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Sample records for cdc42 controls progenitor

  1. Cdc42 GTPase dynamics control directional growth responses

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Alexandra C.; Morrison, Emma; Milne, Stephen; Gonia, Sara; Gale, Cheryl A.; Gow, Neil A. R.

    2014-01-01

    Polarized cells reorient their direction of growth in response to environmental cues. In the fungus Candida albicans, the Rho-family small GTPase, Cdc42, is essential for polarized hyphal growth and Ca2+ influx is required for the tropic responses of hyphae to environmental cues, but the regulatory link between these systems is unclear. In this study, the interaction between Ca2+ influx and Cdc42 polarity-complex dynamics was investigated using hyphal galvanotropic and thigmotropic responses as reporter systems. During polarity establishment in an applied electric field, cathodal emergence of hyphae was lost when either of the two Cdc42 apical recycling pathways was disrupted by deletion of Rdi1, a guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor, or Bnr1, a formin, but was completely restored by extracellular Ca2+. Loss of the Cdc42 GTPase activating proteins, Rga2 and Bem3, also abolished cathodal polarization, but this was not rescued by Ca2+. Expression of GTP-locked Cdc42 reversed the polarity of hypha emergence from cathodal to anodal, an effect augmented by Ca2+. The cathodal directional cue therefore requires Cdc42 GTP hydrolysis. Ca2+ influx amplifies Cdc42-mediated directional growth signals, in part by augmenting Cdc42 apical trafficking. The Ca2+-binding EF-hand motif in Cdc24, the Cdc42 activator, was essential for growth in yeast cells but not in established hyphae. The Cdc24 EF-hand motif is therefore essential for polarity establishment but not for polarity maintenance. PMID:24385582

  2. Subcellular optogenetic activation of Cdc42 controls local and distal signaling to drive immune cell migration

    PubMed Central

    O’Neill, Patrick R.; Kalyanaraman, Vani; Gautam, N.

    2016-01-01

    Migratory immune cells use intracellular signaling networks to generate and orient spatially polarized responses to extracellular cues. The monomeric G protein Cdc42 is believed to play an important role in controlling the polarized responses, but it has been difficult to determine directly the consequences of localized Cdc42 activation within an immune cell. Here we used subcellular optogenetics to determine how Cdc42 activation at one side of a cell affects both cell behavior and dynamic molecular responses throughout the cell. We found that localized Cdc42 activation is sufficient to generate polarized signaling and directional cell migration. The optically activated region becomes the leading edge of the cell, with Cdc42 activating Rac and generating membrane protrusions driven by the actin cytoskeleton. Cdc42 also exerts long-range effects that cause myosin accumulation at the opposite side of the cell and actomyosin-mediated retraction of the cell rear. This process requires the RhoA-activated kinase ROCK, suggesting that Cdc42 activation at one side of a cell triggers increased RhoA signaling at the opposite side. Our results demonstrate how dynamic, subcellular perturbation of an individual signaling protein can help to determine its role in controlling polarized cellular responses. PMID:26941336

  3. Subcellular optogenetic activation of Cdc42 controls local and distal signaling to drive immune cell migration.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Patrick R; Kalyanaraman, Vani; Gautam, N

    2016-05-01

    Migratory immune cells use intracellular signaling networks to generate and orient spatially polarized responses to extracellular cues. The monomeric G protein Cdc42 is believed to play an important role in controlling the polarized responses, but it has been difficult to determine directly the consequences of localized Cdc42 activation within an immune cell. Here we used subcellular optogenetics to determine how Cdc42 activation at one side of a cell affects both cell behavior and dynamic molecular responses throughout the cell. We found that localized Cdc42 activation is sufficient to generate polarized signaling and directional cell migration. The optically activated region becomes the leading edge of the cell, with Cdc42 activating Rac and generating membrane protrusions driven by the actin cytoskeleton. Cdc42 also exerts long-range effects that cause myosin accumulation at the opposite side of the cell and actomyosin-mediated retraction of the cell rear. This process requires the RhoA-activated kinase ROCK, suggesting that Cdc42 activation at one side of a cell triggers increased RhoA signaling at the opposite side. Our results demonstrate how dynamic, subcellular perturbation of an individual signaling protein can help to determine its role in controlling polarized cellular responses. PMID:26941336

  4. Cdc42-dependent actin dynamics controls maturation and secretory activity of dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Anna M.; Stutte, Susanne; Hogl, Sebastian; Luckashenak, Nancy; Dudziak, Diana; Leroy, Céline; Forné, Ignasi; Imhof, Axel; Müller, Stephan A.; Brakebusch, Cord H.; Lichtenthaler, Stefan F.

    2015-01-01

    Cell division cycle 42 (Cdc42) is a member of the Rho guanosine triphosphatase family and has pivotal functions in actin organization, cell migration, and proliferation. To further study the molecular mechanisms of dendritic cell (DC) regulation by Cdc42, we used Cdc42-deficient DCs. Cdc42 deficiency renders DCs phenotypically mature as they up-regulate the co-stimulatory molecule CD86 from intracellular storages to the cell surface. Cdc42 knockout DCs also accumulate high amounts of invariant chain–major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II complexes at the cell surface, which cannot efficiently present peptide antigens (Ag’s) for priming of Ag-specific CD4 T cells. Proteome analyses showed a significant reduction in lysosomal MHC class II–processing proteins, such as cathepsins, which are lost from DCs by enhanced secretion. As these effects on DCs can be mimicked by chemical actin disruption, our results propose that Cdc42 control of actin dynamics keeps DCs in an immature state, and cessation of Cdc42 activity during DC maturation facilitates secretion as well as rapid up-regulation of intracellular molecules to the cell surface. PMID:26553928

  5. Cdc42 and formin activity control non-muscle myosin dynamics during Drosophila heart morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Vogler, Georg; Liu, Jiandong; Iafe, Timothy W.; Migh, Ede; Mihály, József

    2014-01-01

    During heart formation, a network of transcription factors and signaling pathways guide cardiac cell fate and differentiation, but the genetic mechanisms orchestrating heart assembly and lumen formation remain unclear. Here, we show that the small GTPase Cdc42 is essential for Drosophila melanogaster heart morphogenesis and lumen formation. Cdc42 genetically interacts with the cardiogenic transcription factor tinman; with dDAAM which belongs to the family of actin organizing formins; and with zipper, which encodes nonmuscle myosin II. Zipper is required for heart lumen formation, and its spatiotemporal activity at the prospective luminal surface is controlled by Cdc42. Heart-specific expression of activated Cdc42, or the regulatory formins dDAAM and Diaphanous caused mislocalization of Zipper and induced ectopic heart lumina, as characterized by luminal markers such as the extracellular matrix protein Slit. Placement of Slit at the lumen surface depends on Cdc42 and formin function. Thus, Cdc42 and formins play pivotal roles in heart lumen formation through the spatiotemporal regulation of the actomyosin network. PMID:25267295

  6. Cdc42 controls the dilation of the exocytotic fusion pore by regulating membrane tension

    PubMed Central

    Bretou, Marine; Jouannot, Ouardane; Fanget, Isabelle; Pierobon, Paolo; Larochette, Nathanaël; Gestraud, Pierre; Guillon, Marc; Emiliani, Valentina; Gasman, Stéphane; Desnos, Claire; Lennon-Duménil, Ana-Maria; Darchen, François

    2014-01-01

    Membrane fusion underlies multiple processes, including exocytosis of hormones and neurotransmitters. Membrane fusion starts with the formation of a narrow fusion pore. Radial expansion of this pore completes the process and allows fast release of secretory compounds, but this step remains poorly understood. Here we show that inhibiting the expression of the small GTPase Cdc42 or preventing its activation with a dominant negative Cdc42 construct in human neuroendocrine cells impaired the release process by compromising fusion pore enlargement. Consequently the mode of vesicle exocytosis was shifted from full-collapse fusion to kiss-and-run. Remarkably, Cdc42-knockdown cells showed reduced membrane tension, and the artificial increase of membrane tension restored fusion pore enlargement. Moreover, inhibiting the motor protein myosin II by blebbistatin decreased membrane tension, as well as fusion pore dilation. We conclude that membrane tension is the driving force for fusion pore dilation and that Cdc42 is a key regulator of this force. PMID:25143404

  7. Cdc42: Role in Cancer Management.

    PubMed

    Qadir, Muhammad Imran; Parveen, Amna; Ali, Muhammad

    2015-10-01

    Contribution of Cdc42, a member of Rho family, has been characterized for the beginning of variety of cellular responses including cellular transformation, cell division, cell invasion, migration, invadopodia formation, enzyme activity, filopodia formation, and cell polarity in cells. Deregulation of Cdc42 can alter the normal functioning of the cells, responsible for the initiation of signaling pathways and is correlated with several pathogenic processes such as cancer. Therefore, maintaining the level of Cdc42 and its effectors in cells, tumor progression can be controlled. Therefore, it can be suggested that deeper understanding about the Cdc42 contribution in cancer cell progression at molecular level can approach to the development of Cdc42 inhibitors in cancer management. PMID:25777055

  8. Locally excitable Cdc42 signals steer cells during chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils and other amoeboid cells chemotax by steering their front towards chemoattractant. While Ras, Rac, Cdc42, and RhoA small GTPases all regulate chemotaxis, it has been unclear how they spatiotemporally control polarization and steering. Using fluorescence biosensors in neutrophil-like PLB-985 cells and photorelease of chemoattractant, we show that local Cdc42 signals, but not those of Rac, RhoA or Ras, precede cell turning during chemotaxis. Furthermore, preexisting local Cdc42 signals in morphologically unpolarized cells predict the future direction of movement upon uniform stimulation. Moreover, inhibition of actin polymerization uncovers recurring local Cdc42 activity pulses, suggesting that Cdc42 has the excitable characteristic of the compass activity proposed in models of chemotaxis. Globally, Cdc42 antagonizes RhoA, and maintains a steep spatial activity gradient during migration, while Ras and Rac form shallow gradients. Thus, chemotactic steering and de novo polarization are both directed by locally excitable Cdc42 signals. PMID:26689677

  9. Cdc42 and Actin Control Polarized Expression of TI-VAMP Vesicles to Neuronal Growth Cones and Their Fusion with the Plasma MembraneV⃞

    PubMed Central

    Alberts, Philipp; Rudge, Rachel; Irinopoulou, Theano; Danglot, Lydia; Gauthier-Rouvière, Cécile; Galli, Thierry

    2006-01-01

    Tetanus neurotoxin-insensitive vesicle-associated membrane protein (TI-VAMP)-mediated fusion of intracellular vesicles with the plasma membrane is crucial for neurite outgrowth, a pathway not requiring synaptobrevin-dependent exocytosis. Yet, it is not known how the TI-VAMP membrane trafficking pathway is regulated or how it is coordinated with cytoskeletal dynamics within the growth cone that guide neurite outgrowth. Here, we demonstrate that TI-VAMP, but not synaptobrevin 2, concentrates in the peripheral, F-actin-rich region of the growth cones of hippocampal neurons in primary culture. Its accumulation correlates with and depends upon the presence of F-actin. Moreover, acute stimulation of actin remodeling by homophilic activation of the adhesion molecule L1 induces a site-directed, actin-dependent recruitment of the TI-VAMP compartment. Expression of a dominant-positive mutant of Cdc42, a key regulator of cell polarity, stimulates formation of F-actin- and TI-VAMP-rich filopodia outside the growth cone. Furthermore, we report that Cdc42 activates exocytosis of pHLuorin tagged TI-VAMP in an actin-dependent manner. Collectively, our data suggest that Cdc42 and regulated assembly of the F-actin network control the accumulation and exocytosis of TI-VAMP-containing membrane vesicles in growth cones to coordinate membrane trafficking and actin remodeling during neurite outgrowth. PMID:16381811

  10. Cdc42 is critical for cartilage development during endochondral ossification.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Wataru; Yamada, Atsushi; Aizawa, Ryo; Suzuki, Dai; Kassai, Hidetoshi; Harada, Takeshi; Nakayama, Mutsuko; Nagahama, Ryo; Maki, Koutaro; Takeda, Shu; Yamamoto, Matsuo; Aiba, Atsu; Baba, Kazuyoshi; Kamijo, Ryutaro

    2015-01-01

    Cdc42 is a widely expressed protein that belongs to the family of Rho GTPases and controls a broad variety of signal transduction pathways in a variety of cell types. To investigate the physiological functions of Cdc42 during cartilage development, we generated chondrocyte-specific inactivated Cdc42 mutant mice (Cdc42(fl/fl); Col2-Cre). The gross morphology of mutant neonates showed shorter limbs and body as compared with the control mice (Cdc42(fl/fl)). Skeletal preparations stained with alcian blue and alizarin red also revealed that the body and the long bone length of the mutants were shorter than those of the control mice. Furthermore, severe defects were found in growth plate chondrocytes in the femur sections of mutant mice, characterized by a reduced proliferating zone height, wider hypertrophic zone, and loss of columnar organization in proliferating chondrocytes. The expression levels of chondrocyte marker genes, such as Col2, Col10, and Mmp13, in mutant mice were decreased as compared with the control mice. Mineralization of trabecular bones in the femur sections was also decreased in the mutants as compared with control mice, whereas osteoid volume was increased. Together these results suggested that chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation in growth plates in the present mutant mice were not normally organized, which contributed to abnormal bone formation. We concluded that Cdc42 is essential for cartilage development during endochondral bone formation. PMID:25343271

  11. Fission yeast pak1+ encodes a protein kinase that interacts with Cdc42p and is involved in the control of cell polarity and mating.

    PubMed Central

    Ottilie, S; Miller, P J; Johnson, D I; Creasy, C L; Sells, M A; Bagrodia, S; Forsburg, S L; Chernoff, J

    1995-01-01

    A STE20/p65pak homolog was isolated from fission yeast by PCR. The pak1+ gene encodes a 72 kDa protein containing a putative p21-binding domain near its amino-terminus and a serine/threonine kinase domain near its carboxyl-terminus. The Pak1 protein autophosphorylates on serine residues and preferentially binds to activated Cdc42p both in vitro and in vivo. This binding is mediated through the p21 binding domain on Pak1p and the effector domain on Cdc42p. Overexpression of an inactive mutant form of pak1 gives rise to cells with markedly abnormal shape with mislocalized actin staining. Pak1 overexpression does not, however, suppress lethality associated with cdc42-null cells or the morphologic defeat caused by overexpression of mutant cdc42 alleles. Gene disruption of pak1+ establishes that, like cdc42+, pak1+ function is required for cell viability. In budding yeast, pak1+ expression restores mating function to STE20-null cells and, in fission yeast, overexpression of an inactive form of Pak inhibits mating. These results indicate that the Pak1 protein is likely to be an effector for Cdc42p or a related GTPase, and suggest that Pak1p is involved in the maintenance of cell polarity and in mating. Images PMID:8846783

  12. Phosphorylation-dependent inhibition of Cdc42 GEF Gef1 by 14-3-3 protein Rad24 spatially regulates Cdc42 GTPase activity and oscillatory dynamics during cell morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Das, Maitreyi; Nuñez, Illyce; Rodriguez, Marbelys; Wiley, David J.; Rodriguez, Juan; Sarkeshik, Ali; Yates, John R.; Buchwald, Peter; Verde, Fulvia

    2015-01-01

    Active Cdc42 GTPase, a key regulator of cell polarity, displays oscillatory dynamics that are anticorrelated at the two cell tips in fission yeast. Anticorrelation suggests competition for active Cdc42 or for its effectors. Here we show how 14-3-3 protein Rad24 associates with Cdc42 guanine exchange factor (GEF) Gef1, limiting Gef1 availability to promote Cdc42 activation. Phosphorylation of Gef1 by conserved NDR kinase Orb6 promotes Gef1 binding to Rad24. Loss of Rad24–Gef1 interaction increases Gef1 protein localization and Cdc42 activation at the cell tips and reduces the anticorrelation of active Cdc42 oscillations. Increased Cdc42 activation promotes precocious bipolar growth activation, bypassing the normal requirement for an intact microtubule cytoskeleton and for microtubule-dependent polarity landmark Tea4-PP1. Further, increased Cdc42 activation by Gef1 widens cell diameter and alters tip curvature, countering the effects of Cdc42 GTPase-activating protein Rga4. The respective levels of Gef1 and Rga4 proteins at the membrane define dynamically the growing area at each cell tip. Our findings show how the 14-3-3 protein Rad24 modulates the availability of Cdc42 GEF Gef1, a homologue of mammalian Cdc42 GEF DNMBP/TUBA, to spatially control Cdc42 GTPase activity and promote cell polarization and cell shape emergence. PMID:26246599

  13. Rho GTPase protein Cdc42 is critical for postnatal cartilage development.

    PubMed

    Nagahama, Ryo; Yamada, Atsushi; Tanaka, Junichi; Aizawa, Ryo; Suzuki, Dai; Kassai, Hidetoshi; Yamamoto, Matsuo; Mishima, Kenji; Aiba, Atsu; Maki, Koutaro; Kamijo, Ryutaro

    2016-02-19

    Cdc42, a small Rho GTPase family member, has been shown to regulate multiple cellular functions in vitro, including actin cytoskeletal reorganization, cell migration, proliferation, and gene expression. However, its tissue-specific roles in vivo remain largely unknown, especially in postnatal cartilage development, as cartilage-specific Cdc42 inactivated mice die within a few days after birth. In this study, we investigated the physiological functions of Cdc42 during cartilage development after birth using tamoxifen-induced cartilage-specific inactivated Cdc42 conditional knockout (Cdc42 (fl/fl); Col2-CreERT) mice, which were generated by crossing Cdc42 flox mice (Cdc42 (fl/fl)) with tamoxifen-induced type II collagen (Col2) Cre transgenic mice using a Cre/loxP system. The gross morphology of the Cdc42 cKO mice was shorter limbs and body, as well as reduced body weight as compared with the controls. In addition, severe defects were found in growth plate chondrocytes of the long bones, characterized by a shorter proliferating zone (PZ), wider hypertrophic zone (HZ), and loss of columnar organization of proliferating chondrocytes, resulting in delayed endochondral bone formation associated with abnormal bone growth. Our findings demonstrate the importance of Cdc42 for cartilage development during both embryonic and postnatal stages. PMID:26820532

  14. Cdc42 deficiency induces podocyte apoptosis by inhibiting the Nwasp/stress fibers/YAP pathway

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Z; Zhang, L; Chen, Y; Zhang, H; Zhang, Q; Li, R; Ma, J; Li, Z; Yu, C; Lai, Y; Lin, T; Zhao, X; Zhang, B; Ye, Z; Liu, S; Wang, W; Liang, X; Liao, R; Shi, W

    2016-01-01

    Podocyte apoptosis is a major mechanism that leads to proteinuria in many chronic kidney diseases. However, the concert mechanisms that cause podocyte apoptosis in these kidney diseases are not fully understood. The Rho family of small GTPases has been shown to be required in maintaining podocyte structure and function. Recent studies have indicated that podocyte-specific deletion of Cdc42 in vivo, but not of RhoA or Rac1, leads to congenital nephrotic syndrome and glomerulosclerosis. However, the underlying cellular events in podocyte controlled by Cdc42 remain unclear. Here, we assessed the cellular mechanisms by which Cdc42 regulates podocyte apoptosis. We found that the expression of Cdc42 and its activity were significantly decreased in high glucose-, lipopolysaccharide- or adriamycin-injured podocytes. Reduced Cdc42 expression in vitro and in vivo by small interfering RNA and selective Cdc42 inhibitor ML-141, respectively, caused podocyte apoptosis and proteinuria. Our results further demonstrated that insufficient Cdc42 or Nwasp, its downstream effector, could decrease the mRNA and protein expression of YAP, which had been regarded as an anti-apoptosis protein in podocyte. Moreover, our data indicated that the loss of stress fibers caused by Cdc42/Nwasp deficiency also decreased Yes-associated protein (YAP) mRNA and protein expression, and induced podocyte apoptosis. Podocyte apoptosis induced by Cdc42/Nwasp/stress fiber deficiency was significantly inhibited by overexpressing-active YAP. Thus, the Cdc42/Nwasp/stress fibers/YAP signal pathway may potentially play an important role in regulating podocyte apoptosis. Maintaining necessary Cdc42 would be one potent way to prevent proteinuria kidney diseases. PMID:26986510

  15. The Rho GTPase Cdc42 Is Essential for the Activation and Function of Mature B Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gerasimcik, Natalija; Dahlberg, Carin I. M.; Baptista, Marisa A. P.; Massaad, Michel J.; Geha, Raif S.; Westerberg, Lisa S.

    2015-01-01

    The Rho GTPase Cdc42 coordinates regulation of the actin and the microtubule cytoskeleton by binding and activating the Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome protein. We sought to define the role of intrinsic expression of Cdc42 by mature B cells in their activation and function. Mice with inducible deletion of Cdc42 in mature B cells formed smaller germinal centers and had a reduced Ab response, mostly of low affinity to T cell–dependent Ag, compared with wild-type (WT) controls. Spreading formation of long protrusions that contain F-actin, microtubules, and Cdc42-interacting protein 4, and assumption of a dendritic cell morphology in response to anti-CD40 plus IL-4 were impaired in Cdc42-deficient B cells compared with WT B cells. Cdc42-deficient B cells had an intact migratory response to chemokine in vitro, but their homing to the B cell follicles in the spleen in vivo was significantly impaired. Cdc42-deficient B cells induced a skewed cytokine response in CD4+ T cells, compared with WT B cells. Our results demonstrate a critical role for Cdc42 in the motility of mature B cells, their cognate interaction with T cells, and their differentiation into Ab-producing cells. PMID:25870239

  16. Cdc42 and k-Ras Control Endothelial Tubulogenesis through Apical Membrane and Cytoskeletal Polarization: Novel Stimulatory Roles for GTPase Effectors, the Small GTPases, Rac2 and Rap1b, and Inhibitory Influence of Arhgap31 and Rasa1.

    PubMed

    Norden, Pieter R; Kim, Dae Joong; Barry, David M; Cleaver, Ondine B; Davis, George E

    2016-01-01

    A critical and understudied property of endothelial cells is their ability to form lumens and tube networks. Although considerable information has been obtained concerning these issues, including the role of Cdc42 and Rac1 and their effectors such as Pak2, Pak4, Par6b, and co-regulators such as integrins, MT1-MMP and Par3; many key questions remain that are necessary to elucidate molecular and signaling requirements for this fundamental process. In this work, we identify new small GTPase regulators of EC tubulogenesis including k-Ras, Rac2 and Rap1b that act in conjunction with Cdc42 as well as the key downstream effectors, IQGAP1, MRCKβ, beta-Pix, GIT1, and Rasip1 (which can assemble into multiprotein complexes with key regulators including α2β1 integrin and MT1-MMP). In addition, we identify the negative regulators, Arhgap31 (by inactivating Cdc42 and Rac) and Rasa1 (by inactivating k-Ras) and the positive regulator, Arhgap29 (by inactivating RhoA) which play a major functional role during the EC tubulogenic process. Human EC siRNA suppression or mouse knockout of Rasip1 leads to identical phenotypes where ECs form extensive cord networks, but cannot generate lumens or tubes. Essential roles for these molecules during EC tubulogenesis include; i) establishment of asymmetric EC cytoskeletal polarization (subapical distribution of acetylated tubulin and basal membrane distribution of F-actin); and ii) directed membrane trafficking of pinocytic vacuoles or other intracellular vesicles along acetylated tubulin tracks to the developing apical membrane surface. Cdc42 co-localizes subapically with acetylated tubulin, while Rac1 and k-Ras strongly label vacuole/ vesicle membranes which accumulate and fuse together in a polarized, perinuclear manner. We observe polarized apical membrane and subapical accumulation of key GTPases and effectors regulating EC lumen formation including Cdc42, Rac1, Rac2, k-Ras, Rap1b, activated c-Raf and Rasip1 to control EC tube network

  17. Cdc42 and k-Ras Control Endothelial Tubulogenesis through Apical Membrane and Cytoskeletal Polarization: Novel Stimulatory Roles for GTPase Effectors, the Small GTPases, Rac2 and Rap1b, and Inhibitory Influence of Arhgap31 and Rasa1

    PubMed Central

    Norden, Pieter R.; Kim, Dae Joong; Barry, David M.; Cleaver, Ondine B.; Davis, George E.

    2016-01-01

    A critical and understudied property of endothelial cells is their ability to form lumens and tube networks. Although considerable information has been obtained concerning these issues, including the role of Cdc42 and Rac1 and their effectors such as Pak2, Pak4, Par6b, and co-regulators such as integrins, MT1-MMP and Par3; many key questions remain that are necessary to elucidate molecular and signaling requirements for this fundamental process. In this work, we identify new small GTPase regulators of EC tubulogenesis including k-Ras, Rac2 and Rap1b that act in conjunction with Cdc42 as well as the key downstream effectors, IQGAP1, MRCKβ, beta-Pix, GIT1, and Rasip1 (which can assemble into multiprotein complexes with key regulators including α2β1 integrin and MT1-MMP). In addition, we identify the negative regulators, Arhgap31 (by inactivating Cdc42 and Rac) and Rasa1 (by inactivating k-Ras) and the positive regulator, Arhgap29 (by inactivating RhoA) which play a major functional role during the EC tubulogenic process. Human EC siRNA suppression or mouse knockout of Rasip1 leads to identical phenotypes where ECs form extensive cord networks, but cannot generate lumens or tubes. Essential roles for these molecules during EC tubulogenesis include; i) establishment of asymmetric EC cytoskeletal polarization (subapical distribution of acetylated tubulin and basal membrane distribution of F-actin); and ii) directed membrane trafficking of pinocytic vacuoles or other intracellular vesicles along acetylated tubulin tracks to the developing apical membrane surface. Cdc42 co-localizes subapically with acetylated tubulin, while Rac1 and k-Ras strongly label vacuole/ vesicle membranes which accumulate and fuse together in a polarized, perinuclear manner. We observe polarized apical membrane and subapical accumulation of key GTPases and effectors regulating EC lumen formation including Cdc42, Rac1, Rac2, k-Ras, Rap1b, activated c-Raf and Rasip1 to control EC tube network

  18. DOCK8 is a Cdc42 activator critical for interstitial dendritic cell migration during immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Yosuke; Tanaka, Yoshihiko; Terasawa, Masao; Pieczyk, Markus; Habiro, Katsuyoshi; Katakai, Tomoya; Hanawa-Suetsugu, Kyoko; Kukimoto-Niino, Mutsuko; Nishizaki, Tomoko; Shirouzu, Mikako; Duan, Xuefeng; Uruno, Takehito; Nishikimi, Akihiko; Sanematsu, Fumiyuki; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Stein, Jens V.; Kinashi, Tatsuo

    2012-01-01

    To migrate efficiently through the interstitium, dendritic cells (DCs) constantly adapt their shape to the given structure of the extracellular matrix and follow the path of least resistance. It is known that this amoeboid migration of DCs requires Cdc42, yet the upstream regulators critical for localization and activation of Cdc42 remain to be determined. Mutations of DOCK8, a member of the atypical guanine nucleotide exchange factor family, causes combined immunodeficiency in humans. In the present study, we show that DOCK8 is a Cdc42-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor that is critical for interstitial DC migration. By generating the knockout mice, we found that in the absence of DOCK8, DCs failed to accumulate in the lymph node parenchyma for T-cell priming. Although DOCK8-deficient DCs migrated normally on 2-dimensional surfaces, DOCK8 was required for DCs to crawl within 3-dimensional fibrillar networks and to transmigrate through the subcapsular sinus floor. This function of DOCK8 depended on the DHR-2 domain mediating Cdc42 activation. DOCK8 deficiency did not affect global Cdc42 activity. However, Cdc42 activation at the leading edge membrane was impaired in DOCK8-deficient DCs, resulting in a severe defect in amoeboid polarization and migration. Therefore, DOCK8 regulates interstitial DC migration by controlling Cdc42 activity spatially. PMID:22461490

  19. ATP8B1-mediated spatial organization of Cdc42 signaling maintains singularity during enterocyte polarization

    PubMed Central

    Bruurs, Lucas J.M.; Donker, Lisa; Zwakenberg, Susan; Zwartkruis, Fried J.; Begthel, Harry; Knisely, A.S.; Posthuma, George; van de Graaf, Stan F.J.; Paulusma, Coen C.

    2015-01-01

    During yeast cell polarization localization of the small GTPase, cell division control protein 42 homologue (Cdc42) is clustered to ensure the formation of a single bud. Here we show that the disease-associated flippase ATPase class I type 8b member 1 (ATP8B1) enables Cdc42 clustering during enterocyte polarization. Loss of this regulation results in increased apical membrane size with scattered apical recycling endosomes and permits the formation of more than one apical domain, resembling the singularity defect observed in yeast. Mechanistically, we show that to become apically clustered, Cdc42 requires the interaction between its polybasic region and negatively charged membrane lipids provided by ATP8B1. Disturbing this interaction, either by ATP8B1 depletion or by introduction of a Cdc42 mutant defective in lipid binding, increases Cdc42 mobility and results in apical membrane enlargement. Re-establishing Cdc42 clustering, by tethering it to the apical membrane or lowering its diffusion, restores normal apical membrane size in ATP8B1-depleted cells. We therefore conclude that singularity regulation by Cdc42 is conserved between yeast and human and that this regulation is required to maintain healthy tissue architecture. PMID:26416959

  20. p21-activated kinase 2 regulates HSPC cytoskeleton, migration, and homing via CDC42 activation and interaction with β-Pix.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Pavankumar N G; Radu, Maria; Xu, Ke; Wood, Jenna; Harris, Chad E; Chernoff, Jonathan; Williams, David A

    2016-04-21

    Cytoskeletal remodeling of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) is essential for homing to the bone marrow (BM). The Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate (Rac)/cell division control protein 42 homolog (CDC42) effector p21-activated kinase (Pak2) has been implicated in HSPC homing and engraftment. However, the molecular pathways mediating Pak2 functions in HSPCs are unknown. Here, we demonstrate that both Pak2 kinase activity and its interaction with the PAK-interacting exchange factor-β (β-Pix) are required to reconstitute defective ITALIC! Pak2 (ITALIC! Δ/Δ)HSPC homing to the BM. Pak2 serine/threonine kinase activity is required for stromal-derived factor-1 (SDF1α) chemokine-induced HSPC directional migration, whereas Pak2 interaction with β-Pix is required to regulate the velocity of HSPC migration and precise F-actin assembly. Lack of SDF1α-induced filopodia and associated abnormal cell protrusions seen in ITALIC! Pak2 (ITALIC! Δ/Δ)HSPCs were rescued by wild-type (WT) Pak2 but not by a Pak2-kinase dead mutant (KD). Expression of a β-Pix interaction-defective mutant of Pak2 rescued filopodia formation but led to abnormal F-actin bundles. Although CDC42 has previously been considered an upstream regulator of Pak2, we found a paradoxical decrease in baseline activation of CDC42 in ITALIC! Pak2 (ITALIC! Δ/Δ)HSPCs, which was rescued by expression of Pak2-WT but not by Pak2-KD; defective homing of ITALIC! Pak2-deleted HSPCs was rescued by constitutive active CDC42. These data demonstrate that both Pak2 kinase activity and its interaction with β-Pix are essential for HSPC filopodia formation, cytoskeletal integrity, and homing via activation of CDC42. Taken together, we provide mechanistic insights into the role of Pak2 in HSPC migration and homing. PMID:26932803

  1. Cdc42 explores the cell periphery for mate selection in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Bendezú, Felipe O; Martin, Sophie G

    2013-01-01

    How cells polarize in response to external cues is a fundamental biological problem. For mating, yeast cells orient growth toward the source of a pheromone gradient produced by cells of the opposite mating type. Polarized growth depends on the small GTPase Cdc42, a central eukaryotic polarity regulator that controls signaling, cytoskeleton polarization, and vesicle trafficking. However, the mechanisms of polarity establishment and mate selection in complex cellular environments are poorly understood. Here we show that, in fission yeast, low-level pheromone signaling promotes a novel polarization state, where active Cdc42, its GEF Scd1, and scaffold Scd2 form colocalizing dynamic zones that sample the periphery of the cell. Two direct Cdc42 effectors--actin cables marked by myosin V Myo52 and the exocyst complex labeled by Sec6 and Sec8--also dynamically colocalize with active Cdc42. However, these cells do not grow due to a block in the exocytosis of cell wall synthases Bgs1 and Bgs4. High-level pheromone stabilizes active Cdc42 zones and promotes cell wall synthase exocytosis and polarized growth. However, in the absence of prior low-level pheromone signaling, exploration fails, and cells polarize growth at cell poles by default. Consequently, these cells show altered partner choice, mating preferentially with sister rather than nonsister cells. Thus, Cdc42 exploration serves to orient growth for partner selection. This process may also promote genetic diversification. PMID:23200991

  2. Intersectin-2L Regulates Caveola Endocytosis Secondary to Cdc42-mediated Actin Polymerization*

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Irene K.; Predescu, Dan N.; Sharma, Tiffany; Knezevic, Ivana; Malik, Asrar B.; Predescu, Sanda

    2009-01-01

    Here we addressed the role of intersectin-2L (ITSN-2L), a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the Rho GTPase Cdc42, in the mechanism of caveola endocytosis in endothelial cells (ECs). Immunoprecipitation and co-localization studies showed that ITSN-2L associates with members of the Cdc42-WASp-Arp2/3 actin polymerization pathway. Expression of Dbl homology-pleckstrin homology (DH-PH) region of ITSN-2L (DH-PHITSN-2L) induced specific activation of Cdc42, resulting in formation of extensive filopodia, enhanced cortical actin, as well as a shift from G-actin to F-actin. The “catalytically dead” DH-PH domain reversed these effects and induced significant stress fiber formation, without a detectable shift in actin pools. A biotin assay for caveola internalization indicated a significant decrease in the uptake of biotinylated proteins in DH-PHITSN-2L-transfected cells compared with control and 1 μm jasplakinolide-treated cells. ECs depleted of ITSN-2L by small interfering RNA, however, showed decreased Cdc42 activation and actin remodeling similar to the defective DH-PH, resulting in 62% increase in caveola-mediated uptake compared with controls. Thus, ITSN-2L, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Cdc42, regulates different steps of caveola endocytosis in ECs by controlling the temporal and spatial actin polymerization and remodeling sub-adjacent to the plasma membrane. PMID:19622753

  3. Intersectin-2L regulates caveola endocytosis secondary to Cdc42-mediated actin polymerization.

    PubMed

    Klein, Irene K; Predescu, Dan N; Sharma, Tiffany; Knezevic, Ivana; Malik, Asrar B; Predescu, Sanda

    2009-09-18

    Here we addressed the role of intersectin-2L (ITSN-2L), a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the Rho GTPase Cdc42, in the mechanism of caveola endocytosis in endothelial cells (ECs). Immunoprecipitation and co-localization studies showed that ITSN-2L associates with members of the Cdc42-WASp-Arp2/3 actin polymerization pathway. Expression of Dbl homology-pleckstrin homology (DH-PH) region of ITSN-2L (DH-PH(ITSN-2L)) induced specific activation of Cdc42, resulting in formation of extensive filopodia, enhanced cortical actin, as well as a shift from G-actin to F-actin. The "catalytically dead" DH-PH domain reversed these effects and induced significant stress fiber formation, without a detectable shift in actin pools. A biotin assay for caveola internalization indicated a significant decrease in the uptake of biotinylated proteins in DH-PH(ITSN-2L)-transfected cells compared with control and 1 microM jasplakinolide-treated cells. ECs depleted of ITSN-2L by small interfering RNA, however, showed decreased Cdc42 activation and actin remodeling similar to the defective DH-PH, resulting in 62% increase in caveola-mediated uptake compared with controls. Thus, ITSN-2L, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Cdc42, regulates different steps of caveola endocytosis in ECs by controlling the temporal and spatial actin polymerization and remodeling sub-adjacent to the plasma membrane. PMID:19622753

  4. Polarity establishment requires localized activation of Cdc42

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Benjamin; Kuo, Chun-Chen; Wu, Chi-Fang; Zyla, Trevin R.

    2015-01-01

    Establishment of cell polarity in animal and fungal cells involves localization of the conserved Rho-family guanosine triphosphatase, Cdc42, to the cortical region destined to become the “front” of the cell. The high local concentration of active Cdc42 promotes cytoskeletal polarization through various effectors. Cdc42 accumulation at the front is thought to involve positive feedback, and studies in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have suggested distinct positive feedback mechanisms. One class of mechanisms involves localized activation of Cdc42 at the front, whereas another class involves localized delivery of Cdc42 to the front. Here we show that Cdc42 activation must be localized for successful polarity establishment, supporting local activation rather than local delivery as the dominant mechanism in this system. PMID:26459595

  5. Cdc42p and Rho1p are sequentially activated and mechanistically linked to vacuole membrane fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, Michael R.; Jones, Lynden; Eitzen, Gary

    2010-03-26

    Small monomeric GTPases act as molecular switches, regulating many biological functions via activation of membrane localized signaling cascades. Activation of their switch function is controlled by GTP binding and hydrolysis. Two Rho GTPases, Cdc42p and Rho1p, are localized to the yeast vacuole where they regulate membrane fusion. Here, we define a method to directly examine vacuole membrane Cdc42p and Rho1p activation based on their affinity to probes derived from effectors. Cdc42p and Rho1p showed unique temporal activation which aligned with distinct subreactions of in vitro vacuole fusion. Cdc42p was rapidly activated in an ATP-independent manner while Rho1p activation was kinetically slower and required ATP. Inhibitors that are known to block vacuole membrane fusion were examined for their effect on Cdc42p and Rho1p activation. Rdi1p, which inhibits the dissociation of GDP from Rho proteins, blocked both Cdc42p and Rho1p activation. Ligands of PI(4,5)P{sub 2} specifically inhibited Rho1p activation while pre-incubation with U73122, which targets Plc1p function, increased Rho1p activation. These results define unique activation mechanisms for Cdc42p and Rho1p, which may be linked to the vacuole membrane fusion mechanism.

  6. FLIM FRET Visualization of Cdc42 Activation by Netrin-1 in Embryonic Spinal Commissural Neuron Growth Cones

    PubMed Central

    Rappaz, Benjamin; Lai Wing Sun, Karen; Correia, James P.; Wiseman, Paul W.; Kennedy, Timothy E.

    2016-01-01

    Netrin-1 is an essential extracellular chemoattractant that signals through its receptor DCC to guide commissural axon extension in the embryonic spinal cord. DCC directs the organization of F-actin in growth cones by activating an intracellular protein complex that includes the Rho GTPase Cdc42, a critical regulator of cell polarity and directional migration. To address the spatial distribution of signaling events downstream of netrin-1, we expressed the FRET biosensor Raichu-Cdc42 in cultured embryonic rat spinal commissural neurons. Using FLIM-FRET imaging we detected rapid activation of Cdc42 in neuronal growth cones following application of netrin-1. Investigating the signaling mechanisms that control Cdc42 activation by netrin-1, we demonstrate that netrin-1 rapidly enriches DCC at the leading edge of commissural neuron growth cones and that netrin-1 induced activation of Cdc42 in the growth cone is blocked by inhibiting src family kinase signaling. These findings reveal the activation of Cdc42 in embryonic spinal commissural axon growth cones and support the conclusion that src family kinase activation downstream of DCC is required for Cdc42 activation by netrin-1. PMID:27482713

  7. Cdc42p regulation of the yeast formin Bni1p mediated by the effector Gic2p

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hsin; Kuo, Chun-Chen; Kang, Hui; Howell, Audrey S.; Zyla, Trevin R.; Jin, Michelle; Lew, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    Actin filaments are dynamically reorganized to accommodate ever-changing cellular needs for intracellular transport, morphogenesis, and migration. Formins, a major family of actin nucleators, are believed to function as direct effectors of Rho GTPases, such as the polarity regulator Cdc42p. However, the presence of extensive redundancy has made it difficult to assess the in vivo significance of the low-affinity Rho GTPase–formin interaction and specifically whether Cdc42p polarizes the actin cytoskeleton via direct formin binding. Here we exploit a synthetically rewired budding yeast strain to eliminate the redundancy, making regulation of the formin Bni1p by Cdc42p essential for viability. Surprisingly, we find that direct Cdc42p–Bni1p interaction is dispensable for Bni1p regulation. Alternative paths linking Cdc42p and Bni1p via “polarisome” components Spa2p and Bud6p are also collectively dispensable. We identify a novel regulatory input to Bni1p acting through the Cdc42p effector, Gic2p. This pathway is sufficient to localize Bni1p to the sites of Cdc42p action and promotes a polarized actin organization in both rewired and wild-type contexts. We suggest that an indirect mechanism linking Rho GTPases and formins via Rho effectors may provide finer spatiotemporal control for the formin-nucleated actin cytoskeleton. PMID:22918946

  8. R-Ketorolac Targets Cdc42 and Rac1 and Alters Ovarian Cancer Cell Behaviors Critical for Invasion and Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yuna; Kenney, S Ray; Muller, Carolyn Y; Adams, Sarah; Rutledge, Teresa; Romero, Elsa; Murray-Krezan, Cristina; Prekeris, Rytis; Sklar, Larry A; Hudson, Laurie G; Wandinger-Ness, Angela

    2015-10-01

    Cdc42 (cell division control protein 42) and Rac1 (Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1) are attractive therapeutic targets in ovarian cancer based on established importance in tumor cell migration, adhesion, and invasion. Despite a predicted benefit, targeting GTPases has not yet been translated to clinical practice. We previously established that Cdc42 and constitutively active Rac1b are overexpressed in primary ovarian tumor tissues. Through high-throughput screening and computational shape homology approaches, we identified R-ketorolac as a Cdc42 and Rac1 inhibitor, distinct from the anti-inflammatory, cyclooxygenase inhibitory activity of S-ketorolac. In the present study, we establish R-ketorolac as an allosteric inhibitor of Cdc42 and Rac1. Cell-based assays validate R-ketorolac activity against Cdc42 and Rac1. Studies on immortalized human ovarian adenocarcinoma cells (SKOV3ip) and primary patient-derived ovarian cancer cells show that R-ketorolac is a robust inhibitor of growth factor or serum-dependent Cdc42 and Rac1 activation with a potency and cellular efficacy similar to small-molecule inhibitors of Cdc42 (CID2950007/ML141) and Rac1 (NSC23766). Furthermore, GTPase inhibition by R-ketorolac reduces downstream p21-activated kinases (PAK1/PAK2) effector activation by >80%. Multiple assays of cell behavior using SKOV3ip and primary patient-derived ovarian cancer cells show that R-ketorolac significantly inhibits cell adhesion, migration, and invasion. In summary, we provide evidence for R-ketorolac as a direct inhibitor of Cdc42 and Rac1 that is capable of modulating downstream GTPase-dependent, physiologic responses, which are critical to tumor metastasis. Our findings demonstrate the selective inhibition of Cdc42 and Rac1 GTPases by an FDA-approved drug, racemic ketorolac, that can be used in humans. PMID:26206334

  9. Fus1p interacts with components of the Hog1p mitogen-activated protein kinase and Cdc42p morphogenesis signaling pathways to control cell fusion during yeast mating.

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Bryce; Parsons, Ainslie B; Evangelista, Marie; Schaefer, Karen; Kennedy, Kathy; Ritchie, Steven; Petryshen, Tracey L; Boone, Charles

    2004-01-01

    Cell fusion in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a temporally and spatially regulated process that involves degradation of the septum, which is composed of cell wall material, and occurs between conjugating cells within a prezygote, followed by plasma membrane fusion. The plasma membrane protein Fus1p is known to be required for septum degradation during cell fusion, yet its role at the molecular level is not understood. We identified Sho1p, an osmosensor for the HOG MAPK pathway, as a binding partner for Fus1 in a two-hybrid screen. The Sho1p-Fus1p interaction occurs directly and is mediated through the Sho1p-SH3 domain and a proline-rich peptide ligand on the Fus1p COOH-terminal cytoplasmic region. The cell fusion defect associated with fus1Delta mutants is suppressed by a sho1Delta deletion allele, suggesting that Fus1p negatively regulates Sho1p signaling to ensure efficient cell fusion. A two-hybrid matrix containing fusion proteins and pheromone response pathway signaling molecules reveals that Fus1p may participate in a complex network of interactions. In particular, the Fus1p cytoplasmic domain interacts with Chs5p, a protein required for secretion of specialized Chs3p-containing vesicles during bud development, and chs5Delta mutants were defective in cell surface localization of Fus1p. The Fus1p cytoplasmic domain also interacts with the activated GTP-bound form of Cdc42p and the Fus1p-SH3 domain interacts with Bni1p, a yeast formin that participates in cell fusion and controls the assembly of actin cables to polarize secretion in response to Cdc42p signaling. Taken together, our results suggest that Fus1p acts as a scaffold for the assembly of a cell surface complex involved in polarized secretion of septum-degrading enzymes and inhibition of HOG pathway signaling to promote cell fusion. PMID:15020407

  10. Silencing of CDC42 inhibits neuroblastoma cell proliferation and transformation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sora; Craig, Brian T.; Romain, Carmelle V.; Qiao, Jingbo; Chung, Dai H.

    2014-01-01

    Cell division cycle 42 (CDC42), a small GTPase of the Rho-subfamily, regulates diverse cellular functions including proliferation, cytoskeletal rearrangement and even promotes malignant transformation. Here, we found that increased expression of CDC42 correlated with undifferentiated neuroblastoma as compared to a more benign phenotype. CDC42 inhibition decreased cell growth and soft agar colony formation, and increased cell death in BE(2)-C and BE(2)-M17 cell lines, but not in SK-N-AS. In addition, silencing of CDC42 decreased expression of N-myc in BE(2)-C and BE(2)-M17 cells. Our findings suggest that CDC42 may play a role in the regulation of aggressive neuroblastoma behavior. PMID:25264923

  11. Epithelial junction formation requires confinement of Cdc42 activity by a novel SH3BP1 complex

    PubMed Central

    Elbediwy, Ahmed; Zihni, Ceniz; Terry, Stephen J.; Clark, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Epithelial cell–cell adhesion and morphogenesis require dynamic control of actin-driven membrane remodeling. The Rho guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) Cdc42 regulates sequential molecular processes during cell–cell junction formation; hence, mechanisms must exist that inactivate Cdc42 in a temporally and spatially controlled manner. In this paper, we identify SH3BP1, a GTPase-activating protein for Cdc42 and Rac, as a regulator of junction assembly and epithelial morphogenesis using a functional small interfering ribonucleic acid screen. Depletion of SH3BP1 resulted in loss of spatial control of Cdc42 activity, stalled membrane remodeling, and enhanced growth of filopodia. SH3BP1 formed a complex with JACOP/paracingulin, a junctional adaptor, and CD2AP, a scaffolding protein; both were required for normal Cdc42 signaling and junction formation. The filamentous actin–capping protein CapZ also associated with the SH3BP1 complex and was required for control of actin remodeling. Epithelial junction formation and morphogenesis thus require a dual activity complex, containing SH3BP1 and CapZ, that is recruited to sites of active membrane remodeling to guide Cdc42 signaling and cytoskeletal dynamics. PMID:22891260

  12. Endocytic membrane turnover at the leading edge is driven by a transient interaction between Cdc42 and GRAF1

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Monika K.; Holst, Mikkel R.; Vidal-Quadras, Maite; Henriksson, Sara; Santarella-Mellwig, Rachel; Sandblad, Linda; Lundmark, Richard

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Changes in cell morphology require coordination of plasma membrane turnover and cytoskeleton dynamics, processes that are regulated by Rho GTPases. Here, we describe how a direct interaction between the Rho GTPase Cdc42 and the GTPase-activating protein (GAP) GRAF1 (also known as ARHGAP26), facilitates rapid cell surface turnover at the leading edge. Both Cdc42 and GRAF1 were required for fluid-phase uptake and regulated the generation of transient GRAF1-coated endocytic carriers, which were distinct from clathrin-coated vesicles. GRAF1 was found to transiently assemble at discrete Cdc42-enriched punctae at the plasma membrane, resulting in a corresponding decrease in the microdomain association of Cdc42. However, Cdc42 captured in its active state was, through a GAP-domain-mediated interaction, localised together with GRAF1 on accumulated internal structures derived from the cell surface. Correlative fluorescence and electron tomography microscopy revealed that these structures were clusters of small membrane carriers with defective endosomal processing. We conclude that a transient interaction between Cdc42 and GRAF1 drives endocytic turnover and controls the transition essential for endosomal maturation of plasma membrane internalised by this mechanism. PMID:26446261

  13. Cdc42/N-WASP signaling links actin dynamics to pancreatic β cell delamination and differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Kesavan, Gokul; Lieven, Oliver; Mamidi, Anant; Öhlin, Zarah Löf; Johansson, Jenny Kristina; Li, Wan-Chun; Lommel, Silvia; Greiner, Thomas Uwe; Semb, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Delamination plays a pivotal role during normal development and cancer. Previous work has demonstrated that delamination and epithelial cell movement within the plane of an epithelium are associated with a change in cellular phenotype. However, how this positional change is linked to differentiation remains unknown. Using the developing mouse pancreas as a model system, we show that β cell delamination and differentiation are two independent events, which are controlled by Cdc42/N-WASP signaling. Specifically, we show that expression of constitutively active Cdc42 in β cells inhibits β cell delamination and differentiation. These processes are normally associated with junctional actin and cell-cell junction disassembly and the expression of fate-determining transcription factors, such as Isl1 and MafA. Mechanistically, we demonstrate that genetic ablation of N-WASP in β cells expressing constitutively active Cdc42 partially restores both delamination and β cell differentiation. These findings elucidate how junctional actin dynamics via Cdc42/N-WASP signaling cell-autonomously control not only epithelial delamination but also cell differentiation during mammalian organogenesis. PMID:24449844

  14. Cdc42 is an antihypertrophic molecular switch in the mouse heart

    PubMed Central

    Maillet, Marjorie; Lynch, Jeffrey M.; Sanna, Bastiano; York, Allen J.; Zheng, Yi; Molkentin, Jeffery D.

    2009-01-01

    To improve contractile function, the myocardium undergoes hypertrophic growth without myocyte proliferation in response to both pathologic and physiologic stimulation. Various membrane-bound receptors and intermediate signal transduction pathways regulate the induction of cardiac hypertrophy, but the cardioprotective regulatory pathways or effectors that antagonize cardiac hypertrophy remain poorly understood. Here we identify the small GTPase Cdc42 as a signaling intermediate that restrained the cardiac growth response to physiologic and pathologic stimuli. Cdc42 was specifically activated in the heart after pressure overload and in cultured cardiomyocytes by multiple agonists. Mice with a heart-specific deletion of Cdc42 developed greater cardiac hypertrophy at 2 and 8 weeks of stimulation and transitioned more quickly into heart failure than did wild-type controls. These mice also displayed greater cardiac hypertrophy in response to neuroendocrine agonist infusion for 2 weeks and, more remarkably, enhanced exercise-induced hypertrophy and sudden death. These pathologies were associated with an inability to activate JNK following stimulation through a MEKK1/MKK4/MKK7 pathway, resulting in greater cardiac nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) activity. Restoration of cardiac JNK signaling with an Mkk7 heart-specific transgene reversed the enhanced growth effect. These results identify what we believe to be a novel antihypertrophic and protective cardiac signaling pathway, whereby Cdc42-dependent JNK activation antagonizes calcineurin-NFAT activity to reduce hypertrophy and prevent transition to heart failure. PMID:19741299

  15. Roles of Aspergillus nidulans Cdc42/Rho GTPase regulators in hyphal morphogenesis and development.

    PubMed

    Si, Haoyu; Rittenour, William R; Harris, Steven D

    2016-01-01

    The Rho-related family of GTPases are pivotal regulators of morphogenetic processes in diverse eukaryotic organisms. In the filamentous fungi two related members of this family, Cdc42 and Rac1, perform particularly important roles in the establishment and maintenance of hyphal polarity. The activity of these GTPases is tightly controlled by two sets of regulators: guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) and GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs). Despite the importance of Cdc42 and Rac1 in polarized hyphal growth, the morphogenetic functions of their cognate GEFs and GAPs have not been widely characterized in filamentous fungi outside the Saccharomycotina. Here we present a functional analysis of the Aspergillus nidulans homologs of the yeast GEF Cdc24 and the yeast GAP Rga1. We show that Cdc24 is required for the establishment of hyphal polarity and localizes to hyphal tips. We also show that Rga1 is necessary for the suppression of branching in developing conidiophores. During asexual development Rga1 appears to act primarily via Cdc42 and in doing so serves as a critical determinant of conidiophore architecture. Our results provide new insight into the roles of Cdc42 during development in A nidulans. PMID:26932184

  16. Regulation of the formin for3p by cdc42p and bud6p.

    PubMed

    Martin, Sophie G; Rincón, Sergio A; Basu, Roshni; Pérez, Pilar; Chang, Fred

    2007-10-01

    Formins are conserved actin nucleators responsible for the assembly of diverse actin structures. Many formins are controlled through an autoinhibitory mechanism involving the interaction of a C-terminal DAD sequence with an N-terminal DID sequence. Here, we show that the fission yeast formin for3p, which mediates actin cable assembly and polarized cell growth, is regulated by a similar autoinhibitory mechanism in vivo. Multiple sites govern for3p localization to cell tips. The localization and activity of for3p are inhibited by an intramolecular interaction of divergent DAD and DID-like sequences. A for3p DAD mutant expressed at endogenous levels produces more robust actin cables, which appear to have normal organization and dynamics. We identify cdc42p as the primary Rho GTPase involved in actin cable assembly and for3p regulation. Both cdc42p, which binds at the N terminus of for3p, and bud6p, which binds near the C-terminal DAD-like sequence, are needed for for3p localization and full activity, but a mutation in the for3p DAD restores for3p localization and other phenotypes of cdc42 and bud6 mutants. In particular, the for3p DAD mutation suppresses the bipolar growth (NETO) defect of bud6Delta cells. These findings suggest that cdc42p and bud6p activate for3p by relieving autoinhibition. PMID:17699595

  17. CDC42 inhibition suppresses progression of incipient intestinal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sakamori, Ryotaro; Yu, Shiyan; Zhang, Xiao; Hoffman, Andrew; Sun, Jiaxin; Das, Soumyashree; Vedula, Pavan; Li, Guangxun; Fu, Jiang; Walker, Francesca; Yang, Chung S.; Yi, Zheng; Hsu, Wei; Yu, Da-Hai; Shen, Lanlan; Rodriguez, Alexis J.; Taketo, Makoto M.; Bonder, Edward M.; Verzi, Michael P.; Gao, Nan

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the APC or β-catenin genes are well established initiators of colorectal cancer (CRC), yet modifiers that facilitate the survival and progression of nascent tumor cells are not well defined. Using genetic and pharmacological approaches in mouse CRC and human CRC xenograft models, we show that incipient intestinal tumor cells activate CDC42, an APC-interacting small GTPase, as a crucial step in malignant progression. In the mouse, Cdc42 ablation attenuated the tumorigenicity of mutant intestinal cells carrying single APC or β-catenin mutations. Similarly, human CRC with relatively higher levels of CDC42 activity were particularly sensitive to CDC42 blockade. Mechanistic studies suggested that Cdc42 may be activated at different levels, including at the level of transcriptional activation of the stem-cell-enriched Rho family exchange factor Arhgef4. Our results suggest that early-stage mutant intestinal epithelial cells must recruit the pleiotropic functions of Cdc42 for malignant progression, suggesting its relevance as a biomarker and therapeutic target for selective CRC intervention. PMID:25113996

  18. A TOCA/CDC-42/PAR/WAVE functional module required for retrograde endocytic recycling

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Zhiyong; Grant, Barth D.

    2015-01-01

    Endosome-to-Golgi transport is required for the function of many key membrane proteins and lipids, including signaling receptors, small-molecule transporters, and adhesion proteins. The retromer complex is well-known for its role in cargo sorting and vesicle budding from early endosomes, in most cases leading to cargo fusion with the trans-Golgi network (TGN). Transport from recycling endosomes to the TGN has also been reported, but much less is understood about the molecules that mediate this transport step. Here we provide evidence that the F-BAR domain proteins TOCA-1 and TOCA-2 (Transducer of Cdc42 dependent actin assembly), the small GTPase CDC-42 (Cell division control protein 42), associated polarity proteins PAR-6 (Partitioning defective 6) and PKC-3/atypical protein kinase C, and the WAVE actin nucleation complex mediate the transport of MIG-14/Wls and TGN-38/TGN38 cargo proteins from the recycling endosome to the TGN in Caenorhabditis elegans. Our results indicate that CDC-42, the TOCA proteins, and the WAVE component WVE-1 are enriched on RME-1–positive recycling endosomes in the intestine, unlike retromer components that act on early endosomes. Furthermore, we find that retrograde cargo TGN-38 is trapped in early endosomes after depletion of SNX-3 (a retromer component) but is mainly trapped in recycling endosomes after depletion of CDC-42, indicating that the CDC-42–associated complex functions after retromer in a distinct organelle. Thus, we identify a group of interacting proteins that mediate retrograde recycling, and link these proteins to a poorly understood trafficking step, recycling endosome-to-Golgi transport. We also provide evidence for the physiological importance of this pathway in WNT signaling. PMID:25775511

  19. Rac1 and Cdc42 Play Important Roles in Arsenic Neurotoxicity in Primary Cultured Rat Cerebellar Astrocytes.

    PubMed

    An, Yuan; Liu, Tingting; Liu, Xiaona; Zhao, Lijun; Wang, Jing

    2016-03-01

    This study aimed to explore whether Rac1 and Cdc42, representative members of Ras homologue guanosine triphosphatases (Rho GTPases), are involved in neurotoxicity induced by arsenic exposure in rat nervous system. Expressions of Rac1 and Cdc42 in rat cerebellum and cerebrum exposed to different doses of NaAsO2 (Wistar rats drank 0, 2, 10, and 50 mg/L NaAsO2 water for 3 months) were examined. Both Rac1 and Cdc42 expressions increased significantly in a dose-dependent manner in cerebellum (P < 0.01) by Western blot and immunohistochemistry assay, but in cerebrum, Rac1 and Cdc42 expressions only in 2 mg/L exposure groups were significantly higher than those in control groups (P < 0.01). Five to 50 μM NaAsO2 decreased cell viability in a dose-dependent manner in primary cultured rat astrocytes, whereas 1 μM NaAsO2 increased the cell viability in these cells. Rac1 inhibitor, NSC23766, decreased NaAsO2-induced apoptosis and increased the cell viability in primary cultured rat cerebellar astrocytes exposed to 30 μM NaAsO2. Cdc42 inhibitor, ZCL278, increased cell viability in the cells exposed to 30 μM NaAsO2. Taken together, our current studies in vivo and in vitro indicate that activations of Rac1 and Cdc42 play a very important role in arsenic neurotoxicity in rat cerebellum, providing a new insight into arsenic neurotoxicity. PMID:26231544

  20. CDC42 is required for structural patterning of the lung during development.

    PubMed

    Wan, Huajing; Liu, Caijun; Wert, Susan E; Xu, Wei; Liao, Yong; Zheng, Yi; Whitsett, Jeffrey A

    2013-02-01

    The formation of highly branched epithelial structures is critical for the development of many essential organs, including lung, liver, pancreas, kidney and mammary glands. Elongation and branching of these structures require precise control of complex morphogenetic processes that are dependent upon coordinate regulation of cell shape, apical-basal polarity, proliferation, migration, and interactions among multiple cell types. Herein, we demonstrate that temporal-spatial regulation of epithelial cell polarity by the small GTPase, CDC42, is essential for branching morphogenesis of the developing lung. Epithelial cell-specific deletion of CDC42 in fetal mice disrupted epithelial cell polarity, the actin cytoskeleton, intercellular contacts, directional trafficking of proteins, proliferation and mitotic spindle orientation, impairing the organization and patterning of the developing respiratory epithelium and adjacent mesenchyme. Transition from a pseudostratified to a simple columnar epithelium was impaired, consistent with coordinate dysregulation of epithelial cell polarity, mitotic spindle orientation, and repositioning of mitotic cells within the epithelium during cell cycle progression. Expression of sonic hedgehog and its receptor, patched-1, was decreased, while fibroblast growth factor 10 expression in the mesenchyme was expanded, resulting in disruption of branching morphogenesis and bronchiolar smooth muscle formation in this model. CDC42 is required for spatial positioning of proliferating epithelial cells, as well as signaling interactions between the epithelium and mesenchyme and is, therefore, essential for formation and maintenance of the respiratory tract during morphogenesis of the fetal lung. PMID:23219958

  1. CDC42 is Required for Structural Patterning of the Lung During Development

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Huajing; Liu, Caijun; Wert, Susan E.; Wei, Xu; Liao, Yong; Zheng, Yi; Whitsett, Jeffrey A.

    2012-01-01

    The formation of highly branched epithelial structures is critical for the development of many essential organs, including lung, liver, pancreas, kidney and mammary glands. Elongation and branching of these structures require precise control of complex morphogenetic processes that are dependent upon coordinate regulation of cell shape, apical-basal polarity, proliferation, migration, and interactions among multiple cell types. Herein, we demonstrate that temporal-spatial regulation of epithelial cell polarity by the small GTPase, CDC42, is essential for branching morphogenesis of the developing lung. Epithelial cell-specific deletion of CDC42 in fetal mice disrupted epithelial cell polarity, the actin cytoskeleton, intercellular contacts, directional trafficking of proteins, proliferation and mitotic spindle orientation, impairing the organization and patterning of the developing respiratory epithelium and adjacent mesenchyme. Transition from a pseudostratified to a simple columnar epithelium was impaired, consistent with coordinate dysregulation of epithelial cell polarity, mitotic spindle orientation, and repositioning of mitotic cells within the epithelium during cell cycle progression. Expression of sonic hedgehog and its receptor, patched-1, was decreased, while fibroblast growth factor 10 expression in the mesenchyme was expanded, resulting in disruption of branching morphogenesis and bronchiolar smooth muscle formation in this model. CDC42 is required for spatial positioning of proliferating epithelial cells, as well as signaling interactions between the epithelium and mesenchyme and is, therefore, essential for formation and maintenance of the respiratory tract during morphogenesis of the fetal lung. PMID:23219958

  2. CDC-42 and RAC-1 regulate opposite chemotropisms in Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Lichius, Alexander; Goryachev, Andrew B; Fricker, Mark D; Obara, Boguslaw; Castro-Longoria, Ernestina; Read, Nick D

    2014-05-01

    Cell polarization and fusion are crucial developmental processes that occur in response to intracellular and extracellular signals. Asexual spores (conidia) of the mold Neurospora crassa differentiate two types of polarized cell protrusions, germ tubes and conidial anastomosis tubes (CATs), which exhibit negative and positive chemotropism, respectively. We provide the first evidence that shared and separate functions of the Rho-type GTPases CDC-42 and RAC-1 regulate these opposite chemotropisms. We demonstrate that RAC-1 is essential for CAT formation and cell fusion, whereas CDC-42 is necessary and sufficient for normal germ tube development. Cdc42-Rac-interactive-binding (CRIB) reporters were constructed to exclusively label locally activated GTP-bound GTPases. Time course analyses showed that repositioning of these activated GTPase clusters within germ tube and CAT tip apices controls directional growth in the absence of a tip-localized vesicle supply center (Spitzenkörper). We propose a model in which the local assembly of a plasma-membrane-associated GTPase-PAK-MAPK signaling platform regulates chemoattractant perception and secretion in order to synchronize oscillatory cell-cell communication and directional CAT tip growth. PMID:24790223

  3. Novel Activities of Select NSAID R-Enantiomers against Rac1 and Cdc42 GTPases.

    PubMed

    Oprea, Tudor I; Sklar, Larry A; Agola, Jacob O; Guo, Yuna; Silberberg, Melina; Roxby, Joshua; Vestling, Anna; Romero, Elsa; Surviladze, Zurab; Murray-Krezan, Cristina; Waller, Anna; Ursu, Oleg; Hudson, Laurie G; Wandinger-Ness, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Rho family GTPases (including Rac, Rho and Cdc42) collectively control cell proliferation, adhesion and migration and are of interest as functional therapeutic targets in numerous epithelial cancers. Based on high throughput screening of the Prestwick Chemical Library® and cheminformatics we identified the R-enantiomers of two approved drugs (naproxen and ketorolac) as inhibitors of Rac1 and Cdc42. The corresponding S-enantiomers are considered the active component in racemic drug formulations, acting as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) with selective activity against cyclooxygenases. Here, we show that the S-enantiomers of naproxen and ketorolac are inactive against the GTPases. Additionally, more than twenty other NSAIDs lacked inhibitory action against the GTPases, establishing the selectivity of the two identified NSAIDs. R-naproxen was first identified as a lead compound and tested in parallel with its S-enantiomer and the non-chiral 6-methoxy-naphthalene acetic acid (active metabolite of nabumetone, another NSAID) as a structural series. Cheminformatics-based substructure analyses-using the rotationally constrained carboxylate in R-naproxen-led to identification of racemic [R/S] ketorolac as a suitable FDA-approved candidate. Cell based measurement of GTPase activity (in animal and human cell lines) demonstrated that the R-enantiomers specifically inhibit epidermal growth factor stimulated Rac1 and Cdc42 activation. The GTPase inhibitory effects of the R-enantiomers in cells largely mimic those of established Rac1 (NSC23766) and Cdc42 (CID2950007/ML141) specific inhibitors. Docking predicts that rotational constraints position the carboxylate moieties of the R-enantiomers to preferentially coordinate the magnesium ion, thereby destabilizing nucleotide binding to Rac1 and Cdc42. The S-enantiomers can be docked but are less favorably positioned in proximity to the magnesium. R-naproxen and R-ketorolac have potential for rapid translation and

  4. Novel Activities of Select NSAID R-Enantiomers against Rac1 and Cdc42 GTPases

    PubMed Central

    Oprea, Tudor I.; Sklar, Larry A.; Agola, Jacob O.; Guo, Yuna; Silberberg, Melina; Roxby, Joshua; Vestling, Anna; Romero, Elsa; Surviladze, Zurab; Murray-Krezan, Cristina; Waller, Anna; Ursu, Oleg; Hudson, Laurie G.; Wandinger-Ness, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Rho family GTPases (including Rac, Rho and Cdc42) collectively control cell proliferation, adhesion and migration and are of interest as functional therapeutic targets in numerous epithelial cancers. Based on high throughput screening of the Prestwick Chemical Library® and cheminformatics we identified the R-enantiomers of two approved drugs (naproxen and ketorolac) as inhibitors of Rac1 and Cdc42. The corresponding S-enantiomers are considered the active component in racemic drug formulations, acting as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) with selective activity against cyclooxygenases. Here, we show that the S-enantiomers of naproxen and ketorolac are inactive against the GTPases. Additionally, more than twenty other NSAIDs lacked inhibitory action against the GTPases, establishing the selectivity of the two identified NSAIDs. R-naproxen was first identified as a lead compound and tested in parallel with its S-enantiomer and the non-chiral 6-methoxy-naphthalene acetic acid (active metabolite of nabumetone, another NSAID) as a structural series. Cheminformatics-based substructure analyses—using the rotationally constrained carboxylate in R-naproxen—led to identification of racemic [R/S] ketorolac as a suitable FDA-approved candidate. Cell based measurement of GTPase activity (in animal and human cell lines) demonstrated that the R-enantiomers specifically inhibit epidermal growth factor stimulated Rac1 and Cdc42 activation. The GTPase inhibitory effects of the R-enantiomers in cells largely mimic those of established Rac1 (NSC23766) and Cdc42 (CID2950007/ML141) specific inhibitors. Docking predicts that rotational constraints position the carboxylate moieties of the R-enantiomers to preferentially coordinate the magnesium ion, thereby destabilizing nucleotide binding to Rac1 and Cdc42. The S-enantiomers can be docked but are less favorably positioned in proximity to the magnesium. R-naproxen and R-ketorolac have potential for rapid translation and

  5. Unique spatiotemporal activation pattern of Cdc42 by Gef1 and Scd1 promotes different events during cytokinesis.

    PubMed

    Wei, Bin; Hercyk, Brian S; Mattson, Nicholas; Mohammadi, Ahmad; Rich, Julie; DeBruyne, Erica; Clark, Mikayla M; Das, Maitreyi

    2016-04-15

    The Rho-family GTPase Cdc42 regulates cell polarity and localizes to the cell division site. Cdc42 is activated by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). We report that Cdc42 promotes cytokinesis via a unique spatiotemporal activation pattern due to the distinct action of its GEFs, Gef1 and Scd1, in fission yeast. Before cytokinetic ring constriction, Cdc42 activation, is Gef1 dependent, and after ring constriction, it is Scd1 dependent. Gef1 localizes to the actomyosin ring immediately after ring assembly and promotes timely onset of ring constriction. Gef1 is required for proper actin organization during cytokinesis, distribution of type V myosin Myo52 to the division site, and timely recruitment of septum protein Bgs1. In contrast, Scd1 localizes to the broader region of ingressing membrane during cytokinetic furrowing. Scd1 promotes normal septum formation, andscd1Δcells display aberrant septa with reduced Bgs1 localization. Thus we define unique roles of the GEFs Gef1 and Scd1 in the regulation of distinct events during cytokinesis. Gef1 localizes first to the cytokinetic ring and promotes timely constriction, whereas Scd1 localizes later to the ingressing membrane and promotes septum formation. Our findings are consistent with reports that complexity in GTPase signaling patterns enables exquisite precision over the control of cellular processes. PMID:26941334

  6. Unique spatiotemporal activation pattern of Cdc42 by Gef1 and Scd1 promotes different events during cytokinesis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Bin; Hercyk, Brian S.; Mattson, Nicholas; Mohammadi, Ahmad; Rich, Julie; DeBruyne, Erica; Clark, Mikayla M.; Das, Maitreyi

    2016-01-01

    The Rho-family GTPase Cdc42 regulates cell polarity and localizes to the cell division site. Cdc42 is activated by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). We report that Cdc42 promotes cytokinesis via a unique spatiotemporal activation pattern due to the distinct action of its GEFs, Gef1 and Scd1, in fission yeast. Before cytokinetic ring constriction, Cdc42 activation, is Gef1 dependent, and after ring constriction, it is Scd1 dependent. Gef1 localizes to the actomyosin ring immediately after ring assembly and promotes timely onset of ring constriction. Gef1 is required for proper actin organization during cytokinesis, distribution of type V myosin Myo52 to the division site, and timely recruitment of septum protein Bgs1. In contrast, Scd1 localizes to the broader region of ingressing membrane during cytokinetic furrowing. Scd1 promotes normal septum formation, and scd1Δ cells display aberrant septa with reduced Bgs1 localization. Thus we define unique roles of the GEFs Gef1 and Scd1 in the regulation of distinct events during cytokinesis. Gef1 localizes first to the cytokinetic ring and promotes timely constriction, whereas Scd1 localizes later to the ingressing membrane and promotes septum formation. Our findings are consistent with reports that complexity in GTPase signaling patterns enables exquisite precision over the control of cellular processes. PMID:26941334

  7. Quantitative Analysis of Membrane Trafficking in Regulation of Cdc42 Polarity

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Leah J.; Rossi, Guendalina; Brennwald, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Vesicle delivery of Cdc42 has been proposed as an important mechanism for generating and maintaining Cdc42 polarity at the plasma membrane. This mechanism requires the density of Cdc42 on secretory vesicles to be equal to or higher than the plasma membrane polarity cap. Using a novel method to estimate Cdc42 levels on post-Golgi secretory vesicles in intact yeast cells, we: 1) determined that endocytosis plays an important role in Cdc42’s association with secretory vesicles 2) found that a GFP-tag placed on the N-terminus of Cdc42 negatively impacts this vesicle association and 3) quantified the surface densities of Cdc42 on post-Golgi vesicles which revealed that the vesicle density of Cdc42 is three times more dilute than that at the polarity cap. This work suggests that the immediate consequence of secretory vesicle fusion with the plasma membrane polarity cap is to dilute the local Cdc42 surface density. This provides strong support for the model in which vesicle trafficking acts to negatively regulate Cdc42 polarity on the cell surface while also providing a means to recycle Cdc42 between the cell surface and internal membrane locations. PMID:25158298

  8. Cdc42p GDP/GTP Cycling Is Necessary for Efficient Cell Fusion during Yeast Mating

    PubMed Central

    Barale, Sophie; McCusker, Derek

    2006-01-01

    The highly conserved small Rho G-protein, Cdc42p plays a critical role in cell polarity and cytoskeleton organization in all eukaryotes. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Cdc42p is important for cell polarity establishment, septin ring assembly, and pheromone-dependent MAP-kinase signaling during the yeast mating process. In this study, we further investigated the role of Cdc42p in the mating process by screening for specific mating defective cdc42 alleles. We have identified and characterized novel mating defective cdc42 alleles that are unaffected in vegetative cell polarity. Replacement of the Cdc42p Val36 residue with Met resulted in a specific cell fusion defect. This cdc42[V36M] mutant responded to mating pheromone but was defective in cell fusion and in localization of the cell fusion protein Fus1p, similar to a previously isolated cdc24 (cdc24-m6) mutant. Overexpression of a fast cycling Cdc42p mutant suppressed the cdc24-m6 fusion defect and conversely, overexpression of Cdc24p suppressed the cdc42[V36M] fusion defect. Taken together, our results indicate that Cdc42p GDP–GTP cycling is critical for efficient cell fusion. PMID:16571678

  9. miR-330 regulates the proliferation of colorectal cancer cells by targeting Cdc42

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yuefeng; Zhu, Xiaolan; Xu, Wenlin; Wang, Dongqing; Yan, Jinchuan

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: ► miR-330 was inversely correlated with Cdc42 in colorectal cancer cells. ► Elevated miR-330 suppressed cell proliferation in vivo and in vitro. ► Elevated miR-330 mimicked the effect of Cdc42 knockdown. ► Restoration of Cdc42 could partially attenuate the effects of miR-330. -- Abstract: MicroRNAs are small non-coding RNA molecules that play important roles in the multistep process of colorectal carcinoma (CRC) development. However, the miRNA–mRNA regulatory network is far from being fully understood. The objective of this study was to investigate the expression and the biological roles of miR-330 in colorectal cancer cells. Cdc42, one of the best characterized members of the Rho GTPase family, was found to be up-regulated in several types of human tumors including CRC and has been implicated in cancer initiation and progression. In the present study, we identified miR-330, as a potential regulator of Cdc42, was found to be inversely correlated with Cdc42 expression in colorectal cancer cell lines. Ectopic expression of miR-330 down-regulated Cdc42 expression at both protein and mRNA level, mimicked the effect of Cdc42 knockdown in inhibiting proliferation, inducing G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis of the colorectal cancer cells, whereas restoration of Cdc42 could partially attenuate the effects of miR-330. In addition, elevated expression of miR-330 could suppress the immediate downstream effectors of Cdc42 and inhibit the growth of colorectal cancer cells in vivo. To sum up, our results establish a role of miR-330 in negatively regulating Cdc42 expression and colorectal cancer cell proliferation. They suggest that manipulating the expression level of Cdc42 by miR-330 has the potential to influence colorectal cancer progression.

  10. Role of Cdc42p in Pheromone-Stimulated Signal Transduction in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Moskow, John J.; Gladfelter, Amy S.; Lamson, Rachel E.; Pryciak, Peter M.; Lew, Daniel J.

    2000-01-01

    CDC42 encodes a highly conserved GTPase of the Rho family that is best known for its role in regulating cell polarity and actin organization. In addition, various studies of both yeast and mammalian cells have suggested that Cdc42p, through its interaction with p21-activated kinases (PAKs), plays a role in signaling pathways that regulate target gene transcription. However, recent studies of the yeast pheromone response pathway suggested that prior results with temperature-sensitive cdc42 mutants were misleading and that Cdc42p and the Cdc42p-PAK interaction are not involved in signaling. To clarify this issue, we have identified and characterized novel viable pheromone-resistant cdc42 alleles that retain the ability to perform polarity-related functions. Mutation of the Cdc42p residue Val36 or Tyr40 caused defects in pheromone signaling and in the localization of the Ste20p PAK in vivo and affected binding to the Ste20p Cdc42p-Rac interactive binding (CRIB) domain in vitro. Epistasis analysis suggested that they affect the signaling step at which Ste20p acts, and overproduction of Ste20p rescued the defect. These results suggest that Cdc42p is in fact required for pheromone response and that interaction with the PAK Ste20p is critical for that role. Furthermore, the ste20ΔCRIB allele, previously used to disrupt the Cdc42p-Ste20p interaction, behaved as an activated allele, largely bypassing the signaling defect of the cdc42 mutants. Additional observations lead us to suggest that Cdc42p collaborates with the SH3-domain protein Bem1p to facilitate signal transduction, possibly by providing a cell surface scaffold that aids in the local concentration of signaling kinases, thus promoting activation of a mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade by Ste20p. PMID:11003652

  11. Role of Cdc42p in pheromone-stimulated signal transduction in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Moskow, J J; Gladfelter, A S; Lamson, R E; Pryciak, P M; Lew, D J

    2000-10-01

    CDC42 encodes a highly conserved GTPase of the Rho family that is best known for its role in regulating cell polarity and actin organization. In addition, various studies of both yeast and mammalian cells have suggested that Cdc42p, through its interaction with p21-activated kinases (PAKs), plays a role in signaling pathways that regulate target gene transcription. However, recent studies of the yeast pheromone response pathway suggested that prior results with temperature-sensitive cdc42 mutants were misleading and that Cdc42p and the Cdc42p-PAK interaction are not involved in signaling. To clarify this issue, we have identified and characterized novel viable pheromone-resistant cdc42 alleles that retain the ability to perform polarity-related functions. Mutation of the Cdc42p residue Val36 or Tyr40 caused defects in pheromone signaling and in the localization of the Ste20p PAK in vivo and affected binding to the Ste20p Cdc42p-Rac interactive binding (CRIB) domain in vitro. Epistasis analysis suggested that they affect the signaling step at which Ste20p acts, and overproduction of Ste20p rescued the defect. These results suggest that Cdc42p is in fact required for pheromone response and that interaction with the PAK Ste20p is critical for that role. Furthermore, the ste20DeltaCRIB allele, previously used to disrupt the Cdc42p-Ste20p interaction, behaved as an activated allele, largely bypassing the signaling defect of the cdc42 mutants. Additional observations lead us to suggest that Cdc42p collaborates with the SH3-domain protein Bem1p to facilitate signal transduction, possibly by providing a cell surface scaffold that aids in the local concentration of signaling kinases, thus promoting activation of a mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade by Ste20p. PMID:11003652

  12. Small molecule targeting Cdc42-intersectin interaction disrupts Golgi organization and suppresses cell motility.

    PubMed

    Friesland, Amy; Zhao, Yaxue; Chen, Yan-Hua; Wang, Lie; Zhou, Huchen; Lu, Qun

    2013-01-22

    Signaling through the Rho family of small GTPases has been intensely investigated for its crucial roles in a wide variety of human diseases. Although RhoA and Rac1 signaling pathways are frequently exploited with the aid of effective small molecule modulators, studies of the Cdc42 subclass have lagged because of a lack of such means. We have applied high-throughput in silico screening and identified compounds that are able to fit into the surface groove of Cdc42, which is critical for guanine nucleotide exchange factor binding. Based on the interaction between Cdc42 and intersectin (ITSN), a specific Cdc42 guanine nucleotide exchange factor, we discovered compounds that rendered ITSN-like interactions in the binding pocket. By using in vitro binding and imaging as well as biochemical and cell-based assays, we demonstrated that ZCL278 has emerged as a selective Cdc42 small molecule modulator that directly binds to Cdc42 and inhibits its functions. In Swiss 3T3 fibroblast cultures, ZCL278 abolished microspike formation and disrupted GM130-docked Golgi structures, two of the most prominent Cdc42-mediated subcellular events. ZCL278 reduces the perinuclear accumulation of active Cdc42 in contrast to NSC23766, a selective Rac inhibitor. ZCL278 suppresses Cdc42-mediated neuronal branching and growth cone dynamics as well as actin-based motility and migration in a metastatic prostate cancer cell line (i.e., PC-3) without disrupting cell viability. Thus, ZCL278 is a small molecule that specifically targets Cdc42-ITSN interaction and inhibits Cdc42-mediated cellular processes, thus providing a powerful tool for research of Cdc42 subclass of Rho GTPases in human pathogenesis, such as those of cancer and neurological disorders. PMID:23284167

  13. Regulation of Cdc42 polarization by the Rsr1 GTPase and Rga1, a Cdc42 GTPase-activating protein, in budding yeast

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mid Eum; Lo, Wing-Cheong; Miller, Kristi E.; Chou, Ching-Shan; Park, Hay-Oak

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cdc42 plays a central role in establishing polarity in yeast and animals, yet how polarization of Cdc42 is achieved in response to spatial cues is poorly understood. Using live-cell imaging, we found distinct dynamics of Cdc42 polarization in haploid budding yeast in correlation with two temporal steps of the G1 phase. The position at which the Cdc42–GTP cluster develops changes rapidly around the division site during the first step but becomes stabilized in the second step, suggesting that an axis of polarized growth is determined in mid G1. Cdc42 polarization in the first step and its proper positioning depend on Rsr1 and its GTPase-activating protein (GAP) Bud2. Interestingly, Rga1, a Cdc42 GAP, exhibits transient localization to a site near the bud neck and to the division site during cytokinesis and G1, and this temporal change of Rga1 distribution is necessary for determination of a proper growth site. Mathematical modeling suggests that a proper axis of Cdc42 polarization in haploid cells might be established through a biphasic mechanism involving sequential positive feedback and transient negative feedback. PMID:25908844

  14. Rga6 is a fission yeast Rho GAP involved in Cdc42 regulation of polarized growth

    PubMed Central

    Revilla-Guarinos, M. T.; Martín-García, Rebeca; Villar-Tajadura, M. Antonia; Estravís, Miguel; Coll, Pedro M.; Pérez, Pilar

    2016-01-01

    Active Cdc42 is essential for the establishment of polarized growth. This GTPase is negatively regulated by the GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs), which are important for the spatial specificity of Cdc42 function. Rga4 is the only GAP described as negative regulator of fission yeast Cdc42. We report here that Rga6, another fission yeast Cdc42 GAP, shares some functions with Rga4. Cells lacking Rga6 are viable but slightly shorter and broader than wild type, and cells lacking Rga6 and Rga4 simultaneously are rounded. In these cells, active Cdc42 is observed all around the membrane. These additive effects indicate that both GAPs collaborate in the spatial regulation of active Cdc42. Rga6 localizes to the plasma membrane, forming clusters different from those formed by Rga4. A polybasic region at the Rga6 C-terminus is responsible for its membrane localization. Rga6-GFP fluorescence decreases considerably at the growing tips, and this decrease is dependent on the actin cables. Of note, in the absence of Rga6, the amplitude of active Cdc42 oscillations at the tips decreases, and less GTP-Cdc42 accumulates at the new end of the cells. We propose that Rga6 collaborates with Rga4 to spatially restrict active Cdc42 at the cell tips and maintain cell dimensions. PMID:26960792

  15. Axin Regulates Dendritic Spine Morphogenesis through Cdc42-Dependent Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu; Liang, Zhuoyi; Fei, Erkang; Chen, Yuewen; Zhou, Xiaopu; Fang, Weiqun; Fu, Wing-Yu; Fu, Amy K. Y.; Ip, Nancy Y.

    2015-01-01

    During development, scaffold proteins serve as important platforms for orchestrating signaling complexes to transduce extracellular stimuli into intracellular responses that regulate dendritic spine morphology and function. Axin (“axis inhibitor”) is a key scaffold protein in canonical Wnt signaling that interacts with specific synaptic proteins. However, the cellular functions of these protein–protein interactions in dendritic spine morphology and synaptic regulation are unclear. Here, we report that Axin protein is enriched in synaptic fractions, colocalizes with the postsynaptic marker PSD-95 in cultured hippocampal neurons, and interacts with a signaling protein Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) in synaptosomal fractions. Axin depletion by shRNA in cultured neurons or intact hippocampal CA1 regions significantly reduced dendritic spine density. Intriguingly, the defective dendritic spine morphogenesis in Axin-knockdown neurons could be restored by overexpression of the small Rho-GTPase Cdc42, whose activity is regulated by CaMKII. Moreover, pharmacological stabilization of Axin resulted in increased dendritic spine number and spontaneous neurotransmission, while Axin stabilization in hippocampal neurons reduced the elimination of dendritic spines. Taken together, our findings suggest that Axin promotes dendritic spine stabilization through Cdc42-dependent cytoskeletal reorganization. PMID:26204446

  16. Cdc42 overexpression induces hyperbranching in the developing mammary gland by enhancing cell migration

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The Rho GTPase Cdc42 is overexpressed and hyperactivated in breast tumors compared to normal breast tissue. Cdc42 regulates key processes that are critical for mammary gland morphogenesis and become disrupted during the development, progression, and metastasis of breast cancer. However, the contribution of Cdc42 to normal and neoplastic mammary gland development in vivo remains poorly understood. We were therefore interested in investigating the effects of Cdc42 overexpression on mammary gland morphogenesis as a first step toward understanding how its overexpression may contribute to mammary tumorigenesis. Methods We developed a tetracycline-regulatable Cdc42 overexpression mouse model in which Cdc42 can be inducibly overexpressed in the developing mammary gland. The effects of Cdc42 overexpression during postnatal mammary gland development were investigated using in vivo and in vitro approaches, including morphometric analysis of wholemounted mammary glands, quantification of histological markers, and primary mammary epithelial cell (MEC) functional and biochemical assays. Results Analysis of Cdc42-overexpressing mammary glands revealed abnormal terminal end bud (TEB) morphologies, characterized by hyperbudding and trifurcation, and increased side branching within the ductal tree. Quantification of markers of proliferation and apoptosis suggested that these phenotypes were not due to increased cell proliferation or survival. Rather, Cdc42 overexpressing MECs were more migratory and contractile and formed dysmorphic, invasive acini in three-dimensional cultures. Cdc42 and RhoA activities, phosphorylated myosin light chain, and MAPK signaling, which contribute to migration and invasion, were markedly elevated in Cdc42 overexpressing MECs. Interestingly, Cdc42 overexpressing mammary glands displayed several features associated with altered epithelial-stromal interactions, which are known to regulate branching morphogenesis. These included increased

  17. Investigation of the Interaction between Cdc42 and Its Effector TOCA1

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Joanna R.; Fox, Helen M.; Nietlispach, Daniel; Gallop, Jennifer L.; Owen, Darerca

    2016-01-01

    Transducer of Cdc42-dependent actin assembly protein 1 (TOCA1) is an effector of the Rho family small G protein Cdc42. It contains a membrane-deforming F-BAR domain as well as a Src homology 3 (SH3) domain and a G protein-binding homology region 1 (HR1) domain. TOCA1 binding to Cdc42 leads to actin rearrangements, which are thought to be involved in processes such as endocytosis, filopodia formation, and cell migration. We have solved the structure of the HR1 domain of TOCA1, providing the first structural data for this protein. We have found that the TOCA1 HR1, like the closely related CIP4 HR1, has interesting structural features that are not observed in other HR1 domains. We have also investigated the binding of the TOCA HR1 domain to Cdc42 and the potential ternary complex between Cdc42 and the G protein-binding regions of TOCA1 and a member of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein family, N-WASP. TOCA1 binds Cdc42 with micromolar affinity, in contrast to the nanomolar affinity of the N-WASP G protein-binding region for Cdc42. NMR experiments show that the Cdc42-binding domain from N-WASP is able to displace TOCA1 HR1 from Cdc42, whereas the N-WASP domain but not the TOCA1 HR1 domain inhibits actin polymerization. This suggests that TOCA1 binding to Cdc42 is an early step in the Cdc42-dependent pathways that govern actin dynamics, and the differential binding affinities of the effectors facilitate a handover from TOCA1 to N-WASP, which can then drive recruitment of the actin-modifying machinery. PMID:27129201

  18. Genetically encoded photoswitching of actin assembly through the Cdc42-WASP-Arp2/3 complex pathway

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Daisy W.; Otomo, Chinatsu; Chory, Joanne; Rosen, Michael K.

    2008-01-01

    General methods to engineer genetically encoded, reversible, light-mediated control over protein function would be useful in many areas of biomedical research and technology. We describe a system that yields such photo-control over actin assembly. We fused the Rho family GTPase Cdc42 in its GDP-bound form to the photosensory domain of phytochrome B (PhyB) and fused the Cdc42 effector, the Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome Protein (WASP), to the light-dependent PhyB-binding domain of phytochrome interacting factor 3 (Pif3). Upon red light illumination, the fusion proteins bind each other, activating WASP, and consequently stimulating actin assembly by the WASP target, the Arp2/3 complex. Binding and WASP activation are reversed by far-red illumination. Our approach, in which the biochemical specificity of the nucleotide switch in Cdc42 is overridden by the light-dependent PhyB-Pif3 interaction, should be generally applicable to other GTPase-effector pairs. PMID:18728185

  19. Spontaneous Cdc42 Polarization Independent of GDI-Mediated Extraction and Actin-Based Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Bendezú, Felipe O.; Vincenzetti, Vincent; Vavylonis, Dimitrios; Wyss, Romain; Vogel, Horst; Martin, Sophie G.

    2015-01-01

    The small Rho-family GTPase Cdc42 is critical for cell polarization and polarizes spontaneously in absence of upstream spatial cues. Spontaneous polarization is thought to require dynamic Cdc42 recycling through Guanine nucleotide Dissociation Inhibitor (GDI)-mediated membrane extraction and vesicle trafficking. Here, we describe a functional fluorescent Cdc42 allele in fission yeast, which demonstrates Cdc42 dynamics and polarization independent of these pathways. Furthermore, an engineered Cdc42 allele targeted to the membrane independently of these recycling pathways by an amphipathic helix is viable and polarizes spontaneously to multiple sites in fission and budding yeasts. We show that Cdc42 is highly mobile at the membrane and accumulates at sites of activity, where it displays slower mobility. By contrast, a near-immobile transmembrane domain-containing Cdc42 allele supports viability and polarized activity, but does not accumulate at sites of activity. We propose that Cdc42 activation, enhanced by positive feedback, leads to its local accumulation by capture of fast-diffusing inactive molecules. PMID:25837586

  20. The Cdc42 GTPase-associated proteins Gic1 and Gic2 are required for polarized cell growth in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guang-Chao; Kim, Yung-Jin; Chan, Clarence S.M.

    1997-01-01

    BEM2 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes a Rho-type GTPase-activating protein that is required for proper bud site selection at 26°C and for bud emergence at elevated temperatures. We show here that the temperature-sensitive growth phenotype of bem2 mutant cells can be suppressed by increased dosage of the GIC1 gene. The Gic1 protein, together with its structural homolog Gic2, are required for cell size and shape control, bud site selection, bud emergence, actin cytoskeletal organization, mitotic spindle orientation/positioning, and mating projection formation in response to mating pheromone. Each protein contains a CRIB (Cdc42/Rac-interactive binding) motif and each interacts in the two-hybrid assay with the GTP-bound form of the Rho-type Cdc42 GTPase, a key regulator of polarized growth in yeast. The CRIB motif of Gic1 and the effector domain of Cdc42 are required for this association. Genetic experiments indicate that Gic1 and Gic2 play positive roles in the Cdc42 signal transduction pathway, probably as effectors of Cdc42. Subcellular localization studies with a functional green fluorescent protein–Gic1 fusion protein indicate that this protein is concentrated at the incipient bud site of unbudded cells, at the bud tip and mother-bud neck of budded cells, and at cortical sites on large-budded cells that may delimit future bud sites in the two progeny cells. The ability of Gic1 to associate with Cdc42 is important for its function but is apparently not essential for its subcellular localization. PMID:9367979

  1. Cdc42p Is Activated during Vacuole Membrane Fusion in a Sterol-dependent Subreaction of Priming*

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Lynden; Tedrick, Kelly; Baier, Alicia; Logan, Michael R.; Eitzen, Gary

    2010-01-01

    Cdc42p is a Rho GTPase that initiates signaling cascades at spatially defined intracellular sites for many cellular functions. We have previously shown that Cdc42p is localized to the yeast vacuole where it initiates actin polymerization during membrane fusion. Here we examine the activation cycle of Cdc42p during vacuole membrane fusion. Expression of either GTP- or GDP-locked Cdc42p mutants caused several morphological defects including enlarged cells and fragmented vacuoles. Stimulation of multiple rounds of fusion enhanced vacuole fragmentation, suggesting that cycles of Cdc42p activation, involving rounds of GTP binding and hydrolysis, are required to propagate Cdc42p signaling. We developed an assay to directly examine Cdc42p activation based on affinity to a probe derived from the p21-activated kinase effector, Ste20p. Cdc42p was rapidly activated during vacuole membrane fusion, which kinetically coincided with priming subreaction. During priming, Sec18p ATPase activity dissociates SNARE complexes and releases Sec17p, however, priming inhibitors such as Sec17p and Sec18p ligands did not block Cdc42p activation. Therefore, Cdc42p activation seems to be a parallel subreaction of priming, distinct from Sec18p activity. Specific mutants in the ergosterol synthesis pathway block both Sec17p release and Cdc42p activation. Taken together, our results define a novel sterol-dependent subreaction of vacuole priming that activates cycles of Cdc42p activity to facilitate membrane fusion. PMID:20007700

  2. An Essential Role for Cdc42 in the Functioning of the Adult Mammary Gland.

    PubMed

    Druso, Joseph E; Endo, Makoto; Lin, Miao-Chong Joy; Peng, Xu; Antonyak, Marc A; Meller, Stephanie; Cerione, Richard A

    2016-04-22

    The Rho family small GTPase Cdc42 has been implicated in a wide range of cellular functions including the establishment of cell polarity and the remodeling of the actin cytoskeletal architecture, resulting in the tight regulation of cell growth and survival during developmental processes. The complete knock-out of Cdc42 in the mouse is embryonic-lethal, and its targeted deletion in various tissues has been shown to disrupt tissue homeostasis. Thus far, in most studies, the targeted deletion of Cdc42 occurred during embryogenesis. Here, we have used a conditional gene deletion strategy in mice to probe the specific role of Cdc42 during adult mammary gland function. Cdc42 conditional-knock-out females were unable to adequately nourish their pups, due to a disorganized epithelial compartment within their mammary glands. A closer examination showed that their mammary epithelial cells were not able to maintain functional alveolar lumens, due to an inability to establish normal apical/basal epithelial polarity, as well as proper cell-cell contacts. Loss of these essential epithelial characteristics led to a premature sloughing off of the Cdc42-null epithelial cells. Overall our findings demonstrate that Cdc42 plays essential roles in mammary gland function post pregnancy, where it helps to establish proper epithelial cell polarity and tissue homeostasis during lactation. PMID:26912661

  3. Opposing Roles for Actin in Cdc42p PolarizationD⃞

    PubMed Central

    Irazoqui, Javier E.; Howell, Audrey S.; Theesfeld, Chandra L.; Lew, Daniel J.

    2005-01-01

    In animal and fungal cells, the monomeric GTPase Cdc42p is a key regulator of cell polarity that itself exhibits a polarized distribution in asymmetric cells. Previous work showed that in budding yeast, Cdc42p polarization is unaffected by depolymerization of the actin cytoskeleton (Ayscough et al., J. Cell Biol. 137, 399–416, 1997). Surprisingly, we now report that unlike complete actin depolymerization, partial actin depolymerization leads to the dispersal of Cdc42p from the polarization site in unbudded cells. We provide evidence that dispersal is due to endocytosis associated with cortical actin patches and that actin cables are required to counteract the dispersal and maintain Cdc42p polarity. Thus, although Cdc42p is initially polarized in an actin-independent manner, maintaining that polarity may involve a reinforcing feedback between Cdc42p and polarized actin cables to counteract the dispersing effects of actin-dependent endocytosis. In addition, we report that once a bud has formed, polarized Cdc42p becomes more resistant to dispersal, revealing an unexpected difference between unbudded and budded cells in the organization of the polarization site. PMID:15616194

  4. Identification of Novel Membrane-binding Domains in Multiple Yeast Cdc42 Effectors

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Satoe

    2007-01-01

    The Rho-type GTPase Cdc42 is a central regulator of eukaryotic cell polarity and signal transduction. In budding yeast, Cdc42 regulates polarity and mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase signaling in part through the PAK-family kinase Ste20. Activation of Ste20 requires a Cdc42/Rac interactive binding (CRIB) domain, which mediates its recruitment to membrane-associated Cdc42. Here, we identify a separate domain in Ste20 that interacts directly with membrane phospholipids and is critical for its function. This short region, termed the basic-rich (BR) domain, can target green fluorescent protein to the plasma membrane in vivo and binds PIP2-containing liposomes in vitro. Mutation of basic or hydrophobic residues in the BR domain abolishes polarized localization of Ste20 and its function in both MAP kinase–dependent and independent pathways. Thus, Cdc42 binding is required but is insufficient; instead, direct membrane binding by Ste20 is also required. Nevertheless, phospholipid specificity is not essential in vivo, because the BR domain can be replaced with several heterologous lipid-binding domains of varying lipid preferences. We also identify functionally important BR domains in two other yeast Cdc42 effectors, Gic1 and Gic2, suggesting that cooperation between protein–protein and protein–membrane interactions is a prevalent mechanism during Cdc42-regulated signaling and perhaps for other dynamic localization events at the cell cortex. PMID:17914055

  5. Cloning, sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of the small GTPase gene cdc-42 from Ancylostoma caninum.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yurong; Zheng, Jing; Chen, Jiaxin

    2012-12-01

    CDC-42 is a member of the Rho GTPase subfamily that is involved in many signaling pathways, including mitosis, cell polarity, cell migration and cytoskeleton remodeling. Here, we present the first characterization of a full-length cDNA encoding the small GTPase cdc-42, designated as Accdc-42, isolated from the parasitic nematode Ancylostoma caninum. The encoded protein contains 191 amino acid residues with a predicted molecular weight of 21 kDa and displays a high level of identity with the Rho-family GTPase protein CDC-42. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that Accdc-42 was most closely related to Caenorhabditis briggsae cdc-42. Comparison with selected sequences from the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster, Xenopus laevis, Danio rerio, Mus musculus and human genomes showed that Accdc-42 is highly conserved. AcCDC-42 demonstrates the highest identity to CDC-42 from C. briggsae (94.2%), and it also exhibits 91.6% identity to CDC-42 from C. elegans and 91.1% from Brugia malayi. Additionally, the transcript of Accdc-42 was analyzed during the different developmental stages of the worm. Accdc-42 was expressed in the L1/L2 larvae, L3 larvae and female and male adults of A. caninum. PMID:23000556

  6. Wsp1 Is Downstream of Cin1 and Regulates Vesicle Transport and Actin Cytoskeleton as an Effector of Cdc42 and Rac1 in Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Gui; Zhou, Erxun; Alspaugh, J. Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Human Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASP) is a scaffold linking upstream signals to the actin cytoskeleton. In response to intersectin ITSN1 and Rho GTPase Cdc42, WASP activates the Arp2/3 complex to promote actin polymerization. The human pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans contains the ITSN1 homolog Cin1 and the WASP homolog Wsp1, which share more homology with human proteins than those of other fungi. Here we demonstrate that Cin1, Cdc42/Rac1, and Wsp1 function in an effector pathway similar to that of mammalian models. In the cin1 mutant, expression of the autoactivated Wsp1-B-GBD allele partially suppressed the mutant defect in endocytosis, and expression of the constitutively active CDC42Q61L allele restored normal actin cytoskeleton structures. Similar phenotypic suppression can be obtained by the expression of a Cdc42-green fluorescent protein (GFP)-Wsp1 fusion protein. In addition, Rac1, which was found to exhibit a role in early endocytosis, activates Wsp1 to regulate vacuole fusion. Rac1 interacted with Wsp1 and depended on Wsp1 for its vacuolar membrane localization. Expression of the Wsp1-B-GBD allele restored vacuolar membrane fusion in the rac1 mutant. Collectively, our studies suggest novel ways in which this pathogenic fungus has adapted conserved signaling pathways to control vesicle transport and actin organization, likely benefiting survival within infected hosts. PMID:22327008

  7. Thromboxane-induced actin polymerization in hypoxic neonatal pulmonary arterial myocytes involves Cdc42 signaling.

    PubMed

    Fediuk, Jena; Sikarwar, Anurag S; Nolette, Nora; Dakshinamurti, Shyamala

    2014-12-01

    In hypoxic pulmonary arterial (PA) myocytes, challenge with thromboxane mimetic U46619 induces marked actin polymerization and contraction, phenotypic features of persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN). Rho GTPases regulate the actin cytoskeleton. We previously reported that U46619-induced actin polymerization in hypoxic PA myocytes occurs independently of the RhoA pathway and hypothesized involvement of the Cdc42 pathway. PA myocytes grown in normoxia or hypoxia for 72 h were stimulated with U46619, then analyzed for Rac/Cdc42 activation by affinity precipitation, phosphatidylinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) activity by phospho-Akt, phospho-p21-activated kinase (PAK) by immunoblot, and association of Cdc42 with neuronal Wiskott Aldrich Syndrome protein (N-WASp) by immunoprecipitation. The effect of Rac or PAK inhibition on filamentous actin was quantified by laser-scanning cytometry and by cytoskeletal fractionation; effects of actin-modifying agents were measured by isometric myography. Basal Cdc42 activity increased in hypoxia, whereas Rac activity decreased. U46619 challenge increased Cdc42 and Rac activity in hypoxic cells, independently of PI3K. Hypoxia increased phospho-PAK, unaltered by U46619. Association of Cdc42 with N-WASp decreased in hypoxia but increased after U46619 exposure. Hypoxia doubled filamentous-to-globular ratios of α- and γ-actin isoforms. Jasplakinolide stabilized γ-filaments, increasing force; cytochalasin D depolymerized all actin isoforms, decreasing force. Rac and PAK inhibition decreased filamentous actin in tissues although without decrease in force. Rho inhibition decreased myosin phosphorylation and force. Hypoxia induces actin polymerization in PA myocytes, particularly increasing filamentous α- and γ-actin, contributing to U46619-induced contraction. Hypoxic PA myocytes challenged with a thromboxane mimetic polymerize actin via the Cdc42 pathway, reflecting increased Cdc42 association with N-WASp. Mechanisms

  8. A CDC42EP4/septin-based perisynaptic glial scaffold facilitates glutamate clearance.

    PubMed

    Ageta-Ishihara, Natsumi; Yamazaki, Maya; Konno, Kohtarou; Nakayama, Hisako; Abe, Manabu; Hashimoto, Kenji; Nishioka, Tomoki; Kaibuchi, Kozo; Hattori, Satoko; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi; Tanaka, Kohichi; Huda, Fathul; Hirai, Hirokazu; Hashimoto, Kouichi; Watanabe, Masahiko; Sakimura, Kenji; Kinoshita, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    The small GTPase-effector proteins CDC42EP1-5/BORG1-5 interact reciprocally with CDC42 or the septin cytoskeleton. Here we show that, in the cerebellum, CDC42EP4 is exclusively expressed in Bergmann glia and localizes beneath specific membrane domains enwrapping dendritic spines of Purkinje cells. CDC42EP4 forms complexes with septin hetero-oligomers, which interact with a subset of glutamate transporter GLAST/EAAT1. In Cdc42ep4(-/-) mice, GLAST is dissociated from septins and is delocalized away from the parallel fibre-Purkinje cell synapses. The excitatory postsynaptic current exhibits a protracted decay time constant, reduced sensitivity to a competitive inhibitor of the AMPA-type glutamate receptors (γDGG) and excessive baseline inward current in response to a subthreshold dose of a nonselective inhibitor of the glutamate transporters/EAAT1-5 (DL-TBOA). Insufficient glutamate-buffering/clearance capacity in these mice manifests as motor coordination/learning defects, which are aggravated with subthreshold DL-TBOA. We propose that the CDC42EP4/septin-based glial scaffold facilitates perisynaptic localization of GLAST and optimizes the efficiency of glutamate-buffering and clearance. PMID:26657011

  9. A CDC42EP4/septin-based perisynaptic glial scaffold facilitates glutamate clearance

    PubMed Central

    Ageta-Ishihara, Natsumi; Yamazaki, Maya; Konno, Kohtarou; Nakayama, Hisako; Abe, Manabu; Hashimoto, Kenji; Nishioka, Tomoki; Kaibuchi, Kozo; Hattori, Satoko; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi; Tanaka, Kohichi; Huda, Fathul; Hirai, Hirokazu; Hashimoto, Kouichi; Watanabe, Masahiko; Sakimura, Kenji; Kinoshita, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    The small GTPase-effector proteins CDC42EP1-5/BORG1–5 interact reciprocally with CDC42 or the septin cytoskeleton. Here we show that, in the cerebellum, CDC42EP4 is exclusively expressed in Bergmann glia and localizes beneath specific membrane domains enwrapping dendritic spines of Purkinje cells. CDC42EP4 forms complexes with septin hetero-oligomers, which interact with a subset of glutamate transporter GLAST/EAAT1. In Cdc42ep4−/− mice, GLAST is dissociated from septins and is delocalized away from the parallel fibre-Purkinje cell synapses. The excitatory postsynaptic current exhibits a protracted decay time constant, reduced sensitivity to a competitive inhibitor of the AMPA-type glutamate receptors (γDGG) and excessive baseline inward current in response to a subthreshold dose of a nonselective inhibitor of the glutamate transporters/EAAT1–5 (DL-TBOA). Insufficient glutamate-buffering/clearance capacity in these mice manifests as motor coordination/learning defects, which are aggravated with subthreshold DL-TBOA. We propose that the CDC42EP4/septin-based glial scaffold facilitates perisynaptic localization of GLAST and optimizes the efficiency of glutamate-buffering and clearance. PMID:26657011

  10. Cdc42 is required for EGF-stimulated protrusion and motility in MTLn3 carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    El-Sibai, Mirvat; Nalbant, Peri; Pang, Huan; Flinn, Rory J.; Sarmiento, Corina; Macaluso, Frank; Cammer, Michael; Condeelis, John S.; Hahn, Klaus M.; Backer, Jonathan M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Cdc42 plays a central role in regulating the actin cytoskeleton and maintaining cell polarity. Here, we show that Cdc42 is crucial for epidermal growth factor (EGF)-stimulated protrusion in MTLn3 carcinoma cells. When stimulated with EGF, carcinoma cells showed a rapid increase in activated Cdc42 that is primarily localized to the protruding edge of the cells. siRNA-mediated knockdown of Cdc42 expression caused a decrease in EGF-stimulated protrusion and reduced cell motility in time-lapse studies. These changes were correlated with a decrease in barbed-end formation and Arp2/3 localization at the cell edge, and a marked defect in actin filament branching, as revealed by rotary-shadowing scanning electron microscopy. Upstream of Arp2/3, Cdc42 knockdown inhibited EGF-stimulated activation of PI 3-kinase at early (within 1 minute) but not late (within 3 minutes) time points. Membrane targeting of N-WASP, WAVE2 and IRSp53 were also inhibited. Effects on WAVE2 were not owing to Rac1 inhibition, because WAVE2 recruitment is unaffected by Rac1 knockdown. Our data suggest that Cdc42 activation is crucial for the regulation of actin polymerization in carcinoma cells, and required for both EGF-stimulated protrusion and cell motility independently of effects on Rac. PMID:17855387

  11. Regulation of hyphal morphogenesis by cdc42 and rac1 homologues in Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Virag, Aleksandra; Lee, Maurice P; Si, Haoyu; Harris, Steven D

    2007-12-01

    The ability of filamentous fungi to form hyphae requires the establishment and maintenance of a stable polarity axis. Based on studies in yeasts and animals, the GTPases Cdc42 and Rac1 are presumed to play a central role in organizing the morphogenetic machinery to enable axis formation and stabilization. Here, we report that Cdc42 (ModA) and Rac1 (RacA) share an overlapping function required for polarity establishment in Aspergillus nidulans. Nevertheless, Cdc42 appears to have a more important role in hyphal morphogenesis in that it alone is required for the timely formation of lateral branches. In addition, we provide genetic evidence suggesting that the polarisome components SepA and SpaA function downstream of Cdc42 in a pathway that may regulate microfilament formation. Finally, we show that microtubules become essential for the establishment of hyphal polarity when the function of either Cdc42 or SepA is compromised. Our results are consistent with the action of parallel Cdc42 and microtubule-based pathways in regulating the formation of a stable axis of hyphal polarity in A. nidulans. PMID:18005099

  12. CDC42 Use in Viral Cell Entry Processes by RNA Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Swaine, Thomas; Dittmar, Matthias T.

    2015-01-01

    The cellular actin cytoskeleton presents a barrier that must be overcome by many viruses, and it has become increasingly apparent many viral species have developed a diverse repertoire of mechanisms to hijack cellular actin-regulating signalling pathways as part of their cell entry processes. The Rho family GTPase Cdc42 is appreciated as a key moderator of cellular actin dynamics, and the development of specific Cdc42-inhibiting agents has given us an unprecedented ability to investigate its individual role in signalling pathways. However, investigative use of said agents, and the subsequent characterisation of the role Cdc42 plays in viral entry processes has been lacking. Here, we describe the current literature on the role of Cdc42 in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 cell entry, which represents the most investigated instance of Cdc42 function in viral cell entry processes, and also review evidence of Cdc42 use in other RNA virus cell entries, demonstrating prime areas for more extensive research using similar techniques. PMID:26690467

  13. Functional characterization of the Cdc42p binding domain of yeast Ste20p protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Leberer, E; Wu, C; Leeuw, T; Fourest-Lieuvin, A; Segall, J E; Thomas, D Y

    1997-01-01

    Ste20p from Saccharomyces cerevisiae belongs to the Ste20p/p65PAK family of protein kinases which are highly conserved from yeast to man and regulate conserved mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways. Ste20p fulfills multiple roles in pheromone signaling, morphological switching and vegetative growth and binds Cdc42p, a Rho-like small GTP binding protein required for polarized morphogenesis. We have analyzed the functional consequences of mutations that prevent binding of Cdc42p to Ste20p. The complete amino-terminal, non-catalytic half of Ste20p, including the conserved Cdc42p binding domain, was dispensable for heterotrimeric G-protein-mediated pheromone signaling. However, the Cdc42p binding domain was necessary for filamentous growth in response to nitrogen starvation and for an essential function that Ste20p shares with its isoform Cla4p during vegetative growth. Moreover, the Cdc42p binding domain was required for cell-cell adhesion during conjugation. Subcellular localization of wild-type and mutant Ste20p fused to green fluorescent protein showed that the Cdc42p binding domain is needed to direct localization of Ste20p to regions of polarized growth. These results suggest that Ste20p is regulated in different developmental pathways by different mechanisms which involve heterotrimeric and small GTP binding proteins. PMID:9009270

  14. The small GTPase Cdc42 modulates the number of exocytosis-competent dense-core vesicles in PC12 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Mai; Kitaguchi, Tetsuya; Ikematsu, Kazuya; Kakeyama, Masaki; Murata, Masayuki; Sato, Ken; Tsuboi, Takashi

    2012-04-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Regulation of exocytosis by Rho GTPase Cdc42. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cdc42 increases the number of fusion events from newly recruited vesicles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cdc42 increases the number of exocytosis-competent dense-core vesicles. -- Abstract: Although the small GTPase Rho family Cdc42 has been shown to facilitate exocytosis through increasing the amount of hormones released, the precise mechanisms regulating the quantity of hormones released on exocytosis are not well understood. Here we show by live cell imaging analysis under TIRF microscope and immunocytochemical analysis under confocal microscope that Cdc42 modulated the number of fusion events and the number of dense-core vesicles produced in the cells. Overexpression of a wild-type or constitutively-active form of Cdc42 strongly facilitated high-KCl-induced exocytosis from the newly recruited plasma membrane vesicles in PC12 cells. By contrast, a dominant-negative form of Cdc42 inhibited exocytosis from both the newly recruited and previously docked plasma membrane vesicles. The number of intracellular dense-core vesicles was increased by the overexpression of both a wild-type and constitutively-active form of Cdc42. Consistently, activation of Cdc42 by overexpression of Tuba, a Golgi-associated guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Cdc42 increased the number of intracellular dense-core vesicles, whereas inhibition of Cdc42 by overexpression of the Cdc42/Rac interactive binding domain of neuronal Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein decreased the number of them. These findings suggest that Cdc42 facilitates exocytosis by modulating both the number of exocytosis-competent dense-core vesicles and the production of dense-core vesicles in PC12 cells.

  15. Matrix rigidity regulates spatiotemporal dynamics of Cdc42 activity and vacuole formation kinetics of endothelial colony forming cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seung Joon; Wan, Qiaoqiao; Cho, Eunhye; Han, Bumsoo; Yoder, Mervin C.; Voytik-Harbin, Sherry L.; Na, Sungsoo

    2014-01-01

    Recent evidence has shown that endothelial colony forming cells (ECFCs) may serve as a cell therapy for improving blood vessel formation in subjects with vascular injury, largely due to their robust vasculogenic potential. The Rho family GTPase Cdc42 is known to play a primary role in this vasculogenesis process, but little is known about how extracellular matrix (ECM) rigidity affects Cdc42 activity during the process. In this study, we addressed two questions: Does matrix rigidity affect Cdc42 activity in ECFC undergoing early vacuole formation? How is the spatiotemporal activation of Cdc42 related to ECFC vacuole formation? A fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based Cdc42 biosensor was used to examine the effects of the rigidity of three-dimensional (3D) collagen matrices on spatiotemporal activity of Cdc42 in ECFCs. Collagen matrix stiffness was modulated by varying the collagen concentration and therefore fibril density. The results showed that soft (150 Pa) matrices induced an increased level of Cdc42 activity compared to stiff (1 kPa) matrices. Time-course imaging and colocalization analysis of Cdc42 activity and vacuole formation revealed that Cdc42 activity was colocalized to the periphery of cytoplasmic vacuoles. Moreover, soft matrices generated faster and larger vacuoles than stiff matrices. The matrix-driven vacuole formation was enhanced by a constitutively active Cdc42 mutant, but significantly inhibited by a dominant-negative Cdc42 mutant. Collectively, the results suggest that matrix rigidity is a strong regulator of Cdc42 activity and vacuole formation kinetics, and that enhanced activity of Cdc42 is an important step in early vacuole formation in ECFCs. PMID:24393843

  16. Thyroid bud morphogenesis requires CDC42- and SHROOM3-dependent apical constriction

    PubMed Central

    Loebel, David A. F.; Plageman, Timothy F.; Tang, Theresa L.; Jones, Vanessa J.; Muccioli, Maria; Tam, Patrick P. L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Early development of the gut endoderm and its subsequent remodeling for the formation of organ buds are accompanied by changes to epithelial cell shape and polarity. Members of the Rho-related family of small GTPases and their interacting proteins play multiple roles in regulating epithelial morphogenesis. In this study we examined the role of Cdc42 in foregut development and organ bud formation. Ablation of Cdc42 in post-gastrulation mouse embryos resulted in a loss of apical-basal cell polarity and columnar epithelial morphology in the ventral pharyngeal endoderm, in conjunction with a loss of apical localization of the known CDC42 effector protein PARD6B. Cell viability but not proliferation in the foregut endoderm was impaired. Outgrowth of the liver, lung and thyroid buds was severely curtailed in Cdc42-deficient embryos. In particular, the thyroid bud epithelium did not display the apical constriction that normally occurs concurrently with the outgrowth of the bud into the underlying mesenchyme. SHROOM3, a protein that interacts with Rho GTPases and promotes apical constriction, was strongly expressed in the thyroid bud and its sub-cellular localization was disrupted in Cdc42-deficient embryos. In Shroom3 gene trap mutant embryos, the thyroid bud epithelium showed no apical constriction, while the bud continued to grow and protruded into the foregut lumen. Our findings indicate that Cdc42 is required for epithelial polarity and organization in the endoderm and for apical constriction in the thyroid bud. It is possible that the function of CDC42 is partly mediated by SHROOM3. PMID:26772200

  17. “Spatial Mapping of the Neurite and Soma Proteomes Reveals a Functional Cdc42/Rac Regulatory Network”

    SciTech Connect

    Pertz, Olivier C.; Wang, Yingchun; Yang, Feng; Wang, Wei; gay, laurie J.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Clauss, Therese RW; Anderson, David J.; Liu, Tao; Auberry, Kenneth J.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Klemke, Richard L.

    2008-02-12

    Neurite extension and growth cone navigation are guided by extracellular cues that control cytoskeletal rearrangements. However, understanding the complex signaling mechanisms that mediate neuritogenesis has been limited by the inability to biochemically separate the neurite and soma for spatial proteomic and bioinformatic analyses. Here, we apply global proteome profiling in combination with a novel neurite purification methodology for comparative analysis of the soma and neurite proteomes of neuroblastoma cells. The spatial relationship of 4855 proteins were mapped revealing networks of signaling proteins that control integrins, the actin cytoskeleton, and axonal guidance in the extending neurite. Bioinformatics and functional analyses revealed a spatially compartmentalized Rac/Cdc42 signaling network that operates in conjunction with multiple GEFs and GAPs to control neurite formation. Interestingly, RNA interference experiments revealed that the different GEFs and GAPs regulate specialized functions during neurite formation including neurite growth and retraction kinetics, cytoskeletal organization, and cell polarity. Our findings provide insight into the spatial organization of signaling networks that enable neuritogenesis and provide a comprehensive system-wide profile of proteins that mediate this process including those that control Rac and Cdc42 signaling.

  18. Distinct predictive performance of Rac1 and Cdc42 in cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Yamao, Masataka; Naoki, Honda; Kunida, Katsuyuki; Aoki, Kazuhiro; Matsuda, Michiyuki; Ishii, Shin

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new computation-based approach for elucidating how signaling molecules are decoded in cell migration. In this approach, we performed FRET time-lapse imaging of Rac1 and Cdc42, members of Rho GTPases which are responsible for cell motility, and quantitatively identified the response functions that describe the conversion from the molecular activities to the morphological changes. Based on the identified response functions, we clarified the profiles of how the morphology spatiotemporally changes in response to local and transient activation of Rac1 and Cdc42, and found that Rac1 and Cdc42 activation triggers laterally propagating membrane protrusion. The response functions were also endowed with property of differentiator, which is beneficial for maintaining sensitivity under adaptation to the mean level of input. Using the response function, we could predict the morphological change from molecular activity, and its predictive performance provides a new quantitative measure of how much the Rho GTPases participate in the cell migration. Interestingly, we discovered distinct predictive performance of Rac1 and Cdc42 depending on the migration modes, indicating that Rac1 and Cdc42 contribute to persistent and random migration, respectively. Thus, our proposed predictive approach enabled us to uncover the hidden information processing rules of Rho GTPases in the cell migration. PMID:26634649

  19. Molecular characterisation of the small GTPase CDC42 in the ectomycorrhizal fungus Tuber borchii Vittad.

    PubMed

    Menotta, M; Amicucci, A; Basili, G; Rivero, F; Polidori, E; Sisti, D; Stocchi, V

    2007-01-01

    The small GTPase CDC42 is ubiquitously expressed in eukaryotes, where it participates in the regulation of the cytoskeleton and a wide range of cellular processes, including cytokinesis, gene expression, cell cycle progression, apoptosis, and tumorigenesis. As very little is known on the molecular level about mycorrhizal morphogenesis and development and these events depend on a tightly regulated reorganisation of the cytoskeleton network in filamentous fungi, we focused on the molecular characterisation of the cdc42 gene in Tuber borchii Vittad., an ascomycetous hypogeous fungus forming ectomycorrhizae. The entire gene was isolated from a T. borchii cDNA library and Southern blot analyses showed that only one copy of cdc42 is present in the T. borchii genome. The predicted amino acid sequence is very similar to those of other known small GTPases and the similar domain structures suggest a similar function. Real-time PCR analyses revealed an increased expression of Tbcdc42 during the phase preparative to the instauration of symbiosis, in particular after stimulation with root exudate extracts. Immunolocalisation experiments revealed an accumulation of CDC42 in the apical tips of the growing hyphae. When a constitutively active Tbcdc42 mutant was expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, morphological changes typical of pseudohyphal growth were observed. Our results suggest a fundamental role of CDC42 in cell polarity development in T. borchii. PMID:17762910

  20. Isolation and Characterization of Effector-Loop Mutants of CDC42 in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Gladfelter, Amy S.; Moskow, John J.; Zyla, Trevin R.; Lew, Daniel J.

    2001-01-01

    The highly conserved small GTPase Cdc42p is a key regulator of cell polarity and cytoskeletal organization in eukaryotic cells. Multiple effectors of Cdc42p have been identified, although it is unclear how their activities are coordinated to produce particular cell behaviors. One strategy used to address the contributions made by different effector pathways downstream of small GTPases has been the use of “effector-loop” mutants of the GTPase that selectively impair only a subset of effector pathways. We now report the generation and preliminary characterization of a set of effector-loop mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae CDC42. These mutants define genetically separable pathways influencing actin or septin organization. We have characterized the phenotypic defects of these mutants and the binding defects of the encoded proteins to known yeast Cdc42p effectors in vitro. The results suggest that these effectors cannot account for the observed phenotypes, and therefore that unknown effectors exist that affect both actin and septin organization. The availability of partial function alleles of CDC42 in a genetically tractable system serves as a useful starting point for genetic approaches to identify such novel effectors. PMID:11359919

  1. Isolation and characterization of effector-loop mutants of CDC42 in yeast.

    PubMed

    Gladfelter, A S; Moskow, J J; Zyla, T R; Lew, D J

    2001-05-01

    The highly conserved small GTPase Cdc42p is a key regulator of cell polarity and cytoskeletal organization in eukaryotic cells. Multiple effectors of Cdc42p have been identified, although it is unclear how their activities are coordinated to produce particular cell behaviors. One strategy used to address the contributions made by different effector pathways downstream of small GTPases has been the use of "effector-loop" mutants of the GTPase that selectively impair only a subset of effector pathways. We now report the generation and preliminary characterization of a set of effector-loop mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae CDC42. These mutants define genetically separable pathways influencing actin or septin organization. We have characterized the phenotypic defects of these mutants and the binding defects of the encoded proteins to known yeast Cdc42p effectors in vitro. The results suggest that these effectors cannot account for the observed phenotypes, and therefore that unknown effectors exist that affect both actin and septin organization. The availability of partial function alleles of CDC42 in a genetically tractable system serves as a useful starting point for genetic approaches to identify such novel effectors. PMID:11359919

  2. Yeast Cdc42 functions at a late step in exocytosis, specifically during polarized growth of the emerging bud

    PubMed Central

    Adamo, Joan E.; Moskow, John J.; Gladfelter, Amy S.; Viterbo, Domenic; Lew, Daniel J.; Brennwald, Patrick J.

    2001-01-01

    The Rho family GTPase Cdc42 is a key regulator of cell polarity and cytoskeletal organization in eukaryotic cells. In yeast, the role of Cdc42 in polarization of cell growth includes polarization of the actin cytoskeleton, which delivers secretory vesicles to growth sites at the plasma membrane. We now describe a novel temperature-sensitive mutant, cdc42-6, that reveals a role for Cdc42 in docking and fusion of secretory vesicles that is independent of its role in actin polarization. cdc42-6 mutants can polarize actin and deliver secretory vesicles to the bud, but fail to fuse those vesicles with the plasma membrane. This defect is manifested only during the early stages of bud formation when growth is most highly polarized, and appears to reflect a requirement for Cdc42 to maintain maximally active exocytic machinery at sites of high vesicle throughput. Extensive genetic interactions between cdc42-6 and mutations in exocytic components support this hypothesis, and indicate a functional overlap with Rho3, which also regulates both actin organization and exocytosis. Localization data suggest that the defect in cdc42-6 cells is not at the level of the localization of the exocytic apparatus. Rather, we suggest that Cdc42 acts as an allosteric regulator of the vesicle docking and fusion apparatus to provide maximal function at sites of polarized growth. PMID:11706050

  3. Yeast Cdc42 functions at a late step in exocytosis, specifically during polarized growth of the emerging bud.

    PubMed

    Adamo, J E; Moskow, J J; Gladfelter, A S; Viterbo, D; Lew, D J; Brennwald, P J

    2001-11-12

    The Rho family GTPase Cdc42 is a key regulator of cell polarity and cytoskeletal organization in eukaryotic cells. In yeast, the role of Cdc42 in polarization of cell growth includes polarization of the actin cytoskeleton, which delivers secretory vesicles to growth sites at the plasma membrane. We now describe a novel temperature-sensitive mutant, cdc42-6, that reveals a role for Cdc42 in docking and fusion of secretory vesicles that is independent of its role in actin polarization. cdc42-6 mutants can polarize actin and deliver secretory vesicles to the bud, but fail to fuse those vesicles with the plasma membrane. This defect is manifested only during the early stages of bud formation when growth is most highly polarized, and appears to reflect a requirement for Cdc42 to maintain maximally active exocytic machinery at sites of high vesicle throughput. Extensive genetic interactions between cdc42-6 and mutations in exocytic components support this hypothesis, and indicate a functional overlap with Rho3, which also regulates both actin organization and exocytosis. Localization data suggest that the defect in cdc42-6 cells is not at the level of the localization of the exocytic apparatus. Rather, we suggest that Cdc42 acts as an allosteric regulator of the vesicle docking and fusion apparatus to provide maximal function at sites of polarized growth. PMID:11706050

  4. Pheromone signalling in Saccharomyces cerevisiae requires the small GTP-binding protein Cdc42p and its activator CDC24.

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Z S; Leung, T; Manser, E; Lim, L

    1995-01-01

    Pheromone signalling in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is mediated by the STE4-STE18 G-protein beta gamma subunits. A possible target for the subunits is Ste20p, whose structural homolog, the serine/threonine kinase PAK, is activated by GTP-binding p21s Cdc42 and Rac1. The putative Cdc42p-binding domain of Ste20p, expressed as a fusion protein, binds human and yeast GTP-binding Cdc42p. Cdc42p is required for alpha-factor-induced activation of FUS1.cdc24ts strains defective for Cdc42p GDP/GTP exchange show no pheromone induction at restrictive temperatures but are partially rescued by overexpression of Cdc42p, which is potentiated by Cdc42p12V mutants. Epistatic analysis indicates that CDC24 and CDC42 lie between STE4 and STE20 in the pathway. The two-hybrid system revealed that Ste4p interacts with Cdc24p. We propose that Cdc42p plays a pivotal role both in polarization of the cytoskeleton and in pheromone signalling. PMID:7565673

  5. Investigation of the Interaction between Cdc42 and Its Effector TOCA1: HANDOVER OF Cdc42 TO THE ACTIN REGULATOR N-WASP IS FACILITATED BY DIFFERENTIAL BINDING AFFINITIES.

    PubMed

    Watson, Joanna R; Fox, Helen M; Nietlispach, Daniel; Gallop, Jennifer L; Owen, Darerca; Mott, Helen R

    2016-06-24

    Transducer of Cdc42-dependent actin assembly protein 1 (TOCA1) is an effector of the Rho family small G protein Cdc42. It contains a membrane-deforming F-BAR domain as well as a Src homology 3 (SH3) domain and a G protein-binding homology region 1 (HR1) domain. TOCA1 binding to Cdc42 leads to actin rearrangements, which are thought to be involved in processes such as endocytosis, filopodia formation, and cell migration. We have solved the structure of the HR1 domain of TOCA1, providing the first structural data for this protein. We have found that the TOCA1 HR1, like the closely related CIP4 HR1, has interesting structural features that are not observed in other HR1 domains. We have also investigated the binding of the TOCA HR1 domain to Cdc42 and the potential ternary complex between Cdc42 and the G protein-binding regions of TOCA1 and a member of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein family, N-WASP. TOCA1 binds Cdc42 with micromolar affinity, in contrast to the nanomolar affinity of the N-WASP G protein-binding region for Cdc42. NMR experiments show that the Cdc42-binding domain from N-WASP is able to displace TOCA1 HR1 from Cdc42, whereas the N-WASP domain but not the TOCA1 HR1 domain inhibits actin polymerization. This suggests that TOCA1 binding to Cdc42 is an early step in the Cdc42-dependent pathways that govern actin dynamics, and the differential binding affinities of the effectors facilitate a handover from TOCA1 to N-WASP, which can then drive recruitment of the actin-modifying machinery. PMID:27129201

  6. Dynamics of Cdc42 network embodies a Turing-type mechanism of yeast cell polarity.

    PubMed

    Goryachev, Andrew B; Pokhilko, Alexandra V

    2008-04-30

    Complex biochemical networks can be understood by identifying their principal regulatory motifs and mode of action. We model the early phase of budding yeast cellular polarization and show that the biochemical processes in the presumptive bud site comprise a Turing-type mechanism. The roles of the prototypical activator and substrate are played by GTPase Cdc42 in its active and inactive states, respectively. We demonstrate that the nucleotide cycling of Cdc42 converts cellular energy into a stable cluster of activated Cdc42. This energy drives a continuous membrane-cytoplasmic exchange of the cluster components to counteract diffusive spread of the cluster. This exchange explains why only one bud forms per cell cycle, because the winner-takes-all competition of candidate sites inevitably selects a single site. PMID:18381072

  7. A Rac/Cdc42 exchange factor complex promotes formation of lateral filopodia and blood vessel lumen morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Sabu; Scarcia, Margherita; Bagshaw, Richard D.; McMahon, Kathryn; Grant, Gary; Harvey, Tracey; Yeo, Maggie; Esteves, Filomena O.G.; Thygesen, Helene H.; Jones, Pamela F.; Speirs, Valerie; Hanby, Andrew M.; Selby, Peter J.; Lorger, Mihaela; Dear, T. Neil; Pawson, Tony; Marshall, Christopher J.; Mavria, Georgia

    2015-01-01

    During angiogenesis, Rho-GTPases influence endothelial cell migration and cell–cell adhesion; however it is not known whether they control formation of vessel lumens, which are essential for blood flow. Here, using an organotypic system that recapitulates distinct stages of VEGF-dependent angiogenesis, we show that lumen formation requires early cytoskeletal remodelling and lateral cell–cell contacts, mediated through the RAC1 guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) DOCK4 (dedicator of cytokinesis 4). DOCK4 signalling is necessary for lateral filopodial protrusions and tubule remodelling prior to lumen formation, whereas proximal, tip filopodia persist in the absence of DOCK4. VEGF-dependent Rac activation via DOCK4 is necessary for CDC42 activation to signal filopodia formation and depends on the activation of RHOG through the RHOG GEF, SGEF. VEGF promotes interaction of DOCK4 with the CDC42 GEF DOCK9. These studies identify a novel Rho-family GTPase activation cascade for the formation of endothelial cell filopodial protrusions necessary for tubule remodelling, thereby influencing subsequent stages of lumen morphogenesis. PMID:26129894

  8. Regulation of hematopoietic stem cell aging by the small RhoGTPase Cdc42

    PubMed Central

    Geiger, Hartmut; Zheng, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Summary Aging of stem cells might be the underlying cause of tissue aging in tissue that in the adult heavily rely on stem cell activity, like the blood forming system. Hematopoiesis, the generation of blood forming cells, is sustained by hematopoietic stem cells. In this review article, we introduce the canonical set of phenotypes associated with aged HSCs, focus on the novel aging-associated phenotype apolarity caused by elevated activity of the small RhoGTPase in aged HSCs, disuccs the role of Cdc42 in hematopoiesis and describe that pharmacological inhibition of Cdc42 activity in aged HSCs results in functionally young and thus rejuvenated HSCs. PMID:25220425

  9. Novel Coronin7 interactions with Cdc42 and N-WASP regulate actin organization and Golgi morphology.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Kurchi; Swaminathan, Karthic; Peche, Vivek S; Clemen, Christoph S; Knyphausen, Philipp; Lammers, Michael; Noegel, Angelika A; Rastetter, Raphael H

    2016-01-01

    The contribution of the actin cytoskeleton to the unique architecture of the Golgi complex is manifold. An important player in this process is Coronin7 (CRN7), a Golgi-resident protein that stabilizes F-actin assembly at the trans-Golgi network (TGN) thereby facilitating anterograde trafficking. Here, we establish that CRN7-mediated association of F-actin with the Golgi apparatus is distinctly modulated via the small Rho GTPase Cdc42 and N-WASP. We identify N-WASP as a novel interaction partner of CRN7 and demonstrate that CRN7 restricts spurious F-actin reorganizations by repressing N-WASP 'hyperactivity' upon constitutive Cdc42 activation. Loss of CRN7 leads to increased cellular F-actin content and causes a concomitant disruption of the Golgi structure. CRN7 harbours a Cdc42- and Rac-interactive binding (CRIB) motif in its tandem β-propellers and binds selectively to GDP-bound Cdc42N17 mutant. We speculate that CRN7 can act as a cofactor for active Cdc42 generation. Mutation of CRIB motif residues that abrogate Cdc42 binding to CRN7 also fail to rescue the cellular defects in fibroblasts derived from CRN7 KO mice. Cdc42N17 overexpression partially rescued the KO phenotypes whereas N-WASP overexpression failed to do so. We conclude that CRN7 spatiotemporally influences F-actin organization and Golgi integrity in a Cdc42- and N-WASP-dependent manner. PMID:27143109

  10. Novel Coronin7 interactions with Cdc42 and N-WASP regulate actin organization and Golgi morphology

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Kurchi; Swaminathan, Karthic; Peche, Vivek S.; Clemen, Christoph S.; Knyphausen, Philipp; Lammers, Michael; Noegel, Angelika A.; Rastetter, Raphael H.

    2016-01-01

    The contribution of the actin cytoskeleton to the unique architecture of the Golgi complex is manifold. An important player in this process is Coronin7 (CRN7), a Golgi-resident protein that stabilizes F-actin assembly at the trans-Golgi network (TGN) thereby facilitating anterograde trafficking. Here, we establish that CRN7-mediated association of F-actin with the Golgi apparatus is distinctly modulated via the small Rho GTPase Cdc42 and N-WASP. We identify N-WASP as a novel interaction partner of CRN7 and demonstrate that CRN7 restricts spurious F-actin reorganizations by repressing N-WASP ‘hyperactivity’ upon constitutive Cdc42 activation. Loss of CRN7 leads to increased cellular F-actin content and causes a concomitant disruption of the Golgi structure. CRN7 harbours a Cdc42- and Rac-interactive binding (CRIB) motif in its tandem β-propellers and binds selectively to GDP-bound Cdc42N17 mutant. We speculate that CRN7 can act as a cofactor for active Cdc42 generation. Mutation of CRIB motif residues that abrogate Cdc42 binding to CRN7 also fail to rescue the cellular defects in fibroblasts derived from CRN7 KO mice. Cdc42N17 overexpression partially rescued the KO phenotypes whereas N-WASP overexpression failed to do so. We conclude that CRN7 spatiotemporally influences F-actin organization and Golgi integrity in a Cdc42- and N-WASP-dependent manner. PMID:27143109

  11. Cdc42-Dependent Forgetting Regulates Repetition Effect in Prolonging Memory Retention.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuchen; Li, Qian; Wang, Lianzhang; Liu, Zhong-Jian; Zhong, Yi

    2016-07-19

    Repeated learning is used daily and is a powerful way to improve memory. A fundamental question is how multiple learning trials add up to improve memory. While the major studies so far of such a repetition effect have emphasized the strengthening of memory formation, the current study reveals a molecular mechanism through suppression of forgetting. We find that single-session training leads to formation of anesthesia-resistant memory (ARM) and then activation of the small G protein Cdc42 to cause decay or forgetting of ARM within 24 hr. Repetition suppresses the activation of Cdc42-dependent forgetting, instead of enhancing ARM formation, leading to prolonged ARM. Consistently, inhibition of Cdc42 activity through genetic manipulation mimicked the repetition effect, while repetition-induced ARM improvement was abolished by elevated Cdc42 activity. Thus, only the first session in repetitive training contributes to ARM formation, while the subsequent sessions are devoted not to acquiring information but to inhibiting forgetting. PMID:27396329

  12. The Cdc42-selective GAP Rich regulates postsynaptic development and retrograde BMP transsynaptic signaling

    PubMed Central

    Nahm, Minyeop; Long, A. Ashleigh; Paik, Sang Kyoo; Kim, Sungdae; Bae, Yong Chul

    2010-01-01

    Retrograde bone morphogenetic protein signaling mediated by the Glass bottom boat (Gbb) ligand modulates structural and functional synaptogenesis at the Drosophila melanogaster neuromuscular junction. However, the molecular mechanisms regulating postsynaptic Gbb release are poorly understood. In this study, we show that Drosophila Rich (dRich), a conserved Cdc42-selective guanosine triphosphatase–activating protein (GAP), inhibits the Cdc42–Wsp pathway to stimulate postsynaptic Gbb release. Loss of dRich causes synaptic undergrowth and strongly impairs neurotransmitter release. These presynaptic defects are rescued by targeted postsynaptic expression of wild-type dRich but not a GAP-deficient mutant. dRich inhibits the postsynaptic localization of the Cdc42 effector Wsp (Drosophila orthologue of mammalian Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein, WASp), and manifestation of synaptogenesis defects in drich mutants requires Wsp signaling. In addition, dRich regulates postsynaptic organization independently of Cdc42. Importantly, dRich increases Gbb release and elevates presynaptic phosphorylated Mad levels. We propose that dRich coordinates the Gbb-dependent modulation of synaptic growth and function with postsynaptic development. PMID:21041451

  13. Cdc42 Regulation of Kinase Activity and Signaling by the Yeast p21-Activated Kinase Ste20

    PubMed Central

    Lamson, Rachel E.; Winters, Matthew J.; Pryciak, Peter M.

    2002-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae kinase Ste20 is a member of the p21-activated kinase (PAK) family with several functions, including pheromone-responsive signal transduction. While PAKs are usually activated by small G proteins and Ste20 binds Cdc42, the role of Cdc42-Ste20 binding has been controversial, largely because Ste20 lacking its entire Cdc42-binding (CRIB) domain retains kinase activity and pheromone response. Here we show that, unlike CRIB deletion, point mutations in the Ste20 CRIB domain that disrupt Cdc42 binding also disrupt pheromone signaling. We also found that Ste20 kinase activity is stimulated by GTP-bound Cdc42 in vivo and this effect is blocked by the CRIB point mutations. Moreover, the Ste20 CRIB and kinase domains bind each other, and mutations that disrupt this interaction cause hyperactive kinase activity and bypass the requirement for Cdc42 binding. These observations demonstrate that the Ste20 CRIB domain is autoinhibitory and that this negative effect is antagonized by Cdc42 to promote Ste20 kinase activity and signaling. Parallel results were observed for filamentation pathway signaling, suggesting that the requirement for Cdc42-Ste20 interaction is not qualitatively different between the mating and filamentation pathways. While necessary for pheromone signaling, the role of the Cdc42-Ste20 interaction does not require regulation by pheromone or the pheromone-activated Gβγ complex, because the CRIB point mutations also disrupt signaling by activated forms of the kinase cascade scaffold protein Ste5. In total, our observations indicate that Cdc42 converts Ste20 to an active form, while pathway stimuli regulate the ability of this active Ste20 to trigger signaling through a particular pathway. PMID:11940652

  14. Suppression of Chemotaxis by SSeCKS via Scaffolding of Phosphoinositol Phosphates and the Recruitment of the Cdc42 GEF, Frabin, to the Leading Edge

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Hyun-Kyung; Guo, Li-wu; Su, Bing; Gao, Lingqiu; Gelman, Irwin H.

    2014-01-01

    Chemotaxis is controlled by interactions between receptors, Rho-family GTPases, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases, and cytoskeleton remodeling proteins. We investigated how the metastasis suppressor, SSeCKS, attenuates chemotaxis. Chemotaxis activity inversely correlated with SSeCKS levels in mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEF), DU145 and MDA-MB-231 cancer cells. SSeCKS loss induced chemotactic velocity and linear directionality, correlating with replacement of leading edge lamellipodia with fascin-enriched filopodia-like extensions, the formation of thickened longitudinal F-actin stress fibers reaching to filopodial tips, relative enrichments at the leading edge of phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)P3 (PIP3), Akt, PKC-ζ, Cdc42-GTP and active Src (SrcpoY416), and a loss of Rac1. Leading edge lamellipodia and chemotaxis inhibition in SSeCKS-null MEF could be restored by full-length SSeCKS or SSeCKS deleted of its Src-binding domain (ΔSrc), but not by SSeCKS deleted of its three MARCKS (myristylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate) polybasic domains (ΔPBD), which bind PIP2 and PIP3. The enrichment of activated Cdc42 in SSeCKS-null leading edge filopodia correlated with recruitment of the Cdc42-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor, Frabin, likely recruited via multiple PIP2/3-binding domains. Frabin knockdown in SSeCKS-null MEF restores leading edge lamellipodia and chemotaxis inhibition. However, SSeCKS failed to co-immunoprecipitate with Rac1, Cdc42 or Frabin. Consistent with the notion that chemotaxis is controlled by SSeCKS-PIP (vs. -Src) scaffolding activity, constitutively-active phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase could override the ability of the Src inhibitor, SKI-606, to suppress chemotaxis and filopodial enrichment of Frabin in SSeCKS-null MEF. Our data suggest a role for SSeCKS in controlling Rac1 vs. Cdc42-induced cellular dynamics at the leading chemotactic edge through the scaffolding of phospholipids and signal mediators, and through the reorganization of the

  15. CLN3 deficient cells display defects in the ARF1-Cdc42 pathway and actin-dependent events.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Mark L; Tecedor, Luis; Stein, Colleen S; Stamnes, Mark A; Davidson, Beverly L

    2014-01-01

    Juvenile Batten disease (juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis, JNCL) is a devastating neurodegenerative disease caused by mutations in CLN3, a protein of undefined function. Cell lines derived from patients or mice with CLN3 deficiency have impairments in actin-regulated processes such as endocytosis, autophagy, vesicular trafficking, and cell migration. Here we demonstrate the small GTPase Cdc42 is misregulated in the absence of CLN3, and thus may be a common link to multiple cellular defects. We discover that active Cdc42 (Cdc42-GTP) is elevated in endothelial cells from CLN3 deficient mouse brain, and correlates with enhanced PAK-1 phosphorylation, LIMK membrane recruitment, and altered actin-driven events. We also demonstrate dramatically reduced plasma membrane recruitment of the Cdc42 GTPase activating protein, ARHGAP21. In line with this, GTP-loaded ARF1, an effector of ARHGAP21 recruitment, is depressed. Together these data implicate misregulated ARF1-Cdc42 signaling as a central defect in JNCL cells, which in-turn impairs various cell functions. Furthermore our findings support concerted action of ARF1, ARHGAP21, and Cdc42 to regulate fluid phase endocytosis in mammalian cells. The ARF1-Cdc42 pathway presents a promising new avenue for JNCL therapeutic development. PMID:24792215

  16. The Rho GTPase Cdc42 regulates hair cell planar polarity and cellular patterning in the developing cochlea

    PubMed Central

    Kirjavainen, Anna; Laos, Maarja; Anttonen, Tommi; Pirvola, Ulla

    2015-01-01

    Hair cells of the organ of Corti (OC) of the cochlea exhibit distinct planar polarity, both at the tissue and cellular level. Planar polarity at tissue level is manifested as uniform orientation of the hair cell stereociliary bundles. Hair cell intrinsic polarity is defined as structural hair bundle asymmetry; positioning of the kinocilium/basal body complex at the vertex of the V-shaped bundle. Consistent with strong apical polarity, the hair cell apex displays prominent actin and microtubule cytoskeletons. The Rho GTPase Cdc42 regulates cytoskeletal dynamics and polarization of various cell types, and, thus, serves as a candidate regulator of hair cell polarity. We have here induced Cdc42 inactivation in the late-embryonic OC. We show the role of Cdc42 in the establishment of planar polarity of hair cells and in cellular patterning. Abnormal planar polarity was displayed as disturbances in hair bundle orientation and morphology and in kinocilium/basal body positioning. These defects were accompanied by a disorganized cell-surface microtubule network. Atypical protein kinase C (aPKC), a putative Cdc42 effector, colocalized with Cdc42 at the hair cell apex, and aPKC expression was altered upon Cdc42 depletion. Our data suggest that Cdc42 together with aPKC is part of the machinery establishing hair cell planar polarity and that Cdc42 acts on polarity through the cell-surface microtubule network. The data also suggest that defects in apical polarization are influenced by disturbed cellular patterning in the OC. In addition, our data demonstrates that Cdc42 is required for stereociliogenesis in the immature cochlea. PMID:25770185

  17. Polarization of Diploid Daughter Cells Directed by Spatial Cues and GTP Hydrolysis of Cdc42 in Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Narayan, Monisha; Chou, Ching-Shan; Park, Hay-Oak

    2013-01-01

    Cell polarization occurs along a single axis that is generally determined by a spatial cue. Cells of the budding yeast exhibit a characteristic pattern of budding, which depends on cell-type-specific cortical markers, reflecting a genetic programming for the site of cell polarization. The Cdc42 GTPase plays a key role in cell polarization in various cell types. Although previous studies in budding yeast suggested positive feedback loops whereby Cdc42 becomes polarized, these mechanisms do not include spatial cues, neglecting the normal patterns of budding. Here we combine live-cell imaging and mathematical modeling to understand how diploid daughter cells establish polarity preferentially at the pole distal to the previous division site. Live-cell imaging shows that daughter cells of diploids exhibit dynamic polarization of Cdc42-GTP, which localizes to the bud tip until the M phase, to the division site at cytokinesis, and then to the distal pole in the next G1 phase. The strong bias toward distal budding of daughter cells requires the distal-pole tag Bud8 and Rga1, a GTPase activating protein for Cdc42, which inhibits budding at the cytokinesis site. Unexpectedly, we also find that over 50% of daughter cells lacking Rga1 exhibit persistent Cdc42-GTP polarization at the bud tip and the distal pole, revealing an additional role of Rga1 in spatiotemporal regulation of Cdc42 and thus in the pattern of polarized growth. Mathematical modeling indeed reveals robust Cdc42-GTP clustering at the distal pole in diploid daughter cells despite random perturbation of the landmark cues. Moreover, modeling predicts different dynamics of Cdc42-GTP polarization when the landmark level and the initial level of Cdc42-GTP at the division site are perturbed by noise added in the model. PMID:23437206

  18. Prominin-2 expression increases protrusions, decreases caveolae and inhibits Cdc42 dependent fluid phase endocytosis

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Raman Deep Schroeder, Andreas S.; Scheffer, Luana; Holicky, Eileen L.; Wheatley, Christine L.; Marks, David L. Pagano, Richard E.

    2013-05-10

    Highlights: •Prominin-2 expression induced protrusions that co-localized with lipid raft markers. •Prominin-2 expression decreased caveolae, caveolar endocytosis and increased pCav1. •Prominin-2 expression inhibited fluid phase endocytosis by inactivation of Cdc42. •These endocytic effects can be reversed by adding exogenous cholesterol. •Caveolin1 knockdown restored fluid phase endocytosis in Prominin2 expressing cells. -- Abstract: Background: Membrane protrusions play important roles in biological processes such as cell adhesion, wound healing, migration, and sensing of the external environment. Cell protrusions are a subtype of membrane microdomains composed of cholesterol and sphingolipids, and can be disrupted by cholesterol depletion. Prominins are pentaspan membrane proteins that bind cholesterol and localize to plasma membrane (PM) protrusions. Prominin-1 is of great interest as a marker for stem and cancer cells, while Prominin-2 (Prom2) is reportedly restricted to epithelial cells. Aim: To characterize the effects of Prom-2 expression on PM microdomain organization. Methods: Prom2-fluorescent protein was transfected in human skin fibroblasts (HSF) and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells for PM raft and endocytic studies. Caveolae at PM were visualized using transmission electron microscopy. Cdc42 activation was measured and caveolin-1 knockdown was performed using siRNAs. Results: Prom2 expression in HSF and CHO cells caused extensive Prom2-positive protrusions that co-localized with lipid raft markers. Prom2 expression significantly decreased caveolae at the PM, reduced caveolar endocytosis and increased caveolin-1 phosphorylation. Prom2 expression also inhibited Cdc42-dependent fluid phase endocytosis via decreased Cdc42 activation. Effects on endocytosis were reversed by addition of cholesterol. Knockdown of caveolin-1 by siRNA restored Cdc42 dependent fluid phase endocytosis in Prom2-expressing cells. Conclusions: Prom2 protrusions primarily

  19. Cdc42 and PI(4,5)P2-induced actin assembly in Xenopus egg extracts.

    PubMed

    Lebensohn, Andres M; Ma, Le; Ho, Hsin-Yi Henry; Kirschner, Marc W

    2006-01-01

    Xenopus egg cytoplasmic extracts have been used to study a variety of complex cellular processes. Given their amenability to biochemical manipulation and physiological balance of regulatory proteins, these extracts are an ideal system to dissect signal transduction pathways leading to actin assembly. We have developed methods to study Cdc42 and PI(4,5)P2-induced actin assembly in Xenopus egg extracts. In this chapter, we describe detailed procedures to prepare Xenopus egg extracts, Cdc42, and PI(4,5)P2 for use in actin assembly experiments. We also describe a fluorometric pyrene actin assay for quantitative kinetic analysis of actin polymerization and a microscopic rhodamine actin assay for quick measurement of actin rearrangements in extracts. Finally we provide a protocol for immunodepletion of proteins and discuss the use of immunodepletion and rescue experiments for functional analysis of components in the extracts. PMID:16472657

  20. Cdc42-Dependent Activation of NADPH Oxidase Is Involved in Ethanol-Induced Neuronal Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Ke, Zunji; Chen, Gang; Xu, Mei; Bower, Kimberly A.; Frank, Jacqueline A.; Zhang, Zhuo; Shi, Xianglin; Luo, Jia

    2012-01-01

    It has been suggested that excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress play an important role in ethanol-induced damage to both the developing and mature central nervous system (CNS). The mechanisms underlying ethanol-induced neuronal ROS, however, remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the role of NADPH oxidase (NOX) in ethanol-induced ROS generation. We demonstrated that ethanol activated NOX and inhibition of NOX reduced ethanol-promoted ROS generation. Ethanol significantly increased the expression of p47phox and p67phox, the essential subunits for NOX activation in cultured neuronal cells and the cerebral cortex of infant mice. Ethanol caused serine phosphorylation and membrane translocation of p47phox and p67phox, which were prerequisites for NOX assembly and activation. Knocking down p47phox with the small interfering RNA was sufficient to attenuate ethanol-induced ROS production and ameliorate ethanol-mediated oxidative damage, which is indicated by a decrease in protein oxidation and lipid peroxidation. Ethanol activated cell division cycle 42 (Cdc42) and overexpression of a dominant negative (DN) Cdc42 abrogate ethanol-induced NOX activation and ROS generation. These results suggest that Cdc42-dependent NOX activation mediates ethanol-induced oxidative damages to neurons. PMID:22662267

  1. P-cadherin promotes collective cell migration via a Cdc42-mediated increase in mechanical forces.

    PubMed

    Plutoni, Cédric; Bazellieres, Elsa; Le Borgne-Rochet, Maïlys; Comunale, Franck; Brugues, Agusti; Séveno, Martial; Planchon, Damien; Thuault, Sylvie; Morin, Nathalie; Bodin, Stéphane; Trepat, Xavier; Gauthier-Rouvière, Cécile

    2016-01-18

    Collective cell migration (CCM) is essential for organism development, wound healing, and metastatic transition, the primary cause of cancer-related death, and it involves cell-cell adhesion molecules of the cadherin family. Increased P-cadherin expression levels are correlated with tumor aggressiveness in carcinoma and aggressive sarcoma; however, how P-cadherin promotes tumor malignancy remains unknown. Here, using integrated cell biology and biophysical approaches, we determined that P-cadherin specifically induces polarization and CCM through an increase in the strength and anisotropy of mechanical forces. We show that this mechanical regulation is mediated by the P-cadherin/β-PIX/Cdc42 axis; P-cadherin specifically activates Cdc42 through β-PIX, which is specifically recruited at cell-cell contacts upon CCM. This mechanism of cell polarization and migration is absent in cells expressing E- or R-cadherin. Thus, we identify a specific role of P-cadherin through β-PIX-mediated Cdc42 activation in the regulation of cell polarity and force anisotropy that drives CCM. PMID:26783302

  2. FMNL2 drives actin-based protrusion and migration downstream of Cdc42.

    PubMed

    Block, Jennifer; Breitsprecher, Dennis; Kühn, Sonja; Winterhoff, Moritz; Kage, Frieda; Geffers, Robert; Duwe, Patrick; Rohn, Jennifer L; Baum, Buzz; Brakebusch, Cord; Geyer, Matthias; Stradal, Theresia E B; Faix, Jan; Rottner, Klemens

    2012-06-01

    Cell migration entails protrusion of lamellipodia, densely packed networks of actin filaments at the cell front. Filaments are generated by nucleation, likely mediated by Arp2/3 complex and its activator Scar/WAVE. It is unclear whether formins contribute to lamellipodial actin filament nucleation or serve as elongators of filaments nucleated by Arp2/3 complex. Here we show that the Diaphanous-related formin FMNL2, also known as FRL3 or FHOD2, accumulates at lamellipodia and filopodia tips. FMNL2 is cotranslationally modified by myristoylation and regulated by interaction with the Rho-guanosine triphosphatase Cdc42. Abolition of myristoylation or Cdc42 binding interferes with proper FMNL2 activation, constituting an essential prerequisite for subcellular targeting. In vitro, C-terminal FMNL2 drives elongation rather than nucleation of actin filaments in the presence of profilin. In addition, filament ends generated by Arp2/3-mediated branching are captured and efficiently elongated by the formin. Consistent with these biochemical properties, RNAi-mediated silencing of FMNL2 expression decreases the rate of lamellipodia protrusion and, accordingly, the efficiency of cell migration. Our data establish that the FMNL subfamily member FMNL2 is a novel elongation factor of actin filaments that constitutes the first Cdc42 effector promoting cell migration and actin polymerization at the tips of lamellipodia. PMID:22608513

  3. P-cadherin promotes collective cell migration via a Cdc42-mediated increase in mechanical forces

    PubMed Central

    Plutoni, Cédric; Bazellieres, Elsa; Le Borgne-Rochet, Maïlys; Comunale, Franck; Brugues, Agusti; Séveno, Martial; Planchon, Damien; Thuault, Sylvie; Morin, Nathalie; Bodin, Stéphane; Trepat, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Collective cell migration (CCM) is essential for organism development, wound healing, and metastatic transition, the primary cause of cancer-related death, and it involves cell–cell adhesion molecules of the cadherin family. Increased P-cadherin expression levels are correlated with tumor aggressiveness in carcinoma and aggressive sarcoma; however, how P-cadherin promotes tumor malignancy remains unknown. Here, using integrated cell biology and biophysical approaches, we determined that P-cadherin specifically induces polarization and CCM through an increase in the strength and anisotropy of mechanical forces. We show that this mechanical regulation is mediated by the P-cadherin/β-PIX/Cdc42 axis; P-cadherin specifically activates Cdc42 through β-PIX, which is specifically recruited at cell–cell contacts upon CCM. This mechanism of cell polarization and migration is absent in cells expressing E- or R-cadherin. Thus, we identify a specific role of P-cadherin through β-PIX–mediated Cdc42 activation in the regulation of cell polarity and force anisotropy that drives CCM. PMID:26783302

  4. A Cdc42- and Rac-interactive binding (CRIB) domain mediates functions of coronin.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, Karthic; Müller-Taubenberger, Annette; Faix, Jan; Rivero, Francisco; Noegel, Angelika A

    2014-01-01

    The Cdc42- and Rac-interactive binding motif (CRIB) of coronin binds to Rho GTPases with a preference for GDP-loaded Rac. Mutation of the Cdc42- and Rac-interactive binding motif abrogates Rac binding. This results in increased 1evels of activated Rac in coronin-deficient Dictyostelium cells (corA(-)), which impacts myosin II assembly. corA(-) cells show increased accumulation of myosin II in the cortex of growth-phase cells. Myosin II assembly is regulated by myosin heavy chain kinase-mediated phosphorylation of its tail. Kinase activity depends on the activation state of the p21-activated kinase a. The myosin II defect of corA(-) mutant is alleviated by dominant-negative p21-activated kinase a. It is rescued by wild-type coronin, whereas coronin carrying a mutated Cdc42- and Rac-interactive binding motif failed to rescue the myosin defect in corA(-) mutant cells. Ectopically expressed myosin heavy chain kinases affinity purified from corA(-) cells show reduced kinase activity. We propose that coronin through its affinity for GDP-Rac regulates the availability of GTP-Rac for activation of downstream effectors. PMID:24347642

  5. Cdc42 is a key regulator of B cell differentiation and is required for antiviral humoral immunity

    PubMed Central

    Burbage, Marianne; Keppler, Selina J.; Gasparrini, Francesca; Martínez-Martín, Nuria; Gaya, Mauro; Feest, Christoph; Domart, Marie-Charlotte; Brakebusch, Cord; Collinson, Lucy; Bruckbauer, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The small Rho GTPase Cdc42, known to interact with Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome (WAS) protein, is an important regulator of actin remodeling. Here, we show that genetic ablation of Cdc42 exclusively in the B cell lineage is sufficient to render mice unable to mount antibody responses. Indeed Cdc42-deficient mice are incapable of forming germinal centers or generating plasma B cells upon either viral infection or immunization. Such severe immune deficiency is caused by multiple and profound B cell abnormalities, including early blocks during B cell development; impaired antigen-driven BCR signaling and actin remodeling; defective antigen presentation and in vivo interaction with T cells; and a severe B cell–intrinsic block in plasma cell differentiation. Thus, our study presents a new perspective on Cdc42 as key regulator of B cell physiology. PMID:25547673

  6. Dynamic and thermodynamic response of the Ras protein Cdc42Hs upon association with the effector domain of PAK3.

    PubMed

    Moorman, Veronica R; Valentine, Kathleen G; Bédard, Sabrina; Kasinath, Vignesh; Dogan, Jakob; Love, Fiona M; Wand, A Joshua

    2014-10-23

    Human cell division cycle protein 42 (Cdc42Hs) is a small, Rho-type guanosine triphosphatase involved in multiple cellular processes through its interactions with downstream effectors. The binding domain of one such effector, the actin cytoskeleton-regulating p21-activated kinase 3, is known as PBD46. Nitrogen-15 backbone and carbon-13 methyl NMR relaxation was measured to investigate the dynamical changes in activated GMPPCP·Cdc42Hs upon PBD46 binding. Changes in internal motion of the Cdc42Hs, as revealed by methyl axis order parameters, were observed not only near the Cdc42Hs-PBD46 interface but also in remote sites on the Cdc42Hs molecule. The binding-induced changes in side-chain dynamics propagate along the long axis of Cdc42Hs away from the site of PBD46 binding with sharp distance dependence. Overall, the binding of the PBD46 effector domain on the dynamics of methyl-bearing side chains of Cdc42Hs results in a modest rigidification, which is estimated to correspond to an unfavorable change in conformational entropy of approximately -10kcalmol(-1) at 298K. A cluster of methyl probes closest to the nucleotide-binding pocket of Cdc42Hs becomes more rigid upon binding of PBD46 and is proposed to slow the catalytic hydrolysis of the γ phosphate moiety. An additional cluster of methyl probes surrounding the guanine ring becomes more flexible on binding of PBD46, presumably facilitating nucleotide exchange mediated by a guanosine exchange factor. In addition, the Rho insert helix, which is located at a site remote from the PBD46 binding interface, shows a significant dynamic response to PBD46 binding. PMID:25109462

  7. Small GTPase CDC-42 promotes apoptotic cell corpse clearance in response to PAT-2 and CED-1 in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Neukomm, L J; Zeng, S; Frei, A P; Huegli, P A; Hengartner, M O

    2014-01-01

    The rapid clearance of dying cells is important for the well-being of multicellular organisms. In C. elegans, cell corpse removal is mainly mediated by three parallel engulfment signaling cascades. These pathways include two small GTPases, MIG-2/RhoG and CED-10/Rac1. Here we present the identification and characterization of CDC-42 as a third GTPase involved in the regulation of cell corpse clearance. Genetic analyses performed by both loss of cdc-42 function and cdc-42 overexpression place cdc-42 in parallel to the ced-2/5/12 signaling module, in parallel to or upstream of the ced-10 module, and downstream of the ced-1/6/7 module. CDC-42 accumulates in engulfing cells at membranes surrounding apoptotic corpses. The formation of such halos depends on the integrins PAT-2/PAT-3, UNC-112 and the GEF protein UIG-1, but not on the canonical ced-1/6/7 or ced-2/5/12 signaling modules. Together, our results suggest that the small GTPase CDC-42 regulates apoptotic cell engulfment possibly upstream of the canonical Rac GTPase CED-10, by polarizing the engulfing cell toward the apoptotic corpse in response to integrin signaling and ced-1/6/7 signaling in C. elegans. PMID:24632947

  8. A New Genetically Encoded Single-Chain Biosensor for Cdc42 Based on FRET, Useful for Live-Cell Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Dianne; Hodgson, Louis

    2014-01-01

    Cdc42 is critical in a myriad of cellular morphogenic processes, requiring precisely regulated activation dynamics to affect specific cellular events. To facilitate direct observations of Cdc42 activation in live cells, we developed and validated a new biosensor of Cdc42 activation. The biosensor is genetically encoded, of single-chain design and capable of correctly localizing to membrane compartments as well as interacting with its upstream regulators including the guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor. We characterized this new biosensor in motile mouse embryonic fibroblasts and observed robust activation dynamics at leading edge protrusions, similar to those previously observed for endogenous Cdc42 using the organic dye-based biosensor system. We then extended our validations and observations of Cdc42 activity to macrophages, and show that this new biosensor is able to detect differential activation patterns during phagocytosis and cytokine stimulation. Furthermore, we observe for the first time, a highly transient and localized activation of Cdc42 during podosome formation in macrophages, which was previously hypothesized but never directly visualized. PMID:24798463

  9. Hydrogen peroxide formation and actin filament reorganization by Cdc42 are essential for ethanol-induced in vitro angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yong; Luo, Jia; Leonard, Stephen S; Harris, Gabriel K; Millecchia, Lyndell; Flynn, Daniel C; Shi, Xianglin

    2003-05-01

    This report focuses on the identification of the molecular mechanisms of ethanol-induced in vitro angiogenesis. The manipulation of angiogenesis is an important therapeutic approach for the treatment of cancer, cardiovascular diseases, and chronic inflammation. Our results showed that ethanol stimulation altered the integrity of actin filaments and increased the formation of lamellipodia and filopodia in SVEC4-10 cells. Further experiments demonstrated that ethanol stimulation increased cell migration and invasion and induced in vitro angiogenesis in SVEC4-10 cells. Mechanistically, ethanol stimulation activated Cdc42 and produced H(2)O(2) a reactive oxygen species intermediate in SVEC4-10 cells. Measuring the time course of Cdc42 activation and H(2)O(2) production upon ethanol stimulation revealed that the Cdc42 activation and the increase of H(2)O(2) lasted more than 3 h, which indicates the mechanisms of the long duration effects of ethanol on the cells. Furthermore, either overexpression of a constitutive dominant negative Cdc42 or inhibition of H(2)O(2) production abrogated the effects of ethanol on SVEC4-10 cells, indicating that both the activation of Cdc42 and the production of H(2)O(2) are essential for the actions of ethanol. Interestingly, we also found that overexpression of a constitutive dominant positive Cdc42 itself was sufficient to produce H(2)O(2) and to induce in vitro angiogenesis. Taken together, our results suggest that ethanol stimulation can induce H(2)O(2) production through the activation of Cdc42, which results in reorganizing actin filaments and increasing cell motility and in vitro angiogenesis. PMID:12598535

  10. Genetic analysis of the interface between Cdc42p and the CRIB domain of Ste20p in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Ash, Josée; Wu, Cunle; Larocque, Robert; Jamal, Maleek; Stevens, Willem; Osborne, Mike; Thomas, David Y; Whiteway, Malcolm

    2003-01-01

    Mutagenesis was used to probe the interface between the small GTPase Cdc42p and the CRIB domain motif of Ste20p. Members of a cluster of hydrophobic residues of Cdc42p were changed to alanine and/or arginine. The interaction of the wild-type and mutant proteins was measured using the two-hybrid assay; many, but not all, changes reduced interaction between Cdc42p and the target CRIB domain. Mutations in conserved residues in the CRIB domain were also tested for their importance in the association with Cdc42p. Two conserved CRIB domain histidines were changed to aspartic acid. These mutants reduced mating, as well as responsiveness to pheromone-induced gene expression and cell cycle arrest, but did not reduce in vitro the kinase activity of Ste20p. GFP-tagged mutant proteins were unable to localize to sites of polarized growth. In addition, these point mutants were synthetically lethal with disruption of CLA4 and blocked the Ste20p-Cdc42p two-hybrid interaction. Compensatory mutations in Cdc42p that reestablished the two-hybrid association with the mutant Ste20p CRIB domain baits were identified. These mutations improved the pheromone responsiveness of cells containing the CRIB mutations, but did not rescue the lethality associated with the CRIB mutant CLA4 deletion interaction. These results suggest that the Ste20p-Cdc42p interaction plays a direct role in Ste20p kinase function and that this interaction is required for efficient activity of the pheromone response pathway. PMID:12586692

  11. Mechanism and rate constants of the Cdc42 GTPase binding with intrinsically disordered effectors.

    PubMed

    Pang, Xiaodong; Zhou, Huan-Xiang

    2016-05-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are often involved in signaling and regulatory functions, through binding to cellular targets. Many IDPs undergo disorder-to-order transitions upon binding. Both the binding mechanisms and the magnitudes of the binding rate constants can have functional importance. Previously we have found that the coupled binding and folding of any IDP generally follows a sequential mechanism that we term dock-and-coalesce, whereby one segment of the IDP first docks to its subsite on the target surface and the remaining segments subsequently coalesce around their respective subsites. Here we applied our TransComp method within the framework of the dock-and-coalesce mechanism to dissect the binding kinetics of two Rho-family GTPases, Cdc42 and TC10, with two intrinsically disordered effectors, WASP and Pak1. TransComp calculations identified the basic regions preceding the GTPase binding domains (GBDs) of the effectors as the docking segment. For Cdc42 binding with both WASP and Pak1, the calculated docking rate constants are close to the observed overall binding rate constants, suggesting that basic-region docking is the rate-limiting step and subsequent conformational coalescence of the GBDs on the Cdc42 surface is fast. The possibility that conformational coalescence of the WASP GBD on the TC10 surface is slow warrants further experimental investigation. The account for the differences in binding rate constants among the three GTPase-effector systems and mutational effects therein yields deep physical and mechanistic insight into the binding processes. Our approach may guide the selection of mutations that lead to redesigned binding pathways. Proteins 2016; 84:674-685. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26879470

  12. Cdc42EP3/BORG2 and Septin Network Enables Mechano-transduction and the Emergence of Cancer-Associated Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Calvo, Fernando; Ranftl, Romana; Hooper, Steven; Farrugia, Aaron J.; Moeendarbary, Emad; Bruckbauer, Andreas; Batista, Facundo; Charras, Guillaume; Sahai, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Summary Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are non-cancerous cells found in solid tumors that remodel the tumor matrix and promote cancer invasion and angiogenesis. Here, we demonstrate that Cdc42EP3/BORG2 is required for the matrix remodeling, invasion, angiogenesis, and tumor-growth-promoting abilities of CAFs. Cdc42EP3 functions by coordinating the actin and septin networks. Furthermore, depletion of SEPT2 has similar effects to those of loss of Cdc42EP3, indicating a role for the septin network in the tumor stroma. Cdc42EP3 is upregulated early in fibroblast activation and precedes the emergence of the highly contractile phenotype characteristic of CAFs. Depletion of Cdc42EP3 in normal fibroblasts prevents their activation by cancer cells. We propose that Cdc42EP3 sensitizes fibroblasts to further cues—in particular, those activating actomyosin contractility—and thereby enables the generation of the pathological activated fibroblast state. PMID:26711338

  13. GIT1 promotes lung cancer cell metastasis through modulating Rac1/Cdc42 activity and is associated with poor prognosis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jeng-Shou; Su, Chia-Yi; Yu, Wen-Hsuan; Lee, Wei-Jiunn; Liu, Yu-Peng; Lai, Tsung-Ching; Jan, Yi-Hua; Yang, Yi-Fang; Shen, Chia-Ning; Shew, Jin-Yuh; Lu, Jean; Yang, Chih-Jen; Huang, Ming-Shyan; Lu, Pei-Jung; Lin, Yuan-Feng; Kuo, Min-Liang; Hua, Kuo-Tai; Hsiao, Michael

    2015-11-01

    G-protein-coupled receptor kinase interacting protein 1 (GIT1) is participated in cell movement activation, which is a fundamental process during tissue development and cancer progression. GIT1/PIX forming a functional protein complex that contributes to Rac1/Cdc42 activation, resulting in increasing cell mobility. Although the importance of Rac1/Cdc42 activation is well documented in cancer aggressiveness, the clinical importance of GIT1 remains largely unknown. Here, we investigated the clinical significance of GIT1 expression in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and also verified the importance of GIT1-Rac1/Cdc42 axis in stimulating NSCLC cell mobility. The result indicated higher GIT1 expression patients had significantly poorer prognoses in disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) compared with lower GIT1 expression patients. Higher GIT1 expression was an independent prognostic factor by multivariate analysis and associated with migration/invasion of NSCLC cells in transwell assay. In vivo studies indicated that GIT1 promotes metastasis of NSCLC cells. Finally, GIT1 was found to stimulate migration/invasion by altering the activity of Rac1/Cdc42 in NSCLC cells. Together, the GIT1 expression is associated with poor prognosis in patients with NSCLC. GIT1 is critical for the invasiveness of NSCLC cells through stimulating the activity of Rac1/Cdc42. PMID:26462147

  14. The structure of FMNL2-Cdc42 yields insights into the mechanism of lamellipodia and filopodia formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühn, Sonja; Erdmann, Constanze; Kage, Frieda; Block, Jennifer; Schwenkmezger, Lisa; Steffen, Anika; Rottner, Klemens; Geyer, Matthias

    2015-05-01

    Formins are actin polymerization factors that elongate unbranched actin filaments at the barbed end. Rho family GTPases activate Diaphanous-related formins through the relief of an autoregulatory interaction. The crystal structures of the N-terminal domains of human FMNL1 and FMNL2 in complex with active Cdc42 show that Cdc42 mediates contacts with all five armadillo repeats of the formin with specific interactions formed by the Rho-GTPase insert helix. Mutation of three residues within Rac1 results in a gain-of-function mutation for FMNL2 binding and reconstitution of the Cdc42 phenotype in vivo. Dimerization of FMNL1 through a parallel coiled coil segment leads to formation of an umbrella-shaped structure that--together with Cdc42--spans more than 15 nm in diameter. The two interacting FMNL-Cdc42 heterodimers expose six membrane interaction motifs on a convex protein surface, the assembly of which may facilitate actin filament elongation at the leading edge of lamellipodia and filopodia.

  15. The structure of FMNL2–Cdc42 yields insights into the mechanism of lamellipodia and filopodia formation

    PubMed Central

    Kühn, Sonja; Erdmann, Constanze; Kage, Frieda; Block, Jennifer; Schwenkmezger, Lisa; Steffen, Anika; Rottner, Klemens; Geyer, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Formins are actin polymerization factors that elongate unbranched actin filaments at the barbed end. Rho family GTPases activate Diaphanous-related formins through the relief of an autoregulatory interaction. The crystal structures of the N-terminal domains of human FMNL1 and FMNL2 in complex with active Cdc42 show that Cdc42 mediates contacts with all five armadillo repeats of the formin with specific interactions formed by the Rho-GTPase insert helix. Mutation of three residues within Rac1 results in a gain-of-function mutation for FMNL2 binding and reconstitution of the Cdc42 phenotype in vivo. Dimerization of FMNL1 through a parallel coiled coil segment leads to formation of an umbrella-shaped structure that—together with Cdc42—spans more than 15 nm in diameter. The two interacting FMNL–Cdc42 heterodimers expose six membrane interaction motifs on a convex protein surface, the assembly of which may facilitate actin filament elongation at the leading edge of lamellipodia and filopodia. PMID:25963737

  16. GIT1 promotes lung cancer cell metastasis through modulating Rac1/Cdc42 activity and is associated with poor prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jeng-Shou; Su, Chia-Yi; Yu, Wen-Hsuan; Lee, Wei-Jiunn; Liu, Yu-Peng; Lai, Tsung-Ching; Jan, Yi-Hua; Yang, Yi-Fang; Shen, Chia-Ning; Shew, Jin-Yuh; Lu, Jean; Yang, Chih-Jen; Huang, Ming-Shyan; Lu, Pei-Jung; Lin, Yuan-Feng; Kuo, Min-Liang; Hua, Kuo-Tai; Hsiao, Michael

    2015-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptor kinase interacting protein 1 (GIT1) is participated in cell movement activation, which is a fundamental process during tissue development and cancer progression. GIT1/PIX forming a functional protein complex that contributes to Rac1/Cdc42 activation, resulting in increasing cell mobility. Although the importance of Rac1/Cdc42 activation is well documented in cancer aggressiveness, the clinical importance of GIT1 remains largely unknown. Here, we investigated the clinical significance of GIT1 expression in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and also verified the importance of GIT1-Rac1/Cdc42 axis in stimulating NSCLC cell mobility. The result indicated higher GIT1 expression patients had significantly poorer prognoses in disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) compared with lower GIT1 expression patients. Higher GIT1 expression was an independent prognostic factor by multivariate analysis and associated with migration/invasion of NSCLC cells in transwell assay. In vivo studies indicated that GIT1 promotes metastasis of NSCLC cells. Finally, GIT1 was found to stimulate migration/invasion by altering the activity of Rac1/Cdc42 in NSCLC cells. Together, the GIT1 expression is associated with poor prognosis in patients with NSCLC. GIT1 is critical for the invasiveness of NSCLC cells through stimulating the activity of Rac1/Cdc42. PMID:26462147

  17. The role of Cdc42 and Gic1 in the regulation of septin filament formation and dissociation

    PubMed Central

    Sadian, Yashar; Gatsogiannis, Christos; Patasi, Csilla; Hofnagel, Oliver; Goody, Roger S; Farkašovský, Marian; Raunser, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Septins are guanine nucleotide-binding proteins that polymerize into filamentous and higher-order structures. Cdc42 and its effector Gic1 are involved in septin recruitment, ring formation and dissociation. The regulatory mechanisms behind these processes are not well understood. Here, we have used electron microscopy and cryo electron tomography to elucidate the structural basis of the Gic1-septin and Gic1-Cdc42-septin interaction. We show that Gic1 acts as a scaffolding protein for septin filaments forming long and flexible filament cables. Cdc42 in its GTP-form binds to Gic1, which ultimately leads to the dissociation of Gic1 from the filament cables. Surprisingly, Cdc42-GDP is not inactive, but in the absence of Gic1 directly interacts with septin filaments resulting in their disassembly. We suggest that this unanticipated dual function of Cdc42 is crucial for the cell cycle. Based on our results we propose a novel regulatory mechanism for septin filament formation and dissociation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01085.001 PMID:24286829

  18. The structure of FMNL2-Cdc42 yields insights into the mechanism of lamellipodia and filopodia formation.

    PubMed

    Kühn, Sonja; Erdmann, Constanze; Kage, Frieda; Block, Jennifer; Schwenkmezger, Lisa; Steffen, Anika; Rottner, Klemens; Geyer, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Formins are actin polymerization factors that elongate unbranched actin filaments at the barbed end. Rho family GTPases activate Diaphanous-related formins through the relief of an autoregulatory interaction. The crystal structures of the N-terminal domains of human FMNL1 and FMNL2 in complex with active Cdc42 show that Cdc42 mediates contacts with all five armadillo repeats of the formin with specific interactions formed by the Rho-GTPase insert helix. Mutation of three residues within Rac1 results in a gain-of-function mutation for FMNL2 binding and reconstitution of the Cdc42 phenotype in vivo. Dimerization of FMNL1 through a parallel coiled coil segment leads to formation of an umbrella-shaped structure that—together with Cdc42—spans more than 15 nm in diameter. The two interacting FMNL-Cdc42 heterodimers expose six membrane interaction motifs on a convex protein surface, the assembly of which may facilitate actin filament elongation at the leading edge of lamellipodia and filopodia. PMID:25963737

  19. The Shp2-induced epithelial disorganization defect is reversed by HDAC6 inhibition independent of Cdc42

    PubMed Central

    Tien, Sui-Chih; Lee, Hsiao-Hui; Yang, Ya-Chi; Lin, Miao-Hsia; Chen, Yu-Ju; Chang, Zee-Fen

    2016-01-01

    Regulation of Shp2, a tyrosine phosphatase, critically influences the development of various diseases. Its role in epithelial lumenogenesis is not clear. Here we show that oncogenic Shp2 dephosphorylates Tuba to decrease Cdc42 activation, leading to the abnormal multi-lumen formation of epithelial cells. HDAC6 suppression reverses oncogenic Shp2-induced multiple apical domains and spindle mis-orientation during division in cysts to acquire normal lumenogenesis. Intriguingly, Cdc42 activity is not restored in this rescued process. We present evidence that simultaneous reduction in myosin II and ERK1/2 activity by HDAC6 inhibition is responsible for the reversion. In HER2-positive breast cancer cells, Shp2 also mediates Cdc42 repression, and HDAC6 inhibition or co-suppression of ERK/myosin II promotes normal epithelial lumen phenotype without increasing Cdc42 activity. Our data suggest a mechanism of epithelial disorganization by Shp2 deregulation, and reveal the cellular context where HDAC6 suppression is capable of establishing normal epithelial lumenogenesis independent of Cdc42. PMID:26783207

  20. miR-124-regulated RhoG reduces neuronal process complexity via ELMO/Dock180/Rac1 and Cdc42 signalling

    PubMed Central

    Franke, Kristin; Otto, Wolfgang; Johannes, Sascha; Baumgart, Jan; Nitsch, Robert; Schumacher, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    The small GTPase RhoG plays a central role in actin remodelling during diverse biological processes such as neurite outgrowth, cell migration, phagocytosis of apoptotic cells, and the invasion of pathogenic bacteria. Although it is known that RhoG stimulates neurite outgrowth in the rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cell line, neither the physiological function nor the regulation of this GTPase in neuronal differentiation is clear. Here, we identify RhoG as an inhibitor of neuronal process complexity, which is regulated by the microRNA miR-124. We find that RhoG inhibits dendritic branching in hippocampal neurons in vitro and in vivo. RhoG also inhibits axonal branching, acting via an ELMO/Dock180/Rac1 signalling pathway. However, RhoG inhibits dendritic branching dependent on the small GTPase Cdc42. Finally, we show that the expression of RhoG in neurons is suppressed by the CNS-specific microRNA miR-124 and connect the regulation of RhoG expression by miR-124 to the stimulation of neuronal process complexity. Thus, RhoG emerges as a cellular conductor of Rac1 and Cdc42 activity, in turn regulated by miR-124 to control axonal and dendritic branching. PMID:22588079

  1. miR-124-regulated RhoG reduces neuronal process complexity via ELMO/Dock180/Rac1 and Cdc42 signalling.

    PubMed

    Franke, Kristin; Otto, Wolfgang; Johannes, Sascha; Baumgart, Jan; Nitsch, Robert; Schumacher, Stefan

    2012-06-29

    The small GTPase RhoG plays a central role in actin remodelling during diverse biological processes such as neurite outgrowth, cell migration, phagocytosis of apoptotic cells, and the invasion of pathogenic bacteria. Although it is known that RhoG stimulates neurite outgrowth in the rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cell line, neither the physiological function nor the regulation of this GTPase in neuronal differentiation is clear. Here, we identify RhoG as an inhibitor of neuronal process complexity, which is regulated by the microRNA miR-124. We find that RhoG inhibits dendritic branching in hippocampal neurons in vitro and in vivo. RhoG also inhibits axonal branching, acting via an ELMO/Dock180/Rac1 signalling pathway. However, RhoG inhibits dendritic branching dependent on the small GTPase Cdc42. Finally, we show that the expression of RhoG in neurons is suppressed by the CNS-specific microRNA miR-124 and connect the regulation of RhoG expression by miR-124 to the stimulation of neuronal process complexity. Thus, RhoG emerges as a cellular conductor of Rac1 and Cdc42 activity, in turn regulated by miR-124 to control axonal and dendritic branching. PMID:22588079

  2. Rac1 and Cdc42 GTPases regulate shear stress-driven β-catenin signaling in osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Qiaoqiao; Cho, Eunhye; Yokota, Hiroki; Na, Sungsoo

    2013-01-01

    Beta-catenin-dependent TCF/LEF (T-cell factor/lymphocyte enhancing factor) is known to be mechanosensitive and an important regulator for promoting bone formation. However, the functional connection between TCF/LEF activity and Rho family GTPases is not well understood in osteoblasts. Herein we investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying oscillatory shear stress-induced TCF/LEF activity in MC3T3-E1 osteoblast cells using live cell imaging. We employed fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based and green fluorescent protein (GFP)-based biosensors, which allowed us to monitor signal transduction in living cells in real time. Oscillatory (1 Hz) shear stress (10 dynes/cm2) increased TCF/LEF activity and stimulated translocation of β-catenin to the nucleus with the distinct activity patterns of Rac1 and Cdc42. The shear stress-induced TCF/LEF activity was blocked by the inhibition of Rac1 and Cdc42 with their dominant negative mutants or selective drugs, but not by a dominant negative mutant of RhoA. In contrast, constitutively active Rac1 and Cdc42 mutants caused a significant enhancement of TCF/LEF activity. Moreover, activation of Rac1 and Cdc42 increased the basal level of TCF/LEF activity, while their inhibition decreased the basal level. Interestingly, disruption of cytoskeletal structures or inhibition of myosin activity did not significantly affect shear stress-induced TCF/LEF activity. Although Rac1 is reported to be involved in β-catenin in cancer cells, the involvement of Cdc42 in β-catenin signaling in osteoblasts has not been identified. Our findings in this study demonstrate that both Rac1 and Cdc42 GTPases are critical regulators in shear stress-driven β-catenin signaling in osteoblasts. PMID:23524265

  3. The HPV16 E6 binding protein Tip-1 interacts with ARHGEF16, which activates Cdc42

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, A W; He, X; Borthwick, K; Donne, A J; Hampson, L; Hampson, I N

    2011-01-01

    Background: Guanidine exchange factor (GEF)-catalysed activation of Rho proteins such as Cdc42 has been shown to have a crucial role in cellular transformation, malignant progression and invasion. We have previously shown that the HPV16 E6 oncoprotein binds to the PDZ domain protein Tax-interacting-protein 1 (Tip-1) and we now report identification and functional analysis of a novel Tip-1 binding GEF. Methods: Yeast two-hybrid, in vitro pull-down, site-directed mutagenesis, semiquantitative PCR, co-immunoprecipitation and western blotting were used to identify/confirm novel Tip-1 binding partners and analyse cellular expression levels. In vitro kinetic analyses of recombinant proteins, siRNA gene silencing and in cell assays were used to measure Rho protein activation. Results: Tax-interacting-protein 1 was shown to interact with ARHGEF16 by its carboxyl PDZ binding motif. Levels of ARHGEF16 were increased in transformed and immortalised cells expressing ectopic HPV16 E6 and Cdc42 was co-immunoprecipitated by ARHGEF16 in the presence of high-risk HPV E6. In vitro kinetic analysis confirmed that recombinant ARHGEF16 activates Cdc42 and this was increased by the addition of recombinant Tip-1 and E6. Cells expressing HPV16 E6 had higher levels of Cdc42 activation, which was decreased by siRNA silencing of either Tip-1 or ARHGEF16. Conclusion: These data suggest that HPV16 E6, Tip-1 and ARHGEF16 may cooperate to activate Cdc42 and support a potential link between the expression of HPV16 E6 and Cdc42 activation. PMID:21139582

  4. Rac1 and Cdc42 GTPases regulate shear stress-driven β-catenin signaling in osteoblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Qiaoqiao; Cho, Eunhye; Yokota, Hiroki; Na, Sungsoo

    2013-04-19

    Highlights: •Shear stress increased TCF/LEF activity and stimulated β-catenin nuclear localization. •Rac1, Cdc42, and RhoA displayed distinct dynamic activity patterns under flow. •Rac1 and Cdc42, but not RhoA, regulate shear stress-driven TCF/LEF activation. •Cytoskeleton did not significantly affect shear stress-induced TCF/LEF activation. -- Abstract: Beta-catenin-dependent TCF/LEF (T-cell factor/lymphocyte enhancing factor) is known to be mechanosensitive and an important regulator for promoting bone formation. However, the functional connection between TCF/LEF activity and Rho family GTPases is not well understood in osteoblasts. Herein we investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying oscillatory shear stress-induced TCF/LEF activity in MC3T3-E1 osteoblast cells using live cell imaging. We employed fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based and green fluorescent protein (GFP)-based biosensors, which allowed us to monitor signal transduction in living cells in real time. Oscillatory (1 Hz) shear stress (10 dynes/cm{sup 2}) increased TCF/LEF activity and stimulated translocation of β-catenin to the nucleus with the distinct activity patterns of Rac1 and Cdc42. The shear stress-induced TCF/LEF activity was blocked by the inhibition of Rac1 and Cdc42 with their dominant negative mutants or selective drugs, but not by a dominant negative mutant of RhoA. In contrast, constitutively active Rac1 and Cdc42 mutants caused a significant enhancement of TCF/LEF activity. Moreover, activation of Rac1 and Cdc42 increased the basal level of TCF/LEF activity, while their inhibition decreased the basal level. Interestingly, disruption of cytoskeletal structures or inhibition of myosin activity did not significantly affect shear stress-induced TCF/LEF activity. Although Rac1 is reported to be involved in β-catenin in cancer cells, the involvement of Cdc42 in β-catenin signaling in osteoblasts has not been identified. Our findings in this study demonstrate

  5. Plexin-B2 negatively regulates macrophage motility, Rac, and Cdc42 activation.

    PubMed

    Roney, Kelly E; O'Connor, Brian P; Wen, Haitao; Holl, Eda K; Guthrie, Elizabeth H; Davis, Beckley K; Jones, Stephen W; Jha, Sushmita; Sharek, Lisa; Garcia-Mata, Rafael; Bear, James E; Ting, Jenny P-Y

    2011-01-01

    Plexins are cell surface receptors widely studied in the nervous system, where they mediate migration and morphogenesis though the Rho family of small GTPases. More recently, plexins have been implicated in immune processes including cell-cell interaction, immune activation, migration, and cytokine production. Plexin-B2 facilitates ligand induced cell guidance and migration in the nervous system, and induces cytoskeletal changes in overexpression assays through RhoGTPase. The function of Plexin-B2 in the immune system is unknown. This report shows that Plexin-B2 is highly expressed on cells of the innate immune system in the mouse, including macrophages, conventional dendritic cells, and plasmacytoid dendritic cells. However, Plexin-B2 does not appear to regulate the production of proinflammatory cytokines, phagocytosis of a variety of targets, or directional migration towards chemoattractants or extracellular matrix in mouse macrophages. Instead, Plxnb2(-/-) macrophages have greater cellular motility than wild type in the unstimulated state that is accompanied by more active, GTP-bound Rac and Cdc42. Additionally, Plxnb2(-/-) macrophages demonstrate faster in vitro wound closure activity. Studies have shown that a closely related family member, Plexin-B1, binds to active Rac and sequesters it from downstream signaling. The interaction of Plexin-B2 with Rac has only been previously confirmed in yeast and bacterial overexpression assays. The data presented here show that Plexin-B2 functions in mouse macrophages as a negative regulator of the GTPases Rac and Cdc42 and as a negative regulator of basal cell motility and wound healing. PMID:21966369

  6. Proper Regulation of Cdc42 Activity is Required for Tight Actin Concentration at the Equator during Cytokinesis in Adherent Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiaodong; Wang, Junxia; Moriguchi, Kazuki; Liow, Lu Ting; Ahmed, Sohail; Kaverina, Irina; Murata-Hori, Maki

    2012-01-01

    Cytokinesis in mammalian cells requires actin assembly at the equatorial region. Although functions of RhoA in this process have been well established, additional mechanisms are likely involved. We have examined if Cdc42 is involved in actin assembly during cytokinesis. Depletion of Cdc42 had no apparent effects on the duration of cytokinesis, while overexpression of constitutively active Cdc42 (CACdc42) caused cytokinesis failure in normal rat kidney epithelial cells. Cells depleted of Cdc42 displayed abnormal cell morphology and caused a failure of tight accumulation of actin and RhoA at the equator. In contrast, in cells overexpressing CACdc42, actin formed abnormal bundles and RhoA was largely eliminated from the equator. Our results suggest that accurate regulation of Cdc42 activity is crucial for proper equatorial actin assembly and RhoA localization during cytokinesis. Notably, our observations also suggest that tight actin concentration is not essential for cytokinesis in adherent mammalian cells. PMID:21763307

  7. EspT triggers formation of lamellipodia and membrane ruffles through activation of Rac-1 and Cdc42

    PubMed Central

    Bulgin, Richard R; Arbeloa, Ana; Chung, Jade C S; Frankel, Gad

    2009-01-01

    Subversion of the eukaryotic cell cytoskeleton is a virulence strategy employed by many bacterial pathogens. Due to the pivotal role of Rho GTPases in actin dynamics they are common targets of bacterial effector proteins and toxins. IpgB1, IpgB2 (Shigella), SifA, SifB (Salmonella) and Map and EspM (attaching and effacing pathogens) constitute a family of type III secretion system effectors that subverts small GTPase signalling pathways. In this study we identified and characterized EspT from Citrobacter rodentium that triggers formation of lamellipodia on Swiss 3T3 and membrane ruffles on HeLa cells, which are reminiscent of the membrane ruffles induced by IpgB1. Ectopic expression of EspT and IpgB1, but not EspM, resulted in a mitochondrial localization. Using dominant negative constructs we found that EspT-induced actin remodelling is dependent on GTP-bound Rac-1 and Cdc42 but not ELMO or Dock180, which are hijacked by IpgB1 in order to form a Rac-1 specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor. Using pull-down assays with the Rac-1 and Cdc42 binding domains of Pak and WASP we demonstrate that EspT is capable of activating both Rac-1 and Cdc42. These results suggest that EspT modulates the host cell cytoskeleton through coactivation of Rac-1 and Cdc42 by a distinct mechanism. PMID:19016787

  8. Arf nucleotide binding site opener [ARNO] promotes sequential activation of Arf6, Cdc42 and Rac1 and insulin secretion in INS 832/13 β-cells and rat islets

    PubMed Central

    Jayaram, Bhavaani; Syed, Ismail; Kyathanahalli, Chandrashekara N.; Rhodes, Christopher J.; Kowluru, Anjaneyulu

    2011-01-01

    Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion [GSIS] involves interplay between small G-proteins and their regulatory factors. Herein, we tested the hypothesis that Arf nucleotide binding site opener [ARNO], a guanine nucleotide exchange factor [GEF] for the small G-protein Arf6, mediates the functional activation of Arf6, and that ARNO/Arf6 signaling axis, in turn, controls the activation of Cdc42 and Rac1, which have been implicated in GSIS. Molecular biological [i.e., expression of inactive mutants or siRNA] and pharmacological approaches were employed to assess the roles for ARNO/Arf6 signaling pathway in insulin secretion in normal rat islets and INS 832/13 cells. Degrees of activation of Arf6 and Cdc42/Rac1 were quantitated by GST-GGA3 and PAK-1 kinase pull-down assays, respectively. ARNO is expressed in INS 832/13 cells, rat islets and human islets. Expression of inactive mutants of Arf6 [Arf6-T27N] or ARNO [ARNO-E156K] or siRNA-ARNO markedly reduced GSIS in isolated β-cells. secinH3, a selective inhibitor of ARNO/Arf6 signaling axis, also inhibited GSIS in INS 832/13 cells and rat islets. Stimulatory concentrations of glucose promoted Arf6 activation, which was inhibited by secinH3 or siRNA-ARNO, suggesting that ARNO/Arf6 signaling cascade is necessary for GSIS. secinH3 or siRNA-ARNO also inhibited glucose-induced activation of Cdc42 and Rac1 suggesting that ARNO/Arf6 might be upstream to Cdc42 and Rac1 activation steps, which are necessary for GSIS. Lastly, co-immunoprecipitation and confocal microscopic studies suggested increased association between Arf6 and ARNO in glucose-stimulated β-cells. These findings provide the first evidence to implicate ARNO in the sequential activation of Arf6, Cdc42 and Rac1 culminating in GSIS. PMID:21276423

  9. Dock10, a Cdc42 and Rac1 GEF, induces loss of elongation, filopodia, and ruffles in cervical cancer epithelial HeLa cells

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Lafuente, Natalia; Alcaraz-García, María-José; García-Serna, Azahara-María; Sebastián-Ruiz, Silvia; Moya-Quiles, María-Rosa; García-Alonso, Ana-María; Parrado, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Dock10 is one of the three members of the Dock-D family of Dock proteins, a class of guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) for Rho GTPases. Its homologs Dock9 and Dock11 are Cdc42 GEFs. Dock10 is required for maintenance of rounded morphology and amoeboid-type movement. Full-length isoforms of Dock10 have been recently cloned. Here, we address GTPase specificity and GEF activity of Dock10. In order of decreasing intensity, Dock10 interacted with nucleotide-free Rac1, Cdc42, and Rac3, and more weakly with Rac2, RhoF, and RhoG. Inducible expression of Dock10 in HeLa epithelial cells promoted GEF activity on Cdc42 and Rac1, and a morphologic change in two-dimensional culture consisting in loss of cell elongation, increase of filopodia, and ruffles. Area in contact with the substrate of cells that spread with non-elongated morphology was larger in cells expressing Dock10. Inducible expression of constitutively active mutants of Cdc42 and Rac1 in HeLa cells also induced loss of elongation. However, Cdc42 induced filopodia and contraction, and Rac1 induced membrane ruffles and flattening. When co-expressed with Dock10, Cdc42 potentiated filopodia, and Rac1 potentiated ruffles. These results suggest that Dock10 functions as a dual GEF for Cdc42 and Rac1, affecting cell morphology, spreading and actin cytoskeleton protrusions of adherent HeLa cells. PMID:25862245

  10. Discoidin domain receptor 1 activation suppresses alpha2beta1 integrin-dependent cell spreading through inhibition of Cdc42 activity.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Yi-Chun; Wang, Chau-Zen; Tang, Ming-Jer

    2009-01-01

    Upregulation and overexpression of discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1) have been implied in the regulation of kidney development and progression of cancers. Our previous studies with Mardin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells showed that overexpression of DDR1 inhibited cell spreading, whereas dominant negative DDR1 promoted cell spreading on collagen-coated dish. Cell spreading is an important characteristic for cell differentiation and survival. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying the role of DDR1 in cell spreading. We have found here a novel signaling pathway of DDR1 consisting of Cdc42 that regulates the assembly and disassembly of cytoskeleton and cell spreading in MDCK cells. Cell spreading involves the organization of cytoskeleton that is mainly regulated by Rho-family GTPases. We assessed the activity of Rho-family GTPases and transfected MDCK cells with constitutively active or dominant negative GTPases, and quantified the extent of cell spreading. These results showed that DDR1 decreased the filamentous actin ratio and Rac1/Cdc42 activities, but had no effects on RhoA activity. Neither constitutively active nor dominant negative Rac1 altered DDR1-inhibited cell spreading. Constitutively active Cdc42 could rescue the DDR1-inhibited cell spreading, whereas dominant negative Cdc42 inhibited cell spreading, indicating that DDR1-inhibited cell spreading is Cdc42 dependent. With the use of alpha(2)beta(1) integrin blocking antibody, we showed that collagen-induced Cdc42 activation was mediated by alpha(2)beta(1) integrin. Moreover, ectopic FAK expression enhanced the Cdc42 activity. Reducing FAK activity by dominant negative FAK (FRNK) markedly abolished the Cdc42 activity. These findings show that DDR1a/b activation inhibits cell spreading through suppressing alpha(2)beta(1) integrin-mediated Cdc42 activation. PMID:18780290

  11. Cdc42 and the Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors Ect2 and Trio Mediate Fn14-Induced Migration and Invasion of Glioblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fortin, Shannon P.; Ennis, Matthew J.; Schumacher, Cassie A.; Zylstra-Diegel, Cassandra R.; Williams, Bart O.; Ross, Julianna T.D.; Winkles, Jeffrey A.; Loftus, Joseph C.; Symons, Marc H.; Tran, Nhan L.

    2012-01-01

    Malignant glioblastomas are characterized by their ability to infiltrate into normal brain. We previously reported that binding of the multifunctional cytokine TNF-like weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK) to its receptor fibroblast growth factor–inducible 14 (Fn14) induces glioblastoma cell invasion via Rac1 activation. Here, we show that Cdc42 plays an essential role in Fn14-mediated activation of Rac1. TWEAK-treated glioma cells display an increased activation of Cdc42, and depletion of Cdc42 using siRNA abolishes TWEAK-induced Rac1 activation and abrogates glioma cell migration and invasion. In contrast, Rac1 depletion does not affect Cdc42 activation by Fn14, showing that Cdc42 mediates TWEAK-stimulated Rac1 activation. Furthermore, we identified two guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEF), Ect2 and Trio, involved in TWEAK-induced activation of Cdc42 and Rac1, respectively. Depletion of Ect2 abrogates both TWEAK-induced Cdc42 and Rac1 activation, as well as subsequent TWEAK-Fn14–directed glioma cell migration and invasion. In contrast, Trio depletion inhibits TWEAK-induced Rac1 activation but not TWEAK-induced Cdc42 activation. Finally, inappropriate expression of Fn14 or Ect2 in mouse astrocytes in vivo using an RCAS vector system for glial-specific gene transfer in G-tva transgenic mice induces astrocyte migration within the brain, corroborating the in vitro importance of the TWEAK-Fn14 signaling cascade in glioblastoma invasion. Our results suggest that the TWEAK-Fn14 signaling axis stimulates glioma cell migration and invasion through two GEF-GTPase signaling units, Ect2-Cdc42 and Trio-Rac1. Components of the Fn14-Rho GEF-Rho GTPase signaling pathway present innovative drug targets for glioma therapy. PMID:22571869

  12. AKAP-9 promotes colorectal cancer development by regulating Cdc42 interacting protein 4.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhi-Yan; Liu, Yan-Ping; Xie, Lin-Ying; Wang, Xiao-Yan; Yang, Fang; Chen, Shi-You; Li, Zu-Guo

    2016-06-01

    Our previous studies have shown that PRKA kinase anchor protein 9 (AKAP-9) is involved in colorectal cancer (CRC) cell proliferation and migration in vitro. However, whether or not AKAP-9 is important for CRC development or metastasis in vivo remains unknown. In the present study, we found that AKAP-9 expression was significantly higher in human colorectal cancer tissues than the paired normal tissues. In fact, AKAP-9 level correlated with the CRC infiltrating depth and metastasis. Moreover, the higher AKAP-9 expression was associated with the lower survival rate in patients. In cultured CRC cells, knockdown of AKAP-9 inhibited cell proliferation, invasion, and migration. AKAP-9 deficiency also attenuated CRC tumor growth and metastasis in vivo. Mechanistically, AKAP-9 interacted with cdc42 interacting protein 4 (CIP4) and regulated its expression. CIP4 levels were interrelated to the AKAP-9 level in CRC cells. Functionally, AKAP-9 was essential for TGF-β1-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition of CRC cells, and CIP4 played a critical role in mediating the function of AKAP-9. Importantly, CIP4 expression was significantly up-regulated in human CRC tissues. Taken together, our results demonstrated that AKAP-9 facilitates CRC development and metastasis via regulating CIP4-mediated epithelial-mesenchymal transition of CRC cells. PMID:27039663

  13. MicroRNA-224 Suppresses Colorectal Cancer Cell Migration by Targeting Cdc42

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Han-Lin; Wu, Yu-Hua; Chen, William Tzu-Liang; Cheng, Ya-Wen

    2014-01-01

    The metastatic spread of tumor cells is the major risk factor affecting the clinical prognosis of colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. The metastatic phenotype can be modulated by dysregulating the synthesis of different structural and functional proteins of tumor cells. Micro(mi)RNAs are noncoding RNAs that recognize their cognate messenger (m)RNA targets by sequence-specific interactions with the 3′ untranslated region and are involved in the multistep process of CRC development. The objective of this study was to investigate the expression and biological roles of miR-224 in CRC. The miR-224 expression level was assessed by a quantitative real-time PCR in 79 CRC and 18 nontumor tissues. Expression levels of miR-224 in CRC tissues were significantly lower than those in nontumor tissues. Its expression level was associated with the mutation status of the APC gene. Ectopic expression of miR-224 suppressed the migratory ability of CRC cell line, but cell proliferation was less affected. Increased miR-224 diminished Cdc42 and SMAD4 expressions at both the protein and mRNA levels and inhibited the formation of actin filaments. Overall, this study indicated a role of miR-224 in negatively regulating CRC cell migration. The expression level of miR-224 may be a useful predictive biomarker for CRC progression. PMID:24817781

  14. Novel role of Cdc42 and RalA GTPases in TNF-α mediated secretion of CCL2

    PubMed Central

    Langert, Kelly A; Pervan, Cynthia L; Stubbs, Jr, Evan B

    2014-01-01

    Transendothelial migration of autoreactive leukocytes into peripheral nerves is an early pathological hallmark of acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (AIDP), a North American and European variant of Guillain-Barré Syndrome. Whereas the clinical management of AIDP is currently limited to non-selective immune modulating therapies, recent experimental studies support selective targeting of leukocyte trafficking as a promising alternative therapeutic strategy. Here, using a combination of targeted siRNA knockdown and pharmacological inhibitors, we report a novel role of both Cdc42 and RalA GTPases in facilitating TNF-α mediated CCL2 trafficking and release from immortalized rat peripheral nerve microvascular endoneurial endothelial cells. These findings raise interest in Cdc42 and RalA GTPases as potential therapeutic targets for the management of autoimmune inflammatory peripheral nerve disease. PMID:24911990

  15. Rsr1 Focuses Cdc42 Activity at Hyphal Tips and Promotes Maintenance of Hyphal Development in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Pulver, Rebecca; Heisel, Timothy; Gonia, Sara; Robins, Robert; Norton, Jennifer; Haynes, Paula

    2013-01-01

    The extremely elongated morphology of fungal hyphae is dependent on the cell's ability to assemble and maintain polarized growth machinery over multiple cell cycles. The different morphologies of the fungus Candida albicans make it an excellent model organism in which to study the spatiotemporal requirements for constitutive polarized growth and the generation of different cell shapes. In C. albicans, deletion of the landmark protein Rsr1 causes defects in morphogenesis that are not predicted from study of the orthologous protein in the related yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, thus suggesting that Rsr1 has expanded functions during polarized growth in C. albicans. Here, we show that Rsr1 activity localizes to hyphal tips by the differential localization of the Rsr1 GTPase-activating protein (GAP), Bud2, and guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF), Bud5. In addition, we find that Rsr1 is needed to maintain the focused localization of hyphal polarity structures and proteins, including Bem1, a marker of the active GTP-bound form of the Rho GTPase, Cdc42. Further, our results indicate that tip-localized Cdc42 clusters are associated with the cell's ability to express a hyphal transcriptional program and that the ability to generate a focused Cdc42 cluster in early hyphae (germ tubes) is needed to maintain hyphal morphogenesis over time. We propose that in C. albicans, Rsr1 “fine-tunes” the distribution of Cdc42 activity and that self-organizing (Rsr1-independent) mechanisms of polarized growth are not sufficient to generate narrow cell shapes or to provide feedback to the transcriptional program during hyphal morphogenesis. PMID:23223038

  16. Cdc42 and Rac1 activity is reduced in human pheochromocytoma and correlates with FARP1 and ARHGEF1 expression.

    PubMed

    Croisé, Pauline; Houy, Sébastien; Gand, Mathieu; Lanoix, Joël; Calco, Valérie; Tóth, Petra; Brunaud, Laurent; Lomazzi, Sandra; Paramithiotis, Eustache; Chelsky, Daniel; Ory, Stéphane; Gasman, Stéphane

    2016-04-01

    Among small GTPases from the Rho family, Cdc42, RAC, and Rho are well known to mediate a large variety of cellular processes linked with cancer biology through their ability to cycle between an inactive (GDP-bound) and an active (GTP-bound) state. Guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) stimulate the exchange of GDP for GTP to generate the activated form, whereas the GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) catalyze GTP hydrolysis, leading to the inactivated form. Modulation of Rho GTPase activity following altered expression of RHO-GEFs and/or RHO-GAPs has already been reported in various human tumors. However, nothing is known about the Rho GTPase activity or the expression of their regulators in human pheochromocytomas, a neuroendocrine tumor (NET) arising from chromaffin cells of the adrenal medulla. In this study, we demonstrate, through an ELISA-based activity assay, that Rac1 and Cdc42 activities decrease in human pheochromocytomas (PCCs) compared with the matched adjacent non-tumor tissue. Furthermore, through quantitative mass spectrometry (MS) approaches, we show that the expression of two RHO-GEF proteins, namely ARHGEF1 and FARP1, is significantly reduced in tumors compared with matched non-tumor tissue, whereas ARHGAP36 expression is increased. Moreover, siRNA-based knockdown of ARHGEF1 and FARP1 in PC12 cells leads to a significant inhibition of Rac1 and Cdc42 activities, respectively. Finally, a principal component analysis (PCA) of our dataset was able to discriminate PCC from non-tumor tissue and indicates a close correlation between Cdc42/Rac1 activity and FARP1/ARHGEF1 expression. Altogether, our findings reveal for the first time the importance of modulation of Rho GTPase activities and expression of their regulators in human PCCs. PMID:26911374

  17. The Cdc42 Effector Kinase PAK4 Localizes to Cell-Cell Junctions and Contributes to Establishing Cell Polarity

    PubMed Central

    Selamat, Widyawilis; Tay, Pei-Ling Felicia; Baskaran, Yohendran; Manser, Ed

    2015-01-01

    The serine/threonine kinase PAK4 is a Cdc42 effector whose role is not well understood; overexpression of PAK4 has been associated with some cancers, and there are reports that correlate kinase level with increased cell migration in vitro. Here we report that PAK4 is primarily associated with cell-cell junctions in all the cell lines we tested, and fails to accumulate at focal adhesions or at the leading edge of migrating cells. In U2OS osteosarcoma and MCF-7 breast cancer cell lines, PAK4 depletion did not affect collective cell migration, but affected cell polarization. By contrast, Cdc42 depletion (as reported by many studies) caused a strong defect in junctional assembly in multiple cells lines. We also report that the depletion of PAK4 protein or treatment of cells with the PAK4 inhibitor PF-3758309 can lead to defects in centrosome reorientation (polarization) after cell monolayer wounding. These experiments are consistent with PAK4 forming part of a conserved cell-cell junctional polarity Cdc42 complex. We also confirm β-catenin as a target for PAK4 in these cells. Treatment of cells with PF-3758309 caused inhibition of β-catenin Ser-675 phosphorylation, which is located predominantly at cell-cell junctions. PMID:26068882

  18. The Cdc42 Effector Kinase PAK4 Localizes to Cell-Cell Junctions and Contributes to Establishing Cell Polarity.

    PubMed

    Selamat, Widyawilis; Tay, Pei-Ling Felicia; Baskaran, Yohendran; Manser, Ed

    2015-01-01

    The serine/threonine kinase PAK4 is a Cdc42 effector whose role is not well understood; overexpression of PAK4 has been associated with some cancers, and there are reports that correlate kinase level with increased cell migration in vitro. Here we report that PAK4 is primarily associated with cell-cell junctions in all the cell lines we tested, and fails to accumulate at focal adhesions or at the leading edge of migrating cells. In U2OS osteosarcoma and MCF-7 breast cancer cell lines, PAK4 depletion did not affect collective cell migration, but affected cell polarization. By contrast, Cdc42 depletion (as reported by many studies) caused a strong defect in junctional assembly in multiple cells lines. We also report that the depletion of PAK4 protein or treatment of cells with the PAK4 inhibitor PF-3758309 can lead to defects in centrosome reorientation (polarization) after cell monolayer wounding. These experiments are consistent with PAK4 forming part of a conserved cell-cell junctional polarity Cdc42 complex. We also confirm β-catenin as a target for PAK4 in these cells. Treatment of cells with PF-3758309 caused inhibition of β-catenin Ser-675 phosphorylation, which is located predominantly at cell-cell junctions. PMID:26068882

  19. Activation by Cdc42 and Pip2 of Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome Protein (Wasp) Stimulates Actin Nucleation by Arp2/3 Complex

    PubMed Central

    Higgs, Henry N.; Pollard, Thomas D.

    2000-01-01

    We purified native WASp (Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome protein) from bovine thymus and studied its ability to stimulate actin nucleation by Arp2/3 complex. WASp alone is inactive in the presence or absence of 0.5 μM GTP-Cdc42. Phosphatidylinositol 4,5 bisphosphate (PIP2) micelles allowed WASp to activate actin nucleation by Arp2/3 complex, and this was further enhanced twofold by GTP-Cdc42. Filaments nucleated by Arp2/3 complex and WASp in the presence of PIP2 and Cdc42 concentrated around lipid micelles and vesicles, providing that Cdc42 was GTP-bound and prenylated. Thus, the high concentration of WASp in neutrophils (9 μM) is dependent on interactions with both acidic lipids and GTP-Cdc42 to activate actin nucleation by Arp2/3 complex. The results also suggest that membrane binding increases the local concentrations of Cdc42 and WASp, favoring their interaction. PMID:10995437

  20. Phosphorylation of Bem2p and Bem3p may contribute to local activation of Cdc42p at bud emergence

    PubMed Central

    Knaus, Michèle; Pelli-Gulli, Marie-Pierre; van Drogen, Frank; Springer, Sander; Jaquenoud, Malika; Peter, Matthias

    2007-01-01

    Site-specific activation of the Rho-type GTPase Cdc42p is critical for the establishment of cell polarity. Here we investigated the role and regulation of the GTPase-activating enzymes (GAPs) Bem2p and Bem3p for Cdc42p activation and actin polarization at bud emergence in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Bem2p and Bem3p are localized throughout the cytoplasm and the cell cortex in unbudded G1 cells, but accumulate at sites of polarization after bud emergence. Inactivation of Bem2p results in hyperactivation of Cdc42p and polarization toward multiple sites. Bem2p and Bem3p are hyperphosphorylated at bud emergence most likely by the Cdc28p-Cln2p kinase. This phosphorylation appears to inhibit their GAP activity in vivo, as non-phosphorylatable Bem3p mutants are hyperactive and interfere with Cdc42p activation. Taken together, our results indicate that Bem2p and Bem3p may function as global inhibitors of Cdc42p activation during G1, and their inactivation by the Cdc28p/Cln kinase contributes to site-specific activation of Cdc42p at bud emergence. PMID:17914457

  1. Phosphorylation of Bem2p and Bem3p may contribute to local activation of Cdc42p at bud emergence.

    PubMed

    Knaus, Michèle; Pelli-Gulli, Marie-Pierre; van Drogen, Frank; Springer, Sander; Jaquenoud, Malika; Peter, Matthias

    2007-10-31

    Site-specific activation of the Rho-type GTPase Cdc42p is critical for the establishment of cell polarity. Here we investigated the role and regulation of the GTPase-activating enzymes (GAPs) Bem2p and Bem3p for Cdc42p activation and actin polarization at bud emergence in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Bem2p and Bem3p are localized throughout the cytoplasm and the cell cortex in unbudded G1 cells, but accumulate at sites of polarization after bud emergence. Inactivation of Bem2p results in hyperactivation of Cdc42p and polarization toward multiple sites. Bem2p and Bem3p are hyperphosphorylated at bud emergence most likely by the Cdc28p-Cln2p kinase. This phosphorylation appears to inhibit their GAP activity in vivo, as non-phosphorylatable Bem3p mutants are hyperactive and interfere with Cdc42p activation. Taken together, our results indicate that Bem2p and Bem3p may function as global inhibitors of Cdc42p activation during G1, and their inactivation by the Cdc28p/Cln kinase contributes to site-specific activation of Cdc42p at bud emergence. PMID:17914457

  2. SNX9 as an adaptor for linking synaptojanin-1 to the Cdc42 effector ACK1.

    PubMed

    Yeow-Fong, Lee; Lim, Louis; Manser, Ed

    2005-09-12

    Sorting nexin 9 (SNX9, also referred to as SH3PX1) is a binding partner for the non-receptor and Cdc42-associated kinase (ACK) in Drosophila and mammals. ACK1 is known to bind clathrin and influence EGF receptor endocytosis. SNX9 comprises an N-terminal Src homology domain 3 (SH3), a central PHOX homology (PX) domain, and a carboxyl-terminal coiled-coil region. In order to investigate SNX9 further we have made use of a novel in vivo biotinylation system to label various GST-SH3 domains and perform blot overlays, thereby identifying synaptojanin-1 as a partner for SNX9. Biotinylated SH3 domains were also used for specific identification of target proline-rich sequences in synaptojanin and ACK1 on synthetic peptides arrays. Direct assessment of SH3 binding efficiencies at different positions within the extensive proline-rich regions of these proteins were thus determined. While SNX9 targets a number of sequences within the proline-rich regions of synaptojanin, a single site was identified in human ACK1. By testing the association of various truncations of ACK1 with SNX9 we confirmed the dominant SNX9 binding domain in human ACK1 (residues 920-955). In the presence of SNX9 we find that synaptojanin is able to colocalize with distinct ACK1 containing vesicles, indicating that this tyrosine kinase is linked to many components involved in vesicle dynamics including clathrin, AP2 and synaptojanin-1. PMID:16137687

  3. Cdc42 Interacting Protein 4 promotes breast cancer cell invasion and formation of invadopodia through activation of N-WASp

    PubMed Central

    Pichot, Christina S.; Arvanitis, Constadina; Hartig, Sean M.; Jensen, Samuel A.; Bechill, John; Marzouk, Saad; Yu, Jindan; Frost, Jeffrey A.; Corey, Seth J.

    2010-01-01

    In the earliest stages of metastasis, breast cancer cells must reorganize the cytoskeleton to affect cell shape change and promote cell invasion and motility. These events require the cytoskeletal regulators Cdc42 and Rho, their effectors, such as N-WASp/WAVE, and direct inducers of actin polymerization such as Arp2/3. Little consideration has been given to molecules that shape the cell membrane. The F-BAR proteins CIP4, TOCA-1, and FBP17 generate membrane curvature and act as scaffolding proteins for activated Cdc42 and N-WASp. We found that expression of CIP4, but not TOCA-1 or FBP17, was increased in invasive breast cancer cell lines in comparison to weakly or non-invasive breast cancer cell lines. Endogenous CIP4 localized to the leading edge of migrating cells and to invadopodia in cells invading gelatin. Because CIP4 serves as a scaffolding protein for Cdc42, Src, and N-WASp, we tested whether loss of CIP4 could result in decreased N-WASp function. Interaction between CIP4 and N-WASp was EGF-responsive, and CIP4 silencing by siRNA caused decreased tyrosine phosphorylation of N-WASp at a Src-dependent activation site (Y256). CIP4 silencing also impaired the migration and invasion of MDA-MB-231 cells and was associated with decreased formation of invadopodia and gelatin degradation. This study presents a new role for CIP4 in the promotion of migration and invasion of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells and establishes the contribution of F-BAR proteins to cancer cell motility and invasion. PMID:20940394

  4. A comprehensive genome-wide analysis of melanoma Breslow thickness identifies interaction between CDC42 and SCIN genetic variants.

    PubMed

    Vaysse, Amaury; Fang, Shenying; Brossard, Myriam; Wei, Qingyi; Chen, Wei V; Mohamdi, Hamida; Vincent-Fetita, Lynda; Margaritte-Jeannin, Patricia; Lavielle, Nolwenn; Maubec, Eve; Lathrop, Mark; Avril, Marie-Françoise; Amos, Christopher I; Lee, Jeffrey E; Demenais, Florence

    2016-11-01

    Breslow thickness (BT) is a major prognostic factor of cutaneous melanoma (CM), the most fatal skin cancer. The genetic component of BT has only been explored by candidate gene studies with inconsistent results. Our objective was to uncover the genetic factors underlying BT using an hypothesis-free genome-wide approach. Our analysis strategy integrated a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for BT followed by pathway analysis of GWAS outcomes using the gene-set enrichment analysis (GSEA) method and epistasis analysis within BT-associated pathways. This strategy was applied to two large CM datasets with Hapmap3-imputed SNP data: the French MELARISK study for discovery (966 cases) and the MD Anderson Cancer Center study (1,546 cases) for replication. While no marginal effect of individual SNPs was revealed through GWAS, three pathways, defined by gene ontology (GO) categories were significantly enriched in genes associated with BT (false discovery rate ≤5% in both studies): hormone activity, cytokine activity and myeloid cell differentiation. Epistasis analysis, within each significant GO, identified a statistically significant interaction between CDC42 and SCIN SNPs (pmeta-int =2.2 × 10(-6) , which met the overall multiple-testing corrected threshold of 2.5 × 10(-6) ). These two SNPs (and proxies) are strongly associated with CDC42 and SCIN gene expression levels and map to regulatory elements in skin cells. This interaction has important biological relevance since CDC42 and SCIN proteins have opposite effects in actin cytoskeleton organization and dynamics, a key mechanism underlying melanoma cell migration and invasion. PMID:27347659

  5. Lipoxin A4 redistributes myosin IIA and Cdc42 in macrophages: implications for phagocytosis of apoptotic leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Reville, Keira; Crean, John K; Vivers, Sharon; Dransfield, Ian; Godson, Catherine

    2006-02-01

    Lipoxins (LXs) are endogenously produced anti-inflammatory agents that modulate leukocyte trafficking and stimulate nonphlogistic macrophage phagocytosis of apoptotic neutrophils, thereby promoting the resolution of inflammation. Previous data suggest a role for altered protein phosphorylation and cytoskeletal rearrangement in LX-stimulated phagocytosis but the exact mechanisms remain unclear. In this study we examine the effects of LXA4 on the protein phosphorylation pattern of THP-1 cells differentiated into a macrophage-like phenotype. THP-1 cells stimulated with LXA4 (1 nM) exhibit dephosphorylation of a 220-kDa protein. Using mass spectrometry, this protein was identified as MYH9, a nonmuscle myosin H chain II isoform A, which is involved in cytoskeleton rearrangement. THP-1 cells treated with LXA4 adopt a polarized morphology with activated Cdc42 localized toward the leading edge and MYH9 localized at the cell posterior. Polarized distribution of Cdc42 is associated with Akt/PKB-mediated Cdc42 activation. Interestingly, the annexin-derived peptide Ac2-26, a recently described agonist for the LXA4 receptor, also stimulates macrophage phagocytosis, MYH9 dephosphorylation, and MYH9 redistribution. In addition, we demonstrate that LXA4 stimulates the phosphorylation of key polarity organization molecules: Akt, protein kinase Czeta, and glycogen synthase kinase-3beta. Inhibition of LXA4-induced Akt and protein kinase Czeta activity with specific inhibitors prevented LXA4-stimulated phagocytosis of both apoptotic polymorphonuclear neutrophils and lymphocytes, highlighting a potential use for LXA4 in the treatment of autoimmune diseases. Furthermore, phosphorylation and subsequent inactivation of glycogen synthase kinase-3beta resulted in an increase in phagocytosis similar to that of LXA4. These data highlight an integrated mechanism whereby LXA4 regulates phagocytosis through facilitative actin cytoskeleton rearrangement and cell polarization. PMID:16424219

  6. Caveolin-1 and CDC42 mediated endocytosis of silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles in HeLa cells

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Summary Nanomedicine is a rapidly growing field in nanotechnology, which has great potential in the development of new therapies for numerous diseases. For example iron oxide nanoparticles are in clinical use already in the thermotherapy of brain cancer. Although it has been shown, that tumor cells take up these particles in vitro, little is known about the internalization routes. Understanding of the underlying uptake mechanisms would be very useful for faster and precise development of nanoparticles for clinical applications. This study aims at the identification of key proteins, which are crucial for the active uptake of iron oxide nanoparticles by HeLa cells (human cervical cancer) as a model cell line. Cells were transfected with specific siRNAs against Caveolin-1, Dynamin 2, Flotillin-1, Clathrin, PIP5Kα and CDC42. Knockdown of Caveolin-1 reduces endocytosis of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) and silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles (SCIONs) between 23 and 41%, depending on the surface characteristics of the nanoparticles and the experimental design. Knockdown of CDC42 showed a 46% decrease of the internalization of PEGylated SPIONs within 24 h incubation time. Knockdown of Dynamin 2, Flotillin-1, Clathrin and PIP5Kα caused no or only minor effects. Hence endocytosis in HeLa cells of iron oxide nanoparticles, used in this study, is mainly mediated by Caveolin-1 and CDC42. It is shown here for the first time, which proteins of the endocytotic pathway mediate the endocytosis of silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles in HeLa cells in vitro. In future studies more experiments should be carried out with different cell lines and other well-defined nanoparticle species to elucidate possible general principles. PMID:25671161

  7. Constitutive activated Cdc42-associated kinase (Ack) phosphorylation at arrested endocytic clathrin-coated pits of cells that lack dynamin

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hongying; Ferguson, Shawn M.; Dephoure, Noah; Park, Ryan; Yang, Yan; Volpicelli-Daley, Laura; Gygi, Steven; Schlessinger, Joseph; De Camilli, Pietro

    2011-01-01

    Clathrin-mediated endocytosis is a fundamental cellular process conserved from yeast to mammals and is an important endocytic route for the internalization of many specific cargos, including activated growth factor receptors. Here we examined changes in tyrosine phosphorylation, a representative output of growth factor receptor signaling, in cells in which endocytic clathrin-coated pits are frozen at a deeply invaginated state, that is, cells that lack dynamin (fibroblasts from dynamin 1, dynamin 2 double conditional knockout mice). The major change observed in these cells relative to wild-type cells was an increase in the phosphorylation state, and thus activation, of activated Cdc42-associated kinase (Ack), a nonreceptor tyrosine kinase. Ack is concentrated at clathrin-coated pits, and binds clathrin heavy chain via two clathrin boxes. RNA interference–based approaches and pharmacological manipulations further demonstrated that the phosphorylation of Ack requires both clathrin assembly into endocytic clathrin-coated pits and active Cdc42. These findings reveal a link between progression of clathrin-coated pits to endocytic vesicles and an activation–deactivation cycle of Ack. PMID:21169560

  8. RNAi screen of Salmonella invasion shows role of COPI in membrane targeting of cholesterol and Cdc42

    PubMed Central

    Misselwitz, Benjamin; Dilling, Sabrina; Vonaesch, Pascale; Sacher, Raphael; Snijder, Berend; Schlumberger, Markus; Rout, Samuel; Stark, Manuel; Mering, Christian von; Pelkmans, Lucas; Hardt, Wolf-Dietrich

    2011-01-01

    The pathogen Salmonella Typhimurium is a common cause of diarrhea and invades the gut tissue by injecting a cocktail of virulence factors into epithelial cells, triggering actin rearrangements, membrane ruffling and pathogen entry. One of these factors is SopE, a G-nucleotide exchange factor for the host cellular Rho GTPases Rac1 and Cdc42. How SopE mediates cellular invasion is incompletely understood. Using genome-scale RNAi screening we identified 72 known and novel host cell proteins affecting SopE-mediated entry. Follow-up assays assigned these ‘hits' to particular steps of the invasion process; i.e., binding, effector injection, membrane ruffling, membrane closure and maturation of the Salmonella-containing vacuole. Depletion of the COPI complex revealed a unique effect on virulence factor injection and membrane ruffling. Both effects are attributable to mislocalization of cholesterol, sphingolipids, Rac1 and Cdc42 away from the plasma membrane into a large intracellular compartment. Equivalent results were obtained with the vesicular stomatitis virus. Therefore, COPI-facilitated maintenance of lipids may represent a novel, unifying mechanism essential for a wide range of pathogens, offering opportunities for designing new drugs. PMID:21407211

  9. The N-BAR Domain Protein, Bin3, Regulates Rac1- and Cdc42-Dependent Processes in Myogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Simionescu-Bankston, Adriana; Leoni, Giovanna; Wang, Yanru; Pham, Peter P.; Ramalingam, Arivudainambi; DuHadaway, James B.; Faundez, Victor; Nusrat, Asma; Prendergast, George C.; Pavlath, Grace K.

    2013-01-01

    Actin dynamics are necessary at multiple steps in the formation of multinucleated muscle cells. BAR domain proteins can regulate actin dynamics in several cell types, but have been little studied in skeletal muscle. Here, we identify novel functions for the N-BAR domain protein, Bridging integrator 3 (Bin3), during myogenesis in mice. Bin3 plays an important role in regulating myofiber size in vitro and in vivo. During early myogenesis, Bin3 promotes migration of differentiated muscle cells, where it colocalizes with F-actin in lamellipodia. In addition, Bin3 forms a complex with Rac1 and Cdc42, Rho GTPases involved in actin polymerization, which are known to be essential for myotube formation. Importantly, a Bin3-dependent pathway is a major regulator of Rac1 and Cdc42 activity in differentiated muscle cells. Overall, these data classify N-BAR domain proteins as novel regulators of actin-dependent processes in myogenesis, and further implicate BAR domain proteins in muscle growth and repair. PMID:23872330

  10. Inter-kingdom Signaling by the Legionella Quorum Sensing Molecule LAI-1 Modulates Cell Migration through an IQGAP1-Cdc42-ARHGEF9-Dependent Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Sylvia; Schell, Ursula; Heuer, Natalie; Hager, Dominik; Albers, Michael F.; Matthias, Jan; Fahrnbauer, Felix; Trauner, Dirk; Eichinger, Ludwig; Hedberg, Christian; Hilbi, Hubert

    2015-01-01

    Small molecule signaling promotes the communication between bacteria as well as between bacteria and eukaryotes. The opportunistic pathogenic bacterium Legionella pneumophila employs LAI-1 (3-hydroxypentadecane-4-one) for bacterial cell-cell communication. LAI-1 is produced and detected by the Lqs (Legionella quorum sensing) system, which regulates a variety of processes including natural competence for DNA uptake and pathogen-host cell interactions. In this study, we analyze the role of LAI-1 in inter-kingdom signaling. L. pneumophila lacking the autoinducer synthase LqsA no longer impeded the migration of infected cells, and the defect was complemented by plasmid-borne lqsA. Synthetic LAI-1 dose-dependently inhibited cell migration, without affecting bacterial uptake or cytotoxicity. The forward migration index but not the velocity of LAI-1-treated cells was reduced, and the cell cytoskeleton appeared destabilized. LAI-1-dependent inhibition of cell migration involved the scaffold protein IQGAP1, the small GTPase Cdc42 as well as the Cdc42-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor ARHGEF9, but not other modulators of Cdc42, or RhoA, Rac1 or Ran GTPase. Upon treatment with LAI-1, Cdc42 was inactivated and IQGAP1 redistributed to the cell cortex regardless of whether Cdc42 was present or not. Furthermore, LAI-1 reversed the inhibition of cell migration by L. pneumophila, suggesting that the compound and the bacteria antagonistically target host signaling pathway(s). Collectively, the results indicate that the L. pneumophila quorum sensing compound LAI-1 modulates migration of eukaryotic cells through a signaling pathway involving IQGAP1, Cdc42 and ARHGEF9. PMID:26633832

  11. CdGAP/ARHGAP31, a Cdc42/Rac1 GTPase regulator, is critical for vascular development and VEGF-mediated angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Caron, Christine; DeGeer, Jonathan; Fournier, Patrick; Duquette, Philippe M; Luangrath, Vilayphone; Ishii, Hidetaka; Karimzadeh, Fereshteh; Lamarche-Vane, Nathalie; Royal, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the CdGAP/ARHGAP31 gene, which encodes a GTPase-activating protein for Rac1 and Cdc42, have been reported causative in the Adams-Oliver developmental syndrome often associated with vascular defects. However, despite its abundant expression in endothelial cells, CdGAP function in the vasculature remains unknown. Here, we show that vascular development is impaired in CdGAP-deficient mouse embryos at E15.5. This is associated with superficial vessel defects and subcutaneous edema, resulting in 44% embryonic/perinatal lethality. VEGF-driven angiogenesis is defective in CdGAP(-/-) mice, showing reduced capillary sprouting from aortic ring explants. Similarly, VEGF-dependent endothelial cell migration and capillary formation are inhibited upon CdGAP knockdown. Mechanistically, CdGAP associates with VEGF receptor-2 and controls VEGF-dependent signaling. Consequently, CdGAP depletion results in impaired VEGF-mediated Rac1 activation and reduced phosphorylation of critical intracellular mediators including Gab1, Akt, PLCγ and SHP2. These findings are the first to demonstrate the importance of CdGAP in embryonic vascular development and VEGF-induced signaling, and highlight CdGAP as a potential therapeutic target to treat pathological angiogenesis and vascular dysfunction. PMID:27270835

  12. CdGAP/ARHGAP31, a Cdc42/Rac1 GTPase regulator, is critical for vascular development and VEGF-mediated angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Caron, Christine; DeGeer, Jonathan; Fournier, Patrick; Duquette, Philippe M.; Luangrath, Vilayphone; Ishii, Hidetaka; Karimzadeh, Fereshteh; Lamarche-Vane, Nathalie; Royal, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the CdGAP/ARHGAP31 gene, which encodes a GTPase-activating protein for Rac1 and Cdc42, have been reported causative in the Adams-Oliver developmental syndrome often associated with vascular defects. However, despite its abundant expression in endothelial cells, CdGAP function in the vasculature remains unknown. Here, we show that vascular development is impaired in CdGAP-deficient mouse embryos at E15.5. This is associated with superficial vessel defects and subcutaneous edema, resulting in 44% embryonic/perinatal lethality. VEGF-driven angiogenesis is defective in CdGAP−/− mice, showing reduced capillary sprouting from aortic ring explants. Similarly, VEGF-dependent endothelial cell migration and capillary formation are inhibited upon CdGAP knockdown. Mechanistically, CdGAP associates with VEGF receptor-2 and controls VEGF-dependent signaling. Consequently, CdGAP depletion results in impaired VEGF-mediated Rac1 activation and reduced phosphorylation of critical intracellular mediators including Gab1, Akt, PLCγ and SHP2. These findings are the first to demonstrate the importance of CdGAP in embryonic vascular development and VEGF-induced signaling, and highlight CdGAP as a potential therapeutic target to treat pathological angiogenesis and vascular dysfunction. PMID:27270835

  13. Two Pathways through Cdc42 Couple the N-Formyl Receptor to Actin Nucleation in Permeabilized Human Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Glogauer, M.; Hartwig, J.; Stossel, T.

    2000-01-01

    We developed a permeabilization method that retains coupling between N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine tripeptide (FMLP) receptor stimulation, shape changes, and barbed-end actin nucleation in human neutrophils. Using GTP analogues, phosphoinositides, a phosphoinositide-binding peptide, constitutively active or inactive Rho GTPase mutants, and activating or inhibitory peptides derived from neural Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome family proteins (N-WASP), we identified signaling pathways leading from the FMLP receptor to actin nucleation that require Cdc42, but then diverge. One branch traverses the actin nucleation pathway involving N-WASP and the Arp2/3 complex, whereas the other operates through active Rac to promote actin nucleation. Both pathways depend on phosphoinositide expression. Since maximal inhibition of the Arp2/3 pathway leaves an N17Rac inhibitable alternate pathway intact, we conclude that this alternate involves phosphoinositide-mediated uncapping of actin filament barbed ends. PMID:10953003

  14. Cdc42- and IRSp53-dependent contractile filopodia tether presumptive lens and retina to coordinate epithelial invagination

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Bharesh K.; Disanza, Andrea; Choi, Sue-Yeon; Faber, Sonya C.; Lou, Ming; Beggs, Hilary E.; Scita, Giorgio; Zheng, Yi; Lang, Richard A.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The vertebrate lens provides an excellent model with which to study the mechanisms required for epithelial invagination. In the mouse, the lens forms from the head surface ectoderm. A domain of ectoderm first thickens to form the lens placode and then invaginates to form the lens pit. The epithelium of the lens placode remains in close apposition to the epithelium of the presumptive retina as these structures undergo a coordinated invagination. Here, we show that F-actin-rich basal filopodia that link adjacent presumptive lens and retinal epithelia function as physical tethers that coordinate invagination. The filopodia, most of which originate in the presumptive lens, form at E9.5 when presumptive lens and retinal epithelia first come into close contact, and have retracted by E11.5 when invagination is complete. At E10.5 - the lens pit stage - there is approximately one filopodium per epithelial cell. Formation of filopodia is dependent on the Rho family GTPase Cdc42 and the Cdc42 effector IRSp53 (Baiap2). Loss of filopodia results in reduced lens pit invagination. Pharmacological manipulation of the actin-myosin contraction pathway showed that the filopodia can respond rapidly in length to change inter-epithelial distance. These data suggest that the lens-retina inter-epithelial filopodia are a fine-tuning mechanism to assist in lens pit invagination by transmitting the forces between presumptive lens and retina. Although invagination of the archenteron in sea urchins and dorsal closure in Drosophila are known to be partly dependent on filopodia, this mechanism of morphogenesis has not previously been identified in vertebrates. PMID:19820184

  15. Shear stress–induced endothelial cell polarization is mediated by Rho and Rac but not Cdc42 or PI 3-kinases

    PubMed Central

    Wojciak-Stothard, Beata; Ridley, Anne J.

    2003-01-01

    Shear stress induces endothelial polarization and migration in the direction of flow accompanied by extensive remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton. The GTPases RhoA, Rac1, and Cdc42 are known to regulate cell shape changes through effects on the cytoskeleton and cell adhesion. We show here that all three GTPases become rapidly activated by shear stress, and that each is important for different aspects of the endothelial response. RhoA was activated within 5 min after stimulation with shear stress and led to cell rounding via Rho-kinase. Subsequently, the cells respread and elongated within the direction of shear stress as RhoA activity returned to baseline and Rac1 and Cdc42 reached peak activation. Cell elongation required Rac1 and Cdc42 but not phosphatidylinositide 3-kinases. Cdc42 and PI3Ks were not required to establish shear stress–induced polarity although they contributed to optimal migration speed. Instead, Rho and Rac1 regulated directionality of cell movement. Inhibition of Rho or Rho-kinase did not affect the cell speed but significantly increased cell displacement. Our results show that endothelial cells reorient in response to shear stress by a two-step process involving Rho-induced depolarization, followed by Rho/Rac-mediated polarization and migration in the direction of flow. PMID:12719476

  16. Grandparental stem cells in leech segmentation: differences in CDC42 expression are correlated with an alternating pattern of blast cell fates

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shaobing O.; Kuo, Dian-Han; Weisblat, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Embryonic segmentation in clitellate annelids (oligochaetes and leeches) is a cell lineage-driven process. Embryos of these worms generate a posterior growth zone consisting of 5 bilateral pairs of identified segmentation stem cells (teloblasts), each of which produces a column of segmental founder cells (blast cells). Each blast cell generates a lineage-specific clone via a stereotyped sequence of cell divisions, which are typically unequal both in terms of the relative size of the sister cells and in the progeny to which they give rise. In two of the five teloblast lineages, including the ventralmost, primary neurogenic (N) lineage, the blast cells adopt two different fates, designated nf and ns, in exact alternation within the blast cell column; this is termed a grandparental stem cell lineage. To lay groundwork for investigating unequal divisions in the leech Helobdella, we have surveyed the H. robusta genome for genes encoding orthologs of the Rho family GTPases, including the rho, rac and cdc42 sub-families, which are known to be involved in multiple processes involving cell polarization in other systems. We find that, in contrast to most other known systems the Helobdella genome contains two cdc42 orthologs, one of which is expressed at higher levels in the ns blast cells than in nf blast cells. We also demonstrate that the asymmetric divisions of the primary nf and ns blast cells are regulated by the polarized distribution of the activated form of the Cdc42 protein, rather than by the overall level of expression. Our results provide the first molecular insights into the mechanisms of the grandparental stem cell lineages, a novel, yet evolutionarily ancient stem cell division pattern. Our results also provide an example in which asymmetries in the distribution of Cdc42 activity, rather than in the overall levels of Cdc42 protein, are important regulating unequal divisions in animal cells. PMID:19747476

  17. Proliferation control in neural stem and progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Homem, Catarina CF; Repic, Marko; Knoblich, Juergen A

    2015-01-01

    Neural circuit function can be drastically affected by variations in the number of cells that are produced during development or by a reduction in adult cell number due to disease. Unlike many other organs, the brain is unable to compensate for such changes by increasing cell numbers or altering the size of the cells. For this reason, unique cell cycle and cell growth control mechanisms operate in the developing and adult brain. In Drosophila melanogaster and mammalian neural stem and progenitor cells these mechanisms are intricately coordinated with the developmental age and the nutritional, metabolic and hormonal state of the animal. Defects in neural stem cell proliferation that result in the generation of incorrect cell numbers or defects in neural stem cell differentiation can cause microcephaly or megalencephaly. PMID:26420377

  18. Distinct roles of Rho1, Cdc42, and Cyk3 in septum formation and abscission during yeast cytokinesis

    PubMed Central

    Onishi, Masayuki; Ko, Nolan; Nishihama, Ryuichi

    2013-01-01

    In yeast and animal cytokinesis, the small guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) Rho1/RhoA has an established role in formation of the contractile actomyosin ring, but its role, if any, during cleavage-furrow ingression and abscission is poorly understood. Through genetic screens in yeast, we found that either activation of Rho1 or inactivation of another small GTPase, Cdc42, promoted secondary septum (SS) formation, which appeared to be responsible for abscission. Consistent with this hypothesis, a dominant-negative Rho1 inhibited SS formation but not cleavage-furrow ingression or the concomitant actomyosin ring constriction. Moreover, Rho1 is temporarily inactivated during cleavage-furrow ingression; this inactivation requires the protein Cyk3, which binds Rho1-guanosine diphosphate via its catalytically inactive transglutaminase-like domain. Thus, unlike the active transglutaminases that activate RhoA, the multidomain protein Cyk3 appears to inhibit activation of Rho1 (and thus SS formation), while simultaneously promoting cleavage-furrow ingression through primary septum formation. This work suggests a general role for the catalytically inactive transglutaminases of fungi and animals, some of which have previously been implicated in cytokinesis. PMID:23878277

  19. CXCR4 and Gab1 cooperate to control the development of migrating muscle progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Vasyutina, Elena; Stebler, Jürg; Brand-Saberi, Beate; Schulz, Stefan; Raz, Erez; Birchmeier, Carmen

    2005-01-01

    Long-range migrating progenitor cells generate hypaxial muscle, for instance the muscle of the limbs, hypoglossal cord, and diaphragm. We show here that migrating muscle progenitors express the chemokine receptor CXCR4. The corresponding ligand, SDF1, is expressed in limb and branchial arch mesenchyme; i.e., along the routes and at the targets of the migratory cells. Ectopic application of SDF1 in the chick limb attracts muscle progenitor cells. In CXCR4 mutant mice, the number of muscle progenitors that colonize the anlage of the tongue and the dorsal limb was reduced. Changes in the distribution of the muscle progenitor cells were accompanied by increased apoptosis, indicating that CXCR4 signals provide not only attractive cues but also control survival. Gab1 encodes an adaptor protein that transduces signals elicited by tyrosine kinase receptors, for instance the c-Met receptor, and plays a role in the migration of muscle progenitor cells. We found that CXCR4 and Gab1 interact genetically. For instance, muscle progenitors do not reach the anlage of the tongue in CXCR4;Gab1 double mutants; this target is colonized in either of the single mutants. Our analysis reveals a role of SDF1/CXCR4 signaling in the development of migrating muscle progenitors and shows that a threshold number of progenitor cells is required to generate muscle of appropriate size. PMID:16166380

  20. CXCR4 and Gab1 cooperate to control the development of migrating muscle progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Vasyutina, Elena; Stebler, Jürg; Brand-Saberi, Beate; Schulz, Stefan; Raz, Erez; Birchmeier, Carmen

    2005-09-15

    Long-range migrating progenitor cells generate hypaxial muscle, for instance the muscle of the limbs, hypoglossal cord, and diaphragm. We show here that migrating muscle progenitors express the chemokine receptor CXCR4. The corresponding ligand, SDF1, is expressed in limb and branchial arch mesenchyme; i.e., along the routes and at the targets of the migratory cells. Ectopic application of SDF1 in the chick limb attracts muscle progenitor cells. In CXCR4 mutant mice, the number of muscle progenitors that colonize the anlage of the tongue and the dorsal limb was reduced. Changes in the distribution of the muscle progenitor cells were accompanied by increased apoptosis, indicating that CXCR4 signals provide not only attractive cues but also control survival. Gab1 encodes an adaptor protein that transduces signals elicited by tyrosine kinase receptors, for instance the c-Met receptor, and plays a role in the migration of muscle progenitor cells. We found that CXCR4 and Gab1 interact genetically. For instance, muscle progenitors do not reach the anlage of the tongue in CXCR4;Gab1 double mutants; this target is colonized in either of the single mutants. Our analysis reveals a role of SDF1/CXCR4 signaling in the development of migrating muscle progenitors and shows that a threshold number of progenitor cells is required to generate muscle of appropriate size. PMID:16166380

  1. Spatio-temporal co-ordination of RhoA, Rac1 and Cdc42 activation during prototypical edge protrusion and retraction dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Katrin; Reimann, Andreas; Fritz, Rafael D.; Ryu, Hyunryul; Jeon, Noo Li; Pertz, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    The three canonical Rho GTPases RhoA, Rac1 and Cdc42 co-ordinate cytoskeletal dynamics. Recent studies indicate that all three Rho GTPases are activated at the leading edge of motile fibroblasts, where their activity fluctuates at subminute time and micrometer length scales. Here, we use a microfluidic chip to acutely manipulate fibroblast edge dynamics by applying pulses of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) or the Rho kinase inhibitor Y-27632 (which lowers contractility). This induces acute and robust membrane protrusion and retraction events, that exhibit stereotyped cytoskeletal dynamics, allowing us to fairly compare specific morphodynamic states across experiments. Using a novel Cdc42, as well as previously described, second generation RhoA and Rac1 biosensors, we observe distinct spatio-temporal signaling programs that involve all three Rho GTPases, during protrusion/retraction edge dynamics. Our results suggest that Rac1, Cdc42 and RhoA regulate different cytoskeletal and adhesion processes to fine tune the highly plastic edge protrusion/retraction dynamics that power cell motility. PMID:26912264

  2. Antipsychotic drugs induce cell cytoskeleton reorganization in glial and neuronal cells via Rho/Cdc42 signal pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mao-Liang; Tsai, Fu-Ming; Lee, Ming-Cheng; Lin, Yi-Yin

    2016-11-01

    Long-term administration of antipsychotic drugs (APDs) has been theorized to effect drug-induced changes in protein expression in the brain. Our previous findings revealed that ADPs can regulate Rho GDP-dissociation inhibitor 1 (RhoGDI1) expression in glial cells. To reveal whether APDs (haloperidol, risperidone, and clozapine) might regulate cell functions in rat brain by affecting RhoGDI1, RhoGDI1 regulation, RhoGDI1-related Rho family protein, and also MLC2 in brain of 7-day APD treatment rat were examined. Increased expression of RhoGDI1 and RhoA and decreased expression of MLC2, p-MLC2 and ARP2/3 were found in the cortex of APD-treated rats. The activation of RhoA in APD-treated rat cortex was also found. The regulation of RhoGDI1-induced protein expression and its relation to intracellular stress filament production and cell migration were further examined in APD-treated C6 and B35 cells. APD-induced RhoA expression and activation in C6 cells and Cdc42 expression and activation in B35 cells were investigated. In C6 cells, ARP2/3, ROCK1, pMLC2, and PFN1 expressions were decreased, and N-WASP expression was increased by any of the three APDs. In B35 cells, haloperidol decreased ROCK1 expression, but risperidone increased ROCK1 expression. MLC2, p-MLC2, and PFN1 expressions were decreased in B35 cells treated with either risperidone or clozapine. N-WASP expression was decreased by haloperidol and clozapine. We also found all three APDs enhance C6 and B35 F-actin condensation and migration ability. PMID:27302765

  3. Gene 33/Mig-6, a Transcriptionally Inducible Adapter Protein That Binds GTP-Cdc42 and Activates SAPK/JNK*

    PubMed Central

    Makkinje, Anthony; Quinn, Deborah A.; Chen, Ang; Cadilla, Carmen L.; Force, Thomas; Bonventre, Joseph V.; Kyriakis, John M.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic stresses, including the mechanical strain caused by hypertension or excess pulmonary ventilation pressure, lead to important clinical consequences, including hypertrophy and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Pathologic hypertrophy contributes to decreased organ function and, ultimately, organ failure; and cardiac and diabetic renal hypertrophy are major causes of morbidity and morality in the developed world. Likewise, acute respiratory distress syndrome is a serious potential side effect of mechanical pulmonary ventilation. Whereas the deleterious effects of chronic stress are well established, the molecular mechanisms by which these stresses affect cell function are still poorly characterized. gene 33 (also called mitogen-inducible gene-6, mig-6) is an immediate early gene that is transcriptionally induced by a divergent array of extra-cellular stimuli. The physiologic function of Gene 33 is unknown. Here we show that gene 33 mRNA levels increase sharply in response to a set of commonly occurring chronic stress stimuli: mechanical strain, vasoactive peptides, and diabetic nephropathy. Induction of gene 33 requires the stress-activated protein kinases (SAPKs)/c-Jun NH2-terminal kinases. This expression pattern suggests that gene 33 is a potential marker for diabetic nephropathy and other pathologic responses to persistent sublethal stress. The structure of Gene 33 indicates an adapter protein capable of binding monomeric GTPases of the Rho subfamily. Consistent with this, Gene 33 interacts in vivo and, in a GTP-dependent manner, in vitro with Cdc42Hs; and transient expression of Gene 33 results in the selective activation of the SAPKs. These results imply a reciprocal, positive feedback relationship between Gene 33 expression and SAPK activation. Expression of Gene 33 at sufficient levels may enable a compensatory reprogramming of cellular function in response to chronic stress, which may have pathophysiological consequences. PMID:10749885

  4. GRP75 upregulates clathrin-independent endocytosis through actin cytoskeleton reorganization mediated by the concurrent activation of Cdc42 and RhoA.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hang; Gao, Zhihui; He, Changzheng; Xiang, Rong; van Kuppevelt, Toin H; Belting, Mattias; Zhang, Sihe

    2016-05-01

    Therapeutic macromolecules are internalized into the cell by either clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) or clathrin-independent endocytosis (CIE). Although some chaperone proteins play an essential role in CME (e.g. Hsc70 in clathrin uncoating), relatively few of these proteins are functionally involved in CIE. We previously revealed a role for the mitochondrial chaperone protein GRP75 in heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG)-mediated, membrane raft-associated macromolecule endocytosis. However, the mechanism underlying this process remains unclear. In this study, using a mitochondrial signal peptide-directed protein trafficking expression strategy, we demonstrate that wild-type GRP75 expression enhanced the uptakes of HSPG and CIE marker cholera toxin B subunit but impaired the uptake of CME marker transferrin. The endocytosis regulation function of GRP75 is largely mediated by its subcellular location in mitochondria and is essentially determined by its ATPase domain. Interestingly, the mitochondrial expression of GRP75 or its ATPase domain significantly stimulates increases in both RhoA and Cdc42 activation, remarkably induces stress fibers and enhances filopodia formation, which collectively results in the promotion of CIE, but the inhibition of CME. Furthermore, silencing of Cdc42 or RhoA impaired the ability of GRP75 overexpression to increase CIE. Therefore, these results suggest that endocytosis vesicle enrichment of GRP75 by mitochondria trafficking upregulates CIE through an actin cytoskeleton reorganization mechanism mediated by the concurrent activation of Cdc42 and RhoA. This finding provides novel insight into organelle-derived chaperone signaling and the regulation of different endocytosis pathways in cells. PMID:27090015

  5. Assembly of scaffold-mediated complexes containing Cdc42p, the exchange factor Cdc24p, and the effector Cla4p required for cell cycle-regulated phosphorylation of Cdc24p.

    PubMed

    Bose, I; Irazoqui, J E; Moskow, J J; Bardes, E S; Zyla, T R; Lew, D J

    2001-03-01

    In budding yeast cells, the cytoskeletal polarization and depolarization events that shape the bud are triggered at specific times during the cell cycle by the cyclin-dependent kinase Cdc28p. Polarity establishment also requires the small GTPase Cdc42p and its exchange factor, Cdc24p, but the mechanism whereby Cdc28p induces Cdc42p-dependent polarization is unknown. Here we show that Cdc24p becomes phosphorylated in a cell cycle-dependent manner, triggered by Cdc28p. However, the role of Cdc28p is indirect, and the phosphorylation appears to be catalyzed by the p21-activated kinase family member Cla4p and also depends on Cdc42p and the scaffold protein Bem1p. Expression of GTP-Cdc42p, the product of Cdc24p-mediated GDP/GTP exchange, stimulated Cdc24p phosphorylation independent of cell cycle cues, raising the possibility that the phosphorylation is part of a feedback regulatory pathway. Bem1p binds directly to Cdc24p, to Cla4p, and to GTP-bound Cdc42p and can mediate complex formation between these proteins in vitro. We suggest that Bem1p acts to concentrate polarity establishment proteins at a discrete site, facilitating polarization and promoting Cdc24p phosphorylation at specific times during the cell cycle. PMID:11113154

  6. MicroRNA-132 Interact with p250GAP/Cdc42 Pathway in the Hippocampal Neuronal Culture Model of Acquired Epilepsy and Associated with Epileptogenesis Process.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jinxian; Huang, Hao; Zhou, Xin; Liu, Xi; Ou, Shu; Xu, Tao; Li, Ruohan; Ma, Limin; Chen, Yangmei

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that epilepsy is the result of synaptic reorganization and pathological excitatory loop formation in the central nervous system; however, the mechanisms that regulate this process are not well understood. We proposed that microRNA-132 (miR-132) and p250GAP might play important roles in this process by activating the downstream Rho GTPase family. We tested this hypothesis using a magnesium-free medium-induced epileptic model of cultured hippocampal neurons. We investigated whether miR-132 regulates GTPase activity through p250GAP and found that Cdc42 was significantly activated in our experimental model. Silencing miR-132 inhibited the electrical excitability level of cultured epileptic neurons, whereas silencing p250GAP had an opposite effect. In addition, we verified the effect of miR-132 in vivo and found that silencing miR-132 inhibited the aberrant formation of dendritic spines and chronic spontaneous seizure in a lithium-pilocarpine-induced epileptic mouse model. Finally, we confirmed that silencing miR-132 has a neuroprotective effect on cultured epileptic neurons; however, this effect did not occur through the p250GAP pathway. Generally, silencing miR-132 may suppress spontaneous seizure activity through the miR-132/p250GAP/Cdc42 pathway by regulating the morphology and electrophysiology of dendritic spines; therefore, miR-132 may serve as a potential target for the development of antiepileptic drugs. PMID:27579184

  7. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase enables phagocytosis of large particles by terminating actin assembly through Rac/Cdc42 GTPase-activating proteins

    PubMed Central

    Schlam, Daniel; Bagshaw, Richard D.; Freeman, Spencer A.; Collins, Richard F.; Pawson, Tony; Fairn, Gregory D.; Grinstein, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Phagocytosis is responsible for the elimination of particles of widely disparate sizes, from large fungi or effete cells to small bacteria. Though superficially similar, the molecular mechanisms involved differ: engulfment of large targets requires phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), while that of small ones does not. Here, we report that inactivation of Rac and Cdc42 at phagocytic cups is essential to complete internalization of large particles. Through a screen of 62 RhoGAP-family members, we demonstrate that ARHGAP12, ARHGAP25 and SH3BP1 are responsible for GTPase inactivation. Silencing these RhoGAPs impairs phagocytosis of large targets. The GAPs are recruited to large—but not small—phagocytic cups by products of PI3K, where they synergistically inactivate Rac and Cdc42. Remarkably, the prominent accumulation of phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate characteristic of large-phagosome formation is less evident during phagocytosis of small targets, accounting for the contrasting RhoGAP distribution and the differential requirement for PI3K during phagocytosis of dissimilarly sized particles. PMID:26465210

  8. Cdc42 and p190RhoGAP activation by CCN2 regulates cell spreading and polarity and induces actin disassembly in migrating keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Kiwanuka, Elizabeth; Lee, Cameron Cy; Hackl, Florian; Caterson, Edward J; Junker, Johan Pe; Gerdin, Bengt; Eriksson, Elof

    2016-06-01

    Cell migration requires spatiotemporal integration of signals that regulate cytoskeletal dynamics. In response to a migration-promoting agent, cells begin to polarise and extend protrusions in the direction of migration. These cytoskeletal rearrangements are orchestrated by a variety of proteins, including focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and the Rho family of GTPases. CCN2, also known as connective tissue growth factor, has emerged as a regulator of cell migration but the mechanism by which CCN2 regulates keratinocyte function is not well understood. In this article, we sought to elucidate the basic mechanism of CCN2-induced cell migration in human keratinocytes. Immunohistochemical staining was used to demonstrate that treatment with CCN2 induces a migratory phenotype through actin disassembly, spreading of lamellipodia and re-orientation of the Golgi. In vitro assays were used to show that CCN2-induced cell migration is dependent on FAK, RhoA and Cdc42, but independent of Rac1. CCN2-treated keratinocytes displayed increased Cdc42 activity and decreased RhoA activity up to 12 hours post-treatment, with upregulation of p190RhoGAP. An improved understanding of how CCN2 regulates cell migration may establish the foundation for future therapeutics in fibrotic and neoplastic diseases. PMID:25185742

  9. MicroRNA-132 Interact with p250GAP/Cdc42 Pathway in the Hippocampal Neuronal Culture Model of Acquired Epilepsy and Associated with Epileptogenesis Process

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hao; Zhou, Xin; Liu, Xi; Xu, Tao; Ma, Limin

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that epilepsy is the result of synaptic reorganization and pathological excitatory loop formation in the central nervous system; however, the mechanisms that regulate this process are not well understood. We proposed that microRNA-132 (miR-132) and p250GAP might play important roles in this process by activating the downstream Rho GTPase family. We tested this hypothesis using a magnesium-free medium-induced epileptic model of cultured hippocampal neurons. We investigated whether miR-132 regulates GTPase activity through p250GAP and found that Cdc42 was significantly activated in our experimental model. Silencing miR-132 inhibited the electrical excitability level of cultured epileptic neurons, whereas silencing p250GAP had an opposite effect. In addition, we verified the effect of miR-132 in vivo and found that silencing miR-132 inhibited the aberrant formation of dendritic spines and chronic spontaneous seizure in a lithium-pilocarpine-induced epileptic mouse model. Finally, we confirmed that silencing miR-132 has a neuroprotective effect on cultured epileptic neurons; however, this effect did not occur through the p250GAP pathway. Generally, silencing miR-132 may suppress spontaneous seizure activity through the miR-132/p250GAP/Cdc42 pathway by regulating the morphology and electrophysiology of dendritic spines; therefore, miR-132 may serve as a potential target for the development of antiepileptic drugs. PMID:27579184

  10. Role of a Cdc42p Effector Pathway in Recruitment of the Yeast Septins to the Presumptive Bud SiteD⃞V⃞

    PubMed Central

    Iwase, Masayuki; Luo, Jianying; Nagaraj, Satish; Longtine, Mark; Kim, Hyong Bai; Haarer, Brian K.; Caruso, Carlo; Tong, Zongtian; Pringle, John R.; Bi, Erfei

    2006-01-01

    The septins are GTP-binding, filament-forming proteins that are involved in cytokinesis and other processes. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the septins are recruited to the presumptive bud site at the cell cortex, where they form a ring through which the bud emerges. We report here that in wild-type cells, the septins typically become detectable in the vicinity of the bud site several minutes before ring formation, but the ring itself is the first distinct structure that forms. Septin recruitment depends on activated Cdc42p but not on the normal pathway for bud-site selection. Recruitment occurs in the absence of F-actin, but ring formation is delayed. Mutant phenotypes and suppression data suggest that the Cdc42p effectors Gic1p and Gic2p, previously implicated in polarization of the actin cytoskeleton, also function in septin recruitment. Two-hybrid, in vitro protein binding, and coimmunoprecipitation data indicate that this role involves a direct interaction of the Gic proteins with the septin Cdc12p. PMID:16371506

  11. c-Myc–mediated control of cell fate in megakaryocyte-erythrocyte progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yinshi; Niu, Chao; Breslin, Peter; Tang, Minghui; Zhang, Shubin; Wei, Wei; Kini, Ameet R.; Paner, Gladell P.; Alkan, Serhan; Morris, Stephan W.; Diaz, Manuel; Stiff, Patrick J.

    2009-01-01

    It has been found that c-Myc protein plays a critical role in controlling self-renewal versus differentiation in hematopoietic stem cells. We report that c-Myc also controls the fate of megakaryocyte-erythrocyte progenitors through regulating the differentiation of erythroid and megakaryocytic progenitors. In addition to the significant reduction of granulocytes/macrophages and B and T lymphocytes because of the reduction of their corresponding progenitors, we found significantly increased numbers of megakaryocytic progenitors and mature megakaryocytes in bone marrow and spleens of c-Myc-knockout (c-Myc−/−) mice. Differentiation of erythrocytes was blocked at the erythroid progenitor stage. This increased megakaryocytopoiesis is a cell-intrinsic defect of c-Myc-mutant hematopoietic stem cells, as shown by transplantation studies. Furthermore, we found that c-Myc is required for polyploidy formation but not for cytoplasmic maturation of megakaryocytes. Megakaryocytes from c-Myc−/− mice are significantly smaller in size and lower in ploidy than those of control mice; however, because of the dramatic increase in megakaryocyte number, although fewer platelets are produced by each megakaryocyte, a greater than 3-fold increase in platelet number was consistently observed in c-Myc−/− mice. Thus, c-Myc−/− mice develop a syndrome of severe thrombocytosis-anemia-leukopenia because of significant increases in megakaryocytopoiesis and concomitant blockage of erythrocyte differentiation and reductions in myelolymphopoiesis. PMID:19372257

  12. Sox5 controls dorsal progenitor and interneuron specification in the spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Quiroga, Alejandra C; Stolt, C Claus; Diez del Corral, Ruth; Dimitrov, Spas; Pérez-Alcalá, Siro; Sock, Elisabeth; Barbas, Julio A; Wegner, Michael; Morales, Aixa V

    2015-05-01

    The basic organization of somatosensory circuits in the spinal cord is already setup during the initial patterning of the dorsal neural tube. Extrinsic signals, such as Wnt and TGF-β pathways, activate combinatorial codes of transcription factors that are responsible for generating a pattern of discrete domains of dorsal progenitors (dp). These progenitors will give rise to distinct dorsal interneurons (dI). The Wnt/ βcatenin signaling pathway controls specification of dp/dI1-3 progenitors and interneurons. According to the current model in the field, Wnt/βcatenin activity seems to act in a graded fashion in the spinal cord, as different relative levels determine the identity of adjacent progenitors. However, it is not clear how this activity gradient is controlled and how the identities of dI1-3 are differentially regulated by Wnt signalling. We have determined that two SoxD transcription factors, Sox5 and Sox6, are expressed in restricted domains of dorsal progenitors in the neural tube. Using gain- and loss-of function approaches in chicken embryos, we have established that Sox5 controls cell fate specification of dp2 and dp3 progenitors and, as a result, controls the correct number of the corresponding dorsal interneurons (dI2 and dI3). Furthermore, Sox5 exerts its function by restricting dorsally Wnt signaling activity via direct transcriptional induction of the negative Wnt pathway regulator Axin2. By that way, Sox5 acts as a Wnt pathway modulator that contributes to sharpen the dorsal gradient of Wnt/βcatenin activity to control the distinction of two functionally distinct types of interneurons, dI2 and dI3 involved in the somatosensory relay. PMID:25363628

  13. Hs3st3-modified heparan sulfate controls KIT+ progenitor expansion by regulating 3-O-sulfotransferases

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Vaishali N.; Lombaert, Isabelle M. A.; Cowherd, Samuel N.; Shworak, Nicholas W.; Xu, Yongmei; Liu, Jian; Hoffman, Matthew P.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The exquisite control of growth factor function by heparan sulfate (HS) is dictated by the tremendous structural heterogeneity of sulfated modifications. It is not known how specific HS structures control growth factor-dependent progenitor expansion during organogenesis. We isolated KIT+ progenitors from fetal salivary glands during a stage of rapid progenitor expansion and profiled HS biosynthetic enzyme expression. Enzymes generating a specific type of 3-O-sulfated-HS (3-O-HS) are enriched, and FGF10/FGFR2b signaling directly regulates their expression. Bioengineered 3-O-HS binds FGFR2b and stabilizes FGF10/FGFR2b complexes in a receptor- and growth factor-specific manner. Rapid autocrine feedback increases 3-O-HS, KIT and progenitor expansion. Knockdown of multiple Hs3st isoforms limits fetal progenitor expansion, but is rescued with bioengineered 3-O-HS, which also increases adult progenitor expansion. Rapidly altering a specific 3-O-sulfated epitope provides a cellular mechanism to modulate the response to FGFR2b signaling and control progenitor expansion. 3-O-HS may expand KIT+ progenitors in vitro for regenerative therapy. PMID:24960693

  14. Increased expression of microRNA-221 inhibits PAK1 in endothelial progenitor cells and impairs its function via c-Raf/MEK/ERK pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiaoping; Mao, Haian; Chen, Jin-yuan; Wen, Shengjun; Li, Dan; Ye, Meng; Lv, Zhongwei

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: ► MicroRNA-221 is upregulated in the endothelial progenitor cells of atherosclerosis patients. ► PAK1 is a direct target of microRNA-221. ► MicroRNA-221 inhibits EPCs proliferation through c-Raf/MEK/ERK pathway. -- Abstract: Coronary artery disease (CAD) is associated with high mortality and occurs via endothelial injury. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) restore the integrity of the endothelium and protect it from atherosclerosis. In this study, we compared the expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) in EPCs in atherosclerosis patients and normal controls. We found that miR-221 expression was significantly up-regulated in patients compared with controls. We predicted and identified p21/Cdc42/Rac1-activated kinase 1 (PAK1) as a novel target of miR-221 in EPCs. We also demonstrated that miR-221 targeted a putative binding site in the 3′UTR of PAK1, and absence of this site was inversely associated with miR-221 expression in EPCs. We confirmed this relationship using a luciferase reporter assay. Furthermore, overexpression of miR-221 in EPCs significantly decreased EPC proliferation, in accordance with the inhibitory effects induced by decreased PAK1. Overall, these findings demonstrate that miR-221 affects the MEK/ERK pathway by targeting PAK1 to inhibit the proliferation of EPCs.

  15. Controlled skeletal progenitor cell migration on nanostructured porous silicon/silicon micropatterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Costa, V.; Sánchez-Vaquero, V.; Muñoz-Noval, Á.; González-Méndez, L.; Punzón-Quijorna, E.; Gallach-Pérez, D.; Manso-Silván, M.; Martínez-Muñoz, G.; Climent-Font, A.; García-Ruiz, J. P.; Martín-Palma, R. J.

    2011-10-01

    In this work nanostructured porous silicon (nanoPS) was used for the fabrication of surface micropatterns aiming at controlling cell adhesion and migration. In particular, surface patterns of nanoPS and Si were engineered by high-energy ion-beam irradiation and subsequent anodization. It was found that human skeletal progenitor cells are sensitive to oneand two-dimensional patterns and that focal adhesion is inhibited on nanoPS areas. In spite of this anti-fouling characteristics, studies on patterns with reduced Si areas show that cells conform to nanoPS pathways favoring migration through cell protrusion, body translocation and tail retraction from two parallel Si traction rails. Moreover, migration can be blocked and cells tend to arrange when grid patterns with the appropriate dimensions are fabricated. The experimental results confirm that progenitor cells are able to exploit nanoPS anti-fouling designs by adapting to it for migration purposes.

  16. Tetrandrine inhibits migration and invasion of rheumatoid arthritis fibroblast-like synoviocytes through down-regulating the expressions of Rac1, Cdc42, and RhoA GTPases and activation of the PI3K/Akt and JNK signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Lv, Qi; Zhu, Xian-Yang; Xia, Yu-Feng; Dai, Yue; Wei, Zhi-Feng

    2015-11-01

    Tetrandrine (Tet), the main active constituent of Stephania tetrandra root, has been demonstrated to alleviate adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of Tet on the migration and invasion of rheumatoid arthritis fibroblast-like synoviocytes (RA-FLS) and explore the underlying mechanisms. By using cultures of primary FLS isolated from synoviums of RA patients and cell line MH7A, Tet (0.3, 1 μmol·L(-1)) was proven to significantly impede migration and invasion of RA-FLS, but not cell proliferation. Tet also greatly reduced the activation and expressions of matrix degrading enzymes MMP-2/9, the expression of F-actin and the activation of FAK, which controlled the morphologic changes in migration process of FLS. To identify the key signaling pathways by which Tet exerts anti-migration effect, the specific inhibitors of multiple signaling pathways LY294002, Triciribine, SP600125, U0126, SB203580, and PDTC (against PI3K, Akt, JNK, ERK, p38 MAPK and NF-κB-p65, respectively) were used. Among them, LY294002, Triciribine, and SP600125 were shown to obviously inhibit the migration of MH7A cells. Consistently, Tet was able to down-regulate the activation of Akt and JNK as demonstrated by Western blotting assay. Moreover, Tet could reduce the expressions of migration-related proteins Rho GTPases Rac1, Cdc42, and RhoA in MH7A cells. In conclusion, Tet can impede the migration and invasion of RA-FLS, which provides a plausible explanation for its protective effect on RA. The underlying mechanisms involve the reduction of the expressions of Rac1, Cdc42, and RhoA, inhibition of the activation of Akt and JNK, and subsequent down-regulation of activation and/or expressions of MMP-2/9, F-actin, and FAK. PMID:26614458

  17. SNAI2 controls the undifferentiated state of human epidermal progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Mistry, Devendra S; Chen, Yifang; Wang, Ying; Zhang, Kang; Sen, George L

    2014-12-01

    The transcription factor, SNAI2, is an inducer of the epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) which mediates cell migration during development and tumor invasion. SNAI2 can also promote the generation of mammary epithelial stem cells from differentiated luminal cells when overexpressed. How SNAI2 regulates these critical and diverse functions is unclear. Here, we show that the levels of SNAI2 expression are important for epidermal cell fate decisions. The expression of SNAI2 was found to be enriched in the basal layer of the interfollicular epidermis where progenitor cells reside and extinguished upon differentiation. Loss of SNAI2 resulted in premature differentiation whereas gain of SNAI2 expression inhibited differentiation. SNAI2 controls the differentiation status of epidermal progenitor cells by binding to and repressing the expression of differentiation genes with increased binding leading to further transcriptional silencing. Thus, the levels of SNAI2 binding to genomic targets determine the differentiation status of epithelial cells with increased levels triggering EMT and dedifferentiation, moderate (physiological) levels promoting epidermal progenitor function, and low levels leading to epidermal differentiation. PMID:25100569

  18. Signaling Pathways That Control Rho Kinase Activity Maintain the Embryonic Epicardial Progenitor State

    PubMed Central

    Artamonov, Mykhaylo V.; Jin, Li; Franke, Aaron S.; Momotani, Ko; Ho, Ruoya; Dong, Xiu Rong; Majesky, Mark W.; Somlyo, Avril V.

    2015-01-01

    This study identifies signaling pathways that play key roles in the formation and maintenance of epicardial cells, a source of progenitors for coronary smooth muscle cells (SMCs). After epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), mesenchymal cells invade the myocardium to form coronary SMCs. RhoA/Rho kinase activity is required for EMT and for differentiation into coronary SMCs, whereas cAMP activity is known to inhibit EMT in epithelial cells by an unknown mechanism. We use outgrowth of epicardial cells from E9.5 isolated mouse proepicardium (PE) explants, wild type and Epac1 null E12.5 mouse heart explants, adult rat epicardial cells, and immortalized mouse embryonic epicardial cells as model systems to identify signaling pathways that regulate RhoA activity to maintain the epicardial progenitor state. We demonstrate that RhoA activity is suppressed in the epicardial progenitor state, that the cAMP-dependent Rap1 GTP exchange factor (GEF), Epac, known to down-regulate RhoA activity through activation of Rap1 GTPase activity increased, that Rap1 activity increased, and that expression of the RhoA antagonistic Rnd proteins known to activate p190RhoGAP increased and associated with p190RhoGAP. Finally, EMT is associated with increased p63RhoGEF and RhoGEF-H1 protein expression, increased GEF-H1 activity, with a trend in increased p63RhoGEF activity. EMT is suppressed by partial silencing of p63RhoGEF and GEF-H1. In conclusion, we have identified new signaling molecules that act together to control RhoA activity and play critical roles in the maintenance of coronary smooth muscle progenitor cells in the embryonic epicardium. We suggest that their eventual manipulation could promote revascularization after myocardial injury. PMID:25733666

  19. Targeting Cdc42 with the small molecule drug AZA197 suppresses primary colon cancer growth and prolongs survival in a preclinical mouse xenograft model by downregulation of PAK1 activity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Rho GTPases play important roles in cytoskeleton organization, cell cycle progression and are key regulators of tumor progression. Strategies to modulate increased Rho GTPase activities during cancer progression could have therapeutic potential. Methods We report here the characterization of a Cdc42-selective small-molecule inhibitor AZA197 for the treatment of colon cancer that was developed based on structural information known from previously developed compounds affecting Rho GTPase activation. We investigated the effects of AZA197 treatment on RhoA, Rac1 and Cdc42 activities and associated molecular mechanisms in colon cancer cells in vitro. Therapeutic effects of AZA197 were examined in vivo using a xenograft mouse model of SW620 human colon cancer cells. After treatment, tumors were excised and processed for Ki-67 staining, TUNEL assays and Western blotting to evaluate proliferative and apoptotic effects induced by AZA197. Results In SW620 and HT-29 human colon cancer cells, AZA197 demonstrated selectivity for Cdc42 without inhibition of Rac1 or RhoA GTPases from the same family. AZA197 suppressed colon cancer cell proliferation, cell migration and invasion and increased apoptosis associated with down-regulation of the PAK1 and ERK signaling pathways in vitro. Furthermore, systemic AZA197 treatment reduced tumor growth in vivo and significantly increased mouse survival in SW620 tumor xenografts. Ki-67 staining and tissue TUNEL assays showed that both inhibition of cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis associated with reduced PAK/ERK activation contributed to the AZA197-induced therapeutic effects in vivo. Conclusions These data indicate the therapeutic potential of the small-molecule inhibitor AZA197 based on targeting Cdc42 GTPase activity to modulate colorectal cancer growth. PMID:24279335

  20. Modulation of Embryonic Mesenchymal Progenitor Cell Differentiation via Control over Pure Mechanical Modulus in Electrospun Nanofibers

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Jin; Johnson, Jed; Lannutti, John, J.; Agarwal, Sudha

    2010-01-01

    As the potential range of stem cell applications in tissue engineering continues to grow, appropriate scaffolding choice is necessary to create tightly defined artificial microenvironments for each target organ. These microenvironments determine stem cell fate via control over differentiation. In this study, we examined the specific effects of scaffold stiffness on embryonic mesenchymal progenitor cell behavior. Mechanically distinct scaffolds having identical microstructure and surface chemistry, were produced utilizing core-shell electrospinning. The modulus of core-shell poly(ether sulfone)-poly(ε-caprolactone) (PES-PCL) fibers (30.6 MPa) was more than 4 times that of pure PCL (7.1 MPa). Results from chondrogenic or osteogenic differentiation of progenitor cells on each scaffold indicate that the lower modulus PCL fibers provided more appropriate microenvironments for chondrogenesis, evident by marked upregulation of chondrocytic Sox9, collagen type 2 and aggrecan gene expression, and chondrocyte-specific extracellular matrix glycosaminoglycan production. In contrast, the stiffer core-shell PES-PCL fibers supported enhanced osteogenesis by promoting osteogenic Runx2, alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin gene expression as well as alkaline phosphatase activity. The findings demonstrate that the microstructural stiffness of a scaffold and the pliability of individual fibers may play a critical role in controlling stem cell differentiation. This may occur via regulation of distinct cytoskeletal organization and subsequent intracellular signaling events that control differentiation-specific gene expression. PMID:21109030

  1. Fz2 and Cdc42 Mediate Melanization and Actin Polymerization but Are Dispensable for Plasmodium Killing in the Mosquito Midgut

    PubMed Central

    Zachary, Daniel; Hoffmann, Jules A; Levashina, Elena A

    2006-01-01

    The midgut epithelium of the mosquito malaria vector Anopheles is a hostile environment for Plasmodium, with most parasites succumbing to host defenses. This study addresses morphological and ultrastructural features associated with Plasmodium berghei ookinete invasion in Anopheles gambiae midguts to define the sites and possible mechanisms of parasite killing. We show by transmission electron microscopy and immunofluorescence that the majority of ookinetes are killed in the extracellular space. Dead or dying ookinetes are surrounded by a polymerized actin zone formed within the basal cytoplasm of adjacent host epithelial cells. In refractory strain mosquitoes, we found that formation of this zone is strongly linked to prophenoloxidase activation leading to melanization. Furthermore, we identify two factors controlling both phenomena: the transmembrane receptor frizzled-2 and the guanosine triphosphate–binding protein cell division cycle 42. However, the disruption of actin polymerization and melanization by double-stranded RNA inhibition did not affect ookinete survival. Our results separate the mechanisms of parasite killing from subsequent reactions manifested by actin polymerization and prophenoloxidase activation in the A. gambiae–P. berghei model. These latter processes are reminiscent of wound healing in other organisms, and we propose that they represent a form of wound-healing response directed towards a moribund ookinete, which is perceived as damaged tissue. PMID:17196037

  2. Hippo pathway effectors control cardiac progenitor cell fate by acting as dynamic sensors of substrate mechanics and nanostructure.

    PubMed

    Mosqueira, Diogo; Pagliari, Stefania; Uto, Koichiro; Ebara, Mitsuhiro; Romanazzo, Sara; Escobedo-Lucea, Carmen; Nakanishi, Jun; Taniguchi, Akiyoshi; Franzese, Ornella; Di Nardo, Paolo; Goumans, Marie José; Traversa, Enrico; Pinto-do-Ó, Perpetua; Aoyagi, Takao; Forte, Giancarlo

    2014-03-25

    Stem cell responsiveness to extracellular matrix (ECM) composition and mechanical cues has been the subject of a number of investigations so far, yet the molecular mechanisms underlying stem cell mechano-biology still need full clarification. Here we demonstrate that the paralog proteins YAP and TAZ exert a crucial role in adult cardiac progenitor cell mechano-sensing and fate decision. Cardiac progenitors respond to dynamic modifications in substrate rigidity and nanopattern by promptly changing YAP/TAZ intracellular localization. We identify a novel activity of YAP and TAZ in the regulation of tubulogenesis in 3D environments and highlight a role for YAP/TAZ in cardiac progenitor proliferation and differentiation. Furthermore, we show that YAP/TAZ expression is triggered in the heart cells located at the infarct border zone. Our results suggest a fundamental role for the YAP/TAZ axis in the response of resident progenitor cells to the modifications in microenvironment nanostructure and mechanics, thereby contributing to the maintenance of myocardial homeostasis in the adult heart. These proteins are indicated as potential targets to control cardiac progenitor cell fate by materials design. PMID:24483337

  3. Inhibition of silibinin on migration and adhesion capacity of human highly metastatic breast cancer cell line, MDA-MB-231, by evaluation of β1-integrin and downstream molecules, Cdc42, Raf-1 and D4GDI.

    PubMed

    Dastpeyman, Mohadeseh; Motamed, Nasrin; Azadmanesh, Kayhan; Mostafavi, Ehsan; Kia, Vahid; Jahanian-Najafabadi, Ali; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali

    2012-12-01

    Metastasis is a property of malignant cancer cells that requires integrins which with their downstream molecules participate in a number of signaling events in cells with pivotal roles in malignancy, migration and invasion of tumor cells. Silibinin, a flavonoid antioxidant from milk thistle (Silybum marianum L.), has attracted attention in the last decades for chemoprevention and chemotherapy of tumor cells. In the present study, the effect of silibinin on migration and adhesion capacity of MDA-MB-231 cells, a highly metastatic human breast cancer cell line, was investigated by evaluation of β1-integrin and its important downstream molecules. MTT, migration and adhesion assays were performed to evaluate the silibinin effects on proliferation, migration and adhesion of MDA-MB-231 cells. In addition, the influence of the silibinin on the expression of β1-integrin, Raf-1, Cdc42 and D4-GDI mRNAs was assessed by RT-PCR. Results showed significant dose-dependent inhibitory effect of silibinin on proliferation, migration and adhesion of MDA-MB-231 cells. It significantly inhibited the expression of Cdc42 and D4-GDI mRNAs but had no statistically significant effect on the expression of β1-integrin and Raf-1 mRNAs although it indirectly but effectively modulated β1-integrin signaling pathway and RAF1 function. In conclusion, the results showed the silibinin effectson reducing the rate of metastasis, migration and adhesion of MDA-MB-231 to distant organs. PMID:22101790

  4. Thickness-controllable electrospun fibers promote tubular structure formation by endothelial progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jong Kyu; Bang, Ju Yup; Xu, Guan; Lee, Jun-Hee; Kim, Yeon-Ju; Lee, Ho-Jun; Kim, Han Seong; Kwon, Sang-Mo

    2015-01-01

    Controlling the thickness of an electrospun nanofibrous scaffold by altering its pore size has been shown to regulate cell behaviors such as cell infiltration into a three-dimensional (3D) scaffold. This is of great importance when manufacturing tissue-engineering scaffolds using an electrospinning process. In this study, we report the development of a novel process whereby additional aluminum foil layers were applied to the accumulated electrospun fibers of an existing aluminum foil collector, effectively reducing the incidence of charge buildup. Using this process, we fabricated an electrospun scaffold with a large pore (pore size >40 μm) while simultaneously controlling the thickness. We demonstrate that the large pore size triggered rapid infiltration (160 μm in 4 hours of cell culture) of individual endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and rapid cell colonization after seeding EPC spheroids. We confirmed that the 3D, but not two-dimensional, scaffold structures regulated tubular structure formation by the EPCs. Thus, incorporation of stem cells into a highly porous 3D scaffold with tunable thickness has implications for the regeneration of vascularized thick tissues and cardiac patch development. PMID:25709441

  5. LOXL2 Oxidizes Methylated TAF10 and Controls TFIID-Dependent Genes during Neural Progenitor Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Iturbide, Ane; Pascual-Reguant, Laura; Fargas, Laura; Cebrià, Joan Pau; Alsina, Berta; García de Herreros, Antonio; Peiró, Sandra

    2015-06-01

    Protein function is often regulated and controlled by posttranslational modifications, such as oxidation. Although oxidation has been mainly considered to be uncontrolled and nonenzymatic, many enzymatic oxidations occur on enzyme-selected lysine residues; for instance, LOXL2 oxidizes lysines by converting the ε-amino groups into aldehyde groups. Using an unbiased proteomic approach, we have identified methylated TAF10, a member of the TFIID complex, as a LOXL2 substrate. LOXL2 oxidation of TAF10 induces its release from its promoters, leading to a block in TFIID-dependent gene transcription. In embryonic stem cells, this results in the inactivation of the pluripotency genes and loss of the pluripotent capacity. During zebrafish development, the absence of LOXL2 resulted in the aberrant overexpression of the neural progenitor gene Sox2 and impaired neural differentiation. Thus, lysine oxidation of the transcription factor TAF10 is a controlled protein modification and demonstrates a role for protein oxidation in regulating pluripotency genes. PMID:25959397

  6. Thickness-controllable electrospun fibers promote tubular structure formation by endothelial progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jong Kyu; Bang, Ju Yup; Xu, Guan; Lee, Jun-Hee; Kim, Yeon-Ju; Lee, Ho-Jun; Kim, Han Seong; Kwon, Sang-Mo

    2015-01-01

    Controlling the thickness of an electrospun nanofibrous scaffold by altering its pore size has been shown to regulate cell behaviors such as cell infiltration into a three-dimensional (3D) scaffold. This is of great importance when manufacturing tissue-engineering scaffolds using an electrospinning process. In this study, we report the development of a novel process whereby additional aluminum foil layers were applied to the accumulated electrospun fibers of an existing aluminum foil collector, effectively reducing the incidence of charge buildup. Using this process, we fabricated an electrospun scaffold with a large pore (pore size >40 μm) while simultaneously controlling the thickness. We demonstrate that the large pore size triggered rapid infiltration (160 μm in 4 hours of cell culture) of individual endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and rapid cell colonization after seeding EPC spheroids. We confirmed that the 3D, but not two-dimensional, scaffold structures regulated tubular structure formation by the EPCs. Thus, incorporation of stem cells into a highly porous 3D scaffold with tunable thickness has implications for the regeneration of vascularized thick tissues and cardiac patch development. PMID:25709441

  7. Endothelial Progenitor Cells Are Related to Glycemic Control in Children With Type 1 Diabetes Over Time

    PubMed Central

    Hörtenhuber, Thomas; Rami-Mehar, Birgit; Satler, Miriam; Nagl, Katrin; Höbaus, Clemens; Höllerl, Florian; Koppensteiner, Renate; Schernthaner, Guntram; Schober, Edith; Schernthaner, Gerit-Holger

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The risk of cardiovascular death before the age of 40 is 20-fold higher in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) predict cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients without diabetes. We hypothesized that EPCs are modified in children with T1DM and are related to characteristics of T1DM such as glycemic control. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Children (n = 190; 156 T1DM subjects and 34 control subjects) were included in an observational cohort study and matched for age and sex. EPCs were enumerated by flow cytometry at the beginning (cross-sectional) and 1 year later (longitudinal). To analyze changes of variables during the observation, Δ values were calculated. RESULTS EPCs were significantly reduced in T1DM children versus control subjects (609 ± 359 vs. 1,165 ± 484, P < 0.001). Multivariate regression modeling revealed that glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) was the strongest independent predictor of EPCs (β = −0.355, P < 0.001). Overall glycemic control at the beginning and end of study did not differ (7.8 ± 1.2 vs. 7.8 ± 1.2 relative %, P = NS), but we observed individual HbA1c changes of −4.30/+3.10 relative %. The strongest EPC increase was observed in the patients with the most favorable HbA1c lowering during the 1-year follow-up. Accordingly, the strongest EPC decrease was demonstrated in the patients with the strongest HbA1c worsening during the time period. CONCLUSIONS This is the first prospective study demonstrating diminished EPCs in children with T1DM. The association of better glycemic control with an increase in EPC numbers within 1 year suggests that a reduction of the high cardiovascular disease burden might be mediated likewise. PMID:23340890

  8. RhoA GTPase controls cytokinesis and programmed necrosis of hematopoietic progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xuan; Florian, Maria Carolina; Arumugam, Paritha; Chen, Xiaoyi; Cancelas, Jose A.; Lang, Richard; Malik, Punam; Geiger, Hartmut

    2013-01-01

    Hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) are central to hematopoiesis as they provide large numbers of lineage-defined blood cells necessary to sustain blood homeostasis. They are one of the most actively cycling somatic cells, and their precise control is critical for hematopoietic homeostasis. The small GTPase RhoA is an intracellular molecular switch that integrates cytokine, chemokine, and adhesion signals to coordinate multiple context-dependent cellular processes. By using a RhoA conditional knockout mouse model, we show that RhoA deficiency causes a multilineage hematopoietic failure that is associated with defective multipotent HPCs. Interestingly, RhoA−/− hematopoietic stem cells retained long-term engraftment potential but failed to produce multipotent HPCs and lineage-defined blood cells. This multilineage hematopoietic failure was rescued by reconstituting wild-type RhoA into the RhoA−/− Lin−Sca-1+c-Kit+ compartment. Mechanistically, RhoA regulates actomyosin signaling, cytokinesis, and programmed necrosis of the HPCs, and loss of RhoA results in a cytokinesis failure of HPCs manifested by an accumulation of multinucleated cells caused by failed abscission of the cleavage furrow after telophase. Concomitantly, the HPCs show a drastically increased death associated with increased TNF–RIP-mediated necrosis. These results show that RhoA is a critical and specific regulator of multipotent HPCs during cytokinesis and thus essential for multilineage hematopoiesis. PMID:24101377

  9. Hnf1b controls pancreas morphogenesis and the generation of Ngn3+ endocrine progenitors

    PubMed Central

    De Vas, Matias G.; Kopp, Janel L.; Heliot, Claire; Sander, Maike; Cereghini, Silvia; Haumaitre, Cécile

    2015-01-01

    Heterozygous mutations in the human HNF1B gene are associated with maturity-onset diabetes of the young type 5 (MODY5) and pancreas hypoplasia. In mouse, Hnf1b heterozygous mutants do not exhibit any phenotype, whereas the homozygous deletion in the entire epiblast leads to pancreas agenesis associated with abnormal gut regionalization. Here, we examine the specific role of Hnf1b during pancreas development, using constitutive and inducible conditional inactivation approaches at key developmental stages. Hnf1b early deletion leads to a reduced pool of pancreatic multipotent progenitor cells (MPCs) due to decreased proliferation and increased apoptosis. Lack of Hnf1b either during the first or the secondary transitions is associated with cystic ducts. Ductal cells exhibit aberrant polarity and decreased expression of several cystic disease genes, some of which we identified as novel Hnf1b targets. Notably, we show that Glis3, a transcription factor involved in duct morphogenesis and endocrine cell development, is downstream Hnf1b. In addition, a loss and abnormal differentiation of acinar cells are observed. Strikingly, inactivation of Hnf1b at different time points results in the absence of Ngn3+ endocrine precursors throughout embryogenesis. We further show that Hnf1b occupies novel Ngn3 putative regulatory sequences in vivo. Thus, Hnf1b plays a crucial role in the regulatory networks that control pancreatic MPC expansion, acinar cell identity, duct morphogenesis and generation of endocrine precursors. Our results uncover an unappreciated requirement of Hnf1b in endocrine cell specification and suggest a mechanistic explanation of diabetes onset in individuals with MODY5. PMID:25715395

  10. NOTCH4 signaling controls EFNB2-induced endothelial progenitor cell dysfunction in preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoxia; Luo, Qingqing; Zheng, Yanfang; Liu, Xiaoping; Hu, Ying; Liu, Weifang; Luo, Minglian; Zhao, Yin; Zou, Li

    2016-07-01

    Preeclampsia is a serious complication of pregnancy and is closely related to endothelial dysfunction, which can be repaired by endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs). The DLL4/NOTCH-EFNB2 (ephrinB2) cascade may be involved in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia by inhibiting the biological activity of EPCs. In addition, both NOTCH1 and NOTCH4, which are specific receptors for DLL4/NOTCH, play critical roles in the various steps of angiogenesis. However, it has not been determined which receptor (NOTCH1, NOTCH4, or both) is specific for the DLL4/NOTCH-EFNB2 cascade. Accordingly, we performed a series of investigations to evaluate it. EFNB2 expression was examined when NOTCH4 or NOTCH1 was downregulated, with or without DLL4 treatment. Then, the effects of NOTCH4 on EPC function were detected. Additionally, we analyzed NOTCH4 and EFNB2 expression in the EPCs from preeclampsia and normal pregnancies. Results showed that NOTCH4 downregulation led to decreased expression of EFNB2, which maintained the same level in the presence of DLL4/NOTCH activation. By contrast, NOTCH1 silencing resulted in a moderate increase in EFNB2 expression, which further increased in the presence of DLL4/NOTCH activation. The downregulation of NOTCH4 resulted in an increase of EPC biological activity, which was similar to EFNB2 silencing. NOTCH4 expression, consistent with the EFNB2 level, increased notably in preeclampsia EPCs compared with the controls. These findings suggest that NOTCH4, not NOTCH1, is the specific receptor for the DLL4/NOTCH-EFNB2 cascade. Blockade of this cascade may enhance the angiogenic property of EPCs, and act as a potential target to promote angiogenesis in patients with preeclampsia. PMID:27069008

  11. A Progesterone-CXCR4 Axis Controls Mammary Progenitor Cell Fate in the Adult Gland

    PubMed Central

    Shiah, Yu-Jia; Tharmapalan, Pirashaanthy; Casey, Alison E.; Joshi, Purna A.; McKee, Trevor D.; Jackson, Hartland W.; Beristain, Alexander G.; Chan-Seng-Yue, Michelle A.; Bader, Gary D.; Lydon, John P.; Waterhouse, Paul D.; Boutros, Paul C.; Khokha, Rama

    2015-01-01

    Summary Progesterone drives mammary stem and progenitor cell dynamics through paracrine mechanisms that are currently not well understood. Here, we demonstrate that CXCR4, the receptor for stromal-derived factor 1 (SDF-1; CXC12), is a crucial instructor of hormone-induced mammary stem and progenitor cell function. Progesterone elicits specific changes in the transcriptome of basal and luminal mammary epithelial populations, where CXCL12 and CXCR4 represent a putative ligand-receptor pair. In situ, CXCL12 localizes to progesterone-receptor-positive luminal cells, whereas CXCR4 is induced in both basal and luminal compartments in a progesterone-dependent manner. Pharmacological inhibition of CXCR4 signaling abrogates progesterone-directed expansion of basal (CD24+CD49fhi) and luminal (CD24+CD49flo) subsets. This is accompanied by a marked reduction in CD49b+SCA-1− luminal progenitors, their functional capacity, and lobuloalveologenesis. These findings uncover CXCL12 and CXCR4 as novel paracrine effectors of hormone signaling in the adult mammary gland, and present a new avenue for potentially targeting progenitor cell growth and malignant transformation in breast cancer.

  12. Control of AC133/CD133 and impact on human hematopoietic progenitor cells through nucleolin.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, S; Reister, S; Mahotka, C; Meisel, R; Borkhardt, A; Grinstein, E

    2015-11-01

    AC133 is a prominent surface marker of CD34+ and CD34- hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell (HSPC) subsets. AC133+ HSPCs contain high progenitor cell activity and are capable of hematopoietic reconstitution. Furthermore, AC133 is used for prospective isolation of tumor-initiating cells in several hematological malignancies. Nucleolin is a multifunctional factor of growing and cancer cells, which is aberrantly active in certain hematological neoplasms, and serves as a candidate molecular target for cancer therapy. Nucleolin is involved in gene transcription and RNA metabolism and is prevalently expressed in HSPCs, as opposed to differentiated hematopoietic tissue. The present study dissects nucleolin-mediated activation of surface AC133 and its cognate gene CD133, via specific interaction of nucleolin with the tissue-dependent CD133 promoter P1, as a mechanism that crucially contributes to AC133 expression in CD34+ HSPCs. In mobilized peripheral blood (MPB)-derived HSPCs, nucleolin elevates colony-forming unit (CFU) frequencies and enriches granulocyte-macrophage CFUs. Furthermore, nucleolin amplifies long-term culture-initiating cells and also promotes long-term, cytokine-dependent maintenance of hematopoietic progenitor cells. Active β-catenin, active Akt and Bcl-2 levels in MPB-derived HSPCs are nucleolin-dependent, and effects of nucleolin on these cells partially rely on β-catenin activity. The study provides new insights into molecular network relevant to stem/progenitor cells in normal and malignant hematopoiesis. PMID:26183533

  13. The EGFR signaling pathway controls gut progenitor differentiation during planarian regeneration and homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Barberán, Sara; Fraguas, Susanna; Cebrià, Francesc

    2016-06-15

    The planarian Schmidtea mediterranea maintains and regenerates all its adult tissues through the proliferation and differentiation of a single population of pluripotent adult stem cells (ASCs) called neoblasts. Despite recent advances, the mechanisms regulating ASC differentiation into mature cell types are poorly understood. Here, we show that silencing of the planarian EGF receptor egfr-1 by RNA interference (RNAi) impairs gut progenitor differentiation into mature cells, compromising gut regeneration and maintenance. We identify a new putative EGF ligand, nrg-1, the silencing of which phenocopies the defects observed in egfr-1(RNAi) animals. These findings indicate that egfr-1 and nrg-1 promote gut progenitor differentiation, and are thus essential for normal cell turnover and regeneration in the planarian gut. Our study demonstrates that the EGFR signaling pathway is an important regulator of ASC differentiation in planarians. PMID:27122174

  14. Substrate stiffness and matrix composition coordinately control the differentiation of liver progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Kourouklis, Andreas P; Kaylan, Kerim B; Underhill, Gregory H

    2016-08-01

    Recent approaches have utilized microfabricated platforms to examine combinations of microenvironmental signals that regulate stem and progenitor cell differentiation. However, the majority of these efforts have focused on the biochemical properties of extracellular matrix (ECM) or soluble factors without simultaneously exploring the biomechanical effects of cell-substrate interactions. To address this need, we combined a high-throughput approach for the analysis of combinatorial ECM cues with substrates of modular stiffness and traction force microscopy. This integrated approach enabled the characterization of cell-generated traction stress and phenotypic expression in response to ECM cues. We investigated the impact of substrate stiffness and ECM composition on the differentiation of bipotential mouse embryonic liver (BMEL) progenitor cells. We observed that hepatocyte differentiation was primarily regulated by ECM composition, and cholangiocyte differentiation was cooperatively influenced by ECM proteins and stiffness properties. In particular, stiffness-mediated cholangiocyte differentiation was observed for cells cultured on fibronectin, while collagen IV promoted differentiation independent of substrate stiffness. We demonstrated the influence of cell contractility and traction stress in early cholangiocyte specification and further uncovered the roles of ERK and ROCK in this differentiation process. Overall, these findings illustrate the involvement of biomechanical signals in liver progenitor differentiation. Further, this approach could enable investigations for a broad range of cell types and ECM proteins, providing an integrated platform for evaluating the combinatorial effects of biochemical and biophysical signals in cell differentiation. PMID:27235994

  15. Feedback control of growth, differentiation, and morphogenesis of pancreatic endocrine progenitors in an epithelial plexus niche

    PubMed Central

    Bankaitis, Eric D.; Bechard, Matthew E.; Wright, Christopher V.E.

    2015-01-01

    In the mammalian pancreas, endocrine cells undergo lineage allocation upon emergence from a bipotent duct/endocrine progenitor pool, which resides in the “trunk epithelium.” Major questions remain regarding how niche environments are organized within this epithelium to coordinate endocrine differentiation with programs of epithelial growth, maturation, and morphogenesis. We used EdU pulse-chase and tissue-reconstruction approaches to analyze how endocrine progenitors and their differentiating progeny are assembled within the trunk as it undergoes remodeling from an irregular plexus of tubules to form the eventual mature, branched ductal arbor. The bulk of endocrine progenitors is maintained in an epithelial “plexus state,” which is a transient intermediate during epithelial maturation within which endocrine cell differentiation is continually robust and surprisingly long-lived. Within the plexus, local feedback effects derived from the differentiating and delaminating endocrine cells nonautonomously regulate the flux of endocrine cell birth as well as proliferative growth of the bipotent cell population using Notch-dependent and Notch-independent influences, respectively. These feedback effects in turn maintain the plexus state to ensure prolonged allocation of endocrine cells late into gestation. These findings begin to define a niche-like environment guiding the genesis of the endocrine pancreas and advance current models for how differentiation is coordinated with the growth and morphogenesis of the developing pancreatic epithelium. PMID:26494792

  16. Controlled induction of human pancreatic progenitors produces functional beta-like cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Russ, Holger A; Parent, Audrey V; Ringler, Jennifer J; Hennings, Thomas G; Nair, Gopika G; Shveygert, Mayya; Guo, Tingxia; Puri, Sapna; Haataja, Leena; Cirulli, Vincenzo; Blelloch, Robert; Szot, Greg L; Arvan, Peter; Hebrok, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Directed differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells into functional insulin-producing beta-like cells holds great promise for cell replacement therapy for patients suffering from diabetes. This approach also offers the unique opportunity to study otherwise inaccessible aspects of human beta cell development and function in vitro. Here, we show that current pancreatic progenitor differentiation protocols promote precocious endocrine commitment, ultimately resulting in the generation of non-functional polyhormonal cells. Omission of commonly used BMP inhibitors during pancreatic specification prevents precocious endocrine formation while treatment with retinoic acid followed by combined EGF/KGF efficiently generates both PDX1+ and subsequent PDX1+/NKX6.1+ pancreatic progenitor populations, respectively. Precise temporal activation of endocrine differentiation in PDX1+/NKX6.1+ progenitors produces glucose-responsive beta-like cells in vitro that exhibit key features of bona fide human beta cells, remain functional after short-term transplantation, and reduce blood glucose levels in diabetic mice. Thus, our simplified and scalable system accurately recapitulates key steps of human pancreas development and provides a fast and reproducible supply of functional human beta-like cells. PMID:25908839

  17. The proteoglycan Trol controls proliferation and differentiation of blood progenitors in the Drosophila lymph gland

    PubMed Central

    Grigorian, Melina; Liu, Ting; Banerjee, Utpal; Hartenstein, Volker

    2014-01-01

    The heparin sulfate proteoglycan Trol (Terribly Reduced Optic Lobes) is the D. melanogaster homolog of the vertebrate protein Perlecan. Trol is expressed as part of the extracellular matrix (ECM) found in the hematopoietic organ, called the lymph gland. In the normal lymph gland, the ECM forms thin basement membranes around individual or small groups of blood progenitors. The pattern of basement membranes, reported by Trol expression, is spatio-temporally correlated to hematopoiesis. The central, medullary zone which contain undifferentiated hematopoietic progenitors has many, closely spaced membranes. Fewer basement membranes are present in the outer, cortical zone, where differentiation of blood cells takes place. Loss of trol causes a dramatic change of the ECM into a three-dimensional, spongy mass that fills wide spaces scattered throughout the lymph gland. At the same time proliferation is reduced, leading to a significantly smaller lymph gland. Interestingly, differentiation of blood progenitors in trol mutants is precocious, resulting in the break-down of the usual zonation of the lymph gland which normally consists of an immature center (medullary zone) where cells remain undifferentiated, and an outer cortical zone, where differentiation sets in. We present evidence that the effect of Trol on blood cell differentiation is mediated by Hedgehog (Hh) signaling, which is known to be required to maintain an immature medullary zone. Overexpression of hh in the background of a trol mutation is able to rescue the premature differentiation phenotype. Our data provide novel insight into the role of the ECM component Perlecan during Drosophila hematopoiesis. PMID:23510717

  18. ErbB expressing Schwann cells control lateral line progenitor cells via non-cell-autonomous regulation of Wnt/β-catenin.

    PubMed

    Lush, Mark E; Piotrowski, Tatjana

    2014-01-01

    Proper orchestration of quiescence and activation of progenitor cells is crucial during embryonic development and adult homeostasis. We took advantage of the zebrafish sensory lateral line to define niche-progenitor interactions to understand how integration of diverse signaling pathways spatially and temporally regulates the coordination of these processes. Our previous studies demonstrated that Schwann cells play a crucial role in negatively regulating lateral line progenitor proliferation. Here we demonstrate that ErbB/Neuregulin signaling is not only required for Schwann cell migration but that it plays a continued role in postmigratory Schwann cells. ErbB expressing Schwann cells inhibit lateral line progenitor proliferation and differentiation through non-cell-autonomous inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Subsequent activation of Fgf signaling controls sensory organ differentiation, but not progenitor proliferation. In addition to the lateral line, these findings have important implications for understanding how niche-progenitor cells segregate interactions during development, and how they may go wrong in disease states. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01832.001. PMID:24642408

  19. Quantitative analysis of signaling mechanisms controlling adult neural progenitor cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, David V; O'Neill, Analeah; Hochrein, Lisa; McGranahan, Tresa

    2004-01-01

    Tools of systems engineering and signal dynamics were employed to develop a quantitative model of the intracellular signaling systems involved in adult neural stem cell proliferation, based on pathways elucidated in our experimental systems. Neural progenitors isolated from the adult rat hippocampus are dependent on the basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2) and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. However, the intracellular effects of these stimuli were previously undetermined. We employed chemical inhibitors of known signal transduction molecules to identify important players in the FGF-2/ECM signal cascade, such as the cyclic AMP responsive element binding protein (CREB), protein kinase B/Akt, and several related molecules. Genetic mutants of these proteins were used to confirm their role in adult neural progenitor proliferation. Proliferation was assayed using the incorporation of a thymidine analog to determine cell doubling rate under various stimuli. Such assays have also uncovered novel synergistic signaling between FGF-2 and ECM components. This research is, to our knowledge, the first to elucidate intracellular signaling pathways for adult neural stem cell proliferation. Upon determination of the pertinent intracellular signaling pathways, quantitative immunoblots were employed to examine the dynamics of these systems. These data, as well as enzyme kinetics information from the literature, are being used to parameterize a dynamic mathematical model of progenitor proliferation events induced by FGF-2. This computational model will be used to predict the biochemical and mechanical signaling inputs necessary to achieve a desired proliferative output from the cells, based on specific extracellular stimuli. It is our hope that this essential quantitative understanding will facilitate the use of adult neural stem cells in medical applications. PMID:17271428

  20. FGF Signaling Regulates the Number of Posterior Taste Papillae by Controlling Progenitor Field Size

    PubMed Central

    Mostowfi, Pasha; Charles, Cyril; Ching, Saunders; Thirumangalathu, Shoba; Barlow, Linda A.; Klein, Ophir D.

    2011-01-01

    The sense of taste is fundamental to our ability to ingest nutritious substances and to detect and avoid potentially toxic ones. Sensory taste buds are housed in papillae that develop from epithelial placodes. Three distinct types of gustatory papillae reside on the rodent tongue: small fungiform papillae are found in the anterior tongue, whereas the posterior tongue contains the larger foliate papillae and a single midline circumvallate papilla (CVP). Despite the great variation in the number of CVPs in mammals, its importance in taste function, and its status as the largest of the taste papillae, very little is known about the development of this structure. Here, we report that a balance between Sprouty (Spry) genes and Fgf10, which respectively antagonize and activate receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling, regulates the number of CVPs. Deletion of Spry2 alone resulted in duplication of the CVP as a result of an increase in the size of the placode progenitor field, and Spry1−/−;Spry2−/− embryos had multiple CVPs, demonstrating the redundancy of Sprouty genes in regulating the progenitor field size. By contrast, deletion of Fgf10 led to absence of the CVP, identifying FGF10 as the first inductive, mesenchyme-derived factor for taste papillae. Our results provide the first demonstration of the role of epithelial-mesenchymal FGF signaling in taste papilla development, indicate that regulation of the progenitor field size by FGF signaling is a critical determinant of papilla number, and suggest that the great variation in CVP number among mammalian species may be linked to levels of signaling by the FGF pathway. PMID:21655085

  1. LTβR controls thymic portal endothelial cells for haematopoietic progenitor cell homing and T-cell regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yaoyao; Wu, Weiwei; Chai, Qian; Li, Qingqing; Hou, Yu; Xia, Huan; Ren, Boyang; Xu, Hairong; Guo, Xiaohuan; Jin, Caiwei; Lv, Mengjie; Wang, Zhongnan; Fu, Yang-Xin; Zhu, Mingzhao

    2016-01-01

    Continuous thymic homing of haematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) via the blood is critical for normal T-cell development. However, the nature and the differentiation programme of specialized thymic endothelial cells (ECs) controlling this process remain poorly understood. Here using conditional gene-deficient mice, we find that lymphotoxin beta receptor (LTβR) directly controls thymic ECs to guide HPC homing. Interestingly, T-cell deficiency or conditional ablation of T-cell-engaged LTβR signalling results in a defect in thymic HPC homing, suggesting the feedback regulation of thymic progenitor homing by thymic products. Furthermore, we identify and characterize a special thymic portal EC population with features that guide HPC homing. LTβR is essential for the differentiation and homeostasis of these thymic portal ECs. Finally, we show that LTβR is required for T-cell regeneration on irradiation-induced thymic injury. Together, these results uncover a cellular and molecular pathway that governs thymic EC differentiation for HPC homing. PMID:27493002

  2. The heme exporter Flvcr1 regulates expansion and differentiation of committed erythroid progenitors by controlling intracellular heme accumulation.

    PubMed

    Mercurio, Sonia; Petrillo, Sara; Chiabrando, Deborah; Bassi, Zuni Irma; Gays, Dafne; Camporeale, Annalisa; Vacaru, Andrei; Miniscalco, Barbara; Valperga, Giulio; Silengo, Lorenzo; Altruda, Fiorella; Baron, Margaret H; Santoro, Massimo Mattia; Tolosano, Emanuela

    2015-06-01

    Feline leukemia virus subgroup C receptor 1 (Flvcr1) encodes two heme exporters: FLVCR1a, which localizes to the plasma membrane, and FLVCR1b, which localizes to mitochondria. Here, we investigated the role of the two Flvcr1 isoforms during erythropoiesis. We showed that, in mice and zebrafish, Flvcr1a is required for the expansion of committed erythroid progenitors but cannot drive their terminal differentiation, while Flvcr1b contributes to the expansion phase and is required for differentiation. FLVCR1a-down-regulated K562 cells have defective proliferation, enhanced differentiation, and heme loading in the cytosol, while FLVCR1a/1b-deficient K562 cells show impairment in both proliferation and differentiation, and accumulate heme in mitochondria. These data support a model in which the coordinated expression of Flvcr1a and Flvcr1b contributes to control the size of the cytosolic heme pool required to sustain metabolic activity during the expansion of erythroid progenitors and to allow hemoglobinization during their terminal maturation. Consistently, reduction or increase of the cytosolic heme rescued the erythroid defects in zebrafish deficient in Flvcr1a or Flvcr1b, respectively. Thus, heme export represents a tightly regulated process that controls erythropoiesis. PMID:25795718

  3. The Hippo Pathway Controls a Switch between Retinal Progenitor Cell Proliferation and Photoreceptor Cell Differentiation in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Asaoka, Yoichi; Hata, Shoji; Namae, Misako; Furutani-Seiki, Makoto; Nishina, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    The precise regulation of numbers and types of neurons through control of cell cycle exit and terminal differentiation is an essential aspect of neurogenesis. The Hippo signaling pathway has recently been identified as playing a crucial role in promoting cell cycle exit and terminal differentiation in multiple types of stem cells, including in retinal progenitor cells. When Hippo signaling is activated, the core Mst1/2 kinases activate the Lats1/2 kinases, which in turn phosphorylate and inhibit the transcriptional cofactor Yap. During mouse retinogenesis, overexpression of Yap prolongs progenitor cell proliferation, whereas inhibition of Yap decreases this proliferation and promotes retinal cell differentiation. However, to date, it remains unknown how the Hippo pathway affects the differentiation of distinct neuronal cell types such as photoreceptor cells. In this study, we investigated whether Hippo signaling regulates retinogenesis during early zebrafish development. Knockdown of zebrafish mst2 induced early embryonic defects, including altered retinal pigmentation and morphogenesis. Similar abnormal retinal phenotypes were observed in zebrafish embryos injected with a constitutively active form of yap [(yap (5SA)]. Loss of Yap’s TEAD-binding domain, two WW domains, or transcription activation domain attenuated the retinal abnormalities induced by yap (5SA), indicating that all of these domains contribute to normal retinal development. Remarkably, yap (5SA)-expressing zebrafish embryos displayed decreased expression of transcription factors such as otx5 and crx, which orchestrate photoreceptor cell differentiation by activating the expression of rhodopsin and other photoreceptor cell genes. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that Rx1 is a novel interacting partner of Yap that regulates photoreceptor cell differentiation. Our results suggest that Yap suppresses the differentiation of photoreceptor cells from retinal progenitor cells by repressing Rx1

  4. A Defined, Controlled Culture System for Primary Bovine Chromaffin Progenitors Reveals Novel Biomarkers and Modulators

    PubMed Central

    Masjkur, Jimmy; Levenfus, Ian; Lange, Sven; Arps-Forker, Carina; Poser, Steve; Qin, Nan; Vukicevic, Vladimir; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; Eisenhofer, Graeme; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Ehrhart-Bornstein, Monika

    2014-01-01

    We present a method to efficiently culture primary chromaffin progenitors from the adult bovine adrenal medulla in a defined, serum-free monolayer system. Tissue is dissociated and plated for expansion under support by the mitogen basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). The cultures, although not homogenous, contain a subpopulation of cells expressing the neural stem cell marker Hes3 that also propagate. In addition, Hes3 is also expressed in the adult adrenal medulla from where the tissue is taken. Differentiation is induced by bFGF withdrawal and switching to Neurobasal medium containing B27. Following differentiation, Hes3 expression is lost, and cells acquire morphologies and biomarker expression patterns of chromaffin cells and dopaminergic neurons. We tested the effect of different treatments that we previously showed regulate Hes3 expression and cell number in cultures of fetal and adult rodent neural stem cells. Treatment of the cultures with a combination of Delta4, Angiopoietin2, and a Janus kinase inhibitor increases cell number during the expansion phase without significantly affecting catecholamine content levels. Treatment with cholera toxin does not significantly affect cell number but reduces the ratio of epinephrine to norepinephrine content and increases the dopamine content relative to total catecholamines. These data suggest that this defined culture system can be used for target identification in drug discovery programs and that the transcription factor Hes3 may serve as a new biomarker of putative adrenomedullary chromaffin progenitor cells. PMID:24855275

  5. The carboxy-terminus of p63 links cell cycle control and the proliferative potential of epidermal progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Daisuke; Sahu, Raju; Leu, N. Adrian; Senoo, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor p63 (Trp63) plays a key role in homeostasis and regeneration of the skin. The p63 gene is transcribed from dual promoters, generating TAp63 isoforms with growth suppressive functions and dominant-negative ΔNp63 isoforms with opposing properties. p63 also encodes multiple carboxy (C)-terminal variants. Although mutations of C-terminal variants have been linked to the pathogenesis of p63-associated ectodermal disorders, the physiological role of the p63 C-terminus is poorly understood. We report here that deletion of the p63 C-terminus in mice leads to ectodermal malformation and hypoplasia, accompanied by a reduced proliferative capacity of epidermal progenitor cells. Notably, unlike the p63-null condition, we find that p63 C-terminus deficiency promotes expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21Waf1/Cip1 (Cdkn1a), a factor associated with reduced proliferative capacity of both hematopoietic and neuronal stem cells. These data suggest that the p63 C-terminus plays a key role in the cell cycle progression required to maintain the proliferative potential of stem cells of many different lineages. Mechanistically, we show that loss of Cα, the predominant C-terminal p63 variant in epithelia, promotes the transcriptional activity of TAp63 and also impairs the dominant-negative activity of ΔNp63, thereby controlling p21Waf1/Cip1 expression. We propose that the p63 C-terminus links cell cycle control and the proliferative potential of epidermal progenitor cells via mechanisms that equilibrate TAp63 and ΔNp63 isoform function. PMID:25503409

  6. Retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein in pancreatic progenitors controls α- and β-cell fate.

    PubMed

    Cai, Erica P; Wu, Xiaohong; Schroer, Stephanie A; Elia, Andrew J; Nostro, M Cristina; Zacksenhaus, Eldad; Woo, Minna

    2013-09-01

    Pancreatic endocrine cells expand rapidly during embryogenesis by neogenesis and proliferation, but during adulthood, islet cells have a very slow turnover. Disruption of murine retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (Rb) in mature pancreatic β-cells has a limited effect on cell proliferation. Here we show that deletion of Rb during embryogenesis in islet progenitors leads to an increase in the neurogenin 3-expressing precursor cell population, which persists in the postnatal period and is associated with increased β-cell mass in adults. In contrast, Rb-deficient islet precursors, through repression of the cell fate factor aristaless related homeobox, result in decreased α-cell mass. The opposing effect on survival of Rb-deficient α- and β-cells was a result of opposing effects on p53 in these cell types. As a consequence, loss of Rb in islet precursors led to a reduced α- to β-cell ratio, leading to improved glucose homeostasis and protection against diabetes. PMID:23946427

  7. Gene 33/Mig-6, a transcriptionally inducible adapter protein that binds GTP-Cdc42 and activates SAPK/JNK. A potential marker transcript for chronic pathologic conditions, such as diabetic nephropathy. Possible role in the response to persistent stress.

    PubMed

    Makkinje, A; Quinn, D A; Chen, A; Cadilla, C L; Force, T; Bonventre, J V; Kyriakis, J M

    2000-06-01

    Chronic stresses, including the mechanical strain caused by hypertension or excess pulmonary ventilation pressure, lead to important clinical consequences, including hypertrophy and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Pathologic hypertrophy contributes to decreased organ function and, ultimately, organ failure; and cardiac and diabetic renal hypertrophy are major causes of morbidity and morality in the developed world. Likewise, acute respiratory distress syndrome is a serious potential side effect of mechanical pulmonary ventilation. Whereas the deleterious effects of chronic stress are well established, the molecular mechanisms by which these stresses affect cell function are still poorly characterized. gene 33 (also called mitogen-inducible gene-6, mig-6) is an immediate early gene that is transcriptionally induced by a divergent array of extracellular stimuli. The physiologic function of Gene 33 is unknown. Here we show that gene 33 mRNA levels increase sharply in response to a set of commonly occurring chronic stress stimuli: mechanical strain, vasoactive peptides, and diabetic nephropathy. Induction of gene 33 requires the stress-activated protein kinases (SAPKs)/c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinases. This expression pattern suggests that gene 33 is a potential marker for diabetic nephropathy and other pathologic responses to persistent sublethal stress. The structure of Gene 33 indicates an adapter protein capable of binding monomeric GTPases of the Rho subfamily. Consistent with this, Gene 33 interacts in vivo and, in a GTP-dependent manner, in vitro with Cdc42Hs; and transient expression of Gene 33 results in the selective activation of the SAPKs. These results imply a reciprocal, positive feedback relationship between Gene 33 expression and SAPK activation. Expression of Gene 33 at sufficient levels may enable a compensatory reprogramming of cellular function in response to chronic stress, which may have pathophysiological consequences. PMID:10749885

  8. Progenitor Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Marty-Santos, Leilani

    2015-01-01

    Insulin-producing β cells within the vertebrate fetal pancreas acquire their fate in a step-wise manner. Whereas the intrinsic factors dictating the transcriptional or epigenetic status of pancreatic lineages have been intensely examined, less is known about cell–cell interactions that might constitute a niche for the developing β cell lineage. It is becoming increasingly clear that understanding and recapitulating these steps may instruct in vitro differentiation of embryonic stem cells and/or therapeutic regeneration. Indeed, directed differentiation techniques have improved since transitioning from 2D to 3D cultures, suggesting that the 3D microenvironment in which β cells are born is critical. However, to date, it remains unknown whether the changing architecture of the pancreatic epithelium impacts the fate of cells therein. An emerging challenge in the field is to elucidate how progenitors are allocated during key events, such as the stratification and subsequent resolution of the pre-pancreatic epithelium, as well as the formation of lumens and branches. Here, we assess the progenitor epithelium and examine how it might influence the emergence of pancreatic multipotent progenitors (MPCs), which give rise to β cells and other pancreatic lineages. PMID:26216134

  9. Circulating Endothelial Progenitor Cells in Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer: A Randomized, Controlled, Biomarker Study

    PubMed Central

    Fuereder, Thorsten; Wacheck, Volker; Strommer, Sabine; Horak, Peter; Gerschpacher, Marion; Lamm, Wolfgang; Kivaranovic, Danijel; Krainer, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Background Endothelial progenitor cells (CEPs) and circulating endothelial cells (CECs) are potential biomarkers of response to anti-angiogenic treatment regimens. In the current study, we investigated the effect of docetaxel and sunitinib on CEP/CEC kinetics and clinical response in castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) patients. Patients and methods Chemonaive patients with CRPC were enrolled in this study to receive either sunitinib (37.5 mg/d), in combination with docetaxel (75 mg/m2) or docetaxel alone. CEP and CEC kinetics were analyzed for every cycle. The primary objective was to compare CEP/CEC pharmacodynamics between both treatment arms. We also investigated if CEC/CEP spikes, induced by MTD docetaxel, are suppressed by sunitinib in patients treated with docetaxel/sunitinib relative to docetaxel monotherapy. Results A total of 27 patients were enrolled. We observed a significant increase of CEP/CEC (total/viable) counts over time within each cycle (coefficients 0.29233, 0.22092 and 0.26089, respectively; p<0.001). However, no differences between the treatment groups, in terms of CEP and CEC kinetics, were detected. In the docetaxel monotherapy arm 4 (30%) patients responded to therapy with a 50% PSA decline, while 9 (64%) patients showed a PSA decline in the combination group (n.s.). The median PFS in the docetaxel monotherapy group was 3.1 months (2.6–3.6 months, 95% CI) and 6.2 months (4.9–7.4 months, 95% CI; p = 0.062) in the combination arm. Sunitinib/docetaxel was reasonably well tolerated and toxicity manageable. Conclusion In summary, no significant differences in CEC and CEP kinetics between the treatment arms were observed, although a highly significant increase of CEPs/CECs within each cycle over time was detected. These results mirror the challenge we have to face when employing anti-angiogenic strategies in CRPC. Additional preclinical research is needed to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms. However, docetaxel

  10. Severe Type 2 Diabetes Induces Reversible Modifications of Endothelial Progenitor Cells Which are Ameliorate by Glycemic Control

    PubMed Central

    De Pascale, Maria Rosaria; Bruzzese, Giuseppe; Crimi, Ettore; Grimaldi, Vincenzo; Liguori, Antonio; Brongo, Sergio; Barbieri, Michelangela; Picascia, Antonietta; Schiano, Concetta; Sommese, Linda; Ferrara, Nicola; Paolisso, Giuseppe; Napoli, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Background Circulating endothelial progenitors cells (EPCs) play a critical role in neovascularization and endothelial repair. There is a growing evidence that hyperglycemia related to Diabetes Mellitus (DM) decreases EPC number and function so promoting vascular complications. Aim of the Study This study investigated whether an intensive glycemic control regimen in Type 2 DM can increase the number of EPCs and restores their function. Methods Sixty-two patients with Type 2 DM were studied. Patients were tested at baseline and after 3 months of an intensive regimen of glycemic control. The Type 2 DM group was compared to control group of subjects without diabetes. Patients with Type 2 DM (mean age 58.2±5.4 years, 25.6% women, disease duration of 15.4±6.3 years) had a baseline HgA1c of 8.7±0.5% and lower EPC levels (CD34+/KDR+) in comparison to healthy controls (p<0.01). Results The intensive glycemic control regimen (HgA1c decreased to 6.2±0.3%) was coupled with a significant increase of EPC levels (mean of 18%, p<0.04 vs. baseline) and number of EPCs CFUs (p<0.05 vs. baseline). Conclusion This study confirms that number and bioactivity of EPCs are reduced in patients with Type 2 DM and, most importantly, that the intensive glycemic control in Type 2 DM promotes EPC improvement both in their number and in bioactivity. PMID:27426095

  11. IQGAP1 controls tight junction formation through differential regulation of claudin recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Tanos, Barbara E.; Perez Bay, Andres E.; Salvarezza, Susana; Vivanco, Igor; Mellinghoff, Ingo; Osman, Mahasin; Sacks, David B.; Rodriguez-Boulan, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT IQGAP1 is a scaffolding protein previously implicated in adherens junction formation. However, its role in the establishment or maintenance of tight junctions (TJs) has not been explored. We hypothesized that IQGAP1 could regulate TJ formation by modulating the expression and/or localization of junctional proteins, and we systematically tested this hypothesis in the model Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cell line. We find that IQGAP1 silencing enhances a transient increase in transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) observed during the early stages of TJ formation (Cereijido et al., 1978). Quantitative microscopy and biochemical experiments suggest that this effect of IQGAP1 on TJ assembly is accounted for by reduced expression and TJ recruitment of claudin 2, and increased TJ recruitment of claudin 4. Furthermore, we show that IQGAP1 also regulates TJ formation through its interactor CDC42, because IQGAP1 knockdown increases the activity of the CDC42 effector JNK and dominant-negative CDC42 prevents the increase in TER caused by IQGAP1 silencing. Hence, we provide evidence that IQGAP1 modulates TJ formation by a twofold mechanism: (1) controlling the expression and recruitment of claudin 2 and recruitment of claudin 4 to the TJ, and (2) transient inhibition of the CDC42–JNK pathway. PMID:25588839

  12. NTPDase2 and Purinergic Signaling Control Progenitor Cell Proliferation in Neurogenic Niches of the Adult Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Gampe, Kristine; Stefani, Jennifer; Hammer, Klaus; Brendel, Peter; Pötzsch, Alexandra; Enikolopov, Grigori; Enjyoji, Keiichi; Acker-Palmer, Amparo; Robson, Simon C.; Zimmermann, Herbert

    2014-01-01

    Nerve cells are continuously generated from stem cells in the adult mammalian subventricular zone (SVZ) and hippocampal dentate gyrus. We have previously noted that stem/progenitor cells in the SVZ and the subgranular layer (SGL) of the dentate gyrus express high levels of plasma membrane-bound nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase 2 (NTPDase2), an ectoenzyme that hydrolyzes extracellular nucleoside di- and triphosphates. We inferred that deletion of NTPDase2 would increase local extracellular nucleoside triphosphate concentrations perturbing purinergic signaling and boosting progenitor cell proliferation and neurogenesis. Using newly generated mice globally null for Entpd2, we demonstrate that NTPDase2 is the major ectonucleotidase in these progenitor cell rich areas. Using BrdU-labeling protocols, we have measured stem cell proliferation and determined long term survival of cell progeny under basal conditions. Brains of Entpd2 null mice revealed increased progenitor cell proliferation in both the SVZ and the SGL. However, this occurred without noteworthy alterations in long-term progeny survival. The hippocampal stem cell pool and the pool of the intermediate progenitor type-2 cells clearly expanded. However, substantive proportions of these proliferating cells were lost during expansion at around type-3 stage. Cell loss was paralleled by decreases in CREB phosphorylation in the doublecortin-positive progenitor cell population and by an increase in labeling for activated caspase-3 levels. We propose that NTPDase2 has functionality in scavenging mitogenic extracellular nucleoside triphosphates in neurogenic niches of the adult brain, thereby acting as a homeostatic regulator of nucleotide-mediated neural progenitor cell proliferation and expansion. PMID:25205248

  13. Regulating the regulator: Numb acts upstream of p53 to control mammary stem and progenitor cell

    PubMed Central

    Faraldo, Marisa M.

    2015-01-01

    In this issue, Tosoni et al. (2015. J. Cell Biol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201505037) report that cell fate determinant and tumor suppressor Numb imposes asymmetric cell divisions in mammary stem cells by regulating p53. Numb thereby restricts mammary stem cell expansion and controls the proliferation and lineage-specific characteristics of their progeny. PMID:26598611

  14. Promotion of Expansion and Differentiation of Hematopoietic Stem Cells by Interleukin-27 into Myeloid Progenitors to Control Infection in Emergency Myelopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Furusawa, Jun-ichi; Mizoguchi, Izuru; Chiba, Yukino; Hisada, Masayuki; Kobayashi, Fumie; Yoshida, Hiroki; Nakae, Susumu; Tsuchida, Akihiko; Matsumoto, Tetsuya; Ema, Hideo; Mizuguchi, Junichiro; Yoshimoto, Takayuki

    2016-01-01

    Emergency myelopoiesis is inflammation-induced hematopoiesis to replenish myeloid cells in the periphery, which is critical to control the infection with pathogens. Previously, pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interferon (IFN)-α and IFN-γ were demonstrated to play a critical role in the expansion of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and myeloid progenitors, leading to production of mature myeloid cells, although their inhibitory effects on hematopoiesis were also reported. Therefore, the molecular mechanism of emergency myelopoiesis during infection remains incompletely understood. Here, we clarify that one of the interleukin (IL)-6/IL-12 family cytokines, IL-27, plays an important role in the emergency myelopoiesis. Among various types of hematopoietic cells in bone marrow, IL-27 predominantly and continuously promoted the expansion of only Lineage−Sca-1+c-Kit+ (LSK) cells, especially long-term repopulating HSCs and myeloid-restricted progenitor cells with long-term repopulating activity, and the differentiation into myeloid progenitors in synergy with stem cell factor. These progenitors expressed myeloid transcription factors such as Spi1, Gfi1, and Cebpa/b through activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 and 3, and had enhanced potential to differentiate into migratory dendritic cells (DCs), neutrophils, and mast cells, and less so into macrophages, and basophils, but not into plasmacytoid DCs, conventional DCs, T cells, and B cells. Among various cytokines, IL-27 in synergy with the stem cell factor had the strongest ability to augment the expansion of LSK cells and their differentiation into myeloid progenitors retaining the LSK phenotype over a long period of time. The experiments using mice deficient for one of IL-27 receptor subunits, WSX-1, and IFN-γ revealed that the blood stage of malaria infection enhanced IL-27 expression through IFN-γ production, and the IL-27 then promoted the expansion of LSK cells, differentiating and

  15. Sympathetic predominance is associated with impaired endothelial progenitor cells and tunneling nanotubes in controlled-hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    de Cavanagh, Elena M V; González, Sergio A; Inserra, Felipe; Forcada, Pedro; Castellaro, Carlos; Chiabaut-Svane, Jorge; Obregón, Sebastián; Casarini, María Jesús; Kempny, Pablo; Kotliar, Carol

    2014-07-15

    Early endothelial progenitor cells (early EPC) and late EPC are involved in endothelial repair and can rescue damaged endothelial cells by transferring organelles through tunneling nanotubes (TNT). In rodents, EPC mobilization from the bone marrow depends on sympathetic nervous system activity. Indirect evidence suggests a relation between autonomic derangements and human EPC mobilization. We aimed at testing whether hypertension-related autonomic imbalances are associated with EPC impairment. Thirty controlled-essential hypertensive patients [systolic blood pressure/diastolic blood pressure = 130(120-137)/85(61-88) mmHg; 81.8% male] and 20 healthy normotensive subjects [114(107-119)/75(64-79) mmHg; 80% male] were studied. Mononuclear cells were cultured on fibronectin- and collagen-coated dishes for early EPC and late EPC, respectively. Low (LF)- and high (HF)-frequency components of short-term heart rate variability were analyzed during a 5-min rest, an expiration/inspiration maneuver, and a Stroop color-word test. Modulations of cardiac sympathetic and parasympathetic activities were evaluated by LF/HF (%) and HF power (ms(2)), respectively. In controlled-hypertensive patients, the numbers of early EPC, early EPC that emitted TNT, late EPC, and late EPC that emitted TNT were 41, 77, 50, and 88% lower than in normotensive subjects (P < 0.008), respectively. In controlled-hypertensive patients, late EPC number was positively associated with cardiac parasympathetic reserve during the expiration/inspiration maneuver (rho = 0.45, P = 0.031) and early EPC with brachial flow-mediated dilation (rho = 0.655; P = 0.049); also, late TNT number was inversely related to cardiac sympathetic response during the stress test (rho = -0.426, P = 0.045). EPC exposure to epinephrine or norepinephrine showed negative dose-response relationships on cell adhesion to fibronectin and collagen; both catecholamines stimulated early EPC growth, but epinephrine inhibited late EPC growth. In

  16. Impact of obesity control on circulating level of endothelial progenitor cells and angiogenesis in response to ischemic stimulation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background and aim We tested the hypothesis that obesity reduced circulating number of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), angiogenic ability, and blood flow in ischemic tissue that could be reversed after obesity control. Methods 8-week-old C57BL/6J mice (n = 27) were equally divided into group 1 (fed with 22-week control diet), group 2 (22-week high fat diet), and group 3 (14-week high fat diet, followed by 8-week control diet). Critical limb ischemia (CLI) was induced at week 20 in groups 2 and 3. The animals were sacrificed at the end of 22 weeks. Results Heart weight, body weight, abdominal fat weight, serum total cholesterol level, and fasting blood sugar were highest in group 2 (all p < 0.001). The numbers of circulating EPCs (C-kit/CD31+, Sca-1/KDR + and CXCR4/CD34+) were lower in groups 1 and 2 than in group 3 at 18 h after CLI induction (p < 0.03). The numbers of differentiated EPCs (C-kit/CD31+, CXCR4/CD34+ and CD133+) from adipose tissue after 14-day cultivation were also lowest in group 2 (p < 0.001). Protein expressions of VCAM-1, oxidative index, Smad3, and TGF-β were higher, whereas the Smad1/5 and BMP-2, mitochondrial cytochrome-C SDF-1α and CXCR4 were lower in group 2 than in groups 1 and 3 (all p < 0.02). Immunofluorescent staining of CD31+ and vWF + cells, the number of small vessel (<15 μm), and blood flow through Laser Doppler scanning of ischemic area were lower in group 2 compared to groups 1 and 3 on day 14 after CLI induction (all p < 0.001). Conclusion Obesity suppressed abilities of angiogenesis and recovery from CLI that were reversed by obesity control. PMID:22568992

  17. Retinoblastoma Protein (RB1) Controls Fate Determination in Stem Cells and Progenitors of the Mouse Male Germline1

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qi-En; Gwost, Ivy; Oatley, Melissa J.; Oatley, Jon M.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Continual spermatogenesis is the cornerstone of male fertility and relies on the actions of an undifferentiated spermatogonial population comprised of stem cells and progenitors. A foundational spermatogonial stem cell (SSC) pool is established during postnatal development that serves as a self-renewing reservoir from which progenitor spermatogonia arise that transiently amplify in number before committing to terminal differentiation. At present, the underlying molecular mechanisms governing these actions are undefined. Using conditional mutant mouse models, we investigated whether function of the undifferentiated spermatogonial population during postnatal life is influenced by the tumor suppressor protein RB1. Spermatogenesis initiates in mice with conditional inactivation of Rb1 in prospermatogonial precursors, but the germline is progressively lost upon aging due to impaired renewal of the undifferentiated spermatogonial population. In contrast, continual spermatogenesis is sustained following Rb1 inactivation in progenitor spermatogonia, but some cells transform into a carcinoma in situ-like state. Furthermore, knockdown of Rb1 abundance within primary cultures of wild-type undifferentiated spermatogonia impairs maintenance of the SSC pool, and some cells are invasive of the basement membrane after transplant into recipient testes, indicating acquisition of tumorigenic properties. Collectively, these findings indicate that RB1 plays an essential role in establishment of a self-renewing SSC pool and commitment to the spermatogenic lineage within progenitor spermatogonia. PMID:24089198

  18. GLI3 Constrains Digit Number by Controlling Both Progenitor Proliferation and BMP-Dependent Exit to Chondrogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Rios, Javier; Speziale, Dario; Robay, Dimitri; Scotti, Martina; Osterwalder, Marco; Nusspaumer, Gretel; Galli, Antonella; Holländer, Georg A.; Kmita, Marie; Zeller, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Inactivation of Gli3, a key component of Hedgehog signaling in vertebrates, results in formation of additional digits (polydactyly) during limb bud development. The analysis of mouse embryos constitutively lacking Gli3 has revealed the essential GLI3 functions in specifying the anteroposterior (AP) limb axis and digit identities. We conditionally inactivated Gli3 during mouse hand plate development, which uncoupled the resulting preaxial polydactyly from known GLI3 functions in establishing AP and digit identities. Our analysis revealed that GLI3 directly restricts the expression of regulators of the G1–S cell-cycle transition such as Cdk6 and constrains S phase entry of digit progenitors in the anterior hand plate. Furthermore, GLI3 promotes the exit of proliferating progenitors toward BMP-dependent chondrogenic differentiation by spatiotemporally restricting and terminating the expression of the BMP antagonist Gremlin1. Thus, Gli3 is a negative regulator of the proliferative expansion of digit progenitors and acts as a gatekeeper for the exit to chondrogenic differentiation. PMID:22465667

  19. Stiffness-controlled three-dimensional collagen scaffolds for differentiation of human Wharton's jelly mesenchymal stem cells into cardiac progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yun-Li; Chen, Chie-Pein; Lo, Chun-Min; Wang, Hwai-Shi

    2016-09-01

    Stem cell-based regenerative therapy has emerged as a promising treatment for myocardial infarction. The aim of this study is to develop stiffness-controlled collagen scaffolds to allow proliferation and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cell (MSCs) into cardiac progenitor cells. In this study transforming growth factor β2 (TGF-β2), was used to induce stem cell differentiation into cardiac lineage cells. Collagen scaffolds were cross-linked with cross-linkers, 1-Ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC), and N-Hydroxysuccinimide (NHS). The results showed that collagen scaffolds cross-linked with 25/50 and 50/50 of EDC mM/NHS mM cross-linkers exhibited little difference in shape and size, the scaffold cross-linked with 50/50 of cross-linkers demonstrated better interconnectivity and higher Young's modulus (31.8 kPa) than the other (15.4 kPa). SEM observation showed that MSCs could grow inside the scaffolds and interact with collagen scaffolds. Furthermore, greater viability and cardiac lineage differentiation were achieved in MSCs cultured on stiffer scaffolds. The results suggest that three-dimensional type I collagen scaffolds with suitable cross-linking to adjust for stiffness can affect MSC fate and direct the differentiation of MSCs into cardiac progenitor cells with/without TGF-β2. These stiffness-controlled collagen scaffolds hold great potential as carriers for delivering MSCs differentiated cardiac progenitor cells into infracted hearts. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2234-2242, 2016. PMID:27120780

  20. Translational control plays a prominent role in the hepatocytic differentiation of HepaRG liver progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Parent, Romain; Beretta, Laura

    2008-01-01

    Background We investigated the molecular events associated with the differentiation of liver progenitor cells into functional and polarized hepatocytes, using human HepaRG cells that display potent hepatocytic differentiation-inducible properties and share some features with liver progenitor cells. Results Profiling of total and of polysome-bound transcripts isolated from HepaRG cells undergoing hepatocytic differentiation was performed. A group of 3,071 probe sets was reproducibly regulated by at least 2-fold in total or in polysome-bound RNA populations, upon differentiation. The fold changes in the total and the polysome-bound RNA populations for these 3,071 probe sets were poorly correlated (R = 0.38). Moreover, while the majority of the regulated polysome-bound RNA probe sets were up-regulated upon differentiation, the majority of the regulated probe sets selected from the total RNA population was down-regulated. Genes translationally up-regulated were associated with cell cycle inhibition, increased susceptibility to apoptosis and innate immunity. In contrast, genes transcriptionally up-regulated during differentiation corresponded in the majority to liver-enriched transcripts involved in lipid homeostasis and drug metabolism. Finally, several epithelial and hepato-specific transcripts were strongly induced in the total RNA population but were translationally repressed. Conclusion Translational regulation is the main genomic event associated with hepatocytic differentiation of liver progenitor cells in vitro and targets genes critical for moderating hepatocellular growth, cell death and susceptibility to pathogens. Transcriptional regulation targets specifically liver-enriched transcripts vital for establishing normal hepatic energy homeostasis, cell morphology and polarization. The hepatocytic differentiation is also accompanied by a reduction of the transcript content complexity. PMID:18221535

  1. Personalized Radioproteomics: Identification of a Protein Biomarker Signature for Preemptive Rescue by Tocopherol Succinate in CD34+ Irradiated Progenitor Cells Isolated from a Healthy Control Donor

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Anjali; Leighton, Ximena; Eidelman, Ofer; Starr, Joshua; Jozwik, Catherine; Srivastava, Meera; Pollard, Harvey B; Singh, Vijay K

    2016-01-01

    Tocopherol succinate (TS) has been shown to protect mice against acute radiation syndrome, however, its exact mechanism of action and its possible use in humans has not yet been evaluated. Our approach has been to test the radioprotectant properties of TS on CD34-positive stem cells from healthy volunteers. We hypothesize that a radioproteomics strategy can identify a drug-dependent, personalized proteomics signature for radioprotection. To directly test the radioproteomics hypothesis, we treated human CD34-positive stem cells with 20 μM TS for 24 h, and then exposed the cells to 2 Gy of cobalt-60 gamma-radiation. We isolated protein from all cultures and used a high throughput Antibody Microarray (AbMA) platform to measure concentrations of 725 low abundance proteins. As an in vivo control, we also tested mouse CD34-positive stem cells using the same preemptive TS paradigm on progenitor colony forming units. TS pretreatment of in vitro or in vivo CD34-positive stem cells rescued radiation-induced loss of colony-forming potential of progenitors. We identified 50 of 725 proteins that could be preemptively rescued from radiation-induced reduction by pretreatment with TS. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) reveals that the modified proteins fall into categories dominated by epigenetic regulation, DNA repair, and inflammation. Our results suggest that radioproteomics can be used to develop personalized medicine for radioprotection using protein signatures from primary CD34-positive progenitors derived from the patient or victim prior to radiation exposure. The protective effect of TS may be due to its ability to preemptively activate epigenetic mechanisms relevant to radioprotection and to preemptively activate the programs for DNA repair and inflammation leading to cell survival. PMID:27087761

  2. Control of the Normal and Pathological Development of Neural Stem and Progenitor Cells by the PC3/Tis21/Btg2 and Btg1 Genes.

    PubMed

    Micheli, Laura; Ceccarelli, Manuela; Farioli-Vecchioli, Stefano; Tirone, Felice

    2015-12-01

    The PC3/Tis21/Btg2 and Btg1 genes are transcriptional cofactors belonging to the Btg/Tob family, which regulate the development of several cell types, including neural precursors. We summarize here the actions of these genes on neural precursors in the adult neurogenic niches and the cognitive defects associated when their expression is altered. We consider also recent findings implicating them in neural and non-neural tumors, since common developmental mechanisms are involved. PC3/Tis21 is required for the regulation of the maturation of stem and progenitor cells in the adult dentate gyrus and subventricular zone (SVZ), by controlling both their exit from the cell cycle and the ensuing terminal differentiation. Such actions are effected by regulating the expression of several genes, including cyclin D1, BMP4, Id3. In cerebellar precursors, however, PC3/Tis21 regulates chiefly their migration rather than proliferation or differentiation, with important implications for the onset of medulloblastoma, the cerebellar tumor. In fact PC3/Tis21 is a medulloblastoma-suppressor, as its overexpression in cerebellar precursors inhibits this tumor; PC3/Tis21 shows anti-tumor activity also in non-neural tumors. Btg1 presents a different functional profile, as it controls proliferation in adult stem/progenitor cells of dentate gyrus and SVZ, where is required to maintain their self-renewal and quiescence, but is apparently devoid of a direct control of their terminal differentiation or migration. Notably, physical exercise in Btg1-null mice rescues the loss of proliferative capability occurring in older stem cells. Both genes could be further investigated as therapeutical targets, namely, Btg1 in the process of aging and PC3/Tis21 as a tumor-suppressor. PMID:25967096

  3. Hdac1 and Hdac2 act redundantly to control p63 and p53 functions in epidermal progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    LeBoeuf, Matthew; Terrell, Anne; Trivedi, Sohum; Sinha, Satrajit; Epstein, Jonathan A.; Olson, Eric N.; Morrisey, Edward E.; Millar, Sarah E.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Epidermal and hair follicle development from surface ectodermal progenitor cells require coordinated changes in gene expression. Histone deacetylases alter gene expression programs through modification of chromatin and transcription factors. We find that deletion of ectodermal Hdac1 and Hdac2 results in dramatic failure of hair follicle specification and epidermal proliferation and stratification, phenocopying loss of the key ectodermal transcription factor p63. While expression of p63 and its positively regulated basal cell targets is maintained in Hdac1/2 deficient ectoderm, targets of p63-mediated repression, including p21, 14-3-3σ and p16/INK4a, are ectopically expressed, and HDACs bind and are active at their promoter regions in normal undifferentiated keratinocytes. Mutant embryos display increased levels of acetylated p53, which opposes p63 functions, and p53 is required for HDAC inhibitor-mediated p21 expression in keratinocytes. Our data identify critical requirements for HDAC1/2 in epidermal development, and indicate that HDAC1/2 directly mediate repressive functions of p63, and suppress p53 activity. PMID:21093383

  4. Quantifying intrinsic and extrinsic control of single-cell fates in cancer and stem/progenitor cell pedigrees with competing risks analysis.

    PubMed

    Cornwell, J A; Hallett, R M; der Mauer, S Auf; Motazedian, A; Schroeder, T; Draper, J S; Harvey, R P; Nordon, R E

    2016-01-01

    The molecular control of cell fate and behaviour is a central theme in biology. Inherent heterogeneity within cell populations requires that control of cell fate is studied at the single-cell level. Time-lapse imaging and single-cell tracking are powerful technologies for acquiring cell lifetime data, allowing quantification of how cell-intrinsic and extrinsic factors control single-cell fates over time. However, cell lifetime data contain complex features. Competing cell fates, censoring, and the possible inter-dependence of competing fates, currently present challenges to modelling cell lifetime data. Thus far such features are largely ignored, resulting in loss of data and introducing a source of bias. Here we show that competing risks and concordance statistics, previously applied to clinical data and the study of genetic influences on life events in twins, respectively, can be used to quantify intrinsic and extrinsic control of single-cell fates. Using these statistics we demonstrate that 1) breast cancer cell fate after chemotherapy is dependent on p53 genotype; 2) granulocyte macrophage progenitors and their differentiated progeny have concordant fates; and 3) cytokines promote self-renewal of cardiac mesenchymal stem cells by symmetric divisions. Therefore, competing risks and concordance statistics provide a robust and unbiased approach for evaluating hypotheses at the single-cell level. PMID:27250534

  5. Quantifying intrinsic and extrinsic control of single-cell fates in cancer and stem/progenitor cell pedigrees with competing risks analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cornwell, J. A.; Hallett, R. M.; der Mauer, S. Auf; Motazedian, A.; Schroeder, T.; Draper, J. S.; Harvey, R. P.; Nordon, R. E.

    2016-01-01

    The molecular control of cell fate and behaviour is a central theme in biology. Inherent heterogeneity within cell populations requires that control of cell fate is studied at the single-cell level. Time-lapse imaging and single-cell tracking are powerful technologies for acquiring cell lifetime data, allowing quantification of how cell-intrinsic and extrinsic factors control single-cell fates over time. However, cell lifetime data contain complex features. Competing cell fates, censoring, and the possible inter-dependence of competing fates, currently present challenges to modelling cell lifetime data. Thus far such features are largely ignored, resulting in loss of data and introducing a source of bias. Here we show that competing risks and concordance statistics, previously applied to clinical data and the study of genetic influences on life events in twins, respectively, can be used to quantify intrinsic and extrinsic control of single-cell fates. Using these statistics we demonstrate that 1) breast cancer cell fate after chemotherapy is dependent on p53 genotype; 2) granulocyte macrophage progenitors and their differentiated progeny have concordant fates; and 3) cytokines promote self-renewal of cardiac mesenchymal stem cells by symmetric divisions. Therefore, competing risks and concordance statistics provide a robust and unbiased approach for evaluating hypotheses at the single-cell level. PMID:27250534

  6. Vascular Stem/Progenitor Cell Migration Induced by Smooth Muscle Cell-Derived Chemokine (C-C Motif) Ligand 2 and Chemokine (C-X-C motif) Ligand 1 Contributes to Neointima Formation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Baoqi; Wong, Mei Mei; Potter, Claire M F; Simpson, Russell M L; Karamariti, Eirini; Zhang, Zhongyi; Zeng, Lingfang; Warren, Derek; Hu, Yanhua; Wang, Wen; Xu, Qingbo

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies have shown that Sca-1(+) (stem cell antigen-1) stem/progenitor cells within blood vessel walls may contribute to neointima formation, but the mechanism behind their recruitment has not been explored. In this work Sca-1(+) progenitor cells were cultivated from mouse vein graft tissue and found to exhibit increased migration when cocultured with smooth muscle cells (SMCs) or when treated with SMC-derived conditioned medium. This migration was associated with elevated levels of chemokines, CCL2 (chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2) and CXCL1 (chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1), and their corresponding receptors on Sca-1(+) progenitors, CCR2 (chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 2) and CXCR2 (chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 2), which were also upregulated following SMC conditioned medium treatment. Knockdown of either receptor in Sca-1(+) progenitors significantly inhibited cell migration. The GTPases Cdc42 and Rac1 were activated by both CCL2 and CXCL1 stimulation and p38 phosphorylation was increased. However, only Rac1 inhibition significantly reduced migration and p38 phosphorylation. After Sca-1(+) progenitors labeled with green fluorescent protein (GFP) were applied to the adventitial side of wire-injured mouse femoral arteries, a large proportion of GFP-Sca-1(+) -cells were observed in neointimal lesions, and a marked increase in neointimal lesion formation was seen 1 week post-operation. Interestingly, Sca-1(+) progenitor migration from the adventitia to the neointima was abrogated and neointima formation diminished in a wire injury model using CCL2(-/-) mice. These findings suggest vascular stem/progenitor cell migration from the adventitia to the neointima can be induced by SMC release of chemokines which act via CCR2/Rac1/p38 and CXCR2/Rac1/p38 signaling pathways. Stem Cells 2016;34:2368-2380. PMID:27300479

  7. Ciliary transition zone activation of phospho-Tctex-1 controls ciliary resorption, S-phase entry and fate of neural progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Aiqun; Saito, Masaki; Chuang, Jen-Zen; Tseng, Yun-Yu; Dedesma, Carlos; Tomizawa, Kazuhito; Kaitsuka, Taku; Sung, Ching-Hwa

    2014-01-01

    Primary cilia are displayed during the G0/G1 phase of many cell types. Cilia are reabsorbed as cells prepare to re-enter the cell cycle, but the causal and molecular link between these two cellular events remains unclear. We show that phospho(T94)Tctex-1 is recruited to ciliary transition zones prior to S-phase entry and plays a pivotal role in both ciliary disassembly and cell cycle progression. Tctex-1’s role in S-phase entry, however, is dispensable in non-ciliated cells. Exogenously added phosphomimic Tctex-1 T94E accelerates cilium disassembly and S-phase entry. These results support a model in which the cilia act as a brake to prevent cell cycle progression. Mechanistic studies show the involvement of actin dynamics in Tctex-1 regulated cilium resorption. Phospho(T94)Tctex-1 is also selectively enriched at the ciliary transition zones of cortical neural progenitors, and plays a key role in controlling G1 length, cell cycle entry, and fate determination of these cells during corticogenesis. PMID:21394082

  8. Controlling surface topology and functionality of electrospun fibers on the nanoscale using amphiphilic block copolymers to direct mesenchymal progenitor cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, Priyalakshmi; Themistou, Efrosyni; Ngamkham, Kamolchanok; Reilly, Gwendolen C; Armes, Steven P; Battaglia, Giuseppe

    2015-01-12

    Surface patterning in three dimensions is of great importance in biomaterials design for controlling cell behavior. A facile one-step functionalization of biodegradable PDLLA fibers using amphiphilic diblock copolymers is demonstrated here to systematically vary the fiber surface composition. The copolymers comprise a hydrophilic poly[oligo(ethylene glycol) methacrylate] (POEGMA), poly[(2-methacryloyloxy)ethyl phosphorylcholine] (PMPC), or poly[2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate)] (PDMAEMA) block and a hydrophobic poly(l-lactide) (PLA) block. The block copolymer-modified fibers have increased surface hydrophilicity compared to that of PDLLA fibers. Mixtures of PLA-PMPC and PLA-POEGMA copolymers are utilized to exploit microphase separation of the incompatible hydrophilic PMPC and POEGMA blocks at the fiber surface. Conjugation of an RGD cell-adhesive peptide to one hydrophilic block (POEGMA) using thiol-ene chemistry produces fibers with domains of cell-adhesive (POEGMA) and cell-inert (PMPC) sites, mimicking the adhesive properties of the extracellular matrix (ECM). Human mesenchymal progenitor cells (hES-MPs) showed much better adhesion to the fibers with surface-adhesive heterogeneity compared to that to fibers with only adhesive or only inert surface chemistries. PMID:25402847

  9. Nutritional regulation of stem and progenitor cells in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Jiwon; Gururaja-Rao, Shubha; Banerjee, Utpal

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells and their progenitors are maintained within a microenvironment, termed the niche, through local cell-cell communication. Systemic signals originating outside the niche also affect stem cell and progenitor behavior. This review summarizes studies that pertain to nutritional effects on stem and progenitor cell maintenance and proliferation in Drosophila. Multiple tissue types are discussed that utilize the insulin-related signaling pathway to convey nutritional information either directly to these progenitors or via other cell types within the niche. The concept of systemic control of these cell types is not limited to Drosophila and may be functional in vertebrate systems, including mammals. PMID:24255094

  10. Xenotransplantation of Human Cardiomyocyte Progenitor Cells Does Not Improve Cardiac Function in a Porcine Model of Chronic Ischemic Heart Failure. Results from a Randomized, Blinded, Placebo Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Jansen of Lorkeers, Sanne J.; Gho, Johannes M. I. H.; Koudstaal, Stefan; van Hout, Gerardus P. J.; Zwetsloot, Peter Paul M.; van Oorschot, Joep W. M.; van Eeuwijk, Esther C. M.; Leiner, Tim; Hoefer, Imo E.; Goumans, Marie-José; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Sluijter, Joost P. G.; Chamuleau, Steven A. J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Recently cardiomyocyte progenitor cells (CMPCs) were successfully isolated from fetal and adult human hearts. Direct intramyocardial injection of human CMPCs (hCMPCs) in experimental mouse models of acute myocardial infarction significantly improved cardiac function compared to controls. Aim Here, our aim was to investigate whether xenotransplantation via intracoronary infusion of fetal hCMPCs in a pig model of chronic myocardial infarction is safe and efficacious, in view of translation purposes. Methods & Results We performed a randomized, blinded, placebo controlled trial. Four weeks after ischemia/reperfusion injury by 90 minutes of percutaneous left anterior descending artery occlusion, pigs (n = 16, 68.5 ± 5.4 kg) received intracoronary infusion of 10 million fetal hCMPCs or placebo. All animals were immunosuppressed by cyclosporin (CsA). Four weeks after infusion, endpoint analysis by MRI displayed no difference in left ventricular ejection fraction, left ventricular end diastolic and left ventricular end systolic volumes between both groups. Serial pressure volume (PV-)loop and echocardiography showed no differences in functional parameters between groups at any timepoint. Infarct size at follow-up, measured by late gadolinium enhancement MRI showed no difference between groups. Intracoronary pressure and flow measurements showed no signs of coronary obstruction 30 minutes after cell infusion. No premature death occurred in cell treated animals. Conclusion Xenotransplantation via intracoronary infusion of hCMPCs is feasible and safe, but not associated with improved left ventricular performance and infarct size compared to placebo in a porcine model of chronic myocardial infarction. PMID:26678993

  11. Comparison of the Transcriptomes of Long-Term Label Retaining-Cells and Control Cells Microdissected from Mammary Epithelium: An Initial Study to Characterize Potential Stem/Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Ratan K.; Li, Robert W.; Evock-Clover, Christina M.; Capuco, Anthony V.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Previous molecular characterizations of mammary stem cells (MaSC) have utilized fluorescence-activated cell sorting or in vitro cultivation of cells from enzymatically dissociated tissue to enrich for MaSC. These approaches result in the loss of all histological information pertaining to the in vivo locale of MaSC and progenitor cells. Instead, we used laser microdissection to excise putative progenitor cells and control cells from their in situ locations in cryosections and characterized the molecular properties of these cells. MaSC/progenitor cells were identified based on their ability to retain bromodeoxyuridine for an extended period. Results: We isolated four categories of cells from mammary epithelium of female calves: bromodeoxyuridine label retaining epithelial cells (LREC) from basal (LRECb) and embedded layers (LRECe), and epithelial control cells from basal and embedded layers. Enriched expression of genes in LRECb was associated with stem cell attributes and identified WNT, TGF-β, and MAPK pathways of self renewal and proliferation. Genes expressed in LRECe revealed retention of some stem-like properties along with up-regulation of differentiation factors. Conclusion: Our data suggest that LREC in the basal epithelial layer are enriched for MaSC, as these cells showed increased expression of genes that reflect stem cell attributes; whereas LREC in suprabasal epithelial layers are enriched for more committed progenitor cells, expressing some genes that are associated with stem cell attributes along with those indicative of cell differentiation. Our results support the use of DNA label retention to identify MaSC and also provide a molecular profile and novel candidate markers for these cells. Insights into the biology of stem cells will be gained by confirmation and characterization of candidate MaSC markers identified in this study. PMID:23423481

  12. HDAC-regulated myomiRs control BAF60 variant exchange and direct the functional phenotype of fibro-adipogenic progenitors in dystrophic muscles

    PubMed Central

    Saccone, Valentina; Consalvi, Silvia; Giordani, Lorenzo; Mozzetta, Chiara; Barozzi, Iros; Sandoná, Martina; Ryan, Tammy; Rojas-Muñoz, Agustin; Madaro, Luca; Fasanaro, Pasquale; Borsellino, Giovanna; De Bardi, Marco; Frigè, Gianmaria; Termanini, Alberto; Sun, Xin; Rossant, Janet; Bruneau, Benoit G.; Mercola, Mark; Minucci, Saverio; Puri, Pier Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    Fibro-adipogenic progenitors (FAPs) are important components of the skeletal muscle regenerative environment. Whether FAPs support muscle regeneration or promote fibro-adipogenic degeneration is emerging as a key determinant in the pathogenesis of muscular diseases, including Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). However, the molecular mechanism that controls FAP lineage commitment and activity is currently unknown. We show here that an HDAC–myomiR–BAF60 variant network regulates the fate of FAPs in dystrophic muscles of mdx mice. Combinatorial analysis of gene expression microarray, genome-wide chromatin remodeling by nuclease accessibility (NA) combined with next-generation sequencing (NA-seq), small RNA sequencing (RNA-seq), and microRNA (miR) high-throughput screening (HTS) against SWI/SNF BAF60 variants revealed that HDAC inhibitors (HDACis) derepress a “latent” myogenic program in FAPs from dystrophic muscles at early stages of disease. Specifically, HDAC inhibition induces two core components of the myogenic transcriptional machinery, MYOD and BAF60C, and up-regulates the myogenic miRs (myomiRs) (miR-1.2, miR-133, and miR-206), which target the alternative BAF60 variants BAF60A and BAF60B, ultimately directing promyogenic differentiation while suppressing the fibro-adipogenic phenotype. In contrast, FAPs from late stage dystrophic muscles are resistant to HDACi-induced chromatin remodeling at myogenic loci and fail to activate the promyogenic phenotype. These results reveal a previously unappreciated disease stage-specific bipotency of mesenchimal cells within the regenerative environment of dystrophic muscles. Resolution of such bipotency by epigenetic intervention with HDACis provides a molecular rationale for the in situ reprogramming of target cells to promote therapeutic regeneration of dystrophic muscles. PMID:24682306

  13. Store-Operated Ca2+ Entry Is Remodelled and Controls In Vitro Angiogenesis in Endothelial Progenitor Cells Isolated from Tumoral Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dragoni, Silvia; Bottino, Cinzia; Ong, Hwei Ling; Guerra, Germano; Ganini, Carlo; Massa, Margherita; Manzoni, Mariangela; Ambudkar, Indu S.; Genazzani, Armando A.; Rosti, Vittorio; Pedrazzoli, Paolo; Tanzi, Franco; Moccia, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Background Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) may be recruited from bone marrow to sustain tumor vascularisation and promote the metastatic switch. Understanding the molecular mechanisms driving EPC proliferation and tubulogenesis could outline novel targets for alternative anti-angiogenic treatments. Store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE), which is activated by a depletion of the intracellular Ca2+ pool, regulates the growth of human EPCs, where is mediated by the interaction between the endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-sensor, Stim1, and the plasmalemmal Ca2+ channel, Orai1. As oncogenesis may be associated to the capability of tumor cells to grow independently on Ca2+ influx, it is important to assess whether SOCE regulates EPC-dependent angiogenesis also in tumor patients. Methodology/Principal Findings The present study employed Ca2+ imaging, recombinant sub-membranal and mitochondrial aequorin, real-time polymerase chain reaction, gene silencing techniques and western blot analysis to investigate the expression and the role of SOCE in EPCs isolated from peripheral blood of patients affected by renal cellular carcinoma (RCC; RCC-EPCs) as compared to control EPCs (N-EPCs). SOCE, activated by either pharmacological (i.e. cyclopiazonic acid) or physiological (i.e. ATP) stimulation, was significantly higher in RCC-EPCs and was selectively sensitive to BTP-2, and to the trivalent cations, La3+ and Gd3+. Furthermore, 2-APB enhanced thapsigargin-evoked SOCE at low concentrations, whereas higher doses caused SOCE inhibition. Conversely, the anti-angiogenic drug, carboxyamidotriazole (CAI), blocked both SOCE and the intracellular Ca2+ release. SOCE was associated to the over-expression of Orai1, Stim1, and transient receptor potential channel 1 (TRPC1) at both mRNA and protein level The intracellular Ca2+ buffer, BAPTA, BTP-2, and CAI inhibited RCC-EPC proliferation and tubulogenesis. The genetic suppression of Stim1, Orai1, and TRPC1 blocked CPA-evoked SOCE in RCC

  14. CDC42 inhibition suppresses progression of incipient intestinal tumors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mutations in the APC or Beta-catenin genes are well-established initiators of colorectal cancer, yet modifiers that facilitate the survival and progression of nascent tumor cells are not well defined. Using genetic and pharmacologic approaches in mouse colorectal cancer and human colorectal cancer x...

  15. The proteoglycan Trol controls the architecture of the extracellular matrix and balances proliferation and differentiation of blood progenitors in the Drosophila lymph gland.

    PubMed

    Grigorian, Melina; Liu, Ting; Banerjee, Utpal; Hartenstein, Volker

    2013-12-15

    The heparin sulfate proteoglycan Terribly Reduced Optic Lobes (Trol) is the Drosophila melanogaster homolog of the vertebrate protein Perlecan. Trol is expressed as part of the extracellular matrix (ECM) found in the hematopoietic organ, called the lymph gland. In the normal lymph gland, the ECM forms thin basement membranes around individual or small groups of blood progenitors. The pattern of basement membranes, reported by Trol expression, is spatio-temporally correlated to hematopoiesis. The central, medullary zone which contain undifferentiated hematopoietic progenitors has many, closely spaced membranes. Fewer basement membranes are present in the outer, cortical zone, where differentiation of blood cells takes place. Loss of trol causes a dramatic change of the ECM into a three-dimensional, spongy mass that fills wide spaces scattered throughout the lymph gland. At the same time proliferation is reduced, leading to a significantly smaller lymph gland. Interestingly, differentiation of blood progenitors in trol mutants is precocious, resulting in the break-down of the usual zonation of the lymph gland. which normally consists of an immature center (medullary zone) where cells remain undifferentiated, and an outer cortical zone, where differentiation sets in. We present evidence that the effect of Trol on blood cell differentiation is mediated by Hedgehog (Hh) signaling, which is known to be required to maintain an immature medullary zone. Overexpression of hh in the background of a trol mutation is able to rescue the premature differentiation phenotype. Our data provide novel insight into the role of the ECM component Perlecan during Drosophila hematopoiesis. PMID:23510717

  16. Mesenchymal cells. Defining a mesenchymal progenitor niche at single-cell resolution.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Maya E; Bogard, Patrick E; Espinoza, F Hernán; Menke, Douglas B; Kingsley, David M; Krasnow, Mark A

    2014-11-14

    Most vertebrate organs are composed of epithelium surrounded by support and stromal tissues formed from mesenchyme cells, which are not generally thought to form organized progenitor pools. Here, we use clonal cell labeling with multicolor reporters to characterize individual mesenchymal progenitors in the developing mouse lung. We observe a diversity of mesenchymal progenitor populations with different locations, movements, and lineage boundaries. Airway smooth muscle (ASM) progenitors map exclusively to mesenchyme ahead of budding airways. Progenitors recruited from these tip pools differentiate into ASM around airway stalks; flanking stalk mesenchyme can be induced to form an ASM niche by a lateral bud or by an airway tip plus focal Wnt signal. Thus, mesenchymal progenitors can be organized into localized and carefully controlled domains that rival epithelial progenitor niches in regulatory sophistication. PMID:25395543

  17. Two Forkhead transcription factors regulate cardiac progenitor specification by controlling the expression of receptors of the fibroblast growth factor and Wnt signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Shaad M.; Bhattacharyya, Pritha; Jeffries, Neal; Gisselbrecht, Stephen S.; Michelson, Alan M.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiogenesis involves the coordinated regulation of multiple biological processes by a finite set of transcription factors (TFs). Here, we show that the Forkhead TFs Checkpoint suppressor homologue (CHES-1-like) and Jumeau (Jumu), which govern cardiac progenitor cell divisions by regulating Polo kinase activity, play an additional, mutually redundant role in specifying the cardiac mesoderm (CM) as eliminating the functions of both Forkhead genes in the same Drosophila embryo results in defective hearts with missing hemisegments. This process is mediated by the Forkhead TFs regulating the fibroblast growth factor receptor Heartless (Htl) and the Wnt receptor Frizzled (Fz): CHES-1-like and jumu exhibit synergistic genetic interactions with htl and fz in CM specification, thereby implying that they function through the same genetic pathways, and transcriptionally activate the expression of both receptor-encoding genes. Furthermore, ectopic overexpression of either htl or fz in the mesoderm partially rescues the defective CM specification phenotype in embryos lacking both Forkhead genes. Together, these data emphasize the functional redundancy that leads to robustness in the cardiac progenitor specification process, and illustrate the pleiotropic functions of Forkhead TFs in different aspects of cardiogenesis. PMID:26657774

  18. MicroRNA-126-mediated control of cell fate in B-cell myeloid progenitors as a potential alternative to transcriptional factors.

    PubMed

    Okuyama, Kazuki; Ikawa, Tomokatsu; Gentner, Bernhard; Hozumi, Katsuto; Harnprasopwat, Ratanakanit; Lu, Jun; Yamashita, Riu; Ha, Daon; Toyoshima, Takae; Chanda, Bidisha; Kawamata, Toyotaka; Yokoyama, Kazuaki; Wang, Shusheng; Ando, Kiyoshi; Lodish, Harvey F; Tojo, Arinobu; Kawamoto, Hiroshi; Kotani, Ai

    2013-08-13

    Lineage specification is thought to be largely regulated at the level of transcription, where lineage-specific transcription factors drive specific cell fates. MicroRNAs (miR), vital to many cell functions, act posttranscriptionally to decrease the expression of target mRNAs. MLL-AF4 acute lymphocytic leukemia exhibits both myeloid and B-cell surface markers, suggesting that the transformed cells are B-cell myeloid progenitor cells. Through gain- and loss-of-function experiments, we demonstrated that microRNA 126 (miR-126) drives B-cell myeloid biphenotypic leukemia differentiation toward B cells without changing expression of E2A immunoglobulin enhancer-binding factor E12/E47 (E2A), early B-cell factor 1 (EBF1), or paired box protein 5, which are critical transcription factors in B-lymphopoiesis. Similar induction of B-cell differentiation by miR-126 was observed in normal hematopoietic cells in vitro and in vivo in uncommitted murine c-Kit(+)Sca1(+)Lineage(-) cells, with insulin regulatory subunit-1 acting as a target of miR-126. Importantly, in EBF1-deficient hematopoietic progenitor cells, which fail to differentiate into B cells, miR-126 significantly up-regulated B220, and induced the expression of B-cell genes, including recombination activating genes-1/2 and CD79a/b. These data suggest that miR-126 can at least partly rescue B-cell development independently of EBF1. These experiments show that miR-126 regulates myeloid vs. B-cell fate through an alternative machinery, establishing the critical role of miRNAs in the lineage specification of multipotent mammalian cells. PMID:23893300

  19. Functional Blood Progenitor Markers in Developing Human Liver Progenitors.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Orit; Cohen, Idan; Gouon-Evans, Valerie

    2016-08-01

    In the early fetal liver, hematopoietic progenitors expand and mature together with hepatoblasts, the liver progenitors of hepatocytes and cholangiocytes. Previous analyses of human fetal livers indicated that both progenitors support each other's lineage maturation and curiously share some cell surface markers including CD34 and CD133. Using the human embryonic stem cell (hESC) system, we demonstrate that virtually all hESC-derived hepatoblast-like cells (Hep cells) transition through a progenitor stage expressing CD34 and CD133 as well as GATA2, an additional hematopoietic marker that has not previously been associated with human hepatoblast development. Dynamic expression patterns for CD34, CD133, and GATA2 in hepatoblasts were validated in human fetal livers collected from the first and second trimesters of gestation. Knockdown experiments demonstrate that each gene also functions to regulate hepatic fate mostly in a cell-autonomous fashion, revealing unprecedented roles of fetal hematopoietic progenitor markers in human liver progenitors. PMID:27509132

  20. Progenitors of type Ia supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Keiichi; Terada, Yukikatsu

    2016-07-01

    Natures of progenitors of type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) have not yet been clarified. There has been long and intensive discussion on whether the so-called single degenerate (SD) scenario or the double degenerate (DD) scenario, or anything else, could explain a major population of SNe Ia, but the conclusion has not yet been reached. With rapidly increasing observational data and new theoretical ideas, the field of studying the SN Ia progenitors has been quickly developing, and various new insights have been obtained in recent years. This paper aims at providing a summary of the current situation regarding the SN Ia progenitors, both in theory and observations. It seems difficult to explain the emerging diversity seen in observations of SNe Ia by a single population, and we emphasize that it is important to clarify links between different progenitor scenarios and different sub-classes of SNe Ia.

  1. Harnessing endogenous stem/progenitor cells for tendon regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang H.; Lee, Francis Y.; Tarafder, Solaiman; Kao, Kristy; Jun, Yena; Yang, Guodong; Mao, Jeremy J.

    2015-01-01

    Current stem cell–based strategies for tissue regeneration involve ex vivo manipulation of these cells to confer features of the desired progenitor population. Recently, the concept that endogenous stem/progenitor cells could be used for regenerating tissues has emerged as a promising approach that potentially overcomes the obstacles related to cell transplantation. Here we applied this strategy for the regeneration of injured tendons in a rat model. First, we identified a rare fraction of tendon cells that was positive for the known tendon stem cell marker CD146 and exhibited clonogenic capacity, as well as multilineage differentiation ability. These tendon-resident CD146+ stem/progenitor cells were selectively enriched by connective tissue growth factor delivery (CTGF delivery) in the early phase of tendon healing, followed by tenogenic differentiation in the later phase. The time-controlled proliferation and differentiation of CD146+ stem/progenitor cells by CTGF delivery successfully led to tendon regeneration with densely aligned collagen fibers, normal level of cellularity, and functional restoration. Using siRNA knockdown to evaluate factors involved in tendon generation, we demonstrated that the FAK/ERK1/2 signaling pathway regulates CTGF-induced proliferation and differentiation of CD146+ stem/progenitor cells. Together, our findings support the use of endogenous stem/progenitor cells as a strategy for tendon regeneration without cell transplantation and suggest this approach warrants exploration in other tissues. PMID:26053662

  2. Endothelial progenitor cells in hematologic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Saulle, Ernestina; Castelli, Germana; Pelosi, Elvira

    2016-01-01

    Studies carried out in the last years have improved the understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms controlling angiogenesis during adult life in normal and pathological conditions. Some of these studies have led to the identification of some progenitor cells that sustain angiogenesis through indirect, paracrine mechanisms (hematopoietic angiogenic cells) and through direct mechanisms, i.e., through their capacity to generate a progeny of phenotypically and functionally competent endothelial cells [endothelial colony forming cells (ECFCs)]. The contribution of these progenitors to angiogenetic processes under physiological and pathological conditions is intensively investigated. Angiogenetic mechanisms are stimulated in various hematological malignancies, including chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), acute myeloid leukemia (AML), myelodysplastic syndromes and multiple myeloma, resulting in an increased angiogenesis that contributes to disease progression. In some of these conditions there is preliminary evidence that some endothelial cells could derive from the malignant clone, thus leading to the speculation that the leukemic cell derives from the malignant transformation of a hemangioblastic progenitor, i.e., of a cell capable of differentiation to the hematopoietic and to the endothelial cell lineages. Our understanding of the mechanisms underlying increased angiogenesis in these malignancies not only contributed to a better knowledge of the mechanisms responsible for tumor progression, but also offered the way for the discovery of new therapeutic targets. PMID:27583252

  3. Endothelial progenitor cells in hematologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Testa, Ugo; Saulle, Ernestina; Castelli, Germana; Pelosi, Elvira

    2016-01-01

    Studies carried out in the last years have improved the understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms controlling angiogenesis during adult life in normal and pathological conditions. Some of these studies have led to the identification of some progenitor cells that sustain angiogenesis through indirect, paracrine mechanisms (hematopoietic angiogenic cells) and through direct mechanisms, i.e., through their capacity to generate a progeny of phenotypically and functionally competent endothelial cells [endothelial colony forming cells (ECFCs)]. The contribution of these progenitors to angiogenetic processes under physiological and pathological conditions is intensively investigated. Angiogenetic mechanisms are stimulated in various hematological malignancies, including chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), acute myeloid leukemia (AML), myelodysplastic syndromes and multiple myeloma, resulting in an increased angiogenesis that contributes to disease progression. In some of these conditions there is preliminary evidence that some endothelial cells could derive from the malignant clone, thus leading to the speculation that the leukemic cell derives from the malignant transformation of a hemangioblastic progenitor, i.e., of a cell capable of differentiation to the hematopoietic and to the endothelial cell lineages. Our understanding of the mechanisms underlying increased angiogenesis in these malignancies not only contributed to a better knowledge of the mechanisms responsible for tumor progression, but also offered the way for the discovery of new therapeutic targets. PMID:27583252

  4. Intrinsic Age-Dependent Changes and Cell-Cell Contacts Regulate Nephron Progenitor Lifespan.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuang; Brunskill, Eric W; Potter, S Steven; Dexheimer, Phillip J; Salomonis, Nathan; Aronow, Bruce J; Hong, Christian I; Zhang, Tongli; Kopan, Raphael

    2015-10-12

    During fetal development, nephrons of the metanephric kidney form from a mesenchymal progenitor population that differentiates en masse before or shortly after birth. We explored intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms controlling progenitor lifespan in a transplantation assay that allowed us to compare engraftment of old and young progenitors into the same young niche. The progenitors displayed an age-dependent decrease in proliferation and concomitant increase in niche exit rates. Single-cell transcriptome profiling revealed progressive age-dependent changes, with heterogeneity increasing in older populations. Age-dependent elevation in mTor and reduction in Fgf20 could contribute to increased exit rates. Importantly, 30% of old progenitors remained in the niche for up to 1 week post engraftment, a net gain of 50% to their lifespan, but only if surrounded by young neighbors. We provide evidence in support of a model in which intrinsic age-dependent changes affect inter-progenitor interactions that drive cessation of nephrogenesis. PMID:26460946

  5. Circulating Hematopoietic Progenitor Cells are Decreased in COPD

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, William J.; Yunt, Zulma X.; Muldrow, Alaina; Kearns, Mark T.; Kloepfer, Angela; Barthel, Lea; Bratton, Donna L.; Bowler, Russell P.; Henson, Peter M.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Bone marrow derived progenitor cells participate in the repair of injured vessels. The lungs of individuals with emphysema have reduced alveolar capillary density and increased endothelial apoptosis. We hypothesized that circulating levels of endothelial and hematopoietic progenitor cells would be reduced in this group of patients. Objectives The goal of this study was to measure circulating levels of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) in subjects with COPD and to determine if progenitor levels correlated with disease severity and the presence of emphysema. Methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated from 61 patients with COPD and 32 control subjects. Levels of EPCs (CD45dim CD34+ ) and HPCs (CD45+ CD34+ VEGF-R2+) were quantified using multi-parameter flow cytometry. Progenitor cell function was assessed using cell culture assays. All subjects were evaluated with spirometry and CT scanning. Measurements and Main Results HPC levels were reduced in subjects with COPD compared to controls, whereas circulating EPC levels were similar between the two groups. HPC levels correlated with severity of obstruction and were lowest in subjects with severe emphysema. These associations remained after correction for factors known to affect progenitor cell levels including age, smoking status, the use of statin medications and the presence of coronary artery disease. The ability of mononuclear cells to form endothelial cell colony forming units (EC-CFU) was also reduced in subjects with COPD. Conclusions HPC levels are reduced in subjects with COPD and correlate with emphysema phenotype and severity of obstruction. Reduction of HPCs may disrupt maintenance of the capillary endothelium, thereby contributing to the pathogenesis of COPD. PMID:24182349

  6. Embryonic Heart Progenitors and Cardiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Brade, Thomas; Pane, Luna S.; Moretti, Alessandra; Chien, Kenneth R.; Laugwitz, Karl-Ludwig

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian heart is a highly specialized organ, comprised of many different cell types arising from distinct embryonic progenitor populations during cardiogenesis. Three precursor populations have been identified to contribute to different myocytic and nonmyocytic cell lineages of the heart: cardiogenic mesoderm cells (CMC), the proepicardium (PE), and cardiac neural crest cells (CNCCs). This review will focus on molecular cues necessary for proper induction, expansion, and lineage-specific differentiation of these progenitor populations during cardiac development in vivo. Moreover, we will briefly discuss how the knowledge gained on embryonic heart progenitor biology can be used to develop novel therapeutic strategies for the management of congenital heart disease as well as for improvement of cardiac function in ischemic heart disease. PMID:24086063

  7. Black Raspberry Extract Increased Circulating Endothelial Progenitor Cells and Improved Arterial Stiffness in Patients with Metabolic Syndrome: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Han Saem; Kim, Sohyeon; Hong, Soon Jun; Choi, Seung Cheol; Choi, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Jong-Ho; Park, Chi-Yeon; Cho, Jae Young; Lee, Tae-Bum; Kwon, Ji-Wung; Joo, Hyung Joon; Park, Jae Hyoung; Yu, Cheol Woong; Lim, Do-Sun

    2016-04-01

    Administration of black raspberry (Rubus occidentalis) is known to improve vascular endothelial function in patients at a high risk for cardiovascular (CV) disease. We investigated short-term effects of black raspberry on circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and arterial stiffness in patients with metabolic syndrome. Patients with metabolic syndrome (n = 51) were prospectively randomized into the black raspberry group (n = 26, 750 mg/day) and placebo group (n = 25) during the 12-week follow-up. Central blood pressure, augmentation index, and EPCs, such as CD34/KDR(+), CD34/CD117(+), and CD34/CD133(+), were measured at baseline and at 12-week follow-up. Radial augmentation indexes were significantly decreased in the black raspberry group compared to the placebo group (-5% ± 10% vs. 3% ± 14%, P < .05). CD34/CD133(+) cells at 12-week follow-up were significantly higher in the black raspberry group compared to the placebo group (19 ± 109/μL vs. -28 ± 57/μL, P < .05). Decreases from the baseline in interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) were significantly greater in the black raspberry group compared to the placebo group (-0.5 ± 1.4 pg/mL vs. -0.1 ± 1.1 pg/mL, P < .05 and -5.4 ± 4.5 pg/mL vs. -0.8 ± 4.0 pg/mL, P < .05, respectively). Increases from the baseline in adiponectin levels (2.9 ± 2.1 μg/mL vs. -0.2 ± 2.5 μg/mL, P < .05) were significant in the black raspberry group. The use of black raspberry significantly lowered the augmentation index and increased circulating EPCs, thereby improving CV risks in patients with metabolic syndrome during the 12-week follow-up. PMID:26891216

  8. The Progenitors of Thermonuclear Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Piersanti, L.; Straniero, O.; Tornambe, A.; Dominguez, I.

    2009-05-03

    In the framework of the rotating Double Degenerate Scenario for type Ia Supernovae progenitors, we show that the dichotomy between explosive events in early and late type galaxies can be easily explained. Assuming that more massive progenitors produce slow-decline (high-luminosity) light curve, it comes out that, at the current age of the Universe, in late type galaxies the continuous star formation provides very massive exploding objects (prompt component) corresponding to slow-decline (bright) SNe; on the other hand, in early type galaxies, where star formation ended many billions years ago, only low mass ''normal luminosity'' objects (delayed component) are present.

  9. Progenitor Cells and Podocyte Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Shankland, Stuart J.; Pippin, Jeffrey W.; Duffield, Jeremy S.

    2014-01-01

    The very limited ability of adult podocytes to proliferate in vivo is clinically significant because: podocytes form a vascular barrier which is functionally critical to the nephron; podocyte hypoplasia is a characteristic of disease; and inadequate regeneration of podocytes is a major cause of persistent podocyte hypoplasia. Excessive podocyte loss or inadequate replacement leads to glomerulosclerosis in many progressive kidney diseases. Thus, restoration of podocyte cell density is almost certainly reliant on regeneration by podocyte progenitors. However such putative progenitors have remained elusive until recently. In this review we describe the developmental processes leading to podocyte and parietal epithelial cell (PEC) formation during glomerulogenesis. We compare evidence that in normal human kidneys PECs expressing ‘progenitor’ markers CD133 and CD24 can differentiate into podocytes in vitro and in vivo with evidence from animal models suggesting a more limited role of PEC-capacity to serve as podocyte progenitors in adults. We will highlight tantalizing new evidence that specialized vascular wall cells of afferent arterioles including those which produce renin in healthy kidney, provide a novel local progenitor source of new PECs and podocytes in response to podocyte hypoplasia in the adult, and draw comparisons with glomerulogenesis. PMID:25217270

  10. Endothelial progenitor cells and burn injury - exploring the relationship.

    PubMed

    Banyard, Derek A; Adnani, Blake O; Melkumyan, Satenik; Araniego, Cheryl Ann; Widgerow, Alan D

    2016-01-01

    Burn wounds result in varying degrees of soft tissue damage that are typically graded clinically. Recently a key participant in neovascularization, the endothelial progenitor cell, has been the subject of intense cardiovascular research to explore whether it can serve as a biomarker for vascular injury. In this review, we examine the identity of the endothelial progenitor cell as well as the evidence that support its role as a key responder after burn insult. While there is conflicting evidence with regards to the delta of endothelial progenitor cell mobilization and burn severity, it is clear that they play an important role in wound healing. Systematic and controlled studies are needed to clarify this relationship, and whether this population can serve as a biomarker for burn severity. PMID:27574674

  11. Bone Marrow Stress Decreases Osteogenic Progenitors.

    PubMed

    Ng, Adeline H; Baht, Gurpreet S; Alman, Benjamin A; Grynpas, Marc D

    2015-11-01

    Age-related bone loss may be a result of declining levels of stem cells in the bone marrow. Using the Col2.3Δtk (DTK) transgenic mouse, osteoblast depletion was used as a source of marrow stress in order to investigate the effects of aging on osteogenic progenitors which reside in the marrow space. Five-month-old DTK mice were treated with one or two cycles of ganciclovir to conditionally ablate differentiated osteoblasts, whereas controls were saline-treated. Treatment cycles were two weeks in length followed by four weeks of recovery. All animals were sacrificed at 8 months of age; bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) were harvested for cell culture and whole bones were excised for bone quality assessment. Colony-forming unit (CFU) assays were conducted to investigate the osteogenic potential of BMSC in vitro, and RNA was extracted to assess the expression of osteoblastic genes. Bone quality assessments included bone histomorphometry, TRAP staining, microcomputed tomography, and biomechanical testing. Osteoblast depletion decreased CFU-F (fibroblast), CFU-ALP (alkaline phosphatase), and CFU-VK (von Kossa) counts and BMSC osteogenic capacity in cell culture. Ex vivo, there were no differences in bone mineral density of vertebrae or femurs between treatment groups. Histology showed a decrease in bone volume and bone connectivity with repeated osteoblast depletion; however, this was accompanied by an increase in bone formation rate. There were no notable differences in osteoclast parameters or observed bone marrow adiposity. We have developed a model that uses bone marrow stress to mimic age-related decrease in osteogenic progenitors. Our data suggest that the number of healthy BMSCs and their osteogenic potential decline with repeated osteoblast depletion. However, activity of the remaining osteoblasts increases to compensate for this loss in progenitor osteogenic potential. PMID:26220824

  12. Gene expression changes in the retina following subretinal injection of human neural progenitor cells into a rodent model for retinal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Melissa K.; Lu, Bin; Saghizadeh, Mehrnoosh

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Retinal degenerative diseases (RDDs) affect millions of people and are the leading cause of vision loss. Although treatment options for RDDs are limited, stem and progenitor cell–based therapies have great potential to halt or slow the progression of vision loss. Our previous studies have shown that a single subretinal injection of human forebrain derived neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) into the Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) retinal degenerate rat offers long-term preservation of photoreceptors and visual function. Furthermore, neural progenitor cells are currently in clinical trials for treating age-related macular degeneration; however, the molecular mechanisms of stem cell–based therapies are largely unknown. This is the first study to analyze gene expression changes in the retina of RCS rats following subretinal injection of hNPCs using high-throughput sequencing. Methods RNA-seq data of retinas from RCS rats injected with hNPCs (RCShNPCs) were compared to sham surgery in RCS (RCSsham) and wild-type Long Evans (LEsham) rats. Differential gene expression patterns were determined with in silico analysis and confirmed with qRT-PCR. Function, biologic, cellular component, and pathway analyses were performed on differentially expressed genes and investigated with immunofluorescent staining experiments. Results Analysis of the gene expression data sets identified 1,215 genes that were differentially expressed between RCSsham and LEsham samples. Additionally, 283 genes were differentially expressed between the RCShNPCs and RCSsham samples. Comparison of these two gene sets identified 68 genes with inverse expression (termed rescue genes), including Pdc, Rp1, and Cdc42ep5. Functional, biologic, and cellular component analyses indicate that the immune response is enhanced in RCSsham. Pathway analysis of the differential expression gene sets identified three affected pathways in RCShNPCs, which all play roles in phagocytosis signaling. Immunofluorescent

  13. Endothelial cells are progenitors of cardiac pericytes and vascular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qi; Zhang, Hui; Liu, Yang; Adams, Susanne; Eilken, Hanna; Stehling, Martin; Corada, Monica; Dejana, Elisabetta; Zhou, Bin; Adams, Ralf H.

    2016-01-01

    Mural cells of the vessel wall, namely pericytes and vascular smooth muscle cells, are essential for vascular integrity. The developmental sources of these cells and molecular mechanisms controlling their progenitors in the heart are only partially understood. Here we show that endocardial endothelial cells are progenitors of pericytes and vascular smooth muscle cells in the murine embryonic heart. Endocardial cells undergo endothelial–mesenchymal transition and convert into primitive mesenchymal progenitors expressing the platelet-derived growth factor receptors, PDGFRα and PDGFRβ. These progenitors migrate into the myocardium, differentiate and assemble the wall of coronary vessels, which requires canonical Wnt signalling involving Frizzled4, β-catenin and endothelial cell-derived Wnt ligands. Our findings identify a novel and unexpected population of progenitors for coronary mural cells with potential relevance for heart function and disease conditions. PMID:27516371

  14. Endothelial cells are progenitors of cardiac pericytes and vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qi; Zhang, Hui; Liu, Yang; Adams, Susanne; Eilken, Hanna; Stehling, Martin; Corada, Monica; Dejana, Elisabetta; Zhou, Bin; Adams, Ralf H

    2016-01-01

    Mural cells of the vessel wall, namely pericytes and vascular smooth muscle cells, are essential for vascular integrity. The developmental sources of these cells and molecular mechanisms controlling their progenitors in the heart are only partially understood. Here we show that endocardial endothelial cells are progenitors of pericytes and vascular smooth muscle cells in the murine embryonic heart. Endocardial cells undergo endothelial-mesenchymal transition and convert into primitive mesenchymal progenitors expressing the platelet-derived growth factor receptors, PDGFRα and PDGFRβ. These progenitors migrate into the myocardium, differentiate and assemble the wall of coronary vessels, which requires canonical Wnt signalling involving Frizzled4, β-catenin and endothelial cell-derived Wnt ligands. Our findings identify a novel and unexpected population of progenitors for coronary mural cells with potential relevance for heart function and disease conditions. PMID:27516371

  15. Exploring the activated adipogenic niche: interactions of macrophages and adipocyte progenitors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yun-Hee; Thacker, Robert I; Hall, Brian Eric; Kong, Raymond; Granneman, James G

    2014-01-01

    Adult adipose tissue contains a large supply of progenitors that can renew fat cells for homeostatic tissue maintenance and adaptive growth or regeneration in response to external challenges. However, the in vivo mechanisms that control adipocyte progenitor behavior are poorly characterized. We recently demonstrated that recruitment of adipocyte progenitors by macrophages is a central feature of adipose tissue remodeling under various adipogenic conditions. Catabolic remodeling of white adipose tissue by β3-adrenergic receptor stimulation requires anti-inflammatory M2-polarized macrophages to clear dying adipocytes and to recruit new brown adipocytes from progenitors. In this Extra Views article, we discuss in greater detail the cellular elements of adipogenic niches and report a strategy to isolate and characterize the subpopulations of macrophages and adipocyte progenitors that actively participate in adrenergic tissue remodeling. Further characterization of these subpopulations may facilitate identification of new cellular targets to improve metabolic and immune function of adipose tissue. PMID:24394850

  16. Progenitor Outgrowth from the Niche in Drosophila Trachea Is Guided by FGF from Decaying Branches

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Feng; Krasnow, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Although there has been progress identifying adult stem and progenitor cells and the signals that control their proliferation and differentiation, little is known about the substrates and signals that guide them out of their niche. By examining Drosophila tracheal outgrowth during metamorphosis, we show that progenitors follow a stereotyped path out of the niche, tracking along a subset of tracheal branches destined for destruction. The embryonic tracheal inducer branchless FGF (fibroblast growth factor) is expressed dynamically just ahead of progenitor outgrowth in decaying branches. Knockdown of branchless abrogates progenitor outgrowth, whereas misexpression redirects it. Thus, reactivation of an embryonic tracheal inducer in decaying branches directs outgrowth of progenitors that replace them. This explains how the structure of a newly generated tissue is coordinated with that of the old. PMID:24408434

  17. Biology of hematopoietic stem cells and progenitors: implications for clinical application.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Motonari; Wagers, Amy J; Manz, Markus G; Prohaska, Susan S; Scherer, David C; Beilhack, Georg F; Shizuru, Judith A; Weissman, Irving L

    2003-01-01

    Stem cell biology is scientifically, clinically, and politically a current topic. The hematopoietic stem cell, the common ancestor of all types of blood cells, is one of the best-characterized stem cells in the body and the only stem cell that is clinically applied in the treatment of diseases such as breast cancer, leukemias, and congenital immunodeficiencies. Multicolor cell sorting enables the purification not only of hematopoietic stem cells, but also of their downstream progenitors such as common lymphoid progenitors and common myeloid progenitors. Recent genetic approaches including gene chip technology have been used to elucidate the gene expression profile of hematopoietic stem cells and other progenitors. Although the mechanisms that control self-renewal and lineage commitment of hematopoietic stem cells are still ambiguous, recent rapid advances in understanding the biological nature of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells have broadened the potential application of these cells in the treatment of diseases. PMID:12615892

  18. Genomic characterization of Wilms' tumor suppressor 1 targets in nephron progenitor cells during kidney development

    PubMed Central

    Hartwig, Sunny; Ho, Jacqueline; Pandey, Priyanka; MacIsaac, Kenzie; Taglienti, Mary; Xiang, Michael; Alterovitz, Gil; Ramoni, Marco; Fraenkel, Ernest; Kreidberg, Jordan A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The Wilms' tumor suppressor 1 (WT1) gene encodes a DNA- and RNA-binding protein that plays an essential role in nephron progenitor differentiation during renal development. To identify WT1 target genes that might regulate nephron progenitor differentiation in vivo, we performed chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) coupled to mouse promoter microarray (ChIP-chip) using chromatin prepared from embryonic mouse kidney tissue. We identified 1663 genes bound by WT1, 86% of which contain a previously identified, conserved, high-affinity WT1 binding site. To investigate functional interactions between WT1 and candidate target genes in nephron progenitors, we used a novel, modified WT1 morpholino loss-of-function model in embryonic mouse kidney explants to knock down WT1 expression in nephron progenitors ex vivo. Low doses of WT1 morpholino resulted in reduced WT1 target gene expression specifically in nephron progenitors, whereas high doses of WT1 morpholino arrested kidney explant development and were associated with increased nephron progenitor cell apoptosis, reminiscent of the phenotype observed in Wt1−/− embryos. Collectively, our results provide a comprehensive description of endogenous WT1 target genes in nephron progenitor cells in vivo, as well as insights into the transcriptional signaling networks controlled by WT1 that might direct nephron progenitor fate during renal development. PMID:20215353

  19. On Measuring the Metallicity of a Type Ia Supernova’s Progenitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, Broxton J.; van Rossum, Daniel R.; Townsley, Dean M.; Timmes, F. X.; Jackson, Aaron P.; Calder, Alan C.; Brown, Edward F.

    2016-06-01

    In Type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) the relative abundances of chemical elements are affected by the neutron excess in the composition of the progenitor white dwarf. Since these products leave signatures in the spectra near maximum light, spectral features may be used to constrain the composition of the progenitor. We calculate the nucleosynthetic yields for three SN Ia simulations, assuming single degenerate, Chandrasekhar-mass progenitors, for a wide range of progenitor metallicities, and calculate synthetic light curves and spectra to explore correlations between progenitor metallicity and the strength of spectral features. We use two two-dimensional simulations of the deflagration–detonation–transition scenario with different 56Ni yields and the W7 simulation to control for differences between explosion models and total yields. While the overall yields of intermediate-mass elements (16 < A ≤slant 40) differ between the three cases, trends in the yields are similar. With increasing metallicity, 28Si yields remain nearly constant, 40Ca yields decline, and Ti and 54Fe yields increase. In the synthetic spectra, we identify two features at 30 days post-explosion that appear to deepen with progenitor metallicity: a Ti feature around 4200 Å and an Fe feature around 5200 Å. In all three simulations, their pseudo equivalent widths show a systematic trend with progenitor metallicity. This suggests that these two features may allow for differentiation among progenitor metallicities of observed SNe Ia and potentially help to reduce the intrinsic Hubble scatter.

  20. Changes in Chondrogenic Progenitor Populations Associated with Aging and Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Kyla; Dickinson, Sally C.

    2015-01-01

    Chondrogenic progenitor populations, including mesenchymal stem cells, represent promising cell-based transplantation or tissue engineering therapies for the regeneration of damaged cartilage. Osteoarthritis (OA) predominantly affects the elderly and is a leading cause of disability worldwide. Advancing age is a prominent risk factor that is closely associated with the onset and progression of the disease. Understanding the influence that aging and OA have on chondrogenic progenitor cells is important to determine how these processes affect the cellular mechanisms of the cells and their capacity to differentiate into functional chondrocytes for use in therapeutic applications. Here, we review the effect of age- and OA-related changes on the growth kinetics and differentiation potential of chondrogenic progenitor cell populations. Aging differentially influences the proliferative potential of progenitor cells showing reduced growth rates with increased senescence and apoptotic activity over time, while chondrogenesis appears to be independent of donor age. Cartilage tissue affected by OA shows evidence of progenitor populations with some potential for repair, however reports on the proliferative propensity of mesenchymal stem cells and their chondrogenic potential are contradictory. This is likely attributed to the narrow age ranges of samples assessed and deficits in definitively identifying donors with OA versus healthy patients across a wide scope of advancing ages. Further studies that investigate the mechanistic effects of chondrogenic progenitor populations associated with aging and the progression of OA using clearly defined criteria and age-matched control subject groups are crucial to our understanding of the clinical relevance of these cells for use in cartilage repair therapies. PMID:27340514

  1. PROGENITORS OF RECOMBINING SUPERNOVA REMNANTS

    SciTech Connect

    Moriya, Takashi J.

    2012-05-01

    Usual supernova remnants have either ionizing plasma or plasma in collisional ionization equilibrium, i.e., the ionization temperature is lower than or equal to the electron temperature. However, the existence of recombining supernova remnants, i.e., supernova remnants with ionization temperature higher than the electron temperature, has been recently confirmed. One suggested way to have recombining plasma in a supernova remnant is to have a dense circumstellar medium at the time of the supernova explosion. If the circumstellar medium is dense enough, collisional ionization equilibrium can be established in the early stage of the evolution of the supernova remnant and subsequent adiabatic cooling, which occurs after the shock wave gets out of the dense circumstellar medium, makes the electron temperature lower than the ionization temperature. We study the circumstellar medium around several supernova progenitors and show which supernova progenitors can have a circumstellar medium dense enough to establish collisional ionization equilibrium soon after the explosion. We find that the circumstellar medium around red supergiants (especially massive ones) and the circumstellar medium dense enough to make Type IIn supernovae can establish collisional ionization equilibrium soon after the explosion and can evolve to become recombining supernova remnants. Wolf-Rayet stars and white dwarfs have the possibility to be recombining supernova remnants but the fraction is expected to be very small. As the occurrence rate of the explosions of red supergiants is much higher than that of Type IIn supernovae, the major progenitors of recombining supernova remnants are likely to be red supergiants.

  2. Stem cell biology is population biology: differentiation of hematopoietic multipotent progenitors to common lymphoid and myeloid progenitors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) system is a demand control system, with the demand coming from the organism, since the products of the common myeloid and lymphoid progenitor (CMP, CLP respectively) cells are essential for activity and defense against disease. We show how ideas from population biology (combining population dynamics and evolutionary considerations) can illuminate the feedback control of the HSC system by the fully differentiated products, which has recently been verified experimentally. We develop models for the penultimate differentiation of HSC Multipotent Progenitors (MPPs) into CLP and CMP and introduce two concepts from population biology into stem cell biology. The first concept is the Multipotent Progenitor Commitment Response (MPCR) which is the probability that a multipotent progenitor cell follows a CLP route rather than a CMP route. The second concept is the link between the MPCR and a measure of Darwinian fitness associated with organismal performance and the levels of differentiated lymphoid and myeloid cells. We show that many MPCRs are consistent with homeostasis, but that they will lead to different dynamics of cells and signals following a wound or injury and thus have different consequences for Darwinian fitness. We show how coupling considerations of life history to dynamics of the HSC system and its products allows one to compute the selective pressures on cellular processes. We discuss ways that this framework can be used and extended. PMID:23327512

  3. Multipotent adult progenitor cells on an allograft scaffold facilitate the bone repair process

    PubMed Central

    LoGuidice, Amanda; Houlihan, Alison; Deans, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Multipotent adult progenitor cells are a recently described population of stem cells derived from the bone marrow stroma. Research has demonstrated the potential of multipotent adult progenitor cells for treating ischemic injury and cardiovascular repair; however, understanding of multipotent adult progenitor cells in orthopedic applications remains limited. In this study, we evaluate the osteogenic and angiogenic capacity of multipotent adult progenitor cells, both in vitro and loaded onto demineralized bone matrix in vivo, with comparison to mesenchymal stem cells, as the current standard. When compared to mesenchymal stem cells, multipotent adult progenitor cells exhibited a more robust angiogenic protein release profile in vitro and developed more extensive vasculature within 2 weeks in vivo. The establishment of this vascular network is critical to the ossification process, as it allows nutrient exchange and provides an influx of osteoprogenitor cells to the wound site. In vitro assays confirmed the multipotency of multipotent adult progenitor cells along mesodermal lineages and demonstrated the enhanced expression of alkaline phosphatase and production of calcium-containing mineral deposits by multipotent adult progenitor cells, necessary precursors for osteogenesis. In combination with a demineralized bone matrix scaffold, multipotent adult progenitor cells demonstrated enhanced revascularization and new bone formation in vivo in an orthotopic defect model when compared to mesenchymal stem cells on demineralized bone matrix or demineralized bone matrix–only control groups. The potent combination of angiogenic and osteogenic properties provided by multipotent adult progenitor cells appears to create a synergistic amplification of the bone healing process. Our results indicate that multipotent adult progenitor cells have the potential to better promote tissue regeneration and healing and to be a functional cell source for use in orthopedic applications

  4. Multipotent adult progenitor cells on an allograft scaffold facilitate the bone repair process.

    PubMed

    LoGuidice, Amanda; Houlihan, Alison; Deans, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Multipotent adult progenitor cells are a recently described population of stem cells derived from the bone marrow stroma. Research has demonstrated the potential of multipotent adult progenitor cells for treating ischemic injury and cardiovascular repair; however, understanding of multipotent adult progenitor cells in orthopedic applications remains limited. In this study, we evaluate the osteogenic and angiogenic capacity of multipotent adult progenitor cells, both in vitro and loaded onto demineralized bone matrix in vivo, with comparison to mesenchymal stem cells, as the current standard. When compared to mesenchymal stem cells, multipotent adult progenitor cells exhibited a more robust angiogenic protein release profile in vitro and developed more extensive vasculature within 2 weeks in vivo. The establishment of this vascular network is critical to the ossification process, as it allows nutrient exchange and provides an influx of osteoprogenitor cells to the wound site. In vitro assays confirmed the multipotency of multipotent adult progenitor cells along mesodermal lineages and demonstrated the enhanced expression of alkaline phosphatase and production of calcium-containing mineral deposits by multipotent adult progenitor cells, necessary precursors for osteogenesis. In combination with a demineralized bone matrix scaffold, multipotent adult progenitor cells demonstrated enhanced revascularization and new bone formation in vivo in an orthotopic defect model when compared to mesenchymal stem cells on demineralized bone matrix or demineralized bone matrix-only control groups. The potent combination of angiogenic and osteogenic properties provided by multipotent adult progenitor cells appears to create a synergistic amplification of the bone healing process. Our results indicate that multipotent adult progenitor cells have the potential to better promote tissue regeneration and healing and to be a functional cell source for use in orthopedic applications. PMID

  5. Use of long-term human marrow cultures to demonstrate progenitor cell precursors in marrow treated with 4-hydroperoxycyclophosphamide

    SciTech Connect

    Winton, E.F.; Colenda, K.W.

    1987-07-01

    The continued retrieval of progenitor cells (CFU-GEMM, BFU-E, CFU-E, CFU-GM) from human long-term marrow cultures (LTMC) is not uncommonly used as evidence that proliferation and differentiation are occurring in more primitive hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) in these cultures. Alternatively, the continued presence of progenitors in LTMC could be the result of survival and/or limited self-renewal of progenitor cells present when the culture was initiated, and such progenitors would have little relevance to the parent HSC. The following studies were designed to determine the relative contributions of precursors of progenitor cells to the total progenitor cells present in LTMC using a two-stage regeneration model. The adherent layer in LTMC was established over 3 weeks, irradiated (875 rad) to permanently eliminate resident hematopoietic cells, and recharged with autologous cryo-preserved marrow that was either treated or not treated (control) with 4-hydroperoxycyclophosphamide (4-HC, 100 micrograms/ml for 30 min). The 4-HC-treated marrow contained no progenitor cells, yet based on clinical autologous bone marrow transplant experience, has intact HSC. Within 1-3 weeks, progenitor cells reappeared in the irradiated LTMC recharged with 4-HC-treated marrow, and were preferentially located in the adherent layer. By 2-6 weeks, the number of progenitor cells in the adherent layer of LTMC recharged with 4-HC marrow was equivalent to control LTMC. The progenitors regenerating in the irradiated LTMC recharged with 4-HC-treated marrow appear to originate from precursors of progenitor cells, perhaps HSC. We propose this model may be useful in elucidating cellular and molecular correlates of progenitor cell regeneration from precursors.

  6. cKit+ cardiac progenitors of neural crest origin

    PubMed Central

    Hatzistergos, Konstantinos E.; Takeuchi, Lauro M.; Saur, Dieter; Seidler, Barbara; Dymecki, Susan M.; Mai, Jia Jia; White, Ian A.; Balkan, Wayne; Kanashiro-Takeuchi, Rosemeire M.; Schally, Andrew V.; Hare, Joshua M.

    2015-01-01

    The degree to which cKit-expressing progenitors generate cardiomyocytes in the heart is controversial. Genetic fate-mapping studies suggest minimal contribution; however, whether or not minimal contribution reflects minimal cardiomyogenic capacity is unclear because the embryonic origin and role in cardiogenesis of these progenitors remain elusive. Using high-resolution genetic fate-mapping approaches with cKitCreERT2/+ and Wnt1::Flpe mouse lines, we show that cKit delineates cardiac neural crest progenitors (CNCkit). CNCkit possess full cardiomyogenic capacity and contribute to all CNC derivatives, including cardiac conduction system cells. Furthermore, by modeling cardiogenesis in cKitCreERT2-induced pluripotent stem cells, we show that, paradoxically, the cardiogenic fate of CNCkit is regulated by bone morphogenetic protein antagonism, a signaling pathway activated transiently during establishment of the cardiac crescent, and extinguished from the heart before CNC invasion. Together, these findings elucidate the origin of cKit+ cardiac progenitors and suggest that a nonpermissive cardiac milieu, rather than minimal cardiomyogenic capacity, controls the degree of CNCkit contribution to myocardium. PMID:26438843

  7. Dysregulation of Vascular Endothelial Progenitor Cells Lung-Homing in Subjects with COPD

    PubMed Central

    Salter, Brittany M.; Manzoor, Fizza; Beaudin, Suzanne; Kjarsgaard, Melanie; Nair, Parameswaran; Gauvreau, Gail M.; Sehmi, Roma

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by fixed airflow limitation and progressive decline of lung function and punctuated by occasional exacerbations. The disease pathogenesis may involve activation of the bone marrow stimulating mobilization and lung-homing of progenitor cells. We investigated the hypothesis that lower circulating numbers of vascular endothelial progenitor cells (VEPCs) are a consequence of increased lung-sequestration in COPD. Nonatopic, current or ex-smokers with diagnosed COPD and nonatopic, nonsmoking normal controls were enrolled. Blood and induced sputum extracted primitive hemopoietic progenitors (HPCs) and VEPC were enumerated by flow cytometry. Migration and adhesive responses to fibronectin were assessed. In sputum, VEPC numbers were significantly greater in COPD compared to normal controls. In blood, VEPCs were significantly lower in COPD versus normal controls. There were no differences in HPC levels between the two groups in either compartment. Functionally, there was a greater migrational responsiveness of progenitors from COPD subjects to stromal cell-derived factor-1alpha (SDF-1α) compared to normal controls. This was associated with greater numbers of CXCR4+ progenitors in sputum from COPD. Increased migrational responsiveness of progenitor cells may promote lung-homing of VEPC in COPD which may disrupt maintenance and repair of the airways and contribute to COPD disease pathogenesis. PMID:27445517

  8. Syndecan 4 Mediates Nrf2-dependent Expansion of Bronchiolar Progenitors That Protect Against Lung Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Santoso, Arif; Kikuchi, Toshiaki; Tode, Naoki; Hirano, Taizou; Komatsu, Riyo; Damayanti, Triya; Motohashi, Hozumi; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Kojima, Tetsuhito; Uede, Toshimitsu; Nukiwa, Toshihiro; Ichinose, Masakazu

    2016-01-01

    The use of lung progenitors for regenerative medicine appears promising, but their biology is not fully understood. Here, we found anti-inflammatory attributes in bronchiolar progenitors that were sorted as a multipotent subset of mouse club cells and found to express secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI). Notably, the impaired expression of SLPI in mice increased the number of bronchiolar progenitors and decreased the lung inflammation. We determined a transcriptional profile for the bronchiolar progenitors of Slpi-deficient mice and identified syndecan 4, whose expression was markedly elevated as compared to that of wild-type mice. Systemic administration of recombinant syndecan 4 protein caused a substantial increase in the number of bronchiolar progenitors with concomitant attenuation of both airway and alveolar inflammation. The syndecan 4 administration also resulted in activation of the Keap1-Nrf2 antioxidant pathway in lung cells, which is critically involved in the therapeutic responses to the syndecan 4 treatment. Moreover, in 3D culture, the presence of syndecan 4 induced differentiated club cells to undergo Nrf2-dependent transition into bronchiolar progenitors. Our observations reveal that differentiative switches between bronchiolar progenitors and club cells are under the Nrf2-mediated control of SLPI and syndecan 4, suggesting the possibility of new therapeutic approaches in inflammatory lung diseases. PMID:26307669

  9. Epigenetic Reprogramming of Muscle Progenitors: Inspiration for Clinical Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Consalvi, Silvia; Sandoná, Martina

    2016-01-01

    In the context of regenerative medicine, based on the potential of stem cells to restore diseased tissues, epigenetics is becoming a pivotal area of interest. Therapeutic interventions that promote tissue and organ regeneration have as primary objective the selective control of gene expression in adult stem cells. This requires a deep understanding of the epigenetic mechanisms controlling transcriptional programs in tissue progenitors. This review attempts to elucidate the principle epigenetic regulations responsible of stem cells differentiation. In particular we focus on the current understanding of the epigenetic networks that regulate differentiation of muscle progenitors by the concerted action of chromatin-modifying enzymes and noncoding RNAs. The novel exciting role of exosome-bound microRNA in mediating epigenetic information transfer is also discussed. Finally we show an overview of the epigenetic strategies and therapies that aim to potentiate muscle regeneration and counteract the progression of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD). PMID:26839565

  10. Circulating Progenitor Cells and Vascular Dysfunction in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pizarro, Sandra; García-Lucio, Jéssica; Peinado, Víctor I.; Tura-Ceide, Olga; Díez, Marta; Blanco, Isabel; Sitges, Marta; Petriz, Jordi; Torralba, Yolanda; Marín, Pedro; Roca, Josep; Barberà, Joan Albert

    2014-01-01

    Background In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), decreased progenitor cells and impairment of systemic vascular function have been suggested to confer higher cardiovascular risk. The origin of these changes and their relationship with alterations in the pulmonary circulation are unknown. Objectives To investigate whether changes in the number of circulating hematopoietic progenitor cells are associated with pulmonary hypertension or changes in endothelial function. Methods 62 COPD patients and 35 controls (18 non-smokers and 17 smokers) without cardiovascular risk factors other than cigarette smoking were studied. The number of circulating progenitors was measured as CD45+CD34+CD133+ labeled cells by flow cytometry. Endothelial function was assessed by flow-mediated dilation. Markers of inflammation and angiogenesis were also measured in all subjects. Results Compared with controls, the number of circulating progenitor cells was reduced in COPD patients. Progenitor cells did not differ between control smokers and non-smokers. COPD patients with pulmonary hypertension showed greater number of progenitor cells than those without pulmonary hypertension. Systemic endothelial function was worse in both control smokers and COPD patients. Interleukin-6, fibrinogen, high sensitivity C-reactive protein, vascular endothelial growth factor and tumor necrosis factor were increased in COPD. In COPD patients, the number of circulating progenitor cells was inversely related to the flow-mediated dilation of systemic arteries. Conclusions Pulmonary and systemic vascular impairment in COPD is associated with cigarette smoking but not with the reduced number of circulating hematopoietic progenitors. The latter appears to be a consequence of the disease itself not related to smoking habit. PMID:25171153

  11. Characterization of interstitial Cajal progenitors cells and their changes in Hirschsprung's disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhi-Hua; Zhang, Yong-Chang; Jiang, Wei-Fang; Yang, Cissy; Zou, Gang-Ming; Kong, Yu; Cai, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) are critical to gastrointestinal motility. The phenotypes of ICC progenitors have been observed in the mouse gut, but whether they exist in the human colon and what abnormal changes in their quantity and ultrastructure are present in Hirschsprung's disease (HSCR) colon remains uncertain. In this study, we collected the surgical resection of colons, both proximal and narrow segments, from HSCR patients and normal controls. First, we identified the progenitor of ICC in normal adult colon using immunofluorescent localization techniques with laser confocal microscopy. Next, the progenitors were sorted to observe their morphology. We further applied flow cytometry to examine the content of ICC progenitors in these fresh samples. The ultrastructural changes in the narrow and proximal parts of the HSCR colon were observed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and were compared with the normal adult colon. The presumed early progenitor (c-Kit(low)CD34(+)Igf1r(+)) and committed progenitor (c-Kit(+)CD34(+)Igf1r(+)) of ICC exist in adult normal colon as well as in the narrow and proximal parts of the HSCR colon. However, the proportions of mature, early and committed progenitors of ICC were dramatically reduced in the narrow segment of the HSCR colon. The proportions of mature and committed progenitors of ICC in the proximal segment of the HSCR colon were lower than in the adult normal colon. Ultrastructurally, ICC, enteric nerves, and smooth muscle in the narrow segment of the HSCR colon showed severe injury, including swollen vacuola or ted mitochondria, disappearance of mitochondrial cristae, dilated rough endoplasmic reticulum, vesiculation and degranulation, and disappearance of the caveolae on the ICC membrane surface. The contents of ICC and its progenitors in the narrow part of the HSCR colon were significantly decreased than those of adult colon, which may be associated with HSCR pathogenesis. PMID:24475076

  12. PET imaging of adoptive progenitor cell therapies.

    SciTech Connect

    Gelovani, Juri G.

    2008-05-13

    Objectives. The overall objective of this application is to develop novel technologies for non-invasive imaging of adoptive stem cell-based therapies with positron emission tomography (PET) that would be applicable to human patients. To achieve this objective, stem cells will be genetically labeled with a PET-reporter gene and repetitively imaged to assess their distribution, migration, differentiation, and persistence using a radiolabeled reporter probe. This new imaging technology will be tested in adoptive progenitor cell-based therapy models in animals, including: delivery pro-apoptotic genes to tumors, and T-cell reconstitution for immunostimulatory therapy during allogeneic bone marrow progenitor cell transplantation. Technical and Scientific Merits. Non-invasive whole body imaging would significantly aid in the development and clinical implementation of various adoptive progenitor cell-based therapies by providing the means for non-invasive monitoring of the fate of injected progenitor cells over a long period of observation. The proposed imaging approaches could help to address several questions related to stem cell migration and homing, their long-term viability, and their subsequent differentiation. The ability to image these processes non-invasively in 3D and repetitively over a long period of time is very important and will help the development and clinical application of various strategies to control and direct stem cell migration and differentiation. Approach to accomplish the work. Stem cells will be genetically with a reporter gene which will allow for repetitive non-invasive “tracking” of the migration and localization of genetically labeled stem cells and their progeny. This is a radically new approach that is being developed for future human applications and should allow for a long term (many years) repetitive imaging of the fate of tissues that develop from the transplanted stem cells. Why the approach is appropriate. The novel approach to

  13. Regulation of cerebral cortex size and folding by expansion of basal progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Nonaka-Kinoshita, Miki; Reillo, Isabel; Artegiani, Benedetta; Ángeles Martínez-Martínez, Maria; Nelson, Mark; Borrell, Víctor; Calegari, Federico

    2013-01-01

    Size and folding of the cerebral cortex increased massively during mammalian evolution leading to the current diversity of brain morphologies. Various subtypes of neural stem and progenitor cells have been proposed to contribute differently in regulating thickness or folding of the cerebral cortex during development, but their specific roles have not been demonstrated. We report that the controlled expansion of unipotent basal progenitors in mouse embryos led to megalencephaly, with increased surface area of the cerebral cortex, but not to cortical folding. In contrast, expansion of multipotent basal progenitors in the naturally gyrencephalic ferret was sufficient to drive the formation of additional folds and fissures. In both models, changes occurred while preserving a structurally normal, six-layered cortex. Our results are the first experimental demonstration of specific and distinct roles for basal progenitor subtypes in regulating cerebral cortex size and folding during development underlying the superior intellectual capability acquired by higher mammals during evolution. PMID:23624932

  14. Pulmonary vascular disease in mice xenografted with human BM progenitors from patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Farha, Samar; Lichtin, Alan; Graham, Brian; George, Deepa; Aldred, Micheala; Hazen, Stanley L.; Loyd, James; Tuder, Rubin

    2012-01-01

    Hematopoietic myeloid progenitors released into the circulation are able to promote vascular remodeling through endothelium activation and injury. Endothelial injury is central to the development of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), a proliferative vasculopathy of the pulmonary circulation, but the origin of vascular injury is unknown. In the present study, mice transplanted with BM-derived CD133+ progenitor cells from patients with PAH, but not from healthy controls, exhibited morbidity and/or death due to features of PAH: in situ thrombi and endothelial injury, angioproliferative remodeling, and right ventricular hypertrophy and failure. Myeloid progenitors from patients with heritable and/or idiopathic PAH all produced disease in xenografted mice. Analyses of hematopoietic transcription factors and colony formation revealed underlying abnormalities of progenitors that skewed differentiation toward the myeloid-erythroid lineage. The results of the present study suggest a causal role for hematopoietic stem cell abnormalities in vascular injury, right ventricular hypertrophy, and morbidity associated with PAH. PMID:22745307

  15. The progenitors of stripped-envelope supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elias-Rosa, N.

    2013-05-01

    The type Ib/c SNe are those explosions which come from massive star populations, but lack hydrogen and helium. These have been proposed to originate in the explosions of massive Wolf-Rayet stars, and we should easily be able to detect the very luminous, young progenitors if they exist. However, there has not been any detection of progenitors so far. I present the study of two extinguished Type Ic SNe 2003jg and 2004cc. In both cases there is no clear evidence of a direct detection of their progenitors in deep pre-explosion images. Upper limits derived by inserting artificial stars of known brightness at random positions around the progenitor positions (M_v>-8.8 and M_v>-9 magnitudes for the progenitors of SN 2003jg and SN 2004cc, respectively) are brighter than those expected for a massive WC (Wolf-Rayet, carbon-rich) or WO (Wolf-Rayet, oxygen-rich) (e.g., approximately between -3 and -6 in the LMC). Therefore, this is perhaps further evidence that the most massive stars may give rise to black-holes forming SNe, or it is an undetected, compact massive star hidden by a thick dust lane. However the extinction toward these SNe is currently one of the largest known. Even if these results do not directly reveal the nature of the type Ic SN progenitors, they can help to characterize the dusty environment which surrounded the progenitor of the stripped-envelope CC-SNe.

  16. Concise Review: Chemical Approaches for Modulating Lineage-Specific Stem Cells and Progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Tao; Zhang, Mingliang; Laurent, Timothy; Xie, Min

    2013-01-01

    Generation and manipulation of lineage-restricted stem and progenitor cells in vitro and/or in vivo are critical for the development of stem cell-based clinical therapeutics. Lineage-restricted stem and progenitor cells have many advantageous qualities, including being able to efficiently engraft and differentiate into desirable cell types in vivo after transplantation, and they are much less tumorigenic than pluripotent cells. Generation of lineage-restricted stem and progenitor cells can be achieved by directed differentiation from pluripotent stem cells or lineage conversion from easily obtained somatic cells. Small molecules can be very helpful in these processes since they offer several important benefits. For example, the risk of tumorigenesis is greatly reduced when small molecules are used to replace integrated transcription factors, which are widely used in cell fate conversion. Furthermore, small molecules are relatively easy to apply, optimize, and manufacture, and they can more readily be developed into conventional pharmaceuticals. Alternatively, small molecules can be used to expand or selectively control the differentiation of lineage-restricted stem and progenitor cells for desirable therapeutics purposes in vitro or in vivo. Here we summarize recent progress in the use of small molecules for the expansion and generation of desirable lineage-restricted stem and progenitor cells in vitro and for selectively controlling cell fate of lineage-restricted stem and progenitor cells in vivo, thereby facilitating stem cell-based clinical applications. PMID:23580542

  17. Lineage-instructive function of C/EBPα in multipotent hematopoietic cells and early thymic progenitors.

    PubMed

    Wölfler, Albert; Danen-van Oorschot, Astrid A; Haanstra, Jurgen R; Valkhof, Marijke; Bodner, Claudia; Vroegindeweij, Eric; van Strien, Paulette; Novak, Alexandra; Cupedo, Tom; Touw, Ivo P

    2010-11-18

    Hematopoiesis is tightly controlled by transcription regulatory networks, but how and when specific transcription factors control lineage commitment are still largely unknown. Within the hematopoietic stem cell (Lin(-)Sca-1(+)c-Kit(+)) compartment these lineage-specific transcription factors are expressed at low levels but are up-regulated with the process of lineage specification. CCAAT/enhancer binding protein α (C/EBPα) represents one of these factors and is involved in myeloid development and indispensable for formation of granulocytes. To track the cellular fate of stem and progenitor cells, which express C/EBPα, we developed a mouse model expressing Cre recombinase from the Cebpa promoter and a conditional EYFP allele. We show that Cebpa/EYFP(+) cells represent a significant subset of multipotent hematopoietic progenitors, which predominantly give rise to myeloid cells in steady-state hematopoiesis. C/EBPα induced a strong myeloid gene expression signature and down-regulated E2A-induced regulators of early lymphoid development. In addition, Cebpa/EYFP(+) cells compose a fraction of early thymic progenitors with robust myeloid potential. However, Cebpa/EYFP(+) multipotent hematopoietic progenitors and early thymic progenitors retained the ability to develop into erythroid and T-lymphoid lineages, respectively. These findings support an instructive but argue against a lineage-restrictive role of C/EBPα in multipotent hematopoietic and thymic progenitors. PMID:20807890

  18. Canonical Wnt signaling transiently stimulates proliferation and enhances neurogenesis in neonatal neural progenitor cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Hirsch, Cordula; Campano, Louise M.; Woehrle, Simon; Hecht, Andreas . E-mail: andreas.hecht@mol-med.uni-freiburg.de

    2007-02-01

    Canonical Wnt signaling triggers the formation of heterodimeric transcription factor complexes consisting of {beta}-catenin and T cell factors, and thereby controls the execution of specific genetic programs. During the expansion and neurogenic phases of embryonic neural development canonical Wnt signaling initially controls proliferation of neural progenitor cells, and later neuronal differentiation. Whether Wnt growth factors affect neural progenitor cells postnatally is not known. Therefore, we have analyzed the impact of Wnt signaling on neural progenitors isolated from cerebral cortices of newborn mice. Expression profiling of pathway components revealed that these cells are fully equipped to respond to Wnt signals. However, Wnt pathway activation affected only a subset of neonatal progenitors and elicited a limited increase in proliferation and neuronal differentiation in distinct subsets of cells. Moreover, Wnt pathway activation only transiently stimulated S-phase entry but did not support long-term proliferation of progenitor cultures. The dampened nature of the Wnt response correlates with the predominant expression of inhibitory pathway components and the rapid actuation of negative feedback mechanisms. Interestingly, in differentiating cell cultures activation of canonical Wnt signaling reduced Hes1 and Hes5 expression suggesting that during postnatal neural development, Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling enhances neurogenesis from progenitor cells by interfering with Notch pathway activity.

  19. The Mammary Gland Microenvironment Directs Progenitor Cell Fate In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Bussard, Karen M.; Smith, Gilbert H.

    2011-01-01

    The mammary gland is a unique organ that continually undergoes postnatal developmental changes. In mice, the mammary gland is formed via signals from terminal end buds, which direct ductal growth and elongation. Intriguingly, it is likely that the entire cellular repertoire of the mammary gland is formed from a single antecedent cell. Furthermore, in order to produce progeny of varied lineages (e.g., luminal and myoepithelial cells), signals from the local tissue microenvironment influence mammary stem/progenitor cell fate. Data have shown that cells from the mammary gland microenvironment reprogram adult somatic cells from other organs (testes, nerve) into cells that produce milk and express mammary epithelial cell proteins. Similar results were found for human tumorigenic epithelial carcinoma cells. Presently, it is unclear how the deterministic power of the mammary gland microenvironment controls epithelial cell fate. Regardless, signals generated by the microenvironment have a profound influence on progenitor cell differentiation in vivo. PMID:21647291

  20. Progenitor genealogy in the developing cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Laguesse, Sophie; Peyre, Elise; Nguyen, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian cerebral cortex is characterized by a complex histological organization that reflects the spatio-temporal stratifications of related stem and neural progenitor cells, which are responsible for the generation of distinct glial and neuronal subtypes during development. Some work has been done to shed light on the existing filiations between these progenitors as well as their respective contribution to cortical neurogenesis. The aim of the present review is to summarize the current views of progenitor hierarchy and relationship in the developing cortex and to further discuss future research directions that would help us to understand the molecular and cellular regulating mechanisms involved in cerebral corticogenesis. PMID:25141969

  1. Progenitor's Signatures in Type Ia Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiotellis, A.; Kosenko, D.; Schure, K. M.; Vink, J.

    2013-01-01

    The remnants of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) can provide important clues about their progenitor histories. We discuss two well-observed supernova remnants (SNRs) that are believed to have resulted from SNe Ia, and use various tools to shed light on the possible progenitor histories. We find that Kepler's SNR is consistent with a symbiotic binary progenitor consisting of a white dwarf and an AGB star. Our hydrosimulations can reproduce the observed kinematic and morphological properties. For Tycho's remnant we use the characteristics of the X-ray spectrum and kinematics to show that the ejecta has likely interacted with dense circumstellar gas.

  2. Mir-23a and mir-125b regulate neural stem/progenitor cell proliferation by targeting Musashi1

    PubMed Central

    Gioia, Ubaldo; Di Carlo, Valerio; Caramanica, Pasquale; Toselli, Camilla; Cinquino, Antonella; Marchioni, Marcella; Laneve, Pietro; Biagioni, Stefano; Bozzoni, Irene; Cacci, Emanuele; Caffarelli, Elisa

    2014-01-01

    Musashi1 is an RNA binding protein that controls the neural cell fate, being involved in maintaining neural progenitors in their proliferative state. In particular, its downregulation is needed for triggering early neural differentiation programs. In this study, we profiled microRNA expression during the transition from neural progenitors to differentiated astrocytes and underscored 2 upregulated microRNAs, miR-23a and miR-125b, that sinergically act to restrain Musashi1 expression, thus creating a regulatory module controlling neural progenitor proliferation. PMID:25483045

  3. Mir-23a and mir-125b regulate neural stem/progenitor cell proliferation by targeting Musashi1.

    PubMed

    Gioia, Ubaldo; Di Carlo, Valerio; Caramanica, Pasquale; Toselli, Camilla; Cinquino, Antonella; Marchioni, Marcella; Laneve, Pietro; Biagioni, Stefano; Bozzoni, Irene; Cacci, Emanuele; Caffarelli, Elisa

    2014-01-01

    Musashi1 is an RNA binding protein that controls the neural cell fate, being involved in maintaining neural progenitors in their proliferative state. In particular, its downregulation is needed for triggering early neural differentiation programs. In this study, we profiled microRNA expression during the transition from neural progenitors to differentiated astrocytes and underscored 2 upregulated microRNAs, miR-23a and miR-125b, that sinergically act to restrain Musashi1 expression, thus creating a regulatory module controlling neural progenitor proliferation. PMID:25483045

  4. Human Breast Progenitor Cell Numbers Are Regulated by WNT and TBX3

    PubMed Central

    Arendt, Lisa M.; St. Laurent, Jessica; Wronski, Ania; Caballero, Silvia; Lyle, Stephen R.; Naber, Stephen P.; Kuperwasser, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    Background Although human breast development is mediated by hormonal and non-hormonal means, the mechanisms that regulate breast progenitor cell activity remain to be clarified. This limited understanding of breast progenitor cells has been due in part to the lack of appropriate model systems to detect and characterize their properties. Methods To examine the effects of WNT signaling and TBX3 expression on progenitor activity in the breast, primary human mammary epithelial cells (MEC) were isolated from reduction mammoplasty tissues and transduced with lentivirus to overexpress WNT1 or TBX3 or reduce expression of their cognate receptors using shRNA. Changes in progenitor activity were quantified using characterized assays. We identified WNT family members expressed by cell populations within the epithelium and assessed alterations in expression of WNT family ligands by MECs in response to TBX3 overexpression and treatment with estrogen and progesterone. Results Growth of MECs on collagen gels resulted in the formation of distinct luminal acinar and basal ductal colonies. Overexpression of TBX3 in MECs resulted in increased ductal colonies, while shTBX3 expression diminished both colony types. Increased WNT1 expression led to enhanced acinar colony formation, shLRP6 decreased both types of colonies. Estrogen stimulated the formation of acinar colonies in control MEC, but not shLRP6 MEC. Formation of ductal colonies was enhanced in response to progesterone. However, while shLRP6 decreased MEC responsiveness to progesterone, shTBX3 expression did not alter this response. Conclusions We identified two phenotypically distinguishable lineage-committed progenitor cells that contribute to different structural elements and are regulated via hormonal and non-hormonal mechanisms. WNT signaling regulates both types of progenitor activity. Progesterone favors the expansion of ductal progenitor cells, while estrogen stimulates the expansion of acinar progenitor cells. Paracrine

  5. Epigenetic therapy of cancer stem and progenitor cells by targeting DNA methylation machineries.

    PubMed

    Wongtrakoongate, Patompon

    2015-01-26

    Recent advances in stem cell biology have shed light on how normal stem and progenitor cells can evolve to acquire malignant characteristics during tumorigenesis. The cancer counterparts of normal stem and progenitor cells might be occurred through alterations of stem cell fates including an increase in self-renewal capability and a decrease in differentiation and/or apoptosis. This oncogenic evolution of cancer stem and progenitor cells, which often associates with aggressive phenotypes of the tumorigenic cells, is controlled in part by dysregulated epigenetic mechanisms including aberrant DNA methylation leading to abnormal epigenetic memory. Epigenetic therapy by targeting DNA methyltransferases (DNMT) 1, DNMT3A and DNMT3B via 5-Azacytidine (Aza) and 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine (Aza-dC) has proved to be successful toward treatment of hematologic neoplasms especially for patients with myelodysplastic syndrome. In this review, I summarize the current knowledge of mechanisms underlying the inhibition of DNA methylation by Aza and Aza-dC, and of their apoptotic- and differentiation-inducing effects on cancer stem and progenitor cells in leukemia, medulloblastoma, glioblastoma, neuroblastoma, prostate cancer, pancreatic cancer and testicular germ cell tumors. Since cancer stem and progenitor cells are implicated in cancer aggressiveness such as tumor formation, progression, metastasis and recurrence, I propose that effective therapeutic strategies might be achieved through eradication of cancer stem and progenitor cells by targeting the DNA methylation machineries to interfere their "malignant memory". PMID:25621113

  6. Characterization of reversibly immortalized calvarial mesenchymal progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Shenaq, Deana S.; Teven, Chad M.; Seitz, Iris A.; Rastegar, Farbod; Greives, Matthew R.; He, Tong-Chuan; Reid, Russell R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) play a sentinel role in osteoblastic differentiation, and their implementation into clinical practice can revolutionize cranial reconstruction. Preliminary data suggest a therapeutic role of adenoviral gene delivery of BMPs in murine calvarial defect healing. Poor transgene expression inherent in direct adenoviral therapy prompted investigation of cell-based strategies. Objective To isolate and immortalize calvarial cells as a potential progenitor source for osseous tissue engineering. Materials & Methods Cells were isolated from murine skulls, cultured, and transduced with a retroviral vector bearing the loxP-flanked SV40 large T antigen. Immortalized calvarial cells (iCALs) were evaluated via light microscopy, immunohistochemistry, and flow cytometry to determine whether the immortalization process altered cell morphology or progenitor cell profile. iCALs were then infected with adenoviral vectors encoding BMP-2 or GFP and assessed for early and late stages of osteogenic differentiation. Results Immortalization of calvarial cells did not alter cell morphology as demonstrated by phase contrast microscopy. Mesenchymal progenitor cell markers CD166, CD73, CD44, and CD105 were detected at varying levels in both primary cells and iCALs. Significant elevations in alkaline phosphatase activity, osteocalcin mRNA transcription, and matrix mineralization were detected in BMP-2 treated iCALs compared to GFP treated cells. Gross and histological analyses revealed ectopic bone production from treated cells compared to controls in an in vivo stem cell implantation assay. Conclusion We have established an immortalized osteoprogenitor cell line from juvenile calvarial cells that retain a progenitor cell phenotype and can successfully undergo osteogenic differentiation upon BMP-2 stimulation. These cells provide a valuable platform to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying intramembranous bone formation and to screen for

  7. Endothelial progenitor cells: identity defined?

    PubMed Central

    Timmermans, Frank; Plum, Jean; Yöder, Mervin C; Ingram, David A; Vandekerckhove, Bart; Case, Jamie

    2009-01-01

    Abstract In the past decade, researchers have gained important insights on the role of bone marrow (BM)-derived cells in adult neovascularization. A subset of BM-derived cells, called endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), has been of particular interest, as these cells were suggested to home to sites of neovascularization and neoendothelialization and differentiate into endothelial cells (ECs) in situ, a process referred to as postnatal vasculogenesis. Therefore, EPCs were proposed as a potential regenerative tool for treating human vascular disease and a possible target to restrict vessel growth in tumour pathology. However, conflicting results have been reported in the field, and the identification, characterization, and exact role of EPCs in vascular biology is still a subject of much discussion. The focus of this review is on the controversial issues in the field of EPCs which are related to the lack of a unique EPC marker, identification challenges related to the paucity of EPCs in the circulation, and the important phenotypical and functional overlap between EPCs, haematopoietic cells and mature ECs. We also discuss our recent findings on the origin of endothelial outgrowth cells (EOCs), showing that this in vitro defined EC population does not originate from circulating CD133+ cells or CD45+ haematopoietic cells. PMID:19067770

  8. KLF4 transcriptionally activates non-canonical WNT5A to control epithelial stratification

    PubMed Central

    Tetreault, Marie-Pier; Weinblatt, Daniel; Shaverdashvili, Khvaramze; Yang, Yizeng; Katz, Jonathan P.

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial differentiation and stratification are essential for normal homeostasis, and disruption of these processes leads to both injury and cancer. The zinc-finger transciption factor KLF4 is a key driver of epithelial differentiation, yet the mechanisms and targets by which KLF4 controls differentiation are not well understood. Here, we define WNT5A, a non-canonical Wnt ligand implicated in epithelial differentiation, repair, and cancer, as a direct transcriptional target that is activated by KLF4 in squamous epithelial cells. Further, we demonstrate functionally that WNT5A mediates KLF4 control of epithelial differentiation and stratification, as treatment of keratinocytes with WNT5A rescues defective epithelial stratification resulting from KLF4 loss. Finally, we show that the small GTPase CDC42 is regulated by KLF4 in a WNT5A dependent manner. As such, we delineate a novel pathway for epithelial differentiation and stratification and define potential therapeutic targets for epithelial diseases. PMID:27184424

  9. pix-1 controls early elongation in parallel with mel-11 and let-502 in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Martin, Emmanuel; Harel, Sharon; Nkengfac, Bernard; Hamiche, Karim; Neault, Mathieu; Jenna, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Cell shape changes are crucial for metazoan development. During Caenorhabditis elegans embryogenesis, epidermal cell shape changes transform ovoid embryos into vermiform larvae. This process is divided into two phases: early and late elongation. Early elongation involves the contraction of filamentous actin bundles by phosphorylated non-muscle myosin in a subset of epidermal (hypodermal) cells. The genes controlling early elongation are associated with two parallel pathways. The first one involves the rho-1/RHOA-specific effector let-502/Rho-kinase and mel-11/myosin phosphatase regulatory subunit. The second pathway involves the CDC42/RAC-specific effector pak-1. Late elongation is driven by mechanotransduction in ventral and dorsal hypodermal cells in response to body-wall muscle contractions, and involves the CDC42/RAC-specific Guanine-nucleotide Exchange Factor (GEF) pix-1, the GTPase ced-10/RAC and pak-1. In this study, pix-1 is shown to control early elongation in parallel with let-502/mel-11, as previously shown for pak-1. We show that pix-1, pak-1 and let-502 control the rate of elongation, and the antero-posterior morphology of the embryos. In particular, pix-1 and pak-1 are shown to control head, but not tail width, while let-502 controls both head and tail width. This suggests that let-502 function is required throughout the antero-posterior axis of the embryo during early elongation, while pix-1/pak-1 function may be mostly required in the anterior part of the embryo. Supporting this hypothesis we show that low pix-1 expression level in the dorsal-posterior hypodermal cells is required to ensure high elongation rate during early elongation. PMID:24732978

  10. pix-1 Controls Early Elongation in Parallel with mel-11 and let-502 in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Nkengfac, Bernard; Hamiche, Karim; Neault, Mathieu; Jenna, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Cell shape changes are crucial for metazoan development. During Caenorhabditis elegans embryogenesis, epidermal cell shape changes transform ovoid embryos into vermiform larvae. This process is divided into two phases: early and late elongation. Early elongation involves the contraction of filamentous actin bundles by phosphorylated non-muscle myosin in a subset of epidermal (hypodermal) cells. The genes controlling early elongation are associated with two parallel pathways. The first one involves the rho-1/RHOA-specific effector let-502/Rho-kinase and mel-11/myosin phosphatase regulatory subunit. The second pathway involves the CDC42/RAC-specific effector pak-1. Late elongation is driven by mechanotransduction in ventral and dorsal hypodermal cells in response to body-wall muscle contractions, and involves the CDC42/RAC-specific Guanine-nucleotide Exchange Factor (GEF) pix-1, the GTPase ced-10/RAC and pak-1. In this study, pix-1 is shown to control early elongation in parallel with let-502/mel-11, as previously shown for pak-1. We show that pix-1, pak-1 and let-502 control the rate of elongation, and the antero-posterior morphology of the embryos. In particular, pix-1 and pak-1 are shown to control head, but not tail width, while let-502 controls both head and tail width. This suggests that let-502 function is required throughout the antero-posterior axis of the embryo during early elongation, while pix-1/pak-1 function may be mostly required in the anterior part of the embryo. Supporting this hypothesis we show that low pix-1 expression level in the dorsal-posterior hypodermal cells is required to ensure high elongation rate during early elongation. PMID:24732978

  11. Derivation and Isolation of NKX2.1-Positive Basal Forebrain Progenitors from Human Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Germain, Noélle D.; Banda, Erin C.; Becker, Sandy; Naegele, Janice R.

    2013-01-01

    Gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA)-expressing interneurons are the major inhibitory cells of the cerebral cortex and hippocampus. These interneurons originate in the medial ganglionic eminence (MGE) and lateral ganglionic eminence of the ventral forebrain during embryonic development and show reduced survival and function in a variety of neurological disorders, including temporal lobe epilepsy. We and others have proposed that embryonic stem cell (ESC)–derived ventral forebrain progenitors might provide a source of new GABAergic interneurons for cell-based therapies. While human ESCs (hESCs) are readily differentiated in vitro into dorsal telencephalic neural progenitors, standard protocols for generating ventral subtypes of telencephalic progenitors are less effective. We now report efficient derivation of GABAergic progenitors using an established hESC reporter line that expresses green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the control of an endogenous NKX2.1 promoter. GABAergic progenitors were derived from this hESC line by a modified monolayer neural differentiation protocol. Consistent with sonic hedgehog (SHH)-dependent specification of NKX2.1-positive progenitors in the embryonic MGE, we show a dose-dependent increase in the generation of NKX2.1:GFP-positive progenitors after SHH treatment in vitro. Characterization of NKX2.1:GFP-positive cells confirms their identity as MGE-like neural progenitors, based on gene expression profiles and their ability to differentiate into GABAergic interneurons. We are also able to generate highly enriched populations of NKX2.1:GFP-positive progenitors, including cells with telencephalic identity, by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. These hESC-derived ventral forebrain progenitors are suitable candidates for cell-based therapies that aim at replacing dysfunctional or damaged cortical or hippocampal GABAergic interneurons. PMID:23351095

  12. Neural Progenitors Adopt Specific Identities by Directly Repressing All Alternative Progenitor Transcriptional Programs

    PubMed Central

    Kutejova, Eva; Sasai, Noriaki; Shah, Ankita; Gouti, Mina; Briscoe, James

    2016-01-01

    Summary In the vertebrate neural tube, a morphogen-induced transcriptional network produces multiple molecularly distinct progenitor domains, each generating different neuronal subtypes. Using an in vitro differentiation system, we defined gene expression signatures of distinct progenitor populations and identified direct gene-regulatory inputs corresponding to locations of specific transcription factor binding. Combined with targeted perturbations of the network, this revealed a mechanism in which a progenitor identity is installed by active repression of the entire transcriptional programs of other neural progenitor fates. In the ventral neural tube, sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling, together with broadly expressed transcriptional activators, concurrently activates the gene expression programs of several domains. The specific outcome is selected by repressive input provided by Shh-induced transcription factors that act as the key nodes in the network, enabling progenitors to adopt a single definitive identity from several initially permitted options. Together, the data suggest design principles relevant to many developing tissues. PMID:26972603

  13. Neural Progenitors Adopt Specific Identities by Directly Repressing All Alternative Progenitor Transcriptional Programs.

    PubMed

    Kutejova, Eva; Sasai, Noriaki; Shah, Ankita; Gouti, Mina; Briscoe, James

    2016-03-21

    In the vertebrate neural tube, a morphogen-induced transcriptional network produces multiple molecularly distinct progenitor domains, each generating different neuronal subtypes. Using an in vitro differentiation system, we defined gene expression signatures of distinct progenitor populations and identified direct gene-regulatory inputs corresponding to locations of specific transcription factor binding. Combined with targeted perturbations of the network, this revealed a mechanism in which a progenitor identity is installed by active repression of the entire transcriptional programs of other neural progenitor fates. In the ventral neural tube, sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling, together with broadly expressed transcriptional activators, concurrently activates the gene expression programs of several domains. The specific outcome is selected by repressive input provided by Shh-induced transcription factors that act as the key nodes in the network, enabling progenitors to adopt a single definitive identity from several initially permitted options. Together, the data suggest design principles relevant to many developing tissues. PMID:26972603

  14. STELLAR BINARY COMPANIONS TO SUPERNOVA PROGENITORS

    SciTech Connect

    Kochanek, Christopher S.

    2009-12-20

    For typical models of binary statistics, 50%-80% of core-collapse supernova (ccSN) progenitors are members of a stellar binary at the time of the explosion. Independent of any consequences of mass transfer, this has observational consequences that can be used to study the binary properties of massive stars. In particular, the secondary companion to the progenitor of a Type Ib/c SN is frequently (approx50%) the more optically luminous star since the high effective temperatures of the stripped progenitors make it relatively easy for a lower luminosity, cooler secondary to emit more optical light. Secondaries to the lower mass progenitors of Type II SN will frequently produce excess blue emission relative to the spectral energy distribution of the red primary. Available data constrain the models weakly. Any detected secondaries also provide an independent lower bound on the progenitor mass and, for historical SN, show that it was not a Type Ia event. Bright ccSN secondaries have an unambiguous, post-explosion observational signature-strong, blueshifted, relatively broad absorption lines created by the developing SN remnant (SNR). These can be used to locate historical SN with bright secondaries, confirm that a source is a secondary, and, potentially, measure abundances of ccSN ejecta. Luminous, hot secondaries will re-ionize the SNR on timescales of 100-1000 yr that are faster than re-ionization by the reverse shock, creating peculiar H II regions due to the high metallicity and velocities of the ejecta.

  15. Possible Progenitor of Special Supernova Type Detected

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-04-01

    'll learn a lot more about these important supernovas in the future." Voss agrees that, even if the X-ray source is not found to be the progenitor of SN 2007on, the hunt is worth the effort. "Finding the progenitor to one of these Type Ia supernovas is a great chase in astronomy right now," he said. "These supernovas are great tools for studying dark energy, but if we knew more about how they form they might become even better tools." Rasmus Voss receives support from the Excellence Cluster Universe in Garching, Germany. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Ala., manages the Chandra program for the agency's Science Mission Directorate. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory controls science and flight operations from the Chandra X-ray Center in Cambridge, Mass

  16. Eupalinilide E inhibits erythropoiesis and promotes the expansion of hematopoietic progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    de Lichtervelde, Lorenzo; Boitano, Anthony E; Wang, Ying; Krastel, Philipp; Petersen, Frank; Cooke, Michael P; Schultz, Peter G

    2013-05-17

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are the progenitor cells that give rise to all blood cells. The ability to control HSC differentiation has the potential to improve the success of bone marrow transplants and the production of functional blood cells ex vivo. Here we performed an unbiased screen using primary human CD34(+) hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) to identify natural products that selectively control their differentiation. We identified a plant-derived natural product, eupalinilide E, that promotes the ex vivo expansion of HSPCs and hinders the in vitro development of erythrocytes. This activity was additive with aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) antagonists, which are also known to expand HSCs and currently in clinical development. These findings reveal a new activity for eupalinilide E, and suggest that it may be a useful tool to probe the mechanisms of hematopoiesis and improve the ex vivo production of progenitors for therapeutic purposes. PMID:23441826

  17. Exploring the Progenitors of Fast Radio Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke-Spolaor, Sarah; Kramer, Michael; Bhat, Ramesh; Kulkarni, S. R.; Keller, Stefan; Champion, David; Flynn, Chris; Kasliwal, Mansi

    2014-10-01

    Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs) are millisecond bursts that are broadly evidenced to arise from extragalactic, but yet unknown, progenitors. They have presented a true mystery in that so far no progenitor theory can adequately account for their observed properties. We request observations that will glean basic information on FRB progenitors. Our observations will execute a specific test of whether FRBs originate in nearby galaxies. We have also designed our target field and time request to enable a thorough exploration of optical counterparts before, during, and after any detected FRB episode. Additionally, with a number depending on the typical distance to FRBs, our observations will raise the running list of total FRB discoveries by 10-60%.

  18. Progenitor cells in the adult pancreas.

    PubMed

    Holland, Andrew M; Góñez, L Jorge; Harrison, Leonard C

    2004-01-01

    The beta-cell mass in the adult pancreas possesses the ability to undergo limited regeneration following injury. Identifying the progenitor cells involved in this process and understanding the mechanisms leading to their maturation will open new avenues for the treatment of type 1 diabetes. However, despite steady advances in determining the molecular basis of early pancreatic development, the identification of pancreatic stem cells or beta-cell progenitors and the molecular mechanisms underlying beta-cell regeneration remain unclear. Recent advances in the directed differentiation of embryonic and adult stem cells has heightened interest in the possible application of stem cell therapy in the treatment of type 1 diabetes. Drawing on the expanding knowledge of pancreas development, beta-cell regeneration and stem cell research, this review focuses on progenitor cells in the adult pancreas as a potential source of beta-cells. PMID:14737742

  19. Derivation of high-purity oligodendroglial progenitors.

    PubMed

    Hatch, Maya N; Nistor, Gabriel; Keirstead, Hans S

    2009-01-01

    Oligodendrocytes are a type of glial cells that play a critical role in supporting the central nervous system (CNS), in particular insulating axons within the CNS by wrapping them with a myelin sheath, thereby enabling saltatory conduction. They are lost, and myelin damaged - demyelination - in a wide variety of neurological disorders. Replacing depleted cell types within demyelinated areas, however, has been shown experimentally to achieve remyelination and so help restore function. One method to produce oligodendrocytes for cellular replacement therapies is through the use of progenitor or stem cells. The ability to differentiate progenitor or stem cells into high-purity fates not only permits the generation of specific cells for transplantation therapies, but also provides powerful tools for studying cellular mechanisms of development. This chapter outlines methods of generating high-purity OPCs from multipotent neonatal progenitor or human embryonic stem cells. PMID:19378196

  20. Numb family proteins are essential for cardiac morphogenesis and progenitor differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chen; Guo, Hua; Li, Jingjing; Myint, Thomas; Pittman, William; Yang, Le; Zhong, Weimin; Schwartz, Robert J.; Schwarz, John J.; Singer, Harold A.; Tallquist, Michelle D.; Wu, Mingfu

    2014-01-01

    Numb family proteins (NFPs), including Numb and numb-like (Numbl), are cell fate determinants for multiple progenitor cell types. Their functions in cardiac progenitor differentiation and cardiac morphogenesis are unknown. To avoid early embryonic lethality and study NFP function in later cardiac development, Numb and Numbl were deleted specifically in heart to generate myocardial double-knockout (MDKO) mice. MDKOs were embryonic lethal and displayed a variety of defects in cardiac progenitor differentiation, cardiomyocyte proliferation, outflow tract (OFT) and atrioventricular septation, and OFT alignment. By ablating NFPs in different cardiac populations followed by lineage tracing, we determined that NFPs in the second heart field (SHF) are required for OFT and atrioventricular septation and OFT alignment. MDKOs displayed an SHF progenitor cell differentiation defect, as revealed by a variety of methods including mRNA deep sequencing. Numb regulated cardiac progenitor cell differentiation in an endocytosis-dependent manner. Studies including the use of a transgenic Notch reporter line showed that Notch signaling was upregulated in the MDKO. Suppression of Notch1 signaling in MDKOs rescued defects in p57 expression, proliferation and trabecular thickness. Further studies showed that Numb inhibits Notch1 signaling by promoting the degradation of the Notch1 intracellular domain in cardiomyocytes. This study reveals that NFPs regulate trabecular thickness by inhibiting Notch1 signaling, control cardiac morphogenesis in a Notch1-independent manner, and regulate cardiac progenitor cell differentiation in an endocytosis-dependent manner. The function of NFPs in cardiac progenitor differentiation and cardiac morphogenesis suggests that NFPs might be potential therapeutic candidates for cardiac regeneration and congenital heart diseases. PMID:24335256

  1. Semaphorin-Plexin Signaling Controls Mitotic Spindle Orientation during Epithelial Morphogenesis and Repair.

    PubMed

    Xia, Jingjing; Swiercz, Jakub M; Bañón-Rodríguez, Inmaculada; Matković, Ivana; Federico, Giuseppina; Sun, Tianliang; Franz, Timo; Brakebusch, Cord H; Kumanogoh, Atsushi; Friedel, Roland H; Martín-Belmonte, Fernando; Gröne, Hermann-Josef; Offermanns, Stefan; Worzfeld, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    Morphogenesis, homeostasis, and regeneration of epithelial tissues rely on the accurate orientation of cell divisions, which is specified by the mitotic spindle axis. To remain in the epithelial plane, symmetrically dividing epithelial cells align their mitotic spindle axis with the plane. Here, we show that this alignment depends on epithelial cell-cell communication via semaphorin-plexin signaling. During kidney morphogenesis and repair, renal tubular epithelial cells lacking the transmembrane receptor Plexin-B2 or its semaphorin ligands fail to correctly orient the mitotic spindle, leading to severe defects in epithelial architecture and function. Analyses of a series of transgenic and knockout mice indicate that Plexin-B2 controls the cell division axis by signaling through its GTPase-activating protein (GAP) domain and Cdc42. Our data uncover semaphorin-plexin signaling as a central regulatory mechanism of mitotic spindle orientation necessary for the alignment of epithelial cell divisions with the epithelial plane. PMID:25892012

  2. Pigment Cell Progenitors in Zebrafish Remain Multipotent through Metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ajeet Pratap; Dinwiddie, April; Mahalwar, Prateek; Schach, Ursula; Linker, Claudia; Irion, Uwe; Nüsslein-Volhard, Christiane

    2016-08-01

    The neural crest is a transient, multipotent embryonic cell population in vertebrates giving rise to diverse cell types in adults via intermediate progenitors. The in vivo cell-fate potential and lineage segregation of these postembryonic progenitors is poorly understood, and it is unknown if and when the progenitors become fate restricted. We investigate the fate restriction in the neural crest-derived stem cells and intermediate progenitors in zebrafish, which give rise to three distinct adult pigment cell types: melanophores, iridophores, and xanthophores. By inducing clones in sox10-expressing cells, we trace and quantitatively compare the pigment cell progenitors at four stages, from embryogenesis to metamorphosis. At all stages, a large fraction of the progenitors are multipotent. These multipotent progenitors have a high proliferation ability, which diminishes with fate restriction. We suggest that multipotency of the nerve-associated progenitors lasting into metamorphosis may have facilitated the evolution of adult-specific traits in vertebrates. PMID:27453500

  3. Endothelial Progenitor Cells in Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Lois, Noemi; McCarter, Rachel V.; O’Neill, Christina; Medina, Reinhold J.; Stitt, Alan W.

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a leading cause of visual impairment worldwide. Patients with DR may irreversibly lose sight as a result of the development of diabetic macular edema (DME) and/or proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR); retinal blood vessel dysfunction and degeneration plays an essential role in their pathogenesis. Although new treatments have been recently introduced for DME, including intravitreal vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors (anti-VEGFs) and steroids, a high proportion of patients (~40–50%) do not respond to these therapies. Furthermore, for people with PDR, laser photocoagulation remains a mainstay therapy despite this being an inherently destructive procedure. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are a low-frequency population of circulating cells known to be recruited to sites of vessel damage and tissue ischemia where they promote vascular healing and re-perfusion. A growing body of evidence suggests that the number and function of EPCs are altered in patients with varying degrees of diabetes duration, metabolic control, and in the presence or absence of DR. Although there are no clear-cut outcomes from these clinical studies, there is mounting evidence that some EPC sub-types may be involved in the pathogenesis of DR and may also serve as biomarkers for disease progression and stratification. Moreover, some EPC sub-types have considerable potential as therapeutic modalities for DME and PDR in the context of cell therapy. This study presents basic clinical concepts of DR and combines this with a general insight on EPCs and their relation to future directions in understanding and treating this important diabetic complication. PMID:24782825

  4. HIV-1 Alters Neural and Glial Progenitor Cell Dynamics in the CNS: Coordinated Response to Opiates during Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Yun Kyung; Podhaizer, Elizabeth M.; Hauser, Kurt F.; Knapp, Pamela E.

    2014-01-01

    HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) are common sequelae of HIV infection, even when viral titers are well controlled by anti-retroviral therapy. Evidence in patients and animal models suggests that neurologic deficits are increased during chronic opiate exposure. We have hypothesized that CNS progenitor cells in both adult and developing CNS are affected by HIV infection, and that opiates exacerbate these effects. To examine this question, neural progenitors were exposed to HIV-1 Tat1-86 in the developing brain of inducible transgenic mice and in vitro. We examined whether Tat affected the proliferation or balance of progenitor populations expressing nestin, Sox2, and Olig2. Disease relevance was further tested by exposing human-derived progenitors to supernatant from HIV-1 infected monocytes. Studies concentrated on striatum, a region preferentially targeted by HIV and opiates. Results were similar among experimental paradigms. Tat or HIV exposure reduced the proliferation of undifferentiated (Sox2+) progenitors and oligodendroglial (Olig2+) progenitors. Co-exposure to morphine exacerbated the effects of Tat or HIV-1SF162 supernatant, but partially reversed HIV-1IIIB supernatant effects. Populations of Sox2+ and Olig2+ cells were also reduced by Tat exposure, although progenitor survival was unaffected. In rare instances, p24 immunolabeling was detected in viable human progenitors by confocal imaging. The vulnerability of progenitors is likely to distort the dynamic balance among neuron/glial populations as the brain matures, perhaps contributing to reports that neurologic disease is especially prevalent in pediatric HIV patients. Pediatric disease is atypical in developed regions, but remains a serious concern in resource-limited areas where infection occurs commonly at birth and through breast-feeding. PMID:22865725

  5. Identification of proliferative progenitors associated with prominent postnatal growth of the pons

    PubMed Central

    Lindquist, Robert A.; Guinto, Cristina D.; Rodas-Rodriguez, Jose L.; Fuentealba, Luis C.; Tate, Matthew C.; Rowitch, David H.; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo

    2016-01-01

    The pons controls crucial sensorimotor and autonomic functions. In humans, it grows sixfold postnatally and is a site of paediatric gliomas; however, the mechanisms of pontine growth remain poorly understood. We show that the murine pons quadruples in volume postnatally; growth is fastest during postnatal days 0–4 (P0–P4), preceding most myelination. We identify three postnatal proliferative compartments: ventricular, midline and parenchymal. We find no evidence of postnatal neurogenesis in the pons, but each progenitor compartment produces new astroglia and oligodendroglia; the latter expand 10- to 18-fold postnatally, and are derived mostly from the parenchyma. Nearly all parenchymal progenitors at P4 are Sox2+Olig2+, but by P8 a Sox2− subpopulation emerges, suggesting a lineage progression from Sox2+ ‘early' to Sox2− ‘late' oligodendrocyte progenitor. Fate mapping reveals that >90% of adult oligodendrocytes derive from P2–P3 Sox2+ progenitors. These results demonstrate the importance of postnatal Sox2+Olig2+ progenitors in pontine growth and oligodendrogenesis. PMID:27188978

  6. Postnatal epithelium and mesenchyme stem/progenitor cells in bioengineered amelogenesis and dentinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Nan; Zhou, Jian; Chen, Mo; Schiff, Michael D; Lee, Chang H; Kong, Kimi; Embree, Mildred C; Zhou, Yanheng; Mao, Jeremy J

    2014-02-01

    Rodent incisors provide a classic model for studying epithelial-mesenchymal interactions in development. However, postnatal stem/progenitor cells in rodent incisors have not been exploited for tooth regeneration. Here, we characterized postnatal rat incisor epithelium and mesenchyme stem/progenitor cells and found that they formed enamel- and dentin-like tissues in vivo. Epithelium and mesenchyme cells were harvested separately from the apical region of postnatal 4-5 day rat incisors. Epithelial and mesenchymal phenotypes were confirmed by immunocytochemistry, CFU assay and/or multi-lineage differentiation. CK14+, Sox2+ and Lgr5+ epithelium stem cells from the cervical loop enhanced amelogenin and ameloblastin expression upon BMP4 or FGF3 stimulation, signifying their differentiation towards ameloblast-like cells, whereas mesenchyme stem/progenitor cells upon BMP4, BMP7 and Wnt3a treatment robustly expressed Dspp, a hallmark of odontoblastic differentiation. We then control-released microencapsulated BMP4, BMP7 and Wnt3a in transplants of epithelium and mesenchyme stem/progenitor cells in the renal capsule of athymic mice in vivo. Enamel and dentin-like tissues were generated in two integrated layers with specific expression of amelogenin and ameloblastin in the newly formed, de novo enamel-like tissue, and DSP in dentin-like tissue. These findings suggest that postnatal epithelium and mesenchyme stem/progenitor cells can be primed towards bioengineered tooth regeneration. PMID:24345734

  7. Identification of proliferative progenitors associated with prominent postnatal growth of the pons.

    PubMed

    Lindquist, Robert A; Guinto, Cristina D; Rodas-Rodriguez, Jose L; Fuentealba, Luis C; Tate, Matthew C; Rowitch, David H; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo

    2016-01-01

    The pons controls crucial sensorimotor and autonomic functions. In humans, it grows sixfold postnatally and is a site of paediatric gliomas; however, the mechanisms of pontine growth remain poorly understood. We show that the murine pons quadruples in volume postnatally; growth is fastest during postnatal days 0-4 (P0-P4), preceding most myelination. We identify three postnatal proliferative compartments: ventricular, midline and parenchymal. We find no evidence of postnatal neurogenesis in the pons, but each progenitor compartment produces new astroglia and oligodendroglia; the latter expand 10- to 18-fold postnatally, and are derived mostly from the parenchyma. Nearly all parenchymal progenitors at P4 are Sox2(+)Olig2(+), but by P8 a Sox2(-) subpopulation emerges, suggesting a lineage progression from Sox2(+) 'early' to Sox2(-) 'late' oligodendrocyte progenitor. Fate mapping reveals that >90% of adult oligodendrocytes derive from P2-P3 Sox2(+) progenitors. These results demonstrate the importance of postnatal Sox2(+)Olig2(+) progenitors in pontine growth and oligodendrogenesis. PMID:27188978

  8. Ex Vivo and In Vivo Lentivirus-Mediated Transduction of Airway Epithelial Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Leoni, Giulia; Wasowicz, Marguerite Y; Chan, Mario; Meng, Cuixiang; Farley, Raymond; Brody, Steven L; Inoue, Makoto; Hasegawa, Mamoru; Alton, Eric W F W; Griesenbach, Uta

    2015-01-01

    A key challenge in pulmonary gene therapy for cystic fibrosis is to provide long-term correction of the genetic defect. This may be achievable by targeting airway epithelial stem/progenitor cells with an integrating vector. Here, we evaluated the ability of a lentiviral vector, derived from the simian immunodeficiency virus and pseudotyped with F and HN envelope proteins from Sendai virus, to transduce progenitor basal cells of the mouse nasal airways. We first transduced basal cell-enriched cultures ex vivo and confirmed efficient transduction of cytokeratin-5 positive cells. We next asked whether progenitor cells could be transduced in vivo. We evaluated the transduction efficiency in mice pretreated by intranasal administration of polidocanol to expose the progenitor cell layer. Compared to control mice, polidocanol treated mice demonstrated a significant increase in the number of transduced basal cells at 3 and 14 days post vector administration. At 14 days, the epithelium of treated mice contained clusters (4 to 8 adjacent cells) of well differentiated ciliated, as well as basal cells suggesting a clonal expansion. These results indicate that our lentiviral vector can transduce progenitor basal cells in vivo, although transduction required denudation of the surface epithelium prior to vector administration. PMID:26471068

  9. The progenitors of subluminous type Ia supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, D. Andrew

    2001-02-01

    We find that spectroscopically peculiar subluminous SNe Ia come from an old population. Of the thirteen subluminous SNe Ia known, nine are found in E/S0 galaxies, and the remainder are found in early-type spirals. The probability that this is a chance occurrence is only 0.1%. The finding that subluminous SNe Ia are associated with an older stellar population indicates that for a sufficiently large lookback time (already accessible in current high redshift searches) they will not be found. Due to a scarcity in old populations, hydrogen and helium main sequence stars and He red giant stars that undergo Roche lobe overflow are unlikely to be the progenitors of subluminous SNe Ia. Earlier findings that overluminous SNe Ia (DELTA m{sub 15} (B) < 0.94) come from a young progenitor population are confirmed. The fact that subluminous SNe Ia and overluminous SNe Ia come from different progenitor populations and also have different properties is a prediction of the CO white dwarf merger progenitor scenario.

  10. Human Liver Progenitor Cells for Liver Repair

    PubMed Central

    Lombard, Catherine A.; Prigent, Julie; Sokal, Etienne M.

    2013-01-01

    Because of their high proliferative capacity, resistance to cryopreservation, and ability to differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells, stem and progenitor cells have recently emerged as attractive cell sources for liver cell therapy, a technique used as an alternative to orthotopic liver transplantation in the treatment of various hepatic ailments ranging from metabolic disorders to end-stage liver disease. Although stem and progenitor cells have been isolated from various tissues, obtaining them from the liver could be an advantage for the treatment of hepatic disorders. However, the techniques available to isolate these stem/progenitor cells are numerous and give rise to cell populations with different morphological and functional characteristics. In addition, there is currently no established consensus on the tests that need to be performed to ensure the quality and safety of these cells when used clinically. The purpose of this review is to describe the different types of liver stem/progenitor cells currently reported in the literature, discuss their suitability and limitations in terms of clinical applications, and examine how the culture and transplantation techniques can potentially be improved to achieve a better clinical outcome. PMID:26858860

  11. In vivo identification of periodontal progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Roguljic, H; Matthews, B G; Yang, W; Cvija, H; Mina, M; Kalajzic, I

    2013-08-01

    The periodontal ligament contains progenitor cells; however, their identity and differentiation potential in vivo remain poorly characterized. Previous results have suggested that periodontal tissue progenitors reside in perivascular areas. Therefore, we utilized a lineage-tracing approach to identify and track periodontal progenitor cells from the perivascular region in vivo. We used an alpha-smooth muscle actin (αSMA) promoter-driven and tamoxifen-inducible Cre system (αSMACreERT2) that, in combination with a reporter mouse line (Ai9), permanently labels a cell population, termed 'SMA9'. To trace the differentiation of SMA9-labeled cells into osteoblasts/cementoblasts, we utilized a Col2.3GFP transgene, while expression of Scleraxis-GFP was used to follow differentiation into periodontal ligament fibroblasts during normal tissue formation and remodeling following injury. In uninjured three-week-old SMA9 mice, tamoxifen labeled a small population of cells in the periodontal ligament that expanded over time, particularly in the apical region of the root. By 17 days and 7 weeks after labeling, some SMA9-labeled cells expressed markers indicating differentiation into mature lineages, including cementocytes. Following injury, SMA9 cells expanded, and differentiated into cementoblasts, osteoblasts, and periodontal ligament fibroblasts. SMA9-labeled cells represent a source of progenitors that can give rise to mature osteoblasts, cementoblasts, and fibroblasts within the periodontium. PMID:23735585

  12. SUPERNOVA REMNANT PROGENITOR MASSES IN M31

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, Zachary G.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Gilbert, Karoline M.; Fouesneau, Morgan; Weisz, Daniel R.; Murphy, Jeremiah W.; Dolphin, Andrew E. E-mail: adolphin@raytheon.com

    2012-12-10

    Using Hubble Space Telescope photometry, we age-date 59 supernova remnants (SNRs) in the spiral galaxy M31 and use these ages to estimate zero-age main-sequence masses (M{sub ZAMS}) for their progenitors. To accomplish this, we create color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) and employ CMD fitting to measure the recent star formation history of the regions surrounding cataloged SNR sites. We identify any young coeval population that likely produced the progenitor star, then assign an age and uncertainty to that population. Application of stellar evolution models allows us to infer the M{sub ZAMS} from this age. Because our technique is not contingent on identification or precise location of the progenitor star, it can be applied to the location of any known SNRs. We identify significant young star formation around 53 of the 59 SNRs and assign progenitor masses to these, representing a factor of {approx}2 increase over currently measured progenitor masses. We consider the remaining six SNRs as either probable Type Ia candidates or the result of core-collapse progenitors that have escaped their birth sites. In general, the distribution of recovered progenitor masses is bottom-heavy, showing a paucity of the most massive stars. If we assume a single power-law distribution, dN/dM{proportional_to}M{sup {alpha}}, then we find a distribution that is steeper than a Salpeter initial mass function (IMF) ({alpha} = -2.35). In particular, we find values of {alpha} outside the range -2.7 {>=} {alpha} {>=} -4.4 to be inconsistent with our measured distribution at 95% confidence. If instead we assume a distribution that follows a Salpeter IMF up to some maximum mass, then we find that values of M{sub Max} > 26 are inconsistent with the measured distribution at 95% confidence. In either scenario, the data suggest that some fraction of massive stars may not explode. The result is preliminary and requires more SNRs and further analysis. In addition, we use our distribution to estimate a

  13. Eya1 Interacts with Six2 and Myc to Regulate Expansion of the Nephron Progenitor Pool during Nephrogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jinshu; Wong, Elaine Y.M.; Cheng, Chunming; Li, Jun; Sharkar, Mohammad T.K.; Xu, Chelsea Y.; Chen, Binglai; Sun, Jianbo; Jing, Dongzhu; Xu, Pin-Xian

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Self-renewal and proliferation of nephron progenitor cells and the decision to initiate nephrogenesis are crucial events directing kidney development. Despite recent advancements in defining lineage and regulators for the progenitors, fundamental questions about mechanisms driving expansion of the progenitors remain unanswered. Here we show that Eya1 interacts with Six2 and Myc to control self-renewing cell activity. Cell fate tracing reveals a developmental restriction of the Eya1+ population within the intermediate mesoderm to nephron-forming cell fates and a common origin shared between caudal mesonephric and metanephric nephrons. Conditional inactivation of Eya1 leads to loss of Six2 expression and premature epithelialization of the progenitors. Six2 mediates translocation of Eya1 to the nucleus, where Eya1 uses its threonine phosphatase activity to control Myc phosphorylation/dephosphorylation and function in the progenitor cells. Our results reveal a functional link between Eya1, Six2, and Myc in driving the expansion and maintenance of the multipotent progenitors during nephrogenesis. PMID:25458011

  14. MiR-128-2 inhibits common lymphoid progenitors from developing into progenitor B cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huo; Fei, Xia; Tang, YuXu; Yan, Yunqiu; Zhang, Huimin; Zhang, Jinping

    2016-01-01

    A considerable number of studies revealed that B cell development is finely regulated by transcription factors (TFs). Recent studies suggested that TFs are coordinated with microRNAs to control the development of B cells in numerous checkpoints. In the present study, we first found that miR-128-2 was differentially expressed in various immune organs and immunocytes. B cell development was inhibited in miR-128-2-overexpressed chimera and transgenic (TG) mice in bone marrow with decreased preproB, preB, proB, immature B, and recirculating B cells, as well as increased common lymphoid progenitors (CLPs). Further experiments showed that the apoptosis of CLP decreased, but proliferation was not altered in miR-128-2-overexpressed mice. Extensive studies suggested that the inhibition of apoptosis of CLP may be caused by miR-128-2 targeting A2B and MALT1, thereby increasing the phosphorylation of ERK and P38 MAPK. Such findings have prompted future investigations on the function of miR-128-2 in lymph genesis. PMID:27008703

  15. Functional response to SDF1α through over-expression of CXCR4 on adult subventricular zone progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xian Shuang; Chopp, Michael; Santra, Manoranjan; Hozeska-Solgot, Ann; Zhang, Rui Lan; Wang, Lei; Teng, Hua; Liu, Mei; Zhang, Zheng Gang

    2008-01-01

    The chemokine receptor CXCR4 and its ligand, stromal cell derived factor-1α (SDF1α) regulate neuroblast migration towards the ischemic boundary after stroke. Using loss-and gain-function, we investigated the biological effect of CXCR4/SDF1α on neural progenitor cells. Neural progenitor cells, from the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the adult rat, were transfected with rat CXCR4-pLEGFP-C1 and pSIREN-RetroQ-CXCR4-siRNA retroviral vectors. Migration assay analysis showed that inhibition of CXCR4 by siRNA significantly reduced cell migration compared to the empty vector, indicating that CXCR4 mediated neural progenitor cell motility. When neural progenitor cells were cultured in growth medium containing bFGF (20 ng/ml), over-expression of CXCR4 significantly reduced the cell proliferation as measured by the number of bromodeoxyuridine+ (BrdU+) cells (26.4%) compared with the number in the control group (54.0%). Addition of a high concentration of SDF1α (500 ng/ml) into the progenitor cells with over-expression of CXCR4 reversed the cell proliferation back to the control levels (57.6%). Immunostaining analysis showed that neither over-expression nor inhibition of CXCR4 altered the population of neurons and astrocytes, when neural progenitor cells were cultured in differentiation medium. These in vitro results suggest that CXCR4/SDF1α primarily regulates adult neural progenitor cell motility but not differentiation, while over-expression of CXCR4 in the absence of SDF1α decreases neural progenitor cell proliferation. PMID:18598677

  16. The role of Zic family zinc finger transcription factors in the proliferation and differentiation of retinal progenitor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Watabe, Yui; Baba, Yukihiro; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; Mizota, Atsushi; Watanabe, Sumiko

    2011-11-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zic transcription factors expressed early retinal progenitor cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zics sustain proliferation activity of retinal progenitor cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Overexpression of Zic in retinal progenitors perturbed rod differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fate determination to rod photoreceptor was not affected. -- Abstract: Members of the Zic family of zinc finger transcription factors play critical roles in a variety of developmental processes. Using DNA microarray analysis, we found that Zics are strongly expressed in SSEA-1-positive early retinal progenitors in the peripheral region of the mouse retina. Reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction using mRNA from the retina at various developmental stages showed that Zic1 and Zic2 are expressed in the embryonic retina and then gradually disappear during retinal development. Zic3 is also expressed in the embryonic retina; its expression level slightly decreases but it is expressed until adulthood. We overexpressed Zic1, Zic2, or Zic3 in retinal progenitors at embryonic day 17.5 and cultured the retina as explants for 2 weeks. The number of rod photoreceptors was fewer than in the control, but no other cell types showed significant differences between control and Zic overexpressing cells. The proliferation activity of normal retinal progenitors decreased after 5 days in culture, as observed in normal in vivo developmental processes. However, Zic expressing retinal cells continued to proliferate at days 5 and 7, suggesting that Zics sustain the proliferation activities of retinal progenitor cells. Since the effects of Zic1, 2, and 3 are indistinguishable in terms of differentiation and proliferation of retinal progenitors, the redundant function of Zics in retinal development is suggested.

  17. TRPM7 maintains progenitor-like features of neuroblastoma cells: implications for metastasis formation

    PubMed Central

    Middelbeek, Jeroen; Kamermans, Alwin; Kuipers, Arthur J.; Hoogerbrugge, Peter M.; Jalink, Kees; van Leeuwen, Frank N.

    2015-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is an embryonal tumor derived from poorly differentiated neural crest cells. Current research is aimed at identifying the molecular mechanisms that maintain the progenitor state of neuroblastoma cells and to develop novel therapeutic strategies that induce neuroblastoma cell differentiation. Mechanisms controlling neural crest development are typically dysregulated during neuroblastoma progression, and provide an appealing starting point for drug target discovery. Transcriptional programs involved in neural crest development act as a context dependent gene regulatory network. In addition to BMP, Wnt and Notch signaling, activation of developmental gene expression programs depends on the physical characteristics of the tissue microenvironment. TRPM7, a mechanically regulated TRP channel with kinase activity, was previously found essential for embryogenesis and the maintenance of undifferentiated neural crest progenitors. Hence, we hypothesized that TRPM7 may preserve progenitor-like, metastatic features of neuroblastoma cells. Using multiple neuroblastoma cell models, we demonstrate that TRPM7 expression closely associates with the migratory and metastatic properties of neuroblastoma cells in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, microarray-based expression profiling on control and TRPM7 shRNA transduced neuroblastoma cells indicates that TRPM7 controls a developmental transcriptional program involving the transcription factor SNAI2. Overall, our data indicate that TRPM7 contributes to neuroblastoma progression by maintaining progenitor-like features. PMID:25797249

  18. 2D and 3D Stem Cell Models of Primate Cortical Development Identify Species-Specific Differences in Progenitor Behavior Contributing to Brain Size

    PubMed Central

    Otani, Tomoki; Marchetto, Maria C.; Gage, Fred H.; Simons, Benjamin D.; Livesey, Frederick J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Variation in cerebral cortex size and complexity is thought to contribute to differences in cognitive ability between humans and other animals. Here we compare cortical progenitor cell output in humans and three nonhuman primates using directed differentiation of pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) in adherent two-dimensional (2D) and organoid three-dimensional (3D) culture systems. Clonal lineage analysis showed that primate cortical progenitors proliferate for a protracted period of time, during which they generate early-born neurons, in contrast to rodents, where this expansion phase largely ceases before neurogenesis begins. The extent of this additional cortical progenitor expansion differs among primates, leading to differences in the number of neurons generated by each progenitor cell. We found that this mechanism for controlling cortical size is regulated cell autonomously in culture, suggesting that primate cerebral cortex size is regulated at least in part at the level of individual cortical progenitor cell clonal output. PMID:27049876

  19. Periodontal Bioengineering: A Discourse in Surface Topographies, Progenitor Cells and Molecular Profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dangaria, Smit J.

    2011-12-01

    Stem/progenitor cells are a population of cells capable of providing replacement cells for a given differentiated cell type. We have applied progenitor cell-based technologies to generate novel tissue-engineered implants that use biomimetic strategies with the ultimate goal of achieving full regeneration of lost periodontal tissues. Mesenchymal periodontal tissues such as cementum, alveolar bone (AB), and periodontal ligament (PDL) are neural crest-derived entities that emerge from the dental follicle (DF) at the onset of tooth root formation. Using a systems biology approach we have identified key differences between these periodontal progenitors on the basis of global gene expression profiles, gene cohort expression levels, and epigenetic modifications, in addition to differences in cellular morphologies. On an epigenetic level, DF progenitors featured high levels of the euchromatin marker H3K4me3, whereas PDL cells, AB osteoblasts, and cementoblasts contained high levels of the transcriptional repressor H3K9me3. Secondly, we have tested the influence of natural extracellular hydroxyapatite matrices on periodontal progenitor differentiation. Dimension and structure of extracellular matrix surfaces have powerful influences on cell shape, adhesion, and gene expression. Here we show that natural tooth root topographies induce integrin-mediated extracellular matrix signaling cascades in tandem with cell elongation and polarization to generate physiological periodontium-like tissues. In this study we replanted surface topography instructed periodontal ligament progenitors (PDLPs) into rat alveolar bone sockets for 8 and 16 weeks, resulting in complete attachment of tooth roots to the surrounding alveolar bone with a periodontal ligament fiber apparatus closely matching physiological controls along the entire root surface. Displacement studies and biochemical analyses confirmed that progenitor-based engineered periodontal tissues were similar to control teeth and

  20. Bone marrow–derived progenitor cells in pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Naozumi; Jin, Hong; Liu, Tianju; Chensue, Stephen W.; Phan, Sem H.

    2004-01-01

    The origin of fibroblasts in pulmonary fibrosis is assumed to be intrapulmonary, but their extrapulmonary origin and especially derivation from bone marrow (BM) progenitor cells has not been ruled out. To examine this possibility directly, adult mice were durably engrafted with BM isolated from transgenic mice expressing enhanced GFP. Induction of pulmonary fibrosis in such chimera mice by endotracheal bleomycin (BLM) injection caused large numbers of GFP+ cells to appear in active fibrotic lesions, while only a few GFP+ cells could be identified in control lungs. Flow-cytometric analysis of lung cells confirmed the BLM-induced increase in GFP+ cells in chimera mice and revealed a significant increase in GFP+ cells that also express type I collagen. GFP+ lung fibroblasts isolated from chimera mice expressed collagen and telomerase reverse transcriptase but not α-smooth muscle actin. Treatment of isolated GFP+ fibroblasts with TGF-β failed to induce myofibroblast differentiation. Cultured lung fibroblasts expressed the chemokine receptors CXCR4 and CCR7 and responded chemotactically to their cognate ligands, stromal cell–derived factor-1α and secondary lymphoid chemokine, respectively. Thus the collagen-producing lung fibroblasts in pulmonary fibrosis can also be derived from BM progenitor cells. PMID:14722616

  1. Cis-regulatory mechanisms governing stem and progenitor cell transitions

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Kirby D.; Kong, Guangyao; Gao, Xin; Chang, Yuan-I; Hewitt, Kyle J.; Sanalkumar, Rajendran; Prathibha, Rajalekshmi; Ranheim, Erik A.; Dewey, Colin N.; Zhang, Jing; Bresnick, Emery H.

    2015-01-01

    Cis-element encyclopedias provide information on phenotypic diversity and disease mechanisms. Although cis-element polymorphisms and mutations are instructive, deciphering function remains challenging. Mutation of an intronic GATA motif (+9.5) in GATA2, encoding a master regulator of hematopoiesis, underlies an immunodeficiency associated with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Whereas an inversion relocalizes another GATA2 cis-element (−77) to the proto-oncogene EVI1, inducing EVI1 expression and AML, whether this reflects ectopic or physiological activity is unknown. We describe a mouse strain that decouples −77 function from proto-oncogene deregulation. The −77−/− mice exhibited a novel phenotypic constellation including late embryonic lethality and anemia. The −77 established a vital sector of the myeloid progenitor transcriptome, conferring multipotentiality. Unlike the +9.5−/− embryos, hematopoietic stem cell genesis was unaffected in −77−/− embryos. These results illustrate a paradigm in which cis-elements in a locus differentially control stem and progenitor cell transitions, and therefore the individual cis-element alterations cause unique and overlapping disease phenotypes. PMID:26601269

  2. 12-Deoxyphorbols Promote Adult Neurogenesis by Inducing Neural Progenitor Cell Proliferation via PKC Activation

    PubMed Central

    Geribaldi-Doldán, Noelia; Flores-Giubi, Eugenia; Murillo-Carretero, Maribel; García-Bernal, Francisco; Carrasco, Manuel; Macías-Sánchez, Antonio J.; Domínguez-Riscart, Jesús; Verástegui, Cristina; Hernández-Galán, Rosario

    2016-01-01

    Background: Neuropsychiatric and neurological disorders frequently occur after brain insults associated with neuronal loss. Strategies aimed to facilitate neuronal renewal by promoting neurogenesis constitute a promising therapeutic option to treat neuronal death-associated disorders. In the adult brain, generation of new neurons occurs physiologically throughout the entire life controlled by extracellular molecules coupled to intracellular signaling cascades. Proteins participating in these cascades within neurogenic regions constitute potential pharmacological targets to promote neuronal regeneration of injured areas of the central nervous system. Methodology: We have performed in vitro and in vivo approaches to determine neural progenitor cell proliferation to understand whether activation of kinases of the protein kinase C family facilitates neurogenesis in the adult brain. Results: We have demonstrated that protein kinase C activation by phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate induces neural progenitor cell proliferation in vitro. We also show that the nontumorogenic protein kinase C activator prostratin exerts a proliferative effect on neural progenitor cells in vitro. This effect can be reverted by addition of the protein kinase C inhibitor G06850, demonstrating that the effect of prostratin is mediated by protein kinase C activation. Additionally, we show that prostratin treatment in vivo induces proliferation of neural progenitor cells within the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus and the subventricular zone. Finally, we describe a library of diterpenes with a 12-deoxyphorbol structure similar to that of prostratin that induces a stronger effect than prostratin on neural progenitor cell proliferation both in vitro and in vivo. Conclusions: This work suggests that protein kinase C activation is a promising strategy to expand the endogenous neural progenitor cell population to promote neurogenesis and highlights the potential of 12-deoxyphorbols as pharmaceutical

  3. Controlled release of stromal cell-derived factor-1α from silk fibroin-coated coils accelerates intra-aneurysmal organization and occlusion of neck remnant by recruiting endothelial progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yuyuan; Wang, Qiujing; Cui, Xubo; Liu, Yaqi; Zheng, Tao; Chen, Chengwei; Sun, Chengmei; Huang, Shuyun; Wang, Xin; Liu, Yanchao; Jiang, Xiaodan; Zeng, Chi; Quan, Daping

    2014-01-01

    This study is to test the efficacy of stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α)-coated coils together with endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) transplantation in occluding aneurysms. Bone marrow-derived EPC surface markers were analyzed using flow cytometry. The migratory function of EPCs in response to SDF-1α was evaluated using a modified Boyden chamber assay. Capillary-like tube formation was assessed using Matrigel gel. Coil morphologies before and after coating with SDF-1α were observed under a scanning electron microscope. The level of SDF-1α in supernatants was measured by ELISA. Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly allocated into five groups. Histological analysis was performed on days 14 and 28 after coil implantation. The bone marrow-EPCs could express CD133, CD34, and VEGFR-2 and form tubule-like structures in vitro. Migratory ability of EPCs in the presence of SDF-1α-coated coils was similar to that in the presence of 5 ng/ml SDF-1α gradient. Sustained release of SDF-1α was achieved using silk fibroin as a carrier. In SDF-1α-coated coils + EPCs transplantation group, a well-organized fibrous tissue bridging the orifice of aneurysms was shown on days 14 and 28. On day 28, tissue organization was greater in the SDF-1α-coated coils group than in the unmodified coils group. Immunofluorescence showed α-smooth muscle actin-positive cells in organized tissue in sacs. Combined treatment with SDF-1α-coated coils and EPCs transplantation is a safe and effective treatment for rat aneurysms. This may provide a new strategy for endovascular therapy following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. PMID:25674201

  4. Interneuron Progenitor Transplantation to Treat CNS Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Chohan, Muhammad O.; Moore, Holly

    2016-01-01

    Due to the inadequacy of endogenous repair mechanisms diseases of the nervous system remain a major challenge to scientists and clinicians. Stem cell based therapy is an exciting and viable strategy that has been shown to ameliorate or even reverse symptoms of CNS dysfunction in preclinical animal models. Of particular importance has been the use of GABAergic interneuron progenitors as a therapeutic strategy. Born in the neurogenic niches of the ventral telencephalon, interneuron progenitors retain their unique capacity to disperse, integrate and induce plasticity in adult host circuitries following transplantation. Here we discuss the potential of interneuron based transplantation strategies as it relates to CNS disease therapeutics. We also discuss mechanisms underlying their therapeutic efficacy and some of the challenges that face the field. PMID:27582692

  5. Progenitor cells for ocular surface regenerative therapy.

    PubMed

    Casaroli-Marano, Ricardo P; Nieto-Nicolau, Nuria; Martínez-Conesa, Eva M

    2013-01-01

    The integrity and normal function of the corneal epithelium are essential for maintaining the cornea's transparency and vision. The existence of a cell population with progenitor characteristics in the limbus maintains a dynamic of constant epithelial repair and renewal. Currently, cell-based therapies for bio-replacement, such as cultured limbal epithelial transplantation and cultured oral mucosal epithelial transplantation, present very encouraging clinical results for treating limbal stem cell deficiencies. Another emerging therapeutic strategy consists of obtaining and implementing human progenitor cells of different origins using tissue engineering methods. The development of cell-based therapies using stem cells, such as human adult mesenchymal stromal cells, represents a significant breakthrough in the treatment of certain eye diseases and also offers a more rational, less invasive and more physiological approach to ocular surface regeneration. PMID:23257987

  6. Noninvasive Imaging of Administered Progenitor Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Steven R Bergmann, M.D., Ph.D.

    2012-12-03

    The objective of this research grant was to develop an approach for labeling progenitor cells, specifically those that we had identified as being able to replace ischemic heart cells, so that the distribution could be followed non-invasively. In addition, the research was aimed at determining whether administration of progenitor cells resulted in improved myocardial perfusion and function. The efficiency and toxicity of radiolabeling of progenitor cells was to be evaluated. For the proposed clinical protocol, subjects with end-stage ischemic coronary artery disease were to undergo a screening cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) scan using N-13 ammonia to delineate myocardial perfusion and function. If they qualified based on their PET scan, they would undergo an in-hospital protocol whereby CD34+ cells were stimulated by the administration of granulocytes-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF). CD34+ cells would then be isolated by apharesis, and labeled with indium-111 oxine. Cells were to be re-infused and subjects were to undergo single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) scanning to evaluate uptake and distribution of labeled progenitor cells. Three months after administration of progenitor cells, a cardiac PET scan was to be repeated to evaluate changes in myocardial perfusion and/or function. Indium oxine is a radiopharmaceutical for labeling of autologous lymphocytes. Indium-111 (In-111) decays by electron capture with a t{sub ½} of 67.2 hours (2.8 days). Indium forms a saturated complex that is neutral, lipid soluble, and permeates the cell membrane. Within the cell, the indium-oxyquinolone complex labels via indium intracellular chelation. Following leukocyte labeling, ~77% of the In-111 is incorporated in the cell pellet. The presence of red cells and /or plasma reduces the labeling efficacy. Therefore, the product needed to be washed to eliminate plasma proteins. This repeated washing can damage cells. The CD34 selected product was a 90

  7. Cardiac progenitor cells for heart repair

    PubMed Central

    Le, TYL; Chong, JJH

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell therapy is being investigated as an innovative and promising strategy to restore cardiac function in patients with heart failure. Several stem cell populations, including adult (multipotent) stem cells from developed organs and tissues, have been tested for cardiac repair with encouraging clinical and pre-clinical results. The heart has been traditionally considered a post-mitotic organ, however, this view has recently changed with the identification of stem/progenitor cells residing within the adult heart. Given their cardiac developmental origins, these endogenous cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) may represent better candidates for cardiac cell therapy compared with stem cells from other organs such as the bone marrow and adipose tissue. This brief review will outline current research into CPC populations and their cardiac repair/regenerative potential. PMID:27551540

  8. POPULATION SYNTHESIS AND GAMMA RAY BURST PROGENITORS

    SciTech Connect

    C. L. FREYER

    2000-12-11

    Population synthesis studies of binaries are always limited by a myriad of uncertainties from the poorly understood effects of binary mass transfer and common envelope evolution to the many uncertainties that still remain in stellar evolution. But the importance of these uncertainties depends both upon the objects being studied and the questions asked about these objects. Here I review the most critical uncertainties in the population synthesis of gamma-ray burst progenitors. With a better understanding of these uncertainties, binary population synthesis can become a powerful tool in understanding, and constraining, gamma-ray burst models. In turn, as gamma-ray bursts become more important as cosmological probes, binary population synthesis of gamma-ray burst progenitors becomes an important tool in cosmology.

  9. Human progenitor cells for bone engineering applications.

    PubMed

    de Peppo, G M; Thomsen, P; Karlsson, C; Strehl, R; Lindahl, A; Hyllner, J

    2013-06-01

    In this report, the authors review the human skeleton and the increasing burden of bone deficiencies, the limitations encountered with the current treatments and the opportunities provided by the emerging field of cell-based bone engineering. Special emphasis is placed on different sources of human progenitor cells, as well as their pros and cons in relation to their utilization for the large-scale construction of functional bone-engineered substitutes for clinical applications. It is concluded that, human pluripotent stem cells represent a valuable source for the derivation of progenitor cells, which combine the advantages of both embryonic and adult stem cells, and indeed display high potential for the construction of functional substitutes for bone replacement therapies. PMID:23642054

  10. Antidepressants increase neural progenitor cells in the human hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Boldrini, Maura; Underwood, Mark D.; Hen, René; Rosoklija, Gorazd B.; Dwork, Andrew J.; Mann, J. John; Arango, Victoria

    2009-01-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) increase neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus (DG) of rodents and nonhuman primates. We determined whether SSRIs or TCAs increase neural progenitor (NPCs) and dividing cells in the human DG in major depressive disorder (MDD). Whole frozen hippocampi from untreated subjects with MDD (N = 5), antidepressant-treated MDD (MDDT, N = 7), and controls (C, N = 7) were fixed, sectioned and immunostained for NPCs and dividing cell markers (nestin and Ki-67 respectively), NeuN and GFAP, in single and double labeling. NPC and dividing cell numbers in the DG were estimated by stereology. Clinical data were obtained by psychological autopsy and toxicological and neuropathological examination performed in all subjects. NPCs decreased with age (p = 0.034). Females had more NPCs than males (p = 0.023). Correcting for age and sex, MDDT receiving SSRIs had more NPCs than untreated MDD (p ≤ 0.001) and controls (p ≤ 0.001), NPCs were not different in SSRIs- and TCAs-treated MDDT (p = 0.169). Dividing cell number, unaffected by age or sex, was greater in MDDT receiving TCAs than in untreated MDD (p ≤ 0.001), SSRI-treated MDD (p = 0.001) and controls (p ≤ 0.001). The NPCs and dividing cells increase in MDDT was localized to the rostral DG. MDDT had a larger DG volume compared with untreated MDD or controls (p = 0.009). Antidepressants increase neural progenitor cell number in the anterior human dentate gyrus. Whether this finding is critical or necessary for the antidepressants effect remains to be determined. PMID:19606083

  11. Chondrogenic Progenitor Cells Respond to Cartilage Injury

    PubMed Central

    Choe, Hyeonghun; Zheng, Hongjun; Yu, Yin; Jang, Keewoong; Walter, Morgan W.; Lehman, Abigail D.; Ding, Lei; Buckwalter, Joseph A.; Martin, James A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Hypocellularity resulting from chondrocyte death in the aftermath of mechanical injury is thought to contribute to posttraumatic osteoarthritis. However, we observed that nonviable areas in cartilage injured by blunt impact were repopulated within 7–14 days by cells that appeared to migrate from the surrounding matrix. The aim of this study was to assess our hypothesis that the migrating cell population included chondrogenic progenitor cells that were drawn to injured cartilage by alarmins. Methods Osteochondral explants obtained from mature cattle were injured by blunt impact or scratching, resulting in localized chondrocyte death. Injured sites were serially imaged by confocal microscopy, and migrating cells were evaluated for chondrogenic progenitor characteristics. Chemotaxis assays were used to measure the responses to chemokines, injury-conditioned medium, dead cell debris, and high mobility group box chromosomal protein 1 (HMGB-1). Results Migrating cells were highly clonogenic and multipotent and expressed markers associated with chondrogenic progenitor cells. Compared with chondrocytes, these cells overexpressed genes involved in proliferation and migration and underexpressed cartilage matrix genes. They were more active than chondrocytes in chemotaxis assays and responded to cell lysates, conditioned medium, and HMGB-1. Glycyrrhizin, a chelator of HMGB-1 and a blocking antibody to receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), inhibited responses to cell debris and conditioned medium and reduced the numbers of migrating cells on injured explants. Conclusion Injuries that caused chondrocyte death stimulated the emergence and homing of chondrogenic progenitor cells, in part via HMGB-1 release and RAGE-mediated chemotaxis. Their repopulation of the matrix could promote the repair of chondral damage that might otherwise contribute to progressive cartilage loss. PMID:22777600

  12. Multipotent Hematopoietic Progenitors Divide Asymmetrically to Create Progenitors of the Lymphomyeloid and Erythromyeloid Lineages

    PubMed Central

    Görgens, André; Ludwig, Anna-Kristin; Möllmann, Michael; Krawczyk, Adalbert; Dürig, Jan; Hanenberg, Helmut; Horn, Peter A.; Giebel, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Summary Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) can self-renew and create committed progenitors, a process supposed to involve asymmetric cell divisions (ACDs). Previously, we had linked the kinetics of CD133 expression with ACDs but failed to detect asymmetric segregation of classical CD133 epitopes on fixed, mitotic HSPCs. Now, by using a novel anti-CD133 antibody (HC7), we confirmed the occurrence of asymmetric CD133 segregation on paraformaldehyde-fixed and living HSPCs. After showing that HC7 binding does not recognizably affect biological features of human HSPCs, we studied ACDs in different HSPC subtypes and determined the developmental potential of arising daughter cells at the single-cell level. Approximately 70% of the HSPCs of the multipotent progenitor (MPP) fraction studied performed ACDs, and about 25% generated lymphoid-primed multipotent progenitor (LMPP) as wells as erythromyeloid progenitor (EMP) daughter cells. Since MPPs hardly created daughter cells maintaining MPP characteristics, our data suggest that under conventional culture conditions, ACDs are lineage instructive rather than self-renewing. PMID:25448068

  13. TOX3 regulates neural progenitor identity.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Sanjeeb Kumar; Fritz, Alina; Tiwari, Neha; Kovacs, Zsuzsa; Pouya, Alireza; Wüllner, Verena; Bora, Pablo; Schacht, Teresa; Baumgart, Jan; Peron, Sophie; Berninger, Benedikt; Tiwari, Vijay K; Methner, Axel

    2016-07-01

    The human genomic locus for the transcription factor TOX3 has been implicated in susceptibility to restless legs syndrome and breast cancer in genome-wide association studies, but the physiological role of TOX3 remains largely unknown. We found Tox3 to be predominantly expressed in the developing mouse brain with a peak at embryonic day E14 where it co-localizes with the neural stem and progenitor markers Nestin and Sox2 in radial glia of the ventricular zone and intermediate progenitors of the subventricular zone. Tox3 is also expressed in neural progenitor cells obtained from the ganglionic eminence of E15 mice that express Nestin, and it specifically binds the Nestin promoter in chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. In line with this, over-expression of Tox3 increased Nestin promoter activity, which was cooperatively enhanced by treatment with the stem cell self-renewal promoting Notch ligand Jagged and repressed by pharmacological inhibition of Notch signaling. Knockdown of Tox3 in the subventricular zone of E12.5 mouse embryos by in utero electroporation of Tox3 shRNA revealed a reduced Nestin expression and decreased proliferation at E14 and a reduced migration to the cortical plate in E16 embryos in electroporated cells. Together, these results argue for a role of Tox3 in the development of the nervous system. PMID:27080130

  14. EVOLUTION OF PROGENITORS FOR ELECTRON CAPTURE SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Koh; Umeda, Hideyuki; Yoshida, Takashi E-mail: umeda@astron.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2013-07-01

    We provide progenitor models for electron capture supernovae (ECSNe) with detailed evolutionary calculation. We include minor electron capture nuclei using a large nuclear reaction network with updated reaction rates. For electron capture, the Coulomb correction of rates is treated and the contribution from neutron-rich isotopes is taken into account in each nuclear statistical equilibrium (NSE) composition. We calculate the evolution of the most massive super asymptotic giant branch stars and show that these stars undergo off-center carbon burning and form ONe cores at the center. These cores become heavier up to the critical mass of 1.367 M{sub Sun} and keep contracting even after the initiation of O+Ne deflagration. Inclusion of minor electron capture nuclei causes convective URCA cooling during the contraction phase, but the effect on the progenitor evolution is small. On the other hand, electron capture by neutron-rich isotopes in the NSE region has a more significant effect. We discuss the uniqueness of the critical core mass for ECSNe and the effect of wind mass loss on the plausibility of our models for ECSN progenitors.

  15. Endothelial Progenitor Cells in Sprouting Angiogenesis: Proteases Pave the Way.

    PubMed

    Laurenzana, A; Fibbi, G; Margheri, F; Biagioni, A; Luciani, C; Del Rosso, M; Chillà, A

    2015-01-01

    Sprouting angiogenesis consists of the expansion and remodelling of existing vessels, where the vascular sprouts connect each other to form new vascular loops. Endothelial Progenitor Cells (EPCs) are a subtype of stem cells, with high proliferative potential, able to differentiate into mature Endothelial Cells (ECs) during the neovascularization process. In addition to this direct structural role EPCs improve neovascularization, also secreting numerous pro-angiogenic factors able to enhance the proliferation, survival and function of mature ECs, and other surrounding progenitor cells. While sprouting angiogenesis by mature ECs involves resident ECs, the vasculogenic contribution of EPCs is a high hurdle race. Bone marrowmobilized EPCs have to detach from the stem cell niche, intravasate into bone marrow vessels, reach the hypoxic area or tumour site, extravasate and incorporate into the new vessel lumen, thus complementing the resident mature ECs in sprouting angiogenesis. The goal of this review is to highlight the role of the main protease systems able to control each of these steps. The pivotal protease systems here described, involved in vascular patterning in sprouting angiogenesis, are the matrix-metalloproteinases (MMPs), the serineproteinases urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) associated with its receptor (uPAR) and receptorassociated plasminogen/plasmin, the neutrophil elastase and the cathepsins. Since angiogenesis plays a critical role not only in physiological but also in pathological processes, such as in tumours, controlling the contribution of EPCs to the angiogenic process, through the regulation of the protease systems involved, could yield new opportunities for the therapeutic prospect of efficient control of pathological angiogenesis. PMID:26321757

  16. Defining human dendritic cell progenitors by multiparametric flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Breton, Gaëlle; Lee, Jaeyop; Liu, Kang; Nussenzweig, Michel C

    2015-09-01

    Human dendritic cells (DCs) develop from progressively restricted bone marrow (BM) progenitors: these progenitor cells include granulocyte, monocyte and DC progenitor (GMDP) cells; monocyte and DC progenitor (MDP) cells; and common DC progenitor (CDP) and DC precursor (pre-DC) cells. These four DC progenitors can be defined on the basis of the expression of surface markers such as CD34 and hematopoietin receptors. In this protocol, we describe five multiparametric flow cytometry panels that can be used as a tool (i) to simultaneously detect or phenotype the four DC progenitors, (ii) to isolate DC progenitors to enable in vitro differentiation or (iii) to assess the in vitro differentiation and proliferation of DC progenitors. The entire procedure from isolation of cells to flow cytometry can be completed in 3-7 h. This protocol provides optimized antibody panels, as well as gating strategies, for immunostaining of BM and cord blood specimens to study human DC hematopoiesis in health, disease and vaccine settings. PMID:26292072

  17. Transformation of erythroid progenitors by viral and cellular tyrosine kinases.

    PubMed

    Beug, H; Schroeder, C; Wessely, O; Deiner, E; Meyer, S; Ischenko, I D; Hayman, M J

    1995-08-01

    Recently, two different normal avian erythroid progenitors were described. They differ in the receptor tyrosine kinases they express and in their ability to undergo self-renewal in culture. A common progenitor, termed stem cell factor (SCF) progenitor, expresses the receptor for avian SCF c-Kit, and undergoes short-term self-renewal when grown in the presence of avian SCF. A second progenitor, referred to as SCF/transforming growth factor-alpha progenitor, coexpresses c-Kit and the avian epidermal growth factor receptor homologue c-ErbB. These progenitors undergo sustained self-renewal when grown in the presence of transforming growth factor-alpha plus estradiol. The phenotype of the normal SCF/transforming growth factor-alpha progenitors closely corresponded to that of erythroid cells transformed by the tyrosine kinase oncogenes v-erbB or v-sea. This suggested that these cells, but not the SCF progenitors, would be the target cells for erythroblast transformation by these oncogenes. However, we demonstrate that both progenitor cells can be transformed by the v-erbB and v-sea oncogenes and also by the ligand-activated proto-oncogene product c-ErbB. We conclude that the target cell specificity of certain tyrosine kinase oncoproteins for erythroid cells is a reflection of their ability to provide signals for self-renewal that normally emanate from the endogenous c-ErbB protein. PMID:8547228

  18. Defining human dendritic cell progenitors by multiparametric flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Breton, Gaëlle; Lee, Jaeyop; Liu, Kang; Nussenzweig, Michel C

    2015-01-01

    Human dendritic cells (DCs) develop from progressively restricted bone marrow (BM) progenitors: these progenitor cells include granulocyte, monocyte and DC progenitor (GMDP) cells; monocyte and DC progenitor (MDP) cells; and common DC progenitor (CDP) and DC precursor (pre-DC) cells. These four DC progenitors can be defined on the basis of the expression of surface markers such as CD34 and hematopoietin receptors. In this protocol, we describe five multiparametric flow cytometry panels that can be used as a tool (i) to simultaneously detect or phenotype the four DC progenitors, (ii) to isolate DC progenitors to enable in vitro differentiation or (iii) to assess the in vitro differentiation and proliferation of DC progenitors. The entire procedure from isolation of cells to flow cytometry can be completed in 3–7 h. This protocol provides optimized antibody panels, as well as gating strategies, for immunostaining of BM and cord blood specimens to study human DC hematopoiesis in health, disease and vaccine settings. PMID:26292072

  19. Cell culture: Progenitor cells from human brain after death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Theo D.; Schwartz, Philip H.; Taupin, Philippe; Kaspar, Brian; Stein, Stuart A.; Gage, Fred H.

    2001-05-01

    Culturing neural progenitor cells from the adult rodent brain has become routine and is also possible from human fetal tissue, but expansion of these cells from postnatal and adult human tissue, although preferred for ethical reasons, has encountered problems. Here we describe the isolation and successful propagation of neural progenitor cells from human postmortem tissues and surgical specimens. Although the relative therapeutic merits of adult and fetal progenitor cells still need to be assessed, our results may extend the application of these progenitor cells in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

  20. Identification of a T lineage committed progenitor in adult blood

    PubMed Central

    Krueger, Andreas; von Boehmer, Harald

    2007-01-01

    With help of a hCD25 reporter controlled by Ptcra regulatory elements T cell precursors were identified in peripheral blood. Sca-1+, IL-7Rα+, Flt3− precursors that were c-kitlo and Thy-1hi generated T lineage cells when cultured on OP9-DL1 stromal cells and upon transfer into Rag−/−γc−/− mice. No B cells were generated in vivo and only few in vitro. The circulating T cell progenitors (CTP) were found at the same frequency in Foxn1nu/nu thymus deficient mice and wt mice indicating that they were pre- rather than post-thymic, consistent with the observation that inhibition of Notch signaling in vivo did reduce the frequency of intrathymic ETP, but not CTP. Thus, extrathymic T cell commitment is Notch-independent even in adult mice. PMID:17222572

  1. Rapid genetic targeting of pial surface neural progenitors and immature neurons by neonatal electroporation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Recent findings have indicated the presence of a progenitor domain at the marginal zone/layer 1 of the cerebral cortex, and it has been suggested that these progenitors have neurogenic and gliogenic potential. However, their contribution to the histogenesis of the cortex remains poorly understood due to difficulties associated with genetically manipulating these unique cells in a population-specific manner. Results We have adapted the electroporation technique to target pial surface cells for rapid genetic manipulation at postnatal day 2. In vivo data show that most of these cells proliferate and progressively differentiate into both neuronal and glial subtypes. Furthermore, these cells localize to the superficial layers of the optic tectum and cerebral cortex prior to migration away from the surface. Conclusions We provide a foundation upon which future studies can begin to elucidate the molecular controls governing neural progenitor fate, migration, differentiation, and contribution to cortical and tectal histogenesis. Furthermore, specific genetic targeting of such neural progenitor populations will likely be of future clinical interest. PMID:22776033

  2. Transient, afferent input-dependent, postnatal niche for neural progenitor cells in the cochlear nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Volkenstein, Stefan; Oshima, Kazuo; Sinkkonen, Saku T.; Corrales, C. Eduardo; Most, Sam P.; Chai, Renjie; Jan, Taha A.; van Amerongen, Renée; Cheng, Alan G.; Heller, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    In the cochlear nucleus (CN), the first central relay of the auditory pathway, the survival of neurons during the first weeks after birth depends on afferent innervation from the cochlea. Although input-dependent neuron survival has been extensively studied in the CN, neurogenesis has not been evaluated as a possible mechanism of postnatal plasticity. Here we show that new neurons are born in the CN during the critical period of postnatal plasticity. Coincidently, we found a population of neural progenitor cells that are controlled by a complex interplay of Wnt, Notch, and TGFβ/BMP signaling, in which low levels of TGFβ/BMP signaling are permissive for progenitor proliferation that is promoted by Wnt and Notch activation. We further show that cells with activated Wnt signaling reside in the CN and that these cells have high propensity for neurosphere formation. Cochlear ablation resulted in diminishment of progenitors and Wnt/β-catenin-active cells, suggesting that the neonatal CN maintains an afferent innervation-dependent population of progenitor cells that display active canonical Wnt signaling. PMID:23940359

  3. Cytokines and progenitor cells of granulocytopoiesis in peripheral blood of patients with bacterial infections.

    PubMed Central

    Selig, C; Nothdurft, W

    1995-01-01

    To investigate the physiological role of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in the adaptation mechanisms of myelopoiesis to enhanced demand, we studied both cytokines and their myeloid target cells in hematologically healthy patients suffering from acute bacterial infections. Endogenous serum levels of G-CSF and GM-CSF, granulocyte-macrophage colony-forming cell (GM-CFC) concentrations, and differential counts were determined for the peripheral blood of 57 patients with clinically apparent bacterial infections (26 males and 31 females aged 16 to 89 years) and 18 healthy controls (8 males and 10 females aged 23 to 84 years). Patients were selected for acute-phase protein and at least two additional clinical signs reflecting a bacterial infection. Patients showed significantly higher numbers of myeloid progenitor cells than controls (median, 68 versus 26 GM-CFC/ml; P < or = 0.01). G-CSF but not GM-CSF levels were found to be elevated (> or = 50 to 863 pg/ml). In the acute stage of infection, progenitor and cytokine levels were not influenced by gender, differences in therapy, or localization of the infection. Progenitor and G-CSF levels were not associated with absolute neutrophil counts or C-reactive protein. However, a negative correlation between number of GM-CFC per milliliter and age (R = -0.47; P < or = 0.001) and an inverse relationship between the incidence of high GM-CFC concentrations and elevated G-CSF levels (phi = -0.34; P < or = 0.01) were found. Combining both parameters into a cytokine-progenitor pattern, we observed a highly significant age-dependent response of myelopoiesis to inflammation (P < or = 0.001). Younger patients had high progenitor counts (> 75 GM-CFC/ml) associated with G-CSF levels below 50 pg/ml, whereas for the older patients, the reverse pattern was predominant. The results indicate that the age-dependent myelopoietic response to acute bacterial infections is

  4. Circulating endothelial cells and their progenitors in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Zahran, Asmaa Mohammed; Aly, Sanaa Shaker; Altayeb, Hanan Ahmed; Ali, Arwa Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive hematological malignancy characterized by the accumulation of immature myeloid progenitor cells in the bone marrow. Studies are required to investigate the prognostic and predictive value of surrogate biomarkers. Given the importance of angiogenesis in oncology in terms of pathogenesis as well as being a target for treatment, circulating endothelial cells (CECs) and endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are promising candidates to serve as such markers. The aim of the present study was to quantify CECs and EPCs in patients with AML at initial diagnosis and following induction chemotherapy, and to correlate these findings with the response to treatment in AML patients. The present study included 40 patients with de novo AML and 20 age- and gender-matched healthy controls. CECs and EPCs were evaluated by flow cytometry at initial diagnosis and after induction chemotherapy (3+7 protocol for AML other than M3 and all-trans-retinoic acid plus anthracycline for M3 disease). CECs and EPCs were significantly higher in AML patients at diagnosis and after induction chemotherapy than in controls. After induction chemotherapy, CECs and EPCs were significantly decreased compared with the levels at initial diagnosis. Patients who achieved complete response (n=28) had lower initial CEC and EPC levels compared with patients who did not respond to treatment. These results suggest that CEC levels are higher in AML patients and may correlate with disease status and treatment response. Further investigations are required to better determine the predictive value and implication of these cells in AML management. PMID:27602121

  5. ALDH1B1 is a potential stem / progenitor marker for multiple pancreas progenitor pools

    PubMed Central

    Ioannou, Marilia; Serafimidis, Ioannis; Arnes, Luis; Sussel, Lori; Singh, Surendra; Vasiliou, Vasilis; Gavalas, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Aldehyde Dehydrogenase (ALDH) genes are increasingly associated with stem / progenitor cell status but their role in the maintenance of pluripotency remains uncertain. In a screen conducted for downstream Ngn3 target genes using ES derived pancreas progenitors we identified Aldh1b1, encoding a mitochondrial enzyme, as one of the genes strongly up regulated in response to Ngn3 expression. We found both by in situ hybridization and immunofluorescence using a specific antibody that ALDH1B1 is exclusively expressed in the emerging pancreatic buds of the early embryo (9.5 dpc) in a Pdx1 dependent manner. Around the time of secondary transition, ALDH1B1 expression was restricted in the tip tripotent progenitors of the branching epithelium and in a subset of the trunk epithelium. Expression in the latter was Ngn3 dependent. Subsequently, ALDH1B1 expression persisted only in the tip cells that become restricted to the exocrine lineage and declined rapidly as these cells mature. In the adult pancreas we identified rare ALDH1B1+ cells that become abundant following pancreas injury in either the caerulein or streptozotocin paradigms. Blocking ALDH catalytic activity in pancreas embryonic explants resulted in reduced size of the explants and accelerated differentiation suggesting for the first time that ALDH activity may be necessary in the developing pancreas for the maintenance and expansion of progenitor pools. PMID:23142317

  6. Adipose Tissue Residing Progenitors (Adipocyte Lineage Progenitors and Adipose Derived Stem Cells (ADSC)

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Ryan; Rodeheffer, Matthew S.; Rosen, Clifford J.; Horowitz, Mark C.

    2015-01-01

    The formation of brown, white and beige adipocytes have been a subject of intense scientific interest in recent years due to the growing obesity epidemic in the United States and around the world. This interest has led to the identification and characterization of specific tissue resident progenitor cells that give rise to each adipocyte population in vivo. However, much still remains to be discovered about each progenitor population in terms of their “niche” within each tissue and how they are regulated at the cellular and molecular level during healthy and diseased states. While our knowledge of brown, white and beige adipose tissue is rapidly increasing, little is still known about marrow adipose tissue and its progenitor despite recent studies demonstrating possible roles for marrow adipose tissue in regulating the hematopoietic space and systemic metabolism at large. This chapter focuses on our current knowledge of brown, white, beige and marrow adipose tissue with a specific focus on the formation of each tissue from tissue resident progenitor cells. PMID:26526875

  7. Type Ia Supernova Progenitors, Cosmology, and Systematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayden, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Type Ia supernovae have become fundamental tools for cosmology, but their progenitors, explosion mechanism, and dependence on environment remain key problems to be solved to improve their reliability as cosmological distance estimators. In this talk I will present my research into the nature of SN Ia explosions and their environments, and discuss ongoing efforts to understand systematic errors in SN Ia distance measurements. Using SDSS-II SNe, I developed the 2-stretch fitting method for SN Ia light curves. The 2-stretch method allows the rise and decline portions of the light curve to be fit separately, and as a result I discovered that SN Ia light curves with a normal decline rate show a large variation in rise times. This departure from the single stretch model also results in an average rise time of about 17.5 days, 2 days shorter than previously accepted results. While accurate measurements of the rise time do not significantly improve cosmological results, they do improve the estimate of 56-Ni yield, which is an important constraint in theoretical modeling of SN Ia explosions. Using the 2-stretch fitter, I conducted the first search for shock interactions between the exploding white dwarf and a potential companion star in the single degenerate channel. I found no evidence for shocks in an SDSS-II sample of about 100 SNe, and showed using simulations that this rules out shocks above about 9% of peak SN flux. Comparing to theoretical models of single degenerate progenitors, I rule out red giant companions and main sequence stars above 6 solar masses as common companions to SNe Ia. More recent work has focused on the effect of the SN environment, as multiple studies have shown a correlation between host galaxy mass and SN distances. The source of this mass correlation is unknown, but both metallicity and progenitor age are candidate explanations for the observed correlation. I will present new research that attempts to determine the underlying source of the mass

  8. Progenitor endothelial cell involvement in Alzheimer's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Budinger, Thomas F.

    2003-05-01

    There is compelling evidence that endothelial cells of the brain and periphery are dysfunctional in Alzheimer's Disease. There is evidence for a fundamental defect in, or abnormal aging of, endothelial progenitor cells in atherosclerosis. The possibility that endothelial cell defects are a primary cause for Alzheimer's Disease or other dementias can be researched by molecular and cell biology studies as well as cell trafficking studies using recently demonstrated molecular imaging methods. The evidence for abnormal endothelial function and the methods to explore this hypothesis are presented.

  9. Cenpj/CPAP regulates progenitor divisions and neuronal migration in the cerebral cortex downstream of Ascl1

    PubMed Central

    Garcez, Patricia P.; Diaz-Alonso, Javier; Crespo-Enriquez, Ivan; Castro, Diogo; Bell, Donald; Guillemot, François

    2015-01-01

    The proneural factor Ascl1 controls multiple steps of neurogenesis in the embryonic brain, including progenitor division and neuronal migration. Here we show that Cenpj, also known as CPAP, a microcephaly gene, is a transcriptional target of Ascl1 in the embryonic cerebral cortex. We have characterized the role of Cenpj during cortical development by in utero electroporation knockdown and found that silencing Cenpj in the ventricular zone disrupts centrosome biogenesis and randomizes the cleavage plane orientation of radial glia progenitors. Moreover, we show that downregulation of Cenpj in post-mitotic neurons increases stable microtubules and leads to slower neuronal migration, abnormal centrosome position and aberrant neuronal morphology. Moreover, rescue experiments shows that Cenpj mediates the role of Ascl1 in centrosome biogenesis in progenitor cells and in microtubule dynamics in migrating neurons. These data provide insights into genetic pathways controlling cortical development and primary microcephaly observed in humans with mutations in Cenpj. PMID:25753651

  10. 5-azacytidine promotes terminal differentiation of hepatic progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    He, Yun; Cui, Jiejie; He, Tongchuan; Bi, Yang

    2015-08-01

    5-azacytidine (5-azaC) is known to induce cardiomyocyte differentiation. However, its function in hepatocyte differentiation is unclear. The present study investigated the in vitro capability of 5-azaC to promote maturation and differentiation of mouse embryonic hepatic progenitor cells, with the aim of developing an approach for improving hepatic differentiation. Mouse embryonic hepatic progenitor cells (HP14.5 cells) were treated with 5-azaC at concentrations from 0 to 20 μmol/l, in addition to hepatocyte induction culture medium. Hepatocyte induction medium induces HP14.5 cell differentiation. 5-azaC may enhance the albumin promotor-driven Gaussia luciferase (ALB-GLuc) activity in induced HP14.5 cells. In the present study 2 μmol/l was found to be the optimum concentration with which to achieve this. The expression of hepatocyte-associated factors was not significantly different between the group treated with 5-azaC alone and the control group. The mRNA levels of ALB; cytokeratin 18 (CK18); tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT); and cytochrome p450, family 1, member A1 (CYP1A1); in addition to the protein levels of ALB, CK18 and uridine diphosphate glucuronyltransferase 1A (UGT1A) in the induced group with 5-azaC, were higher than those in the induced group without 5-azaC, although no significant differences were detected in expression of the hepatic stem cell markers, DLK and α-fetoprotein, between the two groups. Treatment with 5-azaC alone did not affect glycogen synthesis or indocyanine green (ICG) metabolic function in HP14.5 cells, although it significantly increased ICG uptake and periodic acid-Schiff-positive cell numbers amongst HP14.5 cells. Therefore, the present study demonstrated that treatment with 5-azaC alone exerted no effects on the maturation and differentiation of HP14.5 cells. However, 5-azaC exhibited a synergistic effect on the terminal differentiation of induced hepatic progenitor cells in association with a hepatic induction medium. PMID

  11. The Type Ia Supernovae Progenitor Problem: Searching for Progenitors in the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birchall, Alexander; Di Stefano, R.; Primini, F.; Scalzo, R.

    2013-01-01

    One of the most active areas of current astrophysical research is the search for the progenitors of Type Ia supernovae. Understanding the nature(s) of the progenitors is crucial if we are to use these supernovae to conduct high-precision measurements of the history of cosmic expansion, because in order to confirm them as standardizable candles we need to understand the mechanism by which they are produced. Type Ia supernovae occur when carbon/oxygen white dwarfs explode, having gained mass either by accretion from a companion or by merging with another white dwarf. The white dwarfs in all Type Ia progenitors must go through a stage of high-rate accretion and possibly of nuclear burning. They should then be detectable as bright objects, with luminosities as high as a few times 1038 erg s-1. Furthermore, whatever the correct model(s), more than 1000 bright progenitors (and other systems that may be equally bright but in which the white dwarf does not reach the critical mass) are expected in the Milky Way. We are conducting a comprehensive search through archived data to identify unusual bright sources that may correspond to white dwarfs accreting at high rates. A significant fraction of the progenitors may appear as x-ray sources that are either supersoft or quasisoft some of the time. We have therefore searched the ROSAT, Chandra, and XMM databases to identify all such soft sources in the Milky Way that are detectable from Earth. We report on our results and their implications.

  12. Direct regulation of p53 by miR-142a-3p mediates the survival of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xinyan; Wei, Yonglong; Liu, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells have the capacity to self-renew and differentiate into all blood cell lineages, and thus sustain life-long homeostasis of the hematopoietic system. Although intensive studies have focused on the orchestrated genetic network of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell specification and expansion, relatively little is known on the regulation of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell survival during embryogenesis. Here, we generated two types of miR-142a-3p genetic mutants in zebrafish and showed that the loss-of-function mutants displayed severe reduction of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Further analysis showed that the diminished proliferation and excessive apoptosis in miR-142a-3p mutants were attributed to the increased p53 signaling. Mechanistically, we demonstrated that miR-142a-3p directly targets p53 during hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell development, and the hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell survival defect in miR-142a-3p mutants could be rescued by loss of p53. Therefore, our work reveals the significance of the miR-142a-3p-p53 pathway in controlling hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell survival, and thus advances our understanding of the role of p53 in vertebrate hematopoiesis.

  13. The Chondrogenic Potential of Progenitor Cells Derived from Peripheral Blood: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shao-Jie; Yin, Meng-Hong; Jiang, Dong; Zhang, Zheng-Zheng; Qi, Yan-Song; Wang, Hai-Jun; Yu, Jia-Kuo

    2016-08-15

    An increasing number of studies have detected mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) and mesenchymal progenitor cells (MPCs) in the peripheral blood (PB). This study aimed to systematically review the possibility of using the PB as a source for chondrogenic progenitors. PubMed, the Web of Science, and Embase were searched for relevant articles. The findings of the studies were reviewed to evaluate the biological characteristics of PB-derived MSCs, chondrogenic MPCs, and their applications in cartilage repair. Thirty-six articles were included in the final analysis, 29 of which indicated that PB is a potential source for chondrogenic progenitor cells. Thirty-two studies reporting in vitro data, including 79.2% (19/24) of studies on PB MSCs and 75% (6/8) of studies on chondrogenic PB MPCs, confirmed the existence of PB MSCs and PB MPCs, respectively; all in vivo investigations showed that using PB as a cell source enhanced cartilage repair. PB MSCs were found in most of the animal studies (12/13), whereas 7 of 11 human studies described the presence of PB MSCs. This systematic review strongly indicates the existence of MSCs in the PB of animals, whereas the presence of MSCs in human PB is less clear. Although the presence of both MSCs and chondrogenic MPCs in the PB, as well as a few favorable outcomes associated with the use of PB-derived progenitors for cartilage repair in vivo, suggests that the PB is a potential alternative source of chondrogenic progenitor cells for cartilage repair, the efficacy of these cells has not been compared to those from other sources, such as bone marrow or adipose tissue in controlled studies. PMID:27353075

  14. Neutrino emission from nearby supernova progenitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Takashi; Takahashi, Koh; Umeda, Hideyuki

    2016-05-01

    Neutrinos have an important role for energy loss process during advanced evolution of massive stars. Although the luminosity and average energy of neutrinos during the Si burning are much smaller than those of supernova neutrinos, these neutrinos are expected to be detected by the liquid scintillation neutrino detector KamLAND if a supernova explosion occurs at the distance of ~100 parsec. We investigate the neutrino emission from massive stars during advanced evolution. We calculate the evolution of the energy spectra of neutrinos produced through electron-positron pair-annihilation in the supernova progenitors with the initial mass of 12, 15, and 20 M ⊙ during the Si burning and core-collapse stages. The neutrino emission rate increases from ~ 1050 s-1 to ~ 1052 s-1. The average energy of electron-antineutrinos is about 1.25 MeV during the Si burning and gradually increases until the core-collapse. For one week before the supernova explosion, the KamLAND detector is expected to observe 12-24 and 6-13 v¯e events in the normal and inverted mass hierarchies, respectively, if a supernova explosion of a 12-20 M ⊙ star occurs at the distance of 200 parsec, corresponding to the distance to Betelgeuse. Observations of neutrinos from SN progenitors have a possibility to constrain the core structure and the evolution just before the core collapse of massive stars.

  15. Red supergiants as type II supernova progenitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negueruela, Ignacio; Dorda, Ricardo; González-Fernández, Carlos; Marco, Amparo

    2015-08-01

    Recent searches for supernova IIp progenitors in external galaxies have led to the identification of red objects with magnitudes and colours indicative of red supergiants, in most cases implying quite low luminosities and hence masses well below 10Msol. Stellar models, on the other hand, do not predict explosions from objects below 9 Msol. What does our knowledge of local red supergiants tells us about the expected properties of such objects?We have carried out a comprehensive spectroscopic and photometric study of a sample of hundreds of red supergiants in the Milky Way and both Magellanic Clouds. We have explored correlations between different parameters and the position of stars in the HR diagrams of open clusters. At solar metallicty, there is strong evidence for a phase of very heavy mass loss at the end of the red supergiant phase, but the existence of such a phase is still not confirmed at SMC metallicities. Objects of ~ 7Msol, on the other hand, become very dusty in the SMC, and appear as very luminous Miras.Among Milky Way clusters, we find a surprising lack of objects readily identifiable as the expected 7 to 10 Msol red supergiants or AGB stars. We are carrying out an open cluster survey aimed at filling this region of the HR diagram with reliable data. Finally, we will discuss the implications of all this findings for the expected properties of supernova progenitors, as it looks unlikely that typical red supergiants may explode without undergoing further evolution.

  16. Ventral vs. dorsal chick dermal progenitor specification.

    PubMed

    Fliniaux, Ingrid; Viallet, Jean P; Dhouailly, Danielle

    2004-01-01

    The dorsal and the ventral trunk integuments of the chick differ in their dermal cell lineage (originating from the somatic and somatopleural mesoderm respectively) and in the distribution of their feather fields. The dorsal macropattern has a large spinal pteryla surrounded by semi-apteria, whereas the ventral skin has a true medial apterium surrounded by the ventral pterylae. Comparison of the results of heterotopic transplantations of distal somatopleure in place of somatic mesoderm (Mauger 1972) or in place of proximal somatopleure (our data), leads to two conclusions. These are that the fate of the midventral apterium is not committed at day 2 of incubation and that the signals from the environment which specify the ventral and dorsal featherforming dermal progenitors are different. Effectively, Shh, but not Wnt -1 signalling can induce the formation of feather forming dermis from the embryonic somatopleure. Shh is not able, however, to trigger the formation of a feather forming dermis from the extra embryonic somatopleure. This brief report constitutes the first attempt, by comparing old and new preliminary results, to understand whether dermal progenitors at different sites are specified by different signalling pathways. PMID:15272375

  17. The progenitors of supernovae Type Ia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toonen, Silvia

    2014-09-01

    Despite the significance of Type Ia supernovae (SNeIa) in many fields in astrophysics, SNeIa lack a theoretical explanation. SNeIa are generally thought to be thermonuclear explosions of carbon/oxygen (CO) white dwarfs (WDs). The canonical scenarios involve white dwarfs reaching the Chandrasekhar mass, either by accretion from a non-degenerate companion (single-degenerate channel, SD) or by a merger of two CO WDs (double-degenerate channel, DD). The study of SNeIa progenitors is a very active field of research for binary population synthesis (BPS) studies. The strength of the BPS approach is to study the effect of uncertainties in binary evolution on the macroscopic properties of a binary population, in order to constrain binary evolutionary processes. I will discuss the expected SNeIa rate from the BPS approach and the uncertainties in their progenitor evolution, and compare with current observations. I will also discuss the results of the POPCORN project in which four BPS codes were compared to better understand the differences in the predicted SNeIa rate of the SD channel. The goal of this project is to investigate whether differences in the simulated populations are due to numerical effects or whether they can be explained by differences in the input physics. I will show which assumptions in BPS codes affect the results most and hence should be studied in more detail.

  18. Functional Genetic Targeting of Embryonic Kidney Progenitor Cells Ex Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Junttila, Sanna; Saarela, Ulla; Halt, Kimmo; Manninen, Aki; Pärssinen, Heikki; Lecca, M. Rita; Brändli, André W.; Sims-Lucas, Sunder; Skovorodkin, Ilya

    2015-01-01

    The embryonic mammalian metanephric mesenchyme (MM) is a unique tissue because it is competent to generate the nephrons in response to Wnt signaling. An ex vivo culture in which the MM is separated from the ureteric bud (UB), the natural inducer, can be used as a classic tubule induction model for studying nephrogenesis. However, technological restrictions currently prevent using this model to study the molecular genetic details before or during tubule induction. Using nephron segment-specific markers, we now show that tubule induction in the MM ex vivo also leads to the assembly of highly segmented nephrons. This induction capacity was reconstituted when MM tissue was dissociated into a cell suspension and then reaggregated (drMM) in the presence of human recombinant bone morphogenetic protein 7/human recombinant fibroblast growth factor 2 for 24 hours before induction. Growth factor–treated drMM also recovered the capacity for organogenesis when recombined with the UB. Cell tracking and time-lapse imaging of chimeric drMM cultures indicated that the nephron is not derived from a single progenitor cell. Furthermore, viral vector-mediated transduction of green fluorescent protein was much more efficient in dissociated MM cells than in intact mesenchyme, and the nephrogenic competence of transduced drMM progenitor cells was preserved. Moreover, drMM cells transduced with viral vectors mediating Lhx1 knockdown were excluded from the nephric tubules, whereas cells transduced with control vectors were incorporated. In summary, these techniques allow reproducible cellular and molecular examinations of the mechanisms behind nephrogenesis and kidney organogenesis in an ex vivo organ culture/organoid setting. PMID:25201883

  19. Role of stem and progenitor cells in postmyocardial infarction patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, X; Dauwe, D; Patel, A; Janssens, S

    2009-04-01

    Despite state-of-the-art therapy, clinical outcome remains poor in myocardial infarction (MI) patients with reduced left ventricular (LV) function. Stem cell-mediated repair of the damaged heart is a promising new development in cardiovascular medicine. Embryonic stem cells and adult progenitor cells have been extensively studied for their capacity to improve LV function recovery in preclinical MI models but underlying mechanisms remain incompletely understood. Recent placebo-controlled, randomized bone marrow cell transfer trials in MI patients have shown mixed results with cell-mediated effects on global or regional LV function recovery of variable magnitude and duration. There is now growing consensus that the observed effects of bone marrow-(BM)-derived progenitor cell transfer, as applied in post-MI patients thus far, occur independently of cardiomyocyte formation. Subgroup and meta-analysis of currently available randomized and observational pilot trials have highlighted limitations of current cell-based cardiac repair and provided suggestions for future focused clinical trial design. However, the two most recently reported randomized clinical trials failed to confirm a significant biological effect. A better understanding of underlying molecular mechanisms and modalities of cell-based repair is therefore mandatory to facilitate translation of innovative cell-mediated therapies for functional recovery after MI in the years to come. Rapidly growing insights in the biology of cardiac resident cells and technological advances in generation of patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells may hold great promise to accomplish cardio-myogenesis and directly restore contractile force generation capacity. PMID:19274031

  20. Nitrative Stress Participates in Endothelial Progenitor Cell Injury in Hyperhomocysteinemia

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yu; Sun, Qi; Liu, Teng; Wang, Huanyuan; Jiao, Kun; Xu, Jiahui; Liu, Xin; Liu, Huirong; Wang, Wen

    2016-01-01

    In order to investigate the role of nitrative stress in vascular endothelial injury in hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy), thirty healthy adult female Wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups: control, hyperhomocysteinemia model, and hyperhomocysteinemia with FeTMPyP (peroxynitrite scavenger) treatment. The endothelium-dependent dilatation of thoracic aorta in vitro was determined by response to acetylcholine (ACh). The histological changes in endothelium were assessed by HE staining and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The expression of 3-nitrotyrosine (NT) in thoracic aorta was demonstrated by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence, and the number of circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) was quantified by flow cytometry. Hyperhomocysteinemia caused significant endothelial injury and dysfunction including vasodilative and histologic changes, associated with higher expression of NT in thoracic aorta. FeTMPyP treatment reversed these injuries significantly. Further, the effect of nitrative stress on cultured EPCs in vitro was investigated by administering peroxynitrite donor (3-morpholino-sydnonimine, SIN-1) and peroxynitrite scavenger (FeTMPyP). The roles of nitrative stress on cell viability, necrosis and apoptosis were evaluated with 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assay and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay, respectively. Also, the phospho-eNOS expression and tube formation in Matrigel of cultured EPCs was detected. Our data showed that the survival of EPCs was much lower in SIN-1 group than in vehicle group, both the apoptosis and necrosis of EPCs were much more severe, and the p-eNOS expression and tube formation in Matrigel were obviously declined. Subsequent pretreatment with FeTMPyP reversed these changes. Further, pretreatment with FeTMPyP reversed homocysteine-induced EPC injury. In conclusion, this study indicates that

  1. Nitrative Stress Participates in Endothelial Progenitor Cell Injury in Hyperhomocysteinemia.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yu; Sun, Qi; Liu, Teng; Wang, Huanyuan; Jiao, Kun; Xu, Jiahui; Liu, Xin; Liu, Huirong; Wang, Wen

    2016-01-01

    In order to investigate the role of nitrative stress in vascular endothelial injury in hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy), thirty healthy adult female Wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups: control, hyperhomocysteinemia model, and hyperhomocysteinemia with FeTMPyP (peroxynitrite scavenger) treatment. The endothelium-dependent dilatation of thoracic aorta in vitro was determined by response to acetylcholine (ACh). The histological changes in endothelium were assessed by HE staining and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The expression of 3-nitrotyrosine (NT) in thoracic aorta was demonstrated by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence, and the number of circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) was quantified by flow cytometry. Hyperhomocysteinemia caused significant endothelial injury and dysfunction including vasodilative and histologic changes, associated with higher expression of NT in thoracic aorta. FeTMPyP treatment reversed these injuries significantly. Further, the effect of nitrative stress on cultured EPCs in vitro was investigated by administering peroxynitrite donor (3-morpholino-sydnonimine, SIN-1) and peroxynitrite scavenger (FeTMPyP). The roles of nitrative stress on cell viability, necrosis and apoptosis were evaluated with 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium (MTT) assay, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assay and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay, respectively. Also, the phospho-eNOS expression and tube formation in Matrigel of cultured EPCs was detected. Our data showed that the survival of EPCs was much lower in SIN-1 group than in vehicle group, both the apoptosis and necrosis of EPCs were much more severe, and the p-eNOS expression and tube formation in Matrigel were obviously declined. Subsequent pretreatment with FeTMPyP reversed these changes. Further, pretreatment with FeTMPyP reversed homocysteine-induced EPC injury. In conclusion, this study indicates that

  2. Coordination of progenitor specification and growth in the mouse and chick spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Kicheva, Anna; Bollenbach, Tobias; Ribeiro, Ana; Pérez Valle, Helena; Lovell-Badge, Robin; Episkopou, Vasso; Briscoe, James

    2014-01-01

    Development requires tissue growth as well as cell diversification. To address how these processes are coordinated, we analyzed the development of molecularly distinct domains of neural progenitors in the mouse and chick neural tube. We show that during development these domains undergo changes in size that do not scale with changes in overall tissue size. Our data show that domain proportions are first established by opposing morphogen gradients and subsequently controlled by domain specific regulation of differentiation rate, but not differences in proliferation rate. Regulation of differentiation rate is key to maintaining domain proportions while accommodating both intra- and interspecies variations in size. Thus the sequential control of progenitor specification and differentiation elaborates pattern without requiring that signalling gradients grow as tissues expand. PMID:25258086

  3. Differentiation of pancreatic stem and progenitor β-cells into insulin secreting cells in mice with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Skurikhin, E G; Ermakova, N N; Khmelevskaya, E S; Pershina, O V; Krupin, V A; Ermolaeva, L A; Dygai, A M

    2014-04-01

    We studied in vitro differentiation of pancreatic stem and progenitor cells into insulin secreting cells in the model of streptozotocin-induced diabetes in C57Bl/6 mice. Streptozotocin was shown to increase the population of pancreatic oligopotent β-cell precursors (CD45(-), TER119(-), CD133(+), and CD49f(low)) and did not affect multipotent (stem) progenitor cells (CD45(-), TER119(-), CD17(-), CD309(-)). During long-term culturing, diabetic multipotent progenitor cells showed high capacity for self-renewal. A population of dithizone-positive (insulin secreting cells) mononuclear cells was obtained releasing insulin after prolonged culturing in suspension enriched with diabetic CD45(-), TER119(-), CD17(-), and CD309(-) cells. The rate of generation of "new" insulin-producing cells and insulin release in the samples of experimental group considerably exceeded activity of the corresponding processes in the control group. PMID:24824681

  4. Type Ia Progenitor Hunt in Ancient Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerzendorf, Wolfgang E.

    2013-01-01

    There is broad agreement that the stars which explode as Type Ia supernovae are white dwarfs. They have accreted material in a binary system until they are near the Chandrasekhar mass and detonate/deflagrate. The two main scenarios for this accretion process are merging with a companion white dwarf (double degenerate scenario), or accretion from a main-sequence to red giant donor (single degenerate scenario). The donor star survives post-explosion and would provide substantial evidence for the single degenerate scenario, if found. Our team is analyzing stars in close proximity to Galactic Type Ia remnants to find surviving donor stars. In my talk I will introduce the different progenitor systems and the expected state for a donor star today. I will outline our search using high resolution spectroscopy and will present updated results.

  5. Progenitor model of cosmic ray knee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijay, Biplab; Bhadra, Arunava

    2016-01-01

    The primary energy spectrum of cosmic rays exhibits a knee at about 3 PeV where a change in the spectral index occurs. Despite many efforts, the origin of such a feature in the spectrum is not satisfactorily solved yet. Here it is proposed that the steepening of the spectrum beyond the knee may be a consequence of the mass distribution of the progenitor of the cosmic ray source. The proposed speculative model can account for all the major observed features of cosmic rays without invoking any fine tuning to match flux or spectra at any energy point. The prediction of the proposed model regarding the primary composition scenario beyond the knee is quite different from most of the prevailing models of the knee, and thereby can be discriminated from precise experimental measurement of the primary composition.

  6. New approaches to SNe Ia progenitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Lapuente, Pilar

    2014-10-01

    Although Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are a major tool in cosmology and play a key role in the chemical evolution of galaxies, the nature of their progenitor systems (apart from the fact that they must content at least one white dwarf, that explodes) remains largely unknown. In the last decade, considerable efforts have been made, both observationally and theoretically, to solve this problem. Observations have, however, revealed a previously unsuspected variety of events, ranging from very underluminous outbursts to clearly overluminous ones, and spanning a range well outside the peak luminosity-decline rate of the light curve relationship, used to make calibrated candles of the SNe Ia. On the theoretical side, new explosion scenarios, such as violent mergings of pairs of white dwarfs, have been explored. We review those recent developments, emphasizing the new observational findings, but also trying to tie them to the different scenarios and explosion mechanisms proposed thus far.

  7. Multipotent pancreas progenitors: Inconclusive but pivotal topic.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Fang-Xu; Morahan, Grant

    2015-12-26

    The establishment of multipotent pancreas progenitors (MPP) should have a significant impact not only on the ontology of the pancreas, but also for the translational research of glucose-responding endocrine β-cells. Deficiency of the latter may lead to the pandemic type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus, a metabolic disorder. An ideal treatment of which would potentially be the replacement of destroyed or failed β-cells, by restoring function of endogenous pancreatic endocrine cells or by transplantation of donor islets or in vitro generated insulin-secreting cells. Thus, considerable research efforts have been devoted to identify MPP candidates in the pre- and post-natal pancreas for the endogenous neogenesis or regeneration of endocrine insulin-secreting cells. In order to advance this inconclusive but critical field, we here review the emerging concepts, recent literature and newest developments of potential MPP and propose measures that would assist its forward progression. PMID:26730269

  8. Multipotent pancreas progenitors: Inconclusive but pivotal topic

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Fang-Xu; Morahan, Grant

    2015-01-01

    The establishment of multipotent pancreas progenitors (MPP) should have a significant impact not only on the ontology of the pancreas, but also for the translational research of glucose-responding endocrine β-cells. Deficiency of the latter may lead to the pandemic type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus, a metabolic disorder. An ideal treatment of which would potentially be the replacement of destroyed or failed β-cells, by restoring function of endogenous pancreatic endocrine cells or by transplantation of donor islets or in vitro generated insulin-secreting cells. Thus, considerable research efforts have been devoted to identify MPP candidates in the pre- and post-natal pancreas for the endogenous neogenesis or regeneration of endocrine insulin-secreting cells. In order to advance this inconclusive but critical field, we here review the emerging concepts, recent literature and newest developments of potential MPP and propose measures that would assist its forward progression. PMID:26730269

  9. Galaxies, their satellites and progenitors: chemical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gargiulo, I.; Cora, S. A.; Padilla, N. D.

    We use a model that combines N-body cosmological simulations of galaxy clusters and a semi-analytic model of galaxy formation (SAG: Semi-analytical galaxies; Lagos, Cora & Padilla, 2008) in order to study the properties of galaxy progenitors, using the information provided by their stellar haloes, and surviving satellites at redshift z = 0. We model the formation of stellar haloes by considering tidal stripping events acting on the satellite galaxies before the mergers occur, being able to follow their mass, luminosity and chemical properties. We find that the satellite galaxies have lower metal- licities than the stellar haloes of central galaxies for a given host DM halo mass, as has been already noted by Lagos, Padilla & Cora (2009), using a different approach.

  10. Redefining endothelial progenitor cells via clonal analysis and hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell principals

    PubMed Central

    Mead, Laura E.; Prater, Daniel; Krier, Theresa R.; Mroueh, Karim N.; Li, Fang; Krasich, Rachel; Temm, Constance J.; Prchal, Josef T.

    2007-01-01

    The limited vessel-forming capacity of infused endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) into patients with cardiovascular dysfunction may be related to a misunderstanding of the biologic potential of the cells. EPCs are generally identified by cell surface antigen expression or counting in a commercially available kit that identifies “endothelial cell colony-forming units” (CFU-ECs). However, the origin, proliferative potential, and differentiation capacity of CFU-ECs is controversial. In contrast, other EPCs with blood vessel-forming ability, termed endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs), have been isolated from human peripheral blood. We compared the function of CFU-ECs and ECFCs and determined that CFU-ECs are derived from the hematopoietic system using progenitor assays, and analysis of donor cells from polycythemia vera patients harboring a Janus kinase 2 V617F mutation in hematopoietic stem cell clones. Further, CFU-ECs possess myeloid progenitor cell activity, differentiate into phagocytic macrophages, and fail to form perfused vessels in vivo. In contrast, ECFCs are clonally distinct from CFU-ECs, display robust proliferative potential, and form perfused vessels in vivo. Thus, these studies establish that CFU-ECs are not EPCs and the role of these cells in angiogenesis must be re-examined prior to further clinical trials, whereas ECFCs may serve as a potential therapy for vascular regeneration. PMID:17053059

  11. Redefining endothelial progenitor cells via clonal analysis and hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell principals.

    PubMed

    Yoder, Mervin C; Mead, Laura E; Prater, Daniel; Krier, Theresa R; Mroueh, Karim N; Li, Fang; Krasich, Rachel; Temm, Constance J; Prchal, Josef T; Ingram, David A

    2007-03-01

    The limited vessel-forming capacity of infused endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) into patients with cardiovascular dysfunction may be related to a misunderstanding of the biologic potential of the cells. EPCs are generally identified by cell surface antigen expression or counting in a commercially available kit that identifies "endothelial cell colony-forming units" (CFU-ECs). However, the origin, proliferative potential, and differentiation capacity of CFU-ECs is controversial. In contrast, other EPCs with blood vessel-forming ability, termed endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs), have been isolated from human peripheral blood. We compared the function of CFU-ECs and ECFCs and determined that CFU-ECs are derived from the hematopoietic system using progenitor assays, and analysis of donor cells from polycythemia vera patients harboring a Janus kinase 2 V617F mutation in hematopoietic stem cell clones. Further, CFU-ECs possess myeloid progenitor cell activity, differentiate into phagocytic macrophages, and fail to form perfused vessels in vivo. In contrast, ECFCs are clonally distinct from CFU-ECs, display robust proliferative potential, and form perfused vessels in vivo. Thus, these studies establish that CFU-ECs are not EPCs and the role of these cells in angiogenesis must be re-examined prior to further clinical trials, whereas ECFCs may serve as a potential therapy for vascular regeneration. PMID:17053059

  12. A COMPREHENSIVE PROGENITOR MODEL FOR SNe Ia

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, X.; Yang, W.

    2010-02-20

    Although the nature of the progenitor of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) is still unclear, the single-degenerate (SD) channel for the progenitor is currently accepted, in which a carbon-oxygen white dwarf (CO WD) accretes hydrogen-rich material from its companion, increases its mass to the Chandrasekhar mass limit, and then explodes as an SN Ia. The companion may be a main sequence or a slightly evolved star (WD + MS), or a red giant star (WD + RG). Incorporating the effect of mass stripping and accretion-disk instability on the evolution of the WD binary, we carried out binary stellar evolution calculations for more than 1600 close WD binaries. As a result, the initial parameter spaces for SNe Ia are presented in an orbital period-secondary mass (log P{sub i}, M {sup i}{sub 2}) plane. We confirmed that in a WD + MS system, the initial companion leading to SNe Ia may have mass from 1 M{sub sun} to 5 M{sub sun}. The initial WD mass for SNe Ia from WD + MS channel is as low as 0.565 M{sub sun}, while the lowest WD mass from the WD + RG channel is 1.0 M{sub sun}. Adopting the above results, we studied the birth rate of SNe Ia via a binary population synthesis approach. We found that the Galactic SNe Ia birth rate from SD model is (2.55-2.9) x 10{sup -3} yr{sup -1} (including WD + He star channel), which is slightly smaller than that from observation. If a single starburst is assumed, the distribution of the delay time of SNe Ia from the SD model may be a weak bimodality, where WD + He channel contributes to SNe Ia with delay time shorter than 10{sup 8} yr and WD + RG channel to those with age longer than 6 Gyr.

  13. The dynamics of murine mammary stem/progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    DONG, Qiaoxiang; SUN, Lu-Zhe

    2014-01-01

    The stem/progenitor cells in the murine mammary gland are a highly dynamic population of cells that are responsible for ductal elongation in puberty, homeostasis maintenance in adult, and lobulo-alveolar genesis during pregnancy. In recent years understanding the epithelial cell hierarchy within the mammary gland is becoming particularly important as these different stem/progenitor cells were perceived to be the cells of origin for various subtypes of breast cancer. Although significant advances have been made in enrichment and isolation of stem/progenitor cells by combinations of antibodies against cell surface proteins together with flow cytometry, and in identification of stem/progenitor cells with multi-lineage differentiation and self-renewal using mammary fat pad reconstitution assay and in vivo genetic labeling technique, a clear understanding of how these different stem/progenitors are orchestrated in the mammary gland is still lacking. Here we discuss the different in vivo and in vitro methods currently available for stem/progenitor identification, their associated caveats, and a possible new hierarchy model to reconcile various putative stem/progenitor cell populations identified by different research groups. PMID:25580105

  14. Caspase-1 mediates hyperlipidemia-weakened progenitor cell vessel repair

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ya-Feng; Huang, Xiao; Li, Xinyuan; Gong, Ren; Yin, Ying; Nelson, Jun; Gao, Erhe; Zhang, Hongyu; Hoffman, Nicholas E.; Houser, Steven R.; Madesh, Muniswamy; Tilley, Douglas G.; Choi, Eric T.; Jiang, Xiaohua; Huang, Cong-Xin; Wang, Hong; Yang, Xiao-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Caspase-1 activation senses metabolic danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) and mediates the initiation of inflammation in endothelial cells. Here, we examined whether the caspase-1 pathway is responsible for sensing hyperlipidemia as a DAMP in bone marrow (BM)-derived Stem cell antigen-1 positive (Sca-1+) stem/progenitor cells and weakening their angiogenic ability. Using biochemical methods, gene knockout, cell therapy and myocardial infarction (MI) models, we had the following findings: 1) Hyperlipidemia induces caspase-1 activity in mouse Sca-1+ progenitor cells in vivo; 2) Caspase-1 contributes to hyperlipidemia-induced modulation of vascular cell death-related gene expression in vivo; 3) Injection of Sca-1+ progenitor cells from caspase-1−/− mice improves endothelial capillary density in heart and decreases cardiomyocyte death in a mouse model of MI; and 4) Caspase-1−/− Sca-1+ progenitor cell therapy improves mouse cardiac function after MI. Our results provide insight on how hyperlipidemia activates caspase-1 in Sca-1+ progenitor cells, which subsequently weakens Sca-1+ progenitor cell repair of vasculature injury. These results demonstrate the therapeutic potential of caspase-1 inhibition in improving progenitor cell therapy for MI. PMID:26709768

  15. Thyroid hormone accelerates the differentiation of adult hippocampal progenitors.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, R; Desouza, L A; Nanavaty, I N; Kernie, S G; Vaidya, V A

    2012-09-01

    Disrupted thyroid hormone function evokes severe physiological consequences in the immature brain. In adulthood, although clinical reports document an effect of thyroid hormone status on mood and cognition, the molecular and cellular changes underlying these behavioural effects are poorly understood. More recently, the subtle effects of thyroid hormone on structural plasticity in the mature brain, in particular on adult hippocampal neurogenesis, have come to be appreciated. However, the specific stages of adult hippocampal progenitor development that are sensitive to thyroid hormone are not defined. Using nestin-green fluorescent protein reporter mice, we demonstrate that thyroid hormone mediates its effects on hippocampal neurogenesis by influencing Type 2b and Type 3 progenitors, although it does not alter proliferation of either the Type 1 quiescent progenitor or the Type 2a amplifying neural progenitor. Thyroid hormone increases the number of doublecortin (DCX)-positive Type 3 progenitors, and accelerates neuronal differentiation into both DCX-positive immature neurones and neuronal nuclei-positive granule cell neurones. Furthermore, we show that this increase in neuronal differentiation is accompanied by a significant induction of specific transcription factors involved in hippocampal progenitor differentiation. In vitro studies using the neurosphere assay support a direct effect of thyroid hormone on progenitor development because neurospheres treated with thyroid hormone are shifted to a more differentiated state. Taken together, our results indicate that thyroid hormone mediates its neurogenic effects via targeting Type 2b and Type 3 hippocampal progenitors, and suggests a role for proneural transcription factors in contributing to the effects of thyroid hormone on neuronal differentiation of adult hippocampal progenitors. PMID:22497336

  16. PDL Progenitor-Mediated PDL Recovery Contributes to Orthodontic Relapse.

    PubMed

    Feng, L; Yang, R; Liu, D; Wang, X; Song, Y; Cao, H; He, D; Gan, Y; Kou, X; Zhou, Y

    2016-08-01

    Periodontal ligament (PDL) is subjected to mechanical force during physiologic activities. PDL stem /: progenitor cells are the main mesenchymal stem cells in PDL. However, how PDL progenitors participate in PDL homeostasis upon and after mechanical force is largely unknown. In this study, force-triggered orthodontic tooth movement and the following relapse were used as models to demonstrate the response of PDL progenitors and their role in PDL remodeling upon and after mechanical force. Upon orthodontic force, PDL collagen on the compression side significantly degraded, showing a broken and disorganized pattern. After force withdrawal, the degraded PDL collagen recovered during the early stage of relapse. Correspondingly, increased CD90(+) PDL progenitors with suppressed expression of type I collagen (Col-I) were observed upon orthodontic force, whereas these cells accumulated at the degradation regions and regained Col-I expression after force withdrawal during early relapse. Our results further showed that compressive force altered cell morphology and repressed collagen expression in cultured PDL progenitors, which both recovered after force withdrawal. Force withdrawal-induced recovery of collagen expression in cultured PDL progenitors could be regulated by transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), a key molecule for tissue homeostasis and extracellular matrix remodeling. More interesting, inhibiting the regained Col-I expression in CD90(+) PDL progenitors by blocking TGF-β interrupted PDL collagen recovery and partially inhibited the early relapse. These data suggest that PDL progenitors can respond to mechanical force and may process intrinsic stability to recover to original status after force withdrawal. PDL progenitors with intrinsic stability are required for PDL recovery and consequently contribute to early orthodontic relapse, which can be regulated by TGF-β signaling. PMID:27161015

  17. FOG-1 and GATA-1 act sequentially to specify definitive megakaryocytic and erythroid progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Mancini, Elena; Sanjuan-Pla, Alejandra; Luciani, Luisa; Moore, Susan; Grover, Amit; Zay, Agnes; Rasmussen, Kasper D; Luc, Sidinh; Bilbao, Daniel; O'Carroll, Donal; Jacobsen, Sten Eirik; Nerlov, Claus

    2012-01-01

    The transcription factors that control lineage specification of haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) have been well described for the myeloid and lymphoid lineages, whereas transcriptional control of erythroid (E) and megakaryocytic (Mk) fate is less understood. We here use conditional removal of the GATA-1 and FOG-1 transcription factors to identify FOG-1 as required for the formation of all committed Mk- and E-lineage progenitors, whereas GATA-1 was observed to be specifically required for E-lineage commitment. FOG-1-deficient HSCs and preMegEs, the latter normally bipotent for the Mk and E lineages, underwent myeloid transcriptional reprogramming, and formed myeloid, but not erythroid and megakaryocytic cells in vitro. These results identify FOG-1 and GATA-1 as required for formation of bipotent Mk/E progenitors and their E-lineage commitment, respectively, and show that FOG-1 mediates transcriptional Mk/E programming of HSCs as well as their subsequent Mk/E-lineage commitment. Finally, C/EBPs and FOG-1 exhibited transcriptional cross-regulation in early myelo-erythroid progenitors making their functional antagonism a potential mechanism for separation of the myeloid and Mk/E lineages. PMID:22068055

  18. Leukemia-related chromosomal loss detected in hematopoietic progenitor cells of benzene-exposed workers

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Luoping; Lan, Qing; Ji, Zhiying; Li, Guilan; Shen, Min; Vermeulen, Roel; Guo, Weihong; Hubbard, Alan E.; McHale, Cliona M.; Rappaport, Stephen M.; Hayes, Richard B.; Linet, Martha S.; Yin, Songnian; Smith, Martyn T.; Rothman, Nathaniel

    2012-01-01

    Benzene exposure causes acute myeloid leukemia, and hematotoxicity, shown as suppression of mature blood and myeloid progenitor cell numbers. As the leukemia-related aneuploidies monosomy 7 and trisomy 8 previously had been detected in the mature peripheral blood cells of exposed workers, we hypothesized that benzene could cause leukemia through the induction of these aneuploidies in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. We measured loss and gain of chromosomes 7 and 8 by fluorescence in situ hybridization in interphase colony-forming unit-granulocyte-macrophage (CFU-GM) cells cultured from otherwise healthy benzene-exposed (n=28) and unexposed (n=14) workers. CFU-GM monosomy 7 and 8 levels (but not trisomy) were significantly increased in subjects exposed to benzene overall, compared to levels in the control subjects (p=0.0055 and p=0.0034, respectively). Levels of monosomy 7 and 8 were significantly increased in subjects exposed to <10 ppm (20%, p=0.0419 and 28%, p=0.0056, respectively) and ≥10 ppm (48%, p=0.0045 and 32%, p=0.0354) benzene, compared with controls, and significant exposure-response trends were detected (ptrend=0.0033 and 0.0057). These data show that monosomies 7 and 8 are produced in a dose-dependent fashion in the blood progenitor cells of workers exposed to benzene and may be mechanistically relevant biomarkers of early effect for benzene and other leukemogens. PMID:22643707

  19. EVIDENCE FOR (AND AGAINST) PROGENITOR BIAS IN THE SIZE GROWTH OF COMPACT RED GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Keating, Stephanie K.; Abraham, Roberto G.; Schiavon, Ricardo; Graves, Genevieve; Damjanov, Ivana; Yan, Renbin; Newman, Jeffrey; Simard, Luc

    2015-01-01

    Most massive, passive galaxies are compact at high redshifts, but similarly compact massive galaxies are rare in the local universe. The most common interpretation of this phenomenon is that massive galaxies have grown in size by a factor of about five since redshift z = 2. An alternative explanation is that recently quenched massive galaxies are larger (a {sup p}rogenitor bias{sup )}. In this paper, we explore the importance of progenitor bias by looking for systematic differences in the stellar populations of compact early-type galaxies in the DEEP2 survey as a function of size. Our analysis is based on applying the statistical technique of bootstrap resampling to constrain differences in the median ages of our samples and to begin to characterize the distribution of stellar populations in our co-added spectra. The light-weighted ages of compact early-type galaxies at redshifts 0.5 < z < 1.4 are compared to those of a control sample of larger galaxies at similar redshifts. We find that massive compact early-type galaxies selected on the basis of red color and high bulge-to-total ratio are younger than similarly selected larger galaxies, suggesting that size growth in these objects is not driven mainly by progenitor bias, and that individual galaxies grow as their stellar populations age. However, compact early-type galaxies selected on the basis of image smoothness and high bulge-to-total ratio are older than a control sample of larger galaxies. Progenitor bias will play a significant role in defining the apparent size changes of early-type galaxies if they are selected on the basis of the smoothness of their light distributions.

  20. Oligodendrocyte progenitor programming and reprogramming: Toward myelin regeneration.

    PubMed

    Lopez Juarez, Alejandro; He, Danyang; Richard Lu, Q

    2016-05-01

    Demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS) are among the most disabling and cost-intensive neurological disorders. The loss of myelin in the central nervous system, produced by oligodendrocytes (OLs), impairs saltatory nerve conduction, leading to motor and cognitive deficits. Immunosuppression therapy has a limited efficacy in MS patients, arguing for a paradigm shift to strategies that target OL lineage cells to achieve myelin repair. The inhibitory microenvironment in MS lesions abrogates the expansion and differentiation of resident OL precursor cells (OPCs) into mature myelin-forming OLs. Recent studies indicate that OPCs display a highly plastic ability to differentiate into alternative cell lineages under certain circumstances. Thus, understanding the mechanisms that maintain and control OPC fate and differentiation into mature OLs in a hostile, non-permissive lesion environment may open new opportunities for regenerative therapies. In this review, we will focus on 1) the plasticity of OPCs in terms of their developmental origins, distribution, and differentiation potentials in the normal and injured brain; 2) recent discoveries of extrinsic and intrinsic factors and small molecule compounds that control OPC specification and differentiation; and 3) therapeutic potential for motivation of neural progenitor cells and reprogramming of differentiated cells into OPCs and their likely impacts on remyelination. OL-based therapies through activating regenerative potentials of OPCs or cell replacement offer exciting opportunities for innovative strategies to promote remyelination and neuroprotection in devastating demyelinating diseases like MS. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI:NG2-glia(Invited only). PMID:26546966

  1. Endothelial progenitor cell recruitment in a microfluidic vascular model.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Daniel M; Abaci, Hasan E; Xu, Yu; Gerecht, Sharon

    2015-12-01

    During vessel injury, endothelial progenitors cells (EPCs) are recruited from bone marrow and directed to the hypoxic injury site. The hypoxic conditions in the damaged blood vessel promote TNF-α, which upregulates intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). EPCs attach to endothelial cell lining using ICAM-1. Here we aimed to examine EPC attachment to ECs in an injured-blood vessel conditions. We first determined ICAM-1 expression in stimulated HUVECs. We stimulated HUVECs with 21% oxygen (atmospheric), atmospheric with TNF-α-supplemented media, 1% oxygen (hypoxia), and hypoxia with TNF-α-supplemented media and found the highest ECFC attachment on HUVECs stimulated with TNF-α and hypoxia, correlating with the highest ICAM-1 expression. We next designed, fabricated and tested a three-dimensional microbioreactor (3D MBR) system with precise control and monitoring of dissolve oxygen and media flow rate in the cellular environment. We utilized a step-wise seeding approach, producing monolayer of HUVECs on all four walls. When stimulated with both TNF-α and hypoxia, ECFC retention on HUVECs was significantly increased under low shear stress compared to static controls. Overall, the 3D MBR system mimics the pathological oxygen tension and shear stress in the damaged vasculature, providing a platform to model vascular-related disorders. PMID:26693599

  2. Estrogen Stimulates Homing of Endothelial Progenitor Cells to Endometriotic Lesions.

    PubMed

    Rudzitis-Auth, Jeannette; Nenicu, Anca; Nickels, Ruth M; Menger, Michael D; Laschke, Matthias W

    2016-08-01

    The incorporation of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) into microvessels contributes to the vascularization of endometriotic lesions. Herein, we analyzed whether this vasculogenic process is regulated by estrogen. Estrogen- and vehicle-treated human EPCs were analyzed for migration and tube formation. Endometriotic lesions were induced in irradiated FVB/N mice, which were reconstituted with bone marrow from FVB/N-TgN (Tie2/green fluorescent protein) 287 Sato mice. The animals were treated with 100 μg/kg β-estradiol 17-valerate or vehicle (control) over 7 and 28 days. Lesion growth, cyst formation, homing of green fluorescent protein(+)/Tie2(+) EPCs, vascularization, cell proliferation, and apoptosis were analyzed by high-resolution ultrasonography, caliper measurements, histology, and immunohistochemistry. Numbers of blood circulating EPCs were assessed by flow cytometry. In vitro, estrogen-treated EPCs exhibited a higher migratory and tube-forming capacity when compared with controls. In vivo, numbers of circulating EPCs were not affected by estrogen. However, estrogen significantly increased the number of EPCs incorporated into the lesions' microvasculature, resulting in an improved early vascularization. Estrogen further stimulated the growth of lesions, which exhibited massively dilated glands with a flattened layer of stroma. This was mainly because of an increased glandular secretory activity, whereas cell proliferation and apoptosis were not markedly affected. These findings indicate that vasculogenesis in endometriotic lesions is dependent on estrogen, which adds a novel hormonally regulated mechanism to the complex pathophysiology of endometriosis. PMID:27315780

  3. Transcriptional Heterogeneity and Lineage Commitment in Myeloid Progenitors.

    PubMed

    Paul, Franziska; Arkin, Ya'ara; Giladi, Amir; Jaitin, Diego Adhemar; Kenigsberg, Ephraim; Keren-Shaul, Hadas; Winter, Deborah; Lara-Astiaso, David; Gury, Meital; Weiner, Assaf; David, Eyal; Cohen, Nadav; Lauridsen, Felicia Kathrine Bratt; Haas, Simon; Schlitzer, Andreas; Mildner, Alexander; Ginhoux, Florent; Jung, Steffen; Trumpp, Andreas; Porse, Bo Torben; Tanay, Amos; Amit, Ido

    2015-12-17

    Within the bone marrow, stem cells differentiate and give rise to diverse blood cell types and functions. Currently, hematopoietic progenitors are defined using surface markers combined with functional assays that are not directly linked with in vivo differentiation potential or gene regulatory mechanisms. Here, we comprehensively map myeloid progenitor subpopulations by transcriptional sorting of single cells from the bone marrow. We describe multiple progenitor subgroups, showing unexpected transcriptional priming toward seven differentiation fates but no progenitors with a mixed state. Transcriptional differentiation is correlated with combinations of known and previously undefined transcription factors, suggesting that the process is tightly regulated. Histone maps and knockout assays are consistent with early transcriptional priming, while traditional transplantation experiments suggest that in vivo priming may still allow for plasticity given strong perturbations. These data establish a reference model and general framework for studying hematopoiesis at single-cell resolution. PMID:26627738

  4. Stem and progenitor cell dysfunction in human trisomies

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Binbin; Filippi, Sarah; Roy, Anindita; Roberts, Irene

    2015-01-01

    Trisomy 21, the commonest constitutional aneuploidy in humans, causes profound perturbation of stem and progenitor cell growth, which is both cell context dependent and developmental stage specific and mediated by complex genetic mechanisms beyond increased Hsa21 gene dosage. While proliferation of fetal hematopoietic and testicular stem/progenitors is increased and may underlie increased susceptibility to childhood leukemia and testicular cancer, fetal stem/progenitor proliferation in other tissues is markedly impaired leading to the characteristic craniofacial, neurocognitive and cardiac features in individuals with Down syndrome. After birth, trisomy 21-mediated premature aging of stem/progenitor cells may contribute to the progressive multi-system deterioration, including development of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25520324

  5. Murine Hematopoietic Stem cells and Progenitors Express Adrenergic Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Muthu, Kuzhali; Iyer, Sivaraman; He, L-K.; Szilagyi, Andrea; Gamelli, Richard L; Shankar, Ravi; Jones, Stephen B

    2007-01-01

    Association between the nervous and immune system is well documented. Immune cells originate within the bone marrow that is innervated. Thermal injury induces adrenergic stimulation, augments monocytopoiesis and alters the β-adrenergic receptor (AR) profile of bone marrow monocyte committed progenitors. This provides an impetus to study AR expression in hematopoietic progenitors along myeloid lineage. Using FACS analysis and confocal microscopy, we report the expression of α1-, α2- and β2- AR in enriched populations of ER-MP20+ and ER-MP12+ myeloid progenitors, CD117+ and CD34+ multi-potential progenitors and more importantly pluripotent stem cells suggesting a plausible role for catecholamine in hematopoietic development. PMID:17428548

  6. Signaling pathways implicated in hematopoietic progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Bugarski, Diana; Krstic, Aleksandra; Mojsilovic, Slavko; Vlaski, Marija; Petakov, Marijana; Jovcic, Gordana; Stojanovic, Nevenka; Milenkovic, Pavle

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the signal transduction pathways associated with the clonal development of myeloid and erythroid progenitor cells. The contribution of particular signaling molecules of protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs), mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase, and PI-3 kinase signaling to the growth of murine bone marrow colony forming unit-granulocyte-macrophage (CFU-GM) and erythroid (burst forming unit-erythroid [BFU-E] and colony forming unit-erythroid [CFU-E]) progenitors was examined in studies performed in the presence or absence of specific signal transduction inhibitors. The results clearly pointed to different signal transducing intermediates that are involved in cell proliferation and differentiation depending on the cell lineage, as well as on the progenitors' maturity. Lineage-specific differences were obtained when chemical inhibitors specific for receptor- or nonreceptor-PTKs, as well as for the main groups of distinctly regulated MAPK cascades, were used because all of these compounds suppressed the growth of erythroid progenitors, with no major effects on myeloid progenitors. At the same time, differential involvement of MEK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) MAPK transduction pathway was observed in the proliferation and/or differentiation of early, BFU-E, and late, CFU-E, erythroid progenitor cells. The results also demonstrated that phosphatydylinositol (PI)-3 kinase and nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) transcriptional factor were required for maintenance of both myeloid and erythroid progenitor cell function. Overall, the data obtained indicated that committed hematopoietic progenitors express a certain level of constitutive signaling activity that participates in the regulation of normal steady-state hematopoiesis and point to the importance of evaluating the impact of signal transduction inhibitors on normal bone marrow when used as potential therapeutic agents. PMID:17202596

  7. Viral disruption of olfactory progenitors is exacerbated in allergic mice.

    PubMed

    Ueha, R; Mukherjee, S; Ueha, S; de Almeida Nagata, D E; Sakamoto, T; Kondo, K; Yamasoba, T; Lukacs, N W; Kunkel, S L

    2014-09-01

    Upper airway viral infection in patients with airway allergy often exacerbates olfactory dysfunction, but the mechanism for this exacerbation remains unclear. Here, we examined the effects of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection, in the presence or absence of airway allergy, on olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) and their progenitors in mice. Immunohistological analyses revealed that cockroach allergen (CRA)-induced airway allergy alone did not affect the number of OMP(+) mature ORNs and SOX2(+) ORN progenitors. Intranasal RSV line 19 infection in allergy-free mice resulted in a transient decrease in SOX2(+) ORN progenitors without affecting OMP(+) ORNs. In contrast, the RSV-induced decrease in SOX2(+) ORN progenitors was exacerbated and prolonged in allergic mice, which resulted in eventual loss of OMP(+) ORNs. In the allergic mice, reduction of RSV in the olfactory epithelium was delayed as compared with allergy-free mice. These results suggest that ORN progenitors were impaired by RSV infection and that airway allergy exacerbated damage to ORN progenitors by reducing viral clearance. PMID:24998164

  8. Differential Apoptosis Radiosensitivity of Neural Progenitors in Adult Mouse Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu-Qing; Cheng, Zoey; Wong, Shun

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian tissue-specific stem cells and progenitors demonstrate differential DNA damage response. Neural progenitors in dentate gyrus of the hippocampus are known to undergo apoptosis after irradiation. Using a mouse model of hippocampal neuronal development, we characterized the apoptosis sensitivity of the different neural progenitor subpopulations in adult mouse dentate gyrus after irradiation. Two different bromodeoxyuridine incorporation paradigms were used for cell fate mapping. We identified two apoptosis sensitive neural progenitor subpopulations after irradiation. The first represented non-proliferative and non-newborn neuroblasts and immature neurons that expressed doublecortin, calretinin or both. The second consisted of proliferative intermediate neural progenitors. The putative radial glia-like neural stem cells or type-1 cells, regardless of proliferation status, were apoptosis resistant after irradiation. There was no evidence of radiation-induced apoptosis in the absence of the Trp53 (p53) gene but absence of Cdkn1a (p21) did not alter the apoptotic response. Upregulation of nuclear p53 was observed in neuroblasts after irradiation. We conclude that adult hippocampal neural progenitors may demonstrate differential p53-dependent apoptosis sensitivity after irradiation. PMID:27331809

  9. LINKING TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA PROGENITORS AND THEIR RESULTING EXPLOSIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, Ryan J.; Kirshner, Robert P.; Simon, Joshua D.; Burns, Christopher R.; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Hamuy, Mario; Morrell, Nidia I.; Phillips, Mark M.; Shields, Gregory A.; Sternberg, Assaf

    2012-06-20

    Comparing the ejecta velocities at maximum brightness and narrow circumstellar/interstellar Na D absorption line profiles of a sample of 23 Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), we determine that the properties of SN Ia progenitor systems and explosions are intimately connected. As demonstrated by Sternberg et al., half of all SNe Ia with detectable Na D absorption at the host-galaxy redshift in high-resolution spectroscopy have Na D line profiles with significant blueshifted absorption relative to the strongest absorption component, which indicates that a large fraction of SN Ia progenitor systems have strong outflows. In this study, we find that SNe Ia with blueshifted circumstellar/interstellar absorption systematically have higher ejecta velocities and redder colors at maximum brightness relative to the rest of the SN Ia population. This result is robust at a 98.9%-99.8% confidence level, providing the first link between the progenitor systems and properties of the explosion. This finding is further evidence that the outflow scenario is the correct interpretation of the blueshifted Na D absorption, adding additional confirmation that some SNe Ia are produced from a single-degenerate progenitor channel. An additional implication is that either SN Ia progenitor systems have highly asymmetric outflows that are also aligned with the SN explosion or SNe Ia come from a variety of progenitor systems where SNe Ia from systems with strong outflows tend to have more kinetic energy per unit mass than those from systems with weak or no outflows.

  10. Differential Apoptosis Radiosensitivity of Neural Progenitors in Adult Mouse Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yu-Qing; Cheng, Zoey; Wong, Shun

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian tissue-specific stem cells and progenitors demonstrate differential DNA damage response. Neural progenitors in dentate gyrus of the hippocampus are known to undergo apoptosis after irradiation. Using a mouse model of hippocampal neuronal development, we characterized the apoptosis sensitivity of the different neural progenitor subpopulations in adult mouse dentate gyrus after irradiation. Two different bromodeoxyuridine incorporation paradigms were used for cell fate mapping. We identified two apoptosis sensitive neural progenitor subpopulations after irradiation. The first represented non-proliferative and non-newborn neuroblasts and immature neurons that expressed doublecortin, calretinin or both. The second consisted of proliferative intermediate neural progenitors. The putative radial glia-like neural stem cells or type-1 cells, regardless of proliferation status, were apoptosis resistant after irradiation. There was no evidence of radiation-induced apoptosis in the absence of the Trp53 (p53) gene but absence of Cdkn1a (p21) did not alter the apoptotic response. Upregulation of nuclear p53 was observed in neuroblasts after irradiation. We conclude that adult hippocampal neural progenitors may demonstrate differential p53-dependent apoptosis sensitivity after irradiation. PMID:27331809

  11. How Low Can They Go? Detecting low luminosity supernova progenitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fruchter, Andrew

    2013-10-01

    While we now discover thousands of supernovae {SNe} per year, in the history of astronomy a little more than a dozen SN progenitors have been identified, and all of these have been from Type II SNe. This dearth is largely due to the fact that the progenitors are destroyed in the SN, and so to study them one must have fortuitously taken data on them prior to their explosion. However, the fault may also partially lie with the methods employed to search for progenitors.In the past, searches have generally relied on looking at the location of a SNe in an archival image to see if a noticeable point source is at the right location. This method requires that the background field of the galaxy be relatively uniform, and if one wants an accurate estimate of the progenitor mangitude, that the star was not in an association or binary. Here we propose to take WFC3 images several years post explosion so that we can subtract them from archival WFPC2 images. We show that we can do this with extraordinary fidelity. We will apply this method to a well-chosen sample of three Type II SNe and two Type Ibc SNe, which lie on messy galaxy fields that may have camouflaged the presence of a progenitor. This method has the potential to detect or substantially deepen the limits on the progenitors of these objects, which already appear too faint for theoretical models.

  12. Adult Olfactory Bulb Interneuron Phenotypes Identified by Targeting Embryonic and Postnatal Neural Progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Figueres-Oñate, Maria; López-Mascaraque, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Neurons are generated during embryonic development and in adulthood, although adult neurogenesis is restricted to two main brain regions, the hippocampus and olfactory bulb. The subventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricles generates neural stem/progenitor cells that continually provide the olfactory bulb (OB) with new granule or periglomerular neurons, cells that arrive from the SVZ via the rostral migratory stream. The continued neurogenesis and the adequate integration of these newly generated interneurons is essential to maintain homeostasis in the olfactory bulb, where the differentiation of these cells into specific neural cell types is strongly influenced by temporal cues. Therefore, identifying the critical features that control the generation of adult OB interneurons at either pre- or post-natal stages is important to understand the dynamic contribution of neural stem cells. Here, we used in utero and neonatal SVZ electroporation along with a transposase-mediated stable integration plasmid, in order to track interneurons and glial lineages in the OB. These plasmids are valuable tools to study the development of OB interneurons from embryonic and post-natal SVZ progenitors. Accordingly, we examined the location and identity of the adult progeny of embryonic and post-natally transfected progenitors by examining neurochemical markers in the adult OB. These data reveal the different cell types in the olfactory bulb that are generated in function of age and different electroporation conditions. PMID:27242400

  13. YAP regulates neural progenitor cell number via the TEA domain transcription factor

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Xinwei; Pfaff, Samuel L.; Gage, Fred H.

    2008-01-01

    Tight control of cell proliferation is essential for proper growth during development and for tissue homeostasis in mature animals. The evolutionarily conserved Hippo pathway restrains proliferation through a kinase cascade that culminates in the inhibition of the transcriptional coactivator YAP. Unphosphorylated YAP activates genes involved in cell proliferation and survival by interacting with a DNA-binding factor. Here we show that during vertebrate neural tube development, the TEA domain transcription factor (TEAD) is the cognate DNA-binding partner of YAP. YAP and TEAD gain of function causes marked expansion of the neural progenitor population, partly owing to their ability to promote cell cycle progression by inducing cyclin D1 and to inhibit differentiation by suppressing NeuroM. Their loss of function results in increased apoptosis, whereas repressing their target genes leads to premature neuronal differentiation. Inhibiting the upstream kinases of the Hippo pathway also causes neural progenitor overproliferation. Thus, the Hippo pathway plays critical roles in regulating neural progenitor cell number by affecting proliferation, fate choice, and cell survival. PMID:19015275

  14. Cell-cycle-independent transitions in temporal identity of mammalian neural progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Mayumi; Miyata, Takaki; Konno, Daijiro; Ueda, Hiroki R.; Kasukawa, Takeya; Hashimoto, Mitsuhiro; Matsuzaki, Fumio; Kawaguchi, Ayano

    2016-01-01

    During cerebral development, many types of neurons are sequentially generated by self-renewing progenitor cells called apical progenitors (APs). Temporal changes in AP identity are thought to be responsible for neuronal diversity; however, the mechanisms underlying such changes remain largely unknown. Here we perform single-cell transcriptome analysis of individual progenitors at different developmental stages, and identify a subset of genes whose expression changes over time but is independent of differentiation status. Surprisingly, the pattern of changes in the expression of such temporal-axis genes in APs is unaffected by cell-cycle arrest. Consistent with this, transient cell-cycle arrest of APs in vivo does not prevent descendant neurons from acquiring their correct laminar fates. Analysis of cultured APs reveals that transitions in AP gene expression are driven by both cell-intrinsic and -extrinsic mechanisms. These results suggest that the timing mechanisms controlling AP temporal identity function independently of cell-cycle progression and Notch activation mode. PMID:27094546

  15. A region-specific neurogenesis mode requires migratory progenitors in the Drosophila visual system

    PubMed Central

    Apitz, Holger; Salecker, Iris

    2014-01-01

    Brain areas each generate specific neuron subtypes during development. However, underlying regional variations in neurogenesis strategies and regulatory mechanisms remain poorly understood. In Drosophila, neurons in four optic lobe ganglia originate from two neuroepithelia, the outer (Opc) and inner (Ipc) proliferation centers. Using genetic manipulations, we demonstrate that one Ipc neuroepithelial domain progressively transforms into migratory progenitors that mature into neural stem cells/neuroblasts within a second domain. Progenitors emerge by an epithelial-mesenchymal transition-like mechanism, requiring the Snail-family member Escargot and, in subdomains, Decapentaplegic signaling. The proneural factors Lethal of scute and Asense differentially control progenitor supply and maturation into neuroblasts. These switch expression from Asense to a third proneural protein, Atonal. Dichaete and Tailless mediate this transition essential for generating two neuron populations at defined positions. We propose that this neurogenesis mode is central for setting-up a new proliferative zone to facilitate spatio-temporal matching of neurogenesis and connectivity across ganglia. PMID:25501037

  16. Impairment of endothelial progenitor cell function and vascularization capacity by aldosterone in mice and humans

    PubMed Central

    Thum, Thomas; Schmitter, Kerstin; Fleissner, Felix; Wiebking, Volker; Dietrich, Bernd; Widder, Julian D.; Jazbutyte, Virginija; Hahner, Stefanie; Ertl, Georg; Bauersachs, Johann

    2011-01-01

    Aims Hyperaldosteronism is associated with vascular injury and increased cardiovascular events. Bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) play an important role in endothelial repair and vascular homeostasis. We hypothesized that hyperaldosteronism impairs EPC function and vascularization capacity in mice and humans. Methods and results We characterized the effects of aldosterone and mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) blockade on EPC number and function as well as vascularization capacity and endothelial function. Treatment of human EPC with aldosterone induced translocation of the MR and impaired multiple cellular functions of EPC, such as differentiation, migration, and proliferation in vitro. Impaired EPC function was rescued by pharmacological blockade or genetic ablation of the MR. Aldosterone protein kinase A (PKA) dependently increased reactive oxygen species formation in EPC. Aldosterone infusion in mice impaired EPC function, EPC homing to vascular structures and vascularization capacity in a MR-dependent but blood pressure-independent manner. Endothelial progenitor cells from patients with primary hyperaldosteronism compared with controls of similar age displayed reduced migratory potential. Impaired EPC function was associated with endothelial dysfunction. MR blockade in patients with hyperaldosteronism improved EPC function and arterial stiffness. Conclusion Endothelial progenitor cells express a MR that mediates functional impairment by PKA-dependent increase of reactive oxygen species. Normalization of EPC function may represent a novel mechanism contributing to the beneficial effects of MR blockade in cardiovascular disease prevention and treatment. PMID:20926363

  17. Impaired Survival of Neural Progenitor Cells in Dentate Gyrus of Adult Mice Lacking FMRP

    PubMed Central

    Lazarov, Orly; Demars, Michael P.; Zhao, Kai Da Tommy; Ali, Haroon M.; Grauzas, Vanessa; Kney, Adam; Larson, John

    2011-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common form of inherited intellectual disability in humans. Individuals affected with the disorder exhibit a deficiency of the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), due to transcriptional silencing of the Fmr1 gene. It is widely accepted that learning deficits in FXS result from impaired synaptic function and/or plasticity in the brain. Interestingly, recent evidence suggests that conditional knockout of Fmr1 in neural progenitor cells in mice impairs hippocampal neurogenesis, which in turn contributes to learning impairments. To examine the nature of the neurogenic impairments and determine whether they impact the morphology of the dentate gyrus, we assessed the extent of neural progenitor cell proliferation, survival, and differentiation in older adult Fmr1 knockout mice. Here we show that the number of fast- proliferating cells in the subgranule layer of the dentate gyrus, as well as the subsequent survival of these cells, are dramatically reduced in Fmr1 knockout mice. In addition, the number of mature neurons in the granule layer of the dentate gyrus of these mice is significantly smaller than in WT littermate controls, suggesting that impaired proliferation and survival of neural progenitor cells compromises the structure of the dentate gyrus. Impaired adult neurogenesis may underlie, at least in part, the learning deficits that characterize fragile X syndrome. PMID:22128095

  18. Fibronectin promotes differentiation of neural crest progenitors endowed with smooth muscle cell potential

    SciTech Connect

    Costa-Silva, Bruno; Coelho da Costa, Meline; Melo, Fernanda Rosene; Neves, Cynara Mendes; Alvarez-Silva, Marcio; Calloni, Giordano Wosgrau; Trentin, Andrea Goncalves

    2009-04-01

    The neural crest (NC) is a model system used to investigate multipotency during vertebrate development. Environmental factors control NC cell fate decisions. Despite the well-known influence of extracellular matrix molecules in NC cell migration, the issue of whether they also influence NC cell differentiation has not been addressed at the single cell level. By analyzing mass and clonal cultures of mouse cephalic and quail trunk NC cells, we show for the first time that fibronectin (FN) promotes differentiation into the smooth muscle cell phenotype without affecting differentiation into glia, neurons, and melanocytes. Time course analysis indicated that the FN-induced effect was not related to massive cell death or proliferation of smooth muscle cells. Finally, by comparing clonal cultures of quail trunk NC cells grown on FN and collagen type IV (CLIV), we found that FN strongly increased both NC cell survival and the proportion of unipotent and oligopotent NC progenitors endowed with smooth muscle potential. In contrast, melanocytic progenitors were prominent in clonogenic NC cells grown on CLIV. Taken together, these results show that FN promotes NC cell differentiation along the smooth muscle lineage, and therefore plays an important role in fate decisions of NC progenitor cells.

  19. The convergence of Notch and MAPK signaling specifies the blood progenitor fate in the Drosophila mesoderm

    PubMed Central

    Grigorian, Melina; Mandal, Lolitika; Hakimi, Manuel; Ortiz, Irma; Hartenstein, Volker

    2011-01-01

    Blood progenitors arise from a pool of pluripotential cells (“hemangioblasts”) within the Drosophila embryonic mesoderm. The fact that the cardiogenic mesoderm consists of only a small number of highly stereotypically patterned cells that can be queried individually regarding their gene expression in normal and mutant embryos, is one of the significant advantages that Drosophila offers to dissect the mechanism specifying the fate of these cells. We show in this paper that the expression of the Notch ligand Delta (Dl) reveals segmentally reiterated mesodermal clusters (“cardiogenic clusters”) that constitute the cardiogenic mesoderm. These clusters give rise to cardioblasts, blood progenitors and nephrocytes. Cardioblasts emerging from the cardiogenic clusters accumulate high levels of Dl, which is required to prevent more cells from adopting the cardioblast fate. In embryos lacking Dl function, all cells of the cardiogenic clusters become cardioblasts, and blood progenitors are lacking. Concomitant activation of the Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) pathway by Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) and Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor (FGFR) is required for the specification and maintenance of the cardiogenic mesoderm; in addition, the spatially restricted localization of some of the FGFR ligands may be instrumental in controlling the spatial restriction of the Dl ligand to presumptive cardioblasts. PMID:21382367

  20. Cell-cycle-independent transitions in temporal identity of mammalian neural progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Mayumi; Miyata, Takaki; Konno, Daijiro; Ueda, Hiroki R; Kasukawa, Takeya; Hashimoto, Mitsuhiro; Matsuzaki, Fumio; Kawaguchi, Ayano

    2016-01-01

    During cerebral development, many types of neurons are sequentially generated by self-renewing progenitor cells called apical progenitors (APs). Temporal changes in AP identity are thought to be responsible for neuronal diversity; however, the mechanisms underlying such changes remain largely unknown. Here we perform single-cell transcriptome analysis of individual progenitors at different developmental stages, and identify a subset of genes whose expression changes over time but is independent of differentiation status. Surprisingly, the pattern of changes in the expression of such temporal-axis genes in APs is unaffected by cell-cycle arrest. Consistent with this, transient cell-cycle arrest of APs in vivo does not prevent descendant neurons from acquiring their correct laminar fates. Analysis of cultured APs reveals that transitions in AP gene expression are driven by both cell-intrinsic and -extrinsic mechanisms. These results suggest that the timing mechanisms controlling AP temporal identity function independently of cell-cycle progression and Notch activation mode. PMID:27094546

  1. Environmental signals elicit multiple responses in dorsal telencephalic progenitors by threshold-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Lillien, Laura; Gulacsi, Alexandra

    2006-07-01

    Environmental signals including epidermal growth factor family members, Shh, fibroblast growth factor, and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) can affect multiple processes during the development of the central nervous system, raising questions about the mechanisms that determine how these pleiotropic signals are interpreted to elicit appropriate responses at specific times and locations. Here we address the idea that different thresholds of stimulation determine how progenitors in the dorsal telencephalon interpret these signals. One mechanism for achieving different thresholds of signaling is illustrated by the developmental increase in the level of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression among a subset of progenitors in the late embryonic telencephalon. Another mechanism is illustrated by the antagonistic interaction of BMP with Shh, which can influence EGFR expression and neuron subtype choice. We focus on the similarities and differences in the control of these responses and address the possibility that the gamma-aminobutyric acidergic neuron specification might be linked to progenitor expression of a higher level of EGFRs. PMID:16766711

  2. Occupational exposure to formaldehyde, hematotoxicity and leukemia-specific chromosome changes in cultured myeloid progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Luoping; Tang, Xiaojiang; Rothman, Nathaniel; Vermeulen, Roel; Ji, Zhiying; Shen, Min; Qiu, Chuangyi; Guo, Weihong; Liu, Songwang; Reiss, Boris; Laura Beane, Freeman; Ge, Yichen; Hubbard, Alan E.; Hua, Ming; Blair, Aaron; Galvan, Noe; Ruan, Xiaolin; Alter, Blanche P.; Xin, Kerry X.; Li, Senhua; Moore, Lee E.; Kim, Sungkyoon; Xie, Yuxuan; Hayes, Richard B.; Azuma, Mariko; Hauptmann, Michael; Xiong, Jun; Stewart, Patricia; Li, Laiyu; Rappaport, Stephen M.; Huang, Hanlin; Fraumeni, Joseph F.; Smith, Martyn T.; Lan, Qing

    2010-01-01

    There are concerns about the health effects of formaldehyde exposure, including carcinogenicity, in light of elevated indoor air levels in new homes and occupational exposures experienced by workers in health care, embalming, manufacturing and other industries. Epidemiological studies suggest that formaldehyde exposure is associated with an increased risk of leukemia. However, the biological plausibility of these findings has been questioned because limited information is available on formaldehyde’s ability to disrupt hematopoietic function. Our objective was to determine if formaldehyde exposure disrupts hematopoietic function and produces leukemia-related chromosome changes in exposed humans. We examined the ability of formaldehyde to disrupt hematopoiesis in a study of 94 workers in China (43 exposed to formaldehyde and 51 frequency-matched controls) by measuring complete blood counts and peripheral stem/progenitor cell colony formation. Further, myeloid progenitor cells, the target for leukemogenesis, were cultured from the workers to quantify the level of leukemia-specific chromosome changes, including monosomy 7 and trisomy 8, in metaphase spreads of these cells. Among exposed workers, peripheral blood cell counts were significantly lowered in a manner consistent with toxic effects on the bone marrow and leukemia-specific chromosome changes were significantly elevated in myeloid blood progenitor cells. These findings suggest that formaldehyde exposure can have an adverse impact on the hematopoietic system and that leukemia induction by formaldehyde is biologically plausible, which heightens concerns about its leukemogenic potential from occupational and environmental exposures. PMID:20056626

  3. A region-specific neurogenesis mode requires migratory progenitors in the Drosophila visual system.

    PubMed

    Apitz, Holger; Salecker, Iris

    2015-01-01

    Brain areas each generate specific neuron subtypes during development. However, underlying regional variations in neurogenesis strategies and regulatory mechanisms remain poorly understood. In Drosophila, neurons in four optic lobe ganglia originate from two neuroepithelia, the outer (OPC) and inner (IPC) proliferation centers. Using genetic manipulations, we found that one IPC neuroepithelial domain progressively transformed into migratory progenitors that matured into neural stem cells (neuroblasts) in a second domain. Progenitors emerged by an epithelial-mesenchymal transition-like mechanism that required the Snail-family member Escargot and, in subdomains, Decapentaplegic signaling. The proneural factors Lethal of scute and Asense differentially controlled progenitor supply and maturation into neuroblasts. These switched expression from Asense to a third proneural protein, Atonal. Dichaete and Tailless mediated this transition, which was essential for generating two neuron populations at defined positions. We propose that this neurogenesis mode is central for setting up a new proliferative zone to facilitate spatio-temporal matching of neurogenesis and connectivity across ganglia. PMID:25501037

  4. The convergence of Notch and MAPK signaling specifies the blood progenitor fate in the Drosophila mesoderm.

    PubMed

    Grigorian, Melina; Mandal, Lolitika; Hakimi, Manuel; Ortiz, Irma; Hartenstein, Volker

    2011-05-01

    Blood progenitors arise from a pool of pluripotential cells ("hemangioblasts") within the Drosophila embryonic mesoderm. The fact that the cardiogenic mesoderm consists of only a small number of highly stereotypically patterned cells that can be queried individually regarding their gene expression in normal and mutant embryos is one of the significant advantages that Drosophila offers to dissect the mechanism specifying the fate of these cells. We show in this paper that the expression of the Notch ligand Delta (Dl) reveals segmentally reiterated mesodermal clusters ("cardiogenic clusters") that constitute the cardiogenic mesoderm. These clusters give rise to cardioblasts, blood progenitors and nephrocytes. Cardioblasts emerging from the cardiogenic clusters accumulate high levels of Dl, which is required to prevent more cells from adopting the cardioblast fate. In embryos lacking Dl function, all cells of the cardiogenic clusters become cardioblasts, and blood progenitors are lacking. Concomitant activation of the Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) pathway by Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) and Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor (FGFR) is required for the specification and maintenance of the cardiogenic mesoderm; in addition, the spatially restricted localization of some of the FGFR ligands may be instrumental in controlling the spatial restriction of the Dl ligand to presumptive cardioblasts. PMID:21382367

  5. Adult Olfactory Bulb Interneuron Phenotypes Identified by Targeting Embryonic and Postnatal Neural Progenitors.

    PubMed

    Figueres-Oñate, Maria; López-Mascaraque, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Neurons are generated during embryonic development and in adulthood, although adult neurogenesis is restricted to two main brain regions, the hippocampus and olfactory bulb. The subventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricles generates neural stem/progenitor cells that continually provide the olfactory bulb (OB) with new granule or periglomerular neurons, cells that arrive from the SVZ via the rostral migratory stream. The continued neurogenesis and the adequate integration of these newly generated interneurons is essential to maintain homeostasis in the olfactory bulb, where the differentiation of these cells into specific neural cell types is strongly influenced by temporal cues. Therefore, identifying the critical features that control the generation of adult OB interneurons at either pre- or post-natal stages is important to understand the dynamic contribution of neural stem cells. Here, we used in utero and neonatal SVZ electroporation along with a transposase-mediated stable integration plasmid, in order to track interneurons and glial lineages in the OB. These plasmids are valuable tools to study the development of OB interneurons from embryonic and post-natal SVZ progenitors. Accordingly, we examined the location and identity of the adult progeny of embryonic and post-natally transfected progenitors by examining neurochemical markers in the adult OB. These data reveal the different cell types in the olfactory bulb that are generated in function of age and different electroporation conditions. PMID:27242400

  6. Influence of Rho kinase inhibitor Fasudil on late endothelial progenitor cells in peripheral blood of COPD patients with pulmonary artery hypertension.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pei; Zhang, Hongmei; Tang, Yijun; Sheng, Chunfeng; Liu, Jianxin; Zeng, Yanjun

    2014-02-01

    The objective of our work was to investigate the influence of Fasudil, a Rho inhibitor on the number and function of the late endothelial progenitor cells in peripheral blood of chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD) patients with pulmonary artery hypertension. Eighty COPD patients with pulmonary artery hypertension were selected and divided into two groups: the treatment group and the control group, which had 40 patients respectively. The control group received routine treatment, including oxygen uptake, anti-infection and phlegm dissolving. The treatment group received the Fasudil in addition to the routine treatment. The changes on the number and function of the late endothelial progenitor cells in peripheral blood of the patients before and after the treatment were compared between the two groups. The changes on the pulmonary artery pressure were also compared. The number of the late endothelial progenitor cells in peripheral blood of the treatment group increased and the function was enhanced. The pulmonary artery pressure was reduced. The difference before and after the treatment and with the control group was statistically significant (p<0.05). The changes on the number and function of the late endothelial progenitor cells in peripheral blood and the pulmonary artery pressure before and after the treatment of the control group were not statistically significant (p>0.05). The Rho-kinase inhibitor Fasudil increased the number and enhanced the function of the late endothelial progenitor cells in peripheral blood of COPD patients with pulmonary artery hypertension. PMID:24579970

  7. Ck2-Dependent Phosphorylation Is Required to Maintain Pax7 Protein Levels in Proliferating Muscle Progenitors

    PubMed Central

    González, Natalia; Moresco, James J.; Bustos, Francisco; Yates, John R.; Olguín, Hugo C.

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle regeneration and long term maintenance is directly link to the balance between self-renewal and differentiation of resident adult stem cells known as satellite cells. In turn, satellite cell fate is influenced by a functional interaction between the transcription factor Pax7 and members of the MyoD family of muscle regulatory factors. Thus, changes in the Pax7-to-MyoD protein ratio may act as a molecular rheostat fine-tuning acquisition of lineage identity while preventing precocious terminal differentiation. Pax7 is expressed in quiescent and proliferating satellite cells, while its levels decrease sharply in differentiating progenitors Pax7 is maintained in cells (re)acquiring quiescence. While the mechanisms regulating Pax7 levels based on differentiation status are not well understood, we have recently described that Pax7 levels are directly regulated by the ubiquitin-ligase Nedd4, thus promoting proteasome-dependent Pax7 degradation in differentiating satellite cells. Here we show that Pax7 levels are maintained in proliferating muscle progenitors by a mechanism involving casein kinase 2-dependent Pax7 phosphorylation at S201. Point mutations preventing S201 phosphorylation or casein kinase 2 inhibition result in decreased Pax7 protein in proliferating muscle progenitors. Accordingly, this correlates directly with increased Pax7 ubiquitination. Finally, Pax7 down regulation induced by casein kinase 2 inhibition results in precocious myogenic induction, indicating early commitment to terminal differentiation. These observations highlight the critical role of post translational regulation of Pax7 as a molecular switch controlling muscle progenitor fate. PMID:27144531

  8. Effects of Electromagnetic Radiation from Smartphones on Learning Ability and Hippocampal Progenitor Cell Proliferation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yu-Jin; Choi, Yun-Sik

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Nonionizing radiation is emitted from electronic devices, such as smartphones. In this study, we intended to elucidate the effect of electromagnetic radiation from smartphones on spatial working memory and progenitor cell proliferation in the hippocampus. Methods Both male and female mice were randomly separated into two groups (radiated and control) and the radiated group was exposed to electromagnetic radiation for 9 weeks and 11 weeks for male and female mice, respectively. Spatial working memory was examined with a Y maze, and proliferation of hippocampal progenitor cells were examined by 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine administration and immunohistochemical detection. Results When spatial working memory on a Y maze was examined in the 9th week, there was no significant difference in the spontaneous alternation score on the Y maze between the two groups. In addition, there was no significant difference in hippocampal progenitor cell proliferation. However, immunoreactivity to glial fibrillary acidic protein was increased in exposed animals. Next, to test the effect of recovery following chronic radiation exposure, the remaining female mice were further exposed to electromagnetic radiation for 2 more weeks (total 11 weeks), and spontaneous alternation was tested 4 weeks later. In this experiment, although there was no significant difference in the spontaneous alternation scores, the number of arm entry was significantly increased. Conclusion These data indicate that although chronic electromagnetic radiation does not affect spatial working memory and hippocampal progenitor cell proliferation it can mediate astrocyte activation in the hippocampus and delayed hyperactivity-like behavior. PMID:26981337

  9. Notch/Rbpjκ signaling regulates progenitor maintenance and differentiation of hypothalamic arcuate neurons

    PubMed Central

    Aujla, Paven K.; Naratadam, George T.; Xu, Liwen; Raetzman, Lori T.

    2013-01-01

    The hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (Arc), containing pro-opoiomelanocortin (POMC), neuropeptide Y (NPY) and growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH) neurons, regulates feeding, energy balance and body size. Dysregulation of this homeostatic mediator underlies diseases ranging from growth failure to obesity. Despite considerable investigation regarding the function of Arc neurons, mechanisms governing their development remain unclear. Notch signaling factors such as Hes1 and Mash1 are present in hypothalamic progenitors that give rise to Arc neurons. However, how Notch signaling controls these progenitor populations is unknown. To elucidate the role of Notch signaling in Arc development, we analyzed conditional loss-of-function mice lacking a necessary Notch co-factor, Rbpjκ, in Nkx2.1-cre-expressing cells (Rbpjκ cKO), as well as mice with expression of the constitutively active Notch1 intracellular domain (NICD) in Nkx2.1-cre-expressing cells (NICD Tg). We found that loss of Rbpjκ results in absence of Hes1 but not of Hes5 within the primordial Arc at E13.5. Additionally, Mash1 expression is increased, coincident with increased proliferation and accumulation of Arc neurons at E13.5. At E18.5, Rbpjκ cKO mice have few progenitors and show increased numbers of differentiated Pomc, NPY and Ghrh neurons. By contrast, NICD Tg mice have increased hypothalamic progenitors, show an absence of differentiated Arc neurons and aberrant glial differentiation at E18.5. Subsequently, both Rbpjκ cKO and NICD Tg mice have changes in growth and body size during postnatal development. Taken together, our results demonstrate that Notch/Rbpjκ signaling regulates the generation and differentiation of Arc neurons, which contribute to homeostatic regulation of body size. PMID:23884446

  10. Effects of extracellular matrix proteins on the growth of haematopoietic progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Celebi, Betül; Mantovani, Diego; Pineault, Nicolas

    2011-10-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) transplantation and haematological recovery are currently limited by the amount of haematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) present in each unit. HPCs and haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) normally interact with cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins present within the endosteal and vascular niches. Hence, we investigated whether coating of culture surfaces with ECM proteins normally present in the marrow microenvironment could benefit the ex vivo expansion of HPCs. Towards this, collagen types I and IV (COL I and IV), laminin (LN) and fibronectin (FN) were tested individually or as component of two ECM-mix complexes. Individually, ECM proteins had both common and unique properties on the growth and differentiation of UCB CD34+ cells; some ECM proteins favoured the differentiation of some lineages over that of others (e.g. FN for erythroids), some the expansion of HPCs (e.g. LN and megakaryocyte (MK) progenitor) while others had less effects. Next, two ECM-mix complexes were tested; the first one contained all four ECM proteins (4ECMp), while the second 'basement membrane-like structure' was without COL I (3ECMp). Removal of COL I led to strong reductions in cell growth and HPCs expansion. Interestingly, the 4ECMp-mix complex reproducibly increased CD34+ (1.3-fold) and CD41+ (1.2-fold) cell expansions at day 6 (P < 0.05) versus control, and induced greater myeloid progenitor expansion (P < 0.05) than 3ECMp. In conclusion, these results suggest that optimization of BM ECM protein complexes could provide a better environment for the ex vivo expansion of haematopoietic progenitors than individual ECM protein. PMID:21931196

  11. Deacetylase inhibitors modulate proliferation and self-renewal properties of leukemic stem and progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Romanski, Annette; Schwarz, Kerstin; Keller, Maren; Wietbrauk, Sarah; Vogel, Anja; Roos, Jessica; Oancea, Claudia; Brill, Boris; Krämer, Oliver H.; Serve, Hubert; Ruthardt, Martin; Bug, Gesine

    2012-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a highly malignant disease that is not curable in the majority of patients. Numerous non-random genetic abnormalities are known, among which several translocations such as PLZF/RARα or AML1/ETO are known to aberrantly recruit histone deacetylases. Deacetylase inhibitors (DACi) are promising drugs leading to growth inhibition, cell cycle arrest, premature senescence and apoptosis in malignant cells. It is believed that DACi may have clinical efficacy by eradicating the most primitive population of leukemic stem and progenitor cells, possibly by interfering with self-renewal. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of DACi on leukemic stem and progenitor cells using murine transduction-transplantation models of hematopoietic cells harboring the leukemia-associated fusion proteins (LAFP) PLZF/RARα or a truncated AML1/ETO protein (AML1/ETO exon 9). We show that the self-renewal and short-term repopulation capacity of AML1/ETO- or PLZF/RARα-expressing Sca1+/lin- stem and progenitor cells are profoundly inhibited by clinically applicable concentrations of the DACi dacinostat and vorinostat. To further investigate the mechanisms underlying these effects, we examined the impact of DACi on the transcription factor c-MYC and the Polycomb group protein BMI1, which are induced by LAFP and involved in leukemic transformation. In AML1/ETO or PLZF/RARα-positive 32D cells, DACi-mediated antiproliferative effects were associated with downregulation of BMI1 and c-MYC protein levels. Similar effects were demonstrated in primary samples of cytogenetically defined high-risk AML patients. In conclusion, DACi may be effective as maintenance therapy by negatively interfering with signaling pathways that control survival and proliferation of leukemic stem and progenitor cells. PMID:22895185

  12. Ck2-Dependent Phosphorylation Is Required to Maintain Pax7 Protein Levels in Proliferating Muscle Progenitors.

    PubMed

    González, Natalia; Moresco, James J; Cabezas, Felipe; de la Vega, Eduardo; Bustos, Francisco; Yates, John R; Olguín, Hugo C

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle regeneration and long term maintenance is directly link to the balance between self-renewal and differentiation of resident adult stem cells known as satellite cells. In turn, satellite cell fate is influenced by a functional interaction between the transcription factor Pax7 and members of the MyoD family of muscle regulatory factors. Thus, changes in the Pax7-to-MyoD protein ratio may act as a molecular rheostat fine-tuning acquisition of lineage identity while preventing precocious terminal differentiation. Pax7 is expressed in quiescent and proliferating satellite cells, while its levels decrease sharply in differentiating progenitors Pax7 is maintained in cells (re)acquiring quiescence. While the mechanisms regulating Pax7 levels based on differentiation status are not well understood, we have recently described that Pax7 levels are directly regulated by the ubiquitin-ligase Nedd4, thus promoting proteasome-dependent Pax7 degradation in differentiating satellite cells. Here we show that Pax7 levels are maintained in proliferating muscle progenitors by a mechanism involving casein kinase 2-dependent Pax7 phosphorylation at S201. Point mutations preventing S201 phosphorylation or casein kinase 2 inhibition result in decreased Pax7 protein in proliferating muscle progenitors. Accordingly, this correlates directly with increased Pax7 ubiquitination. Finally, Pax7 down regulation induced by casein kinase 2 inhibition results in precocious myogenic induction, indicating early commitment to terminal differentiation. These observations highlight the critical role of post translational regulation of Pax7 as a molecular switch controlling muscle progenitor fate. PMID:27144531

  13. Systematic Effects of Progenitor Composition on Type Ia Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poludnenko, Alexei Y.; Gamezo, V. N.; Oran, E.

    2013-01-01

    Type Ia supernovae (SNIa) were first suggested over half a century ago to result from the thermonuclear incineration of a degenerate white dwarf star (WD) in a binary stellar system. In the past two decades, SNIa have emerged as a preeminent tool in cosmology, to a great extent, due to the significant improvements in the accuracy of their calibration as standard candles. This accuracy, however, is not perfect and the remaining scatter in the inferred intrinsic brightness of SNIa confounds the detailed studies of dark energy and, more importantly, leaves open the possibility of the presence of unknown systematic effects. Here we investigate one potential source of such systematic effects, namely carbon-to-oxygen ratio (C/O) of the progenitor WD, in the context of the delayed detonation model. In this scenario, the explosion starts as a subsonic deflagration that later transitions to a supersonic detonation (deflagration-to-detonation transition, or DDT). The onset of DDT is controlled by the interaction of the thermonuclear flame with the turbulent flowfield that develops during the explosion. Here we show that microscopic properties of the laminar thermonuclear flame vary strongly with the C/O ratio. In particular, when the 12C mass fraction decreases from 0.5 to 0.2, the flame speed decreases by a factor of 8 at the density 10^8 g/cc and by a factor of ~100 at the density 10^7 g/cc. This drastic change in flame speed is accompanied by the qualitative change in flame structure. Furthermore, we couple these new results on the properties of laminar deflagrations with the model of the spontaneous DDT process recently demonstrated using ab initio 3D simulations (Poludnenko et al., PRL 107, 054501 (2011)). Based on this, we show that decrease in the C/O ratio will systematically lead to significantly higher densities at which DDT occurs and, thus, to systematically larger 56Ni yields. Finally, we discuss the implications of these results that provide a physical

  14. NFAT restricts osteochondroma formation from entheseal progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Xianpeng; Tsang, Kelly; He, Lizhi; Garcia, Roberto A.; Ermann, Joerg; Mizoguchi, Fumitaka; Zhang, Minjie; Zhou, Bin; Zhou, Bin; Aliprantis, Antonios O.

    2016-01-01

    Osteochondromas are common benign osteocartilaginous tumors in children and adolescents characterized by cartilage-capped bony projections on the surface of bones. These tumors often cause pain, deformity, fracture, and musculoskeletal dysfunction, and they occasionally undergo malignant transformation. The pathogenesis of osteochondromas remains poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that nuclear factor of activated T cells c1 and c2 (NFATc1 and NFATc2) suppress osteochondromagenesis through individual and combinatorial mechanisms. In mice, conditional deletion of NFATc1 in mesenchymal limb progenitors, Scleraxis-expressing (Scx-expressing) tendoligamentous cells, or postnatally in Aggrecan-expressing cells resulted in osteochondroma formation at entheses, the insertion sites of ligaments and tendons onto bone. Combinatorial deletion of NFATc1 and NFATc2 gave rise to larger and more numerous osteochondromas in inverse proportion to gene dosage. A population of entheseal NFATc1- and Aggrecan-expressing cells was identified as the osteochondroma precursor, previously believed to be growth plate derived or perichondrium derived. Mechanistically, we show that NFATc1 restricts the proliferation and chondrogenesis of osteochondroma precursors. In contrast, NFATc2 preferentially inhibits chondrocyte hypertrophy and osteogenesis. Together, our findings identify and characterize a mechanism of osteochondroma formation and suggest that regulating NFAT activity is a new therapeutic approach for skeletal diseases characterized by defective or exaggerated osteochondral growth. PMID:27158674

  15. Cardiogenic Differentiation and Transdifferentiation of Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Reinecke, Hans; Minami, Elina; Zhu, Wei-Zhong; Laflamme, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, cell transplantation has drawn tremendous interest as a novel approach to preserving or even restoring contractile function to infarcted hearts. A typical human infarct involves the loss of approximately one billion cardiomyocytes, and so many investigators have sought to identify endogenous or exogenous stem cells with the capacity to differentiate into committed cardiomyocytes and repopulate lost myocardium. As a result of these efforts, dozens of stem cell types have been reported to have cardiac potential. These include pluripotent embryonic stem cells as well various adult stem cells resident in compartments including bone marrow, peripheral tissues, and the heart itself. Some of these cardiogenic progenitors have been reported to contribute replacement muscle through endogenous reparative processes or via cell transplantation in preclinical cardiac injury models. However, considerable disagreement exists regarding the efficiency and even the reality of cardiac differentiation by many of these stem cell types, making these issues a continuing source of controversy in the field. In this review, we consider approaches to cell fate mapping and establishing the cardiac phenotype, as well as the current state of the evidence for the cardiogenic and regenerative potential of the major candidate stem cell types. PMID:18988903

  16. Role of liver progenitors in liver regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Best, Jan; Manka, Paul; Syn, Wing-Kin; Dollé, Laurent; van Grunsven, Leo A.

    2015-01-01

    During massive liver injury and hepatocyte loss, the intrinsic regenerative capacity of the liver by replication of resident hepatocytes is overwhelmed. Treatment of this condition depends on the cause of liver injury, though in many cases liver transplantation (LT) remains the only curative option. LT for end stage chronic and acute liver diseases is hampered by shortage of donor organs and requires immunosuppression. Hepatocyte transplantation is limited by yet unresolved technical difficulties. Since currently no treatment is available to facilitate liver regeneration directly, therapies involving the use of resident liver stem or progenitor cells (LPCs) or non-liver stem cells are coming to fore. LPCs are quiescent in the healthy liver, but may be activated under conditions where the regenerative capacity of mature hepatocytes is severely impaired. Non-liver stem cells include embryonic stem cells (ES cells) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). In the first section, we aim to provide an overview of the role of putative cytokines, growth factors, mitogens and hormones in regulating LPC response and briefly discuss the prognostic value of the LPC response in clinical practice. In the latter section, we will highlight the role of other (non-liver) stem cells in transplantation and discuss advantages and disadvantages of ES cells, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS), as well as MSCs. PMID:25713804

  17. TWEAK induces liver progenitor cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Jakubowski, Aniela; Ambrose, Christine; Parr, Michael; Lincecum, John M; Wang, Monica Z; Zheng, Timothy S; Browning, Beth; Michaelson, Jennifer S; Baetscher, Manfred; Baestcher, Manfred; Wang, Bruce; Bissell, D Montgomery; Burkly, Linda C

    2005-09-01

    Progenitor ("oval") cell expansion accompanies many forms of liver injury, including alcohol toxicity and submassive parenchymal necrosis as well as experimental injury models featuring blocked hepatocyte replication. Oval cells can potentially become either hepatocytes or biliary epithelial cells and may be critical to liver regeneration, particularly when hepatocyte replication is impaired. The regulation of oval cell proliferation is incompletely understood. Herein we present evidence that a TNF family member called TWEAK (TNF-like weak inducer of apoptosis) stimulates oval cell proliferation in mouse liver through its receptor Fn14. TWEAK has no effect on mature hepatocytes and thus appears to be selective for oval cells. Transgenic mice overexpressing TWEAK in hepatocytes exhibit periportal oval cell hyperplasia. A similar phenotype was obtained in adult wild-type mice, but not Fn14-null mice, by administering TWEAK-expressing adenovirus. Oval cell expansion induced by 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidine (DDC) was significantly reduced in Fn14-null mice as well as in adult wild-type mice with a blocking anti-TWEAK mAb. Importantly, TWEAK stimulated the proliferation of an oval cell culture model. Finally, we show increased Fn14 expression in chronic hepatitis C and other human liver diseases relative to its expression in normal liver, which suggests a role for the TWEAK/Fn14 pathway in human liver injury. We conclude that TWEAK has a selective mitogenic effect for liver oval cells that distinguishes it from other previously described growth factors. PMID:16110324

  18. Type Ia Supernova Models and Progenitor Scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomoto, Ken'ichi; Kamiya, Yasuomi; Nakasato, Naohito

    2013-01-01

    We review some recent developments in theoretical studies on the connection between the progenitor systems of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) and the explosion mechanisms. (1) DD-subCh: In the merging of double C+O white dwarfs (DD scenario), if the carbon detonation is induced near the white dwarf (WD) surface in the early dynamical phase, it could result in the (effectively) sub-Chandrasekhar mass explosion. (2) DD-Ch: If no surface C-detonation is ignited, the WD could grow until the Chandrasekhar mass is reached, but the outcome depends on whether the quiescent carbon shell burning is ignited and burns C+O into O+Ne+Mg. (3) SD-subCh: In the single degenerate (SD) scenario, if the He shell-flashes grow strong to induce a He detonation, it leads to the sub-Chandra explosion. (4) SD-Ch: If the He-shell flashes are not strong enough, they still produce interesting amounts of Si and S near the surface of the C+O WD before the explosion. In the Chandra mass explosion, the central density is high enough to produce electron capture elements, e.g., stable 58Ni. Observations of the emission lines of Ni in the nebular spectra provides useful diagnostics of the sub-Chandra vs. Chandra issue. The recent observations of relatively low velocity carbon near the surface of SNe Ia provide also an interesting constraint on the explosion models.

  19. The Binary Progenitor of Tycho Brahe's Supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Lapuente, P.

    2006-08-01

    The brightness of type Ia supernovae, and their homogeneity as a class, makes them powerful tools in cosmology, yet little is known about the progenitor systems of these explosions. They are thought to arise when a white dwarf accretes matter from a companion star, is compressed and undergoes a thermonuclear explosion. Unless the companion star is another white dwarf (in which case it should be destroyed by the mass-transfer process itself), it should survive and show distinguishing properties. Tycho's supernova (SN 1572) provides an opportunity to address observationally the identification of the surviving companion. Here we report a survey of the central region of its remnant, around the position of the explosion, which excludes red giants as the mass donor of the exploding white dwarf. We found a type G0-G2 star, similar to our Sun in surface temperature and luminosity (but lower surface gravity), moving at more than three times the mean velocity of the stars at that distance, which appears to be the surviving companion of the supernova.

  20. Connective tissue progenitor cell growth characteristics on textured substrates.

    PubMed

    Mata, Alvaro; Boehm, Cynthia; Fleischman, Aaron J; Muschler, George F; Roy, Shuvo

    2007-01-01

    Growth characteristics of human connective tissue progenitor (CTP) cells were investigated on smooth and textured substrates, which were produced using MEMS (microelectromechanical systems) fabrication technology. Human bone marrow derived cells were cultured for 9 days under conditions promoting osteoblastic differentiation on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrates comprising smooth (non-patterned) surfaces (SMOOTH), 4 different cylindrical post micro-textures (POSTS) that were 7-10 microm high and 5, 10, 20, and 40 microm diameter, respectively, and channel micro-textures (CHANNELS) with curved cross-sections that were 11 microm high, 45 microm wide, and separated by 5 microm wide ridges. Standard glass-tissue culture surfaces were used as controls. Micro-textures resulted in the modification of CTP morphology, attachment, migration, and proliferation characteristics. Specifically, cells on POSTS exhibited more contoured morphology with closely packed cytoskeletal actin microfilaments compared to the more random orientation in cells grown on SMOOTH. CTP colonies on 10 gm-diameter POSTS exhibited higher cell number than any other POSTS, and a significant increase in cell number (442%) compared to colonies on SMOOTH (71%). On CHANNELS, colonies tended to be denser (229%) than on POSTS (up to 140% on 10 microm POSTS), and significantly more so compared to those on SMOOTH (104%). PMID:18019838

  1. Transdifferentiation of human endothelial progenitors into smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Ji, HaYeun; Atchison, Leigh; Chen, Zaozao; Chakraborty, Syandan; Jung, Youngmee; Truskey, George A; Christoforou, Nicolas; Leong, Kam W

    2016-04-01

    Access to smooth muscle cells (SMC) would create opportunities for tissue engineering, drug testing, and disease modeling. Herein we report the direct conversion of human endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) to induced smooth muscle cells (iSMC) by induced expression of MYOCD. The EPC undergo a cytoskeletal rearrangement resembling that of mesenchymal cells within 3 days post initiation of MYOCD expression. By day 7, the reprogrammed cells show upregulation of smooth muscle markers ACTA2, MYH11, and TAGLN by qRT-PCR and ACTA2 and MYH11 expression by immunofluorescence. By two weeks, they resemble umbilical artery SMC in microarray gene expression analysis. The iSMC, in contrast to EPC control, show calcium transients in response to phenylephrine stimulation and a contractility an order of magnitude higher than that of EPC as determined by traction force microscopy. Tissue-engineered blood vessels constructed using iSMC show functionality with respect to flow- and drug-mediated vasodilation and vasoconstriction. PMID:26874281

  2. Tbx16 regulates hox gene activation in mesodermal progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Payumo, Alexander Y; McQuade, Lindsey E; Walker, Whitney J; Yamazoe, Sayumi; Chen, James K

    2016-09-01

    The transcription factor T-box 16 (Tbx16, or Spadetail) is an essential regulator of paraxial mesoderm development in zebrafish (Danio rerio). Mesodermal progenitor cells (MPCs) fail to differentiate into trunk somites in tbx16 mutants and instead accumulate within the tailbud in an immature state. However, the mechanisms by which Tbx16 controls mesoderm patterning have remained enigmatic. We describe here the use of photoactivatable morpholino oligonucleotides to determine the Tbx16 transcriptome in MPCs. We identified 124 Tbx16-regulated genes that were expressed in zebrafish gastrulae, including several developmental signaling proteins and regulators of gastrulation, myogenesis and somitogenesis. Unexpectedly, we observed that a loss of Tbx16 function precociously activated posterior hox genes in MPCs, and overexpression of a single posterior hox gene was sufficient to disrupt MPC migration. Our studies support a model in which Tbx16 regulates the timing of collinear hox gene activation to coordinate the anterior-posterior fates and positions of paraxial MPCs. PMID:27376691

  3. Effects of shear stress on endothelial progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Obi, Syotaro; Yamamoto, Kimiko; Ando, Joji

    2014-10-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are adult stem cells that play a central role in neovascularization. EPCs are mobilized from bone marrow into peripheral blood, attach to existing endothelial cells, and then transmigrate across the endothelium into tissues, where they proliferate, differentiate, and form new blood vessels. In the process, EPCs are exposed to shear stress, a biomechanical force generated by flowing blood and tissue fluid flow. When cultured EPCs are exposed to controlled levels of shear stress in a flow-loading device, their bioactivities in terms of proliferation, anti-apoptosis, migration, production of bioactive substances, anti-thrombosis, and tube formation increase markedly. Expression of endothelial marker genes and proteins by EPCs also increases in response to shear stress, and they differentiate into mature endothelial cells. Great advances have been made in elucidating the mechanisms by which mature endothelial cells sense and respond to shear stress, but not in EPCs. Further study of EPC responses to shear stress will be necessary to better understand the physiological and pathophysiological roles of EPCs and to apply EPCs to new therapies in the field of regenerative medicine. PMID:25992410

  4. Cell-Surface Protein Profiling Identifies Distinctive Markers of Progenitor Cells in Human Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Uezumi, Akiyoshi; Nakatani, Masashi; Ikemoto-Uezumi, Madoka; Yamamoto, Naoki; Morita, Mitsuhiro; Yamaguchi, Asami; Yamada, Harumoto; Kasai, Takehiro; Masuda, Satoru; Narita, Asako; Miyagoe-Suzuki, Yuko; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Fukada, So-Ichiro; Nishino, Ichizo; Tsuchida, Kunihiro

    2016-08-01

    Skeletal muscle contains two distinct stem/progenitor populations. One is the satellite cell, which acts as a muscle stem cell, and the other is the mesenchymal progenitor, which contributes to muscle pathogeneses such as fat infiltration and fibrosis. Detailed and accurate characterization of these progenitors in humans remains elusive. Here, we performed comprehensive cell-surface protein profiling of the two progenitor populations residing in human skeletal muscle and identified three previously unrecognized markers: CD82 and CD318 for satellite cells and CD201 for mesenchymal progenitors. These markers distinguish myogenic and mesenchymal progenitors, and enable efficient isolation of the two types of progenitors. Functional study revealed that CD82 ensures expansion and preservation of myogenic progenitors by suppressing excessive differentiation, and CD201 signaling favors adipogenesis of mesenchymal progenitors. Thus, cell-surface proteins identified here are not only useful markers but also functionally important molecules, and provide valuable insight into human muscle biology and diseases. PMID:27509136

  5. Embryonic cerebrospinal fluid in brain development: neural progenitor control.

    PubMed

    Gato, Angel; Alonso, M Isabel; Martín, Cristina; Carnicero, Estela; Moro, José Antonio; De la Mano, Aníbal; Fernández, José M F; Lamus, Francisco; Desmond, Mary E

    2014-08-28

    Due to the effort of several research teams across the world, today we have a solid base of knowledge on the liquid contained in the brain cavities, its composition, and biological roles. Although the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is among the most relevant parts of the central nervous system from the physiological point of view, it seems that it is not a permanent and stable entity because its composition and biological properties evolve across life. So, we can talk about different CSFs during the vertebrate life span. In this review, we focus on the CSF in an interesting period, early in vertebrate development before the formation of the choroid plexus. This specific entity is called "embryonic CSF." Based on the structure of the compartment, CSF composition, origin and circulation, and its interaction with neuroepithelial precursor cells (the target cells) we can conclude that embryonic CSF is different from the CSF in later developmental stages and from the adult CSF. This article presents arguments that support the singularity of the embryonic CSF, mainly focusing on its influence on neural precursor behavior during development and in adult life. PMID:25165044

  6. Embryonic cerebrospinal fluid in brain development: neural progenitor control

    PubMed Central

    Gato, Angel; Alonso, M. Isabel; Martín, Cristina; Carnicero, Estela; Moro, José Antonio; De la Mano, Aníbal; Fernández, José M. F.; Lamus, Francisco; Desmond, Mary E.

    2014-01-01

    Due to the effort of several research teams across the world, today we have a solid base of knowledge on the liquid contained in the brain cavities, its composition, and biological roles. Although the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is among the most relevant parts of the central nervous system from the physiological point of view, it seems that it is not a permanent and stable entity because its composition and biological properties evolve across life. So, we can talk about different CSFs during the vertebrate life span. In this review, we focus on the CSF in an interesting period, early in vertebrate development before the formation of the choroid plexus. This specific entity is called “embryonic CSF.” Based on the structure of the compartment, CSF composition, origin and circulation, and its interaction with neuroepithelial precursor cells (the target cells) we can conclude that embryonic CSF is different from the CSF in later developmental stages and from the adult CSF. This article presents arguments that support the singularity of the embryonic CSF, mainly focusing on its influence on neural precursor behavior during development and in adult life. PMID:25165044

  7. Autonomous Agents on Expedition: Humans and Progenitor Ants and Planetary Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rilee, M. L.; Clark, P. E.; Curtis, S. A.; Truszkowski, W. F.

    2002-01-01

    The Autonomous Nano-Technology Swarm (ANTS) is an advanced mission architecture based on a social insect analog of many specialized spacecraft working together to achieve mission goals. The principal mission concept driving the ANTS architecture is a Main Belt Asteroid Survey in the 2020s that will involve a thousand or more nano-technology enabled, artificially intelligent, autonomous pico-spacecraft (< 1 kg). The objective of this survey is to construct a compendium of composition, shape, and other physical parameter observations of a significant fraction of asteroid belt objects. Such an atlas will be of primary scientific importance for the understanding of Solar System origins and evolution and will lay the foundation for future exploration and capitalization of space. As the capabilities enabling ANTS are developed over the next two decades, these capabilities will need to be proven. Natural milestones for this process include the deployment of progenitors to ANTS on human expeditions to space and remote missions with interfaces for human interaction and control. These progenitors can show up in a variety of forms ranging from spacecraft subsystems and advanced handheld sensors, through complete prototypical ANTS spacecraft. A critical capability to be demonstrated is reliable, long-term autonomous operations across the ANTS architecture. High level, mission-oriented behaviors are to be managed by a control / communications layer of the swarm, whereas common low level functions required of all spacecraft, e.g. attitude control and guidance and navigation, are handled autonomically on each spacecraft. At the higher levels of mission planning and social interaction deliberative techniques are to be used. For the asteroid survey, ANTS acts as a large community of cooperative agents while for precursor missions there arises the intriguing possibility of Progenitor ANTS and humans acting together as agents. For optimal efficiency and responsiveness for individual

  8. Molecular assembly of botulinum neurotoxin progenitor complexes.

    PubMed

    Benefield, Desirée A; Dessain, Scott K; Shine, Nancy; Ohi, Melanie D; Lacy, D Borden

    2013-04-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) is produced by Clostridium botulinum and associates with nontoxic neurotoxin-associated proteins to form high-molecular weight progenitor complexes (PCs). The PCs are required for the oral toxicity of BoNT in the context of food-borne botulism and are thought to protect BoNT from destruction in the gastrointestinal tract and aid in absorption from the gut lumen. The PC can differ in size and protein content depending on the C. botulinum strain. The oral toxicity of the BoNT PC increases as the size of the PC increases, but the molecular architecture of these large complexes and how they contribute to BoNT toxicity have not been elucidated. We have generated 2D images of PCs from strains producing BoNT serotypes A1, B, and E using negative stain electron microscopy and single-particle averaging. The BoNT/A1 and BoNT/B PCs were observed as ovoid-shaped bodies with three appendages, whereas the BoNT/E PC was observed as an ovoid body. Both the BoNT/A1 and BoNT/B PCs showed significant flexibility, and the BoNT/B PC was documented as a heterogeneous population of assembly/disassembly intermediates. We have also determined 3D structures for each serotype using the random conical tilt approach. Crystal structures of the individual proteins were placed into the BoNT/A1 and BoNT/B PC electron density maps to generate unique detailed models of the BoNT PCs. The structures highlight an effective platform that can be engineered for the development of mucosal vaccines and the intestinal absorption of oral biologics. PMID:23509303

  9. [Umbilical cord hematopoietic progenitor cells bank].

    PubMed

    Morales, V H; Milone, J; Etchegoyen, O; Bordone, J; Uranga, A

    2001-01-01

    Transplantation of hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC) from bone marrow and mobilized peripheral blood is a standard therapy in malignant and non malignant diseases. The lack of suitable donors is an important limitation. The discovery that umbilical cord blood (CB) contains high numbers of HPC that can be used as an alternative source for allogeneic stem cell transplantation led ITMO to establish BANCEL, the first Argentine and Latinoamerican experience of its kind. The blood remaining in the umbilical cord and in the placenta was requested from women who were in the last quarter of pregnancy. An informed consent together with a medical record focused on family disease was completed. Out of 65 donations, 55 (85%) were collected and 51 (78%) were cryopreserved. Mean collected volume was 110 ml with 68% (75 ml) reduction and mean cryopreservation of 35 ml; ABO and Rh blood group systems were determined, HLA, class I, A and B loci, and class II, DR locus were typed by molecular biology methods using PCR-SSOP. Infectious disease screening was carried out for brucellosis, syphilis, Chagas, hepatitis B and C, HIV I and II, HTLV I and II, toxoplasmosis and cytomegalovirus. Two positive units for hepatitis B (anticore) and two positive units for Chagas were discarded. The quantity of total nucleated cells (TNC), CD34+ cells and the clonogenic capacity were determined twice at the collection and after the procedures of volume reduction previous to cryopreservation. A 5% reduction in both TNC and CD34 cells and a 10% in the colony forming units (CFU) were detected. A good correlation coefficient between TNC and CFU was obtained. PMID:11808425

  10. MY Camelopardalis, a very massive merger progenitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenzo, J.; Negueruela, I.; Baker, A. K. F. Val; García, M.; Simón-Díaz, S.; Pastor, P.; Méndez Majuelos, M.

    2014-12-01

    Context. The early-type binary MY Cam belongs to the young open cluster Alicante 1, embedded in Cam OB3. Aims: MY Cam consists of two early-O type main-sequence stars and shows a photometric modulation suggesting an orbital period slightly above one day. We intend to confirm this orbital period and derive orbital and stellar parameters. Methods: Timing analysis of a very exhaustive (4607 points) light curve indicates a period of 1.1754514 ± 0.0000015 d. High-resolution spectra and the cross-correlation technique implemented in the todcor program were used to derive radial velocities and obtain the corresponding radial velocity curves for MY Cam. Modelling with the stellar atmosphere code fastwind was used to obtain stellar parameters and create templates for cross-correlation. Stellar and orbital parameters were derived using the Wilson-Devinney code, such that a complete solution to the binary system could be described. Results: The determined masses of the primary and secondary stars in MY Cam are 37.7 ± 1.6 and 31.6 ± 1.4M⊙, respectively. The corresponding temperatures, derived from the model atmosphere fit, are 42 000 and 39 000 K, with the more massive component being hotter. Both stars are overfilling their Roche lobes, sharing a common envelope. Conclusions: MY Cam contains the most massive dwarf O-type stars found so far in an eclipsing binary. Both components are still on the main sequence, and probably not far from the zero-age main sequence. The system is a likely merger progenitor, owing to its very short period. Tables 1 and 3 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgPhotometric data (Table 2) are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/572/A110

  11. Endothelial progenitor cells in acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Martí-Fàbregas, Joan; Crespo, Javier; Delgado-Mederos, Raquel; Martínez-Ramírez, Sergi; Peña, Esther; Marín, Rebeca; Dinia, Lavinia; Jiménez-Xarrié, Elena; Fernández-Arcos, Ana; Pérez-Pérez, Jesús; Querol, Luis; Suárez-Calvet, Marc; Badimon, Lina

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The levels of circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) in ischemic stroke have not been studied extensively and reported results are inconsistent. We aimed to investigate the time course, the prognostic relevance, and the variables associated with EPC counts in patients with ischemic stroke at different time points. Material and methods We studied prospectively 146 consecutive patients with ischemic stroke within the first 48 h from the onset of symptoms (baseline). We evaluated demographic data, classical vascular risk factors, treatment with thrombolysis and statins, stroke etiology, National Institute of Health and Stroke Scale score and outcome (favorable when Rankin scale score 0–2). Blood samples were collected at baseline, at day 7 after stroke (n = 121) and at 3 months (n = 92). The EPC were measured by flow cytometry. Results We included 146 patients with a mean age of 70.8 ± 12.2 years. The circulating EPC levels were higher on day 7 than at baseline or at 3 months (P = 0.045). Pretreatment with statins (odds ratio [OR] 3.11, P = 0.008) and stroke etiology (P = 0.032) were predictive of EPC counts in the baseline sample. EPC counts were not associated with stroke severity or functional outcome in all the patients. However, using multivariate analyses, a better functional outcome was found in patients with higher EPC counts in large-artery atherosclerosis and small-vessel disease etiologic subtypes. Conclusions After acute ischemic stroke, circulating EPC counts peaked at day 7. Pretreatment with statins increased the levels of EPC. In patients with large-artery atherosclerosis and small-vessel disease subtypes, higher counts were related to better outcome at 3 months. PMID:24363968

  12. The TRIM-NHL protein TRIM32 activates microRNAs and prevents self-renewal in mouse neural progenitors.

    PubMed

    Schwamborn, Jens C; Berezikov, Eugene; Knoblich, Juergen A

    2009-03-01

    In the mouse neocortex, neural progenitor cells generate both differentiating neurons and daughter cells that maintain progenitor fate. Here, we show that the TRIM-NHL protein TRIM32 regulates protein degradation and microRNA activity to control the balance between those two daughter cell types. In both horizontally and vertically dividing progenitors, TRIM32 becomes polarized in mitosis and is concentrated in one of the two daughter cells. TRIM32 overexpression induces neuronal differentiation while inhibition of TRIM32 causes both daughter cells to retain progenitor cell fate. TRIM32 ubiquitinates and degrades the transcription factor c-Myc but also binds Argonaute-1 and thereby increases the activity of specific microRNAs. We show that Let-7 is one of the TRIM32 targets and is required and sufficient for neuronal differentiation. TRIM32 is the mouse ortholog of Drosophila Brat and Mei-P26 and might be part of a protein family that regulates the balance between differentiation and proliferation in stem cell lineages. PMID:19269368

  13. Myeloid cell-derived reactive oxygen species externally regulate the proliferation of myeloid progenitors in emergency granulopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Hyun-Jeong; Liu, Peng; Bajrami, Besnik; Xu, Yuanfu; Park, Shin-Young; Nombela-Arrieta, Cesar; Mondal, Subhanjan; Sun, Yan; Zhu, Haiyan; Chai, Li; Silberstein, Leslie E.; Cheng, Tao; Luo, Hongbo R.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The cellular mechanisms controlling infection-induced emergency granulopoiesis are poorly defined. Here we found that reactive oxygen species (ROS) concentrations in the bone marrow (BM) were elevated during acute infection in a phagocytic NADPH oxidase-dependent manner in myeloid cells. Gr1+ myeloid cells were uniformly distributed in the BM, and all c-Kit+ progenitor cells were adjacent to Gr1+ myeloid cells. Inflammation-induced ROS production in the BM played a critical role in myeloid progenitor expansion during emergency granulopoiesis. ROS elicited oxidation and deactivation of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), resulting in up-regulation of PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 signaling in BM myeloid progenitors. We further revealed that BM myeloid cell-produced ROS stimulated proliferation of myeloid progenitors via a paracrine mechanism. Taken together, our results establish that phagocytic NADPH oxidase-mediated ROS production by BM myeloid cells plays a critical role in mediating emergency granulopoiesis during acute infection. PMID:25579427

  14. Regular Exercise Training Increases the Number of Endothelial Progenitor Cells and Decreases Homocysteine Levels in Healthy Peripheral Blood

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jeong Kyu; Moon, Ki Myung; Jung, Seok Yun; Kim, Ji Yong; Choi, Sung Hyun; Kim, Da Yeon; Kang, Songhwa; Chu, Chong Woo

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are known to play an important role in the repair of damaged blood vessels. We used an endothelial progenitor cell colony-forming assay (EPC-CFA) to determine whether EPC numbers could be increased in healthy individuals through regular exercise training. The number of functional EPCs obtained from human peripheral blood-derived AC133 stem cells was measured after a 28-day regular exercise training program. The number of total endothelial progenitor cell colony-forming units (EPC-CFU) was significantly increased compared to that in the control group (p=0.02, n=5). In addition, we observed a significant decrease in homocysteine levels followed by an increase in the number of EPC-CFUs (p=0.04, n=5), indicating that the 28-day regular exercise training could increase the number of EPC colonies and decrease homocysteine levels. Moreover, an inverse correlation was observed between small-endothelial progenitor cell colony-forming units (small-EPC-CFUs) and plasma homocysteine levels in healthy men (r=-0.8125, p=0.047). We found that regular exercise training could increase the number of EPC-CFUs and decrease homocysteine levels, thus decreasing the cardiovascular disease risk in men. PMID:24757379

  15. FatJ acts via the Hippo mediator Yap1 to restrict the size of neural progenitor cell pools

    PubMed Central

    Van Hateren, Nick J.; Das, Raman M.; Hautbergue, Guillaume M.; Borycki, Anne-Gaëlle; Placzek, Marysia; Wilson, Stuart A.

    2011-01-01

    The size, composition and functioning of the spinal cord is likely to depend on appropriate numbers of progenitor and differentiated cells of a particular class, but little is known about how cell numbers are controlled in specific cell cohorts along the dorsoventral axis of the neural tube. Here, we show that FatJ cadherin, identified in a large-scale RNA interference (RNAi) screen of cadherin genes expressed in the neural tube, is localised to progenitors in intermediate regions of the neural tube. Loss of function of FatJ promotes an increase in dp4-vp1 progenitors and a concomitant increase in differentiated Lim1+/Lim2+ neurons. Our studies reveal that FatJ mediates its action via the Hippo pathway mediator Yap1: loss of downstream Hippo components can rescue the defect caused by loss of FatJ. Together, our data demonstrate that RNAi screens are feasible in the chick embryonic neural tube, and show that FatJ acts through the Hippo pathway to regulate cell numbers in specific subsets of neural progenitor pools and their differentiated progeny. PMID:21521736

  16. Development and molecular composition of the hepatic progenitor cell niche.

    PubMed

    Vestentoft, Peter Siig

    2013-05-01

    End-stage liver diseases represent major health problems that are currently treated by liver transplantation. However, given the world-wide shortage of donor livers novel strategies are needed for therapeutic treatment. Adult stem cells have the ability to self-renew and differentiate into the more specialized cell types of a given organ and are found in tissues throughout the body. These cells, whose progeny are termed progenitor cells in human liver and oval cells in rodents, have the potential to treat patients through the generation of hepatic parenchymal cells, even from the patient's own tissue. Little is known regarding the nature of the hepatic progenitor cells. Though they are suggested to reside in the most distal part of the biliary tree, the canal of Hering, the lack of unique surface markers for these cells has hindered their isolation and characterization. Upon activation, they proliferate and form ductular structures, termed "ductular reactions", which radiate into the hepatic parenchyma. The ductular reactions contain activated progenitor cells that not only acquire a phenotype resembling that observed in developing liver but also display markers of differentiation shared with the cholangiocytic or hepatocytic lineages, the two parenchymal hepatic cell types. Interactions between the putative progenitor cells, the surrounding support cells and the extracellular matrix scaffold, all constituting the progenitor cell niche, are likely to be important for regulating progenitor cell activity and differentiation. Therefore, identifying novel progenitor cell markers and deciphering their microenvironment could facilitate clinical use. The aims of the present PhD thesis were to expand knowledge of the hepatic progenitor cell niche and characterize it both during development and in disease. Several animal models of hepatic injury are known to induce activation of the progenitor cells. In order to identify possible progenitor cell markers and niche components

  17. SUPERNOVA 2008bk AND ITS RED SUPERGIANT PROGENITOR

    SciTech Connect

    Van Dyk, Schuyler D.; Elias-Rosa, Nancy; and others

    2012-01-15

    We have obtained limited photometric and spectroscopic data for supernova (SN) 2008bk in NGC 7793, primarily at {approx}> 150 days after explosion. We find that it is a Type II-Plateau (II-P) SN that most closely resembles the low-luminosity SN 1999br in NGC 4900. Given the overall similarity between the observed light curves and colors of SNe 2008bk and 1999br, we infer that the total visual extinction to SN 2008bk (A{sub V} = 0.065 mag) must be almost entirely due to the Galactic foreground, similar to what has been assumed for SN 1999br. We confirm the identification of the putative red supergiant (RSG) progenitor star of the SN in high-quality g'r'i' images we had obtained in 2007 at the Gemini-South 8 m telescope. Little ambiguity exists in this progenitor identification, qualifying it as the best example to date, next to the identification of the star Sk -69 Degree-Sign 202 as the progenitor of SN 1987A. From a combination of photometry of the Gemini images with that of archival, pre-SN, Very Large Telescope JHK{sub s} images, we derive an accurate observed spectral energy distribution (SED) for the progenitor. We find from nebular strong-intensity emission-line indices for several H II regions near the SN that the metallicity in the environment is likely subsolar (Z Almost-Equal-To 0.6 Z{sub Sun }). The observed SED of the star agrees quite well with synthetic SEDs obtained from model RSG atmospheres with effective temperature T{sub eff} = 3600 {+-} 50 K. We find, therefore, that the star had a bolometric luminosity with respect to the Sun of log (L{sub bol}/L{sub Sun} ) = 4.57 {+-} 0.06 and radius R{sub *} = 496 {+-} 34 R{sub Sun} at {approx}6 months prior to explosion. Comparing the progenitor's properties with theoretical massive-star evolutionary models, we conclude that the RSG progenitor had an initial mass in the range of 8-8.5 M{sub Sun }. This mass is consistent with, albeit at the low end of, the inferred range of initial masses for SN II

  18. Cardiac Progenitor Cell Commitment is Inhibited by Nuclear Akt Expression

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Kimberlee M.; Din, Shabana; Gude, Natalie; Konstandin, Mathias H.; Wu, Weitao; Quijada, Pearl; Sussman, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    Rationale Stem cell therapies to regenerate damaged cardiac tissue represent a novel approach to treat heart disease. However, the majority of adoptively transferred stem cells delivered to damaged myocardium do not survive long enough to impart protective benefits, resulting in modest functional improvements. Strategies to improve survival and proliferation of stem cells show promise for significantly enhancing cardiac function and regeneration. Objective Determine if injected cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) genetically modified to overexpress nuclear Akt (CPCeA) increase structural and functional benefits to infarcted myocardium relative to control CPCs. Methods and Results CPCeA exhibit significantly increased proliferation and secretion of paracrine factors compared to CPCs. However, CPCeA exhibit impaired capacity for lineage commitment in vitro. Infarcted hearts receiving intramyocardial injection of CPCeA have increased recruitment of endogenous c-kit cells compared to CPCs, but neither population provides long-term functional and structural improvements compared to saline injected controls. Pharmacologic inhibition of Akt alleviated blockade of lineage commitment in CPCeA. Conclusions Although overexpression of nuclear Akt promotes rapid proliferation and secretion of protective paracrine factors, the inability of CPCeA to undergo lineage commitment hinders their capacity to provide functional or structural benefits to infarcted hearts. Despite enhanced recruitment of endogenous CPCs, lack of functional improvement in CPCeA treated hearts demonstrates CPC lineage commitment is essential to the regenerative response. Effective stem cell therapies must promote cellular survival and proliferation without inhibiting lineage commitment. Since CPCeA exhibit remarkable proliferative potential, an inducible system mediating nuclear Akt expression could be useful to augment cell therapy approaches. PMID:21350213

  19. Renal blood flow and oxygenation drive nephron progenitor differentiation.

    PubMed

    Rymer, Christopher; Paredes, Jose; Halt, Kimmo; Schaefer, Caitlin; Wiersch, John; Zhang, Guangfeng; Potoka, Douglas; Vainio, Seppo; Gittes, George K; Bates, Carlton M; Sims-Lucas, Sunder

    2014-08-01

    During kidney development, the vasculature develops via both angiogenesis (branching from major vessels) and vasculogenesis (de novo vessel formation). The formation and perfusion of renal blood vessels are vastly understudied. In the present study, we investigated the regulatory role of renal blood flow and O2 concentration on nephron progenitor differentiation during ontogeny. To elucidate the presence of blood flow, ultrasound-guided intracardiac microinjection was performed, and FITC-tagged tomato lectin was perfused through the embryo. Kidneys were costained for the vasculature, ureteric epithelium, nephron progenitors, and nephron structures. We also analyzed nephron differentiation in normoxia compared with hypoxia. At embryonic day 13.5 (E13.5), the major vascular branches were perfused; however, smaller-caliber peripheral vessels remained unperfused. By E15.5, peripheral vessels started to be perfused as well as glomeruli. While the interior kidney vessels were perfused, the peripheral vessels (nephrogenic zone) remained unperfused. Directly adjacent and internal to the nephrogenic zone, we found differentiated nephron structures surrounded and infiltrated by perfused vessels. Furthermore, we determined that at low O2 concentration, little nephron progenitor differentiation was observed; at higher O2 concentrations, more differentiation of the nephron progenitors was induced. The formation of the developing renal vessels occurs before the onset of blood flow. Furthermore, renal blood flow and oxygenation are critical for nephron progenitor differentiation. PMID:24920757

  20. Simultaneous characterization of progenitor cell compartments in adult human liver.

    PubMed

    Porretti, Laura; Cattaneo, Alessandra; Colombo, Federico; Lopa, Raffaella; Rossi, Giorgio; Mazzaferro, Vincenzo; Battiston, Carlo; Svegliati-Baroni, Gianluca; Bertolini, Francesco; Rebulla, Paolo; Prati, Daniele

    2010-01-01

    The human liver is a complex tissue consisting of epithelial, endothelial, hematopoietic, and mesenchymal elements that probably derive from multiple lineage-committed progenitors, but no comprehensive study aimed at identifying and characterizing intrahepatic precursors has yet been published. Cell suspensions for this study were obtained by enzymatic digestion of liver specimens taken from 20 patients with chronic liver disease and 13 multiorgan donors. Stem and progenitor cells were first isolated, amplified, and characterized ex vivo according to previously validated methods, and then optimized flow cytometry was used to assess their relative frequencies and characterize their immunophenotypes in the clinical specimens. Stem and progenitor cells committed to hematopoietic, endothelial, epithelial, and mesenchymal lineages were clearly identifiable in livers from both healthy and diseased subjects. Within the mononuclear liver cell compartment, epithelial progenitors [epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM)(+)/CD49f(+)/CD29(+)/CD45(-)] accounted for 2.7-3.5% whereas hematopoietic (CD34(+)/CD45(+)), endothelial [vascular endothelial growth factor-2 (KDR)(+)/CD146(+)/CD45(-)], and mesenchymal [CD73(+)/CD105(+)/CD90 (Thy-1)(+)/CD45 (-)] stem cells and progenitors accounted for smaller fractions (0.02-0.6%). The patients' livers had higher percentages of hematopoietic and endothelial precursors than those of the donors. In conclusion, we identified and characterized precursors committed to four different lineages in adult human liver. We also optimized a flow cytometry approach that will be useful in exploring the contribution of these cells to the pathogenesis of liver disease. PMID:19960544

  1. The Progenitor Mass of the Magnetar SGR1900+14

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Ben; Figer, Don F.; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Trombley, Christine; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Wachter, Stefanie

    2009-12-01

    Magnetars are young neutron stars with extreme magnetic fields (B gsim 1014-1015 G). How these fields relate to the properties of their progenitor stars is not yet clearly established. However, from the few objects associated with young clusters it has been possible to estimate the initial masses of the progenitors, with results indicating that a very massive progenitor star (M prog> 40 M _{⊙}) is required to produce a magnetar. Here, we present adaptive-optics assisted Keck/NIRC2 imaging and Keck/NIRSPEC spectroscopy of the cluster associated with the magnetar SGR 1900+14, and report that the initial progenitor star mass of the magnetar was a factor of 2 lower than this limit, M prog = 17 ± 2 M_{⊙}. Our result presents a strong challenge to the concept that magnetars can only result from very massive progenitors. Instead, we favor a mechanism which is dependent on more than just initial stellar mass for the production of these extreme magnetic fields, such as the "fossil-field" model or a process involving close binary evolution.

  2. Inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 affects endothelial progenitor cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Colleselli, Daniela; Bijuklic, Klaudija; Mosheimer, Birgit A.; Kaehler, Christian M. . E-mail: C.M.Kaehler@uibk.ac.at

    2006-09-10

    Growing evidence indicates that inducible cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is involved in the pathogenesis of inflammatory disorders and various types of cancer. Endothelial progenitor cells recruited from the bone marrow have been shown to be involved in the formation of new vessels in malignancies and discussed for being a key point in tumour progression and metastasis. However, until now, nothing is known about an interaction between COX and endothelial progenitor cells (EPC). Expression of COX-1 and COX-2 was detected by semiquantitative RT-PCR and Western b