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Sample records for cell antigen recognition

  1. Dual antigenic recognition by cloned human gamma delta T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Holoshitz, J; Vila, L M; Keroack, B J; McKinley, D R; Bayne, N K

    1992-01-01

    The function of gamma delta T cells is still elusive. The nature of the antigens that they recognize and the mode of presentation of these antigens are largely unknown. The majority of human peripheral gamma delta T cells bear a V gamma 9/V delta 2 T cell receptor, and display nonclonal reactivity to mycobacteria, without restriction by MHC. It is unknown whether these cells have clonal antigenic specificity as well. Here we describe rheumatoid arthritis-derived V gamma 9/V delta 2 T cell clones, displaying dual antigenic recognition: a nonclonal, MHC-unrestricted recognition of mycobacteria, and a clonal recognition of a short tetanus toxin peptide presented by HLA-DRw53, a nonpolymorphic class II MHC molecule associated with susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis. This is the first evidence that V gamma 9/V delta 2 T cells can recognize nominal antigenic peptides presented by class II MHC molecules. These results suggest that much like alpha beta T cells, V gamma 9/V delta 2 cells may contribute to the immune response against foreign antigens in an antigen-specific and MHC-restricted manner. The reactivity of these gamma delta T cells to mycobacteria may represent a superantigen-like phenomenon. PMID:1345917

  2. CD1-Restricted T Cell Recognition of Microbial Lipoglycan Antigens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sieling, P. A.; Chatterjee, D.; Porcelli, S. A.; Prigozy, T. I.; Mazzaccaro, R. J.; Soriano, T.; Bloom, B. R.; Brenner, M. B.; Kronenberg, M.; Brennan, P. J.; Modlin, R. L.

    1995-07-01

    It has long been the paradigm that T cells recognize peptide antigens presented by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules. However, nonpeptide antigens can be presented to T cells by human CD1b molecules, which are not encoded by the MHC. A major class of microbial antigens associated with pathogenicity are lipoglycans. It is shown here that human CD1b presents the defined mycobacterial lipoglycan lipoarabinomannan (LAM) to αβ T cell receptor-bearing lymphocytes. Presentation of these lipoglycan antigens required internalization and endosomal acidification. The T cell recognition required mannosides with α(1-->2) linkages and a phosphatidylinositol unit. T cells activated by LAM produced interferon γ and were cytolytic. Thus, an important class of microbial molecules, the lipoglycans, is a part of the universe of foreign antigens recognized by human T cells.

  3. Analyzing Antigen Recognition by Natural Killer T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zeissig, Sebastian; Olszak, Torsten; Melum, Espen; Blumberg, Richard S.

    2013-01-01

    Natural Killer T (NKT) cells are a subset of T lymphocytes that recognize a wide variety of lipid antigens presented by CD1 molecules. NKT cells exhibit rapid activation after recognition of cognate antigens, secrete abundant amounts of T helper (Th) 1, Th2, and Th17 cytokines within hours of activation and shape the immune response through subsequent activation of dendritic, NK, T and B cells. NKT cells therefore play central roles in antimicrobial and anticancer immunity and in modulation of various autoimmune disorders. Consequently, recent research has focused on the discovery of microbial and self-antigens involved in NKT cell activation. In this chapter, we discuss different strategies for studying antigen recognition by NKT cells including CD1d tetramer-based approaches and in vitro assays characterizing NKT cell activation in response to lipid antigen presentation. While toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists and cytokines such as IL-12 are critical for NKT cell activation in vivo, particularly in the context of microbial infection, methods for detection of TLR- and cytokine-dependent NKT cell activation will not be discussed in this section. PMID:23329514

  4. Toxicities of chimeric antigen receptor T cells: recognition and management.

    PubMed

    Brudno, Jennifer N; Kochenderfer, James N

    2016-06-30

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells can produce durable remissions in hematologic malignancies that are not responsive to standard therapies. Yet the use of CAR T cells is limited by potentially severe toxicities. Early case reports of unexpected organ damage and deaths following CAR T-cell therapy first highlighted the possible dangers of this new treatment. CAR T cells can potentially damage normal tissues by specifically targeting a tumor-associated antigen that is also expressed on those tissues. Cytokine release syndrome (CRS), a systemic inflammatory response caused by cytokines released by infused CAR T cells can lead to widespread reversible organ dysfunction. CRS is the most common type of toxicity caused by CAR T cells. Neurologic toxicity due to CAR T cells might in some cases have a different pathophysiology than CRS and requires different management. Aggressive supportive care is necessary for all patients experiencing CAR T-cell toxicities, with early intervention for hypotension and treatment of concurrent infections being essential. Interleukin-6 receptor blockade with tocilizumab remains the mainstay pharmacologic therapy for CRS, though indications for administration vary among centers. Corticosteroids should be reserved for neurologic toxicities and CRS not responsive to tocilizumab. Pharmacologic management is complicated by the risk of immunosuppressive therapy abrogating the antimalignancy activity of the CAR T cells. This review describes the toxicities caused by CAR T cells and reviews the published approaches used to manage toxicities. We present guidelines for treating patients experiencing CRS and other adverse events following CAR T-cell therapy. PMID:27207799

  5. Interferon-γ Reduces Melanosomal Antigen Expression and Recognition of Melanoma Cells by Cytotoxic T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Le Poole, I. Caroline; Riker, Adam I.; Quevedo, M. Eugenia; Stennett, Lawrence S.; Wang, Ena; Marincola, Francesco M.; Kast, W. Martin; Robinson, June K.; Nickoloff, Brian J.

    2002-01-01

    In malignant melanoma, tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes are frequently reactive with melanosomal antigens. Achieving complete remissions by peptide therapy is frequently hampered by metastases evading immune recognition. The tumor microenvironment seems to favor reduced expression of target antigens by melanoma cells. Among candidate factors, interferon-γ (IFN-γ) (102 to 103 U/ml) suppressed expression of antigens MART-1, TRP-1, and gp100 by M14 melanoma cells as shown by immunohistology and fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis, reducing MART-1 expression by >65%. Northern blot analysis revealed that reduced expression was regulated at the transcriptional level, demonstrating a 79% reduction in MART-1 transcript abundance after 32 hours of IFN-γ treatment. To evaluate consequences of IFN-γ exposure for immune recognition, MART-1-responsive T cells were reacted with pretreated HLA-matched melanoma cells. Cytotoxicity was reduced up to 78% by IFN-γ pretreatment, and was restored by addition of MART-1 peptide AAGIGILTV for 2 hours. Examination of melanoma lesions by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction revealed up to 188-fold more abundant IFN-γ transcripts when compared to control skin. Laser capture microdissection and immunohistology localized most IFN-γ-producing T cells to the tumor stroma. Reduced MART-1 expression was frequently observed in adjacent tumor cells. Consequently, IFN-γ may enhance inflammatory responses yet hamper effective recognition of melanoma cells. PMID:11839572

  6. Precision Tumor Recognition by T Cells With Combinatorial Antigen-Sensing Circuits.

    PubMed

    Roybal, Kole T; Rupp, Levi J; Morsut, Leonardo; Walker, Whitney J; McNally, Krista A; Park, Jason S; Lim, Wendell A

    2016-02-11

    T cells can be re-directed to kill cancer cells using chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) or T cell receptors (TCRs). This approach, however, is constrained by the rarity of tumor-specific single antigens. Targeting antigens also found on bystander tissues can cause life-threatening adverse effects. A powerful way to enhance ON-target activity of therapeutic T cells is to engineer them to require combinatorial antigens. Here, we engineer a combinatorially activated T cell circuit in which a synthetic Notch receptor for one antigen induces the expression of a CAR for a second antigen. These dual-receptor AND-gate T cells are only armed and activated in the presence of dual antigen tumor cells. These T cells show precise therapeutic discrimination in vivo-sparing single antigen "bystander" tumors while efficiently clearing combinatorial antigen "disease" tumors. This type of precision dual-receptor circuit opens the door to immune recognition of a wider range of tumors. VIDEO ABSTRACT. PMID:26830879

  7. Atypical natural killer T-cell receptor recognition of CD1d-lipid antigens.

    PubMed

    Le Nours, Jérôme; Praveena, T; Pellicci, Daniel G; Gherardin, Nicholas A; Ross, Fiona J; Lim, Ricky T; Besra, Gurdyal S; Keshipeddy, Santosh; Richardson, Stewart K; Howell, Amy R; Gras, Stephanie; Godfrey, Dale I; Rossjohn, Jamie; Uldrich, Adam P

    2016-01-01

    Crucial to Natural Killer T (NKT) cell function is the interaction between their T-cell receptor (TCR) and CD1d-antigen complex. However, the diversity of the NKT cell repertoire and the ensuing interactions with CD1d-antigen remain unclear. We describe an atypical population of CD1d-α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer)-reactive human NKT cells that differ markedly from the prototypical TRAV10-TRAJ18-TRBV25-1(+) type I NKT cell repertoire. These cells express a range of TCR α- and β-chains that show differential recognition of glycolipid antigens. Two atypical NKT TCRs (TRAV21-TRAJ8-TRBV7-8 and TRAV12-3-TRAJ27-TRBV6-5) bind orthogonally over the A'-pocket of CD1d, adopting distinct docking modes that contrast with the docking mode of all type I NKT TCR-CD1d-antigen complexes. Moreover, the interactions with α-GalCer differ between the type I and these atypical NKT TCRs. Accordingly, diverse NKT TCR repertoire usage manifests in varied docking strategies and specificities towards CD1d-α-GalCer and related antigens, thus providing far greater scope for diverse glycolipid antigen recognition. PMID:26875526

  8. Atypical natural killer T-cell receptor recognition of CD1d–lipid antigens

    PubMed Central

    Le Nours, Jérôme; Praveena, T.; Pellicci, Daniel G.; Gherardin, Nicholas A.; Ross, Fiona J.; Lim, Ricky T.; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Keshipeddy, Santosh; Richardson, Stewart K.; Howell, Amy R.; Gras, Stephanie; Godfrey, Dale I.; Rossjohn, Jamie; Uldrich, Adam P.

    2016-01-01

    Crucial to Natural Killer T (NKT) cell function is the interaction between their T-cell receptor (TCR) and CD1d-antigen complex. However, the diversity of the NKT cell repertoire and the ensuing interactions with CD1d-antigen remain unclear. We describe an atypical population of CD1d–α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer)-reactive human NKT cells that differ markedly from the prototypical TRAV10-TRAJ18-TRBV25-1+ type I NKT cell repertoire. These cells express a range of TCR α- and β-chains that show differential recognition of glycolipid antigens. Two atypical NKT TCRs (TRAV21-TRAJ8-TRBV7–8 and TRAV12-3-TRAJ27-TRBV6-5) bind orthogonally over the A′-pocket of CD1d, adopting distinct docking modes that contrast with the docking mode of all type I NKT TCR-CD1d-antigen complexes. Moreover, the interactions with α-GalCer differ between the type I and these atypical NKT TCRs. Accordingly, diverse NKT TCR repertoire usage manifests in varied docking strategies and specificities towards CD1d–α-GalCer and related antigens, thus providing far greater scope for diverse glycolipid antigen recognition. PMID:26875526

  9. A structural basis for antigen recognition by the T cell-like lymphocytes of sea lamprey

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Lu; Velikovsky, C. Alejandro; Xu, Gang; Iyer, Lakshminarayan M.; Tasumi, Satoshi; Kerzic, Melissa C.; Flajnik, Martin F.; Aravind, L.; Pancer, Zeev; Mariuzza, Roy A.

    2010-10-28

    Adaptive immunity in jawless vertebrates is mediated by leucine-rich repeat proteins called 'variable lymphocyte receptors' (VLRs). Two types of VLR (A and B) are expressed by mutually exclusive lymphocyte populations in lamprey. VLRB lymphocytes resemble the B cells of jawed vertebrates; VLRA lymphocytes are similar to T cells. We determined the structure of a high-affinity VLRA isolated from lamprey immunized with hen egg white lysozyme (HEL) in unbound and antigen-bound forms. The VLRA-HEL complex demonstrates that certain VLRAs, like {gamma}{delta} T-cell receptors (TCRs) but unlike {alpha}{beta} TCRs, can recognize antigens directly, without a requirement for processing or antigen-presenting molecules. Thus, these VLRAs feature the nanomolar affinities of antibodies, the direct recognition of unprocessed antigens of both antibodies and {gamma}{delta} TCRs, and the exclusive expression on the lymphocyte surface that is unique to {alpha}{beta} and {gamma}{delta} TCRs.

  10. Recognition of Major Histocompatibility Complex Antigens on Cultured Human Biliary Epithelial Cells by Alloreactive Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Saidman, Susan L.; Duquesnoy, Rene J.; Zeevi, Adriana; Fung, John J.; Starzl, Thomas E.; Demetris, A. Jake

    2010-01-01

    We have developed an in vitro system to study the interactions between biliary epithelium and lymphocytes using cultured human biliary epithelial cells. No class II antigens were detected by immunoperoxidase staining of the normal biliary epithelial cells, but alloactivated lymphocyte culture supernatants were able to induce class II expression. The activity of the supernatants was blocked with an anti-γ-interferon monoclonal antibody. In addition, recombinant human γ-interferon alone induced the expression of class II antigens and increased the intensity of class I staining of cultured biliary epithelial cells. Biliary epithelial cell–induced proliferation of alloreactive T lymphocytes demonstrated that the major histocompatibility complex molecules carry functional lymphocyte-activating determinants. The recognition of major histocompatibility complex determinants was confirmed by monoclonal antibody–blocking studies and by stimulation of an alloreactive T-cell clone. However, the biliary epithelial cells were much less potent stimulators than arterial endothelial cells tested in the same assay system. PMID:1704868

  11. On the logic of restrictive recognition of peptide by the T-cell antigen receptor

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    This essay provides an analysis of the inadequacy of the current view of restrictive recognition of peptide by the T-cell antigen receptor. A competing model is developed, and the experimental evidence for the prevailing model is reinterpreted in the new framework. The goal is to contrast the two models with respect to their consistency, coverage of the data, explanatory power, and predictability. PMID:20931295

  12. Heat Shock Protein-90 Inhibitors Enhance Antigen Expression on Melanomas and Increase T Cell Recognition of Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Haggerty, Timothy J.; Dunn, Ian S.; Rose, Lenora B.; Newton, Estelle E.; Pandolfi, Franco; Kurnick, James T.

    2014-01-01

    In an effort to enhance antigen-specific T cell recognition of cancer cells, we have examined numerous modulators of antigen-expression. In this report we demonstrate that twelve different Hsp90 inhibitors (iHsp90) share the ability to increase the expression of differentiation antigens and MHC Class I antigens. These iHsp90 are active in several molecular and cellular assays on a series of tumor cell lines, including eleven human melanomas, a murine B16 melanoma, and two human glioma-derived cell lines. Intra-cytoplasmic antibody staining showed that all of the tested iHsp90 increased expression of the melanocyte differentiation antigens Melan-A/MART-1, gp100, and TRP-2, as well as MHC Class I. The gliomas showed enhanced gp100 and MHC staining. Quantitative analysis of mRNA levels showed a parallel increase in message transcription, and a reporter assay shows induction of promoter activity for Melan-A/MART-1 gene. In addition, iHsp90 increased recognition of tumor cells by T cells specific for Melan-A/MART-1. In contrast to direct Hsp90 client proteins, the increased levels of full-length differentiation antigens that result from iHsp90 treatment are most likely the result of transcriptional activation of their encoding genes. In combination, these results suggest that iHsp90 improve recognition of tumor cells by T cells specific for a melanoma-associated antigen as a result of increasing the expressed intracellular antigen pool available for processing and presentation by MHC Class I, along with increased levels of MHC Class I itself. As these Hsp90 inhibitors do not interfere with T cell function, they could have potential for use in immunotherapy of cancer. PMID:25503774

  13. Intravacuolar Membranes Regulate CD8 T Cell Recognition of Membrane-Bound Toxoplasma gondii Protective Antigen.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Jodie; Bittame, Amina; Massera, Céline; Vasseur, Virginie; Effantin, Grégory; Valat, Anne; Buaillon, Célia; Allart, Sophie; Fox, Barbara A; Rommereim, Leah M; Bzik, David J; Schoehn, Guy; Weissenhorn, Winfried; Dubremetz, Jean-François; Gagnon, Jean; Mercier, Corinne; Cesbron-Delauw, Marie-France; Blanchard, Nicolas

    2015-12-15

    Apicomplexa parasites such as Toxoplasma gondii target effectors to and across the boundary of their parasitophorous vacuole (PV), resulting in host cell subversion and potential presentation by MHC class I molecules for CD8 T cell recognition. The host-parasite interface comprises the PV limiting membrane and a highly curved, membranous intravacuolar network (IVN) of uncertain function. Here, using a cell-free minimal system, we dissect how membrane tubules are shaped by the parasite effectors GRA2 and GRA6. We show that membrane association regulates access of the GRA6 protective antigen to the MHC I pathway in infected cells. Although insertion of GRA6 in the PV membrane is key for immunogenicity, association of GRA6 with the IVN limits presentation and curtails GRA6-specific CD8 responses in mice. Thus, membrane deformations of the PV regulate access of antigens to the MHC class I pathway, and the IVN may play a role in immune modulation. PMID:26628378

  14. Cytokine Production and Antigen Recognition by Human Mucosal Homing Conjunctival Effector Memory CD8+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Geraint P.; Pachnio, Annette; Long, Heather M.; Rauz, Saaeha; Curnow, S. John

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Conjunctival epithelial T cells are dominated by CD3+CD56-TCRαβ+CD8αβ+ lymphocytes. In this study we explored the antigen experience status, mucosal homing phenotype, cytokine expression, and viral antigen recognition of conjunctival epithelial CD8+ T cells from healthy individuals. Methods. Following ocular surface impression cytology, conjunctival cells were recovered by gentle agitation and analyzed by flow cytometry for cell surface markers, cytokine production (stimulated by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate [PMA]/ionomycin), and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)/cytomegalovirus (CMV) immunodominant epitope recognition using major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I peptide tetramers. Results. In contrast to peripheral blood, conjunctival epithelial CD8+ T cells were dominantly CD45RA−CCR7− effector memory cells, and the vast majority expressed the mucosal homing integrin αEβ7. Conjunctival memory CD8+ T cells maintained effector functions with the ability to secrete IFN-γ and expression of Granzyme B, although they expressed significantly reduced amounts per cell compared to peripheral blood T cells. Interestingly, herpetic virus-specific CD8+ T cells recognizing epitopes derived from EBV and CMV could be detected in the conjunctival cells of healthy virus carriers, although they were generally at lower frequencies than in the peripheral blood of the same donor. Virus-specific conjunctival CD8+ T cells were dominated by CD45RA−CCR7− effector memory cells that expressed αEβ7. Conclusions. These data demonstrate that the majority of conjunctival epithelial CD8+ T cells are mucosal homing αEβ7+ effector memory T cells, which can recognize viral epitopes and are capable of secreting Granzyme B and IFN-γ. PMID:25395484

  15. Recognition of Antigen-Specific B Cell Receptors From Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Patients By Synthetic Antigen Surrogates

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Mohosin; Liu, Yun; Morimoto, Jumpei; Peng, Haiyong; Aquino, Claudio; Rader, Christoph; Chiorazzi, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    In patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), a single neoplastic antigen-specific B cell accumulates and overgrows other B cells, leading to immune deficiency. CLL is often treated with drugs that ablate all B cells, leading to further weakening of humoral immunity, and a more focused therapeutic strategy capable of targeting only the pathogenic B cells would represent a significant advance. One approach to this would be to develop synthetic surrogates of the CLL antigens allowing differentiation of the CLL cells and healthy B cells in a patient. Here, we describe discovery of non-peptidic molecules capable of targeting antigen-specific B cell receptors with good affinity and selectivity using a combinatorial library screen. We demonstrate that our hit compounds act as synthetic antigen surrogates and recognize CLL cells and not healthy B cells. Additionally, we argue that the technology we developed can be used for discovery of other classes of antigen surrogates. PMID:25467125

  16. Antigen recognition and presentation in periapical tissues: a role for TLR expressing cells?

    PubMed

    Desai, S V; Love, R M; Rich, A M; Seymour, G J

    2011-02-01

    Bacteria are the prime cause of periapical diseases and root canal microbiology is a well-researched area of endodontics. Antigen-presenting cells (APCs) are present in periapical lesions of endodontic origin and play a substantial role in recognizing, processing and presenting pathogenic antigens to the adaptive immune system such as an effective and long-lasting immune response is generated against the specific pathogens. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are germ-line encoded pathogen recognition receptors (PRR) expressed by various APCs which induce their maturation, lead to gene transcription in the nucleus and the production of several pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines. Thirteen TLRs have been discovered, 10 of which have been identified in humans so far. Preliminary studies of dental pulp tissue have demonstrated various cell types expressing different TLRs in response to commonly encountered microorganisms. However, there is little information available regarding the expression and function of the various TLRs in human periapical lesions. This review discusses the interactions of various APCs in periapical lesions and the possible roles of different TLRs and APCs in pulp/periapical pathogen recognition and presentation to the adaptive immune system in the initiation and sustaining of periapical diseases. PMID:21083574

  17. Molecular basis of mycobacterial lipid antigen presentation by CD1c and its recognition by αβ T cells.

    PubMed

    Roy, Sobhan; Ly, Dalam; Li, Nan-Sheng; Altman, John D; Piccirilli, Joseph A; Moody, D Branch; Adams, Erin J

    2014-10-28

    CD1c is a member of the group 1 CD1 family of proteins that are specialized for lipid antigen presentation. Despite high cell surface expression of CD1c on key antigen-presenting cells and the discovery of its mycobacterial lipid antigen presentation capability, the molecular basis of CD1c recognition by T cells is unknown. Here we present a comprehensive functional and molecular analysis of αβ T-cell receptor (TCR) recognition of CD1c presenting mycobacterial phosphomycoketide antigens. Our structure of CD1c with the mycobacterial phosphomycoketide (PM) shows similarities to that of CD1c-mannosyl-β1-phosphomycoketide in that the A' pocket accommodates the mycoketide alkyl chain; however, the phosphate head-group of PM is shifted ∼6 Å in relation to that of mannosyl-β1-PM. We also demonstrate a bona fide interaction between six human TCRs and CD1c-mycoketide complexes, measuring high to moderate affinities. The crystal structure of the DN6 TCR and mutagenic studies reveal a requirement of five complementarity determining region (CDR) loops for CD1c recognition. Furthermore, mutagenesis of CD1c reveals residues in both the α1 and α2 helices involved in TCR recognition, yet not entirely overlapping among the examined TCRs. Unlike patterns for MHC I, no archetypical binding footprint is predicted to be shared by CD1c-reactive TCRs, even when recognizing the same or similar antigens. PMID:25298532

  18. Molecular basis of mycobacterial lipid antigen presentation by CD1c and its recognition by αβ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Sobhan; Ly, Dalam; Li, Nan-Sheng; Altman, John D.; Piccirilli, Joseph A.; Moody, D. Branch; Adams, Erin J.

    2014-01-01

    CD1c is a member of the group 1 CD1 family of proteins that are specialized for lipid antigen presentation. Despite high cell surface expression of CD1c on key antigen-presenting cells and the discovery of its mycobacterial lipid antigen presentation capability, the molecular basis of CD1c recognition by T cells is unknown. Here we present a comprehensive functional and molecular analysis of αβ T-cell receptor (TCR) recognition of CD1c presenting mycobacterial phosphomycoketide antigens. Our structure of CD1c with the mycobacterial phosphomycoketide (PM) shows similarities to that of CD1c-mannosyl-β1-phosphomycoketide in that the A' pocket accommodates the mycoketide alkyl chain; however, the phosphate head-group of PM is shifted ∼6 Å in relation to that of mannosyl-β1-PM. We also demonstrate a bona fide interaction between six human TCRs and CD1c-mycoketide complexes, measuring high to moderate affinities. The crystal structure of the DN6 TCR and mutagenic studies reveal a requirement of five complementarity determining region (CDR) loops for CD1c recognition. Furthermore, mutagenesis of CD1c reveals residues in both the α1 and α2 helices involved in TCR recognition, yet not entirely overlapping among the examined TCRs. Unlike patterns for MHC I, no archetypical binding footprint is predicted to be shared by CD1c-reactive TCRs, even when recognizing the same or similar antigens. PMID:25298532

  19. T-cell recognition of a cross-reactive antigen(s) in erythrocyte stages of Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium yoelii: inhibition of parasitemia by this antigen(s).

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, B; Engels, A; Camus, D; Haque, A

    1993-01-01

    In the current study, we investigated the presence of a cross-reactive antigen(s) in the erythrocyte stage from Plasmodium yoelii (265 BY strain) and Plasmodium falciparum through recognition by T cells primed in vivo with antigens from each of these parasites. BALB/c mice are naturally resistant to P. falciparum but are susceptible to P. yoelii infection. Mice that had recovered from P. yoelii primary infection became resistant to a second infection. A higher in vitro proliferative response to a soluble blood stage preparation of P. falciparum was observed in splenic cells from immune animals than in those from mice with a patent P. yoelii infection. The antigen-induced proliferative response was enhanced when animals were exposed to a secondary infection. Animals exposed to a challenge infection were treated with anti-CD4 or anti-CD8 monoclonal antibodies to deplete the corresponding subset of T cells. There was a marked diminution in P. falciparum antigen-induced proliferative response in the total splenic cell populations from CD8-depleted but not from CD4-depleted mice. In CD8-depleted and nondepleted animals, the antigen-induced proliferation in the total cell populations was markedly lower than in the T-cell-rich populations, indicating inhibitory activities of B cells and/or macrophages. There was no such difference in the stimulation between total and T-enriched cell populations from CD4-depleted animals. Flow cytometry analysis demonstrated the presence of an almost equal percentage of CD8+ (59.6%) and CD4+ (64%) T cells in the spleen preparations following in vivo depletion of CD4- and CD8-bearing T cells, respectively. When cultured with P. yoelii blood stage antigen, splenocytes from animals immunized with P. falciparum antigen displayed a significant proliferative response which was markedly diminished by treatment with anti-Thy-1.2 antibody plus complement. Animals immunized with P. falciparum antigen and then challenged with P. yoelii blood stage

  20. Co-potentiation of antigen recognition: A mechanism to boost weak T cell responses and provide immunotherapy in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Michele M.; Molina-Mendiola, Carlos; Nelson, Alfreda D.; Parks, Christopher A.; Reyes, Edwin E.; Hansen, Michael J.; Rajagopalan, Govindarajan; Pease, Larry R.; Schrum, Adam G.; Gil, Diana

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive immunity is mediated by antigen receptors that can induce weak or strong immune responses depending on the nature of the antigen that is bound. In T lymphocytes, antigen recognition triggers signal transduction by clustering T cell receptor (TCR)/CD3 multiprotein complexes. In addition, it hypothesized that biophysical changes induced in TCR/CD3 that accompany receptor engagement may contribute to signal intensity. Nonclustering monovalent TCR/CD3 engagement is functionally inert despite the fact that it may induce changes in conformational arrangement or in the flexibility of receptor subunits. We report that the intrinsically inert monovalent engagement of TCR/CD3 can specifically enhance physiologic T cell responses to weak antigens in vitro and in vivo without stimulating antigen-unengaged T cells and without interrupting T cell responses to strong antigens, an effect that we term as “co-potentiation.” We identified Mono-7D6-Fab, which biophysically altered TCR/CD3 when bound and functionally enhanced immune reactivity to several weak antigens in vitro, including a gp100-derived peptide associated with melanoma. In vivo, Mono-7D6-Fab induced T cell antigen–dependent therapeutic responses against melanoma lung metastases, an effect that synergized with other anti-melanoma immunotherapies to significantly improve outcome and survival. We conclude that Mono-7D6-Fab directly co-potentiated TCR/CD3 engagement by weak antigens and that such concept can be translated into an immunotherapeutic design. The co-potentiation principle may be applicable to other receptors that could be regulated by otherwise inert compounds whose latent potency is only invoked in concert with specific physiologic ligands. PMID:26601285

  1. Evaluation of antigen specific recognition and cell mediated cytotoxicity by a modified lysispot assay in a rat colon carcinoma model

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Antigen-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes represent potent effector cells of the adaptive immune response against viruses as well as tumours. Therefore assays capable at exploring the generation and function of cytotoxic T lymphocytes represent an important objective for both clinical and experimental settings. Methods Here we show a simple and reproducible assay for the evaluation of antigen-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes based on a LysiSpot technique for the simultaneous determination of antigen-specific IFN-γ production and assessment of tumor cytolysis. The assay was developed within an experimental model of colorectal carcinoma, induced by the colorectal tumor cell line DHD-K12 that induces tumors in BDIX rats and, in turn, elicits a tumor- specific immune response. Results Using DHD-K12 cells transfected to express Escherichia coli β-galactosidase as target cells, and by the fine setting of spot colours detection, we have developed an in vitro assay that allows the recognition of cytotoxic T lymphocytes induced in BDIX rats as well as the assessment of anti-tumour cytotoxicity. The method highlighted that in the present experimental model the tumour antigen-specific immune response was bound to killing target cells in the proportion of 55%, while 45% of activated cells were not cytotoxic but released IFN-γ. Moreover in this model by an ELISPOT assay we demonstrated the specific recognition of a nonapeptide epitope called CSH-275 constitutionally express in DHD-K12 cells. Conclusions The assay proved to be highly sensitive and specific, detecting even low frequencies of cytotoxic/activated cells and providing the evaluation of cytokine-expressing T cells as well as the extent of cytotoxicity against the target cells as independent functions. This assay may represent an important tool to be adopted in experimental settings including the development of vaccines or immune therapeutic strategies PMID:22296726

  2. Direct recognition by alphabeta cytolytic T cells of Hfe, a MHC class Ib molecule without antigen-presenting function.

    PubMed

    Rohrlich, Pierre S; Fazilleau, Nicolas; Ginhoux, Florent; Firat, Hüseyin; Michel, Frédérique; Cochet, Madeleine; Laham, Nihay; Roth, Marie Paule; Pascolo, Steve; Nato, Faridabano; Coppin, Hélène; Charneau, Pierre; Danos, Olivier; Acuto, Oreste; Ehrlich, Rachel; Kanellopoulos, Jean; Lemonnier, François A

    2005-09-01

    Crystallographic analysis of human Hfe has documented an overall structure similar to classical (class Ia) MHC molecules with a peptide binding groove deprived of ligand. Thus, to address the question of whether alphabeta T cells could recognize MHC molecules independently of bound ligands, we studied human and mouse Hfe interactions with T lymphocytes. We provide formal evidence of direct cytolytic recognition of human Hfe by mouse alphabeta T cell receptors (TCR) in HLA-A*0201 transgenic mice and that this interaction results in ZAP-70 phosphorylation. Furthermore, direct recognition of mouse Hfe molecules by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) was demonstrated in DBA/2 Hfe knockout mice. These CTLs express predominantly two T cell antigen receptor alpha variable gene segments (AV6.1 and AV6.6). Interestingly, in wild-type mice we identified a subset of CD8+ T cells positively selected by Hfe that expresses the AV6.1/AV6.6 gene segments. T cell antigen receptor recognition of MHC molecules independently of bound ligand has potential general implications in alloreactivity and identifies in the Hfe case a cognitive link supporting the concept that the immune system could be involved in the control of iron metabolism. PMID:16123136

  3. Expression and T cell recognition of hybrid antigens with amino-terminal domains encoded by Qa-2 region of major histocompatibility complex and carboxyl termini of transplantation antigens.

    PubMed

    Stroynowski, I; Forman, J; Goodenow, R S; Schiffer, S G; McMillan, M; Sharrow, S O; Sachs, D H; Hood, L

    1985-05-01

    Coding potential of the Q6 gene from the Qa-2a region of BALB/c Crgl mice was analyzed by a combination of hybrid class I gene construction and DNA-mediated gene transfer. Recombinant genes were created by exon shuffling of the 5' coding region of the Q6 gene and the 3' coding region of a gene encoding a transplantation antigen (Kd, Dd, or Ld), or the inverse. Some of these hybrid class I genes were expressed in the transfected mouse fibroblasts (L cells). The hybrid class I molecules encoded by the 5' end of the Q6 gene and the 3' end of the Ld gene precipitated as 45,000 mol wt molecules associated with beta 2-microglobulin. The expression of the hybrid proteins indicates that 926 basepairs of the 5' flanking region upstream of the structural Q6 gene contain a promoter that functions as a transcription initiation site in L cells. The 3' portion of the Q6 gene appears to be responsible for the lack of cell surface expression of the intact Q6 and the hybrid Ld/Q6 genes in mouse fibroblasts. Accordingly, this portion of the Q6 class I gene may play a regulatory role in tissue-specific expression. Serological analyses of hybrid Q6 proteins suggested that Q6 may be a structural gene for CR (H-2 crossreactive) antigen found normally on subpopulations of lymphocytes. If this identification is correct, Q6 gene will define a new category of class I genes encoding approximately 40,000 mol wt molecules and carrying a characteristic truncated cytoplasmic tail. Analysis of L cells transfected with Q6 hybrid genes demonstrated also that the cytotoxic T cells specific for Qa-2a region-coded antigens recognize the amino-terminal alpha 1-alpha 2 domain of Q6 fusion products. This recognition can be blocked by anti-Qa-2a alloantiserum and monoclonal antibodies reactive with the alpha 3-beta 2-microglobulin portion of the Q6 hybrids. We propose that the structural requirements for the anti-Qa-2a cytotoxic T lymphocyte-specific epitopes on target molecules are the same as for anti

  4. Antigen Recognition By Variable Lymphocyte Receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Han, B.W.; Herrin, B.R.; Cooper, M.D.; Wilson, I.A.

    2009-05-18

    Variable lymphocyte receptors (VLRs) rather than antibodies play the primary role in recognition of antigens in the adaptive immune system of jawless vertebrates. Combinatorial assembly of leucine-rich repeat (LRR) gene segments achieves the required repertoire for antigen recognition. We have determined a crystal structure for a VLR-antigen complex, VLR RBC36 in complex with the H-antigen trisaccharide from human blood type O erythrocytes, at 1.67 angstrom resolution. RBC36 binds the H-trisaccharide on the concave surface of the LRR modules of the solenoid structure where three key hydrophilic residues, multiple van der Waals interactions, and the highly variable insert of the carboxyl-terminal LRR module determine antigen recognition and specificity. The concave surface assembled from the most highly variable regions of the LRRs, along with diversity in the sequence and length of the highly variable insert, can account for the recognition of diverse antigens by VLRs.

  5. The Tumor Antigen NY-ESO-1 Mediates Direct Recognition of Melanoma Cells by CD4+ T Cells after Intercellular Antigen Transfer.

    PubMed

    Fonteneau, Jean Francois; Brilot, Fabienne; Münz, Christian; Gannagé, Monique

    2016-01-01

    NY-ESO-1-specific CD4(+) T cells are of interest for immune therapy against tumors, because it has been shown that their transfer into a patient with melanoma resulted in tumor regression. Therefore, we investigated how NY-ESO-1 is processed onto MHC class II molecules for direct CD4(+) T cell recognition of melanoma cells. We could rule out proteasome and autophagy-dependent endogenous Ag processing for MHC class II presentation. In contrast, intercellular Ag transfer, followed by classical MHC class II Ag processing via endocytosis, sensitized neighboring melanoma cells for CD4(+) T cell recognition. However, macroautophagy targeting of NY-ESO-1 enhanced MHC class II presentation. Therefore, both elevated NY-ESO-1 release and macroautophagy targeting could improve melanoma cell recognition by CD4(+) T cells and should be explored during immunotherapy of melanoma. PMID:26608910

  6. The Tumor Antigen NY-ESO-1 Mediates Direct Recognition of Melanoma Cells by CD4+ T Cells after Intercellular Antigen Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Fonteneau, Jean Francois; Brilot, Fabienne; Münz, Christian

    2016-01-01

    NY-ESO-1–specific CD4+ T cells are of interest for immune therapy against tumors, because it has been shown that their transfer into a patient with melanoma resulted in tumor regression. Therefore, we investigated how NY-ESO-1 is processed onto MHC class II molecules for direct CD4+ T cell recognition of melanoma cells. We could rule out proteasome and autophagy-dependent endogenous Ag processing for MHC class II presentation. In contrast, intercellular Ag transfer, followed by classical MHC class II Ag processing via endocytosis, sensitized neighboring melanoma cells for CD4+ T cell recognition. However, macroautophagy targeting of NY-ESO-1 enhanced MHC class II presentation. Therefore, both elevated NY-ESO-1 release and macroautophagy targeting could improve melanoma cell recognition by CD4+ T cells and should be explored during immunotherapy of melanoma. PMID:26608910

  7. Disruption of HLA class II antigen presentation in Burkitt lymphoma: implication of a 47 000 MW acid labile protein in CD4+ T-cell recognition

    PubMed Central

    God, Jason M; Zhao, Dan; Cameron, Christine A; Amria, Shereen; Bethard, Jennifer R; Haque, Azizul

    2014-01-01

    While Burkitt lymphoma (BL) has a well-known defect in HLA class I-mediated antigen presentation, the exact role of BL-associated HLA class II in generating a poor CD4+ T-cell response remains unresolved. Here, we found that BL cells are deficient in their ability to optimally stimulate CD4+ T cells via the HLA class II pathway. This defect in CD4+ T-cell recognition was not associated with low levels of co-stimulatory molecules on BL cells, as addition of external co-stimulation failed to elicit CD4+ T-cell activation by BL. Further, the defect was not caused by faulty antigen/class II interaction, because antigenic peptides bound with measurable affinity to BL-associated class II molecules. Interestingly, functional class II–peptide complexes were formed at acidic pH 5·5, which restored immune recognition. Acidic buffer (pH 5·5) eluate from BL cells contained molecules that impaired class II-mediated antigen presentation and CD4+ T-cell recognition. Biochemical analysis showed that these molecules were greater than 30 000 molecular weight in size, and proteinaceous in nature. In addition, BL was found to have decreased expression of a 47 000 molecular weight enolase-like molecule that enhances class II-mediated antigen presentation in B cells, macrophages and dendritic cells, but not in BL cells. These findings demonstrate that BL likely has multiple defects in HLA class II-mediated antigen presentation and immune recognition, which may be exploited for future immunotherapies. PMID:24628049

  8. Polymorphism in human cytomegalovirus UL40 impacts on recognition of human leukocyte antigen-E (HLA-E) by natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Heatley, Susan L; Pietra, Gabriella; Lin, Jie; Widjaja, Jacqueline M L; Harpur, Christopher M; Lester, Sue; Rossjohn, Jamie; Szer, Jeff; Schwarer, Anthony; Bradstock, Kenneth; Bardy, Peter G; Mingari, Maria Cristina; Moretta, Lorenzo; Sullivan, Lucy C; Brooks, Andrew G

    2013-03-22

    Natural killer (NK) cell recognition of the nonclassical human leukocyte antigen (HLA) molecule HLA-E is dependent on the presentation of a nonamer peptide derived from the leader sequence of other HLA molecules to CD94-NKG2 receptors. However, human cytomegalovirus can manipulate this central innate interaction through the provision of a "mimic" of the HLA-encoded peptide derived from the immunomodulatory glycoprotein UL40. Here, we analyzed UL40 sequences isolated from 32 hematopoietic stem cell transplantation recipients experiencing cytomegalovirus reactivation. The UL40 protein showed a "polymorphic hot spot" within the region that encodes the HLA leader sequence mimic. Although all sequences that were identical to those encoded within HLA-I genes permitted the interaction between HLA-E and CD94-NKG2 receptors, other UL40 polymorphisms reduced the affinity of the interaction between HLA-E and CD94-NKG2 receptors. Furthermore, functional studies using NK cell clones expressing either the inhibitory receptor CD94-NKG2A or the activating receptor CD94-NKG2C identified UL40-encoded peptides that were capable of inhibiting target cell lysis via interaction with CD94-NKG2A, yet had little capacity to activate NK cells through CD94-NKG2C. The data suggest that UL40 polymorphisms may aid evasion of NK cell immunosurveillance by modulating the affinity of the interaction with CD94-NKG2 receptors. PMID:23335510

  9. T cell receptor reversed polarity recognition of a self-antigen major histocompatibility complex.

    PubMed

    Beringer, Dennis X; Kleijwegt, Fleur S; Wiede, Florian; van der Slik, Arno R; Loh, Khai Lee; Petersen, Jan; Dudek, Nadine L; Duinkerken, Gaby; Laban, Sandra; Joosten, Antoinette; Vivian, Julian P; Chen, Zhenjun; Uldrich, Adam P; Godfrey, Dale I; McCluskey, James; Price, David A; Radford, Kristen J; Purcell, Anthony W; Nikolic, Tatjana; Reid, Hugh H; Tiganis, Tony; Roep, Bart O; Rossjohn, Jamie

    2015-11-01

    Central to adaptive immunity is the interaction between the αβ T cell receptor (TCR) and peptide presented by the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecule. Presumably reflecting TCR-MHC bias and T cell signaling constraints, the TCR universally adopts a canonical polarity atop the MHC. We report the structures of two TCRs, derived from human induced T regulatory (iT(reg)) cells, complexed to an MHC class II molecule presenting a proinsulin-derived peptide. The ternary complexes revealed a 180° polarity reversal compared to all other TCR-peptide-MHC complex structures. Namely, the iT(reg) TCR α-chain and β-chain are overlaid with the α-chain and β-chain of MHC class II, respectively. Nevertheless, this TCR interaction elicited a peptide-reactive, MHC-restricted T cell signal. Thus TCRs are not 'hardwired' to interact with MHC molecules in a stereotypic manner to elicit a T cell signal, a finding that fundamentally challenges our understanding of TCR recognition. PMID:26437244

  10. A High-avidity WT1-reactive T-Cell Receptor Mediates Recognition of Peptide and Processed Antigen but not Naturally Occurring WT1-positive Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Jaigirdar, Adnan; Rosenberg, Steven A; Parkhurst, Maria

    2016-04-01

    Wilms tumor gene 1 (WT1) is an attractive target antigen for cancer immunotherapy because it is overexpressed in many hematologic malignancies and solid tumors but has limited, low-level expression in normal adult tissues. Multiple HLA class I and class II restricted epitopes have been identified in WT1, and multiple investigators are pursuing the treatment of cancer patients with WT1-based vaccines and adoptively transferred WT1-reactive T cells. Here we isolated an HLA-A*0201-restricted WT1-reactive T-cell receptor (TCR) by stimulating peripheral blood lymphocytes of healthy donors with the peptide WT1:126-134 in vitro. This TCR mediated peptide recognition down to a concentration of ∼0.1 ng/mL when pulsed onto T2 cells as well as recognition of HLA-A*0201 target cells transfected with full-length WT1 cDNA. However, it did not mediate consistent recognition of many HLA-A*0201 tumor cell lines or freshly isolated leukemia cells that endogeneously expressed WT1. We dissected this pattern of recognition further and observed that WT1:126-134 was more efficiently processed by immunoproteasomes compared with standard proteasomes. However, pretreatment of WT1 tumor cell lines with interferon gamma did not appreciably enhance recognition by our TCR. In addition, we highly overexpressed WT1 in several leukemia cell lines by electroporation with full-length WT1 cDNA. Some of these lines were still not recognized by our TCR suggesting possible antigen processing defects in some leukemias. These results suggest WT1:126-134 may not be a suitable target for T-cell based tumor immunotherapies. PMID:26938944

  11. Receptor affinity and extracellular domain modifications affect tumor recognition by ROR1-specific chimeric antigen receptor T-cells

    PubMed Central

    Hudecek, Michael; Lupo-Stanghellini, Maria-Teresa; Kosasih, Paula L.; Sommermeyer, Daniel; Jensen, Michael C.; Rader, Christoph; Riddell, Stanley R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The adoptive transfer of T-cells modified to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) comprised of an extracellular single chain antibody (scFV) fragment specific for a tumor cell surface molecule, and linked to an intracellular signaling module has activity in advanced malignancies. ROR1 is a tumor-associated molecule expressed on prevalent B-lymphoid and epithelial cancers, and is absent on normal mature B-cells and vital tissues, making it a candidate for CAR T-cell therapy. Experimental Design We constructed ROR1-CARs from scFVs with different affinities and containing extracellular IgG4-Fc spacer domains of different lengths, and evaluated the ability of T-cells expressing each CAR to recognize ROR1+ hematopoietic and epithelial tumors in vitro, and to eliminate human mantle cell lymphoma engrafted into immunodeficient mice. Results ROR1-CARs containing a short ‘Hinge-only’ extracellular spacer conferred superior lysis of ROR1+ tumor cells and induction of T-cell effector functions compared to CARs with long ‘Hinge-CH2-CH3’ spacers. CARs derived from a higher affinity scFV conferred maximum T-cell effector function against primary CLL and ROR1+ epithelial cancer lines in vitro without inducing activation induced T-cell death. T-cells modified with an optimal ROR1-CAR were equivalently effective as CD19-CAR modified T-cells in mediating regression of JeKo-1 mantle cell lymphoma in immunodeficient mice. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that customizing spacer design and increasing affinity of ROR1-CARs enhances T-cell effector function and recognition of ROR1+ tumors. T-cells modified with an optimized ROR1-CAR have significant anti-tumor efficacy in a preclinical model in vivo, suggesting they may be useful to treat ROR1+ tumors in clinical applications. PMID:23620405

  12. Evidence for recognition of novel islet T cell antigens by granule-specific T cell lines from new onset type 1 diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Tree, T I M; O'Byrne, D; Tremble, J M; Macfarlane, W M; Haskins, K; James, R F L; Docherty, K; Hutton, J C; Banga, J P

    2000-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes is a T cell-mediated autoimmune disease where a number of islet β-cell target autoantigens have been characterized on the basis of reactivity with autoantibodies. Nevertheless, there remains uncertainty of the nature of another group of autoantigens associated with the secretory granule fraction of islet β-cells that appear to be targeted predominantly by autoreactive T cells. We have previously characterized CD4+, HLA-DR-restricted T cell lines from new onset type 1 diabetic patients that are specific for the secretory granule fraction of rat tumour insulinoma, RIN. The T cell line from the first patient, HS, proliferates in response to crude microsomal membranes prepared from a recently established, pure human islet β-cell line NES2Y. In addition, the HS line also responds to secretory granule fractions prepared from a murine tumour insulinoma grown in RIP-Tag mice, showing the recognition of species-conserved antigen(s) in β-cells. Using partially matched antigen-presenting cells, the HS T cells and another line derived from a second patient, MR, were shown to be restricted by disease-associated DRB1*0101 and DRB1*0404 alleles, respectively. Neither the HS or MR T cell lines proliferate in response to a large panel of candidate islet cell antigens, including insulin, proinsulin, glutamic acid decarboxylase, the protein tyrosine phosphatase IA-2/phogrin, imogen-38, ICA69 or hsp60. Our data provide compelling evidence of the presence of a group of antigens associated with the secretory granule fraction of islet β-cells recognized by the T cell lines, whose definition may contribute to our knowledge of disease induction as well as to diagnosis. PMID:10886245

  13. Human Mycobacterium tuberculosis-reactive CD4+ T-cell clones: heterogeneity in antigen recognition, cytokine production, and cytotoxicity for mononuclear phagocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Boom, W H; Wallis, R S; Chervenak, K A

    1991-01-01

    CD4+ T cells regulate the protective immune response which follows exposure to Mycobacterium tuberculosis by activating macrophages through the cytokines the CD4+ T cells secrete. In addition CD4+ T cells have been shown to be directly cytotoxic for antigen-pulsed mononuclear phagocytes (monocytes-macrophages). To explore the functional interaction between mycobacterial antigen-specific CD4+ T cells and mononuclear phagocytes further, CD4+ T-cell clones were derived from healthy purified protein derivative-positive individuals. Five T-cell clones were selected for detailed analysis. None responded to the purified recombinant or native mycobacterial antigens of 14, 19, 65, 71, and 30 (alpha-antigen/Ag6) kDa. However, the T-cell clones demonstrated heterogeneity in antigen recognition as measured by their Western blot (immunoblot) responses. Some T-cell clones made only interleukin 2, while others made only interleukin 4; all produced gamma interferon, although in differing amounts. Four of five T-cells clones were cytotoxic for purified protein derivative-pulsed monocytes at 1:1 and 10:1 effector-target cell ratios. When monocytes infected with live M. tuberculosis were used as targets, comparable levels of cytotoxicity were observed. The cytotoxicity was major histocompatibility complex class II restricted and inhibited by antibodies to ICAM-1 and LFA-1 and not by antibodies to tumor necrosis factor alpha, lymphotoxin, and gamma interferon. Cytotoxicity by CD4+ T cells for monocytes pulsed with mycobacterial antigens or infected with live M. tuberculosis is a common property of these cells and appears to be independent of the repertoire of lymphokines produced and not limited to recognition of defined mycobacterial heat shock proteins. Lysis of heavily infected mononuclear phagocytes may be one manner in which CD4+ T cells regulate host immune response to M. tuberculosis. PMID:1713198

  14. Tumour-specific CD4 T cells eradicate melanoma via indirect recognition of tumour-derived antigen.

    PubMed

    Shklovskaya, Elena; Terry, Alexandra M; Guy, Thomas V; Buckley, Adrian; Bolton, Holly A; Zhu, Erhua; Holst, Jeff; Fazekas de St. Groth, Barbara

    2016-07-01

    The importance of CD4 T cells in tumour immunity has been increasingly recognised, with recent reports describing robust CD4 T cell-dependent tumour control in mice whose immune-regulatory mechanisms have been disturbed by irradiation, chemotherapy, immunomodulatory therapy and/or constitutive immunodeficiency. Tumour control in such models has been attributed in large part to direct Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class II-dependent CD4 T cell killing of tumour cells. To test whether CD4 T cells can eradicate tumours without directly killing tumour cells, we developed an animal model in which tumour-derived antigen could be presented to T-cell receptor (TCR)-transgenic CD4 T cells by host but not tumour MHC class II molecules. In I-E(+) mice bearing I-E(null) tumours, naive I-E-restricted CD4 T cells proliferated locally in tumour-draining lymph nodes after recognising tumour-derived antigen on migratory dendritic cells. In lymphopaenic but not immunosufficient hosts, CD4 T cells differentiated into polarised T helper type 1 (Th1) cells expressing interferon gamma (IFNγ), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and interleukin (IL)-2 but little IL-17, and cleared established tumours. Tumour clearance was enhanced by higher TCR affinity for tumour antigen-MHC class II and was critically dependent on IFNγ, as demonstrated by early tumour escape in animals treated with an IFNγ blocking antibody. Thus, CD4 T cells and IFNγ can control tumour growth without direct T-cell killing of tumour cells, and without requiring additional adaptive immune cells such as CD8 T cells and B cells. Our results support a role for effective CD4 T cell-dependent tumour immunity against MHC class II-negative tumours. PMID:26837456

  15. RNA Binding of T-cell Intracellular Antigen-1 (TIA-1) C-terminal RNA Recognition Motif Is Modified by pH Conditions*

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Gallardo, Isabel; Aroca, Ángeles; Persson, Cecilia; Karlsson, B. Göran; Díaz-Moreno, Irene

    2013-01-01

    T-cell intracellular antigen-1 (TIA-1) is a DNA/RNA-binding protein that regulates critical events in cell physiology by the regulation of pre-mRNA splicing and mRNA translation. TIA-1 is composed of three RNA recognition motifs (RRMs) and a glutamine-rich domain and binds to uridine-rich RNA sequences through its C-terminal RRM2 and RRM3 domains. Here, we show that RNA binding mediated by either isolated RRM3 or the RRM23 construct is controlled by slight environmental pH changes due to the protonation/deprotonation of TIA-1 RRM3 histidine residues. The auxiliary role of the C-terminal RRM3 domain in TIA-1 RNA recognition is poorly understood, and this work provides insight into its binding mechanisms. PMID:23902765

  16. The Dynamics of the Human Leukocyte Antigen Head Domain Modulates Its Recognition by the T-Cell Receptor

    PubMed Central

    García-Guerrero, Estefanía; Pérez-Simón, José Antonio; Sánchez-Abarca, Luis Ignacio; Díaz-Moreno, Irene; De la Rosa, Miguel A.; Díaz-Quintana, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Generating the immune response requires the discrimination of peptides presented by the human leukocyte antigen complex (HLA) through the T-cell receptor (TCR). However, how a single amino acid substitution in the antigen bonded to HLA affects the response of T cells remains uncertain. Hence, we used molecular dynamics computations to analyze the molecular interactions between peptides, HLA and TCR. We compared immunologically reactive complexes with non-reactive and weakly reactive complexes. MD trajectories were produced to simulate the behavior of isolated components of the various p-HLA-TCR complexes. Analysis of the fluctuations showed that p-HLA binding barely restrains TCR motions, and mainly affects the CDR3 loops. Conversely, inactive p-HLA complexes displayed significant drop in their dynamics when compared with its free versus ternary forms (p-HLA-TCR). In agreement, the free non-reactive p-HLA complexes showed a lower amount of salt bridges than the responsive ones. This resulted in differences between the electrostatic potentials of reactive and inactive p-HLA species and larger vibrational entropies in non-elicitor complexes. Analysis of the ternary p-HLA-TCR complexes also revealed a larger number of salt bridges in the responsive complexes. To summarize, our computations indicate that the affinity of each p-HLA complex towards TCR is intimately linked to both, the dynamics of its free species and its ability to form specific intermolecular salt-bridges in the ternary complexes. Of outstanding interest is the emerging concept of antigen reactivity involving its interplay with the HLA head sidechain dynamics by rearranging its salt-bridges. PMID:27124285

  17. The Dynamics of the Human Leukocyte Antigen Head Domain Modulates Its Recognition by the T-Cell Receptor.

    PubMed

    García-Guerrero, Estefanía; Pérez-Simón, José Antonio; Sánchez-Abarca, Luis Ignacio; Díaz-Moreno, Irene; De la Rosa, Miguel A; Díaz-Quintana, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Generating the immune response requires the discrimination of peptides presented by the human leukocyte antigen complex (HLA) through the T-cell receptor (TCR). However, how a single amino acid substitution in the antigen bonded to HLA affects the response of T cells remains uncertain. Hence, we used molecular dynamics computations to analyze the molecular interactions between peptides, HLA and TCR. We compared immunologically reactive complexes with non-reactive and weakly reactive complexes. MD trajectories were produced to simulate the behavior of isolated components of the various p-HLA-TCR complexes. Analysis of the fluctuations showed that p-HLA binding barely restrains TCR motions, and mainly affects the CDR3 loops. Conversely, inactive p-HLA complexes displayed significant drop in their dynamics when compared with its free versus ternary forms (p-HLA-TCR). In agreement, the free non-reactive p-HLA complexes showed a lower amount of salt bridges than the responsive ones. This resulted in differences between the electrostatic potentials of reactive and inactive p-HLA species and larger vibrational entropies in non-elicitor complexes. Analysis of the ternary p-HLA-TCR complexes also revealed a larger number of salt bridges in the responsive complexes. To summarize, our computations indicate that the affinity of each p-HLA complex towards TCR is intimately linked to both, the dynamics of its free species and its ability to form specific intermolecular salt-bridges in the ternary complexes. Of outstanding interest is the emerging concept of antigen reactivity involving its interplay with the HLA head sidechain dynamics by rearranging its salt-bridges. PMID:27124285

  18. Structures of MART-126/27-35Peptide/HLA-A2 Complexes Reveal a Remarkable Disconnect between Antigen Structural Homology and T Cell Recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Borbulevych, Oleg Y; Insaidoo, Francis K; Baxter, Tiffany K; Powell, Jr., Daniel J.; Johnson, Laura A; Restifo, Nicholas P; Baker, Brian M

    2008-09-17

    Small structural changes in peptides presented by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules often result in large changes in immunogenicity, supporting the notion that T cell receptors are exquisitely sensitive to antigen structure. Yet there are striking examples of TCR recognition of structurally dissimilar ligands. The resulting unpredictability of how T cells will respond to different or modified antigens impacts both our understanding of the physical bases for TCR specificity as well as efforts to engineer peptides for immunomodulation. In cancer immunotherapy, epitopes and variants derived from the MART-1/Melan-A protein are widely used as clinical vaccines. Two overlapping epitopes spanning amino acid residues 26 through 35 are of particular interest: numerous clinical studies have been performed using variants of the MART-1 26-35 decamer, although only the 27-35 nonamer has been found on the surface of targeted melanoma cells. Here, we show that the 26-35 and 27-35 peptides adopt strikingly different conformations when bound to HLA-A2. Nevertheless, clonally distinct MART-1{sub 26/27-35}-reactive T cells show broad cross-reactivity towards these ligands. Simultaneously, however, many of the cross-reactive T cells remain unable to recognize anchor-modified variants with very subtle structural differences. These dichotomous observations challenge our thinking about how structural information on unligated peptide/MHC complexes should be best used when addressing questions of TCR specificity. Our findings also indicate that caution is warranted in the design of immunotherapeutics based on the MART-1 26/27-35 epitopes, as neither cross-reactivity nor selectivity is predictable based on the analysis of the structures alone.

  19. Natural micropolymorphism in human leukocyte antigens provides a basis for genetic control of antigen recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Archbold, Julia K.; Macdonald, Whitney A.; Gras, Stephanie; Ely, Lauren K.; Miles, John J.; Bell, Melissa J.; Brennan, Rebekah M.; Beddoe, Travis; Wilce, Matthew C.J.; Clements, Craig S.; Purcell, Anthony W.; McCluskey, James; Burrows, Scott R.; Rossjohn, Jamie

    2009-07-10

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) gene polymorphism plays a critical role in protective immunity, disease susceptibility, autoimmunity, and drug hypersensitivity, yet the basis of how HLA polymorphism influences T cell receptor (TCR) recognition is unclear. We examined how a natural micropolymorphism in HLA-B44, an important and large HLA allelic family, affected antigen recognition. T cell-mediated immunity to an Epstein-Barr virus determinant (EENLLDFVRF) is enhanced when HLA-B*4405 was the presenting allotype compared with HLA-B*4402 or HLA-B*4403, each of which differ by just one amino acid. The micropolymorphism in these HLA-B44 allotypes altered the mode of binding and dynamics of the bound viral epitope. The structure of the TCR-HLA-B*4405EENLLDFVRF complex revealed that peptide flexibility was a critical parameter in enabling preferential engagement with HLA-B*4405 in comparison to HLA-B*4402/03. Accordingly, major histocompatibility complex (MHC) polymorphism can alter the dynamics of the peptide-MHC landscape, resulting in fine-tuning of T cell responses between closely related allotypes.

  20. Podosomes of dendritic cells facilitate antigen sampling

    PubMed Central

    Reinieren-Beeren, Inge; Cambi, Alessandra; Figdor, Carl G.; van den Bogaart, Geert

    2014-01-01

    Summary Dendritic cells sample the environment for antigens and play an important role in establishing the link between innate and acquired immunity. Dendritic cells contain mechanosensitive adhesive structures called podosomes that consist of an actin-rich core surrounded by integrins, adaptor proteins and actin network filaments. They facilitate cell migration via localized degradation of extracellular matrix. Here we show that podosomes of human dendritic cells locate to spots of low physical resistance in the substrate (soft spots) where they can evolve into protrusive structures. Pathogen recognition receptors locate to these protrusive structures where they can trigger localized antigen uptake, processing and presentation to activate T-cells. Our data demonstrate a novel role in antigen sampling for podosomes of dendritic cells. PMID:24424029

  1. Nonclassical antigen-processing pathways are required for MHC class II-restricted direct tumor recognition by NY-ESO-1-specific CD4(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, Junko; Tsuji, Takemasa; Luescher, Immanuel; Old, Lloyd J; Shrikant, Protul; Gnjatic, Sacha; Odunsi, Kunle

    2014-04-01

    Tumor antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells that directly recognize cancer cells are important for orchestrating antitumor immune responses at the local tumor sites. However, the mechanisms of direct MHC class II (MHC-II) presentation of intracellular tumor antigen by cancer cells are poorly understood. We found that two functionally distinct subsets of CD4(+) T cells were expanded after HLA-DPB1*04 (DP04)-binding NY-ESO-1157-170 peptide vaccination in patients with ovarian cancer. Although both subsets recognized exogenous NY-ESO-1 protein pulsed on DP04(+) target cells, only one type recognized target cells with intracellular expression of NY-ESO-1. The tumor-recognizing CD4(+) T cells more efficiently recognized the short 8-9-mer peptides than the non-tumor-recognizing CD4(+) T cells. In addition to endosomal/lysosomal proteases that are typically involved in MHC-II antigen presentation, several pathways in the MHC class I presentation pathways, such as the proteasomal degradation and transporter-associated with antigen-processing-mediated peptide transport, were also involved in the presentation of intracellular NY-ESO-1 on MHC-II. The presentation was inhibited significantly by primaquine, a small molecule that inhibits endosomal recycling, consistent with findings that pharmacologic inhibition of new protein synthesis enhances antigen presentation. Together, our data demonstrate that cancer cells selectively present peptides from intracellular tumor antigens on MHC-II by multiple nonclassical antigen-processing pathways. Harnessing the direct tumor-recognizing ability of CD4(+) T cells could be a promising strategy to enhance antitumor immune responses in the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. PMID:24764581

  2. Non-classical antigen processing pathways are required for MHC class II-restricted direct tumor recognition by NY-ESO-1-specific CD4+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Matsuzaki, Junko; Tsuji, Takemasa; Luescher, Immanuel; Old, Lloyd J.; Shrikant, Protul; Gnjatic, Sacha; Odunsi, Kunle

    2014-01-01

    Tumor antigen-specific CD4+ T cells that directly recognize cancer cells are important for orchestrating antitumor immune responses at the local tumor sites. However, the mechanisms of direct MHC class II (MHC-II) presentation of intracellular tumor antigen by cancer cells are poorly understood. We found that two functionally distinct subsets of CD4+ T cells were expanded after HLA-DPB1*04 (DP04)-binding NY-ESO-1157–170 peptide vaccination in ovarian cancer patients. While both subsets similarly recognized exogenous NY-ESO-1 protein pulsed on DP04+ target cells, only one type recognized target cells with intracellular expression of NY-ESO-1. The tumor-recognizing CD4+ T cells more efficiently recognized the short 8–9-mer peptides than the non-tumor-recognizing CD4+ T cells. In addition to endosomal/lysosomal proteases that are typically involved in MHC-II antigen presentation, several pathways in the MHC class I presentation pathways such as the proteasomal degradation and transporter-associated with antigen-processing (TAP)-mediated peptide transport were also involved in the presentation of intracellular NY-ESO-1 on MHC-II. The presentation was inhibited significantly by primaquine, a small molecule that inhibits endosomal recycling, consistent with findings that pharmacological inhibition of new protein synthesis enhances antigen presentation. Together, our data demonstrated that cancer cells selectively present peptides from intracellular tumor antigens on MHC-II by multiple non-classical antigen-processing pathways. Harnessing direct tumor-recognizing ability of CD4+ T cells could be a promising strategy to enhance antitumor immune responses in the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. PMID:24764581

  3. Loss of T Cell Antigen Recognition Arising from Changes in Peptide and Major Histocompatibility Complex Protein Flexibility: Implications for Vaccine Design

    SciTech Connect

    Insaidoo, Francis K.; Borbulevych, Oleg Y.; Hossain, Moushumi; Santhanagopolan, Sujatha M.; Baxter, Tiffany K.; Baker, Brian M.

    2012-05-08

    Modification of the primary anchor positions of antigenic peptides to improve binding to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins is a commonly used strategy for engineering peptide-based vaccine candidates. However, such peptide modifications do not always improve antigenicity, complicating efforts to design effective vaccines for cancer and infectious disease. Here we investigated the MART-1{sub 27-35} tumor antigen, for which anchor modification (replacement of the position two alanine with leucine) dramatically reduces or ablates antigenicity with a wide range of T cell clones despite significantly improving peptide binding to MHC. We found that anchor modification in the MART-1{sub 27-35} antigen enhances the flexibility of both the peptide and the HLA-A*0201 molecule. Although the resulting entropic effects contribute to the improved binding of the peptide to MHC, they also negatively impact T cell receptor binding to the peptide {center_dot} MHC complex. These results help explain how the 'anchor-fixing' strategy fails to improve antigenicity in this case, and more generally, may be relevant for understanding the high specificity characteristic of the T cell repertoire. In addition to impacting vaccine design, modulation of peptide and MHC flexibility through changes to antigenic peptides may present an evolutionary strategy for the escape of pathogens from immune destruction.

  4. The Structural Basis of Antibody-Antigen Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Sela-Culang, Inbal; Kunik, Vered; Ofran, Yanay

    2013-01-01

    The function of antibodies (Abs) involves specific binding to antigens (Ags) and activation of other components of the immune system to fight pathogens. The six hypervariable loops within the variable domains of Abs, commonly termed complementarity determining regions (CDRs), are widely assumed to be responsible for Ag recognition, while the constant domains are believed to mediate effector activation. Recent studies and analyses of the growing number of available Ab structures, indicate that this clear functional separation between the two regions may be an oversimplification. Some positions within the CDRs have been shown to never participate in Ag binding and some off-CDRs residues often contribute critically to the interaction with the Ag. Moreover, there is now growing evidence for non-local and even allosteric effects in Ab-Ag interaction in which Ag binding affects the constant region and vice versa. This review summarizes and discusses the structural basis of Ag recognition, elaborating on the contribution of different structural determinants of the Ab to Ag binding and recognition. We discuss the CDRs, the different approaches for their identification and their relationship to the Ag interface. We also review what is currently known about the contribution of non-CDRs regions to Ag recognition, namely the framework regions (FRs) and the constant domains. The suggested mechanisms by which these regions contribute to Ag binding are discussed. On the Ag side of the interaction, we discuss attempts to predict B-cell epitopes and the suggested idea to incorporate Ab information into B-cell epitope prediction schemes. Beyond improving the understanding of immunity, characterization of the functional role of different parts of the Ab molecule may help in Ab engineering, design of CDR-derived peptides, and epitope prediction. PMID:24115948

  5. Direct recognition of SLA- and HLA-like class II antigens on porcine endothelium by human T cells results in T cell activation and release of interleukin-2.

    PubMed

    Bravery, C A; Batten, P; Yacoub, M H; Rose, M L

    1995-11-15

    To investigate whether human T cells can directly recognize pig xenoantigens, highly purified human CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were incubated with pig aortic endothelial cells (PAEC). The response was measured by [3H]thymidine uptake and release of bioactive interleukin-2. A detailed examination of MHC expression by cultured PAEC and tissue sections of porcine aorta and heart showed porcine endothelial cells (EC) to be constitutively positive for SLA class II and antigens that crossreact with HLA class II molecules. Low level expression of B7 receptors was detected by binding of both human and mouse CTLA-4-Ig to untreated PAEC, which was enhanced significantly by treatment with recombinant porcine interferon-gamma. Human T cells, purified by positive selection and residual DR+ cells removed by lymphocytolysis, were shown to be functionally free of monocytes. Untreated PAEC elicited strong proliferation by human CD4+ T cells: CD8+ T cells also proliferated, but more weakly. This response was inhibited by CTLA-4-Ig. Blocking studies were performed with mAbs that bind to PAEC and not human EC (MSA3, TH16B), an mAb that binds to human and porcine EC (DA6.231), and L243, which binds to human and not porcine EC. The proliferative response of CD4+ T cells to PAEC was inhibited significantly by mAbs against swine and human determinants. In contrast, the response of CD4+ T cells to human EC was inhibited only by mAbs against human determinants. Experiments that directly compared the CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses to PAEC and the human EC line EAhy.926, both with and without prior treatment with species-specific interferon gamma, demonstrated greater proliferation and 5-10 times more interleukin-2 in response to pig EC than to human EC. PMID:7491676

  6. Quaitative studies on antigenic recognition. I. Immunological and nonimmunological parameters of the response.

    PubMed

    Ramseier, H

    1969-12-01

    Lymphoid cells from normal animals from two genetically alien but isogenic strains of mice or rats elaborated a factor into the medium during in vitro cultivation. Similarly, lymphoid cells from specifically presensitized animals mixed and cultivated with donor-type lymphoid cells, as well as normal or specifically immunized mouse spleen cells exposed to heterologous red blood cell antigens, formed this factor. Culture supernatants of genetically identical lymphoid cells lacked activity. This factor was measured by its ability to induce accumulations of polymorphonuclear cells following injection into the skin of normal hamster hosts. Gentle trypsinization of excised 24 hr cutaneous reactions permitted quantitative estimation of the number of polymorphonuclear cells accumulated and, therefore, of the activity of the factor. The factor present in culture fluids could be defined as a product of antigenic recognition (PAR). PAR was formed only when immunologically competent cells were exposed to cells carrying histocompatibility antigens of recognizable foreignness. This view was based chiefly on the observation that, whereas lymphoid cells from specifically tolerant mice failed to recognize the paralytogen, they did recognize antigens of an unrelated mouse strain. In addition, immunocompetence was of paramount importance, since cocultivation of immunologically incompetent, yet strongly incompatible, rat thymocytes did not result in the formation of PAR. Formation of PAR was observed in very simple media. A source of energy and a suitable culture vessel were found to be the only essential nonimmunological factors for PAR to be elaborated. The presence of inhibitors of glycolysis in the medium during cultivation of mixtures of immunocompetent cells of disparate origin severely inhibited the recognition process. With cell mixtures of the immunological one-way variety, treatment of aggressor cells with inhibitors of glycolysis or of protein synthesis interfered with

  7. Nonclassical T Cells and Their Antigens in Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    De Libero, Gennaro; Singhal, Amit; Lepore, Marco; Mori, Lucia

    2014-01-01

    T cells that recognize nonpeptidic antigens, and thereby are identified as nonclassical, represent important yet poorly characterized effectors of the immune response. They are present in large numbers in circulating blood and tissues and are as abundant as T cells recognizing peptide antigens. Nonclassical T cells exert multiple functions including immunoregulation, tumor control, and protection against infections. They recognize complexes of nonpeptidic antigens such as lipid and glycolipid molecules, vitamin B2 precursors, and phosphorylated metabolites of the mevalonate pathway. Each of these antigens is presented by antigen-presenting molecules other than major histocompatibility complex (MHC), including CD1, MHC class I–related molecule 1 (MR1), and butyrophilin 3A1 (BTN3A1) molecules. Here, we discuss how nonclassical T cells participate in the recognition of mycobacterial antigens and in the mycobacterial-specific immune response. PMID:25059739

  8. HIV-infected CD4+ T Cells Use T-bet-dependent Pathway for Production of IL-10 Upon Antigen Recognition.

    PubMed

    Shete, A; Suryawanshi, P; Godbole, S; Pawar, J; Paranjape, R; Thakar, M

    2016-04-01

    Interleukin (IL)-10 has been implicated in persistence of pathogens in a number of chronic infections. Infected CD4+ cells upon reactivation with HIV antigens were also shown to produce IL-10, which might contribute to their persistence. Hence, it is crucial to determine mechanisms regulating IL-10 production after activation with HIV antigens for devising effective blocking strategies. In this study, ERK-, T-bet- and FoxP3-dependent pathways were evaluated for their possible roles in IL-10 production by infected CD4+ cells after reactivation with HIV Env. Intracellular and secreted IL-10 levels were determined by flow cytometry and Bioplex assay after treating PBMCs with PD98059, tipifarnib and cyclosporin A for blocking of ERK-, T-bet-and FoxP3-dependent pathways, respectively. Baseline levels of T-bet, pERK were higher in P24+ CD4+ cells as compared to uninfected CD4+ cells, which increased further after activation with Env. Inhibition of T-bet resulted in 2.3-fold reduction of IL-10 expression whereas ERK and FoxP3 inhibition failed to cause suppression of IL-10 expression. Conversely, IL-10 secreted by PBMCs was inhibited maximally after ERK inhibition suggesting its role in regulation of cytokine secretory pathway. IFN-γ was found to be suppressed after treatment with inhibitors of all these pathways. Thus, the study highlighted need for IL-10 blockade along with the use of antigens for therapeutic vaccinations or latency reversal and identified the T-bet-dependent pathway as an important pathway regulating IL-10 production by infected CD4+ cells. However, simultaneous blockade of IFN-γ precludes use of inhibitor of this pathway as an IL-10 blocking strategy. PMID:27028319

  9. Function and Dynamics of Tetraspanins during Antigen Recognition and Immunological Synapse Formation

    PubMed Central

    Rocha-Perugini, Vera; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco; Martínez del Hoyo, Gloria

    2016-01-01

    Tetraspanin-enriched microdomains (TEMs) are specialized membrane platforms driven by protein–protein interactions that integrate membrane receptors and adhesion molecules. Tetraspanins participate in antigen recognition and presentation by antigen-­presenting cells (APCs) through the organization of pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) and their downstream-induced signaling, as well as the regulation of MHC-II–peptide trafficking. T lymphocyte activation is triggered upon specific recognition of antigens present on the APC surface during immunological synapse (IS) formation. This dynamic process is characterized by a defined spatial organization involving the compartmentalization of receptors and adhesion molecules in specialized membrane domains that are connected to the underlying cytoskeleton and signaling molecules. Tetraspanins contribute to the spatial organization and maturation of the IS by controlling receptor clustering and local accumulation of adhesion receptors and integrins, their downstream signaling, and linkage to the actin cytoskeleton. This review offers a perspective on the important role of TEMs in the regulation of antigen recognition and presentation and in the dynamics of IS architectural organization. PMID:26793193

  10. B-cell acquisition of antigen: Sensing the surface.

    PubMed

    Knight, Andrew M

    2015-06-01

    B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) recognition and acquisition of antigen by B cells is the essential first step in the generation of effective antibody responses. As B-cell-mediated antigen presentation is also believed to play a significant role in the activation of CD4(+) Th-cell responses, considerable effort has focused on clarifying the nature of antigen/BCR interactions. Following earlier descriptions of interactions of soluble antigens with the BCR, it is now clear that B cells also recognize, physically extract and present antigens that are tethered to, or integral components of, the surfaces or extracellular matrix of other cells. In this issue of the European Journal of Immunology, Zeng et al. [Eur. J. Immunol. 2015. 45: XXXX-XXXX] examine how the physical property or "stiffness" of the surface displaying antigens to B cells influences the B-cell response. This commentary reports that antigen tethered on "less stiff" surfaces induces increased B-cell activation and antibody responses. I then infer how "sensing the surface" by B cells may represent a new component of the immune system's ability to detect "damage," and how this understanding may influence approaches to clinical therapies where immune activity is either unwanted or desired. PMID:25929718

  11. Kinetics of T-cell receptor-dependent antigen recognition determined in vivo by multi-spectral normalized epifluorescence laser scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favicchio, Rosy; Zacharakis, Giannis; Oikonomaki, Katerina; Zacharopoulos, Athanasios; Mamalaki, Clio; Ripoll, Jorge

    2012-07-01

    Detection of multiple fluorophores in conditions of low signal represents a limiting factor for the application of in vivo optical imaging techniques in immunology where fluorescent labels report for different functional characteristics. A noninvasive in vivo Multi-Spectral Normalized Epifluorescence Laser scanning (M-SNELS) method was developed for the simultaneous and quantitative detection of multiple fluorophores in low signal to noise ratios and used to follow T-cell activation and clonal expansion. Colocalized DsRed- and GFP-labeled T cells were followed in tandem during the mounting of an immune response. Spectral unmixing was used to distinguish the overlapping fluorescent emissions representative of the two distinct cell populations and longitudinal data reported the discrete pattern of antigen-driven proliferation. Retrieved values were validated both in vitro and in vivo with flow cytometry and significant correlation between all methodologies was achieved. Noninvasive M-SNELS successfully quantified two colocalized fluorescent populations and provides a valid alternative imaging approach to traditional invasive methods for detecting T cell dynamics.

  12. Pattern recognition and cellular immune responses to novel Mycobacterium tuberculosis-antigens in individuals from Belarus

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) is an enduring health problem worldwide and the emerging threat of multidrug resistant (MDR) TB and extensively drug resistant (XDR) TB is of particular concern. A better understanding of biomarkers associated with TB will aid to guide the development of better targets for TB diagnosis and for the development of improved TB vaccines. Methods Recombinant proteins (n = 7) and peptide pools (n = 14) from M. tuberculosis (M.tb) antigens associated with M.tb pathogenicity, modification of cell lipids or cellular metabolism, were used to compare T cell immune responses defined by IFN-γ production using a whole blood assay (WBA) from i) patients with TB, ii) individuals recovered from TB and iii) individuals exposed to TB without evidence of clinical TB infection from Minsk, Belarus. Results We identified differences in M.tb target peptide recognition between the test groups, i.e. a frequent recognition of antigens associated with lipid metabolism, e.g. cyclopropane fatty acyl phospholipid synthase. The pattern of peptide recognition was broader in blood from healthy individuals and those recovered from TB as compared to individuals suffering from pulmonary TB. Detection of biologically relevant M.tb targets was confirmed by staining for intracellular cytokines (IL-2, TNF-α and IFN-γ) in T cells from non-human primates (NHPs) after BCG vaccination. Conclusions PBMCs from healthy individuals and those recovered from TB recognized a broader spectrum of M.tb antigens as compared to patients with TB. The nature of the pattern recognition of a broad panel of M.tb antigens will devise better strategies to identify improved diagnostics gauging previous exposure to M.tb; it may also guide the development of improved TB-vaccines. PMID:22336002

  13. Generalized immunological recognition of the major merozoite surface antigen (gp195) of Plasmodium falciparum

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S.P.; Hui, G.S.N.; Kato, A.; Siddiqui, W.A. )

    1989-08-01

    The antibody response to the Plasmodium falciparum major merozoite surface antigen (gp195) of congenic mouse strains differing in H-2 haplotype has been examined. All seven strains of mice were capable of producing gp195-specific antibodies. Generalized immune recognition of gp195 by mice of diverse H-2 haplotypes distinguished gp195 from the P. falciparum circumsporozoite protein and the 230-kDa and 48/45-kDa gamete surface antigens. However, the H-2 genetic locus appeared to influence the specificity of gp105-specific antibodies. Immunoblot patterns of mouse sera with parasite antigens revealed a complex pattern of reactivity with terminal and intermediate processing fragments of gp195. The majority of immunoblot bands observed were similar for all of the mouse strains; however, there were several strains that additionally recognized a few unique fragments or displayed more intense reactivities with specific processing fragments. These results suggest that while individuals of diverse major histocompatibility complex makeup are capable of recognizing the gp195 antigen, the recognition of specific gp195 B-cell and T-cell epitopes may be under control of the major histocompatibility complex.

  14. Control of T cell antigen reactivity via programmed TCR downregulation.

    PubMed

    Gallegos, Alena M; Xiong, Huizhong; Leiner, Ingrid M; Sušac, Bože; Glickman, Michael S; Pamer, Eric G; van Heijst, Jeroen W J

    2016-04-01

    The T cell antigen receptor (TCR) is unique in that its affinity for ligand is unknown before encounter and can vary by orders of magnitude. How the immune system regulates individual T cells that display very different reactivity to antigen remains unclear. Here we found that activated CD4(+) T cells, at the peak of clonal expansion, persistently downregulated their TCR expression in proportion to the strength of the initial antigen recognition. This programmed response increased the threshold for cytokine production and recall proliferation in a clone-specific manner and ultimately excluded clones with the highest antigen reactivity. Thus, programmed downregulation of TCR expression represents a negative feedback mechanism for constraining T cell effector function with a suitable time delay to thereby allow pathogen control while avoiding excess inflammatory damage. PMID:26901151

  15. Functional Development of the T Cell Receptor for Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Ebert, Peter J.R.; Li, Qi-Jing; Huppa, Johannes B.; Davis, Mark M.

    2016-01-01

    For over three decades now, the T cell receptor (TCR) for antigen has not ceased to challenge the imaginations of cellular and molecular immunologists alike. T cell antigen recognition transcends every aspect of adaptive immunity: it shapes the T cell repertoire in the thymus and directs T cell-mediated effector functions in the periphery, where it is also central to the induction of peripheral tolerance. Yet, despite its central position, there remain many questions unresolved: how can one TCR be specific for one particular peptide-major histocompatibility complex (pMHC) ligand while also binding other pMHC ligands with an immunologically relevant affinity? And how can a T cell’s extreme specificity (alterations of single methyl groups in their ligand can abrogate a response) and sensitivity (single agonist ligands on a cell surface are sufficient to trigger a measurable response) emerge from TCR–ligand interactions that are so low in affinity? Solving these questions is intimately tied to a fundamental understanding of molecular recognition dynamics within the many different contexts of various T cell–antigen presenting cell (APC) contacts: from the thymic APCs that shape the TCR repertoire and guide functional differentiation of developing T cells to the peripheral APCs that support homeostasis and provoke antigen responses in naïve, effector, memory, and regulatory T cells. Here, we discuss our recent findings relating to T cell antigen recognition and how this leads to the thymic development of foreign-antigen-responsive αβT cells. PMID:20800817

  16. Neutrophil elastase enhances antigen presentation by upregulating human leukocyte antigen class I expression on tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Akhil; Alatrash, Gheath; Philips, Anne V; Qiao, Na; Sukhumalchandra, Pariya; Kerros, Celine; Diaconu, Iulia; Gall, Victor; Neal, Samantha; Peters, Haley L; Clise-Dwyer, Karen; Molldrem, Jeffrey J; Mittendorf, Elizabeth A

    2016-06-01

    Neutrophil elastase (NE) is an innate immune cell-derived inflammatory mediator that we have shown increases the presentation of tumor-associated peptide antigens in breast cancer. In this study, we extend these observations to show that NE uptake has a broad effect on enhancing antigen presentation by breast cancer cells. We show that NE increases human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I expression on the surface of breast cancer cells in a concentration and time-dependent manner. HLA class I upregulation requires internalization of enzymatically active NE. Western blots of NE-treated breast cancer cells confirm that the expression of total HLA class I as well as the antigen-processing machinery proteins TAP1, LMP2, and calnexin does not change following NE treatment. This suggests that NE does not increase the efficiency of antigen processing; rather, it mediates the upregulation of HLA class I by stabilizing and reducing membrane recycling of HLA class I molecules. Furthermore, the effects of NE extend beyond breast cancer since the uptake of NE by EBV-LCL increases the presentation of HLA class I-restricted viral peptides, as shown by their increased sensitivity to lysis by EBV-specific CD8+ T cells. Together, our results show that NE uptake increases the responsiveness of breast cancer cells to adaptive immunity by broad upregulation of membrane HLA class I and support the conclusion that the innate inflammatory mediator NE enhances tumor cell recognition and increases tumor sensitivity to the host adaptive immune response. PMID:27129972

  17. T Cells Expressing CD19/CD20 Bispecific Chimeric Antigen Receptors Prevent Antigen Escape by Malignant B Cells.

    PubMed

    Zah, Eugenia; Lin, Meng-Yin; Silva-Benedict, Anne; Jensen, Michael C; Chen, Yvonne Y

    2016-06-01

    The adoptive transfer of T cells expressing anti-CD19 chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) has shown remarkable curative potential against advanced B-cell malignancies, but multiple trials have also reported patient relapses due to the emergence of CD19-negative leukemic cells. Here, we report the design and optimization of single-chain, bispecific CARs that trigger robust cytotoxicity against target cells expressing either CD19 or CD20, two clinically validated targets for B-cell malignancies. We determined the structural parameters required for efficient dual-antigen recognition, and we demonstrate that optimized bispecific CARs can control both wild-type B-cell lymphoma and CD19(-) mutants with equal efficiency in vivo To our knowledge, this is the first bispecific CAR capable of preventing antigen escape by performing true OR-gate signal computation on a clinically relevant pair of tumor-associated antigens. The CD19-OR-CD20 CAR is fully compatible with existing T-cell manufacturing procedures and implementable by current clinical protocols. These results present an effective solution to the challenge of antigen escape in CD19 CAR T-cell therapy, and they highlight the utility of structure-based rational design in the development of receptors with higher-level complexity. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(6); 498-508. ©2016 AACRSee related Spotlight by Sadelain, p. 473. PMID:27059623

  18. Recognition of Microbial Glycolipids by Natural Killer T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zajonc, Dirk M.; Girardi, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    T cells can recognize microbial antigens when presented by dedicated antigen-presenting molecules. While peptides are presented by classical members of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) family (MHC I and II), lipids, glycolipids, and lipopeptides can be presented by the non-classical MHC member, CD1. The best studied subset of lipid-reactive T cells are type I natural killer T (iNKT) cells that recognize a variety of different antigens when presented by the non-classical MHCI homolog CD1d. iNKT cells have been shown to be important for the protection against various microbial pathogens, including B. burgdorferi, the causative agents of Lyme disease, and S. pneumoniae, which causes pneumococcal meningitis and community-acquired pneumonia. Both pathogens carry microbial glycolipids that can trigger the T cell antigen receptor (TCR), leading to iNKT cell activation. iNKT cells have an evolutionary conserved TCR alpha chain, yet retain the ability to recognize structurally diverse glycolipids. They do so using a conserved recognition mode, in which the TCR enforces a conserved binding orientation on CD1d. TCR binding is accompanied by structural changes within the TCR binding site of CD1d, as well as the glycolipid antigen itself. In addition to direct recognition of microbial antigens, iNKT cells can also be activated by a combination of cytokines (IL-12/IL-18) and TCR stimulation. Many microbes carry TLR antigens, and microbial infections can lead to TLR activation. The subsequent cytokine response in turn lower the threshold of TCR-mediated iNKT cell activation, especially when weak microbial or even self-antigens are presented during the cause of the infection. In summary, iNKT cells can be directly activated through TCR triggering of strong antigens, while cytokines produced by the innate immune response may be necessary for TCR triggering and iNKT cell activation in the presence of weak antigens. Here, we will review the molecular basis of iNKT cell

  19. Vertebrate Cells Express Protozoan Antigen after Hybridization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crane, Mark St. J.; Dvorak, James A.

    1980-04-01

    Epimastigotes, the invertebrate host stage of Trypanosoma cruzi, the protozoan parasite causing Chagas' disease in man, were fused with vertebrate cells by using polyethylene glycol. Hybrid cells were selected on the basis of T. cruzi DNA complementation of biochemical deficiencies in the vertebrate cells. Some clones of the hybrid cells expressed T. cruzi-specific antigen. It might be possible to use selected antigens obtained from the hybrids as vaccines for immunodiagnosis or for elucidation of the pathogenesis of Chagas' disease.

  20. Specific recognition of mycobacterial protein and peptide antigens by gamma-delta T cell subsets following infection with virulent Mycobacterium bovis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Promoting effective immunity to Mycobacterium bovis infection is a challenge that is of interest to the fields of human and animal medicine alike. We report that 'd T cells from virulent M. bovis infected cattle respond specifically and directly to complex, protein and non-protein mycobacterial anti...

  1. Specific recognition of mycobacterial protein and peptide antigens by gamma-delta T cell subsets following infection with virulent Mycobacterium bovis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Promoting effective immunity to Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex pathogens is a challenge that is of interest to the fields of human and veterinary medicine alike. We report that gamma delta T cells from virulent Mycobacterium bovis-infected cattle respond specifically and directly to complex, pro...

  2. Antigenically Modified Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Generate Antigen-Presenting Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Jieming; Wu, Chunxiao; Wang, Shu

    2015-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) provide a promising platform to produce dendritic cell (DC) vaccine. To streamline the production process, we investigated a unique antigen-loading strategy that suits this novel platform. Specifically, we stably modified hPSCs using tumour antigen genes in the form of a full-length tumour antigen gene or an artificial tumour antigen epitope-coding minigene. Such antigenically modified hPSCs were able to differentiate into tumour antigen-presenting DCs. Without conventional antigen-loading, DCs derived from the minigene-modified hPSCs were ready to prime a tumour antigen-specific T cell response and further expand these specific T cells in restimulation processes. These expanded tumour antigen-specific T cells were potent effectors with central memory or effector memory phenotype. Thus, we demonstrated that immunocompetent tumour antigen-loaded DCs can be directly generated from antigenically modified hPSCs. Using such strategy, we can completely eliminate the conventional antigen-loading step and significantly simplify the production of DC vaccine from hPSCs. PMID:26471005

  3. Bovine immune recognition of Ostertagia ostertagi larval antigens.

    PubMed

    Mansour, M M; Dixon, J B; Clarkson, M J; Carter, S D; Rowan, T G; Hammet, N C

    1990-04-01

    Analysis of a detergent-solubilized somatic antigen of Ostertagia ostertagi 3rd stage larvae by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting has revealed two specific antigens with apparent molecular weights of 17 and 43 kD under reducing conditions. Probing of the Ostertagia ostertagi preparation with preinfection control sera has shown two cross-reacting antigens with apparent molecular weights of 67 and 81 kD. Both the 17 and the 43 kD antigens were recognised by IgG1 which was the predominant reactive subclass. FPLC fractionation of the crude extract with gel filtration and ion-exchange columns demonstrated immune reactivity in discrete peaks. Comparisons of ELISA and lymphocyte transformation showed antigenic components reactive with both antibodies and primed lymphocytes. PMID:2339503

  4. Antigen Export Reduces Antigen Presentation and Limits T Cell Control of M. tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Smita; Grace, Patricia S; Ernst, Joel D

    2016-01-13

    Persistence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis results from bacterial strategies that manipulate host adaptive immune responses. Infected dendritic cells (DCs) transport M. tuberculosis to local lymph nodes but activate CD4 T cells poorly, suggesting bacterial manipulation of antigen presentation. However, M. tuberculosis antigens are also exported from infected DCs and taken up and presented by uninfected DCs, possibly overcoming this blockade of antigen presentation by infected cells. Here we show that the first stage of this antigen transfer, antigen export, benefits M. tuberculosis by diverting bacterial proteins from the antigen presentation pathway. Kinesin-2 is required for antigen export and depletion of this microtubule-based motor increases activation of antigen-specific CD4 T cells by infected cells and improves control of intracellular infection. Thus, although antigen transfer enables presentation by bystander cells, it does not compensate for reduced antigen presentation by infected cells and represents a bacterial strategy for CD4 T cell evasion. PMID:26764596

  5. Recognition of oxidized albumin and thyroid antigens by psoriasis autoantibodies

    PubMed Central

    Al-Shobaili, Hani A.; Ahmed, Ahmed A.; Rasheed, Zafar

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the role of reactive-oxygen-species (ROS) induced epitopes on human-serum-albumin (HSA) and thyroid antigens in psoriasis autoimmunity. Methods: This study was performed in the College of Medicine, Qassim University, Buraidah, Saudi Arabia between May 2014 and February 2015. The study was designed to explore the role of ROS-induced epitopes in psoriasis autoimmunity. Singlet-oxygen (or ROS)-induced epitopes on protein (ROS-epitopes-albumin) was characterized by in-vitro and in-vivo. Thyroid antigens were prepared from rabbit thyroid, and thyroglobulin was isolated from thyroid extract. Immunocross-reactions of protein-A purified anti-ROS-epitopes-HSA-immunoglobulin G (IgGs) with thyroid antigen, thyroglobulin, and their oxidized forms were determined. Binding characteristics of autoantibodies in chronic plaque psoriasis patients (n=26) against ROS-epitopes-HSA and also with native and oxidized thyroid antigens were screened, and the results were compared with age-matched controls (n=22). Results: The anti-ROS-epitopes-HSA-IgGs showed cross-reactions with thyroid antigen, thyroglobulin and with their oxidized forms. High degree of specific binding by psoriasis IgGs to ROS-epitopes-HSA, ROS-thyroid antigen and ROS-thyroglobulin was observed. Immunoglobulin G from normal-human-controls showed negligible binding with all tested antigens. Moreover, sera from psoriasis patients had higher levels of carbonyl contents compared with control sera. Conclusion: Structural alterations in albumin, thyroid antigens by ROS, generate unique neo-epitopes that might be one of the factors for the induction of autoantibodies in psoriasis. PMID:26620982

  6. Utilizing Chimeric Antigen Receptors to Direct Natural Killer Cell Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hermanson, David L.; Kaufman, Dan S.

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells represent an attractive lymphocyte population for cancer immunotherapy due to their ability to lyse tumor targets without prior sensitization and without need for human leukocyte antigens-matching. Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) are able to enhance lymphocyte targeting and activation toward diverse malignancies. CARs consist of an external recognition domain (typically a small chain variable fragment) directed at a specific tumor antigen that is linked with one or more intracellular signaling domains that mediate lymphocyte activation. Most CAR studies have focused on their expression in T cells. However, use of CARs in NK cells is starting to gain traction because they provide a method to redirect these cells more specifically to target refractory cancers. CAR-mediated anti-tumor activity has been demonstrated using NK cell lines, as well as NK cells isolated from peripheral blood, and NK cells produced from human pluripotent stem cells. This review will outline the CAR constructs that have been reported in NK cells with a focus on comparing the use of different signaling domains in combination with other co-activating domains. PMID:25972867

  7. Local antigen in nonlymphoid tissue promotes resident memory CD8+ T cell formation during viral infection.

    PubMed

    Khan, Tahsin N; Mooster, Jana L; Kilgore, Augustus M; Osborn, Jossef F; Nolz, Jeffrey C

    2016-05-30

    Tissue-resident memory (Trm) CD8(+) T cells are functionally distinct from their circulating counterparts and are potent mediators of host protection against reinfection. Whether local recognition of antigen in nonlymphoid tissues during infection can impact the formation of Trm populations remains unresolved. Using skin infections with vaccinia virus (VacV)-expressing model antigens, we found that local antigen recognition had a profound impact on Trm formation. Activated CD8(+) T cells trafficked to VacV-infected skin in an inflammation-dependent, but antigen-independent, manner. However, after viral clearance, there was a subsequent ∼50-fold increase in Trm formation when antigen was present in the tissue microenvironment. Secondary antigen stimulation in nonlymphoid tissue caused CD8(+) T cells to rapidly express CD69 and be retained at the site of infection. Finally, Trm CD8(+) T cells that formed during VacV infection in an antigen-dependent manner became potent stimulators of localized antigen-specific inflammatory responses in the skin. Thus, our studies indicate that the presence of antigen in the nonlymphoid tissue microenvironment plays a critical role in the formation of functional Trm CD8(+) T cell populations, a finding with relevance for both vaccine design and prevention of inflammatory disorders. PMID:27217536

  8. Safety of targeting tumor endothelial cell antigens.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Samuel C; Riordan, Neil H; Ichim, Thomas E; Szymanski, Julia; Ma, Hong; Perez, Jesus A; Lopez, Javier; Plata-Munoz, Juan J; Silva, Francisco; Patel, Amit N; Kesari, Santosh

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying discrimination between "self" and "non-self", a central immunological principle, require careful consideration in immune oncology therapeutics where eliciting anti-cancer immunity must be weighed against the risk of autoimmunity due to the self origin of tumors. Whole cell vaccines are one promising immunotherapeutic avenue whereby a myriad of tumor antigens are introduced in an immunogenic context with the aim of eliciting tumor rejection. Despite the possibility collateral damage to healthy tissues, cancer immunotherapy can be designed such that off target autoimmunity remains limited in scope and severity or completely non-existent. Here we provide an immunological basis for reconciling the safety of cancer vaccines, focusing on tumor endothelial cell vaccines, by discussing the following topics: (a) Antigenic differences between neoplastic and healthy tissues that can be leveraged in cancer vaccine design; (b) The layers of tolerance that control T cell responses directed against antigens expressed in healthy tissues and tumors; and, (c) The hierarchy of antigenic epitope selection and display in response to whole cell vaccines, and how antigen processing and presentation can afford a degree of selectivity against tumors. We conclude with an example of early clinical data utilizing ValloVax™, an immunogenic placental endothelial cell vaccine that is being advanced to target the tumor endothelium of diverse cancers, and we report on the safety and efficacy of ValloVax™ for inducing immunity against tumor endothelial antigens. PMID:27071457

  9. CD1 mediated T cell recognition of glycolipids

    PubMed Central

    Zajonc, Dirk M.; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2007-01-01

    Summary Specialized subsets of T lymphocytes can distinguish the carbohydrate portions of microbial and self-glycolipids when they are presented by proteins in the CD1 family of antigen presenting molecules. Recent immunochemical and structural analyses indicate that the chemical composition of the presented carbohydrate, together with its precise orientation above the CD1 binding groove, determines if a particular T cell is activated. More recently, however, it has been shown that the lipid backbone of the glycolipid, buried inside the CD1 protein, also can have an impact on T cell activation. While glycolipid recognition is a relatively new category of T cell specificity, the powerful combination of microbial antigen discovery and structural biochemistry has provided great insight into the mechanism of carbohydrate recognition. PMID:17951048

  10. Regulation of protein synthesis and autophagy in activated dendritic cells: implications for antigen processing and presentation.

    PubMed

    Argüello, Rafael J; Reverendo, Marisa; Gatti, Evelina; Pierre, Philippe

    2016-07-01

    Antigenic peptides presented in the context of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules originate from the degradation of both self and non-self proteins. T cells can therefore recognize at the surface of surveyed cells, the self-peptidome produced by the cell itself (mostly inducing tolerance) or immunogenic peptides derived from exogenous origins. The initiation of adaptive immune responses by dendritic cells (DCs), through the antigenic priming of naïve T cells, is associated to microbial pattern recognition receptors engagement. Activation of DCs by microbial product or inflammatory cytokines initiates multiple processes that maximize DC capacity to present exogenous antigens and stimulate T cells by affecting major metabolic and membrane traffic pathways. These include the modulation of protein synthesis, the regulation of MHC and co-stimulatory molecules transport, as well as the regulation of autophagy, that, all together promote exogenous antigen presentation while limiting the display of self-antigens by MHC molecules. PMID:27319340

  11. Close correlation between Daudi and mycobacterial antigen recognition by human gamma delta T cells and expression of V9JPC1 gamma/V2DJC delta-encoded T cell receptors.

    PubMed

    Davodeau, F; Peyrat, M A; Hallet, M M; Gaschet, J; Houde, I; Vivien, R; Vie, H; Bonneville, M

    1993-08-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that a large fraction of human gamma delta PBL recognize Ag of prokaryotic and eukaryotic origins, respectively found in hydrosoluble mycobacterial extracts and on the Daudi Burkitt's lymphoma cells. The structural basis of the recognition of these Ag have been presently studied in detail, through analysis of a large panel of thymus- and peripheral blood-derived gamma delta T-cell clones. Our results suggest that Daudi and mycobacteria-reactive gamma delta subsets are strictly overlapping and hence that gamma delta T-cell responses against these two Ag are closely related. Daudi cells and mycobacteria were recognized by V gamma 9+V delta 2+, but not by V gamma 9+V delta 2-, V gamma 9-V delta 2+, or V gamma 9-V delta 2- PBL clones. However, not all V gamma 9+V delta 2+ clones were reactive and, in particular: 1) the proportion of Ag-reactive lymphocytes was much lower among thymus- than PBL-derived clones (respectively 24/36 vs 72/73); 2) none of the V gamma 9+V delta 2+ clones expressing a V9J2C2 gamma chain (n = 4) were reactive to Daudi or mycobacteria, indicating that expression of a disulfide-linked TCR is probably a prerequisite for recognition of these Ag; and 3) among V gamma 9+V delta 2+ clones bearing disulfide-linked TCR, almost all (50/53) clones expressing a V9JPC1 gamma chain were reactive, whereas a large fraction (6/10) of those expressing a V9J1C1 gamma chain were weakly or nonreactive. Together, these observations suggest that germline residues specific to V gamma 9, V delta 2, and J gamma P elements directly contribute to recognition of Daudi and mycobacterial Ag. Furthermore, these findings may provide an explanation for coordinate use of these gene elements by a large fraction of gamma delta PBL, through peripheral selection events mediated by ligands identical or structurally related to the above Ag. PMID:8393042

  12. Activation of B cells by antigens on follicular dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    El Shikh, Mohey Eldin M.; El Sayed, Rania M.; Sukumar, Selvakumar; Szakal, Andras K.; Tew, John G.

    2010-01-01

    A need for antigen-processing and presentation to B cells is not widely appreciated. However, cross-linking of multiple B cell receptors (BCRs) by T-independent antigens delivers a potent signal that induces antibody responses. Such BCR cross-linking also occurs in germinal centers where follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) present multimerized antigens as periodically arranged antigen-antibody complexes (ICs). Unlike T cells that recognize antigens as peptide-MHC complexes, optimal B cell-responses are induced by multimerized FDC-ICs that simultaneously engage multiple BCRs. FDC-FcγRIIB mediates IC-periodicity and FDC-BAFF, -IL-6 and -C4bBP are co-stimulators. Remarkably, specific antibody responses can be induced by FDC-ICs in the absence of T cells, opening up the exciting possibility that people with T cell insufficiencies may be immunized with T-dependent vaccines via FDC-ICs. PMID:20418164

  13. Structural Basis for Antigenic Peptide Recognition and Processing by Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) Aminopeptidase 2.

    PubMed

    Mpakali, Anastasia; Giastas, Petros; Mathioudakis, Nikolas; Mavridis, Irene M; Saridakis, Emmanuel; Stratikos, Efstratios

    2015-10-23

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) aminopeptidases process antigenic peptide precursors to generate epitopes for presentation by MHC class I molecules and help shape the antigenic peptide repertoire and cytotoxic T-cell responses. To perform this function, ER aminopeptidases have to recognize and process a vast variety of peptide sequences. To understand how these enzymes recognize substrates, we determined crystal structures of ER aminopeptidase 2 (ERAP2) in complex with a substrate analogue and a peptidic product to 2.5 and 2.7 Å, respectively, and compared them to the apo-form structure determined to 3.0 Å. The peptides were found within the internal cavity of the enzyme with no direct access to the outside solvent. The substrate analogue extends away from the catalytic center toward the distal end of the internal cavity, making interactions with several shallow pockets along the path. A similar configuration was evident for the peptidic product, although decreasing electron density toward its C terminus indicated progressive disorder. Enzymatic analysis confirmed that visualized interactions can either positively or negatively impact in vitro trimming rates. Opportunistic side-chain interactions and lack of deep specificity pockets support a limited-selectivity model for antigenic peptide processing by ERAP2. In contrast to proposed models for the homologous ERAP1, no specific recognition of the peptide C terminus by ERAP2 was evident, consistent with functional differences in length selection and self-activation between these two enzymes. Our results suggest that ERAP2 selects substrates by sequestering them in its internal cavity and allowing opportunistic interactions to determine trimming rates, thus combining substrate permissiveness with sequence bias. PMID:26381406

  14. Tailored immunity by skin antigen-presenting cells

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Clement; Perrin, Helene; Combadiere, Behazine

    2014-01-01

    Skin vaccination aims at targeting epidermal and dermal antigen-presenting cells (APCs), indeed many subsets of different origin endowed with various functions populate the skin. The idea that the skin could represent a particularly potent site to induce adaptive and protective immune response emerged after the success of vaccinia virus vaccination by skin scarification. Recent advances have shown that multiple subsets of APCs coexist in the skin and participate in immunity to infectious diseases. Induction of an adaptive immune response depends on the initial recognition and capture of antigens by skin APCs and their transport to lymphoid organs. Innovative strategies of vaccination have thus been developed to target skin APCs for tailored immunity, hence this review will discuss recent insights into skin APC subsets characterization and how they can shape adaptive immune responses. PMID:25483512

  15. Distinct antigen recognition pattern during zoonotic visceral leishmaniasis in humans and dogs.

    PubMed

    Goto, Yasuyuki; Howard, Randall F; Bhatia, Ajay; Trigo, Joelma; Nakatani, Maria; Netto, Eduardo M; Reed, Steven G

    2009-03-23

    Leishmania infantum is a causative agent of endemic zoonotic visceral leishmaniasis (VL) in regions of South America and the Mediterranean. Dogs are the major reservoirs for L. infantum in these regions, and control of disease in dogs could have a significant impact on human disease. Although dogs share many symptoms of VL with humans as a result of L. infantum infection, they also show some unique clinical manifestations, which are often a combination of visceral and cutaneous leishmaniasis, suggesting different mechanisms of disease development in dogs and humans. Here, we compare antibody responses of dogs and humans with VL to various defined leishmanial antigens. Parasite lysate and K39, the two most commonly used antigens for serodiagnosis of VL, detected the highest levels of antibodies in both humans and dogs with VL, whereas the recognition patterns of these antigens were distinct between the hosts. Among other defined antigens tested, LmSTI1 and CPB detected higher levels of antibodies in dogs and humans, respectively. These results indicate there is a difference between humans and dogs in antigen recognition patterns during VL. We infer that different strategies may need to be used in development of vaccines and diagnostics for humans and for dogs. In addition, we show a correlation between antibody titers to several antigens and severity of clinical symptoms during canine VL. PMID:19059724

  16. Stable isotope labeling of oligosaccharide cell surface antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Unkefer, C.J.; Silks, L.A. III; Martinez, R.A.

    1998-12-31

    The overall goal of this Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project was to develop new methods for synthesis of {sup 13}C-labeled oligosaccharides that are required for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of their solution conformation. Oligosaccharides are components of the cell`s outer surface and are involved in important processes such as cell-cell recognition and adhesion. Recently, Danishefsky and coworkers at Slone-Kettering Cancer Center developed a method for the solid-phase chemical synthesis of oligosaccharides. The specific goal of this LDRD project was to prepare uniform {sup 13}C-labeled aldohexose precursors required for the solid-phase synthesis of the Lewis blood-group antigenic determinants. We report the synthesis of {sup 13}C-labeled D-glucal, D-galactal and Fucosyl precursors. We have been collaborating with the Danishefsky group on the synthesis of the Lewis oligosaccharides and the NMR analysis of their solution conformation.

  17. γδ T cells recognize a microbial encoded B cell antigen to initiate a rapid antigen-specific interleukin-17 response.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xun; Wei, Yu-Ling; Huang, Jun; Newell, Evan W; Yu, Hongxiang; Kidd, Brian A; Kuhns, Michael S; Waters, Ray W; Davis, Mark M; Weaver, Casey T; Chien, Yueh-hsiu

    2012-09-21

    γδ T cells contribute uniquely to immune competence. Nevertheless, how they function remains an enigma. It is unclear what most γδ T cells recognize, what is required for them to mount an immune response, and how the γδ T cell response is integrated into host immune defense. Here, we report that a noted B cell antigen, the algae protein phycoerythrin (PE), is a murine and human γδ T cell antigen. Employing this specificity, we demonstrated that antigen recognition activated naive γδ T cells to make interleukin-17 and respond to cytokine signals that perpetuate the response. High frequencies of antigen-specific γδ T cells in naive animals and their ability to mount effector response without extensive clonal expansion allow γδ T cells to initiate a swift, substantial response. These results underscore the adaptability of lymphocyte antigen receptors and suggest an antigen-driven rapid response in protective immunity prior to the maturation of classical adaptive immunity. PMID:22960222

  18. γδ T cells recognize a microbial encoded B cell antigen to initiate a rapid antigen specific Interleukin 17 response

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Xun; Wei, Yu-ling; Huang, Jun; Newell, Evan W.; Yu, Hongxiang; Kidd, Brian A.; Kuhns, Michael S.; Waters, Ray W.; Davis, Mark M.; Weaver, Casey T.; Chien, Yueh-hsiu

    2012-01-01

    Summary γδ T cells contribute uniquely to host immune defense. However, how they function remains an enigma. Although it is unclear what most γδ T cells recognize, common dogma asserts that they recognize self-antigens. While they are the major initial Interleukin-17 (IL-17) producers in infections, it is unclear what is required to trigger these cells to act. Here, we report that a noted B cell antigen, the algae protein-phycoerythrin (PE) is an antigen for murine and human γδ T cells. PE also stained specific bovine γδ T cells. Employing this specificity, we demonstrated that antigen recognition, but not extensive clonal expansion, was required to activate naïve γδ T cells to make IL-17. In this activated state, γδ T cells gained the ability to respond to cytokine signals that perpetuated the IL-17 production. These results underscore the adaptability of lymphocyte antigen receptors and suggest a previously unrecognized antigen-driven rapid response in protective immunity prior to the maturation of classical adaptive immunity. PMID:22960222

  19. Formaldehyde treatment of proteins can constrain presentation to T cells by limiting antigen processing.

    PubMed Central

    di Tommaso, A; de Magistris, M T; Bugnoli, M; Marsili, I; Rappuoli, R; Abrignani, S

    1994-01-01

    Proteins to be used as vaccines are frequently treated with formaldehyde, although little is known about the effects of this treatment on protein antigenicity. To investigate the effect of formaldehyde treatment on antigen recognition by T cells, we compared the in vitro T-cell response to proteins that have been formaldehyde treated with the response to untreated proteins. We found that peripheral blood mononuclear cells from individuals vaccinated with three formaldehyde-treated proteins (pertussis toxin, filamentous hemagglutinin, pertactin) of Bordetella pertussis showed little or no response to the formaldehyde-treated proteins but proliferated very well in response to the corresponding untreated protein. These findings were further confirmed with CD4+ T-cell clones specific for defined epitopes of the bacterial proteins. We found that some epitopes are presented poorly or not at all when formaldehyde-treated proteins are used, whereas other epitopes are equally presented to T-cell clones when either formaldehyde-treated or untreated antigens are used. However, T-cell recognition could be restored by either antigen degradation before formaldehyde treatment or heat denaturation after such treatment. Parallel digestion with trypsin of both formaldehyde-treated and untreated proteins showed that fragments generated from the two forms of the same antigen were different in size. These results demonstrate that formaldehyde treatment can constrain antigen presentation to T cells and that this may be due to an altered proteolytic processing of formaldehyde-treated proteins. Images PMID:7513307

  20. Regional immune responses with stage-specific antigen recognition profiles develop in lymph nodes of pigs following Ascaris suum larval migration.

    PubMed

    Jungersen, G; Eriksen, L; Nansen, P; Lind, P; Rasmussen, T; Meeusen, E N

    2001-04-01

    The early life-cycle of the pig round worm, Ascaris suum, involves well-defined larval development in the liver, lungs and finally the small intestine. Distinct regional immune responses to larval antigens of A. suum were observed in the draining lymph nodes of immunized and challenged pigs during larval migration. This was reflected in a transient enlargement of the stimulated lymph nodes, due to increases in numbers of B cells and CD4 T cells, and the production of A. suum-specific antibody by antibody secreting cell (ASC) cultures. Larval antigen recognition pattern of antibodies in serum, bile and draining lymph node ASC culture supernatant (ASC-probes) was examined by immunoblotting. This revealed distinct organ-specific recognition patterns of larval-specific antigens by the draining lymph nodes at different times after challenge. In particular, an early larval 42 kDa antigen was recognized specifically by ASC-probes of the liver lymph nodes at 7 but not 14 days postchallenge (pc) which was not detected in other lymph nodes, serum or bile of the same pig. Similarly, a late larval antigen of 34 kDa was uniquely detected by lung and jejunal ASC-probes at 14 days pc. These observations demonstrate how development of distinct regional immune responses in tissues with different antigen stimulation can be monitored with ASC-probes and flow cytometry. PMID:11298295

  1. Pharmacologic suppression of target cell recognition by engineered T cells expressing chimeric T-cell receptors.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Vallina, L; Yañez, R; Blanco, B; Gil, M; Russell, S J

    2000-04-01

    Adoptive therapy with autologous T cells expressing chimeric T-cell receptors (chTCRs) is of potential interest for the treatment of malignancy. To limit possible T-cell-mediated damage to normal tissues that weakly express the targeted tumor antigen (Ag), we have tested a strategy for the suppression of target cell recognition by engineered T cells. Jurkat T cells were transduced with an anti-hapten chTCR tinder the control of a tetracycline-suppressible promoter and were shown to respond to Ag-positive (hapten-coated) but not to Ag-negative target cells. The engineered T cells were then reacted with hapten-coated target cells at different effector to target cell ratios before and after exposure to tetracycline. When the engineered T cells were treated with tetracycline, expression of the chTCR was greatly decreased and recognition of the hapten-coated target cells was completely suppressed. Tetracycline-mediated suppression of target cell recognition by engineered T cells may be a useful strategy to limit the toxicity of the approach to cancer gene therapy. PMID:10811469

  2. CD1c tetramers detect ex vivo T cell responses to processed phosphomycoketide antigens

    PubMed Central

    Ly, Dalam; Kasmar, Anne G.; Cheng, Tan-Yun; de Jong, Annemieke; Huang, Shouxiong; Roy, Sobhan; Bhatt, Apoorva; van Summeren, Ruben P.; Altman, John D.; Jacobs, William R.; Adams, Erin J.; Minnaard, Adriaan J.; Porcelli, Steven A.

    2013-01-01

    CD1c is expressed with high density on human dendritic cells (DCs) and B cells, yet its antigen presentation functions are the least well understood among CD1 family members. Using a CD1c-reactive T cell line (DN6) to complete an organism-wide survey of M. tuberculosis lipids, we identified C32 phosphomycoketide (PM) as a previously unknown molecule and a CD1c-presented antigen. CD1c binding and presentation of mycoketide antigens absolutely required the unusual, mycobacteria-specific lipid branching patterns introduced by polyketide synthase 12 (pks12). Unexpectedly, one TCR responded to diversely glycosylated and unglycosylated forms of mycoketide when presented by DCs and B cells. Yet cell-free systems showed that recognition was mediated only by the deglycosylated phosphoantigen. These studies identify antigen processing of a natural bacterial antigen in the human CD1c system, indicating that cells act on glycolipids to generate a highly simplified neoepitope composed of a sugar-free phosphate anion. Using knowledge of this processed antigen, we generated human CD1c tetramers, and demonstrate that CD1c–PM complexes stain T cell receptors (TCRs), providing direct evidence for a ternary interaction among CD1c-lipid-TCR. Furthermore, PM-loaded CD1c tetramers detect fresh human T cells from peripheral blood, demonstrating a polyclonal response to PM antigens in humans ex vivo. PMID:23530121

  3. Atomic resolution structural characterization of recognition of histo-blood group antigens by Norwalk virus

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jae-Mun; Hutson, Anne M.; Estes, Mary K.; Prasad, B.V. Venkataram

    2008-07-28

    Members of Norovirus, a genus in the family Caliciviridae, are causative agents of epidemic diarrhea in humans. Susceptibility to several noroviruses is linked to human histo-blood type, and its determinant histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs) are regarded as receptors for these viruses. Specificity for these carbohydrates is strain-dependent. Norwalk virus (NV) is the prototype genogroup I norovirus that specifically recognizes A- and H-type HBGA, in contrast to genogroup II noroviruses that exhibit a more diverse HBGA binding pattern. To understand the structural basis for how HBGAs interact with the NV capsid protein, and how the specificity is achieved, we carried out x-ray crystallographic analysis of the capsid protein domain by itself and in complex with A- and H-type HBGA at a resolution of {approx}1.4 {angstrom}. Despite differences in their carbohydrate sequence and linkage, both HBGAs bind to the same surface-exposed site in the capsid protein and project outward from the capsid surface, substantiating their possible role in initiating cell attachment. Precisely juxtaposed polar side chains that engage the sugar hydroxyls in a cooperative hydrogen bonding and a His/Trp pair involved in a cation-p interaction contribute to selective and specific recognition of A- and H-type HBGAs. This unique binding epitope, confirmed by mutational analysis, is highly conserved, but only in the genogroup I noroviruses, suggesting that a mechanism by which noroviruses infect broader human populations is by evolving different sites with altered HBGA specificities.

  4. Isolation and In vivo Transfer of Antigen Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Pooja; Kharkwal, Shalu Sharma; Porcelli, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    Transfer of antigen presenting cells in vivo is a method used by immunologists to examine the potency of antigen presentation by a selected population of cells. This method is most commonly used to analyze presentation of protein antigens to MHC class I or II restricted T cells, but it can also be used for studies of nonconventional antigens such as CD1-presented lipids. In a recent study focusing on CD1d-restricted glycolipid antigen presentation to Natural Killer T cells, we compared antigen presenting properties of splenic B cells, CD8αPos dendritc cells (DCs) and CD8αNeg DCs (Arora et al., 2014). This protocol describes the detailed method used for isolation of these cell populations, and their transfer into recipient mice to analyze their antigen presenting properties. PMID:27390759

  5. Comparative analysis of core amino acid residues of H-2D(b)-restricted cytotoxic T-lymphocyte recognition epitopes in simian virus 40 T antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Deckhut, A M; Lippolis, J D; Tevethia, S S

    1992-01-01

    Simian virus 40 (SV40) tumor (T) antigen expressed in H-2b SV40-transformed cells induces the generation of Lyt-2+ (CD8+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), which are involved in tumor rejection, in syngeneic mice. Five CTL recognition sites on T antigen have been described by using mutant T antigens. Four of the sites (I, II, III, and V) are H-2Db restricted and have been broadly mapped with synthetic peptides of 15 amino acids in length overlapping by 5 residues at the amino and carboxy termini. The goal of this study was to define the minimal and optimal amino acid sequences of T antigen which would serve as recognition elements for the H-2Db-restricted CTL clones Y-1, Y-2, Y-3, and Y-5, which recognizes sites I, II, III, and V, respectively. The minimal and optimal residues of T antigen recognized by the four CTL clones were determined by using synthetic peptides truncated at the amino or carboxy terminus and an H-2Db peptide-binding motif. The minimal site recognized by CTL clone Y-1 was defined as amino acids 207 to 215 of SV40 T antigen. However, the optimal sequence recognized by CTL clone Y-1 spanned T-antigen amino acids 205 to 215. The T-antigen peptide sequence LT223-231 was the optimal and minimal sequence recognized by both CTL clones Y-2 and Y-3. Site V was determined to be contained within amino acids 489 to 497 of T antigen. The lytic activities of CTL clones Y-2 and Y-3, which recognize a single nonamer peptide, LT223-231, were affected differently by anti-Lyt-2 antibody, suggesting that the T-cell receptors of these two CTL clones differ in their avidities. As the minimal and optimal H-2Db-restricted CTL recognition sites have been defined by nonamer synthetic peptides, it is now possible to search for naturally processed H-2Db-restricted epitopes of T antigen and identify critical residues involved in processing, presentation, and recognition by SV40-specific CTL. PMID:1370091

  6. Adoptive therapy with redirected primary regulatory T cells results in antigen-specific suppression of arthritis.

    PubMed

    Wright, Graham P; Notley, Clare A; Xue, Shao-An; Bendle, Gavin M; Holler, Angelika; Schumacher, Ton N; Ehrenstein, Michael R; Stauss, Hans J

    2009-11-10

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) can suppress a wide range of immune cells, making them an ideal candidate for the treatment of autoimmunity. The potential clinical translation of targeted therapy with antigen-specific Tregs is hampered by the difficulties of isolating rare specificities from the natural polyclonal T cell repertoire. Moreover, the initiating antigen is often unknown in autoimmune disease. Here we tested the ability of antigen-specific Tregs generated by retroviral gene transfer to ameliorate arthritis through linked suppression and therefore without cognate recognition of the disease-initiating antigen. We explored two distinct strategies: T cell receptor (TCR) gene transfer into purified CD4+CD25+ T cells was used to redirect the specificity of naturally occurring Tregs; and co-transfer of FoxP3 and TCR genes served to convert conventional CD4(+) T cells into antigen-specific regulators. Following adoptive transfer into recipient mice, the gene-modified T cells engrafted efficiently and retained TCR and FoxP3 expression. Using an established arthritis model, we demonstrate antigen-driven accumulation of the gene modified T cells at the site of joint inflammation, which resulted in a local reduction in the number of inflammatory Th17 cells and a significant decrease in arthritic bone destruction. Together, we describe a robust strategy to rapidly generate antigen-specific regulatory T cells capable of highly targeted inhibition of tissue damage in the absence of systemic immune suppression. This opens the possibility to target Tregs to tissue-specific antigens for the treatment of autoimmune tissue damage without the knowledge of the disease-causing autoantigens recognized by pathogenic T cells. PMID:19884493

  7. Viral Escape Mutant Epitope Maintains TCR Affinity for Antigen yet Curtails CD8 T Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Shorter, Shayla K.; Schnell, Frederick J.; McMaster, Sean R.; Pinelli, David F.; Andargachew, Rakieb; Evavold, Brian D.

    2016-01-01

    T cells have the remarkable ability to recognize antigen with great specificity and in turn mount an appropriate and robust immune response. Critical to this process is the initial T cell antigen recognition and subsequent signal transduction events. This antigen recognition can be modulated at the site of TCR interaction with peptide:major histocompatibility (pMHC) or peptide interaction with the MHC molecule. Both events could have a range of effects on T cell fate. Though responses to antigens that bind sub-optimally to TCR, known as altered peptide ligands (APL), have been studied extensively, the impact of disrupting antigen binding to MHC has been highlighted to a lesser extent and is usually considered to result in complete loss of epitope recognition. Here we present a model of viral evasion from CD8 T cell immuno-surveillance by a lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) escape mutant with an epitope for which TCR affinity for pMHC remains high but where the antigenic peptide binds sub optimally to MHC. Despite high TCR affinity for variant epitope, levels of interferon regulatory factor-4 (IRF4) are not sustained in response to the variant indicating differences in perceived TCR signal strength. The CD8+ T cell response to the variant epitope is characterized by early proliferation and up-regulation of activation markers. Interestingly, this response is not maintained and is characterized by a lack in IL-2 and IFNγ production, increased apoptosis and an abrogated glycolytic response. We show that disrupting the stability of peptide in MHC can effectively disrupt TCR signal strength despite unchanged affinity for TCR and can significantly impact the CD8+ T cell response to a viral escape mutant. PMID:26915099

  8. Human gamma delta T-cell recognition of Yersinia enterocolitica.

    PubMed Central

    Young, J L; Goodall, J C; Beacock-Sharp, H; Gaston, J S

    1997-01-01

    We have studied the human gamma delta T-cell response to Yersinia enterocolitica, a facultative intracellular bacterium which causes gastroenteritis and, particularly in human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-B27+ individuals, reactive arthritis (ReA). A marked proliferation of that cytotoxic gamma delta T cells is seen when Yersinia-infected lymphoblastoid cell lines or fixed intact Yersinia are added to cultures of mononuclear cells derived from the synovial fluid of ReA patients or from the peripheral blood of healthy donors. In contrast, heat-inactivated Yersinia fail to stimulate the gamma delta T-cell response. The gamma delta T-cell lines generated killed both autologous and allogeneic infected cell lines. Interestingly, a T-cell line generated from synovial fluid mononuclear cells (SFMC) killed infected autologous cell lines and a cell line matched for HLA-B27 less well than infected allogeneic target cells. gamma delta T-cell clones isolated from this line were found to express V gamma 9V delta 2 T-cell receptor (TCR) and also killed infected mismatched cells more efficiently than autologous targets. Moreover, from experiments using major histocompatability complex (MHC)-deficient cell lines, it was apparent that target cell recognition was MHC independent. Our results suggest that gamma delta T cells can be involved in immunity to Yersinia enterocolitica and should be taken into account when considering immunopathological mechanisms leading to reactive arthritis. PMID:9378487

  9. HLA antigen changes in malignant cells: epigenetic mechanisms and biologic significance

    PubMed Central

    Campoli, Michael; Ferrone, Soldano

    2009-01-01

    Changes in classical and non-classical HLA class I as well as HLA class II antigens have been identified in malignant lesions. These changes which are described in this paper are believed to play a major role in the clinical course of the disease since both HLA class I and class II antigens are critical to the interaction between tumor cells and components of both innate and adaptive immune system. Abnormalities in HLA antigen expression in malignant cells, which range in frequency from 0-90%, are caused by distinct mechanisms. They include defects in β2-microglobulin (β2m) synthesis, loss of the gene(s) encoding HLA antigen heavy chain(s), mutations which inhibit HLA antigen heavy chain transcription or translation, defects in the regulatory mechanisms which control HLA antigen expression and/or abnormalities in one or more of the antigen processing machinery (APM) components. More recently, epigenetic events associated with tumor development and progression have been found to underlie changes in HLA antigen, APM component, co-stimulatory molecule and TA expression in malignant cells. The types of epigenetic modifications that may occur in normal and malignant cells as well as their role underlying changes in HLA expression by malignant cells have been reviewed. The epigenetic events associated with alterations in HLA antigen expression may be clinically relevant since, in some case, they have been shown to impair the recognition of tumor cells by components of the adaptive immune system. The functional relevance and potential clinical significance of these epigenetic alterations have been addressed. Lastly, unlike genetic alterations, epigenetic modifications can, in some cases, be reversed with pharmacologic agents that induce DNA hypomethylation or inhibit histone deacetylation. Therefore strategies to overcome epigenetic modifications underlying changes in HLA expression in malignant cells have been discussed. PMID:18836468

  10. Artificial antigen presenting cells for use in adoptive immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Turtle, Cameron J.; Riddell, Stanley R.

    2010-01-01

    The observation that T cells can recognize and specifically eliminate cancer cells has spurred interest in the development of efficient methods to generate large numbers of T cells with specificity for tumor antigens that can be harnessed for use in cancer therapy. Recent studies have demonstrated that during encounter with tumor antigen, the signals delivered to T cells by professional antigen presenting cells can affect T cell programming and their subsequent therapeutic efficacy. This has stimulated efforts to develop artificial antigen presenting cells that allow optimal control over the signals provided to T cells. In this review, we will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of cellular and acellular artificial antigen presenting cell systems and their use in T cell adoptive immunotherapy for cancer. PMID:20693850

  11. Antigen-induced regulation of T-cell motility, interaction with antigen-presenting cells and activation through endogenous thrombospondin-1 and its receptors

    PubMed Central

    Bergström, Sten-Erik; Uzunel, Mehmet; Talme, Toomas; Bergdahl, Eva; Sundqvist, Karl-Gösta

    2015-01-01

    Antigen recognition reduces T-cell motility, and induces prolonged contact with antigen-presenting cells and activation through mechanisms that remain unclear. Here we show that the T-cell receptor (TCR) and CD28 regulate T-cell motility, contact with antigen-presenting cells and activation through endogenous thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) and its receptors low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1), calreticulin and CD47. Antigen stimulation induced a prominent up-regulation of TSP-1 expression, and transiently increased and subsequently decreased LRP1 expression whereas calreticulin was unaffected. This antigen-induced TSP-1/LRP1 response down-regulated a motogenic mechanism directed by LRP1-mediated processing of TSP-1 in cis within the same plasma membrane while promoting contact with antigen-presenting cells and activation through cis interaction of the C-terminal domain of TSP-1 with CD47 in response to N-terminal TSP-1 triggering by calreticulin. The antigen-induced TSP-1/LRP1 response maintained a reduced but significant motility level in activated cells. Blocking CD28 co-stimulation abrogated LRP1 and TSP-1 expression and motility. TCR/CD3 ligation alone enhanced TSP-1 expression whereas CD28 ligation alone enhanced LRP1 expression. Silencing of TSP-1 inhibited T-cell conjugation to antigen-presenting cells and T helper type 1 (Th1) and Th2 cytokine responses. The Th1 response enhanced motility and increased TSP-1 expression through interleukin-2, whereas the Th2 response weakened motility and reduced LRP1 expression through interleukin-4. Ligation of the TCR and CD28 therefore elicits a TSP-1/LRP1 response that stimulates prolonged contact with antigen-presenting cells and, although down-regulating motility, maintains a significant motility level to allow serial contacts and activation. Th1 and Th2 cytokine responses differentially regulate T-cell expression of TSP-1 and LRP1 and motility. PMID:25393517

  12. Antigen recognition by T-lymphocyte studied with an optical trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xunbin; Krasieva, Tatiana B.; Negulescu, Paul A.; Zhang, Zhanxiang; Sun, Chung-Ho; Berns, Michael W.; Sonek, Gregory J.; Cahalan, Michael D.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    1998-01-01

    T-cell contact with antigen-presenting B cells initiates an activation cascade which includes an increase in T-cell intracellular calcium and leads to T-cell proliferation and differentiation. We studied cell-cell contact requirements for T-cell activation using an optical trap to control the orientation of T-cell/B-cell pairs and fluorescence microscopy to measure subsequent T-cell(Ca2+)i response. B cells or beads coated with antibodies to the T- cell receptor are trapped with a titanium-sapphire laser and placed at different locations along the T-cell, which has a polarized appearance defined by the shape and direction of crawling. T-cell (Ca2+)i is detected as an emission shift from the combination of fura-red and oregon- green, two cytoplasmic (Ca2+)i indicators. T- cells which are presented antigen at the leading edge have a higher probability of responding and a shorter latency of response than those contacting B-cells or beads with their trailing end.

  13. Targeted delivery of antigen to hamster nasal lymphoid tissue with M-cell-directed lectins.

    PubMed Central

    Giannasca, P J; Boden, J A; Monath, T P

    1997-01-01

    The nasal cavity of a rodent is lined by an epithelium organized into distinct regional domains responsible for specific physiological functions. Aggregates of nasal lymphoid tissue (NALT) located at the base of the nasal cavity are believed to be sites of induction of mucosal immune responses to airborne antigens. The epithelium overlying NALT contains M cells which are specialized for the transcytosis of immunogens, as demonstrated in other mucosal tissues. We hypothesized that NALT M cells are characterized by distinct glycoconjugate receptors which influence antigen uptake and immune responses to transcytosed antigens. To identify glycoconjugates that may distinguish NALT M cells from other cells of the respiratory epithelium (RE), we performed lectin histochemistry on sections of the hamster nasal cavity with a panel of lectins. Many classes of glycoconjugates were found on epithelial cells in this region. While most lectins bound to sites on both the RE and M cells, probes capable of recognizing alpha-linked galactose were found to label the follicle-associated epithelium (FAE) almost exclusively. By morphological criteria, the FAE contains >90% M cells. To determine if apical glycoconjugates on M cells were accessible from the nasal cavity, an M-cell-selective lectin and a control lectin in parallel were administered intranasally to hamsters. The M-cell-selective lectin was found to specifically target the FAE, while the control lectin did not. Lectin bound to M cells in vivo was efficiently endocytosed, consistent with the role of M cells in antigen transport. Intranasal immunization with lectin-test antigen conjugates without adjuvant stimulated induction of specific serum immunoglobulin G, whereas antigen alone or admixed with lectin did not. The selective recognition of NALT M cells by a lectin in vivo provides a model for microbial adhesin-host cell receptor interactions on M cells and the targeted delivery of immunogens to NALT following intranasal

  14. Molecular Mechanisms of B Cell Antigen Gathering and Endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Hoogeboom, Robbert; Tolar, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Generation of high-affinity, protective antibodies requires B cell receptor (BCR) signaling, as well as antigen internalization and presentation to helper T cells. B cell antigen internalization is initiated by antigen capture, either from solution or from immune synapses formed on the surface of antigen-presenting cells, and proceeds via clathrin-dependent endocytosis and intracellular routing to late endosomes. Although the components of this pathway are still being discovered, it has become clear that antigen internalization is actively regulated by BCR signaling at multiple steps and, vice versa, that localization of the BCR along the endocytic pathway modulates signaling. Accordingly, defects in BCR internalization or trafficking contribute to enhanced B cell activation in models of autoimmune diseases and in B cell lymphomas. In this review, we discuss how BCR signaling complexes regulate each of the steps of this endocytic process and why defects along this pathway manifest as hyperactive B cell responses in vivo. PMID:26336965

  15. The B-cell tumor–associated antigen ROR1 can be targeted with T cells modified to express a ROR1-specific chimeric antigen receptor

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Thomas M.; Baskar, Sivasubramanian; Lupo-Stanghellini, Maria Teresa; Nishida, Tetsuya; Yamamoto, Tori N.; Bleakley, Marie; Turtle, Cameron J.; Chang, Wen-Chung; Greisman, Harvey A.; Wood, Brent; Maloney, David G.; Jensen, Michael C.; Rader, Christoph; Riddell, Stanley R.

    2010-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies and T cells modified to express chimeric antigen receptors specific for B-cell lineage surface molecules such as CD20 exert antitumor activity in B-cell malignancies, but deplete normal B cells. The receptor tyrosine kinase-like orphan receptor 1 (ROR1) was identified as a highly expressed gene in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL), but not normal B cells, suggesting it may serve as a tumor-specific target for therapy. We analyzed ROR1-expression in normal nonhematopoietic and hematopoietic cells including B-cell precursors, and in hematopoietic malignancies. ROR1 has characteristics of an oncofetal gene and is expressed in undifferentiated embryonic stem cells, B-CLL and mantle cell lymphoma, but not in major adult tissues apart from low levels in adipose tissue and at an early stage of B-cell development. We constructed a ROR1-specific chimeric antigen receptor that when expressed in T cells from healthy donors or CLL patients conferred specific recognition of primary B-CLL and mantle cell lymphoma, including rare drug effluxing chemotherapy resistant tumor cells that have been implicated in maintaining the malignancy, but not mature normal B cells. T-cell therapies targeting ROR1 may be effective in B-CLL and other ROR1-positive tumors. However, the expression of ROR1 on some normal tissues suggests the potential for toxi-city to subsets of normal cells. PMID:20702778

  16. Carbohydrate-functionalized nanovaccines preserve HIV-1 antigen stability and activate antigen presenting cells

    PubMed Central

    Vela Ramirez, J.E.; Roychoudhury, R.; Habte, H.H.; Cho, M. W.; Pohl, N. L. B.; Narasimhan, B.

    2015-01-01

    The functionalization of polymeric nanoparticles with ligands that target specific receptors on immune cells offers the opportunity to tailor adjuvant properties by conferring pathogen mimicking attributes to the particles. Polyanhydride nanoparticles are promising vaccine adjuvants with desirable characteristics such as immunomodulation, sustained antigen release, activation of antigen presenting cells, and stabilization of protein antigens. These capabilities can be exploited to design nanovaccines against viral pathogens, such as HIV-1, due to the important role of dendritic cells and macrophages in viral spread. In this work, an optimized process was developed for carbohydrate functionalization of HIV-1 antigen-loaded polyanhydride nanoparticles. The carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles preserved antigenic properties upon release and also enabled sustained antigen release kinetics. Particle internalization was observed to be chemistry-dependent with positively charged nanoparticles being taken up more efficiently by dendritic cells. Up-regulation of the activation makers CD40 and CD206 was demonstrated with carboxymethyl-α-d-mannopyranosyl-(1,2)-d-mannopyranoside functionalized nanoparticles. The secretion of the cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α was shown to be chemistry-dependent upon stimulation with carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles. These results offer important new insights upon the interactions between carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles and antigen presenting cells and provide foundational information for the rational design of targeted nanovaccines against HIV-1. PMID:25068589

  17. Spinning-disk self-referencing interferometry of antigen-antibody recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varma, M. M.; Nolte, D. D.; Inerowicz, H. D.; Regnier, F. E.

    2004-05-01

    A gold ridge microstructure fabricated to a height of lambda/8 on a high-reflectivity substrate behaves as a wave-front-splitting self-referencing interferometer in phase quadrature when illuminated by a Gaussian laser beam and observed in the far field along the optic axis. When immuno-gammaglobulin (IgG) antibodies are selectively immobilized on the gold microstructure, they recognize and bind to a specific antigen, which shifts the relative optical phase of the interferometer and modifies the far-field diffracted intensity. We detect bound antigen interferometrically on spinning disks at a sampling rate of 100 kHz and verify the interferometric nature of the signal by using two quadratures of opposite sign to rule out effects of dynamic light scattering. Strong molecular recognition is demonstrated by the absence of binding to nontarget molecules but strong signal change in response to a specific antigen. This BioCD has the potential to be applied as a spinning-disk interferometric immunoassay and biosensor.

  18. Targeting Antigens to Dendritic Cell Receptors for Vaccine Development

    PubMed Central

    Apostolopoulos, Vasso; Thalhammer, Theresia; Tzakos, Andreas G.

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are highly specialized antigen presenting cells of the immune system which play a key role in regulating immune responses. Depending on the method of antigen delivery, DCs stimulate immune responses or induce tolerance. As a consequence of the dual function of DCs, DCs are studied in the context of immunotherapy for both cancer and autoimmune diseases. In vaccine development, a major aim is to induce strong, specific T-cell responses. This is achieved by targeting antigen to cell surface molecules on DCs that efficiently channel the antigen into endocytic compartments for loading onto MHC molecules and stimulation of T-cell responses. The most attractive cell surface receptors, expressed on DCs used as targets for antigen delivery for cancer and other diseases, are discussed. PMID:24228179

  19. Effect of yeast-derived products and distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS) on antibody-mediated immune response and gene expression of pattern recognition receptors and cytokines in broiler chickens immunized with T-cell dependent antigens.

    PubMed

    Alizadeh, M; Rodriguez-Lecompte, J C; Echeverry, H; Crow, G H; Slominski, B A

    2016-04-01

    This study evaluated the effect of yeast-derived products on innate and antibody mediated immune response in broiler chickens following immunization with sheep red blood cells (SRBC) and bovine serum albumin (BSA). One-day-old male broiler chickens (Ross-308) were randomly assigned to 6 dietary treatments of 9 replicate cages of 5 birds each per treatment. Dietary treatments consisted of a Control diet without antibiotic, and diets containing 11 mg/kg of virginiamycin, 0.25% of yeast cell wall (YCW), 0.2% of a commercial product Maxi-Gen Plus containing processed yeast and nucleotides, 0.05% of nucleotides, or a diet containing 10% of DDGS. On days 21 and 28 post-hatching, 5 birds per treatment were immunized intramuscularly with both SRBC and BSA. One week after each immunization, blood samples were collected. Serum samples were analyzed by hemagglutination test for antibody response to SRBC, and by ELISA for serum IgM and IgG response to BSA. On d 35, 5 birds per treatment were euthanized and the tissue samples from the cecal tonsils were collected to assess the gene expression of toll-like receptors TLR2b, TLR4, and TLR21, monocyte mannose receptor (MMR), and cytokines IL-10, IL-13, IL-4, IL-12p35, and IFN-γ. The results for gene expression analysis demonstrated that the diet supplemented with YCW increased the expression of TLR2b and T-helper type 2 cytokines IL-10, IL-4, and IL-13 relative to the Control; and the expression of TLR4 and IL-13 was upregulated in the nucleotide-containing diet. However, the diets containing antibiotics or Maxi-Gen Plus downregulated the expression of IFN-γ compared to the control. The primary antibody response to SRBC was not affected by diets. However, the diet containing YCW increased the secondary antibody response to SRBC compared to the antibiotic treatment. Neither primary nor secondary IgG and IgM response against BSA were affected by diets. In conclusion, supplementation of the diet with YCW stimulated Th2 cell

  20. TAP-independent self-peptides enhance T cell recognition of immune-escaped tumors

    PubMed Central

    Doorduijn, Elien M.; Sluijter, Marjolein; Querido, Bianca J.; Oliveira, Cláudia C.; Achour, Adnane; Ossendorp, Ferry; van der Burg, Sjoerd H.; van Hall, Thorbald

    2016-01-01

    Tumor cells frequently escape from CD8+ T cell recognition by abrogating MHC-I antigen presentation. Deficiency in processing components, like the transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP), results in strongly decreased surface display of peptide/MHC-I complexes. We previously identified a class of hidden self-antigens known as T cell epitopes associated with impaired peptide processing (TEIPP), which emerge on tumor cells with such processing defects. In the present study, we analyzed thymus selection and peripheral behavior of T cells with specificity for the prototypic TEIPP antigen, the “self” TRH4 peptide/Db complex. TEIPP T cells were efficiently selected in the thymus, egressed with a naive phenotype, and could be exploited for immunotherapy against immune-escaped, TAP-deficient tumor cells expressing low levels of MHC-I (MHC-Ilo). In contrast, overt thymus deletion and functionally impaired TEIPP T cells were observed in mice deficient for TAP1 due to TEIPP antigen presentation on all body cells in these mice. Our results strongly support the concept that TEIPPs derive from ubiquitous, nonmutated self-antigens and constitute a class of immunogenic neoantigens that are unmasked during tumor immune evasion. These data suggest that TEIPP-specific CD8+ T cells are promising candidates in the treatment of tumors that have escaped from conventional immunotherapies. PMID:26784543

  1. A cell-based immunobiosensor with engineered molecular recognition--Part I: Design feasibility.

    PubMed

    Pizziconi, V B; Page, D L

    1997-01-01

    A novel bioelectronic sensor is described in which living immune cells are transformed into unique biotransducer couples by engineering their molecular recognition for preselected antigens of clinical interest. This 'hybrid' biosensor, constructed with mast cells interfaced to a microfabricated thermoelectric device with the use of biomolecular linkages, is capable of detecting antigens in real time by transducing minute heat changes arising from antigen-induced mast cell activation processes. The thermoelectric approach was selected based upon preliminary bioenergetic calculations which indicated that metabolic changes arising from mast cell antigen recognition result in a significant increase in exothermic heat relative to basal metabolic conditions. Experimental studies confirmed that mast cell activation and degranulation can be discriminated theramally from basal metabolic activity. Results obtained from microcalorimetry experiments using cultured mast cells (MC/9) mucosal-like mast cell line), and harvested mast cells (rat peritoneal mast cells) indicated that detectable increases in heat output (-3 +/- 0.5 pW/cell, mean peak output) immediately followed cell activation. The construction of a miniature hybrid immunobiosensor device was made possible by bioelectronic coupling achieved with the use of cellular adhesive proteins that immobilized non-adherent (MC/9) cells as well as adherent (RBL-2H3 rat basophilic leukemia) cells to the thermopile. Results from preliminary tests conducted on a hybrid biosensor prototype validated the design feasibility of a miniature, living cell immunodiagnostic biosensor. Such cell-based hybrid biosensor approaches may greatly extend the capability for selective, rapid, on-site, antigen detection for a wide range of clinically relevant antigens and offer new approaches to in vitro diagnostics. PMID:9178514

  2. Pattern recognition monitoring of PEM fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Meltser, M.A.

    1999-08-31

    The CO-concentration in the H{sub 2} feed stream to a PEM fuel cell stack is monitored by measuring current and voltage behavior patterns from an auxiliary cell attached to the end of the stack. The auxiliary cell is connected to the same oxygen and hydrogen feed manifolds that supply the stack, and discharges through a constant load. Pattern recognition software compares the current and voltage patterns from the auxiliary cell to current and voltage signature determined from a reference cell similar to the auxiliary cell and operated under controlled conditions over a wide range of CO-concentrations in the H{sub 2} fuel stream. 4 figs.

  3. Pattern recognition monitoring of PEM fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Meltser, Mark Alexander

    1999-01-01

    The CO-concentration in the H.sub.2 feed stream to a PEM fuel cell stack is monitored by measuring current and voltage behavior patterns from an auxiliary cell attached to the end of the stack. The auxiliary cell is connected to the same oxygen and hydrogen feed manifolds that supply the stack, and discharges through a constant load. Pattern recognition software compares the current and voltage patterns from the auxiliary cell to current and voltage signature determined from a reference cell similar to the auxiliary cell and operated under controlled conditions over a wide range of CO-concentrations in the H.sub.2 fuel stream.

  4. Mutagenesis of beryllium-specific TCRs suggests an unusual binding topology for antigen recognition.

    PubMed

    Bowerman, Natalie A; Falta, Michael T; Mack, Douglas G; Kappler, John W; Fontenot, Andrew P

    2011-10-01

    Unconventional Ags, such as metals, stimulate T cells in a very specific manner. To delineate the binding landscape for metal-specific T cell recognition, alanine screens were performed on a set of Be-specific TCRs derived from the lung of a chronic beryllium disease patient. These TCRs are HLA-DP2-restricted and express nearly identical TCR Vβ5.1 chains coupled with different TCR α-chains. Site-specific mutagenesis of all amino acids comprising the CDRs of the TCRA and TCRB genes showed a dominant role for Vβ5.1 residues in Be recognition, with little contribution from the TCR α-chain. Solvent-exposed residues along the α-helices of the HLA-DP2 α- and β-chains were also mutated to alanine. Two β-chain residues, located near the proposed Be binding site of HLA-DP2, played a dominant role in T cell recognition with no contribution from the HLA-DP2 α-chain. These findings suggest that Be-specific T cells recognize Ag using an unconventional binding topology, with the majority of interactions contributed by TCR Vβ5.1 residues and the HLA-DP2 β1-chain. Thus, unusual docking topologies are not exclusively used by autoreactive T cells, but also for the recognition of unconventional metal Ags, such as Be. PMID:21873524

  5. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen in neutrophil fate.

    PubMed

    Witko-Sarsat, Véronique; Ohayon, Delphine

    2016-09-01

    The life span of a neutrophil is a tightly regulated process as extended survival is beneficial for pathogen elimination and cell death necessary to prevent cytotoxic content release from activated neutrophils at the inflammatory site. Therefore, the control between survival and death must be a dynamic process. We have previously described that proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) which is known as a nuclear protein pivotal in DNA synthesis, is a key element in controlling neutrophil survival through its association with procaspases. Contrary to the dogma which asserted that PCNA has a strictly nuclear function, in mature neutrophils, PCNA is present exclusively within the cytosol due to its nuclear export at the end of the granulocytic differentiation. More recent studies are consistent with the notion that the cytosolic scaffold of PCNA is aimed at modulating neutrophil fate rather than simply preventing death. Ultimately, targeting neutrophil survival might have important applications not just in the field of immunology and inflammation, but also in hematology and transfusion. The neutrophil emerges as a unique and powerful cellular model to unravel the basic mechanisms governing the cell cycle-independent functions of PCNA and should be considered as a leader of the pack. PMID:27558345

  6. The TCR’s sensitivity to self-peptide–MHC dictates the ability of naïve CD8+ T cells to respond to foreign antigens

    PubMed Central

    Fulton, Ross B.; Hamilton, Sara E.; Xing, Yan; Best, J. Adam; Goldrath, Ananda W.; Hogquist, Kristin A.; Jameson, Stephen C.

    2014-01-01

    The strength of self-peptide–major histocompatibility complex (MHC) recognition dictates naïve CD8+ T cell homeostasis, but its effect on foreign antigen reactivity is controversial. As CD5 expression correlates with self-recognition, we studied CD5lo and CD5hi naïve CD8+ T cells. Gene expression characteristics suggested CD5hi cells were better poised for reactivity and differentiation compared to the CD5lo population, and we found that the CD5hi pool exhibited more efficient clonal recruitment and expansion, as well as enhanced reactivity to inflammatory cues, during recognition of foreign antigen. Yet foreign peptide–MHC recognition was similar for both subsets. Thus, CD8+ T cells with higher self-reactivity dominate the immune response against foreign antigens, with implications for T cell repertoire diversity and autoimmunity. PMID:25419629

  7. Immunochemistry of the streptococcal group R cell wall polysaccharide antigen.

    PubMed

    Soprey, P; Slade, H D

    1972-01-01

    The group R streptococcal group antigen has been shown to be a polysaccharide located at the surface of the cell wall of the organism. The antigen was extracted from cell walls in 0.05 n HCl or 5% trichloracetic acid at 100 C, from whole cells at room temperature in 0.85% NaCl or 0.1 m acetate (pH 5.0), and by sonic oscillation. The antigen is largely destroyed when extracted from whole cells in 0.05 n HCl at 100 C. Acetate is recommended for routine extraction. The antigen extracted by sonic treatment was separated into six immunologically active fractions on diethylaminoethyl-Sephadex. The fractions were found to possess a common antigen which exhibited similar properties on immunodiffusion and immunoelectrophoresis. The purified antigen did not react with any other streptococcal group antisera. Adsorption of group R serum with the antigen removed all antibodies against whole cell antigen extracts of R cells. Chemical and enzymatic analysis of three fractions showed that the antigen was composed of d-glucose, d-galactose, rhamnose, and glucosamine. No significant quantities of phosphorus, glycerol, ribitol, or muramic acid were present. Significant inhibition of the quantitative precipitin determination by d-galactose and stachyose indicated that galactose in terminal alpha linkage was the immunodominant hexose in the antigen. d-Glucose and d-glucosamine possessed a partial inhibitory activity. N-acetyl-d-glucosamine and l-rhamnose did not produce significant inhibition. The results indicate that the R antigen is an immunologically specific structure which serves as a reliable means of identification of these streptococci as a serological group. PMID:4632470

  8. Antigen

    MedlinePlus

    An antigen is any substance that causes your immune system to produce antibodies against it. This means your immune ... and is trying to fight it off. An antigen may be a substance from the environment, such ...

  9. Calnexin induces expansion of antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells that confer immunity to fungal ascomycetes via conserved epitopes.

    PubMed

    Wüthrich, Marcel; Brandhorst, Tristan T; Sullivan, Thomas D; Filutowicz, Hanna; Sterkel, Alana; Stewart, Douglas; Li, Mengyi; Lerksuthirat, Tassanee; LeBert, Vanessa; Shen, Zu Ting; Ostroff, Gary; Deepe, George S; Hung, Chiung Yu; Cole, Garry; Walter, Jennifer A; Jenkins, Marc K; Klein, Bruce

    2015-04-01

    Fungal infections remain a threat due to the lack of broad-spectrum fungal vaccines and protective antigens. Recent studies showed that attenuated Blastomyces dermatitidis confers protection via T cell recognition of an unknown but conserved antigen. Using transgenic CD4(+) T cells recognizing this antigen, we identify an amino acid determinant within the chaperone calnexin that is conserved across diverse fungal ascomycetes. Calnexin, typically an ER protein, also localizes to the surface of yeast, hyphae, and spores. T cell epitope mapping unveiled a 13-residue sequence conserved across Ascomycota. Infection with divergent ascomycetes, including dimorphic fungi, opportunistic molds, and the agent causing white nose syndrome in bats, induces expansion of calnexin-specific CD4(+) T cells. Vaccine delivery of calnexin in glucan particles induces fungal antigen-specific CD4(+) T cell expansion and resistance to lethal challenge with multiple fungal pathogens. Thus, the immunogenicity and conservation of calnexin make this fungal protein a promising vaccine target. PMID:25800545

  10. Calnexin induces expansion of antigen-specific CD4+ T cells that confer immunity to fungal ascomycetes via conserved epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Wüthrich, Marcel; Brandhorst, Tristan T.; Sullivan, Thomas D.; Filutowicz, Hanna; Sterkel, Alana; Stewart, Douglas; Li, Mengyi; Lerksuthirat, Tassanee; LeBert, Vanessa; Shen, Zu Ting; Ostroff, Gary; Deepe, George S.; Hung, Chiung Yu; Cole, Garry; Walter, Jennifer A.; Jenkins, Marc K.; Klein, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Fungal infections remain a threat due to the lack of broad spectrum fungal vaccines and protective antigens. Recent studies showed that attenuated Blastomyces dermatitidis confers protection via T cell recognition of an unknown, but conserved antigen. Using transgenic CD4+ T cells recognizing this antigen, we identify an amino acid determinant within the chaperone calnexin that is conserved across diverse fungal ascomycetes. Calnexin, typically an ER protein, also localizes to the surface of yeast, hyphae and spores. T cell epitope mapping unveiled a 13-residue sequence conserved across Ascomycota. Infection with divergent ascomycetes including dimorphic fungi, opportunistic molds, and the agent causing white nose syndrome in bats induces expansion of calnexin-specific CD4+ T cells. Vaccine delivery of calnexin in glucan particles induces fungal antigen-specific CD4+ T cell expansion and resistance to lethal challenge with multiple fungal pathogens. Thus, the immunogeneticity and conservation of calnexin make this fungal protein a promising vaccine target. PMID:25800545

  11. Antigenic liposomes displaying CD22 ligands induce antigen-specific B cell apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Macauley, Matthew S.; Pfrengle, Fabian; Rademacher, Christoph; Nycholat, Corwin M.; Gale, Andrew J.; von Drygalski, Annette; Paulson, James C.

    2013-01-01

    Antibodies confer humoral immunity but can also be harmful when they target an autoantigen, alloantigen, allergen, or biotherapeutic. New strategies are needed for antigen-specific suppression of undesired antibody responses, particularly to T cell–dependent protein antigens, because they elicit T cell help. Here we show that liposomal nanoparticles, displaying both antigen and glycan ligands of the inhibitory coreceptor CD22, induce a tolerogenic program that selectively causes apoptosis in mouse and human B cells. These SIGLEC-engaging tolerance-inducing antigenic liposomes (STALs, where SIGLEC is defined as sialic acid–binding Ig-like lectin) induced robust antigen-specific tolerance to protein antigens in mice, preventing subsequent immune response to challenge with the same antigen. Since development of inhibitory antibodies to FVIII is a serious problem in treatment of hemophilia A patients, we investigated the potential of this approach for inducing tolerance to FVIII in a hemophilia mouse model. STALs prevented formation of inhibitory FVIII antibodies, allowing for effective administration of FVIII to hemophilia mice to prevent bleeding. These findings suggest that STALs could be used to eliminate or prevent harmful B cell–mediated immune responses. PMID:23722906

  12. Phylogeny of immune recognition: antigen processing/presentation in channel catfish immune responses to hemocyanins.

    PubMed

    Vallejo, A N; Miller, N W; Jørgensen, T; Clem, L W

    1990-10-15

    Studies were conducted to address the role(s) of antigen (Ag) processing/presentation in channel catfish immune responses. Vigorous and specific secondary in vitro proliferative and antibody (Ab) responses were obtained to keyhole limpet and Limulus polyphemus hemocyanins with peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) from catfish previously primed in vivo with Ag. In addition, such antigen-specific in vitro proliferative and Ab responses were efficiently elicited by antigen-pulsed and subsequently paraformaldehyde-fixed autologous PBL used as putative antigen-presenting cells (APC) but not by APC fixed prior to Ag pulsing. Treatment of these putative APC with lysosomotropic agents, protease inhibitors, or the ionophore monensin prior to or during pulsing with Ag significantly inhibited both in vitro responses. Furthermore, the use of radiolabeled protein indicated that both untreated and inhibitor-treated PBL but not erythrocytes take up Ag; however, only untreated PBL were able to degrade Ag. Immune restriction was indicated by the use of allogeneic PBL as APC in that only strong MLRs were generated with no detectable antibodies produced in vitro. Finally, the employment of isolated leukocyte subpopulations demonstrated that both catfish B (sIg+) lymphocytes and monocytes were efficient Ag presentors. PMID:2208303

  13. Identifying protective Streptococcus pyogenes vaccine antigens recognized by both B and T cells in human adults and children.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Rasmus; Nissen, Thomas Nørrelykke; Fredslund, Sine; Rosenkrands, Ida; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Andersen, Peter; Dietrich, Jes

    2016-01-01

    No commercial vaccine exists against Group A streptococci (GAS; Streptococcus pyogenes) and only little is known about anti-GAS protective immunity. In our effort to discover new protective vaccine candidates, we selected 21 antigens based on an in silico evaluation. These were all well-conserved among different GAS strains, upregulated in host-pathogen interaction studies, and predicted to be extracellular or associated with the surface of the bacteria. The antigens were tested for both antibody recognition and T cell responses in human adults and children. The antigenicity of a selected group of antigens was further validated using a high-density peptide array technology that also identified the linear epitopes. Based on immunological recognition, four targets were selected and tested for protective capabilities in an experimental GAS infection model in mice. Shown for the first time, three of these targets (spy0469, spy1228 and spy1801) conferred significant protection whereas one (spy1643) did not. PMID:26911649

  14. Identifying protective Streptococcus pyogenes vaccine antigens recognized by both B and T cells in human adults and children

    PubMed Central

    Mortensen, Rasmus; Nissen, Thomas Nørrelykke; Fredslund, Sine; Rosenkrands, Ida; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Andersen, Peter; Dietrich, Jes

    2016-01-01

    No commercial vaccine exists against Group A streptococci (GAS; Streptococcus pyogenes) and only little is known about anti-GAS protective immunity. In our effort to discover new protective vaccine candidates, we selected 21 antigens based on an in silico evaluation. These were all well-conserved among different GAS strains, upregulated in host-pathogen interaction studies, and predicted to be extracellular or associated with the surface of the bacteria. The antigens were tested for both antibody recognition and T cell responses in human adults and children. The antigenicity of a selected group of antigens was further validated using a high-density peptide array technology that also identified the linear epitopes. Based on immunological recognition, four targets were selected and tested for protective capabilities in an experimental GAS infection model in mice. Shown for the first time, three of these targets (spy0469, spy1228 and spy1801) conferred significant protection whereas one (spy1643) did not. PMID:26911649

  15. Dendritic cell function and antigen presentation in malaria.

    PubMed

    Cockburn, Ian A; Zavala, Fidel

    2016-06-01

    Due to the diverse roles T cells play in protection against malaria as well as pathogenesis it is critical to know which cells present antigen and the nature of the antigens they present. During pre-erythrocytic stages of infection, cutting-edge imaging studies have shown how Plasmodium antigens are presented during both the priming and effector phases of the protective CD8+ T cell response. During blood stages, pathology is in part due to the loss of DC function and the action of pathogenic T cells in the brain. Recently endothelial cells presenting malaria antigen to cognate T cells have emerged as critical players in malaria pathogenesis. Manipulating these processes may inform both vaccine design and the development of therapies for cerebral malaria. PMID:26845735

  16. The actin cytoskeleton coordinates the signal transduction and antigen processing functions of the B cell antigen receptor

    PubMed Central

    LIU, Chaohong; FALLEN, Margaret K.; MILLER, Heather; UPADHYAYA, Arpita; SONG, Wenxia

    2014-01-01

    The B cell antigen receptor (BCR) is the sensor on the B cell surface that surveys foreign molecules (antigen) in our bodies and activates B cells to generate antibody responses upon encountering cognate antigen. The binding of antigen to the BCR induces signaling cascades in the cytoplasm, which provides the first signal for B cell activation. Subsequently, BCRs internalize and target bound antigen to endosomes, where antigen is processed into T cell recognizable forms. T helper cells generate the second activation signal upon binding to antigen presented by B cells. The optimal activation of B cells requires both signals, thereby depending on the coordination of BCR signaling and antigen transport functions. Antigen binding to the BCR also induces rapid remodeling of the cortical actin network of B cells. While being initiated and controlled by BCR signaling, recent studies reveal that this actin remodeling is critical for both the signaling and antigen processing functions of the BCR, indicating a role for actin in coordinating these two pathways. Here we will review previous and recent studies on actin reorganization during BCR activation and BCR-mediated antigen processing, and discuss how actin remodeling translates BCR signaling into rapid antigen uptake and processing while providing positive and negative feedback to BCR signaling. PMID:24999354

  17. T cell recognition of beryllium.

    PubMed

    Dai, Shaodong; Falta, Michael T; Bowerman, Natalie A; McKee, Amy S; Fontenot, Andrew P

    2013-12-01

    Chronic beryllium disease (CBD) is a granulomatous lung disorder caused by a hypersensitivity to beryllium and characterized by the accumulation of beryllium-specific CD4(+) T cells in the lung. Genetic susceptibility to beryllium-induced disease is strongly associated with HLA-DP alleles possessing a glutamic acid at the 69th position of the β-chain (βGlu69). The structure of HLA-DP2, the most prevalent βGlu69-containing molecule, revealed a unique solvent-exposed acidic pocket that includes βGlu69 and represents the putative beryllium-binding site. The delineation of mimotopes and endogenous self-peptides that complete the αβTCR ligand for beryllium-specific CD4(+) T cells suggests a unique role of these peptides in metal ion coordination and the generation of altered self-peptides, blurring the distinction between hypersensitivity and autoimmunity. PMID:23978481

  18. Antigen specificity of invariant natural killer T-cells.

    PubMed

    Birkholz, Alysia M; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2015-12-01

    Natural killer T-cells, with an invariant T-cell antigen receptor α-chain (iNKT cells), are unique and conserved subset of lymphocytes capable of altering the immune system through their rapid and potent cytokine responses. They are reactive to lipid antigens presented by the CD1d molecule, an antigen-presenting molecule that is not highly polymorphic. iNKT cell responses frequently involve mixtures of cytokines that work against each other, and therefore attempts are underway to develop synthetic antigens that elicit only strong interferon-gamma (IFNγ) or only strong interleukin-4 responses but not both. Strong IFNγ responses may correlate with tighter binding to CD1d and prolonged stimulation of iNKT cells, and this may be useful for vaccine adjuvants and for stimulating anti-tumor responses. iNKT cells are self-reactive although the structure of the endogenous antigen is controversial. By contrast, bacterial and fungal lipids that engage the T-cell receptor and activate IFNγ from iNKT cells have been identified from both pathogenic and commensal organisms and the responses are in some cases highly protective from pathogens in mice. It is possible that the expanding knowledge of iNKT cell antigens and iNKT cell activation will provide the basis for therapies for patients suffering from infectious and immune diseases and cancer. PMID:27013447

  19. Overcoming Antigen Escape with CAR T-cell Therapy.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Hollie J; Brentjens, Renier J

    2015-12-01

    Sotillo and colleagues describe the molecular events associated with apparent loss of target antigen expression following CAR T-cell therapy. We propose that broader immune activation is required to prevent outgrowth of tumor antigen escape variants following targeted therapies. PMID:26637657

  20. Carbohydrate-functionalized nanovaccines preserve HIV-1 antigen stability and activate antigen presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Vela Ramirez, J E; Roychoudhury, R; Habte, H H; Cho, M W; Pohl, N L B; Narasimhan, B

    2014-01-01

    The functionalization of polymeric nanoparticles with ligands that target specific receptors on immune cells offers the opportunity to tailor adjuvant properties by conferring pathogen mimicking attributes to the particles. Polyanhydride nanoparticles are promising vaccine adjuvants with desirable characteristics such as immunomodulation, sustained antigen release, activation of antigen presenting cells (APCs), and stabilization of protein antigens. These capabilities can be exploited to design nanovaccines against viral pathogens, such as HIV-1, due to the important role of dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages in viral spread. In this work, an optimized process was developed for carbohydrate functionalization of HIV-1 antigen-loaded polyanhydride nanoparticles. The carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles preserved antigenic properties upon release and also enabled sustained antigen release kinetics. Particle internalization was observed to be chemistry-dependent with positively charged nanoparticles being taken up more efficiently by DCs. Up-regulation of the activation makers CD40 and CD206 was demonstrated with carboxymethyl-α-d-mannopyranosyl-(1,2)-d-mannopyranoside functionalized nanoparticles. The secretion of the cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α was shown to be chemistry-dependent upon stimulation with carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles. These results offer important new insights upon the interactions between carbohydrate-functionalized nanoparticles and APCs and provide foundational information for the rational design of targeted nanovaccines against HIV-1. PMID:25068589

  1. Cytomegalovirus-Infected Cells Resist T Cell Mediated Killing in an HLA-Recognition Independent Manner.

    PubMed

    Proff, Julia; Walterskirchen, Christian; Brey, Charlotte; Geyeregger, Rene; Full, Florian; Ensser, Armin; Lehner, Manfred; Holter, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    In order to explore the potential of HLA-independent T cell therapy for human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infections, we developed a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) directed against the HCMV encoded glycoprotein B (gB), which is expressed at high levels on the surface of infected cells. T cells engineered with this anti-gB CAR recognized HCMV-infected cells and released cytokines and cytotoxic granules. Unexpectedly, and in contrast to analogous approaches for HIV, Hepatitis B or Hepatitis C virus, we found that HCMV-infected cells were resistant to killing by the CAR-modified T cells. In order to elucidate whether this phenomenon was restricted to the use of CARs, we extended our experiments to T cell receptor (TCR)-mediated recognition of infected cells. To this end we infected fibroblasts with HCMV-strains deficient in viral inhibitors of antigenic peptide presentation and targeted these HLA-class I expressing peptide-loaded infected cells with peptide-specific cytotoxic T cells (CTLs). Despite strong degranulation and cytokine production by the T cells, we again found significant inhibition of lysis of HCMV-infected cells. Impairment of cell lysis became detectable 1 day after HCMV infection and gradually increased during the following 3 days. We thus postulate that viral anti-apoptotic factors, known to inhibit suicide of infected host cells, have evolved additional functions to directly abrogate T cell cytotoxicity. In line with this hypothesis, CAR-T cell cytotoxicity was strongly inhibited in non-infected fibroblasts by expression of the HCMV-protein UL37x1, and even more so by additional expression of UL36. Our data extend the current knowledge on Betaherpesviral evasion from T cell immunity and show for the first time that, beyond impaired antigen presentation, infected cells are efficiently protected by direct blockade of cytotoxic effector functions through viral proteins. PMID:27375569

  2. Cytomegalovirus-Infected Cells Resist T Cell Mediated Killing in an HLA-Recognition Independent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Proff, Julia; Walterskirchen, Christian; Brey, Charlotte; Geyeregger, Rene; Full, Florian; Ensser, Armin; Lehner, Manfred; Holter, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    In order to explore the potential of HLA-independent T cell therapy for human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infections, we developed a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) directed against the HCMV encoded glycoprotein B (gB), which is expressed at high levels on the surface of infected cells. T cells engineered with this anti-gB CAR recognized HCMV-infected cells and released cytokines and cytotoxic granules. Unexpectedly, and in contrast to analogous approaches for HIV, Hepatitis B or Hepatitis C virus, we found that HCMV-infected cells were resistant to killing by the CAR-modified T cells. In order to elucidate whether this phenomenon was restricted to the use of CARs, we extended our experiments to T cell receptor (TCR)-mediated recognition of infected cells. To this end we infected fibroblasts with HCMV-strains deficient in viral inhibitors of antigenic peptide presentation and targeted these HLA-class I expressing peptide-loaded infected cells with peptide-specific cytotoxic T cells (CTLs). Despite strong degranulation and cytokine production by the T cells, we again found significant inhibition of lysis of HCMV-infected cells. Impairment of cell lysis became detectable 1 day after HCMV infection and gradually increased during the following 3 days. We thus postulate that viral anti-apoptotic factors, known to inhibit suicide of infected host cells, have evolved additional functions to directly abrogate T cell cytotoxicity. In line with this hypothesis, CAR-T cell cytotoxicity was strongly inhibited in non-infected fibroblasts by expression of the HCMV-protein UL37x1, and even more so by additional expression of UL36. Our data extend the current knowledge on Betaherpesviral evasion from T cell immunity and show for the first time that, beyond impaired antigen presentation, infected cells are efficiently protected by direct blockade of cytotoxic effector functions through viral proteins. PMID:27375569

  3. Immunological and clinical significance of HLA class I antigen processing machinery component defects in malignant cells.

    PubMed

    Concha-Benavente, Fernando; Srivastava, Raghvendra; Ferrone, Soldano; Ferris, Robert L

    2016-07-01

    Experimental as well as clinical studies demonstrate that the immune system plays a major role in controlling generation and progression of tumors. The cancer immunoediting theory supports the notion that tumor cell immunogenicity is dynamically shaped by the immune system, as it eliminates immunogenic tumor cells in the early stage of the disease and then edits their antigenicity. The end result is the generation of a tumor cell population able to escape from immune recognition and elimination by tumor infiltrating lymphocytes. Two major mechanisms, which affect the target cells and the effector phase of the immune response, play a crucial role in the editing process. One is represented by the downregulation of tumor antigen (TA) processing and presentation because of abnormalities in the HLA class I antigen processing machinery (APM). The other one is represented by the anergy of effector immune infiltrates in the tumor microenvironment caused by aberrant inhibitory signals triggered by immune checkpoint receptor (ICR) ligands, such as programmed death ligand-1 (PD-L1). In this review, we will focus on tumor immune escape mechanisms caused by defects in HLA class I APM component expression and/or function in different types of cancer, with emphasis on head and neck cancer (HNC). We will also discuss the immunological implications and clinical relevance of these HLA class I APM abnormalities. Finally, we will describe strategies to counteract defective TA presentation with the expectation that they will enhance tumor recognition and elimination by tumor infiltrating effector T cells. PMID:27264839

  4. Human onchocerciasis in Nigeria: isotypic responses and antigen recognition in individuals with defined cutaneous pathology.

    PubMed

    Murdoch, M E; Abiose, A; Garate, T; Hay, R J; Jones, B R; Maizels, R M; Parkhouse, R M

    1996-06-01

    Antigen (Ag)-specific isotype responses to Onchocerca volvulus Ag (OvAg) were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunoblot in 123 residents of a mesoendemic area in northern Nigeria and 16 Nigerians from a nonendemic area. Individuals from an endemic area were divided into six groups on the basis of cutaneous onchocercal pathology: acute papular onchodermatitis (APOD), chronic papular onchodermatitis (CPOD), lichenified onchodermatitis (LOD), atrophy (ATR), depigmentation (DPM) and normal skin, high microfilarial load (NSHMF). Immunoglobulin (Ig)G1-4 levels were all significantly associated with residence in an endemic area after controlling for age and sex (all P values = 0.0001). Both IgG1 and IgG3 were significantly associated with onchocercal clinical category after controlling for age, sex, and microfilarial load (P = 0.0031 and 0.0035, respectively). The IgG1 and IgG3 responses were both highest in LOD and lowest in NSHMF and ATR, respectively. A significant inverse association was found between IgG1 levels and microfilarial load after controlling for age, sex, and clinical category (P = 0.0061). On immunoblotting, 20 (44.4%) of 45 individual onchocerciasis sera contained IgG4 antibodies against a band of 29-31 kD, which was not recognized by pooled sera from individuals with other filarial infections. There was heterogeneity of antigen recognition within each of the onchocercal clinical groups, which together with the small numbers examined by immunoblotting, limits interpretation. Nevertheless, some differences in patterns of antigen recognition were found between the onchocercal groups. The LOD group demonstrated prominent immunoreactivity in IgG1 and IgG3 while a general paucity of low molecular weight reactivity was seen with NSHMF in IgG1-3 subclasses, but there was no specific banding pattern that differentiated NSHMF from those with pathology. Comparison of microfilariae-positive (mf+) and mf- individuals with onchocercal skin disease

  5. Mycoplasma Superantigen Is a CDR3-dependent Ligand for the T Cell Antigen Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Hodtsev, Andrew S.; Choi, Yongwon; Spanopoulou, Eugenia; Posnett, David N.

    1998-01-01

    Superantigens are defined as proteins that activate a large number of T cells through interaction with the Vβ region of the T cell antigen receptor (TCR). Here we demonstrate that the superantigen produced by Mycoplasma arthritidis (MAM), unlike six bacterial superantigens tested, interacts not only with the Vβ region but also with the CDR3 (third complementarity-determining region) of TCR-β. Although MAM shares typical features with other superantigens, direct interaction with CDR3-β is a feature of nominal peptide antigens situated in the antigen groove of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules rather than superantigens. During peptide recognition, Vβ and Vα domains of the TCR form contacts with MHC and the complex is stabilized by CDR3–peptide interactions. Similarly, recognition of MAM is Vβ-dependent and is apparently stabilized by direct contacts with the CDR3-β region. Thus, MAM represents a new type of ligand for TCR, distinct from both conventional peptide antigens and other known superantigens. PMID:9449712

  6. Signal strength regulates antigen-mediated T-cell deceleration by distinct mechanisms to promote local exploration or arrest

    PubMed Central

    Moreau, Hélène D.; Lemaître, Fabrice; Garrod, Kym R.; Garcia, Zacarias; Lennon-Duménil, Ana-Maria; Bousso, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    T lymphocytes are highly motile cells that decelerate upon antigen recognition. These cells can either completely stop or maintain a low level of motility, forming contacts referred to as synapses or kinapses, respectively. Whether similar or distinct molecular mechanisms regulate T-cell deceleration during synapses or kinapses is unclear. Here, we used microfabricated channels and intravital imaging to observe and manipulate T-cell kinapses and synapses. We report that high-affinity antigen induced a pronounced deceleration selectively dependent on Ca2+ signals and actin-related protein 2/3 complex (Arp2/3) activity. In contrast, low-affinity antigens induced a switch of migration mode that promotes T-cell exploratory behavior, characterized by partial deceleration and frequent direction changes. This switch depended on T-cell receptor binding but was largely independent of downstream signaling. We propose that distinct mechanisms of T-cell deceleration can be triggered during antigenic recognition to favor local exploration and signal integration upon suboptimal stimulus and complete arrest on the best antigen-presenting cells. PMID:26371316

  7. Distribution of Primed T Cells and Antigen-Loaded Antigen Presenting Cells Following Intranasal Immunization in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ciabattini, Annalisa; Pettini, Elena; Fiorino, Fabio; Prota, Gennaro; Pozzi, Gianni; Medaglini, Donata

    2011-01-01

    Priming of T cells is a key event in vaccination, since it bears a decisive influence on the type and magnitude of the immune response. T-cell priming after mucosal immunization via the nasal route was studied by investigating the distribution of antigen-loaded antigen presenting cells (APCs) and primed antigen-specific T cells. Nasal immunization studies were conducted using the model protein antigen ovalbumin (OVA) plus CpG oligodeoxynucleotide adjuvant. Trafficking of antigen-specific primed T cells was analyzed in vivo after adoptive transfer of OVA-specific transgenic T cells in the presence or absence of fingolimod, a drug that causes lymphocytes sequestration within lymph nodes. Antigen-loaded APCs were observed in mediastinal lymph nodes, draining the respiratory tract, but not in distal lymph nodes. Antigen-specific proliferating T cells were first observed within draining lymph nodes, and later in distal iliac and mesenteric lymph nodes and in the spleen. The presence at distal sites was due to migration of locally primed T cells as shown by fingolimod treatment that caused a drastic reduction of proliferated T cells in non-draining lymph nodes and an accumulation of extensively divided T cells within draining lymph nodes. Homing of nasally primed T cells in distal iliac lymph nodes was CD62L-dependent, while entry into mesenteric lymph nodes depended on both CD62L and α4β7, as shown by in vivo antibody-mediated inhibition of T-cell trafficking. These data, elucidating the trafficking of antigen-specific primed T cells to non-draining peripheral and mucosa-associated lymph nodes following nasal immunization, provide relevant insights for the design of vaccination strategies based on mucosal priming. PMID:21559409

  8. The molecular bases of δ/αβ T cell–mediated antigen recognition

    PubMed Central

    Pellicci, Daniel G.; Uldrich, Adam P.; Le Nours, Jérôme; Ross, Fiona; Chabrol, Eric; Eckle, Sidonia B.G.; de Boer, Renate; Lim, Ricky T.; McPherson, Kirsty; Besra, Gurdyal; Howell, Amy R.; Moretta, Lorenzo; McCluskey, James; Heemskerk, Mirjam H.M.; Gras, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    αβ and γδ T cells are disparate T cell lineages that can respond to distinct antigens (Ags) via the use of the αβ and γδ T cell Ag receptors (TCRs), respectively. Here we characterize a population of human T cells, which we term δ/αβ T cells, expressing TCRs comprised of a TCR-δ variable gene (Vδ1) fused to joining α and constant α domains, paired with an array of TCR-β chains. We demonstrate that these cells, which represent ∼50% of all Vδ1+ human T cells, can recognize peptide- and lipid-based Ags presented by human leukocyte antigen (HLA) and CD1d, respectively. Similar to type I natural killer T (NKT) cells, CD1d-lipid Ag-reactive δ/αβ T cells recognized α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer); however, their fine specificity for other lipid Ags presented by CD1d, such as α-glucosylceramide, was distinct from type I NKT cells. Thus, δ/αβTCRs contribute new patterns of Ag specificity to the human immune system. Furthermore, we provide the molecular bases of how δ/αβTCRs bind to their targets, with the Vδ1-encoded region providing a major contribution to δ/αβTCR binding. Our findings highlight how components from αβ and γδTCR gene loci can recombine to confer Ag specificity, thus expanding our understanding of T cell biology and TCR diversity. PMID:25452463

  9. Analysis of culture filtrate and cell wall-associated antigens of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis with monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Mutharia, L M; Moreno, W; Raymond, M

    1997-01-01

    Proteins secreted by Mycobacterium species have been suggested as major immune targets in the early phase of infection. In this study, we sought to identify specific antigens in culture filtrates and in soluble cell extracts of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis. The release of antigens into the culture medium during growth of the bacilli and the distribution of specific epitopes within the Mycobacterium species were investigated by immunoblot analysis with monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) raised against M. paratuberculosis antigens. MAb B6A interacted with a cellular antigen with an apparent molecular mass of 34.5 kDa in lysates of M. paratuberculosis. MAb B6A did not interact with lysates from any other mycobacterial species, suggesting recognition of an M. paratuberculosis species-specific epitope. MAb FL1-A1 reacted with an antigen of 44.3 kDa in M. paratuberculosis and a 9-kDa antigen in Mycobacterium kansasii. MAb PII-B1 reacted with concanavalin A (ConA)-binding cellular and filtrate molecules of M. paratuberculosis and with lysates of Mycobacterium kansasii and Mycobacterium avium 18. The affinity-purified glycosylated antigens migrated as a diffuse band of between 35 and 45.6 kDa and reacted strongly with ovine and bovine paratuberculosis serum and polyclonal serum against M. tuberculosis lipoarabinomannan antigens. These glycoconjugates were the earliest antigens detected in culture filtrates of M. paratuberculosis. Deglycosylation of the ConA-binding molecules with alpha-mannosidase enzyme abolished the reaction with MAb PII-B1 and with bovine but not ovine paratuberculosis serum, suggesting selective immunogenicity in the different animal species. PMID:9009287

  10. B cell mitogenic activity of sea squirt antigen.

    PubMed

    Segawa, K; Ono, K; Oka, S; Jyo, T; Kuroiwa, A; Yamashita, U

    1994-07-01

    The activity of sea squirt antigen, one of the allergy-inducing substances for humans, on murine and human lymphocytes was studied in vitro. Sea squirt antigen stimulated normal mouse spleen cells to proliferate, as detected by [3H]-TdR incorporation, in a dose-dependent manner. The responder cells are B cells because the response was reduced by the treatment of spleen cells with anti-immunoglobulin antibody and complement and passing through a nylon wool column, but not with anti-Thy-1 antibody and complement. Spleen cells of C3H/HeJ mice, which are lipopolysaccharide low responders, were also stimulated as well as spleen cells of C3H/HeN mice, suggesting that this response is not due to lipopolysaccharide in the antigen fraction. Sea squirt antigen stimulated not only proliferative response of B cells, but also polyclonal immunoglobulin production. Furthermore, sea squirt antigen also stimulated human lymphocytes to proliferate and to produce immunoglobulin. All these results suggest that sea squirt antigen has mitogenic activity on B cells, and this ability is concerned with the induction of allergic reaction. PMID:8032238

  11. Synthetic Antibodies for Reversible Cell Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jing Zhou

    2011-12-01

    Antibody-mediated cell recognition plays a critical role in various biological and biomedical applications. However, strong antibody-cell interactions can lead to the difficulty of separating antibodies from the bound cells in a simple and non-destructive manner, which is often necessary to numerous applications such as cell sorting or separation. Thus, this thesis research is aimed to create an antibody-like nanomaterial with the function of reversible cell recognition It was hypothesized that nucleic acid aptamer and dendrimer could be used as fundamental structural components to develop an antibody-like nanomaterial. The aptamer functions as the binding site of an antibody; the dendrimer is used as a robust, defined nano-scaffold to support the aptamer and to carry small molecules (e.g., fluorophores). To test this hypothesis, a novel method was first developed to discover the essential nucleotides of full-length aptamers to mimic the binding sites of antibodies. The essential nucleotides were further conjugated with a dendrimer to synthesize a monovalent aptamer-dendrimer nanomaterial. The results clearly showed that the essential nucleotides could maintain high affinity and specificity after tethered on dendrimer surface. To further test the hypothesis that antibody-like nanomaterials can be rationally designed to acquire the capability of reversible cell recognition, an aptamer that was selected at 0 °C was used as a model to synthesize a "Y-shaped" nanomaterial by conjugating two aptamers to the same dendrimer. The results showed that the nanomaterial-cell interaction could be affected by the distance between two binding aptamers. In addition, the "Y-shaped" antibody-like nanomaterial could bind target cells more strongly than its monovalent control. Importantly, the strong cell-nanomaterial interaction could be rapidly reversed when the temperature was shifted from 0 °C to 37 °C. In summary, we developed a synthetic antibody that can not only mimic the

  12. Recognition of Human Erythrocyte Receptors by the Tryptophan-Rich Antigens of Monkey Malaria Parasite Plasmodium knowlesi

    PubMed Central

    Tyagi, Kriti; Gupta, Deepali; Saini, Ekta; Choudhary, Shilpa; Jamwal, Abhishek; Alam, Mohd. Shoeb; Zeeshan, Mohammad; Tyagi, Rupesh K.; Sharma, Yagya D.

    2015-01-01

    Background The monkey malaria parasite Plasmodium knowlesi also infect humans. There is a lack of information on the molecular mechanisms that take place between this simian parasite and its heterologous human host erythrocytes leading to this zoonotic disease. Therefore, we investigated here the binding ability of P. knowlesi tryptophan-rich antigens (PkTRAgs) to the human erythrocytes and sharing of the erythrocyte receptors between them as well as with other commonly occurring human malaria parasites. Methods Six PkTRAgs were cloned and expressed in E.coli as well as in mammalian CHO-K1 cell to determine their human erythrocyte binding activity by cell-ELISA, and in-vitro rosetting assay, respectively. Results Three of six PkTRAgs (PkTRAg38.3, PkTRAg40.1, and PkTRAg67.1) showed binding to human erythrocytes. Two of them (PkTRAg40.1 and PkTRAg38.3) showed cross-competition with each other as well as with the previously described P.vivax tryptophan-rich antigens (PvTRAgs) for human erythrocyte receptors. However, the third protein (PkTRAg67.1) utilized the additional but different human erythrocyte receptor(s) as it did not cross-compete for erythrocyte binding with either of these two PkTRAgs as well as with any of the PvTRAgs. These three PkTRAgs also inhibited the P.falciparum parasite growth in in-vitro culture, further indicating the sharing of human erythrocyte receptors by these parasite species and the biological significance of this receptor-ligand interaction between heterologous host and simian parasite. Conclusions Recognition and sharing of human erythrocyte receptor(s) by PkTRAgs with human parasite ligands could be part of the strategy adopted by the monkey malaria parasite to establish inside the heterologous human host. PMID:26393350

  13. The Memory Function of the B Cell Antigen Receptor.

    PubMed

    Wienands, Jürgen; Engels, Niklas

    2016-01-01

    Activated B lymphocytes preserve their antigen experience by differentiating into long-lived pools of antibody-secreting plasma cells or various types of memory B cells (MBCs). The former population constantly produces serum immunoglobulins with sufficient specificity and affinity to thwart infections with recurrent pathogens. By contrast, memory B cell populations retain their antigen receptors on the cell surface and hence need pathogen-induced differentiation steps before they can actively contribute to host defense. The terminal differentiation of MBCs into antibody-secreting plasma cells is hallmarked by the absence of the lag phase characteristic for primary antibody responses. Moreover, secondary antibody responses are predominantly driven by MBCs that bear an antigen receptor of the IgG class on their surface although IgM-positive memory populations exist as well. These fundamental principles of B cell memory were enigmatic for decades. Only recently, we have begun to understand the underlying mechanisms. This review summarizes our current understanding of how different subpopulations of MBCs are generated during primary immune responses and how their functional heterogeneity on antigen recall is controlled by different signaling capabilities of B cell antigen receptor (BCR) isotypes and by the nature of the antigen. PMID:26362935

  14. Self-Antigen Presentation by Dendritic Cells in Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Hopp, Ann-Katrin; Rupp, Anne; Lukacs-Kornek, Veronika

    2014-01-01

    The operation of both central and peripheral tolerance ensures the prevention of autoimmune diseases. The maintenance of peripheral tolerance requires self-antigen presentation by professional antigen presenting cells (APCs). Dendritic cells (DCs) are considered as major APCs involved in this process. The current review discusses the role of DCs in autoimmune diseases, the various factors involved in the induction and maintenance of tolerogenic DC phenotype, and pinpoints their therapeutic capacity as well as potential novel targets for future clinical studies. PMID:24592266

  15. Galactosylated LDL nanoparticles: a novel targeting delivery system to deliver antigen to macrophages and enhance antigen specific T cell responses.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fang; Wuensch, Sherry A; Azadniv, Mitra; Ebrahimkhani, Mohammad R; Crispe, I Nicholas

    2009-01-01

    We aim to define the role of Kupffer cells in intrahepatic antigen presentation, using the selective delivery of antigen to Kupffer cells rather than other populations of liver antigen-presenting cells. To achieve this we developed a novel antigen delivery system that can target antigens to macrophages, based on a galactosylated low-density lipoprotein nanoscale platform. Antigen was delivered via the galactose particle receptor (GPr), internalized, degraded and presented to T cells. The conjugation of fluoresceinated ovalbumin (FLUO-OVA) and lactobionic acid with LDL resulted in a substantially increased uptake of FLUO-OVA by murine macrophage-like ANA1 cells in preference to NIH3T3 cells, and by primary peritoneal macrophages in preference to primary hepatic stellate cells. Such preferential uptake led to enhanced proliferation of OVA specific T cells, showing that the galactosylated LDL nanoscale platform is a successful antigen carrier, targeting antigen to macrophages but not to all categories of antigen presenting cells. This system will allow targeted delivery of antigen to macrophages in the liver and elsewhere, addressing the question of the role of Kupffer cells in liver immunology. It may also be an effective way of delivering drugs or vaccines directly at macrophages. PMID:19637876

  16. Chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy for solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Newick, Kheng; Moon, Edmund; Albelda, Steven M

    2016-01-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells are engineered constructs composed of synthetic receptors that direct T cells to surface antigens for subsequent elimination. Many CAR constructs are also manufactured with elements that augment T-cell persistence and activity. To date, CAR T cells have demonstrated tremendous success in eradicating hematological malignancies (e.g., CD19 CARs in leukemias). This success is not yet extrapolated to solid tumors, and the reasons for this are being actively investigated. Here in this mini-review, we discuss some of the key hurdles encountered by CAR T cells in the solid tumor microenvironment. PMID:27162934

  17. A New Type of Metal Recognition by Human T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gamerdinger, Katharina; Moulon, Corinne; Karp, David R.; van Bergen, Jeroen; Koning, Frits; Wild, Doris; Pflugfelder, Ulrike; Weltzien, Hans Ulrich

    2003-01-01

    In spite of high frequencies of metal allergies, the structural basis for major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-restricted metal recognition is among the unanswered questions in the field of T cell activation. For the human T cell clone SE9, we have identified potential Ni contact sites in the T cell receptor (TCR) and the restricting human histocompatibility leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR structure. The specificity of this HLA-DR–promiscuous VA22/VB17+ TCR is primarily harbored in its α chain. Ni reactivity is neither dependent on protein processing in antigen-presenting cells nor affected by the nature of HLA-DR–associated peptides. However, SE9 activation by Ni crucially depends on Tyr29 in CDR1α, an N-nucleotide–encoded Tyr94 in CDR3α, and a conserved His81 in the HLA-DR β chain. These data indicate that labile, nonactivating complexes between the SE9 TCR and most HLA-DR/peptide conjugates might supply sterically optimized coordination sites for Ni ions, three of which were identified in this study. In such complexes Ni may effectively bridge the TCR α chain to His81 of most DR molecules. Thus, in analogy to superantigens, Ni may directly link TCR and MHC in a peptide-independent manner. However, unlike superantigens, Ni requires idiotypic, i.e., CDR3α-determined TCR amino acids. This new type of TCR–MHC linkage might explain the high frequency of Ni-reactive T cells in the human population. PMID:12756270

  18. NK cells engineered to express a GD2-specific antigen receptor display built-in ADCC-like activity against tumour cells of neuroectodermal origin

    PubMed Central

    Esser, Ruth; Müller, Tina; Stefes, Dörthe; Kloess, Stephan; Seidel, Diana; Gillies, Stephen D; Aperlo-Iffland, Christel; Huston, James S; Uherek, Christoph; Schönfeld, Kurt; Tonn, Torsten; Huebener, Nicole; Lode, Holger N; Koehl, Ulrike; Wels, Winfried S

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Treatment of high-risk neuroblastoma (NB) represents a major challenge in paediatric oncology. Alternative therapeutic strategies include antibodies targeting the disialoganglioside GD2, which is expressed at high levels on NB cells, and infusion of donor-derived natural killer (NK) cells. To combine specific antibody-mediated recognition of NB cells with the potent cytotoxic activity of NK cells, here we generated clonal derivatives of the clinically applicable human NK cell line NK-92 that stably express a GD2-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) comprising an anti-GD2 ch14.18 single chain Fv antibody fusion protein with CD3-ζ chain as a signalling moiety. CAR expression by gene-modified NK cells facilitated effective recognition and elimination of established GD2 expressing NB cells, which were resistant to parental NK-92. In the case of intrinsically NK-sensitive NB cell lines, we observed markedly increased cell killing activity of retargeted NK-92 cells. Enhanced cell killing was strictly dependent on specific recognition of the target antigen and could be blocked by GD2-specific antibody or anti-idiotypic antibody occupying the CAR’s cell recognition domain. Importantly, strongly enhanced cytotoxicity of the GD2-specific NK cells was also found against primary NB cells and GD2 expressing tumour cells of other origins, demonstrating the potential clinical utility of the retargeted effector cells. PMID:21595822

  19. Identification of Theileria lestoquardi Antigens Recognized by CD8+ T Cells.

    PubMed

    Goh, Shan; Ngugi, Daniel; Lizundia, Regina; Hostettler, Isabel; Woods, Kerry; Ballingall, Keith; MacHugh, Niall D; Morrison, W Ivan; Weir, Willie; Shiels, Brian; Werling, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    As part of an international effort to develop vaccines for Theileria lestoquardi, we undertook a limited screen to test T. lestoquardi orthologues of antigens recognised by CD8+ T lymphocyte responses against T. annulata and T. parva in cattle. Five MHC defined sheep were immunized by live T. lestoquardi infection and their CD8+ T lymphocyte responses determined. Thirteen T. lestoquardi orthologues of T. parva and T. annulata genes, previously shown to be targets of CD8+ T lymphocyte responses of immune cattle, were expressed in autologous fibroblasts and screened for T cell recognition using an IFNγ assay. Genes encoding T. lestoquardi antigens Tl8 (putative cysteine proteinase, 349 aa) or Tl9 (hypothetical secreted protein, 293 aa) were recognise by T cells from one animal that displayed a unique MHC class I genotype. Antigenic 9-mer peptide epitopes of Tl8 and Tl9 were identified through peptide scans using CD8+ T cells from the responding animal. These experiments identify the first T. lestoquardi antigens recognised by CD8+ T cell responses linked to specific MHC class I alleles. PMID:27611868

  20. Pattern recognition of neuron specific enolase and carcinoembryonic antigen in whole blood samples.

    PubMed

    Stefan-van Staden, Raluca-Ioana; Comnea-Stancu, Ionela Raluca; Surdu-Bob, Carmen Cristina; Stanciu-Gavan, Camelia

    2015-02-01

    New tools and methods for pattern recognition of neuron specific enolase (NSE) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) were proposed for the screening of whole blood samples. The new tools were based on stochastic sensors designed using nanoporous gold microspheres, graphite, graphene, diamond paste as well as α-CDs, and 5,10,15,20-tetraphenyl-21H,23H-porphyrin. The best sensor for the assay of CEA was the one based on P/graphite (the limit of determination was 16 fg/ml and sensitivity was 2.32 × 10(7)  s mg(-1)  ml), while for the assay of NSE the, best sensor was the one based on P/graphene (the limit of determination was 7.45 pg/ml and sensitivity was 2.49 × 10(8)  s mg(-1)  ml). The sensor of choice for simultaneous detection of NSE and CEA is the one based on P/graphene because we need high sensitivity and low limit of determination for NSE. To our knowledge, this is the only one screening test for early detection of lung cancer, by identification of NSE and CEA in whole blood samples. PMID:25604868

  1. Atypical antigen recognition mode of a shark immunoglobulin new antigen receptor (IgNAR) variable domain characterized by humanization and structural analysis.

    PubMed

    Kovalenko, Oleg V; Olland, Andrea; Piché-Nicholas, Nicole; Godbole, Adarsh; King, Daniel; Svenson, Kristine; Calabro, Valerie; Müller, Mischa R; Barelle, Caroline J; Somers, William; Gill, Davinder S; Mosyak, Lidia; Tchistiakova, Lioudmila

    2013-06-14

    The immunoglobulin new antigen receptors (IgNARs) are a class of Ig-like molecules of the shark immune system that exist as heavy chain-only homodimers and bind antigens by their single domain variable regions (V-NARs). Following shark immunization and/or in vitro selection, V-NARs can be generated as soluble, stable, and specific high affinity monomeric binding proteins of ∼12 kDa. We have previously isolated a V-NAR from an immunized spiny dogfish shark, named E06, that binds specifically and with high affinity to human, mouse, and rat serum albumins. Humanization of E06 was carried out by converting over 60% of non-complementarity-determining region residues to those of a human germ line Vκ1 sequence, DPK9. The resulting huE06 molecules have largely retained the specificity and affinity of antigen binding of the parental V-NAR. Crystal structures of the shark E06 and its humanized variant (huE06 v1.1) in complex with human serum albumin (HSA) were determined at 3- and 2.3-Å resolution, respectively. The huE06 v1.1 molecule retained all but one amino acid residues involved in the binding site for HSA. Structural analysis of these V-NARs has revealed an unusual variable domain-antigen interaction. E06 interacts with HSA in an atypical mode that utilizes extensive framework contacts in addition to complementarity-determining regions that has not been seen previously in V-NARs. On the basis of the structure, the roles of various elements of the molecule are described with respect to antigen binding and V-NAR stability. This information broadens the general understanding of antigen recognition and provides a framework for further design and humanization of shark IgNARs. PMID:23632026

  2. Differential recognition of members of the carcinoembryonic antigen family by Opa variants of Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed Central

    Bos, M P; Grunert, F; Belland, R J

    1997-01-01

    Opacity (Opa) protein variation in Neisseria gonorrhoeae is implicated in the pathogenesis of gonorrhea, possibly by mediating adherence and entry of the bacteria into human tissues. One particular Opa protein mediates adherence to epithelial cells through cell surface proteoglycans. Recently, two other eukaryotic cell receptors for Opa proteins have been reported. These receptors are members of a subgroup of the carcinoembryonic (CEA) gene family that express CD66 antigens. CEA family members vary in their distribution in human tissues. In order to understand whether interactions between Opa and CEA-like molecules play any role in pathogenesis, we must investigate which CEA family members are able to serve as Opa receptors and which Opa proteins recognize CEA-like molecules. We therefore studied HeLa cells that were stably transfected with five different members of the CEA family, i.e., CEA, CEA gene family member 1a (CGM1a), CGM6, nonspecific cross-reacting antigen (NCA), and biliary glycoprotein a (BGPa). We infected these transfectants with all possible 11 Opa variants of gonococcal strain MS11 and determined the numbers of bacteria that were bound and internalized. To account for proteoglycan-mediated adherence, infection assays were also performed in the presence of heparin. Our results show that of the 11 Opa variants of MS11, the same 4 recognized CGM1a and NCA. CGM6, however, was not recognized by any Opa variant of MS11. CEA was recognized by at least 9 of 11 Opa variants, and the BGP transfectants specifically bound and internalized 10 of 11 Opa variants and also bound Opa-negative gonococci. Immunofluorescence experiments showed that clustering of CEA-like molecules occurred upon infection of HeLa transfectants with those Opa variants that interacted specifically with the CEA family member. Together these data show that CEA family members are differentially recognized by gonococcal Opa variants, suggesting that this phenomenon may contribute to cell

  3. Antigen-specificity using chimeric antigen receptors: the future of regulatory T-cell therapy?

    PubMed

    Boardman, Dominic; Maher, John; Lechler, Robert; Smyth, Lesley; Lombardi, Giovanna

    2016-04-15

    Adoptive regulatory T-cell (Treg) therapy using autologous Tregs expandedex vivois a promising therapeutic approach which is currently being investigated clinically as a means of treating various autoimmune diseases and transplant rejection. Despite this, early results have highlighted the need for potent Tregs to yield a substantial clinical advantage. One way to achieve this is to create antigen-specific Tregs which have been shown in pre-clinical animal models to have an increased potency at suppressing undesired immune responses, compared to polyclonal Tregs. This mini review outlines where Treg therapy currently stands and discusses the approaches which may be taken to generate antigen-specific Tregs, including the potential use of chimeric antigen receptors (CARs), for future clinical trials. PMID:27068938

  4. Design and Development of Therapies using Chimeric Antigen Receptor-Expressing T cells

    PubMed Central

    Dotti, Gianpietro; Gottschalk, Stephen; Savoldo, Barbara; Brenner, Malcolm K

    2013-01-01

    Summary Investigators developed chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) for expression on T cells more than 25 years ago. When the CAR is derived from an antibody, the resultant cell should combine the desirable targeting features of an antibody (e.g. lack of requirement for major histocompatibility complex recognition, ability to recognize non-protein antigens) with the persistence, trafficking and effector functions of a T-cell. This article describes how the past two decades have seen a crescendo of research which has now begun to translate these potential benefits into effective treatments for patients with cancer. We describe the basic design of CARs, describe how antigenic targets are selected, and the initial clinical experience with CART cells. Our review then describes our own and other investigators’ work aimed at improving the function of CARs and reviews the clinical studies in hematological and solid malignancies that are beginning to exploit these approaches. Finally, we show the value of adding additional engineering features to CAR-T cells, irrespective of their target, to render them better suited to function in the tumor environment, and discuss how the safety of these heavily modified cells may be maintained. PMID:24329793

  5. Activated Brain Endothelial Cells Cross-Present Malaria Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Howland, Shanshan W.; Poh, Chek Meng; Rénia, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    In the murine model of cerebral malaria caused by P. berghei ANKA (PbA), parasite-specific CD8+ T cells directly induce pathology and have long been hypothesized to kill brain endothelial cells that have internalized PbA antigen. We previously reported that brain microvessel fragments from infected mice cross-present PbA epitopes, using reporter cells transduced with epitope-specific T cell receptors. Here, we confirm that endothelial cells are the population responsible for cross-presentation in vivo, not pericytes or microglia. PbA antigen cross-presentation by primary brain endothelial cells in vitro confers susceptibility to killing by CD8+ T cells from infected mice. IFNγ stimulation is required for brain endothelial cross-presentation in vivo and in vitro, which occurs by a proteasome- and TAP-dependent mechanism. Parasite strains that do not induce cerebral malaria were phagocytosed and cross-presented less efficiently than PbA in vitro. The main source of antigen appears to be free merozoites, which were avidly phagocytosed. A human brain endothelial cell line also phagocytosed P. falciparum merozoites. Besides being the first demonstration of cross-presentation by brain endothelial cells, our results suggest that interfering with merozoite phagocytosis or antigen processing may be effective strategies for cerebral malaria intervention. PMID:26046849

  6. Allergen recognition by innate immune cells: critical role of dendritic and epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Fabián; Ghaemmaghami, Amir M

    2013-01-01

    Allergy is an exacerbated response of the immune system against non-self-proteins called allergens and is typically characterized by biased type-2 T helper cell and deleterious IgE mediated immune responses. The allergic cascade starts with the recognition of allergens by antigen presenting cells, mainly dendritic cells (DCs), leading to Th2 polarization, switching to IgE production by B cells, culminating in mast cell sensitization and triggering. DCs have been demonstrated to play a crucial role in orchestrating allergic diseases. Using different C-type lectin receptors DCs are able to recognize and internalize a number of allergens from diverse sources leading to sensitization. Furthermore, there is increasing evidence highlighting the role of epithelial cells in triggering and modulating immune responses to allergens. As well as providing a physical barrier, epithelial cells can interact with allergens and influence DCs behavior through the release of a number of Th2 promoting cytokines. In this review we will summarize current understanding of how allergens are recognized by DCs and epithelial cells and what are the consequences of such interaction in the context of allergic sensitization and downstream events leading to allergic inflammation. Better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of allergen recognition and associated signaling pathways could enable developing more effective therapeutic strategies that target the initial steps of allergic sensitization hence hindering development or progression of allergic diseases. PMID:24204367

  7. Lymphohaemopoietic antigens of cultured human glomerular epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    van der Woude, F. J.; Michael, A. F.; Muller, E.; van der Hem, G. K.; Vernier, R. L.; Kim, Y.

    1989-01-01

    Glomerular visceral epithelial cells (GVEC) from normal human glomeruli were grown in tissue culture. Cell surface markers were studied by immunofluorescence microscopy using antibodies against lymphohaemopoietic differentiation antigens which are known to be present early (BA-1, OKB2, BA-2) and late (J5, anti CR1) in renal ontogenesis. Like foetal human glomerular epithelium, the cultured cells reacted with BA-1 and OKB2 (identifying an antigen expressed on B cells and polymorphonuclear leucocytes), and BA-2 (leukaemia-associated antigen), but were consistently negative for CR1 (C3b receptor); J5 which identifies the common acute lymphoblastic leukaemia antigen (CALLA) stained variably. Reactivity with antimyosin or anti factor VIII were absent. The cells produced an extracellular matrix containing laminin, type IV collagen, and fibronectin. This study supports the notion that GVEC undergo dedifferentiation as shown by the acquisition of lymphohaemopoietic differentiation antigens present early in renal ontogeny. In addition, the production of extracellular matrix constituents in vitro may be useful for the investigation of human glomerular basement membranes. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:2647119

  8. Relationship between Fc receptors, antigen-binding sites on T and B cells, and H-2 complex-associated determinants.

    PubMed

    Basten, A; Miller, J F; Abraham, R

    1975-03-01

    The relationship between H-2 complex-associated determinants, Fc receptors, and specific antigen-recognition sites on T and B cells was examined by binding and functional assays. The Fc receptor was detected by radiolabeled immune complexes or aggregated human IgG. Both these reagents selectively bound to B cells, not to T cells. When spleen cells, from mice primed to several antigens, were exposed to highly substituted radioactive aggregates, their capacity to transfer both a direct and indirect plaque-forming cell response to these antigens was abrogated. Addition of B cells, but not of T cells, restored responsiveness. Complexed Ig binding to Fc receptors was prevented by pretreatment of mixed lymphoid cell populations with antisera directed against membrane components on the same cell (e.g., H-2) and on other cells (e.g., theta). The lack of specificity of inhibition was thought to be due to the formation on cell surfaces of antigen-antibody complexes which would then attach to the Fc receptor during the incubation precedure. Specific blockade of the Fc receptor during the incubation procedure. Specific blockade of the Fc receptor however occurred when B cells were pretreated with the Fab fragments of anti-H-2 antibody. This was demonstrated autoradiographically and by inhibition of aggregate-induced suicide. The blocking activity of ante-H-2 Fab was removed by absorption with spleen cells from thymectomized irradiated mice but not with thymus cells of appropriate specificity. This suggested that the antibodies involved had specificity for determinants on the B-cell membrane distinct from those coded by the K or D end of the H-2 complex, and either absent from, or poorly represented on, thymus cells. Specific antigen-induced suicide of B cells was achieved simply by incubating the cells with radioactive antigen in the cold. T-cell suicide on the other hand required that the 125I-labeled antigen be presented to the T cells at 37 degrees-C on the surface of

  9. ICOS-based chimeric antigen receptors program bipolar TH17/TH1 cells.

    PubMed

    Guedan, Sonia; Chen, Xi; Madar, Aviv; Carpenito, Carmine; McGettigan, Shannon E; Frigault, Matthew J; Lee, Jihyun; Posey, Avery D; Scholler, John; Scholler, Nathalie; Bonneau, Richard; June, Carl H

    2014-08-14

    With the notable exception of B-cell malignancies, the efficacy of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells has been limited, and CAR T cells have not been shown to expand and persist in patients with nonlymphoid tumors. Here we demonstrate that redirection of primary human T cells with a CAR containing the inducible costimulator (ICOS) intracellular domain generates tumor-specific IL-17-producing effector cells that show enhanced persistence. Compared with CARs containing the CD3ζ chain alone, or in tandem with the CD28 or the 4-1BB intracellular domains, ICOS signaling increased IL-17A, IL-17F, and IL-22 following antigen recognition. In addition, T cells redirected with an ICOS-based CAR maintained a core molecular signature characteristic of TH17 cells and expressed higher levels of RORC, CD161, IL1R-1, and NCS1. Of note, ICOS signaling also induced the expression of IFN-γ and T-bet, consistent with a TH17/TH1 bipolarization. When transferred into mice with established tumors, TH17 cells that were redirected with ICOS-based CARs mediated efficient antitumor responses and showed enhanced persistence compared with CD28- or 4-1BB-based CAR T cells. Thus, redirection of TH17 cells with a CAR encoding the ICOS intracellular domain is a promising approach to augment the function and persistence of CAR T cells in hematologic malignancies. PMID:24986688

  10. How Chimeric Antigen Receptor Design Affects Adoptive T Cell Therapy.

    PubMed

    Gacerez, Albert T; Arellano, Benjamine; Sentman, Charles L

    2016-12-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells have been developed to treat tumors and have shown great success against B cell malignancies. Exploiting modular designs and swappable domains, CARs can target an array of cell surface antigens and, upon receptor-ligand interactions, direct signaling cascades, thereby driving T cell effector functions. CARs have been designed using receptors, ligands, or scFv binding domains. Different regions of a CAR have each been found to play a role in determining the overall efficacy of CAR T cells. Therefore, this review provides an overview of CAR construction and common designs. Each CAR region is discussed in the context of its importance to a CAR's function. Additionally, the review explores how various engineering strategies have been applied to CAR T cells in order to regulate CAR T cell function and activity. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2590-2598, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27163336

  11. Chimeric Antigen Receptors Modified T-Cells for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Hanren; Wang, Yao; Lu, Xuechun

    2016-01-01

    The genetic modification and characterization of T-cells with chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) allow functionally distinct T-cell subsets to recognize specific tumor cells. The incorporation of costimulatory molecules or cytokines can enable engineered T-cells to eliminate tumor cells. CARs are generated by fusing the antigen-binding region of a monoclonal antibody (mAb) or other ligand to membrane-spanning and intracellular-signaling domains. They have recently shown clinical benefit in patients treated with CD19-directed autologous T-cells. Recent successes suggest that the modification of T-cells with CARs could be a powerful approach for developing safe and effective cancer therapeutics. Here, we briefly review early studies, consider strategies to improve the therapeutic potential and safety, and discuss the challenges and future prospects for CAR T-cells in cancer therapy. PMID:26819347

  12. Chimeric Antigen Receptors Modified T-Cells for Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Dai, Hanren; Wang, Yao; Lu, Xuechun; Han, Weidong

    2016-07-01

    The genetic modification and characterization of T-cells with chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) allow functionally distinct T-cell subsets to recognize specific tumor cells. The incorporation of costimulatory molecules or cytokines can enable engineered T-cells to eliminate tumor cells. CARs are generated by fusing the antigen-binding region of a monoclonal antibody (mAb) or other ligand to membrane-spanning and intracellular-signaling domains. They have recently shown clinical benefit in patients treated with CD19-directed autologous T-cells. Recent successes suggest that the modification of T-cells with CARs could be a powerful approach for developing safe and effective cancer therapeutics. Here, we briefly review early studies, consider strategies to improve the therapeutic potential and safety, and discuss the challenges and future prospects for CAR T-cells in cancer therapy. PMID:26819347

  13. Chimeric Antigen Receptors Modified T-Cells for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Hanren; Wang, Yao; Lu, Xuechun

    2016-01-01

    The genetic modification and characterization of T-cells with chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) allow functionally distinct T-cell subsets to recognize specific tumor cells. The incorporation of costimulatory molecules or cytokines can enable engineered T-cells to eliminate tumor cells. CARs are generated by fusing the antigen-binding region of a monoclonal antibody (mAb) or other ligand to membrane-spanning and intracellular-signaling domains. They have recently shown clinical benefit in patients treated with CD19-directed autologous T-cells. Recent successes suggest that the modification of T-cells with CARs could be a powerful approach for developing safe and effective cancer therapeutics. Here, we briefly review early studies, consider strategies to improve the therapeutic potential and safety, and discuss the challenges and future prospects for CAR T-cells in cancer therapy.

  14. Unusual Water-mediated Antigenic Recognition of the Proinflammatory Cytokine Interleukin-18

    SciTech Connect

    Argiriadi, Maria A.; Xiang, Tao; Wu, Chengbin; Ghayur, Tariq; Borhani, David W.

    2009-10-21

    The unique cytokine interleukin-18 (IL-18) acts synergistically with IL-12 to regulate T-helper 1 and 2 lymphocytes and, as such, seems to underlie the pathogenesis of various autoimmune and allergic diseases. Several anti-IL-18 agents are in clinical development, including the recombinant human antibody ABT-325, which is entering trials for autoimmune diseases. Given competing cytokine/receptor and cytokine/receptor decoy interactions, understanding the structural basis for recognition is critical for effective development of anti-cytokine therapies. Here we report three crystal structures: the murine antibody 125-2H Fab fragment bound to human IL-18, at 1.5 {angstrom} resolution; the 125-2H Fab (2.3 {angstrom}); and the ABT-325 Fab (1.5 {angstrom}). These structures, along with human/mouse IL-18 chimera binding data, allow us to make three key observations relevant to the biology and antigenic recognition of IL-18 and related cytokines. First, several IL-18 residues shift dramatically (>10 {angstrom}) upon binding 125-2H, compared with unbound IL-18 (Kato, Z., Jee, J., Shikano, H., Mishima, M., Ohki, I., Ohnishi, H., Li, A., Hashimoto, K., Matsukuma, E., Omoya, K., Yamamoto, Y., Yoneda, T., Hara, T., Kondo, N., and Shirakawa, M. (2003) Nat. Struct. Biol. 10, 966-971). IL-18 thus exhibits plasticity that may be common to its interactions with other receptors. Related cytokines may exhibit similar plasticity. Second, ABT-325 and 125-2H differ significantly in combining site character and architecture, thus explaining their ability to bind IL-18 simultaneously at distinct epitopes. These data allow us to define the likely ABT-325 epitope and thereby explain the distinct neutralizing mechanisms of both antibodies. Third, given the high 125-2H potency, 10 well ordered water molecules are trapped upon complex formation in a cavity between two IL-18 loops and all six 125-2H complementarity-determining regions. Thus, counterintuitively, tight and specific antibody

  15. Antigen Presentation by Monocytes and Monocyte-derived Cells

    PubMed Central

    Randolph, Gwendalyn J.; Jakubzick, Claudia; Qu, Chunfeng

    2008-01-01

    Summary Monocytes are circulating mononuclear phagocytes with a fundamental capacity to differentiate into macrophages. This differentiation can, in the presence of the right environmental cues, be re-directed instead to dendritic cells (DCs). Recent advances have been made in understanding the role of monocytes and their derivatives in presenting antigen to drive immune responses, and we review this topic herein. We briefly discuss the heterogeneity of monocytes in the blood and subsequently raise the possibility that one of the major monocyte phenotypes in the blood corresponds with a population of “blood DCs” previously proposed to drive T-independent antibody reactions in the spleen. Then we evaluate the role of monocytes in T-dependent immunity, considering their role in acquiring antigens for presentation prior to exiting the bloodstream and their ability to differentiate into macrophages versus antigen-presenting DCs. Finally, we review recent literature on the role of monocyte-derived cells in cross-presentation and discuss the possibility that monocyte-derived cells participate critically in processing antigen for cross-priming, even if they do not present that antigen to T cells themselves. PMID:18160272

  16. Mycobacterial phosphatidylinositol mannoside is a natural antigen for CD1d-restricted T cells

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Karsten; Scotet, Emmanuel; Niemeyer, Marcus; Koebernick, Heidrun; Zerrahn, Jens; Maillet, Sophie; Hurwitz, Robert; Kursar, Mischo; Bonneville, Marc; Kaufmann, Stefan H. E.; Schaible, Ulrich E.

    2004-01-01

    A group of T cells recognizes glycolipids presented by molecules of the CD1 family. The CD1d-restricted natural killer T cells (NKT cells) are primarily considered to be self-reactive. By employing CD1d-binding and T cell assays, the following structural parameters for presentation by CD1d were defined for a number of mycobacterial and mammalian lipids: two acyl chains facilitated binding, and a polar head group was essential for T cell recognition. Of the mycobacterial lipids tested, only a phosphatidylinositol mannoside (PIM) fulfilled the requirements for CD1d binding and NKT cell stimulation. This PIM activated human and murine NKT cells via CD1d, thereby triggering antigen-specific IFN-γ production and cell-mediated cytotoxicity, and PIM-loaded CD1d tetramers identified a subpopulation of murine and human NKT cells. This phospholipid, therefore, represents a mycobacterial antigen recognized by T cells in the context of CD1d. PMID:15243159

  17. Early innate responses to pathogens: pattern recognition by unconventional human T-cells

    PubMed Central

    Liuzzi, Anna Rita; McLaren, James E; Price, David A; Eberl, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Although typically viewed as a feature of innate immune responses, microbial pattern recognition is increasingly acknowledged as a function of particular cells nominally categorized within the adaptive immune system. Groundbreaking research over the past three years has shown how unconventional human T-cells carrying invariant or semi-invariant TCRs that are not restricted by classical MHC molecules sense microbial compounds via entirely novel antigen presenting pathways. This review will focus on the innate-like recognition of non-self metabolites by Vγ9/Vδ2 T-cells, mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells and germline-encoded mycolyl-reactive (GEM) T-cells, with an emphasis on early immune responses in acute infection. PMID:26182978

  18. An antigenic study of human plasma cells in normal tissue and in myeloma: identification of a novel plasma cell associated antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Nathan, P D; Walker, L; Hardie, D; Richardson, P; Khan, M; Johnson, G D; Ling, N R

    1986-01-01

    A mouse monoclonal antibody named BU11 which detects an antigen strongly expressed on human plasma cells is described. The antibody stains plasma cells in tonsil sections, fresh and cultured plasmacytoid cells from the bone marrow of patients with multiple myeloma and cells of the plasmacytoid cell line RPMI 8226 used as the immunogen. In vitro studies of pokeweed mitogen (PWM) stimulated peripheral blood B cells and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) stimulated tonsil B cells show that the antigen is present mainly on cells coexpressing the OKT10 antigen and containing cytoplasmic immunoglobulin (cIg). The BU11 antigen is expressed weakly on some normal B cells and is not present on T cells, monocytes or granulocytes. The antigen is of molecular weight 58kD under reducing conditions and is biochemically distinct from previously described plasma cell antigens. Images Fig. 4 PMID:3024883

  19. Generation of β cell-specific human cytotoxic T cells by lentiviral transduction and their survival in immunodeficient human leucocyte antigen-transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Babad, J; Mukherjee, G; Follenzi, A; Ali, R; Roep, B O; Shultz, L D; Santamaria, P; Yang, O O; Goldstein, H; Greiner, D L; DiLorenzo, T P

    2015-01-01

    Several β cell antigens recognized by T cells in the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse model of type 1 diabetes (T1D) are also T cell targets in the human disease. While numerous antigen-specific therapies prevent diabetes in NOD mice, successful translation of rodent findings to patients has been difficult. A human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-transgenic mouse model incorporating human β cell-specific T cells might provide a better platform for evaluating antigen-specific therapies. The ability to study such T cells is limited by their low frequency in peripheral blood and the difficulty in obtaining islet-infiltrating T cells from patients. We have worked to overcome this limitation by using lentiviral transduction to ‘reprogram’ primary human CD8 T cells to express three T cell receptors (TCRs) specific for a peptide derived from the β cell antigen islet-specific glucose-6-phosphatase catalytic subunit-related protein (IGRP265–273) and recognized in the context of the human class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecule HLA-A2. The TCRs bound peptide/MHC multimers with a range of avidities, but all bound with at least 10-fold lower avidity than the anti-viral TCR used for comparison. One exhibited antigenic recognition promiscuity. The β cell-specific human CD8 T cells generated by lentiviral transduction with one of the TCRs released interferon (IFN)-γ in response to antigen and exhibited cytotoxic activity against peptide-pulsed target cells. The cells engrafted in HLA-A2-transgenic NOD-scid IL2rγnull mice and could be detected in the blood, spleen and pancreas up to 5 weeks post-transfer, suggesting the utility of this approach for the evaluation of T cell-modulatory therapies for T1D and other T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases. PMID:25302633

  20. Utilization of a photoactivatable antigen system to examine B-cell probing termination and the B-cell receptor sorting mechanisms during B-cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Tang, Shan; Wan, Zhengpeng; Gao, Yiren; Cao, Yiyun; Yi, Junyang; Si, Yanyan; Zhang, Haowen; Liu, Lei; Liu, Wanli

    2016-01-01

    Antigen binding to the B-cell receptor (BCR) induces several responses, resulting in B-cell activation, proliferation, and differentiation. However, it has been difficult to study these responses due to their dynamic, fast, and transient nature. Here, we attempted to solve this problem by developing a controllable trigger point for BCR and antigen recognition through the construction of a photoactivatable antigen, caged 4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenyl acetyl (caged-NP). This photoactivatable antigen system in combination with live cell and single molecule imaging techniques enabled us to illuminate the previously unidentified B-cell probing termination behaviors and the precise BCR sorting mechanisms during B-cell activation. B cells in contact with caged-NP exhibited probing behaviors as defined by the unceasing extension of membrane pseudopods in random directions. Further analyses showed that such probing behaviors are cell intrinsic with strict dependence on F-actin remodeling but not on tonic BCR signaling. B-cell probing behaviors were terminated within 4 s after photoactivation, suggesting that this response was sensitive and specific to BCR engagement. The termination of B-cell probing was concomitant with the accumulation response of the BCRs into the BCR microclusters. We also determined the Brownian diffusion coefficient of BCRs from the same B cells before and after BCR engagement. The analysis of temporally segregated single molecule images of both BCR and major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) demonstrated that antigen binding induced trapping of BCRs into the BCR microclusters is a fundamental mechanism for B cells to acquire antigens. PMID:26764382

  1. Molecular Pathways: Breaking the Epithelial Cancer Barrier for Chimeric Antigen Receptor and T-cell Receptor Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Hinrichs, Christian S

    2016-04-01

    Adoptive transfer of T cells genetically engineered to express a tumor-targeting chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) or T-cell receptor (TCR) can mediate cancer regression in some patients. CARs are synthetic single-chain proteins that use antibody domains to target cell surface antigens. TCRs are natural heterodimeric proteins that can target intracellular antigens through recognition of peptides bound to human leukocyte antigens. CARs have shown promise in B-cell malignancies and TCRs in melanoma, but neither approach has achieved clear success in an epithelial cancer. Treatment of epithelial cancers may be particularly challenging because of a paucity of target antigens expressed by carcinomas and not by important healthy tissues. In addition, epithelial cancers may be protected by inhibitory ligands and soluble factors in the tumor microenvironment. One strategy to overcome these negative regulators is to modulate expression of T-cell genes to enhance intrinsic T-cell function. Programmable nucleases, which can suppress inhibitory genes, and inducible gene expression systems, which can enhance stimulatory genes, are entering clinical testing. Other work is delineating whether control of genes for immune checkpoint receptors (e.g.,PDCD1, CTLA4) and cytokine and TCR signaling regulators (e.g.,CBLB, CISH, IL12, IL15) can increase the antitumor activity of therapeutic T cells.Clin Cancer Res; 22(7); 1559-64. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27037253

  2. Shape recognition of microbial cells by colloidal cell imprints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovička, Josef; Stoyanov, Simeon D.; Paunov, Vesselin N.

    2013-08-01

    We have engineered a class of colloids which can recognize the shape and size of targeted microbial cells and selectively bind to their surfaces. These imprinted colloid particles, which we called ``colloid antibodies'', were fabricated by partial fragmentation of silica shells obtained by templating the targeted microbial cells. We successfully demonstrated the shape and size recognition between such colloidal imprints and matching microbial cells. High percentage of binding events of colloidal imprints with the size matching target particles was achieved. We demonstrated selective binding of colloidal imprints to target microbial cells in a binary mixture of cells of different shapes and sizes, which also resulted in high binding selectivity. We explored the role of the electrostatic interactions between the target cells and their colloid imprints by pre-coating both of them with polyelectrolytes. Selective binding occurred predominantly in the case of opposite surface charges of the colloid cell imprint and the targeted cells. The mechanism of the recognition is based on the amplification of the surface adhesion in the case of shape and size match due to the increased contact area between the target cell and the colloidal imprint. We also tested the selective binding for colloid imprints of particles of fixed shape and varying sizes. The concept of cell recognition by colloid imprints could be used for development of colloid antibodies for shape-selective binding of microbes. Such colloid antibodies could be additionally functionalized with surface groups to enhance their binding efficiency to cells of specific shape and deliver a drug payload directly to their surface or allow them to be manipulated using external fields. They could benefit the pharmaceutical industry in developing selective antimicrobial therapies and formulations.

  3. Antigen loading of dendritic cells with whole tumor cell preparations.

    PubMed

    Thumann, Peter; Moc, Isabelle; Humrich, Jens; Berger, Thomas G; Schultz, Erwin S; Schuler, Gerold; Jenne, Lars

    2003-06-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) based vaccinations have been widely used for the induction of anti-tumoral immunity in clinical studies. Antigen loading of DC with whole tumor cell preparations is an attractive method whenever tumor cell material is available. In order to determine parameters for the loading procedure, we performed dose finding and timing experiments. We found that apoptotic and necrotic melanoma cells up to a ratio of one-to-one, equivalent to 1mg/ml protein per 1 x 10(6) DC, can be added to monocyte derived DC without effecting DC recovery extensively. Using the isolated protein content of tumor cells (lysate) as a parameter, up to 5 mg/ml protein per 1 x 10(6) DC can be added. To achieve significant protein uptake at least 1 mg/ml of protein have to be added for more than 24 h as tested with FITC-labelled ovalbumin. Maturation inducing cytokines can be added simultaneously with the tumor cell preparations to immature DC without affecting the uptake. Furthermore, we tested the feasibility of cryopreservation of loaded and matured DC to facilitate the generation of ready to use aliquots. DC were cryopreserved in a mix of human serum albumin, DMSO and 5% glucose. After thawing, surface expression of molecules indicating the mature status (CD83, costimulatory and MHC molecules), was found to be unaltered. Furthermore, cryopreserved DC kept the capability to stimulate allogenic T-cell proliferation in mixed leukocyte reactions at full level. Loaded and matured DC pulsed with influenza matrix peptide (IMP) retained the capacity to induce the generation of IMP-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocytes after cryopreservation as measured by ELISPOT and tetramer staining. The expression of the chemokine receptor CXCR-4 and CCR-7 remained unaltered during cryopreservation and the migratory responsiveness towards MIP-3beta was unaltered as measured in a migration assay. Thus we conclude that the large scale loading and maturation of DC with whole tumor cell preparations can be

  4. A novel system of artificial antigen-presenting cells efficiently stimulates Flu peptide-specific cytotoxic T cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Hui; Peng, Ji-Run; Chen, Peng-Cheng; Gong, Lei; Qiao, Shi-Shi; Wang, Wen-Zhen; Cui, Zhu-Qingqing; Yu, Xin; Wei, Yu-Hua; Leng, Xi-Sheng

    2011-08-05

    Highlights: {yields} Adoptive immunotherapy depends on relevant numbers of cytolytic T lymphocytes. {yields} An ideal artificial APCs system was successfully prepared in vivo. {yields} Controlled release of IL-2 leads to much more T-cell expansion. {yields} This system is better than general cellular APCs on T-cell expansion. -- Abstract: Therapeutic numbers of antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) are key effectors in successful adoptive immunotherapy. However, efficient and reproducible methods to meet the qualification remain poor. To address this issue, we designed the artificial antigen-presenting cell (aAPC) system based on poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA). A modified emulsion method was used for the preparation of PLGA particles encapsulating interleukin-2 (IL-2). Biotinylated molecular ligands for recognition and co-stimulation of T cells were attached to the particle surface through the binding of avidin-biotin. These formed the aAPC system. The function of aAPCs in the proliferation of specific CTLs against human Flu antigen was detected by enzyme-linked immunospot assay (ELISPOT) and MTT staining methods. Finally, we successfully prepared this suitable aAPC system. The results show that IL-2 is released from aAPCs in a sustained manner over 30 days. This dramatically improves the stimulatory capacity of this system as compared to the effect of exogenous addition of cytokine. In addition, our aAPCs promote the proliferation of Flu antigen-specific CTLs more effectively than the autologous cellular APCs. Here, this aAPC platform is proved to be suitable for expansion of human antigen-specific T cells.

  5. Cloning and Functional Characterization of Chicken Stem Cell Antigen 2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Stem cell antigen 2 (SCA2) is a Ly-6 family member whose function is largely unknown. To characterize biological properties and tissue distribution of chicken SCA2, SCA2 protein was expressed and purified in E. coli, and a polyclonal antibody developed. Utilizing the polyclonal antibody SCA2 is a 13...

  6. Antigen presentation by non-immune B-cell hybridoma clones: presentation of synthetic antigenic sites reveals clones that exhibit no specificity and clones that present only one epitope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohly, H. H.; Morrison, D. R.; Atassi, M. Z.

    1989-01-01

    Recently, we reported the preparation and antigen-presenting properties of hybridoma B-cell clones obtained after fusing non-secreting, non-antigen presenting Balb/c 653-myeloma cells with non-immune SJL spleen cells. It was found that antigen presentation at the clonal level can be specific or non-specific, depending on the particular B-cell clone. In the present work, one specific and one general presenter B-cell clones were tested for their epitope presentation ability to SJL T-cells that were specific to lysozyme or myoglobin. B-cell clone A1G12, a general presenter which presented both lysozyme and myoglobin to their respective T-cell lines, was found to present all five myoglobin epitopes while clone A1L16, a lysozyme specific presenter presented only one of the three epitopes of lysozyme. The latter reveals a hitherto unknown submolecular specificity (to a given epitope within a protein) for antigen presenting cells at the clonal level. Therefore, the specificity of T-cell recognition does not only derive from the T-cell but may also be dependent on the epitope specificity of the antigen-presenting B-cell.

  7. αvβ3-dependent cross-presentation of matrix metalloproteinase–2 by melanoma cells gives rise to a new tumor antigen

    PubMed Central

    Godefroy, Emmanuelle; Moreau-Aubry, Agnes; Diez, Elisabeth; Dreno, Brigitte; Jotereau, Francine; Guilloux, Yannick

    2005-01-01

    A large array of antigens that are recognized by tumor-specific T cells has been identified and shown to be generated through various processes. We describe a new mechanism underlying T cell recognition of melanoma cells, which involves the generation of a major histocompatibility complex class I–restricted epitope after tumor-mediated uptake and processing of an extracellular protein—a process referred to as cross-presentation—which is believed to be restricted to immune cells. We show that melanoma cells cross-present, in an αvβ3-dependent manner, an antigen derived from secreted matrix metalloproteinase–2 (MMP-2) to human leukocyte antigen A*0201-restricted T cells. Because MMP-2 activity is critical for melanoma progression, the MMP-2 peptide should be cross-presented by most progressing melanomas and represents a unique antigen for vaccine therapy of these tumors. PMID:15998788

  8. Crystal Structure of Insulin-Regulated Aminopeptidase with Bound Substrate Analogue Provides Insight on Antigenic Epitope Precursor Recognition and Processing.

    PubMed

    Mpakali, Anastasia; Saridakis, Emmanuel; Harlos, Karl; Zhao, Yuguang; Papakyriakou, Athanasios; Kokkala, Paraskevi; Georgiadis, Dimitris; Stratikos, Efstratios

    2015-09-15

    Aminopeptidases that generate antigenic peptides influence immunodominance and adaptive cytotoxic immune responses. The mechanisms that allow these enzymes to efficiently process a vast number of different long peptide substrates are poorly understood. In this work, we report the structure of insulin-regulated aminopeptidase, an enzyme that prepares antigenic epitopes for cross-presentation in dendritic cells, in complex with an antigenic peptide precursor analog. Insulin-regulated aminopeptidase is found in a semiclosed conformation with an extended internal cavity with limited access to the solvent. The N-terminal moiety of the peptide is located at the active site, positioned optimally for catalysis, whereas the C-terminal moiety of the peptide is stabilized along the extended internal cavity lodged between domains II and IV. Hydrophobic interactions and shape complementarity enhance peptide affinity beyond the catalytic site and support a limited selectivity model for antigenic peptide selection that may underlie the generation of complex immunopeptidomes. PMID:26259583

  9. Cross-Presentation of Cell-Associated Antigens by MHC Class I in Dendritic Cell Subsets

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez-Martínez, Enric; Planès, Remi; Anselmi, Giorgio; Reynolds, Matthew; Menezes, Shinelle; Adiko, Aimé Cézaire; Saveanu, Loredana; Guermonprez, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) have the unique ability to pick up dead cells carrying antigens in tissue and migrate to the lymph nodes where they can cross-present cell-associated antigens by MHC class I to CD8+ T cells. There is strong in vivo evidence that the mouse XCR1+ DCs subset acts as a key player in this process. The intracellular processes underlying cross-presentation remain controversial and several pathways have been proposed. Indeed, a wide number of studies have addressed the cellular process of cross-presentation in vitro using a variety of sources of antigen and antigen-presenting cells. Here, we review the in vivo and in vitro evidence supporting the current mechanistic models and disscuss their physiological relevance to the cross-presentation of cell-associated antigens by DCs subsets. PMID:26236315

  10. Hepatitis B virus antigens impair NK cell function.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yinli; Han, Qiuju; Zhang, Cai; Xiao, Min; Zhang, Jian

    2016-09-01

    An inadequate immune response of the host is thought to be a critical factor causing chronic hepatitis B virus (CHB) infection. Natural killer (NK) cells, as one of the key players in the eradication and control of viral infections, were functionally impaired in CHB patients, which might contribute to viral persistence. Here, we reported that HBV antigens HBsAg and HBeAg directly inhibited NK cell function. HBsAg and/or HBeAg blocked NK cell activation, cytokine production and cytotoxic granule release in human NK cell-line NK-92 cells, which might be related to the downregulation of activating receptors and upregulation of inhibitory receptor. Furthermore, the underlying mechanisms likely involved the suppression of STAT1, NF-κB and p38 MAPK pathways. These findings implicated that HBV antigen-mediated inhibition of NK cells might be an efficient strategy for HBV evasion, targeting the early antiviral responses mediated by NK cells and resulting in the establishment of chronic virus infection. Therefore, this study revealed the relationship between viral antigens and human immune function, especially a potential important interaction between HBV and innate immune responses. PMID:27341035

  11. Dendritic cells cross-present HIV antigens from live as well as apoptotic infected CD4+ T lymphocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marañón, Concepción; Desoutter, Jean-François; Hoeffel, Guillaume; Cohen, William; Hanau, Daniel; Hosmalin, Anne

    2004-04-01

    A better understanding of the antigen presentation pathways that lead to CD8+ T cell recognition of HIV epitopes in vivo is needed to achieve better immune control of HIV replication. Here, we show that cross-presentation of very small amounts of HIV proteins from apoptotic infected CD4+ T lymphocytes by dendritic cells to CD8+ T cells is much more efficient than other known HIV presentation pathways, i.e., direct presentation of infectious virus or cross-presentation of defective virus. Unexpectedly, dendritic cells also take up actively antigens into endosomes from live infected CD4+ T lymphocytes and cross-present them as efficiently as antigens derived from apoptotic infected cells. Moreover, live infected CD4+ T cells costimulate cross-presenting dendritic cells in the process. Therefore, dendritic cells can present very small amounts of viral proteins from infected T cells either after apoptosis, which is frequent during HIV infection, or not. Thus, if HIV expression is transiently induced while costimulation is enhanced (for instance after IL-2 and IFN immune therapy), this HIV antigen presentation pathway could be exploited to eradicate latently infected reservoirs, which are poorly recognized by patients' immune systems.

  12. Identification of DRG-1 As a Melanoma-Associated Antigen Recognized by CD4+ Th1 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kiniwa, Yukiko; Li, Jiang; Wang, Mingjun; Sun, Chuang; Lee, Jeffrey E.; Wang, Rong-Fu; Wang, Helen Y.

    2015-01-01

    Immunotherapy has emerged as a promising strategy for the treatment of metastatic melanoma. Clinical studies have demonstrated the feasibility of cancer immunotherapy using tumor antigens recognized by CD8+ T cells. However, the overall immune responses induced by these antigens are too weak and transient to induce tumor regression in the majority of patients who received immunization. A growing body of evidence suggests that CD4+ T helper (Th) cells play an important role in antitumor immunity. Therefore, the identification of MHC class II-restricted tumor antigens capable of stimulating CD4+ T cells may provide opportunities for developing effective cancer vaccines. To this end, we describe the identification of developmentally regulated GTP-binding protein 1 (DRG-1) as a melanoma-associated antigen recognized by HLA-DR11-restricted CD4+ Th1 cells. Epitope mapping analysis showed that the DRG1248-268 epitope of DRG-1 was required for T cell recognition. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction revealed that DRG-1 was highly expressed in melanoma cell lines but not in normal tissues. DRG-1 knockdown by lentiviral-based shRNA suppressed melanoma cell proliferation and soft agar colony formation. Taken together, these data suggest that DRG-1 plays an important role in melanoma cell growth and transformation, indicating that DRG1 may represent a novel target for CD4+ T cell-mediated immunotherapy in melanoma. PMID:25993655

  13. Reaching for far-flung antigen: How solid-core podosomes of dendritic cells transform into protrusive structures

    PubMed Central

    Baranov, Maksim V; ter Beest, Martin; van den Bogaart, Geert

    2014-01-01

    We recently identified a novel role for podosomes in antigen sampling. Podosomes are dynamic cellular structures that consist of point-like concentrations of actin surrounded by integrins and adaptor proteins such as vinculin and talin. Podosomes establish cellular contact with the extracellular matrix (ECM) and facilitate cell migration via ECM degradation. In our recent paper, we studied podosomes of human dendritic cells (DCs), major antigen presenting cells (APC) that take-up, process, and present foreign antigen to naive T-cells. We employed gelatin-impregnated porous polycarbonate filters to demonstrate that the mechanosensitive podosomes of DCs selectively localize to regions of low-physical resistance such as the filter pores. After degradation of the gelatin, podosomes increasingly protrude into the lumen of these pores. These protrusive podosome-derived structures contain several endocytic and early endosomal markers such as clathrin, Rab5, and VAMP3, and, surprisingly, also contain C-type lectins, a type of pathogen recognition receptors (PRRs). Finally, we performed functional uptake experiments to demonstrate that these PRRs facilitate uptake of antigen from the opposite side of the filter. Our data provide mechanistic insight in how dendritic cells sample for antigen across epithelial barriers for instance from the lumen of the lung and gut. PMID:26843902

  14. The Exonuclease Domain of Lassa Virus Nucleoprotein Is Involved in Antigen-Presenting-Cell-Mediated NK Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Russier, Marion; Reynard, Stéphanie; Carnec, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lassa virus is an Old World Arenavirus which causes Lassa hemorrhagic fever in humans, mostly in West Africa. Lassa fever is an important public health problem, and a safe and effective vaccine is urgently needed. The infection causes immunosuppression, probably due to the absence of activation of antigen-presenting cells (dendritic cells and macrophages), low type I interferon (IFN) production, and deficient NK cell function. However, a recombinant Lassa virus carrying D389A and G392A substitutions in the nucleoprotein that abolish the exonuclease activity and IFN activation loses its inhibitory activity and induces strong type I IFN production by dendritic cells and macrophages. We show here that during infection by this mutant Lassa virus, antigen-presenting cells trigger efficient human NK cell responses in vitro, including production of IFN-γ and cytotoxicity. NK cell activation involves close contact with both antigen-presenting cells and soluble factors. We report that infected dendritic cells and macrophages express the NKG2D ligands major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-related chains A and B and that they may produce interleukin-12 (IL-12), IL-15, and IL-18, all involved in NK cell functions. NK cell degranulation is significantly increased in cocultures, suggesting that NK cells seem to kill infected dendritic cells and macrophages. This work confirms the inhibitory function of Lassa virus nucleoprotein. Importantly, we demonstrate for the first time that Lassa virus nucleoprotein is involved in the inhibition of antigen-presenting cell-mediated NK cell responses. IMPORTANCE The pathogenesis and immune responses induced by Lassa virus are poorly known. Recently, an exonuclease domain contained in the viral nucleoprotein has been shown to be able to inhibit the type I IFN response by avoiding the recognition of viral RNA by cell sensors. Here, we studied the responses of NK cells to dendritic cells and macrophages infected with a

  15. Making Better Chimeric Antigen Receptors for Adoptive T-cell Therapy.

    PubMed

    Maus, Marcela V; June, Carl H

    2016-04-15

    Chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) are engineered fusion proteins constructed from antigen recognition, signaling, and costimulatory domains that can be expressed in cytotoxic T cells with the purpose of reprograming the T cells to specifically target tumor cells. CAR T-cell therapy uses gene transfer technology to reprogram a patient's own T cells to stably express CARs, thereby combining the specificity of an antibody with the potent cytotoxic and memory functions of a T cell. In early-phase clinical trials, CAR T cells targeting CD19 have resulted in sustained complete responses within a population of otherwise refractory patients with B-cell malignancies and, more specifically, have shown complete response rates of approximately 90% in patients with relapsed or refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Given this clinical efficacy, preclinical development of CAR T-cell therapy for a number of cancer indications has been actively investigated, and the future of the CAR T-cell field is extensive and dynamic. Several approaches to increase the feasibility and safety of CAR T cells are currently being explored, including investigation into the mechanisms regulating the persistence of CAR T cells. In addition, numerous early-phase clinical trials are now investigating CAR T-cell therapy beyond targeting CD19, especially in solid tumors. Trials investigating combinations of CAR T cells with immune checkpoint blockade therapies are now beginning and results are eagerly awaited. This review evaluates several of the ongoing and future directions of CAR T-cell therapy.Clin Cancer Res; 22(8); 1875-84. ©2016 AACR SEE ALL ARTICLES IN THIS CCR FOCUS SECTION, "OPPORTUNITIES AND CHALLENGES IN CANCER IMMUNOTHERAPY". PMID:27084741

  16. Human CD1-restricted T cell recognition of lipids from pollens.

    PubMed

    Agea, Elisabetta; Russano, Anna; Bistoni, Onelia; Mannucci, Roberta; Nicoletti, Ildo; Corazzi, Lanfranco; Postle, Anthony D; De Libero, Gennaro; Porcelli, Steven A; Spinozzi, Fabrizio

    2005-07-18

    Plant pollens are an important source of environmental antigens that stimulate allergic responses. In addition to acting as vehicles for foreign protein antigens, they contain lipids that incorporate saturated and unsaturated fatty acids, which are necessary in the reproduction of higher plants. The CD1 family of nonpolymorphic major histocompatibility complex-related molecules is highly conserved in mammals, and has been shown to present microbial and self lipids to T cells. Here, we provide evidence that pollen lipids may be recognized as antigens by human T cells through a CD1-dependent pathway. Among phospholipids extracted from cypress grains, phosphatidyl-choline and phosphatidyl-ethanolamine were able to stimulate the proliferation of T cells from cypress-sensitive subjects. Recognition of phospholipids involved multiple cell types, mostly CD4(+) T cell receptor for antigen (TCR)alphabeta(+), some CD4(-)CD8(-) TCRgammadelta(+), but rarely Valpha24i(+) natural killer-T cells, and required CD1a(+) and CD1d(+) antigen presenting cell. The responding T cells secreted both interleukin (IL)-4 and interferon-gamma, in some cases IL-10 and transforming growth factor-beta, and could provide help for immunoglobulin E (IgE) production. Responses to pollen phospholipids were maximally evident in blood samples obtained from allergic subjects during pollinating season, uniformly absent in Mycobacterium tuberculosis-exposed health care workers, but occasionally seen in nonallergic subjects. Finally, allergic, but not normal subjects, displayed circulating specific IgE and cutaneous weal and flare reactions to phospholipids. PMID:16009719

  17. Recognition of Vitamin B Precursors and Byproducts by Mucosal Associated Invariant T Cells.

    PubMed

    Eckle, Sidonia B G; Corbett, Alexandra J; Keller, Andrew N; Chen, Zhenjun; Godfrey, Dale I; Liu, Ligong; Mak, Jeffrey Y W; Fairlie, David P; Rossjohn, Jamie; McCluskey, James

    2015-12-18

    Vitamin B2 (riboflavin) is essential for metabolic functions and is synthesized by many bacteria, yeast, and plants, but not by mammals and other animals, which must acquire it from the diet. In mammals, modified pyrimidine intermediates from the microbial biosynthesis of riboflavin are recognized as signature biomarkers of microbial infection. This recognition occurs by specialized lymphocytes known as mucosal associated invariant T (MAIT) cells. The major histocompatibility class I-like antigen-presenting molecule, MR1, captures these pyrimidine intermediates, but only after their condensation with small molecules derived from glycolysis and other metabolic pathways to form short-lived antigens. The resulting MR1-Ag complexes are recognized by MAIT cell antigen receptors (αβ T cell receptors (TCRs)), and the subsequent MAIT cell immune responses are thought to protect the host from pathogens at mucosal surfaces. Here, we review our understanding of how these novel antigens are generated and discuss their interactions with MR1 and MAIT TCRs. PMID:26468291

  18. Cutaneous lymphocyte antigen expression on human effector B cells depends on the site and on the nature of antigen encounter.

    PubMed

    Kantele, Anu; Savilahti, Erkki; Tiimonen, Heidi; Iikkanen, Katja; Autio, Soile; Kantele, Jussi M

    2003-12-01

    In contrast to T cells, information on skin-homing B cells expressing the cutaneous lymphocyte antigen (CLA) is sparse. CLA expression on human B cells was investigated among circulating immunoglobulin-secreting cells (ISC) and among antigen-specific antibody-secreting cells (ASC) elicited by parenteral, oral or rectal primary immunization, or by parenteral or oral secondary immunization with Salmonella typhi Ty21a. CLA expression was examined by combining cell sorting with an enzyme-linked immunospot assay. Among all ISC, the proportion of CLA(+) cells was 13-21%. Parenteral immunization induced antigen-specific ASC of which 13% were CLA(+), while oral and rectal immunizations were followed by only 1% of CLA(+) ASC (p<0.001). Oral re-immunization was followed by an up-regulation of CLA (34-48%) regardless of the route of priming. Parenteral re-immunization elicited ASC of which 9-14% were CLA(+). In conclusion, the expression of CLA on human effector B cells depends on the site of antigen encounter: intestinal stimulation elicits cells with no CLA, while parenteral encounter elicits significant numbers of CLA(+) cells. Even though primary antigen encounter in the intestine failed to stimulate CLA expression, up-regulation of CLA was found upon intestinal antigen re-encounter. These findings may be of relevance in the pathogenesis of some cutaneous disorders. PMID:14635035

  19. Intestinal dendritic cells survey circulatory antigens prior to induction of CD8+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Sun Young; Song, Joo-Hye; Guleng, Bayasi; Cotoner, Carmen Alonso; Arihiro, Seiji; Zhao, Yun; Chiang, Hao-Sen; O'Keeffe, Michael; Liao, Gongxian; Karp, Christopher L.; Kweon, Mi-Na; Sharpe, Arlene H.; Bhan, Atul; Terhorst, Cox; Reinecker, Hans-Christian

    2013-01-01

    Circulatory antigens transit through the small intestine via the fenestrated capillaries in the lamina propria prior to entering into the draining lymphatics. But whether or how this process controls mucosal immune responses remains unknown. Here we demonstrate that dendritic cells (DCs) of the lamina propria can sample and process both circulatory and luminal antigens. Surprisingly, antigen cross-presentation by resident CX3CR1+ DCs induced differentiation of precursor cells into CD8+ T cells that expressed interleukin-10 (IL-10), IL-13 and IL-9 and could migrate into adjacent compartments. We conclude that lamina propria CX3CR1+ DCs facilitate the surveillance of circulatory antigens and act as a conduit for the processing of self- and intestinally-absorbed-antigens, leading to the induction of CD8+ T cells, that partake in the control of T cell activation during mucosal immune responses. PMID:23246312

  20. The Extended Family of CD1d-Restricted NKT Cells: Sifting through a Mixed Bag of TCRs, Antigens, and Functions

    PubMed Central

    Macho-Fernandez, Elodie; Brigl, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells comprise a family of specialized T cells that recognize lipid antigens presented by CD1d. Based on their T cell receptor (TCR) usage and antigen specificities, CD1d-restricted NKT cells have been divided into two main subsets: type I NKT cells that use a canonical invariant TCR α-chain and recognize α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer), and type II NKT cells that use a more diverse αβ TCR repertoire and do not recognize α-GalCer. In addition, α-GalCer-reactive NKT cells that use non-canonical αβ TCRs and CD1d-restricted T cells that use γδ or δ/αβ TCRs have recently been identified, revealing further diversity among CD1d-restricted T cells. Importantly, in addition to their distinct antigen specificities, functional differences are beginning to emerge between the different members of the CD1d-restricted T cell family. In this review, while using type I NKT cells as comparison, we will focus on type II NKT cells and the other non-invariant CD1d-restricted T cell subsets, and discuss our current understanding of the antigens they recognize, the formation of stimulatory CD1d/antigen complexes, the modes of TCR-mediated antigen recognition, and the mechanisms and consequences of their activation that underlie their function in antimicrobial responses, anti-tumor immunity, and autoimmunity. PMID:26284062

  1. Nuclear localization of Merkel cell polyomavirus large T antigen in Merkel cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Tomoyuki; Sato, Yuko; Watanabe, Daisuke; Ito, Hideki; Shimonohara, Nozomi; Tsuji, Takahiro; Nakajima, Noriko; Suzuki, Yoshio; Matsuo, Koma; Nakagawa, Hidemi; Sata, Tetsutaro; Katano, Harutaka

    2010-03-15

    To clarify whether mutations in the large T gene encoded by Merkel cell polyomavirus affect the expression and function of large T antigen in Merkel cell carcinoma cases, we investigated the expression of large T antigen in vitro and in vivo. Immunohistochemistry using a rabbit polyclonal antibody revealed that large T antigen was expressed in the nuclei of Merkel cell carcinoma cells with Merkel cell polyomavirus infection. Deletion mutant analyses identified an Arg-Lys-Arg-Lys sequence (amino acids 277-280) as a nuclear localization signal in large T antigen. Sequence analyses revealed that there were no mutations in the nuclear localization signal in any of the eleven Merkel cell polyomavirus strains examined. Furthermore, stop codons were not observed in the upstream of the nuclear localization signal in any of the Merkel cell carcinoma cases examined. These data suggest that the nuclear localization signal is highly conserved and functional in Merkel cell carcinoma cases.

  2. Modeling T cell responses to antigenic challenge

    PubMed Central

    Wodarz, Dominik

    2014-01-01

    T cell responses are a crucial part of the adaptive immune system in the fight against infections. This article discusses the use of mathematical models for understanding the dynamics of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses against viral infections. Complementing experimental research, mathematical models have been very useful for exploring new hypotheses, interpreting experimental data, and for defining what needs to be measured to improve understanding. This review will start with minimally parameterized models of CTL responses, which have generated some valuable insights into basic dynamics and correlates of control. Subsequently, more biological complexity is incorporated into this modeling framework, examining different mechanisms of CTL expansion, different effector activities, and the influence of T cell help. Models and results are discussed in the context of data from specific infections. PMID:25269610

  3. Thymus-Derived Regulatory T Cells Are Positively Selected on Natural Self-Antigen through Cognate Interactions of High Functional Avidity.

    PubMed

    Kieback, Elisa; Hilgenberg, Ellen; Stervbo, Ulrik; Lampropoulou, Vicky; Shen, Ping; Bunse, Mario; Jaimes, Yarua; Boudinot, Pierre; Radbruch, Andreas; Klemm, Uwe; Kühl, Anja A; Liblau, Roland; Hoevelmeyer, Nadine; Anderton, Stephen M; Uckert, Wolfgang; Fillatreau, Simon

    2016-05-17

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells expressing Foxp3 transcripton factor are essential for immune homeostasis. They arise in the thymus as a separate lineage from conventional CD4(+)Foxp3(-) T (Tconv) cells. Here, we show that the thymic development of Treg cells depends on the expression of their endogenous cognate self-antigen. The formation of these cells was impaired in mice lacking this self-antigen, while Tconv cell development was not negatively affected. Thymus-derived Treg cells were selected by self-antigens in a specific manner, while autoreactive Tconv cells were produced through degenerate recognition of distinct antigens. These distinct modes of development were associated with the expression of T cell receptor of higher functional avidity for self-antigen by Treg cells than Tconv cells, a difference subsequently essential for the control of autoimmunity. Our study documents how self-antigens define the repertoire of thymus-derived Treg cells to subsequently endow this cell type with the capacity to undermine autoimmune attack. PMID:27192577

  4. Myelin-reactive antibodies initiate T cell-mediated CNS autoimmune disease by opsonization of endogenous antigen.

    PubMed

    Kinzel, Silke; Lehmann-Horn, Klaus; Torke, Sebastian; Häusler, Darius; Winkler, Anne; Stadelmann, Christine; Payne, Natalie; Feldmann, Linda; Saiz, Albert; Reindl, Markus; Lalive, Patrice H; Bernard, Claude C; Brück, Wolfgang; Weber, Martin S

    2016-07-01

    In the pathogenesis of central nervous system (CNS) demyelinating disorders, antigen-specific B cells are implicated to act as potent antigen-presenting cells (APC), eliciting waves of inflammatory CNS infiltration. Here, we provide the first evidence that CNS-reactive antibodies (Ab) are similarly capable of initiating an encephalitogenic immune response by targeting endogenous CNS antigen to otherwise inert myeloid APC. In a transgenic mouse model, constitutive production of Ab against myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) was sufficient to promote spontaneous experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in the absence of B cells, when mice endogenously contained MOG-recognizing T cells. Adoptive transfer studies corroborated that anti-MOG Ab triggered activation and expansion of peripheral MOG-specific T cells in an Fc-dependent manner, subsequently causing EAE. To evaluate the underlying mechanism, anti-MOG Ab were added to a co-culture of myeloid APC and MOG-specific T cells. At otherwise undetected concentrations, anti-MOG Ab enabled Fc-mediated APC recognition of intact MOG; internalized, processed and presented MOG activated naïve T cells to differentiate in an encephalitogenic manner. In a series of translational experiments, anti-MOG Ab from two patients with an acute flare of CNS inflammation likewise facilitated detection of human MOG. Jointly, these observations highlight Ab-mediated opsonization of endogenous CNS auto-antigen as a novel disease- and/or relapse-triggering mechanism in CNS demyelinating disorders. PMID:27022743

  5. T Cell Epitope Clustering in the Highly Immunogenic BZLF1 Antigen of Epstein-Barr Virus

    PubMed Central

    Rist, Melissa J.; Neller, Michelle A.; Burrows, Jacqueline M.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Polymorphism in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) loci ensures that the CD8+ T cell response to viruses is directed against a diverse range of antigenic epitopes, thereby minimizing the impact of virus escape mutation across the population. The BZLF1 antigen of Epstein-Barr virus is an immunodominant target for CD8+ T cells, but the response has been characterized only in the context of a limited number of HLA molecules due to incomplete epitope mapping. We have now greatly expanded the number of defined CD8+ T cell epitopes from BZLF1, allowing the response to be evaluated in a much larger proportion of the population. Some regions of the antigen fail to be recognized by CD8+ T cells, while others include clusters of overlapping epitopes presented by different HLA molecules. These highly immunogenic regions of BZLF1 include polymorphic sequences, such that up to four overlapping epitopes are impacted by a single amino acid variation common in different regions of the world. This focusing of the immune response to limited regions of the viral protein could be due to sequence similarity to human proteins creating “immune blind spots” through self-tolerance. This study significantly enhances the understanding of the immune response to BZLF1, and the precisely mapped T cell epitopes may be directly exploited in vaccine development and adoptive immunotherapy. IMPORTANCE Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is an important human pathogen, associated with several malignancies, including nasopharyngeal carcinoma and Hodgkin lymphoma. T lymphocytes are critical for virus control, and clinical trials aimed at manipulating this arm of the immune system have demonstrated efficacy in treating these EBV-associated diseases. These trials have utilized information on the precise location of viral epitopes for T cell recognition, for either measuring or enhancing responses. In this study, we have characterized the T cell response to the highly immunogenic BZLF1 antigen of EBV by

  6. Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cell Therapy in Hematology.

    PubMed

    Ataca, Pınar; Arslan, Önder

    2015-12-01

    It is well demonstrated that the immune system can control and eliminate cancer cells. Immune-mediated elimination of tumor cells has been discovered and is the basis of both cancer vaccines and cellular therapies including hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Adoptive T cell transfer has been improved to be more specific and potent and to cause less off-target toxicity. Currently, there are two forms of engineered T cells being tested in clinical trials: T cell receptor (TCR) and chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) modified T cells. On 1 July 2014, the United States Food and Drug Administration granted 'breakthrough therapy' designation to anti-CD19 CAR T cell therapy. Many studies were conducted to evaluate the benefits of this exciting and potent new treatment modality. This review summarizes the history of adoptive immunotherapy, adoptive immunotherapy using CARs, the CAR manufacturing process, preclinical and clinical studies, and the effectiveness and drawbacks of this strategy. PMID:26377367

  7. Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cell Therapy in Hematology

    PubMed Central

    Ataca, Pınar; Arslan, Önder

    2015-01-01

    It is well demonstrated that the immune system can control and eliminate cancer cells. Immune-mediated elimination of tumor cells has been discovered and is the basis of both cancer vaccines and cellular therapies including hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Adoptive T cell transfer has been improved to be more specific and potent and to cause less off-target toxicity. Currently, there are two forms of engineered T cells being tested in clinical trials: T cell receptor (TCR) and chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) modified T cells. On 1 July 2014, the United States Food and Drug Administration granted ‘breakthrough therapy’ designation to anti-CD19 CAR T cell therapy. Many studies were conducted to evaluate the benefits of this exciting and potent new treatment modality. This review summarizes the history of adoptive immunotherapy, adoptive immunotherapy using CARs, the CAR manufacturing process, preclinical and clinical studies, and the effectiveness and drawbacks of this strategy. PMID:26377367

  8. Chitin Recognition via Chitotriosidase Promotes Pathologic Type-2 Helper T Cell Responses to Cryptococcal Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wiesner, Darin L.; Specht, Charles A.; Lee, Chrono K.; Smith, Kyle D.; Mukaremera, Liliane; Lee, S. Thera; Lee, Chun G.; Elias, Jack A.; Nielsen, Judith N.; Boulware, David R.; Bohjanen, Paul R.; Jenkins, Marc K.; Levitz, Stuart M.; Nielsen, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary mycoses are often associated with type-2 helper T (Th2) cell responses. However, mechanisms of Th2 cell accumulation are multifactorial and incompletely known. To investigate Th2 cell responses to pulmonary fungal infection, we developed a peptide-MHCII tetramer to track antigen-specific CD4+ T cells produced in response to infection with the fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans. We noted massive accruement of pathologic cryptococcal antigen-specific Th2 cells in the lungs following infection that was coordinated by lung-resident CD11b+ IRF4-dependent conventional dendritic cells. Other researchers have demonstrated that this dendritic cell subset is also capable of priming protective Th17 cell responses to another pulmonary fungal infection, Aspergillus fumigatus. Thus, higher order detection of specific features of fungal infection by these dendritic cells must direct Th2 cell lineage commitment. Since chitin-containing parasites commonly elicit Th2 responses, we hypothesized that recognition of fungal chitin is an important determinant of Th2 cell-mediated mycosis. Using C. neoformans mutants or purified chitin, we found that chitin abundance impacted Th2 cell accumulation and disease. Importantly, we determined Th2 cell induction depended on cleavage of chitin via the mammalian chitinase, chitotriosidase, an enzyme that was also prevalent in humans experiencing overt cryptococcosis. The data presented herein offers a new perspective on fungal disease susceptibility, whereby chitin recognition via chitotriosidase leads to the initiation of harmful Th2 cell differentiation by CD11b+ conventional dendritic cells in response to pulmonary fungal infection. PMID:25764512

  9. Microfluidic squeezing for intracellular antigen loading in polyclonal B-cells as cellular vaccines.

    PubMed

    Szeto, Gregory Lee; Van Egeren, Debra; Worku, Hermoon; Sharei, Armon; Alejandro, Brian; Park, Clara; Frew, Kirubel; Brefo, Mavis; Mao, Shirley; Heimann, Megan; Langer, Robert; Jensen, Klavs; Irvine, Darrell J

    2015-01-01

    B-cells are promising candidate autologous antigen-presenting cells (APCs) to prime antigen-specific T-cells both in vitro and in vivo. However to date, a significant barrier to utilizing B-cells as APCs is their low capacity for non-specific antigen uptake compared to "professional" APCs such as dendritic cells. Here we utilize a microfluidic device that employs many parallel channels to pass single cells through narrow constrictions in high throughput. This microscale "cell squeezing" process creates transient pores in the plasma membrane, enabling intracellular delivery of whole proteins from the surrounding medium into B-cells via mechano-poration. We demonstrate that both resting and activated B-cells process and present antigens delivered via mechano-poration exclusively to antigen-specific CD8(+)T-cells, and not CD4(+)T-cells. Squeezed B-cells primed and expanded large numbers of effector CD8(+)T-cells in vitro that produced effector cytokines critical to cytolytic function, including granzyme B and interferon-γ. Finally, antigen-loaded B-cells were also able to prime antigen-specific CD8(+)T-cells in vivo when adoptively transferred into mice. Altogether, these data demonstrate crucial proof-of-concept for mechano-poration as an enabling technology for B-cell antigen loading, priming of antigen-specific CD8(+)T-cells, and decoupling of antigen uptake from B-cell activation. PMID:25999171

  10. Microfluidic squeezing for intracellular antigen loading in polyclonal B-cells as cellular vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Lee Szeto, Gregory; Van Egeren, Debra; Worku, Hermoon; Sharei, Armon; Alejandro, Brian; Park, Clara; Frew, Kirubel; Brefo, Mavis; Mao, Shirley; Heimann, Megan; Langer, Robert; Jensen, Klavs; Irvine, Darrell J

    2015-01-01

    B-cells are promising candidate autologous antigen-presenting cells (APCs) to prime antigen-specific T-cells both in vitro and in vivo. However to date, a significant barrier to utilizing B-cells as APCs is their low capacity for non-specific antigen uptake compared to “professional” APCs such as dendritic cells. Here we utilize a microfluidic device that employs many parallel channels to pass single cells through narrow constrictions in high throughput. This microscale “cell squeezing” process creates transient pores in the plasma membrane, enabling intracellular delivery of whole proteins from the surrounding medium into B-cells via mechano-poration. We demonstrate that both resting and activated B-cells process and present antigens delivered via mechano-poration exclusively to antigen-specific CD8+T-cells, and not CD4+T-cells. Squeezed B-cells primed and expanded large numbers of effector CD8+T-cells in vitro that produced effector cytokines critical to cytolytic function, including granzyme B and interferon-γ. Finally, antigen-loaded B-cells were also able to prime antigen-specific CD8+T-cells in vivo when adoptively transferred into mice. Altogether, these data demonstrate crucial proof-of-concept for mechano-poration as an enabling technology for B-cell antigen loading, priming of antigen-specific CD8+T-cells, and decoupling of antigen uptake from B-cell activation. PMID:25999171

  11. Microfluidic squeezing for intracellular antigen loading in polyclonal B-cells as cellular vaccines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee Szeto, Gregory; van Egeren, Debra; Worku, Hermoon; Sharei, Armon; Alejandro, Brian; Park, Clara; Frew, Kirubel; Brefo, Mavis; Mao, Shirley; Heimann, Megan; Langer, Robert; Jensen, Klavs; Irvine, Darrell J.

    2015-05-01

    B-cells are promising candidate autologous antigen-presenting cells (APCs) to prime antigen-specific T-cells both in vitro and in vivo. However to date, a significant barrier to utilizing B-cells as APCs is their low capacity for non-specific antigen uptake compared to “professional” APCs such as dendritic cells. Here we utilize a microfluidic device that employs many parallel channels to pass single cells through narrow constrictions in high throughput. This microscale “cell squeezing” process creates transient pores in the plasma membrane, enabling intracellular delivery of whole proteins from the surrounding medium into B-cells via mechano-poration. We demonstrate that both resting and activated B-cells process and present antigens delivered via mechano-poration exclusively to antigen-specific CD8+T-cells, and not CD4+T-cells. Squeezed B-cells primed and expanded large numbers of effector CD8+T-cells in vitro that produced effector cytokines critical to cytolytic function, including granzyme B and interferon-γ. Finally, antigen-loaded B-cells were also able to prime antigen-specific CD8+T-cells in vivo when adoptively transferred into mice. Altogether, these data demonstrate crucial proof-of-concept for mechano-poration as an enabling technology for B-cell antigen loading, priming of antigen-specific CD8+T-cells, and decoupling of antigen uptake from B-cell activation.

  12. Internalization and presentation of myelin antigens by the brain endothelium guides antigen-specific T cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Lopes Pinheiro, Melissa A; Kamermans, Alwin; Garcia-Vallejo, Juan J; van het Hof, Bert; Wierts, Laura; O'Toole, Tom; Boeve, Daniël; Verstege, Marleen; van der Pol, Susanne MA; van Kooyk, Yvette; de Vries, Helga E; Unger, Wendy WJ

    2016-01-01

    Trafficking of myelin-reactive CD4+ T-cells across the brain endothelium, an essential step in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS), is suggested to be an antigen-specific process, yet which cells provide this signal is unknown. Here we provide direct evidence that under inflammatory conditions, brain endothelial cells (BECs) stimulate the migration of myelin-reactive CD4+ T-cells by acting as non-professional antigen presenting cells through the processing and presentation of myelin-derived antigens in MHC-II. Inflamed BECs internalized myelin, which was routed to endo-lysosomal compartment for processing in a time-dependent manner. Moreover, myelin/MHC-II complexes on inflamed BECs stimulated the trans-endothelial migration of myelin-reactive Th1 and Th17 2D2 cells, while control antigen loaded BECs did not stimulate T-cell migration. Furthermore, blocking the interaction between myelin/MHC-II complexes and myelin-reactive T-cells prevented T-cell transmigration. These results demonstrate that endothelial cells derived from the brain are capable of enhancing antigen-specific T cell recruitment. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13149.001 PMID:27336724

  13. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-binding epitopes dataset for the newly identified T-cell antigens of Mycobacterium immunogenum.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Harish; Yadav, Jagjit S

    2016-09-01

    The dataset described herein is related to our article entitled "T-cell antigens of Mycobacterium immunogenum (MI), an etiological agent of occupational hypersensitivity pneumonitis'' (Chandra and Yadav, 2016) [1]. The data include in silico-predicted T-cell epitopes of the T-cell antigens AgA and AgD of MI predicted to bind to HLA-I or HLA-II alleles. Data on two reference T-cell antigens ESAT-6 and CFP-10 of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv are included for comparison. The data for each antigen include the predicted epitope׳s amino acid sequence, its first amino acid position, and its ability to bind HLA-I or HLA-II allele(s). PMID:27508266

  14. Recognition and characterization of stage-specific oocyst/sporozoite antigens of Toxoplasma gondii by human antisera.

    PubMed Central

    Kasper, L H; Ware, P L

    1985-01-01

    antisera. Neither absorption of the antisera with tachyzoites nor periodate treatment of the oocyst/sporozoites reduced the antibody recognition of these stage-specific antigens. These data suggest that individuals infected by a presumed oocyst-transmitted route develop antibodies against unique stage-specific oocyst/sporozoite antigens. Images PMID:2581998

  15. Targeting of folate receptor β on acute myeloid leukemia blasts with chimeric antigen receptor-expressing T cells.

    PubMed

    Lynn, Rachel C; Poussin, Mathilde; Kalota, Anna; Feng, Yang; Low, Philip S; Dimitrov, Dimiter S; Powell, Daniel J

    2015-05-28

    T cells expressing a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) can produce dramatic results in lymphocytic leukemia patients; however, therapeutic strategies for myeloid leukemia remain limited. Folate receptor β (FRβ) is a myeloid-lineage antigen expressed on 70% of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patient samples. Here, we describe the development and evaluation of the first CARs specific for human FRβ (m909) in vitro and in vivo. m909 CAR T cells exhibited selective activation and lytic function against engineered C30-FRβ as well as endogenous FRβ(+) AML cell lines in vitro. In mouse models of human AML, m909 CAR T cells mediated the regression of engrafted FRβ(+) THP1 AML in vivo. In addition, we demonstrated that treatment of AML with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) enhanced FRβ expression, resulting in improved immune recognition by m909 CAR T cells. Because many cell surface markers are shared between AML blasts and healthy hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSCs), we evaluated FRβ expression and recognition of HSCs by CAR T cells. m909 CAR T cells were not toxic against healthy human CD34(+) HSCs in vitro. Our results indicate that FRβ is a promising target for CAR T-cell therapy of AML, which may be augmented by combination with ATRA. PMID:25887778

  16. Targeting of folate receptor β on acute myeloid leukemia blasts with chimeric antigen receptor–expressing T cells

    PubMed Central

    Lynn, Rachel C.; Poussin, Mathilde; Kalota, Anna; Feng, Yang; Low, Philip S.; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.

    2015-01-01

    T cells expressing a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) can produce dramatic results in lymphocytic leukemia patients; however, therapeutic strategies for myeloid leukemia remain limited. Folate receptor β (FRβ) is a myeloid-lineage antigen expressed on 70% of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patient samples. Here, we describe the development and evaluation of the first CARs specific for human FRβ (m909) in vitro and in vivo. m909 CAR T cells exhibited selective activation and lytic function against engineered C30-FRβ as well as endogenous FRβ+ AML cell lines in vitro. In mouse models of human AML, m909 CAR T cells mediated the regression of engrafted FRβ+ THP1 AML in vivo. In addition, we demonstrated that treatment of AML with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) enhanced FRβ expression, resulting in improved immune recognition by m909 CAR T cells. Because many cell surface markers are shared between AML blasts and healthy hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSCs), we evaluated FRβ expression and recognition of HSCs by CAR T cells. m909 CAR T cells were not toxic against healthy human CD34+ HSCs in vitro. Our results indicate that FRβ is a promising target for CAR T-cell therapy of AML, which may be augmented by combination with ATRA. PMID:25887778

  17. The nonpolymorphic MHC Qa-1b mediates CD8+ T cell surveillance of antigen-processing defects.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Cláudia C; van Veelen, Peter A; Querido, Bianca; de Ru, Arnoud; Sluijter, Marjolein; Laban, Sandra; Drijfhout, Jan W; van der Burg, Sjoerd H; Offringa, Rienk; van Hall, Thorbald

    2010-01-18

    The nonclassical major histocompatibility complex (MHC) Qa-1b accommodates monomorphic leader peptides and functions as a ligand for germ line receptors CD94/NKG2, which are expressed by natural killer cells and CD8+ T cells. We here describe that the conserved peptides are replaced by a novel peptide repertoire of surprising diversity as a result of impairments in the antigen-processing pathway. This novel peptide repertoire represents immunogenic neoantigens for CD8+ T cells, as we found that these Qa-1b-restricted T cells dominantly participated in the response to tumors with processing deficiencies. A surprisingly wide spectrum of target cells, irrespective of transformation status, MHC background, or type of processing deficiency, was recognized by this T cell subset, complying with the conserved nature of Qa-1b. Target cell recognition depended on T cell receptor and Qa-1b interaction, and immunization with identified peptide epitopes demonstrated in vivo priming of CD8+ T cells. Our data reveal that Qa-1b, and most likely its human homologue human leukocyte antigen-E, is important for the defense against processing-deficient cells by displacing the monomorphic leader peptides, which relieves the inhibition through CD94/NKG2A on lymphocytes, and by presenting a novel repertoire of immunogenic peptides, which recruits a subset of cytotoxic CD8+ T cells. PMID:20038604

  18. The nonpolymorphic MHC Qa-1b mediates CD8+ T cell surveillance of antigen-processing defects

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Cláudia C.; van Veelen, Peter A.; Querido, Bianca; de Ru, Arnoud; Sluijter, Marjolein; Laban, Sandra; Drijfhout, Jan W.; van der Burg, Sjoerd H.; Offringa, Rienk

    2010-01-01

    The nonclassical major histocompatibility complex (MHC) Qa-1b accommodates monomorphic leader peptides and functions as a ligand for germ line receptors CD94/NKG2, which are expressed by natural killer cells and CD8+ T cells. We here describe that the conserved peptides are replaced by a novel peptide repertoire of surprising diversity as a result of impairments in the antigen-processing pathway. This novel peptide repertoire represents immunogenic neoantigens for CD8+ T cells, as we found that these Qa-1b–restricted T cells dominantly participated in the response to tumors with processing deficiencies. A surprisingly wide spectrum of target cells, irrespective of transformation status, MHC background, or type of processing deficiency, was recognized by this T cell subset, complying with the conserved nature of Qa-1b. Target cell recognition depended on T cell receptor and Qa-1b interaction, and immunization with identified peptide epitopes demonstrated in vivo priming of CD8+ T cells. Our data reveal that Qa-1b, and most likely its human homologue human leukocyte antigen-E, is important for the defense against processing-deficient cells by displacing the monomorphic leader peptides, which relieves the inhibition through CD94/NKG2A on lymphocytes, and by presenting a novel repertoire of immunogenic peptides, which recruits a subset of cytotoxic CD8+ T cells. PMID:20038604

  19. Germinal center B cells recognize antigen through a specialized immune synapse architecture.

    PubMed

    Nowosad, Carla R; Spillane, Katelyn M; Tolar, Pavel

    2016-07-01

    B cell activation is regulated by B cell antigen receptor (BCR) signaling and antigen internalization in immune synapses. Using large-scale imaging across B cell subsets, we found that, in contrast with naive and memory B cells, which gathered antigen toward the synapse center before internalization, germinal center (GC) B cells extracted antigen by a distinct pathway using small peripheral clusters. Both naive and GC B cell synapses required proximal BCR signaling, but GC cells signaled less through the protein kinase C-β-NF-κB pathway and produced stronger tugging forces on the BCR, thereby more stringently regulating antigen binding. Consequently, GC B cells extracted antigen with better affinity discrimination than naive B cells, suggesting that specialized biomechanical patterns in B cell synapses regulate T cell-dependent selection of high-affinity B cells in GCs. PMID:27183103

  20. Cloning of the gene coding for a shared human melanoma antigen recognized by autologous T cells infiltrating into tumor.

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Y; Eliyahu, S; Delgado, C H; Robbins, P F; Rivoltini, L; Topalian, S L; Miki, T; Rosenberg, S A

    1994-01-01

    By cDNA expression cloning we have isolated a gene encoding a shared human melanoma antigen recognized by HLA-A2 restricted autologous and allogenic tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) from patients with metastatic melanoma. By using both transient and stable expression systems, transfection of this gene into non-antigen-expressing HLA-A2+ cell lines resulted in recognition by the antigen-specific TILs. The sequence of this cDNA revealed a previously undescribed putative transmembrane protein whose expression was restricted to melanoma and melanocyte cell lines and human retina but no other fresh or cultured normal tissues tested or other tumor histologies. Thus, we have identified a gene encoding a melanocyte lineage-specific protein (MART-1; melanoma antigen recognized by T cells 1) that is a widely shared melanoma antigen recognized by the T lymphocytes of patients with established malignancy. Identification of this gene opens possibilities for the development of immunotherapies for patients with melanoma. PMID:8170938

  1. B-cell antigens within normal and activated human T cells

    PubMed Central

    Sandilands, G P; Perry, M; Wootton, M; Hair, J; More, I A R

    1999-01-01

    In this study we compared cell surface staining for human peripheral blood lymphocyte (PBL) CD antigens by flow cytometry, with staining obtained following permeabilization of PBL using the Cytoperm method (Serotec). Six CD antigens (CD20, CD21, CD22, CD32, CD35 and major histocompatibility complex class II antigen) normally found on the surface of B cells, were also found to be expressed within T cells. We also showed, by immunoelectron microscopy, that these inappropriately expressed (‘occult’) CD antigens are located within cytoplasmic vesicles or within the rough endoplasmic reticulum. Following in vitro activation of T cells a distinct increase in expression of all of these cytoplasmic antigens was observed but staining at the cell surface was, by comparison, weak. We therefore propose that up-regulation of various B-cell CD antigens occurs within the cytoplasm of T cells following activation and that these antigens may be synthesized and released into the fluid-phase as soluble immunoregulatory molecules. PMID:10233724

  2. B-cell antigens within normal and activated human T cells.

    PubMed

    Sandilands, G P; Perry, M; Wootton, M; Hair, J; More, I A

    1999-03-01

    In this study we compared cell surface staining for human peripheral blood lymphocyte (PBL) CD antigens by flow cytometry, with staining obtained following permeabilization of PBL using the Cytoperm method (Serotec). Six CD antigens (CD20, CD21, CD22, CD32, CD35 and major histocompatibility complex class II antigen) normally found on the surface of B cells, were also found to be expressed within T cells. We also showed, by immunoelectron microscopy, that these inappropriately expressed ('occult') CD antigens are located within cytoplasmic vesicles or within the rough endoplasmic reticulum. Following in vitro activation of T cells a distinct increase in expression of all of these cytoplasmic antigens was observed but staining at the cell surface was, by comparison, weak. We therefore propose that up-regulation of various B-cell CD antigens occurs within the cytoplasm of T cells following activation and that these antigens may be synthesized and released into the fluid-phase as soluble immunoregulatory molecules. PMID:10233724

  3. The role of a human antigen specific T8+ cell subset in antigen presentation, helper function and contrasuppression.

    PubMed Central

    Lehner, T; Avery, J; Jones, T

    1985-01-01

    Regulation of the human immune response was studied by sequential separation of subsets of T cells, followed by assessment of their helper and suppressor functions in a series of reconstitution experiments. T8+ lymphocytes were separated by panning on streptococcal antigen (SA) coated plates into T8+ SA-adherent cells (T8+SA+) and T8+ SA-non-adherent cells (T8+SA-). The helper and suppressor functions of the T8+SA+ and T8+SA- cells, reconstituted with T4+ helper cells were then studied by a direct antibody forming cell assay. T4+ cells will not induce helper activity by 1000 ng SA alone but require the accessory function of monocytes (Mo). However, replacing Mo by T8+SA+ cells will elicit a similar helper activity by T4+ cells and SA as that induced by Mo. In addition to the antigen-specific presentation and induction of helper activity, the T8+SA+ subset displays the properties of antigen-specific contrasuppressor cells. Thus, reconstitution of T4+ cells and T8+SA- (suppressor cells) with T8+SA+ and 1000 ng SA induces helper and no suppressor activity. Substitution of Mo for the T8+SA+ cells converts the helper to a predominantly suppressor-cell function. T8+SA- cells elicit suppression with 1 ng SA in the absence of accessory cells and reconstitution with Mo, T8+SA+ or T4+ cells failed to affect the suppressor activity. Total reconstitution of the four principle subsets of T4+, T8+SA+, T8+SA- cells and Mo elicited similar antigen dose-dependent responses as those of the unseparated mononuclear cells. It seems that all four cell subsets are required for optimal immunoregulation. We suggest that the T8+SA+ can present antigen to T4+ helper cells and induce helper activity, but in addition these cells can prevent the suppressor subset of T8+ cells from inhibiting T4+ helper cells and function as contrasuppressor cells. The mechanism of these functions is not known but HLA class II antigens might play an essential role in antigen binding, presentation and

  4. Differential Recognition and Hydrolysis of Host Carbohydrate Antigens by Streptococcus pneumoniae Family 98 Glycoside Hydrolases

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, M.; Whitworth, G; El Warry, N; Randriantsoa, M; Samain, E; Burke, R; Vocadlo, D; Boraston, A

    2009-01-01

    The presence of a fucose utilization operon in the Streptococcus pneumoniae genome and its established importance in virulence indicates a reliance of this bacterium on the harvesting of host fucose-containing glycans. The identities of these glycans, however, and how they are harvested is presently unknown. The biochemical and high resolution x-ray crystallographic analysis of two family 98 glycoside hydrolases (GH98s) from distinctive forms of the fucose utilization operon that originate from different S. pneumoniae strains reveal that one enzyme, the predominant type among pneumococcal isolates, has a unique endo-{beta}-galactosidase activity on the LewisY antigen. Altered active site topography in the other species of GH98 enzyme tune its endo-{beta}-galactosidase activity to the blood group A and B antigens. Despite their different specificities, these enzymes, and by extension all family 98 glycoside hydrolases, use an inverting catalytic mechanism. Many bacterial and viral pathogens exploit host carbohydrate antigens for adherence as a precursor to colonization or infection. However, this is the first evidence of bacterial endoglycosidase enzymes that are known to play a role in virulence and are specific for distinct host carbohydrate antigens. The strain-specific distribution of two distinct types of GH98 enzymes further suggests that S. pneumoniae strains may specialize to exploit host-specific antigens that vary from host to host, a factor that may feature in whether a strain is capable of colonizing a host or establishing an invasive infection.

  5. In vivo gammadelta T cell priming to mycobacterial antigens by primary Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and exposure to nonpeptidic ligands.

    PubMed Central

    Poccia, F.; Malkovsky, M.; Pollak, A.; Colizzi, V.; Sireci, G.; Salerno, A.; Dieli, F.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The recognition of phosphorylated nonpeptidic microbial metabolites by Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cells does not appear to require the presence of MHC molecules or antigen processing, permitting rapid responses against microbial pathogens. These may constitute an important area of natural anti-infectious immunity. To provide evidence of their involvement in immune reactivities against mycobacteria, we measured the responsiveness of peripheral blood Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cells in children with primary Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) infections. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 22 children with MTB infections and 16 positivity of tuberculin (PPD)-negative healthy children were exposed to nonpeptidic antigens in vitro and the reactivity of the Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cell subset with these antigens was determined using proliferation and cytokine assays. Also, responses of gammadelta T cells from rhesus monkeys stimulated with phosphoantigens in vivo were measured. RESULTS: The Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cell responses were highly increased in infected children in comparison with age-matched controls. This augmented Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cell reactivity subsided after successful antibiotic chemotherapy, suggesting that persistent exposure to mycobacterial antigens is required for the maintenance of gammadelta T cell activation in vivo. The in vivo reactivity of Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cells to phosphoantigens was also analyzed in a rhesus monkey model system. Intravenous injections of phosphoantigens induced an activated state of simian Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cells which decreased after 2 months, i.e., with a time course similar to that seen in MTB-infected children. CONCLUSIONS: The increased reactivity of Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cells to phosphoantigens appears to be dependent on constant antigenic exposure. Consequently, the assessment of Vgamma9Vdelta2 responses may be useful for monitoring the efficacy of antimycobacterial therapies. PMID:10449808

  6. Multiphoton microscopy of antigen presenting cells in experimental cancer therapies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, Simon C.; Papworth, Glenn D.; Spencer, Lori A.; Larregina, Adriana T.; Hackstein, Holger

    2002-06-01

    The absence of effective conventional therapy for most cancer patients justifies the application of novel, experimental approaches. One alternative to conventional cytotoxic agents is a more defined molecular approach for cancer immune treatment; promotion of the immune system specifically to target and eliminate tumor cells on the basis of expression of tumor-associated antigens (TAA). TAA could be presented to T-cells by professional antigen-presenting cells (APC) that generate a more efficient and effective anti-tumor immune response. In fact, it has been well documented that dendritic cells, the most immunologically potent APC, are capable of recognizing, processing and presenting TAA, in turn initiating a specific antitumor immune response. Results from several laboratories and clinical trials suggested significant but still limited efficacy of TAA-pulsed dendritic cells administered to tumor-bearing hosts. Following such delivery, it is fundamentally necessary to dynamically assess cell abundance within the microenvironment of the tumor in the presence of the appropriate therapeutic agent. Multiphoton microscopy was used to assess the trafficking of pulsed dendritic cells and other APC in skin, lymph nodes and brain of several animal tumor models, following different routes of administration.

  7. Phenotypic and functional profiling of mouse intestinal antigen presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Harusato, Akihito; Flannigan, Kyle L; Geem, Duke; Denning, Timothy L

    2015-06-01

    The microbiota that populates the mammalian intestine consists of hundreds of trillions of bacteria that are separated from underlying immune cells by a single layer of epithelial cells. The intestinal immune system effectively tolerates components of the microbiota that provide benefit to the host while remaining poised to eliminate those that are harmful. Antigen presenting cells, especially macrophages and dendritic cells, play important roles in maintaining intestinal homeostasis via their ability to orchestrate appropriate responses to the microbiota. Paramount to elucidating intestinal macrophage- and dendritic cell-mediated functions is the ability to effectively isolate and identify these cells from a complex cellular environment. In this review, we summarize methodology for the isolation and phenotypic characterization of macrophages and DCs from the mouse intestine and discuss how this may be useful for gaining insight into the mechanisms by which mucosal immune tolerance is maintained. PMID:25891794

  8. Original Encounter with Antigen Determines Antigen-Presenting Cell Imprinting of the Quality of the Immune Response in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Abadie, Valérie; Bonduelle, Olivia; Duffy, Darragh; Parizot, Christophe; Verrier, Bernard; Combadière, Béhazine

    2009-01-01

    Background Obtaining a certain multi-functionality of cellular immunity for the control of infectious diseases is a burning question in immunology and in vaccine design. Early events, including antigen shuttling to secondary lymphoid organs and recruitment of innate immune cells for adaptive immune response, determine host responsiveness to antigens. However, the sequence of these events and their impact on the quality of the immune response remain to be elucidated. Here, we chose to study Modified Vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) which is now replacing live Smallpox vaccines and is proposed as an attenuated vector for vaccination strategies against infectious diseases. Methodology/Principal findings We analyzed in vivo mechanisms triggered following intradermal (i.d.) and intramuscular (i.m.) Modified Vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) administration. We demonstrated significant differences in the antigen shuttling to lymphoid organs by macrophages (MΦs), myeloid dendritic cells (DCs), and neutrophils (PMNs). MVA i.d. administration resulted in better antigen distribution and more sustained antigen-presenting cells (APCs) recruitment into draining lymph nodes than with i.m. administration. These APCs, which comprise both DCs and MΦs, were differentially involved in T cell priming and shaped remarkably the quality of cytokine-producing virus-specific T cells according to the entry route of MVA. Conclusions/Significance This study improves our understanding of the mechanisms of antigen delivery and their consequences on the quality of immune responses and provides new insights for vaccine development. PMID:19997562

  9. Polyoma small T antigen triggers cell death via mitotic catastrophe.

    PubMed

    Pores Fernando, A T; Andrabi, S; Cizmecioglu, O; Zhu, C; Livingston, D M; Higgins, J M G; Schaffhausen, B S; Roberts, T M

    2015-05-01

    Polyoma small T antigen (PyST), an early gene product of the polyoma virus, has been shown to cause cell death in a number of mammalian cells in a protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A)-dependent manner. In the current study, using a cell line featuring regulated expression of PyST, we found that PyST arrests cells in mitosis. Live-cell and immunofluorescence studies showed that the majority of the PyST expressing cells were arrested in prometaphase with almost no cells progressing beyond metaphase. These cells exhibited defects in chromosomal congression, sister chromatid cohesion and spindle positioning, thereby resulting in the activation of the spindle assembly checkpoint. Prolonged mitotic arrest then led to cell death via mitotic catastrophe. Cell cycle inhibitors that block cells in G1/S prevented PyST-induced death. PyST-induced cell death that occurs during M is not dependent on p53 status. These data suggested, and our results confirmed, that PP2A inhibition could be used to preferentially kill cancer cells with p53 mutations that proliferate normally in the presence of cell cycle inhibitors. PMID:24998850

  10. An antigen-specific, four-color, B-cell FluoroSpot assay utilizing tagged antigens for detection.

    PubMed

    Jahnmatz, Peter; Bengtsson, Theresa; Zuber, Bartek; Färnert, Anna; Ahlborg, Niklas

    2016-06-01

    The FluoroSpot assay, a variant of ELISpot utilizing fluorescent detection, has so far been used primarily for assessment of T cells, where simultaneous detection of several cytokines has allowed a more qualitative analysis of functionally distinct T cells. The potential to measure multiple analytes also presents several advantages when analyzing B cells. Our aim was to develop a B-cell FluoroSpot assay adaptable to studies of a variety of antigens. The assay utilizes anti-IgG antibodies immobilized in 96-well filter membrane plates. During cell culture, IgG antibodies secreted by antibody-secreting cells (ASCs) are captured in the vicinity of each of these cells and the specificity of single ASCs is defined using antigens for detection. The antigens were labeled with biotin or peptide tags enabling secondary detection with fluorophore-conjugated streptavidin or tag-specific antibodies. The assay, utilizing up to four different tag systems and fluorophores simultaneously, was evaluated using hybridomas and immunized splenocytes as ASCs. Assay variants were developed that could: i) identify multiple ASCs with different antigen specificities; ii) detect ASCs showing cross-reactivity with different but related antigens; and iii) define the antigen-specificity and, by including anti-IgG subclass detection reagents, simultaneously determine the IgG subclass of antibodies secreted by ASCs. As demonstrated here, the B-cell FluoroSpot assay using tag-based detection systems provides a versatile and powerful tool to investigate antibody responses by individual cells that can be readily adapted to studies of a variety of antigen-specific ASCs. PMID:26930550

  11. Human TRAV1-2-negative MR1-restricted T cells detect S. pyogenes and alternatives to MAIT riboflavin-based antigens

    PubMed Central

    Meermeier, Erin W.; Laugel, Bruno F.; Sewell, Andrew K.; Corbett, Alexandra J.; Rossjohn, Jamie; McCluskey, James; Harriff, Melanie J.; Franks, Tamera; Gold, Marielle C.; Lewinsohn, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells are thought to detect microbial antigens presented by the HLA-Ib molecule MR1 through the exclusive use of a TRAV1-2-containing TCRα. Here we use MR1 tetramer staining and ex vivo analysis with mycobacteria-infected MR1-deficient cells to demonstrate the presence of functional human MR1-restricted T cells that lack TRAV1-2. We characterize an MR1-restricted clone that expresses the TRAV12-2 TCRα, which lacks residues previously shown to be critical for MR1-antigen recognition. In contrast to TRAV1-2+ MAIT cells, this TRAV12-2-expressing clone displays a distinct pattern of microbial recognition by detecting infection with the riboflavin auxotroph Streptococcus pyogenes. As known MAIT antigens are derived from riboflavin metabolites, this suggests that TRAV12-2+ clone recognizes unique antigens. Thus, MR1-restricted T cells can discriminate between microbes in a TCR-dependent manner. We postulate that additional MR1-restricted T-cell subsets may play a unique role in defence against infection by broadening the recognition of microbial metabolites. PMID:27527800

  12. Human TRAV1-2-negative MR1-restricted T cells detect S. pyogenes and alternatives to MAIT riboflavin-based antigens.

    PubMed

    Meermeier, Erin W; Laugel, Bruno F; Sewell, Andrew K; Corbett, Alexandra J; Rossjohn, Jamie; McCluskey, James; Harriff, Melanie J; Franks, Tamera; Gold, Marielle C; Lewinsohn, David M

    2016-01-01

    Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells are thought to detect microbial antigens presented by the HLA-Ib molecule MR1 through the exclusive use of a TRAV1-2-containing TCRα. Here we use MR1 tetramer staining and ex vivo analysis with mycobacteria-infected MR1-deficient cells to demonstrate the presence of functional human MR1-restricted T cells that lack TRAV1-2. We characterize an MR1-restricted clone that expresses the TRAV12-2 TCRα, which lacks residues previously shown to be critical for MR1-antigen recognition. In contrast to TRAV1-2(+) MAIT cells, this TRAV12-2-expressing clone displays a distinct pattern of microbial recognition by detecting infection with the riboflavin auxotroph Streptococcus pyogenes. As known MAIT antigens are derived from riboflavin metabolites, this suggests that TRAV12-2(+) clone recognizes unique antigens. Thus, MR1-restricted T cells can discriminate between microbes in a TCR-dependent manner. We postulate that additional MR1-restricted T-cell subsets may play a unique role in defence against infection by broadening the recognition of microbial metabolites. PMID:27527800

  13. Cell Wall Anchoring of the Campylobacter Antigens to Lactococcus lactis

    PubMed Central

    Kobierecka, Patrycja A.; Olech, Barbara; Książek, Monika; Derlatka, Katarzyna; Adamska, Iwona; Majewski, Paweł M.; Jagusztyn-Krynicka, Elżbieta K.; Wyszyńska, Agnieszka K.

    2016-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is the most frequent cause of human food-borne gastroenteritis and chicken meat is the main source of infection. Recent studies showed that broiler chicken immunization against Campylobacter should be the most efficient way to lower the number of human infections by this pathogen. Induction of the mucosal immune system after oral antigen administration should provide protective immunity to chickens. In this work we tested the usefulness of Lactococcus lactis, the most extensively studied lactic acid bacterium, as a delivery vector for Campylobacter antigens. First we constructed hybrid protein – CjaA antigen presenting CjaD peptide epitopes on its surface. We showed that specific rabbit anti-rCjaAD serum reacted strongly with both CjaA and CjaD produced by a wild type C. jejuni strain. Next, rCjaAD and CjaA were fused to the C-terminus of the L. lactis YndF containing the LPTXG motif. The genes expressing these proteins were transcribed under control of the L. lactis Usp45 promoter and their products contain the Usp45 signal sequences. This strategy ensures a cell surface location of both analyzed proteins, which was confirmed by immunofluorescence assay. In order to evaluate the impact of antigen location on vaccine prototype efficacy, a L. lactis strain producing cytoplasm-located rCjaAD was also generated. Animal experiments showed a decrease of Campylobacter cecal load in vaccinated birds as compared with the control group and showed that the L. lactis harboring the surface-exposed rCjaAD antigen afforded greater protection than the L. lactis producing cytoplasm-located rCjaAD. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt to employ Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) strains as a mucosal delivery vehicle for chicken immunization. Although the observed reduction of chicken colonization by Campylobacter resulting from vaccination was rather moderate, the experiments showed that LAB strains can be considered as an alternative vector to

  14. Cell Wall Anchoring of the Campylobacter Antigens to Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Kobierecka, Patrycja A; Olech, Barbara; Książek, Monika; Derlatka, Katarzyna; Adamska, Iwona; Majewski, Paweł M; Jagusztyn-Krynicka, Elżbieta K; Wyszyńska, Agnieszka K

    2016-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is the most frequent cause of human food-borne gastroenteritis and chicken meat is the main source of infection. Recent studies showed that broiler chicken immunization against Campylobacter should be the most efficient way to lower the number of human infections by this pathogen. Induction of the mucosal immune system after oral antigen administration should provide protective immunity to chickens. In this work we tested the usefulness of Lactococcus lactis, the most extensively studied lactic acid bacterium, as a delivery vector for Campylobacter antigens. First we constructed hybrid protein - CjaA antigen presenting CjaD peptide epitopes on its surface. We showed that specific rabbit anti-rCjaAD serum reacted strongly with both CjaA and CjaD produced by a wild type C. jejuni strain. Next, rCjaAD and CjaA were fused to the C-terminus of the L. lactis YndF containing the LPTXG motif. The genes expressing these proteins were transcribed under control of the L. lactis Usp45 promoter and their products contain the Usp45 signal sequences. This strategy ensures a cell surface location of both analyzed proteins, which was confirmed by immunofluorescence assay. In order to evaluate the impact of antigen location on vaccine prototype efficacy, a L. lactis strain producing cytoplasm-located rCjaAD was also generated. Animal experiments showed a decrease of Campylobacter cecal load in vaccinated birds as compared with the control group and showed that the L. lactis harboring the surface-exposed rCjaAD antigen afforded greater protection than the L. lactis producing cytoplasm-located rCjaAD. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt to employ Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) strains as a mucosal delivery vehicle for chicken immunization. Although the observed reduction of chicken colonization by Campylobacter resulting from vaccination was rather moderate, the experiments showed that LAB strains can be considered as an alternative vector to

  15. Chimeric antigen receptor-modified T cells strike back.

    PubMed

    Frigault, Matthew J; Maus, Marcela V

    2016-07-01

    Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) are engineered molecules designed to endow a polyclonal T-cell population with the ability to recognize tumor-associated surface antigens. In their simplest form, CARs comprise a targeting moiety in the form of a single-chain variable fragment from an antibody connected to various intracellular signaling domains allowing for T-cell activation. This powerful approach combines the specificity of an antibody with the cytotoxic ability of a T cell. There has been much excitement since early phase trials of CAR-T cells targeting CD19 expressed on B-cell malignancies demonstrated remarkable efficacy in inducing long-term, stable remissions in otherwise relapsed/refractory disease. Despite these successes, we have just begun to understand the intricacies of CAR biology with efforts underway to utilize this platform in the treatment of other, previously refractory malignancies. Challenges currently include identification of viable cancer targets, management strategies for potentially severe and irreversible toxicities and overcoming the immunosuppressive nature of the tumor microenvironment. This review will focus on basic CAR structure and function, previous success and new approaches aimed at the broader application of CAR-T-cell therapy. PMID:27021308

  16. HLA antigen expression in enteropathy associated T cell lymphoma.

    PubMed Central

    Ashton-Key, M; Singh, N; Pan, L X; Smith, M E

    1996-01-01

    AIMS: To investigate the occurrence of abnormal patterns of HLA-ABC and HLA-DR expression in enteropathy associated T cell lymphoma and to relate such abnormalities to the Epstein Barr virus (EBV) status of the tumours. METHODS: Eleven enteropathy associated T cell lymphomas were immunostained with HC10 (HLA-ABC heavy chain) and TAL 1B5 (HLA-DR alpha chain) monoclonal antibodies and polyclonal anti-beta 2 microglobulin (beta 2m, the HLA-ABC light chain) antibodies. In situ hybridisation for EBV using EBER probes was performed on all cases. RESULTS: Tumour cells of two of 11 patients were EBER positive. One of these showed partial, and the other, complete loss of beta 2m. HLA-DR expression was undetectable in both patients. Of the remaining nine EBER negative tumours, two were HLA-ABC heavy chain negative or showed only occasional positive cells and five of nine showed partial or complete loss of the HLA-ABC light chain, beta 2m. Seven of the nine cases were either negative for HLA-DR or showed weak expression in a proportion of tumour cells. CONCLUSIONS: These data show that low or absent HLA-ABC and HLA-DR antigen expression occurs commonly in enteropathy associated T cell lymphoma. These abnormal patterns of HLA expression may be associated with escape from immune attack which, in a minority of patients, could be directed against EBV antigens. Images PMID:8813950

  17. Immune complexes that contain HIV antigens activate peripheral blood T cells.

    PubMed

    Korolevskaya, L B; Shmagel, K V; Saidakova, E V; Shmagel, N G; Chereshnev, V A

    2016-07-01

    Uninfected donor T cells were treated in vitro by model immune complexes that contained either HIV or hepatitis C virus (HCV) antigens. Unlike HCV antigen-containing complexes, the immune complexes that contained HIV antigens have been shown to activate peripheral blood T cells of uninfected donors under in vitro conditions. Both the antiviral antibodies and HIV antigen were involved in the activation process. The unique properties of the immune complexes formed by HIV antigens and antiviral antibodies are believed to result from the virus-specific antibody properties and molecular conformation of the antigen-antibody complex. PMID:27595830

  18. Recognition of serogroup A Neisseria meningitidis serotype antigens by human antisera.

    PubMed Central

    Sugasawara, R J

    1985-01-01

    The antigens of Neisseria meningitidis serogroup A which were recognized by human antisera were identified by Western blot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay techniques. The components of six prototype strains used for serotyping serogroup A meningococci were resolved by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and then transferred to nitrocellulose for immunoperoxidase staining with sera collected from 10 acute-phase and 14 convalescent-phase patients. Six acute-phase sera detected six major antigens having apparent molecular weights between 14,000 and 82,000. In addition to recognizing these antigens, the convalescent-phase sera detected a protease-sensitive antigen with an apparent molecular weight of 20,000 for one strain and 27,000 for five strains, lipopolysaccharide, and the heat-modifiable proteins. The sera recognized lipopolysaccharide in a serotype-specific manner, whereas their reactions with the heat-modifiable protein were not serotype specific. Convalescent-phase sera recognized components from eight meningococcal serogroups. The concentrations of immunoglobulin G directed to capsular polysaccharide were determined by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay; seven acute-phase sera had less than 0.39 micrograms of antibody per ml, whereas the average concentration in convalescent-phase sera was 3.22 micrograms/ml and the range was 0.40 to 7.50 micrograms/ml. Images PMID:3920147

  19. Membrane-bound heat shock proteins facilitate the uptake of dying cells and cross-presentation of cellular antigen.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Haiyan; Fang, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Dongmei; Wu, Weicheng; Shao, Miaomiao; Wang, Lan; Gu, Jianxin

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) were originally identified as stress-responsive proteins and serve as molecular chaperones in different intracellular compartments. Translocation of HSPs to the cell surface and release of HSPs into the extracellular space have been observed during the apoptotic process and in response to a variety of cellular stress. Here, we report that UV irradiation and cisplatin treatment rapidly induce the expression of membrane-bound Hsp60, Hsp70, and Hsp90 upstream the phosphatidylserine exposure. Membrane-bound Hsp60, Hsp70 and Hsp90 could promote the release of IL-6 and IL-1β as well as DC maturation by the evaluation of CD80 and CD86 expression. On the other hand, Hsp60, Hsp70 and Hsp90 on cells could facilitate the uptake of dying cells by bone marrow-derived dendritic cells. Lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1), as a common receptor for Hsp60, Hsp70, and Hsp90, is response for their recognition and mediates the uptake of dying cells. Furthermore, membrane-bound Hsp60, Hsp70 and Hsp90 could promote the cross-presentation of OVA antigen from E.G7 cells and inhibition of the uptake of dying cells by LOX-1 decreases the cross-presentation of cellular antigen. Therefore, the rapid exposure of HSPs on dying cells at the early stage allows for the recognition by and confers an activation signal to the immune system. PMID:26481477

  20. Molecular tracking of antigen-specific T cell clones in neurological immune-mediated disorders

    PubMed Central

    Muraro, Paolo A.; Wandinger, Klaus-Peter; Bielekova, Bibiana; Gran, Bruno; Marques, Adriana; Utz, Ursula; McFarland, Henry F.; Jacobson, Steve; Martin, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Summary T cells recognizing self or microbial antigens may trigger or reactivate immune-mediated diseases. Monitoring the frequency of specific T cell clonotypes to assess a possible link with the course of disease has been a difficult task with currently available technology. Our goal was to track individual candidate pathogenic T cell clones, selected on the basis of previous extensive studies from patients with immune-mediated disorders of the CNS, including multiple sclerosis, HTLV-I associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/ TSP) and chronic Lyme neuroborreliosis. We developed and applied a highly specific and sensitive technique to track single CD4+ and CD8+ T cell clones through the detection and quantification of T cell receptor (TCR) α or β chain complementarity-determining region 3 transcripts by real-time reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR. We examined the frequency of the candidate pathogenic T cell clones in the peripheral blood and CSF during the course of neurological disease. Using this approach, we detected variations of clonal frequencies that appeared to be related to clinical course, significant enrichment in the CSF, or both. By integrating clono-type tracking with direct visualization of antigen-specific staining, we showed that a single T cell clone contributed substantially to the overall recognition of the viral peptide/MHC complex in a patient with HAM/ TSP. T cell clonotype tracking is a powerful new technology enabling further elucidation of the dynamics of expansion of autoreactive or pathogen-specific T cells that mediate pathological or protective immune responses in neurological disorders. PMID:12477694

  1. Unstained viable cell recognition in phase-contrast microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skoczylas, M.; Rakowski, W.; Cherubini, R.; Gerardi, S.

    2011-09-01

    Individual cell recognition is a relevant task to be accomplished when single-ion microbeam irradiations are performed. At INFN-LNL facility cell visualization system is based on a phase-contrast optical microscope, without the use of any cell dye. Unstained cells are seeded in the special designed Petri dish, between two mylar foils, and at present the cell recognition is achieved manually by an expert operator. Nevertheless, this procedure is time consuming and sometimes it could be not practical if the amount of living cells to be irradiated is large. To reduce the time needed to recognize unstained cells on the Petri dish, it has been designed and implemented an automated, parallel algorithm. Overlapping ROIs sliding in steps over the captured grayscale image are firstly pre-classified and potential cell markers for the segmentation are obtained. Segmented objects are additionally classified to categorize cell bodies from other structures considered as sample dirt or background. As a result, cell coordinates are passed to the dedicated CELLView program that controls all the LNL single-ion microbeam irradiation protocol, including the positioning of individual cells in front of the ion beam. Unstained cell recognition system was successfully tested in experimental conditions with two different mylar surfaces. The recognition time and accuracy was acceptable, however, improvements in speed would be useful.

  2. T8 cell suppression of antigen- and mitogen-induced T4 cell dependent immunoglobulin production.

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, E; von Stedingk, L V; Biberfeld, G

    1986-01-01

    The suppressor effect of T8 cells on antigen-induced, as compared to pokeweed mitogen-induced, T4 cell dependent immunoglobulin (Ig) production by B cells of healthy subjects was studied. The antigens used were purified protein derivative of tuberculin (PPD) and tetanus toxoid (TT). The suppressor effect of T8 cells on IgG, IgM and IgA responses in co-cultures of T4 cells and B cells was significantly stronger in the pokeweed mitogen driven system than in PPD- and TT-driven cultures under the same experimental conditions. PMID:2948744

  3. Cardiac-Oxidized Antigens Are Targets of Immune Recognition by Antibodies and Potential Molecular Determinants in Chagas Disease Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Dhiman, Monisha; Zago, Maria Paola; Nunez, Sonia; Amoroso, Alejandro; Rementeria, Hugo; Dousset, Pierre; Burgos, Federico Nunez; Garg, Nisha Jain

    2012-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi elicits reactive oxygen species (ROS) of inflammatory and mitochondrial origin in infected hosts. In this study, we examined ROS-induced oxidative modifications in the heart and determined whether the resultant oxidized cardiac proteins are targets of immune response and of pathological significance in Chagas disease. Heart biopsies from chagasic mice, rats and human patients exhibited, when compared to those from normal controls, a substantial increase in protein 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE), malondialdehyde (MDA), carbonyl, and 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT) adducts. To evaluate whether oxidized proteins gain antigenic properties, heart homogenates or isolated cardiomyocytes were oxidized in vitro and one- or two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2D-GE)/Western blotting (WB) was performed to investigate the proteomic oxidative changes and recognition of oxidized proteins by sera antibodies in chagasic rodents (mice, rats) and human patients. Human cardiomyocytes exhibited LD50 sensitivity to 30 µM 4-HNE and 100 µM H2O2 at 6 h and 12 h, respectively. In vitro oxidation with 4-HNE or H2O2 resulted in a substantial increase in 4-HNE- and carbonyl-modified proteins that correlated with increased recognition of cardiac (cardiomyocytes) proteins by sera antibodies of chagasic rodents and human patients. 2D-GE/Western blotting followed by MALDI-TOF-MS/MS analysis to identify cardiac proteins that were oxidized and recognized by human chagasic sera yielded 82 unique proteins. We validated the 2D-GE results by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and WB and demonstrated that oxidation of recombinant titin enhanced its immunogenicity and recognition by sera antibodies from chagasic hosts (rats and humans). Treatment of infected rats with phenyl-α-tert-butyl nitrone (PBN, antioxidant) resulted in normalized immune detection of cardiac proteins associated with control of cardiac pathology and preservation of heart contractile function in chagasic rats. We

  4. CD94-NKG2A Recognition of Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA)-E Bound to an HLA Class I Leader Sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Petrie,E.; Clements, C.; Lin, J.; Sullivan, L.; Johnson, D.; Huyton, T.; Heroux, A.; Hoare, H.; Beddoe, T.; et al

    2008-01-01

    The recognition of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-E by the heterodimeric CD94-NKG2 natural killer (NK) receptor family is a central innate mechanism by which NK cells monitor the expression of other HLA molecules, yet the structural basis of this highly specific interaction is unclear. Here, we describe the crystal structure of CD94-NKG2A in complex with HLA-E bound to a peptide derived from the leader sequence of HLA-G. The CD94 subunit dominated the interaction with HLA-E, whereas the NKG2A subunit was more peripheral to the interface. Moreover, the invariant CD94 subunit dominated the peptide-mediated contacts, albeit with poor surface and chemical complementarity. This unusual binding mode was consistent with mutagenesis data at the CD94-NKG2A-HLA-E interface. There were few conformational changes in either CD94-NKG2A or HLA-E upon ligation, and such a 'lock and key' interaction is typical of innate receptor-ligand interactions. Nevertheless, the structure also provided insight into how this interaction can be modulated by subtle changes in the peptide ligand or by the pairing of CD94 with other members of the NKG2 family. Differences in the docking strategies used by the NKG2D and CD94-NKG2A receptors provided a basis for understanding the promiscuous nature of ligand recognition by NKG2D compared with the fidelity of the CD94-NKG2 receptors.

  5. T cell recognition of the posttranslationally cleaved intersubunit region of influenza virus hemagglutinin.

    PubMed

    Rajnavölgyi, E; Nagy, Z; Kurucz, I; Gogolák, P; Tóth, G K; Váradi, G; Penke, B; Tigyi, Z; Hollósi, M; Gergely, J

    1994-12-01

    The influenza virus hemagglutinin is synthesized as a single polypeptide chain, but upon maturation it will posttranslationally be modified by a host cell related trypsin-like enzyme. The enzymatic cleavage attacks the so-called intersubunit region of the molecule giving rise to covalently linked HA1 and HA2 subunits. An I-Ed-restricted T cell epitope was identified in the highly conserved intact intersubunit region of the influenza virus hemagglutinin. T cell recognition of a 25-mer synthetic peptide comprising the intact intersubunit region does not require further processing and the elimination of the intervening Arg residue coupling the fusion peptide to the C-terminal segment of HA1 does not abolish the T cell activating capacity. The fine specificity pattern of a T cell hybridoma similar to that of the polyclonal T cell response demonstrates that a single T cell receptor is able to recognize peptides of different sizes representing not only the uncleaved but also the cleaved form of this hemagglutinin region. Based on specificity studies the epitope was localized to the C-terminal 11 amino acids of the HA1 subunit. The cross-reactivity of peptide-primed T cells with influenza virus infected antigen-presenting cells shows that fragments comprising the identified epitope of the intersubunit region can be generated as a result of natural processing of the hemagglutinin molecule. As antigen-presenting cells are lacking the enzyme which is responsible for the posttranslational modification of newly synthesized hemagglutinin molecules, the role of immature viral proteins in immune recognition is discussed. PMID:7823966

  6. Innate recognition of cell wall β-glucans drives invariant Natural Killer T (iNKT) cell responses against fungi

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Nadia R.; Tatituri, Raju V.V.; Rivera, Amariliz; Watts, Gerald F.M.; Kim, Edy Y.; Chiba, Asako; Fuchs, Beth B.; Mylonakis, Eleftherios; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Levitz, Stuart M.; Brigl, Manfred; Brenner, Michael B.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY iNKT cells are innate T lymphocytes recognizing endogenous and foreign lipid antigens presented in the MHC-like molecule CD1d. The semi-invariant iNKT cell TCR can detect certain bacterial and parasitic lipids, and drive iNKT cell responses. How iNKT cells respond to fungi, however, is unknown. We found that CD1d-deficient mice, which lack iNKT cells, poorly control infection with the fungal pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus. Furthermore, A. fumigatus rapidly activates iNKT cells in vivo and in vitro in the presence of APCs. Surprisingly, despite a requirement for CD1d recognition, the anti-fungal iNKT cell response does not require fungal lipids. Instead, Dectin-1 and MyD88-mediated responses to β-1,3 glucans, major fungal cell-wall polysaccharides, trigger IL-12 production by APCs that drives self-reactive iNKT cells to secrete IFN-γ. Innate recognition of β-1,3 glucans also drives iNKT cell responses against Candida, Histoplasma and Alternaria, suggesting that this mechanism may broadly define the basis for anti-fungal iNKT cell responses. PMID:22100160

  7. Monomeric and oligomeric complexes of the B cell antigen receptor.

    PubMed

    Schamel, W W; Reth, M

    2000-07-01

    The current structural model of the B cell antigen receptor (BCR) describes it as a symmetric protein complex in which one membrane-bound immunoglobulin molecule (mIg) is noncovalently bound on each side by an Ig-alpha/Ig-beta heterodimer. Using peptide-tagged Ig-alpha proteins, blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (BN-PAGE), and biosynthetical labeling of B cells, we find that the mIg:Ig-alpha/Ig-beta complex has a stoichiometry of 1:1 and not 1:2. An anti-Flag stimulation of B cells coexpressing Flag-tagged and wild-type Ig-alpha proteins results in the phosphorylation of both Ig-alpha proteins, suggesting that on the surface of living B cells, several BCR monomers are in contact with each other. A BN-PAGE analysis after limited detergent lysis provides further evidence for an oligomeric BCR structure. PMID:10933390

  8. IL-12 release by engineered T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors can effectively Muster an antigen-independent macrophage response on tumor cells that have shut down tumor antigen expression.

    PubMed

    Chmielewski, Markus; Kopecky, Caroline; Hombach, Andreas A; Abken, Hinrich

    2011-09-01

    During malignant progression cancer cells tend to lose cell surface expression of MHC and other immune antigens, making them invisible to cytotoxic T cells and therefore inaccessible to tumor antigen-directed immunotherapy. Moreover, cancer cell variants that have lost antigen expression frequently contribute to deadly tumor relapses that occur following treatments that had been initially effective. In an effort to destroy antigen-loss cancer cells in tumors, we created a strategy that combines a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-redirected T-cell attack with an engineered local release of the cytokine interleukin 12 (IL-12), which recruits and reinforces macrophage function. Cytotoxic T cells were engineered to release inducible IL-12 upon CAR engagement in the tumor lesion, resulting in destruction of antigen-loss cancer cells that would normally escape. Importantly, elimination of the antigen-loss cancer cells was accompanied by an accumulation of activated macrophages that was critical to the antitumor response, because removing the macrophages abolished the response and restoring them reengaged it. Neutralizing TNF-α also abrogated the elimination of antigen-loss cancer cells, implying this proinflammatory factor in the process. Taken together, our results show how IL-12 supplementation by CAR T cells can target otherwise inaccessible tumor lesions, in a manner associated with reduced systemic toxicity, by recruiting and activating innate immune cells for a proinflammatory response. PMID:21742772

  9. Single molecular recognition force spectroscopy study of a DNA aptamer with the target epithelial cell adhesion molecule.

    PubMed

    Wang, Nan; Liu, Huiqing; Hao, Jinhui; Bai, Xiaojing; Li, Huiyan; Zhang, Zhe; Wang, Hongda; Tang, Jilin

    2015-09-21

    The epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) is a tumor-specific antigen for malignancies of the epithelialis lineage. In this study the interaction between the DNA-based EpCAM aptamer (SYL3C) and EpCAM was explored using single molecular recognition force spectroscopy (SMFS). The capability of aptamer SYL3C to recognize the EpCAM protein and the kinetic parameters were investigated. PMID:26229987

  10. Memory of tolerance and induction of regulatory T cells by erythrocyte-targeted antigens

    PubMed Central

    Grimm, Alizée J.; Kontos, Stephan; Diaceri, Giacomo; Quaglia-Thermes, Xavier; Hubbell, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    New approaches based on induction of antigen-specific immunological tolerance are being explored for treatment of autoimmunity and prevention of immunity to protein drugs. Antigens associated with apoptotic debris are known to be processed tolerogenically in vivo. Our group is exploring an approach toward antigen-specific tolerization using erythrocyte-binding antigens, based on the premise that as the erythrocytes circulate, age and are cleared, the erythrocyte surface-bound antigen payload will be cleared tolerogenically along with the eryptotic debris. Here, we characterized the phenotypic signatures of CD8+ T cells undergoing tolerance in response to soluble and erythrocyte-targeted antigen. Signaling through programmed death-1/programmed death ligand-1 (PD-1/PD-L1), but not through cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA4), was shown to be required for antigen-specific T cell deletion, anergy and expression of regulatory markers. Generation of CD25+FOXP3+ regulatory T cells in response to erythrocyte-targeted antigens but not soluble antigen at an equimolar dose was observed, and these cells were required for long-term maintenance of immune tolerance in both the CD4+ and CD8+ T cell compartments. Evidence of infectious tolerance was observed, in that tolerance to a one antigenic epitope was able to regulate responses to other epitopes in the same protein antigen. PMID:26511151

  11. Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells for Sustained Remissions in Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Maude, Shannon L.; Frey, Noelle; Shaw, Pamela A.; Aplenc, Richard; Barrett, David M.; Bunin, Nancy J.; Chew, Anne; Gonzalez, Vanessa E.; Zheng, Zhaohui; Lacey, Simon F.; Mahnke, Yolanda D.; Melenhorst, Jan J.; Rheingold, Susan R.; Shen, Angela; Teachey, David T.; Levine, Bruce L.; June, Carl H.; Porter, David L.; Grupp, Stephan A.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is difficult to treat despite the availability of aggressive therapies. Chimeric antigen receptor–modified T cells targeting CD19 may overcome many limitations of conventional therapies and induce remission in patients with refractory disease. METHODS We infused autologous T cells transduced with a CD19-directed chimeric antigen receptor (CTL019) lentiviral vector in patients with relapsed or refractory ALL at doses of 0.76×106 to 20.6×106 CTL019 cells per kilogram of body weight. Patients were monitored for a response, toxic effects, and the expansion and persistence of circulating CTL019 T cells. RESULTS A total of 30 children and adults received CTL019. Complete remission was achieved in 27 patients (90%), including 2 patients with blinatumomab-refractory disease and 15 who had undergone stem-cell transplantation. CTL019 cells proliferated in vivo and were detectable in the blood, bone marrow, and cerebrospinal fluid of patients who had a response. Sustained remission was achieved with a 6-month event-free survival rate of 67% (95% confidence interval [CI], 51 to 88) and an overall survival rate of 78% (95% CI, 65 to 95). At 6 months, the probability that a patient would have persistence of CTL019 was 68% (95% CI, 50 to 92) and the probability that a patient would have relapse-free B-cell aplasia was 73% (95% CI, 57 to 94). All the patients had the cytokine-release syndrome. Severe cytokine-release syndrome, which developed in 27% of the patients, was associated with a higher disease burden before infusion and was effectively treated with the anti–interleukin-6 receptor antibody tocilizumab. CONCLUSIONS Chimeric antigen receptor–modified T-cell therapy against CD19 was effective in treating relapsed and refractory ALL. CTL019 was associated with a high remission rate, even among patients for whom stem-cell transplantation had failed, and durable remissions up to 24 months were observed. (Funded by

  12. Roles for glycosylation of cell surface receptors involved in cellular immune recognition.

    PubMed

    Rudd, P M; Wormald, M R; Stanfield, R L; Huang, M; Mattsson, N; Speir, J A; DiGennaro, J A; Fetrow, J S; Dwek, R A; Wilson, I A

    1999-10-22

    The majority of cell surface receptors involved in antigen recognition by T cells and in the orchestration of the subsequent cell signalling events are glycoproteins. The length of a typical N-linked sugar is comparable with that of an immunoglobulin domain (30 A). Thus, by virtue of their size alone, oligosaccharides may be expected to play a significant role in the functions and properties of the cell surface proteins to which they are attached. A databank of oligosaccharide structures has been constructed from NMR and crystallographic data to aid in the interpretation of crystal structures of glycoproteins. As unambiguous electron density can usually only be assigned to the glycan cores, the remainder of the sugar is then modelled into the crystal lattice by superimposing the appropriate oligosaccharide from the database. This approach provides insights into the roles that glycosylation might play in cell surface receptors, by providing models that delineate potential close packing interactions on the cell surface. It has been proposed that the specific recognition of antigen by T cells results in the formation of an immunological synapse between the T cell and the antigen-presenting cell. The cell adhesion glycoproteins, such as CD2 and CD48, help to form a cell junction, providing a molecular spacer between opposing cells. The oligosaccharides located on the membrane proximal domains of CD2 and CD48 provide a scaffold to orient the binding faces, which leads to increased affinity. In the next step, recruitment of the peptide major histocompatibility complex (pMHC) by the T-cell receptors (TCRs) requires mobility on the membrane surface. The TCR sugars are located such that they could prevent non-specific aggregation. Importantly, the sugars limit the possible geometry and spacing of TCR/MHC clusters which precede cell signalling. We postulate that, in the final stage, the sugars could play a general role in controlling the assembly and stabilisation of the

  13. A fully human chimeric antigen receptor with potent activity against cancer cells but reduced risk for off-tumor toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Song, De-Gang; Ye, Qunrui; Poussin, Mathilde; Liu, Lin; Figini, Mariangela; Powell, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) can redirect T cells against antigen-expressing tumors in an HLA-independent manner. To date, various CARs have been constructed using mouse single chain antibody variable fragments (scFvs) of high affinity that are immunogenic in humans and have the potential to mediate “on-target” toxicity. Here, we developed and evaluated a fully human CAR comprised of the human C4 folate receptor-alpha (αFR)-specific scFv coupled to intracellular T cell signaling domains. Human T cells transduced to express the C4 CAR specifically secreted proinflammatory cytokine and exerted cytolytic functions when cultured with αFR-expressing tumors in vitro. Adoptive transfer of C4 CAR T cells mediated the regression of large, established human ovarian cancer in a xenogeneic mouse model. Relative to a murine MOv19 scFv-based αFR CAR, C4 CAR T cells mediated comparable cytotoxic tumor activity in vitro and in vivo but had lower affinity for αFR protein and exhibited reduced recognition of normal cells expressing low levels of αFR. Thus, T cells expressing a fully human CAR of intermediate affinity can efficiently kill antigen-expressing tumors in vitro and in vivo and may overcome issues of transgene immunogenicity and “on-target off-tumor” toxicity that plague trials utilizing CARs containing mouse-derived, high affinity scFvs. PMID:26101914

  14. Defining the HLA class I-associated viral antigen repertoire from HIV-1-infected human cells.

    PubMed

    Ternette, Nicola; Yang, Hongbing; Partridge, Thomas; Llano, Anuska; Cedeño, Samandhy; Fischer, Roman; Charles, Philip D; Dudek, Nadine L; Mothe, Beatriz; Crespo, Manuel; Fischer, William M; Korber, Bette T M; Nielsen, Morten; Borrow, Persephone; Purcell, Anthony W; Brander, Christian; Dorrell, Lucy; Kessler, Benedikt M; Hanke, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    Recognition and eradication of infected cells by cytotoxic T lymphocytes is a key defense mechanism against intracellular pathogens. High-throughput definition of HLA class I-associated immunopeptidomes by mass spectrometry is an increasingly important analytical tool to advance our understanding of the induction of T-cell responses against pathogens such as HIV-1. We utilized a liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry workflow including de novo-assisted database searching to define the HLA class I-associated immunopeptidome of HIV-1-infected human cells. We here report for the first time the identification of 75 HIV-1-derived peptides bound to HLA class I complexes that were purified directly from HIV-1-infected human primary CD4(+) T cells and the C8166 human T-cell line. Importantly, one-third of eluted HIV-1 peptides had not been previously known to be presented by HLA class I. Over 82% of the identified sequences originated from viral protein regions for which T-cell responses have previously been reported but for which the precise HLA class I-binding sequences have not yet been defined. These results validate and expand the current knowledge of virus-specific antigenic peptide presentation during HIV-1 infection and provide novel targets for T-cell vaccine development. PMID:26467324

  15. Transgenic antigen-specific, HLA-A*02:01-allo-restricted cytotoxic T cells recognize tumor-associated target antigen STEAP1 with high specificity.

    PubMed

    Schirmer, David; Grünewald, Thomas G P; Klar, Richard; Schmidt, Oxana; Wohlleber, Dirk; Rubío, Rebeca Alba; Uckert, Wolfgang; Thiel, Uwe; Bohne, Felix; Busch, Dirk H; Krackhardt, Angela M; Burdach, Stefan; Richter, Günther H S

    2016-06-01

    Pediatric cancers, including Ewing sarcoma (ES), are only weakly immunogenic and the tumor-patients' immune system often is devoid of effector T cells for tumor elimination. Based on expression profiling technology, targetable tumor-associated antigens (TAA) are identified and exploited for engineered T-cell therapy. Here, the specific recognition and lytic potential of transgenic allo-restricted CD8(+) T cells, directed against the ES-associated antigen 6-transmembrane epithelial antigen of the prostate 1 (STEAP1), was examined. Following repetitive STEAP1(130) peptide-driven stimulations with HLA-A*02:01(+) dendritic cells (DC), allo-restricted HLA-A*02:01(-) CD8(+) T cells were sorted with HLA-A*02:01/peptide multimers and expanded by limiting dilution. After functional analysis of suitable T cell clones via ELISpot, flow cytometry and xCELLigence assay, T cell receptors' (TCR) α- and β-chains were identified, cloned into retroviral vectors, codon optimized, transfected into HLA-A*02:01(-) primary T cell populations and tested again for specificity and lytic capacity in vitro and in a Rag2(-/-)γc(-/-) mouse model. Initially generated transgenic T cells specifically recognized STEAP1(130)-pulsed or transfected cells in the context of HLA-A*02:01 with minimal cross-reactivity as determined by specific interferon-γ (IFNγ) release, lysed cells and inhibited growth of HLA-A*02:01(+) ES lines more effectively than HLA-A*02:01(-) ES lines. In vivo tumor growth was inhibited more effectively with transgenic STEAP1(130)-specific T cells than with unspecific T cells. Our results identify TCRs capable of recognizing and inhibiting growth of STEAP1-expressing HLA-A*02:01(+) ES cells in vitro and in vivo in a highly restricted manner. As STEAP1 is overexpressed in a wide variety of cancers, we anticipate these STEAP1-specific TCRs to be potentially useful for immunotherapy of other STEAP1-expressing tumors. PMID:27471654

  16. Glycan modification of antigen alters its intracellular routing in dendritic cells, promoting priming of T cells

    PubMed Central

    Streng-Ouwehand, Ingeborg; Ho, Nataschja I; Litjens, Manja; Kalay, Hakan; Boks, Martine Annemarie; Cornelissen, Lenneke AM; Kaur Singh, Satwinder; Saeland, Eirikur; Garcia-Vallejo, Juan J; Ossendorp, Ferry A; Unger, Wendy WJ; van Kooyk, Yvette

    2016-01-01

    Antigen uptake by dendritic cells and intracellular routing of antigens to specific compartments is regulated by C-type lectin receptors that recognize glycan structures. We show that the modification of Ovalbumin (OVA) with the glycan-structure LewisX (LeX) re-directs OVA to the C-type lectin receptor MGL1. LeX-modification of OVA favored Th1 skewing of CD4+ T cells and enhanced cross-priming of CD8+ T cells. While cross-presentation of native OVA requires high antigen dose and TLR stimuli, LeX modification reduces the required amount 100-fold and obviates its dependence on TLR signaling. The OVA-LeX-induced enhancement of T cell cross-priming is MGL1-dependent as shown by reduced CD8+ effector T cell frequencies in MGL1-deficient mice. Moreover, MGL1-mediated cross-presentation of OVA-LeX neither required TAP-transporters nor Cathepsin-S and was still observed after prolonged intracellular storage of antigen in Rab11+LAMP1+ compartments. We conclude that controlled neo-glycosylation of antigens can crucially influence intracellular routing of antigens, the nature and strength of immune responses and should be considered for optimizing current vaccination strategies. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11765.001 PMID:26999763

  17. T-cell intracellular antigens function as tumor suppressor genes

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Jiménez, C; Ludeña, M D; Izquierdo, J M

    2015-01-01

    Knockdown of T-cell intracellular antigens TIA1 and TIAR in transformed cells triggers cell proliferation and tumor growth. Using a tetracycline-inducible system, we report here that an increased expression of TIA1 or TIAR in 293 cells results in reduced rates of cell proliferation. Ectopic expression of these proteins abolish endogenous TIA1 and TIAR levels via the regulation of splicing of their pre-mRNAs, and partially represses global translation in a phospho-eukaryotic initiation factor 2 alpha-dependent manner. This is accompanied by cell cycle arrest at G1/S and cell death through caspase-dependent apoptosis and autophagy. Genome-wide profiling illustrates a selective upregulation of p53 signaling pathway-related genes. Nude mice injected with doxycycline-inducible cells expressing TIA1 or TIAR retard, or even inhibit, growth of xenotumors. Remarkably, low expressions of TIA1 and TIAR correlate with poor prognosis in patients with lung squamous cell carcinoma. These findings strongly support the concept that TIA proteins act as tumor suppressor genes. PMID:25741594

  18. CD8 T-cell recognition of acquired alloantigen promotes acute allograft rejection

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Simon J. F.; Ali, Jason M.; Wlodek, Elizabeth; Negus, Marg C.; Harper, Ines G.; Chhabra, Manu; Qureshi, M. Saeed; Mallik, Mekhola; Bolton, Eleanor; Bradley, J. Andrew; Pettigrew, Gavin J.

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive CD8 T-cell immunity is the principal arm of the cellular alloimmune response, but its development requires help. This can be provided by CD4 T cells that recognize alloantigen “indirectly,” as self-restricted allopeptide, but this process remains unexplained, because the target epitopes for CD4 and CD8 T-cell recognition are “unlinked” on different cells (recipient and donor antigen presenting cells (APCs), respectively). Here, we test the hypothesis that the presentation of intact and processed MHC class I alloantigen by recipient dendritic cells (DCs) (the “semidirect” pathway) allows linked help to be delivered by indirect-pathway CD4 T cells for generating destructive cytotoxic CD8 T-cell alloresponses. We show that CD8 T-cell–mediated rejection of murine heart allografts that lack hematopoietic APCs requires host secondary lymphoid tissue (SLT). SLT is necessary because within it, recipient dendritic cells can acquire MHC from graft parenchymal cells and simultaneously present it as intact protein to alloreactive CD8 T cells and as processed peptide alloantigen for recognition by indirect-pathway CD4 T cells. This enables delivery of essential help for generating cytotoxic CD8 T-cell responses that cause rapid allograft rejection. In demonstrating the functional relevance of the semidirect pathway to transplant rejection, our findings provide a solution to a long-standing conundrum as to why SLT is required for CD8 T-cell allorecognition of graft parenchymal cells and suggest a mechanism by which indirect-pathway CD4 T cells provide help for generating effector cytotoxic CD8 T-cell alloresponses at late time points after transplantation. PMID:26420874

  19. CD4+ T Cells and Toll-Like Receptors Recognize Salmonella Antigens Expressed in Bacterial Surface Organelles

    PubMed Central

    Bergman, Molly A.; Cummings, Lisa A.; Barrett, Sara L. Rassoulian; Smith, Kelly D.; Lara, J. Cano; Aderem, Alan; Cookson, Brad T.

    2005-01-01

    A better understanding of immunity to infection is revealed from the characteristics of microbial ligands recognized by host immune responses. Murine infection with the intracellular bacterium Salmonella generates CD4+ T cells that specifically recognize Salmonella proteins expressed in bacterial surface organelles such as flagella and membrane vesicles. These natural Salmonella antigens are also ligands for Toll-like receptors (TLRs) or avidly associated with TLR ligands such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS). PhoP/PhoQ, a regulon controlling Salmonella virulence and remodeling of LPS to resist innate immunity, coordinately represses production of surface-exposed antigens recognized by CD4+ T cells and TLRs. These data suggest that genetically coordinated surface modifications may provide a growth advantage for Salmonella in host tissues by limiting both innate and adaptive immune recognition. PMID:15731032

  20. Immunoproteomic Analysis of Antibody Responses to Extracellular Proteins of Candida albicans Revealing the Importance of Glycosylation for Antigen Recognition.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ting; Krüger, Thomas; Knüpfer, Uwe; Kasper, Lydia; Wielsch, Natalie; Hube, Bernhard; Kortgen, Andreas; Bauer, Michael; Giamarellos-Bourboulis, Evangelos J; Dimopoulos, George; Brakhage, Axel A; Kniemeyer, Olaf

    2016-08-01

    During infection, the human pathogenic fungus Candida albicans undergoes a yeast-to-hypha transition, secretes numerous proteins for invasion of host tissues, and modulates the host's immune response. Little is known about the interplay of C. albicans secreted proteins and the host adaptive immune system. Here, we applied a combined 2D gel- and LC-MS/MS-based approach for the characterization of C. albicans extracellular proteins during the yeast-to-hypha transition, which led to a comprehensive C. albicans secretome map. The serological responses to C. albicans extracellular proteins were investigated by a 2D-immunoblotting approach combined with MS for protein identification. On the basis of the screening of sera from candidemia and three groups of noncandidemia patients, a core set of 19 immunodominant antibodies against secreted proteins of C. albicans was identified, seven of which represent potential diagnostic markers for candidemia (Xog1, Lip4, Asc1, Met6, Tsa1, Tpi1, and Prx1). Intriguingly, some secreted, strongly glycosylated protein antigens showed high cross-reactivity with sera from noncandidemia control groups. Enzymatic deglycosylation of proteins secreted from hyphae significantly impaired sera antibody recognition. Furthermore, deglycosylation of the recombinantly produced, secreted aspartyl protease Sap6 confirmed a significant contribution of glycan epitopes to the recognition of Sap6 by antibodies in patient's sera. PMID:27386892

  1. VH and VL Domains of Polyspecific IgM and Monospecific IgG Antibodies Contribute Differentially to Antigen Recognition and Virus Neutralization Functions.

    PubMed

    Pasman, Y; Kaushik, A K

    2016-07-01

    We analysed contributions of variable heavy (FdVH ) and variable light (FdVL ) domains in comparison to scFv (FdVH +FdVL ) of naturally occurring polyspecific bovine IgM with an exceptionally long CDR3H and an induced monospecific bovine herpes virus-1 (BoHV-1) neutralizing IgG1 antibody in the context of to antigen-binding site and antibody function. Various recombinant FdVH , FdVL and scFv were constructed and expressed in Pichia pastoris from the bovine IgM and IgG1 antibody encoding cDNA. The scFv1H12 showed polyspecific antigen binding similar to parent IgM antibody, though subtle differences, for example, higher thyroglobulin recognition. Such differences reflect influence of the constant region on the antigen-binding site configuration. Unlike, variable light domain FdVL 1H12, the variable heavy domain FdVH 1H12 alone recognized multiple antigens that differed from the recognition pattern of scFv1H12 (FdVH +FdVL ) and the parent IgM antibody. Nonetheless, role of FdVL 1H12 in providing structural support to FdVH in antigen recognition is noted, apart from its intrinsic antigen recognition ability. Surface plasmon resonance analysis revealed low to moderate affinity of scFv1H12 to IgG antigen. By contrast, the individual FdVH 073 and FdVL 074, originating from induced BoHV-1 neutralizing IgG1 antibody, recognized target epitope on BoHV-1 weakly when compared to FdVH +FdVL (scFv3-18L). Interestingly, both the FdVH and FdVL domains of induced IgG antibody are required to achieve BoHV-1 neutralization. To conclude, there exist subtle functional differences in the contribution of FdVH and FdVL to antigen-binding site generation of polyspecific IgM and monospecific IgG antibodies relevant to antigen recognition and virus neutralization functions. PMID:27104652

  2. From the Deep Sea to Everywhere: Environmental Antigens for iNKT Cells.

    PubMed

    Wingender, Gerhard

    2016-08-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are a unique subset of innate T cells that share features with innate NK cells and adaptive memory T cells. The first iNKT cell antigen described was found 1993 in a marine sponge and it took over 10 years for other, bacterial antigens to be described. Given the paucity of known bacterial iNKT cell antigens, it appeared as if iNKT cells play a very specialist role in the protection against few, rare and unusual pathogenic bacteria. However, in the last few years several publications painted a very different picture, suggesting that antigens for iNKT cells are found almost ubiquitous in the environment. These environmental iNKT cell antigens can shape the distribution, phenotype and function of iNKT cells. Here, these recent findings will be reviewed and their implications for the field will be outlined. PMID:26703211

  3. Human blood dendritic cell subsets exhibit discriminative pattern recognition receptor profiles

    PubMed Central

    Lundberg, Kristina; Rydnert, Frida; Greiff, Lennart; Lindstedt, Malin

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) operate as the link between innate and adaptive immunity. Their expression of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and C-type lectin receptors (CLRs), enables antigen recognition and mediates appropriate immune responses. Distinct subsets of human DCs have been identified; however their expression of PRRs is not fully clarified. Expressions of CLRs by DC subpopulations, in particular, remain elusive. This study aimed to identify and compare PRR expressions on human blood DC subsets, including CD1c+, CD141+ and CD16+ myeloid DCs and CD123+ plasmacytoid DCs, in order to understand their capacity to recognize different antigens as well as their responsiveness to PRR-directed targeting. Whole blood was obtained from 13 allergic and six non-allergic individuals. Mononuclear cells were purified and multi-colour flow cytometry was used to assess the expression of 10 CLRs and two TLRs on distinct DC subsets. PRR expression levels were shown to differ between DC subsets for each PRR assessed. Furthermore, principal component analysis and random forest test demonstrated that the PRR profiles were discriminative between DC subsets. Interestingly, CLEC9A was expressed at lower levels by CD141+ DCs from allergic compared with non-allergic donors. The subset-specific PRR expression profiles suggests individual responsiveness to PRR-targeting and supports functional specialization. PMID:24444310

  4. Human blood dendritic cell subsets exhibit discriminative pattern recognition receptor profiles.

    PubMed

    Lundberg, Kristina; Rydnert, Frida; Greiff, Lennart; Lindstedt, Malin

    2014-06-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) operate as the link between innate and adaptive immunity. Their expression of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and C-type lectin receptors (CLRs), enables antigen recognition and mediates appropriate immune responses. Distinct subsets of human DCs have been identified; however their expression of PRRs is not fully clarified. Expressions of CLRs by DC subpopulations, in particular, remain elusive. This study aimed to identify and compare PRR expressions on human blood DC subsets, including CD1c(+) , CD141(+) and CD16(+) myeloid DCs and CD123(+) plasmacytoid DCs, in order to understand their capacity to recognize different antigens as well as their responsiveness to PRR-directed targeting. Whole blood was obtained from 13 allergic and six non-allergic individuals. Mononuclear cells were purified and multi-colour flow cytometry was used to assess the expression of 10 CLRs and two TLRs on distinct DC subsets. PRR expression levels were shown to differ between DC subsets for each PRR assessed. Furthermore, principal component analysis and random forest test demonstrated that the PRR profiles were discriminative between DC subsets. Interestingly, CLEC9A was expressed at lower levels by CD141(+) DCs from allergic compared with non-allergic donors. The subset-specific PRR expression profiles suggests individual responsiveness to PRR-targeting and supports functional specialization. PMID:24444310

  5. Fluorine substitutions in an antigenic peptide selectively modulate T-cell receptor binding in a minimally perturbing manner

    SciTech Connect

    Piepenbrink, Kurt H.; Borbulevych, Oleg Y.; Sommese, Ruth F.; Clemens, John; Armstrong, Kathryn M.; Desmond, Clare; Do, Priscilla; Baker, Brian M.

    2010-08-17

    TCR (T-cell receptor) recognition of antigenic peptides bound and presented by MHC (major histocompatibility complex) molecules forms the basis of the cellular immune response to pathogens and cancer. TCRs bind peptide - MHC complexes weakly and with fast kinetics, features which have hindered detailed biophysical studies of these interactions. Modified peptides resulting in enhanced TCR binding could help overcome these challenges. Furthermore, there is considerable interest in using modified peptides with enhanced TCR binding as the basis for clinical vaccines. In the present study, we examined how fluorine substitutions in an antigenic peptide can selectively impact TCR recognition. Using a structure-guided design approach, we found that fluorination of the Tax peptide [HTLV (human T-cell lymphotropic virus)-1 Tax] enhanced binding by the Tax-specific TCR A6, yet weakened binding by the Tax-specific TCR B7. The changes in affinity were consistent with crystallographic structures and fluorine chemistry, and with the A6 TCR independent of other substitutions in the interface. Peptide fluorination thus provides a means to selectively modulate TCR binding affinity without significantly perturbing peptide composition or structure. Lastly, we probed the mechanism of fluorine's effect on TCR binding and we conclude that our results were most consistent with a 'polar hydrophobicity' mechanism, rather than a purely hydrophobic- or electrostatic-based mechanism. This finding should have an impact on other attempts to alter molecular recognition with fluorine.

  6. Three-dimensional arrayed amino aerogel biochips for molecular recognition of antigens.

    PubMed

    Li, Yen K; Chen, Yun-Chu; Jiang, Kai-Jen; Wu, Jui-chuang; Chen-Yang, Yui W

    2011-10-01

    The three-dimensional (3D) biochips prepared in this study are composed of a glass microscopy slide arrayed with amino aerogel dots. The amino aerogel was produced using the sol-gel process, with an ionic liquid as the template followed by a solvent extraction to remove the template and build a three-dimensional mesoporous structure. The FTIR spectrum verified that the major template was removed and the (29)Si solid-state NMR spectra recognized the cross-linkages in the SiO(2) network structure. SEM images measured the particles at around 100 nm. After grinding, the BET analysis confirmed that the nano-size amino aerogel powders had exhibited specific surface area of 188 m(2)/g, pore volume of 0.83 cm(3)/g, and average pore size of 16.2 nm. The as-prepared amino aerogel surface contained amino functional groups capable of performing a sandwich immunoassay. The primary antibody was immobilized on the internal surface of the arrayed amino aerogel to capture its affinity antigen. On the top of the captured antigen, the report antibody was read its labeling fluorescent dye. In comparison to the corresponding two-dimensional (2D) biochip, the 3D amino aerogel biochips were observed to amplify signal intensities more effectively due to their remarkable capturing capability. PMID:21783248

  7. Recognition of Stage-Specific Mycobacterial Antigens Differentiates between Acute and Latent Infections with Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Demissie, Abebech; Leyten, Eliane M. S.; Abebe, Markos; Wassie, Liya; Aseffa, Abraham; Abate, Getahun; Fletcher, Helen; Owiafe, Patrick; Hill, Philip C.; Brookes, Roger; Rook, Graham; Zumla, Alimuddin; Arend, Sandra M.; Klein, Michel; Ottenhoff, Tom H. M.; Andersen, Peter; Doherty, T. Mark

    2006-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is estimated to infect 80 to 100 million people annually, the majority of whom do not develop clinical tuberculosis (TB) but instead maintain the infection in a latent state. These individuals generally become positive in response to a tuberculin skin test and may develop clinical TB at a later date, particularly if their immune systems are compromised. Latently infected individuals are interesting for two reasons. First, they are an important reservoir of M. tuberculosis, which needs to be considered for TB control. Second, if detected prior to recrudescence of the disease, they represent a human population that is making a protective immune response to M. tuberculosis, which is very important for defining correlates of protective immunity. In this study, we show that while responsiveness to early secretory antigenic target 6 is a good marker for M. tuberculosis infection, a strong response to the 16-kDa Rv2031c antigen (HspX or α-crystallin) is largely restricted to latently infected individuals, offering the possibility of differential immunodiagnosis of, or therapeutic vaccination against, TB. PMID:16467323

  8. Direct tumor recognition by a human CD4+ T-cell subset potently mediates tumor growth inhibition and orchestrates anti-tumor immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Matsuzaki, Junko; Tsuji, Takemasa; Luescher, Immanuel F.; Shiku, Hiroshi; Mineno, Junichi; Okamoto, Sachiko; Old, Lloyd J.; Shrikant, Protul; Gnjatic, Sacha; Odunsi, Kunle

    2015-01-01

    Tumor antigen-specific CD4+ T cells generally orchestrate and regulate immune cells to provide immune surveillance against malignancy. However, activation of antigen-specific CD4+ T cells is restricted at local tumor sites where antigen-presenting cells (APCs) are frequently dysfunctional, which can cause rapid exhaustion of anti-tumor immune responses. Herein, we characterize anti-tumor effects of a unique human CD4+ helper T-cell subset that directly recognizes the cytoplasmic tumor antigen, NY-ESO-1, presented by MHC class II on cancer cells. Upon direct recognition of cancer cells, tumor-recognizing CD4+ T cells (TR-CD4) potently induced IFN-γ-dependent growth arrest in cancer cells. In addition, direct recognition of cancer cells triggers TR-CD4 to provide help to NY-ESO-1-specific CD8+ T cells by enhancing cytotoxic activity, and improving viability and proliferation in the absence of APCs. Notably, the TR-CD4 either alone or in collaboration with CD8+ T cells significantly inhibited tumor growth in vivo in a xenograft model. Finally, retroviral gene-engineering with T cell receptor (TCR) derived from TR-CD4 produced large numbers of functional TR-CD4. These observations provide mechanistic insights into the role of TR-CD4 in tumor immunity, and suggest that approaches to utilize TR-CD4 will augment anti-tumor immune responses for durable therapeutic efficacy in cancer patients. PMID:26447332

  9. Dietary antigens limit mucosal immunity by inducing regulatory T cells in the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwang Soon; Hong, Sung-Wook; Han, Daehee; Yi, Jaeu; Jung, Jisun; Yang, Bo-Gie; Lee, Jun Young; Lee, Minji; Surh, Charles D

    2016-02-19

    Dietary antigens are normally rendered nonimmunogenic through a poorly understood "oral tolerance" mechanism that involves immunosuppressive regulatory T (Treg) cells, especially Treg cells induced from conventional T cells in the periphery (pTreg cells). Although orally introducing nominal protein antigens is known to induce such pTreg cells, whether a typical diet induces a population of pTreg cells under normal conditions thus far has been unknown. By using germ-free mice raised and bred on an elemental diet devoid of dietary antigens, we demonstrated that under normal conditions, the vast majority of the small intestinal pTreg cells are induced by dietary antigens from solid foods. Moreover, these pTreg cells have a limited life span, are distinguishable from microbiota-induced pTreg cells, and repress underlying strong immunity to ingested protein antigens. PMID:26822607

  10. An Overview of B-1 Cells as Antigen-Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Popi, Ana F.; Longo-Maugéri, Ieda M.; Mariano, Mario

    2016-01-01

    The role of B cells as antigen-presenting cells (APCs) has been extensively studied, mainly in relation to the activation of memory T cells. Considering the B cell subtypes, the role of B-1 cells as APCs is beginning to be explored. Initially, it was described that B-1 cells are activated preferentially by T-independent antigens. However, some reports demonstrated that these cells are also involved in a T-dependent response. The aim of this review is to summarize information about the ability of B-1 cells to play a role as APCs and to briefly discuss the role of the BCR and toll-like receptor signals in this process. Furthermore, some characteristics of B-1 cells, such as natural IgM production and phagocytic ability, could interfere in the participation of these cells in the onset of an adaptive response. PMID:27148259