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Sample records for cdwo4 scintillating bolometer

  1. Search for double beta processes in 106Cd with enriched 106CdWO4 crystal scintillator in coincidence with four crystals HPGe detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danevich, F. A.; Belli, P.; Bernabei, R.; Brudanin, V. B.; Cappella, F.; Caracciolo, V.; Cerulli, R.; Chernyak, D. M.; D'Angelo, S.; Incicchitti, A.; Laubenstein, M.; Mokina, V. M.; Poda, D. V.; Polischuk, O. G.; Tretyak, V. I.; Tupitsyna, I. A.

    2015-10-01

    A radiopure cadmium tungstate crystal scintillator, enriched in 106Cd (106CdWO4), was used to search for double beta decay processes in 106Cd in coincidence with an ultra-low background set-up containing four high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors in a single cryostat. The experiment has been completed after 13085 h of data taking. New improved limits on most of the double beta processes in 106Cd have been set on the level of 1020-1021 yr. Tn particular, the half-life limit on the two neutrino electron capture with positron emission, T1/2 ≥ 1.8 × 1021 yr, reached the region of theoretical predictions.

  2. Search for 2 β decay of 106Cd with an enriched 106CdWO4 crystal scintillator in coincidence with four HPGe detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belli, P.; Bernabei, R.; Brudanin, V. B.; Cappella, F.; Caracciolo, V.; Cerulli, R.; Chernyak, D. M.; Danevich, F. A.; d'Angelo, S.; Di Marco, A.; Incicchitti, A.; Laubenstein, M.; Mokina, V. M.; Poda, D. V.; Polischuk, O. G.; Tretyak, V. I.; Tupitsyna, I. A.

    2016-04-01

    A radiopure cadmium tungstate crystal scintillator, enriched in 106Cd to 66%, with mass of 216 g (106CdWO4 ), was used to search for double-β decay processes in 106Cd in coincidence with four ultra-low-background high-purity germanium detectors in a single cryostat. Improved limits on the double-β processes in 106Cd have been set on the level of 1020-1021 yr after 13 085 h of data taking. In particular, the half-life limit on the two-neutrino electron capture with positron emission, T1/2 2 ν ɛ β+≥1.1 ×1021 yr, has reached the region of theoretical predictions. With this half-life limit the effective nuclear matrix element for the 2 ν ɛ β+ decay is bounded as Meff2 ν ɛ β+≤1.1 . The resonant neutrinoless double-electron captures to the 2718-, 2741-, and 2748-keV excited states of 106Pd are restricted at the level of T1 /2≥(8.5 × 1020-1.4 ×1021 ) yr.

  3. Search for double beta decay of 116Cd with enriched 116CdWO4 crystal scintillators (Aurora experiment)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danevich, F. A.; Barabash, A. S.; Belli, P.; Bernabei, R.; Cappella, F.; Caracciolo, V.; Cerulli, R.; Chernyak, D. M.; d’Angelo, S.; Incicchitti, A.; Kobychev, V. V.; Konovalov, S. I.; Laubenstein, M.; Mokina, V. M.; Poda, D. V.; Polischuk, O. G.; Shlegel, V. N.; Tretyak, V. I.; Umatov, V. I.

    2016-05-01

    The Aurora experiment to investigate double beta decay of 116 Cd with the help of 1.162 kg cadmium tungstate crystal scintillators enriched in 116 Cd to 82% is in progress at the Gran Sasso Underground Laboratory. The half-life of 116 Cd relatively to the two neutrino double beta decay is measured with the highest up-to-date accuracy T1/2 = (2.62 ± 0.14) × 1019 yr. The sensitivity of the experiment to the neutrinoless double beta decay of 116 Cd to the ground state of 116 Sn is estimated as T1/2 ≥ 1.9 × 1023 yr at 90% CL, which corresponds to the effective Majorana neutrino mass limit (mv) ≤ (1.2 — 1.8) eV. New limits are obtained for the double beta decay of 116 Cd to the excited levels of 116 Sn, and for the neutrinoless double beta decay with emission of majorons.

  4. Scintillating bolometers for the LUCIFER project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattavina, L.; LUCIFER Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    Neutrinoless double beta decay (0vββ) is one of the most sensitive probes for physics beyond the Standard Model, providing unique information on the nature and masses of neutrinos. In order to explore the so-called inverted neutrino mass hierarchy region a further improvement on the upcoming 0vββ experiment is needed. In this respect, scintillating bolometers are the suitable technology for achieving such goal: they ensure excellent energy resolution and highly efficient particle discrimination. The LUCIFER project aims at deploying the first array of enriched scintillating bolometers for the investigation of 0vββ of 82Se. The matrix which embeds the source is an array of Zn 82Se crystals, where enriched 82Se is used as decay isotope. Taking advantage of the large Q-value (2997 keV) and of the particle discrimination, the expected background rate in the region of interest is as low as 10-3 c/keV/kg/y. The foreseen sensitivity after 2 years of live time will be 1.8×1025 years. We will report on the potential of such technology and on the present status of the project.

  5. Segmented CdWO4 detector for low background experiments at DUSEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Dongming; Sun, Yongchen; Day, Alyssa; Thomas, Keenan; Perevozchikov, Oleg

    2010-11-01

    We propose to develop a segmented CdWO4 scintillator array for detecting geo-neutrinos, neutrinoless double-beta, and dark matter. The detection of geo-neutrinos can shed light on the sources of the terrestrial heat flow, on the present composition, and on the origins of the Earth. The development of a new technique to detect geo-neutrinos through charge current antineutrino capture processes on ^106Cd is very interesting. This target allows us to detect all of geo-neutrinos from uranium, thorium, and potassium decays. When it is built, the detector can be also used to detect neutrinoless double-beta decay with ^116Cd. Both enriched ^106Cd and ^116Cd can be used to search for dark matter from the Universe. This paper will present RD results on the energy response of gamma-rays and neutrons from three small CdWO4 detectors.

  6. Scintillating bolometers: A promising tool for rare decays search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattavina, L.

    2013-12-01

    The idea of using a scintillating bolometer was first suggested for solar neutrino experiments in 1989. After many years of developments, now we are able to exploit this experimental technique, based on the calorimetric approach with cryogenic particle detectors, to investigate rare events such as Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay and interaction of Dark Matter candidates. The possibility to have high resolution detectors in which a very large part of the natural background can be discriminated with respect to the weak expected signal is very appealing. The goal to distinguish the different types of interactions in the detector can be achieved by means of scintillating bolometer. The simultaneous read-out of the heat and scintillation signals made with two independent bolometers enable this precious feature leading to possible background free experiment. In the frame of the LUCIFER project we report on how exploiting this technique to investigate Double Beta Decay for different isotope candidates. Moreover we demonstrate how scintillating bolometers are suited for investigating other rare events such as α decays of long living isotopes of lead and bismuth.

  7. LUCIFER: scintillating bolometers for neutrinoless double-beta decay searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattavina, Luca

    2014-09-01

    In the field of fundamental particle physics, the nature of the neutrino, if it is a Dirac or a Majorana particle, plays a crucial role not only in neutrino physics, but also in the overall framework of fundamental particle interactions and in cosmology. Neutrinoless double-beta decay (0vDBD) is the key tool for the investigation of this nature. Experimental techniques based on the calorimetric approach with cryogenic particle detectors have demonstrated suitability for the investigation of rare nuclear processes, profiting from excellent energy resolution and scalability to large masses. Unfortunately, the most relevant issue is related to background suppression. In fact, bolometers being fully-active detectors struggle to reach extremely low background level. The LUCIFER project aims to deploy the first array of enriched scintillating bolometers. Thanks to the double read-out - heat and scintillation light produced by scintillating bolometers - a highly efficient background identification and rejection is guaranteed, leading to a background-free experiment. We show the potential of such technology in ZnMoO4 and ZnSe prototypes. We describe the current status of the project, including results of the recent R&D activity.

  8. Scintillating Bolometers for Rare Events Searches: The LUCIFER Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardani, L.

    2014-09-01

    The main goal of LUCIFER is the study of the neutrino-less double beta decay, a rare process that, if detected, could demonstrate the Majorana nature of neutrino and set the absolute mass of this particle. Dealing with rare decays, one of the most critical issues of the experiment is the background reduction. This requirement will be satisfied by LUCIFER thanks to the use of ZnSe scintillating bolometers: the simultaneous read-out of heat and light emitted by the interactions in the detector will allow to reject most of the spurious events, providing a background of 10 counts/keV/kg/year at the transition energy of Se (2,997 keV). The detector will be made by tens of 0.5 kg ZnSe crystals and Ge light detectors operated as bolometers at 10 mK. We present the results obtained with a single detector module in terms of energy resolution, radio-purity and background rejection capability. In addition, we discuss the feasibility of dark matter searches in the framework of the LUCIFER experiment.

  9. LUCIFER: Neutrinoless Double Beta decay search with scintillating bolometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattavina, Luca; LUCIFER Collaboration

    2011-12-01

    One of the fundamental open questions in elementary particle physics is the value of the neutrino mass and its nature of Dirac or Majorana particle. Neutrinoless double beta decay (DBD0ν) is a key tool for investigating these neutrino properties and for finding answers to the open questions concerning mass hierarchy and absolute scale. Experimental techniques based on the calorimetric approach with cryogenic particle detectors are proved to be suitable for the search of this rare decay, thanks to high energy resolution and large mass of the detectors. One of the main issues to access an increase of the experimental sensitivity is strictly related to background reduction, trying to perform possibly a zero background experiment. The LUCIFER (Low-background Underground Cryogenic Installation For Elusive Rates) project, funded by the European Research Council, aims at building a background-free DBD0ν experiment, with a discovery potential comparable with the present generation experiments. The idea of LUCIFER is to measure, simultaneously, heat and scintillation light with ZnSe bolometers. Detector features and operational procedures are reviewed. The expected performances and sensitivity are also discussed.

  10. Characterization of a ZnSe scintillating bolometer prototype for neutrinoless double beta decay search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenconi, M.; Giuliani, A.; Nones, C.; Pessina, G.; Plantevin, O.; Rusconi, C.

    2014-01-01

    As proposed in the LUCIFER project, ZnSe crystals are attractive materials to realize scintillating bolometers aiming at the search for neutrinoless double beta decay of the promising isotope 82Se. However, the optimization of the ZnSe-based detectors is rather complex and requires a wide-range investigation of the crystal features: optical properties, crystalline quality, scintillation yields and bolometric behaviour. Samples tested up to now show problems in the reproducibility of crucial aspects of the detector performance. In this work, we present the results obtained with a scintillating bolometer operated aboveground at about 25 mK. The detector energy absorber was a single 1 cm3 ZnSe crystal. The good energy resolution of the heat channel (about 14 keV at 1460 keV) and the excellent alpha/beta discrimination capability are very encouraging for a successful realization of the LUCIFER program. The bolometric measurements were completed by optical tests on the crystal (optical transmission and luminescence measurements down to 10 K) and investigation of the crystalline structure. The work here described provides a set of parameters and procedures useful for a complete pre-characterization of ZnSe crystals in view of the realization of highly performing scintillating bolometers.

  11. An experimental study of antireflective coatings in Ge light detectors for scintillating bolometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancuso, M.; Beeman, J. W.; Giuliani, A.; Dumoulin, L.; Olivieri, E.; Pessina, G.; Plantevin, O.; Rusconi, C.; Tenconi, M.

    2014-01-01

    Luminescent bolometers are double-readout devices able to measure simultaneously the phonon and the light yields after a particle interaction in the detector. This operation allows in some cases to tag the type of the interacting quantum, crucial issue for background control in rare event experiments such as the search for neutrinoless double beta decay and for interactions of particle dark matter candidates. The light detectors used in the LUCIFER and LUMINEU searches (projects aiming at the study of the double beta interesting candidates 82Se and 100Mo using ZnSe and ZnMoO4 scintillating bolometers) consist of hyper-pure Ge thin slabs equipped with NTD thermistors. A substantial sensitivity improvement of the Ge light detectors can be obtained applying a proper anti-reflective coatings on the Ge side exposed to the luminescent bolometer. The present paper deals with the investigation of this aspect, proving and quantifying the positive effect of a SiO2 and a SiO coating and setting the experimental bases for future tests of other coating materials. The results confirm that an appropriate coating procedure helps in improving the sensitivity of bolometric light detectors by an important factor (in the range 20% - 35%) and needs to be included in the recipe for the development of an optimized radio-pure scintillating bolometer.

  12. Radiopure ZnMoO4 scintillating bolometers for the LUMINEU double-beta experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poda, D. V.; Armengaud, E.; Arnaud, Q.; Augier, C.; Barabash, A. S.; Benoît, A.; Benoît, A.; Bergé, L.; Boiko, R. S.; Bergmann, T.; Blümer, J.; Broniatowski, A.; Brudanin, V.; Camus, P.; Cazes, A.; Censier, B.; Chapellier, M.; Charlieux, F.; Chernyak, D. M.; Coron, N.; Coulter, P.; Cox, G. A.; Danevich, F. A.; de Boissière, T.; Decourt, R.; De Jesus, M.; Devoyon, L.; Drillien, A.-A.; Dumoulin, L.; Eitel, K.; Enss, C.; Filosofov, D.; Fleischmann, A.; Fourches, N.; Gascon, J.; Gastaldo, L.; Gerbier, G.; Giuliani, A.; Gros, M.; Hehn, L.; Henry, S.; Hervé, S.; Heuermann, G.; Humbert, V.; Ivanov, I. M.; Juillard, A.; Kéfélian, C.; Kleifges, M.; Kluck, H.; Kobychev, V. V.; Koskas, F.; Kozlov, V.; Kraus, H.; Kudryavtsev, V. A.; Le Sueur, H.; Loidl, M.; Magnier, P.; Makarov, E. P.; Mancuso, M.; de Marcillac, P.; Marnieros, S.; Marrache-Kikuchi, C.; Menshikov, A.; Nasonov, S. G.; Navick, X.-F.; Nones, C.; Olivieri, E.; Pari, P.; Paul, B.; Penichot, Y.; Pessina, G.; Piro, M. C.; Plantevin, O.; Redon, T.; Robinson, M.; Rodrigues, M.; Rozov, S.; Sanglard, V.; Schmidt, B.; Shlegel, V. N.; Siebenborn, B.; Strazzer, O.; Tcherniakhovski, D.; Tenconi, M.; Torres, L.; Tretyak, V. I.; Vagneron, L.; Vasiliev, Ya. V.; Velazquez, M.; Viraphong, O.; Walker, R. J.; Weber, M.; Yakushev, E.; Zhang, X.; Zhdankov, V. N.

    2015-08-01

    The results of R&D of radiopure zinc molybdate (ZnMoO4) based scintillating bolometers for the LUMINEU (Luminescent Underground Molybdenum Investigation for NEUtrino mass and nature) double-beta decay experiment are presented. A dedicated two-stage molybdenum purification technique (sublimation in vacuum and recrystallization from aqueous solutions) and an advanced directional solidification method (the low-thermal-gradient Czochralski technique) were utilized to produce high optical quality large mass (˜1 kg) ZnMoO4 crystal boules and first 100Mo (99.5%) enriched Zn100MoO4 crystal scintillator (mass of ˜0.2 kg). Scintillating bolometers based on ZnMoO4 (≈ 0.33 kg) and Zn100MoO4 (≈ 0.06 kg) scintillation elements and high purity Ge wafers were tested in the EDELWEISS set-up at the Modane Underground Laboratory (France). Long term low temperature tests demonstrate excellent detectors' performance and effectiveness of the purification and solidification procedures for the achievement of high radiopurity of the material, in particular with a bulk activity of 228Th and 226Ra below 4 µBq/kg. The adopted protocol was used to produce for the first time a large volume Zn100MoO4 crystal scintillator (mass of ˜1.4 kg, 100Mo enrichment is 99.5%) to search for neutrinoless double-beta decay of 100Mo in the framework of the LUMINEU project.

  13. Radiopure ZnMoO{sub 4} scintillating bolometers for the LUMINEU double-beta experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Poda, D. V.; Chernyak, D. M.; Armengaud, E.; Boissière, T. de; Fourches, N.; Gerbier, G.; Gros, M.; Hervé, S.; Magnier, P.; Navick, X-F.; Nones, C.; Paul, B.; Penichot, Y.; Arnaud, Q.; Augier, C.; Benoît, A.; Cazes, A.; Censier, B.; Charlieux, F.; De Jesus, M. [IPNL, Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, CNRS and others

    2015-08-17

    The results of R&D of radiopure zinc molybdate (ZnMoO{sub 4}) based scintillating bolometers for the LUMINEU (Luminescent Underground Molybdenum Investigation for NEUtrino mass and nature) double-beta decay experiment are presented. A dedicated two-stage molybdenum purification technique (sublimation in vacuum and recrystallization from aqueous solutions) and an advanced directional solidification method (the low-thermal-gradient Czochralski technique) were utilized to produce high optical quality large mass (∼1 kg) ZnMoO{sub 4} crystal boules and first {sup 100}Mo (99.5%) enriched Zn{sup 100}MoO{sub 4} crystal scintillator (mass of ∼0.2 kg). Scintillating bolometers based on ZnMoO{sub 4} (≈ 0.33 kg) and Zn{sup 100}MoO{sub 4} (≈ 0.06 kg) scintillation elements and high purity Ge wafers were tested in the EDELWEISS set-up at the Modane Underground Laboratory (France). Long term low temperature tests demonstrate excellent detectors’ performance and effectiveness of the purification and solidification procedures for the achievement of high radiopurity of the material, in particular with a bulk activity of {sup 228}Th and {sup 226}Ra below 4 µBq/kg. The adopted protocol was used to produce for the first time a large volume Zn{sup 100}MoO{sub 4} crystal scintillator (mass of ∼1.4 kg, {sup 100}Mo enrichment is 99.5%) to search for neutrinoless double-beta decay of {sup 100}Mo in the framework of the LUMINEU project.

  14. A scintillating bolometer array for double beta decay studies: The LUCIFER experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gironi, L.

    2016-07-01

    The main goal of the LUCIFER experiment is to study the neutrinoless double beta decay, a rare process allowed if neutrinos are Majorana particles. Although aiming at a discovery, in the case of insufficient sensitivity the LUCIFER technique will be the demonstrator for a higher mass experiment able to probe the entire inverted hierarchy region of the neutrino mass. In order to achieve this challenging result, high resolution detectors with active background discrimination capability are required. This very interesting possibility can be largely fulfilled by scintillating bolometers thanks to the simultaneous read-out of heat and light emitted by the interactions in the detector or by pulse shape analysis.

  15. Development of a Li2MoO4 scintillating bolometer for low background physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardani, L.; Casali, N.; Nagorny, S.; Pattavina, L.; Piperno, G.; Barinova, O. P.; Beeman, J. W.; Bellini, F.; Danevich, F. A.; Di Domizio, S.; Gironi, L.; Kirsanova, S. V.; Orio, F.; Pessina, G.; Pirro, S.; Rusconi, C.; Tomei, C.; Tretyak, V. I.; Vignati, M.

    2013-10-01

    We present the performance of a 33 g Li2MoO4 crystal working as a scintillating bolometer. The crystal was tested for more than 400 h in a dilution refrigerator installed in the underground laboratory of Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (Italy). This compound shows promising features in the frame of neutron detection, dark matter search (solar axions) and neutrinoless double-beta decay physics. Low temperature scintillating properties were investigated by means of different α, β/γ and neutron sources, and for the first time the Light Yield for different types of interacting particle is estimated. The detector shows great ability of tagging fast neutron interactions and high intrinsic radiopurity levels ( < 90 μBq/kg for 238U and < 110 μBq/kg for 232Th).

  16. LUCIFER: A Scintillating Bolometer Array for the Search of Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardani, L.; Lucifer Collaboration

    2012-07-01

    One of the main limitations in the study of 0vDBD is the presence of a radioactive background in the energy region of interest. This limit can be overcome by the technological approach of the LUCIFER project, which is based the double read-out of the heat and scintillation light produced by ZnSe scintillating bolometers. This experiment aims at a background lower than 10-3counts/keV/kg/y in the energy region of the 0νDBD of 82Se. Such a low background level will provide a sensitivity on the effective neutrino mass of the order of 100 meV. In the following, the results of the recent R&D activity are discussed, the single module for the LUCIFER detector is described, and the process for the production of 82Se-enriched ZnSe crystals is presented.

  17. A bench-top megavoltage fan-beam CT using CdWO4-photodiode detectors. I. System description and detector characterization.

    PubMed

    Rathee, S; Tu, D; Monajemi, T T; Rickey, D W; Fallone, B G

    2006-04-01

    We describe the components of a bench-top megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) scanner that uses an 80-element detector array consisting of CdWO4 scintillators coupled to photodiodes. Each CdWO4 crystal is 2.75 x 8 x 10 mm3. The detailed design of the detector array, timing control, and multiplexer are presented. The detectors show a linear response to dose (dose rate was varied by changing the source to detector distance) with a correlation coefficient (R2) nearly unity with the standard deviation of signal at each dose being less than 0.25%. The attenuation of a 6 MV beam by solid water measured by this detector array indicates a small, yet significant spectral hardening that needs to be corrected before image reconstruction. The presampled modulation transfer function is strongly affected by the detector's large pitch and a large improvement can be obtained by reducing the detector pitch. The measured detective quantum efficiency at zero spatial frequency is 18.8% for 6 MV photons which will reduce the dose to the patient in MVCT applications. The detector shows a less than a 2% reduction in response for a dose of 24.5 Gy accumulated in 2 h; however, the lost response is recovered on the following day. A complete recovery can be assumed within the experimental uncertainty (standard deviation <0.5%); however, any smaller permanent damage could not be assessed. PMID:16696485

  18. G0W0 band structure of CdWO4.

    PubMed

    Laasner, Raul

    2014-03-26

    The full quasiparticle band structure of CdWO4 is calculated within the single-shot GW (G0W0) approximation using maximally localized Wannier functions, which allows one to assess the validity of the commonly used scissor operator. Calculations are performed using the Godby-Needs plasmon pole model and the accurate contour deformation technique. It is shown that while the two methods yield identical band gap energies, the low-lying states are given inaccurately by the plasmon pole model. We report a band gap energy of 4.94 eV, including spin-orbit interaction at the DFT-LDA (density functional theory-local density approximation) level. Quasiparticle renormalization in CdWO4 is shown to be correlated with localization distance. Electron and hole effective masses are calculated at the DFT and G0W0 levels. PMID:24599225

  19. Low Thermal Gradient Czochralski growth of large CdWO4 crystals and electronic properties of (010) cleaved surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atuchin, V. V.; Galashov, E. N.; Khyzhun, O. Y.; Bekenev, V. L.; Pokrovsky, L. D.; Borovlev, Yu. A.; Zhdankov, V. N.

    2016-04-01

    The crystal growth of large high-quality inclusion-free CdWO4 crystals, 110 mm in diameter and mass up to 20 kg, has been carried out by the Low Thermal Gradient Czochralski (LTG Cz) technique. The high-purity CdWO4(010) surface has been prepared by cleavage and high structural quality of the surface has been verified by RHEED, revealing a system of Kikuchi lines. The chemical state and electronic structure of the surface have been studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES). The total and partial densities of states of the CdWO4 tungstate were calculated employing the first-principles full potential linearized augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) method. The results indicate that the principal contributors to the valence band of CdWO4 are the Cd 4d, W 5d and O 2p states which contribute mainly at the bottom, in the central portion and at the top of the valence band, respectively, with also significant contributions of the mentioned states throughout the whole CdWO4 valence-band region. With respect to the occupation of the O 2p states, the results of the FP-LAPW calculations are confirmed by comparison on a common energy scale of the XPS valence-band spectrum and the XES band representing the energy distribution of the O 2p states in this compound. Additionally, the FP-LAPW data allow us to conclude that the CdWO4 tungstate is a non-direct semiconductor.

  20. LUCIFER: Scintillating bolometers for the search of Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vignati, M.

    2012-08-01

    The nature of neutrino mass is one of the frontier problems of particle physics. Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay (0νDBD) is a powerful tool to measure the neutrino mass and to test possible extensions of the Standard Model. Bolometers are excellent detectors to search for this rare decay, thanks to their good energy resolution and to the low background conditions in which they can operate. The current challenge consists in the reduction of the background, represented by environmental γ's and α's, in view of a zero background experiment. We present the LUCIFER R&D, funded by an European grant, in which the background can be reduced by an order of magnitude with respect to the present generation experiments. The technique is based on the simultaneous bolometric measurement of the heat and of the scintillation light produced by a particle, that allows to discriminate between β and α particles. The γ background is reduced by choosing 0νDBD candidate isotopes with transition energy above the environmental γ's spectrum. The prospect of this R&D are discussed.

  1. Synthesis and photoelectrochemical properties of CdWO4 and CdS/CdWO4 nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Weina; Zheng, Chunhua; Hua, Hao; Yang, Qi; Chen, Lin; Xi, Yi; Hu, Chenguo

    2015-02-01

    A facile composite-salt-mediated strategy is employed for the first time to synthesize CdWO4 nanowire and nanoflower arrays on cadmium foil substrates. The photoelectrochemical (PEC) properties are measured on the electrodes made of the CdWO4 nanowire and nanoflower arrays under the simulated sunlight illumination. Both electrodes display high sensitive response and photocurrent stability. The photocurrent density of the nanowire arrays electrode reach 0.35 mA/cm2, which is about 3 times as much as that of the nanoflower array electrode. To improve the visible light photocurrent response, CdS nanoparticles are deposited on the CdWO4 nanowire arrays to form a CdS/CdWO4 heterojunction. Remarkably enhanced photoresponse is observed on the CdS/CdWO4 heterostructure and the photocurrent intensity is about twice as much as that of the electrode made of the pure CdWO4 nanowire arrays. The photoelectric mechanism is also discussed by the crystal structure and morphology characterization, optical band gap and carrier mobility analysis. This work presents a new design of a photoelectrochemical device for possible applications in photoelectrolysis of water and solar cells or highly sensitive light detection.

  2. Enriched ZnMoO scintillating bolometers to search for decay of Mo with the LUMINEU experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barabash, A. S.; Chernyak, D. M.; Danevich, F. A.; Giuliani, A.; Ivanov, I. M.; Makarov, E. P.; Mancuso, M.; Marnieros, S.; Nasonov, S. G.; Nones, C.; Olivieri, E.; Pessina, G.; Poda, D. V.; Shlegel, V. N.; Tenconi, M.; Tretyak, V. I.; Vasiliev, Ya. V.; Velazquez, M.; Zhdankov, V. N.

    2014-10-01

    The LUMINEU project aims at performing a demonstrator underground experiment searching for the neutrinoless double beta decay of the isotope $^{100}$Mo embedded in zinc molybdate (ZnMoO$_4$) scintillating bolometers. In this context, a zinc molybdate crystal boule enriched in $^{100}$Mo to 99.5\\% with a mass of 171 g was grown for the first time by the low-thermal-gradient Czochralski technique. The production cycle provided a high yield (the crystal boule mass was 84\\% of initial charge) and an acceptable level -- around 4\\% -- of irrecoverable losses of the costy enriched material. Two crystals of 59 g and 63 g, obtained from the enriched boule, were tested aboveground at milli-Kelvin temperature as scintillating bolometers. They showed a high detection performance, equivalent to that of previously developed natural ZnMoO$_4$ detectors. These results pave the way to future sensitive searches based on the LUMINEU technology, capable to approach and explore the inverted hierarchy region of the neutrino mass pattern.

  3. Aboveground test of an advanced Li2MoO4 scintillating bolometer to search for neutrinoless double beta decay of 100Mo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekker, T. B.; Coron, N.; Danevich, F. A.; Degoda, V. Ya.; Giuliani, A.; Grigorieva, V. D.; Ivannikova, N. V.; Mancuso, M.; de Marcillac, P.; Moroz, I. M.; Nones, C.; Olivieri, E.; Pessina, G.; Poda, D. V.; Shlegel, V. N.; Tretyak, V. I.; Velazquez, M.

    2016-01-01

    Large lithium molybdate (Li2MoO4) crystal boules were produced by using the low thermal gradient Czochralski growth technique from deeply purified molybdenum. A small sample from one of the boules was preliminary characterized in terms of X-ray-induced and thermally-excited luminescence. A large cylindrical crystalline element (with a size of ⊘40 × 40 mm) was used to fabricate a scintillating bolometer, which was operated aboveground at ˜15 mK by using a pulse-tube cryostat housing a high-power dilution refrigerator. The excellent detector performance in terms of energy resolution and α background suppression along with preliminary positive indications on the radiopurity of this material show the potentiality of Li2MoO4 scintillating bolometers for low-counting experiment to search for neutrinoless double beta decay of 100Mo.

  4. Effect of tungsten doping on ZnMoO4 scintillating bolometer performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernyak, D. M.; Danevich, F. A.; Degoda, V. Ya.; Giuliani, A.; Ivanov, I. M.; Kogut, Ya. P.; Kraus, H.; Kropivyansky, B. N.; Makarov, E. P.; Mancuso, M.; de Marcillac, P.; Mikhailik, V. B.; Mokina, V. M.; Moroz, I. M.; Nasonov, S. G.; Plantevin, O.; Poda, D. V.; Shlegel, V. N.; Tenconi, M.; Tretyak, V. I.; Velazquez, M.; Zhdankov, V. N.

    2015-11-01

    The introduction of a small quantity of tungsten oxide (in the range 0.2-0.5 wt%) into the melt improves the growth of ZnMoO4 crystals. No significant difference in the kinetics of scintillation decay, scintillation efficiency, emission spectra, optical transmittance was observed for three ZnMoO4 crystal samples grown from the melt of stoichiometric composition, with excess of molybdenum and doped with tungsten. Using CaWO4 as reference, the absolute light yield of ZnMoO4 is found to be equal to 3550 ± 550 ph/MeV at 77 K. For two ZnMoO4 samples 20 mm in diameter and 40 mm in length (grown from the melt of stoichiometric composition and doped with tungsten) it is confirmed that scintillation and bolometric response are similar at milli-Kelvin temperature.

  5. LUMINEU: a search for neutrinoless double beta decay based on ZnMoO4 scintillating bolometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armengaud, E.; Arnaud, Q.; Augier, C.; Benoît, A.; Benoît, A.; Boiko, L. Bergé S.; Bergmann, T.; Blümer, J.; Broniatowski, A.; Brudanin, V.; Camus, P.; Cazes, A.; Chapellier, M.; Charlieux, F.; Chernyak, D. M.; Coron, N.; Coulter, P.; Danevich, F. A.; de Boissiére, T.; Decourt, R.; De Jesus, M.; Devoyon, L.; Drillien, A.-A.; Dumoulin, L.; Eitel, K.; Enss, C.; Filosofov, D.; Fleischmann, A.; Foerster, N.; Fourches, N.; Gascon, J.; Gastaldo, L.; Gerbier, G.; Giuliani, A.; Gray, D.; Gros, M.; Hehn, L.; Henry, S.; Hervé, S.; Heuermann, G.; Humbert, V.; Ivanov, I. M.; Juillard, A.; Kéfélian, C.; Kleifges, M.; Kluck, H.; Kobychev, V. V.; Koskas, F.; Kozlov, V.; Kraus, H.; Kudryavtsev, V. A.; Le Sueur, H.; Loidl, M.; Magnier, P.; Makarov, E. P.; Mancuso, M.; de Marcillac, P.; Marnieros, S.; Marrache-Kikuchi, C.; Menshikov, A.; Nasonov, S. G.; Navick, X.-F.; Nones, C.; Olivieri, E.; Pari, P.; Paul, B.; Penichot, Y.; Pessina, G.; Piro, M. C.; Plantevin, O.; Poda, D. V.; Redon, T.; Robinson, M.; Rodrigues, M.; Rozov, S.; Sanglard, V.; Schmidt, B.; Scorza, S.; Shlegel, V. N.; Siebenborn, B.; Strazzer, O.; Tcherniakhovski, D.; Tenconi, M.; Torres, L.; Tretyak, V. I.; Vagneron, L.; Vasiliev, Ya V.; Velazquez, M.; Viraphong, O.; Walker, R. J.; Weber, M.; Yakushev, E.; Zhang, X.; Zhdankov, V. N.

    2016-05-01

    The LUMINEU is designed to investigate the possibility to search for neutrinoless double beta decay in 100 Mo by means of a large array of scintillating bolometers based on ZnMoO4 crystals enriched in 100 Mo. High energy resolution and relatively fast detectors, which are able to measure both the light and the heat generated upon the interaction of a particle in a crystal, are very promising for the recognition and rejection of background events. We present the LUMINEU concepts and the experimental results achieved aboveground and underground with large-mass natural and enriched crystals. The measured energy resolution, the α/β discrimination power and the radioactive internal contamination are all within the specifications for the projected final LUMINEU sensitivity. Simulations and preliminary results confirm that the LUMINEU technology can reach zero background in the region of interest (around 3 MeV) with exposures of the order of hundreds kgxyears, setting the bases for a next generation 0v2β decay experiment capable to explore the inverted hierarchy region of the neutrino mass pattern.

  6. CdWO4-Boron FY 2000 Task 4 Completion Report

    SciTech Connect

    Z. W. Bell; M. W. Moyer

    2001-02-01

    The fabrication of boron-covered crystal scintillation detectors is described. Bulk boron-loaded epoxy material was cast and cut into 0.5 mm-thick wafers that were mounted on CdWO{sub 4} and CsI(Tl) crystals. The crystals were mounted on miniature photomultiplier tubes and gamma spectra were obtained with the detectors. The ability of these small detectors to produce spectra that can be analyzed to provide isotopic identification has been demonstrated. In addition, the detector can produce a signature indicating the presence of neutrons. The same miniature size of these detectors that makes them attractive for hand-held portable use, may be a limiting factor in their efficiency. The small size of the scintillation crystals makes them not as efficient as larger NaI(Tl) crystals simply by virtue of significantly decreased sensitive volume and surface area. It may be worthwhile to consider slightly larger crystals (approximately 15 mm cubic CdWO{sub 4}) mounted on rectangular photomultipliers in a detecting head connected to the electronics package by a signal cable.

  7. Development and underground test of radiopure ZnMoO4 scintillating bolometers for the LUMINEU 0ν2β project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armengaud, E.; Arnaud, Q.; Augier, C.; Benoît, A.; Benoît, A.; Bergé, L.; Boiko, R. S.; Bergmann, T.; Blümer, J.; Broniatowski, A.; Brudanin, V.; Camus, P.; Cazes, A.; Chapellier, M.; Charlieux, F.; Chernyak, D. M.; Coron, N.; Coulter, P.; Danevich, F. A.; de Boissière, T.; Decourt, R.; De Jesus, M.; Devoyon, L.; Drillien, A.-A.; Dumoulin, L.; Eitel, K.; Enss, C.; Filosofov, D.; Fleischmann, A.; Foerster, N.; Fourches, N.; Gascon, J.; Gastaldo, L.; Gerbier, G.; Giuliani, A.; Gray, D.; Gros, M.; Hehn, L.; Henry, S.; Hervé, S.; Heuermann, G.; Humbert, V.; Ivanov, I. M.; Juillard, A.; Kéfélian, C.; Kleifges, M.; Kluck, H.; Kobychev, V. V.; Koskas, F.; Kozlov, V.; Kraus, H.; Kudryavtsev, V. A.; Le Sueur, H.; Loidl, M.; Magnier, P.; Makarov, E. P.; Mancuso, M.; de Marcillac, P.; Marnieros, S.; Marrache-Kikuchi, C.; Menshikov, A.; Nasonov, S. G.; Navick, X.-F.; Nones, C.; Olivieri, E.; Pari, P.; Paul, B.; Penichot, Y.; Pessina, G.; Piro, M. C.; Plantevin, O.; Poda, D. V.; Redon, T.; Robinson, M.; Rodrigues, M.; Rozov, S.; Sanglard, V.; Schmidt, B.; Scorza, S.; Shlegel, V. N.; Siebenborn, B.; Strazzer, O.; Tcherniakhovski, D.; Tenconi, M.; Torres, L.; Tretyak, V. I.; Vagneron, L.; Vasiliev, Ya. V.; Velazquez, M.; Viraphong, O.; Walker, R. J.; Weber, M.; Yakushev, E.; Zhang, X.; Zhdankov, V. N.

    2015-05-01

    The LUMINEU (Luminescent Underground Molybdenum Investigation for NEUtrino mass and nature) project envisages a high-sensitivity search for neutrinoless double beta (0ν 2β) decay of 100Mo with the help of scintillating bolometers based on zinc molybdate (ZnMoO4) crystals. One of the crucial points for the successful performance of this experiment is the development of a protocol for producing high quality large mass ZnMoO4 crystal scintillators with extremely high internal radiopurity. Here we report a significant progress in the development of large volume ZnMoO4 crystalline boules (with mass up to 1 kg) from deeply purified materials. We present and discuss the results achieved with two ZnMoO4 samples (with mass of about 0.3 kg each): one is a precursor of the LUMINEU project, while the other one was produced in the framework of LUMINEU with an improved purification / crystallization procedure. The two crystals were measured deep underground as scintillating bolometers in the EDELWEISS dilution refrigerator at the Laboratoire Souterrain de Modane (France) protected by a rock overburden corresponding to 4800 m w.e. The results indicate that both tested crystals are highly radiopure. However, the advanced LUMINEU sample shows a clear improvement with respect to the precursor, exhibiting only a trace internal contamination related with 210Po at the level of 1 mBq/kg, while the activity of 226Ra and 228Th is below 0.005 mBq/kg. This demonstrates that the LUMINEU purification and crystal-growth procedures are very efficient and leads to radiopurity levels which exceedingly satisfy not only the LUMINEU goals but also the requirements of a next-generation 0ν 2β experiment.

  8. Status of LUMINEU program to search for neutrinoless double beta decay of {sup 100}Mo with cryogenic ZnMoO{sub 4} scintillating bolometers

    SciTech Connect

    Danevich, F. A. Boiko, R. S.; Chernyak, D. M.; Kobychev, V. V.; Bergé, L.; Chapellier, M.; Drillien, A.-A.; Dumoulin, L.; Humbert, V.; Marcillac, P. de; Marnieros, S.; Marrache-Kikuchi, C.; Olivieri, E.; Plantevin, O.; Tenconi, M.; Devoyon, L.; Koskas, F.; and others

    2015-10-28

    The LUMTNEU program aims at performing a pilot experiment on 0ν2β decay of {sup 100}Mo using radiopure ZnMoO{sub 4} crystals enriched in {sup 100}Mo operated as cryogenic scintillating bolometers. Large volume ZnMoO{sub 4} crystal scintillators (∼ 0.3 kg) were developed and tested showing high performance in terms of radiopurity, energy resolution and α/β particle discrimination capability. Zinc molybdate crystal scintillators enriched in {sup 100}Mo were grown for the first time by the low-thermal-gradient Czochralski technique with a high crystal yield and an acceptable level of enriched molybdenum irrecoverable losses. A background level of ∼ 0.5 counts/(yr keV ton) in the region of interest can be reached in a large detector array thanks to the excellent detectors radiopurity and particle discrimination capability, suppression of randomly coinciding events by pulse-shape analysis, and anticoincidence cut. These results pave the way to future sensitive searches based on the LUMTNEU technology, capable of approachingand exploring the inverted hierarchy region of the neutrino mass pattern.

  9. Status of LUMINEU program to search for neutrinoless double beta decay of 100Mo with cryogenic ZnMoO4 scintillating bolometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danevich, F. A.; Bergé, L.; Boiko, R. S.; Chapellier, M.; Chernyak, D. M.; Coron, N.; Devoyon, L.; Drillien, A.-A.; Dumoulin, L.; Enss, C.; Fleischmann, A.; Gastaldo, L.; Giuliani, A.; Gray, D.; Gros, M.; Hervé, S.; Humbert, V.; Ivanov, I. M.; Juillard, A.; Kobychev, V. V.; Koskas, F.; Loidl, M.; Magnier, P.; Makarov, E. P.; Mancuso, M.; de Marcillac, P.; Marnieros, S.; Marrache-Kikuchi, C.; Navick, X.-F.; Nones, C.; Olivieri, E.; Paul, B.; Penichot, Y.; Pessina, G.; Plantevin, O.; Poda, D. V.; Redon, T.; Rodrigues, M.; Shlegel, V. N.; Strazzer, O.; Tenconi, M.; Torres, L.; Tretyak, V. I.; Vasiliev, Ya. V.; Velazquez, M.; Viraphong, O.

    2015-10-01

    The LUMTNEU program aims at performing a pilot experiment on 0ν2β decay of 100Mo using radiopure ZnMoO4 crystals enriched in 100Mo operated as cryogenic scintillating bolometers. Large volume ZnMoO4 crystal scintillators (˜ 0.3 kg) were developed and tested showing high performance in terms of radiopurity, energy resolution and α/β particle discrimination capability. Zinc molybdate crystal scintillators enriched in 100Mo were grown for the first time by the low-thermal-gradient Czochralski technique with a high crystal yield and an acceptable level of enriched molybdenum irrecoverable losses. A background level of ˜ 0.5 counts/(yr keV ton) in the region of interest can be reached in a large detector array thanks to the excellent detectors radiopurity and particle discrimination capability, suppression of randomly coinciding events by pulse-shape analysis, and anticoincidence cut. These results pave the way to future sensitive searches based on the LUMTNEU technology, capable of approachingand exploring the inverted hierarchy region of the neutrino mass pattern.

  10. Nanowire Bolometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Jeffrey B.; Bolinger, A. T.; Berzyadin, A.; Bock, D.; Garcia, K.

    2003-02-01

    Cryogenic tests of a prototype superconducting nanowire bolometer are presented. The device has such low thermal conductance it should be sensitive when used as a direct detector. Because of the small size of the active area we anticipate that this bolometer may also be fast enough to be used as a wideband mixer.

  11. Alpha Background Rejection in Bolometer Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deporzio, Nicholas

    2016-03-01

    This study presents the modification of bolometer detectors used in particle searches to veto or otherwise reject alpha radiation background and the statistical advantages of doing so. Several techniques are presented in detail - plastic film scintillator vetoes, metallic film ionization vetoes, and scintillating bolometer vetoes. Plastic scintillator films are cooled to bolometer temperatures and bombarded with 1.4MeV to 6.0MeV alpha particles representative of documented detector background. Photomultipliers detect this scintillation light and produce a veto signal. Layered metallic films of a primary metal, dielectric, and secondary metal, such as gold-polyethylene-gold films, are cooled to milli-kelvin temperatures and biased to produce a current signal veto when incident 1.4MeV to 6.0MeV alpha particles ionize conduction paths through the film. Modified Zinc Molybdate Bolometers are used to produce scintillation light when stimulated by alpha background. Calibration of veto signal to background energy is presented. Results are used to quantify the statistical impact of such modifications on bolometer searches.

  12. Imaging bolometer

    DOEpatents

    Wurden, G.A.

    1999-01-19

    Radiation-hard, steady-state imaging bolometer is disclosed. A bolometer employing infrared (IR) imaging of a segmented-matrix absorber of plasma radiation in a cooled-pinhole camera geometry is described. The bolometer design parameters are determined by modeling the temperature of the foils from which the absorbing matrix is fabricated by using a two-dimensional time-dependent solution of the heat conduction equation. The resulting design will give a steady-state bolometry capability, with approximately 100 Hz time resolution, while simultaneously providing hundreds of channels of spatial information. No wiring harnesses will be required, as the temperature-rise data will be measured via an IR camera. The resulting spatial data may be used to tomographically investigate the profile of plasmas. 2 figs.

  13. Imaging bolometer

    DOEpatents

    Wurden, Glen A.

    1999-01-01

    Radiation-hard, steady-state imaging bolometer. A bolometer employing infrared (IR) imaging of a segmented-matrix absorber of plasma radiation in a cooled-pinhole camera geometry is described. The bolometer design parameters are determined by modeling the temperature of the foils from which the absorbing matrix is fabricated by using a two-dimensional time-dependent solution of the heat conduction equation. The resulting design will give a steady-state bolometry capability, with approximately 100 Hz time resolution, while simultaneously providing hundreds of channels of spatial information. No wiring harnesses will be required, as the temperature-rise data will be measured via an IR camera. The resulting spatial data may be used to tomographically investigate the profile of plasmas.

  14. The First Tests of a Large-Area Light Detector Equipped with Metallic Magnetic Calorimeters for Scintillating Bolometers for the LUMINEU Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, D.; Enss, C.; Fleischmann, A.; Gastaldo, L.; Hassel, C.; Hengstler, D.; Kempf, S.; Loidl, M.; Navick, X. F.; Rodrigues, M.

    2016-02-01

    Future rare-event searches using scintillating crystals need very low background levels for high sensitivity; however, unresolved pile-up can limit this. We present the design and fabrication of large-area photon detectors based on metallic magnetic calorimeters (MMCs), optimized for fast rise times to resolve close pile-up. The first prototypes have been characterized using Fe-55 X-rays and ZnMoO4 crystal scintillation light. A fast intrinsic rise time of 25-30 \\upmu s has been measured and has been compared to the 250 \\upmu s scintillation light pulse rise time constant. The difference indicates that the scintillation process limits the light pulse rise time. The fast rise time allows for a reduction of background due to close pile-up events as well as the study of the inherent crystal scintillation process. MMC-based photon detectors are shown to be a promising tool for scintillating crystal based rare event searches.

  15. The First Tests of a Large-Area Light Detector Equipped with Metallic Magnetic Calorimeters for Scintillating Bolometers for the LUMINEU Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay Search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, D.; Enss, C.; Fleischmann, A.; Gastaldo, L.; Hassel, C.; Hengstler, D.; Kempf, S.; Loidl, M.; Navick, X. F.; Rodrigues, M.

    2016-08-01

    Future rare-event searches using scintillating crystals need very low background levels for high sensitivity; however, unresolved pile-up can limit this. We present the design and fabrication of large-area photon detectors based on metallic magnetic calorimeters (MMCs), optimized for fast rise times to resolve close pile-up. The first prototypes have been characterized using Fe-55 X-rays and ZnMoO4 crystal scintillation light. A fast intrinsic rise time of 25-30 \\upmu s has been measured and has been compared to the 250 \\upmu s scintillation light pulse rise time constant. The difference indicates that the scintillation process limits the light pulse rise time. The fast rise time allows for a reduction of background due to close pile-up events as well as the study of the inherent crystal scintillation process. MMC-based photon detectors are shown to be a promising tool for scintillating crystal based rare event searches.

  16. Femtosecond laser ablation of cadmium tungstate for scintillator arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, S.; Baker, M. A.; Wilson, M. D.; Lohstroh, A.; Seller, P.

    2016-08-01

    Ultrafast pulsed laser ablation has been investigated as a technique to machine CdWO4 single crystal scintillator and segment it into small blocks with the aim of fabricating a 2D high energy X-ray imaging array. Cadmium tungstate (CdWO4) is a brittle transparent scintillator used for the detection of high energy X-rays and γ-rays. A 6 W Yb:KGW Pharos-SP pulsed laser of wavelength 1028 nm was used with a tuneable pulse duration of 10 ps to 190 fs, repetition rate of up to 600 kHz and pulse energies of up to 1 mJ was employed. The effect of varying the pulse duration, pulse energy, pulse overlap and scan pattern on the laser induced damage to the crystals was investigated. A pulse duration of ≥500 fs was found to induce substantial cracking in the material. The laser induced damage was minimised using the following operating parameters: a pulse duration of 190 fs, fluence of 15.3 J cm-2 and employing a serpentine scan pattern with a normalised pulse overlap of 0.8. The surface of the ablated surfaces was studied using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Ablation products were found to contain cadmium tungstate together with different cadmium and tungsten oxides. These laser ablation products could be removed using an ammonium hydroxide treatment.

  17. Alpha Background Rejection in Bolometer Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deporzio, Nicholas; Cuore Collaboration

    This study presents the modification of bolometer detectors used in particle searches to veto or otherwise reject alpha radiation background and the statistical advantages of doing so. Several techniques are presented in detail - plastic film scintillator vetoes, metallic film ionization vetoes, and Cherenkov radiation vetoes. Plastic scintillator films are cooled to bolometer temperatures and bombarded with 1.4MeV to 6.0MeV alpha particles representative of documented detector background. Quantum dot based liquid scintillator is similarly bombarded to produce a background induced scintillation light. Photomultipliers detect this scintillation light and produce a veto signal. Layered metallic films of a primary metal, dielectric, and secondary metal, such as gold-polyethylene-gold films, are cooled to milli-kelvin temperatures and biased to produce a current signal veto when incident 1.4MeV to 6.0MeV alpha particles ionize conduction paths through the film. Calibration of veto signal to background energy is presented. These findings are extrapolated to quantify the statistical impact of such modifications to bolometer searches. Effects of these techniques on experiment duration and signal-background ratio are discussed.

  18. Film Vetoes for Alpha Background Rejection in Bolometer Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deporzio, Nicholas; Bucci, Carlo; Canonica, Lucia; Divacri, Marialaura; Cuore Collaboration; Absurd Team

    2015-04-01

    This study characterizes the effectiveness of encasing bolometer detectors in scintillator, metal ionization, and more exotic films to veto alpha radiation background. Bolometers are highly susceptible to alpha background and a successful veto should boost the statistical strength, speed, and signal-background ratio of bolometer particle searches. Plastic scintillator films are cooled to bolometer temperatures and bombarded with 1.4 MeV to 6.0 MeV alpha particles representative of detector conditions. Photomultipliers detect the keV range scintillation light and produce a veto signal. Also, layered films of a primary metal, dielectric, and secondary metal, such as gold-polyethylene-gold films, are cooled to milli-kelvin temperatures and biased with 0.1V to 100V to produce a current signal when incident 1.4 MeV to 6.0 MeV alpha particles ionize conduction paths through the film. Veto signals are characterized by their affect on bolometer detection of 865 keV target signals. Similar methods are applied to more exotic films. Early results show scintillator films raise target signal count rate and suppress counts above target energy by at least a factor of 10. This indicates scintillation vetoes are effective and that metal ionization and other films under study will also be effective.

  19. Investigation of the effect of the scintillator material on the overall X-ray detection system performance by application of analytical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efthimiou, N.; Kalivas, N.; Patatoukas, G.; Konstantinidis, A.; Valais, I.; Nikolopoulos, D.; Gaitanis, A.; David, S.; Michail, C.; Loudos, G.; Cavouras, D.; Panayiotakis, G.; Kandarakis, I.

    2007-02-01

    The purpose of the present work was to model a modern X-ray detection system and to investigate the effect of the scintillator material on the detector's output signal. The scintillators were used in the form of screens. The parameters investigated were the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF), the Detective Quantum Efficiency (DQE) and the Energy Absorption Efficiency (EAE). The results for some well-known scintillators (Y 3Al 5O 12:Ce, Y 2O 3:Eu, ZnSCdS:Ag, Lu 3Al 5O 7, CdWO 4) are presented. Typical radiographic conditions were considered as input parameters. For simulation purposes, the intrinsic conversion efficiency ( ηc), the total number of optical photons produced per incident X-ray ( m0), the attenuation coefficients and other optical parameters of the scintillator materials, were taken as input data. The complete simulation procedure was performed in a specially designed Graphical User Interface (GUI). The results showed that the Y 2O 3:Eu scintillator presented similar behavior to that of ZnSCdS:Ag, exhibiting higher DQE at zero spatial frequencies. For higher frequencies, however, the DQE values of Lu 3Al 5O 7 and CdWO 4 prevailed.

  20. Double β experiments with the help of scintillation and HPGe detectors at Gran Sasso

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barabash, A.; Belli, P.; Bernabei, R.; Boiko, R. S.; Brudanin, V. B.; Cappella, F.; Caracciolo, V.; Cerulli, R.; Chernyak, D. M.; Danevich, F. A.; d'Angelo, S.; Di Marco, A.; Di Vacri, M. L.; Dossovitskiyj, A. E.; Galashov, E. N.; Grinyov, B. V.; Incicchitti, A.; Kobychev, V. V.; Konovalov, S. I.; Kovtun, G. P.; Kropivyansky, B. N.; Kudovbenko, V. M.; Laubenstein, M.; Mikhlin, A. L.; Nagornaya, L. L.; Nagorny, S. S.; Nagornyi, P. G.; Nisi, S.; Poda, D. V.; Podviyanuk, R. B.; Prosperi, D.; Polischuk, O. G.; Shcherban, A. P.; Shlegel, V. N.; Solopikhin, D. A.; Stenin, Y. G.; Suhonen, J.; Tolmachev, A. V.; Tretyak, V. I.; Umatov, V. I.; Vasiliev, Y. V.; Virich, V. D.; Vyshnevskyi, I. M.; Yavetskiy, R. P.; Yurchenko, S. S.

    2011-12-01

    A search for double beta decay of 64,70Zn, 180,186W was carried out by using low background ZnWO4 crystal scintillators, while a CeCl3 scintillation detector was applied to investigate 2β processes in 136,138,142Ce. A search for 2β decay of 96,104Ru, 156,158Dy, 190,198Pt and study of 2ν2β decay of 100Mo to the first excited 0+ level of 100Ru were realized by ultra-low background HPGe γ spectrometry. Moreover, CdWO4 crystal scintillators from enriched 106Cd and 116Cd isotopes were developed to search for 2β decay of 106Cd and 116Cd. Finally, experiments aimed to investigate 96,104Ru and 116Cd are in progress and a new phase of the experiment to search for 2β processes in 106Cd is in preparation.

  1. Precision bolometer bridge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, D. R.

    1968-01-01

    Prototype precision bolometer calibration bridge is manually balanced device for indicating dc bias and balance with either dc or ac power. An external galvanometer is used with the bridge for null indication, and the circuitry monitors voltage and current simultaneously without adapters in testing 100 and 200 ohm thin film bolometers.

  2. Bolometer Simulation Using SPICE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Hollis H.; Aslam, Shahid; Lakew, Brook

    2004-01-01

    A general model is presented that assimilates the thermal and electrical properties of the bolometer - this block model demonstrates the Electro-Thermal Feedback (ETF) effect on the bolometers performance. This methodology is used to construct a SPICE model that by way of analogy combines the thermal and electrical phenomena into one simulation session. The resulting circuit diagram is presented and discussed.

  3. Superconducting Bolometer Array Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, Dominic; Chervenak, Jay; Irwin, Kent; Moseley, S. Harvey; Shafer, Rick; Staguhn, Johannes; Wollack, Ed; Oegerle, William (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The next generation of far-infrared and submillimeter instruments require large arrays of detectors containing thousands of elements. These arrays will necessarily be multiplexed, and superconducting bolometer arrays are the most promising present prospect for these detectors. We discuss our current research into superconducting bolometer array technologies, which has recently resulted in the first multiplexed detections of submillimeter light and the first multiplexed astronomical observations. Prototype arrays containing 512 pixels are in production using the Pop-Up Detector (PUD) architecture, which can be extended easily to 1000 pixel arrays. Planar arrays of close-packed bolometers are being developed for the GBT (Green Bank Telescope) and for future space missions. For certain applications, such as a slewed far-infrared sky survey, feedhorncoupling of a large sparsely-filled array of bolometers is desirable, and is being developed using photolithographic feedhorn arrays. Individual detectors have achieved a Noise Equivalent Power (NEP) of -10(exp 17) W/square root of Hz at 300mK, but several orders of magnitude improvement are required and can be reached with existing technology. The testing of such ultralow-background detectors will prove difficult, as this requires optical loading of below IfW. Antenna-coupled bolometer designs have advantages for large format array designs at low powers due to their mode selectivity.

  4. Ideal Integrating Bolometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogut, A.; DiPirro, M.; Moseley, S. H.

    2004-01-01

    We describe a new "ideal integrator" bolometer as a prototype for a new generation of sensitive, flexible far-IR detectors suitable for use in large arrays. The combination of a non-dissipative sensor coupled with a fast heat switch provides breakthrough capabilities in both sensitivity and operation. The bolometer temperature varies linearly with the integrated infrared power incident on the detector, and may be sampled intermittently without loss of information between samples. The sample speed and consequent dynamic range depend only on the heat switch reset cycle and can be selected in software. Between samples, the device acts as an ideal integrator with noise significantly lower than resistive bolometers. Since there is no loss of information between samples, the device is well-suited for large arrays. A single SQUID readout could process an entire column of detectors, greatly reducing the complexity, power requirements, and cost of readout electronics for large pixel arrays.

  5. Size effects on the properties of high z scintillator materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez-Sanchez, Bernadette A.; Boyle, Timothy J.; Villone, Janelle; Yang, Pin; Kinnan, Mark; Hoppe, Sarah; Thoma, Steve; Hattar, Khalid M.; Doty, F. P.

    2012-10-01

    Particle size effects of nano- and polycrystalline metal tungstate MWO4 (M = Ca, Pb, Cd) scintillators were examined through a comparison of commercially available powders and solution precipitation prepared nanoscaled materials. The scintillation behaviors of nanoparticles and commercial powders were examined with ion beam induced luminescence (IBIL), photoluminescence (PL), and cathodoluminescence (CL) spectroscopy techniques. For commercial microns sized MWO4 powders, spectral emission differences between CL and PL were only observed for Cd and Pb tungstates when compared to reported single crystals. The IBIL wavelength emissions also differed from the commercial MWO4 CL and PL data and were red shifted by 28 and 14 nm for CaWO4 and CdWO4; respectively, while PbWO4 had no significant change. IBIL analysis on CaWO4 nanoparticles produced a 40 nm blue shift from the commercial powder emission. These preliminary results suggest that both size and cation Z may affect the emission properties of the MWO4 scintillators.

  6. HFI Bolometer Detectors Programmatic CDR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, Andrew E.

    2002-01-01

    Programmatic Critical Design Review (CDR) of the High Frequency Instrument (HFI) Bolometer Detector on the Planck Surveyor is presented. The topics include: 1) Scientific Requirements and Goals; 2) Silicon Nitride Micromesh 'Spider-Web' Bolometers; 3) Sub-Orbital Heritage: BOOMERANG; 4) Noise stability demonstrated in BOOMERANG; 5) Instrument Partners; 6) Bolometer Environment on Planck/HFI; 7) Bolometer Modules; and 8) Mechanical Interface. Also included are the status of the receivables and delivery plans with Europe. This paper is presented in viewgraph form.

  7. Frequency selective bolometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowitt, M. S.; Fixsen, D. J.; Goldin, A.; Meyer, S. S.

    1996-10-01

    We propose a concept for radiometry in the millimeter, the submillimeter, and the far-IR spectral regions, the frequency selective bolometer (FSB). This system uses a bolometer as a coupled element of a tuned quasi-optical interference filter in which the absorption, the transmission, and the reflection characteristics of the filter depend on the frequency in a controlled manner. Several FSB's can be cascaded within a straight light pipe to produce a high-efficiency, compact, multiband radiometer. A prototype design is presented together with its anticipated performance based on a one-dimensional transmission-line model. Instruments based on FSB technology should have several advantages over current multiband bolometric radiometers including smaller and more compact cryogenic optics, reduced demands on cryostat size and weight, high coupling efficiency, minimum constraints on the geometry in the focal plane. An FSB system can be configured as a multiband, close-packed focal-plane array, permitting efficient use of the throughput of a telescope.

  8. MEMS: fabrication of cryogenic bolometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunert, J.; Anders, S.; May, T.; Zakosarenko, V.; Zieger, G.; Kreysa, E.; Meyer, H.-G.

    2012-02-01

    Cryogenic bolometers are among the most sensitive devices for the detection of electromagnetic radiation in the submillimeter wavelength range. Such radiation is of interest for astronomical observations as well as for security checks. We describe how we fabricate an array of these bolometers. Standard contact lithography is sufficient for these relatively coarse features. To increase the sensitivity, it is imperative to weaken the thermal link between the thermistors (the sensing devices) and the temperature bath. This is achieved by placing them on a silicon nitride membrane that is structured so that the thermistors are placed on a platform which is held only by a few beams. The fabrication process does not require sophisticated lithographic techniques, but special care to achieve the desired yield of 100 % intact bolometers in one array. We discuss bolometer basics and requirements for our applications, critical fabrication issues, and show results of complete systems built for a radio telescope and for security cameras.

  9. Silicon Hot-Electron Bolometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, Thomas R.; Hsieh, Wen-Ting; Mitchell, Robert R.; Isenberg, Hal D.; Stahle, Carl M.; Cao, Nga T.; Schneider, Gideon; Travers, Douglas E.; Moseley, S. Harvey; Wollack, Edward J.

    2004-01-01

    We discuss a new type of direct detector, a silicon hot-electron bolometer, for measurements in the far-infrared and submillimeter spectral ranges. High performance bolometers can be made using the electron-phonon conductance in heavily doped silicon to provide thermal isolation from the cryogenic bath. Noise performance is expected to be near thermodynamic limits, allowing background limited performance for many far infrared and submillimeter photometric and spectroscopic applications.

  10. The GISMO-2 Bolometer Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staguhn, Johannes G.; Benford, Dominic J.; Fixsen, Dale J.; Hilton, Gene; Irwin, Kent D.; Jhabvala, Christine A.; Kovacs, Attila; Leclercq, Samuel; Maher, Stephen F.; Miller, Timothy M.; Moseley, Samuel H.; Sharp, Elemer H.; Wollack, Edward J.

    2012-01-01

    We present the concept for the GISMO-2 bolometer camera) which we build for background-limited operation at the IRAM 30 m telescope on Pico Veleta, Spain. GISM0-2 will operate Simultaneously in the 1 mm and 2 mm atmospherical windows. The 1 mm channel uses a 32 x 40 TES-based Backshort Under Grid (BUG) bolometer array, the 2 mm channel operates with a 16 x 16 BUG array. The camera utilizes almost the entire full field of view provided by the telescope. The optical design of GISM0-2 was strongly influenced by our experience with the GISMO 2 mm bolometer camera which is successfully operating at the 30m telescope. GISMO is accessible to the astronomical community through the regular IRAM call for proposals.

  11. On 3He bolometer systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houck, J. R.

    1983-01-01

    A 3He cryostat which was constructed to cool a germanium bolometer for use as an infrared detector at submillimeter wavelength is discussed. The system had better sensitivity than any other existing system for these wavelengths; the system could be improved if better optical coupling could be achieved between the bolometer and the incoming photon stream. Considerable effort was expended to improve this coupling. Even the best results however, fell short of an ideal system by a factor of nearly 5 in coupling efficiency.

  12. Neutron transmutation doped Ge bolometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haller, E. E.; Kreysa, E.; Palaio, N. P.; Richards, P. L.; Rodder, M.

    1983-01-01

    Some conclusions reached are as follow. Neutron Transmutation Doping (NTD) of high quality Ge single crystals provides perfect control of doping concentration and uniformity. The resistivity can be tailored to any given bolometer operating temperature down to 0.1 K and probably lower. The excellent uniformity is advantaged for detector array development.

  13. First array of enriched Zn^{82}Se bolometers to search for double beta decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artusa, D. R.; Balzoni, A.; Beeman, J. W.; Bellini, F.; Biassoni, M.; Brofferio, C.; Camacho, A.; Capelli, S.; Cardani, L.; Carniti, P.; Casali, N.; Cassina, L.; Clemenza, M.; Cremonesi, O.; Cruciani, A.; D'Addabbo, A.; Dafinei, I.; Di Domizio, S.; di Vacri, M. L.; Ferroni, F.; Gironi, L.; Giuliani, A.; Gotti, C.; Keppel, G.; Maino, M.; Mancuso, M.; Martinez, M.; Morganti, S.; Nagorny, S.; Nastasi, M.; Nisi, S.; Nones, C.; Orio, F.; Orlandi, D.; Pagnanini, L.; Pallavicini, M.; Palmieri, V.; Pattavina, L.; Pavan, M.; Pessina, G.; Pettinacci, V.; Pirro, S.; Pozzi, S.; Previtali, E.; Puiu, A.; Rusconi, C.; Schäffner, K.; Tomei, C.; Vignati, M.; Zolotarova, A.

    2016-07-01

    The R&D activity performed during the last years proved the potential of ZnSe scintillating bolometers to the search for neutrino-less double beta decay, motivating the realization of the first large-mass experiment based on this technology: CUPID-0. The isotopic enrichment in ^{82}Se, the Zn^{82}Se crystals growth, as well as the light detectors production have been accomplished, and the experiment is now in construction at Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (Italy). In this paper we present the results obtained testing the first three Zn^{82}Se crystals operated as scintillating bolometers, and we prove that their performance in terms of energy resolution, background rejection capability and intrinsic radio-purity complies with the requirements of CUPID-0.

  14. Bolometers - Ultimate sensitivity, optimization, and amplifier coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, J. C.

    1984-01-01

    Theoretical expressions for Johnson noise and thermal noise in bolometers are considered, and optimization with respect to thermal conductivity and bias power is performed. Numerical approximations are given for the ultimate NEP of bolometers as a function of material parameters and compared with photon noise including photon correlations. A resonating capacitor is shown to improve the coupling to an amplifier, so that the amplifier need not limit performance even for very low temperature bolometers.

  15. Improved fabrication techniques for infrared bolometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, A. E.; Kreysa, E.; Mcbride, S. E.; Richards, P. L.; Haller, E. E.

    1983-01-01

    Techniques are described for producing improved infrared bolometers from doped germanium. Ion implantation and sputter metalization have been used to make ohmic electrical contacts to Ge:Ga chips. This method results in a high yield of small monolithic bolometers with very little low-frequency noise. When one of these chips is used as the thermometric element of a composite bolometer, it must be bonded to a dielectric substrate. The thermal resistance of the conventional epoxy bond has been measured and found to be undesirably large. A procedure for soldering the chip to a metalized portion of the substrate is described which reduced this resistance. The contribution of the metal film absorber to the heat capacity of a composite bolometer has been measured. The heat capacity of a NiCr absorber at 1.3 K can dominate the bolometer performance. A Bi absorber has significantly lower heat capacity. A low temperature blackbody calibrator has been built to measure the optical responsivity of bolometers. A composite bolometer system with a throughput of approx. 0.1 sr sq cm was constructed using the new techniques. In negligible background it has an optical NEP of 3.6 10((exp -15) W/sq root of Hz at 1.0 K with a time constant of 20 ms. The noise in this bolometer is white above 2.5 Hz and is somewhat below the value predicted by thermodynamic equilibrium theory. It is in agreement with calculations based on a recent nonequilibrium theory.

  16. Infrared-Bolometer Arrays with Reflective Backshorts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Timothy M.; Abrahams, John; Allen, Christine A.

    2011-01-01

    Integrated circuits that incorporate square arrays of superconducting-transition- edge bolometers with optically reflective backshorts are being developed for use in image sensors in the spectral range from far infrared to millimeter wavelengths. To maximize the optical efficiency (and, thus, sensitivity) of such a sensor at a specific wavelength, resonant optical structures are created by placing the backshorts at a quarter wavelength behind the bolometer plane. The bolometer and backshort arrays are fabricated separately, then integrated to form a single unit denoted a backshort-under-grid (BUG) bolometer array. In a subsequent fabrication step, the BUG bolometer array is connected, by use of single-sided indium bump bonding, to a readout device that comprises mostly a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) multiplexer circuit. The resulting sensor unit comprising the BUG bolometer array and the readout device is operated at a temperature below 1 K. The concept of increasing optical efficiency by use of backshorts at a quarter wavelength behind the bolometers is not new. Instead, the novelty of the present development lies mainly in several features of the design of the BUG bolometer array and the fabrication sequence used to implement the design. Prior to joining with the backshort array, the bolometer array comprises, more specifically, a square grid of free-standing molybdenum/gold superconducting-transition-edge bolometer elements on a 1.4- m-thick top layer of silicon that is part of a silicon support frame made from a silicon-on-insulator wafer. The backshort array is fabricated separately as a frame structure that includes support beams and contains a correspond - ing grid of optically reflective patches on a single-crystal silicon substrate. The process used to fabricate the bolometer array includes standard patterning and etching steps that result in the formation of deep notches in the silicon support frame. These notches are designed to

  17. Scintillator material

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, David F.; Kross, Brian J.

    1994-01-01

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography.

  18. Scintillator material

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, D.F.; Kross, B.J.

    1992-07-28

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography. 4 figs.

  19. Scintillator material

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, D.F.; Kross, B.J.

    1994-06-07

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography. 4 figs.

  20. Scintillator material

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, David F.; Kross, Brian J.

    1992-01-01

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography.

  1. 950 keV X-Band Linac For Material Recognition Using Two-Fold Scintillator Detector As A Concept Of Dual-Energy X-Ray System

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kiwoo; Natsui, Takuya; Hirai, Shunsuke; Uesaka, Mitsuru; Hashimoto, Eiko

    2011-06-01

    One of the advantages of applying X-band linear accelerator (Linac) is the compact size of the whole system. That shows us the possibility of on-site system such as the custom inspection system in an airport. As X-ray source, we have developed X-band Linac and achieved maximum X-ray energy 950 keV using the low power magnetron (250 kW) in 2 {mu}s pulse length. The whole size of the Linac system is 1x1x1 m{sup 3}. That is realized by introducing X-band system. In addition, we have designed two-fold scintillator detector in dual energy X-ray concept. Monte carlo N-particle transport (MCNP) code was used to make up sensor part of the design with two scintillators, CsI and CdWO4. The custom inspection system is composed of two equipments: 950 keV X-band Linac and two-fold scintillator and they are operated simulating real situation such as baggage check in an airport. We will show you the results of experiment which was performed with metal samples: iron and lead as targets in several conditions.

  2. Improved fabrication techniques for infrared bolometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, A. E.; Mcbride, S. E.; Richards, P. L.; Haller, E. E.; Kreysa, E.

    1983-01-01

    Ion implantation and sputter metallization are used to produce ohmic electrical contacts to Ge:Ga chips. The method is shown to give a high yield of small monolithic bolometers with very little low-frequency noise. It is noted that when one of the chips is used as the thermometric element of a composite bolometer it must be bonded to a dielectric substrate. The thermal resistance of the conventional epoxy bond is measured and found to be undesirably large. A procedure for soldering the chip to a metallized portion of the substrate in such a way as to reduce this resistance is outlined. An evaluation is made of the contribution of the metal film absorber to the heat capacity of a composite bolometer. It is found that the heat capacity of a NiCr absorber at 1.3 K can dominate the bolometer performance. A Bi absorber possesses significantly lower heat capacity. A low-temperature blackbody calibrator is built to measure the optical responsivity of bolometers. A composite bolometer system with a throughput of approximately 0.1 sr sq cm is constructed using the new techniques. The noise in this bolometer is white above 2.5 Hz and is slightly below the value predicted by thermodynamic equilibrium theory.

  3. Submillimeter Bolometer Array for the CSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ning; Hunter, T. R.; Benford, D. J.; Phillips, T. G.

    We are building a bolometer array for use as a submillimeter continuum camera for the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) located on Mauna Kea. This effort is a collaboration with Moseley et al. at Goddard Space Flight Center, who have developed the technique for fabricating monolithic bolometer arrays on Si wafers, as well as a sophisticated data taking system to use with these arrays (Moseley et al. 1984). Our primary goal is to construct a camera with 1x24 bolometer pixels operating at 350 and 450 microns using a 3He refrigerator. The monolithic bolometer arrays are fabricated using the techniques of photolithography and micromachining. Each pixel of the array is suspended by four thin Si legs 2 mm long and 12x14 square microns in cross section. These thin legs, obtained by wet Si etching, provide the weak thermal link between the bolometer pixel and the heat sink. A thermistor is formed on each bolometer pixel by P implantation compensated with 50% B. The bolometer array to be used for the camera will have a pixel size of 1x2 square millimeters, which is about half of the CSO beam size at a wavelength of 400 microns. We plan to use mirrors to focus the beam onto the pixels intead of Winston cones. In order to eliminate background radiation from warm surroundings reaching the bolometers, cold baffles will be inserted along the beam passages. To increase the bolometer absorption to radiation, a thin metal film will be deposited on the back of each bolometer pixel. It has been demonstrated that a proper impedance match of the bolometer element can increase the bolometer absorption efficiency to about 50% (Clarke et al., 1978). The use of baffle approach to illumination will make it easier for us to expand to more pixels in the future. The first stage amplification will be performed with cold FETs, connected to each bolometer pixel. Signals from each bolometer will be digitized using a 16 bit A/D with differential inputs. The digitizing frequency will be up to

  4. Semiconductor Bolometers Give Background-Limited Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goebel, John; McMurray, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Semiconductor bolometers that are capable of detecting electromagnetic radiation over most or all of the infrared spectrum and that give background-limited performance at operating temperatures from 20 to 300 K have been invented. The term background-limited performance as applied to a bolometer, thermopile, or other infrared detector signifies that the ability to detect infrared signals that originate outside the detector is limited primarily by thermal noise attributable to the background radiation generated external to the bolometer. The signal-to-noise ratios and detectivities of the bolometers and thermopiles available prior to this invention have been lower than those needed for background-limited performance by factors of about 100 and 10, respectively. Like other electrically resistive bolometers, a device according to the invention exhibits an increase in electrical resistance when heated by infrared radiation. Depending on whether the device is operated under the customary constant- current or constant-voltage bias, the increase in electrical resistance can be measured in terms of an increase in voltage across the device or a decrease in current through the device, respectively. In the case of a semiconductor bolometer, it is necessary to filter out visible and shorter-wavelength light that could induce photoconductivity and thereby counteract all or part of the desired infrared- induced increase in resistance. The basic semiconductor material of a bolometer according to the invention is preferably silicon doped with one or more of a number of elements, each of which confers a different variable temperature coefficient of resistance. Suitable dopants include In, Ga, S, Se, Te, B, Al, As, P, and Sb. The concentration of dopant preferably lies in the range between 0.1 and 1,000 parts per billion.

  5. Array of Bolometers for Submillimeter- Wavelength Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bock, James; Turner, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    A feed-horn-coupled monolithic array of micromesh bolometers is undergoing development for use in a photometric camera. The array is designed for conducting astrophysical observations in a wavelength band centered at 350 m. The bolometers are improved versions of previously developed bolometers comprising metalized Si3N4 micromesh radiation absorbers coupled with neutron- transmutation-doped Ge thermistors. Incident radiation heats the absorbers above a base temperature, changing the electrical resistance of each thermistor. In the present array of improved bolometers (see figure), the thermistors are attached to the micromesh absorbers by indium bump bonds and are addressed by use of lithographed, vapor-deposited electrical leads. This architecture reduces the heat capacity and minimizes the thermal conductivity to 1/20 and 1/300, respectively, of earlier versions of these detectors, with consequent improvement in sensitivity and speed of response. The micromesh bolometers, intended to operate under an optical background set by thermal emission from an ambient-temperature space-borne telescope, are designed such that the random arrival of photons ("photon noise") dominates the noise sources arising from the detector and readout electronics. The micromesh is designed to be a highly thermally and optically efficient absorber with a limiting response time of about 100 s. The absorber and thermistor heat capacity are minimized in order to give rapid speed of response. Due to the minimization of the absorber volume, the dominant source of heat capacity arises from the thermistor.

  6. Performance of new handheld IR camera using uncooled bolometer FPA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sone, Takanori; Ohkawa, Norio; Kawashima, Yasuo; Matsui, Yasuji; Sugiura, Yosuke; Araki, Tomiharu; Kamozawa, Makoto; Ueno, Masashi; Kaneda, Osamu; Ishikawa, Tomohiro; Hata, Hisatoshi; Hashima, Kazuo; Nakagi, Yoshiyuki; Yamada, Akira; Kimata, Masafumi

    1996-06-01

    A camera using an uncooled infrared image sensor has been developed. This image sensor is a bolometer focal plane array (FPA), of which the readout circuit is designed to minimize the temperature drift or the pattern noise caused by the changes of the ambient temperature. The circuit has a bolometer for the load resistor, which has the same temperature coefficient of resistance as that of the pixel bolometer. Therefore the signal change induced by the temperature change of the FPA substrate is reduced because the resistance change of the load bolometer compensates for that of the pixel bolometer. The effectiveness of the drift- compensating circuit has been confirmed with a prototype handheld camera.

  7. Characterising the SCUBA-2 superconducting bolometer arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bintley, Dan; MacIntosh, Michael J.; Holland, Wayne S.; Friberg, Per; Walther, Craig; Atkinson, David; Kelly, Dennis; Gao, Xiaofeng; Ade, Peter A. R.; Grainger, William; House, Julian; Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Hollister, Matthew I.; Woodcraft, Adam; Dunare, Camelia; Parkes, William; Walton, Anthony J.; Irwin, Kent D.; Hilton, Gene C.; Niemack, Michael; Reintsema, Carl D.; Amiri, Mandana; Burger, Bryce; Halpern, Mark; Hasselfield, Matthew; Hill, Jeff; Kycia, J. B.; Mugford, C. G. A.; Persaud, Lauren

    2010-07-01

    SCUBA-2 is a state of the art 10,000 pixel submillimeter camera installed and being commissioned at the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) providing wide-field simultaneous imaging at wavelengths of 450 and 850 microns. At each wavelength there are four 32 by 40 sub-arrays of superconducting Transition Edge Sensor (TES) bolometers, each packaged with inline SQUID multiplexed readout and amplifier. In this paper we present the results of characterising individual 1280 bolometer science grade sub-arrays, both in a dedicated 50mk dilution refrigerator test facility and in the instrument installed at the JCMT.

  8. The ITER bolometer diagnostic: status and plans.

    PubMed

    Meister, H; Giannone, L; Horton, L D; Raupp, G; Zeidner, W; Grunda, G; Kalvin, S; Fischer, U; Serikov, A; Stickel, S; Reichle, R

    2008-10-01

    A consortium consisting of four EURATOM Associations has been set up to develop the project plan for the full development of the ITER bolometer diagnostic and to continue urgent R&D activities. An overview of the current status is given, including detector development, line-of-sight optimization, performance analysis as well as the design of the diagnostic components and their integration in ITER. This is complemented by the presentation of plans for future activities required to successfully implement the bolometer diagnostic, ranging from the detector development over diagnostic design and prototype testing to RH tools for calibration. PMID:19044656

  9. Optimization of the Performance of Segmented Scintillators for Radiotherapy Imaging through Novel Binning Techniques

    PubMed Central

    El-Mohri, Youcef; Antonuk, Larry E.; Choroszucha, Richard B.; Zhao, Qihua; Jiang, Hao; Liu, Langechuan

    2014-01-01

    Thick, segmented crystalline scintillators have shown increasing promise as replacement x-ray converters for the phosphor screens currently used in active matrix flat-panel imagers (AMFPIs) in radiotherapy, by virtue of providing over an order of magnitude improvement in the DQE. However, element-to-element misalignment in current segmented scintillator prototypes creates a challenge for optimal registration with underlying AMFPI arrays, resulting in degradation of spatial resolution. To overcome this challenge, a methodology involving the use of a relatively high resolution AMFPI array in combination with novel binning techniques is presented. The array, which has a pixel pitch of 0.127 mm, was coupled to prototype segmented scintillators based on BGO, LYSO and CsI:Tl materials, each having a nominal element-to-element pitch of 1.016 mm and thickness of ~1 cm. The AMFPI systems incorporating these prototypes were characterized at a radiotherapy energy of 6 MV in terms of MTF, NPS, DQE, and reconstructed images of a resolution phantom acquired using a cone-beam CT geometry. For each prototype, the application of 8×8 pixel binning to achieve a sampling pitch of 1.016 mm was optimized through use of an alignment metric which minimized misregistration and thereby improved spatial resolution. In addition, the application of alternative binning techniques that exclude the collection of signal near septal walls resulted in further significant improvement in spatial resolution for the BGO and LYSO prototypes, though not for the CsI:Tl prototype due to the large amount of optical cross-talk resulting from significant light spread between scintillator elements in that device. The efficacy of these techniques for improving spatial resolution appears to be enhanced for scintillator materials that exhibit mechanical hardness, high density and high refractive index, such as BGO. Moreover, materials that exhibit these properties as well as offer significantly higher light

  10. Optimization of the performance of segmented scintillators for radiotherapy imaging through novel binning techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Mohri, Youcef; Antonuk, Larry E.; Choroszucha, Richard B.; Zhao, Qihua; Jiang, Hao; Liu, Langechuan

    2014-02-01

    Thick, segmented crystalline scintillators have shown increasing promise as replacement x-ray converters for the phosphor screens currently used in active matrix flat-panel imagers (AMFPIs) in radiotherapy, by virtue of providing over an order of magnitude improvement in the detective quantum efficiency (DQE). However, element-to-element misalignment in current segmented scintillator prototypes creates a challenge for optimal registration with underlying AMFPI arrays, resulting in degradation of spatial resolution. To overcome this challenge, a methodology involving the use of a relatively high resolution AMFPI array in combination with novel binning techniques is presented. The array, which has a pixel pitch of 0.127 mm, was coupled to prototype segmented scintillators based on BGO, LYSO and CsI:Tl materials, each having a nominal element-to-element pitch of 1.016 mm and thickness of ∼1 cm. The AMFPI systems incorporating these prototypes were characterized at a radiotherapy energy of 6 MV in terms of modulation transfer function, noise power spectrum, DQE, and reconstructed images of a resolution phantom acquired using a cone-beam CT geometry. For each prototype, the application of 8 × 8 pixel binning to achieve a sampling pitch of 1.016 mm was optimized through use of an alignment metric which minimized misregistration and thereby improved spatial resolution. In addition, the application of alternative binning techniques that exclude the collection of signal near septal walls resulted in further significant improvement in spatial resolution for the BGO and LYSO prototypes, though not for the CsI:Tl prototype due to the large amount of optical cross-talk resulting from significant light spread between scintillator elements in that device. The efficacy of these techniques for improving spatial resolution appears to be enhanced for scintillator materials that exhibit mechanical hardness, high density and high refractive index, such as BGO. Moreover, materials

  11. Optimization of the performance of segmented scintillators for radiotherapy imaging through novel binning techniques.

    PubMed

    El-Mohri, Youcef; Antonuk, Larry E; Choroszucha, Richard B; Zhao, Qihua; Jiang, Hao; Liu, Langechuan

    2014-02-21

    Thick, segmented crystalline scintillators have shown increasing promise as replacement x-ray converters for the phosphor screens currently used in active matrix flat-panel imagers (AMFPIs) in radiotherapy, by virtue of providing over an order of magnitude improvement in the detective quantum efficiency (DQE). However, element-to-element misalignment in current segmented scintillator prototypes creates a challenge for optimal registration with underlying AMFPI arrays, resulting in degradation of spatial resolution. To overcome this challenge, a methodology involving the use of a relatively high resolution AMFPI array in combination with novel binning techniques is presented. The array, which has a pixel pitch of 0.127 mm, was coupled to prototype segmented scintillators based on BGO, LYSO and CsI:Tl materials, each having a nominal element-to-element pitch of 1.016 mm and thickness of ∼ 1 cm. The AMFPI systems incorporating these prototypes were characterized at a radiotherapy energy of 6 MV in terms of modulation transfer function, noise power spectrum, DQE, and reconstructed images of a resolution phantom acquired using a cone-beam CT geometry. For each prototype, the application of 8 × 8 pixel binning to achieve a sampling pitch of 1.016 mm was optimized through use of an alignment metric which minimized misregistration and thereby improved spatial resolution. In addition, the application of alternative binning techniques that exclude the collection of signal near septal walls resulted in further significant improvement in spatial resolution for the BGO and LYSO prototypes, though not for the CsI:Tl prototype due to the large amount of optical cross-talk resulting from significant light spread between scintillator elements in that device. The efficacy of these techniques for improving spatial resolution appears to be enhanced for scintillator materials that exhibit mechanical hardness, high density and high refractive index, such as BGO. Moreover, materials

  12. Multimode Bolometer Development for the PIXIE Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagler, Peter C.; Crowley, Kevin T.; Denis, Kevin L.; Devasia, Archana M.; Fixsen, Dale J.; Kogut, Alan J.; Manos, George; Porter, Scott; Stevenson, Thomas R.

    2016-01-01

    The Primordial Inflation Explorer (PIXIE) is an Explorer-class mission concept designed to measure the polarization and absolute intensity of the cosmic microwave background. In the following, we report on the design, fabrication, and performance of the multimode polarization-sensitive bolometers for PIXIE, which are based on silicon thermistors. In particular we focus on several recent advances in the detector design, including the implementation of a scheme to greatly raise the frequencies of the internal vibrational modes of the large-area, low-mass optical absorber structure consisting of a grid of micromachined, ion-implanted silicon wires. With approximately 30 times the absorbing area of the spider-web bolometers used by Planck, the tensioning scheme enables the PIXIE bolometers to be robust in the vibrational and acoustic environment at launch of the space mission. More generally, it could be used to reduce microphonic sensitivity in other types of low temperature detectors. We also report on the performance of the PIXIE bolometers in a dark cryogenic environment.

  13. High-temperature-superconducting magnetic susceptibility bolometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brasunas, J.; Lakew, B.; Lee, C.

    1992-01-01

    An infrared detector called the magnetic susceptibility bolometer is introduced which is based on the tmperature dependence of the diamagnetic screening of a high-Tc superconductor film near Tc. Results are reported for the response of a prototype model to modulated blackbody radiation. Possible improvements are discussed as is the potential sensitivity of an improved device.

  14. SCINTILLATION SPECTROMETER

    DOEpatents

    Bell, P.R.; Francis, J.E.

    1960-06-21

    A portable scintillation spectrometer is described which is especially useful in radio-biological studies for determining the uptake and distribution of gamma -emitting substances in tissue. The spectrometer includes a collimator having a plurality of apertures that are hexagonal in cross section. Two crystals are provided: one is activated to respond to incident rays from the collimator; the other is not activated and shields the first from external radiation.

  15. Plastic scintillation dosimetry: Optimal selection of scintillating fibers and scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Archambault, Louis; Arsenault, Jean; Gingras, Luc; Sam Beddar, A.; Roy, Rene; Beaulieu, Luc

    2005-07-15

    Scintillation dosimetry is a promising avenue for evaluating dose patterns delivered by intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans or for the small fields involved in stereotactic radiosurgery. However, the increase in signal has been the goal for many authors. In this paper, a comparison is made between plastic scintillating fibers and plastic scintillator. The collection of scintillation light was measured experimentally for four commercial models of scintillating fibers (BCF-12, BCF-60, SCSF-78, SCSF-3HF) and two models of plastic scintillators (BC-400, BC-408). The emission spectra of all six scintillators were obtained by using an optical spectrum analyzer and they were compared with theoretical behavior. For scintillation in the blue region, the signal intensity of a singly clad scintillating fiber (BCF-12) was 120% of that of the plastic scintillator (BC-400). For the multiclad fiber (SCSF-78), the signal reached 144% of that of the plastic scintillator. The intensity of the green scintillating fibers was lower than that of the plastic scintillator: 47% for the singly clad fiber (BCF-60) and 77% for the multiclad fiber (SCSF-3HF). The collected light was studied as a function of the scintillator length and radius for a cylindrical probe. We found that symmetric detectors with nearly the same spatial resolution in each direction (2 mm in diameter by 3 mm in length) could be made with a signal equivalent to those of the more commonly used asymmetric scintillators. With augmentation of the signal-to-noise ratio in consideration, this paper presents a series of comparisons that should provide insight into selection of a scintillator type and volume for development of a medical dosimeter.

  16. A 65 nm CMOS LNA for Bolometer Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Tom Nan; Boon, Chirn Chye; Zhu, Forest Xi; Yi, Xiang; He, Xiaofeng; Feng, Guangyin; Lim, Wei Meng; Liu, Bei

    2016-04-01

    Modern bolometers generally consist of large-scale arrays of detectors. Implemented in conventional technologies, such bolometer arrays suffer from integrability and productivity issues. Recently, the development of CMOS technologies has presented an opportunity for the massive production of high-performance and highly integrated bolometers. This paper presents a 65-nm CMOS LNA designed for a millimeter-wave bolometer's pre-amplification stage. By properly applying some positive feedback, the noise figure of the proposed LNA is minimized at under 6 dB and the bandwidth is extended to 30 GHz.

  17. The Dielectric Bolometer, A New Type of Thermal Radiation Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanel, R. A.

    1960-01-01

    Thermal detectors for the infrared, such as thermocouples and bolometers, are limited in their ultimate sensitivity predominantly by Johnson noise rather than temperature noise. Low noise figures are hard to achieve since Johnson noise preponderates temperature noise, which is the only essential noise for thermal detectors. The dielectric constants of some materials are sufficiently temperature dependent to make a new type of bolometer feasible. The basic theory of a dielectric bolometer, as shown here, promises noise figures below 3 decibels even at chopper frequencies well above the 1/tau value of the detector. Ferroelectrics such as barium-strontium titanate and others seem to be well suited for radiation-cooled dielectric bolometers.

  18. Testing of 100 mK bolometers for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, A. G.; Ade, P. A. R.; Bhatia, R. S.; Griffin, M. J.; Maffei, B.; Nartallo, R.; Beeman, J. W.; Bock, J.; Lange, A.; DelCastillo, H.

    1996-01-01

    Electrical and optical performance data are presented for a prototype 100 mK spider-web bolometer operating under very low photon backgrounds. These data are compared with the bolometer theory and are used to estimate the expected sensitivity of such a detector used for low background space astronomy. The results demonstrate that the sensitivity and speed of response requirements of the bolometer instruments proposed for these missions can be met by 100 mK spider-web bolometers using neutron transmutation doped germanium as the temperature sensitive element.

  19. A Compact, Modular Superconducting Bolometer Array Package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, Dominic J.

    2008-01-01

    We have designed a detector package to house a superconducting bolometer array, SQUID multiplexers, bias and integration circuitry, optical filtering, electrical connectors, and thermal/mechanical interfaces. This package has been used successfully in the GISMO 2mm camera, a 128-pixel camera operating at a base temperature of 270mK. Operation at lower temperatures is allowed by providing direct heat sinking to the SQUIDS and bias resistors, which generate the bulk of the dissipation in the package. Standard electrical connectors provide reliable contact while enabling quick installation and removal of the package. Careful design has gone into the compensation for differing thermal expansions, the need for heat sinking of the bolometer array, and the placement of magnetic shielding in critical areas. In this presentation, we detail the design and performance of this detector package and describe its scalability to 1280- pixel arrays in the near future.

  20. Gold absorbing film for a composite bolometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dragovan, M.; Moseley, S. H.

    1984-01-01

    The principles governing the design of metal films are reviewed, with attention also given to the choice of metals. A description is then given of the characteristics of a bolometer with a gold absorbing film. It is demonstrated that gold is effective as an absorbing film for a millimeter bolometer operated at 1.5 K. At 1.5 K, gold is significantly better than bismuth since gold has a lower heat capacity for the absorbing film. At 0.3 K, gold and bismuth are both suitable. It is pointed out that at temperatures below 0.3 K, a superconducting absorbing film can have a heat capacity low enough not to dominate the heat capacity of the detector; for this reason, it may give better performance than a nonsuperconducting absorbing film.

  1. A monolithic bolometer array suitable for FIRST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bock, J. J.; LeDuc, H. G.; Lange, A. E.; Zmuidzinas, J.

    1997-01-01

    The development of arrays of infrared bolometers that are suitable for use in the Far Infrared and Submillimeter Telescope (FIRST) mission is reported. The array architecture is based on the silicon nitride micromesh bolometer currently baselined for use in the case of the Planck mission. This architecture allows each pixel to be efficiently coupled to one or both polarizations and to one or more spatial models of radiation. Micromesh structures are currently being developed, coupled with transistor-edge sensors and read out by a SQUID amplifier. If these devices are successful, then the relatively large cooling power available at 300 mK may enable a SQUID-based multiplexer to be integrated on the same wafer as the array, creating a monolithic, fully multiplexed, 2D array with relatively few connections to the sub-Kelvin stage.

  2. Massive composite bolometers for dark matter detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coron, N.; Artzner, G.; Leblanc, J.; Jegoudez, G.; de Marcillac, P.

    Massive composite bolometers cooled below 100 mK can detect recoil energy of particles with a very high efficiency. By using different absorber materials, some identification of dark matter particles will be possible. Resolutions in the 10 eV range for 1 kg of absorber are theoretically possible at 10 mK if the thermistor is well matched to the substrate (for the heat capacity) and to the electronics (for the impedance). A 25-gram sapphire bolometer at 100 mK obtain on a 60 KeV gamma line a 16/KeV FWHM resolution limited by extraneous noise. Bolometric spectra of radioactivity and cosmic-ray background obtained at sea level are presented.

  3. Fabrication of sensitive high Tc bolometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahum, Michael; Verghese, S.; Hu, Qing; Richards, Paul L.; Char, K.; Newman, N.; Sachtjen, Scott A.

    1990-01-01

    The rapid change of resistance with temperature of high quality films of high T sub c superconductors can be used to make resistance thermometers with very low temperature noise. Measurements on c-axis yttrium barium copper oxide (YBCO) films have given a spectral intensity of temperature noise less than 4 times 10(exp -8) K/Hz(exp 1/2) at 10 Hz. Consequently, the opportunity exists to make useful bolometric infrared detectors that operate near 90 K which can be cooled with liquid nitrogen. The fabrication and measurement of two bolometer architectures are discussed. The first is a conventional bolometer which consists of a 3000 A thick YBCO film deposited in situ by laser ablation on top of a 500 A thick SrTiO3 thickness and diced into 1x1 mm(exp 2) bolometer chips. Gold black smoke was used as the radiation absorber. The voltage noise was less than the amplifier noise when the film was current biased. Optical measurements gave an NEP of 5 times 10(exp -11) W/Hz(exp 1/2) at 10 Hz. The second architecture is that of an antenna-coupled microbolometer which consists of a small (5x10 cubic microns) YBCO film deposited directly on a bulk substrate with a low thermal conductance (YSZ) and an impedance matched planar lithographed spiral or log-periodic antenna. This structure is produced by standard photolithographic techniques. Measurements gave an electrical NEP of 4.7 times 10(exp -12) W/Hz(exp 1/2) at 10 kHz. Measurements of the optical efficiency are in progress. The measured performance of both bolometers will be compared to other detectors operating at or above liquid nitrogen temperatures so as to identify potential applications.

  4. Performances of a large mass ZnSe bolometer to search for rare events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beeman, J. W.; Bellini, F.; Cardani, L.; Casali, N.; Dafinei, I.; Di Domizio, S.; Ferroni, F.; Gironi, L.; Giuliani, A.; Nagorny, S.; Orio, F.; Pattavina, L.; Pessina, G.; Piperno, G.; Pirro, S.; Previtali, E.; Rusconi, C.; Tomei, C.; Vignati, M.

    2013-05-01

    Scintillating bolometers of ZnSe are the baseline choice of the LUCIFER experiment, whose aim is to observe the neutrinoless double beta decay of 82Se. The independent read-out of the heat and scintillation signals allows to identify and reject α particle interactions, the dominant background source for bolometric detectors. In this paper we report the performances of a ZnSe crystal operated within the LUCIFER R&D. We measured the scintillation yield, the energy resolution and the background in the energy region where the signal from 0νDBD decay of 82Se is expected with an exposure of 9.4 kg·days. With a newly developed analysis algorithm we improved the rejection of α events, and we estimated the increase in energy resolution obtained by the combination of the heat and light signals. For the first time we measured the light emitted by nuclear recoils, and found it to be compatible with zero. We conclude that the discrimination of nuclear recoils from β/γ interactions in the WIMPs energy region is possible, but low-noise light detectors are needed.

  5. Silicon nitride Micromesh Bolometer Array for Submillimeter Astrophysics.

    PubMed

    Turner, A D; Bock, J J; Beeman, J W; Glenn, J; Hargrave, P C; Hristov, V V; Nguyen, H T; Rahman, F; Sethuraman, S; Woodcraft, A L

    2001-10-01

    We present the design and performance of a feedhorn-coupled bolometer array intended for a sensitive 350-mum photometer camera. Silicon nitride micromesh absorbers minimize the suspended mass and heat capacity of the bolometers. The temperature transducers, neutron-transmutation-doped Ge thermistors, are attached to the absorber with In bump bonds. Vapor-deposited electrical leads address the thermistors and determine the thermal conductance of the bolometers. The bolometer array demonstrates a dark noise-equivalent power of 2.9 x 10(-17) W/ radicalHz and a mean heat capacity of 1.3 pJ/K at 390 mK. We measure the optical efficiency of the bolometer and feedhorn to be 0.45-0.65 by comparing the response to blackbody calibration sources. The bolometer array demonstrates theoretical noise performance arising from the photon and the phonon and Johnson noise, with photon noise dominant under the design background conditions. We measure the ratio of total noise to photon noise to be 1.21 under an absorbed optical power of 2.4 pW. Excess noise is negligible for audio frequencies as low as 30 mHz. We summarize the trade-offs between bare and feedhorn-coupled detectors and discuss the estimated performance limits of micromesh bolometers. The bolometer array demonstrates the sensitivity required for photon noise-limited performance from a spaceborne, passively cooled telescope. PMID:18364768

  6. Approaches on calibration of bolometer and establishment of bolometer calibration device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Ming; Gao, Jianqiang; Ye, Jun'an; Xia, Junwen; Yin, Dejin; Li, Tiecheng; Zhang, Dong

    2015-10-01

    Bolometer is mainly used for measuring thermal radiation in the field of public places, labor hygiene, heating and ventilation and building energy conservation. The working principle of bolometer is under the exposure of thermal radiation, temperature of black absorbing layer of detector rise after absorption of thermal radiation, which makes the electromotive force produced by thermoelectric. The white light reflective layer of detector does not absorb thermal radiation, so the electromotive force produced by thermoelectric is almost zero. A comparison of electromotive force produced by thermoelectric of black absorbing layer and white reflective layer can eliminate the influence of electric potential produced by the basal background temperature change. After the electromotive force which produced by thermal radiation is processed by the signal processing unit, the indication displays through the indication display unit. The measurement unit of thermal radiation intensity is usually W/m2 or kW/m2. Its accurate and reliable value has important significance for high temperature operation, labor safety and hygiene grading management. Bolometer calibration device is mainly composed of absolute radiometer, the reference light source, electric measuring instrument. Absolute radiometer is a self-calibration type radiometer. Its working principle is using the electric power which can be accurately measured replaces radiation power to absolutely measure the radiation power. Absolute radiometer is the standard apparatus of laser low power standard device, the measurement traceability is guaranteed. Using the calibration method of comparison, the absolute radiometer and bolometer measure the reference light source in the same position alternately which can get correction factor of irradiance indication. This paper is mainly about the design and calibration method of the bolometer calibration device. The uncertainty of the calibration result is also evaluated.

  7. Preparing the Alcator C bolometer system for use on MTX (Microwave Tokamak Experiment)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinak, Marty

    1988-02-01

    The Alcator C bolometer array has been modified to be compatible with electron cyclotron heating on the Microwave Tokamak Experiment. Fine wire mesh screens are mounted on the front of the bolometer collimator tubes to attenuate microwave heating of the bolometers. Structural changes eliminate openings in the seams of the bolometer housing, which represent pathways for microwaves to enter the system. This paper outlines the operational principles of the bolometer system, discusses the measured and predicted performance characteristics of the bolometer array, and includes a concise guide to the operation of the bolometer controller.

  8. Cosmic-ray backgrounds in infrared bolometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nolt, I. G.; Radostitz, J. V.; Carlotti, M.; Carli, B.; Mencaraglia, F.

    1985-01-01

    Model calculations for the production of cosmic ray events in IR detectors by energy impulses due to fast charged particles' ionization trails are presently compared to the pulse-amplitude spectrum observed from a balloon at an altitude of 38 km. The results are pertinent to the current understanding of cosmic ray backgrounds found in all high sensitivity bolometer applications. The observed signal transients are in all details consistent with the modeling of known cosmic charged particle flux characteristics and with the detector response. Generally, the optics design should minimize detector/substrate cross section.

  9. An adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator for infrared bolometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britt, R. D.; Richards, P. L.

    1981-01-01

    Adiabatic demagnetization refrigerators have been built and installed in small portable liquid helium cryostats to test the feasibility of this method of cooling infrared bolometric detectors to temperatures below 0.3 K. Performance has been achieved which suggests that bolometer temperatures of 0.2 K can be maintained for periods of approximately 60 hours. Applications to sensitive infrared detection from ground-based telescopes and space satellites are discussed. Design data are given which permit the evaluation of refrigerator performance for a variety of design parameters.

  10. Neutron-transmutation-doped germanium bolometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaio, N. P.; Rodder, M.; Haller, E. E.; Kreysa, E.

    1983-01-01

    Six slices of ultra-pure germanium were irradiated with thermal neutron fluences between 7.5 x 10 to the 16th and 1.88 x 10 to the 18th per sq cm. After thermal annealing the resistivity was measured down to low temperatures (less than 4.2 K) and found to follow the relationship rho = rho sub 0 exp(Delta/T) in the hopping conduction regime. Also, several junction FETs were tested for noise performance at room temperature and in an insulating housing in a 4.2 K cryostat. These FETs will be used as first stage amplifiers for neutron-transmutation-doped germanium bolometers.

  11. Rejection of Alpha Surface Background in Non-scintillating Bolometric Detectors: The ABSuRD Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biassoni, M.; Brofferio, C.; Bucci, C.; Canonica, L.; di Vacri, M. L.; Gorla, P.; Pavan, M.; Yeh, M.

    2016-08-01

    Due to their excellent energy resolution values and the vast choice of possible materials, bolometric detectors are currently widely used in the physics of rare events. A limiting aspect for bolometers rises from their inability to discriminate among radiation types or surface from bulk events. It has been demonstrated that the main limitation to sensitivity for purely bolometric detectors is represented by surface alpha contaminations, causing a continuous background that cannot be discriminated. A new scintillation-based technique for the rejection of surface alpha background in non-scintillating bolometric experiments is proposed in this work. The idea is to combine a scintillating and a high sensitivity photon detector with a non-scintillating absorber. We present results showing the possibility to reject events due to alpha decay at or nearby the surface of the crystal.

  12. Characteristics of a custom integrated bolometer array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Paul J.; Duggan, Philip; Pope, Timothy D.; Sinclair, Peter M.; Soffer, Raymond; Evstigneev, Alexander; Zackodnick, Nadine; George, Matthew

    1998-11-01

    Integration of detector arrays and digital CMOS circuitry can confer significant performance improvements on an imaging system. In this paper we present an integrated sensor array based on (Figure 1), micro bolometer (MB) elements deposited on a CMOS substrate containing electronics for random access readout, amplification, gain and offset control and digitization. Such integrated MB arrays are effective components in a novel implementation of an earth-horizon attitude sensor for satellites. The bolometer elements are used to distinguish the earth's thermal IR from the space background. For this application, the reduced detectivity of MB arrays compared with cooled IR detectors can be tolerated. Low mass, enhanced reliability, and low power consumption are gained by using an uncooled IR detector, and by using an integrated circuit design. These considerations are especially important for microsatellites. The low cost per array facilitates the use of multiple arrays, which allows significant flexibility in the optical and systems designs. The integrated chip design allows for random-access readout, on-chip gain and offset compensation and local control of pixel geometry, which contribute to the overall system effectiveness and help to allay any performance reductions that come from reduced detectivity.

  13. Amorphous silicon bolometer for fire/rescue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francisco, Glenn L.

    2001-03-01

    Thermal imaging sensors have completely changed the way the world views fire and rescue applications. Recently, in the uncooled infrared camera and microbolometer detector areas, major strides have been made in manufacturing personal fire and rescue sensors. A family of new amorphous silicon microbolometers are being produced utilizing low cost, low weight, ultra low power, small size, high volume vacuum packaged silicon wafer-level focal plane array technologies. These bolometers contain no choppers or thermoelectric coolers, require no manual calibration and use readily available commercial off-the-shelf components. Manufacturing and packaging discoveries have allowed infrared sensitive silicon arrays to be produced with the same methods that have driven the rapidly advancing digital wireless telecommunications industries. Fire and rescue professionals are now able to conduct minimum time thermal imaging penetration, surveillance, detection, recognition, rescue and egress while maintaining situational awareness in a manner consistent with the modern technological applications. The purpose of this paper is to describe an uncooled micro bolometer infrared camera approach for meeting fire/rescue wants, needs and requirements, with application of recent technology advancements. This paper also details advances in bolometric focal plane arrays, optical and circuit card technologies, while providing a glimpse into the future of micro sensor growth. Technical barriers are addressed in light of constraints and lessons learned around this technology.

  14. Scintillators and applications thereof

    DOEpatents

    Williams, Richard T.

    2014-07-15

    Scintillators of various constructions and methods of making and using the same are provided. In some embodiments, a scintillator comprises at least one radiation absorption region and at least one spatially discrete radiative exciton recombination region.

  15. Scintillators and applications thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Richard T.

    2015-09-01

    Scintillators of various constructions and methods of making and using the same are provided. In some embodiments, a scintillator comprises at least one radiation absorption region and at least one spatially discrete radiative exciton recombination region.

  16. BoA: a versatile software for bolometer data reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuller, Frédéric

    2012-09-01

    Together with the development of the Large APEX Bolometer Camera (LABOCA) for the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX), a new data reduction package has been written. This software naturally interfaces with the telescope control system, and provides all functionalities for the reduction, analysis and visualization of bolometer data. It is used at APEX for real time processing of observations performed with LABOCA and other bolometer arrays, providing feedback to the observer. Written in an easy-to-script language, BoA is also used offline to reduce APEX continuum data. In this paper, the general structure of this software is presented, and its online and offline capabilities are described.

  17. Antenna-coupled arrays of voltage-biased superconducting bolometers

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, Michael J.; Lee, Adrian T.; Richards, P.L.; Schwan, D.; Skidmore, J.T.; Smith, A.D.; Spieler, H.; Yoon, Jongsoo

    2001-07-23

    We report on the development of antenna-coupled Voltage-biased Superconducting Bolometers (VSBs) which use Transition-edge Sensors (TES). Antenna coupling can greatly simplify the fabrication of large multi-frequency bolometer arrays compared to horn-coupled techniques. This simplification can make it practical to implement 1000+ element arrays that fill the focal plane of mm/sub-mm wave telescopes. We have designed a prototype device with a double-slot dipole antenna, integrated band-defining filters, and a membrane-suspended bolometer. A test chip has been constructed and will be tested shortly.

  18. Investigation of electrical noise in selenium-immersed thermistor bolometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarpley, J. L.; Sarmiento, P. D.

    1980-01-01

    The selenium immersed, thermistor bolometer, IR detector failed due to spurious and escalating electrical noise outburst as a function of time at elevated temperatures during routine ground based testing in a space simulated environment. Spectrographic analysis of failed bolometers revealed selenium pure zones in the insulating selenium arsenic (Se-As) glass film which surrounds the active sintered Mn, Ni, Co oxide flake. The selenium pure film was identified as a potentially serious failure mechanism. Significant changes were instituted in the manufacturing techniques along with more stringent process controls which eliminated the selenium pure film and successfully produced 22study bolometers.

  19. Lead carbonate scintillator materials

    DOEpatents

    Derenzo, Stephen E.; Moses, William W.

    1991-01-01

    Improved radiation detectors containing lead carbonate or basic lead carbonate as the scintillator element are disclosed. Both of these scintillators have been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to other known scintillator materials. The radiation detectors disclosed are favorably suited for use in general purpose detection and in medical uses.

  20. Scintillator materials for calorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, M.J.

    1994-09-01

    Requirements for fast, dense scintillator materials for calorimetry in high energy physics and approaches to satisfying these requirements are reviewed with respect to possible hosts and luminescent species. Special attention is given to cerium-activated crystals, core-valence luminescence, and glass scintillators. The present state of the art, limitations, and suggestions for possible new scintillator materials are presented.

  1. Scintillator manufacture at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Mellott, K.; Bross, A.; Pla-Dalmau, A.

    1998-08-01

    A decade of research into plastic scintillation materials at Fermilab is reviewed. Early work with plastic optical fiber fabrication is revisited and recent experiments with large-scale commercial methods for production of bulk scintillator are discussed. Costs for various forms of scintillator are examined and new development goals including cost reduction methods and quality improvement techniques are suggested.

  2. Scintillator reflective layer coextrusion

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, Jae-Chul; Para, Adam

    2001-01-01

    A polymeric scintillator has a reflective layer adhered to the exterior surface thereof. The reflective layer comprises a reflective pigment and an adhesive binder. The adhesive binder includes polymeric material from which the scintillator is formed. A method of forming the polymeric scintillator having a reflective layer adhered to the exterior surface thereof is also provided. The method includes the steps of (a) extruding an inner core member from a first amount of polymeric scintillator material, and (b) coextruding an outer reflective layer on the exterior surface of the inner core member. The outer reflective layer comprises a reflective pigment and a second amount of the polymeric scintillator material.

  3. Focal Plane Arrays of Voltage-Biased Superconducting Bolometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Michael J.; Clarke, John; Gildemeister, J. M.; Lee, Adrian T.; Richards, P. L.; Schwan, Dan; Skidmore, J. T.; Spieler, Helmuth; Yoon, Jongsoo

    2001-01-01

    The 200-micrometer to 3-mm wavelength range has great astronomical and cosmological significance. Science goals include characterization of the cosmic microwave background, measurement of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect in galaxy clusters, and observations of forming galaxies. Cryogenic bolometers are the most sensitive broadband detectors in this frequency range. Because single bolometer pixels are reaching the photon noise limit for many observations, the development of large arrays will be critical for future science progress. Voltage-biased superconducting bolometers (VSBs) have several advantages compared to other cryogenic bolometers. Their strong negative electrothermal feedback enhances their linearity, speed, and stability. The large noise margin of the SQUID readout enables multiplexed readout schemes, which are necessary for developing large arrays. In this paper, we discuss the development of a large absorber-coupled array, a frequency-domain SQUID readout multiplexer, and an antenna-coupled VSB design.

  4. Dual-gated bilayer graphene hot-electron bolometer.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jun; Kim, M-H; Elle, J A; Sushkov, A B; Jenkins, G S; Milchberg, H M; Fuhrer, M S; Drew, H D

    2012-07-01

    Graphene is an attractive material for use in optical detectors because it absorbs light from mid-infrared to ultraviolet wavelengths with nearly equal strength. Graphene is particularly well suited for bolometers-devices that detect temperature-induced changes in electrical conductivity caused by the absorption of light-because its small electron heat capacity and weak electron-phonon coupling lead to large light-induced changes in electron temperature. Here, we demonstrate a hot-electron bolometer made of bilayer graphene that is dual-gated to create a tunable bandgap and electron-temperature-dependent conductivity. The bolometer exhibits a noise-equivalent power (33 fW Hz(-1/2) at 5 K) that is several times lower, and intrinsic speed (>1 GHz at 10 K) three to five orders of magnitude higher than commercial silicon bolometers and superconducting transition-edge sensors at similar temperatures. PMID:22659611

  5. Carbon Nanotube Bolometer for Absolute FTIR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, Solomon; Neira, Jorge; Tomlin, Nathan; Lehman, John

    We have developed and calibrated planar electrical-substitution bolometers which employ absorbers made from vertically-aligned carbon nanotube arrays. The nearly complete absorption of light by the carbon nanotubes from the visible range to the far-infrared can be exploited to enable a device with read-out in native units equivalent to optical power. Operated at cryogenic temperatures near 4 K, these infrared detectors are designed to have time constant near 10 ms and a noise floor of about 10 pW. Built upon a micro-machined silicon platform, each device has an integrated heater and thermometer, either a carbon nanotube thermistor or superconducting transition edge sensor, for temperature control. We are optimizing temperature-controlled measurement techniques to enable high resolution spectral calibrations using these devices with a Fourier-transform spectrometer.

  6. Superconducting cuprate heterostructures for hot electron bolometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, B.; Yakobov, R.; Vitkalov, S. A.; Sergeev, A.

    2013-11-01

    Transport properties of the resistive state of quasi-two dimensional superconducting heterostructures containing ultrathin La2-xSrxCuO4 layers synthesized using molecular beam epitaxy are studied. The electron transport exhibits strong deviation from Ohm's law, δV ˜γI3, with a coefficient γ(T) that correlates with the temperature variation of the resistivity dρ /dT. Close to the normal state, analysis of the nonlinear behavior in terms of electron heating yields an electron-phonon thermal conductance per unit area ge -ph≈1 W/K cm2 at T = 20 K, one-two orders of magnitude smaller than in typical superconductors. This makes superconducting LaSrCuO heterostructures to be attractive candidate for the next generation of hot electron bolometers with greatly improved sensitivity.

  7. An Analysis Package for Bolometer Ground Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, B.; Zhang, L.; Ganga, K.; Nguyen, H.; Holmes, W.

    2005-12-01

    ESA's Herschel Space Observatory, to be launched in 2007, will be sensitive to far infrared wavelengths beyond 60 μm. The longer wavelength interval between 200 and 670 μm will be covered by SPIRE, a combination of broad band camera and Fourier transform spectrometer. SPIRE will use exclusively spiderweb bolometers as detectors, which are manufactured and tested at JPL. We describe a data analysis package developed at the NASA Herschel Science Center at IPAC in support of the testing activity, which expects to cover 12 detector arrays with between 24 and 144 channels each. The package consists of a widget based viewer allowing immediate display and limited processing of the 193 recorded data channels in the lab and a suite of subroutines and scripts, allowing fast and flexible pipeline data reduction.

  8. Superconducting cuprate heterostructures for hot electron bolometers

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, B.; Yakobov, R.; Vitkalov, S. A.; Sergeev, A.

    2013-11-25

    Transport properties of the resistive state of quasi-two dimensional superconducting heterostructures containing ultrathin La{sub 2−x}Sr{sub x}CuO{sub 4} layers synthesized using molecular beam epitaxy are studied. The electron transport exhibits strong deviation from Ohm's law, δV∼γI{sup 3}, with a coefficient γ(T) that correlates with the temperature variation of the resistivity dρ/dT. Close to the normal state, analysis of the nonlinear behavior in terms of electron heating yields an electron-phonon thermal conductance per unit area g{sub e−ph}≈1 W/K cm{sup 2} at T = 20 K, one-two orders of magnitude smaller than in typical superconductors. This makes superconducting LaSrCuO heterostructures to be attractive candidate for the next generation of hot electron bolometers with greatly improved sensitivity.

  9. Infrared bolometers with silicon nitride micromesh absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bock, J. J.; Turner, A. D.; DelCastillo, H. M.; Beeman, J. W.; Lange, A. E.; Mauskopf, P. D.

    1996-01-01

    Sensitive far infrared and millimeter wave bolometers fabricated from a freestanding membrane of low stress silicon nitride are reported. The absorber, consisting of a metallized silicon nitride micromesh thermally isolated by radial legs of silicon nitride, is placed in an integrating cavity to efficiently couple to single mode or multiple mode infrared radiation. This structure provides low heat capacity, low thermal conduction and minimal cross section to energetic particles. A neutron transmutation doped Ge thermister is bump bonded to the center of the device and read out with evaporated Cr-Au leads. The limiting performance of the micromesh absorber is discussed and the recent results obtained from a 300 mK cold stage are summarized.

  10. Antenna-coupled bolometer arrays using transition-edgesensors

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, Michael J.; Ade, Peter; Engargiola, Greg; Holzapfel,William; Lee,Adrian T.; O'Brient, Roger; Richards, Paul L.; Smith, Andy; Spieler, Helmuth; Tran, Huan

    2004-06-08

    We describe the development of an antenna-coupled bolometer array for use in a Cosmic Microwave Background polarization experiment. Prototype single pixels using double-slot dipole antennas and integrated microstrip band defining filters have been built and tested. Preliminary results of optical testing and simulations are presented. A bolometer array design based on this pixel will also be shown and future plans for application of the technology will be discussed.

  11. The resistive bolometer for radiated power measurement on EAST

    SciTech Connect

    Duan, Y. M.; Hu, L. Q.; Mao, S. T.; Chen, K. Y.; Lin, S. Y.; Collaboration: EAST Diagnostics Team

    2012-09-15

    The resistive bolometer system has been successfully employed on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak for the first time to measure the radiated power of plasma. The bolometer detectors are based on 4 {mu}m thick Pt absorbers deposited on 1.5 {mu}m thick SiN membranes. The system consists of 3 cameras with a total of 48 channels. The detector and the system setup are described in detail. The detector calibration and typical measurement results are presented as well.

  12. UEDGE code comparisons with DIII-D bolometer DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, J.M.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the work done to develop a bolometer post processor that converts volumetric radiated power values taken from a UEDGE solution, to a line integrated radiated power along chords of the bolometers in the DIII-D tokamak. The UEDGE code calculates plasma physics quantities, such as plasma density, radiated power, or electron temperature, and compares them to actual diagnostic measurements taken from the scrape off layer (SOL) and divertor regions of the DIII-D tokamak. Bolometers are devices measuring radiated power within the tokamak. The bolometer interceptors are made up of two complete arrays, an upper array with a vertical view and a lower array with a horizontal view, so that a two dimensional profile of the radiated power may be obtained. The bolometer post processor stores line integrated values taken from UEDGE solutions into a file in tabular format. Experimental data is then put into tabular form and placed in another file. Comparisons can be made between the UEDGE solutions and actual bolometer data. Analysis has been done to determine the accuracy of the plasma physics involved in producing UEDGE simulations.

  13. UEDGE code comparisons with DIII-D bolometer data

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, J.M.

    1994-12-01

    This paper describes the work done to develop a bolometer post processor that converts volumetric radiated power values taken from a UEDGE solution, to a line integrated radiated power along chords of the bolometers in the DIII-D tokamak. The UEDGE code calculates plasma physics quantities, such as plasma density, radiated power, or electron temperature, and compares them to actual diagnostic measurements taken from the scrape off layer (SOL) and divertor regions of the DIII-D tokamak. Bolometers are devices measuring radiated power within the tokamak. The bolometer interceptors are made up of two complete arrays, an upper array with a vertical view and a lower array with a horizontal view, so that a two dimensional profile of the radiated power may be obtained. The bolometer post processor stores line integrated values taken from UEDGE solutions into a file in tabular format. Experimental data is then put into tabular form and placed in another file. Comparisons can be made between the UEDGE solutions and actual bolometer data. Analysis has been done to determine the accuracy of the plasma physics involved in producing UEDGE simulations.

  14. Recent development in organic scintillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horrocks, D. L.; Wirth, H. O.

    1969-01-01

    Discussion on recent developments of organic scintillators includes studies of organic compounds that form glass-like masses which scintillate and are stable at room temperature, correlations between molecular structure of organic scintillators and self-quenching, recently developed fast scintillators, and applications of liquid-scintillation counters.

  15. Shifting scintillator neutron detector

    SciTech Connect

    Clonts, Lloyd G; Cooper, Ronald G; Crow, Jr., Morris Lowell; Hannah, Bruce W; Hodges, Jason P; Richards, John D; Riedel, Richard A

    2014-03-04

    Provided are sensors and methods for detecting thermal neutrons. Provided is an apparatus having a scintillator for absorbing a neutron, the scintillator having a back side for discharging a scintillation light of a first wavelength in response to the absorbed neutron, an array of wavelength-shifting fibers proximate to the back side of the scintillator for shifting the scintillation light of the first wavelength to light of a second wavelength, the wavelength-shifting fibers being disposed in a two-dimensional pattern and defining a plurality of scattering plane pixels where the wavelength-shifting fibers overlap, a plurality of photomultiplier tubes, in coded optical communication with the wavelength-shifting fibers, for converting the light of the second wavelength to an electronic signal, and a processor for processing the electronic signal to identify one of the plurality of scattering plane pixels as indicative of a position within the scintillator where the neutron was absorbed.

  16. Scintillator manufacture at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Mellott, K.; Bross, A.; Pla-Dalmau, A.

    1998-11-01

    A decade of research into plastic scintillation materials at Fermilab is reviewed. Early work with plastic optical fiber fabrication is revisited and recent experiments with large-scale commercial methods for production of bulk scintillator are discussed. Costs for various forms of scintillator are examined and new development goals including cost reduction methods and quality improvement techniques are suggested. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. Lead carbonate scintillator materials

    DOEpatents

    Derenzo, S.E.; Moses, W.W.

    1991-05-14

    Improved radiation detectors containing lead carbonate or basic lead carbonate as the scintillator element are disclosed. Both of these scintillators have been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to other known scintillator materials. The radiation detectors disclosed are favorably suited for use in general purpose detection and in medical uses. 3 figures.

  18. Extruded plastic scintillation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Anna Pla-Dalmau, Alan D. Bross and Kerry L. Mellott

    1999-04-16

    As a way to lower the cost of plastic scintillation detectors, commercially available polystyrene pellets have been used in the production of scintillating materials that can be extruded into different profiles. The selection of the raw materials is discussed. Two techniques to add wavelength shifting dopants to polystyrene pellets and to extrude plastic scintillating strips are described. Data on light yield and transmittance measurements are presented.

  19. Study of equatorial scintillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pomalaza, J.; Woodman, R.; Tisnado, G.; Nakasone, E.

    1972-01-01

    Observations of the amplitude scintillations produced by the F-region in equatorial areas are presented. The equipment used for conducting the observations is described. The use of transmissions from the ATS-1, ATS-3, and ATS-5 for obtaining data is described. The two principal subjects discussed are: (1) correlation between satellite and incoherent radar observations of scintillations and (2) simultaneous observations of scintillations at 136 MHz and 1550 MHz.

  20. A Two-Dimensional, Semiconducting Bolometer Array for HAWC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voellmer, George M.; Allen, Christine A.; Babu, Schidananda R.; Bartels, Arlin E.; Dowell, C. Darren; Dotson, Jessie; Harper, D. Al; Moseley, Harvey; Rennick, Timothy

    2004-01-01

    The Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy's (SOFIA's) High resolution Airborne Wideband Camera (HAWC) will use an ion-implanted silicon bolometer array developed at NASA s Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The GSFC Pop-Up Detectors (PUDs) use a unique folding technique to enable a 12 x 32 element closepacked array of bolometers with a filling factor greater than 95%. The HAWC detector uses a resistive metal film on silicon to provide frequency independent, approx. 50% absorption over the 40 - 300 micron band. The silicon bolometers are manufactured in 32-element rows within silicon frames using Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) silicon etching techniques. The frames are then cut, "folded", and glued onto a metallized, ceramic, thermal bus "bar". Optical alignment using micrometer jigs ensures their uniformity and correct placement. The rows are then stacked side-by-side to create the final 12 x 32 element array. A kinematic Kevlar suspension system isolates the 200 mK bolometer cold stage from the rest of the 4K detector housing. GSFC - developed silicon bridge chips make electrical connection to the bolometers, while maintaining thermal isolation. The Junction Field Effect Transistor (JFET) preamplifiers for all the signal channels operate at 120 K, yet they are electrically connected and located in close proximity to the bolometers. The JFET module design provides sufficient thermal isolation and heat sinking for these, so that their heat is not detected by the bolometers. Preliminary engineering results from the flight detector dark test run are expected to be available in July 2004. This paper describes the array assembly and mechanical and thermal design of the HAWC detector and the JFET module.

  1. A two-dimensional semiconducting bolometer array for HAWC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voellmer, George M.; Allen, Christine A.; Babu, Sachidananda R.; Bartels, Arlin E.; Dowell, Charles D.; Dotson, Jessie L.; Harper, Doyle A.; Moseley, S. H., Jr.; Rennick, Timothy; Shirron, Peter J.; Smith, W. W.; Wollack, Edward J.

    2004-10-01

    The Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy's (SOFIA's) High resolution Airborne Wideband Camera (HAWC) will use an ion-implanted silicon bolometer array developed at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The GSFC Pop-Up Detectors (PUDs) use a unique "folding" technique to enable a 12 x 32 element close-packed array of bolometers with a filling factor greater than 95%. The HAWC detector uses a resistive metal film on silicon to provide frequency independent, ~50% absorption over the 40 - 300 micron band. The silicon bolometers are manufactured in 32-element rows within silicon frames using Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) silicon etching techniques. The frames are then cut, "folded", and glued onto a metallized, ceramic, thermal bus "bar". Optical alignment using micrometer jigs ensures their uniformity and correct placement. The rows are then stacked side-by-side to create the final 12 x 32 element array. A kinematic Kevlar suspension system isolates the 200 mK bolometer cold stage from the rest of the 4K detector housing. GSFC - developed silicon bridge chips make electrical connection to the bolometers, while maintaining thermal isolation. The Junction Field Effect Transistor (JFET) preamplifiers for all the signal channels operate at 120 K, yet they are electrically connected and located in close proximity to the bolometers. The JFET module design provides sufficient thermal isolation and heat sinking for these, so that their heat is not detected by the bolometers. Preliminary engineering results from the flight detector dark test run are expected to be available in July 2004. This paper describes the array assembly and mechanical and thermal design of the HAWC detector and the JFET module.

  2. First Astronomical Use of Multiplexed Transition Edge Sensor Bolometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staguhn, J. G.; Ames, T. A.; Benford, D. J.; Chervenak, J. A.; Grossman, E. N.; Irwin, K. D.; Khan, S. A.; Maffei, B.; Moseley, S. H.; Pajot, F.

    2004-01-01

    We present performance results based on the first astronomical use of multiplexed superconducting bolometers. The Fabry-Perot Interferometer Bolometer Research Experiment (FIBRE) is a broadband submillimeter spectrometer that achieved first light in June 2001 at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO). FIBRE's detectors are superconducting transition edge sensor (TES) bolometers read out by a SQUID multiplexer. The Fabry-Perot uses a low resolution grating to order sort the incoming light. A linear bolometer array consisting of 16 elements detects this dispersed light, capturing 5 orders simultaneously from one position on the sky. With tuning of the Fabry-Perot over one free spectral range, a spectrum covering Delta lambda/lambda = 1/7 at a resolution of delta lambda/lambda approx. 1/1200 can be acquired. This spectral resolution is sufficient to resolve Doppler-broadened line emission from external galaxies. FIBRE operates in the 350 m and 450 m bands. These bands cover line emission from the important star formation tracers neutral carbon (CI) and carbon monoxide (CO). We have verified that the multiplexed bolometers are photon noise limited even with the low power present in moderate resolution spectrometry.

  3. Epitaxial graphene quantum dots for high-performance terahertz bolometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Fatimy, Abdel; Myers-Ward, Rachael L.; Boyd, Anthony K.; Daniels, Kevin M.; Gaskill, D. Kurt; Barbara, Paola

    2016-04-01

    Light absorption in graphene causes a large change in electron temperature due to the low electronic heat capacity and weak electron–phonon coupling. This property makes graphene a very attractive material for hot-electron bolometers in the terahertz frequency range. Unfortunately, the weak variation of electrical resistance with temperature results in limited responsivity for absorbed power. Here, we show that, due to quantum confinement, quantum dots of epitaxial graphene on SiC exhibit an extraordinarily high variation of resistance with temperature (higher than 430 MΩ K‑1 below 6 K), leading to responsivities of 1 × 1010 V W‑1, a figure that is five orders of magnitude higher than other types of graphene hot-electron bolometer. The high responsivity, combined with an extremely low electrical noise-equivalent power (∼2 × 10‑16 W Hz‑1/2 at 2.5 K), already places our bolometers well above commercial cooled bolometers. Additionally, we show that these quantum dot bolometers demonstrate good performance at temperature as high as 77 K.

  4. Predicting the response of a submillimeter bolometer to cosmic rays.

    PubMed

    Woodcraft, Adam L; Sudiwala, Rashmi V; Ade, Peter A R; Griffin, Matthew J; Wakui, Elley; Bhatia, Ravinder S; Lange, Andrew E; Bock, James J; Turner, Anthony D; Yun, Minhee H; Beeman, Jeffrey W

    2003-09-01

    Bolometers designed to detect submillimeter radiation also respond to cosmic, gamma, and x rays. Because detectors cannot be fully shielded from such energy sources, it is necessary to understand the effect of a photon or cosmic-ray particle being absorbed. The resulting signal (known as a glitch) can then be removed from raw data. We present measurements using an Americium-241 gamma radiation source to irradiate a prototype bolometer for the High Frequency Instrument in the Planck Surveyor satellite. Our measurements showed no variation in response depending on where the radiation was absorbed, demonstrating that the bolometer absorber and thermistor thermalize quickly. The bolometer has previously been fully characterized both electrically and optically. We find that using optically measured time constants underestimates the time taken for the detector to recover from a radiation absorption event. However, a full thermal model for the bolometer, with parameters taken from electrical and optical measurements, provides accurate time constants. Slight deviations from the model were seen at high energies; these can be accounted for by use of an extended model. PMID:12962375

  5. Epitaxial graphene quantum dots for high-performance terahertz bolometers.

    PubMed

    El Fatimy, Abdel; Myers-Ward, Rachael L; Boyd, Anthony K; Daniels, Kevin M; Gaskill, D Kurt; Barbara, Paola

    2016-04-01

    Light absorption in graphene causes a large change in electron temperature due to the low electronic heat capacity and weak electron-phonon coupling. This property makes graphene a very attractive material for hot-electron bolometers in the terahertz frequency range. Unfortunately, the weak variation of electrical resistance with temperature results in limited responsivity for absorbed power. Here, we show that, due to quantum confinement, quantum dots of epitaxial graphene on SiC exhibit an extraordinarily high variation of resistance with temperature (higher than 430 MΩ K(-1) below 6 K), leading to responsivities of 1 × 10(10) V W(-1), a figure that is five orders of magnitude higher than other types of graphene hot-electron bolometer. The high responsivity, combined with an extremely low electrical noise-equivalent power (∼2 × 10(-16) W Hz(-1/2) at 2.5 K), already places our bolometers well above commercial cooled bolometers. Additionally, we show that these quantum dot bolometers demonstrate good performance at temperature as high as 77 K. PMID:26727199

  6. Ultralow-Background Large-Format Bolometer Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, Dominic; Chervenak, Jay; Irwin, Kent; Moseley, S. Harvey; Oegerle, William (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In the coming decade, work will commence in earnest on large cryogenic far-infrared telescopes and interferometers. All such observatories - for example, SAFIR, SPIRIT, and SPECS - require large format, two dimensional arrays of close-packed detectors capable of reaching the fundamental limits imposed by the very low photon backgrounds present in deep space. In the near term, bolometer array architectures which permit 1000 pixels - perhaps sufficient for the next generation of space-based instruments - can be arrayed efficiently. Demonstrating the necessary performance, with Noise Equivalent Powers (NEPs) of order 10-20 W/square root of Hz, will be a hurdle in the coming years. Superconducting bolometer arrays are a promising technology for providing both the performance and the array size necessary. We discuss the requirements for future detector arrays in the far-infrared and submillimeter, describe the parameters of superconducting bolometer arrays able to meet these requirements, and detail the present and near future technology of superconducting bolometer arrays. Of particular note is the coming development of large format planar arrays with absorber-coupled and antenna-coupled bolometers.

  7. Multiplexed Readout of Thermal Bolometers with Superconducting Transition Edge Thermometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, Dominic J.; Allen, Christine A.; Chervenak, James A.; Freund, Mino M.; Kutyrev, Alexander S.; Moseley, S. Harvey; Shafer, Richard A.; Staguhn, Johannes G.; Grossman, Erich N.; Hilton, Gene C.

    2001-01-01

    History shows that in astronomy, more is better. In the near future, direct detector arrays for the far-infrared and submillimeter will contain hundreds to thousands of elements. A multiplexed readout is necessary for practical implementation of such arrays, and has been developed using SQUIDs. The technology permits a 32 x 32 array of bolometers to be read out using approximately 100 wires rather than the >2000 needed with direct wiring. These bolometer arrays are made by micromachining techniques, using superconducting transition edge sensors as the thermistors. We describe the development of this multiplexed superconducting bolometer array architecture as a step toward bringing about the first astronomically useful arrays of this design. This technology will be used in the Submillimeter and Far Infrared Experiment (SAFIRE) instrument on Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA), and is a candidate for a wide variety of other spectroscopic and photometric instruments.

  8. Physics and design of advanced IR bolometers and photoconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haller, E. E.

    1985-01-01

    The state-of-the-art in photoconductors and bolometers is reviewed, centering on the materials development and concepts of extrinsic Si and Ge devices. It is suggested that in the field of 2-D detector arrays the hybrid circuits containing a photoconductor or a photodiode array, bonded with In solder to a switched MOS readout device with up to 60 x 60 elements, will produce superior performance. Other systems discussed include charge-coupled devices, developed for visible-light imaging and adapted to IR imaging, and charge-injection devices, a monolithic combination of a standard photoconductor and a metal-insulator-semiconductor capacitor. Finally, it is pointed out that a nonequilibrium theory of bolometer noise demonstrates the possibility of reducing the traditionally accepted noise limits by 60 percent for Johnson noise and 30 percent for the noise from phonons in the thermal link of the bolometer.

  9. First results of the resistive bolometers on KSTAR

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Dongcheol; Peterson, B. J.; Lee, Seung Hun

    2010-10-15

    The resistive bolometers have been successfully installed in the midplane of L-port in Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) device. The spatial and temporal resolutions, 4.5 cm and {approx}1 kHz, respectively, enable us to measure the radial profile of the total radiated power from magnetically confined plasma at a high temperature through radiation and neutral particles. The radiated power was measured at all shots. Even at low plasma current, the bolometer signal was detectable. The electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECH) has been used in tokamak for ECH assisted start-up and plasma control by local heating and current drive. The detectors of resistive bolometer, near the antenna of ECH, are affected by electron cyclotron wave. The tomographic reconstruction, using the Phillips-Tikhonov regularization method, will be carried out for a major radial profile of the radiation emissivity of the circular cross-section plasma.

  10. Model for excess noise in voltage-biased superconducting bolometers.

    PubMed

    Gildemeister, J M; Lee, A T; Richards, P L

    2001-12-01

    We are developing superconducting transition-edge bolometers for far-infrared and millimeter wavelengths. The bolometers described here are suspended by thin legs of silicon nitride for thermal isolation. At frequencies between 200 mHz and 10-50 Hz these devices show white noise at their thermal fluctuation limit (NEP approximately 10(-17) W/ radicalHz). At higher frequencies a broad peak appears in the noise spectrum, which we attribute to a combination of thermal fluctuations in complex thermal circuits and electrothermal feedback. Detailed noise calculations fit the noise measured in three different devices that were specifically designed to test the model. We discuss how changes in bolometer materials can shift the noise peak above the frequency range of interest for most applications. PMID:18364926

  11. First results of the resistive bolometers on KSTAR.

    PubMed

    Seo, Dongcheol; Peterson, B J; Lee, Seung Hun

    2010-10-01

    The resistive bolometers have been successfully installed in the midplane of L-port in Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) device. The spatial and temporal resolutions, 4.5 cm and ∼1 kHz, respectively, enable us to measure the radial profile of the total radiated power from magnetically confined plasma at a high temperature through radiation and neutral particles. The radiated power was measured at all shots. Even at low plasma current, the bolometer signal was detectable. The electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECH) has been used in tokamak for ECH assisted start-up and plasma control by local heating and current drive. The detectors of resistive bolometer, near the antenna of ECH, are affected by electron cyclotron wave. The tomographic reconstruction, using the Phillips-Tikhonov regularization method, will be carried out for a major radial profile of the radiation emissivity of the circular cross-section plasma. PMID:21033992

  12. A progress report on using bolometers cooled by adiabatic demagnetization refrigeration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lesyna, L.; Roellig, T.; Savage, M.; Werner, Michael W.

    1989-01-01

    For sensitive detection of astronomical continuum radiation in the 200 micron to 3 mm wavelength range, bolometers are presently the detectors of choice. In order to approach the limits imposed by photon noise in a cryogenically cooled telescope in space, bolometers must be operated at temperatures near 0.1 K. Researchers report progress in building and using bolometers that operate at these temperatures. The most sensitive bolometer had an estimated noise equivalent power (NEP) of 7 x 10(exp 017) W Hz(exp -1/2). Researchers also briefly discuss the durability of paramagnetic salts used to cool the bolometers.

  13. Infrared technology for satellite power conversion. [antenna arrays and bolometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, D. P.; Gouker, M. A.; Gallagher, J. J.

    1984-01-01

    Successful fabrication of bismuth bolometers led to the observation of antenna action rom array elements. Fabrication of the best antennas arrays was made more facile with finding that increased argon flow during the dc sputtering produced more uniform bismuth films and bonding to antennas must be done with the substrate temperaure below 100 C. Higher temperatures damaged the bolometers. During the testing of the antennas, it was found that the use of a quasi-optical system provided a uniform radiation field. Groups of antennas were bonded in series and in parallel with the parallel configuration showing the greater response.

  14. The resistive bolometer for radiated power measurement on EAST.

    PubMed

    Duan, Y M; Hu, L Q; Mao, S T; Chen, K Y; Lin, S Y

    2012-09-01

    The resistive bolometer system has been successfully employed on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak for the first time to measure the radiated power of plasma. The bolometer detectors are based on 4 μm thick Pt absorbers deposited on 1.5 μm thick SiN membranes. The system consists of 3 cameras with a total of 48 channels. The detector and the system setup are described in detail. The detector calibration and typical measurement results are presented as well. PMID:23025621

  15. Thin film scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Warren; McKinney, George; Tzolov, Marian

    2015-03-01

    Scintillating materials convert energy flux (particles or electromagnetic waves) into light with spectral characteristic matching a subsequent light detector. Commercial scintillators such as yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) and yttrium aluminum perovskite (YAP) are commonly used. These are inefficient at lower energies due to the conductive coating present on their top surface, which is needed to avoid charging. We hypothesize that nano-structured thin film scintillators will outperform the commercial scintillators at low electron energies. We have developed alternative thin film scintillators, zinc tungstate and zinc oxide, which show promise for higher sensitivity to lower energy electrons since they are inherently conductive. Zinc tungstate films exhibit photoluminescence quantum efficiency of 74%. Cathodoluminescence spectroscopy was applied in transmission and reflection geometries. The comparison between the thin films and the YAG and YAP commercial scintillators shows much higher light output from the zinc tungstate and zinc oxide at electron energies less than 5 keV. Our films were integrated in a backscattered electron detector. This detector delivers better images than an identical detector with commercial YAG scintillator at low electron energies. Dr. Nicholas Barbi from PulseTor LLC, Dr. Anura Goonewardene, NSF Grants: #0806660, #1058829, #0923047.

  16. Search for axioelectric effect of solar axions using BGO scintillating bolometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derbin, A. V.; Gironi, L.; Nagorny, S. S.; Pattavina, L.; Beeman, J. W.; Bellini, F.; Biassoni, M.; Capelli, S.; Clemenza, M.; Drachnev, I. S.; Ferri, E.; Giachero, A.; Gotti, C.; Kayunov, A. S.; Maiano, C.; Maino, M.; Muratova, V. N.; Pavan, M.; Pirro, S.; Semenov, D. A.; Sisti, M.; Unzhakov, E. V.

    2014-09-01

    A search for axioelectric absorption of solar axions produced in the reaction has been performed with a BGO detector placed in a low-background setup. A model-independent limit on the combination of axion-nucleon and axion-electron coupling constants has been obtained: for 90 % confidence level. The constraint of the axion-electron coupling constant has been obtained for hadronic axion with masses of (0.1-1) MeV:.

  17. Fast bolometer built in an artificial HPHT diamond matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Klokov, A Yu; Sharkov, A I; Galkina, T I; Khmelnitskii, R A; Dravin, V A; Gippius, Aleksei A

    2010-05-26

    A fast bolometer built in a plate of diamond grown at high pressure by the gradient growth method is developed and fabricated. The parameters of this structure are compared with these of the structures investigated earlier, which were fabricated based on chemical vapour deposited (CVD) diamond and natural type IIa diamond.

  18. Multimode Bolometer Development for the Primordial Inflation Explorer (PIXIE) Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagler, Peter C.; Crowley, Kevin T.; Denis, Kevin L.; Devasia, Archana M.; Fixsen, Dale J.; Kogut, Alan J.; Manos, George; Porter, Scott; Stevenson, Thomas R.

    2016-01-01

    The Primordial Inflation Explorer (PIXIE) is an Explorer-class mission concept designed to measure the polarization and absolute intensity of the cosmic microwave background [1]. In this work, we report on the design, fabrication, and performance of the multimode polarization-sensitive bolometers for PIXIE, which are based on silicon thermistors. In particular we focus on several recent advances in the detector design, including the implementation of a tensioning scheme to greatly raise the frequencies of the internal vibrational modes of the large-area, low-mass optical absorber structure consisting of a grid of micromachined, ion-implanted silicon wires. With 30 times the absorbing area of the spider-web bolometers used by Planck, the tensioning scheme enables the PIXIE bolometers to be robust in the vibrational and acoustic environment at launch of the space mission. More generally, it could be used to reduce microphonic sensitivity in other types of low temperature detectors. We also report on the performance of the PIXIE bolometers in a dark cryogenic environment.

  19. Technology developments toward large format long wavelength bolometer arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Christine A.; Benford, Dominic J.; Miller, Timothy M.; Moseley, S. Harvey; Staguhn, Johannes G.; Wollack, Edward J.

    2007-09-01

    We are developing a kilopixel, filled bolometer array for infrared astronomy. The array consists of three individual components, to be merged into a single, working unit; 1) a transition edge sensor (TES) bolometer array, operating in the milliKelvin regime, 2) quarter-wave resonance backshorts, and 3) superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) multiplexer readout. The detector array is a filled, square-grid of suspended, silicon membrane bolometers with superconducting thermistors. The spacing of the backshort beneath the detector grid can be set from ~30-300 microns by adjusting two process parameters during fabrication. We have produced prototype, monolithic arrays having 1 mm and 2 mm pitch detectors. The key technologies required for kilopixel arrays of detectors to be hybridized to SQUID multiplexer readout circuits have been demonstrated. Mechanical models of large-format detector grids have been indium bump-bonded to dummy multiplexer readouts to study electrical continuity. A monolithic array of 1 mm pitch detectors has been mated to a backshort grid optimized for a 350 micron resonant wavelength. Through-wafer microvias, for electroplated, low-resistance electrical connection of detector elements, have been prototyped using deep reactive ion etching. The ultimate goal of this work is to develop large-format (thousands of pixels) bolometer array architecture with background-limited sensitivity, suitable for a wide range of long wavelengths and a wide range of astronomical applications such as imaging, spectroscopy, and polarimetry and applicable for ground-based, suborbital, and space-based instruments.

  20. Highly sensitive hot electron bolometer based on disordered graphene.

    PubMed

    Han, Qi; Gao, Teng; Zhang, Rui; Chen, Yi; Chen, Jianhui; Liu, Gerui; Zhang, Yanfeng; Liu, Zhongfan; Wu, Xiaosong; Yu, Dapeng

    2013-01-01

    A bolometer is a device that makes an electrical resistive response to the electromagnetic radiation resulted from a raise of temperature due to heating. The combination of the extremely weak electron-phonon interactions along with its small electron heat capacity makes graphene an ideal material for applications in ultra-fast and sensitive hot electron bolometer. However, a major issue is that the resistance of pristine graphene weakly depends on the electronic temperature. We propose using disordered graphene to obtain a strongly temperature dependent resistance. The measured electrical responsivity of the disordered graphene bolometer reaches 6 × 10(6) V/W at 1.5 K, corresponding to an optical responsivity of 1.6 × 10(5) V/W. The deduced electrical noise equivalent power is 1.2 fW/√Hz, corresponding to the optical noise equivalent power of 44 fW/√Hz. The minimal device structure and no requirement for high mobility graphene make a step forward towards the applications of graphene hot electron bolometers. PMID:24346418

  1. Highly sensitive hot electron bolometer based on disordered graphene

    PubMed Central

    Han, Qi; Gao, Teng; Zhang, Rui; Chen, Yi; Chen, Jianhui; Liu, Gerui; Zhang, Yanfeng; Liu, Zhongfan; Wu, Xiaosong; Yu, Dapeng

    2013-01-01

    A bolometer is a device that makes an electrical resistive response to the electromagnetic radiation resulted from a raise of temperature due to heating. The combination of the extremely weak electron-phonon interactions along with its small electron heat capacity makes graphene an ideal material for applications in ultra-fast and sensitive hot electron bolometer. However, a major issue is that the resistance of pristine graphene weakly depends on the electronic temperature. We propose using disordered graphene to obtain a strongly temperature dependent resistance. The measured electrical responsivity of the disordered graphene bolometer reaches 6 × 106 V/W at 1.5 K, corresponding to an optical responsivity of 1.6 × 105 V/W. The deduced electrical noise equivalent power is 1.2 , corresponding to the optical noise equivalent power of 44 . The minimal device structure and no requirement for high mobility graphene make a step forward towards the applications of graphene hot electron bolometers. PMID:24346418

  2. Ionospheric Scintillation Explorer (ISX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iuliano, J.; Bahcivan, H.

    2015-12-01

    NSF has recently selected Ionospheric Scintillation Explorer (ISX), a 3U Cubesat mission to explore the three-dimensional structure of scintillation-scale ionospheric irregularities associated with Equatorial Spread F (ESF). ISX is a collaborative effort between SRI International and Cal Poly. This project addresses the science question: To what distance along a flux tube does an irregularity of certain transverse-scale extend? It has been difficult to measure the magnetic field-alignment of scintillation-scale turbulent structures because of the difficulty of sampling a flux tube at multiple locations within a short time. This measurement is now possible due to the worldwide transition to DTV, which presents unique signals of opportunity for remote sensing of ionospheric irregularities from numerous vantage points. DTV spectra, in various formats, contain phase-stable, narrowband pilot carrier components that are transmitted simultaneously. A 4-channel radar receiver will simultaneously record up to 4 spatially separated transmissions from the ground. Correlations of amplitude and phase scintillation patterns corresponding to multiple points on the same flux tube will be a measure of the spatial extent of the structures along the magnetic field. A subset of geometries where two or more transmitters are aligned with the orbital path will be used to infer the temporal development of the structures. ISX has the following broad impact. Scintillation of space-based radio signals is a space weather problem that is intensively studied. ISX is a step toward a CubeSat constellation to monitor worldwide TEC variations and radio wave distortions on thousands of ionospheric paths. Furthermore, the rapid sampling along spacecraft orbits provides a unique dataset to deterministically reconstruct ionospheric irregularities at scintillation-scale resolution using diffraction radio tomography, a technique that enables prediction of scintillations at other radio frequencies, and

  3. Scintillator Measurements for SNO+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaptanoglu, Tanner; SNO+ Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    SNO+ is a neutrino detector located 2km underground in the SNOLAB facility with the primary goal of searching for neutrinoless double beta decay. The detector will be filled with a liquid scintillator target primarily composed of linear alkyl benzene (LAB). As charged particles travel through the detector the LAB produces scintillation light which is detected by almost ten thousand PMTs. The LAB is loaded with Te130, an isotope known to undergo double beta decay. Additionally, the LAB is mixed with an additional fluor and wavelength shifter to improve the light output and shift the light to a wavelength regime in which the PMTs are maximally efficient. The precise scintillator optics drastically affect the ultimate sensitivity of SNO+. I will present work being done to measure the optical properties of the SNO+ scintillator cocktail. The measured properties are used as input to a scintillation model that allows us to extrapolate to the SNO+ scale and ultimately predict the sensitivity of the experiment. Additionally, I will present measurements done to characterize the R5912 PMT, a candidate PMT for the second phase of SNO+ that provides better light collection, improved charge resolution, and a narrower spread in timing.

  4. Scintillator plate calorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Price, L.E.

    1990-01-01

    Calorimetry using scintillator plates or tiles alternated with sheets of (usually heavy) passive absorber has been proven over multiple generations of collider detectors. Recent detectors including UA1, CDF, and ZEUS have shown good results from such calorimeters. The advantages offered by scintillator calorimetry for the SSC environment, in particular, are speed (<10 nsec), excellent energy resolution, low noise, and ease of achieving compensation and hence linearity. On the negative side of the ledger can be placed the historical sensitivity of plastic scintillators to radiation damage, the possibility of nonuniform response because of light attenuation, and the presence of cracks for light collection via wavelength shifting plastic (traditionally in sheet form). This approach to calorimetry is being investigated for SSC use by a collaboration of Ames Laboratory/Iowa State University, Argonne National Laboratory, Bicron Corporation, Florida State University, Louisiana State University, University of Mississippi, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Westinghouse Electric Corporation, and University of Wisconsin.

  5. A progress report on bolometers operating at 0.1 K using adiabatic demagnetization refrigeration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roellig, T.; Lesyna, L.; Werner, M.; Kittel, P.

    1986-01-01

    Bolometers are still the detectors of choice for low background infrared observations at wavelengths longer than 200 microns. In the low background limit, bolometers become more sensitive as their operating temperature decreases, due to fundamental thermodynamic laws. The adiabatic demagnetization technique was evaluated by building a bolometer detection system operating at a wavelength of 1 millimeter for use at a ground based telescope. The system was fit checked at the telescope and is expected to take its first data in November, 1985.

  6. A bolometer array for the spectral energy distribution (SPEED) camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverberg, R. F.; Ali, S.; Bier, A.; Campano, B.; Chen, T. C.; Cheng, E. S.; Cottingham, D. A.; Crawford, T. M.; Downes, T.; Finkbeiner, F. M.; Fixsen, D. J.; Logan, D.; Meyer, S. S.; O'dell, C.; Perera, T.; Sharp, E. H.; Timbie, P. T.; Wilson, G. W.

    2004-03-01

    The Spectral Energy Distribution (SPEED) Camera is being developed to study the spectral energy distributions of high redshift galaxies. Its initial use will be on the Heinrich Hertz Telescope and eventually on the Large Millimeter Telescope. SPEED requires a small cryogenic detector array of 2×2 pixels with each pixel having four frequency bands in the 150-375GHz range. Here we describe the development of the detector array of these high-efficiency Frequency Selective Bolometers (FSB). The FSB design provides the multi-pixel, multi-spectral band capability required for SPEED in a compact stackable array. The SPEED bolometers will use proximity effect superconducting transition edge sensors as their temperature-sensing element, allowing for higher levels of electronic multiplexing in future applications.

  7. A bolometer array for the SPEctral Energy Distribution (SPEED) Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverberg, Robert F.; Campano, Barbara; Chen, Tina C.; Cheng, Edward; Cottingham, David A.; Crawford, Thomas M.; Downes, Tom; Finkbeiner, Fred M.; Fixsen, Dale J.; Logan, Dan; Meyer, Stephan S.; Perera, Thushara; Sharp, Elmer H.; Wilson, Grant W.

    2004-10-01

    The SPEED camera is being developed to study the spectral energy distributions of high redshift galaxies, Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect in X-ray clusters and other cold objects in the universe. Its initial runs will be done on the 10 m Heinrich Hertz Submillimeter Telescope (HHSMT), with later runs using the Large Millimeter Telescope (LMT). SPEED requires a 2x2 pixel cryogenic detector array of Frequency Selective Bolometers (FSB). Each of the pixels will have four frequency bands in the ~150-350 GHz range. Here we describe the development of the detector array of these high efficiency FSBs. The FSB design provides the multi-pixel multi-spectral band capability required for SPEED in a compact, light weight, stackable array. The SPEED FSB bolometers will use proximity effect superconducting transition edge sensors (TES) as their temperature-sensing element permitting significantly higher levels of electronic multiplexing in future applications where larger numbers of detectors may be required.

  8. Development of neutron-transmutation-doped germanium bolometer material

    SciTech Connect

    Palaio, N.P.

    1983-08-01

    The behavior of lattice defects generated as a result of the neutron-transmutation-doping of germanium was studied as a function of annealing conditions using deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) and mobility measurements. DLTS and variable temperature Hall effect were also used to measure the activation of dopant impurities formed during the transmutation process. In additioon, a semi-automated method of attaching wires on to small chips of germanium (< 1 mm/sup 3/) for the fabrication of infrared detecting bolometers was developed. Finally, several different types of junction field effect transistors were tested for noise at room and low temperature (approx. 80 K) in order to find the optimum device available for first stage electronics in the bolometer signal amplification circuit.

  9. An Antenna-coupled bolometer with an integrated microstripbandpass filter

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, Michael J.; Holzapfel, William; Lee, Adrian T.; O'Brient,Roger; Richards, P.L.; Tran, Huan T.; Ade, Peter; Engargiola, Greg; Smith, Andy; Spieler, Helmuth

    2004-09-17

    We describe the fabrication and testing of antenna-coupled superconducting transition-edge bolometers for use at millimeter wavelengths. The design uses a double-slot dipole antenna connected to superconducting niobium microstrip. Band defining filters are implemented in the microstrip, which is then terminated with a load resistor. The power dissipated in the load resistor is measured by a superconducting transition-edge sensor TES. The load resistor and TES are thermally well connected and are supported by a silicon nitride substrate. The substrate is suspended by four narrow silicon nitride legs for thermal isolation. The bolometers have been optically characterized and the spectral response is presented. This detector is a prototype element for use in an array designed for studies of the cosmic microwave background polarization.

  10. Monolayer graphene bolometer as a sensitive far-IR detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karasik, Boris S.; McKitterick, Christopher B.; Prober, Daniel E.

    2014-07-01

    In this paper we give a detailed analysis of the expected sensitivity and operating conditions in the power detection mode of a hot-electron bolometer (HEB) made from a few μm2 of monolayer graphene (MLG) flake which can be embedded into either a planar antenna or waveguide circuit via NbN (or NbTiN) superconducting contacts with critical temperature ~ 14 K. Recent data on the strength of the electron-phonon coupling are used in the present analysis and the contribution of the readout noise to the Noise Equivalent Power (NEP) is explicitly computed. The readout scheme utilizes Johnson Noise Thermometry (JNT) allowing for Frequency-Domain Multiplexing (FDM) using narrowband filter coupling of the HEBs. In general, the filter bandwidth and the summing amplifier noise have a significant effect on the overall system sensitivity. The analysis shows that the readout contribution can be reduced to that of the bolometer phonon noise if the detector device is operated at 0.05 K and the JNT signal is read at about 10 GHz where the Johnson noise emitted in equilibrium is substantially reduced. Beside the high sensitivity (NEP < 10-20 W/Hz1/2), this bolometer does not have any hard saturation limit and thus can be used for far-IR sky imaging with arbitrary contrast. By changing the operating temperature of the bolometer the sensitivity can be fine tuned to accommodate the background photon flux in a particular application. By using a broadband low-noise kinetic inductance parametric amplifier, ~100s of graphene HEBs can be read simultaneously without saturation of the system output.

  11. Development of NTD Ge Sensors for Superconducting Bolometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garai, A.; Mathimalar, S.; Singh, V.; Dokania, N.; Nanal, V.; Pillay, R. G.; Ramakrishnan, S.; Shrivastava, A.; Jagadeesan, K. C.; Thakare, S. V.

    2016-08-01

    Neutron transmutation-doped (NTD) Ge sensors have been prepared by irradiating device-grade Ge with thermal neutrons at Dhruva reactor, BARC, Mumbai. These sensors are intended to be used for the study of neutrinoless double beta decay in ^{124}Sn with a superconducting Tin bolometer. Resistance measurements are performed on NTD Ge sensors in the temperature range 100-350 mK. The observed temperature dependence is found to be consistent with the variable-range hopping mechanism.

  12. Infrared Imaging Bolometer for the HL-2A Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jinming; Li, Wei; Lu, Jie; Xia, Zhiwei; Yi, Ping; Liu, Yi; Yang, Qingwei; HL-2A Team

    2016-06-01

    An infrared imaging bolometer diagnostic has been upgraded recently to be adapted for the complications of the signal-to-noise ratio arising from the low level of plasma radiation and high reflectivity of low energy photon (<6.2 eV). It utilizes a platinum foil, blackened on both sides with graphite spray, as the bolometer detector. The advantage of the blackened foil is the light absorption extending into the infrared. After a careful calibration of the foil, the incident power density distribution on the foil is determined by solving the heat diffusion equation with a numerical technique. The local plasma radiated power density is reconstructed with a minimum fisher information regularization method by assuming plasma emission toroidal symmetry. Comparisons of the results and the profiles measured by an ordinary bolometric detector demonstrate that this method is good enough to provide the plasma radiated power pattern. The typical plasma radiated power density distribution before and after high mode (H-mode) transition is firstly reconstructed with the infrared imaging bolometer. Moreover, during supersonic molecular beam injection (SMBI), an enhanced radiation region is observed at the edge of the plasma. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 10805016 and 11175061), and the Chinese National Fusion Project for ITER (No. 2014GB109001)

  13. Development of imaging bolometers for magnetic fusion reactors (invited).

    PubMed

    Peterson, Byron J; Parchamy, Homaira; Ashikawa, Naoko; Kawashima, Hisato; Konoshima, Shigeru; Kostryukov, Artem Yu; Miroshnikov, Igor V; Seo, Dongcheol; Omori, T

    2008-10-01

    Imaging bolometers utilize an infrared (IR) video camera to measure the change in temperature of a thin foil exposed to the plasma radiation, thereby avoiding the risks of conventional resistive bolometers related to electric cabling and vacuum feedthroughs in a reactor environment. A prototype of the IR imaging video bolometer (IRVB) has been installed and operated on the JT-60U tokamak demonstrating its applicability to a reactor environment and its ability to provide two-dimensional measurements of the radiation emissivity in a poloidal cross section. In this paper we review this development and present the first results of an upgraded version of this IRVB on JT-60U. This upgrade utilizes a state-of-the-art IR camera (FLIR/Indigo Phoenix-InSb) (3-5 microm, 256 x 360 pixels, 345 Hz, 11 mK) mounted in a neutron/gamma/magnetic shield behind a 3.6 m IR periscope consisting of CaF(2) optics and an aluminum mirror. The IRVB foil is 7 cm x 9 cm x 5 microm tantalum. A noise equivalent power density of 300 microW/cm(2) is achieved with 40 x 24 channels and a time response of 10 ms or 23 microW/cm(2) for 16 x 12 channels and a time response of 33 ms, which is 30 times better than the previous version of the IRVB on JT-60U. PMID:19044463

  14. A 90GHz Bolometer Camera Detector System for the Green

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, Dominic J.; Allen, Christine A.; Buchanan, Ernest; Chen, Tina C.; Chervenak, James A.; Devlin, Mark J.; Dicker, Simon R.; Forgione, Joshua B.

    2004-01-01

    We describe a close-packed, two-dimensional imaging detector system for operation at 90GHz (3.3 mm) for the 100m Green Bank Telescope (GBT). This system will provide high sensitivity (less than 1mJy in 1s) rapid imaging (15'x15' to 150 micron Jy in 1 hr) at the world's largest steerable aperture. The heart of this camera is an 8x8 close-packed, Nyquist-sampled array of superconducting transition edge sensor (TES) bolometers. We have designed and are producing a functional superconducting bolometer array system using a monolithic planar architecture and high-speed multiplexed readout electronics. With an NEP of approximately 2 x 10(exp -17) W/square root of Hz, the TES bolometers will provide fast, linear, sensitive response for high performance imaging. The detectors are read out by an 8x8 time domain SQUID multiplexer. A digital/analog electronics system has been designed to enable read out by SQUID multiplexers. First light for this instrument on the GBT is expected within a year.

  15. A Compact, Modular Package for Superconducting Bolometer Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, D.

    2008-01-01

    As bolometer arrays grow to ever-larger formats, packaging becomes a more critical engineering issue. We have designed a detector package to house a superconducting bolometer array, SQUID multiplexers, bias and filtering circuitry, and electrical connectors. The package includes an optical filter, magnetic shielding, and has well-defined thermal and mechanical interfaces. An early version of this package has been used successfully in the GISMO 2mm camera, a 128-pixel camera operating at a base temperature of 270mK. A more advanced package permits operation at lower temperatures by providing direct heat sinking to the SQUIDS and bias resistors, which generate the bulk of the dissipation in the package. Standard electrical connectors provide reliable contact while enabling quick installation and removal of the package. We describe how the design compensates for differing thermal expansions, allows heat sinking of the bolometer array, and features magnetic shielding in critical areas. We highlight the performance of this detector package and describe its scalability to 1280-pixel arrays in the near future.

  16. A monolithic Si bolometer array for the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ning; Hunter, T. R.; Benford, D. J.; Serabyn, E.; Phillips, T. G.; Moseley, S. H.

    1994-01-01

    We are developing a submillimeter continuum camera for the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) located on Mauna Kea. The camera will employ a monolithic Si bolometer array which was developed by Moseley et al. at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The camera will be cooled to a temperature of about 300 mK in a He-3 cryostat, and will operate primarily at wavelengths of 350 and 450 micrometers. We plan to use a bolometer array with 1x24 directly illuminated pixels, each pixel of dimension 1x2 sq mm, which is about half of the F/4 beam size at these wavelengths. Each pixel is 10 to 12 micrometers thick and is supported only by four thin Si legs formed by wet chemical etch. The pixels are doped n-type by phosphorus implantation, compensated by boron implantation. Signals from the bolometer pixels are first amplified by cryogenically cooled FET's. The signals are further amplified by room-temperature amplifiers and then separately digitized by 16 bit A/D converters with differential inputs. The outputs of the A/D converters are fed into a digital signal processing board via fiber-optic cables. The electronics and data acquisition system were designed by the Goddard group. We will report the status of this effort.

  17. The 0.1K bolometers cooled by adiabatic demagnetization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roellig, T.; Lesyna, L.; Kittel, P.; Werner, M.

    1983-01-01

    The most straightforward way of reducing the noise equivalent power of bolometers is to lower their operating temperature. We have been exploring the possibility of using conventionally constructed bolometers at ultra-low temperatures to achieve NEP's suitable to the background environment of cooled space telescopes. We have chosen the technique of adiabatic demagnetization of a paramagnetic salt as a gravity independent, compact, and low power way to achieve temperatures below pumped He-3 (0.3 K). The demagnetization cryostat we used was capable of reaching temperatures below 0.08 K using Chromium Potassium Alum as a salt from a starting temperature of 1.5 K and a starting magnetic field of 30,000 gauss. Computer control of the magnetic field decay allowed a temperature of 0.2 K to be maintained to within 0.5 mK over a time period exceeding 14 hours. The refrigerator duty cycle was over 90 percent at this temperature. The success of these tests has motivated us to construct a more compact portable adiabatic demagnetization cryostat capable of bolometer optical tests and use at the 5m Hale telescope at 1mm wavelengths.

  18. Development of imaging bolometers for magnetic fusion reactors (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Byron J.; Parchamy, Homaira; Ashikawa, Naoko; Kawashima, Hisato; Konoshima, Shigeru; Kostryukov, Artem Yu.; Miroshnikov, Igor V.; Seo, Dongcheol; Omori, T.

    2008-10-15

    Imaging bolometers utilize an infrared (IR) video camera to measure the change in temperature of a thin foil exposed to the plasma radiation, thereby avoiding the risks of conventional resistive bolometers related to electric cabling and vacuum feedthroughs in a reactor environment. A prototype of the IR imaging video bolometer (IRVB) has been installed and operated on the JT-60U tokamak demonstrating its applicability to a reactor environment and its ability to provide two-dimensional measurements of the radiation emissivity in a poloidal cross section. In this paper we review this development and present the first results of an upgraded version of this IRVB on JT-60U. This upgrade utilizes a state-of-the-art IR camera (FLIR/Indigo Phoenix-InSb) (3-5 {mu}m, 256x360 pixels, 345 Hz, 11 mK) mounted in a neutron/gamma/magnetic shield behind a 3.6 m IR periscope consisting of CaF{sub 2} optics and an aluminum mirror. The IRVB foil is 7 cmx9 cmx5 {mu}m tantalum. A noise equivalent power density of 300 {mu}W/cm{sup 2} is achieved with 40x24 channels and a time response of 10 ms or 23 {mu}W/cm{sup 2} for 16x12 channels and a time response of 33 ms, which is 30 times better than the previous version of the IRVB on JT-60U.

  19. Boron loaded scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, Zane William; Brown, Gilbert Morris; Maya, Leon; Sloop, Jr., Frederick Victor; Sloop, Jr., Frederick Victor

    2009-10-20

    A scintillating composition for detecting neutrons and other radiation comprises a phenyl containing silicone rubber with carborane units and at least one phosphor molecule. The carbonate units can either be a carborane molecule dispersed in the rubber with the aid of a compatibilization agent or can be covalently bound to the silicone.

  20. Polysiloxane scintillator composition

    DOEpatents

    Walker, J.K.

    1992-05-05

    A plastic scintillator useful for detecting ionizing radiation comprising a matrix which comprises an optically transparent polysiloxane having incorporated therein at least one ionizing radiation-hard fluor capable of converting electromagnetic energy produced in the polysiloxane upon absorption of ionizing radiation to detectable light.

  1. SCINTILLATION EXPOSURE RATE DETECTOR

    DOEpatents

    Spears, W.G.

    1960-11-01

    A radiation detector for gamma and x rays is described. The detector comprises a scintillation crystal disposed between a tantalum shield and the input of a photomultiplier tube, the crystal and the shield cooperating so that their combined response to a given quantity of radiation at various energy levels is substantially constant.

  2. Polysiloxane scintillator composition

    DOEpatents

    Walker, James K.

    1992-01-01

    A plastic scintillator useful for detecting ionizing radiation comprising a matrix which comprises an optically transparent polysiloxane having incorporated therein at least one ionizing radiation-hard fluor capable of converting electromagnetic energy produced in the polysiloxane upon absorption of ionizing radiation to detectable light.

  3. Scintillator requirements for medical imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, William W.

    1999-09-01

    Scintillating materials are used in a variety of medical imaging devices. This paper presents a description of four medical imaging modalities that make extensive use of scintillators: planar x-ray imaging, x-ray computed tomography (x-ray CT), SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) and PET (positron emission tomography). The discussion concentrates on a description of the underlying physical principles by which the four modalities operate. The scintillator requirements for these systems are enumerated and the compromises that are made in order to maximize imaging performance utilizing existing scintillating materials are discussed, as is the potential for improving imaging performance by improving scintillator properties.

  4. Scintillator Waveguide For Sensing Radiation

    DOEpatents

    Bliss, Mary; Craig, Richard A.; Reeder; Paul L.

    2003-04-22

    The present invention is an apparatus for detecting ionizing radiation, having: a waveguide having a first end and a second end, the waveguide formed of a scintillator material wherein the therapeutic ionizing radiation isotropically generates scintillation light signals within the waveguide. This apparatus provides a measure of radiation dose. The apparatus may be modified to permit making a measure of location of radiation dose. Specifically, the scintillation material is segmented into a plurality of segments; and a connecting cable for each of the plurality of segments is used for conducting scintillation signals to a scintillation detector.

  5. Infrared detection with high-[Tc] bolometers and response of Nb tunnel junctions to picosecond voltage pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Verghese, S.

    1993-05-01

    Oxide superconductors with high critical temperature [Tc] make sensitive thermometers for several types of infrared bolometers. The authors built composite bolometers with YBa[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]O[sub 7[minus][delta

  6. Integrated Electron-tunneling Refrigerator and TES Bolometer for Millimeter Wave Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverberg, R. F.; Benford, D. J.; Chen, T. C.; Chervenak, J.; Finkbeiner, F.; Moseley, S. H.; Duncan, W.; Miller, N.; Schmidt, D.; Ullom, J.

    2005-01-01

    We describe progress in the development of a close-packed array of bolometers intended for use in photometric applications at millimeter wavelengths from ground- based telescopes. Each bolometer in the may uses a proximity-effect Transition Edge Sensor (TES) sensing element and each will have integrated Normal-Insulator-Superconductor (NIS) refrigerators to cool the bolometer below the ambient bath temperature. The NIS refrigerators and acoustic-phonon-mode-isolated bolometers are fabricated on silicon. The radiation-absorbing element is mechanically suspended by four legs, whose dimensions are used to control and optimize the thermal conductance of the bolometer. Using the technology developed at NIST, we fabricate NIS refrigerators at the base of each of the suspension legs. The NIS refrigerators remove hot electrons by quantum-mechanical tunneling and are expected to cool the biased (approx.10 pW) bolometers to <170 mK while the bolometers are inside a pumped 3He-cooled cryostat operating at approx.280 mK. This significantly lower temperature at the bolometer allows the detectors to approach background-limited performance despite the simple cryogenic system.

  7. Composite scintillator screen

    DOEpatents

    Zeman, Herbert D.

    1994-01-01

    A scintillator screen for an X-ray system includes a substrate of low-Z material and bodies of a high-Z material embedded within the substrate. By preselecting the size of the bodies embedded within the substrate, the spacial separation of the bodies and the thickness of the screen, the sensitivity of the screen to X-rays within a predetermined energy range can be predicted.

  8. Arrays of Bolometers for Far-infrared and Submillimeter Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuss, D. T.; Allen, C. A.; Babu, S.; Casey, S.; Dotson, J. L.; Dowell, C. D.; Jhabvala, M.; Harper, D. A.; Moseley, S. H.; Silverberg, R. F.

    2004-01-01

    We describe 12 x 32 arrays of semiconducting cryogenic bolometers designed for use in far-infrared and submillimeter cameras. These 12 x 32 arrays are constructed from 1 x 32 monolithic pop-up detectors developed at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. The pop-up technology allows the construction of large arrays with high filling factors that provide efficient use of space in the focal planes of far-infrared and submillimeter astronomical instruments. This directly leads to a significant decrease in observing time. The prototype array is currently operating in SHARC II, a facility instrument in use at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO). The elements of this array employ a bismuth absorber coating and quarter wave backshort to optimize the bolometer absorption for a passband centered at 350 microns. However, this resonant structure also provides good bolometer performance at 450 and 850 microns, the two additional SHARC II passbands. A second array is to be installed in the High-resolution Airborne Widebandwidth Camera (HAWC), a far-infrared imaging camera for the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA). This array is currently in the final stage of construction, and its completion is expected in early 2004. HAWC is scheduled for commissioning in 2005. The HAWC array employs titanium-gold absorbers and is optimized for uniform absorption from 40 to 300 microns to accommodate all four of its far-infrared passbands. We describe the details of the array construction including the mechanical design and electrical characterization of the constituent linear arrays, comparing the SHARC II and HAWC cases. We also summarize the overall characteristics of the final two-dimensional arrays. Finally, we show examples of array performance in the form of images obtained with SHARC II.

  9. Submillimeter video imaging with a superconducting bolometer array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Daniel Thomas

    Millimeter wavelength radiation holds promise for detection of security threats at a distance, including suicide bombers and maritime threats in poor weather. The high sensitivity of superconducting Transition Edge Sensor (TES) bolometers makes them ideal for passive imaging of thermal signals at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths. I have built a 350 GHz video-rate imaging system using an array of feedhorn-coupled TES bolometers. The system operates at standoff distances of 16 m to 28 m with a measured spatial resolution of 1.4 cm (at 17 m). It currently contains one 251-detector sub-array, and can be expanded to contain four sub-arrays for a total of 1004 detectors. The system has been used to take video images that reveal the presence of weapons concealed beneath a shirt in an indoor setting. This dissertation describes the design, implementation and characterization of this system. It presents an overview of the challenges associated with standoff passive imaging and how these problems can be overcome through the use of large-format TES bolometer arrays. I describe the design of the system and cover the results of detector and optical characterization. I explain the procedure used to generate video images using the system, and present a noise analysis of those images. This analysis indicates that the Noise Equivalent Temperature Difference (NETD) of the video images is currently limited by artifacts of the scanning process. More sophisticated image processing algorithms can eliminate these artifacts and reduce the NETD to 100 mK, which is the target value for the most demanding passive imaging scenarios. I finish with an overview of future directions for this system.

  10. New scintillator and waveshifter materials

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, H.; Baumbaugh, B.; Gerig, A.; Marchant, J.; Reynolds, K.; Ruchti, R.; Warchol, J; Wayne, M. Hurlbut, C. Kauffman, J. Pla-Dalmau, A.

    1998-11-01

    Experimental applications requiring fast timing and/or high efficiency position and energy measurements typically use scintillation materials. Scintillators utilized for triggering, tracking, and calorimetry in colliding beam detectors are vulnerable to the high radiation fields associated with such experiments. We have begun an investigation of several fluorescent dyes which might lead to fast, efficient, and radiation resistant scintillators. Preliminary results of spectral analysis and efficiency are presented. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. Lunar components in Lunping scintillations

    SciTech Connect

    Koster, J.R.; Lue, H.Y.; Wu, Hsi-Shu; Huang, Yinn-Nien

    1993-08-01

    The authors report on an anlysis of a 14 year data set of ionospheric scintillation data for 136 MHz signals transmitted from a Japanese satellite. They use a lunar age superposition method to analyze this data, breaking the data into blocks by seasons of the year. They observe a number of different scintillation types in the record, as well as impacts of lunar tides on the time record. They attempt to provide an origin for the different scintillation types.

  12. Diffusion-Cooled Tantalum Hot-Electron Bolometer Mixers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skalare, Anders; McGrath, William; Bumble, Bruce; LeDuc, Henry

    2004-01-01

    A batch of experimental diffusion-cooled hot-electron bolometers (HEBs), suitable for use as mixers having input frequencies in the terahertz range and output frequencies up to about a gigahertz, exploit the superconducting/normal-conducting transition in a thin strip of tantalum. The design and operation of these HEB mixers are based on mostly the same principles as those of a prior HEB mixer that exploited the superconducting/normal- conducting transition in a thin strip of niobium and that was described elsewhere.

  13. A plastic scintillation counter prototype.

    PubMed

    Furuta, Etsuko; Kawano, Takao

    2015-10-01

    A new prototype device for beta-ray measurement, a plastic scintillation counter, was assembled as an alternative device to liquid scintillation counters. This device uses plastic scintillation sheets (PS sheets) as a sample applicator without the use of a liquid scintillator. The performance was evaluated using tritium labeled compounds, and good linearity was observed between the activity and net count rate. The calculated detection limit of the device was 0.01 Bq mL(-1) after 10 h measurement for 2 mL sample. PMID:26164628

  14. Statistical analysis of scintillation data

    SciTech Connect

    Chua, S.; Noonan, J.P.; Basu, S.

    1981-09-01

    The Nakagami-m distribution has traditionally been used successfully to model the probability characteristics of ionospheric scintillations at UHF. This report investigates the distribution properties of scintillation data in the L-band range. Specifically, the appropriateness of the Nakagami-m and lognormal distributions is tested. Briefly the results confirm that the Nakagami-m is appropriate for UHF but not for L-band scintillations. The lognormal provides a better fit to the distribution of L-band scintillations and is an adequate model allowing for an error of + or - 0.1 or smaller in predicted probability with a sample size of 256.

  15. Scintillation properties of Bi{sub 4}Ge{sub 3}O{sub 12} down to 3 K under {gamma} rays

    SciTech Connect

    Verdier, M.-A.; Di Stefano, P. C. F.; Dujardin, C.

    2011-12-01

    Bismuth germanate (BGO) has been widely used as a room-temperature scintillator in many applications for decades. Interest in it has recently increased as a low-temperature scintillator to be used in bolometers for rare-event detection. We present our time-resolved-scintillation studies of BGO down to 3 K under {gamma}-ray excitation. Our multiple-photon-counting-coincidence-based setup allows clear identification of {gamma}-line energies at least as low as 122 keV down to base temperature and the measurement of the light yield and decay-time constants as a function of temperature. We also discuss the time structure of the pulses and report a previously unappreciated but significant, very slow component assigned to afterglow. Finally, we demonstrate that nonlinearity of the light yield as a function of energy persists at low temperatures.

  16. The estimation of thermal properties of μ-bolometers in a FPA with some selected structures and pitches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Seung-man; Han, Seungoh; Han, Chang Suk; Lee, Hee Chul

    2012-06-01

    We present a thermal property estimation method required for a bolometer design and demonstrate the utilization of a presented method to the scaled μ-bolometers. The estimated thermal properties of 25μm pitch VOx bolometers with our presented method shows K=1.33x10-8 W/K, H=1.36x10-10 J/K, τth=10.2 ms for an active bolometer and K=1.64x10-6 W/K, H=1.82x10-10 J/K, τth=111 μs for a reference bolometer. These estimated thermal properties have a good agreement with the previous reports and with results from the FEM analyses carried on the same bolometer designs. The presented method is useful to estimate thermal properties of a scaled bolometer and to estimate thermal properties of a specific design.

  17. Bolometer detection of magnetic resonances in nanoscaled objects.

    PubMed

    Rod, Irina; Meckenstock, Ralf; Zähres, Horst; Derricks, Christian; Mushenok, Fedor; Reckers, Nathalie; Kijamnajsuk, Puchong; Wiedwald, Ulf; Farle, Michael

    2014-10-24

    We report on a nanoscaled thermocouple (ThC) as a temperature sensor of a highly sensitive bolometer for probing the dissipative damping of spin dynamics in nanosized Permalloy (Py) stripes. The Au-Pd ThC based device is fabricated by standard electron beam lithography on a 200 nm silicon nitride membrane to minimize heat dissipation through the substrate. We show that this thermal sensor allows not only measurements of the temperature change on the order of a few mK due to the uniform resonant microwave (MW) absorption by the Py stripe but also detection of standing spin waves of different mode numbers. Using a 3D finite element method, we estimate the absorbed MW power by the stripe in resonance and prove the necessity of using substrates with an extremely low heat dissipation like a silicon nitride membrane for successful thermal detection. The voltage responsivity and the noise equivalent power for the ThC-based bolometer are equal to 15 V W(-1) and 3 nW Hz(-1/2), respectively. The ThC device offers a magnetic resonance response of 1 nV/(μ(B) W) corresponding to a sensitivity of 10(9) spins and a temperature resolution of 300 μK under vacuum conditions. PMID:25271896

  18. Design analysis of a novel low temperature bolometer

    SciTech Connect

    Nahum, M.; Richards, P.L. . Dept. of Physics Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA )

    1990-09-01

    We propose a novel antenna-coupled superconducting bolometer which makes use of the thermal boundary resistance available at low temperatures. The radiation is collected by a planar self-complementary antenna and thermalized in a small thin film resistor. The resulting temperature rise is detected by a transition edge thermometer which can be (but need not be) a separate film. All components are deposited directly on a substrate so that arrays can be conveniently produced by conventional lithographic techniques. The active area of the bolometer is thermally decoupled by its small size and by the thermal resistance of the boundaries with the substrate and the antenna terminals. Design calculations based on a 2 {times} 2 {mu}m square film of a superconductor with {Tc} {approx}0 .1 K give an NEP {approx} 10{sup {minus}18} WHz{sup {minus}1/2}, time constant {approx}10{sup {minus}6} s and responsivities up to {approx}10{sup 9} V/W. These specifications meet the requirements for NASA's Space Infrared Telescope Facility and Sub-Millimeter Moderate Mission. Useful applications also exist at {sup 3}He and {sup 4}He temperatures. The calculated NEP scales as T{sup 5/2}. Materials, architectures, and readout schemes will be discussed. 22 refs., 3 figs.

  19. Status of NTD Ge bolometer material and devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haller, E. E.; Haegel, N. M.; Park, I. S.

    1986-01-01

    The first IR Detector Technology Workshop took place at NASA Ames Research Center on July 12 and 13, 1983. The conclusions presented at that meeting are still valid. More was learned about the physics of hopping conduction at very low temperatures which will be important for bolometer design and operation at ever decreasing temperatures. Resistivity measurements were extended down to 50 mK. At such low temperatures, precise knowledge of the neutron capture cross sections sigma (sub n) of the various Ge isotopes is critical if one is to make an accurate prediction of the dopant concentrations and compensation, and therefore resistivity, that will result from a given irradiation. An empirical approach for obtaining the desired resistivity material is described and the process of conducting a set of experiments which will improve the knowledge of the effective sigma (sub n) values for a given location in a particular reactor is discussed. A wider range of NTD Ge samples is now available. Noise measurements on bolometers with ion implanted contacts show the no 1/f noise component appears down to 1 Hz and probably lower.

  20. Bolometer detection of magnetic resonances in nanoscaled objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rod, Irina; Meckenstock, Ralf; Zähres, Horst; Derricks, Christian; Mushenok, Fedor; Reckers, Nathalie; Kijamnajsuk, Puchong; Wiedwald, Ulf; Farle, Michael

    2014-10-01

    We report on a nanoscaled thermocouple (ThC) as a temperature sensor of a highly sensitive bolometer for probing the dissipative damping of spin dynamics in nanosized Permalloy (Py) stripes. The Au-Pd ThC based device is fabricated by standard electron beam lithography on a 200 nm silicon nitride membrane to minimize heat dissipation through the substrate. We show that this thermal sensor allows not only measurements of the temperature change on the order of a few mK due to the uniform resonant microwave (MW) absorption by the Py stripe but also detection of standing spin waves of different mode numbers. Using a 3D finite element method, we estimate the absorbed MW power by the stripe in resonance and prove the necessity of using substrates with an extremely low heat dissipation like a silicon nitride membrane for successful thermal detection. The voltage responsivity and the noise equivalent power for the ThC-based bolometer are equal to 15 V W-1 and 3 nW Hz-1/2, respectively. The ThC device offers a magnetic resonance response of 1 nV/(μB W) corresponding to a sensitivity of 109 spins and a temperature resolution of 300 μK under vacuum conditions.

  1. Free liquid scintillation counting bibliography

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    Packard Instrument Company announces the availability of its newly updated Bibliography of Packard Tri-Carb Liquid Scintillation Analyzers. This unique new booklet lists 628 references in which Packard Tri-Carb{reg_sign} liquid scintillation analyzers have been used in life science, environmental, nuclear power and archaeological measurements. All listings are cross-referenced by radionuclide, specific field of study and author.

  2. Lithium-loaded liquid scintillators

    DOEpatents

    Dai, Sheng; Kesanli, Banu; Neal, John S.

    2012-05-15

    The invention is directed to a liquid scintillating composition containing (i) one or more non-polar organic solvents; (ii) (lithium-6)-containing nanoparticles having a size of up to 10 nm and surface-capped by hydrophobic molecules; and (iii) one or more fluorophores. The invention is also directed to a liquid scintillator containing the above composition.

  3. Development of radiation hard scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markley, F.; Davidson, M.; Keller, J.; Foster, G.; Pla-Dalmau, A.; Harmon, J.; Biagtan, E.; Schueneman, G.; Senchishin, V.; Gustfason, H.

    1993-11-01

    The authors have demonstrated that the radiation stability of scintillators made from styrene polymer is very much improved by compounding with pentaphenyl trimethyl trisiloxane (DC 705 vacuum pump oil). The resulting scintillators are softer than desired, so they decided to make the scintillators directly from monomer where the base resin could be easily crosslinked to improve the mechanical properties. They can now demonstrate that scintillators made directly from the monomer, using both styrene and 4-methyl styrene, are also much more radiation resistant when modified with DC705 oil. In fact, they retain from 92% to 95% of their original light output after gamma irradiation to 10 Mrads in nitrogen with air annealing. When these scintillators made directly from monomer are compared with scintillators of the same composition made from polymer the latter have much higher light outputs. They commonly reach 83% while those made from monomer give only 50% to 60% relative to the reference, BC408. When oil modified scintillators using both p-terphenyl and tetra phenyl butadiene are compared with identical scintillators except that they use 3 hydroxy-flavone as the only luminophore the radiation stability is the same. However the 3HF system gives only 30% as much light as BC408 instead of 83% when both are measured with a green extended Phillips XP2081B phototube.

  4. Extruding plastic scintillator at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Anna Pla-Dalmau; Alan D. Bross; Victor V. Rykalin

    2003-10-31

    An understanding of the costs involved in the production of plastic scintillators and the development of a less expensive material have become necessary with the prospects of building very large plastic scintillation detectors. Several factors contribute to the high cost of plastic scintillating sheets, but the principal reason is the labor-intensive nature of the manufacturing process. In order to significantly lower the costs, the current casting procedures had to be abandoned. Since polystyrene is widely used in the consumer industry, the logical path was to investigate the extrusion of commercial-grade polystyrene pellets with dopants to yield high quality plastic scintillator. This concept was tested and high quality extruded plastic scintillator was produced. The D0 and MINOS experiments are already using extruded scintillator strips in their detectors. An extrusion line has recently been installed at Fermilab in collaboration with NICADD (Northern Illinois Center for Accelerator and Detector Development). This new facility will serve to further develop and improve extruded plastic scintillator. This paper will discuss the characteristics of extruded plastic scintillator and its raw materials, the different manufacturing techniques and the current R&D program at Fermilab.

  5. Development of radiation hard scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Markley, F.; Davidson, M.; Keller, J.; Foster, G.; Pla-Dalmau, A.; Harmon, J.; Biagtan, E.; Schueneman, G.; Senchishin, V.; Gustfason, H.; Rivard, M.

    1993-11-01

    The authors have demonstrated that the radiation stability of scintillators made from styrene polymer is very much improved by compounding with pentaphenyltrimethyltrisiloxane (DC 705 vacuum pump oil). The resulting scintillators are softer than desired, so they decided to make the scintillators directly from monomer where the base resin could be easily crosslinked to improve the mechanical properties. They can now demonstrate that scintillators made directly from the monomer, using both styrene and 4-methyl styrene, are also much more radiation resistant when modified with DC705 oil. In fact, they retain from 92% to 95% of their original light output after gamma irradiation to 10 Mrads in nitrogen with air annealing. When these scintillators made directly from monomer are compared with scintillators of the same composition made from polymer the latter have much higher light outputs. They commonly reach 83% while those made form monomer give only 50% to 60% relative to the reference, BC408. When oil modified scintillators using both p-terphenyl and tetraphenylbutadiene are compared with identical scintillators except that they use 3 hydroxy-flavone as the only luminophore the radiation stability is the same. However the 3HF system gives only 30% as much light as BC408 instead of 83% when both are measured with a green extended Phillips XP2081B phototube.

  6. Hybrid scintillators for neutron discrimination

    DOEpatents

    Feng, Patrick L; Cordaro, Joseph G; Anstey, Mitchell R; Morales, Alfredo M

    2015-05-12

    A composition capable of producing a unique scintillation response to neutrons and gamma rays, comprising (i) at least one surfactant; (ii) a polar hydrogen-bonding solvent; and (iii) at least one luminophore. A method including combining at least one surfactant, a polar hydrogen-bonding solvent and at least one luminophore in a scintillation cell under vacuum or an inert atmosphere.

  7. Development of intrinsic IPT scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Bross, A.D.

    1989-07-31

    We report on the development of a new polystyrene based plastic scintillator. Optical absorption, fluorescence and light output measurements are presented. Preliminary results of radiation damage effects are also given and compared to the effects on a commercial plastic scintillator, NE 110. 6 refs., 12 figs.

  8. Design of high-T{sub c} superconducting bolometers for a far infrared imaging array

    SciTech Connect

    Verghese, S.; Richards, P.L.; Fork, D.K.; Char, K.; Geballe, T.H.

    1992-08-01

    The design of high-{Tc} superconducting bolometers for use in a far infrared imaging array from wavelengths 30--100{mu}m is discussed. Measurements of the voltage noise in thin films of YBa{sub 2}CU{sub 3}O{sub 7-{var_sigma}} on yttria-stabilized zirconia buffer layers on silicon substrates are used to make performance estimates. Useful opportunities exist for imaging and spectroscopy with bolometer arrays made on micro-machined silicon membranes. A circuit on each pixel which performs some signal integration can improve the sensitivity of large two-dimensional arrays of bolometers which use multiplexed readout amplifiers.

  9. Arrays of membrane isolated yttrium-barium-copper-oxide kinetic inductance bolometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindeman, M. A.; Bonetti, J. A.; Bumble, B.; Day, P. K.; Eom, B. H.; Holmes, W. A.; Kleinsasser, A. W.

    2014-06-01

    We are developing of arrays of membrane isolated resonator-bolometers, each with a kinetic inductance device (KID) to measure the temperature of the membrane. The KIDs are fabricated out of the high temperature superconductor YBCO to allow operation at relatively high temperatures. The bolometers are designed to offer higher sensitivity than sensors operating at 300 K, but they require less expensive and lighter weight cooling than even more sensitive conventional superconducting detectors operating at lower temperatures. The bolometer arrays are applicable as focal planes in infrared imaging spectrometers, such as for planetary science missions or earth observing satellites. We describe the devices and present measurements of their sensitivity.

  10. Arrays of membrane isolated yttrium-barium-copper-oxide kinetic inductance bolometers

    SciTech Connect

    Lindeman, M. A. Bonetti, J. A.; Bumble, B.; Day, P. K.; Holmes, W. A.; Kleinsasser, A. W.; Eom, B. H.

    2014-06-21

    We are developing of arrays of membrane isolated resonator-bolometers, each with a kinetic inductance device (KID) to measure the temperature of the membrane. The KIDs are fabricated out of the high temperature superconductor YBCO to allow operation at relatively high temperatures. The bolometers are designed to offer higher sensitivity than sensors operating at 300 K, but they require less expensive and lighter weight cooling than even more sensitive conventional superconducting detectors operating at lower temperatures. The bolometer arrays are applicable as focal planes in infrared imaging spectrometers, such as for planetary science missions or earth observing satellites. We describe the devices and present measurements of their sensitivity.

  11. The 160 TES bolometer read-out using FDM for SAFARI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hijmering, R. A.; den Hartog, R. H.; van der Linden, A. J.; Ridder, M.; Bruijn, M. P.; van der Kuur, J.; van Leeuwen, B. J.; van Winden, P.; Jackson, B.

    2014-07-01

    For the read out of the Transition Edge Sensors (TES) bolometer arrays of the SAFARI instrument on the Japanese background-limited far-IR SPICA mission SRON is developing a Frequency Domain Multiplexing (FDM) read-out system. The next step after the successful demonstration of the read out of 38 TES bolometers using FDM was to demonstrate the FDM readout of the required 160 TES bolometers. Of the 160 LC filter and TES bolometer chains 151 have been connected and after cooldown 148 of the resonances could be identified. Although initial operation and locking of the pixels went smoothly the experiment revealed several complications. In this paper we describe the 160 pixel FDM set-up, show the results and discuss the issues faced during operation of the 160 pixel FDM experiment.

  12. Preliminary performance measurements of bolometers for the planck high frequency instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, W.; Bock, J.; Ganga, K.; Hristov, V. V.; Hustead, L.; Koch, T.; Lange, A. E.; Paine, C.; Yun, M.

    2002-01-01

    We report on the characterization of bolometers fabricated at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for the High Frequency Instrument (HFI) of the joint ESA/NASA Herschel/Planck mission to be launched in 2007.

  13. Proton recoil scintillator neutron rem meter

    DOEpatents

    Olsher, Richard H.; Seagraves, David T.

    2003-01-01

    A neutron rem meter utilizing proton recoil and thermal neutron scintillators to provide neutron detection and dose measurement. In using both fast scintillators and a thermal neutron scintillator the meter provides a wide range of sensitivity, uniform directional response, and uniform dose response. The scintillators output light to a photomultiplier tube that produces an electrical signal to an external neutron counter.

  14. Ionospheric scintillation studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rino, C. L.; Freemouw, E. J.

    1973-01-01

    The diffracted field of a monochromatic plane wave was characterized by two complex correlation functions. For a Gaussian complex field, these quantities suffice to completely define the statistics of the field. Thus, one can in principle calculate the statistics of any measurable quantity in terms of the model parameters. The best data fits were achieved for intensity statistics derived under the Gaussian statistics hypothesis. The signal structure that achieved the best fit was nearly invariant with scintillation level and irregularity source (ionosphere or solar wind). It was characterized by the fact that more than 80% of the scattered signal power is in phase quadrature with the undeviated or coherent signal component. Thus, the Gaussian-statistics hypothesis is both convenient and accurate for channel modeling work.

  15. Optical characterization of ultra-sensitive TES bolometers for SAFARI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audley, Michael D.; de Lange, Gerhard; Gao, Jian-Rong; Khosropanah, Pourya; Mauskopf, Philip D.; Morozov, Dmitry; Trappe, Neil A.; Doherty, Stephen; Withington, Stafford

    2014-07-01

    We have characterized the optical response of prototype detectors for SAFARI, the far-infrared imaging spectrometer for the SPICA satellite. SAFARI's three bolometer arrays will image a 2'×2' field of view with spectral information over the wavelength range 34—210 μm. SAFARI requires extremely sensitive detectors (goal NEP ~ 0.2 aW/√Hz), with correspondingly low saturation powers (~5 fW), to take advantage of SPICA's cooled optics. We have constructed an ultra-low background optical test facility containing an internal cold black-body illuminator and have recently added an internal hot black-body source and a light-pipe for external illumination. We illustrate the performance of the test facility with results including spectral-response measurements. Based on an improved understanding of the optical throughput of the test facility we find an optical efficiency of 60% for prototype SAFARI detectors.

  16. Monolayer Graphene Bolometer as a Sensitive Far-IR Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karasik, Boris S.; McKitterick, Christopher B.; Prober, Daniel E.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we give a detailed analysis of the expected sensitivity and operating conditions in the power detection mode of a hot-electron bolometer (HEB) made from a few micro m(sup 2) of monolayer graphene (MLG) flake which can be embedded into either a planar antenna or waveguide circuit via NbN (or NbTiN) superconducting contacts with critical temperature approx. 14 K. Recent data on the strength of the electron-phonon coupling are used in the present analysis and the contribution of the readout noise to the Noise Equivalent Power (NEP) is explicitly computed. The readout scheme utilizes Johnson Noise Thermometry (JNT) allowing for Frequency-Domain Multiplexing (FDM) using narrowband filter coupling of the HEBs. In general, the filter bandwidth and the summing amplifier noise have a significant effect on the overall system sensitivity.

  17. A 100 micro Kelvin bolometer system for SIRTF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstein, G. M.; Timbie, P. T.; Richards, P. L.

    1989-01-01

    Progress toward a prototype of 100 mK bolometric detection system for the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) is described. Two adiabatic demagnetization refrigerators (ADR's) were constructed and used to investigate the capabilities necessary for orbital operation. The first, a laboratory ADR, demonstrated a hold time at 0.1 K of over 12 hours, with temperature stability approx. 3 micro-K RMS achieved by controlling the magnetic field. A durable salt pill and an efficient support system have been demonstrated. A second ADR, the SIRTF flight prototype, has been built and will be flown on a balloon. Techniques for magnetic shielding, low heat leak current leads, and a mechanical heat switch are being developed in this ADR. Plans for construction of 100 mK bolometers are discussed. Three important cosmological investigations which will be carried out by these longest wavelength SIRTF detectors are described.

  18. Properties of scintillator solutes

    SciTech Connect

    Fluornoy, J.M.

    1998-06-01

    This special report summarizes measurements of the spectroscopic and other properties of the solutes that were used in the preparation of several new liquid scintillators developed at EG and G/Energy Measurements/Santa Barbara Operations (the precursor to Bechtel Nevada/Special Technologies Laboratory) on the radiation-to-light converter program. The data on the individual compounds are presented in a form similar to that used by Prof. Isadore Berlman in his classic handbook of fluorescence spectra. The temporal properties and relative efficiencies of the new scintillators are presented in Table 1, and the efficiencies as a function of wavelength are presented graphically in Figure 1. In addition, there is a descriptive glossary of the abbreviations used herein. Figure 2 illustrates the basic structures of some of the compounds and of the four solvents reported in this summary. The emission spectra generally exhibit more structure than the absorption spectra, with the result that the peak emission wavelength for a given compound may lie several nm away from the wavelength, {lambda}{sub avg}, at the geometric center of the emission spectrum. Therefore, the author has chosen to list absorption peaks, {lambda}{sub max}, and emission {lambda}{sub avg} values in Figures 3--30, as being most illustrative of the differences between the compounds. The compounds, BHTP, BTPB, ADBT, and DPTPB were all developed on this program. P-terphenyl, PBD, and TPB are commercially available blue emitters. C-480 and the other longer-wavelength emitters are laser dyes available commercially from Exciton Corporation. 1 ref., 30 figs.

  19. A frequency selective bolometer camera for measuring millimeter spectral energy distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logan, Daniel William

    2009-06-01

    Bolometers are the most sensitive detectors for measuring millimeter and submillimeter wavelength astrophysical signals. Cameras comprised of arrays of bolometers have already made significant contributions to the field of astronomy. A challenge for bolometer cameras is obtaining observations at multiple wavelengths. Traditionally, observing in multiple bands requires a partial disassembly of the instrument to replace bandpass filters, a task which prevents immediate spectral interrogation of a source. More complex cameras have been constructed to observe in several bands using beam splitters and dichroic filters, but the added complexity leads to physically larger instruments with reduced efficiencies. The SPEctral Energy Distribution camera (SPEED) is a new type of bolometer camera designed to efficiently observe in multiple wavebands without the need for excess bandpass filters and beam splitters. SPEED is a ground-based millimeter-wave bolometer camera designed to observe at 2.1, 1.3, 1.1, and 0.85 mm simultaneously. SPEED makes use of a new type of bolometer, the frequency selective bolometer (FSB), to observe all of the wavebands within each of the camera's four pixels. FSBs incorporate frequency selective dipole surfaces as absorbing elements allowing each detector to absorb a single, narrow band of radiation and pass all other radiation with low loss. Each FSB also contains a superconducting transition-edge sensor (TES) that acts as a sensitive thermistor for measuring the temperature of the FSB. This thesis describes the development of the SPEED camera and FSB detectors. The design of the detectors used in the instrument is described as well as the the general optical performance of frequency selective dipole surfaces. Laboratory results of both the optical and thermal properties of millimeter- wave FSBs are also presented. The SPEED instrument and its components are highlighted and the optical design of the optics which couple SPEED to the Heinrich Hertz

  20. Scintillator materials containing lanthanum fluorides

    DOEpatents

    Moses, W.W.

    1991-05-14

    An improved radiation detector containing a crystalline mixture of LaF[sub 3] and CeF[sub 3] as the scintillator element is disclosed. Scintillators made with from 25% to 99.5% LaF[sub 3] and the remainder CeF[sub 3] have been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is equal to or superior to other known scintillator materials, and which may be processed from natural starting materials containing both rare earth elements. The radiation detectors disclosed are favorably suited for use in general purpose detection and in positron emission tomography. 2 figures.

  1. Scintillator materials containing lanthanum fluorides

    DOEpatents

    Moses, William W.

    1991-01-01

    An improved radiation detector containing a crystalline mixture of LaF.sub.3 and CeF.sub.3 as the scintillator element is disclosed. Scintillators made with from 25% to 99.5% LaF.sub.3 and the remainder CeF.sub.3 have been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is equal to or superior to other known scintillator materials, and which may be processed from natural starting materials containing both rare earth elements. The radiation detectors disclosed are favorably suited for use in general purpose detection and in positron emission tomography.

  2. PolKa: a polarimeter for submillimeter bolometer arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siringo, Giorgio

    2003-04-01

    Starting from measurements of the linear polarization of the radiation emitted by celestial objects it is possible to estimate some physical parameters of the source. For example, magnetic field intensities and directions or, when the magnetic field is already known, the processes producing the polarization. A new concept of polarimeter has been designed to be used together with the arrays of bolometers developed in the Bolometer Group at the Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie in Bonn. The new polarimeter has the unique characteristic of being tunable over a wide range of wavelengths and of producing a negligible absorption. It has been used at the Heinrich Hertz telescope in Arizona, to measure the linear polarization of some quasars and of some extended sources inside our galaxy. Some results are presented. We detected polarization on the quasars 3C279 and 1633+382. On 3C279 we also detected polarization variability on a time scale of a week. Three maps of extended sources are presented: the BN/KL complex in Orion OMC-1, a filament cloud in Orion OMC-3 and the massive star forming region IRAS 05358+3543. The first map shows the polarization pattern in OMC-1 over an extended sky area with high signal-to-noise and accurate detection of the position angle. The filament in OMC-3 was observed for a short integration time and is presented here only to show the agreement with published data even under conditions of a weak signal-to-noise. The third map is the first detection of polarization in the high-mass star forming region IRAS 05358+3543. The polarimeter has low spurious polarization and a good efficiency and the tests at the telescope show that it is well suited to become a permanent facility.

  3. A strained silicon cold electron bolometer using Schottky contacts

    SciTech Connect

    Brien, T. L. R. Ade, P. A. R.; Barry, P. S.; Dunscombe, C.; Morozov, D. V.; Sudiwala, R. V.; Leadley, D. R.; Myronov, M.; Parker, E. H. C.; Prest, M. J.; Whall, T. E.; Prunnila, M.; Mauskopf, P. D.

    2014-07-28

    We describe optical characterisation of a strained silicon cold electron bolometer (CEB), operating on a 350 mK stage, designed for absorption of millimetre-wave radiation. The silicon cold electron bolometer utilises Schottky contacts between a superconductor and an n{sup ++} doped silicon island to detect changes in the temperature of the charge carriers in the silicon, due to variations in absorbed radiation. By using strained silicon as the absorber, we decrease the electron-phonon coupling in the device and increase the responsivity to incoming power. The strained silicon absorber is coupled to a planar aluminium twin-slot antenna designed to couple to 160 GHz and that serves as the superconducting contacts. From the measured optical responsivity and spectral response, we calculate a maximum optical efficiency of 50% for radiation coupled into the device by the planar antenna and an overall noise equivalent power, referred to absorbed optical power, of 1.1×10{sup −16} W Hz{sup −1/2} when the detector is observing a 300 K source through a 4 K throughput limiting aperture. Even though this optical system is not optimized, we measure a system noise equivalent temperature difference of 6 mK Hz{sup −1/2}. We measure the noise of the device using a cross-correlation of time stream data, measured simultaneously with two junction field-effect transistor amplifiers, with a base correlated noise level of 300 pV Hz{sup −1/2} and find that the total noise is consistent with a combination of photon noise, current shot noise, and electron-phonon thermal noise.

  4. Frequency multiplexed superconducting quantum interference device readout of large bolometer arrays for cosmic microwave background measurements.

    PubMed

    Dobbs, M A; Lueker, M; Aird, K A; Bender, A N; Benson, B A; Bleem, L E; Carlstrom, J E; Chang, C L; Cho, H-M; Clarke, J; Crawford, T M; Crites, A T; Flanigan, D I; de Haan, T; George, E M; Halverson, N W; Holzapfel, W L; Hrubes, J D; Johnson, B R; Joseph, J; Keisler, R; Kennedy, J; Kermish, Z; Lanting, T M; Lee, A T; Leitch, E M; Luong-Van, D; McMahon, J J; Mehl, J; Meyer, S S; Montroy, T E; Padin, S; Plagge, T; Pryke, C; Richards, P L; Ruhl, J E; Schaffer, K K; Schwan, D; Shirokoff, E; Spieler, H G; Staniszewski, Z; Stark, A A; Vanderlinde, K; Vieira, J D; Vu, C; Westbrook, B; Williamson, R

    2012-07-01

    A technological milestone for experiments employing transition edge sensor bolometers operating at sub-Kelvin temperature is the deployment of detector arrays with 100s-1000s of bolometers. One key technology for such arrays is readout multiplexing: the ability to read out many sensors simultaneously on the same set of wires. This paper describes a frequency-domain multiplexed readout system which has been developed for and deployed on the APEX-SZ and South Pole Telescope millimeter wavelength receivers. In this system, the detector array is divided into modules of seven detectors, and each bolometer within the module is biased with a unique ∼MHz sinusoidal carrier such that the individual bolometer signals are well separated in frequency space. The currents from all bolometers in a module are summed together and pre-amplified with superconducting quantum interference devices operating at 4 K. Room temperature electronics demodulate the carriers to recover the bolometer signals, which are digitized separately and stored to disk. This readout system contributes little noise relative to the detectors themselves, is remarkably insensitive to unwanted microphonic excitations, and provides a technology pathway to multiplexing larger numbers of sensors. PMID:22852677

  5. Scintillator fiber optic long counter

    DOEpatents

    McCollum, Tom; Spector, Garry B.

    1994-01-01

    A flat response position sensitive neutron detector capable of providing neutron spectroscopic data utilizing scintillator fiber optic filaments embedded in a neutron moderating housing having an open end through which neutrons enter to be detected.

  6. Scintillator fiber optic long counter

    DOEpatents

    McCollum, T.; Spector, G.B.

    1994-03-29

    A flat response position sensitive neutron detector capable of providing neutron spectroscopic data utilizing scintillator fiber optic filaments embedded in a neutron moderating housing having an open end through which neutrons enter to be detected is described. 11 figures.

  7. Photon statistics in scintillation crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bora, Vaibhav Joga Singh

    Scintillation based gamma-ray detectors are widely used in medical imaging, high-energy physics, astronomy and national security. Scintillation gamma-ray detectors are eld-tested, relatively inexpensive, and have good detection eciency. Semi-conductor detectors are gaining popularity because of their superior capability to resolve gamma-ray energies. However, they are relatively hard to manufacture and therefore, at this time, not available in as large formats and much more expensive than scintillation gamma-ray detectors. Scintillation gamma-ray detectors consist of: a scintillator, a material that emits optical (scintillation) photons when it interacts with ionization radiation, and an optical detector that detects the emitted scintillation photons and converts them into an electrical signal. Compared to semiconductor gamma-ray detectors, scintillation gamma-ray detectors have relatively poor capability to resolve gamma-ray energies. This is in large part attributed to the "statistical limit" on the number of scintillation photons. The origin of this statistical limit is the assumption that scintillation photons are either Poisson distributed or super-Poisson distributed. This statistical limit is often dened by the Fano factor. The Fano factor of an integer-valued random process is dened as the ratio of its variance to its mean. Therefore, a Poisson process has a Fano factor of one. The classical theory of light limits the Fano factor of the number of photons to a value greater than or equal to one (Poisson case). However, the quantum theory of light allows for Fano factors to be less than one. We used two methods to look at the correlations between two detectors looking at same scintillation pulse to estimate the Fano factor of the scintillation photons. The relationship between the Fano factor and the correlation between the integral of the two signals detected was analytically derived, and the Fano factor was estimated using the measurements for SrI2:Eu, YAP

  8. About NICADD extruded scintillating strips

    SciTech Connect

    Dyshkant, A.; Beznosko, D.; Blazey, G.; Chakraborty, D.; Francis, K.; Kubik, D.; Lima, J.G.; Rykalin, V.; Zutshi, v.; Baldina, E.; Bross, A.; Deering, P.; Nebel, T.; Pla-Dalmau, A.; Schellpfeffer, J.; Serritella, C.; Zimmerman, J.; /Fermilab

    2005-04-01

    The results of control measurements of extruded scintillating strip responses to a radioactive source Sr-90 are provided, and details of strip choice, preparation, and method of measurement are included. About four hundred one meter long extruded scintillating strips were measured at four different points. These results were essential for prototyping a tail catcher and muon tracker for a future international electron positron linear collider detector.

  9. Ionospheric Scintillation Effects on GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steenburgh, R. A.; Smithtro, C.; Groves, K.

    2007-12-01

    . Ionospheric scintillation of Global Positioning System (GPS) signals threatens navigation and military operations by degrading performance or making GPS unavailable. Scintillation is particularly active, although not limited to, a belt encircling the earth within 20 degrees of the geomagnetic equator. As GPS applications and users increases, so does the potential for detrimental impacts from scintillation. We examined amplitude scintillation data spanning seven years from Ascension Island, U.K.; Ancon, Peru; and Antofagasta, Chile in the Atlantic/Americas longitudinal sector at as well as data from Parepare, Indonesia; Marak Parak, Malaysia; Pontianak, Indonesia; Guam; and Diego Garcia, U.K.; in the Pacific longitudinal sector. From these data, we calculate percent probability of occurrence of scintillation at various intensities described by the S4 index. Additionally, we determine Dilution of Precision at one minute resolution. We examine diurnal, seasonal and solar cycle characteristics and make spatial comparisons. In general, activity was greatest during the equinoxes and solar maximum, although scintillation at Antofagasta, Chile was higher during 1998 rather than at solar maximum.

  10. Extruded plastic scintillator including inorganic powders

    DOEpatents

    Bross, Alan D.; Mellott, Kerry L.; Pla-Dalmau, Anna

    2006-06-27

    A method for producing a plastic scintillator is disclosed. A plurality of nano-sized particles and one or more dopants can be combined with a plastic material for the formation of a plastic scintillator thereof. The nano-sized particles, the dopant and the plastic material can be combined within the dry inert atmosphere of an extruder to produce a reaction that results in the formation of a plastic scintillator thereof and the deposition of energy within the plastic scintillator, such that the plastic scintillator produces light signifying the detection of a radiative element. The nano-sized particles can be treated with an inert gas prior to processing the nano-sized particles, the dopant and the plastic material utilizing the extruder. The plastic scintillator can be a neutron-sensitive scintillator, x-ray sensitive scintillator and/or a scintillator for the detection of minimum ionizing particles.

  11. PMT calibration of a scintillation detector using primary scintillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, E. D. C.; Fernandes, L. M. P.; Yahlali, N.; Pérez, J.; Álvarez, V.; Borges, F. I. G.; Camargo, M.; Cárcel, S.; Cebrián, S.; Cervera, A.; Conde, C. A. N.; Dafni, T.; Díaz, J.; Esteve, R.; Ferrario, P.; Ferreira, A. L.; Gehman, V. M.; Goldschmidt, A.; Gómez, H.; Gómez-Cadenas, J. J.; González Díaz, D.; Gutiérrez, R. M.; Hauptman, J.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; Herrera, D. C.; Irastorza, I. G.; Labarga, L.; Laing, A.; Liubarsky, I.; Lopez-March, N.; Lorca, D.; Losada, M.; Luzón, G.; Marí, A.; Martín-Albo, J.; Martínez, A.; Martínez Lema, G.; Miller, T.; Monrabal, F.; Monserrate, M.; Mora, F. J.; Moutinho, L. M.; Muñoz Vidal, J.; Nebot Guinot, M.; Nygren, D.; Oliveira, C. A. B.; Pérez, J.; Pérez Aparicio, J. L.; Querol, M.; Renner, J.; Ripoll, L.; Rodríguez, A.; Rodríguez, J.; Santos, F. P.; Dos Santos, J. M. F.; Seguí, L.; Serra, L.; Shuman, D.; Simón, A.; Sofka, C.; Sorel, M.; Toledo, J. F.; Torrent, J.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Veloso, J. F. C. A.; Villar, J. A.; Webb, R.; White, J.; Monteiro, C. M. B.

    2015-02-01

    We have studied the calibration of PMTs in scintillation detectors, inducing single electron response on the PMT from primary scintillation produced by x-ray interaction. The results agree with those obtained by the commonly used single electron response (SER) method, which uses LED light pulses to induce the PMT SER. The use of the primary scintillation for PMT calibration will be convenient in situations where the PMT is already in situ, when it becomes difficult or even impossible to apply the SER method, e.g. in commercial sealed scintillator/PMT devices. Furthermore, we have experimentally investigated the possibility of fitting the high-charge tail of the PMT SER pulse-height distribution to an exponential function, inferring the PMT gain from the inverse of the exponent. The results of the exponential fit method agree with those obtained by the SER method for pulse-height distributions resulting from an average number of around 1.0 photoelectrons reaching the first dynode per light/scintillation pulse. The SER method has higher precision and, therefore, is used in a larger number of applications. Nevertheless, the exponential fit method will be useful in situations where the single photoelectron peak is under the background or noise peak and it may present an alternative, simple way, for relative gain calibration of PMT arrays as well as for monitoring the PMT gain variations.

  12. FNAL-NICADD extruded scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Beznosko, D.; Bross, A.; Dyshkant, A.; Pla-Dalmau, A.; Rykalin, V.; /Northern Illinois U.

    2005-09-01

    The possibility to produce a scintillator that satisfies the demands of physicists from different science areas has emerged with the installation of an extrusion line at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL). The extruder is the product of the fruitful collaboration between FNAL and Northern Illinois Center for Accelerator and Detector Development (NICADD) at Northern Illinois University (NIU). The results from the light output, light attenuation length and mechanical tolerance indicate that FNAL-NICADD scintillator is of high quality. Improvements in the extrusion die will yield better scintillator profiles and decrease the time needed for initial tuning. This paper will present the characteristics of the FNAL-NICADD scintillator based on the measurements performed. They include the response to MIPs from cosmic rays for individual extruded strips and irradiation studies where extruded samples were irradiated up to 1 Mrad. We will also discuss the results achieved with a new die design. The attractive perspective of using the extruded scintillator with MRS (Metal Resistive Semiconductor) photodetector readout will also be shown.

  13. Development of Uncooled Micro-bolometer Arrays Based on Hole-doped Rare-Earth Manganites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanyi, E.; Yong, Grace; Keshavarz, Camron; Sharma, Prakash; Rubin, Christopher; Kolagani, Rajeswari; Gross, Steven

    2013-03-01

    Material properties indicate that rare earth manganites have a competitive advantage over VOx which is a material commonly employed as bolometric sensors in state of the art uncooled imaging arrays. We will present the results of our work on developing manganite thin films for uncooled micro-bolometer arrays. By fine tuning the cation composition and stoichiometry, we have identified material compositions suitable for uncooled bolometer operation and developed thin films of these materials by Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) on Si. For hetero-epitaxy on Si, we employ lattice engineering schemes to circumvent problems such as chemical incompatibility and amorphization of the substrate surface due to the native oxide. We are in the process of fabricating single test bolometers and micro-bolometer arrays. We will discuss the results of materials development and device fabrication efforts and will present performance parameters and estimated figures of merit for test bolometers. We will also discuss efforts towards understanding and alleviating material problems such as the residual stresses in the thin film heterostructures which are of critical importance for the fabrication of suspended microstructures. We acknowledge support from the NSF grant ECCS 1128586 at Towson University.

  14. A new readout system for bolometers with improved low frequency stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaertner, S.; Benoit, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Giard, M.; Bret, J.-L.; Chabaud, J.-P.; Desert, F.-X.; Faure, J.-P.; Jegoudez, G.; Lande, J.; Leblanc, J.; Lepeltier, J.-P.; Narbonne, J.; Piat, M.; Pons, R.; Serra, G.; Simiand, G.

    1997-11-01

    A new readout electronic system for bolometers is presented in this paper. The bolometer resistance is measured in a bridge with a capacitive load, using a periodic square wave bias current. The bias voltages at both ends of the bridge are balanced in order to keep the middle point around zero. Only changes around this zero value are amplified and detected synchronously with the bias signal. These features shift the measurement frequency out of the electrical low frequency noises (JFETs), and reduces the dynamics required from the amplification chain. The bias voltages are fully controlled by computer, and the lock-in detection is digital. This readout electronic has many advantages over previous ones. In particular, it proved to be able to read the total power of the radiation reaching the bolometer, and to perform measurements down to low frequencies (<= 0.1 Hz) without significant additional noise. These features open new observation strategies such as full sky scanning to bolometer instruments on board future submillimetre space projects having high thermal background levels (warm telescope). The different steps of the development of this new readout electronics on the ground-based Diabolo experiment are described, the performances reached are discussed, and a version suitable for the readout of the arrays of bolometers on the COBRAS/SAMBA satellite mission is presented.

  15. Operation of a Wideband Terahertz Superconducting Bolometer Responding to Quantum Cascade Laser Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cibella, S.; Beck, M.; Carelli, P.; Castellano, M. G.; Chiarello, F.; Faist, J.; Leoni, R.; Ortolani, M.; Sabbatini, L.; Scalari, G.; Torrioli, G.; Turcinkova, D.

    2012-06-01

    We make use of a niobium film to produce a micrometric vacuum-bridge superconducting bolometer responding to THz frequency. The bolometer works anywhere in the temperature range 2-7 K, which can be easily reached in helium bath cryostats or closed-cycle cryocoolers. In this work the bolometer is mounted on a pulse tube refrigerator and operated to measure the equivalent noise power (NEP) and the response to fast (μs) terahertz pulses. The NEP above 100 Hz equals that measured in a liquid helium cryostat showing that potential drawbacks related to the use of a pulse tube refrigerator (like mechanical and thermal oscillations, electromagnetic interference, noise) are irrelevant. At low frequency, instead, the pulse tube expansion-compression cycles originate lines at 1 Hz and harmonics in the noise spectrum. The bolometer was illuminated with THz single pulses coming either from a Quantum Cascade Laser operating at liquid nitrogen temperature or from a frequency-multiplied electronic oscillator. The response of the bolometer to the single pulses show that the device can track signals with a rise time as fast as about 450 ns.

  16. PolKa: A Tunable Polarimeter for Submillimeter Bolometer Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siringo, G.; Kreysa, E.; Menten, K. M.; Reichertz, L. A.

    2005-12-01

    A new polarimeter has been constructed to be used with the bolometer arrays developed at the Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie in Bonn. The new polarimeter has the unique characteristic of being tunable over a wide range of wavelengths and of producing negligible absorption. It has been used at the Heinrich Hertz Telescope to measure the linear polarization of quasars and of extended sources inside our Galaxy. We detected polarization in the quasars 3C 279 and QSO B1633+382. In 3C 279 we also detected polarization variability on a time scale of a week. We also produced maps of three extended sources: the Becklin-Neugebauer/Kleinmann-Low complex in the Orion Molecular Cloud 1 (OMC 1), a filamentary cloud in OMC 3, and the massive star-forming region IRAS 05358+3543. The polarimeter has low spurious polarization and a high modulation efficiency, and the tests at the telescope show that it is well suited to become a permanent facility.

  17. A new polarimeter for (sub)millimeter bolometer arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siringo, G.; Kreysa, E.; Reichertz, L. A.; Menten, K. M.

    2004-08-01

    A new polarimeter concept has been designed to be used together with the bolometer arrays developed at the Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie in Bonn. The new polarimeter has the unique characteristic of being tunable over a wide range of wavelengths and of producing negligible absorption. It has been used at the Heinrich Hertz Telescope to measure the linear polarization of several quasars and of extended sources inside our Galaxy. Some results are presented here. We detected polarization in the quasars 3C 279 and QSO B1633+382. In 3C 279 we also detected polarization variability on a time scale of a week. We also produced maps of three extended sources: the Becklin-Neugebauer/Kleinmann-Low (BNKL) complex in the Orion Molecular Cloud 1 (OMC 1), a filamentary cloud in OMC 3, and the massive star-forming region IRAS 05358+3543. The polarimeter has low spurious polarization and a high modulation efficiency, and the tests at the telescope show that it is well suited to become a permanent facility.

  18. Frequency selective bolometer development at Argonne National Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datesman, Aaron; Pearson, John; Wang, Gensheng; Yefremenko, Volodymyr; Divan, Ralu; Downes, Thomas; Chang, Clarence; McMahon, Jeff; Meyer, Stephan; Carlstrom, John; Logan, Daniel; Perera, Thushara; Wilson, Grant; Novosad, Valentyn

    2008-07-01

    We discuss the development, at Argonne National Laboratory, of a four-pixel camera suitable for photometry of distant dusty galaxies located by Spitzer and SCUBA, and for study of other millimeter-wave sources such as ultra-luminous infrared galaxies, the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect in clusters, and galactic dust. Utilizing Frequency Selective Bolometers (FSBs) with superconducting Transition-Edge Sensors (TESs), each of the camera's four pixels is sensitive to four colors, with frequency bands centered approximately at 150, 220, 270, and 360 GHz. The current generation of these devices utilizes proximity effect superconducting bilayers of Mo/Au or Ti/Au for TESs, along with frequency selective circuitry on membranes of silicon nitride 1 cm across and 1 micron thick. The operational properties of these devices are determined by this circuitry, along with thermal control structures etched into the membranes. These etched structures do not perforate the membrane, so that the device is both comparatively robust mechanically and carefully tailored in terms of its thermal transport properties. In this paper, we report on development of the superconducting bilayer TES technology and characterization of the FSB stacks. This includes the use of new materials, the design and testing of thermal control structures, the introduction of desirable thermal properties using buried layers of crystalline silicon underneath the membrane, detector stability control, and optical and thermal test results. The scientific motivation, FSB design, FSB fabrication, and measurement results are discussed.

  19. TES development for a frequency selective bolometer camera.

    SciTech Connect

    Datesman, A. M.; Downes, T. P.; Perera, T. A.; Wang, G.; Yefremenko, V. G.; Pearson, J. E.; Novosad, V.; Divan, R.; Chang, C. L.; Logan, D. W.; Meyer, S. S.; Wilson , G. W.; Bleem, L. E.; Crites, A. T.; McMahon, J. J.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Materials Science Division; Kavli Inst. Cosmological Phys.; Univ. of Massachusetts

    2009-06-01

    We discuss the development, at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), of a four-pixel camera with four spectral channels centered at 150, 220, 270, and 360 GHz. The scientific motivation involves photometry of distant dusty galaxies located by Spitzer and SCUBA, as well as the study of other millimeter-wave sources such as ultra-luminous infrared galaxies, the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect in clusters, and galactic dust. The camera incorporates Frequency Selective Bolometer (FSB) and superconducting Transition-Edge Sensor (TES) technology. The current generation of TES devices we examine utilizes proximity effect superconducting bilayers of Mo/Au, Ti, or Ti/Au as TESs, located along with frequency selective absorbing structures on silicon nitride membranes. The detector incorporates lithographically patterned structures designed to address both TES device stability and detector thermal transport concerns. The membrane is not perforated, resulting in a detector which is comparatively robust mechanically. In this paper, we report on the development of the superconducting bilayer TES technology, the design and testing of the detector thermal transport and device stability control structures, optical and thermal test results, and the use of new materials.

  20. Frequency selective bolometer development at Argonne National Laboratory.

    SciTech Connect

    Datesman, A.; Pearson, J.; Wang, G.; Yefremenko, V.; Divan, R.; Downes, T.; Chang, C.; McMahon, J.; Meyer, S.; Carlstrom, J.; Logan, D.; Perera, T.; Wilson, G.; Novosad, V.; Univ. of Chicago; Univ. of Massachusetts

    2008-07-01

    We discuss the development, at Argonne National Laboratory, of a four-pixel camera suitable for photometry of distant dusty galaxies located by Spitzer and SCUBA, and for study of other millimeter-wave sources such as ultra-luminous infrared galaxies, the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect in clusters, and galactic dust. Utilizing Frequency Selective Bolometers (FSBs) with superconducting Transition-Edge Sensors (TESs), each of the camera's four pixels is sensitive to four colors, with frequency bands centered approximately at 150, 220, 270, and 360 GHz. The current generation of these devices utilizes proximity effect superconducting bilayers of Mo/Au or Ti/Au for TESs, along with frequency selective circuitry on membranes of silicon nitride 1 cm across and 1 micron thick. The operational properties of these devices are determined by this circuitry, along with thermal control structures etched into the membranes. These etched structures do not perforate the membrane, so that the device is both comparatively robust mechanically and carefully tailored in terms of its thermal transport properties. In this paper, we report on development of the superconducting bilayer TES technology and characterization of the FSB stacks. This includes the use of new materials, the design and testing of thermal control structures, the introduction of desirable thermal properties using buried layers of crystalline silicon underneath the membrane, detector stability control, and optical and thermal test results. The scientific motivation, FSB design, FSB fabrication, and measurement results are discussed.

  1. Neutron spectroscopy with {sup 6}LiF bolometers

    SciTech Connect

    Gironnet, J.; Brandt, B. van den; Hautle, P.; Filges, U.; Konter, J. A.; Coron, N.; Marcillac, P. de; Torres, L.

    2009-12-16

    A compact and semi-portable neutron detector has been built based on the bolometric technique. Its unique features open new possibilities for the radioprotection survey of fast neutrons at nuclear installations and the investigations of background problems of sensitive neutron scattering instruments. This cryogenic detector, operated at 300-400 mK, consists of a 0.5 g LiF 95%{sup 6}Li enriched crystal read out by a NTD-Ge sensor and is based on the {sup 6}Li(n, {alpha}){sup 3}H neutron capture reaction. It is used to define the energy of neutrons up to 5 MeV. Measurements with {sup 252}Cf source have been performed to determine the energy resolution of the detector. We report the first results obtained with this neutron detector. From developments made in view of the ROSEBUD (Rare Objects SEarch with Bolometers UndergrounD) collaboration we suggest a possible further improvement of the neutron detector by employing a combined heat and light detection. In the case of dark matter experiments, such a detector would allow to monitor the residual fast neutron component.

  2. Dual Transition Edge Sensor Bolometer for Enhanced Dynamic Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chervenak, J. A.; Benford, D. J.; Moseley, S. H.; Irwin, K. D.

    2004-01-01

    Broadband surveys at the millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths will require bolometers that can reach new limits of sensitivity and also operate under high background conditions. To address this need, we present results on a dual transition edge sensor (TES) device with two operating modes: one for low background, ultrasensitive detection and one for high background, enhanced dynamic range detection. The device consists of a detector element with two transition temperatures (T(sub c)) of 0.25 and 0.51 K located on the same micromachined, thermally isolated membrane structure. It can be biased on either transition, and features phonon-limited noise performance at the lower T(sub c). We measure noise performance on the lower transition 7 x 10(exp -18) W/rt(Hz) and the bias power on the upper transition of 12.5 pW, giving a factor of 10 enhancement of the dynamic range for the device. We discuss the biasable range of this type of device and present a design concept to optimize utility of the device.

  3. Characterization of MgB2 Superconducting Hot Electron Bolometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunnane, D.; Kawamura, J. H.; Wolak, M. A.; Acharya, N.; Tan, T.; Xi, X. X.; Karasik, B. S.

    2014-01-01

    Hot-Electron Bolometer (HEB) mixers have proven to be the best tool for high-resolution spectroscopy at the Terahertz frequencies. However, the current state of the art NbN mixers suffer from a small intermediate frequency (IF) bandwidth as well as a low operating temperature. MgB2 is a promising material for HEB mixer technology in view of its high critical temperature and fast thermal relaxation allowing for a large IF bandwidth. In this work, we have fabricated and characterized thin-film (approximately 15 nanometers) MgB2-based spiral antenna-coupled HEB mixers on SiC substrate. We achieved the IF bandwidth greater than 8 gigahertz at 25 degrees Kelvin and the device noise temperature less than 4000 degrees Kelvin at 9 degrees Kelvin using a 600 gigahertz source. Using temperature dependencies of the radiation power dissipated in the device we have identified the optical loss in the integrated microantenna responsible as a cause of the limited sensitivity of the current mixer devices. From the analysis of the current-voltage (IV) characteristics, we have derived the effective thermal conductance of the mixer device and estimated the required local oscillator power in an optimized device to be approximately 1 microwatts.

  4. Radiopure Metal-Loaded Liquid Scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Rosero, Richard; Yeh, Minfang

    2015-03-18

    Metal-loaded liquid scintillator plays a key role in particle and nuclear physics experiments. The applications of metal ions in various neutrino experiments and the purification methods for different scintillator components are discussed in this paper.

  5. Radiopure metal-loaded liquid scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Rosero, Richard; Yeh, Minfang

    2015-08-17

    Metal-loaded liquid scintillator plays a key role in particle and nuclear physics experiments. The applications of metal ions in various neutrino experiments and the purification methods for different scintillator components are discussed in this paper.

  6. Unitary scintillation detector and system

    DOEpatents

    McElhaney, Stephanie A.; Chiles, Marion M.

    1994-01-01

    The invention is a unitary alpha, beta, and gamma scintillation detector and system for sensing the presence of alpha, beta, and gamma radiations selectively or simultaneously. The scintillators are mounted in a light-tight housing provided with an entrance window for admitting alpha, beta, and gamma radiation and excluding ambient light from the housing. Light pulses from each scintillator have different decay constants that are converted by a photosensitive device into corresponding differently shaped electrical pulses. A pulse discrimination system identifies the electrical pulses by their respective pulse shapes which are determined by decay time. The identified electrical pulses are counted in separate channel analyzers to indicate the respective levels of sensed alpha, beta, and gamma radiations.

  7. Unitary scintillation detector and system

    DOEpatents

    McElhaney, S.A.; Chiles, M.M.

    1994-05-31

    The invention is a unitary alpha, beta, and gamma scintillation detector and system for sensing the presence of alpha, beta, and gamma radiations selectively or simultaneously. The scintillators are mounted in a light-tight housing provided with an entrance window for admitting alpha, beta, and gamma radiation and excluding ambient light from the housing. Light pulses from each scintillator have different decay constants that are converted by a photosensitive device into corresponding differently shaped electrical pulses. A pulse discrimination system identifies the electrical pulses by their respective pulse shapes which are determined by decay time. The identified electrical pulses are counted in separate channel analyzers to indicate the respective levels of sensed alpha, beta, and gamma radiations. 10 figs.

  8. Fracture-resistant lanthanide scintillators

    DOEpatents

    Doty, F. Patrick

    2011-01-04

    Lanthanide halide alloys have recently enabled scintillating gamma ray spectrometers comparable to room temperature semiconductors (<3% FWHM energy resolutions at 662 keV). However brittle fracture of these materials upon cooling hinders the growth of large volume crystals. Efforts to improve the strength through non-lanthanide alloy substitution, while preserving scintillation, have been demonstrated. Isovalent alloys having nominal compositions of comprising Al, Ga, Sc, Y, and In dopants as well as aliovalent alloys comprising Ca, Sr, Zr, Hf, Zn, and Pb dopants were prepared. All of these alloys exhibit bright fluorescence under UV excitation, with varying shifts in the spectral peaks and intensities relative to pure CeBr.sub.3. Further, these alloys scintillate when coupled to a photomultiplier tube (PMT) and exposed to .sup.137Cs gamma rays.

  9. Scintillation-Hardened GPS Receiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, Donald R.

    2015-01-01

    CommLargo, Inc., has developed a scintillation-hardened Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver that improves reliability for low-orbit missions and complies with NASA's Space Telecommunications Radio System (STRS) architecture standards. A software-defined radio (SDR) implementation allows a single hardware element to function as either a conventional radio or as a GPS receiver, providing backup and redundancy for platforms such as the International Space Station (ISS) and high-value remote sensing platforms. The innovation's flexible SDR implementation reduces cost, weight, and power requirements. Scintillation hardening improves mission reliability and variability. In Phase I, CommLargo refactored an open-source GPS software package with Kalman filter-based tracking loops to improve performance during scintillation and also demonstrated improved navigation during a geomagnetic storm. In Phase II, the company generated a new field-programmable gate array (FPGA)-based GPS waveform to demonstrate on NASA's Space Communication and Navigation (SCaN) test bed.

  10. Development of radiation hard scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Markley, F.; Woods, D.; Pla-Dalmau, A.; Foster, G. ); Blackburn, R. )

    1992-05-01

    Substantial improvements have been made in the radiation hardness of plastic scintillators. Cylinders of scintillating materials 2.2 cm in diameter and 1 cm thick have been exposed to 10 Mrads of gamma rays at a dose rate of 1 Mrad/h in a nitrogen atmosphere. One of the formulations tested showed an immediate decrease in pulse height of only 4% and has remained stable for 12 days while annealing in air. By comparison a commercial PVT scintillator showed an immediate decrease of 58% and after 43 days of annealing in air it improved to a 14% loss. The formulated sample consisted of 70 parts by weight of Dow polystyrene, 30 pbw of pentaphenyltrimethyltrisiloxane (Dow Corning DC 705 oil), 2 pbw of p-terphenyl, 0.2 pbw of tetraphenylbutadiene, and 0.5 pbw of UVASIL299LM from Ferro.

  11. Nanophosphor composite scintillator with a liquid matrix

    DOEpatents

    McKigney, Edward Allen; Burrell, Anthony Keiran; Bennett, Bryan L.; Cooke, David Wayne; Ott, Kevin Curtis; Bacrania, Minesh Kantilal; Del Sesto, Rico Emilio; Gilbertson, Robert David; Muenchausen, Ross Edward; McCleskey, Thomas Mark

    2010-03-16

    An improved nanophosphor scintillator liquid comprises nanophosphor particles in a liquid matrix. The nanophosphor particles are optionally surface modified with an organic ligand. The surface modified nanophosphor particle is essentially surface charge neutral, thereby preventing agglomeration of the nanophosphor particles during dispersion in a liquid scintillator matrix. The improved nanophosphor scintillator liquid may be used in any conventional liquid scintillator application, including in a radiation detector.

  12. Magnetic fields and scintillator performance

    SciTech Connect

    Green, D.; Ronzhin, A.; Hagopian, V.

    1995-06-01

    Experimental data have shown that the light output of a scintillator depends on the magnitude of the externally applied magnetic fields, and that this variation can affect the calorimeter calibration and possibly resolution. The goal of the measurements presented here is to study the light yield of scintillators in high magnetic fields in conditions that are similar to those anticipated for the LHC CMS detector. Two independent measurements were performed, the first at Fermilab and the second at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory at Florida State University.

  13. Liquid scintillating fiber calorimetry prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Gui, M.; Brookes, D.; David, A.

    1995-08-01

    A full size liquid scintillating fiber spaghetti-hadronic calorimeter has been constructed and tested using cosmic rays at Texas A and M University. The purpose of this research is to find practical solutions for detectors to be used in extremely high radiation environments. The details of design and construction of this module are presented. The advantages of using liquid scintillating materials were investigated. Relevant subjects are addressed. Cosmic ray test results are compared with that of GEANT Monte Carlo simulations. Over all, they agree well with each other. The conclusion is that calorimeters utilizing this technique can be used in high radiation environments such as SSC colliding area.

  14. Hygroscopicity Evaluation of Halide Scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuravleva, M; Stand, L; Wei, H; Hobbs, C. L.; Boatner, Lynn A; Ramey, Joanne Oxendine; Burger, Arnold; Rowe, E; Bhattacharya, P.; Tupitsyn, E; Melcher, Charles L

    2014-01-01

    A collaborative study of relative hygroscopicity of anhydrous halide scintillators grown at various laboratories is presented. We have developed a technique to evaluate moisture sensitivity of both raw materials and grown crystals, in which the moisture absorption rate is measured using a gravimetric analysis. Degradation of the scintillation performance was investigated by recording gamma-ray spectra and monitoring the photopeak position, count rate and energy resolution. The accompanying physical degradation of the samples exposed to ambient atmosphere was photographically recorded as well. The results were compared with ben

  15. Enhancing the spectral response of filled bolometer arrays for submillimeter astronomy.

    PubMed

    Revéret, Vincent; Rodriguez, Louis; Agnèse, Patrick

    2010-12-10

    Future missions for astrophysical studies in the submillimeter region will need detectors with very high sensitivity and large fields of view. Bolometer arrays can fulfill these requirements over a very broad band. We describe a technique that enables bolometer arrays that use quarter-wave cavities to have a high spectral response over most of the submillimeter band. This technique is based on the addition on the front of the array of an antireflecting dielectric layer. The optimum parameters (layer thickness and distance to the array) are determined by a 2D analytic code. This general principle is applied to the case of Herschel PACS bolometers (optimized for the 60 to 210 μm band). As an example, we demonstrate experimentally that a PACS array covered by a 138 μm thick silicon layer can improve the spectral response by a factor of 1.7 in the 450 μm band. PMID:21151229

  16. Searching for neutrinoless double beta decay of Te-130 with CUORE bolometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Ke; Cuore Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The CUORE (Cryogenic Underground Observatory for Rare Events) experiment will search for neutrinoless double beta decay of Te-130. CUORE large-mass bolometer array will consist of 988 tellurium oxide bolometer modules and a total of 206 kg of Te-130 in one single cryostat at 10 mK. It will be sensitive to an effective Majorana neutrino mass of 50-130 meV and is one of the most sensitive experiments under construction. The detector and the cryostat are in an advanced stage of installation and is expected to start operation by the end of 2015. Recents results from CUORE-0, a prototype experiment to CUORE, have validated the performance and background predictions of TeO2 bolometer arrays. In this talk, we will present the latest results from CUORE-0, the construction status, as well as sensitivity projection of CUORE. On behalf of the CUORE Collaboration.

  17. Photonic crystal scintillators and methods of manufacture

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, Ricardo D.; Sexton, Lindsay T.; Fuentes, Roderick E.; Cortes-Concepcion, Jose

    2015-08-11

    Photonic crystal scintillators and their methods of manufacture are provided. Exemplary methods of manufacture include using a highly-ordered porous anodic alumina membrane as a pattern transfer mask for either the etching of underlying material or for the deposition of additional material onto the surface of a scintillator. Exemplary detectors utilizing such photonic crystal scintillators are also provided.

  18. Composite scintillators for detection of ionizing radiation

    DOEpatents

    Dai, Sheng [Knoxville, TN; Stephan, Andrew Curtis [Knoxville, TN; Brown, Suree S [Knoxville, TN; Wallace, Steven A [Knoxville, TN; Rondinone, Adam J [Knoxville, TN

    2010-12-28

    Applicant's present invention is a composite scintillator having enhanced transparency for detecting ionizing radiation comprising a material having optical transparency wherein said material comprises nano-sized objects having a size in at least one dimension that is less than the wavelength of light emitted by the composite scintillator wherein the composite scintillator is designed to have selected properties suitable for a particular application.

  19. Characteristics of High Latitude Ionosphere Scintillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, Y.

    2012-12-01

    As we enter a new solar maximum period, global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) receivers, especially the ones operating in high latitude and equatorial regions, are facing an increasing threat from ionosphere scintillations. The increased solar activities, however, also offer a great opportunity to collect scintillation data to characterize scintillation signal parameters and ionosphere irregularities. While there are numerous GPS receivers deployed around the globe to monitor ionosphere scintillations, most of them are commercial receivers whose signal processing mechanisms are not designed to operate under ionosphere scintillation. As a result, they may distort scintillation signal parameters or lose lock of satellite signals under strong scintillations. Since 2008, we have established and continuously improved a unique GNSS receiver array at HAARP, Alaska. The array contains high ends commercial receivers and custom RF front ends which can be automatically triggered to collect high quality GPS and GLONASS satellite signals during controlled heating experiments and natural scintillation events. Custom designed receiver signal tracking algorithms aim to preserve true scintillation signatures are used to process the raw RF samples. Signal strength, carrier phase, and relative TEC measurements generated by the receiver array since its inception have been analyzed to characterize high latitude scintillation phenomena. Daily, seasonal, and solar events dependency of scintillation occurrence, spectral contents of scintillation activities, and plasma drifts derived from these measurements will be presented. These interesting results demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of our experimental data collection system in providing insightful details of ionosphere responses to active perturbations and natural disturbances.

  20. Synthesis of plastic scintillation microspheres: Evaluation of scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santiago, L. M.; Bagán, H.; Tarancón, A.; Garcia, J. F.

    2013-01-01

    The use of plastic scintillation microspheres (PSm) appear to be an alternative to liquid scintillation for the quantification of alpha and beta emitters because it does not generate mixed wastes after the measurement (organic and radioactive). In addition to routine radionuclide determinations, PSm can be used for further applications, e.g. for usage in a continuous monitoring equipment, for measurements of samples with a high salt concentration and for an extractive scintillation support which permits the separation, pre-concentration and measurement of the radionuclides without additional steps of elution and sample preparation. However, only a few manufacturers provide PSm, and the low number of regular suppliers reduces its availability and restricts the compositions and sizes available. In this article, a synthesis method based on the extraction/evaporation methodology has been developed and successfully used for the synthesis of plastic scintillation microspheres. Seven different compositions of plastic scintillation microspheres have been synthesised; PSm1 with polystyrene, PSm2 with 2,5-Diphenyloxazol(PPO), PSm3 with p-terphenyl (pT), PSm4 with PPO and 1,4-bis(5-phenyloxazol-2-yl) (POPOP), PSm5 pT and (1,4-bis [2-methylstyryl] benzene) (Bis-MSB), PSm6 with PPO, POPOP and naphthalene and PSm7 with pT, Bis-MSB and naphthalene. The synthesised plastic scintillation microspheres have been characterised in terms of their morphology, detection capabilities and alpha/beta separation capacity. The microspheres had a median diameter of approximately 130 μm. Maximum detection efficiency values were obtained for the PSm4 composition as follows 1.18% for 3H, 51.2% for 14C, 180.6% for 90Sr/90Y and 76.7% for 241Am. Values of the SQP(E) parameter were approximately 790 for PSm4 and PSm5. These values show that the synthesised PSm exhibit good scintillation properties and that the spectra are at channel numbers higher than in commercial PSm. Finally, the addition of

  1. Enhanced performance of VOx-based bolometer using patterned gold black absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Evan M.; Panjwani, Deep; Ginn, James; Warren, Andrew; Long, Christopher; Figuieredo, Pedro; Smith, Christian; Perlstein, Joshua; Walter, Nick; Hirschmugl, Carol; Peale, Robert E.; Shelton, David J.

    2015-06-01

    Patterned highly absorbing gold black film has been selectively deposited on the active surfaces of a vanadium-oxide-based infrared bolometer array. Patterning by metal lift-off relies on protection of the fragile gold black with an evaporated oxide, which preserves gold black's near unity absorption. This patterned gold black also survives the dry-etch removal of the sacrificial polyimide used to fabricate the air-bridge bolometers. Infrared responsivity is substantially improved by the gold black coating without significantly increasing noise. The increase in the time constant caused by the additional mass of gold black is a modest 14%.

  2. A highly linear superconducting bolometer for quantitative THz Fourier transform spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kehrt, Mathias; Monte, Christian; Beyer, Jörn; Hollandt, Jörg

    2015-05-01

    A superconducting transition edge sensor (TES) bolometer operating in the spectral range from 0.1 THz to 3 THz was designed. It is especially intended for Fourier transform spectroscopy and features a higher dynamic range and a highly linear response at a similar response compared to commercially available silicon composite bolometers. The design is based on a thin film metal mesh absorber, a superconducting thermistor and Si3N4 membrane technology. A prototype was set up, characterized and successfully used in first applications. PMID:25969213

  3. A Planar Two-Dimensional Superconducting Bolometer Array for the Green Bank Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, Dominic; Staguhn, Johannes G.; Chervenak, James A.; Chen, Tina C.; Moseley, S. Harvey; Wollack, Edward J.; Devlin, Mark J.; Dicker, Simon R.; Supanich, Mark

    2004-01-01

    In order to provide high sensitivity rapid imaging at 3.3mm (90GHz) for the Green Bank Telescope - the world's largest steerable aperture - a camera is being built by the University of Pennsylvania, NASA/GSFC, and NRAO. The heart of this camera is an 8x8 close-packed, Nyquist-sampled detector array. We have designed and are fabricating a functional superconducting bolometer array system using a monolithic planar architecture. Read out by SQUID multiplexers, the superconducting transition edge sensors will provide fast, linear, sensitive response for high performance imaging. This will provide the first ever superconducting bolometer array on a facility instrument.

  4. SNO+ Scintillator Purification and Assay

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, R.; Vazquez-Jauregui, E.; Chen, M.; Chkvorets, O.; Hallman, D.

    2011-04-27

    We describe the R and D on the scintillator purification and assay methods and technology for the SNO+ neutrino and double-beta decay experiment. The SNO+ experiment is a replacement of the SNO heavy water with liquid scintillator comprised of 2 g/L PPO in linear alkylbenzene (LAB). During filling the LAB will be transported underground by rail car and purified by multi-stage distillation and steam stripping at a flow rate of 19 LPM. While the detector is operational the scintillator can be recirculated at 150 LPM (full detector volume in 4 days) to provide repurification as necessary by either water extraction (for Ra, K, Bi) or by functional metal scavenger columns (for Pb, Ra, Bi, Ac, Th) followed by steam stripping to remove noble gases and oxygen (Rn, O{sub 2}, Kr, Ar). The metal scavenger columns also provide a method for scintillator assay for ex-situ measurement of the U and Th chain radioactivity. We have developed ''natural'' radioactive spikes of Pb and Ra in LAB and use these for purification testing. Lastly, we present the planned operating modes and purification strategies and the plant specifications and design.

  5. Boron Doped Plastic Scintillator Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahl, Adam; Chouinard-Dussault, Pascale; Pecinovsky, Cory; Potter, Andrew; Remedes, Tyler; Dorgan, John; Greife, Uwe

    2013-04-01

    This talk will describe the progress made in an interdisciplinary development project aimed at cost-effective, neutron sensitive, plastic scintillator. Colorado School of Mines researchers with backgrounds in Physics, Chemistry, and Chemical Engineering have worked on the incorporation of ^10B in plastics through extrusion. First results on transparent samples using fluorescent spectroscopy and beta excitation will be presented.

  6. SNO+ Scintillator Purification and Assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, R.; Chen, M.; Chkvorets, O.; Hallman, D.; Vázquez-Jáuregui, E.

    2011-04-01

    We describe the R&D on the scintillator purification and assay methods and technology for the SNO+ neutrino and double-beta decay experiment. The SNO+ experiment is a replacement of the SNO heavy water with liquid scintillator comprised of 2 g/L PPO in linear alkylbenzene (LAB). During filling the LAB will be transported underground by rail car and purified by multi-stage distillation and steam stripping at a flow rate of 19 LPM. While the detector is operational the scintillator can be recirculated at 150 LPM (full detector volume in 4 days) to provide repurification as necessary by either water extraction (for Ra, K, Bi) or by functional metal scavenger columns (for Pb, Ra, Bi, Ac, Th) followed by steam stripping to remove noble gases and oxygen (Rn, O2, Kr, Ar). The metal scavenger columns also provide a method for scintillator assay for ex-situ measurement of the U and Th chain radioactivity. We have developed "natural" radioactive spikes of Pb and Ra in LAB and use these for purification testing. Lastly, we present the planned operating modes and purification strategies and the plant specifications and design.

  7. Scintillating fiber ribbon --- tungsten calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Bross, A.; Crisler, M.; Kross, B.; Wrbanek, J.

    1989-07-14

    We describe an ultra-high density scintillating fiber and tungsten calorimeter used as an active beam-dump for electrons. Data showing the calorimeter response to electrons with momenta between 50 and 350 GeV/c are presented. 9 figs.

  8. Terahertz hot electron bolometer waveguide mixers for GREAT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pütz, P.; Honingh, C. E.; Jacobs, K.; Justen, M.; Schultz, M.; Stutzki, J.

    2012-06-01

    Context. Supplementing the publications based on the first-light observations with the German REceiver for Astronomy at Terahertz frequencies (GREAT) on SOFIA, we present background information on the underlying heterodyne detector technology. This Letter complements the GREAT instrument Letter and focuses on the mixers itself. Aims: We describe the superconducting hot electron bolometer (HEB) detectors that are used as frequency mixers in the L1 (1400 GHz), L2 (1900 GHz), and M (2500 GHz) channels of GREAT. Measured performance of the detectors is presented and background information on their operation in GREAT is given. Methods: Our mixer units are waveguide-based and couple to free-space radiation via a feedhorn antenna. The HEB mixers are designed, fabricated, characterized, and flight-qualified in-house. We are able to use the full intermediate frequency bandwidth of the mixers using silicon-germanium multi-octave cryogenic low-noise amplifiers with very low input return loss. Results: Superconducting HEB mixers have proven to be practical and sensitive detectors for high-resolution THz frequency spectroscopy on SOFIA. We show that our niobium-titanium-nitride (NbTiN) material HEBs on silicon nitride (SiN) membrane substrates have an intermediate frequency (IF) noise roll-off frequency above 2.8 GHz, which does not limit the current receiver IF bandwidth. Our mixer technology development efforts culminate in the first successful operation of a waveguide-based HEB mixer at 2.5 THz and deployment for radioastronomy. A significant contribution to the success of GREAT is made by technological development, thorough characterization and performance optimization of the mixer and its IF interface for receiver operation on SOFIA. In particular, the development of an optimized mixer IF interface contributes to the low passband ripple and excellent stability, which GREAT demonstrated during its initial successful astronomical observation runs.

  9. Operation of a tangential bolometer on the PBX tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, S.F.; Fonck, R.J.; Schmidt, G.L.

    1987-04-01

    A compact 15-channel bolometer array that views plasma emission tangentially across the midplane has been installed on the PBX tokamak to supplement a 19-channel poloidal array which views the plasma perpendicular to the toroidal direction. By comparing measurements from these arrays, poloidal asymmetries in the emission profile can be assessed. The detector array consists of 15 discrete 2-mm x 2-mm Thinistors, a mixed semiconductor material whose temperature coefficient of resistance is relatively high. The accumulated heat incident on a detector gives rise to a change in the resistance in each active element. Operated in tandem with an identical blind detector, the resistance in each pair is compared in a Wheatstone bridge circuit. The variation in voltage resulting from the change in resistance is amplified, stored on a CAMAC transient recorder during the plasma discharge, and transferred to a VAX data acquisition computer. The instantaneous power is obtained by digitally smoothing and differentiating the signals in time, with suitable compensation for the cooling of the detector over the course of a plasma discharge. The detectors are ''free standing,'' i.e., they are supported only by their electrical leads. Having no substrate in contact with the detector reduces the response time and increases the time it takes for the detector to dissipate its accumulated heat, reducing the compensation for cooling required in the data analysis. The detectors were absolutely calibrated with a tungsten-halogen filament lamp and were found to vary by +-3%. The irradiance profiles are inverted to reveal the radially resolved emitted power density from the plasma, which is typically in the 0.1 to 0.5 W/cm/sup 3/ range.

  10. Scintillating lustre induced by radial fins.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kohske; Fukuda, Haruaki; Watanabe, Katsumi; Ueda, Kazuhiro

    2012-01-01

    Radial lines of Ehrenstein patterns induce illusory scintillating lustre in gray disks inserted into the central gaps (scintillating-lustre effect). We report a novel variant of this illusion by replacing the radial lines with white and black radial fins. Both white and gray disks inserted into the central gaps were perceived as scintillating, if the ratio of the black/white fin width were balanced (ie, close to 1.0). Thus, the grayness of the central disk is not a prerequisite for the scintillation. However, the scintillation was drastically reduced when the ratio was imbalanced. Furthermore, the optimal ratio depended on the color of the center disks. PMID:23145270

  11. Method of making a scintillator waveguide

    DOEpatents

    Bliss, Mary; Craig, Richard A.; Reeder, Paul L.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is an apparatus for detecting ionizing radiation, having: a waveguide having a first end and a second end, the waveguide formed of a scintillator material wherein the therapeutic ionizing radiation isotropically generates scintillation light signals within the waveguide. This apparatus provides a measure of radiation dose. The apparatus may be modified to permit making a measure of location of radiation dose. Specifically, the scintillation material is segmented into a plurality of segments; and a connecting cable for each of the plurality of segments is used for conducting scintillation signals to a scintillation detector.

  12. Extruded plastic scintillator for MINERvA

    SciTech Connect

    Pla-Dalmau, Anna; Bross, Alan D.; Rykalin, Victor V.; Wood, Brian M.; /NICADD, DeKalb

    2005-11-01

    An extrusion line has recently been installed at Fermilab in collaboration with NICADD (Northern Illinois Center for Accelerator and Detector Development). This new facility will serve to further develop and improve extruded plastic scintillator. Since polystyrene is widely used in the consumer industry, the logical path was to investigate the extrusion of commercial-grade polystyrene pellets with dopants to yield high quality plastic scintillator. The D0 and MINOS experiments are already using extruded scintillator strips in their detectors. A new experiment at Fermilab is pursuing the use of extruded plastic scintillator. A new plastic scintillator strip is being tested and its properties characterized. The initial results are presented here.

  13. Scintillators for positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, W.W.; Derenzo, S.E.

    1995-09-01

    Like most applications that utilize scintillators for gamma detection, Positron Emission Tomography (PET) desires materials with high light output, short decay time, and excellent stopping power that are also inexpensive, mechanically rugged, and chemically inert. Realizing that this ``ultimate`` scintillator may not exist, this paper evaluates the relative importance of these qualities and describes their impact on the imaging performance of PET. The most important PET scintillator quality is the ability to absorb 511 keV photons in a small volume, which affects the spatial resolution of the camera. The dominant factor is a short attenuation length ({le} 1.5 cm is required), although a high photoelectric fraction is also important (> 30% is desired). The next most important quality is a short decay time, which affects both the dead time and the coincidence timing resolution. Detection rates for single 511 keV photons can be extremely high, so decay times {le} 500 ns are essential to avoid dead time losses. In addition, positron annihilations are identified by time coincidence so {le}5 ns fwhm coincidence pair timing resolution is required to identify events with narrow coincidence windows, reducing contamination due to accidental coincidences. Current trends in PET cameras are toward septaless, ``fully-3D`` cameras, which have significantly higher count rates than conventional 2-D cameras and so place higher demands on scintillator decay time. Light output affects energy resolution, and thus the ability of the camera to identify and reject events where the initial 511 keV photon has undergone Compton scatter in the patient. The scatter to true event fraction is much higher in fully-3D cameras than in 2-D cameras, so future PET cameras would benefit from scintillators with a 511 keV energy resolution < 10--12% fwhm.

  14. Toward 17µm pitch heterogeneously integrated Si/SiGe quantum well bolometer focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ericsson, Per; Fischer, Andreas C.; Forsberg, Fredrik; Roxhed, Niclas; Samel, Björn; Savage, Susan; Stemme, Göran; Wissmar, Stanley; Öberg, Olof; Niklaus, Frank

    2011-06-01

    Most of today's commercial solutions for un-cooled IR imaging sensors are based on resistive bolometers using either Vanadium oxide (VOx) or amorphous Silicon (a-Si) as the thermistor material. Despite the long history for both concepts, market penetration outside high-end applications is still limited. By allowing actors in adjacent fields, such as those from the MEMS industry, to enter the market, this situation could change. This requires, however, that technologies fitting their tools and processes are developed. Heterogeneous integration of Si/SiGe quantum well bolometers on standard CMOS read out circuits is one approach that could easily be adopted by the MEMS industry. Due to its mono crystalline nature, the Si/SiGe thermistor material has excellent noise properties that result in a state-ofthe- art signal-to-noise ratio. The material is also stable at temperatures well above 450°C which offers great flexibility for both sensor integration and novel vacuum packaging concepts. We have previously reported on heterogeneous integration of Si/SiGe quantum well bolometers with pitches of 40μm x 40μm and 25μm x 25μm. The technology scales well to smaller pixel pitches and in this paper, we will report on our work on developing heterogeneous integration for Si/SiGe QW bolometers with a pixel pitch of 17μm x 17μm.

  15. Broadband Direct Detection Submillimeter Spectrometer with Multiplexed Superconducting Transition Edge Thermometer Bolometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, D. J.; Ames, T. A.; Chervenak, J. A.; Moseley, S. H.; Shafer, R. A.; Staguhn, J. G.; Voellmer, G. M.; Pajot, F.; Rioux, C.; Phillips, T. G.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present performance results based on the first astronomical use of multiplexed superconducting bolometers as direct detectors (i.e., with cold electrons) for spectroscopy. The Fabry-Perot Interferometer Bolometer Research Experiment (FIBRE) is a broadband submillimeter spectrometer for the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO). FIBRE's detectors are superconducting transition edge sensor (TES) bolometers read out by a SQUID multiplexer. The Fabry-Perot uses a low resolution grating to order sort the incoming light. A linear bolometer array consisting of 16 elements detects this dispersed light, capturing 5 orders simultaneously from one position on the sky. With tuning of the Fabry-Perot over one free spectral range, a spectrum covering Delta lambda/lambda = 1/7 at a resolution of delta lambda/lambda = 1/1200 can be acquired. This spectral resolution is sufficient to resolve Doppler-broadened line emission from external galaxies. FIBRE has been operated in the 350 Am (850 GHz) band. These bands cover line emission from the important star formation tracers neutral carbon [CI] and carbon monoxide (CO).

  16. Passive Spectroscopy Bolometers, Grating- And X-Ray Imaging Crystal Spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Bitter, M; Hill, K W; Scott, S; Paul, S; Ince-Cushmann, A; Reinke, M; Rice, J; Beiersdorfer, P; Gu, M F; Lee, S G; Broennimann, C; Eikenberry, E F

    2007-11-07

    This tutorial gives a brief introduction into passive spectroscopy and describes the working principles of bolometers, a high-resolution grating spectrometer, and a novel X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer, which is of particular interest for profile measurements of the ion temperature and plasma rotation velocity on ITER and future burning plasma experiments.

  17. Design of high-T[sub c] superconducting bolometers for a far infrared imaging array

    SciTech Connect

    Verghese, S.; Richards, P.L. ); Fork, D.K. ); Char, K. ); Geballe, T.H. . Dept. of Applied Physics)

    1992-08-01

    The design of high-[Tc] superconducting bolometers for use in a far infrared imaging array from wavelengths 30--100[mu]m is discussed. Measurements of the voltage noise in thin films of YBa[sub 2]CU[sub 3]O[sub 7-[var sigma

  18. Passive Spectroscopy Bolometers, Grating- And X-ray Imaging Crystal Spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Bitter, M.; Hill, K. W.; Scott, S.; Paul, S.; Ince-Cushman, A.; Reinke, M.; Rice, J. E.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Gu, M. F.; Lee, S. G.; Broennimann, Ch.; Eikenberry, E. F.

    2008-03-12

    This tutorial gives a brief introduction into passive spectroscopy and describes the working principles of bolometers, a high-resolution grating spectrometer, and a novel X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer, which is also of particular interest for profile measurements of the ion temperature and plasma rotation velocity on ITER and future burning plasma experiments.

  19. Upcoming planetary missions and the applicability of high temperature superconductor bolometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brasunas, J.; Kunde, V.; Moseley, H.; Lakew, B.

    1990-01-01

    Past and present planetary exploration is briefly reviewed, and the planned 1996 Cassini mission to Saturn and Titan is examined. The CIRS experiment aboard Cassini, which will retrieve information on the atmospheres of Titan and Saturn, is discussed. Ongoing efforts to build a high-sensitivity, high-Tc bolometer that would greatly improve detection in Titan's atmosphere are addressed.

  20. Scintillation Monitoring Using Asymmetry Index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaikh, Muhammad Mubasshir; Mahrous, Ayman; Abdallah, Amr; Notarpietro, Riccardo

    Variation in electron density can have significant effect on GNSS signals in terms of propagation delay. Ionospheric scintillation can be caused by rapid change of such delay, specifically, when they last for a longer period of time. Ionospheric irregularities that account for scintillation may vary significantly in spatial range and drift with the background plasma at speeds of 45 to 130 m/sec. These patchy irregularities may occur several times during night, e.g. in equatorial region, with the patches move through the ray paths of the GNSS satellite signals. These irregularities are often characterized as either ‘large scale’ (which can be as large as several hundred km in East-West direction and many times that in the North-South direction) or ‘small scale’ (which can be as small as 1m). These small scale irregularities are regarded as the main cause of scintillation [1,2]. In normal solar activity conditions, the mid-latitude ionosphere is not much disturbed. However, during severe magnetic storms, the aurora oval extends towards the equator and the equator anomaly region may stretched towards poles extending the scintillation phenomena more typically associated with those regions into mid-latitudes. In such stormy conditions, the predicted TEC may deviate largely from the true value of the TEC both at low and mid-latitudes due to which GNSS applications may be strongly degraded. This work is an attempt to analyze ionospheric scintillation (S4 index) using ionospheric asymmetry index [3]. The asymmetry index is based on trans-ionospheric propagation between GPS and LEO satellites in a radio occultation (RO) scenario, using background ionospheric data provided by MIDAS [4]. We attempted to simulate one of the recent geomagnetic storms (NOAA scale G4) occurred over low/mid-latitudes. The storm started on 26 September 2011 at UT 18:00 and lasted until early hours of 27 September 2011. The scintillation data for the storm was taken from an ionospheric

  1. LHCb Upgrade: Scintillating Fibre Tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, Mark

    2016-07-01

    The LHCb detector will be upgraded during the Long Shutdown 2 (LS2) of the LHC in order to cope with higher instantaneous luminosities and to read out the data at 40 MHz using a trigger-less read-out system. All front-end electronics will be replaced and several sub-detectors must be redesigned to cope with higher occupancy. The current tracking detectors downstream of the LHCb dipole magnet will be replaced by the Scintillating Fibre (SciFi) Tracker. The SciFi Tracker will use scintillating fibres read out by Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs). State-of-the-art multi-channel SiPM arrays are being developed to read out the fibres and a custom ASIC will be used to digitise the signals from the SiPMs. The evolution of the design since the Technical Design Report in 2014 and the latest R & D results are presented.

  2. Silicon photomultipliers for scintillating trackers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabaioli, S.; Berra, A.; Bolognini, D.; Bonvicini, V.; Bosisio, L.; Ciano, S.; Iugovaz, D.; Lietti, D.; Penzo, A.; Prest, M.; Rashevskaya, I.; Reia, S.; Stoppani, L.; Vallazza, E.

    2012-12-01

    In recent years, silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) have been proposed as a new kind of readout device for scintillating detectors in many experiments. A SiPM consists of a matrix of parallel-connected pixels, which are independent photon counters working in Geiger mode with very high gain (∼106). This contribution presents the use of an array of eight SiPMs (manufactured by FBK-irst) for the readout of a scintillating bar tracker (a small size prototype of the Electron Muon Ranger detector for the MICE experiment). The performances of the SiPMs in terms of signal to noise ratio, efficiency and time resolution will be compared to the ones of a multi-anode photomultiplier tube (MAPMT) connected to the same bars. Both the SiPMs and the MAPMT are interfaced to a VME system through a 64 channel MAROC ASIC.

  3. Upcoming planetary missions and the applicability of high temperature superconductor bolometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brasunas, J.; Kunde, V.; Moseley, H.; Lakew, B.

    1991-01-01

    Planetary missions to Mars and beyond can last 11 years and longer, making impractical the use of stored cryogens. Passive radiative coolers and single-stage mechanical coolers remain possibilities. Cassini and Comet Rendezvous/Asteroid Fly-by (CRAF), both using the newly developed Mariner Mark 2 spacecraft, will be the next outer planet missions after Galileo; they are intended to provide information on the origin and evolution of the solar system. CRAF is slated for a 1994 launch. Cassini was chosen by ESA and will be launched by a Titan 4/Centaur in 1996. It will fly by Jupiter in 2000, inject an ESA-supplied probe into Titan in 2002, and take data in Saturn's orbit from 2002 to 2006. NASA/Goddard is currently developing a prototype Fourier transform spectrometer, the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS), for the Cassini mission. The baseline infrared detectors for CIRS are HgCdTe to 16 microns and Schwarz-type thermopiles from 16 to 1000 microns. The far infrared focal plane could be switched from thermopiles to high temperature superconductor (HTS) bolometers between now and 1996. An HTS bolometer could be built using the kinetic inductance effect, or the sharp resistance change at the transition. The transition-edge bolometer is more straightforward to implement, and initial efforts at NASA/Goddard are directed to that device. A working device was made and tested in early 1989. It also has somewhat elevated noise levels below 100 Hz. Upcoming efforts will center on reducing the time constant of the HTS bolometer by attempting to deposit an HTS film on a diamond substrate, and by thinning SrTiO3 substrates. Attempts will be made to improve the film quality to reduce the 1/4 noise level, and to improve the thermal isolation to increase the bolometer sensitivity. An attempt is being made to deposit good-quality HTS films on diamond films using a metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) technique.

  4. Upcoming planetary missions and the applicability of high temperature superconductor bolometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brasunas, J.; Kunde, V.; Moseley, H.; Lakew, B.

    1990-01-01

    Planetary missions to Mars and beyond can last 11 years and longer, making impractical the use of stored cryogens. Passive radiative coolers and single-stage mechanical coolers remain possibilities. CRAF and CASSINI, both using the newly developed Mariner Mark 2 spacecraft, will be the next outer planet missions after Galileo; they are intended to provide information on the origin and evolution of the solar system. CRAF is a cometary rendezvous mission slated for a 1994 launch. CASSINI has been chosen by ESA and will be launched by a Titan 4/Centaur in 1996. It will fly by Jupiter in 2000, inject an ESA-supplied probe into Titan in 2002, and take data in Saturn orbit from 2002 to 2006. NASA/Goddard is currently developing a prototype Fourier transform spectrometer (CIRS) that will be proposed for the CASSINI mission. The baseline infrared detectors for CIRS are HgCdTe to 16 microns and Schwarz-type thermopiles from 16 to 1000 microns. The far infrared focal plane could be switched from thermopiles to high temperature superconductor (HTS) bolometers between now and 1996. An HTS bolometer could be built using the kinetic inductance effect, or the sharp resistance change at the transition. The transition-edge bolometer is more straightforward to implement and initial efforts at NASA/Goddard are directed to that device. A working device was made and tested in early 1989. It also has somewhat elevated noise levels below 100 Hz. Upcoming efforts will center on reducing the time constant of the HTS bolometer by attempting to deposit an HTS film on a diamond substrate, and by thinning SrTiO3 substrates. Attempts will be made to improve the film quality to reduce th 1/f noise level, and to improve the thermal isolation to increase the bolometer sensitivity. An attempt is being made to deposit good-quality HTS films on diamond films using an MOCVD technique.

  5. Detecting scintillations in liquid helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffman, P. R.; McKinsey, D. N.

    2013-09-01

    We review our work in developing a tetraphenyl butadiene (TPB)-based detection system for a measurement of the neutron lifetime using magnetically confined ultracold neutrons (UCN). As part of the development of the detection system for this experiment, we studied the scintillation properties of liquid helium itself, characterized the fluorescent efficiencies of different fluors, and built and tested three detector geometries. We provide an overview of the results from these studies as well as references for additional information.

  6. Multi-PSPMT scintillation camera

    SciTech Connect

    Pani, R.; Pellegrini, R.; Trotta, G.; Scopinaro, F.; Soluri, A.; Vincentis, G. de; Scafe, R.; Pergola, A.

    1999-06-01

    Gamma ray imaging is usually accomplished by the use of a relatively large scintillating crystal coupled to either a number of photomultipliers (PMTs) (Anger Camera) or to a single large Position Sensitive PMT (PSPMT). Recently the development of new diagnostic techniques, such as scintimammography and radio-guided surgery, have highlighted a number of significant limitations of the Anger camera in such imaging procedures. In this paper a dedicated gamma camera is proposed for clinical applications with the aim of improving image quality by utilizing detectors with an appropriate size and shape for the part of the body under examination. This novel scintillation camera is based upon an array of PSPMTs (Hamamatsu R5900-C8). The basic concept of this camera is identical to the Anger Camera with the exception of the substitution of PSPMTs for the PMTs. In this configuration it is possible to use the high resolution of the PSPMTs and still correctly position events lying between PSPMTs. In this work the test configuration is a 2 by 2 array of PSPMTs. Some advantages of this camera are: spatial resolution less than 2 mm FWHM, good linearity, thickness less than 3 cm, light weight, lower cost than equivalent area PSPMT, large detection area when coupled to scintillating arrays, small dead boundary zone (< 3 mm) and flexibility in the shape of the camera.

  7. Morphology of auroral zone radio wave scintillation

    SciTech Connect

    Rino, C.L.; Matthews, S.J.

    1980-08-01

    This paper describes the morphology of midnight sector and morning sector auroral zone scintillation observations made over a two-year period using the Wideband satelite, which is in a sun-synchronous, low-altitude orbit. No definitive seasonal variation was found. The nighttime data showed the highest scintillation ocurrence levels, but significant amounts of morning scintillation were observed. For the most part the scintillation activity followed the general pattern of local magnetic activity. The most prominent feature in the nightime data is a localized amplitude and phase scintillation enhancement at the point where the propagation vector lies within an L shell. A geometrical effect due to a dynamic slab of sheetlike structures in the F region is hypothesized as the source of his enhancement. The data have been sorted by magnetic activity, proximity to local midnight, and season. The general features of the data are in agreement with the accepted morphology of auroral zone scintillation.

  8. Scintillating Fibre Tracking at High Luminosity Colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joram, C.; Haefeli, G.; Leverington, B.

    2015-08-01

    The combination of small diameter scintillating plastic fibres with arrays of SiPM photodetectors has led to a new class of SciFi trackers usable at high luminosity collider experiments. After a short review of the main principles and history of the scintillating fibre technology, we describe the challenges and developments of the large area Scintillating Fibre Tracker currently under development for the upgraded LHCb experiment.

  9. Recording of relativistic particles in thin scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Tolstukhin, I A.; Somov, Alexander S.; Somov, S. V.; Bolozdynya, A. I.

    2014-11-01

    Results of investigating an assembly of thin scintillators and silicon photomultipliers for registering relativistic particles with the minimum ionization are presented. A high efficiency of registering relativistic particles using an Ej-212 plastic scintillator, BSF-91A wavelength-shifting fiber (Saint-Gobain), and a silicon photomultiplier (Hamamtsu) is shown. The measurement results are used for creating a scintillation hodoscope of the magnetic spectrometer for registering γ quanta in the GlueX experiment.

  10. Spacecraft Radio Scintillation and Solar System Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, Richard

    1993-01-01

    When a wave propagates through a turbulent medium, scattering by the random refractive index inhomogeneities can lead to a wide variety of phenomena that have been the subject of extensive study. The observed scattering effects include amplitude or intensity scintillation, phase scintillation, angular broadening, and spectral broadening, among others. In this paper, I will refer to these scattering effects collectively as scintillation. Although the most familiar example is probably the twinkling of stars (light wave intensity scintillation by turbulence in the Earth's atmosphere), scintillation has been encountered and investigated in such diverse fields as ionospheric physics, oceanography, radio astronomy, and radio and optical communications. Ever since planetary spacecraft began exploring the solar system, scintillation has appeared during the propagation of spacecraft radio signals through planetary atmospheres, planetary ionospheres, and the solar wind. Early studies of these phenomena were motivated by the potential adverse effects on communications and navigation, and on experiments that use the radio link to conduct scientific investigations. Examples of the latter are radio occultation measurements (described below) of planetary atmospheres to deduce temperature profiles, and the search for gravitational waves. However,these concerns soon gave way to the emergence of spacecraft radio scintillation as a new scientific tool for exploring small-scale dynamics in planetary atmospheres and structure in the solar wind, complementing in situ and other remote sensing spacecraft measurements, as well as scintillation measurements using natural (celestial) radio sources. The purpose of this paper is to briefly describe and review the solar system spacecraft radio scintillation observations, to summarize the salient features of wave propagation analyses employed in interpreting them, to underscore the unique remote sensing capabilities and scientific relevance of

  11. Waveshifters and Scintillators for Ionizing Radiation Detection

    SciTech Connect

    B.Baumgaugh; J.Bishop; D.Karmgard; J.Marchant; M.McKenna; R.Ruchti; M.Vigneault; L.Hernandez; C.Hurlbut

    2007-12-11

    Scintillation and waveshifter materials have been developed for the detection of ionizing radiation in an STTR program between Ludlum Measurements, Inc. and the University of Notre Dame. Several new waveshifter materials have been developed which are comparable in efficiency and faster in fluorescence decay than the standard material Y11 (K27) used in particle physics for several decades. Additionally, new scintillation materials useful for fiber tracking have been developed which have been compared to 3HF. Lastly, work was done on developing liquid scintillators and paint-on scintillators and waveshifters for high radiation environments.

  12. Divalent fluoride doped cerium fluoride scintillator

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, David F.; Sparrow, Robert W.

    1991-01-01

    The use of divalent fluoride dopants in scintillator materials comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. The preferred divalent fluoride dopants are calcium fluoride, strontium fluoride, and barium fluoride. The preferred amount of divalent fluoride dopant is less than about two percent by weight of the total scintillator. Cerium fluoride scintillator crystals grown with the addition of a divalent fluoride have exhibited better transmissions and higher light outputs than crystals grown without the addition of such dopants. These scintillators are useful in radiation detection and monitoring applications, and are particularly well suited for high-rate applications such as positron emission tomography (PET).

  13. Radio wave scintillations at equatorial regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poularikas, A. D.

    1972-01-01

    Radio waves, passing through the atmosphere, experience amplitude and phase fluctuations know as scintillations. A characterization of equatorial scintillation, which has resulted from studies of data recorded primarily in South America and equatorial Africa, is presented. Equatorial scintillation phenomena are complex because they appear to vary with time of day (pre-and postmidnight), season (equinoxes), and magnetic activity. A wider and more systematic geographical coverage is needed for both scientific and engineering purposes; therefore, it is recommended that more observations should be made at earth stations (at low-geomagnetic latitudes) to record equatorial scintillation phenomena.

  14. Infrared detection with high-{Tc} bolometers and response of Nb tunnel junctions to picosecond voltage pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Verghese, S.

    1993-05-01

    Oxide superconductors with high critical temperature {Tc} make sensitive thermometers for several types of infrared bolometers. The authors built composite bolometers with YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}} thermometers on sapphire substrates which have higher sensitivity than competing thermal detectors which operate at temperatures above 77 K. A 1 x 1 mm bolometer with gold black serving as the radiation absorber has useful sensitivity for wavelengths 20--100 {mu}m. A 3 x 3 mm bolometer with a bismuth film as the absorber operates from 20--100 {mu}m. High-{Tc} bolometers which are fabricated with micromachining techniques on membranes of Si or Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} have potential application to large-format arrays which are used for infrared imaging. A nonisothermal high-{Tc} bolometer can be fabricated on a membrane of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) which is in thermal contact with the heat sink along the perimeter of the membrane. A thermal analysis indicates that the YSZ membrane bolometer can have improved sensitivity compared to the sapphire bolometer for spectrometer applications. The quasiparticle tunneling current in a superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) junction is highly nonlinear in the applied voltage. The authors have made the first measurement of the linear response of the quasiparticle current in a Nb/AlO{sub x}/Nb junction over a broad bandwidth from 75--200 GHz. Nonlinear measurements made with these pulses may provide information about the quasiparticle lifetime. Preliminary data from such measurements are presented.

  15. Adaptation of frequency-domain readout for Transition Edge Sensor bolometers for the POLARBEAR-2 Cosmic Microwave Background experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattori, Kaori; Arnold, Kam; Barron, Darcy; Dobbs, Matt; de Haan, Tijmen; Harrington, Nicholas; Hasegawa, Masaya; Hazumi, Masashi; Holzapfel, William L.; Keating, Brian; Lee, Adrian T.; Morii, Hideki; Myers, Michael J.; Smecher, Graeme; Suzuki, Aritoki; Tomaru, Takayuki

    2013-12-01

    The POLARBEAR-2 Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) experiment aims to observe B-mode polarization with high sensitivity to explore gravitational lensing of CMB and inflationary gravitational waves. POLARBEAR-2 is an upgraded experiment based on POLARBEAR-1, which had first light in January 2012. For POLARBEAR-2, we will build a receiver that has 7588 Transition Edge Sensor (TES) bolometers coupled to two-band (95 and 150 GHz) polarization-sensitive antennas. For the large array's readout, we employ digital frequency-domain multiplexing and multiplex 32 bolometers through a single superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). An 8-bolometer frequency-domain multiplexing readout has been deployed with the POLARBEAR-1 experiment. Extending that architecture to 32 bolometers requires an increase in the bandwidth of the SQUID electronics to 3 MHz. To achieve this increase in bandwidth, we use Digital Active Nulling (DAN) on the digital frequency multiplexing platform. In this paper, we present requirements and improvements on parasitic inductance and resistance of cryogenic wiring and capacitors used for modulating bolometers. These components are problematic above 1 MHz. We also show that our system is able to bias a bolometer in its superconducting transition at 3 MHz.

  16. The Do/ scintillating fiber tracker

    SciTech Connect

    Bross, A.; Gutierrez, G.; Grunendahl, S.; Lincoln, D.; Ramberg, E.; Ray, R.; Ruchti, R.; Warchol, J.; Wayne, M.; Choic, S.

    1998-11-01

    The Do/ detector is being upgraded in preparation for the next collider run at Fermilab. The Central Fiber Tracker discussed in this report is a major component of the Do/ upgrade. The expected Tevatron luminosity of 2{times}10{sup 32} cm{sup {minus}2} sec{sup {minus}1}, the 132ns bunch crossing time, and the Do/ detector constraints of a 2 Tesla solenoid and a 52 cm lever arm, make a scintillating fiber based tracker an optimal choice for the upgrade of the Do/ detector. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. Photodetectors for Scintillator Proportionality Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, William W.; Choong, Woon-Seng; Hull, Giulia; Payne, Steve; Cherepy, Nerine; Valentine, J.D.

    2010-10-18

    We evaluate photodetectors for use in a Compton Coincidence apparatus designed for measuring scintillator proportionality. There are many requirements placed on the photodetector in these systems, including active area, linearity, and the ability to accurately measure low light levels (which implies high quantum efficiency and high signal-to-noise ratio). Through a combination of measurement and Monte Carlo simulation, we evaluate a number of potential photodetectors, especially photomultiplier tubes and hybrid photodetectors. Of these, we find that the most promising devices available are photomultiplier tubes with high ({approx}50%) quantum efficiency, although hybrid photodetectors with high quantum efficiency would be preferable.

  18. Multilayer scintillation spectrometer for charged pionium detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnov, V. A.; Karnyushina, L. V.; Kuznetsov, S. N.; Kurepin, A. B.; Livanov, A. N.; Pilyar, A. V.

    2013-01-01

    The design description and characteristics of a 14-layer scintillation spectrometer for meson recording are given. The results from testing the spectrometer, calibrating it with cosmic-ray particles, and using the particle beams at energies reaching 1 GeV are presented. The spectrometer design is based on flat scintillation plates glued with wavelength-shifting optic fibers.

  19. Scintillator handbook with emphasis on cesium iodide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tidd, J. L.; Dabbs, J. R.; Levine, N.

    1973-01-01

    This report provides a background of reasonable depth and reference material on scintillators in general. Particular attention is paid to the cesium iodide scintillators as used in the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO) experiments. It is intended especially for use by persons such as laboratory test personnel who need to obtain a working knowledge of these materials and their characteristics in a short time.

  20. Binderless composite scintillator for neutron detection

    DOEpatents

    Hodges, Jason P [Knoxville, TN; Crow, Jr; Lowell, M [Oak Ridge, TN; Cooper, Ronald G [Oak Ridge, TN

    2009-03-10

    Composite scintillator material consisting of a binderless sintered mixture of a Lithium (Li) compound containing .sup.6Li as the neutron converter and Y.sub.2SiO.sub.5:Ce as the scintillation phosphor, and the use of this material as a method for neutron detection. Other embodiments of the invention include various other Li compounds.

  1. Design, realization, and characteristics of a transition edge bolometer for sub-millimeter wave astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, Torsten; Zakosarenko, Vyatcheslav; Kreysa, Ernst; Esch, Walter; Anders, Solveig; Gemuend, Hans-Peter; Heinz, Erik; Meyer, Hans-Georg

    2012-11-01

    The large array bolometer camera is scheduled to succeed its semiconducting predecessor at the Atacama pathfinder experiment. It shall be an array of 300 transition edge sensors operated at a temperature of about 0.25 K, provided by a 3He evaporation cooler and a pulse tube refrigerator. The instrument will be read out by a superconducting quantum interference device time domain multiplexer. The design and realization of a suitable detector for this instrument is described. Based on sensitivity demands derived from the background limit, the thermal and electrical designs for a spider-web bolometer are deduced. The theoretical predictions are compared to experimental results. The pixel design yields a background-limited performance for background loads corresponding to blackbody sources between 77 K and 300 K and a partially effective anti-aliasing filter for the intended multiplexed readout.

  2. Development of frequency selective bolometers for ground-based MM-wave astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cottingham, David A.; Bier, Alex; Campano, Barbara; Chen, Tina C.; Cheng, Edward S.; Crawford, Thomas; Finkbeiner, Fred M.; Fixsen, Dale J.; Logan, Daniel W.; Meyer, Stephan; Sharp, Elmer; Silverberg, Robert F.; Wilson, Grant

    2003-02-01

    The Frequency Selective Bolometer (FSB) is a bolometer with a patterned frequency selective absorber, coupled with a band-reflecting backshort. The resulting unit absorbs in-band radiation, and passes out-of-band radiation. Thus a series of FSBs tuned to different bands packed in series in a light pipe forms a compact multi-band photometer. The compact form factor makes it an attractive detector for a mm-wave array camera. We have built and characterized prototypes that demonstrate this technology. We are now developing a set of FSBs for SPEED (the SPEctral Energy Distribution camera), an FSB array camera which will observe 4 pixels in 4 mm-wave spectral bands, to be used on the Heinrich Hertz Telescope and the Large Millimeter Telescope. These FSBs are fabricated on a free-standing SiN film with TES thermometers. We will discuss the design and performance of these detectors.

  3. Tuning of Kilopixel Transition Edge Sensor Bolometer Arrays with a Digital Frequency Multiplexed Readout System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDermid, Kevin; Hyland, Peter; Aubin, Francois; Bissonnette, Eric; Dobbs, Matt; Hubmayr, Johannes; Smecher, Graeme; Wairrach, Shahjahen

    2009-12-01

    A digital frequency multiplexing (DfMUX) system has been developed and used to tune large arrays of transition edge sensor (TES) bolometers read out with SQUID arrays for mm-wavelength cosmology telescopes. The DfMUX system multiplexes the input bias voltages and output currents for several bolometers on a single set of cryogenic wires. Multiplexing reduces the heat load on the camera's sub-Kelvin cryogenic detector stage. In this paper we describe the algorithms and software used to set up and optimize the operation of the bolometric camera. The algorithms are implemented on soft processors embedded within FPGA devices operating on each backend readout board. The result is a fully parallelized implementation for which the setup time is independent of the array size.

  4. BIG MAC: A bolometer array for mid-infrared astronomy, Center Director's Discretionary Fund

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Telesco, C. M.; Decher, R.; Baugher, C.

    1985-01-01

    The infrared array referred to as Big Mac (for Marshall Array Camera), was designed for ground based astronomical observations in the wavelength range 5 to 35 microns. It contains 20 discrete gallium-doped germanium bolometer detectors at a temperature of 1.4K. Each bolometer is irradiated by a square field mirror constituting a single pixel of the array. The mirrors are arranged contiguously in four columns and five rows, thus defining the array configuration. Big Mac utilized cold reimaging optics and an up looking dewar. The total Big Mac system also contains a telescope interface tube for mounting the dewar and a computer for data acquisition and processing. Initial astronomical observations at a major infrared observatory indicate that Big Mac performance is excellent, having achieved the design specifications and making this instrument an outstanding tool for astrophysics.

  5. An antenna-coupled bolometer with an integrated microstrip bandpass filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Michael J.; Holzapfel, William; Lee, Adrian T.; O'Brient, Roger; Richards, P. L.; Tran, Huan T.; Ade, Peter; Engargiola, Greg; Smith, Andy; Spieler, Helmuth

    2005-03-01

    We describe the fabrication and testing of antenna-coupled superconducting transition-edge bolometers for use at millimeter wavelengths. The design uses a double-slot dipole antenna connected to superconducting niobium microstrip. Band defining filters are implemented in the microstrip, which is then terminated with a load resistor. The power dissipated in the load resistor is measured by a superconducting transition-edge sensor (TES). The load resistor and TES are thermally well connected and are supported by a silicon nitride substrate. The substrate is suspended by four narrow silicon nitride legs for thermal isolation. The bolometers have been optically characterized and the spectral response is presented. This detector is a prototype element for use in an array designed for studies of the cosmic microwave background polarization.

  6. Design, realization, and characteristics of a transition edge bolometer for sub-millimeter wave astronomy.

    PubMed

    May, Torsten; Zakosarenko, Vyatcheslav; Kreysa, Ernst; Esch, Walter; Anders, Solveig; Gemuend, Hans-Peter; Heinz, Erik; Meyer, Hans-Georg

    2012-11-01

    The large array bolometer camera is scheduled to succeed its semiconducting predecessor at the Atacama pathfinder experiment. It shall be an array of 300 transition edge sensors operated at a temperature of about 0.25 K, provided by a (3)He evaporation cooler and a pulse tube refrigerator. The instrument will be read out by a superconducting quantum interference device time domain multiplexer. The design and realization of a suitable detector for this instrument is described. Based on sensitivity demands derived from the background limit, the thermal and electrical designs for a spider-web bolometer are deduced. The theoretical predictions are compared to experimental results. The pixel design yields a background-limited performance for background loads corresponding to blackbody sources between 77 K and 300 K and a partially effective anti-aliasing filter for the intended multiplexed readout. PMID:23206078

  7. Hot-Electron Bolometer Mixers on Silicon-on-Insulator Substrates for Terahertz Frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skalare, Anders; Stern, Jeffrey; Bumble, Bruce; Maiwald, Frank

    2005-01-01

    A terahertz Hot-Electron Bolometer (HEB) mixer design using device substrates based on Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) technology is described. This substrate technology allows very thin chips (6 pm) with almost arbitrary shape to be manufactured, so that they can be tightly fitted into a waveguide structure and operated at very high frequencies with only low risk for power leakages and resonance modes. The NbTiN-based bolometers are contacted by gold beam-leads, while other beamleads are used to hold the chip in place in the waveguide test fixture. The initial tests yielded an equivalent receiver noise temperature of 3460 K double-sideband at a local oscillator frequency of 1.462 THz and an intermediate frequency of 1.4 GHz.

  8. Optimization of a bolometer detector for ITER based on Pt absorber on SiN membrane.

    PubMed

    Meister, H; Eich, T; Endstrasser, N; Giannone, L; Kannamüller, M; Kling, A; Koll, J; Trautmann, T; Detemple, P; Schmitt, S

    2010-10-01

    Any plasma diagnostic in ITER must be able to operate at temperatures in excess of 200 °C and neutron loads corresponding to 0.1 dpa over its lifetime. To achieve this aim for the bolometer diagnostic, a miniaturized metal resistor bolometer detector based on Pt absorbers galvanically deposited on SiN membranes is being developed. The first two generations of detectors featured up to 4.5 μm thick absorbers. Results from laboratory tests are presented characterizing the dependence of their calibration constants under thermal loads up to 450 °C. Several detectors have been tested in ASDEX Upgrade providing reliable data but also pointing out the need for further optimization. A laser trimming procedure has been implemented to reduce the mismatch in meander resistances below 1% for one detector and the thermal drifts from this mismatch. PMID:21061487

  9. CALDER: neutrinoless double-beta decay identification in TeO bolometers with kinetic inductance detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battistelli, E. S.; Bellini, F.; Bucci, C.; Calvo, M.; Cardani, L.; Casali, N.; Castellano, M. G.; Colantoni, I.; Coppolecchia, A.; Cosmelli, C.; Cruciani, A.; de Bernardis, P.; Di Domizio, S.; D'Addabbo, A.; Martinez, M.; Masi, S.; Pagnanini, L.; Tomei, C.; Vignati, M.

    2015-08-01

    Next-generation experiments searching for neutrinoless double-beta decay must be sensitive to a Majorana neutrino mass as low as 10. CUORE , an array of 988 TeO bolometers being commissioned at Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, features an expected sensitivity of 50-130 at 90 % C.L. The background is expected to be dominated by radioactivity, and can be in principle removed by detecting the small amount of Cherenkov light emitted by the signal. The Cryogenic wide-Area Light Detectors with Excellent Resolution project aims at developing a small prototype experiment consisting of TeO bolometers coupled to high-sensitivity light detectors based on kinetic inductance detectors. The R&D is focused on the light detectors in view of the implementation in a next-generation neutrinoless double-beta decay experiment.

  10. Development of Superconducting Magnetic Heat Switches for an Ideal Integrating Bolometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagler, P. C.; Canavan, E.; De Alba, R.; Stevenson, T. R.

    2016-07-01

    We are developing an ideal integrating bolometer (IIB), a novel detector for far-infrared applications. An IIB consists of a dissipationless temperature sensor weakly coupled to a thermal bath through a heat switch. If the heat switch's thermal conductance in the "off" state is much smaller than its conductance in the "on" state, the thermometer temperature will depend linearly on integrated incident power, until the bolometer temperature is reset by changing the conductance to the "on" state. A key component of an IIB is the heat switch, the subject of this paper. We have fabricated and tested prototype IIB devices designed to demonstrate a superconducting magnetic heat switch on both solid substrates and membranes. In this work, we will present details on the design, fabrication, and experimental performance of our prototype IIB devices.

  11. Nonequilibrium theory of a hot-electron bolometer with normal metal-insulator-superconductor tunnel junction

    SciTech Connect

    Golubev, Dmitri; Kuzmin, Leonid

    2001-06-01

    The operation of the hot-electron bolometer with normal metal-insulator-superconductor (NIS) tunnel junction as a temperature sensor is analyzed theoretically. The responsivity and the noise equivalent power (NEP) of the bolometer are obtained numerically for typical experimental parameters. Relatively simple approximate analytical expressions for these values are derived. The time constant of the device is also found. We demonstrate that the effect of the electron cooling by the NIS junction, which serves as a thermometer, can improve the sensitivity. This effect is also useful in the presence of the finite background power load. We discuss the effect of the correlation of the shot noise and the heat flow noise in the NIS junction. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  12. Development of scintillation materials for PET scanners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korzhik, Mikhail; Fedorov, Andrei; Annenkov, Alexander; Borissevitch, Andrei; Dossovitski, Alexei; Missevitch, Oleg; Lecoq, Paul

    2007-02-01

    The growing demand on PET methodology for a variety of applications ranging from clinical use to fundamental studies triggers research and development of PET scanners providing better spatial resolution and sensitivity. These efforts are primarily focused on the development of advanced PET detector solutions and on the developments of new scintillation materials as well. However Lu containing scintillation materials introduced in the last century such as LSO, LYSO, LuAP, LuYAP crystals still remain the best PET species in spite of the recent developments of bright, fast but relatively low density lanthanum bromide scintillators. At the same time Lu based materials have several drawbacks which are high temperature of crystallization and relatively high cost compared to alkali-halide scintillation materials. Here we describe recent results in the development of new scintillation materials for PET application.

  13. Interstellar scattering of pulsar radiation. 1: Scintillation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Backer, D. C.

    1974-01-01

    An investigation of the intensity fluctuations of 28 pulsars near 0.4 GHz indicates that scintillation spectra have a Gaussian shape, scintillation indices are near unity, and the scintillation bandwidth depends linearly on dispersion measure. Observations near 2.5 GHz suggest a strong dependence of the frequency at which scintillation indices fall below unity on dispersion measure. Multistation measurements of scintillation provide values or limits for the scale size of the scattering diffraction pattern. The dependences of scattering parameters on dispersion measure is discussed in terms of the current models. It is suggested that any line of sight through the galaxy encounters increasingly rare, increasingly large deviations of thermal electron density on the scale of 10 to the 11th power cm.

  14. Equitorial scintillations: Advances since ISEA-6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, S.

    1985-01-01

    Since the last equatorial aeronomy meeting in 1980, our understanding of the morphology of equatorial scintillations has advanced greatly due to more intensive observations at the equatorial anomaly locations in the different longitude zones. The unmistakable effect of the sunspot cycle in controlling irregularity belt width and electron concentration responsible for strong scintillation in the GHz range has been demonstrated. The fact that night-time F-region dynamics is an important factor in controlling the magnitude of scintillations has been recognized by interpreting scintillation observations in the light of realistic models of total electron content at various longitudes. A hypothesis based on the alignment of the solar terminator with the geomagnetic flux tubes as an indicator of enhanced scintillation occurrence and another based on the influence of a transequatorial thermospheric neutral wind have been postulated to describe the observed longitudinal variation.

  15. Extruded scintillator for the calorimetry applications

    SciTech Connect

    Dyshkant, A.; Rykalin, V.; Pla-Dalmau, A.; Beznosko, D.; /SUNY, Stony Brook

    2006-08-01

    An extrusion line has been installed and successfully operated at FNAL (Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory) in collaboration with NICADD (Northern Illinois Center for Accelerator and Detector Development). This new Facility will serve to further develop and improve extruded plastic scintillator. Recently progress has been made in producing co-extruded plastic scintillator, thus increasing the potential HEP applications of this Facility. The current R&D work with extruded and co-extruded plastic scintillator for a potential ALICE upgrade, the ILC calorimetry program and the MINERvA experiment show the attractiveness of the chosen strategy for future experiments and calorimetry. We extensively discuss extruded and co-extruded plastic scintillator in calorimetry in synergy with new Solid State Photomultipliers. The characteristics of extruded and co-extruded plastic scintillator will be presented here as well as results with non-traditional photo read-out.

  16. Extruded scintillator for the Calorimetry applications

    SciTech Connect

    Dyshkant, A.; Rykalin, V.; Pla-Dalmau, A.; Beznosko, D.

    2006-10-27

    An extrusion line has been installed and successfully operated at FNAL (Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory) in collaboration with NICADD (Northern Illinois Center for Accelerator and Detector Development). This new Facility will serve to further develop and improve extruded plastic scintillator. Recently progress has been made in producing co-extruded plastic scintillator, thus increasing the potential HEP applications of this Facility. The current R and D work with extruded and co-extruded plastic scintillator for a potential ALICE upgrade, the ILC calorimetry program and the MINERvA experiment show the attractiveness of the chosen strategy for future experiments and calorimetry. We extensively discuss extruded and co-extruded plastic scintillator in calorimetry in synergy with new Solid State Photomultipliers. The characteristics of extruded and co-extruded plastic scintillator will be presented here as well as results with non-traditional photo read-out.

  17. A four channel He-3 cooled balloon-borne bolometer radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Stephan

    1988-01-01

    A four channel He-3 cooled balloon-borne bolometer radiometer was constructed. The principal goal of the instrument is to measure the anisotropy of the 3 K cosmic background radiation on angular scales of 4 to 180 deg. The goal is to improve the sensitivity of the measurements to Delta T/T is less than .00001. A secondary goal is to survey the galactic thermal dust emission in the submillimeter range.

  18. Neutron Transmutation Doped (NTD) germanium thermistors for sub-mm bolometer applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haller, E. E.; Itoh, K. M.; Beeman, J. W.

    1996-01-01

    Recent advances in the development of neutron transmutation doped (NTD) semiconductor thermistors fabricated from natural and controlled isotopic composition germanium are reported. The near ideal doping uniformity that can be achieved with the NTD process, the device simplicity of NTD Ge thermistors and the high performance of cooled junction field effect transistor preamplifiers led to the widespread acceptance of these thermal sensors in ground-based, airborne and spaceborne radio telescopes. These features made possible the development of efficient bolometer arrays.

  19. Liquid helium-cooled MOSFET preamplifier for use with astronomical bolometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goebel, J. H.

    1977-01-01

    A liquid helium-cooled p-channel enhancement mode MOSFET, the 3N167, is found to have sufficiently low noise for use as a preamplifier with helium-cooled bolometers that are used in infrared astronomy. Its characteristics at 300, 77, and 4.2 K are presented. It is also shown to have useful application with certain photoconductive and photovoltaic infrared detectors.

  20. Scintillation proximity assay using polymeric membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Mansfield, R.K.

    1992-01-01

    Liquid scintillation counting (LSC) is typically used to quantify electron emitting isotopes. In LSC, radioactive samples are dissolved in an organic fluor solution (scintillation cocktail) to ensure that the label is close enough to the fluor molecules to be detected. Although efficient, scintillation cocktail is neither specific or selective for samples labeled with the same radioisotope. Scintillation cocktail is flammable posing significant health risks to the user and is expensive to purchase and discard. Scintillation Proximity Assay (SPA) is a radioanalytical technique where only those radiochemical entities (RCE's) bound to fluor containing matrices are detected. Only bound RCE's are in close enough proximity the entrapped fluor molecules to induce scintillations. Unbound radioligands are too far removed from the fluor molecules to be detected. The research in this dissertation focused on the development and evaluation of fluor-containing membranes (scintillation proximity membranes, SP membranes) to be used for specific radioanalytical techniques without using scintillation cocktail. Polysulfone and PVC SP membranes prepared in our laboratory were investigated for radioimmunossay (RIA) where only bound radioligand is detected, thereby eliminating the separation step impeding the automation of RIA. These SP membranes performed RIA where the results were nearly identical to commercial SP microbeads. SP membranes functionalized with quaternary ammonium hydroxide moieties were able to trap and quantify [sup 14]CO[sub 2] without using liquid scintillation cocktail. RCE's bound in the pore structure of SP membranes are intimate with the entrapped fluor providing the geometry needed for high detection efficiencies. Absorbent SP membranes were used in radiation surveys and were shown to be as effective as conventional survey techniques using filter paper and scintillation cocktail.

  1. Scintillation Effects on Space Shuttle GPS Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, John L.; Kramer, Leonard

    2001-01-01

    Irregularities in ionospheric electron density result in variation in amplitude and phase of Global Positioning System (GPS) signals, or scintillation. GPS receivers tracking scintillated signals may lose carrier phase or frequency lock in the case of phase sc intillation. Amplitude scintillation can cause "enhancement" or "fading" of GPS signals and result in loss of lock. Scintillation can occur over the equatorial and polar regions and is a function of location, time of day, season, and solar and geomagnetic activity. Mid latitude regions are affected only very rarely, resulting from highly disturbed auroral events. In the spring of 1998, due to increasing concern about scintillation of GPS signals during the upcoming solar maximum, the Space Shuttle Program began to assess the impact of scintillation on Collins Miniaturized Airborne GPS Receiver (MAGR) units that are to replace Tactical Air Control and Navigation (TACAN) units on the Space Shuttle orbiters. The Shuttle Program must determine if scintillation effects pose a threat to safety of flight and mission success or require procedural and flight rule changes. Flight controllers in Mission Control must understand scintillation effects on GPS to properly diagnose "off nominal" GPS receiver performance. GPS data from recent Space Shuttle missions indicate that the signals tracked by the Shuttle MAGR manifest scintillation. Scintillation is observed as anomalous noise in velocity measurements lasting for up to 20 minutes on Shuttle orbit passes and are not accounted for in the error budget of the MAGR accuracy parameters. These events are typically coincident with latitude and local time occurrence of previously identified equatorial spread F within about 20 degrees of the magnetic equator. The geographic and seasonal history of these events from ground-based observations and a simple theoretical model, which have potential for predicting events for operational purposes, are reviewed.

  2. The improved scintillation crystal lead tungstate scintillation for PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Youbao; WU, Rurong; Xiao, Linrong; Zhang, Jianxin; Yang, Peizhi; Yan, Hui

    2009-07-01

    As a valuable material for the detecting of γ-ray, PbWO4 and BaF2:PbWO4 crystals were grown by a novel multi-crucible temperature gradient system developed by ourselves. Utilizing a topical partial heating method, this system can form a topical partial high temperature in its hearth. Thus this system could melt raw materials in step by step as requirement. The advantage of this method is that there would be solid obstruct left on the melt in the procedure of the crystal growing up. The left obstruct could prevent the volatilization of the component in the melt. Hence it is helpful for the composition homogenization in the crystal. The system also offers a sustaining device for multi-crucibles and thus it can grow many crystals simultaneity. The optical properties and scintillation properties of the crystals were studied. The results reveal that the ions doping improves the scintillation properties of the crystal. The transmittance spectra show that the transmittance of BaF2:PbWO4 crystals are better than that of PbWO4 crystals. For the PbWO4 crystals, their absorption edge is at 325nm, and their maximum transmittance is 68%. For the BaF2:PbWO4 crystals, their absorption edge is at 325nm and their maximum transmittance is upto76%. The X-ray excited luminescence spectra shows that the luminescence peak is at 420nm for the samples of PbWO4 crystal while the peak is at 430nm for the samples of BaF2:PbWO4 crystal respectively. The luminescence intensity of the samples of BaF2:PbWO4 crystal is about two times than that of PbWO4 crystal. And their peak shape is different for the two kind of crystal. The light yield of BaF2:PbWO4 crystals is about 2.9 times than that of PbWO4 crystal Analyzing these scintillation properties, we find that the VPb 3+ and VO- defects do harm for the optical properties of the crystal. Ions doping method could reduce the defect concentration and improving its illumination performance of the crystal. Specially, the doped F- ions in O2- site can

  3. Thermal response of large area high temperature superconducting YBaCuO infrared bolometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khalil, Ali E.

    1990-01-01

    Thermal analysis of large area high temperature superconducting infrared detector operating in the equilibrium mode (bolometer) was performed. An expression for the temperature coefficient beta=1/R(dR/dT) in terms of the thermal conductance and the thermal time constant of the detector were derived. A superconducting transition edge bolometer is a thermistor consisting of a thin film superconducting YBaCuO evaporated into a suitable thermally isolated substrate. The operating temperature of the bolometer is maintained close to the midpoint of the superconducting transition region where the resistance R has a maximum dynamic range. A detector with a strip configuration was analyzed and an expression for the temperature rise (delta T) above the ambient due to a uniform illumination with a source of power density P(sub i) was calculated. An expression for the thermal responsivity of the detector was derived using the thermal diffusion analysis with appropriate boundary conditions. It was found that the thermal responsibility depends upon the spatial modulation frequency and the angular frequency of the incoming radiation. The problem of the thermal cross talk between different detector elements was addressed. In the case of monolithic HTS detector array with a row of square elements of dimensions 2a and CCD or CID readout electronics the thermal spread function was derived for different spacing between elements. This analysis can be critical for future design and applications of large area focal plane arrays as broad band optical detectors made of granular thin films HTS YBaCuO.

  4. Advances in small-pixel, large-format α-Si bolometer arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schimert, T.; Hanson, C.; Brady, J.; Fagan, T.; Taylor, M.; McCardel, W.; Gooch, R.; Gohlke, M.; Syllaios, A. J.

    2009-05-01

    Continued reduction of α-Si bolometer pixel size has led to increases in array size as well as improvements in temporal response for a given level of sensitivity. Programs funded by DARPA and NVESD are developing advanced 320×240, 640×480 and 1024×768 α-Si bolometer arrays with 17μm pixels, on-chip A/D conversion, significant improvements in dynamic range, significant reductions in thermal time constant and other specialized functions. The push to 17μm is motivated not only by system size and weight, but also by improvements in performance resulting from increased resolution. Smaller pixels permit fabrication of larger arrays without subverting the field-size constraints of ordinary photolithographic processes. Reducing pixel size also reduces the effects of stress mismatches. This permits reduction of device thickness, thereby reducing thermal time constant. Improvements in bolometer material properties have served to improve responsivity while lowering 1/f noise. Because these arrays substantially reduce sensor size, they are becoming the preferred format for most applications, particularly for weapon sights and for head-mounted and UAV applications. The larger array sizes are of interest for pilotage and surveillance.

  5. Kilopixel Pop-Up Bolometer Arrays for the Atacama Cosmology Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chervenak, J. A.; Wollack, E.; Henry, R.; Moseley, S. H.; Niemack, M.; Staggs, S.; Page, L.; Doriese, R.; Hilton, G. c.; Irwin, K. D.

    2007-01-01

    The recently deployed Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) anticipates first light on its kilopixel array of close-packed transition-edge-sensor bolometers in November of 2007. The instrument will represent a full implementation of the next-generation, large format arrays for millimeter wave astronomy that use superconducting electronics and detectors. Achieving the practical construction of such an array is a significant step toward producing advanced detector arrays for future SOFIA instruments. We review the design considerations for the detector array produced for the ACT instrument. The first light imager consists of 32 separately instrumented 32-channel pop-up bolometer arrays (to create a 32x32 filled array of mm-wave sensors). Each array is instrumented with a 32-channel bias resistor array, Nyquist filter array, and time-division SQUID multiplexer. Each component needed to be produced in relatively large quantities with suitable uniformity to meet tolerances for array operation. An optical design was chosen to maximize absorption at the focal plane while mitigating reflections and stray light. The pop-up geometry (previously implemented with semiconducting detectors and readout on the SHARC II and HAWC instruments) enabled straightforward interface of the superconducting bias and readout circuit with the 2D array of superconducting bolometers. The array construction program balanced fabrication challenges with assembly challenges to deliver the instrument in a timely fashion. We present some of the results of the array build and characterization of its performance.

  6. Design and Fabrication of a Two-Dimensional Superconducting Pop-up Bolometer Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, Dominic J.; Staguhn, Johannes G.; Chervenak, James A.; Allen, Christine A.; Moseley, S. Harvey; Irwin, Kent D.; Stacey, Gordon J.; Page, Lyman A.

    2004-01-01

    We have been developing an architecture for producing large format, two dimensional arrays of close-packed bolometers, which will enable submillimeter cameras and spectrometers to obtain images and spectra orders of magnitude faster than present instruments. The low backgrounds achieved in these instruments require very sensitive detectors with NEPs of order 5 x 10(exp -18) W/square root of Hz. Superconducting transition edge sensor bolometers can be close-packed using the Pop-up Detector (PUD) format, and SQUID multiplexers operating at the detector base temperature can be intimately coupled to them. The array unit cell is 8 x 32 pixels, using 32- element detector and multiplexer components. We have fabricated an engineering model array with this technology which features a very compact, modular approach for large format arrays. We report on the production of the 32-element components for the arrays. Planned instruments using this array architecture include the Submillimeter and Far-InfraRed Experiment (SAFIRE) on the SOFIA airborne observatory, the South Pole Imaging Fabry-Perot Interferometer (SPIFI) for the AST/RO observatory, the Millimeter Bolometer Camera for the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (MBC/ACT), and the Redshift (Z) Early Universe Spectrometer (ZEUS j.

  7. Fabrication and Test of Large Area Spider-Web Bolometers for CMB Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biasotti, M.; Ceriale, V.; Corsini, D.; De Gerone, M.; Gatti, F.; Orlando, A.; Pizzigoni, G.

    2015-12-01

    Detecting the primordial 'B-mode' polarization of the cosmic microwave background is one of the major challenges of modern observational cosmology. Microwave telescopes need sensitive cryogenic bolometers with an overall equivalent noise temperature in the nK range. In this paper, we present the development status of large area (about 1 cm2) spider-web bolometer, which imply additional fabrication challenges. The spider-web is a suspended Si3 N4 1 \\upmu m-thick and 8-mm diameter with mesh size of 250 \\upmu m. The thermal sensitive element is a superconducting transition edge sensor (TES) at the center of the bolometer. The first prototype is a Ti-Au TES with transition temperature tuned around 350 mK, new devices will be a Mo-Au bilayer tuned to have a transition temperature of 500 mK. We present the fabrication process with micro-machining techniques from silicon wafer covered with SiO2 - Si3 N4 CVD films, 0.3 and 1 \\upmu m- thick, respectively, and preliminary tests.

  8. A 90GHz Bolometer Camera Detector System for the Green Bank Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, Dominic J.; Allen, Christine A.; Buchanan, Ernest D.; Chen, Tina C.; Chervenak, James A.; Devlin, Mark J.; Dicker, Simon R.; Forgione, Joshua B.

    2004-01-01

    We describe a close-packed, two-dimensional imaging detector system for operation at 90GHz (3.3mm) for the 100 m Green Bank Telescope (GBT) This system will provide high sensitivity (<1mjy in 1s rapid imaging (15'x15' to 250 microJy in 1 hr) at the world's largest steerable aperture. The heart of this camera is an 8x8 close packed, Nyquist-sampled array of superconducting transition edge sensor bolometers. We have designed and are producing a functional superconducting bolometer array system using a monolithic planar architecture and high-speed multiplexed readout electronics. With an NEP of approx. 2.10(exp 17) W/square root Hz, the TES bolometers will provide fast linear sensitive response for high performance imaging. The detectors are read out by and 8x8 time domain SQUID multiplexer. A digital/analog electronics system has been designed to enable read out by SQUID multiplexers. First light for this instrument on the GBT is expected within a year.

  9. Fabrication and Test of Large Area Spider-Web Bolometers for CMB Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biasotti, M.; Ceriale, V.; Corsini, D.; De Gerone, M.; Gatti, F.; Orlando, A.; Pizzigoni, G.

    2016-08-01

    Detecting the primordial 'B-mode' polarization of the cosmic microwave background is one of the major challenges of modern observational cosmology. Microwave telescopes need sensitive cryogenic bolometers with an overall equivalent noise temperature in the nK range. In this paper, we present the development status of large area (about 1 cm2) spider-web bolometer, which imply additional fabrication challenges. The spider-web is a suspended Si3N4 1 \\upmu m-thick and 8-mm diameter with mesh size of 250 \\upmu m. The thermal sensitive element is a superconducting transition edge sensor (TES) at the center of the bolometer. The first prototype is a Ti-Au TES with transition temperature tuned around 350 mK, new devices will be a Mo-Au bilayer tuned to have a transition temperature of 500 mK. We present the fabrication process with micro-machining techniques from silicon wafer covered with SiO2 - Si3N4 CVD films, 0.3 and 1 \\upmu m- thick, respectively, and preliminary tests.

  10. 5,120 Superconducting Bolometers for the PIPER Balloon-Borne CMB Polarization Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, Dominic J.; Chuss, David T.; Hilton, Gene C.; Irwin, Kent D.; Jethava, Nikhil; Jhabvala, Christine A.; Kogut, Alan J.; Miller, Timothy M.; Moseley, S. Harvey; Rostem, Karwan; Sharp, Elmer H.; Staguhn, Johannes G.; Voellmer, George M.; Wollack, Edward J.

    2010-01-01

    We are constructing the Primordial Inflation Polarization Explorer (PIPER) to measure the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and search for the imprint of gravity waves produced during an inflationary epoch in the early universe. The signal is faint and lies behind confusing foregrounds, both astrophysical and cosmological, and so many detectors are required to complete the measurement in a limited time. We will use four of our matured 1,280 pixel, high-filling-factor backshort-under-grid bolometer arrays for efficient operation at the PIPER CMB wavelengths. All four arrays observe at a common wavelength set by passband filters in the optical path. PIPER will fly four times to observe at wavelengths of 1500, 1100, 850, and 500 microns in order to separate CMB from foreground emission. The arrays employ leg-isolated superconducting transition edge sensor bolometers operated at 145 mK; tuned resonant backshorts for efficient optical coupling; and a second-generation superconducting quantum interference device multiplexer readout. We describe the design, development, and performance of PIPER bolometer array technology to achieve background-limited sensitivity for a cryogenic balloon-borne telescope.

  11. Development of a prototype infrared imaging bolometer for NSTX-U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Eden, G. G.; Delgado-Aparicio, L. F.; Gray, T. K.; Jaworski, M. A.; Morgan, T. W.; Peterson, B. J.; Reinke, M. L.; Sano, R.; Mukai, K.; Differ/Pppl Collaboration; Nifs/Pppl Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    Measurements of the radiated power in fusion reactors are of high importance for studying detachment and the overall power balance. A prototype Infrared Video Bolometer (IRVB) is being developed for NSTX-U complementing resistive bolometer and AXUV diode diagnostics. The IRVB has proven to be a powerful tool on LHD and JT-60U for its 2D imaging quality and reactor environment compatibility. For NSTX-U, a poloidal view of the lower center stack and lower divertor are envisaged for the 2016 run campaign. The IRVB concept images radiation from the plasma onto a 2.5 μm thick 9 x 7 cm2 calibrated Pt foil and monitors its temperature evolution using an IR camera (SB focal plane, 2-12 μm, 128x128 pixels, 1.6 kHz). The power incident on the foil is calculated by solving the 2D +time heat diffusion equation. Benchtop characterization is presented, demonstrating a sensitivity of approximately 20 mK and a noise equivalent power density of 71.5 μW cm-2 for 4x20 bolometer super-pixels and a 50 Hz time response. The hardware design, optimization of camera and detector settings as well as first results of both synthetic and experimental origin are discussed.

  12. The preliminary measurements from the Bolometer Oscillation System (BOS) on board PICARD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, P.; Ruymbeke, M. V.; Meftah, M.; Clette, F.; Dewitte, S.; Chevalier, A.; van Ruymbeke, F.; Noel, J.

    2010-12-01

    The PICARD is a French CNES micro-satellite mission which was successfully launched on June 15, 2010 by the Russian DNEPR launcher. Its objectives are the study of the origin of the solar variability and the relations between the Sun and the Earth’s climate. The duration of the mission is about two years with possibility to extend to three or more years. SOVAP/BOS (SOlar Variability for Picard - Bolometer Oscillation System) is one of the key instruments in the PICARD payload. The main goal of SOVAP/BOS consists in measuring the TSI (Total Solar Irradiance) with very high precision. SOVAP is a new improved version of the DIARAD absolute solar radiometer, which has been successfully installed and operated on several previous missions designed by the Royal Meteorological Institute of Belgium. BOS is a pioneering experiment or to say, a complementary part of SOVAP. It consists of a solar bolometer that measures the incident electromagnetic radiation power by converting this radiation energy in a thermal signal. The radiation is measured using a differential thermometer placed in a thermal shunt. By design, this bolometer is able to measure radiation integrated over all wavelengths and provide a broad dynamic range, with high precision and combined with a fast measuring cadence of 10s, instead of typ. 2-3 minutes in earlier TSI (total solar irradiance) measurements. We will show the preliminary results of measurements made by BOS. For instance, the solar eclipse records during 11, July 2010.

  13. Initial test results on bolometers for the Planck high frequency instrument.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Warren A; Bock, James J; Crill, Brendan P; Koch, Timothy C; Jones, William C; Lange, Andrew E; Paine, Christopher G

    2008-11-10

    We summarize the fabrication, flight qualification, and dark performance of bolometers completed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for the High Frequency Instrument (HFI) of the joint ESA/NASA Herschel/Planck mission to be launched in 2009. The HFI is a multicolor focal plane which consists of 52 bolometers operated at 100 mK. Each bolometer is mounted to a feedhorn-filter assembly which defines one of six frequency bands centered between 100-857 GHz. Four detectors in each of five bands from 143-857 GHz are coupled to both linear polarizations and thus measure the total intensity. In addition, eight detectors in each of four bands (100, 143, 217, and 353 GHz) couple only to a single linear polarization and thus provide measurements of the Stokes parameters, Q and U, as well as the total intensity. The measured noise equivalent power (NEP) of all detectors is at or below the background limit for the telescope and time constants are a few ms, short enough to resolve point sources as the 5 to 9 arc min beams move across the sky at 1 rpm. PMID:19002223

  14. Terahertz real-time imaging uncooled array based on antenna- and cavity-coupled bolometers.

    PubMed

    Simoens, François; Meilhan, Jérôme

    2014-03-28

    The development of terahertz (THz) applications is slowed down by the availability of affordable, easy-to-use and highly sensitive detectors. CEA-Leti took up this challenge by tailoring the mature infrared (IR) bolometer technology for optimized THz sensing. The key feature of these detectors relies on the separation between electromagnetic absorption and the thermometer. For each pixel, specific structures of antennas and a resonant quarter-wavelength cavity couple efficiently the THz radiation on a broadband range, while a central silicon microbridge bolometer resistance is read out by a complementary metal oxide semiconductor circuit. 320×240 pixel arrays have been designed and manufactured: a better than 30 pW power direct detection threshold per pixel has been demonstrated in the 2-4 THz range. Such performance is expected on the whole THz range by proper tailoring of the antennas while keeping the technological stack largely unchanged. This paper gives an overview of the developed bolometer-based technology. First, it describes the technology and reports the latest performance characterizations. Then imaging demonstrations are presented, such as real-time reflectance imaging of a large surface of hidden objects and THz time-domain spectroscopy beam two-dimensional profiling. Finally, perspectives of camera integration for scientific and industrial applications are discussed. PMID:24567477

  15. Design and Fabrication Highlights Enabling a 2 mm, 128 Element Bolometer Array for GISMO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Christine; Benford, Dominic; Miller, Timothy; Staguhn, Johannes; Wollack, Edward; Moseley, Harvey

    2007-01-01

    The Backshort-Under-Grid (BUG) superconducting bolometer array architecture is intended to be highly versatile, operating in a large range of wavelengths and background conditions. We have undertaken a three-year program to develop key technologies and processes required to build kilopixel arrays. To validate the basic array design and to demonstrate its applicability for future kilopixel arrays, we have chosen to demonstrate a 128 element bolometer array optimized for 2 mm wavelength using a newly built Goddard instrument, GISMO (Goddard /RAM Superconducting 2-millimeter Observer). The arrays are fabricated using batch wafer processing developed and optimized for high pixel yield, low noise, and high uniformity. The molybdenum-gold superconducting transition edge sensors are fabricated using batch sputter deposition and are patterned using dry etch techniques developed at Goddard. With a detector pitch of 2 mm 8x16 array for GISMO occupies nearly one half of the processing area of a 100 mm silicon-on-insulator starting wafer. Two such arrays are produced from a single wafer along with witness samples for process characterization. To provide thermal isolation for the detector elements, at the end of the process over 90% of the silicon must be removed using deep reactive ion etching techniques. The electrical connections for each bolometer element are patterned on the top edge of the square grid supporting the array. The design considerations unique to GISMO, key fabrication challenges, and laboratory experimental results will be presented.

  16. Thermal response of large area high temperature superconducting YBaCuO infrared bolometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khalil, Ali E.

    1991-01-01

    Thermal analysis of large area high temperature superconducting infrared detector operating in the equilibrium mode (bolometer) was performed. An expression for the temperature coefficient beta = 1/R(dR/dT) in terms of the thermal conductance and the thermal time constant of the detector were derived. A superconducting transition edge bolometer is a thermistor consisting of a thin film superconducting YBaCuO evaporated into a suitable thermally isolated substrate. The operating temperature of the bolometer is maintained close to the midpoint of the superconducting transition region where the resistance R has a maximum dynamic range. A detector with a strip configuration was analyzed and an expression for the temperature rise (delta T) above the ambient due to a uniform illumination with a source of power density was calculated. An expression for the thermal responsibility depends upon the spatial modulation frequency and the angular frequency of the incoming radiation. The problem of the thermal cross talk between different detector elements was addressed. In the case of monolithic HTS detector array with a row of square elements of dimensions 2a and CCD or CID readout electronics the thermal spread function was derived for different spacing between elements.

  17. Progress on Background-Limited Membrane-Isolated TES Bolometers for Far-IR/Submillimeter Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenyon, M.; Day, P. K.; Bradford, C. M.; Bock, J. J.; Leduc, H. G.

    2006-01-01

    To determine the lowest attainable phonon noise equivalent power (NEP) for membrane-isolation bolometers, we fabricated and measured the thermal conductance of suspended Si3N4 beams with different geometries via a noise thermometry technique. We measured beam cross-sectional areas ranging from 0.35 x 0.5 (micro)m(sup 2) to 135 x 1.0 (micro)m(sup 2) and beam lengths ranging from (micro)m to 8300 (micro)m. The measurements directly imply that membrane-isolation bolometers are capable of reaching a phonon noise equivalent power (NEP) of 4 x 10(sup -20)W/Hz(sup 1)/O . This NEP adequate for the Background-Limited Infrared-Submillimeter Spectrograph (BLISS) proposed for the Japanese SPICA observatory, and adequate for NASA's SAFIR observatory, a 10-meter, 4 K telescope to be deployed at L2. Further, we measured the heat capacity of a suspended Si3N4 membrane and show how this result implies that one can make membrane-isolation bolometers with a response time which is fast enough for BLISS.

  18. Antenna-coupled Superconducting Bolometers for Observations of the Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Michael James

    We describe the development of a novel millimeter-wave cryogenic detector. The device integrates a planar antenna, superconducting transmission line, bandpass filter, and bolometer onto a single silicon wafer. The bolometer uses a superconducting Transition-Edge Sensor (TES) thermistor, which provides substantial advantages over conventional semiconductor bolometers. The detector chip is fabricated using standard micro-fabrication techniques. This highly-integrated detector architecture is particularly well-suited for use in the de- velopment of polarization-sensitive cryogenic receivers with thousands of pixels. Such receivers are needed to meet the sensitivity requirements of next-generation cosmic microwave background polarization experiments. The design, fabrication, and testing of prototype array pixels are described. Preliminary considerations for a full array design are also discussed. A set of on-chip millimeter-wave test structures were developed to help understand the performance of our millimeter-wave microstrip circuits. These test structures produce a calibrated transmission measurement for an arbitrary two-port circuit using optical techniques, rather than a network analyzer. Some results of fabricated test structures are presented.

  19. Search for long-lived superheavy eka-tungsten with radiopure ZnWO4 crystal scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belli, P.; Bernabei, R.; Cappella, F.; Cerulli, R.; Danevich, F. A.; Denisov, V. Yu; d'Angelo, A.; Incicchitti, A.; Kobychev, V. V.; Poda, D. V.; Polischuk, O. G.; Tretyak, V. I.

    2015-08-01

    The data collected with a radioactively pure ZnWO4 crystal scintillator (699 g) in low background measurements during 2130 h at the underground (3600 m w.e.) Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (INFN, Italy) were used to set a limit on possible concentration of superheavy eka-W (seaborgium Sg, Z = 106) in the crystal. Assuming that one of the daughters in a chain of decays of the initial Sg nucleus decays with emission of high energy α particle ({{Q}α }\\gt 8 MeV) and analyzing the high energy part of the measured α spectrum, the limit N(Sg)/N(W) \\lt 5.5× {{10}-14} atoms/atom at 90% C.L. was obtained (for Sg half-life of 109 yr). In addition, a limit on the concentration of eka-Bi was set by analysing the data collected with a large BGO scintillation bolometer in an experiment performed by another group (Cardani et al 2012 JINST 7 P10022): N(eka-Bi)/N(Bi) \\lt 1.1× {{10}-13} atoms/atom with 90% C.L. Both the limits are comparable with those obtained in recent experiments which instead look for spontaneous fission of superheavy elements or use the accelerator mass spectrometry.

  20. Measurement of radiation damage of water-based liquid scintillator and liquid scintillator

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bignell, L. J.; Diwan, M. V.; Hans, S.; Jaffe, D. E.; Rosero, R.; Vigdor, S.; Viren, B.; Worcester, E.; Yeh, M.; Zhang, C.

    2015-10-19

    Liquid scintillating phantoms have been proposed as a means to perform real-time 3D dosimetry for proton therapy treatment plan verification. We have studied what effect radiation damage to the scintillator will have upon this application. We have performed measurements of the degradation of the light yield and optical attenuation length of liquid scintillator and water-based liquid scintillator after irradiation by 201 MeV proton beams that deposited doses of approximately 52 Gy, 300 Gy, and 800 Gy in the scintillator. Liquid scintillator and water-based liquid scintillator (composed of 5% scintillating phase) exhibit light yield reductions of 1.74 ± 0.55 % andmore » 1.31 ± 0.59 % after ≈ 800 Gy of proton dose, respectively. Some increased optical attenuation was observed in the irradiated samples, the measured reduction to the light yield is also due to damage to the scintillation light production. Based on our results and conservative estimates of the expected dose in a clinical context, a scintillating phantom used for proton therapy treatment plan verification would exhibit a systematic light yield reduction of approximately 0.1% after a year of operation.« less

  1. Measurement of radiation damage of water-based liquid scintillator and liquid scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Bignell, L. J.; Diwan, M. V.; Hans, S.; Jaffe, D. E.; Rosero, R.; Vigdor, S.; Viren, B.; Worcester, E.; Yeh, M.; Zhang, C.

    2015-10-19

    Liquid scintillating phantoms have been proposed as a means to perform real-time 3D dosimetry for proton therapy treatment plan verification. We have studied what effect radiation damage to the scintillator will have upon this application. We have performed measurements of the degradation of the light yield and optical attenuation length of liquid scintillator and water-based liquid scintillator after irradiation by 201 MeV proton beams that deposited doses of approximately 52 Gy, 300 Gy, and 800 Gy in the scintillator. Liquid scintillator and water-based liquid scintillator (composed of 5% scintillating phase) exhibit light yield reductions of 1.74 ± 0.55 % and 1.31 ± 0.59 % after ≈ 800 Gy of proton dose, respectively. Some increased optical attenuation was observed in the irradiated samples, the measured reduction to the light yield is also due to damage to the scintillation light production. Based on our results and conservative estimates of the expected dose in a clinical context, a scintillating phantom used for proton therapy treatment plan verification would exhibit a systematic light yield reduction of approximately 0.1% after a year of operation.

  2. Scintillation Breakdowns in Chip Tantalum Capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teverovsky, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    Scintillations in solid tantalum capacitors are momentarily local breakdowns terminated by a self-healing or conversion to a high-resistive state of the manganese oxide cathode. This conversion effectively caps the defective area of the tantalum pentoxide dielectric and prevents short-circuit failures. Typically, this type of breakdown has no immediate catastrophic consequences and is often considered as nuisance rather than a failure. Scintillation breakdowns likely do not affect failures of parts under surge current conditions, and so-called "proofing" of tantalum chip capacitors, which is a controllable exposure of the part after soldering to voltages slightly higher than the operating voltage to verify that possible scintillations are self-healed, has been shown to improve the quality of the parts. However, no in-depth studies of the effect of scintillations on reliability of tantalum capacitors have been performed so far. KEMET is using scintillation breakdown testing as a tool for assessing process improvements and to compare quality of different manufacturing lots. Nevertheless, the relationship between failures and scintillation breakdowns is not clear, and this test is not considered as suitable for lot acceptance testing. In this work, scintillation breakdowns in different military-graded and commercial tantalum capacitors were characterized and related to the rated voltages and to life test failures. A model for assessment of times to failure, based on distributions of breakdown voltages, and accelerating factors of life testing are discussed.

  3. Estimation of Fano factor in inorganic scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bora, Vaibhav; Barrett, Harrison H.; Fastje, David; Clarkson, Eric; Furenlid, Lars; Bousselham, Abdelkader; Shah, Kanai S.; Glodo, Jarek

    2016-01-01

    The Fano factor of an integer-valued random variable is defined as the ratio of its variance to its mean. Correlation between the outputs of two photomultiplier tubes on opposite faces of a scintillation crystal was used to estimate the Fano factor of photoelectrons and scintillation photons. Correlations between the integrals of the detector outputs were used to estimate the photoelectron and photon Fano factor for YAP:Ce, SrI2:Eu and CsI:Na scintillator crystals. At 662 keV, SrI2:Eu was found to be sub-Poisson, while CsI:Na and YAP:Ce were found to be super-Poisson. An experiment setup inspired from the Hanbury Brown and Twiss experiment was used to measure the correlations as a function of time between the outputs of two photomultiplier tubes looking at the same scintillation event. A model of the scintillation and the detection processes was used to generate simulated detector outputs as a function of time for different values of Fano factor. The simulated outputs from the model for different Fano factors was compared to the experimentally measured detector outputs to estimate the Fano factor of the scintillation photons for YAP:Ce, LaBr3:Ce scintillator crystals. At 662 keV, LaBr3:Ce was found to be sub-Poisson, while YAP:Ce was found to be close to Poisson.

  4. Equatorial scintillations: advances since ISEA-6

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    Our understanding of the morphology of equatorial scintillations has advanced due to more intensive observations at the equatorial anomaly locations in the different longitude zones. The unmistakable effect of the sunspot cycle in controlling irregularity belt width and electron concentration responsible for strong scintillation in the controlling the magnitude of scintillations has been recognized by interpreting scintillation observations inthe light of realistic models of total electron content at various longitudes. A hypothesis based on the alignment of the solar terminator with the geomagnetic flux tubes as an indicator of enhanced scintillation occurrence and another based on the influence of a transequatorial thermospheric neutral wind have been postulated to describe the observed longitudinal variation. A distinct class of equatorial irregularities known as the bottomside sinusoidal (BSS) type was identified. These irregularities occur in very large patches, sometimes in excess of several thousand kilometers in the E-W direction and are associated with frequency spread on ionograms. Scintillations caused by such irregularities exist only in the VHF band, exhibit Fresnel oscillations in intensity spectra and are found to give rise to extremely long durations (approx. several hours) of uninterrrupted scintillations.

  5. Pulse shaping analysis with LAB-based liquid scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. S.; Kim, Y. H.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, M. K.; Ma, K. J.; Jeon, E. J.; Kim, J. Y.; Kim, N. Y.; Kim, Y. D.; Lee, J. Y.

    2012-02-01

    We report on a pulse shaping analysis for alpha-beta discrimination using a linear alkylbenzene (LAB)-based liquid scintillator developed for reactor neutrino experiments. The scintillation properties are measured with an internal alpha source diluted in the same scintillator and an external gamma source. The comparison of the fast and the slow parts in the signal waveforms provide clear separations of alpha and gamma events in the liquid scintillator. The discrimination power is compared between the LAB-based liquid scintillator and other commercially available liquid scintillators. The potential use of this scintillator when loaded with 6Li is discussed with regard to neutron measurements.

  6. Fast scintillation counters with WLS bars

    SciTech Connect

    Bezzubov, V.; Denisov, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Evdokimov, V.; Galyaev, A.; Goncharov, P.; Gurzhiev, S.; Kostritsky, A.; Kozelov, A.; Stoianova, D.; Denisov, D.; Diehl, H.T.; Ito, A.S.; Johns, K.

    1998-11-01

    The Do/ collaboration is building 4608 scintillation counters to upgrade forward muon system for the next Fermilab Collider run. Each counter consists of 12.7 mm thick scintillator plate with two WLS bars along two sides for the light collection. With average 10{sup 2} photoelectrons from {ital mip} particle the counters provide time resolution below 1ns and have good energy resolution. Results of Bicron 404A scintillator and Kumarin 30 WLS aging under irradiation up to 3Mrad are presented. With specially designed magnetic shielding counters can operate in magnetic filed up to 500G. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. Manufacturing and studying of new polystyrene scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senchishin, Vitalij G.; Vasilchuk, Vladimir L.; Borysenko, Artem; Lebedev, Valentin N.; Adadurov, Alexander F.; Kalinichenko, Alexander I.; Titskaja, Valentina D.; Koba, Valentina S.; Khlapova, Nina P.; Pelipyagina, Ludmilla E.; Miroshnichenko, Ludmilla A.; Osadchenko, Valentina N.; Kluban, Nikolaj A.

    1999-10-01

    New type of polystyrene-based scintillators UPS98GC were tested regarding long term stability, radiation hardness and light yield uniformity for different doses and dose-rate levels of gamma radiation. They were compared to SCSN-81 produced by Kuraray Co. which has often used in high-energy physics experiments. The dependence of scintillator properties on radiation dose rates as well on total dose values is studied. It is shown that for relatively small dose rate, closed to those expected during scintillator lifetime, our UPS98GC does not yield to SCSN-81.

  8. Scintillation Noise in Exoplanet Transit Photometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Föhring, Dóra; Wilson, Richard; Osborn, James; Dhillon, Vik

    2015-04-01

    Transit photometry is a powerful technique for studying exoplanets. Transit observations from the ground of targets of magnitude V= 10 or brighter, however, are limited by scintillation noise due to Earth's atmosphere. Through turbulence profiling using instruments such as the stereo-SCIDAR, we have shown to able to accurately model scintillation noise, which is essential in order to fully account for the error budget of the observation. Through numerical modelling we find that employing scintillation reducing techniques enables an improvement of a factor between 1.36 — 1.6 on the astrophysical parameters.

  9. Measurement of light emission in scintillation vials

    SciTech Connect

    Duran Ramiro, M. Teresa; Garcia-Torano, Eduardo

    2005-09-15

    The efficiency and energy resolution of liquid scintillation counting (LSC) systems are strongly dependent on the optical characteristics of scintillators, vials, and reflectors. This article presents the results of measurements of the light-emission profile of scintillation vials. Two measurement techniques, autoradiographs and direct measurements with a photomultiplier tube, have been used to obtain light-emission distribution for standard vials of glass, etched glass and polyethylene. Results obtained with both techniques are in good agreement. For the first time, the effect of the meniscus in terms of light contribution has been numerically estimated. These results can help design LSC systems that are more efficient in terms of light collection.

  10. Large volume flow-through scintillating detector

    DOEpatents

    Gritzo, Russ E.; Fowler, Malcolm M.

    1995-01-01

    A large volume flow through radiation detector for use in large air flow situations such as incinerator stacks or building air systems comprises a plurality of flat plates made of a scintillating material arranged parallel to the air flow. Each scintillating plate has a light guide attached which transfers light generated inside the scintillating plate to an associated photomultiplier tube. The output of the photomultiplier tubes are connected to electronics which can record any radiation and provide an alarm if appropriate for the application.

  11. Comparison of the Effects of Magnetic Field on Low Noise MoAu and TiAu TES Bolometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hijmering, R. A.; Khosropanah, P.; Ridder, M.; Gao, J. R.; Hoevers, H.; Jackson, B.; Goldie, D.; Withington, S.; Kozorezov, A. G.

    2014-08-01

    Recently we have reported on the effects of magnetic field on our low noise (NEP = 4 W/Hz) [1] TiAu TES bolometers that are being developed at SRON for the SAFARI FIR Imaging Spectrometer on SPICA telescope that will be operated in three different wavelength bands: S-band for 30-60 , M-band for 60-110 and L-band for 110-210 . The arrays for the S- and M- band will be based on TiAu TES bolometer arrays, developed by SRON. The L-band array will be based on a MoAu TES bolometer developed by University of Cambridge. We have investigated the effect of the magnetic field on the current, responsivity, speed and critical current for both the TiAu and MoAu TES bolometers in our high accuracy magnetic field set-up. A clear difference in weak link behavior is observed between the two types of TES bolometers in both strength of the effect and period of the oscillations.

  12. First implementation of TES bolometer arrays with SQUID-based multiplexed readout on a balloon-borne platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubin, François; Aboobaker, Asad M.; Ade, Peter; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Bao, Chaoyun; Borrill, Julian; Cantalupo, Christopher; Chapman, Daniel; Didier, Joy; Dobbs, Matt; Grainger, Will; Hanany, Shaul; Hubmayr, Johannes; Hyland, Peter; Hillbrand, Seth; Jaffe, Andrew; Johnson, Bradley; Jones, Terry; Kisner, Theodore; Klein, Jeff; Korotkov, Andrei; Leach, Sam; Lee, Adrian; Limon, Michele; MacDermid, Kevin; Matsumura, Tomotake; Meng, Xiaofan; Miller, Amber; Milligan, Michael; Polsgrove, Daniel; Ponthieu, Nicolas; Raach, Kate; Reichborn-Kjennerud, Britt; Sagiv, Ilan; Smecher, Graeme; Tran, Huan; Tucker, Gregory S.; Vinokurov, Yury; Yadav, Amit; Zaldarriaga, Matias; Zilic, Kyle

    2010-07-01

    EBEX (the E and B EXperiment) is a balloon-borne telescope designed to measure the polarisation of the cosmic microwave background radiation. During a two week long duration science flight over Antarctica, EBEX will operate 768, 384 and 280 spider-web transition edge sensor (TES) bolometers at 150, 250 and 410 GHz, respectively. The 10-hour EBEX engineering flight in June 2009 over New Mexico and Arizona provided the first usage of both a large array of TES bolometers and a Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) based multiplexed readout in a space-like environment. This successful demonstration increases the technology readiness level of these bolometers and the associated readout system for future space missions. A total of 82, 49 and 82 TES detectors were operated during the engineering flight at 150, 250 and 410 GHz. The sensors were read out with a new SQUID-based digital frequency domain multiplexed readout system that was designed to meet the low power consumption and robust autonomous operation requirements presented by a balloon experiment. Here we describe the system and the remote, automated tuning of the bolometers and SQUIDs. We compare results from tuning at float to ground, and discuss bolometer performance during flight.

  13. Voltage-Biased Superconducting Transition-Edge Bolometer with Strong Electrothermal Feedback Operated at 370 mK.

    PubMed

    Lee, S F; Gildemeister, J M; Holmes, W; Lee, A T; Richards, P L

    1998-06-01

    We present an experimental study of a composite voltage-biased superconducting bolometer (VSB). The tested VSB consists of a Ti-film superconducting thermometer (T(c) ~375 mK) on a Si substrate suspended by NbTi superconducting leads. A resistor attached to the substrate provides calibrated heat input into the bolometer. The current through the bolometer is measured with a superconducting quantum interference device ammeter. Strong negative electrothermal feedback fixes the bolometer temperature at T(c) and reduces the measured response time from 2.6 s to 13 ms. As predicted, the measured current responsivity of the bolometer is equal to the inverse of the bias voltage. A noise equivalent power of 5 x 10(-17) W/ radicalHz was measured for a thermal conductance G ~ 4.7 x 10(-10) W/K, which is consistent with the expected thermal noise. Excess noise was observed for bias conditions for which the electrothermal feedback strength was close to maximum. PMID:18273298

  14. Double Beta Decay Experiments: Present Status and Prospects for the Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barabash, A. S.

    The review of modern experiments on search and studying of double beta decay processes is done. Results of the most sensitive current experiments are discussed. The main attention is paid to EXO-200, KamLAND-Zen, GERDA-I and CUORE-0 experiments. Modern values of T1/2(2ν) and best present limits on neutrinoless double beta decay and double beta decay with Majoron emission are presented. Conservative limits on effective mass of a Majorana neutrino ( < 0.46 eV) and a coupling constant of Majoron to neutrino ( < 1.3 × 10-5) are obtained. In the second part of the review prospects of search for the neutrinoless double beta decay in new experiments with sensitivity to at the level of ∼ (0.01-0.1) eV are discussed. The main attention is paid to experiments of CUORE, GERDA, MAJORANA, EXO, KamLAND-Zen-2, SuperNEMO and SNO+. Possibilities of low-temperature scintillating bolometers on the basis of inorganic crystals (ZnSe, ZnMoO4, Li2MoO4, CaMoO4 and CdWO4) are considered too.

  15. Equatorial scintillations: advances since ISEA-6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Sunanda; Basu, Santimay

    1985-10-01

    Since the last equatorial aeronomy meeting in 1980, our understanding of the morphology of equatorial scintillations has advanced greatly due to more intensive observations at the equatorial anomaly locations in the different longitude zones. The unmistakable effect of the sunspot cycle in controlling irregularity belt width and electron concentration responsible for strong scintillation in the GHz range has been demonstrated. The fact that night-time F-region dynamics is an important factor in controlling the magnitude of scintillations has been recognized by interpreting scintillation observations in the light of realistic models of total electron content at various longitudes. A hypothesis based on the alignment of the solar terminator with the geomagnetic flux tubes as an indicator of enhanced scintillation occurrence and another based on the influence of a transequatorial thermospheric neutral wind have been postulated to describe the observed longitudinal variation. A distinct class of equatorial irregularities known as the bottomside sinusoidal (BSS) type has been identified. Unlike equatorial bubbles, these irregularities occur in very large patches, sometimes in excess of several thousand kilometers in the E-W direction and are associated with frequency spread on ionograms. Scintillations caused by such irregularities exist only in the VHF band, exhibit Fresnel oscillations in intensity spectra and are found to give rise to extremely long durations (~ several hours) of uninterrupted scintillations. These irregularities maximize during solstices, so that in the VHF range, scintillation morphology at an equatorial station is determined by considering occurrence characteristics of both bubble type and BSS type irregularities. The temporal structure of scintillations in relation to the in situ measurements of irregularity spatial structure within equatorial bubbles has been critically examined. A two-component irregularity spectrum with a shallow slope ( p1

  16. A comparative study of 1/f noise and temperature coefficient of resistance in multiwall and single-wall carbon nanotube bolometers.

    PubMed

    Lu, Rongtao; Kamal, Rayyan; Wu, Judy Z

    2011-07-01

    The 1/f noise and temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR) are investigated in multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) film bolometers since both affect the bolometer detectivity directly. A comparison is made between the MWCNT film bolometers and their single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) counterparts. The intrinsic noise level in the former has been found at least two orders of magnitude lower than that in the latter, which outweighs the moderately lower TCR absolute values in the former and results in higher bolometer detectivity in MWCNT bolometers. Interestingly, reduced noise and enhanced TCR can be obtained by improving the inter-tube coupling using thermal annealing in both SWCNT and MWCNT films, suggesting much higher detectivity may be achieved via engineering the inter-tube coupling. PMID:21576772

  17. Elastic scintillation materials based on polyorganosiloxane

    SciTech Connect

    Grinev, B.V.; Andryushchenko, L.A.; Shershukov, V.M.; Ulanenko, K.B.; Minakova, R.A.; Sevastjanova, I.V.

    1994-12-31

    The developed elastic scintillators based on polymethyl-phenylsiloxane rubber are characterized by an elevated light output and a low toxicity. The increase of their light output is achieved by raising the content of phenyl chains, varying the chemical structure of luminescent additions and using isopropylnaphthalene. This high-boiling solvent introduced into the scintillation siloxane compositions is confined within siloxane matrix after the hardening of the rubber.

  18. Liquid scintillators for optical fiber applications

    DOEpatents

    Franks, Larry A.; Lutz, Stephen S.

    1982-01-01

    A multicomponent liquid scintillator solution for use as a radiation-to-light converter in conjunction with a fiber optic transmission system. The scintillator includes a quantity of 1, 2, 4, 5, 3H, 6H, 1 OH, tetrahydro-8-trifluoromethyl (1) benzopyrano (9, 9a, 1-gh) quinolizin-10-one (Coumarin) as a solute in a fluor solvent such as benzyl alcohol or pseudo-cumene. The use of BIBUQ as an additional or primary solute is also disclosed.

  19. Current status on plastic scintillators modifications.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Guillaume H V; Hamel, Matthieu; Sguerra, Fabien

    2014-11-24

    Recent developments of plastic scintillators are reviewed, from 2000 to March 2014, distributed in two different chapters. First chapter deals with the chemical modifications of the polymer backbone, whereas modifications of the fluorescent probe are presented in the second chapter. All examples are provided with the scope of detection of various radiation particles. The main characteristics of these newly created scintillators and their detection properties are given. PMID:25335882

  20. Ternary liquid scintillator for optical fiber applications

    DOEpatents

    Franks, Larry A.; Lutz, Stephen S.

    1982-01-01

    A multicomponent liquid scintillator solution for use as a radiation-to-light converter in conjunction with a fiber optic transmission system. The scintillator includes a quantity of 5-amino-9-diethylaminobenz (a) phenoxazonium nitrate (Nile Blue Nitrate) as a solute in a fluor solvent such as benzyl alcohol. The use of PPD as an additional solute is also disclosed. The system is controllable by addition of a suitable quenching agent, such as phenol.

  1. Multi-GNSS for Ionospheric Scintillation Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, Y.

    2015-12-01

    GNSS have been widely used for ionospheric monitoring. We anticipate over 160 GNSS satellites broadcasting 400 signals by 2023, nearly double the number today. With their well-defined signal structures, high spatial density and spectral diversity, GNSS offers low cost and distributed passive sensing of ionosphere effects. There are, however, many challenges to utilize GNSS resources to characterize and forecast ionospheric scintillation. Originally intended for navigation purposes, GNSS receivers are designed to filter out nuisance effects due to ionosphere effects. GNSS measurements are plagued with errors from multipath, oscillator jitters, processing artifacts, and neutral atmosphere effects. Strong scintillation events are often characterized by turbulent structures in ionosphere, causing simultaneous deep amplitude fading and abrupt carrier phase changes. The combined weak signal and high carrier dynamics imposes conflicting requirements for GNSS receiver design. Therefore, GNSS receivers often experience cycle slips and loss of lock of signals during strong scintillation events. High quality, raw GNSS signals bearing space weather signatures and robust receiver algorithms designed to capture these signatures are needed in order for GNSS to be a reliable and useful agent for scintillation monitoring and forecasting. Our event-driven, reconfigurable data collection system is designed to achieve this purpose. To date, our global network has collected ~150TB of raw GNSS data during space weather events. A suite of novel receiver processing algorithms has been developed by exploitating GNSS spatial, frequency, temporal, and constellation diversity to process signals experiencing challenging scintillation impact. The algorithms and data have advanced our understanding of scintillation impact on GNSS, lead to more robust receiver technologies, and enabled high spatial and temporal resolution depiction of ionosphere responses to solar and geomagnetic conditions. This

  2. Crystal growth and scintillation properties of strontium iodide scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    van Loef, Edgar; Wilson, Cody; Cherepy, Nerine; Payne, Steven; Choong, Woon-Seng; Moses, William W.; Shah, Kanai

    2009-06-01

    Single crystals of SrI{sub 2}:Eu and SrI{sub 2}:Ce/Na were grown from anhydrous iodides by the vertical Bridgman technique in evacuated silica ampoules. Growth rates were of the order of 5-30 mm/day. Radioluminescence spectra of SrI{sub 2}:Eu and SrI{sub 2}:Ce/Na exhibit a broad band due to Eu{sup 2+} and Ce{sup 3+} emission, respectively. The maximum in the luminescence spectrum of SrI{sub 2}:Eu is found at 435 nm. The spectrum of SrI{sub 2}:Ce/Na exhibits a doublet peaking at 404 and 435 nm attributed to Ce{sup 3+} emission, while additional impurity - or defected - related emission is present at approximately 525 nm. The strontium iodide scintillators show very high light yields of up to 120,000 photons/MeV, have energy resolutions down to 3% at 662 keV (Full Width Half Maximum) and exhibit excellent light yield proportionality with a standard deviation of less than 5% between 6 and 460 keV.

  3. Inversion of infrared imaging bolometer based on one-dimensional and three-dimensional modeling in HL-2A

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, J. M. Liu, Y.; Li, W.; Cui, Z. Y.; Dong, Y. B.; Lu, J.; Xia, Z. W.; Yi, P.; Yang, Q. W.

    2014-04-15

    Linear regularization has been applied to the HL-2A infrared imaging bolometer to reconstruct local plasma emission with one-dimensional (1D) and three-dimensional (3D) modeling under the assumption of toroidal symmetry. In the 3D modeling, a new method to calculate the detector point response function is introduced. This method can be adapted to an arbitrarily shaped pinhole. With the full 3D treatment of the detector geometry, up to 50% of the mean-squared error is reduced compared with the 1D modeling. This is attributed to the effects of finite detector size being taken into account in the 3D modeling. Meanwhile, the number of the bolometer pixels has been optimized to 20 × 20 by making a trade-off between the number of bolometer pixels and the sensitivity of the system. The plasma radiated power density distributions have been calculated as a demonstration using 1D modeling and 3D modeling, respectively.

  4. Scintillation Hole Observed by FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shih Ping; Yenq Liu, Jann; Krishnanunni Rajesh, Panthalingal

    2013-04-01

    Ionospheric scintillations can significantly disturb satellite positioning, navigation, and communication. FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC provides the first 3-D global observation by solo instrument (radio occultation experiment, GOX). The GPS L-band amplitude fluctuation from 50Hz signal is received and recorded by F3/C GOX to calculate S4-index from 50-800km altitude. The global F3/C S4 index are subdivided and examined in various latitudes, longitudes, altitudes, and seasons during 2007-2012. The F-region scintillations in the equatorial and low-latitude ionosphere start around post-sunset period and often persist till post-midnight hours (0300 MLT, magnetic local time) during the March and September equinox as well as December Solstice seasons. The E-region scintillations reveal a clear solar zenith effect and yield pronounced intensities in mid-latitudes during the Summer Solstice seasons, which are well correlated with occurrences of the sporadic E-layer. It is interesting to find there is no scintillation, which is termed "scintillation hole", in the E region ranging from 80 to 130km altitude over the South Africa region, and become the most pronounced in November-January (December Solstice seasons or summer months). Other space-borne and ground based observations are use to confirm the existence of the scintillation hole.

  5. Development of Novel Polycrystalline Ceramic Scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Wisniewska, Monika; Boatner, Lynn A; Neal, John S; Jellison Jr, Gerald Earle; Ramey, Joanne Oxendine; North, Andrea L; Wisniewski, Monica; Payzant, E Andrew; Howe, Jane Y; Lempicki, Aleksander; Brecher, Charlie; Glodo, J.

    2008-01-01

    For several decades most of the efforts to develop new scintillator materials have concentrated on high-light-yield inorganic single-crystals while polycrystalline ceramic scintillators, since their inception in the early 1980 s, have received relatively little attention. Nevertheless, transparent ceramics offer a promising approach to the fabrication of relatively inexpensive scintillators via a simple mechanical compaction and annealing process that eliminates single-crystal growth. Until recently, commonly accepted concepts restricted the polycrystalline ceramic approach to materials exhibiting a cubic crystal structure. Here, we report our results on the development of two novel ceramic scintillators based on the non-cubic crystalline materials: Lu SiO:Ce (LSO:Ce) and LaBr:Ce. While no evidence for texturing has been found in their ceramic microstructures, our LSO:Ce ceramics exhibit a surprisingly high level of transparency/ translucency and very good scintillation characteristics. The LSO:Ce ceramic scintillation reaches a light yield level of about 86% of that of a good LSO:Ce single crystal, and its decay time is even faster than in single crystals. Research on LaBr:Ce shows that translucent ceramics of the high-light-yield rare-earth halides can also be synthesized. Our LaBr:Ce ceramics have light yields above 42 000 photons/MeV (i.e., 70%of the single-crystal light yield).

  6. GPS phase scintillation correlated with auroral forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampton, D. L.; Azeem, S. I.; Crowley, G.; Santana, J.; Reynolds, A.

    2013-12-01

    The disruption of radio wave propagation due to rapid changes in electron density caused by auroral precipitation has been observed for several decades. In a few cases the disruption of GPS signals has been attributed to distinct auroral arcs [Kintner, 2007; Garner, 2011], but surprisingly there has been no systematic study of the characteristics of the auroral forms that cause GPS scintillation. In the Fall of 2012 ASTRA deployed four CASES GPS receivers at UAF observatories in Alaska (Kaktovik, Fort Yukon, Poker Flat and Gakona) specifically to address the effects of auroral activity on the high latitude ionosphere. We have initiated an analysis that compares the phase scintillation, recorded at high cadence, with filtered digital all-sky camera data to determine the auroral morphology and electron precipitation parameters that cause scintillation. From correlation studies from a single site (Poker Flat), we find that scintillation is well correlated with discrete arcs that have high particle energy flux (power per unit area), and not as well correlated with pulsating forms which typically have high characteristic energy, but lower energy flux . This indicates that the scintillation is correlated with the magnitude of the change in total electron density as expected. We will also report on ongoing work where we correlate the scintillation from the Fort Yukon receiver with the all-sky images at Poker Flat to determine the altitude that produces the greatest disturbance. These studies are aimed at a model that can predict the expected local disturbance to navigation due to auroral activity.

  7. Validating the use of scintillation proxies to study ionospheric scintillation over the Ugandan region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amabayo, Emirant B.; Jurua, Edward; Cilliers, Pierre J.

    2015-06-01

    In this study, we compare the standard scintillation indices (S4 and σΦ) from a SCINDA receiver with scintillation proxies (S4p and | sDPR |) derived from two IGS GPS receivers. Amplitude (S4) and phase (σΦ) scintillation data were obtained from the SCINDA installed at Makerere University (0.34°N, 32.57°E). The corresponding amplitude (S4p) and phase (| sDPR |) scintillation proxies were derived from data archived by IGS GPS receivers installed at Entebbe (0.04°N, 32.44°E) and Mbarara (0.60°S, 30.74°E). The results show that for most of the cases analysed in this study, σΦ and | sDPR | are in agreement. Amplitude scintillation occurrence estimated using the S4p are fairly consistent with the standard S4, mainly between 17:00 UT and 21:00 UT, despite a few cases of over and under estimation of scintillation levels by S4p. Correlation coefficients between σΦ and the | sDPR | proxy revealed positive correlation. Generally, S4p and S4 exhibits both moderate and strong positive correlation. TEC depletions associated with equatorial plasma bubbles are proposed as the cause of the observed scintillation over the region. These equatorial plasma bubbles were evident along the ray paths to satellites with PRN 2, 15, 27 and 11 as observed from MBAR and EBBE. In addition to equatorial plasma bubbles, atmospheric gravity waves with periods similar to those of large scale traveling ionospheric disturbances were also observed as one of the mechanisms for scintillation occurrence. The outcome of this study implies that GPS derived scintillation proxies can be used to quantify scintillation levels in the absence of standard scintillation data in the equatorial regions.

  8. Numerical optimization of integrating cavities for diffraction-limited millimeter-wave bolometer arrays.

    PubMed

    Glenn, Jason; Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Edgington, Samantha F; Lange, Andrew E; Bock, James J; Mauskopf, Philip D; Lee, Adrian T

    2002-01-01

    Far-infrared to millimeter-wave bolometers designed to make astronomical observations are typically encased in integrating cavities at the termination of feedhorns or Winston cones. This photometer combination maximizes absorption of radiation, enables the absorber area to be minimized, and controls the directivity of absorption, thereby reducing susceptibility to stray light. In the next decade, arrays of hundreds of silicon nitride micromesh bolometers with planar architectures will be used in ground-based, suborbital, and orbital platforms for astronomy. The optimization of integrating cavity designs is required for achieving the highest possible sensitivity for these arrays. We report numerical simulations of the electromagnetic fields in integrating cavities with an infinite plane-parallel geometry formed by a solid reflecting backshort and the back surface of a feedhorn array block. Performance of this architecture for the bolometer array camera (Bolocam) for cosmology at a frequency of 214 GHz is investigated. We explore the sensitivity of absorption efficiency to absorber impedance and backshort location and the magnitude of leakage from cavities. The simulations are compared with experimental data from a room-temperature scale model and with the performance of Bolocam at a temperature of 300 mK. The main results of the simulations for Bolocam-type cavities are that (1) monochromatic absorptions as high as 95% are achievable with <1% cross talk between neighboring cavities, (2) the optimum absorber impedances are 400 ohms/sq, but with a broad maximum from approximately 150 to approximately 700 ohms/sq, and (3) maximum absorption is achieved with absorber diameters > or = 1.5 lambda. Good general agreement between the simulations and the experiments was found. PMID:11900429

  9. Infrared Detection with High Transition Temperature Bolometers and Response of Niobium Tunnel Junctions to Picosecond Voltage Pulses.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verghese, Simon

    1993-01-01

    Oxide superconductors with high critical temperature T_{rm c} make sensitive thermometers for several types of infrared bolometers. We built composite bolometers with rm YBa_2Cu _3O_{7-delta} thermometers on sapphire substrates which have higher sensitivity than competing thermal detectors which operate at temperatures above 77 K. A 1 x 1 mm bolometer with gold black serving as the radiation absorber has useful sensitivity for wavelengths 20-100 mum. A 3 x 3 mm bolometer with a bismuth film as the absorber operates from 20-100 mum. High-T_{ rm c} bolometers which are fabricated with micromachining techniques on membranes of Si or Si _3N_4 have potential application to large-format arrays which are used for infrared imaging. Thermal isolation is achieved by suspending the membrane on two thin legs of the membrane material. A nonisothermal high-T_{ rm c} bolometer can be fabricated on a membrane of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) which is in thermal contact with the heat sink along the perimeter of the membrane. A thermal analysis indicates that the YSZ membrane bolometer can have improved sensitivity compared to the sapphire bolometer for spectrometer applications. The quasiparticle tunneling current in a superconductor -insulator-superconductor (SIS) junction is highly nonlinear in the applied voltage. If an SIS junction is excited with photons of energy hbaromega, where hbaromega/e is larger than the width of the nonlinearity in the I-V curve, the response of the quasiparticle current is retarded and depends strongly on omega. We have made the first measurement of the linear response of the quasiparticle current in a Nb/AlO_{rm x} /Nb junction over a broad bandwidth from 75-200 GHz. We used picosecond pulses of millimeter wave radiation which were generated by illuminating a photoconductive switch with a mode-locked laser. The data are in agreement with the theory of linear photon-assisted tunneling. Nonlinear measurements made with these pulses may provide

  10. Application of Superconducting Hot-Electron Bolometer Mixers for Terahertz-Band Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maezawa, Hiroyuki

    2015-03-01

    Recently, a next-generation heterodyne mixer detector - a hot electron bolometer (HEB) mixer employing a superconducting microbridge - has gradually opened up terahertz-band astronomy. The surrounding state-of-the-art technologies including fabrication processes, 4 K cryostats, cryogenic low-noise amplifiers, local oscillator sources, micromachining techniques, and spectrometers, as well as the HEB mixers, have played a valuable role in the development of super-low-noise heterodyne spectroscopy systems for the terahertz band. The current developmental status of terahertz-band HEB mixer receivers and their applications for spectroscopy and astronomy with ground-based, airborne, and satellite telescopes are presented.

  11. An Array of Frequency Selective Bolometers (FSB) for the Spectral Energy Distribution (SPEED) Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverberg, R. F.; Ali, S.; O'Dell, C.; Timbie, P. T.; Bier, A.; Campano, B.; Chen, T. C.; Cottingham, D. A.; Sharp, E.; Cheng, E. S.

    2003-01-01

    The SPEED camera is being developed to study the spectral energy distributions of high redshift galaxies using the Heinrich Hertz Telescope (HHT) in Arizona. SPEED requires a small cryogenic detector array of 2x2 pixels with each pixel having four frequency bands in the 150-350 GHz range. Here we describe the development of the detector array of these high efficiency FSBs. The FSB design provides the multi-pixel multi-spectral band capability required for SPEED in a compact stackable array. The SPEED bolometers will use proximity effect superconducting transition edge sensors as their temperature-sensing element allowing for higher levels of multiplexing in future applications.

  12. Neutron transmutation doped (Ntd) germanium thermistors for sub-Mm bolometer applications

    SciTech Connect

    Haller, E.E. |; Itoh, K.M.; Beeman, J.W.

    1996-09-01

    The authors report on recent advances in the development of Neutron Transmutation Doped (NTD) semiconductor thermistors fabricated from germanium of natural and controlled isotopic composition. The near ideal doping uniformity which can be achieved with the NTD process, the device simplicity of NTD Ge thermistors and the high performance of cooled junction field effect transistor (FET) preamplifiers have led to the widespread acceptance of these thermal sensors in many radiotelescopes operating on the ground, on high altitude aircraft and on spaceborne satellites. These features also have made possible the development of efficient bolometer arrays which are beginning to produce exciting results.

  13. Reconstruction of plasma radiation features from projections measured with two bolometer arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Schivell, J.

    1986-09-01

    A specialized method has been developed to maximize the two-dimensional detail obtained from two perpendicular bolometer arrays. The technique relies on the assumption that poloidal variations exists only near the plasma surface. The cross section is divided into appropriate zones, and the emittance is reconstructed by a numerical method. The position, intensity, and width of large features are clearly displayed. A marfe is tracked as it drifts around the plasma and evolves into a radiating shell detached from the limiter. A central peak, plus inner-wall radiating layer, plus a marfe appear in a high-density case reached by pellet injection.

  14. Hot-Electron Gallium Nitride Two Dimensional Electron Gas Nano-bolometers For Advanced THz Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaswamy, Rahul

    Two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in semiconductor heterostructures was identified as a promising medium for hot-electron bolometers (HEB) in the early 90s. Up until now all research based on 2DEG HEBs is done using high mobility AlGaAs/GaAs heterostructures. These systems have demonstrated very good performance, but only in the sub terahertz (THz) range. However, above ˜0.5 THz the performance of AlGaAs/GaAs detectors drastically deteriorates. It is currently understood, that detectors fabricated from standard AlGaAs/GaAs heterostructures do not allow for reasonable coupling to THz radiation while maintaining high conversion efficiency. In this work we have developed 2DEG HEBs based on disordered Gallium Nitride (GaN) semiconductor, that operate at frequencies beyond 1THz at room temperature. We observe strong free carrier absorption at THz frequencies in our disordered 2DEG film due to Drude absorption. We show the design and fabrication procedures of novel micro-bolometers having ultra-low heat capacities. In this work the mechanism of 2DEG response to THz radiation is clearly identified as bolometric effect through our direct detection measurements. With optimal doping and detector geometry, impedances of 10--100 O have been achieved, which allow integration of these devices with standard THz antennas. We also demonstrate performance of the antennas used in this work in effectively coupling THz radiation to the micro-bolometers through polarization dependence and far field measurements. Finally heterodyne mixing due to hot electrons in the 2DEG micro-bolometer has been performed at sub terahertz frequencies and a mixing bandwidth greater than 3GHz has been achieved. This indicates that the characteristic cooling time in our detectors is fast, less than 50ps. Due to the ultra-low heat capacity; these detectors can be used in a heterodyne system with a quantum cascade laser (QCL) as a local oscillator (LO) which typically provides output powers in the micro

  15. Feedhorn-Coupled Transition-Edge Superconducting Bolometer Arrays for Cosmic Microwave Background Polarimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubmayr, J.; Austermann, J.; Beall, J.; Becker, D.; Cho, H.-M.; Datta, R.; Duff, S. M.; Grace, E.; Halverson, N.; Henderson, S. W.; Hilton, G. C.; Ho, S. P.; Irwin, K. D.; Koopman, B. J.; Li, D.; McMahon, J.; Munson, C.; Niemack, M. D.; Pappas, C.; Schmitt, B. L.; Simon, S. M.; Staggs, S. T.; Van Lanen, J.; Wollack, Edward J.

    2015-01-01

    NIST produces large-format, dual-polarization-sensitive detector arrays for a broad range of frequencies (30-1400 GHz). Such arrays enable a host of astrophysical measurements. Detectors optimized for cosmic microwave background observations are monolithic, polarization-sensitive arrays based on feedhorn and planar Nb antenna-coupled transition-edge superconducting (TES) bolometers. Recent designs achieve multiband, polarimetric sensing within each spatial pixel. In this proceeding, we describe our multichroic, feedhorn-coupled design; demonstrate performance at 70-380 GHz; and comment on current developments for implementation of these detector arrays in the advanced Atacama Cosmology Telescope receiver

  16. Multi-mode TES Bolometer Optimization for the LSPE-SWIPE Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gualtieri, R.; Battistelli, E. S.; Cruciani, A.; de Bernardis, P.; Biasotti, M.; Corsini, D.; Gatti, F.; Lamagna, L.; Masi, S.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we explore the possibility of using transition edge sensor (TES) detectors in multi-mode configuration in the focal plane of the Short Wavelength Instrument for the Polarization Explorer (SWIPE) of the balloon-borne polarimeter Large-Scale Polarization Explorer (LSPE) for the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) polarization. This study is motivated by the fact that maximizing the sensitivity of TES bolometers, under the augmented background due to the multi-mode design, requires a non-trivial choice of detector parameters. We evaluate the best parameter combination taking into account scanning strategy, noise constraints, saturation power, and operating temperature of the cryostat during the flight.

  17. In situ calibration of an infrared imaging video bolometer in the Large Helical Device.

    PubMed

    Mukai, K; Peterson, B J; Pandya, S N; Sano, R

    2014-11-01

    The InfraRed imaging Video Bolometer (IRVB) is a powerful diagnostic to measure multi-dimensional radiation profiles in plasma fusion devices. In the Large Helical Device (LHD), four IRVBs have been installed with different fields of view to reconstruct three-dimensional profiles using a tomography technique. For the application of the measurement to plasma experiments using deuterium gas in LHD in the near future, the long-term effect of the neutron irradiation on the heat characteristics of an IRVB foil should be taken into account by regular in situ calibration measurements. Therefore, in this study, an in situ calibration system was designed. PMID:25430342

  18. A photodiode-based neutral particle bolometer for characterizing charge-exchanged fast-ion behavior.

    PubMed

    Clary, R; Smirnov, A; Dettrick, S; Knapp, K; Korepanov, S; Ruskov, E; Heidbrink, W W; Zhu, Y

    2012-10-01

    A neutral particle bolometer (NPB) has been designed and implemented on Tri Alpha Energy's C-2 device in order to spatially and temporally resolve the charge-exchange losses of fast-ion populations originating from neutral beam injection into field-reversed configuration plasmas. This instrument employs a silicon photodiode as the detection device with an integrated tungsten filter coating to reduce sensitivity to light radiation. Here we discuss the technical aspects and calibration of the NPB, and report typical NPB measurement results of wall recycling effects on fast-ion losses. PMID:23126887

  19. Non-uniform absorption of terahertz radiation on superconducting hot electron bolometer microbridges

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, W.; Zhang, W.; Zhong, J. Q.; Shi, S. C.; Delorme, Y.; Lefevre, R.; Feret, A.; Vacelet, T.

    2014-02-03

    We interpret the experimental observation of a frequency-dependence of superconducting hot electron bolometer (HEB) mixers by taking into account the non-uniform absorption of the terahertz radiation on the superconducting HEB microbridge. The radiation absorption is assumed to be proportional to the local surface resistance of the HEB microbridge, which is computed using the Mattis-Bardeen theory. With this assumption the dc and mixing characteristics of a superconducting niobium-nitride (NbN) HEB device have been modeled at frequencies below and above the equilibrium gap frequency of the NbN film.

  20. Indium Hybridization of Large Format TES Bolometer Arrays to Readout Multiplexers for Far-Infrared Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Timothy M.; Costen, Nick; Allen, Christine

    2007-01-01

    This conference poster reviews the Indium hybridization of the large format TES bolometer arrays. We are developing a key technology to enable the next generation of detectors. That is the Hybridization of Large Format Arrays using Indium bonded detector arrays containing 32x40 elements which conforms to the NIST multiplexer readout architecture of 1135 micron pitch. We have fabricated and hybridized mechanical models with the detector chips bonded after being fully back-etched. The mechanical support consists of 30 micron walls between elements Demonstrated electrical continuity for each element. The goal is to hybridize fully functional array of TES detectors to NIST readout.

  1. Multi-mode TES Bolometer Optimization for the LSPE-SWIPE Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gualtieri, R.; Battistelli, E. S.; Cruciani, A.; de Bernardis, P.; Biasotti, M.; Corsini, D.; Gatti, F.; Lamagna, L.; Masi, S.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we explore the possibility of using transition edge sensor (TES) detectors in multi-mode configuration in the focal plane of the Short Wavelength Instrument for the Polarization Explorer (SWIPE) of the balloon-borne polarimeter Large-Scale Polarization Explorer (LSPE) for the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) polarization. This study is motivated by the fact that maximizing the sensitivity of TES bolometers, under the augmented background due to the multi-mode design, requires a non-trivial choice of detector parameters. We evaluate the best parameter combination taking into account scanning strategy, noise constraints, saturation power, and operating temperature of the cryostat during the flight.

  2. Phononic Thermal Conduction Engineering for Bolometers: From Phononic Crystals to Radial Casimir Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maasilta, I. J.; Puurtinen, T. A.; Tian, Y.; Geng, Z.

    2016-07-01

    We discuss two alternative and complementary means of controlling radial phonon conduction for bolometers in two dimensions: by using phononic crystals or by roughening the surface of the membranes (Casimir limit). For phononic crystals, we present new experiments with a modified geometry and a larger hole periodicity than before, achieving a low thermal conductance {˜ }2 pW/K at 150 mK. Calculations in the Casimir limit, on the other hand, show that for small detector dimensions thermal conductance below 1 fW/K seems achievable.

  3. In situ calibration of an infrared imaging video bolometer in the Large Helical Device

    SciTech Connect

    Mukai, K. Peterson, B. J.; Pandya, S. N.; Sano, R.

    2014-11-15

    The InfraRed imaging Video Bolometer (IRVB) is a powerful diagnostic to measure multi-dimensional radiation profiles in plasma fusion devices. In the Large Helical Device (LHD), four IRVBs have been installed with different fields of view to reconstruct three-dimensional profiles using a tomography technique. For the application of the measurement to plasma experiments using deuterium gas in LHD in the near future, the long-term effect of the neutron irradiation on the heat characteristics of an IRVB foil should be taken into account by regular in situ calibration measurements. Therefore, in this study, an in situ calibration system was designed.

  4. Analysys of the concept of a superconducing bolometer with rf readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramov, N. N.

    2016-02-01

    The concept of a superconducting transition-edge bolometer with rf readout, which was proposed in a number of earlier publications, is analyzed. It is shown that such a device cannot in fact operate at the edge of the superconducting transition, and nonequilibrium effects in the superconductor play the major role in its response to the electromagnetic action. A mathematical model is developed, which explains qualitatively the experimental results reported earlier and indicating an unstable response to the action of a readout (pump) signal. The possibility of obtaining a stable response with an optimal choice of parameters of the device is also demonstrated.

  5. Ionosphere scintillations associated with features of equatorial ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandra, H.; Vats, H. O.; Sethia, G.; Deshpande, M. R.; Rastogi, R. G.; Sastri, J. H.; Murthy, B. S.

    1979-01-01

    Amplitude scintillations of radio beacons aboard the ATS-6 satellite on 40 MHz, 140 MHz and 360 MHz recorded during the ATS-6 phase II at an equatorial station Ootacamund (dip 4 deg N) and the ionograms at a nearby station Kodaikanal (dip 3.5 deg N) are examined for scintillation activity. Only sporadic E events, other than Es-q, Es-c or normal E are found to be associated with intense daytime scintillations. Scintillations are also observed during night Es conditions. The amplitude spread is associated with strong scintillations on all frequencies while frequency spread causes weaker scintillations and that mainly at 40 MHz.

  6. Review on photonic crystal coatings for scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapitsch, Arno; Lecoq, Paul

    2014-11-01

    The amount of light and its time distribution are key factors determining the performance of scintillators when used as radiation detectors. However most inorganic scintillators are made of heavy materials and suffer from a high index of refraction which limits light extraction efficiency. This increases the path length of the photons in the material with the consequence of higher absorption and tails in the time distribution of the extracted light. Photonic crystals are a relatively new way of conquering this light extraction problem. Basically they are a way to produce a smooth and controllable index matching between the scintillator and the output medium through the nanostructuration of a thin layer of optically transparent high index material deposited at the coupling face of the scintillator. Our review paper discusses the theory behind this approach as well as the simulation details. Furthermore the different lithography steps of the production of an actual photonic crystal sample will be explained. Measurement results of LSO scintillator pixels covered with a nanolithography machined photonic crystal surface are presented together with practical tips for the further development and improvement of this technique.

  7. Radar detection during scintillation. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Knepp, D.L.; Reinking, J.T.

    1990-04-01

    Electromagnetic signals that propagate through a disturbed region of the ionosphere can experience scattering which can cause fluctuations in the received amplitude, phase, and angle-of-arrival. This report considers the performance of a radar that must operate through a disturbed propagation environment such as might occur during strong equatorial scintillation, during a barium release experiment or after a high altitude nuclear detonation. The severity of the channel disturbance is taken to range from weak scattering where the signal quadrature components are uncorrelated Gaussian variates. The detection performance of noncoherent combining is compared to that of double threshold (M out of N) combining under various levels of scintillation disturbance. Results are given for detection sensitivity as a function of the scintillation index and the ratio of the radar hopping bandwidth to the channel bandwidth. It is shown that both types of combining can provide mitigation of fading, and that noncoherent combining generally enjoys an advantage in detection sensitivity of about 2 dB. This work serves as a quantitative guideline to the advantages and disadvantages of certain types of detection strategies during scintillation and is, therefore, useful in the radar design process. However, a detailed simulation of the radar detection algorithms is necessary to evaluate a radar design strategy to predict performance under scintillation conditions.

  8. Thallium bromide photodetectors for scintillation detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hitomi, K.; Muroi, O.; Shoji, T.; Hiratate, Y.; Ishibashi, H.; Ishii, M.

    2000-07-01

    A wide bandgap compound semiconductor, TlBr, has been investigated as a blue sensitive photodetector material for scintillation detection. The TlBr photodetectors have been fabricated from the TlBr crystals grown by the TMZ method using materials purified by many pass zone refining. The performance of the photodetectors has been evaluated by measuring their leakage current, quantum efficiency, spatial uniformity, direct X-ray detection and scintillation detection characteristics. The photodetectors have shown high quantum efficiency for the blue wavelength region and high spatial uniformity for their optical response. In addition, good direct X-ray detection characteristics with an energy resolution of 4.5 keV FWHM for 22 keV X-rays from a 109Cd radioactive source have been obtained. Detection of blue scintillation from GSO and LSO scintillators irradiated with a 22Na radioactive source has been done successfully by using the photodetectors at room temperature. A clear full-energy peak for 511 keV γ-rays has been obtained with the TlBr photodetector coupled to the LSO scintillator with an energy resolution of 40% FWHM.

  9. Linear bolometer array using a high TCR VOx-Au film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Evan M.; Ginn, James C.; Warren, Andrew P.; Long, Christopher J.; Panjwani, Deep; Peale, Robert E.; Shelton, David J.

    2014-06-01

    We present a design for a low-noise bolometer linear array based on the temperature-dependent conductivity of a VOx- Au film. Typical thin film bolometers must compromise between low resistivity to limit Johnson noise and high temperature coefficient of resistivity (TCR) to maximize responsivity. Our vanadium oxide is alloyed with a small concentration of gold by co-sputtering, which gives very low resistivity and very high TCR simultaneously. The film is fabricated on an air bridge device having high thermal conductivity and small thermal time constant optimized for 30 to 60 Hz frame rates. The linear array functions as a low-power profile sensor with a modulated bias. For 1 V bias, we predict responsivity exceeding 1200 V/W. Johnson noise dominates with predicted NEP values as low as 1.0 × 10-11 W/Hz1/2. Preliminary device testing shows film resistivity below 2.5 Ω-cm with TCR exceeding -2.0%. Preliminary measurements of NEP and D* are reported.

  10. The 12x32 Pop-Up Bolometer Array for the SHARC II Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowell, C. Darren; Groseth, Jeffrey E.; Phillips, Thomas G.; Allen, Christine A.; Babu, Sachidananda R.; Jhabvala, Murzy D.; Moseley, S. Harvey, Jr.; Voellmer, George M.

    2002-01-01

    SHARC II is a 350 micron facility camera for the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) expected to come on-line in 2002. The key component of SHARC II is a 12x32 array of doped silicon 'pop-up' bolometers developed at NASA/Goddard and delivered to Caltech in March 2002. Each pixel is 1 mm x 1 mm, coated with a 400 Omega/square bismuth film, and located lambda/4 above a reflective backshort to maximize radiation absorption. The pixels cover the focal plane with greater than 95% filling factor. Each doped thermistor occupies nearly the full area of the pixel to minimize 1/f noise. We report some results from the first cold measurements of this array. The bolometers were located inside a dark cover, and 4x32 pixels were read simultaneously. In the best 25% of winter nights on Mauna Kea, SHARC II is expected to have an NEFD at 350 microns of 1 Jy s(sup 1/2) or better.

  11. Design and Fabrication of a Two-Dimensional Superconducting Bolometer Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, Dominic; Voellmer, George M.; Chervenak, Jay; Irwin, Kent; Moseley, S. Harvey; Shafer, Rick; Stacey, Gordon; Staguhn, J.; Oegerle, William (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Large format, two dimensional arrays of close-packed bolometers will enable submillimeter cameras and spectrometers to obtain images and spectra orders of magnitude faster than present instruments. The South Pole Imaging Fabry-Perot Interferometer (SPIFI) for the AST/RO observatory and the Submillimeter and Far-InfraRed Experiment (SAFIRE) on the SOFIA airborne observatory will employ a large-format, two-dimensional, closepacked bolometer arrays. Both these instruments are imaging Fabry-Perot spectrometers operating at wavelengths between 100 micron and 700 micron. The array format is 16x32 pixels, using a 32-element multiplexer developed in part for this purpose. The low backgrounds achieved in spectroscopy require very sensitive detectors with NEPs of order 5x10(exp 18) W/square root of Hz. Superconducting detectors can be close-packed using the Pop-Up Detector (PUD) format, and SQUID multiplexers operating at the detector bas temperature can be intimately coupled to them. We have fabricated an engineering model array with this technology which features a very compact, modular approach for large format arrays.

  12. Electromagnetic Considerations for Planar Bolometer Arrays in the Single Mode Limit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wollack, Edward J.; Chuss, David T.; Moseley, Samuel

    2006-01-01

    Filled arrays of planar bolometers are finding astronomical applications at wavelengths as long as several millimeters. In an effort to keep focal planes to a reasonable size while maintaining large numbers of detectors, a common strategy is to push these arrays to operate close to or at the single mode limit. Doing so introduces several new challenges that are not experienced in the multi-mode case of far-infrared detectors having similar pixel sizes. First, diffractive effects of the pixels themselves are no longer insignificant and will ultimately contribute to the resolution limit of the optical system in which they reside. We use the method of Withlngton et al. (2003) to model the polarized diffraction in this limit. Second, it is necessary to re-examine the coupling between the radiation and the absorbing element that is thermally connected to the bolometers. The small f-numbers that are often employed to make use of large focal planes makes backshort construction problematic. We introduce a new strategy to increase detector efficiency that uses an antireflective layer on the front side of the detector array. In addition, typical methods for stray light control that rely on multiple reflections in a lossy medium fail due to physical size constraints. For this application, we find that resonant absorbers are a more effective strategy that can be implemented in the space available.

  13. Large-format 17μm high-end VOx μ-bolometer infrared detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizrahi, U.; Argaman, N.; Elkind, S.; Giladi, A.; Hirsh, Y.; Labilov, M.; Pivnik, I.; Shiloah, N.; Singer, M.; Tuito, A.; Ben-Ezra, M.; Shtrichman, I.

    2013-06-01

    Long range sights and targeting systems require a combination of high spatial resolution, low temporal NETD, and wide field of view. For practical electro-optical systems it is hard to support these constraints simultaneously. Moreover, achieving these needs with the relatively low-cost Uncooled μ-Bolometer technology is a major challenge in the design and implementation of both the bolometer pixel and the Readout Integrated Circuit (ROIC). In this work we present measured results from a new, large format (1024×768) detector array, with 17μm pitch. This detector meets the demands of a typical armored vehicle sight with its high resolution and large format, together with low NETD of better than 35mK (at F/1, 30Hz). We estimate a Recognition Range for a NATO target of better than 4 km at all relevant atmospheric conditions, which is better than standard 2nd generation scanning array cooled detector. A new design of the detector package enables improved stability of the Non-Uniformity Correction (NUC) to environmental temperature drifts.

  14. AC Read-Out Circuits for Single Pixel Characterization of TES Microcalorimeters and Bolometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gottardi, L.; van de Kuur, J.; Bandler, S.; Bruijn, M.; de Korte, P.; Gao, J. R.; den Hartog, R.; Hijmering, R. A.; Hoevers, H.; Koshropanah, P.; Kilbourne, C.; Lindemann, M. A.; Parra Borderias, M.; Ridder, M.

    2011-01-01

    SRON is developing Frequency Domain Multiplexing (FDM) for the read-out of transition edge sensor (TES) soft x-ray microcalorimeters for the XMS instrument of the International X-ray Observatory and far-infrared bolometers for the SAFARI instrument on the Japanese mission SPICA. In FDM the TESs are AC voltage biased at frequencies from 0.5 to 6 MHz in a superconducting LC resonant circuit and the signal is read-out by low noise and high dynamic range SQUIDs amplifiers. The TES works as an amplitude modulator. We report on several AC bias experiments performed on different detectors. In particular, we discuss the results on the characterization of Goddard Space Flight Center x-ray pixels and SRON bolometers. The paper focuses on the analysis of different read-out configurations developed to optimize the noise and the impedance matching between the detectors and the SQUID amplifier. A novel feedback network electronics has been developed to keep the SQUID in flux locked loop, when coupled to superconducting high Q circuits, and to optimally tune the resonant bias circuit. The achieved detector performances are discussed in view of the instrument requirement for the two space missions.

  15. Characterization of non-uniformity and bias-heating for uncooled bolometer FPA detectors using simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jungeon; Kyung, Chong-Min

    2013-06-01

    There are some difficulties in the development of uncooled focal plane array (FPA) detectors due to the absence of full simulation model which reflects the characterization of FPA detectors by variations of various parameters. In this paper we propose the simulator for the both readout integrated circuit (ROIC) and bolometer FPA which is based on a thermal equivalence equation of bolometer and mathematical modeling of optical and electrical part in infrared sensor system. The simulator shows the characteristics and the behaviors of individual components of infrared sensor system in the transient-state and steady-state. We present here the simulation results for output characteristics of detectors owing to variations of parameters induced non-uniformity in FPA detectors and find the dominant parameter to be the leading source non-uniformity in FPA detectors. We also present the simulation results for some typical ROICs to cancel the bias-heating which wastes most of the dynamic range of infrared sensor system. These show the effectiveness of compensation for the bias-heating according to variations of parameters. Using the proposed simulator we can expect the quantitative amount of non-uniformity due to the statistical variations in various processing steps and design of ROIC components. It can be used for the systematic design of infrared sensor system which cannot be performed in fabrication procedure.

  16. Instrument design and characterization of the Millimeter Bolometer Array Camera on the Atacama Cosmology Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swetz, D. S.; Ade, P. A. R.; Allen, C.; Amiri, M.; Appel, J. W.; Battistelli, E. S.; Burger, B.; Chervenak, J. A.; Dahlen, A. J.; Das, S.; Denny, S.; Devlin, M. J.; Dicker, S. R.; Doriese, W. B.; Dünner, R.; Essinger-Hileman, T.; Fisher, R. P.; Fowler, J. W.; Gao, X.; Hajian, A.; Halpern, M.; Hargrave, P. C.; Hasselfield, M.; Hilton, G. C.; Hincks, A. D.; Irwin, K. D.; Jarosik, N.; Kaul, M.; Klein, J.; Knotek, S.; Lau, J. M.; Limon, M.; Lupton, R. H.; Marriage, T. A.; Martocci, K. L.; Mauskopf, P.; Moseley, S. H.; Netterfield, C. B.; Niemack, M. D.; Nolta, M. R.; Page, L.; Parker, L. P.; Reid, B. A.; Reintsema, C. D.; Sederberg, A. J.; Sehgal, N.; Sievers, J. L.; Spergel, D. N.; Staggs, S. T.; Stryzak, O. R.; Switzer, E. R.; Thornton, R. J.; Tucker, C.; Wollack, E. J.; Zhao, Y.

    2008-07-01

    The Millimeter Bolometer Array Camera (MBAC) was commissioned in the fall of 2007 on the new 6-meter Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT). The MBAC on the ACT will map the temperature anisotropies of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) with arc-minute resolution. For this first observing season, the MBAC contained a diffraction-limited, 32 by 32 element, focal plane array of Transition Edge Sensor (TES) bolometers for observations at 145 GHz. This array was coupled to the telescope with a series of cold, refractive, reimaging optics. To meet the performance specifications, the MBAC employs four stages of cooling using closed-cycle 3He/4He sorption fridge systems in combination with pulse tube coolers. In this paper we present the design of the instrument and discuss its performance during the first observing season. Finally, we report on the status of the MBAC for the 2008 observing season, when the instrument will be upgraded to a total of three separate 1024-element arrays at 145 GHz, 220 GHz and 280 GHz.

  17. 5,120 Superconducting Bolometers for the PIPER Balloon-Borne CMB Polarization Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, Dominic J.; Chuss, David T.; Hilton, Gene C.; Irwin, Kent D.; Jethava, Nikhil S.; Jhabvala, Christine A.; Kogut, Alan J.; Miller, Timothy M.; Mirel, Paul; Moseley, S. Harvey; Rostem, Karwan; Sharp, Elmer H.; Staguhn, Johannes G.; Stiehl, gregory M.; Voellmer, George M.; Wollack, Edward J.

    2010-01-01

    We are constructing the Primordial Inflation Polarization Explorer (PIPER) to measure the polarization o[ the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and search for the imprint of gravity waves produced during an inflationary epoch in the early universe. The signal is faint and lies behind confusing foregrounds, both astrophysical and cosmological, and so many detectors are required to complete the measurement in a limited time. We will use four of our matured 1,280 pixel, high-filling-factor backshort-under-grid bolometer arrays for efficient operation at the PIPER CMB wavelengths. All four arrays observe at a common wavelength set by passband filters in the optical path. PIPER will fly four times to observe at wavelengths of 1500, 1100, 850, and 500 microns in order to separate CMB from foreground emission. The arrays employ leg-isolated superconducting transition edge sensor bolometers operated at 128mK; tuned resonant backshorts for efficient optical coupling; and a second-generation superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) multiplexer readout. We describe the design, development, and performance of PIPER bo|ometer array technology to achieve background-limited sensitivity for a cryogenic balloon-borne telescope.

  18. A Low-Noise NbTiN Hot Electron Bolometer Mixer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tong, C. Edward; Stern, Jeffrey; Megerian, Krikor; LeDuc, Henry; Sridharan, T. K.; Gibson, Hugh; Blundell, Raymond

    2001-01-01

    Hot electron bolometer (HEB) mixer elements, based on niobium titanium nitride (NbTiN) thin film technology, have been fabricated on crystalline quartz substrates over a 20 nm thick AlN buffer layer. The film was patterned by optical lithography, yielding bolometer elements that measure about 1 micrometer long and between 2 and 12 micrometers wide. These mixer chips were mounted in a fixed-tuned waveguide mixer block, and tested in the 600 and 800 GHz frequency range. The 3-dB output bandwidth of these mixers was determined to be about 2.5 GHz and we measured a receiver noise temperature of 270 K at 630 GHz using an intermediate frequency of 1.5 GHz. The receiver has excellent amplitude stability and the noise temperature measurements are highly repeatable. An 800 GHz receiver incorporating one of these mixer chips has recently been installed at the Sub-Millimeter Telescope in Arizona for field test and for astronomical observations.

  19. Tantalum hot-electron bolometers for low-noise heterodyne receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skalare, A.; McGrath, W.; Bumble, B.; LeDuc, H. G.

    2002-01-01

    We describe superconducting diffusion-cooled hot-electron bolometers that were fabricated fromtantalum films grown on a thin niobium seed layer. The seed layer promotes single-phase growth of the Ta films, resulting in high-quality bolometers with transition temperatures up to 2.35 K and transition widths of less than 0.2 K. An S-parameter measurement set-up in a He-3 cryostat was used to measure device impedance versus frequency of a 400 nm long device at a temperature of 400 mK. It is shown that a 3 dB roll-off frequency of about 1 GHz can be achieved when the device resistance matches the impedance of the embedding network (no electrothermal feedback). This would lead to a prediction of 16 GHz for a 100 nm device, and indicates that a heterodyne mixer using a Ta HEB should be able to operate at several GHz even with a significant amount of electrothermal feedback.

  20. Room temperature, very sensitive thermometer using a doubly clamped microelectromechanical beam resonator for bolometer applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Watanabe, Y.; Hosono, S.; Nagai, N.; Hirakawa, K.

    2016-04-01

    We propose a room temperature, all electrical driving and detecting, very sensitive thermometer structure using a microelectromechanical (MEMS) resonator for bolometer applications. We have fabricated a GaAs doubly clamped MEMS beam resonator whose oscillation can be excited and detected by the piezoelectric effect. When a heating power is applied to a NiCr film deposited on the MEMS beam surface, internal thermal stress is generated in the beam, leading to a reduction in the resonance frequency. The present device detects the shift in the resonance frequency caused by heating and works as a very sensitive thermometer. When the resonator was driven by a voltage slightly below the threshold for the nonlinear, hysteretic oscillation, the thermometer showed a voltage responsivity of about 3300 V/W, while keeping a low noise spectral density of about 60 nV/Hz1/2, demonstrating a noise equivalent power of <20 pW/Hz1/2 even at room temperature. The observed effect can be used for realizing high-sensitivity terahertz bolometers for room-temperature operation.

  1. GISMO, a 2 mm Bolometer Camera Optimized for the Study of High Redshift Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staguhn, J.

    2007-01-01

    The 2mm spectral range provides a unique terrestrial window enabling ground based observations of the earliest active dusty galaxies in the universe and thereby allowing a better constraint on the star formation rate in these objects. We present a progress report for our bolometer camera GISMO (the Goddard-IRAM Superconducting 2-Millimeter Observer), which will obtain large and sensitive sky maps at this wavelength. The instrument will be used at the IRAM 30 m telescope and we expect to install it at the telescope in 2007. The camera uses an 8 x 16 planar array of multiplexed TES bolometers, which incorporates our recently designed Backshort Under Grid (BUG) architecture. GISMO will be very efficient at detecting sources serendipitously in large sky surveys. With the background limited performance of the detectors, the camera provides significantly greater imaging sensitivity and mapping speed at this wavelength than has previously been possible. The major scientific driver for the instrument is to provide the IRAM 30 m telescope with the capability to rapidly observe galactic and extragalactic dust emission, in particular from high-zeta ULI RGs and quasar s, even in the summer season. The instrument will fill in the SEDs of high redshift galaxies at the Rayleigh-Jeans part of the dust emission spectrum, even at the highest redshifts. Our source count models predict that GISMO will serendipitously detect one galaxy every four hours on the blank sky, and that one quarter of these galaxies will be at a redshift of zeta 6.5.

  2. Measurements of the Optical Performance of Prototype TES Bolometers for SAFARI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audley, M. D.; de Lange, G.; Ranjan, M.; Gao, J.-R.; Khosropanah, P.; Ridder, M. L.; Mauskopf, P. D.; Morozov, D.; Doherty, S.; Trappe, N.; Withington, S.

    2014-09-01

    We have measured the optical response of prototype detectors for SAFARI, the far-infrared imaging spectrometer for the SPICA satellite. SAFARI's three bolometer arrays, coupled with a Fourier transform spectrometer, will provide images of a 2'×2' field of view with spectral information over the wavelength range 34-210 μm. Each horn-coupled bolometer consists of a transition edge sensor (TES), with a transition temperature close to 100 mK, and a thin-film Ta absorber on a thermally-isolated silicon nitride membrane. SAFARI requires extremely sensitive detectors ( NEP˜2×10-19 W/), with correspondingly low saturation powers (˜5 fW), to take advantage of SPICA's cooled optics. To meet the challenge of testing such sensitive detectors we have constructed an ultra-low background test facility based on a cryogen-free high-capacity dilution refrigerator, paying careful attention to stray-light exclusion, shielding, and vibration isolation. For optical measurements the system contains internal cold (3-30 K) and hot (˜300 K) black-body calibration sources, as well as a light pipe for external illumination. We discuss our measurements of high optical efficiency in prototype SAFARI detectors and describe recent improvements to the test facility that will enable us to test the full SAFARI focal-plane arrays.

  3. Single SQUID multiplexer for arrays of voltage-biased superconducting bolometers

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Jongsoo; Clarke, John; Gildemeister, J.M.; Lee, Adrian T.; Myers, M.J.; Richards, P.L.; Skidmore, J.T.; Spieler, H.G.

    2001-08-20

    We describe a frequency domain superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) multiplexer which monitors a row of low-temperature sensors simultaneously with a single SQUID. Each sensor is ac biased with a unique frequency and all the sensor currents are added in a superconducting summing loop. A single SQUID measures the current in the summing loop, and the individual signals are lock-in detected after the room temperature SQUID electronics. The current in the summing loop is nulled by feedback to eliminate direct crosstalk. In order to avoid the accumulation of Johnson noise in the summing loop, a tuned bandpass filter is inserted in series with each sensor. For a 32-channel multiplexer for Voltage-biased Superconducting Bolometer (VSB) with a time constant {approx}1msec, we estimate that bias frequencies in the range from {approx}500kHz to {approx}600kHz are practical. The major limitation of our multiplexing scheme is in the slew rate of a readout SQUID. We discuss a ''carrier nulling'' technique which could be used to increase the number of sensors in a row or to multiplex faster bolometers by reducing the required slew rate for a readout SQUID.

  4. Characterization of a submillimeter high-angular-resolution camera with a monolithic silicon bolometer array for the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ning; Hunter, T. R.; Benford, D. J.; Serabyn, E.; Lis, D. C.; Phillips, T. G.; Moseley, S. H.; Boyce, K.; Szymkowiak, A.; Allen, C.; Mott, B.; Gygax, J.

    1996-12-01

    We constructed a 24-pixel bolometer camera operating in the 350- and 450- mu m atmospheric windows for the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO). This instrument uses a monolithic silicon bolometer array that is cooled to approximately 300 mK by a single-shot 3He refrigerator. First-stage amplification is provided by field-effect transistors at approximately 130 K. The sky is imaged onto the bolometer array by means of several mirrors outside the Dewar and a cold off-axis elliptical mirror inside the cryostat. The beam is defined by cold aperture and field stops, which eliminates the need for any condensing horns. We describe the instrument, present measurements of the physical properties of the bolometer array, describe the performance of the electronics and the data-acquisition system, and demonstrate the sensitivity of the instrument operating at the observatory. Approximate detector noise at 350 mu m is 5 \\times 10-15 W/\\radicalHz\\end-radical, referenced to the entrance of the Dewar, and the CSO system noise-equivalent flux density is approximately 4 Jy/\\radicalHz\\end-radical. These values are within a factor of 2.5 of the background limit.

  5. Twenty-channel bolometer array for studying impurity radiation and transport in the TCS field-reversed configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostora, M. R.; Hsu, S. C.; Wurden, G. A.

    2006-10-01

    A bolometer array diagnostic has been developed for the University of Washington Translation, Confinement, and Sustainment (TCS) field-reversed configuration (FRC) experiment in order to measure radially resolved total radiated power per unit length of the FRC. This will provide radiation energy loss information, useful in power balance and impurity studies. The 20-element photodiode bolometer will be mounted at the midplane of the TCS cylindrical vacuum chamber to view the rotating magnetic field (RMF) generated FRC plasma. Key features of this new bolometer array are (1) extensive electrical shielding against the RMF, (2) robust electrical isolation, (3) trans-impedance amplifiers using a microcoax interface at the array and a fiber optic interface to the screen room, and (4) a custom glass-on-metal socket for the 20-element photodiode chip to ensure high vacuum compatibility. The bolometer array can be retracted behind a gate valve using a stepper motor to protect it during vacuum chamber bakeout. The slit assembly housing is interchangeable to provide flexibility for the viewing sightlines.

  6. A low noise, high thermal stability, 0.1 K test facility for the Planck HFI bolometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paine, C. G.; Bock, J. J.; Hristov, V. V.; Lange, A. E.

    2002-05-01

    We are developing a facility which will be used to characterize the bolometric detectors for Planck, an ESA mission to investigate the Cosmic Microwave Background. The bolometers operate at 0.1 K, employing neutron-transmutation doped (NTD) Ge thermistors with resistances of several megohms to achieve NEPs˜1×10-17 W Hz-1/2. Characterization of the intrinsic noise of the bolometers at frequencies as low as 0.010 Hz dictates a test apparatus thermal stability of 40 nK Hz-1/2 to that frequency. This temperature stability is achieved via a multi-stage isolation and control geometry with high resolution thermometry implemented with NTD Ge thermistors, JFET source followers, and dedicated lock-in amplifiers. The test facility accommodates 24 channels of differential signal readout, for measurement of bolometer V(I) characteristics and intrinsic noise. The test facility also provides for modulated radiation in the submillimeter band incident on the bolometers, for measurement of the optical speed-of-response; this illumination can be reduced below detectable limits without interrupting cryogenic operation. A commercial Oxford Instruments dilution refrigerator provides the cryogenic environment for the test facility.

  7. A 1.5 THz hot-electron bolometer mixer operated by a planar diode based local oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tong, C. Y. E.; Meledin, D.; Blundell, R.; Erickson, N.; Mehdi, I.; Goltsman, G.

    2003-01-01

    We have developed a 1.5 THz superconducting NbN Hot-Electron Bolometer mixer. It is oprated by an all-solid-state Local Oscillator comprising of a cascade of 4 planar doublers following an MMIC based W-band power amplifier.

  8. Very large scale heterogeneous integration (VLSHI) and wafer-level vacuum packaging for infrared bolometer focal plane arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forsberg, Fredrik; Roxhed, Niclas; Fischer, Andreas C.; Samel, Björn; Ericsson, Per; Hoivik, Nils; Lapadatu, Adriana; Bring, Martin; Kittilsland, Gjermund; Stemme, Göran; Niklaus, Frank

    2013-09-01

    Imaging in the long wavelength infrared (LWIR) range from 8 to 14 μm is an extremely useful tool for non-contact measurement and imaging of temperature in many industrial, automotive and security applications. However, the cost of the infrared (IR) imaging components has to be significantly reduced to make IR imaging a viable technology for many cost-sensitive applications. This paper demonstrates new and improved fabrication and packaging technologies for next-generation IR imaging detectors based on uncooled IR bolometer focal plane arrays. The proposed technologies include very large scale heterogeneous integration for combining high-performance, SiGe quantum-well bolometers with electronic integrated read-out circuits and CMOS compatible wafer-level vacuum packing. The fabrication and characterization of bolometers with a pitch of 25 μm × 25 μm that are arranged on read-out-wafers in arrays with 320 × 240 pixels are presented. The bolometers contain a multi-layer quantum well SiGe thermistor with a temperature coefficient of resistance of -3.0%/K. The proposed CMOS compatible wafer-level vacuum packaging technology uses Cu-Sn solid-liquid interdiffusion (SLID) bonding. The presented technologies are suitable for implementation in cost-efficient fabless business models with the potential to bring about the cost reduction needed to enable low-cost IR imaging products for industrial, security and automotive applications.

  9. Characterization of ionospheric scintillation at a geomagnetic equatorial region station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seba, Ephrem Beshir; Gogie, Tsegaye Kassa

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we analyzed ionospheric scintillation at Bahir Dar station, Ethiopia (11.6°N, 37.38°E) using GPS-SCINDA data between August 2010 and July 2011. We found that small scale variation in TEC caused high ionospheric scintillation, rather than large scale variation. We studied the daily and monthly variations in the scintillation index S4 during this year, which showed that scintillation was a post-sunset phenomenon on equinoctial days, with high activity during the March equinox. The scintillation activity observed on solstice days was relatively low and almost constant throughout the day with low post-sunset activity levels. Our analysis of the seasonal and annual scintillation characteristics showed that intense activity occurred in March and April. We also studied the dependence of the scintillation index on the satellite elevation angle and found that scintillation was high for low angles but low for high elevation angles.

  10. Isotopic response with small scintillator based gamma-ray spectrometers

    DOEpatents

    Madden, Norman W.; Goulding, Frederick S.; Asztalos, Stephen J.

    2012-01-24

    The intrinsic background of a gamma ray spectrometer is significantly reduced by surrounding the scintillator with a second scintillator. This second (external) scintillator surrounds the first scintillator and has an opening of approximately the same diameter as the smaller central scintillator in the forward direction. The second scintillator is selected to have a higher atomic number, and thus has a larger probability for a Compton scattering interaction than within the inner region. Scattering events that are essentially simultaneous in coincidence to the first and second scintillators, from an electronics perspective, are precluded electronically from the data stream. Thus, only gamma-rays that are wholly contained in the smaller central scintillator are used for analytic purposes.

  11. Scintillating-glass-fiber neutron sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abel, K. H.; Arthur, R. J.; Bliss, M.; Brite, D. W.; Brodzinski, R. L.; Craig, R. A.; Geelhood, B. D.; Goldman, D. S.; Griffin, J. W.; Perkins, R. W.; Reeder, P. L.; Richey, W. R.; Stahl, K. A.; Sunberg, D. S.; Warner, R. A.; Wogman, N. A.; Weber, M. J.

    1994-12-01

    Cerium-doped lithium-silicate glass fibers have been developed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for use as thermal neutron detectors. By using highly-enriched 6Li, these fibers efficiently capture thermal neutrons and produce scintillation light that can be detected at the ends of the fibers. Advantages of scintillating fibers over 3He or BF 3 proportional tubes include flexibility in geometric configuration, ruggedness in high-vibration environments, and less detector weight for the same neutron sensitivity. This paper describes the performance of these scintillating fibers with regard to count rates, pulse height spectra, absolute efficiencies, and neutron/gamma discrimination. Fibers with light transmission lengths ( {1}/{e}) of greater than 2 m have been produced at PNL. Neutron sensors in fiber form allow development of a variety of neutron detectors packaged in previously unavailable configurations. Brief descriptions of some of the devices already produced are included to illustrate these possibilities.

  12. Bispectral analysis of meter wavelength interplanetary scintillation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, J. W.

    1977-01-01

    The bispectrum of interplanetary scintillation is investigated. Rice-squared and lognormal point-source intensity probability density functions are used to derive model bispectra as functionals of the intensity autocovariance. Simultaneous observations of the source CTA 21 at 270, 340, and 470 MHz are analyzed to produce scintillation indices, skewness parameters, and bispectra, which are compared with the models for the cases of weak, intermediate, and strong scattering. The results obtained for CTA 21 are shown to rule out lognormal statistics for interplanetary scintillation over the frequency range from 340 to 470 MHz. It is found that the observed bispectra correspond well with the predictions of the Rice-squared model for weak and intermediate scattering, but are systematically different from model bispectra computed by assuming a point source in the case of strong scattering.

  13. Wavelength-shifter Readout of Scintillation Counters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauletta, Giovanni

    1998-04-01

    A compact system for reading out the scintillation counters of the CDF muon upgrade has been developed and tested. The system relies on wavelength-shifter (wls) fiber ribbon, glued to the side of 1.5 to 2 cm - thick counters, to collect and transfer the light from the scintillator to a small(Hamamatsu R5600) phototube, embedded in one corner of the counter. Prototype counters were constructed from polystyrene-based scintillator(Manufactured by Monocristal Institute at Kharkov under Dubna supervision.) using y11 - doped wls fibers(Manufactured by Kuraray.) for readout. Their response to cosmic ray muons was measured and found to be adequate for up to more than 3 m when the light collection was enhanced by mirroring the wls fiber ends furthest from the photomultiplier.

  14. New Efficient Organic Scintillators Derived from Pyrazoline.

    PubMed

    Bliznyuk, Valery N; Seliman, Ayman F; Ishchenko, Alexander A; Derevyanko, Nadezhda A; DeVol, Timothy A

    2016-05-25

    We report on the synthesis, spectroscopic and scintillation properties of three new pyrazoline core based fluorophores. Fluorescence properties of the fluorophores have been studied both in a solution state and in a solid polyvinyltoluene (PVT) resin matrix of different porosity. The synthesized fluorophores were found to be promising candidates for application in plastic scintillators for detection of ionizing radiation (alpha, beta particles, γ rays and neutrons) and demonstrated superior efficiency in comparison to the existing commercially used fluorophores (2-(1-naphthyl)-5-phenyloxazole (αNPO), 9,10-diphenylanthracene, etc.). Moreover, the suggested synthetic route allows functionalization of the fluorophores with a vinyl group for further covalent bound to the PVT or other vinyl polymer matrices, which dramatically improves chemical stability of the system simultaneously improving the photoluminescence quantum yield. Possible mechanisms of the enhanced scintillation properties are discussed based on preliminary quantum mechanical calculations and spectroscopic characteristics of the fluorophores under study. PMID:27163887

  15. Refractive scintillation in the interstellar medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coles, W. A.; Rickett, B. J.; Codona, J. L.; Frehlich, R. G.

    1987-04-01

    The slow variation in the apparent intensity of pulsars on time scales of days to months was recently shown to be due to a large-scale component of interstellar scintillation (Rickett, Coles, and Bourgois). These variations are greater than one would expect if the turbulence spectrum were a simple Kolmogorov power law. It is shown that this large-scale component can be greatly enhanced when the turbulence spectrum has a limiting "inner scale" of the order of 109m. The authors present a solution for the covariance of refractive scintillation of an extended source in an extended medium. The results show that refractive scintillations are also responsible for slow variations in "low-frequency variables".

  16. Testing Gravity Using Pulsar Scintillation Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Huan; Nishizawa, Atsushi; Pen, Ue-Li

    2016-03-01

    We propose to use pulsar scintillation measurements to test predictions of alternative theories of gravity. Comparing to single-path pulsar timing measurements, the scintillation measurements can achieve a factor of 104 ~105 improvement in timing accuracy, due to the effect of multi-path interference. The self-noise from pulsar also does not affect the interference pattern, where the data acquisition timescale is 103 seconds instead of years. Therefore it has unique advantages in measuring gravitational effect or other mechanisms (at mHz and above frequencies) on light propagation. We illustrate its application in constraining scalar gravitational-wave background and measuring gravitational-wave speed, in which cases the sensitivities are greatly improved with respect to previous limits. We expect much broader applications in testing gravity with existing and future pulsar scintillation observations.

  17. The design of the TASD (totally active scintillator detector) prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Mefodiev, A. V. Kudenko, Yu. G.

    2015-12-15

    Totally active and magnetic segmented scintillation neutrino detectors are developed for the nextgeneration accelerator neutrino experiments. Such detectors will incorporate scintillation modules with scintillation counters that form X and Y planes. A single counter is a 7 × 10 × 90 mm{sup 3} scintillation bar with gluedin wavelength-shifting fibers and micropixel avalanche photodiodes. The results of measurements of the parameters of these detectors are presented.

  18. Spectral attenuation length of scintillating fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drexlin, Guido; Eberhard, Veit; Hunkel, Dirk; Zeitnitz, B.

    1995-02-01

    A double spectrometer allows the precise measurement of the spectral attenuation length of scintillating fibers. Exciting the fibers with a N 2-laser at different points and measuring the wavelength dependent light intensity on both ends of the fiber simultaneously, enables a measurement of the attenuation length which is practically independent of systematic uncertainties. The experimental setup can additionally be used for the measurement of the relative light output. Six types of scintillating fibers from four manufactures (Bicron, Kuraray, Pol.Hi.Tech, and Plastifo) were tested. For different fibers the wavelength dependent attenuation lengths were measured from 0.3 m up to 20 m with an accuracy as good as 1%.

  19. Near-infrared scintillation of liquid argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, T.; Escobar, C. O.; Lippincott, W. H.; Rubinov, P.

    2016-03-01

    Since the 1970s it has been known that noble gases scintillate in the near infrared (NIR) region of the spectrum (0.7 μm < λ < 1.5 μm). More controversial has been the question of the NIR light yield for condensed noble gases. We first present the motivation for using the NIR scintillation in liquid argon detectors, then briefly review early as well as more recent efforts and finally show encouraging preliminary results of a test performed at Fermilab.

  20. Statistics of time averaged atmospheric scintillation

    SciTech Connect

    Stroud, P.

    1994-02-01

    A formulation has been constructed to recover the statistics of the moving average of the scintillation Strehl from a discrete set of measurements. A program of airborne atmospheric propagation measurements was analyzed to find the correlation function of the relative intensity over displaced propagation paths. The variance in continuous moving averages of the relative intensity was then found in terms of the correlation functions. An empirical formulation of the variance of the continuous moving average of the scintillation Strehl has been constructed. The resulting characterization of the variance of the finite time averaged Strehl ratios is being used to assess the performance of an airborne laser system.

  1. The homestake surface-underground scintillations: Description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cherry, M. L.; Corbato, S.; Daily, T.; Fenyves, E. J.; Kieda, D.; Lande, K.; Lee, C. K.

    1985-01-01

    Two new detectors are currently under construction at the Homestake Gold Mine a 140-ton Large Area Scintillation Detector (LASD) with an upper surface area of 130 square meters, a geometry factor (for an isotropic flux) of 1200 square meters, sr, and a depth of 4200 m.w.e.; and a surface air shower array consisting of 100 scintillator elements, each 3 square meters, spanning an area of approximately square kilometers. Underground, half of the LASD is currently running and collecting muon data; on the surface, the first section of the air shower array will begin operation in the spring of 1985. The detectors and their capabilities are described.

  2. Scintillation index in strong oceanic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baykal, Yahya

    2016-09-01

    Scintillation index of spherical wave in strongly turbulent oceanic medium is evaluated. In the evaluation, modified Rytov solution and our recent formulation that expresses the oceanic turbulence parameters by the atmospheric turbulence structure constant, are employed. Variations of the scintillation index in strong oceanic turbulence are examined versus the oceanic turbulence parameters such as the rate of dissipation of kinetic energy per unit mass of fluid, the rate of dissipation of mean-squared temperature, viscosity, wavelength, the link length, and the ratio of temperature to salinity contributions to the refractive index spectrum.

  3. New Structured Scintillators for Neutron Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagarkar, V. V.; Ovechkina, E. E.; Bhandari, H. B.; Soundara-Pandian, L.; More, M. J.; Riedel, R. A.; Miller, S. R.

    We report on the development of novel neutron scintillators fabricated in microcolumnar formats using the physical vapour deposition (PVD) method. Such structures mitigate the conventional trade-off between spatial resolution and detection efficiency by channelling the scintillation light towards the detector while minimizing lateral spread in the film. Consequently, high resolution and high contrast neutron images can be acquired in a time efficient manner. In this paper, we discuss methods and characterization for scintillator films made from three distinct compositions, Thallium (Tl) or Europium (Eu) doped Lithium CesiumIodide (Li3Cs2I5:Tl,Eu, referred to as LCI), Tl or Eudoped Lithium Sodium Iodide (LixNa1-xI:Tl,Eu, referred to as LNI), and Cerium (Ce)-doped Gadolinium Iodide (GdI3:Ce, referred to as GDI). LCI and LNI scintillators are derived from the well-known CsI and NaI scintillators by the incorporation of 6Li into their lattice. Based on our measurements reported here, LCI/LNI scintillators have shown to exhibit bright emissions, fast, sub-microsecond decay, and an ability to effectively discriminate between neutron and gamma interactions using pulse shape (PSD) and/or pulse height (PHD) discrimination. LCI has a density of 4.5 g/cm3, a measured peak emission wavelength of 460 nm (doped with Eu), and a light yield of ∼50,000 photons/thermal neutron. LNI has a density of 3.6 g/cm3, an emission peak measured at 420 nm, and a light yield of ∼100,000 photons/thermal neutron. The recently discovered GDI exhibits excellent scintillation properties including a bright emission of up to 5,000 photons/thermal neutron interaction, 550 nm green emission, a rise time of ∼0.5 ns and a primary decay time of ∼38 ns (Glodo et al., 2006). Its high thermal neutron cross-section of ∼255 kb makes it an attractive candidate for neutron detection and imaging. Although it has high density of 5.2 gm/cm3 and effective atomic number of 57, its gamma sensitivity can be

  4. Spectral Characterizations of the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) Thermistor Bolometers using Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornhill, K. Lee; Bitting, Herbert; Lee, Robert B., III; Paden, Jack; Pandey, Dhirendra K.; Priestley, Kory J.; Thomas, Susan; Wilson, Robert S.

    1998-01-01

    Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) techniques are being used to characterize the relative spectral response, or sensitivity, of scanning thermistor bolometers in the infrared (IR) region (2 - >= 100-micrometers). The bolometers are being used in the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) program. The CERES measurements are designed to provide precise, long term monitoring of the Earth's atmospheric radiation energy budget. The CERES instrument houses three bolometric radiometers, a total wavelength (0.3- >= 150-micrometers) sensor, a shortwave (0.3-5-micrometers) sensor, and an atmospheric window (8-12-micrometers) sensor. Accurate spectral characterization is necessary for determining filtered radiances for longwave radiometric calibrations. The CERES bolometers spectral response's are measured in the TRW FTS Vacuum Chamber Facility (FTS - VCF), which uses a FTS as the source and a cavity pyroelectric trap detector as the reference. The CERES bolometers and the cavity detector are contained in a vacuum chamber, while the FTS source is housed in a GN2 purged chamber. Due to the thermal time constant of the CERES bolometers, the FTS must be operated in a step mode. Data are acquired in 6 IR spectral bands covering the entire longwave IR region. In this paper, the TRW spectral calibration facility design and data measurement techniques are described. Two approaches are presented which convert the total channel FTS data into the final CERES spectral characterizations, producing the same calibration coefficients (within 0.1 percent). The resulting spectral response curves are shown, along with error sources in the two procedures. Finally, the impact of each spectral response curve on CERES data validation will be examined through analysis of filtered radiance values from various typical scene types.

  5. 21 CFR 892.1100 - Scintillation (gamma) camera.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Scintillation (gamma) camera. 892.1100 Section 892.1100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1100 Scintillation (gamma) camera. (a) Identification. A scintillation (gamma) camera...

  6. Upconverting nanoparticles for optimizing scintillator based detection systems

    DOEpatents

    Kross, Brian; McKisson, John E; McKisson, John; Weisenberger, Andrew; Xi, Wenze; Zom, Carl

    2013-09-17

    An upconverting device for a scintillation detection system is provided. The detection system comprises a scintillator material, a sensor, a light transmission path between the scintillator material and the sensor, and a plurality of upconverting nanoparticles particles positioned in the light transmission path.

  7. Robust GPS carrier tracking under ionospheric scintillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susi, M.; Andreotti, M.; Aquino, M. H.; Dodson, A.

    2013-12-01

    Small scale irregularities present in the ionosphere can induce fast and unpredictable fluctuations of Radio Frequency (RF) signal phase and amplitude. This phenomenon, known as scintillation, can degrade the performance of a GPS receiver leading to cycle slips, increasing the tracking error and also producing a complete loss of lock. In the most severe scenarios, if the tracking of multiple satellites links is prevented, outages in the GPS service can also occur. In order to render a GPS receiver more robust under scintillation, particular attention should be dedicated to the design of the carrier tracking stage, that is the receiver's part most sensitive to these types of phenomenon. This paper exploits the reconfigurability and flexibility of a GPS software receiver to develop a tracking algorithm that is more robust under ionospheric scintillation. For this purpose, first of all, the scintillation level is monitored in real time. Indeed the carrier phase and the post correlation terms obtained by the PLL (Phase Locked Loop) are used to estimate phi60 and S4 [1], the scintillation indices traditionally used to quantify the level of phase and amplitude scintillations, as well as p and T, the spectral parameters of the fluctuations PSD. The effectiveness of the scintillation parameter computation is confirmed by comparing the values obtained by the software receiver and the ones provided by a commercial scintillation monitoring, i.e. the Septentrio PolarxS receiver [2]. Then the above scintillation parameters and the signal carrier to noise density are exploited to tune the carrier tracking algorithm. In case of very weak signals the FLL (Frequency Locked Loop) scheme is selected in order to maintain the signal lock. Otherwise an adaptive bandwidth Phase Locked Loop (PLL) scheme is adopted. The optimum bandwidth for the specific scintillation scenario is evaluated in real time by exploiting the Conker formula [1] for the tracking jitter estimation. The performance

  8. Indium Hybridization of Large Format TES Bolometer Arrays to Readout Multiplexers for Far-Infrared Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Timothy M.; Costen, Nick; Allen, Christine

    2007-01-01

    The advance of new detector technologies combined with enhanced fabrication methods has resulted in an increase in development of large format arrays. The next generation of scientific instruments will utilize detectors containing hundreds to thousands of elements providing a more efficient means to conduct large area sky surveys. Some notable detectors include a 32x32 x-ray microcalorimeter for Constellation-X, an infrared bolometer called SAFIRE to fly on the airborne observatory SOFIA, and the sub-millimeter bolometer SCUBA-2 to be deployed at the JCMT which will use more than 10,000 elements for two colors, each color using four 32x40 arrays. Of these detectors, SCUBA-2 is farthest along in development and uses indium hybridization to multiplexers for readout of the large number of elements, a technology that will be required to enable the next generation of large format arrays. Our current efforts in working toward large format arrays have produced GISMO, the Goddard IRAM Superconducting 2-Millimeter observer. GISMO is a far infrared instrument to be field tested later this year at the IRAM 30 meter telescope in Spain. GISMO utilizes transition edge sensor (TES) technology in an 8x16 filled array format that allows for typical fan-out wiring and wire-bonding to four 1x32 NIST multiplexers. GISMO'S electrical wiring is routed along the tops of 30 micron walls which also serve as the mechanical framework for the array. This architecture works well for the 128 element array, but is approaching the limit for routing the necessary wires along the surface while maintaining a high fill factor. Larger format arrays will benefit greatly from making electrical connections through the wafer to the backside, where they can be hybridized to a read-out substrate tailored to handling the wiring scheme. The next generation array we are developing is a 32x40 element array on a pitch of 1135 microns that conforms to the NIST multiplexer, already developed for the SCUBA-2

  9. The SNO+ Scintillator Purification Plant and Projected Sensitivity to Solar Neutrinos in the Pure Scintillator Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pershing, Teal; SNO+ Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The SNO+ detector is a neutrino and neutrinoless double-beta decay experiment utilizing the renovated SNO detector. In the second phase of operation, the SNO+ detector will contain 780 tons of organic liquid scintillator composed of 2 g/L 2,5-diphenyloxazole (PPO) in linear alkylbenzene (LAB). In this phase, SNO+ will strive to detect solar neutrinos in the sub-MeV range, including CNO production neutrinos and pp production neutrinos. To achieve the necessary detector sensitivity, a four-part scintillator purification plant has been constructed in SNOLAB for the removal of ionic and radioactive impurities. We present an overview of the SNO+ scintillator purification plant stages, including distillation, water extraction, gas stripping, and metal scavenger columns. We also give the projected SNO+ sensitivities to various solar-produced neutrinos based on the scintillator plant's projected purification efficiency.

  10. Development of scintillator plates with high energy resolution for alpha particles made of GPS scintillator grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimaoka, Takehiro; Kaneko, Junichi H.; Izaki, Kenji; Tsubota, Youichi; Higuchi, Mikio; Nishiyama, Shusuke

    2014-01-01

    A scintillator plate with high energy resolution was developed to produce an alpha particle monitor used in nuclear fuel reprocessing plants and mixed plutonium-uranium oxide (MOX) fuel plants. Grains of a Gd2Si2O7 (GPS) scintillator of several 10 to 550 μm were fixed on a glass substrate and were then mechanically polished. By increasing the size of scintillator grains and removing fine powders, the collected light yield and energy resolution for alpha particles were drastically improved. Energy resolution of 9.3% was achieved using average grain size of 91 μm. Furthermore, the ratios between counts in a peak and total counts were improved by more than 60% by the further increase of grain size and adoption of mechanically polished surfaces on both sides. Beta and gamma ray influences were suppressed sufficiently by the thin 100 μm scintillator plates.

  11. An improved model of equatorial scintillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Secan, J. A.; Bussey, R. M.; Fremouw, E. J.; Basu, Sa.

    1995-05-01

    One of the main limitations of the modeling work that went into the equatorial section of the Wideband ionospheric scintillation model (WBMOD) was that the data set used in the modeling was limited to two stations near the dip equator (Ancon, Peru, and Kwajalein Island, in the North Pacific Ocean) at two fixed local times (nominally 1000 and 2200). Over the past year this section of the WBMOD model has been replaced by a model developed using data from three additional stations (Ascension Island, in the South Atlantic Ocean, Huancayo, Peru, and Manila, Phillipines; data collected under the auspices of the USAF Phillips Laboratory Geophysics Directorate) which provide a greater diversity in both latitude and longitude, as well as cover the entire day. The new model includes variations with latitude, local time, longitude, season, solar epoch, and geomagnetic activity levels. The way in which the irregularity strength parameter CkL is modeled has also been changed. The new model provides the variation of the full probability distribution function (PDF) of log (CkL) rather than simply the average of log (CkL). This permits the user to specify a threshold on scintillation level, and the model will calculate the percent of the time that scintillation will exceed that level in the user-specified scenario. It will also permit calculation of scintillation levels at a user-specified percentile. A final improvement to the WBMOD model is the implementation of a new theory for calculating S4 on a two-way channel.

  12. Scintillator Development for the PROSPECT Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Minfang

    2014-03-01

    Doped scintillator is the target material of choice for antineutrino detection as it utilizes the time-delayed coincidence signature of the positron annihilation and neutron capture resulting from the Inverse Beta Decay (IBD) interaction. Additionally, the multiple gamma rays or heavy ions emitted after neutron capture on either Gd or 6Li respectively provide a distinct signal for the identification of antineutrino events and therefore significantly enhance accidental background reduction. The choice of scintillator and dopant depends on the detector requirements and scintillator performance criteria. Both Gd and 6Li doped scintillators have been used in past reactor antineutrino experiments such as Double Chooz, Daya Bay, RENO, and Bugey3 and are currently under investigation by the PROSPECT collaboration. Their properties in terms of light yield, optical transparency, chemical stability and background rejection efficiency using Pulse Shape Discrimination (PSD) will be reported. Research sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Physics and Office of High Energy Physics, under contract with Brookhaven National Laboratory-Brookhaven Science Associates.

  13. Fluorescent compounds for plastic scintillation applications

    SciTech Connect

    Pla-Dalmau, A.; Bross, A.D.

    1994-04-01

    Several 2-(2{prime}-hydroxyphenyl)benzothiazole, -benzoxazole, and -benzimidazole derivatives have been prepared. Transmittance, fluorescence, light yield, and decay time characteristics of these compounds have been studied in a polystyrene matrix and evaluated for use in plastic scintillation detectors. Radiation damage studies utilizing a {sup 60}C source have also been performed.

  14. High resolution scintillation detector with semiconductor readout

    DOEpatents

    Levin, Craig S.; Hoffman, Edward J.

    2000-01-01

    A novel high resolution scintillation detector array for use in radiation imaging such as high resolution Positron Emission Tomography (PET) which comprises one or more parallelepiped crystals with at least one long surface of each crystal being in intimate contact with a semiconductor photodetector such that photons generated within each crystal by gamma radiation passing therethrough is detected by the photodetector paired therewith.

  15. Temperature dependence of BCF plastic scintillation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wootton, Landon; Beddar, Sam

    2013-05-01

    We examined temperature dependence in plastic scintillation detectors (PSDs) made of BCF-60 or BCF-12 scintillating fiber coupled to optical fiber with cyanoacrylate. PSDs were subjected to a range of temperatures using a temperature-controlled water bath and irradiated at each temperature while either the dose was measured using a CCD camera or the spectral output was measured using a spectrometer. The spectrometer was used to examine the intensity and spectral distribution of scintillation light emitted by the PSDs, Cerenkov light generated within the PSD, and light transmitted through an isolated optical coupling. BCF-60 PSDs exhibited a 0.50% decrease and BCF-12 PSDs a 0.09% decrease in measured dose per °C increase, relative to dose measured at 22 °C. Spectrometry revealed that the total intensity of the light generated by BCF-60 and BCF-12 PSDs decreased by 0.32% and 0.13%, respectively, per °C increase. The spectral distribution of the light changed slightly with temperature for both PSDs, accounting for the disparity between the change in measured dose and total light output. The generation of Cerenkov light was temperature independent. However, light transmitted through optical coupling between the scintillator and the optical fiber also exhibited temperature dependence.

  16. Progress in studying scintillator proportionality: Phenomenological model

    SciTech Connect

    Bizarri, Gregory; Cherepy, Nerine; Choong, Woon-Seng; Hull, Giulia; Moses, William; Payne, Sephen; Singh, Jai; Valentine, John; Vasilev, Andrey; Williams, Richard

    2009-04-30

    We present a model to describe the origin of non-proportional dependence of scintillator light yield on the energy of an ionizing particle. The non-proportionality is discussed in terms of energy relaxation channels and their linear and non-linear dependences on the deposited energy. In this approach, the scintillation response is described as a function of the deposited energy deposition and the kinetic rates of each relaxation channel. This mathematical framework allows both a qualitative interpretation and a quantitative fitting representation of scintillation non-proportionality response as function of kinetic rates. This method was successfully applied to thallium doped sodium iodide measured with SLYNCI, a new facility using the Compton coincidence technique. Finally, attention is given to the physical meaning of the dominant relaxation channels, and to the potential causes responsible for the scintillation non-proportionality. We find that thallium doped sodium iodide behaves as if non-proportionality is due to competition between radiative recombinations and non-radiative Auger processes.

  17. Waveshifting fiber readout of lanthanum halide scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Case, G. L.; Cherry, M. L.; Stacy, J. G.

    2006-07-01

    Newly developed high-light-yield inorganic scintillators coupled to waveshifting optical fibers provide the capability of efficient X-ray detection and millimeter scale position resolution suitable for high-energy cosmic ray instruments, hard X-ray/gamma ray astronomy telescopes and applications to national security. The CASTER design for NASA's proposed Black Hole Finder Probe mission, in particular, calls for a 6 8 m2 hard X-ray coded aperture imaging telescope operating in the 20 600 keV energy band, putting significant constraints on cost and readout complexity. The development of new inorganic scintillator materials (e.g., cerium-doped LaBr3 and LaCl3) provides improved energy resolution and timing performance that is well suited to the requirements for national security and astrophysics applications. LaBr3 or LaCl3 detector arrays coupled with waveshifting fiber optic readout represent a significant advance in the performance capabilities of scintillator-based gamma cameras and provide the potential for a feasible approach to affordable, large area, extremely sensitive detectors. We describe some of the applications and present laboratory test results demonstrating the expected scintillator performance.

  18. Ionospheric scintillations associated with equatorial E-region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandra, H.; Vats, H. O.; Sethia, G.; Deshpande, M. R.; Rastogi, R. G.; Sastri, J. H.

    1978-01-01

    Amplitude scintillations at 40, 140, and 360 MHz recorded at an equatorial station Ootacamund (dip 4 deg N) during the ATS-6 phase II and the ionograms at a nearby station Kodaikanal (dip 3.5 deg N) are examined for the scintillation activity. Various sporadic E events, but not the Es-q, are associated with intense daytime scintillations. There are no scintillations at times of normal E-layer or cusp type of Es. Scintillations are also present at times of night Es.

  19. Liquid scintillator production for the NOvA experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mufson, S.; Baugh, B.; Bower, C.; Coan, T. E.; Cooper, J.; Corwin, L.; Karty, J. A.; Mason, P.; Messier, M. D.; Pla-Dalmau, A.; Proudfoot, M.

    2015-11-01

    The NOvA collaboration blended and delivered 8.8 kt (2.72M gal) of liquid scintillator as the active detector medium to its near and far detectors. The composition of this scintillator was specifically developed to satisfy NOvA's performance requirements. A rigorous set of quality control procedures was put in place to verify that the incoming components and the blended scintillator met these requirements. The scintillator was blended commercially in Hammond, IN. The scintillator was shipped to the NOvA detectors using dedicated stainless steel tanker trailers cleaned to food grade.

  20. Liquid Scintillator Production for the NOvA Experiment

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mufson, S.; Baugh, B.; Bower, C.; Coan, T.; Cooper, J.; Corwin, L.; Karty, J.; Mason, P.; Messier, M. D.; Pla-Dalmau, A.; et al

    2015-04-15

    The NOvA collaboration blended and delivered 8.8 kt (2.72M gal) of liquid scintillator as the active detector medium to its near and far detectors. The composition of this scintillator was specifically developed to satisfy NOvA's performance requirements. A rigorous set of quality control procedures was put in place to verify that the incoming components and the blended scintillator met these requirements. The scintillator was blended commercially in Hammond, IN. The scintillator was shipped to the NOvA detectors using dedicated stainless steel tanker trailers cleaned to food grade.

  1. Frequency-Domain Analysis of Diffusion-Cooled Hot-Electron Bolometer Mixers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skalare, A.; McGrath, W. R.; Bumble, B.; LeDuc, H. G.

    1998-01-01

    A new theoretical model is introduced to describe heterodyne mixer conversion efficiency and noise (from thermal fluctuation effects) in diffusion-cooled superconducting hot-electron bolometers. The model takes into account the non-uniform internal electron temperature distribution generated by Wiedemann-Franz heat conduction, and accepts for input an arbitrary (analytical or experimental) superconducting resistance-versus- temperature curve. A non-linear large-signal solution is solved iteratively to calculate the temperature distribution, and a linear frequency-domain small-signal formulation is used to calculate conversion efficiency and noise. In the small-signal solution the device is discretized into segments, and matrix algebra is used to relate the heating modulation in the segments to temperature and resistance modulations. Matrix expressions are derived that allow single-sideband mixer conversion efficiency and coupled noise power to be directly calculated. The model accounts for self-heating and electrothermal feedback from the surrounding bias circuit.

  2. The architecture and performance of SCD's 17 μm pitch VOx μ-bolometer detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraenkel, A.; Mizrahi, U.; Bikov, L.; Giladi, A.; Shiloah, N.; Elkind, S.; Czyzewski, T.; Kogan, I.; Amsterdam, A.

    2009-05-01

    In this paper SCD's 17μm pitch large format VOx μ-Bolometer detector is introduced. In the first part the radiometric performance and the challenges involved in achieving the desired pixel sensitivity are discussed. We elaborate on the progress towards the performance design goal (< 50mK@F/1, 60Hz) utilizing various test structures and technology demonstration platforms. The combination of reduced pixel size and high-end thermal sensitivity can provide smaller light weight systems. In the second part the ROIC architecture options will be presented in depth. New capabilities and features are enabled by the advanced 0.18um VLSI technology. Explicitly, we address the contribution in terms of system flexibility, simplification and reduced power dissipation. Some vital tasks, such as coarse non-uniformity correction, are done internally thus facilitating the user interface.

  3. New developments in SCD's 17-μm VOx μ-bolometer product line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizrahi, U.; Bikov, L.; Giladi, A.; Shiloah, N.; Elkind, S.; Czyzewski, T.; Kogan, I.; Maayani, S.; Amsterdam, A.; Vaserman, I.; Hirsh, Y.; Fraenkel, A.

    2010-04-01

    Last year we have introduced the development program of SCD's 17μm pitch VGA VOx μ-Bolometer detector (1). Due to the overall size, weight and power advantages the 17μm pitch is currently being considered for the next generation systems such as thermal weapon sights (TWS), driver vision enhancers (DVE) and digitally fused goggles (DENVG). In the first part of this paper we will discuss in detail the performance of this detector. Specifically, we will elaborate on the radiometric results, ROIC performance and operability. Detailed measurements for a wide temperature range will be presented as well. In the second part, we will describe some new capabilities and features that are enabled by the advanced 0.18um VLSI technology. These features will be embedded in new products that are currently under development.

  4. A surface micromachined amorphous GexSi1-xOy bolometer for thermal imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, A. H. Z.; Tait, R. N.; Oogarah, Tania B.; Liu, H. C.; Denhoff, Mike W.; Sproule, G. I.; Graham, M. J.

    2004-10-01

    We present characterization of a surface micro-machined microbolometer featuring a number of unique features. The active resistor layer is amorphous GexSi1-xOy grown by reactively co-sputtering Ge and Si in an oxygen background. Complete control over Ge, Si, and O content using this technique allows control of both temperature coefficient of resistance and resistivity of the material, enabling optimization of material characteristics for bolometer applications. The resistor layer is combined with top and bottom NiCr metalization to form a tuned absorber for 10 μm radiation, eliminating requirements for additional absorber layers or for carefully controlled air gap thickness. Characterization of device noise and performance is presented.

  5. Highly sensitive hBN/graphene hot electron bolometers with a Johnson noise readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efetov, Dmitri; Gao, Yuanda; Walsh, Evan; Shiue, Ren-Jye; Grosso, Gabriele; Peng, Cheng; Hone, James; Fong, Kin Chun; Englund, Dirk

    Graphene has remarkable opto-electronic and thermo-electric properties that make it an exciting functional material for various photo-detection applications. In particular, owed to graphenes unique combination of an exceedingly low electronic heat capacity and a strongly suppressed electron-phonon thermal conductivity Gth, the electronic and phononic temperatures are highly decoupled allowing an operation principle as a hot electron bolometer (HEB). Here we demonstrate highly sensitive HEBs made of high quality hBN/graphene/hBN stacks and employ a direct electronic temperature read out scheme via Johnson noise thermometry (JNT). We perform combined pump-probe and JNT measurements to demonstrate strongly damped Ce and Gth in the ultra-low impurity σi = 109 cm-2 hBN/G/hBN stacks, which result in unprecedented photo-detection sensitivity and noise equivalent power for graphene HEBs.

  6. Minimum Fisher regularization of image reconstruction for infrared imaging bolometer on HL-2A

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, J. M.; Liu, Y.; Li, W.; Lu, J.; Dong, Y. B.; Xia, Z. W.; Yi, P.; Yang, Q. W.

    2013-09-15

    An infrared imaging bolometer diagnostic has been developed recently for the HL-2A tokamak to measure the temporal and spatial distribution of plasma radiation. The three-dimensional tomography, reduced to a two-dimensional problem by the assumption of plasma radiation toroidal symmetry, has been performed. A three-dimensional geometry matrix is calculated with the one-dimensional pencil beam approximation. The solid angles viewed by the detector elements are taken into account in defining the chord brightness. And the local plasma emission is obtained by inverting the measured brightness with the minimum Fisher regularization method. A typical HL-2A plasma radiation model was chosen to optimize a regularization parameter on the criterion of generalized cross validation. Finally, this method was applied to HL-2A experiments, demonstrating the plasma radiated power density distribution in limiter and divertor discharges.

  7. Optical Response of Strained- and Unstrained-Silicon Cold-Electron Bolometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brien, T. L. R.; Ade, P. A. R.; Barry, P. S.; Dunscombe, C. J.; Leadley, D. R.; Morozov, D. V.; Myronov, M.; Parker, E. H. C.; Prest, M. J.; Prunnila, M.; Sudiwala, R. V.; Whall, T. E.; Mauskopf, P. D.

    2016-07-01

    We describe the optical characterisation of two silicon cold-electron bolometers each consisting of a small (32 × 14 mathrm {\\upmu m}) island of degenerately doped silicon with superconducting aluminium contacts. Radiation is coupled into the silicon absorber with a twin-slot antenna designed to couple to 160-GHz radiation through a silicon lens. The first device has a highly doped silicon absorber, the second has a highly doped strained-silicon absorber. Using a novel method of cross-correlating the outputs from two parallel amplifiers, we measure noise-equivalent powers of 3.0 × 10^{-16} and 6.6 × 10^{-17} mathrm {W Hz^{{-1}/{2}}} for the control and strained device, respectively, when observing radiation from a 77-K source. In the case of the strained device, the noise-equivalent power is limited by the photon noise.

  8. RAPID COMMUNICATION: Low-temperature GaSb bolometer for non-equilibrium phonon pulse detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taele, B. M.; Lawson, N. S.; Wigmore, J. K.

    2000-11-01

    We report on the first use of undoped bulk-grown p-type GaSb as a low-temperature detector in composite bolometers for the detection of non-equilibrium phonons. In the ohmic regime, the detector's low-temperature resistivity measurements are consistent with the Mott variable-range hopping conduction characterized by ln R(T)∝exp (T0/T)1/4 with a temperature coefficient of (-0.42-3.46ln T)-1 K-1 in the temperature range 1.4 K≤T≤4.2 K. The detector showed a fast response time of approximately 1 µs and excellent reproducibility. In our opinion, the most promising areas of applications are in nuclear spectroscopy (low-energy x-ray and beta-particle detection) for which small-volume detectors can be used and the study of phonon dynamics in 2DEG structures.

  9. Design and construction of high-sensitivity, infrared bolometers for operation at 300 mK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alsop, D. C.; Inman, C.; Lange, A. E.; Wibanks, T.

    1992-11-01

    The design and construction of 300-mK composite bolometers developed for millimeter-wave astronomical observations are described. Graphite fibers are used as the electrical leads for the thermistor to reduce the thermal conductance and heat capacity associated with the leads. A mechanical suspension made of Nylon fibers provides the required thermal conductance. Electrical noise equivalent powers below 1 x 10 exp -16 W/sq rt Hz have been achieved for detectors with thermal time constants of 11 ms. The detectors were installed in a millimeter-wave photometer and used to perform observations of the cosmic microwave background from a balloonborne platform. The flight performance was consistent with the measured laboratory properties.

  10. Antenna-coupled TES bolometers for the Keck array, Spider, and Polar-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brient, R.; Ade, P. A. R.; Ahmed, Z.; Aikin, R. W.; Amiri, M.; Benton, S.; Bischoff, C.; Bock, J. J.; Bonetti, J. A.; Brevik, J. A.; Burger, B.; Davis, G.; Day, P.; Dowell, C. D.; Duband, L.; Filippini, J. P.; Fliescher, S.; Golwala, S. R.; Grayson, J.; Halpern, M.; Hasselfield, M.; Hilton, G.; Hristov, V. V.; Hui, H.; Irwin, K.; Kernasovskiy, S.; Kovac, J. M.; Kuo, C. L.; Leitch, E.; Lueker, M.; Megerian, K.; Moncelsi, L.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nguyen, H. T.; Ogburn, R. W.; Pryke, C. L.; Reintsema, C.; Ruhl, J. E.; Runyan, M. C.; Schwarz, R.; Sheehy, C. D.; Staniszewski, Z.; Sudiwala, R.; Teply, G.; Tolan, J. E.; Turner, A. D.; Tucker, R. S.; Vieregg, A.; Wiebe, D. V.; Wilson, P.; Wong, C. L.; Wu, W. L. K.; Yoon, K. W.

    2012-09-01

    Between the BICEP2 and Keck Array experiments, we have deployed over 1500 dual polarized antenna coupled bolometers to map the Cosmic Microwave Background’s polarization. We have been able to rapidly deploy these detectors because they are completely planar with an integrated phased-array antenna. Through our experience in these experiments, we have learned of several challenges with this technology- specifically the beam synthesis in the antenna- and in this paper we report on how we have modified our designs to mitigate these challenges. In particular, we discus differential steering errors between the polarization pairs’ beam centroids due to microstrip cross talk and gradients of penetration depth in the niobium thin films of our millimeter wave circuits. We also discuss how we have suppressed side lobe response with a Gaussian taper of our antenna illumination pattern. These improvements will be used in Spider, Polar-1, and this season’s retrofit of Keck Array.

  11. Improved calibration technique of the infrared imaging bolometer using ultraviolet light-emitting diodes.

    PubMed

    Drapiko, E; Peterson, B; Alekseev, A; Seo, D C

    2010-10-01

    The technique used until recently utilizing the Ne-He laser for imaging bolometer foils calibration [B. J. Peterson et al., J. Plasma Fusion Res. 2, S1018 (2007)] has showed several issues. The method was based on irradiation of 1 cm spaced set of points on a foil by the laser beam moved by set of mirrors. Issues were the nonuniformity of laser power due to the vacuum window transmission nonuniformity and high reflection coefficient for the laser. Also, due to the limited infrared (IR) window size, it was very time consuming. The new methodology uses a compact ultraviolet (uv) light-emitting diodes installed inside the vacuum chamber in a fixed position and the foil itself will be moved in the XY directions by two vacuum feedthroughs. These will help to avoid the above mentioned issues due to lack of a vacuum window, fixed emitters, higher uv power absorption, and a fixed IR camera position. PMID:21033981

  12. Minimum Fisher regularization of image reconstruction for infrared imaging bolometer on HL-2A.

    PubMed

    Gao, J M; Liu, Y; Li, W; Lu, J; Dong, Y B; Xia, Z W; Yi, P; Yang, Q W

    2013-09-01

    An infrared imaging bolometer diagnostic has been developed recently for the HL-2A tokamak to measure the temporal and spatial distribution of plasma radiation. The three-dimensional tomography, reduced to a two-dimensional problem by the assumption of plasma radiation toroidal symmetry, has been performed. A three-dimensional geometry matrix is calculated with the one-dimensional pencil beam approximation. The solid angles viewed by the detector elements are taken into account in defining the chord brightness. And the local plasma emission is obtained by inverting the measured brightness with the minimum Fisher regularization method. A typical HL-2A plasma radiation model was chosen to optimize a regularization parameter on the criterion of generalized cross validation. Finally, this method was applied to HL-2A experiments, demonstrating the plasma radiated power density distribution in limiter and divertor discharges. PMID:24089825

  13. Nondestructive test of brazed cooling tubes of prototype bolometer camera housing using active infrared thermography.

    PubMed

    Tahiliani, Kumudni; Pandya, Santosh P; Pandya, Shwetang; Jha, Ratneshwar; Govindarajan, J

    2011-01-01

    The active infrared thermography technique is used for assessing the brazing quality of an actively cooled bolometer camera housing developed for steady state superconducting tokamak. The housing is a circular pipe, which has circular tubes vacuum brazed on the periphery. A unique method was adopted to monitor the temperature distribution on the internal surface of the pipe. A stainless steel mirror was placed inside the pipe and the reflected IR radiations were viewed using an IR camera. The heat stimulus was given by passing hot water through the tubes and the temperature distribution was monitored during the transient phase. The thermographs showed a significant nonuniformity in the brazing with a contact area of around 51%. The thermography results were compared with the x-ray radiographs and a good match between the two was observed. Benefits of thermography over x-ray radiography testing are emphasized. PMID:21280850

  14. Reliability issues for a bolometer detector for ITER at high operating temperatures.

    PubMed

    Meister, H; Kannamüller, M; Koll, J; Pathak, A; Penzel, F; Trautmann, T; Detemple, P; Schmitt, S; Langer, H

    2012-10-01

    The first detector prototypes for the ITER bolometer diagnostic featuring a 12.5 μm thick Pt-absorber have been realized and characterized in laboratory tests. The results show linear dependencies of the calibration parameters and are in line with measurements of prototypes with thinner absorbers. However, thermal cycling tests up to 450 °C of the prototypes with thick absorbers demonstrated that their reliability at these elevated operating temperatures is not yet sufficient. Profilometer measurements showed a deflection of the membrane hinting to stresses due to the deposition processes of the absorber. Finite element analysis (FEA) managed to reproduce the deflection and identified the highest stresses in the membrane in the region around the corners of the absorber. FEA was further used to identify changes in the geometry of the absorber with a positive impact on the intrinsic stresses of the membrane. However, further improvements are still necessary. PMID:23126898

  15. Superconductive hot-electron-bolometer mixer receiver for 800-GHz operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, J.; Blundell, R.; Tong, C.-Y. E.; Papa, D. C.; Hunter, T. R.; Paine, S. N.; Patt, F.; Gol'Tsman, G.; Cherednichenko, S.; Voronov, B.; Gershenzon, E.

    2000-04-01

    In this paper, we describe a superconductive hot-electron-bolometer mixer receiver designed to operate in the partially transmissive 350-μm atmospheric window. The receiver employs an NbN thin-film microbridge as the mixer element, in which the main cooling mechanism of the hot electrons is through electron-phonon interaction. At a local-oscillator frequency of 808 GHz, the measured double-sideband receiver noise temperature is Trx=970 K, across a 1-GHz intermediate-frequency bandwidth centered at 1.8 GHz. We have measured the linearity of the receiver and the amount of local-oscillator power incident on the mixer for optimal operation, which is PLO ≈ 1 microwatt. This receiver was used in making observations as a facility instrument at the Heinrich Hertz Telescope, Mt. Graham, AZ, during the 1998-1999 winter observing season.

  16. Active local oscillator power stabilization for a hot electron bolometer heterodyne receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayton, D. J.; Gao, J. R.; Kooi, J. W.; Ren, Y.; Zhang, W.; de Lange, G.

    2012-09-01

    We report on the application of a new technique for actively stabilizing the power of a far infrared gas laser as the local oscillator (LO) in a superconducting hot electron bolometer (HEB) heterodyne receiver system at 2.5 THz. The technique utilizes PID feedback control of the local oscillator intensity by means of a voice-coil based swing arm actuator placed in the beam path. The HEB itself is used as a direct detector to measure incident LO power whilst simultaneously continuing to function as heterodyne mixer. Results presented here demonstrate a factor of 50 improvement in the measured total power and spectroscopic Allan variance time. Allan times of 30 seconds and 25 seconds respectively are shown for large and small area HEB's with a measured effective noise fluctuation bandwidth of 12 MHz. The technique is versatile and can be applied to any LO source and at any LO frequency.

  17. YBa2Cu3O7 thin films on nanocrystalline diamond films for HTSC bolometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cui, G.; Beetz, C. P., Jr.; Boerstler, R.; Steinbeck, J.

    1993-01-01

    Superconducting YBa2Cu3O(7-x) films on nanocrystalline diamond thin films have been fabricated. A composite buffer layer system consisting of diamond/Si3N4/YSZ/YBCO was explored for this purpose. The as-deposited YBCO films were superconducting with Tc of about 84 K and a relatively narrow transition width of about 8 K. SEM cross sections of the films showed very sharp interfaces between diamond/Si3N4 and between Si3N4/YSZ. The deposited YBCO film had a surface roughness of about 1000 A, which is suitable for high-temperature superconductive (HTSC) bolometer fabrication. It was also found that preannealing of the nanocrystalline diamond thin films at high temperature was very important for obtaining high-quality YBCO films.

  18. High T(sub c) Superconducting Bolometer on Chemically Etched 7 Micrometer Thick Sapphire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakew, B.; Brasunas, J. C.; Pique, A.; Fettig, R.; Mott, B.; Babu, S.; Cushman, G. M.

    1997-01-01

    A transition-edge IR detector, using a YBa2Cu3O(7-x) (YBCO) thin film deposited on a chemically etched, 7 micrometer thick sapphire substrate has been built. To our knowledge it is the first such high T(sub c) superconducting (HTS) bolometer on chemically thinned sapphire. The peak optical detectivity obtained is l.2 x 10(exp 10) cmHz(sup 1/2)/W near 4Hz. Result shows that it is possible to obtain high detectivity with thin films on etched sapphire with no processing after the deposition of the YBCO film. We discuss the etching process and its potential for micro-machining sapphire and fabricating 2-dimensional detector arrays with suspended sapphire membranes. A 30 micrometer thick layer of gold black provided IR absorption. Comparison is made with the current state of the art on silicon substrates.

  19. Scintillator efficiency study with MeV x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Stuart; Brown, Kristina; Curtis, Alden; Lutz, Stephen S.; Howe, Russell; Malone, Robert; Mitchell, Stephen; Danielson, Jeremy; Haines, Todd; Kwiatkowski, Kris

    2014-09-01

    We have investigated scintillator efficiency for MeV radiographic imaging. This paper discusses the modeled detection efficiency and measured brightness of a number of scintillator materials. An optical imaging camera records images of scintillator emission excited by a pulsed x-ray machine. The efficiency of various thicknesses of monolithic LYSO:Ce (cerium-doped lutetium yttrium orthosilicate) are being studied to understand brightness and resolution trade-offs compared with a range of micro-columnar CsI:Tl (thallium-doped cesium iodide) scintillator screens. The micro-columnar scintillator structure apparently provides an optical gain mechanism that results in brighter signals from thinner samples. The trade-offs for brightness versus resolution in monolithic scintillators is straightforward. For higher-energy x-rays, thicker materials generally produce brighter signal due to x-ray absorption and the optical emission properties of the material. However, as scintillator thickness is increased, detector blur begins to dominate imaging system resolution due to the volume image generated in the scintillator thickness and the depth of field of the imaging system. We employ a telecentric optical relay lens to image the scintillator onto a recording CCD camera. The telecentric lens helps provide sharp focus through thicker-volume emitting scintillators. Stray light from scintillator emission can also affect the image scene contrast. We have applied an optical light scatter model to the imaging system to minimize scatter sources and maximize scene contrasts.

  20. Non-Carbon Dyes For Platic Scintillators- Report

    SciTech Connect

    Teprovich, J.; Colon-Mercado, H.; Gaillard, J.; Sexton, L.; Washington, A.; Ward, P.; Velten, J.

    2015-10-19

    Scintillation based detectors are desirable for many radiation detection applications (portal and border monitoring, safeguards verification, contamination detection and monitoring). The development of next generation scintillators will require improved detection sensitivity for weak gamma ray sources, and fast and thermal neutron quantification. Radiation detection of gamma and neutron sources can be accomplished with organic scintillators, however, the single crystals are difficult to grow for large area detectors and subject to cracking. Alternatives to single crystal organic scintillators are plastic scintillators (PS) which offer the ability to be shaped and scaled up to produce large sized detectors. PS is also more robust than the typical organic scintillator and are ideally suited for deployment in harsh real-world environments. PS contain a mixture of dyes to down-convert incident radiation into visible light that can be detected by a PMT. This project will evaluate the potential use of nano-carbon dyes in plastic scintillators.

  1. Hot electron bolometer for detection of fast terahertz pulses from optical parametric oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palka, Norbert; Zagrajek, Przemyslaw; Czerwinski, Adam; Trzcinski, Tomasz; Rurka, Elzbieta; Szustakowski, Mieczyslaw; Sypek, Maciej

    2012-10-01

    Detection of nanosecond pulses by fast and sensitive Hot Electron Bolometer (HEB) is reported. Pulses were generated by an Optical Parametric Oscillator (OPO)-based source. The laser can be tuned in the range 0.7-2.5 THz; its repetition rate equals to 53Hz, duration of the pulse is about 10-20ns, energy is 10nJ and spectral width 50GHz. HEB operates at temperature of about 8.8K in a cryogenic refrigeration system. A sensitive element is a bridge from a 4-mm thick NbN film integrated with a planar logarithmic spiral antenna on a high-resistive silicon. HEB works in 0.3-3THz range with NEP ~3x10-13 W/Hz1/2 and dynamic range 0.1 uW. Thanks to exploitation of hot electrons in superconducting state, the detector is very fast with minimum response time equals to 50ps. The THz radiation is focused with a silicon lens, and then is coupled to a sensitive bolometer using the planar antenna. THz radiation from the OPO, through a set of mirrors and attenuators, was coupled to the detector. The distance between the source and detector was about 3m. Full Width at Half Maximum of the recorded pulses was about 20 ns. Moreover, we measured linearity of the detector in the range 0.7- 2.0 THz by rotation of the polarizer axis. The pulses were averaged and integrated for better stability. We obtained a good similarity to the theoretical curve of the polarizer.

  2. Calculations and measurements of the scintillator-to-water stopping power ratio of liquid scintillators for use in proton radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ingram, W. Scott; Robertson, Daniel; Beddar, Sam

    2015-01-01

    Liquid scintillators are a promising detector for high-resolution three-dimensional proton therapy dosimetry. Because the scintillator comprises both the active volume of the detector and the phantom material, an ideal scintillator will exhibit water equivalence in its radiological properties. One of the most fundamental of these is the scintillator’s stopping power. The objective of this study was to compare calculations and measurements of scintillator-to-water stopping power ratios to evaluate the suitability of the liquid scintillators BC-531 and OptiPhase HiSafe 3 for proton dosimetry. We also measured the relative scintillation output of the two scintillators. Both calculations and measurements show that the linear stopping power of OptiPhase is significantly closer to water than that of BC-531. BC-531 has a somewhat higher scintillation output. OptiPhase can be mixed with water at high concentrations, which further improves its scintillator-to-water stopping power ratio. However, this causes the solution to become cloudy, which has a negative impact on the scintillation output and spatial resolution of the detector. OptiPhase is preferred over BC-531 for proton dosimetry because its density and scintillator-to-water stopping power ratio are more water equivalent. PMID:25705066

  3. Neutron spectroscopy with scintillation detectors using wavelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartman, Jessica

    The purpose of this research was to study neutron spectroscopy using the EJ-299-33A plastic scintillator. This scintillator material provided a novel means of detection for fast neutrons, without the disadvantages of traditional liquid scintillation materials. EJ-299-33A provided a more durable option to these materials, making it less likely to be damaged during handling. Unlike liquid scintillators, this plastic scintillator was manufactured from a non-toxic material, making it safer to use, as well as easier to design detectors. The material was also manufactured with inherent pulse shape discrimination abilities, making it suitable for use in neutron detection. The neutron spectral unfolding technique was developed in two stages. Initial detector response function modeling was carried out through the use of the MCNPX Monte Carlo code. The response functions were developed for a monoenergetic neutron flux. Wavelets were then applied to smooth the response function. The spectral unfolding technique was applied through polynomial fitting and optimization techniques in MATLAB. Verification of the unfolding technique was carried out through the use of experimentally determined response functions. These were measured on the neutron source based on the Van de Graff accelerator at the University of Kentucky. This machine provided a range of monoenergetic neutron beams between 0.1 MeV and 24 MeV, making it possible to measure the set of response functions of the EJ-299-33A plastic scintillator detector to neutrons of specific energies. The response of a plutonium-beryllium (PuBe) source was measured using the source available at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. The neutron spectrum reconstruction was carried out using the experimentally measured response functions. Experimental data was collected in the list mode of the waveform digitizer. Post processing of this data focused on the pulse shape discrimination analysis of the recorded response functions to remove the

  4. Nonproportionality of Scintillator Detectors: Theory and Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, Stephen; Cherepy, Nerine; Hull, Giulia; Valentine, John; Moses, William; Choong, Woon-Seng

    2009-08-17

    On the basis of nonproportionality data obtained for several scintillators, we have developed a theory to describe the carrier dynamics to fit the light yield versus electron energy. The theory of Onsager was adapted to explain how the carriers form excitons or sequentially arrive at the activators to promote the ion to an excited state, and the theory of Birks was employed to allow for exciton-exciton annihilation. We then developed a second theory to deduce the degradation in resolution that results from nonproportionality by evoking Landau fluctuations, which are essentially variations in the deposited energy density that occur as the high energy electron travels along its trajectory. In general there is good agreement with the data, in terms of fitting the nonproportionality curves and reproducing the literature values of nonproportionality's contribution to the scintillator resolution. With the resurgence of interest in developing scintillator detectors that have good energy resolution, an improved understanding of nonproportionality has become a crucial matter since it presents the fundamental limit to the achievable resolution. In order to hasten an improved understanding of scintillator nonproportionality, we have constructed an instrument referred to as SLYNCI (Scintillator Light Yield Nonproportionality Compton Instrument). This is a second-generation instrument to the original device developed by Valentine and coworkers, wherein several new principles of operation have served to increase the data rate by an order of magnitude as discussed in detail in References. In the present article, the focus is on a theory to describe the measured electron response, which is the light yield as a function of the electron energy. To do this, we account for transport of carriers and excitons, in terms of how they transfer their energy to the activators with competition from nonradiative decay pathways. This work builds on the original work of Murray and coworkers, and

  5. Real-time Scintillation Monitoring in Alaska from a Longitudinal Chain of ASTRA's SM-211 GPS TEC and Scintillation Receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowley, G.; Azeem, S. I.; Reynolds, A.; Santana, J.; Hampton, D. L.

    2013-12-01

    Amplitude and phase scintillation can cause serious difficulties for GPS receivers. Intense scintillation can cause loss of lock. High latitude studies generally show that phase scintillation can be severe, but the amplitude scintillation tends to be small. The reason for this is not yet understood. Furthermore, the actual causes of the ionospheric irregularities that produce high latitude scintillation are not well understood. While the gradient drift instability is thought to be important in the F-region, there may be other structures present in either the E- or F-regions. The role of particle precipitation is also not well understood. Four of ASTRA's CASES GPS receivers were deployed in Alaska to demonstrate our ability to map scintillation in realtime, to provide space weather services to GPS users, and to initiate a detailed investigation of these effects. These dual-frequency GPS receivers measure total electron content (TEC) and scintillation. The scintillation monitors were deployed in a longitudinal chain at sites in Kaktovic, Fort Yukon, Poker Flat, and Gakona. Scintillation statistics show phase scintillations to be largest at Kaktovic and smallest at Gakona. We present GPS phase scintillation and auroral emission results from the Alaska chain to characterize the correspondence between scintillation and auroral features, and to investigate the role of high latitude auroral features in driving the phase scintillations. We will also present data showing how phase scintillation can cause other GPS receivers to lose lock. The data and results are particularly valuable because they illustrate some of the challenges of using GPS systems for positioning and navigation in an auroral region like Alaska. These challenges for snowplough drivers were recently highlighted, along with the CASES SM-211 space weather monitor, in a special video in which ASTRA and three other small businesses were presented with an entrepreneurial award from William Shatner (http://youtu.be/bIVKEQH_YPk).

  6. Terahertz Real-Time Imaging Uncooled Arrays Based on Antenna-Coupled Bolometers or FET Developed at CEA-Leti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simoens, François; Meilhan, Jérôme; Nicolas, Jean-Alain

    2015-10-01

    Sensitive and large-format terahertz focal plane arrays (FPAs) integrated in compact and hand-held cameras that deliver real-time terahertz (THz) imaging are required for many application fields, such as non-destructive testing (NDT), security, quality control of food, and agricultural products industry. Two technologies of uncooled THz arrays that are being studied at CEA-Leti, i.e., bolometer and complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) field effect transistors (FET), are able to meet these requirements. This paper reminds the followed technological approaches and focuses on the latest modeling and performance analysis. The capabilities of application of these arrays to NDT and security are then demonstrated with experimental tests. In particular, high technological maturity of the THz bolometer camera is illustrated with fast scanning of large field of view of opaque scenes achieved in a complete body scanner prototype.

  7. Divalent europium doped and un-doped calcium iodide scintillators: Scintillator characterization and single crystal growth

    SciTech Connect

    Boatner, L. A.; Ramey, J. O.; Kolopus, J. A.; Neal, John S.

    2015-02-21

    Initially, the alkaline-earth scintillator, CaI2:Eu2+, was discovered around 1964 by Hofstadter, Odell, and Schmidt. Serious practical problems quickly arose, however, that were associated with the growth of large monolithic single crystals of this material due to its lamellar, mica-like structure. As a result of its theoretically higher light yield, CaI2:Eu2+ has the potential to exceed the excellent scintillation performance of SrI2:Eu2+. In fact, theoretical predictions for the light yield of CaI2:Eu2+ scintillators suggested that an energy resolution approaching 2% at 662 keV could be achievable. Like the early SrI2:Eu2+ scintillator, the performance of CaI2:Eu2+ scintillators has traditionally suffered due, at least in part, to outdated materials synthesis, component stoichiometry/purity, and single-crystal-growth techniques. Based on our recent work on SrI2:Eu2+ scintillators in single-crystal form, we have developed new techniques that are applied here to CaI2:Eu2+ and pure CaI2 with the goal of growing large un-cracked crystals and, potentially, realizing the theoretically predicted performance of the CaI2:Eu2+ form of this material. Calcium iodide does not adhere to modern glassy carbon Bridgman crucibles - so there should be no differential thermal-contraction-induced crystal/crucible stresses on cooling that would result in crystal cracking of the lamellar structure of CaI2. Here we apply glassy carbon crucible Bridgman growth, high-purity growth-charge compounds, our molten salt processing/filtration technique, and extended vacuum-melt-pumping methods to the growth of both CaI2:Eu2+ and un-doped CaI2. Moreover, large scintillating single crystals were obtained, and detailed characterization studies of the

  8. Divalent europium doped and un-doped calcium iodide scintillators: Scintillator characterization and single crystal growth

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Boatner, L. A.; Ramey, J. O.; Kolopus, J. A.; Neal, John S.

    2015-02-21

    Initially, the alkaline-earth scintillator, CaI2:Eu2+, was discovered around 1964 by Hofstadter, Odell, and Schmidt. Serious practical problems quickly arose, however, that were associated with the growth of large monolithic single crystals of this material due to its lamellar, mica-like structure. As a result of its theoretically higher light yield, CaI2:Eu2+ has the potential to exceed the excellent scintillation performance of SrI2:Eu2+. In fact, theoretical predictions for the light yield of CaI2:Eu2+ scintillators suggested that an energy resolution approaching 2% at 662 keV could be achievable. Like the early SrI2:Eu2+ scintillator, the performance of CaI2:Eu2+ scintillators has traditionally suffered due, atmore » least in part, to outdated materials synthesis, component stoichiometry/purity, and single-crystal-growth techniques. Based on our recent work on SrI2:Eu2+ scintillators in single-crystal form, we have developed new techniques that are applied here to CaI2:Eu2+ and pure CaI2 with the goal of growing large un-cracked crystals and, potentially, realizing the theoretically predicted performance of the CaI2:Eu2+ form of this material. Calcium iodide does not adhere to modern glassy carbon Bridgman crucibles - so there should be no differential thermal-contraction-induced crystal/crucible stresses on cooling that would result in crystal cracking of the lamellar structure of CaI2. Here we apply glassy carbon crucible Bridgman growth, high-purity growth-charge compounds, our molten salt processing/filtration technique, and extended vacuum-melt-pumping methods to the growth of both CaI2:Eu2+ and un-doped CaI2. Moreover, large scintillating single crystals were obtained, and detailed characterization studies of the scintillation properties of CaI2:Eu2+ and pure CaI2 single crystals are presented that include studies of the effects of plastic deformation of the crystals on the scintillator performance.« less

  9. Reflectance of polytetrafluoroethylene for xenon scintillation light

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, C.; Pinto da Cunha, J.; Pereira, A.; Chepel, V.; Lopes, M. I.; Solovov, V.; Neves, F.

    2010-03-15

    Gaseous and liquid xenon particle detectors are being used in a number of applications including dark matter search and neutrino-less double beta decay experiments. Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) is often used in these detectors both as electrical insulator and as a light reflector to improve the efficiency of detection of scintillation photons. However, xenon emits in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) wavelength region ({lambda}{approx_equal}175 nm) where the reflecting properties of PTFE are not sufficiently known. In this work, we report on measurements of PTFE reflectance, including its angular distribution, for the xenon scintillation light. Various samples of PTFE, manufactured by different processes (extruded, expanded, skived, and pressed) have been studied. The data were interpreted with a physical model comprising both specular and diffuse reflections. The reflectance obtained for these samples ranges from about 47% to 66% for VUV light. Other fluoropolymers, namely, ethylene tetrafluoroethylene (ETFE), fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP), and perfluoro-alkoxyalkane (PFA) were also measured.

  10. Scintillating 99Tc Selective Ion Exchange Resins

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell Greenhalgh; Richard D. Tillotson

    2012-07-01

    Scintillating technetium (99Tc) selective ion exchange resins have been developed and evaluated for equilibrium capacities and detection efficiencies. These resins can be utilized for the in-situ concentration and detection of low levels of pertechnetate anions (99TcO4-) in natural waters. Three different polystyrene type resin support materials were impregnated with varying amounts of tricaprylmethylammonium chloride (Aliquat 336) extractant, several different scintillating fluors and wavelength shifters. The prepared resins were contacted batch-wise to equilibrium over a wide range of 99TcO4- concentrations in natural water. The measured capacities were used to develop Langmuir adsorption isotherms for each resin. 99Tc detection efficiencies were determined and up to 71.4 ± 2.6% was achieved with some resins. The results demonstrate that a low level detection limit for 99TcO4- in natural waters can be realized.

  11. Neutron detection with single crystal organic scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Zaitseva, N; Newby, J; Hamel, S; Carman, L; Faust, M; Lordi, V; Cherepy, N; Stoeffl, W; Payne, S

    2009-07-15

    Detection of high-energy neutrons in the presence of gamma radiation background utilizes pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) phenomena in organics studied previously only with limited number of materials, mostly liquid scintillators and single crystal stilbene. The current paper presents the results obtained with broader varieties of luminescent organic single crystals. The studies involve experimental tools of crystal growth and material characterization in combination with the advanced computer modeling, with the final goal of better understanding the relevance between the nature of the organic materials and their PSD properties. Special consideration is given to the factors that may diminish or even completely obscure the PSD properties in scintillating crystals. Among such factors are molecular and crystallographic structures that determine exchange coupling and exciton mobility in organic materials and the impurity effect discussed on the examples of trans-stilbene, bibenzyl, 9,10-diphenylanthracene and diphenylacetylene.

  12. Effects of light on scintillating fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Manho; Margulies, Seymour

    1993-10-01

    Tracking detectors based on scintillating-fiber technology are being developed for the Solenoidal Detector Collaboration at the Superconducting Super Collider and for the D0 collaboration at Fermilab. An important part of the work is to insure that the fibers will not be damaged by environmental conditions in the course of detector construction. This paper presents preliminary results of the effects of ambient fluorescent light on scintillating fibers containing 3-hydroxyflavone (3HF) waveshifter. Six fiber types having 3HF concentrations between 100 ppm and 6000 ppm were studied; both single-clad fibers from Bicron and Kuraray and a new Kuraray multiclad fiber were included. A blue fiber containing no 3HF was used to provide a comparison.

  13. Development of High-Resolution Scintillator Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Larry A. Franks; Warnick J. Kernan

    2007-09-01

    Mercuric iodide (HgI2) is a well known material for the direct detection of gamma-rays; however, the largest volume achievable is limited by the thickness of the detector which needs to be a small fraction of the average trapping length for electrons. We report results of using HgI2 crystals to fabricate photocells used in the readout of scintillators. The optical spectral response and efficiency of these photocells were measured and will be reported. Nuclear response from an HgI2 photocell that was optically matched to a cerium-activated scintillator is presented and discussed. Further improvements can be expected by optimizing the transparent contact technology.

  14. Scintillator phase of the SNO+ experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozza, V.; SNO+ Collaboration

    2012-07-01

    The SNO+ experiment is the follow up of the SNO experiment, replacing the heavy water volume with about 780 tons of liquid scintillator (LAB) in order to shift the sensitive threshold to lower energy range. The 6000 m.w.e. natural rock shielding, and the use of ultra-clean materials makes the detector suitable for the detection of pep and CNO solar neutrinos, geo-neutrinos, reactor neutrinos and the possible observation of neutrinos from supernovae. Complementing this program, SNO+ will also search for 150Nd (5.6% abundance) neutrinoless double beta decay, loading the liquid scintillator with 0.1% of natural Neodymium. After a review of the general SNO+ setup, the physics of the solar neutrino phase will be presented.

  15. Neutron detection with single crystal organic scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaitseva, Natalia P.; Newby, Jason; Hamel, Sebastien; Carman, Leslie; Faust, Michelle; Lordi, Vincenzo; Cherepy, Nerine J.; Stoeffl, Wolfgang; Payne, Stephen A.

    2009-08-01

    Detection of high-energy neutrons in the presence of gamma radiation background utilizes pulse-shape discrimination (PSD) phenomena in organics studied previously only with limited number of materials, mostly liquid scintillators and single crystal stilbene. The current paper presents the results obtained with broader varieties of luminescent organic single crystals. The studies involve experimental tools of crystal growth and material characterization in combination with the advanced computer modeling, with the final goal of better understanding the relevance between the nature of the organic materials and their PSD properties. Special consideration is given to the factors that may diminish or even completely obscure the PSD properties in scintillating crystals. Among such factors are molecular and crystallographic structures that determine exchange coupling and exciton mobility in organic materials and the impurity effect discussed on the examples of trans-stilbene, bibenzyl, 9,10- diphenylanthracene and diphenylacetylene.

  16. Plastic fiber scintillator response to fast neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danly, C. R.; Sjue, S.; Wilde, C. H.; Merrill, F. E.; Haight, R. C.

    2014-11-01

    The Neutron Imaging System at NIF uses an array of plastic scintillator fibers in conjunction with a time-gated imaging system to form an image of the neutron emission from the imploded capsule. By gating on neutrons that have scattered from the 14.1 MeV DT energy to lower energy ranges, an image of the dense, cold fuel around the hotspot is also obtained. An unmoderated spallation neutron beamline at the Weapons Neutron Research facility at Los Alamos was used in conjunction with a time-gated imaging system to measure the yield of a scintillating fiber array over several energy bands ranging from 1 to 15 MeV. The results and comparison to simulation are presented.

  17. Codoped direct-gap semiconductor scintillators

    DOEpatents

    Derenzo, Stephen Edward; Bourret-Courchesne, Edith; Weber, Marvin J.; Klintenberg, Mattias K.

    2008-07-29

    Fast, bright inorganic scintillators at room temperature are based on radiative electron-hole recombination in direct-gap semiconductors, e.g. CdS and ZnO. The direct-gap semiconductor is codoped with two different impurity atoms to convert the semiconductor to a fast, high luminosity scintillator. The codopant scheme is based on dopant band to dopant trap recombination. One dopant provides a significant concentration of carriers of one type (electrons or holes) and the other dopant traps carriers of the other type. Examples include CdS:In,Te; CdS:In,Ag; CdS:In,Na; ZnO:Ga,P; ZnO:Ga,N; ZnO:Ga,S; and GaN:Ge,Mg.

  18. Codoped direct-gap semiconductor scintillators

    DOEpatents

    Derenzo, Stephen E.; Bourret-Courchesne, Edith; Weber, Marvin J.; Klintenberg, Mattias K.

    2006-05-23

    Fast, bright inorganic scintillators at room temperature are based on radiative electron-hole recombination in direct-gap semiconductors, e.g. CdS and ZnO. The direct-gap semiconductor is codoped with two different impurity atoms to convert the semiconductor to a fast, high luminosity scintillator. The codopant scheme is based on dopant band to dopant trap recombination. One dopant provides a significant concentration of carriers of one type (electrons or holes) and the other dopant traps carriers of the other type. Examples include CdS:In,Te; CdS:In,Ag; CdS:In,Na; ZnO:Ga,P; ZnO:Ga,N; ZnO:Ga,S; and GaN:Ge,Mg.

  19. Reflectance of polytetrafluoroethylene for xenon scintillation light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, C.; Pinto da Cunha, J.; Pereira, A.; Chepel, V.; Lopes, M. I.; Solovov, V.; Neves, F.

    2010-03-01

    Gaseous and liquid xenon particle detectors are being used in a number of applications including dark matter search and neutrino-less double beta decay experiments. Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) is often used in these detectors both as electrical insulator and as a light reflector to improve the efficiency of detection of scintillation photons. However, xenon emits in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) wavelength region (λ ≃175 nm) where the reflecting properties of PTFE are not sufficiently known. In this work, we report on measurements of PTFE reflectance, including its angular distribution, for the xenon scintillation light. Various samples of PTFE, manufactured by different processes (extruded, expanded, skived, and pressed) have been studied. The data were interpreted with a physical model comprising both specular and diffuse reflections. The reflectance obtained for these samples ranges from about 47% to 66% for VUV light. Other fluoropolymers, namely, ethylene tetrafluoroethylene (ETFE), fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP), and perfluoro-alkoxyalkane (PFA) were also measured.

  20. Plastic fiber scintillator response to fast neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Danly, C. R.; Sjue, S.; Wilde, C. H.; Merrill, F. E.; Haight, R. C.

    2014-11-15

    The Neutron Imaging System at NIF uses an array of plastic scintillator fibers in conjunction with a time-gated imaging system to form an image of the neutron emission from the imploded capsule. By gating on neutrons that have scattered from the 14.1 MeV DT energy to lower energy ranges, an image of the dense, cold fuel around the hotspot is also obtained. An unmoderated spallation neutron beamline at the Weapons Neutron Research facility at Los Alamos was used in conjunction with a time-gated imaging system to measure the yield of a scintillating fiber array over several energy bands ranging from 1 to 15 MeV. The results and comparison to simulation are presented.

  1. Transparent Ceramic Scintillator Fabrication, Properties and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Cherepy, N J; Kuntz, J D; Roberts, J J; Hurst, T A; Drury, O B; Sanner, R D; Tillotson, T M; Payne, S A

    2008-08-24

    Transparent ceramics offer an alternative to single crystals for scintillator applications such as gamma ray spectroscopy and radiography. We have developed a versatile, scaleable fabrication method, using Flame Spray Pyrolysis (FSP) to produce feedstock which is readily converted into phase-pure transparent ceramics. We measure integral light yields in excess of 80,000 Ph/MeV with Cerium-doped Garnets, and excellent optical quality. Avalanche photodiode readout of Garnets provides resolution near 6%. For radiography applications, Lutetium Oxide offers a high performance metric and is formable by ceramics processing. Scatter in transparent ceramics due to secondary phases is the principal limitation to optical quality, and afterglow issues that affect the scintillation performance are presently being addressed.

  2. Nanophosphor composite scintillators comprising a polymer matrix

    DOEpatents

    Muenchausen, Ross Edward; Mckigney, Edward Allen; Gilbertson, Robert David

    2010-11-16

    An improved nanophosphor composite comprises surface modified nanophosphor particles in a solid matrix. The nanophosphor particle surface is modified with an organic ligand, or by covalently bonding a polymeric or polymeric precursor material. The surface modified nanophosphor particle is essentially charge neutral, thereby preventing agglomeration of the nanophosphor particles during formation of the composite material. The improved nanophosphor composite may be used in any conventional scintillator application, including in a radiation detector.

  3. Time resolution of a scintillating fiber detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horikawa, S.; Toeda, T.; Daito, I.; Doushita, N.; Hasegawa, T.; Horikawa, N.; Iwata, T.; Kibe, Y.; Matsuda, T.; Miyachi, Y.; Noboriguchi, K.; Takabayashi, N.; Tohyama, T.; Wakai, A.

    1999-07-01

    The performance of scintillating fiber detectors with 2 m long light guides was investigated for COMPASS experiment, using a 450 MeV/ c electron beam.Prototypes consisting of 0.5 mm diameter fibers (Kuraray SCSF-38 single-cladding) with the position-sensitive photomultipliers H6568 (Hamamatsu) were constructed for the test. The time resolution of σ˜430 ps was obtained with about 10 photoelectrons for the prototype of 10-layers structure.

  4. Sorohalide scintillators, phosphors, and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Pin; Deng, Haoran; Doty, F. Patrick; Zhou, Xiaowang

    2016-05-10

    The present invention relates to sorohalide compounds having formula A.sub.3B.sub.2X.sub.9, where A is an alkali metal, B is a rare earth metal, and X is a halogen. Optionally, the sorohalide includes a dopant D. Such undoped and doped sorohalides are useful as scintillation materials or phosphors for any number of uses, including for radiation detectors, solid-state light sources, gamma-ray spectroscopy, medical imaging, and drilling applications.

  5. Simulating Silicon Photomultiplier Response to Scintillation Light

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Abhinav K.; van Dam, Herman T.; Kupinski, Matthew A.; Clarkson, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The response of a Silicon Photomultiplier (SiPM) to optical signals is affected by many factors including photon-detection efficiency, recovery time, gain, optical crosstalk, afterpulsing, dark count, and detector dead time. Many of these parameters vary with overvoltage and temperature. When used to detect scintillation light, there is a complicated non-linear relationship between the incident light and the response of the SiPM. In this paper, we propose a combined discrete-time discrete-event Monte Carlo (MC) model to simulate SiPM response to scintillation light pulses. Our MC model accounts for all relevant aspects of the SiPM response, some of which were not accounted for in the previous models. We also derive and validate analytic expressions for the single-photoelectron response of the SiPM and the voltage drop across the quenching resistance in the SiPM microcell. These analytic expressions consider the effect of all the circuit elements in the SiPM and accurately simulate the time-variation in overvoltage across the microcells of the SiPM. Consequently, our MC model is able to incorporate the variation of the different SiPM parameters with varying overvoltage. The MC model is compared with measurements on SiPM-based scintillation detectors and with some cases for which the response is known a priori. The model is also used to study the variation in SiPM behavior with SiPM-circuit parameter variations and to predict the response of a SiPM-based detector to various scintillators. PMID:26236040

  6. Improved Neutron Scintillators Based on Nanomaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis Friesel, PhD

    2008-06-30

    The development work conducted in this SBIR has so far not supported the premise that using nano-particles in LiFZnS:Ag foils improves their transparency to 420 (or other frequency) light. This conclusion is based solely on the light absorption properties of LiFZnS foils fabricated from nano- and from micro-particles. Furthermore, even for the case of the Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} foils, the transmission of 420 nm light gained by using nano-particles all but disappears as the foil thickness is increased beyond about 0.2 mm, a practical scintillator thickness. This was not immediately apparent from the preliminary study since no foils thicker than about 0.04 mm were produced. Initially it was believed that the failure to see an improvement by using nano-particles for the LiFZnS foils was caused by the clumping of the particles in Toluene due to the polarity of the ZnS particles. However, we found, much to our surprise, that nano-particle ZnS alone in polystyrene, and in Epoxy, had worse light transmission properties than the micro-particle foils for equivalent thickness and density foils. The neutron detection measurements, while disappointing, are attributable to our inability to procure or fabricate Bulk Doped ZnS nanoparticles. The cause for the failure of nano-particles to improve the scintillation light, and hence improved neutron detection efficiency, is a fundamental one of light scattering within the scintillator. A consequence of PartTec's documentation of this is that several concepts for the fabrication of improved {sup 6}LiFZnS scintillators were formulated that will be the subject of a future SBIR submission.

  7. Characteristics of Yerevan High Transparency Scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Zorn, Carl; Asryan, Gegham; Egiyan, Kim; Tarverdyan, M.; Amaryan, Moscov; Amaryan, Moskov; Demirchyan, Raphael; Stepanyan, Stepan; Burkert, Volker; Sharabian, Youri

    1992-08-01

    Optical transmission, light output and time characteristics are given for long scintillator strips fabricated at the Yerevan Physics Institute using the extrusion method. It is shown that at 45% relative (to anthracene) light output, good transmission (2.5/2.9 m attenuation length with photomultiplier direct readout and 3/3.5 m attenuation length fiber readout) and time characteristics (average decay time 2.8 nsec) were obtained.

  8. Studies of NICADD Extruded Scintillator Strips

    SciTech Connect

    Dychkant, Alexandre; et al.

    2005-03-01

    About four hundred one meter long, 10 cm wide and 5 mm thick extruded scintillating strips were measured at four different points. The results of measurements strip responses to a radioactive source {sup 90}Sr are provided, and details of strip choice, preparation, and method of measurement are included. This work was essential for prototyping a tail catcher and muon tracker for a future international electron positron linear collider detector.

  9. CALDER - Neutrinoless double-beta decay identification in TeO2 bolometers with kinetic inductance detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vignati, M.; Bellini, F.; Cardani, L.; Casali, N.; Castellano, M. G.; Colantoni, I.; Coppolecchia, A.; Cosmelli, C.; Cruciani, A.; D’Addabbo, A.; Di Domizio, S.; Martinez, M.; Tomei, C.

    2016-05-01

    Next-generation experiments searching for neutrinoless double-beta decay must be sensitive to a Majorana neutrino mass as low as 10 meV. CUORE, an array of 988 TeO2 bolometers being commissioned at Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso in Italy, features an expected sensitivity of 50-130 meV at 90% C.L, that can be improved by removing the background from α radioactivity. This is possible if, in coincidence with the heat release in a bolometer, the Cherenkov light emitted by the β signal is detected. The amount of light detected is so far limited to only 100 eV, requiring low-noise cryogenic light detectors. The CALDER project (Cryogenic wide-Area Light Detectors with Excellent Resolution) aims at developing a small prototype experiment consisting of TeO2 bolometers coupled to new light detectors based on kinetic inductance detectors. The present R&D is focused on the light detectors. We present the latest results and the perspectives of the project.

  10. Fabrication of Cryogenic Manganite Bolometers to Measure the Total Energy at the LCLS Free Electron X-ray Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Drury, O B; Yong, G J; Kolagani, R M; Liang, Y; Gardner, C; Ables, E; Fong, K W; Bionta, R M; Friedrich, S

    2008-06-14

    We are developing cryogenic bolometers to measure the total energy of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) free electron X-ray laser that is currently being built at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. LCLS will produce ultrashort {approx}200 fs X-ray laser pulses with {approx}10{sup 13} photons at 0.8 keV up to {approx}10{sup 12} photons at 8 keV per pulse at a repeat interval as short as 8 ms, and will be accompanied by a halo of spontaneous undulator radiation. Our bolometer consists of a 375 {micro}m thick Si absorber and a Nd{sub 0.67}Sr{sub 0.33}MnO{sub 3} sensor operated at its metal-insulator transition. It will measure the total energy of each pulse with a precision of <1%, and is designed to meet the conflicting requirements of radiation hardness, sensitivity, linearity over a dynamic range of three orders of magnitude, and readout speed compatible with the LCLS pulse rate. Here we discuss bolometer design and fabrication, and the photoresponse of prototype devices to pulsed optical lasers.

  11. Inversion of infrared imaging bolometer based on one-dimensional and three-dimensional modeling in HL-2A.

    PubMed

    Gao, J M; Liu, Y; Li, W; Cui, Z Y; Dong, Y B; Lu, J; Xia, Z W; Yi, P; Yang, Q W

    2014-04-01

    Linear regularization has been applied to the HL-2A infrared imaging bolometer to reconstruct local plasma emission with one-dimensional (1D) and three-dimensional (3D) modeling under the assumption of toroidal symmetry. In the 3D modeling, a new method to calculate the detector point response function is introduced. This method can be adapted to an arbitrarily shaped pinhole. With the full 3D treatment of the detector geometry, up to 50% of the mean-squared error is reduced compared with the 1D modeling. This is attributed to the effects of finite detector size being taken into account in the 3D modeling. Meanwhile, the number of the bolometer pixels has been optimized to 20 × 20 by making a trade-off between the number of bolometer pixels and the sensitivity of the system. The plasma radiated power density distributions have been calculated as a demonstration using 1D modeling and 3D modeling, respectively. PMID:24784605

  12. Fabrication of large dual-polarized multichroic TES bolometer arrays for CMB measurements with the SPT-3G camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posada, C. M.; Ade, P. A. R.; Ahmed, Z.; Arnold, K.; Austermann, J. E.; Bender, A. N.; Bleem, L. E.; Benson, B. A.; Byrum, K.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Cho, H. M.; Ciocys, S. T.; Cliche, J. F.; Crawford, T. M.; Cukierman, A.; Czaplewski, D.; Ding, J.; Divan, R.; de Haan, T.; Dobbs, M. A.; Dutcher, D.; Everett, W.; Gilbert, A.; Halverson, N. W.; Harrington, N. L.; Hattori, K.; Henning, J. W.; Hilton, G. C.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Hubmayr, J.; Irwin, K. D.; Jeong, O.; Keisler, R.; Kubik, D.; Kuo, C. L.; Lee, A. T.; Leitch, E. M.; Lendinez, S.; Meyer, S. S.; Miller, C. S.; Montgomery, J.; Myers, M.; Nadolski, A.; Natoli, T.; Nguyen, H.; Novosad, V.; Padin, S.; Pan, Z.; Pearson, J.; Ruhl, J. E.; Saliwanchik, B. R.; Smecher, G.; Sayre, J. T.; Shirokoff, E.; Stan, L.; Stark, A. A.; Sobrin, J.; Story, K.; Suzuki, A.; Thompson, K. L.; Tucker, C.; Vanderlinde, K.; Vieira, J. D.; Wang, G.; Whitehorn, N.; Yefremenko, V.; Yoon, K. W.; Ziegler, K. E.

    2015-09-01

    This work presents the procedures used at Argonne National Laboratory to fabricate large arrays of multichroic transition-edge sensor (TES) bolometers for cosmic microwave background (CMB) measurements. These detectors will be assembled into the focal plane for the SPT-3G camera, the third generation CMB camera to be installed in the South Pole Telescope. The complete SPT-3G camera will have approximately 2690 pixels, for a total of 16 140 TES bolometric detectors. Each pixel is comprised of a broad-band sinuous antenna coupled to a Nb microstrip line. In-line filters are used to define the different bands before the millimeter-wavelength signal is fed to the respective Ti/Au TES bolometers. There are six TES bolometer detectors per pixel, which allow for measurements of three band-passes (95, 150 and 220 GHz) and two polarizations. The steps involved in the monolithic fabrication of these detector arrays are presented here in detail. Patterns are defined using a combination of stepper and contact lithography. The misalignment between layers is kept below 200 nm. The overall fabrication involves a total of 16 processes, including reactive and magnetron sputtering, reactive ion etching, inductively coupled plasma etching and chemical etching.

  13. Detecting dark matter with scintillating bubble chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianjie; Dahl, C. Eric; Jin, Miaotianzi; Baxter, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    Threshold based direct WIMP dark matter detectors such as the superheated bubble chambers developed by the PICO experiment have demonstrated excellent electron-recoil and alpha discrimination, excellent scalability, ease of change of target fluid, and low cost. However, the nuclear-recoil like backgrounds have been a limiting factor in their dark matter sensitivity. We present a new type of detector, the scintillating bubble chamber, which reads out the scintillation pulse of the scattering events as well as the pressure, temperature, acoustic traces, and bubble images as a conventional bubble chamber does. The event energy provides additional handle to discriminate against the nuclear-recoil like backgrounds. Liquid xenon is chosen as the target fluid in our prototyping detector for its high scintillation yield and suitable vapor pressure which simplifies detector complexity. The detector can be used as an R&D tool to study the backgrounds present in the current PICO bubble chambers or as a prototype for standalone dark matter detectors in the future. Supported by DOE Grant DE-SC0012161.

  14. Calorimetry using organic scintillators, 'a sideways perspective'.

    SciTech Connect

    Proudfoot, J.

    1999-09-10

    Over the last two decades, calorimetry baaed on organic scintillators has developed into an excellent technology for many experimental situations in high energy physics. The primary difficulty, that of extracting the light signals, has benefited from two milestone innovations. The first was the use of wavelength-shifting bars to allow light to be efficiently collected from large areas of scintillator and then readily piped to a readout device. The second of these was the extension of this approach to plastic wavelength-shifting optical fibers whose great flexibility and small diameter allowed a minimum of detector volume to be compromised by the read-out. These two innovations coupled with inventiveness have produced many varied and successful calorimeters. Equal response to both hadronic and electromagnetic showers can be realized in scintillator-based calorimeters. However, in general this is not the case and it is likely that in the search for greater performance, in the future, combined tracking and calorimeter systems will be required.

  15. Boron-Loaded Silicone Rubber Scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, Z.W.; Maya, L.; Brown, G.M.; Sloop, F.V.Jr

    2003-05-12

    Silicone rubber received attention as an alternative to polyvinyltoluene in applications in which the scintillator is exposed to high doses because of the increased resistance of the rubber to the formation of blue-absorbing color centers. Work by Bowen, et al., and Harmon, et al., demonstrated their properties under gamma/x-ray irradiation, and Bell, et al. have shown their response to thermal neutrons. This last work, however, provided an example of a silicone in which both the boron and the scintillator were contained in the rubber as solutes, a formulation which led to the precipitation of solids and sublimation of the boron component. In the present work we describe a scintillator in which the boron is chemically bonded to the siloxane and so avoids the problem of precipitation and loss of boron to sublimation. Material containing up to 18% boron, by weight, was prepared, mounted on photomultipliers, and exposed to both neutron and gamma fluxes. Pulse height spectra showing the neutron and photon response were obtained, and although the light output was found to be much poorer than from samples in which boron was dissolved, the higher boron concentrations enabled essentially 100% neutron absorption in only a few millimeters' thickness of rubber.

  16. Scintillators with potential to supersede lanthanum bromide

    SciTech Connect

    Cherepy, Nerine; Payne, Steven; Aszatlos, Steve; Hull, Giulia; Kuntz, J.; Niedermayr, Tom; Pimputkar, S.; Roberts, J.; Sanner, R.; Tillotson, T.; van Loef, Edger; Wilson, Cody; Shah, Kanai; Roy, U.; Hawrami, R.; Burger, Arnold; Boatner, Lynn; Choong, Woon-Seng; Moses, William

    2009-06-01

    New scintillators for high-resolution gamma ray spectroscopy have been identified, grown and characterized. Our development efforts have focused on two classes of high light yield materials: Europium-doped alkaline earth halides and Cerium-doped garnets. Of the halide single crystals we have grown by the Bridgman method - SrI{sub 2}, CaI{sub 2}, SrBr{sub 2}, BaI{sub 2} and BaBr{sub 2} - SrI{sub 2} is the most promising. SrI{sub 2}(Eu) emits into the Eu{sup 2+} band, centered at 435 nm, with a decay time of 1.2 {micro}s and a light yield of up to 115,000 photons/MeV. It offers energy resolution better than 3% FWHM at 662 keV, and exhibits excellent light yield proportionality. Transparent ceramics fabrication allows production of Gadolinium- and Terbium-based garnets which are not growable by melt techniques due to phase instabilities. While scintillation light yields of Cerium-doped ceramic garnets are high, light yield non-proportionality and slow decay components appear to limit their prospects for high energy resolution. We are developing an understanding of the mechanisms underlying energy dependent scintillation light yield non-proportionality and how it affects energy resolution. We have also identified aspects of optical design that can be optimized to enhance energy resolution.

  17. Sillicon Photomultiplier and Scintillator Bar Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shelor, Mark; Elizondo, Leonardo; Ritt, Stefan

    2016-03-01

    To analyze extraterrestrial cosmic rays via precise measurements of airshower axes directions of penetrating particles such as muons, we constructed a model detector consisting of two 1-meter long scintillator bars. Each bar is fitted with green wavelength shifting fibers to modulate input for two silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) light detectors to record light produced by cosmic rays via scintillation. The purpose of the experiment is to determine the performance of these devices. Two makes of SiPMs were evaluated - from AdvanSiD and Hamamatsu. In order to filter out noise, timing measurements of the apparatus were performed under several trigger conditions such as coincidence trigger with 2 photomultiplier detectors, as well as SiPM detector arrays in self-triggered mode. The DRS4 Digitizer 4-channel fast waveform sampler digitized SiPM detector waveforms. Signals were analyzed with the CERN PAW package. The speed of light in the scintillator using the SiPM modules was found to be approximately 66% of the speed of light in a vacuum which is in accordance with the index of refraction for the fibers given by the manufacturer's specifications. The results of our timing measurements would be presented. Dept. of Ed. Title V Grant PO31S090007.

  18. Pulse height model for deuterated scintillation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haitang; Enqvist, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    An analytical model of light pulse height distribution for finite deuterated scintillation detectors is created using the impulse approximation. Particularly, the energy distribution of a scattered neutron is calculated based on an existing collision probability scheme for general cylindrical shaped detectors considering double differential cross-sections. The light pulse height distribution is analytically and numerically calculated by convoluting collision sequences with the light output function for an EJ-315 detector from our measurements completed at Ohio University. The model provides a good description of collision histories capturing transferred neutron energy in deuterium-based scintillation materials. The resulting light pulse height distribution details pulse compositions and their corresponding contributions. It shows that probabilities of neutron collision with carbon and deuterium nuclei are comparable, however the light pulse amplitude due to collisions with carbon nuclei is small and mainly located at the lower region of the light pulse distribution axis. The model can explore those neutron interaction events that generate pulses near or below a threshold that would be imposed in measurements. A comparison is made between the light pulse height distributions given by the analytical model and measurements. It reveals a significant probability of a neutron generating a small light pulse due to collisions with carbon nuclei when compared to larger light pulse generated by collisions involving deuterium nuclei. This model is beneficial to understand responses of scintillation materials and pulse compositions, as well as nuclei information extraction from recorded pulses.

  19. Characterization of Ionospheric Scintillation Using Simultaneous Formosat-3/COSMIC Radio Occultation Observations and AFRL SCINDA Ground Scintillation Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starks, M. J.; Lin, C. S.; Groves, K. M.; Pedersen, T. R.; Basu, S.; Syndergaard, S.; Rocken, C.

    2007-05-01

    Ionospheric scintillation at low latitudes has been studied using ionospheric radio occultation (RO) measurements by the FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC micro-satellites in conjunction with ground-based data from the Scintillation Network Decision Aid (SCINDA) station at Kwajalein Atoll. The Air Force Research Laboratory has developed the SCINDA network for monitoring low-latitude ionospheric total electron content (TEC) and scintillation associated with equatorial spread F. The network currently consists of sixteen stations distributed around the globe and the data have been used to conduct numerous studies on the characteristics and climatology of equatorial scintillation. The present study focuses on COSMIC RO and SCINDA data during the three COSMIC campaigns in 2006. Radio occultation events are selected by requiring that ionospheric scintillation was detected by the SCINDA VHF scintillation monitor at Kwajalein, and that the occultation ray path intersected the Kwajalein longitude below the satellite altitude, which varied from 500 to 800 km for the six FORMOSAT-3 satellites. In order to exclude tropospheric effects, only GPS signal amplitudes from FORMOSAT-3 with ray path tangent altitudes above 100 km are considered. Locations of ionospheric scintillation are estimated by triangulation using the satellites and the SCINDA ground station. Airglow images at Kwajalein are also used to confirm occurrence of equatorial ionospheric scintillations. For the selected events, large amplitude L1 and L2 scintillations tend to occur at altitudes below 200 km at frequencies around 0.5 Hz. The results are discussed as a potential path toward better specifying the occurrence of equatorial scintillations.

  20. Separation of scintillation and Cherenkov lights in linear alkyl benzene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mohan; Guo, Ziyi; Yeh, Minfang; Wang, Zhe; Chen, Shaomin

    2016-09-01

    To separate scintillation and Cherenkov lights in water-based liquid scintillator detectors is a desired feature for future neutrino and proton decay experiments. Linear alkyl benzene (LAB) is one important ingredient of a water-based liquid scintillator currently under development. In this paper we report on the separation of scintillation and Cherenkov lights observed in an LAB sample. The rise and decay times of the scintillation light are measured to be (7.7 ± 3.0) ns and (36.6 ± 2.4) ns , respectively, while the full width [-3σ, 3σ] of the Cherenkov light is 12 ns and is dominated by the time resolution of the photomultiplier tubes. The scintillation light yield was measured to be (1.01 ± 0.12) ×103 photons / MeV .

  1. Light collection from scintillation counters using WLS fibers and bars

    SciTech Connect

    Evdokimov, V.

    1998-01-01

    Several methods of collecting light on scintillation counters using WLS fibers and WLS bars were studied. Nearly 20 prototype counters with different designs and with sizes ranging from 14{times}11{times}1.3cm{sup 3} to 105{times}60{times}1.3cm{sup 3} have been tested using cosmic muons and radioactive source. The efficiency of light collection on number of photoelectrons, uniformity of response, and time resolution have been measured. Test results for two new designs of light collection from scintillator based on WLS fibers around perimeter of scintillator plate and WLS fibers placed in machined on scintillator plate deep grooves are presented. Two out of the studied designs have been chosen as the basic options for the D0 muon system upgrade: light collection using two WLS bars for the forward muon scintillation counters and light collection using WLS fibers in deep grooves on scintillator for central area muon counters.

  2. Metal-loaded organic scintillators for neutrino physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buck, Christian; Yeh, Minfang

    2016-09-01

    Organic liquid scintillators are used in many neutrino physics experiments of the past and present. In particular for low energy neutrinos when realtime and energy information are required, liquid scintillators have several advantages compared to other technologies. In many cases the organic liquid needs to be loaded with metal to enhance the neutrino signal over background events. Several metal loaded scintillators of the past suffered from chemical and optical instabilities, limiting the performance of these neutrino detectors. Different ways of metal loading are described in the article with a focus on recent techniques providing metal loaded scintillators that can be used under stable conditions for many years even in ton scale experiments. Applications of metal loaded scintillators in neutrino experiments are reviewed and the performance as well as the prospects of different scintillator types are compared.

  3. Methods for the continuous production of plastic scintillator materials

    DOEpatents

    Bross, Alan; Pla-Dalmau, Anna; Mellott, Kerry

    1999-10-19

    Methods for producing plastic scintillating material employing either two major steps (tumble-mix) or a single major step (inline-coloring or inline-doping). Using the two step method, the polymer pellets are mixed with silicone oil, and the mixture is then tumble mixed with the dopants necessary to yield the proper response from the scintillator material. The mixture is then placed in a compounder and compounded in an inert gas atmosphere. The resultant scintillator material is then extruded and pelletized or formed. When only a single step is employed, the polymer pellets and dopants are metered into an inline-coloring extruding system. The mixture is then processed under a inert gas atmosphere, usually argon or nitrogen, to form plastic scintillator material in the form of either scintillator pellets, for subsequent processing, or as material in the direct formation of the final scintillator shape or form.

  4. Ionospheric scintillation in Brazil: Analyses and Effects on GNSS Positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, D. B.; Souza, J. S.; Silva, H. D.

    2013-05-01

    Ionosphere has a great influence on GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System) signals and its behavior depends on several variables: local time, geographic location, seasons and solar activity. Besides, there are ionospheric irregularities that also affect the GNSS signal propagation, as the ionospheric scintillation. The ionospheric scintillation can be described as a fast change in phase and amplitude of GNSS signal, caused by irregularities of electron density. Scintillation can degrade or cause the GNSS signal lost. Due to these described factors, one can say that the ionosphere can cause important effects on GNSS positioning. It can degrade the coordinate accuracy obtained by GNSS positioning methods. In this paper the goal is to evaluate the ionospheric effect, in special the ionospheric scintillation in different regions of Brazil, and its effects on GNSS Point Positioning. In order to evaluate the days where the scintillation was more significant it is used a database (http://200.145.185.118/cigala/index.php) from CIGALA (Concept for Ionospheric Scintillation Mitigation for Professional GNSS in Latin America) project (http://cigala.galileoic.org/). Using these data it is possible to obtain information about ionospheric scintillation in different GNSS stations in Brazil. It is possible to correlate the data according to time, season and other factors that can contribute to scintillation analysis. In 2013 must occur an intense solar activity, which can intensify the ionospheric effects, and consequently ionospheric scintillation, mainly in Brazil region, where the scintillation index is already intense. Preliminary evaluations, showed larger values of S4 (scintillation index) in Brazil. For example, in October 2012, it was obtained S4 values larger than 1 in several epochs. This causes severe effects in GNSS Positioning. In this paper, the results of GNSS positioning under ionosphere scintillation effects in different regions of Brazil will be presented.

  5. Transition effect of air shower particles in plastic scintillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asakimori, K.; Maeda, T.; Kameda, T.; Mizushima, K.; Misaki, Y.

    1985-01-01

    The transition effect of air shower particles in the plastic scintillators near the core was measured by scintillators of various thickness. The air showers selected for the measurement were of 10,000. Results obtained are as follows: (1) the multiplication of shower particles in the scintillators is less than 20% for that of 50 mm thickness; (2) dependence of the transition effect on age parameter is not recognized within the experimental errors.

  6. Growth and scintillation properties of gadolinium and yttrium orthovanadate crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voloshina, O. V.; Baumer, V. N.; Bondar, V. G.; Kurtsev, D. A.; Gorbacheva, T. E.; Zenya, I. M.; Zhukov, A. V.; Sidletskiy, O. Ts.

    2012-02-01

    Aiming to explore the possibility of using the undoped rare-earth orthovanadates as scintillation materials, we developed the procedure for growth of gadolinium (GdVO 4) and yttrium (YVO 4) orthovanadate single crystals by Czochralski method, and determined the optimal conditions of their after-growth annealing. Optical, luminescent, and scintillation properties of YVO 4 and GdVO 4 were discussed versus known literature data. Scintillation characteristics of GdVO 4 were determined for the first time.

  7. Composite solid-state scintillators for neutron detection

    DOEpatents

    Dai, Sheng; Im, Hee-Jung; Pawel, Michelle D.

    2006-09-12

    Applicant's present invention is a composite scintillator for neutron detection comprising a matrix material fabricated from an inorganic sol-gel precursor solution homogeneously doped with a liquid scintillating material and a neutron absorbing material. The neutron absorbing material yields at least one of an electron, a proton, a triton, an alpha particle or a fission fragment when the neutron absorbing material absorbs a neutron. The composite scintillator further comprises a liquid scintillating material in a self-assembled micelle formation homogeneously doped in the matrix material through the formation of surfactant-silica composites. The scintillating material is provided to scintillate when traversed by at least one of an electron, a proton, a triton, an alpha particle or a fission fragment. The scintillating material is configured such that the matrix material surrounds the micelle formation of the scintillating material. The composite scintillator is fabricated and applied as a thin film on substrate surfaces, a coating on optical fibers or as a glass material.

  8. Plasmonic light yield enhancement of a liquid scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Bignell, Lindsey J.; Jackson, Timothy W.; Mume, Eskender; Lee, George P.

    2013-05-27

    We demonstrate modifications to the light yield properties of an organic liquid scintillator due to the localization of the tertiary fluorophore component to the surface of Ag-core silica-shell nanoparticles. We attribute this enhancement to the near-field interaction of Ag nanoparticle plasmons with these fluor molecules. The scintillation light yield enhancement is shown to be equal to the fluorescence enhancement within measurement uncertainties. With a suitable choice of plasmon energy and scintillation fluor, this effect may be used to engineer scintillators with enhanced light yields for radiation detection applications.

  9. Large-scale liquid scintillation detectors for solar neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benziger, Jay B.; Calaprice, Frank P.

    2016-04-01

    Large-scale liquid scintillation detectors are capable of providing spectral yields of the low energy solar neutrinos. These detectors require > 100 tons of liquid scintillator with high optical and radiopurity. In this paper requirements for low-energy neutrino detection by liquid scintillation are specified and the procedures to achieve low backgrounds in large-scale liquid scintillation detectors for solar neutrinos are reviewed. The designs, operations and achievements of Borexino, KamLAND and SNO+ in measuring the low-energy solar neutrino fluxes are reviewed.

  10. Plasmonic light yield enhancement of a liquid scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bignell, Lindsey J.; Mume, Eskender; Jackson, Timothy W.; Lee, George P.

    2013-05-01

    We demonstrate modifications to the light yield properties of an organic liquid scintillator due to the localization of the tertiary fluorophore component to the surface of Ag-core silica-shell nanoparticles. We attribute this enhancement to the near-field interaction of Ag nanoparticle plasmons with these fluor molecules. The scintillation light yield enhancement is shown to be equal to the fluorescence enhancement within measurement uncertainties. With a suitable choice of plasmon energy and scintillation fluor, this effect may be used to engineer scintillators with enhanced light yields for radiation detection applications.

  11. Development of polystyrene-based scintillation materials and its mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Hidehito; Kitamura, Hisashi; Shinji, Osamu; Saito, Katashi; Shirakawa, Yoshiyuki; Takahashi, Sentaro

    2012-12-01

    Scintillation materials based on polystyrene (PS) have been investigated. Para-terphenyl was employed as a fluorescent molecule (fluor) that functions as a wavelength shifter. A clear increase in photon yield of the scintillation materials relative to the pure PS was observed, which cannot be explained by the conventional theory of scintillation mechanism. Furthermore, the photon yield increased with flour concentration in accordance with a power-law. Here we reveal the emergence of a luminescence of PS-based scintillation materials and demonstrate that their photon yields can be controlled by the fluor concentration.

  12. Lanthanide doped strontium-barium cesium halide scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Bizarri, Gregory; Bourret-Courchesne, Edith; Derenzo, Stephen E.; Borade, Ramesh B.; Gundiah, Gautam; Yan, Zewu; Hanrahan, Stephen M.; Chaudhry, Anurag; Canning, Andrew

    2015-06-09

    The present invention provides for a composition comprising an inorganic scintillator comprising an optionally lanthanide-doped strontium-barium, optionally cesium, halide, useful for detecting nuclear material.

  13. Energy Transfer Based Nanocomposite Scintillator for Radiation Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslam, Soha; Sahi, Sunil; Chen, Wei; Ma, Lun; Kenarangui, Rasool

    2014-09-01

    Scintillators are the materials that emit light upon irradiation with high energy radiation like X-ray or gamma-ray. Inorganic single crystal and organic (plastic and liquid) are the two most used scintillator types. Both of these scintillator kinds have advantages and disadvantages. Inorganic single crystals are expensive and difficult to grow in desire shape and size. Also, single crystal scintillator such as NaI and CsI are very hygroscopic. On the other hand, organic scintillators have low density which limits their applications in gamma spectroscopy. Due to high quantum yield and size dependent emission, nanoparticles have attracted interested in various field of research. Here, we have studies the nanoparticles for radiation detection. We have synthesized nanoparticles of Cerium fluoride (CeF3), Zinc Oxide (ZnO), Cadmium Telluride (CdTe), Copper complex and Zinc sulfide (ZnS). We have used Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) principle to enhance the luminescence properties of nanocomposite scintillator. Nanocomposites scintillators are structurally characterized with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Optical properties are studied using Photoluminescence, UV-Visible and X-ray. Enhancements in the luminescence are observed under UV and X-ray excitation. Preliminary studies shows nanocomposite scintillators are promising for radiation detection. Scintillators are the materials that emit light upon irradiation with high energy radiation like X-ray or gamma-ray. Inorganic single crystal and organic (plastic and liquid) are the two most used scintillator types. Both of these scintillator kinds have advantages and disadvantages. Inorganic single crystals are expensive and difficult to grow in desire shape and size. Also, single crystal scintillator such as NaI and CsI are very hygroscopic. On the other hand, organic scintillators have low density which limits their applications in gamma spectroscopy. Due to high quantum

  14. Scintillation near the F-layer trough over Northern Europe

    SciTech Connect

    Kersley, L.; Pryse, S.E.; Russell, C.D.

    1990-05-03

    Results are presented of scintillation observations made during a two and a half year period at Lerwick in the Shetland Islands using more than 19000 passes of NNSS satellites. Examples of scintillation morphology, in the region near the scintillation boundary and the F-layer trough, for both amplitude and phase are discussed using exceedence levels for the S sub 4 and sigma sub psi indices respectively. The equatorwards advancement of the scintillation boundary in response to enhanced solar activity during the increasing phase of the solar cycle is shown to be a dominant feature in the observations.

  15. Chaotic behavior of ionospheric turbulence from scintillation measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharyya, A. )

    1990-05-01

    Ionospheric amplitude and phase scintillation data have been analyzed to estimate the information dimension associated with the attractor of the system. For weak scintillations, both amplitude and phase data yield identical results which demonstrate that spatial fluctuations of electron density in the ionosphere may be characterized by a few degrees of freedom. Stronger scintillations are attributed to steepened density irregularities which cause focusing of the incident radio wave. This results in the amplitude scintillations exhibiting higher dimensional chaos but spatial fluctuations in ionospheric density still involve low dimensional chaos.

  16. Application of accelerators for the research and development of scintillators.

    PubMed

    Shibuya, Kengo; Koshimizu, Masanori; Asai, Keisuke; Muroya, Yusa; Katsumura, Yosuke; Inadama, Naoko; Yoshida, Eiji; Nishikido, Fumihiko; Yamaya, Taiga; Murayama, Hideo

    2007-08-01

    We introduce experimental systems which use accelerators to evaluate scintillation properties such as scintillation intensity, wavelength, and lifetime. A single crystal of good optical quality is often unavailable during early stages in the research and development (R&D) of new scintillator materials. Because of their beams' high excitation power and/or low penetration depth, accelerators facilitate estimation of the properties of early samples which may only be available as powders, thin films, and very small crystals. We constructed a scintillation spectrum measurement system that uses a Van de Graaff accelerator and an optical multichannel analyzer to estimate the relative scintillation intensity. In addition, we constructed a scintillation time profile measurement system that uses an electron linear accelerator and a femtosecond streak camera or a microchannel plate photomultiplier tube followed by a digital oscilloscope to determine the scintillation lifetimes. The time resolution is approximately 10 ps. The scintillation spectra or time profiles can be obtained in a significantly shorter acquisition time in comparison with that required by conventional measuring systems. The advantages of the systems described in this study can significantly promote the R&D of novel scintillator materials. PMID:17764319

  17. CCAM: A novel millimeter-wave instrument using a close-packed TES bolometer array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Judy M.

    This thesis describes CCAM, an instrument designed to map the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB), and also presents some of the initial measurements made with CCAM on the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT). CCAM uses a CCD-like camera of millimeter-wave TES bolometers. It employs new detector technology, read-out electronics, cold re-imaging optics, and cryogenics to obtain high sensitivity CMB anisotropy measurements. The free-standing 8×32 close-packed array of pop- up TES detectors is the first of its kind to observe the sky at 145 GHz. We present the design of the receiver including the antireflection coated silicon lens re-imaging system, construction and optimization of the pulse tube/ sorption refrigerator cryogenic system, as well as the technology developed to integrate eight 1×32 TES columns and accompanying read-out electronics in to an array of 256 millimeter-wave detectors into a focal plane area of 3.5 cm 2. The performance of the detectors and optics prior to deployment at the ACT site in Chile are reported as well as preliminary performance results of the instrument when optically paired with the ACT telescope in the summer of 2007. Here, we also report on the feasibility of the TES detector array to measure polarization when coupled to a rotating birefringent sapphire half wave plate and wire-grid polarizer.

  18. Room-temperature IR detection using pulsed laser deposited vanadium oxide bolometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajendra Kumar, R. T.; Karunagaran, B.; Mangalaraj, D.; Narayandass, Sa. K.; Manoravi, P.; Joseph, M.; Gopal, Vishnu

    2003-10-01

    We report the design, fabrication and performance of the 5 x 2 pixel uncooled microbolometer array. The test microbolometer utilizes pulsed laser deposited vanadium oxide film at room temperature as the IR sensitive layer. The microbolometer was fabricated without air-gap thermal isolation structure and the pixel area of about 200 x 800 μm2. The observed change in bolometer resistance with respect to temperature (dR/dT) as high as 9.3 x 103 Ω/°C and temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR) of about 5%/°C at room temperature, implies an excellent bolometric response. The room temperature deposition of the IR sensing layer facilitates their integration with the existing complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology for better signal processing. IR response of the device was evaluated in the spectral region 8 - 15 μm. The preliminary IR characterization revealed that the test microbolometer exhibits responsivity (Rv) and detectivity (D*) approximately as 36 V/W and 6 x 105 cm2Hz1/2/W at chopper frequency of 10 Hz for 50 μA bias current. Provided with the air-gap thermal isolation structure, the microbolometer will exhibit responsivity (Rv) over 1.2 x 104 V/W, which compares well with the reported values.

  19. Design and Fabrication of Two-Dimensional Superconducting Bolometer Array for SAFIRE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, Dominic; Voellmer, George; Chervenak, Jay; Irwin, Kent; Moseley, S. Harvey; Shafer, Rick; Staguhn, Johannes; Oegerle, William (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Submillimeter and Far-InfraRed Experiment (SAFIRE) on the SOFIA airborne observatory will employ a large-format, two-dimensional, close-packed bolometer array. SAFIRE is an imaging Fabry-Perot spectrometer operating at wavelengths between 100 micron and 700 micron. The array format is 16x32 pixels, using a 32-element multiplexer developed in part for this instrument. The low backgrounds achieved in spectroscopy require very sensitive detectors with NEPs (Noise Equivalent Powers) of order 5x10(exp 18)W/square root of Hz. An architecture which permits 512 pixels to be placed adjacent to each other in an area the size of a postage stamp, integrate them with multiplexers, and provide all the necessary wiring interconnections is a complex proposition, but can be achieved. Superconducting detectors can be close-packed using the Pop-Up Detector (PUD) format, and SQUID multiplexers operating at the detector bas temperature can be intimately coupled to them. The result is a compact array, easily scalable to kilopixel arrays. Engineering results from the first such detector arrays will be presented.

  20. PolKa: A New Polarimeter for Millimeter and Submillimeter Bolometer Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siringo, G.; Kreysa, E.; Reichertz, L. A.; Menten, K. M.

    2004-02-01

    A new concept of polarimeter has been designed to be used together with the arrays of bolometers developed at the Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie in Bonn. The new polarimeter has the unique characteristic of being tunable over a wide range of wavelengths and of producing a negligible absorption. It has been used at the Heinrich-Hertz telescope to measure the linear polarization of some quasars and of some extended sources inside our Galaxy. Some results are presented here. We detected polarization on the quasars 3C279 and 1633+382. On 3C279 we also detected polarization variability on a time scale of a week. We performed also maps of extended sources: the BN/KL complex in Orion OMC-1, a filament cloud in Orion OMC-3 and the massive star-forming region IRAS 05358+3543. The polarimeter has low spurious polarization and a high modulation efficiency and the tests at the telescope show that it is well suited to become a permanent facility.