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1

Emergência e vigor de plântulas de Cedrela fissilis L. em função de diferentes posições de profundidades de semeadura  

Microsoft Academic Search

Emergence and vigor of Cedrela fissilis L. seedlings in function of the sowing position and depth. Cedrela fissilis L. are Meliaceae, popularly known as cedro. This species is native to Brazil, and owing to its qualities for the timber industry, it is being exploited progressively at its place of occurrence until the point of exhaustion. It is now listed as

Sueli da Silva Santos; Mácio Farias de Moura; Roberta Sales Guedes; Edilma Pereira Gonçalves; Edna Ursulino; Paulo Alexandre; Fernandes Rodrigues de Melo

2009-01-01

2

Effect of latitudinal gradient and impact of logging on genetic diversity of Cedrela lilloi along the Argentine Yungas Rainforest.  

PubMed

Cedrela lilloi C. DC. (cedro coya, Meliaceae), an important south American timber species, has been historically overexploited through selective logging in Argentine Yungas Rainforest. Management and conservation programs of the species require knowledge of its genetic variation patterns; however, no information is available. Molecular genetic variability of the species was characterized to identify high-priority populations for conservation and domestication purposes. Fourteen native populations (160 individuals) along a latitudinal gradient and with different logging's intensities were assessed by 293 polymorphic AFLP (amplified fragment length polymorphism) markers. Genetic diversity was low (Ht = 0.135), according to marginal location of the species in Argentina. Most of the diversity was distributed within populations (87%). Northern populations showed significant higher genetic diversity (R(2)= 0.69) that agreed with latitudinal pattern of distribution of taxonomic diversity in the Yungas. Three clusters were identified by Bayesian analysis in correspondence with northern, central, and southern Yungas. An analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) revealed significant genetic differences among latitudinal clusters even when logging (?(RT) = 0.07) and unlogging populations (?(PT) = 0.10) were separately analyzed. Loss of genetic diversity with increasing logging intensity was observed between neighboring populations with different disturbance (?(PT) = 0.03-0.10). Bottlenecks in disturbed populations are suggested as the main cause. Our results emphasize both: the necessity of maintaining the genetic diversity in protected areas that appear as possible long-term refuges of the species; and to rescue for the national system of protected areas some high genetic diversity populations that are on private fields. PMID:23170208

Inza, Maria V; Zelener, Noga; Fornes, Luis; Gallo, Leonardo A

2012-11-01

3

Effect of latitudinal gradient and impact of logging on genetic diversity of Cedrela lilloi along the Argentine Yungas Rainforest  

PubMed Central

Cedrela lilloi C. DC. (cedro coya, Meliaceae), an important south American timber species, has been historically overexploited through selective logging in Argentine Yungas Rainforest. Management and conservation programs of the species require knowledge of its genetic variation patterns; however, no information is available. Molecular genetic variability of the species was characterized to identify high-priority populations for conservation and domestication purposes. Fourteen native populations (160 individuals) along a latitudinal gradient and with different logging's intensities were assessed by 293 polymorphic AFLP (amplified fragment length polymorphism) markers. Genetic diversity was low (Ht = 0.135), according to marginal location of the species in Argentina. Most of the diversity was distributed within populations (87%). Northern populations showed significant higher genetic diversity (R2= 0.69) that agreed with latitudinal pattern of distribution of taxonomic diversity in the Yungas. Three clusters were identified by Bayesian analysis in correspondence with northern, central, and southern Yungas. An analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) revealed significant genetic differences among latitudinal clusters even when logging (?RT = 0.07) and unlogging populations (?PT = 0.10) were separately analyzed. Loss of genetic diversity with increasing logging intensity was observed between neighboring populations with different disturbance (?PT = 0.03–0.10). Bottlenecks in disturbed populations are suggested as the main cause. Our results emphasize both: the necessity of maintaining the genetic diversity in protected areas that appear as possible long-term refuges of the species; and to rescue for the national system of protected areas some high genetic diversity populations that are on private fields. PMID:23170208

Inza, Maria V; Zelener, Noga; Fornes, Luis; Gallo, Leonardo A

2012-01-01

4

Threat to Cedar, Cedrela odorata, Plantations in Vietnam by the Weevil, Aclees sp.  

PubMed Central

The recent decline and death of young cedar, Cedrela odorata L. (Sapindales: Meliaceae), plantations in Vietnam is caused by Aclees sp. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), a wood-boring brown weevil. A field study was undertaken in three-year-old plantations in two districts in Thanh Hoa province in August 2008. Trees were heavily impacted by the weevil, Aclees; the infestation level (P) ranged from 80 to 100% and the average damage index (R) ranged from 1.8 to 2.8. Observations over one year enabled the life history to be determined. Eggs were laid (February to March, September to November) inside the bark from the base of the trunk up to 60 cm in height. Larvae formed extensive feeding tunnels in the inner bark and sap wood. Pupation occurred in feeding tunnels or pupal chambers in the sapwood. Adults emerged twice a year, February to March and August to October. It is concluded that Aclees is a threat to C. odorata plantations in tropical regions of the world, and quarantine measures should be implemented to reduce the risk of spread. PMID:21271846

Thu, Pham Quang; Quang, Dao Ngoc; Dell, Bernard

2010-01-01

5

Relación entre el crecimiento individual y la abundancia de la población de la sardina del Pacífico Sardinops Caeruleus (Pisces: Clupeidae) (Girard 1856) en Isla de Cedros, Baja California, México Individual Growth And Population Abundance Relationship In The Pacific Sardine Sardinops Caeruleus (Pisces: Clupeidae) (Girard 1856) From Isla De Cedros, Baja California, Mexico  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effect of the population abundance on the individual growth during the pre-recruit stage of the Pacific sardine from Island de Cedros, Baja California, Mexico was analyzed. The population size was estimated using virtual population analysis and the fish length at age was backcalculate using otolith radius-standard length relationship. During the Pacific sardine first year of life, the results showed

Casimiro Quiñonez-Velázquez; Reyna Alvarado-Castillo; Roberto Félix-Uraga

6

Long-term trends in cellulose delta13 C and water-use efficiency of tropical Cedrela and Swietenia from Brazil.  

PubMed

Elevated CO(2) concentrations ([CO(2)]) affect plant water relations and photosynthesis, and the increase in atmospheric [CO(2)] over the past 100-200 years has been related to changes in stomatal density and the carbon isotope ratio (delta(13)C) in tree rings and leaves from herbarium specimens. Because many tropical trees do not produce annual growth rings and their wood is therefore difficult to date, no trends in delta(13)C of tropical trees have been reported. Wood from Cedrela odorata L. (tropical cedar) and Swietenia macrophylla King (bigleaf mahogany), which do produce annual rings, was collected from a primary rain forest in Aripuanã, Brazil (10 degrees 09' S, 59 degrees 26' W). We measured wood cellulose delta(13)C in 10-year growth increments from 37 Cedrela trees (between 11 and 151 years old in 2001) and 16 Swietenia trees (48-126 years old). A comparison of delta(13)C in cellulose of trees from different decades and of trees of different cambial ages showed that the amount of delta(13)C was largely related to the decade the wood was produced in, and not, or only to a minor extent, to tree age. Cellulose delta(13)C decreased from -26.0 to -27.3 per thousand in Cedrela and from -25.7 to -27.1 per thousand in Swietenia, with the largest changes occurring during the past 50 years. Based on these data and the trends in atmospheric [CO(2)] and delta(13)CO(2), we calculated that the internal [CO(2)] increased from about 220 to 260 ppm and that intrinsic water-use efficiency increased by 34% in Cedrela and by 52% in Swietenia. This may have implications for the water cycle and may explain the trend toward increased tree growth and turnover observed in some tropical forests. PMID:15805094

Hietz, Peter; Wanek, Wolfgang; Dünisch, Oliver

2005-06-01

7

Root endophyte interaction between ectomycorrhizal basidiomycete Tricholoma matsutake and arbuscular mycorrhizal tree Cedrela odorata, allowing in vitro synthesis of rhizospheric "shiro".  

PubMed

The ectomycorrhizal basidiomycete Tricholoma matsutake associates with members of the Pinaceae such as Pinus densiflora (red pine), forming a rhizospheric colony or "shiro," which produces the prized "matsutake" mushroom. We investigated whether the host specificity of T. matsutake to conifers is innately determined using somatic plants of Cedrela odorata, a tropical broad-leaved tree (Meliaceae) that naturally harbors arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. We found that T. matsutake could form in vitro shiro with C. odorata 140 days after inoculation, as with P. densiflora. The shiro was typically aromatic like that of P. densiflora. However, this was a root endophytic interaction unlike the mycorrhizal association with P. densiflora. Infected plants had epidermal tissues and thick exodermal tissues outside the inner cortex. The mycelial sheath surrounded the outside of the epidermis, and the hyphae penetrated into intra- and intercellular spaces, often forming hyphal bundles or a pseudoparenchymatous organization. However, the hyphae grew only in the direction of vascular bundles and did not form Hartig nets. Tricholoma fulvocastaneum or "false matsutake" naturally associates with Fagaceae and was also able to associate with C. odorata as a root endophyte. With T. matsutake, C. odorata generated a number of roots and showed greatly enhanced vigor, while with T. fulvocastaneum, it generated a smaller number of roots and showed somewhat lesser vigor. We argue that the host-plant specificity of ectomycorrhizal matsutake is not innately determined, and that somatic arbuscular mycorrhizal plants have a great potential to form mutualistic relationships with ectomycorrhizal fungi. PMID:23064771

Murata, Hitoshi; Yamada, Akiyoshi; Maruyama, Tsuyoshi; Endo, Naoki; Yamamoto, Kohei; Ohira, Tatsuro; Shimokawa, Tomoko

2013-04-01

8

The Lepidoptera associated with forestry crop species in Brazil: a historical approach.  

PubMed

Despite the long history of forestry activity in Brazil and its importance to the national economy, there is still much disorder in the information regarding pests of forestry species. Considering the importance of the entomological knowledge for the viability of silvicultural management, this work aimed to gather information on the species of Lepidoptera associated with forestry crops within Brazil using a historical approach. Through a literature review, all registered species of Lepidoptera related to forestry crops in Brazil from 1896 to 2010 were identified. The historical evaluation was based on the comparison of the number of published articles, species richness, and community similarities of the Lepidoptera and their associated forest crops, grouped in 10-year samples. A total of 417 occurrences of Lepidoptera associated with forestry species were recorded, from which 84 species are related with 40 different forestry crops. The nocturnal Lepidoptera were dominant on the records, with Eacles imperialis magnifica Walker as the most frequent pest species cited. Myrtaceae was the most frequent plant family, with Cedrela fissilis as the most cited forestry crop species. A successional change in both Lepidoptera species and their host plants was observed over the decades. The richness of lepidopteran pest species increased over the years, unlike the richness of forestry crop species. This increase could be related to the inefficient enforcement of sanitary barriers, to the increase of monoculture areas, and to the adaptability of native pests to exotic forestry species used in monoculture stands. PMID:23950084

Kowalczuck, Manoela; Carneiro, E; Casagrande, M M; Mielke, O H H

2012-10-01

9

Identification of endangered or threatened Costa Rican tree species by wood anatomy and fluorescence activity.  

PubMed

A total of 45 native Costa Rican tree species are threatened or in danger of extinction, but the Convention on International Trade Endangered Species (CITES) includes only eight of these in its Appendices. However, the identification of other species based on their wood anatomy is limited. The present study objective was to describe and to compare wood anatomy and fluorescence activity in some endangered or threatened species of Costa Rica. A total of 45 (22 endangered and 23 threatened with extinction) wood samples of these species, from the xylaria of the Instituto Tecnológico de Costa Rica and the Forest Products Laboratory in Madison, Wisconsin, were examined. Surface fluorescence was positive in eight species, water extract fluorescence was positive in six species and ethanol extract fluorescence was positive in 24 species. Almost all species were diffuse porous except for occasional (Cedrela odorata, C. fissilis, Cordia gerascanthus) or regular (C. salvadorensis and C. tonduzii) semi-ring porosity. A dendritic vessel arrangement was found in Sideroxylon capari, and pores were solitary in Guaiacum sanctum and Vantanea barbourii. Vessel element length was shortest in Guaiacum sanctum and longest in Humiriastrum guianensis, Minquartia guianensis and Vantanea barbourii. Finally, anatomical information and fluorescence activity were utilized to construct an identification key of species, in which fluorescence is a feature used in identification. PMID:24027913

Moya, Róger; Wiemann, Michael C; Olivares, Carlos

2013-09-01

10

REGULAR ARTICLE Tree mixture effects on aboveground nutrient pools  

E-print Network

REGULAR ARTICLE Tree mixture effects on aboveground nutrient pools of trees in an experimental biomass in mixtures than in monocultures while Cedrela odorata ­ the most nutrient efficient species ­ produced more biomass independent of stem growth rates because they acquired more nutrients in mixtures

Potvin, Catherine

11

Predicting the direction of ornament evolution in Trinidadian guppies (Poecilia reticulata).  

PubMed

Sexual selection is thought to be opposed by natural selection such that ornamental traits express a balance between these two antagonistic influences. Phenotypic variation among populations may indicate local shifts in this balance, or that different stable 'solutions' are possible, but testing these alternatives presents a major challenge. In the guppy (Poecilia reticulata), a small freshwater fish with male-limited ornamental coloration, these issues can be addressed by transplanting fish among sites of varying predation pressure, thus effectively manipulating the strength and nature of natural selection. Here, we contrast the evolutionary outcome of two such introductions conducted in the Trinidadian El Cedro and Aripo Rivers. We use sophisticated colour appraisal methods that account for full spectrum colour variation and which incorporate the very latest visual sensitivity data for guppies and their predators. Our data indicate that ornamentation evolved along different trajectories: whereas Aripo males evolved more numerous and/or larger orange, black and iridescent markings, El Cedro males only evolved more extensive and brighter iridescence. Examination of the El Cedro experiment also revealed little or no ornamental evolution at the control site over 29 years, which contrasts markedly with the rapid (approx. 2-3 years) changes reported for introduction populations. Finally, whole colour-pattern analysis suggested that the greatest visual difference between El Cedro introduction and control fish would be perceived by the two most salient viewers: guppies and the putatively dangerous predator Crenicichla alta. We discuss whether and how these evolutionary trajectories may result from founder effects, population-specific mate preferences and/or sensory drive. PMID:19776075

Kemp, Darrell J; Reznick, David N; Grether, Gregory F; Endler, John A

2009-12-22

12

Contributions to an integrated control programme of Hypsipyla grandella (Zeller) in Costa Rica  

Microsoft Academic Search

The shootborer Hypsipyla<\\/u>grandella<\\/u> (Zeller) (Lep., Pyralidae) is the main obstacle to the artificial regeneration of valuable meliaceous tree species such as mahogany ( Swietenia<\\/u> spp.) and Spanish cedar ( Cedrela<\\/u> spp.) in Latin America. On the other hand, the natural regeneration of these species is endangered due to depletion of the naturally existing resources and burning in colonization projects.This dissertation

P. Grijpma

1974-01-01

13

Do multipurpose companion trees affect high value timber trees in a silvopastoral plantation system?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Establishment of native timber trees on deforested land may contribute to the livelihood of farmers, to improved ecosystem\\u000a services and to increased greenhouse gas uptake. Here, we present a new silvopastoral planting design to assess species performance\\u000a and interspecific competition or facilitation effects among native timber and multipurpose trees in Central America. Two timber\\u000a species, Tabebuia rosea and Cedrela odorata,

Karsten Mody; Catherine Potvin; Silvia Dorn

2011-01-01

14

Long-term trends in nitrogen isotope composition and nitrogen concentration in Brazilian rainforest trees suggest changes in nitrogen cycle  

PubMed Central

Direct or indirect anthropogenic effects on ecosystem nitrogen cycles are important components of global change. Recent research has shown that N isotopes in tree rings reflect changes in ecosystem nitrogen sources or cycles and can be used to study past changes. We analysed trends in two tree species from a remote and pristine tropical rainforest in Brazil, using trees of different ages to distinguish between the effect of tree age and long-term trends. Because sapwood differed from heartwood in ?15N and N concentration and N can be translocated between living sapwood cells, long-term trends are best seen in dead heartwood. Heartwood ?15N in Spanish cedar (Cedrela odorata) and big-leaf mahogany (Swietenia macrophylla) increased with tree age, and N concentrations increased with age in Cedrela. Controlling for tree age, ?15N increased significantly during the past century even when analysing only heartwood and after removing labile N compounds. In contrast to northern temperate and boreal forests where wood ?15N often decreased, the ?15N increase in a remote rainforest is unlikely to be a direct signal of changed N deposition. More plausibly, the change in N isotopic composition indicates a more open N cycle, i.e. higher N losses relative to internal N cycling in the forest, which could be the result of changed forest dynamics. PMID:20092248

Hietz, Peter; Dünisch, Oliver; Wanek, Wolfgang

2010-01-01

15

Long-term trends in nitrogen isotope composition and nitrogen concentration in brazilian rainforest trees suggest changes in nitrogen cycle.  

PubMed

Direct or indirect anthropogenic effects on ecosystem nitrogen cycles are important components of global change. Recent research has shown that N isotopes in tree rings reflect changes in ecosystem nitrogen sources or cycles and can be used to study past changes. We analyzed trends in two tree species from a remote and pristine tropical rainforest in Brazil, using trees of different ages to distinguish between the effect of tree age and long-term trends. Because sapwood differed from heartwood in delta(15)N and N concentration and N can be translocated between living sapwood cells, long-term trends are best seen in dead heartwood. Heartwood delta(15)N in Spanish cedar (Cedrela odorata) and big-leaf mahogany (Swietenia macrophylla) increased with tree age, and N concentrations increased with age in Cedrela. Controlling for tree age, delta(15)N increased significantly during the past century even when analyzing only heartwood and after removing labile N compounds. In contrast to northern temperate and boreal forests where wood delta(15)N often decreased, the delta(15)N increase in a remote rainforest is unlikely to be a direct signal of changed N deposition. More plausibly, the change in N isotopic composition indicates a more open N cycle, i.e., higher N losses relative to internal N cycling in the forest, which could be the result of changed forest dynamics. PMID:20092248

Hietz, Peter; Dünisch, Oliver; Wanek, Wolfgang

2010-02-15

16

A Re-examination of Shallow Paleomagnetic Inclinations From the Cretaceous Valle Group Sedimentary Rocks, Baja California, Mexico  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A paleomagnetic, rock magnetic, and sedimentological study was conducted in order to determine whether depositional/compactional processes have caused the shallow inclinations observed in the Valle Group sedimentary rocks. A total of 126 samples (14 sites) were collected from the middle Cenomanian section of the Valle along the northern coast of the Vizcaino Peninsula, Baja California, approximately 20 km east of Punta Eugenia at Campito. Samples were subjected to detailed thermal and alternating field (af) demagnetization, typically in 14 steps to 610° C for thermal demagnetization and ~24 steps to 130 mT for af demagnetization. NRMs were strong for marine sedimentary rocks, typically 10 mA/m. The mean of the site means for the demagnetized data was Inc=54.2° , Dec=306° , ? 95=4.8° , N=12, in geographic coordinates, and Inc=20.5° , Dec=341.3° , ? 95=4° , N=12 in stratigraphic coordinates. AMS fabrics have minimum axes clustered nearly perpendicular to bedding, typical of primary depositional/compactional fabrics. Some sites exhibited minimum axes clustering about 10° from the vertical and maximum axes clustered about 10° from the horizontal suggesting that currents and/or initial bedding dip affected the magnetization of these samples at deposition. Since the stratigraphy of the Valle Group dips consistently to the NE at approximately 50° , we sampled a tight slump fold at one site in order to constrain the age of magnetization. Both the AMS fabric and the characteristic remanence (ChRM) fail the fold test at the 95% confidence level. At another site, we sampled adjacent beds each approximately 5 cm thick composed of coarse, medium, or fine-grained sandstone. The directions of these beds are within 2° of each other. These results can be interpreted to indicate either a late remagnetization of the Valle group or an acquisition of the Valle's detrital remanence after slumping, but early in the rock's post-depositional history. Smith and Busby's (1993) slump block test from nearby Cedros Island supports an early acquisition of magnetization for the Valle. Also, a positive regional tilt test for the site means at Campito and Cedros Island suggests that magnetization acquisition predates the regional tilting. Anisotropy of remanence measurements will be conducted to correct any inclination shallowing due to compaction since our mean stratigraphic direction is about 15° shallower than the inclination observed by Smith and Busby for the Valle at Cedros Island. Tectonic implications of the corrected results will be discussed.

Li, Y.; Kodama, K. P.; Smith, D. P.

2001-05-01

17

Antifungal activity of 10 Guadeloupean plants.  

PubMed

Screening of the antifungal activities of ten Guadeloupean plants was undertaken to find new extracts and formulations against superficial mycoses such as onychomycosis, athlete's foot, Pityriasis versicolor, as well as the deep fungal infection Pneumocystis pneumonia. For the first time, the CMI of these plant extracts [cyclohexane, ethanol and ethanol/water (1:1, v/v)] was determined against five dermatophytes, five Candida species, Scytalidium dimidiatum, a Malassezia sp. strain and Pneumocystis carinii. Cytotoxicity tests of the most active extracts were also performed on an HaCat keratinocyte cell line. Results suggest that the extracts of Bursera simaruba, Cedrela odorata, Enterolobium cyclocarpum and Pluchea carolinensis have interesting activities and could be good candidates for developing antifungal formulations. PMID:23280633

Biabiany, Murielle; Roumy, Vincent; Hennebelle, Thierry; François, Nadine; Sendid, Boualem; Pottier, Muriel; Aliouat, El Moukhtar; Rouaud, Isabelle; Lohézic-Le Dévéhat, Françoise; Joseph, Henry; Bourgeois, Paul; Sahpaz, Sevser; Bailleul, François

2013-11-01

18

The influence of mesoscale physical structures in the phytoplankton taxonomic composition of the subsurface chlorophyll maximum off western Baja California  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The distribution of the subsurface chlorophyll maximum (SCM) layer, its taxonomic phytoplankton composition, and the maximum quantum efficiency of charge separation of PSII (Fv/Fm) was investigated in the west coast off Baja California during October 2003. SCM characteristics were described and related to the hydrographic regime and the mesoscale physical structures present during this period. Seven groups of phytoplankton were detected in the SCM based on chemotaxonomic analysis of pigment fingerprints: diatoms, haptophytes, pelagophytes, prasinophytes, cryptophytes, Prochlorococcus and cyanobacteria. The distribution of these groups was heterogeneous and closely related to the circulation patterns characterized by the interaction of subarctic and tropical water. Eddies and meanders were detected in the study area and these structures exerted a direct response in the depth, chlorophyll concentration, and photosynthetic competence of phytoplankton in the SCM. A cyclonic eddy characterized by a high chlorophyll concentration (1.6 mg m-3) and high values of Fv/Fm, (0.52) was detected in the northern zone of the study area. In the central zone, a cyclonic eddy (1.2 mg m-3); and other structure resembling a mode-water eddy was located northwest of Cedros Island. This structure presented the highest chlorophyll concentration (1.8 mg m-3) and high Fv/Fm (?0.5). Chlorophyll concentration and the photosynthetic performance of the phytoplankton community was lower outside of these eddies. Cyanobacteria dominated the phytoplankton SCM community in these areas.

Almazán-Becerril, Antonio; Rivas, David; García-Mendoza, Ernesto

2012-12-01

19

Root endophyte symbiosis in vitro between the ectomycorrhizal basidiomycete Tricholoma matsutake and the arbuscular mycorrhizal plant Prunus speciosa.  

PubMed

We previously reported that Tricholoma matsutake and Tricholoma fulvocastaneum, ectomycorrhizal basidiomycetes that associate with Pinaceae and Fagaceae, respectively, in the Northern Hemisphere, could interact in vitro as a root endophyte of somatic plants of Cedrela odorata (Meliaceae), which naturally harbors arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in South America, to form a characteristic rhizospheric colony or "shiro". We questioned whether this phenomenon could have occurred because of plant-microbe interactions between geographically separated species that never encounter one another in nature. In the present study, we document that these fungi formed root endophyte interactions and shiro within 140 days of inoculation with somatic plants of Prunus speciosa (=Cerasus speciosa, Rosaceae), a wild cherry tree that naturally harbors arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in Japan. Compared with C. odorata, infected P. speciosa plants had less mycelial sheath surrounding the exodermis, and the older the roots, especially main roots, the more hyphae penetrated. In addition, a large number of juvenile roots were not associated with hyphae. We concluded that such root endophyte interactions were not events isolated to the interactions between exotic plants and microbes but could occur generally in vitro. Our pure culture system with a somatic plant allowed these fungi to express symbiosis-related phenotypes that varied with the plant host; these traits are innately programmed but suppressed in nature and could be useful in genetic analyses of plant-fungal symbiosis. PMID:24158697

Murata, Hitoshi; Yamada, Akiyoshi; Yokota, Satoru; Maruyama, Tsuyoshi; Endo, Naoki; Yamamoto, Kohei; Ohira, Tatsuro; Neda, Hitoshi

2014-05-01

20

Use of grafting to prevent Hypsipyla grandella (Zeller) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) damage to new world Meliaceae species.  

PubMed

The susceptible species Cedrela odorata and Swietenia macrophylla to attack by Hypsipyla grandella (Zeller) larvae were grafted onto the resistant species Khaya senegalensis and Toona ciliata. Six-month-old grafted plants were then compared to their reciprocal grafts and to both intact (non-grafted) and autografted plants for damage due to H. grandella larvae and for their effects on larval performance. Two experiments were conducted: one in which the apical bud of the main plant shoot was inoculated with H. grandella eggs, and the other in which the bud was inoculated with third instars. Damage in each experiment was assessed by the number of frass piles, number and length of tunnels, number of damaged leaves, and damage to the apical bud. Larval performance was evaluated in terms of time to reach pupation and pupal weight and length. In both experiments, plant damage differed significantly among treatments (P < 0.03). Resistant rootstocks conferred resistance to susceptible scions. In both experiments, grafting by itself, regardless of the rootstock and scion combination, also reduced damage caused by H. grandella larvae. Scions of autografted susceptible species had similar resistance to susceptible scions grafted on resistant rootstocks. Few larvae reached pupation, and their pupal weight and length were similar. PMID:20878001

Perez, Julian; Eigenbrode, Sanford D; Hilje, Luko; Tripepi, Robert R; Aguilar, Maria E; Mesen, Francisco

2010-01-01

21

Electrophysiological responses of female and male Hypsipyla grandella (Zeller) to Swietenia macrophylla essential oils.  

PubMed

The mahogany shoot borer, Hypsipyla grandella, is one of the most economically important Neotropical forest pest insects because it attacks valuable timber of the Meliaceae. Despite detailed information on the life cycle of H. grandella, factors influencing attack by the shoot borer are not well known. Electroantennogram studies of borer antennae indicate that both female and male moths elicited significant antennal responses to essential oil of the terminal shoots, mature and senescent leaves, in three concentrations. Gamma-himachalene, germacrene D, germacrene A, cadina-1,4-diene, hexadecanoic acid, and ethyl hexadecanoate appeared in all essential oils from Swietenia macrophylla. Germacrene-D and gamma-himachalene were also present in the active essential oil of Cedrela odorata and Toona ciliata. These findings suggest that these compounds play a role in attracting H. grandella to oviposit on the leaves of these plants. The GC-EAD of essential oil from S. macrophylla mature leaves to female H. grandella antennae led to the identification of beta-caryophyllene as the main constituent responsible for the antennae response. PMID:14584681

Soares, Marisi G; Batista-Pereira, Luciane G; Fernandes, João B; Corrêa, Arlene G; da Silva, M Fátima G F; Vieira, Paulo C; Rodrigues Filho, Edson; Ohashi, Orlando S

2003-09-01

22

Oxygen isotopes in tree rings are a good proxy for Amazon precipitation and El Ni?o-Southern Oscillation variability  

PubMed Central

We present a unique proxy for the reconstruction of variation in precipitation over the Amazon: oxygen isotope ratios in annual rings in tropical cedar (Cedrela odorata). A century-long record from northern Bolivia shows that tree rings preserve the signal of oxygen isotopes in precipitation during the wet season, with weaker influences of temperature and vapor pressure. Tree ring ?18O correlates strongly with ?18O in precipitation from distant stations in the center and west of the basin, and with Andean ice core ?18O showing that the signal is coherent over large areas. The signal correlates most strongly with basin-wide precipitation and Amazon river discharge. We attribute the strength of this (negative) correlation mainly to the cumulative rainout processes of oxygen isotopes (Rayleigh distillation) in air parcels during westward transport across the basin. We further find a clear signature of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) in the record, with strong ENSO influences over recent decades, but weaker influence from 1925 to 1975 indicating decadal scale variation in the controls on the hydrological cycle. The record exhibits a significant increase in ?18O over the 20th century consistent with increases in Andean ?18O ice core and lake records, which we tentatively attribute to increased water vapor transport into the basin. Taking these data together, our record reveals a fresh path to diagnose and improve our understanding of variation and trends of the hydrological cycle of the world’s largest river catchment. PMID:23027960

Brienen, Roel J. W.; Helle, Gerd; Pons, Thijs L.; Guyot, Jean-Loup; Gloor, Manuel

2012-01-01

23

Oxygen isotopes in tree rings are a good proxy for Amazon precipitation and El Nino-Southern Oscillation variability.  

PubMed

We present a unique proxy for the reconstruction of variation in precipitation over the Amazon: oxygen isotope ratios in annual rings in tropical cedar (Cedrela odorata). A century-long record from northern Bolivia shows that tree rings preserve the signal of oxygen isotopes in precipitation during the wet season, with weaker influences of temperature and vapor pressure. Tree ring ?(18)O correlates strongly with ?(18)O in precipitation from distant stations in the center and west of the basin, and with Andean ice core ?(18)O showing that the signal is coherent over large areas. The signal correlates most strongly with basin-wide precipitation and Amazon river discharge. We attribute the strength of this (negative) correlation mainly to the cumulative rainout processes of oxygen isotopes (Rayleigh distillation) in air parcels during westward transport across the basin. We further find a clear signature of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) in the record, with strong ENSO influences over recent decades, but weaker influence from 1925 to 1975 indicating decadal scale variation in the controls on the hydrological cycle. The record exhibits a significant increase in ?(18)O over the 20th century consistent with increases in Andean ?(18)O ice core and lake records, which we tentatively attribute to increased water vapor transport into the basin. Taking these data together, our record reveals a fresh path to diagnose and improve our understanding of variation and trends of the hydrological cycle of the world's largest river catchment. PMID:23027960

Brienen, Roel J W; Helle, Gerd; Pons, Thijs L; Guyot, Jean-Loup; Gloor, Manuel

2012-10-16

24

The 27 May 1937 catastrophic flow failure of gold tailings at Tlalpujahua, Michoacán, México  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

On 27 May 1937, after one week of sustained heavy rainfall, a voluminous flood caused the death of at least 300 people and the destruction of the historic El Carmen church and several neighborhoods in the mining region of Tlalpujahua, Michoacán, central Mexico. This destructive flood was triggered by the breaching of the impoundment of the Los Cedros tailings and the sudden release of 16 Mt of water-saturated waste materials. The muddy silty flood, moving at estimated speeds of 20-25 m s-1, was channelized along the Dos Estrellas and Tlalpujahua drainages and devastated everything along its flow path. After advancing 2.5 km downstream, the flood slammed into El Carmen church and surrounding houses at estimated speeds of ~7 m s-1, destroying many of construction walls and covering the church floor with ~2 m of mud and debris. Eyewitness accounts and newspaper articles, together with analysis of archived photographic materials, indicated that the flood consisted of three muddy pulses. This interpretation is confirmed and extended by the results of our geological investigations during 2013 and 2014. Stratigraphic relations and granulometric data for selected proximal and distal samples show that the flood behaved as a hyperconcentrated flow along most of its trajectory. Even though premonitory signs of possible impoundment failure were reported days before the flood, and people living downstream were alerted, authorities ordered no evacuations or other mitigative actions. The catastrophic flood at Tlalpujahua provides a well-documented, though tragic, example of impoundment breaching of a tailings dam caused by the combined effects of intense rainfall, dam weakness, and inadequate emergency-management protocols - unfortunately an all too common case-scenario for most of the world's mining regions.

Macías, J. L.; Corona-Chávez, P.; Sanchéz-Núñez, J. M.; Martínez-Medina, M.; Garduño-Monroy, V. H.; García-Tenorio, F.; Cisneros-Máximo, G.

2014-08-01

25

Attaining the canopy in dry and moist tropical forests: strong differences in tree growth trajectories reflect variation in growing conditions.  

PubMed

Availability of light and water differs between tropical moist and dry forests, with typically higher understorey light levels and lower water availability in the latter. Therefore, growth trajectories of juvenile trees--those that have not attained the canopy--are likely governed by temporal fluctuations in light availability in moist forests (suppressions and releases), and by spatial heterogeneity in water availability in dry forests. In this study, we compared juvenile growth trajectories of Cedrela odorata in a dry (Mexico) and a moist forest (Bolivia) using tree rings. We tested the following specific hypotheses: (1) moist forest juveniles show more and longer suppressions, and more and stronger releases; (2) moist forest juveniles exhibit wider variation in canopy accession pattern, i.e. the typical growth trajectory to the canopy; (3) growth variation among dry forest juveniles persists over longer time due to spatial heterogeneity in water availability. As expected, the proportion of suppressed juveniles was higher in moist than in dry forest (72 vs. 17%). Moist forest suppressions also lasted longer (9 vs. 5 years). The proportion of juveniles that experienced releases in moist forest (76%) was higher than in dry forest (41%), and releases in moist forests were much stronger. Trees in the moist forest also had a wider variation in canopy accession patterns compared to the dry forest. Our results also showed that growth variation among juvenile trees persisted over substantially longer periods of time in dry forest (>64 years) compared to moist forest (12 years), most probably because of larger persistent spatial variation in water availability. Our results suggest that periodic increases in light availability are more important for attaining the canopy in moist forests, and that spatial heterogeneity in water availability governs long-term tree growth in dry forests. PMID:20033820

Brienen, Roel J W; Zuidema, Pieter A; Martínez-Ramos, Miguel

2010-06-01

26

The status of conservation of urban forests in eastern Amazonia.  

PubMed

This study aims to identify the remnant tree flora in six forest fragments in the metropolitan area of Belém and to analyze these fragments in terms of biological conservation, species richness and diversity in the local urban landscape. The fragments and their respective sampling areas were as follows: Amafrutas reserve (15 ha), Trambioca Is. reserve (2 ha), Bosque Rodrigues Alves city park (15 ha), Combu Is. reserve (10 ha), Gunma Park reserve (10 ha) and Mocambo reserve (5 ha). Inventories were built from lineal plots of 250 m² and included trees with DBH equal to or greater than 10 cm at a height of 1.3 m above ground. Sixty-nine families and 759 species, of which eight were officially listed as endangered (Brazilian National Flora: Ministry of Environment, Normative Instruction of September, 2008; Pará State Flora: Decree Nº. 802 of February 2008) were recorded. These endangered species are: Aspidosperma desmanthum Benth. ex Müll. Arg. (Apocynaceae), Cedrela odorata L. (Meliaceae), Eschweilera piresii S.A Mori (Lecythidaceae), Euxylophora paraensis Huber (Rutaceae), Hymenolobium excelsum Ducke (Leguminosae), Manilkara huberi (Ducke) Chevalier (Sapotaceae), Tabebuia impetiginosa (Mart. ex DC.) Standl. (Bignoniaceae), Mezilaurus itauba (Meisn.) Taub. ex Mez (Lauraceae) and Qualea coerulea Aubl. (Vochysiaceae). Emergency actions such as implementing management plans for already existing Conservation Units, the creation of new such units in areas of primary forest fragments (as in the case of the Amafrutas reserve), as well as the intensification of actions of surveillance and monitoring, should be undertaken by Federal, State, and Municipal environmental agencies so as to ensure the conservation of these last primary forest remnants in the metropolitan area of Belém. PMID:22735132

Amaral, D D; Vieira, I C G; Salomão, R P; Almeida, S S; Jardim, M A G

2012-05-01

27

Attaining the canopy in dry and moist tropical forests: strong differences in tree growth trajectories reflect variation in growing conditions  

PubMed Central

Availability of light and water differs between tropical moist and dry forests, with typically higher understorey light levels and lower water availability in the latter. Therefore, growth trajectories of juvenile trees—those that have not attained the canopy—are likely governed by temporal fluctuations in light availability in moist forests (suppressions and releases), and by spatial heterogeneity in water availability in dry forests. In this study, we compared juvenile growth trajectories of Cedrela odorata in a dry (Mexico) and a moist forest (Bolivia) using tree rings. We tested the following specific hypotheses: (1) moist forest juveniles show more and longer suppressions, and more and stronger releases; (2) moist forest juveniles exhibit wider variation in canopy accession pattern, i.e. the typical growth trajectory to the canopy; (3) growth variation among dry forest juveniles persists over longer time due to spatial heterogeneity in water availability. As expected, the proportion of suppressed juveniles was higher in moist than in dry forest (72 vs. 17%). Moist forest suppressions also lasted longer (9 vs. 5 years). The proportion of juveniles that experienced releases in moist forest (76%) was higher than in dry forest (41%), and releases in moist forests were much stronger. Trees in the moist forest also had a wider variation in canopy accession patterns compared to the dry forest. Our results also showed that growth variation among juvenile trees persisted over substantially longer periods of time in dry forest (>64 years) compared to moist forest (12 years), most probably because of larger persistent spatial variation in water availability. Our results suggest that periodic increases in light availability are more important for attaining the canopy in moist forests, and that spatial heterogeneity in water availability governs long-term tree growth in dry forests. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00442-009-1540-5) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20033820

Zuidema, Pieter A.; Martínez-Ramos, Miguel

2009-01-01

28

Assessing the extent of "conflict of use" in multipurpose tropical forest trees: a regional view.  

PubMed

In the context of multiple forest management, multipurpose tree species which provide both timber and non-timber forest products (NTFP), present particular challenges as the potential of conflicting use for either product may be high. One key aspect is that the magnitude of conflict of use can be location specific, thus adding complexity to policy development. This paper focuses on the extent to which the potential for conflict of use in multipurpose tree species varies across the Amazonian lowland forests shared by Peru, Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador and Venezuela, emphasizing the economic dimension of conflict. Based on a review of the current normative and regulatory aspects of timber and NTFP extraction in the five countries, the paper also briefly discusses the opportunities and constraints for harmonization of timber and NTFP management of multipurpose species across the region. It was found that about half of the 336 timber species reviewed across the five countries also have non-timber uses. Eleven timber species are multipurpose in all five countries: Calophyllum brasiliense, Cedrela odorata, Ceiba pentandra, Clarisia racemosa, Ficus insipida, Jacaranda copaia, Schefflera morototoni, Simarouba amara and Terminalia amazonia. Seven other multipurpose species occurred only in either Venezuela (Tabebuia impetiginosa, Spondias mombin, Pentaclethra macroloba, Copaifera officinalis, Chlorophora tinctoria, Carapa guianensis) or Ecuador (Tabebuia chrysantha). Four multipurpose tree species presented the highest potential of conflict of use across the region: Dipteryx odorata, Tabebuia serratifolia, Hymenaea courbaril and Myroxylon balsamum yet these were not evenly distributed across all five countries. None of the five studied countries have specific legislation to promote sustainable use of any of the multipurpose species reported here and thus mitigate potential conflict of use; nor documented management options for integration or else segregation of both their timber and NTFP values. PMID:24061084

Herrero-Jáuregui, Cristina; Guariguata, Manuel R; Cárdenas, Dairon; Vilanova, Emilio; Robles, Marco; Licona, Juan Carlos; Nalvarte, Walter

2013-11-30

29

Induction of laccases in Trametes versicolor by aqueous wood extracts.  

PubMed

The induction of laccase isoforms in Trametes versicolor HEMIM-9 by aqueous extracts (AE) from softwood and hardwood was studied. Samples of sawdust of Pinus sp., Cedrela sp., and Quercus sp. were boiled in water to obtain AE. Different volumes of each AE were added to fungal cultures to determine the amount of AE needed for the induction experiments. Laccase activity was assayed every 24 h for 15 days. The addition of each AE (50 to 150 ?l) to the fungal cultures increased laccase production compared to the control (0.42 ± 0.01 U ml(-1)). The highest laccase activities detected were 1.92 ± 0.15 U ml(-1) (pine), 1.87 ± 0.26 U ml(-1) (cedar), and 1.56 ± 0.34 U ml(-1) (oak); laccase productivities were also significantly increased. Larger volumes of any AE inhibited mycelial growth. Electrophoretic analysis revealed two laccase bands (lcc1 and lcc2) for all the treatments. However, when lcc2 was analyzed by isoelectric focusing, inducer-dependent isoform patterns composed of three (pine AE), four (oak AE), and six laccase bands (cedar AE) were observed. Thus, AE from softwood and hardwood had induction effects in T. versicolor HEMIM-9, as indicated by the increase in laccase activity and different isoform patterns. All of the enzymatic extracts were able to decolorize the dye Orange II. Dye decolorization was mainly influenced by pH. The optimum pH for decolorization was pH 5 (85%), followed by pH 7 (50%) and pH 3 (15%). No significant differences in the dye decolorizing capacity were detected between the control and the differentially induced laccase extracts (oak, pine and cedar). This could be due to the catalytic activities of isoforms with pI 5.4 and 5.8, which were detected under all induction conditions. PMID:23861040

Bertrand, Brandt; Martínez-Morales, Fernando; Tinoco, Raunel; Rojas-Trejo, Sonia; Serrano-Carreón, Leobardo; Trejo-Hernández, María R

2014-01-01

30

Insect growth regulatory effects of some extracts and sterols from Myrtillocactus geometrizans (Cactaceae) against Spodoptera frugiperda and Tenebrio molitor.  

PubMed

A methanol extract from the roots and aerial parts of Myrtillocactus geometrizans (Cactaceae) yielded peniocerol 1, macdougallin 2, and chichipegenin 3. The natural products 1, 2 their mixtures, MeOH and CH(2)Cl(2) extracts showed insecticidal and insect growth regulatory activity against fall armyworm [Spodoptera frugiperda J. E. Smith (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)], an important insect pest of corn, and [Tenebrio molitor (Coleoptera)], a pest of stored grains in Mexico. The most active compounds were 1, 2, and a mixture (M(2)) of 1 and 2 (6:4). All these extracts, compounds and the mixture had insect growth regulating (IGR) activity between 5.0 and 50.0 ppm and insecticidal effects between 50 and 300 ppm in diets. The extracts were insecticidal to larvae, with lethal doses between 100 and 200 ppm. These compounds appear to have selective effects on the pre-emergence metabolism of Coleoptera, because in all treatments of the larvae of T. molitor, pupation were shortened and this process show precociousness in relation to controls. In contrast to S. frugiperda larvae, onset of pupation was noticeably delayed. Emergence in both cases was drastically diminished. In both pupae and in the few adults that were able to emerge, many deformations were observed. The results of these assays indicated that the compounds were more active than other known natural insect growth inhibitors such as gedunin and methanol extracts of Cedrela salvadorensis and Yucca periculosa. Peniocerol, macdougallin and chichipegenin, as well as mixtures of these substances, may be useful as natural insecticidal agents. PMID:16122768

Céspedes, Carlos L; Salazar, J Rodrigo; Martínez, Mariano; Aranda, Eduardo

2005-10-01

31

An efficient immunodetection method for histone modifications in plants  

PubMed Central

Background Epigenetic mechanisms can be highly dynamic, but the cross-talk among them and with the genome is still poorly understood. Many of these mechanisms work at different places in the cell and at different times of organism development. Covalent histone modifications are one of the most complex and studied epigenetic mechanisms involved in cellular reprogramming and development in plants. Therefore, the knowledge of the spatial distribution of histone methylation in different tissues is important to understand their behavior on specific cells. Results Based on the importance of epigenetic marks for biology, we present a simplified, inexpensive and efficient protocol for in situ immunolocalization on different tissues such as flowers, buds, callus, somatic embryo and meristematic tissue from several plants of agronomical and biological importance. Here, we fully describe all the steps to perform the localization of histone modifications. Using this method, we were able to visualize the distribution of H3K4me3 and H3K9me2 without loss of histological integrity of tissues from several plants, including Agave tequilana, Capsicum chinense, Coffea canephora and Cedrela odorata, as well as Arabidopsis thaliana. Conclusions There are many protocols to study chromatin modifications; however, most of them are expensive, difficult and require sophisticated equipment. Here, we provide an efficient protocol for in situ localization of histone methylation that dispenses with the use of expensive and sensitive enzymes. The present method can be used to investigate the cellular distribution and localization of a wide array of proteins, which could help to clarify the biological role that they play at specific times and places in different tissues of various plant species. PMID:24341414

2013-01-01

32

Motions of the California Borderland: Results from the SCIGN array  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The California borderland is the geomorphic region offshore Southern California, extending from Point Conception to the Vizcaino Peninsula in Baja California, Mexico. Its western limits are delineated by the Patton escarpment to the north and the Cedros Deep to the south. Except for the west-trending Santa Barbara Channel and Channel Islands, the basin and ridge structures of this 250-km wide zone of rugged topography are largely parallel to the northwest trending coast and the relative motion between the North America and Pacific plates, and are characterized by oblique faulting throughout. We investigate the current motion of the Borderlands region by analyzing continuous data from GPS stations of the SCIGN array located on the Southern California coast and the Channel Islands. After subtracting the interseismic signal due to strain accumulation at the San Andreas, San Jacinto, Elsinore, and Garlock faults from the regional velocity field, we find that the Channel Islands show up to \\(4.5\\pm 0.5\\) mm/yr residual motion relative to the Pacific plate, suggesting that significant shear occurs west of the Channel Islands. Our estimates of the rate of shortening across the Santa Barbara channel (\\(5\\pm 0.4\\) mm/yr), shortening across the Ventura basin (\\(6\\pm 1\\) mm/yr), shortening offshore Ventura basin (\\(1\\pm 0.6\\) mm/yr), and shortening across the LA basin (\\(6\\pm 0.5\\) mm/yr) are similar to previous estimates. Shortening between Palos Verdes and Santa Catalina is \\(1\\pm 0.7\\) mm/yr. Motion between San Diego and San Clemente island is no more than \\(2.7\\pm 0.5\\) mm/yr, lower than Larson's [1993] estimate of \\(5.9\\pm 1.8\\) mm/yr, and is also lower than the combined geological estimates of slip rates on three major faults located in the region (the Coronado Bank, San Diego Trough, and San Clemente faults). If the geological estimates for the Coronado Bank (2 mm/yr) and San Diego Trough (1.5 mm/yr) faults are accurate, our geodetic data do not show the strain accumulation necessary to produce a large earthquake on the San Clemente fault. The recent (August 2001) \\(M\\sim 4\\) earthquakes near San Clemente may indicate that more of the slip occurs on the San Clemente fault.

Prawirodirdjo, L. M.; Bock, Y.; Nikolaidis, R.

2001-12-01

33

Region-wide trends of nesting ospreys in northwestern Mexico: a three-decade perspective  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We used a double-sampling technique (air plus ground survey) in 2006, with partial double coverage, to estimate the present size of the Osprey (Pandion haliaetus) nesting population in northwestern Mexico (coastal Baja California, islands in the Gulf of California, and coastal Sonora and Sinaloa). With the exception of Natividad, Cedros, and San Benitos islands along the Pacific coast of Baja California (all three excluded from our coverage in 2006 due to fog), this survey was a repeat of previous surveys conducted by us with the same protocol in 1977 and 1992/1993, allowing for estimates of regional population trends. The minimum population estimate for the area we surveyed in 2006 was 1343 nesting pairs, an 81% increase since 1977, but only a 3% increase since 1992/1993. The population on the Gulf side of Baja California generally remained stable during the three surveys (255, 236, and 252 pairs, respectively). The population of the Midriff Islands (Gulf of California in the vicinity of 29°N latitude) remained similar from 1992/1993 (308 pairs) to 2006 (289 pairs), but with notable population changes on the largest two islands (Guardian Angel: 45 to 105 pairs [133% increase]; Tiburón: 164 to 109 pairs [34% decrease]). The minimum estimated Osprey population on the Sonora mainland decreased in a manner similar to adjacent Isla Tiburón, i.e., by 26%, from 214 pairs in 1993 to 158 pairs in 2006. In contrast, the population in coastal Sinaloa, which had increased by 150% between 1977 and 1993, grew again by 58% between 1993 and 2006, from 180 to 285 pairs. Our survey confirmed previously described patterns of rapid population changes at a local level, coupled with apparent shifts in spatial distribution. The large ground-nesting population that until recently nested on two islands in San Ignacio Lagoon ( Pacific Ocean side, Baja California) was no longer present on the islands in 2006, but an equivalent number of pairs were found to the north and south of the lagoon, nesting in small towns and along adjoining overhead electric lines, with no overall change in population size for that general area (198 pairs in 1992; 199 in 2006). Use of artificial nesting structures was 4.3% in 1977 and 6.2% in 1992/1993, but jumped to 26.4% in 2006. Use of poles that support overhead electric lines poses a risk of electrocution to Ospreys and also causes power outages and fires. We recommend modification of these poles to safely accommodate Osprey nests, as has been successfully accomplished in many countries.

Henny, Charles J.; Anderson, Daniel W.; Vera, Aradit Castellanos; Cartron, Jean-Luc E.

2008-01-01

34

Water use in four model tropical plant associations established in the lowlands of Costa Rica.  

PubMed

We examined soil water use patterns of four model plant associations established in the North Caribbean lowlands of Costa Rica by comparing the stable hydrogen isotope composition, deltaD, in xylem sap and in soil water at different depths, under rainy and dry conditions. Four 5-year-old model plant associations composed of 2 tree species (Hyeronima alchorneoides and Cedrela odorata) having different architecture and phenology were studied. Average tree height was 8.9 and 7.6 m, respectively. Each tree species was grown in monoculture and in polyculture with 2 perennial monocotyledons (Euterpe oleracea and Heliconia imbricata). Maximum rooting depth at the time of 6D determination was approximately 2 m for almost all species. Most roots of all species were concentrated in the upper soil layers. Stomatal conductance to water vapor (gS) was higher in the deciduous C. odorata than in the evergreen H. alchorneoides; within each species, g, did not differ when the trees were grown in mono or in polyculture. During the rainy season, gradients in soil water 6D were not observed. Average rainy season xylem sap deltaD did not differ among members of the plant combinations tested (-30% per thousand), and was more similar to deltaD values of shallow soil water. Under dry conditions, volumetric soil water content declined from 50 to approximately 35%, and modest gradients in soil water deltaD were observed. Xylem sap deltaD obtained during dry conditions was significantly lower than rainy season values. Xylem sap deltaD of plants growing in the four associations varied between -9 and -22% per hundred, indicating that shallow water was predominantly absorbed during the dry period too. Differences in xylem sap deltaD of trees and monocots were also detected, but no significant patterns emerged. The results suggest that: (a) the plant associations examined extracted water predominantly from shallow soil layers (<1 m), (b) the natural isotopic variation in soil and plant water at the study site was low, and (c) the plant mixes obtain water from more than a single soil layer simultaneously. Temporal factors were important in determining the competition and complementary relations observed among the trees and the perennial monocots. Under the prevailing environmental conditions, water use in these plant associations was determined largely by species-specific attributes such as biomass allocation to fine roots, phenology, and canopy architecture, and to a lesser extent by water limitations. PMID:19419093

Gutiérrez-Soto, Marco V; Ewel, John J

2008-12-01

35

Hydrogeology study of Faial Island, the Azores  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Azores Archipelago is a Portuguese territory formed by nine islands divided into three groups (eastern, central and western) located in the North Atlantic Ocean. The islands stretch along a NW-SE direction near the so called Azores triple junction, where the North American Plate, the African Plate and the Eurasian Plate meet. Faial Island is the westernmost island of the central group, located between 38°30'56'' to 38°38'40'' N latitude and 28°35'55'' to 28°50'06'' W longitude. Faial is affected by important tectonic features with a WNW-ESE general trend. These features combined with faults with NNW-SSE to NW-SE and NE-SW directions may have conditioned the emplacement of the central volcano with caldera on the central part of the island. In what concerns the geomorphology, besides the central volcano with caldera, one should refer to the graben on the eastern sector, to the scoria cones alignment on the W and to the flattened sector SE of the central volcano. The drainage network is markedly controlled by tectonics and the drainage density is higher on the northern and southern flanks of the central volcano. The origin of the island started more than 800000 years ago with the emplacement of a composite volcano on the NE of the island (Ribeirinha Complex) consisting of a series of lava flows of basaltic to benmoreitic composition and undifferentiated pyroclasts. The complex (Cedros Complex) which followed is about 580000 years old and corresponds to the central volcano formed by suites of basaltic to trachitic lava flows, pyroclasts and domes. Approximately 50000 ago an important fissural activity took place on the eastern part of the island and originated Almoxarife Formation consisting of basaltic to benmoreitic lava flows, scoria cones and tuff cones. The Caldeira Formation (~16000 years) comprises benmoreitic to trachytic materials emitted from the central volcano, whose explosive phases generated ten members formed mainly by pumice fall deposits and pyroclastic flows. Capelo Complex, which is partially contemporary to the previous formation, comprises the western fissural volcanism and the historical eruptions of Cabeço do Fogo and Capelinhos. Groundwater occurs in two main aquifer systems: (1) the basal aquifer that corresponds to the freshwater lens floating over underlying salt water and (2) perched water bodies. 15 drilled wells and 10 hand dug wells extract water from the basal aquifer and about 80 springs drain the volcanic edifices at different altitudes. In what concerns hydrodynamic characterisation, an estimate of the recession constant of the springs yielded values from 2x10-3 to 14.2x10-3. Calculated transmissivity values for the basal aquifer and a perched aquifer are within the range of 9.5x10-3 to 3x10-2 m2/s. Hydraulic diffusivity estimated from tidal effect measurements has a value of 2634 m2/d. Physical and chemical water analysis shows that they are cold, except for two of them. Four water samples show high CO2 contents. Water from springs and from wells not contaminated by salt water intrusion are bicarbonated and sodium rich in composition while water from contaminated wells has higher chloride and magnesium contents. Geochemical modelling indicates that the major mineralizing processes are silicate dissolution and salt water intrusion.

Coutinho, R. M.; Cruz, J. V.

2011-12-01

36

Graben calderas of the Sierra Madre Occidental: The case of Guanajuato, central Mexico  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Sierra Madre Occidental (SMO) volcanic province is characterized by voluminous silicic ignimbrites that reach an accumulated thickness of 500 to 1500 m. A single ignimbrite can reach up to 350 m thick in its outflow facies. This ignimbrite sequence formed mostly within 38-23 Ma, building up a total estimated volume of ca. 580,000 km3 making the SMO the largest ignimbrite province of the world. We have showed that several and probably most of the SMO ignimbrites were erupted from fissures associated to Basin and Range fault systems or grabens (Geology, 2003), thus naming these volcano-tectonic structures as graben calderas (Caldera Volcanism book, Elsevier, 2008). Generally, the sequence observed in graben calderas include, from oldest to youngest, alluvial fan deposits combined with lacustrine deposits, pyroclastic surge deposits and minor volume ignimbrites, a large-volume ignimbrite that could be massive or made of successive layers, and sometimes silicic lava domes and/or mafic fissural lavas both with vents aligned with the graben trend. Fallout deposits, plinian or non-plinian, are not observed in the sequence. Thus, onset of caldera collapse represented by the major ignimbrite must occur just after deposition of continental sediments within the graben domain. A similar volcano-tectonic development is observed in pull-apart grabens. Therefore, extensional or transtensional tectonics, before and during caldera collapse, and the emplacement of a subgraben shallow silicic magma chamber are the necessary conditions for the development of graben calderas. We describe here the case of the Guanajuato graben caldera, located in the central part of Mexico and in the southeastern portion of the SMO volcanic province. The caldera is part of the economically important mining district of Guanajuato, with 28 silver mines, some active since the 16th century. The caldera structure, a rectangle of 10 x 16 km, was controlled by NW and NE regional fault systems. Most ore deposits occur along this orthogonal faulting network, but mainly along the NW fault of Veta Madre that crosses through the center of the caldera. The mid-Tertiary stratigraphy in Guanajuato follows the general sequence observed in graben calderas; i.e., from oldest to youngest includes 1) at least 1,500 m of alluvial fan deposits within a tectonic basin (Guanajuato Red Conglomerate), 2) pyroclastic flow deposits, consisting of surge deposits (Loseros Formation) that are concordant with a massive, large volume, rhyolitic ignimbrite (Bufa Rhyolite), which is covered by a layered series of pyroclastic flow deposits (Calderones Formation), and 3) effusive volcanism in the form of rhyolitic lava domes (Chichíndaro Rhyolite) and basaltic-andesite dikes and lavas (Cedros Andesite). The Guanajuato graben caldera formed at about 33 Ma, based on our new U-Pb zr age of the main ignimbrite, Bufa Rhyolite.

Aguirre-Diaz, G. J.; Tristán-González, M.; Labarthe-Hernández, G.; Marti, J.

2013-12-01