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Sample records for ccr5 coreceptor antagonist

  1. Evolution of coreceptor utilization to escape CCR5 antagonist therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jie; Gao, Xiang; Martin, John; Rosa, Bruce; Chen, Zheng; Mitreva, Makedonka; Henrich, Timothy; Kuritzkes, Daniel; Ratner, Lee

    2016-01-01

    The HIV-1 envelope interacts with coreceptors CCR5 and CXCR4 in a dynamic, multi-step process, its molecular details not clearly delineated. Use of CCR5 antagonists results in tropism shift and therapeutic failure. Here we describe a novel approach using full-length patient-derived gp160 quasispecies libraries cloned into HIV-1 molecular clones, their separation based on phenotypic tropism in vitro, and deep sequencing of the resultant variants for structure-function analyses. Analysis of functionally validated envelope sequences from patients who failed CCR5 antagonist therapy revealed determinants strongly associated with coreceptor specificity, especially at the gp120-gp41 and gp41-gp41 interaction surfaces that invite future research on the roles of subunit interaction and envelope trimer stability in coreceptor usage. This study identifies important structure-function relationships in HIV-1 envelope, and demonstrates proof of concept for a new integrated analysis method that facilitates laboratory discovery of resistant mutants to aid in development of other therapeutic agents. PMID:27128349

  2. Evolution of coreceptor utilization to escape CCR5 antagonist therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Gao, Xiang; Martin, John; Rosa, Bruce; Chen, Zheng; Mitreva, Makedonka; Henrich, Timothy; Kuritzkes, Daniel; Ratner, Lee

    2016-07-01

    The HIV-1 envelope interacts with coreceptors CCR5 and CXCR4 in a dynamic, multi-step process, its molecular details not clearly delineated. Use of CCR5 antagonists results in tropism shift and therapeutic failure. Here we describe a novel approach using full-length patient-derived gp160 quasispecies libraries cloned into HIV-1 molecular clones, their separation based on phenotypic tropism in vitro, and deep sequencing of the resultant variants for structure-function analyses. Analysis of functionally validated envelope sequences from patients who failed CCR5 antagonist therapy revealed determinants strongly associated with coreceptor specificity, especially at the gp120-gp41 and gp41-gp41 interaction surfaces that invite future research on the roles of subunit interaction and envelope trimer stability in coreceptor usage. This study identifies important structure-function relationships in HIV-1 envelope, and demonstrates proof of concept for a new integrated analysis method that facilitates laboratory discovery of resistant mutants to aid in development of other therapeutic agents. PMID:27128349

  3. Spiropiperidine CCR5 antagonists.

    PubMed

    Rotstein, David M; Gabriel, Stephen D; Makra, Ferenc; Filonova, Lubov; Gleason, Shelley; Brotherton-Pleiss, Christine; Setti, Lina Q; Trejo-Martin, Alejandra; Lee, Eun Kyung; Sankuratri, Surya; Ji, Changhua; Derosier, Andre; Dioszegi, Marianna; Heilek, Gabrielle; Jekle, Andreas; Berry, Pamela; Weller, Paul; Mau, Cheng-I

    2009-09-15

    A novel series of CCR5 antagonists has been identified, utilizing leads from high-throughput screening which were further modified based on insights from competitor molecules. Lead optimization was pursued by balancing opposing trends of metabolic stability and potency. Selective and potent analogs with good pharmacokinetic properties were successfully developed. PMID:19674898

  4. Molecular Gymnastics: Mechanisms of HIV-1 Resistance to CCR5 Antagonists and Impact on Virus Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Roche, Michael; Borm, Katharina; Flynn, Jacqueline K; Lewin, Sharon R; Churchill, Melissa J; Gorry, Paul R

    2016-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) enters host cells through the binding of its envelope glycoproteins (Env) to the host cell receptor CD4 and then subsequent binding to a chemokine coreceptor, either CCR5 or CXCR4. CCR5 antagonists are a relatively recent class addition to the armamentarium of anti-HIV-1 drugs. These compounds act by binding to a hydrophobic pocket formed by the transmembrane helices of CCR5 and altering the conformation of the extracellular domains, such that they are no longer recognized by Env. Maraviroc is the first drug within this class to be licenced for use in HIV-1 therapy regimens. HIV resistance to CCR5 antagonists occurs either through outgrowth of pre-existing CXCR4-using viruses, or through acquisition of the ability of CCR5-using HIV-1 to use the antagonist bound form of CCR5. In the latter scenario, the mechanism underlying resistance is through complex alterations in the way that resistant Envs engage CCR5. These significant changes are unlikely to occur without consequence to the viral entry phenotype and may also open up new avenues to target CCR5 antagonist resistant viruses. This review discusses the mechanism of action of CCR5 antagonists, how HIV resistance to CCR5 antagonists occurs, and the subsequent effects on Env function. PMID:26324043

  5. Two distinct CCR5 domains can mediate coreceptor usage by human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Doranz, B J; Lu, Z H; Rucker, J; Zhang, T Y; Sharron, M; Cen, Y H; Wang, Z X; Guo, H H; Du, J G; Accavitti, M A; Doms, R W; Peiper, S C

    1997-01-01

    The chemokine receptor CCR5 is the major fusion coreceptor for macrophage-tropic strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). To define the structures of CCR5 that can support envelope (Env)-mediated membrane fusion, we analyzed the activity of homologs, chimeras, and mutants of human CCR5 in a sensitive gene reporter cell-cell fusion assay. Simian, but not murine, homologs of CCR5 were fully active as HIV-1 fusion coreceptors. Chimeras between CCR5 and divergent chemokine receptors demonstrated the existence of two distinct regions of CCR5 that could be utilized for Env-mediated fusion, the amino-terminal domain and the extracellular loops. Dual-tropic Env proteins were particularly sensitive to alterations in the CCR5 amino-terminal domain, suggesting that this domain may play a pivotal role in the evolution of coreceptor usage in vivo. We identified individual residues in both functional regions, Asp-11, Lys-197, and Asp-276, that contribute to coreceptor function. Deletion of a highly conserved cytoplasmic motif rendered CCR5 incapable of signaling but did not abrogate its ability to function as a coreceptor, implying the independence of fusion and G-protein-mediated chemokine receptor signaling. Finally, we developed a novel monoclonal antibody to CCR5 to assist in future studies of CCR5 expression. PMID:9261347

  6. An anti-CCR5 monoclonal antibody and small molecule CCR5 antagonists synergize by inhibiting different stages of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 entry

    SciTech Connect

    Safarian, Diana; Carnec, Xavier; Tsamis, Fotini; Kajumo, Francis; Dragic, Tatjana . E-mail: tdragic@aecom.yu.edu

    2006-09-01

    HIV-1 coreceptors are attractive targets for novel antivirals. Here, inhibition of entry by two classes of CCR5 antagonists was investigated. We confirmed previous findings that HIV-1 isolates vary greatly in their sensitivity to small molecule inhibitors of CCR5-mediated entry, SCH-C and TAK-779. In contrast, an anti-CCR5 monoclonal antibody (PA14) similarly inhibited entry of diverse viral isolates. Sensitivity to small molecules was V3 loop-dependent and inversely proportional to the level of gp120 binding to CCR5. Moreover, combinations of the MAb and small molecules were highly synergistic in blocking HIV-1 entry, suggesting different mechanisms of action. This was confirmed by time course of inhibition experiments wherein the PA14 MAb and small molecules were shown to inhibit temporally distinct stages of CCR5 usage. We propose that small molecules inhibit V3 binding to the second extracellular loop of CCR5, whereas PA14 preferentially inhibits subsequent events such as CCR5 recruitment into the fusion complex or conformational changes in the gp120-CCR5 complex that trigger fusion. Importantly, our findings suggest that combinations of CCR5 inhibitors with different mechanisms of action will be central to controlling HIV-1 infection and slowing the emergence of resistant strains.

  7. Chemokine Receptor CCR5 Antagonist Maraviroc: Medicinal Chemistry and Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Guoyan G.; Guo, Jia; Wu, Yuntao

    2015-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) causes acquired immumodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), one of the worst global pandemic. The virus infects human CD4 T cells and macrophages, and causes CD4 depletion. HIV enters target cells through the binding of the viral envelope glycoprotein to CD4 and the chemokine coreceptor, CXCR4 or CCR5. In particular, the CCR5-utilizing viruses predominate in the blood during the disease course. CCR5 is expressed on the surface of various immune cells including macrophages, monocytes, microglia, dendric cells, and active memory CD4 T cells. In the human population, the CCR5 genomic mutation, CCR5Δ32, is associated with relative resistance to HIV. These findings paved the way for the discovery and development of CCR5 inhibitors to block HIV transmission and replication. Maraviroc, discovered as a CCR5 antagonist, is the only CCR5 inhibitor that has been approved by both US FDA and the European Medicines Agency (EMA) for treating HIV/AIDS patients. In this review, we summarize the medicinal chemistry and clinical studies of Maraviroc. PMID:25159165

  8. Genetically divergent strains of simian immunodeficiency virus use CCR5 as a coreceptor for entry.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Z; Zhou, P; Ho, D D; Landau, N R; Marx, P A

    1997-01-01

    Entry of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) requires CD4 and one of a family of related seven-transmembrane-domain coreceptors. Macrophage-tropic HIV-1 isolates are generally specific for CCR5, a receptor for the CC chemokines RANTES, MIP-1alpha, and MIP-1beta, while T-cell line-tropic viruses tend to use CXCR4 (also known as fusin, LESTR, or HUMSTR). Like HIV-1, simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) requires CD4 on the target cell surface; however, whether it also requires a coreceptor is not known. We report here that several genetically divergent SIV isolates, including SIVmac, SIVsmSL92a, SIVsmLib-1, and SIVcpzGAB, can use human and rhesus CCR5 for entry. CXCR4 did not facilitate entry of any of the simian viruses tested, nor did any of the other known chemokine receptors. Moreover, SIVmac251 that had been extensively passaged in a human transformed T-cell line retained its use of CCR5. Rhesus and human CCR5 differed at only eight amino acid residues, four of which were in regions of the receptor that could be exposed, two in the amino-terminal extracellular region and two in the second extracellular loop. The human coreceptor was as active as the simian for SIV entry. In addition, HIV-1 was able to use the rhesus homologs of the human coreceptors, CCR5 and CXCR4. The SIV strains tested were specific for CCR5 regardless of whether they were able to replicate in transformed T-cell lines or macrophages and whether they were phenotypically syncytium inducing or noninducing in MT-2 cells. However, SIV replication was not restricted to cells expressing CCR5. SIV strains replicated efficiently in the human transformed lymphoid cell line CEMx174, which does not express detectable amounts of transcripts of CCR5. SIV also replicated in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells that were genetically deficient in CCR5. These findings indicated that, in addition to CCR5, SIV can use one or more unknown coreceptors that are expressed on human PBMCs and CEMx174 cells

  9. Simian Immunodeficiency Virus SIVagm Efficiently Utilizes Non-CCR5 Entry Pathways in African Green Monkey Lymphocytes: Potential Role for GPR15 and CXCR6 as Viral Coreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Riddick, Nadeene E.; Wu, Fan; Matsuda, Kenta; Whitted, Sonya; Ourmanov, Ilnour; Goldstein, Simoy; Goeken, Robert M.; Plishka, Ronald J.; Buckler-White, Alicia; Brenchley, Jason M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT African green monkeys (AGM) are natural hosts of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), and infection in these animals is generally nonpathogenic, whereas infection of nonnatural hosts, such as rhesus macaques (RM), is commonly pathogenic. CCR5 has been described as the primary entry coreceptor for SIV in vivo, while human-derived CXCR6 and GPR15 also appear to be used in vitro. However, sooty mangabeys that are genetically deficient in CCR5 due to an out-of-frame deletion are infectible with SIVsmm, indicating that SIVsmm can use alternative coreceptors in vivo. In this study, we examined the CCR5 dependence of SIV strains derived from vervet AGM (SIVagmVer) and the ability of AGM-derived GPR15 and CXCR6 to serve as potential entry coreceptors. We found that SIVagmVer replicated efficiently in AGM and RM peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in the presence of the CCR5 antagonist maraviroc, despite the fact that maraviroc was capable of blocking the CCR5-tropic strains SIVmac239, SIVsmE543-3, and simian-human immunodeficiency virus SHIV-AD8 in RM PBMC. We also found that AGM CXCR6 and AGM GPR15, to a lesser extent, supported entry of pseudotype viruses bearing SIVagm envelopes, including SIVagm transmitted/founder envelopes. Lastly, we found that CCR5, GPR15, and CXCR6 mRNAs were detected in AGM and RM memory CD4+ T cells. These results suggest that GPR15 and CXCR6 are expressed on AGM CD4+ T cells and are potential alternative coreceptors for SIVagm use in vivo. These data suggest that the use of non-CCR5 entry pathways may be a common feature of SIV replication in natural host species, with the potential to contribute to nonpathogenicity in these animals. IMPORTANCE African green monkeys (AGM) are natural hosts of SIV, and infection in these animals generally does not cause AIDS, whereas SIV-infected rhesus macaques (RM) typically develop AIDS. Although it has been reported that SIV generally uses CD4 and CCR5 to enter target cells in vivo, other

  10. Cloning and Analysis of Sooty Mangabey Alternative Coreceptors That Support Simian Immunodeficiency Virus SIVsmm Entry Independently of CCR5

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Sarah T. C.; Riddick, Nadeene E.; Francella, Nicholas; Paiardini, Mirko; Vanderford, Thomas H.; Li, Bing; Apetrei, Cristian; Sodora, Donald L.; Derdeyn, Cynthia A.; Silvestri, Guido

    2012-01-01

    Natural host sooty mangabeys (SM) infected with simian immunodeficiency virus SIVsmm do not develop AIDS despite high viremia. SM and other natural hosts express very low levels of CCR5 on CD4+ T cells, and we recently showed that SIVsmm infection and robust replication occur in vivo in SM genetically lacking CCR5, indicating the use of additional entry pathways. SIVsmm uses several alternative coreceptors of human origin in vitro, but which molecules of SM origin support entry is unknown. We cloned a panel of putative coreceptors from SM and tested their ability to mediate infection, in conjunction with smCD4, by pseudotypes carrying Envs from multiple SIVsmm subtypes. smCXCR6 supported efficient infection by all SIVsmm isolates with entry levels comparable to those for smCCR5, and smGPR15 enabled entry by all isolates at modest levels. smGPR1 and smAPJ supported low and variable entry, whereas smCCR2b, smCCR3, smCCR4, smCCR8, and smCXCR4 were not used by most isolates. In contrast, SIVsmm from rare infected SM with profound CD4+ T cell loss, previously reported to have expanded use of human coreceptors, including CXCR4, used smCXCR4, smCXCR6, and smCCR5 efficiently and also exhibited robust entry through smCCR3, smCCR8, smGPR1, smGPR15, and smAPJ. Entry was similar with both known alleles of smCD4. These alternative coreceptors, particularly smCXCR6 and smGPR15, may support virus replication in SM that have restricted CCR5 expression as well as SM genetically lacking CCR5. Defining expression of these molecules on SM CD4+ subsets may delineate distinct natural host target cell populations capable of supporting SIVsmm replication without CD4+ T cell loss. PMID:22090107

  11. Functional Mimetics of the HIV-1 CCR5 Co-Receptor Displayed on the Surface of Magnetic Liposomes

    PubMed Central

    Kuzmina, Alona; Vaknin, Karin; Gdalevsky, Garik; Vyazmensky, Maria; Marks, Robert S.; Taube, Ran

    2015-01-01

    Chemokine G protein coupled receptors, principally CCR5 or CXCR4, function as co-receptors for HIV-1 entry into CD4+ T cells. Initial binding of the viral envelope glycoprotein (Env) gp120 subunit to the host CD4 receptor induces a cascade of structural conformational changes that lead to the formation of a high-affinity co-receptor-binding site on gp120. Interaction between gp120 and the co-receptor leads to the exposure of epitopes on the viral gp41 that mediates fusion between viral and cell membranes. Soluble CD4 (sCD4) mimetics can act as an activation-based inhibitor of HIV-1 entry in vitro, as it induces similar structural changes in gp120, leading to increased virus infectivity in the short term but to virus Env inactivation in the long term. Despite promising clinical implications, sCD4 displays low efficiency in vivo, and in multiple HIV strains, it does not inhibit viral infection. This has been attributed to the slow kinetics of the sCD4-induced HIV Env inactivation and to the failure to obtain sufficient sCD4 mimetic levels in the serum. Here we present uniquely structured CCR5 co-receptor mimetics. We hypothesized that such mimetics will enhance sCD4-induced HIV Env inactivation and inhibition of HIV entry. Co-receptor mimetics were derived from CCR5 gp120-binding epitopes and functionalized with a palmitoyl group, which mediated their display on the surface of lipid-coated magnetic beads. CCR5-peptidoliposome mimetics bound to soluble gp120 and inhibited HIV-1 infectivity in a sCD4-dependent manner. We concluded that CCR5-peptidoliposomes increase the efficiency of sCD4 to inhibit HIV infection by acting as bait for sCD4-primed virus, catalyzing the premature discharge of its fusion potential. PMID:26629902

  12. Efficient Clinical Scale Gene Modification via Zinc Finger Nuclease–Targeted Disruption of the HIV Co-receptor CCR5

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Dawn A.; Brennan, Andrea L.; Jiang, Shuguang; Binder-Scholl, Gwendolyn K.; Lee, Gary; Plesa, Gabriela; Zheng, Zhaohui; Cotte, Julio; Carpenito, Carmine; Wood, Travis; Spratt, S. Kaye; Ando, Dale; Gregory, Philip; Holmes, Michael C.; Perez, Elena. E.; Riley, James L.; Carroll, Richard G.; June, Carl H.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Since HIV requires CD4 and a co-receptor, most commonly C-C chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5), for cellular entry, targeting CCR5 expression is an attractive approach for therapy of HIV infection. Treatment of CD4+ T cells with zinc-finger protein nucleases (ZFNs) specifically disrupting chemokine receptor CCR5 coding sequences induces resistance to HIV infection in vitro and in vivo. A chimeric Ad5/F35 adenoviral vector encoding CCR5-ZFNs permitted efficient delivery and transient expression following anti-CD3/anti-CD28 costimulation of T lymphocytes. We present data showing CD3/CD28 costimulation substantially improved transduction efficiency over reported methods for Ad5/F35 transduction of T lymphocytes. Modifications to the laboratory scale process, incorporating clinically compatible reagents and methods, resulted in a robust ex vivo manufacturing process capable of generating >1010 CCR5 gene-edited CD4+ T cells from healthy and HIV+ donors. CD4+ T-cell phenotype, cytokine production, and repertoire were comparable between ZFN-modified and control cells. Following consultation with regulatory authorities, we conducted in vivo toxicity studies that showed no detectable ZFN-specific toxicity or T-cell transformation. Based on these findings, we initiated a clinical trial testing the safety and feasibility of CCR5 gene-edited CD4+ T-cell transfer in study subjects with HIV-1 infection. PMID:23360514

  13. HIV-1 entry inhibition by small-molecule CCR5 antagonists: A combined molecular modeling and mutant study using a high-throughput assay

    SciTech Connect

    Labrecque, Jean; Metz, Markus; Lau, Gloria; Darkes, Marilyn C.; Wong, Rebecca S.Y.; Bogucki, David; Carpenter, Bryon; Chen Gang; Li Tongshuang; Nan, Susan; Schols, Dominique; Bridger, Gary J.; Fricker, Simon P.; Skerlj, Renato T.

    2011-05-10

    Based on the attrition rate of CCR5 small molecule antagonists in the clinic the discovery and development of next generation antagonists with an improved pharmacology and safety profile is necessary. Herein, we describe a combined molecular modeling, CCR5-mediated cell fusion, and receptor site-directed mutagenesis approach to study the molecular interactions of six structurally diverse compounds (aplaviroc, maraviroc, vicriviroc, TAK-779, SCH-C and a benzyloxycarbonyl-aminopiperidin-1-yl-butane derivative) with CCR5, a coreceptor for CCR5-tropic HIV-1 strains. This is the first study using an antifusogenic assay, a model of the interaction of the gp120 envelope protein with CCR5. This assay avoids the use of radioactivity and HIV infection assays, and can be used in a high throughput mode. The assay was validated by comparison with other established CCR5 assays. Given the hydrophobic nature of the binding pocket several binding models are suggested which could prove useful in the rational drug design of new lead compounds.

  14. Development of maraviroc, a CCR5 antagonist for treatment of HIV, using a novel tropism assay.

    PubMed

    van der Ryst, Elna; Heera, Jayvant; Demarest, James; Knirsch, Charles

    2015-06-01

    Assays to identify infectious organisms are critical for diagnosis and enabling the development of therapeutic agents. The demonstration that individuals with a 32-bp deletion within the CCR5 locus were resistant to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, while those heterozygous for the mutation progressed more slowly, led to the discovery of maraviroc (MVC), a CCR5 antagonist. As MVC is only active against CCR5-tropic strains of HIV, it was critical to develop a diagnostic assay to identify appropriate patients. Trofile™, a novel phenotypic tropism assay, was used to identify patients with CCR5-tropic virus for the MVC development program. Results of these clinical studies demonstrated that the assay correctly identified patients likely to respond to MVC. Over time, the performance characteristics of the phenotypic assay were enhanced, necessitating retesting of study samples. Genotypic tropism tests that have the potential to allow for local use and more rapid turnaround times are also being developed. PMID:25962411

  15. The Lupane-type Triterpene 30-Oxo-calenduladiol Is a CCR5 Antagonist with Anti-HIV-1 and Anti-chemotactic Activities*

    PubMed Central

    Barroso-González, Jonathan; El Jaber-Vazdekis, Nabil; García-Expósito, Laura; Machado, José-David; Zárate, Rafael; Ravelo, Ángel G.; Estévez-Braun, Ana; Valenzuela-Fernández, Agustín

    2009-01-01

    The existence of drug-resistant human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) viruses in patients receiving antiretroviral treatment urgently requires the characterization and development of new antiretroviral drugs designed to inhibit resistant viruses and to complement the existing antiretroviral strategies against AIDS. We assayed several natural or semi-synthetic lupane-type pentacyclic triterpenes in their ability to inhibit HIV-1 infection in permissive cells. We observed that the 30-oxo-calenduladiol triterpene, compound 1, specifically impaired R5-tropic HIV-1 envelope-mediated viral infection and cell fusion in permissive cells, without affecting X4-tropic virus. This lupane derivative competed for the binding of a specific anti-CCR5 monoclonal antibody or the natural CCL5 chemokine to the CCR5 viral coreceptor with high affinity. 30-Oxo-calenduladiol seems not to interact with the CD4 antigen, the main HIV receptor, or the CXCR4 viral coreceptor. Our results suggest that compound 1 is a specific CCR5 antagonist, because it binds to the CCR5 receptor without triggering cell signaling or receptor internalization, and inhibits RANTES (regulated on activation normal T cell expressed and secreted)-mediated CCR5 internalization, intracellular calcium mobilization, and cell chemotaxis. Furthermore, compound 1 appeared not to interact with β-chemokine receptors CCR1, CCR2b, CCR3, or CCR4. Thereby, the 30-oxo-calenduladiol-associated anti-HIV-1 activity against R5-tropic virus appears to rely on the selective occupancy of the CCR5 receptor to inhibit CCR5-mediated HIV-1 infection. Therefore, it is plausible that the chemical structure of 30-oxo-calenduladiol or other related dihydroxylated lupane-type triterpenes could represent a good model to develop more potent anti-HIV-1 molecules to inhibit viral infection by interfering with early fusion and entry steps in the HIV life cycle. PMID:19386595

  16. Pharmacotherapy of HIV-1 Infection: Focus on CCR5 Antagonist Maraviroc

    PubMed Central

    Latinovic, Olga; Kuruppu, Janaki; Davis, Charles; Le, Nhut; Heredia, Alonso

    2009-01-01

    Sustained inhibition of HIV-1, the goal of antiretroviral therapy, is often impeded by the emergence of viral drug resistance. For patients infected with HIV-1 resistant to conventional drugs from the viral reverse transcriptase and protease inhibitor classes, the recently approved entry and integration inhibitors effectively suppress HIV-1 and offer additional therapeutic options. Entry inhibitors are particularly attractive because, unlike conventional antiretrovirals, they target HIV-1 extracellularly, thereby sparing cells from both viral- and drug-induced toxicities. The fusion inhibitor enfuvirtide and the CCR5 antagonist maraviroc are the first entry inhibitors licensed for patients with drug-resistant HIV-1, with maraviroc restricted to those infected with CCR5-tropic HIV-1 (R5 HIV-1) only. Vicriviroc (another CCR5 antagonist) is in Phase III clinical trials, whereas the CCR5 antibodies PRO 140 and HGS 004 are in early stages of clinical development. Potent antiviral synergy between maraviroc and CCR5 antibodies, coupled with distinct patterns of resistance, suggest their combinations might be particularly effective in patients. In addition, given that oral administration of maraviroc achieves high drug levels in cervicovaginal fluid, combinations of maraviroc and other CCR5 inhibitors could be effective in preventing HIV-1 transmission. Moreover, since CCR5 antagonists prevent rejection of transplanted organs, maraviroc could both suppress HIV-1 and prolong organ survival for the growing number of HIV-1 patients with kidney or liver failure necessitating organ transplantation. Thus, maraviroc offers an important treatment option for patients with drug-resistant R5 HIV-1, who presently account for >50% of drug-resistance cases. PMID:19920876

  17. Epigenetic mechanisms, T-cell activation, and CCR5 genetics interact to regulate T-cell expression of CCR5, the major HIV-1 coreceptor

    PubMed Central

    Gornalusse, German G.; Mummidi, Srinivas; Gaitan, Alvaro A.; Jimenez, Fabio; Ramsuran, Veron; Picton, Anabela; Rogers, Kristen; Manoharan, Muthu Saravanan; Avadhanam, Nymisha; Murthy, Krishna K.; Martinez, Hernan; Molano Murillo, Angela; Chykarenko, Zoya A.; Hutt, Richard; Daskalakis, Demetre; Shostakovich-Koretskaya, Ludmila; Abdool Karim, Salim; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Deeks, Steven G.; Hecht, Frederick; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Clark, Robert A.; Okulicz, Jason; Valentine, Fred T.; Martinson, Neil; Tiemessen, Caroline Tanya; Ndung’u, Thumbi; Hunt, Peter W.; He, Weijing; Ahuja, Sunil K.

    2015-01-01

    T-cell expression levels of CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) are a critical determinant of HIV/AIDS susceptibility, and manifest wide variations (i) between T-cell subsets and among individuals and (ii) in T-cell activation-induced increases in expression levels. We demonstrate that a unifying mechanism for this variation is differences in constitutive and T-cell activation-induced DNA methylation status of CCR5 cis-regulatory regions (cis-regions). Commencing at an evolutionarily conserved CpG (CpG −41), CCR5 cis-regions manifest lower vs. higher methylation in T cells with higher vs. lower CCR5 levels (memory vs. naïve T cells) and in memory T cells with higher vs. lower CCR5 levels. HIV-related and in vitro induced T-cell activation is associated with demethylation of these cis-regions. CCR5 haplotypes associated with increased vs. decreased gene/surface expression levels and HIV/AIDS susceptibility magnify vs. dampen T-cell activation-associated demethylation. Methylation status of CCR5 intron 2 explains a larger proportion of the variation in CCR5 levels than genotype or T-cell activation. The ancestral, protective CCR5-HHA haplotype bears a polymorphism at CpG −41 that is (i) specific to southern Africa, (ii) abrogates binding of the transcription factor CREB1 to this cis-region, and (iii) exhibits a trend for overrepresentation in persons with reduced susceptibility to HIV and disease progression. Genotypes lacking the CCR5-Δ32 mutation but with hypermethylated cis-regions have CCR5 levels similar to genotypes heterozygous for CCR5-Δ32. In HIV-infected individuals, CCR5 cis-regions remain demethylated, despite restoration of CD4+ counts (≥800 cells per mm3) with antiretroviral therapy. Thus, methylation content of CCR5 cis-regions is a central epigenetic determinant of T-cell CCR5 levels, and possibly HIV-related outcomes. PMID:26307764

  18. Epigenetic mechanisms, T-cell activation, and CCR5 genetics interact to regulate T-cell expression of CCR5, the major HIV-1 coreceptor.

    PubMed

    Gornalusse, German G; Mummidi, Srinivas; Gaitan, Alvaro A; Jimenez, Fabio; Ramsuran, Veron; Picton, Anabela; Rogers, Kristen; Manoharan, Muthu Saravanan; Avadhanam, Nymisha; Murthy, Krishna K; Martinez, Hernan; Molano Murillo, Angela; Chykarenko, Zoya A; Hutt, Richard; Daskalakis, Demetre; Shostakovich-Koretskaya, Ludmila; Abdool Karim, Salim; Martin, Jeffrey N; Deeks, Steven G; Hecht, Frederick; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Clark, Robert A; Okulicz, Jason; Valentine, Fred T; Martinson, Neil; Tiemessen, Caroline Tanya; Ndung'u, Thumbi; Hunt, Peter W; He, Weijing; Ahuja, Sunil K

    2015-08-25

    T-cell expression levels of CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) are a critical determinant of HIV/AIDS susceptibility, and manifest wide variations (i) between T-cell subsets and among individuals and (ii) in T-cell activation-induced increases in expression levels. We demonstrate that a unifying mechanism for this variation is differences in constitutive and T-cell activation-induced DNA methylation status of CCR5 cis-regulatory regions (cis-regions). Commencing at an evolutionarily conserved CpG (CpG -41), CCR5 cis-regions manifest lower vs. higher methylation in T cells with higher vs. lower CCR5 levels (memory vs. naïve T cells) and in memory T cells with higher vs. lower CCR5 levels. HIV-related and in vitro induced T-cell activation is associated with demethylation of these cis-regions. CCR5 haplotypes associated with increased vs. decreased gene/surface expression levels and HIV/AIDS susceptibility magnify vs. dampen T-cell activation-associated demethylation. Methylation status of CCR5 intron 2 explains a larger proportion of the variation in CCR5 levels than genotype or T-cell activation. The ancestral, protective CCR5-HHA haplotype bears a polymorphism at CpG -41 that is (i) specific to southern Africa, (ii) abrogates binding of the transcription factor CREB1 to this cis-region, and (iii) exhibits a trend for overrepresentation in persons with reduced susceptibility to HIV and disease progression. Genotypes lacking the CCR5-Δ32 mutation but with hypermethylated cis-regions have CCR5 levels similar to genotypes heterozygous for CCR5-Δ32. In HIV-infected individuals, CCR5 cis-regions remain demethylated, despite restoration of CD4+ counts (≥800 cells per mm(3)) with antiretroviral therapy. Thus, methylation content of CCR5 cis-regions is a central epigenetic determinant of T-cell CCR5 levels, and possibly HIV-related outcomes. PMID:26307764

  19. mRNA transfection of a novel TAL effector nuclease (TALEN) facilitates efficient knockout of HIV co-receptor CCR5

    PubMed Central

    Mock, Ulrike; Machowicz, Rafał; Hauber, Ilona; Horn, Stefan; Abramowski, Pierre; Berdien, Belinda; Hauber, Joachim; Fehse, Boris

    2015-01-01

    Homozygosity for a natural deletion variant of the HIV-coreceptor molecule CCR5, CCR5Δ32, confers resistance toward HIV infection. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation from a CCR5Δ32-homozygous donor has resulted in the first cure from HIV (‘Berlin patient’). Based thereon, genetic disruption of CCR5 using designer nucleases was proposed as a promising HIV gene-therapy approach. Here we introduce a novel TAL-effector nuclease, CCR5-Uco-TALEN that can be efficiently delivered into T cells by mRNA electroporation, a gentle and truly transient gene-transfer technique. CCR5-Uco-TALEN mediated high-rate CCR5 knockout (>90% in PM1 and >50% in primary T cells) combined with low off-target activity, as assessed by flow cytometry, next-generation sequencing and a newly devised, very convenient gene-editing frequency digital-PCR (GEF-dPCR). GEF-dPCR facilitates simultaneous detection of wild-type and gene-edited alleles with remarkable sensitivity and accuracy as shown for the CCR5 on-target and CCR2 off-target loci. CCR5-edited cells were protected from infection with HIV-derived lentiviral vectors, but also with the wild-type CCR5-tropic HIV-1BaL strain. Long-term exposure to HIV-1BaL resulted in almost complete suppression of viral replication and selection of CCR5-gene edited T cells. In conclusion, we have developed a novel TALEN for the targeted, high-efficiency knockout of CCR5 and a useful dPCR-based gene-editing detection method. PMID:25964300

  20. The Isolation of Novel Phage Display-Derived Human Recombinant Antibodies Against CCR5, the Major Co-Receptor of HIV

    PubMed Central

    Shimoni, Moria; Herschhorn, Alon; Britan-Rosich, Yelena; Kotler, Moshe; Benhar, Itai

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Selecting for antibodies against specific cell-surface proteins is a difficult task due to many unrelated proteins that are expressed on the cell surface. Here, we describe a method to screen antibody-presenting phage libraries against native cell-surface proteins. We applied this method to isolate antibodies that selectively recognize CCR5, which is the major co-receptor for HIV entry (consequently, playing a pivotal role in HIV transmission and pathogenesis). We employed a phage screening strategy by using cells that co-express GFP and CCR5, along with an excess of control cells that do not express these proteins (and are otherwise identical to the CCR5-expressing cells). These control cells are intended to remove most of the phages that bind the cells nonspecifically; thus leading to an enrichment of the phages presenting anti-CCR5-specific antibodies. Subsequently, the CCR5-presenting cells were quantitatively sorted by flow cytometry, and the bound phages were eluted, amplified, and used for further successive selection rounds. Several different clones of human single-chain Fv antibodies that interact with CCR5-expressing cells were identified. The most specific monoclonal antibody was converted to a full-length IgG and bound the second extracellular loop of CCR5. The experimental approach presented herein for screening for CCR5-specific antibodies can be applicable to screen antibody-presenting phage libraries against any cell-surface expressed protein of interest. PMID:23941674

  1. The isolation of novel phage display-derived human recombinant antibodies against CCR5, the major co-receptor of HIV.

    PubMed

    Shimoni, Moria; Herschhorn, Alon; Britan-Rosich, Yelena; Kotler, Moshe; Benhar, Itai; Hizi, Amnon

    2013-08-01

    Selecting for antibodies against specific cell-surface proteins is a difficult task due to many unrelated proteins that are expressed on the cell surface. Here, we describe a method to screen antibody-presenting phage libraries against native cell-surface proteins. We applied this method to isolate antibodies that selectively recognize CCR5, which is the major co-receptor for HIV entry (consequently, playing a pivotal role in HIV transmission and pathogenesis). We employed a phage screening strategy by using cells that co-express GFP and CCR5, along with an excess of control cells that do not express these proteins (and are otherwise identical to the CCR5-expressing cells). These control cells are intended to remove most of the phages that bind the cells nonspecifically; thus leading to an enrichment of the phages presenting anti-CCR5-specific antibodies. Subsequently, the CCR5-presenting cells were quantitatively sorted by flow cytometry, and the bound phages were eluted, amplified, and used for further successive selection rounds. Several different clones of human single-chain Fv antibodies that interact with CCR5-expressing cells were identified. The most specific monoclonal antibody was converted to a full-length IgG and bound the second extracellular loop of CCR5. The experimental approach presented herein for screening for CCR5-specific antibodies can be applicable to screen antibody-presenting phage libraries against any cell-surface expressed protein of interest. PMID:23941674

  2. In vivo effect of statins on the expression of the HIV co-receptors CCR5 and CXCR4

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background During the HIV-1 replication cycle, several molecules including chemokine receptors and cholesterol are crucial, and are therefore potential targets for therapeutic intervention. Indeed statins, compounds that inhibit cellular synthesis of cholesterol and have anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties were shown to inhibit HIV-1 infection by R5 tropic strains but not by X4 strains in vitro, mainly by altering the chemokine receptor/ligands axes. Therefore, the objective of this study was to characterize in vivo, the capacity of statins to modulate in HIV seronegative and chronically HIV-1-infected adults the expression of CCR5 and CXCR4, of their ligands and the tropism of circulating HIV-1 strains. Methods Samples from asymptomatic HIV-1-infected adults enrolled in a clinical trial aimed at evaluating the antiretroviral activity of lovastatin were used to evaluate in vivo the modulation by lovastatin of CCR5, CXCR4, their ligands, and the shift in plasma viral tropism over one year of intervention. In addition, ten HIV negative adults received a daily oral dose of 40 mg of lovastatin or 20 mg of atorvastatin; seven other HIV negative individuals who received no treatment were followed as controls. The frequency and phenotype of immune cells were determined by flow-cytometry; mRNA levels of chemokine receptors and their ligands were determined by real-time PCR. Viral tropism was determined by PCR and sequencing, applying the clonal and clinical model of analyses. Results Our study shows that long-term administration of lovastatin in HIV-infected individuals does not induce a shift in viral tropism, or induce a significant modulation of CCR5 and CXCR4 on immune cells in HIV-infected patients. Similar results were found in HIV seronegative control subjects, treated with lovastatin or atorvastatin, but a significant increase in CCL3 and CCL4 transcription was observed in these individuals. Conclusions These findings suggest that long

  3. P2X1 Receptor Antagonists Inhibit HIV-1 Fusion by Blocking Virus-Coreceptor Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Giroud, Charline; Marin, Mariana; Hammonds, Jason; Spearman, Paul

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT HIV-1 Env glycoprotein-mediated fusion is initiated upon sequential binding of Env to CD4 and the coreceptor CXCR4 or CCR5. Whereas these interactions are thought to be necessary and sufficient to promote HIV-1 fusion, other host factors can modulate this process. Previous studies reported potent inhibition of HIV-1 fusion by selective P2X1 receptor antagonists, including NF279, and suggested that these receptors play a role in HIV-1 entry. Here we investigated the mechanism of antiviral activity of NF279 and found that this compound does not inhibit HIV-1 fusion by preventing the activation of P2X1 channels but effectively blocks the binding of the virus to CXCR4 or CCR5. The notion of an off-target effect of NF279 on HIV-1 fusion is supported by the lack of detectable expression of P2X1 receptors in cells used in fusion experiments and by the fact that the addition of ATP or the enzymatic depletion of ATP in culture medium does not modulate viral fusion. Importantly, NF279 fails to inhibit HIV-1 fusion with cell lines and primary macrophages when added at an intermediate stage downstream of Env-CD4-coreceptor engagement. Conversely, in the presence of NF279, HIV-1 fusion is arrested downstream of CD4 binding but prior to coreceptor engagement. NF279 also antagonizes the signaling function of CCR5, CXCR4, and another chemokine receptor, as evidenced by the suppression of calcium responses elicited by specific ligands and by recombinant gp120. Collectively, our results demonstrate that NF279 is a dual HIV-1 coreceptor inhibitor that interferes with the functional engagement of CCR5 and CXCR4 by Env. IMPORTANCE Inhibition of P2X receptor activity suppresses HIV-1 fusion and replication, suggesting that P2X signaling is involved in HIV-1 entry. However, mechanistic experiments conducted in this study imply that P2X1 receptor is not expressed in target cells or involved in viral fusion. Instead, we found that inhibition of HIV-1 fusion by a specific P2X1

  4. Design, Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Novel Piperazine Derivatives as CCR5 Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tao; Weng, Zhiyong; Dong, Xiaowu; Chen, Linjie; Ma, Ling; Cen, Shan; Zhou, Naiming; Hu, Yongzhou

    2013-01-01

    By using a fragment-assembly strategy and bioisosteric-replacement principle, a series of novel piperazine derivatives were designed, synthesized, and evaluated for their cellular target-effector fusion activities and in vitro antiviral activities against HIV-1. Preliminary structure-activity relationships (SARs) of target compounds were concluded in this study, and five compounds were found to exhibited medium to potent CCR5 fusion activities with IC50 values in low micromolar level. Among evaluated compounds, 23 h was found to be a CCR5 antagonist with an IC50 value of 6.29 µM and an anti-HIV-1 inhibitor with an IC50 value of 0.44 µM. PMID:23308267

  5. Primary, syncytium-inducing human immunodeficiency virus type 1 isolates are dual-tropic and most can use either Lestr or CCR5 as coreceptors for virus entry.

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, G; Wilkinson, D; Reeves, J D; Dittmar, M T; Beddows, S; Weber, J; Carnegie, G; Desselberger, U; Gray, P W; Weiss, R A; Clapham, P R

    1996-01-01

    A panel of primary syncytium-inducing (SI) human immunodeficiency virus type 1 isolates that infected several CD4+ T-cell lines, including MT-2 and C8166, were tested for infection of blood-derived macrophages. Infectivity titers for C8166 cells and macrophages demonstrated that primary SI strains infected macrophages much more efficiently than T-cell line-adapted HIV-1 strains such as LAI and RF. These primary SI strains were therefore dual-tropic. Nine biological clones of two SI strains, prepared by limiting dilution, had macrophage/C8166 infectivity ratios similar to those of their parental viruses, indicating that the dual-tropic phenotype was not due to a mixture of non-SI/macrophage-tropic and SI/T-cell tropic viruses. We tested whether the primary SI strains used either Lestr (fusin) or CCR5 as coreceptors. Infection of cat CCC/CD4 cells transiently expressing Lestr supported infection by T-cell line-adapted strains including LAI, whereas CCC/CD4 cells expressing CCR5 were sensitive to primary non-SI strains as well as to the molecularly cloned strains SF-162 and JR-CSF. Several primary SI strains, as well as the molecularly cloned dual-tropic viruses 89.6 and GUN-1, infected both Lestr+ and CCR5+ CCC/CD4 cells. Thus, these viruses can choose between Lestr and CCR5 for entry into cells. Interestingly, some dual-tropic primary SI strains that infected Lestr+ cells failed to infect CCR5+ cells, suggesting that these viruses may use an alternative coreceptor for infection of macrophages. Alternatively, CCR5 may be processed or presented differently on cat cells so that entry of some primary SI strains but not others is affected. PMID:8970955

  6. A Cell Line-Based Neutralization Assay for Primary Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Isolates That Use either the CCR5 or the CXCR4 Coreceptor

    PubMed Central

    Trkola, Alexandra; Matthews, Jamie; Gordon, Cynthia; Ketas, Tom; Moore, John P.

    1999-01-01

    We describe here a cell line-based assay for the evaluation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) neutralization. The assay is based on CEM.NKR cells, transfected to express the HIV-1 coreceptor CCR5 to supplement the endogenous expression of CD4 and the CXCR4 coreceptor. The resulting CEM.NKR-CCR5 cells efficiently replicate primary HIV-1 isolates of both R5 and X4 phenotypes. A comparison of the CEM.NKR-CCR5 cells with mitogen-activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in neutralization assays with sera from HIV-1-infected individuals or specific anti-HIV-1 monoclonal antibodies shows that the sensitivity of HIV-1 neutralization is similar in the two cell types. The CEM.NKR-CCR5 cell assay, however, is more convenient to perform and eliminates the donor-to-donor variation in HIV-1 replication efficiency, which is one of the principal drawbacks of the PBMC-based neutralization assay. We suggest that this new assay is suitable for the general measurement of HIV-1 neutralization by antibodies. PMID:10516002

  7. Induction of mucosal and systemic antibody responses against the HIV coreceptor CCR5 upon intramuscular immunization and aerosol delivery of a Virus-like Particle based vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Z; Smyth, HD; Durfee, P; Chackerian, B

    2009-01-01

    Virus-like particles (VLPs) can be exploited as platforms to increase the immunogenicity of poorly immunogenic antigens, including self-proteins. We have developed VLP-based vaccines that target two domains of the HIV coreceptor CCR5 that are involved in HIV binding. These vaccines induce anti-CCR5 antibodies that bind to native CCR5 and inhibit SIV infection in vitro. Given the role of mucosal surfaces in HIV transmission and replication, we also asked whether an aerosolized, VLP-based pulmonary vaccine targeting CCR5 could induce a robust mucosal response in addition to a systemic response. In rats, both intramuscular and pulmonary immunization induced high titer IgG and IgA against the vaccine in the serum, but only aerosol vaccination induced IgA antibodies at local mucosal sites. An intramuscular prime followed by an aerosol boost resulted in strong serum and mucosal antibody responses. These results show that VLP-based vaccines targeting CCR5 induce high-titer systemic antibodies, and can elicit both local and systemic mucosal response when administered via an aerosol. Vaccination against a self-molecule that is critically involved during HIV transmission and pathogenesis is an alternative to targeting the virus itself. More generally, our results provide a general method for inducing broad systemic and mucosal antibody responses using VLP-based immunogens. PMID:19849995

  8. A dual CCR2/CCR5 chemokine antagonist, BMS-813160? Evaluation of WO2011046916.

    PubMed

    Norman, Peter

    2011-12-01

    This application claims the dual CCR2/CCR5 antagonist (S)-1-[(1S,2R,4R)-4-isopropyl(methyl)amino)-2-propylcyclohexyl]-3-(6-(trifluoromethyl)quinazolin-4-ylamino)pyrrolidin-2-one, crystalline form N-1, a process for its preparation and therapeutic uses of it. The compound is shown to be a potent, well-absorbed, drug with a good duration of action. It shows better properties than similar compounds previously claimed by Bristol-Myers Squibb and appears to be a clinical development candidate. PMID:21936726

  9. CCR5 receptor antagonists block metastasis to bone of v-Src-oncogene-transformed metastatic prostate cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Sicoli, Daniela; Jiao, Xuanmao; Ju, Xiaoming; Velasco-Velazquez, Marco; Ertel, Adam; Addya, Sankar; Li, Zhiping; Ando, Sebastiano; Fatatis, Alessandro; Paudyal, Bishnuhari; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Thakur, Mathew L.; Lisanti, Michael P; Pestell, Richard G.

    2014-01-01

    Src family kinases (SFKs) integrate signal transduction for multiple receptors, regulating cellular proliferation invasion and metastasis in human cancer. Although Src is rarely mutated in human prostate cancer, SFK activity is increased in the majority of human prostate cancers. In order to determine the molecular mechanisms governing prostate cancer bone metastasis, FVB murine prostate epithelium was transduced with oncogenic v-Src. The prostate cancer cell lines metastasized in FVB mice to brain and bone. Gene expression profiling of the tumors identified activation of a CCR5 signaling module when the prostate epithelial cells (PEC) lines were grown in vivo vs. tissue cultures. The whole body, bone and brain metastatic prostate cancer burden was reduced by oral CCR5 antagonist. Clinical trials of CCR5 inhibitors may warrant consideration in patients with CCR5 activation in their tumors. PMID:25452256

  10. Combined 3D-QSAR modeling and molecular docking study on azacycles CCR5 antagonists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Yongjun; Shu, Mao; Lin, Yong; Wang, Yuanqiang; Wang, Rui; Hu, Yong; Lin, Zhihua

    2013-08-01

    The beta chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) is an attractive target for pharmaceutical industry in the HIV-1, inflammation and cancer therapeutic areas. In this study, we have developed quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) models for a series of 41 azacycles CCR5 antagonists using comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA), comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA), and Topomer CoMFA methods. The cross-validated coefficient q2 values of 3D-QASR (CoMFA, CoMSIA, and Topomer CoMFA) methods were 0.630, 0.758, and 0.852, respectively, the non-cross-validated R2 values were 0.979, 0.978, and 0.990, respectively. Docking studies were also employed to determine the most probable binding mode. 3D contour maps and docking results suggested that bulky groups and electron-withdrawing groups on the core part would decrease antiviral activity. Furthermore, docking results indicated that H-bonds and π bonds were favorable for antiviral activities. Finally, a set of novel derivatives with predicted activities were designed.

  11. Targeting CCR5 for anti-HIV research.

    PubMed

    Gu, W-G; Chen, X-Q

    2014-11-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) is the only approach for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection treatment at present. Although HAART is effective in controlling the progression of infection, it is impossible to eradicate the virus from patients. The patients have to live with the virus. Alternative ways for the cure of HIV infection have been investigated. As the major co-receptor for HIV-1 infection, C-C motif chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) is naturally an ideal target for anti-HIV research. The first CCR5 antagonist, maraviroc, has been approved for the treatment of HIV infection. Several other CCR5 antagonists are in clinical trials. CCR5 delta32 is a natural genotype, conferring resistance to CCR5 using HIV-1 strains. Gene therapy research targeting this mutant has been conducted for HIV infection treatment. A Berlin patient has been cured of HIV infection by the transplantation of stem cells from a CCR5 delta32 genotype donor. The infusion of an engineered zinc finger nuclease (ZFN)-modified autologous cluster of differentiation 4 (CD4) T cells has been proved to be a promising direction recently. In this study, the anti-HIV research targeting CCR5 is summarized, including CCR5 antagonist development, stem cell transplantation, and gene therapy. PMID:25027072

  12. Protection of rhesus macaques from vaginal infection by vaginally delivered maraviroc, an inhibitor of HIV-1 entry via the CCR5 co-receptor.

    PubMed

    Veazey, Ronald S; Ketas, Thomas J; Dufour, Jason; Moroney-Rasmussen, Terri; Green, Linda C; Klasse, P J; Moore, John P

    2010-09-01

    An effective vaginal microbicide could reduce human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transmission to women. Among microbicide candidates in clinical development is Maraviroc (MVC), a small-molecule drug that binds the CCR5 co-receptor and impedes HIV-1 entry into cells. Delivered systemically, MVC reduces viral load in HIV-1-infected individuals, but its ability to prevent transmission is untested. We have now evaluated MVC as a vaginal microbicide with use of a stringent model that involves challenge of rhesus macaques with a high-dose of a CCR5-using virus, SHIV-162P3. Gel-formulated, prescription-grade MVC provided dose-dependent protection, half-maximally at 0.5 mM (0.25 mg/mL). The duration of protection was transient; the longer the delay between MVC application and virus challenge, the less protection (half life of approximately 4 h). As expected, MVC neither protected against challenge with a CXCR4-using virus, SHIV-KU1, nor exacerbated postinfection viremia. These findings validate MVC development as a vaginal microbicide for women and should guide clinical programs. PMID:20629537

  13. Protection of rhesus macaques from vaginal infection by vaginally delivered Maraviroc, an inhibitor of HIV-1 entry via the CCR5 co-receptor

    PubMed Central

    Veazey, Ronald S.; Ketas, Thomas J.; Dufour, Jason; Moroney-Rasmussen, Terri; Green, Linda C.; Klasse, P.J.; Moore, John P.

    2010-01-01

    An effective vaginal microbicide could reduce human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transmission to women. Among microbicide candidates in clinical development is Maraviroc (MVC), a small molecule drug that binds the CCR5 co-receptor and impedes HIV-1 entry into cells. Delivered systemically, MVC reduces viral load in HIV-1-infected people, but its ability to prevent transmission is untested. We have now evaluated MVC as a vaginal microbicide, using a stringent model involving challenge of rhesus macaques with a high-dose of a CCR5-using virus, SHIV-162P3. Gel-formulated, prescription-grade MVC provided dose-dependent protection, half-maximally at 0.5 mM (0.25 mg/ml). The duration of protection was transient; the longer the delay between MVC application and virus challenge, the less protection (T1/2 ~ 4 h). As expected, MVC neither protected against challenge with a CXCR4-using virus, SHIV-KU1, nor exacerbated post-infection viremia. These findings validate MVC development as a vaginal microbicide for women, and should guide clinical programs. PMID:20629537

  14. Design and synthesis of pyridin-2-yloxymethylpiperidin-1-ylbutyl amide CCR5 antagonists that are potent inhibitors of M-tropic (R5) HIV-1 replication.

    PubMed

    Skerlj, Renato; Bridger, Gary; Zhou, Yuanxi; Bourque, Elyse; Langille, Jonathan; Di Fluri, Maria; Bogucki, David; Yang, Wen; Li, Tongshuang; Wang, Letian; Nan, Susan; Baird, Ian; Metz, Markus; Darkes, Marilyn; Labrecque, Jean; Lau, Gloria; Fricker, Simon; Huskens, Dana; Schols, Dominique

    2011-04-15

    A novel series of CCR5 antagonists were identified based on the redesign of Schering C. An SAR was established based on inhibition of CCR5 (RANTES) binding and these compounds exhibited potent inhibition of R5 HIV-1 replication in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. PMID:21398122

  15. Characterizing the Diverse Mutational Pathways Associated with R5-Tropic Maraviroc Resistance: HIV-1 That Uses the Drug-Bound CCR5 Coreceptor

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xiaowei; Feyertag, Felix; Meehan, Conor J.; McCormack, Grace P.; Travers, Simon A.; Craig, Charles; Westby, Mike; Lewis, Marilyn

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Entry inhibitors represent a potent class of antiretroviral drugs that target a host cell protein, CCR5, an HIV-1 entry coreceptor, and not viral protein. Lack of sensitivity can occur due to preexisting virus that uses the CXCR4 coreceptor, while true resistance occurs through viral adaptation to use a drug-bound CCR5 coreceptor. To understand this R5 resistance pathway, we analyzed >500 envelope protein sequences and phenotypes from viruses of 20 patients from the clinical trials MOTIVATE 1 and 2, in which treatment-experienced patients received maraviroc plus optimized background therapy. The resistant viral population was phylogenetically distinct and associated with a genetic bottleneck in each patient, consistent with de novo emergence of resistance. Recombination analysis showed that the C2-V3-C3 region tends to genotypically correspond to the recombinant's phenotype, indicating its primary importance in conferring resistance. Between patients, there was a notable lack of commonality in the specific sites conferring resistance, confirming the unusual nature of R5-tropic resistance. We used coevolutionary and positive-selection analyses to characterize the genotypic determinants of resistance and found that (i) there are complicated covariation networks, indicating frequent coevolutionary/compensatory changes in the context of protein structure; (ii) covarying sites under positive selection are enriched in resistant viruses; (iii) CD4 binding sites form part of a unique covariation network independent of the V3 loop; and (iv) the covariation network formed between the V3 loop and other regions of gp120 and gp41 intersects sites involved in glycosylation and protein secretion. These results demonstrate that while envelope sequence mutations are the key to conferring maraviroc resistance, the specific changes involved are context dependent and thus inherently unpredictable. IMPORTANCE The entry inhibitor drug maraviroc makes the cell coreceptor CCR5

  16. Quantitative Deep Sequencing Reveals Dynamic HIV-1 Escape and Large Population Shifts during CCR5 Antagonist Therapy In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Tsibris, Athe M. N.; Russ, Carsten; Lo, Chien-Chi; Leitner, Thomas; Gaschen, Brian; Theiler, James; Paredes, Roger; Su, Zhaohui; Hughes, Michael D.; Gulick, Roy M.; Greaves, Wayne; Coakley, Eoin; Flexner, Charles; Nusbaum, Chad; Kuritzkes, Daniel R.

    2009-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing platforms provide an approach for detecting rare HIV-1 variants and documenting more fully quasispecies diversity. We applied this technology to the V3 loop-coding region of env in samples collected from 4 chronically HIV-infected subjects in whom CCR5 antagonist (vicriviroc [VVC]) therapy failed. Between 25,000–140,000 amplified sequences were obtained per sample. Profound baseline V3 loop sequence heterogeneity existed; predicted CXCR4-using populations were identified in a largely CCR5-using population. The V3 loop forms associated with subsequent virologic failure, either through CXCR4 use or the emergence of high-level VVC resistance, were present as minor variants at 0.8–2.8% of baseline samples. Extreme, rapid shifts in population frequencies toward these forms occurred, and deep sequencing provided a detailed view of the rapid evolutionary impact of VVC selection. Greater V3 diversity was observed post-selection. This previously unreported degree of V3 loop sequence diversity has implications for viral pathogenesis, vaccine design, and the optimal use of HIV-1 CCR5 antagonists. PMID:19479085

  17. Frequencies of 32 base pair deletion of the (Delta 32) allele of the CCR5 HIV-1 co-receptor gene in Caucasians: a comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Lucotte, Gérard

    2002-05-01

    The CCR5 gene encodes for the co-receptor for the major macrophage-tropics strains of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1), and a mutant allele of this gene (Delta 32) provide to homozygotes a strong resistance against infection by HIV. The frequency of the Delta 32 allele was investigated in 40 populations of 8842 non-infected subjects coming from Europe, the Middle-East and North Africa. A clear north-south decreasing gradient was evident for Delta 32 frequencies, with a significant correlation coefficient (r=0.83). The main frequency value of Delta 32 for Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Finland and Iceland (0.134) is significantly (chi(2)=63.818, P<0.001) highest than the Delta 32 mean value, indicating that probably the Vikings might have been instrumental in disseminating the Delta 32 allele during the eighth to the tenth centuries during historical times. Possibly variola virus has discriminated the Delta 32 carriers in Europe since the eighth century AD, explaining the high frequency of the Delta 32 allele in Europe today. PMID:12798016

  18. Incompatible Natures of the HIV-1 Envelope in Resistance to the CCR5 Antagonist Cenicriviroc and to Neutralizing Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Enomoto, Ikumi; Baba, Masanori

    2015-01-01

    Cenicriviroc is a CCR5 antagonist which prevents human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) from cellular entry. The CCR5-binding regions of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein are important targets for neutralizing antibodies (NAbs), and mutations conferring cenicriviroc resistance may therefore affect sensitivity to NAbs. Here, we used the in vitro induction of HIV-1 variants resistant to cenicriviroc or NAbs to examine the relationship between resistance to cenicriviroc and resistance to NAbs. The cenicriviroc-resistant variant KK652-67 (strain KK passaged 67 times in the presence of increasing concentrations of cenicriviroc) was sensitive to neutralization by NAbs against the V3 loop, the CD4-induced (CD4i) region, and the CD4-binding site (CD4bs), whereas the wild-type (WT) parental HIV-1 strain KKWT from which cenicriviroc-resistant strain KK652-67 was obtained was resistant to these NAbs. The V3 region of KK652-67 was important for cenicriviroc resistance and critical to the high sensitivity of the V3, CD4i, and CD4bs epitopes to NAbs. Moreover, induction of variants resistant to anti-V3 NAb 0.5γ and anti-CD4i NAb 4E9C from cenicriviroc-resistant strain KK652-67 resulted in reversion to the cenicriviroc-sensitive phenotype comparable to that of the parental strain, KKWT. Resistance to 0.5γ and 4E9C was caused by the novel substitutions R315K, G324R, and E381K in the V3 and C3 regions near the substitutions conferring cenicriviroc resistance. Importantly, these amino acid changes in the CCR5-binding region were also responsible for reversion to the cenicriviroc-sensitive phenotype. These results suggest the presence of key amino acid residues where resistance to cenicriviroc is incompatible with resistance to NAbs. This implies that cenicriviroc and neutralizing antibodies may restrict the emergence of variants resistant to each other. PMID:26525792

  19. Antifibrotic Effects of the Dual CCR2/CCR5 Antagonist Cenicriviroc in Animal Models of Liver and Kidney Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Lefebvre, Eric; Moyle, Graeme; Reshef, Ran; Richman, Lee P.; Thompson, Melanie; Hong, Feng; Chou, Hsin-l; Hashiguchi, Taishi; Plato, Craig; Poulin, Dominic; Richards, Toni; Yoneyama, Hiroyuki; Jenkins, Helen; Wolfgang, Grushenka; Friedman, Scott L.

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims Interactions between C-C chemokine receptor types 2 (CCR2) and 5 (CCR5) and their ligands, including CCL2 and CCL5, mediate fibrogenesis by promoting monocyte/macrophage recruitment and tissue infiltration, as well as hepatic stellate cell activation. Cenicriviroc (CVC) is an oral, dual CCR2/CCR5 antagonist with nanomolar potency against both receptors. CVC’s anti-inflammatory and antifibrotic effects were evaluated in a range of preclinical models of inflammation and fibrosis. Methods Monocyte/macrophage recruitment was assessed in vivo in a mouse model of thioglycollate-induced peritonitis. CCL2-induced chemotaxis was evaluated ex vivo on mouse monocytes. CVC’s antifibrotic effects were evaluated in a thioacetamide-induced rat model of liver fibrosis and mouse models of diet-induced non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and renal fibrosis. Study assessments included body and liver/kidney weight, liver function test, liver/kidney morphology and collagen deposition, fibrogenic gene and protein expression, and pharmacokinetic analyses. Results CVC significantly reduced monocyte/macrophage recruitment in vivo at doses ≥20 mg/kg/day (p < 0.05). At these doses, CVC showed antifibrotic effects, with significant reductions in collagen deposition (p < 0.05), and collagen type 1 protein and mRNA expression across the three animal models of fibrosis. In the NASH model, CVC significantly reduced the non-alcoholic fatty liver disease activity score (p < 0.05 vs. controls). CVC treatment had no notable effect on body or liver/kidney weight. Conclusions CVC displayed potent anti-inflammatory and antifibrotic activity in a range of animal fibrosis models, supporting human testing for fibrotic diseases. Further experimental studies are needed to clarify the underlying mechanisms of CVC’s antifibrotic effects. A Phase 2b study in adults with NASH and liver fibrosis is fully enrolled (CENTAUR Study 652-2-203; NCT02217475). PMID:27347680

  20. Design and synthesis of pyridin-2-ylmethylaminopiperidin-1-ylbutyl amide CCR5 antagonists that are potent inhibitors of M-tropic (R5) HIV-1 replication.

    PubMed

    Skerlj, Renato; Bridger, Gary; Zhou, Yuanxi; Bourque, Elyse; McEachern, Ernest; Langille, Jonathan; Harwig, Curtis; Veale, Duane; Yang, Wen; Li, Tongshong; Zhu, Yongbao; Bey, Michael; Baird, Ian; Sartori, Michael; Metz, Markus; Mosi, Renee; Nelson, Kim; Bodart, Veronique; Wong, Rebecca; Fricker, Simon; Mac Farland, Ron; Huskens, Dana; Schols, Dominique

    2011-12-01

    A series of CCR5 antagonists were optimized for potent inhibition of R5 HIV-1 replication in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Compounds that met acceptable ADME criteria, selectivity, human plasma protein binding, potency shift in the presence of α-glycoprotein were evaluated in rat and dog pharmacokinetics. PMID:22033460

  1. Exploration on natural product anibamine side chain modification toward development of novel CCR5 antagonists and potential anti-prostate cancer agents.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guoyan G; Zaidi, Saheem A; Zhang, Feng; Singh, Shilpa; Raborg, Thomas J; Yuan, Yunyun; Zhang, Yan

    2015-09-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the leading causes of death among males in the world. Prostate cancer cells have been shown to express upregulated chemokine receptor CCR5, a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that relates to the inflammation process. Anibamine, a natural product containing a pyridine ring and two aliphatic side chains, was shown to carry a binding affinity of 1 μM at CCR5 as an antagonist with potential anti-cancer activity. However, it is not drug-like according to the Lipinski's rule of five mainly due to its two long aliphatic side chains. In our effort to improve its drug-like property, a series of anibamine derivatives were designed and synthesized by placement of aromatic side chains through an amide linkage to the pyridine ring. The newly synthesized compounds were tested for their CCR5 affinity and antagonism, and potential anti-proliferation activity against prostate cancer cell lines. Basal cytotoxicity was finally studied for compounds showing potent anti-proliferation activity. It was found that compounds with hydrophobic substitutions on the aromatic systems seemed to carry more promising CCR5 binding and prostate cancer cell proliferation inhibition activities. PMID:26096680

  2. Design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of the combinatorial library with a new spirodiketopiperazine scaffold. Discovery of novel potent and selective low-molecular-weight CCR5 antagonists.

    PubMed

    Habashita, Hiromu; Kokubo, Masaya; Hamano, Shin-ichi; Hamanaka, Nobuyuki; Toda, Masaaki; Shibayama, Shiro; Tada, Hideaki; Sagawa, Kenji; Fukushima, Daikichi; Maeda, Kenji; Mitsuya, Hiroaki

    2006-07-13

    We previously reported the discovery of several spirodiketopiperazine derivatives as potent CCR5 antagonists with anti-HIV activity. Herein, we describe in detail the identification of these lead compounds using a combinatorial chemistry approach. A novel spirodiketopiperazine scaffold was designed on the basis of the concept of the privileged structure of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). This new framework was obtained in acceptable yield with high purity from the readily prepared isonitrile resin through the Ugi reaction, sequential transformations, and cyclative cleavage. By measuring the inhibitory activity of each compound in the initial library against the intracellular calcium mobilization stimulated by MIP-1alpha, several compounds were found to show modest but selective CCR5 antagonistic activity. After the rapid evaluation of these hit compounds, several single-digit nanomolar, low-molecular-weight CCR5 antagonists that can potently block the infectivity and replication of laboratory and clinical strains of HIV as well as those of highly drug-resistant HIV variants with minimal cytotoxicity have been identified. PMID:16821774

  3. Species differences in the disposition of the CCR5 antagonist, UK-427,857, a new potential treatment for HIV.

    PubMed

    Walker, Don K; Abel, Samantha; Comby, Pierre; Muirhead, Gary J; Nedderman, Angus N R; Smith, Dennis A

    2005-04-01

    UK-427,857 (4, 4-difluoro-N-[(1S)-3-[exo-3-(3-isopropyl-5-methyl-4H-1,2,4-triazol-4-yl)-8-azabicyclo[3.2.1]oct-8-yl]-1-phenylpropyl]cyclohexanecarboxamide) is a novel CCR5 antagonist undergoing investigation for use in the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Pharmacokinetic and metabolism studies have been performed in mouse, rat, dog, and human after single and multiple administration by oral and intravenous routes. The compound has physicochemical properties that are borderline for good pharmacokinetics, being moderately lipophilic (log D(7.4) 2.1) and basic (pK(a) 7.3), possessing a number of H-bonding functionalities, and with a molecular weight of 514. The compound was incompletely absorbed in rat (approximately 20-30%) but well absorbed in dog (>70%). Based on in vitro studies in Caco-2 cells, UK-427,857 has relatively poor membrane permeability, and transcellular flux is enhanced in the presence of inhibitors of P-glycoprotein. Further evidence for the involvement of P-glycoprotein in restricting the oral absorption of UK-427,857 was obtained in P-glycoprotein null mice (mdr1a/mdr1b knockout). In these animals, AUC after oral administration was 3-fold higher than in control animals. In oral dose escalation studies in humans, the compound demonstrated nonlinear pharmacokinetics, with increased dose-normalized exposure with increased dose size, consistent with saturation of P-glycoprotein. The oral dose-exposure relationship of UK-427,857 in humans was not reflected in either rat or dog. In animal species and humans, UK-427,857 undergoes some metabolism, with parent compound the major component present in the systemic circulation and excreta. Elimination of radioactive dose was primarily via the feces. In rat, parent compound was secreted via bile and directly into the gastrointestinal tract. Metabolites were products of oxidative metabolism and showed a high degree of structural consistency across species. PMID:15650075

  4. Synthesis and biological evaluation of 1,3,3,4-tetrasubstituted pyrrolidine CCR5 receptor antagonists. Discovery of a potent and orally bioavailable anti-HIV agent.

    PubMed

    Ma, Dawei; Yu, Shanghai; Li, Ben; Chen, Li; Chen, Renhai; Yu, Kunqian; Zhang, Linqi; Chen, Zhiwei; Zhong, Dafang; Gong, Zheng; Wang, Renxiao; Jiang, Hualiang; Pei, Gang

    2007-02-01

    A series of 1,3,3,4-tetrasubstituted pyrrolidine containing CCR5 receptor antagonists were designed, which were elaborated either by condensation of a lithium salt of 3-(N,N-dibenzyl)aminopropionic acid methyl ester with ethyl benzoformate or by Baylis-Hillman reaction of ethyl acrylate with ethyl benzoformate and subsequent 1,4-addition of benzylamine, in the key steps. These compounds bearing 4-(N,N-disubstituted)amino piperidine units showed low nanomolar potency against the CCR5 receptor, whereas molecules with a 4-phenylpiperidine moiety displayed poor activity. Asymmetric synthesis of the most potent compound 23 a gave rise to the (3R,4S)-enantiomer 30 and the (3S,4R)-enantiomer 31, which showed IC(50) values of 2.9 and 385.9 nM, respectively. These results indicated that (3R,4S)-configuration in the series of compounds is favored for their interaction with the CCR5 receptor. The possible binding mode of these antagonists with the CCR5 receptor was discussed using a computer-modeling method. Compound 30 displayed excellent replication inhibition of seven genetically diverse R5 HIV-1 strains in the PBMC model, in a concentration-dependent manner with EC(50) values ranging from 0.3 nM to 30 nM. This molecule showed oral bioavailabilities of 41.2 % and 21.6 % in rats and dogs, respectively. Thus, compound 30 is a promising candidate for the treatment of HIV-1 infection. PMID:17163560

  5. CCR5 antibodies HGS004 and HGS101 preferentially inhibit drug-bound CCR5 infection and restore drug sensitivity of Maraviroc-resistant HIV-1 in primary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Latinovic, Olga; Reitz, Marvin; Le, Nhut M.; Foulke, James S.; Faetkenheuer, Gerd; Lehmann, Clara; Redfield, Robert R.; Heredia, Alonso

    2011-03-01

    R5 HIV-1 strains resistant to the CCR5 antagonist Maraviroc (MVC) can use drug-bound CCR5. We demonstrate that MVC-resistant HIV-1 exhibits delayed kinetics of coreceptor engagement and fusion during drug-bound versus free CCR5 infection of cell lines. Antibodies directed against the second extracellular loop (ECL2) of CCR5 had greater antiviral activity against MVC-bound compared to MVC-free CCR5 infection. However, in PBMCs, only ECL2 CCR5 antibodies HGS004 and HGS101, but not 2D7, inhibited infection by MVC resistant HIV-1 more potently with MVC-bound than with free CCR5. In addition, HGS004 and HGS101, but not 2D7, restored the antiviral activity of MVC against resistant virus in PBMCs. In flow cytometric studies, CCR5 binding by the HGS mAbs, but not by 2D7, was increased when PBMCs were treated with MVC, suggesting MVC increases exposure of the relevant epitope. Thus, HGS004 and HGS101 have antiviral mechanisms distinct from 2D7 and could help overcome MVC resistance.

  6. Mitigating hERG Inhibition: Design of Orally Bioavailable CCR5 Antagonists as Potent Inhibitors of R5 HIV-1 Replication.

    PubMed

    Skerlj, Renato; Bridger, Gary; Zhou, Yuanxi; Bourque, Elyse; McEachern, Ernest; Danthi, Sanjay; Langille, Jonathan; Harwig, Curtis; Veale, Duane; Carpenter, Bryon; Ba, Tuya; Bey, Michael; Baird, Ian; Wilson, Trevor; Metz, Markus; MacFarland, Ron; Mosi, Renee; Bodart, Veronique; Wong, Rebecca; Fricker, Simon; Huskens, Dana; Schols, Dominique

    2012-03-01

    A series of CCR5 antagonists representing the thiophene-3-yl-methyl ureas were designed that met the pharmacological criteria for HIV-1 inhibition and mitigated a human ether-a-go-go related gene (hERG) inhibition liability. Reducing lipophilicity was the main design criteria used to identify compounds that did not inhibit the hERG channel, but subtle structural modifications were also important. Interestingly, within this series, compounds with low hERG inhibition prolonged the action potential duration (APD) in dog Purkinje fibers, suggesting a mixed effect on cardiac ion channels. PMID:24900457

  7. A Simplified Technique for Evaluating Human "CCR5" Genetic Polymorphism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falteisek, Lukáš; Cerný, Jan; Janštová, Vanda

    2013-01-01

    To involve students in thinking about the problem of AIDS (which is important in the view of nondecreasing infection rates), we established a practical lab using a simplified adaptation of Thomas's (2004) method to determine the polymorphism of HIV co-receptor CCR5 from students' own epithelial cells. CCR5 is a receptor involved in…

  8. Cenicriviroc, a Novel CCR5 (R5) and CCR2 Antagonist, Shows In Vitro Activity against R5 Tropic HIV-2 Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Visseaux, Benoit; Charpentier, Charlotte; Collin, Gilles; Bertine, Mélanie; Peytavin, Gilles; Damond, Florence; Matheron, Sophie; Lefebvre, Eric; Brun-Vézinet, Françoise; Descamps, Diane

    2015-01-01

    Background Maraviroc activity against HIV-2, a virus naturally resistant to different HIV-1 antiretroviral drugs, has been recently demonstrated. The aim of this study was to assess HIV-2 susceptibility to cenicriviroc, a novel, once-daily, dual CCR5 and CCR2 antagonist that has completed Phase 2b development in HIV-1 infection. Methods Cenicriviroc phenotypic activity has been tested using a PBMC phenotypic susceptibility assay against four R5-, one X4- and one dual-tropic HIV-2 clinical primary isolates. All isolates were obtained by co-cultivation of PHA-activated PBMC from distinct HIV-2-infected CCR5-antagonist-naïve patients included in the French HIV-2 cohort and were previously tested for maraviroc susceptibility using the same protocol. HIV-2 tropism was determined by phenotypic assay using Ghost(3) cell lines. Results Regarding the 4 R5 HIV-2 clinical isolates tested, effective concentration 50% EC50 for cenicriviroc were 0.03, 0.33, 0.45 and 0.98 nM, similar to those observed with maraviroc: 1.13, 0.58, 0.48 and 0.68 nM, respectively. Maximum percentages of inhibition (MPI) of cenicriviroc were 94, 94, 93 and 98%, similar to those observed with maraviroc (93, 90, 82, 100%, respectively). The dual- and X4-tropic HIV-2 strains were resistant to cenicriviroc with EC50 >1000 nM and MPI at 33% and 4%, respectively. Conclusions In this first study assessing HIV-2 susceptibility to cenicriviroc, we observed an in vitro activity against HIV-2 R5-tropic strains similar to that observed with maraviroc. Thus, cenicriviroc may offer a once-daily treatment opportunity in the limited therapeutic arsenal for HIV-2. Clinical studies are warranted. PMID:26247470

  9. CCR5Δ32 mutation and HIV infection: basis for curative HIV therapy.

    PubMed

    Allers, Kristina; Schneider, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    The C-C chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) is expressed on potential human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) target cells and serves as the predominant co-receptor for viral entry during initial transmission and through the early stages of infection. A homozygous Δ32 mutation in the CCR5 gene prevents CCR5 cell surface expression and thus confers resistance to infection with CCR5-tropic HIV strains. Transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells from a CCR5Δ32/Δ32 donor was previously successful in eliminating HIV from the recipient's immune system, suggesting that targeted CCR5 disruption can lead to an HIV cure. Therefore, intense work is currently being carried out on CCR5 gene-editing tools to develop curative HIV therapy. Here, we review the natural function of CCR5, the progress made on CCR5 gene editing to date and discuss the current limitations. PMID:26143158

  10. Neurological Response to cART vs. cART plus Integrase Inhibitor and CCR5 Antagonist Initiated during Acute HIV

    PubMed Central

    Valcour, Victor G.; Spudich, Serena S.; Sailasuta, Napapon; Phanuphak, Nittaya; Lerdlum, Sukalaya; Fletcher, James L. K.; Kroon, Eugene D. M. B.; Jagodzinski, Linda L.; Allen, Isabel E.; Adams, Collin L.; Prueksakaew, Peeriya; Slike, Bonnie M.; Hellmuth, Joanna M.; Kim, Jerome H.; Ananworanich, Jintanat

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare central nervous system (CNS) outcomes in participants treated during acute HIV infection with standard combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) vs. cART plus integrase inhibitor and CCR5 antagonist (cART+). Design 24-week randomized open-label prospective evaluation. Method Participants were evaluated then randomized to initiate cART (efavirenz, tenofovir, and either emtricitabine or lamivudine) vs. cART+ (cART plus raltegravir and maraviroc) during acute HIV and re-evaluated at 4, 12 and 24 weeks. We examined plasma and CSF cytokines, HIV RNA levels, neurological and neuropsychological findings, and brain MRS across groups and compared to healthy controls. Results At baseline, 62 participants were in Fiebig stages I-V. Randomized groups were similar for mean age (27 vs. 25, p = 0.137), gender (each 94% male), plasma log10 HIV RNA (5.4 vs. 5.6, p = 0.382), CSF log10 HIV RNA (2.35 vs. 3.31, p = 0.561), and estimated duration of HIV (18 vs. 17 days, p = 0.546). Randomized arms did not differ at 24 weeks by any CNS outcome. Combining arms, all measures concurrent with antiretroviral treatment improved, for example, neuropsychological testing (mean NPZ-4 of -0.408 vs. 0.245, p<0.001) and inflammatory markers by MRS (e.g. mean frontal white matter (FWM) choline of 2.92 vs. 2.84, p = 0.045) at baseline and week 24, respectively. Plasma neopterin (p<0.001) and interferon gamma-induced protein 10 (IP-10) (p = 0.007) remained elevated in participants compared to controls but no statistically significant differences were seen in CSF cytokines compared to controls, despite individual variability among the HIV-infected group. Conclusions A 24-week course of cART+ improved CNS related outcomes, but was not associated with measurable differences compared to standard cART. PMID:26555069

  11. Common promoter deletion is associated with 3.9-fold differential transcription of ovine CCR5 and reduced proviral level of ovine progressive pneumonia virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    CCR5 is a chemokine receptor that regulates immune cell recruitment in inflammation and serves as a coreceptor for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). A human CCR5 coding deletion (termed delta-32) results in strong resistance to HIV infection, and polymorphisms in CCR5 regulatory regions have been ...

  12. Heroin use in Indonesia is associated with higher expression of CCR5 on CD4+ cells and lower ex-vivo production of CCR5 ligands.

    PubMed

    Meijerink, Hinta; Indrati, Agnes R; Soedarmo, Suharyani; Utami, Fitri; de Jong, Cor A J; Alisjahbana, Bachti; van Crevel, Reinout; Wisaksana, Rudi; Van der Ven, Andre J A M

    2015-01-28

    Opioid use may affect HIV infection through altered expression of HIV co-receptors. This was examined in Indonesia among antiretroviral therapy-naive HIV patients, many of whom use drugs. C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) expression on CD4+ cells was higher in heroin (P = 0.007), methadone (P = 0.024) and former opioid users (P = 0.003) compared to nonusers, whereas production of RANTES and other CCR5 ligands was similar or lower. This suggests that opioids can affect HIV susceptibility through up-regulation of CCR5 or down-regulation of its ligands. PMID:25834861

  13. A Topical Microbicide Gel Formulation of CCR5 Antagonist Maraviroc Prevents HIV-1 Vaginal Transmission in Humanized RAG-hu Mice

    PubMed Central

    Neff, C. Preston; Kurisu, Theresa; Ndolo, Thomas; Fox, Kami; Akkina, Ramesh

    2011-01-01

    For prevention of HIV infection many currently licensed anti-HIV drugs and new ones in the pipeline show potential as topically applied microbicides. While macaque models have been the gold standard for in vivo microbicide testing, they are expensive and sufficient numbers are not available. Therefore, a small animal model that facilitates rapid evaluation of potential candidates for their preliminary efficacy is urgently needed in the microbicide field. We previously demonstrated that RAG-hu humanized mouse model permits HIV-1 mucosal transmission via both vaginal and rectal routes and that oral pre-exposure chemo-prophylactic strategies could be tested in this system. Here in these proof-of-concept studies, we extended this system for topical microbicide testing using HIV-1 as the challenge virus. Maraviroc, a clinically approved CCR5 inhibitor drug for HIV treatment, was formulated as a microbicide gel at 5 mM concentration in 2.2% hydroxyl ethyl cellulose. Female RAG-hu mice were challenged vaginally with HIV-1 an hour after intravaginal application of the maraviroc gel. Our results showed that maraviroc gel treated mice were fully protected against vaginal HIV-1 challenge in contrast to placebo gel treated mice which all became infected. These findings highlight the utility of the humanized mouse models for microbicide testing and, together with the recent data from macaque studies, suggest that maraviroc is a promising candidate for future microbicide clinical trials in the field. PMID:21673796

  14. Structure of the CCR5 Chemokine Receptor-HIV Entry Inhibitor Maraviroc Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Qiuxiang; Zhu, Ya; Li, Jian; Chen, Zhuxi; Han, Gye Won; Kufareva, Irina; Li, Tingting; Ma, Limin; Fenalti, Gustavo; Li, Jing; Zhang, Wenru; Xie, Xin; Yang, Huaiyu; Jiang, Hualiang; Cherezov, Vadim; Liu, Hong; Stevens, Raymond C.; Zhao, Qiang; Wu, Beili

    2013-10-21

    The CCR5 chemokine receptor acts as a co-receptor for HIV-1 viral entry. Here we report the 2.7 angstrom–resolution crystal structure of human CCR5 bound to the marketed HIV drug maraviroc. The structure reveals a ligand-binding site that is distinct from the proposed major recognition sites for chemokines and the viral glycoprotein gp120, providing insights into the mechanism of allosteric inhibition of chemokine signaling and viral entry. A comparison between CCR5 and CXCR4 crystal structures, along with models of co-receptor–gp120-V3 complexes, suggests that different charge distributions and steric hindrances caused by residue substitutions may be major determinants of HIV-1 co-receptor selectivity. These high-resolution insights into CCR5 can enable structure-based drug discovery for the treatment of HIV-1 infection.

  15. ERK1-Based Pathway as a New Selective Mechanism To Modulate CCR5 with Natural Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Venuti, Assunta; Pastori, Claudia; Siracusano, Gabriel; Riva, Agostino; Sciortino, Maria Teresa; Lopalco, Lucia

    2015-10-01

    Natural human Abs, recognizing an epitope within the first extramembrane loop of CCR5 (the main HIV coreceptor), induce a long-lasting internalization (48 h) of the protein, whereas all known CCR5 modulating molecules show a short-term kinetics (60-90 min). Despite extensive studies on the regulation of CCR5 signaling cascades, which are the effect of concomitant CCR5 internalization by exogenous stimuli such as Abs, downstream signaling continues to be poorly understood. In this article, we report a hitherto unrecognized mechanism of CCR5 modulation mediated by G protein-dependent ERK1 activity. We further demonstrate that ERK1 is localized mainly in the cytoplasmic compartment and that it interacts directly with the CCR5 protein, thus provoking possible CCR5 degradation with a subsequent de novo synthesis, and that re-expression of CCR5 on the cell membrane required several days. In contrast, the RANTES treatment induces a recovery of the receptor on the cell membrane in short-term kinetics without the involvement of de novo protein synthesis. The said new pathway could be relevant not only to better understand the molecular basis of all pathologic conditions in which CCR5 is involved but also to generate new tools to block viral infections, such as the use of recombinant Abs. PMID:26324779

  16. Early- and Intermediate-Stage Variants of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Replicate Efficiently in Cells Lacking CCR5

    PubMed Central

    Forte, Serene; Harmon, Mary-Elizabeth; Pineda, Mario J.; Overbaugh, Julie

    2003-01-01

    Primate lentiviruses are thought to use the chemokine receptor CCR5 as the major coreceptor for entry into cells. Here we show that some variants of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) replicate efficiently in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) lacking a functional CCR5. There were differences in the replication patterns of sequential variants that evolved during SIVMne infection; the late-stage pathogenic variants were unable to replicate in PBMCs lacking CCR5, whereas the early- and intermediate-stage viruses replicated as well in PBMCs lacking CCR5 as they did in cells with wild-type CCR5. The coreceptor specificities of these sequential variants were compared using indicator cell lines expressing known SIV coreceptors. Among the known SIV coreceptors, there were none that were functional for the early and intermediate variants but not the late-stage variants, suggesting that the coreceptor used for replication in PBMCs may be a coreceptor that has not yet been described. Because some variants replicate with high efficiency in peripheral blood cells using this as yet uncharacterized cellular receptor, this coreceptor may be important for viral entry of some target cell populations in the host. PMID:12915585

  17. Highly specific blockade of CCR5 inhibits leukocyte trafficking and reduces mucosal inflammation in murine colitis.

    PubMed

    Mencarelli, Andrea; Cipriani, Sabrina; Francisci, Daniela; Santucci, Luca; Baldelli, Franco; Distrutti, Eleonora; Fiorucci, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Targeted disruption of leukocyte trafficking to the gut represents a promising approach for the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). CCR5, the shared receptor for MIP1α and β and RANTES, is expressed by multiple leukocytes. Here, we aimed to determine the role of CCR5 in mediating leukocyte trafficking in models of colitis, and evaluate the therapeutic potential of maraviroc, an orally active CCR5 antagonist used in the treatment of CCR5-tropic HIV. Acute and chronic colitis were induced by administration of DSS or TNBS to wild-type and CCR5(-/-) mice or adoptive transfer of splenic naïve CD4(+) T-cells from wild type or CCR5(-/-) mice into RAG-1(-/-). CCR5 gene ablation reduced the mucosal recruitment and activation of CCR5-bearing CD4(+) and CD11b(+) leukocytes, resulting in profound attenuation of signs and symptoms of inflammation in the TNBS and transfer models of colitis. In the DSS/TNBS colitis and in the transfer model, maraviroc attenuated development of intestinal inflammation by selectively reducing the recruitment of CCR5 bearing leukocytes. In summary, CCR5 regulates recruitment of blood leukocytes into the colon indicating that targeting CCR5 may offer therapeutic options in IBDs. PMID:27492684

  18. Highly specific blockade of CCR5 inhibits leukocyte trafficking and reduces mucosal inflammation in murine colitis

    PubMed Central

    Mencarelli, Andrea; Cipriani, Sabrina; Francisci, Daniela; Santucci, Luca; Baldelli, Franco; Distrutti, Eleonora; Fiorucci, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Targeted disruption of leukocyte trafficking to the gut represents a promising approach for the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). CCR5, the shared receptor for MIP1α and β and RANTES, is expressed by multiple leukocytes. Here, we aimed to determine the role of CCR5 in mediating leukocyte trafficking in models of colitis, and evaluate the therapeutic potential of maraviroc, an orally active CCR5 antagonist used in the treatment of CCR5-tropic HIV. Acute and chronic colitis were induced by administration of DSS or TNBS to wild-type and CCR5−/− mice or adoptive transfer of splenic naïve CD4+ T-cells from wild type or CCR5−/− mice into RAG-1−/−. CCR5 gene ablation reduced the mucosal recruitment and activation of CCR5-bearing CD4+ and CD11b+ leukocytes, resulting in profound attenuation of signs and symptoms of inflammation in the TNBS and transfer models of colitis. In the DSS/TNBS colitis and in the transfer model, maraviroc attenuated development of intestinal inflammation by selectively reducing the recruitment of CCR5 bearing leukocytes. In summary, CCR5 regulates recruitment of blood leukocytes into the colon indicating that targeting CCR5 may offer therapeutic options in IBDs. PMID:27492684

  19. Reduced Frequencies and Activation of Regulatory T Cells After the Treatment of HIV-1-Infected Individuals with the CCR5 Antagonist Maraviroc Are Associated with a Reduction in Viral Loads Rather Than a Direct Effect of the Drug on Regulatory T Cells.

    PubMed

    Joedicke, Jara J; Dirks, Miriam; Esser, Stefan; Verheyen, Jens; Dittmer, Ulf

    2016-04-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play an important role in the pathogenesis of HIV-1 infection and they frequently express the chemokine receptor CCR5. We therefore investigated whether antiretroviral treatment with the CCR5 antagonist Maraviroc affected Tregs in chronically HIV-1-infected individuals. HIV-1-infected patients with high viral loads had elevated frequencies of activated Tregs in the peripheral blood compared with healthy controls. In patients successfully treated with antiretroviral drugs (undetectable viral loads), the frequency and the activation status of Tregs were comparable with healthy controls without any specific effect related to the treatment with Maraviroc. These results indicate that the control of viral replication in general rather than a direct binding of Maraviroc to CCR5-positive Tregs influences Treg responses in successfully treated chronically HIV-1-infected individuals. PMID:27035639

  20. CCR5 deficiency accelerates lipopolysaccharide-induced astrogliosis, amyloid-beta deposit and impaired memory function.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Chul Ju; Park, Mi Hee; Hwang, Jae Yeon; Kim, Ju Hwan; Yun, Na Young; Oh, Sang Yeon; Song, Ju Kyung; Seo, Hyun Ok; Kim, Yun-Bae; Hwang, Dae Yeon; Oh, Ki-Wan; Han, Sang-Bae; Hong, Jin Tae

    2016-03-15

    Chemokine receptors are implicated in inflammation and immune responses. Neuro-inflammation is associated with activation of astrocyte and amyloid-beta (Aβ) generations that lead to pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD). Previous our study showed that deficiency of CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) results in activation of astrocytes and Aβ deposit, and thus memory dysfunction through increase of CC chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) expression. CCR5 knockout mice were used as an animal model with memory dysfunction. For the purpose LPS was injected i.p. daily (0.25 mg/kg/day). The memory dysfunctions were much higher in LPS-injected CCR5 knockout mice compared to CCR5 wild type mice as well as non-injected CCR5 knockout mice. Associated with severe memory dysfuction in LPS injected CCR5 knockout mice, LPS injection significant increase expression of inflammatory proteins, astrocyte activation, expressions of β-secretase as well as Aβ deposition in the brain of CCR5 knockout mice as compared with that of CCR5 wild type mice. In CCR5 knockout mice, CCR2 expressions were high and co-localized with GFAP which was significantly elevated by LPS. Expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) which ligands of CCR2 also increased by LPS injection, and increment of MCP-1 expression is much higher in CCR5 knockout mice. BV-2 cells treated with CCR5 antagonist, D-ala-peptide T-amide (DAPTA) and cultured astrocytes isolated from CCR5 knockout mice treated with LPS (1 μg/ml) and CCR2 antagonist, decreased the NF-ĸB activation and Aβ level. These findings suggest that the deficiency of CCR5 enhances response of LPS, which accelerates to neuro-inflammation and memory impairment. PMID:26910914

  1. CCR5 deficiency accelerates lipopolysaccharide-induced astrogliosis, amyloid-beta deposit and impaired memory function

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jae Yeon; Kim, Ju Hwan; Yun, Na Young; Oh, Sang Yeon; Song, Ju Kyung; Seo, Hyun Ok; Kim, Yun-Bae; Hwang, Dae Yeon; Oh, Ki-Wan; Han, Sang-Bae; Hong, Jin Tae

    2016-01-01

    Chemokine receptors are implicated in inflammation and immune responses. Neuro-inflammation is associated with activation of astrocyte and amyloid-beta (Aβ) generations that lead to pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD). Previous our study showed that deficiency of CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) results in activation of astrocytes and Aβ deposit, and thus memory dysfunction through increase of CC chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2) expression. CCR5 knockout mice were used as an animal model with memory dysfunction. For the purpose LPS was injected i.p. daily (0.25 mg/kg/day). The memory dysfunctions were much higher in LPS-injected CCR5 knockout mice compared to CCR5 wild type mice as well as non-injected CCR5 knockout mice. Associated with severe memory dysfuction in LPS injected CCR5 knockout mice, LPS injection significant increase expression of inflammatory proteins, astrocyte activation, expressions of β-secretase as well as Aβ deposition in the brain of CCR5 knockout mice as compared with that of CCR5 wild type mice. In CCR5 knockout mice, CCR2 expressions were high and co-localized with GFAP which was significantly elevated by LPS. Expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) which ligands of CCR2 also increased by LPS injection, and increment of MCP-1 expression is much higher in CCR5 knockout mice. BV-2 cells treated with CCR5 antagonist, D-ala-peptide T-amide (DAPTA) and cultured astrocytes isolated from CCR5 knockout mice treated with LPS (1 μg/ml) and CCR2 antagonist, decreased the NF-ĸB activation and Aβ level. These findings suggest that the deficiency of CCR5 enhances response of LPS, which accelerates to neuro-inflammation and memory impairment. PMID:26910914

  2. Development and characterization of a novel single-cycle recombinant-virus assay to determine human immunodeficiency virus type 1 coreceptor tropism.

    PubMed

    Whitcomb, Jeannette M; Huang, Wei; Fransen, Signe; Limoli, Kay; Toma, Jonathan; Wrin, Terri; Chappey, Colombe; Kiss, Linda D B; Paxinos, Ellen E; Petropoulos, Christos J

    2007-02-01

    Most human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) strains require either the CXCR4 or CCR5 chemokine receptor to efficiently enter cells. Blocking viral binding to these coreceptors is an attractive therapeutic target. Currently, several coreceptor antagonists are being evaluated in clinical trials that require characterization of coreceptor tropism for enrollment. In this report, we describe the development of an automated and accurate procedure for determining HIV-1 coreceptor tropism (Trofile) and its validation for routine laboratory testing. HIV-1 pseudoviruses are generated using full-length env genes derived from patient virus populations. Coreceptor tropism is determined by measuring the abilities of these pseudovirus populations to efficiently infect CD4+/U87 cells expressing either the CXCR4 or CCR5 coreceptor. Viruses exclusively and efficiently infecting CXCR4+/CD4+/U87 cells are designated X4-tropic. Conversely, viruses exclusively and efficiently infecting CCR5+/CD4+/U87 cells are designated R5-tropic. Viruses capable of infecting both CXCR4+/CD4+/U87 and CCR5+/CD4+/U87 cells are designated dual/mixed-tropic. Assay accuracy and reproducibility were established by evaluating the tropisms of well-characterized viruses and the variability among replicate results from samples tested repeatedly. The viral subtype, hepatitis B virus or hepatitis C virus coinfection, and the plasma viral load did not affect assay performance. Minority subpopulations with alternate tropisms were reliably detected when present at 5 to 10%. The plasma viral load above which samples can be amplified efficiently in the Trofile assay is 1,000 copies per ml of plasma. Trofile has been automated for high-throughput use; it can be used to identify patients most likely to benefit from treatment regimens that include a coreceptor inhibitor and to monitor patients on treatment for the emergence of resistant virus populations that switch coreceptor tropism. PMID:17116663

  3. A Novel Role for the Receptor of the Complement Cleavage Fragment C5a, C5aR1, in CCR5-Mediated Entry of HIV into Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Fernandez, Maria E; Aliberti, Julio; Groeneweg, Sander; Köhl, Jörg; Chougnet, Claire A

    2016-04-01

    The complement system is an ancient pattern recognition system that becomes activated during all stages of HIV infection. Previous studies have shown that C5a can enhance the infection of monocyte-derived macrophages and T cells indirectly through the production of interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and the attraction of dendritic cells. C5a exerts its multiple biologic functions mainly through activation of C5a receptor 1 (C5aR1). Here, we assessed the role of C5aR1 as an enhancer of CCR5-mediated HIV infection. We determined CCR5 and C5aR1 heterodimer formation in myeloid cells and the impact of C5aR1 blockade on HIV entry and genomic integration. C5aR1/CCR5 heterodimer formation was identified by immunoprecipitation and western blotting. THP-1 cells and monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) were infected by R5 laboratory strains or HIV pseudotyped for the vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) envelope. Levels of integrated HIV were measured by quantitative PCR after targeting of C5aR1 by a C5aR antagonist, neutralizing C5aR1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) or hC5a. C5aR1 was also silenced by specific siRNA prior to viral entry. We found that C5aR1 forms heterodimers with the HIV coreceptor CCR5 in myeloid cells. Targeting C5aR1 significantly decreased integration by R5 viruses but not by VSV-pseudotyped viruses, suggesting that C5aR1 is critical for viral entry. The level of inhibition achieved with C5aR1-blocking reagents was comparable to that of CCR5 antagonists. Mechanistically, C5aR1 targeting decreased CCR5 expression. MDM from CCR5Δ32 homozygous subjects expressed levels of C5aR1 similar to CCR5 WT individuals, suggesting that mere C5aR1 expression is not sufficient for HIV infection. HIV appeared to preferentially enter THP-1 cells expressing high levels of both C5aR1 and CCR5. Targeted reduction of C5aR1 expression in such cells reduced HIV infection by ~50%. Our data thus suggest that C5aR1 acts as an enhancer of CCR5-mediated HIV entry into

  4. Development and Bioanalytical Validation of a Liquid Chromatographic-Tandem Mass Spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) Method for the Quantification of the CCR5 Antagonist Maraviroc in Human Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Emory, Joshua F.; Seserko, Lauren A.; Marzinke, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Maraviroc is a CCR5 antagonist that has been utilized as a viral entry inhibitor in the management of HIV-1. Current clinical trials are pursuing maraviroc drug efficacy in both oral and topical formulations. Therefore, in order to fully understand drug pharmacokinetics, a sensitive method is required to quantify plasma drug concentrations. Methods Maraviroc-spiked plasma was combined with acetonitrile containing an isotopically-labeled internal standard, and following protein precipitation, samples were evaporated to dryness and reconstituted for liquid chromatographic-tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) analysis. Chromatographic separation was achieved on a Waters BEH C8, 50 × 2.1 mm UPLC column, with a 1.7 μm particle size and the eluent was analyzed using an API 4000 mass analyzer in selected reaction monitoring mode. The method was validated as per FDA Bioanalytical Method Validation guidelines. Results The analytical measuring range of the LC-MS/MS method is 0.5-1000 ng/ml. Calibration curves were generated using weighted 1/x2 quadratic regression. Inter-and intra-assay precision was ≤ 5.38% and ≤ 5.98%, respectively; inter-and intra-assay accuracy (%DEV) was ≤ 10.2% and ≤ 8.44%, respectively. Additional studies illustrated similar matrix effects between maraviroc and its internal standard, and that maraviroc is stable under a variety of conditions. Method comparison studies with a reference LC-MS/MS method show a slope of 0.948 with a Spearman coefficient of 0.98. Conclusions Based on the validation metrics, we have generated a sensitive and automated LC-MS/MS method for maraviroc quantification in human plasma. PMID:24561264

  5. HEK293T Cells Are Heterozygous for CCR5 Delta 32 Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Chunxia; Jia, Xiaopeng; Lu, Lingling; Ma, Ping; Wei, Min

    2016-01-01

    C-C chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) is a receptor for chemokines and a co-receptor for HIV-1 entry into the target CD4+ cells. CCR5 delta 32 deletion is a loss-of-function mutation, resistant to HIV-1 infection. We tried to induce the CCR5 delta 32 mutation harnessing the genome editing technique, CRISPR-Cas9 (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats, CRISPR and CRISPR associated protein 9, Cas9) in the commonly used cell line human embryonic kidney HEK 293T cells. Surprisingly, we found that HEK293T cells are heterozygous for CCR5 delta 32 mutation, in contrast to the wild type CCR5 cells, human acute T cell leukemia cell line Jurkat and human breast adenocarcinoma cell line MDA-MB-231 cells. This finding indicates that at least one human cell line is heterozygous for the CCR5 delta 32 mutation. We also found that in PCR amplification, wild type CCR5 DNA and mutant delta 32 DNA can form mismatched heteroduplex and move slowly in gel electrophoresis. PMID:27042825

  6. Dengue virus requires the CC-chemokine receptor CCR5 for replication and infection development

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Rafael E; Guabiraba, Rodrigo; Del Sarto, Juliana L; Rocha, Rebeca F; Queiroz, Ana Luiza; Cisalpino, Daniel; Marques, Pedro E; Pacca, Carolina C; Fagundes, Caio T; Menezes, Gustavo B; Nogueira, Maurício L; Souza, Danielle G; Teixeira, Mauro M

    2015-01-01

    Dengue is a mosquito-borne disease that affects millions of people worldwide yearly. Currently, there is no vaccine or specific treatment available. Further investigation on dengue pathogenesis is required to better understand the disease and to identify potential therapeutic targets. The chemokine system has been implicated in dengue pathogenesis, although the specific role of chemokines and their receptors remains elusive. Here we describe the role of the CC-chemokine receptor CCR5 in Dengue virus (DENV-2) infection. In vitro experiments showed that CCR5 is a host factor required for DENV-2 replication in human and mouse macrophages. DENV-2 infection induces the expression of CCR5 ligands. Incubation with an antagonist prevents CCR5 activation and reduces DENV-2 positive-stranded (+) RNA inside macrophages. Using an immunocompetent mouse model of DENV-2 infection we found that CCR5−/− mice were resistant to lethal infection, presenting at least 100-fold reduction of viral load in target organs and significant reduction in disease severity. This phenotype was reproduced in wild-type mice treated with CCR5-blocking compounds. Therefore, CCR5 is a host factor required for DENV-2 replication and disease development. Targeting CCR5 might represent a therapeutic strategy for dengue fever. These data bring new insights on the association between viral infections and the chemokine receptor CCR5. PMID:25939314

  7. The evolution of HIV-1 interactions with coreceptors and mannose C-type lectin receptors.

    PubMed

    Borggren, Marie; Jansson, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    The phenotype of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) commonly evolves between and within infected individuals, at virus transmission, and during disease progression. This evolution includes altered interactions between the virus and its coreceptors, i.e., chemokine receptors, as well as mannose C-type lectin receptors (CLRs). Transmitted/founder viruses are predominantly restricted to CCR5, whereas the subsequent intrapatient evolution of HIV-1 coreceptor use during progressive disease can be subdivided into two distinct pathways. Accordingly, the CCR5-restricted virus population is either gradually replaced by virus variants able to use CXCR4 or evolves toward an altered, more flexible use of CCR5. Despite a strong dependency on these coreceptors for host cell entry, HIV-1 also interacts with other cell surface molecules during target cell attachment, including the CLRs. The virus interaction with the CLRs may result either in the efficient transfer of virus to CD4(+) T cells or in the degradation of the virus in endosomal compartments. The determinants of the diverse outcomes depend on which CLR is engaged and also on the glycan makeup of the envelope glycoproteins, which may evolve with the strength of the immune pressure during the disease course. With the current clinical introduction of CCR5 antagonists and the development of additional entry inhibitors, knowledge on the evolution and baseline characteristics of HIV-1 interactions with coreceptor and CLR interactions may play important roles for individualized and optimized treatment strategies. This review summarizes our current understanding of the evolution of HIV-1 interactions with these receptors. PMID:25595802

  8. Polymorphisms in the CCR5 promoter region influence disease progression in perinatally human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected children.

    PubMed

    Ometto, L; Bertorelle, R; Mainardi, M; Zanchetta, M; Tognazzo, S; Rampon, O; Ruga, E; Chieco-Bianchi, L; De Rossi, A

    2001-03-01

    The effect of CC-chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) promoter polymorphisms on the natural history of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease was studied in 73 HIV-1-infected children. The CCR5(59338-59537) promoter haplotype, CCR5-59029A/G polymorphism, and CCR5Delta32 and CCR2-64I alterations were investigated. After exclusion of carriers of CCR5Delta32 or CCR2-64I, Kaplan-Meier analysis disclosed that children with the P1/P1(59353C,59356C,59402A) genotype progressed faster to disease than did children with other haplotypes (P=.016). When CCR2-64I carriers were included, this effect had borderline significance (P=.065) and was lost when CCR5Delta32 carriers were also considered (P=.387). The P1/P1 effect was strongest early after infection, when progression to disease was mainly associated with CCR5 coreceptor-using viruses. These results indicate that the P1/P1 genotype is predictive of rapid progression in HIV-1-infected children lacking CCR5Delta32 or CCR5-64I alleles. The observation of a linkage disequilibrium between P1 and 59029A might explain the previously reported association between 59029A homozygosity and rapid disease progression. PMID:11181160

  9. Protection of macaques from vaginal SHIV challenge by an orally delivered CCR5 inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Veazey, Ronald S; Springer, Martin S; Marx, Preston A; Dufour, Jason; Klasse, Per Johan; Moore, John P

    2005-12-01

    Pre-exposure oral prophylaxis with antiviral drugs is a potential method for preventing transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). We show that oral delivery of CMPD167, a small molecule that binds to the CCR5 coreceptor, for 10-14 d can protect a substantial proportion of macaques from vaginal infection with a CCR5-using virus (SHIV-162P3). The macaques that became infected despite receiving CMPD167 had reduced plasma viremia levels during the earliest stages of infection. PMID:16273102

  10. Relationship between the chemokine receptor CCR5 and microglia in neurological disorders: consequences of targeting CCR5 on neuroinflammation, neuronal death and regeneration in a model of epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Louboutin, Jean-Pierre; Strayer, David S

    2013-09-01

    Chemokines may play a role in leukocyte migration across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) during neuroinflammation and other neuropathological processes, such as epilepsy. The CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) is a member of CC-chemokine receptor family that binds several chemokines, including CCL3 (macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha, MIP-1alpha), CCL4 (macrophage inflammatory protein-1beta, MIP-1beta) and CCL5 (RANTES). The current review examines the relationship between CCR5 and the microglia in different neurological disorders and models of CNS injury. CCR5 expression is upregulated in different neurological diseases, where it is often immunolocalized in microglial cells. A multistep cascade couples CCR5 activation by chemokines to Ca(2+) increases in human microglia. Because changes in [Ca(2+)] (i) affect chemotaxis, secretion, and gene expression, pharmacologic modulation of this pathway may alter inflammatory and degenerative processes in the CNS. Consequently, targeting CCR5 by using CCR5 antagonists may attenuate critical aspects of neuroinflammation in different models of neurological disorders. To illustrate the interaction between CCR5 and microglia in the CNS, we used a model of excitotoxicity, and demonstrate the intimate involvement of CCR5 in neuron injury and inflammation attendant to kainic acid (KA)-induced neurotoxicity. CCR5 participates in neuronal injury caused by the excitotoxin, KA, brings inflammatory cells to the sites of KA-induced CNS injury, defines the extent of tissue loss after KA exposure and limits reparative responses. We used a SV40-derived vector carrying an interfering RNA (RNAi) that targets CCR5. Delivered directly to the bone marrow, this vector decreased CCR5 expression in circulating cells. Animals so treated showed greatly reduced expression of CCR5 and its ligands (MIP-1alpha and RANTES) in the CNS, including in the brain vasculature, decreased BBB leakage, demonstrated greater KA-stimulated neurogenesis and increased

  11. Transmitted/Founder and Chronic HIV-1 Envelope Proteins Are Distinguished by Differential Utilization of CCR5

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Zahra F.; Iyer, Shilpa S.; Wilen, Craig B.; Parrish, Nicholas F.; Chikere, Kelechi C.; Lee, Fang-Hua; Didigu, Chuka A.; Berro, Reem; Klasse, Per Johan; Lee, Benhur; Moore, John P.; Shaw, George M.

    2013-01-01

    Infection by HIV-1 most often results from the successful transmission and propagation of a single virus variant, termed the transmitted/founder (T/F) virus. Here, we compared the attachment and entry properties of envelope (Env) glycoproteins from T/F and chronic control (CC) viruses. Using a panel of 40 T/F and 47 CC Envs, all derived by single genome amplification, we found that 52% of clade C and B CC Envs exhibited partial resistance to the CCR5 antagonist maraviroc (MVC) on cells expressing high levels of CCR5, while only 15% of T/F Envs exhibited this same property. Moreover, subtle differences in the magnitude with which MVC inhibited infection on cells expressing low levels of CCR5, including primary CD4+ T cells, were highly predictive of MVC resistance when CCR5 expression levels were high. These results are consistent with previous observations showing a greater sensitivity of T/F Envs to MVC inhibition on cells expressing very high levels of CCR5 and indicate that CC Envs are often capable of recognizing MVC-bound CCR5, albeit inefficiently on cells expressing physiologic levels of CCR5. When CCR5 expression levels are high, this phenotype becomes readily detectable. The utilization of drug-bound CCR5 conformations by many CC Envs was seen with other CCR5 antagonists, with replication-competent viruses, and did not obviously correlate with other phenotypic traits. The striking ability of clade C and B CC Envs to use MVC-bound CCR5 relative to T/F Envs argues that the more promiscuous use of CCR5 by these Env proteins is selected against at the level of virus transmission and is selected for during chronic infection. PMID:23269796

  12. Inhibition of HIV-1 infection by synthetic peptides derived CCR5 fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Imai, Masaki; Baranyi, Lajos; Okada, Noriko; Okada, Hidechika; E-mail: hiokada@med.nagoya-cu.ac.jp

    2007-02-23

    HIV-1 infection requires interaction of viral envelope protein gp160 with CD4 and a chemokine receptor, CCR5 or CXCR4 as entry coreceptor. We designed HIV-inhibitory peptides targeted to CCR5 using a novel computer program (ANTIS), which searched all possible sense-antisense amino acid pairs between proteins. Seven AHBs were found in CCR5 receptor. All AHB peptides were synthesized and tested for their ability to prevent HIV-1 infection to human T cells. A peptide fragment (LC5) which is a part of the CCR5 receptor corresponding to the loop between the fifth and sixth transmembrane regions (amino acids 222-240) proved to inhibit HIV-1{sub IIIB} infection of MT-4 cells. Interaction of these antisense peptides could be involved in sustaining HIV-1 infectivity. LC5 effectively indicated dose-dependent manner, and the suppression was enhanced additively by T20 peptide, which inhibits infection in vitro by disrupting the gp41 conformational changes necessary for membrane fusion. Thus, these results indicate that CCR5-derived AHB peptides could provide a useful tool to define the mechanism(s) of HIV infection, and may provide insight which will contribute to the development of an anti-HIV-1 reagent.

  13. Neutralizing antibody and anti-retroviral drug sensitivities of HIV-1 isolates resistant to small molecule CCR5 inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Pugach, Pavel; Ketas, Thomas J.; Michael, Elizabeth; Moore, John P.

    2008-08-01

    The small molecule CCR5 inhibitors are a new class of drugs for treating infection by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). They act by binding to the CCR5 co-receptor and preventing its use during HIV-1-cell fusion. Escape mutants can be raised against CCR5 inhibitors in vitro and will arise when these drugs are used clinically. Here, we have assessed the responses of CCR5 inhibitor-resistant viruses to other anti-retroviral drugs that act by different mechanisms, and their sensitivities to neutralizing antibodies (NAbs). The rationale for the latter study is that the resistance pathway for CCR5 inhibitors involves changes in the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Env), which are also targets for NAbs. The escape mutants CC101.19 and D1/85.16 were selected for resistance to AD101 and vicriviroc (VVC), respectively, from the primary R5 HIV-1 isolate CC1/85. Each escape mutant was cross-resistant to other small molecule CCR5 inhibitors (aplaviroc, maraviroc, VVC, AD101 and CMPD 167), but sensitive to protein ligands of CCR5: the modified chemokine PSC-RANTES and the humanized MAb PRO-140. The resistant viruses also retained wild-type sensitivity to the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (RTI) zidovudine, the non-nucleoside RTI nevirapine, the protease inhibitor atazanavir and other attachment and fusion inhibitors that act independently of CCR5 (BMS-806, PRO-542 and enfuvirtide). Of note is that the escape mutants were more sensitive than the parental CC1/85 isolate to a subset of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies and to some sera from HIV-1-infected people, implying that sequence changes in Env that confer resistance to CCR5 inhibitors can increase the accessibility of some NAb epitopes. The need to preserve NAb resistance may therefore be a constraint upon how escape from CCR5 inhibitors occurs in vivo.

  14. RNAi-Mediated CCR5 Knockdown Provides HIV-1 Resistance to Memory T Cells in Humanized BLT Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Saki; Ringpis, Gene-Errol; Marsden, Matthew D; Cortado, Ruth V; Wilhalme, Holly M; Elashoff, David; Zack, Jerome A; Chen, Irvin S Y; An, Dong Sung

    2015-01-01

    Transplantation of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPC) modified with a lentiviral vector bearing a potent nontoxic short hairpin RNA (sh1005) directed to the HIV coreceptor CCR5 is capable of continuously producing CCR5 downregulated CD4+ T lymphocytes. Here, we characterized HIV-1 resistance of the sh1005-modified CD4+ T lymphocytes in vivo in humanized bone marrow/liver/thymus (hu BLT) mice. The sh1005-modified CD4+ T lymphocytes were positively selected in CCR5-tropic HIV-1–challenged mice. The sh1005-modified memory CD4+ T lymphocytes (the primary target of CCR5-tropic HIV-1) expressing sh1005 were maintained in lymphoid tissues in CCR5-tropic HIV-1–challenged mice. Frequencies of HIV-1 p24 expressing cells were significantly reduced in the sh1005-modified splenocytes by ex vivo cell stimulation confirming that CCR5 downregulated sh1005 modified cells are protected from viral infection. These results demonstrate that stable CCR5 downregulation through genetic modification of human HSPC by lentivirally delivered sh1005 is highly effective in providing HIV-1 resistance. Our results provide in vivo evidence in a relevant small animal model that sh1005 is a potent early-step anti-HIV reagent that has potential as a novel anti-HIV-1 HSPC gene therapeutic reagent for human applications. PMID:25689223

  15. Cell-specific RNA aptamer against human CCR5 specifically targets HIV-1 susceptible and inhibits HIV-1 infectivity

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jiehua; Satheesan, Sangeetha; Li, Haitang; Weinberg, Marc S.; Morris, Kevin V.; Burnett, John; Rossi, John

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) is a receptor expressed by T-cells and macrophages that serves as a co-receptor for macrophage-tropic HIV-1. Loss of CCR5 is associated with resistance to HIV-1. Here we combine the live cell-based SELEX with high throughput sequencing technology to generate CCR5 RNA aptamers capable of specifically targeting HIV-1 susceptible cells (as siRNA delivery agent) and inhibiting HIV-1 infectivity (as antiviral agent) via block of the CCR5 required for HIV-1 to enter cells. One of the best candidates, G-3, efficiently bound and was internalized into human CCR5 expressing cells. The G-3 specifically neutralized R5 virus infection in primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and in vivo generated human CD4+ T cells with a nanomolar IC50. G-3 was also capable of transferring functional siRNAs to CCR5 expressing cells. Collectively, the cell-specific, internalizing, CCR5-targeted aptamers and aptamer-siRNA conjugates offer promise for overcoming some of the current challenges of drug resistance in HIV-1 by providing cell-type- or tissue-specific delivery of various therapeutic moieties. PMID:25754473

  16. Efficient modification of CCR5 in primary human hematopoietic cells using a megaTAL nuclease and AAV donor template

    PubMed Central

    Sather, Blythe D.; Romano Ibarra, Guillermo S.; Sommer, Karen; Curinga, Gabrielle; Hale, Malika; Khan, Iram F.; Singh, Swati; Song, Yumei; Gwiazda, Kamila; Sahni, Jaya; Jarjour, Jordan; Astrakhan, Alexander; Wagner, Thor A.; Scharenberg, Andrew M.; Rawlings, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Genetic mutations or engineered nucleases that disrupt the HIV co-receptor CCR5 block HIV infection of CD4+ T cells. These findings have motivated the engineering of CCR5-specific nucleases for application as HIV therapies. The efficacy of this approach relies on efficient biallelic disruption of CCR5, and the ability to efficiently target sequences that confer HIV resistance to the CCR5 locus has the potential to further improve clinical outcomes. We used RNA-based nuclease expression paired with adeno-associated virus (AAV) – mediated delivery of a CCR5-targeting donor template to achieve highly efficient targeted recombination in primary human T cells. This method consistently achieved 8 to 60% rates of homology-directed recombination into the CCR5 locus in T cells, with over 80% of cells modified with an MND-GFP expression cassette exhibiting biallelic modification. MND-GFP – modified T cells maintained a diverse repertoire and engrafted in immune-deficient mice as efficiently as unmodified cells. Using this method, we integrated sequences coding chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) into the CCR5 locus, and the resulting targeted CAR T cells exhibited antitumor or anti-HIV activity. Alternatively, we introduced the C46 HIV fusion inhibitor, generating T cell populations with high rates of biallelic CCR5 disruption paired with potential protection from HIV with CXCR4 co-receptor tropism. Finally, this protocol was applied to adult human mobilized CD34+ cells, resulting in 15 to 20% homologous gene targeting. Our results demonstrate that high-efficiency targeted integration is feasible in primary human hematopoietic cells and highlight the potential of gene editing to engineer T cell products with myriad functional properties. PMID:26424571

  17. Cytokine-induced killer cells interact with tumor lysate-pulsed dendritic cells via CCR5 signaling.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hong Kyung; Kim, Yong Guk; Kim, Ji Sung; Park, Eun Jae; Kim, Boyeong; Park, Ki Hwan; Kang, Jong Soon; Hong, Jin Tae; Kim, Youngsoo; Han, Sang-Bae

    2016-08-10

    The antitumor activity of cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells can be increased by co-culturing them with tumor lysate-pulsed dendritic cells (tDCs); this phenomenon has been studied mainly at the population level. Using time-lapse imaging, we examined how CIK cells gather information from tDCs at the single-cell level. tDCs highly expressed CCL5, which bound CCR5 expressed on CIK cells. tDCs strongly induced migration of Ccr5(+/+) CIK cells, but not that of Ccr5(-/-) CIK cells or Ccr5(+/+) CIK cells treated with the CCR5 antagonist Maraviroc. Individual tDCs contacted Ccr5(+/+) CIK cells more frequently and lengthily than with Ccr5(-/-) CIK cells. Consequently, tDCs increased the antitumor activity of Ccr5(+/+) CIK cells in vitro and in vivo, but did not increase that of Ccr5(-/-) CIK cells. Taken together, our data provide insight into the mechanism of CIK cell activation by tDCs at the single-cell level. PMID:27216980

  18. A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial of a Chemokine Receptor 5 (CCR5) Antagonist to Decrease the Occurrence of Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome in HIV-Infection: The CADIRIS Study

    PubMed Central

    Sierra-Madero, Juan G.; Ellenberg, Susan; Rassool, Mohammed S.; Tierney, Ann; Belaunzarán-Zamudio, Pablo F.; López-Martínez, Alondra; Piñeirúa-Menéndez, Alicia; Montaner, Luis J.; Azzoni, Livio; Benítez, César Rivera; Sereti, Irini; Andrade-Villanueva, Jaime; Mosqueda-Gómez, Juan L.; Rodriguez, Benigno; Sanne, Ian; Lederman, Michael M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome (IRIS) is a common complication of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in HIV-infected patients. IRIS is associated with an increased risk of hospitalization and death. We ascertained whether CCR5 blockade using maraviroc reduces the risk of IRIS. Methods The CADIRIS study was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, clinical trial that accrued subjects from five clinical sites in Mexico and one in South Africa between November 2009 and January 2012, and followed them for one year. The primary outcome was occurrence of IRIS by 24 weeks. HIV-infected adults, naïve to ART, with CD4 cells <100/μL, and HIVRNA >1,000 copies/mL were eligible. We screened 362 subjects; 279 met inclusion criteria, 3 refused participation, and 276 were randomized. Participants received maraviroc 600 mg twice daily or placebo added to an ART regimen that included tenofovir, emtricitabine, and efavirenz for 48 weeks. Findings There were 276 patients randomized (140 received maraviroc and 136 placebo). There was no difference in the time to IRIS events between treatment arms (HR 1·08, 95% CI (0·66, 1·77), log-rank test p=0·743). In total, 64 (23%) patients had IRIS events, 33 (24%) in the maraviroc arm and 31 (23%) in the placebo arm (p=0·88). Interpretation Maraviroc had no significant effect on frequency, time or severity of IRIS events after ART initiation. Including a CCR5 inhibitor in an initial treatment regimen does not confer a meaningful protection from the occurrence of IRIS in persons with advanced HIV infection. Funding The trial was funded as investigator initiated research by Pfizer Inc, New York, NY, USA. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov. ID: NCT00988780 (http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00988780) PMID:26366430

  19. Lymphocyte adhesion to CCR5 ligands is reduced by anti-CCR5 gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Marusich, Elena; Louboutin, Jean-Pierre; Chekmasova, Alena A; Strayer, David S

    2011-09-15

    Immune-mediated damage to the central nervous system (CNS) is an important contributor to many CNS diseases, including epilepsy. Chemokines play a role in leukocyte recruitment to, and migration across, the blood-brain barrier (BBB) during many such processes. We previously investigated the role of the chemokine receptor CCR5 in a rat model of epilepsy based on intraperitoneal kainic acid (KA) administration. Before KA injection, rats were given intramarrow inoculations of SV(RNAiR5-RevM10.AU1), which carries an interfering RNA (RNAi) that targets CCR5. Decreased CCR5 expression in blood cells after vector administration reduced expression of CCR5 ligands MIP-1α and RANTES in the microvasculature, and strongly protected from BBB leakage, CNS loss and inflammation and facilitated CNS repair. We show here that rSV40-mediated downregulation of CCR5 in lymphocytes decreased cellular adhesion to surfaces carrying CCR5 ligands. These data suggest that reducing CCR5 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) might alter their adhesion to the microvasculature and their participation in inflammatory processes. PMID:21741662

  20. Functional impact of HIV coreceptor-binding site mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Biscone, Mark J.; Miamidian, John L.; Muchiri, John M.; Baik, Sarah S.W.; Lee, Fang-Hua; Doms, Robert W. . E-mail: doms@mail.med.upenn.edu; Reeves, Jacqueline D. . E-mail: jreeves@MonogramBio.com

    2006-07-20

    The bridging sheet region of the gp120 subunit of the HIV-1 Env protein interacts with the major virus coreceptors, CCR5 and CXCR4. We examined the impact of mutations in and adjacent to the bridging sheet region of an X4 tropic HIV-1 on membrane fusion and entry inhibitor susceptibility. When the V3-loop of this Env was changed so that CCR5 was used, the effects of these same mutations on CCR5 use were assayed as well. We found that coreceptor-binding site mutations had greater effects on CXCR4-mediated fusion and infection than when CCR5 was used as a coreceptor, perhaps related to differences in coreceptor affinity. The mutations also reduced use of the alternative coreceptors CCR3 and CCR8 to varying degrees, indicating that the bridging sheet region is important for the efficient utilization of both major and minor HIV coreceptors. As seen before with a primary R5 virus strain, bridging sheet mutations increased susceptibility to the CCR5 inhibitor TAK-779, which correlated with CCR5 binding efficiency. Bridging sheet mutations also conferred increased susceptibility to the CXCR4 ligand AMD-3100 in the context of the X4 tropic Env. However, these mutations had little effect on the rate of membrane fusion and little effect on susceptibility to enfuvirtide, a membrane fusion inhibitor whose activity is dependent in part on the rate of Env-mediated membrane fusion. Thus, mutations that reduce coreceptor binding and enhance susceptibility to coreceptor inhibitors can affect fusion and enfuvirtide susceptibility in an Env context-dependent manner.

  1. Genotypic Prediction of Co-receptor Tropism of HIV-1 Subtypes A and C.

    PubMed

    Riemenschneider, Mona; Cashin, Kieran Y; Budeus, Bettina; Sierra, Saleta; Shirvani-Dastgerdi, Elham; Bayanolhagh, Saeed; Kaiser, Rolf; Gorry, Paul R; Heider, Dominik

    2016-01-01

    Antiretroviral treatment of Human Immunodeficiency Virus type-1 (HIV-1) infections with CCR5-antagonists requires the co-receptor usage prediction of viral strains. Currently available tools are mostly designed based on subtype B strains and thus are in general not applicable to non-B subtypes. However, HIV-1 infections caused by subtype B only account for approximately 11% of infections worldwide. We evaluated the performance of several sequence-based algorithms for co-receptor usage prediction employed on subtype A V3 sequences including circulating recombinant forms (CRFs) and subtype C strains. We further analysed sequence profiles of gp120 regions of subtype A, B and C to explore functional relationships to entry phenotypes. Our analyses clearly demonstrate that state-of-the-art algorithms are not useful for predicting co-receptor tropism of subtype A and its CRFs. Sequence profile analysis of gp120 revealed molecular variability in subtype A viruses. Especially, the V2 loop region could be associated with co-receptor tropism, which might indicate a unique pattern that determines co-receptor tropism in subtype A strains compared to subtype B and C strains. Thus, our study demonstrates that there is a need for the development of novel algorithms facilitating tropism prediction of HIV-1 subtype A to improve effective antiretroviral treatment in patients. PMID:27126912

  2. Genotypic Prediction of Co-receptor Tropism of HIV-1 Subtypes A and C

    PubMed Central

    Riemenschneider, Mona; Cashin, Kieran Y.; Budeus, Bettina; Sierra, Saleta; Shirvani-Dastgerdi, Elham; Bayanolhagh, Saeed; Kaiser, Rolf; Gorry, Paul R.; Heider, Dominik

    2016-01-01

    Antiretroviral treatment of Human Immunodeficiency Virus type-1 (HIV-1) infections with CCR5-antagonists requires the co-receptor usage prediction of viral strains. Currently available tools are mostly designed based on subtype B strains and thus are in general not applicable to non-B subtypes. However, HIV-1 infections caused by subtype B only account for approximately 11% of infections worldwide. We evaluated the performance of several sequence-based algorithms for co-receptor usage prediction employed on subtype A V3 sequences including circulating recombinant forms (CRFs) and subtype C strains. We further analysed sequence profiles of gp120 regions of subtype A, B and C to explore functional relationships to entry phenotypes. Our analyses clearly demonstrate that state-of-the-art algorithms are not useful for predicting co-receptor tropism of subtype A and its CRFs. Sequence profile analysis of gp120 revealed molecular variability in subtype A viruses. Especially, the V2 loop region could be associated with co-receptor tropism, which might indicate a unique pattern that determines co-receptor tropism in subtype A strains compared to subtype B and C strains. Thus, our study demonstrates that there is a need for the development of novel algorithms facilitating tropism prediction of HIV-1 subtype A to improve effective antiretroviral treatment in patients. PMID:27126912

  3. Investigation of Inhibition Mechanism of Chemokine Receptor CCR5 by Micro-second Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Salmas, Ramin Ekhteiari; Yurtsever, Mine; Durdagi, Serdar

    2015-01-01

    Chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) belongs to G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) and plays an important role in treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection since HIV uses CCR5 protein as a co-receptor. Recently, the crystal structure of CCR5-bound complex with an approved anti-retroviral drug (maroviroc) was resolved. During the crystallization procedure, amino acid residues (i.e., Cys224, Arg225, Asn226 and Glu227) at the third intra-cellular loop were replaced by the rubredoxin for stability reasons. In the current study, we aimed to understand the impact of the incorporated rubredoxin on the conformations of TM domains of the target protein. For this reason, rubredoxin was deleted from the crystal structure and the missing amino acids were engineered. The resultant structure was subjected to long (μs) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to shed light into the inhibitory mechanism. The derived model structure displayed a significant deviation in the cytoplasmic domain of TM5 and IC3 in the absence of rubredoxin. The principal component analyses (PCA) and MD trajectory analyses revealed important structural and dynamical differences at apo and holo forms of the CCR5. PMID:26299310

  4. CCR5/CD4/CXCR4 oligomerization prevents HIV-1 gp120IIIB binding to the cell surface

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Muñoz, Laura; Barroso, Rubén; Dyrhaug, Sunniva Y.; Navarro, Gemma; Lucas, Pilar; Soriano, Silvia F.; Vega, Beatriz; Costas, Coloma; Muñoz-Fernández, M. Ángeles; Santiago, César; Frade, José Miguel Rodríguez; Franco, Rafael; Mellado, Mario

    2014-01-01

    CCR5 and CXCR4, the respective cell surface coreceptors of R5 and X4 HIV-1 strains, both form heterodimers with CD4, the principal HIV-1 receptor. Using several resonance energy transfer techniques, we determined that CD4, CXCR4, and CCR5 formed heterotrimers, and that CCR5 coexpression altered the conformation of both CXCR4/CXCR4 homodimers and CD4/CXCR4 heterodimers. As a result, binding of the HIV-1 envelope protein gp120IIIB to the CD4/CXCR4/CCR5 heterooligomer was negligible, and the gp120-induced cytoskeletal rearrangements necessary for HIV-1 entry were prevented. CCR5 reduced HIV-1 envelope-induced CD4/CXCR4-mediated cell-cell fusion. In nucleofected Jurkat CD4 cells and primary human CD4+ T cells, CCR5 expression led to a reduction in X4 HIV-1 infectivity. These findings can help to understand why X4 HIV-1 strains infection affect T-cell types differently during AIDS development and indicate that receptor oligomerization might be a target for previously unidentified therapeutic approaches for AIDS intervention. PMID:24778234

  5. Infection of Macrophages and Dendritic Cells with Primary R5-Tropic Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Inhibited by Natural Polyreactive Anti-CCR5 Antibodies Purified from Cervicovaginal Secretions▿

    PubMed Central

    Eslahpazir, Jobin; Jenabian, Mohammad-Ali; Bouhlal, Hicham; Hocini, Hakim; Carbonneil, Cédric; Grésenguet, Gérard; Kéou, François-Xavier Mbopi; LeGoff, Jérôme; Saïdi, Héla; Requena, Mary; Nasreddine, Nadine; de Dieu Longo, Jean; Kaveri, Srinivas V.; Bélec, Laurent

    2008-01-01

    Heterosexual contact is the primary mode of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 (HIV-1) transmission worldwide. The chemokine receptor CCR5 is the major coreceptor that is associated with the mucosal transmission of R5-tropic HIV-1 during sexual intercourse. The CCR5 molecule is thus a target for antibody-based therapeutic strategies aimed at blocking HIV-1 entry into cells. We have previously demonstrated that polyreactive natural antibodies (NAbs) from therapeutic preparations of immunoglobulin G and from human breast milk contain NAbs directed against CCR5. Such antibodies inhibit the infection of human macrophages and T lymphocytes by R5-tropic isolates of HIV in vitro. In the present study, we demonstrate that human immunoglobulins from the cervicovaginal secretions of HIV-seronegative or HIV-seropositive women contain NAbs directed against the HIV-1 coreceptor CCR5. Natural affinity-purified anti-CCR5 antibodies bound to CCR5 expressed on macrophages and dendritic cells and further inhibited the infection of macrophages and dendritic cells with primary and laboratory-adapted R5-tropic HIV but not with X4-tropic HIV. Natural anti-CCR5 antibodies moderately inhibited R5-tropic HIV transfer from monocyte-derived dendritic cells to autologous T cells. Our results suggest that mucosal anti-CCR5 antibodies from healthy immunocompetent donors may hamper the penetration of HIV and may be suitable for use in the development of novel passive immunotherapy regimens in specific clinical settings of HIV infection. PMID:18353923

  6. CCR1 and CCR5 promote hepatic fibrosis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Seki, Ekihiro; De Minicis, Samuele; Gwak, Geum-Youn; Kluwe, Johannes; Inokuchi, Sayaka; Bursill, Christina A.; Llovet, Josep M.; Brenner, David A.; Schwabe, Robert F.

    2009-01-01

    Hepatic fibrosis develops as a response to chronic liver injury and almost exclusively occurs in a proinflammatory environment. However, the role of inflammatory mediators in fibrogenic responses of the liver is only poorly understood. We therefore investigated the role of CC chemokines and their receptors in hepatic fibrogenesis. The CC chemokines MIP-1α, MIP-1β, and RANTES and their receptors CCR1 and CCR5 were strongly upregulated in 2 experimental mouse models of fibrogenesis. Neutralization of CC chemokines by the broad-spectrum CC chemokine inhibitor 35k efficiently reduced hepatic fibrosis, and CCR1- and CCR5-deficient mice displayed substantially reduced hepatic fibrosis and macrophage infiltration. Analysis of fibrogenesis in CCR1- and CCR5-chimeric mice revealed that CCR1 mediates its profibrogenic effects in BM-derived cells, whereas CCR5 mediates its profibrogenic effects in resident liver cells. CCR5 promoted hepatic stellate cell (HSC) migration through a redox-sensitive, PI3K-dependent pathway. Both CCR5-deficient HSCs and CCR1- and CCR5-deficient Kupffer cells displayed strong suppression of CC chemokine–induced migration. Finally, we detected marked upregulation of RANTES, CCR1, and CCR5 in patients with hepatic cirrhosis, confirming activation of the CC chemokine system in human fibrogenesis. Our data therefore support a role for the CC chemokine system in hepatic fibrogenesis and suggest distinct roles for CCR1 and CCR5 in Kupffer cells and HSCs. PMID:19603542

  7. An extended CCR5-ECL2 peptide forms a helix that binds HIV-1 gp120 through non-specific hydrophobic interactions

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, Naama; Arshava, Boris; Naider, Fred; Scherf, Tali; Anglister, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    The chemokine receptor CCR5 serves as a co-receptor for the Human Immunodefficiency Virus type-1, HIV-1. The CCR5 N-terminal segment, the second extracellular loop (ECL2) and the transmembrane helices have been implicated in binding the envelope glycoprotein gp120. Peptides corresponding to the sequence of the putative ECL2 as well as peptides containing the ECL1 and ECL3 were found to inhibit HIV-1 infection. The aromatic residues in the C-terminal half of an ECL2 peptide were shown to interact with gp120. In the present study we determined that in aqueous buffer the segment Q188-Q194 in an elongated ECL2 peptide (R168 to K197) forms an amphiphilic helix, which corresponds to the beginning of the fifth transmembrane helix in the crystal structure of CCR5. Two dimensional Saturation Transfer Difference NMR spectroscopy and dynamic filtering studies revealed the involvement of Y187, F189, W190 and F193 of the helical segment, in the interaction with gp120. The crystal structure of CCR5 shows that the aromatic side chains of F189, W190 and F193 point away from the binding pocket and interact with the membrane or with an adjacent CCR5 molecule and therefore, could not interact with gp120 in the intact CCR5 receptor. We conclude that these three aromatic residues of ECL2 peptides interact with gp120 through hydrophobic interactions not representative of the interactions of the intact CCR5 receptor. The HIV-1 inhibition by ECL2 peptides as well as by ECL1 and ECL3 peptides and peptides corresponding to ECL2 of CXCR4, which serves as an alternative HIV-1 co-receptor, suggests that there is a hydrophobic surface in the envelope spike that could be a target for HIV-1 entry inhibitors. PMID:25703038

  8. More about the Viking hypothesis of origin of the delta32 mutation in the CCR5 gene conferring resistance to HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Lucotte, Gérard; Dieterlen, Florent

    2003-11-01

    The chemokine receptor CCR5 constitutes the major coreceptor for the HIV-1, because a mutant allele of the CCR5 gene named delta32 was shown to provide to homozygotes a strong resistance against infection. In the present study the frequency of the delta32 allele was collected in 36 European populations and in Cyprus, and the highest allele frequencies were found in Nordic countries. We constructed an allele map of delta32 frequencies in Europe; the map is in accordance to the Vikings hypothesis of the origin of the mutation and his dissemination during the eighth to the tenth centuries. PMID:14636691

  9. The CCL3L1-CCR5 genotype influences the development of AIDS, but not HIV susceptibility or the response to HAART

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; Stanton, Jennifer; Kim, Eun - Young; Kunstman, Kevin; Phair, John; Jacobson, Lisa P; Wolinsky, Steven M

    2008-01-01

    A selective advantage against infectious diseases such as HIV/AIDS is associated with differences in the genes relevant to immunity and virus replication. The CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5), the principal coreceptor for HIV, and its chemokine ligands, including CCL3L1, influences the CD4+ target cells susceptibility to infection. The CCL3L1 gene is in a region of segmental duplication on the q-arm of human chromosome 17. Increased numbers of CCL3L1 gene copies that affect the gene expression phenotype might have substantial protective effects. Here we show that the population-specific CCL3L1 gene copy number and the CCR5 {Delta}32 protein-inactivating deletion that categorizes the CCL3L1-CCR5 genotype do not influence HIV/AIDS susceptibility or the robustness of immune recovery after the initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART).

  10. [Targeted modification of CCR5 gene in rabbits by TALEN].

    PubMed

    Tang, Chengcheng; Zhang, Quanjun; Li, Xiaoping; Fan, Nana; Yang, Yi; Quan, Longquan; Lai, Liangxue

    2014-04-01

    The lack of suitable animal model for HIV-1 infection has become a bottleneck for the development of AIDS vaccines and drugs. Wild-type rabbits can be infected by HIV-1 persistently and HIV-1 can be efficiently replicated resulting in syncytia in rabbit cell line co-expressing human CD4 and CCR5.Therefore, a rabbit highly expressing human CD4 and CCR5 may be an ideal animal model for AIDS disease study. In the present report, by using the efficient gene targeting technology, transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN), we explored the feasibility of generating a HIV-1 model by knocking in human CD4 and CCR5 into rabbit genome. First we constructed two TALEN vectors targeting rabbit CCR5 gene and a vector with homologous arms. TALEN mRNAs and donor DNA were then co-injected into fertilized oocytes. After 3?5 days, 24 embryos were collected and used to conduct mutation analysis with PCR and sequencing. All the 24 embryos were detected with CCR5 knockouts and 5 were human CD4 and CCR5 knockins. Our results laid a foundation for establishing a new animal model for the study of AIDS. PMID:24846981

  11. Could FIV zoonosis responsible of the breakdown of the pathocenosis which has reduced the European CCR5-Delta32 allele frequencies?

    PubMed Central

    Faure, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Background In Europe, the north-south downhill cline frequency of the chemokine receptor CCR5 allele with a 32-bp deletion (CCR5-Δ32) raises interesting questions for evolutionary biologists. We had suggested first that, in the past, the European colonizers, principally Romans, might have been instrumental of a progressively decrease of the frequencies southwards. Indeed, statistical analyses suggested strong negative correlations between the allele frequency and historical parameters including the colonization dates by Mediterranean civilisations. The gene flows from colonizers to native populations were extremely low but colonizers are responsible of the spread of several diseases suggesting that the dissemination of parasites in naive populations could have induced a breakdown rupture of the fragile pathocenosis changing the balance among diseases. The new equilibrium state has been reached through a negative selection of the null allele. Results Most of the human diseases are zoonoses and cat might have been instrumental in the decrease of the allele frequency, because its diffusion through Europe was a gradual process, due principally to Romans; and that several cat zoonoses could be transmitted to man. The possible implication of a feline lentivirus (FIV) which does not use CCR5 as co-receptor is discussed. This virus can infect primate cells in vitro and induces clinical signs in macaque. Moreover, most of the historical regions with null or low frequency of CCR5-Δ32 allele coincide with historical range of the wild felid species which harbor species-specific FIVs. Conclusion We proposed the hypothesis that the actual European CCR5 allelic frequencies are the result of a negative selection due to a disease spreading. A cat zoonosis, could be the most plausible hypothesis. Future studies could provide if CCR5 can play an antimicrobial role in FIV pathogenesis. Moreover, studies of ancient DNA could provide more evidences regarding the implications of

  12. CD4-independent, CCR5-dependent infection of brain capillary endothelial cells by a neurovirulent simian immunodeficiency virus strain

    PubMed Central

    Edinger, Aimee L.; Mankowski, Joseph L.; Doranz, Benjamin J.; Margulies, Barry J.; Lee, Benhur; Rucker, Joseph; Sharron, Matthew; Hoffman, Trevor L.; Berson, Joanne F.; Zink, M. Christine; Hirsch, Vanessa M.; Clements, Janice E.; Doms, Robert W.

    1997-01-01

    Brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs) are targets of CD4-independent infection by HIV-1 and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) strains in vitro and in vivo. Infection of BCECs may provide a portal of entry for the virus into the central nervous system and could disrupt blood–brain barrier function, contributing to the development of AIDS dementia. We found that rhesus macaque BCECs express chemokine receptors involved in HIV and SIV entry including CCR5, CCR3, CXCR4, and STRL33, but not CCR2b, GPR1, or GPR15. Infection of BCECs by the neurovirulent strain SIV/17E-Fr was completely inhibited by aminooxypentane regulation upon activation, normal T cell expression and secretion in the presence or absence of ligands, but not by eotaxin or antibodies to CD4. We found that the envelope (env) proteins from SIV/17E-Fr and several additional SIV strains mediated cell–cell fusion and virus infection with CD4-negative, CCR5-positive cells. In contrast, fusion with cells expressing the coreceptors STRL33, GPR1, and GPR15 was CD4-dependent. These results show that CCR5 can serve as a primary receptor for SIV in BCECs and suggest a possible CD4-independent mechanism for blood–brain barrier disruption and viral entry into the central nervous system. PMID:9405683

  13. Ribosomal frameshifting in the CCR5 mRNA is regulated by miRNAs and the NMD pathway

    PubMed Central

    Belew, Ashton Trey; Meskauskas, Arturas; Musalgaonkar, Sharmishtha; Advani, Vivek M.; Sulima, Sergey O.; Kasprzak, Wojciech K.; Shapiro, Bruce A.; Dinman, Jonathan D.

    2015-01-01

    Programmed –1 ribosomal frameshift (–1 PRF) signals redirect translating ribosomes to slip back one base on messenger RNAs. Although well characterized in viruses, how these elements may regulate cellular gene expression is not understood. Here we describe a –1 PRF signal in the human mRNA encoding CCR5, the HIV-1 co-receptor. CCR5 mRNA-mediated –1 PRF is directed by an mRNA pseudoknot, and is stimulated by at least two microRNAs. Mapping the mRNA–miRNA interaction suggests that formation of a triplex RNA structure stimulates –1 PRF. A –1 PRF event on the CCR5 mRNA directs translating ribosomes to a premature termination codon, destabilizing it through the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay pathway. At least one additional mRNA decay pathway is also involved. Functional –1 PRF signals that seem to be regulated by miRNAs are also demonstrated in mRNAs encoding six other cytokine receptors, suggesting a novel mode through which immune responses may be fine-tuned in mammalian cells. PMID:25043019

  14. Gating function of isoleucine-116 in TM-3 (position III:16/3.40) for the activity state of the CC-chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5)

    PubMed Central

    Steen, A; Sparre-Ulrich, A H; Thiele, S; Guo, D; Frimurer, T M; Rosenkilde, M M

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose A conserved amino acid within a protein family indicates a significance of the residue. In the centre of transmembrane helix (TM)-5, position V:13/5.47, an aromatic amino acid is conserved among class A 7TM receptors. However, in 37% of chemokine receptors – a subgroup of 7TM receptors – it is a leucine indicating an altered function. Here, we describe the significance of this position and its possible interaction with TM-3 for CCR5 activity. Experimental Approach The effects of [L203F]-CCR5 in TM-5 (position V:13/5.47), [I116A]-CCR5 in TM-3 (III:16/3.40) and [L203F;G286F]-CCR5 (V:13/5.47;VII:09/7.42) were determined in G-protein-and β-arrestin-coupled signalling. Computational modelling monitored changes in amino acid conformation. Key Results [L203F]-CCR5 increased the basal level of G-protein coupling (20–70% of Emax) and β-arrestin recruitment (50% of Emax) with a threefold increase in agonist potency. In silico, [I116A]-CCR5 switched χ1-angle in [L203F]-CCR5. Furthermore, [I116A]-CCR5 was constitutively active to a similar degree as [L203F]-CCR5. Tyr244 in TM-6 (VI:09/6.44) moved towards TM-5 in silico, consistent with its previously shown function for CCR5 activation. On [L203F;G286F]-CCR5 the antagonist aplaviroc was converted to a superagonist. Conclusions and Implications The results imply that an aromatic amino acid in the centre of TM-5 controls the level of receptor activity. Furthermore, Ile116 acts as a gate for the movement of Tyr244 towards TM-5 in the active state, a mechanism proposed previously for the β2-adrenoceptor. The results provide an understanding of chemokine receptor function and thereby information for the development of biased and non-biased antagonists and inverse agonists. PMID:24328926

  15. Characterization of the "CCR5" Chemokine Receptor Gene

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, John C.

    2004-01-01

    The life cycle of retroviruses is an essential topic of modern cell biology instruction. Furthermore, the process of HIV viral entry into the cell is a question of great interest in basic and clinical biology. This paper describes how students can easily recover their own DNA, amplify a portion of the "CCR5" chemokine receptor gene, characterize…

  16. HIV coreceptor tropism determination and mutational pattern identification.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hui-Shuang; Yin, Jason; Leng, Fei; Teng, Rui-Fang; Xu, Chao; Xia, Xia-Yu; Pan, Xian-Ming

    2016-01-01

    In the early stages of infection, Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) generally selects CCR5 as the primary coreceptor for entering the host cell. As infection progresses, the virus evolves and may exhibit a coreceptor-switch to CXCR4. Accurate determination coreceptor usage and identification key mutational patterns associated tropism switch are essential for selection of appropriate therapies and understanding mechanism of coreceptor change. We developed a classifier composed of two coreceptor-specific weight matrices (CMs) based on a full-scale dataset. For this classifier, we found an AUC of 0.97, an accuracy of 95.21% and an MCC of 0.885 (sensitivity 92.92%; specificity 95.54%) in a ten-fold cross-validation, outperforming all other methods on an independent dataset (13% higher MCC value than geno2pheno and 15% higher MCC value than PSSM). A web server (http://spg.med.tsinghua.edu.cn/CM.html) based on our classifier was provided. Patterns of genetic mutations that occur along with coreceptor transitions were further identified based on the score of each sequence. Six pairs of one-AA mutational patterns and three pairs of two-AA mutational patterns were identified to associate with increasing propensity for X4 tropism. These mutational patterns offered new insights into the mechanism of coreceptor switch and aided in monitoring coreceptor switch. PMID:26883082

  17. CCR5 knockout suppresses experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Gu, Sun Mi; Park, Mi Hee; Yun, Hyung Mun; Han, Sang Bae; Oh, Ki Wan; Son, Dong Ju; Yun, Jae Suk; Hong, Jin Tae

    2016-03-29

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory disease in which myelin in the spinal cord is damaged. C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) is implicated in immune cell migration and cytokine release in central nervous system (CNS). We investigated whether CCR5 plays a role in MS progression using a murine model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), in CCR5 deficient (CCR5-/-) mice. CCR5-/- and CCR5+/+ (wild-type) mice were immunized with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein 35-55 (MOG35-55) followed by pertussis toxin, after which EAE paralysis was scored for 28 days. We found that clinical scoring and EAE neuropathology were lower in CCR5-/- mice than CCR5+/+ mice. Immune cells (CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, B cell, NK cell and macrophages) infiltration and astrocytes/microglial activation were attenuated in CCR5-/- mice. Moreover, levels of IL-1β, TNF-α, IFN-γ and MCP-1 cytokine levels were decreased in CCR5-/- mice spinal cord. Myelin basic protein (MBP) and CNPase were increased while NG2 and O4 were decreased in CCR5-/- mice, indicating that demyelination was suppressed by CCR5 gene deletion. These findings suggest that CCR5 is likely participating in demyelination in the spinal cord the MS development, and that it could serve as an effective therapeutic target for the treatment of MS. PMID:26985768

  18. CCR5 knockout suppresses experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in C57BL/6 mice

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Hyung Mun; Han, Sang Bae; Oh, Ki Wan; Son, Dong Ju; Yun, Jae Suk; Hong, Jin Tae

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory disease in which myelin in the spinal cord is damaged. C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) is implicated in immune cell migration and cytokine release in central nervous system (CNS). We investigated whether CCR5 plays a role in MS progression using a murine model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), in CCR5 deficient (CCR5−/−) mice. CCR5−/− and CCR5+/+ (wild-type) mice were immunized with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein 35-55 (MOG35-55) followed by pertussis toxin, after which EAE paralysis was scored for 28 days. We found that clinical scoring and EAE neuropathology were lower in CCR5−/− mice than CCR5+/+ mice. Immune cells (CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, B cell, NK cell and macrophages) infiltration and astrocytes/microglial activation were attenuated in CCR5−/− mice. Moreover, levels of IL-1β, TNF-α, IFN-γ and MCP-1 cytokine levels were decreased in CCR5−/− mice spinal cord. Myelin basic protein (MBP) and CNPase were increased while NG2 and O4 were decreased in CCR5−/− mice, indicating that demyelination was suppressed by CCR5 gene deletion. These findings suggest that CCR5 is likely participating in demyelination in the spinal cord the MS development, and that it could serve as an effective therapeutic target for the treatment of MS. PMID:26985768

  19. HIV-1 Tropism Dynamics and Phylogenetic Analysis from Longitudinal Ultra-Deep Sequencing Data of CCR5- and CXCR4-Using Variants

    PubMed Central

    Sede, Mariano M.; Moretti, Franco A.; Laufer, Natalia L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Coreceptor switch from CCR5 to CXCR4 is associated with HIV disease progression. The molecular and evolutionary mechanisms underlying the CCR5 to CXCR4 switch are the focus of intense recent research. We studied the HIV-1 tropism dynamics in relation to coreceptor usage, the nature of quasispecies from ultra deep sequencing (UDPS) data and their phylogenetic relationships. Methods Here, we characterized C2-V3-C3 sequences of HIV obtained from 19 patients followed up for 54 to 114 months using UDPS, with further genotyping and phylogenetic analysis for coreceptor usage. HIV quasispecies diversity and variability as well as HIV plasma viral load were measured longitudinally and their relationship with the HIV coreceptor usage was analyzed. The longitudinal UDPS data were submitted to phylogenetic analysis and sampling times and coreceptor usage were mapped onto the trees obtained. Results Although a temporal viral genetic structuring was evident, the persistence of several viral lineages evolving independently along the infection was statistically supported, indicating a complex scenario for the evolution of viral quasispecies. HIV X4-using variants were present in most of our patients, exhibiting a dissimilar inter- and intra-patient predominance as the component of quasispecies even on antiretroviral therapy. The viral populations from some of the patients studied displayed evidences of the evolution of X4 variants through fitness valleys, whereas for other patients the data favored a gradual mode of emergence. Conclusions CXCR4 usage can emerge independently, in multiple lineages, along the course of HIV infection. The mode of emergence, i.e. gradual or through fitness valleys seems to depend on both virus and patient factors. Furthermore, our analyses suggest that, besides becoming dominant after population-level switches, minor proportions of X4 viruses might exist along the infection, perhaps even at early stages of it. The fate of these minor

  20. Use of Four Next-Generation Sequencing Platforms to Determine HIV-1 Coreceptor Tropism

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Kenneth; Winner, Dane; Gibson, Richard; Lee, Lawrence; Paxinos, Ellen; Arts, Eric J.; Robertson, David L.; Mimms, Larry; Quiñones-Mateu, Miguel E.

    2012-01-01

    HIV-1 coreceptor tropism assays are required to rule out the presence of CXCR4-tropic (non-R5) viruses prior treatment with CCR5 antagonists. Phenotypic (e.g., Trofile™, Monogram Biosciences) and genotypic (e.g., population sequencing linked to bioinformatic algorithms) assays are the most widely used. Although several next-generation sequencing (NGS) platforms are available, to date all published deep sequencing HIV-1 tropism studies have used the 454™ Life Sciences/Roche platform. In this study, HIV-1 co-receptor usage was predicted for twelve patients scheduled to start a maraviroc-based antiretroviral regimen. The V3 region of the HIV-1 env gene was sequenced using four NGS platforms: 454™, PacBio® RS (Pacific Biosciences), Illumina®, and Ion Torrent™ (Life Technologies). Cross-platform variation was evaluated, including number of reads, read length and error rates. HIV-1 tropism was inferred using Geno2Pheno, Web PSSM, and the 11/24/25 rule and compared with Trofile™ and virologic response to antiretroviral therapy. Error rates related to insertions/deletions (indels) and nucleotide substitutions introduced by the four NGS platforms were low compared to the actual HIV-1 sequence variation. Each platform detected all major virus variants within the HIV-1 population with similar frequencies. Identification of non-R5 viruses was comparable among the four platforms, with minor differences attributable to the algorithms used to infer HIV-1 tropism. All NGS platforms showed similar concordance with virologic response to the maraviroc-based regimen (75% to 80% range depending on the algorithm used), compared to Trofile (80%) and population sequencing (70%). In conclusion, all four NGS platforms were able to detect minority non-R5 variants at comparable levels suggesting that any NGS-based method can be used to predict HIV-1 coreceptor usage. PMID:23166726

  1. Evaluation of the Genotypic Prediction of HIV-1 Coreceptor Use versus a Phenotypic Assay and Correlation with the Virological Response to Maraviroc: the ANRS GenoTropism Study▿

    PubMed Central

    Recordon-Pinson, Patricia; Soulié, Cathia; Flandre, Philippe; Descamps, Diane; Lazrek, Mouna; Charpentier, Charlotte; Montes, Brigitte; Trabaud, Mary-Anne; Cottalorda, Jacqueline; Schneider, Véronique; Morand-Joubert, Laurence; Tamalet, Catherine; Desbois, Delphine; Macé, Muriel; Ferré, Virginie; Vabret, Astrid; Ruffault, Annick; Pallier, Coralie; Raymond, Stéphanie; Izopet, Jacques; Reynes, Jacques; Marcelin, Anne-Geneviève; Masquelier, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    Genotypic algorithms for prediction of HIV-1 coreceptor usage need to be evaluated in a clinical setting. We aimed at studying (i) the correlation of genotypic prediction of coreceptor use in comparison with a phenotypic assay and (ii) the relationship between genotypic prediction of coreceptor use at baseline and the virological response (VR) to a therapy including maraviroc (MVC). Antiretroviral-experienced patients were included in the MVC Expanded Access Program if they had an R5 screening result with Trofile (Monogram Biosciences). V3 loop sequences were determined at screening, and coreceptor use was predicted using 13 genotypic algorithms or combinations of algorithms. Genotypic predictions were compared to Trofile; dual or mixed (D/M) variants were considered as X4 variants. Both genotypic and phenotypic results were obtained for 189 patients at screening, with 54 isolates scored as X4 or D/M and 135 scored as R5 with Trofile. The highest sensitivity (59.3%) for detection of X4 was obtained with the Geno2pheno algorithm, with a false-positive rate set up at 10% (Geno2pheno10). In the 112 patients receiving MVC, a plasma viral RNA load of <50 copies/ml was obtained in 68% of cases at month 6. In multivariate analysis, the prediction of the X4 genotype at baseline with the Geno2pheno10 algorithm including baseline viral load and CD4 nadir was independently associated with a worse VR at months 1 and 3. The baseline weighted genotypic sensitivity score was associated with VR at month 6. There were strong arguments in favor of using genotypic coreceptor use assays for determining which patients would respond to CCR5 antagonist. PMID:20530226

  2. Expression of CCR5, CXCR4 and DC-SIGN in Cervix of HIV-1 Heterosexually Infected Mexican Women

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Morales, Lydia Guadalupe; Lopez-Guillen, Paulo; Vazquez-Guillen, Jose Manuel; Palacios-Saucedo, Gerardo C; Rosas-Taraco, Adrian G; Ramirez-Pineda, Antonio; Amaya-Garcia, Patricia Irene; Rodriguez-Padilla, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    Background: A number of studies have demonstrated that receptor and co-receptor expression levels which may affect viral entry, promoting cervical HIV infection. The aim was to evaluate the expression levels of CCR5, CXCR4and DC-SIGN mRNA in a sample of heterosexually HIV infected Mexican women. Methods: We enrolled twenty-six HIV heterosexual infected women attending a local infectious diseases medical unit.RNA was isolated from the cervix and gene expression analysis was performed using real-time PCR. Results: Expression rates for mRNA of CCR5 (median 1.82; range 0.003–2934) were higher than those observed for CXCR4 (0.79; 0.0061–3312) and DC-SIGN (0.33; 0.006–532) receptors (p < 0.05). A high correlation was found between the mRNA expression levels of these three receptors (rs = 0.52 to 0.85, p < 0.01). Conclusion: Levels of expression of the tested chemokine receptors in the cervix are different from each other and alsovary from woman to woman, and seem to support the suggestion that chemokine receptor expression in genital tissues may be playing a role in the HIV transmission. PMID:23115608

  3. Essential roles of the interaction between cancer cell-derived chemokine, CCL4, and intra-bone CCR5-expressing fibroblasts in breast cancer bone metastasis.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Soichiro; Baba, Tomohisa; Nishimura, Tatsunori; Hayakawa, Yoshihiro; Hashimoto, Shin-Ichi; Gotoh, Noriko; Mukaida, Naofumi

    2016-08-01

    From a murine breast cancer cell line, 4T1, we established a subclone, 4T1.3, which consistently metastasizes to bone upon its injection into the mammary fat pad. 4T1.3 clone exhibited similar proliferation rate and migration capacity as the parental clone. However, the intra-bone injection of 4T1.3 clone caused larger tumors than that of the parental cells, accompanied with increases in fibroblast, but not osteoclast or osteoblast numbers. 4T1.3 clone displayed an enhanced expression of a chemokine, CCL4, but not its specific receptor, CCR5. CCL4 shRNA-transfection of 4T1.3 clone had few effects on its in vitro properties, but reduced the tumorigenicity arising from the intra-bone injection. Moreover, intra-bone injection of 4T1.3 clone caused smaller tumors in mice deficient in CCR5 or those receiving CCR5 antagonist than in wild-type mice. The reduced tumor formation was associated with attenuated accumulation of CCR5-positive fibroblasts expressing connective tissue growth factor (CTGF)/CCN2. Tumor cell-derived CCL4 could induce fibroblasts to express CTGF/CCN2, which could support 4T1.3 clone proliferation under hypoxic culture conditions. Thus, the CCL4-CCR5 axis can contribute to breast cancer metastasis to bone by mediating the interaction between cancer cells and fibroblasts in bone cavity. PMID:27177471

  4. Decreased HIV Type 1 Transcription in CCR5-Δ32 Heterozygotes During Suppressive Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Charlene; Abdel-Mohsen, Mohamed; Strain, Matthew C.; Lada, Steven M.; Yukl, Steven; Cockerham, Leslie R.; Pilcher, Christopher D.; Hecht, Frederick M.; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Liegler, Teri; Richman, Douglas D.; Deeks, Steven G.; Pillai, Satish K.

    2014-01-01

    Individuals who are heterozygous for the CCR5-Δ32 mutation provide a natural model to examine the effects of reduced CCR5 expression on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) persistence. We evaluated the HIV reservoir in 18 CCR5-Δ32 heterozygotes and 54 CCR5 wild-type individuals during suppressive antiretroviral therapy. Cell-associated HIV RNA levels (P = .035), RNA to DNA transcriptional ratios (P = .013), and frequency of detectable HIV 2–long terminal repeat circular DNA (P = .013) were significantly lower in CD4+ T cells from CCR5-Δ32 heterozygotes. Cell-associated HIV RNA was significantly correlated with CCR5 surface expression on CD4+ T cells (r2 = 0.136; P = .002). Our findings suggest that curative strategies should further explore manipulation of CCR5. PMID:24935955

  5. HIV co-receptor tropism prediction remains stable over time in treatment-naïve patients.

    PubMed

    Philip, Keir Ej; Macartney, Malcolm J; Conibear, Tim Cr; Smith, Colette J; Marshall, Neal; Johnson, Margaret A; Haque, Tanzina; Webster, Daniel P

    2016-06-01

    HIV co-receptor tropism determination is essential before prescribing the CCR5 antagonist maraviroc. British HIV Association guidelines suggest tropism testing may remain valid for only 90 days in antiretroviral-naïve patients. We aimed to determine the accuracy of this figure. Tropism was assessed in 26 antiretroviral-naïve patients with ongoing viral replication, sampled yearly from first clinic visit. The V3 region of HIV-1 was sequenced in triplicate, then tropism predicted using the Geno2Pheno system. Baseline tropism prediction remained valid for a median of 52 months (range 7-81). For 19/26 individuals baseline tropism remained unchanged throughout a median of 54 months follow-up; 18 R5 tropic and 1 X4 tropic. In seven patients (27%) baseline tropism switched at least once (range 1-4 switches) during follow-up; however, their baseline tropism prediction remained valid for a median of 45 months. Co-receptor tropism in treatment-naïve patients with ongoing viral replication appears highly stable over time, suggesting that baseline genotypic tropism prediction may be valid for a longer duration in patients delaying ART initiation. In this study, baseline tropism prediction remained valid for a median of 52 months, suggesting current guidelines recommending repeat testing after 90 days may be excessively conservative in their assessment of tropism stability. PMID:25999168

  6. Tyrosine-sulfated V2 peptides inhibit HIV-1 infection via coreceptor mimicry.

    PubMed

    Cimbro, Raffaello; Peterson, Francis C; Liu, Qingbo; Guzzo, Christina; Zhang, Peng; Miao, Huiyi; Van Ryk, Donald; Ambroggio, Xavier; Hurt, Darrell E; De Gioia, Luca; Volkman, Brian F; Dolan, Michael A; Lusso, Paolo

    2016-08-01

    Tyrosine sulfation is a post-translational modification that facilitates protein-protein interaction. Two sulfated tyrosines (Tys173 and Tys177) were recently identified within the second variable (V2) loop of the major HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein, gp120, and shown to contribute to stabilizing the intramolecular interaction between V2 and the third variable (V3) loop. Here, we report that tyrosine-sulfated peptides derived from V2 act as structural and functional mimics of the CCR5 N-terminus and potently block HIV-1 infection. Nuclear magnetic and surface plasmon resonance analyses indicate that a tyrosine-sulfated V2 peptide (pV2α-Tys) adopts a CCR5-like helical conformation and directly interacts with gp120 in a CD4-dependent fashion, competing with a CCR5 N-terminal peptide. Sulfated V2 mimics, but not their non-sulfated counterparts, inhibit HIV-1 entry and fusion by preventing coreceptor utilization, with the highly conserved C-terminal sulfotyrosine, Tys177, playing a dominant role. Unlike CCR5 N-terminal peptides, V2 mimics inhibit a broad range of HIV-1 strains irrespective of their coreceptor tropism, highlighting the overall structural conservation of the coreceptor-binding site in gp120. These results document the use of receptor mimicry by a retrovirus to occlude a key neutralization target site and provide leads for the design of therapeutic strategies against HIV-1. PMID:27389109

  7. Simian immunodeficiency virus variants with differential T-cell and macrophage tropism use CCR5 and an unidentified cofactor expressed in CEMx174 cells for efficient entry.

    PubMed Central

    Kirchhoff, F; Pöhlmann, S; Hamacher, M; Means, R E; Kraus, T; Uberla, K; Di Marzio, P

    1997-01-01

    The recent identification of coreceptors that mediate efficient entry of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) suggests new therapeutic and preventive strategies. We analyzed simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) entry cofactors to investigate whether the macaque SIV model can be used as an experimental model to evaluate these strategies. Similar to primary HIV-1 isolates, a well-characterized molecular clone, SIVmac239, which replicates poorly but efficiently enters into rhesus alveolar macrophages and an envelope variant, SIVmac239/316Env, with an approximately 1,000-fold-higher replicative capacity in macrophages used the beta-chemokine receptor CCR5 for efficient entry. The transmembrane portion of 316Env allowed low-level entry into cells expressing CCR1, CCR2B, and CCR3. A single amino acid substitution in the V3 loop of SIVmac239/316Env, 321P-->S, impaired the ability to enter into the T-B hybrid cell line CEMx174 but had relatively little effect on entry into primary cells and HOS.CD4 cells expressing CCR5. Although CEMx174 cells do not express CCR5, most SIVmac variants entered this hybrid cell line efficiently but did not enter the parental T-cell line CEM. It seems likely that CEMx174 cells express an as-yet-unidentified, perhaps B-cell-derived cofactor which allows efficient entry of SIVmac. PMID:9261370

  8. Sequential CCR5-Tropic HIV-1 Reactivation from Distinct Cellular Reservoirs following Perturbation of Elite Control

    PubMed Central

    Watters, Sarah A.; Mlcochova, Petra; Maldarelli, Frank; Goonetilleke, Nilu; Pillay, Deenan; Gupta, Ravindra K.

    2016-01-01

    Background HIV Elite Controllers may reveal insights into virus persistence given they harbour small reservoir sizes, akin to HIV non-controllers treated early with combination antiretroviral therapy. Both groups of patients represent the most promising candidates for interventions aimed at sustained remission or ‘cure’. Analytic treatment interruption (ATI) in the latter group leads to stochastic rebound of virus, though it is unclear whether loss of elite control is also associated with similar rebound characteristics. Methods We studied three discrete periods of virus rebound during myeloma related immune disruption over 2.5 years in an elite controller who previously underwent autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) in the absence of any antiretroviral therapy. Single genome sequencing of the V1-V4 region of env in PBMC and plasma was performed and phylogenies reconstructed. Average pairwise distance (APD) was calculated and non-parametric methods used to assess compartmentalisation. Coreceptor usage was predicted based on genotypic algorithms. Results 122 single genome sequences were obtained (median 26 sequences per rebound). The initial rebounding plasma env sequences following ASCT represented two distinct lineages, and clustered with proviral DNA sequences isolated prior to ASCT. One of the lineages was monophyletic, possibly indicating reactivation from clonally expanded cells. The second rebound occurred 470 days after spontaneous control of the first rebound and was phylogenetically distinct from the first, confirmed by compartmentalisation analysis, with a different cellular origin rather than ongoing replication. By contrast, third rebound viruses clustered with second rebound viruses, with evidence for ongoing evolution that was associated with lymphopenia and myeloma progression. Following ASCT a shift in tropism from CXCR4-tropic viruses to a CCR5-tropic population was observed to persist through to the third rebound. Conclusions Our data

  9. Different Pathogenesis of CCR5-Using Primary HIV-1 Isolates from Non-Switch and Switch Virus Patients in Human Lymphoid Tissue Ex Vivo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iarlsson, Ingrid; Grivel, Jean-Charles; Chen. Silvia; Karlsson, Anders; Albert, Jan; Fenyol, Eva Maria; Margolis, Leonid B.

    2005-01-01

    CCR5-utilizing HIV-1 variants (R5) typically transmit infection and dominate its early stages, whereas emergence of CXCR4-using (X4 or R5X4) HIV-1 is often associated with disease progression. However, such a switch in co-receptor usage can only be detected in approximately onehalf of HIV-infected patients (switch virus patients), and progression to immunodeficiency may also occur in patients without detectable switch in co-receptor usage (non-switch virus patients). Here, we used a system of ex vivo-infected tonsillar tissue to compare the pathogenesis of sequential primary R5 HIV-1 isolates from the switch and non-switch patients. Inoculation of ex vivo tissue with these R5 isolates resulted in viral replication and CCR5(+)CD4(+) T cell depletion. The levels of such depletion by HIV-1 isolated from non-switch virus patients were significantly higher than those by R5 HIV-1 isolates from switch virus patients. T cell depletion seemed to be controlled by viral factors and did not significantly vary between tissues from different donors. In contrast, viral replication did not correlate with the switch status of the patients; in tissues fiom different donors it varied 30-fold and seemed to be controlled by a combination of viral and tissue factors. Nevertheless, replication-level hierarchy among sequential isolates remained constant in tissues from various donors. Viral load in vivo was higher in switch virus patients compared to non-switch virus patients. The high cytopathogenicity of CCR5(+)CD4(+) T cells by R5 HIV-1 isolates from non-switch virus patients may explain the steady decline of CD4(+) T cells in the absence of CXCR4 using virus; elimination of target cells by these isolates may limit their own replication in vivo.

  10. A synthetic heparan sulfate-mimetic peptide conjugated to a mini CD4 displays very high anti- HIV-1 activity independently of coreceptor usage.

    PubMed

    Connell, Bridgette Janine; Baleux, Françoise; Coic, Yves-Marie; Clayette, Pascal; Bonnaffé, David; Lortat-Jacob, Hugues

    2012-01-27

    The HIV-1 envelope gp120, which features both the virus receptor (CD4) and coreceptor (CCR5/CXCR4) binding sites, offers multiple sites for therapeutic intervention. However, the latter becomes exposed, thus vulnerable to inhibition, only transiently when the virus has already bound cellular CD4. To pierce this defense mechanism, we engineered a series of heparan sulfate mimicking tridecapeptides and showed that one of them target the gp120 coreceptor binding site with μM affinity. Covalently linked to a CD4-mimetic that binds to gp120 and renders the coreceptor binding domain available to be targeted, the conjugated tridecapeptide now displays nanomolar affinity for its target. Using solubilized coreceptors captured on top of sensorchip we show that it inhibits gp120 binding to both CCR5 and CXCR4 and in peripheral blood mononuclear cells broadly inhibits HIV-1 replication with an IC(50) of 1 nM. PMID:22284360

  11. CXCR3/CCR5 pathways in metastatic melanoma patients treated with adoptive therapy and interleukin-2

    PubMed Central

    Bedognetti, D; Spivey, T L; Zhao, Y; Uccellini, L; Tomei, S; Dudley, M E; Ascierto, M L; De Giorgi, V; Liu, Q; Delogu, L G; Sommariva, M; Sertoli, M R; Simon, R; Wang, E; Rosenberg, S A; Marincola, F M

    2013-01-01

    Background: Adoptive therapy with tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) induces durable complete responses (CR) in ∼20% of patients with metastatic melanoma. The recruitment of T cells through CXCR3/CCR5 chemokine ligands is critical for immune-mediated rejection. We postulated that polymorphisms and/or expression of CXCR3/CCR5 in TILs and the expression of their ligands in tumour influence the migration of TILs to tumours and tumour regression. Methods: Tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes from 142 metastatic melanoma patients enrolled in adoptive therapy trials were genotyped for CXCR3 rs2280964 and CCR5-Δ32 deletion, which encodes a protein not expressed on the cell surface. Expression of CXCR3/CCR5 in TILs and CXCR3/CCR5 and ligand genes in 113 available parental tumours was also assessed. Tumour-infiltrating lymphocyte data were validated by flow cytometry (N=50). Results: The full gene expression/polymorphism model, which includes CXCR3 and CCR5 expression data, CCR5-Δ32 polymorphism data and their interaction, was significantly associated with both CR and overall response (OR; P=0.0009, and P=0.007, respectively). More in detail, the predicted underexpression of both CXCR3 and CCR5 according to gene expression and polymorphism data (protein prediction model, PPM) was associated with response to therapy (odds ratio=6.16 and 2.32, for CR and OR, respectively). Flow cytometric analysis confirmed the PPM. Coordinate upregulation of CXCL9, CXCL10, CXCL11, and CCL5 in pretreatment tumour biopsies was associated with OR. Conclusion: Coordinate overexpression of CXCL9, CXCL10, CXCL11, and CCL5 in pretreatment tumours was associated with responsiveness to treatment. Conversely, CCR5-Δ32 polymorphism and CXCR3/CCR5 underexpression influence downregulation of the corresponding receptors in TILs and were associated with likelihood and degree of response. PMID:24129241

  12. Highly Accurate Structure-Based Prediction of HIV-1 Coreceptor Usage Suggests Intermolecular Interactions Driving Tropism

    PubMed Central

    Kieslich, Chris A.; Tamamis, Phanourios; Guzman, Yannis A.; Onel, Melis; Floudas, Christodoulos A.

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 entry into host cells is mediated by interactions between the V3-loop of viral glycoprotein gp120 and chemokine receptor CCR5 or CXCR4, collectively known as HIV-1 coreceptors. Accurate genotypic prediction of coreceptor usage is of significant clinical interest and determination of the factors driving tropism has been the focus of extensive study. We have developed a method based on nonlinear support vector machines to elucidate the interacting residue pairs driving coreceptor usage and provide highly accurate coreceptor usage predictions. Our models utilize centroid-centroid interaction energies from computationally derived structures of the V3-loop:coreceptor complexes as primary features, while additional features based on established rules regarding V3-loop sequences are also investigated. We tested our method on 2455 V3-loop sequences of various lengths and subtypes, and produce a median area under the receiver operator curve of 0.977 based on 500 runs of 10-fold cross validation. Our study is the first to elucidate a small set of specific interacting residue pairs between the V3-loop and coreceptors capable of predicting coreceptor usage with high accuracy across major HIV-1 subtypes. The developed method has been implemented as a web tool named CRUSH, CoReceptor USage prediction for HIV-1, which is available at http://ares.tamu.edu/CRUSH/. PMID:26859389

  13. Prediction of co-receptor usage of HIV-1 from genotype.

    PubMed

    Dybowski, J Nikolaj; Heider, Dominik; Hoffmann, Daniel

    2010-04-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 uses for entry into host cells a receptor (CD4) and one of two co-receptors (CCR5 or CXCR4). Recently, a new class of antiretroviral drugs has entered clinical practice that specifically bind to the co-receptor CCR5, and thus inhibit virus entry. Accurate prediction of the co-receptor used by the virus in the patient is important as it allows for personalized selection of effective drugs and prognosis of disease progression. We have investigated whether it is possible to predict co-receptor usage accurately by analyzing the amino acid sequence of the main determinant of co-receptor usage, i.e., the third variable loop V3 of the gp120 protein. We developed a two-level machine learning approach that in the first level considers two different properties important for protein-protein binding derived from structural models of V3 and V3 sequences. The second level combines the two predictions of the first level. The two-level method predicts usage of CXCR4 co-receptor for new V3 sequences within seconds, with an area under the ROC curve of 0.937+/-0.004. Moreover, it is relatively robust against insertions and deletions, which frequently occur in V3. The approach could help clinicians to find optimal personalized treatments, and it offers new insights into the molecular basis of co-receptor usage. For instance, it quantifies the importance for co-receptor usage of a pocket that probably is responsible for binding sulfated tyrosine. PMID:20419152

  14. CCR5Δ32 Genotypes in a German HIV-1 Seroconverter Cohort and Report of HIV-1 Infection in a CCR5Δ32 Homozygous Individual

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Djin-Ye; Jessen, Heiko; Kücherer, Claudia; Neumann, Konrad; Oh, Nari; Poggensee, Gabriele; Bartmeyer, Barbara; Jessen, Arne; Pruss, Axel

    2008-01-01

    Background Homozygosity (Δ32/Δ32) for the 32 bp deletion in the chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) gene is associated with strong resistance against HIV infection. Heterozygosity is associated with protection of HIV-1 disease progression. Methodology/Principal Findings We genotyped a population of 737 HIV-positive adults and 463 healthy controls for the CCR5Δ32 deletion and found heterozygous frequencies of 16.2% (HIV-negative) and 17.5% (HIV-positive) among Caucasian individuals. Analysis of CCR5Δ32 influence on disease progression showed notably lower viral setpoints and a longer time to a CD4 count of <200 µl−1 in seroconverters heterozygous for the deletion. Furthermore, we identified one HIV-positive man homozygous for the Δ32 deletion. Conclusions/Significance The protective effect of CCR5 Δ32 heterozygosity is confimed in a large cohort of German seroconverters. The HIV-infected CCR5 Δ32 homozygous individual, however, displays extremely rapid disease progression. This is the 12th case of HIV-infection in this genotype described worldwide. PMID:18648518

  15. The CCR5Δ32 Polymorphism in Brazilian Patients with Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Mariana Pezzute; Santos, Magnun Nueldo Nunes; Faber, Eliel Wagner; Bezerra, Marcos André Cavalcanti; Hatzlhofer, Betânia Lucena Domingues; Albuquerque, Dulcinéia Martins; Zaccariotto, Tânia Regina; Ribeiro, Daniela Maria; Araújo, Aderson da Silva; Costa, Fernando Ferreira

    2014-01-01

    Background. Previous studies on the role of inflammation in the pathophysiology of sickle cell disease (SCD) suggested that the CCR5Δ32 allele, which is responsible for the production of truncated C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5), could confer a selective advantage on patients with SCD because it leads to a less efficient Th1 response. We determined the frequency of the CCR5Δ32 polymorphism in 795 Afro-Brazilian SCD patients followed up at the Pernambuco Hematology and Hemotherapy Center, in Northeastern Brazil, divided into a pediatric group (3 months–17 years, n = 483) and an adult group (18–70 years, n = 312). The adult patients were also compared to a healthy control group (blood donors, 18–61 years, n = 247). Methods. The CCR5/CCR5Δ32 polymorphism was determined by allele-specific PCR. Results. No homozygous patient for the CCR5Δ32 allele was detected. The frequency of heterozygotes in the study population (patients and controls) was 5.8%, in the total SCD patients 5.1%, in the children 5.4%, in the adults with SCD 4.8%, and in the adult controls 8.1%. These differences did not reach statistical significance. Conclusions. Our findings failed to demonstrate an important role of the CCR5Δ32 allele in the population sample studied here. PMID:25548430

  16. A single amino acid change and truncated TM are sufficient for simian immunodeficiency virus to enter cells using CCR5 in a CD4-independent pathway

    PubMed Central

    Bonavia, A.; Bullock, B.T.; Gisselman, K.M.; Margulies, B.J.; Clements, J.E.

    2009-01-01

    Entry of HIV and SIV into susceptible cells is mediated by CD4 and chemokine receptors, which act as coreceptors. To study cell entry of SIV, we constructed a cell line, xKLuSIV, derived from non-susceptible human K562 cells, that express the firefly luciferase reporter gene under control of a minimal SIV long terminal repeat (LTR). Using these susceptible cells, we studied the entry of a well-characterized molecularly cloned macrophage-tropic SIV. xKLuSIV cells that express rhesus macaque CD4 and/or the rhesus chemokine receptor CCR5 are susceptible to infection with the macrophage-tropic, neurovirulent strain SIV/17E-Fr, but only xKLuSIV cells expressing both CCR5 and CD4 were susceptible to infection by the macrophage-tropic, non-neurovirulent strain SIV/17E-Cl. CCR5-dependent, CD4-independent infection by SIV/17E-Fr was abrogated by pre-incubation of the cells with AOP-RANTES, a ligand for CCR5. In addition to viral entry occurring by a CD4-independent mechanism, neutralization of SIV/17E-Fr with rhesus mAbs from 3 different neutralization groups blocked entry into xKLuSIV cells by both CD4-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Triggering the env glycoprotein of SIV-17EFr with soluble CD4 had no significant effect in infectivity, but triggering of the same glycoprotein of SIV/17E-Cl allowed it to enter cells in a CD4-independent fashion. Using mutant molecular clones, we studied the determinants for CD4 independence, all of which are confined to the env gene. We report here that truncation of the TM at amino acid 764 and changing a single amino acid (R751G) in the SIV envelope transmembrane protein (TM) conferred the observed CD4-independent phenotype. Our data suggest that the envelope from the neurovirulent SIV/17E-Fr interacts with CCR5 in a CD4-independent manner, and changes in the TM protein of this virus are important components that contribute to neurovirulence in SIV. PMID:16061266

  17. Frequency of CCR5Δ32 allele in healthy Bosniak population

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Grażyna; Valjevac, Amina; Skonieczna-Żydecka, Karolina; Mackic-Djurovic, Mirela; Parczewski, Miłosz; Urbańska, Anna; Salkic, Nermin N

    2014-01-01

    Recent evidence has demonstrated the role of CCR5Δ32 in a variety of human diseases: from infectious and inflammatory diseases to cancer. Several studies have confirmed that genetic variants in chemokine receptor CCR5 gene are correlated with susceptibility and resistance to HIV infection. A 32-nucleotide deletion within the CCR5 reading frame is associated with decreased susceptibility to HIV acquisition and a slower progression to AIDS. Mean frequency of CCR5Δ32 allele in Europe is approximately 10%. The highest allele frequency is observed among Nordic populations (about 12%) and the lowest in the regions of Southeast Mediterranean (about 5%). Although the frequency of CCR5Δ32 was determined in numerous European populations, there is a lack of studies on this variant in the Bosnia and Herzegovina population. Therefore, the aim of our study was to assess the frequency of CCR5Δ32 allele in the cohort of Bosniaks and compare the results with European reports. CCR5Δ32 was detected by sequence-specific PCR in a sample of 100 healthy Bosniaks (DNA collected 2011-2013). Mean age of the cohort being 58.8 (±10.7) years, with 82% of women. We identified 17 heterozygotes and one mutant homozygote in study group, with mean ∆32 allele frequency of 9.5%. CCR5∆32 allele frequency among Bosniaks is comparable to that found in Caucasian populations and follows the pattern of the north-southern gradient observed for Europe. Further studies on larger cohorts with adequate female-to-male ratio are necessary. PMID:25172974

  18. CCR5 Targeted Cell Therapy for HIV and Prevention of Viral Escape

    PubMed Central

    Hütter, Gero; Bodor, Josef; Ledger, Scott; Boyd, Maureen; Millington, Michelle; Tsie, Marlene; Symonds, Geoff

    2015-01-01

    Allogeneic transplantation with CCR5-delta 32 (CCR5-d32) homozygous stem cells in an HIV infected individual in 2008, led to a sustained virus control and probably eradication of HIV. Since then there has been a high degree of interest to translate this approach to a wider population. There are two cellular ways to do this. The first one is to use a CCR5 negative cell source e.g., hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) to copy the initial finding. However, a recent case of a second allogeneic transplantation with CCR5-d32 homozygous stem cells suffered from viral escape of CXCR4 quasi-species. The second way is to knock down CCR5 expression by gene therapy. Currently, there are five promising techniques, three of which are presently being tested clinically. These techniques include zinc finger nucleases (ZFN), clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated protein 9 nuclease (CRISPR/Cas9), transcription activator-like effectors nuclease (TALEN), short hairpin RNA (shRNA), and a ribozyme. While there are multiple gene therapy strategies being tested, in this review we reflect on our current knowledge of inhibition of CCR5 specifically and whether this approach allows for consequent viral escape. PMID:26225991

  19. Low-cost simultaneous detection of CCR5-delta32 and HLA-B*5701 alleles in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infected patients by selective multiplex endpoint PCR.

    PubMed

    Rosi, Andrea; Meini, Genny; Materazzi, Angelo; Vicenti, Ilaria; Saladini, Francesco; Zazzi, Maurizio

    2015-11-01

    Host genetic traits impact susceptibility to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection, disease progression as well as antiretroviral drug pharmacokinetics and toxicity. Remarkable examples include a 32-bp deletion in the CCR5 coreceptor molecule (CCR5-delta32) impairing attachment of monocytotropic HIV-1 to the host cell membrane and the HLA-B*5701 allele, strongly associated with a potentially fatal hypersensitivity reaction triggered by abacavir, a nucleoside inhibitor of HIV reverse transcriptase. We developed a simple selective multiplex endpoint PCR method for simultaneous analysis of both genetic traits. Two primers were designed for amplification of a region surrounding the CCR5 32-bp deletion site. One common forward primer and two reverse primers with different 3' termini targeting the HLA-B*570101 and HLA-B*570102 alleles were designed for HLA-B*5701 analysis. A panel of 110 reference DNA samples typed in the HLA-B locus was used for development and blind validation of the assay. All the 45 HLA-B*5701 positive and the 55 HLA-B*5701 negative samples were correctly identified. The CCR5-delta32 allele was readily detected in 7 samples and did not interfere with detection of HLA-B*5701 while providing an internal amplification control. Multiplex PCR products were easily identified in agarose gels with no background noise. This simple and low-cost end-point selective multiplex PCR can conveniently screen HIV patients for the protective CCR5-delta32 allele and the risk of developing abacavir hypersensitivity reaction. PMID:26341061

  20. Distribution of the CCR5delta32 allele (gene variant CCR5) in Rondônia, Western Amazonian region, Brazil.

    PubMed

    de Farias, Josileide Duarte; Santos, Marlene Guimarães; de França, Andonai Krauze; Delani, Daniel; Tada, Mauro Shugiro; Casseb, Almeida Andrade; Simões, Aguinaldo Luiz; Engracia, Vera

    2012-01-01

    Since around 1723, on the occasion of its initial colonization by Europeans, Rondonia has received successive waves of immigrants. This has been further swelled by individuals from northeastern Brazil, who began entering at the beginning of the twentieth century. The ethnic composition varies across the state according to the various sites of settlement of each wave of immigrants. We analyzed the frequency of the CCR5Δ32 allele of the CCR5 chemokine receptor, which is considered a Caucasian marker, in five sample sets from the population. Four were collected in Porto Velho, the state capital and the site of several waves of migration. Of these, two, from the Hospital de Base were comprised of HB Mothers and HB Newborns presenting allele frequencies of 3.5% and 3.1%, respectively, a third from the peri-urban neighborhoods of Candelária/Bate-Estaca (1.8%), whereas a fourth, from the Research Center on Tropical Medicine/CEPEM (0.6%), was composed of malaria patients under treament. The fifth sample (3.4%) came from the inland Quilombola village of Pedras Negras. Two homozygous individuals (CCR5Δ32/CCR5Δ32) were detected among the HB Mother samples. The frequency of this allele was heterogeneous and higher where the European inflow was more pronounced. The presence of the allele in Pedras Negras revealed European miscegenation in a community largely comprising Quilombolas. PMID:22481870

  1. Distribution of the CCR5delta32 allele (gene variant CCR5) in Rondônia, Western Amazonian region, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    de Farias, Josileide Duarte; Santos, Marlene Guimarães; de França, Andonai Krauze; Delani, Daniel; Tada, Mauro Shugiro; Casseb, Almeida Andrade; Simões, Aguinaldo Luiz; Engracia, Vera

    2012-01-01

    Since around 1723, on the occasion of its initial colonization by Europeans, Rondonia has received successive waves of immigrants. This has been further swelled by individuals from northeastern Brazil, who began entering at the beginning of the twentieth century. The ethnic composition varies across the state according to the various sites of settlement of each wave of immigrants. We analyzed the frequency of the CCR5Δ32 allele of the CCR5 chemokine receptor, which is considered a Caucasian marker, in five sample sets from the population. Four were collected in Porto Velho, the state capital and the site of several waves of migration. Of these, two, from the Hospital de Base were comprised of HB Mothers and HB Newborns presenting allele frequencies of 3.5% and 3.1%, respectively, a third from the peri-urban neighborhoods of Candelária/Bate-Estaca (1.8%), whereas a fourth, from the Research Center on Tropical Medicine/CEPEM (0.6%), was composed of malaria patients under treament. The fifth sample (3.4%) came from the inland Quilombola village of Pedras Negras. Two homozygous individuals (CCR5Δ32/CCR5Δ32) were detected among the HB Mother samples. The frequency of this allele was heterogeneous and higher where the European inflow was more pronounced. The presence of the allele in Pedras Negras revealed European miscegenation in a community largely comprising Quilombolas. PMID:22481870

  2. Distribution of the CCR5 gene 32-basepair deletion in West Europe. A hypothesis about the possible dispersion of the mutation by the Vikings in historical times.

    PubMed

    Lucotte, G

    2001-09-01

    The chemokine receptor CCR5 constitutes the major coreceptor for the macrophage-tropic strains of HIV-1. A mutant allele of the CCR5 gene named Delta32 was shown to provide to homozygotes a strong resistance against infection by HIV. The frequency of the Delta32 allele was collected in 7328 noninfected unrelated individuals from 31 different European populations, and in Cyprus, Turkey, Daghestan, and North-Africa. The Delta32 allele was found in all populations studied, with a mean frequency of about 8.0%. A north to south gradient correlating latitude with Delta32 allelic frequencies was found (r = 0.795, p < 10(-9)), with highest allele frequencies in Nordic countries. We hypothesized that the Delta32 allele was disseminated in Europe by the Vikings during the eighth to the tenth centuries, because the most elevated values of this variant are actually found in their actual populations, and because they raided during the corresponding period in most European countries. PMID:11543895

  3. Chemokine receptor CCR5 promotes leukocyte trafficking to the brain and survival in West Nile virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Glass, William G.; Lim, Jean K.; Cholera, Rushina; Pletnev, Alexander G.; Gao, Ji-Liang; Murphy, Philip M.

    2005-01-01

    The molecular immunopathogenesis of West Nile virus (WNV) infection is poorly understood. Here, we characterize a mouse model for WNV using a subcutaneous route of infection and delineate leukocyte subsets and immunoregulatory factors present in the brains of infected mice. Central nervous system (CNS) expression of the chemokine receptor CCR5 and its ligand CCL5 was prominently up-regulated by WNV, and this was associated with CNS infiltration of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, NK1.1+ cells and macrophages expressing the receptor. The significance of CCR5 in pathogenesis was established by mortality studies in which infection of CCR5−/− mice was rapidly and uniformly fatal. In the brain, WNV-infected CCR5−/− mice had increased viral burden but markedly reduced NK1.1+ cells, macrophages, and CD4+ and CD8+ T cells compared with WNV-infected CCR5+/+ mice. Adoptive transfer of splenocytes from WNV-infected CCR5+/+ mice into infected CCR5−/− mice increased leukocyte accumulation in the CNS compared with transfer of splenocytes from infected CCR5−/− mice into infected CCR5−/− mice, and increased survival to 60%, the same as in infected CCR5+/+ control mice. We conclude that CCR5 is a critical antiviral and survival determinant in WNV infection of mice that acts by regulating trafficking of leukocytes to the infected brain. PMID:16230476

  4. Anti-infective peptide IDR-1002 augments monocyte chemotaxis towards CCR5 chemokines.

    PubMed

    Madera, Laurence; Hancock, Robert E W

    2015-08-28

    Innate defense regulator (IDR) peptides are a class of immunomodulators which enhance and modulate host innate immune responses against microbial pathogens. While IDR-mediated protection against a range of bacterial pathogens is dependent on enhanced monocyte recruitment to the site of infection, the mechanisms through which they increase monocyte trafficking remain unclear. In this study, anti-infective peptide IDR-1002 was shown to enhance monocyte chemotaxis towards chemokines CCL3 and CCL5. This enhancement correlated with the selective upregulation of CCR5 surface expression by peptide-treated monocytes. It was found that IDR-1002 enhancement of monocyte chemotaxis was fully dependent on CCR5 function. Furthermore, IDR-1002 enhanced chemokine-induced monocyte p38 MAPK phosphorylation in a CCR5-dependent fashion. Overall, these results indicate that peptide IDR-1002 can selectively influence monocyte recruitment by host chemokines through the regulation of chemokine receptors. PMID:26168734

  5. Association analysis of a CCR5 variant with ewe lifetime production in 3 breeds of sheep.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A deletion in the promoter region of CCR5 associates with a 50% reduction in proviral concentration (log10 env copies/microgram DNA) of ovine progressive pneumonia virus (OPPV) in blood. Nearly half of all flocks in the U.S. have at least one sheep infected with OPPV. Because OPP provirus concentr...

  6. Donor and recipient chemokine receptor CCR5 genotype is associated with survival after bone marrow transplantation

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, David H.; Conway, Susan E.; Wang, Tao; Ricklefs, Stacy M.; Agovi, Manza A.; Porcella, Stephen F.; Tran, Huong Thi Bich; Milford, Edgar; Spellman, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Despite continual improvement, morbidity and mortality after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) remain high. The importance of chemokines in HSCT lies in their regulation of immune responses that determine transplantation outcomes. We investigated the role of recipient and donor chemokine system gene polymorphisms by using a candidate gene approach on the incidence of graft-versus-host disease and posttransplantation outcomes in 1370 extensively human leukocyte antigen–matched, unrelated donor-recipient pairs by using multivariate Cox regression models. Our analysis identified that recipients homozygous for a common CCR5 haplotype (H1/H1) had better disease-free survival (DFS; P = .005) and overall survival (P = .021). When the same genotype of both the donor and recipient were considered in the models, a highly significant association with DFS and overall survival was noted (P < .001 and P = .007, respectively) with absolute differences in survival of up to 20% seen between the groups at 3 years after transplantation (50% DFS for pairs with recipient CCR5 H1/H1 vs 30% for pairs with donor CCR5 H1/H1). This finding suggests that donor and/or recipient CCR5 genotypes may be associated with HSCT outcome and suggests new diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for optimizing therapy. PMID:20068218

  7. Absence of Association between CCR5 rs333 Polymorphism and Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Carlos Eduardo Coral; Perim, Aparecida de Lourdes; Ozawa, Patricia Midori Murobushi; Freire Vitiello, Glauco Akelinghton; Losi Guembarovski, Roberta; Watanabe, Maria Angelica Ehara

    2014-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a malignant disorder that originates from one single hematopoietic precursor committed to B- or T-cell lineage. Ordinarily, these cells express CCR5 chemokine receptor, which directs the immune response to a cellular pattern and is involved in cancer pathobiology. The genetic rs333 polymorphism of CCR5 (Δ32), results in a diminished receptor expression, thus leading to impaired cell trafficking. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of CCR5 chemokine receptor rs333 polymorphism in the pathogenesis of ALL. The genotype distribution was studied in 79 patients and compared with 80 control subjects, in a childhood population of Southern Brazil. Genotyping was performed using DNA samples amplified by polymerase chain reaction with sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP). The homozygous (Δ32/Δ32) deletion was not observed in any subject involved in the study. Heterozygous genotype was not associated with ALL risk (OR 0.7%; 95% CI 0.21–2.32; P > 0.05), nor recurrence status of ALL (OR 0.86; 95% CI 0.13–5.48; P > 0.05). This work demonstrated, for the first time, no significant differences in the frequency of the CCR5/Δ32 genotype between ALL and control groups, indicating no effect of this genetic variant on the ALL susceptibility and recurrence risk. PMID:24822066

  8. Association analysis of a CCR5 variant with ewe lifetime production.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A deletion in the promoter region of CCR5 associates with a 50% reduction in proviral concentration (log10 env copies/microgram DNA) of ovine progressive pneumonia virus (OPPV) in sheep blood. Because OPP provirus blood concentrations correlate with the degree of histological lesions in affected ti...

  9. HIV-1 adaptation to low levels of CCR5 results in V3 and V2 loop changes that increase envelope pathogenicity, CCR5 affinity and decrease susceptibility to Maraviroc.

    PubMed

    Garg, Himanshu; Lee, Raphael T C; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Joshi, Anjali

    2016-06-01

    Variability in CCR5 levels in the human population is suggested to affect virus evolution, fitness and the course of HIV disease. We previously demonstrated that cell surface CCR5 levels directly affect HIV Envelope mediated bystander apoptosis. In this study, we attempted to understand HIV evolution in the presence of low levels of CCR5, mimicking the limiting CCR5 levels inherent to the host. HIV-1 adaptation in a T cell line expressing low levels of CCR5 resulted in two specific mutations; N302Y and E172K. The N302Y mutation led to accelerated virus replication, increase in Maraviroc IC50 and an increase in Envelope mediated bystander apoptosis in low CCR5 expressing cells. Analysis of subtype B sequences showed that N302Y is over-represented in CXCR4 tropic viruses in comparison to CCR5 tropic isolates. Considering the variability in CCR5 levels between individuals, our findings have implications for virus evolution, MVC susceptibility as well as HIV pathogenesis. PMID:27017055

  10. Increased Efficacy of HIV-1 Neutralization by Antibodies at Low CCR5 Surface Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Choudhry, Vidita; Zhang, Mei-Yun; Harris, Ilia; Sidorov, Igor A.; Vu, Bang; Dimitrov, Antony S.; Fouts, Timothy; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.

    2007-01-01

    It has been observed that some antibodies, including the CD4-induced (CD4i) antibody IgG X5 and the gp41-specific antibody IgG 2F5, exhibit higher neutralizing activity in PBMC-based assays than in cell line based assays (Binley et al., J. Virology, 2004, 78: 13232). It has been hypothesized that the lower CCR5 concentration on the surface of the CD4 T lymphocyte compared to that on cell lines used for the neutralization assays could be a contributing factor to the observed differences in neutralizing activity. To test this hypothesis and to further elucidate the contribution of CCR5 concentration differences on antibody neutralizing activity, we used a panel of HeLa cell lines with well-defined and differential surface concentrations of CCR5 and CD4 in a pseudovirus-based assay. We observed that the CCR5 cell surface concentration but not the CD4 concentration had a significant effect on the inhibitory activity of X5 and several other CD4i antibodies including 17b and m9, as well as that of the gp41-specifc antibodies 2F5 and 4E10 but not on that of the CD4 binding site antibody (CD4bs), b12. The 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) decreased up to two orders of magnitude in cell lines with low CCR5 concentration corresponding to that in CD4 T cells used in PBMC-based assays (about 103 per cell) compared to cell lines with high CCR5 concentration (about 104 or more). Our results suggest that the CCR5 cell surface concentration could be a contributing factor to the high neutralizing activities of some antibodies in PBMC-based-assays but other factors could also play an important role. These findings could have implications for development of vaccine immunogens based on the epitopes of X5 and other CD4i antibodies, for elucidation of the mechanisms of HIV-1 neutralization by antibodies, and for design of novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:16904645

  11. A Vaccine against CCR5 Protects a Subset of Macaques upon Intravaginal Challenge with Simian Immunodeficiency Virus SIVmac251

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Zoe; Jayashankar, Kartika; Peabody, Julianne; Montefiori, David; LaBranche, Celia C.; Keele, Brandon F.; Jensen, Kara; Abel, Kristina

    2014-01-01

    As an alternative to targeting human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), we have developed vaccines targeting CCR5, a self-protein critically involved in HIV replication and pathogenesis. By displaying peptides derived from CCR5 at high density on the surface of virus-like particles, we can efficiently induce high-titer IgG antibodies against this self-molecule. Here, we investigated whether prophylactic immunization of rhesus macaques with a particle-based vaccine targeting two regions of macaque CCR5 could prevent or suppress vaginal infection with highly virulent SIVmac251. Twelve macaques were vaccinated with a bacteriophage Qß-based vaccine targeting macaque CCR5 (Qß.CCR5). Six control animals were immunized with the Qß platform alone. All animals immunized with Qß.CCR5 developed high-titer anti-CCR5 antibody responses. Macaques were vaginally challenged with a high dose of SIVmac251. The mean peak viral RNA levels in the vaccinated groups were 30-fold lower than in the control group (106.8 versus 108.3 copies/ml plasma). Three of the 12 vaccinated macaques dramatically suppressed simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) replication: peak viral loads were low (103 to 104 RNA copies/ml), and SIV RNA became undetectable from 6 weeks onward. No viral RNA or DNA could be detected in colon and lymph node biopsy specimens collected 13 months after challenge. In vivo depletion of CD8+ cells failed to induce a viral rebound. However, once anti-CCR5 antibody responses had waned, the 3 animals became infected after intravaginal and/or intravenous rechallenge. In conclusion, vaccination against CCR5 was associated with dramatic suppression of virus replication in a subset (25%) of macaques. These data support further research of vaccination against CCR5 to combat HIV infection. PMID:24307581

  12. Natural anti-CCR5 antibodies in HIV-infection and -exposure

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Natural antibodies constitute a first-line of defence against pathogens; they may also play other roles in immune regulation and homeostasis, through their ability to bind host antigens, surface molecules and receptors. Natural anti-CCR5 antibodies can be decisive in preventing HIV infection in mucosal tissues and offer prompt and effective protection just at major sites of virus entry. Among natural anti-CCR5 antibodies, IgG and IgA to the ECL1 domain have been shown to block HIV effectively and durably without causing harm to the host. Their biological properties and their uncommon generation in subsets of HIV-infected and HIV-exposed individuals (so called ESN) will be introduced and discussed, with the aim at exploiting their potential in therapy and prevention. PMID:21284903

  13. Identification of a Subset of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1), HIV-2, and Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Strains Able To Exploit an Alternative Coreceptor on Untransformed Human Brain and Lymphoid Cells

    PubMed Central

    Willey, Samantha J.; Reeves, Jacqueline D.; Hudson, Richard; Miyake, Koichi; Dejucq, Nathalie; Schols, Dominique; Clercq, Erik De; Bell, Jeanne; McKnight, Áine; Clapham, Paul R.

    2003-01-01

    The chemokine receptors CCR5 and CXCR4 are the major coreceptors for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). At least 12 other chemokine receptors or close relatives support infection by particular HIV and SIV strains on CD4+ transformed indicator cell lines in vitro. However, the role of these alternative coreceptors in vivo is presently thought to be insignificant. Infection of cell lines expressing high levels of recombinant CD4 and coreceptors thus does not provide a true indication of coreceptor use in vivo. We therefore tested primary untransformed cell cultures that lack CCR5 and CXCR4, including astrocytes and brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMVECs), for naturally expressed alternative coreceptors functional for HIV and SIV infection. An adenovirus vector (Ad-CD4) was used to express CD4 in CD4− astrocytes and thus confer efficient infection if a functional coreceptor is present. Using a large panel of viruses with well-defined coreceptor usage, we identified a subset of HIV and SIV strains able to infect two astrocyte cultures derived from adult brain tissue. Astrocyte infection was partially inhibited by several chemokines, indicating a role for the chemokine receptor family in the observed infection. BMVECs were weakly positive for CD4 but negative for CCR5 and CXCR4 and were susceptible to infection by the same subset of isolates that infected astrocytes. BMVEC infection was efficiently inhibited by the chemokine vMIP-I, implicating one of its receptors as an alternative coreceptor for HIV and SIV infection. Furthermore, we tested whether the HIV type 1 and type 2 strains identified were able to infect peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) via an alternative coreceptor. Several strains replicated in Δ32/Δ32 CCR5 PBMCs with CXCR4 blocked by AMD3100. This AMD3100-resistant replication was also sensitive to vMIP-I inhibition. The nature and potential role of this alternative coreceptor(s) in HIV infection

  14. CCL5 activation of CCR5 regulates cell metabolism to enhance proliferation of breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Darrin; Rahbar, Ramtin; Fish, Eleanor N.

    2016-01-01

    In earlier studies, we showed that CCL5 enhances proliferation and survival of MCF-7 breast cancer cells in an mTOR-dependent manner and we provided evidence that, for T cells, CCL5 activation of CCR5 results in increased glycolysis and enhanced ATP production. Increases in metabolic activity of cancer cells, specifically increased glycolytic activity and increased expression of glucose transporters, are associated with tumour progression. In this report, we provide evidence that CCL5 enhances the proliferation of human breast cancer cell lines (MDA-MB-231, MCF-7) and mouse mammary tumour cells (MMTV-PyMT), mediated by CCR5 activation. Concomitant with enhanced proliferation we show that CCL5 increases cell surface expression of the glucose transporter GLUT1, and increases glucose uptake and ATP production by these cells. Blocking CCL5-inducible glucose uptake abrogates the enhanced proliferation induced by CCL5. We provide evidence that increased glucose uptake is associated with enhanced glycolysis, as measured by extracellular acidification. Moreover, CCL5 enhances the invasive capacity of these breast cancer cells. Using metabolomics, we demonstrate that the metabolic signature of CCL5-treated primary mouse mammary tumour cells reflects increased anabolic metabolism. The implications are that CCL5–CCR5 interactions in the tumour microenvironment regulate metabolic events, specifically glycolysis, to promote tumour proliferation and invasion. PMID:27335323

  15. CCL5 activation of CCR5 regulates cell metabolism to enhance proliferation of breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Darrin; Rahbar, Ramtin; Fish, Eleanor N

    2016-06-01

    In earlier studies, we showed that CCL5 enhances proliferation and survival of MCF-7 breast cancer cells in an mTOR-dependent manner and we provided evidence that, for T cells, CCL5 activation of CCR5 results in increased glycolysis and enhanced ATP production. Increases in metabolic activity of cancer cells, specifically increased glycolytic activity and increased expression of glucose transporters, are associated with tumour progression. In this report, we provide evidence that CCL5 enhances the proliferation of human breast cancer cell lines (MDA-MB-231, MCF-7) and mouse mammary tumour cells (MMTV-PyMT), mediated by CCR5 activation. Concomitant with enhanced proliferation we show that CCL5 increases cell surface expression of the glucose transporter GLUT1, and increases glucose uptake and ATP production by these cells. Blocking CCL5-inducible glucose uptake abrogates the enhanced proliferation induced by CCL5. We provide evidence that increased glucose uptake is associated with enhanced glycolysis, as measured by extracellular acidification. Moreover, CCL5 enhances the invasive capacity of these breast cancer cells. Using metabolomics, we demonstrate that the metabolic signature of CCL5-treated primary mouse mammary tumour cells reflects increased anabolic metabolism. The implications are that CCL5-CCR5 interactions in the tumour microenvironment regulate metabolic events, specifically glycolysis, to promote tumour proliferation and invasion. PMID:27335323

  16. Physiological Levels of Virion-Associated Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Envelope Induce Coreceptor-Dependent Calcium Flux▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Melar, Marta; Ott, David E.; Hope, Thomas J.

    2007-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) entry into target cells requires the engagement of receptor and coreceptor by envelope glycoprotein (Env). Coreceptors CCR5 and CXCR4 are chemokine receptors that generate signals manifested as calcium fluxes in response to binding of the appropriate ligand. It has previously been shown that engagement of the coreceptors by HIV Env can also generate Ca2+ fluxing. Since the sensitivity and therefore the physiological consequence of signaling activation in target cells is not well understood, we addressed it by using a microscopy-based approach to measure Ca2+ levels in individual CD4+ T cells in response to low Env concentrations. Monomeric Env subunit gp120 and virion-bound Env were able to activate a signaling cascade that is qualitatively different from the one induced by chemokines. Env-mediated Ca2+ fluxing was coreceptor mediated, coreceptor specific, and CD4 dependent. Comparison of the observed virion-mediated Ca2+ fluxing with the exact number of viral particles revealed that the viral threshold necessary for coreceptor activation of signaling in CD4+ T cells was quite low, as few as two virions. These results indicate that the physiological levels of virion binding can activate signaling in CD4+ T cells in vivo and therefore might contribute to HIV-induced pathogenesis. PMID:17121788

  17. Elucidating a Key Anti-HIV-1 and Cancer-Associated Axis: The Structure of CCL5 (Rantes) in Complex with CCR5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamamis, Phanourios; Floudas, Christodoulos A.

    2014-06-01

    CCL5 (RANTES) is an inflammatory chemokine which binds to chemokine receptor CCR5 and induces signaling. The CCL5:CCR5 associated chemotactic signaling is of critical biological importance and is a potential HIV-1 therapeutic axis. Several studies provided growing evidence for the expression of CCL5 and CCR5 in non-hematological malignancies. Therefore, the delineation of the CCL5:CCR5 complex structure can pave the way for novel CCR5-targeted drugs. We employed a computational protocol which is primarily based on free energy calculations and molecular dynamics simulations, and report, what is to our knowledge, the first computationally derived CCL5:CCR5 complex structure which is in excellent agreement with experimental findings and clarifies the functional role of CCL5 and CCR5 residues which are associated with binding and signaling. A wealth of polar and non-polar interactions contributes to the tight CCL5:CCR5 binding. The structure of an HIV-1 gp120 V3 loop in complex with CCR5 has recently been derived through a similar computational protocol. A comparison between the CCL5 : CCR5 and the HIV-1 gp120 V3 loop : CCR5 complex structures depicts that both the chemokine and the virus primarily interact with the same CCR5 residues. The present work provides insights into the blocking mechanism of HIV-1 by CCL5.

  18. A Prominent Site of Antibody Vulnerability on HIV Envelope Incorporates a Motif Associated with CCR5 Binding and Its Camouflaging Glycans.

    PubMed

    Sok, Devin; Pauthner, Matthias; Briney, Bryan; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Saye-Francisco, Karen L; Hsueh, Jessica; Ramos, Alejandra; Le, Khoa M; Jones, Meaghan; Jardine, Joseph G; Bastidas, Raiza; Sarkar, Anita; Liang, Chi-Hui; Shivatare, Sachin S; Wu, Chung-Yi; Schief, William R; Wong, Chi-Huey; Wilson, Ian A; Ward, Andrew B; Zhu, Jiang; Poignard, Pascal; Burton, Dennis R

    2016-07-19

    The dense patch of high-mannose-type glycans surrounding the N332 glycan on the HIV envelope glycoprotein (Env) is targeted by multiple broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs). This region is relatively conserved, implying functional importance, the origins of which are not well understood. Here we describe the isolation of new bnAbs targeting this region. Examination of these and previously described antibodies to Env revealed that four different bnAb families targeted the (324)GDIR(327) peptide stretch at the base of the gp120 V3 loop and its nearby glycans. We found that this peptide stretch constitutes part of the CCR5 co-receptor binding site, with the high-mannose patch glycans serving to camouflage it from most antibodies. GDIR-glycan bnAbs, in contrast, bound both (324)GDIR(327) peptide residues and high-mannose patch glycans, which enabled broad reactivity against diverse HIV isolates. Thus, as for the CD4 binding site, bnAb effectiveness relies on circumventing the defenses of a critical functional region on Env. PMID:27438765

  19. Folding of newly translated membrane protein CCR5 is assisted by the chaperonin GroEL-GroES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Haixia; Wang, Xiaoqiang; Li, Jiqiang; Ren, Hao; Huang, Fang

    2015-11-01

    The in vitro folding of newly translated human CC chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5), which belongs to the physiologically important family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), has been studied in a cell-free system supplemented with the surfactant Brij-35. The freshly synthesized CCR5 can spontaneously fold into its biologically active state but only slowly and inefficiently. However, on addition of the GroEL-GroES molecular chaperone system, the folding of the nascent CCR5 was significantly enhanced, as was the structural stability and functional expression of the soluble form of CCR5. The chaperonin GroEL was partially effective on its own, but for maximum efficiency both the GroEL and its GroES lid were necessary. These results are direct evidence for chaperone-assisted membrane protein folding and therefore demonstrate that GroEL-GroES may be implicated in the folding of membrane proteins.

  20. Folding of newly translated membrane protein CCR5 is assisted by the chaperonin GroEL-GroES

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Haixia; Wang, Xiaoqiang; Li, Jiqiang; Ren, Hao; Huang, Fang

    2015-01-01

    The in vitro folding of newly translated human CC chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5), which belongs to the physiologically important family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), has been studied in a cell-free system supplemented with the surfactant Brij-35. The freshly synthesized CCR5 can spontaneously fold into its biologically active state but only slowly and inefficiently. However, on addition of the GroEL-GroES molecular chaperone system, the folding of the nascent CCR5 was significantly enhanced, as was the structural stability and functional expression of the soluble form of CCR5. The chaperonin GroEL was partially effective on its own, but for maximum efficiency both the GroEL and its GroES lid were necessary. These results are direct evidence for chaperone-assisted membrane protein folding and therefore demonstrate that GroEL-GroES may be implicated in the folding of membrane proteins. PMID:26585937

  1. Targeted disruption of the CCR5 gene in human hematopoietic stem cells stimulated by peptide nucleic acids

    PubMed Central

    Schleifman, Erica B.; Bindra, Ranjit; Leif, Jean; Campo, Jacob del; Rogers, Faye A.; Uchil, Pradeep; Kutsch, Olaf; Shultz, Leonard D.; Kumar, Priti; Greiner, Dale L.; Glazer, Peter M.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) bind duplex DNA in a sequence-specific manner, creating triplex structures that can provoke DNA repair and produce genome modification. CCR5 encodes a chemokine receptor required for HIV-1 entry into human cells and individuals carrying mutations in this gene are resistant to HIV-1 infection. Transfection of human cells with PNAs targeted to the CCR5 gene, plus donor DNAs designed to introduce stop codons mimicking the naturally occurring CCR5-delta32 mutation, produced 2.46% targeted gene modification. CCR5 modification was confirmed at the DNA, RNA and protein levels and was shown to confer resistance to infection with HIV-1. Targeting of CCR5 was achieved in human CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) with subsequent engraftment into mice and persistence of the gene modification more than four months post-transplantation. This work suggests a therapeutic strategy for CCR5 knockout in HSCs from HIV-1-infected individuals, rendering cells resistant to HIV-1 and preserving immune system function. PMID:21944757

  2. Induction of Simian AIDS in Infant Rhesus Macaques Infected with CCR5- or CXCR4-Utilizing Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Viruses Is Associated with Distinct Lesions of the Thymus

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, R. A.; Canfield, Don R.; Esser, Ursula; Adamson, Lourdes A.; Brown, Charles R.; Cheng-Mayer, Cecilia; Gardner, Murray B.; Harouse, Janet M.; Luciw, Paul A.

    2004-01-01

    Newborn rhesus macaques were infected with two chimeric simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) strains which contain unique human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) env genes and exhibit distinct phenotypes. Infection with either the CCR5-specific SHIVSF162P3 or the CXCR4-utilizing SHIVSF33A resulted in clinical manifestations consistent with simian AIDS. Most prominent in this study was the detection of severe thymic involution in all SHIVSF33A-infected infants, which is very similar to HIV-1-induced thymic dysfunction in children who exhibit a rapid pattern of disease progression. In contrast, SHIVSF162P3 induced only a minor disruption in thymic morphology. Consistent with the distribution of the coreceptors CXCR4 and CCR5 within the thymus, the expression of SHIVSF162P3 was restricted to the thymic medulla, whereas SHIVSF33A was preferentially detected in the cortex. This dichotomy of tissue tropism is similar to the differential tropism of HIV-1 isolates observed in the reconstituted human thymus in SCID-hu mice. Accordingly, our results show that the SHIV-monkey model can be used for the molecular dissection of cell and tissue tropisms controlled by the HIV-1 env gene and for the analysis of mechanisms of viral immunopathogenesis in AIDS. Furthermore, these findings could help explain the rapid progression of disease observed in some HIV-1-infected children. PMID:14747577

  3. Pyrazolo-Piperidines Exhibit Dual Inhibition of CCR5/CXCR4 HIV Entry and Reverse Transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Cox, Bryan D; Prosser, Anthony R; Sun, Yongnian; Li, Zhufang; Lee, Sangil; Huang, Ming B; Bond, Vincent C; Snyder, James P; Krystal, Mark; Wilson, Lawrence J; Liotta, Dennis C

    2015-07-01

    We report novel anti-HIV-1 agents with combined dual host-pathogen pharmacology. Lead compound 3, composed of a pyrazole-piperidine core, exhibits three concurrent mechanisms of action: (1) non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibition, (2) CCR5-mediated M-tropic viral entry inhibition, and (3) CXCR4-based T-tropic viral entry inhibition that maintains native chemokine ligand binding. This discovery identifies important tool compounds for studying viral infectivity and prototype agents that block HIV-1 entry through dual chemokine receptor ligation. PMID:26191361

  4. Lefty Blocks a Subset of TGFβ Signals by Antagonizing EGF-CFC Coreceptors

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Members of the EGF-CFC family play essential roles in embryonic development and have been implicated in tumorigenesis. The TGFβ signals Nodal and Vg1/GDF1, but not Activin, require EGF-CFC coreceptors to activate Activin receptors. We report that the TGFβ signaling antagonist Lefty also acts through an EGF-CFC-dependent mechanism. Lefty inhibits Nodal and Vg1 signaling, but not Activin signaling. Lefty genetically interacts with EGF-CFC proteins and competes with Nodal for binding to these coreceptors. Chimeras between Activin and Nodal or Vg1 identify a 14 amino acid region that confers independence from EGF-CFC coreceptors and resistance to Lefty. These results indicate that coreceptors are targets for both TGFβ agonists and antagonists and suggest that subtle sequence variations in TGFβ signals result in greater ligand diversity. PMID:14966532

  5. Influence of the CCR-5/MIP-1 α Axis in the Pathogenesis of Rocio Virus Encephalitis in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Chávez, Juliana H.; França, Rafael F. O.; Oliveira, Carlo J. F.; de Aquino, Maria T. P.; Farias, Kleber J. S.; Machado, Paula R. L.; de Oliveira, Thelma F. M.; Yokosawa, Jonny; Soares, Edson G.; da Silva, João S.; da Fonseca, Benedito A. L.; Figueiredo, Luiz T. M.

    2013-01-01

    Rocio virus (ROCV) caused an outbreak of human encephalitis during the 1970s in Brazil and its immunopathogenesis remains poorly understood. CC-chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) is a chemokine receptor that binds to macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP-1 α). Both molecules are associated with inflammatory cells migration during infections. In this study, we demonstrated the importance of the CCR5 and MIP-1 α, in the outcome of viral encephalitis of ROCV-infected mice. CCR5 and MIP-1 α knockout mice survived longer than wild-type (WT) ROCV-infected animals. In addition, knockout mice had reduced inflammation in the brain. Assessment of brain viral load showed mice virus detection five days post-infection in wild-type and CCR5−/− mice, while MIP-1 α−/− mice had lower viral loads seven days post-infection. Knockout mice required a higher lethal dose than wild-type mice as well. The CCR5/MIP-1 α axis may contribute to migration of infected cells to the brain and consequently affect the pathogenesis during ROCV infection. PMID:24080631

  6. Relationship of Genetic Polymorphisms of the Chemokine, CCL5, and Its Receptor, CCR5, with Coronary Artery Disease in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Ting, Ke-Hsin; Ueng, Kwo-Chang; Chiang, Whei-Ling; Chou, Ying-Erh; Yang, Shun-Fa; Wang, Po-Hui

    2015-01-01

    The chemokine receptor CCR5 polymorphism, which confers resistance to HIV infection, has been associated with reduced risk of cardiovascular disease. However, the association of the chemokine, CCL5, and its receptor, CCR5, polymorphism and coronary artery disease (CAD) in the Taiwanese has not been studied. In this study, 483 subjects who received elective coronary angiography were recruited from Chung Shan Medical University Hospital. CCL5-403 and CCR5-59029 were determined by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. We found that CCL5-403 with TT genotype frequencies was significantly associated with the risk of CAD group (odds ratio = 3.063 and p = 0.012). Moreover, the frequencies of CCR5-59029 with GG or GA genotype were higher than AA genotype in acute coronary syndrome individuals (odds ratio = 1.853, CI = 1.176–2.921, p = 0.008). In conclusion, we found that CCL5-403 polymorphism may increase genetic susceptibility of CAD. CCL5-403 or CCR5-59029 single nucleotide polymorphism may include genotype score and it may predict cardiovascular event. PMID:26688689

  7. Dynamics of CCR5 Expression by CD4+ T Cells in Lymphoid Tissues during Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Veazey, Ronald S.; Mansfield, Keith G.; Tham, Irene C.; Carville, Angela C.; Shvetz, Daniel E.; Forand, Amy E.; Lackner, Andrew A.

    2000-01-01

    Early viral replication and profound CD4+ T-cell depletion occur preferentially in intestinal tissues of macaques infected with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). Here we show that a much higher percentage of CD4+ T cells in the intestine express CCR5 compared with those found in the peripheral blood, spleen, or lymph nodes. In addition, the selectivity and extent of the CD4+ T-cell loss in SIV infection may depend upon these cells coexpressing CCR5 and having a “memory” phenotype (CD45RA−). Following intravenous infection with SIVmac251, memory CD4+ CCR5+ T cells were selectively eliminated within 14 days in all major lymphoid tissues (intestine, spleen, and lymph nodes). However, the effect on CD4+ T-cell numbers was most profound in the intestine, where cells of this phenotype predominate. The CD4+ T cells that remain after 14 days of infection lacked CCR5 and/or were naive (CD45RA+). Furthermore, when animals in the terminal stages of SIV infection (with AIDS) were examined, virtually no CCR5-expressing CD4+ T cells were found in lymphoid tissues, and all of the remaining CD4+ T cells were naive and coexpressed CXCR4. These findings suggest that chemokine receptor usage determines which cells are targeted for SIV infection and elimination in vivo. PMID:11069995

  8. Frequency of the CCR5-delta32 allele in Brazilian populations: A systematic literature review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Silva-Carvalho, Wlisses Henrique Veloso; de Moura, Ronald Rodrigues; Coelho, Antonio Victor Campos; Crovella, Sergio; Guimarães, Rafael Lima

    2016-09-01

    The CCR5 is a chemokine receptor widely expressed by several immune cells that are engaged in inflammatory responses. Some populations have individuals exhibiting a 32bp deletion in the CCR5 gene (CCR5-delta32) that produces a truncated non-functional protein not expressed on the cell surface. This polymorphism, known to be associated with susceptibility to infectious and inflammatory diseases, such as osteomyelitis, pre-eclampsia, systemic lupus erythematous, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and HIV/AIDS, is more commonly found in European populations with average frequency of 10%. However, it is also possible to observe a significant frequency in other world populations, such as the Brazilian one. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of CCR5-delta32 genetic association studies in Brazilian populations throughout the country to estimate the frequency of this polymorphism. We also compared CCR5-delta32 frequencies across Brazilian regions. The systematic literature reviewed studies involving delta32 allele in Brazilian populations published from 1995 to 2015. Among the reviewed literature, 25 studies including 30 Brazilian populations distributed between the North, Northeast, South and Southeast regions were included in our meta-analysis. We observed an overall allelic frequency of 4% (95%-CI, 0.03-0.05), that was considered moderate and, notably, higher than some European populations, such as Cyprus (2.8%), Italy (3%) and Greece (2.4%). Regarding the regional frequency comparisons between North-Northeast (N-NE) and South-Southeast (S-SE) regions, we observed an allelic frequency of 3% (95%-CI, 0.02-0.04) and 4% (95%-CI, 0.03-0.05), respectively. The populations from S-SE regions had a slightly higher CCR5-delta32 frequency than N-NE regions (OR=1.41, p=0.002). Although there are several studies about the CCR5-delta32 polymorphism and its effect on the immune response of some infectious diseases, this report is the first meta

  9. Effects of sequence changes in the HIV-1 gp41 fusion peptide on CCR5 inhibitor resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Anastassopoulou, Cleo G.; Ketas, Thomas J.; Sanders, Rogier W.; Johan Klasse, Per; Moore, John P.

    2012-07-05

    A rare pathway of HIV-1 resistance to small molecule CCR5 inhibitors such as Vicriviroc (VCV) involves changes solely in the gp41 fusion peptide (FP). Here, we show that the G516V change is critical to VCV resistance in PBMC and TZM-bl cells, although it must be accompanied by either M518V or F519I to have a substantial impact. Modeling VCV inhibition data from the two cell types indicated that G516V allows both double mutants to use VCV-CCR5 complexes for entry. The model further identified F519I as an independent determinant of preference for the unoccupied, high-VCV affinity form of CCR5. From inhibitor-free reversion cultures, we also identified a substitution in the inner domain of gp120, T244A, which appears to counter the resistance phenotype created by the FP substitutions. Examining the interplay of these changes will enhance our understanding of Env complex interactions that influence both HIV-1 entry and resistance to CCR5 inhibitors.

  10. A Linear Epitope in the N-Terminal Domain of CCR5 and Its Interaction with Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Chain, Benny; Arnold, Jack; Akthar, Samia; Brandt, Michael; Davis, David; Noursadeghi, Mahdad; Lapp, Thabo; Ji, Changhua; Sankuratri, Surya; Zhang, Yanjing; Govada, Lata; Saridakis, Emmanuel; Chayen, Naomi

    2015-01-01

    The CCR5 receptor plays a role in several key physiological and pathological processes and is an important therapeutic target. Inhibition of the CCR5 axis by passive or active immunisation offers one very selective strategy for intervention. In this study we define a new linear epitope within the extracellular domain of CCR5 recognised by two independently produced monoclonal antibodies. A short peptide encoding the linear epitope can induce antibodies which recognise the intact receptor when administered colinear with a tetanus toxoid helper T cell epitope. The monoclonal antibody RoAb 13 is shown to bind to both cells and peptide with moderate to high affinity (6x10^8 and 1.2x107 M-1 respectively), and binding to the peptide is enhanced by sulfation of tyrosines at positions 10 and 14. RoAb13, which has previously been shown to block HIV infection, also blocks migration of monocytes in response to CCR5 binding chemokines and to inflammatory macrophage conditioned medium. A Fab fragment of RoAb13 has been crystallised and a structure of the antibody is reported to 2.1 angstrom resolution. PMID:26030924

  11. Neferine inhibits the upregulation of CCL5 and CCR5 in vascular endothelial cells during chronic high glucose treatment.

    PubMed

    Li, Guilin; Zhu, Gaochun; Gao, Yun; Xiao, Wen; Xu, Hong; Liu, Shuangmei; Tu, Guihua; Peng, Haiying; Zheng, Chaoran; Liang, Shangdong; Li, Guodong

    2013-04-01

    We investigated whether the expressions of CCL5 and CCR5 participate in dysfunctional changes in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) induced by chronic high glucose treatment and examined whether neferine exerts its therapeutic effects by blocking the development of dysfunctional vascular endothelium. HUVECs were cultured with control or high concentrations of glucose in the absence or presence of neferine for 5 days. Nitric acid reductase method was used to detect the concentration of nitric oxide (NO) released into culture media. The level of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) was measured by fluorescent DCFH-DA probe. The expressions of 84 genes related to endothelial cell biology were assessed by Human Endothelial Cell Biology RT(2) Profiler PCR Array. The expressions of the chemokine CCL5 and its receptor CCR5 were further determined by real-time RT-PCR and western blotting. PCR array indicated that CCL5 was the most significantly upregulated when HUVECs were exposed to chronic high glucose; the intracellular ROS level and the expressions of CCL5 and CCR5 at both mRNA and protein levels were significantly increased, whereas NO production was decreased simultaneously. The increased level of ROS and elevated expressions of CCL5 and CCR5 at high glucose were significantly inhibited by neferine; meanwhile the decreased NO production upon chronic high glucose treatment was relieved. An antioxidant (vitamin E) exerted similar beneficial effects. These data indicate that neferine can reduce the upregulation of CCL5 and CCR5 of vascular endothelium exposure to chronic high glucose and prevent or inhibit subsequent occurrence of inflammation in blood vessels possibly through antioxidation. PMID:23053727

  12. Nanoparticle for delivery of antisense γPNA oligomers targeting CCR5

    PubMed Central

    Bahal, Raman; McNeer, Nicole Ali; Ly, Danith H.; Saltzman, W. Mark; Glazer, Peter M.

    2013-01-01

    The development of a new class of peptide nucleic acids (PNAs), i.e., gamma PNAs (γPNAs), creates the need for a general and effective method for its delivery into cells for regulating gene expression in mammalian cells. Here we report the antisense activity of a recently developed hydrophilic and biocompatible diethylene glycol (miniPEG)-based gamma peptide nucleic acid called MPγPNAs via its delivery by poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA)-based nanoparticle system. We show that MPγPNA oligomers designed to bind to the selective region of Chemokine Receptor 5 (CCR5) transcript, induce potent and sequence-specific antisense effects as compared with regular PNA oligomers. In addition, PLGA nanoparticle delivery of MPγPNAs is not toxic to the cells. The findings reported in this study provide a combination of γPNA technology and PLGA-based nanoparticle delivery method for regulating gene expression in live cells via the antisense mechanism. PMID:23954968

  13. Downregulation of CCR5 inhibits the proliferation and invasion of cervical cancer cells and is regulated by microRNA-107

    PubMed Central

    CHE, LI-FAN; SHAO, SU-FANG; WANG, LI-XIN

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer is among the most prevalent forms of cancer worldwide. C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) is hypothesized to be a key functional protein involved in tumorigenesis. However, the role of CCR5 in cervical cancer remains unclear. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis were used to evaluate the mRNA and protein expression levels of CCR5 in human cervical carcinoma tissues. Furthermore, a small interfering RNA was employed to knockdown CCR5 in HeLa and C33A cells. MTT, colony formation and Transwell assays were performed to determine the effects of this knockdown on cell viability, proliferation and invasion. In addition, micro RNA (miR)-107 was identified as a potential candidate regulator of CCR5 using miR prediction algorithms, and the effects of miR-107 and its antisense miR on CCR5 mRNA expression were determined. The results of the present study indicated that CCR5 is overexpressed in human cervical cancer tissues compared with adjacent normal tissues, and its downregulation inhibits cervical cancer cell growth and proliferation. Furthermore, the downregulation of CCR5 appears to suppress cervical cancer cell invasion. Finally, the tumor suppressor miR-107 was able to directly target CCR5 and inhibit its expression. These results suggest that the upregulation of CCR5, which is inhibited by miR-107, may play a carcinogenic role in cervical cancer and could provide a novel therapeutic target in the future. PMID:26893637

  14. Human immunodeficiency virus receptor and coreceptor expression on human uterine epithelial cells: regulation of expression during the menstrual cycle and implications for human immunodeficiency virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Yeaman, Grant R; Howell, Alexandra L; Weldon, Sally; Demian, Douglas J; Collins, Jane E; O'Connell, Denise M; Asin, Susana N; Wira, Charles R; Fanger, Michael W

    2003-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) is primarily a sexually transmitted disease. Identification of cell populations within the female reproductive tract that are initially infected, and the events involved in transmission of infection to other cells, remain to be established. In this report, we evaluated expression of HIV receptors and coreceptors on epithelial cells in the uterus and found they express several receptors critical for HIV infection including CD4, CXCR4, CCR5 and galactosylceramide (GalC). Moreover, expression of these receptors varied during the menstrual cycle. Expression of CD4 and CCR5 on uterine epithelial cells is high throughout the proliferative phase of the menstrual cycle when blood levels of oestradiol are high. In contrast, CXCR4 expression increased gradually throughout the proliferative phase. During the secretory phase of the cycle when both oestradiol and progesterone are elevated, CD4 and CCR5 expression decreased whereas CXCR4 expression remained elevated. Expression of GalC on endometrial glands is higher during the secretory phase than during the proliferative phase of the menstrual cycle. Because epithelial cells line the female reproductive tract and express HIV receptors and coreceptors, it is likely that they are one of the first cell types to become infected. The hormonal regulation of HIV receptor expression may affect a woman's susceptibility to HIV infection during her menstrual cycle. Moreover, selective coreceptor expression could account for the preferential transmission of R5-HIV-1 strains to women. In addition, these studies provide evidence that the uterus, and potentially the entire upper reproductive tract, are important sites for the initial events involved in HIV infection. PMID:12709027

  15. Human immunodeficiency virus receptor and coreceptor expression on human uterine epithelial cells: regulation of expression during the menstrual cycle and implications for human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Yeaman, Grant R; Howell, Alexandra L; Weldon, Sally; Demian, Douglas J; Collins, Jane E; O'Connell, Denise M; Asin, Susana N; Wira, Charles R; Fanger, Michael W

    2003-05-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) is primarily a sexually transmitted disease. Identification of cell populations within the female reproductive tract that are initially infected, and the events involved in transmission of infection to other cells, remain to be established. In this report, we evaluated expression of HIV receptors and coreceptors on epithelial cells in the uterus and found they express several receptors critical for HIV infection including CD4, CXCR4, CCR5 and galactosylceramide (GalC). Moreover, expression of these receptors varied during the menstrual cycle. Expression of CD4 and CCR5 on uterine epithelial cells is high throughout the proliferative phase of the menstrual cycle when blood levels of oestradiol are high. In contrast, CXCR4 expression increased gradually throughout the proliferative phase. During the secretory phase of the cycle when both oestradiol and progesterone are elevated, CD4 and CCR5 expression decreased whereas CXCR4 expression remained elevated. Expression of GalC on endometrial glands is higher during the secretory phase than during the proliferative phase of the menstrual cycle. Because epithelial cells line the female reproductive tract and express HIV receptors and coreceptors, it is likely that they are one of the first cell types to become infected. The hormonal regulation of HIV receptor expression may affect a woman's susceptibility to HIV infection during her menstrual cycle. Moreover, selective coreceptor expression could account for the preferential transmission of R5-HIV-1 strains to women. In addition, these studies provide evidence that the uterus, and potentially the entire upper reproductive tract, are important sites for the initial events involved in HIV infection. PMID:12709027

  16. A formylpeptide receptor, FPRL1, acts as an efficient coreceptor for primary isolates of human immunodeficiency virus

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Nobuaki; Tanaka, Atsushi; Mori, Takahisa; Ohtsuki, Takahiro; Hoque, Aliful; Jinno-Oue, Atsushi; Apichartpiyakul, Chatchawann; Kusagawa, Shigeru; Takebe, Yutaka; Hoshino, Hiroo

    2008-01-01

    Background More than 10 members of seven-transmembrane G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have been shown to work as coreceptors for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), HIV type 2 (HIV-2), and simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIVs). As a common feature of HIV/SIV coreceptors, tyrosine residues are present with asparagines, aspartic acids or glutamic acids in the amino-terminal extracellular regions (NTRs). We noticed that a receptor for N-formylpeptides, FPRL1, also contains two tyrosine residues accompanied by glutamic acids in its NTR. It was reported that monocytes expressing CCR5 and FPRL1 in addition to CD4 are activated by treatment with ligands or agonists of FPRL1. Activated monocytes down-modulate CCR5 and become resistant to infection by HIV-1 strains. Thus, FPRL1 plays important roles in protection of monocyptes against HIV-1 infection. However, its own coreceptor activity has not been elucidated yet. In this study, we examined coreceptor activities of FPRL1 for HIV/SIV strains including primary HIV-1 isolates. Results A CD4-transduced human glioma cell line, NP-2/CD4, is strictly resistant to HIV/SIV infection. We have reported that when NP-2/CD4 cells are transduced with a GPCR having coreceptor activity, the cells become susceptible to HIV/SIV strains. When NP-2/CD4 cells were transduced with FPRL1, the resultant NP-2/CD4/FPRL1 cells became markedly susceptible to some laboratory-adapted HIV/SIV strains. We found that FPRL1 is also efficiently used as a coreceptor by primary HIV-1 isolates as well as CCR5 or CXCR4. Amino acid sequences linked to the FPRL1 use could not be detected in the V3 loop of the HIV-1 Env protein. Coreceptor activities of FPRL1 were partially blocked by the forymyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLF) peptide. Conclusion We conclude that FPRL1 is a novel and efficient coreceptor for HIV/SIV strains. FPRL1 works as a bifunctional factor in HIV-1 infection. Namely, the role of FPRL1 in HIV-1 infection is protective and/or promotive in

  17. CCL5/CCR5 axis induces vascular endothelial growth factor-mediated tumor angiogenesis in human osteosarcoma microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shih-Wei; Liu, Shih-Chia; Sun, Hui-Lung; Huang, Te-Yang; Chan, Chia-Han; Yang, Chen-Yu; Yeh, Hung-I; Huang, Yuan-Li; Chou, Wen-Yi; Lin, Yu-Min; Tang, Chih-Hsin

    2015-01-01

    Chemokines modulate angiogenesis and metastasis that dictate cancer development in tumor microenvironment. Osteosarcoma is the most frequent bone tumor and is characterized by a high metastatic potential. Chemokine CCL5 (previously called RANTES) has been reported to facilitate tumor progression and metastasis. However, the crosstalk between chemokine CCL5 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) as well as tumor angiogenesis in human osteosarcoma microenvironment has not been well explored. In this study, we found that CCL5 increased VEGF expression and production in human osteosarcoma cells. The conditioned medium (CM) from CCL5-treated osteosarcoma cells significantly induced tube formation and migration of human endothelial progenitor cells. Pretreatment of cells with CCR5 antibody or transfection with CCR5 specific siRNA blocked CCL5-induced VEGF expression and angiogenesis. CCL5/CCR5 axis demonstrably activated protein kinase Cδ (PKCδ), c-Src and hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α) signaling cascades to induce VEGF-dependent angiogenesis. Furthermore, knockdown of CCL5 suppressed VEGF expression and attenuated osteosarcoma CM-induced angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. CCL5 knockdown dramatically abolished tumor growth and angiogenesis in the osteosarcoma xenograft animal model. Importantly, we demonstrated that the expression of CCL5 and VEGF were correlated with tumor stage according the immunohistochemistry analysis of human osteosarcoma tissues. Taken together, our findings provide evidence that CCL5/CCR5 axis promotes VEGF-dependent tumor angiogenesis in human osteosarcoma microenvironment through PKCδ/c-Src/HIF-1α signaling pathway. CCL5 may represent a potential therapeutic target against human osteosarcoma. PMID:25330803

  18. The CCR5Δ32 allele is not a major predisposing factor for severe H1N1pdm09 infection

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Host genetic factors are thought to modulated the severity of disease caused by infection with the 2009 H1N1 pandemic influenza virus (H1N1pdm09). The human CCR5 gene encodes a cytokine receptor important for cell-mediated immune response against H1N1pdm09. A 32-bp polymorphic deletion in the coding sequence of CCR5, the so-called CCR5Δ32 allele, segregates in populations of European ancestry with a frequency of 8-15%. A high proportion of CCR5Δ32 heterozygotes was reported in a sample of white Canadian critically-ill H1N1pdm09 infected subjects, suggesting an association with disease severity. Methods We recruited 29 H1N1pdm09 infected subjects from Southern Europe (mostly Italians) with a wide clinical spectrum of disease symptoms; the sample included 7 subjects who developed acute respiratory distress syndrome requiring extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. The CCR5Δ32 variant was genotyped in all subjects. Results The CCR5Δ32 allele was found in one single subject, who developed a very mild form and was not hospitalized. Conclusions The CCR5Δ32 allele was not found to be associated with the risk of H1N1pdm09 infection or with a severe disease course. PMID:25100510

  19. Analysis of peripheral T cells and the CC chemokine receptor (CCR5) delta32 polymorphism in prostate cancer patients treated with carboxymethyl-glucan (CM-G).

    PubMed

    Magnani, Marciane; Castro-Gomez, Raul Hernan; Aoki, Mateus Nobrega; Gregório, Emerson Pereira; Libos, Farid; Morimoto, Helena Kaminami; Reiche, Edna Maria Vissoci; Watanabe, Maria Angelica Ehara

    2012-01-01

    β-Glucan, derived from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is a biological response modifier which affects the innate and adaptive immune responses. The CCR5 chemokine receptor is crucial for immune cell responses. In this study, the effects of the carboxymethylated form of β-glucan (CM-G) on the lymphocyte population of CCR5 genotype patients with prostate cancer (PCa), undergoing androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) was assessed. The CCR5 genotype and lymphocyte population was investigated by cytometry flow in 30 Brazilian patients with advanced PCa who were treated with CM-G for 28 days. The analysis of the CCR5 chemokine receptor revealed that the wild-type genotype Wt/Wt was present in 80% of patients, while the heterozygotic genotype Wt/delta32 was present in 20% of patients. After CM-G administration, a significant increase in CD3(+), CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes was observed in patients who displayed the wild-type genotype for the CCR5 chemokine receptor. No association was found between patient's age or length of ADT and increase in T lymphocyte cells. The results demonstrated the ability of CM-G to stimulate CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells in the peripheral blood of patients carrying a wild-type CCR5 genotype, suggesting an interaction between immunomodulation by CM-G and the CCR5 receptor. PMID:21827290

  20. Dual function of Ccr5 during Langat virus encephalitis - Reduction of neutrophil-mediated CNS inflammation and increase in T cell-mediated viral clearance

    PubMed Central

    Michlmayr, Daniela; Bardina, Susana V.; Rodriguez, Carlos A.; Pletnev, Alexander G.; Lim, Jean K.

    2016-01-01

    Tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) is a vector-transmitted flavivirus that causes potentially fatal neurological infection. There are thousands of cases reported annually, and despite the availability of an effective vaccine, the incidence of TBEV is increasing worldwide. Importantly, up to thirty percent of affected individuals will develop long-term neurologic sequelae. We investigated the role of chemokine receptor Ccr5 in a mouse model of TBEV infection using the naturally attenuated tick-borne flavivirus, Langat virus (LGTV). Ccr5-deficient mice presented with an increase in viral replication within the CNS and decreased survival during LGTV encephalitis when compared to wild type (WT) controls. This enhanced susceptibility was due to the temporal lag in lymphocyte migration into the CNS. Adoptive transfer of WT T cells, but not Ccr5-deficient T cells, was able to significantly improve survival outcome in LGTV-infected Ccr5-deficient mice. Concomitantly, a significant increase in neutrophil migration into the CNS in LGTV-infected Ccr5−/− mice was documented at the late stage of infection. Antibody-mediated depletion of neutrophils in Ccr5−/− mice resulted in a significant improvement in mortality, a decrease in viral load, and a decrease in overall tissue damage in the CNS when compared to isotype control-treated mice. Ccr5 is crucial in not only directing T cells towards the LGTV-infected brain, but also in suppressing neutrophil-mediated inflammation within the CNS. PMID:27183602

  1. Role of CCR5 and its ligands in the control of vascular inflammation and leukocyte recruitment required for acute excitotoxic seizure induction and neural damage.

    PubMed

    Louboutin, Jean-Pierre; Chekmasova, Alena; Marusich, Elena; Agrawal, Lokesh; Strayer, David S

    2011-02-01

    Chemokines may play a role in leukocyte migration across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) during neuroinflammation and other neuropathological processes, such as epilepsy. We investigated the role of the chemokine receptor CCR5 in seizures. We used a rat model based on intraperitoneal kainic acid (KA) administration. Four months before KA injection, adult rats were given femoral intramarrow inoculations of SV (RNAiR5-RevM10.AU1), which carries an interfering RNA (RNAi) against CCR5, plus a marker epitope (AU1), or its monofunctional RNAi-carrying homologue, SV(RNAiR5). This treatment lowered expression of CCR5 in circulating cells. In control rats, seizures induced elevated expression of CCR5 ligands MIP-1α and RANTES in the microvasculature, increased BBB leakage and CCR5(+) cells, as well as neuronal loss, inflammation, and gliosis in the hippocampi. Animals given either the bifunctional or the monofunctional vector were largely protected from KA-induced seizures, neuroinflammation, BBB damage, and neuron loss. Brain CCR5 mRNA was reduced. Rats receiving RNAiR5-bearing vectors showed far greater repair responses: increased neuronal proliferation, and decreased production of MIP-1α and RANTES. Controls received unrelated SV(BUGT) vectors. Decrease in CCR5 in circulating cells strongly protected from excitotoxin-induced seizures, BBB leakage, CNS injury, and inflammation, and facilitated neurogenic repair. PMID:20940264

  2. Dual Function of Ccr5 during Langat Virus Encephalitis: Reduction in Neutrophil-Mediated Central Nervous System Inflammation and Increase in T Cell-Mediated Viral Clearance.

    PubMed

    Michlmayr, Daniela; Bardina, Susana V; Rodriguez, Carlos A; Pletnev, Alexander G; Lim, Jean K

    2016-06-01

    Tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) is a vector-transmitted flavivirus that causes potentially fatal neurologic infection. There are thousands of cases reported annually, and despite the availability of an effective vaccine, the incidence of TBEV is increasing worldwide. Importantly, up to 30% of affected individuals develop long-term neurologic sequelae. We investigated the role of chemokine receptor Ccr5 in a mouse model of TBEV infection using the naturally attenuated tick-borne flavivirus Langat virus (LGTV). Ccr5-deficient mice presented with an increase in viral replication within the CNS and decreased survival during LGTV encephalitis compared with wild-type controls. This enhanced susceptibility was due to the temporal lag in lymphocyte migration into the CNS. Adoptive transfer of wild-type T cells, but not Ccr5-deficient T cells, significantly improved survival outcome in LGTV-infected Ccr5-deficient mice. Concomitantly, a significant increase in neutrophil migration into the CNS in LGTV-infected Ccr5(-/-) mice was documented at the late stage of infection. Ab-mediated depletion of neutrophils in Ccr5(-/-) mice resulted in a significant improvement in mortality, a decrease in viral load, and a decrease in overall tissue damage in the CNS compared with isotype control-treated mice. Ccr5 is crucial in directing T cells toward the LGTV-infected brain, as well as in suppressing neutrophil-mediated inflammation within the CNS. PMID:27183602

  3. Genetic Susceptibility to Cardiac and Digestive Clinical Forms of Chronic Chagas Disease: Involvement of the CCR5 59029 A/G Polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Amanda Priscila; Bernardo, Cássia Rubia; Camargo, Ana Vitória da Silveira; Ronchi, Luiz Sérgio; Borim, Aldenis Albaneze; Brandão de Mattos, Cinara Cássia; de Campos Júnior, Eumildo; Castiglioni, Lílian; Netinho, João Gomes; Cavasini, Carlos Eugênio; Bestetti, Reinaldo Bulgarelli; de Mattos, Luiz Carlos

    2015-01-01

    The clinical manifestations of chronic Chagas disease include the cardiac form of the disease and the digestive form. Not all the factors that act in the variable clinical course of this disease are known. This study investigated whether the CCR5Δ32 (rs333) and CCR5 59029 A/G (promoter region—rs1799987) polymorphisms of the CCR5 gene are associated with different clinical forms of chronic Chagas disease and with the severity of left ventricular systolic dysfunction in patients with chronic Chagas heart disease (CCHD). The antibodies anti-T. cruzi were identified by ELISA. PCR and PCR-RFLP were used to identify the CCR5Δ32 and CCR5 59029 A/G polymorphisms. The chi-square test was used to compare variables between groups. There was a higher frequency of the AA genotype in patients with CCHD compared with patients with the digestive form of the disease and the control group. The results also showed a high frequency of the AG genotype in patients with the digestive form of the disease compared to the other groups. The results of this study show that the CCR5Δ32 polymorphism does not seem to influence the different clinical manifestations of Chagas disease but there is involvement of the CCR5 59029 A/G polymorphism in susceptibility to the different forms of chronic Chagas disease. Besides, these polymorphisms do not influence left ventricular systolic dysfunction in patients with CCHD. PMID:26599761

  4. Balanced polymorphism in bottlenecked populations: the case of the CCR5 5' cis-regulatory region in Amazonian Amerindians.

    PubMed

    Ramalho, Rodrigo F; Santos, Eduardo J M; Guerreiro, João F; Meyer, Diogo

    2010-09-01

    The 5' cis-regulatory region of the CCR5 gene exhibits a strong signature of balancing selection in several human populations. Here we analyze the polymorphism of this region in Amerindians from Amazonia, who have a complex demographic history, including recent bottlenecks that are known to reduce genetic variability. Amerindians show high nucleotide diversity (pi = 0.27%) and significantly positive Tajima's D, and carry haplotypes associated with weak and strong gene expression. To evaluate whether these signatures of balancing selection could be explained by demography, we perform neutrality tests based on empiric and simulated data. The observed Tajima's D was higher than that of other world populations; higher than that found for 18 noncoding regions of South Amerindians, and higher than 99.6% of simulated genealogies, which assume nonequilibrium conditions. Moreover, comparing Amerindians and Asians, the Fst for CCR5 cis-regulatory region was unusually low, in relation to neutral markers. These findings indicate that, despite their complex demographic history, South Amerindians carry a detectable signature of selection on the CCR5 cis-regulatory region. PMID:20538030

  5. CD4+ CCR5+ and CD4+ CCR3+ lymphocyte subset and monocyte apoptosis in patients with acute visceral leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Potestio, Marcella; D'Agostino, Pietro; Romano, Giuseppina Colonna; Milano, Salvatore; Ferlazzo, Viviana; Aquino, Alessandra; Di Bella, Gloria; Caruso, Rosalba; Gambino, Giuseppe; Vitale, Giustina; Mansueto, Serafino; Cillari, Enrico

    2004-01-01

    The potential involvement of apoptosis in the pathogenesis of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) was examined by studying spontaneous and Leishmania antigen (LAg)-induced apoptosis using cryopreserved peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of Sicilian patients with VL. Results indicate that monocytes and T lymphocytes from acute VL patients show a significantly higher level of apoptosis compared with that observed in healed subjects. The percentage of apoptotic cells was higher in monocytes than in T lymphocytes. T cells involved in programmed cell death (PCD) were mainly of the CD4+ phenotype. In particular, the T helper 1-type (Th1) subset, as evaluated by chemokine receptor-5 (CCR5) expression, is involved in this process. Cell death in Th1-type uses a CD95-mediated mechanism. Furthermore, Th1-type CCR5+ cells are prone to cell suicide in an autocrine or paracrine way, as attested by enhanced expression of CD95L in acute VL patients. The reduction in Th1-type cells by apoptosis was confirmed by the decrease in interferon-γ secretion. In conclusion, apoptosis of monocytes, CD4+ and CD4+ CCR5+ T cells could be involved in the failure of cell mediated immunity that is responsible for severe immune-depression in VL. PMID:15379987

  6. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Immune Cell Receptors, Coreceptors, and Cofactors: Implications for Prevention and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Woodham, Andrew W; Skeate, Joseph G; Sanna, Adriana M; Taylor, Julia R; Da Silva, Diane M; Cannon, Paula M; Kast, W Martin

    2016-07-01

    In the last three decades, extensive research on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has highlighted its capability to exploit a variety of strategies to enter and infect immune cells. Although CD4(+) T cells are well known as the major HIV target, with infection occurring through the canonical combination of the cluster of differentiation 4 (CD4) receptor and either the C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) or C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) coreceptors, HIV has also been found to enter other important immune cell types such as macrophages, dendritic cells, Langerhans cells, B cells, and granulocytes. Interestingly, the expression of distinct cellular cofactors partially regulates the rate in which HIV infects each distinct cell type. Furthermore, HIV can benefit from the acquisition of new proteins incorporated into its envelope during budding events. While several publications have investigated details of how HIV manipulates particular cell types or subtypes, an up-to-date comprehensive review on HIV tropism for different immune cells is lacking. Therefore, this review is meant to focus on the different receptors, coreceptors, and cofactors that HIV exploits to enter particular immune cells. Additionally, prophylactic approaches that have targeted particular molecules associated with HIV entry and infection of different immune cells will be discussed. Unveiling the underlying cellular receptors and cofactors that lead to HIV preference for specific immune cell populations is crucial in identifying novel preventative/therapeutic targets for comprehensive strategies to eliminate viral infection. PMID:27410493

  7. Prediction of R5, X4, and R5X4 HIV-1 Coreceptor Usage with Evolved Neural Networks

    PubMed Central

    Lamers, Susanna L.; Salemi, Marco; McGrath, Michael S.; Fogel, Gary B.

    2012-01-01

    The HIV-1 genome is highly heterogeneous. This variation affords the virus a wide range of molecular properties, including the ability to infect cell types, such as macrophages and lymphocytes, expressing different chemokine receptors on the cell surface. In particular, R5 HIV-1 viruses use CCR5 as a coreceptor for viral entry, X4 viruses use CXCR4, whereas some viral strains, known as R5X4 or D-tropic, have the ability to utilize both coreceptors. X4 and R5X4 viruses are associated with rapid disease progression to AIDS. R5X4 viruses differ in that they have yet to be characterized by the examination of the genetic sequence of HIV-1 alone. In this study, a series of experiments was performed to evaluate different strategies of feature selection and neural network optimization. We demonstrate the use of artificial neural networks trained via evolutionary computation to predict viral coreceptor usage. The results indicate the identification of R5X4 viruses with a predictive accuracy of 75.5 percent. PMID:18451438

  8. Role of CCR5 and its ligands in the control of vascular inflammation and leukocyte recruitment required for acute excitotoxic seizure induction and neural damage

    PubMed Central

    Louboutin, Jean-Pierre; Chekmasova, Alena; Marusich, Elena; Agrawal, Lokesh; Strayer, David S.

    2011-01-01

    Chemokines may play a role in leukocyte migration across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) during neuroinflammation and other neuropathological processes, such as epilepsy. We investigated the role of the chemokine receptor CCR5 in seizures. We used a rat model based on intraperitoneal kainic acid (KA) administration. Four months before KA injection, adult rats were given femoral intramarrow inoculations of SV (RNAiR5-RevM10.AU1), which carries an interfering RNA (RNAi) against CCR5, plus a marker epitope (AU1), or its monofunctional RNAi-carrying homologue, SV(RNAiR5). This treatment lowered expression of CCR5 in circulating cells. In control rats, seizures induced elevated expression of CCR5 ligands MIP-1α and RANTES in the microvasculature, increased BBB leakage and CCR5+ cells, as well as neuronal loss, inflammation, and gliosis in the hippocampi. Animals given either the bifunctional or the monofunctional vector were largely protected from KA-induced seizures, neuroinflammation, BBB damage, and neuron loss. Brain CCR5 mRNA was reduced. Rats receiving RNAiR5-bearing vectors showed far greater repair responses: increased neuronal proliferation, and decreased production of MIP-1α and RANTES. Controls received unrelated SV(BUGT) vectors. Decrease in CCR5 in circulating cells strongly protected from excitotoxin-induced seizures, BBB leakage, CNS injury, and inflammation, and facilitated neurogenic repair.—Louboutin, J.-P., Chekmasova, A., Marusich, E., Agrawal, L., Strayer, D. S. Role of CCR5 and its ligands in the control of vascular inflammation and leukocyte recruitment required for acute excitotoxic seizure induction and neural damage. PMID:20940264

  9. Prevalence of CCR5-Δ32 and CCR2-V64I polymorphisms in a mixed population from northeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ferreira-Fernandes, H; Santos, A C C; Motta, F J N; Canalle, R; Yoshioka, F K N; Burbano, R R; Rey, J A; da Silva, B B; Pinto, G R

    2015-01-01

    Chemokines are low-molecular weight proteins that play a key role in inflammatory processes. Genomic variations in chemokine receptors are associated with the susceptibility to various diseases. Polymorphisms in chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5)-Δ32 and CCR2-V64I are related to human immunodeficiency virus infection resistance, which has led to genetic association studies for several other diseases. Given the heterogeneous distribution of these polymorphisms in different global populations and within Brazilian populations, we analyzed the prevalence of CCR5-Δ32 and CCR2-V64I polymorphisms in a mixed population from northeastern Brazil. The study included 223 individuals from the general population of the city of Parnaíba, Piauí, who had a mean age of 73 years. Of these individuals, 37.2% were men and 62.8% were women. Polymorphisms were analyzed using DNA extracted from peripheral blood leukocytes by using polymerase chain reaction alone (CCR5-Δ32) or accompanied by restriction endonuclease digestion (CCR2-V64I). In both cases, the genotypes were determined using 8% polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and silver nitrate staining. The population conformed to Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium for both the loci studied. No individuals were homozygous for allele-Δ32, which was present in 1.8% of the population, whereas allele-64I was present in 13.9% of the participants studied; 74.9% were homozygous for the wild-type allele, while 22.4 and 2.7% were heterozygous and homozygous for the mutant allele, respectively. Additional studies are needed to investigate the relationship between these polymorphisms and disease etiopathogenesis in reference populations. PMID:26436495

  10. CCR5 plays an important role in resolving an inflammatory response to single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun-Jung; Roh, Jinkyu; Kim, Soo Nam; Kim, Younghun; Han, Sang-Bae; Hong, Jin Tae

    2013-08-01

    Owing to the development of new materials and technology, the pollutants in the environment are becoming more varied and complex over time. In our previous study using ICR mice, we suggested that a single intratracheal instillation of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) induced early lung fibrosis and subchronic tissue damage. In the present study, to investigate the role of CCR5 in inflammatory responses to the uptake of SWCNTs, we compared BAL (Bronchoalveolar lavage) cell composition, cell cycles, cytokines, cell phenotypes, inflammatory response-related proteins, cell surface receptors and histopathology using CCR5 knockout (KO) and wild-type mice. Results showed that the distribution of neutrophils in BAL fluid significantly decreased in KO mice. The expression of apoptosis-related proteins including caspase-3, p53, phospho-p53, p21 and cleaved PARP, TGF βl and mesothelin markedly increased in KO mice compared with wild-type mice. Histopathological lesions were also more frequently noted in KO mice. Moreover, the secretion of IL-13 and IL-17 with IL-6 significantly increased in KO mice compared with wild-type mice, whereas that of IL-12 significantly decreased in comparison to wild-type mice. The distribution of B cells and CD8+ T cells was predominant in the inflammatory responses in KO mice, whereas that of T cells and CD4+ T cells was predominant in the inflammatory responses in wild-type mice. Furthermore, the expression of CCR4 and CCR7 significantly increased in KO mice. Based on these results, we suggest that the absence of CCR5 delays the resolution of inflammatory responses triggered by SWCNTs inflowing into the lungs and shifts inflammatory response for SWCNTs clearance from Th1-type to Th2-type. PMID:22438032

  11. Influence of CCR5 and CCR2 Genetic Variants in the Resistance/Susceptibility to HIV in Serodiscordant Couples from Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Zapata, Wildeman; Aguilar-Jiménez, Wbeimar; Pineda-Trujillo, Nicolás; Rojas, Winston; Estrada, Hernando

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The main genetic factor related to HIV-1 resistance is the CCR5-Δ32 mutation; however, the homozygous genotype is uncommon. The CCR5-Δ32 mutation along with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the CCR5 promoter and the CCR2-V64I mutation have been included in seven human haplogroups (HH) previously associated with resistance/susceptibility to HIV-1 infection and different rates of AIDS progression. Here, we determined the association of the CCR5 promoter SNPs, the CCR5-Δ32 mutation, CCR2-V64I SNP, and HH frequencies with resistance/susceptibility to HIV-1 infection in a cohort of HIV-1-serodiscordant couples from Colombia. Seventy HIV-1-exposed, but seronegative (HESN) individuals, 57 seropositives (SP), and 112 healthy controls (HC) were included. The CCR5-Δ32 mutation and CCR2-V64I SNP were identified by PCR, and the CCR5 promoter SNPs were evaluated by sequencing. None of the individuals exhibited a homozygous Δ32 genotype; the CCR2-I allele was more frequent in HESN (34%) than HC (23%) (p=0.039, OR=1.672). The frequency of the 29G allele was higher in SP than HC (p=0.003, OR=3). HHF2 showed a higher frequency in HC (19%) than SP (9%) (p=0.027), while HHG1 was more frequent in SP (11.1%) than in HC (4.2%) (p=0.019). The AGACCAC-CCR2-I-CCR5 wild-type haplotype showed a higher frequency in SP (14.2%) than in HC (3.7%) (p=0.001). In conclusion, the CCR5-Δ32 allele is not responsible for HIV-1 resistance in this HESN group; however, the CCR2-I allele could be protective, while the 29G allele might increase the likelihood of acquiring HIV-1 infection. HHG1 and the AGACCAC-CCR2-I-CCR5 wild-type haplotype might promote HIV-1 infection while HHF2 might be related to resistance. However, additional studies are required to evaluate the implications of these findings. PMID:24098976

  12. Upregulation of Surface Feline CXCR4 Expression following Ectopic Expression of CCR5: Implications for Studies of the Cell Tropism of Feline Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Willett, Brian J.; Cannon, Celia A.; Hosie, Margaret J.

    2002-01-01

    Feline CXCR4 and CCR5 were expressed in feline cells as fusion proteins with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). Expression of the EGFP fusion proteins was localized to the cell membrane, and surface expression of CXCR4 was confirmed by using a cross-species-reactive anti-CXCR4 monoclonal antibody. Ectopic expression of feline CCR5 enhanced expression of either endogenous feline CXCR4 or exogenous feline or human CXCR4 expressed from a retrovirus vector, indicating that experiments investigating the effect of CCR5 expression on feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection must be interpreted with caution. Susceptibility to infection with cell culture-adapted strains of FIV or to syncytium formation following transfection with a eukaryotic vector expressing an env gene from a cell culture-adapted strain of virus correlated with expression of either human or feline CXCR4, whereas feline CCR5 had no effect. In contrast, neither CXCR4 nor CCR5 rendered cells permissive to either productive infection with primary strains of FIV or syncytium formation following transfection with primary env gene expression vectors. Screening a panel of Ghost cell lines expressing diverse human chemokine receptors confirmed that CXCR4 alone supported fusion mediated by the FIV Env from cell culture-adapted viruses. CXCR4 expression was upregulated in Ghost cells coexpressing CXCR4 and CCR5 or CXCR4, CCR5, and CCR3, and susceptibility to FIV infection could be correlated with the level of CXCR4 expression. The data suggest that β-chemokine receptors may influence FIV infection by modulating the expression of CXCR4. PMID:12186908

  13. A role for CCR5(+)CD4 T cells in cutaneous psoriasis and for CD103(+) CCR4(+) CD8 Teff cells in the associated systemic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sgambelluri, Francesco; Diani, Marco; Altomare, Andrea; Frigerio, Elena; Drago, Lorenzo; Granucci, Francesca; Banfi, Giuseppe; Altomare, Gianfranco; Reali, Eva

    2016-06-01

    Recent results have identified critical components of the T cell response involved in the initiation and amplification phases of psoriasis. However the link between T cell responses arising in the skin and the systemic inflammation associated with severe psoriasis is largely unknown. We hypothesized that specific subsets of memory T cells recirculating from the skin could play a role. We therefore dissected the circulating memory T cell compartment in patients by analyzing the TCM, TEM and Teff phenotype, the pattern of CCR4 and CCR5 chemokine receptor expression and the expression of the tissue homing molecule CD103. For each subset we calculated the correlation with the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) and with the extent of systemic inflammation measured as serum level of the prototypic short pentraxin, C reactive protein (CRP). Validation was performed by comparison with gene expression data in psoriatic plaques. We found that circulating CD103(+)CCR4(+)CCR5(+) and CCR4(+)CCR6(-) CD8(+) Teff cells, were highly correlated with CRP levels as well as with the validated index PASI, reflecting a link between skin involvement and systemic inflammation in patients with severe psoriasis. In addition we observed a contraction of circulating CCR5(+) T cells in psoriasis patients, with a highly significant inverse correlation between CCR5(+)CD4 T cells and the PASI score. Increased expression of CCR5 and CCL5 genes in psoriatic skin lesions was consistent with an accumulation of CCR5(+) cells in psoriatic plaques indicating a role for CCR5/CCL5 axis in disease pathogenesis. PMID:27068801

  14. 27-Hydroxycholesterol and 7alpha-hydroxycholesterol trigger a sequence of events leading to migration of CCR5-expressing Th1 lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sun-Mi; Kim, Bo-Young; Lee, Sae-A; Eo, Seong-Kug; Yun, Yungdae; Kim, Chi-Dae; Kim, Koanhoi

    2014-02-01

    Th1 lymphocytes are predominant in atherosclerotic lesions. However, mechanisms involved in the Th1 predominance are unknown. We have investigated the possibility of Th1 lymphocyte recruitment in a cholesterol-rich milieu. A high cholesterol diet resulted in enhanced expression of CCR5 ligands, including CCL3 and CCL4, but not of proatherogenic CXCR3 ligands, in atherosclerotic arteries of ApoE{sup −/−} mice. 27-Hydroxycholesterol and 7α-hydroxycholesterol, cholesterol oxides (oxysterols) detected in abundance in atherosclerotic lesions, greatly induced the transcription of CCL3 and CCL4 genes in addition to enhancing secretion of corresponding proteins by THP-1 monocytic cells. However, an identical or even higher concentration of cholesterol, 7β-hydroxycholesterol, and 7-ketocholsterol did not influence expression of these chemokines. Conditioned media containing the CCR5 ligands secreted from THP-1 cells induced migration of Jurkat T cells expressing CCR5, a characteristic chemokine receptor of Th1 cells, but not of Jurkat T cells that do not express CCR5. The migration of CCR5-expressing Jurkat T cells was abrogated in the presence of a CCR5-neutralizing antibody. 27-Hydroxycholesterol and 7α-hydroxycholesterol enhanced phosphorylation of Akt. Pharmacological inhibitors of phosphoinositide-3-kinase/Akt pathways blocked transcription as well as secretion of CCL3 and CCL4 in conjunction with attenuated migration of CCR5-expressing Jurkat T cells. This is the first report on the involvement of cholesterol oxides in migration of distinct subtype of T cells. We propose that 27-hydroxycholesterol and 7α-hydroxycholesterol can trigger a sequence of events that leads to recruitment of Th1 lymphocytes and phosphoinositide-3-kinase/Akt pathways play a major role in the process. - Graphical abstract: Th1 lymphocytes are predominant in atherosclerotic lesions. However, mechanisms involved in the Th1 predominance are unknown. We have investigated the possibility of

  15. Anti-phospholipid human monoclonal antibodies inhibit CCR5-tropic HIV-1 and induce β-chemokines

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Hua-Xin; Alam, S. Munir; Scearce, Richard M.; Plonk, M. Kelly; Kozink, Daniel M.; Drinker, Mark S.; Zhang, Ruijun; Xia, Shi-Mao; Sutherland, Laura L.; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Giles, Ian P.; Kappes, John C.; Ochsenbauer-Jambor, Christina; Edmonds, Tara G.; Soares, Melina; Barbero, Gustavo; Forthal, Donald N.; Landucci, Gary; Chang, Connie; King, Steven W.; Kavlie, Anita; Denny, Thomas N.; Hwang, Kwan-Ki; Chen, Pojen P.; Thorpe, Philip E.; Montefiori, David C.

    2010-01-01

    Traditional antibody-mediated neutralization of HIV-1 infection is thought to result from the binding of antibodies to virions, thus preventing virus entry. However, antibodies that broadly neutralize HIV-1 are rare and are not induced by current vaccines. We report that four human anti-phospholipid monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) (PGN632, P1, IS4, and CL1) inhibit HIV-1 CCR5-tropic (R5) primary isolate infection of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) with 80% inhibitory concentrations of <0.02 to ∼10 µg/ml. Anti-phospholipid mAbs inhibited PBMC HIV-1 infection in vitro by mechanisms involving binding to monocytes and triggering the release of MIP-1α and MIP-1β. The release of these β-chemokines explains both the specificity for R5 HIV-1 and the activity of these mAbs in PBMC cultures containing both primary lymphocytes and monocytes. PMID:20368576

  16. Differences in T cell distribution and CCR5 expression in HIV-positive and HIV-exposed seronegative persons who inject drugs.

    PubMed

    Kallas, Eveli; Huik, Kristi; Türk, Silver; Pauskar, Merit; Jõgeda, Ene-Ly; Šunina, Marina; Karki, Tõnis; Des Jarlais, Don; Uusküla, Anneli; Avi, Radko; Lutsar, Irja

    2016-06-01

    Some individuals remain uninfected despite repeated exposure to HIV. This protection against HIV has been partly associated with altered T cell subset distributions and CCR5 expression levels. However, the majority of studies have been conducted in sexually exposed subjects. We aimed to assess whether HIV infection and intravenous drug use were associated with differences in CCR5 expression, immune activation on the CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and T cell distribution among Caucasian persons who inject drugs (PWIDs). Analyses of the data from 41 HIV-positive PWIDs, 47 HIV-exposed seronegative PWIDs (ESNs) and 47 age- and gender-matched HIV-negative non-drug users are presented. Of all of the study subjects, 111 (82 %) were male, and the median age was 29 years. T cell phenotyping was performed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells with multicolour flow cytometry using anti-CD3, CD4, CD8, CD45RA, CD45RO, HLA-DR and CCR5 antibodies. The ESNs exhibited greater levels of immune activation and higher percentages of CD4+ CD45RA+RO+ and CD8+ CD45RA+RO+ cells compared to the controls but not the HIV-positive people. The CCR5 expression on the CD4+ T cell subsets in the ESNs was lower than that in the controls but similar to that the HIV positives. The percentages of CCR5+ T cells were similar in all study groups and in most of the studied cell populations. Intravenous drug use was similarly associated with differences in T cell subset distributions and CCR5 expression among both the HIV-positive and HIV-negative PWIDs compared with the controls. PMID:26696529

  17. Escape of HIV-1 from a Small Molecule CCR5 Inhibitor Is Not Associated with a Fitness Loss

    PubMed Central

    Anastassopoulou, Cleo G; Marozsan, Andre J; Matet, Alexandre; Snyder, Amy D; Arts, Eric J; Kuhmann, Shawn E; Moore, John P

    2007-01-01

    Fitness is a parameter used to quantify how well an organism adapts to its environment; in the present study, fitness is a measure of how well strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replicate in tissue culture. When HIV-1 develops resistance in vitro or in vivo to antiretroviral drugs such as reverse transcriptase or protease inhibitors, its fitness is often impaired. Here, we have investigated whether the development of resistance in vitro to a small molecule CCR5 inhibitor, AD101, has an associated fitness cost. To do this, we developed a growth-competition assay involving dual infections with molecularly cloned viruses that are essentially isogenic outside the env genes under study. Real-time TaqMan quantitative PCR (QPCR) was used to quantify each competing virus individually via probes specific to different, phenotypically silent target sequences engineered within their vif genes. Head-to-head competition assays of env clones derived from the AD101 escape mutant isolate, the inhibitor-sensitive parental virus, and a passage control virus showed that AD101 resistance was not associated with a fitness loss. This observation is consistent with the retention of the resistant phenotype when the escape mutant was cultured for a total of 20 passages in the absence of the selecting compound. Amino acid substitutions in the V3 region of gp120 that confer complete AD101 resistance cause a fitness loss when introduced into an AD101-sensitive, parental clone; however, in the resistant isolate, changes elsewhere in env that occurred prior to the substitutions within V3 appear to compensate for the adverse effect of the V3 changes on replicative capacity. These in vitro studies may have implications for the development and management of resistance to other CCR5 inhibitors that are being evaluated clinically for the treatment of HIV-1 infection. PMID:17542646

  18. Distribution Of CCR-5Δ32, CCR2-64I, and SDF-1-3′A Alleles Among Jordanians

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Haweleh, Laila J.; Alzoubi, Karem H.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Entry of HIV virus into cells is mediated by chemokine receptors. Genetic variations in chemokine receptors have been shown to modulate susceptibility to HIV infection and disease course. In this study, the frequencies of CCR5 (CCR5-Δ32), CCR2 (CCR2-64I), and SDF-1 (SDF-1-3′) gene polymorphisms were determined in a Jordanian population. A total of 540 subjects were randomly selected from different regions of Jordan (South, Middle, and North). Six individuals were found to carry the CCR5-Δ32 allele (0.6%) and only in the heterozygous genotype. The frequencies of CCR2-64I and SDF1-3′A were 17.5% and 34.2%, respectively. In addition, no significant difference in the distribution of the examined polymorphisms among different regions of Jordan was detected. In conclusion, the CCR5-Δ32 allele is rare, whereas the CCR2-64I and SDF1-3′A alleles are common among Jordanians. PMID:22770415

  19. Marsdenia tenacissima extract suppresses A549 cell migration through regulation of CCR5-CCL5 axis, Rho C, and phosphorylated FAK.

    PubMed

    Lin, Sen-Sen; Li, Fang-Fang; Sun, Li; Fan, Wei; Gu, Ming; Zhang, Lu-Yong; Qin, Song; Yuan, Sheng-Tao

    2016-03-01

    Marsdenia tenacissima, a traditional Chinese medicine, is long been used to treat various diseases including asthma, cancer, trachitis, tonsillitis, pharyngitis, cystitis, and pneumonia. Although Marsdenia tenacissima has been demonstrated to have strong anti-tumor effects against primary tumors, its effect on cancer metastasis remains to be defined, and the molecular mechanism underlying the anti-metastatic effect is unknown. In the present study, we investigated the effects of XAP (an extract of Marsdenia tenacissima) on A549 lung cancer cell migration and explored the role of CCR5-CCL5 axis in the anti-metastatic effects of XAP. Our resutls showed that XAP inhibited A549 lung cancer cell migration and invasion in a dose-dependent manner. The protein levels of CCR5, but not CCR9 and CXCR4, were decreased by XAP. The secretion of CCL5, the ligand of CCR5, was reduced by XAP. XAP down-regulated Rho C expression and FAK phosphorylation. In conclusion, XAP inhibited A549 cell migration and invasion through down-regulation of CCR5-CCL5 axis, Rho C, and FAK. PMID:27025367

  20. Is the European spatial distribution of the HIV-1-resistant CCR5-Delta32 allele formed by a breakdown of the pathocenosis due to the historical Roman expansion?

    PubMed

    Faure, Eric; Royer-Carenzi, Manuela

    2008-12-01

    We studied the possible effects of the expansion of ancient Mediterranean civilizations during the five centuries before and after Christ on the European distribution of the mutant allele for the chemokine receptor gene CCR5 which has a 32-bp deletion (CCR5-Delta32). There is a strong evidence for the unitary origin of the CCR5-Delta32 mutation, this it is found principally in Europe and Western Asia, with generally a north-south downhill cline frequency. Homozygous carriers of this mutation show a resistance to HIV-1 infection and a slower progression towards AIDS. However, HIV has clearly emerged too recently to have been the selective force on CCR5. Our analyses showed strong negative correlations in Europe between the allele frequency and two historical parameters, i.e. the first colonization dates by the great ancient Mediterranean civilizations, and the distances from the Northern frontiers of the Roman Empire in its greatest expansion. Moreover, other studies have shown that the deletion frequencies in both German Bronze Age and Swedish Neolithic populations were similar to those found in the corresponding modern populations, and this deletion has been found in ancient DNA of around 7000 years ago, suggesting that in the past, the deletion frequency could have been relatively high in European populations. In addition, in West Nile virus pathogenesis, CCR5 plays an antimicrobial role showing that host genetic factors are highly pathogen-specific. Our results added to all these previous data suggest that the actual European allele frequency distribution might not be due to genes spreading, but to a negative selection resulting in the spread of pathogens principally during Roman expansion. Indeed, as gene flows from colonizers to European native populations were extremely low, the mutational changes might be associated with vulnerability to imported infections. To date, the nature of the parasites remains unknown; however, zoonoses could be incriminated. PMID

  1. Acute response of peripheral CCr5 chemoreceptor and NK cells in individuals submitted to a single session of low-intensity strength exercise with blood flow restriction.

    PubMed

    Dorneles, Gilson Pires; Colato, Alana Schraiber; Galvão, Simone Lunelli; Ramis, Thiago Rozales; Ribeiro, Jerri Luiz; Romão, Pedro Roosevelt; Peres, Alessandra

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the peripheral expression of natural killers and CCR5 in a session of low-intensity strength training with vascular occlusion and in high-intensity training. Young males were randomized into session groups of a high-intensity strength training (HI) and a session group of low-intensity strength training with vascular occlusion (LI-BFR). The exercise session consisted in knee extension and bicep curl in 80% 1RM (HI) and 30% 1RM (LI-BFR) with equalized volumes. Blood collection was made before, immediately after and 24 h after each training session. Immunophenotyping was carried out through CD195+ (CCR5) e CD3-CD16+CD56+ (NK) in peripheral blood and analysed by flow cytometry and presented in frequency (%). Peripheral frequency of NK cells showed no significant difference in LI-BFR group in time effect, while a gradual reduction of NK cells was identified in HI group in before-24 h postexercise and after-24 h postexercise comparison. However, significant differences have been found in relative change of NK cells immediately after exercise between sessions. In addition, HI and LI-BFR groups showed a significant reduction in the cells expressed CCR5 during 24 h postsession compared to the postsession, but CCR5 also differed when comparing before-24 h after session in the HI group. No differences were observed amongst the groups. LIO induced CCR5 response similar to the HI session, while the NK cells remained in similar frequency during the studied moments in LI-BFR, but not in HI group, suggesting that local hypoxia created by the blood flow restriction was able to prevent a change in the frequency of peripheral cells and a possible immunosuppression. PMID:25643617

  2. Impact of CCR5delta32 host genetic background and disease progression on HIV-1 intrahost evolutionary processes: efficient hypothesis testing through hierarchical phylogenetic models.

    PubMed

    Edo-Matas, Diana; Lemey, Philippe; Tom, Jennifer A; Serna-Bolea, Cèlia; van den Blink, Agnes E; van 't Wout, Angélique B; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Suchard, Marc A

    2011-05-01

    The interplay between C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) host genetic background, disease progression, and intrahost HIV-1 evolutionary dynamics remains unclear because differences in viral evolution between hosts limit the ability to draw conclusions across hosts stratified into clinically relevant populations. Similar inference problems are proliferating across many measurably evolving pathogens for which intrahost sequence samples are readily available. To this end, we propose novel hierarchical phylogenetic models (HPMs) that incorporate fixed effects to test for differences in dynamics across host populations in a formal statistical framework employing stochastic search variable selection and model averaging. To clarify the role of CCR5 host genetic background and disease progression on viral evolutionary patterns, we obtain gp120 envelope sequences from clonal HIV-1 variants isolated at multiple time points in the course of infection from populations of HIV-1-infected individuals who only harbored CCR5-using HIV-1 variants at all time points. Presence or absence of a CCR5 wt/Δ32 genotype and progressive or long-term nonprogressive course of infection stratify the clinical populations in a two-way design. As compared with the standard approach of analyzing sequences from each patient independently, the HPM provides more efficient estimation of evolutionary parameters such as nucleotide substitution rates and d(N)/d(S) rate ratios, as shown by significant shrinkage of the estimator variance. The fixed effects also correct for nonindependence of data between populations and results in even further shrinkage of individual patient estimates. Model selection suggests an association between nucleotide substitution rate and disease progression, but a role for CCR5 genotype remains elusive. Given the absence of clear d(N)/d(S) differences between patient groups, delayed onset of AIDS symptoms appears to be solely associated with lower viral replication rates rather

  3. CD4-binding site alterations in CCR5-using HIV-1 envelopes influencing gp120-CD4 interactions and fusogenicity

    SciTech Connect

    Sterjovski, Jasminka; Churchill, Melissa J.; Roche, Michael; Ellett, Anne; Farrugia, William; Wesselingh, Steven L.; Cunningham, Anthony L.; Ramsland, Paul A.; Gorry, Paul R.

    2011-02-20

    CD4-binding site (CD4bs) alterations in gp120 contribute to different pathophysiological phenotypes of CCR5-using (R5) HIV-1 strains, but the potential structural basis is unknown. Here, we characterized functionally diverse R5 envelope (Env) clones (n = 16) to elucidate potential structural alterations within the gp120 CD4bs that influence Env function. Initially, we showed that the magnitude of gp120-CD4-binding correlates with increased fusogenicity and reduced CD4 dependence. Analysis of three-dimensional gp120 structural models revealed two CD4bs variants, D279 and N362, that were associated with reduced CD4 dependence. Further structural analysis showed that a wider aperture of the predicted CD4bs cavity, as constrained by the inner-most atoms at the gp120 V1V2 stem and the V5 loop, was associated with amino acid alterations within V5 and correlated with increased gp120-CD4 binding and increased fusogenicity. Our results provide evidence that the gp120 V5 loop may alter CD4bs conformation and contribute to increased gp120-CD4 interactions and Env fusogenicity.

  4. Improving HIV coreceptor usage prediction in the clinic using hints from next-generation sequencing data

    PubMed Central

    Pfeifer, Nico; Lengauer, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Due to the high mutation rate of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), drug-resistant-variants emerge frequently. Therefore, researchers are constantly searching for new ways to attack the virus. One new class of anti-HIV drugs is the class of coreceptor antagonists that block cell entry by occupying a coreceptor on CD4 cells. This type of drug just has an effect on the subset of HIVs that use the inhibited coreceptor. A good prediction of whether the viral population inside a patient is susceptible to the treatment is hence very important for therapy decisions and pre-requisite to administering the respective drug. The first prediction models were based on data from Sanger sequencing of the V3 loop of HIV. Recently, a method based on next-generation sequencing (NGS) data was introduced that predicts labels for each read separately and decides on the patient label through a percentage threshold for the resistant viral minority. Results: We model the prediction problem on the patient level taking the information of all reads from NGS data jointly into account. This enables us to improve prediction performance for NGS data, but we can also use the trained model to improve predictions based on Sanger sequencing data. Therefore, also laboratories without NGS capabilities can benefit from the improvements. Furthermore, we show which amino acids at which position are important for prediction success, giving clues on how the interaction mechanism between the V3 loop and the particular coreceptors might be influenced. Availability: A webserver is available at http://coreceptor.bioinf.mpi-inf.mpg.de. Contact: nico.pfeifer@mpi-inf.mpg.de PMID:22962486

  5. CCL5-403, CCR5-59029, and Delta32 polymorphisms and cancer risk: a meta-analysis based on 20,625 subjects.

    PubMed

    Ying, Houqun; Wang, Jie; Gao, Xueren

    2014-06-01

    Associations between CCL5-403, CCR5-59029, and Delta32 polymorphisms and cancer risk are inconclusive. To derive a more precise estimation of the association, we performed a meta-analysis by searching PubMed, EMBASE, Google scholar, and WanFang databases. A total of 20 eligible articles with 39 studies were included. Of those studies, there were 21 studies for CCR5-Delta32 polymorphism, 9 studies for CCR5-59029 polymorphism, and 9 studies for CCL5-403 polymorphism. Combined analysis revealed no associations between these polymorphisms and cancer risk. However, subgroup analysis by ethnicity suggested that CCR5-59029 polymorphism was associated with the risk of cancer among Asian populations (A vs. G: odds ratio (OR)=1.36, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.13-1.65, P H=0.27; AA vs. GG: OR=2.07, 95 % CI 1.37-3.12, P H=0.17; GA+AA vs. GG: OR=1.35, 95 % CI 1.03-1.77, P H=0.92; AA vs. GA+GG: OR=1.98, 95 % CI 1.01-3.88, P H=0.08), but not among Caucasian populations. CCL5-403 polymorphism was associated with the risk of cancer among African populations (A vs. G: OR=0.68, 95 % CI 0.55-0.83, P H=0.14; AA vs. GG: OR=0.51, 95 % CI 0.33-0.77, P H=0.52; AG vs. GG: OR=0.58, 95 % CI 0.42-0.80, P H=0.14; AG+AA vs. GG: OR=0.56, 95 % CI 0.41-0.75, P H=0.13), but not among Caucasian populations and Asian populations. Overall, this meta-analysis indicated that CCR5-Delta32 was not associated with the risk of cancer. CCR5-59029 polymorphism contributed to cancer risk among Asian populations, and CCL5-403 polymorphism was associated with the decreased risk of cancer among African populations. PMID:24687549

  6. Trans-spliced Cas9 allows cleavage of HBB and CCR5 genes in human cells using compact expression cassettes.

    PubMed

    Fine, Eli J; Appleton, Caleb M; White, Douglas E; Brown, Matthew T; Deshmukh, Harshavardhan; Kemp, Melissa L; Bao, Gang

    2015-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 systems have been used in a wide variety of biological studies; however, the large size of CRISPR/Cas9 presents challenges in packaging it within adeno-associated viruses (AAVs) for clinical applications. We identified a two-cassette system expressing pieces of the S. pyogenes Cas9 (SpCas9) protein which splice together in cellula to form a functional protein capable of site-specific DNA cleavage. With specific CRISPR guide strands, we demonstrated the efficacy of this system in cleaving the HBB and CCR5 genes in human HEK-293T cells as a single Cas9 and as a pair of Cas9 nickases. The trans-spliced SpCas9 (tsSpCas9) displayed ~35% of the nuclease activity compared with the wild-type SpCas9 (wtSpCas9) at standard transfection doses, but had substantially decreased activity at lower dosing levels. The greatly reduced open reading frame length of the tsSpCas9 relative to wtSpCas9 potentially allows for more complex and longer genetic elements to be packaged into an AAV vector including tissue-specific promoters, multiplexed guide RNA expression, and effector domain fusions to SpCas9. For unknown reasons, the tsSpCas9 system did not work in all cell types tested. The use of protein trans-splicing may help facilitate exciting new avenues of research and therapeutic applications through AAV-based delivery of CRISPR/Cas9 systems. PMID:26126518

  7. Expression of Nef Downregulates CXCR4, the Major Coreceptor of Human Immunodeficiency Virus, from the Surfaces of Target Cells and Thereby Enhances Resistance to Superinfection▿

    PubMed Central

    Venzke, Stephanie; Michel, Nico; Allespach, Ina; Fackler, Oliver T.; Keppler, Oliver T.

    2006-01-01

    Lentiviral Nef proteins are key factors for pathogenesis and are known to downregulate functionally important molecules, including CD4 and major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I), from the surfaces of infected cells. Recently, we demonstrated that Nef reduces cell surface levels of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) entry coreceptor CCR5 (N. Michel, I. Allespach, S. Venzke, O. T. Fackler, and O. T. Keppler, Curr. Biol. 15:714-723, 2005). Here, we report that Nef downregulates the second major HIV-1 coreceptor, CXCR4, from the surfaces of HIV-infected primary CD4 T lymphocytes with efficiencies comparable to those of the natural CXCR4 ligand, stromal cell-derived factor-1 alpha. Analysis of a panel of mutants of HIV-1SF2 Nef revealed that the viral protein utilized the same signature motifs for downmodulation of CXCR4 and MHC-I, including the proline-rich motif P73P76P79P82 and the acidic cluster motif E66E67E68E69. Expression of wild-type Nef, but not of specific Nef mutants, resulted in a perinuclear accumulation of the coreceptor. Remarkably, the carboxy terminus of CXCR4, which harbors the classical motifs critical for basal and ligand-induced receptor endocytosis, was dispensable for the Nef-mediated reduction of surface exposure. Functionally, the ability of Nef to simultaneously downmodulate CXCR4 and CD4 correlated with maximum-level protection of Nef-expressing target cells from fusion with cells exposing X4 HIV-1 envelopes. Furthermore, the Nef-mediated downregulation of CXCR4 alone on target T lymphocytes was sufficient to diminish cells' susceptibility to X4 HIV-1 virions at the entry step. The downregulation of chemokine coreceptors is a conserved activity of Nef to modulate infected cells, an important functional consequence of which is an enhanced resistance to HIV superinfection. PMID:16928758

  8. CCR5 Gene Editing of Resting CD4+ T Cells by Transient ZFN Expression From HIV Envelope Pseudotyped Nonintegrating Lentivirus Confers HIV-1 Resistance in Humanized Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Guohua; Choi, Jang Gi; Bharaj, Preeti; Abraham, Sojan; Dang, Ying; Kafri, Tal; Alozie, Ogechika; Manjunath, Manjunath N; Shankar, Premlata

    2014-01-01

    CCR5 disruption by zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) is a promising method for HIV-1 gene therapy. However, successful clinical translation of this strategy necessitates the development of a safe and effective method for delivery into relevant cells. We used non-integrating lentivirus (NILV) for transient expression of ZFNs and pseudotyped the virus with HIV-envelope for targeted delivery to CD4+ T cells. Both activated and resting primary CD4+ T cells transduced with CCR5-ZFNs NILV showed resistance to HIV-1 infection in vitro. Furthermore, NILV transduced resting CD4+ T cells from HIV-1 seronegative individuals were resistant to HIV-1 challenge when reconstituted into NOD-scid IL2rγc null (NSG) mice. Likewise, endogenous virus replication was suppressed in NSG mice reconstituted with CCR5-ZFN–transduced resting CD4+ T cells from treatment naïve as well as ART-treated HIV-1 seropositive patients. Taken together, NILV pseudotyped with HIV envelope provides a simple and clinically viable strategy for HIV-1 gene therapy. PMID:25268698

  9. CCR2 and CCR5 genes polymorphisms in women with cervical lesions from Pernambuco, Northeast Region of Brazil: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Erinaldo Ubirajara Damasceno; de Lima, Géssica Dayane Cordeiro; Oliveira, Micheline de Lucena; Heráclio, Sandra de Andrade; da Silva, Hildson Dornelas Angelo; Crovella, Sergio; Maia, Maria de Mascena Diniz; de Souza/, Paulo Roberto Eleutério

    2016-01-01

    Polymorphisms in chemokine receptors play an important role in the progression of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) to cervical cancer (CC). Our study examined the association of CCR2-64I (rs1799864) andCCR5-Δ32 (rs333) polymorphisms with susceptibility to develop cervical lesion (CIN and CC) in a Brazilian population. The genotyping of 139 women with cervical lesions and 151 women without cervical lesions for the CCR2-64I and CCR5-Δ32 polymorphisms were performed using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. The individuals carrying heterozygous or homozygous genotypes (GA+AA) for CCR2-64I polymorphisms seem to be at lower risk for cervical lesion [odds ratio (OR) = 0.37, p = 0.0008)]. The same was observed for the A allele (OR = 0.39, p = 0.0002), while no association was detected (p > 0.05) with CCR5-Δ32 polymorphism. Regarding the human papillomavirus (HPV) type, patients carrying the CCR2-64Ipolymorphism were protected against infection by HPV type 16 (OR = 0.35, p = 0.0184). In summary, our study showed a protective effect ofCCR2-64I rs1799864 polymorphism against the development of cervical lesions (CIN and CC) and in the susceptibility of HPV 16 infection. PMID:26982176

  10. Resistance of a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 isolate to a small molecule CCR5 inhibitor can involve sequence changes in both gp120 and gp41

    SciTech Connect

    Anastassopoulou, Cleo G. Ketas, Thomas J.; Depetris, Rafael S.; Thomas, Antonia M.; Klasse, Per Johan; Moore, John P.

    2011-04-25

    Here, we describe the genetic pathways taken by a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolate, D101.12, to become resistant to the small molecule CCR5 inhibitor, vicriviroc (VCV), in vitro. Resistant D101.12 variants contained at least one substitution in the gp120 V3 region (H308P), plus one of two patterns of gp41 sequence changes involving the fusion peptide (FP) and a downstream residue: G514V+V535M or M518V+F519L+V535M. Studies of Env-chimeric and point-substituted viruses in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and TZM-bl cells showed that resistance can arise from the cooperative action of gp120 and gp41 changes, while retaining CCR5 usage. Modeling the VCV inhibition data from the two cell types suggests that D101.12 discriminates between high- and low-VCV affinity forms of CCR5 less than D1/85.16, a resistant virus with three FP substitutions.

  11. Molecular basis for tetanus toxin coreceptor interactions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; Baldwin, Michael R; Barbieri, Joseph T

    2008-07-01

    Tetanus toxin (TeNT) elicits spastic paralysis through the cleavage of vesicle-associated membrane protein-2 (VAMP-2) in neurons at the interneuronal junction of the central nervous system. While TeNT retrograde traffics from peripheral nerve endings to the interneuronal junction, there is limited understanding of the neuronal receptors utilized by tetanus toxin for the initial entry into nerve cells. Earlier studies implicated a coreceptor for tetanus toxin entry into neurons: a ganglioside binding pocket and a sialic acid binding pocket and that GT1b bound to each pocket. In this study, a solid phase assay characterized the ganglioside binding specificity and functional properties of both carbohydrate binding pockets of TeNT. The ganglioside binding pocket recognized the ganglioside sugar backbone, Gal-GalNAc, independent of sialic acid-(5) and sialic acid-(7) and GM1a was an optimal substrate for this pocket, while the sialic acid binding pocket recognized sialic acid-(5) and sialic acid-(7) with "b"series of gangliosides preferred relative to "a" series gangliosides. The high-affinity binding of gangliosides to TeNT HCR required functional ganglioside and sialic acid binding pockets, supporting synergistic binding to coreceptors. This analysis provides a model for how tetanus toxin utilizes coreceptors for high-affinity binding to neurons. PMID:18543947

  12. IgE-FcεRI Interactions Determine HIV Coreceptor Usage and Susceptibility to Infection during Ontogeny of Mast Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Sundstrom, J. Bruce; Hair, Gregory A.; Ansari, Aftab A.; Secor, W. Evan; Gilfillan, Alasdair M.; Metcalfe, Dean D.; Kirshenbaum, Arnold S.

    2009-01-01

    Progenitor mast cells (prMCs), derived from CD34+ precursors are CD4+/CCR5+/CXCR4+ and susceptible to CCR5(R5)-tropic virus but only marginally susceptible to CXCR4(X4)-tropic HIV. As infected prMCs mature within extravascular compartments, they become both latently infected and HIV-infection resistant, and thus capable of establishing an inducible reservoir of CCR5-tropic infectious clones. In this report we provide the first evidence that IgE-FcεRI interactions, occurring during a unique period of mast cell (MC) ontogeny, enhance prMC susceptibility to X4 and R5X4 virus. IgE-FcεRI interactions significantly increased expression of CXCR4 mRNA (∼400- to 1800-fold), enhanced prMC susceptibility to X4 and R5X4 virus (∼3000- to 16,000-fold), but had no significant effect on CD4, CCR3, or CCR5 expression, susceptibility to R5 virus, or degranulation. Enhanced susceptibility to infection with X4 virus occurred during the first 3–5 wk of MC ontogeny and was completely inhibited by CXCR4-specific peptide antagonists and omalizumab, a drug that inhibits IgE-FcεRI interactions. IgE-FcεRI coaggregation mediated by HIVgp120 or Schistosoma mansoni soluble egg Ag accelerated maximal CXCR4 expression and susceptibility to X4 virus by prMCs. Our findings suggest that for HIV-positive individuals with atopic or helminthic diseases, elevated IgE levels could potentially influence the composition of CXCR4-tropic and R5X4-tropic variants archived within the long-lived tissue MC reservoir created during infection. PMID:19414793

  13. The Inner Foreskin of Healthy Males at Risk of HIV Infection Harbors Epithelial CD4+ CCR5+ Cells and Has Features of an Inflamed Epidermal Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Lemos, Maria P.; Lama, Javier R.; Karuna, Shelly T.; Fong, Youyi; Montano, Silvia M.; Ganoza, Carmela; Gottardo, Raphael; Sanchez, Jorge; McElrath, M. Juliana

    2014-01-01

    Male circumcision provides partial protection against multiple sexually transmitted infections (STIs), including HIV, but the mechanisms are not fully understood. To examine potential vulnerabilities in foreskin epithelial structure, we used Wilcoxon paired tests adjusted using the false discovery rate method to compare inner and outer foreskin samples from 20 healthy, sexually active Peruvian males who have sex with males or transgender females, ages 21–29, at elevated risk of HIV infection. No evidence of epithelial microtrauma was identified, as assessed by keratinocyte activation, fibronectin deposition, or parakeratosis. However, multiple suprabasal tight junction differences were identified: 1) inner foreskin stratum corneum was thinner than outer (p = 0.035); 2) claudin 1 had extended membrane-bound localization throughout inner epidermis stratum spinosum (p = 0.035); 3) membrane-bound claudin 4 was absent from inner foreskin stratum granulosum (p = 0.035); and 4) occludin had increased membrane deposition in inner foreskin stratum granulosum (p = 0.042) versus outer. Together, this suggests subclinical inflammation and paracellular transport modifications to the inner foreskin. A setting of inflammation was further supported by inner foreskin epithelial explant cultures secreting higher levels of GM-CSF (p = 0.029), IP-10 (p = 0.035) and RANTES (p = 0.022) than outer foreskin, and also containing an increased density of CCR5+ and CD4+ CCR5+ cells (p = 0.022). Inner foreskin dermis also secreted more RANTES than outer (p = 0.036), and had increased density of CCR5+ cells (p = 0.022). In conclusion, subclinical changes to the inner foreskin of sexually active males may support an inflammatory state, with availability of target cells for HIV infection and modifications to epidermal barriers, potentially explaining the benefits of circumcision for STI prevention. PMID:25268493

  14. Bioinformatic analysis of neurotropic HIV envelope sequences identifies polymorphisms in the gp120 bridging sheet that increase macrophage-tropism through enhanced interactions with CCR5

    SciTech Connect

    Mefford, Megan E.; Kunstman, Kevin; Wolinsky, Steven M.; Gabuzda, Dana

    2015-07-15

    Macrophages express low levels of the CD4 receptor compared to T-cells. Macrophage-tropic HIV strains replicating in brain of untreated patients with HIV-associated dementia (HAD) express Envs that are adapted to overcome this restriction through mechanisms that are poorly understood. Here, bioinformatic analysis of env sequence datasets together with functional studies identified polymorphisms in the β3 strand of the HIV gp120 bridging sheet that increase M-tropism. D197, which results in loss of an N-glycan located near the HIV Env trimer apex, was detected in brain in some HAD patients, while position 200 was estimated to be under positive selection. D197 and T/V200 increased fusion and infection of cells expressing low CD4 by enhancing gp120 binding to CCR5. These results identify polymorphisms in the HIV gp120 bridging sheet that overcome the restriction to macrophage infection imposed by low CD4 through enhanced gp120–CCR5 interactions, thereby promoting infection of brain and other macrophage-rich tissues. - Highlights: • We analyze HIV Env sequences and identify amino acids in beta 3 of the gp120 bridging sheet that enhance macrophage tropism. • These amino acids at positions 197 and 200 are present in brain of some patients with HIV-associated dementia. • D197 results in loss of a glycan near the HIV Env trimer apex, which may increase exposure of V3. • These variants may promote infection of macrophages in the brain by enhancing gp120–CCR5 interactions.

  15. Role of inhibitory BCR co-receptors in immunity.

    PubMed

    Tsubata, Takeshi

    2012-06-01

    B lymphocytes (B cells) express a variety of membrane molecules containing immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibition motifs (ITIMs) in the cytoplasmic region such as FcγRIIB, FCRLs, CD22, mouse Siglec-G/human Siglec-10, PECAM-1, mouse PIR-B/human LIRB1 and LIRB2PD-1 and CD72. When phosphorylated, ITIMs in these molecules recruit and activate phosphatases such as SH2 domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase 1 (SHP-1), SHP-2, SH2 domain- containing inositol 5-phosphatase 1 (SHIP1) and SHIP2 depending on receptors. These phosphatases then negatively regulate B cell antigen receptor (BCR) signaling. Because of their ability to inhibit BCR signaling, these ITIMcontaining molecules are called inhibitory BCR co-receptors. Studies on mice deficient in an inhibitory co-receptor have demonstrated that the inhibitory co-receptors regulate B cell development, antibody responses and development of autoimmune diseases. Moreover, polymorphisms in some inhibitory co-receptors such as FcγRIIB, FCRL3 and CD72 are associated with autoimmune diseases, suggesting a crucial role of inhibitory co-receptor polymorphisms in the regulation of autoimmune diseases. The ligands for inhibitory co-receptors regulate their inhibitory activity by inducing co-ligation of the co-receptors with BCR or some other regulatory mechanisms. Inhibitory co-receptors and their ligands are therefore good targets for controlling antibody responses and autoimmune diseases. PMID:22394175

  16. Lentivector Knockdown of CCR5 in Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells Confers Functional and Persistent HIV-1 Resistance in Humanized Mice

    PubMed Central

    Myburgh, Renier; Ivic, Sandra; Pepper, Michael S.; Gers-Huber, Gustavo; Li, Duo; Audigé, Annette; Rochat, Mary-Aude; Jaquet, Vincent; Regenass, Stephan; Manz, Markus G.; Salmon, Patrick; Krause, Karl-Heinz

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Gene-engineered CD34+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) can be used to generate an HIV-1-resistant immune system. However, a certain threshold of transduced HSPCs might be required for transplantation into mice for creating an HIV-resistant immune system. In this study, we combined CCR5 knockdown by a highly efficient microRNA (miRNA) lentivector with pretransplantation selection of transduced HSPCs to obtain a rather pure population of gene engineered CD34+ cells. Low-level transduction of HSPCs and subsequent sorting by flow cytometry yielded >70% transduced cells. Mice transplanted with these cells showed functional and persistent resistance to a CCR5-tropic HIV strain: viral load was significantly decreased over months, and human CD4+ T cells were preserved. In one mouse, viral mutations, resulting presumably in a CXCR4-tropic strain, overcame HIV resistance. Our results suggest that HSPC-based CCR5 knockdown may lead to efficient control of HIV in vivo. We overcame a major limitation of previous HIV gene therapy in humanized mice in which only a proportion of the cells in chimeric mice in vivo are anti-HIV engineered. Our strategy underlines the promising future of gene engineering HIV-resistant CD34+ cells that produce a constant supply of HIV-resistant progeny. IMPORTANCE Major issues in experimental long-term in vivo HIV gene therapy have been (i) low efficacy of cell transduction at the time of transplantation and (ii) transduction resulting in multiple copies of heterologous DNA in target cells. In this study, we demonstrated the efficacy of a transplantation approach with a selection step for transduced cells that allows transplantation of an enriched population of HSPCs expressing a single (low) copy of a CCR5 miRNA. Efficient maintenance of CD4+ T cells and a low viral titer resulted only when at least 70% of the HIV target cells were genetically modified. These findings imply that clinical protocols of HIV gene therapy require a

  17. Charged amino acid patterns of coreceptor use in the major subtypes of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed

    Pramanik, Lotta; Fried, Ulrik; Clevestig, Peter; Ehrnst, Anneka

    2011-08-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 has several genetic subtypes and two coreceptor use phenotypes: R5 that uses CCR5, while X4 uses CXCR4. A high amino acid charge of the envelope glycoprotein 120 V3 region, common at positions 11 and 25, is important for CXCR4 use. We characterized charged V3 amino acids, retrieving all biologically phenotyped sequences from the HIV Sequence Database. Selecting individually unique ones randomly yielded 48 subtype A, 231 B, 180 C, 37 D and 32 CRF01_AE sequences; 482 were R5 and 46 were X4. Charged amino acids were conserved in both R5 and X4 with general and subtype-specific patterns. X4 viruses gained a higher charge from positive amino acids at positions other than in R5, and through the loss of negative amino acids. Other positions than 11/25 had a greater impact on charge (P<0.001). This describes how R5 evolves into X4 in a subtype-specific context, useful for computer-based predictions and vaccine design. PMID:21525208

  18. Enhanced CD4+ cellular apoptosis by CCR5-restricted HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein variants from patients with progressive HIV-1 infection

    SciTech Connect

    Wade, Jessica; Sterjovski, Jasminka; Gray, Lachlan; Roche, Michael; Chiavaroli, Lisa; Ellett, Anne; Jakobsen, Martin R.; Cowley, Daniel; Fonseca Pereira, Candida da; Saksena, Nitin; Wang, Bin; Purcell, Damian F.J.; Karlsson, Ingrid; Fenyoe, Eva-Maria; Churchill, Melissa; Gorry, Paul R.

    2010-01-20

    CCR5-using (R5) human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) strains cause CD4+ T-cell loss in most infected individuals, but mechanisms underlying cytopathicity of R5 viruses are poorly understood. We investigated mechanisms contributing to R5 envelope glycoprotein (Env)-mediated cellular apoptosis by constructing a panel of retroviral vectors engineered to co-express GFP and R5 Envs derived from two HIV-1-infected subjects spanning asymptomatic (Early, E-R5 Envs) to late stages of infection (Late, L-R5 Envs). The L-R5 Envs induced significantly more cellular apoptosis than E-R5 Envs, but only in Env-expressing (GFP-positive) cells, and only in cells where CD4 and CCR5 levels were limiting. Studies with fusion-defective Env mutants showed induction of apoptosis required membrane-fusing events. Our results provide evidence for an intracellular mechanism of R5 Env-induced apoptosis of CD4+ cells that requires membrane fusion. Furthermore, they contribute to a better understanding of mechanisms involved in CD4+ T-cell loss in subjects experiencing progressive R5 HIV-1 infection.

  19. Better CD4+ T cell recovery in Brazilian HIV-infected individuals under HAART due to cumulative carriage of SDF-1-3'A, CCR2-V64I, CCR5-D32 and CCR5-promoter 59029A/G polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Rigato, Paula O; Hong, Marisa A; Casseb, Jorge; Ueda, Mirthes; de Castro, Isac; Benard, Gil; Duarte, Alberto J S

    2008-09-01

    Polymorphisms of chemokines and chemokine-receptors genes have been shown to influence the rate of progression to AIDS; however, their influence on response to HAART remains unclear. We investigated the frequency of the SDF-1-3'A, CCR2-64I, CCR5-D32 and CCR5-Promoter-59029-A/G polymorphisms in Brazilian HIV-1-infected and uninfected individuals and their influence on CD4+ T-cell evolution HIV-1 infected individuals before and during HAART. Polymorphism detection was done in a transversal study of 200 HIV-1-infected and 82 uninfected individuals. The rate of CD4+ T cell increase or decrease was studied in a cohort of 155 HIV-1 infected individuals on pre and post-HAART. Polymorphisms were determined by PCR associated with RFLP. The rate of CD4+ T-cell decline or increase was also determined. HIV-1 infected and uninfected subjects showed, respectively, frequencies of 0.193 and 0.220 for SDF-1-3'A, of 0.140 and 0.110 for CCR2-V64I, of 0.038 and 0.055 for CCR5-D32, and of 0.442 and 0.390 for CCR5-P-59029-A/G. HIV-1-infected subjects carrying one, two or three of these four polymorphisms showed better CD4+ T-cell recovery than HIV-1-infected subjects carrying the four wild-type alleles (+2.7, +1.6, +3.5, and -0.9 lymphocytes/microl/month, respectively). Regression logistic analysis showed that the CCR5-D32/CCR2-V64I association was predictor of positive CD4+ T cell slope after HAART. The distribution of polymorphisms did not differ between HIV-1-infected and uninfected individuals, but differed from more homogenous ethnic groups probably reflecting the miscegenation of the Brazilian population. We add further evidence of the role of these polymorphisms by showing that the CD4 gain was influenced by carriage of one or more of the polymorphisms studied here. These results highlight the possibility that these genetic traits can be useful to identify patients at risk for faster progression to AIDS or therapeutic failure. PMID:18855658

  20. Genetic variation at chemokine receptor CCR5 in leporids: alteration at the 2nd extracellular domain by gene conversion with CCR2 in Oryctolagus, but not in Sylvilagus and Lepus species.

    PubMed

    Carmo, C R; Esteves, P J; Ferrand, N; van der Loo, W

    2006-06-01

    Whereas in its natural host (Sylvilagus sps.) the effects of myxoma virus infections are benign, in European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus), it causes a highly infectious disease with very high mortality rate, known as myxomatosis. There is evidence that, as with HIV-1 virus in human, myxoma virus may use chemokine receptors such as CCR5 of the host target cell for entry and activation of pathways of immune avoidance. We have characterized and compared CCR5 genes of leporid species with different susceptibility levels to myxomatosis. The CCR5 protein of O. cuniculus differs markedly from all those known from other species. The most striking was the replacement of a specific peptide motif of the second extracellular loop (ECL2) by a motif, which in other species characterizes the CCR2 molecules. While absent in Sylvilagus and Lepus species, this CCR2 imposed CCR5-ECL2 alteration was observed in all genomes of 25 European rabbits, representing the subspecies O. cuniculus algirus and O. cuniculus cuniculus. Allelic variation at the rabbit CCR5 locus confirmed that the gene conversion predates the subspecies split (1-2 Ma). PMID:16596402

  1. Activated CD4+CCR5+ T cells in the rectum predict increased SIV acquisition in SIVGag/Tat-vaccinated rhesus macaques

    PubMed Central

    Carnathan, Diane G.; Wetzel, Katherine S.; Yu, Joana; Lee, S. Thera; Johnson, Brent A.; Paiardini, Mirko; Yan, Jian; Morrow, Matthew P.; Sardesai, Niranjan Y.; Weiner, David B.; Ertl, Hildegund C. J.; Silvestri, Guido

    2015-01-01

    An effective T-cell–based AIDS vaccine should induce strong HIV-specific CD8+ T cells in mucosal tissues without increasing the availability of target cells for the virus. Here, we evaluated five immunization strategies that include Human adenovirus-5 (AdHu5), Chimpanzee adenovirus-6 (AdC6) or -7 (AdC7), Vaccinia virus (VV), and DNA given by electroporation (DNA/EP), all expressing Simian immunodeficiency virus group specific antigen/transactivator of transcription (SIVmac239Gag/Tat). Five groups of six rhesus macaques (RMs) each were vaccinated with DNA/EP-AdC6-AdC7, VV-AdC6-AdC7, DNA/-EP-VV-AdC6, DNA/EP-VV-AdC7, or AdHu5-AdHu5-AdHu5 and were challenged repeatedly with low-dose intrarectal SIVmac239. Upon challenge, there were no significant differences among study groups in terms of virus acquisition or viral load after infection. When taken together, the immunization regimens did not protect against SIV acquisition compared with controls but did result in an ∼1.6-log decline in set-point viremia. Although all immunized RMs had detectable SIV-specific CD8+ T cells in blood and rectal mucosa, we found no correlation between the number or function of these SIV-specific CD8+ T cells and protection against SIV acquisition. Interestingly, RMs experiencing breakthrough infection showed significantly higher prechallenge levels of CD4+C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5)+HLA-DR+ T cells in the rectal biopsies (RB) than animals that remained uninfected. In addition, among the infected RMs, the percentage of CD4+CCR5+Ki-67+ T cells in RBs prechallenge correlated with higher early viremia. Overall, these data suggest that the levels of activated CD4+CCR5+ target T cells in the rectal mucosa may predict the risk of SIV acquisition in RMs vaccinated with vectors that express SIVGag/Tat. PMID:25550504

  2. Activated CD4+CCR5+ T cells in the rectum predict increased SIV acquisition in SIVGag/Tat-vaccinated rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Carnathan, Diane G; Wetzel, Katherine S; Yu, Joana; Lee, S Thera; Johnson, Brent A; Paiardini, Mirko; Yan, Jian; Morrow, Matthew P; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Weiner, David B; Ertl, Hildegund C J; Silvestri, Guido

    2015-01-13

    An effective T-cell-based AIDS vaccine should induce strong HIV-specific CD8(+) T cells in mucosal tissues without increasing the availability of target cells for the virus. Here, we evaluated five immunization strategies that include Human adenovirus-5 (AdHu5), Chimpanzee adenovirus-6 (AdC6) or -7 (AdC7), Vaccinia virus (VV), and DNA given by electroporation (DNA/EP), all expressing Simian immunodeficiency virus group specific antigen/transactivator of transcription (SIV(mac239Gag/Tat)). Five groups of six rhesus macaques (RMs) each were vaccinated with DNA/EP-AdC6-AdC7, VV-AdC6-AdC7, DNA/-EP-VV-AdC6, DNA/EP-VV-AdC7, or AdHu5-AdHu5-AdHu5 and were challenged repeatedly with low-dose intrarectal SIVmac239. Upon challenge, there were no significant differences among study groups in terms of virus acquisition or viral load after infection. When taken together, the immunization regimens did not protect against SIV acquisition compared with controls but did result in an ∼ 1.6-log decline in set-point viremia. Although all immunized RMs had detectable SIV-specific CD8(+) T cells in blood and rectal mucosa, we found no correlation between the number or function of these SIV-specific CD8(+) T cells and protection against SIV acquisition. Interestingly, RMs experiencing breakthrough infection showed significantly higher prechallenge levels of CD4(+)C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5)(+)HLA-DR(+) T cells in the rectal biopsies (RB) than animals that remained uninfected. In addition, among the infected RMs, the percentage of CD4(+)CCR5(+)Ki-67(+) T cells in RBs prechallenge correlated with higher early viremia. Overall, these data suggest that the levels of activated CD4(+)CCR5(+) target T cells in the rectal mucosa may predict the risk of SIV acquisition in RMs vaccinated with vectors that express SIVGag/Tat. PMID:25550504

  3. Expression and coreceptor function of APJ for primate immunodeficiency viruses.

    PubMed

    Puffer, B A; Sharron, M; Coughlan, C M; Baribaud, F; McManus, C M; Lee, B; David, J; Price, K; Horuk, R; Tsang, M; Doms, R W

    2000-10-25

    APJ is a seven transmembrane domain G-protein-coupled receptor that functions as a coreceptor for some primate immunodeficiency virus strains. The in vivo significance of APJ coreceptor function remains to be elucidated, however, due to the lack of an antibody that can be used to assess APJ expression, and because of the absence of an antibody or ligand that can block APJ coreceptor activity. Therefore, we produced a specific monoclonal antibody (MAb 856) to APJ and found that it detected this receptor in FACS, immunofluorescence, and immunohistochemistry studies. MAb 856 also recognized APJ by Western blot, enabling us to determine that APJ is N-glycosylated. Using this antibody, we correlated APJ expression with coreceptor activity and found that APJ had coreceptor function even at low levels of expression. However, we found that APJ could not be detected by FACS analysis on cell lines commonly used to propagate primate lentiviruses, nor was it expressed on human PBMC cultured under a variety of conditions. We also found that some viral envelope proteins could mediate fusion with APJ-positive, CD4-negative cells, provided that CD4 was added in trans. These findings indicate that in some situations APJ use could render primary cell types susceptible to virus infection, although we have not found any evidence that this occurs. Finally, the peptide ligand for APJ, apelin-13, efficiently blocked APJ coreceptor activity. PMID:11040134

  4. Is long-term virological response related to CCR5 Δ32 deletion in HIV-1-infected patients started on highly active antiretroviral therapy?

    PubMed Central

    Laurichesse, Jean-Jacques; Taieb, Audrey; Capoulade-Metay, Corinne; Katlama, Christine; Villes, Virginie; Drobacheff-Thiebaud, Marie-Christine; Raffi, François; Chêne, Genevieve; Theodorou, Ioannis; Leport, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    Objective To examine whether CCR5 Δ32 deletion is associated with long-term response to combination antiretroviral treatment (cART) in HIV-1 infected patients. Methods The genetic sub-study of ANRS CO8 APROCO-COPILOTE cohort included 609 patients who started a protease inhibitor-containing cART in 1997–99. Patients were considered to have a sustained virological response if all plasma HIV-RNA measurements between month 4 and years 3–5 were <500 copies/ml, allowing for a single blip. Virological response was compared between patients heterozygous for CCR5 Δ32 (Δ32/wt) and wild-type patients (wt/wt) from month 4 to year 3 and month 4 to year 5. Logistic regression analysis was used to adjust for baseline demographical data, HIV-RNA, CD4 cell counts, antiretroviral naive status, time spent on antiretroviral therapy at year 3 and 5 and adherence to treatment (month 4 to year 3 and 5). Results Sustained virological response was better in Δ32/wt than in wt/wt patients: 66% versus 52% up to year 3 (p=0.02), nearly significant after adjustment to potential cofounders (p=0.07). Δ32/wt patients had a better virological response, up to year 5, 48% versus 35% (p=0.01), and remained significantly better, after adjustment, associated with a better virological response up to 5 years post initiation of cART (p=0.04). There was no association with CD4 response. Conclusion Δ32/wt deletion is associated with a beneficial virological response to cART on the long-term. Whether this association can be a direct effect of Δ32/wt deletion remains questionable and needs confirmation in other observational studies. PMID:20050936

  5. Frequency of the CCR5-delta32 mutation in the Atlantic island populations of Madeira, the Azores, Cabo Verde, and São Tomé e Príncipe.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Tamira; Brehm, António; Fernandes, Ana Teresa

    2006-12-01

    There is evidence that the CCR5-delta32 mutation confers protection against HIV-1 infection to homozygous individuals. It is believed that this mutation spread through Europe with the Vikings and that it has been subjected to positive selection, leading to a high frequency in Europe (approximately 10%). We carried out the present study to determine the 32-bp deletion allele and genotype frequencies of the CCR5 gene (CCR5-delta32) in the Atlantic island populations of Madeira, the Azores, Cabo Verde, and São Tomé e Principe. These Atlantic archipelagos were all colonized by the Portuguese in the 15th and 16th centuries, but the latter two received most of their settlers from the West African coast. The frequency of the CCR5-delta32 mutation varies between 0% in São Tomé e Príncipe and 16.5% in the Azores. The Azores Islands have one of the highest frequencies of homozygotes found in Europe (4.8%). There are significant differences (P < 0.05) between some of these populations, for example, between São Tomé e Príncipe and Cabo Verde, and even within populations (e.g., Portugal, Madeira, and the Azores). PMID:17564248

  6. Stable Delivery of CCR5-Directed shRNA into Human Primary Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells and Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells via a Lentiviral Vector

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Saki; Yadav, Swati Seth; An, Dong Sung

    2016-01-01

    RNAi is a powerful tool to achieve suppression of a specific gene expression and therefore it has tremendous potential for gene therapy applications. A number of vector systems have been developed to express short-hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) to produce siRNAs within mammalian T-cells, primary hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPC), human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and in animal model systems. Among these, vectors based on lentivirus backbones have significantly transformed our ability to transfer shRNAs into nondividing cells, such as HSPC, resulting in high transduction efficiencies. However, delivery and long-term expression of shRNAs should be carefully optimized for efficient knock down of target gene without causing cytotoxicity in mammalian cells. Here, we describe our protocols for the development of shRNA against a major HIV co-receptor/chemokine receptor CCR5 and the use of lentiviral vectors for stable shRNA delivery and expression in primary human PBMC and HSPC. PMID:26472455

  7. Stable Delivery of CCR5-Directed shRNA into Human Primary Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells and Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells via a Lentiviral Vector.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Saki; Yadav, Swati Seth; An, Dong Sung

    2016-01-01

    RNAi is a powerful tool to achieve suppression of a specific gene expression and therefore it has tremendous potential for gene therapy applications. A number of vector systems have been developed to express short-hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) to produce siRNAs within mammalian T-cells, primary hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPC), human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and in animal model systems. Among these, vectors based on lentivirus backbones have significantly transformed our ability to transfer shRNAs into nondividing cells, such as HSPC, resulting in high transduction efficiencies. However, delivery and long-term expression of shRNAs should be carefully optimized for efficient knock down of target gene without causing cytotoxicity in mammalian cells. Here, we describe our protocols for the development of shRNA against a major HIV co-receptor/chemokine receptor CCR5 and the use of lentiviral vectors for stable shRNA delivery and expression in primary human PBMC and HSPC. PMID:26472455

  8. Generation of a neutralization-resistant CCR5 tropic simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV-MK38) molecular clone, a derivative of SHIV-89.6.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Yuki; Yoneda, Mai; Otsuki, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Yuji; Kato, Fumihiro; Matsuura, Kanako; Kikukawa, Minako; Matsushita, Shuzo; Hishiki, Takayuki; Igarashi, Tatsuhiko; Miura, Tomoyuki

    2016-05-01

    Previously, we reported that a new genetically diverse CCR5 (R5) tropic simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV-MK38) adapted to rhesus monkeys became more neutralization resistant to SHIV-infected plasma than did the parental SHIV-KS661 clone. Here, to clarify the significance of the neutralization-resistant phenotype of SHIV in a macaque model, we initially investigated the precise neutralization phenotype of the SHIVs, including SHIV-MK38 molecular clones, using SHIV-MK38-infected plasma, a pooled plasma of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals, soluble CD4 and anti-HIV-1 neutralizing mAbs, the epitopes of which were known. The results show that SHIV-KS661 had tier 1 neutralization sensitivity, but monkey-adapted R5 tropic SHIV-MK38 acquired neutralization resistance similar to that of tier 2 or 3 as a clone virus. Sequence analysis of the env gene suggested that the neutralization-resistant phenotype of SHIV-MK38 was acquired by conformational changes in Env associated with the net charge and potential N-linked glycosylation sites. To examine the relationship between neutralization phenotype and stably persistent infection in monkeys, we performed in vivo rectal inoculation experiments using a SHIV-MK38 molecular clone. The results showed that one of three rhesus monkeys exhibited durable infection with a plasma viral load of 105 copies ml- 1 despite the high antibody responses that occurred in the host. Whilst further improvements are required in the development of a challenge virus, it will be useful to generate a neutralization-resistant R5 tropic molecular clone of the SHIV-89.6 lineage commonly used for vaccine development - a result that can be used to explore the foundation of AIDS pathogenesis. PMID:26850058

  9. Chronic Helminth Infection Induces Alternatively Activated Macrophages Expressing High Levels of CCR5 with Low Interleukin-12 Production and Th2-Biasing Ability

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Sosa, Miriam; Satoskar, Abhay R.; Calderón, Rodrigo; Gomez-Garcia, Lorena; Saavedra, Rafael; Bojalil, Rafael; Terrazas, Luis I.

    2002-01-01

    Helminth infections induce Th2-type biased immune responses. Although the mechanisms involved in this phenomenon are not yet clearly defined, antigen-presenting cells (APC) could play an important role in this process. Here, we have used peritoneal macrophages (F4/80+) recruited at different times after challenge with Taenia crassiceps as APC and tested their ability to regulate Th1/Th2 differentiation. Macrophages from acute infections produced high levels of interleukin-12 (IL-12) and nitric oxide (NO), paralleled with low levels of IL-6 and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and with the ability to induce strong antigen-specific CD4+ T-cell proliferation in response to nonrelated antigens. In contrast, macrophages from chronic infections produced higher levels of IL-6 and PGE2 and had suppressed production of IL-12 and NO, associated with a poor ability to induce antigen-specific proliferation in CD4+ T cells. Failure to induce proliferation was not due to a deficient expression of accessory molecules, since major histocompatibility complex class II, CD40, and B7-2 were up-regulated, together with CD23 and CCR5 as infection progressed. These macrophages from chronic infections were able to bias CD4+ T cells to produce IL-4 but not gamma interferon (IFN-γ), contrary to macrophages from acute infections. Blockade of B7-2 and IL-6 and inhibition of PGE2 failed to restore the proliferative response in CD4+ T cells. Furthermore, studies using STAT6−/− mice revealed that STAT6-mediated signaling was essential for the expansion of these alternatively activated macrophages. These data demonstrate that helminth infections can induce different macrophage populations that have Th2-biasing properties. PMID:12065507

  10. Progesterone Levels Associate with a Novel Population of CCR5+CD38+ CD4 T Cells Resident in the Genital Mucosa with Lymphoid Trafficking Potential.

    PubMed

    Swaims-Kohlmeier, Alison; Haaland, Richard E; Haddad, Lisa B; Sheth, Anandi N; Evans-Strickfaden, Tammy; Lupo, L Davis; Cordes, Sarah; Aguirre, Alfredo J; Lupoli, Kathryn A; Chen, Cheng-Yen; Ofotukun, Igho; Hart, Clyde E; Kohlmeier, Jacob E

    2016-07-01

    The female genital tract (FGT) provides a means of entry to pathogens, including HIV, yet immune cell populations at this barrier between host and environment are not well defined. We initiated a study of healthy women to characterize resident T cell populations in the lower FGT from lavage and patient-matched peripheral blood to investigate potential mechanisms of HIV sexual transmission. Surprisingly, we observed FGT CD4 T cell populations were primarily CCR7(hi), consistent with a central memory or recirculating memory T cell phenotype. In addition, roughly half of these CCR7(hi) CD4 T cells expressed CD69, consistent with resident memory T cells, whereas the remaining CCR7(hi) CD4 T cells lacked CD69 expression, consistent with recirculating memory CD4 T cells that traffic between peripheral tissues and lymphoid sites. HIV susceptibility markers CCR5 and CD38 were increased on FGT CCR7(hi) CD4 T cells compared with blood, yet migration to the lymphoid homing chemokines CCL19 and CCL21 was maintained. Infection with GFP-HIV showed that FGT CCR7(hi) memory CD4 T cells are susceptible HIV targets, and productive infection of CCR7(hi) memory T cells did not alter chemotaxis to CCL19 and CCL21. Variations of resident CCR7(hi) FGT CD4 T cell populations were detected during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle, and longitudinal analysis showed the frequency of this population positively correlated to progesterone levels. These data provide evidence women may acquire HIV through local infection of migratory CCR7(hi) CD4 T cells, and progesterone levels predict opportunities for HIV to access these novel target cells. PMID:27233960

  11. Calcium antagonists.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Ehud; Messerli, Franz H

    2004-01-01

    Calcium antagonists were introduced for the treatment of hypertension in the 1980s. Their use was subsequently expanded to additional disorders, such as angina pectoris, paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardias, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, Raynaud phenomenon, pulmonary hypertension, diffuse esophageal spasms, and migraine. Calcium antagonists as a group are heterogeneous and include 3 main classes--phenylalkylamines, benzothiazepines, and dihydropyridines--that differ in their molecular structure, sites and modes of action, and effects on various other cardiovascular functions. Calcium antagonists lower blood pressure mainly through vasodilation and reduction of peripheral resistance. They maintain blood flow to vital organs, and are safe in patients with renal impairment. Unlike diuretics and beta-blockers, calcium antagonists do not impair glucose metabolism or lipid profile and may even attenuate the development of arteriosclerotic lesions. In long-term follow-up, patients treated with calcium antagonists had development of less overt diabetes mellitus than those who were treated with diuretics and beta-blockers. Moreover, calcium antagonists are able to reduce left ventricular mass and are effective in improving anginal pain. Recent prospective randomized studies attested to the beneficial effects of calcium antagonists in hypertensive patients. In comparison with placebo, calcium antagonist-based therapy reduced major cardiovascular events and cardiovascular death significantly in elderly hypertensive patients and in diabetic patients. In several comparative studies in hypertensive patients, treatment with calcium antagonists was equally effective as treatment with diuretics, beta-blockers, or angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. From these studies, it seems that a calcium antagonist-based regimen is superior to other regimens in preventing stroke, equivalent in preventing ischemic heart disease, and inferior in preventing congestive heart failure

  12. Differential adapter recruitment by TLR2 co-receptors.

    PubMed

    Piao, Wenji; Ru, Lisa W; Toshchakov, Vladimir Y

    2016-07-01

    TLR2 heterodimers with TLR1 or TLR6 recognize distinct pathogen-associated molecules such as tri- and di-acylated lipopeptides. The activated TLR2 heterodimers recruit Toll-IL-1R domain- (TIR-) containing adapter proteins, TIRAP and MyD88, through the receptor TIR domains. Molecular recognition mechanisms responsible for agonist-driven, TIR domain-mediated receptor-adapter interactions as well as the structure of resultant signaling complexes remain unknown. We previously reported that the cell-permeable peptide derived from helix D of TLR2 TIR (2R9) specifically binds TIRAP in vitro and in cells and thereby inhibits TIRAP-dependent TLR signaling. This study demonstrates that cell-permeable peptides from D helix of TLR1 or TLR6, peptides 1R9 and 6R9 respectively, inhibit signaling mediated by cognate TLR2 co-receptors. Interestingly, 1R9 and 6R9 bind different TLR2 adapters, as they selectively bind MyD88 and TIRAP TIR, respectively. Both peptides block the agonist-induced co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP) of TLR2 with TIRAP or MyD88, but not TLR2 co-IP with co-receptors. Our data suggest that D helices of TLR1 and TLR6 TIR domains are adapter recruitment sites in both co-receptors; yet the sites recruit different adapters. The D helix in TLR1 is the MyD88 docking site, whereas in TLR6 this site recruits TIRAP. PMID:27150837

  13. Comparison of Viral Env Proteins from Acute and Chronic Infections with Subtype C Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Identifies Differences in Glycosylation and CCR5 Utilization and Suggests a New Strategy for Immunogen Design

    PubMed Central

    Ping, Li-Hua; Joseph, Sarah B.; Anderson, Jeffrey A.; Abrahams, Melissa-Rose; Salazar-Gonzalez, Jesus F.; Kincer, Laura P.; Treurnicht, Florette K.; Arney, Leslie; Ojeda, Suany; Zhang, Ming; Keys, Jessica; Potter, E. Lake; Chu, Haitao; Moore, Penny; Salazar, Maria G.; Iyer, Shilpa; Jabara, Cassandra; Kirchherr, Jennifer; Mapanje, Clement; Ngandu, Nobubelo; Seoighe, Cathal; Hoffman, Irving; Gao, Feng; Tang, Yuyang; Labranche, Celia; Lee, Benhur; Saville, Andrew; Vermeulen, Marion; Fiscus, Susan; Morris, Lynn; Karim, Salim Abdool; Haynes, Barton F.; Shaw, George M.; Korber, Bette T.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Cohen, Myron S.; Montefiori, David; Williamson, Carolyn

    2013-01-01

    Understanding human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transmission is central to developing effective prevention strategies, including a vaccine. We compared phenotypic and genetic variation in HIV-1 env genes from subjects in acute/early infection and subjects with chronic infections in the context of subtype C heterosexual transmission. We found that the transmitted viruses all used CCR5 and required high levels of CD4 to infect target cells, suggesting selection for replication in T cells and not macrophages after transmission. In addition, the transmitted viruses were more likely to use a maraviroc-sensitive conformation of CCR5, perhaps identifying a feature of the target T cell. We confirmed an earlier observation that the transmitted viruses were, on average, modestly underglycosylated relative to the viruses from chronically infected subjects. This difference was most pronounced in comparing the viruses in acutely infected men to those in chronically infected women. These features of the transmitted virus point to selective pressures during the transmission event. We did not observe a consistent difference either in heterologous neutralization sensitivity or in sensitivity to soluble CD4 between the two groups, suggesting similar conformations between viruses from acute and chronic infection. However, the presence or absence of glycosylation sites had differential effects on neutralization sensitivity for different antibodies. We suggest that the occasional absence of glycosylation sites encoded in the conserved regions of env, further reduced in transmitted viruses, could expose specific surface structures on the protein as antibody targets. PMID:23616655

  14. CXCR3 antagonist VUF10085 binds to an intrahelical site distinct from that of the broad spectrum antagonist TAK–779

    PubMed Central

    Nedjai, Belinda; Viney, Jonathan M; Li, Hubert; Hull, Caroline; Anderson, Caroline A; Horie, Tomoki; Horuk, Richard; Vaidehi, Nagarajan; Pease, James E

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose The chemokine receptor CXCR3 is implicated in a variety of clinically important diseases, notably rheumatoid arthritis and atherosclerosis. Consequently, antagonists of CXCR3 are of therapeutic interest. In this study, we set out to characterize binding sites of the specific low MW CXCR3 antagonist VUF10085 and the broad spectrum antagonist TAK-779 which blocks CXCR3 along with CCR2 and CCR5. Experimental Approach Molecular modelling of CXCR3, followed by virtual ligand docking, highlighted several CXCR3 residues likely to contact either antagonist, notably a conserved aspartate in helix 2 (Asp-1122:63), which was postulated to interact with the quaternary nitrogen of TAK-779. Validation of modelling was carried out by site-directed mutagenesis of CXCR3, followed by assays of cell surface expression, ligand binding and receptor activation. Key Results Mutation of Asn-1323.33, Phe-207 and Tyr-2716.51 within CXCR3 severely impaired both ligand binding and chemotactic responses, suggesting that these residues are critical for maintenance of a functional CXCR3 conformation. Contrary to our hypothesis, mutation of Asp-1122:63 had no observable effects on TAK-779 activity, but clearly decreased the antagonist potency of VUF 10085. Likewise, mutations of Phe-1313.32, Ile-2796.59 and Tyr-3087.43 were well tolerated and were critical for the antagonist activity of VUF 10085 but not for that of TAK-779. Conclusions and Implications This more detailed definition of a binding pocket within CXCR3 for low MW antagonists should facilitate the rational design of newer CXCR3 antagonists, with obvious clinical potential. PMID:25425280

  15. Structural analysis of a novel rabbit monoclonal antibody R53 targeting an epitope in HIV-1 gp120 C4 region critical for receptor and co-receptor binding

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Ruimin; Chen, Yuxin; Vaine, Michael; Hu, Guangnan; Wang, Shixia; Lu, Shan; Kong, Xiang -Peng

    2015-07-15

    The fourth conserved region (C4) in the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) gp120 is a structural element that is important for its function, as it binds to both the receptor CD4 and the co-receptor CCR5/CXCR4. It has long been known that this region is highly immunogenic and that it harbors B-cell as well as T-cell epitopes. It is the target of a number of antibodies in animal studies, which are called CD4-blockers. However, the mechanism by which the virus shields itself from such antibody responses is not known. Here, we determined the crystal structure of R53 in complex with its epitope peptide using a novel anti-C4 rabbit monoclonal antibody R53. Our data show that although the epitope of R53 covers a highly conserved sequence 433AMYAPPI439, it is not available in the gp120 trimer and in the CD4-bound conformation. Our results suggest a masking mechanism to explain how HIV-1 protects this critical region from the human immune system.

  16. Structural analysis of a novel rabbit monoclonal antibody R53 targeting an epitope in HIV-1 gp120 C4 region critical for receptor and co-receptor binding

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pan, Ruimin; Chen, Yuxin; Vaine, Michael; Hu, Guangnan; Wang, Shixia; Lu, Shan; Kong, Xiang -Peng

    2015-07-15

    The fourth conserved region (C4) in the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) gp120 is a structural element that is important for its function, as it binds to both the receptor CD4 and the co-receptor CCR5/CXCR4. It has long been known that this region is highly immunogenic and that it harbors B-cell as well as T-cell epitopes. It is the target of a number of antibodies in animal studies, which are called CD4-blockers. However, the mechanism by which the virus shields itself from such antibody responses is not known. Here, we determined the crystal structure of R53 in complex with its epitopemore » peptide using a novel anti-C4 rabbit monoclonal antibody R53. Our data show that although the epitope of R53 covers a highly conserved sequence 433AMYAPPI439, it is not available in the gp120 trimer and in the CD4-bound conformation. Our results suggest a masking mechanism to explain how HIV-1 protects this critical region from the human immune system.« less

  17. Structural analysis of a novel rabbit monoclonal antibody R53 targeting an epitope in HIV-1 gp120 C4 region critical for receptor and co-receptor binding.

    PubMed

    Pan, Ruimin; Chen, Yuxin; Vaine, Michael; Hu, Guangnan; Wang, Shixia; Lu, Shan; Kong, Xiang-Peng

    2015-07-01

    The fourth conserved region (C4) in the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) gp120 is a structural element that is important for its function, as it binds to both the receptor CD4 and the co-receptor CCR5/CXCR4. It has long been known that this region is highly immunogenic and that it harbors B-cell as well as T-cell epitopes. It is the target of a number of antibodies in animal studies, which are called CD4-blockers. However, the mechanism by which the virus shields itself from such antibody responses is not known. Here, we determined the crystal structure of R53 in complex with its epitope peptide using a novel anti-C4 rabbit monoclonal antibody R53. Our data show that although the epitope of R53 covers a highly conserved sequence (433)AMYAPPI(439), it is not available in the gp120 trimer and in the CD4-bound conformation. Our results suggest a masking mechanism to explain how HIV-1 protects this critical region from the human immune system. PMID:26251831

  18. Structural analysis of a novel rabbit monoclonal antibody R53 targeting an epitope in HIV-1 gp120 C4 region critical for receptor and co-receptor binding

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Ruimin; Chen, Yuxin; Vaine, Michael; Hu, Guangnan; Wang, Shixia; Lu, Shan; Kong, Xiang-Peng

    2015-01-01

    The fourth conserved region (C4) in the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) gp120 is a structural element that is important for its function, as it binds to both the receptor CD4 and the co-receptor CCR5/CXCR4. It has long been known that this region is highly immunogenic and that it harbors B-cell as well as T-cell epitopes. It is the target of a number of antibodies in animal studies, which are called CD4-blockers. However, the mechanism by which the virus shields itself from such antibody responses is not known. Here, we determined the crystal structure of R53 in complex with its epitope peptide using a novel anti-C4 rabbit monoclonal antibody R53. Our data show that although the epitope of R53 covers a highly conserved sequence 433AMYAPPI439, it is not available in the gp120 trimer and in the CD4-bound conformation. Our results suggest a masking mechanism to explain how HIV-1 protects this critical region from the human immune system. PMID:26251831

  19. Transmitted/Founder and Chronic Subtype C HIV-1 Use CD4 and CCR5 Receptors with Equal Efficiency and Are Not Inhibited by Blocking the Integrin α4β7

    PubMed Central

    Banks, Lauren B.; Iyer, Shilpa S.; Pfaff, Jennifer M.; Salazar-Gonzalez, Jesus F.; Salazar, Maria G.; Decker, Julie M.; Parrish, Erica H.; Berg, Anna; Hopper, Jennifer; Hora, Bhavna; Kumar, Amit; Mahlokozera, Tatenda; Yuan, Sally; Coleman, Charl; Vermeulen, Marion; Ding, Haitao; Ochsenbauer, Christina; Tilton, John C.; Permar, Sallie R.; Kappes, John C.; Betts, Michael R.; Busch, Michael P.; Gao, Feng; Montefiori, David; Haynes, Barton F.; Shaw, George M.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Doms, Robert W.

    2012-01-01

    Sexual transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) most often results from productive infection by a single transmitted/founder (T/F) virus, indicating a stringent mucosal bottleneck. Understanding the viral traits that overcome this bottleneck could have important implications for HIV-1 vaccine design and other prevention strategies. Most T/F viruses use CCR5 to infect target cells and some encode envelope glycoproteins (Envs) that contain fewer potential N-linked glycosylation sites and shorter V1/V2 variable loops than Envs from chronic viruses. Moreover, it has been reported that the gp120 subunits of certain transmitted Envs bind to the gut-homing integrin α4β7, possibly enhancing virus entry and cell-to-cell spread. Here we sought to determine whether subtype C T/F viruses, which are responsible for the majority of new HIV-1 infections worldwide, share biological properties that increase their transmission fitness, including preferential α4β7 engagement. Using single genome amplification, we generated panels of both T/F (n = 20) and chronic (n = 20) Env constructs as well as full-length T/F (n = 6) and chronic (n = 4) infectious molecular clones (IMCs). We found that T/F and chronic control Envs were indistinguishable in the efficiency with which they used CD4 and CCR5. Both groups of Envs also exhibited the same CD4+ T cell subset tropism and showed similar sensitivity to neutralization by CD4 binding site (CD4bs) antibodies. Finally, saturating concentrations of anti-α4β7 antibodies failed to inhibit infection and replication of T/F as well as chronic control viruses, although the growth of the tissue culture-adapted strain SF162 was modestly impaired. These results indicate that the population bottleneck associated with mucosal HIV-1 acquisition is not due to the selection of T/F viruses that use α4β7, CD4 or CCR5 more efficiently. PMID:22693444

  20. CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T regulatory cells, Th1 (CCR5, IL-2, IFN-γ) and Th2 (CCR4, IL-4, Il-13) type chemokine receptors and intracellular cytokines in children with common variable immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Kutukculer, Necil; Azarsiz, Elif; Aksu, Guzide; Karaca, Neslihan Edeer

    2016-06-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is a heterogeneous group of primary antibody deficiencies characterized by decreased serum immunoglobulin G along with a decrease in serum IgA and/or IgM, defective specific antibody production, and recurrent bacterial infections. Abnormal lymphocyte trafficking, dysregulated cellular responses to chemokines, and uncontrolled T cell polarization may be involved in the pathogenesis and may help to understand the clinical complications. We evaluated T helper cell subsets (chemokine receptors CCR4, CCR5, and CCR7), expressions on T lymphocytes, intracellular cytokines - IL-2, IL-4, IL-13, IFN- γ-on CD4(+) T cells, and expression of CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells of 20 CVID patients and 26 healthy controls. Autoimmune clinical findings and other complications were also determined. Percentages and absolute numbers of CD4(+)CD25(+) Foxp3(+) cells did not show any significant difference between CVID cases and healthy controls nor between severe and moderate disease patients. The only significant difference regarding Th1 and Th2 type intracellular cytokines was the decreased absolute numbers of CD3(+)CD4(+)IL4(+) cells in CVID cases. There were some findings about T helper cell type dominance in CVID patients such as positive correlation between hepatomegaly and high IL-2 and IFN-γ in CD3(+)CD4(+) cells and very high expression of CCR5 (Th1) on CD3(+)CD4(+) cells in patients with granuloma. Th1 (CCR5) and Th2 (CCR4) type chemokine receptors did not show any dominance in CVID cases. However, frequencies of CCR7 expressing CD3(+) T cells, CD3(+)CD4(+) T helper cells and CD3(+)CD8(+) T cytotoxic cells were significantly lower in severe CVID patients. In addition, presence of autoimmune clinical findings was negatively correlated with CCR7(+) cells. As CCR7 is a key mediator balancing immunity and tolerance in the immune system, the abnormality of this mediator may contribute to the profound immune dysregulation seen in CVID

  1. Targeting VEGF signalling via the neuropilin co-receptor.

    PubMed

    Djordjevic, Snezana; Driscoll, Paul C

    2013-05-01

    The blockade of tumour vascularisation and angiogenesis continues to be a focus for drug development in oncology and other pathologies. Historically, targeting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) activity and its association with VEGF receptors (VEGFRs) has represented the most promising line of attack. More recently, the recognition that VEGFR co-receptors, neuropilin-1 and -2 (NRP1 and NRP2), are also engaged by specific VEGF isoforms in tandem with the VEGFRs has expanded the landscape for the development of modulators of VEGF-dependent signalling. Here, we review the recent structural characterisation of VEGF interactions with NRP subdomains and the impact this has had on drug development activity in this area. PMID:23228652

  2. Use of the heteroduplex mobility assay and cell sorting to select genome sequences of the CCR5 gene in HEK 293T cells edited by transcription activator-like effector nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Nerys-Junior, Arildo; Costa, Lendel C.; Braga-Dias, Luciene P.; Oliveira, Márcia; Rossi, Átila D.; da Cunha, Rodrigo Delvecchio; Gonçalves, Gabriel S.; Tanuri, Amilcar

    2014-01-01

    Engineered nucleases such as zinc finger nucleases (ZFN) and transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALEN) are one of the most promising tools for modifying genomes. These site-specific enzymes cause double-strand breaks that allow gene disruption or gene insertion, thereby facilitating genetic manipulation. The major problem associated with this approach is the labor-intensive procedures required to screen and confirm the cellular modification by nucleases. In this work, we produced a TALEN that targets the human CCR5 gene and developed a heteroduplex mobility assay for HEK 293T cells to select positive colonies for sequencing. This approach provides a useful tool for the quick detection and easy assessment of nuclease activity. PMID:24688299

  3. Use of the heteroduplex mobility assay and cell sorting to select genome sequences of the CCR5 gene in HEK 293T cells edited by transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    PubMed

    Nerys-Junior, Arildo; Costa, Lendel C; Braga-Dias, Luciene P; Oliveira, Márcia; Rossi, Atila D; da Cunha, Rodrigo Delvecchio; Gonçalves, Gabriel S; Tanuri, Amilcar

    2014-03-01

    Engineered nucleases such as zinc finger nucleases (ZFN) and transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALEN) are one of the most promising tools for modifying genomes. These site-specific enzymes cause double-strand breaks that allow gene disruption or gene insertion, thereby facilitating genetic manipulation. The major problem associated with this approach is the labor-intensive procedures required to screen and confirm the cellular modification by nucleases. In this work, we produced a TALEN that targets the human CCR5 gene and developed a heteroduplex mobility assay for HEK 293T cells to select positive colonies for sequencing. This approach provides a useful tool for the quick detection and easy assessment of nuclease activity. PMID:24688299

  4. The odorant receptor co-receptor from the bed bug, Cimex lectularius L.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Immo A; Rodriguez, Stacy D; Drake, Lisa L; Price, David P; Blakely, Brittny N; Hammond, John I; Tsujimoto, Hitoshi; Monroy, Erika Y; Maio, William A; Romero, Alvaro

    2014-01-01

    Recently, the bed bug, Cimex lectularius L. has re-emerged as a serious and growing problem in many parts of the world. Presence of resistant bed bugs and the difficulty to eliminate them has renewed interest in alternative control tactics. Similar to other haematophagous arthropods, bed bugs rely on their olfactory system to detect semiochemicals in the environment. Previous studies have morphologically characterized olfactory organs of bed bugs' antenna and have physiologically evaluated the responses of olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) to host-derived chemicals. To date, odorant binding proteins (OBPs) and odorant receptors (ORs) associated with these olfaction processes have not been studied in bed bugs. Chemoreception in insects requires formation of heteromeric complexes of ORs and a universal OR coreceptor (Orco). Orco is the constant chain of every odorant receptor in insects and is critical for insect olfaction but does not directly bind to odorants. Orco agonists and antagonists have been suggested as high-value targets for the development of novel insect repellents. In this study, we have performed RNAseq of bed bug sensory organs and identified several odorant receptors as well as Orco. We characterized Orco expression and investigated the effect of chemicals targeting Orco on bed bug behavior and reproduction. We have identified partial cDNAs of six C. lectularius OBPs and 16 ORs. Full length bed bug Orco was cloned and sequenced. Orco is widely expressed in different parts of the bed bug including OR neurons and spermatozoa. Treatment of bed bugs with the agonist VUAA1 changed bed bug pheromone-induced aggregation behavior and inactivated spermatozoa. We have described and characterized for the first time OBPs, ORs and Orco in bed bugs. Given the importance of these molecules in chemoreception of this insect they are interesting targets for the development of novel insect behavior modifiers. PMID:25411789

  5. The Odorant Receptor Co-Receptor from the Bed Bug, Cimex lectularius L

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Immo A.; Rodriguez, Stacy D.; Drake, Lisa L.; Price, David P.; Blakely, Brittny N.; Hammond, John I.; Tsujimoto, Hitoshi; Monroy, Erika Y.; Maio, William A.; Romero, Alvaro

    2014-01-01

    Recently, the bed bug, Cimex lectularius L. has re-emerged as a serious and growing problem in many parts of the world. Presence of resistant bed bugs and the difficulty to eliminate them has renewed interest in alternative control tactics. Similar to other haematophagous arthropods, bed bugs rely on their olfactory system to detect semiochemicals in the environment. Previous studies have morphologically characterized olfactory organs of bed bugs’ antenna and have physiologically evaluated the responses of olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) to host-derived chemicals. To date, odorant binding proteins (OBPs) and odorant receptors (ORs) associated with these olfaction processes have not been studied in bed bugs. Chemoreception in insects requires formation of heteromeric complexes of ORs and a universal OR coreceptor (Orco). Orco is the constant chain of every odorant receptor in insects and is critical for insect olfaction but does not directly bind to odorants. Orco agonists and antagonists have been suggested as high-value targets for the development of novel insect repellents. In this study, we have performed RNAseq of bed bug sensory organs and identified several odorant receptors as well as Orco. We characterized Orco expression and investigated the effect of chemicals targeting Orco on bed bug behavior and reproduction. We have identified partial cDNAs of six C. lectularius OBPs and 16 ORs. Full length bed bug Orco was cloned and sequenced. Orco is widely expressed in different parts of the bed bug including OR neurons and spermatozoa. Treatment of bed bugs with the agonist VUAA1 changed bed bug pheromone-induced aggregation behavior and inactivated spermatozoa. We have described and characterized for the first time OBPs, ORs and Orco in bed bugs. Given the importance of these molecules in chemoreception of this insect they are interesting targets for the development of novel insect behavior modifiers. PMID:25411789

  6. LRP4 serves as a coreceptor of agrin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Luo, Shiwen; Wang, Qiang; Suzuki, Tatsuo; Xiong, Wen C; Mei, Lin

    2008-10-23

    Neuromuscular junction (NMJ) formation requires agrin, a factor released from motoneurons, and MuSK, a transmembrane tyrosine kinase that is activated by agrin. However, how signal is transduced from agrin to MuSK remains unclear. We report that LRP4, a low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR)-related protein, is expressed specifically in myotubes and binds to neuronal agrin. Its expression enables agrin binding and MuSK signaling in cells that otherwise do not respond to agrin. Suppression of LRP4 expression in muscle cells attenuates agrin binding, agrin-induced MuSK tyrosine phosphorylation, and AChR clustering. LRP4 also forms a complex with MuSK in a manner that is stimulated by agrin. Finally, we showed that LRP4 becomes tyrosine-phosphorylated in agrin-stimulated muscle cells. These observations indicate that LRP4 is a coreceptor of agrin that is necessary for MuSK signaling and AChR clustering and identify a potential target protein whose mutation and/or autoimmunization may cause muscular dystrophies. PMID:18957220

  7. Effects of Combined CCR5/Integrase Inhibitors-Based Regimen on Mucosal Immunity in HIV-Infected Patients Naïve to Antiretroviral Therapy: A Pilot Randomized Trial.

    PubMed

    Serrano-Villar, Sergio; Sainz, Talia; Ma, Zhong-Min; Utay, Netanya S; Chun, Tae-Wook; Wook-Chun, Tae; Mann, Surinder; Kashuba, Angela D; Siewe, Basile; Albanese, Anthony; Troia-Cancio, Paolo; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Somasunderam, Anoma; Yotter, Tammy; Deeks, Steven G; Landay, Alan; Pollard, Richard B; Miller, Christopher J; Moreno, Santiago; Asmuth, David M

    2016-01-01

    Whether initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens aimed at achieving greater concentrations within gut associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) impacts the level of mucosal immune reconstitution, inflammatory markers and the viral reservoir remains unknown. We included 12 HIV- controls and 32 ART-naïve HIV patients who were randomized to efavirenz, maraviroc or maraviroc+raltegravir, each with fixed-dose tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/emtricitabine. Rectal and duodenal biopsies were obtained at baseline and at 9 months of ART. We performed a comprehensive assay of T-cell subsets by flow cytometry, T-cell density in intestinal biopsies, plasma and tissue concentrations of antiretroviral drugs by high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectroscopy, and plasma interleukin-6 (IL-6), lipoteichoic acid (LTA), soluble CD14 (sCD14) and zonulin-1 each measured by ELISA. Total cell-associated HIV DNA was measured in PBMC and rectal and duodenal mononuclear cells. Twenty-six HIV-infected patients completed the follow-up. In the duodenum, the quadruple regimen resulted in greater CD8+ T-cell density decline, greater normalization of mucosal CCR5+CD4+ T-cells and increase of the naïve/memory CD8+ T-cell ratio, and a greater decline of sCD14 levels and duodenal HIV DNA levels (P = 0.004 and P = 0.067, respectively), with no changes in HIV RNA in plasma or tissue. Maraviroc showed the highest drug distribution to the gut tissue, and duodenal concentrations correlated well with other T-cell markers in duodenum, i.e., the CD4/CD8 ratio, %CD4+ and %CD8+ HLA-DR+CD38+ T-cells. Maraviroc use elicited greater activation of the mucosal naïve CD8+ T-cell subset, ameliorated the distribution of the CD8+ T-cell maturational subsets and induced higher improvement of zonulin-1 levels. These data suggest that combined CCR5 and integrase inhibitor based combination therapy in ART treatment naïve patients might more effectively reconstitute duodenal immunity, decrease inflammatory

  8. Effects of Combined CCR5/Integrase Inhibitors-Based Regimen on Mucosal Immunity in HIV-Infected Patients Naïve to Antiretroviral Therapy: A Pilot Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhong-Min; Utay, Netanya S.; Wook-Chun, Tae; Mann, Surinder; Kashuba, Angela D.; Siewe, Basile; Albanese, Anthony; Troia-Cancio, Paolo; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Somasunderam, Anoma; Yotter, Tammy; Deeks, Steven G.; Landay, Alan; Pollard, Richard B.; Miller, Christopher J.; Moreno, Santiago; Asmuth, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Whether initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens aimed at achieving greater concentrations within gut associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) impacts the level of mucosal immune reconstitution, inflammatory markers and the viral reservoir remains unknown. We included 12 HIV- controls and 32 ART-naïve HIV patients who were randomized to efavirenz, maraviroc or maraviroc+raltegravir, each with fixed-dose tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/emtricitabine. Rectal and duodenal biopsies were obtained at baseline and at 9 months of ART. We performed a comprehensive assay of T-cell subsets by flow cytometry, T-cell density in intestinal biopsies, plasma and tissue concentrations of antiretroviral drugs by high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectroscopy, and plasma interleukin-6 (IL-6), lipoteichoic acid (LTA), soluble CD14 (sCD14) and zonulin-1 each measured by ELISA. Total cell-associated HIV DNA was measured in PBMC and rectal and duodenal mononuclear cells. Twenty-six HIV-infected patients completed the follow-up. In the duodenum, the quadruple regimen resulted in greater CD8+ T-cell density decline, greater normalization of mucosal CCR5+CD4+ T-cells and increase of the naïve/memory CD8+ T-cell ratio, and a greater decline of sCD14 levels and duodenal HIV DNA levels (P = 0.004 and P = 0.067, respectively), with no changes in HIV RNA in plasma or tissue. Maraviroc showed the highest drug distribution to the gut tissue, and duodenal concentrations correlated well with other T-cell markers in duodenum, i.e., the CD4/CD8 ratio, %CD4+ and %CD8+ HLA-DR+CD38+ T-cells. Maraviroc use elicited greater activation of the mucosal naïve CD8+ T-cell subset, ameliorated the distribution of the CD8+ T-cell maturational subsets and induced higher improvement of zonulin-1 levels. These data suggest that combined CCR5 and integrase inhibitor based combination therapy in ART treatment naïve patients might more effectively reconstitute duodenal immunity, decrease inflammatory

  9. Syndecans: from peripheral coreceptors to mainstream regulators of cell behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Couchman, John R; Gopal, Sandeep; Lim, Hooi Ching; Nørgaard, Steffen; Multhaupt, Hinke AB

    2015-01-01

    In the 25 years, as the first of the syndecan family was cloned, interest in these transmembrane proteoglycans has steadily increased. While four distinct members are present in mammals, one is present in invertebrates, including C. elegans that is such a powerful genetic model. The syndecans, therefore, have a long evolutionary history, indicative of important roles. However, these roles have been elusive. The knockout in the worm has a developmental neuronal phenotype, while knockouts of the syndecans in the mouse are mild and mostly limited to post-natal rather than developmental effects. Moreover, their association with high-affinity receptors, such as integrins, growth factor receptors, frizzled and slit/robo, have led to the notion that syndecans are coreceptors, with minor roles. Given that their heparan sulphate chains can gather many different protein ligands, this gave credence to views that the importance of syndecans lay with their ability to concentrate ligands and that only the extracellular polysaccharide was of significance. Syndecans are increasingly identified with roles in the pathogenesis of many diseases, including tumour progression, vascular disease, arthritis and inflammation. This has provided impetus to understanding syndecan roles in more detail. It emerges that while the cytoplasmic domains of syndecans are small, they have clear interactive capabilities, most notably with the actin cytoskeleton. Moreover, through the binding and activation of signalling molecules, it is likely that syndecans are important receptors in their own right. Here, an overview of syndecan structure and function is provided, with some prospects for the future. PMID:25546317

  10. [Companion Diagnostics for Selecting Antiretroviral Drugs against HIV-1].

    PubMed

    Fukutake, Katsuyuki

    2015-11-01

    Currently, the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus involves combination therapy, as antiretroviral therapy(ART). The treatment has improved steadily since the advent of potent combination therapy in 1996. New drugs that offer new mechanisms of action, improvements in potency and activity even against multidrug-resistant viruses, dosing convenience, and tolerability have been approved. Among ART with useful drugs, there are two important examinations before starting the treatment using the two kinds of drug. CCR5 co-receptor antagonists, maraviroc, prevent HIV entry into target cells by binding to CCR5 receptors. Genotypic assays have been developed that can determine or predict the co-receptor tropism(i.e., CCR5, CXCR4, or both) of the patient's dominant virus population. The assay for HIV-1 co-receptor usage should be performed whenever the use of a CCR5 antagonist is being considered. One of the nucleoside/nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), abacavir, is an important agent to develop recommended regimens for antiretroviral therapy. Serious and sometimes fatal hypersensitivity reactions have been associated with abacavir-containing products, ZIAGEN, Epzicom, and Triumeq. Patients who carry the HLA-B*5701 allele are at high-risk of a hypersensitivity reaction to abacavir. Prior to initiating therapy with abacavir, performing a screening test for the HLA-B*5701 allele is recommended. [Review]. PMID:26995879

  11. ACTH Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Clark, Adrian John; Forfar, Rachel; Hussain, Mashal; Jerman, Jeff; McIver, Ed; Taylor, Debra; Chan, Li

    2016-01-01

    Adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) acts via a highly selective receptor that is a member of the melanocortin receptor subfamily of type 1 G protein-coupled receptors. The ACTH receptor, also known as the melanocortin 2 receptor (MC2R), is unusual in that it is absolutely dependent on a small accessory protein, melanocortin receptor accessory protein (MRAP) for cell surface expression and function. ACTH is the only known naturally occurring agonist for this receptor. This lack of redundancy and high degree of ligand specificity suggests that antagonism of this receptor could provide a useful therapeutic aid and a potential investigational tool. Clinical situations in which this could be useful include (1) Cushing's disease and ectopic ACTH syndrome - especially while preparing for definitive treatment of a causative tumor, or in refractory cases, or (2) congenital adrenal hyperplasia - as an adjunct to glucocorticoid replacement. A case for antagonism in other clinical situations in which there is ACTH excess can also be made. In this article, we will explore the scientific and clinical case for an ACTH antagonist, and will review the evidence for existing and recently described peptides and modified peptides in this role. PMID:27547198

  12. ACTH Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Adrian John; Forfar, Rachel; Hussain, Mashal; Jerman, Jeff; McIver, Ed; Taylor, Debra; Chan, Li

    2016-01-01

    Adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) acts via a highly selective receptor that is a member of the melanocortin receptor subfamily of type 1 G protein-coupled receptors. The ACTH receptor, also known as the melanocortin 2 receptor (MC2R), is unusual in that it is absolutely dependent on a small accessory protein, melanocortin receptor accessory protein (MRAP) for cell surface expression and function. ACTH is the only known naturally occurring agonist for this receptor. This lack of redundancy and high degree of ligand specificity suggests that antagonism of this receptor could provide a useful therapeutic aid and a potential investigational tool. Clinical situations in which this could be useful include (1) Cushing’s disease and ectopic ACTH syndrome – especially while preparing for definitive treatment of a causative tumor, or in refractory cases, or (2) congenital adrenal hyperplasia – as an adjunct to glucocorticoid replacement. A case for antagonism in other clinical situations in which there is ACTH excess can also be made. In this article, we will explore the scientific and clinical case for an ACTH antagonist, and will review the evidence for existing and recently described peptides and modified peptides in this role. PMID:27547198

  13. Discovery of tetrahydroisoquinoline-based CXCR4 antagonists.

    PubMed

    Truax, Valarie M; Zhao, Huanyu; Katzman, Brooke M; Prosser, Anthony R; Alcaraz, Ana A; Saindane, Manohar T; Howard, Randy B; Culver, Deborah; Arrendale, Richard F; Gruddanti, Prahbakar R; Evers, Taylor J; Natchus, Michael G; Snyder, James P; Liotta, Dennis C; Wilson, Lawrence J

    2013-11-14

    A de novo hit-to-lead effort involving the redesign of benzimidazole-containing antagonists of the CXCR4 receptor resulted in the discovery of a novel series of 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline (TIQ) analogues. In general, this series of compounds show good potencies (3-650 nM) in assays involving CXCR4 function, including both inhibition of attachment of X4 HIV-1IIIB virus in MAGI-CCR5/CXCR4 cells and inhibition of calcium release in Chem-1 cells. Series profiling permitted the identification of TIQ-(R)-stereoisomer 15 as a potent and selective CXCR4 antagonist lead candidate with a promising in vitro profile. The drug-like properties of 15 were determined in ADME in vitro studies, revealing low metabolic liability potential. Further in vivo evaluations included pharmacokinetic experiments in rats and mice, where 15 was shown to have oral bioavailability (F = 63%) and resulted in the mobilization of white blood cells (WBCs) in a dose-dependent manner. PMID:24936240

  14. Co-receptors are dispensable for tethering receptor-mediated phagocytosis of apoptotic cells.

    PubMed

    Park, B; Lee, J; Moon, H; Lee, G; Lee, D-H; Cho, J Hoon; Park, D

    2015-01-01

    During efferocytosis, phagocytic cells recognize dying cells by receptors binding to ligands specifically exposed on apoptotic cells. Multiple phagocytic receptors and some of their signaling pathways have been identified. However, the downstream pathways of tethering receptors that secure apoptotic cells remain elusive. It is generally assumed that tethering receptors induce signaling to mediate engulfment via interacting with co-receptors or other engulfment receptors located nearby. However, it is poorly understood whether co-receptors for tethering receptors exist during efferocytosis, and, if they do, whether they are indispensable for this process. Here, we address this issue using glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored annexin A5 (Anxa5-GPI), an artificial tethering receptor without a putative co-receptor. Phagocytes expressing Anxa5-GPI exhibited enhanced binding of apoptotic cells, resulting in promoted ingestion of apoptotic cells in a phosphatidylserine-dependent manner. Anxa5-GPI-induced phagocytosis of apoptotic cells relied on the known cytoskeletal engulfment machinery but partially depended on the Elmo-Dock-Rac module or the integrin pathway. In addition, Anxa5-GPI-mediated efferocytosis provoked anti-inflammatory responses. Taken together, our work suggests that co-receptors are dispensable for tethering receptor-induced efferocytosis and that tethering receptors mediate the engulfment of apoptotic cells through multiple engulfment signaling pathways. PMID:26018733

  15. T-cell receptor accessory and co-receptor molecules in channel catfish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    T cell receptor (TCR) associated invariant chains CD3gamma/delta,epsilon, and zeta as well as TCR co-receptors CD8alpha and CD8beta were isolated from the channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, at both the gene and cDNA levels. All of catfish CD3 sequences encode for proteins that resemble their resp...

  16. Splicing and proteolytic processing in VEGF signaling: now it is the coreceptor's turn.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xiaolan; Bouyain, Samuel

    2015-04-01

    Alternative splicing and proteolytic processing of VEGFs generate proteins with distinct physiological roles. In this issue of Structure, Parker et al. show that proteolysis of an isoform of the VEGF-C coreceptor Nrp2 produces a soluble receptor that inhibits VEGF-C/Nrp2 interactions. PMID:25862932

  17. Co-receptors are dispensable for tethering receptor-mediated phagocytosis of apoptotic cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, B; Lee, J; Moon, H; Lee, G; Lee, D-H; Hoon Cho, J; Park, D

    2015-01-01

    During efferocytosis, phagocytic cells recognize dying cells by receptors binding to ligands specifically exposed on apoptotic cells. Multiple phagocytic receptors and some of their signaling pathways have been identified. However, the downstream pathways of tethering receptors that secure apoptotic cells remain elusive. It is generally assumed that tethering receptors induce signaling to mediate engulfment via interacting with co-receptors or other engulfment receptors located nearby. However, it is poorly understood whether co-receptors for tethering receptors exist during efferocytosis, and, if they do, whether they are indispensable for this process. Here, we address this issue using glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored annexin A5 (Anxa5-GPI), an artificial tethering receptor without a putative co-receptor. Phagocytes expressing Anxa5-GPI exhibited enhanced binding of apoptotic cells, resulting in promoted ingestion of apoptotic cells in a phosphatidylserine-dependent manner. Anxa5-GPI-induced phagocytosis of apoptotic cells relied on the known cytoskeletal engulfment machinery but partially depended on the Elmo-Dock-Rac module or the integrin pathway. In addition, Anxa5-GPI-mediated efferocytosis provoked anti-inflammatory responses. Taken together, our work suggests that co-receptors are dispensable for tethering receptor-induced efferocytosis and that tethering receptors mediate the engulfment of apoptotic cells through multiple engulfment signaling pathways. PMID:26018733

  18. Ligand engaged TCR is triggered by Lck not associated with CD8 coreceptor

    PubMed Central

    Casas, Javier; Brzostek, Joanna; Zarnitsyna, Veronika I.; Hong, Jin-sung; Wei, Qianru; Hoerter, John A.H.; Fu, Guo; Ampudia, Jeanette; Zamoyska, Rose; Zhu, Cheng; Gascoigne, Nicholas R.J.

    2014-01-01

    The earliest molecular events in T cell recognition have not yet been fully described, and the initial T cell receptor (TCR) triggering mechanism remains a subject of controversy. Here, using TIRF/FRET microscopy, we observe a two-stage interaction between TCR, CD8, and MHCp. There is an early (within seconds) interaction between CD3ζ and the coreceptor CD8 that is independent of the binding of CD8 to MHC, but that requires CD8 association with Lck. Later (several minutes) CD3ζ-CD8 interactions require CD8-MHC binding. Lck can be found free or bound to the coreceptor. This work indicates that the initial TCR triggering event is induced by free Lck. PMID:25427562

  19. Tomoregulin-1 (TMEFF1) inhibits nodal signaling through direct binding to the nodal coreceptor Cripto

    PubMed Central

    Harms, Paul W.; Chang, Chenbei

    2003-01-01

    Transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) signals regulate multiple processes during development and in adult. We recently showed that tomoregulin-1 (TMEFF1), a transmembrane protein, selectively inhibits nodal but not activin in early Xenopus embryos. Here we report that TMEFF1 binds to the nodal coreceptor Cripto, but does not associate with either nodal or the type I ALK (activin receptor-like kinase) 4 receptor in coimmunoprecipitation assays. The inhibition of the nodal signaling by TMEFF1 in Xenopus ectodermal explants is rescued with wild-type but not mutant forms of Cripto. Furthermore, we show that the Cripto-FRL1-Cryptic (CFC) domain in Cripto, which is essential for its binding to ALK4, is also important for its interaction with TMEFF1. Our results demonstrate for the first time that nodal signaling can be regulated by a novel mechanism of blocking the Cripto coreceptor. PMID:14563676

  20. Identification of RL-TGR, a coreceptor involved in aversive chemical signaling

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Staci P.; Haack, Karla K. V.; Halstead-Nussloch, Gwyneth E.; Bernard, Karen F.; Hatt, Hanns; Kubanek, Julia; McCarty, Nael A.

    2010-01-01

    Chemical signaling plays an important role in predator–prey interactions and feeding dynamics. Like other organisms that are sessile or slow moving, some marine sponges contain aversive compounds that defend these organisms from predation. We sought to identify and characterize a fish chemoreceptor that detects one of these compounds. Using expression cloning in Xenopus oocytes coexpressing the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel, the beta-2 adrenergic receptor (β2AR), and fractions of a zebrafish cDNA library, we isolated a cDNA clone encoding receptor activity–modifying protein (RAMP)-like triterpene glycoside receptor (RL-TGR), a novel coreceptor involved in signaling in response to triterpene glycosides. This coreceptor appears to be structurally and functionally related to RAMPs, a family of coreceptors that physically associate with and modify the activity of G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs). In membranes from formoside-responsive oocytes, RL-TGR was immunoprecipitated in an apparent complex with β2AR. In HEK293 cells, coexpression of β2AR induced the trafficking of RL-TGR from the cytoplasm to the plasma membrane. These results suggest that RL-TGR in the predatory fish physically associates with the β2AR or another, more physiologically relevant GPCR and modifies its pharmacology to respond to triterpene glycosides found in sponges that serve as a potential food source for the fish. RL-TGR forms a coreceptor that responds to a chemical defense compound in the marine environment, and its discovery might lead the way to the identification of other receptors that mediate chemical defense signaling. PMID:20566865

  1. Identification of RL-TGR, a coreceptor involved in aversive chemical signaling.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Staci P; Haack, Karla K V; Halstead-Nussloch, Gwyneth E; Bernard, Karen F; Hatt, Hanns; Kubanek, Julia; McCarty, Nael A

    2010-07-01

    Chemical signaling plays an important role in predator-prey interactions and feeding dynamics. Like other organisms that are sessile or slow moving, some marine sponges contain aversive compounds that defend these organisms from predation. We sought to identify and characterize a fish chemoreceptor that detects one of these compounds. Using expression cloning in Xenopus oocytes coexpressing the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel, the beta-2 adrenergic receptor (beta(2)AR), and fractions of a zebrafish cDNA library, we isolated a cDNA clone encoding receptor activity-modifying protein (RAMP)-like triterpene glycoside receptor (RL-TGR), a novel coreceptor involved in signaling in response to triterpene glycosides. This coreceptor appears to be structurally and functionally related to RAMPs, a family of coreceptors that physically associate with and modify the activity of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). In membranes from formoside-responsive oocytes, RL-TGR was immunoprecipitated in an apparent complex with beta(2)AR. In HEK293 cells, coexpression of beta(2)AR induced the trafficking of RL-TGR from the cytoplasm to the plasma membrane. These results suggest that RL-TGR in the predatory fish physically associates with the beta(2)AR or another, more physiologically relevant GPCR and modifies its pharmacology to respond to triterpene glycosides found in sponges that serve as a potential food source for the fish. RL-TGR forms a coreceptor that responds to a chemical defense compound in the marine environment, and its discovery might lead the way to the identification of other receptors that mediate chemical defense signaling. PMID:20566865

  2. Competitive binding of antagonistic peptides fine-tunes stomatal patterning

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin Suk; Hnilova, Marketa; Maes, Michal; Lin, Ya-Chen Lisa; Putarjunan, Aarthi; Han, Soon-Ki; Avila, Julian; U.Torii, Keiko

    2015-01-01

    During development, cells interpret complex, often conflicting signals to make optimal decisions. Plant stomata, the cellular interface between a plant and the atmosphere, develop according to positional cues including a family of secreted peptides, EPIDERMAL PATTERNING FACTORS (EPFs). How these signaling peptides orchestrate pattern formation at a molecular level remains unclear. Here we report that Stomagen/EPF-LIKE9 peptide, which promotes stomatal development, requires ERECTA (ER)-family receptor kinases and interferes with the inhibition of stomatal development by the EPF2-ER module. Both EPF2 and Stomagen directly bind to ER and its co-receptor TOO MANY MOUTHS. Stomagen peptide competitively replaced EPF2 binding to ER. Furthermore, application of EPF2, but not Stomagen, elicited rapid phosphorylation of downstream signaling components in vivo. Our findings demonstrate how a plant receptor agonist and antagonist define inhibitory and inductive cues to fine-tune tissue patterning on the plant epidermis. PMID:26083750

  3. CCR6 Functions as a New Coreceptor for Limited Primary Human and Simian Immunodeficiency Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Salequl; Shimizu, Nobuaki; Hoque, Sheikh Ariful; Jinno-Oue, Atsushi; Tanaka, Atsushi; Hoshino, Hiroo

    2013-01-01

    More than 12 chemokine receptors (CKRs) have been identified as coreceptors for the entry of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), type 2 (HIV-2), and simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIVs) into target cells. The expression of CC chemokine receptor 6 (CCR6) on Th17 cells and regulatory T cells make the host cells vulnerable to HIV/SIV infection preferentially. However, only limited information is available concerning the specific role of CCR6 in HIV/SIV infection. We examined CCR6 as a coreceptor candidate in this study using NP-2 cell line-based in-vitro studies. Normally, CD4-transduced cell line, NP-2/CD4, is strictly resistant to all HIV/SIV infection. When CCR6 was transduced there, the resultant NP-2/CD4/CCR6 cells became susceptible to HIV-1HAN2, HIV-2MIR and SIVsmE660, indicating coreceptor roles of CCR6. Viral antigens in infected cells were detected by IFA and confirmed by detection of proviral DNA. Infection-induced syncytia in NP-2/CD4/CCR6 cells were detected by Giemsa staining. Amount of virus release through CCR6 has been detected by RT assay in spent culture medium. Sequence analysis of proviral DNA showed two common amino acid substitutions in the C2 envelope region of HIV-2MIR clones propagated through NP-2/CD4/CCR6 cells. Conversely, CCR6-origin SIVsmE660 clones resulted two amino acid changes in the V1 region and one change in the C2 region. The substitutions in the C2 region for HIV-2MIR and the V1 region of SIVsmE660 may confer selection advantage for CCR6-use. Together, the results describe CCR6 as an independent coreceptor for HIV and SIV in strain-specific manner. The alteration of CCR6 uses by viruses may influence the susceptibility of CD4+ CCR6+ T-cells and dendritic cell subsets in vivo and therefore, is important for viral pathogenesis in establishing latent infections, trafficking, and transmission. However, clinical relevance of CCR6 as coreceptor in HIV/SIV infections should be investigated further. PMID:24009735

  4. Wnt Coreceptor Lrp5 Is a Driver of Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Anna P.; Herazo-Maya, Jose D.; Sennello, Joseph A.; Flozak, Annette S.; Russell, Susan; Mutlu, Gökhan M.; Budinger, G. R. Scott; DasGupta, Ramanuj; Varga, John; Kaminski, Naftali

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Wnt/β-catenin signaling has been implicated in lung fibrosis, but how this occurs and whether expression changes in Wnt pathway components predict disease progression is unknown. Objectives: To determine whether the Wnt coreceptor Lrp5 drives pulmonary fibrosis in mice and is predictive of disease severity in humans. Methods: We examined mice with impaired Wnt signaling caused by loss of the Wnt coreceptor Lrp5 in models of lung fibrosis induced by bleomycin or an adenovirus encoding an active form of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β. We also analyzed gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Measurements and Main Results: In patients with IPF, analysis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells revealed that elevation of positive regulators, Lrp5 and 6, was independently associated with disease progression. LRP5 was also associated with disease severity at presentation in an additional cohort of patients with IPF. Lrp5 null mice were protected against bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis, an effect that was phenocopied by direct inhibition of β-catenin signaling by the small molecular inhibitor of β-catenin responsive transcription. Transplantation of Lrp5 null bone marrow cells into wild-type mice did not limit fibrosis. Instead, Lrp5 loss was associated with reduced TGF-β production by alveolar type 2 cells and leukocytes. Consistent with a role of Lrp5 in the activation of TGF-β, Lrp5 null mice were not protected against lung fibrosis induced by TGF-β. Conclusions: We show that the Wnt coreceptor, Lrp5, is a genetic driver of lung fibrosis in mice and a marker of disease progression and severity in humans with IPF. Evidence that TGF-β signaling can override a loss in Lrp5 has implications for patient selection and timing of Wnt pathway inhibitors in lung fibrosis. PMID:24921217

  5. CD36 is a co-receptor for hepatitis C virus E1 protein attachment

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jun-Jun; Li, Jian-Rui; Huang, Meng-Hao; Ma, Lin-Lin; Wu, Zhou-Yi; Jiang, Chen-Chen; Li, Wen-Jing; Li, Yu-Huan; Han, Yan-Xing; Li, Hu; Chen, Jin-Hua; Wang, Yan-Xiang; Song, Dan-Qing; Peng, Zong-Gen; Jiang, Jian-Dong

    2016-01-01

    The cluster of differentiation 36 (CD36) is a membrane protein related to lipid metabolism. We show that HCV infection in vitro increased CD36 expression in either surface or soluble form. HCV attachment was facilitated through a direct interaction between CD36 and HCV E1 protein, causing enhanced entry and replication. The HCV co-receptor effect of CD36 was independent of that of SR-BI. CD36 monoclonal antibodies neutralized the effect of CD36 and reduced HCV replication. CD36 inhibitor sulfo-N-succinimidyl oleate (SSO), which directly bound CD36 but not SR-BI, significantly interrupted HCV entry, and therefore inhibited HCV replication. SSO’s antiviral effect was seen only in HCV but not in other viruses. SSO in combination with known anti-HCV drugs showed additional inhibition against HCV. SSO was considerably safe in mice. Conclusively, CD36 interacts with HCV E1 and might be a co-receptor specific for HCV entry; thus, CD36 could be a potential drug target against HCV. PMID:26898231

  6. Maraviroc: a review of its use in HIV infection and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Woollard, Shawna M; Kanmogne, Georgette D

    2015-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) enters target cells by binding its envelope glycoprotein gp120 to the CD4 receptor and/or coreceptors such as C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5; R5) and C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4; X4), and R5-tropic viruses predominate during the early stages of infection. CCR5 antagonists bind to CCR5 to prevent viral entry. Maraviroc (MVC) is the only CCR5 antagonist currently approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration, the European Commission, Health Canada, and several other countries for the treatment of patients infected with R5-tropic HIV-1. MVC has been shown to be effective at inhibiting HIV-1 entry into cells and is well tolerated. With expanding MVC use by HIV-1-infected humans, different clinical outcomes post-approval have been observed with MVC monotherapy or combination therapy with other antiretroviral drugs, with MVC use in humans infected with dual-R5- and X4-tropic HIV-1, infected with different HIV-1 genotype or infected with HIV-2. This review discuss the role of CCR5 in HIV-1 infection, the development of the CCR5 antagonist MVC, its pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, drug–drug interactions, and the implications of these interactions on treatment outcomes, including viral mutations and drug resistance, and the mechanisms associated with the development of resistance to MVC. This review also discusses available studies investigating the use of MVC in the treatment of other diseases such as cancer, graft-versus-host disease, and inflammatory diseases. PMID:26491256

  7. Gene number determination and genetic polymorphism of the gamma delta T cell co-receptor WC1 genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background WC1 co-receptors belong to the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich superfamily and are encoded by a multi-gene family. Expression of particular WC1 genes defines functional subpopulations of WC1+ '' T cells. Our previous study identified partial sequences for 13 different WC1 genes by annota...

  8. Vasopressin receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Biff F

    2015-01-01

    Arginine vasopressin (AVP) is the principal hormone involved in regulating the tonicity of body fluids. Less appreciated is the role that AVP plays in a variety of other physiologic functions including glucose metabolism, cardiovascular homeostasis, bone metabolism, and cognitive behavior. AVP receptor antagonists are now available and currently approved to treat hyponatremia. There is a great deal of interest in exploring the potential benefits that these drugs may play in blocking AVP-mediated effects in other organ systems. The purpose of this report is to provide an update on the expanding role of AVP receptor antagonists and what disease states these drugs may eventually be used for. PMID:25604388

  9. Lack of Prophylactic Efficacy of Oral Maraviroc in Macaques despite High Drug Concentrations in Rectal Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Massud, Ivana; Aung, Wutyi; Martin, Amy; Bachman, Shanon; Mitchell, James; Aubert, Rachael; Solomon Tsegaye, Theodros; Kersh, Ellen; Pau, Chou-Pong; Heneine, Walid

    2013-01-01

    Maraviroc (MVC) is a potent CCR5 coreceptor antagonist that is in clinical testing for daily oral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for HIV prevention. We used a macaque model consisting of weekly SHIV162p3 exposures to evaluate the efficacy of oral MVC in preventing rectal SHIV transmission. MVC dosing was informed by the pharmacokinetic profile seen in blood and rectal tissues and consisted of a human-equivalent dose given 24 h before virus exposure, followed by a booster postexposure dose. In rectal secretions, MVC peaked at 24 h (10,242 ng/ml) with concentrations at 48 h that were about 40 times those required to block SHIV infection of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in vitro. Median MVC concentrations in rectal tissues at 24 h (1,404 ng/g) were 30 and 10 times those achieved in vaginal or lymphoid tissues, respectively. MVC significantly reduced macrophage inflammatory protein 1β-induced CCR5 internalization in rectal mononuclear cells, an indication of efficient binding to CCR5 in rectal lymphocytes. The half-life of CCR5-bound MVC in PBMCs was 2.6 days. Despite this favorable profile, 5/6 treated macaques were infected during five rectal SHIV exposures as were 3/4 controls. MVC treatment was associated with a significant increase in the percentage of CD3+/CCR5+ cells in blood. We show that high and durable MVC concentrations in rectal tissues are not sufficient to prevent SHIV infection in macaques. The increases in CD3+/CCR5+ cells seen during MVC treatment point to unique immunological effects of CCR5 inhibition by MVC. The implications of these immunological effects on PrEP with MVC require further evaluation. PMID:23740994

  10. CDO, an Hh-Coreceptor, Mediates Lung Cancer Cell Proliferation and Tumorigenicity through Hedgehog Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Leem, Young-Eun; Ha, Hye-Lim; Bae, Ju-Hyeon; Baek, Kwan-Hyuck; Kang, Jong-Sun

    2014-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling plays essential roles in various developmental processes, and its aberrant regulation results in genetic disorders or malignancies in various tissues. Hyperactivation of Hh signaling is associated with lung cancer development, and there have been extensive efforts to investigate how to control Hh signaling pathway and regulate cancer cell proliferation. In this study we investigated a role of CDO, an Hh co-receptor, in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Inhibition of Hh signaling by SANT-1 or siCDO in lung cancer cells reduced proliferation and tumorigenicity, along with the decrease in the expression of the Hh components. Histological analysis with NSCLC mouse tissue demonstrated that CDO was expressed in advanced grade of the cancer, and precisely co-localized with GLI1. These data suggest that CDO is required for proliferation and survival of lung cancer cells via Hh signaling. PMID:25369201