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Sample records for cdms ii fermi

  1. The CDMS II data acquisition system

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, D.A.; Burke, S.; Cooley, J.; Crisler, M.; Cushman, P.; DeJongh, F.; Duong, L.; Ferril, R.; Golwala, S.R.; Hall, J.; Holmgren, D.; /Fermilab /Texas A-M

    2011-01-01

    The Data Acquisition System for the CDMS II dark matter experiment was designed and built when the experiment moved to its new underground installation at the Soudan Lab. The combination of remote operation and increased data load necessitated a completely new design. Elements of the original LabView system remained as stand-alone diagnostic programs, but the main data processing moved to a VME-based system with custom electronics for signal conditioning, trigger formation and buffering. The data rate was increased 100-fold and the automated cryogenic system was linked to the data acquisition. A modular server framework with associated user interfaces was implemented in Java to allow control and monitoring of the entire experiment remotely.

  2. Beyond the CDMS-II dark matter search: SuperCDMS

    SciTech Connect

    Brink, Paul L.; et al.

    2005-03-01

    Presently the CDMS-II collaboration's Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) search at the Soudan Underground Laboratory sets the most stringent exclusion limits of any WIMP cold dark matter direct-detection experiment. To extend our reach further, to WIMP-nucleon cross sections in the range 10{sup -46}-10{sup -44} cm{sup 2}, we propose SuperCDMS, which would take advantage of a very deep site. One promising site is the recently approved SNOLab facility in Canada. In this paper we will present our overall plan, identify primary issues, and set the goals that need to be met prior to embarking upon each phase of SuperCDMS.

  3. Dark matter searches with the CDMS II experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Saab, T.; Collaboration: CDMS Collaboration

    2014-06-24

    The CDMS II experiment ran between 2003 and 2009. A total of 30 germanium and silicon ZIP detectors were operated, producing a high quality set of data that has been analyzed for evidence of and placed leading constraints on standard, low-mass, electron-recoil, and annually modulating WIMP interactions. This article will describe the general operation principles behind the CDMS detectors, report on the results of major Ge and Si detector analyses, and describe the current and future activities of the SuperCDMS program.

  4. Advancing the Search for Dark Matter: from CDMS II to SuperCDMS

    SciTech Connect

    Hertel, Scott A.

    2012-09-01

    An overwhelming proportion of the universe (83% by mass) is composed of particles we know next to nothing about. Detecting these dark matter particles directly, through hypothesized weak-force-mediated recoils with nuclear targets here on earth, could shed light on what these particles are, how they relate to the standard model, and how the standard model ts within a more fundamental understanding. This thesis describes two such experimental eorts: CDMS II (2007-2009) and SuperCDMS Soudan (ongoing). The general abilities and sensitivities of both experiments are laid out, placing a special emphasis on the detector technology, and how this technology has evolved from the rst to the second experiment. Some topics on which I spent signicant eorts are described here only in overview (in particular the details of the CDMS II analysis, which has been laid out many times before), and some topics which are not described elsewhere are given a somewhat deeper treatment. In particular, this thesis is hopefully a good reference for those interested in the annual modulation limits placed on the low-energy portion of the CDMS II exposure, the design of the detectors for SuperCDMS Soudan, and an overview of the extremely informative data these detectors produce. It is an exciting time. The technology I've had the honor to work on the past few years provides a wealth of information about each event, more so than any other direct detection experiment, and we are still learning how to optimally use all this information. Initial tests from the surface and now underground suggest this technology has the background rejection abilities necessary for a planned 200kg experiment or even ton-scale experiment, putting us on the threshold of probing parameter space orders of magnitude from where the eld currently stands.

  5. Results from the Final Exposure of the CDMS II Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Z.; Akerib, D.S.; Arrenberg, S.; Bailey, C.N.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Baudis, L.; Bauer, D.A.; Brink, P.L.; Bruch, T.; Bunker, R.; Cabrera, B.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /UC, Santa Barbara

    2009-12-01

    We report results from a blind analysis of the final data taken with the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search experiment (CDMS II) at the Soudan Underground Laboratory, Minnesota, USA. A total raw exposure of 612 kg-days was analyzed for this work. We observed two events in the signal region; based on our background estimate, the probability of observing two or more background events is 23%. These data set an upper limit on the Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP)-nucleon elastic-scattering spin-independent cross-section of 7.0 x 10{sup -44} cm{sup 2} for a WIMP of mass 70 GeV/c{sup 2} at the 90% confidence level. Combining this result with all previous CDMS II data gives an upper limit on the WIMP-nucleon spin-independent cross-section of 3.8 x 10{sup -44} cm{sup 2} for a WIMP of mass 70 GeV/c{sup 2}. We also exclude new parameter space in recently proposed inelastic dark matter models.

  6. Search for lightly ionizing particles using CDMS-II data and fabrication of CDMS detectors with improved homogeneity in properties

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, Kunj Bihari

    2013-12-01

    Fundamental particles are always observed to carry charges which are integral multiples of one-third charge of electron, e/3. While this is a well established experimental fact, the theoretical understanding for the charge quantization phenomenon is lacking. On the other hand, there exist numerous theoretical models that naturally allow for existence of particles with fractional electromagnetic charge. These particles, if existing, hint towards existence of physics beyond the standard model. Multiple high energy, optical, cosmological and astrophysical considerations restrict the allowable mass-charge parameter space for these fractional charges. Still, a huge unexplored region remains. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS-II), located at Soudan mines in northern Minnesota, employs germanium and silicon crystals to perform direct searches for a leading candidate to dark matter called Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). Alternately, the low detection threshold allows search for fractional electromagnetic-charged particles, or Lightly Ionizing Particles (LIPs), moving at relativistic speed. Background rejection is obtained by requiring that the magnitude and location of energy deposited in each detector be consistent with corresponding \\signatures" resulting from the passage of a fractionally charged particle. In this dissertation, the CDMS-II data is analyzed to search for LIPs, with an expected background of 0.078 0.078 events. No candidate events are observed, allowing exclusion of new parameter space for charges between e/6 and e/200.

  7. Development of CDMS-II Surface Event Rejection Techniques and Their Extensions to Lower Energy Thresholds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofer, Thomas James

    2014-10-01

    The CDMS-II phase of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search, a dark matter direct-detection experiment, was operated at the Soudan Underground Laboratory from 2003 to 2008. The full payload consisted of 30 ZIP detectors, totaling approximately 1.1 kg of Si and 4.8 kg of Ge, operated at temperatures of 50 mK. The ZIP detectors read out both ionization and phonon pulses from scatters within the crystals; channel segmentation and analysis of pulse timing parameters allowed effective fiducialization of the crystal volumes and background rejection sufficient to set world-leading limits at the times of their publications. A full re-analysis of the CDMS-II data was motivated by an improvement in the event reconstruction algorithms which improved the resolution of ionization energy and timing information. The Ge data were re-analyzed using three distinct background-rejection techniques; the Si data from runs 125--128 were analyzed for the first time using the most successful of the techniques from the Ge re-analysis. The results of these analyses prompted a novel "mid-threshold" analysis, wherein energy thresholds were lowered but background rejection using phonon timing information was still maintained. This technique proved to have significant discrimination power, maintaining adequate signal acceptance and minimizing background leakage. The primary background for CDMS-II analyses comes from surface events, whose poor ionization collection make them difficult to distinguish from true nuclear recoil events. The novel detector technology of SuperCDMS, the successor to CDMS-II, uses interleaved electrodes to achieve full ionization collection for events occurring at the top and bottom detector surfaces. This, along with dual-sided ionization and phonon instrumentation, allows for excellent fiducialization and relegates the surface-event rejection techniques of CDMS-II to a secondary level of background discrimination. Current and future SuperCDMS results hold great promise for

  8. Global interpretation of direct Dark Matter searches after CDMS-II results

    SciTech Connect

    Kopp, Joachim; Schwetz, Thomas; Zupan, Jure

    2009-12-01

    We perform a global fit to data from Dark Matter (DM) direct detection experiments, including the recent CDMS-II results. We discuss possible interpretations of the DAMA annual modulation signal in terms of spin-independent and spin-dependent DM-nucleus interactions, both for elastic and inelastic scattering. We find that for the spin-dependent inelastic scattering off protons a good fit to all data is obtained. We present a simple toy model realizing such a scenario. In all the remaining cases the DAMA allowed regions are disfavored by other experiments or suffer from severe fine tuning of DM parameters with respect to the galactic escape velocity. Finally, we also entertain the possibility that the two events observed in CDMS-II are an actual signal of elastic DM scattering, and we compare the resulting CDMS-II allowed regions to the exclusion limits from other experiments.

  9. Development of CDMS-II Surface Event Rejection Techniques and Their Extensions to Lower Energy Thresholds

    SciTech Connect

    Hofer, Thomas James

    2014-12-01

    The CDMS-II phase of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search, a dark matter direct-detection experiment, was operated at the Soudan Underground Laboratory from 2003 to 2008. The full payload consisted of 30 ZIP detectors, totaling approximately 1.1 kg of Si and 4.8 kg of Ge, operated at temperatures of 50 mK. The ZIP detectors read out both ionization and phonon pulses from scatters within the crystals; channel segmentation and analysis of pulse timing parameters allowed e ective ducialization of the crystal volumes and background rejection su cient to set world-leading limits at the times of their publications. A full re-analysis of the CDMS-II data was motivated by an improvement in the event reconstruction algorithms which improved the resolution of ionization energy and timing information. The Ge data were re-analyzed using three distinct background-rejection techniques; the Si data from runs 125 - 128 were analyzed for the rst time using the most successful of the techniques from the Ge re-analysis. The results of these analyses prompted a novel \\mid-threshold" analysis, wherein energy thresholds were lowered but background rejection using phonon timing information was still maintained. This technique proved to have signi cant discrimination power, maintaining adequate signal acceptance and minimizing background leakage. The primary background for CDMS-II analyses comes from surface events, whose poor ionization collection make them di cult to distinguish from true nuclear recoil events. The novel detector technology of SuperCDMS, the successor to CDMS-II, uses interleaved electrodes to achieve full ionization collection for events occurring at the top and bottom detector surfaces. This, along with dual-sided ionization and phonon instrumentation, allows for excellent ducialization and relegates the surface-event rejection techniques of CDMS-II to a secondary level of background discrimination. Current and future SuperCDMS results hold great promise for mid- to low

  10. Bound on Z{sup '} mass from CDMS II in the dark left-right gauge model II

    SciTech Connect

    Khalil, Shaaban; Lee, Hye-Sung; Ma, Ernest

    2010-03-01

    With the recent possible signal of dark matter from the CDMS II experiment, the Z{sup '} mass of a new version of the dark left-right gauge model (DLRM II) is predicted to be at around a TeV. As such, it has an excellent discovery prognosis at the operating Large Hadron Collider.

  11. Results from a Low-Energy Analysis of the CDMS II Germanium Data

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Z.; Akerib, D.S.; Arrenberg, S.; Bailey, C.N.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Baudis, L.; Bauer, D.A.; Brink, P.L.; Bruch, T.; Bunker, R.; Cabrera, B.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /UC, Santa Barbara

    2010-11-01

    We report results from a reanalysis of data from the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS II) experiment at the Soudan Underground Laboratory. Data taken between October 2006 and September 2008 using eight germanium detectors are reanalyzed with a lowered, 2 keV recoil-energy threshold, to give increased sensitivity to interactions from Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) with masses below {approx}10 GeV/c{sup 2}. This analysis provides stronger constraints than previous CDMS II results for WIMP masses below 9 GeV/c{sup 2} and excludes parameter space associated with possible low-mass WIMP signals from the DAMA/LIBRA and CoGeNT experiments.

  12. Measurement of Nuclear Recoils in the CDMS II Dark Matter Search

    SciTech Connect

    Fallows, Scott Mathew

    2014-12-01

    The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment is designed to directly detect elastic scatters of weakly-interacting massive dark matter particles (WIMPs), on target nuclei in semiconductor crystals composed of Si and Ge. These scatters would occur very rarely, in an overwhelming background composed primarily of electron recoils from photons and electrons, as well as a smaller but non-negligible background of WIMP-like nuclear recoils from neutrons. The CDMS II generation of detectors simultaneously measure ionization and athermal phonon signals from each scatter, allowing discrimination against virtually all electron recoils in the detector bulk. Pulse-shape timing analysis allows discrimination against nearly all remaining electron recoils taking place near detector surfaces. Along with carefully limited neutron backgrounds, this experimental program allowed for \\background- free" operation of CDMS II at Soudan, with less than one background event expected in each WIMP-search analysis. As a result, exclusionary upper-limits on WIMP-nucleon interaction cross section were placed over a wide range of candidate WIMP masses, ruling out large new regions of parameter space.

  13. Background Characterization and Discrimination in the Final Analysis of the CDMS II Phase of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search

    SciTech Connect

    Fritts, Matthew C.

    2011-02-01

    The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) is designed to detectWeakly-Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) in the Milky Way halo. The phase known as CDMS II was performed in the Soudan Underground Laboratory. The final set of CDMS II data, collected in 2007-8 and referred to as Runs 125-8, represents the largest exposure to date for the experiment. We seek collisions between WIMPs and atomic nuclei in disk-shaped germanium and silicon detectors. A key design feature is to keep the rate of collisions from known particles producing WIMP-like signals very small. The largest category of such background is interactions with electrons in the detectors that occur very close to one of the faces of the detector. The next largest category is collisions between energetic neutrons that bypass the experimental shielding and nuclei in the detectors. Analytical efforts to discriminate these backgrounds and to estimate the rate at which such discrimination fails have been refined and improved throughout each phase of CDMS. Next-generation detectors for future phases of CDMS require testing at cryogenic test facilities. One such facility was developed at the University of Minnesota in 2007 and has been used continuously since then to test detectors for the next phase of the experiment, known as SuperCDMS.

  14. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS-II) Experiment: First Results from the Soudan Mine

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Clarence Leeder

    2004-09-01

    There is an abundance of evidence that the majority of the mass of the universe is in the form of non-baryonic non-luminous matter that was non-relativistic at the time when matter began to dominate the energy density. Weakly Interacting Massive Particles, or WIMPs, are attractive cold dark matter candidates because they would have a relic abundance today of {approx}0.1 which is consistent with precision cosmological measurements. WIMPs are also well motivated theoretically. Many minimal supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model have WIMPs in the form of the lightest supersymmetric partner, typically taken to be the neutralino. The CDMS II experiment searches for WIMPs via their elastic scattering off of nuclei. The experiment uses Ge and Si ZIP detectors, operated at <50 mK, which simultaneously measure the ionization and athermal phonons produced by the scattering of an external particle. The dominant background for the experiment comes from electromagnetic interactions taking place very close to the detector surface. Analysis of the phonon signal from these interactions makes it possible to discriminate them from interactions caused by WIMPs. This thesis presents the details of an important aspect of the phonon pulse shape analysis known as the ''Lookup Table Correction''. The Lookup Table Correction is a position dependent calibration of the ZIP phonon response which improves the rejection of events scattering near the detector surface. The CDMS collaboration has recently commissioned its experimental installation at the Soudan Mine. This thesis presents an analysis of the data from the first WIMP search at the Soudan Mine. The results of this analysis set the world's lowest exclusion limit making the CDMS II experiment at Soudan the most sensitive WIMP search to this date.

  15. Task I: Dark Matter Search Experiments with Cryogenic Detectors: CDMS-I and CDMS-II Task II: Experimental Study of Neutrino Properties: EXO and KamLAND

    SciTech Connect

    Cabrera, Blas; Gratta, Giorgio

    2013-08-30

    Dark Matter Search - During the period of performance, our group continued the search for dark matter in the form of weakly interacting massive particles or WIMPs. As a key member of the CDMS (Cryogenic Dark Matter Search) collaboration, we completed the CDMS II experiment which led the field in sensitivity for more than five years. We fabricated all detectors, and participated in detector testing and verification. In addition, we participated in the construction and operation of the facility at the Soudan Underground Laboratory and played key roles in the data acquisition and analysis. Towards the end of the performance period, we began operating the SuperCDMS Soudan experiment, which consists of 15 advanced Ge (9 kg) detectors. The advanced detector design called iZIP grew out of our earlier DOE Particle Detector R&D program which demonstrated the rejection of surface electrons to levels where they are no longer the dominant source of background. Our group invented this advanced design and these larger detectors were fabricated on the Stanford campus in collaboration with the SLAC CDMS group and the Santa Clara University group. The sensitivity reach is expected to be up to 5 times better than CDMS II after two years of operation. We will check the new limits on WIMPs set by XENON100, and we expect improved sensitivity for light mass WIMPs beyond that of any other existing experiment. Our group includes the Spokesperson for SuperCDMS and continues to make important contributions to improvements in the detector technology which are enabling the very low trigger thresholds used to explore the low mass WIMP region. We are making detailed measurements of the charge transport and trapping within Ge crystals, measuring the diffusive trapping distance of the quasiparticle excitations within the Al phonon collector fins on the detector surface, and we are contributing to the development of much improved detector Monte Carlos which are essential to guide the detector

  16. Measurement of Nuclear Recoils in the CDMS II Dark Matter Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallows, Scott M.

    The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment is designed to directly detect elastic scatters of weakly-interacting massive dark matter particles (WIMPs), on target nuclei in semiconductor crystals composed of Si and Ge. These scatters would occur very rarely, in an overwhelming background composed primarily of electron recoils from photons and electrons, as well as a smaller but non-negligible background of WIMP-like nuclear recoils from neutrons. The CDMS~II generation of detectors simultaneously measure ionization and athermal phonon signals from each scatter, allowing discrimination against virtually all electron recoils in the detector bulk. Pulse-shape timing analysis allows discrimination against nearly all remaining electron recoils taking place near detector surfaces. Along with carefully limited neutron backgrounds, this experimental program allowed for "background-free'' operation of CDMS~II at Soudan, with less than one background event expected in each WIMP-search analysis. As a result, exclusionary upper-limits on WIMP-nucleon interaction cross section were placed over a wide range of candidate WIMP masses, ruling out large new regions of parameter space. These results, like any others, are subject to a variety of systematic effects that may alter their final interpretations. A primary focus of this dissertation will be difficulties in precisely calibrating the energy scale for nuclear recoil events like those from WIMPs. Nuclear recoils have suppressed ionization signals relative to electron recoils of the same recoil energy, so the response of the detectors is calibrated differently for each recoil type. The overall normalization and linearity of the energy scale for electron recoils in CDMS~II detectors is clearly established by peaks of known gamma energy in the ionization spectrum of calibration data from a 133Ba source. This electron-equivalent keVee) energy scale enables calibration of the total phonon signal (keVt) by enforcing unity

  17. Improved WIMP-search reach of the CDMS II germanium data

    SciTech Connect

    Agnese, R.; Anderson, A. J.; Asai, M.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Barker, D.; Basu Thakur, R.; Bauer, D. A.; Billard, J.; Borgland, A.; Bowles, M. A.; Brandt, D.; Brink, P. L.; Bunker, R.; Cabrera, B.; Caldwell, D. O.; Calkins, R.; Cerdeno, D. G.; Chagani, H.; Chen, Y.; Cooley, J.; Cornell, B.; Crewdson, C. H.; Cushman, Priscilla B.; Daal, M.; Di Stefano, P. C.; Doughty, T.; Esteban, L.; Fallows, S.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Godfrey, G. L.; Golwala, S. R.; Hall, Jeter C.; Harris, H. R.; Hertel, S. A.; Hofer, T.; Holmgren, D.; Hsu, L.; Huber, M. E.; Jardin, D. M.; Jastram, A.; Kamaev, O.; Kara, B.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kennedy, A.; Kiveni, M.; Koch, K.; Leder, A.; Loer, B.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Lukens, P.; Mahapatra, R.; Mandic, V.; McCarthy, K. A.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Moffatt, R. A.; Oser, S. M.; Page, K.; Page, W. A.; Partridge, R.; Pepin, M.; Phipps, A.; Prasad, K.; Pyle, M.; Qiu, H.; Rau, W.; Redl, P.; Reisetter, A.; Ricci, Y.; Rogers, H. E.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Sander, J.; Schneck, K.; Schnee, R. W.; Scorza, S.; Serfass, B.; Shank, B.; Speller, D.; Toback, D.; Upadhyayula, S.; Villano, A. N.; Welliver, B.; Wilson, J. S.; Wright, D. H.; Yang, X.; Yellin, S.; Yen, J. J.; Young, B. A.; Zhang, J.

    2015-10-31

    CDMS II data from the five-tower runs at the Soudan Underground Laboratory were reprocessed with an improved charge-pulse fitting algorithm. Two new analysis techniques to reject surface-event backgrounds were applied to the 612 kg days germanium-detector weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP)-search exposure. An extended analysis was also completed by decreasing the 10 keV analysis threshold to ~5 keV, to increase sensitivity near a WIMP mass of 8 GeV/c2. After unblinding, there were zero candidate events above a deposited energy of 10 keV and six events in the lower-threshold analysis. This yielded minimum WIMP-nucleon spin-independent scattering cross-section limits of 1.8×10-44 and 1.18×10-41 at 90% confidence for 60 and 8.6 GeV/c2 WIMPs, respectively. This improves the previous CDMS II result by a factor of 2.4 (2.7) for 60 (8.6) GeV/c2 WIMPs.

  18. Improved WIMP-search reach of the CDMS II germanium data

    SciTech Connect

    Agnese, R.

    2015-10-12

    CDMS II data from the five-tower runs at the Soudan Underground Laboratory were reprocessed with an improved charge-pulse fitting algorithm. Two new analysis techniques to reject surface-event backgrounds were applied to the 612 kg days germanium-detector weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP)-search exposure. An extended analysis was also completed by decreasing the 10 keV analysis threshold to ~5 keV, to increase sensitivity near a WIMP mass of 8 GeV/c2. After unblinding, there were zero candidate events above a deposited energy of 10 keV and six events in the lower-threshold analysis. This yielded minimum WIMP-nucleon spin-independent scattering cross-section limits of 1.8×10–44 and 1.18×10–41 at 90% confidence for 60 and 8.6 GeV/c2 WIMPs, respectively. This improves the previous CDMS II result by a factor of 2.4 (2.7) for 60 (8.6) GeV/c2 WIMPs.

  19. Improved WIMP-search reach of the CDMS II germanium data

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Agnese, R.

    2015-10-12

    CDMS II data from the five-tower runs at the Soudan Underground Laboratory were reprocessed with an improved charge-pulse fitting algorithm. Two new analysis techniques to reject surface-event backgrounds were applied to the 612 kg days germanium-detector weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP)-search exposure. An extended analysis was also completed by decreasing the 10 keV analysis threshold to ~5 keV, to increase sensitivity near a WIMP mass of 8 GeV/c2. After unblinding, there were zero candidate events above a deposited energy of 10 keV and six events in the lower-threshold analysis. This yielded minimum WIMP-nucleon spin-independent scattering cross-section limits of 1.8×10–44 andmore » 1.18×10–41 at 90% confidence for 60 and 8.6 GeV/c2 WIMPs, respectively. This improves the previous CDMS II result by a factor of 2.4 (2.7) for 60 (8.6) GeV/c2 WIMPs.« less

  20. A dark-matter search using the final CDMS II dataset and a novel detector of surface radiocontamination

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Zeeshan

    2012-01-01

    Substantial evidence from galaxies, galaxy clusters, and cosmological scales suggests that ~85% of the matter of our universe is invisible. The missing matter, or "dark matter" is likely composed of non-relativistic, non-baryonic particles, which have very rare interactions with baryonic matter and with one another. Among dark matter candidates, Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) are particularly well motivated. In the early universe, thermally produced particles with weak-scale mass and interactions would `freeze out’ at the correct density to be dark matter today. Extensions to the Standard Model of particle physics, such as Supersymmetry, which solve gauge hierarchy and coupling unification problems, naturally provide such particles. Interactions of WIMPs with baryons are expected to be rare, but might be detectable in low-noise detectors. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment uses ionization- and phonon- sensitive germanium particle detectors to search for such interactions. CDMS detectors are operated at the Soudan Underground Laboratory in Minnesota, within a shielded environment to lower cosmogenic and radioactive background. The combination of phonon and ionization signatures from the detectors provides excellent residual-background rejection. This dissertation presents improved techniques for phonon calibration of CDMS II detectors and the analysis of the final CDMS II dataset with 612 kg-days of exposure. We set a limit of 3.8x10$^{-}$44 cm$^{2}$ on WIMP-nucleon spin-independent scattering cross section for a WIMP mass of 70 GeV/c$^{2}$. At the time this analysis was published, these data presented the most stringent limits on WIMP scattering for WIMP masses over 42 GeV/c$^{2}$, ruling out previously unexplored parameter space. Next-generation rare-event searches such as SuperCDMS, COUPP, and CLEAN will be limited in sensitivity, unless they achieve stringent control of the surface radioactive contamination on their detectors. Low

  1. Silicon detector dark matter results from the final exposure of CDMS II.

    PubMed

    Agnese, R; Ahmed, Z; Anderson, A J; Arrenberg, S; Balakishiyeva, D; Basu Thakur, R; Bauer, D A; Billard, J; Borgland, A; Brandt, D; Brink, P L; Bruch, T; Bunker, R; Cabrera, B; Caldwell, D O; Cerdeno, D G; Chagani, H; Cooley, J; Cornell, B; Crewdson, C H; Cushman, P; Daal, M; Dejongh, F; do Couto e Silva, E; Doughty, T; Esteban, L; Fallows, S; Figueroa-Feliciano, E; Filippini, J; Fox, J; Fritts, M; Godfrey, G L; Golwala, S R; Hall, J; Harris, R H; Hertel, S A; Hofer, T; Holmgren, D; Hsu, L; Huber, M E; Jastram, A; Kamaev, O; Kara, B; Kelsey, M H; Kennedy, A; Kim, P; Kiveni, M; Koch, K; Kos, M; Leman, S W; Loer, B; Lopez Asamar, E; Mahapatra, R; Mandic, V; Martinez, C; McCarthy, K A; Mirabolfathi, N; Moffatt, R A; Moore, D C; Nadeau, P; Nelson, R H; Page, K; Partridge, R; Pepin, M; Phipps, A; Prasad, K; Pyle, M; Qiu, H; Rau, W; Redl, P; Reisetter, A; Ricci, Y; Saab, T; Sadoulet, B; Sander, J; Schneck, K; Schnee, R W; Scorza, S; Serfass, B; Shank, B; Speller, D; Sundqvist, K M; Villano, A N; Welliver, B; Wright, D H; Yellin, S; Yen, J J; Yoo, J; Young, B A; Zhang, J

    2013-12-20

    We report results of a search for weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPS) with the silicon detectors of the CDMS II experiment. This blind analysis of 140.2 kg day of data taken between July 2007 and September 2008 revealed three WIMP-candidate events with a surface-event background estimate of 0.41(-0.08)(+0.20)(stat)(-0.24)(+0.28)(syst). Other known backgrounds from neutrons and 206Pb are limited to <0.13 and <0.08 events at the 90% confidence level, respectively. The exposure of this analysis is equivalent to 23.4 kg day for a recoil energy range of 7-100 keV for a WIMP of mass 10  GeV/c2. The probability that the known backgrounds would produce three or more events in the signal region is 5.4%. A profile likelihood ratio test of the three events that includes the measured recoil energies gives a 0.19% probability for the known-background-only hypothesis when tested against the alternative WIMP+background hypothesis. The highest likelihood occurs for a WIMP mass of 8.6  GeV/c2 and WIMP-nucleon cross section of 1.9×10(-41)  cm2. PMID:24483735

  2. A Search for WIMP Dark Matter Using an Optimized Chi-square Technique on the Final Data from the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search Experiment (CDMS II)

    SciTech Connect

    Manungu Kiveni, Joseph

    2012-12-01

    This dissertation describes the results of a WIMP search using CDMS II data sets accumulated at the Soudan Underground Laboratory in Minnesota. Results from the original analysis of these data were published in 2009; two events were observed in the signal region with an expected leakage of 0.9 events. Further investigation revealed an issue with the ionization-pulse reconstruction algorithm leading to a software upgrade and a subsequent reanalysis of the data. As part of the reanalysis, I performed an advanced discrimination technique to better distinguish (potential) signal events from backgrounds using a 5-dimensional chi-square method. This dataanalysis technique combines the event information recorded for each WIMP-search event to derive a backgrounddiscrimination parameter capable of reducing the expected background to less than one event, while maintaining high efficiency for signal events. Furthermore, optimizing the cut positions of this 5-dimensional chi-square parameter for the 14 viable germanium detectors yields an improved expected sensitivity to WIMP interactions relative to previous CDMS results. This dissertation describes my improved (and optimized) discrimination technique and the results obtained from a blind application to the reanalyzed CDMS II WIMP-search data.

  3. A Search for WIMP Dark Matter using an Optimized Chi-square Technique on the Final Data from the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search Experiment (CDMS II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manungu Kiveni, Joseph

    2012-06-01

    During the last two decades, cosmology has become a precision observational science thanks (in part) to the incredible number of experiments performed to better understand the composition of the universe. The large amount of data accumulated strongly indicates that the bulk of the universe's matter is in the form of non-baryonic matter that does not interact electromagnetically. Combined evidence from the dynamics of galaxies and galaxy clusters confirms that most of the mass in the universe is not composed of any known form of matter. Measurements of the cosmic microwave background, big bang nucleosynthesis and many other experiments indicate that ˜80% of the matter in the universe is dark, non-relativistic and cold. The dark matter resides in the halos surrounding galaxies, galaxy clusters and other large-scale structures. Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) are well motivated class of dark matter candidates that arise naturally in supersymmetric extensions to the Standard Model of particles physics, and can be produced as non-relativistic thermal relics in the early universe with about the right density to account for the missing mass. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment seeks to directly detect the keV-scale energy deposited by WIMPs in the galactic halo when they scatter from nuclei in the crystalline detectors made of germanium and silicon. These detectors, called Z-sensitive Ionization and Phonon detectors (ZIPs) are operated at ˜ 45 mK and simultaneously measure the ionization and the (athermal) phonons produced by particle interactions. The ratio of ionization and phonon energies allows discrimination of a low rate of nuclear recoils (expected for WIMPs) from an overwhelming rate of electron recoils (expected for most backgrounds). Phonon-pulse shape and timing enables further suppression of lower-rate interactions at the detector surfaces. This dissertation describes the results of a WIMP search using CDMS II data sets

  4. Conceptual Design for SuperCDMS SNOLAB

    SciTech Connect

    Brink, P.L.; /SLAC

    2012-06-13

    Beyond the present dark matter direct detection experiment at the Soudan underground laboratory, the SuperCDMS Collaboration is engaged in R and D activities for a 100-kg scale germanium dark matter experiment nominally sited at SNOLAB (2070 m overburden of rock). The expected sensitivity after 3 years of running is 3 x 10{sup -46} cm{sup 2} for the spin-independent cross section, an order of magnitude improvement over present exclusion limits for WIMP masses {approx}80 GeV/c{sup 2}. At this depth, and appropriate design of shielding and cryostat, neutron backgrounds will be negligible. The baseline design is an expanded version of CDMS II with Ge substrates (100 x 33 mm discs) instrumented with the iZIP phonon sensor layout to achieve the electron surface-event rejection power required.

  5. Controlling cosmogenic radioactivity in SuperCDMS SNOLAB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Alan; CDMS Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The SuperCDMS SNOLAB experiment is being designed with sensitivity far in excess of existing experiments to low-mass WIMP dark matter. To attain this sensitivity, events due to ionizing radiation that mimic dark matter must be controlled. Depending on the source of ionizing radiation, different strategies are required for its mitigation. Cosmic rays and neutron radiation at earth's surface continuously generate an multitude of radioactive atoms in the materials that will be used to build SuperCDMS SNOLAB. Of these isotopes, we are concerned with isotopes with long half-lives and high production rates. The production and effects of cobalt-60, silicon-32, and tritium will be discussed. A new analysis of the silicon-32 concentration in the CDMS-II silicon detectors will be discussed and compared to the measured concentration of silicon-32 in the silicon used by the DAMIC dark matter search.

  6. Ionization Readout of CDMS Detectors with Low Power, Low Noise HEMTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phipps, A.; Jin, Y.; Sadoulet, B.

    2014-08-01

    We have measured the ionization performance of a CDMS II detector using CNRS/LPN HEMTs as opposed to Si JFETs in the front end electronics. We find no significant difference in ionization resolution when using HEMTs compared to Si JFETs indicating the CNRS/LPN HEMTs can act as a low power, low noise replacement for Si JFETs in cryogenic applications. We present the HEMT DC/AC properties, measured noise in both low impedance and high impedance closed-loop configurations using CDMS electronics, and performance with a CDMS detector exposed to a Am source.

  7. Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS): The Hunt for Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Sadoulet, Bernard

    2006-03-06

    Deciphering the nature of dark matter has great scientific importance. A leading hypothesis is that dark matter is made of Weakly Interactive Massive Particles (WIMPs), which may result from supersymmetry or additional spatial dimensions. The underground search for elastic scattering of WIMPs on suitable targets (the so-called 'direct detection') is currently led by the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search II (CDMS II) experiment. Its sensitivity is ten times better than any other experiment and we hope to obtain another factor ten in the coming two years. After a brief recall of our recent results, I will describe the complementarity between direct detection experiments, the LHC and the ILC and I will outline the role that SLAC could play in this SuperCDMS program.

  8. A search for particle dark matter using cryogenic germanium and silicon detectors in the one- and two-tower runs of CDMS-II at Soudan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogburn, Reuben Walter, IV

    Images of the Bullet Cluster of galaxies in visible light, X-rays, and through gravitational lensing confirm that most of the matter in the universe is not composed of any known form of matter. The combined evidence from the dynamics of galaxies and clusters of galaxies, the cosmic microwave background, big bang nucleosynthesis, and other observations indicates that 80% of the universe's matter is dark, nearly collisionless, and cold. The identity of the dark matter remains unknown, but weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) are a very good candidate. They are a natural part of many supersymmetric extensions to the standard model, and could be produced as a nonrelativistic, thermal relic in the early universe with about the right density to account for the missing mass. The dark matter of a galaxy should exist as a spherical or ellipsoidal cloud, called a "halo" because it extends well past the edge of the visible galaxy. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) seeks to directly detect interactions between WIMPs in the Milky Way's galactic dark matter halo using crystals of germanium and silicon. Our Z-sensitive ionization and phonon ("ZIP") detectors simultaneously measure both phonons and ionization produced by particle interactions. In order to find very rare, low-energy WIMP interactions, we must identify and reject background events caused by environmental radioactivity, radioactive contaminants on the detectors, and cosmic rays. In particular, sophisticated analysis of the timing of phonon signals is needed to eliminate signals caused by beta decays at the detector surfaces. This thesis presents the first two dark matter data sets from the deep underground experimental site at the Soudan Underground Laboratory in Minnesota. These are known as "Run 118," with six detectors (1 kg Ge, 65.2 live days before cuts) and "Run 119," with twelve detectors (1.5 kg Ge, 74.5 live days before cuts). We have analyzed all data from the two runs together in a single

  9. A search for particle dark matter using cryogenic germanium and silicon detectors in the one- and two- tower runs of CDMS-II at Soudan

    SciTech Connect

    Reuben Walter Ogburn, IV

    2008-06-01

    Images of the Bullet Cluster of galaxies in visible light, X-rays, and through gravitational lensing confirm that most of the matter in the universe is not composed of any known form of matter. The combined evidence from the dynamics of galaxies and clusters of galaxies, the cosmic microwave background, big bang nucleosynthesis, and other observations indicates that 80% of the universe's matter is dark, nearly collisionless, and cold. The identify of the dar, matter remains unknown, but weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) are a very good candidate. They are a natural part of many supersymmetric extensions to the standard model, and could be produced as a nonrelativistic, thermal relic in the early universe with about the right density to account for the missing mass. The dark matter of a galaxy should exist as a spherical or ellipsoidal cloud, called a 'halo' because it extends well past the edge of the visible galaxy. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) seeks to directly detect interactions between WIMPs in the Milky Way's galactic dark matter halo using crystals of germanium and silicon. Our Z-sensitive ionization and phonon ('ZIP') detectors simultaneously measure both phonons and ionization produced by particle interactions. In order to find very rare, low-energy WIMP interactions, they must identify and reject background events caused by environmental radioactivity, radioactive contaminants on the detector,s and cosmic rays. In particular, sophisticated analysis of the timing of phonon signals is needed to eliminate signals caused by beta decays at the detector surfaces. This thesis presents the firs two dark matter data sets from the deep underground experimental site at the Soudan Underground Laboratory in Minnesota. These are known as 'Run 118', with six detectors (1 kg Ge, 65.2 live days before cuts) and 'Run 119', with twelve detectors (1.5 kg Ge, 74.5 live days before cuts). They have analyzed all data from the two runs together in a single

  10. Characterization of SuperCDMS 1-inch Ge Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Z.; Akerib, D. S.; Bailey, C. N.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Bauer, D. A.; Beaty, J.; Brink, P. L.; Bunker, R.; Cabrera, B.; Caldwell, D. O.; Clark, K.; Cooley, J.; Cushman, P.; DeJongh, F.; Dragowsky, M. R.; Duong, L.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Filippini, J.; Fritts, M.; Golwala, S. R.; Grant, D. R.; Hall, J.; Hennings-Yeomans, R.; Hertel, S.; Homgren, D.; Hsu, L.; Huber, M. E.; Kamaev, O.; Kiveni, M.; Kos, M.; Leman, S. W.; Mahapatra, R.; Mandic, V.; Moore, D.; McCarthy, K. A.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Nelson, H.; Ogburn, R. W.; Pyle, M.; Qiu, X.; Ramberg, E.; Rau, W.; Reisetter, A.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Sander, J.; Schnee, R. W.; Seitz, D. N.; Serfass, B.; Sundqvist, K. M.; Tomada, A.; Wang, G.; Yellin, S.; Yoo, J.; Young, B. A.

    2009-12-01

    The newly commissioned SuperCDMS Soudan experiment aims to search for WIMP dark matter with a sensitivity to cross sections of 5×10-45cm2 and larger (90% CL upper limit). This goal is facilitated by a new set of germanium detectors, 2.5 times more massive than the ones used in the CDMS-II experiment, and with a different athermal phonon sensor layout that eliminates radial degeneracy in position reconstruction of high radius events. We present characterization data on these detectors, as well as improved techniques for correcting position-dependent variations in pulse shape across the detector. These improvements provide surface-event discrimination sufficient for a reach of 5×10-45cm2.

  11. The unbearable lightness of being: CDMS versus XENON

    SciTech Connect

    Frandsen, Mads T.; Kahlhoefer, Felix; Sarkar, Subir; McCabe, Christopher; Schmidt-Hoberg, Kai E-mail: felix.kahlhoefer@physics.ox.ac.uk E-mail: s.sarkar@physics.ox.ac.uk

    2013-07-01

    The CDMS-II collaboration has reported 3 events in a Si detector, which are consistent with being nuclear recoils due to scattering of Galactic dark matter particles with a mass of ∼ 8.6 GeV and a cross-section on neutrons of ∼ 2 × 10{sup −41} cm{sup 2}. While a previous result from the XENON10 experiment has supposedly ruled out such particles as dark matter, we find by reanalysing the XENON10 data that this is not the case. Some tension remains however with the upper limit placed by the XENON100 experiment, independently of astrophysical uncertainties concerning the Galactic dark matter distribution. We explore possible ways of ameliorating this tension by altering the properties of dark matter interactions. Nevertheless, even with standard couplings, light dark matter is consistent with both CDMS and XENON10/100.

  12. SuperCDMS Cold Hardware Design

    SciTech Connect

    Al Kenany, S.; Rolla, Julie A.; Godfrey, Gary; Brink, Paul L.; Seitz, Dennis N.; Figueroa-Feliciano, Enectali; Huber, Martin E.; Hines, Bruce A.; Irwin, Kent D.; /NIST, Boulder

    2012-06-13

    We discuss the current design of the cold hardware and cold electronics to be used in the upcoming SuperCDMS Soudan deployment. Engineering challenges associated with such concerns as thermal isolation, microphonics, radiopurity, and power dissipation are discussed, along with identifying the design changes necessary for SuperCDMS SNOLAB. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) employs ultrapure 1-inch thick, 3-inch diameter germanium crystals operating below 50 mK in a dilution cryostat. These detectors give an ionization and phonon signal, which gives us rejection capabilities regarding background events versus dark matter signals.

  13. The Accretion Wind Model of Fermi Bubbles. II. Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mou, Guobin; Yuan, Feng; Gan, Zhaoming; Sun, Mouyuan

    2015-09-01

    In a previous work, we have shown that the formation of Fermi bubbles can be due to the interaction between winds launched from the hot accretion flow in Sgr A* and the interstellar medium (ISM). In that work, we focus only on the morphology. In this paper we continue our study by calculating the gamma-ray radiation. Some cosmic-ray protons (CRp) and electrons (CRe) must be contained in the winds, which are likely formed by physical processes such as magnetic reconnection. We have performed MHD simulations to study the spatial distribution of CRp, considering the advection and diffusion of CRp in the presence of magnetic field. We find that a permeated zone is formed just outside of the contact discontinuity between winds and the ISM, where the collisions between CRp and thermal nuclei mainly occur. The decay of neutral pions generated in the collisions, combined with the inverse Compton scattering of background soft photons by the secondary leptons generated in the collisions and primary CRe, can well explain the observed gamma-ray spectral energy distribution. Other features such as the uniform surface brightness along the latitude and the boundary width of the bubbles are also explained. The advantage of this “accretion wind” model is that the adopted wind properties come from the detailed small-scale MHD numerical simulation of accretion flows and the value of mass accretion rate has independent observational evidences. The success of the model suggests that we may seriously consider the possibility that cavities and bubbles observed in other contexts such as galaxy clusters may be formed by winds rather than jets.

  14. The SuperCDMS Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Schnee, Richard W.; Akerib, D.S.; Attisha, M.J.; Bailey, C.N.; Baudis, L.; Bauer, Daniel A.; Brink, P.L.; Brusov, P.P.; Bunker, R.; Cabrera, B.; Caldwell, D.O.; Chang, C.L.; Cooley, J.; Crisler, M.B.; Cushman, P.; Denes, P.; Dragowsky, M.R.; Duong, L.; Filippini, J.; Gaitskell, R.J.; Golwala, S.R.; /Case Western Reserve U. /Brown U. /Florida U. /Fermilab /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /UC, Santa Barbara /Minnesota U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Caltech /Colorado U., Denver /NIST, Boulder /Santa Clara U.

    2005-02-01

    Modest improvements in the level and/or discrimination of backgrounds are needed to keep backgrounds negligible during the three phases of SuperCDMS. By developing production designs that require only modest testing, detector production rates may be improved sufficiently to allow an exposure of 500 ton d within a reasonable time and budget. Overall, the improvement estimates described above are conservative. Previous development efforts have shown that some areas prove easier and provide larger factors while others prove more difficult. The conservative estimates together with the broad approach reduce the risk and give us confidence that we will succeed, providing the surest way to probe to WIMP-nucleon cross sections of 10{sup -46} cm{sup 2}.

  15. FERMI-LAT SENSITIVITY TO DARK MATTER ANNIHILATION IN VIA LACTEA II SUBSTRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Brandon; Johnson, Robert P.; Madau, Piero; Kuhlen, Michael; Diemand, Juerg E-mail: mqk@astro.berkeley.ed

    2010-08-01

    We present a study of the ability of the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope to detect dark matter (DM) annihilation signals from the Galactic subhalos predicted by the Via Lactea II N-body simulation. We implement an improved formalism for estimating the boost factor needed to account for the effect of DM clumping on scales below the resolution of the simulation, and we incorporate a detailed Monte Carlo simulation of the response of the Fermi-LAT, including a simulation of its all-sky observing mode integrated over a 10 year mission. We find that for WIMP masses up to about 150 GeV c {sup -2} in standard supersymmetric models with ({sigma}v) = 3 x 10{sup -26} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1}, a few subhalos could be detectable with >5 standard deviation significance and would likely deviate significantly from the appearance of a point source.

  16. The SuperCDMS SNOLAB Detector Tower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aramaki, Tsuguo

    2016-01-01

    The SuperCDMS collaboration is moving forward with the design and construction of SuperCDMS SNOLAB, where the initial deployment will include ˜ 30 kg of Ge and ˜ 5 kg of Si detectors. Here, we will discuss the associated cryogenic cold hardware required for the detector readout. The phonon signals will be read out with superconducting quantum interference device arrays and the ionization signals will use high electron mobility transistor amplifiers operating at 4 K. A number of design challenges exist regarding the required wiring complex impedance, noise pickup, vibration, and thermal isolation. Our progress to date will be presented.

  17. Background considerations for SuperCDMS

    SciTech Connect

    Cooley, J.; Collaboration: SuperCDMS Collaboration

    2013-08-08

    Rejection and protection from background is a key issue for the next generation SuperCDMS SNOLAB experiment that will have a cross-section sensitivity of better than 8 × 10{sup −46} cm{sup 2} for spin-independent WIMP-nucleon interactions. This paper presents the details of the methods used to reject electromagnetic backgrounds using the new iZIP detectors that are currently operated in the Soudan Underground Laboratory, MN and the methods the collaboration is investigating to protect against neutron background in the next generation SuperCDMS experiment.

  18. The SuperCDMS SNOLAB Detector Tower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aramaki, Tsuguo

    2016-08-01

    The SuperCDMS collaboration is moving forward with the design and construction of SuperCDMS SNOLAB, where the initial deployment will include ˜ 30 kg of Ge and ˜ 5 kg of Si detectors. Here, we will discuss the associated cryogenic cold hardware required for the detector readout. The phonon signals will be read out with superconducting quantum interference device arrays and the ionization signals will use high electron mobility transistor amplifiers operating at 4 K. A number of design challenges exist regarding the required wiring complex impedance, noise pickup, vibration, and thermal isolation. Our progress to date will be presented.

  19. Validation of Phonon Physics in the CDMS Detector Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, K.A.; Leman, S.W.; Anderson, A.J.; Brandt, D.; Brink, P.L.; Cabrera, B.; Cherry, M.; Do Couto E Silva, E.; Cushman, P.; Doughty, T.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Kim, P.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Novak, L.; Partridge, R.; Pyle, M.; Reisetter, A.; Resch, R.; Sadoulet, B.; Serfass, B.; Sundqvist, K.M.; /UC, Berkeley /Stanford U.

    2012-06-06

    The SuperCDMS collaboration is a dark matter search effort aimed at detecting the scattering of WIMP dark matter from nuclei in cryogenic germanium targets. The CDMS Detector Monte Carlo (CDMS-DMC) is a simulation tool aimed at achieving a deeper understanding of the performance of the SuperCDMS detectors and aiding the dark matter search analysis. We present results from validation of the phonon physics described in the CDMS-DMC and outline work towards utilizing it in future WIMP search analyses.

  20. Determining the Appropriate Package and Transportation Methodology for the Detroit Edison, Fermi II Msrs and Associated Components

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, B.

    2007-07-01

    During the spring of 2005, Detroit Edison, Enrico Fermi II Nuclear Power Station (Fermi) decided to disposition two MSRs and associated components scheduled for replacement in the spring of 2006 during the MSR Replacement Outage. Of concern to Fermi was the proper packaging and transportation methodology when dis-positioning a component measuring approximately 110' in length and 13' in diameter and weighing over 300 tons. Upon removal from the Turbine Deck the retired MSRs and associated components were turned over to the Rad Waste Group for packaging and final disposition. Fermi requested quotations from vendors to package, transport, and disposition the MSRs and associated components. However, multiple Vendors informed Fermi that the size and weight of the MSRs were questionable in passing permitting requirements and would require segmentation and volume reduction on site or at a waste processor. Fermi contracted with MHF Logistical Solutions (MHF-LS) based on their ability to receive clearances for shipping the MSRs in one piece via two heavy haul rail conveyances acting as a bolstered load with professionally engineered blocking and bracing configured to support the retired MSRs. (authors)

  1. SuperCDMS Detector Readout Cryogenic Hardware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seitz, D. N.; Ahmed, Z.; Akerib, D. S.; Arrenberg, S.; Bailey, C. N.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Baudis, L.; Bauer, D. A.; Beaty, J.; Brink, P. L.; Bruch, T.; Bunker, R.; Cabrera, B.; Caldwell, D. O.; Clark, K.; Cooley, J.; Cushman, P.; DeJongh, F.; Dragowsky, M. R.; Duong, L.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Filippini, J.; Fritts, M.; Golwala, S. R.; Grant, D. R.; Hall, J.; Hennings-Yeomans, R.; Hertel, S.; Homgren, D.; Hsu, L.; Huber, M. E.; Kamaev, O.; Kiveni, M.; Kos, M.; Leman, S. W.; Mahapatra, R.; Mandic, V.; Moore, D.; McCarthy, K. A.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Nelson, H.; Novak, L.; Ogburn, R. W.; Pyle, M.; Qiu, X.; Ramberg, E.; Rau, W.; Reisetter, A.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Sander, J.; Schnee, R. W.; Serfass, B.; Sundqvist, K. M.; Tomada, A.; Wang, G.; Wikus, P.; Yellin, S.; Yoo, J.; Young, B. A.

    2009-12-01

    SuperCDMS employs 1-inch thick germanium crystals operated below 50mK in a dilution cryostat. Each detector produces ionization and phonon signals. Ionization signals are amplified by JFETs operating at 150K within an assembly mounted on the 4K cryostat stage. These high impedance signals are carried to the FETs by superconducting "vacuum coaxes" which minimize thermal conductivity, stray capacitance, and microphonics. Transition edge sensors produce low-impedance phonon signals, amplified by SQUID arrays mounted on a 600mK stage. Detectors are mounted in a six-sided wiring configuration called a "tower", which carries signals from 40mK to 4K. A flex circuit 3 meters in length carries amplified signals for each detector from 4K to a vacuum bulkhead. We describe the methods used to support the detectors, wiring and amplifier elements at various thermal stages, minimizing electrical noise and thermal loads.

  2. The SuperCDMS Soudan high threshold WIMP search and the planned SuperCDMS SNOLAB experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calkins, R.; SuperCDMS collaboration

    2016-05-01

    There is ample evidence that visible matter cannot account for a large component of the mass in the universe. Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) are one popular hypothesis to account for the missing mass. The Super Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (SuperCDMS) experiment is designed to directly detect WIMPs through interactions with a nucleus in a target crystal. The SuperCDMS detectors are instrumented with phonon and charge sensors, enabling excellent rejection of electron-recoil backgrounds. Approximately 3000 kg-days of exposure have been collected with the SuperCDMS Soudan experiment. We will describe the search for WIMPs with masses between 10-100 GeV and work towards the SuperCDMS SNOLAB experiment.

  3. Search for Axions with the CDMS Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Z.; Akerib, D.S.; Arrenberg, S.; Bailey, C.N.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Baudis, L.; Bauer, D.A.; Beaty, J.; Brink, P.L.; Bruch, T.; Bunker, R.; /UC, Santa Barbara /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2009-02-01

    We report on the first axion search results from the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment at the Soudan Underground Laboratory. An energy threshold of 2 keV for electron-recoil events allows a search for possible solar axion conversion into photons or local Galactic axion conversion into electrons in the germanium crystal detectors. The solar axion search sets an upper limit on the Primakov coupling g{sub a{gamma}{gamma}} of 2.4 x 10{sup ?9} GeV{sup -1} at the 95% confidence level for an axion mass less than 0.1 keV/c{sup 2}. This limit benefits from the first precise measurement of the absolute crystal plane orientations in this type of experiment. The Galactic axion search analysis sets a world-leading experimental upper limit on the axio-electric coupling g{sub a{bar e}e} of 1.4 x 10{sup -12} at the 90% confidence level for an axion mass of 2.5 keV/c{sup 2}. This analysis excludes an interpretation of the DAMA annual modulation result in terms of Galactic axion interactions for axion masses above 1.4 keV/c{sup 2}.

  4. Theory of helimagnons in itinerant quantum systems. II. Nonanalytic corrections to Fermi-liquid behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belitz, D.; Kirkpatrick, T. R.; Rosch, A.

    2006-07-01

    A recent theory for the ordered phase of helical or chiral magnets such as MnSi is used to calculate observable consequences of the helical Goldstone modes or helimagnons. In systems with no quenched disorder, the helimagnon contribution to the specific heat coefficient is shown to have a linear temperature dependence, while the quasiparticle inelastic scattering rate is anisotropic in momentum space and depends on the electronic dispersion relation. For cubic lattices the generic temperature dependence is given by a non-Fermi-liquid T3/2 behavior. The contribution to the temperature dependence of the resistivity is shown to be T5/2 in a Boltzmann approximation. The helimagnon thus leads to nonanalytic corrections to Fermi-liquid behavior. Implications for experiments, and for transport theories beyond the Boltzmann level, are discussed.

  5. Prototyping an Active Neutron Veto for SuperCDMS

    SciTech Connect

    Calkins, Robert; Loer, Ben

    2015-08-17

    Neutrons, originating cosmogenically or from radioactive decays, can produce signals in dark matter detectors that are indistinguishable from Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). To combat this background for the SuperCDMS SNOLAB experiment, we are investigating designs for an active neutron veto within the constrained space of the compact SuperCDMS passive shielding. The current design employs an organic liquid scintillator mixed with an agent to enhance thermal neutron captures, with the scintillation light collected using wavelength-shifting fibers and read out by silicon photo-multipliers. We will describe the proposed veto and its predicted efficiency in detail and give some recent results from our R&D and prototyping efforts.

  6. Prototyping an active neutron veto for SuperCDMS

    SciTech Connect

    Calkins, Robert; Loer, Ben

    2015-08-17

    Neutrons, originating cosmogenically or from radioactive decays, can produce signals in dark matter detectors that are indistinguishable from Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). To combat this background for the SuperCDMS SNOLAB experiment, we are investigating designs for an active neutron veto within the constrained space of the compact SuperCDMS passive shielding. The current design employs an organic liquid scintillator mixed with an agent to enhance thermal neutron captures, with the scintillation light collected using wavelength-shifting fibers and read out by silicon photo-multipliers. We will describe the proposed veto and its predicted efficiency in detail and give some recent results from our R&D and prototyping efforts.

  7. Command and data management system (CDMS) of the Philae lander

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balázs, A.; Baksa, A.; Bitterlich, H.; Hernyes, I.; Küchemann, O.; Pálos, Z.; Rustenbach, J.; Schmidt, W.; Spányi, P.; Sulyán, J.; Szalai, S.; Várhalmi, L.

    2016-08-01

    The paper covers the principal requirements, design concepts and implementation of the hardware and software for the central on-board computer (CDMS) of the Philae lander in the context of the ESA Rosetta space mission, including some technical details. The focus is on the implementation of fault tolerance, autonomous operation and operational flexibility by means of specific linked data structures and code execution mechanisms that can be interpreted as a kind of object oriented model for mission sequencing.

  8. Testing and Characterization of SuperCDMS Dark Matter Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Shank, Benjamin

    2014-05-01

    The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (SuperCDMS) relies on collection of phonons and charge carriers in semiconductors held at tens of milliKelvin as handles for detection of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). This thesis begins with a brief overview of the direct dark matter search (Chapter 1) and SuperCDMS detectors (Chapter 2). In Chapter 3, a 3He evaporative refrigerator facility is described. Results from experiments performed in-house at Stanford to measure carrier transport in high-purity germanium (HPGe) crystals operated at sub-Kelvin temperatures are presented in Chapter 4. Finally, in Chapter 5 a new numerical model and a time-domain optimal filtering technique are presented, both developed for use with superconducting Transition Edge Sensors (TESs), that provide excellent event reconstruction for single particle interactions in detectors read out with superconducting W-TESs coupled to energy-collecting films of Al. This thesis is not intended to be read straight through. For those new to CDMS or dark matter searches, the first two chapters are meant to be a gentle introduction for experimentalists. They are by no means exhaustive. The remaining chapters each stand alone, with different audiences.

  9. Improved Infrastucture for Cdms and JPL Molecular Spectroscopy Catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endres, Christian; Schlemmer, Stephan; Drouin, Brian; Pearson, John; Müller, Holger S. P.; Schilke, P.; Stutzki, Jürgen

    2014-06-01

    Over the past years a new infrastructure for atomic and molecular databases has been developed within the framework of the Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Centre (VAMDC). Standards for the representation of atomic and molecular data as well as a set of protocols have been established which allow now to retrieve data from various databases through one portal and to combine the data easily. Apart from spectroscopic databases such as the Cologne Database for Molecular Spectroscopy (CDMS), the Jet Propulsion Laboratory microwave, millimeter and submillimeter spectral line catalogue (JPL) and the HITRAN database, various databases on molecular collisions (BASECOL, KIDA) and reactions (UMIST) are connected. Together with other groups within the VAMDC consortium we are working on common user tools to simplify the access for new customers and to tailor data requests for users with specified needs. This comprises in particular tools to support the analysis of complex observational data obtained with the ALMA telescope. In this presentation requests to CDMS and JPL will be used to explain the basic concepts and the tools which are provided by VAMDC. In addition a new portal to CDMS will be presented which has a number of new features, in particular meaningful quantum numbers, references linked to data points, access to state energies and improved documentation. Fit files are accessible for download and queries to other databases are possible.

  10. Maximum Likelihood Analysis of Low Energy CDMS II Germanium Data

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Agnese, R.

    2015-03-30

    We report on the results of a search for a Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) signal in low-energy data of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search experiment using a maximum likelihood analysis. A background model is constructed using GEANT4 to simulate the surface-event background from Pb210decay-chain events, while using independent calibration data to model the gamma background. Fitting this background model to the data results in no statistically significant WIMP component. In addition, we also perform fits using an analytic ad hoc background model proposed by Collar and Fields, who claimed to find a large excess of signal-like events in ourmore » data. Finally, we confirm the strong preference for a signal hypothesis in their analysis under these assumptions, but excesses are observed in both single- and multiple-scatter events, which implies the signal is not caused by WIMPs, but rather reflects the inadequacy of their background model.« less

  11. Maximum Likelihood Analysis of Low Energy CDMS II Germanium Data

    SciTech Connect

    Agnese, R.

    2015-03-30

    We report on the results of a search for a Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) signal in low-energy data of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search experiment using a maximum likelihood analysis. A background model is constructed using GEANT4 to simulate the surface-event background from Pb210decay-chain events, while using independent calibration data to model the gamma background. Fitting this background model to the data results in no statistically significant WIMP component. In addition, we also perform fits using an analytic ad hoc background model proposed by Collar and Fields, who claimed to find a large excess of signal-like events in our data. Finally, we confirm the strong preference for a signal hypothesis in their analysis under these assumptions, but excesses are observed in both single- and multiple-scatter events, which implies the signal is not caused by WIMPs, but rather reflects the inadequacy of their background model.

  12. Fermi arc electronic structure and Chern numbers in the type-II Weyl semimetal candidate MoxW1 -xTe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belopolski, Ilya; Xu, Su-Yang; Ishida, Yukiaki; Pan, Xingchen; Yu, Peng; Sanchez, Daniel S.; Zheng, Hao; Neupane, Madhab; Alidoust, Nasser; Chang, Guoqing; Chang, Tay-Rong; Wu, Yun; Bian, Guang; Huang, Shin-Ming; Lee, Chi-Cheng; Mou, Daixiang; Huang, Lunan; Song, You; Wang, Baigeng; Wang, Guanghou; Yeh, Yao-Wen; Yao, Nan; Rault, Julien E.; Le Fèvre, Patrick; Bertran, François; Jeng, Horng-Tay; Kondo, Takeshi; Kaminski, Adam; Lin, Hsin; Liu, Zheng; Song, Fengqi; Shin, Shik; Hasan, M. Zahid

    2016-08-01

    It has recently been proposed that electronic band structures in crystals can give rise to a previously overlooked type of Weyl fermion, which violates Lorentz invariance and, consequently, is forbidden in particle physics. It was further predicted that MoxW1 -xTe2 may realize such a type-II Weyl fermion. Here, we first show theoretically that it is crucial to access the band structure above the Fermi level ɛF to show a Weyl semimetal in MoxW1 -xTe2 . Then, we study MoxW1 -xTe2 by pump-probe ARPES and we directly access the band structure >0.2 eV above ɛF in experiment. By comparing our results with ab initio calculations, we conclude that we directly observe the surface state containing the topological Fermi arc. We propose that a future study of MoxW1 -xTe2 by pump-probe ARPES may directly pinpoint the Fermi arc. Our work sets the stage for the experimental discovery of the first type-II Weyl semimetal in MoxW1 -xTe2 .

  13. THE FERMI BUBBLES. II. THE POTENTIAL ROLES OF VISCOSITY AND COSMIC-RAY DIFFUSION IN JET MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Fulai; Mathews, William G.; Oh, S. Peng

    2012-09-10

    The origin of the Fermi bubbles recently detected by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope in the inner Galaxy is mysterious. In the companion paper Guo and Mathews (Paper I), we use hydrodynamic simulations to show that they could be produced by a recent powerful active galactic nucleus (AGN) jet event. Here, we further explore this scenario to study the potential roles of shear viscosity and cosmic-ray (CR) diffusion on the morphology and CR distribution of the bubbles. We show that even a relatively low level of viscosity ({mu}{sub visc} {approx}> 3 g cm{sup -1} s{sup -1}, or {approx}0.1%-1% of Braginskii viscosity in this context) could effectively suppress the development of Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities at the bubble surface, resulting in smooth bubble edges as observed. Furthermore, viscosity reduces circulating motions within the bubbles, which would otherwise mix the CR-carrying jet backflow near bubble edges with the bubble interior. Thus viscosity naturally produces an edge-favored CR distribution, an important ingredient to produce the observed flat gamma-ray surface brightness distribution. Generically, such a CR distribution often produces a limb-brightened gamma-ray intensity distribution. However, we show that by incorporating CR diffusion that is strongly suppressed across the bubble surface (as inferred from sharp bubble edges) but is close to canonical values in the bubble interior, we obtain a reasonably flat gamma-ray intensity profile. The similarity of the resulting CR bubble with the observed Fermi bubbles strengthens our previous result in Paper I that the Fermi bubbles were produced by a recent AGN jet event. Studies of the nearby Fermi bubbles may provide a unique opportunity to study the potential roles of plasma viscosity and CR diffusion on the evolution of AGN jets and bubbles.

  14. Anisotropic Fermi Couplings due to Large Unquenched Orbital Angular Momentum: Q-band 1H, 14N and 11B ENDOR of bistrispyrazolylborate Co(II)

    PubMed Central

    Myers, William K.; Scholes, Charles P.; Tierney, David L.

    2009-01-01

    We report Q-band ENDOR of 1H, 14N, and 11B at the g|| extreme of the EPR spectrum of bistrispyrazolylborate Co(II), Co(Tp)2 and two structural analogs. This trigonally symmetric, high-spin (hs) S = 3/2 Co(II) complex shows large unquenched ground–state orbital angular momentum, which leads to highly anisotropic electronic g-values [g|| = 8.48, g⊥ = 1.02]. The large g-anisotropy is shown to result in large dipolar couplings near g|| and uniquely anisotropic 14N Fermi couplings, which arise from spin transferred to the nitrogen 2s orbital (2.2 %) via anti-bonding interactions with singly occupied metal dx2−y2 and dz2 orbitals. Large, well-resolved 1H and 11B dipolar couplings were also observed. Taken in concert with our previous X-band ENDOR measurements at g⊥ (Myers, et al, Inorg. Chem. 2008, 47, 6701–6710), the present data allow a detailed analysis of the dipolar hyperfine tensors of two of the four symmetry distinct protons in the parent molecule. In the substituted analogs, changes in hyperfine coupling due to altered metal-proton distances give further evidence of an anisotropic Fermi contact interaction. For the pyrazolyl 3H proton, the data indicate a 0.2 MHz anisotropic contact interaction and ~ 4 % transfer of spin away from Co(II). Dipolar coupling also dominates for the axial boron atoms, consistent with their distance from the Co(II) ion, and resolved 11B quadrupolar coupling showed ~ 30 % electronic inequivalence between the B-H and B-C sp3 bonds. This is the first comprehensive ENDOR study of any hs Co(II) species and lays the foundation for future development. PMID:19591466

  15. Remembering Fermi

    SciTech Connect

    Cronin, James

    2005-03-30

    A combination of the discovery of nuclear fission and the circumstances of the 2nd World War brought Enrico Fermi to Chicago, where he led the team that produced the first controlled, self-sustained nuclear chain reaction. Following the war in 1945 Chancellor Hutchins, William Zachariasen, and Walter Bartky convinced Fermi to accept a professorship at the University of Chicago, where the Institute for Nuclear Studies was established. Fermi served as the leading figure in surely the greatest collection of scientists the world has ever seen. Fermi's tenure at Chicago was cut short by his death in 1954. My talk will concentrate on the years 1945-54. Examples of his research notebooks, his speeches, his teaching, and his correspondence will be discussed.

  16. A possible explanation of low energy γ-ray excess from galactic centre and Fermi bubble by a Dark Matter model with two real scalars

    SciTech Connect

    Modak, Kamakshya Prasad; Majumdar, Debasish

    2015-03-09

    We promote the idea of multi-component Dark Matter (DM) to explain results from both direct and indirect detection experiments. In these models as contribution of each DM candidate to relic abundance is summed up to meet WMAP/Planck measurements of Ω{sub DM}, these candidates have larger annihilation cross-sections compared to the single-component DM models. We illustrate this fact by introducing an extra scalar to the popular single real scalar DM model. We also present detailed calculations for the vacuum stability bounds, perturbative unitarity and triviality constraints on this model. As direct detection experimental results still show some conflict, we kept our options open, discussing different scenarios with different DM mass zones. In the framework of our model we make an interesting observation: the existing direct detection experiments like CDMS II, CoGeNT, CRESST II, XENON 100 or LUX together with the observation of excess low energy γ-ray from galactic centre and Fermi bubble by Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (FGST) already have the capability to distinguish between different DM halo profiles.

  17. A possible explanation of low energy γ-ray excess from galactic centre and Fermi bubble by a Dark Matter model with two real scalars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad Modak, Kamakshya; Majumdar, Debasish; Rakshit, Subhendu

    2015-03-01

    We promote the idea of multi-component Dark Matter (DM) to explain results from both direct and indirect detection experiments. In these models as contribution of each DM candidate to relic abundance is summed up to meet WMAP/Planck measurements of ΩDM, these candidates have larger annihilation cross-sections compared to the single-component DM models. We illustrate this fact by introducing an extra scalar to the popular single real scalar DM model. We also present detailed calculations for the vacuum stability bounds, perturbative unitarity and triviality constraints on this model. As direct detection experimental results still show some conflict, we kept our options open, discussing different scenarios with different DM mass zones. In the framework of our model we make an interesting observation: the existing direct detection experiments like CDMS II, CoGeNT, CRESST II, XENON 100 or LUX together with the observation of excess low energy γ-ray from galactic centre and Fermi bubble by Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (FGST) already have the capability to distinguish between different DM halo profiles.

  18. The CDMS view on molecular data needs of Herschel, SOFIA, and ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Holger S. P.; Endres, C. P.; Stutzki, J.; Schlemmer, S.

    2013-07-01

    The catalog section of the Cologne Database for Molecular Spectroscopy, CDMS, contains mostly rotational transition frequencies, with auxiliary information, of molecules observable in space. The frequency lists are generated mostly from critically evaluated laboratory data employing established Hamiltonian models. The CDMS has been online publicly for more than 12 years, e.g., via the short-cut http://www.cdms.de. Initially constructed as ascii tables, its inclusion into a database environment within the Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Centre (VAMDC, http://www.vamdc.eu) has begun in June 2008. A test version of the new CDMS is about to be released. The CDMS activities have been part of the extensive laboratory spectroscopic investigations in Cologne. Moreover, these activities have also benefit from collaborations with other laboratory spectroscopy groups as well as with astronomers. We will provide some basic information on the CDMS and its participation in the VAMDC project. In addition, some recent detections of molecules as well as spectroscopic studies will be discussed to evaluate the spectroscopic data needs of Herschel, SOFIA, and ALMA in particular in terms of light hydrides, complex molecules, and metal containing species.

  19. A low-threshold analysis of CDMS shallow-site data

    SciTech Connect

    Akerib, D.S.; Attisha, M.J.; Baudis, L.; Bauer, D.A.; Bolozdynya, A.I.; Brink, P.L.; Bunker, R.; Cabrera, B.; Caldwell, D.O.; Chang, C.L.; Clarke, R.M.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Southern Methodist U.

    2010-10-01

    Data taken during the final shallow-site run of the first tower of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS II) detectors have been reanalyzed with improved sensitivity to small energy depositions. Four {approx}224 g germanium and two {approx}105 g silicon detectors were operated at the Stanford Underground Facility (SUF) between December 2001 and June 2002, yielding 118 live days of raw exposure. Three of the germanium and both silicon detectors were analyzed with a new low-threshold technique, making it possible to lower the germanium and silicon analysis thresholds down to the actual trigger thresholds of {approx}1 keV and {approx}2 keV, respectively. Limits on the spin-independent cross section for weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) to elastically scatter from nuclei based on these data exclude interesting parameter space for WIMPs with masses below 9 GeV/c{sup 2}. Under standard halo assumptions, these data partially exclude parameter space favored by interpretations of the DAMA/LIBRA and CoGeNT experiments data as WIMP signals, and exclude new parameter space for WIMP masses between 3 GeV/c{sup 2} and 4 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  20. A Low-threshold Analysis of CDMS Shallow-site Data

    SciTech Connect

    Akerib, D.S.; Attisha, M.J.; Baudis, L.; Bauer, D.A.; Bolozdynya, A.I.; Brink, P.L.; Bunker, R.; Cabrera, B.; Caldwell, D.O.; Chang, C.L.; Clarke, R.M.; Cooley, J.; Crisler, M.B.; Cushman, P.; DeJongh, F.; Dixon, R.; Driscoll, D.D.; Filippini, J.; Funkhouser, S.; Gaitskell, R.J.; Golwala, S.R.; /Caltech /Fermilab /Fermilab /Colorado U., Denver /Case Western Reserve U. /Texas A-M /Minnesota U. /UC, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Caltech /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /UC, Santa Barbara /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Minnesota U. /Queen's U., Kingston /Minnesota U. /St. Olaf Coll. /Florida U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Texas A-M /UC, Santa Barbara /Syracuse U. /UC, Berkeley /Princeton U. /Case Western Reserve U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /UC, Santa Barbara /Fermilab /Santa Clara U.

    2012-06-04

    Data taken during the final shallow-site run of the first tower of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS II) detectors have been reanalyzed with improved sensitivity to small energy depositions. Four {approx}224 g germanium and two {approx}105 g silicon detectors were operated at the Stanford Underground Facility (SUF) between December 2001 and June 2002, yielding 118 live days of raw exposure. Three of the germanium and both silicon detectors were analyzed with a new low-threshold technique, making it possible to lower the germanium and silicon analysis thresholds down to the actual trigger thresholds of {approx}1 and {approx}2 keV, respectively. Limits on the spin-independent cross section for weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) to elastically scatter from nuclei based on these data exclude interesting parameter space for WIMPs with masses below 9 GeV/c{sup 2}. Under standard halo assumptions, these data partially exclude parameter space favored by interpretations of the DAMA/LIBRA and CoGeNT experiments data as WIMP signals, and exclude new parameter space for WIMP masses between 3 and 4 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  1. Nuclear Quantum Gravitation, LIGO, Gravity B Probe. CDMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotas, Ronald

    2012-03-01

    LIGO systems have failed to detect gravity waves of any kind, even after years of trying. This is because there is no space fabric to transmit gravity waves. Space fabric is a fallacy concept of general relativity. There are no gravity waves. Space fabric does not push anything down. General relativity does not explain an object falling to Earth. The Gravity B Probe did not detect real frame dragging in the raw data, only program manipulation that showed a small amount of questionable data. This does not prove material frame dragging. The CDMS has not proven any Dark Matter. A Galaxy is not like a Solar System but rotates as a conglomerate; plainly Newtonian Mechanics; no dark matter needed. Other facts also disprove general relativity. The Sun's corona and Newtonian refraction bend light, not general relativity. The Perihelion of Mercury is a perfectly explainable Newtonian Mechanic, not general relativity. Time does not change, clocks change. No space fabric, no spacetime. There is no general relativity. Nuclear Quantum Gravitation with 30 proofs and indications clearly, logically explains Gravity and Gravitation. It is plainly harmonious with Newtonian Mechanics and Quantum Mechanics. This should clearly be realized and accepted, not general relativity.

  2. SuperCDMS status from Soudan and plans for SNOLab

    SciTech Connect

    Sander, J.; Jastram, A.; Koch, K.; Mahapatra, R.; Prasad, K.; Ahmed, Z.; Cornell, B.; Golwala, S. R.; Moore, D. C.; Nelson, R.; Anderson, A. J.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Hertel, S. A.; Leman, S. W.; Mccarthy, K. A.; Arrenberg, S.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Saab, T.; Welliver, B.; Thakur, R. B.; and others

    2013-05-23

    Matter, as we know it, makes up less than 5% of the Universe. Various astrophysical observations have confirmed that one quarter of the Universe and most of the matter content in the Universe is made up of Dark Matter. The nature of Dark Matter is yet to be discovered and is one of the biggest questions in Physics. Particle Physics combined with astrophysical measurements of the abundance gives rise to a Dark Matter candidate called Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP). The low density of WIMPs in the galaxies and the extremely weak nature of the interaction with ordinary matter make detection of the WIMP an extraordinarily challenging task, with abundant fakes from various radioactive and cosmogenic backgrounds with much stronger electromagnetic interaction. The extremely weak nature of the WIMP interaction dictates detectors that have extremely low naturally occurring radioactive background, a large active volume (mass) of sensitive detector material to maximize statistics, a highly efficient detector based rejection mechanism for the dominant electromagnetic background and sophisticated analysis techniques to reject any residual background. This paper describes the status of the SuperCDMS experiment.

  3. Comparison of CDMS [100] and [111] Oriented Germanium Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Leman, S.W.; Hertel, S.A.; Kim, P.; Cabrera, B.; Do Couto E.Silva, E.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; McCarthy, K.A.; Resch, R.; Sadoulet, B.; Sundqvist, K.M.; /UC, Berkeley

    2012-09-14

    The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) utilizes large mass, 3-inch diameter x 1-inch thick target masses as particle detectors. The target is instrumented with both phonon and ionization sensors and comparison of energy in each channel provides event-by-event classification of electron and nuclear recoils. Fiducial volume is determined by the ability to obtain good phonon and ionization signal at a particular location. Due to electronic band structure in germanium, electron mass is described by an anisotropic tensor with heavy mass aligned along the symmetry axis defined by the [111] Miller index (L valley), resulting in large lateral component to the transport. The spatial distribution of electrons varies significantly for detectors which have their longitudinal axis orientations described by either the [100] or [111] Miller indices. Electric fields with large fringing component at high detector radius also affect the spatial distribution of electrons and holes. Both effects are studied in a 3 dimensional Monte Carlo and the impact on fiducial volume is discussed.

  4. Fermi questions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouffard, Karen

    1999-05-01

    This column contains problems and solutions for the general category of questions known as "Fermi" questions. Forcing the students to use their ability to estimate, giving answers in terms of order-of-magnitude, is not only a challenge for a competition, but a teaching strategy to use in the classroom to develop self-confidence and the ability to analyze answers as to whether or not they make sense, as opposed to relying on the "precision" of a calculator value.

  5. Parallelizing Climate Data Management System, version 3 (CDMS3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeau, D.; Williams, D. N.; Painter, J.; Doutriaux, C.

    2015-12-01

    The Climate Data Management System is an object-oriented data management system, specialized for organizing multidimensional, gridded data used in climate analyses for data observation and simulation. The basic unit of computation in CDMS3 is the variable, which consist of a multidimensional array that represents climate information in four dimensions corresponding to: time, pressure levels, latitudes, and longitudes. As model become more precise in their computation, the volume of data generated becomes bigger and difficult to handle due to the limit of computational resources. Model today can produce data a time frequency of one hourly, three hourly, or six hourly for spatial footprint close to satellite data used run models. The amount of time for scientists to analyze the data and retrieve useful information is more and more unmanageable. Parallelizing libraries such as CMDS3 would ease the burden of working with such big datasets. Multiple approaches of parallelizing are possible. The most obvious one is embarrassingly parallel or pleasingly parallel programming where each computer node processes one file at a time. A more challenging approach is to send a piece of the data to each node for computation and each node will save the results at its right place in a file as a slab of data. This is possible with Hierarchical Data Format 5 (HDF5) using the Message Passing Interface (MPI). A final approach would be the use of Open Multi-Processing API (OpenMP) where a master thread is split in multiple threads for different sections of the main code. Each method has its advantages and disadvantages. This poster bring to light each benefit of these methods and seek to find an optimal solution to compute climate data analyses in a efficient fashion using one or a mixtures of these parallelized methods.

  6. Multi-wavelength Emission from the Fermi Bubble. II. Secondary Electrons and the Hadronic Model of the Bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, K.-S.; Chernyshov, D. O.; Dogiel, V. A.; Ko, C.-M.

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the origin of the gamma-ray flux from the Fermi Bubbles (FBs) in the framework of the hadronic model in which gamma-rays are produced by collisions of relativistic protons with the protons of the background plasma in the Galactic halo. It is assumed in this model that the observed radio emission from the FBs is due to synchrotron radiation of secondary electrons produced by pp collisions. However, if these electrons lose their energy through synchrotron and inverse-Compton emission, the spectrum of secondary electrons will be too soft, and an additional arbitrary component of the primary electrons will be necessary in order to reproduce the radio data. Thus, a mixture of the hadronic and leptonic models is required for the observed radio flux. It was shown that if the spectrum of primary electrons is {\\propto} E_e-2, the permitted range of the magnetic field strength is within the 2-7 μG region. The fraction of gamma-rays produced by pp collisions can reach about 80% of the total gamma-ray flux from the FBs. If the magnetic field is <2 μG or >7 μG the model is unable to reproduce the data. Alternatively, the electrons in the FBs may lose their energy through adiabatic energy losses if there is a strong plasma outflow in the GC. Then, the pure hadronic model is able to reproduce characteristics of the radio and gamma-ray flux from the FBs. However, in this case the required magnetic field strength in the FBs and the power of CR sources are much higher than those following from observations.

  7. MULTI-WAVELENGTH EMISSION FROM THE FERMI BUBBLE. II. SECONDARY ELECTRONS AND THE HADRONIC MODEL OF THE BUBBLE

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, K.-S.; Chernyshov, D. O.; Dogiel, V. A.; Ko, C.-M.

    2015-01-20

    We analyze the origin of the gamma-ray flux from the Fermi Bubbles (FBs) in the framework of the hadronic model in which gamma-rays are produced by collisions of relativistic protons with the protons of the background plasma in the Galactic halo. It is assumed in this model that the observed radio emission from the FBs is due to synchrotron radiation of secondary electrons produced by pp collisions. However, if these electrons lose their energy through synchrotron and inverse-Compton emission, the spectrum of secondary electrons will be too soft, and an additional arbitrary component of the primary electrons will be necessary in order to reproduce the radio data. Thus, a mixture of the hadronic and leptonic models is required for the observed radio flux. It was shown that if the spectrum of primary electrons is ∝E{sub e}{sup −2}, the permitted range of the magnetic field strength is within the 2-7 μG region. The fraction of gamma-rays produced by pp collisions can reach about 80% of the total gamma-ray flux from the FBs. If the magnetic field is <2 μG or >7 μG the model is unable to reproduce the data. Alternatively, the electrons in the FBs may lose their energy through adiabatic energy losses if there is a strong plasma outflow in the GC. Then, the pure hadronic model is able to reproduce characteristics of the radio and gamma-ray flux from the FBs. However, in this case the required magnetic field strength in the FBs and the power of CR sources are much higher than those following from observations.

  8. Enrico Fermi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chen Ning

    2013-05-01

    Enrico Fermi was, of all the great physicists of the 20th century, among the most respected and admired. He was respected and admired because of his contributions to both theoretical and experimental physics, because of his leadership in discovering for mankind a powerful new source of energy, and above all, because of his personal character. He was always reliable and trustworthy. He had both of his feet on the ground all the time. He had great strength, but never threw his weight around. He did not play to the gallery. He did not practise one-up-manship. He exemplified, I always believe, the perfect Confucian gentleman...

  9. Cdms and JPL Molecular Spectroscopy Catalogues in a Common Infrastructure: Vamdc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlemmer, S.; Endres, C. P.; Drouin, B. J.; Yu, S.; Pearson, J. C.; Müller, H. S. P.; Schilke, P.; Stutzki, J.

    2012-06-01

    The virtual atomic and molecular data centre (VAMDC, http://www.vamdc.org/) is a collection of databases with a common data model. It combines molecular spectroscopy databases; like the Cologne Database for Molecular Spectroscopy (CDMS), the Jet Propulsion Laboratory microwave, millimeter and submillimeter spectral line catalogue (JPL) and the HITRAN databases, with other databases, e.g., on molecular collisions (BASECOL, KIDA). VAMDC is open to include other databases adopting the same data structure and access protocols to the data. Due to the common data model all data can be accessed through one portal. The individual databases are located on a system of distributed servers which all can handle a common query language which enables the combined access to the very different data. In this presentation requests to CDMS and JPL will be used to explain the basic ideas behind the very powerful VAMDC instrument, its portal and the query possibilities. A new portal to CDMS allows access to all old and new spectroscopic data. In addition CDMS has a number of new features, in particular meaningful quantum numbers, references linked to data points, and improved documentation. In addition, fit files are accessible for download and queries to other databases are possible. Due to the new format the long anticipated unified spectroscopy database including all relevant information is realized. Together with other groups within the VAMDC consortium we are working on common user tools to simplify the access for new customers and to tailor data requests for users with specified needs, e.g. HFS information. The development of CDMS and JPL within the VAMDC infrastructure will allow a much more sophisticated analysis of complex observational data which, e.g., come from the ALMA telescope.

  10. Geant4 Simulations of SuperCDMS iZip Detector Charge Carrier Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnese, Robert; Brandt, Daniel; Redl, Peter; Asai, Makoto; Faiez, Dana; Kelsey, Mike; Bagli, Enrico; Anderson, Adam; Schlupf, Chandler

    2014-03-01

    The SuperCDMS experiment uses germanium crystal detectors instrumented with ionization and phonon readout circuits to search for dark matter. In order to simulate the response of the detectors to particle interactions the SuperCDMS Detector Monte Carlo (DMC) group has been implementing the processes governing electrons and phonons at low temperatures in Geant4. The charge portion of the DMC simulates oblique propagation of the electrons through the L-valleys, propagation of holes through the Γ-valleys, inter-valley scattering, and emission of Neganov-Luke phonons in a complex applied electric field. The field is calculated by applying a directed walk search on a tetrahedral mesh of known potentials and then interpolating the value. This talk will present an overview of the DMC status and a comparison of the charge portion of the DMC to experimental data of electron-hole pair propagation in germanium.

  11. CDMS detector fabrication improvements and low energy nuclear recoil measurements in germanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jastram, Andrew Karl

    As the CDMS (Cryogenic Dark Matter Search) experiment is scaled up to tackle new dark matter parameter spaces (lower masses and cross-sections), detector production efficiency and repeatability becomes ever more important. A dedicated facility has been commissioned for SuperCDMS detector fabrication at Texas A&M University (TAMU). The fabrication process has been carefully tuned using this facility and its equipment. Production of successfully tested detectors has been demonstrated. Significant improvements in detector performance have been made using new fabrication methods, equipment, and tuning of process parameters. This work has demonstrated the capability for production of next generation CDMS SNOLAB detectors. Additionally, as the dark matter parameter space is probed further, careful calibrations of detector response to nuclear recoil interactions must be performed in order to extract useful information (in relation to dark matter particle characterizations) from experimental results. A neutron beam of tunable energy is used in conjunction with a commercial radiation detector to characterize ionization energy losses in germanium during nuclear recoil events. Data indicates agreement with values predicted by the Lindhard equation, providing a best-fit k-value of 0.146.

  12. The Cologne Database for Molecular Spectroscopy, Cdms, in Times of Herschel, SOFIA, and Alma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Holger S. P.; Stutzki, Jürgen; Schlemmer, Stephan

    2009-06-01

    The CDMS provides in its catalog section atomic and molecular line lists for species that have been or may be observed in space by radio astronomical means. The line list of each molecule is gathered in an individual entry; minor isotopologs have separate entries, and the same applies to excited vibrational states with the exception of some diatomic molecules. With 5 to 10 new or updated entries each month, the CDMS catalog has been growing rapidly over the past 10 years: since February 2009, there have been more than 500 entries in the CDMS - with many more entries to be created. Entries are generated from fitting (mostly) laboratory data to accepted Hamiltonian models. Despite many dedicated laboratory spectroscopic investigations in recent years, accurate data is still lacking frequently - in particular at higher frequencies, for minor isotopic species, for excited vibrational states, or for somewhat larger molecules. While high frequency data are of special concern for the Herschel satellite, scheduled to be launched in mid-April 2009, or for the Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA), the remaining issues mentioned above are important especially for telecope arrays such as the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA). The main features of the CDMS catalog will be described, including recent developments concerning new entries as well as available and planned features. In particular, we will discuss issues relevant for generating a consolidated database that also takes into account information from other databases. Attention will be given to laboratory spectroscopic needs for missions such as Herschel and SOFIA on one hand and for ALMA, the Expanded Very Large Array (EVLA), and other facilities on the other, both, in terms of general aspects and in terms of specific examples. Selected contributions from the Cologne spectroscopy laboratories to address these needs will be presented. H. S. P. Müller, S. Thorwirth, D. A. Roth, G. Winnewisser

  13. Fermi Pulsar Analysis

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation illustrates how analysis of Fermi data reveals new pulsars. Fermi's LAT records the precise arrival time and approximate direction of the gamma rays it detects, but to identify a pul...

  14. A modified detector concept for SuperCDMS: The HiZIP and its charge performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, Kedar Mohan

    SuperCDMS is a leading direct dark matter search experiment which uses solid state detectors (Ge crystals) at milliKelvin temperatures to look for nuclear recoils caused by dark matter interactions in the detector. 'Weakly Interacting Massive Particles' (WIMPs) are the most favoured dark matter candidate particles. SuperCDMS, like many other direct dark matter search experiments, primarily looks for WIMPs. The measurement of both the ionization and the lattice vibration (phonon) signals from an interaction in the detector allow it to discriminate against electron recoils which are the main source of background for WIMP detection. SuperCDMS currently operates about 9 kgs worth of germanium detectors at the Soudan underground lab in northern Minnesota. In its next phase, SuperCDMS SNOLAB, it plans to use 100-200 kg of target mass (Ge) which would allow it to probe more of the interesting and unexplored parameter space for WIMPs predicted by theoretical models. The SuperCDMS Queen's Test Facility is a detector testing facility which is intended to serve detector testing and detector research and development purposes for the SuperCDMS experiment. A modified detector called the 'HiZIP' (Half-iZIP), which is reduced in complexity in comparison to the currently used iZIP (interleaved Z-sensitive Ionization and Phonon mediated) detectors, is studied in this thesis. The HiZIP detector design also serves to discriminate against background from multiple scatter events occurring close to the surfaces in a single detector. Studies carried out to compare the surface event leakage in the HiZIP detector using limited information from iZIP data taken at SuperCDMS test facility at UC Berkley produce a highly conservative upper limit of 5 out of 10,000 events at 90% confidence level. This upper limit is the best among many different HiZIP configurations that were investigated and is comparable to the upper limit calculated for an iZIP detector in the same way using the same data. A

  15. A modified detector concept for SuperCDMS: The HiZIP and its charge performance

    SciTech Connect

    Page, Kedar Mohan

    2013-01-01

    SuperCDMS (Super Cryogenic Dark Matter Search) is a leading direct dark mat-ter search experiment which uses solid state detectors (Ge crystals) at milliKelvintemperatures to look for nuclear recoils caused by dark matter interactions in the de-tector. `Weakly Interacting Massive Particles' (WIMPs) are the most favoured darkmatter candidate particles. SuperCDMS, like many other direct dark matter searchexperiments, primarily looks for WIMPs. The measurement of both the ionizationand the lattice vibration (phonon) signals from an interaction in the detector allow itto discriminate against electron recoils which are the main source of background forWIMP detection.SuperCDMS currently operates about 9 kg of Ge detectors at the Soudan under-ground lab in northern Minnesota. In its next phase, SuperCDMS SNOLAB plansto use 100-200 kg of target mass (Ge) which would allow it to probe more of theinteresting and and as of yet unexplored parameter space for WIMPs predicted bytheoretical models. The SuperCDMS Queen's Test Facility is a detector test facilitywhich is intended to serve as detector testing and detector research and developmentpurposes for the SuperCDMS experiment.A modifed detector called the HiZIP (Half-iZIP), which is reduced in complex-ity in comparison to the currently used iZIP (interleaved Z-sensitive Ionization and Phonon mediated) detectors, is studied in this thesis. The HiZIP detector designalso serves to discriminate against background from multiple scatter events occurringclose to the surfaces in a single detector. Studies carried out to compare the surfaceevent leakage in the HiZIP detector using limited information from iZIP data takenat SuperCDMS test facility at UC Berkley produce a highly conservative upper limitof 5 out of 10,000 events at 90% condence level. This upper limit is the best amongmany different HiZIP congurations that were investigated and is comparable to theupper limit calculated for an HiZIP detector in the same way using the

  16. BKGE: Fermi-LAT Background Estimator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasileiou, Vlasios

    2014-11-01

    The Fermi-LAT Background Estimator (BKGE) is a publicly available open-source tool that can estimate the expected background of the Fermi-LAT for any observational conguration and duration. It produces results in the form of text files, ROOT files, gtlike source-model files (for LAT maximum likelihood analyses), and PHA I/II FITS files (for RMFit/XSpec spectral fitting analyses). Its core is written in C++ and its user interface in Python.

  17. Unveiling Unidentified Fermi Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lizhong; South Pole Telescope

    2016-01-01

    The Fermi γ-ray Space Telescope (Fermi) has surveyed the entire sky at the highest-energy band of the electromagnetic spectrum. The majority of Fermi sources have counterpart identifications from multi-wavelength large-area surveys, particularly in the radio and x-ray bands. However, around 35% of Fermi sources remain unidentified, a problem exasperated by the low resolution of the telescope. Understanding the nature of unidentified Fermi sources is one of the most pressing problems in γ-ray astronomy. The South Pole Telescope (SPT) has completed a survey covering a 2500 square degrees of the southern extragalactic sky with arcminute resolution at millimeter wavelengths. The mm wavelength is the most efficient means to identify blazars and unidentified Fermi sources. Our analysis shows that the SPT point source catalog provides candidate associations for 40% of the unidentified Fermi sources, showing them to be flat-spectrum radio quasars which are extraordinarily bright at millimeter (mm) wavelengths.

  18. Thermal conductance measurements of bolted copper joints for SuperCDMS

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Schmitt, R. L.; Tatkowski, G; Ruschman, M.; Golwala, S.; Kellaris, N.; Daal, M.; Hall, J.; Hoppe, E. W.

    2015-05-22

    Joint thermal conductance testing has been undertaken for bolted copper to copper connections from 60 mK to 26 K. This testing was performed to validate an initial design basis for the SuperCDMS experiment, where a dilution refrigerator will be coupled to a cryostat via multiple bolted connections. Copper used during testing was either gold plated or passivated with citric acid to prevent surface oxidation. Results obtained are well fit by a power law regression of joint thermal conductance to temperature and match well with data collected during a literature review.

  19. Ionization Measurements of SuperCDMS SNOLAB 100 mm Diameter Germanium Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Chagani, H.; Bauer, D.A.; Brandt, D.; Brink, P.L.; Cabrera, B.; Cherry, M.; Silva, E.Do Couto e; Godfrey, G.G.; Hall, J.; Hansen, S.; Hasi, J.; Kelsey, M.; Kenney, C.J.; Mandic, V.; Nagasawa, D.; Novak, L.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Partridge, R.; Radpour, R.; Resch, R.; Sadoulet, B.; /UC, Berkeley /Stanford U. /SLAC /Stanford U. /Santa Clara U. /Minnesota U.

    2012-06-12

    Scaling cryogenic Germanium-based dark matter detectors to probe smaller WIMP-nucleon cross-sections poses significant challenges in the forms of increased labor, cold hardware, warm electronics and heat load. The development of larger crystals alleviates these issues. The results of ionization tests with two 100 mm diameter, 33 mm thick cylindrical detector-grade Germanium crystals are presented here. Through these results the potential of using such crystals in the Super Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (SuperCDMS) SNOLAB experiment is demonstrated.

  20. Thermal conductance measurements of bolted copper joints for SuperCDMS

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, R. L.; Tatkowski, G.; Ruschman, M.; Golwala, S.; Kellaris, N.; Daal, M.; Hall, J.; Hoppe, E. W.

    2015-04-28

    Joint thermal conductance testing has been undertaken for bolted copper to copper connections from 60 mK to 26 K. This testing was performed to validate an initial design basis for the SuperCDMS experiment, where a dilution refrigerator will be coupled to a cryostat via multiple bolted connections. Copper used during testing was either gold plated or passivated with citric acid to prevent surface oxidation. Finally, the results we obtained are well fit by a power law regression of joint thermal conductance to temperature and match well with data collected during a literature review.

  1. Search for Low-Mass Weakly Interacting Massive Particles with SuperCDMS

    SciTech Connect

    Agnese, R.; Anderson, Alan J.; Asai, M.; balakishiyeva, D.; Basu Thakur, R.; Bauer, D. A.; Beaty, John; Billard, J.; Borgland, A.; Bowles, M. A.; Brandt, D.; Brink, P. L.; Bunker, R.; Cabrera, B.; Caldwell, D. O.; Cerdeno, D. G.; Chagani, H.; Chen, Y.; Cherry, M.; Cooley, J.; Cornell, B.; Crewdson, C. H.; Cushman, Priscilla B.; Daal, M.; DeVaney, D.; DeStefano, PC F.; Do Couto E Silva, E.; Doughty, T.; Esteban, L.; Fallows, S.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Godfrey, G. L.; Golwala, S. R.; Hall, Jeter C.; Hansen, S.; Harris, Harold R.; Hertel, S. A.; Hines, B. A.; Hofer, T.; Holmgren, D.; Hsu, L.; Huber, M. E.; Jastram, A.; Kamaev, O.; Kara, B.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kenany, S.; Kennedy, A.; Kiveni, M.; Koch, K.; Leder, A.; Loer, B.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Mahapatra, R.; Mandic, V.; Martinez, C.; McCarthy, K. A.; Mirabolfathi, M.; Moffatt, R. A.; Nelson, R. H.; Novak, L.; Page, K.; Partridge, R.; Pepin, M.; Phipps, A.; Platt, M.; Prasad, K.; Pyle, M.; Qiu, H.; Rau, W.; Redl, P.; Reisetter, A.; Resch, R. W.; Ricci, Y.; Ruschman, M.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Sander, J.; Schmitt, R.; Schneck, K.; Schnee, Richard; Scorza, A.; Seitz, D.; Serfass, B.; Shank, B.; Speller, D.; Tomada, A.; Upadhyayula, S.; Villano, A. N.; Welliver, B.; Wright, D. H.; Yellin, S.; Yen, J. J.; Young, B. A.; Zhang, J.

    2014-06-01

    We report a first search for weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) using the background rejection capabilities of SuperCDMS. An exposure of 577 kg-days was analyzed for WIMPs with mass < 30 GeV/c2, with the signal region blinded. Eleven events were observed after unblinding. We set an upper limit on the spin-independent WIMP-nucleon cross section of 1:2 10-42cm2 at 8 GeV/c2. This result is in tension with WIMP interpretations of recent experiments and probes new parameter space for WIMP-nucleon scattering for WIMP masses < 6 GeV/c2.

  2. Thermal conductance measurements of bolted copper joints for SuperCDMS

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, R.; Tatkowski, Greg; Ruschman, M.; Golwala, S. R.; Kellaris, N.; Daal, M.; Hall, Jeter C.; Hoppe, Eric W.

    2015-09-01

    Joint thermal conductance testing has been undertaken for bolted copper to copper connections from 60 mK to 26 K. This testing was performed to validate an initial design basis for the SuperCDMS experiment, where a dilution refrigerator will be coupled to a cryostat via multiple bolted connections. Copper used during testing was either gold plated or passivated with citric acid to prevent surface oxidation. Results obtained are well fit by a power law regression of joint thermal conductance to temperature and match well with data collected during a literature review.

  3. Measurement of SQUID noise levels for SuperCDMS SNOLAB detectors - Final Paper

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Maxwell

    2015-08-27

    SuperCDMS SNOLAB is a second generation direct dark matter search. In the SuperCDMS SNOLAB experiment, detectors are able to pick up from signals from dark matter nuclear recoil interactions which occur inside the bulk of the detectors. These interactions produce both phonon and charge signals. HEMTs read out charge signals whereas TES are used to detect phonon signals which are then read out by SQUID amplifiers. SQUID amplifiers must add negligible noise to the TES intrinsic noise which has been previously measured and is approximately 50pA/√Hz down to 100Hz for ease of signal distinguishability in dark matter nuclear interactions. The intrinsic noise level of the SQUID was tested in the SLAC 300mK fridge and determined to provide adequately low levels of noise with a floor of approximately 3pA/√Hz. Furthermore, a 10x amplifier was tested for addition of extraneous noise. This noise was investigated with and without this amplifier, and it was found that it did not add a significant amount of noise to the intrinsic SQUID noise.

  4. Radon Mitigation for the SuperCDMS-SNOLAB Dark Matter Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Street, Joseph; SuperCDMS Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    Experiments that seek to detect very rare processes, such as interactions of the dark matter particles thought to make up 85% of the mass of the universe, may suffer background interactions from radon daughters that have plated out onto detector surfaces. To reduce these backgrounds, an ultra-low-radon cleanroom was built at the South Dakota School of Mines & Technology. Cleanroom air is supplied by an optimized vacuum-swing-adsorption radon mitigation system that has achieved a > 300 × reduction from an input activity of 58.6 +/- 0.7 Bq/m3 to a cleanroom activity of 0.13 +/- 0.06 Bq/m3. Expected backgrounds due to radon daughters for the SuperCDMS dark matter search will be presented.

  5. Global analysis of the pMSSM in light of the Fermi GeV excess: prospects for the LHC Run-II and astroparticle experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertone, Gianfranco; Calore, Francesca; Caron, Sascha; Ruiz, Roberto; Kim, Jong Soo; Trotta, Roberto; Weniger, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    We present a new global fit of the 19-dimensional phenomenological Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (pMSSM-19) that complies with all the latest experimental results from dark matter indirect, direct and accelerator dark matter searches. We show that the model provides a satisfactory explanation of the excess of gamma rays from the Galactic centre observed by the Fermi Large Area Telescope, assuming that it is produced by the annihilation of neutralinos in the Milky Way halo. We identify two regions that pass all the constraints: the first corresponds to neutralinos with a mass 0~ 80‑10 GeV annihilating into WW with a branching ratio of 95%; the second to heavier neutralinos, with mass 0~ 180‑20 GeV annihilating into bar tt with a branching ratio of 87%. We show that neutralinos compatible with the Galactic centre GeV excess will soon be within the reach of LHC run-II—notably through searches for charginos and neutralinos, squarks and light smuons—and of Xenon1T, thanks to its unprecedented sensitivity to spin-dependent cross-section off neutrons.

  6. Fermi at Six Months

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    An overview of the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope's first 6 months in operation is provided. The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, formerly called GLAST, is a mission to measure the cosmic gamma-ray flux in the energy rage 20 MeV to more than 300 GeV, with supporting measurements for gamma-ray bursts from 8 keV to 30 MeV. It contains a Large Area Telescope capable of viewing the entire sky every 3 hours and a Gamma-ray Burst Monitor for viewing the entire unocculted sky. Since its launch on June 11, 2008 Fermi has provided information on pulsars, gamma ray bursts, relativistic jets, the active galactic nucleus, and a globular star cluster. This presentation describes Fermi's development, mission, instruments and recent findings.

  7. Fermi Galactic Center Zoom

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation zooms into an image of the Milky Way, shown in visible light, and superimposes a gamma-ray map of the galactic center from NASA's Fermi. Raw data transitions to a view with all known...

  8. Fermi, Szilard and Trinity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Herbert L.

    1974-01-01

    The final installment of the author's recollections of his work with physicists Enrico Fermi, Leo Szilard and others in developing the first controlled nuclear chain reaction and in preparing the test explosion of the first atomic bomb. (GS)

  9. A COMPREHENSIVE ANALYSIS OF FERMI GAMMA-RAY BURST DATA. II. E{sub p} EVOLUTION PATTERNS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR THE OBSERVED SPECTRUM-LUMINOSITY RELATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Ruijing; Wei Junjie; Liang Enwei; Lue Lianzhong; Zhang Binbin; Lue Houjun; Zhang Bing; Lei Weihua E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu

    2012-09-10

    We present a time-resolved spectral analysis of 51 long and 11 short bright gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) observed with the Fermi/Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor, paying special attention to E{sub p} evolution within each burst. Among eight single-pulse long GRBs, five show an evolution from hard to soft, while three show intensity tracking. The multi-pulse long GRBs have more complicated patterns. Statistically, the hard-to-soft evolution pulses tend to be more asymmetric than the intensity-tracking ones, with a steeper rising wing than the falling wing. Short GRBs have E{sub p} tracking intensity exclusively with the 16 ms time-resolution analysis. We performed a simulation analysis and suggest that for at least some bursts, the late intensity-tracking pulses could be a consequence of overlapping hard-to-soft pulses. However, the fact that the intensity-tracking pattern exists in the first pulse of the multi-pulse long GRBs and some single-pulse GRBs, suggests that intensity tracking is an independent component, which may operate in some late pulses as well. For the GRBs with measured redshifts, we present a time-resolved E{sub p} - L{sub {gamma},iso} correlation analysis and show that the scatter of the correlation is comparable to that of the global Amati/Yonetoku relation. We discuss the predictions of various radiation models regarding E{sub p} evolution, as well as the possibility of a precessing jet in GRBs. The data pose a great challenge to each of these models, and hold the key to unveiling the physics behind GRB prompt emission.

  10. Non-thermal electron acceleration in low Mach number collisionless shocks. II. Firehose-mediated Fermi acceleration and its dependence on pre-shock conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Xinyi; Narayan, Ramesh; Sironi, Lorenzo

    2014-12-10

    Electron acceleration to non-thermal energies is known to occur in low Mach number (M{sub s} ≲ 5) shocks in galaxy clusters and solar flares, but the electron acceleration mechanism remains poorly understood. Using two-dimensional (2D) particle-in-cell (PIC) plasma simulations, we showed in Paper I that electrons are efficiently accelerated in low Mach number (M{sub s} = 3) quasi-perpendicular shocks via a Fermi-like process. The electrons bounce between the upstream region and the shock front, with each reflection at the shock resulting in energy gain via shock drift acceleration. The upstream scattering is provided by oblique magnetic waves that are self-generated by the electrons escaping ahead of the shock. In the present work, we employ additional 2D PIC simulations to address the nature of the upstream oblique waves. We find that the waves are generated by the shock-reflected electrons via the firehose instability, which is driven by an anisotropy in the electron velocity distribution. We systematically explore how the efficiency of wave generation and of electron acceleration depend on the magnetic field obliquity, the flow magnetization (or equivalently, the plasma beta), and the upstream electron temperature. We find that the mechanism works for shocks with high plasma beta (≳ 20) at nearly all magnetic field obliquities, and for electron temperatures in the range relevant for galaxy clusters. Our findings offer a natural solution to the conflict between the bright radio synchrotron emission observed from the outskirts of galaxy clusters and the low electron acceleration efficiency usually expected in low Mach number shocks.

  11. Design and performance of a modular low-radioactivity readout system for cryogenic detectors in the CDMS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akerib, D. S.; Barnes, P. D., Jr.; Brink, P. L.; Cabrera, B.; Clarke, R. M.; Gaitskell, R. J.; Golwala, S. R.; Huber, M. E.; Kurylowicz, M.; Mandic, V.; Martinis, J. M.; Meunier, P.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Nam, S. W.; Perillo-Isaac, M.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Schnee, R. W.; Seitz, D. N.; Shutt, T.; Smith, G. W.; Stockwell, W. K.; Sundqvist, K. M.; White, S.

    2008-07-01

    The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment employs ultra-cold solid-state detectors to search for rare events resulting from WIMP-nucleus scattering. An innovative detector packaging and readout system has been developed to meet the unusual combination of requirements for: low temperature, low radioactivity, low energy threshold, and large channel count. Features include use of materials with low radioactivity such as multi-layer KAPTON laminates for circuit boards; immunity to microphonic noise via a vacuum coaxial wiring design, manufacturability, and modularity. The detector readout design had to accommodate various electronic components which have to be operated in close proximity to the detector as well maintaining separate individual temperatures (ranging from 600 mK to 150 K) in order to achieve optimal noise performance. The paper will describe the general electrical, thermal, and mechanical designs of the CDMS readout system, as well as presenting the theoretical and measured performance of the detector readout channels.

  12. Cooper pairing in non-Fermi liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metlitski, Max A.; Mross, David F.; Sachdev, Subir; Senthil, T.

    2015-03-01

    States of matter with a sharp Fermi surface but no well-defined Landau quasiparticles arise in a number of physical systems. Examples include (i) quantum critical points associated with the onset of order in metals; (ii) spinon Fermi-surface [U(1) spin-liquid] state of a Mott insulator; (iii) Halperin-Lee-Read composite fermion charge liquid state of a half-filled Landau level. In this work, we use renormalization group techniques to investigate possible instabilities of such non-Fermi liquids in two spatial dimensions to Cooper pairing. We consider the Ising-nematic quantum critical point as an example of an ordering phase transition in a metal, and demonstrate that the attractive interaction mediated by the order-parameter fluctuations always leads to a superconducting instability. Moreover, in the regime where our calculation is controlled, superconductivity preempts the destruction of electronic quasiparticles. On the other hand, the spinon Fermi surface and the Halperin-Lee-Read states are stable against Cooper pairing for a sufficiently weak attractive short-range interaction; however, once the strength of attraction exceeds a critical value, pairing sets in. We describe the ensuing quantum phase transition between (i) U(1 ) and Z2 spin-liquid states; (ii) Halperin-Lee-Read and Moore-Read states.

  13. FermiGrid

    SciTech Connect

    Yocum, D.R.; Berman, E.; Canal, P.; Chadwick, K.; Hesselroth, T.; Garzoglio, G.; Levshina, T.; Sergeev, V.; Sfiligoi, I.; Sharma, N.; Timm, S.; /Fermilab

    2007-05-01

    As one of the founding members of the Open Science Grid Consortium (OSG), Fermilab enables coherent access to its production resources through the Grid infrastructure system called FermiGrid. This system successfully provides for centrally managed grid services, opportunistic resource access, development of OSG Interfaces for Fermilab, and an interface to the Fermilab dCache system. FermiGrid supports virtual organizations (VOs) including high energy physics experiments (USCMS, MINOS, D0, CDF, ILC), astrophysics experiments (SDSS, Auger, DES), biology experiments (GADU, Nanohub) and educational activities.

  14. More Fermi questions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouffard, Karen

    1999-09-01

    "Fermi" questions are a popular component of most Physics Olympics meets. Asking students to make a reasonable assumption about a problem and give answers in terms of order of magnitude is not only a great challenge for a competition, but is also a valued teaching strategy in the classroom.

  15. Fermi TGF detection map

    NASA Video Gallery

    Fermi’s Gamma-ray Burst Monitor detected 130 TGFs from August 2008 to the end of 2010. Thanks to instrument tweaks, the team has been able to improve the detection rate to several TGFs per week. ...

  16. Interaction quenches of Fermi gases

    SciTech Connect

    Uhrig, Goetz S.

    2009-12-15

    It is shown that the jump in the momentum distribution of Fermi gases evolves smoothly for small and intermediate times once an interaction between the fermions is suddenly switched on. The jump does not vanish abruptly. The loci in momentum space where the jumps occur are those of the noninteracting Fermi sea. No relaxation of the Fermi surface geometry takes place.

  17. Fermi-liquid theory of ultracold trapped Fermi gases: Implications for pseudogap physics and other strongly correlated phases

    SciTech Connect

    Chien, Chih-Chun; Levin, K.

    2010-07-15

    We show how Fermi-liquid theory can be applied to ultracold Fermi gases, thereby expanding their ''simulation'' capabilities to a class of problems of interest to multiple physics subdisciplines. We introduce procedures for measuring and calculating position-dependent Landau parameters. This lays the groundwork for addressing important controversial issues: (i) the suggestion that thermodynamically, the normal state of a unitary gas is indistinguishable from a Fermi liquid and (ii) that a fermionic system with strong repulsive contact interactions is associated with either ferromagnetism or localization; this relates as well to {sup 3}He and its p-wave superfluidity.

  18. New Results from the Search for Low-Mass Weakly Interacting Massive Particles with the CDMS Low Ionization Threshold Experiment.

    PubMed

    Agnese, R; Anderson, A J; Aramaki, T; Asai, M; Baker, W; Balakishiyeva, D; Barker, D; Basu Thakur, R; Bauer, D A; Billard, J; Borgland, A; Bowles, M A; Brink, P L; Bunker, R; Cabrera, B; Caldwell, D O; Calkins, R; Cerdeno, D G; Chagani, H; Chen, Y; Cooley, J; Cornell, B; Cushman, P; Daal, M; Di Stefano, P C F; Doughty, T; Esteban, L; Fallows, S; Figueroa-Feliciano, E; Ghaith, M; Godfrey, G L; Golwala, S R; Hall, J; Harris, H R; Hofer, T; Holmgren, D; Hsu, L; Huber, M E; Jardin, D; Jastram, A; Kamaev, O; Kara, B; Kelsey, M H; Kennedy, A; Leder, A; Loer, B; Lopez Asamar, E; Lukens, P; Mahapatra, R; Mandic, V; Mast, N; Mirabolfathi, N; Moffatt, R A; Morales Mendoza, J D; Oser, S M; Page, K; Page, W A; Partridge, R; Pepin, M; Phipps, A; Prasad, K; Pyle, M; Qiu, H; Rau, W; Redl, P; Reisetter, A; Ricci, Y; Roberts, A; Rogers, H E; Saab, T; Sadoulet, B; Sander, J; Schneck, K; Schnee, R W; Scorza, S; Serfass, B; Shank, B; Speller, D; Toback, D; Underwood, R; Upadhyayula, S; Villano, A N; Welliver, B; Wilson, J S; Wright, D H; Yellin, S; Yen, J J; Young, B A; Zhang, J

    2016-02-19

    The CDMS low ionization threshold experiment (CDMSlite) uses cryogenic germanium detectors operated at a relatively high bias voltage to amplify the phonon signal in the search for weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). Results are presented from the second CDMSlite run with an exposure of 70 kg day, which reached an energy threshold for electron recoils as low as 56 eV. A fiducialization cut reduces backgrounds below those previously reported by CDMSlite. New parameter space for the WIMP-nucleon spin-independent cross section is excluded for WIMP masses between 1.6 and 5.5  GeV/c^{2}. PMID:26943526

  19. New Results from the Search for Low-Mass Weakly Interacting Massive Particles with the CDMS Low Ionization Threshold Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnese, R.; Anderson, A. J.; Aramaki, T.; Asai, M.; Baker, W.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Barker, D.; Basu Thakur, R.; Bauer, D. A.; Billard, J.; Borgland, A.; Bowles, M. A.; Brink, P. L.; Bunker, R.; Cabrera, B.; Caldwell, D. O.; Calkins, R.; Cerdeno, D. G.; Chagani, H.; Chen, Y.; Cooley, J.; Cornell, B.; Cushman, P.; Daal, M.; Di Stefano, P. C. F.; Doughty, T.; Esteban, L.; Fallows, S.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Ghaith, M.; Godfrey, G. L.; Golwala, S. R.; Hall, J.; Harris, H. R.; Hofer, T.; Holmgren, D.; Hsu, L.; Huber, M. E.; Jardin, D.; Jastram, A.; Kamaev, O.; Kara, B.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kennedy, A.; Leder, A.; Loer, B.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Lukens, P.; Mahapatra, R.; Mandic, V.; Mast, N.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Moffatt, R. A.; Morales Mendoza, J. D.; Oser, S. M.; Page, K.; Page, W. A.; Partridge, R.; Pepin, M.; Phipps, A.; Prasad, K.; Pyle, M.; Qiu, H.; Rau, W.; Redl, P.; Reisetter, A.; Ricci, Y.; Roberts, A.; Rogers, H. E.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Sander, J.; Schneck, K.; Schnee, R. W.; Scorza, S.; Serfass, B.; Shank, B.; Speller, D.; Toback, D.; Underwood, R.; Upadhyayula, S.; Villano, A. N.; Welliver, B.; Wilson, J. S.; Wright, D. H.; Yellin, S.; Yen, J. J.; Young, B. A.; Zhang, J.; SuperCDMS Collaboration

    2016-02-01

    The CDMS low ionization threshold experiment (CDMSlite) uses cryogenic germanium detectors operated at a relatively high bias voltage to amplify the phonon signal in the search for weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). Results are presented from the second CDMSlite run with an exposure of 70 kg day, which reached an energy threshold for electron recoils as low as 56 eV. A fiducialization cut reduces backgrounds below those previously reported by CDMSlite. New parameter space for the WIMP-nucleon spin-independent cross section is excluded for WIMP masses between 1.6 and 5.5 GeV /c2 .

  20. New results from the search for low-mass weakly interacting massive particles with the CDMS low ionization threshold experiment

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Agnese, R.

    2016-02-17

    The CDMS low ionization threshold experiment (CDMSlite) uses cryogenic germanium detectors operated at a relatively high bias voltage to amplify the phonon signal in the search for weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). Our results are presented from the second CDMSlite run with an exposure of 70 kg days, which reached an energy threshold for electron recoils as low as 56 eV. Furthermore, a fiducialization cut reduces backgrounds below those previously reported by CDMSlite. Lastly, new parameter space for the WIMP-nucleon spin-independent cross section is excluded forWIMP masses between 1.6 and 5.5 GeV/c2.

  1. GRB Studies with Fermi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meegan, Charles A.

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the studies of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRB) with the Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope. Included are pictures of the observatory, with illustrations of the Large Area Telescope (LAT), and the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) including information about both their capabilities. Graphs showing the GBM count rate over time after the GBM trigger for three GRBs, preliminary charts showing the multiple detector light curves the spectroscopy of the main LAT peak and the spectral evolution of GRB 080916C Burst Temporally-extended LAT emission.

  2. Second-Order Fermi Acceleration and Emission in Blazar Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asano, Katsuaki; Takahara, Fumio; Toma, Kenji; Kusunose, Masaaki; Kakuwa, Jun

    The second-order Fermi acceleration (Fermi-II) driven by turbulence may be responsible for the electron acceleration in blazar jets. We test this model with time-dependent simulations, adopt it for 1ES 1101-232, and Mrk 421. The Fermi-II model with radial evolution of the electron injection rate and/or diffusion coefficient can reproduce the spectra from the radio to the gamma-ray regime. For Mrk 421, an external radio photon field with a luminosity of 4.9 begin{math} {times} 10 (38) erg s (-1) is required to agree with the observed GeV flux. The temporal variability of the diffusion coefficient or injection rate causes flare emission. The observed synchronicity of X-ray and TeV flares implies a decrease of the magnetic field in the flaring source region.

  3. Fermi surface evolution and luttinger theorem in naxcoo2: asystematic photoemission study

    SciTech Connect

    Yang H.-B.; Pan, Z.-H.; Sekharan, A.K.P.; Sato, T.; Souma, S.; Takahashi, T.; Jin, R.; Sales, B.C.; Mandrus, D.; Fedorov,A.V.; Wang,Z.; Ding, H.

    2005-01-17

    We report a systematic angle-resolved photoemission study on NaxCoO2 for a wide range of Na concentrations (0.3x0.72). In all the metallic samples at different x, we observed (i) only a single holelike Fermi surface centered around and (ii) its area changes with x according to the Luttinger theorem. We also observed a surface state that exhibits a larger Fermi surface area. The e band and the associated small Fermi surface pockets near the K points predicted by band calculations are found to sink below the Fermi energy in a manner almost independent of the doping and temperature.

  4. The Statistical Fermi Paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maccone, C.

    In this paper is provided the statistical generalization of the Fermi paradox. The statistics of habitable planets may be based on a set of ten (and possibly more) astrobiological requirements first pointed out by Stephen H. Dole in his book Habitable planets for man (1964). The statistical generalization of the original and by now too simplistic Dole equation is provided by replacing a product of ten positive numbers by the product of ten positive random variables. This is denoted the SEH, an acronym standing for “Statistical Equation for Habitables”. The proof in this paper is based on the Central Limit Theorem (CLT) of Statistics, stating that the sum of any number of independent random variables, each of which may be ARBITRARILY distributed, approaches a Gaussian (i.e. normal) random variable (Lyapunov form of the CLT). It is then shown that: 1. The new random variable NHab, yielding the number of habitables (i.e. habitable planets) in the Galaxy, follows the log- normal distribution. By construction, the mean value of this log-normal distribution is the total number of habitable planets as given by the statistical Dole equation. 2. The ten (or more) astrobiological factors are now positive random variables. The probability distribution of each random variable may be arbitrary. The CLT in the so-called Lyapunov or Lindeberg forms (that both do not assume the factors to be identically distributed) allows for that. In other words, the CLT "translates" into the SEH by allowing an arbitrary probability distribution for each factor. This is both astrobiologically realistic and useful for any further investigations. 3. By applying the SEH it is shown that the (average) distance between any two nearby habitable planets in the Galaxy may be shown to be inversely proportional to the cubic root of NHab. This distance is denoted by new random variable D. The relevant probability density function is derived, which was named the "Maccone distribution" by Paul Davies in

  5. The fermi paradox is neither Fermi's nor a paradox.

    PubMed

    Gray, Robert H

    2015-03-01

    The so-called Fermi paradox claims that if technological life existed anywhere else, we would see evidence of its visits to Earth--and since we do not, such life does not exist, or some special explanation is needed. Enrico Fermi, however, never published anything on this topic. On the one occasion he is known to have mentioned it, he asked "Where is everybody?"--apparently suggesting that we do not see extraterrestrials on Earth because interstellar travel may not be feasible, but not suggesting that intelligent extraterrestrial life does not exist or suggesting its absence is paradoxical. The claim "they are not here; therefore they do not exist" was first published by Michael Hart, claiming that interstellar travel and colonization of the Galaxy would be inevitable if intelligent extraterrestrial life existed, and taking its absence here as proof that it does not exist anywhere. The Fermi paradox appears to originate in Hart's argument, not Fermi's question. Clarifying the origin of these ideas is important, because the Fermi paradox is seen by some as an authoritative objection to searching for evidence of extraterrestrial intelligence--cited in the U.S. Congress as a reason for killing NASA's SETI program on one occasion. But evidence indicates that it misrepresents Fermi's views, misappropriates his authority, deprives the actual authors of credit, and is not a valid paradox. PMID:25719510

  6. Fermi's New Pulsar Detection Technique

    NASA Video Gallery

    To locate a pulsar in Fermi LAT data requires knowledge of the object’s sky position, its pulse period, and how the pulse rate slows over time. Computers check many different combinations of posi...

  7. The Fermi LAT Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romani, Roger W.

    2011-08-01

    The Large Area Telescope on the Fermi satellite is an impressive pulsar discovery machine, with over 75 pulse detections and counting. The populations of radio-selected, γ-selected and millisecond pulsars are now large enough to display observational patterns in the light curves and luminosities. These patterns are starting to teach us about the physics of the emission zone, which seems dominated by open field lines near the speed of light cylinder. The sample also provides initial inferences about the pulsar population. Apparently a large fraction of neutron stars have a young energetic γ-ray emitting phase, making these objects a good probe of massive star evolution. The long-lived millisecond γ-ray pulsars are even more ubiquitous and may produce a significant fraction of the γ-ray background. In any event, it is clear that the present LAT pulsar sample is dominated by nearby objects, and there is every expectation that the number, and quality, of pulsar detections will increase in years to come.

  8. Strongly Interacting Fermi and Bose-Fermi Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ye-Ryoung; Choi, Jae; Christensen, Caleb; Jo, Gyu-Boong; Wang, Tout; Ketterle, Wolfgang; Pritchard, David

    2010-03-01

    We present our recent progress on the study ultracold gases of ^6Li and ^23Na near homonuclear and heteronuclear Feshbach resonances. We discuss new experimental and theoretical developments on itinerant ferromagnetism in a Fermi gas of ultracold atoms [1]. We also report on ultracold gases of ^6Li and ^23Na, including fermionic LiNa molecules. [4pt] [1] G.-B. Jo, Y.-R. Lee, J.-H. Choi, C.A. Christensen, T.H. Kim, J.H. Thywissen, D.E. Pritchard, and W. Ketterle, Observation of itinerant ferromagnetism in a strongly interacting Fermi gas of ultracold atoms, Science 325, 1521 (2009).

  9. Strongly Interacting Homogeneous Fermi Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Biswaroop; Patel, Parth; Yan, Zhenjie; Struck, Julian; Zwierlein, Martin

    2016-05-01

    We present a homogeneous box potential for strongly interacting Fermi gases. The local density approximation (LDA) allows measurements on traditional inhomogeneous traps to observe a continuous distribution of Fermi gases in a single shot, but also suffer from a broadened response due to line-of-sight averaging over varying densities. We trap ultracold Fermionic (6 Li) in an optical homogeneous potential and characterize its flatness through in-situ tomography. A hybrid approach combining a cylindrical optical potential with a harmonic magnetic trap allows us to exploit the LDA and measure local RF spectra without requiring significant image reconstruction. We extract various quantities from the RF spectra such as the Tan's contact, and discuss further measurements of homogeneous Fermi systems under spin imbalance and finite temperature.

  10. Fermi Finds Youthful Pulsar Among Ancient Stars

    NASA Video Gallery

    In three years, NASA's Fermi has detected more than 100 gamma-ray pulsars, but something new has appeared. Among a type of pulsar with ages typically numbering a billion years or more, Fermi has fo...

  11. Fermi, Enrico (1901-54)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Italian physicist, created the first controlled chain reaction, founded Argonne National Laboratory. His work on the properties of electrons (spin-half particles like electrons are called fermions after him, and the study of their properties is called Fermi-Dirac statistics) enabled the pressure source in white dwarf stars to be identified, and white dwarf star properties to be calculated by CHAN...

  12. Fermi's β-DECAY Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chen Ning

    2013-05-01

    Throughout his lifetime Enrico Fermi (1901-1954) had considered his 1934 β-decay theory as his most important contribution to theoretical physics. E. Segrè (1905-1989) had vividly written about an episode at the inception of that paper:1...

  13. Fermi GBM Early Trigger Characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Connaughton, Valerie; Briggs, Michael; Paciesas, Bill; Meegan, Charles

    2009-05-25

    Since the launch of the Fermi observatory on June 11 2008, the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has seen approximately 250 triggers of which about 150 were cosmic gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). GBM operates dozens of trigger algorithms covering various energy bands and timescales and is therefore sensitive to a wide variety of phenomena, both astrophysical and not.

  14. Fermi's Large Area Telescope (LAT)

    NASA Video Gallery

    Fermi’s Large Area Telescope (LAT) is the spacecraft’s main scientificinstrument. This animation shows a gamma ray (purple) entering the LAT,where it is converted into an electron (red) and a...

  15. CCC and the Fermi paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurzadyan, V. G.; Penrose, R.

    2016-01-01

    Within the scheme of conformal cyclic cosmology (CCC), information can be transmitted from aeon to aeon. Accordingly, the "Fermi paradox" and the SETI programme --of communication by remote civilizations-- may be examined from a novel perspective: such information could, in principle, be encoded in the cosmic microwave background. The current empirical status of CCC is also discussed.

  16. Lectures of Fermi liquid theory

    SciTech Connect

    Bedell, K.S.

    1993-01-01

    The Fermi liquid theory was first introduced by Landau in 1956 to provide a theoretical basis for the properties of strongly correlated Fermi systems. This theory has proven to be crucial for our understanding of a broad range of materials. These include liquid [sup 3]He, [sup 3]He-[sup 4]He mixtures, simple metals, heavy-fermions, and nuclear matter to name a few. In the high temperature superconductors questions have been raised regarding the applicability of Fermi liquid theory to the normal state behavior of these materials. I will not address this issue in these lectures. My focus will be to summarize the foundations of this theory and to explore the consequences. These lectures are in part a summary of the excellent review article by Baym and Pethick and the books by Pines and Nozieres and Baym and Pethick. They include as well a summary of some articles that I have authored and co-authored. In the main body of the lectures I will not make any additional references to the books or articles. In the absence of reading the original materials, my lectures should provide the essentials of a mini-course in Fermi liquid theory.

  17. Lectures of Fermi liquid theory

    SciTech Connect

    Bedell, K.S.

    1993-07-01

    The Fermi liquid theory was first introduced by Landau in 1956 to provide a theoretical basis for the properties of strongly correlated Fermi systems. This theory has proven to be crucial for our understanding of a broad range of materials. These include liquid {sup 3}He, {sup 3}He-{sup 4}He mixtures, simple metals, heavy-fermions, and nuclear matter to name a few. In the high temperature superconductors questions have been raised regarding the applicability of Fermi liquid theory to the normal state behavior of these materials. I will not address this issue in these lectures. My focus will be to summarize the foundations of this theory and to explore the consequences. These lectures are in part a summary of the excellent review article by Baym and Pethick and the books by Pines and Nozieres and Baym and Pethick. They include as well a summary of some articles that I have authored and co-authored. In the main body of the lectures I will not make any additional references to the books or articles. In the absence of reading the original materials, my lectures should provide the essentials of a mini-course in Fermi liquid theory.

  18. Extending the Fermi-LAT Data Processing Pipeline to the Grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmer, S.; Arrabito, L.; Glanzman, T.; Johnson, T.; Lavalley, C.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.

    2012-12-01

    The Data Handling Pipeline (“Pipeline”) has been developed for the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope (Fermi) Large Area Telescope (LAT) which launched in June 2008. Since then it has been in use to completely automate the production of data quality monitoring quantities, reconstruction and routine analysis of all data received from the satellite and to deliver science products to the collaboration and the Fermi Science Support Center. Aside from the reconstruction of raw data from the satellite (Level 1), data reprocessing and various event-level analyses are also reasonably heavy loads on the pipeline and computing resources. These other loads, unlike Level 1, can run continuously for weeks or months at a time. In addition it receives heavy use in performing production Monte Carlo tasks. In daily use it receives a new data download every 3 hours and launches about 2000 jobs to process each download, typically completing the processing of the data before the next download arrives. The need for manual intervention has been reduced to less than 0.01% of submitted jobs. The Pipeline software is written almost entirely in Java and comprises several modules. The software comprises web-services that allow online monitoring and provides charts summarizing work flow aspects and performance information. The server supports communication with several batch systems such as LSF and BQS and recently also Sun Grid Engine and Condor. This is accomplished through dedicated job control services that for Fermi are running at SLAC and the other computing site involved in this large scale framework, the Lyon computing center of IN2P3. While being different in the logic of a task, we evaluate a separate interface to the Dirac system in order to communicate with EGI sites to utilize Grid resources, using dedicated Grid optimized systems rather than developing our own. More recently the Pipeline and its associated data catalog have been generalized for use by other experiments, and are

  19. Nonanalytic Magnetic Response of Fermi- and non-Fermi Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chubukov, Andrey; Maslov, Dmitrii; Saha, Ronojoy

    2007-03-01

    We revisit the issue of the non-analytic dependence of the static spin susceptibility of a 2D Fermi liquid on temperature and a magnetic field, χs(T, H) = χ0+ A T fχ(μB|H|/T). We show that in a generic Fermi liquid the prefactor A is expressed via complex combinations of the Landau parameters, and does not reduce to the backscattering amplitude, contrary to the case of the specific heat C(T, H). We show that this distinction with the specific heat is mostly relevant near a ferromagnetic QCP -- the non-analytic terms in χs(T,H) are less singular near QCP than those in C(T, H).

  20. Stability of Fermi surfaces and K theory.

    PubMed

    Horava, Petr

    2005-07-01

    Nonrelativistic Fermi liquids in d+1 dimensions exhibit generalized Fermi surfaces: (d-p)-dimensional submanifolds in the (k,omega)-space supporting gapless excitations. We show that the universality classes of stable Fermi surfaces are classified by K theory, with the pattern of stability determined by Bott periodicity. The Atiyah-Bott-Shapiro construction implies that the low-energy modes near a Fermi surface exhibit relativistic invariance in the transverse p+1 dimensions. This suggests an intriguing parallel between nonrelativistic Fermi liquids and D-branes of string theory. PMID:16090638

  1. Fermi resonance in optical microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Chang-Hwan; Yu, Hyeon-Hye; Lee, Ji-Won; Kim, Chil-Min

    2015-04-01

    Fermi resonance is a phenomenon of quantum mechanical superposition, which most often occurs between normal and overtone modes in molecular systems that are nearly coincident in energy. We find that scarred resonances in deformed dielectric microcavities are the very phenomenon of Fermi resonance, that is, a pair of quasinormal modes interact with each other due to coupling and a pair of resonances are generated through an avoided resonance crossing. Then the quantum number difference of a pair of quasinormal modes, which is a consequence of quantum mechanical superposition, equals periodic orbits, whereby the resonances are localized on the periodic orbits. We derive the relation between the quantum number difference and the periodic orbits and confirm it in an elliptic, a rectangular, and a stadium-shaped dielectric microcavity.

  2. Fermi Timing and Synchronization System

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcox, R.; Staples, J.; Doolittle, L.; Byrd, J.; Ratti, A.; Kaertner, F.X.; Kim, J.; Chen, J.; Ilday, F.O.; Ludwig, F.; Winter, A.; Ferianis, M.; Danailov, M.; D'Auria, G.

    2006-07-19

    The Fermi FEL will depend critically on precise timing of its RF, laser and diagnostic subsystems. The timing subsystem to coordinate these functions will need to reliably maintain sub-100fs synchronicity between distant points up to 300m apart in the Fermi facility. The technology to do this is not commercially available, and has not been experimentally demonstrated in a working facility. Therefore, new technology must be developed to meet these needs. Two approaches have been researched by different groups working with the Fermi staff. At MIT, a pulse transmission scheme has been developed for synchronization of RF and laser devices. And at LBL, a CW transmission scheme has been developed for RF and laser synchronization. These respective schemes have advantages and disadvantages that will become better understood in coming years. This document presents the work done by both teams, and suggests a possible system design which integrates them both. The integrated system design provides an example of how choices can be made between the different approaches without significantly changing the basic infrastructure of the system. Overall system issues common to any synchronization scheme are also discussed.

  3. Enrico Fermi and the Dolomites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battimelli, Giovanni; de Angelis, Alessandro

    2014-11-01

    Summer vacations in the Dolomites were a tradition among the professors of the Faculty of Mathematical and Physical Sciences at the University of Roma since the end of the XIX century. Beyond the academic walls, people like Tullio Levi-Civita, Federigo Enriques and Ugo Amaldi sr., together with their families, were meeting friends and colleagues in Cortina, San Vito, Dobbiaco, Vigo di Fassa and Selva, enjoying trekking together with scientific discussions. The tradition was transmitted to the next generations, in particular in the first half of the XX century, and the group of via Panisperna was directly connected: Edoardo Amaldi, the son of the mathematician Ugo sr., rented at least during two summers, in 1925 and in 1949, and in the winter of 1960, a house in San Vito di Cadore, and almost every year in the Dolomites; Enrico Fermi was a frequent guest. Many important steps in modern physics, in particular the development of the Fermi-Dirac statistics and the Fermi theory of beta decay, are related to scientific discussions held in the region of the Dolomites.

  4. Fermi acceleration of Lyman-alpha photons by shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neufeld, David A.; Mckee, Christopher F.

    1988-01-01

    The repeated scattering of Ly-alpha radiation across a shock front results in a systematic blueshift which may greatly exceed the shock velocity vs and is proportional to cube root of (Nvs), where N is the column density of hydrogen atoms on either side of the shock front. The blueshifting process is similar to the Fermi acceleration of cosmic rays and may be responsible for the blue asymmetric line profiles that have been observed in high-redshift Ly-alpha galaxies. The Ly-alpha line profile in 3C 326.1 is accounted for by a model in which shocks, driven into a population of interstellar clouds by a radio lobe, trigger the formation of ionizing stars and Fermi accelerate the Ly-alpha radiation emitted by H II regions surrounding those stars. Galaxy mergers, particularly between galaxies with low dust content, should produce Ly-alpha lines with strong blue wings.

  5. Bioterrorism and the Fermi Paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Joshua

    2013-04-01

    We proffer a contemporary solution to the so-called Fermi Paradox, which is concerned with conflict between Copernicanism and the apparent paucity of evidence for intelligent alien civilizations. In particular, we argue that every community of organisms that reaches its space-faring age will (1) almost immediately use its rocket-building computers to reverse-engineer its genetic chemistry and (2) self-destruct when some individual uses said technology to design an omnicidal pathogen. We discuss some of the possible approaches to prevention with regard to Homo sapiens' vulnerability to bioterrorism, particularly on a short-term basis.

  6. Generalized second-order Thomas-Fermi method for superfluid Fermi systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, J. C.; Fei, Na; Zhang, Y. N.; Schuck, P.

    2015-12-01

    Using the ℏ expansion of the Green's function of the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov equation, we extend the second-order Thomas-Fermi approximation to generalized superfluid Fermi systems by including the density-dependent effective mass and the spin-orbit potential. We first implement and examine the full correction terms over different energy intervals of the quasiparticle spectra in calculations of finite nuclei. Final applications of this generalized Thomas-Fermi method are intended for various inhomogeneous superfluid Fermi systems.

  7. Fermi liquids near Pomeranchuk instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reidy, Kelly Elizabeth

    We explore features of a Fermi liquid near generalized Pomeranchuk instabilities (PIs) starting from both ordered and disordered phases. These PIs can be viewed as quantum critical points in parameter space, and thus provide an alternate viewpoint on quantum criticality. We employ the tractable crossing symmetric equation method, which is a non-perturbative diagrammatic many-particle method used to calculate the Fermi liquid interaction functions and scattering amplitudes. We consider both repulsive and attractive underlying interactions of arbitrary strength. Starting from a ferromagnetically ordered ground state, we find that upon approach to an s-wave instability in one critical channel, the system simultaneously approaches instabilities in non-critical channels. We study origins and implications of this "quantum multicriticality". We also find that a nematic (non-s-wave) instability precedes and is driven by Pomeranchuk instabilities in both the s-wave spin and density channels. Finally, we discuss potential applications of our results to physical systems, such as ferromagnetic superconductors.

  8. Nonanalytic magnetic response of Fermi and non-Fermi liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslov, Dmitrii L.; Chubukov, Andrey V.; Saha, Ronojoy

    2006-12-01

    We study the nonanalytic behavior of the static spin susceptibility of two-dimensional fermions as a function of temperature and magnetic field. For a generic Fermi liquid, χs(T,H)=const+c1max{T,μB∣H∣} , where c1 is shown to be expressed via complicated combinations of the Landau parameters, rather than via the backscattering amplitude, contrary to the case of the specific heat. Near a ferromagnetic quantum critical point, the field dependence acquires a universal form χs-1(H)=const-c2∣H∣3/2 , with c2>0 . This behavior implies a first-order transition into a ferromagnetic state. We establish a criterion for such a transition to win over the transition into an incommensurate phase.

  9. Optical klystron SASE at FERMI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penco, G.; Allaria, E. M.; De Ninno, G.; Ferrari, E.; Giannessi, L.

    2015-05-01

    The optical klystron enhancement to a self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) free electron laser (FEL) has been deeply studied in theory and in simulations. In this FEL scheme, a relativistic electron beam passes through two undulators, separated by a dispersive section. The latter converts the electron-beam energy modulation produced in the first undulator in density modulation, thus enhancing the free-electron laser gain. We report the first experiment that has been carried out at the FERMI facility in Trieste, of enhancement to a SASE FEL by using the optical klystron scheme. XUV photons have been produced with an intensity several orders of magnitude larger than in pure SASE mode. The impact of the uncorrelated energy spread of the electron beam on the optical klystron SASE performance has been also investigated.

  10. Search for Low-Mass Weakly Interacting Massive Particles Using Voltage-Assisted Calorimetric Ionization Detection in the SuperCDMS Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnese, R.; Anderson, A. J.; Asai, M.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Basu Thakur, R.; Bauer, D. A.; Billard, J.; Borgland, A.; Bowles, M. A.; Brandt, D.; Brink, P. L.; Bunker, R.; Cabrera, B.; Caldwell, D. O.; Cerdeno, D. G.; Chagani, H.; Cooley, J.; Cornell, B.; Crewdson, C. H.; Cushman, P.; Daal, M.; Di Stefano, P. C. F.; Doughty, T.; Esteban, L.; Fallows, S.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Godfrey, G. L.; Golwala, S. R.; Hall, J.; Harris, H. R.; Hertel, S. A.; Hofer, T.; Holmgren, D.; Hsu, L.; Huber, M. E.; Jastram, A.; Kamaev, O.; Kara, B.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kennedy, A.; Kiveni, M.; Koch, K.; Loer, B.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Mahapatra, R.; Mandic, V.; Martinez, C.; McCarthy, K. A.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Moffatt, R. A.; Moore, D. C.; Nadeau, P.; Nelson, R. H.; Page, K.; Partridge, R.; Pepin, M.; Phipps, A.; Prasad, K.; Pyle, M.; Qiu, H.; Rau, W.; Redl, P.; Reisetter, A.; Ricci, Y.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Sander, J.; Schneck, K.; Schnee, R. W.; Scorza, S.; Serfass, B.; Shank, B.; Speller, D.; Villano, A. N.; Welliver, B.; Wright, D. H.; Yellin, S.; Yen, J. J.; Young, B. A.; Zhang, J.; SuperCDMS Collaboration

    2014-01-01

    SuperCDMS is an experiment designed to directly detect weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), a favored candidate for dark matter ubiquitous in the Universe. In this Letter, we present WIMP-search results using a calorimetric technique we call CDMSlite, which relies on voltage-assisted Luke-Neganov amplification of the ionization energy deposited by particle interactions. The data were collected with a single 0.6 kg germanium detector running for ten live days at the Soudan Underground Laboratory. A low energy threshold of 170 eVee (electron equivalent) was obtained, which allows us to constrain new WIMP-nucleon spin-independent parameter space for WIMP masses below 6 GeV /c2.

  11. A Search for Low-Mass Weakly Interacting Massive Particles Using Voltage-Assisted Calorimetric Ionization Detection in the SuperCDMS Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Agnese, R.; Anderson, A. J.; Asai, M.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Basu Thakur, R.; Bauer, D. A.; Billard, J.; Borgland, A.; Bowles, M. A.; Brandt, D.; Brink, P. L.; Bunker, R.; Cabrera, B.; Caldwell, D. O.; Cerdeno, D. G.; Chagani, H.; Cooley, J.; Cornell, B.; Crewdson, C. H.; Cushman, Priscilla B.; Daal, M.; Di Stefano, P. C.; Doughty, T.; Esteban, L.; Fallows, S.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Godfrey, G. L.; Golwala, S. R.; Hall, Jeter C.; Harris, H. R.; Hertel, S. A.; Hofer, T.; Holmgren, D.; Hsu, L.; Huber, M. E.; Jastram, A.; Kamaev, O.; Kara, B.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kennedy, A.; Kiveni, M.; Koch, K.; Loer, B.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Mahapatra, R.; Mandic, V.; Martinez, C.; McCarthy, K. A.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Moffatt, R. A.; Moore, D. C.; Nadeau, P.; Nelson, R. H.; Page, K.; Partridge, R.; Pepin, M.; Phipps, A.; Prasad, K.; Pyle, M.; Qiu, H.; Rau, W.; Redi, P.; Reisetter, A.; Ricci, Y.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Sander, J.; Schneck, K.; Schnee, Richard; Scorza, S.; Serfass, B.; Shank, B.; Speller, D.; Villano, A. N.; Welliver, B.; Wright, D. H.; Yellin, S.; Yen, J. J.; Young, B. A.; Zhang, J.

    2014-01-27

    SuperCDMS is an experiment designed to directly detect weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), a favored candidate for dark matter ubiquitous in the Universe. In this Letter, we present WIMP-search results using a calorimetric technique we call CDMSlite, which relies on voltage-assisted Luke-Neganov amplification of the ionization energy deposited by particle interactions. The data were collected with a single 0.6 kg germanium detector running for ten live days at the Soudan Underground Laboratory. A low energy threshold of (electron equivalent) was obtained, which allows us to constrain new WIMP-nucleon spin-independent parameter space for WIMP masses below 6 GeV/c2.

  12. Crow Instability in Unitary Fermi Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, Sandeep

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, we investigate the initiation and subsequent evolution of Crow instability in an inhomogeneous unitary Fermi gas using zero-temperature Galilei-invariant nonlinear Schrödinger equation. Considering a cigar-shaped unitary Fermi gas, we generate the vortex-antivortex pair either by phase-imprinting or by moving a Gaussian obstacle potential. We observe that the Crow instability in a unitary Fermi gas leads to the decay of the vortex-antivortex pair into multiple vortex rings and ultimately into sound waves.

  13. Quantum Mechanical Models Of The Fermi Shuttle

    SciTech Connect

    Sternberg, James

    2011-06-01

    The Fermi shuttle is a mechanism in which high energy electrons are produced in an atomic collision by multiple collisions with a target and a projectile atom. It is normally explained purely classically in terms of the electron's orbits prescribed in the collision. Common calculations to predict the Fermi shuttle use semi-classical methods, but these methods still rely on classical orbits. In reality such collisions belong to the realm of quantum mechanics, however. In this paper we discuss several purely quantum mechanical calculations which can produce the Fermi shuttle. Being quantum mechanical in nature, these calculations produce these features by wave interference, rather than by classical orbits.

  14. Reconstructing WIMP properties through an interplay of signal measurements in direct detection, Fermi-LAT, and CTA searches for dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roszkowski, Leszek; Sessolo, Enrico Maria; Trojanowski, Sebastian; Williams, Andrew J.

    2016-08-01

    We examine the projected ability to reconstruct the mass, scattering, and annihilation cross section of dark matter in the new generation of large underground detectors, XENON-1T, SuperCDMS, and DarkSide-G2, in combination with diffuse gamma radiation from expected 15 years of data from Fermi-LAT observation of 46 local spiral dwarf galaxies and projected CTA sensitivity to a signal from the Galactic Center. To this end we consider several benchmark points spanning a wide range of WIMP mass, different annihilation final states, and large enough event rates to warrant detection in one or more experiments. As previously shown, below some 100 GeV only direct detection experiments will in principle be able to reconstruct WIMP mass well. This may, in case a signal at Fermi-LAT is also detected, additionally help restricting σv and the allowed decay branching rates. In the intermediate range between some 100 GeV and up a few hundred GeV, direct and indirect detection experiments can be used in complementarity to ameliorate the respective determinations, which in individual experiments can at best be rather poor, thus making the WIMP reconstruction in this mass range very challenging. At large WIMP mass, ~ 1 TeV, CTA will have the ability to reconstruct mass, annihilation cross section, and the allowed decay branching rates to very good precision for the τ+τ‑ or purely leptonic final state, good for the W+W‑ case, and rather poor for bbar b. A substantial improvement can potentially be achieved by reducing the systematic uncertainties, increasing exposure, or by an additional measurement at Fermi-LAT that would help reconstruct the annihilation cross section and the allowed branching fractions to different final states.

  15. Time-dependent models for blazar emission with the second-order Fermi acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Asano, Katsuaki; Takahara, Fumio; Toma, Kenji; Kusunose, Masaaki; Kakuwa, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The second-order Fermi acceleration (Fermi-II) driven by turbulence may be responsible for the electron acceleration in blazar jets. We test this model with time-dependent simulations. The hard electron spectrum predicted by the Fermi-II process agrees with the hard photon spectrum of 1ES 1101–232. For other blazars that show softer spectra, the Fermi-II model requires radial evolution of the electron injection rate and/or diffusion coefficient in the outflow. Such evolutions can yield a curved electron spectrum, which can reproduce the synchrotron spectrum of Mrk 421 from the radio to the X-ray regime. The photon spectrum in the GeV energy range of Mrk 421 is hard to fit with a synchrotron self-Compton model. However, if we introduce an external radio photon field with a luminosity of 4.9 × 10{sup 38} erg s{sup –1}, GeV photons are successfully produced via inverse Compton scattering. The temporal variability of the diffusion coefficient or injection rate causes flare emission. The observed synchronicity of X-ray and TeV flares implies a decrease of the magnetic field in the flaring source region.

  16. Time-dependent Models for Blazar Emission with the Second-order Fermi Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asano, Katsuaki; Takahara, Fumio; Kusunose, Masaaki; Toma, Kenji; Kakuwa, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The second-order Fermi acceleration (Fermi-II) driven by turbulence may be responsible for the electron acceleration in blazar jets. We test this model with time-dependent simulations. The hard electron spectrum predicted by the Fermi-II process agrees with the hard photon spectrum of 1ES 1101-232. For other blazars that show softer spectra, the Fermi-II model requires radial evolution of the electron injection rate and/or diffusion coefficient in the outflow. Such evolutions can yield a curved electron spectrum, which can reproduce the synchrotron spectrum of Mrk 421 from the radio to the X-ray regime. The photon spectrum in the GeV energy range of Mrk 421 is hard to fit with a synchrotron self-Compton model. However, if we introduce an external radio photon field with a luminosity of 4.9 × 1038 erg s-1, GeV photons are successfully produced via inverse Compton scattering. The temporal variability of the diffusion coefficient or injection rate causes flare emission. The observed synchronicity of X-ray and TeV flares implies a decrease of the magnetic field in the flaring source region.

  17. Fermi's Conundrum: Proliferation and Closed Societies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teller, Wendy; Westfall, Catherine

    2007-04-01

    On January 1, 1946 Emily Taft Douglas, a freshman Representative at Large for Illinois, sent a letter to Enrico Fermi. She wanted to know whether, if atomic energy was used for peaceful purposes, it might be possible to clandestinely divert some material for bombs. Douglas first learned about the bomb not quite five months before when Hiroshima was bombed. Even though she was not a scientist she identified a key problem of the nuclear age. Fermi responded with requirements to allow peaceful uses of atomic energy and still outlaw nuclear weapons. First, free interchange of information between people was required, and second, people who reported possible violations had to be protected. Fermi had lived in Mussolini's Italy and worked under the war time secrecy restrictions of the Manhattan Project. He was not optimistic that these conditions could be met. This paper discusses how Douglas came to recognize the proliferation issue and what led Fermi to his solution and his pessimism about its practicality.

  18. Fermi discovers giant bubbles in Milky Way

    NASA Video Gallery

    Using data from NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, scientists have recently discovered a gigantic, mysterious structure in our galaxy. This feature looks like a pair of bubbles extending above...

  19. Fermi Sees Antimatter-Hurling Thunderstorms

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has detected beams of antimatter launched by thunderstorms. Acting like enormous particle accelerators, the storms can emit gamma-ray flashes, called TGFs, an...

  20. RF Spectroscopy on a Homogeneous Fermi Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhenjie; Mukherjee, Biswaroop; Patel, Parth; Struck, Julian; Zwierlein, Martin

    2016-05-01

    Over the last two decades RF spectroscopy has been established as an indispensable tool to probe a large variety of fundamental properties of strongly interacting Fermi gases. This ranges from measurement of the pairing gap over tan's contact to the quasi-particle weight of Fermi polarons. So far, most RF spectroscopy experiments have been performed in harmonic traps, resulting in an averaged response over different densities. We have realized an optical uniform potential for ultracold Fermi gases of 6 Li atoms, which allows us to avoid the usual problems connected to inhomogeneous systems. Here we present recent results on RF spectroscopy of these homogeneous samples with a high signal to noise ratio. In addition, we report progress on measuring the contact of a unitary Fermi gas across the normal to superfluid transition.

  1. Fermi Proves Supernova Remnants Make Cosmic Rays

    NASA Video Gallery

    The husks of exploded stars produce some of the fastest particles in the cosmos. New findings by NASA's Fermi show that two supernova remnants accelerate protons to near the speed of light. The pro...

  2. ORIGIN OF THE FERMI BUBBLE

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, K.-S.; Chernyshov, D. O.; Dogiel, V. A.; Ko, C.-M.; Ip, W.-H.

    2011-04-10

    Fermi has discovered two giant gamma-ray-emitting bubbles that extend nearly 10 kpc in diameter north and south of the Galactic center. The existence of the bubbles was first evidenced in X-rays detected by ROSAT and later WMAP detected an excess of radio signals at the location of the gamma-ray bubbles. We propose that periodic star capture processes by the galactic supermassive black hole, Sgr A*, with a capture rate 3 x 10{sup -5} yr{sup -1} and energy release {approx}3 x 10{sup 52} erg per capture can produce very hot plasma {approx}10 keV with a wind velocity {approx}10{sup 8} cm s{sup -1} injected into the halo and heat up the halo gas to {approx}1 keV, which produces thermal X-rays. The periodic injection of hot plasma can produce shocks in the halo and accelerate electrons to {approx}TeV, which produce radio emission via synchrotron radiation and gamma rays via inverse Compton scattering with the relic and the galactic soft photons.

  3. Observation of Fermi Polarons in a Tunable Fermi Liquid of Ultracold Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Schirotzek, Andre; Wu, C.-H.; Sommer, Ariel; Zwierlein, Martin W.

    2009-06-12

    We have observed Fermi polarons, dressed spin-down impurities in a spin-up Fermi sea of ultracold atoms. The polaron manifests itself as a narrow peak in the impurities' rf spectrum that emerges from a broad incoherent background. We determine the polaron energy and the quasiparticle residue for various interaction strengths around a Feshbach resonance. At a critical interaction, we observe the transition from polaronic to molecular binding. Here, the imbalanced Fermi liquid undergoes a phase transition into a Bose liquid, coexisting with a Fermi sea.

  4. First Light on GRBs with Fermi

    SciTech Connect

    Dermer, Charles D.

    2010-10-15

    Fermi LAT (Large Area Telescope) and GBM (Gamma ray Burst Monitor) observations of GRBs are briefly reviewed, keeping in mind EGRET expectations. Using {gamma}{gamma} constraints on outflow Lorentz factors, leptonic models are pitted against hadronic models, and found to be energetically favored. Interpretation of the Fermi data on GRBs helps establish whether GRBs accelerate cosmic rays, including those reaching {approx_equal}10{sup 20} eV.

  5. Understanding and Using the Fermi Science Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asercion, Joseph; Fermi Science Support Center Team

    2016-01-01

    The Fermi Science Support Center (FSSC) provides information, documentation, and tools for the analysis of Fermi science data, including both the Large-Area Telescope (LAT) and the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM). Source and binary versions of the Fermi Science Tools can be downloaded from the FSSC website, and are supported on multiple platforms. An overview document, the Cicerone, provides details of the Fermi mission, the science instruments and their response functions, the science data preparation and analysis process, and interpretation of the results. Analysis Threads and a reference manual available on the FSSC website provide the user with step-by-step instructions for many different types of data analysis: point source analysis - generating maps, spectra, and light curves, pulsar timing analysis, source identification, and the use of python for scripting customized analysis chains. We present an overview of the structure of the Fermi science tools and documentation, and how to acquire them. We also provide examples of standard analyses, including tips and tricks for improving Fermi science analysis.

  6. Upgrading Fermi Without Traveling to Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-02-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has received an upgrade that increased its sensitivity by a whopping 40% and nobody had to travel to space to make it happen! The difference instead stems from remarkable improvement to the software used to analyze Fermi-LATs data, and it has resulted in a new high-energy map of our sky.Animation (click to watch!) comparing the Pass 7 to the Pass 8 Fermi-LAT analysis, in a region in the constellation Carina. Pass 8 provides more accurate directions for incoming gamma rays, so more of them fall closer to their sources, creating taller spikes and a sharper image. [NASA/DOE/Fermi LAT Collaboration]Pass 8Fermi-LAT has been surveying the whole sky since August 2008. It detects gamma-ray photons by converting them into electron-positron pairs and tracking the paths of these charged particles. But differentiating this signal from the charged cosmic rays that also pass through the detector with a flux that can be 10,000 times larger! is a challenging process. Making this distinction and rebuilding the path of the original gamma ray relies on complex analysis software.Pass 8 is a complete reprocessing of all data collected by Fermi-LAT. The software has gone through many revisions before now, but this is the first revision that has taken into account all of the experience that the Fermi team has gained operating the LAT in its orbital environment.The improvements made in Pass 8 include better background rejection of misclassified charged particles, improvements to the point spread function and effective area of the detector, and an extension of the effective energy range from below 100 MeV to beyond a few hundred GeV. The changes made in Pass 8 have increased the sensitivity of Fermi-LAT by an astonishing 40%.Map of the High-Energy SkySky map of the sources in the 2FHL catalog, classified by their most likely association. Click for a better look! [Ackermann et al. 2016]The first result from the

  7. Extending the Fermi - Swift Joint AGN Sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrader, Chris R.; Macomb, D. J.

    2014-01-01

    The Swift BAT and the Fermi LAT each provide excellent sky coverage and have led to impressive compilations of extragalactic source catalogs. For the most part they sample separate AGN subpopulations - Swift the lower-luminosity and relatively nearby Seyfert galaxies while the Fermi sample is dominated by blazars and does not include any radio-quiet objects. The overlap between these samples is among the radio-loud subset of the Swift sample as has been discussed elsewhere in the literature. The observable properties at these two bands - flux and spectral indices - are not expected to be well correlated as they sample different portions of the synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) spectral energy distribution. In this contribution we consider an extension of the high-latitude Swift sample by relaxing the significance cut to less than 5 standard deviations and consider the overlap of that subsample with the Fermi AGN catalog. While such a threshold is generally inadvisable as it introduces the strong possibility of spurious detections, the objects of the overlapping sample which are detected at high significance in Fermi can be considered as reasonably high-confidence Swift detections. For example, there are 190 Swift sub-5-sigma Swift sources that have significance >2-sigma with Fermi counterparts, whereas we predict only ~5 due to statistical fluctuation. We also investigate any coincident INTEGRAL/IBIS observations to further bolster or diminish candidate Swift detections. We present our correlation analyses and offer interpretation in the context of the blazar sequence.

  8. FERMI longitudinal diagnostics: results and future challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veronese, Marco; Ferrari, E.; Allaria, E.; Cinquegrana, P.; Froelich, L.; Giannessi, L.; Penco, G.; Predonzani, M.; Rossi, F.; Sigalotti, P.; Ferianis, M.

    2015-05-01

    The seeded FEL FERMI has completed the commissioning of both the FEL lines, and it is now providing the user community with a coherent and tunable UV radiation (from 100 nm to 4 nm) in a number of different configurations. These also include original FEL-pump - FEL-probe schemes with twin-seeded FEL pulses. Among the key systems for the operation of FERMI, there is the femtosecond optical timing system and dedicated longitudinal diagnostics, specifically developed for FERMI. In this paper, after a short review of the FERMI optical timing system and of its routinely achieved performances, we focus on the results obtained from the suite of longitudinal diagnostics (Bunch Arrival Monitor, Electro Optical sampling station and RF deflectors) all operating in single shot and with 10s fs resolution which demonstrate the FERMI achieved performances. The longitudinal diagnostics measurements are compared between these device and other device on shot-to-shot basis, looking for correlations between machine parameters. Finally future challenges in terms of improvement of existing diagnostics, planned installations and possible upgrades are discussed.

  9. Understanding and Using the Fermi Science Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asercion, Joseph; Fermi Science Support Center

    2015-01-01

    The Fermi Science Support Center (FSSC) provides information, documentation, and tools for the analysis of Fermi science data, including both the Large-Area Telescope (LAT) and the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM). Source and binary versions of the Fermi Science Tools can be downloaded from the FSSC website, and are supported on multiple platforms. An overview document, the Cicerone, provides details of the Fermi mission, the science instruments and their response functions, the science data preparation and analysis process, and interpretation of the results. Analysis Threads provide the user with step-by-step instructions for many different types of data analysis: point source analysis - generating maps, spectra, and light curves, pulsar timing analysis, source identification, and the use of python for scripting customized analysis chains. The reference manual gives details of the options available for each tool. We present an overview of the structure of the Fermi science tools and documentation, and how to acquire them. We also provide information on recent updates incorporated in the Science Tools as well as upcoming changes that will be included in the upcoming release of the Science Tools in early 2015.

  10. Dark lump excitations in superfluid Fermi gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yan-Xia; Duan, Wen-Shan

    2012-11-01

    We study the linear and nonlinear properties of two-dimensional matter-wave pulses in disk-shaped superfluid Fermi gases. A Kadomtsev—Petviashvili I (KPI) solitary wave has been realized for superfluid Fermi gases in the limited cases of Bardeen—Cooper—Schrieffer (BCS) regime, Bose—Einstein condensate (BEC) regime, and unitarity regime. One-lump solution as well as one-line soliton solutions for the KPI equation are obtained, and two-line soliton solutions with the same amplitude are also studied in the limited cases. The dependence of the lump propagating velocity and the sound speed of two-dimensional superfluid Fermi gases on the interaction parameter are investigated for the limited cases of BEC and unitarity.

  11. Aspects of non-Fermi-liquid metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pivovarov, Eugene

    We consider several examples of metallic systems that exhibit non-Fermi-liquid behavior. In these examples the system is not a Fermi liquid due to the presence of a "hidden" order. The primary models are density waves with an odd-frequency-dependent order parameter and density waves with d-wave symmetry. In the first model, the same-time correlation functions vanish and there is a conventional Fermi surface. In the second model, the gap vanishes at the nodes. We derive the phase diagrams and study the thermodynamic and kinetic properties. We also consider the effects of competing orders on the phase diagram when the underlying microscopic interaction has a high symmetry.

  12. The Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Dave; McEnery, Julie

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the Gamma Ray Astronomy as enhanced by the Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope and Radio Astronomy as a synergistic relationship. Gamma rays often represent a significant part of the energy budget of a source; therefore, gamma-ray studies can be critical to understanding physical processes in such sources. Radio observations offer timing and spatial resolutions vastly superior to anything possible with gamma-ray telescopes; therefore radio is often the key to understanding source structure. Gamma-ray and radio observations can complement each other, making a great team. It reviews the Fermi Guest Investigator (GI) program, and calls for more cooperative work that involves Fermi and the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA), a system of ten radio telescopes.

  13. Entanglement Entropy and the Fermi Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swingle, Brian

    2010-07-01

    Free fermions with a finite Fermi surface are known to exhibit an anomalously large entanglement entropy. The leading contribution to the entanglement entropy of a region of linear size L in d spatial dimensions is S˜Ld-1log⁡L, a result that should be contrasted with the usual boundary law S˜Ld-1. This term depends only on the geometry of the Fermi surface and on the boundary of the region in question. I give an intuitive account of this anomalous scaling based on a low energy description of the Fermi surface as a collection of one-dimensional gapless modes. Using this picture, I predict a violation of the boundary law in a number of other strongly correlated systems.

  14. Fermi surface anisotropy in the cuprates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramshaw, Brad

    Broken rotational (C4) symmetry is a distinguishing feature for a number of experiments in the underdoped high-Tc cuprates, including electrical resistivity, neutron scattering, Nernst coefficient, and scanning tunneling microscopy. This broken symmetry has not been observed on the Fermi surface, however, with or without the presence of an applied magnetic field. We measure the angle-dependent magnetoresistance-a quantity known to be extremely sensitive to the geometry and symmetry of the Fermi surface-of YBa2Cu3O6.58, and find that the Fermi surface has a clear two-fold symmetry, breaking the C4 symmetry of the copper-oxide plane. We discuss the implications of this finding, including how it fits with recent X-ray measurements in high magnetic fields.

  15. Pairing in a dry Fermi sea.

    PubMed

    Maier, T A; Staar, P; Mishra, V; Chatterjee, U; Campuzano, J C; Scalapino, D J

    2016-01-01

    In the traditional Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory of superconductivity, the amplitude for the propagation of a pair of electrons with momentum k and -k has a log singularity as the temperature decreases. This so-called Cooper instability arises from the presence of an electron Fermi sea. It means that an attractive interaction, no matter how weak, will eventually lead to a pairing instability. However, in the pseudogap regime of the cuprate superconductors, where parts of the Fermi surface are destroyed, this log singularity is suppressed, raising the question of how pairing occurs in the absence of a Fermi sea. Here we report Hubbard model numerical results and the analysis of angular-resolved photoemission experiments on a cuprate superconductor. In contrast to the traditional theory, we find that in the pseudogap regime the pairing instability arises from an increase in the strength of the spin-fluctuation pairing interaction as the temperature decreases rather than the Cooper log instability. PMID:27312569

  16. The evolutionary sequence of Fermi blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Yongjuan; Zhang, Haojing; Zhang, Xiong; Xiong, Dingrong; Li, Bijun; Dong, Xia; Li, Jin

    2014-02-01

    Using γ-ray data ( α γ , F γ ) detected by Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) and black hole mass which has been compiled from literatures for 116 Fermi blazars, we calculated intrinsic γ-ray luminosity, intrinsic bolometric luminosity, intrinsic Eddington ratio and studied the relationships between all above parameters and redshift, between α γ and L γ . Furthermore, we obtained the histograms of key parameters. Our results are the following: (1) The main reason for the evolutionary sequence of three subclasses (HBLs, LBLs, FSRQs) may be Eddington ratio rather than black hole mass; (2) FSRQs occupy in the earlier, high-luminosity, high Eddington ratio, violent phase of the galactic evolution sequence, while BL Lac objects occur in the low luminosity, low Eddington ratio, late phase of the galactic evolution sequence; (3) These results imply that the evolutionary track of Fermi blazars is FSRQs ⟶ LBLs ⟶ HBLs.

  17. Pairing in a dry Fermi sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, T. A.; Staar, P.; Mishra, V.; Chatterjee, U.; Campuzano, J. C.; Scalapino, D. J.

    2016-06-01

    In the traditional Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory of superconductivity, the amplitude for the propagation of a pair of electrons with momentum k and -k has a log singularity as the temperature decreases. This so-called Cooper instability arises from the presence of an electron Fermi sea. It means that an attractive interaction, no matter how weak, will eventually lead to a pairing instability. However, in the pseudogap regime of the cuprate superconductors, where parts of the Fermi surface are destroyed, this log singularity is suppressed, raising the question of how pairing occurs in the absence of a Fermi sea. Here we report Hubbard model numerical results and the analysis of angular-resolved photoemission experiments on a cuprate superconductor. In contrast to the traditional theory, we find that in the pseudogap regime the pairing instability arises from an increase in the strength of the spin-fluctuation pairing interaction as the temperature decreases rather than the Cooper log instability.

  18. Information-driven societies and Fermi's paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampton, Michael

    2013-10-01

    Fermi's paradox is founded on the idea that one or more Galactic extraterrestrial civilizations (ETCs) existed long ago and sustained exploration for millions of years, but in spite of their advanced knowledge, they could not find a way to explore the Galaxy other than with fleets of starships or self replicating probes. Here, I question this second assumption: if advanced technology generally allows long-distance remote sensing, and if ETCs were motivated by gaining information rather than conquest or commerce, then such voyages would be unnecessary, thereby resolving Fermi's paradox.

  19. Switchable Fermi surface sheets in greigite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, B.; de Wijs, G. A.; de Groot, R. A.

    2012-07-01

    Greigite (Fe3S4) and magnetite (Fe3O4) are isostructural and isoelectronic ferrimagnets with quite distinct properties. Electronic structure calculations reveal greigite is a normal metal in contrast to half-metallic magnetite. Greigite shows a complex Fermi surface with a unique influence of relativistic effects: The existence of sheets of the Fermi surface depends on the direction of the magnetization. This enables spinorbitronics, spintronics on the level of a single compound rather than a device. Due to its relativistic origin, spin contamination is irrelevant in spinorbitronics and the entire periodic table is available for optimizations.

  20. Traveling dark solitons in superfluid Fermi gases

    SciTech Connect

    Liao Renyuan; Brand, Joachim

    2011-04-15

    Families of dark solitons exist in superfluid Fermi gases. The energy-velocity dispersion and number of depleted particles completely determine the dynamics of dark solitons on a slowly varying background density. For the unitary Fermi gas, we determine these relations from general scaling arguments and conservation of local particle number. We find solitons to oscillate sinusoidally at the trap frequency reduced by a factor of 1/{radical}(3). Numerical integration of the time-dependent Bogoliubov-de Gennes equation determines spatial profiles and soliton-dispersion relations across the BEC-BCS crossover, and proves consistent with the scaling relations at unitarity.

  1. Enrico: Python package to simplify Fermi-LAT analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, David; Deil, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Enrico analyzes Fermi data. It produces spectra (model fit and flux points), maps and lightcurves for a target by editing a config file and running a python script which executes the Fermi science tool chain.

  2. FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE SECOND SOURCE CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Nolan, P. L.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Bechtol, K.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Antolini, E.; Bonamente, E.; Atwood, W. B.; Belfiore, A.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Ballet, J.; Bastieri, D.; Bignami, G. F. E-mail: Gino.Tosti@pg.infn.it E-mail: tburnett@u.washington.edu; and others

    2012-04-01

    We present the second catalog of high-energy {gamma}-ray sources detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT), the primary science instrument on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi), derived from data taken during the first 24 months of the science phase of the mission, which began on 2008 August 4. Source detection is based on the average flux over the 24 month period. The second Fermi-LAT catalog (2FGL) includes source location regions, defined in terms of elliptical fits to the 95% confidence regions and spectral fits in terms of power-law, exponentially cutoff power-law, or log-normal forms. Also included are flux measurements in five energy bands and light curves on monthly intervals for each source. Twelve sources in the catalog are modeled as spatially extended. We provide a detailed comparison of the results from this catalog with those from the first Fermi-LAT catalog (1FGL). Although the diffuse Galactic and isotropic models used in the 2FGL analysis are improved compared to the 1FGL catalog, we attach caution flags to 162 of the sources to indicate possible confusion with residual imperfections in the diffuse model. The 2FGL catalog contains 1873 sources detected and characterized in the 100 MeV to 100 GeV range of which we consider 127 as being firmly identified and 1171 as being reliably associated with counterparts of known or likely {gamma}-ray-producing source classes.

  3. Pairing, pseudogap and Fermi arcs in cuprates

    SciTech Connect

    Kaminski, Adam; Kondo, Takeshi; Takeuchi, Tsunehiro; Gu, Genda

    2014-04-29

    We use Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARPES) to study the relationship between the pseudogap, pairing and Fermi arcs in cuprates. High quality data measured over a wide range of dopings reveals a consistent picture of Fermiology and pairing in these materials. The pseudogap is due to an ordered state that competes with superconductivity rather than preformed pairs. Pairing does occur below Tpair ~ 150K and significantly above Tc, but well below T* and the doping dependence of this temperature scale is distinct from that of the pseudogap. The d-wave gap is present below Tpair, and its interplay with strong scattering creates “artificial” Fermi arcs for Tc ≤ T ≤ Tpair. However, above Tpair, the pseudogap exists only at the antipodal region. This leads to presence of real, gapless Fermi arcs close to the node. The length of these arcs remains constant up to T*, where the full Fermi surface is recovered. As a result, we demonstrate that these findings resolve a number of seemingly contradictory scenarios.

  4. Pairing, pseudogap and Fermi arcs in cuprates

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kaminski, Adam; Kondo, Takeshi; Takeuchi, Tsunehiro; Gu, Genda

    2014-04-29

    We use Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARPES) to study the relationship between the pseudogap, pairing and Fermi arcs in cuprates. High quality data measured over a wide range of dopings reveals a consistent picture of Fermiology and pairing in these materials. The pseudogap is due to an ordered state that competes with superconductivity rather than preformed pairs. Pairing does occur below Tpair ~ 150K and significantly above Tc, but well below T* and the doping dependence of this temperature scale is distinct from that of the pseudogap. The d-wave gap is present below Tpair, and its interplay with strong scatteringmore » creates “artificial” Fermi arcs for Tc ≤ T ≤ Tpair. However, above Tpair, the pseudogap exists only at the antipodal region. This leads to presence of real, gapless Fermi arcs close to the node. The length of these arcs remains constant up to T*, where the full Fermi surface is recovered. As a result, we demonstrate that these findings resolve a number of seemingly contradictory scenarios.« less

  5. Fermi Large Area Telescope Second Source Catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nolan, P. L.; Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M; Allafort, A.; Antolini, E; Bonnell, J.; Cannon, A.; Celik O.; Corbet, R.; Davis, D. S.; DeCesar, M. E.; Ferrara, E. C.; Gehrels, N.; Harding, A. K.; Hays, E.; Johnson, T. E.; McConville, W.; McEnery, J. E; Perkins, J. S.; Racusin, J. L; Scargle, J. D.; Stephens, T. E.; Thompson, D. J.; Troja, E.

    2012-01-01

    We present the second catalog of high-energy gamma-ray sources detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT), the primary science instrument on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi), derived from data taken during the first 24 months of the science phase of the mission, which began on 2008 August 4. Source detection is based on the average flux over the 24-month period. The Second Fermi-LAT catalog (2FGL) includes source location regions, defined in terms of elliptical fits to the 95% confidence regions and spectral fits in terms of power-law, exponentially cutoff power-law, or log-normal forms. Also included are flux measurements in 5 energy bands and light curves on monthly intervals for each source. Twelve sources in the catalog are modeled as spatially extended. We provide a detailed comparison of the results from this catalog with those from the first Fermi-LAT catalog (1FGL). Although the diffuse Galactic and isotropic models used in the 2FGL analysis are improved compared to the 1FGL catalog, we attach caution flags to 162 of the sources to indicate possible confusion with residual imperfections in the diffuse model. The 2FGL catalog contains 1873 sources detected and characterized in the 100 11eV to 100 GeV range of which we consider 127 as being firmly identified and 1171 as being reliably associated with counterparts of known or likely gamma-ray-producing source classes.

  6. Radiatively induced Fermi scale and unification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alanne, Tommi; Meroni, Aurora; Sannino, Francesco; Tuominen, Kimmo

    2016-05-01

    We consider extensions of the Standard Model in which the hierarchy between the unification and the Fermi scale emerges radiatively. Within the Pati-Salam framework, we show that it is possible to construct a viable model where the Higgs is an elementary pseudo-Goldstone boson, and the correct hierarchy is generated.

  7. Radio core dominance of Fermi blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Zhi-Yuan; Fan, Jun-Hui; Liu, Yi; Yuan, Yi-Hai; Cai, Wei; Xiao, Hu-Bing; Lin, Chao; Yang, Jiang-He

    2016-07-01

    During the first 4 years of mission, Fermi/LAT detected 1444 blazars (3FGL) (Ackermann et al. in Astrophys. J. 810:14, 2015). Fermi/LAT observations of blazars indicate that Fermi blazars are luminous and strongly variable with variability time scales, for some cases, as short as hours. Those observations suggest a strong beaming effect in Fermi/LAT blazars. In the present work, we will investigate the beaming effect in Fermi/LAT blazars using a core-dominance parameter, R = S_{core}/ S_{ext.}, where S_{core} is the core emission, while S_{ext.} is the extended emission. We compiled 1335 blazars with available core-dominance parameter, out of which 169 blazars have γ-ray emission (from 3FGL). We compared the core-dominance parameters, log R, between the 169 Fermi-detected blazars (FDBs) and the rest non-Fermi-detected blazars (non-FDBs), and we found that the averaged values are < log Rrangle = 0.99±0.87 for FDBs and < log Rrangle = -0.62±1.15 for the non-FDBs. A K-S test shows that the probability for the two distributions of FDBs and non-FDBs to come from the same parent distribution is near zero (P =9.12×10^{-52}). Secondly, we also investigated the variability index (V.I.) in the γ-ray band for FDBs, and we found V.I.=(0.12 ±0.07) log R+(2.25±0.10), suggesting that a source with larger log R has larger V.I. value. Thirdly, we compared the mean values of radio spectral index for FDBs and non-FDBs, and we obtained < α_{radio}rangle =0.06±0.35 for FDBs and < α_{radio}rangle =0.57±0.46 for non-FDBs. If γ-rays are composed of two components like radio emission (core and extended components), then we can expect a correlation between log R and the γ-ray spectral index. When we used the radio core-dominance parameter, log R, to investigate the relationship, we found that the spectral index for the core component is α_{γ}|_{core} = 1.11 (a photon spectral index of α_{γ}^{ph}|_{core} = 2.11) and that for the extended component is α_{γ}|_{ext.} = 0

  8. FermiGrid - experience and future plans

    SciTech Connect

    Chadwick, K.; Berman, E.; Canal, P.; Hesselroth, T.; Garzoglio, G.; Levshina, T.; Sergeev, V.; Sfiligoi, I.; Timm, S.; Yocum, D.; /Fermilab

    2007-09-01

    Fermilab supports a scientific program that includes experiments and scientists located across the globe. In order to better serve this community, Fermilab has placed its production computer resources in a Campus Grid infrastructure called 'FermiGrid'. The FermiGrid infrastructure allows the large experiments at Fermilab to have priority access to their own resources, enables sharing of these resources in an opportunistic fashion, and movement of work (jobs, data) between the Campus Grid and National Grids such as Open Science Grid and the WLCG. FermiGrid resources support multiple Virtual Organizations (VOs), including VOs from the Open Science Grid (OSG), EGEE and the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid Collaboration (WLCG). Fermilab also makes leading contributions to the Open Science Grid in the areas of accounting, batch computing, grid security, job management, resource selection, site infrastructure, storage management, and VO services. Through the FermiGrid interfaces, authenticated and authorized VOs and individuals may access our core grid services, the 10,000+ Fermilab resident CPUs, near-petabyte (including CMS) online disk pools and the multi-petabyte Fermilab Mass Storage System. These core grid services include a site wide Globus gatekeeper, VO management services for several VOs, Fermilab site authorization services, grid user mapping services, as well as job accounting and monitoring, resource selection and data movement services. Access to these services is via standard and well-supported grid interfaces. We will report on the user experience of using the FermiGrid campus infrastructure interfaced to a national cyberinfrastructure--the successes and the problems.

  9. Bosonization of the low energy excitations of Fermi liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Castro Neto, A.H.; Fradkin, E. )

    1994-03-07

    We bosonize the low energy excitations of Fermi liquids in any number of dimensions in the limit of long wavelengths. The bosons are a coherent superposition of electron-hole pairs and are related with the displacements of the Fermi surface in some arbitrary direction. A coherent-state path integral for the bosonized theory is derived and it is shown to represent histories of the shape of the Fermi surface. The Landau theory of Fermi liquids can be obtained from the formalism in the absence of nesting of the Fermi surface and singular interactions. We show that the Landau equation for sound waves is exact in the semiclassical approximation for the bosons.

  10. New Results from the Search for Low-Mass Weakly Interacting Massive Particles with the CDMS Low Ionization Threshold Experiment [WIMP-Search Results from the Second CDMSlite Run

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Agnese, R.

    2016-02-01

    The CDMS low ionization threshold experiment (CDMSlite) uses cryogenic germanium detectors operated at a relatively high bias voltage to amplify the phonon signal in the search for weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). Our results are presented from the second CDMSlite run with an exposure of 70 kg days, which reached an energy threshold for electron recoils as low as 56 eV. Furthermore, a fiducialization cut reduces backgrounds below those previously reported by CDMSlite. New parameter space for the WIMP-nucleon spin-independent cross section is excluded forWIMP masses between 1.6 and 5.5 GeV/c2.

  11. Dilute spin-orbit Fermi gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldonado-Mundo, Daniel; He, Lianyi; Öhberg, Patrik; Valiente, Manuel

    2014-03-01

    We study repulsive Fermi gases with Rashba spin-orbit coupling in two and three dimensions when they are dilute enough that a single branch of the spectrum is occupied in the non-interacting ground state. We develop an effective renormalizable theory for fermions in the lower branch and obtain the energy of the system in three dimensions to second order in the renormalized coupling constant. We then exploit the non-Galilean-relativistic nature of spin-orbit coupled gases. We find that at finite momentum, the two-dimensional Fermi sea is deformed in a non-trivial way. Using mean-field theory to include interactions, we show that the ground-state of the system acquires a finite momentum, and is consequently deformed, when the interaction is stronger than a critical value. Heriot-Watt University. CM-DTC. SUPA. EPSRC.

  12. Unconventional Fermi surface in an insulating state

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Neil; Tan, B. S.; Hsu, Y. -T.; Zeng, B.; Hatnean, M. Ciomaga; Zhu, Z.; Hartstein, M.; Kiourlappou, M.; Srivastava, A.; Johannes, M. D.; Murphy, T. P.; Park, J. -H.; Balicas, L.; Lonzarich, G. G.; Balakrishnan, G.; Sebastian, Suchitra E.

    2015-07-17

    Insulators occur in more than one guise; a recent finding was a class of topological insulators, which host a conducting surface juxtaposed with an insulating bulk. Here, we report the observation of an unusual insulating state with an electrically insulating bulk that simultaneously yields bulk quantum oscillations with characteristics of an unconventional Fermi liquid. We present quantum oscillation measurements of magnetic torque in high-purity single crystals of the Kondo insulator SmB6, which reveal quantum oscillation frequencies characteristic of a large three-dimensional conduction electron Fermi surface similar to the metallic rare earth hexaborides such as PrB6 and LaB6. As a result, the quantum oscillation amplitude strongly increases at low temperatures, appearing strikingly at variance with conventional metallic behavior.

  13. Pulsar timing and the Fermi mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, Matthew; Possenti, Andrea; Manchester, Dick; Johnston, Simon; Hobbs, George; Romani, Roger W.; Thompson, David J.; Weltevrede, Patrick; Shannon, Ryan; Petroff, Emily; Brook, Paul

    2014-04-01

    We request time to observe 180 pulsars on a regular basis in order to provide the accurate ephemerides necessary for the detection and characterisation of gamma-ray pulsars with the Fermi satellite. The main science goals are to increase the number of known gamma-ray pulsars (both radio loud and radio quiet), to determine accurate pulse profiles, and to characterise their high energy (phase-resolved) spectra. In the radio, the observations will also allow us to find glitches, characterise timing noise, investigate dispersion and rotation measure variability, and enhance our knowledge of single pulse phenomenology. To date, we are (co-)authors on 45 papers arising from the collaboration and P574 data. The data have contributed to the PhD theses of Lucas Guillemot and Damien Parent from the Bordeaux Fermi group and Kyle Watters from Stanford. Currently four students have active projects using the radio datasets.

  14. Young Pulsar Timing and the Fermi Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, Matthew; Possenti, Andrea; Manchester, Dick; Johnston, Simon; Hobbs, George; Romani, Roger W.; Thompson, David J.; Weltevrede, Patrick; Shannon, Ryan; Petroff, Emily; Brook, Paul

    2014-10-01

    We request time to observe 230 pulsars on a regular basis in order to provide the accurate ephemerides necessary for the detection and characterisation of gamma-ray pulsars with the Fermi satellite. The main science goals are to increase the number of known gamma-ray pulsars (both radio loud and radio quiet), to determine accurate pulse profiles, and to characterise their high energy (phase-resolved) spectra. In the radio, the observations will also allow us to find glitches, characterise timing noise, investigate dispersion and rotation measure variability, and enhance our knowledge of single pulse phenomenology. To date, we are (co-)authors on 45 papers arising from the collaboration and P574 data. The data have contributed to the PhD theses of Lucas Guillemot and Damien Parent from the Bordeaux Fermi group and Kyle Watters from Stanford. Currently four students have active projects using the radio datasets.

  15. Remarks on Fermi liquid from holography

    SciTech Connect

    Kulaxizi, Manuela; Parnachev, Andrei

    2008-10-15

    We investigate the signatures of Fermi liquid formation in the N=4 super Yang-Mills theory coupled to fundamental hypermultiplet at nonvanishing chemical potential for the global U(1) vector symmetry. At strong 't Hooft coupling the system can be analyzed in terms of the D7-brane dynamics in the AdS{sub 5}xS{sup 5} background. The phases with vanishing and finite charge density are separated at zero temperature by a quantum phase transition. In the case of vanishing hypermultiplet mass, Karch, Son, and Starinets discovered a gapless excitation whose speed equals the speed of sound. We find that this zero sound mode persists to all values of the hypermultiplet mass, and its speed vanishes at the point of phase transition. The value of critical exponent and the ratio of the velocities of zero and first sounds are consistent with the predictions of Landau Fermi liquid theory at strong coupling.

  16. High Energy Neutrinos from the Fermi Bubbles

    SciTech Connect

    Lunardini, Cecilia; Razzaque, Soebur

    2012-06-01

    Recently the Fermi-LAT data have revealed two gamma-ray emitting bubble-shaped structures at the Galactic center. If the observed gamma rays have hadronic origin (collisions of accelerated protons), the bubbles must emit high energy neutrinos as well. This new, Galactic, neutrino flux should trace the gamma-ray emission in spectrum and spatial extent. Its highest energy part, above 20–50 TeV, is observable at a kilometer-scale detector in the northern hemisphere, such as the planned KM3NeT, while interesting constraints on it could be obtained by the IceCube Neutrino Observatory at the South Pole. The detection or exclusion of neutrinos from the Fermi bubbles will discriminate between hadronic and leptonic models, thus bringing unique information on the still mysterious origin of these objects and on the time scale of their formation.

  17. Magnetar Observations with Fermi/GBM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouveliotou, Chryssa

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Fermi Observatory was launched June 11, 2009; the Fermi Gamma Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) began normal operations on July 14, about a month after launch, when the trigger algorithms were enabled. In the first year of operations we recorded emission from four magnetar sources; of these, only one was an old magnetar: SGR 1806+20. The other three detections were: SGR J0501+4516, newly discovered with Swift and extensively monitored with both Swift and GBM, SGR J1550-5418, a source originally classified as an Anomalous X-ray Pulsar (AXP) and a very recently discovered new source, SGR 0418+5729. I report below on the current status of the analyses efforts of the GBM data.

  18. Magnetar Observations in the Fermi Era

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouveliotou, Chryssa

    2009-01-01

    NASA s Fermi Observatory was launched June 11, 2009; the Fermi Gamma Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) began normal operations on July 14, about a month after launch, when the trigger algorithms were enabled. In the first 8 months of operations we recorded emission of three magnetar sources; of these, only one was an old magnetar: SGR 1806+20. The other two detections were: SGR J0501+4516, newly discovered with Swift and extensively monitored with both Swift and GBM, and SGR J1550-5418, a source originally classified as an Anomalous X-ray Pulsar (AXP). I report below on the current status of the analyses efforts of all these GBM data sets, combined with data from other satellites (Spitzer, RXTE, Chandra, Swift).

  19. Study of superfluid Bose-Fermi mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, Sebastien; Delehaye, Marion; Jin, Shuwei; Pierce, Matthieu; Yefsah, Tarik; Chevy, Frederic; Salomon, Christophe

    2016-05-01

    Using fermionic and bosonic isotopes of lithium we produce and study ultracold Bose-Fermi mixtures. First in a low temperature counterflow experiment, we measure the critical velocity of the system in the BEC-BCS crossover. Around unitarity, we observe a remarkably high superfluid critical velocity which reaches the sound velocity of the strongly interacting Fermi gas. Second, when we increase the temperature of the system slightly above the superfluid transitions we observe an unexpected phase locking of the oscillations of the clouds induced by dissipation. Finally, as suggested in, we explore the nature of the superfluid phase when we impose a spin polarization in the situation where the mean field potential created by the bosons on the fermions tends to cancel out the trapping potential of the latter.

  20. Single impurity in ultracold Fermi superfluids

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Lei; Baksmaty, Leslie O.; Pu, Han; Hu Hui; Chen Yan

    2011-06-15

    The role of impurities as experimental probes in the detection of quantum material properties is well appreciated. Here we study the effect of a single classical magnetic impurity in trapped ultracold Fermi superfluids. Depending on its shape and strength, a magnetic impurity can induce single or multiple midgap bound states in a superfluid Fermi gas. The multiple midgap states could coincide with the development of a Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov (FFLO) phase within the superfluid. As an analog of the scanning tunneling microsope, we propose a modified rf spectroscopic method to measure the local density of states which can be employed to detect these states and other quantum phases of cold atoms. A key result of our self-consistent Bogoliubov-de Gennes calculations is that a magnetic impurity can controllably induce an FFLO state at currently accessible experimental parameters.

  1. Relativistic Beaming Effect in Fermi Blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, J. H.; Bastieri, D.; Yang, J. H.; Liu, Y.; Wu, D. X.; Li, S. H.

    2014-09-01

    The most identified sources observed by Fermi/LAT are blazars, based on which we can investigate the emission mechanisms and beaming effect in the γ-ray bands for blazars. Here, we used the compiled around 450 Fermi blazars with the available X-ray observations to estimate their Doppler factors and compared them with the integral γ-ray luminosity in the range of 1-100 GeV. It is interesting that the integral γ-ray luminosity is closely correlated with the estimated Doppler factor, for the whole sample. When the dependence of the correlation between them and the X-ray luminosity is removed, the correlation is still strong, which suggests that the γ-ray emissions are strongly beamed.

  2. Fractal generalization of Thomas-Fermi model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rekhviashvili, S. Sh.; Sokurov, A. A.

    2016-05-01

    The Thomas-Fermi model is developed for a multielectron neutral atom at an arbitrary metric dimension of the electron cloud. It has been shown that the electron cloud with the reduced dimension should be located in the close vicinity of the nucleus. At a metric dimension of the electron cloud of 2, the differential equation of the model admits an analytical solution. In this case, the screening parameter does not depend on the charge of the nucleus.

  3. Fermi Large Area Telescope Second Source Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolan, P. L.; Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Antolini, E.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Belfiore, A.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Bignami, G. F.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Bonnell, J.; Borgland, A. W.; Bottacini, E.; Bouvier, A.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Burnett, T. H.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Campana, R.; Cañadas, B.; Cannon, A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cavazzuti, E.; Ceccanti, M.; Cecchi, C.; Çelik, Ö.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, J.; Chipaux, R.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cominsky, L. R.; Conrad, J.; Corbet, R.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; Davis, D. S.; de Angelis, A.; DeCesar, M. E.; DeKlotz, M.; De Luca, A.; den Hartog, P. R.; de Palma, F.; Dermer, C. D.; Digel, S. W.; Silva, E. do Couto e.; Drell, P. S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Enoto, T.; Escande, L.; Fabiani, D.; Falletti, L.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Focke, W. B.; Fortin, P.; Frailis, M.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Giebels, B.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grove, J. E.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Gustafsson, M.; Hadasch, D.; Hanabata, Y.; Harding, A. K.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Hill, A. B.; Horan, D.; Hou, X.; Hughes, R. E.; Iafrate, G.; Itoh, R.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, R. P.; Johnson, T. E.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, T. J.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Katsuta, J.; Kawai, N.; Kerr, M.; Knödlseder, J.; Kocevski, D.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Landriu, D.; Latronico, L.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lionetto, A. M.; Llena Garde, M.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Madejski, G. M.; Marelli, M.; Massaro, E.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McConville, W.; McEnery, J. E.; Mehault, J.; Michelson, P. F.; Minuti, M.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Mongelli, M.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nakamori, T.; Naumann-Godo, M.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Nymark, T.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Okumura, A.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Ozaki, M.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Parent, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Pierbattista, M.; Pinchera, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Racusin, J. L.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reposeur, T.; Ritz, S.; Rochester, L. S.; Romani, R. W.; Roth, M.; Rousseau, R.; Ryde, F.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Salvetti, D.; Sanchez, D. A.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Sbarra, C.; Scargle, J. D.; Schalk, T. L.; Sgrò, C.; Shaw, M. S.; Shrader, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, D. A.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Stephens, T. E.; Strickman, M. S.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, T.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. G.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Tibolla, O.; Tinebra, F.; Tinivella, M.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Uchiyama, Y.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Van Etten, A.; Van Klaveren, B.; Vasileiou, V.; Vianello, G.; Vitale, V.; Waite, A. P.; Wallace, E.; Wang, P.; Werner, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, D. L.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.; Yang, Z.; Zimmer, S.

    2012-04-01

    We present the second catalog of high-energy γ-ray sources detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT), the primary science instrument on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi), derived from data taken during the first 24 months of the science phase of the mission, which began on 2008 August 4. Source detection is based on the average flux over the 24 month period. The second Fermi-LAT catalog (2FGL) includes source location regions, defined in terms of elliptical fits to the 95% confidence regions and spectral fits in terms of power-law, exponentially cutoff power-law, or log-normal forms. Also included are flux measurements in five energy bands and light curves on monthly intervals for each source. Twelve sources in the catalog are modeled as spatially extended. We provide a detailed comparison of the results from this catalog with those from the first Fermi-LAT catalog (1FGL). Although the diffuse Galactic and isotropic models used in the 2FGL analysis are improved compared to the 1FGL catalog, we attach caution flags to 162 of the sources to indicate possible confusion with residual imperfections in the diffuse model. The 2FGL catalog contains 1873 sources detected and characterized in the 100 MeV to 100 GeV range of which we consider 127 as being firmly identified and 1171 as being reliably associated with counterparts of known or likely γ-ray-producing source classes. We dedicate this paper to the memory of our colleague Patrick Nolan, who died on 2011 November 6. His career spanned much of the history of high-energy astronomy from space and his work on the Large Area Telescope (LAT) began nearly 20 years ago when it was just a concept. Pat was a central member in the operation of the LAT collaboration and he is greatly missed.

  4. "Permanence" - An Adaptationist Solution to Fermi's Paradox?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirkovic, Milan M.

    A new solution of Fermi's paradox sketched by SF writer Karl Schroeder in his 2002. novel Permanence is investigated. It is argued that this solution is tightly connected with adaptationism - a widely discussed working hypothesis in evolutionary biology. Schroeder's hypothesis has important ramifications for astrobiology, SETI projects, and future studies. Its weaknesses should be explored without succumbing to the emotional reactions often accompanying adaptationist explanations.

  5. Ideas by Szilard, physics by Fermi

    SciTech Connect

    Lanouette, W.

    1992-12-01

    An excerpt from William Lanouette's book Genius in the shadows: A biography of Leo Szilard, the man behind the bomb (with Bela Silard). This article covers Szilard's life from early 1933, when he first began contemplating fleeing Germany, to the first self-sustaining nuclear chain reaction on December 2, 1942, and includes a description of his partnership with Enrico Fermi. Part of a series of articles in this magazine commemorating the 50th anniversary of the first controlled chain reaction.

  6. Cinema, Fermi problems and general education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efthimiou, C. J.; Llewellyn, R. A.

    2007-05-01

    During the past few years the authors have developed a new approach to the teaching of physical science, a general education course typically found in the curricula of nearly every college and university. This approach, called Physics in Films (Efthimiou and Llewellyn 2006 Phys. Teach. 44 28-33), uses scenes from popular films to illustrate physical principles and has excited student interest and improved student performance. A similar approach at the senior/high-school level, nicknamed Hollywood Physics, has been developed by Chandler (2006 Phys. Teach. 44 290-2 2002 Phys. Teach. 40 420-4). The two approaches may be considered complementary as they target different student groups. The analyses of many of the scenes in Physics in Films are a direct application of Fermi calculations—estimates and approximations designed to make solutions of complex and seemingly intractable problems understandable to the student non-specialist. The intent of this paper is to provide instructors with examples they can use to develop skill in recognizing Fermi problems and making Fermi calculations in their own courses.

  7. Fermi/GBM Results of Magnetars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouveliotou, chryssa

    2011-01-01

    Magnetars are magnetically powered rotating neutron stars with extreme magnetic fields (over 10(exp 14) Gauss). They were discovered in the X- and gamma-rays where they predominantly emit their radiation. Very few sources (roughly 18) have been found since their discovery in 1987. NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope was launched June 11,2009; since then the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) recorded emission from four magnetar sources. Two of these were brand new sources, SGR J0501 +4516, discovered with Swift and extensively monitored with Swift and GBM, SGR J0418+5729, discovered with GBM and the Interplanetary Network (IPN). A third was SGR Jl550-5418, a source originally classified as an Anomalous X-ray Pulsar (AXP IEI547.0-5408), but exhibiting a very prolific outburst with over 400 events recorded in January 2009. In my talk I will give a short history of magnetars and describe how this, once relatively esoteric field, has emerged as a link between several astrophysical areas including Gamma-Ray Bursts. Finally, I will describe the exciting new results of Fermi in this field and the current status of our knowledge of the magnetar population properties and magnetic fields.

  8. A Probabilistic Analysis of the Fermi Paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomonides, Evan; Terzian, Yervant

    2016-06-01

    The Fermi paradox uses an appeal to the mediocrity principle to make it seem counterintuitive that humanity has not been contacted by extraterrestrial intelligence. A numerical, statistical analysis was conducted to determine whether this apparent loneliness is, in fact, unexpected. An inequality was derived to relate the frequency of life arising and developing technology on a suitable planet in the galaxy; the average length of time since the first broadcast of such a civilization; and a constant term. An analysis of the sphere reached thus far by human communication was also conducted, considering our local neighborhood and planets of particular interest. These analyses both conclude that the Fermi paradox is not, in fact, unexpected. By the mediocrity principle and numerical modeling, it is actually unlikely that the Earth would have been reached by extraterrestrial communication at this point. We predict that under 1% of the galaxy has been reached at all thus far, and we do not anticipate to be reached until approximately 50% of stars/planets have been reached. We offer a prediction that we should not expect this until at least 1,500 years in the future. Thus the Fermi paradox is not a shocking observation- or lack thereof- and humanity may very well be contacted within our species’ lifespan (we can begin to expect to be contacted 1,500 years in the future).

  9. Pairing in a dry Fermi sea

    PubMed Central

    Maier, T. A; Staar, P.; Mishra, V.; Chatterjee, U.; Campuzano, J. C.; Scalapino, D. J.

    2016-01-01

    In the traditional Bardeen–Cooper–Schrieffer theory of superconductivity, the amplitude for the propagation of a pair of electrons with momentum k and −k has a log singularity as the temperature decreases. This so-called Cooper instability arises from the presence of an electron Fermi sea. It means that an attractive interaction, no matter how weak, will eventually lead to a pairing instability. However, in the pseudogap regime of the cuprate superconductors, where parts of the Fermi surface are destroyed, this log singularity is suppressed, raising the question of how pairing occurs in the absence of a Fermi sea. Here we report Hubbard model numerical results and the analysis of angular-resolved photoemission experiments on a cuprate superconductor. In contrast to the traditional theory, we find that in the pseudogap regime the pairing instability arises from an increase in the strength of the spin–fluctuation pairing interaction as the temperature decreases rather than the Cooper log instability. PMID:27312569

  10. Absence of thermalization in a Fermi liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maraga, Anna; Silva, Alessandro; Fabrizio, Michele

    2014-10-01

    We study a weak interaction quench in a three-dimensional Fermi gas. We first show that, under some general assumptions on time-dependent perturbation theory, the perturbative expansion of the long-wavelength structure factor S (q ) is not compatible with the hypothesis that steady-state averages correspond to thermal ones. In particular, S (q ) does develop an analytical component ˜const +O (q2) at q →0 , as implied by thermalization, but, in contrast, it maintains a nonanalytic part ˜|q | characteristic of a Fermi liquid at zero-temperature. In real space, this nonanalyticity corresponds to persisting power-law decaying density-density correlations, whereas thermalization would predict only an exponential decay. We next consider the case of a dilute gas, where one can obtain nonperturbative results in the interaction strength but at lowest order in the density. We find that in the steady state the momentum distribution jump at the Fermi surface remains finite, though smaller than in equilibrium, up to second order in kFf0 , where f0 is the scattering length of two particles in the vacuum. Both results question the emergence of a finite length scale in the quench dynamics as expected by thermalization.

  11. Fermi edge singularity in a tunnel junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jin; Sherkunov, Yury; D'Ambrumenil, Nicholas; Muzykantskii, Boris

    2010-03-01

    We present results on the non-equilibrium Fermi edge singularity (FES) problem in tunnel junctions. The FES, which is present in a Fermi gas subject to any sudden change of potential, manifests itself in the final state many body interaction between the electrons in the leads [1]. We establish a connection between the FES problem in a tunnel junction and the Full Counting Statistics (FCS) for the device [2]. We find that the exact profile of the changing potential (or the profile for the barrier opening and closing in the tunnel junction case) strongly affects the overlap between the initial and final state of the Fermi gas. We factorize the contribution to the FES into two approximately independent terms: one is connected with the short time opening process while the other is concerned with the long time asymptotic effect, namely the Anderson orthogonality catastrophe. We consider applications to a localized level coupled through a tunnel barrier to a 1D lead driven out of equilibrium [3]. References: [1] G. Mahan, Phys. Rev. 163, 1612 (1967); P. Nozieres and C. T. De Dominicis, Phys. Rev. 178, 1079 (1969); P. Anderson, Phys. Rev. Lett. 18, 1049 (1967) [2] J. Zhang, Y. Sherkunov, N. d'Ambrumenil, and B. Muzykantskii, ArXiv:0909.3427 [3] D. Abanin and L. Levitov, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 186803 (2005)

  12. Pairing in a dry Fermi sea

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Maier, Thomas A.; Staar, Peter; Mishra, V.; Chatterjee, Utpal; Campuzano, J. C.; Scalapino, Douglas J.

    2016-06-17

    In the traditional Bardeen–Cooper–Schrieffer theory of superconductivity, the amplitude for the propagation of a pair of electrons with momentum k and -k has a log singularity as the temperature decreases. This so-called Cooper instability arises from the presence of an electron Fermi sea. It means that an attractive interaction, no matter how weak, will eventually lead to a pairing instability. However, in the pseudogap regime of the cuprate superconductors, where parts of the Fermi surface are destroyed, this log singularity is suppressed, raising the question of how pairing occurs in the absence of a Fermi sea. In this paper, wemore » report Hubbard model numerical results and the analysis of angular-resolved photoemission experiments on a cuprate superconductor. Finally, in contrast to the traditional theory, we find that in the pseudogap regime the pairing instability arises from an increase in the strength of the spin–fluctuation pairing interaction as the temperature decreases rather than the Cooper log instability.« less

  13. The TeraFERMI terahertz source at the seeded FERMI free-electron-laser facility

    SciTech Connect

    Perucchi, A.; Di Mitri, S.; Penco, G.; Allaria, E.; Lupi, S.

    2013-02-15

    We describe the project for the construction of a terahertz (THz) beamline to be called TeraFERMI at the seeded FERMI free electron laser (FEL) facility in Trieste, Italy. We discuss topics as the underlying scientific case, the choice of the source, the expected performance, and THz beam propagation. Through electron beam dynamics simulations we show that the installation of the THz source in the beam dump section provides a new approach for compressing the electron bunch length without affecting FEL operation. Thanks to this further compression of the FEL electron bunch, the TeraFERMI facility is expected to provide THz pulses with energies up to the mJ range during normal FEL operation.

  14. The TeraFERMI terahertz source at the seeded FERMI free-electron-laser facility.

    PubMed

    Perucchi, A; Di Mitri, S; Penco, G; Allaria, E; Lupi, S

    2013-02-01

    We describe the project for the construction of a terahertz (THz) beamline to be called TeraFERMI at the seeded FERMI free electron laser (FEL) facility in Trieste, Italy. We discuss topics as the underlying scientific case, the choice of the source, the expected performance, and THz beam propagation. Through electron beam dynamics simulations we show that the installation of the THz source in the beam dump section provides a new approach for compressing the electron bunch length without affecting FEL operation. Thanks to this further compression of the FEL electron bunch, the TeraFERMI facility is expected to provide THz pulses with energies up to the mJ range during normal FEL operation. PMID:23464184

  15. Frustration and time-reversal symmetry breaking for Fermi and Bose-Fermi systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacha, Krzysztof; Targońska, Katarzyna; Zakrzewski, Jakub

    2012-05-01

    The modulation of an optical lattice potential that breaks time-reversal symmetry enables the realization of complex tunneling amplitudes in the corresponding tight-binding model. For a superfluid Fermi gas in a triangular lattice potential with complex tunnelings, the pairing function acquires a complex phase, so the frustrated magnetism of fermions can be realized. Bose-Fermi mixtures of bosonic molecules and unbound fermions in the lattice also show interesting behavior. Due to boson-fermion coupling, the fermions become enslaved by the bosons and the corresponding pairing function takes the complex phase determined by the bosons. In the presence of bosons the Fermi system can reveal both gapped and gapless superfluidity.

  16. Virial expansion for a strongly correlated Fermi system and its application to ultracold atomic Fermi gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xia-Ji

    2013-03-01

    A strongly correlated Fermi system plays a fundamental role in very different areas of physics, from neutron stars, quark-gluon plasmas, to high temperature superconductors. Despite the broad applicability, it is notoriously difficult to be understood theoretically because of the absence of a small interaction parameter. Recent achievements of ultracold trapped Fermi atoms near a Feshbach resonance have ushered in enormous changes. The unprecedented control of interaction, geometry and purity in these novel systems has led to many exciting experimental results, which are to be urgently understood at both low and finite temperatures. Here we review the latest developments of virial expansion for a strongly correlated Fermi gas and their applications on ultracold trapped Fermi atoms. We show remarkable, quantitative agreements between virial predictions and various recent experimental measurements at about the Fermi degenerate temperature. For equations of state, we discuss a practical way of determining high-order virial coefficients and use it to calculate accurately the long-sought third-order virial coefficient, which is now verified firmly in experiments at ENS and MIT. We discuss also virial expansion of a new many-body parameter-Tan’s contact. We then turn to less widely discussed issues of dynamical properties. For dynamic structure factors, the virial prediction agrees well with the measurement at the Swinburne University of Technology. For single-particle spectral functions, we show that the expansion up to the second order accounts for the main feature of momentum-resolved rf-spectroscopy for a resonantly interacting Fermi gas, as recently reported by JILA. In the near future, more practical applications with virial expansion are possible, owing to the ever-growing power in computation.

  17. Fermi arcs vs. fermi pockets in electron-doped perovskite iridates

    DOE PAGESBeta

    He, Junfeng; Hafiz, H.; Mion, Thomas R.; Hogan, T.; Dhital, C.; Chen, X.; Lin, Qisen; Hashimoto, M.; Lu, D. H.; Zhang, Y.; et al

    2015-02-23

    We report on an angle resolved photoemission (ARPES) study of bulk electron-doped perovskite iridate, (Sr1-xLax)₃Ir₂O₇. Fermi surface pockets are observed with a total electron count in keeping with that expected from La substitution. Depending on the energy and polarization of the incident photons, these pockets show up in the form of disconnected “Fermi arcs”, reminiscent of those reported recently in surface electron-doped Sr₂IrO₄. Our observed spectral variation is consistent with the coexistence of an electronic supermodulation with structural distortion in the system.

  18. Fermi Arcs vs. Fermi Pockets in Electron-doped Perovskite Iridates

    PubMed Central

    He, Junfeng; Hafiz, H.; Mion, Thomas R.; Hogan, T.; Dhital, C.; Chen, X.; Lin, Qisen; Hashimoto, M.; Lu, D. H.; Zhang, Y.; Markiewicz, R. S.; Bansil, A.; Wilson, S. D.; He, Rui-Hua

    2015-01-01

    We report on an angle resolved photoemission (ARPES) study of bulk electron-doped perovskite iridate, (Sr1−xLax)3Ir2O7. Fermi surface pockets are observed with a total electron count in keeping with that expected from La substitution. Depending on the energy and polarization of the incident photons, these pockets show up in the form of disconnected “Fermi arcs”, reminiscent of those reported recently in surface electron-doped Sr2IrO4. Our observed spectral variation is consistent with the coexistence of an electronic supermodulation with structural distortion in the system. PMID:25704850

  19. Fermi arcs vs. fermi pockets in electron-doped perovskite iridates

    SciTech Connect

    He, Junfeng; Hafiz, H.; Mion, Thomas R.; Hogan, T.; Dhital, C.; Chen, X.; Lin, Qisen; Hashimoto, M.; Lu, D. H.; Zhang, Y.; Markiewicz, R. S.; Bansil, A.; Wilson, S. D.; He, Rui -Hua

    2015-02-23

    We report on an angle resolved photoemission (ARPES) study of bulk electron-doped perovskite iridate, (Sr1-xLax)₃Ir₂O₇. Fermi surface pockets are observed with a total electron count in keeping with that expected from La substitution. Depending on the energy and polarization of the incident photons, these pockets show up in the form of disconnected “Fermi arcs”, reminiscent of those reported recently in surface electron-doped Sr₂IrO₄. Our observed spectral variation is consistent with the coexistence of an electronic supermodulation with structural distortion in the system.

  20. Fermi Surface Evolution and Luttinger Theorem in NaxCoO2: A Systematic Photoemission Study

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, H. B.; Pan, Z. H.; Sekharan, A. K. P.; Sato, T.; Souma, S.; Takahashi, T.; Jin, Rongying; Sales, Brian C; Mandrus, David; Fedorov, A. V.; Wang, Z.; Ding, H.

    2005-01-01

    We report a systematic angle-resolved photoemission study on Na{sub x}CoO{sub 2} for a wide range of Na concentrations (0.3 {le} x {le} 0.72). In all the metallic samples at different x, we observed (i) only a single holelike Fermi surface centered around {Gamma} and (ii) its area changes with x according to the Luttinger theorem. We also observed a surface state that exhibits a larger Fermi surface area. The e{prime}{sub g} band and the associated small Fermi surface pockets near the K points predicted by band calculations are found to sink below the Fermi energy in a manner almost independent of the doping and temperature.

  1. Mechanism of Fermi-level stabilization in semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Walukiewicz, W.

    1988-03-15

    A striking correlation between the Fermi-level in heavily radiation damaged semiconductors and at metal-semiconductor interfaces is presented. The correlation provides critical evidence supporting the defect model for Schottky-barrier formation. The Fermi-level energy for both situations corresponds to the average energy of the sp/sup 3/ hybrid. In the case of GaAs, a detailed description of the Fermi-level stabilization caused by amphoteric dangling-bond-like defects is given

  2. Transport phenomena in correlated quantum liquids: Ultracold Fermi gases and F/N junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hua

    Landau Fermi-liquid theory was first introduced by L. D. Landau in the effort of understanding the normal state of Fermi systems, where the application of the concept of elementary excitations to the Fermi systems has proved very fruitful in clarifying the physics of strongly correlated quantum systems at low temperatures. In this thesis, I use Landau Fermi-liquid theory to study the transport phenomena of two different correlated quantum liquids: the strongly interacting ultracold Fermi gases and the ferromagnet/normal-metal (F/N) junctions. The detailed work is presented in chapter II and chapter III of this thesis, respectively. Chapter I holds the introductory part and the background knowledge of this thesis. In chapter II, I study the transport properties of a Fermi gas with strong attractive interactions close to the unitary limit. In particular, I compute the transport lifetimes of the Fermi gas due to superfluid fluctuations above the BCS transition temperature Tc. To calculate the transport lifetimes I need the scattering amplitudes. The scattering amplitudes are dominated by the superfluid fluctuations at temperatures just above Tc. The normal scattering amplitudes are calculated from the Landau parameters. These Landau parameters are obtained from the local version of the induced interaction model for computing Landau parameters. I also calculate the leading order finite temperature corrections to the various transport lifetimes. A calculation of the spin diffusion coefficient is presented in comparison to the experimental findings. Upon choosing a proper value of F0a, I am able to present a good match between the theoretical result and the experimental measurement, which indicates the presence of the superfluid fluctuations near Tc. Calculations of the viscosity, the viscosity/entropy ratio and the thermal conductivity are also shown in support of the appearance of the superfluid fluctuations. In chapter III, I study the spin transport in the low

  3. Fermi Large Area Telescope Third Source Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acero, F.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Belfiore, A.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bogart, J. R.; Bonino, R.; Bottacini, E.; Bregeon, J.; Britto, R. J.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Burnett, T. H.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caputo, R.; Caragiulo, M.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cavazzuti, E.; Charles, E.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Chekhtman, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cominsky, L. R.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; DeKlotz, M.; de Palma, F.; Desiante, R.; Digel, S. W.; Di Venere, L.; Drell, P. S.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Finke, J.; Franckowiak, A.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Giebels, B.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grove, J. E.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Harding, A. K.; Hays, E.; Hewitt, J. W.; Hill, A. B.; Horan, D.; Iafrate, G.; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, R. P.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, T. J.; Johnson, W. N.; Kamae, T.; Kataoka, J.; Katsuta, J.; Kuss, M.; La Mura, G.; Landriu, D.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Li, J.; Li, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Madejski, G. M.; Massaro, F.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; Michelson, P. F.; Mirabal, N.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Mongelli, M.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nuss, E.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Racusin, J. L.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reposeur, T.; Rochester, L. S.; Romani, R. W.; Salvetti, D.; Sánchez-Conde, M.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Schulz, A.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, D. A.; Spada, F.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Stephens, T. E.; Strong, A. W.; Suson, D. J.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, T.; Tanaka, Y.; Thayer, J. G.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Tibolla, O.; Torres, D. F.; Torresi, E.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Van Klaveren, B.; Vianello, G.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.; Zimmer, S.; Fermi-LAT Collaboration

    2015-06-01

    We present the third Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) source catalog (3FGL) of sources in the 100 MeV-300 GeV range. Based on the first 4 yr of science data from the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope mission, it is the deepest yet in this energy range. Relative to the Second Fermi LAT catalog, the 3FGL catalog incorporates twice as much data, as well as a number of analysis improvements, including improved calibrations at the event reconstruction level, an updated model for Galactic diffuse γ-ray emission, a refined procedure for source detection, and improved methods for associating LAT sources with potential counterparts at other wavelengths. The 3FGL catalog includes 3033 sources above 4σ significance, with source location regions, spectral properties, and monthly light curves for each. Of these, 78 are flagged as potentially being due to imperfections in the model for Galactic diffuse emission. Twenty-five sources are modeled explicitly as spatially extended, and overall 238 sources are considered as identified based on angular extent or correlated variability (periodic or otherwise) observed at other wavelengths. For 1010 sources we have not found plausible counterparts at other wavelengths. More than 1100 of the identified or associated sources are active galaxies of the blazar class; several other classes of non-blazar active galaxies are also represented in the 3FGL. Pulsars represent the largest Galactic source class. From source counts of Galactic sources we estimate that the contribution of unresolved sources to the Galactic diffuse emission is ˜3% at 1 GeV.

  4. Nonlocal Poisson-Fermi model for ionic solvent.

    PubMed

    Xie, Dexuan; Liu, Jinn-Liang; Eisenberg, Bob

    2016-07-01

    We propose a nonlocal Poisson-Fermi model for ionic solvent that includes ion size effects and polarization correlations among water molecules in the calculation of electrostatic potential. It includes the previous Poisson-Fermi models as special cases, and its solution is the convolution of a solution of the corresponding nonlocal Poisson dielectric model with a Yukawa-like kernel function. The Fermi distribution is shown to be a set of optimal ionic concentration functions in the sense of minimizing an electrostatic potential free energy. Numerical results are reported to show the difference between a Poisson-Fermi solution and a corresponding Poisson solution. PMID:27575084

  5. Evolution of electron Fermi surface with doping in cobaltates.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xixiao; Lan, Yu; Qin, Ling; Kuang, Lülin; Feng, Shiping

    2016-08-24

    The notion of the electron Fermi surface is one of the characteristic concepts in the field of condensed matter physics, and it plays a crucial role in the understanding of the physical properties of doped Mott insulators. Based on the t-J model, we study the nature of the electron Fermi surface in the cobaltates, and qualitatively reproduce the essential feature of the evolution of the electron Fermi surface with doping. It is shown that the underlying hexagonal electron Fermi surface obeys Luttinger's theorem. The theory also predicts a Fermi-arc phenomenon at the low-doped regime, where the region of the hexagonal electron Fermi surface along the [Formula: see text]-K direction is suppressed by the electron self-energy, and then six disconnected Fermi arcs located at the region of the hexagonal electron Fermi surface along the [Formula: see text]-M direction emerge. However, this Fermi-arc phenomenon at the low-doped regime weakens with the increase of doping. PMID:27351111

  6. Evolution of electron Fermi surface with doping in cobaltates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xixiao; Lan, Yu; Qin, Ling; Kuang, Lülin; Feng, Shiping

    2016-08-01

    The notion of the electron Fermi surface is one of the characteristic concepts in the field of condensed matter physics, and it plays a crucial role in the understanding of the physical properties of doped Mott insulators. Based on the t-J model, we study the nature of the electron Fermi surface in the cobaltates, and qualitatively reproduce the essential feature of the evolution of the electron Fermi surface with doping. It is shown that the underlying hexagonal electron Fermi surface obeys Luttinger’s theorem. The theory also predicts a Fermi-arc phenomenon at the low-doped regime, where the region of the hexagonal electron Fermi surface along the Γ -K direction is suppressed by the electron self-energy, and then six disconnected Fermi arcs located at the region of the hexagonal electron Fermi surface along the Γ -M direction emerge. However, this Fermi-arc phenomenon at the low-doped regime weakens with the increase of doping.

  7. Decoherence of Impurities in a Fermi Sea of Ultracold Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cetina, Marko; Jag, Michael; Lous, Rianne S.; Walraven, Jook T. M.; Grimm, Rudolf; Christensen, Rasmus S.; Bruun, Georg M.

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the decoherence of 40K impurities interacting with a three-dimensional Fermi sea of 6Li across an interspecies Feshbach resonance. The decoherence is measured as a function of the interaction strength and temperature using a spin-echo atom interferometry method. For weak to moderate interaction strengths, we interpret our measurements in terms of scattering of K quasiparticles by the Fermi sea and find very good agreement with a Fermi liquid calculation. For strong interactions, we observe significant enhancement of the decoherence rate, which is largely independent of temperature, pointing to behavior that is beyond the scattering of quasiparticles in the Fermi liquid picture.

  8. Nonlocal Poisson-Fermi model for ionic solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Dexuan; Liu, Jinn-Liang; Eisenberg, Bob

    2016-07-01

    We propose a nonlocal Poisson-Fermi model for ionic solvent that includes ion size effects and polarization correlations among water molecules in the calculation of electrostatic potential. It includes the previous Poisson-Fermi models as special cases, and its solution is the convolution of a solution of the corresponding nonlocal Poisson dielectric model with a Yukawa-like kernel function. The Fermi distribution is shown to be a set of optimal ionic concentration functions in the sense of minimizing an electrostatic potential free energy. Numerical results are reported to show the difference between a Poisson-Fermi solution and a corresponding Poisson solution.

  9. Decoherence of Impurities in a Fermi Sea of Ultracold Atoms.

    PubMed

    Cetina, Marko; Jag, Michael; Lous, Rianne S; Walraven, Jook T M; Grimm, Rudolf; Christensen, Rasmus S; Bruun, Georg M

    2015-09-25

    We investigate the decoherence of ^{40}K impurities interacting with a three-dimensional Fermi sea of ^{6}Li across an interspecies Feshbach resonance. The decoherence is measured as a function of the interaction strength and temperature using a spin-echo atom interferometry method. For weak to moderate interaction strengths, we interpret our measurements in terms of scattering of K quasiparticles by the Fermi sea and find very good agreement with a Fermi liquid calculation. For strong interactions, we observe significant enhancement of the decoherence rate, which is largely independent of temperature, pointing to behavior that is beyond the scattering of quasiparticles in the Fermi liquid picture. PMID:26451562

  10. Observation strategies with the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEnery, Julie E.; Fermi mission Teams

    2015-01-01

    During the first few years of the Fermi mission, the default observation mode has been an all-sky survey, optimized to provide relatively uniform coverage of the entire sky every three hours. Over 95% of the mission has been performed in this observation mode. However, Fermi is capable of flexible survey mode patterns, and inertially pointed observations both of which allow increased coverage of selected parts of the sky. In this presentation, we will describe the types of observations that Fermi can make, the relative advantages and disadvantages of various observations, and provide guidelines to help Fermi users plan and evaluate non-standard observations.

  11. Fermi GBM Observations of Terrestrial Gamma Flashes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Briggs, M. S.; Connaughton, V.; Fishman, G. J.; Bhat, P. N.; Paciesas, W. S.; Preece, R. D.; Kippen, R. M.; vonKienlin, A.; Dwyer, J. R.; Smith, D. M.; Holzworth, R.

    2010-01-01

    In its first two years of operation, the Fermi Gamma Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has observed 79 Terrestrial Gamma Flashes (TGFs). The thick Bismuth Germanate (BGO) detectors are excellent for TGF spectroscopy, having a high probability of recording the full energy of an incident photon, spanning a broad energy range from 150 keV to 40 MeV, and recording a large number of photons per TGF. Correlations between GBM TGF triggers and lightning sferics detected with the World-Wide Lightning Location Network indicate that TGFs and lightning are simultaneous to within tens of microseconds.

  12. Fermi-LAT Observations of Galactic Transients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the observations of Galactic transients by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope. The LAT is producing spectacular results for the GeV transient sky, some of which are shown and reviewed. Some of the results in the GeV range that are discussed in this presentation are: (1) New blazars and unidentified transients (2) the jet of the Cygnus X-3 microquasar (3) gamma rays from V407 Cygni nova (4) Fast high-energy gamma-ray flares from the Crab Nebula

  13. Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McEnery, Julie E.; Michelson, Peter F.; Paclesas, William S.; Ritz, Steven

    2012-01-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, launched in June 2008, is an observatory designed to survey the high-energy gamma-ray sky. The primary instrument, the Large Area Telescope (LAT), provides observations from 20 MeV to greater than 300 GeV. A second instrument, the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM), provides observations of transients from less than 10 keV to 40 MeV. We describe the design and performance of the instruments and their subsystems, the spacecraft and the ground system.

  14. Fermi GBM: Highlights from the First Year

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.

    2009-01-01

    The Fermi Gamma ray Burst Monitor is an all-sky instrument sensitive to photons from about 8 keV to 40 MeV. I will summarize highlights from the first year, including triggered observations of gamma ray bursts, soft gamma ray repeaters, and terrestrial gamma flashes, and observations in the continuous data of X-ray binaries and accreting X-ray pulsars. GBM provides complementary observations to Swift/BAT, observing many of the same sources, but over a wider energy range.

  15. Fermi matrix element with isospin breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guichon, P. A. M.; Thomas, A. W.; Saito, K.

    2011-02-01

    Prompted by the level of accuracy now being achieved in tests of the unitarity of the CKM matrix, we consider the possible modification of the Fermi matrix element for the β-decay of a neutron, including possible in-medium and isospin violating corrections. While the nuclear modifications lead to very small corrections once the Behrends-Sirlin-Ademollo-Gatto theorem is respected, the effect of the u-d mass difference on the conclusion concerning Vud is no longer insignificant. Indeed, we suggest that the correction to the value of |+|+| is at the level of 10.

  16. Enhancing Fermi's Capability for Time Domain Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEnery, Julie E.; Fermi-LAT Team

    2016-01-01

    All sky monitors, such as the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope, play a crucial role in detecting transient and variable non-thermal sources for follow up observations by narrow field observatories. In this poster, we describe recent and upcoming improvements in onboard processing, ground analysis pipelines and observatory operations that will to increase the sensitivity to these objects on timescales of seconds to days and reduce the latency for the information to be disseminated to the scientific community. Finally, we will provide examples of some of the expected science returns from these improvements.

  17. Quasicondensation in Two-Dimensional Fermi Gases.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chien-Te; Anderson, Brandon M; Boyack, Rufus; Levin, K

    2015-12-11

    In this paper we follow the analysis and protocols of recent experiments, combined with simple theory, to arrive at a physical understanding of quasi-condensation in two dimensional Fermi gases. A key signature of quasi-condensation, which contains aspects of Berezinskiĭ-Kosterlitz-Thouless behavior, is a strong zero momentum peak in the pair momentum distribution. Importantly, this peak emerges at a reasonably well defined onset temperature. The resulting phase diagram, pair momentum distribution, and algebraic power law decay are compatible with recent experiments throughout the continuum from BEC to BCS. PMID:26705613

  18. Optical Observations Of Fermi LAT Monitored Blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Kyle; Carini, M. T.

    2009-01-01

    For the past 8 years the Bell Observatory at Western Kentucky University has been conducting R band monitoring of the variability of approximately 50 Blazars. A subset of these objects are being routinely observed with the LAT instrument on-board the Fermi Space Telescope. Adding the Robotically Controlled Telescope (RCT) at Kitt Peak National Observatory and observations with the AZT-11 telescope at the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory (CRAO), we are intensively monitoring the Blazars on the Lat monitoring list. We present the results of our long term monitoring of the LAT monitored Blazars, as well as the recent contemporaneous optical R band observations we have obtained of the LAT Blazars.

  19. Superfluidity of ultracold atomic gases of Fermi-Fermi mixtures on an optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jibiao; Chen, Qijin

    Superfluidity of ultracold atomic gases of Fermi-Fermi mixtures has been under active investigation recently. Experimentally, mixtures of 6Li-40K, 171Yb-173Yband6Li-173Yb, for example, have been prepared and cooled down to the quantum degeneracy regime, making the superfluid phase accessible in the near future. In this talk, we will address the superfluidity of ultracold Fermi-Fermi mixtures on 1D through 3D optical lattices, with varying mass and population imbalances and different densities, as they undergo BCS-BEC crossover, within a pairing fluctuation theory which includes self-consistently the important pseudogap effects at finite temperatures. We will present various phase diagrams and show the dramatic combined effects of mass and population imbalances and lattice periodicity. Implications for future experiment will be discussed. References: [1]Q. J. Chen, I. Kosztin, B. Janko, and K. Levin, Phys. Rev. B 59, 7083 (1999). [2] C. -C. Chien, Y. He, Q. J. Chen, and K. Levin, Phys. Rev. A 77, 011601(R) (2008). [3] C. -C. Chien, Q. J. Chen, and K. Levin, Phys. Rev. A 78, 043612 (2008). [4] Q. J. Chen, Phys. Rev. A 86, 023610 (2012). Work supported by NSF of China and the National Basic Research Program of China.

  20. Atomic Fermi-Bose Mixtures in Inhomogeneous and Random Lattices: From Fermi Glass to Quantum Spin Glass and Quantum Percolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanpera, A.; Kantian, A.; Sanchez-Palencia, L.; Zakrzewski, J.; Lewenstein, M.

    2004-07-01

    We investigate strongly interacting atomic Fermi-Bose mixtures in inhomogeneous and random optical lattices. We derive an effective Hamiltonian for the system and discuss its low temperature physics. We demonstrate the possibility of controlling the interactions at local level in inhomogeneous but regular lattices. Such a control leads to the achievement of Fermi glass, quantum Fermi spin-glass, and quantum percolation regimes involving bare and/or composite fermions in random lattices.

  1. Orientifolding of the ABJ Fermi gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuyama, Kazumi

    2016-03-01

    The grand partition functions of ABJ theory can be factorized into even and odd parts under the reflection of fermion coordinate in the Fermi gas approach. In some cases, the even/odd part of ABJ grand partition function is equal to that of {N}=5O(n)× USp({n}^') theory, hence it is natural to think of the even/odd projection of grand partition function as an orientifolding of ABJ Fermi gas system. By a systematic WKB analysis, we determine the coefficients in the perturbative part of grand potential of such orientifold ABJ theory. We also find the exact form of the first few "half-instanton" corrections coming from the twisted sector of the reflection of fermion coordinate. For the Chern-Simons level k = 2 ,4 ,8 we find closed form expressions of the grand partition functions of orientifold ABJ theory, and for k = 2 , 4 we prove the functional relations among the grand partition functions conjectured in arXiv:1410.7658.

  2. THE SPECTRAL INDEX PROPERTIES OF FERMI BLAZARS

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, J. H.; Yang, J. H.; Yuan, Y. H.; Wang, J.; Gao, Y.

    2012-12-20

    In this paper, a sample of 451 blazars (193 flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs), 258 BL Lacertae objects) with corresponding X-ray and Fermi {gamma}-ray data is compiled to investigate the correlation both between the X-ray spectral index and the {gamma}-ray spectral index and between the spectral index and the luminosity, and to compare the spectral indexes {alpha}{sub X}, {alpha}{sub {gamma}}, {alpha}{sub X{gamma}}, and {alpha}{sub {gamma}X{gamma}} for different subclasses. We also investigated the correlation between the X-ray and the {gamma}-ray luminosity. The following results have been obtained. Our analysis indicates that an anti-correlation exists between the X-ray and the {gamma}-ray spectral indexes for the whole sample. However, when we considered the subclasses of blazars (FSRQs, the low-peaked BL Lacertae objects (LBLs) and the high-peaked BL Lacertae objects (HBLs)) separately, there is not a clear relationship for each subclass. Based on the Fermi-detected sources, we can say that the HBLs are different from FSRQs, while the LBLs are similar to FSRQs.

  3. Pulsar candidates towards Fermi unassociated sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frail, D. A.; Mooley, K. P.; Jagannathan, P.; Intema, H. T.

    2016-09-01

    We report on a search for steep spectrum radio sources within the 95 per cent confidence error ellipses of the Fermi unassociated sources from the Large Area Telescope (LAT). Using existing catalogues and the newly released Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope all-sky survey at 150 MHz, we identify compact radio sources that are bright at MHz frequencies but faint or absent at GHz frequencies. Such steep spectrum radio sources are rare and constitute a sample of pulsar candidates, selected independently of period, dispersion measure, interstellar scattering and orbital parameters. We find point-like, steep spectrum candidates towards 11 Fermi sources. Based on the gamma-ray/radio positional coincidence, the rarity of such radio sources, and the properties of the 3FGL sources themselves, we argue that many of these sources could be pulsars. They may have been missed by previous radio periodicity searches due to interstellar propagation effects or because they lie in an unusually tight binary. If this hypothesis is correct, then renewed gamma-ray and radio periodicity searches at the positions of the steep spectrum radio sources may reveal pulsations.

  4. Fermi LAT Observations of LS 5039

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, A.A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Atwood, W.B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Baughman, B.M.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R.D.; Bloom, E.D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A.W.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; /more authors..

    2012-03-29

    The first results from observations of the high-mass X-ray binary LS 5039 using the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope data between 2008 August and 2009 June are presented. Our results indicate variability that is consistent with the binary period, with the emission being modulated with a period of 3.903 {+-} 0.005 days; the first detection of this modulation at GeV energies. The light curve is characterized by a broad peak around superior conjunction in agreement with inverse Compton scattering models. The spectrum is represented by a power law with an exponential cutoff, yielding an overall flux (100 MeV-300 GeV) of 4.9 {+-} 0.5(stat) {+-} 1.8(syst) x 10{sup -7} photon cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, with a cutoff at 2.1 {+-} 0.3(stat) {+-} 1.1(syst) GeV and photon index {Gamma} = 1.9 {+-} 0.1(stat) {+-} 0.3(syst). The spectrum is observed to vary with orbital phase, specifically between inferior and superior conjunction. We suggest that the presence of a cutoff in the spectrum may be indicative of magnetospheric emission similar to the emission seen in many pulsars by Fermi.

  5. Fermi (nee GLAST) at Six Months

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritz, Steve

    2009-01-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, formerly called GLAST, is a mission to measure the cosmic gamma-ray flux in the energy range 20 MeV to >300 GeV, with supporting measurements for gamma-ray bursts from 8 keV to 30 MeV. In addition to breakthrough capabilities in energy coverage and localization, the very large field of view enables observations of 20% of the sky at any instant, and the entire sky on a timescale of a few hours. With its recent launch on 11 June 2008, Fermi now opens a new and important window on a wide variety of phenomena, including pulsars, black holes and active galactic nuclei, gamma-ray bursts, the origin of cosmic rays and supernova remnants, and searches for hypothetical new phenomena such as supersymmetric dark matter annihilations. In addition to early results and the science opportunities, this talk includes a description of the instruments and the mission status and plans.

  6. Fermi (Formerly GLAST) at Six Months

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritz, Steven M.

    2009-01-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, formerly called GLAST, is a mission to measure the cosmic gamma-ray flux in the energy range 20 MeV to more than 300 GeV, with supporting measurements for gamma-ray bursts from 8 keV to 30 MeV. In addition to breakthrough capabilities in energy coverage and localization, the very large field of view enables observations of 20% of the sky at any instant, and the entire sky on a timescale of a few hours. With its recent launch on 11 June 2008, Fermi now opens a new and important window on a wide variety of phenomena, including pulsars, black holes and active galactic nuclei, gamma-ray bursts, the origin of cosmic rays and supernova remnants, and searches for hypothetical new phenomena such as supersymmetric dark matter annihilations. In addition to early results and the science opportunities, this talk includes a description of the instruments and the mission status and plans.

  7. Parity effect in a mesoscopic Fermi gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Johannes; Lobos, Alejandro M.; Galitski, Victor

    2016-06-01

    We develop a quantitative analytic theory that accurately describes the odd-even effect observed experimentally in a one-dimensional, trapped Fermi gas with a small number of particles [G. Zürn et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 175302 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.175302]. We find that the underlying physics is similar to the parity effect known to exist in ultrasmall mesoscopic superconducting grains and atomic nuclei. However, in contrast to superconducting nanograins, the density (Hartree) correction dominates over the superconducting pairing fluctuations and leads to a much more pronounced odd-even effect in the mesoscopic, trapped Fermi gas. We calculate the corresponding parity parameter and separation energy using both perturbation theory and a path integral framework in the mesoscopic limit, generalized to account for the effects of the trap, pairing fluctuations, and Hartree corrections. Our results are in an excellent quantitative agreement with experimental data and exact diagonalization. Finally, we discuss a few-particle to many-particle crossover between the perturbative mesoscopic regime and nonperturbative many-body physics that the system approaches in the thermodynamic limit.

  8. Lasing in Bose-Fermi mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Kochereshko, Vladimir P.; Durnev, Mikhail V.; Besombes, Lucien; Mariette, Henri; Sapega, Victor F.; Askitopoulos, Alexis; Savenko, Ivan G.; Liew, Timothy C. H.; Shelykh, Ivan A.; Platonov, Alexey V.; Tsintzos, Simeon I.; Hatzopoulos, Z.; Savvidis, Pavlos G.; Kalevich, Vladimir K.; Afanasiev, Mikhail M.; Lukoshkin, Vladimir A.; Schneider, Christian; Amthor, Matthias; Metzger, Christian; Kamp, Martin; Hoefling, Sven; Lagoudakis, Pavlos; Kavokin, Alexey

    2016-01-01

    Light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation, well-known for revolutionising photonic science, has been realised primarily in fermionic systems including widely applied diode lasers. The prerequisite for fermionic lasing is the inversion of electronic population, which governs the lasing threshold. More recently, bosonic lasers have also been developed based on Bose-Einstein condensates of exciton-polaritons in semiconductor microcavities. These electrically neutral bosons coexist with charged electrons and holes. In the presence of magnetic fields, the charged particles are bound to their cyclotron orbits, while the neutral exciton-polaritons move freely. We demonstrate how magnetic fields affect dramatically the phase diagram of mixed Bose-Fermi systems, switching between fermionic lasing, incoherent emission and bosonic lasing regimes in planar and pillar microcavities with optical and electrical pumping. We collected and analyzed the data taken on pillar and planar microcavity structures at continuous wave and pulsed optical excitation as well as injecting electrons and holes electronically. Our results evidence the transition from a Bose gas to a Fermi liquid mediated by magnetic fields and light-matter coupling. PMID:26822483

  9. Ther FERMI FEL project at TRIESTE

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, R.P.; Bulfone, D.; Cargnello, F.

    1995-12-31

    The goal of the FERMI project - Free Electron Radiation and Matching Instrumentation - is to construct a new user facility for FEL radiation beams covering a broad spectral range (2-250 {mu}m) to complement the high brightness VUV/Soft-Xray radiation available from the ELETTRA synchrotron radiation facility at Trieste. A unique feature of the project will be the possibility of carrying out {open_quote}pump-probe{close_quote} experiments using synchronized radiation beams from FERMI and ELETTRA on the same sample. The project was launched at a meeting with Italian FEL experts held in Trieste on the 18th November 1994, chaired by C. Rubbia, as a collaboration between Sincrotrone Trieste, ENEA (Frascati), INFN (Frascati) and the University of Naples (Department of Electronic Engineering). The facility will make use of an existing linac, that forms part of the ELETTRA injection system, and a hall into which the beam can be extracted. In addition, for the first phase of the project equipment will be used from the suspended INFN/ENEA {open_quote}SURF{close_quote} FEL experiment, including the undulator, beam transport magnets and optical cavity. In this first International FEL Conference report on the project, we summarize the main features of the project, concentrating in particular on the most recent activities, including: results of measurements of the linac beam in the FEL mode of operation, further studies of the electron beam transport system including possibilities for bunch length manipulations, and further numerical calculations of the FEL performance.

  10. The first Fermi LAT supernova remnant catalog

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Acero, F.

    2016-05-16

    To uniformly determine the properties of supernova remnants (SNRs) at high energies, we have developed the first systematic survey at energies from 1 to 100 GeV using data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope. Based on the spatial overlap of sources detected at GeV energies with SNRs known from radio surveys, we classify 30 sources as likely GeV SNRs. We also report 14 marginal associations and 245 flux upper limits. A mock catalog in which the positions of known remnants are scrambled in Galactic longitude, allows us to determine an upper limit of 22% on the number of GeV candidatesmore » falsely identified as SNRs. We have also developed a method to estimate spectral and spatial systematic errors arising from the diffuse interstellar emission model, a key component of all Galactic Fermi LAT analyses. By studying remnants uniformly in aggregate, we measure the GeV properties common to these objects and provide a crucial context for the detailed modeling of individual SNRs. Combining our GeV results with multiwavelength (MW) data, including radio, X-ray, and TeV, demonstrates the need for improvements to previously sufficient, simple models describing the GeV and radio emission from these objects. As a result, we model the GeV and MW emission from SNRs in aggregate to constrain their maximal contribution to observed Galactic cosmic rays.« less

  11. Spiraling Fermi arcs in Weyl materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Songci; Andreev, Anton

    In Weyl materials the valence and conduction electron bands touch at an even number of isolated points in the Brillouin zone. In the vicinity of these points the electron dispersion is linear and may be described by the massless Dirac equation. This results in nontrivial topology of Berry connection curvature. One of its consequences is the existence of peculiar surface electron states whose Fermi surfaces form arcs connecting projections of the Weyl points onto the surface plane. Band bending near the boundary of the crystal also produces surface states. We show that in Weyl materials band bending near the crystal surface gives rise to spiral structure of energy surfaces of arc states. The corresponding Fermi surface has the shape of a spiral that winds about the projection of the Weyl point onto the surface plane. The direction of the winding is determined by the helicity of the Weyl point and the sign of the band bending potential. For close valleys arc state morphology may be understood in terms of avoided crossing of oppositely winding spirals. This work is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences under Award Number DE-FG02-07ER46452.

  12. Fermi level stabilization energy in cadmium oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Speaks, D. T.; Mayer, M. A.; Yu, K. M.; Mao, S. S.; Haller, E. E.; Walukiewicz, W.

    2010-04-08

    We have studied the effects of high concentrations of native point defects on the electrical and optical properties of CdO. The defects were introduced by irradiation with high energy He+, Ne+, Ar+ and C+ ions. Increasing the irradiation damage with particles heavier than He+ increases the electron concentration until a saturation level of 5x1020 cm-3 is reached. In contrast, due to the ionic character and hence strong dynamic annealing of CdO, irradiation with much lighter He+ stabilizes the electron concentration at a much lower level of 1.7x1020 cm-3. A large shift of the optical absorption edge with increasing electron concentration in irradiated samples is explained by the Burstein-Moss shift corrected for electron-electron and electron-ion interactions. The saturation of the electron concentration and the optical absorption edge energy are consistent with a defect induced stabilization of the Fermi energy at 1 eV above the conduction band edge. The result is in a good agreement with previously determined Fermi level pinning energies on CdO surfaces. The results indicate that CdO shares many similarities with InN, as both materials exhibit extremely large electron affinities and an unprecedented propensity for n-type conductivity.

  13. THE FERMI GAMMA-RAY BURST MONITOR

    SciTech Connect

    Meegan, Charles; Lichti, Giselher; Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Diehl, Roland; Greiner, Jochen; Von Kienlin, Andreas; Steinle, Helmut; Bhat, P. N.; Briggs, Michael S.; Connaughton, Valerie; Paciesas, W. S.; Preece, Robert; Wilson, Robert B.; Fishman, Gerald; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Van der Horst, Alexander J.; McBreen, Sheila

    2009-09-01

    The Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) will significantly augment the science return from the Fermi Observatory in the study of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). The primary objective of GBM is to extend the energy range over which bursts are observed downward from the energy range of the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on Fermi into the hard X-ray range where extensive previous data sets exist. A secondary objective is to compute burst locations onboard to allow re-orienting the spacecraft so that the LAT can observe delayed emission from bright bursts. GBM uses an array of 12 sodium iodide scintillators and two bismuth germanate scintillators to detect gamma rays from {approx}8 keV to {approx}40 MeV over the full unocculted sky. The onboard trigger threshold is {approx}0.7 photons cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} (50-300 keV, 1 s peak). GBM generates onboard triggers for {approx}250 GRBs per year.

  14. Fermi's Paradox - The Last Challenge For Copernicanism?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirkovic, M. M.

    2009-06-01

    We review Fermi's paradox (or the "Great Silence" problem), not only arguably the oldest and crucial problem for the Search for ExtraTerrestrial Intelligence (SETI), but also a conundrum of profound scientific, philosophical and cultural importance. By a simple analysis of observation selection effects, the correct resolution of Fermi's paradox is certain to tell us something about the future of humanity. Already more than three quarters of century old puzzle -- and a quarter of century since the last major review paper in the field by G. David Brin -- has generated many ingenious discussions and hypotheses. We analyze the often tacit methodological assumptions built in various answers to this puzzle and attempt a new classification of the numerous solutions proposed in an already huge literature on the subject. Finally, we consider the ramifications of various classes of hypotheses for the practical SETI projects. Somewhat paradoxically, it seems that the class of (neo)catastrophic hypotheses gives, on the balance, the strongest justification to optimism regarding our current and near-future SETI efforts.

  15. Lasing in Bose-Fermi mixtures.

    PubMed

    Kochereshko, Vladimir P; Durnev, Mikhail V; Besombes, Lucien; Mariette, Henri; Sapega, Victor F; Askitopoulos, Alexis; Savenko, Ivan G; Liew, Timothy C H; Shelykh, Ivan A; Platonov, Alexey V; Tsintzos, Simeon I; Hatzopoulos, Z; Savvidis, Pavlos G; Kalevich, Vladimir K; Afanasiev, Mikhail M; Lukoshkin, Vladimir A; Schneider, Christian; Amthor, Matthias; Metzger, Christian; Kamp, Martin; Hoefling, Sven; Lagoudakis, Pavlos; Kavokin, Alexey

    2016-01-01

    Light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation, well-known for revolutionising photonic science, has been realised primarily in fermionic systems including widely applied diode lasers. The prerequisite for fermionic lasing is the inversion of electronic population, which governs the lasing threshold. More recently, bosonic lasers have also been developed based on Bose-Einstein condensates of exciton-polaritons in semiconductor microcavities. These electrically neutral bosons coexist with charged electrons and holes. In the presence of magnetic fields, the charged particles are bound to their cyclotron orbits, while the neutral exciton-polaritons move freely. We demonstrate how magnetic fields affect dramatically the phase diagram of mixed Bose-Fermi systems, switching between fermionic lasing, incoherent emission and bosonic lasing regimes in planar and pillar microcavities with optical and electrical pumping. We collected and analyzed the data taken on pillar and planar microcavity structures at continuous wave and pulsed optical excitation as well as injecting electrons and holes electronically. Our results evidence the transition from a Bose gas to a Fermi liquid mediated by magnetic fields and light-matter coupling. PMID:26822483

  16. The First Fermi LAT Supernova Remnant Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acero, F.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonino, R.; Bottacini, E.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caputo, R.; Caragiulo, M.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cavazzuti, E.; Cecchi, C.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen, J. M.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cominsky, L. R.; Condon, B.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; D’Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Desiante, R.; Digel, S. W.; Di Venere, L.; Drell, P. S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Favuzzi, C.; Ferrara, E. C.; Franckowiak, A.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Gomez-Vargas, G. A.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Gustafsson, M.; Hadasch, D.; Harding, A. K.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Hewitt, J. W.; Hill, A. B.; Horan, D.; Hou, X.; Iafrate, G.; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Katsuta, J.; Kerr, M.; Knödlseder, J.; Kocevski, D.; Kuss, M.; Laffon, H.; Lande, J.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Li, J.; Li, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Magill, J.; Maldera, S.; Marelli, M.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monzani, M. E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nemmen, R.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Petrosian, V.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; Reposeur, T.; Rousseau, R.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Schmid, J.; Schulz, A.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Spada, F.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Strong, A. W.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Tibolla, O.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Uchiyama, Y.; Vianello, G.; Wells, B.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.; Yassine, M.; den Hartog, P. R.; Zimmer, S.

    2016-05-01

    To uniformly determine the properties of supernova remnants (SNRs) at high energies, we have developed the first systematic survey at energies from 1 to 100 GeV using data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). Based on the spatial overlap of sources detected at GeV energies with SNRs known from radio surveys, we classify 30 sources as likely GeV SNRs. We also report 14 marginal associations and 245 flux upper limits. A mock catalog in which the positions of known remnants are scrambled in Galactic longitude allows us to determine an upper limit of 22% on the number of GeV candidates falsely identified as SNRs. We have also developed a method to estimate spectral and spatial systematic errors arising from the diffuse interstellar emission model, a key component of all Galactic Fermi LAT analyses. By studying remnants uniformly in aggregate, we measure the GeV properties common to these objects and provide a crucial context for the detailed modeling of individual SNRs. Combining our GeV results with multiwavelength (MW) data, including radio, X-ray, and TeV, we demonstrate the need for improvements to previously sufficient, simple models describing the GeV and radio emission from these objects. We model the GeV and MW emission from SNRs in aggregate to constrain their maximal contribution to observed Galactic cosmic rays.

  17. Lasing in Bose-Fermi mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochereshko, Vladimir P.; Durnev, Mikhail V.; Besombes, Lucien; Mariette, Henri; Sapega, Victor F.; Askitopoulos, Alexis; Savenko, Ivan G.; Liew, Timothy C. H.; Shelykh, Ivan A.; Platonov, Alexey V.; Tsintzos, Simeon I.; Hatzopoulos, Z.; Savvidis, Pavlos G.; Kalevich, Vladimir K.; Afanasiev, Mikhail M.; Lukoshkin, Vladimir A.; Schneider, Christian; Amthor, Matthias; Metzger, Christian; Kamp, Martin; Hoefling, Sven; Lagoudakis, Pavlos; Kavokin, Alexey

    2016-01-01

    Light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation, well-known for revolutionising photonic science, has been realised primarily in fermionic systems including widely applied diode lasers. The prerequisite for fermionic lasing is the inversion of electronic population, which governs the lasing threshold. More recently, bosonic lasers have also been developed based on Bose-Einstein condensates of exciton-polaritons in semiconductor microcavities. These electrically neutral bosons coexist with charged electrons and holes. In the presence of magnetic fields, the charged particles are bound to their cyclotron orbits, while the neutral exciton-polaritons move freely. We demonstrate how magnetic fields affect dramatically the phase diagram of mixed Bose-Fermi systems, switching between fermionic lasing, incoherent emission and bosonic lasing regimes in planar and pillar microcavities with optical and electrical pumping. We collected and analyzed the data taken on pillar and planar microcavity structures at continuous wave and pulsed optical excitation as well as injecting electrons and holes electronically. Our results evidence the transition from a Bose gas to a Fermi liquid mediated by magnetic fields and light-matter coupling.

  18. Evidence of Fermi bubbles around M31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pshirkov, M. S.; Vasiliev, V. V.; Postnov, K. A.

    2016-06-01

    Gamma-ray haloes can exist around galaxies due to the interaction of escaping galactic cosmic rays with the surrounding gas. We have searched for such a halo around the nearby giant spiral Andromeda galaxy M31 using almost 7 yr of Fermi LAT data at energies above 300 MeV. The presence of a diffuse gamma-ray halo with total photon flux 2.6 ± 0.6 × 10-9 cm-2 s-1, corresponding to a luminosity (0.3-100 GeV) of (3.2 ± 0.6) × 1038 erg s-1 (for a distance of 780 kpc) was found at a 5.3σ confidence level. The halo form does not correspond to the extended baryonic H I disc of M31, as would be expected in hadronic production of gamma photons from cosmic ray interaction, nor it is spherically symmetric, as could be in the case of dark matter annihilation. The best-fitting halo template corresponds to two 6-7.5 kpc bubbles symmetrically located perpendicular to the M31 galactic disc, similar to the `Fermi bubbles' found around the Milky Way centre, which suggests the past activity of the central supermassive black hole or a star formation burst in M31.

  19. Fermi Liquid Instabilities in the Spin Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Congjun; Sun, Kai; Fradkin, Eduardo; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2010-03-16

    We study the Fermi surface instabilities of the Pomeranchuk type in the spin triplet channel with high orbital partial waves (F{sub l}{sup a} (l > 0)). The ordered phases are classified into two classes, dubbed the {alpha} and {beta}-phases by analogy to the superfluid {sup 3}He-A and B-phases. The Fermi surfaces in the {alpha}-phases exhibit spontaneous anisotropic distortions, while those in the {beta}-phases remain circular or spherical with topologically non-trivial spin configurations in momentum space. In the {alpha}-phase, the Goldstone modes in the density channel exhibit anisotropic overdamping. The Goldstone modes in the spin channel have nearly isotropic underdamped dispersion relation at small propagating wavevectors. Due to the coupling to the Goldstone modes, the spin wave spectrum develops resonance peaks in both the {alpha} and {beta}-phases, which can be detected in inelastic neutron scattering experiments. In the p-wave channel {beta}-phase, a chiral ground state inhomogeneity is spontaneously generated due to a Lifshitz-like instability in the originally nonchiral systems. Possible experiments to detect these phases are discussed.

  20. Dark matter subhalos and unidentified sources in the Fermi 3FGL source catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoonenberg, Djoeke; Gaskins, Jennifer; Bertone, Gianfranco; Diemand, Jürg

    2016-05-01

    If dark matter consists of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), dark matter subhalos in the Milky Way could be detectable as gamma-ray point sources due to WIMP annihilation. In this work, we perform an updated study of the detectability of dark matter subhalos as gamma-ray sources with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi LAT). We use the results of the Via Lactea II simulation, scaled to the Planck 2015 cosmological parameters, to predict the local dark matter subhalo distribution. Under optimistic assumptions for the WIMP parameters—a 40 GeV particle annihilating to bbar b with a thermal cross-section, as required to explain the Galactic center GeV excess—we predict that at most ~ 10 subhalos might be present in the third Fermi LAT source catalog (3FGL). This is a smaller number than has been predicted by prior studies, and we discuss the origin of this difference. We also compare our predictions for the detectability of subhalos with the number of subhalo candidate sources in 3FGL, and derive upper limits on the WIMP annihilation cross-section as a function of the particle mass. If a dark matter interpretation could be excluded for all 3FGL sources, our constraints would be competitive with those found by indirect searches using other targets, such as known Milky Way satellite galaxies.

  1. Scaling in electron scattering from a relativistic Fermi gas

    SciTech Connect

    W. M. Alberico; A. Molinari; T. William Donnelly; E. L. Kronenberg; Wally Van Orden

    1988-10-01

    Within the context of the relativistic Fermi gas model, the concept of ''y scaling'' for inclusive electron scattering from nuclei is investigated. Specific kinematic shifts of the single-nucleon response in the nuclear medium can be incorporated with this model. Suggested generalizations beyond the strict Fermi gas model, including treatments of separated longitudinal and transverse responses, are also explored.

  2. Collisional Properties of a Polarized Fermi Gas with Resonant Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Bruun, G. M.; Recati, A.; Stringari, S.; Pethick, C. J.; Smith, H.

    2008-06-20

    Highly polarized mixtures of atomic Fermi gases constitute a novel Fermi liquid. We demonstrate how information on thermodynamic properties may be used to calculate quasiparticle scattering amplitudes even when the interaction is resonant and apply the results to evaluate the damping of the spin dipole mode. We estimate that under current experimental conditions the mode would be intermediate between the hydrodynamic and collisionless limits.

  3. Fermi surfaces and energy gaps of high-temperature superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Z.X.; Dessau, D.S.

    1994-12-31

    In this short paper, the authors describe their recent experimental results from high-temperature superconductors. In the normal state, the data reveals interesting features of the Fermi surfaces and low energy excitations near the Fermi level. In the superconducting state, the data shows a very strong anisotropy in the superconducting gap.

  4. LETTERS AND COMMENTS: Enrico Fermi: a great teacher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Boon Leong

    2002-09-01

    Enrico Fermi was not only a great theoretical and experimental physicist but a great teacher as well. This article highlights Fermi's approaches in both his formal and informal teaching, and as a thesis advisor. The great teacher inspires - William Arthur Ward

  5. Don't Just Stand There--Teach Fermi Problems!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, A. W.

    2008-01-01

    Fermi problems, or order of magnitude estimates, are often used in introductory physics courses. In this paper I will show that first year students studying physics at university do not arrive with the skill set to solve these problems, and they have to be actively taught how to solve them. Once they have been shown how to solve Fermi problems,…

  6. Fermi-Dirac statistics and the number theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubasiak, Anna; Korbicz, Jaroslaw K.; Zakrzewski, Jakub; Lewenstein, Maciej

    2005-11-01

    We relate the Fermi-Dirac statistics of an ideal Fermi gas in a harmonic trap to partitions of given integers into distinct parts, studied in number theory. Using methods of quantum statistical physics we derive analytic expressions for cumulants of the probability distribution of the number of different partitions.

  7. "Where is Everybody?" An Account of Fermi's Question

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Jones, E. M.

    1985-03-01

    Enrico Fermi's famous question, now central to debates about the prevalence of extraterrestrial civilizations, arose during a luncheon conversation with Emil Konopinski, Edward Teller, and Herbert York in the summer of 1950. Fermi's companions on that day have provided accounts of the incident.

  8. Orthogonal metals: The simplest non-Fermi liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandkishore, Rahul; Metlitski, Max A.; Senthil, T.

    2012-07-01

    We present a fractionalized metallic phase which is indistinguishable from the Fermi liquid in conductivity and thermodynamics, but is sharply distinct in one-electron properties, such as the electron spectral function. We dub this phase the “orthogonal metal.” The orthogonal metal and the transition to it from the Fermi liquid are naturally described using a slave-particle representation wherein the electron is expressed as a product of a fermion and a slave Ising spin. We emphasize that when the slave spins are disordered, the result is not a Mott insulator (as erroneously assumed in the prior literature), but rather the orthogonal metal. We construct prototypical ground-state wave functions for the orthogonal metal by modifying the Jastrow factor of Slater-Jastrow wave functions that describe ordinary Fermi liquids. We further demonstrate that the transition from the Fermi liquid to the orthogonal metal can, in some circumstances, provide a simple example of a continuous destruction of a Fermi surface with a critical Fermi surface appearing right at the critical point. We present exactly soluble models that realize an orthogonal metal phase, and the phase transition to the Fermi liquid. These models thus provide valuable solvable examples for phase transitions associated with the death of a Fermi surface.

  9. ''Where is everybody. '' An account of Fermi's question

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, E.M.

    1985-03-01

    Fermi's famous question, now central to debates about the prevalence of extraterrestrial civilizations, arose during a luncheon conversation with Emil Konopinski, Edward Teller, and Herbert York in the summer of 1950. Fermi's companions on that day have provided accounts of the incident.

  10. Where is everybody? an account of Fermi's question

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, E. M.

    1985-03-01

    Fermi's famous question, now central to debates about the prevalence of extraterrestrial civilizations, arose during a luncheon conversation with Emil Konopinski, Edward Teller, and Herbert York in the summer of 1950. Fermi's companions on that day have provided accounts of the incident.