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Sample records for cell capture assay

  1. Laser Capture Microdissection of Embryonic Cells and Preparation of RNA for Microarray Assays

    PubMed Central

    Redmond, Latasha C.; Pang, Christopher J.; Dumur, Catherine; Haar, Jack L.; Lloyd, Joyce A.

    2014-01-01

    In order to compare the global gene expression profiles of different embryonic cell types, it is first necessary to isolate the specific cells of interest. The purpose of this chapter is to provide a step-by-step protocol to perform laser capture microdissection (LCM) on embryo samples and obtain sufficient amounts of high-quality RNA for microarray hybridizations. Using the LCM/microarray strategy on mouse embryo samples has some challenges, because the cells of interest are available in limited quantities. The first step in the protocol is to obtain embryonic tissue, and immediately cryoprotect and freeze it in a cryomold containing Optimal Cutting Temperature freezing media (Sakura Finetek), using a dry ice–isopentane bath. The tissue is then cryosectioned, and the microscope slides are processed to fix, stain, and dehydrate the cells. LCM is employed to isolate specific cell types from the slides, identified under the microscope by virtue of their morphology. Detailed protocols are provided for using the currently available ArcturusXT LCM instrument and CapSure® LCM Caps, to which the selected cells adhere upon laser capture. To maintain RNA integrity, upon removing a slide from the final processing step, or attaching the first cells on the LCM cap, LCM is completed within 20 min. The cells are then immediately recovered from the LCM cap using a denaturing solution that stabilizes RNA integrity. RNA is prepared using standard methods, modified for working with small samples. To ensure the validity of the microarray data, the quality of the RNA is assessed using the Agilent bioanalyzer. Only RNA that is of sufficient integrity and quantity is used to perform microarray assays. This chapter provides guidance regarding troubleshooting and optimization to obtain high-quality RNA from cells of limited availability, obtained from embryo samples by LCM. PMID:24318813

  2. Enhanced and Differential Capture of Circulating Tumor Cells from Lung Cancer Patients by Microfluidic Assays Using Aptamer Cocktail

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Libo; Tang, Chuanhao; Xu, Li; Zhang, Zhen; Li, Xiaoyan; Hu, Haixu; Cheng, Si; Zhou, Wei; Huang, Mengfei; Fong, Anna; Liu, Bing; Tseng, Hsian-Rong; Gao, Hongjun; Liu, Yi; Fang, Xiaohong

    2016-01-01

    Collecting circulating tumor cells (CTCs) shed from solid tumor through a minimally invasive approach provides an opportunity to solve a long-standing oncology problem, the real-time monitoring of tumor state and analysis of tumor heterogeneity. However, efficient capture and detection of CTCs with diverse phenotypes is still challenging. In this work, a microfluidic assay is developed using the rationally-designed aptamer cocktails with synergistic effect. Enhanced and differential capture of CTCs for nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients is achieved. It is also demonstrated that the overall consideration of CTC counts obtained by multiple aptamer combinations can provide more comprehensive information in treatment monitoring. PMID:26763166

  3. Multiwell 14CO2-capture assay for evaluation of substrate oxidation rates of cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Collins, C L; Bode, B P; Souba, W W; Abcouwer, S F

    1998-05-01

    14CO2 capture is commonly used to evaluate the cellular oxidation rate of respiratory substrates. A modification of the established 14CO2-capture method was developed that enables the use of cells in adherent culture and easy analysis of multiple samples under different culture conditions. The use of commercially available culture and filter plates designed for use in a multiplate scintillation spectrophotometer enabled substrate oxidation rates to be evaluated for cells in a 24-well plate format without the need to dislodge the cells from the culture substrate as is required in traditional methods. Evaluation of radioactivity captured in potassium hydroxide-saturated filters was accomplished by adding scintillation fluid to the filter plate wells and counting. Alternatively, filters could be removed and placed in vials for evaluation in a conventional scintillation counter. This method was applied to the oxidation of 14C-glutamine by human breast cell lines and demonstrated concentration-dependent linear accumulation of captured counts. PMID:9591130

  4. Highly Sensitive and Selective Immuno-capture/Electrochemical Assay of Acetylcholinesterase Activity in Red Blood Cells: A Biomarker of Exposure to Organophosphorus Pesticides and Nerve Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Aiqiong; Du, Dan; Lin, Yuehe

    2012-02-09

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) enzyme activity in red blood cells (RBCs) is a useful biomarker for biomonitoring of exposures to organophosphorus (OP) pesticides and chemical nerve agents. In this paper, we reported a new method for AChE activity assay based on selective immuno-capture of AChE from biological samples followed by enzyme activity assay of captured AChE using a disposable electrochemical sensor. The electrochemical sensor is based on multiwalled carbon nanotubes-gold nanocomposites (MWCNTs-Au) modified screen printed carbon electrode (SPCE). Upon the completion of immunoreaction, the target AChE (including active and inhibited) is captured onto the electrode surface and followed by an electrochemical detection of enzymatic activity in the presence of acetylthiocholine. A linear response is obtained over standard AChE concentration range from 0.1 to 10 nM. To demonstrate the capability of this new biomonitoring method, AChE solutions dosed with different concentration of paraoxon were used to validate the new AChE assay method. AChE inhibition in OP dosed solutions was proportional to its concentration from 0.2 to 50 nM. The new AChE activity assay method for biomonitoring of OP exposure was further validated with in-vitro paraoxon-dosed RBC samples. The established electrochemical sensing platform for AChE activity assay not only avoids the problem of overlapping substrate specificity with esterases by using selective antibody, but also eliminates potential interference from other electroactive species in biological samples. It offers a new approach for sensitive, selective, and rapid AChE activity assay for biomonitoring of exposures to OPs.

  5. Quick chip assay using locked nucleic acid modified epithelial cell adhesion molecule and nucleolin aptamers for the capture of circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Maremanda, Nihal G; Roy, Kislay; Kanwar, Rupinder K; Shyamsundar, Vidyarani; Ramshankar, Vijayalakshmi; Krishnamurthy, Arvind; Krishnakumar, Subramanian; Kanwar, Jagat R

    2015-09-01

    The role of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in disease diagnosis, prognosis, monitoring of the therapeutic efficacy, and clinical decision making is immense and has attracted tremendous focus in the last decade. We designed and fabricated simple, flat channel microfluidic devices polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS based) functionalized with locked nucleic acid (LNA) modified aptamers (targeting epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) and nucleolin expression) for quick and efficient capture of CTCs and cancer cells. With optimized flow rates (10 μl/min), it was revealed that the aptamer modified devices offered reusability for up to six times while retaining optimal capture efficiency (>90%) and specificity. High capture sensitivity (92%) and specificity (100%) was observed in whole blood samples spiked with Caco-2 cells (10-100 cells/ml). Analysis of blood samples obtained from 25 head and neck cancer patients on the EpCAM LNA aptamer functionalized chip revealed that an average count of 5 ± 3 CTCs/ml of blood were captured from 22/25 samples (88%). EpCAM intracellular domain (EpICD) immunohistochemistry on 9 oral squamous cell carcinomas showed the EpICD positivity in the tumor cells, confirming the EpCAM expression in CTCs from head and neck cancers. These microfluidic devices also maintained viability for in vitro culture and characterization. Use of LNA modified aptamers provided added benefits in terms of cost effectiveness due to increased reusability and sustainability of the devices. Our results present a robust, quick, and efficient CTC capture platform with the use of simple PDMS based devices that are easy to fabricate at low cost and have an immense potential in cancer diagnosis, prognosis, and therapeutic planning. PMID:26487896

  6. Elastomeric Capture Microparticles (ECmuPs) and Their use with Acoustophoresis to Perform Affinity Capture Assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cushing, Kevin Wallace

    This dissertation describes the development of elastomeric capture microparticles (ECmicroPs) and their use with acoustophoresis to perform affinity capture assays. ECμPs that function as negative acoustic contrast particles were developed by crosslinking emulsion-based droplets composed of commercially available silicone precursors followed by functionalization with avidin/biotin reagents. The size distribution of the ECμPs was very broad or narrow depending on the emulsion system that was used during the synthesis process. Elastomeric particles exhibited a very broad size distribution when a bulk-emulsion process was used; however, when microfluidic systems were utilized, their size distribution became comparatively narrow. The functionalization of elastomeric particles was accomplished by the non-specific adsorption of avidin protein followed by bovine serum albumin (BSA) blocking and bio-specific adsorption of a biotinylated-capture antibody. Polydisperse ECμPs were functionalized to bind prostate specific antigen (PSA) or IgG-phycoerythrin (PE) in aqueous media (buffer, plasma, blood); whereas monodisperse ECμPs were functionalized to bind a high density lipoprotein in the aqueous media. Polydisperse ECμPs functionalized to bind PSA in a physiological buffer (PBS pH 7.4) demonstrated nanomolar detection using flow cytometry analysis; whereas ECμPs functionalized to bind IgG-PE demonstrated picomolar detection in 10% porcine plasma. ECμPs have a specific density of ~1.03 and are more compressible than their surrounding aqueous media; which allowed the ECμPs to exhibit negative acoustic contrast properties under an ultrasonic acoustic standing wave field. The negative acoustic contrast property of ECμPs was advantageously utilized in an IgG-PE assay conducted in 0.1% whole porcine blood. The ligand-bound ECμPs suspended in the diluted blood sample were flowed through an acoustofluidic device where the application of an ultrasonic acoustic standing wave

  7. Development of a Rapid Streptavidin Capture-Based Assay for the Tyrosine Phosphorylated CSF-1R in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Shalini; Dell, Elayne; Siegel, Derick; Brittingham, Gregory; Seetharam, Shobha

    2013-01-01

    A novel assay was developed to measure ratio of p-FMS (phospho FMS) to FMS using the Meso Scale Discovery® (MSD) technology and compared to the routinely used, IP-Western based approach. The existing IP-Western assay used lysed PBMCs (Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells) that were immunoprecipitated (IP) overnight, and assayed qualitatively by Western analysis. This procedure takes three days for completion. The novel IP-MSD method described in this paper employed immunoprecipitation of the samples for one hour, followed by assessment of the samples by a ruthenium labeled secondary antibody on a 96-well Streptavidin-coated MSD plate. This IP-MSD method was semi-quantitative, could be run in less than a day, required one-eighth the volume of sample, and compared well to the IP-Western method. In order to measure p-FMS/FMS, samples from healthy volunteers (HV) were first stimulated with CSF-1(Macrophage colony-stimulating factor) to initiate the changes in the phosphotyrosyl signaling complexes in FMS. The objective of the present work was to develop a high throughput assay that measured p-FMS/FMS semi-quantitatively, with minimal sample requirement, and most importantly compared well to the current IP-Western assay. PMID:24339731

  8. Biochemical Assays of Cultured Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barlow, G. H.

    1985-01-01

    Subpopulations of human embryonic kidney cells isolated from continuous flow electrophoresis experiments performed at McDonnell Douglas and on STS-8 have been analyzed. These analyses have included plasminogen activator assays involving indirect methodology on fibrin plated and direct methodology using chromogenic substrates. Immunological studies were performed and the conditioned media for erythropoietin activity and human granulocyte colony stimulating (HGCSF) activity was analyzed.

  9. A protein chip membrane-capture assay for botulinum neurotoxin activity

    SciTech Connect

    Marconi, Severine; Ferracci, Geraldine; Berthomieu, Maelys; Kozaki, Shunji; Miquelis, Raymond; Boucraut, Jose; Seagar, Michael

    2008-12-15

    Botulinum neurotoxins A and B (BoNT/A and B) are neuromuscular blocking agents which inhibit neurotransmission by cleaving the intra-cellular presynaptic SNARE proteins SNAP-25 and VAMP2, localized respectively in plasma membrane and synaptic vesicles. These neurotoxins are both dangerous pathogens and powerful therapeutic agents with numerous clinical and cosmetic applications. Consequently there is a need for in vitro assays of their biological activity to screen for potential inhibitors and to replace the widely used in vivo mouse assay. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) was used to measure membrane vesicle capture by antibodies against SNAP-25 and VAMP2. Substrate cleavage by BoNTs modified capture providing a method to assay toxin activity. Firstly using synaptic vesicles as a substrate, a comparison of the EC{sub 50}s for BoNT/B obtained by SPR, ELISA or flow cytometry indicated similar sensitivity although SPR assays were more rapid. Sonication of brain or neuronal cultures generated plasma membrane fragments with accessible intra-cellular epitopes adapted to measurement of BoNT/A activity. SPR responses were proportional to antigen concentration permitting detection of as little as 4 pM SNAP-25 in crude lysates. BoNT/A activity was assayed using monoclonal antibodies that specifically recognize a SNAP-25 epitope generated by the proteolytic action of the toxin. Incubation of intact primary cultured neurons with BoNT/A yielded an EC{sub 50} of 0.5 pM. The SPR biosensor method was sensitive enough to monitor BoNT/A and B activity in cells cultured in a 96-well format providing an alternative to experimental animals for toxicological assays.

  10. Monoclonal platelet antigen capture assays (MAIPA) and reagents: a statement.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, C; Freedman, J; Foxcroft, Z; Husebekk, A; Metcalfe, P; Muniz-Diaz, E; Ouwehand, W; Panzer, S; Rozman, P; Skogen, B

    2007-11-01

    This statement concerning the monoclonal-specific immobilization of platelet antigens (MAIPA) has been written on behalf of the International Society of Blood Transfusion--Working Party on Platelet Immunology. The MAIPA technique is considered as the gold standard reference technique in platelet immunology. The assay performed with reagents labelled for 'research only' is acceptable as long as it is regularly evaluated by participation of laboratories in national or international workshops held with reference laboratories. PMID:18070272

  11. Proteasome Assay in Cell Lysates

    PubMed Central

    Maher, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) mediates the majority of the proteolysis seen in the cytoplasm and nucleus of mammalian cells. As such it plays an important role in the regulation of a variety of physiological and pathophysiological processes including tumorigenesis, inflammation and cell death (Ciechanover, 2005; Kisselev and Goldberg, 2001). A number of recent studies have shown that proteasome activity is decreased in a variety of neurological disorders including Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and stroke as well as during normal aging (Chung et al., 2001; Ciechanover and Brundin, 2003; Betarbet et al., 2005). This decrease in proteasome activity is thought to play a critical role in the accumulation of abnormal and oxidized proteins. Protein clearance by the UPS involves two sequential reactions. The first is the tagging of protein lysine residues with ubiquitin (Ub) and the second is the subsequent degradation of the tagged proteins by the proteasome. We herein describe an assay for the second of these two reactions (Valera et al., 2013). This assay uses fluorogenic substrates for each of the three activities of the proteasome: chymotrypsin-like activity, trypsin-like activity and caspase-like activity. Cleavage of the fluorophore from the substrate by the proteasome results in fluorescence that can be detected with a fluorescent plate reader.

  12. A Versatile Simple Capture Assay for Assessing the Structural Integrity of MHC Multimer Reagents

    PubMed Central

    Malo, Courtney S.; Renner, Danielle N.; Van Keulen, Virginia S.; Girtman, Megan A.; Nevala, Wendy N.; Pavelko, Kevin D.; Gil, Diana; Schrum, Adam G.; Johnson, Aaron J.; Pease, Larry R.

    2015-01-01

    Antigen-specific T cell responses can be visualized using MHC:peptide multimers. In cases where robust T cell controls are not readily available to assess the integrity of multimer reagents prior to analyzing limited sample, the ability to assess the structural integrity of MHC multimers before their use in critical experiments would be useful. We present a method to probe the structural integrity of MHC multimers using antibodies specific for conformational determinants. Beads coated with anti-mouse Ig are incubated with conformation-specific mouse monoclonal antibody and then with fluorescently tagged MHC multimer. The ability of the bead to capture the labeled multimer can be measured semi-quantitatively by flow cytometry. In this manner, the correct folding of MHC multimers can be visualized and batches of multimer can be compared for quality control. Because there are multiple conformational epitopes formed by various molecular interactions among heavy chain, peptide, and β2M, this capture assay can assess the fidelity of each aspect of multimer structure, depending on the availability of antibodies. The described approach could be particularly useful for studies using irreplaceable samples, including patient samples collected in clinical trials. PMID:26389800

  13. Capturing relevant extracellular matrices for investigating cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Keely, Patricia; Nain, Amrinder

    2015-01-01

    Much progress in understanding cell migration has been determined by using classic two-dimensional (2D) tissue culture platforms. However, increasingly, it is appreciated that certain properties of cell migration in vivo are not represented by strictly 2D assays. There is much interest in creating relevant three-dimensional (3D) culture environments and engineered platforms to better represent features of the extracellular matrix and stromal microenvironment that are not captured in 2D platforms. Important to this goal is a solid understanding of the features of the extracellular matrix—composition, stiffness, topography, and alignment—in different tissues and disease states and the development of means to capture these features PMID:26918156

  14. Microscale Magnetic Field Modulation for Enhanced Capture and Distribution of Rare Circulating Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Peng; Huang, Yu-Yen; Hoshino, Kazunori; Zhang, John X.J.

    2015-01-01

    Immunomagnetic assay combines the powers of the magnetic separation and biomarker recognition and has been an effective tool to perform rare Circulating Tumor Cells detection. Key factors associated with immunomagnetic assay include the capture rate, which indicates the sensitivity of the system, and distributions of target cells after capture, which impact the cell integrity and other biological properties that are critical to downstream analyses. Here we present a theoretical framework and technical approach to implement a microscale magnetic immunoassay through modulating local magnetic field towards enhanced capture and distribution of rare cancer cells. Through the design of a two-dimensional micromagnet array, we characterize the magnetic field generation and quantify the impact of the micromagnets on rare cell separation. Good agreement is achieved between the theory and experiments using a human colon cancer cell line (COLO205) as the capture targets. PMID:25735563

  15. Active capture and transport of virus particles using a biomolecular motor-driven, nanoscale antibody sandwich assay.

    SciTech Connect

    Hess, Henry; Bachand, Marlene; Bachand, George David; Carroll-Portillo, Amanda; Rivera, Susan B.

    2005-07-01

    Virus particles are captured and transported using kinesin-driven, antibody-functionalized microtubules. The functionalization was achieved through covalent crosslinking, which consequently enhanced the microtubule stability. The capture and transport of the virus particles was subsequently demonstrated in gliding motility assays in which antibody-coated microtubules functioned as capture elements, and antibody-coated microspheres served as fluorescent reporters.

  16. Detecting West Nile Virus in Owls and Raptors by an Antigen-capture Assay

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Douglas G.; Barker, Ian K.; Lindsay, Robbin; Hunter, Bruce

    2004-01-01

    We evaluated a rapid antigen-capture assay (VecTest) for detection of West Nile virus in oropharyngeal and cloacal swabs, collected at necropsy from owls (N = 93) and raptors (N = 27). Sensitivity was 93.5%–95.2% for northern owl species but <42.9% for all other species. Specificity was 100% for owls and 85.7% for raptors. PMID:15663862

  17. Fluorometric assay for red blood cell antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Schreiber, A.B.; Lambermont, M.; Strosberg, A.D.; Wybran, J.

    1981-03-01

    A fluorometric assay is described for the detection of red blood cell antibodies. The assay reveals as little as 600 molecules of bound, fluoroesceinated rabbit anti-human IgG antibodies per erythrocyte. Eleven patients with possible autoimmune erythrocyte disorder and negative direct antiglobulin test were studied by the fluorometric assay. The outcome of the fluorometric assay was compared with that of the human allogeneic rosette test. Results obtained by the two methods were in complete agreement. Five of the patients were shown to possess unexpectedly high levels of erythrocyte-bound IgG in spite of a negative, direct antiglobulin test. These findings and the validity of the fluorometric assay are discussed.

  18. In vitro Cell Migration and Invasion Assays

    PubMed Central

    Justus, Calvin R.; Leffler, Nancy; Ruiz-Echevarria, Maria; Yang, Li V.

    2014-01-01

    Migration is a key property of live cells and critical for normal development, immune response, and disease processes such as cancer metastasis and inflammation. Methods to examine cell migration are very useful and important for a wide range of biomedical research such as cancer biology, immunology, vascular biology, cell biology and developmental biology. Here we use tumor cell migration and invasion as an example and describe two related assays to illustrate the commonly used, easily accessible methods to measure these processes. The first method is the cell culture wound closure assay in which a scratch is generated on a confluent cell monolayer. The speed of wound closure and cell migration can be quantified by taking snapshot pictures with a regular inverted microscope at several time intervals. More detailed cell migratory behavior can be documented using the time-lapse microscopy system. The second method described in this paper is the transwell cell migration and invasion assay that measures the capacity of cell motility and invasiveness toward a chemo-attractant gradient. It is our goal to describe these methods in a highly accessible manner so that the procedures can be successfully performed in research laboratories even just with basic cell biology setup. PMID:24962652

  19. Cell Culture Assay for Human Noroviruses [response

    SciTech Connect

    Straub, Tim M.; Honer Zu Bentrup, Kerstin; Orosz Coghlan, Patricia; Dohnalkova, Alice; Mayer, Brooke K.; Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Valdez, Catherine O.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.; Gerba, Charles P.; Abbaszadegan, Morteza A.; Nickerson, Cheryl A.

    2007-07-01

    We appreciate the comments provided by Leung et al., in response to our recently published article “In Vitro Cell Culture Infectivity Assay for Human Noroviruses” by Straub et al. (1). The specific aim of our project was to develop an in vitro cell culture infectivity assay for human noroviruses (hNoV) to enhance risk assessments when they are detected in water supplies. Reverse transcription (RT) qualitative or quantitative PCR are the primary assays for waterborne NoV monitoring. However, these assays cannot distinguish between infectious vs. non-infectious virions. When hNoV is detected in water supplies, information provided by our infectivity assay will significantly improve risk assessment models and protect human health, regardless of whether we are propagating NoV. Indeed, in vitro cell culture infectivity assays for the waterborne pathogen Cryptosporidium parvum that supplement approved fluorescent microscopy assays, do not result in amplification of the environmentally resistant hard-walled oocysts (2). However, identification of life cycle stages in cell culture provides evidence of infectious oocysts in a water supply. Nonetheless, Leung et al.’s assertion regarding the suitability of our method for the in vitro propagation of high titers of NoV is valid for the medical research community. In this case, well-characterized challenge pools of virus would be useful for developing and testing diagnostics, therapeutics, and vaccines. As further validation of our published findings, we have now optimized RT quantitative PCR to assess the level of viral production in cell culture, where we are indeed finding significant increases in viral titer. The magnitude and time course of these increases is dependent on both virus strain and multiplicity of infection. We are currently preparing a manuscript that will discuss these findings in greater detail, and the implications this may have for creating viral challenge pools

  20. Assaying Cell Cycle Status Using Flow Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kang Ho; Sederstrom, Joel M

    2015-01-01

    In this unit, two protocols are described for analyzing cell cycle status using flow cytometry. The first is based on the simultaneous analysis of proliferation-specific marker (Ki-67) and cellular DNA content, which discriminate resting/quiescent cell populations (G0 cell) and quantify cell cycle distribution (G1, S, or G2/M), respectively. The second is based on differential staining of DNA and RNA through co-staining of Hoechst 33342 and Pyronin Y, which is also useful to identify G0 cells from G1 cells. Along with these methods for analyzing cell cycle status, two additional methods for cell proliferation assays with recent updates of newly developed fluorophores, which allow multiplex analysis of cell cycle status, cell proliferation, and a gene of interest using flow cytometry, are outlined. PMID:26131851

  1. High-Throughput Cell Toxicity Assays.

    PubMed

    Murray, David; McWilliams, Lisa; Wigglesworth, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Understanding compound-driven cell toxicity is vitally important for all drug discovery approaches. With high-throughput screening (HTS) being the key strategy to find hit and lead compounds for drug discovery projects in the pharmaceutical industry [1], an understanding of the cell toxicity profile of hit molecules from HTS activities is fundamentally important. Recently, there has been a resurgence of interest in phenotypic drug discovery and these cell-based assays are now being run in HTS labs on ever increasing numbers of compounds. As the use of cell assays increases the ability to measure toxicity of compounds on a large scale becomes increasingly important to ensure that false hits are not progressed and that compounds do not carry forward a toxic liability that may cause them to fail at later stages of a project. Here we describe methods employed in the AstraZeneca HTS laboratory to carry out very large scale cell toxicity screening. PMID:27317000

  2. Microfluidic Magnetic Bead Assay for Cell Detection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fan; KC, Pawan; Zhang, Ge; Zhe, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel cell detection device based on a magnetic bead cell assay and microfluidic Coulter counting technology. The device cannot only accurately measure cells size distribution and concentration but also detect specific target cells. The device consists of two identical micro Coulter counters separated by a fluid chamber where an external magnetic field is applied. Antibody-functionalized magnetic beads were bound to specific antigens expressed on the target cells. A high-gradient magnetic field was applied to the chamber closer to the second counter via an external cylindrical magnet. Because of the magnetic interaction between the magnetic beads and the magnetic field, target cells were retarded by the magnetic field; transit time of a target cell (bound with magnetic beads) passing through the second counter was longer than that through the first counter. In comparison, transit times of a nontarget cell remained nearly the same when it passed through both counters. Thus, from the transit time delay we can identify target cells and quantify their concentration in a cell suspension. The transit time and the size of each cell were accurately measured in terms of the width and amplitude of the resistive pulses generated from the two Coulter counters. Experiments demonstrated that for mixed cells with various target cell ratios, the transit time delay increased approximately linearly with the increasing target cell ratio. The limit of detection (LOD) of the assay was estimated to be 5.6% in terms of target cell ratio. Cell viability tests further demonstrated that most cells were viable after the detection. With the simple device configuration and easy sample preparation, this rapid and reliable method is expected to accurately detect target cells and could be applied to facilitate stem cell isolation and characterization. PMID:26636715

  3. Flexible Octopus-Shaped Hydrogel Particles for Specific Cell Capture.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lynna; An, Harry Z; Haghgooie, Ramin; Shank, Aaron T; Martel, Joseph M; Toner, Mehmet; Doyle, Patrick S

    2016-04-01

    Multiarm hydrogel microparticles with varying geometry are fabricated to specifically capture cells expressing epithelial cell adhesion molecule. Results show that particle shape influences cell-capture efficiency due to differences in surface area, hydrodynamic effects, and steric constraints. These findings can lead to improved particle design for cell separation and diagnostic applications. PMID:26929053

  4. Glycopeptide Capture for Cell Surface Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Lee, M. C. Gilbert; Sun, Bingyun

    2014-01-01

    Cell surface proteins, including extracellular matrix proteins, participate in all major cellular processes and functions, such as growth, differentiation, and proliferation. A comprehensive characterization of these proteins provides rich information for biomarker discovery, cell-type identification, and drug-target selection, as well as helping to advance our understanding of cellular biology and physiology. Surface proteins, however, pose significant analytical challenges, because of their inherently low abundance, high hydrophobicity, and heavy post-translational modifications. Taking advantage of the prevalent glycosylation on surface proteins, we introduce here a high-throughput glycopeptide-capture approach that integrates the advantages of several existing N-glycoproteomics means. Our method can enrich the glycopeptides derived from surface proteins and remove their glycans for facile proteomics using LC-MS. The resolved N-glycoproteome comprises the information of protein identity and quantity as well as their sites of glycosylation. This method has been applied to a series of studies in areas including cancer, stem cells, and drug toxicity. The limitation of the method lies in the low abundance of surface membrane proteins, such that a relatively large quantity of samples is required for this analysis compared to studies centered on cytosolic proteins. PMID:24836557

  5. Comparison of Onclarity Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Assay with Hybrid Capture II HPV DNA Assay for Detection of Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia Grade 2 and 3 Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Sideri, M.; Gulmini, C.; Igidbashian, S.; Tricca, A.; Casadio, C.; Carinelli, S.; Boveri, S.; Ejegod, D.; Bonde, J.; Sandri, M. T.

    2015-01-01

    Analytical and clinical performance validation is essential before introduction of a new human papillomavirus (HPV) assay into clinical practice. This study compares the new BD Onclarity HPV assay, which detects E6/E7 DNA from 14 high-risk HPV types, to the Hybrid Capture II (HC2) HPV DNA test, to concurrent cytology and histology results, in order to evaluate its performance in detecting high-grade cervical lesions. A population of 567 women, including 325 with ≥ASCUS (where ASCUS stands for atypical cells of undetermined significance) and any HC2 result and 242 with both negative cytology and negative HC2 results, were prospectively enrolled for the study. The overall agreement between Onclarity and HC2 was 94.6% (95% confidence intervals [CI], 92.3% to 96.2%). In this population with a high prevalence of disease, the relative sensitivities (versus adjudicated cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grades 2 and 3 [CIN2+] histology endpoints) of the Onclarity and HC2 tests were 95.2% (95% CI, 90.7% to 97.5%) and 96.9% (95% CI, 92.9% to 98.7%), respectively, and the relative specificities were 50.3% (95% CI, 43.2% to 57.4%) for BD and 40.8% (95% CI, 33.9%, 48.1%) for HC2. These results indicate that the BD Onclarity HPV assay has sensitivity comparable to that of the HC2 assay, with a trend to an increased specificity. Moreover, as Onclarity gives the chance to discriminate between the different genotypes, we calculated the genotype prevalence and the absolute risk of CIN2+: HPV 16 was the most prevalent genotype (19.8%) with an absolute risk of CIN2+ of 77.1%. PMID:25903574

  6. Comparison of Onclarity Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Assay with Hybrid Capture II HPV DNA Assay for Detection of Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia Grade 2 and 3 Lesions.

    PubMed

    Bottari, F; Sideri, M; Gulmini, C; Igidbashian, S; Tricca, A; Casadio, C; Carinelli, S; Boveri, S; Ejegod, D; Bonde, J; Sandri, M T

    2015-07-01

    Analytical and clinical performance validation is essential before introduction of a new human papillomavirus (HPV) assay into clinical practice. This study compares the new BD Onclarity HPV assay, which detects E6/E7 DNA from 14 high-risk HPV types, to the Hybrid Capture II (HC2) HPV DNA test, to concurrent cytology and histology results, in order to evaluate its performance in detecting high-grade cervical lesions. A population of 567 women, including 325 with ≥ASCUS (where ASCUS stands for atypical cells of undetermined significance) and any HC2 result and 242 with both negative cytology and negative HC2 results, were prospectively enrolled for the study. The overall agreement between Onclarity and HC2 was 94.6% (95% confidence intervals [CI], 92.3% to 96.2%). In this population with a high prevalence of disease, the relative sensitivities (versus adjudicated cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grades 2 and 3 [CIN2+] histology endpoints) of the Onclarity and HC2 tests were 95.2% (95% CI, 90.7% to 97.5%) and 96.9% (95% CI, 92.9% to 98.7%), respectively, and the relative specificities were 50.3% (95% CI, 43.2% to 57.4%) for BD and 40.8% (95% CI, 33.9%, 48.1%) for HC2. These results indicate that the BD Onclarity HPV assay has sensitivity comparable to that of the HC2 assay, with a trend to an increased specificity. Moreover, as Onclarity gives the chance to discriminate between the different genotypes, we calculated the genotype prevalence and the absolute risk of CIN2+: HPV 16 was the most prevalent genotype (19.8%) with an absolute risk of CIN2+ of 77.1%. PMID:25903574

  7. 21 CFR 864.7100 - Red blood cell enzyme assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Red blood cell enzyme assay. 864.7100 Section 864... enzyme assay. (a) Identification. Red blood cell enzyme assay is a device used to measure the activity in... kinase or 2,3-diphosphoglycerate. A red blood cell enzyme assay is used to determine the enzyme...

  8. 21 CFR 864.7100 - Red blood cell enzyme assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Red blood cell enzyme assay. 864.7100 Section 864... enzyme assay. (a) Identification. Red blood cell enzyme assay is a device used to measure the activity in... kinase or 2,3-diphosphoglycerate. A red blood cell enzyme assay is used to determine the enzyme...

  9. 21 CFR 864.7100 - Red blood cell enzyme assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Red blood cell enzyme assay. 864.7100 Section 864... enzyme assay. (a) Identification. Red blood cell enzyme assay is a device used to measure the activity in... kinase or 2,3-diphosphoglycerate. A red blood cell enzyme assay is used to determine the enzyme...

  10. 21 CFR 864.7100 - Red blood cell enzyme assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Red blood cell enzyme assay. 864.7100 Section 864... enzyme assay. (a) Identification. Red blood cell enzyme assay is a device used to measure the activity in... kinase or 2,3-diphosphoglycerate. A red blood cell enzyme assay is used to determine the enzyme...

  11. 21 CFR 864.7100 - Red blood cell enzyme assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Red blood cell enzyme assay. 864.7100 Section 864... enzyme assay. (a) Identification. Red blood cell enzyme assay is a device used to measure the activity in... kinase or 2,3-diphosphoglycerate. A red blood cell enzyme assay is used to determine the enzyme...

  12. Nanoroughened Surfaces for Efficient Capture of Circulating Tumor Cells without Using Capture Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Weiqiang; Weng, Shinuo; Zhang, Feng; Allen, Steven; Li, Xiang; Bao, Liwei; Lam, Raymond H. W.; Macoska, Jill A.; Merajver, Sofia D.; Fu, Jianping

    2014-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) detached from both primary and metastatic lesions represent a potential alternative to invasive biopsies as a source of tumor tissue for the detection, characterization and monitoring of cancers. Here we report a simple yet effective strategy for capturing CTCs without using capture antibodies. Our method uniquely utilized the differential adhesion preference of cancer cells to nanorough surfaces when compared to normal blood cells and thus did not depend on their physical size or surface protein expression, a significant advantage as compared to other existing CTC capture techniques. PMID:23194329

  13. Antibody secreting cell assay for influenza A virus in swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An ELISPOT assay to enumerate B-cells producing antibodies specific to a given antigen, also known as an antibody secreting cell (ASC) assay, was adapted to detect B-cells specific for influenza A virus (IAV). The assay is performed ex vivo and enumerates ASC at a single cell level. A simple ASC det...

  14. Indicator displacement assays inside live cells.

    PubMed

    Norouzy, Amir; Azizi, Zahra; Nau, Werner M

    2015-01-12

    The macrocycle p-sulfonatocalix[4]arene (CX4) and the fluorescent dye lucigenin (LCG) form a stable host-guest complex, in which the dye fluorescence is quenched. Incubation of live V79 and CHO cells with the CX4/LCG chemosensing ensemble resulted in its spontaneous uptake. Subsequent addition of choline, acetylcholine, or protamine, which have a high affinity for CX4 and are capable of entering cells, resulted in a fluorescence switch-on response. This can be traced to the displacement of LCG from CX4 by the analytes. The results establish the principal functionality of indicator displacement assays with synthetic receptors for the detection of the uptake of bioorganic analytes by live cells. PMID:25430503

  15. Microfluidic Transport in Microdevices for Rare Cell Capture

    PubMed Central

    Smith, James P.; Barbati, Alexander C.; Santana, Steven M.; Gleghorn, Jason P.; Kirby, Brian J.

    2013-01-01

    The isolation and capture of rare cells is a problem uniquely suited to microfluidic devices, in which geometries on the cellular length scale can be engineered and a wide range of chemical functionalizations can be implemented. The performance of such devices is primarily affected by the chemical interaction between the cell and the capture surface and the mechanics of cell– surface collision and adhesion. As rare cell capture technology has been summarized elsewhere [1], this article focuses on the fundamental adhesion and transport mechanisms in rare cell capture microdevices, and explores modern device design strategies in a transport context. The biorheology and engineering parameters of cell adhesion are defined; adhesion models and reaction kinetics briefly reviewed. Transport at the microscale, including diffusion and steric interactions that result in cell motion across streamlines, is discussed. The review concludes by discussing design strategies with a focus on leveraging the underlying transport phenomena to maximize device performance. PMID:23065634

  16. Laser capture microdissection of intestinal tissue from sea bass larvae using an optimized RNA integrity assay and validated reference genes.

    PubMed

    Schaeck, M; De Spiegelaere, W; De Craene, J; Van den Broeck, W; De Spiegeleer, B; Burvenich, C; Haesebrouck, F; Decostere, A

    2016-01-01

    The increasing demand for a sustainable larviculture has promoted research regarding environmental parameters, diseases and nutrition, intersecting at the mucosal surface of the gastrointestinal tract of fish larvae. The combination of laser capture microdissection (LCM) and gene expression experiments allows cell specific expression profiling. This study aimed at optimizing an LCM protocol for intestinal tissue of sea bass larvae. Furthermore, a 3'/5' integrity assay was developed for LCM samples of fish tissue, comprising low RNA concentrations. Furthermore, reliable reference genes for performing qPCR in larval sea bass gene expression studies were identified, as data normalization is critical in gene expression experiments using RT-qPCR. We demonstrate that a careful optimization of the LCM procedure allows recovery of high quality mRNA from defined cell populations in complex intestinal tissues. According to the geNorm and Normfinder algorithms, ef1a, rpl13a, rps18 and faua were the most stable genes to be implemented as reference genes for an appropriate normalization of intestinal tissue from sea bass across a range of experimental settings. The methodology developed here, offers a rapid and valuable approach to characterize cells/tissues in the intestinal tissue of fish larvae and their changes following pathogen exposure, nutritional/environmental changes, probiotic supplementation or a combination thereof. PMID:26883391

  17. Laser capture microdissection of intestinal tissue from sea bass larvae using an optimized RNA integrity assay and validated reference genes

    PubMed Central

    Schaeck, M.; De Spiegelaere, W.; De Craene, J.; Van den Broeck, W.; De Spiegeleer, B.; Burvenich, C.; Haesebrouck, F.; Decostere, A.

    2016-01-01

    The increasing demand for a sustainable larviculture has promoted research regarding environmental parameters, diseases and nutrition, intersecting at the mucosal surface of the gastrointestinal tract of fish larvae. The combination of laser capture microdissection (LCM) and gene expression experiments allows cell specific expression profiling. This study aimed at optimizing an LCM protocol for intestinal tissue of sea bass larvae. Furthermore, a 3′/5′ integrity assay was developed for LCM samples of fish tissue, comprising low RNA concentrations. Furthermore, reliable reference genes for performing qPCR in larval sea bass gene expression studies were identified, as data normalization is critical in gene expression experiments using RT-qPCR. We demonstrate that a careful optimization of the LCM procedure allows recovery of high quality mRNA from defined cell populations in complex intestinal tissues. According to the geNorm and Normfinder algorithms, ef1a, rpl13a, rps18 and faua were the most stable genes to be implemented as reference genes for an appropriate normalization of intestinal tissue from sea bass across a range of experimental settings. The methodology developed here, offers a rapid and valuable approach to characterize cells/tissues in the intestinal tissue of fish larvae and their changes following pathogen exposure, nutritional/environmental changes, probiotic supplementation or a combination thereof. PMID:26883391

  18. Enzyme-capture assay for rapid detection of Escherichia coli in oysters.

    PubMed

    Holt, S M; Hartman, P A; Kaspar, C W

    1989-01-01

    Enzyme-capture assays (ECAs) for Escherichia coli beta-D-glucuronidase (GUD) were performed directly from 24-h gas-positive lauryl tryptose broth (LTB) fermentation tubes that had been inoculated with oyster homogenate seeded with E. coli. The LTB-ECA method yielded results in 1 day that were equivalent to those obtained in 2 days by an LTB and EC-4-methylumbelliferyl-beta-D-glucuronide (EC-MUG) method. Overall, 62 of 64 (97%) positive EC-MUG broths from which E. coli was isolated were correctly identified by ECA. Of 61 LTB tubes identified as GUD negative by ECA, 59 were confirmed to be free of E. coli by using EC-MUG; thus, the false-negative rate was approximately 3%. Polyclonal antibodies prepared against E. coli GUD reacted only with GUDs of E. coli, Escherichia vulneris, and Shigella sonnei. The antibodies did not react with GUDs from Flavobacterium spp., Staphylococcus spp., Yersinia enterocolitica, shellfish, or bovine liver. The GUD ECA test, when used in conjunction with the most-probable-number technique, was a rapid method for E. coli enumeration in oysters. PMID:2650619

  19. Peptide-based protein capture agents with high affinity, selectivity, and stability as antibody replacements in biodetection assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppock, Matthew B.; Farrow, Blake; Warner, Candice; Finch, Amethist S.; Lai, Bert; Sarkes, Deborah A.; Heath, James R.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra

    2014-05-01

    Current biodetection assays that employ monoclonal antibodies as primary capture agents exhibit limited fieldability, shelf life, and performance due to batch-to-batch production variability and restricted thermal stability. In order to improve upon the detection of biological threats in fieldable assays and systems for the Army, we are investigating protein catalyzed capture (PCC) agents as drop-in replacements for the existing antibody technology through iterative in situ click chemistry. The PCC agent oligopeptides are developed against known protein epitopes and can be mass produced using robotic methods. In this work, a PCC agent under development will be discussed. The performance, including affinity, selectivity, and stability of the capture agent technology, is analyzed by immunoprecipitation, western blotting, and ELISA experiments. The oligopeptide demonstrates superb selectivity coupled with high affinity through multi-ligand design, and improved thermal, chemical, and biochemical stability due to non-natural amino acid PCC agent design.

  20. Laser capture microdissection of nematode feeding cells.

    PubMed

    Ithal, Nagabhushana; Mitchum, Melissa G

    2011-01-01

    Obligate plant-parasitic nematodes, such as cyst nematodes (Heterodera and Globodera spp.) and root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.), form specialized feeding cells in host plant roots. These feeding cells provide the sole source of nutrition for the growth and reproduction of the nematode to complete its life cycle. Feeding cell formation involves complex physiological and morphological changes to normal root cells and is accompanied by dramatic changes in plant gene expression. The distinct features of feeding cells suggest that their formation entails a unique gene expression profile, a better understanding of which will assist in building models to explain signaling pathways that modulate transcriptional changes in response to nematodes. Ultimately, this knowledge can be used to design strategies to develop resistance against nematodes in crop plants. Feeding cells comprise a small fraction of the total root cell population, and identification of plant gene expression changes specific to these cells is difficult. Until recently, the specific isolation of nematode feeding cells could be accomplished only by manual dissection or microaspiration. These approaches are limited in that only mature feeding cells can be isolated. These limitations in tissue accessibility for macromolecule isolation at different stages of feeding cell development can be overcome through the use of laser microdissection (LM), a technique that enables the specific isolation of feeding cells from early to late stages for RNA isolation, amplification, and downstream analysis. PMID:21359812

  1. Penetration of multiple thin films in micrometeorite capture cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Charles G.

    1994-01-01

    As part of a continuing effort to develop cosmic dust detectors/collectors for use in space, we performed a series of hypervelocity impact experiments on combined sensor/capture-cell assemblies using 10-200-micron-diameter glass projectiles and olivine crystals at velocities of 0.9-14.4 km/s. The design objective of the space-flight instrument is to measure the trajectories of individual particles with sufficient accuracy to permit identification of their parent bodies and to capture enough impactor material to allow chemical and isotopic analyses of samples returned to Earth. Three different multiple-film small-particle capture cell designs (0.1-100-micron-thick Al foils with approx. 10, 100, and 1800 micron spacing) were evaluated for their ability to capture impactor fragments and residue. Their performances were compared to two other types of capture cells, foil covered Ge crystals, and 0.50 and 0.120 g/cu cm aerogels. All capture cells were tested behind multifilm (1.4-6.0-micron-thick) polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) velocity/trajectory sensor devices. Several tests were also done without the PVDF sensors for comparison. The results of this study were reported by Simon in a comprehensive report in which the morphology of impacts and impactor residues in various types of capture cells after passage through two PVDF sensor films is discussed. Impactor fragments in selected capture cells from impacts at velocities up to 6.4 km/s were identified using scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS).

  2. A Versatile Microarray Platform for Capturing Rare Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinkmann, Falko; Hirtz, Michael; Haller, Anna; Gorges, Tobias M.; Vellekoop, Michael J.; Riethdorf, Sabine; Müller, Volkmar; Pantel, Klaus; Fuchs, Harald

    2015-10-01

    Analyses of rare events occurring at extremely low frequencies in body fluids are still challenging. We established a versatile microarray-based platform able to capture single target cells from large background populations. As use case we chose the challenging application of detecting circulating tumor cells (CTCs) - about one cell in a billion normal blood cells. After incubation with an antibody cocktail, targeted cells are extracted on a microarray in a microfluidic chip. The accessibility of our platform allows for subsequent recovery of targets for further analysis. The microarray facilitates exclusion of false positive capture events by co-localization allowing for detection without fluorescent labelling. Analyzing blood samples from cancer patients with our platform reached and partly outreached gold standard performance, demonstrating feasibility for clinical application. Clinical researchers free choice of antibody cocktail without need for altered chip manufacturing or incubation protocol, allows virtual arbitrary targeting of capture species and therefore wide spread applications in biomedical sciences.

  3. Bovine viral diarrhea virus antigen detection across whole cattle hides using two antigen-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays.

    PubMed

    Vander Ley, Brian L; Ridpath, Julia F; Sweiger, Shaun H

    2012-05-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus is a costly disease of cattle that can be controlled by vaccination, biosecurity, and removal of persistently infected cattle. Development and proficiency testing of assays to identify persistently infected cattle requires substantial quantities of known positive- and negative-sample material. The objective of this study was to determine what sections of bovine skin contained Bovine viral diarrhea virus antigen. Two commercially available antigen-capture enzyme-linked immunoassays were used to test subsamples representing the entire skin of 3 persistently infected calves. Both assays detected Bovine viral diarrhea virus antigen in the samples indicated for use by assay protocol. However, one assay identified all subsamples as positive, while the second assay identified 64.4% of subsamples as positive. These results show that use of samples other than those specified by the assay protocol must be validated for each individual assay. In this study, alternative sample sites and use of the entire hide for proficiency testing would be acceptable for only one of the assays tested. PMID:22529122

  4. Dielectrophoretic Capture and Genetic Analysis of Single Neuroblastoma Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Erica L.; Rader, JulieAnn; Ruden, Jacob; Rappaport, Eric F.; Hunter, Kristen N.; Hallberg, Paul L.; Krytska, Kate; O’Dwyer, Peter J.; Mosse, Yael P.

    2014-01-01

    Our understanding of the diversity of cells that escape the primary tumor and seed micrometastases remains rudimentary, and approaches for studying circulating and disseminated tumor cells have been limited by low throughput and sensitivity, reliance on single parameter sorting, and a focus on enumeration rather than phenotypic and genetic characterization. Here, we utilize a highly sensitive microfluidic and dielectrophoretic approach for the isolation and genetic analysis of individual tumor cells. We employed fluorescence labeling to isolate 208 single cells from spiking experiments conducted with 11 cell lines, including 8 neuroblastoma cell lines, and achieved a capture sensitivity of 1 tumor cell per 106 white blood cells (WBCs). Sample fixation or freezing had no detectable effect on cell capture. Point mutations were accurately detected in the whole genome amplification product of captured single tumor cells but not in negative control WBCs. We applied this approach to capture 144 single tumor cells from 10 bone marrow samples of patients suffering from neuroblastoma. In this pediatric malignancy, high-risk patients often exhibit wide-spread hematogenous metastasis, but access to primary tumor can be difficult or impossible. Here, we used flow-based sorting to pre-enrich samples with tumor involvement below 0.02%. For all patients for whom a mutation in the Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase gene had already been detected in their primary tumor, the same mutation was detected in single cells from their marrow. These findings demonstrate a novel, non-invasive, and adaptable method for the capture and genetic analysis of single tumor cells from cancer patients. PMID:25133137

  5. Cell stretching in extensional flows for assaying cell mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gossett, Daniel; Tse, Henry; Adeyiga, Oladunni; Yang, Otto; Rao, Jianyu; di Carlo, Dino

    2013-03-01

    There is growing evidence that cell deformability is a useful indicator of cell state and may be a label-free biomarker of metastatic potential, degree of differentiation, and leukocyte activation. In order for deformability measurements to be clinically valuable given the heterogeneity of biological samples, there exists a need for a high-throughput assay of this biophysical property. We developed a robust method for obtaining high-throughput (>1,000 cells/sec) single-cell mechanical measurements which employs coupled hydrodynamic lift forces and curvature-induced secondary flows to uniformly position cells in flow, extensional flow stretching, high-speed imaging, and automated image analysis to extract diameter and deformability parameters. Using this method we have assayed numerous in vitro models of cellular transformations and clinical fluids where malignant cells manifest. We found transformations associated with increased motility or invasiveness increased deformability and the presence of large and deformable cells within clinical pleural fluids correlated well with cytological diagnoses of malignancy. This agrees with the hypothesis that cancerous cells are deformable by necessity-to be able to transverse tight endothelial gaps and invade tissues.

  6. Standardization of a cytometric p24-capture bead-assay for the detection of main HIV-1 subtypes.

    PubMed

    Merbah, Mélanie; Onkar, Sayali; Grivel, Jean-Charles; Vanpouille, Christophe; Biancotto, Angélique; Bonar, Lydia; Sanders-Buell, Eric; Kijak, Gustavo; Michael, Nelson; Robb, Merlin; Kim, Jerome H; Tovanabutra, Sodsai; Chenine, Agnès-Laurence

    2016-04-01

    The prevailing method to assess HIV-1 replication and infectivity is to measure the production of p24 Gag protein by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Since fluorescent bead-based technologies offer a broader dynamic range and higher sensitivity, this study describes a p24 capture Luminex assay capable of detecting HIV-1 subtypes A-D, circulating recombinant forms (CRF) CRF01_AE and CRF02_AG, which together are responsible for over 90% of HIV-1 infections worldwide. The success of the assay lies in the identification and selection of a cross-reactive capture antibody (clone 183-H12-5C). Fifty-six isolates that belonged to six HIV-1 subtypes and CRFs were successfully detected with p-values below 0.021; limits of detection ranging from 3.7 to 3×104pg/ml. The intra- and inter-assay variation gave coefficient of variations below 6 and 14%, respectively. The 183-bead Luminex assay also displayed higher sensitivity of 91% and 98% compared to commercial p24 ELISA and a previously described Luminex assay. The p24 concentrations measured by the 183-bead Luminex assay showed a significant correlation (R=0.92, p<0.0001) with the data obtained from quantitative real time PCR. This newly developed p24 assay leverages the advantages of the Luminex platform, which include smaller sample volume and simultaneous detection of up to 500 analytes in a single sample, and delivers a valuable tool for the field. PMID:26808359

  7. Electrospun Nanofibrous Sheets for Selective Cell Capturing in Continuous Flow in Microchannels.

    PubMed

    Son, Young Ju; Kang, Jihyun; Kim, Hye Sung; Yoo, Hyuk Sang

    2016-03-14

    Electrospun nanofibrous meshes were surface-modified for selective capturing of specific cells from a continuous flow in PDMS microchannels. We electrospun nanofibrous mats composed of poly(ε-carprolactone) (PCL) and amine-functionalized block copolymers composed of PCL and poly(ethylenimine) (PEI). A mixture of biotinylated PEG and blunt PEG was chemically tethered to the nanofibrous mats via the surface-exposed amines on the mat. The degree of biotinylation was fluorescently and quantitatively assayed for confirming the surface-biotinylation levels for avidin-specific binding. The incorporation level of avidin gradually increased when the blend ratio of biotinylated PEG on the mat increased, confirming the manipulated surfaces with various degree of biotinylation. Biotinylated cells were incubated with avidin-coated biotinylated mats and the specific binding of biotinylated cells was monitored in a microfluidic channel with a continuous flow of culture medium, which suggests efficient and selective capturing of the biotinylated cells on the nanofibrous mat. PMID:26812501

  8. Evaluation of the hybrid capture 2 assay for detecting anal high-grade dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Goldstone, Stephen E; Lowe, Brian; Rothmann, Thomas; Nazarenko, Irina

    2012-10-01

    Hybrid Capture 2 (HC2) Human Papillomavirus (HPV) DNA Test® is FDA approved and is a proven aid in detecting HPV infections of the cervix and as an aid in diagnosing, with cytology, cervical disease. A prospective feasibility study was conducted to determine if HC2 testing has utility when screening for high-grade anal dysplasia (AIN2+). We enrolled 298 patients (45% HIV+) who had AIN2+ screening with cytology, histology and HC2 testing for two specimens: a swab into liquid-based cytology medium and either a swab or a brush collection in specimen transport medium (STM). High-resolution anoscopy was performed on all patients with biopsy of AIN2+ suspicious lesions. Cytology was benign (42%), atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (30%), low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (18%), high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (1%), ASCUS possibly high-grade dysplasia (1.7%) and nondiagnostic (7%) and 36% had AIN2+ histology. Sensitivity and specificity for predicting AIN2+ histology for any abnormal cytology were 77 and 52%, whereas HC2 sensitivity and specificity were 91 and 40% (p = 0.005 for sensitivity), respectively. There was no significant difference in HC2 sensitivity or specificity between brush and swab or STM and residual cells from cytology. AIN2+ was found in 20% of patients with benign cytology. Only nine AIN2+ specimens were HC2-. This prospective study indicates that HC2 may be useful when screening for anal dysplasia; however, a larger study is recommended. PMID:22234750

  9. Gadolinium in human glioblastoma cells for gadolinium neutron capture therapy.

    PubMed

    De Stasio, G; Casalbore, P; Pallini, R; Gilbert, B; Sanità, F; Ciotti, M T; Rosi, G; Festinesi, A; Larocca, L M; Rinelli, A; Perret, D; Mogk, D W; Perfetti, P; Mehta, M P; Mercanti, D

    2001-05-15

    157Gd is a potential agent for neutron capture cancer therapy (GdNCT). We directly observed the microdistribution of Gd in cultured human glioblastoma cells exposed to Gd-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA). We demonstrated, with three independent techniques, that Gd-DTPA penetrates the plasma membrane, and we observed no deleterious effect on cell survival. A systematic microchemical analysis revealed a higher Gd accumulation in cell nuclei compared with cytoplasm. This is significant for prospective GdNCT because the proximity of Gd to DNA increases the cell-killing potential of the short-range, high-energy electrons emitted during the neutron capture reaction. We also exposed Gd-containing cells to thermal neutrons and demonstrated the GdNC reaction effectiveness in inducing cell death. These results in vitro stimulated in vivo Gd-DTPA uptake studies, currently underway, in human glioblastoma patients. PMID:11358855

  10. Improved Methods for Capture, Extraction, and Quantitative Assay of Environmental DNA from Asian Bigheaded Carp (Hypophthalmichthys spp.)

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Cameron R.; Miller, Derryl J.; Coyne, Kathryn J.; Corush, Joel

    2014-01-01

    Indirect, non-invasive detection of rare aquatic macrofauna using aqueous environmental DNA (eDNA) is a relatively new approach to population and biodiversity monitoring. As such, the sensitivity of monitoring results to different methods of eDNA capture, extraction, and detection is being investigated in many ecosystems and species. One of the first and largest conservation programs with eDNA-based monitoring as a central instrument focuses on Asian bigheaded carp (Hypophthalmichthys spp.), an invasive fish spreading toward the Laurentian Great Lakes. However, the standard eDNA methods of this program have not advanced since their development in 2010. We developed new, quantitative, and more cost-effective methods and tested them against the standard protocols. In laboratory testing, our new quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay for bigheaded carp eDNA was one to two orders of magnitude more sensitive than the existing endpoint PCR assays. When applied to eDNA samples from an experimental pond containing bigheaded carp, the qPCR assay produced a detection probability of 94.8% compared to 4.2% for the endpoint PCR assays. Also, the eDNA capture and extraction method we adapted from aquatic microbiology yielded five times more bigheaded carp eDNA from the experimental pond than the standard method, at a per sample cost over forty times lower. Our new, more sensitive assay provides a quantitative tool for eDNA-based monitoring of bigheaded carp, and the higher-yielding eDNA capture and extraction method we describe can be used for eDNA-based monitoring of any aquatic species. PMID:25474207

  11. Nanostructured Substrates for Capturing Circulating Tumor Cells in Whole Blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Hsian-Rong

    2009-03-01

    Over the past decade, circulating tumor cells (CTCs) has become an emerging ``biomarker'' for detecting early-stage cancer metastasis, predicting patient prognosis, as well as monitoring disease progression and therapeutic outcomes. However, isolation of CTCs has been technically challenging due to the extremely low abundance (a few to hundreds per ml) of CTCs among a high number of hematologic cells (109 per mL) in the blood. Our joint research team at UCLA has developed a new cell capture technology for quantification of CTCs in whole blood samples. Similar to most of the existing approaches, epithelial cell adhesion molecule antibody (anti-EpCAM) was grafted onto the surfaces to distinguish CTCs from the surrounding hematologic cells. The uniqueness of our technology is the use of nanostructured surfaces, which facilitates local topographical interactions between CTCs and substrates at the very first cell/substrate contacting time point. We demonstrated the ability of these nanostructured substrates to capture CTCs in whole blood samples with significantly improved efficiency and selectivity. The successful demonstration of this cell capture technology using brain, breast and prostate cancer cell lines encouraged us to test this approach in clinical setting. We have been able to bond our first validation study with a commercialized technology based on the use of immunomagnetic nanoparticles. A group of clinically well-characterized prostate cancer patients at UCLA hospital have been recruited and tested in parallel by these two technologies.

  12. Antigen-capture blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay based on a baculovirus recombinant antigen to differentiate Transmissible gastroenteritis virus from Porcine respiratory coronavirus antibodies.

    PubMed

    López, Lissett; Venteo, Angel; García, Marga; Camuñas, Ana; Ranz, Ana; García, Julia; Sarraseca, Javier; Anaya, Carmen; Rueda, Paloma

    2009-09-01

    A new commercially available antigen-capture, blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (antigen-capture b-ELISA), based on baculovirus truncated-S recombinant protein of Transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) and 3 specific monoclonal antibodies, was developed and evaluated by examining a panel of 453 positive Porcine respiratory coronavirus (PRCoV), 31 positive TGEV, and 126 negative field sera by using another commercially available differential coronavirus b-ELISA as the reference technique to differentiate TGEV- from PRCoV-induced antibodies. The recombinant S protein-based ELISA appeared to be 100% sensitive for TGEV and PRCoV detection and highly specific for TGEV and PRCoV detection (100% and 92.06%, respectively), when qualitative results (positive or negative) were compared with those of the reference technique. In variability experiments, the ELISA gave consistent results when the same serum was evaluated on different wells and different plates. These results indicated that truncated recombinant S protein is a suitable alternative to the complete virus as antigen in ELISA assays. The use of recombinant S protein as antigen offers great advantages because it is an easy-to-produce, easy-to-standardize, noninfectious antigen that does not require further purification or concentration. Those advantages represent an important improvement for antigen preparation, in comparison with other assays in which an inactivated virus from mammalian cell cultures is used. PMID:19737754

  13. Electrical lysis of cells for detergent-free droplet assays.

    PubMed

    de Lange, N; Tran, T M; Abate, A R

    2016-03-01

    Efficient lysis is critical when analyzing single cells in microfluidic droplets, but existing methods utilize detergents that can interfere with the assays to be performed. We demonstrate robust cell lysis without the use of detergents or other chemicals. In our method, cells are exposed to electric field immediately before encapsulation in droplets, resulting in cell lysis. We characterize lysis efficiency as a function of control parameters and demonstrate compatibility with enzymatic assays by measuring the catalysis of β-glucosidase, an important cellulase used in the conversion of biomass to biofuel. Our method enables assays in microfluidic droplets that are incompatible with detergents. PMID:27051471

  14. Electrical lysis of cells for detergent-free droplet assays

    PubMed Central

    Tran, T. M.; Abate, A. R.

    2016-01-01

    Efficient lysis is critical when analyzing single cells in microfluidic droplets, but existing methods utilize detergents that can interfere with the assays to be performed. We demonstrate robust cell lysis without the use of detergents or other chemicals. In our method, cells are exposed to electric field immediately before encapsulation in droplets, resulting in cell lysis. We characterize lysis efficiency as a function of control parameters and demonstrate compatibility with enzymatic assays by measuring the catalysis of β-glucosidase, an important cellulase used in the conversion of biomass to biofuel. Our method enables assays in microfluidic droplets that are incompatible with detergents. PMID:27051471

  15. Aptamer-Conjugated Graphene Oxide Membranes for Highly Efficient Capture and Accurate Identification of Multiple Types of Circulating Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Tumor metastasis is responsible for 1 in 4 deaths in the United States. Though it has been well-documented over past two decades that circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in blood can be used as a biomarker for metastatic cancer, there are enormous challenges in capturing and identifying CTCs with sufficient sensitivity and specificity. Because of the heterogeneous expression of CTC markers, it is now well understood that a single CTC marker is insufficient to capture all CTCs from the blood. Driven by the clear need, this study reports for the first time highly efficient capture and accurate identification of multiple types of CTCs from infected blood using aptamer-modified porous graphene oxide membranes. The results demonstrate that dye-modified S6, A9, and YJ-1 aptamers attached to 20–40 μm porous garphene oxide membranes are capable of capturing multiple types of tumor cells (SKBR3 breast cancer cells, LNCaP prostate cancer cells, and SW-948 colon cancer cells) selectively and simultaneously from infected blood. Our result shows that the capture efficiency of graphene oxide membranes is ∼95% for multiple types of tumor cells; for each tumor concentration, 10 cells are present per milliliter of blood sample. The selectivity of our assay for capturing targeted tumor cells has been demonstrated using membranes without an antibody. Blood infected with different cells also has been used to demonstrate the targeted tumor cell capturing ability of aptamer-conjugated membranes. Our data also demonstrate that accurate analysis of multiple types of captured CTCs can be performed using multicolor fluorescence imaging. Aptamer-conjugated membranes reported here have good potential for the early diagnosis of diseases that are currently being detected by means of cell capture technologies. PMID:25565372

  16. Development of a novel hepatitis B virus encapsidation detection assay by viral nucleocapsid-captured quantitative RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Dong-Kyun; Ahn, Yeji; Ryu, Wang-Shick; Windisch, Marc P

    2015-11-01

    After encapsidation, where pregenomic RNA (pgRNA) is packaged into viral nucleocapsids, hepatitis B virus (HBV) uses the pgRNA as a template to replicate its DNA genome by reverse transcription. To date, there are only two encapsidation detection methods for evaluating the amount of pgRNA packaged into nucleocapsids: (i) the RNase protection assay and (ii) the native agarose gel electrophoresis assay. However, these methods are complex and laborious because they require multiple pgRNA purification steps followed by detection via an isotope-labeled probe. Moreover, both assays are unsuitable for evaluating a large number of antiviral agents in a dose-dependent manner. To overcome these limitations, we devised a novel HBV encapsidation assay in a 96-well plate format using nucleocapsid capture plates coated with an anti-HBV core (HBc) antibody, usually employed in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, to immobilize viral nucleocapsids. Viral pgRNA is then detected by quantitative RT-PCR (RT-qPCR). This strategy allows fast, convenient, and quantitative analysis of multiple viral RNA samples to evaluate encapsidation inhibitors. Furthermore, our protocol is potentially suitable for high-throughput screening (HTS) of compounds targeting HBV pgRNA encapsidation. PMID:26554506

  17. Single-cell nanotoxicity assays of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Eustaquio, Trisha; Leary, James F

    2012-01-01

    Properly evaluating the nanotoxicity of nanoparticles involves much more than bulk-cell assays of cell death by necrosis. Cells exposed to nanoparticles may undergo repairable oxidative stress and DNA damage or be induced into apoptosis. Exposure to nanoparticles may cause the cells to alter their proliferation or differentiation or their cell-cell signaling with neighboring cells in a tissue. Nanoparticles are usually more toxic to some cell subpopulations than others, and toxicity often varies with cell cycle. All of these facts dictate that any nanotoxicity assay must be at the single-cell level and must try whenever feasible and reasonable to include many of these other factors. Focusing on one type of quantitative measure of nanotoxicity, we describe flow and scanning image cytometry approaches to measuring nanotoxicity at the single-cell level by using a commonly used assay for distinguishing between necrotic and apoptotic causes of cell death by one type of nanoparticle. Flow cytometry is fast and quantitative, provided that the cells can be prepared into a single-cell suspension for analysis. But when cells cannot be put into suspension without altering nanotoxicity results, or if morphology, attachment, and stain location are important, a scanning image cytometry approach must be used. Both methods are described with application to a particular type of nanoparticle, a superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle (SPION), as an example of how these assays may be applied to the more general problem of determining the effects of nanomaterial exposure to living cells. PMID:22975957

  18. Mutation assays involving blood cells that metabolize toxic substances

    DOEpatents

    Crespi, Charles L.; Thilly, William G.

    1985-01-01

    A line of human blood cells which have high levels of oxidative activity (such as oxygenase, oxidase, peroxidase, and hydroxylase activity) is disclosed. Such cells grow in suspension culture, and are useful to determine the mutagenicity of xenobiotic substances that are metabolized into toxic or mutagenic substances. Mutation assays using these cells, and other cells with similar characteristics, are also disclosed.

  19. A Versatile Microarray Platform for Capturing Rare Cells

    PubMed Central

    Brinkmann, Falko; Hirtz, Michael; Haller, Anna; Gorges, Tobias M.; Vellekoop, Michael J.; Riethdorf, Sabine; Müller, Volkmar; Pantel, Klaus; Fuchs, Harald

    2015-01-01

    Analyses of rare events occurring at extremely low frequencies in body fluids are still challenging. We established a versatile microarray-based platform able to capture single target cells from large background populations. As use case we chose the challenging application of detecting circulating tumor cells (CTCs) – about one cell in a billion normal blood cells. After incubation with an antibody cocktail, targeted cells are extracted on a microarray in a microfluidic chip. The accessibility of our platform allows for subsequent recovery of targets for further analysis. The microarray facilitates exclusion of false positive capture events by co-localization allowing for detection without fluorescent labelling. Analyzing blood samples from cancer patients with our platform reached and partly outreached gold standard performance, demonstrating feasibility for clinical application. Clinical researchers free choice of antibody cocktail without need for altered chip manufacturing or incubation protocol, allows virtual arbitrary targeting of capture species and therefore wide spread applications in biomedical sciences. PMID:26493176

  20. Reference cells and ploidy in the comet assay

    PubMed Central

    Brunborg, Gunnar; Collins, Andrew; Graupner, Anne; Gutzkow, Kristine B.; Olsen, Ann-Karin

    2015-01-01

    In the comet assay single cells are analyzed with respect to their level of DNA damage. Discrimination of the individual cell or cell type based on DNA content, with concomitant scoring of the DNA damage, is useful since this may allow analysis of mixtures of cells. Different cells can then be characterized based on their ploidy, cell cycle stage, or genome size. We here describe two applications of such a cell type-specific comet assay: (i) Testicular cell suspensions, analyzed on the basis of their ploidy during spermatogenesis; and (ii) reference cells in the form of fish erythrocytes which can be included as internal standards to correct for inter-assay variations. With standard fluorochromes used in the comet assay, the total staining signal from each cell – whether damaged or undamaged – was found to be associated with the cell’s DNA content. Analysis of the fluorescence intensity of single cells is straightforward since these data are available in scoring systems based on image analysis. The analysis of testicular cell suspensions provides information on cell type specific composition, susceptibility to genotoxicants, and DNA repair. Internal reference cells, either untreated or carrying defined numbers of lesions induced by ionizing radiation, are useful for investigation of experimental factors that can cause variation in comet assay results, and for routine inclusion in experiments to facilitate standardization of methods, and comparison of comet assay data obtained in different experiments or in different laboratories. They can also be used – in combination with a reference curve – to quantify the DNA lesions induced by a certain treatment. Fish cells of a range of genome sizes, both greater and smaller than human, are suitable for this purpose, and they are inexpensive. PMID:25774164

  1. Detection and serogroup differentiation of Salmonella spp. in food within 30 hours by enrichment-immunoassay with a T6 monoclonal antibody capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed Central

    Ng, S P; Tsui, C O; Roberts, D; Chau, P Y; Ng, M H

    1996-01-01

    We previously described an antigen capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay which makes use of monoclonal antibody T6, which recognizes an epitope on the outer core polysaccharide of Salmonella lipopolysaccharide molecules that is common to almost all Salmonella serovars. In this paper, we show that this assay can detect between 10(5) and 10(7) Salmonella cells per ml even in the presence of excess Escherichia coli. A total of 153 of 154 (99%) serogroup A to E strains and 51 of 78 (71%) serogroup F to 67 strains were reactive as determined by this assay. This corresponds to a detection rate of approximately 98% of all salmonellae known to affect humans. None of the 65 strains of non-Salmonella bacteria tested positive. Taking advantage of the O-factor polysaccharides also present on the antigen captured by the immobilized T6 antibody, we showed that 136 of 154 Salmonella serogroup A to E strains (88%) were correctly differentiated according to their serogroups by use of enzyme conjugates of a panel of O-factor-specific monoclonal antibodies. We evaluated this assay for the detection and serogroup differentiation of salmonellae directly from enrichment cultures of simulated food, eggs, pork, and infant formula milk. All 26 samples which had been contaminated with Salmonella spp. were detected by T6 (100% sensitivity), with only one false-positive result from 101 samples not contaminated by Salmonella spp. (99% specificity). The detection time was substantially reduced to between 17 and 29 h, depending on the enrichment methods used. Since there were no false-negative results, we concluded that this enrichment-immunoassay method can afford rapid screening for Salmonella spp. in food samples. PMID:8779567

  2. Graphene Oxide Nanosheets Modified with Single-Domain Antibodies for Rapid and Efficient Capture of Cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guan-Yu; Li, Zeyang; Theile, Christopher S; Bardhan, Neelkanth M; Kumar, Priyank V; Duarte, Joao N; Maruyama, Takeshi; Rashidfarrokh, Ali; Belcher, Angela M; Ploegh, Hidde L

    2015-11-23

    Peripheral blood can provide valuable information on an individual's immune status. Cell-based assays typically target leukocytes and their products. Characterization of leukocytes from whole blood requires their separation from the far more numerous red blood cells.1 Current methods to classify leukocytes, such as recovery on antibody-coated beads or fluorescence-activated cell sorting require long sample preparation times and relatively large sample volumes.2 A simple method that enables the characterization of cells from a small peripheral whole blood sample could overcome limitations of current analytical techniques. We describe the development of a simple graphene oxide surface coated with single-domain antibody fragments. This format allows quick and efficient capture of distinct WBC subpopulations from small samples (∼30 μL) of whole blood in a geometry that does not require any specialized equipment such as cell sorters or microfluidic devices. PMID:26472062

  3. Assaying endothelial-mural cell interactions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent studies in genetically malleable embryonic model systems have enabled the identification of factors required for blood vessel formation. However, it is not possible in most in vivo systems to dissect carefully the exact cellular behaviours, as well as cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions t...

  4. Inflight Assay of Red Blood Cell Deformability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingram, M.; Paglia, D. E.; Eckstein, E. C.; Frazer, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    Studies on Soviet and American astronauts have demonstrated that red blood cell production is altered in response to low gravity (g) environment. This is associated with changes in individual red cells including increased mean cell volume and altered membrane deformability. During long orbital missions, there is a tendency for the red cell mass deficit to be at least partly corrected although the cell shape anomalies are not. Data currently available suggest that the observed decrease in red cell mass is the result of sudden suppression of erythropoieses and that the recovery trend observed during long missions reflects re-establishment of erythropoietic homeostasis at a "set point" for the red cell mass that is slightly below the normal level at 1 g.

  5. Comet assay, cloning assay, and light and electron microscopy on one preselected cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Karsten; Oehring, Hartmut; Halbhuber, Karl-Juergen; Fiedler, Ursula; Bauer, Eckhard; Greulich, Karl-Otto

    1998-01-01

    In order to perform long-term studies up to one week on a preselected single cell after micromanipulation (e.g. UVA and NIR microbeam exposure) in comparison with non-treated neighbor cells (control cells) we applied a variety of single cell diagnostic techniques and developed a special comet assay for single preselected cells. For that purpose adherent cells were grown in low concentrations and maintained in special sterile centimeter-sized glass cell chambers. After preselection, a single cell was marked by means of diamond-produced circles on the outer cell chamber window. During exposure to microbeams, NADH-attributed autofluorescence of the chosen cell was detected by fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy. In addition, cell morphology was video-monitored (formation of pseudopodia, membrane blebbing,...). Maintaining the microchamber in the incubator, the irradiated cell was examined 24 h later for cell division (clone formation) and modifications in autofluorescence and morphology (including daughter cells). In the case that no division occurred the vitality of the light-exposed cell and of the control cells were probed by intranuclear propidium iodide accumulation. After fixation, either electron microscopy or single cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay) was performed. To monitor comet formation indicating photoinduced DNA damage in the preselected single cell in comparison with the non-exposed neighbor cells the chamber was filled with low-melting gel and lysis solution and exposed to an electric field. In contrast to the conventional comet assay, where only randomly chosen cells of a suspension are investigated, the novel optimized electrophoresis technique should enhance the possibilities of DNA damage detection to a true single (preselected) cell level. The single cell techniques applied to UVA microexposed Chinese hamster ovary cells (364 nm, 1 mW, 3.5 W/cm2) revealed significant cell damage for J/cm2 fluences such as modifications of intracellular

  6. Comet assay, cloning assay, and light and electron microscopy on one preselected cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Karsten; Oehring, H.; Halbhuber, Karl-Juergen; Fiedler, Ursula; Bauer, Eckhard; Greulich, Karl O.

    1997-12-01

    In order to perform long-term studies up to one week on a preselected single cell after micromanipulation (e.g. UVA and NIR microbeam exposure) in comparison with non-treated neighbor cells (control cells) we applied a variety of single cell diagnostic techniques and developed a special comet assay for single preselected cells. For that purpose adherent cells were grown in low concentrations and maintained in special sterile centimeter-sized glass cell chambers. After preselection, a single cell was marked by means of diamond-produced circles on the outer cell chamber window. During exposure to microbeams, NADH-attributed autofluorescence of the chosen cell was detected by fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy. In addition, cell morphology was video-monitored (formation of pseudopodia, membrane blebbing,...). Maintaining the microchamber in the incubator, the irradiated cell was examined 24 h later for cell division (clone formation) and modifications in autofluorescence and morphology (including daughter cells). In the case that no division occurred the vitality of the light-exposed cell and of the control cells were probed by intranuclear propidium iodide accumulation. After fixation, either electron microscopy or single cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay) was performed. To monitor comet formation indicating photoinduced DNA damage in the preselected single cell in comparison with the non-exposed neighbor cells the chamber was filled with low-melting gel and lysis solution and exposed to an electric field. In contrast to the conventional comet assay, where only randomly chosen cells of a suspension are investigated, the novel optimized electrophoresis technique should enhance the possibilities of DNA damage detection to a true single (preselected) cell level. The single cell techniques applied to UVA microexposed Chinese hamster ovary cells (364 nm, 1 mW, 3.5 W/cm2) revealed significant cell damage for J/cm2 fluences such as modifications of intracellular

  7. DETECTION OF ANEUPLOIDY BY A MONOCHROMOSOMAL HYBRID CELL ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A short-term assay utilizing human/mouse monochromosomal hybrid cells to detect chemically-induced aneuploidy in mammalian cells is described. A single human chromosome transferred into mouse cells was used as a cytogenetic marker to quantitate abnormal chromosome segregation fol...

  8. Epithelial cells as alternative human biomatrices for comet assay

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Emilio; Lorenzo, Yolanda; Haug, Kristiane; Nicolaissen, Bjørn; Valverde, Mahara

    2014-01-01

    The comet assay is a valuable experimental tool aimed at mapping DNA damage in human cells in vivo for environmental and occupational monitoring, as well as for therapeutic purposes, such as storage prior to transplant, during tissue engineering, and in experimental ex vivo assays. Furthermore, due to its great versatility, the comet assay allows to explore the use of alternative cell types to assess DNA damage, such as epithelial cells. Epithelial cells, as specialized components of many organs, have the potential to serve as biomatrices that can be used to evaluate genotoxicity and may also serve as early effect biomarkers. Furthermore, 80% of solid cancers are of epithelial origin, which points to the importance of studying DNA damage in these tissues. Indeed, studies including comet assay in epithelial cells have either clear clinical applications (lens and corneal epithelial cells) or examine genotoxicity within human biomonitoring and in vitro studies. We here review improvements in determining DNA damage using the comet assay by employing lens, corneal, tear duct, buccal, and nasal epithelial cells. For some of these tissues invasive sampling procedures are needed. Desquamated epithelial cells must be obtained and dissociated prior to examination using the comet assay, and such procedures may induce varying amounts of DNA damage. Buccal epithelial cells require lysis enriched with proteinase K to obtain free nucleosomes. Over a 30 year period, the comet assay in epithelial cells has been little employed, however its use indicates that it could be an extraordinary tool not only for risk assessment, but also for diagnosis, prognosis of treatments and diseases. PMID:25506353

  9. Parametric control of collision rates and capture rates in geometrically enhanced differential immunocapture (GEDI) microfluidic devices for rare cell capture

    PubMed Central

    Smith, James P.; Lannin, Timothy B.; Syed, Yusef A.; Santana, Steven M.; Kirby, Brian J.

    2013-01-01

    The enrichment and isolation of rare cells from complex samples, such as circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from whole blood, is an important engineering problem with widespread clinical applications. One approach uses a microfluidic obstacle array with an antibody surface functionalization to both guide cells into contact with the capture surface and to facilitate adhesion; geometrically enhanced differential immunocapture is a design strategy in which the array is designed to promote target cell–obstacle contact and minimize other interactions (Gleghorn et al., 2010; Kirby et al., 2012). We present a simulation that uses capture experiments in a simple Hele-Shaw geometry (Santana et al., 2012) to inform a target-cell-specific capture model that can predict capture probability in immunocapture microdevices of any arbitrary complex geometry. We show that capture performance is strongly dependent on the array geometry, and that it is possible to select an obstacle array geometry that maximizes capture efficiency (by creating combinations of frequent target cell–obstacle collisions and shear stress low enough to support capture), while simulatenously enhancing purity by minimizing non-specific adhesion of both smaller contaminant cells (with infrequent cell–obstacle collisions) and larger contaminant cells (by focusing those collisions into regions of high shear stress). PMID:24078270

  10. Mycobacteriophage cell binding proteins for the capture of mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Arutyunov, Denis; Singh, Upasana; El-Hawiet, Amr; Seckler, Henrique dos Santos; Nikjah, Sanaz; Joe, Maju; Bai, Yu; Lowary, Todd L; Klassen, John S; Evoy, Stephane; Szymanski, Christine M

    2014-01-01

    Slow growing Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) causes a deadly condition in cattle known as Johne's disease where asymptomatic carriers are the major source of disease transmission. MAP was also shown to be associated with chronic Crohn's disease in humans. Mycobacterium smegmatis is a model mycobacterium that can cause opportunistic infections in a number of human tissues and, rarely, a respiratory disease. Currently, there are no rapid, culture-independent, reliable and inexpensive tests for the diagnostics of MAP or M. smegmatis infections. Bacteriophages are viruses producing a number of proteins that effectively and specifically recognize the cell envelopes of their bacterial hosts. We demonstrate that the mycobacterial phage L5 minor tail protein Gp6 and lysin Gp10 are useful tools for the rapid capture of mycobacteria. Immobilized Gp10 was able to bind both MAP and M. smegmatis cells whereas Gp6 was M. smegmatis specific. Neither of the 2 proteins was able to capture E. coli, salmonella, campylobacter or Mycobacterium marinum cells. Gp6 was detected previously as a component of the phage particle and shows no homology to proteins with known function. Therefore, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry was used to determine whether recombinant Gp6 could bind to a number of chemically synthesized fragments of mycobacterial surface glycans. These findings demonstrate that mycobacteriophage proteins could be used as a pathogen capturing platform that can potentially improve the effectiveness of existing diagnostic methods. PMID:26713219

  11. Ferromagnetic Bare Metal Stent for Endothelial Cell Capture and Retention.

    PubMed

    Uthamaraj, Susheil; Tefft, Brandon J; Hlinomaz, Ota; Sandhu, Gurpreet S; Dragomir-Daescu, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Rapid endothelialization of cardiovascular stents is needed to reduce stent thrombosis and to avoid anti-platelet therapy which can reduce bleeding risk. The feasibility of using magnetic forces to capture and retain endothelial outgrowth cells (EOC) labeled with super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) has been shown previously. But this technique requires the development of a mechanically functional stent from a magnetic and biocompatible material followed by in-vitro and in-vivo testing to prove rapid endothelialization. We developed a weakly ferromagnetic stent from 2205 duplex stainless steel using computer aided design (CAD) and its design was further refined using finite element analysis (FEA). The final design of the stent exhibited a principal strain below the fracture limit of the material during mechanical crimping and expansion. One hundred stents were manufactured and a subset of them was used for mechanical testing, retained magnetic field measurements, in-vitro cell capture studies, and in-vivo implantation studies. Ten stents were tested for deployment to verify if they sustained crimping and expansion cycle without failure. Another 10 stents were magnetized using a strong neodymium magnet and their retained magnetic field was measured. The stents showed that the retained magnetism was sufficient to capture SPION-labeled EOC in our in-vitro studies. SPION-labeled EOC capture and retention was verified in large animal models by implanting 1 magnetized stent and 1 non-magnetized control stent in each of 4 pigs. The stented arteries were explanted after 7 days and analyzed histologically. The weakly magnetic stents developed in this study were capable of attracting and retaining SPION-labeled endothelial cells which can promote rapid healing. PMID:26436434

  12. Comparison of cell-based and PCR-based assays as methods for measuring infectivity of Tulane virus.

    PubMed

    Shan, Lei; Yang, David; Wang, Dapeng; Tian, Peng

    2016-05-01

    In this study, we used Tulane virus (TV) as a surrogate for HuNoV to evaluate for correlation between two cell-based assays and three PCR-based assays. Specifically, the cell-based plaque and TCID50 assays measure for infectious virus particles, while the PCR-based RNase exposure, porcine gastric mucin in-situ-capture qRT-PCR (PGM-ISC-qRT-PCR), and antibody in-situ-capture qRT-PCR (Ab-ISC-qRT-PCR) assays measure for an amplicon within encapsidated viral genome. Ten batches of viral stocks ranging from 3.41 × 10(5) to 6.67 × 10(6) plaque forming units (PFUs) were used for side by side comparison with PFU as a reference. The results indicate that one PFU was equivalent to 6.69 ± 2.34 TCID50 units, 9.75 ± 10.87 RNase-untreated genomic copies (GCs), 2.87 ± 3.05 RNase-treated GCs, 0.07 ± 0.07 PGM-ISC-qRT-PCR GCs, and 0.52 ± 0.39 Ab-ISC-qRT-PCR GCs. We observed that while the cell-based assays were consistent with each other, the TCID50 assay was more sensitive than the plaque assay. In contrast, the PCR-based assays were not always consistent with the cell-based assays. The very high variations in GCs as measured by both ISC-RT-qPCR assays made them difficult to correlate against the relatively small variations (<20-fold) in the PFUs or TCID50 units as measured by the cell-based assays. PMID:26875997

  13. Microfluidic device with chemical gradient for single-cell cytotoxicity assays.

    PubMed

    Hosokawa, Masahito; Hayashi, Takuma; Mori, Tetsushi; Yoshino, Tomoko; Nakasono, Satoshi; Matsunaga, Tadashi

    2011-05-15

    Here, we report the fabrication of a chemical gradient microfluidic device for single-cell cytotoxicity assays. This device consists of a microfluidic chemical gradient generator and a microcavity array that enables entrapment of cells with high efficiency at 88 ± 6% of the loaded cells. A 2-fold logarithmic chemical gradient generator that is capable of generating a serial 2-fold gradient was designed and then integrated with the microcavity array. High density single-cell entrapment was demonstrated in the device without cell damage, which was performed in 30 s. Finally, we validated the feasibility of this device to perform cytotoxicity assays by exposing cells to potassium cyanide (0-100 μM KCN). The device captured images of 4000 single cells affected by 6 concentrations of KCN and determined cell viability by counting the effected cells. Image scanning of the microcavity array was completed within 10 min using a 10× objective lens and a motorized stage. Aligning cells on the microcavity array eases cell counting, observation, imaging, and evaluation of singular cells. Thus, this platform was able to determine the cytotoxicity of chemicals at a single-cell level, as well as trace the cytotoxicity over time. This device and method will be useful for cytotoxicity analysis and basic biomedical research. PMID:21526753

  14. A novel microculture kinetic assay (MiCK assay) for malignant cell growth and chemosensitivity.

    PubMed

    Kravtsov, V D

    1994-01-01

    The THERMOmax microplate reader was adapted for monitoring the growth kinetics of human leukaemic OCI/AML-2 and mouse tumour J-774.1 cell lines in continuous culture. Fluid evaporation from wells, CO2 escape and contamination were prevented by hermetic sealing of the microcultures in wells of a 96-well microplate, thus enabling the cells to grow exponentially for 72 h under the conditions of the incubated microplate reader. For both OCI/AML-2 cells, which grow in suspension, and adherent J-774.1 cells, a linear correlation was demonstrated between the number of unstained cells seeded in a given microplate well and the optical density (OD) of that well. Therefore, the OD/time curve of the culture could be deemed to be its growth curve. By the use of the linear fit equation, the actual number of the cells in the wells was computable at any time point of the assay. In the chemosensitivity test, an inhibitory effect of ARA-C on the growth of the cells could be estimated by viewing of the growth curves plotted on the screen. The maximum kinetic rates (Vmax) of the curves in the control and the ARA-C-treated wells were compared, yielding a growth inhibition index (GII). Comparison of results of the kinetic chemosensitivity assay with those of a [3H]thymidine incorporation assay revealed that the novel assay is suitable for precise quantitation of the cell chemosensitivity, is more informative and has the added technical advantage of performance without recourse to radioactive or chemically hazardous substances. PMID:7833120

  15. Cell membrane array fabrication and assay technology

    PubMed Central

    Yamazaki, Victoria; Sirenko, Oksana; Schafer, Robert J; Nguyen, Luat; Gutsmann, Thomas; Brade, Lore; Groves, Jay T

    2005-01-01

    Background Microarray technology has been used extensively over the past 10 years for assessing gene expression, and has facilitated precise genetic profiling of everything from tumors to small molecule drugs. By contrast, arraying cell membranes in a manner which preserves their ability to mediate biochemical processes has been considerably more difficult. Results In this article, we describe a novel technology for generating cell membrane microarrays for performing high throughput biology. Our robotically-arrayed supported membranes are physiologically fluid, a critical property which differentiates this technology from other previous membrane systems and makes it useful for studying cellular processes on an industrialized scale. Membrane array elements consist of a solid substrate, above which resides a fluid supported lipid bilayer containing biologically-active molecules of interest. Incorporation of transmembrane proteins into the arrayed membranes enables the study of ligand/receptor binding, as well as interactions with live intact cells. The fluidity of these molecules in the planar lipid bilayer facilitates dimerization and other higher order interactions necessary for biological signaling events. In order to demonstrate the utility of our fluid membrane array technology to ligand/receptor studies, we investigated the multivalent binding of the cholera toxin B-subunit (CTB) to the membrane ganglioside GM1. We have also displayed a number of bona fide drug targets, including bacterial endotoxin (also referred to as lipopolysaccharide (LPS)) and membrane proteins important in T cell activation. Conclusion We have demonstrated the applicability of our fluid cell membrane array technology to both academic research applications and industrial drug discovery. Our technology facilitates the study of ligand/receptor interactions and cell-cell signaling, providing rich qualitative and quantitative information. PMID:15960850

  16. Mutation assays involving blood cells that metabolize toxic substances

    SciTech Connect

    Crespi, Charles L.; Thilly, William G.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention pertains to a line of human blood cells which have high levels of oxidative activity (such as oxygenase, oxidase, peroxidase, and hydroxylase activity). Such cells grow in suspension culture, and are useful to determine the mutagenicity of xenobiotic substances that are metabolized into toxic or mutagenic substances. The invention also includes mutation assays using these cells, and other cells with similar characteristics.

  17. Mutation assays involving blood cells that metabolize toxic substances

    DOEpatents

    Crespi, C.L.; Thilly, W.G.

    1999-08-10

    The present invention pertains to a line of human blood cells which have high levels of oxidative activity (such as oxygenase, oxidase, peroxidase, and hydroxylase activity). Such cells grow in suspension culture, and are useful to determine the mutagenicity of xenobiotic substances that are metabolized into toxic or mutagenic substances. The invention also includes mutation assays using these cells, and other cells with similar characteristics. 3 figs.

  18. AFBI assay – Aptamer Fluorescence Binding and Internalization assay for cultured adherent cells

    PubMed Central

    Thiel, William H.; Giangrande, Paloma H.

    2016-01-01

    The SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment) process allows for the enrichment of DNA or RNA aptamers from a complex nucleic acid library that are specific for a target molecule. The SELEX process has been adapted from identifying aptamers in vitro using recombinant target protein to cell-based methodologies (Cell-SELEX), where the targets are expressed on the surface of cells. One major advantage of Cell-SELEX is that the target molecules are maintained in a native confirmation. Additionally, Cell-SELEX may be used to discover novel therapeutic biomarkers by performing selections on diseased versus healthy cells. However, a caveat to Cell-SELEX is that testing of single aptamers identified in the selection is laborious, time-consuming, and expensive. The most frequently used methods to screen for aptamer binding and internalization on cells are flow cytometry and quantitative PCR (qPCR). While flow cytometry can directly assess binding of a fluorescently-labeled aptamer to a target, it requires significant starting material and is not easily scalable. qPCR-based approaches are highly sensitive but have non-negligible experiment-to-experiment variability due to the number of sample processing steps. Herein we describe a cell-based aptamer fluorescence binding and internalization (AFBI) assay. This assay requires minimal reagents and has few experimental steps/manipulations, thereby allowing for rapid screening of many aptamers and conditions simultaneously and direct quantitation of aptamer binding and internalization. PMID:26972784

  19. AFBI assay - Aptamer Fluorescence Binding and Internalization assay for cultured adherent cells.

    PubMed

    Thiel, William H; Giangrande, Paloma H

    2016-07-01

    The SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment) process allows for the enrichment of DNA or RNA aptamers from a complex nucleic acid library that are specific for a target molecule. The SELEX process has been adapted from identifying aptamers in vitro using recombinant target protein to cell-based methodologies (Cell-SELEX), where the targets are expressed on the surface of cells. One major advantage of Cell-SELEX is that the target molecules are maintained in a native confirmation. Additionally, Cell-SELEX may be used to discover novel therapeutic biomarkers by performing selections on diseased versus healthy cells. However, a caveat to Cell-SELEX is that testing of single aptamers identified in the selection is laborious, time-consuming, and expensive. The most frequently used methods to screen for aptamer binding and internalization on cells are flow cytometry and quantitative PCR (qPCR). While flow cytometry can directly assess binding of a fluorescently-labeled aptamer to a target, it requires significant starting material and is not easily scalable. qPCR-based approaches are highly sensitive but have non-negligible experiment-to-experiment variability due to the number of sample processing steps. Herein we describe a cell-based aptamer fluorescence binding and internalization (AFBI) assay. This assay requires minimal reagents and has few experimental steps/manipulations, thereby allowing for rapid screening of many aptamers and conditions simultaneously and direct quantitation of aptamer binding and internalization. PMID:26972784

  20. The glycophorin A assay for somatic cell mutations in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Langlois, R.G.; Bigbee, W.L.; Jensen, R.H.

    1989-08-18

    In this report we briefly review our past experience and some new developments with the GPA assay. Particular emphasis will be placed on two areas that affect the utility of the GPA assay for human population monitoring. The first is our efforts to simplify the GPA assay to make it more generally available for large population studies. The second is to begin to understand some of the characteristics of human hemopoiesis which affect the accumulation and expression of mutant phenotype cells. 11 refs., 4 figs.

  1. Smart Thin Hydrogel Coatings Harnessing Hydrophobicity and Topography to Capture and Release Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Luying; Liu, Hongliang; Zhang, Feilong; Li, Guannan; Wang, Shutao

    2016-09-01

    Smart thin hydrogel coatings are fabricated to capture and release targeted cancer cells by simultaneously tuning surface hydrophobicity and topography. At physiological temperature, the targeted cancer cells are captured on the hydrophobic and wrinkled coating surface. At room temperature, the captured cells are released from the hydrophilic and smooth coating surface. PMID:27295294

  2. Comparison of peptide mass mapping and electron capture dissociation as assays for histone posttranslational modifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liwen; Freitas, Michael A.

    2004-05-01

    Posttranslational modifications of core histones play a critical role in the structure of chromatin and the regulation of gene activities. Improved techniques for determining these modification sites may lead to a better understanding of histone regulation at the molecular level. LC-MS peptide mass mapping was performed on pepsin, trypsin and Glu-C digests of bovine thymus H4 using a QqTOF instrument. The well established modification sites of H4 (acetylation of K8, 12, 16 and methylation of K20) were observed in addition to several recently discovered modifications including: methylation of K31, 44, 59 and acetylation of K20, 77, 79. For comparison, electron capture dissociation (ECD) was performed on intact H4 along with several peptides from enzymatic digestion. The results from the ECD experiments of histone H4 indicated the acetylation of K5, 12, 16, 31, 91 and the methylation of K20 and 59 in good agreement with the result from peptide mapping. The work is dedicated to Alan G. Marshall on his 60th birthday. His endeavors in the advancement of FT-ICR facilitated experiments reported herein.

  3. Novel yeast cell dehydrogenase activity assay in situ.

    PubMed

    Berłowska, Joanna; Kregiel, Dorota; Klimek, Leszek; Orzeszyna, Bartosz; Ambroziak, Wojciech

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this research was to develop a suitable method of succinate dehydrogenase activity assay in situ for different industrial yeast strains. For this purpose different compounds: EDTA, Triton X-100, sodium deoxycholate, digitonin, nystatin and beta-mercaptoethanol were used. The permeabilization process was controlled microscopically by primuline staining. Enzyme assay was conducted in whole yeast cells with Na-succinate as substrate, phenazine methosulfate (PMS) as electron carrier and in the presence one of two different tetrazolium salts: tetrazolium blue chloride (BT) or cyanoditolyl tetrazolium chloride (CTC) reduced during the assay. In comparabile studies of yeast vitality the amount of intracellular ATP was determined according to luciferin/luciferase method. During the succinate dehydrogenase assay in intact yeast cells without permeabilization, BT formazans were partially visualized in the cells, but CTC formazans appeared to be totally extracellular or associated with the plasma membrane. Under these conditions there was no linear relationship between formazan color intensity signal and yeast cell density. From all chemical compounds tested, only digitonin was effective in membrane permeabilization without negative influence on cell morphology. Furthermore, with digitonin-treated cells a linear relationship between formazan color intensity signal and yeast cell number was noticed. Significant decreasing of succinate dehydrogenase activity and ATP content were observed during aging of the tested yeast strains. PMID:17419290

  4. Capture of Tumor Cells on Anti-EpCAM-Functionalized Poly(acrylic acid)-Coated Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Andree, Kiki C; Barradas, Ana M C; Nguyen, Ai T; Mentink, Anouk; Stojanovic, Ivan; Baggerman, Jacob; van Dalum, Joost; van Rijn, Cees J M; Terstappen, Leon W M M

    2016-06-15

    The presence of tumor cells in blood is predictive of short survival in several cancers and their isolation and characterization can guide toward the use of more effective treatments. These circulating tumor cells (CTC) are, however, extremely rare and require a technology that is sufficiently sensitive and specific to identify CTC against a background of billions of blood cells. Immuno-capture of cells expressing the epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) are frequently used to enrich CTC from blood. The choice of bio conjugation strategy and antibody clone is crucial for adequate cell capture but is poorly understood. In this study, we determined the binding affinity constants and epitope binding of the EpCAM antibodies VU1D-9, HO-3, EpAb3-5, and MJ-37 by surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi). Glass surfaces were coated using a poly(acrylic acid) based coating and functionalized with anti-EpCAM antibodies. Binding of cells from the breast carcinoma cell line (SKBR-3) to the functionalized surfaces were compared. Although EpAb3-5 displayed the highest binding affinity HO-3 captured the highest amount of cells. Hence we report differences in the performance of the different antibodies and more importantly that the choice of antibody to capture CTC should be based on multiple assays. PMID:27187784

  5. Medical devices; immunology and microbiology devices; classification of the West Nile Virus IgM capture Elisa assay. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2003-10-30

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is classifying the West Nile Virus IgM Capture Elisa assay into class II (special controls). The agency is taking this action in response to a petition submitted under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act) as amended by the Medical Device Amendments of 1976 (the amendments), the Safe Medical Devices Act of 1990, and the Food and Drug Administration Modernization Act of 1997 (FDAMA). The agency is classifying this device into class II (special controls) in order to provide a reasonable assurance of safety and effectiveness of the device. Elsewhere in this issue of the Federal Register, FDA is announcing the availability of a guidance document that will serve as the special control for the device. PMID:14587527

  6. Effects of nanopillar array diameter and spacing on cancer cell capture and cell behaviors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shunqiang; Wan, Yuan; Liu, Yaling

    2014-10-01

    While substrates with nanopillars (NPs) have emerged as promising platforms for isolation of circulating tumor cells (CTCs), the influence of diameter and spacing of NPs on CTC capture is still unclear. In this paper, CTC-capture yield and cell behaviors have been investigated by using antibody functionalized NPs of various diameters (120-1100 nm) and spacings (35-800 nm). The results show a linear relationship between the cell capture yield and effective contact area of NP substrates where a NP array of small diameter and reasonable spacing is preferred; however, spacing that is too small or too large adversely impairs the capture efficiency and specificity, respectively. In addition, the formation of pseudopodia between captured cells and the substrate is found to be dependent not only on cell adhesion status but also on elution strength and shear direction. These findings provide essential guidance in designing NP substrates for more efficient capture of CTCs and manipulation of cytomorphology in future.While substrates with nanopillars (NPs) have emerged as promising platforms for isolation of circulating tumor cells (CTCs), the influence of diameter and spacing of NPs on CTC capture is still unclear. In this paper, CTC-capture yield and cell behaviors have been investigated by using antibody functionalized NPs of various diameters (120-1100 nm) and spacings (35-800 nm). The results show a linear relationship between the cell capture yield and effective contact area of NP substrates where a NP array of small diameter and reasonable spacing is preferred; however, spacing that is too small or too large adversely impairs the capture efficiency and specificity, respectively. In addition, the formation of pseudopodia between captured cells and the substrate is found to be dependent not only on cell adhesion status but also on elution strength and shear direction. These findings provide essential guidance in designing NP substrates for more efficient capture of CTCs

  7. Defining cell culture conditions to improve human norovirus infectivity assays.

    PubMed

    Straub, T M; Hutchison, J R; Bartholomew, R A; Valdez, C O; Valentine, N B; Dohnalkova, A; Ozanich, R M; Bruckner-Lea, C J

    2013-01-01

    Significant difficulties remain for determining whether human noroviruses (hNoV) recovered from water, food, and environmental samples are infectious. Three-dimensional (3-D) tissue culture of human intestinal cells has shown promise in developing an infectivity assay, but reproducibility, even within a single laboratory, remains problematic. From the literature and our observations, we hypothesized that the common factors that lead to more reproducible hNoV infectivity in vitro requires that the cell line be (1) of human gastrointestinal origin, (2) expresses apical microvilli, and (3) be a positive secretor cell line. The C2BBe1 cell line, which is a brush-border producing clone of Caco-2, meets these three criteria. When challenged with Genogroup II viruses, we observed a 2 Log(10) increase in viral RNA titer. A passage experiment with GII viruses showed evidence of the ability to propagate hNoV by both quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and microscopy. In our hands, using 3-D C2BBe1 cells improves reproducibility of the infectivity assay for hNoV, but the assay can still be variable. Two sources of variability include the cells themselves (mixed phenotypes of small and large intestine) and initial titer measurements using qRT-PCR that measures all RNA vs. plaque assays that measure infectious virus. PMID:23306266

  8. Defining cell culture conditions to improve human norovirus infectivity assays

    SciTech Connect

    Straub, Tim M.; Hutchison, Janine R.; Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Valdez, Catherine O.; Valentine, Nancy B.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Ozanich, Richard M.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.

    2013-01-10

    Significant difficulties remain for determining whether human noroviruses (hNoV) recovered from water, food, and environmental samples are infectious. Three-dimensional tissue culture of human intestinal cells has shown promise in developing an infectivity assay, but reproducibility, even within a single laboratory, remains problematic. From the literature and our observations, we hypothesized that the common factors that leads to more reproducible hNoV infectivity in vitro requires that the cell line be 1) of human gastrointestinal origin, 2) expresses apical microvilli, and 3) be a positive secretor cell line. The C2BBe1 cell line, which is a brush-border producing clone of Caco-2, meets these three criteria. When challenged with Genogroup II viruses, we observed a 2 Log10 increase in viral RNA titer. A passage experiment with GII viruses showed evidence of the ability to propagate hNoV by both reverse transcription quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR) and microscopy. Using 3-D C2BBe1 cells improves reproducibility of the infectivity assay for hNoV, but the assay can still be variable. Two sources of variability include the cells themselves (mixed phenotypes of small and large intestine) and initial titer measurements using quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) that measures all RNA vs. plaque assays that measure infectious virus.

  9. Antigen-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for detection of different H5 avian Influenza A virus.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Yi-Chung; Chu, Wen-Yu; Tsao, Zak; Wang, Ching-Ho

    2012-07-01

    Avian Influenza A virus (AIV) subtype H5 is divided into American and Eurasian lineages, according to hemagglutinin gene sequences. Although methods for detecting H5 AIVs have been described, no H5 strain-specific detection method has been reported. The purpose of the present study was to develop an antigen-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ACE) to detect and differentiate between the American and the Eurasian H5 AIVs. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against the HA fragment of a Eurasian H5N2 AIV were used as the capture antibodies as well as the detector antibodies after labeling with horseradish peroxidase to develop an ACE. One mAb was selected for detecting the American as well as the Eurasian H5 AIVs. The other mAb was used for detecting only the Eurasian H5N2 but not the American H5N2 AIVs, H6N1 AIVs, or Newcastle disease virus. The ACEs developed would be useful for detection and differentiation of H5 AIVs from the Eurasian and the American H5 AIVs. PMID:22621946

  10. Transparent, biocompatible nanostructured surfaces for cancer cell capture and culture.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Boran; He, Zhaobo; Zhao, Libo; Fang, Yuan; Chen, Yuanyuan; He, Rongxiang; Chen, Fangfang; Song, Haibin; Deng, Yuliang; Zhao, Xingzhong; Xiong, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in the blood which have detached from both the primary tumor and any metastases may be considered as a "liquid biopsy" and are expected to replace tumor biopsies in the monitoring of treatment response and determining patient prognosis. Here, we introduce a facile and efficient CTC detection material made of hydroxyapatite/chitosan (HA/CTS), which is beneficial because of its transparency and excellent biological compatibility. Atomic force microscopy images show that the roughness of the HA/CTS nanofilm (HA/CTSNF) substrates can be controlled by changing the HA:CTS ratio. Enhanced local topographic interactions between nano-components on cancer cell membranes, and the antibody coated nanostructured substrate lead to improved CTC capture and separation. This remarkable nanostructured substrate has the potential for CTC culture in situ and merits further analysis. CTCs captured from artificial blood samples were observed in culture on HA/CTSNF substrates over a period of 14 days by using conventional staining methods (hematoxylin eosin and Wright's stain). We conclude that these substrates are multifunctional materials capable of isolating and culturing CTCs for subsequent studies. PMID:24904216

  11. Transparent, biocompatible nanostructured surfaces for cancer cell capture and culture

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Boran; He, Zhaobo; Zhao, Libo; Fang, Yuan; Chen, Yuanyuan; He, Rongxiang; Chen, Fangfang; Song, Haibin; Deng, Yuliang; Zhao, Xingzhong; Xiong, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in the blood which have detached from both the primary tumor and any metastases may be considered as a “liquid biopsy” and are expected to replace tumor biopsies in the monitoring of treatment response and determining patient prognosis. Here, we introduce a facile and efficient CTC detection material made of hydroxyapatite/chitosan (HA/CTS), which is beneficial because of its transparency and excellent biological compatibility. Atomic force microscopy images show that the roughness of the HA/CTS nanofilm (HA/CTSNF) substrates can be controlled by changing the HA:CTS ratio. Enhanced local topographic interactions between nano-components on cancer cell membranes, and the antibody coated nanostructured substrate lead to improved CTC capture and separation. This remarkable nanostructured substrate has the potential for CTC culture in situ and merits further analysis. CTCs captured from artificial blood samples were observed in culture on HA/CTSNF substrates over a period of 14 days by using conventional staining methods (hematoxylin eosin and Wright’s stain). We conclude that these substrates are multifunctional materials capable of isolating and culturing CTCs for subsequent studies. PMID:24904216

  12. Progress in Cell Based Assays for Botulinum Neurotoxin Detection

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are the most potent human toxins known and the causative agent of botulism, and are widely used as valuable pharmaceuticals. The BoNTs are modular proteins consisting of a heavy chain and a light chain linked by a disulfide bond. Intoxication of neuronal cells by BoNTs is a multi-step process including specific cell binding, endocytosis, conformational change in the endosome, translocation of the enzymatic light chain into the cells cytosol, and SNARE target cleavage. The quantitative and reliable potency determination of fully functional BoNTs produced as active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) requires an assay that considers all steps in the intoxication pathway. The in vivo mouse bioassay has for years been the ‘gold standard’ assay used for this purpose, but it requires the use of large numbers of mice and thus causes associated costs and ethical concerns. Cell-based assays are currently the only in vitro alternative that detect fully functional BoNTs in a single assay and have been utilized for years for research purposes. Within the last 5 years, several cell-based BoNT detection assays have been developed that are able to quantitatively determine BoNT potency with similar or greater sensitivity than the mouse bioassay. These assays now offer an alternative method for BoNT potency determination. Such quantitative and reliable BoNT potency determination is a crucial step in basic research, in the development of pharmaceutical BoNTs, and in the quantitative detection of neutralizing antibodies. PMID:23239357

  13. Isolating single cells in a neurosphere assay using inertial microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Nathamgari, S. Shiva P.; Dong, Biqin; Zhou, Fan; Kang, Wonmo; Giraldo-Vela, Juan P.; McGuire, Tammy; McNaughton, Rebecca L.; Sun, Cheng; Kessler, John A.; Espinosa, Horacio D.

    2015-01-01

    Sphere forming assays are routinely used for in vitro propagation and differentiation of stem cells. Because the stem cell clusters can become heterogeneous and polyclonal, they must first be dissociated into a single cell suspension for further clonal analysis or differentiation studies. The dissociated population is marred by the presence of doublets, triplets and semi-cleaved/intact clusters which makes identification and further analysis of differentiation pathways difficult. In this work, we use inertial microfluidics to separate the single cells and clusters in a population of chemically dissociated neurospheres. In contrast to previous microfluidic sorting technologies which operated at high flow rates, we implement the spiral microfluidic channel in a novel focusing regime that occurs at lower flow rates. In this regime, the curvature-induced Dean’s force focuses the smaller, single cells towards the inner wall and the larger clusters towards the center. We further demonstrate that sorting in this low flow rate (and hence low shear stress) regime yields a high percentage (> 90%) of viable cells and preserves multipotency by differentiating the sorted neural stem cell population into neurons and astrocytes. The modularity of the device allows easy integration with other lab-on-a-chip devices for upstream mechanical dissociation and downstream high-throughput clonal analysis, localized electroporation and sampling. Although demonstrated in the case of the neurosphere assay, the method is equally applicable to other sphere forming assays. PMID:26511875

  14. Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Adherent Cell Differentiation and Cytotoxicity (ACDC) assay

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Embryonic Stem Cell Test (EST) is an assay which evaluates xenobiotic-induced effects using three endpoints: mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) differentiation, mESC viability, and 3T3-cell viability. Our research goal was to develop an improved high-throughput assay by establi...

  15. Cross-linking approach to affinity capture of protein complexes from chaotrope-solubilized cell lysates.

    PubMed

    Alloza, Iraide; Martens, Erik; Hawthorne, Susan; Vandenbroeck, Koen

    2004-01-01

    Affinity capture methods are widely used for isolation and analysis of protein complexes. Short peptide tags fused to the protein of interest normally facilitate straightforward purification and detection of interacting proteins. We investigated the suitability of applying C-terminally hexahistidine-tagged interleukin-12 (IL-12) alpha- and beta-chains as "bait" proteins for cocapturing novel binding partners using heterologous recombinant human embryonic kidney-293 (HEK-293) cell lines. The beta-chain, but not the alpha-chain, extracted from cell lysates was capable of binding to the Ni(2+)-nitrilotriacetic acid affinity resin under nondenaturing conditions. Retention of the alpha-chain on this matrix was dependent on treatment of cell lysates with high concentrations of chaotropes such as urea. Since under these conditions any noncovalent protein associations are destroyed, prior cross-linking of proteins interacting with the alpha-chain in intact cells was required. The use of the thiol-cleavable cross-linker 3,3'-dithiobis(succinimidyl proprionate) facilitated dissociation of alpha-chain-binding proteins by means of dithiothreitol following purification. Using this approach we were able to demonstrate a strong interaction between the endoplasmic reticulum chaperone calreticulin (CRT) and the IL-12 alpha-chain that was confirmed in a reciprocal anti-CRT immunoprecipitation assay. The assay presented here provides a simple approach to exposing concealed hexahistidine tags while retaining native noncovalent protein interactions and should be generally applicable in a range of pull-down or affinity capture methods aiming at analysis of protein complexes. PMID:14654056

  16. MAMMALIAN CELL GENE MUTATION ASSAYS WORKING GROUP REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mammalian cell gene mutation assays have been used for many years and the diversity of the available systems attests to the varied methods found to grow mammalian dells and detect mutations. s part of the International Workshop on Standardization of Genotoxicity Test Procedures, ...

  17. Serial interactome capture of the human cell nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, Thomas; Albrecht, Anne-Susann; de Melo Costa, Veronica Rodrigues; Sauer, Sascha; Meierhofer, David; Ørom, Ulf Andersson

    2016-01-01

    Novel RNA-guided cellular functions are paralleled by an increasing number of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs). Here we present ‘serial RNA interactome capture' (serIC), a multiple purification procedure of ultraviolet-crosslinked poly(A)–RNA–protein complexes that enables global RBP detection with high specificity. We apply serIC to the nuclei of proliferating K562 cells to obtain the first human nuclear RNA interactome. The domain composition of the 382 identified nuclear RBPs markedly differs from previous IC experiments, including few factors without known RNA-binding domains that are in good agreement with computationally predicted RNA binding. serIC extends the number of DNA–RNA-binding proteins (DRBPs), and reveals a network of RBPs involved in p53 signalling and double-strand break repair. serIC is an effective tool to couple global RBP capture with additional selection or labelling steps for specific detection of highly purified RBPs. PMID:27040163

  18. Single cell multiplexed assay for proteolytic activity using droplet microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Ng, Ee Xien; Miller, Miles A; Jing, Tengyang; Chen, Chia-Hung

    2016-07-15

    Cellular enzymes interact in a post-translationally regulated fashion to govern individual cell behaviors, yet current platform technologies are limited in their ability to measure multiple enzyme activities simultaneously in single cells. Here, we developed multi-color Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based enzymatic substrates and use them in a microfluidics platform to simultaneously measure multiple specific protease activities from water-in-oil droplets that contain single cells. By integrating the microfluidic platform with a computational analytical method, Proteolytic Activity Matrix Analysis (PrAMA), we are able to infer six different protease activity signals from individual cells in a high throughput manner (~100 cells/experimental run). We characterized protease activity profiles at single cell resolution for several cancer cell lines including breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231, lung cancer cell line PC-9, and leukemia cell line K-562 using both live-cell and in-situ cell lysis assay formats, with special focus on metalloproteinases important in metastasis. The ability to measure multiple proteases secreted from or expressed in individual cells allows us to characterize cell heterogeneity and has potential applications including systems biology, pharmacology, cancer diagnosis and stem cell biology. PMID:26995287

  19. Highly Sensitive Assay for Measurement of Arenavirus-cell Attachment.

    PubMed

    Klaus, Joseph P; Botten, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Arenaviruses are a family of enveloped RNA viruses that cause severe human disease. The first step in the arenavirus life cycle is attachment of viral particles to host cells. While virus-cell attachment can be measured through the use of virions labeled with biotin, radioactive isotopes, or fluorescent dyes, these approaches typically require high multiplicities of infection (MOI) to enable detection of bound virus. We describe a quantitative (q)RT-PCR-based assay that measures Junin virus strain Candid 1 attachment via quantitation of virion-packaged viral genomic RNA. This assay has several advantages including its extreme sensitivity and ability to measure attachment over a large dynamic range of MOIs without the need to purify or label input virus. Importantly, this approach can be easily tailored for use with other viruses through the use of virus-specific qRT-PCR reagents. Further, this assay can be modified to permit measurement of particle endocytosis and genome uncoating. In conclusion, we describe a simple, yet robust assay for highly sensitive measurement of arenavirus-cell attachment. PMID:26966937

  20. Oligonucleotide aptamers: A next-generation technology for the capture and detection of circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Dickey, David D; Giangrande, Paloma H

    2016-03-15

    A critical challenge for treating cancer is the early identification of those patients who are at greatest risk of developing metastatic disease. The number of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in cancer patients has recently been shown to be a valuable (and non-invasively accessible) diagnostic indicator of the state of metastatic disease. CTCs are rare cancer cells found in the blood circulation of cancer patients believed to provide a means of diagnosing the likelihood for metastatic spread and assessing response to therapy in advanced, as well as early stage disease settings. Numerous technical efforts have been made to reliably detect and quantify CTCs, but the development of a universal assay has proven quite difficult. Notable challenges for developing a broadly useful CTC-based diagnostic assay are the development of easy-to-operate methods that (1) are sufficiently sensitive to reliably detect the small number of CTCs that are present in the circulation and (2) can capture the molecular heterogeneity of tumor cells. In this review, we describe recent progress towards the application of synthetic oligonucleotide aptamers as promising, novel, robust tools for the isolation and detection of CTCs. Advantages and challenges of the aptamer approach are also discussed. PMID:26631715

  1. An Electrochemical Cell for Selective Lithium Capture from Seawater.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joo-Seong; Lee, Yong-Hee; Choi, Seungyeon; Shin, Jaeho; Dinh, Hung-Cuong; Choi, Jang Wook

    2015-08-18

    Lithium (Li) is a core element of Li-ion batteries (LIBs). Recent developments in mobile electronics such as smartphones and tablet PCs as well as advent of large-scale LIB applications including electrical vehicles and grid-level energy storage systems have led to an increase in demand for LIBs, giving rise to a concern on the availability and market price of Li resources. However, the current Lime-Soda process that is responsible for greater than 80% of worldwide Li resource supply is applicable only in certain regions on earth where the Li concentrations are sufficiently high (salt lakes or salt pans). Moreover, not only is the process time-consuming (12-18 months), but post-treatments are also required for the purification of Li. Here, we have devised a location-independent electrochemical system for Li capture, which can operate within a short time period (a few hours to days). By engaging olivine LiFePO4 active electrode that improves interfacial properties via polydopamine coating, the electrochemical cell achieves 4330 times amplification in Li/Na ion selectivity (Li/Na molar ratio of initial solution = 0.01 and Li/Na molar ratio of final electrode = 43.3). In addition, the electrochemical system engages an I(-)/I3(-) redox couple in the other electrode for balancing of the redox states on both electrode sides and sustainable operations of the entire cell. Based on the electrochemical results, key material and interfacial properties that affect the selectivity in Li capture are identified. PMID:25920476

  2. Improved Method for Bacterial Cell Capture after Flow Cytometry Cell Sorting ▿

    PubMed Central

    Guillebault, D.; Laghdass, M.; Catala, P.; Obernosterer, I.; Lebaron, P.

    2010-01-01

    Fixed cells with different nucleic acid contents and scatter properties (low nucleic acid [LNA], high nucleic acid 1 [HNA1], and HNA2) were sorted by flow cytometry (FCM). For each sort, 10,000 cells were efficiently captured on poly-l-lysine-coated microplates, resulting in efficient and reproducible PCR amplification. PMID:20817799

  3. Rodent cell transformation assays-a brief historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Schechtman, Leonard M

    2012-04-11

    In vitro cell transformation is a process characterized by a series of progressive distinctive events that often emulate manifestations occurring in vivo and which are associated with neoplasia. Attendant cellular and sub-cellular alterations include, among others: cellular immortality, phenotypic changes, aneuploidy, genetic variability, cellular disarray, anchorage-independent growth, and tumorigenicity in vivo. Early chemically induced neoplastic transformation studies involved the use of normal diploid (Syrian) hamster embryo (SHE) cells and monitored the formation of morphologically altered colonies. Later investigations employed primarily two established mouse cell lines, i.e. the BALB/c 3T3 A31 cell line and the C3H 10T 1/2 cell line, and monitored the induction of morphologically aberrant foci. In either case, such transformed cellular clusters (colonies and foci) could induce tumors upon inoculation in vivo. Some subsequent noteworthy advancements using these systems included pH adjustments, metabolic supplementation, amplification of expression of formerly latent transformed foci, concurrent detection of mutagenesis and transformation, and use of a Bhas 42 cell line (v-Ha-ras transfected BALB/c 3T3 cells) to detect both tumor initiators and promoters. Over time, such transformation assay systems have been found useful in academic, industry and regulatory laboratories, generally for research purposes, but also occasionally as screening tools for potential chemical carcinogens. Nevertheless, to date, use of these assays for decision-making purposes in the regulatory arena remains elusive and will require comprehensive validation to gain universal acceptance. PMID:22230428

  4. Cell-free Assays for HIV-1 Uncoating

    PubMed Central

    Aiken, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Summary/Abstract Uncoating is an essential step in the retrovirus life cycle about which little is known. Uncoating is defined as the specific dissociation of the capsid shell from the viral core in the host cell cytoplasm. In this chapter, biochemical assays for studying HIV-1 uncoating in vitro are described. These techniques have proven useful for characterizing HIV-1 mutants that exhibit defects in the uncoating step of infection. PMID:19020817

  5. Cell-free assays for HIV-1 uncoating.

    PubMed

    Aiken, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Uncoating is an essential step in the retrovirus life cycle about which little is known. Uncoating is defined as the specific dissociation of the capsid shell from the viral core in the host cell cytoplasm. In this chapter, biochemical assays for studying HIV-1 uncoating in vitro are described. These techniques have proven useful for characterizing HIV-1 mutants that exhibit defects in the uncoating step of infection. PMID:19020817

  6. Microcystis aeruginosa toxin: cell culture toxicity, hemolysis, and mutagenicity assays.

    PubMed Central

    Grabow, W O; Du Randt, W C; Prozesky, O W; Scott, W E

    1982-01-01

    Crude toxin was prepared by lyophilization and extraction of toxic Microcystis aeruginosa from four natural sources and a unicellular laboratory culture. The responses of cultures of liver (Mahlavu and PCL/PRF/5), lung (MRC-5), cervix (HeLa), ovary (CHO-K1), and kidney (BGM, MA-104, and Vero) cell lines to these preparations did not differ significantly from one another, indicating that toxicity was not specific for liver cells. The results of a trypan blue staining test showed that the toxin disrupted cell membrane permeability within a few minutes. Human, mouse, rat, sheep, and Muscovy duck erythrocytes were also lysed within a few minutes. Hemolysis was temperature dependent, and the reaction seemed to follow first-order kinetics. Escherichia coli, Streptococcus faecalis, and Tetrahymena pyriformis were not significantly affected by the toxin. The toxin yielded negative results in Ames/Salmonella mutagenicity assays. Microtiter cell culture, trypan blue, and hemolysis assays for Microcystis toxin are described. The effect of the toxin on mammalian cell cultures was characterized by extensive disintegration of cells and was distinguishable from the effects of E. coli enterotoxin, toxic chemicals, and pesticides. A possible reason for the acute lethal effect of Microcystis toxin, based on cytolytic activity, is discussed. Images PMID:6808921

  7. Cell assay using a two-photon-excited europium chelate

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Xudong; Haushalter, Jeanne P.; Kotz, Kenneth T.; Faris, Gregory W.

    2011-01-01

    We report application of two-photon excitation of europium chelates to immunolabeling of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) cell surface proteins on A431 cancer cells. The europium chelates are excited with two photons of infrared light and emit in the visible. Europium chelates are conjugated to antibodies for EGFR. A431 (human epidermoid carcinoma) cells are labeled with this conjugate and imaged using a multiphoton microscope. To minimize signal loss due to the relatively long-lived Eu3+ emission, the multiphoton microscope is used with scanning laser two-photon excitation and non-scanning detection with a CCD. The chelate labels show very little photobleaching (less than 1% during continuous illumination in the microscope for 20 minutes) and low levels of autofluorescence (less than 1% of the signal from labeled cells). The detection limit of the europium label in the cell assay is better than 100 zeptomoles. PMID:21833362

  8. Use of the mitochondria toxicity assay for quantifying the viable cell density of microencapsulated jurkat cells.

    PubMed

    Werner, M; Biss, K; Jérôme, V; Hilbrig, F; Freitag, R; Zambrano, K; Hübner, H; Buchholz, R; Mahou, R; Wandrey, C

    2013-01-01

    The mitochondria toxicity assay (MTT assay) is an established method for monitoring cell viability based on mitochondrial activity. Here the MTT assay is proposed for the in situ quantification of the living cell density of microencapsulated Jurkat cells. Three systems were used to encapsulate the cells, namely a membrane consisting of an interpenetrating polyelectrolyte network of sodium cellulose sulphate/poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (NaCS/PDADMAC), a calcium alginate hydrogel covered with poly(L-lysine) (Ca-alg-PLL), and a novel calcium alginate-poly(ethylene glycol) hybrid material (Ca-alg-PEG). MTT results were correlated to data obtained by the trypan blue exclusion assay after release of the cells from the NaCS/PDADMAC and Ca-alg-PLL capsules, while a resazurin-based assay was used for comparison in case of the Ca-alg-PEG material. Analysis by MTT assay allows quick and reliable determination of viable cell densities of encapsulated cells independent of the capsule material. The assay is highly reproducible with inter-assay relative standard deviations below 10%. PMID:23636962

  9. Characterization of mesenchymal stromal cells: potency assay development.

    PubMed

    Hematti, Peiman

    2016-04-01

    Based on their many different mechanisms of action, presumed immune-privileged status, and relative ease of production, mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are under intensive clinical investigation for treating a wide range of degenerative, inflammatory, and immunologic disorders. Identification of relevant and robust potency assays is not only a regulatory requirement, but it is also the basis for producing and delivering a product that is consistent, safe, and ultimately an effective therapy. Although development of an appropriate potency assay is one of the most challenging issues in cell-based therapies, it is of paramount importance in the process of developing and testing cellular products. Regardless of the many different tissue sources and methods used in culture expansion of MSCs, they possess many of the same morphologic, cell surface markers, and differentiation characteristics. However, MSC products with similar phenotypic characteristics could still have major differences in their biologic and functional attributes. Understanding the different mechanisms of action and establishment of relevant potency assays is of pivotal importance in allowing investigators and regulatory agencies to compare MSCs used in different clinical trials. PMID:27079322

  10. Laser capture microdissection (LCM) and comparative microarray expression analysis of syncytial cells isolated from incompatible and compatible soybean roots infected by soybean cyst nematode (Heterodera glycines)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Syncytial cells in soybean (Glycine max cultivar [cv.] Peking) roots infected by incompatible (I) and compatible (C) populations of soybean cyst nematode [SCN] (Heterodera glycines) were collected using laser capture microdissection. Gene transcript abundance was assayed using an Affymetrix® soybean...

  11. A Modified NK Cell Degranulation Assay Applicable for Routine Evaluation of NK Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Shabrish, Snehal; Gupta, Maya; Madkaikar, Manisha

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play important role in innate immunity against tumors and viral infections. Studies show that lysosome-associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1, CD107a) is a marker for degranulation of NK and cytotoxic T cells and its expression is a sensitive marker for the cytotoxic activity determination. The conventional methods of determination of CD107a on NK cells involve use of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) or pure NK cells and K562 cells as stimulants. Thus, it requires large volume of blood sample which is usually difficult to obtain in pediatric patients and patients with cytopenia and also requires specialized laboratory for maintaining cell line. We have designed a flow cytometric assay to determine CD107a on NK cells using whole blood, eliminating the need for isolation of PBMC or isolate NK cells. This assay uses phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) and calcium ionophore (Ca2+-ionophore) instead of K562 cells for stimulation and thus does not require specialized cell culture laboratory. CD107a expression on NK cells using modified NK cell degranulation assay compared to the conventional assay was significantly elevated (p < 0.0001). It was also validated by testing patients diagnosed with familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHL) with defect in exocytosis. This assay is rapid, cost effective, and reproducible and requires significantly less volume of blood which is important for clinical evaluation of NK cells. PMID:27413758

  12. Buccal Micronucleus Cytome Assay in Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Naga, Mallika Bokka Sri Satya; Gour, Shreya; Nallagutta, Nalini; Velidandla, Surekha; Manikya, Sangameshwar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Sickle Cell Anaemia (SCA) is a commonly inherited blood disorder preceded by episodes of pain, chronic haemolytic anaemia and severe infections. The underlying phenomenon which causes this disease is the point mutation in the haemoglobin beta gene (Hbβ) found on chromosome 11 p. Increased oxidative stress leads to DNA damage. DNA damage occurring in such conditions can be studied by the buccal micronucleus cytome assay, which is a minimally invasive method for studying chromosomal instability, cell death and regenerative potential of human buccal tissue. Aim To evaluate genomic instability in patients with sickle cell disease by buccal micronucleus cytome assay. Materials and Methods The study included 40 sickle cell anemia patients (Group A) and 40 age and sex matched controls (Group B). Buccal swabs were collected and stained with Papanicolaou (PAP). Number of cells with micronucleus, binuclei, nuclear bud, pyknosis and karyolysis were counted in two groups as parameters for the evaluation of genome stability. Results All the analysis was done using t-test. A p-value of <0.001 was considered statistically significant. There was a statistically significant increase in micronuclei number in SCA patients when compared with controls. Karyolytic (un-nucleated) cell number in Group A was more than to those of the controls. Conclusion The results might suggest that patients with sickle cell anaemia have genome instability which is represented by the presence of micronuclei in the somatic cells. Presence of apoptotic cells might only indicate the bodily damage to the tissue as a result of the disease. PMID:27504413

  13. Genotoxicity of complex mixtures: CHO cell mutagenicity assay

    SciTech Connect

    Frazier, M.E.; Samuel, J.E.

    1985-02-01

    A Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) mammalian cell assay was used to evaluate the genotoxicity of complex mixtures (synthetic fuels). The genotoxicity (mutagenic potency) of the mixtures increased as the temperature of their boiling range increased. Most of the genotoxicity in the 750/sup 0/F+ boiling-range materials was associated with the neutral polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) fractions. Chemical analysis data indicate that the PAH fractions of high-boiling coal liquids contain a number of known chemical carcinogens, including five- and six-ring polyaromatics (e.g., benzo(a)pyrene) as well as four- and five-ring alkyl-substituted PAH (e.g., methylchrysene and dimethylbenzanthracenes); concentrations are a function of boiling point (bp). In vitro genotoxicity was also detected in fractions of nitrogen-containing polyaromatic compounds, as well as in those with aliphatics of hydroxy-containing PAH. Mutagenic activity of some fractions was detectable in the CHO assay in the absence of an exogenous metabolic activation system; in some instances, addition of exogenous enzymes and cofactors inhibited expression of the direct-acting mutagenic potential of the fraction. These data indicate that the organic matrix of the chemical fraction determines whether, and to what degree, various mutagens are expressed in the CHO assay. Therefore, the results of biological assays of these mixtures must be correlated with chemical analyses for proper interpretation of these data. 29 references, 16 figures, 4 tables.

  14. A Single-Cell Assay for Time Lapse Studies of Exosome Secretion and Cell Behaviors.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Yu-Jui; Cai, Wei; Shih, Yu-Ru V; Lian, Ian; Lo, Yu-Hwa

    2016-07-01

    To understand the inhomogeneity of cells in biological systems, there is a growing demand on the capability of characterizing the properties of individual single cells. Since single-cell studies require continuous monitoring of the cell behaviors, an effective single-cell assay that can support time lapsed studies in a high throughput manner is desired. Most currently available single-cell technologies cannot provide proper environments to sustain cell growth and, proliferation of single cells and convenient, noninvasive tests of single-cell behaviors from molecular markers. Here, a highly versatile single-cell assay is presented that can accommodate different cellular types, enable easy and efficient single-cell loading and culturing, and be suitable for the study of effects of in vitro environmental factors in combination with drug screening. One salient feature of the assay is the noninvasive collection and surveying of single-cell secretions at different time points, producing unprecedented insight of single-cell behaviors based on the biomarker signals from individual cells under given perturbations. Above all, the acquired information is quantitative, for example, measured by the number of exosomes each single-cell secretes for a given time period. Therefore, our single-cell assay provides a convenient, low-cost, and enabling tool for quantitative, time lapsed studies of single-cell properties. PMID:27254278

  15. A photonic crystal hydrogel suspension array for the capture of blood cells from whole blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bin; Cai, Yunlang; Shang, Luoran; Wang, Huan; Cheng, Yao; Rong, Fei; Gu, Zhongze; Zhao, Yuanjin

    2016-02-01

    Diagnosing hematological disorders based on the separation and detection of cells in the patient's blood is a significant challenge. We have developed a novel barcode particle-based suspension array that can simultaneously capture and detect multiple types of blood cells. The barcode particles are polyacrylamide (PAAm) hydrogel inverse opal microcarriers with characteristic reflection peak codes that remain stable during cell capture on their surfaces. The hydrophilic PAAm hydrogel scaffolds of the barcode particles can entrap various plasma proteins to capture different cells in the blood, with little damage to captured cells.Diagnosing hematological disorders based on the separation and detection of cells in the patient's blood is a significant challenge. We have developed a novel barcode particle-based suspension array that can simultaneously capture and detect multiple types of blood cells. The barcode particles are polyacrylamide (PAAm) hydrogel inverse opal microcarriers with characteristic reflection peak codes that remain stable during cell capture on their surfaces. The hydrophilic PAAm hydrogel scaffolds of the barcode particles can entrap various plasma proteins to capture different cells in the blood, with little damage to captured cells. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06368j

  16. Specific serum immunoglobulin D, detected by antibody capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), in cytomegalovirus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Mortensen, J; Nielsen, S L; Sørensen, I; Andersen, H K

    1989-01-01

    An antibody capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed for the detection of immunoglobulin D (IgD) antibodies to cytomegalovirus (CMV) in sera from blood donors and various groups of patients infected with CMV. This method has previously been found especially valuable in detecting specific antibodies of the IgM, IgE, IgA and IgG class in patients with CMV infection. Specific CMV IgD antibodies were found in 37% of CMV seropositive blood donors and in 47 (88%) of the 53 patients investigated, including bone marrow transplant and renal allograft transplant patients, patients with CMV mononucleosis, neonates with CMV infection and AIDS patients with CMV infection. The highest IgD reactivity was found in patients having either a primary post-transplant CMV infection or CMV mononucleosis. The IgD reactivity in patients with AIDS and in neonates was low. It was also found that in the acute phase of CMV infection the development of CMV antibodies of the IgD class was similar to the development of antibodies of the other classes. The maintenance of IgD activity in some patients together with the presence of CMV IgD antibodies in a great proportion of the blood donors indicates that the development of CMV IgD antibodies resembles that of the IgG class. Determination of specific IgD antibodies offered no advantage over determination of specific antibodies of the IgM, IgE and IgA classes in the diagnosis of CMV infection. PMID:2539278

  17. Comparison of two rapid assays for Clostridium difficile Common antigen and a C difficile toxin A/B assay with the cell culture neutralization assay.

    PubMed

    Reller, Megan E; Alcabasa, Romina C; Lema, Clara A; Carroll, Karen C

    2010-01-01

    We compared 3 rapid assays for Clostridium difficile with a cell culture cytotoxicity neutralization assay (CCNA). Of 600 stool samples, 46 were positive for toxigenic C difficile. Both rapid common antigen assays were highly sensitive (91.3%-100%) and, therefore, were appropriate screening tests. The rapid toxin assay had poor sensitivity (61%) but excellent specificity (99.3%). Testing stools for glutamate dehydrogenase (step 1) and those positive with a rapid toxin assay (step 2) would correctly classify 81% of submitted specimens within 2 hours, including during periods of limited staffing (evenings, nights, and weekends). CCNA could then be used as a third step to test rapid toxin-negative samples, thereby providing a final result for the remaining 19% of samples by 48 to 72 hours. The use of rapid assays as outlined could enhance timely diagnosis of C difficile. PMID:20023265

  18. A Multiscale TiO2 Nanorod Array for Ultrasensitive Capture of Circulating Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Na; Li, Xinpan; Wang, Zhili; Zhang, Ruihua; Wang, Jine; Wang, Kewei; Pei, Renjun

    2016-05-25

    In this work, a uniform multiscale TiO2 nanorod array is fabricated to provide a "multi-scale interacting platform" for cell capture, which exhibits excellent capture specificity and sensitivity of the target cells after modification with bovine serum albumin (BSA) and DNA aptamer. After studying the capture performance of the BSA-aptamer TiO2 nanorod substrates and other nanostructured substrates, we can conclude that the multisacle TiO2 nanorod substrates could indeed effectively enhance the capture yields of target cancer cells. The capture yield of artificial blood samples on the BSA-aptamer TiO2 nanorod substrates is up to 85%-95%, revealing the potential application of the TiO2 nanorods on efficient and sensitive capture of rare circulating tumor cells. PMID:27176724

  19. A rapid and selective assay for measuring cell surface hydrophobicity of brewer's yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Straver, M H; Kijne, J W

    1996-03-15

    A rapid and selective assay was developed to measure cell surface hydrophobicity of brewer's yeast cells. During this so-called magnobead assay, bottom-fermenting yeast cells adhere to paramagnetic, polystyrene-coated latex beads which can easily be removed from the cell suspension by using a (samarium-cobalt) magnet. At pH 4 center dot 5, electrostatic repulsion between yeast cells and latex beads was found to be minimal and yeast cell adhesion was predominantly based on hydrophobic interactions. The percentage of cells adhering to the beads could be calculated and provided a measure for cell surface hydrophobicity. Cell surface hydrophobicity measured by the magnobead assay was found to yield similar results, as did determination of contact angles of water droplets on a layer of yeast cells, a standard method for measuring surface hydrophobicity. However, the magnobead assay has the following advantages: (i) it is a quick and simple method, and, more significantly, (ii) hydrophobicity can be measured under physiological conditions. Use of the magnobead assay confirmed that a higher level of cell surface hydrophobicity is correlated with stronger flocculence of brewer's lager yeast cells. PMID:8904332

  20. Microfluidic System for Automated Cell-based Assays.

    PubMed

    Lee, Philip J; Ghorashian, Navid; Gaige, Terry A; Hung, Paul J

    2007-12-01

    Microfluidic cell culture is a promising technology for applications in the drug screening industry. Key benefits include improved biological function, higher quality cell-based data, reduced reagent consumption, and lower cost. In this work, we demonstrate how a microfluidic cell culture design was adapted to be compatible with the standard 96-well plate format. Key design features include the elimination of tubing and connectors, the ability to maintain long term continuous perfusion cell culture using a passive gravity driven pump, and direct analysis on the outlet wells of the microfluidic plate. A single microfluidic culture plate contained 8 independent flow units, each with 10(4) cells at a flow rate of 50 μl/day (6 minute residence time). The cytotoxicity of the anti-cancer drug etoposide was measured on HeLa cells cultured in this format, using a commercial lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) plate reader assay. The integration of microfluidic cell culture methods with commercial automation capabilities offers an exciting opportunity for improved cell-based screening. PMID:18172509

  1. T cells kill bacteria captured by transinfection from dendritic cells and confer protection in mice.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Adalia, Aránzazu; Ramirez-Santiago, Guillermo; Calabia-Linares, Carmen; Torres-Torresano, Mónica; Feo, Lidia; Galán-Díez, Marta; Fernández-Ruiz, Elena; Pereiro, Eva; Guttmann, Peter; Chiappi, Michele; Schneider, Gerd; Carrascosa, José López; Chichón, Francisco Javier; Martínez Del Hoyo, Gloria; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco; Veiga, Esteban

    2014-05-14

    Dendritic cells (DCs) phagocytose, process, and present bacterial antigens to T lymphocytes to trigger adaptive immunity. In vivo, bacteria can also be found inside T lymphocytes. However, T cells are refractory to direct bacterial infection, leaving the mechanisms by which bacteria invade T cells unclear. We show that T cells take up bacteria from infected DCs by the process of transinfection, which requires direct contact between the two cells and is enhanced by antigen recognition. Prior to transfer, bacteria localize to the immunological synapse, an intimate DC/T cell contact structure that activates T cells. Strikingly, T cells efficiently eliminate the transinfecting bacteria within the first hours after infection. Transinfected T cells produced high levels of proinflammatory cytokines and were able to protect mice from bacterial challenge following adoptive transfer. Thus, T lymphocytes can capture and kill bacteria in a manner reminiscent of innate immunity. PMID:24832455

  2. Nonstructural Protein 1-Specific Immunoglobulin M and G Antibody Capture Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assays in Diagnosis of Flaviviral Infections in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Galula, Jedhan Ucat; Shen, Wen-Fan; Davis, Brent S.

    2014-01-01

    IgM antibody- and IgG antibody-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (MAC/GAC-ELISAs) targeted at envelope protein (E) of dengue viruses (DENV), West Nile virus, and Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) are widely used as serodiagnostic tests for presumptive confirmation of viral infection. Antibodies directed against the flavivirus nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) have been proposed as serological markers of natural infections among vaccinated populations. The aim of the current study is to optimize an IgM and IgG antibody-capture ELISA (MAC/GAC-ELISA) to detect anti-NS1 antibodies and compare it with anti-E MAC/GAC-ELISA. Plasmids to express premembrane/envelope (prM/E) or NS1 proteins of six medically important flaviviruses, including dengue viruses (DENV-1 to DENV-4), West Nile virus (WNV), and Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), were constructed. These plasmids were used for the production of prM/E-containing virus-like particles (VLPs) and secreted NS1 (sNS1) from COS-1 cells. Archived clinical specimens from patients with confirmed DENV, JEV, and WNV infections, along with naive sera, were subjected to NS1-MAC/GAC-ELISAs before or after depletion of anti-prM/E antibodies by preabsorption with or without VLPs. Human serum specimens from previously confirmed DENV infections showed significantly enhanced positive-to-negative (P/N) ratios for NS1-MAC/GAC-ELISAs after the depletion of anti-prM/E antibodies. No statistical differences in sensitivities and specificities were found between the newly developed NS1- and VLP-MAC/GAC-ELISAs. Further application of the assays to WNV- and JEV-infected serum panels showed similar results. A novel approach to perform MAC/GAC-ELISAs for NS1 antibody detection was successfully developed with great potential to differentiate antibodies elicited by the tetravalent chimeric yellow fever-17D/dengue vaccine or DENV infection. PMID:25502522

  3. Nonstructural protein 1-specific immunoglobulin M and G antibody capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays in diagnosis of flaviviral infections in humans.

    PubMed

    Chao, Day-Yu; Galula, Jedhan Ucat; Shen, Wen-Fan; Davis, Brent S; Chang, Gwong-Jen J

    2015-02-01

    IgM antibody- and IgG antibody-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (MAC/GAC-ELISAs) targeted at envelope protein (E) of dengue viruses (DENV), West Nile virus, and Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) are widely used as serodiagnostic tests for presumptive confirmation of viral infection. Antibodies directed against the flavivirus nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) have been proposed as serological markers of natural infections among vaccinated populations. The aim of the current study is to optimize an IgM and IgG antibody-capture ELISA (MAC/GAC-ELISA) to detect anti-NS1 antibodies and compare it with anti-E MAC/GAC-ELISA. Plasmids to express premembrane/envelope (prM/E) or NS1 proteins of six medically important flaviviruses, including dengue viruses (DENV-1 to DENV-4), West Nile virus (WNV), and Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), were constructed. These plasmids were used for the production of prM/E-containing virus-like particles (VLPs) and secreted NS1 (sNS1) from COS-1 cells. Archived clinical specimens from patients with confirmed DENV, JEV, and WNV infections, along with naive sera, were subjected to NS1-MAC/GAC-ELISAs before or after depletion of anti-prM/E antibodies by preabsorption with or without VLPs. Human serum specimens from previously confirmed DENV infections showed significantly enhanced positive-to-negative (P/N) ratios for NS1-MAC/GAC-ELISAs after the depletion of anti-prM/E antibodies. No statistical differences in sensitivities and specificities were found between the newly developed NS1- and VLP-MAC/GAC-ELISAs. Further application of the assays to WNV- and JEV-infected serum panels showed similar results. A novel approach to perform MAC/GAC-ELISAs for NS1 antibody detection was successfully developed with great potential to differentiate antibodies elicited by the tetravalent chimeric yellow fever-17D/dengue vaccine or DENV infection. PMID:25502522

  4. Assay for transposase-accessible chromatin and circularized chromosome conformation capture, two methods to explore the regulatory landscapes of genes in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Miñán, A; Bessa, J; Tena, J J; Gómez-Skarmeta, J L

    2016-01-01

    Accurate transcriptional control of genes is fundamental for the correct functioning of organs and developmental processes. This control depends on the interplay between the promoter of genes and other noncoding sequences, whose interaction is mediated by 3D chromatin arrangements. Thus, the detailed description of transcriptional regulatory landscapes is essential to understand the mechanisms of transcriptional regulation. However, to achieve that, two important challenges have to be faced: (1) the identification of the noncoding sequences that contribute to gene transcription and (2) the association of these sequences to the respective genes they control. In this chapter, we describe two protocols that allow overcoming these important challenges: the assay for transposase-accessible chromatin using sequencing (ATAC-seq) and circularized chromosome conformation capture (4C-seq). ATAC-seq is a very efficient technique that, using a very low number of cells as starting material, allows the identification of active chromatin regions genome wide, whereas 4C-seq detects the subset of sequences that interact specifically with the promoter of a given gene. When combined, both techniques provide a comprehensive snapshot of the regulatory landscapes of developmental genes. The protocols we present here have been optimized for teleost fish samples, zebrafish and medaka, allowing the in-depth study of transcriptional regulation in these two emerging animal models. Given the amenability and easy genetic manipulation of these two experimental systems, we anticipate that they will be important in revealing general principles of the vertebrate regulatory genome. PMID:27443938

  5. Prevalence estimation of tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) antibodies in dogs from Finland using novel dog anti-TBEV IgG MAb-capture and IgG immunofluorescence assays based on recombinant TBEV subviral particles.

    PubMed

    Levanov, Lev; Vera, Cristina Pérez; Vapalahti, Olli

    2016-07-01

    Tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) is one of the most dangerous human neurological infections occurring in Europe and Northern parts of Asia with thousands of cases and millions vaccinated against it. The risk of TBE might be assessed through analyses of the samples taken from wildlife or from animals which are in close contact with humans. Dogs have been shown to be a good sentinel species for these studies. Serological assays for diagnosis of TBE in dogs are mainly based on purified and inactivated TBEV antigens. Here we describe novel dog anti-TBEV IgG monoclonal antibody (MAb)-capture assay which is based on TBEV prME subviral particles expressed in mammalian cells from Semliki Forest virus (SFV) replicon as well as IgG immunofluorescence assay (IFA) which is based on Vero E6 cells transfected with the same SFV replicon. We further demonstrate their use in a small-scale TBEV seroprevalence study of dogs representing different regions of Finland. Altogether, 148 dog serum samples were tested by novel assays and results were compared to those obtained with a commercial IgG enzyme immunoassay (EIA), hemagglutination inhibition test and IgG IFA with TBEV infected cells. Compared to reference tests, the sensitivities of the developed assays were 90-100% and the specificities of the two assays were 100%. Analysis of the dog serum samples showed a seroprevalence of 40% on Åland Islands and 6% on Southwestern archipelago of Finland. In conclusion, a specific and sensitive EIA and IFA for the detection of IgG antibodies in canine sera were developed. Based on these assays the seroprevalence of IgG antibodies in dogs from different regions of Finland was assessed and was shown to parallel the known human disease burden as the Southwestern archipelago and Åland Islands in particular had considerable dog TBEV antibody prevalence and represent areas with high risk of TBE for humans. PMID:27189583

  6. Cell migration in confinement: a micro-channel-based assay.

    PubMed

    Heuzé, Mélina L; Collin, Olivier; Terriac, Emmanuel; Lennon-Duménil, Ana-Maria; Piel, Matthieu

    2011-01-01

    This chapter describes a method to study cells migrating in micro-channels, a confining environment of well-defined geometry. This assay is a complement to more complex 3D migration systems and provides several advantages even if it does not recapitulate the full complexity of 3D migration. Important parameters such as degree of adhesion, degree of confinement, mechanical properties, and geometry can be varied independently of each other. The device is fully compatible with almost any type of light microscopy and the simple geometry makes automated analysis very easy to perform, which allows screening strategy. The chapters is divided into five parts describing the design of different types of migration chambers, the fabrication of a mold by photolithography, the assembly of the chamber, the loading of cells, and finally the imaging on live or fixed cells. PMID:21748692

  7. Capturing CD4 cells using a functionalized circular microfluidic device and glutaraldehyde as biolinker for tuberculosis detection and diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Yeu-Farn; Huang, Nien-Tsu; Lee, Chih-Kung

    2015-03-01

    It is estimated that about one-third of the world's population has already been infected by tuberculosis. Mycobacterium tuberculosis, in general, can result in an active case of tuberculosis in approximately 5%-10% of those who suffer from latent tuberculosis and the chance of becoming ill is the highest within one of year of getting the disease. Although a newly developed methods called interferon gamma release assay (IGRA) can monitor CD4 cells secreted cytokine to diagnose tuberculosis (TB) condition. However, it is difficult to count total numbers of cytokine secreted CD4 cells, which make the diagnosis less accurate. Therefore, we develop a functionalized polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) device using glutaraldehyde to capture CD4 cells. To enhance the capture efficiency, we use COMSOL simulation to optimize the arrangement of PDMS micro pillars to make cells uniformly distributed in the device. Our preliminary data showed the microfluidic configuration in a circular shape with HCP patterned micro pillars turned 30 degrees offers the highest cell capture rate.

  8. Cell-Based Lipid Flippase Assay Employing Fluorescent Lipid Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Maria S; Costa, Sara; Günther-Pomorski, Thomas; López-Marqués, Rosa L

    2016-01-01

    P-type ATPases in the P4 subfamily (P4-ATPases) are transmembrane proteins unique for eukaryotes that act as lipid flippases, i.e., to translocate phospholipids from the exofacial to the cytofacial monolayer of cellular membranes. While initially characterized as aminophospholipid translocases, studies of individual P4-ATPase family members from fungi, plants, and animals show that P4-ATPases differ in their substrate specificities and mediate transport of a broader range of lipid substrates. Here, we describe an assay based on fluorescent lipid derivatives to monitor and characterize lipid flippase activities in the plasma membrane of cells, using yeast as an example. PMID:26695048

  9. An antigen-specific, four-color, B-cell FluoroSpot assay utilizing tagged antigens for detection.

    PubMed

    Jahnmatz, Peter; Bengtsson, Theresa; Zuber, Bartek; Färnert, Anna; Ahlborg, Niklas

    2016-06-01

    The FluoroSpot assay, a variant of ELISpot utilizing fluorescent detection, has so far been used primarily for assessment of T cells, where simultaneous detection of several cytokines has allowed a more qualitative analysis of functionally distinct T cells. The potential to measure multiple analytes also presents several advantages when analyzing B cells. Our aim was to develop a B-cell FluoroSpot assay adaptable to studies of a variety of antigens. The assay utilizes anti-IgG antibodies immobilized in 96-well filter membrane plates. During cell culture, IgG antibodies secreted by antibody-secreting cells (ASCs) are captured in the vicinity of each of these cells and the specificity of single ASCs is defined using antigens for detection. The antigens were labeled with biotin or peptide tags enabling secondary detection with fluorophore-conjugated streptavidin or tag-specific antibodies. The assay, utilizing up to four different tag systems and fluorophores simultaneously, was evaluated using hybridomas and immunized splenocytes as ASCs. Assay variants were developed that could: i) identify multiple ASCs with different antigen specificities; ii) detect ASCs showing cross-reactivity with different but related antigens; and iii) define the antigen-specificity and, by including anti-IgG subclass detection reagents, simultaneously determine the IgG subclass of antibodies secreted by ASCs. As demonstrated here, the B-cell FluoroSpot assay using tag-based detection systems provides a versatile and powerful tool to investigate antibody responses by individual cells that can be readily adapted to studies of a variety of antigen-specific ASCs. PMID:26930550

  10. A comparative study of colorimetric cell proliferation assays in immune cells.

    PubMed

    Koyanagi, Madoka; Kawakabe, So; Arimura, Yutaka

    2016-08-01

    Cell proliferation assays are basic and essential techniques for assessing cellular function. Various colorimetric assays, such as MTT-, WST-1-, and resazurin-based assays, are available; however, studies directly comparing the suitability of each method for immune cell proliferation are scarce. Thus, we aimed to determine the best reagent and its optimal conditions based on variables such as cell number range, stimulation dose, kinetics, and compatibility with the cell division assay using CFSE fluorescence dye which is able to directly monitor divided cells by flow cytometry. In the absence of stimulation, MTT solubilized with SDS (MTT-SDS) and resazurin appeared to accurately reflect the cell numbers in a linear fashion. On the other hand, WST-1 exhibited a higher stimulation index following strong stimulation, whereas MTT-SDS and resazurin exhibited a better sensitivity to weak stimulation. A longer duration for stimulation did not necessarily increase sensitivity. CFSE staining revealed incremental cell division in response to anti-CD3 antibody stimulation in a dose-dependent manner. The cell numbers indirectly estimated from cell division profiles were consistent with the dose-response curve in the absorbance of MTT-SDS and resazurin. The absorbance does not increase before cell division, irrespective of T cell activation status, suggesting that these reagents reflect the cell number but not the cellular volume. Collectively, resazurin and MTT-SDS seem to be more reliable than others, and thus appear applicable in various conditions for the immune cell experiments. PMID:26280992

  11. Oxygen Control For Bioreactors And In-vitro Cell Assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nock, V.; Blaikie, R. J.; David, T.

    2009-07-01

    Dissolved oxygen (DO) is an important parameter in biomedical and cell-culture applications. Several studies have found cell survival and function to be intimately linked to oxygen concentration. Laminar flow, as observed in microfluidic devices, provides an ideal environment to manipulate and control concentration gradients. In this paper we demonstrate the first characterization of integrated fluorescence-based oxygen sensors for DO measurement within a cell-culture bioreactor device. Solid-state PtOEPK/PS sensor patterns were integrated into the PDMS-based bioreactor and calibrated for detection of DO concentration with a superimposed layer of collagen and Ishikawa human endometrial cancer cells. The sensor signal of the layer subjacent to the cells was found to follow a Stern-Volmer model and the intensity ratio was measured to I0/I100 = 3.9 after 3 days in culture. The device provides a novel tool for the control and spatially-resolved measurement of oxygen levels in cellular assays and cell-culture applications.

  12. Cell-free NADPH oxidase activation assays: "in vitro veritas".

    PubMed

    Pick, Edgar

    2014-01-01

    The superoxide (O2 (∙-))-generating NADPH oxidase complex of phagocytes comprises a membrane-imbedded heterodimeric flavocytochrome, known as cytochrome b 558 (consisting of Nox2 and p22 (phox) ) and four cytosolic regulatory proteins, p47 (phox) , p67 (phox) , p40 (phox) , and the small GTPase Rac. Under physiological conditions, in the resting phagocyte, O2 (∙-) generation is initiated by engagement of membrane receptors by a variety of stimuli, followed by specific signal transduction sequences leading to the translocation of the cytosolic components to the membrane and their association with the cytochrome. A consequent conformational change in Nox2 initiates the electron "flow" along a redox gradient, from NADPH to oxygen, leading to the one-electron reduction of molecular oxygen to O2 (∙-). Methodological difficulties in the dissection of this complex mechanism led to the design "cell-free" systems (also known as "broken cells" or in vitro systems). In these, membrane receptor stimulation and all or part of the signal transduction sequence are missing, the accent being placed on the actual process of "NADPH oxidase assembly," thus on the formation of the complex between cytochrome b 558 and the cytosolic components and the resulting O2 (∙-) generation. Cell-free assays consist of a mixture of the individual components of the NADPH oxidase complex, derived from resting phagocytes or in the form of purified recombinant proteins, exposed in vitro to an activating agent (distinct from and unrelated to whole cell stimulants), in the presence of NADPH and oxygen. Activation is commonly quantified by measuring the primary product of the reaction, O2 (∙-), trapped immediately after its generation by an appropriate acceptor in a kinetic assay, permitting the calculation of the linear rate of O2 (∙-) production, but numerous variations exist, based on the assessment of reaction products or the consumption of substrates. Cell-free assays played a paramount

  13. Surface Design for Efficient Capturing of Rare Cells in Microfluidic Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yaling; Depietro, Dan; Thomas, Antony; Chen, Chi-Mon; Yang, Shu

    2011-11-01

    This work aims to design, fabricate, and characterize a micro-patterned surface that will be integrated into microfluidic devices to enhance particle and rare cell capture efficiency. Capture of ultralow concentration of circulating tumor cells in a blood sample is of vital importance for early diagnostics of cancer diseases. Despite the significant progress achieved in development of cell capture techniques, the enhancement in capture efficiency is still limited and often accompanied with drawbacks such as low throughput, low selectivity, pre-diluting requirement, and cell viability issues. The goal of this work is to design a biomimetic surface that could significantly enhance particle/cell capture efficacy through computational modeling, surface patterning, and microfluidic integration and testing. A PDMS surface with microscale ripples is functionalized with epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) to capture prostate cancer PC3 cells. Our microfluid chip with micropatterns has shown significantly higher cell capture efficiency and selectivity compared to the chips with plane surface or classical herringbone-grooves.

  14. Surface Design for Efficient Capturing of Rare Cells in Microfluidic Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yaling; Thomas, Antony; Chen, Chi-Mon; Yang, Shu

    2012-02-01

    This work aims to design, fabricate, and characterize a micro-patterned surface that will be integrated into microfluidic devices to enhance particle and rare cell capture efficiency. Capture of ultralow concentration of circulating tumor cells in a blood sample is of vital importance for early diagnostics of cancer diseases. Despite the significant progress achieved in development of cell capture techniques, the enhancement in capture efficiency is still limited and often accompanied with drawbacks such as low throughput, low selectivity, pre-diluting requirement, and cell viability issues. The goal of this work is to design a biomimetic surface that could significantly enhance particle/cell capture efficacy through computational modeling, surface patterning, and microfluidic integration and testing. A PDMS surface with microscale ripples is functionalized with epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) to capture prostate cancer PC3 cells. Our microfluid chip with micropatterns has shown significantly higher cell capture efficiency and selectivity compared to the chips with plane surface or classical herringbone-grooves.

  15. Specific capture and temperature-mediated release of cells in an aptamer-based microfluidic device†

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jing; Nguyen, ThaiHuu; Pei, Renjun; Stojanovic, Milan; Lin, Qiao

    2014-01-01

    Isolation of cells from heterogeneous mixtures is critically important in both basic cell biology studies and clinical diagnostics. Cell isolation can be realized based on physical properties such as size, density and electrical properties. Alternatively, affinity binding of target cells by surface-immobilized ligands, such as antibodies, can be used to achieve specific cell isolation. Microfluidics technology has recently been used in conjunction with antibody-based affinity isolation methods to capture, purify and isolate cells with higher yield rates, better efficiencies and lower costs. However, a method that allows easy release and collection of live cells from affinity surfaces for subsequent analysis and detection has yet to be developed. This paper presents a microfluidic device that not only achieves specific affinity capture and enrichment, but also enables non-destructive, temperature-mediated release and retrieval of cells. Specific cell capture is achieved using surface-immobilized aptamers in a microchamber. Release of the captured cells is realized by a moderate temperature change, effected via integrated heaters and a temperature sensor, to reversibly disrupt the cell-aptamer interaction. Experimental results with CCRF-CEM cells have demonstrated that the device is capable of specific capture and temperature-mediated release of cells, that the released cells remain viable and that the aptamer-functionalized surface is regenerable. PMID:22854859

  16. Velocity valleys enable efficient capture and spatial sorting of nanoparticle-bound cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besant, Justin D.; Mohamadi, Reza M.; Aldridge, Peter M.; Li, Yi; Sargent, Edward H.; Kelley, Shana O.

    2015-03-01

    The development of strategies for isolating rare cells from complex matrices like blood is important for a wide variety of applications including the analysis of bloodborne cancer cells, infectious pathogens, and prenatal testing. Due to their high colloidal stability and surface-to-volume ratio, antibody-coated magnetic nanoparticles are excellent labels for cellular surface markers. Unfortunately, capture of nanoparticle-bound cells at practical flow rates is challenging due to the small volume, and thus low magnetic susceptibility, of magnetic nanoparticles. We have developed a means to capture nanoparticle-labeled cells using microstructures which create pockets of locally low linear velocity, termed velocity valleys. Cells that enter a velocity valley slow down momentarily, allowing the magnetic force to overcome the reduced drag force and trap the cells. Here, we describe a model for this mechanism of cell capture and use this model to guide the rational design of a device that efficiently captures rare cells and sorts them according to surface expression in complex matrices with greater than 10 000-fold specificity. By analysing the magnetic and drag forces on a cell, we calculate a threshold linear velocity for capture and relate this to the capture efficiency. We find that the addition of X-shaped microstructures enhances capture efficiency 5-fold compared to circular posts. By tuning the linear velocity, we capture cells with a 100-fold range of surface marker expression with near 100% efficiency and sort these cells into spatially distinct zones. By tuning the flow channel geometry, we reduce non-specific cell adhesion by 5-fold.The development of strategies for isolating rare cells from complex matrices like blood is important for a wide variety of applications including the analysis of bloodborne cancer cells, infectious pathogens, and prenatal testing. Due to their high colloidal stability and surface-to-volume ratio, antibody-coated magnetic

  17. Capture of esophageal and breast cancer cells with polymeric microfluidic devices for CTC isolation

    PubMed Central

    OHNAGA, TAKASHI; SHIMADA, YUTAKA; TAKATA, KOJI; OBATA, TSUTOMU; OKUMURA, TOMOYUKI; NAGATA, TAKUYA; KISHI, HIROYUKI; MURAGUCHI, ATSUSHI; TSUKADA, KAZUHIRO

    2016-01-01

    The present study evaluated the capture efficiency of esophageal and breast cancer cells with a modified ‘polymeric circulating tumor cells (CTC)-chip’ microfluidic device, which was developed for the isolation of circulating tumor cells. Esophageal cancer cell lines KYSE150, KYSE220 and KYSE510, and breast cancer cell lines MCF7, SKBR3 and MDA-MB-231 were used for evaluation. The capture efficiencies of the esophageal cancer cell lines in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) were ~0.9, irrespective of epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) expression, which was represented as the mean fluorescent intensity from 528 to 76. In the breast cancer cell lines, efficient capture was observed for MCF7 and SKBR3 in PBS; however, a low value of ~0.1 was obtained for MDA-MB-231. Fluorescent imaging of immunolabeled cells revealed marginal EpCAM expression in MDA-MB-231. Using whole blood, no clogging occurred in the microstructure-modified CTC-chip and efficiency of capture was successfully evaluated. Capture efficiencies for KYSE220 and MCF7 in whole blood were >0.7, but were of either equal or lesser efficiency in comparison to PBS. Therefore, the modified CTC-chip appears useful for clinical application due to its cost, practicality of use, and efficient cancer cell capture. PMID:27073672

  18. Mutational Analysis of Circulating Tumor Cells Using a Novel Microfluidic Collection Device and qPCR Assay.

    PubMed

    Harb, Wael; Fan, Andrea; Tran, Tony; Danila, Daniel C; Keys, David; Schwartz, Michael; Ionescu-Zanetti, Cristian

    2013-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) provide a readily accessible source of tumor material from patients with cancer. Molecular profiling of these rare cells can lead to insight on disease progression and therapeutic strategies. A critical need exists to isolate CTCs with sufficient quantity and sample integrity to adapt to conventional analytical techniques. We present a microfluidic platform (IsoFlux) that uses flow control and immunomagnetic capture to enhance CTC isolation. A novel cell retrieval mechanism ensures complete transfer of CTCs into the molecular assay. Improved sensitivity to the capture antigen was demonstrated by spike-in experiments for three cell lines of varying levels of antigen expression. We obtained spike-in recovery rates of 74%, 75%, and 85% for MDA-MB-231 (low), PC3 (middle), and SKBR3 (high) cell lines. Recovery using matched enumeration protocols and matched samples (PC3) yielded 90% and 40% recovery for the IsoFlux and CellSearch systems, respectively. In matched prostate cancer samples (N = 22), patients presenting more than four CTCs per blood draw were 95% and 36% using IsoFlux and CellSearch, respectively. An assay for detecting KRAS mutations was described along with data from patients with colorectal cancer, of which 87% presented CTCs above the assay's limit of detection (four CTCs). The CTC KRAS mutant rate was 50%, with 46% of patients displaying a CTC KRAS mutational status that differed from the previously acquired tissue biopsy data. The microfluidic system and mutation assay presented here provide a complete workflow to track oncogene mutational changes longitudinally with high success rates. PMID:24151533

  19. Mutational Analysis of Circulating Tumor Cells Using a Novel Microfluidic Collection Device and qPCR Assay12

    PubMed Central

    Harb, Wael; Fan, Andrea; Tran, Tony; Danila, Daniel C; Keys, David; Schwartz, Michael; Ionescu-Zanetti, Cristian

    2013-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) provide a readily accessible source of tumor material from patients with cancer. Molecular profiling of these rare cells can lead to insight on disease progression and therapeutic strategies. A critical need exists to isolate CTCs with sufficient quantity and sample integrity to adapt to conventional analytical techniques. We present a microfluidic platform (IsoFlux) that uses flow control and immunomagnetic capture to enhance CTC isolation. A novel cell retrieval mechanism ensures complete transfer of CTCs into the molecular assay. Improved sensitivity to the capture antigen was demonstrated by spike-in experiments for three cell lines of varying levels of antigen expression. We obtained spike-in recovery rates of 74%, 75%, and 85% for MDA-MB-231 (low), PC3 (middle), and SKBR3 (high) cell lines. Recovery using matched enumeration protocols and matched samples (PC3) yielded 90% and 40% recovery for the IsoFlux and CellSearch systems, respectively. In matched prostate cancer samples (N = 22), patients presenting more than four CTCs per blood draw were 95% and 36% using IsoFlux and CellSearch, respectively. An assay for detecting KRAS mutations was described along with data from patients with colorectal cancer, of which 87% presented CTCs above the assay's limit of detection (four CTCs). The CTC KRAS mutant rate was 50%, with 46% of patients displaying a CTC KRAS mutational status that differed from the previously acquired tissue biopsy data. The microfluidic system and mutation assay presented here provide a complete workflow to track oncogene mutational changes longitudinally with high success rates. PMID:24151533

  20. A novel mu-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay based on recombinant proteins for sensitive and specific diagnosis of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Zöller, L G; Yang, S; Gött, P; Bautz, E K; Darai, G

    1993-01-01

    Hantavirus nucleocapsid protein has recently been identified as a major antigen inducing an early and long-lasting humoral immune response in patients with hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome. A mu-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay utilizing recombinant nucleocapsid proteins of Hantavirus strains Hantaan 76-118 (Hantaan serotype) and CG 18-20 (Puumala serotype) as diagnostic antigens and specific monoclonal antibodies as the detection system has been developed. Histidine-tailed recombinant proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified in a single step by affinity chromatography on a nickel-chelate resin. The assay was evaluated with a panel of sera from patients with hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome originating from various geographic regions. The overall sensitivity of the mu-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (both recombinant antigens) was 100%, and its specificity was also found to be 100%. Immunoglobulin M antibodies were detected as early as on day 3, and maximum titers were obtained between days 8 and 25 after onset of the disease. The assay was regularly found to be positive within 3 to 4 months but in some cases up to 2 years after the acute phase of the disease. Images PMID:8099085

  1. Different Cell Viability Assays Reveal Inconsistent Results After Bleomycin Electrotransfer In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Jakštys, Baltramiejus; Ruzgys, Paulius; Tamošiūnas, Mindaugas; Šatkauskas, Saulius

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to compare different and commonly used cell viability assays after CHO cells treatment with anticancer drug bleomycin (20 nM), high voltage (HV) electric pulses (4 pulses, 1200 V/cm, 100 µs, 1 Hz), and combination of bleomycin and HV electric pulses. Cell viability was measured using clonogenic assay, propidium iodide (PI) assay, MTT assay, and employing flow cytometry modality to precisely count cells in definite volume of the sample (flow cytometry assay). Results showed that although clonogenic cell viability drastically decreased correspondingly to 57 and 3 % after cell treatment either with HV pulses or combination of bleomycin and HV pulses (bleomycin electrotransfer), PI assay performed ~15 min after the treatments indicated nearly 100 % cell viability. MTT assay performed at 6-72 h time points after these treatments revealed that MTT cell viability is highly dependent on evaluation time point and decreased with later evaluation time points. Nevertheless, in comparison to clonogenic cell viability, MTT cell viability after bleomycin electrotransfer at all testing time points was significantly higher. Flow cytometry assay if used at later times, 2-3 days after the treatment, allowed reliable evaluation of cell viability. In overall, our results showed that in order to estimate cell viability after cell treatment with combination of the bleomycin and electroporation the most reliable method is clonogenic assay. Improper use of PI and MTT assays can lead to misinterpretation of the experimental results. PMID:26077843

  2. Velocity valleys enable efficient capture and spatial sorting of nanoparticle-bound cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Besant, Justin D; Mohamadi, Reza M; Aldridge, Peter M; Li, Yi; Sargent, Edward H; Kelley, Shana O

    2015-04-14

    The development of strategies for isolating rare cells from complex matrices like blood is important for a wide variety of applications including the analysis of bloodborne cancer cells, infectious pathogens, and prenatal testing. Due to their high colloidal stability and surface-to-volume ratio, antibody-coated magnetic nanoparticles are excellent labels for cellular surface markers. Unfortunately, capture of nanoparticle-bound cells at practical flow rates is challenging due to the small volume, and thus low magnetic susceptibility, of magnetic nanoparticles. We have developed a means to capture nanoparticle-labeled cells using microstructures which create pockets of locally low linear velocity, termed velocity valleys. Cells that enter a velocity valley slow down momentarily, allowing the magnetic force to overcome the reduced drag force and trap the cells. Here, we describe a model for this mechanism of cell capture and use this model to guide the rational design of a device that efficiently captures rare cells and sorts them according to surface expression in complex matrices with greater than 10,000-fold specificity. By analysing the magnetic and drag forces on a cell, we calculate a threshold linear velocity for capture and relate this to the capture efficiency. We find that the addition of X-shaped microstructures enhances capture efficiency 5-fold compared to circular posts. By tuning the linear velocity, we capture cells with a 100-fold range of surface marker expression with near 100% efficiency and sort these cells into spatially distinct zones. By tuning the flow channel geometry, we reduce non-specific cell adhesion by 5-fold. PMID:25784586

  3. High content cell-based assay for the inflammatory pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Abhishek; Song, Joon Myong

    2015-07-01

    Cellular inflammation is a non-specific immune response to tissue injury that takes place via cytokine network orchestration to maintain normal tissue homeostasis. However chronic inflammation that lasts for a longer period, plays the key role in human diseases like neurodegenerative disorders and cancer development. Understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the inflammatory pathways may be effective in targeting and modulating their outcome. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine that effectively combines the pro-inflammatory features with the pro-apoptotic potential. Increased levels of TNF-α observed during acute and chronic inflammatory conditions are believed to induce adverse phenotypes like glucose intolerance and abnormal lipid profile. Natural products e. g., amygdalin, cinnamic acid, jasmonic acid and aspirin have proven efficacy in minimizing the TNF-α induced inflammation in vitro and in vivo. Cell lysis-free quantum dot (QDot) imaging is an emerging technique to identify the cellular mediators of a signaling cascade with a single assay in one run. In comparison to organic fluorophores, the inorganic QDots are bright, resistant to photobleaching and possess tunable optical properties that make them suitable for long term and multicolor imaging of various components in a cellular crosstalk. Hence we tested some components of the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway during TNF-α induced inflammation and the effects of aspirin in HepG2 cells by QDot multicolor imaging technique. Results demonstrated that aspirin showed significant protective effects against TNF-α induced cellular inflammation. The developed cell based assay paves the platform for the analysis of cellular components in a smooth and reliable way.

  4. Human endothelial cell-based assay for endotoxin as sensitive as the conventional Limulus Amebocyte Lysate assay.

    PubMed

    Unger, Ronald E; Peters, Kirsten; Sartoris, Anne; Freese, Christian; Kirkpatrick, C James

    2014-03-01

    Endotoxin, also known as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) produced by bacteria can be present in any liquid or on any biomaterial even if the material is sterile. Endotoxin in mammals can cause fever, inflammation, cell and tissue damage and irreversible septic shock and death. In the body, endothelial cells making up the blood vasculature and endothelial cells in vitro rapidly react to minute amounts of endotoxin resulting in a rapid induction of the cell adhesion molecule E-selectin. In this study we have used immunofluorescent staining to evaluate the expression of E-selectin on human microvascular endothelial cells from the skin (HDMEC) and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) exposed to various concentrations of LPS. In addition, the sensitivity of detection was compared with the most widely used assay for the presence of endotoxin, the Limulus Amebocyte Lysate assay (LAL). The detection of E-selectin on endothelial cells in the presence of LPS for 4 h was found to be at least as sensitive in detecting the same concentration using the LAL assay. A cell adhesion molecule-enzyme immunosorbent assay was also developed and used to quantify LPS using the endothelial cell model. A comparison of LAL and the immunofluorescent staining method was carried out with solutions, nanoparticles, biomaterial extracts and endothelial cells grown directly on biomaterials. Under all conditions, the endothelial/E-selectin model system was positive for the test samples that were positive by LAL. Thus, we propose the use of this highly sensitive, rapid, reproducible assay for the routine testing of endotoxin in all steps in the manufacturing process of materials destined for use in humans. This can give a rapid feedback and localization of bacterial contamination sources with the LAL being reserved for the testing of the final product. PMID:24456607

  5. Cell damage by UVA radiation of a mercury microscopy lamp probed by autofluorescence modifications, cloning assay, and comet assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Karsten; Krasieva, Tatiana B.; Bauer, Eckhard; Fiedler, Ursula; Berns, Michael W.; Tromberg, Bruce J.; Greulich, Karl O.

    1996-04-01

    Cell damage by low-power 365-nm radiation of a 50-W high-pressure mercury microscopy lamp was studied. Exposure of Chinese hamster ovary cells to ultraviolet-A (UVA) radiation > 10 kJ/m2 resulted in significant modifications of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide attributed autofluorescence and inhibition of cell division. Single-cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay) revealed UVA-induced single-strand DNA breaks. According to these results, UVA excitation radiation in fluorescence microscopy may damage cells. This has to be considered in vital cell microscopy, e.g., in calcium measurements.

  6. UVA-induced oxidative stress in single cells probed by autofluorescence modifications, cloning assay, and comet assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Karsten; Krasieva, Tatjana; Bauer, Eckhard; Fiedler, Ulrich; Berns, Michael W.; Tromberg, Bruce J.; Greulich, Karl O.

    1996-01-01

    Cell damage by low-power 365 nm radiation of a 50 W high-pressure mercury microscopy lamp was studied. UVA exposure to CHO cells resulted for radiant exposures greater than 10 kJ/m2 in significant modifications of NADH-attributed autofluorescence and in inhibition of cell division. Single cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay) revealed UVA-induced single strand DNA breaks. According to these results, UVA excitation radiation in fluorescence microscopy may damage cells. This has to be considered in vital cell microscopy, e.g. in calcium measurements.

  7. Single-Cell Based Quantitative Assay of Chromosome Transmission Fidelity

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jin; Heinecke, Dominic; Mulla, Wahid A.; Bradford, William D.; Rubinstein, Boris; Box, Andrew; Haug, Jeffrey S.; Li, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Errors in mitosis are a primary cause of chromosome instability (CIN), generating aneuploid progeny cells. Whereas a variety of factors can influence CIN, under most conditions mitotic errors are rare events that have been difficult to measure accurately. Here we report a green fluorescent protein−based quantitative chromosome transmission fidelity (qCTF) assay in budding yeast that allows sensitive and quantitative detection of CIN and can be easily adapted to high-throughput analysis. Using the qCTF assay, we performed genome-wide quantitative profiling of genes that affect CIN in a dosage-dependent manner and identified genes that elevate CIN when either increased (icCIN) or decreased in copy number (dcCIN). Unexpectedly, qCTF screening also revealed genes whose change in copy number quantitatively suppress CIN, suggesting that the basal error rate of the wild-type genome is not minimized, but rather, may have evolved toward an optimal level that balances both stability and low-level karyotype variation for evolutionary adaptation. PMID:25823586

  8. Engineering cholesterol-based fibers for antibody immobilization and cell capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohn, Celine

    In 2015, the United States is expected to have nearly 600,000 deaths attributed to cancer. Of these 600,000 deaths, 90% will be a direct result of cancer metastasis, the spread of cancer throughout the body. During cancer metastasis, circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are shed from primary tumors and migrate through bodily fluids, establishing secondary cancer sites. As cancer metastasis is incredibly lethal, there is a growing emphasis on developing "liquid biopsies" that can screen peripheral blood, search for and identify CTCs. One popular method for capturing CTCs is the use of a detection platform with antibodies specifically suited to recognize and capture cancer cells. These antibodies are immobilized onto the platform and can then bind and capture cells of interest. However, current means to immobilize antibodies often leave them with drastically reduced function. The antibodies are left poorly suited for cell capture, resulting in low cell capture efficiencies. This body of work investigates the use of lipid-based fibers to immobilize proteins in a way that retains protein function, ultimately leading to increased cell capture efficiencies. The resulting increased efficiencies are thought to arise from the retained three-dimensional structure of the protein as well as having a complete coating of the material surface with antibodies that are capable of interacting with their antigens. It is possible to electrospin cholesterol-based fibers that are similar in design to the natural cell membrane, providing proteins a more natural setting during immobilization. Such fibers have been produced from cholesterol-based cholesteryl succinyl silane (CSS). These fibers have previously illustrated a keen aptitude for retaining protein function and increasing cell capture. Herein the work focuses on three key concepts. First, a model is developed to understand the immobilization mechanism used by electrospun CSS fibers. The antibody immobilization and cell capturing

  9. Engineering cholesterol-based fibers for antibody immobilization and cell capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohn, Celine

    In 2015, the United States is expected to have nearly 600,000 deaths attributed to cancer. Of these 600,000 deaths, 90% will be a direct result of cancer metastasis, the spread of cancer throughout the body. During cancer metastasis, circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are shed from primary tumors and migrate through bodily fluids, establishing secondary cancer sites. As cancer metastasis is incredibly lethal, there is a growing emphasis on developing "liquid biopsies" that can screen peripheral blood, search for and identify CTCs. One popular method for capturing CTCs is the use of a detection platform with antibodies specifically suited to recognize and capture cancer cells. These antibodies are immobilized onto the platform and can then bind and capture cells of interest. However, current means to immobilize antibodies often leave them with drastically reduced function. The antibodies are left poorly suited for cell capture, resulting in low cell capture efficiencies. This body of work investigates the use of lipid-based fibers to immobilize proteins in a way that retains protein function, ultimately leading to increased cell capture efficiencies. The resulting increased efficiencies are thought to arise from the retained three-dimensional structure of the protein as well as having a complete coating of the material surface with antibodies that are capable of interacting with their antigens. It is possible to electrospin cholesterol-based fibers that are similar in design to the natural cell membrane, providing proteins a more natural setting during immobilization. Such fibers have been produced from cholesterol-based cholesteryl succinyl silane (CSS). These fibers have previously illustrated a keen aptitude for retaining protein function and increasing cell capture. Herein the work focuses on three key concepts. First, a model is developed to understand the immobilization mechanism used by electrospun CSS fibers. The antibody immobilization and cell capturing

  10. Continuous perfusion microfluidic cell culture array for high-throughput cell-based assays.

    PubMed

    Hung, Paul J; Lee, Philip J; Sabounchi, Poorya; Lin, Robert; Lee, Luke P

    2005-01-01

    We present for the first time a microfluidic cell culture array for long-term cellular monitoring. The 10 x 10 array could potentially assay 100 different cell-based experiments in parallel. The device was designed to integrate the processes used in typical cell culture experiments on a single self-contained microfluidic system. Major functions include repeated cell growth/passage cycles, reagent introduction, and real-time optical analysis. The single unit of the array consists of a circular microfluidic chamber, multiple narrow perfusion channels surrounding the main chamber, and four ports for fluidic access. Human carcinoma (HeLa) cells were cultured inside the device with continuous perfusion of medium at 37 degrees C. The observed doubling time was 1.4 +/- 0.1 days with a peak cell density of approximately 2.5*10(5) cells/cm(2). Cell assay was demonstrated by monitoring the fluorescence localization of calcein AM from 1 min to 10 days after reagent introduction. Confluent cell cultures were passaged within the microfluidic chambers using trypsin and successfully regrown, suggesting a stable culture environment suitable for continuous operation. The cell culture array could offer a platform for a wide range of assays with applications in drug screening, bioinformatics, and quantitative cell biology. PMID:15580587

  11. SLP assay: a rapid assay for detection of red blood cell antibodies in the serology of pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Giannitsis, D J; Hofstätter, I; Wild, J; Häcker-Shahin, B

    1992-01-01

    A rapid manual test for the detection of red cell antibodies called SLP assay has been developed and compared with the sensitivity of the antiglobulin assay. Acid-soluble proteins (SLP) from human leukocytes cause aggregation of human red blood cells. SLP represents a group of proteins consisting of 5 fractions of different positively charged macromolecules, which are able to reduce the negative charge of the red cells. Reduction of the negative charge results in a nonspecific hemagglutination of different strengths, depending on the SLP fractions used. This hemagglutination can be reversed by neutralizing the SLP with heparin. In the case of blood group-antibody-mediated aggregation the hemagglutination is nonreversible despite neutralization with heparin and remains stable for several hours. Because of the high sensitivity of the SLP assay all blood group antibodies from the IgM type as well as from the IgG type are detectable even in low concentrations. The sensitivity of the SLP assay is comparable to the antiglobulin assay. PMID:1284754

  12. A cell culture assay for the detection of cardiotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Loew-Friedrich, Iv.; von Bredow, F.; Schoeppe, W. )

    1991-04-01

    An important step in minimizing the number of animal experiments in medical research is the study of in vitro model systems. The authors propose the use of shock protein formation, which is a cellular response to cell-damaging stress as an assay to monitor cardiotoxicity. Isolated and cultured cardiac myocytes were prepared by a trypsin digestion method from 18-day-old fetal mice. These cells respond to typical substances inducing shock protein formation in other cellular systems as well as to known cardiotoxins with the de novo synthesis of shock proteins. Pharmaceuticals relevant in transplant medicine were tested for possible cardiotoxic effects: Cyclosporine A evokes shock protein formation at subtherapeutic concentrations. Azathioprine and methyl-prednisolone exert the same effect but at concentration ranges highly above the therapeutic level. The ability to induce shock protein synthesis obviously seems to be restricted to toxic drugs. The data presented demonstrate that the proposed in vitro model system for cardiotoxicity is animal saving and sensitive.

  13. A cell-based phenotypic assay to identify cardioprotective agents

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Stephanie; Olm-Shipman, Adam; Walters, Andrew; Urciuoli, William R.; Devito, Stefanie; Nadtochiy, Sergiy M.; Wojtovich, Andrew P.; Brookes, Paul S.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Tissue ischemia/reperfusion (IR) injury underlies several leading causes of death such as heart-attack and stroke. The lack of clinical therapies for IR injury may be partly due to the difficulty of adapting IR injury models to high-throughput screening (HTS). Objective To develop a model of IR injury that is both physiologically relevant and amenable to HTS. Methods and Results A micro-plate based respirometry apparatus was used. Controlling gas flow in the plate head space, coupled with the instrument’s mechanical systems, yielded a 24 well model of IR injury in which H9c2 cardiomyocytes were transiently trapped in a small volume, rendering them ischemic. Following initial validation with known protective molecules, the model was used to screen a 2000 molecule library, with post IR cell death as an endpoint. pO2 and pH monitoring in each well also afforded metabolic data. Ten protective, detrimental and inert molecules from the screen were subsequently tested in a Langendorff perfused heart model of IR injury, revealing strong correlations between the screening endpoint and both recovery of cardiac function (negative r2=0.66), and infarct size (positive, r2=0.62). Relationships between the effects of added molecules on cellular bioenergetics, and protection against IR injury, were also studied. Conclusion This novel cell-based assay can predict either protective or detrimental effects on IR injury in the intact heart. Its application may help identify therapeutic or harmful molecules. PMID:22394516

  14. Trap Effect of Three-Dimensional Fibers Network for High Efficient Cancer-Cell Capture.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lan; Yang, Gao; Wang, Nü; Zhang, Pengchao; Guo, Fengyun; Meng, Jingxin; Zhang, Feilong; Hu, Zuojun; Wang, Shutao; Zhao, Yong

    2015-04-22

    Cells are trapped: The 3D fibrous interfaces, including microfibers, nanofibers, and nanofibers/microbeads composite interfaces, are fabricated by electrospinning. After coated with anti-EpCAM, these 3D fibrous interfaces allow cancer cells to be firmly trapped into the networks that show the outstanding capability for cancer cell capture from real blood. PMID:25645204

  15. Nanotextured PDMS Substrates for Enhanced Roughness and Aptamer Immobilization for Cancer Cell Capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Muhymin; Mahmood, Arif; Bellah, Md.; Kim, Young-Tae; Iqbal, Samir

    2014-03-01

    Detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in the early stages of cancer is requires very sensitive approach. Nanotextured polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrates were fabricated by micro reactive ion etching (Micro-RIE) to have better control on surface morphology and to improve the affinity of PDMS surfaces to capture cancer cells using surface immobilized aptamers. The aptamers were specific to epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR) present in cell membranes, and overexpressed in tumor cells. We also investigated the effect of nano-scale features on cell capturing by implementing various surfaces of different roughnesses. Three different recipes were used to prepare nanotextured PDMS by micro-RIE using oxygen (O2) and carbon tetrafluoride (CF4). The measured average roughness of three nanotextured PDMS surfaces were found to impact average densities of captured cells. In all cases, nanotextured PDMS facilitated cell capturing possibly due to increased effective surface area of roughened substrates at nanoscale. It was also observed that cell capture efficiency was higher for higher surface roughness. The nanotextured PDMS substrates are thus useful for cancer cytology devices.

  16. An automated cell-counting algorithm for fluorescently-stained cells in migration assays

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    A cell-counting algorithm, developed in Matlab®, was created to efficiently count migrated fluorescently-stained cells on membranes from migration assays. At each concentration of cells used (10,000, and 100,000 cells), images were acquired at 2.5 ×, 5 ×, and 10 × objective magnifications. Automated cell counts strongly correlated to manual counts (r2 = 0.99, P < 0.0001 for a total of 47 images), with no difference in the measurements between methods under all conditions. We conclude that our automated method is accurate, more efficient, and void of variability and potential observer bias normally associated with manual counting. PMID:22011343

  17. Bovine viral diarrhea virus antigen detection across whole cattle hides using two antigen-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus is a costly disease of cattle that can be controlled by vaccination, biosecurity, and removal of persistently infected cattle. Development and proficiency testing of assays to identify persistently infected cattle substantial quantities of known positive and negative samp...

  18. Advanced Materials for the Recognition and Capture of Whole Cells and Microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Bole, Amanda L; Manesiotis, Panagiotis

    2016-07-01

    Selective cell recognition and capture has recently attracted significant interest due to its potential importance for clinical, diagnostic, environmental, and security applications. Current methods for cell isolation from complex samples are largely dependent on cell size and density, with limited application scope as many of the target cells do not exhibit appreciable differences in this respect. The most recent and forthcoming developments in the area of selective recognition and capture of whole cells, based on natural receptors, as well as synthetic materials utilising physical and chemical properties of the target cell or microorganism, are highlighted. Particular focus is given to the development of cell complementary surfaces using the cells themselves as templating agents, by means of molecular imprinting, and their combination with sensing platforms for rapid cell detection in complex media. The benefits and challenges of each approach are discussed and a perspective of the future of this research area is given. PMID:26662854

  19. Laser Capture and Single Cell Genotyping from Frozen Tissue Sections.

    PubMed

    Kroneis, Thomas; Ye, Jody; Gillespie, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    There is an increasing requirement for genetic analysis of individual cells from tissue sections. This is particularly the case for analysis of tumor cells but is also a requirement for analysis of cells in pancreas from individuals with type 1 diabetes where there is evidence of viral infection or in the analysis of chimerism in pancreas; either post-transplant or as a result of feto-maternal cell transfer.This protocol describes a strategy to isolate cells using laser microdissection and to run a 17plex PCR to discriminate between cells of haplo-identical origin (i.e., fetal and maternal cells) in pancreas tissue but other robust DNA tests could be used. In short, snap-frozen tissues are cryo-sectioned and mounted onto membrane-coated slides. Target cells are harvested from the tissue sections by laser microdissection and pressure catapulting (LMPC) prior to DNA profiling. This is based on amplification of highly repetitive yet stably inherited loci (short tandem repeats, STR) as well as the amelogenin locus for sex determination and separation of PCR products by capillary electrophoresis. PMID:26659805

  20. Biodegradable nano-films for capture and non-invasive release of circulating tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, Myoung-Hwan; Castleberry, Steven; Deng, Jason Z.; Hsu, Bryan; Mayner, Sarah; Jensen, Anne E.; Sequist, Lecia V.; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Haber, Daniel A.; Toner, Mehmet; Stott, Shannon L.; Hammond, Paula T.

    2016-01-01

    Selective isolation and purification of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from whole blood is an important capability for both clinical medicine and biological research. Current techniques to perform this task place the isolated cells under excessive stresses that reduce cell viability, and potentially induce phenotype change, therefore losing valuable information about the isolated cells. We present a biodegradable nano-film coating on the surface of a microfluidic chip, which can be used to effectively capture as well as non-invasively release cancer cell lines such as PC-3, LNCaP, DU 145, H1650 and H1975. We have applied layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly to create a library of ultrathin coatings using a broad range of materials through complementary interactions. By developing an LbL nano-film coating with an affinity-based cell-capture surface that is capable of selectively isolating cancer cells from whole blood, and that can be rapidly degraded on command, we are able to gently isolate cancer cells and recover them without compromising cell viability or proliferative potential. Our approach has the capability to overcome practical hurdles and provide viable cancer cells for downstream analyses, such as live cell imaging, single cell genomics, and in vitro cell culture of recovered cells. Furthermore, CTCs from cancer patients were also captured, identified, and successfully released using the LbL-modified microchips. PMID:26142780

  1. Biodegradable nano-films for capture and non-invasive release of circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Reátegui, Eduardo; Park, Myoung-Hwan; Castleberry, Steven; Deng, Jason Z; Hsu, Bryan; Mayner, Sarah; Jensen, Anne E; Sequist, Lecia V; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Haber, Daniel A; Toner, Mehmet; Stott, Shannon L; Hammond, Paula T

    2015-10-01

    Selective isolation and purification of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from whole blood is an important capability for both clinical medicine and biological research. Current techniques to perform this task place the isolated cells under excessive stresses that reduce cell viability, and potentially induce phenotype change, therefore losing valuable information about the isolated cells. We present a biodegradable nano-film coating on the surface of a microfluidic chip, which can be used to effectively capture as well as non-invasively release cancer cell lines such as PC-3, LNCaP, DU 145, H1650 and H1975. We have applied layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly to create a library of ultrathin coatings using a broad range of materials through complementary interactions. By developing an LbL nano-film coating with an affinity-based cell-capture surface that is capable of selectively isolating cancer cells from whole blood, and that can be rapidly degraded on command, we are able to gently isolate cancer cells and recover them without compromising cell viability or proliferative potential. Our approach has the capability to overcome practical hurdles and provide viable cancer cells for downstream analyses, such as live cell imaging, single cell genomics, and in vitro cell culture of recovered cells. Furthermore, CTCs from cancer patients were also captured, identified, and successfully released using the LbL-modified microchips. PMID:26142780

  2. The use of Nanotrap particles technology in capturing HIV-1 virions and viral proteins from infected cells.

    PubMed

    Jaworski, Elizabeth; Saifuddin, Mohammed; Sampey, Gavin; Shafagati, Nazly; Van Duyne, Rachel; Iordanskiy, Sergey; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Liotta, Lance; Petricoin, Emanuel; Young, Mary; Lepene, Benjamin; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 infection results in a chronic but incurable illness since long-term HAART can keep the virus to an undetectable level. However, discontinuation of therapy rapidly increases viral burden. Moreover, patients under HAART frequently develop various metabolic disorders and HIV-associated neuronal disease. Today, the main challenge of HIV-1 research is the elimination of the residual virus in infected individuals. The current HIV-1 diagnostics are largely comprised of serological and nucleic acid based technologies. Our goal is to integrate the nanotrap technology into a standard research tool that will allow sensitive detection of HIV-1 infection. This study demonstrates that majority of HIV-1 virions in culture supernatants and Tat/Nef proteins spiked in culture medium can be captured by nanotrap particles. To determine the binding affinities of different baits, we incubated target molecules with nanotrap particles at room temperature. After short sequestration, materials were either eluted or remained attached to nanotrap particles prior to analysis. The unique affinity baits of nanotrap particles preferentially bound HIV-1 materials while excluded albumin. A high level capture of Tat or Tat peptide by NT082 and NT084 particles was measured by western blot (WB). Intracellular Nef protein was captured by NT080, while membrane-associated Nef was captured by NT086 and also detected by WB. Selective capture of HIV-1 particles by NT073 and NT086 was measured by reverse transcriptase assay, while capture of infectious HIV-1 by these nanoparticles was demonstrated by functional transactivation in TZM-bl cells. We also demonstrated specific capture of HIV-1 particles and exosomes-containing TAR-RNA in patients' serum by NT086 and NT082 particles, respectively, using specific qRT-PCR. Collectively, our data indicate that certain types of nanotrap particles selectively capture specific HIV-1 molecules, and we propose to use this technology as a platform to enhance HIV-1

  3. The Use of Nanotrap Particles Technology in Capturing HIV-1 Virions and Viral Proteins from Infected Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sampey, Gavin; Shafagati, Nazly; Van Duyne, Rachel; Iordanskiy, Sergey; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Liotta, Lance; Petricoin, Emanuel; Young, Mary; Lepene, Benjamin; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 infection results in a chronic but incurable illness since long-term HAART can keep the virus to an undetectable level. However, discontinuation of therapy rapidly increases viral burden. Moreover, patients under HAART frequently develop various metabolic disorders and HIV-associated neuronal disease. Today, the main challenge of HIV-1 research is the elimination of the residual virus in infected individuals. The current HIV-1 diagnostics are largely comprised of serological and nucleic acid based technologies. Our goal is to integrate the nanotrap technology into a standard research tool that will allow sensitive detection of HIV-1 infection. This study demonstrates that majority of HIV-1 virions in culture supernatants and Tat/Nef proteins spiked in culture medium can be captured by nanotrap particles. To determine the binding affinities of different baits, we incubated target molecules with nanotrap particles at room temperature. After short sequestration, materials were either eluted or remained attached to nanotrap particles prior to analysis. The unique affinity baits of nanotrap particles preferentially bound HIV-1 materials while excluded albumin. A high level capture of Tat or Tat peptide by NT082 and NT084 particles was measured by western blot (WB). Intracellular Nef protein was captured by NT080, while membrane-associated Nef was captured by NT086 and also detected by WB. Selective capture of HIV-1 particles by NT073 and NT086 was measured by reverse transcriptase assay, while capture of infectious HIV-1 by these nanoparticles was demonstrated by functional transactivation in TZM-bl cells. We also demonstrated specific capture of HIV-1 particles and exosomes-containing TAR-RNA in patients' serum by NT086 and NT082 particles, respectively, using specific qRT-PCR. Collectively, our data indicate that certain types of nanotrap particles selectively capture specific HIV-1 molecules, and we propose to use this technology as a platform to enhance HIV-1

  4. Viable capture and release of cancer cells in human whole blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doh, Il; Yoo, Hwan-il; Cho, Young-Ho; Lee, Jinseon; Kwan Kim, Hong; Kim, Jhingook

    2012-07-01

    We present viable cancer cell isolation devices utilizing the physical properties of cells. The tapered slit structure is proposed to isolate cancer cells from blood cells and collect them by reversed flow. From the experimental study using the spiked cancer cells in human whole blood, we verified the capability of the present cancer cell isolation chip in terms of capture efficiency, viability, and release rate. The viable cancer cells obtained from the present chip can be used for the further applications of cancer diagnosis, treatment monitoring, and new target drug development for cancer stem cells.

  5. A Functional Assay to Assess Connexin 43-Mediated Cell-to-Cell Communication of Second Messengers in Cultured Bone Cells.

    PubMed

    Stains, Joseph P; Civitelli, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Cell-to-cell transfer of small molecules is a fundamental way by which multicellular organisms coordinate function. Recent work has highlighted the complexity of biologic responses downstream of gap junctions. As the connexin-regulated effectors are coming into focus, there is a need to develop functional assays that allow specific testing of biologically relevant second messengers. Here, we describe a modification of the classic gap junction parachute assay to assess biologically relevant molecules passed through gap junctions. PMID:27207296

  6. Particle collision dynamics in periodic asymmetric microfluidic obstacle arrays for rare cell capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, James; Gleghorn, Jason; Kirby, Brian

    2012-11-01

    Particle-obstacle collision dynamics in periodic microfluidic obstacle arrays are presented in the context of microfluidic devices for the capture of rare cells, such as circulating tumor cells (CTCs). A coupled CFD-particle advection simulation was used to calculate particle trajectories for low Reynolds number, low Stokes number flows. A rich range of deterministic transport modes was identified as a function of array geometry, and the resulting particle size-dependent collision rate highlights the usefulness of these arrays for high-efficiency, high-purity rare cell capture. A reduced-order model, assuming unidirectional flow and infinitesimal obstacles, captures most of the details of transport in these systems with an O (104) computational saving; this model is a useful tool for rapidly exploring a large design space and optimizing geometries for a specific rare cell capture application. Results of the CFD simulations, reduced-order ballistic models, and experiments with polystyrene particles and cancer cells indicate that array geometry is central to rare cell capture and that simple models can be used to inform the design of these microfluidic devices. Present affiliation: Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Princeton University.

  7. A minimal physical model captures the shapes of crawling cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tjhung, E.; Tiribocchi, A.; Marenduzzo, D.; Cates, M. E.

    2015-01-01

    Cell motility in higher organisms (eukaryotes) is crucial to biological functions ranging from wound healing to immune response, and also implicated in diseases such as cancer. For cells crawling on hard surfaces, significant insights into motility have been gained from experiments replicating such motion in vitro. Such experiments show that crawling uses a combination of actin treadmilling (polymerization), which pushes the front of a cell forward, and myosin-induced stress (contractility), which retracts the rear. Here we present a simplified physical model of a crawling cell, consisting of a droplet of active polar fluid with contractility throughout, but treadmilling connected to a thin layer near the supporting wall. The model shows a variety of shapes and/or motility regimes, some closely resembling cases seen experimentally. Our work strongly supports the view that cellular motility exploits autonomous physical mechanisms whose operation does not need continuous regulatory effort.

  8. Enzymatic Activity Assays for Base Excision Repair Enzymes in Cell Extracts from Vertebrate Cells

    PubMed Central

    Çağlayan, Melike; Horton, Julie K.; Wilson, Samuel H.

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported enzymatic activity assays for the base excision repair (BER) enzymes DNA polymerase β (pol β), aprataxin (APTX), and flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1) in cell extracts from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Çağlayan and Wilson, 2014). Here, we describe a method to prepare cell extracts from vertebrate cells to investigate these enzymatic activities for the processing of the 5′-adenylated-sugar phosphate-containing BER intermediate. This new protocol complements our previous publication. The cell lines used are wild-type and APTX-deficient human lymphoblast cells from an Ataxia with Oculomotor Apraxia Type 1 (AOA1) disease patient, wild-type and APTX-null DT40 chicken B cells, and mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells. This protocol is a quick and efficient way to make vertebrate cell extracts without using commercial kits. PMID:27390764

  9. Capture and release of cancer cells based on sacrificeable transparent MnO2 nanospheres thin film.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qinqin; Chen, Bolei; He, Rongxiang; He, Zhaobo; Cai, Bo; Xu, Junhua; Qian, Weiyi; Chan, Helen Laiwa; Liu, Wei; Guo, Shishang; Zhao, Xing-Zhong; Yuan, Jikang

    2014-09-01

    A CTCs detection assay using transparent MnO2 nanospheres thin films to capture and release of CTCs is reported. The enhanced local topography interaction between extracellular matrix scaffolds and the antibody-coated substrate leads to improved capture efficiency. CTCs captured from artificial blood sample can be cultured and released, represent a new functional material capable of CTCs isolation and culture for subsequent studies. PMID:24652776

  10. Dengue virus serotyping based on envelope and membrane and nonstructural protein NS1 serotype-specific capture immunoglobulin M enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays.

    PubMed

    Shu, Pei-Yun; Chen, Li-Kuang; Chang, Shu-Fen; Su, Chien-Ling; Chien, Li-Jung; Chin, Chuan; Lin, Ting-Hsiang; Huang, Jyh-Hsiung

    2004-06-01

    Envelope and membrane (E/M) and nonstructural protein NS1 serotype-specific capture Immunoglobulin M (IgM) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) were developed to differentiate four dengue virus serotypes. A total of 93 anti-dengue virus IgM-positive serum samples collected between days 5 and 45 of illness from 59 confirmed dengue patients were analyzed. The results showed that positive serotype specificity could be identified for 86.1 and 47.6% of serum samples tested for E/M-specific IgM antibodies versus 83.3 and 42.9% of serum samples tested for NS1-specific IgM antibodies from patients with primary and secondary dengue virus infections, respectively. Dual analyses with both E/M and NS1 serotype-specific capture IgM ELISAs showed that positive serotype specificity could be correctly identified for 98.6 and 61.9% of all of the primary and secondary serum samples tested, respectively. These findings suggested that E/M and NS1 serotype-specific capture IgM ELISAs have the potential to be of use in dengue virus serotyping. PMID:15184425

  11. Phage-displayed peptides as capture antigens in an innovative assay for Taenia saginata-infected cattle.

    PubMed

    Fogaça, Rafaela L; Capelli-Peixoto, Janaína; Yamanaka, Isabel B; de Almeida, Rodrigo P M; Muzzi, João Carlos D; Borges, Mariangela; Costa, Alvimar J; Chávez-Olortegui, Carlos; Thomaz-Soccol, Vanete; Alvarenga, Larissa M; de Moura, Juliana

    2014-11-01

    Bovine cysticercosis is detected during the routine post mortem examination of carcasses by visual inspection (knife and eye method). However, the sensitivity of this procedure is several times lower than immunoassays, even when it is performed by qualified professionals. In the present study, a new generation capture antigens were screened from a phage display peptide library using antibodies from Taenia saginata-infected animals. Eight phage clones were selected, and one, Tsag 3 (VHTSIRPRCQPRAITPR), produced similar results to the T. saginata metacestode crude antigen (TsCa) when used as a capture antigen in an ELISA. The phage-displayed peptides competed with TsCa for binding sites, reducing the reactivity by approximately 30 %. Alanine scanning indicated that proline, arginine, and serine are important residues for antibody binding. Tsag 1 (HFYQITWLPNTFPAR), the most frequent affinity-selected clone, and Tsag 6 (YRWPSTPSASRQATL) shared similarity with highly conserved proteins from the Taeniidae family with known immunogenicity. Due to their epitopic or mimotopic properties, these affinity-selected phages could contribute to the rational design of an ante mortem immunodiagnosis method for bovine cysticercosis, as well as an epitope-based vaccine to interrupt the taeniosis/cysticercosis complex. PMID:25081558

  12. A simple packed bed device for antibody labelled rare cell capture from whole blood.

    PubMed

    Kralj, Jason G; Arya, Chandamany; Tona, Alessandro; Forbes, Thomas P; Munson, Matthew S; Sorbara, Lynn; Srivastava, Sudhir; Forry, Samuel P

    2012-12-01

    We have developed a system to isolate rare cells from whole blood using commercially available components and simple microfluidics. We characterized the capture of MCF-7 cells spiked into whole human blood using this system to demonstrate that enrichment and enumeration studies give results similar to in situ surface-modified devices while reducing fabrication and operation complexity. PMID:23079718

  13. Development of an Automated and Sensitive Microfluidic Device for Capturing and Characterizing Circulating Tumor Cells (CTCs) from Clinical Blood Samples

    PubMed Central

    Gogoi, Priya; Sepehri, Saedeh; Zhou, Yi; Gorin, Michael A.; Paolillo, Carmela; Capoluongo, Ettore; Gleason, Kyle; Payne, Austin; Boniface, Brian; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Morgan, Todd M.; Fortina, Paolo; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Handique, Kalyan; Wang, Yixin

    2016-01-01

    Current analysis of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is hindered by sub-optimal sensitivity and specificity of devices or assays as well as lack of capability of characterization of CTCs with clinical biomarkers. Here, we validate a novel technology to enrich and characterize CTCs from blood samples of patients with metastatic breast, prostate and colorectal cancers using a microfluidic chip which is processed by using an automated staining and scanning system from sample preparation to image processing. The Celsee system allowed for the detection of CTCs with apparent high sensitivity and specificity (94% sensitivity and 100% specificity). Moreover, the system facilitated rapid capture of CTCs from blood samples and also allowed for downstream characterization of the captured cells by immunohistochemistry, DNA and mRNA fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH). In a subset of patients with prostate cancer we compared the technology with a FDA-approved CTC device, CellSearch and found a higher degree of sensitivity with the Celsee instrument. In conclusion, the integrated Celsee system represents a promising CTC technology for enumeration and molecular characterization. PMID:26808060

  14. Development of an Automated and Sensitive Microfluidic Device for Capturing and Characterizing Circulating Tumor Cells (CTCs) from Clinical Blood Samples.

    PubMed

    Gogoi, Priya; Sepehri, Saedeh; Zhou, Yi; Gorin, Michael A; Paolillo, Carmela; Capoluongo, Ettore; Gleason, Kyle; Payne, Austin; Boniface, Brian; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Morgan, Todd M; Fortina, Paolo; Pienta, Kenneth J; Handique, Kalyan; Wang, Yixin

    2016-01-01

    Current analysis of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is hindered by sub-optimal sensitivity and specificity of devices or assays as well as lack of capability of characterization of CTCs with clinical biomarkers. Here, we validate a novel technology to enrich and characterize CTCs from blood samples of patients with metastatic breast, prostate and colorectal cancers using a microfluidic chip which is processed by using an automated staining and scanning system from sample preparation to image processing. The Celsee system allowed for the detection of CTCs with apparent high sensitivity and specificity (94% sensitivity and 100% specificity). Moreover, the system facilitated rapid capture of CTCs from blood samples and also allowed for downstream characterization of the captured cells by immunohistochemistry, DNA and mRNA fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH). In a subset of patients with prostate cancer we compared the technology with a FDA-approved CTC device, CellSearch and found a higher degree of sensitivity with the Celsee instrument. In conclusion, the integrated Celsee system represents a promising CTC technology for enumeration and molecular characterization. PMID:26808060

  15. Boron neutron capture therapy induces cell cycle arrest and cell apoptosis of glioma stem/progenitor cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Glioma stem cells in the quiescent state are resistant to clinical radiation therapy. An almost inevitable glioma recurrence is due to the persistence of these cells. The high linear energy transfer associated with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) could kill quiescent and proliferative cells. Methods The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of BNCT on glioma stem/progenitor cells in vitro. The damage induced by BNCT was assessed using cell cycle progression, apoptotic cell ratio and apoptosis-associated proteins expression. Results The surviving fraction and cell viability of glioma stem/progenitor cells were decreased compared with differentiated glioma cells using the same boronophenylalanine pretreatment and the same dose of neutron flux. BNCT induced cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase and cell apoptosis via the mitochondrial pathway, with changes in the expression of associated proteins. Conclusions Glioma stem/progenitor cells, which are resistant to current clinical radiotherapy, could be effectively killed by BNCT in vitro via cell cycle arrest and apoptosis using a prolonged neutron irradiation, although radiosensitivity of glioma stem/progenitor cells was decreased compared with differentiated glioma cells when using the same dose of thermal neutron exposure and boronophenylalanine pretreatment. Thus, BNCT could offer an appreciable therapeutic advantage to prevent tumor recurrence, and may become a promising treatment in recurrent glioma. PMID:23915425

  16. Modified procedure for labelling target cells in a europium release assay of natural killer cell activity.

    PubMed

    Pacifici, R; Di Carlo, S; Bacosi, A; Altieri, I; Pichini, S; Zuccaro, P

    1993-05-01

    Lanthanide europium chelated to diethylenetriaminopentaacetate (EuDTPA) can be used to label target cells such as tumor cells and lymphocytes (Blomberg et al., 1986a,b; Granberg et al., 1988). This procedure has permitted the development of new non-radioactive methods for the detection of target cell cytolysis by natural killer (NK) cells (Blomberg et al., 1986a,b), cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) (Granberg et al., 1988) or complement-mediated cytolysis (Cui et al., 1992). However, we had no success with this method because of a lack of comparability between human NK cell activity simultaneously measured by a classical 51Cr release assay (Seaman et al., 1981) and EuDTPA release assay (Blomberg et al., 1986a). Furthermore, cell division and cell viability were significantly impaired by the suggested concentrations of EuCl3. In this paper, we present a modified non-cytotoxic method for target cell labelling with EuDTPA while cells are growing in culture medium. PMID:8486925

  17. Dielectrophoretic capture of low abundance cell population using thick electrodes.

    PubMed

    Marchalot, Julien; Chateaux, Jean-François; Faivre, Magalie; Mertani, Hichem C; Ferrigno, Rosaria; Deman, Anne-Laure

    2015-09-01

    Enrichment of rare cell populations such as Circulating Tumor Cells (CTCs) is a critical step before performing analysis. This paper presents a polymeric microfluidic device with integrated thick Carbon-PolyDimethylSiloxane composite (C-PDMS) electrodes designed to carry out dielectrophoretic (DEP) trapping of low abundance biological cells. Such conductive composite material presents advantages over metallic structures. Indeed, as it combines properties of both the matrix and doping particles, C-PDMS allows the easy and fast integration of conductive microstructures using a soft-lithography approach while preserving O2 plasma bonding properties of PDMS substrate and avoiding a cumbersome alignment procedure. Here, we first performed numerical simulations to demonstrate the advantage of such thick C-PDMS electrodes over a coplanar electrode configuration. It is well established that dielectrophoretic force ([Formula: see text]) decreases quickly as the distance from the electrode surface increases resulting in coplanar configuration to a low trapping efficiency at high flow rate. Here, we showed quantitatively that by using electrodes as thick as a microchannel height, it is possible to extend the DEP force influence in the whole volume of the channel compared to coplanar electrode configuration and maintaining high trapping efficiency while increasing the throughput. This model was then used to numerically optimize a thick C-PDMS electrode configuration in terms of trapping efficiency. Then, optimized microfluidic configurations were fabricated and tested at various flow rates for the trapping of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line. We reached trapping efficiencies of 97% at 20 μl/h and 78.7% at 80 μl/h, for 100 μm thick electrodes. Finally, we applied our device to the separation and localized trapping of CTCs (MDA-MB-231) from a red blood cells sample (concentration ratio of 1:10). PMID:26392836

  18. A novel hydrophilic polymer-brush pattern for site-specific capture of blood cells from whole blood.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jianwen; Shi, Qiang; Ye, Wei; Fan, Qunfu; Shi, Hengchong; Wong, Shing-Chung; Xu, Xiaodong; Yin, Jinghua

    2015-03-11

    A novel hydrophilic PAMPS-PAAm brush pattern is fabricated to selectively capture blood cells from whole blood. PAMPS brushes provide antifouling surfaces to resist protein and cell adhesion while PAAm brushes effectively entrap targeted proteins for site-specific and cell-type dependent capture of blood cells. PMID:25469596

  19. The cell transformation assay: toward a statistical classification of mixed and intermediate foci images.

    PubMed

    Procaccianti, Claudio; Stefanini, Federico M; Urani, Chiara

    2011-03-01

    The human carcinogenicity evaluation of chemicals has a great impact on public health. In vitro methods, such as the cell transformation assay (CTA), allow for a fast and reliable assessment of the carcinogenic potential of a chemical compound in comparison with the standard two-year bioassay. The scoring and classification of foci in selected cell lines is performed, after staining, by light microscopy. Foci can be separated into three classes: type I, which are scored as non-transformed, and types II and III that are considered to include fully transformed foci. However, in a number of cases, even an expert is uncertain about the attribution of a focus to a given class, due to its mixed or intermediate nature. Here, we suggest a simple approach to classifying mixed or intermediate foci by exploiting the quantitative information available from images, which is captured by statistical descriptors. A quantitative index is proposed, to describe the degree of dissimilarity of mixed and intermediate images to the three well-distinguished classes. PMID:21452912

  20. Quantification and viability assays of Toxoplasma gondii in commercial "Serrano" ham samples using magnetic capture real-time qPCR and bioassay techniques.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Samblas, M; Vílchez, S; Racero, J C; Fuentes, M V; Osuna, A

    2015-04-01

    "Serrano" ham is a typical pork product from the Mediterranean area, highly valued for its flavour. To make Serrano ham, pork undergoes a salting and a subsequent fermentation process known as curing. Certain pigs used for meat production are an important source of Toxoplasma gondii infection in humans. We have developed a method for quantifying and assaying the viability of the T. gondii present in commercial Serrano ham samples. A magnetic capture method for the isolation of T. gondii DNA and a qRT-PCR were used to estimate the T. gondii burden in 475 commercial samples of "Serrano" ham in two presentation formats: ham pieces and sliced ham. The infectivity capacity of T. gondii in positive samples was assayed in mice. The global prevalence of T. gondii was 8.84%, ranging from 32.35% in one of the companies to 0% prevalence in three other companies. The infectivity assays revealed that only 4.84% of the positive samples were infective. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report focussing on the prevalence of T. gondii in commercial "Serrano" ham. The method described here could be useful for producers to guarantee the safety of their products. PMID:25475273

  1. Comparison of the f-HPV typing™ and Hybrid Capture II® assays for detection of high-risk HPV genotypes in cervical samples.

    PubMed

    Cañadas, María-Paz; Cirigliano, Vincenzo; Darwich, Laila; Sirera, Guillermo; Coll, Josep; Clotet, Bonaventura; Videla, Sebastian

    2012-07-01

    Human papillomavirus genotyping is being considered in cervical screening programs and for monitoring the effectiveness of HPV vaccination. Both approaches require access to fast, easy and high-throughput technology. The aim of this study was to compare a new commercial assay (f-HPV typing™) with the Hybrid Capture II® (HC2) to detect HPV infection. The F-HPV typing is a multiplex fluorescent PCR method recognizing E6 and E7 regions of 13 high-risk (HR) HPV types, the same set of HR-types targeted HC2 test. A subset of 157 cervical samples was tested with both assays. The percentage of positive HR-HPV DNA samples was 24% (37/155) by HC2 and 33% (49/155) by f-HPV typing. Concordant results were found in 133/155 (overall agreement, 85.8%; Cohen's kappa=0.65). The analytical sensitivity and specificity of f-HPV were 97.6 and 93, respectively. In conclusion, this study shows that the f-HPV assay provides a good alternative to HC2 to detect HPV infection, allowing simple and rapid HPV genotyping and detecting multiple infections. PMID:22449759

  2. Measuring stem cell frequency in epidermis: A quantitative in vivo functional assay for long-term repopulating cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, T. E.; Barland, C.; Alex, A. M.; Mancianti, M. L.; Lu, Y.; Cleaver, J. E.; Lawrence, H. J.; Ghadially, R.

    2003-09-01

    Epidermal stem cells play a central role in tissue homeostasis, wound repair, tumor initiation, and gene therapy. A major impediment to the purification and molecular characterization of epidermal stem cells is the lack of a quantitative assay for cells capable of long-term repopulation in vivo, such as exists for hematopoietic cells. The tremendous strides made in the characterization and purification of hematopoietic stem cells have been critically dependent on the availability of competitive transplantation assays, because these assays permit the accurate quantitation of long-term repopulating cells in vivo. We have developed an analogous functional assay for epidermal stem cells, and have measured the frequency of functional epidermal stem cells in interfollicular epidermis. These studies indicate that cells capable of long-term reconstitution of a squamous epithelium reside in the interfollicular epidermis. We find that the frequency of these long-term repopulating cells is 1 in 35,000 total epidermal cells, or in the order of 1 in 104 basal epidermal cells, similar to that of hematopoietic stem cells in the bone marrow, and much lower than previously estimated in epidermis. Furthermore, these studies establish a novel functional assay that can be used to validate immunophenotypic markers and enrichment strategies for epidermal stem cells, and to quantify epidermal stem cells in various keratinocyte populations. Thus further studies using this type of assay for epidermis should aid in the progress of cutaneous stem cell-targeted gene therapy, and in more basic studies of epidermal stem cell regulation and differentiation.

  3. A simple and novel modification of comet assay for determination of bacteriophage mediated bacterial cell lysis.

    PubMed

    Khairnar, Krishna; Sanmukh, Swapnil; Chandekar, Rajshree; Paunikar, Waman

    2014-07-01

    The comet assay is the widely used method for in vitro toxicity testing which is also an alternative to the use of animal models for in vivo testing. Since, its inception in 1984 by Ostling and Johansson, it is being modified frequently for a wide range of application. In spite of its wide applicability, unfortunately there is no report of its application in bacteriophages research. In this study, a novel application of comet assay for the detection of bacteriophage mediated bacterial cell lysis was described. The conventional methods in bacteriophage research for studying bacterial lysis by bacteriophages are plaque assay method. It is time consuming, laborious and costly. The lytic activity of bacteriophage devours the bacterial cell which results in the release of bacterial genomic material that gets detected by ethidium bromide staining method by the comet assay protocol. The objective of this study was to compare efficacy of comet assay with different assay used to study phage mediated bacterial lysis. The assay was performed on culture isolates (N=80 studies), modified comet assay appear to have relatively higher sensitivity and specificity than other assay. The results of the study showed that the application of comet assay can be an economical, time saving and less laborious alternative to conventional plaque assay for the detection of bacteriophage mediated bacterial cell lysis. PMID:24681053

  4. Orosphere Assay: A method for propagation of head and neck cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Krishnamurthy, Sudha; Nör, Jacques E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent evidence suggests that head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) harbor a small sub-population of highly tumorigenic cells, named cancer stem cells. A limiting factor in cancer stem cell research is the intrinsic difficulty of expanding cells in an undifferentiated state in vitro. Methods Here, we describe the development of the orosphere assay, a method for the study of putative head and neck cancer stem cells. An orosphere is defined as a non-adherent colony of cells sorted from primary HNSCC or from HNSCC cell lines and cultured in 3-D soft agar or ultra-low attachment plates. Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity and CD44 expression were used here as stem cell markers. Results This assay allowed for the propagation of head and neck cancer cells that retained stemness and self-renewal. Conclusion The orosphere assay is well suited for studies designed to understand the pathobiology of head and neck cancer stem cells. PMID:22791367

  5. A Versatile Cell Death Screening Assay Using Dye-Stained Cells and Multivariate Image Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Tony J.; Ylanko, Jarkko; Geng, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A novel dye-based method for measuring cell death in image-based screens is presented. Unlike conventional high- and medium-throughput cell death assays that measure only one form of cell death accurately, using multivariate analysis of micrographs of cells stained with the inexpensive mix, red dye nonyl acridine orange, and a nuclear stain, it was possible to quantify cell death induced by a variety of different agonists even without a positive control. Surprisingly, using a single known cytotoxic agent as a positive control for training a multivariate classifier allowed accurate quantification of cytotoxicity for mechanistically unrelated compounds enabling generation of dose–response curves. Comparison with low throughput biochemical methods suggested that cell death was accurately distinguished from cell stress induced by low concentrations of the bioactive compounds Tunicamycin and Brefeldin A. High-throughput image-based format analyses of more than 300 kinase inhibitors correctly identified 11 as cytotoxic with only 1 false positive. The simplicity and robustness of this dye-based assay makes it particularly suited to live cell screening for toxic compounds. PMID:26422066

  6. A Versatile Cell Death Screening Assay Using Dye-Stained Cells and Multivariate Image Analysis.

    PubMed

    Collins, Tony J; Ylanko, Jarkko; Geng, Fei; Andrews, David W

    2015-11-01

    A novel dye-based method for measuring cell death in image-based screens is presented. Unlike conventional high- and medium-throughput cell death assays that measure only one form of cell death accurately, using multivariate analysis of micrographs of cells stained with the inexpensive mix, red dye nonyl acridine orange, and a nuclear stain, it was possible to quantify cell death induced by a variety of different agonists even without a positive control. Surprisingly, using a single known cytotoxic agent as a positive control for training a multivariate classifier allowed accurate quantification of cytotoxicity for mechanistically unrelated compounds enabling generation of dose-response curves. Comparison with low throughput biochemical methods suggested that cell death was accurately distinguished from cell stress induced by low concentrations of the bioactive compounds Tunicamycin and Brefeldin A. High-throughput image-based format analyses of more than 300 kinase inhibitors correctly identified 11 as cytotoxic with only 1 false positive. The simplicity and robustness of this dye-based assay makes it particularly suited to live cell screening for toxic compounds. PMID:26422066

  7. A microfluidic live cell assay to study anthrax toxin induced cell lethality assisted by conditioned medium

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jie; Cai, Changzu; Yu, Zhilong; Pang, Yuhong; Zhou, Ying; Qian, Lili; Wei, Wensheng; Huang, Yanyi

    2015-01-01

    It is technically challenging to investigate the function of secreted protein in real time by supply of conditioned medium that contains secreted protein of interest. The internalization of anthrax toxin is facilitated by a secreted protein Dickkopf-1 (DKK1) and its receptor, and eventually leads to cell lethality. To monitor the dynamic interplay between these components in live cells, we use an integrated microfluidic device to perform the cell viability assays with real-time controlled culture microenvironment in parallel. Conditioned medium, which contains the secreted proteins from specific cell lines, can be continuously pumped towards the cells that exposed to toxin. The exogenous DKK1 secreted from distant cells is able to rescue the sensitivity to toxin for those DKK1-knocked-down cells. This high-throughput assay allows us to precisely quantify the dynamic interaction between key components that cause cell death, and provide independent evidence of the function of DKK1 in the complex process of anthrax toxin internalization. PMID:25731605

  8. A high-throughput assay of NK cell activity in whole blood and its clinical application

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Saet-byul; Cha, Junhoe; Kim, Im-kyung; Yoon, Joo Chun; Lee, Hyo Joon; Park, Sang Woo; Cho, Sunjung; Youn, Dong-Ye; Lee, Heyja; Lee, Choong Hwan; Lee, Jae Myun; Lee, Kang Young; Kim, Jongsun

    2014-03-14

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We demonstrated a simple assay of NK cell activity from whole blood. • The measurement of secreted IFN-γ from NK cell enables high-throughput screening. • The NKA assay was validated by clinical results of colorectal cancer patients. - Abstract: Natural killer (NK) cells are lymphocytes of the innate immune system and have the ability to kill tumor cells and virus-infected cells without prior sensitization. Malignant tumors and viruses have developed, however, strategies to suppress NK cells to escape from their responses. Thus, the evaluation of NK cell activity (NKA) could be invaluable to estimate the status and the outcome of cancers, viral infections, and immune-mediated diseases. Established methods that measure NKA, such as {sup 51}Cr release assay and CD107a degranulation assay, may be used to determine NK cell function, but they are complicated and time-consuming because they require isolation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) or NK cells. In some cases these assays require hazardous material such as radioactive isotopes. To overcome these difficulties, we developed a simple assay that uses whole blood instead of PBMC or isolated NK cells. This novel assay is suitable for high-throughput screening and the monitoring of diseases, because it employs serum of ex vivo stimulated whole blood to detect interferon (IFN)-γ secreted from NK cells as an indicator of NKA. After the stimulation of NK cells, the determination of IFNγ concentration in serum samples by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) provided a swift, uncomplicated, and high-throughput assay of NKA ex vivo. The NKA results microsatellite stable (MSS) colorectal cancer patients was showed significantly lower NKA, 263.6 ± 54.5 pg/mL compared with healthy subjects, 867.5 ± 50.2 pg/mL (p value <0.0001). Therefore, the NKA could be utilized as a supportive diagnostic marker for microsatellite stable (MSS) colorectal cancer.

  9. Degradable Zinc-Phosphate-Based Hierarchical Nanosubstrates for Capture and Release of Circulating Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shan; Xu, Jiaquan; Xie, Min; Huang, Wei; Yuan, Erfeng; Liu, Ya; Fan, Liping; Cheng, Shibo; Liu, Songmei; Wang, Fubing; Yuan, Bifeng; Dong, Weiguo; Zhang, Xiaolian; Huang, Weihua; Zhou, Xiang

    2016-06-29

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) play a significant role in cancer diagnosis and personalized therapy, and it is still a significant challenge to efficiently capture and gently release CTCs from clinical samples for downstream manipulation and molecular analysis. Many CTC devices incorporating various nanostructures have been developed for CTC isolation with sufficient capture efficiency, however, fabricating such nanostructured substrates often requires elaborate design and complicated procedures. Here we fabricate a degradable zinc-phosphate-based hierarchical nanosubstrate (HZnPNS), and we demonstrate its excellent CTC-capture performance along with effective cell-release capability for downstream molecular analysis. This transparent hierarchical architecture prepared by a low-temperature hydrothermal method, enables substantially enhanced capture efficiency and convenient imaging. Biocompatible sodium citrate could rapidly dissolve the architecture at room temperature, allowing that 88 ± 4% of captured cells are gently released with a high viability of 92 ± 1%. Furthermore, antiepithelial cell adhesion molecule antibody functionalized HZnPNS (anti-EpCAM/HZnPNS) was successfully applied to isolate CTCs from whole blood samples of cancer patients, as well as release CTCs for global DNA methylation analysis, indicating it will serve as a simple and reliable alternative platform for CTC detection. PMID:27265681

  10. A microfluidic device for label-free, physical capture of circulating tumor cell clusters.

    PubMed

    Sarioglu, A Fatih; Aceto, Nicola; Kojic, Nikola; Donaldson, Maria C; Zeinali, Mahnaz; Hamza, Bashar; Engstrom, Amanda; Zhu, Huili; Sundaresan, Tilak K; Miyamoto, David T; Luo, Xi; Bardia, Aditya; Wittner, Ben S; Ramaswamy, Sridhar; Shioda, Toshi; Ting, David T; Stott, Shannon L; Kapur, Ravi; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Haber, Daniel A; Toner, Mehmet

    2015-07-01

    Cancer cells metastasize through the bloodstream either as single migratory circulating tumor cells (CTCs) or as multicellular groupings (CTC clusters). Existing technologies for CTC enrichment are designed to isolate single CTCs, and although CTC clusters are detectable in some cases, their true prevalence and significance remain to be determined. Here we developed a microchip technology (the Cluster-Chip) to capture CTC clusters independently of tumor-specific markers from unprocessed blood. CTC clusters are isolated through specialized bifurcating traps under low-shear stress conditions that preserve their integrity, and even two-cell clusters are captured efficiently. Using the Cluster-Chip, we identified CTC clusters in 30-40% of patients with metastatic breast or prostate cancer or with melanoma. RNA sequencing of CTC clusters confirmed their tumor origin and identified tissue-derived macrophages within the clusters. Efficient capture of CTC clusters will enable the detailed characterization of their biological properties and role in metastasis. PMID:25984697

  11. Rare cell chemiluminescence detection based on aptamer-specific capture in microfluidic channels.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wu; Wei, Huibin; Lin, Zhen; Mao, Sifeng; Lin, Jin-Ming

    2011-10-15

    An aptamer-based "sandwich" approach combined with the chemiluminescence (CL) analysis was developed for the capture and detection of rare cells on a microfluidic chip. Aptamers were immobilized on microfluidic channels to achieve capture and isolation of the specific cells from a cell mixture. The capture efficiency for target cells was more than 70% with the purity greater than 97%, when the content of the target cells was between 0.5% and 10% in the initial cell mixture. Gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) modified with aptamers were then added in to bind on the cells and trigger a CL reaction. A satisfactory linearity of the log/log calibration curve between the CL intensity and the number of target cells was observed with a low detection limit of 30 target cells in a 3 μL cell mixture. Spiked whole blood samples were also used to verify the practicality of the present method. This work demonstrated the potential application of the cheap and rapid CL detection into the early diagnosis of cancers. PMID:21856143

  12. Sickle cell disease biochip: a functional red blood cell adhesion assay for monitoring sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Alapan, Yunus; Kim, Ceonne; Adhikari, Anima; Gray, Kayla E; Gurkan-Cavusoglu, Evren; Little, Jane A; Gurkan, Umut A

    2016-07-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) afflicts millions of people worldwide and is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. Chronic and acute vaso-occlusion are the clinical hallmarks of SCD and can result in pain crisis, widespread organ damage, and early movtality. Even though the molecular underpinnings of SCD were identified more than 60 years ago, there are no molecular or biophysical markers of disease severity that are feasibly measured in the clinic. Abnormal cellular adhesion to vascular endothelium is at the root of vaso-occlusion. However, cellular adhesion is not currently evaluated clinically. Here, we present a clinically applicable microfluidic device (SCD biochip) that allows serial quantitative evaluation of red blood cell (RBC) adhesion to endothelium-associated protein-immobilized microchannels, in a closed and preprocessing-free system. With the SCD biochip, we have analyzed blood samples from more than 100 subjects and have shown associations between the measured RBC adhesion to endothelium-associated proteins (fibronectin and laminin) and individual RBC characteristics, including hemoglobin content, fetal hemoglobin concentration, plasma lactate dehydrogenase level, and reticulocyte count. The SCD biochip is a functional adhesion assay, reflecting quantitative evaluation of RBC adhesion, which could be used at baseline, during crises, relative to various long-term complications, and before and after therapeutic interventions. PMID:27063958

  13. Sickle cell disease biochip: a functional red blood cell adhesion assay for monitoring sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    ALAPAN, YUNUS; KIM, CEONNE; ADHIKARI, ANIMA; GRAY, KAYLA E.; GURKAN-CAVUSOGLU, EVREN; LITTLE, JANE A.; GURKAN, UMUT A.

    2016-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) afflicts millions of people worldwide and is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. Chronic and acute vaso-occlusion are the clinical hallmarks of SCD and can result in pain crisis, widespread organ damage, and early movtality. Even though the molecular underpinnings of SCD were identified more than 60 years ago, there are no molecular or biophysical markers of disease severity that are feasibly measured in the clinic. Abnormal cellular adhesion to vascular endothelium is at the root of vaso-occlusion. However, cellular adhesion is not currently evaluated clinically. Here, we present a clinically applicable microfluidic device (SCD biochip) that allows serial quantitative evaluation of red blood cell (RBC) adhesion to endothelium-associated protein-immobilized microchannels, in a closed and preprocessing-free system. With the SCD biochip, we have analyzed blood samples from more than 100 subjects and have shown associations between the measured RBC adhesion to endothelium-associated proteins (fibronectin and laminin) and individual RBC characteristics, including hemoglobin content, fetal hemoglobin concentration, plasma lactate dehydrogenase level, and reticulocyte count. The SCD biochip is a functional adhesion assay, reflecting quantitative evaluation of RBC adhesion, which could be used at baseline, during crises, relative to various long-term complications, and before and after therapeutic interventions. PMID:27063958

  14. Capture and printing of fixed stromal cell membranes for bioactive display on PDMS surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jungwoo; Wang, Jennifer B.; Bersani, Francesca; Parekkadan, Biju

    2013-01-01

    Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) has emerged as an extremely useful polymer for various biological applications. The conjugation of PDMS with bioactive molecules to create functional surfaces is feasible, yet limited to single molecule display with imprecise localization of the molecules on PDMS. Here we report a robust technique that can transfer and print the membrane surface of glutaraldehyde-fixed stromal cells intact to a PDMS substrate using an intermediate polyvinylalcohol (PVA) film as a transporter system. The cell-PVA film capturing the entirety of surface molecules can be peeled off and subsequently printed onto PDMS while maintaining the spatial display of the original cell surface molecules. Proof-of-concept studies are described using human bone marrow stromal cell membranes, including the demonstration of bioactivity of transferred membranes to capture and adhere hematopoietic cells. The presented process is applicable to virtually any adherent cell and can broaden the functional display of biomolecules on PDMS for biotechnology applications. PMID:23927769

  15. [A novel and facile microchip based on nitrocellulose membrane toward efficient capture of circulating tumor cells].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Sun, Changlong; Zhang, Ren; Gao, Mingxia; Zhang, Xiangmin

    2013-06-01

    A novel and facile circulating tumor cell (CTC) microchip has been developed for the isolation and detection of cancer cells. The CTC microchip was prepared based on the nitrocellulose membrane substrate, which shows high affinity to proteins and hence can adsorb antibodies naturally. We employed non-small-cells of lung cancer NCI-H1650 as target cells and testified the high capture efficacy of the CTC microchip. Furthermore, we spiked 500 cancer cells to 1 mL healthy donor's whole blood in order to simulate the detection of CTC in patient and detected 182 cancer cells ultimately, indicating the huge application potential in the future. PMID:24063189

  16. Capture of endothelial cells under flow using immobilized vascular endothelial growth factor.

    PubMed

    Smith, Randall J; Koobatian, Maxwell T; Shahini, Aref; Swartz, Daniel D; Andreadis, Stelios T

    2015-05-01

    We demonstrate the ability of immobilized vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) to capture endothelial cells (EC) with high specificity under fluid flow. To this end, we engineered a surface consisting of heparin bound to poly-l-lysine to permit immobilization of VEGF through the C-terminal heparin-binding domain. The immobilized growth factor retained its biological activity as shown by proliferation of EC and prolonged activation of KDR signaling. Using a microfluidic device we assessed the ability to capture EC under a range of shear stresses from low (0.5 dyne/cm(2)) to physiological (15 dyne/cm(2)). Capture was significant for all shear stresses tested. Immobilized VEGF was highly selective for EC as evidenced by significant capture of human umbilical vein and ovine pulmonary artery EC but no capture of human dermal fibroblasts, human hair follicle derived mesenchymal stem cells, or mouse fibroblasts. Further, VEGF could capture EC from mixtures with non-EC under low and high shear conditions as well as from complex fluids like whole human blood under high shear. Our findings may have far reaching implications, as they suggest that VEGF could be used to promote endothelialization of vascular grafts or neovascularization of implanted tissues by rare but continuously circulating EC. PMID:25771020

  17. Functional dendrimer modified ultra-hydrophilic trapping copolymer network towards highly efficient cell capture.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peiming; Gao, Mingxia; Zhang, Xiangmin

    2016-06-01

    Highly efficient isolation of living tumor cells possesses great significance in research of cancer. Hence, we have designed the 3-aminophenylboronic acid (APBA) derivative dendrimer-functionalized 3D network polyacrylamide/poly (methyl methacrylate) copolymer as capture substrate which is easily prepared, template free and low-cost. The structure of copolymer is compared to "fishing net" in order to increase the contact between cells and substrates. The application of poly (amidoamine) dendrimers provides abundant amino groups to react with APBA which is just like "baits" that can bond with sialic acid in the cytomembrane to realize cell capture. The 3D network structure trammels cancer cells, offers great reaction space and displays hydrophilic surface, which has immensely improved the contact probability of cells and materials. Due to the 3D network structure and dendrimer, this material can achieve a high capture efficiency of 87±5% in 45min. The viability of captured cells is nearly 100%, as a result of the soft and hydrophilic surface and hypotoxicity of this copolymer. PMID:27130129

  18. Single Cell Multiplex Protein Measurements through Rare Earth Element Immunolabeling, Laser Capture Microdissection and Inductively Coupled Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Liba, Amir; Wanagat, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Complex diseases such as heart disease, stroke, cancer, and aging are the primary causes of death in the US. These diseases cause heterogeneous conditions among cells, conditions that cannot be measured in tissue homogenates and require single cell approaches. Understanding protein levels within tissues is currently assayed using various molecular biology techniques (e.g., Western blots) that rely on milligram to gram quantities of tissue homogenates or immunofluorescent (IF) techniques that are limited by spectral overlap. Tissue homogenate studies lack references to tissue structure and mask signals from individual or rare cellular events. Novel techniques are required to bring protein measurement sensitivity to the single cell level and offer spatiotemporal resolution and scalability. We are developing a novel approach to protein quantification by exploiting the inherently low concentration of rare earth elements (REE) in biological systems. By coupling REE-antibody immunolabeling of cells with laser capture microdissection (LCM) and ICP-QQQ, we are achieving multiplexed protein measurement in histological sections of single cells. This approach will add to evolving single cell techniques and our ability to understand cellular heterogeneity in complex biological systems and diseases.

  19. Differences in estimates of cisplatin-induced cell kill in vitro between colorimetric and cell count/colony assays.

    PubMed

    Henriksson, Eva; Kjellén, Elisabeth; Wahlberg, Peter; Wennerberg, Johan; Kjellström, Johan H

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate some bioassays that are different in principle: cell counting, colony forming assay, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT), sulforhodamine B (SRB), crystal violet, and alamarBlue, with respect to their ability to measure cisplatin-induced cell death of in vitro-cultivated squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Cisplatin was applied in concentrations of 1.0, 5.0, 10.0, 50.0, and 100 microM. The cells were incubated for 1 h, and the cell survival was measured 5 d after treatment. We found the colorimetric assays and cell counting to be comparable. The colony forming assay indicated a higher degree of cell kill compared with the other techniques. Measurement of cell survival after treatment with cisplatin can be done by use of any of the above tested assays. However, the majority of SCCHN cell lines available do not form colonies easily, or at all. Therefore, comparing the chemosensitivity between such cell lines is limited to alternative assays. In this respect, any of the tested colorimetric assays can be used. However, they seem to underestimate cell kill. Cell counting is also an alternative. This technique, however, is time consuming and operator dependent, as in the case of manual counting, or relatively expensive when counting is performed electronically, compared with the colorimetric assays. PMID:17316066

  20. A smart core-sheath nanofiber that captures and releases red blood cells from the blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Q.; Hou, J.; Zhao, C.; Xin, Z.; Jin, J.; Li, C.; Wong, S.-C.; Yin, J.

    2016-01-01

    A smart core-sheath nanofiber for non-adherent cell capture and release is demonstrated. The nanofibers are fabricated by single-spinneret electrospinning of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm), polycaprolactone (PCL) and nattokinase (NK) solution blends. The self-assembly of PNIPAAm and PCL blends during the electrospinning generates the core-sheath PCL/PNIPAAm nanofibers with PNIPAAm as the sheath. The PNIPAAm-based core-sheath nanofibers are switchable between hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity with temperature change and enhance stability in the blood. When the nanofibers come in contact with blood, the NK is released from the nanofibers to resist platelet adhesion on the nanofiber surface, facilitating the direct capture and isolation of red blood cells (RBCs) from the blood above phase-transition temperature of PNIPAAm. Meanwhile, the captured RBCs are readily released from the nanofibers with temperature stimuli in an undamaged manner. The release efficiency of up to 100% is obtained while maintaining cellular integrity and function. This work presents promising nanofibers to effectively capture non-adherent cells and release for subsequent molecular analysis and diagnosis of single cells.A smart core-sheath nanofiber for non-adherent cell capture and release is demonstrated. The nanofibers are fabricated by single-spinneret electrospinning of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm), polycaprolactone (PCL) and nattokinase (NK) solution blends. The self-assembly of PNIPAAm and PCL blends during the electrospinning generates the core-sheath PCL/PNIPAAm nanofibers with PNIPAAm as the sheath. The PNIPAAm-based core-sheath nanofibers are switchable between hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity with temperature change and enhance stability in the blood. When the nanofibers come in contact with blood, the NK is released from the nanofibers to resist platelet adhesion on the nanofiber surface, facilitating the direct capture and isolation of red blood cells (RBCs) from

  1. Capturing the metabolomic diversity of KRAS mutants in non-small-cell lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Marabese, Mirko; Broggini, Massimo; Pastorelli, Roberta

    2014-01-01

    In non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), one-fifth of patients have KRAS mutations, which are considered a negative predictive factor to first-line therapy. Evidence is emerging that not all KRAS mutations have the same biological activities and possible remodeling of cell metabolism by KRAS activation might complicate the scenario. An open question is whether different KRAS mutations at codon-12 affect cellular metabolism differently with possible implications for different responses to cancer treatments. We applied an explorative mass spectrometry-based untargeted metabolomics strategy to characterize the largest possible number of metabolites that might distinguish isogenic NSCLC cells overexpressing mutated forms of KRAS at codon-12 (G12C, G12D, G12V) and the wild-type. The glutamine deprivation assay and real-time PCR were used to confirm the involvement of some of the metabolic pathways highlighted. Cell clones indicated distinct metabolomic profiles in KRAS wild-type and mutants. Clones harboring different KRAS mutations at codon-12 also had different metabolic remodeling, such as a different redox buffering system and different glutamine-dependency not driven by the transcriptional state of enzymes involved in glutaminolysis. These findings indicate that KRAS mutations at codon-12 are associated with different metabolomic profiles that might affect the responses to cancer treatments. PMID:24952473

  2. Microfluidic devices with permeable polymer barriers for capture and transport of biomolecules and cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ho Suk; Chu, Wai Keung; Zhang, Kun

    2013-01-01

    We report a method for fabricating permeable polymer microstructure barriers in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic devices and the use of the devices to capture and transport DNA and cells. The polymer microstructure in a desired location in a fluidic channel is formed in situ by the polymerization of acrylamide and polyethylene diacrylate cross-linker (PEG-DA) monomer in a solution which is trapped in the location using a pair of PDMS valves. The porous polymer microstructure provides a mechanical barrier to convective fluid flow in the channel or between two microfluidic chambers while it still conducts ions or small charged species under an electric field, allowing for the rapid capture and transport of biomolecules and cells by electrophoresis. We have demonstrated the application of the devices for the rapid capture and efficient release of bacteriophage λ genomic DNA, solution exchange and for the transport and capture of HeLa cells. Our devices will enable the multi-step processing of biomolecules and cells or individual cells within a single microfluidic chamber. PMID:23828542

  3. Complete voltage recovery in quantum dot solar cells due to suppression of electron capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varghese, A.; Yakimov, M.; Tokranov, V.; Mitin, V.; Sablon, K.; Sergeev, A.; Oktyabrsky, S.

    2016-03-01

    Extensive investigations in recent years have shown that addition of quantum dots (QDs) to a single-junction solar cell decreases the open circuit voltage, VOC, with respect to the reference cell without QDs. Despite numerous efforts, the complete voltage recovery in QD cells has been demonstrated only at low temperatures. To minimize the VOC reduction, we propose and investigate a new approach that combines nanoscale engineering of the band structure and the potential profile. Our studies of GaAs solar cells with various InAs QD media demonstrate that the main cause of the VOC reduction is the fast capture of photoelectrons from the GaAs conduction band (CB) to the localized states in QDs. As the photoelectron capture into QDs is mainly realized via the wetting layers (WLs), we substantially reduced the WLs using two monolayer AlAs capping of QDs. In the structures with reduced WLs, the direct CB-to-QD capture is further suppressed due to charging of QDs via doping of the interdot space. The QD devices with suppressed photoelectron capture show the same VOC as the GaAs reference cell together with some improvements in the short circuit current.

  4. Complete voltage recovery in quantum dot solar cells due to suppression of electron capture.

    PubMed

    Varghese, A; Yakimov, M; Tokranov, V; Mitin, V; Sablon, K; Sergeev, A; Oktyabrsky, S

    2016-04-01

    Extensive investigations in recent years have shown that addition of quantum dots (QDs) to a single-junction solar cell decreases the open circuit voltage, VOC, with respect to the reference cell without QDs. Despite numerous efforts, the complete voltage recovery in QD cells has been demonstrated only at low temperatures. To minimize the VOC reduction, we propose and investigate a new approach that combines nanoscale engineering of the band structure and the potential profile. Our studies of GaAs solar cells with various InAs QD media demonstrate that the main cause of the VOC reduction is the fast capture of photoelectrons from the GaAs conduction band (CB) to the localized states in QDs. As the photoelectron capture into QDs is mainly realized via the wetting layers (WLs), we substantially reduced the WLs using two monolayer AlAs capping of QDs. In the structures with reduced WLs, the direct CB-to-QD capture is further suppressed due to charging of QDs via doping of the interdot space. The QD devices with suppressed photoelectron capture show the same VOC as the GaAs reference cell together with some improvements in the short circuit current. PMID:26974517

  5. Cell-Type-Specific Genome-wide Expression Profiling after Laser Capture Microdissection of Living Tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Marchetti, F; Manohar, C F

    2005-02-09

    The purpose of this technical feasibility study was to develop and evaluate robust microgenomic tools for investigations of genome-wide expression of very small numbers of cells isolated from whole tissue sections. Tissues contain large numbers of cell-types that play varied roles in organ function and responses to endogenous and exogenous toxicants whether bacterial, viral, chemical or radiation. Expression studies of whole tissue biopsy are severely limited because heterogeneous cell-types result in an averaging of molecular signals masking subtle but important changes in gene expression in any one cell type(s) or group of cells. Accurate gene expression analysis requires the study of specific cell types in their tissue environment but without contamination from surrounding cells. Laser capture microdissection (LCM) is a new technology to isolate morphologically distinct cells from tissue sections. Alternative methods are available for isolating single cells but not yet for their reliable genome-wide expression analyses. The tasks of this feasibility project were to: (1) Develop efficient protocols for laser capture microdissection of cells from tissues identified by antibody label, or morphological stain. (2) Develop reproducible gene-transcript analyses techniques for single cell-types and determine the numbers of cells needed for reliable genome-wide analyses. (3) Validate the technology for epithelial and endothelial cells isolated from the gastrointestinal tract of mice.

  6. The radiosensitivity of a murine fibrosarcoma as measured by three cell survival assays.

    PubMed

    Rice, L; Urano, M; Suit, H D

    1980-04-01

    The radiation sensitivity of a weakly immunogenic spontaneous fibrosarcoma of the C3Hf/Sed mouse (designated FSa-II) was assessed by three in vivo cell survival methods: end-point dilution (TD50) assay, lung colony (LC) assay, and agar diffusion chamber (ADC) assay. The hypoxic fraction of this tumour was also determined by the ADC method. Although there was a good agreement of the cell survival data between the ADC and LC methods, the TD50 method yielded a considerably less steep cell survival curve. Beneficial aspects and limitations of each assay are discussed. In addition, the use of the ADC method for the growth of xenogeneic cell lines and a preliminary experiment with human tumour cells in non-immunosuppressed hosts suggest that this method may be a valuable adjunct for studying the growth and therapeutic responses of human tumour cells. PMID:6932931

  7. Development and Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies to Yellow Fever Virus and Application in Antigen Detection and IgM Capture Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay.

    PubMed

    Adungo, Ferdinard; Yu, Fuxun; Kamau, David; Inoue, Shingo; Hayasaka, Daisuke; Posadas-Herrera, Guillermo; Sang, Rosemary; Mwau, Matilu; Morita, Kouichi

    2016-08-01

    Yellow fever (YF) is an acute hemorrhagic viral infection transmitted by mosquitoes in Africa and South America. The major challenge in YF disease detection and confirmation of outbreaks in Africa is the limited availability of reference laboratories and the persistent lack of access to diagnostic tests. We used wild-type YF virus sequences to generate recombinant envelope protein in an Escherichia coli expression system. Both the recombinant protein and sucrose gradient-purified YF vaccine virus 17D (YF-17D) were used to immunize BALB/c mice to generate monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). Eight MAbs were established and systematically characterized by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), Western blot analysis, and immunofluorescence assay (IFA). The established MAbs showed strong reactivity with wild-type YF virus and recombinant protein with no detectable cross-reactivity to dengue virus or Japanese encephalitis virus. Epitope mapping showed strong binding of three MAbs to amino acid positions 1 to 51, while two MAbs mapped to amino acid positions 52 to 135 of the envelope protein. The remaining three MAbs did not show reactivity to envelope fragments. The established MAbs exert no neutralization against wild-type YF and 17D viruses (titer of <10 for both strains). The applicability of MAbs 8H3 and 3F4 was further evaluated using IgM capture ELISA. A total of 49 serum samples were analyzed, among which 12 positive patient and vaccinee samples were correctly identified. Using serum samples that were 2-fold serially diluted, the IgM capture ELISA was able to detect all YF-positive samples. Furthermore, MAb-based antigen detection ELISA enabled the detection of virus in culture supernatants containing titers of about 1,000 focus-forming units. PMID:27307452

  8. Development and Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies to Yellow Fever Virus and Application in Antigen Detection and IgM Capture Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay

    PubMed Central

    Adungo, Ferdinard; Kamau, David; Inoue, Shingo; Hayasaka, Daisuke; Posadas-Herrera, Guillermo; Sang, Rosemary; Mwau, Matilu

    2016-01-01

    Yellow fever (YF) is an acute hemorrhagic viral infection transmitted by mosquitoes in Africa and South America. The major challenge in YF disease detection and confirmation of outbreaks in Africa is the limited availability of reference laboratories and the persistent lack of access to diagnostic tests. We used wild-type YF virus sequences to generate recombinant envelope protein in an Escherichia coli expression system. Both the recombinant protein and sucrose gradient-purified YF vaccine virus 17D (YF-17D) were used to immunize BALB/c mice to generate monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). Eight MAbs were established and systematically characterized by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), Western blot analysis, and immunofluorescence assay (IFA). The established MAbs showed strong reactivity with wild-type YF virus and recombinant protein with no detectable cross-reactivity to dengue virus or Japanese encephalitis virus. Epitope mapping showed strong binding of three MAbs to amino acid positions 1 to 51, while two MAbs mapped to amino acid positions 52 to 135 of the envelope protein. The remaining three MAbs did not show reactivity to envelope fragments. The established MAbs exert no neutralization against wild-type YF and 17D viruses (titer of <10 for both strains). The applicability of MAbs 8H3 and 3F4 was further evaluated using IgM capture ELISA. A total of 49 serum samples were analyzed, among which 12 positive patient and vaccinee samples were correctly identified. Using serum samples that were 2-fold serially diluted, the IgM capture ELISA was able to detect all YF-positive samples. Furthermore, MAb-based antigen detection ELISA enabled the detection of virus in culture supernatants containing titers of about 1,000 focus-forming units. PMID:27307452

  9. Alternative methods for the detection of emerging marine toxins: biosensors, biochemical assays and cell-based assays.

    PubMed

    Reverté, Laia; Soliño, Lucía; Carnicer, Olga; Diogène, Jorge; Campàs, Mònica

    2014-12-01

    The emergence of marine toxins in water and seafood may have a considerable impact on public health. Although the tendency in Europe is to consolidate, when possible, official reference methods based on instrumental analysis, the development of alternative or complementary methods providing functional or toxicological information may provide advantages in terms of risk identification, but also low cost, simplicity, ease of use and high-throughput analysis. This article gives an overview of the immunoassays, cell-based assays, receptor-binding assays and biosensors that have been developed for the screening and quantification of emerging marine toxins: palytoxins, ciguatoxins, cyclic imines and tetrodotoxins. Their advantages and limitations are discussed, as well as their possible integration in research and monitoring programs. PMID:25431968

  10. Alternative Methods for the Detection of Emerging Marine Toxins: Biosensors, Biochemical Assays and Cell-Based Assays

    PubMed Central

    Reverté, Laia; Soliño, Lucía; Carnicer, Olga; Diogène, Jorge; Campàs, Mònica

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of marine toxins in water and seafood may have a considerable impact on public health. Although the tendency in Europe is to consolidate, when possible, official reference methods based on instrumental analysis, the development of alternative or complementary methods providing functional or toxicological information may provide advantages in terms of risk identification, but also low cost, simplicity, ease of use and high-throughput analysis. This article gives an overview of the immunoassays, cell-based assays, receptor-binding assays and biosensors that have been developed for the screening and quantification of emerging marine toxins: palytoxins, ciguatoxins, cyclic imines and tetrodotoxins. Their advantages and limitations are discussed, as well as their possible integration in research and monitoring programs. PMID:25431968

  11. Human iPSC-Derived Endothelial Cell Sprouting Assay in Synthetic Hydrogel Arrays

    EPA Science Inventory

    Activation of vascular endothelial cells (ECs) by growth factors initiates a cascade of events in vivo consisting of EC tip cell selection, sprout formation, EC stalk cell proliferation, and ultimately vascular stabilization by support cells. Although EC functional assays can rec...

  12. In situ screening assay for cell viability using a dimeric cyanine nucleic acid stain.

    PubMed

    Becker, B; Clapper, J; Harkins, K R; Olson, J A

    1994-08-15

    A rapid and sensitive assay is described for the determination of cell viability of adherent and nonadherent cells that can be performed in situ in 96-well microtiter plates using fluorescence plate scanners. The assay, based on dye exclusion, utilizes a plasma membrane-impermeable, dimeric cyanine dye (YOYO-1). YOYO-1 fluoresces brightly only when bound to nucleic acids. Cells are incubated with YOYO-1, and fluorescence is measured before and after the addition of detergent, which allows the dye to enter the cells. The fluorescence before detergent treatment originates from nonviable cells that have membrane damage and take up YOYO-1. The fluorescence after detergent treatment originates from all cells in the sample. The ratio of the two fluorescence values is used as an indicator of cell viability. The cell viability results of this microplate assay closely resemble those of dye exclusion studies by flow cytometry and are similar but not identical to those of the thiazolyl blue assay, which uses a metabolic indicator of cell death. Because the assay can be performed in situ, without removing the medium, disintegrated cells, cell aggregates, and cells that stick to culture vessel walls are all included in the measurement. PMID:7527190

  13. The dominant role of CD8+ dendritic cells in cross-presentation is not dictated by antigen capture

    PubMed Central

    Schnorrer, Petra; Behrens, Georg M. N.; Wilson, Nicholas S.; Pooley, Joanne L.; Smith, Christopher M.; El-Sukkari, Dima; Davey, Gayle; Kupresanin, Fiona; Li, Ming; Maraskovsky, Eugene; Belz, Gabrielle T.; Carbone, Francis R.; Shortman, Ken; Heath, William R.; Villadangos, Jose A.

    2006-01-01

    Mouse spleens contain three populations of conventional (CD11chigh) dendritic cells (DCs) that play distinct functions. The CD8+ DC are unique in that they can present exogenous antigens on their MHC class I molecules, a process known as cross-presentation. It is unclear whether this special ability is because only the CD8+ DC can capture the antigens used in cross-presentation assays, or because this is the only DC population that possesses specialized machinery for cross-presentation. To solve this important question we examined the splenic DC subsets for their ability to both present via MHC class II molecules and cross-present via MHC class I using four different forms of the model antigen ovalbumin (OVA). These forms include a cell-associated form, a soluble form, OVA expressed in bacteria, or OVA bound to latex beads. With the exception of bacterial antigen, which was poorly cross-presented by all DC, all antigenic forms were cross-presented much more efficiently by the CD8+ DC. This pattern could not be attributed simply to a difference in antigen capture because all DC subsets presented the antigen via MHC class II. Indeed, direct assessments of endocytosis showed that CD8+ and CD8− DC captured comparable amounts of soluble and bead-associated antigen, yet only the CD8+ DC cross-presented these antigenic forms. Our results indicate that cross-presentation requires specialized machinery that is expressed by CD8+ DC but largely absent from CD8− DC. This conclusion has important implications for the design of vaccination strategies based on antigen targeting to DC. PMID:16807294

  14. IMAC capture of recombinant protein from unclarified mammalian cell feed streams

    PubMed Central

    Kinna, Alexander; Tolner, Berend; Rota, Enrique Miranda; Titchener‐Hooker, Nigel; Nesbeth, Darren

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Fusion‐tag affinity chromatography is a key technique in recombinant protein purification. Current methods for protein recovery from mammalian cells are hampered by the need for feed stream clarification. We have developed a method for direct capture using immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) of hexahistidine (His6) tagged proteins from unclarified mammalian cell feed streams. The process employs radial flow chromatography with 300–500 μm diameter agarose resin beads that allow free passage of cells but capture His‐tagged proteins from the feed stream; circumventing expensive and cumbersome centrifugation and/or filtration steps. The method is exemplified by Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cell expression and subsequent recovery of recombinant His‐tagged carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA); a heavily glycosylated and clinically relevant protein. Despite operating at a high NaCl concentration necessary for IMAC binding, cells remained over 96% viable after passage through the column with host cell proteases and DNA detected at ∼8 U/mL and 2 ng/μL in column flow‐through, respectively. Recovery of His‐tagged CEA from unclarified feed yielded 71% product recovery. This work provides a basis for direct primary capture of fully glycosylated recombinant proteins from unclarified mammalian cell feed streams. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 130–140. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26174988

  15. Quality Assurance in the Polio Laboratory. Cell Sensitivity and Cell Authentication Assays.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Glynis

    2016-01-01

    The accuracy of poliovirus surveillance is largely dependent on the quality of the cell lines used for virus isolation, which is the foundation of poliovirus diagnostic work. Many cell lines are available for the isolation of enteroviruses, whilst genetically modified L20B cells can be used as a diagnostic tool for the identification of polioviruses. To be confident that cells can consistently isolate the virus of interest, it is necessary to have a quality assurance system in place, which will ensure that the cells in use are not contaminated with other cell lines or microorganisms and that they remain sensitive to the viruses being studied.The sensitivity of cell lines can be assessed by the regular testing of a virus standard of known titer in the cell lines used for virus isolation. The titers obtained are compared to previously obtained titers in the same assay, so that any loss of sensitivity can be detected.However, the detection of cell line cross contamination is more difficult. DNA bar coding is a technique that uses a short DNA sequence from a standardized position in the genome as a molecular diagnostic assay for species-level identification. For almost all groups of higher animals, the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 of mitochondrial DNA (CO1) is emerging as the standard barcode region. This region is 648 nucleotide base pairs long in most phylogenetic groups and is flanked by regions of conserved sequences, making it relatively easy to isolate and analyze. DNA barcodes vary among individuals of the same species to a very minor degree (generally less than 1-2 %), and a growing number of studies have shown that the COI sequences of even closely related species differ by several per cent, making it possible to identify different species with high confidence. PMID:26983732

  16. A smart core-sheath nanofiber that captures and releases red blood cells from the blood.

    PubMed

    Shi, Q; Hou, J; Zhao, C; Xin, Z; Jin, J; Li, C; Wong, S-C; Yin, J

    2016-01-28

    A smart core-sheath nanofiber for non-adherent cell capture and release is demonstrated. The nanofibers are fabricated by single-spinneret electrospinning of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm), polycaprolactone (PCL) and nattokinase (NK) solution blends. The self-assembly of PNIPAAm and PCL blends during the electrospinning generates the core-sheath PCL/PNIPAAm nanofibers with PNIPAAm as the sheath. The PNIPAAm-based core-sheath nanofibers are switchable between hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity with temperature change and enhance stability in the blood. When the nanofibers come in contact with blood, the NK is released from the nanofibers to resist platelet adhesion on the nanofiber surface, facilitating the direct capture and isolation of red blood cells (RBCs) from the blood above phase-transition temperature of PNIPAAm. Meanwhile, the captured RBCs are readily released from the nanofibers with temperature stimuli in an undamaged manner. The release efficiency of up to 100% is obtained while maintaining cellular integrity and function. This work presents promising nanofibers to effectively capture non-adherent cells and release for subsequent molecular analysis and diagnosis of single cells. PMID:26701327

  17. Tunable nanostructured coating for the capture and selective release of viable circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Reátegui, Eduardo; Aceto, Nicola; Lim, Eugene J; Sullivan, James P; Jensen, Anne E; Zeinali, Mahnaz; Martel, Joseph M; Aranyosi, Alexander J; Li, Wei; Castleberry, Steven; Bardia, Aditya; Sequist, Lecia V; Haber, Daniel A; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Hammond, Paula T; Toner, Mehmet; Stott, Shannon L

    2015-03-01

    A layer-by-layer gelatin nanocoating is presented for use as a tunable, dual response biomaterial for the capture and release of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from cancer patient blood. The entire nanocoating can be dissolved from the surface of microfluidic devices through biologically compatible temperature shifts. Alternatively, individual CTCs can be released through locally applied mechanical stress. PMID:25640006

  18. MOBE-ChIP: a large-scale chromatin immunoprecipitation assay for cell type-specific studies.

    PubMed

    Lau, On Sun; Bergmann, Dominique C

    2015-10-01

    Cell type-specific transcriptional regulators play critical roles in the generation and maintenance of multicellularity. As they are often expressed at low levels, in vivo DNA-binding studies of these regulators by standard chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays are technically challenging. We describe here an optimized ChIP protocol termed Maximized Objects for Better Enrichment (MOBE)-ChIP, which enhances the sensitivity of ChIP assays for detecting cell type-specific signals. The protocol, which is based on the disproportional increase of target signals over background at higher scales, uses substantially greater volume of starting materials than conventional ChIPs to achieve high signal enrichment. This technique can capture weak binding events that are ambiguous in standard ChIP assays, and is useful both in gene-specific and whole-genome analysis. This protocol has been optimized for Arabidopsis, but should be applicable to other model systems with minor modifications. The full procedure can be completed within 3 days. PMID:26332947

  19. On the measurement of human osteosarcoma cell elastic modulus using shear assay experiments.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yifang; Bly, Randy; Moore, Will; Gao, Zhan; Cuitino, Alberto M; Soboyejo, Wole

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a method for determining the elastic modulus of human osteosarcoma (HOS) cells. The method involves a combination of shear assay experiments and finite element analysis. Following in-situ observations of cell deformation during shear assay experiments, a digital image correlation (DIC) technique was used to determine the local displacement and strain fields. Finite element analysis was then used to determine the Young's moduli of HOS cells. This involved a match of the maximum shear stresses estimated from the experimental shear assay measurements and those calculated from finite element simulations. PMID:17200819

  20. Assessing the DNA methylation status of single cells with the comet assay.

    PubMed

    Wentzel, Johannes F; Gouws, Chrisna; Huysamen, Cristal; Dyk, Etresia van; Koekemoer, Gerhard; Pretorius, Pieter J

    2010-05-15

    The comet assay (single cell gel electrophoresis) is a cost-effective, sensitive, and simple technique that is traditionally used for analyzing and quantifying DNA damage in individual cells. The aim of this study was to determine whether the comet assay could be modified to detect changes in the levels of DNA methylation in single cells. We used the difference in methylation sensitivity of the isoschizomeric restriction endonucleases HpaII and MspI to demonstrate the feasibility of the comet assay to measure the global DNA methylation level of individual cells. The results were verified with the well-established cytosine extension assay. We were able to show variations in DNA methylation after treatment of cultured cells with 5-azacytidine and succinylacetone, an accumulating metabolite in human tyrosinemia type I. PMID:20156416

  1. Crystal Violet Assay for Determining Viability of Cultured Cells.

    PubMed

    Feoktistova, Maria; Geserick, Peter; Leverkus, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Adherent cells detach from cell culture plates during cell death. This characteristic can be used for the indirect quantification of cell death and to determine differences in proliferation upon stimulation with death-inducing agents. One simple method to detect maintained adherence of cells is the staining of attached cells with crystal violet dye, which binds to proteins and DNA. Cells that undergo cell death lose their adherence and are subsequently lost from the population of cells, reducing the amount of crystal violet staining in a culture. This protocol describes a quick and reliable screening method that is suitable for the examination of the impact of chemotherapeutics or other compounds on cell survival and growth inhibition. However, characterization of the cause of reduced crystal violet staining requires additional methods detailed elsewhere. PMID:27037069

  2. Self-propelled carbon nanotube based microrockets for rapid capture and isolation of circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Shashwat S; Jalota-Badhwar, Archana; Zope, Khushbu R; Todkar, Kiran J; Mascarenhas, Russel R; Chate, Govind P; Khutale, Ganesh V; Bharde, Atul; Calderon, Marcelo; Khandare, Jayant J

    2015-05-21

    Here, we report a non-invasive strategy for isolating cancer cells by autonomously propelled carbon nanotube (CNT) microrockets. H2O2-driven oxygen (O2) bubble-propelled microrockets were synthesized using CNT and Fe3O4 nanoparticles in the inner surface and covalently conjugating transferrin on the outer surface. Results show that self-propellant microrockets can specifically capture cancer cells. PMID:25902947

  3. Bioluminescent, Nonlytic, Real-Time Cell Viability Assay and Use in Inhibitor Screening

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wenhui; Meisenheimer, Poncho; Vidugiris, Gediminas; Cali, James J.; Gautam, Prson; Wennerberg, Krister; Vidugiriene, Jolanta

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Real-time continuous monitoring of cellular processes offers distinct advantages over traditional endpoint assays. A comprehensive representation of the changes occurring in live cells over the entire length of an experiment provides information about the biological status of the cell and informs decisions about the timing of treatments or the use of other functional endpoint assays. We describe a homogeneous, nonlytic, bioluminescent assay that measures cell viability in real time. This time-dependent measurement allowed us to monitor cell health for 72 h from the same test samples, distinguish differential cell growth, and investigate drug mechanism of action by analyzing time- and dose-dependent drug effects. The real-time measurements also allowed us to detect cell death immediately (>75% signal decrease within 15 min of digitonin addition), analyze drug potency versus efficacy, and identify cytostatic versus toxic drug effects. We screened an oncology compound library (Z′ = 0.7) and identified compounds with varying activity at different time points (1.6% of the library showed activity within 3 h, whereas 35.4% showed a response by 47 h). The assay compared well with orthogonal endpoint cell viability assays and additionally provided data at multiple time points and the opportunity to multiplex assays on the same cells. To test the advantage of time-dependent measurements to direct optimal timing of downstream applications, we used the real-time cell viability assay to determine the ideal time to measure caspase activity by monitoring the onset of cell death and multiplexing a luminescent caspase activation assay on the same test samples. PMID:26383544

  4. KERATINOCYTE CELL-MEDIATED MUTAGENESIS ASSAY: CORRELATION WITH IN VIVO TUMOR STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A murine keratinocyte cell-mediated mutagenesis assay was characterized and examined as an in vitro model system for studying the biotransformation of promutagens/procarcinogens by mouse skin. The assay used living cultured newborn SENCAR keratinocytes for the metabolic activatio...

  5. Capture and On-chip analysis of Melanoma Cells Using Tunable Surface Shear forces

    PubMed Central

    Tsao, Simon Chang-Hao; Vaidyanathan, Ramanathan; Dey, Shuvashis; Carrascosa, Laura G.; Christophi, Christopher; Cebon, Jonathan; Shiddiky, Muhammad J. A.; Behren, Andreas; Trau, Matt

    2016-01-01

    With new systemic therapies becoming available for metastatic melanoma such as BRAF and PD-1 inhibitors, there is an increasing demand for methods to assist with treatment selection and response monitoring. Quantification and characterisation of circulating melanoma cells (CMCs) has been regarded as an excellent non-invasive candidate but a sensitive and efficient tool to do these is lacking. Herein we demonstrate a microfluidic approach for melanoma cell capture and subsequent on-chip evaluation of BRAF mutation status. Our approach utilizes a recently discovered alternating current electrohydrodynamic (AC-EHD)-induced surface shear forces, referred to as nanoshearing. A key feature of nanoshearing is the ability to agitate fluid to encourage contact with surface-bound antibody for the cell capture whilst removing nonspecific cells from the surface. By adjusting the AC-EHD force to match the binding affinity of antibodies against the melanoma-associated chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan (MCSP), a commonly expressed melanoma antigen, this platform achieved an average recovery of 84.7% from biological samples. Subsequent staining with anti-BRAFV600E specific antibody enabled on-chip evaluation of BRAFV600E mutation status in melanoma cells. We believe that the ability of nanoshearing-based capture to enumerate melanoma cells and subsequent on-chip characterisation has the potential as a rapid screening tool while making treatment decisions. PMID:26815318

  6. Detection, isolation, and capture of circulating breast cancer cells with photoacoustic flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Kiran; Njoroge, Martin; Goldschmidt, Benjamin S.; Gaffigan, Brian; Rood, Kyle; Viator, John A.

    2013-03-01

    According to the CDC, breast cancer is the most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer related deaths among women. Metastasis, or the presence of secondary tumors caused by the spread of cancer cells via the circulatory or lymphatic systems, significantly worsens the prognosis of any breast cancer patient. In this study, a technique is developed to detect circulating breast cancer cells in human blood using a photoacoustic flow cytometry method. A Q-switched laser with a 5 ns pulse at 532 nm is used to interrogate thousands of cells with one pulse as they flow through the beam path. Cells which are pigmented, either naturally or artificially, emit an ultrasound wave as a result of the photoacoustic (PA) effect. Breast cancer cells are targeted with chromophores through immunochemistry in order to provide pigment. After which, the device is calibrated to demonstrate a single-cell detection limit. Cultured breast cancer cells are added to whole blood to reach a biologically relevant concentration of about 25-45 breast cancer cells per 1 mL of blood. An in vitro photoacoustic flow cytometer is used to detect and isolate these cells followed by capture with the use of a micromanipulator. This method can not only be used to determine the disease state of the patient and the response to therapy, it can also be used for genetic testing and in vitro drug trials since the circulating cell can be captured and studied.

  7. Cell-based assays for Parkinson's disease using differentiated human LUHMES cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-min; Yin, Ming; Zhang, Min-hua

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Lund human mesencephalic (LUHMES) cells can be differentiated to post-mitotic cells with biochemical, morphological and functional features of dopaminergic (DAergic) neurons. Given the limited scale of primary DAergic neuron culture, we developed differentiated LUHMES cell-based cytotoxicity assays for identifying neuroprotective agents for Parkinson's disease (PD). Methods: LUHMES cells were incubated in a differentiation medium containing cAMP and GDNF for 6 d, and then differentiated cells were treated with MPP+ or infected with baculovirus containing α-synuclein. Cytotoxicity was determined by measuring intracellular ATP levels and caspase 3/7 activity in the cells. DAergic neuron-specific marker protein and mRNA levels in the cells were analyzed using Western blotting and RT-PCR, respectively. Results: LUHMES cells grew extensive neurites and became post-mitotic neuron-like cells during differentiation period, and three DAergic neuron markers TH, DAT and Nurr1 exhibited different expression profiles. MPP+ dose-dependently reduced ATP levels in the cells with an IC50 value of 65 μmol/L. MPP+ (80 μmol/L) significantly increased caspase 3/7 activity in the cells. Both the CDK inhibitor GW8510 and the GSK3β inhibitor SB216763 effectively rescued MPP+-induced reduction of ATP levels with EC50 values of 12 and 205 nmol/L, respectively. Overexpression of α-synuclein also significantly decreased intracellular ATP levels and increased caspase 3/7 activity in the cells. GW8510 and SB216763 effectively rescued α-synuclein overexpression-induced reduction of ATP levels, whereas GW8510, but not SB216763, ameliorated α-synuclein overexpression-induced increase of caspase 3/7 activity. Conclusion: MPP+- and α-synuclein overexpression-induced cytotoxicity of differentiated LUHMES cells may serve as good alternative systems for identifying neuroprotective compounds for PD. PMID:24989254

  8. Standardization of a micro-cytotoxicity assay for human natural killer cell lytic activity.

    PubMed

    Mariani, E; Monaco, M C; Sgobbi, S; de Zwart, J F; Mariani, A R; Facchini, A

    1994-06-24

    Cytotoxicity assays are widely used to evaluate the functional activity of NK and T cells against tumour target cells and the release of radioactive sodium chromate from labelled target cells is still the most commonly used marker of target lysis in culture supernatants. We describe here the standardization of a micro-cytotoxicity test in which the number of cytolytic effector and tumour target cells have been decreased by a factor of 10. The release obtained by 500 tumour target cells was compared with the release obtained by 5000 target cells in the standard cytotoxicity assay for target:effector cell ratios from 1:1 to 1:100. Both gamma and beta emissions of the 51Cr isotope were evaluated to determine the assay release. The results obtained by the micro-cytotoxicity assay (500 target cells) were comparable to those of the standard assay (5000 target cells) and 51Cr release evaluation using the gamma counter was the most sensitive method of determining lytic activity using 500 tumour target cells. beta counter evaluation using solid phase scintillation was found to be a reproducible alternative method, even if the lytic curves cannot be compared with those obtained using the traditional method. PMID:8034970

  9. Fathead minnow FHM cells for use in in vitro cytotoxicity assays of aquatic pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Babich, H.; Borenfreund, E.

    1987-08-01

    The suitability of the fathead minnow (FHM) epithelial cell line for use as the target (indicator) system in in vitro cytotoxicity assays was evaluated using several endpoints. The organometal diethyltin dichloride served as the representative test agent. The concentration of diethyltin dichloride which resulted in a midpoint toxicity was 3.5 microM in a 3-day cell growth assay, 3.8 microM in the 24-hr neutral red assay, and 16.5 microM in a 4-hr cell detachment assay. The neutral red assay was used to compare the relative sensitivities of the FHM cells (exposed at 34/sup 0/C) with those of bluegill sunfish (BF-2) cells, a fibroblastic cell culture (exposed at 26 degrees C), in the presence of different classes of test agents frequently occurring as aquatic pollutants. For both fish species the sequence of potencies of the test agents was in the order of organometals greater than pesticides approximately equal to polychlorinated biphenyls greater than polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons greater than phenolics. Overall, the FHM cells were more sensitive than were the BF-2 cells. However, there was a better correlation between the in vitro cytotoxicity data for the BF-2 cell culture and LC50 data for bluegill sunfish than between similar data for the FHM cell line and fathead minnows.

  10. Psychoneuroimmunology and natural killer cells: the chromium release whole blood assay.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Mary Ann; Barnes, Zachary; Broderick, Gordon; Klimas, Nancy G

    2012-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are an essential component of innate immunity. These lymphocytes are also sensitive barometers of the effects of endogenous and exogenous stressors on the immune system. This chapter will describe a chromium ((51)Cr) release bioassay designed to measure the target cell killing capacity of NK cells (NKCC). Key features of the cytotoxicity assay are that it is done with whole blood and that numbers of effector cells are determined for each sample by flow cytometry and lymphocyte count. Effector cells are defined as CD3-CD56+ lymphocytes. Target cells are the K562 eyrthroleukemia cell line. Killing capacity is defined as number of target cells killed per effector cell, at an effector cell/target cell ratio of 1:1 during a 4 h in vitro assay. PMID:22933153

  11. A Protocol for a High-Throughput Multiplex Cell Viability Assay.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Daniel F; Boutros, Michael

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput cell viability assays are broadly used in RNAi and small molecule screening experiments to identify compounds that selectively kill cancer cells or as counter screens to exclude the compounds that have a generic effect on cell growth. While there are several assaying techniques available, cellular fitness is often assessed on the basis of one single and often rather indirect physiological indicator. This can lead to inconsistencies and poor correspondence between cell viability screening experiments, conducted under comparable conditions but with different viability indicators. Multiplexing, i.e., the combination of different individual assaying techniques in one experiment and subsequent comparative analysis of multiparametric data can decrease inter-assay variability and increase dataset concordance. Here, we describe a protocol for a multiplexing approach for high-throughput cell viability screening to address the issues encountered in the classical strategy using a single fitness indicator described above. The method combines a biochemical, luminescence-based approach and two fluorescence-based assay types. The biochemical method assesses cellular fitness by quantifying intracellular ATP concentration. Calcein labeling reflects cell fitness through membrane integrity and indirect measurement of ATP-dependent enzymatic esterase activity. Hoechst DNA stain correlates cell fitness with cellular DNA content. The presented multiplexing approach is suitable for low, medium and high-throughput screening and has the potential to decrease inter-assay variability and increase dataset concordance as well as reproducibility of experimental results. PMID:27581285

  12. Single Cell Adhesion Assay Using Computer Controlled Micropipette

    PubMed Central

    Salánki, Rita; Hős, Csaba; Orgovan, Norbert; Péter, Beatrix; Sándor, Noémi; Bajtay, Zsuzsa; Erdei, Anna; Horvath, Robert; Szabó, Bálint

    2014-01-01

    Cell adhesion is a fundamental phenomenon vital for all multicellular organisms. Recognition of and adhesion to specific macromolecules is a crucial task of leukocytes to initiate the immune response. To gain statistically reliable information of cell adhesion, large numbers of cells should be measured. However, direct measurement of the adhesion force of single cells is still challenging and today’s techniques typically have an extremely low throughput (5–10 cells per day). Here, we introduce a computer controlled micropipette mounted onto a normal inverted microscope for probing single cell interactions with specific macromolecules. We calculated the estimated hydrodynamic lifting force acting on target cells by the numerical simulation of the flow at the micropipette tip. The adhesion force of surface attached cells could be accurately probed by repeating the pick-up process with increasing vacuum applied in the pipette positioned above the cell under investigation. Using the introduced methodology hundreds of cells adhered to specific macromolecules were measured one by one in a relatively short period of time (∼30 min). We blocked nonspecific cell adhesion by the protein non-adhesive PLL-g-PEG polymer. We found that human primary monocytes are less adherent to fibrinogen than their in vitro differentiated descendants: macrophages and dendritic cells, the latter producing the highest average adhesion force. Validation of the here introduced method was achieved by the hydrostatic step-pressure micropipette manipulation technique. Additionally the result was reinforced in standard microfluidic shear stress channels. Nevertheless, automated micropipette gave higher sensitivity and less side-effect than the shear stress channel. Using our technique, the probed single cells can be easily picked up and further investigated by other techniques; a definite advantage of the computer controlled micropipette. Our experiments revealed the existence of a sub

  13. Detection of circulating immune complexes by Raji cell assay: comparison of flow cytometric and radiometric methods

    SciTech Connect

    Kingsmore, S.F.; Crockard, A.D.; Fay, A.C.; McNeill, T.A.; Roberts, S.D.; Thompson, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    Several flow cytometric methods for the measurement of circulating immune complexes (CIC) have recently become available. We report a Raji cell flow cytometric assay (FCMA) that uses aggregated human globulin (AHG) as primary calibrator. Technical advantages of the Raji cell flow cytometric assay are discussed, and its clinical usefulness is evaluated in a method comparison study with the widely used Raji cell immunoradiometric assay. FCMA is more precise and has greater analytic sensitivity for AHG. Diagnostic sensitivity by the flow cytometric method is superior in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis, and vasculitis patients: however, diagnostic specificity is similar for both assays, but the reference interval of FCMA is narrower. Significant correlations were found between CIC levels obtained with both methods in SLE, rheumatoid arthritis, and vasculitis patients and in longitudinal studies of two patients with cerebral SLE. The Raji cell FCMA is recommended for measurement of CIC levels to clinical laboratories with access to a flow cytometer.

  14. Capture of circulating tumor cells using photoacoustic flowmetry and two phase flow

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Christine M.; Rood, Kyle D.; Bhattacharyya, Kiran; DeSouza, Thiago; Sengupta, Shramik; Gupta, Sagar K.; Mosley, Jeffrey D.; Goldschmidt, Benjamin S.; Sharma, Nikhilesh

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. Melanoma is the deadliest form of skin cancer, yet current diagnostic methods are unable to detect early onset of metastatic disease. Patients must wait until macroscopic secondary tumors form before malignancy can be diagnosed and treatment prescribed. Detection of cells that have broken off the original tumor and travel through the blood or lymph system can provide data for diagnosing and monitoring metastatic disease. By irradiating enriched blood samples spiked with cultured melanoma cells with nanosecond duration laser light, we induced photoacoustic responses in the pigmented cells. Thus, we can detect and enumerate melanoma cells in blood samples to demonstrate a paradigm for a photoacoustic flow cytometer. Furthermore, we capture the melanoma cells using microfluidic two phase flow, a technique that separates a continuous flow into alternating microslugs of air and blood cell suspension. Each slug of blood cells is tested for the presence of melanoma. Slugs that are positive for melanoma, indicated by photoacoustic waves, are separated from the cytometer for further purification and isolation of the melanoma cell. In this paper, we evaluate the two phase photoacoustic flow cytometer for its ability to detect and capture metastastic melanoma cells in blood. PMID:22734751

  15. Capture of circulating tumor cells using photoacoustic flowmetry and two phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Christine M.; Rood, Kyle D.; Bhattacharyya, Kiran; DeSouza, Thiago; Sengupta, Shramik; Gupta, Sagar K.; Mosley, Jeffrey D.; Goldschmidt, Benjamin S.; Sharma, Nikhilesh; Viator, John A.

    2012-06-01

    Melanoma is the deadliest form of skin cancer, yet current diagnostic methods are unable to detect early onset of metastatic disease. Patients must wait until macroscopic secondary tumors form before malignancy can be diagnosed and treatment prescribed. Detection of cells that have broken off the original tumor and travel through the blood or lymph system can provide data for diagnosing and monitoring metastatic disease. By irradiating enriched blood samples spiked with cultured melanoma cells with nanosecond duration laser light, we induced photoacoustic responses in the pigmented cells. Thus, we can detect and enumerate melanoma cells in blood samples to demonstrate a paradigm for a photoacoustic flow cytometer. Furthermore, we capture the melanoma cells using microfluidic two phase flow, a technique that separates a continuous flow into alternating microslugs of air and blood cell suspension. Each slug of blood cells is tested for the presence of melanoma. Slugs that are positive for melanoma, indicated by photoacoustic waves, are separated from the cytometer for further purification and isolation of the melanoma cell. In this paper, we evaluate the two phase photoacoustic flow cytometer for its ability to detect and capture metastastic melanoma cells in blood.

  16. Convenient cell fusion assay for rapid screening for HIV entry inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Shibo; Radigan, Lin; Zhang, Li

    2000-03-01

    Human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV)-induced cell fusion is a critical pathway of HIV spread from infected cells to uninfected cells. A rapid and simple assay was established to measure HIV-induce cell fusion. This study is particularly useful to rapid screen for HIV inhibitors that block HIV cell-to-cell transmission. Present study demonstrated that coculture of HIV-infected cells with uninfected cells at 37 degree(s)C for 2 hours resulted in the highest cell fusion rate. Using this cell fusion assay, we have identified several potent HIV inhibitors targeted to the HIV gp41 core. These antiviral agents can be potentially developed as antiviral drugs for chemotherapy and prophylaxis of HIV infection and AIDS.

  17. Tunable Thermal-Sensitive Polymer-Graphene Oxide Composite for Efficient Capture and Release of Viable Circulating Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hyeun Joong; Shanker, Apoorv; Wang, Yang; Kozminsky, Molly; Jin, Qu; Palanisamy, Nallasivam; Burness, Monika L; Azizi, Ebrahim; Simeone, Diane M; Wicha, Max S; Kim, Jinsang; Nagrath, Sunitha

    2016-06-01

    A highly sensitive microfluidic system to capture circulating tumor cells from whole blood of cancer patients is presented. The device incorporates graphene oxide into a thermoresponsive polymer film to serve as the first step of an antibody functionalization chemistry. By decreasing the temperature, captured cells may be released for subsequent analysis. PMID:27115557

  18. Capturing mechanical properties of biological cells using coarse-grained modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Wenbin; Chang, Monique; Alexeev, Alexander

    2013-11-01

    Understanding cell mechanics is important for a variety of biomedical applications. Our goal is to develop a coarse-grained computational model that can properly capture the micromechanics of biological cells. The coarse-grained cell model includes an elastic shell enclosing a cross-linked polymer network and a viscous fluid representing, respectively, cell membrane, cytoskeleton, and cytoplasm. We use this model to investigate the mechanical response of cells to external forces and compare the results with the experimental AFM measurements. We systematically vary the properties and structure of the internal polymer network and the outer membrane to assess their influence on the cell mechanical responses. This model not only reveals interesting insights into the cell mechanics, but also provides a promising tool for investigation of motile and multicellular systems. Acknowledge financial support from NSF under Award No. 0932510.

  19. In vivo capture and label-free detection of early metastatic cells

    PubMed Central

    Azarin, Samira M.; Yi, Ji; Gower, Robert M.; Aguado, Brian A.; Sullivan, Megan E.; Goodman, Ashley G.; Jiang, Eric J.; Rao, Shreyas S.; Ren, Yinying; Tucker, Susan L.; Backman, Vadim; Jeruss, Jacqueline S.; Shea, Lonnie D.

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is a leading cause of death for women, with mortality resulting from metastasis. Metastases are often detected once tumor cells affect the function of solid organs, with a high disease burden limiting effective treatment. Here we report a method for the early detection of metastasis using an implanted scaffold to recruit and capture metastatic cells in vivo, which achieves high cell densities and reduces the tumor burden within solid organs 10-fold. Recruitment is associated with infiltration of immune cells, which include Gr1hiCD11b+ cells. We identify metastatic cells in the scaffold through a label-free detection system using inverse-spectroscopic optical coherence tomography, which identifies changes to nanoscale tissue architecture associated with the presence of tumor cells. For patients at risk of recurrence, scaffold implantation following completion of primary therapy has the potential to identify metastatic disease at the earliest stage, enabling initiation of therapy while the disease burden is low. PMID:26348915

  20. Isolation, Culture, Functional Assays, and Immunofluorescence of Myofiber-Associated Satellite Cells.

    PubMed

    Vogler, Thomas O; Gadek, Katherine E; Cadwallader, Adam B; Elston, Tiffany L; Olwin, Bradley B

    2016-01-01

    Adult skeletal muscle stem cells, termed satellite cells, regenerate and repair the functional contractile cells in adult skeletal muscle called myofibers. Satellite cells reside in a niche between the basal lamina and sarcolemma of myofibers. Isolating single myofibers and their associated satellite cells provides a culture system that partially mimics the in vivo environment. We describe methods for isolating and culturing intact individual myofibers and their associated satellite cells from the mouse extensor digitorum longus muscle. Following dissection and isolation of individual myofibers we provide protocols for myofiber transplantation, satellite cell transfection, immune detection of satellite cell antigens, and assays to examine satellite cell self-renewal and proliferation. PMID:27492171

  1. In vitro cell-based assays for evaluation of antioxidant potential of plant-derived products.

    PubMed

    Nascimento da Silva, Luís Cláudio; Bezerra Filho, Clovis Macêdo; Paula, Raiana Apolinário de; Silva E Silva, Cristiane Santos; Oliveira de Souza, Larissa Isabela; Silva, Márcia Vanusa da; Correia, Maria Tereza Dos Santos; Figueiredo, Regina Célia Bressan Queiroz de

    2016-08-01

    Several plant-derived compounds have been screened by antioxidant assays, but many of these results are questionable, since they do not evaluate the pharmacologic parameters. In fact, the development of better antioxidants stills a great challenge. In vitro cell-based assays have been employed to assess the antioxidant effect of various compounds at subcellular level. Cell-based assays can also reveal compounds able to enhance the antioxidant pathways, but without direct radical scavenging action (which could not be detected by traditional assays). These methodologies are general of easy implementation and reproducible making them suitable for the early stages of drug discovery. Hydrogen peroxide, a nonradical derivative of oxygen, can be employed as an oxidative agent in these assays due its biochemical properties (presence of all biological systems, solubility) and capacity to induce cell death. Truthfully, if their limitations are understood (such as difference on cell metabolism when in in vitro conditions), these cell-based assays can provide useful information about the pathways involved in the protective effects of phytochemicals against cell death induced by oxidative stress, which can be exploited to develop new therapeutic approaches. PMID:27216086

  2. New DAG and cAMP Sensors Optimized for Live-Cell Assays in Automated Laboratories

    PubMed Central

    Tewson, Paul H.; Martinka, Scott; Shaner, Nathan C.; Hughes, Thomas E.; Quinn, Anne Marie

    2015-01-01

    Protein-based, fluorescent biosensors power basic research on cell signaling in health and disease, but their use in automated laboratories is limited. We have now created two live-cell assays, one for diacyl glycerol and another for cAMP, that are robust (Z′ > 0.7) and easily deployed on standard fluorescence plate readers. We describe the development of these assays, focusing on the parameters that were critical for optimization, in the hopes that the lessons learned can be generalized to the development of new biosensor-based assays. PMID:26657040

  3. Single Cell Proteolytic Assays to Investigate Cancer Clonal Heterogeneity and Cell Dynamics Using an Efficient Cell Loading Scheme

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Chih; Cheng, Yu-Heng; Ingram, Patrick; Yoon, Euisik

    2016-01-01

    Proteolytic degradation of the extracellular matrix (ECM) is critical in cancer invasion, and recent work suggests that heterogeneous cancer populations cooperate in this process. Despite the importance of cell heterogeneity, conventional proteolytic assays measure average activity, requiring thousands of cells and providing limited information about heterogeneity and dynamics. Here, we developed a microfluidic platform that provides high-efficiency cell loading and simple valveless isolation, so the proteolytic activity of a small sample (10–100 cells) can be easily characterized. Combined with a single cell derived (clonal) sphere formation platform, we have successfully demonstrated the importance of microenvironmental cues for proteolytic activity and also investigated the difference between clones. Furthermore, the platform allows monitoring single cells at multiple time points, unveiling different cancer cell line dynamics in proteolytic activity. The presented tool facilitates single cell proteolytic analysis using small samples, and our findings illuminate the heterogeneous and dynamic nature of proteolytic activity. PMID:27283981

  4. Single Cell Proteolytic Assays to Investigate Cancer Clonal Heterogeneity and Cell Dynamics Using an Efficient Cell Loading Scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-Chih; Cheng, Yu-Heng; Ingram, Patrick; Yoon, Euisik

    2016-06-01

    Proteolytic degradation of the extracellular matrix (ECM) is critical in cancer invasion, and recent work suggests that heterogeneous cancer populations cooperate in this process. Despite the importance of cell heterogeneity, conventional proteolytic assays measure average activity, requiring thousands of cells and providing limited information about heterogeneity and dynamics. Here, we developed a microfluidic platform that provides high-efficiency cell loading and simple valveless isolation, so the proteolytic activity of a small sample (10–100 cells) can be easily characterized. Combined with a single cell derived (clonal) sphere formation platform, we have successfully demonstrated the importance of microenvironmental cues for proteolytic activity and also investigated the difference between clones. Furthermore, the platform allows monitoring single cells at multiple time points, unveiling different cancer cell line dynamics in proteolytic activity. The presented tool facilitates single cell proteolytic analysis using small samples, and our findings illuminate the heterogeneous and dynamic nature of proteolytic activity.

  5. Method for measuring neurotoxicity of aggregating polypeptides with the MTT assay on differentiated neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Datki, Zsolt; Juhász, Anna; Gálfi, Márta; Soós, Katalin; Papp, Rita; Zádori, Dénes; Penke, Botond

    2003-12-30

    Reliable in vitro assays are essential for study of the effects of neurotoxic compounds such as beta-amyloid peptides (Abeta). The MTT assay has been used in cultures of different cells, e.g. SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells, for the quantitative measurement of Abeta toxicity. In our laboratory differentiated SH-SY5Y cells were used in the MTT assay. Cell differentiation with 10 microM all-trans-retinoic acid resulted in a constant cell number. The cells possess highly developed neurites and exhibit high sensitivity against Abeta. Owing to the constant cell number in differentiated SH-SY5Y cultures the decrease of the redox activity is directly proportional to the neurotoxicity of the substances, no correction is needed. The results of the MTT assay of Abeta peptides on differentiated SH-SY5Y cells displayed a good correlation also with the in vivo results. The present experiments reveal an effective assay for the study of potentially neurotoxic compounds. PMID:14698355

  6. Soft landing of cell-sized vesicles on solid surfaces for robust vehicle capture/release.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dehui; Wu, Zhengfang; Gao, Aiting; Zhang, Weihong; Kang, Chengying; Tao, Qi; Yang, Peng

    2015-04-28

    Based on a concept of a smooth and steady landing of fragile objects without destruction via a soft cushion, we have developed a model for the soft landing of deformable lipid giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) on solid surfaces. The foundation for a successful soft landing is a solid substrate with a two-layer coating, including a bottom layer of positively charged lysozymes and an upper lipid membrane layer. We came to a clear conclusion that anionic GUVs when sedimented on a surface, the vesicle rupture occurs upon the direct contact with the positively charged lysozyme layer due to the strong coulombic interactions. In contrast, certain separation distances was achieved by the insertion of a soft lipid membrane cushion between the charged GUVs and the lysozyme layer, which attenuated the coulombic force and created a mild buffer zone, ensuring the robust capture of GUVs on the substrate without their rupture. The non-covalent bonding facilitated a fully reversible stimuli-responsive capture/release of GUVs from the biomimetic solid surface, which has never been demonstrated before due to the extreme fragility of GUVs. Moreover, the controllable capture/release of cells has been proven to be of vital importance in biotechnology, and similarity the present approach to capture/release cells is expected to open the previously inaccessible avenues of research. PMID:25787226

  7. Analysis of three marine fish cell lines by rapd assay.

    PubMed

    Guo, H R; Zhang, S C; Tong, S L; Xiang, J H

    2001-01-01

    We tested the applicability of the random amplified polymorphic deoxyribonucleic acid (RAPD) analysis for identification of three marine fish cell lines FG, SPH, and RSBF, and as a possible tool to detect cross-contamination. Sixty commercial 10-mer RAPD primers were tested on the cell lines and on samples collected from individual fish. The results obtained showed that the cell lines could be identified to the correspondent species on the basis of identical patterns produced by 35-48% of the primers tested; the total mean similarity indices for cell lines versus correspondent species of individual fish ranged from 0.825 to 0.851, indicating the existence of genetic variation in these cell lines in relation to the species of their origin. Also, four primers, which gave a monomorphic band pattern within species/line, but different among the species/line, were obtained. These primers can be useful for identification of these cell lines and for characterization of the genetic variation of these cell lines in relation to the species of their origin. This supported the use of RAPD analysis as an effective tool in species identification and cross-contamination test among different cell lines. PMID:11573817

  8. A portable immunomagnetic cell capture system to accelerate culture diagnosis of bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Singh, Saurabh; Upadhyay, Mohita; Sharma, Jyoti; Gupta, Shalini; Vivekanandan, Perumal; Elangovan, Ravikrishnan

    2016-05-23

    Bacterial infections continue to be a major cause of deaths globally, particularly in resource-poor settings. In the absence of rapid and affordable diagnostic solutions, patients are mostly administered broad spectrum antibiotics leading to antibiotics resistance and poor recovery. Culture diagnosis continues to be a gold standard for diagnosis of bacterial infection, despite its long turnaround time of 24 to 48 h. We have developed a portable immunomagnetic cell capture (iMC(2)) system that allows rapid culture diagnosis of bacterial pathogens. Our approach involves the culture growth of the blood samples in broth media for 6 to 8 h, followed by immunomagnetic enrichment of the target cells using the iMC(2) device. The device comprises a disposable capture chip that has two chambers of 5 ml and 50 μl volume connected through a channel with a manual valve. Bacterial cells bound to antibody coated magnetic nanoparticles are swept from the 5 ml sample chamber into the 50 μl recovery chamber by moving an external magnetic field with respect to the capture chip using a linear positioner. This enables specific isolation and up to 100× enrichment of the target cells. The presence of bacteria in the recovered sample is confirmed visually using a lateral flow immunoassay. The system is demonstrated in buffer and blood samples spiked with S. typhi. The method has high sensitivity (10 CFU ml(-1)), specificity and a rapid turnaround time of less than 7 h, a significant improvement over conventional methods. PMID:27118505

  9. Alternating current electrohydrodynamics induced nanoshearing and fluid micromixing for specific capture of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Vaidyanathan, Ramanathan; Rauf, Sakandar; Dray, Eloïse; Shiddiky, Muhammad J A; Trau, Matt

    2014-03-24

    We report a new tuneable alternating current (ac) electrohydrodynamics (ac-EHD) force referred to as “nanoshearing” which involves fluid flow generated within a few nanometers of an electrode surface. This force can be externally tuned via manipulating the applied ac-EHD field strength. The ability to manipulate ac-EHD induced forces and concomitant fluid micromixing can enhance fluid transport within the capture domain of the channel (e.g., transport of analytes and hence increase target–sensor interactions). This also provides a new capability to preferentially select strongly bound analytes over nonspecifically bound cells and molecules. To demonstrate the utility and versatility of nanoshearing phenomenon to specifically capture cancer cells, we present proof-of-concept data in lysed blood using two microfluidic devices containing a long array of asymmetric planar electrode pairs. Under the optimal experimental conditions, we achieved high capture efficiency (e.g., approximately 90%; %RSD=2, n=3) with a 10-fold reduction in nonspecific adsorption of non-target cells for the detection of whole cells expressing Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 (HER2). We believe that our ac-EHD devices and the use of tuneable nanoshearing phenomenon may find relevance in a wide variety of biological and medical applications. PMID:24677444

  10. Laser cross-linking protein captures for living cells on a biochip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chih-Lang; Pan, Ming-Jeng; Chen, Hai-Wen; Lin, Che-Kuan; Lin, Chuen-Fu; Baldeck, Patrice L.

    2014-03-01

    In this study, bio-sensing pads are proposed to capture living cells, which are fabricated on cover glasses by cross-linking proteins/antibodies using laser induced photochemistry. The biological functions of the cross-linked protein/antibody were verified by capturing Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), Leptospira, and red blood cells (RBCs), separately, with associated protein/antibody sensing pads. The experimental results show that S. aureus were bound on GFP-AcmA' pad after minutes of incubation and phosphate buffered saline (PBS) rinsing. No binding was observed with reference pad made of neutral bovine serum albumin (BSA). Second, A-type RBCs were chosen as the model cell to demonstrate the blood typing feasibility of the anti-A pad in microchannel. The A-type RBCs were captured only by the anti-A pad, but not the reference pad made of BSA. The same experimental model was carried out on the Leptospira, which stuck on the blood serum pad after PBS rinsing, but not BSA pad. This study provides a potential platform for simple and direct detection of living full cells without culture that could be used in point-of-care settings.

  11. Cloning assay thresholds on cells exposed to ultrafast laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Karsten; Riemann, Iris; Fischer, Peter; Becker, Thomas P.; Oehring, Hartmut; Halbhuber, Karl-Juergen

    1999-06-01

    The influence of the peak power, laser wavelength and the pulse duration of near infrared ultrashort laser pulses on the reproduction behavior of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells has been studied. In particular, we determined the cloning efficiency of single cell pairs after exposure to ultrashort laser pulses with an intensity in the range of GW/cm2 and TW/cm2. A total of more than 3500 non- labeled cells were exposed to a highly focused scanning beam of a multiphoton laser microscope with 60 microsecond(s) pixel dwell time per scan. The beam was provided by a tunable argon ion laser pumped mode-locked 76 MHz Titanium:Sapphire laser as well as by a compact solid-state laser based system (Vitesse) at a fixed wavelength of 800 nm. Pulse duration (tau) was varied in the range of 100 fs to 4 ps by out-of- cavity pulse-stretching units consisting of SF14 prisms and blazed gratings. Within an optical (laser power) window CHO cells could be scanned for hours without severe impact on reproduction behavior, morphology and vitality. Ultrastructural studies reveal that mitochondria are the major targets of intense destructive laser pulses. Above certain laser power P thresholds, CHO cells started to delay or failed to undergo cell division and, in part, to develop uncontrolled cell growth (giant cell formation). The damage followed a P2/(tau) relation which is typical for a two- photon excitation process. Therefore, cell damage was found to be more pronounced at shorter pulses. Due to the same P2/(tau) relation for the efficiency of fluorescence excitation, two-photon microscopy of living cells does not require extremely short femtosecond laser pulses nor pulse compression units. Picosecond as well as femtosecond lasers can be used as efficient light sources in safe two photon fluorescence microscopy. Only in three photon fluorescence microscopy, femtosecond laser pulses are advantageous over picosecond pulses.

  12. Cloning assay thresholds on cells exposed to ultrafast laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Karsten; Riemann, Iris; Fischer, Peter; Becker, Thomas P.; Oehring, Hartmut; Halbhuber, Karl-Juergen

    1999-06-01

    The influence of the peak power, laser wavelength and the pulse duration of near infrared (NIR) ultrashort laser pulses on the reproduction behavior of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells has been studied. In particular we determined the cloning efficiency of single cell pairs after exposure to ultrashort laser pulses with an intensity in the range of GW/cm2 and TW/cm2. A total of more than 3500 non- labeled cells were exposed to a highly focused scanning beam of a multiphoton laser microscope with 60 microsecond pixel dwell time per scan. The beam was provided by a tunable argon ion laser pumped mode-locked 76 MHz Titanium:Sapphire laser as well as by a compact solid-state laser based system (Vitesse) at a fixed wavelength of 800 nm. Pulse duration (tau) was varied in the range of 100 fs to 4 ps by out-of-cavity pulse- stretching units consisting of SF14 prisms and blazed gratings. Within an optical (laser power) window CHO cells could be scanned for hours without severe impact on reproduction behavior, morphology and vitality. Ultrastructural studies reveal that mitochondria are the major targets of intense destructive laser pulses. Above certain laser power P thresholds, CHO cells started to delay or failed to undergo cell division and, in part, to develop uncontrolled cell growth (giant cell formation). The damage followed a P2/(tau) relation which is typical for a two-photon excitation process. Therefore, cell damage was found to be more pronounced at shorter pulses. Due to the same P2/(tau) relation for the efficiency of fluorescence excitation, two- photon microscopy of living cells does not require extremely short femtosecond laser pulses nor pulse compression units. Picosecond as well as femtosecond layers can be used as efficient light sources in safe two photon fluorescence microscopy. Only in three photon fluorescence microscopy, femtosecond laser pulses are advantageous over picosecond pulses.

  13. A simple and versatile microfluidic cell density gradient generator for quantum dot cytotoxicity assay.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jing; Chen, Qiushui; Liu, Wu; Lin, Jin-Ming

    2013-05-21

    In this work, a simple and versatile microfluidic cell density gradient generator was successfully developed for cytotoxicity of quantum dots (QDs) assay. The microfluidic cell density gradient generator is composed of eight parallel channels which are respectively surrounded by 1-8 microwells with optimized length and width. The cells fall into microwells by gravity and the cell densities are obviously dependent of microwell number. In a case study, HepG2 and MCF-7 cells were successfully utilized for generating cell density gradients on the microfluidic chip. The microfluidic cell density gradient generator was proved to be easily handled, cell-friendly and could be used to conduct the subsequent cell-based assay. As a proof-of-concept, QD cytotoxicity was evaluated and the results exhibited obvious cell density-dependence. For comparison, QD cytotoxicity was also investigated with a series of cell densities infused by pipette tips. Higher reproducibility was observed on the microfluidic cell density gradient generator and cell density was demonstrated to be a vital factor in cytotoxic study. With higher efficiency, controllability and reproducibility, the microfluidic cell density gradient generator could be integrated into microfluidic analysis systems to promote chip-based biological assay. PMID:23538998

  14. A novel microfluidic platform with stable concentration gradient for on chip cell culture and screening assays.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bi-Yi; Hu, Shan-Wen; Qian, Guang-Sheng; Xu, Jing-Juan; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2013-09-21

    In this work a novel microfluidic platform for cell culture and assay is developed. On the chip a static cell culture region is coupled with dynamic fluidic nutrition supply structures. The cell culture unit has a sandwich structure with liquid channels on the top, the cell culture reservoir in the middle and gas channels on the bottom. Samples can be easily loaded into the reservoir and exchange constantly with the external liquid environment by diffusion. Since the flow direction is perpendicular to the liquid channel on the top of the reservoir, the cells in the reservoir are shielded from shear-force. By assembling the basic units into an array, a steady concentration gradient can be generated. Cell culture models both for continuous perfusion and one-off perfusion were established on the chip. Both adherent and suspended cells were successfully cultured on the chip in 2D and 3D culture modes. After culturing, the trapped cells were recovered for use in a later assay. As a competitive candidate for a standard cell culture and assay platform, this chip is also adaptable for cytotoxicity and cell growth assays. PMID:23884407

  15. Radiation survival of murine and human melanoma cells utilizing two assay systems: monolayer and soft agar.

    PubMed Central

    Yohem, K. H.; Slymen, D. J.; Bregman, M. D.; Meyskens, F. L.

    1988-01-01

    The radiation response of murine and human melanoma cells assayed in bilayer soft agar and monolayer was examined. Cells from the murine melanoma Cloudman S91 CCL 53.1 cell line and three human melanoma cell strains (C8146C, C8161, and R83-4) developed in our laboratory were irradiated by single dose X-rays and plated either in agar or on plastic. D0 values were the same within 95% confidence intervals for cells from the human melanoma cell strains C8146C, C8161, and R83-4 but were dissimilar for the murine cell line CCL 53.1 Dq values were different for all cells studied. The shape of the survival curve for all four melanomas was not identical for cells assayed in soft agar versus cells grown on plastic. This would indicate that apparent radiosensitivity was influenced by the method of assay although there were no apparent consistent differences between the curves generated by monolayer or bilayer soft agar assays. PMID:3348949

  16. Application of cell sorting for enhancing the performance of the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Ayumi; Monzen, Satoru; Takasugi, Yuki; Wojcik, Andrzej; Mariya, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    Among the numerous methods available to assess genotoxicity, the cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) assay is very popular due its relative simplicity and power to detect both clastogenic and aneugenic compounds. A problem with the CBMN assay is that all DNA damaging agents also inhibit the ability of cells to progress through mitosis, leading to a low number of binucleated cells (BNCs). One method to resolve this issue is to ensure a sufficient proportion of BNCs in the samples. In the current study, the applicability of a cell sorting system capable of isolating cell fractions containing abundant BNCs was investigated. Furthermore, to investigate the relationship between the cell division delay due to radiation exposure and the generation of BNCs and micronuclei (MN), we assessed a series of lag times between radiation exposure and addition of cytochalasin-B (Cyt-B). Cells from the human chronic myelogenous leukemia cell line K562 were exposed to X-rays (2 Gy and 4 Gy), and Cyt-B was subsequently added at 0, 6 and 12 h following irradiation. After treatment with Cyt-B for 24 h, the percentage of BNCs, the MN frequency and the cell cycle distribution were analyzed. In addition, cells displaying the DNA contents corresponding to BNCs were isolated and analyzed. The results indicate that applying the cell sorter to the CBMN assay increased the percentage of BNCs compared with the standard method. Thus, this technique is a promising way of enhancing the capacity of the CBMN assay. PMID:26826197

  17. Assay of immunoglobulins in supernatants of lymphoid cell lines by conventional laser nephelometry.

    PubMed

    Virella, G; Muñoz, J; Robinson, J E; Goust, J M

    1979-03-01

    An adaptation of the nephelometric assay for serum immunoglobulins has been developed for detection and quantitation of extracellular immunoglobulins in cultures of lymphoblastoid cell lines. This assay employs the standard equipment for laser nephelometry and commercial reagents for immunoglobulin quantitation. By adjusting dilutions of controls and sample volumes of culture supernatants, amounts of IgG and IgM below 1 microgram/ml can be detected in culture supernatants. At concentrations between 1 and 4 microgram/ml, day-to-day and within-run variations for IgM assays were 16 and 11% respectively. The possibility of measuring immunoglobulins secreted by cell lines by conventional laser nephelometry opens several areas of application in the study of the functional activity of B cells and of cell-cell interactions. PMID:313634

  18. Osteoconductivity of Complex Biomaterials Assayed by Fluorescent-Engineered Osteoblast-like Cells.

    PubMed

    Manfrini, Marco; Mazzoni, Elisa; Barbanti-Brodano, Giovanni; Nocini, Pierfrancesco; D'agostino, Antonio; Trombelli, Leonardo; Tognon, Mauro

    2015-04-01

    Biomaterials employed for the bone regeneration can be assayed for specific features such as osteoconductivity and gene expression. In this study, the composite HA/collagen/chondroitin-sulfate biomaterial was investigated using an engineered human cell line, named Saos-eGFP. This cell line, a green fluorescent engineered human osteoblast-like cell, was employed as a cellular model for the in vitro study of biomaterial characteristics. The cytotoxicity was indirectly evaluated by fluorescence detection, osteoconductivity was assayed both by fluorescence and electron microscope analysis as well as cell morphology, whereas the RT-PCR technique was employed to assay gene expression. Saos-eGFP cells viability detection after 24 and 96 h of incubation showed that biomaterial enables the adhesion and proliferation of seeded cells as well as that of the plastic surface, the control. Fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analyses indicated that Saos-eGFP cells were homogeneously distributed on the HA granule surfaces, exhibiting cytoplasmic bridges, and were localized on the collagen-chondroitin sulfate extra-cellular matrix. An expression analysis of specific genes encoding for differentiation markers, showed that biomaterial assayed did not alter the osteogenic pathway of the Saos-eGFP cell line. Our assays confirm the cytocompatibility of this biomaterial, suggesting an osteoconductive capacity mediated by its chemical contents. We showed that the Saos-eGFP cellular model is suitable for in vitro biomaterial assays, and more specifically for assessing osteoconductivity. This result suggests that the cytocompatibility and osteoconductive features of the biomaterial assayed as bone substitute, could have a positive downstream effect on implant osteo-integration. PMID:25388843

  19. Assays to measure nuclear mechanics in interphase cells

    PubMed Central

    Isermann, Philipp; Davidson, Patricia M.; Sliz, Josiah D.

    2012-01-01

    The nucleus is the characteristic hallmark of all eukaryotic cells. The physical properties of the nucleus reflect important biological characteristics, such as chromatin organization or nuclear envelope composition; they can also directly affect cellular function, for example, when cells pass through narrow constrictions, where the stiff nucleus may present a limiting factor. We present two complementary techniques to probe the mechanical properties of the nucleus. In the first, nuclear stiffness relative to the surrounding cytoskeleton is inferred from induced nuclear deformations during strain application to cells on an elastic substrate. In the second approach, nuclear deformability is deduced from the transit time through a perfusion-based microfabricated device with constrictions smaller than the size of the nucleus. These complementary methods, which can be applied to measure nuclear stiffness in large numbers of living adherent or suspended cells, can help identify important changes in nuclear mechanics associated with disease or development. PMID:22968843

  20. Automated Cell Enrichment of Cytomegalovirus-specific T cells for Clinical Applications using the Cytokine-capture System.

    PubMed

    Kumaresan, Pappanaicken; Figliola, Mathew; Moyes, Judy S; Huls, M Helen; Tewari, Priti; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Champlin, Richard; Cooper, Laurence J N

    2015-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of pathogen-specific T cells can be used to prevent and treat opportunistic infections such as cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection occurring after allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation. Viral-specific T cells from allogeneic donors, including third party donors, can be propagated ex vivo in compliance with current good manufacturing practice (cGMP), employing repeated rounds of antigen-driven stimulation to selectively propagate desired T cells. The identification and isolation of antigen-specific T cells can also be undertaken based upon the cytokine capture system of T cells that have been activated to secrete gamma-interferon (IFN-γ). However, widespread human application of the cytokine capture system (CCS) to help restore immunity has been limited as the production process is time-consuming and requires a skilled operator. The development of a second-generation cell enrichment device such as CliniMACS Prodigy now enables investigators to generate viral-specific T cells using an automated, less labor-intensive system. This device separates magnetically labeled cells from unlabeled cells using magnetic activated cell sorting technology to generate clinical-grade products, is engineered as a closed system and can be accessed and operated on the benchtop. We demonstrate the operation of this new automated cell enrichment device to manufacture CMV pp65-specific T cells obtained from a steady-state apheresis product obtained from a CMV seropositive donor. These isolated T cells can then be directly infused into a patient under institutional and federal regulatory supervision. All the bio-processing steps including removal of red blood cells, stimulation of T cells, separation of antigen-specific T cells, purification, and washing are fully automated. Devices such as this raise the possibility that T cells for human application can be manufactured outside of dedicated good manufacturing practice (GMP) facilities and instead be produced

  1. Longitudinal multiparameter assay of lymphocyte interactions from onset by microfluidic cell pairing and culture.

    PubMed

    Dura, Burak; Servos, Mariah M; Barry, Rachel M; Ploegh, Hidde L; Dougan, Stephanie K; Voldman, Joel

    2016-06-28

    Resolving how the early signaling events initiated by cell-cell interactions are transduced into diverse functional outcomes necessitates correlated measurements at various stages. Typical approaches that rely on bulk cocultures and population-wide correlations, however, only reveal these relationships broadly at the population level, not within each individual cell. Here, we present a microfluidics-based cell-cell interaction assay that enables longitudinal investigation of lymphocyte interactions at the single-cell level through microfluidic cell pairing, on-chip culture, and multiparameter assays, and allows recovery of desired cell pairs by micromanipulation for off-chip culture and analyses. Well-defined initiation of interactions enables probing cellular responses from the very onset, permitting single-cell correlation analyses between early signaling dynamics and later-stage functional outcomes within same cells. We demonstrate the utility of this microfluidic assay with natural killer cells interacting with tumor cells, and our findings suggest a possible role for the strength of early calcium signaling in selective coordination of subsequent cytotoxicity and IFN-gamma production. Collectively, our experiments demonstrate that this new approach is well-suited for resolving the relationships between complex immune responses within each individual cell. PMID:27303033

  2. Single cell kinase signaling assay using pinched flow coupled droplet microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Ramji, Ramesh; Wang, Ming; Bhagat, Ali Asgar S.; Tan Shao Weng, Daniel; Thakor, Nitish V.; Teck Lim, Chwee; Chen, Chia-Hung

    2014-01-01

    Droplet-based microfluidics has shown potential in high throughput single cell assays by encapsulating individual cells in water-in-oil emulsions. Ordering cells in a micro-channel is necessary to encapsulate individual cells into droplets further enhancing the assay efficiency. This is typically limited due to the difficulty of preparing high-density cell solutions and maintaining them without cell aggregation in long channels (>5 cm). In this study, we developed a short pinched flow channel (5 mm) to separate cell aggregates and to form a uniform cell distribution in a droplet-generating platform that encapsulated single cells with >55% encapsulation efficiency beating Poisson encapsulation statistics. Using this platform and commercially available Sox substrates (8-hydroxy-5-(N,N-dimethylsulfonamido)-2-methylquinoline), we have demonstrated a high throughput dynamic single cell signaling assay to measure the activity of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) in lung cancer cells triggered by cell surface ligand binding. The phosphorylation of the substrates resulted in fluorescent emission, showing a sigmoidal increase over a 12 h period. The result exhibited a heterogeneous signaling rate in individual cells and showed various levels of drug resistance when treated with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor, gefitinib. PMID:24926389

  3. SpyLigase peptide–peptide ligation polymerizes affibodies to enhance magnetic cancer cell capture

    PubMed Central

    Fierer, Jacob O.; Veggiani, Gianluca; Howarth, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Individual proteins can now often be modified with atomic precision, but there are still major obstacles to connecting proteins into larger assemblies. To direct protein assembly, ideally, peptide tags would be used, providing the minimal perturbation to protein function. However, binding to peptides is generally weak, so assemblies are unstable over time and disassemble with force or harsh conditions. We have recently developed an irreversible protein–peptide interaction (SpyTag/SpyCatcher), based on a protein domain from Streptococcus pyogenes, that locks itself together via spontaneous isopeptide bond formation. Here we develop irreversible peptide–peptide interaction, through redesign of this domain and genetic dissection into three parts: a protein domain termed SpyLigase, which now ligates two peptide tags to each other. All components expressed efficiently in Escherichia coli and peptide tags were reactive at the N terminus, at the C terminus, or at internal sites. Peptide–peptide ligation enabled covalent and site-specific polymerization of affibodies or antibodies against the tumor markers epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and HER2. Magnetic capture of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is one of the most promising approaches to improve cancer prognosis and management, but CTC capture is limited by inefficient recovery of cells expressing low levels of tumor antigen. SpyLigase-assembled protein polymers made possible the isolation of cancerous cells expressing lower levels of tumor antigen and should have general application in enhancing molecular capture. PMID:24639550

  4. A microfluidic device for label-free, physical capture of circulating tumor cell-clusters

    PubMed Central

    Sarioglu, A. Fatih; Aceto, Nicola; Kojic, Nikola; Donaldson, Maria C.; Zeinali, Mahnaz; Hamza, Bashar; Engstrom, Amanda; Zhu, Huili; Sundaresan, Tilak K.; Miyamoto, David T.; Luo, Xi; Bardia, Aditya; Wittner, Ben S.; Ramaswamy, Sridhar; Shioda, Toshi; Ting, David T.; Stott, Shannon L.; Kapur, Ravi; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Haber, Daniel A.; Toner, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells metastasize through the bloodstream either as single migratory circulating tumor cells (CTCs) or as multicellular groupings (CTC-clusters). Existing technologies for CTC enrichment are designed primarily to isolate single CTCs, and while CTC-clusters are detectable in some cases, their true prevalence and significance remain to be determined. Here, we developed a microchip technology (Cluster-Chip) specifically designed to capture CTC-clusters independent of tumor-specific markers from unprocessed blood. CTC-clusters are isolated through specialized bifurcating traps under low shear-stress conditions that preserve their integrity and even two-cell clusters are captured efficiently. Using the Cluster-Chip, we identify CTC-clusters in 30–40% of patients with metastatic cancers of the breast, prostate and melanoma. RNA sequencing of CTC-clusters confirms their tumor origin and identifies leukocytes within the clusters as tissue-derived macrophages. Together, the development of a device for efficient capture of CTC-clusters will enable detailed characterization of their biological properties and role in cancer metastasis. PMID:25984697

  5. Comparison between fibroblast wound healing and cell random migration assays in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ascione, Flora; Vasaturo, Angela; Caserta, Sergio; D'Esposito, Vittoria; Formisano, Pietro; Guido, Stefano

    2016-09-10

    Cell migration plays a key role in many biological processes, including cancer growth and invasion, embryogenesis, angiogenesis, inflammatory response, and tissue repair. In this work, we compare two well-established experimental approaches for the investigation of cell motility in vitro: the cell random migration (CRM) and the wound healing (WH) assay. In the former, extensive tracking of individual live cells trajectories by time-lapse microscopy and elaborate data processing are used to calculate two intrinsic motility parameters of the cell population under investigation, i.e. the diffusion coefficient and the persistence time. In the WH assay, a scratch is made in a confluent cell monolayer and the closure time of the exposed area is taken as an easy-to-measure, empirical estimate of cell migration. To compare WH and CRM we applied the two assays to investigate the motility of skin fibroblasts isolated from wild type and transgenic mice (TgPED) overexpressing the protein PED/PEA-15, which is highly expressed in patients with type 2 diabetes. Our main result is that the cell motility parameters derived from CRM can be also estimated from a time-resolved analysis of the WH assay, thus showing that the latter is also amenable to a quantitative analysis for the characterization of cell migration. To our knowledge this is the first quantitative comparison of these two widely used techniques. PMID:27475838

  6. Phytoplankton photosynthetic characteristics from fluorescence induction assays of individual cells

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, R.J.; Chekalyuk, A.M.; Sosik, H.M.

    1996-09-01

    Saturating-flash fluorescence techniques, which can provide information about the physiological state of phytoplankton, at present measure bulk water samples and so provide {open_quotes}averaged{close_quotes} values for all the fluorescent particles present. In analyzing natural samples, however, more detailed information about the distribution of photosynthetic characteristics among different cell types and(or) individual cells is desirable. Therefore we developed two methods for applying a {open_quotes}pump-during-probe{close_quotes} technique on a cell-by-cell basis. We used either an epifluorescence microscope or a flow cytometer to make time-resolved measurements of the increase in chlorophyll fluorescence induced by a rectangular excitation pulse of 100-{mu}s duration. We used a biophysical model of fluorescence induction to obtain information about the quantum yield of photochemistry in photosystem 2 (PS2) and the functional absorption cross-section for PS2. For several species (including the smallest phytoplankton, Prochlorococcus, which are 0.7 {mu}m in diameter), the maximum quantum yield of photochemistry in PS2 obtained by averaging data from many individual cells agreed well with estimates derived from bulk measurements of DCMU enhancement of Chl fluorescence. 40 refs., 9 figs.

  7. Multiple MTS Assay as the Alternative Method to Determine Survival Fraction of the Irradiated HT-29 Colon Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Arab-Bafrani, Zahra; Shahbazi-Gahrouei, Daryoush; Abbasian, Mahdi; Fesharaki, Mehrafarin

    2016-01-01

    A multiple colorimetric assay has been introduced to evaluate the proliferation and determination of survival fraction (SF) of irradiated cells. The estimation of SF based on the cell-growth curve information is the major advantage of this assay. In this study, the utility of multiple-MTS assay for the SF estimation of irradiated HT-29 colon cancer cells, which were plated before irradiation, was evaluated. The SF of HT-29 colon cancer cells under irradiation with 9 MV photon was estimated using multiple-MTS assay and colony assay. Finally, the correlation between two assays was evaluated. Results showed that there are no significant differences between the SF obtained by two assays at different radiation doses (P > 0.05), and the survival curves have quite similar trends. In conclusion, multiple MTS-assay can be a reliable method to determine the SF of irradiated colon cancer cells that plated before irradiation. PMID:27186539

  8. Capture and printing of fixed stromal cell membranes for bioactive display on PDMS surfaces.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jungwoo; Wang, Jennifer B; Bersani, Francesca; Parekkadan, Biju

    2013-08-27

    Poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) has emerged as an extremely useful polymer for various biological applications. The conjugation of PDMS with bioactive molecules to create functional surfaces is feasible yet limited to a single-molecule display with imprecise localization of the molecules on PDMS. Here we report a robust technique that can transfer and print the membrane surface of glutaraldehyde-fixed stromal cells intact onto a PDMS substrate using an intermediate polyvinylalcohol (PVA) film as a transporter system. The cell-PVA film capturing the entirety of surface molecules can be peeled off and subsequently printed onto PDMS while maintaining the spatial display of the original cell surface molecules. Proof-of-concept studies are described using human bone marrow stromal cell membranes including a demonstration of the bioactivity of transferred membranes to capture and adhere hematopoietic cells. The presented process is applicable to virtually any adherent cell and can broaden the functional display of biomolecules on PDMS for biotechnology applications. PMID:23927769

  9. Recommended protocol for the Syrian hamster embryo (SHE) cell transformation assay.

    PubMed

    Maire, Marie-Aline; Pant, Kamala; Phrakonkham, Pascal; Poth, Albrecht; Schwind, Karl-Rainer; Rast, Claudine; Bruce, Shannon Wilson; Sly, Jamie E; Bohnenberger, Susanne; Kunkelmann, Thorsten; Schulz, Markus; Vasseur, Paule

    2012-04-11

    The Syrian hamster embryo (SHE) cell transformation assay (CTA) is a short-term in vitro assay recommended as an alternative method for testing the carcinogenic potential of chemicals. SHE cells are "normal" cells since they are diploid, genetically stable, non-tumourigenic, and have metabolic capabilities for the activation of some classes of carcinogens. The CTA, first developed in the 1960s by Berwald and Sachs (1963,1964) [3,4], is based on the change of the phenotypic feature of cell colonies expressing the first steps of the conversion of normal to neoplastic-like cells with oncogenic properties. Pienta et al. (1977) [22] developed a protocol using cryopreserved cells to enhance practicality of the assay and limit sources of variability. Several variants of the assay are currently in use, which mainly differ by the pH at which the assay is performed. We present here the common version of the SHE pH 6.7 CTA and SHE pH 7.0 CTA protocols used in the ECVAM (European Centre for the Validation of Alternative Methods) prevalidation study on CTA reported in this issue. It is recommended that this protocol, in combination with the photo catalogues presented in this issue, should be used in the future and serve as a basis for the development of the OECD test guideline. PMID:22198328

  10. Screening ToxCast™ Phase I Chemicals in a Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Adherent Cell Differentiation and Cytotoxicity (ACDC) Assay

    EPA Science Inventory

    An Adherent Cell Differentiation and Cytotoxicity (ACDC) in vitro assay with mouse embryonic stem cells was used to screen the ToxCast Phase I chemical library for effects on cellular differentiation and cell number. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) established the ...

  11. MAMMALIAN CELL CULTURE ASSAY TO QUANTITATE CHEMICALLY INDUCED ANEUPLOIDY: USE OF A MONOCHROMOSOMAL HUMAN/MOUSE CELL HYBRID

    EPA Science Inventory

    A short-term assay utilizing a human/mouse monochromosomal hybrid cell line R3-5, to detect chemically induced aneuploidy in mammalian cells is described. A single human chromosome transferred into mouse cells was used as a cytogenetic marker to quantitate abnormal chromosome seg...

  12. Macrophage Infection via Selective Capture of HIV-1-Infected CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, Amy E.; Russell, Rebecca A.; Duncan, Christopher J.A.; Moore, Michael D.; Willberg, Christian B.; Pablos, Jose L.; Finzi, Andrés; Kaufmann, Daniel E.; Ochsenbauer, Christina; Kappes, John C.; Groot, Fedde; Sattentau, Quentin J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Macrophages contribute to HIV-1 pathogenesis by forming a viral reservoir and mediating neurological disorders. Cell-free HIV-1 infection of macrophages is inefficient, in part due to low plasma membrane expression of viral entry receptors. We find that macrophages selectively capture and engulf HIV-1-infected CD4+ T cells leading to efficient macrophage infection. Infected T cells, both healthy and dead or dying, were taken up through viral envelope glycoprotein-receptor-independent interactions, implying a mechanism distinct from conventional virological synapse formation. Macrophages infected by this cell-to-cell route were highly permissive for both CCR5-using macrophage-tropic and otherwise weakly macrophage-tropic transmitted/founder viruses but restrictive for nonmacrophage-tropic CXCR4-using virus. These results have implications for establishment of the macrophage reservoir and HIV-1 dissemination in vivo. PMID:25467409

  13. Dendritic cell-based in vitro assays for vaccine immunogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Vandebriel, Rob J.; Hoefnagel, Marcel H.N.

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are pivotal in the induction of adaptive immune responses because they can activate naive T-cells. Moreover, they steer these adaptive immune responses by integrating various stimuli, such as from different pathogen associated molecular patterns and the cytokine milieu. Immature DC are very well capable of ingesting protein antigens, whereas mature DC are efficient presenters of peptides to naive T cells. Human DC can be readily cultured from peripheral blood mononuclear cells, which are isolated from human blood. There is a strong need to monitor in a high-throughput fashion the immunogenicity of candidate vaccines during the process of vaccine development. Furthermore, regulators require efficacy and safety testing for batch release. For some vaccines, these tests require animal testing, causing pain and discomfort, which cannot be contested because it would interfere with the test results. With the aims of promoting vaccine development and reducing the number of animals for batch release testing, we propose to use more broadly human DC for vaccine immunogenicity testing. In this commentary, this proposition is illustrated by several examples in which the maturation of human DC was successfully used to test for vaccine and adjuvant immunogenicity. PMID:22951585

  14. Objective scoring of transformed foci in BALB/c 3T3 cell transformation assay by statistical image descriptors.

    PubMed

    Urani, C; Corvi, R; Callegaro, G; Stefanini, F M

    2013-09-01

    In vitro cell transformation assays (CTAs) have been shown to model important stages of in vivo carcinogenesis and have the potential to predict carcinogenicity in humans. Advantages of CTAs are their ability of revealing both genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens while reducing both experimental costs and the number of animals used. The endpoint of the CTA is foci formation, and requires classification under light microscopy based on morphology. Thus current limitations for the wide adoption of the assay partially depend on a fair degree of subjectivity in foci scoring. An objective evaluation may be obtained after separating foci from background monolayer in the digital image, and quantifying values of statistical descriptors which are selected to capture eye-scored morphological features. The aim of this study was to develop statistical descriptors to be applied to transformed foci of BALB/c 3T3, which cover foci size, multilayering and invasive cell growth into the background monolayer. Proposed descriptors were applied to a database of 407 foci images to explore the numerical features, and to illustrate open problems and potential solutions. PMID:23820182

  15. Bone marrow stromal cell assays – in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Robey, Pamela Gehron; Kuznetsov, Sergei A.; Riminucci, Mara; Bianco, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Summary Populations of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs, also known as bone marrow-derived “mesenchymal stem cells”) contain a a subset of cells that are able to recapitulate the formation of a bone/marrow organ (skeletal stem cells, SSCs). The biological properties of BMSC cultures are assessed by a variety of assays, both in vitro and in vivo. Application of these assays in an appropriate fashion provide a great deal of information on the role of BMSCs, and the subset of SSCs, in health and in disease. PMID:24482181

  16. Nonchromatographic assay for expression of the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene in eukaryotic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sleigh, M.J.

    1986-01-01

    A rapid procedure is described for assaying chloramphenicol acetyltranserase (CAT) enzyme activity following transfection of the CAT gene into eukaryotic cells. CAT enzyme activity in cell extracts catalyzes the transfer of (/sup 14/C)acetyl groups from labeled acetyl coenzyme A to unlabeled chloramphenicol. Labeled reaction product is quantitated by liquid scintillation counting after extraction into ethyl acetate. The method is valid for use with transfected cell extracts only if the extracts are first heated to 65/sup 0/C to remove a factor which degrades acetyl coenzyme A. The revised procedure offers considerable advantages in speed and ease of performance over the chromatographic assay in current use.

  17. In vitro red blood cell assay for oxidant toxicity of petroleum oil

    SciTech Connect

    Couillard, C.M.; Leighton, F.A. )

    1993-05-01

    Petroleum oil has caused hemolytic anemia in birds and mammals. In birds, an oxidant damage on circulating red cells has been identified as the primary toxic effect of ingested petroleum oils. An in vitro red blood cell assay was developed to discriminate among the oxidant activities of different petroleum oils. The assay used rabbit red blood cells with a rat liver enzyme system and formation of methemoglobin was measured as an indicator of oxidant damage to the red cells. The assay was applied to five different petroleum oils and to naphthalene, a petroleum hydrocarbon known to cause hemolytic anemia. Different petroleum oils differed in their capacity to induce methemoglobin formation. Methemoglobin levels varied from 2.9% with Arabian light crude oil to 6.2% with South Louisiana crude oil. Naphthalene induced formation of up to 37% methemoglobin. Naphthalene and the five petroleum oils generated methemoglobin only in the presence of liver enzymes.

  18. [Detection of viable metabolically active yeast cells using a colorimetric assay].

    PubMed

    Růzicka, F; Holá, V

    2008-02-01

    The increasing concern of yeasts able to form biofilm brings about the need for susceptibility testing of both planktonic and biofilm cells. Detection of viability or metabolic activity of yeast cells after exposure to antimicrobials plays a key role in the assessment of susceptibility testing results. Colorimetric assays based on the color change of the medium in the presence of metabolically active cells proved suitable for this purpose. In this study, the usability of a colorimetric assay with the resazurin redox indicator for monitoring the effect of yeast inoculum density on the reduction rate was tested. As correlation between the color change rate and inoculum density was observed, approximate quantification of viable cells was possible. The assay would be of relevance to antifungal susceptibility testing in both planktonic and biofilm yeasts. PMID:18318392

  19. MONOCHROMOSOMAL HYBRID CELL ASSAY FOR EVALUATING THE GENOTOXICITY OF ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The development and utilization of a monochromosomal hybrid cell assay for detecting aneuploidy and chromosomal aberrations are described. The monochromosomal hybrid cell lines were produced by a two-step process involving transfer of a marker bacterial gene to a human chromosome...

  20. CYTOTOXICITY OF CHEMICAL CARCINOGENS TOWARDS HUMAN BRONCHIAL EPITHELIAL CELLS EVALUATED IN A CLONAL ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Survival of human bronchial epithelial cells after administration of four chemical carcinogens was measured in a clonal assay. Human bronchial epithelial cells were obtained from outgrowths of explanted tissue pieces. Serum-free medium was used for both explant culture and clonal...

  1. A novel live cell assay to measure diacylglycerol lipase α activity.

    PubMed

    Singh, Praveen K; Markwick, Rachel; Howell, Fiona V; Williams, Gareth; Doherty, Patrick

    2016-06-01

    Diacylglycerol lipase α (DAGLα) hydrolyses DAG to generate the principal endocannabinoid (eCB) 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) in the central nervous system. DAGLα dependent cannabinoid (CB) signalling has been implicated in numerous processes including axonal growth and guidance, adult neurogenesis and retrograde signalling at the synapse. Recent studies have implicated DAGLα as an emerging drug target for several conditions including pain and obesity. Activity assays are critical to the drug discovery process; however, measurement of diacylglycerol lipase (DAGL) activity using its native substrate generally involves low-throughput MS techniques. Some relatively high-throughput membrane based assays utilizing surrogate substrates have been reported, but these do not take into account the rate-limiting effects often associated with the ability of a drug to cross the cell membrane. In the present study, we report the development of a live cell assay to measure DAGLα activity. Two previously reported DAGLα surrogate substrates, p-nitrophenyl butyrate (PNPB) and 6,8-difluoro-4-methylumbelliferyl octanoate (DiFMUO), were evaluated for their ability to detect DAGLα activity in live cell assays using a human cell line stably expressing the human DAGLα transgene. Following optimization, the small molecule chromogenic substrate PNPB proved to be superior by providing lower background activity along with a larger signal window between transfected and parental cells when compared with the fluorogenic substrate DiFMUO. The assay was further validated using established DAGL inhibitors. In summary, the live cell DAGLα assay reported here offers an economical and convenient format to screen for novel inhibitors as part of drug discovery programmes and compliments previously reported high-throughput membrane based DAGL assays. PMID:27013337

  2. A Neutralizing Antibody Assay Based on a Reporter of Antibody-Dependent Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuling; Li, Jia J; Kim, Hyun Jun; Liu, Xu; Liu, Weiyi; Akhgar, Ahmad; Bowen, Michael A; Spitz, Susan; Jiang, Xu-Rong; Roskos, Lorin K; White, Wendy I

    2015-11-01

    Benralizumab is a humanized anti-IL5 receptor α (IL5Rα) monoclonal antibody (mAb) with enhanced (afucosylation) antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) function. An ADCC reporter cell-based neutralizing antibody (NAb) assay was developed and characterized to detect NAb against benralizumab in human serum to support the clinical development of benralizumab. The optimal ratio of target cells to effector cells was 3:1. Neither parental benralizumab (fucosylated) nor benralizumab Fab resulted in ADCC activity, confirming the requirement for ADCC activity in the NAb assay. The serum tolerance of the cells was determined to be 2.5%. The cut point derived from normal and asthma serum samples was comparable. The effective range of benralizumab was determined, and 35 ng/mL [80% maximal effective concentration (EC80)] was chosen as the standard concentration to run in the assessment of NAb. An affinity purified goat anti-benralizumab polyclonal idiotype antibody preparation was shown to have NAb since it inhibited ADCC activity in a dose-dependent fashion. The low endogenous concentrations of IL5 and soluble IL5 receptor (sIL5R) did not demonstrate to interfere with the assay. The estimated assay sensitivities at the cut point were 1.02 and 1.10 μg/mL as determined by the surrogate neutralizing goat polyclonal and mouse monoclonal anti-drug antibody (ADA) controls, respectively. The assay can detect NAb (at 2.5 μg/mL) in the presence of 0.78 μg/mL benralizumab. The assay was not susceptible to non-specific matrix effects. This study provides an approach and feasibility of developing an ADCC cell-based NAb assay to support biopharmaceuticals with an ADCC function. PMID:26205082

  3. A novel live cell assay to measure diacylglycerol lipase α activity

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Praveen K.; Markwick, Rachel; Howell, Fiona V.; Williams, Gareth; Doherty, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Diacylglycerol lipase α (DAGLα) hydrolyses DAG to generate the principal endocannabinoid (eCB) 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) in the central nervous system. DAGLα dependent cannabinoid (CB) signalling has been implicated in numerous processes including axonal growth and guidance, adult neurogenesis and retrograde signalling at the synapse. Recent studies have implicated DAGLα as an emerging drug target for several conditions including pain and obesity. Activity assays are critical to the drug discovery process; however, measurement of diacylglycerol lipase (DAGL) activity using its native substrate generally involves low-throughput MS techniques. Some relatively high-throughput membrane based assays utilizing surrogate substrates have been reported, but these do not take into account the rate-limiting effects often associated with the ability of a drug to cross the cell membrane. In the present study, we report the development of a live cell assay to measure DAGLα activity. Two previously reported DAGLα surrogate substrates, p-nitrophenyl butyrate (PNPB) and 6,8-difluoro-4-methylumbelliferyl octanoate (DiFMUO), were evaluated for their ability to detect DAGLα activity in live cell assays using a human cell line stably expressing the human DAGLα transgene. Following optimization, the small molecule chromogenic substrate PNPB proved to be superior by providing lower background activity along with a larger signal window between transfected and parental cells when compared with the fluorogenic substrate DiFMUO. The assay was further validated using established DAGL inhibitors. In summary, the live cell DAGLα assay reported here offers an economical and convenient format to screen for novel inhibitors as part of drug discovery programmes and compliments previously reported high-throughput membrane based DAGL assays. PMID:27013337

  4. Measurement of Separase Proteolytic Activity in Single Living Cells by a Fluorogenic Flow Cytometry Assay

    PubMed Central

    Haaß, Wiltrud; Kleiner, Helga; Müller, Martin C.; Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten; Fabarius, Alice; Seifarth, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    ESPL1/Separase, an endopeptidase, is required for centrosome duplication and separation of sister-chromatides in anaphase of mitosis. Overexpression and deregulated proteolytic activity of Separase as frequently observed in human cancers is associated with the occurrence of supernumerary centrosomes, chromosomal missegregation and aneuploidy. Recently, we have hypothesized that increased Separase proteolytic activity in a small subpopulation of tumor cells may serve as driver of tumor heterogeneity and clonal evolution in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Currently, there is no quantitative assay to measure Separase activity levels in single cells. Therefore, we have designed a flow cytometry-based assay that utilizes a Cy5- and rhodamine 110 (Rh110)-biconjugated Rad21 cleavage site peptide ([Cy5-D-R-E-I-M-R]2-Rh110) as smart probe and intracellular substrate for detection of Separase enzyme activity in living cells. As measured by Cy5 fluorescence the cellular uptake of the fluorogenic peptide was fast and reached saturation after 210 min of incubation in human histiocytic lymphoma U937 cells. Separase activity was recorded as the intensity of Rh110 fluorescence released after intracellular peptide cleavage providing a linear signal gain within a 90–180 min time slot. Compared to conventional cell extract-based methods the flow cytometric assay delivers equivalent results but is more reliable, bypasses the problem of vague loading controls and unspecific proteolysis associated with whole cell extracts. Especially suited for the investigaton of blood- and bone marrow-derived hematopoietic cells the flow cytometric Separase assay allows generation of Separase activity profiles that tell about the number of Separase positive cells within a sample i.e. cells that currently progress through mitosis and about the range of intercellular variation in Separase activity levels within a cell population. The assay was used to quantify Separase proteolytic activity in leukemic

  5. Mixture models for single-cell assays with applications to vaccine studies.

    PubMed

    Finak, Greg; McDavid, Andrew; Chattopadhyay, Pratip; Dominguez, Maria; De Rosa, Steve; Roederer, Mario; Gottardo, Raphael

    2014-01-01

    Blood and tissue are composed of many functionally distinct cell subsets. In immunological studies, these can be measured accurately only using single-cell assays. The characterization of these small cell subsets is crucial to decipher system-level biological changes. For this reason, an increasing number of studies rely on assays that provide single-cell measurements of multiple genes and proteins from bulk cell samples. A common problem in the analysis of such data is to identify biomarkers (or combinations of biomarkers) that are differentially expressed between two biological conditions (e.g. before/after stimulation), where expression is defined as the proportion of cells expressing that biomarker (or biomarker combination) in the cell subset(s) of interest. Here, we present a Bayesian hierarchical framework based on a beta-binomial mixture model for testing for differential biomarker expression using single-cell assays. Our model allows the inference to be subject specific, as is typically required when assessing vaccine responses, while borrowing strength across subjects through common prior distributions. We propose two approaches for parameter estimation: an empirical-Bayes approach using an Expectation-Maximization algorithm and a fully Bayesian one based on a Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm. We compare our method against classical approaches for single-cell assays including Fisher's exact test, a likelihood ratio test, and basic log-fold changes. Using several experimental assays measuring proteins or genes at single-cell level and simulations, we show that our method has higher sensitivity and specificity than alternative methods. Additional simulations show that our framework is also robust to model misspecification. Finally, we demonstrate how our approach can be extended to testing multivariate differential expression across multiple biomarker combinations using a Dirichlet-multinomial model and illustrate this approach using single-cell gene

  6. Surface-modified hyaluronic acid hydrogels to capture endothelial progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Camci-Unal, Gulden; Aubin, Hug; Ahari, Amirhossein Farajzadeh; Bae, Hojae; Nichol, Jason William; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2010-10-21

    A major challenge to the effective treatment of injured cardiovascular tissues is the promotion of endothelialization of damaged tissues and implanted devices. For this reason, there is a need for new biomaterials that promote endothelialization to enhance vascular repair. The goal of this work was to develop antibody-modified polysaccharide-based hydrogels that could selectively capture endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs). We showed that CD34 antibody immobilization on hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogels provides a suitable surface to capture EPCs. The effect of CD34 antibody immobilization on EPC adhesion was found to be dependent on antibody concentration. The highest level of EPC attachment was found to be 52.2 cells per mm(2) on 1% HA gels modified with 25 μg mL(-1) antibody concentration. Macrophages did not exhibit significant attachment on these modified hydrogel surfaces compared to the EPCs, demonstrating the selectivity of the system. Hydrogels containing only HA, with or without immobilized CD34, did not allow for spreading of EPCs 48 h after cell seeding, even though the cells were adhered to the hydrogel surface. To promote spreading of EPCs, 2% (w/v) gelatin methacrylate (GelMA) containing HA hydrogels were synthesized and shown to improve cell spreading and elongation. This strategy could potentially be useful to enhance the biocompatibility of implants such as artificial heart valves or in other tissue engineering applications where formation of vascular structures is required. PMID:22368689

  7. A Molecular Assay for Sensitive Detection of Pathogen-Specific T-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kasprowicz, Victoria O.; Mitchell, Jessica E.; Chetty, Shivan; Govender, Pamla; Huang, Kuan-Hsiang Gary; Fletcher, Helen A.; Webster, Daniel P.; Brown, Sebastian; Kasmar, Anne; Millington, Kerry; Day, Cheryl L.; Mkhwanazi, Nompumelelo; McClurg, Cheryl; Chonco, Fundisiwe; Lalvani, Ajit; Walker, Bruce D.; Ndung'u, Thumbi; Klenerman, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Here we describe the development and validation of a highly sensitive assay of antigen-specific IFN-γ production using real time quantitative PCR (qPCR) for two reporters - monokine-induced by IFN-γ (MIG) and the IFN-γ inducible protein-10 (IP10). We developed and validated the assay and applied it to the detection of CMV, HIV and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) specific responses, in a cohort of HIV co-infected patients. We compared the sensitivity of this assay to that of the ex vivo RD1 (ESAT-6 and CFP-10)-specific IFN-γ Elispot assay. We observed a clear quantitative correlation between the two assays (P<0.001). Our assay proved to be a sensitive assay for the detection of MTB-specific T cells, could be performed on whole blood samples of fingerprick (50 uL) volumes, and was not affected by HIV-mediated immunosuppression. This assay platform is potentially of utility in diagnosis of infection in this and other clinical settings. PMID:21853018

  8. Monitoring of cell viability and proliferation in hydrogel-encapsulated system by resazurin assay.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jing; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Jianzheng; Yu, Weiting; Wang, Wei; Ma, Xiaojun

    2010-11-01

    Cell microencapsulation is a promising approach for cell implantation, cell-based gene therapy and large-scale cell culture. For better quality control, it is important to accurately measure the microencapsulated cell viability and proliferation in the culture. A number of assays have been used for this purpose, but limitations arise. In this study, we investigated the feasibility and reliability of resazurin as a cell growth indicator in microencapsulated culture system. According to the experiment data, there was a reversible, time- and dose-dependent growth inhibition as observed for resazurin application in encapsulated cells. A positive relationship was observed between reduction of resazurin and CHO cell number in microcapsule. Moreover, the resazurin assay provided an equivalent result to the commonly used MTT method in determining CHO cell proliferation in APA microcapsule with no notable influence on cell distribution and organization pattern. In conclusion, resazurin assay is offered as a simple, rapid and non-invasive method for in vitro microencapsulated cell viability and proliferation measurement. PMID:20437208

  9. High-Content Assays for Hepatotoxicity Using Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell–Derived Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sirenko, Oksana; Hesley, Jayne; Rusyn, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Development of predictive in vitro assays for early toxicity evaluation is extremely important for improving the drug development process and reducing drug attrition rates during clinical development. High-content imaging-based in vitro toxicity assays are emerging as efficient tools for safety and efficacy testing to improve drug development efficiency. In this report we have used an induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)–derived hepatocyte cell model having a primary tissue-like phenotype, unlimited availability, and the potential to compare cells from different individuals. We examined a number of assays and phenotypic markers and developed automated screening methods for assessing multiparameter readouts of general and mechanism-specific hepatotoxicity. Endpoints assessed were cell viability, nuclear shape, average and integrated cell area, mitochondrial membrane potential, phospholipid accumulation, cytoskeleton integrity, and apoptosis. We assayed compounds with known mechanisms of toxicity and also evaluated a diverse hepatotoxicity library of 240 compounds. We conclude that high-content automated screening assays using iPSC-derived hepatocytes are feasible, provide information about mechanisms of toxicity, and can facilitate the safety assessment of drugs and chemicals. PMID:24229356

  10. Automated platform for sensor-based monitoring and controlled assays of living cells and tissues.

    PubMed

    Wolf, P; Brischwein, M; Kleinhans, R; Demmel, F; Schwarzenberger, T; Pfister, C; Wolf, B

    2013-12-15

    Cellular assays have become a fundamental technique in scientific research, pharmaceutical drug screening or toxicity testing. Therefore, the requirements of technical developments for automated assays raised in the same rate. A novel measuring platform was developed, which combines automated assay processing with label-free high-content measuring and real-time monitoring of multiple metabolic and morphologic parameters of living cells or tissues. Core of the system is a test plate with 24 cell culture wells, each equipped with opto-chemical sensor-spots for the determination of cellular oxygen consumption and extracellular acidification, next to electrode-structures for electrical impedance sensing. An automated microscope provides the optical sensor read-out and allows continuous cell imaging. Media and drugs are supplied by a pipetting robot system. Therefore, assay can run over several days without personnel interaction. To demonstrate the performance of the platform in physiologic assays, we continuously recorded the kinetics of metabolic and morphologic parameters of MCF-7 breast cancer cells under the influence of the cytotoxin chloroacetaldehyde. The data point out the time resolved effect kinetics over the complete treatment period. Thereby, the measuring platform overcomes problems of endpoint tests, which cannot monitor the kinetics of different parameters of the same cell population over longer time periods. PMID:23838277

  11. Identification of HDAC Inhibitors Using a Cell-Based HDAC I/II Assay.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chia-Wen; Shou, David; Huang, Ruili; Khuc, Thai; Dai, Sheng; Zheng, Wei; Klumpp-Thomas, Carleen; Xia, Menghang

    2016-07-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are a class of epigenetic enzymes that regulate gene expression by histone deacetylation. Altered HDAC function has been linked to cancer and neurodegenerative diseases, making HDACs popular therapeutic targets. In this study, we describe a screening approach for identification of compounds that inhibit endogenous class I and II HDACs. A homogeneous, luminogenic HDAC I/II assay was optimized in a 1536-well plate format in several human cancer cell lines, including HCT116 and human neural stem cells. The assay confirmed 37 known HDAC inhibitors from two libraries of known epigenetics-active compounds. Using the assay, we identified a group of potential HDAC inhibitors by screening the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) Pharmaceutical Collection of 2527 small-molecule drugs. The selected compounds showed similar HDAC I/II inhibitory potency and efficacy values in both HCT116 and neural stem cells. Several previously unidentified HDAC inhibitors were further evaluated and profiled for their selectivity against a panel of 10 HDAC I/II isoforms using fluorogenic HDAC biochemical assays. In summary, our results show that several novel HDAC inhibitors, including nafamostat and piceatannol, have been identified using the HDAC I/II cell-based assay, and multiple cell types have been validated for high-throughput screening of large chemical libraries. PMID:26858181

  12. Cell-Binding Assays for Determining the Affinity of Protein-Protein Interactions: Technologies and Considerations.

    PubMed

    Hunter, S A; Cochran, J R

    2016-01-01

    Determining the equilibrium-binding affinity (Kd) of two interacting proteins is essential not only for the biochemical study of protein signaling and function but also for the engineering of improved protein and enzyme variants. One common technique for measuring protein-binding affinities uses flow cytometry to analyze ligand binding to proteins presented on the surface of a cell. However, cell-binding assays require specific considerations to accurately quantify the binding affinity of a protein-protein interaction. Here we will cover the basic assumptions in designing a cell-based binding assay, including the relevant equations and theory behind determining binding affinities. Further, two major considerations in measuring binding affinities-time to equilibrium and ligand depletion-will be discussed. As these conditions have the potential to greatly alter the Kd, methods through which to avoid or minimize them will be provided. We then outline detailed protocols for performing direct- and competitive-binding assays against proteins displayed on the surface of yeast or mammalian cells that can be used to derive accurate Kd values. Finally, a comparison of cell-based binding assays to other types of binding assays will be presented. PMID:27586327

  13. A Homogeneous Cell-Based Assay for Measurement of Endogenous PON1 Activity

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Syed; Carter, Jade J.; Scott, John E.

    2010-01-01

    PON1 is a high density lipoprotein-associated enzyme that plays an important role in organophosphate detoxification and prevention of atherosclerosis. Thus, there is significant interest in identifying nutritional and pharmacological enhancers of PON1 activity. In order to identify such compounds, we developed a rapid homogeneous assay to detect endogenous cell-associated PON1 activity. PON1 activity was measured by the simple addition of fluorigenic PON1 substrate DEPFMU to live Huh7 cells in media and monitoring change in fluorescence. A specific PON1 inhibitor, 2-hydroxyquinoline, was used to confirm that the observed activity was due to PON1. The assay was optimized and characterized with regard to time course, substrate and sodium chloride concentration, number of cells and tolerance to DMSO and serum. Aspirin, quercetin and simvastatin are compounds reported to increase PON1 expression. Consistent with the literature and western blot data, these compounds enhanced PON1 activity in this assay with comparable efficacies and potencies. A known toxic compound did not increase assay signal. This assay method also detected PON1 activity in normal hepatocytes. Thus, a novel, homogenous assay for detection of endogenous PON1 expression has been developed and is amenable to high throughput screening for the identification of small molecules that enhance PON1 expression. PMID:20096260

  14. Micro-abrasion package capture cell experiment on the trailing edge of LDEF: Impactor chemistry and whipple bumper shield efficiencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzgerald, Howard J.; Yano, Hajime

    1995-01-01

    Four of the eight available double layer microparticle capture cells, flown as the experiment A0023 on the trailing (West) face of LDEF, have been extensively studied. An investigation of the chemistry of impactors has been made using SEM/EDX techniques and the effectiveness of the capture cells as bumper shields has also been examined. Studies of these capture cells gave positive EDX results, with 53 percent of impact sites indicating the presence of some chemical residues, the predominant residue identified as being silicon in varying quantities.

  15. Miniaturization of mitotic index cell-based assay using "wall-less" plate technology.

    PubMed

    Le Guezennec, Xavier; Phong, Mark; Nor, Liyana; Kim, Namyong

    2014-03-01

    The use of microscopic imaging for the accurate assessment of cells in mitosis is hampered by the round morphology of mitotic cells, which renders them poorly adherent and highly susceptible to loss during the washing stage of cell-based assays. Here, to circumvent these limitations, we make use of DropArray, a recent technology that allows high retention of weakly adherent cells and suspension cells. DropArray offers the competitive advantage of maintaining the classic high throughput format of microtiter plates while reducing classic microwell volume by up to 90% by using a drop format. Here, we present a mitotic index cell-based assay using the mitosis marker phospho histone H3 at serine 10 on a DropArray 384-well plate format. Dose-response curve analysis of the mitotic index assay with an antimitotic drug (docetaxel) on DropArray is presented that shows an effective dosage compared to previous established results similar to those obtained with conventional microtiter plates. The mitotic index assay with DropArray showed a Z-factor >0.6. Our results validate DropArray as a suitable platform for high throughput screening for compounds affecting mitosis or the cell cycle. PMID:24611478

  16. Capture and Release of Cancer Cells by Combining On-Chip Purification and Off-Chip Enzymatic Treatment.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaolei; Wang, Bingrui; Zhang, Nangang; Yin, Changqing; Chen, Hao; Zhang, Lingling; Cai, Bo; He, Zhaobo; Rao, Lang; Liu, Wei; Wang, Fu-Bing; Guo, Shi-Shang; Zhao, Xing-Zhong

    2015-11-01

    As "liquid biopsies", circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have been thought to hold significant insights for cancer diagnosis and treatment. Despite the advances of microfluidic techniques that improve the capture of CTCs to a certain extent, recovering the captured CTCs with enhanced purity at the same time remains a challenge. Here, by combining on-chip purification and off-chip enzymatic treatment, we demonstrate a two-stage strategy to enhance the purity of captured cancer cells from blood samples. The on-chip purification introduces a stirring flow to increase the capture sensitivity and decrease nonspecifically bounded cells. The off-chip enzymatic treatment enables the cancer cells to be released from the attached magnetic beads, further improving the purity and enabling next reculture. For the proof-of-concept study, spiked cancer cells are successfully obtained from unprocessed whole blood with high recovery rate (∼68%) and purity (∼61%), facilitating subsequent RNA expression analysis. PMID:26488449

  17. Human mast cells capture, store, and release bioactive, exogenous IL-17A.

    PubMed

    Noordenbos, Troy; Blijdorp, Iris; Chen, Sijia; Stap, Jan; Mul, Erik; Cañete, Juan D; Lubberts, Erik; Yeremenko, Nataliya; Baeten, Dominique

    2016-09-01

    IL-17A, a major proinflammatory cytokine, can be produced by a variety of leukocytes, but its exact cellular source in human inflammatory diseases remains incompletely understood. IL-17A protein is abundantly found in mast cells in human tissues, such as inflamed synovium, but surprisingly, mechanistic murine studies failed to demonstrate IL-17A production by mast cells. Here, we demonstrate that primary human tissue mast cells do not produce IL-17A themselves but actively capture exogenous IL-17A through receptor-mediated endocytosis. The exogenous IL-17A is stored in intracellular granules and can subsequently be released in a bioactive form. This novel mechanism confers to mast cells the capacity to steer IL-17A-mediated tissue inflammation by the rapid release of preformed cytokine. PMID:27034403

  18. Clausmarin A, Potential Immunosuppressant Revealed by Yeast-Based Assay and Interleukin-2 Production Assay in Jurkat T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Suauam, Pitipreya; Yingyongnarongkul, Boon-ek; Palaga, Tanapat; Miyakawa, Tokichi; Yompakdee, Chulee

    2015-01-01

    Small-molecule inhibitors of Ca2+-signaling pathways are of medicinal importance, as exemplified by the immunosuppressants FK506 and cyclosporin A. Using a yeast-based assay devised for the specific detection of Ca2+-signaling inhibitors, clausmarin A, a previously reported terpenoid coumarin, was identified as an active substance. Here, we investigated the likely mechanism of clausmarin A action in yeast and Jurkat T-cells. In the presence of 100 mM CaCl2 in the growth medium of Ca2+-sensitive Δzds1 strain yeast, clausmarin A exhibited a dose-dependent alleviation of various defects due to hyperactivation of Ca2+ signaling, such as growth inhibition, polarized bud growth and G2 phase cell-cycle arrest. Furthermore, clausmarin A inhibited the growth of Δmpk1 (lacking the Mpk1 MAP kinase pathway) but not Δcnb1 (lacking the calcineurin pathway) strain, suggesting that clausmarin A inhibited the calcineurin pathway as presumed from the synthetic lethality of these pathways. Furthermore, clausmarin A alleviated the serious defects of a strain expressing a constitutively active form of calcineurin. In the human Jurkat T-cell line, clausmarin A exhibited a dose-dependent inhibition of IL-2 production and IL-2 gene transcription, as well as an inhibition of NFAT dephosphorylation. The effects of clausmarin A observed in both yeast and Jurkat cells are basically similar to those of FK506. Our study revealed that clausmarin A is an inhibitor of the calcineurin pathway, and that this is probably mediated via inhibition of calcineurin phosphatase activity. As such, clausmarin A is a potential immunosuppressant. PMID:26313553

  19. Energy capture from thermolytic solutions in microbial reverse-electrodialysis cells.

    PubMed

    Cusick, Roland D; Kim, Younggy; Logan, Bruce E

    2012-03-23

    Reverse electrodialysis allows for the capture of energy from salinity gradients between salt and fresh waters, but potential applications are currently limited to coastal areas and the need for a large number of membrane pairs. Using salt solutions that could be continuously regenerated with waste heat (≥40°C) and conventional technologies would allow much wider applications of salinity-gradient power production. We used reverse electrodialysis ion-exchange membrane stacks in microbial reverse-electrodialysis cells to efficiently capture salinity-gradient energy from ammonium bicarbonate salt solutions. The maximum power density using acetate reached 5.6 watts per square meter of cathode surface area, which was five times that produced without the dialysis stack, and 3.0 ± 0.05 watts per square meter with domestic wastewater. Maximum energy recovery with acetate reached 30 ± 0.5%. PMID:22383807

  20. A simple non-perturbing cell migration assay insensitive to proliferation effects.

    PubMed

    Glenn, Honor L; Messner, Jacob; Meldrum, Deirdre R

    2016-01-01

    Migration is a fundamental cellular behavior that plays an indispensable role in development and homeostasis, but can also contribute to pathology such as cancer metastasis. Due to its relevance to many aspects of human health, the ability to accurately measure cell migration is of broad interest, and numerous approaches have been developed. One of the most commonly employed approaches, because of its simplicity and throughput, is the exclusion zone assay in which cells are allowed to migrate into an initially cell-free region. A major drawback of this assay is that it relies on simply counting cells in the exclusion zone and therefore cannot distinguish the effects of proliferation from migration. We report here a simple modification to the exclusion zone migration assay that exclusively measures cell migration and is not affected by proliferation. This approach makes use of a lineage-tracing vital stain that is retained through cell generations and effectively reads out migration relative to the original, parental cell population. This modification is simple, robust, non-perturbing, and inexpensive. We validate the method in a panel of cell lines under conditions that inhibit or promote migration and demonstrate its use in normal and cancer cell lines as well as primary cells. PMID:27535324

  1. A simple non-perturbing cell migration assay insensitive to proliferation effects

    PubMed Central

    Glenn, Honor L.; Messner, Jacob; Meldrum, Deirdre R.

    2016-01-01

    Migration is a fundamental cellular behavior that plays an indispensable role in development and homeostasis, but can also contribute to pathology such as cancer metastasis. Due to its relevance to many aspects of human health, the ability to accurately measure cell migration is of broad interest, and numerous approaches have been developed. One of the most commonly employed approaches, because of its simplicity and throughput, is the exclusion zone assay in which cells are allowed to migrate into an initially cell-free region. A major drawback of this assay is that it relies on simply counting cells in the exclusion zone and therefore cannot distinguish the effects of proliferation from migration. We report here a simple modification to the exclusion zone migration assay that exclusively measures cell migration and is not affected by proliferation. This approach makes use of a lineage-tracing vital stain that is retained through cell generations and effectively reads out migration relative to the original, parental cell population. This modification is simple, robust, non-perturbing, and inexpensive. We validate the method in a panel of cell lines under conditions that inhibit or promote migration and demonstrate its use in normal and cancer cell lines as well as primary cells. PMID:27535324

  2. Assaying Blood Cell Populations of the Drosophila melanogaster Larva

    PubMed Central

    Petraki, Sophia; Alexander, Brandy; Brückner, Katja

    2015-01-01

    In vertebrates, hematopoiesis is regulated by inductive microenvironments (niches). Likewise, in the invertebrate model organism Drosophila melanogaster, inductive microenvironments known as larval Hematopoietic Pockets (HPs) have been identified as anatomical sites for the development and regulation of blood cells (hemocytes), in particular of the self-renewing macrophage lineage. HPs are segmentally repeated pockets between the epidermis and muscle layers of the larva, which also comprise sensory neurons of the peripheral nervous system. In the larva, resident (sessile) hemocytes are exposed to anti-apoptotic, adhesive and proliferative cues from these sensory neurons and potentially other components of the HPs, such as the lining muscle and epithelial layers. During normal development, gradual release of resident hemocytes from the HPs fuels the population of circulating hemocytes, which culminates in the release of most of the resident hemocytes at the beginning of metamorphosis. Immune assaults, physical injury or mechanical disturbance trigger the premature release of resident hemocytes into circulation. The switch of larval hemocytes between resident locations and circulation raises the need for a common standard/procedure to selectively isolate and quantify these two populations of blood cells from single Drosophila larvae. Accordingly, this protocol describes an automated method to release and quantify the resident and circulating hemocytes from single larvae. The method facilitates ex vivo approaches, and may be adapted to serve a variety of developmental stages of Drosophila and other invertebrate organisms. PMID:26650404

  3. Predictive value of cell assays for developmental toxicity and embryotoxicity of conazole fungicides.

    PubMed

    Dreisig, Karin; Taxvig, Camilla; Birkhøj Kjærstad, Mia; Nellemann, Christine; Hass, Ulla; Vinggaard, Anne Marie

    2013-01-01

    This paper evaluates in vivo predictability of a battery of in vitro tests covering developmental toxicity and embryotoxicity of five widely used conazole fungicides. The conazoles were investigated in the embryonic stem cell test, and data were compared to in vivo embryotoxicity data. The same conazoles were evaluated on the basis of data from a battery of cell assays for endocrine activity, including assays for AR, ER, AhR, and sex hormone synthesis, and data were compared to in vivo developmental toxicity data. Overall, the ranking of the five conazole fungicides based on in vitro data were in reasonably good agreement with available in vivo effects. Ketoconazole and epoxiconazole are the most potent embryotoxic compounds, whereas prochloraz belongs to the most potent developmental toxicants. In conclusion, a rough prediction of the ranking of these conazole fungicides for in vivo toxicity data was possible by a holistic evaluation of data from a panel of cell-based assays. PMID:23861077

  4. GFP-complementation assay to detect functional CPP and protein delivery into living cells

    PubMed Central

    Milech, Nadia; Longville, Brooke AC; Cunningham, Paula T; Scobie, Marie N; Bogdawa, Heique M; Winslow, Scott; Anastasas, Mark; Connor, Theresa; Ong, Ferrer; Stone, Shane R; Kerfoot, Maria; Heinrich, Tatjana; Kroeger, Karen M; Tan, Yew-Foon; Hoffmann, Katrin; Thomas, Wayne R; Watt, Paul M; Hopkins, Richard M

    2015-01-01

    Efficient cargo uptake is essential for cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) therapeutics, which deliver widely diverse cargoes by exploiting natural cell processes to penetrate the cell’s membranes. Yet most current CPP activity assays are hampered by limitations in assessing uptake, including confounding effects of conjugated fluorophores or ligands, indirect read-outs requiring secondary processing, and difficulty in discriminating internalization from endosomally trapped cargo. Split-complementation Endosomal Escape (SEE) provides the first direct assay visualizing true cytoplasmic-delivery of proteins at biologically relevant concentrations. The SEE assay has minimal background, is amenable to high-throughput processes, and adaptable to different transient and stable cell lines. This split-GFP-based platform can be useful to study transduction mechanisms, cellular imaging, and characterizing novel CPPs as pharmaceutical delivery agents in the treatment of disease. PMID:26671759

  5. An assay to measure poly(ADP ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) activity in cells

    PubMed Central

    James, Dominic I.; Durant, Stephen; Eckersley, Kay; Fairweather, Emma; Griffiths, Louise A.; Hamilton, Nicola; Kelly, Paul; O'Connor, Mark; Shea, Kerry; Waddell, Ian D.; Ogilvie, Donald J.

    2016-01-01

    After a DNA damage signal multiple polymers of ADP ribose attached to poly(ADP) ribose (PAR) polymerases (PARPs) are broken down by the enzyme poly(ADP) ribose glycohydrolase (PARG). Inhibition of PARG leads to a failure of DNA repair and small molecule inhibition of PARG has been a goal for many years. To determine whether biochemical inhibitors of PARG are active in cells we have designed an immunofluorescence assay to detect nuclear PAR after DNA damage. This 384-well assay is suitable for medium throughput high-content screening and can detect cell-permeable inhibitors of PARG from nM to µM potency. In addition, the assay has been shown to work in murine cells and in a variety of human cancer cells. Furthermore, the assay is suitable for detecting the DNA damage response induced by treatment with temozolomide and methylmethane sulfonate (MMS). Lastly, the assay has been shown to be robust over a period of several years.

  6. An assay to measure poly(ADP ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) activity in cells.

    PubMed

    James, Dominic I; Durant, Stephen; Eckersley, Kay; Fairweather, Emma; Griffiths, Louise A; Hamilton, Nicola; Kelly, Paul; O'Connor, Mark; Shea, Kerry; Waddell, Ian D; Ogilvie, Donald J

    2016-01-01

    After a DNA damage signal multiple polymers of ADP ribose attached to poly(ADP) ribose (PAR) polymerases (PARPs) are broken down by the enzyme poly(ADP) ribose glycohydrolase (PARG). Inhibition of PARG leads to a failure of DNA repair and small molecule inhibition of PARG has been a goal for many years. To determine whether biochemical inhibitors of PARG are active in cells we have designed an immunofluorescence assay to detect nuclear PAR after DNA damage. This 384-well assay is suitable for medium throughput high-content screening and can detect cell-permeable inhibitors of PARG from nM to µM potency. In addition, the assay has been shown to work in murine cells and in a variety of human cancer cells. Furthermore, the assay is suitable for detecting the DNA damage response induced by treatment with temozolomide and methylmethane sulfonate (MMS). Lastly, the assay has been shown to be robust over a period of several years. PMID:27610220

  7. Effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors on three sex steroids in two versions of the aromatase enzyme inhibition assay and in the H295R cell assay.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Naja Wessel; Hansen, Cecilie Hurup; Nellemann, Christine; Styrishave, Bjarne; Halling-Sørensen, Bent

    2015-10-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are known to have a range of disorders that are often linked to the endocrine system e.g. hormonal imbalances, breast enlargement, sexual dysfunction, and menstrual cycle disorders. The mechanisms behind most of these disorders are not known in details. In this study we investigated whether the endocrine effect due to SSRI exposure could be detected in well adopted in vitro steroidogenesis assays, two versions of the aromatase enzyme inhibition assay and the H295R cell assay. The five drugs citalopram, fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, paroxetine and sertraline, were shown to inhibit the aromatase enzyme in both types of aromatase assays. The IC50 values ranged from 3 to 600 μM. All five SSRIs, were further investigated in the H295R cell line. All compounds altered the steroid secretion from the cells, the lowest observed effect levels were 0.9 μM and 3.1 μM for sertraline and fluvoxamine, respectively. In general the H295R cell assay was more sensitive to SSRI exposure than the two aromatase assays, up to 20 times more sensitive. This indicates that the H295R cell line is a better tool for screening endocrine disrupting effects. Our findings show that the endocrine effects of SSRIs may, at least in part, be due to interference with the steroidogenesis. PMID:26162595

  8. Trajectory-capture cell instrumentation for measurement of dust particle mass, velocity and trajectory, and particle capture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, J. A.; Tuzzolino, A. J.

    1989-01-01

    The development of the polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) dust detector for space missions--such as the Halley Comet Missions where the impact velocity was very high as well as for missions where the impact velocity is low was extended to include: (1) the capability for impact position determination - i.e., x,y coordinate of impact; and (2) the capability for particle velocity determination using two thin PVDF sensors spaced a given distance apart - i.e., by time-of-flight. These developments have led to space flight instrumentation for recovery-type missions, which will measure the masses (sizes), fluxes and trajectories of incoming dust particles and will capture the dust material in a form suitable for later Earth-based laboratory measurements. These laboratory measurements would determine the elemental, isotopic and mineralogical properties of the captured dust and relate these to possible sources of the dust material (i.e., comets, asteroids), using the trajectory information. The instrumentation described here has the unique advantages of providing both orbital characteristics and physical and chemical properties--as well as possible origin--of incoming dust.

  9. Comparison of Analytical and Clinical Performance of HPV 9G DNA Chip, PANArray HPV Genotyping Chip, and Hybrid-Capture II Assay in Cervicovaginal Swabs

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Ho Young; Han, Hye Seung; Kim, Hyo Bin; Oh, Seo Young; Lee, Sun-Joo; Kim, Wook Youn

    2016-01-01

    Background: Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection can be detected by using several molecular methods, including Hybrid-Capture II (HC2) assay and variable HPV DNA chip tests, although each method has different sensitivities and specificities. Methods: We performed HPV 9G DNA Chip (9G) and PANArray HPV Genotyping Chip (PANArray) tests on 118 cervicovaginal swabs and compared the results with HC2, cytology, histology, and direct sequencing results. Results The overall and high-risk HPV (HR-HPV) positivity rates were 62.7% and 44.9% using 9G, and 61.0% and 30.5% using PANArray, respectively. The positivity rates for HR-HPV with these two chips were significantly lower than 55.1% when HC2 was used. The sensitivity of overall HPV positivity in detecting histologically confirmed low-grade cervical squamous intraepithelial lesions or higher was 88.7% for all three tests. The specificity was 58.5% for 9G and 61.5% for PANArray, which was significantly lower than the 72.3% for HC2. With the HR-HPV+ genotype threshold, the sensitivity decreased to 75.5% for 9G and 52.8% for PANArray, which was significantly lower than the 88.7% for HC2. Comparison of the two chips showed concordant results in 55.1% of the samples, compatible results in 16.9%, and discordant results in 28.0%, exhibiting poor agreement in detecting  certain HPV genotypes. Compared with direct sequencing, 9G yielded no discordant results, whereas PANArray yielded 31 discordant results (26.7%). Conclusions Compared with HC2, the HPV genotyping tests showed lower sensitivity in histologic correlation. When the two chips were compared, the 9G was more sensitive and accurate for detecting HR-HPV than the PANArray. PMID:26763506

  10. Different sensitivities of cultured mammalian cells towards aphidicolin-enhanced DNA effects in the comet assay.

    PubMed

    Speit, Günter; Schütz, Petra; Bausinger, Julia

    2016-06-01

    The comet assay in combination with the polymerase inhibitor aphidicolin (APC) has been used to measure DNA excision repair activity, DNA repair kinetics and individual DNA repair capacity. Since APC can enhance genotoxic effects of mutagens measured by the comet assay, this approach has been proposed for increasing the sensitivity of the comet assay in human biomonitoring. The APC-modified comet assay has mainly been performed with human blood and it was shown that it not only enhances the detection of DNA damage repaired by nucleotide excision repair (NER) but also damage typically repaired by base excision repair (BER). Recently, we reported that in contrast to blood leukocytes, A549 cells (a human lung adenocarcinoma cell line) seem to be insensitive towards the repair-inhibiting action of APC. To further elucidate the general usefulness of the APC-modified comet assay for studying repair in cultured mammalian cells, we comparatively investigated further cell lines (HeLa, TK6, V79). DNA damage was induced by BPDE (benzo[a]pyrene-7,8-dihydrodiol-9,10-epoxide) and MMS (methyl methanesulfonate) in the absence and presence of APC (3 or 15μM). APC was either added for 2h together with the mutagen or cells were pre-incubated for 30min with APC before the mutagen was added. The results indicate that the cell lines tested differ fundamentally with regard to their sensitivity and specificity towards the repair-inhibiting effect of APC. The actual cause for these differences is still unclear but potential molecular explanations are discussed. Irrespective of the underlying mechanism(s), our study revealed practical limitations of the use of the APC-modified comet assay. PMID:27265376

  11. Fluorescence assay for the detection of adherent Candida yeasts to target cells in microtest plates.

    PubMed

    Borg-von Zepelin, M; Wagner, T

    1995-01-01

    We describe an assay based on photometric analysis for the measurement of adherence of Candida species to epithelial target cells (Vero cell line). Adherent Candida cells were detected by staining the cells with the fluorescent dye Calcofluor white (CFW), which binds to chitin and glucan in the yeasts. The tests were performed on microtest plates, which were analysed automatically by fluorescence plate readers. The assay is based on the following steps: (i) coating of the microtest plates with target cells (e.g. Vero cells); (ii) infection with Candida: (iii) staining of Candida with CFW; (iv) rinsing to remove non-adherent Candida cells and unbound dye; (v) detection of adherent fluorescent Candida cells. The test was able to detect 4 x 10(4) cells ml-1. The standard deviation was +/- 8%. Day-to-day variation was +/- 10% at most. The adherence of strains of different Candida species was assayed by a standard procedure. The results confirmed the order of adherence, with C. albicans ranking first, followed by C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis and C. glabrata. PMID:8569807

  12. Alkaline nuclear dispersion assays for the determination of DNA damage at the single cell level.

    PubMed

    Sestili, Piero; Fimognari, Carmela

    2014-01-01

    Over the past three decades the development of methods for visualizing at the cell level the extent of DNA breakage significantly contributed to genotoxicity testing: their availability greatly improved the knowledge in the field of genetic toxicology. These procedures are based on the separation and visualization of DNA fragments resulting from cleavage of nuclear DNA. The separation process can be obtained either electrically (comet assay, linear migration of DNA fragments) or chemically (alkaline dispersion assays, radial diffusion of DNA fragments). Once separated and stained, intact and fragmented DNA can be observed with fluorescence or light microscope. Appropriate computer-assisted image analysis allows quantitative determination of the extent of DNA breakage. These procedures have been proven to be sensitive, flexible, and reliable, and, as compared to former methods, they are simpler, are less time and money consuming, and have the unique capability of detecting DNA damage at the single cell level. This last feature has the additional advantage of allowing the identification of cellular subpopulations characterized by different sensitivity to the damaging agent. The fast halo assay (FHA) is currently the simplest and quickest nuclear dispersion assay; recent modifications of FHA have further improved the assay and pave the way to a full exploitation of its analytical potential. In this chapter the development, procedures, applications, and limits of these dispersion assays, with a particular focus on FHA, will be illustrated. PMID:24162979

  13. A rapid and sensitive assay for DNA-protein covalent complexes in living cells.

    PubMed

    Kiianitsa, Kostantin; Maizels, Nancy

    2013-05-01

    A number of proteins form covalent bonds with DNA as obligatory transient intermediates in normal nuclear transactions. Drugs that trap these complexes have proven to be potent therapeutics in both cancer and infectious disease. Nonetheless, current assays for DNA-protein adducts are cumbersome, limiting both mechanistic studies and translational applications. We have developed a rapid and sensitive assay that enables quantitative immunodetection of protein-DNA adducts. This new 'RADAR' (rapid approach to DNA adduct recovery) assay accelerates processing time 4-fold, increases sample throughput 20-fold and requires 50-fold less starting material than the current standard. It can be used to detect topoisomerase 1-DNA adducts in as little as 60 ng of DNA, corresponding to 10 000 human cells. We apply the RADAR assay to demonstrate that expression of SLFN11 does not increase camptothecin sensitivity by promoting accumulation of topoisomerase 1-DNA adducts. The RADAR assay will be useful for analysis of the mechanisms of formation and resolution of DNA-protein adducts in living cells, and identification and characterization of reactions in which covalent DNA adducts are transient intermediates. The assay also has potential application to drug discovery and individualized medicine. PMID:23519618

  14. Semi-microdroplet assay for cell adhesion molecules. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tawa, Lawrence Shinzo

    1988-01-01

    A new cell-to-cell adhesion assay was devised. Using dissociated embryos of the sea urchin, this procedure involves rotating a 0.100 ml suspension of single cells with 0.100 ml of the solution to be tested in the bulb portion of a transfer pipet with the tip removed. After 1 hour of rotation at 60 rpm at 15 C, the contents of each bulb were transferred into individual wells of a 96 well flat bottom plate. After the plate was incubated for 1 hour at 15 C, black and white photographs were taken with a 35 mm camera attached to an inverted photomicroscope. Examining a proof sheet of the negatives directly allowed a rapid evaluation of suspected cell adhesion promoting factors. A ranking system was used to evaluate all samples. The assay was tested by examining the effect of specific solutions on the aggregation of single cells obtained from dissociated 23 hour embryos.

  15. Probing protein complexes inside living cells using a silicon nanowire-based pull-down assay.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sojoong; Kim, Hyunju; Kim, So Yeon; Yang, Eun Gyeong

    2016-06-01

    Most proteins perform their functions as interacting complexes. Here we propose a novel method for capturing an intracellular protein and its interacting partner out of living cells by utilizing intracellular access of antibody modified vertical silicon nanowire arrays whose surface is covered with a polyethylene glycol layer to prevent strong cell adhesion. Such a feature facilitates the removal of cells by simple washing, enabling subsequent detection of a pulled-down protein and its interacting partner, and further assessment of a drug-induced change in the interacting complex. Our new SiNW-based tool is thus suitable for authentication of protein networks inside living cells. PMID:27198202

  16. Isolation of Mouse Hair Follicle Bulge Stem Cells and Their Functional Analysis in a Reconstitution Assay.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ying; Hsieh, Jen-Chih; Escandon, Julia; Cotsarelis, George

    2016-01-01

    The hair follicle (HF) is a dynamic structure readily accessible within the skin, and contains various pools of stem cells that have a broad regenerative potential during normal homeostasis and in response to injury. Recent discoveries demonstrating the multipotent capabilities of hair follicle stem cells and the easy access to skin tissue make the HF an attractive source for isolating stem cells and their subsequent application in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Here, we describe the isolation and purification of hair follicle bulge stem cells from mouse skin, and hair reconstitution assays that allows the functional analysis of multipotent stem cells. PMID:27431247

  17. Editor's Highlight: Analysis of the Effects of Cell Stress and Cytotoxicity on In Vitro Assay Activity Across a Diverse Chemical and Assay Space.

    PubMed

    Judson, Richard; Houck, Keith; Martin, Matt; Richard, Ann M; Knudsen, Thomas B; Shah, Imran; Little, Stephen; Wambaugh, John; Woodrow Setzer, R; Kothya, Parth; Phuong, Jimmy; Filer, Dayne; Smith, Doris; Reif, David; Rotroff, Daniel; Kleinstreuer, Nicole; Sipes, Nisha; Xia, Menghang; Huang, Ruili; Crofton, Kevin; Thomas, Russell S

    2016-08-01

    Chemical toxicity can arise from disruption of specific biomolecular functions or through more generalized cell stress and cytotoxicity-mediated processes. Here, responses of 1060 chemicals including pharmaceuticals, natural products, pesticidals, consumer, and industrial chemicals across a battery of 815 in vitro assay endpoints from 7 high-throughput assay technology platforms were analyzed in order to distinguish between these types of activities. Both cell-based and cell-free assays showed a rapid increase in the frequency of responses at concentrations where cell stress/cytotoxicity responses were observed in cell-based assays. Chemicals that were positive on at least 2 viability/cytotoxicity assays within the concentration range tested (typically up to 100 μM) activated a median of 12% of assay endpoints whereas those that were not cytotoxic in this concentration range activated 1.3% of the assays endpoints. The results suggest that activity can be broadly divided into: (1) specific biomolecular interactions against one or more targets (eg, receptors or enzymes) at concentrations below which overt cytotoxicity-associated activity is observed; and (2) activity associated with cell stress or cytotoxicity, which may result from triggering specific cell stress pathways, chemical reactivity, physico-chemical disruption of proteins or membranes, or broad low-affinity non-covalent interactions. Chemicals showing a greater number of specific biomolecular interactions are generally designed to be bioactive (pharmaceuticals or pesticidal active ingredients), whereas intentional food-use chemicals tended to show the fewest specific interactions. The analyses presented here provide context for use of these data in ongoing studies to predict in vivo toxicity from chemicals lacking extensive hazard assessment. PMID:27208079

  18. Approaches for identifying germ cell mutagens: Report of the 2013 IWGT workshop on germ cell assays(☆).

    PubMed

    Yauk, Carole L; Aardema, Marilyn J; Benthem, Jan van; Bishop, Jack B; Dearfield, Kerry L; DeMarini, David M; Dubrova, Yuri E; Honma, Masamitsu; Lupski, James R; Marchetti, Francesco; Meistrich, Marvin L; Pacchierotti, Francesca; Stewart, Jane; Waters, Michael D; Douglas, George R

    2015-05-01

    This workshop reviewed the current science to inform and recommend the best evidence-based approaches on the use of germ cell genotoxicity tests. The workshop questions and key outcomes were as follows. (1) Do genotoxicity and mutagenicity assays in somatic cells predict germ cell effects? Limited data suggest that somatic cell tests detect most germ cell mutagens, but there are strong concerns that dictate caution in drawing conclusions. (2) Should germ cell tests be done, and when? If there is evidence that a chemical or its metabolite(s) will not reach target germ cells or gonadal tissue, it is not necessary to conduct germ cell tests, notwithstanding somatic outcomes. However, it was recommended that negative somatic cell mutagens with clear evidence for gonadal exposure and evidence of toxicity in germ cells could be considered for germ cell mutagenicity testing. For somatic mutagens that are known to reach the gonadal compartments and expose germ cells, the chemical could be assumed to be a germ cell mutagen without further testing. Nevertheless, germ cell mutagenicity testing would be needed for quantitative risk assessment. (3) What new assays should be implemented and how? There is an immediate need for research on the application of whole genome sequencing in heritable mutation analysis in humans and animals, and integration of germ cell assays with somatic cell genotoxicity tests. Focus should be on environmental exposures that can cause de novo mutations, particularly newly recognized types of genomic changes. Mutational events, which may occur by exposure of germ cells during embryonic development, should also be investigated. Finally, where there are indications of germ cell toxicity in repeat dose or reproductive toxicology tests, consideration should be given to leveraging those studies to inform of possible germ cell genotoxicity. PMID:25953399

  19. Cell lysis with dimethyl sulphoxide produces stable homogeneous solutions in the dichlorofluorescein oxidative stress assay.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guqi; Gong, Yu; Burczynski, Frank J; Hasinoff, Brian B

    2008-05-01

    The oxidation of 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein (2',7'-dichlorofluorescin, DCFH) to a fluorescent product, 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein (DCF), is commonly used to quantitatively measure oxidative stress in cells using a fluorescence microplate reader. However, many cell lines tend to grow non-uniformly in the wells. This non-uniform distribution results in a high degree of variability in the fluorescence signal and decreases the precision of the method. Also, samples treated in large culture plates, dishes or flasks cannot be assayed directly in fluorescence microplate readers. This study reports an improved DCF assay method that lyses cells with DMSO/PBS (90% dimethyl sulphoxide/10% phosphate buffered saline). Oxidative stress was induced with either hydrogen peroxide or an hypoxia-reoxygenation treatment. Cell lysis with DMSO/PBS resulted in highly stable fluorescence signals in comparison to Triton X-100/PBS lysed cells. The precision of DCF fluorescence measurements of DMSO/PBS lysed cells was much better than for attached cells measured directly in 96-well plates. While DCF fluorescence in PBS was strongly quenched by albumin, no quenching occurred in DMSO/PBS. In conclusion this study describes a more convenient and accurate method for measuring cellular oxidative stress that also makes it possible to assay cells treated in large culture plates. PMID:18484276

  20. A novel dual luciferase assay for the simultaneous monitoring of HIV infection and cell viability.

    PubMed

    Mitsuki, Yu-Ya; Yamamoto, Takuya; Mizukoshi, Fuminori; Momota, Masatoshi; Terahara, Kazutaka; Yoshimura, Kazuhisa; Harada, Shigeyoshi; Tsunetsugu-Yokota, Yasuko

    2016-05-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reporter cell lines are critical tools for drug development. However, one disadvantage of HIV-1 reporter cell lines is that reductions in reporter gene activity need to be normalized to cytotoxicity, i.e., live cell numbers. Here, we developed a dual luciferase assay based on a R. reniformis luciferase (hRLuc)-expressing R5-type HIV-1 (NLAD8-hRLuc) and a CEM cell line expressing CCR5 and firefly luciferase (R5CEM-FiLuc). The NLAD8-hRLuc reporter virus was replication competent in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The level of hRLuc was correlated with p24 antigen levels (p<0.001, R=0.862). The target cell line, R5CEM-FiLuc, stably expressed the firefly luciferase (FiLuc) reporter gene and allowed the simultaneous monitoring of compound cytotoxicity. The dual reporter assay combining a NLAD8-hRLuc virus with R5CEM-FiLuc cells permitted the accurate determination of drug susceptibility for entry, reverse transcriptase, integrase, and protease inhibitors at different multiplicities of infection. This dual reporter assay provides a rapid and direct method for the simultaneous monitoring of HIV infection and cell viability. PMID:26898957

  1. Flow cytometric lifetime-based cell viability assay using propidium iodide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinkamp, John A.; Lehnert, Bruce E.; Lehnert, Nancy M.

    1999-05-01

    Assays which discriminate and enumerate dying or dead cells are important in various types of cellular studies. In many instances, there is a need to identify dead cells that interfere with fluorescent probes which are used to measure functional and physiological properties in viable cells. For example, dead cells can introduce analytical errors arising from (1) nonspecific uptake of fluorescent probes, leading to erroneous percentages of positive labeled cells, (2) increased autofluorescence, and (3) altered antigen expression. The ability to detect dead cells is also of importance in determining the effectiveness of cytotoxic agents. Propidium iodide (PPI) exclusion, which is analogous to the non- fluorescent trypan blue dye test for viability, is used extensively in flow cytometry assays. However, the use of PI can potentially limit the application of additional fluorescent probes due to spectral overlap of the probe with PI. In this report we present phase-resolved fluorescence studies on rat and murine thymus cells labeled with phycoerythrin-antiThy 1.1 and phycoerythrin/Texas Red-antiThy 1.2 immunofluorescence markers, respectively, and PI. Overlapping emission spectra are resolved based on differences in fluorescence lifetimes of the probes and PI. These studies demonstrate a new lifetime-based viability method for use in analysis of immunofluorescent probes and for assaying the dynamics of cell killing.

  2. Single cell gel/comet assay: guidelines for in vitro and in vivo genetic toxicology testing.

    PubMed

    Tice, R R; Agurell, E; Anderson, D; Burlinson, B; Hartmann, A; Kobayashi, H; Miyamae, Y; Rojas, E; Ryu, J C; Sasaki, Y F

    2000-01-01

    Atthe International Workshop on Genotoxicity Test Procedures (IWGTP) held in Washington, DC, March 25-26, 1999, an expert panel met to develop guidelines for the use of the single-cell gel (SCG)/Comet assay in genetic toxicology. The expert panel reached a consensus that the optimal version of the Comet assay for identifying agents with genotoxic activity was the alkaline (pH > 13) version of the assay developed by Singh et al. [1988]. The pH > 13 version is capable of detecting DNA single-strand breaks (SSB), alkali-labile sites (ALS), DNA-DNA/DNA-protein cross-linking, and SSB associated with incomplete excision repair sites. Relative to other genotoxicity tests, the advantages of the SCG assay include its demonstrated sensitivity for detecting low levels of DNA damage, the requirement for small numbers of cells per sample, its flexibility, its low costs, its ease of application, and the short time needed to complete a study. The expert panel decided that no single version of the alkaline (pH > 13) Comet assay was clearly superior. However, critical technical steps within the assay were discussed and guidelines developed for preparing slides with agarose gels, lysing cells to liberate DNA, exposing the liberated DNA to alkali to produce single-stranded DNA and to express ALS as SSB, electrophoresing the DNA using pH > 13 alkaline conditions, alkali neutralization, DNA staining, comet visualization, and data collection. Based on the current state of knowledge, the expert panel developed guidelines for conducting in vitro or in vivo Comet assays. The goal of the expert panel was to identify minimal standards for obtaining reproducible and reliable Comet data deemed suitable for regulatory submission. The expert panel used the current Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) guidelines for in vitro and in vivo genetic toxicological studies as guides during the development of the corresponding in vitro and in vivo SCG assay guidelines. Guideline

  3. Proteomic analysis of cellular response induced by boron neutron capture reaction in human squamous cell carcinoma SAS cells.

    PubMed

    Sato, Akira; Itoh, Tasuku; Imamichi, Shoji; Kikuhara, Sota; Fujimori, Hiroaki; Hirai, Takahisa; Saito, Soichiro; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Tanaka, Hiroki; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Minoru; Murakami, Yasufumi; Baiseitov, Diaz; Berikkhanova, Kulzhan; Zhumadilov, Zhaxybay; Imahori, Yoshio; Itami, Jun; Ono, Koji; Masunaga, Shinichiro; Masutani, Mitsuko

    2015-12-01

    To understand the mechanism of cell death induced by boron neutron capture reaction (BNCR), we performed proteome analyses of human squamous tumor SAS cells after BNCR. Cells were irradiated with thermal neutron beam at KUR after incubation under boronophenylalanine (BPA)(+) and BPA(-) conditions. BNCR mainly induced typical apoptosis in SAS cells 24h post-irradiation. Proteomic analysis in SAS cells suggested that proteins functioning in endoplasmic reticulum, DNA repair, and RNA processing showed dynamic changes at early phase after BNCR and could be involved in the regulation of cellular response to BNCR. We found that the BNCR induces fragments of endoplasmic reticulum-localized lymphoid-restricted protein (LRMP). The fragmentation of LRMP was also observed in the rat tumor graft model 20 hours after BNCT treatment carried out at the National Nuclear Center of the Republic of Kazakhstan. These data suggest that dynamic changes of LRMP could be involved during cellular response to BNCR. PMID:26302661

  4. A novel high-throughput nematicidal assay using embryo cells and larvae of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yiling; Xiang, Meichun; Liu, Shuchun; Li, Erwei; Che, Yongsheng; Liu, Xingzhong

    2014-04-01

    Human health safety and environmental concerns have resulted in the widespread deregistration of several agronomic important nematicides. New and safer nematicides are urgently needed. However, a high-throughput bioassay for screening potential nematicides has not been established. We developed a two-step high-throughput nematicidal screening method to combine a cell-based MTS colorimetric assay with Caenorhabditis elegans embryo cells for preliminary cytotoxicity screening (step 1) followed by in vitro larval assay for nematicidal activity (step 2). Based on three conventional nematicides' test, high correlations were obtained between cell viability and larval viability and "r" values were 0.78 for Avermectin, 0.95 for Fosthiazate, and 0.65 for Formaldehyde solution. Further assays with 60 fungal secondary metabolites (extracts, fractions and pure compounds) also demonstrated the high correlation between cell viability and larval viability (r=0.60) and between the C. elegans cell viability and the juvenile viability of soybean cyst nematode Heterodera glycines (r=0.48) and pine wood nematode Bursaphelenchus xylophilus (r=0.56). Six metabolites with high cytotoxicity have performed high larval mortality with a LC50 range of 6.8-500μg/ml. These results indicate that the proposed two-step screening assay represents an efficient and labor-saving method for screening natural nematicidal products. PMID:24594258

  5. A Cell-Based Assay for Measuring Endogenous BcrAbl Kinase Activity and Inhibitor Resistance.

    PubMed

    Ouellette, Steven B; Noel, Brett M; Parker, Laurie L

    2016-01-01

    Kinase enzymes are an important class of drug targets, particularly in cancer. Cell-based kinase assays are needed to understand how potential kinase inhibitors act on their targets in a physiologically relevant context. Current cell-based kinase assays rely on antibody-based detection of endogenous substrates, inaccurate disease models, or indirect measurements of drug action. Here we expand on previous work from our lab to introduce a 96-well plate compatible approach for measuring cell-based kinase activity in disease-relevant human chronic myeloid leukemia cell lines using an exogenously added, multi-functional peptide substrate. Our cellular models natively express the BcrAbl oncogene and are either sensitive or have acquired resistance to well-characterized BcrAbl tyrosine kinase inhibitors. This approach measures IC50 values comparable to established methods of assessing drug potency, and its robustness indicates that it can be employed in drug discovery applications. This medium-throughput assay could bridge the gap between single target focused, high-throughput in vitro assays and lower-throughput cell-based follow-up experiments. PMID:27598410

  6. A homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay for phosphatidylserine exposure on apoptotic cells.

    PubMed

    Gasser, Jean-Philippe; Hehl, Michaela; Millward, Thomas A

    2009-01-01

    A simple, "mix-and-measure" microplate assay for phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) exposure on the surface of apoptotic cells is described. The assay exploits the fact that annexin V, a protein with high affinity and specificity for PtdSer, forms trimers and higher order oligomers on binding to membranes containing PtdSer. The transition from soluble monomer to cell-bound oligomer is detected using time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer from europium chelate-labeled annexin V to Cy5-labeled annexin V. PtdSer detection is achieved by a single addition of a reagent mix containing labeled annexins and calcium ions directly to cell cultures in a 96-well plate, followed by a brief incubation before fluorescence measurement. The assay can be used to quantify PtdSer exposure on both suspension cells and adherent cells in situ. This method is simpler and faster than existing annexin V binding assays based on flow cytometry or microscopy, and it yields precise data with Z' values of 0.6-0.7. PMID:18835236

  7. First Evaluation of the Biologic Effectiveness Factors of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) in a Human Colon Carcinoma Cell Line

    SciTech Connect

    Dagrosa, Maria Alejandra; Crivello, Martin; Perona, Marina; Thorp, Silvia; Santa Cruz, Gustavo Alberto; Pozzi, Emiliano; Casal, Mariana; Thomasz, Lisa; Cabrini, Romulo; Kahl, Steven; Juvenal, Guillermo Juan; Pisarev, Mario Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: DNA lesions produced by boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and those produced by gamma radiation in a colon carcinoma cell line were analyzed. We have also derived the relative biologic effectiveness factor (RBE) of the neutron beam of the RA-3- Argentine nuclear reactor, and the compound biologic effectiveness (CBE) values for p-boronophenylalanine ({sup 10}BPA) and for 2,4-bis ({alpha},{beta}-dihydroxyethyl)-deutero-porphyrin IX ({sup 10}BOPP). Methods and Materials: Exponentially growing human colon carcinoma cells (ARO81-1) were distributed into the following groups: (1) BPA (10 ppm {sup 10}B) + neutrons, (2) BOPP (10 ppm {sup 10}B) + neutrons, (3) neutrons alone, and (4) gamma rays ({sup 60}Co source at 1 Gy/min dose-rate). Different irradiation times were used to obtain total absorbed doses between 0.3 and 5 Gy ({+-}10%) (thermal neutrons flux = 7.5 10{sup 9} n/cm{sup 2} sec). Results: The frequency of micronucleated binucleated cells and the number of micronuclei per micronucleated binucleated cells showed a dose-dependent increase until approximately 2 Gy. The response to gamma rays was significantly lower than the response to the other treatments (p < 0.05). The irradiations with neutrons alone and neutrons + BOPP showed curves that did not differ significantly from, and showed less DNA damage than, irradiation with neutrons + BPA. A decrease in the surviving fraction measured by 3-(4,5-dimetiltiazol-2-il)-2,5-difeniltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay as a function of the absorbed dose was observed for all the treatments. The RBE and CBE factors calculated from cytokinesis block micronucleus (CBMN) and MTT assays were, respectively, the following: beam RBE: 4.4 {+-} 1.1 and 2.4 {+-} 0.6; CBE for BOPP: 8.0 {+-} 2.2 and 2.0 {+-} 1; CBE for BPA: 19.6 {+-} 3.7 and 3.5 {+-} 1.3. Conclusions: BNCT and gamma irradiations showed different genotoxic patterns. To our knowledge, these values represent the first experimental ones obtained for the RA-3 in a

  8. A cytolytic assay for the measurement of palytoxin based on a cultured monolayer cell line.

    PubMed

    Bellocci, Mirella; Ronzitti, Giuseppe; Milandri, Anna; Melchiorre, Nunzia; Grillo, Claudio; Poletti, Roberto; Yasumoto, Takeshi; Rossini, Gian Paolo

    2008-03-01

    A cytolytic assay that could detect palytoxin and its congeners has been developed by the use of an established cell line grown as monolayer to replace the current hemolytic method. We used MCF-7 cells and cytolysis was measured by the release of cytosolic lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in the buffer added to treated cells (culture supernatant). A dose-dependent increase in LDH activity in culture supernatants was detected when MCF-7 cells were exposed to palytoxin and its analogue ostreocin D. The cytolytic response induced by palytoxin and ostreocin D was specific for this group of compounds, acting on Na+/K+-ATPase, as it was prevented when cells were preincubated with ouabain. The specificity of our assay for palytoxin and its congeners was confirmed by the finding that cytolysis was not detected when MCF-7 cells were exposed to unrelated toxins such as maitotoxin, tetrodotoxin, okadaic acid, and yessotoxin, even in the case of compounds that elicit cytotoxic responses under our experimental conditions. Using extracts from biological materials after spiking with the palytoxin standard, we found a good correlation between palytoxin levels measured by our cytolytic assay and the expected values. Our cytolytic assay detected palytoxin in naturally contaminated materials, but estimates were significantly higher than the palytoxin contents determined by LC-MS, indicating that naturally contaminated materials contain biologically active palytoxin congeners. We conclude that our cytolytic assay based on the use of MCF-7 cell monolayers is a viable alternative to animal-based methods for the determination of palytoxin and its congeners in contaminated materials. PMID:18023406

  9. A CpG-methylation-based assay to predict survival in clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jin-Huan; Haddad, Ahmed; Wu, Kai-Jie; Zhao, Hong-Wei; Kapur, Payal; Zhang, Zhi-Ling; Zhao, Liang-Yun; Chen, Zhen-Hua; Zhou, Yun-Yun; Zhou, Jian-Cheng; Wang, Bin; Yu, Yan-Hong; Cai, Mu-Yan; Xie, Dan; Liao, Bing; Li, Cai-Xia; Li, Pei-Xing; Wang, Zong-Ren; Zhou, Fang-Jian; Shi, Lei; Liu, Qing-Zuo; Gao, Zhen-Li; He, Da-Lin; Chen, Wei; Hsieh, Jer-Tsong; Li, Quan-Zhen; Margulis, Vitaly; Luo, Jun-Hang

    2015-01-01

    Clear cell renal cell carcinomas (ccRCCs) display divergent clinical behaviours. Molecular markers might improve risk stratification of ccRCC. Here we use, based on genome-wide CpG methylation profiling, a LASSO model to develop a five-CpG-based assay for ccRCC prognosis that can be used with formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded specimens. The five-CpG-based classifier was validated in three independent sets from China, United States and the Cancer Genome Atlas data set. The classifier predicts the overall survival of ccRCC patients (hazard ratio=2.96−4.82; P=3.9 × 10−6−2.2 × 10−9), independent of standard clinical prognostic factors. The five-CpG-based classifier successfully categorizes patients into high-risk and low-risk groups, with significant differences of clinical outcome in respective clinical stages and individual ‘stage, size, grade and necrosis' scores. Moreover, methylation at the five CpGs correlates with expression of five genes: PITX1, FOXE3, TWF2, EHBP1L1 and RIN1. Our five-CpG-based classifier is a practical and reliable prognostic tool for ccRCC that can add prognostic value to the staging system. PMID:26515236

  10. Generation of TCR-engineered T cells and their use to control the performance of T cell assays.

    PubMed

    Bidmon, Nicole; Attig, Sebastian; Rae, Richard; Schröder, Helene; Omokoko, Tana A; Simon, Petra; Kuhn, Andreas N; Kreiter, Sebastian; Sahin, Ugur; Gouttefangeas, Cécile; van der Burg, Sjoerd H; Britten, Cedrik M

    2015-06-15

    The systematic assessment of the human immune system bears huge potential to guide rational development of novel immunotherapies and clinical decision making. Multiple assays to monitor the quantity, phenotype, and function of Ag-specific T cells are commonly used to unravel patients' immune signatures in various disease settings and during therapeutic interventions. When compared with tests measuring soluble analytes, cellular immune assays have a higher variation, which is a major technical factor limiting their broad adoption in clinical immunology. The key solution may arise from continuous control of assay performance using TCR-engineered reference samples. We developed a simple, stable, robust, and scalable technology to generate reference samples that contain defined numbers of functional Ag-specific T cells. First, we show that RNA-engineered lymphocytes, equipped with selected TCRs, can repetitively deliver functional readouts of a controlled size across multiple assay platforms. We further describe a concept for the application of TCR-engineered reference samples to keep assay performance within or across institutions under tight control. Finally, we provide evidence that these novel control reagents can sensitively detect assay variation resulting from typical sources of error, such as low cell quality, loss of reagent stability, suboptimal hardware settings, or inaccurate gating. PMID:25957167

  11. Gene Expression of Purified β-Cell Tissue Obtained from Human Pancreas with Laser Capture Microdissection

    PubMed Central

    Marselli, Lorella; Thorne, Jeffrey; Ahn, Yu-Bae; Omer, Abdulkadir; Sgroi, Dennis C.; Libermann, Towia; Otu, Hasan H.; Sharma, Arun; Bonner-Weir, Susan; Weir, Gordon C.

    2008-01-01

    Context: Human β-cell gene profiling is a powerful tool for understanding β-cell biology in normal and pathological conditions. Assessment is complicated when isolated islets are studied because of contamination by non-β-cells and the trauma of the isolation procedure. Objective: The objective was to use laser capture microdissection (LCM) of human β-cells from pancreases of cadaver donors and compare their gene expression with that of handpicked isolated islets. Design: Endogenous autofluorescence of β-cells facilitated procurement of purified β-cell tissue from frozen pancreatic sections with LCM. Gene expression profiles of three microdissected β-cell samples and three isolated islet preparations were obtained. The array data were normalized using DNA-Chip Analyzer software (Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA), and the lower confidence bound evaluated differentially expressed genes. Real-time PCR was performed on selected acinar genes and on the duct cell markers, carbonic anhydrase II and keratin 19. Results: Endogenous autofluorescence facilitates the microdissection of β-cell rich tissue in human pancreas. When compared with array profiles of purified β-cell tissue, with lower confidence bound set at 1.2, there were 4560 genes up-regulated and 1226 genes down-regulated in the isolated islets. Among the genes up-regulated in isolated islets were pancreatic acinar and duct genes, chemokine genes, and genes associated with hypoxia, apoptosis, and stress. Quantitative RT-PCR confirmed the differential expression of acinar gene transcripts and the duct marker carbonic anhydrase II in isolated islets. Conclusion: LCM makes it possible to obtain β-cell enriched tissue from human pancreas sections without the trauma and ischemia of islet isolation. PMID:18073315

  12. An autologous endothelial cell:peripheral blood mononuclear cell assay that detects cytokine storm responses to biologics.

    PubMed

    Reed, Daniel M; Paschalaki, Koralia E; Starke, Richard D; Mohamed, Nura A; Sharp, Giles; Fox, Bernard; Eastwood, David; Bristow, Adrian; Ball, Christina; Vessillier, Sandrine; Hansel, Trevor T; Thorpe, Susan J; Randi, Anna M; Stebbings, Richard; Mitchell, Jane A

    2015-06-01

    There is an urgent unmet need for human tissue bioassays to predict cytokine storm responses to biologics. Current bioassays that detect cytokine storm responses in vitro rely on endothelial cells, usually from umbilical veins or cell lines, cocultured with freshly isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from healthy adult volunteers. These assays therefore comprise cells from 2 separate donors and carry the disadvantage of mismatched tissues and lack the advantage of personalized medicine. Current assays also do not fully delineate mild (such as Campath) and severe (such as TGN1412) cytokine storm-inducing drugs. Here, we report a novel bioassay where endothelial cells grown from stem cells in the peripheral blood (blood outgrowth endothelial cells) and PBMCs from the same donor can be used to create an autologous coculture bioassay that responds by releasing a plethora of cytokines to authentic TGN1412 but only modestly to Campath and not to control antibodies such as Herceptin, Avastin, and Arzerra. This assay performed better than the traditional mixed donor assay in terms of cytokine release to TGN1412 and, thus, we suggest provides significant advancement and a definitive system by which biologics can be tested and paves the way for personalized medicine. PMID:25746794

  13. Implementation and Use of State-of-the-Art, Cell-Based In Vitro Assays.

    PubMed

    Langer, Gernot

    2016-01-01

    The impressive advances in the generation and interpretation of functional omics data have greatly contributed to a better understanding of the (patho-)physiology of many biological systems and led to a massive increase in the number of specific targets and phenotypes to investigate in both basic and applied research. The obvious complexity revealed by these studies represents a major challenge to the research community and asks for improved target characterisation strategies with the help of reliable, high-quality assays. Thus, the use of living cells has become an integral part of many research activities because the cellular context more closely represents target-specific interrelations and activity patterns. Although still predominant, the use of traditional two-dimensional (2D) monolayer cell culture models has been gradually complemented by studies based on three-dimensional (3D) spheroid (Sutherland 1988) and other 3D tissue culture systems (Santos et al. 2012; Matsusaki et al. 2014) in an attempt to employ model systems more closely representing the microenvironment of cells in the body. Hence, quite a variety of state-of-the-art cell culture models are available for the generation of novel chemical probes or the identification of starting points for drug development in translational research and pharma drug discovery. In order to cope with these information-rich formats and their increasing technical complexity, cell-based assay development has become a scientific research topic in its own right and is used to ensure the provision of significant, reliable and high-quality data outlasting any discussions related to the current "irreproducibility epidemic" (Dolgin 2014; Prinz et al. 2011; Schatz 2014). At the same time the use of cells in microplate assay formats has become state of the art and greatly facilitates rigorous cell-based assay development by providing the researcher with the opportunity to address the multitude of factors affecting the actual

  14. Analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Cell Envelope Proteome by Capture of Surface-Exposed Proteins on Activated Magnetic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Vecchietti, Davide; Di Silvestre, Dario; Miriani, Matteo; Bonomi, Francesco; Marengo, Mauro; Bragonzi, Alessandra; Cova, Lara; Franceschi, Eleonora; Mauri, Pierluigi; Bertoni, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    We report on specific magneto-capturing followed by Multidimensional Protein Identification Technology (MudPIT) for the analysis of surface-exposed proteins of intact cells of the bacterial opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The magneto-separation of cell envelope fragments from the soluble cytoplasmic fraction allowed the MudPIT identification of the captured and neighboring proteins. Remarkably, we identified 63 proteins captured directly by nanoparticles and 67 proteins embedded in the cell envelope fragments. For a high number of proteins, our analysis strongly indicates either surface exposure or localization in an envelope district. The localization of most identified proteins was only predicted or totally unknown. This novel approach greatly improves the sensitivity and specificity of the previous methods, such as surface shaving with proteases that was also tested on P. aeruginosa. The magneto-capture procedure is simple, safe, and rapid, and appears to be well-suited for envelope studies in highly pathogenic bacteria. PMID:23226459

  15. Analysis of Cell Cycle Phase Response Captures the Synchronization Phenomena and Reveals a Novel Cell Cycle Network Topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ying; Lin, Yihan; Scherer, Norbert; Dinner, Aaron

    2011-03-01

    Cell cycle progression requires a succession of temporally-regulated sub-processes, including chromosome replication and cell division, which are each controlled by their own regulatory modules. The modular design of cell cycle regulatory network allows robust environmental responses and evolutionary adaptations. It is emerging that some of the cell cycle modules involve their own autonomous periodic dynamics. As a consequence, the realization of robust coordination among these modules becomes challenging since each module could potentially run out of sync. We believe that an insight into this puzzle resides in the coupling between the contributing regulatory modules. Here, we measured the phase response curve (PRC) of the cell cycle oscillator by driving the expression of a master regulator of the cell cycle in a pulsatile manner and measuring the single cell phase response. We constructed a return map that quantitatively explains the synchronization phenomena that were caused by periodic chemical perturbation. To capture the measured phase response, we derived a minimalist coupled oscillator model that generalizes the basic topology of the cell cycle network. This diode-like coupling suggests that the cell is engineered to ensure complete coordination of constituent events with the cell cycle.

  16. Collision rates for rare cell capture in periodic obstacle arrays strongly depend on density of cell suspension.

    PubMed

    Cimrák, I

    2016-11-01

    Recently, computational modelling has been successfully used for determination of collision rates for rare cell capture in periodic obstacle arrays. The models were based on particle advection simulations where the cells were advected according to velocity field computed from two dimensional Navier-Stokes equations. This approach may be used under the assumption of very dilute cell suspensions where no mutual cell collisions occur. We use the object-in-fluid framework to demonstrate that even with low cell-to-fluid ratio, the optimal geometry of the obstacle array significantly changes. We show computational simulations for ratios of 3.5, 6.9 and 10.4% determining the optimal geometry of the periodic obstacle arrays. It was already previously demonstrated that cells in periodic obstacle arrays follow trajectories in two modes: the colliding mode and the zig-zag mode. The colliding mode maximizes the cell-obstacle collision frequency. Our simulations reveal that for dilute suspensions and for suspensions with cell-to-fluid ratio 3.5%, there is a range of column shifts for which the cells follow colliding trajectories. However we showed, that for 6.9 and 10.4%, the cells never follow colliding trajectories. PMID:27023645

  17. Living cell imaging and Rac1-GTP levels of CXCL12-treated migrating neural progenitor cells in stripe assay.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Song, Aihong; Lai, Siqiang; Qiu, Lisha; Huang, Yunlong; Chen, Qiang; Zhu, Bing; Xu, Dongsheng; Zheng, Jialin C

    2015-12-01

    This data article contains three figures and three videos related to the research article entitled "Applications of Stripe Assay in the Study of CXCL12-mediated Neural Progenitor Cell Migration and Polarization" Zhang et al. (2015) [1], which uses stripe assay to study mouse neural progenitor cell (NPC) migration and polarization. The current article describes the neurosphere method used to culture NPCs. NPCs in neurospheres and monolayer were characterized using immunocytochemistry method with antibodies against two classic NPC markers: nestin and SOX2. The article also describes method to obtain sufficient protein lysates from NPCs in the stripe assay. When protein lysates were subjected to Rac1 affinity precipitation, Rac1-GTP was detected in the pull-down samples. In addition, the articles provides live cell imaging data to better understand CXCL12-mediated cellular migration and polarization. PMID:26693502

  18. Validation of a Cell-Free Translation Assay for Detecting Shiga Toxin 2 in Bacterial Culture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have validated a cell-free translation (CFT) assay for detecting Shiga toxin (Stx). The limit of detection (LOD) for pure Stx2 (PStx2) and partially pure Stx2 (PPStx2) in water reached 20 pg/µl and 3.5 pg/µL respectively without the artificial process of proteolytic activation and reduction of th...

  19. INFLUENCE OF TEMPERATURE ON AN ESTROGEN-RESPONSIVE RAINBOW TROUT CELL TRANSFECTION ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    One uncertainty in extrapolating estrogenic effects in mammalian systems to those in fish and wildlife is the influence that temperature has on these effects. A reporter gene assay in cultured rainbow trout cell lines was used to determine the influence of temperature on the exp...

  20. Dendritic cell migration assay: a potential prediction model for identification of contact allergens.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Susan; Spiekstra, Sander; Corsini, Emanuela; McLeod, Julie; Reinders, Judith

    2013-04-01

    This manuscript describes methodology and a prediction model for the MUTZ-LC migration assay. The assay represents the physiological change in Langerhans cell (LC) behavior after exposure to a sensitizing chemical, resulting in LC migration from the epidermis to the dermis. MUTZ-LC are derived from the commercially available MUTZ-3 cell line. Upon exposure to a sensitizer MUTZ-LC migrate preferentially towards CXCL12 whereas upon exposure to a non-sensitizer MUTZ-LC migrate towards CCL5. A CXCL12/CCL5 ratio >1.10 in 2/3 independent experiments is indicative of a sensitizer, whereas a CXCL12/CCL5 ratio ≤1.10 is indicative of a non-sensitizer. At non cytotoxic chemical concentrations 9 sensitizers (2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene, paraphenylendiamine, cinnamaldehyde, isoeugenol, nickel-sulfate, tetramethylthiuram disulfide, eugenol, cinnamic-alcohol, ammonium-hexachloroplatinate) were distinguished from 4 non sensitizers (sodium lauryl sulfate, salicylic acid, phenol, octanoic acid). Critical points in assay performance are (i) MUTZ-3 passage number after thawing (p6-p40); (ii) cell viability (>80%); (iii) standard curve to optimize correlation of fluorescence with cell number; and (iv) optimization of the concentration of rhCXCL12 and rhCCL5 in transwell. The protocol has been tested in three European laboratories and results suggest that it may provide working conditions for performing the DC migration assay which is aimed at distinguishing sensitizers from non sensitizers. PMID:22683935

  1. COMPARATIVE TOXICITIES OF DIFFERENT FORMS OF ASBESTOS IN A CELL CULTURE ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three forms of Union Internationale Contre le Cancer (UICC) asbestos, amosite, crocidolite, and chrysotile, were assayed for their cytotoxicity (inhibition of colony formation) in cell culture. Using embryonic human intestine-derived (I-407) and adult rat liver-derived (ARL-6) ep...

  2. A sensitive method to assay the xanthine oxidase activity in primary cultures of cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Atlante, A; Valenti, D; Gagliardi, S; Passarella, S

    2000-11-01

    Since xanthine oxidase (XO, Xanthine:oxidoreductase, E.C.1.2.3.22) is a key enzyme in reactive oxygen specie formation which plays a major role in cell oxidative stress, the availability of a sensitive and simple assay useful to detect its activity in monolayer cell cultures is worthwhile. In order to achieve this, we developed a method in which the conversion of pterine into isoxanthopterin is monitored fluorimetrically. Temperature assay was 50 degrees C. The activity of XO was detected in cerebellar granule cells exposed to glutamate. Since XO is formed from protease-dependent xanthine dehydrogenase processing, its activity appearance was found to be prevented by the protease inhibitor, leupeptin, as well as the glutamate NMDA-receptor inhibitor, MK-801, and the Ca(++) complexing agent, EGTA. The reported novel protocol, at variance with a conventional method, is shown to be a simple, fast, sensitive and relatively cheap method to assay XO activity. In addition, the reported assay can be applied to any cell type in culture. PMID:11086257

  3. The cyclosporin A washout assay to detect HIV-1 uncoating in infected cells.

    PubMed

    Hulme, Amy E; Hope, Thomas J

    2014-01-01

    Uncoating is an early step of HIV-1 replication in which the viral capsid disassembles by p24 capsid (p24(CA)) protein dissociating from the viral complex. Although uncoating is required for HIV-1 replication, many questions remain about the mechanism of this process as well as its impact on other steps in viral replication. Here we describe a recently developed assay to study the process of uncoating in HIV-1-infected cells. The CsA washout assay is a cell-based assay that utilizes the HIV-1 restriction factor TRIM-CypA to detect and inhibit infection of coated viral complexes. Owl monkey kidney (OMK) cells are infected with a GFP reporter virus and TRIM-CypA restriction is switched on at various times postinfection allowing the kinetics of uncoating to be monitored in infected cells. This assay also can be used to examine the effect of different viral or cellular factors on the process of uncoating. PMID:24158812

  4. Evaporative edge lithography of a liposomal drug microarray for cell migration assays

    PubMed Central

    Vafai, Nicholas; Lowry, Troy W.; Wilson, Korey A.; Davidson, Michael W.; Lenhert, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Lipid multilayer microarrays are a promising approach to miniaturize laboratory procedures by taking advantage of the microscopic compartmentalization capabilities of lipids. Here, we demonstrate a new method to pattern lipid multilayers on surfaces based on solvent evaporation along the edge where a stencil contacts a surface called evaporative edge lithography (EEL). As an example of an application of this process, we use EEL to make microarrays suitable for a cell-based migration assay. Currently existing cell migration assays require a separate compartment for each drug which is dissolved at a single concentration in solution. An advantage of the lipid multilayer microarray assay is that multiple compounds can be tested on the same surface. We demonstrate this by testing the effect of two different lipophilic drugs, Taxol and Brefeldin A, on collective cell migration into an unpopulated area. This particular assay should be scalable to test of 2000 different lipophilic compounds or dosages on a standard microtiter plate area, or if adapted for individual cell migration, it would allow for high-throughput screening of more than 50,000 compounds per plate.

  5. Sensitive cytometry based system for enumeration, capture and analysis of gene mutations of circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Takeshi; Watanabe, Masaru; Fujimura, Yuu; Yagishita, Shigehiro; Shimoyama, Tatsu; Maeda, Yoshiharu; Kanda, Shintaro; Yunokawa, Mayu; Tamura, Kenji; Tamura, Tomohide; Minami, Hironobu; Koh, Yasuhiro; Koizumi, Fumiaki

    2016-03-01

    Methods for the enumeration and molecular characterization of circulating tumor cells (CTC) have been actively investigated. However, such methods are still technically challenging. We have developed a novel epithelial cell adhesion molecule independent CTC enumeration system integrated with a sorting system using a microfluidics chip. We compared the number of CTC detected using our system with those detected using the CellSearch system in 46 patients with various cancers. We also evaluated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and PIK3CA mutations of captured CTC in a study of 4 lung cancer and 4 breast cancer patients. The percentage of samples with detected CTC was significantly higher with our system (65.2%) than with CellSearch (28.3%). The number of detected CTC per patient using our system was statistically higher than that using CellSearch (median 5, 0; P = 0.000172, Wilcoxon test). In the mutation analysis study, the number of detected CTC per patient was low (median for lung, 4.5; median for breast, 5.5); however, it was easy to detect EGFR and PIK3CA mutations in the CTC of 2 lung and 1 breast cancer patient, respectively, using a commercially available kit. Our system is more sensitive than CellSearch in CTC enumeration of various cancers and is also capable of detecting EGFR and PIK3CA mutations in the CTC of lung and breast cancer patients, respectively. PMID:26708016

  6. Sensitive capture of circulating tumour cells by functionalized graphene oxide nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Hyeun Joong; Kim, Tae Hyun; Zhang, Zhuo; Azizi, Ebrahim; Pham, Trinh M.; Paoletti, Costanza; Lin, Jules; Ramnath, Nithya; Wicha, Max S.; Hayes, Daniel F.; Simeone, Diane M.; Nagrath, Sunitha

    2013-10-01

    The spread of cancer throughout the body is driven by circulating tumour cells (CTCs). These cells detach from the primary tumour and move from the bloodstream to a new site of subsequent tumour growth. They also carry information about the primary tumour and have the potential to be valuable biomarkers for disease diagnosis and progression, and for the molecular characterization of certain biological properties of the tumour. However, the limited sensitivity and specificity of current methods for measuring and studying these cells in patient blood samples prevents the realization of their full clinical potential. The use of microfluidic devices is a promising method for isolating CTCs. However, the devices are reliant on three-dimensional structures, which limits further characterization and expansion of cells on the chip. Here we demonstrate an effective approach to isolating CTCs from blood samples of pancreatic, breast and lung cancer patients, by using functionalized graphene oxide nanosheets on a patterned gold surface. CTCs were captured with high sensitivity at a low concentration of target cells (73 +/- 32.4% at 3-5 cells per ml blood).

  7. Results of the L5178Y mouse lymphoma assay and the Balb/3t3 cell in vitro transformation assay for eight phthalate esters.

    PubMed

    Barber, E D; Cifone, M; Rundell, J; Przygoda, R; Astill, B D; Moran, E; Mulholland, A; Robinson, E; Schneider, B

    2000-01-01

    Eight phthalate esters, with alcohol chain lengths of 1-11 carbon atoms and with various degrees of branching, were tested in vitro in the L5178Y mouse lymphoma mammalian cell mutation assay and in the Balb/3T3 cell transformation assay. The tests were performed as part of a voluntary testing agreement between the Chemical Manufacturers Association's Phthalate Esters Panel and the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA). The esters tested were: dimethyl phthalate (DMP), di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP), butyl benzyl phthalate (BBP), di-¿n-hexyl, n-octyl, n-decyl¿ phthalate (610P), di-isononyl phthalate (DINP), di-¿heptyl, nonyl, undecyl¿ phthalate (711P), di-isodecyl phthalate (DIDP) and di-undecyl phthalate (DUP). Both DMP and DBP were found to produce significant increases in the mutant frequency in the mouse lymphoma assay in the presence but not in the absence of an Aroclor-induced rat liver activation system (S-9). Ester 610P gave equivocal results in the mouse lymphoma assay in the presence and absence of rat liver S-9. There was no indication of mutagenic potential for any of the other test materials in the mouse lymphoma assay, and none of the test materials increased transformation frequency in the Balb/3T3 cell transformation assay. Aldehyde metabolites of the de-esterified alcohols are postulated to play a role in the positive results for DMP and DBP. PMID:10641018

  8. Poly(ethylene glycol)-Modified Tapered-Slit Membrane Filter for Efficient Release of Captured Viable Circulating Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Jun; Kang, Yoon-Tae; Cho, Young-Ho

    2016-08-16

    The grafting of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) onto an SU8 microfilter has been demonstrated for efficient capture and release of circulating tumor cells (CTCs). Previous CTC filters showed low cell release efficiency due to hydrophobic surfaces, even though their capture efficiency was considerable. PEG, a hydrophilic polymeric compound mainly used to form nonfouling thin films on silicon surfaces, induces repulsive force so that the nonspecific adsorption of the surface is incomparably reduced in comparison with unmodified filter surfaces. The effectiveness of PEG-modified CTC filters was verified through lung (H358) and colorectal (SW620) cancer cells spiked, respectively, in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and unprocessed whole blood. The modified SU8 filters achieved approximately 37.7% and 22.8% improvement in release efficiency without significant changes in cell viability and capture efficiency. In order to verify the filter's potential for clinical applications, we extended our experiments using cancer patient blood samples. Six blood samples from colorectal and lung cancer patients were processed, and captured CTCs were efficiently released. From these experiments, the present PEG-modified filter captures and releases on average 14 ± 7.4 CTCs/mL, including EpCAM-negative CTCs, which could not be captured by previous single antibody-based methods. The antibody-free isolation with enhanced release efficiency facilitates viable cell retrieval, which is significant to CTC culture and comprehensive molecular study for verifying the mechanism of metastasis and cancer. PMID:27444512

  9. High-Density Dielectrophoretic Microwell Array for Detection, Capture, and Single-Cell Analysis of Rare Tumor Cells in Peripheral Blood

    PubMed Central

    Akiyama, Yasuyuki; Katayama, Koji; Futami, Toru; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki; Sawada, Takeshi; Koizumi, Fumiaki; Koh, Yasuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Development of a reliable platform and workflow to detect and capture a small number of mutation-bearing circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from a blood sample is necessary for the development of noninvasive cancer diagnosis. In this preclinical study, we aimed to develop a capture system for molecular characterization of single CTCs based on high-density dielectrophoretic microwell array technology. Spike-in experiments using lung cancer cell lines were conducted. The microwell array was used to capture spiked cancer cells, and captured single cells were subjected to whole genome amplification followed by sequencing. A high detection rate (70.2%–90.0%) and excellent linear performance (R2 = 0.8189–0.9999) were noted between the observed and expected numbers of tumor cells. The detection rate was markedly higher than that obtained using the CellSearch system in a blinded manner, suggesting the superior sensitivity of our system in detecting EpCAM− tumor cells. Isolation of single captured tumor cells, followed by detection of EGFR mutations, was achieved using Sanger sequencing. Using a microwell array, we established an efficient and convenient platform for the capture and characterization of single CTCs. The results of a proof-of-principle preclinical study indicated that this platform has potential for the molecular characterization of captured CTCs from patients. PMID:26107884

  10. Strategic Endothelial Cell Tube Formation Assay: Comparing Extracellular Matrix and Growth Factor Reduced Extracellular Matrix.

    PubMed

    Xie, Daniel; Ju, Donghong; Speyer, Cecilia; Gorski, David; Kosir, Mary A

    2016-01-01

    Malignant tumors require a blood supply in order to survive and spread. These tumors obtain their needed blood from the patient's blood stream by hijacking the process of angiogenesis, in which new blood vessels are formed from existing blood vessels. The CXCR2 (chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 2) receptor is a transmembrane G-protein-linked molecule found in many cells that is closely associated with angiogenesis(1). Specific blockade of the CXCR2 receptor inhibits angiogenesis, as measured by several assays such as the endothelial tube formation assay. The tube formation assay is useful for studying angiogenesis because it is an excellent method of studying the effects that any given compound or environmental condition may have on angiogenesis. It is a simple and quick in vitro assay that generates quantifiable data and requires relatively few components. Unlike in vivo assays, it does not require animals and can be carried out in less than two days. This protocol describes a variation of the extracellular matrix supporting endothelial tube formation assay, which tests the CXCR2 receptor. PMID:27585062

  11. The solar maximum satellite capture cell: Impact features and orbital debris and micrometeoritic projectile materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckay, D. S.; Rietmeijer, F. J. M.; Schramm, L. S.; Barrett, R. A.; Zook, H. A.; Blanford, G. E.

    1986-01-01

    The physical properties of impact features observed in the Solar Max main electronics box (MEB) thermal blanket generally suggest an origin by hypervelocity impact. The chemistry of micrometeorite material suggests that a wide variety of projectile materials have survived impact with retention of varying degrees of pristinity. Impact features that contain only spacecraft paint particles are on average smaller than impact features caused by micrometeorite impacts. In case both types of materials co-occur, it is belevied that the impact feature, generally a penetration hole, was caused by a micrometeorite projectile. The typically smaller paint particles were able to penetrate though the hole in the first layer and deposit in the spray pattern on the second layer. It is suggested that paint particles have arrived with a wide range of velocities relative to the Solar Max satellite. Orbiting paint particles are an important fraction of materials in the near-Earth environment. In general, the data from the Solar Max studies are a good calibration for the design of capture cells to be flown in space and on board Space Station. The data also suggest that development of multiple layer capture cells in which the projectile may retain a large degree of pristinity is a feasible goal.

  12. Novel Application of Carbonate Fuel Cell for Capturing Carbon Dioxide from Flue Gas Streams

    SciTech Connect

    Jolly, Stephen; Ghezel-Ayagh, Hossein; Willman, Carl; Patel, Dilip; DiNitto, M.; Marina, Olga A.; Pederson, Larry R.; Steen, William A.

    2015-09-30

    To address concerns about climate change resulting from emission of CO2 by coal-fueled power plants, FuelCell Energy, Inc. has developed the Combined Electric Power and Carbon-dioxide Separation (CEPACS) system concept. The CEPACS system utilizes Electrochemical Membrane (ECM) technology derived from the Company’s Direct FuelCell® products. The system separates the CO2 from the flue gas of other plants and produces electric power using a supplementary fuel. FCE is currently evaluating the use of ECM to cost effectively separate CO2 from the flue gas of Pulverized Coal (PC) power plants under a U.S. Department of Energy contract. The overarching objective of the project is to verify that the ECM can achieve at least 90% CO2 capture from the flue gas with no more than 35% increase in the cost of electricity. The project activities include: 1) laboratory scale operational and performance tests of a membrane assembly, 2) performance tests of the membrane to evaluate the effects of impurities present in the coal plant flue gas, in collaboration with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 3) techno-economic analysis for an ECM-based CO2 capture system applied to a 550 MW existing PC plant, in partnership with URS Corporation, and 4) bench scale (11.7 m2 area) testing of an ECM-based CO2 separation and purification system.

  13. Probing protein complexes inside living cells using a silicon nanowire-based pull-down assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Sojoong; Kim, Hyunju; Kim, So Yeon; Yang, Eun Gyeong

    2016-06-01

    Most proteins perform their functions as interacting complexes. Here we propose a novel method for capturing an intracellular protein and its interacting partner out of living cells by utilizing intracellular access of antibody modified vertical silicon nanowire arrays whose surface is covered with a polyethylene glycol layer to prevent strong cell adhesion. Such a feature facilitates the removal of cells by simple washing, enabling subsequent detection of a pulled-down protein and its interacting partner, and further assessment of a drug-induced change in the interacting complex. Our new SiNW-based tool is thus suitable for authentication of protein networks inside living cells.Most proteins perform their functions as interacting complexes. Here we propose a novel method for capturing an intracellular protein and its interacting partner out of living cells by utilizing intracellular access of antibody modified vertical silicon nanowire arrays whose surface is covered with a polyethylene glycol layer to prevent strong cell adhesion. Such a feature facilitates the removal of cells by simple washing, enabling subsequent detection of a pulled-down protein and its interacting partner, and further assessment of a drug-induced change in the interacting complex. Our new SiNW-based tool is thus suitable for authentication of protein networks inside living cells. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Materials, experimental methods and Fig. S1-S8. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr00171h

  14. Acute Shear Stress Direction Dictates Adherent Cell Remodeling and Verifies Shear Profile of Spinning Disc Assays

    PubMed Central

    Fuhrmann, Alexander; Engler, Adam J.

    2015-01-01

    Several methods have been developed to quantify population level changes in cell attachment strength given its large heterogeneity. One such method is the rotating disc chamber or “spinning disc” in which a range of shear forces are applied to attached cells to quantify detachment force, i.e. attachment strength, which can be heterogeneous within cell populations. However, computing the exact force vectors that act upon cells is complicated by complex flow fields and variable cell morphologies. Recent observations suggest that cells may remodel their morphology and align during acute shear exposure, but contrary to intuition, shear is not orthogonal to the radial direction. Here we theoretically derive the magnitude and direction of applied shear and demonstrate that cells, under certain physiological conditions, align in this direction within minutes. Shear force magnitude is also experimentally verified which validates that for spread cells shear forces and not torque or drag dominate in this assay, and demonstrates that the applied force per cell area is largely independent of initial morphology. These findings suggest that direct quantified comparison of the effects of shear on a wide array of cell types and conditions can be made with confidence using this assay without the need for computational or numerical modeling. PMID:25619322

  15. Microfluidic assay for simultaneous culture of multiple cell types on surfaces or within hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Yoojin; Han, Sewoon; Jeon, Jessie S.; Yamamoto, Kyoko; Zervantonakis, Ioannis K.; Sudo, Ryo; Kamm, Roger D.; Chung, Seok

    2014-01-01

    This protocol describes a simple but robust microfluidic assay combining three-dimensional (3D) and two-dimensional (2D) cell culture. The microfluidic platform comprises hydrogel incorporating chambers between surface-accessible microchannels. Using this platform, well-defined biochemical and biophysical stimuli can be applied to multiple cell types interacting over distances of <1mm, thereby replicating many aspects of the in vivo microenvironment. Capabilities exist for time-dependent manipulation of flows and concentration gradients as well as high-resolution real-time imaging for observing spatial-temporal single cell behavior, cell-cell communication, cell-matrix interactions and cell population dynamics. These heterotypic cell type assays can be used to study cell survival, proliferation, migration, morphogenesis and differentiation under controlled conditions. Applications include the study of previously unexplored cellular interactions, and have already provided new insights into how biochemical and biophysical factors regulate interactions between populations of different cell types. It takes 3 days to fabricate the system and experiments can run for up to several weeks. PMID:22678430

  16. Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype a Specific Cell-Based Potency Assay to Replace the Mouse Bioassay

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Salas, Ester; Wang, Joanne; Molina, Yanira; Nelson, Jeremy B.; Jacky, Birgitte P. S.; Aoki, K. Roger

    2012-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin serotype A (BoNT/A), a potent therapeutic used to treat various disorders, inhibits vesicular neurotransmitter exocytosis by cleaving SNAP25. Development of cell-based potency assays (CBPAs) to assess the biological function of BoNT/A have been challenging because of its potency. CBPAs can evaluate the key steps of BoNT action: receptor binding, internalization-translocation, and catalytic activity; and therefore could replace the current mouse bioassay. Primary neurons possess appropriate sensitivity to develop potential replacement assays but those potency assays are difficult to perform and validate. This report describes a CBPA utilizing differentiated human neuroblastoma SiMa cells and a sandwich ELISA that measures BoNT/A-dependent intracellular increase of cleaved SNAP25. Assay sensitivity is similar to the mouse bioassay and measures neurotoxin biological activity in bulk drug substance and BOTOX® product (onabotulinumtoxinA). Validation of a version of this CBPA in a Quality Control laboratory has led to FDA, Health Canada, and European Union approval for potency testing of BOTOX®, BOTOX® Cosmetic, and Vistabel®. Moreover, we also developed and optimized a BoNT/A CBPA screening assay that can be used for the discovery of novel BoNT/A inhibitors to treat human disease. PMID:23185348

  17. Capture and sorting of multiple cells by polarization-controlled three-beam interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Yu; Wang, Zuobin; Hu, Yaowei; Li, Dayou; Qiu, Renxi

    2016-03-01

    For the capture and sorting of multiple cells, a sensitive and highly efficient polarization-controlled three-beam interference set-up has been developed. With the theory of superposition of three beams, simulations on the influence of polarization angle upon the intensity distribution and the laser gradient force change with different polarization angles have been carried out. By controlling the polarization angle of the beams, various intensity distributions and different sizes of dots are obtained. We have experimentally observed multiple optical tweezers and the sorting of cells with different polarization angles, which are in accordance with the theoretical analysis. The experimental results have shown that the polarization angle affects the shapes and feature sizes of the interference patterns and the trapping force.

  18. Power generation enhancement in novel microbial carbon capture cells with immobilized Chlorella vulgaris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Minghua; He, Huanhuan; Jin, Tao; Wang, Hongyu

    2012-09-01

    With the increasing concerns for global climate change, a sustainable, efficient and renewable energy production from wastewater is imperative. In this study, a novel microbial carbon capture cell (MCC), is constructed for the first time by the introduction of immobilized microalgae (Chlorella vulgaris) into the cathode chamber of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) to fulfill the zero discharge of carbon dioxide. This process can achieve an 84.8% COD removal, and simultaneously the maximum power density can reach 2485.35 mW m-3 at a current density of 7.9 A m-3 and the Coulombic efficiency is 9.40%, which are 88% and 57.7% greater than that with suspended C. vulgaris, respectively. These enhancements in performance demonstrate the feasibility of an economical and effective approach for the simultaneous wastewater treatment, electricity generation and biodiesel production from microalgae.

  19. Influenza virus assays based on virus‐inducible reporter cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yunsheng; Larrimer, Audrey; Curtiss, Teresa; Kim, Jaekyung; Jones, Abby; Baird‐Tomlinson, Heather; Pekosz, Andrew; Olivo, Paul D.

    2009-01-01

    Background  Virus‐inducible reporter genes have been used as the basis of virus detection and quantitation assays for a number of viruses. A strategy for influenza A virus‐induction of a reporter gene was recently described. In this report, we describe the extension of this strategy to influenza B virus, the generation of stable cell lines with influenza A and B virus‐inducible reporter genes, and the use of these cells in various clinically relevant viral assays. Each of the cell lines described herein constitutively express an RNA transcript that contains a reporter gene coding region flanked by viral 5′‐ and 3′‐untranslated regions (UTR) and therefore mimics an influenza virus genomic segment. Upon infection of the cells with influenza virus the virus‐inducible reporter gene segment (VIRGS) is replicated and transcribed by the viral polymerase complex resulting in reporter gene expression. Findings  Reporter gene induction occurs after infection with a number of laboratory strains and clinical isolates of influenza virus including several H5N1 strains. The induction is dose‐dependent and highly specific for influenza A or influenza B viruses. Conclusions  These cell lines provide the basis of simple, rapid, and objective assays that involve virus quantitation such as determination of viral titer, assessment of antiviral susceptibility, and determination of antibody neutralization titer. These cell lines could be very useful for influenza virus researchers and vaccine manufacturers. PMID:21462401

  20. Classification of phthalates based on an in vitro neurosphere assay using rat mesencephalic neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ishido, Masami; Suzuki, Junko

    2014-02-01

    Exposure to environmental neurotoxic chemicals both in utero and during the early postnatal period can cause neurodevelopmental disorders. To evaluate the disruption of neurodevelopmental programming, we previously established an in vitro neurosphere assay system using rat mesencephalic neural stem cells that can be used to evaluate. Here, we extended the assay system to examine the neurodevelopmental toxicity of the endocrine disruptors butyl benzyl phthalate, di-n-butyl phthalate, dicyclohexyl phthalate, diethyl phthalate, di(2-ethyl hexyl) phthalate, di-n-pentyl phthalate, and dihexyl phthalate at a range of concentrations (0-100 μM). All phthalates tested inhibited cell migration with a linear or non-linear range of concentrations when comparing migration distance to the logarithm of the phthalate concentrations. On the other hand, some, but not all, phthalates decreased the number of proliferating cells. Apoptotic cells were not observed upon phthalate exposure under any of the conditions tested, whereas the dopaminergic toxin rotenone induced significant apoptosis. Thus, we were able to classify phthalate toxicity based on cell migration and cell proliferation using the in vitro neurosphere assay. PMID:24418706

  1. Paper-based assay for red blood cell antigen typing by the indirect antiglobulin test.

    PubMed

    Yeow, Natasha; McLiesh, Heather; Guan, Liyun; Shen, Wei; Garnier, Gil

    2016-07-01

    A rapid and simple paper-based elution assay for red blood cell antigen typing by the indirect antiglobulin test (IAT) was established. This allows to type blood using IgG antibodies for the important blood groups in which IgM antibodies do not exist. Red blood cells incubated with IgG anti-D were washed with saline and spotted onto the paper assay pre-treated with anti-IgG. The blood spot was eluted with an elution buffer solution in a chromatography tank. Positive samples were identified by the agglutinated and fixed red blood cells on the original spotting area, while red blood cells from negative samples completely eluted away from the spot of origin. Optimum concentrations for both anti-IgG and anti-D were identified to eliminate the washing step after the incubation phase. Based on the no-washing procedure, the critical variables were investigated to establish the optimal conditions for the paper-based assay. Two hundred ten donor blood samples were tested in optimal conditions for the paper test with anti-D and anti-Kell. Positive and negative samples were clearly distinguished. This assay opens up new applications of the IAT on paper including antibody detection and blood donor-recipient crossmatching and extends its uses into non-blood typing applications with IgG antibody-based diagnostics. Graphical abstract A rapid and simple paper-based assay for red blood cell antigen typing by the indirect antiglobulin test. PMID:27185543

  2. Quality Control Assays for Clinical-Grade Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells: Methods for ATMP Release.

    PubMed

    Radrizzani, Marina; Soncin, Sabrina; Lo Cicero, Viviana; Andriolo, Gabriella; Bolis, Sara; Turchetto, Lucia

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSC) are promising candidates for the development of cell-based therapies for various diseases and are currently being evaluated in a number of clinical trials (Sharma et al., Transfusion 54:1418-1437, 2014; Ikebe and Suzuki, Biomed Res Int 2014:951512, 2014). MSC for therapeutic applications are classified as advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMP) (Regulation (EC) No 1394/2007 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 13 November 2007 on advanced therapy medicinal products and amending Directive 2001/83/EC and Regulation (EC) No 726/2004) and must be prepared according to good manufacturing practices ( http://ec.europa.eu/health/documents/eudralex/vol-4 ). They may be derived from different starting materials (mainly bone marrow (BM), adipose tissue, or cord blood) and applied as fresh or cryopreserved products, in the autologous as well as an allogeneic context (Sharma et al., Transfusion 54:1418-1437, 2014; Ikebe and Suzuki, Biomed Res Int 2014:951512, 2014; Sensebé and Bourin, Transplantation 87(9 Suppl):S49-S53, 2009). In any case, they require an approved and well-defined panel of assays in order to be released for clinical use.This chapter describes analytical methods implemented and performed in our cell factory as part of the release strategy for an ATMP consisting of frozen autologous BM-derived MSC. Such methods are designed to assess the safety (sterility, endotoxin, and mycoplasma assays) and identity/potency (cell count and viability, immunophenotype and clonogenic assay) of the final product. Some assays are also applied to the biological starting material (sterility) or carried out as in-process controls (sterility, cell count and viability, immunophenotype, clonogenic assay).The validation strategy for each analytical method is described in the accompanying Chapter 20 . PMID:27236681

  3. Microtubule plus-end and minus-end capture at adherens junctions is involved in the assembly of apico-basal arrays in polarised epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bellett, Gemma; Carter, Jane M; Keynton, Jennifer; Goldspink, Deborah; James, Colin; Moss, David K; Mogensen, Mette M

    2009-10-01

    Apico-basal polarisation of epithelial cells involves a dramatic reorganisation of the microtubule cytoskeleton. The classic radial array of microtubules focused on a centrally located centrosome typical of many animal cells is lost or greatly reduced and a non-centrosomal apico-basal array develops. The molecules and mechanisms responsible for the assembly and positioning of these non-centrosomal microtubules have not been fully elucidated. Using a Nocodazole induced regrowth assay in invitro culture (MDCK) and in situ epithelial (cochlear Kolliker's) cell models we establish that the apico-basal array originates from the centrosome and that the non-centrosomal microtubule minus-end anchoring sites do not contribute significantly to their nucleation. Confocal and electron microscopy revealed that an extended radial array assembles with microtubule plus-ends targeting cadheren sites at adherens junctions and EB1 and CLIP-170 co-localising with beta-catenin and dynein clusters at the junction sites. The extended radial array is likely to be a vital intermediate step in the assembly process with cortical anchored dynein providing the mechanical force required for microtubule release, translocation and capture. Ultrastructural analyses of the apico-basal arrays in fully polarised MDCK and Kolliker's cells revealed microtubule minus-end association with the most apical adherens junction (Zonula adherens). We propose that a release and capture model involving both microtubule plus- and minus-end capture at adherens junctions is responsible for the generation of non-centrosomal apico-basal arrays in most centrosome containing polarised epithelial cells. PMID:19479825

  4. A radiolabel-release microwell assay for proteolytic enzymes present in cell culture media

    SciTech Connect

    Rucklidge, G.J.; Milne, G. )

    1990-03-01

    A modified method for the measurement of proteolytic enzyme activity in cell culture-conditioned media has been developed. Using the release of 3H-labeled peptides from 3H-labeled gelatin the method is performed in microwell plates. The substrate is insolubilized and attached to the wells by glutaraldehyde treatment, thus eliminating the need for a precipitation step at the end of the assay. The assay is sensitive, reproducible, and convenient for small sample volumes. The effect of different protease inhibitors on activity can be assessed rapidly allowing an early characterization of the enzyme. It can also be adapted to microplate spectrophotometric analysis by staining residual substrate with Coomassie blue.

  5. Analysis of cell flux in the parallel plate flow chamber: implications for cell capture studies.

    PubMed Central

    Munn, L L; Melder, R J; Jain, R K

    1994-01-01

    The parallel plate flow chamber provides a controlled environment for determinations of the shear stress at which cells in suspension can bind to endothelial cell monolayers. By decreasing the flow rate of cell-containing media over the monolayer and assessing the number of cells bound at each wall shear stress, the relationship between shear force and binding efficiency can be determined. The rate of binding should depend on the delivery of cells to the surface as well as the intrinsic cell-surface interactions; thus, only if the cell flux to the surface is known can the resulting binding curves be interpreted correctly. We present the development and validation of a mathematical model based on the sedimentation rate and velocity profile in the chamber for the delivery of cells from a flowing suspension to the chamber surface. Our results show that the flux depends on the bulk cell concentration, the distance from the entrance point, and the flow rate of the cell-containing medium. The model was then used in a normalization procedure for experiments in which T cells attach to TNF-alpha-stimulated HUVEC monolayers, showing that a threshold for adhesion occurs at a shear stress of about 3 dyn/cm2. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 PMID:7948702

  6. GFP-Based Fluorescence Assay for CAG Repeat Instability in Cultured Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Santillan, Beatriz A.; Moye, Christopher; Mittelman, David; Wilson, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Trinucleotide repeats can be highly unstable, mutating far more frequently than point mutations. Repeats typically mutate by addition or loss of units of the repeat. CAG repeat expansions in humans trigger neurological diseases that include myotonic dystrophy, Huntington disease, and several spinocerebellar ataxias. In human cells, diverse mechanisms promote CAG repeat instability, and in mice, the mechanisms of instability are varied and tissue-dependent. Dissection of mechanistic complexity and discovery of potential therapeutics necessitates quantitative and scalable screens for repeat mutation. We describe a GFP-based assay for screening modifiers of CAG repeat instability in human cells. The assay exploits an engineered intronic CAG repeat tract that interferes with expression of an inducible GFP minigene. Like the phenotypes of many trinucleotide repeat disorders, we find that GFP function is impaired by repeat expansion, in a length-dependent manner. The intensity of fluorescence varies inversely with repeat length, allowing estimates of repeat tract changes in live cells. We validate the assay using transcription through the repeat and engineered CAG-specific nucleases, which have previously been reported to induce CAG repeat instability. The assay is relatively fast and should be adaptable to large-scale screens of chemical and shRNA libraries. PMID:25423602

  7. Cell-Based Assay Design for High-Content Screening of Drug Candidates.

    PubMed

    Nierode, Gregory; Kwon, Paul S; Dordick, Jonathan S; Kwon, Seok-Joon

    2016-02-01

    To reduce attrition in drug development, it is crucial to consider the development and implementation of translational phenotypic assays as well as decipher diverse molecular mechanisms of action for new molecular entities. High-throughput fluorescence and confocal microscopes with advanced analysis software have simplified the simultaneous identification and quantification of various cellular processes through what is now referred to as highcontent screening (HCS). HCS permits automated identification of modifiers of accessible and biologically relevant targets and can thus be used to detect gene interactions or identify toxic pathways of drug candidates to improve drug discovery and development processes. In this review, we summarize several HCS-compatible, biochemical, and molecular biology-driven assays, including immunohistochemistry, RNAi, reporter gene assay, CRISPR-Cas9 system, and protein-protein interactions to assess a variety of cellular processes, including proliferation, morphological changes, protein expression, localization, post-translational modifications, and protein-protein interactions. These cell-based assay methods can be applied to not only 2D cell culture but also 3D cell culture systems in a high-throughput manner. PMID:26428732

  8. Automation of cell-based drug absorption assays in 96-well format using permeable support systems.

    PubMed

    Larson, Brad; Banks, Peter; Sherman, Hilary; Rothenberg, Mark

    2012-06-01

    Cell-based drug absorption assays, such as Caco-2 and MDCK-MDR1, are an essential component of lead compound ADME/Tox testing. The permeability and transport data they provide can determine whether a compound continues in the drug discovery process. Current methods typically incorporate 24-well microplates and are performed manually. Yet the need to generate absorption data earlier in the drug discovery process, on an increasing number of compounds, is driving the use of higher density plates. A simple, more efficient process that incorporates 96-well permeable supports and proper instrumentation in an automated process provides more reproducible data compared to manual methods. Here we demonstrate the ability to perform drug permeability and transport assays using Caco-2 or MDCKII-MDR1 cells. The assay procedure was automated in a 96-well format, including cell seeding, media and buffer exchanges, compound dispense, and sample removal using simple robotic instrumentation. Cell monolayer integrity was confirmed via transepithelial electrical resistance and Lucifer yellow measurements. Proper cell function was validated by analyzing apical-to-basolateral and basolateral-to-apical movement of rhodamine 123, a known P-glycoprotein substrate. Apparent permeability and efflux data demonstrate how the automated procedure provides a less variable method than manual processing, and delivers a more accurate assessment of a compound's absorption characteristics. PMID:22357561

  9. Cell-free production and streamlined assay of cytosol-penetrating antibodies.

    PubMed

    Min, Seung Eui; Lee, Kyung-Ho; Park, Seong-Wook; Yoo, Tae Hyeon; Oh, Chan Hee; Park, Ji-Ho; Yang, Sung Yun; Kim, Yong-Sung; Kim, Dong-Myung

    2016-10-01

    Antibodies that target intracellular proteins hold great promise in the development of novel therapeutic interventions for various diseases. In particular, antibodies that can cross cellular membranes have potential applications in controlling disease-related intracellular protein-protein interactions. Given the large number of cytosolic proteins and complicated interactions that are potentially involved in disease development, discovery of antibodies targeting intracellular proteins requires iterative cycles of expression and assessment of candidate antibodies. Because current cell-based expression methods do not provide sufficient throughput for production and assay of cytosol-penetrating antibodies, we integrated a cell-free protein synthesis system designed to provide optimal conditions for production of functional antibodies with a cytosol-penetration assay. The proposed approach of consolidating cell-free synthesis and cell-based assay will substantially expand the capability of discovering and engineering antibodies that can cross the cell membrane and effectively control protein-mediated cellular functions. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 2107-2112. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27043877

  10. Laser capture.

    PubMed

    Potter, S Steven; Brunskill, Eric W

    2012-01-01

    This chapter describes detailed methods used for laser capture microdissection (LCM) of discrete subpopulations of cells. Topics covered include preparing tissue blocks, cryostat sectioning, processing slides, performing the LCM, and purification of RNA from LCM samples. Notes describe the fine points of each operation, which can often mean the difference between success and failure. PMID:22639264

  11. In vitro comet and micronucleus assays do not predict morphological transforming effects of silica particles in Syrian Hamster Embryo cells.

    PubMed

    Darne, Christian; Coulais, Catherine; Terzetti, Francine; Fontana, Caroline; Binet, Stéphane; Gaté, Laurent; Guichard, Yves

    2016-01-15

    Crystalline silica particles and asbestos have both been classified as carcinogenic by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). However, because of the limited data available, amorphous silica was not classifiable. In vitro, the carcinogenic potential of natural crystalline and amorphous silica particles has been revealed by the Syrian Hamster Embryo (SHE) cell transformation assay. On the other hand, the genotoxic potential of those substances has not been investigated in SHE cells. And yet, genotoxicity assays are commonly used for hazard evaluation and they are often used as in vitro assays of reference to predict a possible carcinogenic potential. The main objective of this study was to compare the genotoxic potential and the carcinogenic potential of different crystalline and amorphous silica particles in SHE cells. Three silica samples of different crystallinity were used: natural amorphous silica, partially crystallized silica and quartz silica particles. Their genotoxicity were tested through the in vitro micronucleus assay and the comet assay in SHE, and their carcinogenic potential through the SHE transformation assay. In addition, silica samples were also tested with the same genotoxicity assays in V79 hamster-lung cells, a common in vitro model for particle exposure. Results obtained in the micronucleus and the comet assays show that none of the silica was capable of inducing genotoxic effects in SHE cells and only the amorphous silica induced genotoxic effects in V79 cells. However in the SHE cell transformation assays, the partially crystallized and quartz silica were able to induce morphological cell transformation. Together, these data suggest that, in vitro, the short-term genotoxic assays alone are not sufficient to predict the hazard and the carcinogenic potential of this type of particles; SHE transformation assay appears a more reliable tool for this purpose and should be included in the "in vitro battery assays" for hazard

  12. Tissue-Specific Methylation of Human Insulin Gene and PCR Assay for Monitoring Beta Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Husseiny, Mohamed I.; Kaye, Alexander; Zebadua, Emily; Kandeel, Fouad; Ferreri, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    The onset of metabolic dysregulation in type 1 diabetes (T1D) occurs after autoimmune destruction of the majority of pancreatic insulin-producing beta cells. We previously demonstrated that the DNA encoding the insulin gene is uniquely unmethylated in these cells and then developed a methylation-specific PCR (MSP) assay to identify circulating beta cell DNA in streptozotocin-treated mice prior to the rise in blood glucose. The current study extends to autoimmune non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice and humans, showing in NOD mice that beta cell death occurs six weeks before the rise in blood sugar and coincides with the onset of islet infiltration by immune cells, demonstrating the utility of MSP for monitoring T1D. We previously reported unique patterns of methylation of the human insulin gene, and now extend this to other human tissues. The methylation patterns of the human insulin promoter, intron 1, exon 2, and intron 2 were determined in several normal human tissues. Similar to our previous report, the human insulin promoter was unmethylated in beta cells, but methylated in all other tissues tested. In contrast, intron 1, exon 2 and intron 2 did not exhibit any tissue-specific DNA methylation pattern. Subsequently, a human MSP assay was developed based on the methylation pattern of the insulin promoter and human islet DNA was successfully detected in circulation of T1D patients after islet transplantation therapy. Signal levels of normal controls and pre-transplant samples were shown to be similar, but increased dramatically after islet transplantation. In plasma the signal declines with time but in whole blood remains elevated for at least two weeks, indicating that association of beta cell DNA with blood cells prolongs the signal. This assay provides an effective method to monitor beta cell destruction in early T1D and in islet transplantation therapy. PMID:24722187

  13. Endothelial cell differentiation into capillary-like structures in response to tumour cell conditioned medium: a modified chemotaxis chamber assay.

    PubMed Central

    Garrido, T.; Riese, H. H.; Aracil, M.; Pérez-Aranda, A.

    1995-01-01

    We have developed a modified chemotaxis chamber assay in which bovine aortic endothelial (BAE) cells degrade Matrigel basement membrane and migrate and form capillary-like structures on type I collagen. This capillary formation occurs in the presence of conditioned media from highly metastatic tumour cell lines, such as B16F10 murine melanoma or MDA-MD-231 human breast adenocarcinoma, but not in the presence of conditioned medium (CM) from the less invasive B16F0 cell line. Replacement of tumour cell CM by 10 ng ml-1 basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) also results in capillary-like structure formation by BAE cells. An anti-bFGF antibody blocks this effect, showing that bFGF is one of the factors responsible for the angiogenic response induced by B16F10 CM in our assay. Addition of an anti-laminin antibody reduces significantly the formation of capillary-like structures, probably by blocking the attachment of BAE cells to laminin present in Matrigel. The anti-angiogenic compound suramin inhibits in a dose-dependent manner (complete inhibition with 100 microM suramin) the migration and differentiation of BAE cells on type I collagen in response to B16F10 CM. This assay represents a new model system to study tumour-induced angiogenesis in vitro. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7536021

  14. Proteins deposited in the dermis are rapidly captured and presented by epidermal Langerhans cells

    PubMed Central

    Flacher, Vincent; Tripp, Christoph H.; Stoitzner, Patrizia; Haid, Bernhard; Ebner, Susanne; Koch, Franz; Park, Chae Gyu; Steinman, Ralph M.; Idoyaga, Juliana; Romani, Nikolaus

    2010-01-01

    Antigen-presenting cells can capture antigens that are deposited in the skin, including vaccines given subcutaneously. These include different dendritic cells (DC) such as epidermal Langerhans cells (LC), dermal DC and dermal langerin+ DC. To evaluate access of dermal antigens to skin DC, we used mAb to two C-type lectin endocytic receptors, DEC-205/CD205 and langerin/CD207. When applied to murine and human skin explant cultures, these mAb were efficiently taken up by epidermal LC. Additionally, anti-DEC-205 targeted langerin+ CD103+ and langerin− CD103− mouse dermal DC. Unexpectedly, intradermal injection of either mAb, but not isotype control, resulted in strong and rapid labelling of LC in situ, implying that large molecules can diffuse through the basement membrane into the epidermis. Epidermal LC targeted in vivo by ovalbumin-coupled anti-DEC-205 potently presented antigen to CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Thus, epidermal LC play a major role in uptake of lectin-binding ligands under standard vaccination conditions. PMID:19890348

  15. A Two-Stage Microfluidic Device for the Isolation and Capture of Circulating Tumor Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Andrew; Belsare, Sayali; Giorgio, Todd; Mu, Richard

    2014-11-01

    Analysis of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) can be critical for studying how tumors grow and metastasize, in addition to personalizing treatment for cancer patients. CTCs are rare events in blood, making it difficult to remove CTCs from the blood stream. Two microfluidic devices have been developed to separate CTCs from blood. The first is a double spiral device that focuses cells into streams, the positions of which are determined by cell diameter. The second device uses ligand-coated magnetic nanoparticles that selectively attach to CTCs. The nanoparticles then pull CTCs out of solution using a magnetic field. These two devices will be combined into a single 2-stage microfluidic device that will capture CTCs more efficiently than either device on its own. The first stage depletes the number of blood cells in the sample by size-based separation. The second stage will magnetically remove CTCs from solution for study and culturing. Thus far, size-based separation has been achieved. Research will also focus on understanding the equations that govern fluid dynamics and magnetic fields in order to determine how the manipulation of microfluidic parameters, such as dimensions and flow rate, will affect integration and optimization of the 2-stage device. NSF-CREST: Center for Physics and Chemistry of Materials. HRD-0420516; Department of Defense, Peer Reviewed Medical Research Program Award W81XWH-13-1-0397.

  16. EBI2-mediated bridging channel positioning supports splenic dendritic cell homeostasis and particulate antigen capture

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Tangsheng; Cyster, Jason G

    2013-01-01

    Splenic dendritic cells (DCs) present blood-borne antigens to lymphocytes to promote T cell and antibody responses. The cues involved in positioning DCs in areas of antigen exposure in the spleen are undefined. Here we show that CD4+ DCs highly express EBI2 and migrate to its oxysterol ligand, 7α,25-OHC. In mice lacking EBI2 or the enzymes needed for generating normal distributions of 7α,25-OHC, CD4+ DCs are reduced in frequency and the remaining cells fail to situate in marginal zone bridging channels. The CD4+ DC deficiency can be rescued by LTβR agonism. EBI2-mediated positioning in bridging channels promotes DC encounter with blood-borne particulate antigen. Upon exposure to antigen, CD4+ DCs move rapidly to the T-B zone interface and promote induction of helper T cell and antibody responses. These findings establish an essential role for EBI2 in CD4+ DC positioning and homeostasis and in facilitating capture and presentation of blood-borne particulate antigens. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00757.001 PMID:23682316

  17. Laser capture microdissection in Ectocarpus siliculosus: the pathway to cell-specific transcriptomics in brown algae.

    PubMed

    Saint-Marcoux, Denis; Billoud, Bernard; Langdale, Jane A; Charrier, Bénédicte

    2015-01-01

    Laser capture microdissection (LCM) facilitates the isolation of individual cells from tissue sections, and when combined with RNA amplification techniques, it is an extremely powerful tool for examining genome-wide expression profiles in specific cell-types. LCM has been widely used to address various biological questions in both animal and plant systems, however, no attempt has been made so far to transfer LCM technology to macroalgae. Macroalgae are a collection of widespread eukaryotes living in fresh and marine water. In line with the collective effort to promote molecular investigations of macroalgal biology, here we demonstrate the feasibility of using LCM and cell-specific transcriptomics to study development of the brown alga Ectocarpus siliculosus. We describe a workflow comprising cultivation and fixation of algae on glass slides, laser microdissection, and RNA amplification. To illustrate the effectiveness of the procedure, we show qPCR data and metrics obtained from cell-specific transcriptomes generated from both upright and prostrate filaments of Ectocarpus. PMID:25713580

  18. Laser capture microdissection in Ectocarpus siliculosus: the pathway to cell-specific transcriptomics in brown algae

    PubMed Central

    Saint-Marcoux, Denis; Billoud, Bernard; Langdale, Jane A.; Charrier, Bénédicte

    2015-01-01

    Laser capture microdissection (LCM) facilitates the isolation of individual cells from tissue sections, and when combined with RNA amplification techniques, it is an extremely powerful tool for examining genome-wide expression profiles in specific cell-types. LCM has been widely used to address various biological questions in both animal and plant systems, however, no attempt has been made so far to transfer LCM technology to macroalgae. Macroalgae are a collection of widespread eukaryotes living in fresh and marine water. In line with the collective effort to promote molecular investigations of macroalgal biology, here we demonstrate the feasibility of using LCM and cell-specific transcriptomics to study development of the brown alga Ectocarpus siliculosus. We describe a workflow comprising cultivation and fixation of algae on glass slides, laser microdissection, and RNA amplification. To illustrate the effectiveness of the procedure, we show qPCR data and metrics obtained from cell-specific transcriptomes generated from both upright and prostrate filaments of Ectocarpus. PMID:25713580

  19. Cellular assay optimization: part II: the use of a simple integrated robotic work cell to allow the multiplexed batching of cellular assays.

    PubMed

    Macmillan, Marie A; Orme, Jonathan P; Roberts, Karen

    2011-10-01

    This report describes the implementation of an automated work cell with commercially available hardware and software, capable of handling up to 15 separate reagents for performing 96-well or 384-well assays but with a small footprint and only a single liquid dispenser and two plate washers. Extremely flexible software was used to enable this simple work cell to perform processes that would traditionally require a much larger, more expensive automation platform. With the development of the C-Myc assays for the targets DYRK, BMX, PERK, and FAK, the authors describe a software solution to multibatch assays to run simultaneously, reducing reagent dead volume and increasing the efficiency of running multiple assays such that the time to generate data across multiple targets was significantly shortened. Although a larger automated system with multiple robotic arms and extensive equipment would also be able to process multiple assays simultaneously, the work cell we have described represents an inexpensive and flexible, easily upgradable option suitable for a wider range of labs. PMID:21844326

  20. RNA Whole-Mount In situ Hybridisation Proximity Ligation Assay (rISH-PLA), an Assay for Detecting RNA-Protein Complexes in Intact Cells

    PubMed Central

    Roussis, Ioannis M.; Guille, Matthew; Myers, Fiona A.; Scarlett, Garry P.

    2016-01-01

    Techniques for studying RNA-protein interactions have lagged behind those for DNA-protein complexes as a consequence of the complexities associated with working with RNA. Here we present a method for the modification of the existing In Situ Hybridisation–Proximity Ligation Assay (ISH-PLA) protocol to adapt it to the study of RNA regulation (rISH-PLA). As proof of principle we used the well-characterised interaction of the Xenopus laevis Staufen RNA binding protein with Vg1 mRNA, the complex of which co-localises to the vegetal pole of Xenopus oocytes. The applicability of both the Stau1 antibody and the Locked Nucleic Acid probe (LNA) recognising Vg1 mRNA were independently validated by whole-mount Immunohistochemistry and whole-mount in situ hybridisation assays respectively prior to combining them in the rISH-PLA assay. The rISH-PLA assay allows the identification of a given RNA-protein complex at subcellular and single cell resolution, thus avoiding the lack of spatial resolution and sensitivity associated with assaying heterogenous cell populations from which conventional RNA-protein interaction detection techniques suffer. This technique will be particularly usefully for studying the activity of RNA binding proteins (RBPs) in complex mixtures of cells, for example tissue sections or whole embryos. PMID:26824753

  1. Electro-osmotic-based catholyte production by Microbial Fuel Cells for carbon capture.

    PubMed

    Gajda, Iwona; Greenman, John; Melhuish, Chris; Santoro, Carlo; Li, Baikun; Cristiani, Pierangela; Ieropoulos, Ioannis

    2015-12-01

    In Microbial Fuel Cells (MFCs), the recovery of water can be achieved with the help of both active (electro-osmosis), and passive (osmosis) transport pathways of electrolyte through the semi-permeable selective separator. The electrical current-dependent transport, results in cations and electro-osmotically dragged water molecules reaching the cathode. The present study reports on the production of catholyte on the surface of the cathode, which was achieved as a direct result of electricity generation using MFCs fed with wastewater, and employing Pt-free carbon based cathode electrodes. The highest pH levels (>13) of produced liquid were achieved by the MFCs with the activated carbon cathodes producing the highest power (309 μW). Caustic catholyte formation is presented in the context of beneficial cathode flooding and transport mechanisms, in an attempt to understand the effects of active and passive diffusion. Active transport was dominant under closed circuit conditions and showed a linear correlation with power performance, whereas osmotic (passive) transport was governing the passive flux of liquid in open circuit conditions. Caustic catholyte was mineralised to a mixture of carbonate and bicarbonate salts (trona) thus demonstrating an active carbon capture mechanism as a result of the MFC energy-generating performance. Carbon capture would be valuable for establishing a carbon negative economy and environmental sustainability of the wastewater treatment process. PMID:26343045

  2. Micromachined nanocalorimetric sensor for ultra-low-volume cell-based assays.

    PubMed

    Johannessen, Erik A; Weaver, John M R; Bourova, Lenka; Svoboda, Petr; Cobbold, Peter H; Cooper, Jonathan M

    2002-05-01

    Current strategies for cell-based screening generally focus on the development of highly specific assays, which require an understanding of the nature of the signaling molecules and cellular pathways involved. In contrast, changes in temperature of cells provides a measure of altered cellular metabolism that is not stimulus specific and hence could have widespread applications in cell-based screening of receptor agonists and antagonists, as well as in the assessment of toxicity of new lead compounds. Consequently, we have developed a micromachined nanocalorimetric biological sensor using a small number of isolated living cells integrated within a subnanoliter format, which is capable of detecting 13 nW of generated power from the cells, upon exposure to a chemical or pharmaceutical stimulus. The sensor comprises a 10-junction gold and nickel thermopile, integrated on a silicon chip which was back-etched to span a 800-nm-thick membrane of silicon nitride. The thin-film membrane, which supported the sensing junctions of the thermoelectric transducer, gave the system a temperature resolution of 0.125 mK, a low heat capacity of 1.2 nJ mK(-1), and a rapid (unfiltered) response time of 12 ms. The application of the system in ultra-low-volume cell-based assays could provide a rapid endogenous screen. It offers important additional advantages over existing methods in that it is generic in nature, it does not require the use of recombinant cell lines or of detailed assay development, and finally, it can enable the use of primary cell lines or tissue biopsies. PMID:12033326

  3. Microfluidic assay-based optical measurement techniques for cell analysis: A review of recent progress.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jong-Ryul; Song, Hyerin; Sung, Jong Hwan; Kim, Donghyun; Kim, Kyujung

    2016-03-15

    Since the early 2000s, microfluidic cell culture systems have attracted significant attention as a promising alternative to conventional cell culture methods and the importance of designing an efficient detection system to analyze cell behavior on a chip in real time is raised. For this reason, various measurement techniques for microfluidic devices have been developed with the development of microfluidic assays for high-throughput screening and mimicking of in vivo conditions. In this review, we discuss optical measurement techniques for microfluidic assays. First of all, the recent development of fluorescence- and absorbance-based optical measurement systems is described. Next, advanced optical detection systems are introduced with respect to three emphases: 1) optimization for long-term, real-time, and in situ measurements; 2) performance improvements; and 3) multimodal analysis conjugations. Moreover, we explore presents future prospects for the establishment of optical detection systems following the development of complex, multi-dimensional microfluidic cell culture assays to mimic in vivo tissue, organ, and human systems. PMID:26409023

  4. A comparison of cell-collecting methods for the Comet assay in urinary bladders of rats.

    PubMed

    Wada, Kunio; Ohnuma, Aya; Kojima, Sayuri; Yoshida, Toshinori; Matsumoto, Kyomu

    2012-02-18

    Conducting the single-cell gel electrophoresis (Comet) assay in the urinary bladders of rodents is technically problematic because the bladder is small and thin, which makes it difficult to collect its mucosal cells by scraping. We performed the Comet assay using a simple mincing method in which tissues are minced with scissors. We then compared data obtained with this method with data obtained using the scraping method. Sprague-Dawley rats of both sexes were orally given twice the known carcinogens N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU), ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS), or o-anisidine (OA). Three hours after the second administration, the bladder of each rat was divided into two parts and each part was processed by either the mincing or the scraping method. Both mincing and scraping methods detected DNA damage in MNU-, EMS-, but not OA-treated rats, and thus the mincing method had a sufficient capability to detect DNA damaging agents. The morphological analysis of the prepared cell suspensions revealed that more than 80% of the cells collected by the mincing method were from the epithelium. Because the mincing method requires only one-half of a bladder, the other half remains intact and can be used for histopathological examination. We conclude that the mincing method is easier and more appropriate for the Comet assay in urinary bladder tissue than the scraping method. PMID:22155339

  5. Identification of compounds that modulate retinol signaling using a cell-based qHTS assay.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yanling; Sakamuru, Srilatha; Huang, Ruili; Reese, David H; Xia, Menghang

    2016-04-01

    In vertebrates, the retinol (vitamin A) signaling pathway (RSP) controls the biosynthesis and catabolism of all-trans retinoic acid (atRA), which regulates transcription of genes essential for embryonic development. Chemicals that interfere with the RSP to cause abnormal intracellular levels of atRA are potential developmental toxicants. To assess chemicals for the ability to interfere with retinol signaling, we have developed a cell-based RARE (Retinoic Acid Response Element) reporter gene assay to identify RSP disruptors. To validate this assay in a quantitative high-throughput screening (qHTS) platform, we screened the Library of Pharmacologically Active Compounds (LOPAC) in both agonist and antagonist modes. The screens detected known RSP agonists, demonstrating assay reliability, and also identified novel RSP agonists including kenpaullone, niclosamide, PD98059 and SU4312, and RSP antagonists including Bay 11-7085, LY294002, 3,4-Methylenedioxy-β-nitrostyrene, and topoisomerase inhibitors (camptothecin, topotecan, amsacrine hydrochloride, and idarubicin). When evaluated in the P19 pluripotent cell, these compounds were found to affect the expression of the Hoxa1 gene that is essential for embryo body patterning. These results show that the RARE assay is an effective qHTS approach for screening large compound libraries to identify chemicals that have the potential to adversely affect embryonic development through interference with retinol signaling. PMID:26820057

  6. The use of human adipose-derived stem cells based cytotoxicity assay for acute toxicity test.

    PubMed

    Abud, Ana Paula Ressetti; Zych, Jaiesa; Reus, Thamile Luciane; Kuligovski, Crisciele; de Moraes, Elizabeth; Dallagiovanna, Bruno; de Aguiar, Alessandra Melo

    2015-12-01

    Human adipose-derived stem cells (ADSC) were evaluated as cell culture model for cytotoxicity assay and toxicity prediction by using the neutral red uptake assay (NRU). In this study, we compared ADSC and the murine cell line BALB/c 3T3 clone A31 to predict the toxicity of 12 reference substances as recommended by the Interagency Coordinating Committee on the Validation of Alternative Methods. We predicted the LD50 for RC-rat-only weight and RC-rat-only millimole regressions for both cell culture models. For RC rat-only weight regression, both cells had the same accordance (50%), while for RC rat-only millimole regression, the accordance was 50% for ADSC and 42% for 3T3s. Thus, ADSC have similar capability for GHS class prediction as the 3T3 cell line for the evaluated reference substances. Therefore, ADSCs showed the potential to be considered a novel model for use in evaluating cytotoxicity in drug development and industry as well as for regulatory purposes to reduce or replace the use of laboratory animals with acceptable sensitivity for toxicity prediction in humans. These cells can be used to complete the results from other models, mainly because of its human origin. Moreover, it is less expensive in comparison with other existing models. PMID:26382612

  7. Colorimetric growth assay for epidermal cell cultures by their crystal violet binding capacity.

    PubMed

    Bonnekoh, B; Wevers, A; Jugert, F; Merk, H; Mahrle, G

    1989-01-01

    The application of a simple, rapid, and inexpensive colorimetric growth assay was tested for human epidermal cells subcultured in uncoated plastic dishes. Cell layers were incubated with a crystal violet (CV) solution (0.2% with ethanol 2% in 0.5 M Tris-Cl buffer, pH 7.8) for 10 min at room temperature. After rinsing with 0.5 M Tris-Cl (pH 7.8) the cell layer was dried and decolorized with a sodium-dodecylsulfate solution (0.5% with ethanol 50% in 0.5 M Tris-Cl, pH 7.8) for 60 min at 37 degrees C. The extinction of the supernatant was read at the absorption maximum of 586 nm. The protein content of attached cells as classical parameter for quantifying cell growth was strongly related to CV extinction with a correlation coefficient of r = 0.98. Furthermore, the subcellular protein binding qualities of CV were analyzed. The water-soluble protein fraction of cultured epidermal cells was separated by sodium-dodecylsulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and stained with CV. We found a staining pattern which was qualitatively very similar to that of Coomassie blue, however less intense. Keratin electrophoresis revealed an affinity of CV to the 48, 50, and 56 kD cytokeratins. In conclusion, this CV assay is a reliable and simple method for the monitoring of epidermal cell growth in cultures. PMID:2482013

  8. A Carbonyl Capture Approach for Profiling Oxidized Metabolites in Cell Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Mattingly, Stephanie J.; Xu, Tao; Nantz, Michael H.; Higashi, Richard M.; Fan, Teresa W.-M.

    2012-01-01

    Fourier-transform ion-cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS) detection of oxidized cellular metabolites is described using isotopologic, carbonyl-selective derivatizing agents that integrate aminooxy functionality for carbonyl capture, quaternary nitrogen for electrospray enhancement, and a hydrophobic domain for sample cleanup. These modular structural features enable rapid, sensitive analysis of complex mixtures of metabolite-derivatives by FT-ICR-MS via continuous nanoelectrospray infusion. Specifically, this approach can be used to globally assess levels of low abundance and labile aldehyde and ketone metabolites quantitatively and in high throughput manner. These metabolites are often key and unique indicators of various biochemical pathways and their perturbations. Analysis of lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells established a profile of carbonyl metabolites spanning multiple structural classes. We also demonstrate a procedure for metabolite quantification using pyruvate as a model analyte. PMID:23175637

  9. Traceable clonal culture and chemodrug assay of heterogeneous prostate carcinoma PC3 cells in microfluidic single cell array chips

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jaehoon; Ingram, Patrick N.; Bersano-Begey, Tom; Yoon, Euisik

    2014-01-01

    Cancer heterogeneity has received considerable attention for its role in tumor initiation and progression, and its implication for diagnostics and therapeutics in the clinic. To facilitate a cellular heterogeneity study in a low cost and highly efficient manner, we present a microfluidic platform that allows traceable clonal culture and characterization. The platform captures single cells into a microwell array and cultures them for clonal expansion, subsequently allowing on-chip characterization of clonal phenotype and response against drug treatments. Using a heterogeneous prostate cancer model, the PC3 cell line, we verified our prototype, identifying three different sub-phenotypes and correlating their clonal drug responsiveness to cell phenotype. PMID:25553180

  10. A lateral electrophoretic flow diagnostic assay

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Robert; Skandarajah, Arunan; Gerver, Rachel E.; Neira, Hector D.; Fletcher, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    Immunochromatographic assays are a cornerstone tool in disease screening. To complement existing lateral flow assays (based on wicking flow) we introduce a lateral flow format that employs directed electrophoretic transport. The format is termed a “lateral e-flow assay” and is designed to support multiplexed detection using immobilized reaction volumes of capture antigen. To fabricate the lateral e-flow device, we employ mask-based UV photopatterning to selectively immobilize unmodified capture antigen along the microchannel in a barcode-like pattern. The channel-filling polyacrylamide hydrogel incorporates a photoactive moiety (benzophenone) to immobilize capture antigen to the hydrogel without a priori antigen modification. We report a heterogeneous sandwich assay using low-power electrophoresis to drive biospecimen through the capture antigen barcode. Fluorescence barcode readout is collected via a low-resource appropriate imaging system (CellScope). We characterize lateral e-flow assay performance and demonstrate a serum assay for antibodies to the hepatitis C virus (HCV). In a pilot study, the lateral e-flow assay positively identifies HCV+ human sera in 60 min. The lateral e-flow assay provides a flexible format for conducting multiplexed immunoassays relevant to confirmatory diagnosis in near-patient settings. PMID:25608872

  11. Serial Measurements of Apoptotic Cell Numbers Provide Better Acceptance Criterion for PBMC Quality than a Single Measurement Prior to the T Cell Assay

    PubMed Central

    Wunsch, Marie; Caspell, Richard; Kuerten, Stefanie; Lehmann, Paul V.; Sundararaman, Srividya

    2015-01-01

    As soon as Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (PBMC) are isolated from whole blood, some cells begin dying. The rate of apoptotic cell death is increased when PBMC are shipped, cryopreserved, or stored under suboptimal conditions. Apoptotic cells secrete cytokines that suppress inflammation while promoting phagocytosis. Increased numbers of apoptotic cells in PBMC may modulate T cell functions in antigen-triggered T cell assays. We assessed the effect of apoptotic bystander cells on a T cell ELISPOT assay by selectively inducing B cell apoptosis using α-CD20 mAbs. The presence of large numbers of apoptotic B cells did not affect T cell functionality. In contrast, when PBMC were stored under unfavorable conditions, leading to damage and apoptosis in the T cells as well as bystander cells, T cell functionality was greatly impaired. We observed that measuring the number of apoptotic cells before plating the PBMC into an ELISPOT assay did not reflect the extent of PBMC injury, but measuring apoptotic cell frequencies at the end of the assay did. Our data suggest that measuring the numbers of apoptotic cells prior to and post T cell assays may provide more stringent PBMC quality acceptance criteria than measurements done only prior to the start of the assay. PMID:25585298

  12. Topoisomerase Assays

    PubMed Central

    Nitiss, John L.; Soans, Eroica; Rogojina, Anna; Seth, Aman; Mishina, Margarita

    2012-01-01

    Topoisomerases are nuclear enzymes that play essential roles in DNA replication, transcription, chromosome segregation, and recombination. All cells have two major forms of topoisomerases: type I, which makes single-stranded cuts in DNA, and type II enzymes, which cut and pass double-stranded DNA. DNA topoisomerases are important targets of approved and experimental anti-cancer agents. The protocols described in this unit are of assays used to assess new chemical entities for their ability to inhibit both forms of DNA topoisomerase. Included are an in vitro assay for topoisomerase I activity based on relaxation of supercoiled DNA and an assay for topoisomerase II based on the decatenation of double-stranded DNA. The preparation of mammalian cell extracts for assaying topoisomerase activity is described, along with a protocol for an ICE assay for examining topoisomerase covalent complexes in vivo and an assay for measuring DNA cleavage in vitro. PMID:22684721

  13. Single-cell multiple gene expression analysis based on single-molecule-detection microarray assay for multi-DNA determination.

    PubMed

    Li, Lu; Wang, Xianwei; Zhang, Xiaoli; Wang, Jinxing; Jin, Wenrui

    2015-01-01

    We report a novel ultra-sensitive and high-selective single-molecule-detection microarray assay (SMA) for multiple DNA determination. In the SMA, a capture DNA (DNAc) microarray consisting of 10 subarrays with 9 spots for each subarray is fabricated on a silanized glass coverslip as the substrate. On the subarrays, the spot-to-spot spacing is 500 μm and each spot has a diameter of ∼300 μm. The sequence of the DNAcs on the 9 spots of a subarray is different, to determine 8 types of target DNAs (DNAts). Thus, 8 types of DNAts are captured to their complementary DNAcs at 8 spots of a subarray, respectively, and then labeled with quantum dots (QDs) attached to 8 types of detection DNAs (DNAds) with different sequences. The ninth spot is used to detect the blank value. In order to determine the same 8 types of DNAts in 10 samples, the 10 DNAc-modified subarrays on the microarray are identical. Fluorescence single-molecule images of the QD-labeled DNAts on each spot of the subarray are acquired using a home-made single-molecule microarray reader. The amounts of the DNAts are quantified by counting the bright dots from the QDs. For a microarray, 8 types of DNAts in 10 samples can be quantified in parallel. The limit of detection of the SMA for DNA determination is as low as 1.3×10(-16) mol L(-1). The SMA for multi-DNA determination can also be applied in single-cell multiple gene expression analysis through quantification of complementary DNAs (cDNAs) corresponding to multiple messenger RNAs (mRNAs) in single cells. To do so, total RNA in single cells is extracted and reversely transcribed into their cDNAs. Three types of cDNAs corresponding to beta-2-microglobulin, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and ribosomal protein, large, P2 mRNAs in single human breast cancer cells and 5 random synthetic DNAts are simultaneously quantified to examine the SMA and SMA-based single-cell multiple gene expression analysis. PMID:25479875

  14. Development and validation of cell-based assays for the detection of neutralizing antibodies to drug products: a practical approach.

    PubMed

    Jolicoeur, Pierre; Tacey, Richard L

    2012-12-01

    Neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) that bind to drug products and may diminish or eliminate the associated biological activity are an unintended and undesirable outcome of some drug products. Standard immunoassays can detect drug-specific antibodies but cannot distinguish NAbs, so cell-based assays are often preferred because they closely mimic the mechanism by which NAbs and drug products interact in vivo. Each cell-based NAb assay is unique and based on several factors, such as the drug product, study population and phase of development (preclinical or clinical). The type of NAb assay (direct or indirect) depends on the drug's mechanism of action. Key steps in assay development are: selecting a suitable cell line, choosing the proper cellular response (end point method), selection of proper controls and optimization of assay parameters. Once developed, the assay must be rigorously tested (validated) to ensure that it meets several important criteria and is fit for its intended purpose. PMID:23244285

  15. Use of limited protocols to evaluate the genotoxicity of hazardous wastes in mammalian cell assays: comparison to Salmonella

    SciTech Connect

    DeMarini, D.M.; Brusick, D.J.; Lewtas, J.

    1987-01-01

    Dichloromethane extracts of four diverse hazardous wastes (coke plant, herbicide manufacturing, pulp and paper, and oil refining) were evaluated for mutagenicity in strains TA98 and TA100 of Salmonella. These extracts also were tested for biological activity in short-term mammalian cell assays, including mutagenicity in L5178Y/TK +/- mouse lymphoma cells, chromosomal aberrations and sister chromatid exchanges in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, morphological transformation in BALB/c-3T3 cells, and teratogenic potential in mouse limb bud cells. The mammalian cell assays were performed using limited protocols that consisted of a preliminary testing of the extracts for cytotoxicity in CHO cells in order to estimate the appropriate dose range for the other assays. These assays were then performed once with only a few doses of extract; all but the mouse limb bud assay were performed in the presence of metabolic activation. Although all four of the wastes were presumptively positive for either mutation or cytogenetic effects, none of the wastes transformed BALB/c-3T3 cells. Further studies are needed to establish which mammalian cell assays, if any, might be useful complements to the Salmonella assay for the purpose of screening hazardous wastes.

  16. In vitro cytotoxicity assessment based on KC(50) with real-time cell analyzer (RTCA) assay.

    PubMed

    Pan, Tianhong; Khare, Swanand; Ackah, Fred; Huang, Biao; Zhang, Weiping; Gabos, Stephan; Jin, Can; Stampfl, Melinda

    2013-12-01

    Technological advances in cytotoxicity analysis have now made it possible to obtain real time data on changes in cell growth, morphology and cell death. This type of testing has a great potential for reducing and refining traditional in vivo toxicology tests. By monitoring the dynamic response profile of living cells via the xCELLigence real-time cell analyzer for high-throughput (RTCA HT) system, cellular changes including cell number (cell index, CI) are recorded and analyzed. A special scaled index defined as normalized cell index (NCI) is used in the analysis which reduces the influence of inter-experimental variations. To assess the extent of exposure of the tested chemicals, a two-exponent model is presented to describe rate of cell growth and death. This model is embodied in the time and concentration-dependent cellular response curves, and the parameters k1 and k2 in this model are used to describe the rate of cell growth and death. Based on calculated k2 values and the corresponding concentrations, a concentration-response curve is fitted. As a result, a cytotoxicity assessment named KC50 is calculated. The validation of the proposed method is demonstrated by exposing six cell lines to 14 chemical compounds. Our findings suggest that the proposed KC50-based toxicity assay can be an alternative to the traditional single time-point assay such as LC50 (the concentration at which 50% of the cells are killed). The proposed index has a potential for routine evaluation of cytotoxicities. Another advantage of the proposed index is that it extracts cytotoxicity information when CI fails to detect the low toxicity. PMID:24055763

  17. Anti-vascular endothelial cell antibodies (AECA): comparison of two assay methods and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Meyer, O; Kaiser, P; Haim, T; Edgell, C J; Pasquier, C; de Bandt, M; Bridey, F; Sellak, H; Lansaman, J; Kahn, M F

    1995-12-01

    Vascular endothelial cells may be a target for autoantibodies (AECAs) against membrane antigens that are constitutively expressed, induced or bound to their surface. To test this hypothesis, we used an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with two types of human endothelial cells as the substrate, i.e., human umbilical cord vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) or the hybrid cell line EAhy-926 obtained by fusion of HUVECs with the bronchial carcinoma cell line A549. A comparative functional study of these two cell types demonstrated that EAhy-926 cells produced only small amounts of VIII von Willebrand factor and tissular factor, did not contain Weibel Palade bodies visible under the electron microscope, and expressed ICAM-1 and selectin E in levels of no more than 15% of those expressed by human umbilical cord vein endothelial cells both after stimulation by bacterial lipopolysaccharide and under basal conditions. However, the two assay methods yielded similar IgG AECA titers when used on sera from patients with rheumatoid vasculitis or antiphospholipid syndrome. These antibodies did not exhibit cytotoxicity for cord vein or EAhy-926 cells. They were not specific for endothelium, since their activity decreased by a mean of 40% after incubation of sera with the epithelial cell line A549. A cross-sectional study of 565 sera demonstrated that anti-vascular IgG and IgM AECAs reactive with EAhy-926 cells occurred mainly in patients with dermatomyositis (IgG, 58%; IgM, 22%), systemic scleroderma (IgG, 48%; IgM, 18%), primary Sjögren's syndrome (IgG, 44%; IgM, 12%) and secondary and primary systemic vasculitides (IgG, 38%; IgM, 18%) including Wegener's granulomatosis. A longitudinal study in patients with Wegener's granulomatosis showed that AECAS were predictive of disease activity. PMID:8869215

  18. Molding a silver nanoparticle template on polydimethylsiloxane to efficiently capture mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Bai, Hai-Jing; Gou, Hong-Lei; Xu, Jing-Juan; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2010-02-16

    Herein, a functional template made up of in situ synthesized silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) is prepared on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) for the spatial control of cell capture, where the residual Si-H groups in the PDMS matrix are used as reductants to reduce AgNO(3) for forming AgNPs. In virtue of microfluidic system, a one-dimensional array pattern of AgNPs is obtained easily. Further combining with plasma treatment, a two-dimensional array pattern of AgNPs could be achieved. The obtained PDMS-AgNPs composite is characterized in detail. The PDMS-AgNPs composite shows good antibacterial property in E. coli adhesion tests. The patterns possess hifi and high resolution (ca. 8 microm). Cell patterns with high efficiency and spatial selectivity are further formed with the aid of H-Arg-Gly-Asp-Cys-OH (RGDC) tetrapeptide which is grafted on the AgNPs template. Cells immobilized on the template show a good ability for adhesion, spreading, migration, and growth. PMID:20141218

  19. Recommended protocol for the BALB/c 3T3 cell transformation assay.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Kiyoshi; Bohnenberger, Susanne; Hayashi, Kumiko; Kunkelmann, Thorsten; Muramatsu, Dai; Phrakonkham, Pascal; Poth, Albrecht; Sakai, Ayako; Salovaara, Susan; Tanaka, Noriho; Thomas, B Claire; Umeda, Makoto

    2012-04-11

    The present protocol has been developed for the BALB/c 3T3 cell transformation assay (CTA), following the prevalidation study coordinated by the European Centre for the Validation of Alternative Methods (ECVAM) and reported in this issue (Tanaka et al. [16]). Based upon the experience gained from this effort and as suggested by the Validation Management Team (VMT), some acceptance and assessment criteria have been refined compared to those used during the prevalidation study. The present protocol thus describes cell culture maintenance, the dose-range finding (DRF) experiment and the transformation assay, including cytotoxicity and morphological transformation evaluation. Use of this protocol and of the associated photo catalogue included in this issue (Sasaki et al. [17]) is recommended for the future conduct of the BALB/c 3T3 CTA. PMID:22212201

  20. Rapid automation of a cell-based assay using a modular approach: case study of a flow-based Varicella Zoster Virus infectivity assay.

    PubMed

    Joelsson, Daniel; Gates, Irina V; Pacchione, Diana; Wang, Christopher J; Bennett, Philip S; Zhang, Yuhua; McMackin, Jennifer; Frey, Tina; Brodbeck, Kristin C; Baxter, Heather; Barmat, Scott L; Benetti, Luca; Bodmer, Jean-Luc

    2010-06-01

    Vaccine manufacturing requires constant analytical monitoring to ensure reliable quality and a consistent safety profile of the final product. Concentration and bioactivity of active components of the vaccine are key attributes routinely evaluated throughout the manufacturing cycle and for product release and dosage. In the case of live attenuated virus vaccines, bioactivity is traditionally measured in vitro by infection of susceptible cells with the vaccine followed by quantification of virus replication, cytopathology or expression of viral markers. These assays are typically multi-day procedures that require trained technicians and constant attention. Considering the need for high volumes of testing, automation and streamlining of these assays is highly desirable. In this study, the automation and streamlining of a complex infectivity assay for Varicella Zoster Virus (VZV) containing test articles is presented. The automation procedure was completed using existing liquid handling infrastructure in a modular fashion, limiting custom-designed elements to a minimum to facilitate transposition. In addition, cellular senescence data provided an optimal population doubling range for long term, reliable assay operation at high throughput. The results presented in this study demonstrate a successful automation paradigm resulting in an eightfold increase in throughput while maintaining assay performance characteristics comparable to the original assay. PMID:20117140

  1. Human mesenchymal stromal cells: identifying assays to predict potency for therapeutic selection.

    PubMed

    Deskins, Desirae L; Bastakoty, Dikshya; Saraswati, Sarika; Shinar, Andrew; Holt, Ginger E; Young, Pampee P

    2013-02-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have the potential to repair and regenerate damaged tissues, making them attractive candidates for cell-based therapies. To maximize efficacy of MSCs, prediction of their therapeutic abilities must be made so that only the best cells will be used. Our goal was to identify feasible and reproducible in vitro assays to predict MSC potency. We generated cell lines from 10 normal human bone marrow samples and used the International Society for Cellular Therapy's minimal criteria to define them as MSCs: plastic adherence, appropriate surface marker expression, and trilineage differentiation. Each MSC line was further characterized by its growth, proliferation, and viability as determined by cell count, bromodeoxyuridine incorporation, and cellular ATP levels, respectively. To determine whether these tests reliably predict the therapeutic aptitude of the MSCs, several lines were implanted in vivo to examine their capacity to engraft and form granulation tissue in a well-established murine wound model using polyvinyl alcohol sponges. Long-term engraftment of MSCs in the sponges was quantified through the presence of the human-specific Alu gene in sponge sections. Sections were also stained for proliferating cells, vascularity, and granulation tissue formation to determine successful engraftment and repair. We found that high performance in a combination of the in vitro tests accurately predicted which lines functioned well in vivo. These findings suggest that reliable and reproducible in vitro assays may be used to measure the functional potential of MSCs for therapeutic use. PMID:23362238

  2. Detection of DNA damage induced by heavy ion irradiation in the individual cells with comet assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, S.; Natsuhori, M.; Ito, N.; Funayama, T.; Kobayashi, Y.

    2003-05-01

    Investigating the biological effects of high-LET heavy ion irradiation at low fluence is important to evaluate the risk of charged particles. Especially it is important to detect radiation damage induced by the precise number of heavy ions in the individual cells. Thus we studied the relationship between the number of ions traversing the cell and DNA damage produced by the ion irradiation. We applied comet assay to measure the DNA damage in the individual cells. Cells attached on the ion track detector CR-39 were irradiated with ion beams at TIARA, JAERI-Takasaki. After irradiation, the cells were stained with ethidium bromide and the opposite side of the CR-39 was etched. We observed that the heavy ions with higher LET values induced the heavier DNA damage. The result indicated that the amount of DNA damage induced by one particle increased with the LET values of the heavy ions.

  3. Effects of several salt marsh plants on mouse spleen and thymus cell proliferation using mtt assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Youngwan; Lee, Hee-Jung; Kim, You Ah; Youn, Hyun Joo; Lee, Burm-Jong

    2005-12-01

    In the present study, we have tested the effects of 21 salt marsh plants on cell proliferation of mouse immune cells (spleen and thymus) using MTT assay in culture. The methanolic extracts of six salt marsh plants ( Rosa rugosa, Ixeris tamagawaensis, Artemisia capillaris, Tetragonia tetragonoides, Erigeron annus, and Glehnia littoralis) showed very powerful suppressive effects of mouse immune cell death and significant activities of cell proliferation in vitro. Especially, the methanolic extract of Rosa rugosa was found to have fifteen times compared to the control treatment, demonstrating that Rosa rugosa may have a potent stimulation effect on immune cell proliferation. These results suggest that several salt marsh plants including Rosa rugosa could be useful for further study as an immunomodulating agent.

  4. High-content analysis of tumour cell invasion in three-dimensional spheroid assays

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Vinton; Esteves, Filomena; Chakrabarty, Aruna; Cockle, Julia; Short, Susan; Brüning-Richardson, Anke

    2015-01-01

    Targeting infiltrating tumour cells is an attractive way of combating cancer invasion and metastasis. Here we describe a novel and reproducible method for high content analysis of invading cells using multicellular tumour spheroid assays in a high grade glioma model. Live cell imaging of spheroids generated from glioma cell lines, U87 and U251, gave insight into migration dynamics and cell morphology in response to anti-migratory drugs. Immunofluorescence imaging confirmed cytoskeletal rearrangements in the treated cells indicating a direct effect on cell morphology. Effect on migration was determined by a Migration Index (MI) from brightfield images which confirmed anti-migratory activity of the drugs. A marked effect on the core with treatment suggestive of disordered proliferation was also observed. A newly developed technique to prepare the spheroids and migratory cells for immunohistochemistry allowed an assessment of response to drug treatment with a selection of markers. A difference in protein expression was noted between cells maintained within the core and migratory cells indicative of the presence of cell subpopulations within the spheroid core. We conclude that this high content analysis allows researchers to perform screening of anti-tumour invasion compounds and study their effects on cellular dynamics, particularly in relation to protein expression, for the first time. PMID:26244167

  5. High-content analysis of tumour cell invasion in three-dimensional spheroid assays.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Vinton; Esteves, Filomena; Chakrabarty, Aruna; Cockle, Julia; Short, Susan; Brüning-Richardson, Anke

    2015-01-01

    Targeting infiltrating tumour cells is an attractive way of combating cancer invasion and metastasis. Here we describe a novel and reproducible method for high content analysis of invading cells using multicellular tumour spheroid assays in a high grade glioma model. Live cell imaging of spheroids generated from glioma cell lines, U87 and U251, gave insight into migration dynamics and cell morphology in response to anti-migratory drugs. Immunofluorescence imaging confirmed cytoskeletal rearrangements in the treated cells indicating a direct effect on cell morphology. Effect on migration was determined by a Migration Index (MI) from brightfield images which confirmed anti-migratory activity of the drugs. A marked effect on the core with treatment suggestive of disordered proliferation was also observed. A newly developed technique to prepare the spheroids and migratory cells for immunohistochemistry allowed an assessment of response to drug treatment with a selection of markers. A difference in protein expression was noted between cells maintained within the core and migratory cells indicative of the presence of cell subpopulations within the spheroid core. We conclude that this high content analysis allows researchers to perform screening of anti-tumour invasion compounds and study their effects on cellular dynamics, particularly in relation to protein expression, for the first time. PMID:26244167

  6. A droplet-to-digital (D2D) microfluidic device for single cell assays.

    PubMed

    Shih, Steve C C; Gach, Philip C; Sustarich, Jess; Simmons, Blake A; Adams, Paul D; Singh, Seema; Singh, Anup K

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a new hybrid droplet-to-digital microfluidic platform (D2D) that integrates droplet-in-channel microfluidics with digital microfluidics (DMF) for performing multi-step assays. This D2D platform combines the strengths of the two formats-droplets-in-channel for facile generation of droplets containing single cells, and DMF for on-demand manipulation of droplets including control of different droplet volumes (pL-μL), creation of a dilution series of ionic liquid (IL), and parallel single cell culturing and analysis for IL toxicity screening. This D2D device also allows for automated analysis that includes a feedback-controlled system for merging and splitting of droplets to add reagents, an integrated Peltier element for parallel cell culture at optimum temperature, and an impedance sensing mechanism to control the flow rate for droplet generation and preventing droplet evaporation. Droplet-in-channel is well-suited for encapsulation of single cells as it allows the careful manipulation of flow rates of aqueous phase containing cells and oil to optimize encapsulation. Once single cell containing droplets are generated, they are transferred to a DMF chip via a capillary where they are merged with droplets containing IL and cultured at 30 °C. The DMF chip, in addition to permitting cell culture and reagent (ionic liquid/salt) addition, also allows recovery of individual droplets for off-chip analysis such as further culturing and measurement of ethanol production. The D2D chip was used to evaluate the effect of IL/salt type (four types: NaOAc, NaCl, [C2mim] [OAc], [C2mim] [Cl]) and concentration (four concentrations: 0, 37.5, 75, 150 mM) on the growth kinetics and ethanol production of yeast and as expected, increasing IL concentration led to lower biomass and ethanol production. Specifically, [C2mim] [OAc] had inhibitory effects on yeast growth at concentrations 75 and 150 mM and significantly reduced their ethanol production compared to cells grown

  7. Cripto is essential to capture mouse epiblast stem cell and human embryonic stem cell pluripotency.

    PubMed

    Fiorenzano, Alessandro; Pascale, Emilia; D'Aniello, Cristina; Acampora, Dario; Bassalert, Cecilia; Russo, Francesco; Andolfi, Gennaro; Biffoni, Mauro; Francescangeli, Federica; Zeuner, Ann; Angelini, Claudia; Chazaud, Claire; Patriarca, Eduardo J; Fico, Annalisa; Minchiotti, Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    Known molecular determinants of developmental plasticity are mainly transcription factors, while the extrinsic regulation of this process has been largely unexplored. Here we identify Cripto as one of the earliest epiblast markers and a key extracellular determinant of the naive and primed pluripotent states. We demonstrate that Cripto sustains mouse embryonic stem cell (ESC) self-renewal by modulating Wnt/β-catenin, whereas it maintains mouse epiblast stem cell (EpiSC) and human ESC pluripotency through Nodal/Smad2. Moreover, we provide unprecedented evidence that Cripto controls the metabolic reprogramming in ESCs to EpiSC transition. Remarkably, Cripto deficiency attenuates ESC lineage restriction in vitro and in vivo, and permits ESC transdifferentiation into trophectoderm lineage, suggesting that Cripto has earlier functions than previously recognized. All together, our studies provide novel insights into the current model of mammalian pluripotency and contribute to the understanding of the extrinsic regulation of the first cell lineage decision in the embryo. PMID:27586544

  8. Mouse ES-cell-based functional assay to evaluate mutations in BRCA2

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsov, Sergey G.; Liu, Pentao; Sharan, Shyam K.

    2009-01-01

    Individuals with mutations in breast cancer susceptibility genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2 have up to 80% risk of developing breast cancer by the age of 70. Sequencing based genetic tests are now available to identify mutation carriers in effort to reduce mortality through prevention and early diagnosis. However, lack of a suitable functional assay hinders risk assessment of more than 1900 BRCA1 and BRCA2 variants in the Breast Cancer Information Core database that do not clearly disrupt the gene product. We have established a simple, versatile and reliable assay to test for functional significance of mutations in BRCA2 using mouse embryonic stem cells (ES-cells) and bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) and have used it to classify 17 sequence variants. The assay is based on the ability of human BRCA2 to complement the loss of endogenous Brca2 in mouse ES-cells. This technique may also serve as a paradigm for functional analysis of mutations found in other human disease genes. PMID:18607349

  9. Activation of chemical promutagens by Selenastrum capricornutum in the plant cell/microbe coincubation assay

    SciTech Connect

    Gentile, J.M.; Lippert, M.; Johnson, P.; Shafer, T. )

    1990-05-01

    The critical balance of organisms living in aquatic environments is influenced by the presence and relationship of plants to those environments. However, even though plants occupy a fundamental trophic level within aquatic ecosystems, few studies have focused upon the effect of xenobiotics on aquatic plants, and even fewer studies have dealt with xenobiotic metabolism by aquatic plants. It is well established that plants can metabolize chemicals into mutagens. The impact of these unique plant-activated chemical mutagens on ecosystems, food chains and, ultimately, human health is an important question that will require intensive and integrative investigation. The plant cell/microbe coincubation assay is particularly advantageous for use with unicellular algae. The conditions of this assay are such that chemical metabolism and subsequent mutagen detection can be followed in intact algal cells under simulated field conditions. The purpose of this research was to demonstrate that a unicellular algal species could be used effectively in the plant cell/microbe coincubation assay to activate model chemical mutagens.

  10. A novel micronucleus in vitro assay utilizing human hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kotova, N; Hebert, N; Härnwall, E-L; Vare, D; Mazurier, C; Douay, L; Jenssen, D; Grawé, J

    2015-10-01

    The induction of micronucleated reticulocytes in the bone marrow is a sensitive indicator of chromosomal damage. Therefore, the micronucleus assay in rodents is widely used in genotoxicity and carcinogenicity testing. A test system based on cultured human primary cells could potentially provide better prediction compared to animal tests, increasing patient safety while also implementing the 3Rs principle, i.e. replace, reduce and refine. Hereby, we describe the development of an in vitro micronucleus assay based on animal-free ex vivo culture of human red blood cells from hematopoietic stem cells. To validate the method, five clastogens with direct action, three clastogens requiring metabolic activation, four aneugenic and three non-genotoxic compounds have been tested. Also, different metabolic systems have been applied. Flow cytometry was used for detection and enumeration of micronuclei. Altogether, the results were in agreement with the published data and indicated that a sensitive and cost effective in vitro assay to assess genotoxicity with a potential to high-throughput screening has been developed. PMID:26208286

  11. Development and characterization of a Rift Valley fever virus cell-cell fusion assay using alphavirus replicon vectors

    SciTech Connect

    Filone, Claire Marie; Heise, Mark; Doms, Robert W. . E-mail: doms@mail.med.upenn.edu; Bertolotti-Ciarlet, Andrea . E-mail: aciarlet@mail.med.upenn.edu

    2006-12-20

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), a member of the Phlebovirus genus in the Bunyaviridae family, is transmitted by mosquitoes and infects both humans and domestic animals, particularly cattle and sheep. Since primary RVFV strains must be handled in BSL-3+ or BSL-4 facilities, a RVFV cell-cell fusion assay will facilitate the investigation of RVFV glycoprotein function under BSL-2 conditions. As for other members of the Bunyaviridae family, RVFV glycoproteins are targeted to the Golgi, where the virus buds, and are not efficiently delivered to the cell surface. However, overexpression of RVFV glycoproteins using an alphavirus replicon vector resulted in the expression of the glycoproteins on the surface of multiple cell types. Brief treatment of RVFV glycoprotein expressing cells with mildly acidic media (pH 6.2 and below) resulted in rapid and efficient syncytia formation, which we quantified by {beta}-galactosidase {alpha}-complementation. Fusion was observed with several cell types, suggesting that the receptor(s) for RVFV is widely expressed or that this acid-dependent virus does not require a specific receptor to mediate cell-cell fusion. Fusion occurred over a broad temperature range, as expected for a virus with both mosquito and mammalian hosts. In contrast to cell fusion mediated by the VSV-G glycoprotein, RVFV glycoprotein-dependent cell fusion could be prevented by treating target cells with trypsin, indicating that one or more proteins (or protein-associated carbohydrate) on the host cell surface are needed to support membrane fusion. The cell-cell fusion assay reported here will make it possible to study the membrane fusion activity of RVFV glycoproteins in a high-throughput format and to screen small molecule inhibitors for the ability to block virus-specific membrane fusion.

  12. Evaluation of the cytotoxicity of cigarette smoke total particulate matter using three in vitro assays and two types of cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Peng, Bin; Nie, Cong; Shang, Pingping; Liu, Huimin

    2013-05-01

    In vitro cytotoxicity assays can be used to evaluate potential toxicological effects of tobacco products. Total particulate matter (TPM) from mainstream cigarette smoke trapped by a Cambridge filter is used widely for biological evaluation of smoke. This study compared neutral red uptake (NRU), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity and WST-1 assays for assessing the cytotoxicity of TPM, and evaluated the sensitivity of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells and human lung adenocarcinoma epithelial cell line (A549 cells) to TPM-induced cytotoxic effects. The results indicate that NRU and WST-1 assays are preferable to LDH activity assay for assessing the TPM-induced cytotoxicity, and NRU assay might be more sensitive than WST-1 assay. The cytotoxicity of 3R4F reference cigarettes and two commercial brands of cigarettes were tested by NRU assay in CHO and A549 cells. The results showed that EC50 values in CHO cells treated with TPM were lower than EC50 values in A549 cells, indicating CHO cells are more sensitive to TPM-induced cytotoxic effects than A549 cells. PMID:23193988

  13. Best practice recommendations for the transfer of cell-based assays for the measurement of neutralizing anti-drug antibodies.

    PubMed

    Belouski, Shelley S; Born, Danika; Jacques, Susan; Harder, Brandon; Reynhardt, Kai; Kaliyaperumal, Arunan; Gupta, Shalini

    2016-09-01

    We recommend the application of a strategically designed step-wise approach to transfer cell-based assays that includes assessing analytical performance (through a fit for purpose validation and/or design of experiment robustness characterization), clinical performance (i.e., concordance) and performance or proficiency testing for long-term method monitoring. Here we focus on the application of this strategy to cell-based assays for the measurement of neutralizing anti-drug antibodies. This application is unique in that it requires a custom cell-based assay to be used over a long period of time (potentially phase 1a through the life of a marketed product) with the confidence of consistent method performance and result reporting. But, the process is adaptable to a variety of assay types and applications. We present lessons learned from two cell-based assay transfers that met relevant challenges while implementing alternative permutations of the recommended method transfer process. PMID:27523191

  14. Assay of Peripheral Regulatory Vδ1 T Cells in Ankylosing Spondylitis and its Significance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongliang; Sun, Na; Li, Ka; Tian, Jiguang; Li, Jianmin

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) involves inflammation at the sacroiliac joint and spine attachment site. This study aimed to observe the ratio and function of peripheral regulatory Vδ1 T cells in AS patients to investigate their roles in AS pathogenesis. MATERIAL AND METHODS Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were separated by density-gradient centrifugation from AS patients and healthy controls. Flow cytometry was used to determine the ratio between Vδ1 and CD4 T cells of PBMC in AS patients and controls. Flow cytometry sorting (FCS) was used to obtain Vδ1 and naïve CD4 T cells with purity higher than 90%. CFSE staining method was used to detect the effect of Vδ1 T cells on proliferation of naïve CD4 T cells. The effect of Vδ1 T cells on secretion of IFN-γ from naïve CD4 T cells and the ability to secrete IL-10 from Vδ1 T cells were determined by flow cytometry. RESULTS AS patients had significantly lower Vδ1 T cell ratio in PBMC compared to controls (p<0.05), but their CD4 T cell ratio was significantly elevated (p<0.05). Functional assay showed suppression of naïve CD4 T cell proliferation and IFN-γ secretion by peripheral Vδ1 T cells in AS patients (p<0.01). AS patients also had lower IL-10 secreting level from peripheral derived Vδ1 T cells (p<0.01). CONCLUSIONS The immune suppression of peripheral Vδ1 T cell in AS patient increases the ratio of peripheral CD4 T cells and IFN-γ level, leading to AS pathogenesis. This immune suppression is mainly due to suppressed IL-10 secretion. PMID:27598263

  15. An integrated microfluidic cell culture system for high-throughput perfusion three-dimensional cell culture-based assays: effect of cell culture model on the results of chemosensitivity assays.

    PubMed

    Huang, Song-Bin; Wang, Shih-Siou; Hsieh, Chia-Hsun; Lin, Yung Chang; Lai, Chao-Sung; Wu, Min-Hsien

    2013-03-21

    Although microfluidic cell culture systems are versatile tools for cellular assays, their use has yet to set in motion an evolutionary shift away from conventional cell culture methods. This situation is mainly due to technical hurdles: the operational barriers to the end-users, the lack of compatible detection schemes capable of reading out the results of a microfluidic-based cellular assay, and the lack of fundamental data to bridge the gap between microfluidic and conventional cell culture models. To address these issues, we propose a high-throughput, perfusion, three-dimensional (3-D) microfluidic cell culture system encompassing 30 microbioreactors. This integrated system not only aims to provide a user-friendly cell culture tool for biologists to perform assays but also to enable them to obtain precise data. Its technical features include (i) integration of a heater chip based on transparent indium tin oxide glass, providing stable thermal conditions for cell culturing; (ii) a microscale 3-D culture sample loading scheme that is both efficient and precise; (iii) a non-mechanical pneumatically driven multiplex medium perfusion mechanism; and (iv) a microplate reader-compatible waste medium collector array for the subsequent high throughput bioassays. In this study, we found that the 3-D culture sample loading method provided uniform sample loading [coefficient of variation (CV): 3.2%]. In addition, the multiplex medium perfusion mechanism led to reasonably uniform (CV: 3.6-6.9%) medium pumping rates in the 30 microchannels. Moreover, we used the proposed system to perform a successful cell culture-based chemosensitivity assay. To determine the effects of cell culture models on the cellular proliferation, and the results of chemosensitivity assays, we compared our data with that obtained using three conventional cell culture models. We found that the nature of the cell culture format could lead to different evaluation outcomes. Consequently, when establishing a

  16. Disrupted Endothelial Cell Layer and Exposed Extracellular Matrix Proteins Promote Capture of Late Outgrowth Endothelial Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mitrofan, Claudia-Gabriela; Appleby, Sarah L.; Morrell, Nicholas W.; Lever, Andrew M. L.

    2016-01-01

    Late outgrowth endothelial progenitor cells (LO-EPC) possess a high proliferative potential, differentiate into vascular endothelial cells (EC), and form networks, suggesting they play a role in vascular repair. However, due to their scarcity in the circulation there is a requirement for ex vivo expansion before they could provide a practical cell therapy and it is currently unclear if they would home and engraft to an injury site. Using an in vitro flow system we studied LO-EPC under simulated injury conditions including EC activation, ischaemia, disrupted EC integrity, and exposed basement membrane. Perfused LO-EPC adhered to discontinuous EC paracellularly at junctional regions between adjacent cells under shear stress 0.7 dyn/cm2. The interaction was not adhesion molecule-dependent and not enhanced by EC activation. LO-EPC expressed high levels of the VE-Cadherin which may explain these findings. Ischaemia reperfusion injury decreased the interaction with LO-EPC due to cell retraction. LO-EPC interacted with exposed extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, fibronectin and vitronectin. The interaction was mediated by integrins α5β3, αvβ1, and αvβ3. This study has demonstrated that an injured local environment presents sufficient adhesive signals to capture flow perfused LO-EPC in vitro and that LO-EPC have properties consistent with their potential role in vascular repair. PMID:27413378

  17. Disrupted Endothelial Cell Layer and Exposed Extracellular Matrix Proteins Promote Capture of Late Outgrowth Endothelial Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Mitrofan, Claudia-Gabriela; Appleby, Sarah L; Morrell, Nicholas W; Lever, Andrew M L

    2016-01-01

    Late outgrowth endothelial progenitor cells (LO-EPC) possess a high proliferative potential, differentiate into vascular endothelial cells (EC), and form networks, suggesting they play a role in vascular repair. However, due to their scarcity in the circulation there is a requirement for ex vivo expansion before they could provide a practical cell therapy and it is currently unclear if they would home and engraft to an injury site. Using an in vitro flow system we studied LO-EPC under simulated injury conditions including EC activation, ischaemia, disrupted EC integrity, and exposed basement membrane. Perfused LO-EPC adhered to discontinuous EC paracellularly at junctional regions between adjacent cells under shear stress 0.7 dyn/cm(2). The interaction was not adhesion molecule-dependent and not enhanced by EC activation. LO-EPC expressed high levels of the VE-Cadherin which may explain these findings. Ischaemia reperfusion injury decreased the interaction with LO-EPC due to cell retraction. LO-EPC interacted with exposed extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, fibronectin and vitronectin. The interaction was mediated by integrins α5β3, αvβ1, and αvβ3. This study has demonstrated that an injured local environment presents sufficient adhesive signals to capture flow perfused LO-EPC in vitro and that LO-EPC have properties consistent with their potential role in vascular repair. PMID:27413378

  18. Development of a cell viability assay to assess drug metabolite structure-toxicity relationships.

    PubMed

    Rana, Payal; Will, Yvonne; Nadanaciva, Sashi; Jones, Lyn H

    2016-08-15

    Many adverse drug reactions are caused by the cytochrome P450 (CYP)-dependent activation of drugs into reactive metabolites. In order to reduce attrition due to metabolism-induced toxicity and to improve the safety of drug candidates, we developed a simple cell viability assay by combining a bioactivation system (human CYP3A4, CYP2D6 and CYP2C9) with Hep3B cells. We screened a series of drugs to explore structural motifs that may be responsible for CYP450-dependent activation caused by reactive metabolite formation, which highlighted specific liabilities regarding certain phenols and anilines. PMID:27397500

  19. A description of an HPLC assay of coproporphyrinogen III oxidase activity in mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Gross, U; Gerlach, R; Kühnel, A; Seifert, V; Doss, M O

    2003-01-01

    Coproporphyrinogen III oxidase is deficient in hereditary coproporphyria. An activity assay for this enzyme in mononuclear cells, besides the preparation of the substrate, are presented. The separation conditions for the product of the test protoporphyrin IX by gradient, reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography are given. The normal value from mononuclear cells of healthy volunteers was 138 +/- 21 pkat/g total soluble protein (mean +/- SD). The enzyme activity of a family with hereditary coproporphyria was measured. The gene carriers exhibit a specific coproporphyrinogen III oxidase activity of 61-90 pkat/g total soluble protein. PMID:14605502

  20. Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation to Assay the Interactions of Ubiquitylation Enzymes in Living Yeast Cells.

    PubMed

    Blaszczak, Ewa; Prigent, Claude; Rabut, Gwenaël

    2016-01-01

    Ubiquitylation is a versatile posttranslational protein modification catalyzed through the concerted action of ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes (E2s) and ubiquitin ligases (E3s). These enzymes form transient complexes with each other and their modification substrates and determine the nature of the ubiquitin signals attached to their substrates. One challenge in the field of protein ubiquitylation is thus to identify the E2-E3 pairs that function in the cell. In this chapter, we describe the use of bimolecular fluorescence complementation to assay E2-E3 interactions in living cells, using budding yeast as a model organism. PMID:27613039

  1. Rapid Multiplexed Flow Cytometric Assay for Botulinum Neurotoxin Detection Using an Automated Fluidic Microbead-Trapping Flow Cell for Enhanced Sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Ozanich, Richard M.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.; Warner, Marvin G.; Miller, Keith D.; Antolick, Kathryn C.; Marks, James D.; Lou, Jianlong; Grate, Jay W.

    2009-07-15

    A bead-based sandwich immunoassay for botulinum neurotoxin serotype A (BoNT/A) has been developed and demonstrated using a recombinant 50 kDa fragment (BoNT/A-HC-fragment) of the BoNT/A heavy chain (BoNT/A-HC) as a structurally valid simulant. Three different anti-BoNT/A antibodies were attached to three different fluorescent dye encoded flow cytometry beads for multiplexing. The assay was conducted in two formats: a manual microcentrifuge tube format and an automated fluidic system format. Flow cytometry detection was used for both formats. The fluidic system used a novel microbead-trapping flow cell to capture antibody-coupled beads with subsequent sequential perfusion of sample, wash, dye-labeled reporter antibody, and final wash solutions. After the reaction period, the beads were collected for analysis by flow cytometry. Sandwich assays performed on the fluidic system gave median fluorescence intensity signals on the flow cytometer that were 2-4 times higher than assays performed manually in the same amount of time. Limits of detection were estimated at 1 pM (~50 pg/mL for BoNT/A-HC-fragment) for the 15 minute fluidic assay.

  2. Is there a role for estrogen activity assays? Recombinant cell bioassay for estrogen: Development and applications.

    PubMed

    Klein, Karen Oerter

    2015-07-01

    There are many questions which cannot be answered without a very sensitive estradiol assay. A recombinant cell bioassay (RCBA) for estradiol was developed in 1994. The sensitivity of the bioassay is 0.02-0.2 pg/ml (0.07-0.7 pmol/L), more than 20 times more sensitive than commercial RIAs and 10 times more sensitive than newer mass spectrometry assays. The RCBA for estradiol opened the door to study low levels of estradiol equivalents (EE) across the physiological spectrum of life from prepubertal children through menopause and across the spectrum from normal physiology, in boys as well as girls, to pathology, including: premature thelarche; estradiol suppression in children treated with GnRH analogues for precocious puberty; aromatase inhibition in boys with growth hormone deficiency; the differences between oral and transdermal routes of estrogen administration in girls with Turner's syndrome; women with breast cancer treated with aromatase inhibitors; and women with urogenital atrophy treated with low dose vaginal estrogen. A bioassay also allows study of endocrine disruptors, like phytoestrogens and other environmental compounds, which are relevant to public health and alternative medicine options. This paper reviews the assay and the last 20 years of applications. A bioassay for estrogen has a role because measuring biological effect is theoretically useful, increasing the understanding of physiology in addition to biochemical levels, giving different information than other assays, and opening the door to measure very low levels of estrogen activity in both humans and the environment. PMID:25159103

  3. A Fluid Membrane-Based Soluble Ligand Display System for Live CellAssays

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Jwa-Min; Nair, Pradeep N.; Neve, Richard M.; Gray, Joe W.; Groves, Jay T.

    2005-10-14

    Cell communication modulates numerous biological processes including proliferation, apoptosis, motility, invasion and differentiation. Correspondingly, there has been significant interest in the development of surface display strategies for the presentation of signaling molecules to living cells. This effort has primarily focused on naturally surface-bound ligands, such as extracellular matrix components and cell membranes. Soluble ligands (e.g. growth factors and cytokines) play an important role in intercellular communications, and their display in a surface-bound format would be of great utility in the design of array-based live cell assays. Recently, several cell microarray systems that display cDNA, RNAi, or small molecules in a surface array format were proven to be useful in accelerating high-throughput functional genetic studies and screening therapeutic agents. These surface display methods provide a flexible platform for the systematic, combinatorial investigation of genes and small molecules affecting cellular processes and phenotypes of interest. In an analogous sense, it would be an important advance if one could display soluble signaling ligands in a surface assay format that allows for systematic, patterned presentation of soluble ligands to live cells. Such a technique would make it possible to examine cellular phenotypes of interest in a parallel format with soluble signaling ligands as one of the display parameters. Herein we report a ligand-modified fluid supported lipid bilayer (SLB) assay system that can be used to functionally display soluble ligands to cells in situ (Figure 1A). By displaying soluble ligands on a SLB surface, both solution behavior (the ability to become locally enriched by reaction-diffusion processes) and solid behavior (the ability to control the spatial location of the ligands in an open system) could be combined. The method reported herein benefits from the naturally fluid state of the supported membrane, which allows

  4. Modeling and fabrication of scale-like cantilever for cell capturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Boyin; Fu, Jing; Muradoglu, Murat

    2013-12-01

    The micro-domain provides excellent conditions for performing biological experiments on small populations of cells and has given rise to the proliferation of so-called lab-on-a-chip devices. In order to fully utilize the benefits of cell assays, means of retaining cells at defined locations over time are required. Here, the creation of scale-like cantilevers, inspired by biomimetics, on planar silicon nitride (Si3N4) film using focused ion beam machining is described. Using SEM imaging, regular tilting of the cantilever with almost no warping of the cantilever was uncovered. Finite element analysis showed that the scale-like cantilever was best at limiting stress concentration without difficulty in manufacture and having stresses more evenly distributed along the edge. It also had a major advantage in that the degree of deflection could be simply altered by changing the central angle. From a piling simulation conducted, it was found that a random delivery of simulated particles on to the scale-like obstacle should create a triangular collection. In the experimental trapping of polystyrene beads in suspension, the basic triangular piling structure was observed, but with extended tails and a fanning out around the obstacle. This was attributed to the aggregation tendency of polystyrene beads that acted on top of the piling behavior. In the experiment with bacterial cells, triangular pile up behind the cantilever was absent and the bacteria cells were able to slip inside the cantilever's opening despite the size of the bacteria being larger than the gap. Overall, the fabricated scale-like cantilever architectures offer a viable way to trap small populations of material in suspension.

  5. An Assay to Detect In Vivo Y Chromosome Loss in Drosophila Wing Disc Cells

    PubMed Central

    Szabad, Janos; Bellen, Hugo J.; Venken, Koen J. T.

    2012-01-01

    Loss of the Y chromosome in Drosophila has no impact on cell viability and therefore allows us to assay the impact of environmental agents and genetic alterations on chromosomal loss. To detect in vivo chromosome loss in cells of the developing Drosophila wing primordia, we first engineered a Y chromosome with an attP docking site. By making use of the ΦC31 integrase system, we site-specifically integrated a genomic transgene encompassing the multiple wing hair (mwh) locus into this attP site, leading to a mwh+Y chromosome. This chromosome fully rescues the mwh mutant phenotype, an excellent recessive wing cell marker mutation. Loss of this mwh+Y chromosome in wing primordial cells then leads to manifestation of the mwh mutant phenotype in mwh-homozygous cells. The forming mwh clones permit us to quantify the effect of agents and genetic alterations by assaying frequency and size of the mwh mosaic spots. To illustrate the use of the mwh+Y loss system, the effects of four known mutagens (X-rays, colchicine, ethyl methanesulfonate, and formaldehyde) and two genetic conditions (loss- and gain-of-function lodestar mutant alleles) are documented. The procedure is simple, sensitive, and inexpensive. PMID:22973547

  6. Determination of immune complexes in sera from dogs with various diseases by mastocytoma cell assay.

    PubMed

    Targowski, S

    1982-01-01

    Canine immunoglobulin G complexed with particulate or soluble antigen can bind to the Fc receptors on the mastocytoma cells. Attachment of immune complexes composed of immunoglobulin G and soluble antigen (ovalbumin) to mastocytoma cells was detected by an inhibition of rosette formation with indicator cells (sensitized sheep erythrocytes). Therefore, canine circulating immune complexes may also attach to mastocytoma cells and inhibit rosette formation (mastocytoma cell assay). Sera from 326 dogs with various diseases and from 50 clinically normal dogs were assayed for immune complexes. The incidence of immune complexes in sera from normal dogs was 6% as compared with 25% in dogs with various diseases. The immune complexes were demonstrated in 37% of sera from dogs with various neoplastic diseases, 40% of sera from dogs with diabetes, 24% of sera from dogs with hypothyroidism, 50% of sera from dogs with mycotic disease, 75% of sera from dogs with arthritis, 38% of sera from dogs with kidney disorders, 40% of sera from dogs with neurological diseases, 45% of sera from dogs with various parasitic diseases, and 27% of sera from dogs with liver disorders. Only 19% of sera from dogs admitted to the hospital for various surgeries gave positive results. The incidence of the positive sera from dogs with various diseases is discussed in regard to their counterparts of human diseases. PMID:6226676

  7. Particle Capture Devices and Methods of Use Thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voldman, Joel (Inventor); Skelley, Alison M. (Inventor); Kirak, Oktay (Inventor); Jaenisch, Rudolf (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention provides a device and methods of use thereof in microscale particle capturing and particle pairing. This invention provides particle patterning device, which mechanically traps individual particles within first chambers of capture units, transfer the particles to second chambers of opposing capture units, and traps a second type of particle in the same second chamber. The device and methods allow for high yield assaying of trapped cells, high yield fusion of trapped, paired cells, for controlled binding of particles to cells and for specific chemical reactions between particle interfaces and particle contents. The device and method provide means of identification of the particle population and a facile route to particle collection.

  8. Evaluation of Rapid Blood Sample Collection in the Detection of Circulating Filarial Antigens for Epidemiological Survey by rWbSXP-1 Capture Assay

    PubMed Central

    Ansel Vishal, Lawrence; Nazeer, Y.; Ravishankaran, Rajendran; Mahalakshmi, Natarajan; Kaliraj, Perumal

    2014-01-01

    Background Lymphatic filariasis is a neglected tropical disease leading to profound disfiguring causing socio economic burden in the tropics. Current diagnosis strategies available during field surveys and epidemics are based on traditional microscopic detections and a few antigen/antibody assays. We have compared different sampling methodologies and standardized the highly sensitive and reliable rWbSXP-1 antigen detection assay to our new sampling methodology. Methodology Samples collected as serum, whole blood, whole blood on filter paper and whole blood on microscopic slides from patients belonging to various clinical groups of filariasis [endemic normal(EN), chronic pathology(CP), microfilaraemic(MF) and non-endemic normal(NEN)] were collected and standardized the rWbSXP-1 antigen detection assay using monoclonal antibody raised against rWbSXP-1 protein. The whole blood collected on microscopic slide based sampling method was employed in the field and the presence of circulating filarial antigen (CFA) was assessed using the rWbSXP-1 assay. Principal Findings The sampling methods were compared and no significant difference was observed for the detection of CFA (MF, P = 0.304, EN, P = 0.675, CP, P = 0.5698, NEN, P = 0.4494). Further the optimized sampling method was utilized to collect the 1106 samples from Polur, Tiruvannamalai. The rWbSXP-1 assay gave 98 antigen positive results whereas the microscopic method gave only 17. Conclusions Four sampling methodologies were analyzed and the new sampling methodology of whole blood collected on microscopic slide was found to be convenient for the detection of CFA using rWbSXP-1 antigen detection assay. The 1106 samples from Polur were collected using the new method. The rWbSXP-1 antigen assay perceived a 7.32% increased result which was read as false negatives on the conventional microscopic staining method. This new sampling methodology coupled with the rWbSXP-1 antigen assay can be used in

  9. Capture and release of cancer cells using electrospun etchable MnO2 nanofibers integrated in microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hui-qin; Yu, Xiao-lei; Cai, Bo; You, Su-jian; He, Zhao-bo; Huang, Qin-qin; Rao, Lang; Li, Sha-sha; Liu, Chang; Sun, Wei-wei; Liu, Wei; Guo, Shi-shang; Zhao, Xing-zhong

    2015-03-01

    This paper introduces a cancer cell capture/release microchip based on the self-sacrificed MnO2 nanofibers. Through electrospinning, lift-off and soft-lithography procedures, MnO2 nanofibers are tactfully fabricated in microchannels to implement enrichment and release of cancer cells in liquid samples. The MnO2 nanofiber net which mimics the extra cellular matrix can lead to high capture ability with the help of a cancer cell-specific antibody bio-conjugation. Subsequently, an effective and friendly release method is carried out by using low concentration of oxalic acid to dissolve the MnO2 nanofiber substrate while keeping high viability of those released cancer cells at the same time. It is conceivable that our microchip may have potentials in realizing biomedical analysis of circulating tumor cells for biological and clinical researches in oncology.

  10. High-throughput genotoxicity assay identifies antioxidants as inducers of DNA damage response and cell death

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Jennifer T.; Sakamuru, Srilatha; Huang, Ruili; Teneva, Nedelina; Simmons, Steven O.; Xia, Menghang; Tice, Raymond R.; Austin, Christopher P.; Myung, Kyungjae

    2012-01-01

    Human ATAD5 is a biomarker for identifying genotoxic compounds because ATAD5 protein levels increase posttranscriptionally in response to DNA damage. We screened over 4,000 compounds with a cell-based quantitative high-throughput ATAD5-luciferase assay detecting genotoxic compounds. We identified 22 antioxidants, including resveratrol, genistein, and baicalein, that are currently used or investigated for the treatment of cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, osteopenia, osteoporosis, and chronic hepatitis, as well as for antiaging. Treatment of dividing cells with these compounds induced DNA damage and resulted in cell death. Despite their genotoxic effects, resveratrol, genistein, and baicalein did not cause mutagenesis, which is a major side effect of conventional anticancer drugs. Furthermore, resveratrol and genistein killed multidrug-resistant cancer cells. We therefore propose that resveratrol, genistein, and baicalein are attractive candidates for improved chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:22431602

  11. Application of a receptor-binding-capture qRTPCR assay to concentrate human norovirus from sewage and to study the distribution and stability of the virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Human noroviruses (HuNoVs) are major agents of gastroenteritis and water is an important route of transmission. Using magnetic beads conjugated with blood group-like antigens previously reported as receptors for HuNoV, we developed a simple and rapid receptor-binding capture and magnetic sequestra...

  12. Photo catalogue for the classification of foci in the BALB/c 3T3 cell transformation assay.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Kiyoshi; Bohnenberger, Susanne; Hayashi, Kumiko; Kunkelmann, Thorsten; Muramatsu, Dai; Poth, Albrecht; Sakai, Ayako; Salovaara, Susan; Tanaka, Noriho; Thomas, B Claire; Umeda, Makoto

    2012-04-11

    This catalogue is a display of focus photos representative of the BALB/c 3T3 cell transformation assay (CTA). It is intended as a visual aid for the identification and the scoring of foci in the conduct of the assay. A proper training from experienced personnel together with the protocol reported in this issue and the present photo catalogue will support method transfer and consistency in the assay results. PMID:22331008

  13. Cell death and renewal during prey capture and digestion in the carnivorous sponge Asbestopluma hypogea (Porifera: Poecilosclerida).

    PubMed

    Martinand-Mari, Camille; Vacelet, Jean; Nickel, Michael; Wörheide, Gert; Mangeat, Paul; Baghdiguian, Stephen

    2012-11-15

    The sponge Asbestopluma hypogea is unusual among sponges due to its peculiar carnivorous feeding habit. During various stages of its nutrition cycle, the sponge is subjected to spectacular morphological modifications. Starved animals are characterized by many elongated filaments, which are crucial for the capture of prey. After capture, and during the digestion process, these filaments actively regress before being regenerated during a subsequent period of starvation. Here, we demonstrate that these morphological events rely on a highly dynamic cellular turnover, implying a coordinated sequence of programmed cell death (apoptosis and autophagy), cell proliferation and cell migration. A candidate niche for cell renewal by stem cell proliferation and differentiation was identified at the base of the sponge peduncle, characterized by higher levels of BrdU/EdU incorporation. Therefore, BrdU/EdU-positive cells of the peduncle base are candidate motile cells responsible for the regeneration of the prey-capturing main sponge body, i.e. the dynamic filaments. Altogether, our results demonstrate that dynamics of cell renewal in sponge appear to be regulated by cellular mechanisms as multiple and complex as those already identified in bilaterian metazoans. PMID:22899530

  14. Rapid Assays for Lectin Toxicity and Binding Changes that Reflect Altered Glycosylation in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Pamela; Sundaram, Subha

    2014-01-01

    Glycosylation engineering is used to generate glycoproteins, glycolipids or proteoglycans with a more defined complement of glycans on their glycoconjugates. For example, a mammalian cell glycosylation mutant lacking a specific glycosyltransferase generates glycoproteins, and/or glycolipids, and/or proteoglycans, with truncated glycans missing the sugar transferred by that glycosyltransferase, and also missing those sugars that would be added subsequently. In some cases, an alternative glycosyltransferase may then use the truncated glycans as acceptors, thereby generating a new or different glycan subset in the mutant cell. Another type of glycosylation mutant arises from gain-of-function mutations that, for example, activate a silent glycosyltransferase gene. In this case, glycoconjugates will have glycans with additional sugar(s) that are more elaborate than the glycans of wild type cells. Mutations in other genes that affect glycosylation, such as nucleotide sugar synthases or transporters, will alter the glycan complement in more general ways that usually affect several types of glycoconjugates. There are now many strategies for generating a precise mutation in a glycosylation gene in a mammalian cell. Large-volume cultures of mammalian cells may also give rise to spontaneous mutants in glycosylation pathways. This article will focus on how to rapidly characterize mammalian cells with an altered glycosylation activity. The key reagents for the protocols described are plant lectins that bind mammalian glycans with varying avidities, depending on the specific structure of those glycans. Cells with altered glycosylation generally become resistant or hypersensitive to lectin toxicity, and have reduced or increased lectin or antibody binding. Here we describe rapid assays to compare the cytotoxicity of lectins in a lectin resistance test, and the binding of lectins or antibodies by flow cytometry in a glycan-binding assay. Based on these tests, glycosylation changes

  15. A Cell-Based Assay Reveals Nuclear Translocation of Intracellular Domains Released by SPPL Proteases.

    PubMed

    Mentrup, Torben; Häsler, Robert; Fluhrer, Regina; Saftig, Paul; Schröder, Bernd

    2015-08-01

    During regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP) a membrane-spanning substrate protein is cleaved by an ectodomain sheddase and an intramembrane cleaving protease. A cytoplasmic intracellular domain (ICD) is liberated, which can migrate to the nucleus thereby influencing transcriptional regulation. Signal peptide peptidase-like (SPPL) 2a and 2b have been implicated in RIP of type II transmembrane proteins. Even though SPPL2a might represent a potential pharmacological target for treatment of B-cell-mediated autoimmunity, no specific and potent inhibitors for this enzyme are currently available. We report here on the first quantitative cell-based assay for measurement of SPPL2a/b activity. Demonstrating the failure of standard Gal4/VP16 reporter assays for SPPL2a/b analysis, we have devised a novel system employing β-galactosidase (βGal) complementation. This is based on detecting nuclear translocation of the proteolytically released substrate ICDs, which results in specific restoration of βGal activity. Utilizing this potentially high-throughput compatible new setup, we demonstrate nuclear translocation of the ICDs from integral membrane protein 2B (ITM2B), tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and CD74 and identify secreted frizzled-related protein 2 (SFRP2) as potential transcriptional downstream target of the CD74 ICD. We show that the presented assay is easily adaptable to other intramembrane proteases and therefore represents a valuable tool for the functional analysis and development of new inhibitors of this class of enzymes. PMID:25824657

  16. A Cell-based PDE4 Assay in 1536-well Plate format for High Throughput Screening

    PubMed Central

    Titus, Steven A.; Li, Xiao; Southall, Noel; Lu, Jianming; Inglese, James; Brasch, Michael; Austin, Christopher P.; Zheng, Wei

    2009-01-01

    The cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) are intracellular enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of 3', 5'-cyclic nucleotides, such as cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), to their corresponding 5'-nucleotide monophosphates. These enzymes play an important role in controlling cellular concentrations of cyclic nucleotides and thus regulate a variety of cellular signaling events. PDEs are emerging as drug targets for several diseases including asthma, cardiovascular disease, ADHD, Parkinson’s disease, and Alzheimer’s disease. Though biochemical assays with purified recombinant PDE enzymes and cAMP or cGMP substrate are commonly used for compound screening, cell-based assays would provide a better assessment of compound activity in a more physiological context. Here we report the development and validation of a new cell-based PDE4 assay using a constitutively active GPCR as a driving force for cAMP production and a cyclic nucleotide gated (CNG) cation channel as a biosensor in 1536-well plates. PMID:18591513

  17. The human T-cell cloning assay: identifying genotypes susceptible to drug toxicity and somatic mutation.

    PubMed

    Hou, Sai-Mei

    2014-01-01

    Humans exhibit marked genetic polymorphisms in drug metabolism that contribute to high incidence of adverse effects in susceptible individuals due to altered balance between metabolic activation and detoxification. The T-cell cloning assay, which detects mutations in the gene for hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT), is the most well-developed reporter system for studying specific locus mutation in human somatic cells. The assay is based on a mitogen- and growth factor-dependent clonal expansion of peripheral T-lymphocytes in which the 6-thioguanine-resistant HPRT mutants can be selected, enumerated, and collected for molecular analysis of the mutational nature. The assay provides a unique tool for studying in vivo and in vitro mutagenesis, for investigating the functional impact of common polymorphism in metabolism and repair genes, and for identifying risk genotypes for drug-induced toxicity and mutagenicity. This chapter presents a simple and reliable method for the enumeration of HPRT mutant frequency induced in vitro without using any source of recombinant interleukin-2. The other main feature is that only truly induced and unique mutants are collected for further analysis. PMID:24623236

  18. Hematopoietic stem cell capture and directional differentiation into vascular endothelial cells for metal stent-coated chitosan/hyaluronic acid loading CD133 antibody.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shixuan; Zhang, Fan; Feng, Bo; Fan, Qingyu; Yang, Feng; Shang, Debin; Sui, Jinghan; Zhao, Hong

    2015-03-01

    A series of metal stents coated with chitosan/hyaluronic acid (CS/HA) loading antibodies by electrostatic self-assembled method were prepared, and the types of cells captured by antibodies and their differentiation in vascular endothelial cells (ECs) evaluated by molecular biology and scanning electron microscope. The results showed that CD133 stent can selectively capture hematopoietic stem cells (HSC),which directionally differentiate into vascular ECs in peripheral blood by (CS/HA) induction, and simultaneously inhibit migration and proliferation of immune cells and vascular smooth muscle cells (MCs). CD34 stent can capture HSC, hematopoietic progenitor cells that differentiate into vascular ECs and immune cells, promoting smooth MCs growth, leading to thrombosis, inflammation, and rejection. CD133 stent can be implanted into miniature pig heart coronary and can repair vascular damage by capturing own HSC, thus contributing to the rapid natural vascular repair, avoiding inflammation and rejection, thrombosis and restenosis. These studies demonstrated that CD133 stent of HSC capture will be an ideal coated metal stent providing a new therapeutic approach for cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease. PMID:25404533

  19. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Capture and Directional Differentiation into Vascular Endothelial Cells for Metal Stent-Coated Chitosan/Hyaluronic Acid Loading CD133 Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fan; Feng, Bo; Fan, Qingyu; Yang, Feng; Shang, Debin; Sui, Jinghan; Zhao, Hong

    2015-01-01

    A series of metal stents coated with chitosan/hyaluronic acid (CS/HA) loading antibodies by electrostatic self-assembled method were prepared, and the types of cells captured by antibodies and their differentiation in vascular endothelial cells (ECs) evaluated by molecular biology and scanning electron microscope. The results showed that CD133 stent can selectively capture hematopoietic stem cells (HSC),which directionally differentiate into vascular ECs in peripheral blood by (CS/HA) induction, and simultaneously inhibit migration and proliferation of immune cells and vascular smooth muscle cells (MCs). CD34 stent can capture HSC, hematopoietic progenitor cells that differentiate into vascular ECs and immune cells, promoting smooth MCs growth, leading to thrombosis, inflammation, and rejection. CD133 stent can be implanted into miniature pig heart coronary and can repair vascular damage by capturing own HSC, thus contributing to the rapid natural vascular repair, avoiding inflammation and rejection, thrombosis and restenosis. These studies demonstrated that CD133 stent of HSC capture will be an ideal coated metal stent providing a new therapeutic approach for cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease. PMID:25404533

  20. The microdosimetry of boron neutron capture therapy in a randomised ellipsoidal cell geometry.

    PubMed

    Nichols, T L; Miller, L F; Kabalka, G W

    2005-01-01

    Two reactions deliver the majority of local dose in boron neutron capture therapy. The ionised particles (protons, alpha particles and lithium nuclei) produced in the two reactions, 10B(n,alpha,gamma)7Li and 14N(n,p)14O, have short ranges that are less than -14 microm (which is on the order of the diameter of a typical human cell). The ionised particles are heavy and are in the 2+ charge state in the case of the boron reactions. These heavy 2+ ions will do significant damage to molecules near their tracks. Thus, the distribution of nitrogen and, in particular, of boron determines the spatial characteristics of the radiation field. Since the distribution of nitrogen is nearly homogeneous in the brain and is not easily altered for the purpose of radiotherapy, the spatial variation in the radiation dose is due mainly to the spatial distribution of boron. This implies that the spatial distribution of boron determines the microscopic energy deposition and therefore the spatial characteristics of the microscopic dose. The microscopic dose from the (n,alpha) and (n,p) reactions has been examined in detail and, as averred, the proton dose is relatively homogeneous except for statistical variability. The statistical variability in essence adds a false spatial variability that would not be seen if a large number of histories were performed. Since the majority of spatial variability occurs in the boron distribution, the (n,p) reaction can be suppressed to better understand the spatial distribution effects on the microscopic dose. Programs have been written in FORTRAN using Monte Carlo techniques to model ellipsoidal cells that are either randomly sized and located in the region of interest or are arranged in a face centred cubic array and are identical except for the location of the nuclei, which may be random. It is shown that closely packed prolate ellipsoidal cells with a large eccentricity in one dimension will receive a larger nuclear dose than cells that are more

  1. In vitro toxicity assay of cisplatin on mouse acute lymphoblastic leukaemia and spermatogonial stem cells.

    PubMed

    Shabani, R; Ashtari, K; Behnam, B; Izadyar, F; Asgari, H; Asghari Jafarabadi, M; Ashjari, M; Asadi, E; Koruji, M

    2016-06-01

    Testicular cancer is the most common cancer affecting men in reproductive age, and cisplatin is one of the major helpful chemotherapeutic agents for treatment of this cancer. In addition, exposure of testes cancer cells to cisplatin could potentially eliminate tumour cells from germ cells in patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of cisplatin on viability of mouse acute lymphoblastic leukaemia cell line (EL-4) and neonatal mouse spermatogonial cells in vitro. In this study, the isolated spermatogonial stem cells (SSC) and EL-4 were divided into six groups including control (received medium), sham (received DMSO in medium) and experimental groups which received different doses of cisplatin (0.5, 5, 10 and 15 μg ml(-1) ). Cells viability was evaluated with MTT assay. The identity of the cultured cells was confirmed by the expression of specific markers. Our finding showed that viability of both SSC and EL-4 cells was reduced with the dose of 15 μg/ml when compared to the control group (P ≤ 0.05). Also, the differences between the IC50 in doses 10 and 15 μg/ml at different time were significant (P ≤ 0.05). The number of TUNEL-positive cells was increased, and the BAX and caspase-3 expressions were upregulated in EL4 cells for group that received an effective dose of cisplatin). In conclusion, despite the dramatic effects of cisplatin on both cells, spermatogonial stem cells could form colony in culture. PMID:26428408

  2. Comparison of vero cell plaque assay, TaqMan reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction RNA assay, and VecTest antigen assay for detection of West Nile virus in field-collected mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Nasci, Roger S; Gottfried, Kristy L; Burkhalter, Kristen L; Kulasekera, Varuni L; Lambert, Amy J; Lanciotti, Robert S; Hunt, Ann R; Ryan, Jeffrey R

    2002-12-01

    Mosquitoes collected during the epidemic of West Nile virus (WN) in Staten Island, NY, during 2000 were identified to species, grouped into pools of up to 50 individuals, and tested for the presence of WN by using TaqMan reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to detect West Nile viral RNA, Vero cell plaque assay to detect infectious virus, and VecTest WNV/SLE Antigen Panel Assay. A total of 10,866 specimens was tested in 801 pools. Analysis of results indicated that TaqMan RT-PCR detected 34 WN-positive pools, more than either of the other techniques. The plaque assay detected 74% of the pools positive by TaqMan, and VecTest detected 60% of the pools positive by TaqMan. The VecTest assay detected evidence of West Nile viral antigen in 67% of the pools that contained live virus detected by plaque assay. A WN enzyme immunoassay performed similarly to the VecTest WN assay. Differences in performance were related to relative sensitivity of the tests. Infection rates of WN in Culex pipiens and Cx. salinarius calculated by the 3 techniques varied, but each estimate indicated a high infection rate in the population. Positive and negative attributes of each procedure, which may influence how and where they are used in surveillance programs, are discussed. PMID:12542186

  3. Utilization of the Soft Agar Colony Formation Assay to Identify Inhibitors of Tumorigenicity in Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Horibata, Sachi; Vo, Tommy V; Subramanian, Venkataraman; Thompson, Paul R; Coonrod, Scott A

    2015-01-01

    Given the inherent difficulties in investigating the mechanisms of tumor progression in vivo, cell-based assays such as the soft agar colony formation assay (hereafter called soft agar assay), which measures the ability of cells to proliferate in semi-solid matrices, remain a hallmark of cancer research. A key advantage of this technique over conventional 2D monolayer or 3D spheroid cell culture assays is the close mimicry of the 3D cellular environment to that seen in vivo. Importantly, the soft agar assay also provides an ideal tool to rigorously test the effects of novel compounds or treatment conditions on cell proliferation and migration. Additionally, this assay enables the quantitative assessment of cell transformation potential within the context of genetic perturbations. We recently identified peptidylarginine deiminase 2 (PADI2) as a potential breast cancer biomarker and therapeutic target. Here we highlight the utility of the soft agar assay for preclinical anti-cancer studies by testing the effects of the PADI inhibitor, BB-Cl-amidine (BB-CLA), on the tumorigenicity of human ductal carcinoma in situ (MCF10DCIS) cells. PMID:26067809

  4. Evaluation of an in vitro cell culture assay for the potency assessment of recombinant human erythropoietin.

    PubMed

    Machado, Francine T; Maldaner, Fernanda P S; Perobelli, Rafaela F; Xavier, Bruna; da Silva, Francielle S; de Freitas, Guilherme W; Bartolini, Paolo; Ribela, M Tereza C P; Dalmora, Sérgio L

    2016-05-01

    Recombinant human erythropoietin is a sialoglycoprotein that stimulates erythropoiesis. To assess potency of human erythropoietin produced by recombinant technology, we investigated an in vitro TF-1 cell proliferation assay, which was applied in conjunction with a reversed-phase liquid chromatography method for the determination of the content of sialic acids. The results obtained, which were higher than 126.8ng/μg, were compared with those obtained with the in vivo normocythaemic mouse bioassay. The in vitro assay resulted in a non-significant lower mean difference of the estimated potencies (0.61% ± 0.026, p > 0.05). The use of this combination of methods represents an advance toward the establishment of alternative in vitro approaches, in the context of the Three Rs, for the potency assessment of biotechnology-derived medicines. PMID:27256453

  5. Identifying GSK-3β kinase inhibitors of Alzheimer's disease: Virtual screening, enzyme, and cell assays.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chih-Hsin; Hsieh, Yu-Shao; Wu, Yih-Ru; Hsu, Chia-Jen; Chen, Hsuan-Chiang; Huang, Wun-Han; Chang, Kuo-Hsuan; Hsieh-Li, Hsiu Mei; Su, Ming-Tsan; Sun, Ying-Chieh; Lee, Guan-Chiun; Lee-Chen, Guey-Jen

    2016-06-30

    Glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β) is widely known as a critical target protein for treating Alzheimer's disease (AD). We utilized virtual screening to search databases for compounds with the potential to be used in drugs targeting GSK-3β kinase, and kinase as well as cell assays to investigate top-scored, selected compounds. Virtual screening of >1.1 million compounds in the ZINC and in-house databases was conducted using an optimized computational protocol in the docking program GOLD. Of the top-ranked compounds, 16 underwent a luminescent kinase assay and a cell assay using HEK293 cells expressing DsRed-tagged ΔK280 in the repeat domain of tau (tauRD). The compounds VB-003 (a potent GSK-3β inhibitor) and VB-008 (AM404, an anandamide transport inhibitor), with determined IC50 values of 0.25 and 5.4μM, respectively, were identified as reducing tau aggregation. Both compounds increased expression of phospho-GSK-3β (Ser9) and reduced endogenous tau phosphorylation at the sites of Ser202, Thr231, and Ser396. In the ∆K280 tauRD-DsRed SH-SY5Y cells, VB-008, but not VB-003, enhanced HSPB1 and GRP78 expression, increased ∆K280 tauRD-DsRed solubility, and promoted neurite outgrowth. Thus VB-008 performed best to the end of the present study. The identified compound VB-008 may guide the identification and synthesis of potential inhibitors analogous to this compound. PMID:27094783

  6. Gamma radiation increases endonuclease-dependent L1 retrotransposition in a cultured cell assay.

    PubMed

    Farkash, Evan A; Kao, Gary D; Horman, Shane R; Prak, Eline T Luning

    2006-01-01

    Long Interspersed Elements (LINE-1s, L1s) are the most active mobile elements in the human genome and account for a significant fraction of its mass. The propagation of L1 in the human genome requires disruption and repair of DNA at the site of integration. As Barbara McClintock first hypothesized, genotoxic stress may contribute to the mobilization of transposable elements, and conversely, element mobility may contribute to genotoxic stress. We tested the ability of genotoxic agents to increase L1 retrotransposition in a cultured cell assay. We observed that cells exposed to gamma radiation exhibited increased levels of L1 retrotransposition. The L1 retrotransposition frequency was proportional to the number of phosphorylated H2AX foci, an indicator of genotoxic stress. To explore the role of the L1 endonuclease in this context, endonuclease-deficient tagged L1 constructs were produced and tested for their activity in irradiated cells. The activity of the endonuclease-deficient L1 was very low in irradiated cells, suggesting that most L1 insertions in irradiated cells still use the L1 endonuclease. Consistent with this interpretation, DNA sequences that flank L1 insertions in irradiated cells harbored target site duplications. These results suggest that increased L1 retrotransposition in irradiated cells is endonuclease dependent. The mobilization of L1 in irradiated cells potentially contributes to genomic instability and could be a driving force for secondary mutations in patients undergoing radiation therapy. PMID:16507671

  7. Microfluidic Assay To Study the Combinatorial Impact of Substrate Properties on Mesenchymal Stem Cell Migration.

    PubMed

    Menon, Nishanth V; Chuah, Yon Jin; Phey, Samantha; Zhang, Ying; Wu, Yingnan; Chan, Vincent; Kang, Yuejun

    2015-08-12

    As an alternative to complex and costly in vivo models, microfluidic in vitro models are being widely used to study various physiological phenomena. It is of particular interest to study cell migration in a controlled microenvironment because of its vital role in a large number of physiological processes, such as wound healing, disease progression, and tissue regeneration. Cell migration has been shown to be affected by variations in the biochemical and physical properties of the extracellular matrix (ECM). To study the combinatorial impact of the ECM physical properties on cell migration, we have developed a microfluidic assay to induce migration of human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs) on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrates with varying combinatorial properties (hydrophobicity, stiffness, and roughness). The results show that although the initial cell adhesion and viability appear similar on all PDMS samples, the cell spreading and migration are enhanced on PDMS samples exhibiting intermediate levels of hydrophobicity, stiffness, and roughness. This study suggests that there is a particular range of substrate properties for optimal cell spreading and migration. The influence of substrate properties on hBMSC migration can help understand the physical cues that affect cell migration, which may facilitate the development of optimized engineered scaffolds with desired properties for tissue regeneration applications. PMID:26186177

  8. Validation of T47D-KBluc cell assay for detection of estrogen receptor agonists and antagonists

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is growing concern of exposure to fish, wildlife, and humans to environmental estrogens and their potential impact on reproductive health. Cell-based assays are useful tools to determine the estrogenic activity of chemicals. Confidence in in vitro assay results is strengthe...

  9. Validation of T47D-KBluc cell assay for detection of estrogen receptor agonists and antagonists###

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is growing concern of exposure to fish, wildlife, and humans to environmental estrogens and their potential impact on reproductive health. Cell-based assays are useful tools to determine the estrogenic activity of chemicals. Confidence in in vitro assay results is strengthe...

  10. A Cell-Based Fluorescent Assay to Detect the Activity of Shiga Toxin and Other Toxins That Inhibit Protein Synthesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Escherichia coli O157:H7, a major cause of food-borne illness, produces Shiga toxins that block protein synthesis by inactivating the ribosome. In this chapter we describe a simple cell-based fluorescent assay to detect Shiga toxins and inhibitors of toxin activity. The assay can also be used to d...

  11. Evaluation of 1066 ToxCast Chemicals in a human stem cell assay for developmental toxicity (SOT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    To increase the diversity of assays used to assess potential developmental toxicity, the ToxCast chemical library was screened in the Stemina devTOX quickPREDICT assay using human embryonic stem (hES) cells. A model for predicting teratogenicity was based on a training set of 23 ...

  12. Circulating Tumor Cell Detection and Capture by Photoacoustic Flow Cytometry in Vivo and ex Vivo.

    PubMed

    Galanzha, Ekaterina I; Zharov, Vladimir P

    2013-01-01

    Despite progress in detecting circulating tumor cells (CTCs), existing assays still have low sensitivity (1-10 CTC/mL) due to the small volume of blood samples (5-10 mL). Consequently, they can miss up to 103-104 CTCs, resulting in the development of barely treatable metastasis. Here we analyze a new concept of in vivo CTC detection with enhanced sensitivity (up to 102-103 times) by the examination of the entire blood volume in vivo (5 L in adults). We focus on in vivo photoacoustic (PA) flow cytometry (PAFC) of CTCs using label-free or targeted detection, photoswitchable nanoparticles with ultrasharp PA resonances, magnetic trapping with fiber-magnetic-PA probes, optical clearance, real-time spectral identification, nonlinear signal amplification, and the integration with PAFC in vitro. We demonstrate PAFC's capability to detect rare leukemia, squamous carcinoma, melanoma, and bulk and stem breast CTCs and its clusters in preclinical animal models in blood, lymph, bone, and cerebrospinal fluid, as well as the release of CTCs from primary tumors triggered by palpation, biopsy or surgery, increasing the risk of metastasis. CTC lifetime as a balance between intravasation and extravasation rates was in the range of 0.5-4 h depending on a CTC metastatic potential. We introduced theranostics of CTCs as an integration of nanobubble-enhanced PA diagnosis, photothermal therapy, and feedback through CTC counting. In vivo data were verified with in vitro PAFC demonstrating a higher sensitivity (1 CTC/40 mL) and throughput (up to 10 mL/min) than conventional assays. Further developments include detection of circulating cancer-associated microparticles, and super-rsesolution PAFC beyond the diffraction and spectral limits. PMID:24335964

  13. Circulating Tumor Cell Detection and Capture by Photoacoustic Flow Cytometry in Vivo and ex Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Galanzha, Ekaterina I.; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2013-01-01

    Despite progress in detecting circulating tumor cells (CTCs), existing assays still have low sensitivity (1–10 CTC/mL) due to the small volume of blood samples (5–10 mL). Consequently, they can miss up to 103–104 CTCs, resulting in the development of barely treatable metastasis. Here we analyze a new concept of in vivo CTC detection with enhanced sensitivity (up to 102–103 times) by the examination of the entire blood volume in vivo (5 L in adults). We focus on in vivo photoacoustic (PA) flow cytometry (PAFC) of CTCs using label-free or targeted detection, photoswitchable nanoparticles with ultrasharp PA resonances, magnetic trapping with fiber-magnetic-PA probes, optical clearance, real-time spectral identification, nonlinear signal amplification, and the integration with PAFC in vitro. We demonstrate PAFC’s capability to detect rare leukemia, squamous carcinoma, melanoma, and bulk and stem breast CTCs and its clusters in preclinical animal models in blood, lymph, bone, and cerebrospinal fluid, as well as the release of CTCs from primary tumors triggered by palpation, biopsy or surgery, increasing the risk of metastasis. CTC lifetime as a balance between intravasation and extravasation rates was in the range of 0.5–4 h depending on a CTC metastatic potential. We introduced theranostics of CTCs as an integration of nanobubble-enhanced PA diagnosis, photothermal therapy, and feedback through CTC counting. In vivo data were verified with in vitro PAFC demonstrating a higher sensitivity (1 CTC/40 mL) and throughput (up to 10 mL/min) than conventional assays. Further developments include detection of circulating cancer-associated microparticles, and super-resolution PAFC beyond the diffraction and spectral limits. PMID:24335964

  14. Microfluidic Capture of Endothelial Colony-Forming Cells from Human Adult Peripheral Blood: Phenotypic and Functional Validation In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ruei-Zeng; Hatch, Adam; Antontsev, Victor G.; Murthy, Shashi K.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) are endothelial progenitors that circulate in peripheral blood and are currently the subject of intensive investigation due to their therapeutic potential. However, in adults, ECFCs comprise a very small subset among circulating cells, which makes their isolation a challenge. Materials and Methods: Currently, the standard method for ECFC isolation relies on the separation of mononuclear cells and erythrocyte lysis, steps that are time consuming and known to increase cell loss. Alternatively, we previously developed a novel disposable microfluidic platform containing antibody-functionalized degradable hydrogel coatings that is ideally suited for capturing low-abundance circulating cells from unprocessed blood. In this study, we reasoned that this microfluidic approach could effectively isolate rare ECFCs by virtue of their CD34 expression. Results: We conducted preclinical experiments with peripheral blood from four adult volunteers and demonstrated that the actual microfluidic capture of circulating CD34+ cells from unprocessed blood was compatible with the subsequent differentiation of these cells into ECFCs. Moreover, the ECFC yield obtained with the microfluidic system was comparable to that of the standard method. Importantly, we unequivocally validated the phenotypical and functional properties of the captured ECFCs, including the ability to form microvascular networks following transplantation into immunodeficient mice. Discussion: We showed that the simplicity and versatility of our microfluidic system could be very instrumental for ECFC isolation while preserving their therapeutic potential. We anticipate our results will facilitate additional development of clinically suitable microfluidic devices by the vascular therapeutic and diagnostic industry. PMID:25091645

  15. Design and validation of a novel ferromagnetic bare metal stent capable of capturing and retaining endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Uthamaraj, Susheil; Tefft, Brandon J; Klabusay, Martin; Hlinomaz, Ota; Sandhu, Gurpreet S; Dragomir-Daescu, Dan

    2014-12-01

    Rapid healing of vascular stents is important for avoiding complications associated with stent thrombosis, restenosis, and bleeding related to antiplatelet drugs. Magnetic forces can be used to capture iron-labeled endothelial cells immediately following stent implantation, thereby promoting healing. This strategy requires the development of a magnetic stent that is biocompatible and functional. We designed a stent from the weakly ferromagnetic 2205 stainless steel using finite element analysis. The final design exhibited a principal strain below the fracture limit of 30% during crimping and expansion. Ten stents were fabricated and validated experimentally for fracture resistance. Another 10 stents magnetized with a neodymium magnet showed a magnetic field in the range of 100-750 mG. The retained magnetism was sufficiently strong to capture magnetically-labeled endothelial cells on the stent surfaces during in vitro studies. Magnetically-labeled endothelial cell capture was also verified in vivo after 7 days following coronary implantation in 4 pigs using histological analysis. Images of the stented blood vessels showed uniform endothelium formation on the stent surfaces. In conclusion, we have designed a ferromagnetic bare metal stent from 2205 stainless steel that is functional, biocompatible, and able to capture and retain magnetically-labeled endothelial cells in order to promote rapid stent healing. PMID:25138164

  16. Evaluation of a Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Adherent Cell Differentiation and Cytotoxicity (ACDC) assay (SOT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Embryonic Stem Cell Test (EST) has been used to evaluate the effects of xenobiotics using three endpoints, stem cell differentiation, stem cell viability and 3T3-cell viability. Our research goal is to establish amodel system that would evaluate chemical effects using a singl...

  17. Human Blood-Circulating Basophils Capture HIV-1 and Mediate Viral trans-Infection of CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ai-Ping; Jiang, Jin-Feng; Guo, Ming-Gao; Jin, Yong-Mei; Li, Yu-Ye

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cell-associated HIV-1 infection has been proposed to play a pivotal role in the spread of HIV-1 infection. Granulocytes are a category of white blood cells, comprising mainly basophils, neutrophils, and eosinophils, and participate in various inflammatory reactions and defense against pathogens. Here, we investigated the role of human blood granulocytes in the dissemination of HIV-1. These cells were found to express a variety of HIV-1 attachment factors (HAFs). Basophils expressed HAFs dendritic cell (DC)-specific intercellular adhesion molecule 3 (ICAM3)-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN), DC immunoreceptor (DCIR), heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG), and α4β7 integrin and mediated the most efficient capture of HIV-1 on the cell surface. Neutrophils were found to express DCIR and demonstrated limited efficiency of viral capture. Eosinophils expressed α4β7 integrin but exhibited little or no virus-binding capacity. Intriguingly, following direct contact with CD4+ T cells, viruses harbored on the surface of basophils were transferred to T cells. The contact between basophils and CD4+ T cells and formation of infectious synapses appeared necessary for efficient HIV-1 spread. In HIV-1-infected individuals, the frequency of basophils remained fairly stable over the course of disease, regardless of CD4+ T depletion or the emergence of AIDS-associated opportunistic infections. Collectively, our results provide novel insights into the roles of granulocytes, particularly basophils, in HIV-1 dissemination. Thus, strategies designed to prevent basophil-mediated viral capture and transfer may be developed into a new form of therapy. IMPORTANCE Cell-associated HIV-1 infection has been proposed to play a pivotal role in the spread of HIV-1 infection. Here, we demonstrated that human blood-circulating granulocytes, particularly basophils, can capture HIV-1 and mediate viral trans-infection of CD4+ T cells. The expression of a variety of HIV-1 attachment factors, such

  18. Ex vivo and in vivo capture and deactivation of circulating tumor cells by dual-antibody-coated nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jingjing; Gao, Yu; Zhao, Rongli; Sinko, Patrick J; Gu, Songen; Wang, Jichuang; Li, Yuanfang; Lu, Yusheng; Yu, Suhong; Wang, Lie; Chen, Shuming; Shao, Jingwei; Jia, Lee

    2015-07-10

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have been detected by us and others in cancer patient blood. However, little is known about how to specifically capture and deactivate CTCs in vivo, which may lead to successful metastasis prevention in asymptomatic cancer survivors after surgery. We hypothesize that the dual antibody conjugates may have the advantage of capturing CTCs specifically over their single antibody counterparts. Here we show that the surface-functionalized dendrimers can be sequentially coated with two antibodies directed to surface biomarkers (EpCAM and Slex) of human colorectal CTCs. The dual antibody-coated dendrimers exhibit a significantly enhanced specificity in capturing CTCs in the presence of interfering blood cells, and in both eight-patient bloods and nude mice administered with the labeled CTCs in comparison to their single antibody-coated counterparts. The dual antibody-coated conjugates down-regulate the captured CTCs. This study provides the first conceptual evidence that two antibodies can be biocompatibly conjugated to a nanomaterial to capture and down-regulate CTCs in vivo with the enhanced specificity. PMID:25933713

  19. Comparison of In Vitro Cell Culture and a Mouse Assay for Measuring Infectivity of Cryptosporidium parvum

    PubMed Central

    Rochelle, Paul A.; Marshall, Marilyn M.; Mead, Jan R.; Johnson, Anne M.; Korich, Dick G.; Rosen, Jeffrey S.; De Leon, Ricardo

    2002-01-01

    In vitro cell cultures were compared to neonatal mice for measuring the infectivity of five genotype 2 isolates of Cryptosporidium parvum. Oocyst doses were enumerated by flow cytometry and delivered to animals and cell monolayers by using standardized procedures. Each dose of oocysts was inoculated into up to nine replicates of 9 to 12 mice or 6 to 10 cell culture wells. Infections were detected by hematoxylin and eosin staining in CD-1 mice, by reverse transcriptase PCR in HCT-8 and Caco-2 cells, and by immunofluorescence microscopy in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. Infectivity was expressed as a logistic transformation of the proportion of animals or cell culture wells that developed infection at each dose. In most instances, the slopes of the dose-response curves were not significantly different when we compared the infectivity models for each isolate. The 50% infective doses for the different isolates varied depending on the method of calculation but were in the range from 16 to 347 oocysts for CD-1 mice and in the ranges from 27 to 106, 31 to 629, and 13 to 18 oocysts for HCT-8, Caco-2, and MDCK cells, respectively. The average standard deviations for the percentages of infectivity for all replicates of all isolates were 13.9, 11.5, 13.2, and 10.7% for CD-1 mice, HCT-8 cells, Caco-2 cells, and MDCK cells, respectively, demonstrating that the levels of variability were similar in all assays. There was a good correlation between the average infectivity for HCT-8 cells and the results for CD-1 mice across all isolates for untreated oocysts (r = 0.85, n = 25) and for oocysts exposed to ozone and UV light (r = 0.89, n = 29). This study demonstrated that in vitro cell culture was equivalent to the “gold standard,” mouse infectivity, for measuring the infectivity of C. parvum and should therefore be considered a practical and accurate alternative for assessing oocyst infectivity and inactivation. However, the high levels of variability displayed by all

  20. An in vitro clonal assay of adherent stem cells (ASC) in mouse marrow.

    PubMed

    Reincke, U; Rosenblatt, M; Hellman, S

    1984-11-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells with high proliferative capacity can be assayed when stromal bone marrow cultures are overlaid with limiting dilutions of marrow samples. This leads to hematopoietic growth after 4 weeks in a fraction of cultures, consistent with expectations based on Poisson statistics. It will be shown that monoclonal cultures are obtained that last from 2 to 15 weeks and that can generate up to several million mature granulocytes. The originating clone-forming cell is named adherent stem cell (ASC) because of its adherence to plastic or stromal surfaces. The ASC is comparable to the CFU-S in frequency, proliferative capacity and in its ability to give rise to CFU-S. As an unexpected additional finding we report that a mode of "clonal succession" was apparent in cultures which expressed more than one clone. PMID:6490726

  1. A Real-Time Cell Analyzing Assay for Identification of Novel Antiviral Compounds against Chikungunya Virus.

    PubMed

    Zandi, Keivan

    2016-01-01

    Screening of viral inhibitors through induction of cytopathic effects (CPE) by conventional method has been applied for various viruses including Chikungunya virus (CHIKV), a significant arbovirus. However, it does not provide the information about cytopathic effect from the beginning and throughout the course of virus replication. Conventionally, most of the approaches are constructed on laborious end-point assays which are not capable for detecting minute and rapid changes in cellular morphology. Therefore, we developed a label-free and dynamical method for monitoring the cellular features that comprises cell attachment, proliferation, and viral cytopathogenicity, known as the xCELLigence real-time cell analysis (RTCA). In this chapter, we provide a RTCA protocol for quantitative analysis of CHIKV replication using an infected Vero cell line treated with ribavirin as an in vitro model. PMID:27233278

  2. A hard microflow cytometer using groove-generated sheath flow for multiplexed bead and cell assays

    PubMed Central

    Thangawng, Abel L.; Kim, Jason S.; Golden, Joel P.; Anderson, George P.; Robertson, Kelly L.; Low, Vyechi

    2010-01-01

    With a view toward developing a rugged microflow cytometer, a sheath flow system was micromachined in hard plastic (polymethylmethacrylate) for analysis of particles and cells using optical detection. Six optical fibers were incorporated into the interrogation region of the chip, in which hydrodynamic focusing narrowed the core stream to ∼35 μm×40 μm. The use of a relatively large channel at the inlet as well as in the interrogation region (375 μm×125 μm) successfully minimized the risk of clogging. The device could withstand pressures greater than 100 psi without leaking. Assays using both coded microparticles and cells were demonstrated using the microflow cytometer. Multiplexed immunoassays detected nine different bacteria and toxins using a single mixture of coded microspheres. A549 cancer cells processed with locked nucleic acid probes were evaluated using fluorescence in situ hybridization. PMID:20658281

  3. Exploring the dark side of MTT viability assay of cells cultured onto electrospun PLGA-based composite nanofibrous scaffolding materials.

    PubMed

    Qi, Ruiling; Shen, Mingwu; Cao, Xueyan; Guo, Rui; Tian, Xuejiao; Yu, Jianyong; Shi, Xiangyang

    2011-07-21

    One major method used to evaluate the biocompatibility of porous tissue engineering scaffolding materials is MTT (3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay. The MTT cell viability assay is based on the absorbance of the dissolved MTT formazan crystals formed in living cells, which is proportional to the number of viable cells. Due to the strong dye sorption capability of porous scaffolding materials, we propose that the cell viability determined from the MTT assay is likely to give a false negative result. In this study, we aim to explore the effect of the adsorption of MTT formazan on the accuracy of the viability assay of cells cultured onto porous electrospun poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanofibers, HNTs (halloysite nanotubes)/PLGA, and CNTs (multiwalled carbon nanotubes)/PLGA composite nanofibrous mats. The morphology of electrospun nanofibers and L929 mouse fibroblasts cultured onto the nanofibrous scaffolds were observed using scanning electron microscopy. The viability of cells proliferated for 3 days was evaluated through the MTT assay. In the meantime, the adsorption of MTT formazan onto the same electrospun nanofibers was evaluated and the standard concentration-absorbance curve was obtained in order to quantify the contribution of the adsorbed MTT formazan during the MTT cell viability assay. We show that the PLGA, and the HNTs- or CNTs-doped PLGA nanofibers display appreciable MTT formazan dye sorption, corresponding to 35.6-50.2% deviation from the real cell viability assay data. The better dye sorption capability of the nanofibers leads to further deviation from the real cell viability. Our study gives a general insight into accurate MTT cytotoxicity assessment of various porous tissue engineering scaffolding materials, and may be applicable to other colorimetric assays for analyzing the biological properties of porous scaffolding materials. PMID:21647502

  4. Stripe-like Clay Nanotubes Patterns in Glass Capillary Tubes for Capture of Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mingxian; He, Rui; Yang, Jing; Zhao, Wei; Zhou, Changren

    2016-03-01

    Here, we used capillary tubes to evaporate an aqueous dispersion of halloysite nanotubes (HNTs) in a controlled manner to prepare a patterned surface with ordered alignment of the nanotubes . Sodium polystyrenesulfonate (PSS) was added to improve the surface charges of the tubes. An increased negative charge of HNTs is realized by PSS coating (from -26.1 mV to -52.2 mV). When the HNTs aqueous dispersion concentration is higher than 10%, liquid crystal phenomenon of the dispersion is found. A typical shear flow behavior and decreased viscosity upon shear is found when HNTs dispersions with concentrations higher than 10%. Upon drying the HNTs aqueous dispersion in capillary tubes, a regular pattern is formed in the wall of the tube. The width and spacing of the bands increase with HNTs dispersion concentration and decrease with the drying temperature for a given initial concentration. Morphology results show that an ordered alignment of HNTs is found especially for the sample of 10%. The patterned surface can be used as a model for preparing PDMS molding with regular micro-/nanostructure. Also, the HNTs rough surfaces can provide much higher tumor cell capture efficiency compared to blank glass surfaces. The HNTs ordered surfaces provide promising application for biomedical areas such as biosensors. PMID:26967539

  5. Microbial carbon capture cell using cyanobacteria for simultaneous power generation, carbon dioxide sequestration and wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Pandit, Soumya; Nayak, Bikram Kumar; Das, Debabrata

    2012-03-01

    Microbial carbon capture cells (MCCs) were constructed with cyanobacteria growing in a photo biocathode in dual-chambered flat plate mediator-less MFCs separated by an anion exchange membrane from the anode compartment containing Shewanella putrefaciens. The performance of the MCC with Anabaena sparged with CO(2)-air mixture was compared with that of a conventional cathode sparged with air only. The power densities achieved were 57.8 mW/m(2) for Anabaena sparged with a CO(2)-air mixture, 39.2 mW/m(2) for CO(2)-air mixture sparging only, 29.7 mW/m(2) for Anabaena sparged with air, and 19.6 mW/m(2) for air sparging only. The pH of the cathode containing Anabaena gradually increased from 7 to 9.12 and power generation decreased from 34.7 to 23.8 mW/m(2) 17 due to pH imbalance associated voltage losses without CO(2)-air mixture sparging. Sparging with a 5% CO(2)-air mixture produced maximum power of 100.1 mW/m(2). In addition, the power density of MCC increased by 31% when nitrate was added into the catholyte. PMID:22221988

  6. Sequestration of CO2 discharged from anode by algal cathode in microbial carbon capture cells (MCCs).

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Feng, Yujie; Liu, Jia; Lee, He; Li, Chao; Li, Nan; Ren, Nanqi

    2010-08-15

    Due to increased discharge of CO(2) is incurring problems, CO(2) sequestration technologies require substantial development. By introducing anodic off gas into an algae grown cathode (Chlorella vulgaris), new microbial carbon capture cells (MCCs) were constructed and demonstrated here to be an effective technology for CO(2) emission reduction with simultaneous voltage output without aeration (610+/-50 mV, 1000 Omega). Maximum power densities increased from 4.1 to 5.6 W/m(3) when the optical density (OD) of cathodic algae suspension increased from 0.21 to 0.85 (658 nm). Compared to a stable voltage of 706+/-21 mV (1000 Omega) obtained with cathodic dissolved oxygen (DO) of 6.6+/-1.0 mg/L in MCC, voltage outputs decreased from 654 to 189 mV over 70 h in the control reactor (no algae) accompanied with a decrease in DO from 7.6 to 0.9 mg/L, indicating that cathode electron acceptor was oxygen. Gas analysis showed that all the CO(2) generated from anode was completely eliminated by catholyte, and the soluble inorganic carbon was further converted into algal biomass. These results showed the possibility of a new method for simultaneous carbon fixing, power generation and biodiesel production during wastewater treatment without aeration. PMID:20547055

  7. Screening Assay for Oxidative Stress in a Feline Astrocyte Cell Line, G355-5

    PubMed Central

    Testa, Maria Pia; Alvarado, Omar; Wournell, Andrea; Lee, Jonathan; Guilford, Frederick T.; Henriksen, Steven H.; Phillips, Tom R.

    2011-01-01

    An often-suggested mechanism of virus induced neuronal damage is oxidative stress. Astrocytes have an important role in controlling oxidative stress of the Central Nervous System (CNS). Astrocytes help maintain a homeostatic environment for neurons as well as protecting neurons from Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS). CM-H2DCFDA is a cell-permeable indicator for the presence of ROS. CM-H2DCFDA enters the cell as a non-fluorescent compound, and becomes fluorescent after cellular esterases remove the acetate groups, and the compound is oxidized. The number of cells, measured by flow cytometry, that are found to be green fluorescing is an indication of the number of cells that are in an oxidative state. CM-H2DCFDA is susceptible to oxidation by a large number of different ROS. This lack of specificity, regarding which ROS can oxidize CM-H2DCFDA, makes this compound a valuable regent for use in the early stages of a pathogenesis investigation, as this assay can be used to screen for an oxidative cellular environment regardless of which oxygen radical or combination of ROS are responsible for the cellular conditions. Once it has been established that ROS are present by oxidation of CM-H2DCFDA, then additional experiments can be performed to determine which ROS or combination of ROSs are involved in the particular pathogenesis process. The results of this study demonstrate that with the addition of hydrogen peroxide an increase in CM-H2DCFDA fluoresce was detected relative to the saline controls, indicating that this assay is a valuable test for detecting an oxidative environment within G355-5 cells, a feline astrocyte cell line. PMID:21775965

  8. Cytocompatibility of porous biphasic calcium phosphate granules with human mesenchymal cells by a multiparametric assay.

    PubMed

    Mitri, Fabio; Alves, Gutemberg; Fernandes, Gustavo; König, Bruno; Rossi, Alexandre J R; Granjeiro, Jose

    2012-06-01

    This work aims to evaluate the cytocompatibility of injectable and moldable restorative biomaterials based on granules of dense or porous biphasic calcium phosphates (BCPs) with human primary mesenchymal cells, in order to validate them as tools for stem cell-induced bone regeneration. Porous hydroxyapatite (HA) and HA/beta-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) (60:40) granules were obtained by the addition of wax spheres and pressing at 20 MPa, while dense materials were compacted by pressing at 100 MPa, followed by thermal treatment (1100°C), grinding, and sieving. Extracts were prepared by 24-h incubation of granules on culture media, with subsequent exposition of human primary mesenchymal cells. Three different cell viability parameters were evaluated on the same samples. Scanning electron microscopy analysis of the granules revealed distinct dense and porous surfaces. After cell exposition to extracts, no significant differences on mitochondrial activity (2,3-bis(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenly)-5-[(phenylamino) carbonyl]-2H-tetrazolium hydroxide) or cell density (Crystal Violet Dye Elution) were observed among groups. However, Neutral Red assay revealed that dense materials extracts induced lower levels of total viable cells to porous HA/β-TCP (P < 0.01). Calcium ion content was also significantly lower on the extracts of dense samples. Porogenic treatments on BCP composites do not affect cytocompatibility, as measured by three different parameters, indicating that these ceramics are well suited for further studies on future bioengineering applications. PMID:22372877

  9. Mammosphere formation assay from human breast cancer tissues and