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Sample records for cdms ii fermi

  1. The CDMS II data acquisition system

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, D.A.; Burke, S.; Cooley, J.; Crisler, M.; Cushman, P.; DeJongh, F.; Duong, L.; Ferril, R.; Golwala, S.R.; Hall, J.; Holmgren, D.; /Fermilab /Texas A-M

    2011-01-01

    The Data Acquisition System for the CDMS II dark matter experiment was designed and built when the experiment moved to its new underground installation at the Soudan Lab. The combination of remote operation and increased data load necessitated a completely new design. Elements of the original LabView system remained as stand-alone diagnostic programs, but the main data processing moved to a VME-based system with custom electronics for signal conditioning, trigger formation and buffering. The data rate was increased 100-fold and the automated cryogenic system was linked to the data acquisition. A modular server framework with associated user interfaces was implemented in Java to allow control and monitoring of the entire experiment remotely.

  2. Beyond the CDMS-II dark matter search: SuperCDMS

    SciTech Connect

    Brink, Paul L.; et al.

    2005-03-01

    Presently the CDMS-II collaboration's Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) search at the Soudan Underground Laboratory sets the most stringent exclusion limits of any WIMP cold dark matter direct-detection experiment. To extend our reach further, to WIMP-nucleon cross sections in the range 10{sup -46}-10{sup -44} cm{sup 2}, we propose SuperCDMS, which would take advantage of a very deep site. One promising site is the recently approved SNOLab facility in Canada. In this paper we will present our overall plan, identify primary issues, and set the goals that need to be met prior to embarking upon each phase of SuperCDMS.

  3. Dark matter searches with the CDMS II experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Saab, T.; Collaboration: CDMS Collaboration

    2014-06-24

    The CDMS II experiment ran between 2003 and 2009. A total of 30 germanium and silicon ZIP detectors were operated, producing a high quality set of data that has been analyzed for evidence of and placed leading constraints on standard, low-mass, electron-recoil, and annually modulating WIMP interactions. This article will describe the general operation principles behind the CDMS detectors, report on the results of major Ge and Si detector analyses, and describe the current and future activities of the SuperCDMS program.

  4. Advancing the Search for Dark Matter: from CDMS II to SuperCDMS

    SciTech Connect

    Hertel, Scott A.

    2012-09-01

    An overwhelming proportion of the universe (83% by mass) is composed of particles we know next to nothing about. Detecting these dark matter particles directly, through hypothesized weak-force-mediated recoils with nuclear targets here on earth, could shed light on what these particles are, how they relate to the standard model, and how the standard model ts within a more fundamental understanding. This thesis describes two such experimental eorts: CDMS II (2007-2009) and SuperCDMS Soudan (ongoing). The general abilities and sensitivities of both experiments are laid out, placing a special emphasis on the detector technology, and how this technology has evolved from the rst to the second experiment. Some topics on which I spent signicant eorts are described here only in overview (in particular the details of the CDMS II analysis, which has been laid out many times before), and some topics which are not described elsewhere are given a somewhat deeper treatment. In particular, this thesis is hopefully a good reference for those interested in the annual modulation limits placed on the low-energy portion of the CDMS II exposure, the design of the detectors for SuperCDMS Soudan, and an overview of the extremely informative data these detectors produce. It is an exciting time. The technology I've had the honor to work on the past few years provides a wealth of information about each event, more so than any other direct detection experiment, and we are still learning how to optimally use all this information. Initial tests from the surface and now underground suggest this technology has the background rejection abilities necessary for a planned 200kg experiment or even ton-scale experiment, putting us on the threshold of probing parameter space orders of magnitude from where the eld currently stands.

  5. Results from the Final Exposure of the CDMS II Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Z.; Akerib, D.S.; Arrenberg, S.; Bailey, C.N.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Baudis, L.; Bauer, D.A.; Brink, P.L.; Bruch, T.; Bunker, R.; Cabrera, B.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /UC, Santa Barbara

    2009-12-01

    We report results from a blind analysis of the final data taken with the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search experiment (CDMS II) at the Soudan Underground Laboratory, Minnesota, USA. A total raw exposure of 612 kg-days was analyzed for this work. We observed two events in the signal region; based on our background estimate, the probability of observing two or more background events is 23%. These data set an upper limit on the Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP)-nucleon elastic-scattering spin-independent cross-section of 7.0 x 10{sup -44} cm{sup 2} for a WIMP of mass 70 GeV/c{sup 2} at the 90% confidence level. Combining this result with all previous CDMS II data gives an upper limit on the WIMP-nucleon spin-independent cross-section of 3.8 x 10{sup -44} cm{sup 2} for a WIMP of mass 70 GeV/c{sup 2}. We also exclude new parameter space in recently proposed inelastic dark matter models.

  6. Search for lightly ionizing particles using CDMS-II data and fabrication of CDMS detectors with improved homogeneity in properties

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, Kunj Bihari

    2013-12-01

    Fundamental particles are always observed to carry charges which are integral multiples of one-third charge of electron, e/3. While this is a well established experimental fact, the theoretical understanding for the charge quantization phenomenon is lacking. On the other hand, there exist numerous theoretical models that naturally allow for existence of particles with fractional electromagnetic charge. These particles, if existing, hint towards existence of physics beyond the standard model. Multiple high energy, optical, cosmological and astrophysical considerations restrict the allowable mass-charge parameter space for these fractional charges. Still, a huge unexplored region remains. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS-II), located at Soudan mines in northern Minnesota, employs germanium and silicon crystals to perform direct searches for a leading candidate to dark matter called Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). Alternately, the low detection threshold allows search for fractional electromagnetic-charged particles, or Lightly Ionizing Particles (LIPs), moving at relativistic speed. Background rejection is obtained by requiring that the magnitude and location of energy deposited in each detector be consistent with corresponding \\signatures" resulting from the passage of a fractionally charged particle. In this dissertation, the CDMS-II data is analyzed to search for LIPs, with an expected background of 0.078 0.078 events. No candidate events are observed, allowing exclusion of new parameter space for charges between e/6 and e/200.

  7. Development of CDMS-II Surface Event Rejection Techniques and Their Extensions to Lower Energy Thresholds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofer, Thomas James

    2014-10-01

    The CDMS-II phase of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search, a dark matter direct-detection experiment, was operated at the Soudan Underground Laboratory from 2003 to 2008. The full payload consisted of 30 ZIP detectors, totaling approximately 1.1 kg of Si and 4.8 kg of Ge, operated at temperatures of 50 mK. The ZIP detectors read out both ionization and phonon pulses from scatters within the crystals; channel segmentation and analysis of pulse timing parameters allowed effective fiducialization of the crystal volumes and background rejection sufficient to set world-leading limits at the times of their publications. A full re-analysis of the CDMS-II data was motivated by an improvement in the event reconstruction algorithms which improved the resolution of ionization energy and timing information. The Ge data were re-analyzed using three distinct background-rejection techniques; the Si data from runs 125--128 were analyzed for the first time using the most successful of the techniques from the Ge re-analysis. The results of these analyses prompted a novel "mid-threshold" analysis, wherein energy thresholds were lowered but background rejection using phonon timing information was still maintained. This technique proved to have significant discrimination power, maintaining adequate signal acceptance and minimizing background leakage. The primary background for CDMS-II analyses comes from surface events, whose poor ionization collection make them difficult to distinguish from true nuclear recoil events. The novel detector technology of SuperCDMS, the successor to CDMS-II, uses interleaved electrodes to achieve full ionization collection for events occurring at the top and bottom detector surfaces. This, along with dual-sided ionization and phonon instrumentation, allows for excellent fiducialization and relegates the surface-event rejection techniques of CDMS-II to a secondary level of background discrimination. Current and future SuperCDMS results hold great promise for

  8. Global interpretation of direct Dark Matter searches after CDMS-II results

    SciTech Connect

    Kopp, Joachim; Schwetz, Thomas; Zupan, Jure

    2009-12-01

    We perform a global fit to data from Dark Matter (DM) direct detection experiments, including the recent CDMS-II results. We discuss possible interpretations of the DAMA annual modulation signal in terms of spin-independent and spin-dependent DM-nucleus interactions, both for elastic and inelastic scattering. We find that for the spin-dependent inelastic scattering off protons a good fit to all data is obtained. We present a simple toy model realizing such a scenario. In all the remaining cases the DAMA allowed regions are disfavored by other experiments or suffer from severe fine tuning of DM parameters with respect to the galactic escape velocity. Finally, we also entertain the possibility that the two events observed in CDMS-II are an actual signal of elastic DM scattering, and we compare the resulting CDMS-II allowed regions to the exclusion limits from other experiments.

  9. Development of CDMS-II Surface Event Rejection Techniques and Their Extensions to Lower Energy Thresholds

    SciTech Connect

    Hofer, Thomas James

    2014-12-01

    The CDMS-II phase of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search, a dark matter direct-detection experiment, was operated at the Soudan Underground Laboratory from 2003 to 2008. The full payload consisted of 30 ZIP detectors, totaling approximately 1.1 kg of Si and 4.8 kg of Ge, operated at temperatures of 50 mK. The ZIP detectors read out both ionization and phonon pulses from scatters within the crystals; channel segmentation and analysis of pulse timing parameters allowed e ective ducialization of the crystal volumes and background rejection su cient to set world-leading limits at the times of their publications. A full re-analysis of the CDMS-II data was motivated by an improvement in the event reconstruction algorithms which improved the resolution of ionization energy and timing information. The Ge data were re-analyzed using three distinct background-rejection techniques; the Si data from runs 125 - 128 were analyzed for the rst time using the most successful of the techniques from the Ge re-analysis. The results of these analyses prompted a novel \\mid-threshold" analysis, wherein energy thresholds were lowered but background rejection using phonon timing information was still maintained. This technique proved to have signi cant discrimination power, maintaining adequate signal acceptance and minimizing background leakage. The primary background for CDMS-II analyses comes from surface events, whose poor ionization collection make them di cult to distinguish from true nuclear recoil events. The novel detector technology of SuperCDMS, the successor to CDMS-II, uses interleaved electrodes to achieve full ionization collection for events occurring at the top and bottom detector surfaces. This, along with dual-sided ionization and phonon instrumentation, allows for excellent ducialization and relegates the surface-event rejection techniques of CDMS-II to a secondary level of background discrimination. Current and future SuperCDMS results hold great promise for mid- to low

  10. Bound on Z{sup '} mass from CDMS II in the dark left-right gauge model II

    SciTech Connect

    Khalil, Shaaban; Lee, Hye-Sung; Ma, Ernest

    2010-03-01

    With the recent possible signal of dark matter from the CDMS II experiment, the Z{sup '} mass of a new version of the dark left-right gauge model (DLRM II) is predicted to be at around a TeV. As such, it has an excellent discovery prognosis at the operating Large Hadron Collider.

  11. Results from a Low-Energy Analysis of the CDMS II Germanium Data

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Z.; Akerib, D.S.; Arrenberg, S.; Bailey, C.N.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Baudis, L.; Bauer, D.A.; Brink, P.L.; Bruch, T.; Bunker, R.; Cabrera, B.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /UC, Santa Barbara

    2010-11-01

    We report results from a reanalysis of data from the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS II) experiment at the Soudan Underground Laboratory. Data taken between October 2006 and September 2008 using eight germanium detectors are reanalyzed with a lowered, 2 keV recoil-energy threshold, to give increased sensitivity to interactions from Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) with masses below {approx}10 GeV/c{sup 2}. This analysis provides stronger constraints than previous CDMS II results for WIMP masses below 9 GeV/c{sup 2} and excludes parameter space associated with possible low-mass WIMP signals from the DAMA/LIBRA and CoGeNT experiments.

  12. Measurement of Nuclear Recoils in the CDMS II Dark Matter Search

    SciTech Connect

    Fallows, Scott Mathew

    2014-12-01

    The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment is designed to directly detect elastic scatters of weakly-interacting massive dark matter particles (WIMPs), on target nuclei in semiconductor crystals composed of Si and Ge. These scatters would occur very rarely, in an overwhelming background composed primarily of electron recoils from photons and electrons, as well as a smaller but non-negligible background of WIMP-like nuclear recoils from neutrons. The CDMS II generation of detectors simultaneously measure ionization and athermal phonon signals from each scatter, allowing discrimination against virtually all electron recoils in the detector bulk. Pulse-shape timing analysis allows discrimination against nearly all remaining electron recoils taking place near detector surfaces. Along with carefully limited neutron backgrounds, this experimental program allowed for \\background- free" operation of CDMS II at Soudan, with less than one background event expected in each WIMP-search analysis. As a result, exclusionary upper-limits on WIMP-nucleon interaction cross section were placed over a wide range of candidate WIMP masses, ruling out large new regions of parameter space.

  13. Background Characterization and Discrimination in the Final Analysis of the CDMS II Phase of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search

    SciTech Connect

    Fritts, Matthew C.

    2011-02-01

    The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) is designed to detectWeakly-Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) in the Milky Way halo. The phase known as CDMS II was performed in the Soudan Underground Laboratory. The final set of CDMS II data, collected in 2007-8 and referred to as Runs 125-8, represents the largest exposure to date for the experiment. We seek collisions between WIMPs and atomic nuclei in disk-shaped germanium and silicon detectors. A key design feature is to keep the rate of collisions from known particles producing WIMP-like signals very small. The largest category of such background is interactions with electrons in the detectors that occur very close to one of the faces of the detector. The next largest category is collisions between energetic neutrons that bypass the experimental shielding and nuclei in the detectors. Analytical efforts to discriminate these backgrounds and to estimate the rate at which such discrimination fails have been refined and improved throughout each phase of CDMS. Next-generation detectors for future phases of CDMS require testing at cryogenic test facilities. One such facility was developed at the University of Minnesota in 2007 and has been used continuously since then to test detectors for the next phase of the experiment, known as SuperCDMS.

  14. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS-II) Experiment: First Results from the Soudan Mine

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Clarence Leeder

    2004-09-01

    There is an abundance of evidence that the majority of the mass of the universe is in the form of non-baryonic non-luminous matter that was non-relativistic at the time when matter began to dominate the energy density. Weakly Interacting Massive Particles, or WIMPs, are attractive cold dark matter candidates because they would have a relic abundance today of {approx}0.1 which is consistent with precision cosmological measurements. WIMPs are also well motivated theoretically. Many minimal supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model have WIMPs in the form of the lightest supersymmetric partner, typically taken to be the neutralino. The CDMS II experiment searches for WIMPs via their elastic scattering off of nuclei. The experiment uses Ge and Si ZIP detectors, operated at <50 mK, which simultaneously measure the ionization and athermal phonons produced by the scattering of an external particle. The dominant background for the experiment comes from electromagnetic interactions taking place very close to the detector surface. Analysis of the phonon signal from these interactions makes it possible to discriminate them from interactions caused by WIMPs. This thesis presents the details of an important aspect of the phonon pulse shape analysis known as the ''Lookup Table Correction''. The Lookup Table Correction is a position dependent calibration of the ZIP phonon response which improves the rejection of events scattering near the detector surface. The CDMS collaboration has recently commissioned its experimental installation at the Soudan Mine. This thesis presents an analysis of the data from the first WIMP search at the Soudan Mine. The results of this analysis set the world's lowest exclusion limit making the CDMS II experiment at Soudan the most sensitive WIMP search to this date.

  15. Task I: Dark Matter Search Experiments with Cryogenic Detectors: CDMS-I and CDMS-II Task II: Experimental Study of Neutrino Properties: EXO and KamLAND

    SciTech Connect

    Cabrera, Blas; Gratta, Giorgio

    2013-08-30

    Dark Matter Search - During the period of performance, our group continued the search for dark matter in the form of weakly interacting massive particles or WIMPs. As a key member of the CDMS (Cryogenic Dark Matter Search) collaboration, we completed the CDMS II experiment which led the field in sensitivity for more than five years. We fabricated all detectors, and participated in detector testing and verification. In addition, we participated in the construction and operation of the facility at the Soudan Underground Laboratory and played key roles in the data acquisition and analysis. Towards the end of the performance period, we began operating the SuperCDMS Soudan experiment, which consists of 15 advanced Ge (9 kg) detectors. The advanced detector design called iZIP grew out of our earlier DOE Particle Detector R&D program which demonstrated the rejection of surface electrons to levels where they are no longer the dominant source of background. Our group invented this advanced design and these larger detectors were fabricated on the Stanford campus in collaboration with the SLAC CDMS group and the Santa Clara University group. The sensitivity reach is expected to be up to 5 times better than CDMS II after two years of operation. We will check the new limits on WIMPs set by XENON100, and we expect improved sensitivity for light mass WIMPs beyond that of any other existing experiment. Our group includes the Spokesperson for SuperCDMS and continues to make important contributions to improvements in the detector technology which are enabling the very low trigger thresholds used to explore the low mass WIMP region. We are making detailed measurements of the charge transport and trapping within Ge crystals, measuring the diffusive trapping distance of the quasiparticle excitations within the Al phonon collector fins on the detector surface, and we are contributing to the development of much improved detector Monte Carlos which are essential to guide the detector

  16. Measurement of Nuclear Recoils in the CDMS II Dark Matter Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallows, Scott M.

    The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment is designed to directly detect elastic scatters of weakly-interacting massive dark matter particles (WIMPs), on target nuclei in semiconductor crystals composed of Si and Ge. These scatters would occur very rarely, in an overwhelming background composed primarily of electron recoils from photons and electrons, as well as a smaller but non-negligible background of WIMP-like nuclear recoils from neutrons. The CDMS~II generation of detectors simultaneously measure ionization and athermal phonon signals from each scatter, allowing discrimination against virtually all electron recoils in the detector bulk. Pulse-shape timing analysis allows discrimination against nearly all remaining electron recoils taking place near detector surfaces. Along with carefully limited neutron backgrounds, this experimental program allowed for "background-free'' operation of CDMS~II at Soudan, with less than one background event expected in each WIMP-search analysis. As a result, exclusionary upper-limits on WIMP-nucleon interaction cross section were placed over a wide range of candidate WIMP masses, ruling out large new regions of parameter space. These results, like any others, are subject to a variety of systematic effects that may alter their final interpretations. A primary focus of this dissertation will be difficulties in precisely calibrating the energy scale for nuclear recoil events like those from WIMPs. Nuclear recoils have suppressed ionization signals relative to electron recoils of the same recoil energy, so the response of the detectors is calibrated differently for each recoil type. The overall normalization and linearity of the energy scale for electron recoils in CDMS~II detectors is clearly established by peaks of known gamma energy in the ionization spectrum of calibration data from a 133Ba source. This electron-equivalent keVee) energy scale enables calibration of the total phonon signal (keVt) by enforcing unity

  17. Improved WIMP-search reach of the CDMS II germanium data

    SciTech Connect

    Agnese, R.

    2015-10-12

    CDMS II data from the five-tower runs at the Soudan Underground Laboratory were reprocessed with an improved charge-pulse fitting algorithm. Two new analysis techniques to reject surface-event backgrounds were applied to the 612 kg days germanium-detector weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP)-search exposure. An extended analysis was also completed by decreasing the 10 keV analysis threshold to ~5 keV, to increase sensitivity near a WIMP mass of 8 GeV/c2. After unblinding, there were zero candidate events above a deposited energy of 10 keV and six events in the lower-threshold analysis. This yielded minimum WIMP-nucleon spin-independent scattering cross-section limits of 1.8×10–44 and 1.18×10–41 at 90% confidence for 60 and 8.6 GeV/c2 WIMPs, respectively. This improves the previous CDMS II result by a factor of 2.4 (2.7) for 60 (8.6) GeV/c2 WIMPs.

  18. Improved WIMP-search reach of the CDMS II germanium data

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Agnese, R.

    2015-10-12

    CDMS II data from the five-tower runs at the Soudan Underground Laboratory were reprocessed with an improved charge-pulse fitting algorithm. Two new analysis techniques to reject surface-event backgrounds were applied to the 612 kg days germanium-detector weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP)-search exposure. An extended analysis was also completed by decreasing the 10 keV analysis threshold to ~5 keV, to increase sensitivity near a WIMP mass of 8 GeV/c2. After unblinding, there were zero candidate events above a deposited energy of 10 keV and six events in the lower-threshold analysis. This yielded minimum WIMP-nucleon spin-independent scattering cross-section limits of 1.8×10–44 andmore » 1.18×10–41 at 90% confidence for 60 and 8.6 GeV/c2 WIMPs, respectively. This improves the previous CDMS II result by a factor of 2.4 (2.7) for 60 (8.6) GeV/c2 WIMPs.« less

  19. Improved WIMP-search reach of the CDMS II germanium data

    SciTech Connect

    Agnese, R.; Anderson, A. J.; Asai, M.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Barker, D.; Basu Thakur, R.; Bauer, D. A.; Billard, J.; Borgland, A.; Bowles, M. A.; Brandt, D.; Brink, P. L.; Bunker, R.; Cabrera, B.; Caldwell, D. O.; Calkins, R.; Cerdeno, D. G.; Chagani, H.; Chen, Y.; Cooley, J.; Cornell, B.; Crewdson, C. H.; Cushman, Priscilla B.; Daal, M.; Di Stefano, P. C.; Doughty, T.; Esteban, L.; Fallows, S.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Godfrey, G. L.; Golwala, S. R.; Hall, Jeter C.; Harris, H. R.; Hertel, S. A.; Hofer, T.; Holmgren, D.; Hsu, L.; Huber, M. E.; Jardin, D. M.; Jastram, A.; Kamaev, O.; Kara, B.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kennedy, A.; Kiveni, M.; Koch, K.; Leder, A.; Loer, B.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Lukens, P.; Mahapatra, R.; Mandic, V.; McCarthy, K. A.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Moffatt, R. A.; Oser, S. M.; Page, K.; Page, W. A.; Partridge, R.; Pepin, M.; Phipps, A.; Prasad, K.; Pyle, M.; Qiu, H.; Rau, W.; Redl, P.; Reisetter, A.; Ricci, Y.; Rogers, H. E.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Sander, J.; Schneck, K.; Schnee, R. W.; Scorza, S.; Serfass, B.; Shank, B.; Speller, D.; Toback, D.; Upadhyayula, S.; Villano, A. N.; Welliver, B.; Wilson, J. S.; Wright, D. H.; Yang, X.; Yellin, S.; Yen, J. J.; Young, B. A.; Zhang, J.

    2015-10-31

    CDMS II data from the five-tower runs at the Soudan Underground Laboratory were reprocessed with an improved charge-pulse fitting algorithm. Two new analysis techniques to reject surface-event backgrounds were applied to the 612 kg days germanium-detector weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP)-search exposure. An extended analysis was also completed by decreasing the 10 keV analysis threshold to ~5 keV, to increase sensitivity near a WIMP mass of 8 GeV/c2. After unblinding, there were zero candidate events above a deposited energy of 10 keV and six events in the lower-threshold analysis. This yielded minimum WIMP-nucleon spin-independent scattering cross-section limits of 1.8×10-44 and 1.18×10-41 at 90% confidence for 60 and 8.6 GeV/c2 WIMPs, respectively. This improves the previous CDMS II result by a factor of 2.4 (2.7) for 60 (8.6) GeV/c2 WIMPs.

  20. A dark-matter search using the final CDMS II dataset and a novel detector of surface radiocontamination

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Zeeshan

    2012-01-01

    Substantial evidence from galaxies, galaxy clusters, and cosmological scales suggests that ~85% of the matter of our universe is invisible. The missing matter, or "dark matter" is likely composed of non-relativistic, non-baryonic particles, which have very rare interactions with baryonic matter and with one another. Among dark matter candidates, Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) are particularly well motivated. In the early universe, thermally produced particles with weak-scale mass and interactions would `freeze out’ at the correct density to be dark matter today. Extensions to the Standard Model of particle physics, such as Supersymmetry, which solve gauge hierarchy and coupling unification problems, naturally provide such particles. Interactions of WIMPs with baryons are expected to be rare, but might be detectable in low-noise detectors. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment uses ionization- and phonon- sensitive germanium particle detectors to search for such interactions. CDMS detectors are operated at the Soudan Underground Laboratory in Minnesota, within a shielded environment to lower cosmogenic and radioactive background. The combination of phonon and ionization signatures from the detectors provides excellent residual-background rejection. This dissertation presents improved techniques for phonon calibration of CDMS II detectors and the analysis of the final CDMS II dataset with 612 kg-days of exposure. We set a limit of 3.8x10$^{-}$44 cm$^{2}$ on WIMP-nucleon spin-independent scattering cross section for a WIMP mass of 70 GeV/c$^{2}$. At the time this analysis was published, these data presented the most stringent limits on WIMP scattering for WIMP masses over 42 GeV/c$^{2}$, ruling out previously unexplored parameter space. Next-generation rare-event searches such as SuperCDMS, COUPP, and CLEAN will be limited in sensitivity, unless they achieve stringent control of the surface radioactive contamination on their detectors. Low

  1. Silicon detector dark matter results from the final exposure of CDMS II.

    PubMed

    Agnese, R; Ahmed, Z; Anderson, A J; Arrenberg, S; Balakishiyeva, D; Basu Thakur, R; Bauer, D A; Billard, J; Borgland, A; Brandt, D; Brink, P L; Bruch, T; Bunker, R; Cabrera, B; Caldwell, D O; Cerdeno, D G; Chagani, H; Cooley, J; Cornell, B; Crewdson, C H; Cushman, P; Daal, M; Dejongh, F; do Couto e Silva, E; Doughty, T; Esteban, L; Fallows, S; Figueroa-Feliciano, E; Filippini, J; Fox, J; Fritts, M; Godfrey, G L; Golwala, S R; Hall, J; Harris, R H; Hertel, S A; Hofer, T; Holmgren, D; Hsu, L; Huber, M E; Jastram, A; Kamaev, O; Kara, B; Kelsey, M H; Kennedy, A; Kim, P; Kiveni, M; Koch, K; Kos, M; Leman, S W; Loer, B; Lopez Asamar, E; Mahapatra, R; Mandic, V; Martinez, C; McCarthy, K A; Mirabolfathi, N; Moffatt, R A; Moore, D C; Nadeau, P; Nelson, R H; Page, K; Partridge, R; Pepin, M; Phipps, A; Prasad, K; Pyle, M; Qiu, H; Rau, W; Redl, P; Reisetter, A; Ricci, Y; Saab, T; Sadoulet, B; Sander, J; Schneck, K; Schnee, R W; Scorza, S; Serfass, B; Shank, B; Speller, D; Sundqvist, K M; Villano, A N; Welliver, B; Wright, D H; Yellin, S; Yen, J J; Yoo, J; Young, B A; Zhang, J

    2013-12-20

    We report results of a search for weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPS) with the silicon detectors of the CDMS II experiment. This blind analysis of 140.2 kg day of data taken between July 2007 and September 2008 revealed three WIMP-candidate events with a surface-event background estimate of 0.41(-0.08)(+0.20)(stat)(-0.24)(+0.28)(syst). Other known backgrounds from neutrons and 206Pb are limited to <0.13 and <0.08 events at the 90% confidence level, respectively. The exposure of this analysis is equivalent to 23.4 kg day for a recoil energy range of 7-100 keV for a WIMP of mass 10  GeV/c2. The probability that the known backgrounds would produce three or more events in the signal region is 5.4%. A profile likelihood ratio test of the three events that includes the measured recoil energies gives a 0.19% probability for the known-background-only hypothesis when tested against the alternative WIMP+background hypothesis. The highest likelihood occurs for a WIMP mass of 8.6  GeV/c2 and WIMP-nucleon cross section of 1.9×10(-41)  cm2. PMID:24483735

  2. A Search for WIMP Dark Matter Using an Optimized Chi-square Technique on the Final Data from the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search Experiment (CDMS II)

    SciTech Connect

    Manungu Kiveni, Joseph

    2012-12-01

    This dissertation describes the results of a WIMP search using CDMS II data sets accumulated at the Soudan Underground Laboratory in Minnesota. Results from the original analysis of these data were published in 2009; two events were observed in the signal region with an expected leakage of 0.9 events. Further investigation revealed an issue with the ionization-pulse reconstruction algorithm leading to a software upgrade and a subsequent reanalysis of the data. As part of the reanalysis, I performed an advanced discrimination technique to better distinguish (potential) signal events from backgrounds using a 5-dimensional chi-square method. This dataanalysis technique combines the event information recorded for each WIMP-search event to derive a backgrounddiscrimination parameter capable of reducing the expected background to less than one event, while maintaining high efficiency for signal events. Furthermore, optimizing the cut positions of this 5-dimensional chi-square parameter for the 14 viable germanium detectors yields an improved expected sensitivity to WIMP interactions relative to previous CDMS results. This dissertation describes my improved (and optimized) discrimination technique and the results obtained from a blind application to the reanalyzed CDMS II WIMP-search data.

  3. A Search for WIMP Dark Matter using an Optimized Chi-square Technique on the Final Data from the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search Experiment (CDMS II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manungu Kiveni, Joseph

    2012-06-01

    During the last two decades, cosmology has become a precision observational science thanks (in part) to the incredible number of experiments performed to better understand the composition of the universe. The large amount of data accumulated strongly indicates that the bulk of the universe's matter is in the form of non-baryonic matter that does not interact electromagnetically. Combined evidence from the dynamics of galaxies and galaxy clusters confirms that most of the mass in the universe is not composed of any known form of matter. Measurements of the cosmic microwave background, big bang nucleosynthesis and many other experiments indicate that ˜80% of the matter in the universe is dark, non-relativistic and cold. The dark matter resides in the halos surrounding galaxies, galaxy clusters and other large-scale structures. Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) are well motivated class of dark matter candidates that arise naturally in supersymmetric extensions to the Standard Model of particles physics, and can be produced as non-relativistic thermal relics in the early universe with about the right density to account for the missing mass. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment seeks to directly detect the keV-scale energy deposited by WIMPs in the galactic halo when they scatter from nuclei in the crystalline detectors made of germanium and silicon. These detectors, called Z-sensitive Ionization and Phonon detectors (ZIPs) are operated at ˜ 45 mK and simultaneously measure the ionization and the (athermal) phonons produced by particle interactions. The ratio of ionization and phonon energies allows discrimination of a low rate of nuclear recoils (expected for WIMPs) from an overwhelming rate of electron recoils (expected for most backgrounds). Phonon-pulse shape and timing enables further suppression of lower-rate interactions at the detector surfaces. This dissertation describes the results of a WIMP search using CDMS II data sets

  4. Conceptual Design for SuperCDMS SNOLAB

    SciTech Connect

    Brink, P.L.; /SLAC

    2012-06-13

    Beyond the present dark matter direct detection experiment at the Soudan underground laboratory, the SuperCDMS Collaboration is engaged in R and D activities for a 100-kg scale germanium dark matter experiment nominally sited at SNOLAB (2070 m overburden of rock). The expected sensitivity after 3 years of running is 3 x 10{sup -46} cm{sup 2} for the spin-independent cross section, an order of magnitude improvement over present exclusion limits for WIMP masses {approx}80 GeV/c{sup 2}. At this depth, and appropriate design of shielding and cryostat, neutron backgrounds will be negligible. The baseline design is an expanded version of CDMS II with Ge substrates (100 x 33 mm discs) instrumented with the iZIP phonon sensor layout to achieve the electron surface-event rejection power required.

  5. Controlling cosmogenic radioactivity in SuperCDMS SNOLAB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Alan; CDMS Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The SuperCDMS SNOLAB experiment is being designed with sensitivity far in excess of existing experiments to low-mass WIMP dark matter. To attain this sensitivity, events due to ionizing radiation that mimic dark matter must be controlled. Depending on the source of ionizing radiation, different strategies are required for its mitigation. Cosmic rays and neutron radiation at earth's surface continuously generate an multitude of radioactive atoms in the materials that will be used to build SuperCDMS SNOLAB. Of these isotopes, we are concerned with isotopes with long half-lives and high production rates. The production and effects of cobalt-60, silicon-32, and tritium will be discussed. A new analysis of the silicon-32 concentration in the CDMS-II silicon detectors will be discussed and compared to the measured concentration of silicon-32 in the silicon used by the DAMIC dark matter search.

  6. Ionization Readout of CDMS Detectors with Low Power, Low Noise HEMTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phipps, A.; Jin, Y.; Sadoulet, B.

    2014-08-01

    We have measured the ionization performance of a CDMS II detector using CNRS/LPN HEMTs as opposed to Si JFETs in the front end electronics. We find no significant difference in ionization resolution when using HEMTs compared to Si JFETs indicating the CNRS/LPN HEMTs can act as a low power, low noise replacement for Si JFETs in cryogenic applications. We present the HEMT DC/AC properties, measured noise in both low impedance and high impedance closed-loop configurations using CDMS electronics, and performance with a CDMS detector exposed to a Am source.

  7. Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS): The Hunt for Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Sadoulet, Bernard

    2006-03-06

    Deciphering the nature of dark matter has great scientific importance. A leading hypothesis is that dark matter is made of Weakly Interactive Massive Particles (WIMPs), which may result from supersymmetry or additional spatial dimensions. The underground search for elastic scattering of WIMPs on suitable targets (the so-called 'direct detection') is currently led by the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search II (CDMS II) experiment. Its sensitivity is ten times better than any other experiment and we hope to obtain another factor ten in the coming two years. After a brief recall of our recent results, I will describe the complementarity between direct detection experiments, the LHC and the ILC and I will outline the role that SLAC could play in this SuperCDMS program.

  8. A search for particle dark matter using cryogenic germanium and silicon detectors in the one- and two- tower runs of CDMS-II at Soudan

    SciTech Connect

    Reuben Walter Ogburn, IV

    2008-06-01

    Images of the Bullet Cluster of galaxies in visible light, X-rays, and through gravitational lensing confirm that most of the matter in the universe is not composed of any known form of matter. The combined evidence from the dynamics of galaxies and clusters of galaxies, the cosmic microwave background, big bang nucleosynthesis, and other observations indicates that 80% of the universe's matter is dark, nearly collisionless, and cold. The identify of the dar, matter remains unknown, but weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) are a very good candidate. They are a natural part of many supersymmetric extensions to the standard model, and could be produced as a nonrelativistic, thermal relic in the early universe with about the right density to account for the missing mass. The dark matter of a galaxy should exist as a spherical or ellipsoidal cloud, called a 'halo' because it extends well past the edge of the visible galaxy. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) seeks to directly detect interactions between WIMPs in the Milky Way's galactic dark matter halo using crystals of germanium and silicon. Our Z-sensitive ionization and phonon ('ZIP') detectors simultaneously measure both phonons and ionization produced by particle interactions. In order to find very rare, low-energy WIMP interactions, they must identify and reject background events caused by environmental radioactivity, radioactive contaminants on the detector,s and cosmic rays. In particular, sophisticated analysis of the timing of phonon signals is needed to eliminate signals caused by beta decays at the detector surfaces. This thesis presents the firs two dark matter data sets from the deep underground experimental site at the Soudan Underground Laboratory in Minnesota. These are known as 'Run 118', with six detectors (1 kg Ge, 65.2 live days before cuts) and 'Run 119', with twelve detectors (1.5 kg Ge, 74.5 live days before cuts). They have analyzed all data from the two runs together in a single

  9. A search for particle dark matter using cryogenic germanium and silicon detectors in the one- and two-tower runs of CDMS-II at Soudan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogburn, Reuben Walter, IV

    Images of the Bullet Cluster of galaxies in visible light, X-rays, and through gravitational lensing confirm that most of the matter in the universe is not composed of any known form of matter. The combined evidence from the dynamics of galaxies and clusters of galaxies, the cosmic microwave background, big bang nucleosynthesis, and other observations indicates that 80% of the universe's matter is dark, nearly collisionless, and cold. The identity of the dark matter remains unknown, but weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) are a very good candidate. They are a natural part of many supersymmetric extensions to the standard model, and could be produced as a nonrelativistic, thermal relic in the early universe with about the right density to account for the missing mass. The dark matter of a galaxy should exist as a spherical or ellipsoidal cloud, called a "halo" because it extends well past the edge of the visible galaxy. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) seeks to directly detect interactions between WIMPs in the Milky Way's galactic dark matter halo using crystals of germanium and silicon. Our Z-sensitive ionization and phonon ("ZIP") detectors simultaneously measure both phonons and ionization produced by particle interactions. In order to find very rare, low-energy WIMP interactions, we must identify and reject background events caused by environmental radioactivity, radioactive contaminants on the detectors, and cosmic rays. In particular, sophisticated analysis of the timing of phonon signals is needed to eliminate signals caused by beta decays at the detector surfaces. This thesis presents the first two dark matter data sets from the deep underground experimental site at the Soudan Underground Laboratory in Minnesota. These are known as "Run 118," with six detectors (1 kg Ge, 65.2 live days before cuts) and "Run 119," with twelve detectors (1.5 kg Ge, 74.5 live days before cuts). We have analyzed all data from the two runs together in a single

  10. Characterization of SuperCDMS 1-inch Ge Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Z.; Akerib, D. S.; Bailey, C. N.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Bauer, D. A.; Beaty, J.; Brink, P. L.; Bunker, R.; Cabrera, B.; Caldwell, D. O.; Clark, K.; Cooley, J.; Cushman, P.; DeJongh, F.; Dragowsky, M. R.; Duong, L.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Filippini, J.; Fritts, M.; Golwala, S. R.; Grant, D. R.; Hall, J.; Hennings-Yeomans, R.; Hertel, S.; Homgren, D.; Hsu, L.; Huber, M. E.; Kamaev, O.; Kiveni, M.; Kos, M.; Leman, S. W.; Mahapatra, R.; Mandic, V.; Moore, D.; McCarthy, K. A.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Nelson, H.; Ogburn, R. W.; Pyle, M.; Qiu, X.; Ramberg, E.; Rau, W.; Reisetter, A.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Sander, J.; Schnee, R. W.; Seitz, D. N.; Serfass, B.; Sundqvist, K. M.; Tomada, A.; Wang, G.; Yellin, S.; Yoo, J.; Young, B. A.

    2009-12-01

    The newly commissioned SuperCDMS Soudan experiment aims to search for WIMP dark matter with a sensitivity to cross sections of 5×10-45cm2 and larger (90% CL upper limit). This goal is facilitated by a new set of germanium detectors, 2.5 times more massive than the ones used in the CDMS-II experiment, and with a different athermal phonon sensor layout that eliminates radial degeneracy in position reconstruction of high radius events. We present characterization data on these detectors, as well as improved techniques for correcting position-dependent variations in pulse shape across the detector. These improvements provide surface-event discrimination sufficient for a reach of 5×10-45cm2.

  11. The unbearable lightness of being: CDMS versus XENON

    SciTech Connect

    Frandsen, Mads T.; Kahlhoefer, Felix; Sarkar, Subir; McCabe, Christopher; Schmidt-Hoberg, Kai E-mail: felix.kahlhoefer@physics.ox.ac.uk E-mail: s.sarkar@physics.ox.ac.uk

    2013-07-01

    The CDMS-II collaboration has reported 3 events in a Si detector, which are consistent with being nuclear recoils due to scattering of Galactic dark matter particles with a mass of ∼ 8.6 GeV and a cross-section on neutrons of ∼ 2 × 10{sup −41} cm{sup 2}. While a previous result from the XENON10 experiment has supposedly ruled out such particles as dark matter, we find by reanalysing the XENON10 data that this is not the case. Some tension remains however with the upper limit placed by the XENON100 experiment, independently of astrophysical uncertainties concerning the Galactic dark matter distribution. We explore possible ways of ameliorating this tension by altering the properties of dark matter interactions. Nevertheless, even with standard couplings, light dark matter is consistent with both CDMS and XENON10/100.

  12. SuperCDMS Cold Hardware Design

    SciTech Connect

    Al Kenany, S.; Rolla, Julie A.; Godfrey, Gary; Brink, Paul L.; Seitz, Dennis N.; Figueroa-Feliciano, Enectali; Huber, Martin E.; Hines, Bruce A.; Irwin, Kent D.; /NIST, Boulder

    2012-06-13

    We discuss the current design of the cold hardware and cold electronics to be used in the upcoming SuperCDMS Soudan deployment. Engineering challenges associated with such concerns as thermal isolation, microphonics, radiopurity, and power dissipation are discussed, along with identifying the design changes necessary for SuperCDMS SNOLAB. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) employs ultrapure 1-inch thick, 3-inch diameter germanium crystals operating below 50 mK in a dilution cryostat. These detectors give an ionization and phonon signal, which gives us rejection capabilities regarding background events versus dark matter signals.

  13. The Accretion Wind Model of Fermi Bubbles. II. Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mou, Guobin; Yuan, Feng; Gan, Zhaoming; Sun, Mouyuan

    2015-09-01

    In a previous work, we have shown that the formation of Fermi bubbles can be due to the interaction between winds launched from the hot accretion flow in Sgr A* and the interstellar medium (ISM). In that work, we focus only on the morphology. In this paper we continue our study by calculating the gamma-ray radiation. Some cosmic-ray protons (CRp) and electrons (CRe) must be contained in the winds, which are likely formed by physical processes such as magnetic reconnection. We have performed MHD simulations to study the spatial distribution of CRp, considering the advection and diffusion of CRp in the presence of magnetic field. We find that a permeated zone is formed just outside of the contact discontinuity between winds and the ISM, where the collisions between CRp and thermal nuclei mainly occur. The decay of neutral pions generated in the collisions, combined with the inverse Compton scattering of background soft photons by the secondary leptons generated in the collisions and primary CRe, can well explain the observed gamma-ray spectral energy distribution. Other features such as the uniform surface brightness along the latitude and the boundary width of the bubbles are also explained. The advantage of this “accretion wind” model is that the adopted wind properties come from the detailed small-scale MHD numerical simulation of accretion flows and the value of mass accretion rate has independent observational evidences. The success of the model suggests that we may seriously consider the possibility that cavities and bubbles observed in other contexts such as galaxy clusters may be formed by winds rather than jets.

  14. The SuperCDMS Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Schnee, Richard W.; Akerib, D.S.; Attisha, M.J.; Bailey, C.N.; Baudis, L.; Bauer, Daniel A.; Brink, P.L.; Brusov, P.P.; Bunker, R.; Cabrera, B.; Caldwell, D.O.; Chang, C.L.; Cooley, J.; Crisler, M.B.; Cushman, P.; Denes, P.; Dragowsky, M.R.; Duong, L.; Filippini, J.; Gaitskell, R.J.; Golwala, S.R.; /Case Western Reserve U. /Brown U. /Florida U. /Fermilab /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /UC, Santa Barbara /Minnesota U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Caltech /Colorado U., Denver /NIST, Boulder /Santa Clara U.

    2005-02-01

    Modest improvements in the level and/or discrimination of backgrounds are needed to keep backgrounds negligible during the three phases of SuperCDMS. By developing production designs that require only modest testing, detector production rates may be improved sufficiently to allow an exposure of 500 ton d within a reasonable time and budget. Overall, the improvement estimates described above are conservative. Previous development efforts have shown that some areas prove easier and provide larger factors while others prove more difficult. The conservative estimates together with the broad approach reduce the risk and give us confidence that we will succeed, providing the surest way to probe to WIMP-nucleon cross sections of 10{sup -46} cm{sup 2}.

  15. FERMI-LAT SENSITIVITY TO DARK MATTER ANNIHILATION IN VIA LACTEA II SUBSTRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Brandon; Johnson, Robert P.; Madau, Piero; Kuhlen, Michael; Diemand, Juerg E-mail: mqk@astro.berkeley.ed

    2010-08-01

    We present a study of the ability of the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope to detect dark matter (DM) annihilation signals from the Galactic subhalos predicted by the Via Lactea II N-body simulation. We implement an improved formalism for estimating the boost factor needed to account for the effect of DM clumping on scales below the resolution of the simulation, and we incorporate a detailed Monte Carlo simulation of the response of the Fermi-LAT, including a simulation of its all-sky observing mode integrated over a 10 year mission. We find that for WIMP masses up to about 150 GeV c {sup -2} in standard supersymmetric models with ({sigma}v) = 3 x 10{sup -26} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1}, a few subhalos could be detectable with >5 standard deviation significance and would likely deviate significantly from the appearance of a point source.

  16. The SuperCDMS SNOLAB Detector Tower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aramaki, Tsuguo

    2016-08-01

    The SuperCDMS collaboration is moving forward with the design and construction of SuperCDMS SNOLAB, where the initial deployment will include ˜ 30 kg of Ge and ˜ 5 kg of Si detectors. Here, we will discuss the associated cryogenic cold hardware required for the detector readout. The phonon signals will be read out with superconducting quantum interference device arrays and the ionization signals will use high electron mobility transistor amplifiers operating at 4 K. A number of design challenges exist regarding the required wiring complex impedance, noise pickup, vibration, and thermal isolation. Our progress to date will be presented.

  17. The SuperCDMS SNOLAB Detector Tower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aramaki, Tsuguo

    2016-01-01

    The SuperCDMS collaboration is moving forward with the design and construction of SuperCDMS SNOLAB, where the initial deployment will include ˜ 30 kg of Ge and ˜ 5 kg of Si detectors. Here, we will discuss the associated cryogenic cold hardware required for the detector readout. The phonon signals will be read out with superconducting quantum interference device arrays and the ionization signals will use high electron mobility transistor amplifiers operating at 4 K. A number of design challenges exist regarding the required wiring complex impedance, noise pickup, vibration, and thermal isolation. Our progress to date will be presented.

  18. Background considerations for SuperCDMS

    SciTech Connect

    Cooley, J.; Collaboration: SuperCDMS Collaboration

    2013-08-08

    Rejection and protection from background is a key issue for the next generation SuperCDMS SNOLAB experiment that will have a cross-section sensitivity of better than 8 × 10{sup −46} cm{sup 2} for spin-independent WIMP-nucleon interactions. This paper presents the details of the methods used to reject electromagnetic backgrounds using the new iZIP detectors that are currently operated in the Soudan Underground Laboratory, MN and the methods the collaboration is investigating to protect against neutron background in the next generation SuperCDMS experiment.

  19. Validation of Phonon Physics in the CDMS Detector Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, K.A.; Leman, S.W.; Anderson, A.J.; Brandt, D.; Brink, P.L.; Cabrera, B.; Cherry, M.; Do Couto E Silva, E.; Cushman, P.; Doughty, T.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Kim, P.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Novak, L.; Partridge, R.; Pyle, M.; Reisetter, A.; Resch, R.; Sadoulet, B.; Serfass, B.; Sundqvist, K.M.; /UC, Berkeley /Stanford U.

    2012-06-06

    The SuperCDMS collaboration is a dark matter search effort aimed at detecting the scattering of WIMP dark matter from nuclei in cryogenic germanium targets. The CDMS Detector Monte Carlo (CDMS-DMC) is a simulation tool aimed at achieving a deeper understanding of the performance of the SuperCDMS detectors and aiding the dark matter search analysis. We present results from validation of the phonon physics described in the CDMS-DMC and outline work towards utilizing it in future WIMP search analyses.

  20. Determining the Appropriate Package and Transportation Methodology for the Detroit Edison, Fermi II Msrs and Associated Components

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, B.

    2007-07-01

    During the spring of 2005, Detroit Edison, Enrico Fermi II Nuclear Power Station (Fermi) decided to disposition two MSRs and associated components scheduled for replacement in the spring of 2006 during the MSR Replacement Outage. Of concern to Fermi was the proper packaging and transportation methodology when dis-positioning a component measuring approximately 110' in length and 13' in diameter and weighing over 300 tons. Upon removal from the Turbine Deck the retired MSRs and associated components were turned over to the Rad Waste Group for packaging and final disposition. Fermi requested quotations from vendors to package, transport, and disposition the MSRs and associated components. However, multiple Vendors informed Fermi that the size and weight of the MSRs were questionable in passing permitting requirements and would require segmentation and volume reduction on site or at a waste processor. Fermi contracted with MHF Logistical Solutions (MHF-LS) based on their ability to receive clearances for shipping the MSRs in one piece via two heavy haul rail conveyances acting as a bolstered load with professionally engineered blocking and bracing configured to support the retired MSRs. (authors)

  1. SuperCDMS Detector Readout Cryogenic Hardware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seitz, D. N.; Ahmed, Z.; Akerib, D. S.; Arrenberg, S.; Bailey, C. N.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Baudis, L.; Bauer, D. A.; Beaty, J.; Brink, P. L.; Bruch, T.; Bunker, R.; Cabrera, B.; Caldwell, D. O.; Clark, K.; Cooley, J.; Cushman, P.; DeJongh, F.; Dragowsky, M. R.; Duong, L.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Filippini, J.; Fritts, M.; Golwala, S. R.; Grant, D. R.; Hall, J.; Hennings-Yeomans, R.; Hertel, S.; Homgren, D.; Hsu, L.; Huber, M. E.; Kamaev, O.; Kiveni, M.; Kos, M.; Leman, S. W.; Mahapatra, R.; Mandic, V.; Moore, D.; McCarthy, K. A.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Nelson, H.; Novak, L.; Ogburn, R. W.; Pyle, M.; Qiu, X.; Ramberg, E.; Rau, W.; Reisetter, A.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Sander, J.; Schnee, R. W.; Serfass, B.; Sundqvist, K. M.; Tomada, A.; Wang, G.; Wikus, P.; Yellin, S.; Yoo, J.; Young, B. A.

    2009-12-01

    SuperCDMS employs 1-inch thick germanium crystals operated below 50mK in a dilution cryostat. Each detector produces ionization and phonon signals. Ionization signals are amplified by JFETs operating at 150K within an assembly mounted on the 4K cryostat stage. These high impedance signals are carried to the FETs by superconducting "vacuum coaxes" which minimize thermal conductivity, stray capacitance, and microphonics. Transition edge sensors produce low-impedance phonon signals, amplified by SQUID arrays mounted on a 600mK stage. Detectors are mounted in a six-sided wiring configuration called a "tower", which carries signals from 40mK to 4K. A flex circuit 3 meters in length carries amplified signals for each detector from 4K to a vacuum bulkhead. We describe the methods used to support the detectors, wiring and amplifier elements at various thermal stages, minimizing electrical noise and thermal loads.

  2. The SuperCDMS Soudan high threshold WIMP search and the planned SuperCDMS SNOLAB experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calkins, R.; SuperCDMS collaboration

    2016-05-01

    There is ample evidence that visible matter cannot account for a large component of the mass in the universe. Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) are one popular hypothesis to account for the missing mass. The Super Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (SuperCDMS) experiment is designed to directly detect WIMPs through interactions with a nucleus in a target crystal. The SuperCDMS detectors are instrumented with phonon and charge sensors, enabling excellent rejection of electron-recoil backgrounds. Approximately 3000 kg-days of exposure have been collected with the SuperCDMS Soudan experiment. We will describe the search for WIMPs with masses between 10-100 GeV and work towards the SuperCDMS SNOLAB experiment.

  3. Search for Axions with the CDMS Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Z.; Akerib, D.S.; Arrenberg, S.; Bailey, C.N.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Baudis, L.; Bauer, D.A.; Beaty, J.; Brink, P.L.; Bruch, T.; Bunker, R.; /UC, Santa Barbara /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2009-02-01

    We report on the first axion search results from the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment at the Soudan Underground Laboratory. An energy threshold of 2 keV for electron-recoil events allows a search for possible solar axion conversion into photons or local Galactic axion conversion into electrons in the germanium crystal detectors. The solar axion search sets an upper limit on the Primakov coupling g{sub a{gamma}{gamma}} of 2.4 x 10{sup ?9} GeV{sup -1} at the 95% confidence level for an axion mass less than 0.1 keV/c{sup 2}. This limit benefits from the first precise measurement of the absolute crystal plane orientations in this type of experiment. The Galactic axion search analysis sets a world-leading experimental upper limit on the axio-electric coupling g{sub a{bar e}e} of 1.4 x 10{sup -12} at the 90% confidence level for an axion mass of 2.5 keV/c{sup 2}. This analysis excludes an interpretation of the DAMA annual modulation result in terms of Galactic axion interactions for axion masses above 1.4 keV/c{sup 2}.

  4. Theory of helimagnons in itinerant quantum systems. II. Nonanalytic corrections to Fermi-liquid behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belitz, D.; Kirkpatrick, T. R.; Rosch, A.

    2006-07-01

    A recent theory for the ordered phase of helical or chiral magnets such as MnSi is used to calculate observable consequences of the helical Goldstone modes or helimagnons. In systems with no quenched disorder, the helimagnon contribution to the specific heat coefficient is shown to have a linear temperature dependence, while the quasiparticle inelastic scattering rate is anisotropic in momentum space and depends on the electronic dispersion relation. For cubic lattices the generic temperature dependence is given by a non-Fermi-liquid T3/2 behavior. The contribution to the temperature dependence of the resistivity is shown to be T5/2 in a Boltzmann approximation. The helimagnon thus leads to nonanalytic corrections to Fermi-liquid behavior. Implications for experiments, and for transport theories beyond the Boltzmann level, are discussed.

  5. Prototyping an active neutron veto for SuperCDMS

    SciTech Connect

    Calkins, Robert; Loer, Ben

    2015-08-17

    Neutrons, originating cosmogenically or from radioactive decays, can produce signals in dark matter detectors that are indistinguishable from Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). To combat this background for the SuperCDMS SNOLAB experiment, we are investigating designs for an active neutron veto within the constrained space of the compact SuperCDMS passive shielding. The current design employs an organic liquid scintillator mixed with an agent to enhance thermal neutron captures, with the scintillation light collected using wavelength-shifting fibers and read out by silicon photo-multipliers. We will describe the proposed veto and its predicted efficiency in detail and give some recent results from our R&D and prototyping efforts.

  6. Prototyping an Active Neutron Veto for SuperCDMS

    SciTech Connect

    Calkins, Robert; Loer, Ben

    2015-08-17

    Neutrons, originating cosmogenically or from radioactive decays, can produce signals in dark matter detectors that are indistinguishable from Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). To combat this background for the SuperCDMS SNOLAB experiment, we are investigating designs for an active neutron veto within the constrained space of the compact SuperCDMS passive shielding. The current design employs an organic liquid scintillator mixed with an agent to enhance thermal neutron captures, with the scintillation light collected using wavelength-shifting fibers and read out by silicon photo-multipliers. We will describe the proposed veto and its predicted efficiency in detail and give some recent results from our R&D and prototyping efforts.

  7. Command and data management system (CDMS) of the Philae lander

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balázs, A.; Baksa, A.; Bitterlich, H.; Hernyes, I.; Küchemann, O.; Pálos, Z.; Rustenbach, J.; Schmidt, W.; Spányi, P.; Sulyán, J.; Szalai, S.; Várhalmi, L.

    2016-08-01

    The paper covers the principal requirements, design concepts and implementation of the hardware and software for the central on-board computer (CDMS) of the Philae lander in the context of the ESA Rosetta space mission, including some technical details. The focus is on the implementation of fault tolerance, autonomous operation and operational flexibility by means of specific linked data structures and code execution mechanisms that can be interpreted as a kind of object oriented model for mission sequencing.

  8. Testing and Characterization of SuperCDMS Dark Matter Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Shank, Benjamin

    2014-05-01

    The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (SuperCDMS) relies on collection of phonons and charge carriers in semiconductors held at tens of milliKelvin as handles for detection of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). This thesis begins with a brief overview of the direct dark matter search (Chapter 1) and SuperCDMS detectors (Chapter 2). In Chapter 3, a 3He evaporative refrigerator facility is described. Results from experiments performed in-house at Stanford to measure carrier transport in high-purity germanium (HPGe) crystals operated at sub-Kelvin temperatures are presented in Chapter 4. Finally, in Chapter 5 a new numerical model and a time-domain optimal filtering technique are presented, both developed for use with superconducting Transition Edge Sensors (TESs), that provide excellent event reconstruction for single particle interactions in detectors read out with superconducting W-TESs coupled to energy-collecting films of Al. This thesis is not intended to be read straight through. For those new to CDMS or dark matter searches, the first two chapters are meant to be a gentle introduction for experimentalists. They are by no means exhaustive. The remaining chapters each stand alone, with different audiences.

  9. Improved Infrastucture for Cdms and JPL Molecular Spectroscopy Catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endres, Christian; Schlemmer, Stephan; Drouin, Brian; Pearson, John; Müller, Holger S. P.; Schilke, P.; Stutzki, Jürgen

    2014-06-01

    Over the past years a new infrastructure for atomic and molecular databases has been developed within the framework of the Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Centre (VAMDC). Standards for the representation of atomic and molecular data as well as a set of protocols have been established which allow now to retrieve data from various databases through one portal and to combine the data easily. Apart from spectroscopic databases such as the Cologne Database for Molecular Spectroscopy (CDMS), the Jet Propulsion Laboratory microwave, millimeter and submillimeter spectral line catalogue (JPL) and the HITRAN database, various databases on molecular collisions (BASECOL, KIDA) and reactions (UMIST) are connected. Together with other groups within the VAMDC consortium we are working on common user tools to simplify the access for new customers and to tailor data requests for users with specified needs. This comprises in particular tools to support the analysis of complex observational data obtained with the ALMA telescope. In this presentation requests to CDMS and JPL will be used to explain the basic concepts and the tools which are provided by VAMDC. In addition a new portal to CDMS will be presented which has a number of new features, in particular meaningful quantum numbers, references linked to data points, access to state energies and improved documentation. Fit files are accessible for download and queries to other databases are possible.

  10. Maximum Likelihood Analysis of Low Energy CDMS II Germanium Data

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Agnese, R.

    2015-03-30

    We report on the results of a search for a Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) signal in low-energy data of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search experiment using a maximum likelihood analysis. A background model is constructed using GEANT4 to simulate the surface-event background from Pb210decay-chain events, while using independent calibration data to model the gamma background. Fitting this background model to the data results in no statistically significant WIMP component. In addition, we also perform fits using an analytic ad hoc background model proposed by Collar and Fields, who claimed to find a large excess of signal-like events in ourmore » data. Finally, we confirm the strong preference for a signal hypothesis in their analysis under these assumptions, but excesses are observed in both single- and multiple-scatter events, which implies the signal is not caused by WIMPs, but rather reflects the inadequacy of their background model.« less

  11. Maximum Likelihood Analysis of Low Energy CDMS II Germanium Data

    SciTech Connect

    Agnese, R.

    2015-03-30

    We report on the results of a search for a Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) signal in low-energy data of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search experiment using a maximum likelihood analysis. A background model is constructed using GEANT4 to simulate the surface-event background from Pb210decay-chain events, while using independent calibration data to model the gamma background. Fitting this background model to the data results in no statistically significant WIMP component. In addition, we also perform fits using an analytic ad hoc background model proposed by Collar and Fields, who claimed to find a large excess of signal-like events in our data. Finally, we confirm the strong preference for a signal hypothesis in their analysis under these assumptions, but excesses are observed in both single- and multiple-scatter events, which implies the signal is not caused by WIMPs, but rather reflects the inadequacy of their background model.

  12. Fermi arc electronic structure and Chern numbers in the type-II Weyl semimetal candidate MoxW1 -xTe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belopolski, Ilya; Xu, Su-Yang; Ishida, Yukiaki; Pan, Xingchen; Yu, Peng; Sanchez, Daniel S.; Zheng, Hao; Neupane, Madhab; Alidoust, Nasser; Chang, Guoqing; Chang, Tay-Rong; Wu, Yun; Bian, Guang; Huang, Shin-Ming; Lee, Chi-Cheng; Mou, Daixiang; Huang, Lunan; Song, You; Wang, Baigeng; Wang, Guanghou; Yeh, Yao-Wen; Yao, Nan; Rault, Julien E.; Le Fèvre, Patrick; Bertran, François; Jeng, Horng-Tay; Kondo, Takeshi; Kaminski, Adam; Lin, Hsin; Liu, Zheng; Song, Fengqi; Shin, Shik; Hasan, M. Zahid

    2016-08-01

    It has recently been proposed that electronic band structures in crystals can give rise to a previously overlooked type of Weyl fermion, which violates Lorentz invariance and, consequently, is forbidden in particle physics. It was further predicted that MoxW1 -xTe2 may realize such a type-II Weyl fermion. Here, we first show theoretically that it is crucial to access the band structure above the Fermi level ɛF to show a Weyl semimetal in MoxW1 -xTe2 . Then, we study MoxW1 -xTe2 by pump-probe ARPES and we directly access the band structure >0.2 eV above ɛF in experiment. By comparing our results with ab initio calculations, we conclude that we directly observe the surface state containing the topological Fermi arc. We propose that a future study of MoxW1 -xTe2 by pump-probe ARPES may directly pinpoint the Fermi arc. Our work sets the stage for the experimental discovery of the first type-II Weyl semimetal in MoxW1 -xTe2 .

  13. THE FERMI BUBBLES. II. THE POTENTIAL ROLES OF VISCOSITY AND COSMIC-RAY DIFFUSION IN JET MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Fulai; Mathews, William G.; Oh, S. Peng

    2012-09-10

    The origin of the Fermi bubbles recently detected by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope in the inner Galaxy is mysterious. In the companion paper Guo and Mathews (Paper I), we use hydrodynamic simulations to show that they could be produced by a recent powerful active galactic nucleus (AGN) jet event. Here, we further explore this scenario to study the potential roles of shear viscosity and cosmic-ray (CR) diffusion on the morphology and CR distribution of the bubbles. We show that even a relatively low level of viscosity ({mu}{sub visc} {approx}> 3 g cm{sup -1} s{sup -1}, or {approx}0.1%-1% of Braginskii viscosity in this context) could effectively suppress the development of Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities at the bubble surface, resulting in smooth bubble edges as observed. Furthermore, viscosity reduces circulating motions within the bubbles, which would otherwise mix the CR-carrying jet backflow near bubble edges with the bubble interior. Thus viscosity naturally produces an edge-favored CR distribution, an important ingredient to produce the observed flat gamma-ray surface brightness distribution. Generically, such a CR distribution often produces a limb-brightened gamma-ray intensity distribution. However, we show that by incorporating CR diffusion that is strongly suppressed across the bubble surface (as inferred from sharp bubble edges) but is close to canonical values in the bubble interior, we obtain a reasonably flat gamma-ray intensity profile. The similarity of the resulting CR bubble with the observed Fermi bubbles strengthens our previous result in Paper I that the Fermi bubbles were produced by a recent AGN jet event. Studies of the nearby Fermi bubbles may provide a unique opportunity to study the potential roles of plasma viscosity and CR diffusion on the evolution of AGN jets and bubbles.

  14. Anisotropic Fermi Couplings due to Large Unquenched Orbital Angular Momentum: Q-band 1H, 14N and 11B ENDOR of bistrispyrazolylborate Co(II)

    PubMed Central

    Myers, William K.; Scholes, Charles P.; Tierney, David L.

    2009-01-01

    We report Q-band ENDOR of 1H, 14N, and 11B at the g|| extreme of the EPR spectrum of bistrispyrazolylborate Co(II), Co(Tp)2 and two structural analogs. This trigonally symmetric, high-spin (hs) S = 3/2 Co(II) complex shows large unquenched ground–state orbital angular momentum, which leads to highly anisotropic electronic g-values [g|| = 8.48, g⊥ = 1.02]. The large g-anisotropy is shown to result in large dipolar couplings near g|| and uniquely anisotropic 14N Fermi couplings, which arise from spin transferred to the nitrogen 2s orbital (2.2 %) via anti-bonding interactions with singly occupied metal dx2−y2 and dz2 orbitals. Large, well-resolved 1H and 11B dipolar couplings were also observed. Taken in concert with our previous X-band ENDOR measurements at g⊥ (Myers, et al, Inorg. Chem. 2008, 47, 6701–6710), the present data allow a detailed analysis of the dipolar hyperfine tensors of two of the four symmetry distinct protons in the parent molecule. In the substituted analogs, changes in hyperfine coupling due to altered metal-proton distances give further evidence of an anisotropic Fermi contact interaction. For the pyrazolyl 3H proton, the data indicate a 0.2 MHz anisotropic contact interaction and ~ 4 % transfer of spin away from Co(II). Dipolar coupling also dominates for the axial boron atoms, consistent with their distance from the Co(II) ion, and resolved 11B quadrupolar coupling showed ~ 30 % electronic inequivalence between the B-H and B-C sp3 bonds. This is the first comprehensive ENDOR study of any hs Co(II) species and lays the foundation for future development. PMID:19591466

  15. Remembering Fermi

    SciTech Connect

    Cronin, James

    2005-03-30

    A combination of the discovery of nuclear fission and the circumstances of the 2nd World War brought Enrico Fermi to Chicago, where he led the team that produced the first controlled, self-sustained nuclear chain reaction. Following the war in 1945 Chancellor Hutchins, William Zachariasen, and Walter Bartky convinced Fermi to accept a professorship at the University of Chicago, where the Institute for Nuclear Studies was established. Fermi served as the leading figure in surely the greatest collection of scientists the world has ever seen. Fermi's tenure at Chicago was cut short by his death in 1954. My talk will concentrate on the years 1945-54. Examples of his research notebooks, his speeches, his teaching, and his correspondence will be discussed.

  16. A possible explanation of low energy γ-ray excess from galactic centre and Fermi bubble by a Dark Matter model with two real scalars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad Modak, Kamakshya; Majumdar, Debasish; Rakshit, Subhendu

    2015-03-01

    We promote the idea of multi-component Dark Matter (DM) to explain results from both direct and indirect detection experiments. In these models as contribution of each DM candidate to relic abundance is summed up to meet WMAP/Planck measurements of ΩDM, these candidates have larger annihilation cross-sections compared to the single-component DM models. We illustrate this fact by introducing an extra scalar to the popular single real scalar DM model. We also present detailed calculations for the vacuum stability bounds, perturbative unitarity and triviality constraints on this model. As direct detection experimental results still show some conflict, we kept our options open, discussing different scenarios with different DM mass zones. In the framework of our model we make an interesting observation: the existing direct detection experiments like CDMS II, CoGeNT, CRESST II, XENON 100 or LUX together with the observation of excess low energy γ-ray from galactic centre and Fermi bubble by Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (FGST) already have the capability to distinguish between different DM halo profiles.

  17. A possible explanation of low energy γ-ray excess from galactic centre and Fermi bubble by a Dark Matter model with two real scalars

    SciTech Connect

    Modak, Kamakshya Prasad; Majumdar, Debasish

    2015-03-09

    We promote the idea of multi-component Dark Matter (DM) to explain results from both direct and indirect detection experiments. In these models as contribution of each DM candidate to relic abundance is summed up to meet WMAP/Planck measurements of Ω{sub DM}, these candidates have larger annihilation cross-sections compared to the single-component DM models. We illustrate this fact by introducing an extra scalar to the popular single real scalar DM model. We also present detailed calculations for the vacuum stability bounds, perturbative unitarity and triviality constraints on this model. As direct detection experimental results still show some conflict, we kept our options open, discussing different scenarios with different DM mass zones. In the framework of our model we make an interesting observation: the existing direct detection experiments like CDMS II, CoGeNT, CRESST II, XENON 100 or LUX together with the observation of excess low energy γ-ray from galactic centre and Fermi bubble by Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (FGST) already have the capability to distinguish between different DM halo profiles.

  18. The CDMS view on molecular data needs of Herschel, SOFIA, and ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Holger S. P.; Endres, C. P.; Stutzki, J.; Schlemmer, S.

    2013-07-01

    The catalog section of the Cologne Database for Molecular Spectroscopy, CDMS, contains mostly rotational transition frequencies, with auxiliary information, of molecules observable in space. The frequency lists are generated mostly from critically evaluated laboratory data employing established Hamiltonian models. The CDMS has been online publicly for more than 12 years, e.g., via the short-cut http://www.cdms.de. Initially constructed as ascii tables, its inclusion into a database environment within the Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Centre (VAMDC, http://www.vamdc.eu) has begun in June 2008. A test version of the new CDMS is about to be released. The CDMS activities have been part of the extensive laboratory spectroscopic investigations in Cologne. Moreover, these activities have also benefit from collaborations with other laboratory spectroscopy groups as well as with astronomers. We will provide some basic information on the CDMS and its participation in the VAMDC project. In addition, some recent detections of molecules as well as spectroscopic studies will be discussed to evaluate the spectroscopic data needs of Herschel, SOFIA, and ALMA in particular in terms of light hydrides, complex molecules, and metal containing species.

  19. A low-threshold analysis of CDMS shallow-site data

    SciTech Connect

    Akerib, D.S.; Attisha, M.J.; Baudis, L.; Bauer, D.A.; Bolozdynya, A.I.; Brink, P.L.; Bunker, R.; Cabrera, B.; Caldwell, D.O.; Chang, C.L.; Clarke, R.M.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Southern Methodist U.

    2010-10-01

    Data taken during the final shallow-site run of the first tower of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS II) detectors have been reanalyzed with improved sensitivity to small energy depositions. Four {approx}224 g germanium and two {approx}105 g silicon detectors were operated at the Stanford Underground Facility (SUF) between December 2001 and June 2002, yielding 118 live days of raw exposure. Three of the germanium and both silicon detectors were analyzed with a new low-threshold technique, making it possible to lower the germanium and silicon analysis thresholds down to the actual trigger thresholds of {approx}1 keV and {approx}2 keV, respectively. Limits on the spin-independent cross section for weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) to elastically scatter from nuclei based on these data exclude interesting parameter space for WIMPs with masses below 9 GeV/c{sup 2}. Under standard halo assumptions, these data partially exclude parameter space favored by interpretations of the DAMA/LIBRA and CoGeNT experiments data as WIMP signals, and exclude new parameter space for WIMP masses between 3 GeV/c{sup 2} and 4 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  20. A Low-threshold Analysis of CDMS Shallow-site Data

    SciTech Connect

    Akerib, D.S.; Attisha, M.J.; Baudis, L.; Bauer, D.A.; Bolozdynya, A.I.; Brink, P.L.; Bunker, R.; Cabrera, B.; Caldwell, D.O.; Chang, C.L.; Clarke, R.M.; Cooley, J.; Crisler, M.B.; Cushman, P.; DeJongh, F.; Dixon, R.; Driscoll, D.D.; Filippini, J.; Funkhouser, S.; Gaitskell, R.J.; Golwala, S.R.; /Caltech /Fermilab /Fermilab /Colorado U., Denver /Case Western Reserve U. /Texas A-M /Minnesota U. /UC, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Caltech /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /UC, Santa Barbara /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Minnesota U. /Queen's U., Kingston /Minnesota U. /St. Olaf Coll. /Florida U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Texas A-M /UC, Santa Barbara /Syracuse U. /UC, Berkeley /Princeton U. /Case Western Reserve U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /UC, Santa Barbara /Fermilab /Santa Clara U.

    2012-06-04

    Data taken during the final shallow-site run of the first tower of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS II) detectors have been reanalyzed with improved sensitivity to small energy depositions. Four {approx}224 g germanium and two {approx}105 g silicon detectors were operated at the Stanford Underground Facility (SUF) between December 2001 and June 2002, yielding 118 live days of raw exposure. Three of the germanium and both silicon detectors were analyzed with a new low-threshold technique, making it possible to lower the germanium and silicon analysis thresholds down to the actual trigger thresholds of {approx}1 and {approx}2 keV, respectively. Limits on the spin-independent cross section for weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) to elastically scatter from nuclei based on these data exclude interesting parameter space for WIMPs with masses below 9 GeV/c{sup 2}. Under standard halo assumptions, these data partially exclude parameter space favored by interpretations of the DAMA/LIBRA and CoGeNT experiments data as WIMP signals, and exclude new parameter space for WIMP masses between 3 and 4 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  1. Nuclear Quantum Gravitation, LIGO, Gravity B Probe. CDMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotas, Ronald

    2012-03-01

    LIGO systems have failed to detect gravity waves of any kind, even after years of trying. This is because there is no space fabric to transmit gravity waves. Space fabric is a fallacy concept of general relativity. There are no gravity waves. Space fabric does not push anything down. General relativity does not explain an object falling to Earth. The Gravity B Probe did not detect real frame dragging in the raw data, only program manipulation that showed a small amount of questionable data. This does not prove material frame dragging. The CDMS has not proven any Dark Matter. A Galaxy is not like a Solar System but rotates as a conglomerate; plainly Newtonian Mechanics; no dark matter needed. Other facts also disprove general relativity. The Sun's corona and Newtonian refraction bend light, not general relativity. The Perihelion of Mercury is a perfectly explainable Newtonian Mechanic, not general relativity. Time does not change, clocks change. No space fabric, no spacetime. There is no general relativity. Nuclear Quantum Gravitation with 30 proofs and indications clearly, logically explains Gravity and Gravitation. It is plainly harmonious with Newtonian Mechanics and Quantum Mechanics. This should clearly be realized and accepted, not general relativity.

  2. SuperCDMS status from Soudan and plans for SNOLab

    SciTech Connect

    Sander, J.; Jastram, A.; Koch, K.; Mahapatra, R.; Prasad, K.; Ahmed, Z.; Cornell, B.; Golwala, S. R.; Moore, D. C.; Nelson, R.; Anderson, A. J.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Hertel, S. A.; Leman, S. W.; Mccarthy, K. A.; Arrenberg, S.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Saab, T.; Welliver, B.; Thakur, R. B.; and others

    2013-05-23

    Matter, as we know it, makes up less than 5% of the Universe. Various astrophysical observations have confirmed that one quarter of the Universe and most of the matter content in the Universe is made up of Dark Matter. The nature of Dark Matter is yet to be discovered and is one of the biggest questions in Physics. Particle Physics combined with astrophysical measurements of the abundance gives rise to a Dark Matter candidate called Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP). The low density of WIMPs in the galaxies and the extremely weak nature of the interaction with ordinary matter make detection of the WIMP an extraordinarily challenging task, with abundant fakes from various radioactive and cosmogenic backgrounds with much stronger electromagnetic interaction. The extremely weak nature of the WIMP interaction dictates detectors that have extremely low naturally occurring radioactive background, a large active volume (mass) of sensitive detector material to maximize statistics, a highly efficient detector based rejection mechanism for the dominant electromagnetic background and sophisticated analysis techniques to reject any residual background. This paper describes the status of the SuperCDMS experiment.

  3. Comparison of CDMS [100] and [111] Oriented Germanium Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Leman, S.W.; Hertel, S.A.; Kim, P.; Cabrera, B.; Do Couto E.Silva, E.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; McCarthy, K.A.; Resch, R.; Sadoulet, B.; Sundqvist, K.M.; /UC, Berkeley

    2012-09-14

    The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) utilizes large mass, 3-inch diameter x 1-inch thick target masses as particle detectors. The target is instrumented with both phonon and ionization sensors and comparison of energy in each channel provides event-by-event classification of electron and nuclear recoils. Fiducial volume is determined by the ability to obtain good phonon and ionization signal at a particular location. Due to electronic band structure in germanium, electron mass is described by an anisotropic tensor with heavy mass aligned along the symmetry axis defined by the [111] Miller index (L valley), resulting in large lateral component to the transport. The spatial distribution of electrons varies significantly for detectors which have their longitudinal axis orientations described by either the [100] or [111] Miller indices. Electric fields with large fringing component at high detector radius also affect the spatial distribution of electrons and holes. Both effects are studied in a 3 dimensional Monte Carlo and the impact on fiducial volume is discussed.

  4. Fermi questions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouffard, Karen

    1999-05-01

    This column contains problems and solutions for the general category of questions known as "Fermi" questions. Forcing the students to use their ability to estimate, giving answers in terms of order-of-magnitude, is not only a challenge for a competition, but a teaching strategy to use in the classroom to develop self-confidence and the ability to analyze answers as to whether or not they make sense, as opposed to relying on the "precision" of a calculator value.

  5. Parallelizing Climate Data Management System, version 3 (CDMS3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeau, D.; Williams, D. N.; Painter, J.; Doutriaux, C.

    2015-12-01

    The Climate Data Management System is an object-oriented data management system, specialized for organizing multidimensional, gridded data used in climate analyses for data observation and simulation. The basic unit of computation in CDMS3 is the variable, which consist of a multidimensional array that represents climate information in four dimensions corresponding to: time, pressure levels, latitudes, and longitudes. As model become more precise in their computation, the volume of data generated becomes bigger and difficult to handle due to the limit of computational resources. Model today can produce data a time frequency of one hourly, three hourly, or six hourly for spatial footprint close to satellite data used run models. The amount of time for scientists to analyze the data and retrieve useful information is more and more unmanageable. Parallelizing libraries such as CMDS3 would ease the burden of working with such big datasets. Multiple approaches of parallelizing are possible. The most obvious one is embarrassingly parallel or pleasingly parallel programming where each computer node processes one file at a time. A more challenging approach is to send a piece of the data to each node for computation and each node will save the results at its right place in a file as a slab of data. This is possible with Hierarchical Data Format 5 (HDF5) using the Message Passing Interface (MPI). A final approach would be the use of Open Multi-Processing API (OpenMP) where a master thread is split in multiple threads for different sections of the main code. Each method has its advantages and disadvantages. This poster bring to light each benefit of these methods and seek to find an optimal solution to compute climate data analyses in a efficient fashion using one or a mixtures of these parallelized methods.

  6. Multi-wavelength Emission from the Fermi Bubble. II. Secondary Electrons and the Hadronic Model of the Bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, K.-S.; Chernyshov, D. O.; Dogiel, V. A.; Ko, C.-M.

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the origin of the gamma-ray flux from the Fermi Bubbles (FBs) in the framework of the hadronic model in which gamma-rays are produced by collisions of relativistic protons with the protons of the background plasma in the Galactic halo. It is assumed in this model that the observed radio emission from the FBs is due to synchrotron radiation of secondary electrons produced by pp collisions. However, if these electrons lose their energy through synchrotron and inverse-Compton emission, the spectrum of secondary electrons will be too soft, and an additional arbitrary component of the primary electrons will be necessary in order to reproduce the radio data. Thus, a mixture of the hadronic and leptonic models is required for the observed radio flux. It was shown that if the spectrum of primary electrons is {\\propto} E_e-2, the permitted range of the magnetic field strength is within the 2-7 μG region. The fraction of gamma-rays produced by pp collisions can reach about 80% of the total gamma-ray flux from the FBs. If the magnetic field is <2 μG or >7 μG the model is unable to reproduce the data. Alternatively, the electrons in the FBs may lose their energy through adiabatic energy losses if there is a strong plasma outflow in the GC. Then, the pure hadronic model is able to reproduce characteristics of the radio and gamma-ray flux from the FBs. However, in this case the required magnetic field strength in the FBs and the power of CR sources are much higher than those following from observations.

  7. MULTI-WAVELENGTH EMISSION FROM THE FERMI BUBBLE. II. SECONDARY ELECTRONS AND THE HADRONIC MODEL OF THE BUBBLE

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, K.-S.; Chernyshov, D. O.; Dogiel, V. A.; Ko, C.-M.

    2015-01-20

    We analyze the origin of the gamma-ray flux from the Fermi Bubbles (FBs) in the framework of the hadronic model in which gamma-rays are produced by collisions of relativistic protons with the protons of the background plasma in the Galactic halo. It is assumed in this model that the observed radio emission from the FBs is due to synchrotron radiation of secondary electrons produced by pp collisions. However, if these electrons lose their energy through synchrotron and inverse-Compton emission, the spectrum of secondary electrons will be too soft, and an additional arbitrary component of the primary electrons will be necessary in order to reproduce the radio data. Thus, a mixture of the hadronic and leptonic models is required for the observed radio flux. It was shown that if the spectrum of primary electrons is ∝E{sub e}{sup −2}, the permitted range of the magnetic field strength is within the 2-7 μG region. The fraction of gamma-rays produced by pp collisions can reach about 80% of the total gamma-ray flux from the FBs. If the magnetic field is <2 μG or >7 μG the model is unable to reproduce the data. Alternatively, the electrons in the FBs may lose their energy through adiabatic energy losses if there is a strong plasma outflow in the GC. Then, the pure hadronic model is able to reproduce characteristics of the radio and gamma-ray flux from the FBs. However, in this case the required magnetic field strength in the FBs and the power of CR sources are much higher than those following from observations.

  8. Enrico Fermi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chen Ning

    2013-05-01

    Enrico Fermi was, of all the great physicists of the 20th century, among the most respected and admired. He was respected and admired because of his contributions to both theoretical and experimental physics, because of his leadership in discovering for mankind a powerful new source of energy, and above all, because of his personal character. He was always reliable and trustworthy. He had both of his feet on the ground all the time. He had great strength, but never threw his weight around. He did not play to the gallery. He did not practise one-up-manship. He exemplified, I always believe, the perfect Confucian gentleman...

  9. Cdms and JPL Molecular Spectroscopy Catalogues in a Common Infrastructure: Vamdc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlemmer, S.; Endres, C. P.; Drouin, B. J.; Yu, S.; Pearson, J. C.; Müller, H. S. P.; Schilke, P.; Stutzki, J.

    2012-06-01

    The virtual atomic and molecular data centre (VAMDC, http://www.vamdc.org/) is a collection of databases with a common data model. It combines molecular spectroscopy databases; like the Cologne Database for Molecular Spectroscopy (CDMS), the Jet Propulsion Laboratory microwave, millimeter and submillimeter spectral line catalogue (JPL) and the HITRAN databases, with other databases, e.g., on molecular collisions (BASECOL, KIDA). VAMDC is open to include other databases adopting the same data structure and access protocols to the data. Due to the common data model all data can be accessed through one portal. The individual databases are located on a system of distributed servers which all can handle a common query language which enables the combined access to the very different data. In this presentation requests to CDMS and JPL will be used to explain the basic ideas behind the very powerful VAMDC instrument, its portal and the query possibilities. A new portal to CDMS allows access to all old and new spectroscopic data. In addition CDMS has a number of new features, in particular meaningful quantum numbers, references linked to data points, and improved documentation. In addition, fit files are accessible for download and queries to other databases are possible. Due to the new format the long anticipated unified spectroscopy database including all relevant information is realized. Together with other groups within the VAMDC consortium we are working on common user tools to simplify the access for new customers and to tailor data requests for users with specified needs, e.g. HFS information. The development of CDMS and JPL within the VAMDC infrastructure will allow a much more sophisticated analysis of complex observational data which, e.g., come from the ALMA telescope.

  10. Geant4 Simulations of SuperCDMS iZip Detector Charge Carrier Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnese, Robert; Brandt, Daniel; Redl, Peter; Asai, Makoto; Faiez, Dana; Kelsey, Mike; Bagli, Enrico; Anderson, Adam; Schlupf, Chandler

    2014-03-01

    The SuperCDMS experiment uses germanium crystal detectors instrumented with ionization and phonon readout circuits to search for dark matter. In order to simulate the response of the detectors to particle interactions the SuperCDMS Detector Monte Carlo (DMC) group has been implementing the processes governing electrons and phonons at low temperatures in Geant4. The charge portion of the DMC simulates oblique propagation of the electrons through the L-valleys, propagation of holes through the Γ-valleys, inter-valley scattering, and emission of Neganov-Luke phonons in a complex applied electric field. The field is calculated by applying a directed walk search on a tetrahedral mesh of known potentials and then interpolating the value. This talk will present an overview of the DMC status and a comparison of the charge portion of the DMC to experimental data of electron-hole pair propagation in germanium.

  11. CDMS detector fabrication improvements and low energy nuclear recoil measurements in germanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jastram, Andrew Karl

    As the CDMS (Cryogenic Dark Matter Search) experiment is scaled up to tackle new dark matter parameter spaces (lower masses and cross-sections), detector production efficiency and repeatability becomes ever more important. A dedicated facility has been commissioned for SuperCDMS detector fabrication at Texas A&M University (TAMU). The fabrication process has been carefully tuned using this facility and its equipment. Production of successfully tested detectors has been demonstrated. Significant improvements in detector performance have been made using new fabrication methods, equipment, and tuning of process parameters. This work has demonstrated the capability for production of next generation CDMS SNOLAB detectors. Additionally, as the dark matter parameter space is probed further, careful calibrations of detector response to nuclear recoil interactions must be performed in order to extract useful information (in relation to dark matter particle characterizations) from experimental results. A neutron beam of tunable energy is used in conjunction with a commercial radiation detector to characterize ionization energy losses in germanium during nuclear recoil events. Data indicates agreement with values predicted by the Lindhard equation, providing a best-fit k-value of 0.146.

  12. The Cologne Database for Molecular Spectroscopy, Cdms, in Times of Herschel, SOFIA, and Alma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Holger S. P.; Stutzki, Jürgen; Schlemmer, Stephan

    2009-06-01

    The CDMS provides in its catalog section atomic and molecular line lists for species that have been or may be observed in space by radio astronomical means. The line list of each molecule is gathered in an individual entry; minor isotopologs have separate entries, and the same applies to excited vibrational states with the exception of some diatomic molecules. With 5 to 10 new or updated entries each month, the CDMS catalog has been growing rapidly over the past 10 years: since February 2009, there have been more than 500 entries in the CDMS - with many more entries to be created. Entries are generated from fitting (mostly) laboratory data to accepted Hamiltonian models. Despite many dedicated laboratory spectroscopic investigations in recent years, accurate data is still lacking frequently - in particular at higher frequencies, for minor isotopic species, for excited vibrational states, or for somewhat larger molecules. While high frequency data are of special concern for the Herschel satellite, scheduled to be launched in mid-April 2009, or for the Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA), the remaining issues mentioned above are important especially for telecope arrays such as the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA). The main features of the CDMS catalog will be described, including recent developments concerning new entries as well as available and planned features. In particular, we will discuss issues relevant for generating a consolidated database that also takes into account information from other databases. Attention will be given to laboratory spectroscopic needs for missions such as Herschel and SOFIA on one hand and for ALMA, the Expanded Very Large Array (EVLA), and other facilities on the other, both, in terms of general aspects and in terms of specific examples. Selected contributions from the Cologne spectroscopy laboratories to address these needs will be presented. H. S. P. Müller, S. Thorwirth, D. A. Roth, G. Winnewisser

  13. Fermi Pulsar Analysis

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation illustrates how analysis of Fermi data reveals new pulsars. Fermi's LAT records the precise arrival time and approximate direction of the gamma rays it detects, but to identify a pul...

  14. A modified detector concept for SuperCDMS: The HiZIP and its charge performance

    SciTech Connect

    Page, Kedar Mohan

    2013-01-01

    SuperCDMS (Super Cryogenic Dark Matter Search) is a leading direct dark mat-ter search experiment which uses solid state detectors (Ge crystals) at milliKelvintemperatures to look for nuclear recoils caused by dark matter interactions in the de-tector. `Weakly Interacting Massive Particles' (WIMPs) are the most favoured darkmatter candidate particles. SuperCDMS, like many other direct dark matter searchexperiments, primarily looks for WIMPs. The measurement of both the ionizationand the lattice vibration (phonon) signals from an interaction in the detector allow itto discriminate against electron recoils which are the main source of background forWIMP detection.SuperCDMS currently operates about 9 kg of Ge detectors at the Soudan under-ground lab in northern Minnesota. In its next phase, SuperCDMS SNOLAB plansto use 100-200 kg of target mass (Ge) which would allow it to probe more of theinteresting and and as of yet unexplored parameter space for WIMPs predicted bytheoretical models. The SuperCDMS Queen's Test Facility is a detector test facilitywhich is intended to serve as detector testing and detector research and developmentpurposes for the SuperCDMS experiment.A modifed detector called the HiZIP (Half-iZIP), which is reduced in complex-ity in comparison to the currently used iZIP (interleaved Z-sensitive Ionization and Phonon mediated) detectors, is studied in this thesis. The HiZIP detector designalso serves to discriminate against background from multiple scatter events occurringclose to the surfaces in a single detector. Studies carried out to compare the surfaceevent leakage in the HiZIP detector using limited information from iZIP data takenat SuperCDMS test facility at UC Berkley produce a highly conservative upper limitof 5 out of 10,000 events at 90% condence level. This upper limit is the best amongmany different HiZIP congurations that were investigated and is comparable to theupper limit calculated for an HiZIP detector in the same way using the

  15. A modified detector concept for SuperCDMS: The HiZIP and its charge performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, Kedar Mohan

    SuperCDMS is a leading direct dark matter search experiment which uses solid state detectors (Ge crystals) at milliKelvin temperatures to look for nuclear recoils caused by dark matter interactions in the detector. 'Weakly Interacting Massive Particles' (WIMPs) are the most favoured dark matter candidate particles. SuperCDMS, like many other direct dark matter search experiments, primarily looks for WIMPs. The measurement of both the ionization and the lattice vibration (phonon) signals from an interaction in the detector allow it to discriminate against electron recoils which are the main source of background for WIMP detection. SuperCDMS currently operates about 9 kgs worth of germanium detectors at the Soudan underground lab in northern Minnesota. In its next phase, SuperCDMS SNOLAB, it plans to use 100-200 kg of target mass (Ge) which would allow it to probe more of the interesting and unexplored parameter space for WIMPs predicted by theoretical models. The SuperCDMS Queen's Test Facility is a detector testing facility which is intended to serve detector testing and detector research and development purposes for the SuperCDMS experiment. A modified detector called the 'HiZIP' (Half-iZIP), which is reduced in complexity in comparison to the currently used iZIP (interleaved Z-sensitive Ionization and Phonon mediated) detectors, is studied in this thesis. The HiZIP detector design also serves to discriminate against background from multiple scatter events occurring close to the surfaces in a single detector. Studies carried out to compare the surface event leakage in the HiZIP detector using limited information from iZIP data taken at SuperCDMS test facility at UC Berkley produce a highly conservative upper limit of 5 out of 10,000 events at 90% confidence level. This upper limit is the best among many different HiZIP configurations that were investigated and is comparable to the upper limit calculated for an iZIP detector in the same way using the same data. A

  16. BKGE: Fermi-LAT Background Estimator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasileiou, Vlasios

    2014-11-01

    The Fermi-LAT Background Estimator (BKGE) is a publicly available open-source tool that can estimate the expected background of the Fermi-LAT for any observational conguration and duration. It produces results in the form of text files, ROOT files, gtlike source-model files (for LAT maximum likelihood analyses), and PHA I/II FITS files (for RMFit/XSpec spectral fitting analyses). Its core is written in C++ and its user interface in Python.

  17. Unveiling Unidentified Fermi Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lizhong; South Pole Telescope

    2016-01-01

    The Fermi γ-ray Space Telescope (Fermi) has surveyed the entire sky at the highest-energy band of the electromagnetic spectrum. The majority of Fermi sources have counterpart identifications from multi-wavelength large-area surveys, particularly in the radio and x-ray bands. However, around 35% of Fermi sources remain unidentified, a problem exasperated by the low resolution of the telescope. Understanding the nature of unidentified Fermi sources is one of the most pressing problems in γ-ray astronomy. The South Pole Telescope (SPT) has completed a survey covering a 2500 square degrees of the southern extragalactic sky with arcminute resolution at millimeter wavelengths. The mm wavelength is the most efficient means to identify blazars and unidentified Fermi sources. Our analysis shows that the SPT point source catalog provides candidate associations for 40% of the unidentified Fermi sources, showing them to be flat-spectrum radio quasars which are extraordinarily bright at millimeter (mm) wavelengths.

  18. Thermal conductance measurements of bolted copper joints for SuperCDMS

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, R. L.; Tatkowski, G.; Ruschman, M.; Golwala, S.; Kellaris, N.; Daal, M.; Hall, J.; Hoppe, E. W.

    2015-04-28

    Joint thermal conductance testing has been undertaken for bolted copper to copper connections from 60 mK to 26 K. This testing was performed to validate an initial design basis for the SuperCDMS experiment, where a dilution refrigerator will be coupled to a cryostat via multiple bolted connections. Copper used during testing was either gold plated or passivated with citric acid to prevent surface oxidation. Finally, the results we obtained are well fit by a power law regression of joint thermal conductance to temperature and match well with data collected during a literature review.

  19. Search for Low-Mass Weakly Interacting Massive Particles with SuperCDMS

    SciTech Connect

    Agnese, R.; Anderson, Alan J.; Asai, M.; balakishiyeva, D.; Basu Thakur, R.; Bauer, D. A.; Beaty, John; Billard, J.; Borgland, A.; Bowles, M. A.; Brandt, D.; Brink, P. L.; Bunker, R.; Cabrera, B.; Caldwell, D. O.; Cerdeno, D. G.; Chagani, H.; Chen, Y.; Cherry, M.; Cooley, J.; Cornell, B.; Crewdson, C. H.; Cushman, Priscilla B.; Daal, M.; DeVaney, D.; DeStefano, PC F.; Do Couto E Silva, E.; Doughty, T.; Esteban, L.; Fallows, S.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Godfrey, G. L.; Golwala, S. R.; Hall, Jeter C.; Hansen, S.; Harris, Harold R.; Hertel, S. A.; Hines, B. A.; Hofer, T.; Holmgren, D.; Hsu, L.; Huber, M. E.; Jastram, A.; Kamaev, O.; Kara, B.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kenany, S.; Kennedy, A.; Kiveni, M.; Koch, K.; Leder, A.; Loer, B.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Mahapatra, R.; Mandic, V.; Martinez, C.; McCarthy, K. A.; Mirabolfathi, M.; Moffatt, R. A.; Nelson, R. H.; Novak, L.; Page, K.; Partridge, R.; Pepin, M.; Phipps, A.; Platt, M.; Prasad, K.; Pyle, M.; Qiu, H.; Rau, W.; Redl, P.; Reisetter, A.; Resch, R. W.; Ricci, Y.; Ruschman, M.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Sander, J.; Schmitt, R.; Schneck, K.; Schnee, Richard; Scorza, A.; Seitz, D.; Serfass, B.; Shank, B.; Speller, D.; Tomada, A.; Upadhyayula, S.; Villano, A. N.; Welliver, B.; Wright, D. H.; Yellin, S.; Yen, J. J.; Young, B. A.; Zhang, J.

    2014-06-01

    We report a first search for weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) using the background rejection capabilities of SuperCDMS. An exposure of 577 kg-days was analyzed for WIMPs with mass < 30 GeV/c2, with the signal region blinded. Eleven events were observed after unblinding. We set an upper limit on the spin-independent WIMP-nucleon cross section of 1:2 10-42cm2 at 8 GeV/c2. This result is in tension with WIMP interpretations of recent experiments and probes new parameter space for WIMP-nucleon scattering for WIMP masses < 6 GeV/c2.

  20. Thermal conductance measurements of bolted copper joints for SuperCDMS

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, R.; Tatkowski, Greg; Ruschman, M.; Golwala, S. R.; Kellaris, N.; Daal, M.; Hall, Jeter C.; Hoppe, Eric W.

    2015-09-01

    Joint thermal conductance testing has been undertaken for bolted copper to copper connections from 60 mK to 26 K. This testing was performed to validate an initial design basis for the SuperCDMS experiment, where a dilution refrigerator will be coupled to a cryostat via multiple bolted connections. Copper used during testing was either gold plated or passivated with citric acid to prevent surface oxidation. Results obtained are well fit by a power law regression of joint thermal conductance to temperature and match well with data collected during a literature review.

  1. Thermal conductance measurements of bolted copper joints for SuperCDMS

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Schmitt, R. L.; Tatkowski, G; Ruschman, M.; Golwala, S.; Kellaris, N.; Daal, M.; Hall, J.; Hoppe, E. W.

    2015-05-22

    Joint thermal conductance testing has been undertaken for bolted copper to copper connections from 60 mK to 26 K. This testing was performed to validate an initial design basis for the SuperCDMS experiment, where a dilution refrigerator will be coupled to a cryostat via multiple bolted connections. Copper used during testing was either gold plated or passivated with citric acid to prevent surface oxidation. Results obtained are well fit by a power law regression of joint thermal conductance to temperature and match well with data collected during a literature review.

  2. Ionization Measurements of SuperCDMS SNOLAB 100 mm Diameter Germanium Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Chagani, H.; Bauer, D.A.; Brandt, D.; Brink, P.L.; Cabrera, B.; Cherry, M.; Silva, E.Do Couto e; Godfrey, G.G.; Hall, J.; Hansen, S.; Hasi, J.; Kelsey, M.; Kenney, C.J.; Mandic, V.; Nagasawa, D.; Novak, L.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Partridge, R.; Radpour, R.; Resch, R.; Sadoulet, B.; /UC, Berkeley /Stanford U. /SLAC /Stanford U. /Santa Clara U. /Minnesota U.

    2012-06-12

    Scaling cryogenic Germanium-based dark matter detectors to probe smaller WIMP-nucleon cross-sections poses significant challenges in the forms of increased labor, cold hardware, warm electronics and heat load. The development of larger crystals alleviates these issues. The results of ionization tests with two 100 mm diameter, 33 mm thick cylindrical detector-grade Germanium crystals are presented here. Through these results the potential of using such crystals in the Super Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (SuperCDMS) SNOLAB experiment is demonstrated.

  3. Measurement of SQUID noise levels for SuperCDMS SNOLAB detectors - Final Paper

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Maxwell

    2015-08-27

    SuperCDMS SNOLAB is a second generation direct dark matter search. In the SuperCDMS SNOLAB experiment, detectors are able to pick up from signals from dark matter nuclear recoil interactions which occur inside the bulk of the detectors. These interactions produce both phonon and charge signals. HEMTs read out charge signals whereas TES are used to detect phonon signals which are then read out by SQUID amplifiers. SQUID amplifiers must add negligible noise to the TES intrinsic noise which has been previously measured and is approximately 50pA/√Hz down to 100Hz for ease of signal distinguishability in dark matter nuclear interactions. The intrinsic noise level of the SQUID was tested in the SLAC 300mK fridge and determined to provide adequately low levels of noise with a floor of approximately 3pA/√Hz. Furthermore, a 10x amplifier was tested for addition of extraneous noise. This noise was investigated with and without this amplifier, and it was found that it did not add a significant amount of noise to the intrinsic SQUID noise.

  4. Radon Mitigation for the SuperCDMS-SNOLAB Dark Matter Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Street, Joseph; SuperCDMS Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    Experiments that seek to detect very rare processes, such as interactions of the dark matter particles thought to make up 85% of the mass of the universe, may suffer background interactions from radon daughters that have plated out onto detector surfaces. To reduce these backgrounds, an ultra-low-radon cleanroom was built at the South Dakota School of Mines & Technology. Cleanroom air is supplied by an optimized vacuum-swing-adsorption radon mitigation system that has achieved a > 300 × reduction from an input activity of 58.6 +/- 0.7 Bq/m3 to a cleanroom activity of 0.13 +/- 0.06 Bq/m3. Expected backgrounds due to radon daughters for the SuperCDMS dark matter search will be presented.

  5. Global analysis of the pMSSM in light of the Fermi GeV excess: prospects for the LHC Run-II and astroparticle experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertone, Gianfranco; Calore, Francesca; Caron, Sascha; Ruiz, Roberto; Kim, Jong Soo; Trotta, Roberto; Weniger, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    We present a new global fit of the 19-dimensional phenomenological Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (pMSSM-19) that complies with all the latest experimental results from dark matter indirect, direct and accelerator dark matter searches. We show that the model provides a satisfactory explanation of the excess of gamma rays from the Galactic centre observed by the Fermi Large Area Telescope, assuming that it is produced by the annihilation of neutralinos in the Milky Way halo. We identify two regions that pass all the constraints: the first corresponds to neutralinos with a mass 0~ 80‑10 GeV annihilating into WW with a branching ratio of 95%; the second to heavier neutralinos, with mass 0~ 180‑20 GeV annihilating into bar tt with a branching ratio of 87%. We show that neutralinos compatible with the Galactic centre GeV excess will soon be within the reach of LHC run-II—notably through searches for charginos and neutralinos, squarks and light smuons—and of Xenon1T, thanks to its unprecedented sensitivity to spin-dependent cross-section off neutrons.

  6. Fermi at Six Months

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    An overview of the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope's first 6 months in operation is provided. The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, formerly called GLAST, is a mission to measure the cosmic gamma-ray flux in the energy rage 20 MeV to more than 300 GeV, with supporting measurements for gamma-ray bursts from 8 keV to 30 MeV. It contains a Large Area Telescope capable of viewing the entire sky every 3 hours and a Gamma-ray Burst Monitor for viewing the entire unocculted sky. Since its launch on June 11, 2008 Fermi has provided information on pulsars, gamma ray bursts, relativistic jets, the active galactic nucleus, and a globular star cluster. This presentation describes Fermi's development, mission, instruments and recent findings.

  7. Fermi Galactic Center Zoom

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation zooms into an image of the Milky Way, shown in visible light, and superimposes a gamma-ray map of the galactic center from NASA's Fermi. Raw data transitions to a view with all known...

  8. Fermi, Szilard and Trinity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Herbert L.

    1974-01-01

    The final installment of the author's recollections of his work with physicists Enrico Fermi, Leo Szilard and others in developing the first controlled nuclear chain reaction and in preparing the test explosion of the first atomic bomb. (GS)

  9. Non-thermal electron acceleration in low Mach number collisionless shocks. II. Firehose-mediated Fermi acceleration and its dependence on pre-shock conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Xinyi; Narayan, Ramesh; Sironi, Lorenzo

    2014-12-10

    Electron acceleration to non-thermal energies is known to occur in low Mach number (M{sub s} ≲ 5) shocks in galaxy clusters and solar flares, but the electron acceleration mechanism remains poorly understood. Using two-dimensional (2D) particle-in-cell (PIC) plasma simulations, we showed in Paper I that electrons are efficiently accelerated in low Mach number (M{sub s} = 3) quasi-perpendicular shocks via a Fermi-like process. The electrons bounce between the upstream region and the shock front, with each reflection at the shock resulting in energy gain via shock drift acceleration. The upstream scattering is provided by oblique magnetic waves that are self-generated by the electrons escaping ahead of the shock. In the present work, we employ additional 2D PIC simulations to address the nature of the upstream oblique waves. We find that the waves are generated by the shock-reflected electrons via the firehose instability, which is driven by an anisotropy in the electron velocity distribution. We systematically explore how the efficiency of wave generation and of electron acceleration depend on the magnetic field obliquity, the flow magnetization (or equivalently, the plasma beta), and the upstream electron temperature. We find that the mechanism works for shocks with high plasma beta (≳ 20) at nearly all magnetic field obliquities, and for electron temperatures in the range relevant for galaxy clusters. Our findings offer a natural solution to the conflict between the bright radio synchrotron emission observed from the outskirts of galaxy clusters and the low electron acceleration efficiency usually expected in low Mach number shocks.

  10. A COMPREHENSIVE ANALYSIS OF FERMI GAMMA-RAY BURST DATA. II. E{sub p} EVOLUTION PATTERNS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR THE OBSERVED SPECTRUM-LUMINOSITY RELATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Ruijing; Wei Junjie; Liang Enwei; Lue Lianzhong; Zhang Binbin; Lue Houjun; Zhang Bing; Lei Weihua E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu

    2012-09-10

    We present a time-resolved spectral analysis of 51 long and 11 short bright gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) observed with the Fermi/Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor, paying special attention to E{sub p} evolution within each burst. Among eight single-pulse long GRBs, five show an evolution from hard to soft, while three show intensity tracking. The multi-pulse long GRBs have more complicated patterns. Statistically, the hard-to-soft evolution pulses tend to be more asymmetric than the intensity-tracking ones, with a steeper rising wing than the falling wing. Short GRBs have E{sub p} tracking intensity exclusively with the 16 ms time-resolution analysis. We performed a simulation analysis and suggest that for at least some bursts, the late intensity-tracking pulses could be a consequence of overlapping hard-to-soft pulses. However, the fact that the intensity-tracking pattern exists in the first pulse of the multi-pulse long GRBs and some single-pulse GRBs, suggests that intensity tracking is an independent component, which may operate in some late pulses as well. For the GRBs with measured redshifts, we present a time-resolved E{sub p} - L{sub {gamma},iso} correlation analysis and show that the scatter of the correlation is comparable to that of the global Amati/Yonetoku relation. We discuss the predictions of various radiation models regarding E{sub p} evolution, as well as the possibility of a precessing jet in GRBs. The data pose a great challenge to each of these models, and hold the key to unveiling the physics behind GRB prompt emission.

  11. Design and performance of a modular low-radioactivity readout system for cryogenic detectors in the CDMS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akerib, D. S.; Barnes, P. D., Jr.; Brink, P. L.; Cabrera, B.; Clarke, R. M.; Gaitskell, R. J.; Golwala, S. R.; Huber, M. E.; Kurylowicz, M.; Mandic, V.; Martinis, J. M.; Meunier, P.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Nam, S. W.; Perillo-Isaac, M.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Schnee, R. W.; Seitz, D. N.; Shutt, T.; Smith, G. W.; Stockwell, W. K.; Sundqvist, K. M.; White, S.

    2008-07-01

    The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment employs ultra-cold solid-state detectors to search for rare events resulting from WIMP-nucleus scattering. An innovative detector packaging and readout system has been developed to meet the unusual combination of requirements for: low temperature, low radioactivity, low energy threshold, and large channel count. Features include use of materials with low radioactivity such as multi-layer KAPTON laminates for circuit boards; immunity to microphonic noise via a vacuum coaxial wiring design, manufacturability, and modularity. The detector readout design had to accommodate various electronic components which have to be operated in close proximity to the detector as well maintaining separate individual temperatures (ranging from 600 mK to 150 K) in order to achieve optimal noise performance. The paper will describe the general electrical, thermal, and mechanical designs of the CDMS readout system, as well as presenting the theoretical and measured performance of the detector readout channels.

  12. Cooper pairing in non-Fermi liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metlitski, Max A.; Mross, David F.; Sachdev, Subir; Senthil, T.

    2015-03-01

    States of matter with a sharp Fermi surface but no well-defined Landau quasiparticles arise in a number of physical systems. Examples include (i) quantum critical points associated with the onset of order in metals; (ii) spinon Fermi-surface [U(1) spin-liquid] state of a Mott insulator; (iii) Halperin-Lee-Read composite fermion charge liquid state of a half-filled Landau level. In this work, we use renormalization group techniques to investigate possible instabilities of such non-Fermi liquids in two spatial dimensions to Cooper pairing. We consider the Ising-nematic quantum critical point as an example of an ordering phase transition in a metal, and demonstrate that the attractive interaction mediated by the order-parameter fluctuations always leads to a superconducting instability. Moreover, in the regime where our calculation is controlled, superconductivity preempts the destruction of electronic quasiparticles. On the other hand, the spinon Fermi surface and the Halperin-Lee-Read states are stable against Cooper pairing for a sufficiently weak attractive short-range interaction; however, once the strength of attraction exceeds a critical value, pairing sets in. We describe the ensuing quantum phase transition between (i) U(1 ) and Z2 spin-liquid states; (ii) Halperin-Lee-Read and Moore-Read states.

  13. FermiGrid

    SciTech Connect

    Yocum, D.R.; Berman, E.; Canal, P.; Chadwick, K.; Hesselroth, T.; Garzoglio, G.; Levshina, T.; Sergeev, V.; Sfiligoi, I.; Sharma, N.; Timm, S.; /Fermilab

    2007-05-01

    As one of the founding members of the Open Science Grid Consortium (OSG), Fermilab enables coherent access to its production resources through the Grid infrastructure system called FermiGrid. This system successfully provides for centrally managed grid services, opportunistic resource access, development of OSG Interfaces for Fermilab, and an interface to the Fermilab dCache system. FermiGrid supports virtual organizations (VOs) including high energy physics experiments (USCMS, MINOS, D0, CDF, ILC), astrophysics experiments (SDSS, Auger, DES), biology experiments (GADU, Nanohub) and educational activities.

  14. Fermi TGF detection map

    NASA Video Gallery

    Fermi’s Gamma-ray Burst Monitor detected 130 TGFs from August 2008 to the end of 2010. Thanks to instrument tweaks, the team has been able to improve the detection rate to several TGFs per week. ...

  15. More Fermi questions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouffard, Karen

    1999-09-01

    "Fermi" questions are a popular component of most Physics Olympics meets. Asking students to make a reasonable assumption about a problem and give answers in terms of order of magnitude is not only a great challenge for a competition, but is also a valued teaching strategy in the classroom.

  16. Interaction quenches of Fermi gases

    SciTech Connect

    Uhrig, Goetz S.

    2009-12-15

    It is shown that the jump in the momentum distribution of Fermi gases evolves smoothly for small and intermediate times once an interaction between the fermions is suddenly switched on. The jump does not vanish abruptly. The loci in momentum space where the jumps occur are those of the noninteracting Fermi sea. No relaxation of the Fermi surface geometry takes place.

  17. Fermi-liquid theory of ultracold trapped Fermi gases: Implications for pseudogap physics and other strongly correlated phases

    SciTech Connect

    Chien, Chih-Chun; Levin, K.

    2010-07-15

    We show how Fermi-liquid theory can be applied to ultracold Fermi gases, thereby expanding their ''simulation'' capabilities to a class of problems of interest to multiple physics subdisciplines. We introduce procedures for measuring and calculating position-dependent Landau parameters. This lays the groundwork for addressing important controversial issues: (i) the suggestion that thermodynamically, the normal state of a unitary gas is indistinguishable from a Fermi liquid and (ii) that a fermionic system with strong repulsive contact interactions is associated with either ferromagnetism or localization; this relates as well to {sup 3}He and its p-wave superfluidity.

  18. New results from the search for low-mass weakly interacting massive particles with the CDMS low ionization threshold experiment

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Agnese, R.

    2016-02-17

    The CDMS low ionization threshold experiment (CDMSlite) uses cryogenic germanium detectors operated at a relatively high bias voltage to amplify the phonon signal in the search for weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). Our results are presented from the second CDMSlite run with an exposure of 70 kg days, which reached an energy threshold for electron recoils as low as 56 eV. Furthermore, a fiducialization cut reduces backgrounds below those previously reported by CDMSlite. Lastly, new parameter space for the WIMP-nucleon spin-independent cross section is excluded forWIMP masses between 1.6 and 5.5 GeV/c2.

  19. New Results from the Search for Low-Mass Weakly Interacting Massive Particles with the CDMS Low Ionization Threshold Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnese, R.; Anderson, A. J.; Aramaki, T.; Asai, M.; Baker, W.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Barker, D.; Basu Thakur, R.; Bauer, D. A.; Billard, J.; Borgland, A.; Bowles, M. A.; Brink, P. L.; Bunker, R.; Cabrera, B.; Caldwell, D. O.; Calkins, R.; Cerdeno, D. G.; Chagani, H.; Chen, Y.; Cooley, J.; Cornell, B.; Cushman, P.; Daal, M.; Di Stefano, P. C. F.; Doughty, T.; Esteban, L.; Fallows, S.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Ghaith, M.; Godfrey, G. L.; Golwala, S. R.; Hall, J.; Harris, H. R.; Hofer, T.; Holmgren, D.; Hsu, L.; Huber, M. E.; Jardin, D.; Jastram, A.; Kamaev, O.; Kara, B.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kennedy, A.; Leder, A.; Loer, B.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Lukens, P.; Mahapatra, R.; Mandic, V.; Mast, N.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Moffatt, R. A.; Morales Mendoza, J. D.; Oser, S. M.; Page, K.; Page, W. A.; Partridge, R.; Pepin, M.; Phipps, A.; Prasad, K.; Pyle, M.; Qiu, H.; Rau, W.; Redl, P.; Reisetter, A.; Ricci, Y.; Roberts, A.; Rogers, H. E.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Sander, J.; Schneck, K.; Schnee, R. W.; Scorza, S.; Serfass, B.; Shank, B.; Speller, D.; Toback, D.; Underwood, R.; Upadhyayula, S.; Villano, A. N.; Welliver, B.; Wilson, J. S.; Wright, D. H.; Yellin, S.; Yen, J. J.; Young, B. A.; Zhang, J.; SuperCDMS Collaboration

    2016-02-01

    The CDMS low ionization threshold experiment (CDMSlite) uses cryogenic germanium detectors operated at a relatively high bias voltage to amplify the phonon signal in the search for weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). Results are presented from the second CDMSlite run with an exposure of 70 kg day, which reached an energy threshold for electron recoils as low as 56 eV. A fiducialization cut reduces backgrounds below those previously reported by CDMSlite. New parameter space for the WIMP-nucleon spin-independent cross section is excluded for WIMP masses between 1.6 and 5.5 GeV /c2 .

  20. New Results from the Search for Low-Mass Weakly Interacting Massive Particles with the CDMS Low Ionization Threshold Experiment.

    PubMed

    Agnese, R; Anderson, A J; Aramaki, T; Asai, M; Baker, W; Balakishiyeva, D; Barker, D; Basu Thakur, R; Bauer, D A; Billard, J; Borgland, A; Bowles, M A; Brink, P L; Bunker, R; Cabrera, B; Caldwell, D O; Calkins, R; Cerdeno, D G; Chagani, H; Chen, Y; Cooley, J; Cornell, B; Cushman, P; Daal, M; Di Stefano, P C F; Doughty, T; Esteban, L; Fallows, S; Figueroa-Feliciano, E; Ghaith, M; Godfrey, G L; Golwala, S R; Hall, J; Harris, H R; Hofer, T; Holmgren, D; Hsu, L; Huber, M E; Jardin, D; Jastram, A; Kamaev, O; Kara, B; Kelsey, M H; Kennedy, A; Leder, A; Loer, B; Lopez Asamar, E; Lukens, P; Mahapatra, R; Mandic, V; Mast, N; Mirabolfathi, N; Moffatt, R A; Morales Mendoza, J D; Oser, S M; Page, K; Page, W A; Partridge, R; Pepin, M; Phipps, A; Prasad, K; Pyle, M; Qiu, H; Rau, W; Redl, P; Reisetter, A; Ricci, Y; Roberts, A; Rogers, H E; Saab, T; Sadoulet, B; Sander, J; Schneck, K; Schnee, R W; Scorza, S; Serfass, B; Shank, B; Speller, D; Toback, D; Underwood, R; Upadhyayula, S; Villano, A N; Welliver, B; Wilson, J S; Wright, D H; Yellin, S; Yen, J J; Young, B A; Zhang, J

    2016-02-19

    The CDMS low ionization threshold experiment (CDMSlite) uses cryogenic germanium detectors operated at a relatively high bias voltage to amplify the phonon signal in the search for weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). Results are presented from the second CDMSlite run with an exposure of 70 kg day, which reached an energy threshold for electron recoils as low as 56 eV. A fiducialization cut reduces backgrounds below those previously reported by CDMSlite. New parameter space for the WIMP-nucleon spin-independent cross section is excluded for WIMP masses between 1.6 and 5.5  GeV/c^{2}. PMID:26943526

  1. GRB Studies with Fermi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meegan, Charles A.

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the studies of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRB) with the Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope. Included are pictures of the observatory, with illustrations of the Large Area Telescope (LAT), and the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) including information about both their capabilities. Graphs showing the GBM count rate over time after the GBM trigger for three GRBs, preliminary charts showing the multiple detector light curves the spectroscopy of the main LAT peak and the spectral evolution of GRB 080916C Burst Temporally-extended LAT emission.

  2. Second-Order Fermi Acceleration and Emission in Blazar Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asano, Katsuaki; Takahara, Fumio; Toma, Kenji; Kusunose, Masaaki; Kakuwa, Jun

    The second-order Fermi acceleration (Fermi-II) driven by turbulence may be responsible for the electron acceleration in blazar jets. We test this model with time-dependent simulations, adopt it for 1ES 1101-232, and Mrk 421. The Fermi-II model with radial evolution of the electron injection rate and/or diffusion coefficient can reproduce the spectra from the radio to the gamma-ray regime. For Mrk 421, an external radio photon field with a luminosity of 4.9 begin{math} {times} 10 (38) erg s (-1) is required to agree with the observed GeV flux. The temporal variability of the diffusion coefficient or injection rate causes flare emission. The observed synchronicity of X-ray and TeV flares implies a decrease of the magnetic field in the flaring source region.

  3. Fermi surface evolution and luttinger theorem in naxcoo2: asystematic photoemission study

    SciTech Connect

    Yang H.-B.; Pan, Z.-H.; Sekharan, A.K.P.; Sato, T.; Souma, S.; Takahashi, T.; Jin, R.; Sales, B.C.; Mandrus, D.; Fedorov,A.V.; Wang,Z.; Ding, H.

    2005-01-17

    We report a systematic angle-resolved photoemission study on NaxCoO2 for a wide range of Na concentrations (0.3x0.72). In all the metallic samples at different x, we observed (i) only a single holelike Fermi surface centered around and (ii) its area changes with x according to the Luttinger theorem. We also observed a surface state that exhibits a larger Fermi surface area. The e band and the associated small Fermi surface pockets near the K points predicted by band calculations are found to sink below the Fermi energy in a manner almost independent of the doping and temperature.

  4. The Statistical Fermi Paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maccone, C.

    In this paper is provided the statistical generalization of the Fermi paradox. The statistics of habitable planets may be based on a set of ten (and possibly more) astrobiological requirements first pointed out by Stephen H. Dole in his book Habitable planets for man (1964). The statistical generalization of the original and by now too simplistic Dole equation is provided by replacing a product of ten positive numbers by the product of ten positive random variables. This is denoted the SEH, an acronym standing for “Statistical Equation for Habitables”. The proof in this paper is based on the Central Limit Theorem (CLT) of Statistics, stating that the sum of any number of independent random variables, each of which may be ARBITRARILY distributed, approaches a Gaussian (i.e. normal) random variable (Lyapunov form of the CLT). It is then shown that: 1. The new random variable NHab, yielding the number of habitables (i.e. habitable planets) in the Galaxy, follows the log- normal distribution. By construction, the mean value of this log-normal distribution is the total number of habitable planets as given by the statistical Dole equation. 2. The ten (or more) astrobiological factors are now positive random variables. The probability distribution of each random variable may be arbitrary. The CLT in the so-called Lyapunov or Lindeberg forms (that both do not assume the factors to be identically distributed) allows for that. In other words, the CLT "translates" into the SEH by allowing an arbitrary probability distribution for each factor. This is both astrobiologically realistic and useful for any further investigations. 3. By applying the SEH it is shown that the (average) distance between any two nearby habitable planets in the Galaxy may be shown to be inversely proportional to the cubic root of NHab. This distance is denoted by new random variable D. The relevant probability density function is derived, which was named the "Maccone distribution" by Paul Davies in

  5. The fermi paradox is neither Fermi's nor a paradox.

    PubMed

    Gray, Robert H

    2015-03-01

    The so-called Fermi paradox claims that if technological life existed anywhere else, we would see evidence of its visits to Earth--and since we do not, such life does not exist, or some special explanation is needed. Enrico Fermi, however, never published anything on this topic. On the one occasion he is known to have mentioned it, he asked "Where is everybody?"--apparently suggesting that we do not see extraterrestrials on Earth because interstellar travel may not be feasible, but not suggesting that intelligent extraterrestrial life does not exist or suggesting its absence is paradoxical. The claim "they are not here; therefore they do not exist" was first published by Michael Hart, claiming that interstellar travel and colonization of the Galaxy would be inevitable if intelligent extraterrestrial life existed, and taking its absence here as proof that it does not exist anywhere. The Fermi paradox appears to originate in Hart's argument, not Fermi's question. Clarifying the origin of these ideas is important, because the Fermi paradox is seen by some as an authoritative objection to searching for evidence of extraterrestrial intelligence--cited in the U.S. Congress as a reason for killing NASA's SETI program on one occasion. But evidence indicates that it misrepresents Fermi's views, misappropriates his authority, deprives the actual authors of credit, and is not a valid paradox. PMID:25719510

  6. Fermi's New Pulsar Detection Technique

    NASA Video Gallery

    To locate a pulsar in Fermi LAT data requires knowledge of the object’s sky position, its pulse period, and how the pulse rate slows over time. Computers check many different combinations of posi...

  7. The Fermi LAT Pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romani, Roger W.

    2011-08-01

    The Large Area Telescope on the Fermi satellite is an impressive pulsar discovery machine, with over 75 pulse detections and counting. The populations of radio-selected, γ-selected and millisecond pulsars are now large enough to display observational patterns in the light curves and luminosities. These patterns are starting to teach us about the physics of the emission zone, which seems dominated by open field lines near the speed of light cylinder. The sample also provides initial inferences about the pulsar population. Apparently a large fraction of neutron stars have a young energetic γ-ray emitting phase, making these objects a good probe of massive star evolution. The long-lived millisecond γ-ray pulsars are even more ubiquitous and may produce a significant fraction of the γ-ray background. In any event, it is clear that the present LAT pulsar sample is dominated by nearby objects, and there is every expectation that the number, and quality, of pulsar detections will increase in years to come.

  8. Strongly Interacting Fermi and Bose-Fermi Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ye-Ryoung; Choi, Jae; Christensen, Caleb; Jo, Gyu-Boong; Wang, Tout; Ketterle, Wolfgang; Pritchard, David

    2010-03-01

    We present our recent progress on the study ultracold gases of ^6Li and ^23Na near homonuclear and heteronuclear Feshbach resonances. We discuss new experimental and theoretical developments on itinerant ferromagnetism in a Fermi gas of ultracold atoms [1]. We also report on ultracold gases of ^6Li and ^23Na, including fermionic LiNa molecules. [4pt] [1] G.-B. Jo, Y.-R. Lee, J.-H. Choi, C.A. Christensen, T.H. Kim, J.H. Thywissen, D.E. Pritchard, and W. Ketterle, Observation of itinerant ferromagnetism in a strongly interacting Fermi gas of ultracold atoms, Science 325, 1521 (2009).

  9. Strongly Interacting Homogeneous Fermi Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Biswaroop; Patel, Parth; Yan, Zhenjie; Struck, Julian; Zwierlein, Martin

    2016-05-01

    We present a homogeneous box potential for strongly interacting Fermi gases. The local density approximation (LDA) allows measurements on traditional inhomogeneous traps to observe a continuous distribution of Fermi gases in a single shot, but also suffer from a broadened response due to line-of-sight averaging over varying densities. We trap ultracold Fermionic (6 Li) in an optical homogeneous potential and characterize its flatness through in-situ tomography. A hybrid approach combining a cylindrical optical potential with a harmonic magnetic trap allows us to exploit the LDA and measure local RF spectra without requiring significant image reconstruction. We extract various quantities from the RF spectra such as the Tan's contact, and discuss further measurements of homogeneous Fermi systems under spin imbalance and finite temperature.

  10. Fermi Finds Youthful Pulsar Among Ancient Stars

    NASA Video Gallery

    In three years, NASA's Fermi has detected more than 100 gamma-ray pulsars, but something new has appeared. Among a type of pulsar with ages typically numbering a billion years or more, Fermi has fo...

  11. Fermi GBM Early Trigger Characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Connaughton, Valerie; Briggs, Michael; Paciesas, Bill; Meegan, Charles

    2009-05-25

    Since the launch of the Fermi observatory on June 11 2008, the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has seen approximately 250 triggers of which about 150 were cosmic gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). GBM operates dozens of trigger algorithms covering various energy bands and timescales and is therefore sensitive to a wide variety of phenomena, both astrophysical and not.

  12. Fermi's Large Area Telescope (LAT)

    NASA Video Gallery

    Fermi’s Large Area Telescope (LAT) is the spacecraft’s main scientificinstrument. This animation shows a gamma ray (purple) entering the LAT,where it is converted into an electron (red) and a...

  13. CCC and the Fermi paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurzadyan, V. G.; Penrose, R.

    2016-01-01

    Within the scheme of conformal cyclic cosmology (CCC), information can be transmitted from aeon to aeon. Accordingly, the "Fermi paradox" and the SETI programme --of communication by remote civilizations-- may be examined from a novel perspective: such information could, in principle, be encoded in the cosmic microwave background. The current empirical status of CCC is also discussed.

  14. Fermi, Enrico (1901-54)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Italian physicist, created the first controlled chain reaction, founded Argonne National Laboratory. His work on the properties of electrons (spin-half particles like electrons are called fermions after him, and the study of their properties is called Fermi-Dirac statistics) enabled the pressure source in white dwarf stars to be identified, and white dwarf star properties to be calculated by CHAN...

  15. Fermi's β-DECAY Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chen Ning

    2013-05-01

    Throughout his lifetime Enrico Fermi (1901-1954) had considered his 1934 β-decay theory as his most important contribution to theoretical physics. E. Segrè (1905-1989) had vividly written about an episode at the inception of that paper:1...

  16. Lectures of Fermi liquid theory

    SciTech Connect

    Bedell, K.S.

    1993-01-01

    The Fermi liquid theory was first introduced by Landau in 1956 to provide a theoretical basis for the properties of strongly correlated Fermi systems. This theory has proven to be crucial for our understanding of a broad range of materials. These include liquid [sup 3]He, [sup 3]He-[sup 4]He mixtures, simple metals, heavy-fermions, and nuclear matter to name a few. In the high temperature superconductors questions have been raised regarding the applicability of Fermi liquid theory to the normal state behavior of these materials. I will not address this issue in these lectures. My focus will be to summarize the foundations of this theory and to explore the consequences. These lectures are in part a summary of the excellent review article by Baym and Pethick and the books by Pines and Nozieres and Baym and Pethick. They include as well a summary of some articles that I have authored and co-authored. In the main body of the lectures I will not make any additional references to the books or articles. In the absence of reading the original materials, my lectures should provide the essentials of a mini-course in Fermi liquid theory.

  17. Lectures of Fermi liquid theory

    SciTech Connect

    Bedell, K.S.

    1993-07-01

    The Fermi liquid theory was first introduced by Landau in 1956 to provide a theoretical basis for the properties of strongly correlated Fermi systems. This theory has proven to be crucial for our understanding of a broad range of materials. These include liquid {sup 3}He, {sup 3}He-{sup 4}He mixtures, simple metals, heavy-fermions, and nuclear matter to name a few. In the high temperature superconductors questions have been raised regarding the applicability of Fermi liquid theory to the normal state behavior of these materials. I will not address this issue in these lectures. My focus will be to summarize the foundations of this theory and to explore the consequences. These lectures are in part a summary of the excellent review article by Baym and Pethick and the books by Pines and Nozieres and Baym and Pethick. They include as well a summary of some articles that I have authored and co-authored. In the main body of the lectures I will not make any additional references to the books or articles. In the absence of reading the original materials, my lectures should provide the essentials of a mini-course in Fermi liquid theory.

  18. Extending the Fermi-LAT Data Processing Pipeline to the Grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmer, S.; Arrabito, L.; Glanzman, T.; Johnson, T.; Lavalley, C.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.

    2012-12-01

    The Data Handling Pipeline (“Pipeline”) has been developed for the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope (Fermi) Large Area Telescope (LAT) which launched in June 2008. Since then it has been in use to completely automate the production of data quality monitoring quantities, reconstruction and routine analysis of all data received from the satellite and to deliver science products to the collaboration and the Fermi Science Support Center. Aside from the reconstruction of raw data from the satellite (Level 1), data reprocessing and various event-level analyses are also reasonably heavy loads on the pipeline and computing resources. These other loads, unlike Level 1, can run continuously for weeks or months at a time. In addition it receives heavy use in performing production Monte Carlo tasks. In daily use it receives a new data download every 3 hours and launches about 2000 jobs to process each download, typically completing the processing of the data before the next download arrives. The need for manual intervention has been reduced to less than 0.01% of submitted jobs. The Pipeline software is written almost entirely in Java and comprises several modules. The software comprises web-services that allow online monitoring and provides charts summarizing work flow aspects and performance information. The server supports communication with several batch systems such as LSF and BQS and recently also Sun Grid Engine and Condor. This is accomplished through dedicated job control services that for Fermi are running at SLAC and the other computing site involved in this large scale framework, the Lyon computing center of IN2P3. While being different in the logic of a task, we evaluate a separate interface to the Dirac system in order to communicate with EGI sites to utilize Grid resources, using dedicated Grid optimized systems rather than developing our own. More recently the Pipeline and its associated data catalog have been generalized for use by other experiments, and are

  19. Nonanalytic Magnetic Response of Fermi- and non-Fermi Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chubukov, Andrey; Maslov, Dmitrii; Saha, Ronojoy

    2007-03-01

    We revisit the issue of the non-analytic dependence of the static spin susceptibility of a 2D Fermi liquid on temperature and a magnetic field, χs(T, H) = χ0+ A T fχ(μB|H|/T). We show that in a generic Fermi liquid the prefactor A is expressed via complex combinations of the Landau parameters, and does not reduce to the backscattering amplitude, contrary to the case of the specific heat C(T, H). We show that this distinction with the specific heat is mostly relevant near a ferromagnetic QCP -- the non-analytic terms in χs(T,H) are less singular near QCP than those in C(T, H).

  20. Stability of Fermi surfaces and K theory.

    PubMed

    Horava, Petr

    2005-07-01

    Nonrelativistic Fermi liquids in d+1 dimensions exhibit generalized Fermi surfaces: (d-p)-dimensional submanifolds in the (k,omega)-space supporting gapless excitations. We show that the universality classes of stable Fermi surfaces are classified by K theory, with the pattern of stability determined by Bott periodicity. The Atiyah-Bott-Shapiro construction implies that the low-energy modes near a Fermi surface exhibit relativistic invariance in the transverse p+1 dimensions. This suggests an intriguing parallel between nonrelativistic Fermi liquids and D-branes of string theory. PMID:16090638

  1. Fermi resonance in optical microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Chang-Hwan; Yu, Hyeon-Hye; Lee, Ji-Won; Kim, Chil-Min

    2015-04-01

    Fermi resonance is a phenomenon of quantum mechanical superposition, which most often occurs between normal and overtone modes in molecular systems that are nearly coincident in energy. We find that scarred resonances in deformed dielectric microcavities are the very phenomenon of Fermi resonance, that is, a pair of quasinormal modes interact with each other due to coupling and a pair of resonances are generated through an avoided resonance crossing. Then the quantum number difference of a pair of quasinormal modes, which is a consequence of quantum mechanical superposition, equals periodic orbits, whereby the resonances are localized on the periodic orbits. We derive the relation between the quantum number difference and the periodic orbits and confirm it in an elliptic, a rectangular, and a stadium-shaped dielectric microcavity.

  2. Enrico Fermi and the Dolomites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battimelli, Giovanni; de Angelis, Alessandro

    2014-11-01

    Summer vacations in the Dolomites were a tradition among the professors of the Faculty of Mathematical and Physical Sciences at the University of Roma since the end of the XIX century. Beyond the academic walls, people like Tullio Levi-Civita, Federigo Enriques and Ugo Amaldi sr., together with their families, were meeting friends and colleagues in Cortina, San Vito, Dobbiaco, Vigo di Fassa and Selva, enjoying trekking together with scientific discussions. The tradition was transmitted to the next generations, in particular in the first half of the XX century, and the group of via Panisperna was directly connected: Edoardo Amaldi, the son of the mathematician Ugo sr., rented at least during two summers, in 1925 and in 1949, and in the winter of 1960, a house in San Vito di Cadore, and almost every year in the Dolomites; Enrico Fermi was a frequent guest. Many important steps in modern physics, in particular the development of the Fermi-Dirac statistics and the Fermi theory of beta decay, are related to scientific discussions held in the region of the Dolomites.

  3. Fermi Timing and Synchronization System

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcox, R.; Staples, J.; Doolittle, L.; Byrd, J.; Ratti, A.; Kaertner, F.X.; Kim, J.; Chen, J.; Ilday, F.O.; Ludwig, F.; Winter, A.; Ferianis, M.; Danailov, M.; D'Auria, G.

    2006-07-19

    The Fermi FEL will depend critically on precise timing of its RF, laser and diagnostic subsystems. The timing subsystem to coordinate these functions will need to reliably maintain sub-100fs synchronicity between distant points up to 300m apart in the Fermi facility. The technology to do this is not commercially available, and has not been experimentally demonstrated in a working facility. Therefore, new technology must be developed to meet these needs. Two approaches have been researched by different groups working with the Fermi staff. At MIT, a pulse transmission scheme has been developed for synchronization of RF and laser devices. And at LBL, a CW transmission scheme has been developed for RF and laser synchronization. These respective schemes have advantages and disadvantages that will become better understood in coming years. This document presents the work done by both teams, and suggests a possible system design which integrates them both. The integrated system design provides an example of how choices can be made between the different approaches without significantly changing the basic infrastructure of the system. Overall system issues common to any synchronization scheme are also discussed.

  4. Fermi acceleration of Lyman-alpha photons by shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neufeld, David A.; Mckee, Christopher F.

    1988-01-01

    The repeated scattering of Ly-alpha radiation across a shock front results in a systematic blueshift which may greatly exceed the shock velocity vs and is proportional to cube root of (Nvs), where N is the column density of hydrogen atoms on either side of the shock front. The blueshifting process is similar to the Fermi acceleration of cosmic rays and may be responsible for the blue asymmetric line profiles that have been observed in high-redshift Ly-alpha galaxies. The Ly-alpha line profile in 3C 326.1 is accounted for by a model in which shocks, driven into a population of interstellar clouds by a radio lobe, trigger the formation of ionizing stars and Fermi accelerate the Ly-alpha radiation emitted by H II regions surrounding those stars. Galaxy mergers, particularly between galaxies with low dust content, should produce Ly-alpha lines with strong blue wings.

  5. Bioterrorism and the Fermi Paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Joshua

    2013-04-01

    We proffer a contemporary solution to the so-called Fermi Paradox, which is concerned with conflict between Copernicanism and the apparent paucity of evidence for intelligent alien civilizations. In particular, we argue that every community of organisms that reaches its space-faring age will (1) almost immediately use its rocket-building computers to reverse-engineer its genetic chemistry and (2) self-destruct when some individual uses said technology to design an omnicidal pathogen. We discuss some of the possible approaches to prevention with regard to Homo sapiens' vulnerability to bioterrorism, particularly on a short-term basis.

  6. Generalized second-order Thomas-Fermi method for superfluid Fermi systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, J. C.; Fei, Na; Zhang, Y. N.; Schuck, P.

    2015-12-01

    Using the ℏ expansion of the Green's function of the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov equation, we extend the second-order Thomas-Fermi approximation to generalized superfluid Fermi systems by including the density-dependent effective mass and the spin-orbit potential. We first implement and examine the full correction terms over different energy intervals of the quasiparticle spectra in calculations of finite nuclei. Final applications of this generalized Thomas-Fermi method are intended for various inhomogeneous superfluid Fermi systems.

  7. Fermi liquids near Pomeranchuk instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reidy, Kelly Elizabeth

    We explore features of a Fermi liquid near generalized Pomeranchuk instabilities (PIs) starting from both ordered and disordered phases. These PIs can be viewed as quantum critical points in parameter space, and thus provide an alternate viewpoint on quantum criticality. We employ the tractable crossing symmetric equation method, which is a non-perturbative diagrammatic many-particle method used to calculate the Fermi liquid interaction functions and scattering amplitudes. We consider both repulsive and attractive underlying interactions of arbitrary strength. Starting from a ferromagnetically ordered ground state, we find that upon approach to an s-wave instability in one critical channel, the system simultaneously approaches instabilities in non-critical channels. We study origins and implications of this "quantum multicriticality". We also find that a nematic (non-s-wave) instability precedes and is driven by Pomeranchuk instabilities in both the s-wave spin and density channels. Finally, we discuss potential applications of our results to physical systems, such as ferromagnetic superconductors.

  8. Nonanalytic magnetic response of Fermi and non-Fermi liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslov, Dmitrii L.; Chubukov, Andrey V.; Saha, Ronojoy

    2006-12-01

    We study the nonanalytic behavior of the static spin susceptibility of two-dimensional fermions as a function of temperature and magnetic field. For a generic Fermi liquid, χs(T,H)=const+c1max{T,μB∣H∣} , where c1 is shown to be expressed via complicated combinations of the Landau parameters, rather than via the backscattering amplitude, contrary to the case of the specific heat. Near a ferromagnetic quantum critical point, the field dependence acquires a universal form χs-1(H)=const-c2∣H∣3/2 , with c2>0 . This behavior implies a first-order transition into a ferromagnetic state. We establish a criterion for such a transition to win over the transition into an incommensurate phase.

  9. Optical klystron SASE at FERMI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penco, G.; Allaria, E. M.; De Ninno, G.; Ferrari, E.; Giannessi, L.

    2015-05-01

    The optical klystron enhancement to a self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) free electron laser (FEL) has been deeply studied in theory and in simulations. In this FEL scheme, a relativistic electron beam passes through two undulators, separated by a dispersive section. The latter converts the electron-beam energy modulation produced in the first undulator in density modulation, thus enhancing the free-electron laser gain. We report the first experiment that has been carried out at the FERMI facility in Trieste, of enhancement to a SASE FEL by using the optical klystron scheme. XUV photons have been produced with an intensity several orders of magnitude larger than in pure SASE mode. The impact of the uncorrelated energy spread of the electron beam on the optical klystron SASE performance has been also investigated.

  10. A Search for Low-Mass Weakly Interacting Massive Particles Using Voltage-Assisted Calorimetric Ionization Detection in the SuperCDMS Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Agnese, R.; Anderson, A. J.; Asai, M.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Basu Thakur, R.; Bauer, D. A.; Billard, J.; Borgland, A.; Bowles, M. A.; Brandt, D.; Brink, P. L.; Bunker, R.; Cabrera, B.; Caldwell, D. O.; Cerdeno, D. G.; Chagani, H.; Cooley, J.; Cornell, B.; Crewdson, C. H.; Cushman, Priscilla B.; Daal, M.; Di Stefano, P. C.; Doughty, T.; Esteban, L.; Fallows, S.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Godfrey, G. L.; Golwala, S. R.; Hall, Jeter C.; Harris, H. R.; Hertel, S. A.; Hofer, T.; Holmgren, D.; Hsu, L.; Huber, M. E.; Jastram, A.; Kamaev, O.; Kara, B.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kennedy, A.; Kiveni, M.; Koch, K.; Loer, B.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Mahapatra, R.; Mandic, V.; Martinez, C.; McCarthy, K. A.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Moffatt, R. A.; Moore, D. C.; Nadeau, P.; Nelson, R. H.; Page, K.; Partridge, R.; Pepin, M.; Phipps, A.; Prasad, K.; Pyle, M.; Qiu, H.; Rau, W.; Redi, P.; Reisetter, A.; Ricci, Y.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Sander, J.; Schneck, K.; Schnee, Richard; Scorza, S.; Serfass, B.; Shank, B.; Speller, D.; Villano, A. N.; Welliver, B.; Wright, D. H.; Yellin, S.; Yen, J. J.; Young, B. A.; Zhang, J.

    2014-01-27

    SuperCDMS is an experiment designed to directly detect weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), a favored candidate for dark matter ubiquitous in the Universe. In this Letter, we present WIMP-search results using a calorimetric technique we call CDMSlite, which relies on voltage-assisted Luke-Neganov amplification of the ionization energy deposited by particle interactions. The data were collected with a single 0.6 kg germanium detector running for ten live days at the Soudan Underground Laboratory. A low energy threshold of (electron equivalent) was obtained, which allows us to constrain new WIMP-nucleon spin-independent parameter space for WIMP masses below 6 GeV/c2.

  11. Search for Low-Mass Weakly Interacting Massive Particles Using Voltage-Assisted Calorimetric Ionization Detection in the SuperCDMS Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agnese, R.; Anderson, A. J.; Asai, M.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Basu Thakur, R.; Bauer, D. A.; Billard, J.; Borgland, A.; Bowles, M. A.; Brandt, D.; Brink, P. L.; Bunker, R.; Cabrera, B.; Caldwell, D. O.; Cerdeno, D. G.; Chagani, H.; Cooley, J.; Cornell, B.; Crewdson, C. H.; Cushman, P.; Daal, M.; Di Stefano, P. C. F.; Doughty, T.; Esteban, L.; Fallows, S.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Godfrey, G. L.; Golwala, S. R.; Hall, J.; Harris, H. R.; Hertel, S. A.; Hofer, T.; Holmgren, D.; Hsu, L.; Huber, M. E.; Jastram, A.; Kamaev, O.; Kara, B.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kennedy, A.; Kiveni, M.; Koch, K.; Loer, B.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Mahapatra, R.; Mandic, V.; Martinez, C.; McCarthy, K. A.; Mirabolfathi, N.; Moffatt, R. A.; Moore, D. C.; Nadeau, P.; Nelson, R. H.; Page, K.; Partridge, R.; Pepin, M.; Phipps, A.; Prasad, K.; Pyle, M.; Qiu, H.; Rau, W.; Redl, P.; Reisetter, A.; Ricci, Y.; Saab, T.; Sadoulet, B.; Sander, J.; Schneck, K.; Schnee, R. W.; Scorza, S.; Serfass, B.; Shank, B.; Speller, D.; Villano, A. N.; Welliver, B.; Wright, D. H.; Yellin, S.; Yen, J. J.; Young, B. A.; Zhang, J.; SuperCDMS Collaboration

    2014-01-01

    SuperCDMS is an experiment designed to directly detect weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), a favored candidate for dark matter ubiquitous in the Universe. In this Letter, we present WIMP-search results using a calorimetric technique we call CDMSlite, which relies on voltage-assisted Luke-Neganov amplification of the ionization energy deposited by particle interactions. The data were collected with a single 0.6 kg germanium detector running for ten live days at the Soudan Underground Laboratory. A low energy threshold of 170 eVee (electron equivalent) was obtained, which allows us to constrain new WIMP-nucleon spin-independent parameter space for WIMP masses below 6 GeV /c2.

  12. Crow Instability in Unitary Fermi Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, Sandeep

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, we investigate the initiation and subsequent evolution of Crow instability in an inhomogeneous unitary Fermi gas using zero-temperature Galilei-invariant nonlinear Schrödinger equation. Considering a cigar-shaped unitary Fermi gas, we generate the vortex-antivortex pair either by phase-imprinting or by moving a Gaussian obstacle potential. We observe that the Crow instability in a unitary Fermi gas leads to the decay of the vortex-antivortex pair into multiple vortex rings and ultimately into sound waves.

  13. Quantum Mechanical Models Of The Fermi Shuttle

    SciTech Connect

    Sternberg, James

    2011-06-01

    The Fermi shuttle is a mechanism in which high energy electrons are produced in an atomic collision by multiple collisions with a target and a projectile atom. It is normally explained purely classically in terms of the electron's orbits prescribed in the collision. Common calculations to predict the Fermi shuttle use semi-classical methods, but these methods still rely on classical orbits. In reality such collisions belong to the realm of quantum mechanics, however. In this paper we discuss several purely quantum mechanical calculations which can produce the Fermi shuttle. Being quantum mechanical in nature, these calculations produce these features by wave interference, rather than by classical orbits.

  14. Reconstructing WIMP properties through an interplay of signal measurements in direct detection, Fermi-LAT, and CTA searches for dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roszkowski, Leszek; Sessolo, Enrico Maria; Trojanowski, Sebastian; Williams, Andrew J.

    2016-08-01

    We examine the projected ability to reconstruct the mass, scattering, and annihilation cross section of dark matter in the new generation of large underground detectors, XENON-1T, SuperCDMS, and DarkSide-G2, in combination with diffuse gamma radiation from expected 15 years of data from Fermi-LAT observation of 46 local spiral dwarf galaxies and projected CTA sensitivity to a signal from the Galactic Center. To this end we consider several benchmark points spanning a wide range of WIMP mass, different annihilation final states, and large enough event rates to warrant detection in one or more experiments. As previously shown, below some 100 GeV only direct detection experiments will in principle be able to reconstruct WIMP mass well. This may, in case a signal at Fermi-LAT is also detected, additionally help restricting σv and the allowed decay branching rates. In the intermediate range between some 100 GeV and up a few hundred GeV, direct and indirect detection experiments can be used in complementarity to ameliorate the respective determinations, which in individual experiments can at best be rather poor, thus making the WIMP reconstruction in this mass range very challenging. At large WIMP mass, ~ 1 TeV, CTA will have the ability to reconstruct mass, annihilation cross section, and the allowed decay branching rates to very good precision for the τ+τ‑ or purely leptonic final state, good for the W+W‑ case, and rather poor for bbar b. A substantial improvement can potentially be achieved by reducing the systematic uncertainties, increasing exposure, or by an additional measurement at Fermi-LAT that would help reconstruct the annihilation cross section and the allowed branching fractions to different final states.

  15. Time-dependent models for blazar emission with the second-order Fermi acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Asano, Katsuaki; Takahara, Fumio; Toma, Kenji; Kusunose, Masaaki; Kakuwa, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The second-order Fermi acceleration (Fermi-II) driven by turbulence may be responsible for the electron acceleration in blazar jets. We test this model with time-dependent simulations. The hard electron spectrum predicted by the Fermi-II process agrees with the hard photon spectrum of 1ES 1101–232. For other blazars that show softer spectra, the Fermi-II model requires radial evolution of the electron injection rate and/or diffusion coefficient in the outflow. Such evolutions can yield a curved electron spectrum, which can reproduce the synchrotron spectrum of Mrk 421 from the radio to the X-ray regime. The photon spectrum in the GeV energy range of Mrk 421 is hard to fit with a synchrotron self-Compton model. However, if we introduce an external radio photon field with a luminosity of 4.9 × 10{sup 38} erg s{sup –1}, GeV photons are successfully produced via inverse Compton scattering. The temporal variability of the diffusion coefficient or injection rate causes flare emission. The observed synchronicity of X-ray and TeV flares implies a decrease of the magnetic field in the flaring source region.

  16. Time-dependent Models for Blazar Emission with the Second-order Fermi Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asano, Katsuaki; Takahara, Fumio; Kusunose, Masaaki; Toma, Kenji; Kakuwa, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The second-order Fermi acceleration (Fermi-II) driven by turbulence may be responsible for the electron acceleration in blazar jets. We test this model with time-dependent simulations. The hard electron spectrum predicted by the Fermi-II process agrees with the hard photon spectrum of 1ES 1101-232. For other blazars that show softer spectra, the Fermi-II model requires radial evolution of the electron injection rate and/or diffusion coefficient in the outflow. Such evolutions can yield a curved electron spectrum, which can reproduce the synchrotron spectrum of Mrk 421 from the radio to the X-ray regime. The photon spectrum in the GeV energy range of Mrk 421 is hard to fit with a synchrotron self-Compton model. However, if we introduce an external radio photon field with a luminosity of 4.9 × 1038 erg s-1, GeV photons are successfully produced via inverse Compton scattering. The temporal variability of the diffusion coefficient or injection rate causes flare emission. The observed synchronicity of X-ray and TeV flares implies a decrease of the magnetic field in the flaring source region.

  17. Fermi discovers giant bubbles in Milky Way

    NASA Video Gallery

    Using data from NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, scientists have recently discovered a gigantic, mysterious structure in our galaxy. This feature looks like a pair of bubbles extending above...

  18. Fermi's Conundrum: Proliferation and Closed Societies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teller, Wendy; Westfall, Catherine

    2007-04-01

    On January 1, 1946 Emily Taft Douglas, a freshman Representative at Large for Illinois, sent a letter to Enrico Fermi. She wanted to know whether, if atomic energy was used for peaceful purposes, it might be possible to clandestinely divert some material for bombs. Douglas first learned about the bomb not quite five months before when Hiroshima was bombed. Even though she was not a scientist she identified a key problem of the nuclear age. Fermi responded with requirements to allow peaceful uses of atomic energy and still outlaw nuclear weapons. First, free interchange of information between people was required, and second, people who reported possible violations had to be protected. Fermi had lived in Mussolini's Italy and worked under the war time secrecy restrictions of the Manhattan Project. He was not optimistic that these conditions could be met. This paper discusses how Douglas came to recognize the proliferation issue and what led Fermi to his solution and his pessimism about its practicality.

  19. RF Spectroscopy on a Homogeneous Fermi Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhenjie; Mukherjee, Biswaroop; Patel, Parth; Struck, Julian; Zwierlein, Martin

    2016-05-01

    Over the last two decades RF spectroscopy has been established as an indispensable tool to probe a large variety of fundamental properties of strongly interacting Fermi gases. This ranges from measurement of the pairing gap over tan's contact to the quasi-particle weight of Fermi polarons. So far, most RF spectroscopy experiments have been performed in harmonic traps, resulting in an averaged response over different densities. We have realized an optical uniform potential for ultracold Fermi gases of 6 Li atoms, which allows us to avoid the usual problems connected to inhomogeneous systems. Here we present recent results on RF spectroscopy of these homogeneous samples with a high signal to noise ratio. In addition, we report progress on measuring the contact of a unitary Fermi gas across the normal to superfluid transition.

  20. Fermi Sees Antimatter-Hurling Thunderstorms

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has detected beams of antimatter launched by thunderstorms. Acting like enormous particle accelerators, the storms can emit gamma-ray flashes, called TGFs, an...

  1. Fermi Proves Supernova Remnants Make Cosmic Rays

    NASA Video Gallery

    The husks of exploded stars produce some of the fastest particles in the cosmos. New findings by NASA's Fermi show that two supernova remnants accelerate protons to near the speed of light. The pro...

  2. ORIGIN OF THE FERMI BUBBLE

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, K.-S.; Chernyshov, D. O.; Dogiel, V. A.; Ko, C.-M.; Ip, W.-H.

    2011-04-10

    Fermi has discovered two giant gamma-ray-emitting bubbles that extend nearly 10 kpc in diameter north and south of the Galactic center. The existence of the bubbles was first evidenced in X-rays detected by ROSAT and later WMAP detected an excess of radio signals at the location of the gamma-ray bubbles. We propose that periodic star capture processes by the galactic supermassive black hole, Sgr A*, with a capture rate 3 x 10{sup -5} yr{sup -1} and energy release {approx}3 x 10{sup 52} erg per capture can produce very hot plasma {approx}10 keV with a wind velocity {approx}10{sup 8} cm s{sup -1} injected into the halo and heat up the halo gas to {approx}1 keV, which produces thermal X-rays. The periodic injection of hot plasma can produce shocks in the halo and accelerate electrons to {approx}TeV, which produce radio emission via synchrotron radiation and gamma rays via inverse Compton scattering with the relic and the galactic soft photons.

  3. Observation of Fermi Polarons in a Tunable Fermi Liquid of Ultracold Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Schirotzek, Andre; Wu, C.-H.; Sommer, Ariel; Zwierlein, Martin W.

    2009-06-12

    We have observed Fermi polarons, dressed spin-down impurities in a spin-up Fermi sea of ultracold atoms. The polaron manifests itself as a narrow peak in the impurities' rf spectrum that emerges from a broad incoherent background. We determine the polaron energy and the quasiparticle residue for various interaction strengths around a Feshbach resonance. At a critical interaction, we observe the transition from polaronic to molecular binding. Here, the imbalanced Fermi liquid undergoes a phase transition into a Bose liquid, coexisting with a Fermi sea.

  4. First Light on GRBs with Fermi

    SciTech Connect

    Dermer, Charles D.

    2010-10-15

    Fermi LAT (Large Area Telescope) and GBM (Gamma ray Burst Monitor) observations of GRBs are briefly reviewed, keeping in mind EGRET expectations. Using {gamma}{gamma} constraints on outflow Lorentz factors, leptonic models are pitted against hadronic models, and found to be energetically favored. Interpretation of the Fermi data on GRBs helps establish whether GRBs accelerate cosmic rays, including those reaching {approx_equal}10{sup 20} eV.

  5. Understanding and Using the Fermi Science Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asercion, Joseph; Fermi Science Support Center Team

    2016-01-01

    The Fermi Science Support Center (FSSC) provides information, documentation, and tools for the analysis of Fermi science data, including both the Large-Area Telescope (LAT) and the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM). Source and binary versions of the Fermi Science Tools can be downloaded from the FSSC website, and are supported on multiple platforms. An overview document, the Cicerone, provides details of the Fermi mission, the science instruments and their response functions, the science data preparation and analysis process, and interpretation of the results. Analysis Threads and a reference manual available on the FSSC website provide the user with step-by-step instructions for many different types of data analysis: point source analysis - generating maps, spectra, and light curves, pulsar timing analysis, source identification, and the use of python for scripting customized analysis chains. We present an overview of the structure of the Fermi science tools and documentation, and how to acquire them. We also provide examples of standard analyses, including tips and tricks for improving Fermi science analysis.

  6. Upgrading Fermi Without Traveling to Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-02-01

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has received an upgrade that increased its sensitivity by a whopping 40% and nobody had to travel to space to make it happen! The difference instead stems from remarkable improvement to the software used to analyze Fermi-LATs data, and it has resulted in a new high-energy map of our sky.Animation (click to watch!) comparing the Pass 7 to the Pass 8 Fermi-LAT analysis, in a region in the constellation Carina. Pass 8 provides more accurate directions for incoming gamma rays, so more of them fall closer to their sources, creating taller spikes and a sharper image. [NASA/DOE/Fermi LAT Collaboration]Pass 8Fermi-LAT has been surveying the whole sky since August 2008. It detects gamma-ray photons by converting them into electron-positron pairs and tracking the paths of these charged particles. But differentiating this signal from the charged cosmic rays that also pass through the detector with a flux that can be 10,000 times larger! is a challenging process. Making this distinction and rebuilding the path of the original gamma ray relies on complex analysis software.Pass 8 is a complete reprocessing of all data collected by Fermi-LAT. The software has gone through many revisions before now, but this is the first revision that has taken into account all of the experience that the Fermi team has gained operating the LAT in its orbital environment.The improvements made in Pass 8 include better background rejection of misclassified charged particles, improvements to the point spread function and effective area of the detector, and an extension of the effective energy range from below 100 MeV to beyond a few hundred GeV. The changes made in Pass 8 have increased the sensitivity of Fermi-LAT by an astonishing 40%.Map of the High-Energy SkySky map of the sources in the 2FHL catalog, classified by their most likely association. Click for a better look! [Ackermann et al. 2016]The first result from the

  7. FERMI longitudinal diagnostics: results and future challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veronese, Marco; Ferrari, E.; Allaria, E.; Cinquegrana, P.; Froelich, L.; Giannessi, L.; Penco, G.; Predonzani, M.; Rossi, F.; Sigalotti, P.; Ferianis, M.

    2015-05-01

    The seeded FEL FERMI has completed the commissioning of both the FEL lines, and it is now providing the user community with a coherent and tunable UV radiation (from 100 nm to 4 nm) in a number of different configurations. These also include original FEL-pump - FEL-probe schemes with twin-seeded FEL pulses. Among the key systems for the operation of FERMI, there is the femtosecond optical timing system and dedicated longitudinal diagnostics, specifically developed for FERMI. In this paper, after a short review of the FERMI optical timing system and of its routinely achieved performances, we focus on the results obtained from the suite of longitudinal diagnostics (Bunch Arrival Monitor, Electro Optical sampling station and RF deflectors) all operating in single shot and with 10s fs resolution which demonstrate the FERMI achieved performances. The longitudinal diagnostics measurements are compared between these device and other device on shot-to-shot basis, looking for correlations between machine parameters. Finally future challenges in terms of improvement of existing diagnostics, planned installations and possible upgrades are discussed.

  8. Extending the Fermi - Swift Joint AGN Sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrader, Chris R.; Macomb, D. J.

    2014-01-01

    The Swift BAT and the Fermi LAT each provide excellent sky coverage and have led to impressive compilations of extragalactic source catalogs. For the most part they sample separate AGN subpopulations - Swift the lower-luminosity and relatively nearby Seyfert galaxies while the Fermi sample is dominated by blazars and does not include any radio-quiet objects. The overlap between these samples is among the radio-loud subset of the Swift sample as has been discussed elsewhere in the literature. The observable properties at these two bands - flux and spectral indices - are not expected to be well correlated as they sample different portions of the synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) spectral energy distribution. In this contribution we consider an extension of the high-latitude Swift sample by relaxing the significance cut to less than 5 standard deviations and consider the overlap of that subsample with the Fermi AGN catalog. While such a threshold is generally inadvisable as it introduces the strong possibility of spurious detections, the objects of the overlapping sample which are detected at high significance in Fermi can be considered as reasonably high-confidence Swift detections. For example, there are 190 Swift sub-5-sigma Swift sources that have significance >2-sigma with Fermi counterparts, whereas we predict only ~5 due to statistical fluctuation. We also investigate any coincident INTEGRAL/IBIS observations to further bolster or diminish candidate Swift detections. We present our correlation analyses and offer interpretation in the context of the blazar sequence.

  9. Understanding and Using the Fermi Science Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asercion, Joseph; Fermi Science Support Center

    2015-01-01

    The Fermi Science Support Center (FSSC) provides information, documentation, and tools for the analysis of Fermi science data, including both the Large-Area Telescope (LAT) and the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM). Source and binary versions of the Fermi Science Tools can be downloaded from the FSSC website, and are supported on multiple platforms. An overview document, the Cicerone, provides details of the Fermi mission, the science instruments and their response functions, the science data preparation and analysis process, and interpretation of the results. Analysis Threads provide the user with step-by-step instructions for many different types of data analysis: point source analysis - generating maps, spectra, and light curves, pulsar timing analysis, source identification, and the use of python for scripting customized analysis chains. The reference manual gives details of the options available for each tool. We present an overview of the structure of the Fermi science tools and documentation, and how to acquire them. We also provide information on recent updates incorporated in the Science Tools as well as upcoming changes that will be included in the upcoming release of the Science Tools in early 2015.

  10. Pairing in a dry Fermi sea.

    PubMed

    Maier, T A; Staar, P; Mishra, V; Chatterjee, U; Campuzano, J C; Scalapino, D J

    2016-01-01

    In the traditional Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory of superconductivity, the amplitude for the propagation of a pair of electrons with momentum k and -k has a log singularity as the temperature decreases. This so-called Cooper instability arises from the presence of an electron Fermi sea. It means that an attractive interaction, no matter how weak, will eventually lead to a pairing instability. However, in the pseudogap regime of the cuprate superconductors, where parts of the Fermi surface are destroyed, this log singularity is suppressed, raising the question of how pairing occurs in the absence of a Fermi sea. Here we report Hubbard model numerical results and the analysis of angular-resolved photoemission experiments on a cuprate superconductor. In contrast to the traditional theory, we find that in the pseudogap regime the pairing instability arises from an increase in the strength of the spin-fluctuation pairing interaction as the temperature decreases rather than the Cooper log instability. PMID:27312569

  11. The evolutionary sequence of Fermi blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Yongjuan; Zhang, Haojing; Zhang, Xiong; Xiong, Dingrong; Li, Bijun; Dong, Xia; Li, Jin

    2014-02-01

    Using γ-ray data ( α γ , F γ ) detected by Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) and black hole mass which has been compiled from literatures for 116 Fermi blazars, we calculated intrinsic γ-ray luminosity, intrinsic bolometric luminosity, intrinsic Eddington ratio and studied the relationships between all above parameters and redshift, between α γ and L γ . Furthermore, we obtained the histograms of key parameters. Our results are the following: (1) The main reason for the evolutionary sequence of three subclasses (HBLs, LBLs, FSRQs) may be Eddington ratio rather than black hole mass; (2) FSRQs occupy in the earlier, high-luminosity, high Eddington ratio, violent phase of the galactic evolution sequence, while BL Lac objects occur in the low luminosity, low Eddington ratio, late phase of the galactic evolution sequence; (3) These results imply that the evolutionary track of Fermi blazars is FSRQs ⟶ LBLs ⟶ HBLs.

  12. The Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Dave; McEnery, Julie

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the Gamma Ray Astronomy as enhanced by the Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope and Radio Astronomy as a synergistic relationship. Gamma rays often represent a significant part of the energy budget of a source; therefore, gamma-ray studies can be critical to understanding physical processes in such sources. Radio observations offer timing and spatial resolutions vastly superior to anything possible with gamma-ray telescopes; therefore radio is often the key to understanding source structure. Gamma-ray and radio observations can complement each other, making a great team. It reviews the Fermi Guest Investigator (GI) program, and calls for more cooperative work that involves Fermi and the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA), a system of ten radio telescopes.

  13. Entanglement Entropy and the Fermi Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swingle, Brian

    2010-07-01

    Free fermions with a finite Fermi surface are known to exhibit an anomalously large entanglement entropy. The leading contribution to the entanglement entropy of a region of linear size L in d spatial dimensions is S˜Ld-1log⁡L, a result that should be contrasted with the usual boundary law S˜Ld-1. This term depends only on the geometry of the Fermi surface and on the boundary of the region in question. I give an intuitive account of this anomalous scaling based on a low energy description of the Fermi surface as a collection of one-dimensional gapless modes. Using this picture, I predict a violation of the boundary law in a number of other strongly correlated systems.

  14. Fermi surface anisotropy in the cuprates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramshaw, Brad

    Broken rotational (C4) symmetry is a distinguishing feature for a number of experiments in the underdoped high-Tc cuprates, including electrical resistivity, neutron scattering, Nernst coefficient, and scanning tunneling microscopy. This broken symmetry has not been observed on the Fermi surface, however, with or without the presence of an applied magnetic field. We measure the angle-dependent magnetoresistance-a quantity known to be extremely sensitive to the geometry and symmetry of the Fermi surface-of YBa2Cu3O6.58, and find that the Fermi surface has a clear two-fold symmetry, breaking the C4 symmetry of the copper-oxide plane. We discuss the implications of this finding, including how it fits with recent X-ray measurements in high magnetic fields.

  15. Aspects of non-Fermi-liquid metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pivovarov, Eugene

    We consider several examples of metallic systems that exhibit non-Fermi-liquid behavior. In these examples the system is not a Fermi liquid due to the presence of a "hidden" order. The primary models are density waves with an odd-frequency-dependent order parameter and density waves with d-wave symmetry. In the first model, the same-time correlation functions vanish and there is a conventional Fermi surface. In the second model, the gap vanishes at the nodes. We derive the phase diagrams and study the thermodynamic and kinetic properties. We also consider the effects of competing orders on the phase diagram when the underlying microscopic interaction has a high symmetry.

  16. Pairing in a dry Fermi sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, T. A.; Staar, P.; Mishra, V.; Chatterjee, U.; Campuzano, J. C.; Scalapino, D. J.

    2016-06-01

    In the traditional Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory of superconductivity, the amplitude for the propagation of a pair of electrons with momentum k and -k has a log singularity as the temperature decreases. This so-called Cooper instability arises from the presence of an electron Fermi sea. It means that an attractive interaction, no matter how weak, will eventually lead to a pairing instability. However, in the pseudogap regime of the cuprate superconductors, where parts of the Fermi surface are destroyed, this log singularity is suppressed, raising the question of how pairing occurs in the absence of a Fermi sea. Here we report Hubbard model numerical results and the analysis of angular-resolved photoemission experiments on a cuprate superconductor. In contrast to the traditional theory, we find that in the pseudogap regime the pairing instability arises from an increase in the strength of the spin-fluctuation pairing interaction as the temperature decreases rather than the Cooper log instability.

  17. Dark lump excitations in superfluid Fermi gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yan-Xia; Duan, Wen-Shan

    2012-11-01

    We study the linear and nonlinear properties of two-dimensional matter-wave pulses in disk-shaped superfluid Fermi gases. A Kadomtsev—Petviashvili I (KPI) solitary wave has been realized for superfluid Fermi gases in the limited cases of Bardeen—Cooper—Schrieffer (BCS) regime, Bose—Einstein condensate (BEC) regime, and unitarity regime. One-lump solution as well as one-line soliton solutions for the KPI equation are obtained, and two-line soliton solutions with the same amplitude are also studied in the limited cases. The dependence of the lump propagating velocity and the sound speed of two-dimensional superfluid Fermi gases on the interaction parameter are investigated for the limited cases of BEC and unitarity.

  18. Switchable Fermi surface sheets in greigite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, B.; de Wijs, G. A.; de Groot, R. A.

    2012-07-01

    Greigite (Fe3S4) and magnetite (Fe3O4) are isostructural and isoelectronic ferrimagnets with quite distinct properties. Electronic structure calculations reveal greigite is a normal metal in contrast to half-metallic magnetite. Greigite shows a complex Fermi surface with a unique influence of relativistic effects: The existence of sheets of the Fermi surface depends on the direction of the magnetization. This enables spinorbitronics, spintronics on the level of a single compound rather than a device. Due to its relativistic origin, spin contamination is irrelevant in spinorbitronics and the entire periodic table is available for optimizations.

  19. Traveling dark solitons in superfluid Fermi gases

    SciTech Connect

    Liao Renyuan; Brand, Joachim

    2011-04-15

    Families of dark solitons exist in superfluid Fermi gases. The energy-velocity dispersion and number of depleted particles completely determine the dynamics of dark solitons on a slowly varying background density. For the unitary Fermi gas, we determine these relations from general scaling arguments and conservation of local particle number. We find solitons to oscillate sinusoidally at the trap frequency reduced by a factor of 1/{radical}(3). Numerical integration of the time-dependent Bogoliubov-de Gennes equation determines spatial profiles and soliton-dispersion relations across the BEC-BCS crossover, and proves consistent with the scaling relations at unitarity.

  20. Information-driven societies and Fermi's paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampton, Michael

    2013-10-01

    Fermi's paradox is founded on the idea that one or more Galactic extraterrestrial civilizations (ETCs) existed long ago and sustained exploration for millions of years, but in spite of their advanced knowledge, they could not find a way to explore the Galaxy other than with fleets of starships or self replicating probes. Here, I question this second assumption: if advanced technology generally allows long-distance remote sensing, and if ETCs were motivated by gaining information rather than conquest or commerce, then such voyages would be unnecessary, thereby resolving Fermi's paradox.

  1. Enrico: Python package to simplify Fermi-LAT analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, David; Deil, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Enrico analyzes Fermi data. It produces spectra (model fit and flux points), maps and lightcurves for a target by editing a config file and running a python script which executes the Fermi science tool chain.

  2. Fermi Large Area Telescope Second Source Catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nolan, P. L.; Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M; Allafort, A.; Antolini, E; Bonnell, J.; Cannon, A.; Celik O.; Corbet, R.; Davis, D. S.; DeCesar, M. E.; Ferrara, E. C.; Gehrels, N.; Harding, A. K.; Hays, E.; Johnson, T. E.; McConville, W.; McEnery, J. E; Perkins, J. S.; Racusin, J. L; Scargle, J. D.; Stephens, T. E.; Thompson, D. J.; Troja, E.

    2012-01-01

    We present the second catalog of high-energy gamma-ray sources detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT), the primary science instrument on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi), derived from data taken during the first 24 months of the science phase of the mission, which began on 2008 August 4. Source detection is based on the average flux over the 24-month period. The Second Fermi-LAT catalog (2FGL) includes source location regions, defined in terms of elliptical fits to the 95% confidence regions and spectral fits in terms of power-law, exponentially cutoff power-law, or log-normal forms. Also included are flux measurements in 5 energy bands and light curves on monthly intervals for each source. Twelve sources in the catalog are modeled as spatially extended. We provide a detailed comparison of the results from this catalog with those from the first Fermi-LAT catalog (1FGL). Although the diffuse Galactic and isotropic models used in the 2FGL analysis are improved compared to the 1FGL catalog, we attach caution flags to 162 of the sources to indicate possible confusion with residual imperfections in the diffuse model. The 2FGL catalog contains 1873 sources detected and characterized in the 100 11eV to 100 GeV range of which we consider 127 as being firmly identified and 1171 as being reliably associated with counterparts of known or likely gamma-ray-producing source classes.

  3. FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE SECOND SOURCE CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Nolan, P. L.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Bechtol, K.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Antolini, E.; Bonamente, E.; Atwood, W. B.; Belfiore, A.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Ballet, J.; Bastieri, D.; Bignami, G. F. E-mail: Gino.Tosti@pg.infn.it E-mail: tburnett@u.washington.edu; and others

    2012-04-01

    We present the second catalog of high-energy {gamma}-ray sources detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT), the primary science instrument on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi), derived from data taken during the first 24 months of the science phase of the mission, which began on 2008 August 4. Source detection is based on the average flux over the 24 month period. The second Fermi-LAT catalog (2FGL) includes source location regions, defined in terms of elliptical fits to the 95% confidence regions and spectral fits in terms of power-law, exponentially cutoff power-law, or log-normal forms. Also included are flux measurements in five energy bands and light curves on monthly intervals for each source. Twelve sources in the catalog are modeled as spatially extended. We provide a detailed comparison of the results from this catalog with those from the first Fermi-LAT catalog (1FGL). Although the diffuse Galactic and isotropic models used in the 2FGL analysis are improved compared to the 1FGL catalog, we attach caution flags to 162 of the sources to indicate possible confusion with residual imperfections in the diffuse model. The 2FGL catalog contains 1873 sources detected and characterized in the 100 MeV to 100 GeV range of which we consider 127 as being firmly identified and 1171 as being reliably associated with counterparts of known or likely {gamma}-ray-producing source classes.

  4. Pairing, pseudogap and Fermi arcs in cuprates

    SciTech Connect

    Kaminski, Adam; Kondo, Takeshi; Takeuchi, Tsunehiro; Gu, Genda

    2014-04-29

    We use Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARPES) to study the relationship between the pseudogap, pairing and Fermi arcs in cuprates. High quality data measured over a wide range of dopings reveals a consistent picture of Fermiology and pairing in these materials. The pseudogap is due to an ordered state that competes with superconductivity rather than preformed pairs. Pairing does occur below Tpair ~ 150K and significantly above Tc, but well below T* and the doping dependence of this temperature scale is distinct from that of the pseudogap. The d-wave gap is present below Tpair, and its interplay with strong scattering creates “artificial” Fermi arcs for Tc ≤ T ≤ Tpair. However, above Tpair, the pseudogap exists only at the antipodal region. This leads to presence of real, gapless Fermi arcs close to the node. The length of these arcs remains constant up to T*, where the full Fermi surface is recovered. As a result, we demonstrate that these findings resolve a number of seemingly contradictory scenarios.

  5. Pairing, pseudogap and Fermi arcs in cuprates

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kaminski, Adam; Kondo, Takeshi; Takeuchi, Tsunehiro; Gu, Genda

    2014-04-29

    We use Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARPES) to study the relationship between the pseudogap, pairing and Fermi arcs in cuprates. High quality data measured over a wide range of dopings reveals a consistent picture of Fermiology and pairing in these materials. The pseudogap is due to an ordered state that competes with superconductivity rather than preformed pairs. Pairing does occur below Tpair ~ 150K and significantly above Tc, but well below T* and the doping dependence of this temperature scale is distinct from that of the pseudogap. The d-wave gap is present below Tpair, and its interplay with strong scatteringmore » creates “artificial” Fermi arcs for Tc ≤ T ≤ Tpair. However, above Tpair, the pseudogap exists only at the antipodal region. This leads to presence of real, gapless Fermi arcs close to the node. The length of these arcs remains constant up to T*, where the full Fermi surface is recovered. As a result, we demonstrate that these findings resolve a number of seemingly contradictory scenarios.« less

  6. Radiatively induced Fermi scale and unification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alanne, Tommi; Meroni, Aurora; Sannino, Francesco; Tuominen, Kimmo

    2016-05-01

    We consider extensions of the Standard Model in which the hierarchy between the unification and the Fermi scale emerges radiatively. Within the Pati-Salam framework, we show that it is possible to construct a viable model where the Higgs is an elementary pseudo-Goldstone boson, and the correct hierarchy is generated.

  7. Radio core dominance of Fermi blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Zhi-Yuan; Fan, Jun-Hui; Liu, Yi; Yuan, Yi-Hai; Cai, Wei; Xiao, Hu-Bing; Lin, Chao; Yang, Jiang-He

    2016-07-01

    During the first 4 years of mission, Fermi/LAT detected 1444 blazars (3FGL) (Ackermann et al. in Astrophys. J. 810:14, 2015). Fermi/LAT observations of blazars indicate that Fermi blazars are luminous and strongly variable with variability time scales, for some cases, as short as hours. Those observations suggest a strong beaming effect in Fermi/LAT blazars. In the present work, we will investigate the beaming effect in Fermi/LAT blazars using a core-dominance parameter, R = S_{core}/ S_{ext.}, where S_{core} is the core emission, while S_{ext.} is the extended emission. We compiled 1335 blazars with available core-dominance parameter, out of which 169 blazars have γ-ray emission (from 3FGL). We compared the core-dominance parameters, log R, between the 169 Fermi-detected blazars (FDBs) and the rest non-Fermi-detected blazars (non-FDBs), and we found that the averaged values are < log Rrangle = 0.99±0.87 for FDBs and < log Rrangle = -0.62±1.15 for the non-FDBs. A K-S test shows that the probability for the two distributions of FDBs and non-FDBs to come from the same parent distribution is near zero (P =9.12×10^{-52}). Secondly, we also investigated the variability index (V.I.) in the γ-ray band for FDBs, and we found V.I.=(0.12 ±0.07) log R+(2.25±0.10), suggesting that a source with larger log R has larger V.I. value. Thirdly, we compared the mean values of radio spectral index for FDBs and non-FDBs, and we obtained < α_{radio}rangle =0.06±0.35 for FDBs and < α_{radio}rangle =0.57±0.46 for non-FDBs. If γ-rays are composed of two components like radio emission (core and extended components), then we can expect a correlation between log R and the γ-ray spectral index. When we used the radio core-dominance parameter, log R, to investigate the relationship, we found that the spectral index for the core component is α_{γ}|_{core} = 1.11 (a photon spectral index of α_{γ}^{ph}|_{core} = 2.11) and that for the extended component is α_{γ}|_{ext.} = 0

  8. FermiGrid - experience and future plans

    SciTech Connect

    Chadwick, K.; Berman, E.; Canal, P.; Hesselroth, T.; Garzoglio, G.; Levshina, T.; Sergeev, V.; Sfiligoi, I.; Timm, S.; Yocum, D.; /Fermilab

    2007-09-01

    Fermilab supports a scientific program that includes experiments and scientists located across the globe. In order to better serve this community, Fermilab has placed its production computer resources in a Campus Grid infrastructure called 'FermiGrid'. The FermiGrid infrastructure allows the large experiments at Fermilab to have priority access to their own resources, enables sharing of these resources in an opportunistic fashion, and movement of work (jobs, data) between the Campus Grid and National Grids such as Open Science Grid and the WLCG. FermiGrid resources support multiple Virtual Organizations (VOs), including VOs from the Open Science Grid (OSG), EGEE and the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid Collaboration (WLCG). Fermilab also makes leading contributions to the Open Science Grid in the areas of accounting, batch computing, grid security, job management, resource selection, site infrastructure, storage management, and VO services. Through the FermiGrid interfaces, authenticated and authorized VOs and individuals may access our core grid services, the 10,000+ Fermilab resident CPUs, near-petabyte (including CMS) online disk pools and the multi-petabyte Fermilab Mass Storage System. These core grid services include a site wide Globus gatekeeper, VO management services for several VOs, Fermilab site authorization services, grid user mapping services, as well as job accounting and monitoring, resource selection and data movement services. Access to these services is via standard and well-supported grid interfaces. We will report on the user experience of using the FermiGrid campus infrastructure interfaced to a national cyberinfrastructure--the successes and the problems.

  9. Bosonization of the low energy excitations of Fermi liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Castro Neto, A.H.; Fradkin, E. )

    1994-03-07

    We bosonize the low energy excitations of Fermi liquids in any number of dimensions in the limit of long wavelengths. The bosons are a coherent superposition of electron-hole pairs and are related with the displacements of the Fermi surface in some arbitrary direction. A coherent-state path integral for the bosonized theory is derived and it is shown to represent histories of the shape of the Fermi surface. The Landau theory of Fermi liquids can be obtained from the formalism in the absence of nesting of the Fermi surface and singular interactions. We show that the Landau equation for sound waves is exact in the semiclassical approximation for the bosons.

  10. Magnetar Observations with Fermi/GBM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouveliotou, Chryssa

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Fermi Observatory was launched June 11, 2009; the Fermi Gamma Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) began normal operations on July 14, about a month after launch, when the trigger algorithms were enabled. In the first year of operations we recorded emission from four magnetar sources; of these, only one was an old magnetar: SGR 1806+20. The other three detections were: SGR J0501+4516, newly discovered with Swift and extensively monitored with both Swift and GBM, SGR J1550-5418, a source originally classified as an Anomalous X-ray Pulsar (AXP) and a very recently discovered new source, SGR 0418+5729. I report below on the current status of the analyses efforts of the GBM data.

  11. Magnetar Observations in the Fermi Era

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouveliotou, Chryssa

    2009-01-01

    NASA s Fermi Observatory was launched June 11, 2009; the Fermi Gamma Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) began normal operations on July 14, about a month after launch, when the trigger algorithms were enabled. In the first 8 months of operations we recorded emission of three magnetar sources; of these, only one was an old magnetar: SGR 1806+20. The other two detections were: SGR J0501+4516, newly discovered with Swift and extensively monitored with both Swift and GBM, and SGR J1550-5418, a source originally classified as an Anomalous X-ray Pulsar (AXP). I report below on the current status of the analyses efforts of all these GBM data sets, combined with data from other satellites (Spitzer, RXTE, Chandra, Swift).

  12. Study of superfluid Bose-Fermi mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, Sebastien; Delehaye, Marion; Jin, Shuwei; Pierce, Matthieu; Yefsah, Tarik; Chevy, Frederic; Salomon, Christophe

    2016-05-01

    Using fermionic and bosonic isotopes of lithium we produce and study ultracold Bose-Fermi mixtures. First in a low temperature counterflow experiment, we measure the critical velocity of the system in the BEC-BCS crossover. Around unitarity, we observe a remarkably high superfluid critical velocity which reaches the sound velocity of the strongly interacting Fermi gas. Second, when we increase the temperature of the system slightly above the superfluid transitions we observe an unexpected phase locking of the oscillations of the clouds induced by dissipation. Finally, as suggested in, we explore the nature of the superfluid phase when we impose a spin polarization in the situation where the mean field potential created by the bosons on the fermions tends to cancel out the trapping potential of the latter.

  13. Unconventional Fermi surface in an insulating state

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Neil; Tan, B. S.; Hsu, Y. -T.; Zeng, B.; Hatnean, M. Ciomaga; Zhu, Z.; Hartstein, M.; Kiourlappou, M.; Srivastava, A.; Johannes, M. D.; Murphy, T. P.; Park, J. -H.; Balicas, L.; Lonzarich, G. G.; Balakrishnan, G.; Sebastian, Suchitra E.

    2015-07-17

    Insulators occur in more than one guise; a recent finding was a class of topological insulators, which host a conducting surface juxtaposed with an insulating bulk. Here, we report the observation of an unusual insulating state with an electrically insulating bulk that simultaneously yields bulk quantum oscillations with characteristics of an unconventional Fermi liquid. We present quantum oscillation measurements of magnetic torque in high-purity single crystals of the Kondo insulator SmB6, which reveal quantum oscillation frequencies characteristic of a large three-dimensional conduction electron Fermi surface similar to the metallic rare earth hexaborides such as PrB6 and LaB6. As a result, the quantum oscillation amplitude strongly increases at low temperatures, appearing strikingly at variance with conventional metallic behavior.

  14. Pulsar timing and the Fermi mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, Matthew; Possenti, Andrea; Manchester, Dick; Johnston, Simon; Hobbs, George; Romani, Roger W.; Thompson, David J.; Weltevrede, Patrick; Shannon, Ryan; Petroff, Emily; Brook, Paul

    2014-04-01

    We request time to observe 180 pulsars on a regular basis in order to provide the accurate ephemerides necessary for the detection and characterisation of gamma-ray pulsars with the Fermi satellite. The main science goals are to increase the number of known gamma-ray pulsars (both radio loud and radio quiet), to determine accurate pulse profiles, and to characterise their high energy (phase-resolved) spectra. In the radio, the observations will also allow us to find glitches, characterise timing noise, investigate dispersion and rotation measure variability, and enhance our knowledge of single pulse phenomenology. To date, we are (co-)authors on 45 papers arising from the collaboration and P574 data. The data have contributed to the PhD theses of Lucas Guillemot and Damien Parent from the Bordeaux Fermi group and Kyle Watters from Stanford. Currently four students have active projects using the radio datasets.

  15. Young Pulsar Timing and the Fermi Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, Matthew; Possenti, Andrea; Manchester, Dick; Johnston, Simon; Hobbs, George; Romani, Roger W.; Thompson, David J.; Weltevrede, Patrick; Shannon, Ryan; Petroff, Emily; Brook, Paul

    2014-10-01

    We request time to observe 230 pulsars on a regular basis in order to provide the accurate ephemerides necessary for the detection and characterisation of gamma-ray pulsars with the Fermi satellite. The main science goals are to increase the number of known gamma-ray pulsars (both radio loud and radio quiet), to determine accurate pulse profiles, and to characterise their high energy (phase-resolved) spectra. In the radio, the observations will also allow us to find glitches, characterise timing noise, investigate dispersion and rotation measure variability, and enhance our knowledge of single pulse phenomenology. To date, we are (co-)authors on 45 papers arising from the collaboration and P574 data. The data have contributed to the PhD theses of Lucas Guillemot and Damien Parent from the Bordeaux Fermi group and Kyle Watters from Stanford. Currently four students have active projects using the radio datasets.

  16. Remarks on Fermi liquid from holography

    SciTech Connect

    Kulaxizi, Manuela; Parnachev, Andrei

    2008-10-15

    We investigate the signatures of Fermi liquid formation in the N=4 super Yang-Mills theory coupled to fundamental hypermultiplet at nonvanishing chemical potential for the global U(1) vector symmetry. At strong 't Hooft coupling the system can be analyzed in terms of the D7-brane dynamics in the AdS{sub 5}xS{sup 5} background. The phases with vanishing and finite charge density are separated at zero temperature by a quantum phase transition. In the case of vanishing hypermultiplet mass, Karch, Son, and Starinets discovered a gapless excitation whose speed equals the speed of sound. We find that this zero sound mode persists to all values of the hypermultiplet mass, and its speed vanishes at the point of phase transition. The value of critical exponent and the ratio of the velocities of zero and first sounds are consistent with the predictions of Landau Fermi liquid theory at strong coupling.

  17. High Energy Neutrinos from the Fermi Bubbles

    SciTech Connect

    Lunardini, Cecilia; Razzaque, Soebur

    2012-06-01

    Recently the Fermi-LAT data have revealed two gamma-ray emitting bubble-shaped structures at the Galactic center. If the observed gamma rays have hadronic origin (collisions of accelerated protons), the bubbles must emit high energy neutrinos as well. This new, Galactic, neutrino flux should trace the gamma-ray emission in spectrum and spatial extent. Its highest energy part, above 20–50 TeV, is observable at a kilometer-scale detector in the northern hemisphere, such as the planned KM3NeT, while interesting constraints on it could be obtained by the IceCube Neutrino Observatory at the South Pole. The detection or exclusion of neutrinos from the Fermi bubbles will discriminate between hadronic and leptonic models, thus bringing unique information on the still mysterious origin of these objects and on the time scale of their formation.

  18. Single impurity in ultracold Fermi superfluids

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Lei; Baksmaty, Leslie O.; Pu, Han; Hu Hui; Chen Yan

    2011-06-15

    The role of impurities as experimental probes in the detection of quantum material properties is well appreciated. Here we study the effect of a single classical magnetic impurity in trapped ultracold Fermi superfluids. Depending on its shape and strength, a magnetic impurity can induce single or multiple midgap bound states in a superfluid Fermi gas. The multiple midgap states could coincide with the development of a Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov (FFLO) phase within the superfluid. As an analog of the scanning tunneling microsope, we propose a modified rf spectroscopic method to measure the local density of states which can be employed to detect these states and other quantum phases of cold atoms. A key result of our self-consistent Bogoliubov-de Gennes calculations is that a magnetic impurity can controllably induce an FFLO state at currently accessible experimental parameters.

  19. Dilute spin-orbit Fermi gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldonado-Mundo, Daniel; He, Lianyi; Öhberg, Patrik; Valiente, Manuel

    2014-03-01

    We study repulsive Fermi gases with Rashba spin-orbit coupling in two and three dimensions when they are dilute enough that a single branch of the spectrum is occupied in the non-interacting ground state. We develop an effective renormalizable theory for fermions in the lower branch and obtain the energy of the system in three dimensions to second order in the renormalized coupling constant. We then exploit the non-Galilean-relativistic nature of spin-orbit coupled gases. We find that at finite momentum, the two-dimensional Fermi sea is deformed in a non-trivial way. Using mean-field theory to include interactions, we show that the ground-state of the system acquires a finite momentum, and is consequently deformed, when the interaction is stronger than a critical value. Heriot-Watt University. CM-DTC. SUPA. EPSRC.

  20. Relativistic Beaming Effect in Fermi Blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, J. H.; Bastieri, D.; Yang, J. H.; Liu, Y.; Wu, D. X.; Li, S. H.

    2014-09-01

    The most identified sources observed by Fermi/LAT are blazars, based on which we can investigate the emission mechanisms and beaming effect in the γ-ray bands for blazars. Here, we used the compiled around 450 Fermi blazars with the available X-ray observations to estimate their Doppler factors and compared them with the integral γ-ray luminosity in the range of 1-100 GeV. It is interesting that the integral γ-ray luminosity is closely correlated with the estimated Doppler factor, for the whole sample. When the dependence of the correlation between them and the X-ray luminosity is removed, the correlation is still strong, which suggests that the γ-ray emissions are strongly beamed.

  1. New Results from the Search for Low-Mass Weakly Interacting Massive Particles with the CDMS Low Ionization Threshold Experiment [WIMP-Search Results from the Second CDMSlite Run

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Agnese, R.

    2016-02-01

    The CDMS low ionization threshold experiment (CDMSlite) uses cryogenic germanium detectors operated at a relatively high bias voltage to amplify the phonon signal in the search for weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). Our results are presented from the second CDMSlite run with an exposure of 70 kg days, which reached an energy threshold for electron recoils as low as 56 eV. Furthermore, a fiducialization cut reduces backgrounds below those previously reported by CDMSlite. New parameter space for the WIMP-nucleon spin-independent cross section is excluded forWIMP masses between 1.6 and 5.5 GeV/c2.

  2. Ideas by Szilard, physics by Fermi

    SciTech Connect

    Lanouette, W.

    1992-12-01

    An excerpt from William Lanouette's book Genius in the shadows: A biography of Leo Szilard, the man behind the bomb (with Bela Silard). This article covers Szilard's life from early 1933, when he first began contemplating fleeing Germany, to the first self-sustaining nuclear chain reaction on December 2, 1942, and includes a description of his partnership with Enrico Fermi. Part of a series of articles in this magazine commemorating the 50th anniversary of the first controlled chain reaction.

  3. Fractal generalization of Thomas-Fermi model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rekhviashvili, S. Sh.; Sokurov, A. A.

    2016-05-01

    The Thomas-Fermi model is developed for a multielectron neutral atom at an arbitrary metric dimension of the electron cloud. It has been shown that the electron cloud with the reduced dimension should be located in the close vicinity of the nucleus. At a metric dimension of the electron cloud of 2, the differential equation of the model admits an analytical solution. In this case, the screening parameter does not depend on the charge of the nucleus.

  4. Fermi Large Area Telescope Second Source Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolan, P. L.; Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Antolini, E.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Belfiore, A.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Bignami, G. F.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Bonnell, J.; Borgland, A. W.; Bottacini, E.; Bouvier, A.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Burnett, T. H.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Campana, R.; Cañadas, B.; Cannon, A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cavazzuti, E.; Ceccanti, M.; Cecchi, C.; Çelik, Ö.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, J.; Chipaux, R.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cominsky, L. R.; Conrad, J.; Corbet, R.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; Davis, D. S.; de Angelis, A.; DeCesar, M. E.; DeKlotz, M.; De Luca, A.; den Hartog, P. R.; de Palma, F.; Dermer, C. D.; Digel, S. W.; Silva, E. do Couto e.; Drell, P. S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Enoto, T.; Escande, L.; Fabiani, D.; Falletti, L.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Focke, W. B.; Fortin, P.; Frailis, M.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Giebels, B.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grove, J. E.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Gustafsson, M.; Hadasch, D.; Hanabata, Y.; Harding, A. K.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Hill, A. B.; Horan, D.; Hou, X.; Hughes, R. E.; Iafrate, G.; Itoh, R.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, R. P.; Johnson, T. E.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, T. J.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Katsuta, J.; Kawai, N.; Kerr, M.; Knödlseder, J.; Kocevski, D.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Landriu, D.; Latronico, L.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lionetto, A. M.; Llena Garde, M.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Madejski, G. M.; Marelli, M.; Massaro, E.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McConville, W.; McEnery, J. E.; Mehault, J.; Michelson, P. F.; Minuti, M.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Mongelli, M.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nakamori, T.; Naumann-Godo, M.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Nymark, T.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Okumura, A.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Ozaki, M.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Parent, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Pierbattista, M.; Pinchera, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Racusin, J. L.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reposeur, T.; Ritz, S.; Rochester, L. S.; Romani, R. W.; Roth, M.; Rousseau, R.; Ryde, F.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Salvetti, D.; Sanchez, D. A.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Sbarra, C.; Scargle, J. D.; Schalk, T. L.; Sgrò, C.; Shaw, M. S.; Shrader, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, D. A.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Stephens, T. E.; Strickman, M. S.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, T.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. G.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Tibolla, O.; Tinebra, F.; Tinivella, M.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Uchiyama, Y.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Van Etten, A.; Van Klaveren, B.; Vasileiou, V.; Vianello, G.; Vitale, V.; Waite, A. P.; Wallace, E.; Wang, P.; Werner, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, D. L.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.; Yang, Z.; Zimmer, S.

    2012-04-01

    We present the second catalog of high-energy γ-ray sources detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT), the primary science instrument on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi), derived from data taken during the first 24 months of the science phase of the mission, which began on 2008 August 4. Source detection is based on the average flux over the 24 month period. The second Fermi-LAT catalog (2FGL) includes source location regions, defined in terms of elliptical fits to the 95% confidence regions and spectral fits in terms of power-law, exponentially cutoff power-law, or log-normal forms. Also included are flux measurements in five energy bands and light curves on monthly intervals for each source. Twelve sources in the catalog are modeled as spatially extended. We provide a detailed comparison of the results from this catalog with those from the first Fermi-LAT catalog (1FGL). Although the diffuse Galactic and isotropic models used in the 2FGL analysis are improved compared to the 1FGL catalog, we attach caution flags to 162 of the sources to indicate possible confusion with residual imperfections in the diffuse model. The 2FGL catalog contains 1873 sources detected and characterized in the 100 MeV to 100 GeV range of which we consider 127 as being firmly identified and 1171 as being reliably associated with counterparts of known or likely γ-ray-producing source classes. We dedicate this paper to the memory of our colleague Patrick Nolan, who died on 2011 November 6. His career spanned much of the history of high-energy astronomy from space and his work on the Large Area Telescope (LAT) began nearly 20 years ago when it was just a concept. Pat was a central member in the operation of the LAT collaboration and he is greatly missed.

  5. "Permanence" - An Adaptationist Solution to Fermi's Paradox?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirkovic, Milan M.

    A new solution of Fermi's paradox sketched by SF writer Karl Schroeder in his 2002. novel Permanence is investigated. It is argued that this solution is tightly connected with adaptationism - a widely discussed working hypothesis in evolutionary biology. Schroeder's hypothesis has important ramifications for astrobiology, SETI projects, and future studies. Its weaknesses should be explored without succumbing to the emotional reactions often accompanying adaptationist explanations.

  6. Pairing in a dry Fermi sea

    PubMed Central

    Maier, T. A; Staar, P.; Mishra, V.; Chatterjee, U.; Campuzano, J. C.; Scalapino, D. J.

    2016-01-01

    In the traditional Bardeen–Cooper–Schrieffer theory of superconductivity, the amplitude for the propagation of a pair of electrons with momentum k and −k has a log singularity as the temperature decreases. This so-called Cooper instability arises from the presence of an electron Fermi sea. It means that an attractive interaction, no matter how weak, will eventually lead to a pairing instability. However, in the pseudogap regime of the cuprate superconductors, where parts of the Fermi surface are destroyed, this log singularity is suppressed, raising the question of how pairing occurs in the absence of a Fermi sea. Here we report Hubbard model numerical results and the analysis of angular-resolved photoemission experiments on a cuprate superconductor. In contrast to the traditional theory, we find that in the pseudogap regime the pairing instability arises from an increase in the strength of the spin–fluctuation pairing interaction as the temperature decreases rather than the Cooper log instability. PMID:27312569

  7. Absence of thermalization in a Fermi liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maraga, Anna; Silva, Alessandro; Fabrizio, Michele

    2014-10-01

    We study a weak interaction quench in a three-dimensional Fermi gas. We first show that, under some general assumptions on time-dependent perturbation theory, the perturbative expansion of the long-wavelength structure factor S (q ) is not compatible with the hypothesis that steady-state averages correspond to thermal ones. In particular, S (q ) does develop an analytical component ˜const +O (q2) at q →0 , as implied by thermalization, but, in contrast, it maintains a nonanalytic part ˜|q | characteristic of a Fermi liquid at zero-temperature. In real space, this nonanalyticity corresponds to persisting power-law decaying density-density correlations, whereas thermalization would predict only an exponential decay. We next consider the case of a dilute gas, where one can obtain nonperturbative results in the interaction strength but at lowest order in the density. We find that in the steady state the momentum distribution jump at the Fermi surface remains finite, though smaller than in equilibrium, up to second order in kFf0 , where f0 is the scattering length of two particles in the vacuum. Both results question the emergence of a finite length scale in the quench dynamics as expected by thermalization.

  8. A Probabilistic Analysis of the Fermi Paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomonides, Evan; Terzian, Yervant

    2016-06-01

    The Fermi paradox uses an appeal to the mediocrity principle to make it seem counterintuitive that humanity has not been contacted by extraterrestrial intelligence. A numerical, statistical analysis was conducted to determine whether this apparent loneliness is, in fact, unexpected. An inequality was derived to relate the frequency of life arising and developing technology on a suitable planet in the galaxy; the average length of time since the first broadcast of such a civilization; and a constant term. An analysis of the sphere reached thus far by human communication was also conducted, considering our local neighborhood and planets of particular interest. These analyses both conclude that the Fermi paradox is not, in fact, unexpected. By the mediocrity principle and numerical modeling, it is actually unlikely that the Earth would have been reached by extraterrestrial communication at this point. We predict that under 1% of the galaxy has been reached at all thus far, and we do not anticipate to be reached until approximately 50% of stars/planets have been reached. We offer a prediction that we should not expect this until at least 1,500 years in the future. Thus the Fermi paradox is not a shocking observation- or lack thereof- and humanity may very well be contacted within our species’ lifespan (we can begin to expect to be contacted 1,500 years in the future).

  9. Pairing in a dry Fermi sea

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Maier, Thomas A.; Staar, Peter; Mishra, V.; Chatterjee, Utpal; Campuzano, J. C.; Scalapino, Douglas J.

    2016-06-17

    In the traditional Bardeen–Cooper–Schrieffer theory of superconductivity, the amplitude for the propagation of a pair of electrons with momentum k and -k has a log singularity as the temperature decreases. This so-called Cooper instability arises from the presence of an electron Fermi sea. It means that an attractive interaction, no matter how weak, will eventually lead to a pairing instability. However, in the pseudogap regime of the cuprate superconductors, where parts of the Fermi surface are destroyed, this log singularity is suppressed, raising the question of how pairing occurs in the absence of a Fermi sea. In this paper, wemore » report Hubbard model numerical results and the analysis of angular-resolved photoemission experiments on a cuprate superconductor. Finally, in contrast to the traditional theory, we find that in the pseudogap regime the pairing instability arises from an increase in the strength of the spin–fluctuation pairing interaction as the temperature decreases rather than the Cooper log instability.« less

  10. Fermi/GBM Results of Magnetars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouveliotou, chryssa

    2011-01-01

    Magnetars are magnetically powered rotating neutron stars with extreme magnetic fields (over 10(exp 14) Gauss). They were discovered in the X- and gamma-rays where they predominantly emit their radiation. Very few sources (roughly 18) have been found since their discovery in 1987. NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope was launched June 11,2009; since then the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) recorded emission from four magnetar sources. Two of these were brand new sources, SGR J0501 +4516, discovered with Swift and extensively monitored with Swift and GBM, SGR J0418+5729, discovered with GBM and the Interplanetary Network (IPN). A third was SGR Jl550-5418, a source originally classified as an Anomalous X-ray Pulsar (AXP IEI547.0-5408), but exhibiting a very prolific outburst with over 400 events recorded in January 2009. In my talk I will give a short history of magnetars and describe how this, once relatively esoteric field, has emerged as a link between several astrophysical areas including Gamma-Ray Bursts. Finally, I will describe the exciting new results of Fermi in this field and the current status of our knowledge of the magnetar population properties and magnetic fields.

  11. Cinema, Fermi problems and general education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efthimiou, C. J.; Llewellyn, R. A.

    2007-05-01

    During the past few years the authors have developed a new approach to the teaching of physical science, a general education course typically found in the curricula of nearly every college and university. This approach, called Physics in Films (Efthimiou and Llewellyn 2006 Phys. Teach. 44 28-33), uses scenes from popular films to illustrate physical principles and has excited student interest and improved student performance. A similar approach at the senior/high-school level, nicknamed Hollywood Physics, has been developed by Chandler (2006 Phys. Teach. 44 290-2 2002 Phys. Teach. 40 420-4). The two approaches may be considered complementary as they target different student groups. The analyses of many of the scenes in Physics in Films are a direct application of Fermi calculations—estimates and approximations designed to make solutions of complex and seemingly intractable problems understandable to the student non-specialist. The intent of this paper is to provide instructors with examples they can use to develop skill in recognizing Fermi problems and making Fermi calculations in their own courses.

  12. Fermi edge singularity in a tunnel junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jin; Sherkunov, Yury; D'Ambrumenil, Nicholas; Muzykantskii, Boris

    2010-03-01

    We present results on the non-equilibrium Fermi edge singularity (FES) problem in tunnel junctions. The FES, which is present in a Fermi gas subject to any sudden change of potential, manifests itself in the final state many body interaction between the electrons in the leads [1]. We establish a connection between the FES problem in a tunnel junction and the Full Counting Statistics (FCS) for the device [2]. We find that the exact profile of the changing potential (or the profile for the barrier opening and closing in the tunnel junction case) strongly affects the overlap between the initial and final state of the Fermi gas. We factorize the contribution to the FES into two approximately independent terms: one is connected with the short time opening process while the other is concerned with the long time asymptotic effect, namely the Anderson orthogonality catastrophe. We consider applications to a localized level coupled through a tunnel barrier to a 1D lead driven out of equilibrium [3]. References: [1] G. Mahan, Phys. Rev. 163, 1612 (1967); P. Nozieres and C. T. De Dominicis, Phys. Rev. 178, 1079 (1969); P. Anderson, Phys. Rev. Lett. 18, 1049 (1967) [2] J. Zhang, Y. Sherkunov, N. d'Ambrumenil, and B. Muzykantskii, ArXiv:0909.3427 [3] D. Abanin and L. Levitov, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 186803 (2005)

  13. The TeraFERMI terahertz source at the seeded FERMI free-electron-laser facility

    SciTech Connect

    Perucchi, A.; Di Mitri, S.; Penco, G.; Allaria, E.; Lupi, S.

    2013-02-15

    We describe the project for the construction of a terahertz (THz) beamline to be called TeraFERMI at the seeded FERMI free electron laser (FEL) facility in Trieste, Italy. We discuss topics as the underlying scientific case, the choice of the source, the expected performance, and THz beam propagation. Through electron beam dynamics simulations we show that the installation of the THz source in the beam dump section provides a new approach for compressing the electron bunch length without affecting FEL operation. Thanks to this further compression of the FEL electron bunch, the TeraFERMI facility is expected to provide THz pulses with energies up to the mJ range during normal FEL operation.

  14. The TeraFERMI terahertz source at the seeded FERMI free-electron-laser facility.

    PubMed

    Perucchi, A; Di Mitri, S; Penco, G; Allaria, E; Lupi, S

    2013-02-01

    We describe the project for the construction of a terahertz (THz) beamline to be called TeraFERMI at the seeded FERMI free electron laser (FEL) facility in Trieste, Italy. We discuss topics as the underlying scientific case, the choice of the source, the expected performance, and THz beam propagation. Through electron beam dynamics simulations we show that the installation of the THz source in the beam dump section provides a new approach for compressing the electron bunch length without affecting FEL operation. Thanks to this further compression of the FEL electron bunch, the TeraFERMI facility is expected to provide THz pulses with energies up to the mJ range during normal FEL operation. PMID:23464184

  15. Frustration and time-reversal symmetry breaking for Fermi and Bose-Fermi systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacha, Krzysztof; Targońska, Katarzyna; Zakrzewski, Jakub

    2012-05-01

    The modulation of an optical lattice potential that breaks time-reversal symmetry enables the realization of complex tunneling amplitudes in the corresponding tight-binding model. For a superfluid Fermi gas in a triangular lattice potential with complex tunnelings, the pairing function acquires a complex phase, so the frustrated magnetism of fermions can be realized. Bose-Fermi mixtures of bosonic molecules and unbound fermions in the lattice also show interesting behavior. Due to boson-fermion coupling, the fermions become enslaved by the bosons and the corresponding pairing function takes the complex phase determined by the bosons. In the presence of bosons the Fermi system can reveal both gapped and gapless superfluidity.

  16. Virial expansion for a strongly correlated Fermi system and its application to ultracold atomic Fermi gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xia-Ji

    2013-03-01

    A strongly correlated Fermi system plays a fundamental role in very different areas of physics, from neutron stars, quark-gluon plasmas, to high temperature superconductors. Despite the broad applicability, it is notoriously difficult to be understood theoretically because of the absence of a small interaction parameter. Recent achievements of ultracold trapped Fermi atoms near a Feshbach resonance have ushered in enormous changes. The unprecedented control of interaction, geometry and purity in these novel systems has led to many exciting experimental results, which are to be urgently understood at both low and finite temperatures. Here we review the latest developments of virial expansion for a strongly correlated Fermi gas and their applications on ultracold trapped Fermi atoms. We show remarkable, quantitative agreements between virial predictions and various recent experimental measurements at about the Fermi degenerate temperature. For equations of state, we discuss a practical way of determining high-order virial coefficients and use it to calculate accurately the long-sought third-order virial coefficient, which is now verified firmly in experiments at ENS and MIT. We discuss also virial expansion of a new many-body parameter-Tan’s contact. We then turn to less widely discussed issues of dynamical properties. For dynamic structure factors, the virial prediction agrees well with the measurement at the Swinburne University of Technology. For single-particle spectral functions, we show that the expansion up to the second order accounts for the main feature of momentum-resolved rf-spectroscopy for a resonantly interacting Fermi gas, as recently reported by JILA. In the near future, more practical applications with virial expansion are possible, owing to the ever-growing power in computation.

  17. Fermi Arcs vs. Fermi Pockets in Electron-doped Perovskite Iridates

    PubMed Central

    He, Junfeng; Hafiz, H.; Mion, Thomas R.; Hogan, T.; Dhital, C.; Chen, X.; Lin, Qisen; Hashimoto, M.; Lu, D. H.; Zhang, Y.; Markiewicz, R. S.; Bansil, A.; Wilson, S. D.; He, Rui-Hua

    2015-01-01

    We report on an angle resolved photoemission (ARPES) study of bulk electron-doped perovskite iridate, (Sr1−xLax)3Ir2O7. Fermi surface pockets are observed with a total electron count in keeping with that expected from La substitution. Depending on the energy and polarization of the incident photons, these pockets show up in the form of disconnected “Fermi arcs”, reminiscent of those reported recently in surface electron-doped Sr2IrO4. Our observed spectral variation is consistent with the coexistence of an electronic supermodulation with structural distortion in the system. PMID:25704850

  18. Fermi arcs vs. fermi pockets in electron-doped perovskite iridates

    DOE PAGESBeta

    He, Junfeng; Hafiz, H.; Mion, Thomas R.; Hogan, T.; Dhital, C.; Chen, X.; Lin, Qisen; Hashimoto, M.; Lu, D. H.; Zhang, Y.; et al

    2015-02-23

    We report on an angle resolved photoemission (ARPES) study of bulk electron-doped perovskite iridate, (Sr1-xLax)₃Ir₂O₇. Fermi surface pockets are observed with a total electron count in keeping with that expected from La substitution. Depending on the energy and polarization of the incident photons, these pockets show up in the form of disconnected “Fermi arcs”, reminiscent of those reported recently in surface electron-doped Sr₂IrO₄. Our observed spectral variation is consistent with the coexistence of an electronic supermodulation with structural distortion in the system.

  19. Fermi arcs vs. fermi pockets in electron-doped perovskite iridates

    SciTech Connect

    He, Junfeng; Hafiz, H.; Mion, Thomas R.; Hogan, T.; Dhital, C.; Chen, X.; Lin, Qisen; Hashimoto, M.; Lu, D. H.; Zhang, Y.; Markiewicz, R. S.; Bansil, A.; Wilson, S. D.; He, Rui -Hua

    2015-02-23

    We report on an angle resolved photoemission (ARPES) study of bulk electron-doped perovskite iridate, (Sr1-xLax)₃Ir₂O₇. Fermi surface pockets are observed with a total electron count in keeping with that expected from La substitution. Depending on the energy and polarization of the incident photons, these pockets show up in the form of disconnected “Fermi arcs”, reminiscent of those reported recently in surface electron-doped Sr₂IrO₄. Our observed spectral variation is consistent with the coexistence of an electronic supermodulation with structural distortion in the system.

  20. Fermi Surface Evolution and Luttinger Theorem in NaxCoO2: A Systematic Photoemission Study

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, H. B.; Pan, Z. H.; Sekharan, A. K. P.; Sato, T.; Souma, S.; Takahashi, T.; Jin, Rongying; Sales, Brian C; Mandrus, David; Fedorov, A. V.; Wang, Z.; Ding, H.

    2005-01-01

    We report a systematic angle-resolved photoemission study on Na{sub x}CoO{sub 2} for a wide range of Na concentrations (0.3 {le} x {le} 0.72). In all the metallic samples at different x, we observed (i) only a single holelike Fermi surface centered around {Gamma} and (ii) its area changes with x according to the Luttinger theorem. We also observed a surface state that exhibits a larger Fermi surface area. The e{prime}{sub g} band and the associated small Fermi surface pockets near the K points predicted by band calculations are found to sink below the Fermi energy in a manner almost independent of the doping and temperature.

  1. Mechanism of Fermi-level stabilization in semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Walukiewicz, W.

    1988-03-15

    A striking correlation between the Fermi-level in heavily radiation damaged semiconductors and at metal-semiconductor interfaces is presented. The correlation provides critical evidence supporting the defect model for Schottky-barrier formation. The Fermi-level energy for both situations corresponds to the average energy of the sp/sup 3/ hybrid. In the case of GaAs, a detailed description of the Fermi-level stabilization caused by amphoteric dangling-bond-like defects is given

  2. Transport phenomena in correlated quantum liquids: Ultracold Fermi gases and F/N junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hua

    Landau Fermi-liquid theory was first introduced by L. D. Landau in the effort of understanding the normal state of Fermi systems, where the application of the concept of elementary excitations to the Fermi systems has proved very fruitful in clarifying the physics of strongly correlated quantum systems at low temperatures. In this thesis, I use Landau Fermi-liquid theory to study the transport phenomena of two different correlated quantum liquids: the strongly interacting ultracold Fermi gases and the ferromagnet/normal-metal (F/N) junctions. The detailed work is presented in chapter II and chapter III of this thesis, respectively. Chapter I holds the introductory part and the background knowledge of this thesis. In chapter II, I study the transport properties of a Fermi gas with strong attractive interactions close to the unitary limit. In particular, I compute the transport lifetimes of the Fermi gas due to superfluid fluctuations above the BCS transition temperature Tc. To calculate the transport lifetimes I need the scattering amplitudes. The scattering amplitudes are dominated by the superfluid fluctuations at temperatures just above Tc. The normal scattering amplitudes are calculated from the Landau parameters. These Landau parameters are obtained from the local version of the induced interaction model for computing Landau parameters. I also calculate the leading order finite temperature corrections to the various transport lifetimes. A calculation of the spin diffusion coefficient is presented in comparison to the experimental findings. Upon choosing a proper value of F0a, I am able to present a good match between the theoretical result and the experimental measurement, which indicates the presence of the superfluid fluctuations near Tc. Calculations of the viscosity, the viscosity/entropy ratio and the thermal conductivity are also shown in support of the appearance of the superfluid fluctuations. In chapter III, I study the spin transport in the low

  3. Fermi Large Area Telescope Third Source Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acero, F.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Albert, A.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Belfiore, A.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bogart, J. R.; Bonino, R.; Bottacini, E.; Bregeon, J.; Britto, R. J.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Burnett, T. H.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caputo, R.; Caragiulo, M.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cavazzuti, E.; Charles, E.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Chekhtman, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cominsky, L. R.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; DeKlotz, M.; de Palma, F.; Desiante, R.; Digel, S. W.; Di Venere, L.; Drell, P. S.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Finke, J.; Franckowiak, A.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Giebels, B.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grove, J. E.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Harding, A. K.; Hays, E.; Hewitt, J. W.; Hill, A. B.; Horan, D.; Iafrate, G.; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, R. P.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, T. J.; Johnson, W. N.; Kamae, T.; Kataoka, J.; Katsuta, J.; Kuss, M.; La Mura, G.; Landriu, D.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Li, J.; Li, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Madejski, G. M.; Massaro, F.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; Michelson, P. F.; Mirabal, N.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Mongelli, M.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nuss, E.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Racusin, J. L.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reposeur, T.; Rochester, L. S.; Romani, R. W.; Salvetti, D.; Sánchez-Conde, M.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Schulz, A.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, D. A.; Spada, F.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Stephens, T. E.; Strong, A. W.; Suson, D. J.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, T.; Tanaka, Y.; Thayer, J. G.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Tibolla, O.; Torres, D. F.; Torresi, E.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Van Klaveren, B.; Vianello, G.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.; Zimmer, S.; Fermi-LAT Collaboration

    2015-06-01

    We present the third Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) source catalog (3FGL) of sources in the 100 MeV-300 GeV range. Based on the first 4 yr of science data from the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope mission, it is the deepest yet in this energy range. Relative to the Second Fermi LAT catalog, the 3FGL catalog incorporates twice as much data, as well as a number of analysis improvements, including improved calibrations at the event reconstruction level, an updated model for Galactic diffuse γ-ray emission, a refined procedure for source detection, and improved methods for associating LAT sources with potential counterparts at other wavelengths. The 3FGL catalog includes 3033 sources above 4σ significance, with source location regions, spectral properties, and monthly light curves for each. Of these, 78 are flagged as potentially being due to imperfections in the model for Galactic diffuse emission. Twenty-five sources are modeled explicitly as spatially extended, and overall 238 sources are considered as identified based on angular extent or correlated variability (periodic or otherwise) observed at other wavelengths. For 1010 sources we have not found plausible counterparts at other wavelengths. More than 1100 of the identified or associated sources are active galaxies of the blazar class; several other classes of non-blazar active galaxies are also represented in the 3FGL. Pulsars represent the largest Galactic source class. From source counts of Galactic sources we estimate that the contribution of unresolved sources to the Galactic diffuse emission is ˜3% at 1 GeV.

  4. Decoherence of Impurities in a Fermi Sea of Ultracold Atoms.

    PubMed

    Cetina, Marko; Jag, Michael; Lous, Rianne S; Walraven, Jook T M; Grimm, Rudolf; Christensen, Rasmus S; Bruun, Georg M

    2015-09-25

    We investigate the decoherence of ^{40}K impurities interacting with a three-dimensional Fermi sea of ^{6}Li across an interspecies Feshbach resonance. The decoherence is measured as a function of the interaction strength and temperature using a spin-echo atom interferometry method. For weak to moderate interaction strengths, we interpret our measurements in terms of scattering of K quasiparticles by the Fermi sea and find very good agreement with a Fermi liquid calculation. For strong interactions, we observe significant enhancement of the decoherence rate, which is largely independent of temperature, pointing to behavior that is beyond the scattering of quasiparticles in the Fermi liquid picture. PMID:26451562

  5. Observation strategies with the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEnery, Julie E.; Fermi mission Teams

    2015-01-01

    During the first few years of the Fermi mission, the default observation mode has been an all-sky survey, optimized to provide relatively uniform coverage of the entire sky every three hours. Over 95% of the mission has been performed in this observation mode. However, Fermi is capable of flexible survey mode patterns, and inertially pointed observations both of which allow increased coverage of selected parts of the sky. In this presentation, we will describe the types of observations that Fermi can make, the relative advantages and disadvantages of various observations, and provide guidelines to help Fermi users plan and evaluate non-standard observations.

  6. Evolution of electron Fermi surface with doping in cobaltates.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xixiao; Lan, Yu; Qin, Ling; Kuang, Lülin; Feng, Shiping

    2016-08-24

    The notion of the electron Fermi surface is one of the characteristic concepts in the field of condensed matter physics, and it plays a crucial role in the understanding of the physical properties of doped Mott insulators. Based on the t-J model, we study the nature of the electron Fermi surface in the cobaltates, and qualitatively reproduce the essential feature of the evolution of the electron Fermi surface with doping. It is shown that the underlying hexagonal electron Fermi surface obeys Luttinger's theorem. The theory also predicts a Fermi-arc phenomenon at the low-doped regime, where the region of the hexagonal electron Fermi surface along the [Formula: see text]-K direction is suppressed by the electron self-energy, and then six disconnected Fermi arcs located at the region of the hexagonal electron Fermi surface along the [Formula: see text]-M direction emerge. However, this Fermi-arc phenomenon at the low-doped regime weakens with the increase of doping. PMID:27351111

  7. Evolution of electron Fermi surface with doping in cobaltates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xixiao; Lan, Yu; Qin, Ling; Kuang, Lülin; Feng, Shiping

    2016-08-01

    The notion of the electron Fermi surface is one of the characteristic concepts in the field of condensed matter physics, and it plays a crucial role in the understanding of the physical properties of doped Mott insulators. Based on the t-J model, we study the nature of the electron Fermi surface in the cobaltates, and qualitatively reproduce the essential feature of the evolution of the electron Fermi surface with doping. It is shown that the underlying hexagonal electron Fermi surface obeys Luttinger’s theorem. The theory also predicts a Fermi-arc phenomenon at the low-doped regime, where the region of the hexagonal electron Fermi surface along the Γ -K direction is suppressed by the electron self-energy, and then six disconnected Fermi arcs located at the region of the hexagonal electron Fermi surface along the Γ -M direction emerge. However, this Fermi-arc phenomenon at the low-doped regime weakens with the increase of doping.

  8. Decoherence of Impurities in a Fermi Sea of Ultracold Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cetina, Marko; Jag, Michael; Lous, Rianne S.; Walraven, Jook T. M.; Grimm, Rudolf; Christensen, Rasmus S.; Bruun, Georg M.

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the decoherence of 40K impurities interacting with a three-dimensional Fermi sea of 6Li across an interspecies Feshbach resonance. The decoherence is measured as a function of the interaction strength and temperature using a spin-echo atom interferometry method. For weak to moderate interaction strengths, we interpret our measurements in terms of scattering of K quasiparticles by the Fermi sea and find very good agreement with a Fermi liquid calculation. For strong interactions, we observe significant enhancement of the decoherence rate, which is largely independent of temperature, pointing to behavior that is beyond the scattering of quasiparticles in the Fermi liquid picture.

  9. Nonlocal Poisson-Fermi model for ionic solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Dexuan; Liu, Jinn-Liang; Eisenberg, Bob

    2016-07-01

    We propose a nonlocal Poisson-Fermi model for ionic solvent that includes ion size effects and polarization correlations among water molecules in the calculation of electrostatic potential. It includes the previous Poisson-Fermi models as special cases, and its solution is the convolution of a solution of the corresponding nonlocal Poisson dielectric model with a Yukawa-like kernel function. The Fermi distribution is shown to be a set of optimal ionic concentration functions in the sense of minimizing an electrostatic potential free energy. Numerical results are reported to show the difference between a Poisson-Fermi solution and a corresponding Poisson solution.

  10. Nonlocal Poisson-Fermi model for ionic solvent.

    PubMed

    Xie, Dexuan; Liu, Jinn-Liang; Eisenberg, Bob

    2016-07-01

    We propose a nonlocal Poisson-Fermi model for ionic solvent that includes ion size effects and polarization correlations among water molecules in the calculation of electrostatic potential. It includes the previous Poisson-Fermi models as special cases, and its solution is the convolution of a solution of the corresponding nonlocal Poisson dielectric model with a Yukawa-like kernel function. The Fermi distribution is shown to be a set of optimal ionic concentration functions in the sense of minimizing an electrostatic potential free energy. Numerical results are reported to show the difference between a Poisson-Fermi solution and a corresponding Poisson solution. PMID:27575084

  11. Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McEnery, Julie E.; Michelson, Peter F.; Paclesas, William S.; Ritz, Steven

    2012-01-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, launched in June 2008, is an observatory designed to survey the high-energy gamma-ray sky. The primary instrument, the Large Area Telescope (LAT), provides observations from 20 MeV to greater than 300 GeV. A second instrument, the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM), provides observations of transients from less than 10 keV to 40 MeV. We describe the design and performance of the instruments and their subsystems, the spacecraft and the ground system.

  12. Fermi GBM: Highlights from the First Year

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.

    2009-01-01

    The Fermi Gamma ray Burst Monitor is an all-sky instrument sensitive to photons from about 8 keV to 40 MeV. I will summarize highlights from the first year, including triggered observations of gamma ray bursts, soft gamma ray repeaters, and terrestrial gamma flashes, and observations in the continuous data of X-ray binaries and accreting X-ray pulsars. GBM provides complementary observations to Swift/BAT, observing many of the same sources, but over a wider energy range.

  13. Fermi matrix element with isospin breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guichon, P. A. M.; Thomas, A. W.; Saito, K.

    2011-02-01

    Prompted by the level of accuracy now being achieved in tests of the unitarity of the CKM matrix, we consider the possible modification of the Fermi matrix element for the β-decay of a neutron, including possible in-medium and isospin violating corrections. While the nuclear modifications lead to very small corrections once the Behrends-Sirlin-Ademollo-Gatto theorem is respected, the effect of the u-d mass difference on the conclusion concerning Vud is no longer insignificant. Indeed, we suggest that the correction to the value of |+|+| is at the level of 10.

  14. Enhancing Fermi's Capability for Time Domain Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEnery, Julie E.; Fermi-LAT Team

    2016-01-01

    All sky monitors, such as the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope, play a crucial role in detecting transient and variable non-thermal sources for follow up observations by narrow field observatories. In this poster, we describe recent and upcoming improvements in onboard processing, ground analysis pipelines and observatory operations that will to increase the sensitivity to these objects on timescales of seconds to days and reduce the latency for the information to be disseminated to the scientific community. Finally, we will provide examples of some of the expected science returns from these improvements.

  15. Fermi-LAT Observations of Galactic Transients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the observations of Galactic transients by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope. The LAT is producing spectacular results for the GeV transient sky, some of which are shown and reviewed. Some of the results in the GeV range that are discussed in this presentation are: (1) New blazars and unidentified transients (2) the jet of the Cygnus X-3 microquasar (3) gamma rays from V407 Cygni nova (4) Fast high-energy gamma-ray flares from the Crab Nebula

  16. Optical Observations Of Fermi LAT Monitored Blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Kyle; Carini, M. T.

    2009-01-01

    For the past 8 years the Bell Observatory at Western Kentucky University has been conducting R band monitoring of the variability of approximately 50 Blazars. A subset of these objects are being routinely observed with the LAT instrument on-board the Fermi Space Telescope. Adding the Robotically Controlled Telescope (RCT) at Kitt Peak National Observatory and observations with the AZT-11 telescope at the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory (CRAO), we are intensively monitoring the Blazars on the Lat monitoring list. We present the results of our long term monitoring of the LAT monitored Blazars, as well as the recent contemporaneous optical R band observations we have obtained of the LAT Blazars.

  17. Fermi GBM Observations of Terrestrial Gamma Flashes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Briggs, M. S.; Connaughton, V.; Fishman, G. J.; Bhat, P. N.; Paciesas, W. S.; Preece, R. D.; Kippen, R. M.; vonKienlin, A.; Dwyer, J. R.; Smith, D. M.; Holzworth, R.

    2010-01-01

    In its first two years of operation, the Fermi Gamma Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has observed 79 Terrestrial Gamma Flashes (TGFs). The thick Bismuth Germanate (BGO) detectors are excellent for TGF spectroscopy, having a high probability of recording the full energy of an incident photon, spanning a broad energy range from 150 keV to 40 MeV, and recording a large number of photons per TGF. Correlations between GBM TGF triggers and lightning sferics detected with the World-Wide Lightning Location Network indicate that TGFs and lightning are simultaneous to within tens of microseconds.

  18. Quasicondensation in Two-Dimensional Fermi Gases.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chien-Te; Anderson, Brandon M; Boyack, Rufus; Levin, K

    2015-12-11

    In this paper we follow the analysis and protocols of recent experiments, combined with simple theory, to arrive at a physical understanding of quasi-condensation in two dimensional Fermi gases. A key signature of quasi-condensation, which contains aspects of Berezinskiĭ-Kosterlitz-Thouless behavior, is a strong zero momentum peak in the pair momentum distribution. Importantly, this peak emerges at a reasonably well defined onset temperature. The resulting phase diagram, pair momentum distribution, and algebraic power law decay are compatible with recent experiments throughout the continuum from BEC to BCS. PMID:26705613

  19. Superfluidity of ultracold atomic gases of Fermi-Fermi mixtures on an optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jibiao; Chen, Qijin

    Superfluidity of ultracold atomic gases of Fermi-Fermi mixtures has been under active investigation recently. Experimentally, mixtures of 6Li-40K, 171Yb-173Yband6Li-173Yb, for example, have been prepared and cooled down to the quantum degeneracy regime, making the superfluid phase accessible in the near future. In this talk, we will address the superfluidity of ultracold Fermi-Fermi mixtures on 1D through 3D optical lattices, with varying mass and population imbalances and different densities, as they undergo BCS-BEC crossover, within a pairing fluctuation theory which includes self-consistently the important pseudogap effects at finite temperatures. We will present various phase diagrams and show the dramatic combined effects of mass and population imbalances and lattice periodicity. Implications for future experiment will be discussed. References: [1]Q. J. Chen, I. Kosztin, B. Janko, and K. Levin, Phys. Rev. B 59, 7083 (1999). [2] C. -C. Chien, Y. He, Q. J. Chen, and K. Levin, Phys. Rev. A 77, 011601(R) (2008). [3] C. -C. Chien, Q. J. Chen, and K. Levin, Phys. Rev. A 78, 043612 (2008). [4] Q. J. Chen, Phys. Rev. A 86, 023610 (2012). Work supported by NSF of China and the National Basic Research Program of China.

  20. Atomic Fermi-Bose Mixtures in Inhomogeneous and Random Lattices: From Fermi Glass to Quantum Spin Glass and Quantum Percolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanpera, A.; Kantian, A.; Sanchez-Palencia, L.; Zakrzewski, J.; Lewenstein, M.

    2004-07-01

    We investigate strongly interacting atomic Fermi-Bose mixtures in inhomogeneous and random optical lattices. We derive an effective Hamiltonian for the system and discuss its low temperature physics. We demonstrate the possibility of controlling the interactions at local level in inhomogeneous but regular lattices. Such a control leads to the achievement of Fermi glass, quantum Fermi spin-glass, and quantum percolation regimes involving bare and/or composite fermions in random lattices.

  1. Fermi LAT Observations of LS 5039

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, A.A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Atwood, W.B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Baughman, B.M.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R.D.; Bloom, E.D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A.W.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; /more authors..

    2012-03-29

    The first results from observations of the high-mass X-ray binary LS 5039 using the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope data between 2008 August and 2009 June are presented. Our results indicate variability that is consistent with the binary period, with the emission being modulated with a period of 3.903 {+-} 0.005 days; the first detection of this modulation at GeV energies. The light curve is characterized by a broad peak around superior conjunction in agreement with inverse Compton scattering models. The spectrum is represented by a power law with an exponential cutoff, yielding an overall flux (100 MeV-300 GeV) of 4.9 {+-} 0.5(stat) {+-} 1.8(syst) x 10{sup -7} photon cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, with a cutoff at 2.1 {+-} 0.3(stat) {+-} 1.1(syst) GeV and photon index {Gamma} = 1.9 {+-} 0.1(stat) {+-} 0.3(syst). The spectrum is observed to vary with orbital phase, specifically between inferior and superior conjunction. We suggest that the presence of a cutoff in the spectrum may be indicative of magnetospheric emission similar to the emission seen in many pulsars by Fermi.

  2. Fermi (nee GLAST) at Six Months

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritz, Steve

    2009-01-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, formerly called GLAST, is a mission to measure the cosmic gamma-ray flux in the energy range 20 MeV to >300 GeV, with supporting measurements for gamma-ray bursts from 8 keV to 30 MeV. In addition to breakthrough capabilities in energy coverage and localization, the very large field of view enables observations of 20% of the sky at any instant, and the entire sky on a timescale of a few hours. With its recent launch on 11 June 2008, Fermi now opens a new and important window on a wide variety of phenomena, including pulsars, black holes and active galactic nuclei, gamma-ray bursts, the origin of cosmic rays and supernova remnants, and searches for hypothetical new phenomena such as supersymmetric dark matter annihilations. In addition to early results and the science opportunities, this talk includes a description of the instruments and the mission status and plans.

  3. Fermi (Formerly GLAST) at Six Months

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritz, Steven M.

    2009-01-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, formerly called GLAST, is a mission to measure the cosmic gamma-ray flux in the energy range 20 MeV to more than 300 GeV, with supporting measurements for gamma-ray bursts from 8 keV to 30 MeV. In addition to breakthrough capabilities in energy coverage and localization, the very large field of view enables observations of 20% of the sky at any instant, and the entire sky on a timescale of a few hours. With its recent launch on 11 June 2008, Fermi now opens a new and important window on a wide variety of phenomena, including pulsars, black holes and active galactic nuclei, gamma-ray bursts, the origin of cosmic rays and supernova remnants, and searches for hypothetical new phenomena such as supersymmetric dark matter annihilations. In addition to early results and the science opportunities, this talk includes a description of the instruments and the mission status and plans.

  4. Parity effect in a mesoscopic Fermi gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Johannes; Lobos, Alejandro M.; Galitski, Victor

    2016-06-01

    We develop a quantitative analytic theory that accurately describes the odd-even effect observed experimentally in a one-dimensional, trapped Fermi gas with a small number of particles [G. Zürn et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 175302 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.175302]. We find that the underlying physics is similar to the parity effect known to exist in ultrasmall mesoscopic superconducting grains and atomic nuclei. However, in contrast to superconducting nanograins, the density (Hartree) correction dominates over the superconducting pairing fluctuations and leads to a much more pronounced odd-even effect in the mesoscopic, trapped Fermi gas. We calculate the corresponding parity parameter and separation energy using both perturbation theory and a path integral framework in the mesoscopic limit, generalized to account for the effects of the trap, pairing fluctuations, and Hartree corrections. Our results are in an excellent quantitative agreement with experimental data and exact diagonalization. Finally, we discuss a few-particle to many-particle crossover between the perturbative mesoscopic regime and nonperturbative many-body physics that the system approaches in the thermodynamic limit.

  5. Lasing in Bose-Fermi mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Kochereshko, Vladimir P.; Durnev, Mikhail V.; Besombes, Lucien; Mariette, Henri; Sapega, Victor F.; Askitopoulos, Alexis; Savenko, Ivan G.; Liew, Timothy C. H.; Shelykh, Ivan A.; Platonov, Alexey V.; Tsintzos, Simeon I.; Hatzopoulos, Z.; Savvidis, Pavlos G.; Kalevich, Vladimir K.; Afanasiev, Mikhail M.; Lukoshkin, Vladimir A.; Schneider, Christian; Amthor, Matthias; Metzger, Christian; Kamp, Martin; Hoefling, Sven; Lagoudakis, Pavlos; Kavokin, Alexey

    2016-01-01

    Light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation, well-known for revolutionising photonic science, has been realised primarily in fermionic systems including widely applied diode lasers. The prerequisite for fermionic lasing is the inversion of electronic population, which governs the lasing threshold. More recently, bosonic lasers have also been developed based on Bose-Einstein condensates of exciton-polaritons in semiconductor microcavities. These electrically neutral bosons coexist with charged electrons and holes. In the presence of magnetic fields, the charged particles are bound to their cyclotron orbits, while the neutral exciton-polaritons move freely. We demonstrate how magnetic fields affect dramatically the phase diagram of mixed Bose-Fermi systems, switching between fermionic lasing, incoherent emission and bosonic lasing regimes in planar and pillar microcavities with optical and electrical pumping. We collected and analyzed the data taken on pillar and planar microcavity structures at continuous wave and pulsed optical excitation as well as injecting electrons and holes electronically. Our results evidence the transition from a Bose gas to a Fermi liquid mediated by magnetic fields and light-matter coupling. PMID:26822483

  6. Ther FERMI FEL project at TRIESTE

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, R.P.; Bulfone, D.; Cargnello, F.

    1995-12-31

    The goal of the FERMI project - Free Electron Radiation and Matching Instrumentation - is to construct a new user facility for FEL radiation beams covering a broad spectral range (2-250 {mu}m) to complement the high brightness VUV/Soft-Xray radiation available from the ELETTRA synchrotron radiation facility at Trieste. A unique feature of the project will be the possibility of carrying out {open_quote}pump-probe{close_quote} experiments using synchronized radiation beams from FERMI and ELETTRA on the same sample. The project was launched at a meeting with Italian FEL experts held in Trieste on the 18th November 1994, chaired by C. Rubbia, as a collaboration between Sincrotrone Trieste, ENEA (Frascati), INFN (Frascati) and the University of Naples (Department of Electronic Engineering). The facility will make use of an existing linac, that forms part of the ELETTRA injection system, and a hall into which the beam can be extracted. In addition, for the first phase of the project equipment will be used from the suspended INFN/ENEA {open_quote}SURF{close_quote} FEL experiment, including the undulator, beam transport magnets and optical cavity. In this first International FEL Conference report on the project, we summarize the main features of the project, concentrating in particular on the most recent activities, including: results of measurements of the linac beam in the FEL mode of operation, further studies of the electron beam transport system including possibilities for bunch length manipulations, and further numerical calculations of the FEL performance.

  7. The first Fermi LAT supernova remnant catalog

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Acero, F.

    2016-05-16

    To uniformly determine the properties of supernova remnants (SNRs) at high energies, we have developed the first systematic survey at energies from 1 to 100 GeV using data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope. Based on the spatial overlap of sources detected at GeV energies with SNRs known from radio surveys, we classify 30 sources as likely GeV SNRs. We also report 14 marginal associations and 245 flux upper limits. A mock catalog in which the positions of known remnants are scrambled in Galactic longitude, allows us to determine an upper limit of 22% on the number of GeV candidatesmore » falsely identified as SNRs. We have also developed a method to estimate spectral and spatial systematic errors arising from the diffuse interstellar emission model, a key component of all Galactic Fermi LAT analyses. By studying remnants uniformly in aggregate, we measure the GeV properties common to these objects and provide a crucial context for the detailed modeling of individual SNRs. Combining our GeV results with multiwavelength (MW) data, including radio, X-ray, and TeV, demonstrates the need for improvements to previously sufficient, simple models describing the GeV and radio emission from these objects. As a result, we model the GeV and MW emission from SNRs in aggregate to constrain their maximal contribution to observed Galactic cosmic rays.« less

  8. Spiraling Fermi arcs in Weyl materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Songci; Andreev, Anton

    In Weyl materials the valence and conduction electron bands touch at an even number of isolated points in the Brillouin zone. In the vicinity of these points the electron dispersion is linear and may be described by the massless Dirac equation. This results in nontrivial topology of Berry connection curvature. One of its consequences is the existence of peculiar surface electron states whose Fermi surfaces form arcs connecting projections of the Weyl points onto the surface plane. Band bending near the boundary of the crystal also produces surface states. We show that in Weyl materials band bending near the crystal surface gives rise to spiral structure of energy surfaces of arc states. The corresponding Fermi surface has the shape of a spiral that winds about the projection of the Weyl point onto the surface plane. The direction of the winding is determined by the helicity of the Weyl point and the sign of the band bending potential. For close valleys arc state morphology may be understood in terms of avoided crossing of oppositely winding spirals. This work is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences under Award Number DE-FG02-07ER46452.

  9. Orientifolding of the ABJ Fermi gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuyama, Kazumi

    2016-03-01

    The grand partition functions of ABJ theory can be factorized into even and odd parts under the reflection of fermion coordinate in the Fermi gas approach. In some cases, the even/odd part of ABJ grand partition function is equal to that of {N}=5O(n)× USp({n}^') theory, hence it is natural to think of the even/odd projection of grand partition function as an orientifolding of ABJ Fermi gas system. By a systematic WKB analysis, we determine the coefficients in the perturbative part of grand potential of such orientifold ABJ theory. We also find the exact form of the first few "half-instanton" corrections coming from the twisted sector of the reflection of fermion coordinate. For the Chern-Simons level k = 2 ,4 ,8 we find closed form expressions of the grand partition functions of orientifold ABJ theory, and for k = 2 , 4 we prove the functional relations among the grand partition functions conjectured in arXiv:1410.7658.

  10. THE SPECTRAL INDEX PROPERTIES OF FERMI BLAZARS

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, J. H.; Yang, J. H.; Yuan, Y. H.; Wang, J.; Gao, Y.

    2012-12-20

    In this paper, a sample of 451 blazars (193 flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs), 258 BL Lacertae objects) with corresponding X-ray and Fermi {gamma}-ray data is compiled to investigate the correlation both between the X-ray spectral index and the {gamma}-ray spectral index and between the spectral index and the luminosity, and to compare the spectral indexes {alpha}{sub X}, {alpha}{sub {gamma}}, {alpha}{sub X{gamma}}, and {alpha}{sub {gamma}X{gamma}} for different subclasses. We also investigated the correlation between the X-ray and the {gamma}-ray luminosity. The following results have been obtained. Our analysis indicates that an anti-correlation exists between the X-ray and the {gamma}-ray spectral indexes for the whole sample. However, when we considered the subclasses of blazars (FSRQs, the low-peaked BL Lacertae objects (LBLs) and the high-peaked BL Lacertae objects (HBLs)) separately, there is not a clear relationship for each subclass. Based on the Fermi-detected sources, we can say that the HBLs are different from FSRQs, while the LBLs are similar to FSRQs.

  11. Pulsar candidates towards Fermi unassociated sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frail, D. A.; Mooley, K. P.; Jagannathan, P.; Intema, H. T.

    2016-09-01

    We report on a search for steep spectrum radio sources within the 95 per cent confidence error ellipses of the Fermi unassociated sources from the Large Area Telescope (LAT). Using existing catalogues and the newly released Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope all-sky survey at 150 MHz, we identify compact radio sources that are bright at MHz frequencies but faint or absent at GHz frequencies. Such steep spectrum radio sources are rare and constitute a sample of pulsar candidates, selected independently of period, dispersion measure, interstellar scattering and orbital parameters. We find point-like, steep spectrum candidates towards 11 Fermi sources. Based on the gamma-ray/radio positional coincidence, the rarity of such radio sources, and the properties of the 3FGL sources themselves, we argue that many of these sources could be pulsars. They may have been missed by previous radio periodicity searches due to interstellar propagation effects or because they lie in an unusually tight binary. If this hypothesis is correct, then renewed gamma-ray and radio periodicity searches at the positions of the steep spectrum radio sources may reveal pulsations.

  12. Lasing in Bose-Fermi mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochereshko, Vladimir P.; Durnev, Mikhail V.; Besombes, Lucien; Mariette, Henri; Sapega, Victor F.; Askitopoulos, Alexis; Savenko, Ivan G.; Liew, Timothy C. H.; Shelykh, Ivan A.; Platonov, Alexey V.; Tsintzos, Simeon I.; Hatzopoulos, Z.; Savvidis, Pavlos G.; Kalevich, Vladimir K.; Afanasiev, Mikhail M.; Lukoshkin, Vladimir A.; Schneider, Christian; Amthor, Matthias; Metzger, Christian; Kamp, Martin; Hoefling, Sven; Lagoudakis, Pavlos; Kavokin, Alexey

    2016-01-01

    Light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation, well-known for revolutionising photonic science, has been realised primarily in fermionic systems including widely applied diode lasers. The prerequisite for fermionic lasing is the inversion of electronic population, which governs the lasing threshold. More recently, bosonic lasers have also been developed based on Bose-Einstein condensates of exciton-polaritons in semiconductor microcavities. These electrically neutral bosons coexist with charged electrons and holes. In the presence of magnetic fields, the charged particles are bound to their cyclotron orbits, while the neutral exciton-polaritons move freely. We demonstrate how magnetic fields affect dramatically the phase diagram of mixed Bose-Fermi systems, switching between fermionic lasing, incoherent emission and bosonic lasing regimes in planar and pillar microcavities with optical and electrical pumping. We collected and analyzed the data taken on pillar and planar microcavity structures at continuous wave and pulsed optical excitation as well as injecting electrons and holes electronically. Our results evidence the transition from a Bose gas to a Fermi liquid mediated by magnetic fields and light-matter coupling.

  13. Fermi level stabilization energy in cadmium oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Speaks, D. T.; Mayer, M. A.; Yu, K. M.; Mao, S. S.; Haller, E. E.; Walukiewicz, W.

    2010-04-08

    We have studied the effects of high concentrations of native point defects on the electrical and optical properties of CdO. The defects were introduced by irradiation with high energy He+, Ne+, Ar+ and C+ ions. Increasing the irradiation damage with particles heavier than He+ increases the electron concentration until a saturation level of 5x1020 cm-3 is reached. In contrast, due to the ionic character and hence strong dynamic annealing of CdO, irradiation with much lighter He+ stabilizes the electron concentration at a much lower level of 1.7x1020 cm-3. A large shift of the optical absorption edge with increasing electron concentration in irradiated samples is explained by the Burstein-Moss shift corrected for electron-electron and electron-ion interactions. The saturation of the electron concentration and the optical absorption edge energy are consistent with a defect induced stabilization of the Fermi energy at 1 eV above the conduction band edge. The result is in a good agreement with previously determined Fermi level pinning energies on CdO surfaces. The results indicate that CdO shares many similarities with InN, as both materials exhibit extremely large electron affinities and an unprecedented propensity for n-type conductivity.

  14. THE FERMI GAMMA-RAY BURST MONITOR

    SciTech Connect

    Meegan, Charles; Lichti, Giselher; Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Diehl, Roland; Greiner, Jochen; Von Kienlin, Andreas; Steinle, Helmut; Bhat, P. N.; Briggs, Michael S.; Connaughton, Valerie; Paciesas, W. S.; Preece, Robert; Wilson, Robert B.; Fishman, Gerald; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Van der Horst, Alexander J.; McBreen, Sheila

    2009-09-01

    The Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) will significantly augment the science return from the Fermi Observatory in the study of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). The primary objective of GBM is to extend the energy range over which bursts are observed downward from the energy range of the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on Fermi into the hard X-ray range where extensive previous data sets exist. A secondary objective is to compute burst locations onboard to allow re-orienting the spacecraft so that the LAT can observe delayed emission from bright bursts. GBM uses an array of 12 sodium iodide scintillators and two bismuth germanate scintillators to detect gamma rays from {approx}8 keV to {approx}40 MeV over the full unocculted sky. The onboard trigger threshold is {approx}0.7 photons cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} (50-300 keV, 1 s peak). GBM generates onboard triggers for {approx}250 GRBs per year.

  15. Fermi's Paradox - The Last Challenge For Copernicanism?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirkovic, M. M.

    2009-06-01

    We review Fermi's paradox (or the "Great Silence" problem), not only arguably the oldest and crucial problem for the Search for ExtraTerrestrial Intelligence (SETI), but also a conundrum of profound scientific, philosophical and cultural importance. By a simple analysis of observation selection effects, the correct resolution of Fermi's paradox is certain to tell us something about the future of humanity. Already more than three quarters of century old puzzle -- and a quarter of century since the last major review paper in the field by G. David Brin -- has generated many ingenious discussions and hypotheses. We analyze the often tacit methodological assumptions built in various answers to this puzzle and attempt a new classification of the numerous solutions proposed in an already huge literature on the subject. Finally, we consider the ramifications of various classes of hypotheses for the practical SETI projects. Somewhat paradoxically, it seems that the class of (neo)catastrophic hypotheses gives, on the balance, the strongest justification to optimism regarding our current and near-future SETI efforts.

  16. Lasing in Bose-Fermi mixtures.

    PubMed

    Kochereshko, Vladimir P; Durnev, Mikhail V; Besombes, Lucien; Mariette, Henri; Sapega, Victor F; Askitopoulos, Alexis; Savenko, Ivan G; Liew, Timothy C H; Shelykh, Ivan A; Platonov, Alexey V; Tsintzos, Simeon I; Hatzopoulos, Z; Savvidis, Pavlos G; Kalevich, Vladimir K; Afanasiev, Mikhail M; Lukoshkin, Vladimir A; Schneider, Christian; Amthor, Matthias; Metzger, Christian; Kamp, Martin; Hoefling, Sven; Lagoudakis, Pavlos; Kavokin, Alexey

    2016-01-01

    Light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation, well-known for revolutionising photonic science, has been realised primarily in fermionic systems including widely applied diode lasers. The prerequisite for fermionic lasing is the inversion of electronic population, which governs the lasing threshold. More recently, bosonic lasers have also been developed based on Bose-Einstein condensates of exciton-polaritons in semiconductor microcavities. These electrically neutral bosons coexist with charged electrons and holes. In the presence of magnetic fields, the charged particles are bound to their cyclotron orbits, while the neutral exciton-polaritons move freely. We demonstrate how magnetic fields affect dramatically the phase diagram of mixed Bose-Fermi systems, switching between fermionic lasing, incoherent emission and bosonic lasing regimes in planar and pillar microcavities with optical and electrical pumping. We collected and analyzed the data taken on pillar and planar microcavity structures at continuous wave and pulsed optical excitation as well as injecting electrons and holes electronically. Our results evidence the transition from a Bose gas to a Fermi liquid mediated by magnetic fields and light-matter coupling. PMID:26822483

  17. The First Fermi LAT Supernova Remnant Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acero, F.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonino, R.; Bottacini, E.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caputo, R.; Caragiulo, M.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cavazzuti, E.; Cecchi, C.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen, J. M.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cominsky, L. R.; Condon, B.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; D’Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Desiante, R.; Digel, S. W.; Di Venere, L.; Drell, P. S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Favuzzi, C.; Ferrara, E. C.; Franckowiak, A.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Gomez-Vargas, G. A.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Gustafsson, M.; Hadasch, D.; Harding, A. K.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Hewitt, J. W.; Hill, A. B.; Horan, D.; Hou, X.; Iafrate, G.; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Katsuta, J.; Kerr, M.; Knödlseder, J.; Kocevski, D.; Kuss, M.; Laffon, H.; Lande, J.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Li, J.; Li, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Magill, J.; Maldera, S.; Marelli, M.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monzani, M. E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nemmen, R.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Petrosian, V.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; Reposeur, T.; Rousseau, R.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Schmid, J.; Schulz, A.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Spada, F.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Strong, A. W.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Tibolla, O.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Uchiyama, Y.; Vianello, G.; Wells, B.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.; Yassine, M.; den Hartog, P. R.; Zimmer, S.

    2016-05-01

    To uniformly determine the properties of supernova remnants (SNRs) at high energies, we have developed the first systematic survey at energies from 1 to 100 GeV using data from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). Based on the spatial overlap of sources detected at GeV energies with SNRs known from radio surveys, we classify 30 sources as likely GeV SNRs. We also report 14 marginal associations and 245 flux upper limits. A mock catalog in which the positions of known remnants are scrambled in Galactic longitude allows us to determine an upper limit of 22% on the number of GeV candidates falsely identified as SNRs. We have also developed a method to estimate spectral and spatial systematic errors arising from the diffuse interstellar emission model, a key component of all Galactic Fermi LAT analyses. By studying remnants uniformly in aggregate, we measure the GeV properties common to these objects and provide a crucial context for the detailed modeling of individual SNRs. Combining our GeV results with multiwavelength (MW) data, including radio, X-ray, and TeV, we demonstrate the need for improvements to previously sufficient, simple models describing the GeV and radio emission from these objects. We model the GeV and MW emission from SNRs in aggregate to constrain their maximal contribution to observed Galactic cosmic rays.

  18. Evidence of Fermi bubbles around M31

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pshirkov, M. S.; Vasiliev, V. V.; Postnov, K. A.

    2016-06-01

    Gamma-ray haloes can exist around galaxies due to the interaction of escaping galactic cosmic rays with the surrounding gas. We have searched for such a halo around the nearby giant spiral Andromeda galaxy M31 using almost 7 yr of Fermi LAT data at energies above 300 MeV. The presence of a diffuse gamma-ray halo with total photon flux 2.6 ± 0.6 × 10-9 cm-2 s-1, corresponding to a luminosity (0.3-100 GeV) of (3.2 ± 0.6) × 1038 erg s-1 (for a distance of 780 kpc) was found at a 5.3σ confidence level. The halo form does not correspond to the extended baryonic H I disc of M31, as would be expected in hadronic production of gamma photons from cosmic ray interaction, nor it is spherically symmetric, as could be in the case of dark matter annihilation. The best-fitting halo template corresponds to two 6-7.5 kpc bubbles symmetrically located perpendicular to the M31 galactic disc, similar to the `Fermi bubbles' found around the Milky Way centre, which suggests the past activity of the central supermassive black hole or a star formation burst in M31.

  19. Fermi Liquid Instabilities in the Spin Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Congjun; Sun, Kai; Fradkin, Eduardo; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2010-03-16

    We study the Fermi surface instabilities of the Pomeranchuk type in the spin triplet channel with high orbital partial waves (F{sub l}{sup a} (l > 0)). The ordered phases are classified into two classes, dubbed the {alpha} and {beta}-phases by analogy to the superfluid {sup 3}He-A and B-phases. The Fermi surfaces in the {alpha}-phases exhibit spontaneous anisotropic distortions, while those in the {beta}-phases remain circular or spherical with topologically non-trivial spin configurations in momentum space. In the {alpha}-phase, the Goldstone modes in the density channel exhibit anisotropic overdamping. The Goldstone modes in the spin channel have nearly isotropic underdamped dispersion relation at small propagating wavevectors. Due to the coupling to the Goldstone modes, the spin wave spectrum develops resonance peaks in both the {alpha} and {beta}-phases, which can be detected in inelastic neutron scattering experiments. In the p-wave channel {beta}-phase, a chiral ground state inhomogeneity is spontaneously generated due to a Lifshitz-like instability in the originally nonchiral systems. Possible experiments to detect these phases are discussed.

  20. Dark matter subhalos and unidentified sources in the Fermi 3FGL source catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoonenberg, Djoeke; Gaskins, Jennifer; Bertone, Gianfranco; Diemand, Jürg

    2016-05-01

    If dark matter consists of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), dark matter subhalos in the Milky Way could be detectable as gamma-ray point sources due to WIMP annihilation. In this work, we perform an updated study of the detectability of dark matter subhalos as gamma-ray sources with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi LAT). We use the results of the Via Lactea II simulation, scaled to the Planck 2015 cosmological parameters, to predict the local dark matter subhalo distribution. Under optimistic assumptions for the WIMP parameters—a 40 GeV particle annihilating to bbar b with a thermal cross-section, as required to explain the Galactic center GeV excess—we predict that at most ~ 10 subhalos might be present in the third Fermi LAT source catalog (3FGL). This is a smaller number than has been predicted by prior studies, and we discuss the origin of this difference. We also compare our predictions for the detectability of subhalos with the number of subhalo candidate sources in 3FGL, and derive upper limits on the WIMP annihilation cross-section as a function of the particle mass. If a dark matter interpretation could be excluded for all 3FGL sources, our constraints would be competitive with those found by indirect searches using other targets, such as known Milky Way satellite galaxies.

  1. "Where is Everybody?" An Account of Fermi's Question

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Jones, E. M.

    1985-03-01

    Enrico Fermi's famous question, now central to debates about the prevalence of extraterrestrial civilizations, arose during a luncheon conversation with Emil Konopinski, Edward Teller, and Herbert York in the summer of 1950. Fermi's companions on that day have provided accounts of the incident.

  2. Orthogonal metals: The simplest non-Fermi liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandkishore, Rahul; Metlitski, Max A.; Senthil, T.

    2012-07-01

    We present a fractionalized metallic phase which is indistinguishable from the Fermi liquid in conductivity and thermodynamics, but is sharply distinct in one-electron properties, such as the electron spectral function. We dub this phase the “orthogonal metal.” The orthogonal metal and the transition to it from the Fermi liquid are naturally described using a slave-particle representation wherein the electron is expressed as a product of a fermion and a slave Ising spin. We emphasize that when the slave spins are disordered, the result is not a Mott insulator (as erroneously assumed in the prior literature), but rather the orthogonal metal. We construct prototypical ground-state wave functions for the orthogonal metal by modifying the Jastrow factor of Slater-Jastrow wave functions that describe ordinary Fermi liquids. We further demonstrate that the transition from the Fermi liquid to the orthogonal metal can, in some circumstances, provide a simple example of a continuous destruction of a Fermi surface with a critical Fermi surface appearing right at the critical point. We present exactly soluble models that realize an orthogonal metal phase, and the phase transition to the Fermi liquid. These models thus provide valuable solvable examples for phase transitions associated with the death of a Fermi surface.

  3. Scaling in electron scattering from a relativistic Fermi gas

    SciTech Connect

    W. M. Alberico; A. Molinari; T. William Donnelly; E. L. Kronenberg; Wally Van Orden

    1988-10-01

    Within the context of the relativistic Fermi gas model, the concept of ''y scaling'' for inclusive electron scattering from nuclei is investigated. Specific kinematic shifts of the single-nucleon response in the nuclear medium can be incorporated with this model. Suggested generalizations beyond the strict Fermi gas model, including treatments of separated longitudinal and transverse responses, are also explored.

  4. Collisional Properties of a Polarized Fermi Gas with Resonant Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Bruun, G. M.; Recati, A.; Stringari, S.; Pethick, C. J.; Smith, H.

    2008-06-20

    Highly polarized mixtures of atomic Fermi gases constitute a novel Fermi liquid. We demonstrate how information on thermodynamic properties may be used to calculate quasiparticle scattering amplitudes even when the interaction is resonant and apply the results to evaluate the damping of the spin dipole mode. We estimate that under current experimental conditions the mode would be intermediate between the hydrodynamic and collisionless limits.

  5. Fermi surfaces and energy gaps of high-temperature superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Z.X.; Dessau, D.S.

    1994-12-31

    In this short paper, the authors describe their recent experimental results from high-temperature superconductors. In the normal state, the data reveals interesting features of the Fermi surfaces and low energy excitations near the Fermi level. In the superconducting state, the data shows a very strong anisotropy in the superconducting gap.

  6. LETTERS AND COMMENTS: Enrico Fermi: a great teacher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Boon Leong

    2002-09-01

    Enrico Fermi was not only a great theoretical and experimental physicist but a great teacher as well. This article highlights Fermi's approaches in both his formal and informal teaching, and as a thesis advisor. The great teacher inspires - William Arthur Ward

  7. Don't Just Stand There--Teach Fermi Problems!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, A. W.

    2008-01-01

    Fermi problems, or order of magnitude estimates, are often used in introductory physics courses. In this paper I will show that first year students studying physics at university do not arrive with the skill set to solve these problems, and they have to be actively taught how to solve them. Once they have been shown how to solve Fermi problems,…

  8. Fermi-Dirac statistics and the number theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubasiak, Anna; Korbicz, Jaroslaw K.; Zakrzewski, Jakub; Lewenstein, Maciej

    2005-11-01

    We relate the Fermi-Dirac statistics of an ideal Fermi gas in a harmonic trap to partitions of given integers into distinct parts, studied in number theory. Using methods of quantum statistical physics we derive analytic expressions for cumulants of the probability distribution of the number of different partitions.

  9. ''Where is everybody. '' An account of Fermi's question

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, E.M.

    1985-03-01

    Fermi's famous question, now central to debates about the prevalence of extraterrestrial civilizations, arose during a luncheon conversation with Emil Konopinski, Edward Teller, and Herbert York in the summer of 1950. Fermi's companions on that day have provided accounts of the incident.

  10. Where is everybody? an account of Fermi's question

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, E. M.

    1985-03-01

    Fermi's famous question, now central to debates about the prevalence of extraterrestrial civilizations, arose during a luncheon conversation with Emil Konopinski, Edward Teller, and Herbert York in the summer of 1950. Fermi's companions on that day have provided accounts of the incident.

  11. Changing Horses in Midstream: Fermi LAT Computing and SCons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogart, J. R.; Golpayegani, N.

    2011-07-01

    (For the Fermi LAT Collaboration) Several years into GLAST (now Fermi) offline software development it became evident we would need a replacement for our original build system, the Configuration Management Tool (CMT) developed at CERN, in order to support Mac users and to keep pace with newer compilers and operating system versions on our traditional platforms, Linux and Windows. The open source product SCons emerged as the only viable alternative and development began in earnest several months before Fermi's successful launch in June of 2008. Over two years later the conversion is nearing completion. This paper describes the conversion to and our use of SCons, concentrating on the resulting environment for users and developers and how it was achieved. Topics discussed include SCons and its interaction with Fermi code, GoGui, a cross-platform gui for Fermi developers, and issues specific to Windows developer support.

  12. Sub-saturation matter in compact stars: Nuclear modelling in the framework of the extended Thomas-Fermi theory

    SciTech Connect

    Aymard, François; Gulminelli, Francesca; Margueron, Jérôme

    2015-02-24

    A recently introduced analytical model for the nuclear density profile [1] is implemented in the Extended Thomas-Fermi (ETF) energy density functional. This allows to (i) shed a new light on the issue of the sign of surface symmetry energy in nuclear mass formulas, as well as to (ii) show the importance of the in-medium corrections to the nuclear cluster energies in thermodynamic conditions relevant for the description of core-collapse supernovae and (proto)-neutron star crust.

  13. Detecting Dark Matter annihilation lines with Fermi

    SciTech Connect

    Ylinen, Tomi; Edmonds, Yvonne; Bloom, Elliott D.; Conrad, Jan; /Royal Inst. Tech., Stockholm /Kalmar U. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Stockholm U.

    2009-05-15

    Dark matter constitutes one of the most intriguing but so far unresolved issues in physics today. In many extensions of the Standard Model the existence of a stable Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) is predicted. The WIMP is an excellent dark matter particle candidate and one of the most interesting scenarios include an annihilation of two WIMPs into two gamma-rays. If the WIMPs are assumed to be non-relativistic, the resulting photons will both have an energy equal to the mass of the WIMP and manifest themselves as a monochromatic spectral line in the energy spectrum. This type of signal would represent a 'smoking gun' for dark matter, since no other known astrophysical process should be able to produce it. In these proceedings we give an overview of the different approaches to a search for dark matter lines that the Fermi-LAT collaboration is pursuing and the various challenges involved.

  14. Entanglement rules for holographic Fermi surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roychowdhury, Dibakar

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, based on the notion of Gauge/Gravity duality, we explore the laws of entanglement thermodynamics for most generic classes of Quantum Field Theories with hyperscaling violation. In our analysis, we note that for Quantum Field Theories with compressible quark like excitation, the first law of entanglement thermodynamics gets modified due to the presence of an additional term that could be identified as the entanglement chemical potential associated with hidden Fermi surfaces of the boundary theory. Most notably, we find that the so called entanglement chemical potential does not depend on the size of the entangling region and is purely determined by the quark d.o.f. encoded within the entangling region.

  15. Universal Fermi gases in mixed dimensions.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Yusuke; Tan, Shina

    2008-10-24

    We investigate a two-species Fermi gas in which one species is confined in a two-dimensional plane (2D) or one-dimensional line (1D) while the other is free in the three-dimensional space (3D). We discuss the realization of such a system with the interspecies interaction tuned to resonance. When the mass ratio is in the range 0.0351

  16. Universal Fermi Gases in Mixed Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Nishida, Yusuke; Tan, Shina

    2008-10-24

    We investigate a two-species Fermi gas in which one species is confined in a two-dimensional plane (2D) or one-dimensional line (1D) while the other is free in the three-dimensional space (3D). We discuss the realization of such a system with the interspecies interaction tuned to resonance. When the mass ratio is in the range 0.0351

  17. Fermi Observation of GRB 080916C

    SciTech Connect

    Piron, F.

    2009-05-25

    We present the observations of the long-duration Gamma-Ray Burst GRB 080916C by the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) and Large Area Telescope (LAT). This event was observed from 8 keV to a photon with an energy of 13.2 GeV. It develops over a 1400 s interval during which the highest number of photons with energy above 100 MeV are detected from a burst. The onset of the high-energy (>100 MeV) emission is delayed by {approx}4.5 s with respect to the low-energy (<1 MeV) emission, which is not detected past 200 s. The broad-band spectrum of the burst is consistent with a single spectral form.

  18. Multiwavelength Challenges in the Fermi Era

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.

    2010-01-01

    The gamma-ray surveys of the sky by AGILE and the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope offer both opportunities and challenges for multiwavelength and multi-messenger studies. Gamma-ray bursts, pulsars, binary sources, flaring Active Galactic Nuclei, and Galactic transient sources are all phenomena that can best be studied with a wide variety of instruments simultaneously or contemporaneously. From the gamma-ray side, a principal challenge is the latency from the time of an astrophysical event to the recognition of this event in the data. Obtaining quick and complete multiwavelength coverage of gamma-ray sources of interest can be difficult both in terms of logistics and in terms of generating scientific interest.

  19. The Mirage of the Fermi Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antipin, Oleg; Sannino, Francesco; Tuominen, Kimmo

    2013-09-01

    The discovery of a light Higgs boson at Large Hadron Collider may be suggesting that we need to revise our model building paradigms to understand the origin of the weak scale. We explore the possibility that the Fermi scale is not fundamental but rather a derived one, i.e. a low energy mirage. We show that this scenario emerges in a very natural way in models previously used to break the electroweak symmetry dynamically and suggest a simple dynamical framework for this idea. In our model the electroweak scale results from the interplay between two very high energy scales, one typically of the order of ΛUV 1010GeV and the other around MU 1016GeV, although other values are also possible.

  20. The Gamma-ray Universe through Fermi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Gamma rays, the most powerful form of light, reveal extreme conditions in the Universe. The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope and its smaller cousin AGILE have been exploring the gamma-ray sky for several years, enabling a search for powerful transients like gamma-ray bursts, novae, solar flares, and flaring active galactic nuclei, as well as long-term studies including pulsars, binary systems, supernova remnants, and searches for predicted sources of gamma rays such as dark matter annihilation. Some results include a stringent limit on Lorentz invariance derived from a gamma-ray burst, unexpected gamma-ray variability from the Crab Nebula, a huge ga.nuna-ray structure associated with the center of our galaxy, surprising behavior from some gamma-ray binary systems, and a possible constraint on some WIMP models for dark matter.

  1. Momentum sharing in imbalanced Fermi systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hen, O.; Sargsian, M.; Weinstein, L. B.; Piasetzky, E.

    2014-10-16

    The atomic nucleus is composed of two different kinds of fermions, protons and neutrons. If the protons and neutrons did not interact, the Pauli exclusion principle would force the majority fermions (usually neutrons) to have a higher average momentum. Our high-energy electron scattering measurements using 12C, 27Al, 56Fe and 208Pb targets show that, even in heavy neutron-rich nuclei, short-range interactions between the fermions form correlated high-momentum neutron-proton pairs. Thus, in neutron-rich nuclei, protons have a greater probability than neutrons to have momentum greater than the Fermi momentum. This finding has implications ranging from nuclear few body systems to neutron stars and may also be observable experimentally in two-spin state, ultra-cold atomic gas systems.

  2. Momentum sharing in imbalanced Fermi systems

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hen, O.; Sargsian, M.; Weinstein, L. B.; Piasetzky, E.

    2014-10-16

    The atomic nucleus is composed of two different kinds of fermions, protons and neutrons. If the protons and neutrons did not interact, the Pauli exclusion principle would force the majority fermions (usually neutrons) to have a higher average momentum. Our high-energy electron scattering measurements using 12C, 27Al, 56Fe and 208Pb targets show that, even in heavy neutron-rich nuclei, short-range interactions between the fermions form correlated high-momentum neutron-proton pairs. Thus, in neutron-rich nuclei, protons have a greater probability than neutrons to have momentum greater than the Fermi momentum. This finding has implications ranging from nuclear few body systems to neutron starsmore » and may also be observable experimentally in two-spin state, ultra-cold atomic gas systems.« less

  3. The Gamma-ray Sky with Fermi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, David

    2012-01-01

    Gamma rays reveal extreme, nonthermal conditions in the Universe. The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has been exploring the gamma-ray sky for more than four years, enabling a search for powerful transients like gamma-ray bursts, novae, solar flares, and flaring active galactic nuclei, as well as long-term studies including pulsars, binary systems, supernova remnants, and searches for predicted sources of gamma rays such as dark matter annihilation. Some results include a stringent limit on Lorentz invariance derived from a gamma-ray burst, unexpected gamma-ray variability from the Crab Nebula, a huge gamma-ray structure associated with the center of our galaxy, surprising behavior from some gamma-ray binary systems, and a possible constraint on some WIMP models for dark matter.

  4. Momentum sharing in imbalanced Fermi systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hen, O.; Sargsian, M.; Weinstein, L. B.; Piasetzky, E.; Hakobyan, H.; Higinbotham, D. W.; Braverman, M.; Brooks, W. K.; Gilad, S.; Adhikari, K. P.; Arrington, J.; Asryan, G.; Avakian, H.; Ball, J.; Baltzell, N. A.; Battaglieri, M.; Beck, A.; Beck, S. May-Tal; Bedlinskiy, I.; Bertozzi, W.; Biselli, A.; Burkert, V. D.; Cao, T.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; De Vita, R.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Doughty, D.; Dugger, M.; Dupre, R.; Egiyan, H.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Forest, T.; Garillon, B.; Garcon, M.; Gevorgyan, N.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Girod, F. X.; Goetz, J. T.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guidal, M.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hanretty, C.; Hattawy, M.; Hicks, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hyde, C. E.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkanov, B. I.; Isupov, E. L.; Jiang, H.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Keller, D.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, F. J.; Koirala, S.; Korover, I.; Kuhn, S. E.; Kubarovsky, V.; Lenisa, P.; Levine, W. I.; Livingston, K.; Lowry, M.; Lu, H. Y.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Markov, N.; Mayer, M.; McKinnon, B.; Mineeva, T.; Mokeev, V.; Movsisyan, A.; Camacho, C. Munoz; Mustapha, B.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Paremuzyan, R.; Park, K.; Pasyuk, E.; Phelps, W.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Prok, Y.; Protopopescu, D.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Rimal, D.; Ripani, M.; Ritchie, B. G.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Roy, P.; Rossi, P.; Sabatié, F.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Smith, G. D.; Shneor, R.; Sokhan, D.; Stepanyan, S. S.; Stepanyan, S.; Stoler, P.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Taiuti, M.; Tkachenko, S.; Ungaro, M.; Vlassov, A. V.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Wei, X.; Wood, M. H.; Wood, S. A.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhao, Z. W.; Zheng, X.; Zonta, I.; aff16

    2014-10-01

    The atomic nucleus is composed of two different kinds of fermions: protons and neutrons. If the protons and neutrons did not interact, the Pauli exclusion principle would force the majority of fermions (usually neutrons) to have a higher average momentum. Our high-energy electron-scattering measurements using 12C, 27Al, 56Fe, and 208Pb targets show that even in heavy, neutron-rich nuclei, short-range interactions between the fermions form correlated high-momentum neutron-proton pairs. Thus, in neutron-rich nuclei, protons have a greater probability than neutrons to have momentum greater than the Fermi momentum. This finding has implications ranging from nuclear few-body systems to neutron stars and may also be observable experimentally in two-spin-state, ultracold atomic gas systems.

  5. Adaptationism Fails to Resolve Fermi's Paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirkovic, M. M.; Dragicevic, I.; Beric-Bjedov, T.

    2005-06-01

    One of the most interesting problems in the nascent discipline of astrobiology is more than half-century old Fermi's paradox: why, considering extraordinary young age of Earth and the Solar System in the Galactic context, don't we perceive much older intelligent communities or signposts of their activity? In spite of a vigorous research activity in recent years, especially bolstered by successes of astrobiology in finding extrasolar planets and extremophiles, this problem (also known as the "Great Silence" or "astrosociological" paradox) remains as open as ever. In a previous paper, we have discussed a particular evolutionary solution suggested by Karl Schroeder based on the currently dominant evolutionary doctrine of adaptationism. Here, we extend that discussion with emphasis on the problems such a solution is bound to face, and conclude that it is ultimately quite unlikely.

  6. Klein factors and Fermi-Bose equivalence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Taejin

    2016-06-01

    Generalizing the kink operator of the Heisenberg spin 1/2 model, we construct a set of Klein factors explicitly such that (1+1)-dimensional fermion theories with an arbitrary number of species are mapped onto the corresponding boson theories with the same number of species and vice versa. The actions for the resultant theories do not possess a nontrivial Klein factor. With this set of Klein factors, we are also able to map the simple boundary states, such as the Neumann and the Dirichlet boundary states, of the fermion (boson) theory onto those of the boson (fermion) theory. Applications of the Fermi-Bose equivalence with the constructed Klein factors to well-known (1+1)-dimensional theories have been discussed.

  7. Fermi GBM Observations of Terrestrial Gamma Flashes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Briggs, M. S.; Fishman, G. J.; Bhat, P. N.; Paciesas, W. S.; Preece, R.; Kippen, R. M.; von Kienlin, A.; Dwyer, J. R.; Smith, D. M.; Holzworth, R.

    2010-01-01

    In its first two years of operation, the Fermi Gamma Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has observed more than 77 Terrestrial Gamma Flashes (TGFs). The thick Bismuth Germanate (BGO) detectors are excellent for TGF spectroscopy, having a high probability of recording the full energy of an incident photon, spanning a broad energy range from 150 keV to 40 MeV, and recording a large number of photons per TGF. Correlations between GBM TGF triggers and lightning sferics detected with the World-Wide Lightning Location Network indicate that TGFs and lightning are simultaneous to within tens of microseconds. The energy spectra of some TGFs have strong 511 keV positron annihilation lines, indicating that these TGFs contain a large fraction of positrons

  8. Topological superradiance in a degenerate Fermi gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Jian-Song; Liu, Xiong-Jun; Zhang, Wei; Yi, Wei; Guo, Guang-Can; Yi's Group Team; Liu's Group Team; Zhang's Group Team

    2015-05-01

    We predict the existence of a topological superradiant state in a two-component degenerate Fermi gas in a cavity. The superradiant light generation in the transversely driven cavity mode induces a cavity-assisted spin-orbit coupling in the system and opens a bulk gap at half filling. This mechanism can simultaneously drive a topological phase transition in the system, yielding a topological superradiant state. We map out the steady-state phase diagram of the system in the presence of an effective Zeeman field, and identify a critical tetracritical point beyond which the topological and the conventional superraidiant phase boundaries separate. We propose to detect the topological phase transition based on its signatures in either the momentum distribution of the atoms or in the cavity photon occupation.

  9. The Lorenz-Fermi-Pasta-Ulam experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balmforth, N. J.; Pasquero, C.; Provenzale, A.

    2000-04-01

    We consider a chain of Lorenz ’63 systems connected through a local, nearest-neighbour coupling. We refer to the resulting system as the Lorenz-Fermi-Pasta-Ulam lattice because of its similarity to the celebrated experiment conducted by Fermi, Pasta and Ulam. At large coupling strengths, the systems synchronize to a global, chaotic orbit of the Lorenz attractor. For smaller coupling, the synchronized state loses stability. Instead, steady, spatially structured equilibrium states are observed. These steady states are related to the heteroclinic orbits of the system describing stationary solutions to the partial differential equation that emerges on taking the continuum limit of the lattice. Notably, these orbits connect saddle-foci, suggesting the existence of a multitude of such equilibria in relatively wide systems. On lowering the coupling strength yet further, the steady states lose stability in what appear to be always subcritical Hopf bifurcations. This can lead to a variety of time-dependent states with fixed time-averaged spatial structure. Such solutions can be limit cycles, tori or possibly chaotic attractors. “Cluster states” can also occur (though with less regularity), consisting of lattices in which the elements are partitioned into families of synchronized subsystems. Ultimately, for very weak coupling, the lattice loses its time-averaged spatial structure. At this stage, the properties of the lattice are probably chaotic and approximately scale with the lattice size, suggesting that the system is essentially an ensemble of elements that evolve largely independent of one another. The weak interaction, however, is sufficient to induce widespread coherent phases; these are ephemeral states in which the dynamics of one or more subsystems takes a more regular form. We present measures of the complexity of these incoherent lattices, and discuss the concept of a “dynamical horizon” (that is, the distance along the lattice that one subsystem can

  10. From ultracold Fermi Gases to Neutron Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salomon, Christophe

    2012-02-01

    Ultracold dilute atomic gases can be considered as model systems to address some pending problem in Many-Body physics that occur in condensed matter systems, nuclear physics, and astrophysics. We have developed a general method to probe with high precision the thermodynamics of locally homogeneous ultracold Bose and Fermi gases [1,2,3]. This method allows stringent tests of recent many-body theories. For attractive spin 1/2 fermions with tunable interaction (^6Li), we will show that the gas thermodynamic properties can continuously change from those of weakly interacting Cooper pairs described by Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory to those of strongly bound molecules undergoing Bose-Einstein condensation. First, we focus on the finite-temperature Equation of State (EoS) of the unpolarized unitary gas. Surprisingly, the low-temperature properties of the strongly interacting normal phase are well described by Fermi liquid theory [3] and we localize the superfluid phase transition. A detailed comparison with theories including recent Monte-Carlo calculations will be presented. Moving away from the unitary gas, the Lee-Huang-Yang and Lee-Yang beyond-mean-field corrections for low density bosonic and fermionic superfluids are quantitatively measured for the first time. Despite orders of magnitude difference in density and temperature, our equation of state can be used to describe low density neutron matter such as the outer shell of neutron stars. [4pt] [1] S. Nascimbène, N. Navon, K. Jiang, F. Chevy, and C. Salomon, Nature 463, 1057 (2010) [0pt] [2] N. Navon, S. Nascimbène, F. Chevy, and C. Salomon, Science 328, 729 (2010) [0pt] [3] S. Nascimbène, N. Navon, S. Pilati, F. Chevy, S. Giorgini, A. Georges, and C. Salomon, Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 215303 (2011)

  11. Collapse and revival of the Fermi sea in a Bose-Fermi mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, Deepak; Will, Sebastian; Rigol, Marcos

    2014-05-01

    The collapse and revival of quantum fields is one of the most pristine forms of coherent quantum dynamics far from equilibrium. Until now, it has only been observed in the dynamical evolution of bosonic systems. We report on the first observation of the boson mediated collapse and revival of the Fermi sea in a Bose-Fermi mixture. Specifically, we present a simple model which captures the experimental observations shown in the talk titled Observation of Collapse and Revival Dynamics in the Fermionic Component of a Lattice Bose-Fermi Mixture by Sebastian Will. Our theoretical analysis shows why the results are robust to the presence of harmonic traps during the loading or the time evolution phase. It also makes apparent that the fermionic dynamics is independent of whether the bosonic component consists of a coherent state or localized Fock states with random occupation numbers. Because of the robustness of the experimental results, we argue that this kind of collapse and revival experiment can be used to accurately characterize interactions between bosons and fermions in a lattice.

  12. Looking for the Northern Fermi Bubble with HAWC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayala, Hugo; Zhou, Hao; Huentemeyer, Petra; HAWC Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The Fermi Bubbles were discovered in the GeV gamma-ray data from the Fermi Telescope in 2010. They extend up to 55° above and below the Galactic Center forming two large and homogeneous regions of spectrally hard gamma-ray emission. Understanding the mechanisms which produce the observed hard spectrum will help understand the origin of the Fermi Bubbles. Both hadronic and leptonic models can describe the spectrum of the bubbles, though the leptonic model can explain similar structures observed in microwave data from the WMAP and Planck satellites. Recent publications show that the spectrum of the Fermi Bubbles is well described by a power law with an exponential cutoff between 100MeV to 500GeV. Observing the Fermi Bubbles at higher gamma-ray energies will help constrain their spectrum. A steeper cutoff will favor a leptonic model. The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory, located 4100m above sea level in Mexico, is designed to measure high-energy gamma rays between 100GeV to 100TeV. With a large field of view and good sensitivity to spatially extended sources, HAWC is the ground-based observatory best suited to detect extended regions like the Fermi Bubbles. We present a search for emission from the Fermi Bubble visible to HAWC.

  13. Attractive and repulsive Fermi polarons in two dimensions.

    PubMed

    Koschorreck, Marco; Pertot, Daniel; Vogt, Enrico; Fröhlich, Bernd; Feld, Michael; Köhl, Michael

    2012-05-31

    The dynamics of a single impurity in an environment is a fundamental problem in many-body physics. In the solid state, a well known case is an impurity coupled to a bosonic bath (such as lattice vibrations); the impurity and its accompanying lattice distortion form a new entity, a polaron. This quasiparticle plays an important role in the spectral function of high-transition-temperature superconductors, as well as in colossal magnetoresistance in manganites. For impurities in a fermionic bath, studies have considered heavy or immobile impurities which exhibit Anderson's orthogonality catastrophe and the Kondo effect. More recently, mobile impurities have moved into the focus of research, and they have been found to form new quasiparticles known as Fermi polarons. The Fermi polaron problem constitutes the extreme, but conceptually simple, limit of two important quantum many-body problems: the crossover between a molecular Bose-Einstein condensate and a superfluid with BCS (Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer) pairing with spin-imbalance for attractive interactions, and Stoner's itinerant ferromagnetism for repulsive interactions. It has been proposed that such quantum phases (and other elusive exotic states) might become realizable in Fermi gases confined to two dimensions. Their stability and observability are intimately related to the theoretically debated properties of the Fermi polaron in a two-dimensional Fermi gas. Here we create and investigate Fermi polarons in a two-dimensional, spin-imbalanced Fermi gas, measuring their spectral function using momentum-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. For attractive interactions, we find evidence for a disputed pairing transition between polarons and tightly bound dimers, which provides insight into the elementary pairing mechanism of imbalanced, strongly coupled two-dimensional Fermi gases. Additionally, for repulsive interactions, we study novel quasiparticles--repulsive polarons--the lifetime of which determines the

  14. Towards a complete Fermi surface in underdoped high Tc superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Neil

    The discovery of magnetic quantum oscillations in underdoped high Tc superconductors raised many questions, and initiated a quest to understand the origin of the Fermi surface the like of which had not been seen since the very first discovery of quantum oscillations in elemental bismuth. While studies of the Fermi surface of materials are today mostly assisted by computer codes for calculating the electronic band structure, this was not the case in the underdoped high Tc materials. The Fermi surface was shown to reconstructed into small pockets, yet there was no hint of a viable order parameter. Crucial clues to understanding the origin of the Fermi surface were provided by the small value of the observed Fermi surface cross-section, the negative Hall coefficient and the small electronic heat capacity at high magnetic fields. We also know that the magnetic fields were likely to be too weak to destroy the pseudogap and that vortex pinning effects could be seen to persist to high magnetic fields at low temperatures. I will show that the Fermi surface that appears to fit best with the experimental observations is a small electron pocket formed by connecting the nodal `Fermi arcs' seen in photoemission experiments, corresponding to a density-wave state with two different orthogonal ordering vectors. The existence of such order has subsequently been detected by x-ray scattering experiments, thereby strengthening the case for charge ordering being responsible for reconstructing the Fermi surface. I will discuss new efforts to understand the relationship between the charge ordering and the pseudogap state, discussing the fate of the quasiparticles in the antinodal region and the dimensionality of the Fermi surface. The author acknowledges contributions from Suchitra Sebastian, Brad Ramshaw, Mun Chan, Yu-Te Hsu, Mate Hartstein, Gil Lonzarich, Beng Tan, Arkady Shekhter, Fedor Balakirev, Ross McDonald, Jon Betts, Moaz Altarawneh, Zengwei Zhu, Chuck Mielke, James Day, Doug

  15. The Fermi-GBM X-ray burst monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linares, M.; Fermi GBM X-ray Burst Collaboration

    2010-12-01

    We discuss the first results of the Fermi-GBM all-sky search for X-ray bursts. The very large field of view and X-ray response of the Fermi-GBM make it a unique instrument to study rare, bright and short-lived X-ray bursts. We are performing a systematic search that exploits such capabilities. We present results on long/intermediate type I X-ray bursts, an unusual kind of thermonuclear bursts from accreting neutron stars, and show how Fermi-GBM is giving for the first time robust measurements of their recurrence time.

  16. Physics of ultracold Fermi gases revealed by spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Törmä, Päivi

    2016-04-01

    This article provides a brief review of how various spectroscopies have been used to investitage many-body quantum phenomena in the context of ultracold Fermi gases. In particular, work done with RF spectroscopy, Bragg spectroscopy and lattice modulation spectroscopy is considered. The theoretical basis of these spectroscopies, namely linear response theory in the many-body quantum physics context is briefly presented. Experiments related to the BCS-BEC crossover, imbalanced Fermi gases, polarons, possible pseudogap and Fermi liquid behaviour and measuring the contact are discussed. Remaining open problems and goals in the field are sketched from the perspective how spectroscopies could contribute.

  17. Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope Science Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, David J.

    2010-01-01

    After more than 2 years of science operations, the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope continues to survey the high-energy sky on a daily basis. In addition to the more than 1400 sources found in the first Fermi Large Area Telescope Catalog (I FGL), new results continue to emerge. Some of these are: (1) Large-scale diffuse emission suggests possible activity from the Galactic Center region in the past; (2) a gamma-ray nova was found, indicating particle acceleration in this binary system; and (3) the Crab Nebula, long thought to be a steady source, has varied in the energy ranges seen by both Fermi instruments.

  18. X.509 Authentication/Authorization in FermiCloud

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyunwoo; Timm, Steven

    2014-11-11

    We present a summary of how X.509 authentication and authorization are used with OpenNebula in FermiCloud. We also describe a history of why the X.509 authentication was needed in FermiCloud, and review X.509 authorization options, both internal and external to OpenNebula. We show how these options can be and have been used to successfully run scientific workflows on federated clouds, which include OpenNebula on FermiCloud and Amazon Web Services as well as other community clouds. We also outline federation options being used by other commercial and open-source clouds and cloud research projects.

  19. Fermi Large Area Telescope Bright Gamma-ray Source List

    SciTech Connect

    Abdo, Aous A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Atwood, W.B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Band, D.L.; Barbiellini, Guido; Bastieri, Denis; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Bignami, G.F.; Bloom, Elliott D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A.W.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Burnett, Thompson H.; /more authors..

    2009-05-15

    Following its launch in 2008 June, the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi) began a sky survey in August. The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on Fermi in three months produced a deeper and better resolved map of the {gamma}-ray sky than any previous space mission. We present here initial results for energies above 100 MeV for the 205 most significant (statistical significance greater than {approx}10{sigma}) {gamma}-ray sources in these data. These are the best characterized and best localized point-like (i.e., spatially unresolved) {gamma}-ray sources in the early mission data.

  20. Thermodynamics of a trapped Bose-Fermi mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Hui; Liu, Xia-Ji

    2003-08-01

    By using the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov equations within the Popov approximation, we investigate the thermodynamic properties of a dilute binary Bose-Fermi mixture confined in an isotropic harmonic trap. For mixtures with an attractive Bose-Fermi interaction, we find a sizable enhancement of the condensate fraction and of the critical temperature of Bose-Einstein condensation with respect to the predictions for a pure interacting Bose gas. Conversely, the influence of the repulsive Bose-Fermi interaction is less pronounced. The possible relevance of our results in current experiments on trapped {sup 87}Rb-{sup 40}K mixtures is discussed.

  1. Redshifts and Optical Identifications of TANAMI/Fermi AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pursimo, Tapio; Ojha, Roopesh

    2013-02-01

    We wish to measure redshifts for the opticalidentifications of those gamma-ray loud southern hemisphere extragalactic radio sources being monitored by the TANAMI program that lack them. We also propose imaging of those sources that currently lack optical identifications after which their redshifts will also be measured. The study of blazar physics has been revolutionized by sl Fermi which has ushered in the age of quasi-simultaneous multi-wavelength studies for which knowledge of physical quantities like blazar-jet luminosities and speeds are crucial. TANAMI is the only significant source of milliarcsecond scale radio information for the southern third of the sky. Source redshifts are essential to determine the linear sizes and physical properties of TANAMI/Fermi sources. Please Note: This proposal has been approved for Gemini observing time in Cycle 5 of the Fermi Guest Investigator program (NASA Fermi Cycle 5 - #51378 Pursimo)

  2. Renormalization group and the superconducting susceptibility of a Fermi liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Parameswaran, S. A.; Sondhi, S. L.; Shankar, R.

    2010-11-15

    A free Fermi gas has, famously, a superconducting susceptibility that diverges logarithmically at zero temperature. In this paper we ask whether this is still true for a Fermi liquid and find that the answer is that it does not. From the perspective of the renormalization group for interacting fermions, the question arises because a repulsive interaction in the Cooper channel is a marginally irrelevant operator at the Fermi liquid fixed point and thus is also expected to infect various physical quantities with logarithms. Somewhat surprisingly, at least from the renormalization group viewpoint, the result for the superconducting susceptibility is that two logarithms are not better than one. In the course of this investigation we derive a Callan-Symanzik equation for the repulsive Fermi liquid using the momentum-shell renormalization group, and use it to compute the long-wavelength behavior of the superconducting correlation function in the emergent low-energy theory. We expect this technique to be of broader interest.

  3. Treatment Method for Fermi Barrel Sodium Metal Residues

    SciTech Connect

    Steven R. Sherman; Collin J. Knight

    2005-06-01

    Fermi barrels are 55-gallon drums that once contained bulk sodium metal from the shutdown Fermi 1 breeder reactor facility, and now contain residual sodium metal and other sodium/air reaction products. This report provides a residual sodium treatment method and proposed quality assurance steps that will ensure that all residual sodium is deactivated and removed from the Fermi barrels before disposal. The treatment method is the application of humidified carbon dioxide to the residual sodium followed by a water wash. The experimental application of the treatment method to six Fermi barrels is discussed, and recommendations are provided for further testing and evaluation of the method. Though more testing would allow for a greater refinement of the treatment technique, enough data has been gathered from the tests already performed to prove that 100% compliance with stated waste criteria can be achieved.

  4. Manipulating superconductivity in ruthenates through Fermi surface engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Yi-Ting; Cho, Weejee; Rebola, Alejandro Federico; Burganov, Bulat; Adamo, Carolina; Shen, Kyle M.; Schlom, Darrell G.; Fennie, Craig J.; Kim, Eun-Ah

    2016-07-01

    The key challenge in superconductivity research is to go beyond the historical mode of discovery-driven research. We put forth a new strategy, which is to combine theoretical developments in the weak-coupling renormalization-group approach with the experimental developments in lattice-strain-driven Fermi surface engineering. For concreteness we theoretically investigate how superconducting tendencies will be affected by strain engineering of ruthenates' Fermi surface. We first demonstrate that our approach qualitatively reproduces recent experiments under uniaxial strain. We then note that the order of a few percent strain, readily accessible to epitaxial thin films, can bring the Fermi surface close to van Hove singularity. Using the experimental observation of the change in the Fermi surface under biaxial epitaxial strain and ab initio calculations, we predict Tc for triplet pairing to be maximized by getting close to the van Hove singularities without tuning on to the singularity.

  5. Four years of Fermi LAT flare advocate activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciprini, Stefano; Fermi-LAT Collaboration

    2012-12-01

    The Fermi Flare Advocate (also known as Gamma-ray Sky Watcher, FA-GSW) service provides for a daily quicklook analysis and review of the high-energy gamma-ray sky seen by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). The FA-GSW service communicates alerts for potentially new gamma-ray sources, interesting transients and flares. A weekly digest containing the highlights about the GeV gamma-ray sky is published in the web-based Fermi Sky Blog and email for special events are posted through the LAT multifrequency mailing-list. During the first 4 years of Fermi allsky survey, more than 200 Astronomical Telegrams, several alerts to the TeV Cherenkov telescopes, and target of opportunity to Swift and other observatories have been realized. This increased the rate of simultaneous multi-frequency observing campaigns and the level of international scientific cooperation.

  6. Fermi and LIGO Hone in on Gravity Wave Source

    NASA Video Gallery

    Fermi's GBM saw a fading X-ray source at nearly the same moment LIGO detected gravitational waves from a black hole merger in 2015. This movie shows how scientists can narrow down the location of t...

  7. Controlling resonant tunneling in graphene via Fermi velocity engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, Jonas R. F.; Pereira, Luiz Felipe C.; Bezerra, C. G.

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the resonant tunneling in a single layer graphene superlattice with modulated energy gap and Fermi velocity via an effective Dirac-like Hamiltonian. We calculate the transmission coefficient with the transfer matrix method and analyze the effect of a Fermi velocity modulation on the electronic transmission, in the case of normal and oblique incidence. We find it is possible to manipulate the electronic transmission in graphene by Fermi velocity engineering, and show that it is possible to tune the transmitivity from 0 to 1. We also analyze how a Fermi velocity modulation influences the total conductance and the Fano factor. Our results are relevant for the development of novel graphene-based electronic devices.

  8. GRBs in the Era of Swift and Fermi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Racusin, Judy

    2011-01-01

    Utilizing both Swift and Fermi to study GRBs provides us with a unique broad spectral and temporal window into both prompt emission and afterglow studies. Swift has provided key information from GRB follow-up of LAT detected bursts) that has led to ground-based redshift measurements and afterglow broadband light curves and SEDs. We study the X-ray and optical afterglows of Fermi-LAT detected bursts in the context of the hundreds of GRBs discovered by Swift over the last 7 years) in order to better understand the origin of the high-energy gamma-rays. We also briefly describe the efforts to best facilitate joint Swift-Fermi observations. These initial results demonstrate the synergy between Swift and Fermi) and hint at the many interesting discoveries to come.

  9. Chandra and Swift Observations of Unidentified Fermi-LAT Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donato, Davide; Cheung, T.; Gehrels, N.

    2010-03-01

    In the last year we targeted some of the unidentified Fermi-LAT objects (UFOs) at high Galactic latitude with Chandra and Swift in order to determine the basic properties (positions, fluxes, hardness ratios) of all X-ray sources within the Fermi-LAT localization circles. These satellites enable us to detect the X-ray conterparts with a flux limit that is at least an order of magnitude lower than achieved in extant RASS data and to further follow-up at other wavelengths, with the ultimate goal to reveal the nature of these enigmatic gamma-ray sources. Here we present the results obtained with 5 Chandra pointings of high Galactic latitude UFOs in the Fermi-LAT 3-months bright source list. The association of detected X-ray sources within the improved 11-months Fermi-LAT localization circles with available optical and radio observations is discussed.

  10. NASA's Fermi Shows How Active Galaxies Can Be

    NASA Video Gallery

    Active galaxies called blazars make up the largest class of objects detected by Fermi's Large Area Telescope (LAT). Massive black holes in the hearts of these galaxies fire particle jets in our dir...

  11. Three years of Transients with Fermi GBM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.

    2012-01-01

    The Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) is an all-sky monitoring instrument, sensitive between 8 keV and 40 MeV, with a primary objective of supporting the Large Area Telescope (LAT) in observations of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs). Both instruments are part of the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. Together, the GBM and LAT instruments have provided ground-breaking measurements of GRBs that have, after 10 years of focus on GRB afterglows, inspired renewed interest in the prompt emission phase of GRBs and the physical mechanisms that fuel them. In addition to GRB science, GBM has made significant contributions to the astrophysics of galactic transient sources including long-term variations in the Crab nebula, spin state transitions in accretion powered pulsars, state transitions in black hole X-ray binaries, and unprecedented time-resolved spectral studies of soft gamma-ray repeater bursts. Closer to home, GBM also contributes to solar flare and terrestrial gamma flash science.

  12. The Nuclear Thomas-Fermi Model

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Myers, W. D.; Swiatecki, W. J.

    1994-08-01

    The statistical Thomas-Fermi model is applied to a comprehensive survey of macroscopic nuclear properties. The model uses a Seyler-Blanchard effective nucleon-nucleon interaction, generalized by the addition of one momentum-dependent and one density-dependent term. The adjustable parameters of the interaction were fitted to shell-corrected masses of 1654 nuclei, to the diffuseness of the nuclear surface and to the measured depths of the optical model potential. With these parameters nuclear sizes are well reproduced, and only relatively minor deviations between measured and calculated fission barriers of 36 nuclei are found. The model determines the principal bulk and surface properties of nuclear matter and provides estimates for the more subtle, Droplet Model, properties. The predicted energy vs density relation for neutron matter is in striking correspondence with the 1981 theoretical estimate of Friedman and Pandharipande. Other extreme situations to which the model is applied are a study of Sn isotopes from {sup 82}Sn to {sup 170}Sn, and the rupture into a bubble configuration of a nucleus (constrained to spherical symmetry) which takes place when Z{sup 2}/A exceeds about 100.

  13. Quench dynamics of a superfluid Fermi gas

    SciTech Connect

    Warner, G.L.; Leggett, A.J.

    2005-04-01

    With an eye toward the interpretation of so-called 'cosmological' experiments performed on the low-temperature phases of {sup 3}He, in which regions of the superfluid are destroyed by local heating with neutron radiation, we have studied the behavior of a Fermi gas subjected to uniform variations of an attractive BCS interaction parameter {lambda}. In {sup 3}He, the quenches induced by the rapid cooling of the 'hot spots' back through the transition may lead to the formation of vortex loops via the Kibble-Zurek mechanism. A consideration of the free energy available in the quenched region for the production of such vortices reveals that the Kibble-Zurek scaling law gives at best a lower bound on the defect spacing. Further, for quenches that fall far outside the Ginzburg-Landau regime, the dynamics on the pair subspace, as initiated by quantum fluctuations, tends irreversibly to a self-driven steady state with a gap {delta}{sub {infinity}}={epsilon}{sub C}(e{sup 2/N(0){lambda}}-1){sup -1/2}. In weak coupling, this is only half the BCS gap, the extra energy being taken up by the residual collective motion of the pairs.

  14. Fermi-Dirac distributions for quark partons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourrely, C.; Buccella, F.; Miele, G.; Migliore, G.; Soffer, J.; Tibullo, V.

    1994-09-01

    We propose to use Fermi-Dirac distributions for quark and antiquark partons. It allows a fair description of the x-dependence of the very recent NMC data on the proton and neutron structure functions F {2/ p } (x) and F {2/ n } (x) at Q 2=4 GeV2, as well as the CCFR antiquark distributionxbar q(x). We show that one can also use a corresponding Bose-Einstein expression to describe consistently the gluon distribution. The Pauli exclusion principle, which has been identified to explain the flavor asymmetry of the light-quark sea of the proton, is advocated to guide us for making a simple construction of the polarized parton distributions. We predict the spin dependent structure functions g {1/ p } (x) and g {1/ n } (x) in good agreement with EMC and SLAC data. The quark distributions involve some parameters whose values support well the hypothesis that the violation of the quark parton model sum rules is a consequence of the Pauli principle.

  15. Fermi resonance in dynamical tunneling in a chaotic billiard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Chang-Hwan; Kim, Ji-Hwan; Yu, Hyeon-Hye; Lee, Ji-Won; Kim, Chil-Min

    2015-08-01

    We elucidate that Fermi resonance ever plays a decisive role in dynamical tunneling in a chaotic billiard. Interacting with each other through an avoided crossing, a pair of eigenfunctions are coupled through tunneling channels for dynamical tunneling. In this case, the tunneling channels are an islands chain and its pair unstable periodic orbit, which equals the quantum number difference of the eigenfunctions. This phenomenon of dynamical tunneling is confirmed in a quadrupole billiard in relation with Fermi resonance.

  16. Double-degenerate Bose-Fermi mixture of strontium

    SciTech Connect

    Tey, Meng Khoon; Schreck, Florian; Stellmer, Simon; Grimm, Rudolf

    2010-07-15

    We report on the attainment of a spin-polarized Fermi sea of {sup 87}Sr in thermal contact with a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) of {sup 84}Sr. Interisotope collisions thermalize the fermions with the bosons during evaporative cooling. A degeneracy with T/T{sub F}=0.30(5) is reached for a {sup 87}Sr Fermi sea of 2x10{sup 4} atoms together with an almost pure {sup 84}Sr BEC of 10{sup 5} atoms.

  17. Suppression of Density Fluctuations in a Quantum Degenerate Fermi Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Sanner, Christian; Su, Edward J.; Keshet, Aviv; Gommers, Ralf; Shin, Yong-il; Huang Wujie; Ketterle, Wolfgang

    2010-07-23

    We study density profiles of an ideal Fermi gas and observe Pauli suppression of density fluctuations (atom shot noise) for cold clouds deep in the quantum degenerate regime. Strong suppression is observed for probe volumes containing more than 10 000 atoms. Measuring the level of suppression provides sensitive thermometry at low temperatures. After this method of sensitive noise measurements has been validated with an ideal Fermi gas, it can now be applied to characterize phase transitions in strongly correlated many-body systems.

  18. Spin waves in a persistent spin-current Fermi liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Feldmann, J. D.; Bedell, K. S.

    2010-06-15

    We report two theoretical results for transverse spin waves, which arise in a system with a persistent spin current. Using Fermi liquid theory, we introduce a spin current in the ground state of a polarized or unpolarized Fermi liquid, and we derive the resultant spin waves using the Landau kinetic equation. The resulting spin waves have a q{sup 1} and q{sup 1/2} dispersion to leading order for the polarized and unpolarized systems, respectively.

  19. Fermi Large Area Telescope Operations: Progress Over 4 Years

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, Robert A.; /SLAC

    2012-06-28

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope was launched into orbit in June 2008, and is conducting a multi-year gamma-ray all-sky survey, using the main instrument on Fermi, the Large Area Telescope (LAT). Fermi began its science mission in August 2008, and has now been operating for almost 4 years. The SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory hosts the LAT Instrument Science Operations Center (ISOC), which supports the operation of the LAT in conjunction with the Mission Operations Center (MOC) and the Fermi Science Support Center (FSSC), both at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. The LAT has a continuous output data rate of about 1.5 Mbits per second, and data from the LAT are stored on Fermi and transmitted to the ground through TDRS and the MOC to the ISOC about 10 times per day. Several hundred computers at SLAC are used to process LAT data to perform event reconstruction, and gamma-ray photon data are subsequently delivered to the FSSC for public release with a few hours of being detected by the LAT. We summarize the current status of the LAT, and the evolution of the data processing and monitoring performed by the ISOC during the first 4 years of the Fermi mission, together with future plans for further changes to detected event data processing and instrument operations and monitoring.

  20. Charged vacancies in ferroelectric PbTiO3: Formation energies, optimal Fermi region, and influence on local polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yanpeng; Fu, Huaxiang

    2011-08-01

    First-principles density-functional calculations are used to study the charged vacancies in ferroelectric perovskite PbTiO3. We systematically determine the vacancy formation energies of VPb, VTi, VO1, and VO2 as a function of the Fermi energy EF of the electron reservoir and as a function of the chemical potentials of the atomic reservoirs. The study reveals (i) the stability of different charged states for each type of vacancy and the vacancy specie that is most likely to exist at a given Fermi energy, and (ii) the optimal Fermi energy that may simultaneously minimize the concentrations of all four types of vacancies and is thus good for the growth of PbTiO3 crystal. Our calculations further reveal two hidden rules in the defect physics of ferroelectric PbTiO3, namely, (iii) it is possible to grow high-quality PbTiO3 crystal even in an oxygen-poor environment, provided that the Fermi energy is wisely chosen, and (iv) the formation energies of two key vacancies (VPb2- and VO2+) in the optimal Fermi-energy region are nearly independently of the choice of the oxygen chemical potential and are constrained to ˜1.3 eV. Furthermore, we reveal, as well as provide microscopic insight on, how the presence of different vacancies may affect the local polarization in PbTiO3. We find that VPb2- is benign, but VO12+ and VO22+ are detrimental, to ferroelectricity.

  1. Fermi LAT detection of a new high-energy transient gamma-ray source Fermi J0751-5136

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocevski, D.; Buson, S.

    2016-08-01

    During the week from 18 July through 25 July, 2016, the Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of the two instruments on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, observed gamma-ray activity from a previously unidentified transient source.

  2. Non-Fermi liquid behavior from dynamical effects of impurity scattering in correlated Fermi liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pramod, Kumar; Vidhyadhiraja, N. S.

    2014-03-01

    The interplay of disorder and interactions is a subject of perennial interest. In this work, we have investigated the effect of disorder due to chemical substitution on the dynamics and transport properties of correlated Fermi liquids. A low frequency analysis in the concentrated and dilute limits shows that the dynamical local potentials arising through disorder averaging generate a linear (in frequency) term in the scattering rate. Such non-Fermi liquid behavior (nFL) is investigated in detail for Kondo hole substitution in heavy fermions within dynamical mean field theory. We find closed form expressions for the dependence of the static and linear terms in the scattering rate on substitutional disorder and model parameters. We argue that the low temperature resistivity will acquire a linear in temperature term, and show that the Drude peak structure in the optical conductivity will disappear beyond a certain disorder pc, that marks the crossover from lattice coherent to single-impurity behavior. A full numerical solution of the dynamical mean field theory equations reveals that the nFL term will show up significantly only in certain regimes, although it is present for any non-zero disorder concentration in principle. DST India and CSIR India.

  3. No indications of axionlike particles from Fermi

    SciTech Connect

    Belikov, Alexander V.; Goodenough, Lisa; Hooper, Dan

    2011-03-15

    As very high energy (> or approx. 100 GeV) gamma rays travel over cosmological distances, their flux is attenuated through interactions with the extragalactic background light. Observations of distant gamma ray sources at energies between {approx}200 GeV and a few TeV by ground-based gamma-ray telescopes such as HESS, however, have motivated the possibility that the universe is more transparent to very high energy photons than had been anticipated. One proposed explanation for this is the existence of axionlike particles (ALPs) which gamma rays can efficiently oscillate into, enabling them to travel cosmological distances without attenuation. In this article, we use a state-of-the-art model for the extragalactic background light (which is somewhat lower at {approx}{mu}m wavelengths than in previous models) and data from the Fermi Gamma Ray Space Telescope to calculate the spectra at 1-100 GeV of two gamma-ray sources, 1ES1101-232 at redshift z=0.186 and H2356-309 at z=0.165, in conjunction with the measurements of ground-based telescopes, to test the ALP hypothesis. We find that these observations can be well fit by an intrinsic power-law source spectrum with indices of -1.72 and -2.1 for 1ES1101-232 and H2356-309, respectively, and that no ALPs or other exotic physics is necessary to explain the observed degree of attenuation. While this does not exclude the possibility that ALPs are involved in the cosmological propagation of gamma rays, it does reduce the motivation for such new physics.

  4. Type-II Weyl semimetals.

    PubMed

    Soluyanov, Alexey A; Gresch, Dominik; Wang, Zhijun; Wu, QuanSheng; Troyer, Matthias; Dai, Xi; Bernevig, B Andrei

    2015-11-26

    Fermions--elementary particles such as electrons--are classified as Dirac, Majorana or Weyl. Majorana and Weyl fermions had not been observed experimentally until the recent discovery of condensed matter systems such as topological superconductors and semimetals, in which they arise as low-energy excitations. Here we propose the existence of a previously overlooked type of Weyl fermion that emerges at the boundary between electron and hole pockets in a new phase of matter. This particle was missed by Weyl because it breaks the stringent Lorentz symmetry in high-energy physics. Lorentz invariance, however, is not present in condensed matter physics, and by generalizing the Dirac equation, we find the new type of Weyl fermion. In particular, whereas Weyl semimetals--materials hosting Weyl fermions--were previously thought to have standard Weyl points with a point-like Fermi surface (which we refer to as type-I), we discover a type-II Weyl point, which is still a protected crossing, but appears at the contact of electron and hole pockets in type-II Weyl semimetals. We predict that WTe2 is an example of a topological semimetal hosting the new particle as a low-energy excitation around such a type-II Weyl point. The existence of type-II Weyl points in WTe2 means that many of its physical properties are very different to those of standard Weyl semimetals with point-like Fermi surfaces. PMID:26607545

  5. Type-II Weyl semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soluyanov, Alexey A.; Gresch, Dominik; Wang, Zhijun; Wu, Quansheng; Troyer, Matthias; Dai, Xi; Bernevig, B. Andrei

    2015-11-01

    Fermions—elementary particles such as electrons—are classified as Dirac, Majorana or Weyl. Majorana and Weyl fermions had not been observed experimentally until the recent discovery of condensed matter systems such as topological superconductors and semimetals, in which they arise as low-energy excitations. Here we propose the existence of a previously overlooked type of Weyl fermion that emerges at the boundary between electron and hole pockets in a new phase of matter. This particle was missed by Weyl because it breaks the stringent Lorentz symmetry in high-energy physics. Lorentz invariance, however, is not present in condensed matter physics, and by generalizing the Dirac equation, we find the new type of Weyl fermion. In particular, whereas Weyl semimetals—materials hosting Weyl fermions—were previously thought to have standard Weyl points with a point-like Fermi surface (which we refer to as type-I), we discover a type-II Weyl point, which is still a protected crossing, but appears at the contact of electron and hole pockets in type-II Weyl semimetals. We predict that WTe2 is an example of a topological semimetal hosting the new particle as a low-energy excitation around such a type-II Weyl point. The existence of type-II Weyl points in WTe2 means that many of its physical properties are very different to those of standard Weyl semimetals with point-like Fermi surfaces.

  6. Molecular structure, spectral constants, and fermi resonances in chlorine nitrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkie, Douglas T.; Butler, Rebecca A. H.; Helminger, Paul; De Lucia, Frank C.

    2004-06-01

    Chlorine nitrate has two low-lying vibrational modes that lead to a series of Fermi resonances in the 9 υ97 υ7 family of levels that include the 9 2⇔7 1 and 9 3⇔7 19 1 dyads and the 9 4⇔9 27 1⇔7 2 and 9 5⇔9 37 1⇔9 17 2 triads. These states, along with the ground and 9 1 vibrational states, have been previously analyzed with millimeter and submillimeter wave spectroscopy and provide a substantial body of data for the investigation of these resonances and their impact on calculated spectroscopic constants and structural parameters. Due to fitting indeterminacies, these previous analyses did not include the main Fermi resonance interaction term. Consequently, the fitted rotational constants are linear combinations of the unmixed rotational constants of the basis vibrational states. In this paper, we have calculated the contributions of the Fermi resonances to the observed rotational constants in a model that determines the vibrational-rotational constants, the Fermi term and the mixing between interacting vibrational states, the cubic potential constant ( φ997) that connects interacting levels through a Fermi resonance, and the inertial defects. These results agree with predictions from ab initio and harmonic force field calculations and provide further experimental information for the determination of the fundamental molecular properties of chlorine nitrate.

  7. The Fermi Guest Investigator program: Impactful Science and Groundbreaking Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrara, Elizabeth C.; Fermi Science Support Center

    2016-01-01

    As an all-sky surveyor, the science impact from the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope is limited by the number of scientists performing data analysis, and not by the number of objects observed by the spacecraft. To encourage this, the Fermi guest investigator (GI) program supports a variety of scientific inquiries that benefit overall Fermi science. The GI program also provides access to radio, optical, X-ray and VHE gamma-ray data and/or observing time, encouraging and enabling relevant multi-wavelength studies. This approach has allowed for new analyses and ideas to flourish, leading to world-class groundbreaking science and a number of unexpected discoveries. The program has also supported a number of multi-year, multi-wavelength observing programs resulting in a rich variety of publicly available resources. Here we describe the most significant results from the Fermi GI program, including those resulting from both sky-survey and target of opportunity pointed observations. We discuss the public resources the program has supported, both for broad-band data acquisition and for the development of new analysis methods and techniques. Additionally, we consider the ramifications of the existence of long-term multi-wavelength datasets, such as those enabled by the Fermi GI program, for future scientific inquiry.

  8. The Fermi Guest Investigator program: Impactful Science and Groundbreaking Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrara, Elizabeth C.

    2016-04-01

    As an all-sky surveyor, the science impact from the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope is limited by the number of scientists performing data analysis, and not by the number of objects observed by the spacecraft. To encourage this, the Fermi guest investigator (GI) program supports a variety of scientific inquiries that benefit overall Fermi science. The GI program also provides access to radio, optical, X-ray and VHE gamma-ray data and/or observing time, encouraging and enabling relevant multi-wavelength studies. This approach has allowed for new analyses and ideas to flourish, leading to world-class groundbreaking science and a number of unexpected discoveries. The program has also supported a number of multi-year, multi-wavelength observing programs resulting in a rich variety of publicly available resources. Here we describe the most significant results from the Fermi GI program, including those resulting from both sky-survey and target of opportunity pointed observations. We discuss the public resources the program has supported, both for broad-band data acquisition and for the development of new analysis methods and techniques. Additionally, we consider the ramifications of the existence of long-term multi-wavelength datasets, such as those enabled by the Fermi GI program, for future scientific inquiry.

  9. Quasiparticles and Fermi liquid behaviour in an organic metal

    PubMed Central

    Kiss, T.; Chainani, A.; Yamamoto, H.M.; Miyazaki, T.; Akimoto, T.; Shimojima, T.; Ishizaka, K.; Watanabe, S.; Chen, C.-T.; Fukaya, A.; Kato, R.; Shin, S.

    2012-01-01

    Many organic metals display exotic properties such as superconductivity, spin-charge separation and so on and have been described as quasi-one-dimensional Luttinger liquids. However, a genuine Fermi liquid behaviour with quasiparticles and Fermi surfaces have not been reported to date for any organic metal. Here, we report the experimental Fermi surface and band structure of an organic metal (BEDT-TTF)3Br(pBIB) obtained using angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy, and show its consistency with first-principles band structure calculations. Our results reveal a quasiparticle renormalization at low energy scales (effective mass m*=1.9 me) and ω2 dependence of the imaginary part of the self energy, limited by a kink at ~50 meV arising from coupling to molecular vibrations. The study unambiguously proves that (BEDT-TTF)3Br(pBIB) is a quasi-2D organic Fermi liquid with a Fermi surface consistent with Shubnikov-de Haas results. PMID:23011143

  10. Theoretical studies of rotation induced Fermi resonances in HOCl

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, R.; Guo, H.; Skokov, S.; Bowman, J.M.

    1999-10-01

    Theoretical investigations of rotation induced Fermi resonances in HOCl are carried out using several different quantum mechanical methods. Due to shape differences of the eigenfunctions, nearby vibrational levels may be energetically tuned to form Fermi (or anharmonic) resonances by varying rotational quantum numbers. Such rotation induced Fermi resonances have been observed experimentally in HOCl, for example, for bright states (3,2,0) and (4,0,0) by Abel {ital et al.} [J. Chem. Phys. {bold 104}, 3189 (1996) and {ital ibid}. {bold 106}, 3103 (1997)]. Using an {ital ab initio} potential, this work shows that the (3,2,0) state is significantly mixed with the (2,3,3) state near J=28 and K=4, and J=14 and K=3, while the (4,0,0) state forms a Fermi pair with (3,2,1) near J=43 and K=8. The wave functions of the Fermi pairs display significant deformation due to the mixing. Both the rotation induced degeneracy and coupling strength are found to be important. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. Fermi Observations of TeV-Selected Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M. G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Burnett, T. H.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cavazzuti, E.; Cecchi, C.; Çelik, Ö.; Chekhtman, A.; Cheung, C. C.; Chiang, J.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cominsky, L. R.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Di Bernardo, G.; Silva, E. do Couto e.; Drell, P. S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Farnier, C.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Finke, J.; Focke, W. B.; Fortin, P.; Foschini, L.; Frailis, M.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Giavitto, G.; Giebels, B.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grove, J. E.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Hanabata, Y.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Horan, D.; Hughes, R. E.; Jackson, M. S.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, R. P.; Johnson, W. N.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Kawai, N.; Kerr, M.; Knödlseder, J.; Kocian, M. L.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Latronico, L.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Madejski, G. M.; Makeev, A.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McConville, W.; McEnery, J. E.; Meurer, C.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nolan, P. L.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Ozaki, M.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Parent, D.; Pelassa, V.; Pepe, M.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Porter, T. A.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reposeur, T.; Reyes, L. C.; Ritz, S.; Rochester, L. S.; Rodriguez, A. Y.; Roth, M.; Ryde, F.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sanchez, D.; Sander, A.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Scargle, J. D.; Schalk, T. L.; Sellerholm, A.; Sgrò, C.; Shaw, M. S.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, D. A.; Smith, P. D.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Strickman, M. S.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, T.; Tanaka, T.; Tanaka, Y.; Thayer, J. B.; Thayer, J. G.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Tramacere, A.; Uchiyama, Y.; Usher, T. L.; Vasileiou, V.; Vilchez, N.; Vitale, V.; Waite, A. P.; Wang, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Ylinen, T.; Ziegler, M.

    2009-12-01

    We report on observations of TeV-selected active galactic nuclei (AGNs) made during the first 5.5 months of observations with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on-board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi). In total, 96 AGNs were selected for study, each being either (1) a source detected at TeV energies (28 sources) or (2) an object that has been studied with TeV instruments and for which an upper limit has been reported (68 objects). The Fermi observations show clear detections of 38 of these TeV-selected objects, of which 21 are joint GeV-TeV sources, and 29 were not in the third EGRET catalog. For each of the 38 Fermi-detected sources, spectra and light curves are presented. Most can be described with a power law of spectral index harder than 2.0, with a spectral break generally required to accommodate the TeV measurements. Based on an extrapolation of the Fermi spectrum, we identify sources, not previously detected at TeV energies, which are promising targets for TeV instruments. Evidence for systematic evolution of the γ-ray spectrum with redshift is presented and discussed in the context of interaction with the extragalactic background light.

  12. The Fermi view of gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axelsson, Magnus; Fermi/LAT Collaboration

    2015-08-01

    The Fermi mission has brought great advances in the study of GRBs. Over 1500 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have been detected by the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM), and more than 100 of these are also detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) above 30 MeV. These high-energy detections have revealed previously unknown features in GRB spectra, including additional components and spectral cut-offs, as well as delayed and long-lived GeV emission. Interpretation of these new features has proven to be a source of vigorous debate within the GRB community. I will review recent Fermi-LAT observations of GRBs, ranging from the detection of the long-lived GRB 130427A to the broad-band fits of simultaneous X-ray and gamma-ray data, and what they reveal about the origin of the high-energy emission from GRBs.

  13. Quantum Phase Transitions in a Bose-Fermi Mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duchon, Eric; Zhang, Shizhong; Chang, Soon-Yong; Randeria, Mohit; Trivedi, Nandini

    2013-03-01

    Motivated by the recent experimental realization of stable Bose-Fermi mixtures with broad Feshbach resonances, we investigate possible quantum phases and phase transitions in this system using variational Monte Carlo. Within a single-channel model appropriate near broad Feshbach resonances, we show that as the boson-fermion coupling increases, the Bose-Einstein condensate disappears and the atomic Fermi surface is destroyed while the Fermi surface of the composite molecules emerges. We calculate the momentum distribution of atomic and molecular fermions and demonstrate that the atomic fermion's quasi-particle weight Z vanishes at a critical coupling. We would like to acknowledge support from NSF DMR-0907275 (E.D., N.T.) and NSF DMR-1006532 (M.R.).

  14. Ferromagnetism in a repulsive atomic Fermi gas with correlated disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilati, S.; Fratini, E.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the zero-temperature ferromagnetic behavior of a two-component repulsive Fermi gas in the presence of a correlated random field that represents an optical speckle pattern. The density is tuned so that the (noninteracting) Fermi energy is close to the mobility edge of the Anderson localization transition. We employ quantum Monte Carlo simulations to determine various ground-state properties, including the equation of state, the magnetic susceptibility, and the energy of an impurity immersed in a polarized Fermi gas (repulsive polaron). In the weakly interacting limit, the magnetic susceptibility is found to be suppressed by disorder. However, it rapidly increases with the interaction strength, and it diverges at a much weaker interaction strength compared to the clean gas. Both the transition from the paramagnetic phase to the partially ferromagnetic phase, and the one from the partially to the fully ferromagnetic phase, are strongly favored by disorder, indicating a case of order induced by disorder.

  15. Enrico Fermi - And the Revolutions of Modern Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Dan

    1999-02-01

    In 1938, at the age of 37, Enrico Fermi was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics. That same year he emigrated from Italy to the United States and, in the course of his experiments, discovered nuclear fission--a process which forms the basis of nuclear power and atomic bombs. Soon the brilliant physicist was involved in the top secret race to produce the deadliest weapon on Earth. He created the first self-sustaining chain reaction, devised new methods for purifying plutonium, and eventually participated in the first atomic test. This compelling biography traces Fermis education in Italy, his meteoric career in the scientific world, his escape from fascism to America, and the ingenious experiments he devised and conducted at the University of Rome, Columbia University, and the Los Alamos laboratory. The book also presents a mini-course in quantum and nuclear physics in an accessible, fast-paced narrative that invokes all the dizzying passion of Fermis brilliant discoveries.

  16. From weakly to strongly interacting 2D Fermi gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyke, Paul; Fenech, Kristian; Lingham, Marcus; Peppler, Tyson; Hoinka, Sascha; Vale, Chris

    2014-05-01

    We study ultracold 2D Fermi gases of 6Li formed in a highly oblate trapping potential. The potential is generated by a cylindrically focused, blue detuned TEM01 mode laser beam. Weak magnetic field curvature provides highly harmonic confinement in the radial direction and we can readily produce single clouds with an aspect ratio of 230. Our experiments investigate the dimensional crossover from 3D to 2D for a two component Fermi gas in the Bose-Einstein Condensate to Bardeen Cooper Schrieffer crossover. Observation of an elbow in measurements of the cloud width vs. atom number is consistent with populating only the lowest transverse harmonic oscillator state for weak attractive interactions. This measurement is extended to the strongly interacting region using the broad Feshbach resonance at 832 G. We also report our progress towards measurement of the 2D equation of state for an interacting 2D Fermi gas via in-situ absorption imaging.

  17. Broad band spectral energy distribution studies of Fermi bright blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monte, C.; Giommi, P.; Cavazzuti, E.; Gasparrini, D.; Rainò, S.; Fuhrmann, L.; Angelakis, E.; Villata, M.; Raiteri, C. M.; Perri, M.; Richards, J.

    2011-02-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope was successfully launched on June 11, 2008 and has already opened a new era for gamma-ray astronomy. The Large Area Telescope (LAT), the main instrument on board Fermi, presents a significant improvement in sensitivity over its predecessor EGRET, due to its large field of view and effective area, combined with its excellent timing capabilities. The preliminary results of the Spectral Energy Distribution Analysis performed on a sample of bright blazars are presented. For this study, the data from the first three months of data collection of Fermi have been used. The analysis is extended down to radio, mm, near-IR, optical, UV and X-ray bands and up to TeV energies based on unprecedented sample of simultaneous multi-wavelength observations by GASP-WEBT.

  18. FERMI@Elettra FEL Design Technical Optimization Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Fawley, William; Penn, Gregory; Allaria, Enrico; De Ninno,Giovanni; Graves, William

    2006-07-31

    This is the final report of the FEL Design Group for the Technical Optimization Study for the FERMI{at}ELETTRA project. The FERMI{at}ELETTRA project is based on the principle of harmonic upshifting of an initial ''seed'' signal in a single pass, FEL amplifier employing multiple undulators. There are a number of FEL physics principles which underlie this approach to obtaining short wavelength output: (1) the energy modulation of the electron beam via the resonant interaction with an external laser seed (2) the use of a chromatic dispersive section to then develop a strong density modulation with large harmonic overtones (3) the production of coherent radiation by the microbunched beam in a downstream radiator. Within the context of the FERMI project, we discuss each of these elements in turn.

  19. Spin-Orbit Coupled Fermi Gases across a Feshbach Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zeng-Qiang; Zhai, Hui

    2011-11-01

    In this Letter we study both ground state properties and the superfluid transition temperature of a spin-1/2 Fermi gas across a Feshbach resonance with a synthetic spin-orbit coupling, using the mean-field theory and the exact solution of two-body problem. We show that a strong spin-orbit coupling can significantly enhance the pairing gap for negative scattering length as, due to increased density of state at Fermi surface. Strong spin-orbit coupling can also significantly enhance the superfluid transition temperature Tc to a sizable fraction of Fermi temperature when as≲0, while it suppresses Tc slightly for positive as. The interaction energy and pair size at resonance are also discussed.

  20. Multiwavelength Spectral Studies Of Fermi-LAT Blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Manasvita; Marscher, A.; Jorstad, S.; Agudo, I.; Larionov, V.; Aller, M.; Gurwell, M.; Lähteenmäki, A.

    2011-01-01

    We present multiwavelength spectral analyses of several Fermi-LAT selected blazars that are part of the Boston University multiwaveband polarization monitoring program. The data for the objects of this study have been compiled from observations with Fermi, RXTE, the VLBA, and various ground-based optical telescopes starting in August 2008. We simulate the dynamic spectral energy distributions (SEDs) within the framework of a multi-zone time-dependent leptonic jet model for blazars, with radiation feedback, in the internal shock scenario. We discuss the intrinsic parameter differences present between the various blazar subclasses of our sample set and the interplay between synchrotron and inverse Compton radiation processes responsible for producing the resultant SEDs. This research was supported in part by NASA through Fermi grants NNX10AO59G, NNX08AV65G, and NNX08AV61G and ADP grant NNX08AJ64G, and by NSF grant AST-0907893.

  1. Multiwavelength Spectral Studies Of Fermi-lat Blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Manasvita; Marscher, A.; Jorstad, S.; Boettcher, M.; Agudo, I.; Larionov, V.; Aller, M.; Gurwell, M.; Lahteenmaki, A.

    2011-09-01

    We present multiwavelength spectral analyses of two Fermi-LAT blazars, OJ 287 and 3C 279, that are part of the Boston University multiwaveband polarization monitoring program. The data have been compiled from observations with Fermi, RXTE, the VLBA, and various ground-based optical and radio telescopes. We simulate the dynamic spectral energy distributions (SEDs) within the framework of a multi-slice, time-dependent leptonic jet model for blazars, with radiation feedback, in the internal shock scenario. We use the physical jet parameters obtained from the VLBA monitoring to guide our modeling efforts. We discuss the role of intrinsic parameters and the interplay between synchrotron and inverse Compton radiation processes responsible for producing the resultant SEDs. This research was supported in part by NASA through Fermi grants NNX10AO59G, NNX08AV65G, and NNX08AV61G and ADP grant NNX08AJ64G, and by NSF grant AST-0907893.

  2. Quantum phase transitions in the Fermi-Bose Hubbard model

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, L.D.; Holland, M.J.

    2005-09-15

    We propose a multiband Fermi-Bose Hubbard model with on-site fermion-boson conversion and general filling factor in three dimensions. Such a Hamiltonian models an atomic Fermi gas trapped in a lattice potential and subject to a Feshbach resonance. We solve this model in the two-state approximation for paired fermions at zero temperature. The problem then maps onto a coupled Heisenberg spin model. In the limit of large positive and negative detuning, the quantum phase transitions in the Bose Hubbard and paired-Fermi Hubbard models are correctly reproduced. Near resonance, the Mott states are given by a superposition of the paired-fermion and boson fields and the Mott-superfluid borders go through an avoided crossing in the phase diagram.

  3. Pulsar timing and the Fermi and AGILE missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weltevrede, Patrick; Possenti, Andrea; Manchester, Dick; Johnston, Simon; Kramer, Michael; Hobbs, George; Keith, Michael; Romani, Roger W.; Thompson, David J.; Thorsett, Stephen; Roberts, Mallory

    2009-10-01

    We request time to observe 160 pulsars on a regular basis in order to provide accurate ephemerides necessary for the detection of gamma-ray pulsars with the Fermi and AGILE satellites. The main science goals are to increase the number of known gamma-ray pulsars (both radio loud and radio quiet), to determine accurate pulse profiles, to characterise their high energy spectra and phase resolved spectroscopy of the brightest pulsars. In the radio, the observations will also allow us to find glitches, characterise timing noise, investigate dispersion and rotation measure variability and enhance our knowledge of single pulse phenomenology. To date, we are (co-)authors on 2 Agile papers, 4 Fermi papers, 3 radio papers and authors on 3 papers in submission. The data are contributing to the PhD theses of Lucas Guillemot and Damien Parent from the Bordeaux Fermi group.

  4. Observation of Fermi arc surface states in a topological metal.

    PubMed

    Xu, Su-Yang; Liu, Chang; Kushwaha, Satya K; Sankar, Raman; Krizan, Jason W; Belopolski, Ilya; Neupane, Madhab; Bian, Guang; Alidoust, Nasser; Chang, Tay-Rong; Jeng, Horng-Tay; Huang, Cheng-Yi; Tsai, Wei-Feng; Lin, Hsin; Shibayev, Pavel P; Chou, Fang-Cheng; Cava, Robert J; Hasan, M Zahid

    2015-01-16

    The topology of the electronic structure of a crystal is manifested in its surface states. Recently, a distinct topological state has been proposed in metals or semimetals whose spin-orbit band structure features three-dimensional Dirac quasiparticles. We used angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy to experimentally observe a pair of spin-polarized Fermi arc surface states on the surface of the Dirac semimetal Na3Bi at its native chemical potential. Our systematic results collectively identify a topological phase in a gapless material. The observed Fermi arc surface states open research frontiers in fundamental physics and possibly in spintronics. PMID:25593189

  5. Weyl superfluidity in a three-dimensional dipolar Fermi gas.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Li, Xiaopeng; Yin, Lan; Liu, W Vincent

    2015-01-30

    Weyl superconductivity or superfluidity, a fascinating topological state of matter, features novel phenomena such as emergent Weyl fermionic excitations and anomalies. Here we report that an anisotropic Weyl superfluid state can arise as a low temperature stable phase in a 3D dipolar Fermi gas. A crucial ingredient of our model is a direction-dependent two-body effective attraction generated by a rotating external field. Experimental signatures are predicted for cold gases in radio-frequency spectroscopy. The finite temperature phase diagram of this system is studied and the transition temperature of the Weyl superfluidity is found to be within the experimental scope for atomic dipolar Fermi gases. PMID:25679898

  6. Hydrodynamics in a Degenerate, Strongly Attractive Fermi Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, John E.; Kinast, Joseph; Hemmer, Staci; Turlapov, Andrey; O'Hara, Ken; Gehm, Mike; Granade, Stephen

    2004-01-01

    In summary, we use all-optical methods with evaporative cooling near a Feshbach resonance to produce a strongly interacting degenerate Fermi gas. We observe hydrodynamic behavior in the expansion dynamics. At low temperatures, collisions may not explain the expansion dynamics. We observe hydrodynamics in the trapped gas. Our observations include collisionally-damped excitation spectra at high temperature which were not discussed above. In addition, we observe weakly damped breathing modes at low temperature. The observed temperature dependence of the damping time and hydrodynamic frequency are not consistent with collisional dynamics nor with collisionless mean field interactions. These observations constitute the first evidence for superfluid hydrodynamics in a Fermi gas.

  7. Magnetic moments and non-Fermi-liquid behavior in quasicrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, Eric

    Motivated by the intrinsic non-Fermi-liquid behavior observed in the heavy-fermion quasicrystal Au51Al34Yb15, we study the low-temperature behavior of dilute magnetic impurities placed in metallic quasicrystals. We find that a large fraction of the magnetic moments are not quenched down to very low temperatures, leading to a power-law distribution of Kondo temperatures, accompanied by a non-Fermi-liquid behavior, in a remarkable similarity to the Kondo-disorder scenario found in disordered heavy-fermion metals. This work was supported by FAPESP (Brazil) Grant No. 2013/00681-8.

  8. Pressure dependence of the Fermi surface of hcp Yb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schirber, J. E.; Beaudry, B. J.; Jepsen, O.

    1981-06-01

    The pressure dependence of Fermi-surface cross sections for principal symmetry directions has been investigated using solid He pressure generation techniques. Careful searches for de Haas-van Alphen signals were conducted from 2 to 9 kbar in both virgin fcc crystals and samples transformed from hcp to fcc. No sign of the frequency reported by Ribault was detected. Results are discussed in terms of theoretically calculated pressure-induced changes in the band structure and Fermi surface of the hcp phase of Yb.

  9. Fermi Surface and Magnetic Structure of TmGa3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biasini, M.; Kontrym-Sznajd, G.; Monge, M. A.; Gemmi, M.; Czopnik, A.; Jura, A.

    2001-05-01

    We carry out measurements of the two-dimensional angular correlation of the positron annihilation radiation (2D-ACAR) to reconstruct the complex multisheet Fermi surface (FS) of the cubic rare-earth (RE) compound TmGa3. We discover a correlation between the antiferromagnetic structures and the nesting of the FS along the [110] directions. Moreover, we propose methods to estimate the density of states at the Fermi energy ( EF) and the electronic contribution to the specific heat [we obtain N\\(EF\\) = 13.6 states/Ryd cell and γ = 2.4 mJ/mole K2].

  10. Fermi surface, magnetic, and superconducting properties in actinide compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ōnuki, Yoshichika; Settai, Rikio; Haga, Yoshinori; Machida, Yo; Izawa, Koichi; Honda, Fuminori; Aoki, Dai

    2014-08-01

    The de Haas-van Alphen effect, which is a powerful method to explore Fermi surface properties, has been observed in cerium, uranium, and nowadays even in neptunium and plutonium compounds. Here, we present the results of several studies concerning the Fermi surface properties of the heavy fermion superconductors UPt3 and NpPd5Al2, and of the ferromagnetic pressure-induced superconductor UGe2, together with those of some related compounds for which fascinating anisotropic superconductivity, magnetism, and heavy fermion behavior has been observed. xml:lang="fr"

  11. Exotic Paired States with Anisotropic Spin-Dependent Fermi Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Feiguin, Adrian E.; Fisher, Matthew P. A.

    2009-07-10

    We propose a model for realizing exotic paired states in cold Fermi gases by using a spin-dependent optical lattice to engineer mismatched Fermi surfaces for each hyperfine species. The BCS phase diagram shows a stable paired superfluid state with coexisting pockets of momentum space with gapless unpaired carriers, similar to the Sarma state in polarized mixtures, but in our case the system is unpolarized. We propose the possible existence of an exotic 'Cooper-pair Bose-metal' phase, which has a gap for single fermion excitations but gapless and uncondensed 'Cooper-pair' excitations residing on a 'Bose surface' in momentum space.

  12. Superfluidity of heated Fermi systems in the static fluctuation approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Khamzin, A. A.; Nikitin, A. S.; Sitdikov, A. S.

    2015-10-15

    Superfluidity properties of heated finite Fermi systems are studied in the static fluctuation approximation, which is an original method. This method relies on a single and controlled approximation, which permits taking correctly into account quasiparticle correlations and thereby going beyond the independent-quasiparticle model. A closed self-consistent set of equations for calculating correlation functions at finite temperature is obtained for a finite Fermi system described by the Bardeen–Cooper–Schrieffer Hamiltonian. An equation for the energy gap is found with allowance for fluctuation effects. It is shown that the phase transition to the supefluid state is smeared upon the inclusion of fluctuations.

  13. Design and simulation challenges for FERMI@elettra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Mitri, S.; Allaria, E.; Badano, L.; Bontoiu, C.; Cornacchia, M.; Craievich, P.; Danailov, M.; De Ninno, G.; Diviacco, B.; Ferrando, O.; Ferry, S.; Iazzourene, F.; Milton, S. V.; Penco, G.; Spampinati, S.; Trovo', M.; Veronese, M.; Fawley, W.; Lidia, S.; Penn, G.; Qiang, J.; Sonnad, K. G.; Venturini, M.; Warnock, R.; Zholents, A. A.; Pogorelov, I. V.; Borland, M.; Bassi, G.; Ellison, J. A.; Heinemann, K.; Fiorito, R.; Shkvarunets, A.; Tobin, J. C.

    2009-09-01

    FERMI@elettra is a fourth-generation light source user facility under construction at the Elettra Laboratory in Trieste, Italy. The high-quality 1.2 GeV electron beam drives two-seeded Free Electron Lasers (FELs) in the wavelength range 100-10 nm. Wavelength tunability, variable polarization and higher electron beam energies to reach even shorter output wavelengths are also in the machine delivery plan. This paper describes the physics processes that have been modelled to simulate FERMI@elettra and the computer codes used to optimize the machine design. The paper focuses on several design challenges and how these translate into modelling and simulation challenges.

  14. Photo-Induced Unpinning of Fermi Level in WO3

    PubMed Central

    Malagù, Cesare; Carotta, Maria C.; Comini, Elisabetta; Faglia, Guido; Giberti, Alessio; Guidi, Vincenzo; Maffeis, Thierry G.G.; Martinelli, Giuliano; Sberveglieri, Giorgio; Wilks, Steve P.

    2005-01-01

    Atomic force and high resolution scanning tunneling analyses were carried out on nanostructured WO3 films. It turned out that the band gap measured by scanning tunneling spectroscopy at surface is lower than the band gap reported in the literature. This effect is attributed to the high density of surface states in this material, which allows tunneling into these states. Such a high density of surface states pins the Fermi level resulting in modest surface activity at room temperature. Photo activation of WO3 results in unpinning of the Fermi level and thereby in higher chemical activity at surface.

  15. Harper Operator, Fermi Curves and Picard-Fuchs Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dan

    2014-05-01

    This paper is a continuation of the work on the spectral problem of the Harper operator using algebraic geometry. We continue to discuss the local monodromy of algebraic Fermi curves based on Picard-Lefschetz formula. The density of states over approximating components of Fermi curves satisfies a Picard-Fuchs equation. By the property of Landen transformation, the density of states has a Lambert series as the quarter period. A q-expansion of the energy is derived from a mirror map as in the B-model.

  16. String theory, quantum phase transitions, and the emergent Fermi liquid.

    PubMed

    Cubrović, Mihailo; Zaanen, Jan; Schalm, Koenraad

    2009-07-24

    A central problem in quantum condensed matter physics is the critical theory governing the zero-temperature quantum phase transition between strongly renormalized Fermi liquids as found in heavy fermion intermetallics and possibly in high-critical temperature superconductors. We found that the mathematics of string theory is capable of describing such fermionic quantum critical states. Using the anti-de Sitter/conformal field theory correspondence to relate fermionic quantum critical fields to a gravitational problem, we computed the spectral functions of fermions in the field theory. By increasing the fermion density away from the relativistic quantum critical point, a state emerges with all the features of the Fermi liquid. PMID:19556462

  17. The γ-ray emission mechanism for Fermi Blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, J. H.; Fan, J. H.; Hua, T. X.; Wu, D. X.

    2014-08-01

    Fermi Blazars are characterized mainly by the vast effect that relativistic beaming has on their emission spectra. Fermi-LAT has detected more than 1000 blazars which provide us with a good opportunity to study the emission mechanism. In this paper, adopted the Doppler factor δ γ determined in our previous paper, the γ-ray emission mechanism is discussed using the investigation of dependence of the γ-ray luminosity on the Doppler factor. Our discussions suggest that the γ-ray emission mechanism is SSC for BL Lacs.

  18. Spontaneous separation of large-spin Fermi gas in the harmonic trap: a density functional study

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zongli; Gu, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    The component separation of the trapped large-spin Fermi gas is studied within density functional theory. The ground state and ferromagnetic transition in the gas, with and without the spin mixing collision, are calculated. In the absence of spin mixing, two patterns of separation are observed as the interaction between atoms increases, whereas only one of them corresponds to a ferromagnetic transition. The phase diagram suggests that the pattern which the system chooses depends on the interaction strength in the collision channels. With the presence of spin mixing, the distribution of phase region changes because of the interplay between different collision channels. Specifically, the spin exchange benefits the FM transition, while it suppresses the component separation of CS-II pattern. PMID:27549012

  19. Photon transport of the superradiant TeraFERMI THz beamline at the FERMI free-electron laser.

    PubMed

    Svetina, Cristian; Mahne, Nicola; Raimondi, Lorenzo; Perucchi, Andrea; Di Pietro, Paola; Lupi, Stefano; Schmidt, Bernhard; Zangrando, Marco

    2016-01-01

    TeraFERMI is the new terahertz (THz) beamline for pump-probe studies on the femtosecond time-scale, under construction at the FERMI free-electron laser (FEL) facility in Trieste, Italy. The beamline will take advantage of the coherent radiation emitted by the spent electrons from the FEL undulators, before being dumped. This will result in short, coherent, high-power THz pulses to be used as a pump beam, in order to modulate structural properties of matter, thereby inducing phase transitions. The TeraFERMI beamline collects THz radiation in the undulator hall and guides it along a beam pipe which is approximately 30 m long, extending across the safety hutch and two shielding walls. Here the optical design, which will allow the efficient transport of the emitted THz radiation in the experimental hall, is presented. PMID:26698051

  20. Global Structure of Isothermal Diffuse X-Ray Emission along the Fermi Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kataoka, J.; Tahara, M.; Totani, T.; Sofue, Y.; Inoue, Y.; Nakashima, S.; Cheung, C. C.

    2015-07-01

    In our previous works, we found absorbed thermal X-ray plasma with kT ≃ 0.3 keV observed ubiquitously near the edges of the Fermi bubbles and interpreted this emission as weakly shock-heated Galactic halo gas. Here we present a systematic and uniform analysis of archival Suzaku (29 pointings; 6 newly presented) and Swift (68 pointings; 49 newly presented) data within Galactic longitudes | l| < 20° and latitude 5°≲ | b| < 60°, covering the whole extent of the Fermi bubbles. We show that the plasma temperature is constant at kT ≃ 0.30 ± 0.07 keV, while the emission measure (EM) varies by an order of magnitude, increasing toward the Galactic center (i.e., low | b| ) with enhancements at the North Polar Spur (NPS), SE-claw, and NW-clump features. Moreover, the EM distribution of kT ≃ 0.30 keV plasma is highly asymmetric in the northern and southern bubbles. Although the association of the X-ray emission with the bubbles is not conclusive, we compare the observed EM properties with simple models assuming (i) a filled halo without bubbles, whose gas density follows a hydrostatic isothermal model (King profile), and (ii) a bubble-in-halo in which two identical bubbles expand into the halo, forming thick shells of swept halo gas. We argue that the EM profile in the north (b > 0°) favors (ii), whereas that of the south (b < 0°) is rather close to (i), but a weak excess signature is clearly detected also in the south like NPS (South Polar Spur). Such an asymmetry, if due to the bubbles, cannot be fully understood only by the inclination of bubbles’ axis against the Galactic disk normal, thus suggesting asymmetric outflow due to different environmental/initial conditions.

  1. Life on the edge: a beginner’s guide to the Fermi surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dugdale, S. B.

    2016-05-01

    The concept of the Fermi surface is at the very heart of our understanding of the metallic state. Displaying intricate and often complicated shapes, the Fermi surfaces of real metals are both aesthetically beautiful and subtly powerful. A range of examples is presented of the startling array of physical phenomena whose origin can be traced to the shape of the Fermi surface, together with experimental observations of the particular Fermi surface features.

  2. Fermi GBM: Main detector-level calibration results

    SciTech Connect

    Bissaldi, E.; Kienlin, A. von; Lichti, G.; Steinle, H.; Diehl, R.; Greiner, J.; Bhat, P. N.; Briggs, M. S.; Connaughton, V.; Paciesas, W. S.; Preece, R. D.; Fishman, G. J.; Horst, A. J. van der; Kouveliotou, C.; Meegan, C. A.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A.; Hoover, A. S.; Kippen, R. M.; Krumrey, M.; Gerlach, M.

    2009-05-25

    One of the scientific objectives of NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope is the study of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs). The Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) was designed to detect and localize bursts for the Fermi mission. By means of an array of 12 NaI(Tl)(8 keV to 1 MeV) and two BGO (0.2 to 40 MeV) scintillation detectors, GBM extends the energy range (20 MeV to >300 GeV) of Fermi's main instrument, the Large Area Telescope (LAT), into the traditional range of current GRB databases. The physical detector response of the GBM instrument to GRBs is determined with the help of Monte Carlo simulations, which are supported and verified by on-ground individual detector calibration measurements. We present the principal instrument properties, which have been determined as a function of energy and angle, including the channel-energy relation, the energy resolution and the effective area.

  3. Pressure profiles of nonuniform two-dimensional atomic Fermi gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martiyanov, Kirill; Barmashova, Tatiana; Makhalov, Vasiliy; Turlapov, Andrey

    2016-06-01

    Spatial profiles of the pressure have been measured in atomic Fermi gases with primarily two-dimensional (2D) kinematics. The in-plane motion of the particles is confined by a Gaussian-shape potential. The two-component deeply degenerate Fermi gases are prepared at different values of the s -wave attraction. The pressure profile is found using the force-balance equation, from the measured density profile and the trapping potential. The pressure is compared to zero-temperature models within the local density approximation. In the weakly interacting regime, the pressure lies above a Landau Fermi-liquid theory and below the ideal-Fermi-gas model, whose prediction coincides with that of the Cooper-pair mean-field theory. The values closest to the data are provided by the approach where the mean field of Cooper pairs is supplemented with fluctuations. In the regime of strong interactions, in response to the increasing attraction, the pressure shifts below this model reaching lower values calculated within Monte Carlo methods. Comparison to models shows that interaction-induced departure from 2D kinematics is either small or absent. In particular, comparison with a lattice Monte Carlo suggests that kinematics is two dimensional in the strongly interacting regime.

  4. Constraining decaying dark matter with Fermi LAT gamma-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Le; Sigl, Günter; Weniger, Christoph; Maccione, Luca; Redondo, Javier E-mail: christoph.weniger@desy.de E-mail: redondo@mppmm.mpg.de

    2010-06-01

    High energy electrons and positrons from decaying dark matter can produce a significant flux of gamma rays by inverse Compton off low energy photons in the interstellar radiation field. This possibility is inevitably related with the dark matter interpretation of the observed PAMELA and FERMI excesses. The aim of this paper is providing a simple and universal method to constrain dark matter models which produce electrons and positrons in their decay by using the Fermi LAT gamma-ray observations in the energy range between 0.5 GeV and 300 GeV. We provide a set of universal response functions that, once convolved with a specific dark matter model produce the desired constraints. Our response functions contain all the astrophysical inputs such as the electron propagation in the galaxy, the dark matter profile, the gamma-ray fluxes of known origin, and the Fermi LAT data. We study the uncertainties in the determination of the response functions and apply them to place constraints on some specific dark matter decay models that can well fit the positron and electron fluxes observed by PAMELA and Fermi LAT. To this end we also take into account prompt radiation from the dark matter decay. We find that with the available data decaying dark matter cannot be excluded as source of the PAMELA positron excess.

  5. The role of causality in tunable Fermi gas condensates.

    PubMed

    Hsiang, Jen-Tsung; Lin, Chi-Yong; Lee, Da-Shin; Rivers, Ray J

    2013-10-01

    We develop a new formalism for the description of the condensates of cold Fermi atoms whose speed of sound can be tuned with the aid of a narrow Feshbach resonance. We use this to look for spontaneous phonon creation that mimics spontaneous particle creation in curved space-time in Friedmann-Robertson-Walker and other model universes. PMID:24025481

  6. All-Sky Monitoring of Variable Sources with Fermi GBM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Cherry, Michael L.; Case, Gary L.; Camero-Arranz, Ascension; Chaplin, Vandiver; Connaughton, Valerie; Finger, Mark H.; Jenke, Pater; Rodi, James C.; Baumgartner, Wayne H.; Beklen, Elif; Bhat, P. Narayana; Briggs, Michael S.; Gehrels, Neil; Greiner, Jochen; Jahoda, Keith; Kippen, R. Marc; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Krimm, Hans A.; Kuulkers, Erik; Lund, Niels; Meegan, Charles A.; Natalucci, Lorenzo; Paciesas, William S.; Preece, Robert

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the monitoring of variable sources with the Fermi Gamma Ray Burst Monitor (GBM). It reviews the use of the Earth Occultation technique, the observations of the Crab Nebula with the GBM, and the comparison with other satellite's observations. The instruments on board the four satellites indicate a decline in the Crab from 2008-2010.

  7. Where Was Everybody? Olaf Stapledon and the Fermi Paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, S.

    In 1948 Olaf Stapledon gave an address to the BIS in which he summarised his vision of mankind's cosmic future: `One can imagine some sort of cosmical community of worlds ...' One might ask, however, since the universe is vastly older than mankind, why races on other worlds have not already built such a community. This is a `Fermi Paradox' question. The Paradox is based on the observation that there has been time for extraterrestrial intelligence to arise and colonise the Galaxy many times over, yet we see no sign of such endeavours. In this paper Stapledon's novels are retrospectively analysed from the point of view of the Fermi Paradox. In Last and First Men (1930) humanity is forever isolated because life and mind are rare in the Galaxy, and interstellar distances are too large ever to be traversed. These are classic candidate Fermi `solutions'. The `solution' implicit in Star Maker (1937) might be criticised in that it posits that humanity lives at a special epoch, with the cosmically transforming development of interstellar travel occurring a `mere' ten billion years after mankind, in a universe supposedly ~200bn years old. Stapledon died in 1950, the year the Paradox was formulated, and was probably unaware of the Paradox. However to apply retrospectively Fermi thinking to Stapledon's cosmologies is to gain a new insight into the author's philosophy.

  8. Strongly interacting Bose-Fermi mixtures in one dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Haiping; Guan, Liming; Chen, Shu

    2016-02-01

    We study one-dimensional (1D) strongly interacting Bose-Fermi mixtures by both the exact Bethe-ansatz method and variational perturbation theory within the degenerate ground state subspace of the system in the infinitely repulsive limit. Based on the exact solution of the 1D Bose-Fermi gas with equal boson-boson and boson-fermion interaction strengths, we demonstrate that the ground state energy is degenerate for different Bose-Fermi configurations and the degeneracy is lifted when the interaction deviates the infinitely interacting limit. We then show that the ground properties in the strongly interacting regime can be well characterized by using the variational perturbation method within the degenerate ground state subspace, which can be applied to deal with more general cases with anisotropic interactions and in external traps. Our results indicate that the total ground-state density profile in the strongly repulsive regime behaves like the polarized non-interacting fermions, whereas the density distributions of bosons and fermions display different properties for different Bose-Fermi configurations and are sensitive to the anisotropy of interactions.

  9. Five Years of the Fermi LAT Flare Advocate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Bryce; Ojha, R.; Gasparrini, D.; Ciprini, S.; Fermi LAT Collaboration; Fermi LAT Flare Advocates

    2014-01-01

    Since the launch of the Fermi satellite, the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) team has run a program that provides a daily review of the the gamma-ray sky as soon as Fermi LAT data becomes available. The Flare Advocate/Gamma-ray Sky Watcher (FA-GSW) program allows a rapid analysis of the Automatic Science Processing (ASP) products and triggers dedicated followup analyses by several LAT science groups such as those studying Galactic transients, extragalactic sources and new gamma-ray sources. Significant gamma-ray detections also trigger rapid communications to the entire astrophysical community via astronomical telegrams and gamma-ray coordination network notices. The FA-GSW program plays a key role in maximizing the science return from Fermi by increasing the rate of multi-frequency observations of sources in an active gamma-ray state. In the past ~5 years blazar flaring activity of varying strength and duty cycles, gravitationally lensed blazars, flares from Galactic sources (like Nova Delphini and the Crab Nebula), unidentified transients near and off the Galactic plane, and emission from the quiet and flaring Sun, represent the range of detections made. Flare Advocates have published about 250 Astronomical Telegrams and they publish a weekly blog. Timely, extensive multi-frequency campaigns have been organized to follow-up on these phenomena leading to some of Fermi’s most interesting results.

  10. Working with Fermi at Chicago and Los Alamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garwin, Richard L.

    2010-02-01

    I discuss my experience with Enrico Fermi as student and fellow faculty member at Chicago and with him as consultants to the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory in 1950-1952. The talk shares observations about this great physicist and exemplary human being. )

  11. 75 FR 76054 - Detroit Edison Company Fermi, Unit 2; Exemption

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-07

    ... described below and in the Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact (75 FR 20867) that was published for the exemption which was granted in May 2010 for Enrico Fermi Atomic Power Plant Unit... significant effect on the quality of the human environment as documented in Federal Register (FR) notice...

  12. Search for the optical counterparts of Fermi discovered pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Susan; Shearer, Andy; Mignani, Roberto

    2011-08-01

    A comprehensive CCD survey of the optical emission from Fermi pulsars is currently being performed using the WHT, TNG and INT telescopes. Candidate targets have been identified for follow-up time-resolved observations with instruments such as GASP, ULTRACAM and OPTIMA.

  13. Fermi surface behavior in the ABJM M2-brane theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeWolfe, Oliver; Henriksson, Oscar; Rosen, Christopher

    2015-06-01

    We calculate fermionic Green's functions for states of the three-dimensional Aharony-Bergman-Jafferis-Maldacena M2-brane theory at large N using the gauge-gravity correspondence. We embed extremal black brane solutions in four-dimensional maximally supersymmetric gauged supergravity, obtain the linearized Dirac equations for each spin-1 /2 mode that cannot mix with a gravitino, and solve these equations with infalling boundary conditions to calculate retarded Green's functions. For generic values of the chemical potentials, we find Fermi surfaces with universally non-Fermi liquid behavior, matching the situation for four-dimensional N =4 super-Yang-Mills. Fermi surface singularities appear and disappear discontinuously at the point where all chemical potentials are equal, reminiscent of a quantum critical point. One limit of parameter space has zero entropy at zero temperature, and fermionic fluctuations are perfectly stable inside an energy region around the Fermi surface. An ambiguity in the quantization of the fermions is resolved by supersymmetry.

  14. Larkin-Ovchinnikov state in resonant Fermi gas

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Nobukatsu; Yip, S.-K.

    2007-06-15

    We construct the phase diagram of a homogeneous two-component Fermi gas with population imbalance under a Feshbach resonance. In particular, we study the physics and stability of the Larkin-Ovchinnikov phase. We show that this phase is stable over a much larger parameter range than has been previously reported by other authors.

  15. Correlation functions of one-dimensional Bose-Fermi mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Frahm, Holger; Palacios, Guillaume

    2005-12-15

    We calculate the asymptotic behavior of correlators as a function of the microscopic parameters for an integrable Bose-Fermi mixture with repulsive interaction in one dimension. For two cases, namely polarized and unpolarized fermions the singularities of the momentum distribution functions are characterized as a function of the coupling constant and the relative density of bosons.

  16. Fermi level stabilization energy in group III-nitrides

    SciTech Connect

    Li, S.X.; Yu, K.M.; Wu, J.; Jones, R.E.; Walukiewicz, W.; AgerIII, J.W.; Shan, W.; Haller, E.E.; Lu, Hai; Schaff, William J.

    2005-01-07

    Energetic particle irradiation is used to systematically introduce point defects into In{sub 1-x}Ga{sub x}N alloys over the entire composition range. Three types of energetic particles (electrons, protons, and {sup 4}He{sup +}) are used to produce a displacement damage dose spanning five decades. In InN and In-rich InGaN the free electron concentration increases with increasing irradiation dose but saturates at a sufficiently high dose. The saturation is due to Fermi level pinning at the Fermi Stabilization Energy (E{sub FS}), which is located at 4.9 eV below the vacuum level. Electrochemical capacitance-voltage (ECV) measurements show that the pinning of the surface Fermi energy at E{sub FS} is also responsible for the surface electron accumulation in as-grown InN and In-rich InGaN alloys. The results are in agreement with the amphoteric defect model that predicts that the same type of native defects are responsible for the Fermi level pinning in both cases.

  17. Fermi-level stabilization energy in group III nitrides

    SciTech Connect

    Li, S.X.; Jones, R.E.; Haller, E.E.; Yu, K.M.; Wu, J.; Walukiewicz, W.; Ager, J.W. III; Shan, W.; Lu Hai; Schaff, William J.

    2005-04-15

    Energetic particle irradiation is used to systematically introduce point defects into In{sub 1-x}Ga{sub x}N alloys over the entire composition range. Three types of energetic particles (electrons, protons, and {sup 4}He{sup +}) are used to produce a displacement damage dose spanning five decades. In InN and In-rich InGaN the free electron concentration increases with increasing irradiation dose but saturates at a sufficiently high dose. The saturation is due to Fermi level pinning at the Fermi stabilization energy (E{sub FS}), which is located at 4.9 eV below the vacuum level. Electrochemical capacitance-voltage (ECV) measurements show that the pinning of the surface Fermi energy at E{sub FS} is also responsible for the surface electron accumulation in as-grown InN and In-rich InGaN alloys. The results are in agreement with the amphoteric defect model that predicts that the same type of native defects are responsible for the Fermi level pinning in both cases.

  18. Entanglement Entropy of Fermi Liquids via Multidimensional Bosonization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Wenxin; Seidel, Alexander; Yang, Kun

    2012-01-01

    The logarithmic violations of the area law, i.e., an “area law” with logarithmic correction of the form S˜Ld-1log⁡L, for entanglement entropy are found in both 1D gapless fermionic systems with Fermi points and high-dimensional free fermions. This paper shows that both violations are of the same origin, and that, in the presence of Fermi-liquid interactions, such behavior persists for 2D fermion systems. In this paper, we first consider the entanglement entropy of a toy model, namely, a set of decoupled 1D chains of free spinless fermions, to relate both violations in an intuitive way. We then use multidimensional bosonization to rederive the formula by Gioev and Klich [D. Gioev and I. Klich, Entanglement Entropy of Fermions in Any Dimension and the Widom Conjecture, Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-9007 96, 100503 (2006).10.1103/PhysRevLett.96.100503] for free fermions through a low-energy effective Hamiltonian and explicitly show that, in both cases, the logarithmic corrections to the area law share the same origin: the discontinuity at the Fermi surface (points). In the presence of Fermi-liquid (forward-scattering) interactions, the bosonized theory remains quadratic in terms of the original local degrees of freedom, and, after regularizing the theory with a mass term, we are able to calculate the entanglement entropy perturbatively up to second order in powers of the coupling parameter for a special geometry via the replica trick. We show that these interactions do not change the leading scaling behavior for the entanglement entropy of a Fermi liquid. At higher orders, we argue that this should remain true through a scaling analysis.

  19. Nonanalytic corrections to the Fermi-liquid behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chubukov, Andrey V.; Maslov, Dmitrii L.

    2003-10-01

    The issue of nonanalytic corrections to the Fermi-liquid behavior is revisited. Previous studies have indicated that the corrections to the Fermi-liquid forms of the specific heat and the static spin susceptibility (CFL∝T, χFLs=const) are nonanalytic in D⩽3 and scale as δC(T)∝TD, χs(T)∝TD-1, and χs(Q)∝QD-1, with extra logarithms in D=3 and 1. It is shown that these nonanalytic corrections originate from the universal singularities in the dynamical bosonic response functions of a generic Fermi liquid. In contrast to the leading, Fermi-liquid forms which depend on the interaction averaged over the Fermi surface, the nonanalytic corrections are parametrized by only two coupling constants, which are the components of the interaction potential at momentum transfers q=0 and q=2pF. For three-dimensional (3D) systems, a recent result of Belitz, Kirkpatrick, and Vojta for the spin susceptibility is reproduced and the issue why a nonanalytic momentum dependence, χs(Q,T=0)-χFLs∝Q2log Q, is not paralleled by a nonanalyticity in the T dependence [χs(0,T)-χFLs]∝T2 is clarified. For 2D systems, explicit forms of C(T)-CFL∝T2, χ(Q,T=0)-χFL∝|Q|, and χ(0,T)-χFL∝T are obtained. It is shown that earlier calculations of the temperature dependences in two dimensions are incomplete.

  20. Generalized charge-screening in relativistic Thomas-Fermi model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, we study the charge shielding within the relativistic Thomas-Fermi model for a wide range of electron number-densities and the atomic-number of screened ions. A generalized energy-density relation is obtained using the force-balance equation and taking into account the Chandrasekhar's relativistic electron degeneracy pressure. By numerically solving a second-order nonlinear differential equation, the Thomas-Fermi screening length is investigated, and the results are compared for three distinct regimes of the solid-density, warm-dense-matter, and white-dwarfs (WDs). It is revealed that our nonlinear screening theory is compatible with the exponentially decaying Thomas-Fermi-type shielding predicted by the linear response theory. Moreover, the variation of relative Thomas-Fermi screening length shows that extremely dense quantum electron fluids are relatively poor charge shielders. Calculation of the total number of screening electrons around a nucleus shows that there is a position of maximum number of screening localized electrons around the screened nucleus, which moves closer to the point-like nucleus by increase in the plasma number density but is unaffected due to increase in the atomic-number value. It is discovered that the total number of screening electrons, ( N s ∝ r T F 3 / r d 3 where rTF and rd are the Thomas-Fermi and interparticle distance, respectively) has a distinct limit for extremely dense plasmas such as WD-cores and neutron star crusts, which is unique for all given values of the atomic-number. This is equal to saying that in an ultrarelativistic degeneracy limit of electron-ion plasma, the screening length couples with the system dimensionality and the plasma becomes spherically self-similar. Current analysis can provide useful information on the effects of relativistic correction to the charge screening for a wide range of plasma density, such as the inertial-confined plasmas and compact stellar objects.

  1. Vibrational lifetime and Fermi resonance in polyatomic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fendt, A.; Fischer, S. F.; Kaiser, W.

    1981-05-01

    The energy decay of CH-stretching modes of the molecules CHCl 3 ,CH 2Cl 2, CH 3COCH 3, CH 3OH, and CH 3CH 2OH is measured in the liquid state. The observed lifetime very between 1.5 and 65 ps. A theoretical analysis points to the importance of Fermi resonance in the vibrational relaxation process. Quantitative comparison between theory and experiments is presented for the individual molecules. The strong variation of the lifetime for CH-stretching modes of various molecules may be understood if several effects are taken into account. First and most important is the influence of the Fermi resonances. Without the anharmonic mixing of the initial state, the overtone of the CH-bending modes and/or a higher order combination tone, one would predict lifetimes which are more than an order of magnitude longer than the observed lifetimes. This effect has been discussed earlier in detail for methylhalides by Zygan-Maus and Fischer [11] and, more recently, it has been incorporated in elaborate discussions for triatomic molecules like CO 2 by several authors [12]. A second factor to be considered for the interpretation is the rapi energy redistribution between different CH-stretching states was found theoretically to be faster than the further decay process by an order of magnitude [6, 11]. Experimentally, this effect was verified in this note for CH 2Cl 2 by the observation that the decay time was the same regardl whether the symmetric or the asymmetric CH-stretching mode was excited. This effect leads to a lengthening of the observed decay process. There is a bottleneck effect. Finally, we have shown that location and width of the final state are important parameters for the interpretation of the depopulatio lifetime. The empirical determination of these effects is not free of uncertainties. Very strong Fermi resonance can lead to rapid energy exchange during the exc process. In this case there is no bottleneck effect and it is difficult to detect the pathway of the energy

  2. Fermi-Teller theory of low-velocity ionization losses applied to monopoles

    SciTech Connect

    Ritson, D.M.

    1982-07-01

    The Fermi-Teller theory was originally used to predict the stopping, by ionization losses, of slow charged particles in materials. The theory is based on a calculation of the energy cost to a uniform Fermi sea. However, the Fermi velocity cancels out in the derivation, so the calculated results also apply to a Thomas-Fermi atom, in which each volume element is considered to be a Fermi sea filled to the top of the potential well with atomic electrons. An outline is presented of the modifications required to make the Fermi-Teller theory valid for a slow monopole traversing an insulator using the Thomas-Fermi model of the atom. (GHT)

  3. Stable non-Fermi-liquid phase of itinerant spin-orbit coupled ferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahri, Yasaman; Potter, Andrew C.

    2015-07-01

    Direct (nongradient) coupling between a gapless bosonic field and a Fermi surface results in the destruction of Landau quasiparticles and a breakdown of Fermi liquid theory. Such a non-Fermi-liquid phase arises in spin-orbit coupled ferromagnets with spontaneously broken continuous symmetries due to strong coupling between rotational Goldstone modes and itinerant electrons. These systems provide an experimentally accessible context for studying non-Fermi-liquid physics. Possible examples include low-density Rashba coupled electron gases, which have a natural tendency towards spontaneous ferromagnetism, or topological insulator surface states with proximity-induced ferromagnetism. Crucially, unlike the related case of a spontaneous nematic distortion of the Fermi surface, for which controlled field theory calculations predict that the non-Fermi-liquid regime will be masked by a superconducting dome, we show that the non-Fermi-liquid phase in spin-orbit coupled ferromagnets is stable.

  4. Stable non-Fermi liquid phase of itinerant spin-orbit coupled ferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahri, Yasaman; Potter, Andrew

    2015-03-01

    Direct coupling between gapless bosons and a Fermi surface results in the destruction of Landau quasiparticles and a breakdown of Fermi liquid theory. Such a non-Fermi liquid phase arises in spin-orbit coupled ferromagnets with spontaneously broken continuous symmetries due to strong coupling between rotational Goldstone modes and itinerant electrons. These systems provide an experimentally accessible context for studying non-Fermi liquid physics. Possible examples include low-density Rashba coupled electron gases, which have a natural tendency towards spontaneous ferromagnetism, or topological insulator surface states with proximity-induced ferromagnetism. Crucially, unlike the related case of a spontaneous nematic distortion of the Fermi surface, for which the non-Fermi liquid regime is expected to be masked by a superconducting dome, we show that the non-Fermi liquid phase in spin-orbit coupled ferromagnets is stable.

  5. Spatial Variations in the Fermi Surface of Bi-2212

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Main, Elizabeth; Pivonka, A. E.; Zeljkovic, I.; Gu, G.; Hudson, E. W.; Hoffman, J. E.

    2011-03-01

    In cuprate superconductors, scanning tunneling microscopy can be used to see variations in the Fermi surface on a nanometer length scale caused by doping inhomogeneity. Prior STM studies show that the local wavelength of the checkerboard, a weak charge modulation ascribed to antinodal Fermi surface nesting, varies with the size of the pseudogap in Bi 2 Sr 2 Cu O6 + δ (Bi-2201). Here we report similar STM measurements in Bi-2212. We therefore confirm the local relationship between pseudogap energy and charge ordering wavevector in a second high-Tc superconductor. We acknowledge support from AFOSR PECASE grant FA9550-06-1-0531, AFOSR DURIP grant FA9550-06-1-0359, NSF Career grant DMR-0847433 and NSF grant DMR-0904400.

  6. Momentum-resolved spectroscopy of a Fermi liquid.

    PubMed

    Doggen, Elmer V H; Kinnunen, Jami J

    2015-01-01

    We consider a recent momentum-resolved radio-frequency spectroscopy experiment, in which Fermi liquid properties of a strongly interacting atomic Fermi gas were studied. Here we show that by extending the Brueckner-Goldstone model, we can formulate a theory that goes beyond basic mean-field theories and that can be used for studying spectroscopies of dilute atomic gases in the strongly interacting regime. The model hosts well-defined quasiparticles and works across a wide range of temperatures and interaction strengths. The theory provides excellent qualitative agreement with the experiment. Comparing the predictions of the present theory with the mean-field Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory yields insights into the role of pair correlations, Tan's contact, and the Hartree mean-field energy shift. PMID:25941948

  7. Heavy fermions. Unconventional Fermi surface in an insulating state.

    PubMed

    Tan, B S; Hsu, Y-T; Zeng, B; Hatnean, M Ciomaga; Harrison, N; Zhu, Z; Hartstein, M; Kiourlappou, M; Srivastava, A; Johannes, M D; Murphy, T P; Park, J-H; Balicas, L; Lonzarich, G G; Balakrishnan, G; Sebastian, Suchitra E

    2015-07-17

    Insulators occur in more than one guise; a recent finding was a class of topological insulators, which host a conducting surface juxtaposed with an insulating bulk. Here, we report the observation of an unusual insulating state with an electrically insulating bulk that simultaneously yields bulk quantum oscillations with characteristics of an unconventional Fermi liquid. We present quantum oscillation measurements of magnetic torque in high-purity single crystals of the Kondo insulator SmB6, which reveal quantum oscillation frequencies characteristic of a large three-dimensional conduction electron Fermi surface similar to the metallic rare earth hexaborides such as PrB6 and LaB6. The quantum oscillation amplitude strongly increases at low temperatures, appearing strikingly at variance with conventional metallic behavior. PMID:26138105

  8. Fermi Science Support Center Data Servers and Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reustle, Alexander; FSSC, LAT Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The Fermi Science Support Center (FSSC) provides the scientific community with access to Fermi data and other products. The Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) data is stored at NASA's High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC) and is accessible through their searchable Browse web interface. The Large Area Telescope (LAT) data is distributed through a custom FSSC interface where users can request all photons detected from a region on the sky over a specified time and energy range. Through its website the FSSC also provides planning and scheduling products, such as long and short term observing timelines, spacecraft position and attitude histories, and exposure maps. We present an overview of the different data products provided by the FSSC, how they can be accessed, and statistics on the archive usage since launch.

  9. Fermi surface reconstruction in FeSe under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terashima, Taichi; Kikugawa, Naoki; Kiswandhi, Andhika; Graf, David; Choi, Eun-Sang; Brooks, James S.; Kasahara, Shigeru; Watashige, Tatsuya; Matsuda, Yuji; Shibauchi, Takasada; Wolf, Thomas; Böhmer, Anna E.; Hardy, Frédéric; Meingast, Christoph; Löhneysen, Hilbert v.; Uji, Shinya

    2016-03-01

    We report Shubnikov-de Haas (SdH) oscillation measurements on FeSe under high pressure up to P =16.1 kbar. We find a sudden change in SdH oscillations at the onset of the pressure-induced antiferromagnetism at P ˜8 kbar. We argue that this change can be attributed to a reconstruction of the Fermi surface by the antiferromagnetic order. The negative d Tc /d P observed in a range between P ˜8 and 12 kbar may be explained by the reduction in the density of states due to the reconstruction. The ratio of the transition temperature to the effective Fermi energy remains high under high pressure: kBTc/EF˜0.1 even at P =16.1 kbar.

  10. Heat capacity and sound velocities of low dimensional Fermi gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salas, P.; Solis, M. A.

    2014-03-01

    We report the heat capacity ratio and sound velocities for an interactionless Fermi gas immersed in periodic structures such as penetrable multilayers or multitubes created by one (planes) or two perpendicular (tubes) external Dirac comb potentials. The isobaric specific heat of the fermion gas presents the dimensional crossover previously observed in the isochoric specific heat - from 3D to 2D or to 1D -. The quotient between the two quantities has a prominent bump related to the confinement, and as the temperature increases, it goes towards the monoatomic classical gas value 5/3. We present the isothermal and the adiabatic sound velocities of the fermion gas which show anomalous behavior at temperatures below TF due to the dimensionality of the system, while at higher temperatures again we recover the behavior of a classical Fermi gas. Furthermore, as the temperature goes to zero the sound velocity has a finite value, as expected.

  11. Weyl Superfluidity in a Three-dimensional Dipolar Fermi Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bo; Li, Xiaopeng; Yin, Lan; Liu, W. Vincent

    2015-03-01

    Weyl superconductivity or superfluidity, a fascinating topological state of matter, features novel phenomena such as emergent Weyl fermionic excitations and anomalies. Here we report that an anisotropic Weyl superfluid state can arise as a low temperature stable phase in a 3D dipolar Fermi gas. A crucial ingredient of our model is a direction-dependent two-body effective attraction generated by a rotating external field. Experimental signatures are predicted for cold gases in radio-frequency spectroscopy. The finite temperature phase diagram of this system is studied and the transition temperature of the Weyl superfluidity is found to be within the experimental scope for atomic dipolar Fermi gases. Work supported in part by U.S. ARO, AFOSR, DARPA-OLE-ARO, Charles E. Kaufman Foundation and The Pittsburgh Foundation, JQI-NSF-PFC, ARO-Atomtronics-MURI, and NSF of China.

  12. Fermi gamma-ray "bubbles" from stochastic acceleration of electrons.

    PubMed

    Mertsch, Philipp; Sarkar, Subir

    2011-08-26

    Gamma-ray data from Fermi Large Area Telescope reveal a bilobular structure extending up to ∼50° above and below the Galactic Center. It has been argued that the gamma rays arise from hadronic interactions of high-energy cosmic rays which are advected out by a strong wind, or from inverse-Compton scattering of relativistic electrons accelerated at plasma shocks present in the bubbles. We explore the alternative possibility that the relativistic electrons are undergoing stochastic 2nd-order Fermi acceleration by plasma wave turbulence through the entire volume of the bubbles. The observed gamma-ray spectral shape is then explained naturally by the resulting hard electron spectrum modulated by inverse-Compton energy losses. Rather than a constant volume emissivity as in other models, we predict a nearly constant surface brightness, and reproduce the observed sharp edges of the bubbles. PMID:21929220

  13. Holographic non-Fermi liquid in a background magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Pallab; He, Jianyang; Mukherjee, Anindya; Shieh, Hsien-Hang

    2010-08-01

    We study the effects of a nonzero magnetic field on a class of 2+1 dimensional non-Fermi liquids, recently found in [Hong Liu, John McGreevy, and David Vegh, arXiv:0903.2477.] by considering properties of a Fermionic probe in an extremal AdS4 black hole background. Introducing a similar fermionic probe in a dyonic AdS4 black hole geometry, we find that the effect of a magnetic field could be incorporated in a rescaling of the probe fermion’s charge. From this simple fact, we observe interesting effects like gradual disappearance of the Fermi surface and quasiparticle peaks at large magnetic fields and changes in other properties of the system. We also find Landau level like structures and oscillatory phenomena similar to the de-Haas-van Alphen effect.

  14. The Five Year Fermi/GBM Magnetar Burst Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collazzi, A. C.; Kouveliotou, C.; van der Horst, A. J.; Younes, G. A.; Kaneko, Y.; Göğüş, E.; Lin, L.; Granot, J.; Finger, M. H.; Chaplin, V. L.; Huppenkothen, D.; Watts, A. L.; von Kienlin, A.; Baring, M. G.; Gruber, D.; Bhat, P. N.; Gibby, M. H.; Gehrels, N.; McEnery, J.; van der Klis, M.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.

    2015-05-01

    Since launch in 2008, the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has detected many hundreds of bursts from magnetar sources. While the vast majority of these bursts have been attributed to several known magnetars, there is also a small sample of magnetar-like bursts of unknown origin. Here, we present the Fermi/GBM magnetar catalog, providing the results of the temporal and spectral analyses of 440 magnetar bursts with high temporal and spectral resolution. This catalog covers the first five years of GBM magnetar observations, from 2008 July to 2013 June. We provide durations, spectral parameters for various models, fluences, and peak fluxes for all the bursts, as well as a detailed temporal analysis for SGR J1550-5418 bursts. Finally, we suggest that some of the bursts of unknown origin are associated with the newly discovered magnetar 3XMM J185246.6+0033.7.

  15. A Fermi gas in a homogeneous box potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Biswaroop; Ku, Mark; Yan, Zhenjie; Patel, Parth; Guardado-Sanchez, Elmer; Yefsah, Tarik; Struck, Julian; Zwierlein, Martin; Zwierlein Group Team

    2015-05-01

    Traditionally, bulk quantum gas experiments take place in inhomogeneous optical and/or magnetic traps. The properties of the homogeneous gas are in many cases masked by line-of-sight integration over the inhomogeneous sample. We report on the trapping of strongly interacting fermionic atoms (6Li) in a quasi-homogenous all-optical potential. We characterize the potential flatness through in-trap imaging, and discuss progress towards directly observing the momentum distribution of the fermions in a box, with the prospect to test predictions from Fermi liquid theory for interacting gases. In contrast to inhomogeneous traps, box potentials prepare a system in one particular point of the phase diagram, giving access to the properties of bulk matter with a high signal-to-noise ratio. This sets a new direction for the exploration of strongly interacting Fermi gases at finite temperature and in the presence of spin imbalance.

  16. Thermodynamic properties of Rashba spin-orbit-coupled Fermi gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Zhen; Pu, Han; Zou, Xubo; Guo, Guangcan

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the thermodynamic properties of a superfluid Fermi gas subject to Rashba spin-orbit coupling and effective Zeeman field. We adopt a T -matrix scheme that takes beyond-mean-field effects, which are important for strongly interacting systems, into account. We focus on the calculation of two important quantities: the superfluid transition temperature and the isothermal compressibility. Our calculation shows very distinct influences of the out-of-plane and the in-plane Zeeman fields on the Fermi gas. We also confirm that the in-plane Zeeman field induces a Fulde-Ferrell superfluid below the critical temperature and an exotic finite-momentum pseudogap phase above the critical temperature.

  17. Singular corrections to the Fermi-liquid theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chubukov, Andrey V.; Maslov, Dmitrii L.

    2004-03-01

    We show that the singularities in the dynamical bosonic response functions of a two-dimensional Fermi liquid give rise to universal nonanalytic corrections to the results of the Fermi-liquid theory. In particular, we find a T2 term in the specific heat, linear-in-T terms in the effective mass and in the uniform spin susceptibility χs(Q=0,T), and |Q| term in χs(Q,T=0). The existence of these terms has been the subject of recent controversy, which is resolved in this paper. We present exact expressions for all nonanalytic terms to second order in a generic interaction U(Q) and show that the nonanalytic terms originate exclusively from forward- and backward-scattering of particles with zero total momentum.

  18. Fluctuation theory of Rashba Fermi gases: Gaussian and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenoy, Vijay B.; Vyasanakere, Jayantha P.

    Fermi gases with generalized Rashba spin orbit coupling induced by a synthetic gauge field have the potential of realizing many interesting states such as rashbon condensates and topological phases. Here we address the key open problem of the fluctuation theory of such systems and demonstrate that beyond-Gaussian effects are essential to capture finite temperature physics of such systems. We obtain their phase diagram by constructing an approximate non-Gaussian theory. We conclusively establish that spin-orbit coupling can enhance the exponentially small transition temperature (Tc) of a weakly attracting superfluid to the order of Fermi temperature, paving a pathway towards high Tc superfluids. Work supported by CSIR, DST, DAE and IUSSTF.

  19. A Southern Sky Survey with Fermi LAT and ASKAP

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, Robert A.; /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2010-04-29

    We present the prospects for a future joint gamma-ray and radio survey of southern hemisphere sources using the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) and the upcoming Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP) radio telescope. ASKAP is a next generation radio telescope designed to perform surveys at GHz frequencies at a much higher survey speed than previous radio telescopes, and is scheduled to start engineering observations in 2011. The survey capabilities of both Fermi LAT and ASKAP are described, and the planned science surveys for ASKAP are summarized. We give some expected details of the Variable and Slow Transient (VAST) survey using ASKAP, which will search for transients on timescales from 5 seconds to years. Some observational properties of faint and transient sources seen at gamma-ray and radio wavelengths are summarized, and prospects and strategies for using ASKAP survey data for LAT source counterpart identification are summarized.

  20. Magnetar Observations in the Swift-Fermi/GBM Era

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouveliotou, Chryssa

    2010-01-01

    NASA's Fermi Observatory was launched June 11, 2008; the Fermi Gamma Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) began normal operations on July 14, about a month after launch, when the trigger algorithms were enabled. Since then, and against all odds, GBM recorded over 600 bursts from 4 SGRs. Of these four sources, only one was an old magnetar: SGR J1806+20. SGR J0501+4516, was discovered with Swift and extensively monitored with GBM. A source originally classified as AXP 1E1547.0-5408 exhibited SGR-like bursting behavior and we reclassified it as SGR J1550-5418. Finally, GBM discovered SGR J0418+5729 on 2009 June. Finally, on March 2010, a third new magnetar was discovered with Swift, SGR J1833-0832. I report below on the current status of the field and on several results combining multi-satellite and ground-based data

  1. Energy fluctuations of a finite free-electron Fermi gas.

    PubMed

    Pekola, Jukka P; Muratore-Ginanneschi, Paolo; Kupiainen, Antti; Galperin, Yuri M

    2016-08-01

    We discuss the energy distribution of free-electron Fermi-gas, a problem with a textbook solution of Gaussian energy fluctuations in the limit of a large system. We find that for a small system, characterized solely by its heat capacity C, the distribution can be solved analytically, and it is both skewed and it vanishes at low energies, exhibiting a sharp drop to zero at the energy corresponding to the filled Fermi sea. The results are relevant from the experimental point of view, since the predicted non-Gaussian effects become pronounced when C/k_{B}≲10^{3} (k_{B} is the Boltzmann constant), a regime that can be easily achieved for instance in mesoscopic metallic conductors at sub-kelvin temperatures. PMID:27627262

  2. Self-capacitance of a Thomas--Fermi nanosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Krcmar, Maja; Saslow, Wayne M.; Zangwill, Andrew

    2000-12-04

    We calculate the self-capacitance and charging energy of a spherical nanoparticle in the Thomas--Fermi approximation. The result is C{sub TF}=C{sub 0}[1-p{sup -1}tanhp]/[1-(1-{epsilon}{sup -1})p{sup -1}tanhp], with C{sub TF}{>=}C{sub 0}. Here C{sub 0}=4{pi}{epsilon}{sub 0}R is the classical geometrical value, p=R/l is the ratio of the particle radius R to the Thomas--Fermi screening length l, and {epsilon} is the material dielectric constant. The addition of surface localized states drives C toward C{sub 0}. These results should be relevant to tunneling spectroscopy studies of giant carbon onions and ''large'' semiconductor nanocrystals that do not require a full quantum treatment.

  3. PROSPECTS FOR GRB SCIENCE WITH THE FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect

    Band, D. L.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M. G.; Bastieri, D.; Battelino, M.; Bissaldi, E.; Bogaert, G.; Chiang, J.; Do Couto e Silva, E.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cutini, S.; De Palma, F.; Dingus, B. L.; Fishman, G.

    2009-08-20

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) instrument on the Fermi mission will reveal the rich spectral and temporal gamma-ray burst (GRB) phenomena in the >100 MeV band. The synergy with Fermi's Gamma-ray Burst Monitor detectors will link these observations to those in the well explored 10-1000 keV range; the addition of the >100 MeV band observations will resolve theoretical uncertainties about burst emission in both the prompt and afterglow phases. Trigger algorithms will be applied to the LAT data both onboard the spacecraft and on the ground. The sensitivity of these triggers will differ because of the available computing resources onboard and on the ground. Here we present the LAT's burst detection methodologies and the instrument's GRB capabilities.

  4. Fermi surfaces of surface states on Si(111)-Ag, Au

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crain, J. N.; Altmann, K. N.; Bromberger, C.; Himpsel, F. J.

    2002-11-01

    Metallic surface states on semiconducting substrates provide an opportunity to study low-dimensional electrons decoupled from the bulk. Angle resolved photoemission is used to determine the Fermi surface, group velocity, and effective mass for surface states on Si(111)(3)×(3)-Ag, Si(111)(3)×(3)-Au, and Si(111)(21)×(21)-(Ag+Au). For Si(111)(3)×(3)-Ag the Fermi surface consists of small electron pockets populated by electrons from a few % excess Ag. For Si(111)(21)×(21)-(Ag+Au) the pockets increase their size corresponding to a filling by three electrons per unit cell. The (21)×(21) superlattice leads to an intricate surface umklapp pattern and to minigaps of 110 meV, giving an interaction potential of 55 meV for the (21)×(21) superlattice.

  5. Pulsar timing and the Fermi and AGILE missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Simon; Possenti, Andrea; Manchester, Dick; Hobbs, George; Keith, Michael; Romani, Roger W.; Thompson, David J.; Thorsett, Stephen; Roberts, Mallory; Weltevrede, Patrick

    2010-10-01

    We request time to observe 170 pulsars on a regular basis in order to provide accurate ephemerides necessary for the detection of gamma-ray pulsars with the Fermi and AGILE satellites. The main science goals are to increase the number of known gamma-ray pulsars (both radio loud and radio quiet), to determine accurate pulse profiles, to characterise their high energy spectra and phase resolved spectroscopy of the brightest pulsars. In the radio, the observations will also allow us to find glitches, characterise timing noise, investigate dispersion and rotation measure variability and enhance our knowledge of single pulse phenomenology. To date, we are (co-)authors on 27 papers arising from the collaboration and P574 data. The data have contributed to the PhD theses of Lucas Guillemot and Damien Parent from the Bordeaux Fermi group (submitted mid 2009) and Kyle Watters from Stanford.

  6. Pulsar timing and the Fermi and AGILE missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Simon; Possenti, Andrea; Manchester, Dick; Hobbs, George; Keith, Michael; Romani, Roger W.; Thompson, David J.; Thorsett, Stephen; Roberts, Mallory; Weltevrede, Patrick

    2010-04-01

    We request time to observe 170 pulsars on a regular basis in order to provide accurate ephemerides necessary for the detection of gamma-ray pulsars with the Fermi and AGILE satellites. The main science goals are to increase the number of known gamma-ray pulsars (both radio loud and radio quiet), to determine accurate pulse profiles, to characterise their high energy spectra and phase resolved spectroscopy of the brightest pulsars. In the radio, the observations will also allow us to find glitches, characterise timing noise, investigate dispersion and rotation measure variability and enhance our knowledge of single pulse phenomenology. To date, we are (co-)authors on 20 papers arising from the collaboration and P574 data. The data have contributed to the PhD theses of Lucas Guillemot and Damien Parent from the Bordeaux Fermi group (submitted mid 2009).

  7. Pulsar Timing and the Fermi and AGILE missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shannon, Ryan; Possenti, Andrea; Manchester, Dick; Johnston, Simon; Hobbs, George; Keith, Michael; Romani, Roger W.; Thompson, David J.; Roberts, Mallory; Weltevrede, Patrick; Kerr, Matthew; Petroff, Emily; Brook, Paul

    2013-10-01

    We request time to observe 170 pulsars on a regular basis in order to provide accurate ephemerides necessary for the detection of gamma-ray pulsars with the Fermi and AGILE satellites. The main science goals are to increase the number of known gamma-ray pulsars (both radio loud and radio quiet), to determine accurate pulse profiles, to characterise their high energy spectra and phase resolved spectroscopy of the brightest pulsars. In the radio, the observations will also allow us to find glitches, characterise timing noise, investigate dispersion and rotation measure variability and enhance our knowledge of single pulse phenomenology. To date, we are (co-)authors on 43 papers arising from the collaboration and P574 data. The data have contributed to the PhD theses of Lucas Guillemot and Damien Parent from the Bordeaux Fermi group and Kyle Watters from Stanford. Currently five students have active projects using the radio datasets.

  8. Pulsar Timing and the Fermi and AGILE missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shannon, Ryan; Possenti, Andrea; Manchester, Dick; Johnston, Simon; Hobbs, George; Keith, Michael; Romani, Roger W.; Thompson, David J.; Thorsett, Stephen; Roberts, Mallory; Weltevrede, Patrick

    2011-04-01

    We request time to observe 170 pulsars on a regular basis in order to provide accurate ephemerides necessary for the detection of gamma-ray pulsars with the Fermi and AGILE satellites. The main science goals are to increase the number of known gamma-ray pulsars (both radio loud and radio quiet), to determine accurate pulse profiles, to characterise their high energy spectra and phase resolved spectroscopy of the brightest pulsars. In the radio, the observations will also allow us to find glitches, characterise timing noise, investigate dispersion and rotation measure variability and enhance our knowledge of single pulse phenomenology. To date, we are (co-)authors on 27 papers arising from the collaboration and P574 data. The data have contributed to the PhD theses of Lucas Guillemot and Damien Parent from the Bordeaux Fermi group (submitted mid 2009) and Kyle Watters from Stanford.

  9. Pulsar Timing and the Fermi and AGILE missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shannon, Ryan; Possenti, Andrea; Manchester, Dick; Johnston, Simon; Hobbs, George; Keith, Michael; Romani, Roger W.; Thompson, David J.; Thorsett, Stephen; Roberts, Mallory; Weltevrede, Patrick

    2011-10-01

    We request time to observe 170 pulsars on a regular basis in order to provide accurate ephemerides necessary for the detection of gamma-ray pulsars with the Fermi and AGILE satellites. The main science goals are to increase the number of known gamma-ray pulsars (both radio loud and radio quiet), to determine accurate pulse profiles, to characterise their high energy spectra and phase resolved spectroscopy of the brightest pulsars. In the radio, the observations will also allow us to find glitches, characterise timing noise, investigate dispersion and rotation measure variability and enhance our knowledge of single pulse phenomenology. To date, we are (co-)authors on 27 papers arising from the collaboration and P574 data. The data have contributed to the PhD theses of Lucas Guillemot and Damien Parent from the Bordeaux Fermi group (submitted mid 2009) and Kyle Watters from Stanford.

  10. Pulsar Timing and the Fermi and AGILE missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shannon, Ryan; Possenti, Andrea; Manchester, Dick; Johnston, Simon; Hobbs, George; Keith, Michael; Romani, Roger W.; Thompson, David J.; Thorsett, Stephen; Roberts, Mallory; Weltevrede, Patrick

    2012-04-01

    We request time to observe 170 pulsars on a regular basis in order to provide accurate ephemerides necessary for the detection of gamma-ray pulsars with the Fermi and AGILE satellites. The main science goals are to increase the number of known gamma-ray pulsars (both radio loud and radio quiet), to determine accurate pulse profiles, to characterise their high energy spectra and phase resolved spectroscopy of the brightest pulsars. In the radio, the observations will also allow us to find glitches, characterise timing noise, investigate dispersion and rotation measure variability and enhance our knowledge of single pulse phenomenology. To date, we are (co-)authors on 27 papers arising from the collaboration and P574 data. The data have contributed to the PhD theses of Lucas Guillemot and Damien Parent from the Bordeaux Fermi group (submitted mid 2009) and Kyle Watters from Stanford.

  11. Pulsar Timing and the Fermi and AGILE missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shannon, Ryan; Possenti, Andrea; Manchester, Dick; Johnston, Simon; Hobbs, George; Keith, Michael; Romani, Roger W.; Thompson, David J.; Thorsett, Stephen; Roberts, Mallory; Weltevrede, Patrick

    2012-10-01

    We request time to observe 170 pulsars on a regular basis in order to provide accurate ephemerides necessary for the detection of gamma-ray pulsars with the Fermi and AGILE satellites. The main science goals are to increase the number of known gamma-ray pulsars (both radio loud and radio quiet), to determine accurate pulse profiles, to characterise their high energy spectra and phase resolved spectroscopy of the brightest pulsars. In the radio, the observations will also allow us to find glitches, characterise timing noise, investigate dispersion and rotation measure variability and enhance our knowledge of single pulse phenomenology. To date, we are (co-)authors on 37 papers arising from the collaboration and P574 data. The data have contributed to the PhD theses of Lucas Guillemot and Damien Parent from the Bordeaux Fermi group and Kyle Watters from Stanford.

  12. Pulsar Timing and the Fermi and AGILE missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shannon, Ryan; Possenti, Andrea; Manchester, Dick; Johnston, Simon; Hobbs, George; Keith, Michael; Romani, Roger W.; Thompson, David J.; Roberts, Mallory; Weltevrede, Patrick; Brook, Paul

    2013-04-01

    We request time to observe 170 pulsars on a regular basis in order to provide accurate ephemerides necessary for the detection of gamma-ray pulsars with the Fermi and AGILE satellites. The main science goals are to increase the number of known gamma-ray pulsars (both radio loud and radio quiet), to determine accurate pulse profiles, to characterise their high energy spectra and phase resolved spectroscopy of the brightest pulsars. In the radio, the observations will also allow us to find glitches, characterise timing noise, investigate dispersion and rotation measure variability and enhance our knowledge of single pulse phenomenology. To date, we are (co-)authors on 37 papers arising from the collaboration and P574 data. The data have contributed to the PhD theses of Lucas Guillemot and Damien Parent from the Bordeaux Fermi group and Kyle Watters from Stanford. Currently for students have active projects using the radio datasets.

  13. Virial theorem and universality in a unitary fermi gas.

    PubMed

    Thomas, J E; Kinast, J; Turlapov, A

    2005-09-16

    Unitary Fermi gases, where the scattering length is large compared to the interparticle spacing, can have universal properties, which are independent of the details of the interparticle interactions when the range of the scattering potential is negligible. We prepare an optically trapped, unitary Fermi gas of 6Li, tuned just above the center of a broad Feshbach resonance. In agreement with the universal hypothesis, we observe that this strongly interacting many-body system obeys the virial theorem for an ideal gas over a wide range of temperatures. Based on this result, we suggest a simple volume thermometry method for unitary gases. We also show that the observed breathing mode frequency, which is close to the unitary hydrodynamic value over a wide range of temperature, is consistent with a universal hydrodynamic gas with nearly isentropic dynamics. PMID:16197054

  14. An improved Thomas--Fermi treatment of nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Swiatecki, W.J.

    1992-08-18

    I want to tell you about an improved Thomas-Fermi method for calculating shell-averaged nuclear properties, such as density distributions, binding energies, etc. A shell-averaged statistical theory is useful as the macroscopic component of microscopic-macroscopic theories of nuclei, such as the Strutinsky method, as well as in theories of nuclear matter in the bulk, relevant in astrophysical applications. In nuclear physics, as well as in atomic and molecular problems, the following question often has to be answered: you are given a potential well, say a deformed Woods-Saxon potential, into which you put N quantized fermions into the lowest N eigenstates, up to a Fermi energy'' To. You square the wave functions of the particles and add them up to get the total density [rho]([sub r][sup [yields

  15. Spin fluctuation and Fermi surface instability in ferromagnetic superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Dai; Gourgout, Adrien; Pourret, Alexandre; Bastien, Gaël; Knebel, Georg; Flouquet, Jacques

    2014-08-01

    We review the ferromagnetic superconductivity observed in the uranium based compounds, namely UGe2, URhGe and UCoGe, where the spin-triplet state is most likely realized. An unusual upper critical field Hc2, which is enhanced under a magnetic field in a certain field direction, is discussed in terms of spin fluctuations and of Fermi surface instabilities. xml:lang="fr"

  16. Nonperturbative effects on the ferromagnetic transition in repulsive Fermi gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Lianyi; Huang, Xu-Guang

    2012-04-01

    It is generally believed that a dilute spin-(1)/(2) Fermi gas with repulsive interactions can undergo a ferromagnetic phase transition to a spin-polarized state at a critical gas parameter (kFa)c. Previous theoretical predictions of the ferromagnetic phase transition have been based on the perturbation theory, which treats the gas parameter as a small number. On the other hand, Belitz, Kirkpatrick, and Vojta (BKV) have argued that the phase transition in clean itinerant ferromagnets is generically of first order at low temperatures, due to the correlation effects that lead to a nonanalytic term in the free energy. The second-order perturbation theory predicts a first-order phase transition at (kFa)c=1.054, consistent with the BKV argument. However, since the critical gas parameter is expected to be of order O(1), perturbative predictions may be unreliable. In this paper we study the nonperturbative effects on the ferromagnetic phase transition by summing the particle-particle ladder diagrams to all orders in the gas parameter. We consider a universal repulsive Fermi gas where the effective range effects can be neglected, which can be realized in a two-component Fermi gas of 6Li atoms by using a nonadiabatic field switch to the upper branch of a Feshbach resonance with a positive s-wave scattering length. Our theory predicts a second-order phase transition, which indicates that ferromagnetic transition in dilute Fermi gases is possibly a counterexample to the BKV argument. The predicted critical gas parameter (kFa)c=0.858 is in good agreement with the recent quantum Monte Carlo result (kFa)c=0.86 for a nearly zero-range potential [S. Pilati , Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.105.030405 105, 030405 (2010)]. We also compare the spin susceptibility with the quantum Monte Carlo result and find good agreement.

  17. Dynamical description of heavy-ion collisions at Fermi energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napolitani, P.; Colonna, M.

    2016-05-01

    Descriptions of heavy-ion collisions at Fermi energies require to take into account in-medium dissipation and phase-space fluctuations. The interplay of these correlations with the one-body collective behaviour determines the properties (kinematics and fragment production) and the variety of mechanisms (from fusion to neck formation and multifragmentation) of the exit channel. Starting from fundamental concepts tested on nuclear matter, we build up a microscopic description which addresses finite systems and applies to experimental observables.

  18. High Energy Astrophysics with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews some of the findings of the Large Area Telescope (LAT) aboard the Fermi Observatory. It includes information about the LAT, and the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM), detection of the quiet sun and the moon in gamma rays, Pulsars observed by the observatory, Globular Star Clusters, Active Galactic Nucleus, and Gamma-Ray Bursts, with specific information about GRB 080916C.

  19. Diagnosing alternative conceptions of Fermi energy among undergraduate students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Sapna; Ahluwalia, Pardeep Kumar

    2012-07-01

    Physics education researchers have scientifically established the fact that the understanding of new concepts and interpretation of incoming information are strongly influenced by the preexisting knowledge and beliefs of students, called epistemological beliefs. This can lead to a gap between what students actually learn and what the teacher expects them to learn. In a classroom, as a teacher, it is desirable that one tries to bridge this gap at least on the key concepts of a particular field which is being taught. One such key concept which crops up in statistical physics/solid-state physics courses, and around which the behaviour of materials is described, is Fermi energy (εF). In this paper, we present the results which emerged about misconceptions on Fermi energy in the process of administering a diagnostic tool called the Statistical Physics Concept Survey developed by the authors. It deals with eight themes of basic importance in learning undergraduate solid-state physics and statistical physics. The question items of the tool were put through well-established sequential processes: definition of themes, Delphi study, interview with students, drafting questions, administration, validity and reliability of the tool. The tool was administered to a group of undergraduate students and postgraduate students, in a pre-test and post-test design. In this paper, we have taken one of the themes i.e. Fermi energy of the diagnostic tool for our analysis and discussion. Students’ responses and reasoning comments given during interview were analysed. This analysis helped us to identify prevailing misconceptions/learning gaps among students on this topic. How spreadsheets can be effectively used to remove the identified misconceptions and help appreciate the finer nuances while visualizing the behaviour of the system around Fermi energy, normally sidestepped both by the teachers and learners, is also presented in this paper.

  20. Momentum Resolved Radio Frequency Spectroscopy in Trapped Fermi Gases

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Qijin; Levin, K.

    2009-05-15

    We address recent momentum-resolved radio frequency (rf) spectroscopy experiments, showing how they yield more stringent tests than other comparisons with theory, associated with the ultracold Fermi gases. We demonstrate that, by providing a clear dispersion signature of pairing, they remove the ambiguity plaguing the interpretation of previous rf experiments. Our calculated spectral intensities are in semiquantitative agreement with the data. Even in the presence of a trap, the spectra are predicted to exhibit two BCS-like branches.

  1. Radiative corrections to sup 10 C superallowed Fermi. beta. decay

    SciTech Connect

    Rasche, G.; Robustelli, D. ); Barker, F.C. )

    1991-07-01

    In view of new data on the {sup 10}C superallowed Fermi {beta} decay, the radiative corrections have been reevaluated. In particular we calculate and include the nuclear-structure-dependent part of the axial-vector-induced contribution to the {ital O}({alpha}) radiative correction. The resulting {ital V}{sub {ital u}{ital d}} is appreciably larger than a value recently published, which was based on the same data.

  2. Holographic Fermi liquids in a spontaneously generated lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsup, James; Papantonopoulos, Eleftherios; Siopsis, George; Yeter, Kubra

    2016-05-01

    We discuss fermions in a spontaneously generated holographic lattice background. The lattice structure at the boundary is generated by introducing a higher-derivative interaction term between a U (1 ) gauge field and a scalar field. We solve the equations of motion below the critical temperature at which the lattice forms and analyze the change in the Fermi surface due to the lattice. The fermion band structure is found to exhibit a gap due to lattice effects.

  3. Magnetic and Fermi Surface Properties of EuGa4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Ai; Hiranaka, Yuichi; Hedo, Masato; Nakama, Takao; Miura, Yasunao; Tsutsumi, Hiroki; Mori, Akinobu; Ishida, Kazuhiro; Mitamura, Katsuya; Hirose, Yusuke; Sugiyama, Kiyohiro; Honda, Fuminori; Settai, Rikio; Takeuchi, Tetsuya; Hagiwara, Masayuki; Matsuda, Tatsuma D.; Yamamoto, Etsuji; Haga, Yoshinori; Matsubayashi, Kazuyuki; Uwatoko, Yoshiya; Harima, Hisatomo; Ōnuki, Yoshichika

    2013-10-01

    We grew a high-quality single crystal EuGa4 with the tetragonal structure by the Ga self-flux method, and measured the electrical resistivity, magnetic susceptibility, high-field magnetization, specific heat, thermoelectric power and de Haas--van Alphen (dHvA) effect, together with the electrical resistivity and thermoelectric power under pressure. EuGa4 is found to be a Eu-divalent compound without anisotropy of the magnetic susceptibility in the paramagnetic state and to reveal the same magnetization curve between H \\parallel [100] and [001] in the antiferromagnetic state, where the antiferromagnetic easy-axis is oriented along the [100] direction below a Néel temperature TN=16.5 K. The magnetization curve is discussed on the basis of a simple two-sublattice model. The Fermi surface in the paramagnetic state was clarified from the results of a dHvA experiment for EuGa4 and an energy band calculation for a non-4f reference compound SrGa4, which consists of a small ellipsoidal hole--Fermi surface and a compensated cube-like electron--Fermi surface with vacant space in center. We observed an anomaly in the temperature dependence of the electrical resistivity and thermoelectric power at TCDW=150 K under 2 GPa. This might correspond to an emergence of the charge density wave (CDW). The similar phenomenon was also observed in EuAl4 at ambient pressure. We discussed the CDW phenomenon on the basis of the present peculiar Fermi surfaces.

  4. Fermi GBM Observations of Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Briggs, M. S.; Connaughton, V.; Fishman, G. J.; Bhat, P. N.; Paciesas, W. S.; Preece, R.; Kippen, R. M.; vonKienlin, A.; Dwyer, J. R.; Smith, D. M.; Holzworth, R.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation explores the relationship between Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes (TGF) and lightning. Using data from the World-Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN), and the gamma ray observations from Fermi's Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM), the study reviews any causal relationship between TGFs and lightning. The conclusion of the study is that the TGF and lightning are simultaneous with out a causal relationship.

  5. Processing GPS Receiver Data for Improved Fermi GLAST Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, Mark A.

    2008-01-01

    Fermi GLAST s 5-year mission objectives: a) Explore the most extreme environments in the Universe. b) Search for signs of new laws of physics and what composes the mysterious Dark Matter. c) Explain how black holes accelerate immense jets of material to nearly light speed. d) Help crack the mysteries of gamma-ray bursts. e) Answer long-standing questions across a broad range of topics, including solar flares, pulsars and the origin of cosmic rays.

  6. Fermi Surface Instabilities in Ferromagnetic Superconductor URhGe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Dai; Knebel, Georg; Flouquet, Jacques

    2014-09-01

    The field-reentrant (field-reinforced) superconductivity on ferromagnetic superconductors is one of the most interesting topics in unconventional superconductivity. The enhancement of effective mass and the induced ferromagnetic fluctuations play key roles for reentrant superconductivity. However, the associated change of the Fermi surface, which is often observed at (pseudo-) metamagnetic transition, can also be a key ingredient. In order to study the Fermi surface instability, we performed Hall effect measurements in the ferromagnetic superconductor URhGe. The Hall effect of URhGe is well explained by two contributions, namely by the normal Hall effect and by the large anomalous Hall effect due to skew scattering. The large change in the Hall coefficient is observed at low fields between the paramagnetic and ferromagnetic states for H || c-axis (easy-magnetization axis) in the orthorhombic structure, indicating that the Fermi surface is reconstructed in the ferromagnetic state below the Curie temperature (TCurie = 9.5 K). At low temperatures (T ll Ttext{Curie}), when the field is applied along the b-axis, the reentrant superconductivity was observed in both the Hall resistivity and the magnetoresistance below 0.4 K. Above 0.4 K, a large jump with the first-order nature was detected in the Hall resistivity at a spin-reorientation field HR ˜ 12.5 T, demonstrating that the marked change of the Fermi surface occurs between the ferromagnetic state and the polarized state above HR. The results can be understood by the Lifshitz-type transition, induced by the magnetic field or by the change of the effective magnetic field.

  7. Future Multiwavelength Studies with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, David J.

    2011-01-01

    With two and a half years of experience, Fermi LAT contributions to multiwavelength studies have become an integral part of many astrophysical research projects. Future efforts will benefit from (1) Deeper LAT exposures} resulting in more sources; (2) More high-energy, high-angular resolution photons, giving better source locations and imaging; (3) Faster analysis of variability and announcements to the community; and (4) Longer time series for studies of variable source properties in comparison to other wavelengths.

  8. Exploring the thermodynamics of a universal Fermi gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nascimbène, S.; Navon, N.; Jiang, K. J.; Chevy, F.; Salomon, C.

    2010-02-01

    One of the greatest challenges in modern physics is to understand the behaviour of an ensemble of strongly interacting particles. A class of quantum many-body systems (such as neutron star matter and cold Fermi gases) share the same universal thermodynamic properties when interactions reach the maximum effective value allowed by quantum mechanics, the so-called unitary limit. This makes it possible in principle to simulate some astrophysical phenomena inside the highly controlled environment of an atomic physics laboratory. Previous work on the thermodynamics of a two-component Fermi gas led to thermodynamic quantities averaged over the trap, making comparisons with many-body theories developed for uniform gases difficult. Here we develop a general experimental method that yields the equation of state of a uniform gas, as well as enabling a detailed comparison with existing theories. The precision of our equation of state leads to new physical insights into the unitary gas. For the unpolarized gas, we show that the low-temperature thermodynamics of the strongly interacting normal phase is well described by Fermi liquid theory, and we localize the superfluid transition. For a spin-polarized system, our equation of state at zero temperature has a 2 per cent accuracy and extends work on the phase diagram to a new regime of precision. We show in particular that, despite strong interactions, the normal phase behaves as a mixture of two ideal gases: a Fermi gas of bare majority atoms and a non-interacting gas of dressed quasi-particles, the fermionic polarons.

  9. Pulsar Polar Cap and Slot Gap Models: Confronting Fermi Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Alice K.

    2012-01-01

    Rotation-powered pulsars are excellent laboratories for studying particle acceleration as well as fundamental physics of strong gravity, strong magnetic fields and relativity. I will review acceleration and gamma-ray emission from the pulsar polar cap and slot gap. Predictions of these models can be tested with the data set on pulsars collected by the Large Area Telescope on the Fermi Gamma-Ray Telescope over the last four years, using both detailed light curve fitting and population synthesis.

  10. Bose and Fermi walk configurations on planar graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrowsmith, D. K.; Bhatti, F. M.; Essam, J. W.

    2012-06-01

    The number, fCn(H), of n-walk configurations of type C is investigated on certain two-rooted directed planar graphs H which will be always realized as plane graphs in R2. C may be Bose or Fermi as defined by Inui and Katori. Both types of configuration are collections of non-crossing walks which follow the directed paths between the roots of the plane graph H. In the case of configurations of Fermi type each walk may be included only once. The number fBosen(H) is shown to be a polynomial in n of degree nmax - 1 where nmax is the maximum number of walks in a Fermi configuration. The coefficient of the highest power of n in this polynomial is simply related to the number of maximal Fermi walk configurations. It is also shown that nmax = c(H) + 1 where c(H) is the number of finite faces on H. Extension of these results to multi-rooted graphs is also discussed. When H is the union of paths between two sites of the directed square lattice subject to various boundary conditions Kreweras showed that the number of Bose configurations is equal to the number of n-element multi-chains on segments of Young’s lattice. He expressed this number as a determinant the elements of which are polynomials in n. We evaluate this determinant by the method of LU decomposition in the case of ‘watermelon’ configurations above a wall. In this case the polynomial is a product of linear factors but on introducing a second wall the polynomial does not completely factorize but has a factor which is the number of watermelon configurations on the largest rectangular subgraph. The number of two-rooted ‘star’ configurations is found to be the product of the numbers of watermelon configurations on the three rectangular subgraphs into which it may be partitioned.

  11. The Fermi Pasta Ulam 'numerical experiment': history and pedagogical perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dauxois, Thierry; Peyrard, Michel; Ruffo, Stefano

    2005-09-01

    The pioneering Fermi-Pasta-Ulam (FPU) numerical experiment played a major role in the history of computer simulation because it introduced this concept for the first time. Moreover, it raised a puzzling question which was answered more than 10 years later. After an introduction to this problem, we briefly review its history and then suggest some simple numerical experiments, with the Matlab© code provided, to study various aspects of the 'FPU' problem.

  12. Fermi-Dirac statistics plus liquid description of quark partons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buccella, F.; Miele, G.; Migliore, G.; Tibullo, V.

    1995-12-01

    A previous approach with Fermi-Dirac distributions for fermion partons is here improved to comply with the expected low x behaviour of structure functions. We are so able to get a fair description of the unpolarized and polarized structure functions of the nucleons as well as of neutrino data. We cannot reach definite conclusions, but confirm our suspicion of a relationship between the defects in Gottfried and spin sum rules.

  13. Fermi: The Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McEnery, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Following its launch in June 2008, high-energy gamma-ray observations by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope have unveiled over 1000 new sources and opened an important and previously unexplored window on a wide variety of phenomena. These have included the discovery of an population of pulsars pulsing only in gamma rays; the detection of photons up to 10s of GeV from gamma-ray bursts, enhancing our understanding of the astrophysics of these powerful explosions; the detection of hundreds of active galaxies; a measurement of the high energy cosmic-ray electron spectrum which may imply the presence of nearby astrophysical particle accelerators; the determination of the diffuse gamma-ray emission with unprecedented accuracy and the constraints on phenomena such as supersymmetric dark-matter annihilations and exotic relics from the Big Bang. Continuous monitoring of the high-energy gamma-ray sky has uncovered numerous outbursts from active galaxies and the discovery of transient sources in our galaxy. In this talk I will describe the current status of the Fermi observatory and review the science highlights from Fermi.

  14. Fermi: The Gamma-Ray Large Area Telescope Mission Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McEnery, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Following its launch in June 2008, high-energy gamma-ray observations by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope have unveiled over 1000 new sources and opened an important and previously unexplored window on a wide variety of phenomena. These have included the discovery of an population of pulsars pulsing only in gamma rays; the detection of photons up to 10s of GeV from gamma-ray bursts, enhancing our understanding of the astrophysics of these powerful explosions; the detection of hundreds of active galaxies; a measurement of the high energy cosmic-ray electron spectrum which may imply the presence of nearby astrophysical particle accelerators; the determination of the diffuse gamma-ray emission with unprecedented accuracy and the constraints on phenomena such as supersymmetric dark-matter annihilations and exotic relics from the Big Bang. Continuous monitoring of the high-energy gamma-ray sky has uncovered numerous outbursts from active galaxies and the discovery of transient sources in our galaxy. In this talk I will describe the current status of the Fermi observatory and review the science highlights from Fermi.

  15. Fermi: The Gamma-Ray Large Area Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McEnery, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Following its launch in June 2008, high-energy gamma-ray observations by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope have unveiled over 1000 new sources and opened an important and previously unexplored window on a wide variety of phenomena. These have included the discovery of an population of pulsars pulsing only in gamma rays; the detection of photons up to 10 seconds of gigaelectronvolts from gamma-ray bursts, enhancing our understanding of the astrophysics of these powerful explosions; the detection of hundreds of active galaxies; a measurement of the high energy cosmic-ray electron spectrum which may imply the presence of nearby astrophysical particle accelerators; the determination of the diffuse gamma-ray emission with unprecedented accuracy and the constraints on phenomena such as super-symmetric dark-matter annihilations and exotic relics from the Big Bang. Continuous monitoring of the high-energy gamma-ray sky has uncovered numerous outbursts from active galaxies and the discovery of transient sources in our galaxy. In this talk I will describe the current status of the Fermi observatory and review the science highlights from Fermi.

  16. Fermi: The Gamma-Ray Large Area Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McEnery, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Following its launch in June 2008, high-energy gamma-ray observations by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope have unveiled over 1000 new sources and opened an important and previously unexplored window on a wide variety of phenomena. These have included the discovery of an population of pulsars pulsing only in gamma rays; the detection of photons up to 10s of GeV from gamma-ray bursts, enhancing our understanding of the astrophysics of these powerful explosions; the detection of hundreds of active galaxies; a measurement of the high energy cosmic-ray electron spectrum which may imply the presence of nearby astrophysical particle accelerators; the determination of the diffuse gamma-ray emission with unprecedented accuracy and the constraints on phenomena such as supersymmetric dark-matter annihilations and exotic relics from the Big Bang. Continuous monitoring of the high-energy gamma-ray sky has uncovered numerous outbursts from active galaxies and the discovery of transient sources in our galaxy. In this talk I will describe the current status of the Fermi observatory and review the science highlights from Fermi.

  17. The First FERMI-LAT Gamma-Ray Burst Catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Asano, K.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Bhat, P. N.; Bissaldi, E.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Bonnell, J.; Bouvier, A.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Burgess, J. Michael; Buson, S.; Byrne, D.; Caliandro, G. A.; Ferrara, E. C.; Gehrels, N.; Guiriec, S.; McEnery, J. E.; Nemmen, R.; Perkins, J. S.; Racusin, J. L.; Thompson, D. J.; Kouveliotou, C.

    2013-01-01

    In three years of observations since the beginning of nominal science operations in 2008 August, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has observed high-energy great than (20 MeV) gamma-ray emission from 35 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Among these, 28 GRBs have been detected above 100 MeV and 7 GRBs above approximately 20 MeV. The first Fermi-LAT catalog of GRBs is a compilation of these detections and provides a systematic study of high-energy emission from GRBs for the first time. To generate the catalog, we examined 733 GRBs detected by the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on Fermi and processed each of them using the same analysis sequence. Details of the methodology followed by the LAT collaboration for the GRB analysis are provided. We summarize the temporal and spectral properties of the LAT-detected GRBs. We also discuss characteristics of LAT-detected emission such as its delayed onset and longer duration compared with emission detected by the GBM, its power-law temporal decay at late times, and the fact that it is dominated by a power-law spectral component that appears in addition to the usual Band model.

  18. Quadratic Fermi node in a 3D strongly correlated semimetal

    SciTech Connect

    Kondo, Takeshi; Nakayama, M.; Chen, R.; Ishikawa, J. J.; Moon, E. -G.; Yamamoto, T.; Ota, Y.; Malaeb, W.; Kanai, H.; Nakashima, Y.; Ishida, Y.; Yoshida, R.; Yamamoto, H.; Matsunami, M.; Kimura, S.; Inami, N.; Ono, K.; Kumigashira, H.; Nakatsuji, S.; Balents, L.; Shin, S.

    2015-12-07

    We report that strong spin–orbit coupling fosters exotic electronic states such as topological insulators and superconductors, but the combination of strong spin–orbit and strong electron–electron interactions is just beginning to be understood. Central to this emerging area are the 5d transition metal iridium oxides. Here, in the pyrochlore iridate Pr2Ir2O7, we identify a non-trivial state with a single-point Fermi node protected by cubic and time-reversal symmetries, using a combination of angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and first-principles calculations. Owing to its quadratic dispersion, the unique coincidence of four degenerate states at the Fermi energy, and strong Coulomb interactions, non-Fermi liquid behaviour is predicted, for which we observe some evidence. Lastly, our discovery implies that Pr2Ir2O7 is a parent state that can be manipulated to produce other strongly correlated topological phases, such as topological Mott insulator, Weyl semimetal, and quantum spin and anomalous Hall states.

  19. Numerical methods for the Poisson-Fermi equation in electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jinn-Liang

    2013-08-01

    The Poisson-Fermi equation proposed by Bazant, Storey, and Kornyshev [Phys. Rev. Lett. 106 (2011) 046102] for ionic liquids is applied to and numerically studied for electrolytes and biological ion channels in three-dimensional space. This is a fourth-order nonlinear PDE that deals with both steric and correlation effects of all ions and solvent molecules involved in a model system. The Fermi distribution follows from classical lattice models of configurational entropy of finite size ions and solvent molecules and hence prevents the long and outstanding problem of unphysical divergence predicted by the Gouy-Chapman model at large potentials due to the Boltzmann distribution of point charges. The equation reduces to Poisson-Boltzmann if the correlation length vanishes. A simplified matched interface and boundary method exhibiting optimal convergence is first developed for this equation by using a gramicidin A channel model that illustrates challenging issues associated with the geometric singularities of molecular surfaces of channel proteins in realistic 3D simulations. Various numerical methods then follow to tackle a range of numerical problems concerning the fourth-order term, nonlinearity, stability, efficiency, and effectiveness. The most significant feature of the Poisson-Fermi equation, namely, its inclusion of steric and correlation effects, is demonstrated by showing good agreement with Monte Carlo simulation data for a charged wall model and an L type calcium channel model.

  20. Annihilation Lines from Dark Matter with the Fermi-LAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ylinen, Tomi

    2010-06-01

    Dark matter is today one of the most intriguing but so far unresolved issues in physics. Many extensions of the Standard Model of particle physics predict a stable Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) that may annihilate directly into two gamma-rays. If the WIMPs are non-relativistic, the gamma-rays from this channel will have an energy equal to the mass of the WIMP. The signature caused by this annihilation is a spectral line, smeared out only by the energy resolution of the detector. The signal would be a ``smoking gun'' for dark matter, since no other astrophysical source should be able to produce it. We present here the preliminary results from the search for a dark matter line on a limited data set from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT), the main instrument onboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, which was successfully launched on June 11, 2008. The Fermi-LAT is a pair-conversion detector for gamma-rays with an energy range from 20 MeV to 300 GeV and has an unprecedented resolution and sensitivity.

  1. Are the surface Fermi arcs in Dirac semimetals topologically protected?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yuan Ming; Kargarian, Mehdi; Randeria, Mohit

    Motivated by recent experiments probing double Fermi arcs on the surface of Dirac semimetals (DSMs) Na3Bi and Cd3As2, we raise the question posed in the title. We find that, in marked contrast to Weyl semimetals, the Fermi arcs of DSMs are not topologically protected in general, except at certain time-reversal invariant momenta. For a simple 4-band model with a pair of Dirac nodes at k = (0, 0, +/-Q) gapless surface states are protected only at kz = 0. We identify symmetry allowed bulk perturbations that destroy Fermi arcs, but show that they are necessarily ``small'', i.e., higher order than terms kept in usual k . p theory. We validate our conclusions about the absence of a topological invariant protecting the surface states in DSMs using a K-theory analysis for the space groups of Na3Bi and Cd3As2 The authors acknowledge the support of the CEM, an NSF MRSEC, under Grant DMR-1420451.

  2. Are the surface Fermi arcs in Dirac semimetals topologically protected?

    PubMed

    Kargarian, Mehdi; Randeria, Mohit; Lu, Yuan-Ming

    2016-08-01

    Motivated by recent experiments probing anomalous surface states of Dirac semimetals (DSMs) Na3Bi and Cd3As2, we raise the question posed in the title. We find that, in marked contrast to Weyl semimetals, the gapless surface states of DSMs are not topologically protected in general, except on time-reversal-invariant planes of surface Brillouin zone. We first demonstrate this finding in a minimal four-band model with a pair of Dirac nodes at [Formula: see text] where gapless states on the side surfaces are protected only near [Formula: see text] We then validate our conclusions about the absence of a topological invariant protecting double Fermi arcs in DSMs, using a K-theory analysis for space groups of Na3Bi and Cd3As2 Generically, the arcs deform into a Fermi pocket, similar to the surface states of a topological insulator, and this pocket can merge into the projection of bulk Dirac Fermi surfaces as the chemical potential is varied. We make sharp predictions for the doping dependence of the surface states of a DSM that can be tested by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and quantum oscillation experiments. PMID:27436895

  3. Quadratic Fermi node in a 3D strongly correlated semimetal

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Takeshi; Nakayama, M.; Chen, R.; Ishikawa, J. J.; Moon, E.-G.; Yamamoto, T.; Ota, Y.; Malaeb, W.; Kanai, H.; Nakashima, Y.; Ishida, Y.; Yoshida, R.; Yamamoto, H.; Matsunami, M.; Kimura, S.; Inami, N.; Ono, K.; Kumigashira, H.; Nakatsuji, S.; Balents, L.; Shin, S.

    2015-01-01

    Strong spin–orbit coupling fosters exotic electronic states such as topological insulators and superconductors, but the combination of strong spin–orbit and strong electron–electron interactions is just beginning to be understood. Central to this emerging area are the 5d transition metal iridium oxides. Here, in the pyrochlore iridate Pr2Ir2O7, we identify a non-trivial state with a single-point Fermi node protected by cubic and time-reversal symmetries, using a combination of angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and first-principles calculations. Owing to its quadratic dispersion, the unique coincidence of four degenerate states at the Fermi energy, and strong Coulomb interactions, non-Fermi liquid behaviour is predicted, for which we observe some evidence. Our discovery implies that Pr2Ir2O7 is a parent state that can be manipulated to produce other strongly correlated topological phases, such as topological Mott insulator, Weyl semimetal, and quantum spin and anomalous Hall states. PMID:26640114

  4. Fermi Surface Topology and the ARPES Spectra of BISCO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansil, A.; Lindroos, M.

    2001-03-01

    The Fermi surface (FS) of BISCO has generated considerable recent controversy with attention focused on whether or not the FS is electron- or hole-like in the vicinity of the M(π,0) symmetry point. Given strong matrix element effects in BISCO[1], care is needed in ascertaining delicate FS features in terms of the the ARPES spectra. With this motivation, we have carried out extensive first-principles simulations of photointensity in the entire (k_x,k_y) plane for emission from the Fermi energy at a photon energy of 21.2 eV. The presence of electron or hole sheets in the underlying spectrum is simulated by varying the Fermi energy appropriately. The simulated ARPES spectra are analyzed using a variety of methods that have been invoked in the recent literature for the purpose of deducing FS topology in BISCO from the ARPES data. While different methods indeed help ameliorate matrix element effects to varying degrees, our study also reveals their limitations. The "renormalization" of the spectrum over a large energy window ( ~600 meV) tends to artificially introduce hole-like features, while the gradient of the total spectral weight has a tendancy to induce spurious electron-like features. These and related issues are discussed. Work supported in part by the U.S.D.O.E. [1] A. Bansil and M. Lindroos, Phys. Rev. Letters 83,5154(1999).

  5. Evolution from BCS to BEC Superfluidity in Dilute Fermi Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Melo, Carlos A. R. Sa

    2006-03-01

    I will review briefly some old results [1,2] of the evolution from BCS to BEC superfluidity in dilute Fermi gases, including critical temperature, order parameter amplitude, chemical potential and time dependent Ginzburg-Landau theory for the s-wave channel in three dimensions. Following this discussion, I will present new results for the BCS to BEC evolution of Fermi gases in the p-wave channel [3]. I will make comparisons between s-wave and p-wave superfluidity and point out the main differences between the two cases. Lastly, I will discuss supefluidity of s-wave and p-wave Fermi gases in a restricted two-dimensional geometry (one dimensional optical lattice), where a Berezinkii-Kosterlitz-Thouless-type transition is proposed as the system evolves from the weak to the strong attraction limit. In this case, I will show that spontaneous vortex-antivortex pairs form and that they can condense into a vortex-antivortex lattice at lower temperatures [4]. [1] C. A. R. Sa de Melo, M. Randeria, and J. R. Engelbrecht, PRL 71, 3202 (1993). [2] J. R. Engelbrecht, M. Randeria, and C. A. R. Sa de Melo, PRB 55, 15153 (1997). [3] M. Iskin, and C. A. R. Sa de Melo, cond-mat/0510300 (2005). [4] S. S. Botelho, and C. A. R. Sa de Melo, cond-mat/0509387 (2005).

  6. Relaxation Dynamics Of Bose-Fermi Doublons In Optical Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safavi-Naini, Arghavan; Gärttner, Martin; Schachenmayer, Johannes; Wall, Michael L.; Covey, Jacob P.; Moses, Steven A.; Miecnikowski, Matthew T.; Fu, Zhengkun; Rey, Ana Maria; Jin, Deborah S.; Ye, Jun

    2016-05-01

    Motivated by a recent experiment at JILA we investigate the out-of-equilibrium dynamics of a dilute Fermi-Bose mixture, starting from a well-defined initial state, where each lattice site is either empty or occupied by a Bose-Fermi doublon. Utilizing analytical techniques and numerical simulations using the t-DRMG method, we identify the leading relaxation mechanisms of the doublons. At short times strong interactions tend to hold the doublons together, as previously reported in similar type of experiments made with identical bosons or two component fermions. Since the fermions feel a much shallower lattice than the bosons, the bosons can be visualized as random localization centers for the fermions. However, at longer times the boson tunneling cannot be ignored and additional decay channels unique to Bose-Fermi mixtures become relevant. While cluster expansion allows us to characterize the short time dynamics for dilute arrays, the long time relaxation dynamics at higher densities is strongly correlated. In this regime exact numerical techniques are employed. JILA-NSF-PFC-1125844, NSF-PIF-1211914, ARO, AFOSR, AFOSR-MURI.

  7. THE FIRST FERMI-LAT GAMMA-RAY BURST CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Asano, K.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bloom, E. D.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J.; Bhat, P. N.; Bissaldi, E.; Bonamente, E.; Bonnell, J.; Brandt, T. J.; Bouvier, A. E-mail: giacomov@slac.stanford.edu; and others

    2013-11-01

    In three years of observations since the beginning of nominal science operations in 2008 August, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has observed high-energy (∼> 20 MeV) γ-ray emission from 35 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Among these, 28 GRBs have been detected above 100 MeV and 7 GRBs above ∼20 MeV. The first Fermi-LAT catalog of GRBs is a compilation of these detections and provides a systematic study of high-energy emission from GRBs for the first time. To generate the catalog, we examined 733 GRBs detected by the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on Fermi and processed each of them using the same analysis sequence. Details of the methodology followed by the LAT collaboration for the GRB analysis are provided. We summarize the temporal and spectral properties of the LAT-detected GRBs. We also discuss characteristics of LAT-detected emission such as its delayed onset and longer duration compared with emission detected by the GBM, its power-law temporal decay at late times, and the fact that it is dominated by a power-law spectral component that appears in addition to the usual Band model.

  8. Quadratic Fermi node in a 3D strongly correlated semimetal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Takeshi; Nakayama, M.; Chen, R.; Ishikawa, J. J.; Moon, E.-G.; Yamamoto, T.; Ota, Y.; Malaeb, W.; Kanai, H.; Nakashima, Y.; Ishida, Y.; Yoshida, R.; Yamamoto, H.; Matsunami, M.; Kimura, S.; Inami, N.; Ono, K.; Kumigashira, H.; Nakatsuji, S.; Balents, L.; Shin, S.

    2015-12-01

    Strong spin-orbit coupling fosters exotic electronic states such as topological insulators and superconductors, but the combination of strong spin-orbit and strong electron-electron interactions is just beginning to be understood. Central to this emerging area are the 5d transition metal iridium oxides. Here, in the pyrochlore iridate Pr2Ir2O7, we identify a non-trivial state with a single-point Fermi node protected by cubic and time-reversal symmetries, using a combination of angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and first-principles calculations. Owing to its quadratic dispersion, the unique coincidence of four degenerate states at the Fermi energy, and strong Coulomb interactions, non-Fermi liquid behaviour is predicted, for which we observe some evidence. Our discovery implies that Pr2Ir2O7 is a parent state that can be manipulated to produce other strongly correlated topological phases, such as topological Mott insulator, Weyl semimetal, and quantum spin and anomalous Hall states.

  9. The First Fermi-LAT Gamma-Ray Burst Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Asano, K.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Bhat, P. N.; Bissaldi, E.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Bonnell, J.; Bouvier, A.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Burgess, J. Michael; Buson, S.; Byrne, D.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Connaughton, V.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Dermer, C. D.; Desiante, R.; Digel, S. W.; Dingus, B. L.; Di Venere, L.; Drell, P. S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Dubois, R.; Favuzzi, C.; Ferrara, E. C.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Foley, S.; Franckowiak, A.; Fukazawa, Y.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Goldstein, A.; Granot, J.; Grenier, I. A.; Grove, J. E.; Gruber, D.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Hanabata, Y.; Hayashida, M.; Horan, D.; Hou, X.; Hughes, R. E.; Inoue, Y.; Jackson, M. S.; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, W. N.; Kamae, T.; Kataoka, J.; Kawano, T.; Kippen, R. M.; Knödlseder, J.; Kocevski, D.; Kouveliotou, C.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Lee, S.-H.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Massaro, F.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McBreen, S.; McEnery, J. E.; McGlynn, S.; Michelson, P. F.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Murgia, S.; Nemmen, R.; Nuss, E.; Nymark, T.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Paciesas, W. S.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Pelassa, V.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Preece, R.; Racusin, J. L.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Rau, A.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reposeur, T.; Ritz, S.; Romoli, C.; Roth, M.; Ryde, F.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Schalk, T. L.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Sonbas, E.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, Y.; Thayer, J. G.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Tierney, D.; Tinivella, M.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Tronconi, V.; Usher, T. L.; Vandenbroucke, J.; van der Horst, A. J.; Vasileiou, V.; Vianello, G.; Vitale, V.; von Kienlin, A.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.; Xiong, S.; Yang, Z.

    2013-11-01

    In three years of observations since the beginning of nominal science operations in 2008 August, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has observed high-energy (gsim 20 MeV) γ-ray emission from 35 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Among these, 28 GRBs have been detected above 100 MeV and 7 GRBs above ~20 MeV. The first Fermi-LAT catalog of GRBs is a compilation of these detections and provides a systematic study of high-energy emission from GRBs for the first time. To generate the catalog, we examined 733 GRBs detected by the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on Fermi and processed each of them using the same analysis sequence. Details of the methodology followed by the LAT collaboration for the GRB analysis are provided. We summarize the temporal and spectral properties of the LAT-detected GRBs. We also discuss characteristics of LAT-detected emission such as its delayed onset and longer duration compared with emission detected by the GBM, its power-law temporal decay at late times, and the fact that it is dominated by a power-law spectral component that appears in addition to the usual Band model.

  10. The extragalactic gamma-ray sky in the Fermi era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massaro, Francesco; Thompson, David J.; Ferrara, Elizabeth C.

    2015-12-01

    The Universe is largely transparent to γ -rays in the GeV energy range, making these high-energy photons valuable for exploring energetic processes in the cosmos. After 7 years of operation, the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has produced a wealth of information about the high-energy sky. This review focuses on extragalactic γ -ray sources: what has been learned about the sources themselves and about how they can be used as cosmological probes. Active galactic nuclei (blazars, radio galaxies, Seyfert galaxies) and star-forming galaxies populate the extragalactic high-energy sky. Fermi observations have demonstrated that these powerful non-thermal sources display substantial diversity in energy spectra and temporal behavior. Coupled with contemporaneous multifrequency observations, the Fermi results are enabling detailed, time-dependent modeling of the energetic particle acceleration and interaction processes that produce the γ -rays, as well as providing indirect measurements of the extragalactic background light and intergalactic magnetic fields. Population studies of the γ -ray source classes compared to the extragalactic γ -ray background place constraints on some models of dark matter. Ongoing searches for the nature of the large number of γ -ray sources without obvious counterparts at other wavelengths remain an important challenge.

  11. Quasiparticle scattering rate in a strongly polarized Fermi mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Rasmus Søgaard; Bruun, Georg M.

    2015-04-01

    We analyze the scattering rate of an impurity atom in a Fermi sea as a function of momentum and temperature in the BCS-BEC crossover. The cross section is calculated using a microscopic multichannel theory for the Feshbach resonance scattering, including finite range and medium effects. We show that pair correlations significantly increase the cross section for strong interactions close to the unitarity regime. They give rise to a molecule pole of the cross section at negative energy on the BEC side of the resonance, which smoothly evolves into a resonance at positive scattering energy with a nonzero imaginary part on the BCS side. The resonance is the analog of superfluid pairing for the corresponding population balanced system. Using Fermi liquid theory, we show that the low temperature scattering rate of the impurity atom is significantly increased due to these pair correlations for low momenta. We demonstrate that finite range and mass imbalance effects are significant for the experimentally relevant 6Li-40K mixture, and we finally discuss how the scattering rate can be measured using radio-frequency spectroscopy and Bose-Fermi mixtures.

  12. Annihilation Lines from Dark Matter with the Fermi-LAT

    SciTech Connect

    Ylinen, Tomi

    2010-06-23

    Dark matter is today one of the most intriguing but so far unresolved issues in physics. Many extensions of the Standard Model of particle physics predict a stable Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) that may annihilate directly into two gamma-rays. If the WIMPs are non-relativistic, the gamma-rays from this channel will have an energy equal to the mass of the WIMP. The signature caused by this annihilation is a spectral line, smeared out only by the energy resolution of the detector. The signal would be a ''smoking gun'' for dark matter, since no other astrophysical source should be able to produce it. We present here the preliminary results from the search for a dark matter line on a limited data set from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT), the main instrument onboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, which was successfully launched on June 11, 2008. The Fermi-LAT is a pair-conversion detector for gamma-rays with an energy range from 20 MeV to 300 GeV and has an unprecedented resolution and sensitivity.

  13. Ugo Fano, Enrico Fermi, and spectral line shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Charles W.

    2005-03-01

    Ugo Fano's 1961 paper on spectral line shapes^1 was recently ranked as the third highest in citation impact of all papers published in the entire Physical Review series.^2 In the course of preparing an article for a NIST Centennial volume,^3 I became interested in the history of the results presented in Fano’s seminal paper, and will present my findings in this talk. An amusing sidelight concerns the role played by Enrico Fermi in the development of the famous ``Fano profile'' formula. I had been told this story by Fano when I was his graduate student, but uncertain of my recollection of the details, I did not publish it in his obituary.^4 I later learned that the archives of the Royal Society of London contain Fano's own written version of the tale, which will be presented in this talk. The story sheds light on the nature of Enrico Fermi's interactions with his students, and confirms accounts concerning the way in which he did his theoretical work.^5 ^1 U. Fano,``Effects of Configuration Interaction on Intensities and Phase Shifts,'' Phys. Rev. 124, 1866-1878 (1961)^2 S. Redner, physics/0407137 (2004)^3 http://nvl.nist.gov/pub/nistpubs/sp958-lide/116-119.pdf^4 C. W. Clark, Nature 410, 164 (2001)^5 F. Rasetti, in Collected Papers, vol. I, E. Fermi (University of Chicago Press, 1962), p. 178

  14. Observation of Weyl nodes and Fermi arcs in tantalum phosphide

    PubMed Central

    Xu, N.; Weng, H. M.; Lv, B. Q.; Matt, C. E.; Park, J.; Bisti, F.; Strocov, V. N.; Gawryluk, D.; Pomjakushina, E.; Conder, K.; Plumb, N. C.; Radovic, M.; Autès, G.; Yazyev, O. V.; Fang, Z.; Dai, X.; Qian, T.; Mesot, J.; Ding, H.; Shi, M.

    2016-01-01

    A Weyl semimetal possesses spin-polarized band-crossings, called Weyl nodes, connected by topological surface arcs. The low-energy excitations near the crossing points behave the same as massless Weyl fermions, leading to exotic properties like chiral anomaly. To have the transport properties dominated by Weyl fermions, Weyl nodes need to locate nearly at the chemical potential and enclosed by pairs of individual Fermi surfaces with non-zero Fermi Chern numbers. Combining angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and first-principles calculation, here we show that TaP is a Weyl semimetal with only a single type of Weyl fermions, topologically distinguished from TaAs where two types of Weyl fermions contribute to the low-energy physical properties. The simple Weyl fermions in TaP are not only of fundamental interests but also of great potential for future applications. Fermi arcs on the Ta-terminated surface are observed, which appear in a different pattern from that on the As-termination in TaAs and NbAs. PMID:26983910

  15. Quadratic Fermi node in a 3D strongly correlated semimetal

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kondo, Takeshi; Nakayama, M.; Chen, R.; Ishikawa, J. J.; Moon, E. -G.; Yamamoto, T.; Ota, Y.; Malaeb, W.; Kanai, H.; Nakashima, Y.; et al

    2015-12-07

    We report that strong spin–orbit coupling fosters exotic electronic states such as topological insulators and superconductors, but the combination of strong spin–orbit and strong electron–electron interactions is just beginning to be understood. Central to this emerging area are the 5d transition metal iridium oxides. Here, in the pyrochlore iridate Pr2Ir2O7, we identify a non-trivial state with a single-point Fermi node protected by cubic and time-reversal symmetries, using a combination of angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and first-principles calculations. Owing to its quadratic dispersion, the unique coincidence of four degenerate states at the Fermi energy, and strong Coulomb interactions, non-Fermi liquid behaviour ismore » predicted, for which we observe some evidence. Lastly, our discovery implies that Pr2Ir2O7 is a parent state that can be manipulated to produce other strongly correlated topological phases, such as topological Mott insulator, Weyl semimetal, and quantum spin and anomalous Hall states.« less

  16. Topologically nontrivial Fermi regions and their novel electromagnetic response properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ching Hua; Zhang, Xiao

    In the last decade, there has been a surge of interest in the application of topology to condensed matter physics. So far, most studies have been concerned with the novel properties that arise due to nontrivial band topology, i.e Quantum Anomalous Hall and Z2 topological insulators (TIs). In this talk, I shall describe another context where nontrivial topology also leads to interesting, measurable effects. Within the semi-classical Boltzmann approach, it can be shown that a topologically nontrivial Fermi sea region generically exhibits a non-monotonic nonlinear electromagnetic response in the limit of low chemical potential. Such topologically nontrivial regions of filled states can arise in experimentally realized TI heterostructures or materials with large Rashba splitting, i.e. BiTeI, where the Fermi sea is not simply connected. A non-monotonic electromagnetic response implies regimes of negative differential resistance, which have important applications in technologies involving microwave generation, like motion sensing and radio astronomy. We hope that nontrivial Fermi sea topology will hence provide another route for the realization of such technologies.

  17. A Mobile Data Application for the Fermi Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, T. E.

    2013-10-01

    With the ever increasing use of smartphones and tablets among scientists and the world at large, it becomes increasingly important for projects and missions to have mobile friendly access to their data. This access could come in the form of mobile friendly websites and/or native mobile applications that allow the users to explore or access the data. The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope Mission has begun work along the latter path. In this poster I present the initial version of the Fermi Mobile Data Portal, a native application for both Android and iOS devices that allows access to various high level public data products from the Fermi Science Support Center (FSSC), the Gamma-ray Coordinate Network (GCN), and other sources. While network access is required to download data, most of the data served by the app are stored locally and are available even when a network connection is not available. This poster discusses the application's features as well as the development experience and lessons learned so far along the way.

  18. A Mobile Data Application for the Fermi Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, Thomas E.; Science Support Center, Fermi

    2014-01-01

    With the ever increasing use of smartphones and tablets among scientists and the world at large, it becomes increasingly important for projects and missions to have mobile friendly access to their data. This access could come in the form of mobile friendly websites and/or native mobile applications that allow the users to explore or access the data. The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope mission has begun work along the latter path. In this poster I present the current version of the Fermi Data Portal, a native mobile application for both Android and iOS devices that allows access to various high level public data products from the Fermi Science Support Center (FSSC), the Gamma-ray Coordinate Network (GCN), and other sources. While network access is required to download data, most of the data served by the app are stored locally and are available even when a network connection is not available. This poster discusses the application's features as well as the development experience and lessons learned so far along the way.

  19. A Fermi model for electron acceleration during magnetic reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, J. F.; Swisdak, M.; Che, H.; Shay, M. A.

    2006-12-01

    A Fermi-like model for energetic electron production during magnetic reconnection is described that explains key observations in the magnetosphere and solar corona [1]. Magnetic reconnection with a guide field leads to the growth and dynamics of multiple magnetic islands rather than a single large x-line. Above a critical energy electron acceleration is dominated by the Fermi-like reflection of electrons within the resulting magnetic islands rather than by the parallel electric fields associated with the x-line. Particles trapped within islands gain energy as they reflect from ends of contracting magnetic islands. The pressure from energetic electrons rises rapidly until the rate of electron energy gain balances the rate of magnetic energy release. The energetic particle pressure therefore throttles the rate of reconnection. A transport equation for the distribution of energetic particles, including their feedback on island contraction, is obtained by averaging over the particle interaction with many islands. The steady state solutions in reconnection geometry result from convective losses balancing the Fermi drive. At high energy distribution functions take the form of a powerlaw whose spectral index depends only on the initial electron β, lower (higher) β producing harder (softer) spectra. The spectral index matches that seen in recent Wind spacecraft observations in the magnetotail. Harder spectra are predicted for the low β conditions of the solar corona. 1. Drake et al., Nature, in press.

  20. Charge distribution and Fermi level in bimetallic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Holmberg, Nico; Laasonen, Kari; Peljo, Pekka

    2016-01-28

    Upon metal-metal contact, a transfer of electrons will occur between the metals until the Fermi levels in both phases are equal, resulting in a net charge difference across the metal-metal interface. Here, we have examined this contact electrification in bimetallic model systems composed of mixed Au-Ag nanoparticles containing ca. 600 atoms using density functional theory calculations. We present a new model to explain this charge transfer by considering the bimetallic system as a nanocapacitor with a potential difference equal to the work function difference, and with most of the transferred charge located directly at the contact interface. Identical results were obtained by considering surface contacts as well as by employing a continuum model, confirming that this model is general and can be applied to any multimetallic structure regardless of geometry or size (going from nano- to macroscale). Furthermore, the equilibrium Fermi level was found to be strongly dependent on the surface coverage of different metals, enabling the construction of scaling relations. We believe that the charge transfer due to Fermi level equilibration has a profound effect on the catalytic, electrocatalytic and other properties of bimetallic particles. Additionally, bimetallic nanoparticles are expected to have very interesting self-assembly for large superstructures due to the surface charge anisotropy between the two metals. PMID:26788999

  1. SU (2) lattice gauge theory simulations on Fermi GPUs

    SciTech Connect

    Cardoso, Nuno; Bicudo, Pedro

    2011-05-10

    In this work we explore the performance of CUDA in quenched lattice SU (2) simulations. CUDA, NVIDIA Compute Unified Device Architecture, is a hardware and software architecture developed by NVIDIA for computing on the GPU. We present an analysis and performance comparison between the GPU and CPU in single and double precision. Analyses with multiple GPUs and two different architectures (G200 and Fermi architectures) are also presented. In order to obtain a high performance, the code must be optimized for the GPU architecture, i.e., an implementation that exploits the memory hierarchy of the CUDA programming model. We produce codes for the Monte Carlo generation of SU (2) lattice gauge configurations, for the mean plaquette, for the Polyakov Loop at finite T and for the Wilson loop. We also present results for the potential using many configurations (50,000) without smearing and almost 2000 configurations with APE smearing. With two Fermi GPUs we have achieved an excellent performance of 200x the speed over one CPU, in single precision, around 110 Gflops/s. We also find that, using the Fermi architecture, double precision computations for the static quark-antiquark potential are not much slower (less than 2x slower) than single precision computations.

  2. [The Effects of Complex of Benzoquinone on Fermi Resonance].

    PubMed

    Li, Shuai-peng; Zhang, Feng-qin; Jiang, Li-tong; Lin, Xiao-long; Jiang, Yong-heng; Zhang Liu-yang; Lin, Bo; Gu, Hao

    2015-07-01

    Fermi resonance phenomenon exists in simple compounds and it also widely exists in vibration spectra of complex. The complex can be formed by adding up simple compounds. As a result, the characteristic parameters of some parts of molecule will make changes, and the molecular spectra have a significant change along with it. Benzoquinone and proline in the solution form charge-transfer complex under certain conditions, but the spectra intensity is weak, our research uses Teflon liquid-core optical fiber technology to gain high quality resonance Raman spectra. We acquire Raman spectra of Benzoquinone and its complex in experiments, and analyze the characteristic parameters of Fermi resonance according to J. F. Bertran quantum theory. The results shows that, because of the formation of complex, Fermi resonance peak of C==0 bond shifts to high wavelength, the spectra intensity decreases, the frequency space increases, the coupling coefficient increases. The explanation is that, in the solution of complex, proline is donor, while benzoquinone is acceptor, the non-bonding electron of N atom which is belong to proline transfers to the pi anti-bonding orbital of benzoquinone, then n-pi* charge transfer complex is produced. That causes the change of molecular energy level, changes the Raman spectra. All these researches provide new idea and clue for spectral line certification and attribution of complex molecules, complexes and polymer. PMID:26717725

  3. Origin of dissipative Fermi arc transport in Weyl semimetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbar, E. V.; Miransky, V. A.; Shovkovy, I. A.; Sukhachov, P. O.

    2016-06-01

    By making use of a low-energy effective model of Weyl semimetals, we show that the Fermi arc transport is dissipative. The origin of the dissipation is the scattering of the surface Fermi arc states into the bulk of the semimetal. It is noticeable that the corresponding scattering rate is nonzero and can be estimated even in a perturbative theory, although in general the reliable calculations of transport properties necessitate a nonperturbative approach. Nondecoupling of the surface and bulk sectors in the low-energy theory of Weyl semimetals invalidates the usual argument of a nondissipative transport due to one-dimensional arc states. This property of Weyl semimetals is in drastic contrast to that of topological insulators, where the decoupling is protected by a gap in the bulk. Within the framework of the linear response theory, we obtain an approximate result for the conductivity due to the Fermi arc states and analyze its dependence on chemical potential, temperature, and other parameters of the model.

  4. Quadratic Fermi node in a 3D strongly correlated semimetal.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Takeshi; Nakayama, M; Chen, R; Ishikawa, J J; Moon, E-G; Yamamoto, T; Ota, Y; Malaeb, W; Kanai, H; Nakashima, Y; Ishida, Y; Yoshida, R; Yamamoto, H; Matsunami, M; Kimura, S; Inami, N; Ono, K; Kumigashira, H; Nakatsuji, S; Balents, L; Shin, S

    2015-01-01

    Strong spin-orbit coupling fosters exotic electronic states such as topological insulators and superconductors, but the combination of strong spin-orbit and strong electron-electron interactions is just beginning to be understood. Central to this emerging area are the 5d transition metal iridium oxides. Here, in the pyrochlore iridate Pr2Ir2O7, we identify a non-trivial state with a single-point Fermi node protected by cubic and time-reversal symmetries, using a combination of angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and first-principles calculations. Owing to its quadratic dispersion, the unique coincidence of four degenerate states at the Fermi energy, and strong Coulomb interactions, non-Fermi liquid behaviour is predicted, for which we observe some evidence. Our discovery implies that Pr2Ir2O7 is a parent state that can be manipulated to produce other strongly correlated topological phases, such as topological Mott insulator, Weyl semimetal, and quantum spin and anomalous Hall states. PMID:26640114

  5. Criteria for Directly Detecting Topological Fermi Arcs in Weyl Semimetals.

    PubMed

    Belopolski, Ilya; Xu, Su-Yang; Sanchez, Daniel S; Chang, Guoqing; Guo, Cheng; Neupane, Madhab; Zheng, Hao; Lee, Chi-Cheng; Huang, Shin-Ming; Bian, Guang; Alidoust, Nasser; Chang, Tay-Rong; Wang, BaoKai; Zhang, Xiao; Bansil, Arun; Jeng, Horng-Tay; Lin, Hsin; Jia, Shuang; Hasan, M Zahid

    2016-02-12

    The recent discovery of the first Weyl semimetal in TaAs provides the first observation of a Weyl fermion in nature and demonstrates a novel type of anomalous surface state, the Fermi arc. Like topological insulators, the bulk topological invariants of a Weyl semimetal are uniquely fixed by the surface states of a bulk sample. Here we present a set of distinct conditions, accessible by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES), each of which demonstrates topological Fermi arcs in a surface state band structure, with minimal reliance on calculation. We apply these results to TaAs and NbP. For the first time, we rigorously demonstrate a nonzero Chern number in TaAs by counting chiral edge modes on a closed loop. We further show that it is unreasonable to directly observe Fermi arcs in NbP by ARPES within available experimental resolution and spectral linewidth. Our results are general and apply to any new material to demonstrate a Weyl semimetal. PMID:26919005

  6. Dark Matter Searches with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Meurer, Christine

    2008-12-24

    The Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope, successfully launched on June 11th, 2008, is the next generation satellite experiment for high-energy gamma-ray astronomy. The main instrument, the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT), with a wide field of view (>2 sr), a large effective area (>8000 cm{sup 2} at 1 GeV), sub-arcminute source localization, a large energy range (20 MeV-300 GeV) and a good energy resolution (close to 8% at 1 GeV), has excellent potential to either discover or to constrain a Dark Matter signal. The Fermi LAT team pursues complementary searches for signatures of particle Dark Matter in different search regions such as the galactic center, galactic satellites and subhalos, the milky way halo, extragalactic regions as well as the search for spectral lines. In these proceedings we examine the potential of the LAT to detect gamma-rays coming from Weakly Interacting Massive Particle annihilations in these regions with special focus on the galactic center region.

  7. Observation of Weyl nodes and Fermi arcs in tantalum phosphide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, N.; Weng, H. M.; Lv, B. Q.; Matt, C. E.; Park, J.; Bisti, F.; Strocov, V. N.; Gawryluk, D.; Pomjakushina, E.; Conder, K.; Plumb, N. C.; Radovic, M.; Autès, G.; Yazyev, O. V.; Fang, Z.; Dai, X.; Qian, T.; Mesot, J.; Ding, H.; Shi, M.

    2016-03-01

    A Weyl semimetal possesses spin-polarized band-crossings, called Weyl nodes, connected by topological surface arcs. The low-energy excitations near the crossing points behave the same as massless Weyl fermions, leading to exotic properties like chiral anomaly. To have the transport properties dominated by Weyl fermions, Weyl nodes need to locate nearly at the chemical potential and enclosed by pairs of individual Fermi surfaces with non-zero Fermi Chern numbers. Combining angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and first-principles calculation, here we show that TaP is a Weyl semimetal with only a single type of Weyl fermions, topologically distinguished from TaAs where two types of Weyl fermions contribute to the low-energy physical properties. The simple Weyl fermions in TaP are not only of fundamental interests but also of great potential for future applications. Fermi arcs on the Ta-terminated surface are observed, which appear in a different pattern from that on the As-termination in TaAs and NbAs.

  8. Observation of Weyl nodes and Fermi arcs in tantalum phosphide.

    PubMed

    Xu, N; Weng, H M; Lv, B Q; Matt, C E; Park, J; Bisti, F; Strocov, V N; Gawryluk, D; Pomjakushina, E; Conder, K; Plumb, N C; Radovic, M; Autès, G; Yazyev, O V; Fang, Z; Dai, X; Qian, T; Mesot, J; Ding, H; Shi, M

    2016-01-01

    A Weyl semimetal possesses spin-polarized band-crossings, called Weyl nodes, connected by topological surface arcs. The low-energy excitations near the crossing points behave the same as massless Weyl fermions, leading to exotic properties like chiral anomaly. To have the transport properties dominated by Weyl fermions, Weyl nodes need to locate nearly at the chemical potential and enclosed by pairs of individual Fermi surfaces with non-zero Fermi Chern numbers. Combining angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and first-principles calculation, here we show that TaP is a Weyl semimetal with only a single type of Weyl fermions, topologically distinguished from TaAs where two types of Weyl fermions contribute to the low-energy physical properties. The simple Weyl fermions in TaP are not only of fundamental interests but also of great potential for future applications. Fermi arcs on the Ta-terminated surface are observed, which appear in a different pattern from that on the As-termination in TaAs and NbAs. PMID:26983910

  9. Fermi-LAT detection of ongoing gamma-ray activity from the new gamma-ray source Fermi J1654-1055 (PMN J1632-1052)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocevski, D.; Ajello, M.; Buson, S.; Buehler, R.; Giomi, M.

    2016-02-01

    During the week between February 8 and 15, 2016, the Large Area Telescope (LAT), one of the two instruments on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, observed gamma-ray activity from a new transient source, Fermi J1654-1055.

  10. Generalized charge-screening in relativistic Thomas–Fermi model

    SciTech Connect

    Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M.

    2014-10-15

    In this paper, we study the charge shielding within the relativistic Thomas-Fermi model for a wide range of electron number-densities and the atomic-number of screened ions. A generalized energy-density relation is obtained using the force-balance equation and taking into account the Chandrasekhar's relativistic electron degeneracy pressure. By numerically solving a second-order nonlinear differential equation, the Thomas-Fermi screening length is investigated, and the results are compared for three distinct regimes of the solid-density, warm-dense-matter, and white-dwarfs (WDs). It is revealed that our nonlinear screening theory is compatible with the exponentially decaying Thomas-Fermi-type shielding predicted by the linear response theory. Moreover, the variation of relative Thomas-Fermi screening length shows that extremely dense quantum electron fluids are relatively poor charge shielders. Calculation of the total number of screening electrons around a nucleus shows that there is a position of maximum number of screening localized electrons around the screened nucleus, which moves closer to the point-like nucleus by increase in the plasma number density but is unaffected due to increase in the atomic-number value. It is discovered that the total number of screening electrons, (N{sub s}∝r{sub TF}{sup 3}/r{sub d}{sup 3} where r{sub TF} and r{sub d} are the Thomas-Fermi and interparticle distance, respectively) has a distinct limit for extremely dense plasmas such as WD-cores and neutron star crusts, which is unique for all given values of the atomic-number. This is equal to saying that in an ultrarelativistic degeneracy limit of electron-ion plasma, the screening length couples with the system dimensionality and the plasma becomes spherically self-similar. Current analysis can provide useful information on the effects of relativistic correction to the charge screening for a wide range of plasma density, such as the inertial-confined plasmas and compact stellar

  11. Kaon condensation in baryonic Fermi liquid at high density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paeng, Won-Gi; Rho, Mannque

    2015-01-01

    We formulate kaon condensation in dense baryonic matter with antikaons fluctuating from the Fermi-liquid fixed point. This entails that in the Wilsonian renormalization group (RG) approach, the decimation is effectuated in the baryonic sector to the Fermi surface while in the meson sector to the origin. In writing the kaon-baryon (KN) coupling, we take a generalized hidden local symmetry Lagrangian for the meson sector endowed with a "mended symmetry" that has the unbroken symmetry limit at high density in which the Goldstone π , scalar s , and vectors ρ (and ω ) and a1 become massless. The vector mesons ρ (and ω ) and a1 can be identified as emergent (hidden) local gauge fields and the scalar s as the dilaton field of the spontaneously broken scale invariance at chiral restoration. In matter-free space, when the vector mesons and the scalar meson—whose masses are much greater than that of the pion—are integrated out, then the resulting KN coupling Lagrangian consists of the leading chiral order [O (p1) ] Weinberg-Tomozawa term and the next chiral order [O (p2) ] ΣKN term. In addressing kaon condensation in dense nuclear matter in chiral perturbation theory, one makes an expansion in the "small" Fermi momentum kF. We argue that in the Wilsonian RG formalism with the Fermi-liquid fixed point, the expansion is on the contrary in 1 /kF with the "large" Fermi momentum kF. The kaon-quasinucleon interaction resulting from integrating out the massive mesons consists of a "relevant" term from the scalar exchange (analog to the ΣKN term) and an "irrelevant" term from the vector-meson exchange (analog to the Weinberg-Tomozawa term). It is found that the critical density predicted by the latter approach, controlled by the relevant term with the irrelevant term suppressed, is three times less than that predicted by chiral perturbation theory. This would make kaon condensation take place at a much lower density than previously estimated in chiral perturbation theory.

  12. Two-dimensional vibrational spectroscopy of the amide I band of crystalline acetanilide: Fermi resonance, conformational substates, or vibrational self-trapping?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edler, J.; Hamm, P.

    2003-08-01

    Two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy is applied to investigate acetanilide, a molecular crystal consisting of quasi-one-dimensional hydrogen bonded peptide units. The amide-I band exhibits a double peak structure, which has been attributed to different mechanisms including vibrational self-trapping, a Fermi resonance, or the existence of two conformational substates. The 2D-IR spectrum of crystalline acetanilide is compared with that of two different molecular systems: (i) benzoylchloride, which exhibits a strong symmetric Fermi resonance and (ii) N-methylacetamide dissolved in methanol which occurs in two spectroscopically distinguishable conformations. Both 2D-IR spectra differ significantly from that of crystalline acetanilide, proving that these two alternative mechanisms cannot account for the anomalous spectroscopy of crystalline acetanilide. On the other hand, vibrational self-trapping of the amide-I band can naturally explain the 2D-IR response.

  13. Luttinger Theorem for the Strongly Correlated Fermi Liquid of Composite Fermions.

    PubMed

    Balram, Ajit C; Tőke, Csaba; Jain, J K

    2015-10-30

    While an ordinary Fermi sea is perturbatively robust to interactions, the paradigmatic composite-fermion (CF) Fermi sea arises as a nonperturbative consequence of emergent gauge fields in a system where there was no Fermi sea to begin with. A mean-field picture suggests two Fermi seas, of composite fermions made from electrons or holes in the lowest Landau level, which occupy different areas away from half filling and thus appear to represent distinct states. Using the microscopic theory of composite fermions, which satisfies particle-hole symmetry in the lowest Landau level to an excellent approximation, we show that the Fermi wave vectors at filling factors ν and 1-ν are equal when expressed in units of the inverse magnetic length, and are generally consistent with the experimental findings of Kamburov et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 196801 (2014)]. Our calculations suggest that the area of the CF Fermi sea may slightly violate the Luttinger area rule. PMID:26565489

  14. The Hamiltonian structure of Dirac's equation in tensor form and its Fermi quantization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reifler, Frank; Morris, Randall

    1992-01-01

    Currently, there is some interest in studying the tensor forms of the Dirac equation to elucidate the possibility of the constrained tensor fields admitting Fermi quantization. We demonstrate that the bispinor and tensor Hamiltonian systems have equivalent Fermi quantizations. Although the tensor Hamiltonian system is noncanonical, representing the tensor Poisson brackets as commutators for the Heisenberg operators directly leads to Fermi quantization without the use of bispinors.

  15. FERMI view of the TeV blazar Markarian 421

    SciTech Connect

    Paneque, D; Raino, S.; Chiang, J.; Mazziotta, M.N.; Tramacere, A.; /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /CIFS, Turin

    2010-08-26

    The high energy component of the TeV blazar Markarian 421 has been extensively studied since the beginning of the 90s, when the source was first detected at gamma-rays with EGRET and the Whipple Telescope, yet the source is still far from being understood. The high sensitivity, large dynamic range, and excellent time coverage of the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT), all representing significant advances over previous gamma-ray observations, will play a key role in the elucidation of the physical processes underlying the high energy emission of this blazar. In this presentation we show the results from almost 6 months (4 August 2008 to 20 January 2009) of observation with LAT. We report significant flux/spectral variability on a range of time scales from weeks to days, and an energy spectrum from 0.1 GeV to 300 GeV, overlapping with the energy ranges covered by the current generation of Cherenkov Telescopes. Results on the observations of the BLLac object Markarian 421 collected in the first months of operation of the Fermi satellite have been presented. Light curves on weekly and daily timescales have been shown, as well as the results of the spectral analysis in the energy range between 100 MeV and 300 GeV, covered for the first time by a satellite experiment overlapping the lower energy observations from Cherenkov telescopes on earth. These results are still preliminary and will be enriched and completed soon by a forthcoming publication. The results shown here demonstrate the great performance of Fermi-LAT to study the gamma-emission from Mrk421 (and blazars in general) over a large dynamic range and also on short timescales, which is expected to be of key importance for the study of the emission of the source in a coordinated way with other instruments covering other energy ranges.

  16. Critical Zeeman splitting of a unitary Fermi superfluid

    SciTech Connect

    He Lianyi; Zhuang Pengfei

    2011-05-01

    We determine the critical Zeeman energy splitting of a homogeneous Fermi superfluid at unitary in terms of the Fermi energy {epsilon}{sub F} according to recent experimental results in Laboratoire Kastler Brossel (LKB)-Lhomond. Based on the universal equations of state for the superfluid and normal phases, we show that there exist two critical fields H{sub c1} and H{sub c2}, between which a superfluid-normal mixed phase is energetically favored. Universal formulas for the critical fields and the critical population imbalance P{sub c} are derived. We have found a universal relation between the critical fields and the critical imbalances: H{sub c1}={gamma}{xi}{epsilon}{sub F} and H{sub c2}=(1+{gamma}P{sub c}){sup 2/3}H{sub c1}, where {xi} is the universal constant and {gamma} is the critical value of the chemical potential imbalance in the grand canonical ensemble. Since {xi}, {gamma}, and P{sub c} have been measured in the experiments, we can determine the critical Zeeman fields without the detailed information of the equation of state for the polarized normal phase. Using the experimental data from LKB-Lhomond, we have found H{sub c1{approx_equal}}0.37{epsilon}{sub F} and H{sub c2{approx_equal}}0.44{epsilon}{sub F}. Our result of the polarization P as a function of the Zeeman field H/{epsilon}{sub F} is in good agreement with the data extracted from the experiments. We also give an estimation of the critical magnetic field for dilute neutron matter at which the matter gets spin polarized, assuming the properties of the dilute neutron matter are close to those of the unitary Fermi gas.

  17. The Spectrum and Morphology of the Fermi Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackermann, M.; Albert, A.; Atwood, W. B.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bottacini, E.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caragiulo, M.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cavazzuti, E.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Dermer, C. D.; Digel, S. W.; Di Venere, L.; Silva, E. do Couto e.; Drell, P. S.; Favuzzi, C.; Ferrara, E. C.; Focke, W. B.; Franckowiak, A.; Fukazawa, Y.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Germani, S.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Godfrey, G.; Gomez-Vargas, G. A.; Grenier, I. A.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Harding, A. K.; Hays, E.; Hewitt, J. W.; Hou, X.; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, W. N.; Kamae, T.; Kataoka, J.; Knödlseder, J.; Kocevski, D.; Kuss, M.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Malyshev, D.; Manfreda, A.; Massaro, F.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nemmen, R.; Nuss, E.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Petrosian, V.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Sánchez-Conde, M.; Schaal, M.; Schulz, A.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Stawarz, Łukasz; Strong, A. W.; Suson, D. J.; Tahara, M.; Takahashi, H.; Thayer, J. B.; Tibaldo, L.; Tinivella, M.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Uchiyama, Y.; Vianello, G.; Werner, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.; Zaharijas, G.

    2014-09-01

    The Fermi bubbles are two large structures in the gamma-ray sky extending to 55° above and below the Galactic center. We analyze 50 months of Fermi Large Area Telescope data between 100 MeV and 500 GeV above 10° in Galactic latitude to derive the spectrum and morphology of the Fermi bubbles. We thoroughly explore the systematic uncertainties that arise when modeling the Galactic diffuse emission through two separate approaches. The gamma-ray spectrum is well described by either a log parabola or a power law with an exponential cutoff. We exclude a simple power law with more than 7σ significance. The power law with an exponential cutoff has an index of 1.9 ± 0.2 and a cutoff energy of 110 ± 50 GeV. We find that the gamma-ray luminosity of the bubbles is 4.4+2.4-0.9 × 1037 erg s-1. We confirm a significant enhancement of gamma-ray emission in the southeastern part of the bubbles, but we do not find significant evidence for a jet. No significant variation of the spectrum across the bubbles is detected. The width of the boundary of the bubbles is estimated to be 3.4+3.7-2.6 deg. Both inverse Compton (IC) models and hadronic models including IC emission from secondary leptons fit the gamma-ray data well. In the IC scenario, synchrotron emission from the same population of electrons can also explain the WMAP and Planck microwave haze with a magnetic field between 5 and 20 μG.

  18. Prospects for Fermi Particle Acceleration at Coronal Magnetic Reconnection Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provornikova, E.; Laming, J. M.; Lukin, V.

    2015-12-01

    The mechanism of first order Fermi acceleration of particles interacting with the converging magnetized flows at a reconnection site was introduced recently in an attempt to predict the energy distribution of particles resulting from violent reconnection in galactic microquasars. More careful consideration of this mechanism showed that the spectral index of accelerated particles is related to the total plasma compression within a reconnection region, similar to that in the formulation for diffusive shock acceleration. In the solar context, reconnection regions producing strong compression could be the source of suprathermal "seed particles". A hard spectrum of such suprathermal particles is believed to be necessary to initiate the particle acceleration process at low Mach number coronal mass ejection shocks close to the Sun where the gradual solar energetic particle events originate. As a first step to investigate the efficiency of Fermi acceleration, we explore the degree of plasma compression that can be achieved at reconnection sites in the solar corona. This work presents a set of 2D two-temperature resistive MHD simulations of the dynamics of several magnetic configurations within a range of lower corona plasma parameters. Energy transport processes in the MHD model include anisotropic thermal conduction for electrons and ions and radiative cooling. Magnetic configurations considered are a Harris current sheet, a force-free current sheet, a flux rope sitting above an arcade of magnetic loops, and two merging flux ropes. We demonstrate that only for some magnetic topologies, corresponding in particular to 3D magnetic nulls, the compression ratio, sufficient for first order Fermi acceleration in the reconnection region, can be achieved. These represent the potential sites in the solar corona where a hard seed particle energetic spectrum could be produced.

  19. Using photoemission spectroscopy to probe a strongly interacting Fermi gas.

    PubMed

    Stewart, J T; Gaebler, J P; Jin, D S

    2008-08-01

    Ultracold atomic gases provide model systems in which to study many-body quantum physics. Recent experiments using Fermi gases have demonstrated a phase transition to a superfluid state with strong interparticle interactions. This system provides a realization of the 'BCS-BEC crossover' connecting the physics of Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) superconductivity with that of Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs). Although many aspects of this system have been investigated, it has not yet been possible to measure the single-particle excitation spectrum (a fundamental property directly predicted by many-body theories). Here we use photoemission spectroscopy to directly probe the elementary excitations and energy dispersion in a strongly interacting Fermi gas of (40)K atoms. In the experiments, a radio-frequency photon ejects an atom from the strongly interacting system by means of a spin-flip transition to a weakly interacting state. We measure the occupied density of single-particle states at the cusp of the BCS-BEC crossover and on the BEC side of the crossover, and compare these results to that for a nearly ideal Fermi gas. We show that, near the critical temperature, the single-particle spectral function is dramatically altered in a way that is consistent with a large pairing gap. Our results probe the many-body physics in a way that could be compared to data for the high-transition-temperature superconductors. As in photoemission spectroscopy for electronic materials, our measurement technique for ultracold atomic gases directly probes low-energy excitations and thus can reveal excitation gaps and/or pseudogaps. Furthermore, this technique can provide an analogue of angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy for probing anisotropic systems, such as atoms in optical lattice potentials. PMID:18685703

  20. CLUSTERING OF γ-RAY-SELECTED 2LAC FERMI BLAZARS

    SciTech Connect

    Allevato, V.; Finoguenov, A.; Cappelluti, N.

    2014-12-20

    We present the first measurement of the projected correlation function of 485 γ-ray-selected blazars, divided into 175 BL Lacertae (BL Lacs) and 310 flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) detected in the 2 year all-sky survey by the Fermi-Large Area Telescope. We find that Fermi BL Lacs and FSRQs reside in massive dark matter halos (DMHs) with log M{sub h} = 13.35{sub −0.14}{sup +0.20} and log M{sub h} = 13.40{sub −0.19}{sup +0.15} h {sup –1} M {sub ☉}, respectively, at low (z ∼ 0.4) and high (z ∼ 1.2) redshift. In terms of clustering properties, these results suggest that BL Lacs and FSRQs are similar objects residing in the same dense environment typical of galaxy groups, despite their different spectral energy distributions, power, and accretion rates. We find no difference in the typical bias and hosting halo mass between Fermi blazars and radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs), supporting the unification scheme simply equating radio-loud objects with misaligned blazar counterparts. This similarity in terms of the typical environment they preferentially live in, suggests that blazars tend to occupy the center of DMHs, as already pointed out for radio-loud AGNs. This implies, in light of several projects looking for the γ-ray emission from DM annihilation in galaxy clusters, a strong contamination from blazars to the expected signal from DM annihilation.

  1. The spectrum and morphology of the Fermi bubbles

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, M.; Buehler, R.; Albert, A.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bottacini, E.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Atwood, W. B.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Ballet, J.; Bastieri, D.; Buson, S.; Bissaldi, E.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; and others

    2014-09-20

    The Fermi bubbles are two large structures in the gamma-ray sky extending to 55° above and below the Galactic center. We analyze 50 months of Fermi Large Area Telescope data between 100 MeV and 500 GeV above 10° in Galactic latitude to derive the spectrum and morphology of the Fermi bubbles. We thoroughly explore the systematic uncertainties that arise when modeling the Galactic diffuse emission through two separate approaches. The gamma-ray spectrum is well described by either a log parabola or a power law with an exponential cutoff. We exclude a simple power law with more than 7σ significance. The power law with an exponential cutoff has an index of 1.9 ± 0.2 and a cutoff energy of 110 ± 50 GeV. We find that the gamma-ray luminosity of the bubbles is 4.4{sub −0.9}{sup +2.4}×10{sup 37} erg s{sup –1}. We confirm a significant enhancement of gamma-ray emission in the southeastern part of the bubbles, but we do not find significant evidence for a jet. No significant variation of the spectrum across the bubbles is detected. The width of the boundary of the bubbles is estimated to be 3.4{sub −2.6}{sup +3.7} deg. Both inverse Compton (IC) models and hadronic models including IC emission from secondary leptons fit the gamma-ray data well. In the IC scenario, synchrotron emission from the same population of electrons can also explain the WMAP and Planck microwave haze with a magnetic field between 5 and 20 μG.

  2. The Spectrum and Morphology of the Fermi Bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackermann, M.; Albert, A.; Atwood, W. B.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Brandt, T. J.; Ferrara, E. C.; Guiriec, S.; Harding, A. K.; Hayes, E.; Kocevski, D.; McEnery, J. E.; Nemmen, R.; Perkins, J. S.; Troja, E.

    2014-01-01

    The Fermi bubbles are two large structures in the gamma-ray sky extending to 55 deg above and below the Galactic center. We analyze 50 months of Fermi Large Area Telescope data between 100 MeV and 500 GeV above 10 deg in Galactic latitude to derive the spectrum and morphology of the Fermi bubbles. We thoroughly explore the systematic uncertainties that arise when modeling the Galactic diffuse emission through two separate approaches. The gamma-ray spectrum is well described by either a log parabola or a power law with an exponential cutoff. We exclude a simple power law with more than 7 sigma significance. The power law with an exponential cutoff has an index of 1.90+/-0.2 and a cutoff energy of 110+/- 50 GeV. We find that the gamma-ray luminosity of the bubbles is 4.4(+)2.4(-0.9 ) 10(exp 37) erg s-1. We confirm a significant enhancement of gamma-ray emission in the south-eastern part of the bubbles, but we do not find significant evidence for a jet. No significant variation of the spectrum across the bubbles is detected. The width of the boundary of the bubbles is estimated to be 3.4(+)3.7(-)2.6 deg. Both inverse Compton (IC) models and hadronic models including IC emission from secondary leptons t the gamma-ray data well. In the IC scenario, the synchrotron emission from the same population of electrons can also explain the WMAP and Planck microwave haze with a magnetic field between 5 and 20 micro-G.

  3. Modified Fermi energy of electrons in a superhigh magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Cui; Gao, Zhi Fu; Li, Xiang Dong; Wang, Na; Yuan, Jian Ping; Peng, Qiu He

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we investigate the electron Landau level stability and its influence on the electron Fermi energy, EF(e), in the circumstance of magnetars, which are powered by magnetic field energy. In a magnetar, the Landau levels of degenerate and relativistic electrons are strongly quantized. A new quantity gn, the electron Landau level stability coefficient is introduced. According to the requirement that gn decreases with increasing the magnetic field intensity B, the magnetic field index β in the expression of EF(e) must be positive. By introducing the Dirac-δ function, we deduce a general formulae for the Fermi energy of degenerate and relativistic electrons, and obtain a particular solution to EF(e) in a superhigh magnetic field (SMF). This solution has a low magnetic field index of β = 1/6, compared with the previous one, and works when ρ ≥ 107g cm-3 and Bcr ≪ B ≤ 1017 Gauss. By modifying the phase space of relativistic electrons, a SMF can enhance the electron number density ne, and decrease the maximum of electron Landau level number, which results in a redistribution of electrons. According to Pauli exclusion principle, the degenerate electrons will fill quantum states from the lowest Landau level to the highest Landau level. As B increases, more and more electrons will occupy higher Landau levels, though gn decreases with the Landau level number n. The enhanced ne in a SMF means an increase in the electron Fermi energy and an increase in the electron degeneracy pressure. The results are expected to facilitate the study of the weak-interaction processes inside neutron stars and the magnetic-thermal evolution mechanism for magnetars.

  4. Teaching theoretical physics: The cases of Enrico Fermi and Ettore Majorana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Gregorio, Alberto; Esposito, Salvatore

    2007-09-01

    We report on theoretical courses by Enrico Fermi and Ettore Majorana, which give evidence of the first appearance and further development of quantum mechanics teaching in Italy. On the basis of original documents, we compare Fermi and Majorana's approaches. A detailed analysis is made of Fermi's course on theoretical physics attended by Majorana in 1927-28. Three (previously unknown) programs on advanced physics courses submitted by Majorana to the University of Rome between 1933 and 1936 and the course he taught in Naples in 1938 complete our analysis. Fermi's phenomenological approach resounded in Majorana, who combined it with a deeper theoretical approach, closer to the contemporary way of presenting quantum mechanics.

  5. The core dominance parameter and Fermi detection of extragalactic radio sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhen-Kuo; Wu, Zhong-Zu; Gu, Min-Feng

    2016-08-01

    By cross-correlating an archive sample of 542 extragalactic radio sources with the Fermi-LAT Third Source Catalog (3FGL), we have compiled a sample of 80 γ-ray sources and 462 non-Fermi sources with available core dominance parameter (R CD), and core and extended radio luminosity; all the parameters are directly measured or derived from available data in the literature. We found that R CD has significant correlations with radio core luminosity, γ-ray luminosity and γ-ray flux; the Fermi sources have on average higher R CD than non-Fermi sources. These results indicate that the Fermi sources should be more compact, and the beaming effect should play a crucial role in the detection of γ-ray emission. Moreover, our results also show Fermi sources have systematically larger radio flux than non-Fermi sources at fixed R CD, indicating larger intrinsic radio flux in Fermi sources. These results show a strong connection between radio and γ-ray flux for the present sample and indicate that the non-Fermi sources are likely due to the low beaming effect, and/or the low intrinsic γ-ray flux. This supports a scenario that has been published in the literature: a co-spatial origin of the activity for the radio and γ-ray emission, suggesting that the origin of the seed photons for the high-energy γ-ray emission is within the jet.

  6. Bose-Fermi solid and its quantum melting in a one-dimensional optical lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Bin; Das Sarma, S.; Wang, Daw-Wei

    2010-08-15

    We investigate the quantum phase diagram of Bose-Fermi mixtures of ultracold dipolar particles trapped in one-dimensional optical lattices in the thermodynamic limit. With the presence of nearest-neighbor (NN) interactions, a long-ranged ordered crystalline phase (Bose-Fermi solid) is found stabilized in the limit of weak intersite tunneling (J). When J is increased, such a Bose-Fermi solid can be quantum melted into a Bose-Fermi liquid through different procedures, depending on whether the crystalline order is dominated by the NN interaction between fermions or bosons. These properties are qualitatively different from the classical picture of solid-liquid phase transition.

  7. Condensate fraction of a two-dimensional attractive Fermi gas

    SciTech Connect

    Salasnich, Luca

    2007-07-15

    We investigate the Bose-Einstein condensation of fermionic pairs in a two-dimensional uniform two-component Fermi superfluid obtaining an explicit formula for the condensate density as a function of the chemical potential and the energy gap. By using the mean-field extended Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory, we analyze, as a function of the bound-state energy, the off-diagonal long-range order in the crossover from the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer state of weakly bound Cooper pairs to the Bose-Einstein condensate of strongly-bound molecular dimers.

  8. Rashba spin-orbit-coupled atomic Fermi gases

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Lei; Pu Han; Liu Xiaji; Hu Hui

    2011-12-15

    We investigate theoretically BEC-BCS crossover physics in the presence of Rashba spin-orbit coupling in a system of a two-component Fermi gas with and without a Zeeman field that breaks the population balance between the two components. A bound state (Rashba pair) emerges because of the spin-orbit interaction. We study the properties of Rashba pairs using standard pair fluctuation theory. At zero temperature, the Rashba pairs condense into a macroscopic mixed-spin state. We discuss in detail the experimental signatures for observing the condensation of Rashba pairs by calculating various physical observables which characterize the properties of the system and can be measured in experiment.

  9. The Fermi-Pasta-Ulam problem: fifty years of progress.

    PubMed

    Berman, G P; Izrailev, F M

    2005-03-01

    A brief review of the Fermi-Pasta-Ulam (FPU) paradox is given, together with its suggested resolutions and its relation to other physical problems. We focus on the ideas and concepts that have become the core of modern nonlinear mechanics, in their historical perspective. Starting from the first numerical results of FPU, both theoretical and numerical findings are discussed in close connection with the problems of ergodicity, integrability, chaos and stability of motion. New directions related to the Bose-Einstein condensation and quantum systems of interacting Bose-particles are also considered. PMID:15836281

  10. Spectral function and kinetic equation for a normal Fermi liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Arshad, M.; Siddique, I.; Kondratyev, A. S.

    2007-08-01

    On the basis of the Kadanoff-Baym (KB) version of the time-dependent Green's function method, an Ansatz for the approximation of a spectral function is offered. The Ansatz possesses all the advantages of quasiparticle and extended quasiparticle approximations and satisfies the KB equation for a spectral function in the case of slightly nonequilibrium system when disturbances in space and time are taken into consideration in the gradient approximation. This feature opens opportunities for the microscopic derivation of the Landau kinetic equation for the quasiparticle distribution function of the normal Fermi liquid and provides the widening of these equations' temperature range of validity.

  11. Mass-imbalanced Fermi gases with spin-orbit coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Iskin, M.; Subasi, A. L.

    2011-10-15

    We use the mean-field theory to analyze the ground-state phase diagrams of spin-orbit-coupled mass-imbalanced Fermi gases throughout the BCS-BEC evolution, including both the population-balanced and -imbalanced systems. Our calculations show that the competition between the mass and population imbalance and the Rashba-type spin-orbit coupling gives rise to very rich phase diagrams, involving normal, superfluid, and phase-separated regions. In addition, we find quantum phase transitions between the topologically trivial gapped superfluid and the nontrivial gapless superfluid phases, opening the way for the experimental observation of exotic phenomena with cold atom systems.

  12. Spin response of a normal Fermi liquid with noncentral interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Pethick, C. J.; Schwenk, A.

    2009-11-15

    We consider the spin response of a normal Fermi liquid with noncentral interactions under conditions intermediate between the collisionless and hydrodynamic regimes. This problem is of importance for calculations of neutrino properties in dense matter. By expressing the deviation of the quasiparticle distribution function from equilibrium in terms of eigenfunctions of the transport equation under the combined influence of collisions and an external field, we derive a closed expression for the spin-density-spin-density response function and compare its predictions with that of a relaxation-time approximation. Our results indicate that the relaxation-time approximation is reliable for neutrino properties under astrophysically relevant conditions.

  13. Bose-Fermi mixtures in an optical lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Sengupta, K.; Majumdar, P.

    2007-06-15

    We study an atomic Bose-Fermi mixture with unpolarized fermions in an optical lattice. We obtain the Mott ground states of such a system in the limit of the deep optical lattice and discuss the effect of quantum fluctuations on these states. We also study the superfluid-insulator transitions of bosons and metal-insulator transition of fermions in such a mixture within a slave-rotor mean-field approximation, and obtain the corresponding phase diagram. We discuss experimental implications of our results.

  14. Time-Domain Astronomy with Swift, Fermi and Lobster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehrels, Neil; Barthelmy, Scott D.; Cannizzo, John K.

    2012-04-01

    The dynamic transient gamma-ray sky is revealing many interesting results, largely due to findings by Fermi and Swift. The list includes new twists on gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), a GeV flare from a symbiotic star, GeV flares from the Crab Nebula, high-energy emission from novae and supernovae, and, within the last year, a new type of object discovered by Swift-a jetted tidal disruption event. In this review we present highlights of these exciting discoveries. A new mission concept called Lobster is also described; it would monitor the X-ray sky at order-of-magnitude higher sensitivity than current missions can.

  15. Strongly correlated Fermi Bose mixtures in disordered optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Palencia, L.; Ahufinger, V.; Kantian, A.; Zakrzewski, J.; Sanpera, A.; Lewenstein, M.

    2006-05-01

    We investigate theoretically the low-temperature physics of a two-component ultracold mixture of bosons and fermions in disordered optical lattices. We focus on the strongly correlated regime. We show that, under specific conditions, composite fermions, made of one fermion plus one bosonic hole, form. The composite picture is used to derive an effective Hamiltonian whose parameters can be controlled via the boson-boson and the boson-fermion interactions, the tunnelling terms and the inhomogeneities. We finally investigate the quantum phase diagram of the composite fermions and show that it corresponds to the formation of Fermi glasses, spin glasses and quantum percolation regimes.

  16. Inhomogeneous atomic Bose-Fermi mixtures in cubic lattices.

    PubMed

    Cramer, M; Eisert, J; Illuminati, F

    2004-11-01

    We determine the ground state properties of inhomogeneous mixtures of bosons and fermions in cubic lattices and parabolic confining potentials. For finite hopping we determine the domain boundaries between Mott-insulator plateaux and hopping-dominated regions for lattices of arbitrary dimension within mean-field and perturbation theory. The results are compared with a new numerical method that is based on a Gutzwiller variational approach for the bosons and an exact treatment for the fermions. The findings can be applied as a guideline for future experiments with trapped atomic Bose-Fermi mixtures in optical lattices. PMID:15600816

  17. Gamma Ray Bursts in the Swift-Fermi Era

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, Neil; Razzaque, Soebur

    2013-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are among the most violent occurrences in the universe. They are powerful explosions, visible to high redshift, and thought to be the signature of black hole birth. They are highly luminous events and provide excellent probes of the distant universe. GRB research has greatly advanced over the past 10 years with the results from Swift, Fermi and an active follow-up community. In this review we survey the interplay between these recent observations and the theoretical models of the prompt GRB emission and the subsequent afterglows.

  18. Matrix product ansatz for Fermi fields in one dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Sangwoo S.; Sun, Kuei; Bolech, C. J.

    2015-03-01

    We present an implementation of a continuous matrix product state for two-component fermions in one dimension. We propose a construction of variational matrices with an efficient parametrization that respects the translational symmetry of the problem (without being overly constraining) and readily meets the regularity conditions that arise from removing the ultraviolet divergences in the kinetic energy. We test the validity of our approach on an interacting spin-1/2 system and observe that the ansatz correctly predicts the ground-state magnetic properties for the attractive spin-1/2 Fermi gas, including the phase-oscillating pair correlation function in the partially polarized regime.

  19. Fermi J1418+3541 = CSS110512:141829+354249

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahabal, A. A.; Drake, A. J.; Djorgovski, S. G.; Graham, M. J.; Williams, R.; Donalek, C.; Greaves, John; Prieto, J.; Catelan, M.; Christensen, E.; Beshore, E. C.; Larson, S. M.

    2012-12-01

    Recently, Dutka et al. (2012, ATEL#4643) noted the detection of gamma-ray point source Fermi J1418+3541. They find the source to be at RA=14:18:31, Dec=+35:41:23 and associate it with radio source NVSS J141828+354250 and detect it as a steep spectrum X-ray source in SWIFT data. The NVSS detection is coincident with the highly variable source CSS110512:141829+354249 that was discovered in outburst by Catalina Real-time Transient Survey (CRTS) on May 12th 2011 UT.

  20. The 2d MIT: The Pseudogap and Fermi Liquid Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castner, T. G.

    2005-06-01

    Fermi liquid theory for the 2d metal-insulator transition is extended to include the correlation gap in the density-of-states. The results are consistent with the scaling form g=gce[on(To/T)] at T larger than a characteristic T* ∝ xTc (Tc=Ec= mobility edge). The two-component model n1+nloc=n=nc(1+x) for n>nc is required and the theory explains the T-dependence of the data of Hanein et al. for p-type GaAs.

  1. Dependence of Kambersky damping on Fermi level and spin orientation

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, T.; Victora, R. H.

    2014-05-07

    Kambersky damping represents the loss of magnetic energy from the electrons to the lattice through the spin orbit interaction. It is demonstrated that, for bcc Fe-based transition metal alloys, the logarithm of the energy loss is proportional to the density of states at the Fermi level. Both inter and intraband damping are calculated for spins at arbitrary angle to the previously examined [001] direction. Although the easy axis 〈100〉 shows isotropic relaxation and achieves the minimum damping value of 0.002, other directions, such as 〈110〉, show substantial anisotropic damping.

  2. Fermi Paradox and C.E.T.I.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, T. B.

    1982-05-01

    Extraterrestrial civilisations are expected to be abundant and yet no real evidence of any visit to our Solar System exists. An explanation of this so-called Fermi Paradox is put forward here. It is argued that most of them have attempted communication before extrasolar exploration and there is therefore a galactic network of inter-communicating cultures which undertake space travel only infrequently. First-time contacts with them should be achievable via radio. Interstellar interaction may lead to convergent mental evolution as the influence of boundary conditions for individual societies is reduced.

  3. The Fermi paradox: an approach based on percolation theory.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landis, G. A.

    1998-05-01

    If even a very small fraction of the hundred billion stars on the galaxy are home to technological civilisations which colonise over interstellar distances, the entire galaxy could be completely colonised in a few million years. The absence of such extraterrestrial civilisations visiting Earth is the Fermi paradox. A model for interstellar colonisation is proposed using the assumption that there is a maximum distance over which direct interstellar colonisation is feasible. Due to the time lag involved in interstellar communications, it is assumed that an interstellar colony will rapidly develop a culture independent of the civilisation that originally settled it.

  4. The Planetarium Hypothesis - A Resolution of the Fermi Paradox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, S.

    A possible resolution to the Fermi Paradox is that we are living in an artificial universe, perhaps a form of virtual- reality `planetarium', designed to give us the illusion that the universe is empty. Quantum-physical and thermo- dynamic considerations inform estimates of the energy required to generate such simulations of varying sizes and quality. The perfect simulation of a world containing our present civilisation is within the scope of a Type K3 extraterrestrial culture. However the containment of a coherent human culture spanning ~100 light years within a perfect simulation would exceed the capacities of any conceivable virtual-reality generator.

  5. Universal Quantum Viscosity in a Unitary Fermi Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Chenglin

    Unitary Fermi gases, first observed in 2002, have been widely studied as they provide model systems for tabletop research on a variety of strongly coupled systems, including the high temperature superconductors, quark-gluon plasmas and neutron stars. A two component 6Li unitary Fermi gas is created through a collisional Feshbach resonance centered around 834G, using all-optical trapping and cooling methods. In the vicinity of the Feshbach resonance, the atoms are strongly interacting and exhibit universal behaviors, where the equilibrium thermodynamic properties and transport coefficients are universal functions of the density n and temperature T. Thus, unitary Fermi gases provide a paradigm to study nonperturbative many-body physics, which is of fundamental significance and field-crossing interests. This dissertation reports the measurement of the quantum shear viscosity in a 6Li unitary Fermi gas, which is the first measurement of transport coefficients for unitary Fermi gases. Two hydrodynamic experiments are employed to measure the shear viscosity eta in different temperature regimes: the anisotropic expansion for the high temperature regime and the radial breathing mode for the low temperature regime. In order to consistently and quantitatively extract the shear viscosity from these two experiments, the hydrodynamic theory is utilized to derive the universal hydrodynamic equations, which include both friction force and heating arising from frictions. These equations are simplified and solved, considering the universal properties of unitary Fermi gases as well as the specific conditions for each experiment. Using these universal hydrodynamic equations, shear viscosity is extracted from the anisotropic expansion conducted at high temperatures and the predicted eta ∝ T3/2 scaling is demonstrated. The demonstration of the high temperature scaling sets a benchmark for measuring viscosity at low temperatures. For the low temperature breathing mode experiment, the

  6. Dark matter annihilation and the PAMELA, FERMI, and ATIC anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    El Zant, A. A.; Okada, H.; Khalil, S.

    2010-06-15

    If dark matter annihilation accounts for the tantalizing excess of cosmic ray electron/positrons, as reported by the PAMELA, ATIC, HESS, and FERMI observatories, then the implied annihilation cross section must be relatively large. This results, in the context of standard cosmological models, in very small relic dark matter abundances that are incompatible with astrophysical observations. We explore possible resolutions to this apparent conflict in terms of nonstandard cosmological scenarios; plausibly allowing for large cross sections, while maintaining relic abundances in accord with current observations.

  7. Non-interacting Fermi gas in a magnetic quadrupole trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, To Chun Johnathan; Goulko, Olga; Chevy, Frédéric; Lobo, Carlos

    2014-05-01

    A non-interacting gas of spin polarised 6Li Fermi gas in a magnetic quadrupole trap which is not in thermal equilibrium can nevertheless show thermal signatures in some cases. This puzzling behaviour can be seen by measuring the doubly integrated momentum distribution along a particular axis. This distribution can be extremely close to a Gaussian from which we can extract a temperature. However, we show, using molecular dynamics simulations that the temperature thus measured is generally different along different axes. We provide a general explanation of this phenomenon based on ergodicity and check it with further simulations.

  8. Quantum phases of quadrupolar Fermi gases in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhongale, Satyan; Mathey, Ludwig; Zhao, Erhai; Yellin, Susanne; Lemeshko, Mikhail

    2013-05-01

    We introduce a new platform for quantum simulation of many-body systems based on nonspherical atoms or molecules with zero dipole moment but possessing a significant value of electric quadrupole moment. We consider a quadrupolar Fermi gas trapped in a 2D square optical lattice, and show that the peculiar symmetry and broad tunability of the quadrupole-quadrupole interaction results in a rich phase diagram encompassing unconventional BCS and charge density wave phases, and opens up a perspective to create topological superfluid. Quadrupolar species, such as metastable alkaline-earth atoms and homonuclear molecules, are stable against chemical reactions and collapse and are readily available in experiment at high densities.

  9. Quantum Phases of Quadrupolar Fermi Gases in Optical Lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhongale, S. G.; Mathey, L.; Zhao, Erhai; Yelin, S. F.; Lemeshko, Mikhail

    2013-04-01

    We introduce a new platform for quantum simulation of many-body systems based on nonspherical atoms or molecules with zero dipole moments but possessing a significant value of electric quadrupole moments. We consider a quadrupolar Fermi gas trapped in a 2D square optical lattice, and show that the peculiar symmetry and broad tunability of the quadrupole-quadrupole interaction results in a rich phase diagram encompassing unconventional BCS and charge density wave phases, and opens up a perspective to create a topological superfluid. Quadrupolar species, such as metastable alkaline-earth atoms and homonuclear molecules, are stable against chemical reactions and collapse and are readily available in experiment at high densities.

  10. Observation of Shock Waves in a Strongly Interacting Fermi Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph, J. A.; Thomas, J. E.; Kulkarni, M.; Abanov, A. G.

    2011-04-15

    We study collisions between two strongly interacting atomic Fermi gas clouds. We observe exotic nonlinear hydrodynamic behavior, distinguished by the formation of a very sharp and stable density peak as the clouds collide and subsequent evolution into a boxlike shape. We model the nonlinear dynamics of these collisions by using quasi-1D hydrodynamic equations. Our simulations of the time-dependent density profiles agree very well with the data and provide clear evidence of shock wave formation in this universal quantum hydrodynamic system.

  11. Pushing the Limits: High Redshift Fermi-LAT Blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojha, Roopesh; Gasparrini, Dario; Lott, Benoit; Cutini, Sara; Fermi-LAT Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    High-redshift blazars detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) are of great astrophysical import as they are extreme objects whose energetics remain a mystery. Such blazars are intrinsically interesting since they inform us about the evolution of gamma-ray blazars and are, by definition, some of the more luminous blazars in the LAT sample. They are also an excellent tool to study the EBL and thus the gamma-ray horizon. We present the latest high redshift blazar detections in the LAT and discuss some of their implications.

  12. Detroit Edison's Fermi 1 - Preparation for Reactor Removal

    SciTech Connect

    Swindle, Danny

    2008-01-15

    This paper is intended to provide information about the ongoing decommissioning tasks at Detroit Edison's Fermi 1 plant, and in particular, the work being performed to prepare the reactor for removal and disposal. In 1972 Fermi 1 was shutdown and the fuel returned to the Atomic Energy Commission. By the end of 1975, a retirement plan was prepared, the bulk sodium removed, and the plant placed in a safe store condition. The plant systems were left isolated with the sodium containing systems inert with carbon dioxide in an attempt to form a carbonate layer, thus passivating the underlying reactive sodium. In 1996, Detroit Edison determined to evaluate the condition of the plant and to make recommendations in relation to the Fermi 1 future plans. At the end of 1997 approval was obtained to remove the bulk asbestos and residual alkali-metals (i.e., sodium and sodium potassium (NaK)). In 2000, full nuclear decommissioning of the plant was approved. To date, the bulk asbestos insulation has been removed, and the only NaK remaining is located in six capillary instrument tubes. The remaining sodium is contained within the reactor, two of the three primary loops, and miscellaneous removed pipes and equipment to be processed. The preferred method for removing or reacting sodium at Fermi 1 is by injecting superheated steam into a heated, nitrogen inert system. The byproducts of this reaction are caustic sodium hydroxide, hydrogen gas, and heat. The decision was made to separate the three primary loops from the reactor for better control prior to processing each loop and the reactor separately. The first loop has already been processed. The main focus is now to process the reactor to allow removal and disposal of the Class C waste prior to the anticipated June 2008 closure of the Barnwell radioactive waste disposal facility located in South Carolina. Lessons learnt are summarized and concern: the realistic schedule and adherence to the schedule, time estimates, personnel

  13. Observations and Interpretation of Behind the Limb Solar Flares Detected by Fermi-LAT and Other Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrosian, Vahe; Omodei, Nicola; Pesce-Rollins, Melissa; Rubio da Costa, Fatima; Liu, Wei

    2015-04-01

    The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) is the most sensitive instrument ever deployed in space for observing > 30 MeV gamma-rays. During the past active period of the Sun the LAT has detected more than 40 flares up to GeV energies some of which occur behind the limb as determined by STEREO observations. We will present the observations on two such flares with significant flux of > 100 MeV (and some indication of 1 to 10 MeV detected by Fermi-GBM) gamma-rays coming from the visible disk while the flare and associated CMEs are initiated in active regions tens of degrees behind the visible limb of the Sun. We will consider acceleration of particles, their transport and radiative signatures, and the transfer of these radiation in the solar atmosphere to distinguish between (i) acceleration in the low corona, in a high corona trap, and/or in the CME driven shock; (ii) between continuous and prompt acceleration; and (iii) between electron bremsstrahlung and decay of pions produced by accelerated ions.

  14. Fermi resonance in the phonon spectra of quaternary chalcogenides of the type Cu2ZnGeS4.

    PubMed

    Valakh, M Ya; Litvinchuk, A P; Dzhagan, V M; Yukhymchuk, V O; Yaremko, A M; Romanyuk, Yu A; Guc, M; Bodnar, I V; Pérez-Rodríguez, A; Zahn, D R T

    2016-02-17

    The experimental resonant and non-resonant Raman scattering spectra of the kesterite structural modification of Cu2ZnGeS4 single crystals are reported. The results are compared with those calculated theoretically within the density functional perturbation theory. For the majority of lines a good agreement (within 2-5 cm(-1)) is established between experimental and calculated mode frequencies. However, several dominant spectral lines, in particular the two intense fully symmetric modes, are found to deviate from the calculated values by as much as 20 cm(-1). A possible reason for this discrepancy is found to be associated with the Fermi resonant interaction between one and two-phonon vibrational excitations. The modelling of spectra, which takes into account the symmetry of interacting states, allows a qualitative description of the observed experimental findings. Due to the similarity of the vibrational spectra of Cu2A (II) B (IV) S4 (A  =  Zn, Mn, Cd; B  =  Sn, Ge, Si) chalcogenides, Fermi resonance is argued to be a general phenomenon for this class of compounds. PMID:26795711

  15. Fermi resonance in the phonon spectra of quaternary chalcogenides of the type Cu2ZnGeS4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valakh, M. Ya; Litvinchuk, A. P.; Dzhagan, V. M.; Yukhymchuk, V. O.; Yaremko, A. M.; Romanyuk, Yu A.; Guc, M.; Bodnar, I. V.; Pérez-Rodríguez, A.; Zahn, D. R. T.

    2016-02-01

    The experimental resonant and non-resonant Raman scattering spectra of the kesterite structural modification of Cu2ZnGeS4 single crystals are reported. The results are compared with those calculated theoretically within the density functional perturbation theory. For the majority of lines a good agreement (within 2-5 cm-1) is established between experimental and calculated mode frequencies. However, several dominant spectral lines, in particular the two intense fully symmetric modes, are found to deviate from the calculated values by as much as 20 cm-1. A possible reason for this discrepancy is found to be associated with the Fermi resonant interaction between one and two-phonon vibrational excitations. The modelling of spectra, which takes into account the symmetry of interacting states, allows a qualitative description of the observed experimental findings. Due to the similarity of the vibrational spectra of Cu2A II B IV S4 (A  =  Zn, Mn, Cd; B  =  Sn, Ge, Si) chalcogenides, Fermi resonance is argued to be a general phenomenon for this class of compounds.

  16. Correlations in the low-density Fermi gas: Fermi-liquid state, dimerization, and Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer pairing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, H. H.; Krotscheck, E.; Lichtenegger, T.; Mateo, D.; Zillich, R. E.

    2015-08-01

    We present ground-state calculations for low-density Fermi gases described by two model interactions, an attractive square-well potential and a Lennard-Jones potential, of varying strength. We use the optimized Fermi-hypernetted chain integral equation method, which has been proved to provide, in the density regimes of interest here, an accuracy of better than 1%. We first examine the low-density expansion of the energy and compare it with the exact answer of H. Huang and C. N. Yang [Phys. Rev. 105, 767 (1957), 10.1103/PhysRev.105.767]. It is shown that a locally correlated wave function of the Jastrow-Feenberg type does not recover the quadratic term in the expansion of the energy in powers of a0kF , where a0 is the vacuum s -wave scattering length and kF the Fermi wave number. The problem is cured by adding second-order perturbation corrections in a correlated basis. Going to higher densities and/or more strongly coupled systems, we encounter an instability of the normal state of the system which is characterized by a divergence of the in-medium scattering length. We interpret this divergence as a phonon-exchange-driven dimerization of the system, similar to what occurs at zero density when the vacuum scattering length a0 diverges. We then study, in the stable regime, the superfluid gap and its dependence on the density and the interaction strength. We identify two corrections to low-density expansions: One is medium corrections to the pairing interaction, and the other is finite-range corrections. We show that the most important finite-range corrections are a direct manifestation of the many-body nature of the system.

  17. Superconductor-Insulator Transition and Fermi-Bose Crossovers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trivedi, Nandini; Loh, Yen Lee; Randeria, Mohit; Chang, Chia-Chen; Scalettar, Richard

    The direct transition from an insulator to a superconductor (SC) in Fermi systems is a problem of long-standing interest, which necessarily goes beyond the standard BCS paradigm of superconductivity as a Fermi surface instability. We introduce here a simple, translationally-invariant lattice fermion model that undergoes a SC-insulator transition (SIT) and elucidate its properties using analytical methods and quantum Monte Carlo simulations. We show that there is a fermionic band insulator to bosonic insulator crossover in the insulating phase and a BCS-to-BEC crossover in the SC. The SIT is always found to be from a bosonic insulator to a BEC-like SC, with an energy gap for fermions that remains finite across the SIT. The energy scales that go critical at the SIT are the gap to pair excitations in the insulator and the superfluid stiffness in the SC. In addition to giving insights into important questions about the SIT in solid state systems, our model should be experimentally realizable using ultracold fermions in optical lattices. Ref: arXiv:1507.05641 We gratefully acknowledge support from NSF DMR-1410364 (MR), DOE DE-FG02-07ER46423 (NT), and from the UC Office of the President (CC, RTS).

  18. Detecting superlight dark matter with Fermi-degenerate materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hochberg, Yonit; Pyle, Matt; Zhao, Yue; Zurek, Kathryn M.

    2016-08-01

    We examine in greater detail the recent proposal of using superconductors for detecting dark matter as light as the warm dark matter limit of O (keV). Detection of suc light dark matter is possible if the entire kinetic energy of the dark matter is extracted in the scattering, and if the experiment is sensitive to O (meV) energy depositions. This is the case for Fermi-degenerate materials in which the Fermi velocity exceeds the dark matter velocity dispersion in the Milky Way of ˜ 10-3. We focus on a concrete experimental proposal using a superconducting target with a transition edge sensor in order to detect the small energy deposits from the dark matter scatterings. Considering a wide variety of constraints, from dark matter self-interactions to the cosmic microwave background, we show that models consistent with cosmological/astrophysical and terrestrial constraints are observable with such detectors. A wider range of viable models with dark matter mass below an MeV is available if dark matter or mediator properties (such as couplings or masses) differ at BBN epoch or in stellar interiors from those in superconductors. We also show that metal targets pay a strong in-medium suppression for kinetically mixed mediators; this suppression is alleviated with insulating targets.

  19. The Blazar's Divide and the Properties of Fermi Blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghisellini, G.

    2010-10-01

    The LAT instrument, onboard the Fermi satellite, in its first three months of operation detected more than 100 blazars at more than the 10σ level. This is already a great improvement with respect to its predecessor, the instrument EGRET onboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory. Observationally, the new detections follow and confirm the so-called blazar sequence, relating the bolometric observed non-thermal luminosity to the overall shape of the spectral energy distribution. We have studied the general physical properties of all these bright Fermi blazars, and found that their jets are matter dominated, carrying a large total power that correlates with the luminosity of their accretion disks. We suggest that the division of blazars into the two subclasses of broad line emitting objects (Flat Spectrum Radio Quasars) and line-less BL Lacs is a consequence of a rather drastic change of the accretion mode, becoming radiatively inefficient below a critical value of the accretion rate, corresponding to a disk luminosity of ˜1 per cent of the Eddington one. The reduction of the ionizing photons below this limit implies that the broad line clouds, even if present, cannot produce significant broad lines, and the object becomes a BL Lac.

  20. Beyond Gaussian pair fluctuation theory for strongly interacting Fermi gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulkerin, Brendan C.; Liu, Xia-Ji; Hu, Hui

    2016-07-01

    Interacting Fermi systems in the strongly correlated regime play a fundamental role in many areas of physics and are of particular interest to the condensed matter community. Though weakly interacting fermions are understood, strongly correlated fermions are difficult to describe theoretically as there is no small interaction parameter to expand about. Existing strong-coupling theories rely heavily on the so-called many-body T -matrix approximation that sums ladder-type Feynman diagrams. Here, by acknowledging the fact that the effective interparticle interaction (i.e., the vertex function) becomes smaller above three dimensions, we propose an alternative way to reorganize Feynman diagrams and develop a theoretical framework for interacting Fermi gases beyond the ladder approximation. As an application, we solve the equation of state for three- and two-dimensional strongly interacting fermions and find excellent agreement with experimental [M. J. H. Ku et al., Science 335, 563 (2012), 10.1126/science.1214987] and other theoretical results above temperatures of 0.5 TF .