwave-assisted reaction of the ZnO precursor with a NaSrBO3:Tb(3+) suspension using a microwave synthesis system. The morphology, structure and photocatalytic performance in the degradation of methylene blue (MB) were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectrophotometry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, respectively. The results show that the ZNT composites exhibit enhanced photocatalytic activity in the degradation of MB with a maximum degradation rate of 97% under visible light irradiation compared with pure ZnO (12%), which is ascribed to the increased light absorption and the reduction of photoelectron-hole pair recombination in ZnO with the introduction of NaSrBO3:Tb(3+), as well as the light down-converting effect of NaSrBO3:Tb(3+), which facilitates the self-sensitized degradation of MB. PMID:25366251

  19. Twin photon pairs in a high-Q silicon microresonator

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, Steven; Lu, Xiyuan; Jiang, Wei C.; Lin, Qiang

    2015-07-27

    We report the generation of high-purity twin photon pairs through cavity-enhanced non-degenerate four-wave mixing (FWM) in a high-Q silicon microdisk resonator. Twin photon pairs are created within the same cavity mode and are consequently expected to be identical in all degrees of freedom. The device is able to produce twin photons at telecommunication wavelengths with a pair generation rate as large as (3.96 ± 0.03) × 10{sup 5} pairs/s, within a narrow bandwidth of 0.72 GHz. A coincidence-to-accidental ratio of 660 ± 62 was measured, the highest value reported to date for twin photon pairs, at a pair generation rate of (2.47 ± 0.04) × 10{sup 4} pairs/s. Through careful engineering of the dispersion matching window, we have reduced the ratio of photons resulting from degenerate FWM to non-degenerate FWM to less than 0.15.

  20. High spatial resolution upgrade of the electron cyclotron emission radiometer for the DIII-D tokamak.

    PubMed

    Truong, D D; Austin, M E

    2014-11-01

    The 40-channel DIII-D electron cyclotron emission (ECE) radiometer provides measurements of Te(r,t) at the tokamak midplane from optically thick, second harmonic X-mode emission over a frequency range of 83-130 GHz. The frequency spacing of the radiometer's channels results in a spatial resolution of ∼1-3 cm, depending on local magnetic field and electron temperature. A new high resolution subsystem has been added to the DIII-D ECE radiometer to make sub-centimeter (0.6-0.8 cm) resolution Te measurements. The high resolution subsystem branches off from the regular channels' IF bands and consists of a microwave switch to toggle between IF bands, a switched filter bank for frequency selectivity, an adjustable local oscillator and mixer for further frequency down-conversion, and a set of eight microwave filters in the 2-4 GHz range. Higher spatial resolution is achieved through the use of a narrower (200 MHz) filter bandwidth and closer spacing between the filters' center frequencies (250 MHz). This configuration allows for full coverage of the 83-130 GHz frequency range in 2 GHz bands. Depending on the local magnetic field, this translates into a "zoomed-in" analysis of a ∼2-4 cm radial region. Expected uses of these channels include mapping the spatial dependence of Alfven eigenmodes, geodesic acoustic modes, and externally applied magnetic perturbations. Initial Te measurements, which demonstrate that the desired resolution is achieved, are presented. PMID:25430227

  1. High Precision Noise Measurements at Microwave Frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, Eugene; Tobar, Michael

    2009-04-23

    We describe microwave noise measurement system capable of detecting the phase fluctuations of rms amplitude of 2{center_dot}10{sup -11} rad/{radical}(Hz). Such resolution allows the study of intrinsic fluctuations in various microwave components and materials, as well as precise tests of fundamental physics. Employing this system we discovered a previously unknown phenomenon of down-conversion of pump oscillator phase noise into the low-frequency voltage fluctuations.

  2. Photonic generation of high frequency millimeter-wave and transmission over optical fiber.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amitesh; Priye, Vishnu

    2016-08-01

    A novel technique of photonic generation of millimeter-waves beyond the presently reported 120 GHz and with a wider tunability (∼240  GHz) is proposed and demonstrated through a simulation experiment. The scheme consists of generating 24 times the frequency of a conventional low frequency microwave source using a combination of a LiNbO3 Mach-Zehnder modulator and four-wave mixing in a semiconductor optical amplifier. The filtering of a high frequency sideband and the suppression of a carrier are achieved by incorporating an optical band pass and fiber Bragg grating filters, respectively. Next, the spectral purity of the generated millimeter-wave parameters is evaluated after propagation through a conventional fiber of different lengths by digitally modulating it at 2.5 Gbps and generating an eye diagram. The constraints on the selection of the frequency of the millimeter-wave and length of fiber are discussed. The present method of millimeter-wave generation and distribution will find applications in photonic up/down conversion, phase-array antennas, photonic sensors, radars, and terahertz applications. PMID:27505360

  3. High quantum yield graphene quantum dots decorated TiO2 nanotubes for enhancing photocatalytic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Ailan; Xie, Haolong; Xu, Xinmei; Zhang, Yangyu; Wen, Shengwu; Cui, Yifan

    2016-07-01

    Graphene quantum dots (GQDs) with high quantum yield (about 23.6% at an excitation wavelength of 320 nm) and GQDs/TiO2 nanotubes (GQDs/TiO2 NTs) composites were achieved by a simple hydrothermal method at low temperature. Photoluminescence characterization showed that the GQDs exhibited the down-conversion PL features at excitation from 300 to 420 nm and up-conversion photoluminescence in the range of 600-800 nm. The photocatalytic activity of prepared GQDs/TiO2 NTs composites on the degradation of methyl orange (MO) was significantly enhanced compared with that of pure TiO2 nanotubes (TiO2 NTs). For the composites coupling with 1.5%, 2.5% and 3.5% GQDs, the degradation of MO after 20 min irradiation under UV-vis light irradiation (λ = 380-780 nm) were 80.52%, 94.64% and 51.91%, respectively, which are much higher than that of pure TiO2 NTs (35.41%). It was inferred from the results of characterization that the improved photocatalytic activity of the GQDs/TiO2 NTs composites was attributed to the synergetic effect of up-conversion properties of the GQDs, enhanced visible light absorption and efficient separation of photogenerated electron-holes of the GQDs/TiO2 composite.

  4. New High Precision Linelist of H_3^+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodges, James N.; Perry, Adam J.; Markus, Charles; Jenkins, Paul A., II; Kocheril, G. Stephen; McCall, Benjamin J.

    2014-06-01

    As the simplest polyatomic molecule, H_3^+ serves as an ideal benchmark for theoretical predictions of rovibrational energy levels. By strictly ab initio methods, the current accuracy of theoretical predictions is limited to an impressive one hundredth of a wavenumber, which has been accomplished by consideration of relativistic, adiabatic, and non-adiabatic corrections to the Born-Oppenheimer PES. More accurate predictions rely on a treatment of quantum electrodynamic effects, which have improved the accuracies of vibrational transitions in molecular hydrogen to a few MHz. High precision spectroscopy is of the utmost importance for extending the frontiers of ab initio calculations, as improved precision and accuracy enable more rigorous testing of calculations. Additionally, measuring rovibrational transitions of H_3^+ can be used to predict its forbidden rotational spectrum. Though the existing data can be used to determine rotational transition frequencies, the uncertainties are prohibitively large. Acquisition of rovibrational spectra with smaller experimental uncertainty would enable a spectroscopic search for the rotational transitions. The technique Noise Immune Cavity Enhanced Optical Heterodyne Velocity Modulation Spectroscopy, or NICE-OHVMS has been previously used to precisely and accurately measure transitions of H_3^+, CH_5^+, and HCO^+ to sub-MHz uncertainty. A second module for our optical parametric oscillator has extended our instrument's frequency coverage from 3.2-3.9 μm to 2.5-3.9 μm. With extended coverage, we have improved our previous linelist by measuring additional transitions. O. L. Polyansky, et al. Phil. Trans. R. Soc. A (2012), 370, 5014--5027. J. Komasa, et al. J. Chem. Theor. Comp. (2011), 7, 3105--3115. C. M. Lindsay, B. J. McCall, J. Mol. Spectrosc. (2001), 210, 66--83. J. N. Hodges, et al. J. Chem. Phys. (2013), 139, 164201.

  5. High speed photodetectors based on a two-dimensional electron/hole gas heterostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallo, Eric M.; Cola, Adriano; Quaranta, Fabio; Spanier, Jonathan E.

    2013-04-01

    We report on high-speed metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) resonant cavity enhanced photodetectors based on Schottky-contacted (Al,In)GaAs heterostructures containing both electron and hole quantum wells. Interdigitated detectors were fabricated and characterized with and without an underlying Distributed Bragg Reflector (DBR). All detectors had very low dark currents and high linear responsivities. The fastest measured temporal response with a 16 ps full-width at half-maximum and a 29 ps fall time was demonstrated on a device with 1 μm gap between electrodes and an underlying DBR. Single quantum well detectors have previously demonstrated increased responsivity and speed but were limited by a slow decaying tail in the high speed photoresponse, attributed to the long collection path of minority carriers. The use of an electron and hole well, separated by a 110 nm absorption region as well as an underlying DBR, eliminates the slow tail by providing an enhanced collection path for both optically generated electrons and holes. Here, we present the fabricated device structure along with the DC and high speed photoresponse under varying incident powers. We briefly compare these results to those of the previous single well devices and attribute improvements in the time response tail to enhanced diffusion created by the presence of the separated dual well structure.

  6. Quantum non-Gaussianity of frequency up-converted single photons.

    PubMed

    Baune, Christoph; Schönbeck, Axel; Samblowski, Aiko; Fiurášek, Jaromír; Schnabel, Roman

    2014-09-22

    Nonclassical states of light are an important resource in today's quantum communication and metrology protocols. Quantum up-conversion of nonclassical states is a promising approach to overcome frequency differences between disparate subsystems within a quantum information network. Here, we present the generation of heralded narrowband single photons at 1550 nm via cavity enhanced spontaneous parametric down-conversion (SPDC) and their subsequent up-conversion to 532 nm. Quantum non-Gaussianity (QNG), which is an important feature for applications in quantum information science, was experimentally certified for the first time in frequency up-converted states. PMID:25321750

  7. Ultrafast XUV Pulses at High Repetition Rate for Time Resolved Photoelectron Spectroscopy of Surface Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corder, Christopher; Zhao, Peng; Li, Xinlong; Muraca, Amanda R.; Kershis, Matthew D.; White, Michael G.; Allison, Thomas K.

    2016-05-01

    Ultrafast photoelectron studies of surface dynamics are often limited by low repetition rates. At Stony Brook we have built a cavity-enhanced high-harmonic generation XUV source that delivers ultrafast pulses to a surface science apparatus for photoelectron spectroscopy. We begin with a Ytterbium fiber laser at a repetition rate of 78 MHz and up to 90 W of average power. After compression the pulses have μJ's of energy with < 180 fs pulse width. We then use an enhancement cavity with a finesse of a few hundred to build up to the peak intensity required for high harmonic generation. The enhancement cavity is a six mirror double folded bow-tie geometry with a focus of 15 μm at a Krypton gas jet, followed by a Sapphire crystal at Brewster's angle for the fundamental to allow outcoupling of the harmonics. A single harmonic is selected using a time-preserving monochromator to maintain the short pulses, and is sent to an ultra high vacuum chamber with sample preparation and diagnostic tools as well as an electron energy spectrometer. This allows us to study the electronic dynamics of semiconductor surfaces and their interfaces with adsorbed molecules which enable various charge transfer effects. Supported by AFOSR.

  8. Travelling-wave resonant four-wave mixing breaks the limits of cavity-enhanced all-optical wavelength conversion

    PubMed Central

    Morichetti, Francesco; Canciamilla, Antonio; Ferrari, Carlo; Samarelli, Antonio; Sorel, Marc; Melloni, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Wave mixing inside optical resonators, while experiencing a large enhancement of the nonlinear interaction efficiency, suffers from strong bandwidth constraints, preventing its practical exploitation for processing broad-band signals. Here we show that such limits are overcome by the new concept of travelling-wave resonant four-wave mixing (FWM). This approach combines the efficiency enhancement provided by resonant propagation with a wide-band conversion process. Compared with conventional FWM in bare waveguides, it exhibits higher robustness against chromatic dispersion and propagation loss, while preserving transparency to modulation formats. Travelling-wave resonant FWM has been demonstrated in silicon-coupled ring resonators and was exploited to realize a 630-μm-long wavelength converter operating over a wavelength range wider than 60 nm and with 28-dB gain with respect to a bare waveguide of the same physical length. Full compatibility of the travelling-wave resonant FWM with optical signal processing applications has been demonstrated through signal retiming and reshaping at 10 Gb s−1 PMID:21540838

  9. High Precision Spectroscopy of CH_5^+ Using Nice-Ohvms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodges, James N.; Perry, Adam J.; McCall, Benjamin J.

    2013-06-01

    The elusive methonium ion, CH_5^+, is of great interest due to its highly fluxional nature. The only published high-resolution infrared spectrum remains completely unassigned to this date. The primary challenge in understanding the CH_5^+ spectrum is that traditional spectroscopic approaches rely on a molecule having only small (or even large) amplitude motions about a well-defined reference geometry, and this is not the case with CH_5^+. We are in the process of re-scanning Oka's spectrum, in the original Black Widow discharge cell, using the new technique of Noise Immune Cavity Enhanced Optical Heterodyne Velocity Modulation Spectroscopy (NICE-OHVMS). The high precision afforded by optical saturation in conjunction with a frequency comb allows transition line centers to be determined with sub-MHz accuracy and precision -- a substantial improvement over the 90 MHz precision of Oka's work. With a high-precision linelist in hand, we plan to search for four line combination differences to directly determine the spacings between rotational energy levels. Such a search is currently infeasible due to the large number of false positives resulting from the relatively low precision and high spectral density of Oka's spectrum. The resulting combination differences, in conjunction with state-of-the-art theoretical calculations from Tucker Carrington, may provide the first insight into the rotational structure of this unique molecular system. E. T. White, J. Tang, T. Oka, Science (1999) 284, 135--137. B. M. Siller, et al. Opt. Express (2011), 19, 24822--24827. K. N. Crabtree, et al. Chem. Phys. Lett. (2012), 551, 1--6. X. Wang, T. Carrington, J. Chem. Phys., (2008), 129, 234102.

  10. Highly tunable hybrid metamaterials employing split-ring resonators strongly coupled to graphene surface plasmons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Peter Q.; Luxmoore, Isaac J.; Mikhailov, Sergey A.; Savostianova, Nadja A.; Valmorra, Federico; Faist, Jérôme; Nash, Geoffrey R.

    2015-11-01

    Metamaterials and plasmonics are powerful tools for unconventional manipulation and harnessing of light. Metamaterials can be engineered to possess intriguing properties lacking in natural materials, such as negative refractive index. Plasmonics offers capabilities of confining light in subwavelength dimensions and enhancing light-matter interactions. Recently, the technological potential of graphene-based plasmonics has been recognized as the latter features large tunability, higher field-confinement and lower loss compared with metal-based plasmonics. Here, we introduce hybrid structures comprising graphene plasmonic resonators coupled to conventional split-ring resonators, thus demonstrating a type of highly tunable metamaterial, where the interaction between the two resonances reaches the strong-coupling regime. Such hybrid metamaterials are employed as high-speed THz modulators, exhibiting ~60% transmission modulation and operating speed in excess of 40 MHz. This device concept also provides a platform for exploring cavity-enhanced light-matter interactions and optical processes in graphene plasmonic structures for applications including sensing, photo-detection and nonlinear frequency generation.

  11. High-performance diamond-based single-photon sources for quantum communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Chun-Hsu; Greentree, Andrew D.; Hollenberg, Lloyd C. L.

    2009-11-01

    Quantum communication places stringent requirements on single-photon sources. Here we report a theoretical study of the cavity Purcell enhancement of two diamond point defects, the nickel-nitrogen (NE8) and silicon-vacancy (SiV) centers, for high-performance, near on-demand single-photon generation. By coupling the centers strongly to high-finesse optical photonic-band-gap cavities with modest quality factor Q=O(104) and small mode volume V=O(λ3) , these system can deliver picosecond single-photon pulses at their zero-phonon lines with probabilities of 0.954 (NE8) and 0.812 (SiV) under a realistic optical excitation scheme. The undesirable blinking effect due to transitions via metastable states can also be suppressed with O(10-4) blinking probability. We analyze the application of these enhanced centers, including the previously studied cavity-enhanced nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center, to long-distance Bennett-Brassard 1984 protocol quantum key distribution (QKD) in fiber-based, open-air terrestrial and satellite-ground setups. In this comparative study, we show that they can deliver performance comparable with decoy state implementation with weak coherent sources, and are most suitable for open-air communication.

  12. Highly tunable hybrid metamaterials employing split-ring resonators strongly coupled to graphene surface plasmons

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Peter Q.; Luxmoore, Isaac J.; Mikhailov, Sergey A.; Savostianova, Nadja A.; Valmorra, Federico; Faist, Jérôme; Nash, Geoffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    Metamaterials and plasmonics are powerful tools for unconventional manipulation and harnessing of light. Metamaterials can be engineered to possess intriguing properties lacking in natural materials, such as negative refractive index. Plasmonics offers capabilities of confining light in subwavelength dimensions and enhancing light–matter interactions. Recently, the technological potential of graphene-based plasmonics has been recognized as the latter features large tunability, higher field-confinement and lower loss compared with metal-based plasmonics. Here, we introduce hybrid structures comprising graphene plasmonic resonators coupled to conventional split-ring resonators, thus demonstrating a type of highly tunable metamaterial, where the interaction between the two resonances reaches the strong-coupling regime. Such hybrid metamaterials are employed as high-speed THz modulators, exhibiting ∼60% transmission modulation and operating speed in excess of 40 MHz. This device concept also provides a platform for exploring cavity-enhanced light–matter interactions and optical processes in graphene plasmonic structures for applications including sensing, photo-detection and nonlinear frequency generation. PMID:26584781

  13. Highly efficient single-pass blue-light generation at 488 nm using a PPKTP waveguide crystal and high-brightness diode lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jechow, Andreas; McNeil, Shirley; Kaleva, Christopher; Skoczowsky, Danilo; Menzel, Ralf

    2009-02-01

    The combination of high brightness laser diodes and periodically poled (PP) waveguide crystals for the generation of blue light at the technically interesting wavelength of 488 nm is promising. Although PPKTP has a lower nonlinear coefficient compared to PPLN it is of interest for the use in such devices. Because of its higher photorefractive damage threshold, it is well suited for operation at room temperature. In this work, a DFB laser as well as a tunable external cavity enhanced broad area diode laser (ECDL) are used for second harmonic generation using a waveguide PPKTP crystal. Both lasers yield several hundred Miliwatts of diffraction limited light around a center wavelength of 976 nm with excellent spectral properties. The ECDL system is further tunable over a broad range of 40 nm. The PPKTP crystal has a length of 12 mm and the 4 μm x 8 μm waveguides are manufactured by ion exchange followed by a patented submount poling technique. By using a DFB laser diode as pump source a laser to waveguide coupling efficiency of more than 55% could be achieved. A maximum output power of 66.7 mW could be generated out of 220 mW infrared light inside the waveguide channel at room temperature. This results in a conversion efficiency of more than 260%/W.

  14. A high-field magnetic resonance imaging spectrometer using an oven-controlled crystal oscillator as the local oscillator of its radio frequency transceiver.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiao; Tang, Xin; Tang, Weinan; Gao, Jia-Hong

    2014-09-01

    A home-made high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) spectrometer with multiple receiving channels is described. The radio frequency (RF) transceiver of the spectrometer consists of digital intermediate frequency (IF) circuits and corresponding mixing circuits. A direct digital synthesis device is employed to generate the IF pulse; the IF signal from a down-conversion circuit is sampled and followed by digital quadrature detection. Both the IF generation and the IF sampling use a 50 MHz clock. An oven-controlled crystal oscillator, which has outstanding spectral purity and a compact circuit, is used as the local oscillator of the RF transceiver. A digital signal processor works as the pulse programmer of the spectrometer, as a result, 32 control lines can be generated simultaneously while an event is triggered. Field programmable gate array devices are utilized as the auxiliary controllers of the IF generation, IF receiving, and gradient control. High performance, including 1 μs time resolution of the soft pulse, 1 MHz receiving bandwidth, and 1 μs time resolution of the gradient waveform, is achieved. High-quality images on a 1.5 T MRI system using the spectrometer are obtained. PMID:25273752

  15. Broadband High-Resolution Spectroscopy with Fabry-Perot Quantum Cascade Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yin; Wysocki, Gerard

    2014-06-01

    Simultaneous spectroscopic detection of large molecules with broad ro-vibrational spectra, and small molecules with well-resolved narrow spectral lines requires both broadband optical frequency coverage (>50 wn) and high resolution (<0.01 wn) to perform accurate spectral measurements. With the advent of room temperature, high power, continuous wave quantum cascade lasers (QCLs), high resolution mid-IR spectrometers for field applications became feasible. So far to address the broadband spectral coverage, external cavity (EC) QCLs with >100 wn tuning ranges have been spectroscopic sources of choice in the mid-IR; however EC-QCLs are rather complex opto-mechanical systems, which are vibration-sensitive, and construction of robust transportable systems is difficult. In this work we present a new method of performing broadband mid-IR spectroscopy using two free-running Fabry-Perot (FP) QCLs to perform multi-heterodyne down-conversion of optical signals to RF domain. The sample transmission spectrum probed by one multi-mode FP-QCL is down-converted to the RF domain through an optical multi-heterodyne process using a second FP-QCL as the local oscillator. Both a broadband multi-mode spectral measurement as well as high-resolution ( 15 MHz or 0.0005 wn) absorption spectroscopy of NH3 and N2O are demonstrated and show potential for all-solid-state FP-laser-based spectrometers for chemical sensing. Y. Wang, M. G. Soskind, W. Wang, and G. Wysocki, "High-resolution multi-heterodyne spectroscopy based on Fabry-Perot quantum cascade lasers," Appl Phys Lett 104, 0311141-0311145 (2014)

  16. Highly Sensitive Tunable Diode Laser Spectrometers for In Situ Planetary Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasudev, Ram; Mansour, Kamjou; Webster, Christopher R.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes highly sensitive tunable diode laser spectrometers suitable for in situ planetary exploration. The technology developed at JPL is based on wavelength modulated cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy. It is capable of sensitively detecting chemical signatures of life through the abundance of biogenic molecules and their isotopic composition, and chemicals such as water necessary for habitats of life. The technology would be suitable for searching for biomarkers, extinct life, potential habitats of extant life, and signatures of ancient climates on Mars; and for detecting biomarkers, prebiotic chemicals and habitats of life in the outer Solar System. It would be useful for prospecting for water on the Moon and asteroids, and characterizing its isotopic composition. Deployment on the Moon could provide ground truth to the recent remote measurements and help to uncover precious records of the early bombardment history of the inner Solar System buried at the shadowed poles, and elucidate the mechanism for the generation of near-surface water in the illuminated regions. The technology would also be useful for detecting other volatile molecules in planetary atmospheres and subsurface reservoirs, isotopic characterization of planetary materials, and searching for signatures of extinct life preserved in solid matrices.

  17. High Resolution BPM Upgrade for the ATF Damping Ring at KEK

    SciTech Connect

    Eddy, N.; Briegel, C.; Fellenz, B.; Gianfelice-Wendt, E.; Prieto, P.; Rechenmacher, R.; Semenov, A.; Voy, D.; Wendt, M.; Zhang, D.; Terunuma, N.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2011-08-17

    A beam position monitor (BPM) upgrade at the KEK Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) damping ring has been accomplished, carried out by a KEK/FNAL/SLAC collaboration under the umbrella of the global ILC R&D effort. The upgrade consists of a high resolution, high reproducibility read-out system, based on analog and digital down-conversion techniques, digital signal processing, and also implements a new automatic gain error correction schema. The technical concept and realization as well as results of beam studies are presented. The next generation of linear colliders require ultra-low vertical emittance of <2 pm-rad. The damping ring at the KEK Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) is designed to demonstrate this mission critical goal. A high resolution beam position monitor (BPM) system for the damping ring is one of the key tools for realizing this goal. The BPM system needs to provide two distnict measurements. First, a very high resolution ({approx}100-200nm) closed-orbit measurement which is averaged over many turns and realized with narrowband filter techniques - 'narrowband mode'. This is needed to monitor and steer the beam along an optimum orbit and to facilitate beam-based alignment to minimize non-linear field effects. Second, is the ability to make turn by turn (TBT) measurements to support optics studies and corrections necessary to achieve the design performance. As the TBT measurement necessitates a wider bandwidth, it is often referred to as 'wideband mode'. The BPM upgrade was initiated as a KEK/SLAC/FNAL collaboration in the frame of the Global Design Initiative of the International Linear Collider. The project was realized and completed using Japan-US funds with Fermilab as the core partner.

  18. A high linearity current mode second IF CMOS mixer for a DRM/DAB receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, Xu; Zheng, Zhou; Yiqiang, Wu; Zhigong, Wang; Jianping, Chen

    2015-05-01

    A passive current switch mixer was designed for the second IF down-conversion in a DRM/DAB receiver. The circuit consists of an input transconductance stage, a passive current switching stage, and a current amplifier stage. The input transconductance stage employs a self-biasing current reusing technique, with a resistor shunt feedback to increase the gain and output impedance. A dynamic bias technique is used in the switching stage to ensure the stability of the overdrive voltage versus the PVT variations. A current shunt feedback is introduced to the conventional low-voltage second-generation fully balanced multi-output current converter (FBMOCCII), which provides very low input impedance and high output impedance. With the circuit working in current mode, the linearity is effectively improved with low supply voltages. Especially, the transimpedance stage can be removed, which simplifies the design considerably. The design is verified with a SMIC 0.18 μm RF CMOS process. The measurement results show that the voltage conversation gain is 1.407 dB, the NF is 16.22 dB, and the IIP3 is 4.5 dBm, respectively. The current consumption is 9.30 mA with a supply voltage of 1.8 V. This exhibits a good compromise among the gain, noise, and linearity for the second IF mixer in DRM/DAB receivers. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61306069), and the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (No. 2011AA010301).

  19. High spatial resolution upgrade of the electron cyclotron emission radiometer for the DIII-D tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Truong, D. D.; Austin, M. E.

    2014-11-15

    The 40-channel DIII-D electron cyclotron emission (ECE) radiometer provides measurements of T{sub e}(r,t) at the tokamak midplane from optically thick, second harmonic X-mode emission over a frequency range of 83–130 GHz. The frequency spacing of the radiometer's channels results in a spatial resolution of ∼1–3 cm, depending on local magnetic field and electron temperature. A new high resolution subsystem has been added to the DIII-D ECE radiometer to make sub-centimeter (0.6–0.8 cm) resolution T{sub e} measurements. The high resolution subsystem branches off from the regular channels’ IF bands and consists of a microwave switch to toggle between IF bands, a switched filter bank for frequency selectivity, an adjustable local oscillator and mixer for further frequency down-conversion, and a set of eight microwave filters in the 2–4 GHz range. Higher spatial resolution is achieved through the use of a narrower (200 MHz) filter bandwidth and closer spacing between the filters’ center frequencies (250 MHz). This configuration allows for full coverage of the 83–130 GHz frequency range in 2 GHz bands. Depending on the local magnetic field, this translates into a “zoomed-in” analysis of a ∼2–4 cm radial region. Expected uses of these channels include mapping the spatial dependence of Alfven eigenmodes, geodesic acoustic modes, and externally applied magnetic perturbations. Initial T{sub e} measurements, which demonstrate that the desired resolution is achieved, are presented.

  20. Progress Towards a High-Precision Infrared Spectroscopic Survey of the H_3^+ Ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, Adam J.; Hodges, James N.; Markus, Charles R.; Kocheril, G. Stephen; Jenkins, Paul A., II; McCall, Benjamin J.

    2015-06-01

    The trihydrogen cation, H_3^+, represents one of the most important and fundamental molecular systems. Having only two electrons and three nuclei, H_3^+ is the simplest polyatomic system and is a key testing ground for the development of new techniques for calculating potential energy surfaces and predicting molecular spectra. Corrections that go beyond the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, including adiabatic, non-adiabatic, relativistic, and quantum electrodynamic corrections are becoming more feasible to calculate. As a result, experimental measurements performed on the H_3^+ ion serve as important benchmarks which are used to test the predictive power of new computational methods. By measuring many infrared transitions with precision at the sub-MHz level it is possible to construct a list of the most highly precise experimental rovibrational energy levels for this molecule. Until recently, only a select handful of infrared transitions of this molecule have been measured with high precision (˜ 1 MHz). Using the technique of Noise Immune Cavity Enhanced Optical Heterodyne Velocity Modulation Spectroscopy, we are aiming to produce the largest high-precision spectroscopic dataset for this molecule to date. Presented here are the current results from our survey along with a discussion of the combination differences analysis used to extract the experimentally determined rovibrational energy levels. O. Polyansky, et al., Phil. Trans. R. Soc. A (2012), 370, 5014. M. Pavanello, et al., J. Chem. Phys. (2012), 136, 184303. L. Diniz, et al., Phys. Rev. A (2013), 88, 032506. L. Lodi, et al., Phys. Rev. A (2014), 89, 032505. J. Hodges, et al., J. Chem. Phys (2013), 139, 164201.

  1. Intermediate frequency band digitized high dynamic range radiometer system for plasma diagnostics and real-time Tokamak control

    SciTech Connect

    Bongers, W. A.; Beveren, V. van; Westerhof, E.; Goede, A. P. H.; Krijger, B.; Berg, M. A. van den; Graswinckel, M. F.; Schueller, F. C.; Thoen, D. J.; Nuij, P. J. W. M.; Baar, M. R. de; Donne, A. J. H.; Hennen, B. A.; Kantor, M.

    2011-06-15

    An intermediate frequency (IF) band digitizing radiometer system in the 100-200 GHz frequency range has been developed for Tokamak diagnostics and control, and other fields of research which require a high flexibility in frequency resolution combined with a large bandwidth and the retrieval of the full wave information of the mm-wave signals under investigation. The system is based on directly digitizing the IF band after down conversion. The enabling technology consists of a fast multi-giga sample analog to digital converter that has recently become available. Field programmable gate arrays (FPGA) are implemented to accomplish versatile real-time data analysis. A prototype system has been developed and tested and its performance has been compared with conventional electron cyclotron emission (ECE) spectrometer systems. On the TEXTOR Tokamak a proof of principle shows that ECE, together with high power injected and scattered radiation, becomes amenable to measurement by this device. In particular, its capability to measure the phase of coherent signals in the spectrum offers important advantages in diagnostics and control. One case developed in detail employs the FPGA in real-time fast Fourier transform (FFT) and additional signal processing. The major benefit of such a FFT-based system is the real-time trade-off that can be made between frequency and time resolution. For ECE diagnostics this corresponds to a flexible spatial resolution in the plasma, with potential application in smart sensing of plasma instabilities such as the neoclassical tearing mode (NTM) and sawtooth instabilities. The flexible resolution would allow for the measurement of the full mode content of plasma instabilities contained within the system bandwidth.

  2. High Speed, Ultrasensitive Trace Gas Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, David A.; Fleisher, Adam J.; Plusquellic, David F.; Hodges, Joseph

    2014-06-01

    I will describe a variety of cavity-enhanced spectroscopic techniques, including frequency-agile rapid scanning spectroscopy (FARS) and heterodyne-detected cavity ring-down spectroscopy (HD-CRDS), which we have recently developed for rapid, ultrasensitive absorption measurements. Scanning rates that are limited only by the cavity response time itself as well as noise-equivalent detection limits as low as 6×10-14 cm-1 Hz-1/2 have been achieved. I will discuss the application of these techniques to current problems in atmospheric science including recent infrared measurements of analytes which are present at ultra-trace concentrations.

  3. Up/down conversion luminescence and charge compensation investigation of Ca0.5Y1-x(WO4)2:xLn3+ (Ln = Pr, Sm, Eu, Tb, Dy, Yb/Er) phosphors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahalingam, Venkatakrishnan; Thirumalai, Jagannathan; Krishnan, Rajagopalan; Mantha, Srinivas

    2016-01-01

    Microstructures of Ca0.5Y(1-x)(WO4)2:xLn3+ (Ln = Pr, Sm, Eu, Tb, Dy, Yb/Er) phosphors were prepared via the solid-state reaction method. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and photoluminescence were used to characterize the prepared phosphor samples. The results reveal that the phosphor samples have single phase scheelite structures with tetragonal symmetry of I41/a. The down/up conversion photoluminescence of the Ca0.5Y(1-x)(WO4)2:xLn3+ (Ln = Pr, Sm, Eu, Tb, Dy, Yb/Er) phosphors properties reveal characteristic visible emissions. The energy transfer process, fluorescence lifetime and color coordinates are discussed in detail. Furthermore, the phosphor Ca0.5Y(1-x)(WO4)2:xPr3+ co-doped with alkali chlorides shows the enhancement of luminescence, which was found in the sodium chloride co-doped powder phosphor. The photometric characteristics indicate the suitability of the inorganic powder phosphors for solid-state lighting and display applications.

  4. High-Precision Sub-Doppler Infrared Spectroscopy of HeH^+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, Adam J.; Hodges, James N.; Markus, Charles; Kocheril, G. Stephen; Jenkins, Paul A., II; McCall, Benjamin J.

    2014-06-01

    The helium hydride ion, HeH^+, is the simplest heteronuclear diatomic, and is composed of the two most abundant elements in the universe. It is widely believed that this ion was among the first molecules to be formed; thus it has been of great interest to scientists studying the chemistry of the early universe. HeH^+ is also isoelectronic to H_2 which makes it a great target ion for theorists to include adiabatic and non-adiabatic corrections to its Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surface. The accuracy of such calculations is further improved by incorporating electron relativistic and quantum electrodynamic effects. Using the highly sensitive spectroscopic technique of Noise Immune Cavity Enhanced Optical Heterodyne Velocity Modulation Spectroscopy (NICE-OHVMS) we are able to perform sub-Doppler spectroscopy on ions of interest. When combined with frequency calibration from an optical frequency comb we fit line centers with sub-MHz precision as has previously been shown for the H3^+, HCO+, and CH5+ ions. Here we report a list of the most precisely measured rovibrational transitions of HeH^+ to date. These measurements should allow theorists to continue to push the boundaries of ab initio calculations in order to further study this important fundamental species. S. Lepp, P. C. Stancil, A. Dalgarno J. Phys. B (2002), 35, R57. S. Lepp, Astrophys. Space Sci. (2003), 285, 737. K. Pachucki, J. Komasa, J. Chem. Phys (2012), 137, 204314. J. N. Hodges, A. J. Perry, P. A. Jenkins II, B. M. Siller, B. J. McCall J. Chem. Phys. (2013), 139, 164201.

  5. Continuous-wave seeded mid-IR parametric system pumped by the high-average-power picosecond Yb:YAG thin-disk laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novák, Ondřej; Smrž, Martin; Miura, Taisuke; Turčičová, Hana; Endo, Akira; Mocek, Tomáś

    2015-05-01

    Mid-IR wavelength range offers variety of interesting applications. Down-conversion in the optical parametric devices is promising to generate high average power mid-IR beam due to inherently low thermal load of the nonlinear crystals if a powerful and high quality pump beam is available. We developed 100 kHz pump laser of 100-W level average power. The stretched pulses of Yb-fiber laser oscillator at 1030 nm wavelength are injected into the regenerative amplifier with an Yb:YAG thin-disk. Diode pumping at zero phonon line at wavelength of 969 nm significantly reduces its thermal load and increases conversion efficiency and stability. We obtained the beam with power of 80 W and 2 ps compressed pulsewidth. We are developing a watt level mid-IR picosecond light source pumped by a beam of the thin disk regenerative amplifier. Part of the beam pumps PPLN, which is seeded by a continuous wave laser diode at 1.94 μm to decrease the generation threshold and determine the amplified spectrum. The 3 W pumping gave output of 30 mW, which is by up to two orders higher compared to unseeded operation. The gain of about 107 was achieved in the PPLN in the temporal window of the pump pulse. The spectrum and beam of the generated idler pulses in the mid-IR was measured. We obtained an amplified signal from the second stage with the KTP crystal. We expect watt level mid-IR output for initial 50-W pumping. The generation of longer wavelengths is discussed.

  6. Tailoring photonic entanglement in high-dimensional Hilbert spaces

    SciTech Connect

    Riedmatten, Hugues de; Marcikic, Ivan; Scarani, Valerio; Tittel, Wolfgang; Zbinden, Hugo; Gisin, Nicolas

    2004-05-01

    We present an experiment where two photonic systems of arbitrary dimensions can be entangled. The method is based on spontaneous parametric down-conversion with trains of d pump pulses with a fixed phase relation, generated by a mode-locked laser. This leads to a photon pair created in a coherent superposition of d discrete emission times, given by the successive laser pulses. Entanglement is shown by performing a two-photon interference experiment and by observing the visibility of the interference fringes increasing as a function of the dimension d. Factors limiting the visibility, such as the presence of multiple pairs in one train, are discussed.

  7. Cavity-enhanced frequency doubling from 795nm to 397.5nm ultra-violet coherent radiation with PPKTP crystals in the low pump power regime.

    PubMed

    Wen, Xin; Han, Yashuai; Bai, Jiandong; He, Jun; Wang, Yanhua; Yang, Baodong; Wang, Junmin

    2014-12-29

    We demonstrate a simple, compact and cost-efficient diode laser pumped frequency doubling system at 795 nm in the low power regime. In two configurations, a bow-tie four-mirror ring enhancement cavity with a PPKTP crystal inside and a semi-monolithic PPKTP enhancement cavity, we obtain 397.5nm ultra-violet coherent radiation of 35mW and 47mW respectively with a mode-matched fundamental power of about 110mW, corresponding to a conversion efficiency of 32% and 41%. The low loss semi-monolithic cavity leads to the better results. The constructed ultra-violet coherent radiation has good power stability and beam quality, and the system has huge potential in quantum optics and cold atom physics. PMID:25607194

  8. Airborne measurements of CO2 and CH4 onboard the UK FAAM research aircraft using a, Los Gatos Research Inc, cavity enhanced absorption spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Shea, S.; Bauguitte, S.; Muller, J. B.; Le Breton, M.; Gallagher, M. W.; Allen, G.; Percival, C. J.

    2012-12-01

    Airborne measurements of CO2 and CH4 have been made using the UK Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements (FAAM) BAe-146 research aircraft since spring 2011.The measurement system uses a commercially available analyser, based on the off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy technique, from Los Gatos Research Inc (FGGA, Model RMT-200). During the first year of operation (29 flights), 1 Hz measurements were found to be accurate to 0.07 ± 2.48ppbv for CH4 and -0.06± 0.66ppmv for CO2. In summer 2011, as part of the BORTAS project (Quantifying the impact of BOReal forest fires on Tropospheric oxidants over the Atlantic using Aircraft and Satellites), outflow from boreal forest fires was measured in Eastern Canada. A number of fresh and photochemically-aged plumes were identified using simultaneous HCN measurements, a widely used tracer for biomass burning. In the freshest plumes, strong relationships were found between CH4, CO2 and other tracers for biomass burning. From this we were able to estimate that 6.9±0.8 g of CH4 and 1551±213 g of CO2 were released into the atmosphere per kg of dry matter burnt. These emission factors are in good agreement with estimates from previous studies in boreal regions. However for aged plumes the correlations between CH4 and other biomass burning tracers were not as robust, most likely due to mixing from other CH4 emission sources, such as the wetland regions. The role of additional emission sources will be investigated using the UK Met Office NAME atmospheric dispersion model and the HYSPLIT trajectory model. Using tailored back trajectory analysis, we will present an interpretation of this new dataset in the context of air mass/fire origin, relating this to MODIS fire maps and source strength.

  9. High Tech High.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardy, Lawrence

    2001-01-01

    In an era of high-stakes testing and prescriptive teaching styles, a San Diego charter high school embraces project learning, multilevel classrooms, and video portfolios of student work. The school lacks dining, music, and athletic facilities, but features hefty teacher salaries, student freedom, and real-world problem solving. (MLH)

  10. Quantum storage of heralded single photons in a praseodymium-doped crystal.

    PubMed

    Rieländer, Daniel; Kutluer, Kutlu; Ledingham, Patrick M; Gündoğan, Mustafa; Fekete, Julia; Mazzera, Margherita; de Riedmatten, Hugues

    2014-01-31

    We report on experiments demonstrating the reversible mapping of heralded single photons to long-lived collective optical atomic excitations stored in a Pr3+:Y2SiO5 crystal. A cavity-enhanced spontaneous down-conversion source is employed to produce widely nondegenerate narrow-band (≈2  MHz) photon pairs. The idler photons, whose frequency is compatible with telecommunication optical fibers, are used to herald the creation of the signal photons, compatible with the Pr3+ transition. The signal photons are stored and retrieved using the atomic frequency comb protocol. We demonstrate storage times up to 4.5  μs while preserving nonclassical correlations between the heralding and the retrieved photon. This is more than 20 times longer than in previous realizations in solid state devices, and implemented in a system ideally suited for the extension to spin-wave storage. PMID:24580428

  11. Techniques in molecular spectroscopy: from broad bandwidth to high resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cossel, Kevin C.

    This thesis presents a range of different experiments all seeking to extended the capabilities of molecular spectroscopy and enable new applications. The new technique of cavity-enhanced direct frequency comb spectroscopy (CE-DFCS) provides a unique combination of broad bandwidth, high resolution, and high sensitivity that can be useful for a wide range of applications. Previous demonstrations of CE-DFCS were confined to the visible or near-infrared and operated over a limited bandwidth: for many applications it is desirable to increase the spectral coverage and to extend to the mid-infrared where strong, fundamental vibrational modes of molecules occur. There are several key requirements for CE-DFCS: a frequency comb source that provides broad bandwidth and high resolution, an optical cavity for high sensitivity, and a detection system capable of multiplex detection of the comb spectrum transmitted through the cavity. We first discuss comb sources with emphasis on the coherence properties of spectral broadening in nonlinear fiber and the development of a high-power frequency comb source in the mid-infrared based on an optical-parametric oscillator (OPO). To take advantage of this new mid-infrared comb source for spectroscopy, we also discuss the development of a rapid-scan Fourier-transform spectrometer (FTS). We then discuss the first demonstration of CE-DFCS with spectrally broadened light from a highly nonlinear fiber with the application to measurements of impurities in semiconductor manufacturing gases. We also cover our efforts towards extending CE-DFCS to the mid-infrared using the mid-infrared OPO and FTS to measure ppb levels of various gases important for breath analysis and atmospheric chemistry and highlight some future applications of this system. In addition to the study of neutral molecules, broad-bandwidth and high-resolution spectra of molecular ions are useful for astrochemistry where many of the observed molecules are ionic, for studying

  12. High Frequency Measurements of Methane Concentrations and Carbon Isotopes at a Marsh and Landfill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortazavi, B.; Wilson, B.; Chanton, J.; Eller, K.; Dong, F.; Baer, D. S.; Gupta, M.; Dzwonkowski, B.

    2012-12-01

    High frequency measurements of methane concentrations and carbon isotopes can help constrain the source strengths of methane emitted to the atmosphere. We report here methane concentrations and 13C values measured at 0.5 Hz with cavity enhanced laser absorption spectrometers (Los Gatos Research) deployed at a saltmarsh in Alabama and a landfill in Florida. Methane concentrations and 13C at the saltmarsh were monitored over a 2.5 day time period at 2 m, 0.5 m above the ground as well as from the outflow of a flow-through (2 L) chamber placed on the Spartina alterniflora dominated marsh. A typical measurement cycle included regular samples from two tanks of known methane concentrations and isotopic values and from ambient air samples. Over the 2.5-day measurement period methane concentrations and isotopic ratios at 2 m averaged 1.85 ppm and -43.57‰ (±0.34, 1 SE), respectively. The concentration and isotopic values from the chamber outflow varied from 1.92 to 5.81 ppm and -38.5 to -59.3‰, respectively. Methane flux from the marsh ranged from undetectable to 3.6 mgC m-2hr-1, with high fluxes measured during low tide. The 13δCH4 of the emitted CH4 from the marsh, determined from a mass balance equation using the chamber inflow and outflow concentration and isotopic values ranged from -62.1 to -93.9‰ and averaged -77‰ (±1.25, 1SE). At the landfill ambient methane concentrations and 13C ratios measured over multiple days varied from 4.25 to 11.91 ppm and from -58.81 to -45.12‰, respectively. At higher methane concentrations the δ13C of CH4 was more depleted consistent with previously observed relationship at this site made by more traditional techniques. Over a 30-minute measurement period CH4 concentrations at the landfill could vary by as much as 15 ppm. The high frequency continuous optical measurements with field-deployed instruments provide us with an unprecedented temporal resolution of CH4 concentrations and isotopic ratios. These measurements will

  13. Qcl Spectroscopy at 9 μM Calibrated with a High-Power Thulium-Based Frequency Comb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Andrew A.; Jiang, Jie; Hartl, Ingmar; Fermann, Martin; Gatti, Davide; Marangoni, Marco

    2012-06-01

    Optical frequency comb synthesizers (OFCS) comprised of mode-locked femtosecond lasers can be stabilized with Hertz-level accuracy and used in combination with cw lasers for high resolution spectroscopy. As currently established OFCS technologies are confined to the near-IR, mid-IR spectroscopy requires either down-conversion of near-IR combs or up-conversion of the probing laser. Due to the near-IR absorption edge of the nonlinear crystals with extended mid-IR transparency, the conversion efficiency of nonlinear processes increases with the wavelength of the interacting fields. A more straightforward and efficient link between comb and probing laser is thus expected to be obtained by increasing the wavelength of the comb synthesizer. In this work, the use of a novel, powerful Thulium-based OFCS with emission wavelengths near 2 μm is shown to be an excellent candidate to obtain absolute frequency calibration of quantum cascade lasers (QCL) operating at wavelengths as long as 9 μm. Specifically, by combining the frequencies of a 9 μm QCL with the high power 2 μm comb in a AgGaSe_2 crystal, SFG light is created near 1.6 μm. A portion of the 2 μm comb is non-linearly shifted to 1.6 μm. As the carrier envelope offset frequency (fceo) is the same for the SFG radiation and the shifted comb at 1.6 μm, heterodyning the two signals produces a beat signal independent of fceo, eliminating the need for an octave spanning comb and f-2f interferometer. We report on the development of this instrument, and the absolute line transitions of NH_3 at 9 μm, enabled by rapid scanning of the repetition rate of the comb enabled to increase the signal-to-noise ratio. J. Jiang, C. Mohr, J. Bethge, M. Fermann, and I. Hartl, in CLEO/Europe and EQEC 2011 Conference Digest, OSA Technical Digest (CD) PDB_1, 2001 D. Gatti, A. Gambetta, A. Castrillo, G. Galzerano, P. Laporta, L. Gainfrani and M. Marangoni Op. Exp. 19, 17520 2011

  14. Development and Testing of High-Precision Analyzers for Measurements of N2O and CO and for Measurements of CH4, CO2, and H2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baer, D. S.; Gupta, M.; Owano, T. G.

    2011-12-01

    We report the continued development of two continuous-flow gas analyzers, based on cavity enhanced laser absorption spectroscopy, which measure important atmospheric constituents in real time, with high precision and accuracy, and over a wide range of mixing ratios. One instrument (N2O+CO Analyzer) uses a tunable continuous-wave quantum cascade laser operating in the wavelength region near 4.56 microns to record measurements of carbon monoxide, nitrous oxide and water vapor in ambient air. The typical precision for continuous measurements at typical ambient levels of either CO or N2O is less than 0.1 ppb. The instrument reports water vapor mixing ratio simultaneously and employs those measurements to determine the effects due to dilution and line broadening to allow accurate determination of mixing ratios (CO, N2O) on a dry basis. The other instrument uses two tunable continuous-wave near-infrared telecommunications-grade diode lasers operating in the wavelength regions near 1.6 and 1.65 microns to record measurements of carbon dioxide and methane in ambient air. This instrument employs an internal thermal control system to allow extremely low drift despite changes in ambient temperatures over the range from 0 to 45 degrees C. The instrument reports water vapor mixing ratio simultaneously and employs those measurements to accurately quantify the effects due to dilution and line broadening and provide accurate determination of the measured mixing ratios (CO2, CH4) on a dry basis. Both of these instruments require relatively low-power (150-180 W, steady state) and no liquid nitrogen thus allowing for easy measurements in the field. Measurements recorded at leading atmospheric monitoring laboratories in the US, Europe and Asia indicate that both of these instruments exceed the WMO goals for compatibility for CO2, CH4, N2O, and CO.

  15. Reduced erbium-doped ceria nanoparticles: one nano-host applicable for simultaneous optical down- and up-conversions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces a new synthesis procedure to form erbium-doped ceria nanoparticles (EDC NPs) that can act as an optical medium for both up-conversion and down-conversion in the same time. This synthesis process results qualitatively in a high concentration of Ce3+ ions required to obtain high fluorescence efficiency in the down-conversion process. Simultaneously, the synthesized nanoparticles contain the molecular energy levels of erbium that are required for up-conversion. Therefore, the synthesized EDC NPs can emit visible light when excited with either UV or IR photons. This opens new opportunities for applications where emission of light via both up- and down-conversions from a single nanomaterial is desired such as solar cells and bio-imaging. PMID:24940173

  16. Quasi-Optical Network Analyzers and High-Reliability RF MEMS Switched Capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grichener, Alexander

    The thesis first presents a 2-port quasi-optical scalar network analyzer consisting of a transmitter and receiver both built in planar technology. The network analyzer is based on a Schottky-diode mixer integrated inside a planar antenna and fed differentially by a CPW transmission line. The antenna is placed on an extended hemispherical high-resistivity silicon substrate lens. The LO signal is swept from 3-5 GHz and high-order harmonic mixing in both up- and down- conversion mode is used to realize the 15-50 GHz RF bandwidth. The network analyzer resulted in a dynamic range of greater than 40 dB and was successfully used to measure a frequency selective surface with a second-order bandpass response. Furthermore, the system was built with circuits and components for easy scaling to millimeter-wave frequencies which is the primary motivation for this work. The application areas for a millimeter and submillimeter-wave network analyzer include material characterization and art diagnostics. The second project presents several RF MEMS switched capacitors designed for high-reliability operation and suitable for tunable filters and reconfigurable networks. The first switched-capacitor resulted in a digital capacitance ratio of 5 and an analog capacitance ratio of 5-9. The analog tuning of the down-state capacitance is enhanced by a positive vertical stress gradient in the the beam, making it ideal for applications that require precision tuning. A thick electroplated beam resulted in Q greater than 100 at C to X-band frequencies, and power handling of 0.6-1.1 W. The design also minimized charging in the dielectric, resulting in excellent reliability performance even under hot-switched and high power (1 W) conditions. The second switched-capacitor was designed without any dielectric to minimize charging. The device was hot-switched at 1 W of RF power for greater than 11 billion cycles with virtually no change in the C-V curve. The final project presents a 7-channel

  17. Continuous Supersonic Expansion Discharge Source for High-Precision Mid-Infrared Spectroscopy of Cold Molecular Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talicska, Courtney; Porambo, Michael; McCall, Benjamin J.

    2015-06-01

    The low temperatures and pressures of the interstellar medium provide an ideal environment for gas phase ion-neutral reactions that play an essential role in the chemistry of the universe. High-precision laboratory spectra of molecular ions are necessary to facilitate new astronomical discoveries and provide a deeper understanding of interstellar chemistry, but forming ions in measurable quantities in the laboratory has proved challenging. Even when cryogenically cooled, the high temperatures and pressures of typical discharge cells lead to diluted and congested spectra from which extracting chemical information is difficult. Here we overcome this challenge by coupling an electric discharge to a continuous supersonic expansion source to form ions cooled to low temperatures. The ion production abilities of the source have been demonstrated previously as ion densities on the order of 1010-1012 cm-3 have been observed for H3+.a With a smaller rotational constant and the expectation that it will be formed with comparable densities, HN2+ is used as a reliable measure of the cooling abilities of the source. Ions are probed through the use of a widely tunable mid-infrared (3-5 μm) spectrometer based on light formed by difference frequency generation and noise-immune cavity-enhanced optical heterodyne molecular spectroscopy (NICE-OHMS).b To improve the sensitivity of the instrument the discharge is electrically modulated and the signal is fed into a lock-in amplifier before being recorded by a custom data acquisition program. Rovibrational transitions of H3+ and HN2+ have been recorded, giving rotational temperatures of 80-120 K and 35-40 K, respectively. With verification that the source is producing rotationally cold ions, we move toward the study of primary ions of more astronomical significance, including H2CO+. aK. N. Crabtree, C. A. Kaufman, and B. J. McCall, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 086103 (2010). bM. W. Porambo, B. M. Siller, J. M. Pearson, and B. J. McCall, Opt

  18. Intracavity generation of broadband biphotons in a thin crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katamadze, K. G.; Borshchevskaya, N. A.; Dyakonov, I. V.; Paterova, A. V.; Kulik, S. P.

    2013-04-01

    We propose and realize a method of high intensity generation of broadband biphotons and achieve its value up to 150 THz. The source is based on a thin BBO crystal with a thickness of 100 microns, in which spontaneous parametric down-conversion takes place. To compensate for the intensity decrease of the down-conversion caused by the small thickness of the crystal, it is placed inside the cavity of an Ar+ laser. In general, this experiment relates to the widely discussed problem of two-photon shaping in the frequency and/or angular domain.

  19. Photon recycling across a ultraviolet-blocking layer by luminescence in polymer solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engmann, Sebastian; Machalett, Marie; Turkovic, Vida; Rösch, Roland; Rädlein, Edda; Gobsch, Gerhard; Hoppe, Harald

    2012-08-01

    UV-blocking layers can increase the long term stability of organic solar cell devices; however, they limit the amount of light that can be utilized for energy conversion. We present photon recycling and down-conversion via a luminescent layer across a UV-blocking TiO2 layer. Our results show that the use of an additional UV-blocking layer does not necessarily reduce the overall efficiency of organic solar cells, since the loss in photocurrent due to the UV-absorption loss can be partially compensated using high energy photon down-conversion via luminescence layers.

  20. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Solid State Lighting Core Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Franky So; Paul Holloway; Jiangeng Xue

    2009-08-06

    The project objective is to demonstrate high efficiency white emitting OLED devices with a target luminous efficiency between 100 1m/W and 150 1m/W with integrated microcavity structure and down conversion phosphors. The main focus of this work will be on three areas: (1) demonstration of a 2X reduction in OLED device operating voltage by employing the appropriate dopants in the carrier transporting layers; (2) demonstration of a 3X light out-coupling efficiency enhancement by incorporating microcavity structure in the OLED devices; and (3) demonstration of a 2X down-conversion efficiency enhancement (from blue to white) using phosphors.

  1. High arch

    MedlinePlus

    ... is on the back and balls of the foot (metatarsals head). Your health care provider will check to see if the high ... Call your health care provider if you suspect you are having foot pain related to high arches.

  2. High PRF high current switch

    DOEpatents

    Moran, Stuart L.; Hutcherson, R. Kenneth

    1990-03-27

    A triggerable, high voltage, high current, spark gap switch for use in pu power systems. The device comprises a pair of electrodes in a high pressure hydrogen environment that is triggered by introducing an arc between one electrode and a trigger pin. Unusually high repetition rates may be obtained by undervolting the switch, i.e., operating the trigger at voltages much below the self-breakdown voltage of the device.

  3. High arch

    MedlinePlus

    Pes cavus; High foot arch ... High foot arches are much less common than flat feet. They are more likely to be caused by a ... stress is placed on the section of the foot between the ankle and toes (metatarsals). This condition ...

  4. Ultrasensitive, High Accuracy Measurements of Trace Gas Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, David A.; Fleisher, Adam J.; Plusquellic, David F.; Hodges, Joseph

    2015-06-01

    Our laboratory seeks to apply novel cavity-enhanced spectroscopic techniques to present problems in atmospheric and physical chemistry. Primarily we use cavity ring-down spectroscopy in which the passive decay of optical power within a Fabry-Pérot resonator is utilized to extract an absorption signal. With this technique we have demonstrated quantum (shot) noise limited sensitivities in both the near-infrared and mid-infrared spectral regions. Both commercial and home-built optical frequency combs are employed either to serve as absolute frequency references for molecular spectra or in a multiheterodyne approach for multiplexed sensing. I will discuss this novel instrumentation as well as measurements we have made of atmospherically relevant species such as CO2, H2O, O2, CH4, and CO with implications for in situ and remote (i.e. satellite-based) sensing. I will conclude by discussing future directions and plans for challenging measurements in the mid-infrared.

  5. Multisite high resolution measurements of carbon monoxide along Greenland ice cores: evidence for in-situ production and potential for atmospheric reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faïn, Xavier; Chappellaz, Jérôme; Rhodes, Rachael; Stowasser, Christopher; Blunier, Thomas; McConnell, Joseph; Brook, Edward; Desbois, Thibault; Romanini, Daniele

    2014-05-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is the principal sink for hydroxyl radicals (OH) in the troposphere. Consequently, changes in atmospheric CO levels can considerably perturb the oxidizing capacity of the atmosphere, affecting mixing ratios of a host of chemical species oxidized by OH, including methane. In addition, CO variations (and changes in its stable isotopic composition) are expected to be good tracers of changes in biomass burning emissions. Investigating past mixing ratios of carbon monoxide is thus a promising approach towards reducing uncertainty related to the past oxidative capacity of the atmosphere and biogeochemical cycling of methane. Recent developments in optical spectrometry (Optical Feedback Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectrometry, OFCEAS), combined with continuous flow analysis (CFA) systems, allow efficient, precise measurements of CO concentrations in ice cores. Coupling our OFCEAS spectrometer with the CFA melter operated at DRI (Reno, USA) provided the first continuous CO measurements along the NEEM (Greenland) core covering the last 1800 yr at an unprecedented resolution. Although the most recent section of this record (i.e., since 1700 AD) agreed with existing discrete CO measurements from the Eurocore ice core and the deep NEEM firn, it was difficult to interpret in terms of atmospheric CO variation due to high frequency, high amplitudes spikes related to in-situ production (Faïn et al., Climate of the Past Discussion). During a recent 8-week analytical campaign, three different ice archives from Greenland were melted on the DRI CFA and analyzed continuously for CO with the OFCEAS spectrometer: (i) the D4 core (spanning the last 170 yr), (ii) the NEEM core (extending the existing record from 200 AD to 800 BC), and (iii) the Tunu core (spanning the last 1800 yr). Although in-situ production of CO is observed at all sites, these new records reveal different CO patterns and trends. This multisite approach allows us to better characterize the

  6. High Stakes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elgin, Catherine Z.

    2004-01-01

    I discuss the contributions of Harvey Siegel, Francis Schrag and Randall Curren to this volume. Their articles cast in bold relief the relation of High Stakes Testing to the goals of education, the nature of mind and the demands of justice. I argue that the connections are deep, but that the considerations these authors raise do not show that High…

  7. High Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldecker, Mark

    2005-01-01

    Education administrators make buying decisions for furniture based on many factors. Cost, durability, functionality, safety and aesthetics represent just a few. Those issues always will be important, but gaining greater recognition in recent years has been the role furniture plays in creating positive, high-performance learning environments. The…

  8. Flying High

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Litvin, Margaret

    2000-01-01

    Nearly a decade ago, the Montreal School of Aerospace Trades became part of a massive education reform that takes most career education in the province out of comprehensive high schools and invests millions of dollars in specialized vocational schools. Through education-industry partnerships, these schools helping to change the image of vocational…

  9. Highly dominating, highly authoritarian personalities.

    PubMed

    Altemeyer, Bob

    2004-08-01

    The author considered the small part of the population whose members score highly on both the Social Dominance Orientation scale and the Right-Wing Authoritarianism scale. Studies of these High SDO-High RWAs, culled from samples of nearly 4000 Canadian university students and over 2600 of their parents and reported in the present article, reveal that these dominating authoritarians are among the most prejudiced persons in society. Furthermore, they seem to combine the worst elements of each kind of personality, being power-hungry, unsupportive of equality, manipulative, and amoral, as social dominators are in general, while also being religiously ethnocentric and dogmatic, as right-wing authoritarians tend to be. The author suggested that, although they are small in number, such persons can have considerable impact on society because they are well-positioned to become the leaders of prejudiced right-wing political movements. PMID:15279331

  10. Fast time resolution measurements of high concentrations of iodine above a Laminaria Digitata seaweed bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Stephen; Adams, Thomas; Leblanc, Catherine; Potin, Philippe

    2013-04-01

    We report observations of extremely large concentrations of molecular iodine (I2) measured in situ above a seaweed bed composed of laminaria digitata (90%) and laminaria hyperborea (10%) growing in its natural habitat. Measurements were made off the coast of Roscoff in Brittany, France, during day-time low tides on several days in September and November 2012 with the greatest tidal amplitudes. Iodine was quantified using a portable, battery-powered broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectrometer (BBCEAS) deployed from the in-shore research vessel "Aurelia" operated by the Station Biologique de Roscoff. For the 5 second integration times used here, the BBCEAS instrument has a detection limit for iodine of 12 pptv (parts per trillion by volume). The boat was anchored above the seaweed bed before it was exposed to air by the ebbing tide; the boat was grounded on the seaweed bed around the tidal minimum, and then refloated as the incoming tide covered the seaweed. I2 concentrations were strongly anti-correlated with water depth. Initially little I2 was seen above background levels whilst the blades of the seaweed plants were floating on the water surface. However several hundred pptv of I2 was observed within a few minutes of the plants' stipes breaking the surface and first blades coming to rest on rocks out of the water. Iodine concentrations increased further as the tide ebbed, typically peaking around 1500 pptv around the tidal minimum (by which time the seaweed had been exposed for 45 minutes). I2 concentrations decreased rapidly back to background levels as the returning tide submerged the seaweeds. The concentration profiles showed a lot of high frequency structure, with I2 concentrations commonly varying by a factor 2 (or more) within 60 seconds. Additionally the profiles of I2 emitted from the seaweeds immediately below the instrument's inlet typically sat on a smoothly-varying background of approximately 100 pptv, which we attribute to I2 from other more

  11. Ultrasensitive high resolution laser spectroscopy and its application to optical frequency standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Jun

    1997-09-01

    Advanced laser stabilization techniques now enable one to lock laser frequencies onto line centers of natural atomic/molecular resonances with unprecedented precision and accuracy. In this dissertation we discuss our effort in utilizing these techniques to establish visible optical frequency standards. By summarizing our earlier results on frequency measurements of the 87Rb D2 line at 780 nm 127I2 hyperfine transitions at 532 nm, we show the advantage of using a higher quality reference line, usually characterized by its narrower linewidth, higher attainable signal-to-noise ratio and lower sensitivity toward external perturbations. We then present a novel approach of cavity-enhanced frequency modulation spectroscopy for ultra-sensitive detections. The powerful utility of this new technique in the field of frequency standards is demonstrated by probing saturated molecular overtone transitions in the visible and near infrared. Weakly-absorbing gases such as C2H2 and C2HD are placed inside an external high-finesse resonator to enhance their detection sensitivities. A frequency modulation technique is employed to achieve a shot noise limited signal-to- noise ratio. The rf modulation frequency is chosen to match the cavity's free spectral range in order to avoid the cavity-induced conversion of laser frequency noise into amplitude noise. The molecular saturated dispersion signal is directly recovered after demodulation of the cavity transmitted light. A record high integrated absorption sensitivity of 5× 10-13/ (1× 10-14/cm) (at 1 second averaging time) has been obtained. Systematic studies on this new technique are presented on topics of detection sensitivity, signal line shape, signal size and slope, and pressure dependent linewidth broadening and linecenter shift. A Nd:YAG laser is stabilized on the P(5) transition in the (ν2+3/ ν3) overtone band of C2HD at 1.064 μm. Its absolute frequency is established. The excellent signal- to-noise ratio produces a frequency

  12. Convergent optical wired and wireless long-reach access network using high spectral-efficient modulation.

    PubMed

    Chow, C W; Lin, Y H

    2012-04-01

    To provide broadband services in a single and low cost perform, the convergent optical wired and wireless access network is promising. Here, we propose and demonstrate a convergent optical wired and wireless long-reach access networks based on orthogonal wavelength division multiplexing (WDM). Both the baseband signal and the radio-over-fiber (ROF) signal are multiplexed and de-multiplexed in optical domain, hence it is simple and the operation speed is not limited by the electronic bottleneck caused by the digital signal processing (DSP). Error-free de-multiplexing and down-conversion can be achieved for all the signals after 60 km (long-reach) fiber transmission. The scalability of the system for higher bit-rate (60 GHz) is also simulated and discussed. PMID:22513636

  13. Experimental generation of a high-fidelity four-photon linear cluster state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chao; Huang, Yun-Feng; Liu, Bi-Heng; Li, Chuan-Feng; Guo, Guang-Can

    2016-06-01

    Cluster state plays a crucial role in one-way quantum computation. Here, we propose and experimentally demonstrate a scheme to prepare an ultrahigh-fidelity four-photon linear cluster state via a spontaneous parametric down-conversion process. The state fidelity is measured to be 0.9517 ±0.0027 . Our scheme can be directly extended to more photons to generate an N -qubit linear cluster state. Furthermore, our scheme is optimal for generating photonic linear cluster states in the sense of achieving the maximal success probability and having the simplest strategy. The key idea is that the photon pairs are prepared in some special nonmaximally entangled states instead of the normal Bell states. To generate a 2 N -qubit linear cluster state from N pairs of entangled photons, only (N -1 ) Hong-Ou-Mandel interferences are needed and a success probability of (1/4) N -1 is achieved.

  14. High Poverty, High Performing Schools. IDRA Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IDRA Newsletter, 1997

    1997-01-01

    This theme issue includes four articles on high performance by poor Texas schools. In "Principal of National Blue Ribbon School Says High Poverty Schools Can Excel" (interview with Robert Zarate by Christie L. Goodman), the principal of Mary Hull Elementary School (San Antonio, Texas) describes how the high-poverty, high-minority school…

  15. A low-noise high dynamic-range time-domain EMI measurement system for CISPR Band E

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, C.; Russer, P.

    2011-08-01

    In this paper, a broadband time-domain EMI measurement system for measurements from 9 kHz to 18 GHz is presented that allows for compliant EMI measurements in CISPR Band E. Combining ultra-fast analog-to-digital-conversion and real-time digital signal processing on a field-programmable-gate-array (FPGA) with ultra-broadband multi-stage down-conversion, scan times can be reduced by several orders of magnitude in comparison to a traditional heterodyne EMI-receiver. The ultra-low system noise floor of 6-8 dB and the real-time spectrogram allow for the characterisation of the time-behaviour of EMI near the noise floor. EMI measurements of electronic consumer devices and electric household appliances are presented.

  16. Project Georgia High School/High Tech

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Georgia High School/High Tech has been developing a suggested curriculum for use in its programs. The purpose of this instructional material is to provide a basic curriculum format for teachers of High School/High Tech students. The curriculum is designed to implement QCC classroom instruction that encourages career development in technological fields through post-secondary education, paid summer internships, and exposure to experiences in high technology.

  17. Quantum information processing with narrow band two-photon state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yajun

    Application of quantum sources in communication and information processing are believed to bring a new revolution to the on-going information age. The generation of applicable quantum sources such as single photon state and two-photon state, appears to be one of the most difficult in experimental quantum optics. Spontaneous Parametric Down-Conversion (PDC) is known to generate two-photon state, but bandwidth problem makes it less applicable in quantum information processing. The aim of this work is to generate a narrow band two-photon state and apply it to quantum information processing. We start by developing a cavity enhanced PDC device to narrow the bandwidth of the two-photon state. Direct measurement of the bandwidth of the generated state has been made and the quantum theory of such a device has been investigated. An application of this narrow band two-photon state is to generate anti-bunched photons for quantum cryptography, based on the quantum interference between the two-photon state and a coherent state. The feasibility of this scheme for pulsed pump is also investigated. When applying the concept of mode locking in lasers to a two-photon state, we have mode-locked two-photon state which exhibits a comb-like correlation function and may be used for engineering of quantum states in time domain. Other applications such as demonstration of single photon nonlocality, nonlinear sign gate in quantum computation, and direct measurement of quantum beating, will also be addressed.

  18. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Print Page Text Size: A A A Listen High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) Nearly 1 in 3 American adults has high ... weight. How Will I Know if I Have High Blood Pressure? High blood pressure is a silent problem — you ...

  19. Highly Anisotropic, Highly Transparent Wood Composites.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Mingwei; Song, Jianwei; Li, Tian; Gong, Amy; Wang, Yanbin; Dai, Jiaqi; Yao, Yonggang; Luo, Wei; Henderson, Doug; Hu, Liangbing

    2016-07-01

    For the first time, two types of highly anisotropic, highly transparent wood composites are demonstrated by taking advantage of the macro-structures in original wood. These wood composites are highly transparent with a total transmittance up to 90% but exhibit dramatically different optical and mechanical properties. PMID:27147136

  20. Interpretation of Cluster WBD frequency conversion mode data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickett, J. S.; Christopher, I. W.; Kirchner, D. L.

    2013-08-01

    The Cluster Wide-Band Data (WBD) plasma wave receiver mounted on each of the four Cluster spacecraft obtains high time resolution waveform data in the frequency range of ~70 Hz to 577 kHz. In order to make measurements above 77 kHz, it uses frequency conversion to sample the higher frequency waves at one of three different conversion frequencies (~125, 250 and 500 kHz, where these frequencies are the base frequency of the frequency range being sampled) in one of three different filter bandwidths (9.5, 19 and 77 kHz). Within the WBD instrument a down conversion technique, built around quadrature mixing, is used to convert these data to baseband (0 kHz) in order to reduce the sample rate for telemetry to the ground. We describe this down conversion technique and illustrate it through data obtained in space. Because these down converted data sometimes contain pulses, which can be indicative of nonlinear physical structures (e.g., electron phase space holes and electron density enhancements and depletions), it is necessary to understand what effects mixing and down conversion have on them. We present simulations using constructed signals containing pulses, nonlinear wave packets, sinusoids and noise. We show that the pulses and impulsive wave packets, if of sufficient amplitude and of appropriate width, survive the down conversion process, sometimes with the same pulse shape but usually with reduced amplitude, and have time scales consistent with the filter bandwidth at the base frequency. Although we cannot infer the actual time scale of the pulses and impulsive wave packets as originally recorded by the WBD instrument before mixing and down conversion, their presence indicates nonlinear processes occurring at or somewhat near the location of the measurement. Sinusoidal waves are represented in the down conversion time scale as sinusoids of nearly the same amplitude and at frequencies adjusted down by the conversion frequency. The original input waveforms, regardless

  1. Interpretation of Cluster WBD frequency conversion mode data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickett, J. S.; Christopher, I. W.; Kirchner, D. L.

    2014-02-01

    The Cluster wide-band data (WBD) plasma wave receiver mounted on each of the four Cluster spacecraft obtains high time resolution waveform data in the frequency range of ~70 Hz to 577 kHz. In order to make measurements above 77 kHz, it uses frequency conversion to sample the higher frequency waves at one of three different conversion frequencies (~125, 250 and 500 kHz, these frequencies being the possible options for setting the base frequency of the frequency range being sampled) in one of three different filter bandwidths (9.5, 19 and 77 kHz). Within the WBD instrument, a down-conversion technique, built around quadrature mixing, is used to convert these data to baseband (0 kHz) in order to reduce the sample rate for telemetry to the ground. We describe this down-conversion technique and illustrate it through data obtained in space. Because these down-converted data sometimes contain pulses, which can be indicative of nonlinear physical structures (e.g., electron phase-space holes and electron density enhancements and depletions), it is necessary to understand what effects mixing and down conversion have on them. We present simulations using constructed signals containing pulses, nonlinear wave packets, sinusoids and noise. We show that the pulses and impulsive wave packets, if of sufficient amplitude and of appropriate width, survive the down-conversion process, sometimes with the same pulse shape but usually with reduced amplitude, and have timescales consistent with the filter bandwidth at the base frequency. Although we cannot infer the actual timescale of the pulses and impulsive wave packets as originally recorded by the WBD instrument before mixing and down conversion, their presence indicates nonlinear processes occurring at or somewhat near the location of the measurement. Sinusoidal waves are represented in the down-conversion timescale as sinusoids of nearly the same amplitude and at frequencies adjusted down by the conversion frequency. The original

  2. Si infrared pixelless photonic emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malyutenko, V. K.; Bogatyrenko, V. V.; Malyutenko, O. Y.; Chyrchyk, S. V.

    2005-09-01

    We report on basic principle and technology of Si high-temperature (T>300K) IR emitter based on all optical down conversion concept. The approach is based on the possibility to modulate semiconductor thermal emission power in the spectral range of intra-band electron transitions through shorter wavelength (inter-band transitions) optical pumping (light down conversion process). Device emission bands are matched to transparency windows in atmosphere (3-5 μm and 8-12 μm) by adjusting thin film coat parameters. The carrier lifetime is responsible for the device time response whereas its maximum power emitted (mW-range) activates with temperature increase. One of the major advantages of devices employing optical "read in" technology is that they are free of contacts and junctions, thus making them ideal for operation at high temperatures.

  3. Project Georgia High School/High Tech

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The High School/High Tech initiative of the President's Committee on Employment of Disabilities, Georgia's application of the collaborative "Georgia Model" and NASA's commitment of funding have shown that opportunities for High School/High Tech students are unlimited. In Georgia, the partnership approach to meeting the needs of this program has opened doors previously closed. As the program grows and develops, reflecting the needs of our students and the marketplace, more opportunities will be available. Our collaboratives are there to provide these opportunities and meet the challenge of matching our students with appropriate education and career goals. Summing up the activities and outcomes of Project Georgia High School/High Tech is not difficult. Significant outcomes have already occurred in the Savannah area as a result of NASA's grant. The support of NASA has enabled Georgia Committee to "grow" High School/High Tech throughout the region-and, by example, the state. The success of the Columbus pilot project has fostered the proliferation of projects, resulting in more than 30 Georgia High School High Tech programs-with eight in the Savannah area.

  4. High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. High Blood Pressure What Is High Blood Pressure? High blood pressure is a common disease in ... the heart, kidneys, brain, and eyes. Types of High Blood Pressure There are two main types of high blood ...

  5. High blood sugar

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000332.htm High blood sugar To use the sharing features on this page, ... later when energy is needed. Symptoms of High Blood Sugar Symptoms of high blood sugar can include: Being ...

  6. High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... version High Blood Pressure Overview What is blood pressure? Blood pressure is the amount of force that your ... called your blood pressure. What is high blood pressure? High blood pressure (also called hypertension) occurs when your blood ...

  7. High blood pressure - infants

    MedlinePlus

    National High Blood Pressure Education Program Working Group on High Blood Pressure in Children and Adolescents. The fourth report on the diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment of high blood pressure in children and adolescents. Pediatrics . ...

  8. High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... normal blood pressure 140/90 or higher is high blood pressure Between 120 and 139 for the top number, ... prehypertension. Prehypertension means you may end up with high blood pressure, unless you take steps to prevent it. High ...

  9. High-Flying High-Poverty Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Educator, 2013

    2013-01-01

    In discussing socioeconomic integration before audiences, the author is frequently asked: What about high-poverty schools that do work? Don't they suggest that economic segregation isn't much of a problem after all? High-poverty public schools that beat the odds paint a heartening story that often attracts considerable media attention. In 2000,…

  10. High Performance Networks for High Impact Science

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Mary A.; Bair, Raymond A.

    2003-02-13

    This workshop was the first major activity in developing a strategic plan for high-performance networking in the Office of Science. Held August 13 through 15, 2002, it brought together a selection of end users, especially representing the emerging, high-visibility initiatives, and network visionaries to identify opportunities and begin defining the path forward.

  11. High strength high modulus ceramic fiber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fetterolf, R. N.

    1972-01-01

    Low cost method was developed for producing high strength, high modulus, continuous ceramic oxide fibers. Process transforms inexpensive metallic salts into syrup-like liquids that can be fiberized at room temperatures. Resulting salt fibers are then converted to oxides by calcination at relatively low temperatures.

  12. Development of high strength, high temperature ceramics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, W. B.

    1982-01-01

    Improvement in the high-pressure turbopumps, both fuel and oxidizer, in the Space Shuttle main engine were considered. The operation of these pumps is limited by temperature restrictions of the metallic components used in these pumps. Ceramic materials that retain strength at high temperatures and appear to be promising candidates for use as turbine blades and impellers are discussed. These high strength materials are sensitive to many related processing parameters such as impurities, sintering aids, reaction aids, particle size, processing temperature, and post thermal treatment. The specific objectives of the study were to: (1) identify and define the processing parameters that affect the properties of Si3N4 ceramic materials, (2) design and assembly equipment required for processing high strength ceramics, (3) design and assemble test apparatus for evaluating the high temperature properties of Si3N4, and (4) conduct a research program of manufacturing and evaluating Si3N4 materials as applicable to rocket engine applications.

  13. High pressure, high current, low inductance, high reliability sealed terminals

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, John S [Oak Ridge, TN; McKeever, John W [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-03-23

    The invention is a terminal assembly having a casing with at least one delivery tapered-cone conductor and at least one return tapered-cone conductor routed there-through. The delivery and return tapered-cone conductors are electrically isolated from each other and positioned in the annuluses of ordered concentric cones at an off-normal angle. The tapered cone conductor service can be AC phase conductors and DC link conductors. The center core has at least one service conduit of gate signal leads, diagnostic signal wires, and refrigerant tubing routed there-through. A seal material is in direct contact with the casing inner surface, the tapered-cone conductors, and the service conduits thereby hermetically filling the interstitial space in the casing interior core and center core. The assembly provides simultaneous high-current, high-pressure, low-inductance, and high-reliability service.

  14. Flexible RF filter using a nonuniform SCISSOR.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Leimeng

    2016-03-15

    This work presents a flexible radiofrequency (RF) filter using an integrated microwave photonic circuit that comprises a nonuniform side-coupled integrated spaced sequence of resonators (N-SCISSOR). The filter passband can be reconfigured by varying the N-SCISSOR parameters. When employing a dual-parallel Mach-Zechnder modulator, the filter is also able to perform frequency down-conversion. In the experiment, various filter response shapes are shown, ranging from a flat-top band-pass filter to a total opposite high-rejection (>40  dB) notch filter, with a frequency coverage of greater than two octaves. The frequency down-conversion function is also demonstrated. PMID:26977648

  15. High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Description of High Blood Pressure Español High blood pressure is a common disease ... defines high blood pressure severity levels. Stages of High Blood Pressure in Adults Stages Systolic (top number) Diastolic (bottom ...

  16. Bumball: Highly Engaging, Highly Inclusive, and Highly Entertaining

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Amber; Barney, David; Wilkinson, Carol

    2014-01-01

    Physical educators are always looking for new and exciting games and activities in which students can participate. This article describes Bumball, a high-intensity game that provides the opportunity for students to use many common game skills, such as hand-eye coordination, passing to a target, running, playing defense, and getting to an open…

  17. High-current, high-frequency capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renz, D. D.

    1983-01-01

    The NASA Lewis high-current, high-frequency capacitor development program was conducted under a contract with Maxwell Laboratories, Inc., San Diego, California. The program was started to develop power components for space power systems. One of the components lacking was a high-power, high-frequency capacitor. Some of the technology developed in this program may be directly usable in an all-electric airplane. The materials used in the capacitor included the following: the film is polypropylene, the impregnant is monoisopropyl biphenyl, the conductive epoxy is Emerson and Cuming Stycast 2850 KT, the foil is aluminum, the case is stainless steel (304), and the electrode is a modified copper-ceramic.

  18. High strength and high toughness steel

    DOEpatents

    Parker, Earl R.; Zackay, Victor F.

    1979-01-01

    A structural steel which possess both high strength and high toughness and has particular application of cryogenic uses. The steel is produced by the utilization of thermally induced phase transformation following heating in a three-phase field in iron-rich alloys of the Fe-Ni-Ti system, with a preferred composition of 12% nickel, 0.5% titanium, the remainder being iron.

  19. High strength, high ductility low carbon steel

    DOEpatents

    Koo, Jayoung; Thomas, Gareth

    1978-01-01

    A high strength, high ductility low carbon steel consisting essentially of iron, 0.05-0.15 wt% carbon, and 1-3 wt% silicon. Minor amounts of other constituents may be present. The steel is characterized by a duplex ferrite-martensite microstructure in a fibrous morphology. The microstructure is developed by heat treatment consisting of initial austenitizing treatment followed by annealing in the (.alpha. + .gamma.) range with intermediate quenching.

  20. High Temperature, High Power Piezoelectric Composite Transducers

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyeong Jae; Zhang, Shujun; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, StewarT.

    2014-01-01

    Piezoelectric composites are a class of functional materials consisting of piezoelectric active materials and non-piezoelectric passive polymers, mechanically attached together to form different connectivities. These composites have several advantages compared to conventional piezoelectric ceramics and polymers, including improved electromechanical properties, mechanical flexibility and the ability to tailor properties by using several different connectivity patterns. These advantages have led to the improvement of overall transducer performance, such as transducer sensitivity and bandwidth, resulting in rapid implementation of piezoelectric composites in medical imaging ultrasounds and other acoustic transducers. Recently, new piezoelectric composite transducers have been developed with optimized composite components that have improved thermal stability and mechanical quality factors, making them promising candidates for high temperature, high power transducer applications, such as therapeutic ultrasound, high power ultrasonic wirebonding, high temperature non-destructive testing, and downhole energy harvesting. This paper will present recent developments of piezoelectric composite technology for high temperature and high power applications. The concerns and limitations of using piezoelectric composites will also be discussed, and the expected future research directions will be outlined. PMID:25111242

  1. High temperature, high power piezoelectric composite transducers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyeong Jae; Zhang, Shujun; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, Stewart

    2014-01-01

    Piezoelectric composites are a class of functional materials consisting of piezoelectric active materials and non-piezoelectric passive polymers, mechanically attached together to form different connectivities. These composites have several advantages compared to conventional piezoelectric ceramics and polymers, including improved electromechanical properties, mechanical flexibility and the ability to tailor properties by using several different connectivity patterns. These advantages have led to the improvement of overall transducer performance, such as transducer sensitivity and bandwidth, resulting in rapid implementation of piezoelectric composites in medical imaging ultrasounds and other acoustic transducers. Recently, new piezoelectric composite transducers have been developed with optimized composite components that have improved thermal stability and mechanical quality factors, making them promising candidates for high temperature, high power transducer applications, such as therapeutic ultrasound, high power ultrasonic wirebonding, high temperature non-destructive testing, and downhole energy harvesting. This paper will present recent developments of piezoelectric composite technology for high temperature and high power applications. The concerns and limitations of using piezoelectric composites will also be discussed, and the expected future research directions will be outlined. PMID:25111242

  2. High assurance SPIRAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franchetti, Franz; Sandryhaila, Aliaksei; Johnson, Jeremy R.

    2014-06-01

    In this paper we introduce High Assurance SPIRAL to solve the last mile problem for the synthesis of high assurance implementations of controllers for vehicular systems that are executed in today's and future embedded and high performance embedded system processors. High Assurance SPIRAL is a scalable methodology to translate a high level specification of a high assurance controller into a highly resource-efficient, platform-adapted, verified control software implementation for a given platform in a language like C or C++. High Assurance SPIRAL proves that the implementation is equivalent to the specification written in the control engineer's domain language. Our approach scales to problems involving floating-point calculations and provides highly optimized synthesized code. It is possible to estimate the available headroom to enable assurance/performance trade-offs under real-time constraints, and enables the synthesis of multiple implementation variants to make attacks harder. At the core of High Assurance SPIRAL is the Hybrid Control Operator Language (HCOL) that leverages advanced mathematical constructs expressing the controller specification to provide high quality translation capabilities. Combined with a verified/certified compiler, High Assurance SPIRAL provides a comprehensive complete solution to the efficient synthesis of verifiable high assurance controllers. We demonstrate High Assurance SPIRALs capability by co-synthesizing proofs and implementations for attack detection and sensor spoofing algorithms and deploy the code as ROS nodes on the Landshark unmanned ground vehicle and on a Synthetic Car in a real-time simulator.

  3. High blood pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000468.htm High blood pressure To use the sharing features on ... body. Hypertension is the term used to describe high blood pressure. Blood pressure readings are given as ...

  4. High Speed data acquisition

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Peter S.

    1998-02-01

    A general introduction to high Speed data acquisition system techniques in modern particle physics experiments is given. Examples are drawn from the SELEX(E781) high statistics charmed baryon production and decay experiment now taking data at Fermilab.

  5. High-Altitude Illness

    MedlinePlus

    ... altitude illness: Acute mountain sickness High-altitude pulmonary edema (also called HAPE), which affects the lungs High-altitude cerebral edema (also called HACE), which affects the brain These ...

  6. Cleaning Up High.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rittner-Heir, Robbin M.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses cleaning techniques and equipment for areas in a school that are hard to reach, such as the high spacious ceilings, the tall windows of a school atrium, and high points in gymnasiums and auditoriums. (GR)

  7. High blood pressure - infants

    MedlinePlus

    Hypertension - infants ... and blood vessels The health of the kidneys High blood pressure in infants may be due to kidney or ... Bronchopulmonary dysplasia Renal artery stenosis In newborn babies, high blood pressure is often caused by a blood clot in ...

  8. High potassium level

    MedlinePlus

    High potassium level is a problem in which the amount of potassium in the blood is higher than normal. The medical ... There are often no symptoms with a high level of potassium. When symptoms do occur, they may ...

  9. High energy neutron radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Gavron, A.; Morley, K.; Morris, C.; Seestrom, S.; Ullmann, J.; Yates, G.; Zumbro, J.

    1996-06-01

    High-energy spallation neutron sources are now being considered in the US and elsewhere as a replacement for neutron beams produced by reactors. High-energy and high intensity neutron beams, produced by unmoderated spallation sources, open potential new vistas of neutron radiography. The authors discuss the basic advantages and disadvantages of high-energy neutron radiography, and consider some experimental results obtained at the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility at Los Alamos.

  10. Tunable high pressure lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, R. V.

    1976-01-01

    Atmospheric transmission of high energy CO2 lasers is considerably improved by high pressure operation which, due to pressure broadening, permits tuning the laser lines off atmospheric absorption lines. Pronounced improvement is shown for horizontal transmission at altitudes above several kilometers and for vertical transmission through the entire atmosphere. Applications of tunable high pressure CO2 lasers to energy transmission and to remote sensing are discussed along with initial efforts in tuning high pressure CO2 lasers.

  11. High power microwave generator

    DOEpatents

    Ekdahl, C.A.

    1983-12-29

    A microwave generator efficiently converts the energy of an intense relativistic electron beam (REB) into a high-power microwave emission using the Smith-Purcell effect which is related to Cerenkov radiation. Feedback for efficient beam bunching and high gain is obtained by placing a cylindrical Smith-Purcell transmission grating on the axis of a toroidal resonator. High efficiency results from the use of a thin cold annular highly-magnetized REB that is closely coupled to the resonant structure.

  12. High power microwave generator

    DOEpatents

    Ekdahl, Carl A.

    1986-01-01

    A microwave generator efficiently converts the energy of an intense relativistic electron beam (REB) into a high-power microwave emission using the Smith-Purcell effect which is related to Cerenkov radiation. Feedback for efficient beam bunching and high gain is obtained by placing a cylindrical Smith-Purcell transmission grating on the axis of a toroidal resonator. High efficiency results from the use of a thin cold annular highly-magnetized REB that is closely coupled to the resonant structure.

  13. High Technology Partnership Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis Tuttle Vo-Tech Center, Oklahoma City, OK.

    The High Technology Center at Francis Tuttle Vo-Tech Center in Oklahoma City conducted an 18-month demonstration program, beginning in January 1989, to train or retrain average workers, unemployed because of cutbacks in their field or lack of marketable skills, for careers in high technology. The High Technology Center offered adults training in…

  14. High Technology Needs Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southeastern Louisiana Univ., Hammond.

    A project produced a high technology status report providing needs assessment data for educational planning. The purpose was to determine the impact and future of high technology in Louisiana. Information was obtained from 68 Louisiana manufacturing industries by mailed questionnaire. Data indicated that 45 industries were involved in high tech. A…

  15. High performance systems

    SciTech Connect

    Vigil, M.B.

    1995-03-01

    This document provides a written compilation of the presentations and viewgraphs from the 1994 Conference on High Speed Computing given at the High Speed Computing Conference, {open_quotes}High Performance Systems,{close_quotes} held at Gleneden Beach, Oregon, on April 18 through 21, 1994.

  16. High speed civil transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcknight, R. L.

    1992-01-01

    The design requirements of the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) are discussed. The following design concerns are presented: (1) environmental impact (emissions and noise); (2) critical components (the high temperature combustor and the lightweight exhaust nozzle); and (3) advanced materials (high temperature ceramic matrix composites (CMC's)/intermetallic matrix composites (IMC's)/metal matrix composites (MMC's)).

  17. Early College High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dessoff, Alan

    2011-01-01

    For at-risk students who stand little chance of going to college, or even finishing high school, a growing number of districts have found a solution: Give them an early start in college while they still are in high school. The early college high school (ECHS) movement that began with funding from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation 10 years ago…

  18. Evaluating High School IT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Brett A.

    2004-01-01

    Since its inception in 1997, Cisco's curriculum has entered thousands of high schools across the U.S. and around the world for two reasons: (1) Cisco has a large portion of the computer networking market, and thus has the resources for and interest in developing high school academies; and (2) high school curriculum development teams recognize the…

  19. Efficient quantum optical state engineering and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCusker, Kevin T.

    Over a century after the modern prediction of the existence of individual particles of light by Albert Einstein, a reliable source of this simple quantum state of one photon does not exist. While common light sources such as a light bulb, LED, or laser can produce a pulse of light with an average of one photon, there is (currently) no way of knowing the number of photons in that pulse without first absorbing (and thereby destroying) them. Spontaneous parametric down-conversion, a process in which one high-energy photon splits into two lower-energy photons, allows us to prepare a single-photon state by detecting one of the photons, which then heralds the existence of its twin. This process has been the workhorse of quantum optics, allowing demonstrations of a myriad of quantum processes and protocols, such as entanglement, cryptography, superdense coding, teleportation, and simple quantum computing demonstrations. All of these processes would benefit from better engineering of the underlying down-conversion process, but despite significant effort (both theoretical and experimental), optimization of this process is ongoing. The focus of this work is to optimize certain aspects of a down-conversion source, and then use this tool in novel experiments not otherwise feasible. Specifically, the goal is to optimize the heralding efficiency of the down-conversion photons, i.e., the probability that if one photon is detected, the other photon is also detected. This source is then applied to two experiments (a single-photon source, and a quantum cryptography implementation), and the detailed theory of an additional application (a source of Fock states and path-entangled states, called N00N states) is discussed, along with some other possible applications.

  20. High Tech High: Cruising on the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Thomas F.

    1995-01-01

    A "driver's license" at one suburban Minnesota high school is a free round-trip ticket to the world. The Internet allows students to stroll through the Louvre, tour the White House, or examine current satellite weather photos at NASA's computer center. Students are developing friendships, exploring different cultures, and learning foreign…

  1. High power, high beam quality regenerative amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, Lloyd A.; Dane, Clifford B.

    1993-01-01

    A regenerative laser amplifier system generates high peak power and high energy per pulse output beams enabling generation of X-rays used in X-ray lithography for manufacturing integrated circuits. The laser amplifier includes a ring shaped optical path with a limited number of components including a polarizer, a passive 90 degree phase rotator, a plurality of mirrors, a relay telescope, and a gain medium, the components being placed close to the image plane of the relay telescope to reduce diffraction or phase perturbations in order to limit high peak intensity spiking. In the ring, the beam makes two passes through the gain medium for each transit of the optical path to increase the amplifier gain to loss ratio. A beam input into the ring makes two passes around the ring, is diverted into an SBS phase conjugator and proceeds out of the SBS phase conjugator back through the ring in an equal but opposite direction for two passes, further reducing phase perturbations. A master oscillator inputs the beam through an isolation cell (Faraday or Pockels) which transmits the beam into the ring without polarization rotation. The isolation cell rotates polarization only in beams proceeding out of the ring to direct the beams out of the amplifier. The diffraction limited quality of the input beam is preserved in the amplifier so that a high power output beam having nearly the same diffraction limited quality is produced.

  2. High power, high beam quality regenerative amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, L.A.; Dane, C.B.

    1993-08-24

    A regenerative laser amplifier system generates high peak power and high energy per pulse output beams enabling generation of X-rays used in X-ray lithography for manufacturing integrated circuits. The laser amplifier includes a ring shaped optical path with a limited number of components including a polarizer, a passive 90 degree phase rotator, a plurality of mirrors, a relay telescope, and a gain medium, the components being placed close to the image plane of the relay telescope to reduce diffraction or phase perturbations in order to limit high peak intensity spiking. In the ring, the beam makes two passes through the gain medium for each transit of the optical path to increase the amplifier gain to loss ratio. A beam input into the ring makes two passes around the ring, is diverted into an SBS phase conjugator and proceeds out of the SBS phase conjugator back through the ring in an equal but opposite direction for two passes, further reducing phase perturbations. A master oscillator inputs the beam through an isolation cell (Faraday or Pockels) which transmits the beam into the ring without polarization rotation. The isolation cell rotates polarization only in beams proceeding out of the ring to direct the beams out of the amplifier. The diffraction limited quality of the input beam is preserved in the amplifier so that a high power output beam having nearly the same diffraction limited quality is produced.

  3. High performance polymer development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, Paul M.

    1991-01-01

    The term high performance as applied to polymers is generally associated with polymers that operate at high temperatures. High performance is used to describe polymers that perform at temperatures of 177 C or higher. In addition to temperature, other factors obviously influence the performance of polymers such as thermal cycling, stress level, and environmental effects. Some recent developments at NASA Langley in polyimides, poly(arylene ethers), and acetylenic terminated materials are discussed. The high performance/high temperature polymers discussed are representative of the type of work underway at NASA Langley Research Center. Further improvement in these materials as well as the development of new polymers will provide technology to help meet NASA future needs in high performance/high temperature applications. In addition, because of the combination of properties offered by many of these polymers, they should find use in many other applications.

  4. High pressure and high temperature apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Voronov, Oleg A.

    2005-09-13

    A design for high pressure/high temperature apparatus and reaction cell to achieve .about.30 GPa pressure in .about.1 cm volume and .about.100 GPa pressure in .about.1 mm volumes and 20-5000.degree. C. temperatures in a static regime. The device includes profiled anvils (28) action on a reaction cell (14, 16) containing the material (26) to be processed. The reaction cell includes a heater (18) surrounded by insulating layers and screens. Surrounding the anvils are cylindrical inserts and supporting rings (30-48) whose hardness increases towards the reaction cell. These volumes may be increased considerably if applications require it, making use of presses that have larger loading force capability, larger frames and using larger anvils.

  5. High Resolution, High Frame Rate Video Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Papers and working group summaries presented at the High Resolution, High Frame Rate Video (HHV) Workshop are compiled. HHV system is intended for future use on the Space Shuttle and Space Station Freedom. The Workshop was held for the dual purpose of: (1) allowing potential scientific users to assess the utility of the proposed system for monitoring microgravity science experiments; and (2) letting technical experts from industry recommend improvements to the proposed near-term HHV system. The following topics are covered: (1) State of the art in the video system performance; (2) Development plan for the HHV system; (3) Advanced technology for image gathering, coding, and processing; (4) Data compression applied to HHV; (5) Data transmission networks; and (6) Results of the users' requirements survey conducted by NASA.

  6. A simple, high efficiency, high resolution spectropolarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barden, Samuel C.

    2012-09-01

    A simple concept is described that uses volume phase holographic gratings as polarizing dispersers for a high efficiency, high resolution spectropolarimeter. Although the idea has previously been mentioned in the literature as possible, such a concept has not been explored in detail. Performance analysis is presented for a VPHG spectropolarimeter concept that could be utilized for both solar and night-time astronomy. Instrumental peak efficiency can approach 100% with spectral dispersions permitting R~200,000 spectral resolution with diffraction limited telescopes. The instrument has 3-channels: two dispersed image planes with orthogonal polarization and an undispersed image plane. The concept has a range of versatility where it could be configured (with appropriate half-wave plates) for slit-fed spectroscopy or without slits for snapshot/hyperspectral/tomographic spectroscopic imaging. Multiplex gratings could also be used for the simultaneous recording of two separate spectral bands or multiple instruments could be daisy chained with beam splitters for further spectral coverage.

  7. High modulus high temperature glass fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacon, J. F.

    1973-01-01

    The search for a new high-modulus, high-temperature glass fiber involved the preparation of 500 glass compositions lying in 12 glass fields. These systems consisted primarily of low atomic number oxides and rare-earth oxides. Direct optical measurements of the kinetics of crystallization of the cordierite-rare earth system, for example, showed that the addition of rare-earth oxides decreased the rate of formation of cordierite crystals. Glass samples prepared from these systems proved that the rare-earth oxides made large specific contributions to the Young's modulus of the glasses. The best glasses have moduli greater than 21 million psi, the best glass fibers have moduli greater than 18 million psi, and the best glass fiber-epoxy resin composites have tensile strengths of 298,000 psi, compressive strengths of at least 220,000 psi, flexural strengths of 290,000 psi, and short-beam shear strengths of almost 17,000 psi.

  8. High energy high brightness thin disk laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nixon, Matthew D.; Cates, Michael C.

    2012-11-01

    Boeing has been developing solid state lasers for high energy applications since 2004 using Yb:YAG thin disk lasers as pioneered by A. Giesen1 and commercialized by Trumpf Laser GmbH.2 In this paper, we report results of our second generation design and status of a third generation we are currently developing, which will produce 35 kW and a beam quality <2.

  9. HIGH VOLTAGE, HIGH CURRENT SPARK GAP SWITCH

    DOEpatents

    Dike, R.S.; Lier, D.W.; Schofield, A.E.; Tuck, J.L.

    1962-04-17

    A high voltage and current spark gap switch comprising two main electrodes insulatingly supported in opposed spaced relationship and a middle electrode supported medially between the main electrodes and symmetrically about the median line of the main electrodes is described. The middle electrode has a perforation aligned with the median line and an irradiation electrode insulatingly supported in the body of the middle electrode normal to the median line and protruding into the perforation. (AEC)

  10. High frequency, high power capacitor development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, C. W.; Hoffman, P. S.

    1983-01-01

    A program to develop a special high energy density, high power transfer capacitor to operate at frequency of 40 kHz, 600 V rms at 125 A rms plus 600 V dc bias for space operation. The program included material evaluation and selection, a capacitor design was prepared, a thermal analysis performed on the design. Fifty capacitors were manufactured for testing at 10 kHz and 40 kHz for 50 hours at Industrial Electric Heating Co. of Columbus, Ohio. The vacuum endurance test used on environmental chamber and temperature plate furnished by Maxwell. The capacitors were energized with a special power conditioning apparatus developed by Industrial Electric Heating Co. Temperature conditions of the capacitors were monitored by IEHCo test equipment. Successful completion of the vacuum endurance test series confirmed achievement of the main goal of producing a capacitor or reliable operation at high frequency in an environment normally not hospitable to electrical and electronic components. The capacitor developed compared to a typical commercial capacitor at the 40 kHz level represents a decrease in size and weight by a factor of seven.

  11. High output lamp with high brightness

    DOEpatents

    Kirkpatrick, Douglas A.; Bass, Gary K.; Copsey, Jesse F.; Garber, Jr., William E.; Kwong, Vincent H.; Levin, Izrail; MacLennan, Donald A.; Roy, Robert J.; Steiner, Paul E.; Tsai, Peter; Turner, Brian P.

    2002-01-01

    An ultra bright, low wattage inductively coupled electrodeless aperture lamp is powered by a solid state RF source in the range of several tens to several hundreds of watts at various frequencies in the range of 400 to 900 MHz. Numerous novel lamp circuits and components are disclosed including a wedding ring shaped coil having one axial and one radial lead, a high accuracy capacitor stack, a high thermal conductivity aperture cup and various other aperture bulb configurations, a coaxial capacitor arrangement, and an integrated coil and capacitor assembly. Numerous novel RF circuits are also disclosed including a high power oscillator circuit with reduced complexity resonant pole configuration, parallel RF power FET transistors with soft gate switching, a continuously variable frequency tuning circuit, a six port directional coupler, an impedance switching RF source, and an RF source with controlled frequency-load characteristics. Numerous novel RF control methods are disclosed including controlled adjustment of the operating frequency to find a resonant frequency and reduce reflected RF power, controlled switching of an impedance switched lamp system, active power control and active gate bias control.

  12. Highly directional thermal emitter

    DOEpatents

    Ribaudo, Troy; Shaner, Eric A; Davids, Paul; Peters, David W

    2015-03-24

    A highly directional thermal emitter device comprises a two-dimensional periodic array of heavily doped semiconductor structures on a surface of a substrate. The array provides a highly directional thermal emission at a peak wavelength between 3 and 15 microns when the array is heated. For example, highly doped silicon (HDSi) with a plasma frequency in the mid-wave infrared was used to fabricate nearly perfect absorbing two-dimensional gratings structures that function as highly directional thermal radiators. The absorption and emission characteristics of the HDSi devices possessed a high degree of angular dependence for infrared absorption in the 10-12 micron range, while maintaining high reflectivity of solar radiation (.about.64%) at large incidence angles.

  13. High lift selected concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, M. L.

    1979-01-01

    The benefits to high lift system maximum life and, alternatively, to high lift system complexity, of applying analytic design and analysis techniques to the design of high lift sections for flight conditions were determined and two high lift sections were designed to flight conditions. The influence of the high lift section on the sizing and economics of a specific energy efficient transport (EET) was clarified using a computerized sizing technique and an existing advanced airplane design data base. The impact of the best design resulting from the design applications studies on EET sizing and economics were evaluated. Flap technology trade studies, climb and descent studies, and augmented stability studies are included along with a description of the baseline high lift system geometry, a calculation of lift and pitching moment when separation is present, and an inverse boundary layer technique for pressure distribution synthesis and optimization.

  14. High speed handpieces

    PubMed Central

    Bhandary, Nayan; Desai, Asavari; Shetty, Y Bharath

    2014-01-01

    High speed instruments are versatile instruments used by clinicians of all specialties of dentistry. It is important for clinicians to understand the types of high speed handpieces available and the mechanism of working. The centers for disease control and prevention have issued guidelines time and again for disinfection and sterilization of high speed handpieces. This article presents the recent developments in the design of the high speed handpieces. With a view to prevent hospital associated infections significant importance has been given to disinfection, sterilization & maintenance of high speed handpieces. How to cite the article: Bhandary N, Desai A, Shetty YB. High speed handpieces. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(1):130-2. PMID:24653618

  15. High-altitude headache.

    PubMed

    Marmura, Michael J; Hernandez, Pablo Bandres

    2015-05-01

    High-altitude headache is one of many neurological symptoms associated with the ascent to high altitudes. Cellular hypoxia due to decreased barometric pressure seems to be the common final pathway for headache as altitude increases. Susceptibility to high-altitude headache depends on genetic factors, history of migraine, and acclimatization, but symptoms of acute mountain sickness are universal at very high altitudes. This review summarizes the pathophysiology of acute mountain sickness and high-altitude headache as well as the evidence for treatment and prevention with different drugs and devices which may be useful for regular and novice mountaineers. This includes an examination of other headache disorders which may mimic high-altitude headache. PMID:25795155

  16. High temperature furnace

    DOEpatents

    Borkowski, Casimer J.

    1976-08-03

    A high temperature furnace for use above 2000.degree.C is provided that features fast initial heating and low power consumption at the operating temperature. The cathode is initially heated by joule heating followed by electron emission heating at the operating temperature. The cathode is designed for routine large temperature excursions without being subjected to high thermal stresses. A further characteristic of the device is the elimination of any ceramic components from the high temperature zone of the furnace.

  17. High temperature refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Steyert, Jr., William A.

    1978-01-01

    A high temperature magnetic refrigerator which uses a Stirling-like cycle in which rotating magnetic working material is heated in zero field and adiabatically magnetized, cooled in high field, then adiabatically demagnetized. During this cycle said working material is in heat exchange with a pumped fluid which absorbs heat from a low temperature heat source and deposits heat in a high temperature reservoir. The magnetic refrigeration cycle operates at an efficiency 70% of Carnot.

  18. High-Temperature Superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Shoji

    2006-12-01

    A general review on high-temperature superconductivity was made. After prehistoric view and the process of discovery were stated, the special features of high-temperature superconductors were explained from the materials side and the physical properties side. The present status on applications of high-temperature superconductors were explained on superconducting tapes, electric power cables, magnets for maglev trains, electric motors, superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) and single flux quantum (SFQ) devices and circuits.

  19. High redshift GRBs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehrels, Neil; Cannizzo, John K.

    2012-09-01

    The Swift mission has opened a new, high redshift window on the universe. In this review we provide an overview of gamma-ray burst (GRB) science, describe the Swift mission, discuss high-z GRBs and tools for high-z studies, and look forward at future capabilities. A new mission concept - Lobster - is described that would monitor the X-ray sky at order of magnitude higher sensitivity than current missions.

  20. High Redshift GRBs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil; Cannizzo, John K.

    2012-01-01

    The Swift mission has opened a new, high redshift window on the universe. In this review we provide an overview of gamma-ray burst (GRB) science, describe the Swift mission, discuss high-z GRBs and tools for high-z studies, and look forward at future capabilities. A new mission concept - Lobster - is described that would monitor the X-ray sky at order of magnitude higher sensitivity than current missions.

  1. High Reynolds Number Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baals, D. D. (Editor)

    1977-01-01

    Fundamental aerodynamic questions for which high Reynolds number experimental capability is required are discussed. The operational characteristics and design features of the National Transonic Facility are reviewed.

  2. High altitude decelerator systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silbert, Mendel N.; Moltedo, A. David; Gilbertson, Gaylord S.

    1989-01-01

    High Altitude Decelerator Systems are used to provide a stable descending platform when deployed from a sounding rocket at altitudes greater than 40 kilometers allowing a scientific mission to be conducted in a specific altitude region. The High Altitude Decelerator is designed to provide a highly stable, high drag area system packed in a minimum volume to deploy successfully from a sounding rocket. Deployment altitudes greater than 100 kilometers have been successfully demonstrated at dynamic pressures as low as 0.004 pounds per square foot.

  3. High power, high frequency helix TWT's

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sloley, H. J.; Willard, J.; Paatz, S. R.; Keat, M. J.

    The design and performance characteristics of a 34-GHz pulse tube capable of 75 W peak power output at 30 percent duty cycle and a broadband CW tube are presented. Particular attention is given to the engineering problems encountered during the development of the tubes, including the suppression of backward wave oscillation, the design of electron guns for small-diameter high-current beams, and the thermal capability of small helix structures. The discussion also covers the effects of various design parameters and choice of engineering materials on the ultimate practical limit of power and gain at the operating frequencies. Measurements are presented for advanced experimental tubes.

  4. High power, high frequency, vacuum flange

    DOEpatents

    Felker, B.; McDaniel, M.R.

    1993-03-23

    An improved waveguide flange is disclosed for high power operation that helps prevent arcs from being initiated at the junctions between waveguide sections. The flanges at the end of the waveguide sections have counter bores surrounding the waveguide tubes. When the sections are bolted together the counter bores form a groove that holds a fully annealed copper gasket. Each counterbore has a beveled step that is specially configured to insure the gasket forms a metal-to-metal vacuum seal without gaps or sharp edges. The resultant inner surface of the waveguide is smooth across the junctions between waveguide sections, and arcing is prevented.

  5. High power, high frequency, vacuum flange

    DOEpatents

    Felker, Brian; McDaniel, Michael R.

    1993-01-01

    An improved waveguide flange is disclosed for high power operation that helps prevent arcs from being initiated at the junctions between waveguide sections. The flanges at the end of the waveguide sections have counterbores surrounding the waveguide tubes. When the sections are bolted together the counterbores form a groove that holds a fully annealed copper gasket. Each counterbore has a beveled step that is specially configured to insure the gasket forms a metal-to-metal vacuum seal without gaps or sharp edges. The resultant inner surface of the waveguide is smooth across the junctions between waveguide sections, and arcing is prevented.

  6. High performance, high density hydrocarbon fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frankenfeld, J. W.; Hastings, T. W.; Lieberman, M.; Taylor, W. F.

    1978-01-01

    The fuels were selected from 77 original candidates on the basis of estimated merit index and cost effectiveness. The ten candidates consisted of 3 pure compounds, 4 chemical plant streams and 3 refinery streams. Critical physical and chemical properties of the candidate fuels were measured including heat of combustion, density, and viscosity as a function of temperature, freezing points, vapor pressure, boiling point, thermal stability. The best all around candidate was found to be a chemical plant olefin stream rich in dicyclopentadiene. This material has a high merit index and is available at low cost. Possible problem areas were identified as low temperature flow properties and thermal stability. An economic analysis was carried out to determine the production costs of top candidates. The chemical plant and refinery streams were all less than 44 cent/kg while the pure compounds were greater than 44 cent/kg. A literature survey was conducted on the state of the art of advanced hydrocarbon fuel technology as applied to high energy propellents. Several areas for additional research were identified.

  7. Highly Parallel, High-Precision Numerical Integration

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, David H.; Borwein, Jonathan M.

    2005-04-22

    This paper describes a scheme for rapidly computing numerical values of definite integrals to very high accuracy, ranging from ordinary machine precision to hundreds or thousands of digits, even for functions with singularities or infinite derivatives at endpoints. Such a scheme is of interest not only in computational physics and computational chemistry, but also in experimental mathematics, where high-precision numerical values of definite integrals can be used to numerically discover new identities. This paper discusses techniques for a parallel implementation of this scheme, then presents performance results for 1-D and 2-D test suites. Results are also given for a certain problem from mathematical physics, which features a difficult singularity, confirming a conjecture to 20,000 digit accuracy. The performance rate for this latter calculation on 1024 CPUs is 690 Gflop/s. We believe that this and one other 20,000-digit integral evaluation that we report are the highest-precision non-trivial numerical integrations performed to date.

  8. High Involvement Work Teams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1996

    These three papers were presented at a symposium on high-involvement work teams moderated by Michael Leimbach at the 1996 conference of the Academy of Human Resource Development. "Beyond Training to the New Learning Environment: Workers on the High-Involvement Frontline" (Joseph Anthony Ilacqua, Carol Ann Zulauf) shows the link between an…

  9. High School Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Preparation for college or life, working conditions and continuing education for high school chemistry teachers, and form/function of high school chemistry textbooks were addressed in presentations at the Seventh Biennial Conference on Chemical Education (Stillwater, Oklahoma 1982). Workshops, lectures, and demonstrations were also presented to…

  10. High Speed data acquisition

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, P.S.

    1998-02-01

    A general introduction to high Speed data acquisition system techniques in modern particle physics experiments is given. Examples are drawn from the SELEX(E781) high statistics charmed baryon production and decay experiment now taking data at Fermilab. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. High temperature sensor

    DOEpatents

    Tokarz, Richard D.

    1982-01-01

    A high temperature sensor includes a pair of electrical conductors separated by a mass of electrical insulating material. The insulating material has a measurable resistivity within the sensor that changes in relation to the temperature of the insulating material within a high temperature range (1,000 to 2,000 K.). When required, the sensor can be encased within a ceramic protective coating.

  12. High-Stakes Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nieto, Sonia; Irizarry, Jason G.; Luna, Cathy

    2002-01-01

    Discusses four books that provide critical information about the nature of high-stakes tests; the impact of these tests on teaching, learning, and students; the political issues surrounding high-stakes testing; and ways that educators can take informed action to appropriately respond to these tests. (SG)

  13. High School Gifted.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drum, Jean, Ed.

    1993-01-01

    This theme issue on gifted high school students presents several feature articles, a California legislative update, and an editorial. In "Summer Seminar '93--California in the 21st Century," Janis Van Dreal describes a 2-week residential program in which gifted high school students examined California's future. "Visiting a Gifted Program in…

  14. High School Oceanography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falmouth Public Schools, MA.

    This book is a compilation of a series of papers designed to aid high school teachers in organizing a course in oceanography for high school students. It consists of twelve papers, with references, covering each of the following: (1) Introduction to Oceanography, (2) Geology of the Ocean, (3) The Continental Shelves, (4) Physical Properties of Sea…

  15. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... En Español Who is at risk? How is high blood pressure treated? Understanding your blood pressure: What do the ...

  16. High-Conflict Divorce.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Janet R.

    1994-01-01

    Reviews available research studies of high-conflict divorce and its effects on children. Factors believed to contribute to high-conflict divorce are explored, and a model of their interrelationships is proposed. Dispute resolution, intervention, and prevention programs are discussed, and implications for social policy are outlined. (SLD)

  17. High energy forming facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciurlionis, B.

    1967-01-01

    Watertight, high-explosive forming facility, 25 feet in diameter and 15 feet deep, withstands repeated explosions of 10 pounds of TNT equivalent. The shell is fabricated of high strength steel and allows various structural elements to deform or move elastically and independently while retaining structural integrity.

  18. High School: Erasing Borders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Dianne; Bogotch, Ira

    2006-01-01

    Over the last several years there have been numerous calls for reforming high school to college transitions. In 2000-2001, the American Youth Policy Forum (AYPF) and the National Commission on the High School Senior Year respectively called for a re-thinking of how students moved from secondary to postsecondary education. A widely-discussed…

  19. The American High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    2008-01-01

    Of all levels of schooling, the high school receives by far the most criticism. There are continuous innovations recommended in journal articles, textbooks, and speeches at state/national conventions on ways to improve the secondary level of schooling. At one teacher education convention, the speaker was criticizing the American high school and…

  20. High School Programming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Update on Gifted Education, 1992

    1992-01-01

    This theme issue covers "High School Programming" and approaches to meeting the needs of gifted high school students in Texas. The first article is "Thematic Interdisciplinary Curricula for Secondary Gifted Students in English and Social Studies" (Joel E. McIntosh and April W. Meacham). This approach is contrasted with the traditional curriculum…

  1. High coking value pitch

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Douglas J.; Chang, Ching-Feng; Lewis, Irwin C.; Lewis, Richard T.

    2014-06-10

    A high coking value pitch prepared from coal tar distillate and has a low softening point and a high carbon value while containing substantially no quinoline insolubles is disclosed. The pitch can be used as an impregnant or binder for producing carbon and graphite articles.

  2. Reforming Underperforming High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MDRC, 2013

    2013-01-01

    Urban high schools are in trouble--high dropout rates, low student academic achievement, and graduates who are unprepared for college are just some of the disappointing indicators. However, recent research points to a select number of approaches to improving student outcomes and reforming underperforming schools--from particular ways of creating…

  3. High and Dry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Robert L.

    2005-01-01

    High-performance schools are facilities that improve the learning environment while saving energy, resources and money. Creating a high-performance school requires an integrated design approach. Key systems--including lighting, HVAC, electrical and plumbing--must be considered from the beginning of the design process. According to William H.…

  4. High current high accuracy IGBT pulse generator

    SciTech Connect

    Nesterov, V.V.; Donaldson, A.R.

    1995-05-01

    A solid state pulse generator capable of delivering high current triangular or trapezoidal pulses into an inductive load has been developed at SLAC. Energy stored in a capacitor bank of the pulse generator is switched to the load through a pair of insulated gate bipolar transistors (IGBT). The circuit can then recover the remaining energy and transfer it back to the capacitor bank without reversing the capacitor voltage. A third IGBT device is employed to control the initial charge to the capacitor bank, a command charging technique, and to compensate for pulse to pulse power losses. The rack mounted pulse generator contains a 525 {mu}F capacitor bank. It can deliver 500 A at 900V into inductive loads up to 3 mH. The current amplitude and discharge time are controlled to 0.02% accuracy by a precision controller through the SLAC central computer system. This pulse generator drives a series pair of extraction dipoles.

  5. High redshift quasars and high metallicities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferland, Gary J.

    1997-01-01

    A large-scale code called Cloudy was designed to simulate non-equilibrium plasmas and predict their spectra. The goal was to apply it to studies of galactic and extragalactic emission line objects in order to reliably deduce abundances and luminosities. Quasars are of particular interest because they are the most luminous objects in the universe and the highest redshift objects that can be observed spectroscopically, and their emission lines can reveal the composition of the interstellar medium (ISM) of the universe when it was well under a billion years old. The lines are produced by warm (approximately 10(sup 4)K) gas with moderate to low density (n less than or equal to 10(sup 12) cm(sup -3)). Cloudy has been extended to include approximately 10(sup 4) resonance lines from the 495 possible stages of ionization of the lightest 30 elements, an extension that required several steps. The charge transfer database was expanded to complete the needed reactions between hydrogen and the first four ions and fit all reactions with a common approximation. Radiative recombination rate coefficients were derived for recombination from all closed shells, where this process should dominate. Analytical fits to Opacity Project (OP) and other recent photoionization cross sections were produced. Finally, rescaled OP oscillator strengths were used to compile a complete set of data for 5971 resonance lines. The major discovery has been that high redshift quasars have very high metallicities and there is strong evidence that the quasar phenomenon is associated with the birth of massive elliptical galaxies.

  6. High-pressure microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hjort, K.

    2015-03-01

    When using appropriate materials and microfabrication techniques, with the small dimensions the mechanical stability of microstructured devices allows for processes at high pressures without loss in safety. The largest area of applications has been demonstrated in green chemistry and bioprocesses, where extraction, synthesis and analyses often excel at high densities and high temperatures. This is accessible through high pressures. Capillary chemistry has been used since long but, just like in low-pressure applications, there are several potential advantages in using microfluidic platforms, e.g., planar isothermal set-ups, large local variations in geometries, dense form factors, small dead volumes and precisely positioned microstructures for control of reactions, catalysis, mixing and separation. Other potential applications are in, e.g., microhydraulics, exploration, gas driven vehicles, and high-pressure science. From a review of the state-of-art and frontiers of high pressure microfluidics, the focus will be on different solutions demonstrated for microfluidic handling at high pressures and challenges that remain.

  7. Diamond Ranch High School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Betsky, Aaron

    2000-01-01

    Highlights award-winning Diamond Ranch High School (California) that was designed and built on a steep site around Los Angeles considered unsatisfactory for building due to its unstable soils. Building organization is discussed, and photos are provided. (GR)

  8. High pressure furnace

    DOEpatents

    Morris, D.E.

    1993-09-14

    A high temperature high pressure furnace has a hybrid partially externally heated construction. A metallic vessel fabricated from an alloy having a composition of at least 45% nickel, 15% chrome, and 10% tungsten is utilized (the preferred alloy including 55% nickel, 22% chrome, 14% tungsten, 2% molybdenum, 3% iron (maximum) and 5% cobalt (maximum)). The disclosed alloy is fabricated into 11/4 or 2 inch, 32 mm or 50 mm bar stock and has a length of about 22 inches, 56 cm. This bar stock has an aperture formed therein to define a closed high temperature, high pressure oxygen chamber. The opposite and closed end of the vessel is provided with a small blind aperture into which a thermocouple can be inserted. The closed end of the vessel is inserted into an oven, preferably heated by standard nickel chrome electrical elements and having a heavily insulated exterior. 19 figures.

  9. High pressure furnace

    DOEpatents

    Morris, Donald E.

    1993-01-01

    A high temperature high pressure furnace has a hybrid partially externally heated construction. A metallic vessel fabricated from an alloy having a composition of at least 45% nickel, 15% chrome, and 10% tungsten is utilized (the preferred alloy including 55% nickel, 22% chrome, 14% tungsten, 2% molybdenum, 3% iron (maximum) and 5% cobalt (maximum). The disclosed alloy is fabricated into 11/4 or 2 inch, 32 mm or 50 mm bar stock and has a length of about 22 inches, 56 cm. This bar stock has an aperture formed therein to define a closed high temperature, high pressure oxygen chamber. The opposite and closed end of the vessel is provided with a small blind aperture into which a thermocouple can be inserted. The closed end of the vessel is inserted into an oven, preferably heated by standard nickel chrome electrical elements and having a heavily insulated exterior.

  10. High blood pressure medicines

    MedlinePlus

    Hypertension - medicines ... blood vessel diseases. You may need to take medicines to lower your blood pressure if lifestyle changes ... blood pressure to the target level. WHEN ARE MEDICINES FOR HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE USED Most of the ...

  11. High-Temperature Lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    In the early 1980's, Lewis Research Center began a program to develop high-temperature lubricants for use on future aircraft flying at three or more times the speed of sound, which can result in vehicle skin temperatures as high as 1,600 degrees Fahrenheit. A material that emerged from this research is a plasma-sprayed, self-lubricating metal- glass-fluoride coating able to reduce oxidation at very high temperatures. Technology is now in commercial use under the trade name Surf-Kote C-800, marketed by Hohman Plating and Manufacturing Inc. and manufactured under a patent license from NASA. Among its uses are lubrication for sliding contact bearings, shaft seals for turbopumps, piston rings for high performance compressors and hot glass processing machinery; it is also widely used in missile and space applications.

  12. High Redshift Quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elvis, Martin S.

    1996-01-01

    The report for this period includes three papers: 'Associated Absorption at Low and High Redshift'; 'Strong X-ray Absorption in a Broad Absorption Line Quasar: PHL5200'; and 'ASCA and ROSAT X-ray Spectra of High-Redshift Radio-Loud Quasars'. The first gives examples from both low and high redshift for combining information on absorbing material in active galactic nuclei from both x-ray and the UV. The second presents ASCA observations of the z = 1.98 prototype broad absorption line quasar (BALQSO): PHL 5200, detected with both the solid-state imaging spectrometers and the gas imaging spectometers. The third paper presents results on the x-ray properties of 9 high-redshift radio-loud quasars observed by ASCA and ROSAT, including ASCA observations of S5 0014+81 (z = 3.38) and S5 0836+71 (z = 2.17) and ROSAT observations of PKS 2126-158.

  13. High-Temperature Superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Johnson

    2008-11-05

    Like astronomers tweaking images to gain a more detailed glimpse of distant stars, physicists at Brookhaven National Laboratory have found ways to sharpen images of the energy spectra in high-temperature superconductors — materials that carry electrical c

  14. Highly Autonomous Systems Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doyle, R.; Rasmussen, R.; Man, G.; Patel, K.

    1998-01-01

    It is our aim by launching a series of workshops on the topic of highly autonomous systems to reach out to the larger community interested in technology development for remotely deployed systems, particularly those for exploration.

  15. High Power Hall Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jankovsky, Robert; Tverdokhlebov, Sergery; Manzella, David

    1999-01-01

    The development of Hall thrusters with powers ranging from tens of kilowatts to in excess of one hundred kilowatts is considered based on renewed interest in high power. high thrust electric propulsion applications. An approach to develop such thrusters based on previous experience is discussed. It is shown that the previous experimental data taken with thrusters of 10 kW input power and less can be used. Potential mass savings due to the design of high power Hall thrusters are discussed. Both xenon and alternate thruster propellant are considered, as are technological issues that will challenge the design of high power Hall thrusters. Finally, the implications of such a development effort with regard to ground testing and spacecraft intecrati'on issues are discussed.

  16. High-mix insulins

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Sanjay; Farooqi, Mohammad Hamed; El-Houni, Ali E.

    2015-01-01

    Premix insulins are commonly used insulin preparations, which are available in varying ratios of different molecules. These drugs contain one short- or rapid-acting, and one intermediate- or long-acting insulin. High-mix insulins are mixtures of insulins that contain 50% or more than 50% of short-acting insulin. This review describes the clinical pharmacology of high-mix insulins, including data from randomized controlled trials. It suggests various ways, in which high-mix insulin can be used, including once daily, twice daily, thrice daily, hetero-mix, and reverse regimes. The authors provide a rational framework to help diabetes care professionals, identify indications for pragmatic high-mix use. PMID:26425485

  17. Hypertension (High Blood Pressure)

    MedlinePlus

    ... pressure to live. Without it, blood can't flow through our bodies and carry oxygen to our vital organs. But when blood pressure gets too high — a condition called hypertension — it can lead to ...

  18. High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Division of Geriatrics and Clinical Gerontology Division of Neuroscience FAQs Funding Opportunities Intramural Research Program Office of ... to major health problems. Make a point of learning what blood pressure should be. And, remember: High ...

  19. High blood cholesterol levels

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/article/000403.htm High blood cholesterol levels To use the sharing features on this page, ... called "bad" cholesterol For many people, abnormal cholesterol levels are partly due to an unhealthy lifestyle. This ...

  20. High pressure oxygen furnace

    DOEpatents

    Morris, Donald E.

    1992-01-01

    A high temperature high pressure oxygen furnace having a hybrid partially externally heated construction is disclosed. A metallic bar fabricated from an alloy having a composition of at least 45% nickel, 15% chrome, and 10% tungsten is utilized (the preferred alloy including 55% nickel, 22% chrome, 14% tungsten, 2% molybdenum, 3% iron (maximum) and 5% cobalt (maximum). The disclosed alloy is fabricated into 11/4 inch bar stock and has a length of about 17 inches. This bar stock is gun drilled for over 16 inches of its length with 0.400 inch aperture to define a closed high temperature, high pressure oxygen chamber. The opposite and closed end of the bar is provided with a small support aperture into which both a support and a thermocouple can be inserted. The closed end of the gun drilled bar is inserted into an oven, preferably heated by standard nickel chrome electrical elements and having a heavily insulated exterior.

  1. High pressure oxygen furnace

    DOEpatents

    Morris, D.E.

    1992-07-14

    A high temperature high pressure oxygen furnace having a hybrid partially externally heated construction is disclosed. A metallic bar fabricated from an alloy having a composition of at least 45% nickel, 15% chrome, and 10% tungsten is utilized, the preferred alloy including 55% nickel, 22% chrome, 14% tungsten, 2% molybdenum, 3% iron (maximum) and 5% cobalt (maximum). The disclosed alloy is fabricated into 11/4 inch bar stock and has a length of about 17 inches. This bar stock is gun drilled for over 16 inches of its length with 0.400 inch aperture to define a closed high temperature, high pressure oxygen chamber. The opposite and closed end of the bar is provided with a small support aperture into which both a support and a thermocouple can be inserted. The closed end of the gun drilled bar is inserted into an oven, preferably heated by standard nickel chrome electrical elements and having a heavily insulated exterior. 5 figs.

  2. High Velocity Gas Gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    A video tape related to orbital debris research is presented. The video tape covers the process of loading a High Velocity Gas Gun and firing it into a mounted metal plate. The process is then repeated in slow motion.

  3. High-Temperature Superconductivity

    ScienceCinema

    Peter Johnson

    2010-01-08

    Like astronomers tweaking images to gain a more detailed glimpse of distant stars, physicists at Brookhaven National Laboratory have found ways to sharpen images of the energy spectra in high-temperature superconductors ? materials that carry electrical c

  4. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... and Learning About Prediabetes Type 2 Diabetes Risk Test Lower Your Risk Healthy Eating Overweight Smoking High ... prediabetes, and no one is excused. Take the test. Know where you stand. sticky en -- Chef Ronaldo's ...

  5. High School Parking Lots.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neff, Thomas G.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the reorganization of the site of Ben Davis High School in Wayne Township, Indiana as an example of improvements to school parking lot design and vehicle/pedestrian traffic flow and security. Includes design drawings. (EV)

  6. High Speed Research Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Robert E.; Corsiglia, Victor R.; Schmitz, Frederic H. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    An overview of the NASA High Speed Research Program will be presented from a NASA Headquarters perspective. The presentation will include the objectives of the program and an outline of major programmatic issues.

  7. High Efficiency, High Performance Clothes Dryer

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Pescatore; Phil Carbone

    2005-03-31

    This program covered the development of two separate products; an electric heat pump clothes dryer and a modulating gas dryer. These development efforts were independent of one another and are presented in this report in two separate volumes. Volume 1 details the Heat Pump Dryer Development while Volume 2 details the Modulating Gas Dryer Development. In both product development efforts, the intent was to develop high efficiency, high performance designs that would be attractive to US consumers. Working with Whirlpool Corporation as our commercial partner, TIAX applied this approach of satisfying consumer needs throughout the Product Development Process for both dryer designs. Heat pump clothes dryers have been in existence for years, especially in Europe, but have not been able to penetrate the market. This has been especially true in the US market where no volume production heat pump dryers are available. The issue has typically been around two key areas: cost and performance. Cost is a given in that a heat pump clothes dryer has numerous additional components associated with it. While heat pump dryers have been able to achieve significant energy savings compared to standard electric resistance dryers (over 50% in some cases), designs to date have been hampered by excessively long dry times, a major market driver in the US. The development work done on the heat pump dryer over the course of this program led to a demonstration dryer that delivered the following performance characteristics: (1) 40-50% energy savings on large loads with 35 F lower fabric temperatures and similar dry times; (2) 10-30 F reduction in fabric temperature for delicate loads with up to 50% energy savings and 30-40% time savings; (3) Improved fabric temperature uniformity; and (4) Robust performance across a range of vent restrictions. For the gas dryer development, the concept developed was one of modulating the gas flow to the dryer throughout the dry cycle. Through heat modulation in a

  8. High efficiency incandescent lighting

    SciTech Connect

    Bermel, Peter; Ilic, Ognjen; Chan, Walker R.; Musabeyoglu, Ahmet; Cukierman, Aviv Ruben; Harradon, Michael Robert; Celanovic, Ivan; Soljacic, Marin

    2014-09-02

    Incandescent lighting structure. The structure includes a thermal emitter that can, but does not have to, include a first photonic crystal on its surface to tailor thermal emission coupled to, in a high-view-factor geometry, a second photonic filter selected to reflect infrared radiation back to the emitter while passing visible light. This structure is highly efficient as compared to standard incandescent light bulbs.

  9. High conductivity composite metal

    DOEpatents

    Zhou, Ruoyi; Smith, James L.; Embury, John David

    1998-01-01

    Electrical conductors and methods of producing them, where the conductors possess both high strength and high conductivity. Conductors are comprised of carbon steel and a material chosen from a group consisting of copper, nickel, silver, and gold. Diffusion barriers are placed between these two materials. The components of a conductor are assembled and then the assembly is subjected to heat treating and mechanical deformation steps.

  10. High conductivity composite metal

    DOEpatents

    Zhou, R.; Smith, J.L.; Embury, J.D.

    1998-01-06

    Electrical conductors and methods of producing them are disclosed, where the conductors possess both high strength and high conductivity. Conductors are comprised of carbon steel and a material chosen from a group consisting of copper, nickel, silver, and gold. Diffusion barriers are placed between these two materials. The components of a conductor are assembled and then the assembly is subjected to heat treating and mechanical deformation steps. 10 figs.

  11. High pressure gas target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelbart, W.; Johnson, R. R.; Abeysekera, B.

    2012-12-01

    Compact, high pressure, high current gas target features all metal construction and semi-automatic window assembly change. The unique aspect of this target is the domed-shaped window. The Havar alloy window is electron beam welded to a metal ring, thus forming one, interchangeable assembly. The window assembly is sealed by knife-edges locked by a pneumatic toggle allowing a quick, in situ window change.

  12. High beta multipoles

    SciTech Connect

    Prager, S C

    1982-05-01

    Multipoles are being employed as devices to study fusion issues and plasma phenomena at high values of beta (plasma pressure/magnetic pressure) in a controlled manner. Due to their large volume, low magnetic field (low synchrotron radiation) region, they are also under consideration as potential steady state advanced fuel (low neutron yield) reactors. Present experiments are investigating neoclassical (bootstrap and Pfirsch-Schlueter) currents and plasma stability at extremely high beta.

  13. High temperature pressure gauge

    DOEpatents

    Echtler, J. Paul; Scandrol, Roy O.

    1981-01-01

    A high temperature pressure gauge comprising a pressure gauge positioned in fluid communication with one end of a conduit which has a diaphragm mounted in its other end. The conduit is filled with a low melting metal alloy above the diaphragm for a portion of its length with a high temperature fluid being positioned in the remaining length of the conduit and in the pressure gauge.

  14. High Performance Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venumbaka, Sreenivasulu R.; Cassidy, Patrick E.

    2003-01-01

    This report summarizes results from research on high performance polymers. The research areas proposed in this report include: 1) Effort to improve the synthesis and to understand and replicate the dielectric behavior of 6HC17-PEK; 2) Continue preparation and evaluation of flexible, low dielectric silicon- and fluorine- containing polymers with improved toughness; and 3) Synthesis and characterization of high performance polymers containing the spirodilactam moiety.

  15. High-temperature electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matus, Lawrence G.; Seng, Gary T.

    1990-01-01

    To meet the needs of the aerospace propulsion and space power communities, the high temperature electronics program at the Lewis Research Center is developing silicon carbide (SiC) as a high temperature semiconductor material. This program supports a major element of the Center's mission - to perform basic and developmental research aimed at improving aerospace propulsion systems. Research is focused on developing the crystal growth, characterization, and device fabrication technologies necessary to produce a family of SiC devices.

  16. HIGH TEMPERATURE THERMOCOUPLE

    DOEpatents

    Eshayu, A.M.

    1963-02-12

    This invention contemplates a high temperature thermocouple for use in an inert or a reducing atmosphere. The thermocouple limbs are made of rhenium and graphite and these limbs are connected at their hot ends in compressed removable contact. The rhenium and graphite are of high purity and are substantially stable and free from diffusion into each other even without shielding. Also, the graphite may be thick enough to support the thermocouple in a gas stream. (AEC)

  17. High-temperature sensor

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1981-01-29

    A high temperature sensor is described which includes a pair of electrical conductors separated by a mass of electrical insulating material. The insulating material has a measurable resistivity within the sensor that changes in relation to the temperature of the insulating material within a high temperature range (1000 to 2000/sup 0/K). When required, the sensor can be encased within a ceramic protective coating.

  18. High-temperature electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matus, Lawrence G.; Seng, Gary T.

    1990-02-01

    To meet the needs of the aerospace propulsion and space power communities, the high temperature electronics program at the Lewis Research Center is developing silicon carbide (SiC) as a high temperature semiconductor material. This program supports a major element of the Center's mission - to perform basic and developmental research aimed at improving aerospace propulsion systems. Research is focused on developing the crystal growth, characterization, and device fabrication technologies necessary to produce a family of SiC devices.

  19. High performance polymeric foams

    SciTech Connect

    Gargiulo, M.; Sorrentino, L.; Iannace, S.

    2008-08-28

    The aim of this work was to investigate the foamability of high-performance polymers (polyethersulfone, polyphenylsulfone, polyetherimide and polyethylenenaphtalate). Two different methods have been used to prepare the foam samples: high temperature expansion and two-stage batch process. The effects of processing parameters (saturation time and pressure, foaming temperature) on the densities and microcellular structures of these foams were analyzed by using scanning electron microscopy.

  20. Fulminant high altitude blindness.

    PubMed

    Mashkovskiy, Evgeny; Szawarski, Piotr; Ryzhkov, Pavel; Goslar, Tomaz; Mrak, Irena

    2016-06-01

    Prolonged altitude exposure even with acclimatization continues to present a physiological challenge to all organ systems including the central nervous system. We describe a case of a 41-year-old Caucasian female climber who suffered severe visual loss that was due to possible optic nerve pathology occurring during a high altitude expedition in the Himalayas. This case is atypical of classic high altitude cerebral oedema and highlights yet another danger of prolonged sojourn at extreme altitudes. PMID:27601532

  1. High power density targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellemoine, Frederique

    2013-12-01

    In the context of new generation rare isotope beam facilities based on high-power heavy-ion accelerators and in-flight separation of the reaction products, the design of the rare isotope production targets is a major challenge. In order to provide high-purity beams for science, high resolution is required in the rare isotope separation. This demands a small beam spot on the production target which, together with the short range of heavy ions in matter, leads to very high power densities inside the target material. This paper gives an overview of the challenges associated with this high power density, discusses radiation damage issues in targets exposed to heavy ion beams, and presents recent developments to meet some of these challenges through different projects: FAIR, RIBF and FRIB which is the most challenging. Extensive use of Finite Element Analysis (FEA) has been made at all facilities to specify critical target parameters and R&D work at FRIB successfully retired two major risks related to high-power density and heavy-ion induced radiation damage.

  2. High Energy Continuum of High Redshift Quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elvis, Martin

    2000-01-01

    Discussion with the RXTE team at GSFC showed that a sufficiently accurate background subtraction procedure had now, been derived for sources at the flux level of PKS 2126-158. However this solution does not apply to observations carried out before April 1997, including our observation. The prospect of an improved solution becoming available soon is slim. As a result the RXTE team agreed to re-observe PKS2126-158. The new observation was carried out in April 1999. Quasi-simultaneous optical observations were obtained, as Service observing., at the 4-meter Anglo-Australian Telescope, and ftp-ed from the AAT on 22April. The RXTE data was processed in late June, arriving at SAO in early July. Coincidentally, our collaborative Beppo-SAX observation of PKS2126-158 was made later in 1999, and a GTO Chandra observation (with which we are involved) was made on November 16. Since this gives us a unique monitoring data for a high redshift quasar over a broad pass-band we are now combining all three observations into a single comprehensive study Final publication of the RXTE data will thus take place under another grant.

  3. 1 W average-power 100 MHz repetition-rate 259 nm femtosecond deep ultraviolet pulse generation from ytterbium fiber amplifier.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiangyu; Yoshitomi, Dai; Kobayashi, Yohei; Torizuka, Kenji

    2010-05-15

    We demonstrate 1W average-power ultraviolet (UV) femtosecond (fs) ultrashort pulse generation at a wavelength of 259 nm and a repetition rate as high as 100 MHz by quadrupling a fs ytterbium-fiber laser. A cavity-enhanced design is employed for efficient frequency doubling to the UV region. The optical-to-optical efficiency of UV output to the pump diode is 2.6%. PMID:20479859

  4. High Performance Arcjet Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennel, Elliot B.; Ivanov, Alexey Nikolayevich; Nikolayev, Yuri Vyacheslavovich

    1994-01-01

    This effort sought to exploit advanced single crystal tungsten-tantalum alloy material for fabrication of a high strength, high temperature arcjet anode. The use of this material is expected to result in improved strength, temperature resistance, and lifetime compared to state of the art polycrystalline alloys. In addition, the use of high electrical and thermal conductivity carbon-carbon composites was considered, and is believed to be a feasible approach. Highly conductive carbon-carbon composite anode capability represents enabling technology for rotating-arc designs derived from the Russian Scientific Research Institute of Thermal Processes (NIITP) because of high heat fluxes at the anode surface. However, for US designs the anode heat flux is much smaller, and thus the benefits are not as great as in the case of NIITP-derived designs. Still, it does appear that the tensile properties of carbon-carbon can be even better than those of single crystal tungsten alloys, especially when nearly-single-crystal fibers such as vapor grown carbon fiber (VGCF) are used. Composites fabricated from such materials must be coated with a refractory carbide coating in order to ensure compatibility with high temperature hydrogen. Fabrication of tungsten alloy single crystals in the sizes required for fabrication of an arcjet anode has been shown to be feasible. Test data indicate that the material can be expected to be at least the equal of W-Re-HfC polycrystalline alloy in terms of its tensile properties, and possibly superior. We are also informed by our colleagues at Scientific Production Association Luch (NP0 Luch) that it is possible to use Russian technology to fabricate polycrystalline W-Re-HfC or other high strength alloys if desired. This is important because existing engines must rely on previously accumulated stocks of these materials, and a fabrication capability for future requirements is not assured.

  5. High Beta Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Cowley, S.

    1998-11-14

    Perhaps the ideal tokamak would have high {beta} ({beta} {approx}> 1) and classical confinement. Such a tokamak has not been found, and we do not know if one does exist. We have searched for such a possibility, so far without success. In 1990, we obtained analytic equilibrium solutions for large aspect ratio tokamaks at {beta} {approx} {Omicron}(1) [1]. These solutions and the extension at high {beta} poloidal to finite aspect ratio [2] provided a basis for the study of high {beta} tokamaks. We have shown that these configurations can be stable to short scale MHD modes [3], and that they have reduced neoclassical transport [4]. Microinstabilities (such as the {del}T{sub i} mode) seem to be stabilized at high {beta} [5] - this is due to the large local shear [3] and the magnetic well. We have some concerns about modes associated with the compressional branch which may appear at high {beta}. Bill Dorland and Mike Kotschenreuther have studied this issue and our concerns may be unfounded. It is certainly tantalizing, especially given the lowered neoclassical transport values, that these configurations could have no microinstabilities and, one could assume, no anomalous transport. Unfortunately, while this work is encouraging, the key question for high {beta} tokamaks is the stability to large scale kink modes. The MHD {beta} limit (Troyon limit) for kink modes at large aspect ratio is problematically low. There is ample evidence from computations that the limit exists. However, it is not known if stable equilibria exist at much higher {beta}--none have been found. We have explored this question in the asymptotic high {beta} poloidal limit. Unfortunately, we are unable to find stable equilibrium and also unable to show that they don't exist. The results of these calculations will be published when a more definitive answer is found.

  6. High Temperature Capacitor Development

    SciTech Connect

    John Kosek

    2009-06-30

    The absence of high-temperature electronics is an obstacle to the development of untapped energy resources (deep oil, gas and geothermal). US natural gas consumption is projected to grow from 22 trillion cubic feet per year (tcf) in 1999 to 34 tcf in 2020. Cumulatively this is 607 tcf of consumption by 2020, while recoverable reserves using current technology are 177 tcf. A significant portion of this shortfall may be met by tapping deep gas reservoirs. Tapping these reservoirs represents a significant technical challenge. At these depths, temperatures and pressures are very high and may require penetrating very hard rock. Logistics of supporting 6.1 km (20,000 ft) drill strings and the drilling processes are complex and expensive. At these depths up to 50% of the total drilling cost may be in the last 10% of the well depth. Thus, as wells go deeper it is increasingly important that drillers are able to monitor conditions down-hole such as temperature, pressure, heading, etc. Commercial off-the-shelf electronics are not specified to meet these operating conditions. This is due to problems associated with all aspects of the electronics including the resistors and capacitors. With respect to capacitors, increasing temperature often significantly changes capacitance because of the strong temperature dependence of the dielectric constant. Higher temperatures also affect the equivalent series resistance (ESR). High-temperature capacitors usually have low capacitance values because of these dielectric effects and because packages are kept small to prevent mechanical breakage caused by thermal stresses. Electrolytic capacitors do not operate at temperatures above 150oC due to dielectric breakdown. The development of high-temperature capacitors to be used in a high-pressure high-temperature (HPHT) drilling environment was investigated. These capacitors were based on a previously developed high-voltage hybridized capacitor developed at Giner, Inc. in conjunction with a

  7. High Altitude Medical Problems

    PubMed Central

    Hultgren, Herbert N.

    1979-01-01

    Increased travel to high altitude areas by mountaineers and nonclimbing tourists has emphasized the clinical problems associated with rapid ascent. Acute mountain sickness affects most sojourners at elevations above 10,000 feet. Symptoms are usually worse on the second or third day after arrival. Gradual ascent, spending one to three days at an intermediate altitude, and the use of acetazolamide (Diamox) will prevent or ameliorate symptoms in most instances. Serious and potentially fatal problems, such as high altitude pulmonary edema or cerebral edema, occur in approximately 0.5 percent to 1.0 percent of visitors to elevations above 10,000 feet—especially with heavy physical exertion on arrival, such as climbing or skiing. Early recognition, high flow oxygen therapy and prompt descent are crucially important in management. Our knowledge of the causes of these and other high altitude problems, such as retinal hemorrhage, systemic edema and pulmonary hypertension, is still incomplete. Even less is known of the effect of high altitudes on medical conditions common at sea level or on the action of commonly used drugs. ImagesFigure 2. PMID:483805

  8. High level nuclear waste

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, J L

    1980-01-01

    The DOE Division of Waste Products through a lead office at Savannah River is developing a program to immobilize all US high-level nuclear waste for terminal disposal. DOE high-level wastes include those at the Hanford Plant, the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, and the Savannah River Plant. Commercial high-level wastes, for which DOE is also developing immobilization technology, include those at the Nuclear Fuel Services Plant and any future commercial fuels reprocessing plants. The first immobilization plant is to be the Defense Waste Processing Facility at Savannah River, scheduled for 1983 project submission to Congress and 1989 operation. Waste forms are still being selected for this plant. Borosilicate glass is currently the reference form, but alternate candidates include concretes, calcines, other glasses, ceramics, and matrix forms.

  9. High brightness electron accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Sheffield, Richard L.; Carlsten, Bruce E.; Young, Lloyd M.

    1994-01-01

    A compact high brightness linear accelerator is provided for use, e.g., in a free electron laser. The accelerator has a first plurality of acclerating cavities having end walls with four coupling slots for accelerating electrons to high velocities in the absence of quadrupole fields. A second plurality of cavities receives the high velocity electrons for further acceleration, where each of the second cavities has end walls with two coupling slots for acceleration in the absence of dipole fields. The accelerator also includes a first cavity with an extended length to provide for phase matching the electron beam along the accelerating cavities. A solenoid is provided about the photocathode that emits the electons, where the solenoid is configured to provide a substantially uniform magnetic field over the photocathode surface to minimize emittance of the electons as the electrons enter the first cavity.

  10. HIGH POWER PULSED OSCILLATOR

    DOEpatents

    Singer, S.; Neher, L.K.

    1957-09-24

    A high powered, radio frequency pulse oscillator is described for generating trains of oscillations at the instant an input direct voltage is impressed, or immediately upon application of a light pulse. In one embodiment, the pulse oscillator comprises a photo-multiplier tube with the cathode connected to the first dynode by means of a resistor, and adjacent dynodes are connected to each other through adjustable resistors. The ohmage of the resistors progressively increases from a very low value for resistors adjacent the cathode to a high value adjacent the plate, the last dynode. Oscillation occurs with this circuit when a high negative voltage pulse is applied to the cathode and the photo cathode is bombarded. Another embodiment adds capacitors at the resistor connection points of the above circuit to increase the duration of the oscillator train.

  11. Bioremediation of high explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Kitts, C.L.; Alvarez, M.A.; Hanners, J.L.; Ogden, K.L.; Vanderberg-Twary, L.; Unkefer, P.J.

    1995-09-01

    Manufacture and use of high explosives has resulted in contamination of ground water and soils throughout the world. The use of biological methods for remediation of high explosives contamination has received considerable attention in recent years. Biodegradation is most easily studied using organisms in liquid cultures. Thus, the amount of explosive that can be degraded in liquid culture is quite small. However, these experiments are useful for gathering basic information about the biochemical pathways of biodegradation, identifying appropriate organisms and obtaining rates of degradation. The authors` laboratory has investigated all three major areas of explosives bioremediation: explosives in solution, explosives in soil, and the disposal of bulk explosives from demilitarization operations. They investigated the three explosives most commonly used in modern high explosive formulations: 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), hexahydro 1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) and octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX).

  12. Highly Thermal Conductive Nanocomposites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Ya-Ping (Inventor); Connell, John W. (Inventor); Veca, Lucia Monica (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Disclosed are methods for forming carbon-based fillers as may be utilized in forming highly thermal conductive nanocomposite materials. Formation methods include treatment of an expanded graphite with an alcohol/water mixture followed by further exfoliation of the graphite to form extremely thin carbon nanosheets that are on the order of between about 2 and about 10 nanometers in thickness. Disclosed carbon nanosheets can be functionalized and/or can be incorporated in nanocomposites with extremely high thermal conductivities. Disclosed methods and materials can prove highly valuable in many technological applications including, for instance, in formation of heat management materials for protective clothing and as may be useful in space exploration or in others that require efficient yet light-weight and flexible thermal management solutions.

  13. High Performance, Dependable Multiprocessor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramos, Jeremy; Samson, John R.; Troxel, Ian; Subramaniyan, Rajagopal; Jacobs, Adam; Greco, James; Cieslewski, Grzegorz; Curreri, John; Fischer, Michael; Grobelny, Eric; George, Alan; Aggarwal, Vikas; Patel, Minesh; Some, Raphael

    2006-01-01

    With the ever increasing demand for higher bandwidth and processing capacity of today's space exploration, space science, and defense missions, the ability to efficiently apply commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) processors for on-board computing is now a critical need. In response to this need, NASA's New Millennium Program office has commissioned the development of Dependable Multiprocessor (DM) technology for use in payload and robotic missions. The Dependable Multiprocessor technology is a COTS-based, power efficient, high performance, highly dependable, fault tolerant cluster computer. To date, Honeywell has successfully demonstrated a TRL4 prototype of the Dependable Multiprocessor [I], and is now working on the development of a TRLS prototype. For the present effort Honeywell has teamed up with the University of Florida's High-performance Computing and Simulation (HCS) Lab, and together the team has demonstrated major elements of the Dependable Multiprocessor TRLS system.

  14. High-conflict divorce.

    PubMed

    Johnston, J R

    1994-01-01

    This article reviews available research studies of high-conflict divorce and its effects on children. Interparental conflict after divorce (defined as verbal and physical aggression, overt hostility, and distrust) and the primary parent's emotional distress are jointly predictive of more problematic parent-child relationships and greater child emotional and behavioral maladjustment. As a group, children of high-conflict divorce as defined above, especially boys, are two to four times more likely to be clinically disturbed in emotions and behavior compared with national norms. Court-ordered joint physical custody and frequent visitation arrangements in high-conflict divorce tend to be associated with poorer child outcomes, especially for girls. Types of intervention programs and social policy appropriate for these kinds of families are presented. PMID:7922278

  15. High temperature interface superconductivity

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gozar, A.; Bozovic, I.

    2016-01-20

    High-Tc superconductivity at interfaces has a history of more than a couple of decades. In this review we focus our attention on copper-oxide based heterostructures and multi-layers. We first discuss the technique, atomic layer-by-layer molecular beam epitaxy (ALL-MBE) engineering, that enabled High-Tc Interface Superconductivity (HT-IS), and the challenges associated with the realization of high quality interfaces. Then we turn our attention to the experiments which shed light on the structure and properties of interfacial layers, allowing comparison to those of single-phase films and bulk crystals. Both ‘passive’ hetero-structures as well as surface-induced effects by external gating are discussed. Here, wemore » conclude by comparing HT-IS in cuprates and in other classes of materials, especially Fe-based superconductors, and by examining the grand challenges currently laying ahead for the field.« less

  16. High voltage power supply

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruitberg, A. P.; Young, K. M. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A high voltage power supply is formed by three discrete circuits energized by a battery to provide a plurality of concurrent output signals floating at a high output voltage on the order of several tens of kilovolts. In the first two circuits, the regulator stages are pulse width modulated and include adjustable ressistances for varying the duty cycles of pulse trains provided to corresponding oscillator stages while the third regulator stage includes an adjustable resistance for varying the amplitude of a steady signal provided to a third oscillator stage. In the first circuit, the oscillator, formed by a constant current drive network and a tuned resonant network included a step up transformer, is coupled to a second step up transformer which, in turn, supplies an amplified sinusoidal signal to a parallel pair of complementary poled rectifying, voltage multiplier stages to generate the high output voltage.

  17. High resolution data acquisition

    DOEpatents

    Thornton, Glenn W.; Fuller, Kenneth R.

    1993-01-01

    A high resolution event interval timing system measures short time intervals such as occur in high energy physics or laser ranging. Timing is provided from a clock (38) pulse train (37) and analog circuitry (44) for generating a triangular wave (46) synchronously with the pulse train (37). The triangular wave (46) has an amplitude and slope functionally related to the time elapsed during each clock pulse in the train. A converter (18, 32) forms a first digital value of the amplitude and slope of the triangle wave at the start of the event interval and a second digital value of the amplitude and slope of the triangle wave at the end of the event interval. A counter (26) counts the clock pulse train (37) during the interval to form a gross event interval time. A computer (52) then combines the gross event interval time and the first and second digital values to output a high resolution value for the event interval.

  18. High resolution data acquisition

    DOEpatents

    Thornton, G.W.; Fuller, K.R.

    1993-04-06

    A high resolution event interval timing system measures short time intervals such as occur in high energy physics or laser ranging. Timing is provided from a clock, pulse train, and analog circuitry for generating a triangular wave synchronously with the pulse train (as seen in diagram on patent). The triangular wave has an amplitude and slope functionally related to the time elapsed during each clock pulse in the train. A converter forms a first digital value of the amplitude and slope of the triangle wave at the start of the event interval and a second digital value of the amplitude and slope of the triangle wave at the end of the event interval. A counter counts the clock pulse train during the interval to form a gross event interval time. A computer then combines the gross event interval time and the first and second digital values to output a high resolution value for the event interval.

  19. High temperature electronics technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dening, J. C.; Hurtle, D. E.

    1984-03-01

    This report summarizes the barrier metallization developments accomplished in a program intended to develop 300 C electronic controls capability for potential on-engine aircraft engine application. In addition, this report documents preliminary life test results at 300 C and above and discusses improved design practices required for high temperature integrated injection logic semiconductors. Previous Phase 1 activities focused on determining the viability of operating silicon semiconductor devices over the -55 C to +300 C temperature range. This feasibility was substantiated but the need for additional design work and process development was indicated. Phase 2 emphasized the development of a high temperature metallization system as the primary development need for high temperature silicon semiconductor applications.

  20. High temperature interface superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gozar, A.; Bozovic, I.

    2016-02-01

    High-Tc superconductivity at interfaces has a history of more than a couple of decades. In this review we focus our attention on copper-oxide based heterostructures and multi-layers. We first discuss the technique, atomic layer-by-layer molecular beam epitaxy (ALL-MBE) engineering, that enabled High-Tc Interface Superconductivity (HT-IS), and the challenges associated with the realization of high quality interfaces. Then we turn our attention to the experiments which shed light on the structure and properties of interfacial layers, allowing comparison to those of single-phase films and bulk crystals. Both 'passive' hetero-structures as well as surface-induced effects by external gating are discussed. We conclude by comparing HT-IS in cuprates and in other classes of materials, especially Fe-based superconductors, and by examining the grand challenges currently laying ahead for the field.

  1. High-energy detector

    DOEpatents

    Bolotnikov, Aleksey E.; Camarda, Giuseppe; Cui, Yonggang; James, Ralph B.

    2011-11-22

    The preferred embodiments are directed to a high-energy detector that is electrically shielded using an anode, a cathode, and a conducting shield to substantially reduce or eliminate electrically unshielded area. The anode and the cathode are disposed at opposite ends of the detector and the conducting shield substantially surrounds at least a portion of the longitudinal surface of the detector. The conducting shield extends longitudinally to the anode end of the detector and substantially surrounds at least a portion of the detector. Signals read from one or more of the anode, cathode, and conducting shield can be used to determine the number of electrons that are liberated as a result of high-energy particles impinge on the detector. A correction technique can be implemented to correct for liberated electron that become trapped to improve the energy resolution of the high-energy detectors disclosed herein.

  2. High School Principals and the High School Journalism Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Jane W.

    A study asked selected high school principals to respond to statements about the value of high school journalism to the high school student and about the rights and responsibilities of the high school journalist. These responses were then checked against such information as whether or not the high school principal had worked on a high school…

  3. High temperature electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seng, Gary T.

    1991-03-01

    In recent years, the aerospace propulsion and space power communities have acknowledged a growing need for electronic devices that are capable of sustained high-temperature operation. Aeropropulsion applications for high-temperature electronic devices include engine ground test instrumentation such as multiplexers, analog-to-digital converters, and telemetry systems capable of withstanding hot section engine temperatures in excess of 600 C. Uncooled operation of control and condition monitoring systems in advanced supersonic aircraft would subject the electronics to temperatures in excess of 300 C. Similarly, engine-mounted integrated electronic sensors could reach temperatures which exceed 500 C. In addition to aeronautics, there are many other areas that could benefit from the existence of high-temperature electronic devices. Space applications include power electronic devices for space platforms and satellites. Since power electronics require radiators to shed waste heat, electronic devices that operate at higher temperatures would allow a reduction in radiator size. Terrestrial applications include deep-well drilling instrumentation, high power electronics, and nuclear reactor instrumentation and control. To meet the needs of the applications mentioned previously, the high-temperature electronics (HTE) program at the Lewis Research Center is developing silicon carbide (SiC) as a high-temperature semiconductor material. Research is focused on developing the crystal growth, growth modeling, characterization, and device fabrication technologies necessary to produce a family of SiC devices. Interest in SiC has grown dramatically in recent years due to solid advances in the technology. Much research remains to be performed, but SiC appears ready to emerge as a useful semiconductor material.

  4. Highly compliant transparent electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shian, Samuel; Diebold, Roger M.; McNamara, Alena; Clarke, David R.

    2012-08-01

    Adaptive optical devices based on electric field induced deformation of dielectric elastomers require transparent and highly compliant electrodes to conform to large shape changes. Electrical, optical, and actuation properties of acrylic elastomer electrodes fabricated with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and silver nanowires (AgNWs) have been evaluated. Based on these properties, a figure of merit is introduced for evaluating the overall performance of deformable transparent electrodes. This clearly indicates that SWCNTs outperform AgNWs. Under optimal conditions, optical transparency as high as 91% at 190% maximum actuation strain is readily achievable using SWCNT electrodes.

  5. High strength alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Maziasz, Phillip James; Shingledecker, John Paul; Santella, Michael Leonard; Schneibel, Joachim Hugo; Sikka, Vinod Kumar; Vinegar, Harold J.; John, Randy Carl; Kim, Dong Sub

    2012-06-05

    High strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one composition of a metal alloy includes chromium, nickel, copper, manganese, silicon, niobium, tungsten and iron. System, methods, and heaters that include the high strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one heater system may include a canister at least partially made from material containing at least one of the metal alloys. At least one system for heating a subterranean formation may include a tublar that is at least partially made from a material containing at least one of the metal alloys.

  6. High strength alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Maziasz, Phillip James; Shingledecker, John Paul; Santella, Michael Leonard; Schneibel, Joachim Hugo; Sikka, Vinod Kumar; Vinegar, Harold J; John, Randy Carl; Kim, Dong Sub

    2010-08-31

    High strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one composition of a metal alloy includes chromium, nickel, copper, manganese, silicon, niobium, tungsten and iron. System, methods, and heaters that include the high strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one heater system may include a canister at least partially made from material containing at least one of the metal alloys. At least one system for heating a subterranean formation may include a tubular that is at least partially made from a material containing at least one of the metal alloys.

  7. Delirium at high altitude.

    PubMed

    Basnyat, Buddha

    2002-01-01

    A 35-year-old man on a trek to the Mount Everest region of Nepal presented with a sudden, acute confusional state at an altitude of about 5000 m. Although described at higher altitudes, delirium presenting alone has not been documented at 5000 m or at lower high altitudes. The differential diagnosis which includes acute mountain sickness and high altitude cerebral edema is discussed. Finally, the importance of travelling with a reliable partner and using proper insurance is emphasized in treks to the Himalayas. PMID:12006167

  8. High intensity hadron accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, L.C.

    1989-05-01

    This rapporteur report consists mainly of two parts. Part I is an abridged review of the status of all High Intensity Hadron Accelerator projects in the world in semi-tabulated form for quick reference and comparison. Part II is a brief discussion of the salient features of the different technologies involved. The discussion is based mainly on my personal experiences and opinions, tempered, I hope, by the discussions I participated in in the various parallel sessions of the workshop. In addition, appended at the end is my evaluation and expression of the merits of high intensity hadron accelerators as research facilities for nuclear and particle physics.

  9. High Brightness Test Stand

    SciTech Connect

    Birx, D.L.; Caporaso, G.J.; Boyd, J.K.; Hawkins, S.A.; Poor, S.E.; Reginato, L.L.; Rogers, D. Jr.; Smith, M.W.

    1985-08-07

    The High Brightness Test Stand is a 2 MeV, less than or equal to 10 kA electron accelerator module. This accelerator module, designed as an upgrade prototype for the Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA), combines solid state nonlinear magnetic drives with state-of-the-art induction linac technology. The facility serves a dual role, as it not only provides a test bed for this new technology, but is used to develop high brightness electron optics. We will both further describe the accelerator, as well as present some of the preliminary electron optics measurements.

  10. High Energy Astrophysics Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This report reviews activities performed by members of the USRA (Universities Space Research Association) contract team during the six months during the reporting period (10/95 - 3/96) and projected activities during the coming six months. Activities take place at the Goddard Space Flight Center, within the Laboratory for High Energy Astrophysics. Developments concern instrumentation, observation, data analysis, and theoretical work in Astrophysics. Missions supported include: Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA), X-ray Timing Experiment (XTE), X-ray Spectrometer (XRS), Astro-E, High Energy Astrophysics Science, Archive Research Center (HEASARC), and others.

  11. High Energy Astrophysics Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This report reviews activities performed-by members of the USRA contract team during the six months of the reporting period and projected activities during the coming six months. Activities take place at the Goddard Space Flight Center, visiting the Laboratory for High Energy Astrophysics. Developments concern instrumentation, observation, data analysis, and theoretical work in Astrophysics. Missions supported include: Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA); X-ray Timing Experiment (XTE); X-ray Spectrometer (XRS); Astro-E; High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC), and others.

  12. High Performance FORTRAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehrotra, Piyush

    1994-01-01

    High performance FORTRAN is a set of extensions for FORTRAN 90 designed to allow specification of data parallel algorithms. The programmer annotates the program with distribution directives to specify the desired layout of data. The underlying programming model provides a global name space and a single thread of control. Explicitly parallel constructs allow the expression of fairly controlled forms of parallelism in particular data parallelism. Thus the code is specified in a high level portable manner with no explicit tasking or communication statements. The goal is to allow architecture specific compilers to generate efficient code for a wide variety of architectures including SIMD, MIMD shared and distributed memory machines.

  13. High Availability Electronics Standards

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, R.S.; /SLAC

    2006-12-13

    Availability modeling of the proposed International Linear Collider (ILC) predicts unacceptably low uptime with current electronics systems designs. High Availability (HA) analysis is being used as a guideline for all major machine systems including sources, utilities, cryogenics, magnets, power supplies, instrumentation and controls. R&D teams are seeking to achieve total machine high availability with nominal impact on system cost. The focus of this paper is the investigation of commercial standard HA architectures and packaging for Accelerator Controls and Instrumentation. Application of HA design principles to power systems and detector instrumentation are also discussed.

  14. High Median Nerve Injuries.

    PubMed

    Isaacs, Jonathan; Ugwu-Oju, Obinna

    2016-08-01

    The median nerve serves a crucial role in extrinsic and intrinsic motor and sensory function to the radial half of the hand. High median nerve injuries, defined as injuries proximal to the anterior interosseous nerve origin, therefore typically result in significant functional loss prompting aggressive surgical management. Even with appropriate recognition and contemporary nerve reconstruction, however, motor and sensory recovery may be inadequate. With isolated persistent high median nerve palsies, a variety of available tendon transfers can improve key motor functions and salvage acceptable use of the hand. PMID:27387077

  15. Prevention of High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Prevention of High Blood Pressure Healthy lifestyle habits, proper use of medicines, and ... prevent high blood pressure or its complications. Preventing High Blood Pressure Onset Healthy lifestyle habits can help prevent high ...

  16. High Blood Pressure in Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... The Health Information Center High Blood Pressure in Pregnancy What Is High Blood Pressure? Blood pressure is ... Are the Effects of High Blood Pressure in Pregnancy? Although many pregnant women with high blood pressure ...

  17. High Impact Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Jim

    2013-01-01

    The key to improving student achievement isn't more teacher time--it's more teacher impact. But how do you decide which instructional practices will deliver the most bang for your buck? In this handbook, written for teachers but suitable for use by principals and instructional coaches, best-selling author Jim Knight presents the high-leverage…

  18. Reshaping High School English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pirie, Bruce

    This book takes up the question of what shape high school English studies should take in the coming years. It describes an English program that blends philosophical depth with classroom practicality. Drawing examples from commonly taught texts such as "Macbeth,""To Kill a Mockingbird," and "Lord of the Flies," the book places literary analysis…

  19. The Runner's High.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sachs, Michael L.

    Research concerning the euphoric state known as "the runner's high" is reviewed in an attempt to determine psychological factors behind the experience. Possible factors include cerebral dominance, relaxation, environmental influences, time and/or distance of run, and absence of personal problems. A list of references and several descriptions of…

  20. Investing in High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Daniel G.

    2012-01-01

    Strapped for cash, a Massachusetts high school creates its own venture capital fund to incentivize teachers to create programs that improve student learning. The result has been higher test scores and higher job satisfaction. One important program is credited with helping close the achievement gap at the school, while others have helped ambitious…