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Sample records for cell cathode catalyst

  1. Cathode catalyst for primary phosphoric fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, F.

    1980-01-01

    Alkylation of Vulcan XC-72 provided the most stable bond type for linking CoTAA to the surface of the carbon; this result is based on data obtained by cyclic voltammetry, pulse voltammetry and by release of 14C from bonded CoTAA. Half-cell tests at 100 C in 85% phosphoric acid showed that CoTAA bonded to the surface of carbon (Vulcan XC-72) via an alkylation procedure is a more active catalyst than is platinum based on a factor of two improvement in Tafel slope; dimeric CoTAA has catalytic activity equal to platinum. Half-cell tests also showed that bonded CoTAA catalysts do not suffer a loss in potential when air is used as a fuel rather than oxygen. Commercially available PTFE was shown to be stable for four months in 200 C 85% phosphoric acid based on lack of change in surface wetting properties, IR and physical characteristics. When stressed electrochemically in 150 C 85% phosphoric acid, PTFE also showed no changes after one month.

  2. Development of gold alloy catalyst cathode for alkaline electrolyte fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, M. S.; Lawrance, R. J.

    1975-01-01

    A program for the development of improved catalyst and Teflon-bonded electrode structures using this improved catalyst is described, for use in fuel cell cathodes. It was found that Au-Pt was superior to the traditional platinum black as a catalyst. The impetus to the program was provided by the discovery that a life-limiting mechanism on the old catalyst was the gradual dissolution of platinum from the cathode and subsequent redeposition in the electrolyte-containing matrix.

  3. Surface-reconstructed graphite nanofibers as a support for cathode catalysts of fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Gan, Lin; Du, Hongda; Li, Baohua; Kang, Feiyu

    2011-04-01

    Graphite nanofibers (GNFs), on which surface graphite edges were reconstructed into nano-loops, were explored as a cathode catalyst support for fuel cells. The high degree of graphitization, as well as the surface-reconstructed nano-loops that possess topological defects for uniform metal deposition, resulted in an improved performance of the GNF-supported Pt catalyst. PMID:21336405

  4. Electricity generation by microbial fuel cell using microorganisms as catalyst in cathode.

    PubMed

    Jang, Jae Kyung; Kan, Jinjun; Bretschger, Orianna; Gorby, Yuri A; Hsu, Lewis; Kim, Byung Hong; Nealson, Kenneth H

    2013-12-01

    The cathode reaction is one of the most seriously limiting factors in a microbial fuel cell (MFC). The critical dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration of a platinum-loaded graphite electrode was reported as 2.2 mg/l, about 10-fold higher than an aerobic bacterium. A series of MFCs were run with the cathode compartment inoculated with activated sludge (biotic) or not (abiotic) on platinum-loaded or bare graphite electrodes. At the beginning of the operation, the current values from MFCs with a biocathode and abiotic cathode were 2.3 ± 0.1 and 2.6 ± 0.2 mA, respectively, at the air-saturated water supply in the cathode. The current from MFCs with an abiotic cathode did not change, but that of MFCs with a biotic cathode increased to 3.0 mA after 8 weeks. The coulomb efficiency was 59.6% in the MFCs with a biotic cathode, much higher than the value of 15.6% of the abiotic cathode. When the DO supply was reduced, the current from MFCs with an abiotic cathode decreased more sharply than in those with a biotic cathode. When the respiratory inhibitor azide was added to the catholyte, the current decreased in MFCs with a biotic cathode but did not change in MFCs with an abiotic cathode. The power density was higher in MFCs with a biotic cathode (430 W/m(3) cathode compartment) than the abiotic cathode MFC (257 W/m(3) cathode compartment). Electron microscopic observation revealed nanowire structures in biofilms that developed on both the anode and on the biocathode. These results show that an electron consuming bacterial consortium can be used as a cathode catalyst to improve the cathode reaction. PMID:24225369

  5. Novel anti-flooding poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) catalyst binder for microbial fuel cell cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fang; Chen, Guang; Hickner, Michael A.; Logan, Bruce E.

    2012-11-01

    Poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) was investigated as an alternative to Nafion as an air cathode catalyst binder in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Cathodes were constructed around either stainless steel (SS) mesh or copper mesh using PDMS as both catalyst binder and diffusion layer, and compared to cathodes of the same structure having a Nafion binder. With PDMS binder, copper mesh cathodes produced a maximum power of 1710 ± 1 mW m-2, while SS mesh had a slightly lower power of 1680 ± 12 mW m-2, with both values comparable to those obtained with Nafion binder. Cathodes with PDMS binder had stable power production of 1510 ± 22 mW m-2 (copper) and 1480 ± 56 mW m-2 (SS) over 15 days at cycle 15, compared to a 40% decrease in power with the Nafion binder. Cathodes with the PDMS binder had lower total cathode impedance than those with Nafion. This is due to a large decrease in diffusion resistance, because hydrophobic PDMS effectively prevented catalyst sites from filling up with water, improving oxygen mass transfer. The cost of PDMS is only 0.23% of that of Nafion. These results showed that PDMS is a very effective and low-cost alternative to Nafion binder that will be useful for large scale construction of these cathodes for MFC applications.

  6. Microbial fuel cell cathode with dendrimer encapsulated Pt nanoparticles as catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaoling; Lu, Jindan; Zhu, Yihua; Shen, Jianhua; Zhang, Zhen; Zhang, Jianmei; Chen, Cheng; Li, Chunzhong

    In this paper, we investigated the use of polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimer-encapsulated platinum nanoparticles (Pt-DENs) as a promising type of cathode catalyst for air-cathode single chamber microbial fuel cells (SCMFCs). The Pt-DENs, prepared via template synthesis method, have uniform diameter distribution with size range of 3-5 nm. The Pt-DENs then loaded on to a carbon substrate. For comparison, we also electrodeposited Pt on carbon substrate. The calculation shows that the loading amount of Pt-DENs on carbon substrate is about 0.1 mg cm -2, which is three times lower than that of the electrodeposited Pt (0.3 mg cm -2). By measuring batch experiments, the results show that Pt-DENs in air-cathode SCMFCs have a power density of 630 ± 5 mW m -2 and a current density of 5200 ± 10 mA m -2 (based on the projected anodic surface area), which is significantly better than electrodeposited Pt cathodes (power density: 275 ± 5 mW m -2 and current density: 2050 ± 10 mA m -2). Additionally, Pt-DENs-based cathodes resulted in a higher power production with 129.1% as compared to cathode with electrodeposited Pt. This finding suggests that Pt-DENs in MFC cathodes is a better catalyst and has a lower loading amount than electrodeposited Pt, and may serve as a novel and alternative catalyst to previously used noble metals in MFC applications.

  7. Cathode catalysts for primary phosphoric acid fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Alkylation or carbon Vulcan XC-72, the support carbon, was shown to provide the most stable bond type for linking cobalt dehydrodibenzo tetraazannulene (CoTAA) to the surface of the carbon; this result is based on data obtained by cyclic voltammetry, pulse voltammetry and by release of 14C from bonded CoTAA. Half-cell tests at 100 C in 85% phosphoric acid showed that CoTAA bonded to the surface of carbon (Vulcan XC-72) via an alkylation procedure is a more active catalyst than is platinum based on a factor of two improvement in Tafel slope; dimeric CoTAA had catalytic activity equal to platinum. Half-cell tests also showed that bonded CoTAA catalysts do not suffer a loss in potential when air is used as a fuel rather than oxygen. Commercially available polytetrafluroethylene (PTFE) was shown to be unstable in the fuel cell environment with degradation occurring in 2000 hours or less. The PTFE was stressed at 200 C in concentrated phosphoric acid as well as electrochemically stressed in 150 C concentrated phosphoric acid; the surface chemistry of PTFE was observed to change significantly. Radiolabeled PTFE was prepared and used to verify that such chemical changes also occur in the primary fuel cell environment.

  8. Enhanced stability of multilayer graphene-supported catalysts for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinkas, A.; Hempelmann, R.; Heinzel, A.; Peinecke, V.; Radev, I.; Natter, H.

    2015-11-01

    One of the biggest challenges in the field of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) is to enhance the lifetime and the long-term stability of PEMFC electrodes, especially of cathodes, furthermore, to reduce their platinum loading, which could lead to a cost reduction for efficient PEMFCs. These demands could be achieved with a new catalyst support architecture consisting of a composite of carbon structures with significant different morphologies. A highly porous cathode catalyst support layer is prepared by addition of various carbon types (carbon black particles, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT)) to multilayer graphene (MLG). The reported optimized cathodes shows extremely high durability and similar performance to commercial standard cathodes but with 89% lower Pt loading. The accelerated aging protocol (AAP) on the membrane electrode assemblies (MEA) shows that the presence of MLG increases drastically the durability and the Pt-extended electrochemical surface area (ECSA). In fact, after the AAP slightly enhanced performance can be observed for the MLG-containing cathodes instead of a performance loss, which is typical for the commercial carbon-based cathodes. Furthermore, the presence of MLG drastically decreases the ECSA loss rate. The MLG-containing cathodes show up to 6.8 times higher mass-normalized Pt-extended ECSA compared to the commercial standard systems.

  9. Evaluation of low-cost cathode catalysts for high yield biohydrogen production in microbial electrolysis cell.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Chen, Y; Ye, Y; Lu, B; Zhu, S; Shen, S

    2011-01-01

    As an ideal fuel due to the advantages of no pollution, high combustion heat and abundant sources, hydrogen gas can be produced from organic matter through the electrohydrogenesis process in microbial electrolysis cells. But in many MECs, platinum is often used as catalyst, which limits the practical applications of MECs. To reduce the cost of the MECs, Ni-based alloy cathodes were developed by electrodepositing. In this paper hydrogen production using Ni-W-P cathode was studied for the first time in a single-chamber membrane-free MEC. At an applied voltage of 0.9 V, MECs with Ni-W-P cathodes obtained a hydrogen production rate of 1.09 m3/m3/day with an cathodic hydrogen recovery of 74%, a Coulombic efficiency of 56% and an electrical energy efficiency relative to electrical input of 139%, which was the best result of reports in this study. The Ni-W-P cathode demonstrated a better electrocatalytic activity than the Ni-Ce-P cathode and achieved a comparable performance to the Pt cathode in terms of hydrogen production rate, Coulombic efficiency, cathodic hydrogen recovery and electrical energy efficiency at 0.9 V. PMID:21278465

  10. Solid oxide fuel cells having porous cathodes infiltrated with oxygen-reducing catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Meilin; Liu, Ze; Liu, Mingfei; Nie, Lifang; Mebane, David Spencer; Wilson, Lane Curtis; Surdoval, Wayne

    2014-08-12

    Solid-oxide fuel cells include an electrolyte and an anode electrically coupled to a first surface of the electrolyte. A cathode is provided, which is electrically coupled to a second surface of the electrolyte. The cathode includes a porous backbone having a porosity in a range from about 20% to about 70%. The porous backbone contains a mixed ionic-electronic conductor (MIEC) of a first material infiltrated with an oxygen-reducing catalyst of a second material different from the first material.

  11. Manganese dioxide as a new cathode catalyst in microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiang; Hu, Boxun; Suib, Steven; Lei, Yu; Li, Baikun

    This study focused on manganese oxides with a cryptomelane-type octahedral molecular sieve (OMS-2) structure to replace platinum as a cathode catalyst in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Undoped (ud-OSM-2) and three catalysts doped with cobalt (Co-OMS-2), copper (Cu-OMS-2), and cerium (Ce-OMS-2) to enhance their catalytic performances were investigated. The novel OMS-2 cathodes were examined in granular activated carbon MFC (GACMFC) with sodium acetate as the anode reagent and oxygen in air as the cathode reagent. The results showed that after 400 h of operation, the Co-OMS-2 and Cu-OMS-2 exhibited good catalytic performance in an oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The voltage of the Co-OMS-2 GACMFC was 217 mV, and the power density was 180 mW m -2. The voltage of the Cu-OMS-2 GACMFC was 214 mV and the power density was 165 mW m -2. The internal resistance (R in) of the OMS-2 GACMFCs (18 ± 1 Ω) was similar to that of the platinum GACMFCs (17 Ω). Furthermore, the degradation rates of organic substrates in the OMS-2 GACMFCs were twice those in the platinum GACMFCs, which enhance their wastewater treatment efficiencies. This study indicated that using OMS-2 manganese oxides to replace platinum as a cathodic catalyst enhances power generation, increases contaminant removal, and substantially reduces the cost of MFCs.

  12. Iron-based cathode catalyst with enhanced power density in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Proietti, Eric; Jaouen, Frédéric; Lefèvre, Michel; Larouche, Nicholas; Tian, Juan; Herranz, Juan; Dodelet, Jean-Pol

    2011-01-01

    H(2)-air polymer-electrolyte-membrane fuel cells are electrochemical power generators with potential vehicle propulsion applications. To help reduce their cost and encourage widespread use, research has focused on replacing the expensive Pt-based electrocatalysts in polymer-electrolyte-membrane fuel cells with a lower-cost alternative. Fe-based cathode catalysts are promising contenders, but their power density has been low compared with Pt-based cathodes, largely due to poor mass-transport properties. Here we report an iron-acetate/phenanthroline/zeolitic-imidazolate-framework-derived electrocatalyst with increased volumetric activity and enhanced mass-transport properties. The zeolitic-imidazolate-framework serves as a microporous host for phenanthroline and ferrous acetate to form a catalyst precursor that is subsequently heat treated. A cathode made with the best electrocatalyst from this work, tested in H(2)-O(2,) has a power density of 0.75 W cm(-2) at 0.6 V, a meaningful voltage for polymer-electrolyte-membrane fuel cells operation, comparable with that of a commercial Pt-based cathode tested under identical conditions. PMID:21811245

  13. Nonactivated and Activated Biochar Derived from Bananas as Alternative Cathode Catalyst in Microbial Fuel Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Haoran; Deng, Lifang; Qi, Yujie; Kobayashi, Noriyuki; Tang, Jiahuan

    2014-01-01

    Nonactivated and activated biochars have been successfully prepared by bananas at different thermotreatment temperatures. The activated biochar generated at 900°C (Biochar-act900) exhibited improved oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER) performances in alkaline media, in terms of the onset potential and generated current density. Rotating disk electron result shows that the average of 2.65 electrons per oxygen molecule was transferred during ORR of Biochar-act900. The highest power density of 528.2 mW/m2 and the maximum stable voltage of 0.47 V were obtained by employing Biochar-act900 as cathode catalyst, which is comparable to the Pt/C cathode. Owning to these advantages, it is expected that the banana-derived biochar cathode can find application in microbial fuel cell systems. PMID:25243229

  14. Effects of operating conditions on durability of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell Pt cathode catalyst layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohyagi, Shinsuke; Matsuda, Toshihiko; Iseki, Yohei; Sasaki, Tatsuyoshi; Kaito, Chihiro

    In this study, we investigated the effects of humidity and oxygen reduction on the degradation of the catalyst of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) in a voltage cycling test. To elucidate the effect of humidity on the voltage cycling corrosion of a carbon-supported Pt catalyst with 3 nm Pt particles, voltage cycling tests based on 10,000 cycles were conducted using 100% relative humidity (RH) hydrogen as anode gas and nitrogen of varying humidities as cathode gas. The degradation rate of an electrochemical surface area (ECSA) was almost 50% under 189% RH nitrogen atmosphere and the Pt average particle diameter after 10,000 cycles under these conditions was about 2.3 times that of a particle of fresh catalyst because of the agglomeration of Pt particles. The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) that facilitated Pt catalyst agglomeration when oxygen was employed as the cathode gas also demonstrated that Pt agglomeration was prominent in higher concentrations of oxygen. The ECSA degradation figure in 100% RH oxygen was similar to that in 189% RH nitrogen. It was concluded that liquid water, which was dropped under a supersaturated condition or generated by ORR, accelerated Pt agglomeration. In this paper, we suggest that the Pt agglomeration degradation occurs in a flooding area in a cell plane.

  15. Membrane fuel cell cathode catalysts based on titanium oxide supported platinum nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Gebauer, Christian; Jusys, Zenonas; Wassner, Maximilian; Hüsing, Nicola; Behm, R Jürgen

    2014-07-21

    The potential of platinum catalysts supported on pure, nitrogen-, or carbon-doped titania for application in the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), as a cathode catalyst in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells, is investigated. The oxide supports are synthesized by using a sol-gel route. Modification with nitrogen and carbon doping is achieved by thermal decomposition of urea and the structure-directing agent P123. Platinum nanoparticles are prepared by reduction of a Pt(IV) salt in ethylene glycol and subsequently immobilized on different support materials. Structural and electronic properties of the support materials and the resulting catalysts are characterized by various methods, including X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. These results and electrochemical characterization of the support materials and platinum nanoparticle catalysts indicate distinct support effects in the catalysts. The electrocatalytic performance of these catalysts in the ORR, as determined in rotating ring disc electrode measurements, is promising. Also here, distinct support effects can be identified. Correlations with the structural/electronic and the electrochemical properties are discussed, as well as the role of metal-support interactions. PMID:24850442

  16. High Temperature Membrane & Advanced Cathode Catalyst Development

    SciTech Connect

    Protsailo, Lesia

    2006-04-20

    Current project consisted of three main phases and eighteen milestones. Short description of each phase is given below. Table 1 lists program milestones. Phase 1--High Temperature Membrane and Advanced Catalyst Development. New polymers and advanced cathode catalysts were synthesized. The membranes and the catalysts were characterized and compared against specifications that are based on DOE program requirements. The best-in-class membranes and catalysts were downselected for phase 2. Phase 2--Catalyst Coated Membrane (CCM) Fabrication and Testing. Laboratory scale catalyst coated membranes (CCMs) were fabricated and tested using the down-selected membranes and catalysts. The catalysts and high temperature membrane CCMs were tested and optimized. Phase 3--Multi-cell stack fabrication. Full-size CCMs with the down-selected and optimized high temperature membrane and catalyst were fabricated. The catalyst membrane assemblies were tested in full size cells and multi-cell stack.

  17. Using bacterial catalyst in the cathode of microbial desalination cell to improve wastewater treatment and desalination.

    PubMed

    Wen, Qinxue; Zhang, Huichao; Chen, Zhiqiang; Li, Yufei; Nan, Jun; Feng, Yujie

    2012-12-01

    A microbial desalination cell (MDC) is able to desalinate salt water without energy consumption whilst generating bioenergy. Previously MDCs used abiotic cathodes, which are restricted in application by high operating costs and low levels of sustainability whereas, in the present study, an aerobic biocathode consisting of carbon felt and bacterial catalysts was tested. The biocathode MDC produced a maximum voltage of 609 mV, the value of which was 136 mV higher than that of an air cathode MDC operated under the same conditions. The salinity of 39 mL of salt water (35 g L(-1) NaCl) was reduced by 92% using 0.441 L of anode solution (11.3:1), with a coulombic efficiency of 96.2 ± 3.8% and a total desalination rate of 2.83 mg h(-1). The biocathode MDC proved to be a promising approach for efficient desalination of salt water. PMID:23026321

  18. Use of pyrolyzed iron ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid modified activated carbon as air-cathode catalyst in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xue; Zhang, Fang; Zhang, Xiaoyuan; Liang, Peng; Huang, Xia; Logan, Bruce E

    2013-08-28

    Activated carbon (AC) is a cost-effective catalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in air-cathode microbial fuel cells (MFCs). To enhance the catalytic activity of AC cathodes, AC powders were pyrolyzed with iron ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (FeEDTA) at a weight ratio of FeEDTA:AC = 0.2:1. MFCs with FeEDTA modified AC cathodes and a stainless steel mesh current collector produced a maximum power density of 1580 ± 80 mW/m(2), which was 10% higher than that of plain AC cathodes (1440 ± 60 mW/m(2)) and comparable to Pt cathodes (1550 ± 10 mW/m(2)). Further increases in the ratio of FeEDTA:AC resulted in a decrease in performance. The durability of AC-based cathodes was much better than Pt-catalyzed cathodes. After 4.5 months of operation, the maximum power density of Pt cathode MFCs was 50% lower than MFCs with the AC cathodes. Pyridinic nitrogen, quaternary nitrogen and iron species likely contributed to the increased activity of FeEDTA modified AC. These results show that pyrolyzing AC with FeEDTA is a cost-effective and durable way to increase the catalytic activity of AC. PMID:23902951

  19. Binary and ternary nano-catalysts as cathode materials in proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimm, Bryan Dunning

    The need for alternative energy, in order to reduce dependence on petroleum based fuels, has increased in recent years. Public demand is at an all-time high for low emitting or none polluting energy sources, driving the research for cleaner technology. Lithium batteries and fuel cells have the ability to produce this alternative energy with much cleaner standards, while allowing for portability and high energy densities. This work focuses on the performance of nanocatalysts in Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell or PEMFC. A key technical challenge is the sluggish rate for oxygen reduction reaction at the cathode of PEMFC, which requires highly-active and stable catalysts. Our investigation is directed at increasing stability and durability as well as reducing high loading of noble metals in these catalyst materials. Binary and ternary structured nanomaterials, e.g., Pt51V1Co48/C and Pd xCu1-x/C, have been synthesized and tested in a PEMFC, in order to gain a better understanding of their durability and efficiency. In addition to electrochemical characterization, synchrotron x-ray techniques at the Advance Photon Source in Argonne National Lab have also been used for the structural characterization.

  20. Power generation using spinel manganese-cobalt oxide as a cathode catalyst for microbial fuel cell applications.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Mohamed; Gad-Allah, Tarek A; El-Khatib, K M; El-Gohary, Fatma

    2011-11-01

    This study focused on the use of spinel manganese-cobalt (Mn-Co) oxide, prepared by a solid state reaction, as a cathode catalyst to replace platinum in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) applications. Spinel Mn-Co oxides, with an Mn/Co atomic ratios of 0.5, 1, and 2, were prepared and examined in an air cathode MFCs which was fed with a molasses-laden synthetic wastewater and operated in batch mode. Among the three Mn-Co oxide cathodes and after 300 h of operation, the Mn-Co oxide catalyst with Mn/Co atomic ratio of 2 (MnCo-2) exhibited the highest power generation 113 mW/m2 at cell potential of 279 mV, which were lower than those for the Pt catalyst (148 mW/m2 and 325 mV, respectively). This study indicated that using spinel Mn-Co oxide to replace platinum as a cathodic catalyst enhances power generation, increases contaminant removal, and substantially reduces the cost of MFCs. PMID:21944282

  1. Double-chamber microbial fuel cell with a non-platinum-group metal Fe-N-C cathode catalyst.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Carlo; Serov, Alexey; Narvaez Villarrubia, Claudia W; Stariha, Sarah; Babanova, Sofia; Schuler, Andrew J; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Atanassov, Plamen

    2015-03-01

    Non-Pt-group metal (non-PGM) materials based on transition metal-nitrogen-carbon (M-N-C) and derived from iron salt and aminoantipyrine (Fe-AAPyr) of mebendazole (Fe-MBZ) were studied for the first time as cathode catalysts in double-chamber microbial fuel cells (DCMFCs). The pH value of the cathode chamber was varied from 6 to 11 to elucidate the activity of those catalysts in acidic to basic conditions. The Fe-AAPyr- and Fe-MBZ-based cathodes were compared to a Pt-based cathode used as a baseline. Pt cathodes performed better at pH 6-7.5 and had similar performances at pH 9 and a substantially lower performance at pH 11 at which Fe-AAPyr and Fe-MBZ demonstrated their best electrocatalytic activity. The power density achieved with Pt constantly decreased from 94-99 μW cm(-2) at pH 6 to 55-57 μW cm(-2) at pH 11. In contrast, the power densities of DCMFs using Fe-AAPyr and Fe-MBZ were 61-68 μW cm(-2) at pH 6, decreased to 51-58 μW cm(-2) at pH 7.5, increased to 65-75 μW cm(-2) at pH 9, and the highest power density was achieved at pH 11 (68-80 μW cm(-2) ). Non-PGM cathode catalysts can be manufactured at the fraction of the cost of the Pt-based ones. The higher performance and lower cost indicates that non-PGM catalysts may be a viable materials choice in large-scale microbial fuel cells. PMID:25606716

  2. MWCNT-supported phthalocyanine cobalt as air-breathing cathodic catalyst in glucose/O2 fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elouarzaki, Kamal; Haddad, Raoudha; Holzinger, Michael; Le Goff, Alan; Thery, Jessica; Cosnier, Serge

    2014-06-01

    Simple and highly efficient glucose fuel cells using abiotic catalysts and different ion exchange membranes were designed. The glucose fuel cells are based on a multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)-supported cobalt phthalocyanine (CoPc) cathode and a carbon black/platinum (C/Pt) anode. The electrocatalytic activity of the MWCNT/CoPc electrode for oxygen reduction was investigated by cyclic and linear sweep voltammetry. The electrochemical experiments show that CoPc exhibits promising catalytic properties for oxygen reduction due to its high overpotential and efficiency at reduced metal load. The MWCNT/CoPc electrodes were applied to the oxygen reduction reaction as air-breathing cathode in a single-chambered glucose fuel cell. This cathode was associated with a C/Pt anode in fuel cell configurations using either an anion (Nafion®) or a cation (Tokuyama) exchange membrane. The best fuel cell configuration delivered a maximum power density of 2.3 mW cm-2 and a cell voltage of 0.8 V in 0.5 M KOH solution containing 0.5 M glucose using the Tokuyama membrane at ambient conditions. Beside the highest power density per cathodic catalyst mass (383 W g-1), these glucose fuel cells exhibit a high operational stability, delivering 0.3 mW cm-2 after 50 days.

  3. Inhibition of microbial growth on air cathodes of single chamber microbial fuel cells by incorporating enrofloxacin into the catalyst layer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Weifeng; Cheng, Shaoan; Sun, Dan; Huang, Haobin; Chen, Jie; Cen, Kefa

    2015-10-15

    The inevitable growth of aerobic bacteria on the surface of air cathodes is an important factor reducing the performance stability of air cathode single-chamber membrane-free microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Thus searching for effective methods to inhibit the cathodic microbial growth is critical for the practical application of MFCs. In this study, enrofloxacin (ENR), a broad spectrum fluoroquinolone antibiotic, was incorporated into the catalyst layer of activated carbon air cathodes (ACACs) to inhibit the cathodic microbial growth. The biomass content on ACACs was substantially reduced by 60.2% with ENR treatment after 91 days of MFCs operation. As a result of the inhibited microbial growth, the oxygen reduction catalytic performance of the ENR treated ACACs was much stable compared to the fast performance decline of the untreated control. Consequently, a quite stable electricity production was obtained for the MFCs with the ENR treated ACACs, in contrast with a 22.5% decrease in maximum power density of the MFCs with the untreated cathode. ENR treatment of ACACs showed minimal effects on the anode performance. These results indicate that incorporating antibiotics into ACACs should be a simple and effective strategy to inhibit the microbial growth and improve the long-term stability of the performance of air cathode and the electricity production of MFCs. PMID:25957076

  4. Generalized flooded agglomerate model for the cathode catalyst layer of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamarajugadda, Sai; Mazumder, Sandip

    2012-06-01

    The flooded agglomerate model has found prolific usage in modeling the oxygen reduction reaction within the cathode catalyst layer of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). The assumption made in this model is that the ionomer-coated carbon-platinum agglomerate is spherical in shape and that the spheres are non-overlapping. This assumption is convenient because the governing equations lend themselves to closed-form analytical solution when a spherical shape is assumed. In reality, micrographs of the catalyst layer show that the agglomerates are best represented by sets of overlapping spheres of unequal radii. In this article, the flooded agglomerate is generalized by considering overlapping spheres of unequal radii. As a first cut, only two overlapping spheres are considered. The governing reaction-diffusion equations are solved numerically using the unstructured finite-volume method. The volumetric current density is extracted for various parametric variations, and tabulated. This sub-grid-scale generalized flooded agglomerate model is first validated and finally coupled to a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code for predicting the performance of the PEMFC. Results show that when the agglomerates are small (<200 nm equivalent radius), the effect of agglomerate shape on the overall PEMFC performance is insignificant. For large agglomerates, on the other hand, the effect of agglomerate shape was found to be critical, especially for high current densities for which the mass transport resistance within the agglomerate is strongly dependent on the shape of the agglomerate, and was found to correlate well with the surface-to-volume ratio of the agglomerate.

  5. Chalcogen catalysts for polymer electrolyte fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Zelenay, Piotr; Choi, Jong-Ho; Alonso-Vante, Nicolas; Wieckowski, Andrzej; Cao, Dianxue

    2010-08-24

    A methanol-tolerant cathode catalyst and a membrane electrode assembly for fuel cells that includes such a cathode catalyst. The cathode catalyst includes a support having at least one transition metal in elemental form and a chalcogen disposed on the support. Methods of making the cathode catalyst and membrane electrode assembly are also described.

  6. Highly active nanoporous Pt-based alloy as anode and cathode catalyst for direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaoting; Jiang, Yingying; Sun, Junzhe; Jin, Chuanhong; Zhang, Zhonghua

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we explore nanoporous PtPdAlCu (np-PtPdAlCu) quaternary alloy through ball-milling with the subsequent two-step dealloying strategy. The microstructure and catalytic performance of the np-PtPdAlCu catalyst have been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and electrochemical measurements. The np-PtPdAlCu catalyst exhibits an open bi-continuous interpenetrating ligament/channel structure with a length scale of 2.3 ± 0.5 nm. The np-PtPdAlCu catalyst shows 2 and 3.5 times enhancement in the mass activity and area specific activity towards methanol oxidation at anode respectively, compared to the Johnson Matthey (JM) Pt/C (40 wt.%) catalyst. Moreover, the CO stripping peak of np-PtPdAlCu is 0.49 V (vs. SCE), indicating a 180 mV negative shift in comparison with the Pt/C catalyst (0.67 V vs. SCE). In addition, the np-PtPdAlCu catalyst also shows an enhanced oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity at cathode compared to Pt/C. The present study provides a facile and effective route to design high-performance catalysts for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs).

  7. Immobilization of a Metal-Nitrogen-Carbon Catalyst on Activated Carbon with Enhanced Cathode Performance in Microbial Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wulin; Logan, Bruce E

    2016-08-23

    Applications of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are limited in part by low power densities mainly due to cathode performance. Successful immobilization of an Fe-N-C co-catalyst on activated carbon (Fe-N-C/AC) improved the oxygen reduction reaction to nearly a four-electron transfer, compared to a twoelectron transfer achieved using AC. With acetate as the fuel, the maximum power density was 4.7±0.2 W m(-2) , which is higher than any previous report for an air-cathode MFC. With domestic wastewater as a fuel, MFCs with the Fe-N-C/AC cathode produced up to 0.8±0.03 W m(-2) , which was twice that obtained with a Pt-catalyzed cathode. The use of this Fe-N-C/AC catalyst can therefore substantially increase power production, and enable broader applications of MFCs for renewable electricity generation using waste materials. PMID:27416965

  8. Using ammonium bicarbonate as pore former in activated carbon catalyst layer to enhance performance of air cathode microbial fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Da; Qu, Youpeng; Liu, Jia; He, Weihua; Wang, Haiman; Feng, Yujie

    2014-12-01

    The rolling catalyst layers in air cathode microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are prepared by introducing NH4HCO3 as pore former (PF) with four PF/activated carbon mass ratios of 0.1, 0.2, 0.3 and 1.0. The maximum power density of 892 ± 8 mW m-2 is obtained by cathodes with the mass ratio of 0.2, which is 33% higher than that of the control reactor (without PF, 671 ± 22 mW m-2). Pore analysis indicates the porosity increases by 38% and the major pore range concentrates between 0.5 μm-0.8 μm which likely facilitates to enrich the active reaction sites compared to 0.8 μm-3.0 μm in the control and other PF-cathodes. In addition, pore structure endows the cathode improved exchange current density by 2.4 times and decreased charge transfer resistance by 44%, which are the essential reasons to enhance the oxygen reduction. These results show that addition of NH4HCO3 proves an effective way to change the porosity and pore distribution of catalyst layers and then enhance the MFC performance.

  9. Carbon supported cobalt oxide nanoparticles-iron phthalocyanine as alternative cathode catalyst for oxygen reduction in microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Jalal; Yuan, Yong; Zhou, Lihua; Kim, Sunghyun

    2012-06-01

    The high cost and limited resources of precious metals as oxygen reduction catalysts (ORR) hindered the widespread use of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) in practice. Here, the feasibility of metal oxide assisted metal macrocyclic complex was investigated as a catalyst for ORR in an air-cathode MFC. Electrochemical results revealed that cobalt oxide (CoOx) incorporation increased the ORR activity of iron phthalocyanine (FePc). In MFCs, the maximum power density of 654 ± 32 mW m-2 was achieved from the C-CoOx-FePc cathode, which was 37% higher than the power density of carbon supported FePc (C-FePc). The voltage output of the MFC only decreased to 85% of its initial voltage after 50 cycles, suggesting that the synthesized catalyst showed acceptable long-term stability. The voltage drop partially resulted from the covering of biofilm on the catalyst layer. This work provided a potential alternative to Pt in MFCs for sustainable energy generation.

  10. Copper nitride nanocubes: size-controlled synthesis and application as cathode catalyst in alkaline fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haibin; Chen, Wei

    2011-10-01

    Copper nitride nanocubes are synthesized in a facile one-phase process. The crystal size could be tuned easily by using different primary amines as capping agents. Such Pt-free nanocrystals exhibit electrocatalytic activity toward oxygen reduction and appear to be promising cathodic electrocatalysts in alkaline fuel cells. PMID:21894995

  11. High catalytic activity and pollutants resistivity using Fe-AAPyr cathode catalyst for microbial fuel cell application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santoro, Carlo; Serov, Alexey; Villarrubia, Claudia W. Narvaez; Stariha, Sarah; Babanova, Sofia; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Schuler, Andrew J.; Atanassov, Plamen

    2015-11-01

    For the first time, a new generation of innovative non-platinum group metal catalysts based on iron and aminoantipyrine as precursor (Fe-AAPyr) has been utilized in a membraneless single-chamber microbial fuel cell (SCMFC) running on wastewater. Fe-AAPyr was used as an oxygen reduction catalyst in a passive gas-diffusion cathode and implemented in SCMFC design. This catalyst demonstrated better performance than platinum (Pt) during screening in “clean” conditions (PBS), and no degradation in performance during the operation in wastewater. The maximum power density generated by the SCMFC with Fe-AAPyr was 167 ± 6 μW cm-2 and remained stable over 16 days, while SCMFC with Pt decreased to 113 ± 4 μW cm-2 by day 13, achieving similar values of an activated carbon based cathode. The presence of S2- and showed insignificant decrease of ORR activity for the Fe-AAPyr. The reported results clearly demonstrate that Fe-AAPyr can be utilized in MFCs under the harsh conditions of wastewater.

  12. High catalytic activity and pollutants resistivity using Fe-AAPyr cathode catalyst for microbial fuel cell application

    PubMed Central

    Santoro, Carlo; Serov, Alexey; Villarrubia, Claudia W. Narvaez; Stariha, Sarah; Babanova, Sofia; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Schuler, Andrew J.; Atanassov, Plamen

    2015-01-01

    For the first time, a new generation of innovative non-platinum group metal catalysts based on iron and aminoantipyrine as precursor (Fe-AAPyr) has been utilized in a membraneless single-chamber microbial fuel cell (SCMFC) running on wastewater. Fe-AAPyr was used as an oxygen reduction catalyst in a passive gas-diffusion cathode and implemented in SCMFC design. This catalyst demonstrated better performance than platinum (Pt) during screening in “clean” conditions (PBS), and no degradation in performance during the operation in wastewater. The maximum power density generated by the SCMFC with Fe-AAPyr was 167 ± 6 μW cm−2 and remained stable over 16 days, while SCMFC with Pt decreased to 113 ± 4 μW cm−2 by day 13, achieving similar values of an activated carbon based cathode. The presence of S2− and showed insignificant decrease of ORR activity for the Fe-AAPyr. The reported results clearly demonstrate that Fe-AAPyr can be utilized in MFCs under the harsh conditions of wastewater. PMID:26563922

  13. Iron-nitrogen-activated carbon as cathode catalyst to improve the power generation of single-chamber air-cathode microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yajun; Mo, Xiaoping; Li, Kexun; Pu, Liangtao; Liu, Di; Yang, Tingting

    2016-04-01

    In order to improve the performance of microbial fuel cell (MFC), iron-nitrogen-activated carbon (Fe-N-C) as an excellent oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalyst was prepared here using commercial activated carbon (AC) as matrix and employed in single chamber MFC. In MFC, the maximum power density increased to 2437±55mWm(-2), which was 2 times of that with AC. The open circuit potential (OCP) of Fe-N-C cathode (0.47) was much higher than that of AC cathode (0.21V). The R0 of Fe-N-C decreased by 47% from 14.36Ω (AC) to 7.6Ω (Fe-N-C). From X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), pyridinic nitrogen, quaternary nitrogen and iron species were present, which played an important role in the ORR performance of Fe-N-C. These results demonstrated that the as-prepared Fe-N-C material provided a potential alternative to Pt in AC air cathode MFC for relatively desirable energy generation and wastewater treatment. PMID:26898678

  14. Co-Pt core-shell nanostructured catalyst prepared by selective chemical vapor pulse deposition of Pt on Co as a cathode in polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Sang-Joon; Chung, Ho-Kyoon; Yoo, Ji-Beom; Chae, Heeyeop; Seo, Seung-Woo; Min Cho, Sung

    2014-01-15

    A new type of PtCo/C catalyst for use as a cathode in polymer electrolyte fuel cells was prepared by selective chemical vapor pulse deposition (CVPD) of Pt on the surface of Co. The activity of the prepared catalyst for oxygen reduction was higher than that of a catalyst prepared by sequential impregnation (IMP) with the two metallic components. This catalytic activity difference occurs because the former catalyst has smaller Pt crystallites that produce stronger Pt-Co interactions and have a larger Pt surface area. Consequently, the CVPD catalyst has a great number of Co particles that are in close contact with the added Pt. The Pt surface was also electronically modified by interactions with Co, which were stronger in the CVPD catalyst than in the IMP catalyst, as indicated by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, and cyclic voltammetry measurements of the catalysts.

  15. Bifunctional Ag/Fe/N/C Catalysts for Enhancing Oxygen Reduction via Cathodic Biofilm Inhibition in Microbial Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Dai, Ying; Chan, Yingzi; Jiang, Baojiang; Wang, Lei; Zou, Jinlong; Pan, Kai; Fu, Honggang

    2016-03-23

    Limitation of the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in single-chamber microbial fuel cells (SC-MFCs) is considered an important hurdle in achieving their practical application. The cathodic catalysts faced with a liquid phase are easily primed with the electrolyte, which provides more surface area for bacterial overgrowth, resulting in the difficulty in transporting protons to active sites. Ag/Fe/N/C composites prepared from Ag and Fe-chelated melamine are used as antibacterial ORR catalysts for SC-MFCs. The structure-activity correlations for Ag/Fe/N/C are investigated by tuning the carbonization temperature (600-900 °C) to clarify how the active-constituents of Ag/Fe and N-species influence the antibacterial and ORR activities. A maximum power density of 1791 mW m(-2) is obtained by Ag/Fe/N/C (630 °C), which is far higher than that of Pt/C (1192 mW m(-2)), only having a decline of 16.14% after 90 days of running. The Fe-bonded N and the cooperation of pyridinic N and pyrrolic N in Ag/Fe/N/C contribute equally to the highly catalytic activity toward ORR. The ·OH or O2(-) species originating from the catalysis of O2 can suppress the biofilm growth on Ag/Fe/N/C cathodes. The synergistic effects between the Ag/Fe heterojunction and N-species substantially contribute to the high power output and Coulombic efficiency of Ag/Fe/N/C catalysts. These new antibacterial ORR catalysts show promise for application in MFCs. PMID:26938657

  16. Load cycle durability of a graphitized carbon black-supported platinum catalyst in polymer electrolyte fuel cell cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takei, Chikara; Kakinuma, Katsuyoshi; Kawashima, Kazuhito; Tashiro, Keisuke; Watanabe, Masahiro; Uchida, Makoto

    2016-08-01

    We focus on Pt degradation occurring during fuel cell vehicle (FCV) combined drive cycles involving load and open circuit voltage (OCV) just after startup and during idling. Load cycle durability is evaluated as a function of OCV/load holding time, load rate and relative humidity (RH) with a graphitized carbon black-supported platinum catalyst (Pt/GCB) in the cathode. The degradation of Pt/GCB is suppressed for shorter OCV holding times, lower load rates and lower RH. Scanning ion microscopy (SIM) images of membrane cross-sections indicate that the amount of Pt deposited in the membrane decreases during drive cycles involving load with short OCV holding times. Investigations of the Pt distribution in the cathode catalyst layer (CL) by using scanning TEM-EDX show that the dissolution of Pt is suppressed on the membrane side in the CL. The Pt dissolution is accelerated by the high Pt oxidation due to the long OCV holding time. A load cycle with both long OCV holding time and low load inhibits the Pt2+ migration into the membrane but accelerates the Pt particle growth due to electrochemical Ostwald ripening; meanwhile, a load cycle with long OCV holding time at lower RH prevents both the Pt dissolution and particle growth.

  17. Catalysts for ultrahigh current density oxygen cathodes for space fuel cell applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tryk, D.; Yeager, E.; Shingler, M.; Aldred, W.; Wang, C.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this research was to identify promising electrocatalyst/support systems for the oxygen cathode in alkaline fuel cells operating at relatively high temperatures, O2 pressures and current densities. A number of materials were prepared, including Pb-Ru and Pb-Ir pyrochlores, RuO2 and Pt-doped RuO2, and lithiated NiO. Several of these were prepared using techniques that had not been previously used to prepare them. Particularly interesting is the use of the alkaline solution technique to prepare the Pt-doped Pb-Ru pyrochlore in high area form. Well-crystallized Pb(2)Ru(2)O(7-y) was used to fabricate high performance O2 cathodes with relatively good stability in room temperature KOH. This material was also found to be stable over a useful potential range at approximately 140 C in concentrated KOH. Other pyrochlores were found to be either unstable (amorphous samples) or the fabrication of the gas-fed electrodes could not be fully optimized during this project period. Future work may be directed at this problem. High area platinum supported on conductive metal oxide supports produced mixed results: small improvements in O2 reduction performance for Pb(2)Ru(2)O(7-y) but a large improvement for Li-doped NiO at room temperature. Nearly reversible behavior was observed for the O2/OH couple for Li-doped NiO at approximately 200 C.

  18. Porous nitrogen-doped carbon nanosheet on graphene as metal-free catalyst for oxygen reduction reaction in air-cathode microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Wen, Qing; Wang, Shaoyun; Yan, Jun; Cong, Lijie; Chen, Ye; Xi, Hongyuan

    2014-02-01

    Porous nitrogen-doped carbon nanosheet on graphene (PNCN) was used as an alternative cathode catalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in air-cathode microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Here we report a novel, low-cost, scalable, synthetic method for preparation of PNCN via the carbonization of graphite oxide-polyaniline hybrid (GO-PANI), subsequently followed by KOH activation treatment. Due to its high concentration of nitrogen and high specific surface area, PNCN exhibited an excellent catalytic activity for ORR. As a result, the maximum power density of 1159.34mWm(-2) obtained with PNCN catalyst was higher than that of Pt/C catalyst (858.49mWm(-2)) in a MFC. Therefore, porous nitrogen-doped carbon nanosheet could be a good alternative to Pt catalyst in MFCs. PMID:24239870

  19. PRELIMINARY IN-SITU X-RAY ABSORPTION FINE STRUCTURE EXAMINATION OF PT/C AND PTCO/C CATHODE CATALYSTS IN AN OPERATIONAL POLYMER ELECTROLYTE FUEL CELL

    SciTech Connect

    Phelan, B.T.; Myers, D.J.; Smith, M.C.

    2009-01-01

    State-of-the-art polymer electrolyte fuel cells require a conditioning period to reach optimized cell performance. There is insuffi cient understanding about the behavior of catalysts during this period, especially with regard to the changing environment of the cathode electrocatalyst, which is typically Pt nanoparticles supported on high surface area Vulcan XC-72 carbon (Pt/C). The purpose of this research was to record preliminary observations of the changing environment during the conditioning phase using X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) spectroscopy. XAFS was recorded for a Pt/C cathode at the Pt L3-edge and a PtCo/C cathode at both the Pt L3-edge and Co K-edge. Using precision machined graphite cell-blocks, both transmission and fl uorescence data were recorded at Sector 12-BM-B of Argonne National Laboratory’s Advanced Photon Source. The fl uorescence and transmission edge steps allow for a working description of the changing electrocatalyst environment, especially water concentration, at the anode and cathode as functions of operating parameters. These features are discussed in the context of how future analysis may correlate with potential, current and changing apparent thickness of the membrane electrode assembly through loss of catalyst materials (anode, cathode, carbon support). Such direct knowledge of the effect of the conditioning protocol on the electrocatalyst may lead to better catalyst design. In turn, this may lead to minimizing, or even eliminating, the conditioning period.

  20. Nickel oxide and carbon nanotube composite (NiO/CNT) as a novel cathode non-precious metal catalyst in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jianjian; Zhu, Nengwu; Yang, Tingting; Zhang, Taiping; Wu, Pingxiao; Dang, Zhi

    2015-10-15

    Comparing with the precious metal catalysts, non-precious metal catalysts were preferred to use in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) due to the low cost and high oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) efficiency. In this study, the transmission electron microscope and X-ray diffraction as well as Raman investigation revealed that the prepared nanoscale NiO was attached on the surface of CNT. Cyclic voltammogram and rotating ring-disk electrode tests showed that the NiO/CNT composite catalyst had an apparent oxygen reduction peak and 3.5 electron transfer pathway was acquired under oxygen atmosphere. The catalyst performance was highly dependent on the percentage of NiO in the CNT nanocomposites. When 77% NiO/CNT nano-sized composite was applied as cathode catalyst in membrane free single-chamber air cathode MFC, a maximum power density of 670 mW/m(2) and 0.772 V of OCV was obtained. Moreover, the MFC with pure NiO (control) could not achieve more than 0.1 V. All findings suggested that NiO/CNT could be a potential cathode catalyst for ORR in MFCs. PMID:26002018

  1. Catalysts for ultrahigh current density oxygen cathodes for space fuel cell applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tryk, Donald A.; Yeager, E.

    1992-01-01

    The objective was to identify promising electrocatalyst/support systems for oxygen cathodes capable of operating at ultrahigh current densities in alkaline fuel cells. Such cells will require operation at relatively high temperatures and O2 pressures. A number of materials were prepared, including Pb-Ru and Pb-Ir pyrochlores, RuO2 and Pt-doped RuO2, lithiated NiO and La-Ni perovskites. Several of these materials were prepared using techniques that had not been previously used to prepare them. Particularly interesting was the use of the alkaline solution technique to prepare Pt-doped and Pb-Ru pyrochlores in high area form. Also interesting was the use of the fusion (melt) method for preparing the Pb-Ru pyrochlore. Several of the materials were also deposited with platinum. Well-crystallized Pb2Ru2O(7-y) was used to fabricate very high performance O2 cathodes with good stability in room temperature KOH. This material was also found to be stable over a useful potential range at approx. 140 C in concentrated KOH. For some of the samples, fabrication of the gas-fed electrodes could not be fully optimized during this project period. Future work may be directed at this problem. Pyrochlores that were not well-crystallized were found to be unstable in alkaline solution. Very good O2 reduction performance and stability were observed with Pb2RuO(7-y) in a carbon-based gas-fed electrode with an anion-conducting membrane placed on the electrolyte side of the electrode. The performance came within a factor of about two of that observed without carbon. High area platinum and gold supported on several conductive metal oxide supports were examined. Only small improvements in O2 reduction performance at room temperature were observed for Pb2Ru2O(7-y) as a support because of the high intrinsic activity of the pyrochlore. In contrast, a large improvement was observed for Li-doped NiO as a support for Pt. Very poor performance was observed for Au deposited on Li-NiO at approx. 150 C

  2. Nb doped TiO2 as a Cathode Catalyst Support Material for Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Toole, Alexander W.

    In order to reduce the emissions of greenhouse gases and reduce dependence on the use of fossil fuels, it is necessary to pursue alternative sources of energy. Transportation is a major contributor to the emission of greenhouse gases due to the use of fossil fuels in the internal combustion engine. To reduce emission of these pollutants into the atmosphere, research is needed to produce alternative solutions for vehicle transportation. Low temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells are energy conversion devices that provide an alternative to the internal combustion engine, however, they still have obstacles to overcome to achieve large scale implementation. T he following work presents original research with regards to the development of Nb doped TiO2 as a cathode catalyst support material for low temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. The development of a new process to synthesize nanoparticles of Nb doped TiO2 with controlled compositions is presented as well as methods to scale up the process and optimize the synthesis for the aforementioned application. In addition to this, comparison of both electrochemical activity and durability with current state of the art Pt on high surface area carbon black (Vulcan XC-72) is investigated. Effects of the strong metal-support interaction on the electrochemical behavior of these materials is also observed and discussed.

  3. Carbon supported Ag nanoparticles as high performance cathode catalyst for H2/O2 anion exchange membrane fuel cell

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Le; Zhang, Zhiyong; Wang, Zhichao; Qi, Ji; Li, Wenzhen

    2013-01-01

    A solution phase-based nanocapsule method was successfully developed to synthesize non-platinum metal catalyst—carbon supported Ag nanoparticles (Ag/C). XRD patterns and TEM image show Ag nanoparticles with a small average size (5.4 nm) and narrow size distribution (2–9 nm) are uniformly dispersed on the carbon black Vulcan XC-72 support. The intrinsic activity and pathway of oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) on the Ag/C and commercial Pt/C were investigated using rotating ring disk electrode (RRDE) tests at room temperature. The results confirmed that the 4-electron pathway of ORR proceeds on small Ag nanoparticles, and showed comparable ORR activities on the self-prepared Ag/C and a commercial Pt/C. A single H2-O2 anion exchange membrane fuel cell (AEMFC) with the Ag/C cathode catalyst exhibited an open circuit potential of 0.98 V and a peak power density of 190 mW/cm2 at 80°C. PMID:24790944

  4. Development of ternary alloy cathode catalysts for phosphoric acid fuel cells: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Jalan, V.; Kosek, J.; Giner, J.; Taylor, E. J.; Anderson, E.; Bianchi, V.; Brooks, C.; Cahill, K.; Cropley, C.; Desai, M.; Frost, D.; Morriseau, B.; Paul, B.; Poirier, J.; Rousseau, M.; Swette, L.; Waterhouse, R.

    1988-11-01

    The overall objective of the program was the identification development and incorporation of high activity platinum ternary alloys on corrosion resistant supports, for use in advanced phosphoric acid fuel cells. Two high activity ternary alloys, Pr-Cr-Ce and Pt-Ni-Co, both supported on Vulcan XC-72, were identified during the course of the program. The Pr-Ni-Co system was selected for optimization, including preparation and evaluation on corrosion resistant supports such as 2700/degree/C heat-treated Vulcan XC-72 and 2700/degree/ heat-treated Black Pearls 2000. A series of tests identified optimum metal ratios, heat-treatment temperatures and heat-treatment atmospheres for the Pr-Ni-Co system. During characterization testing, it was discovered that approximately 50% of the nickel and cobalt present in the starting material could be removed, subsequent to alloy formation, without degrading performance. Extremely stable full cell performance was observed for the Pt-Ni-Co system during a 10,000 hour atmosphere pressure life test. Several theories are proposed to explain the enhancement in activity due to alloy formation. Recommendations are made for future research in this area. 62 refs., 23 figs., 27 tabs.

  5. Effect of the nanosized TiO2 particles in Pd/C catalysts as cathode materials in direct methanol fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Mahnsoo; Han, Choonsoo; Kim, In-Tae; Lee, Ji-Jung; Lee, Hong-Ki; Shim, Joongpyo

    2011-07-01

    Pd-TiO2/C catalysts were prepared by impregnating titanium dioxide (TiO2) on carbon-supported Pd (Pd/C) for use as the catalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). Transmission electron microscope (TEM), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses were carried to confirm the distribution, morphology and structure of Pd and TiO2 on the carbon support. In fuel cell test, we confirmed that the addition of TiO2 nanoparticles make the improved catalytic activity of oxygen reduction. The electrochemical characterization of the Pd-TiO2/C catalyst for the ORR was carried out by cyclic voltammetry (CV) in the voltage window of 0.04 V to 1.2 V with scan rate of 25 mV/s. With the increase in the crystallite size of TiO2, the peak potential for OH(ads) desorption on the surface of Pd particle shifted to higher potential. This implies that TiO2 might affect the adsorption and desorption of oxygen molecules on Pd catalyst. The performance of Pd-TiO2/C as a cathode material was found to be similar to or better performance than that of Pt/C. PMID:22121727

  6. Fibrous polyaniline@manganese oxide nanocomposites as supercapacitor electrode materials and cathode catalysts for improved power production in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Sajid Ali; Parveen, Nazish; Han, Thi Hiep; Ansari, Mohammad Omaish; Cho, Moo Hwan

    2016-03-23

    Fibrous Pani-MnO2 nanocomposite were prepared using a one-step and scalable in situ chemical oxidative polymerization method. The formation, structural and morphological properties were investigated using a range of characterization techniques. The electrochemical capacitive behavior of the fibrous Pani-MnO2 nanocomposite was examined by cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic charge-discharge measurements using a three-electrode experimental setup in an aqueous electrolyte. The fibrous Pani-MnO2 nanocomposite achieved high capacitance (525 F g(-1) at a current density of 2 A g(-1)) and excellent cycling stability of 76.9% after 1000 cycles at 10 A g(-1). Furthermore, the microbial fuel cell constructed with the fibrous Pani-MnO2 cathode catalyst showed an improved power density of 0.0588 W m(-2), which was higher than that of pure Pani and carbon paper, respectively. The improved electrochemical supercapacitive performance and cathode catalyst performance in microbial fuel cells were attributed mainly to the synergistic effect of Pani and MnO2 in fibrous Pani-MnO2, which provides high surface area for the electrode/electrolyte contact as well as electronic conductive channels and exhibits pseudocapacitance behavior. PMID:26967202

  7. H2O2 detection analysis of oxygen reduction reaction on cathode and anode catalysts for polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishi, Akira; Shironita, Sayoko; Umeda, Minoru

    2012-01-01

    The generation percentage of H2O2 during oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) at practical powder electrocatalysts was evaluated using a scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM). We employed a porous microelectrode that contains electrocatalysts, namely, Pt/C, Pt-Co/C, and Pt-Ru/C as the oxygen reduction electrode of the SECM, and the Pt microelectrode was used as the H2O2 detector. First, the H2O2 generation amount at Pt/Cs was measured by changing the Pt loading amount. A Pt/C with a higher Pt loading has a higher ORR activity and generates a larger amount of H2O2. However, the percentage of H2O2 generated with respect to the ORR is the same regardless of the Pt loading amount. Next, H2O2 generation is markedly suppressed at the Pt-Co/C and Pt-Ru/C in the potential ranges of practical fuel cell cathode and anode, respectively. This explains that the Pt-Co/C is effective when used as a cathode, and the anode Pt-Ru/C enables the reduction of the H2O2 generation even if O2 crossleak occurs in the practical polymer electrolyte fuel cell.

  8. Nitrogen-doped graphene/CoNi alloy encased within bamboo-like carbon nanotube hybrids as cathode catalysts in microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Yang; Yuan, Heyang; Wen, Zhenhai; Cui, Shumao; Guo, Xiaoru; He, Zhen; Chen, Junhong

    2016-03-01

    Cost-effective catalysts are of key importance to the successful deployment of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) for electricity generation from organic wastes. Herein, a novel catalyst prepared by one-step synthesis strategy is reported. The catalyst features N-doped bamboo-like carbon nanotube (BCNT) in which CoNi-alloy is encapsulated at the end and/or the middle section of the tube with many graphene layers inside inner cavities of BCNT (N-G@CoNi/BCNT). The prepared N-G@CoNi/BCNT exhibits a high oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity with an early onset potential of 0.06 V vs. Ag/AgCl and a comparable exchange current density to that of commercial Pt/C. The excellent catalytic activity is further evidenced by a high electron transfer number of 3.63. When being applied in MFCs, the N-G@CoNi/BCNT yields an average current density of 6.7 A m-2, slightly lower than that of Pt/C but with a less mass transfer potential loss. The cost of the N-G@CoNi/BCNT for constructing a 1-m2 cathode electrode is 200 times lower than that of Pt/C. With such a competitive price and excellent electrocatalytic-activity resulting from its unique morphology, CoNi-alloy/nitrogen dopants, considerable specific surface area, and carbon-coated alloy/graphene hybridization, the present catalyst is a promising candidate for ORR catalysts in MFCs for energy recovery from wastes.

  9. Easy-to-operate and low-temperature synthesis of gram-scale nitrogen-doped graphene and its application as cathode catalyst in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Feng, Leiyu; Chen, Yinguang; Chen, Lang

    2011-12-27

    Nitrogen-doped graphene (NG), with unique electronic properties, is showing great promise for a wide range of practical applications. However, the reported approaches for NG synthesis are usually complex, require high temperatures, produce lower atomic ratios of nitrogen to carbon (N/C), and do not deliver products in a reasonably large quantity. Here we report an easy-to-operate and low-temperature method to synthesize NG in gram-scale quantities with a denotation process. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction characterization suggested that the synthesized NG films were uniformly multilayered and had a high crystalline quality. In the graphene sheets the existence of nitrogen substitution with an atomic ratio of N/C 12.5%, which was greater than those reported in the literature, was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic analysis. In the neutral phosphate buffer solution, the synthesized NG was demonstrated to act as a metal-free electrode with excellent electrocatalytic activity and long-term operation stability for oxygen reduction via a combination of two-electron and four-electron pathways. When the NG was applied as the cathode catalyst of microbial fuel cells (MFCs), the obtained maximum power density was comparable to that of conventional platinum catalyst. More importantly, MFCs with NG produced power more stably and less expensively than those with Pt catalyst, indicating that the synthesized NG might be used as a good alternative to Pt catalyst in MFCs with a long run. PMID:22029637

  10. Synthesis and electrochemical performances of LiNiCuZn oxides as anode and cathode catalyst for low temperature solid oxide fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Jing, Y; Qin, H; Liu, Q; Singh, M; Zhu, B

    2012-06-01

    Low temperature solid oxide fuel cell (LTSOFC, 300-600 degrees C) is developed with advantages compared to conventional SOFC (800-1000 degrees C). The electrodes with good catalytic activity, high electronic and ionic conductivity are required to achieve high power output. In this work, a LiNiCuZn oxides as anode and cathode catalyst is prepared by slurry method. The structure and morphology of the prepared LiNiCuZn oxides are characterized by X-ray diffraction and field emission scanning electron microscopy. The LiNiCuZn oxides prepared by slurry method are nano Li0.28Ni0.72O, ZnO and CuO compound. The nano-crystallites are congregated to form ball-shape particles with diameter of 800-1000 nm. The LiNiCuZn oxides electrodes exhibits high ion conductivity and low polarization resistance to hydrogen oxidation reaction and oxygen reduction reaction at low temperature. The LTSOFC using the LiNiCuZn oxides electrodes demonstrates good cell performance of 1000 mW cm(-2) when it operates at 470 degrees C. It is considered that nano-composite would be an effective way to develop catalyst for LTSOFC. PMID:22905585

  11. Synthesis of iron oxide/partly graphitized carbon composites as a high-efficiency and low-cost cathode catalyst for microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ming; Dai, Ying; Zou, Jin-long; Wang, Lei; Pan, Kai; Fu, Hong-gang

    2014-08-27

    Waste cornstalks and pomelo skins are used as carbon resources for preparing nanocomposites of iron oxide and partly graphitized carbon (Fe3O4/PGC-CS and Fe3O4/PGC-PS). The results showed that Fe3O4 with a face-centered cubic structure is uniformly dispersed on the skeleton of Fe3O4/GC, and the highest SBET values of Fe3O4/PGC-CS (476.5 m(2) g(-1)) and Fe3O4/PGC-PS (547.7 m(2) g(-1)) are obtained at 1000 °C. The electrical conductivity and density of catalytic active sites are correspondingly improved by the introduction of Fe species. Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) with a mixed composite (Fe3O4/PGC-CS:Fe3O4/PGC-PS = 1:1) cathode (three-dimensional structures) generate the highest power density of 1502 ± 30 mW m(-2), which is 26.01% higher than that of Pt/C (1192 ± 33 mW m(-2)) and only declines by 7.12% after 18 cycles. The Fe3O4/PGC-CS cathode has the highest Coulombic efficiency (24.3 ± 0.7%). The Fe3O4/PGC composites exhibit high oxygen reduction reactivity, low charge transfer resistances, and long-term stability and can be used as a low-cost and high-efficiency catalyst for MFCs. PMID:25084054

  12. Surface-Regulated Nano-SnO2/Pt3Co/C Cathode Catalysts for Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells Fabricated by a Selective Electrochemical Sn Deposition Method.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Kensaku; Takao, Shinobu; Nagamatsu, Shin-ichi; Samjeské, Gabor; Sekizawa, Oki; Kaneko, Takuma; Higashi, Kotaro; Yamamoto, Takashi; Uruga, Tomoya; Iwasawa, Yasuhiro

    2015-10-14

    We have achieved significant improvements for the oxygen reduction reaction activity and durability with new SnO2-nanoislands/Pt3Co/C catalysts in 0.1 M HClO4, which were regulated by a strategic fabrication using a new selective electrochemical Sn deposition method. The nano-SnO2/Pt3Co/C catalysts with Pt/Sn = 4/1, 9/1, 11/1, and 15/1 were characterized by STEM-EDS, XRD, XRF, XPS, in situ XAFS, and electrochemical measurements to have a Pt3Co core/Pt skeleton-skin structure decorated with SnO2 nanoislands at the compressive Pt surface with the defects and dislocations. The high performances of nano-SnO2/Pt3Co/C originate from efficient electronic modification of the Pt skin surface (site 1) by both the Co of the Pt3Co core and surface nano-SnO2 and more from the unique property of the periphery sites of the SnO2 nanoislands at the compressive Pt skeleton-skin surface (more active site 2), which were much more active than expected from the d-band center values. The white line peak intensity of the nano-SnO2/Pt3Co/C revealed no hysteresis in the potential up-down operations between 0.4 and 1.0 V versus RHE, unlike the cases of Pt/C and Pt3Co/C, resulting in the high ORR performance. Here we report development of a new class of cathode catalysts with two different active sites for next-generation polymer electrolyte fuel cells. PMID:26412503

  13. Nitrogen-doped carbonaceous catalysts for gas-diffusion cathodes for alkaline aluminum-air batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davydova, E. S.; Atamanyuk, I. N.; Ilyukhin, A. S.; Shkolnikov, E. I.; Zhuk, A. Z.

    2016-02-01

    Cobalt tetramethoxyphenyl porphyrin and polyacrylonitrile - based catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction were synthesized and characterized by means of SEM, TEM, XPS, BET, limited evaporation method, rotating disc and rotating ring-disc electrode methods. Half-cell and Al-air cell tests were carried out to determine the characteristics of gas-diffusion cathodes. Effect of active layer thickness and its composition on the characteristics of the gas-diffusion cathodes was investigated. Power density of 300 mW cm-2 was achieved for alkaline Al-air cell with an air-breathing polyacrylonitrile-based cathode.

  14. Catalyst-infiltrated supporting cathode for thin-film SOFCs

    SciTech Connect

    Yamahara, Keiji; Jacobson, Craig P.; Visco, Steven J.; De Jonghe,Lutgard C.

    2004-04-12

    The fabrication and electrochemical performance of co-fired,LSM-SYSZ [i.e., La0.65Sr0.30MnO3 (LSM) - (Sc2O3)0.1(Y2O3)0.01(ZrO2)0.89] supported thin-film cells were examined using humidified hydrogen as a fuel. Co-firing of bi-layers and tri-layers was successful at 1250 C by optimizing the amount of carbon pore formers. A power density of a factor of 2.5 higher than that recently reported for the same type of cell at 800 C [3] was obtained for a cell with cobalt infiltration into the supporting cathode: the peak power densities were 455, 389, 285, 202, 141mW/cm2 at 800, 750, 700, 650, 600 C, respectively, and in most cases power densities at 0.7V exceeded more than 90 percent of the peak output. Increasing the cathode porosity from 43 to 53 percent improved peak power densities by as much as 1.3, shifting the diffusion limitation to high current densities. Cobalt infiltration into the support improved those by as much as a factor of 2 due to a significant reduction in non-ohmic resistance. These results demonstrate that cobalt catalyst-infiltrated LSM can be effective and low-cost supporting electrodes for reduced temperature, thin film SOFCs.

  15. Formic acid fuel cells and catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Masel, Richard I.; Larsen, Robert; Ha, Su Yun

    2010-06-22

    An exemplary fuel cell of the invention includes a formic acid fuel solution in communication with an anode (12, 134), an oxidizer in communication with a cathode (16, 135) electrically linked to the anode, and an anode catalyst that includes Pd. An exemplary formic acid fuel cell membrane electrode assembly (130) includes a proton-conducting membrane (131) having opposing first (132) and second surfaces (133), a cathode catalyst on the second membrane surface, and an anode catalyst including Pd on the first surface.

  16. Hydrothermal synthesis of highly crystalline RuS{sub 2} nanoparticles as cathodic catalysts in the methanol fuel cell and hydrochloric acid electrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yanjuan; Li, Nan; Yanagisawa, Kazumichi; Li, Xiaotian; Yan, Xiao

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Highly crystalline RuS{sub 2} nanoparticles have been first synthesized by a “one-step” hydrothermal method. • The product presents a pure cubic phase of stoichiometric ratio RuS{sub 2} with average particle size of 14.8 nm. • RuS{sub 2} nanoparticles were used as cathodic catalysts in methanol fuel cell and hydrochloric acid electrolysis. • The catalyst outperforms commercial Pt/C in methanol tolerance and stability towards Cl{sup −}. - Abstract: Highly crystalline ruthenium sulfide (RuS{sub 2}) nanoparticles have been first synthesized by a “one-step” hydrothermal method at 400 °C, using ruthenium chloride and thiourea as reactants. The products were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy/energy disperse spectroscopy (SEM/EDS), thermo gravimetric-differential thermal analyze (TG-DTA), transmission electron microscopy equipped with selected area electron diffraction (TEM/SAED). Fourier transform infrared spectra (IR), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). XRD result illustrates that the highly crystalline product presents a pure cubic phase of stoichiometric ratio RuS{sub 2} and the average particle size is 14.8 nm. SEM and TEM images display the products have irregular shape of 6–25 nm. XPS analyst indicates that the sulfur exists in the form of S{sub 2}{sup 2−}. Cyclic voltammetry (CV), rotating disk electrode (RDE), chronoamperometry (CA) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements are conducted to evaluate the electrocatalytic activity and stability of the highly crystalline RuS{sub 2} nanoparticles in oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) for methanol fuel cell and hydrochloric acid electrolysis. The results illustrate that RuS{sub 2} is active towards oxygen reduction reaction. Although the activity of RuS{sub 2} is lower than that of Pt/C, the RuS{sub 2} catalyst outperforms commercial Pt/C in methanol tolerance and stability towards Cl{sup −}.

  17. Fuel cell development for transportation: Catalyst development

    SciTech Connect

    Doddapaneni, N.

    1996-04-01

    Fuel cells are being considered as alternate power sources for transportation and stationary applications. With proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells the fuel crossover to cathodes causes severe thermal management and cell voltage drop due to oxidation of fuel at the platinized cathodes. The main goal of this project was to design, synthesize, and evaluate stable and inexpensive transition metal macrocyclic catalysts for the reduction of oxygen and be electrochemically inert towards anode fuels such as hydrogen and methanol.

  18. Highly durable and active non-precious air cathode catalyst for zinc air battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhu; Choi, Ja-Yeon; Wang, Haijiang; Li, Hui; Chen, Zhongwei

    The electrochemical stability of non-precious FeCo-EDA and commercial Pt/C cathode catalysts for zinc air battery have been compared using accelerated degradation test (ADT) in alkaline condition. Outstanding oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) stability of the FeCo-EDA catalyst was observed compared with the commercial Pt/C catalyst. The FeCo-EDA catalyst retained 80% of the initial mass activity for ORR whereas the commercial Pt/C catalyst retained only 32% of the initial mass activity after ADT. Additionally, the FeCo-EDA catalyst exhibited a nearly three times higher mass activity compared to that of the commercial Pt/C catalyst after ADT. Furthermore, single cell test of the FeCo-EDA and Pt/C catalysts was performed where both catalysts exhibited pseudolinear behaviour in the 12-500 mA cm -2 range. In addition, 67% higher peak power density was observed from the FeCo-EDA catalyst compared with commercial Pt/C. Based on the half cell and single cell tests the non-precious FeCo-EDA catalyst is a very promising ORR electrocatalyst for zinc air battery.

  19. Long term investigations of silver cathodes for alkaline fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, N.; Schulze, M.; Gülzow, E.

    Alkaline fuel cells (AFC) are an interesting alternative to polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFC). In AFC no expensive platinum metal is necessary; silver can be used for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) (cathode catalyst). For technical use of AFC the long term behavior of AFC components is important, especially that of the electrodes. The investigated cathodes for AFC consist of a mixture of silver catalyst and polytetrafluorethylene (PTFE) as organic binder rolled onto a metal web. The electrodes were electrochemically investigated through measuring V- i curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The electrochemical characterization and the long term tests were performed in half-cells at 70 °C using pure oxygen (1 bar) under galvanostatic conditions. The cathodes were electrochemically investigated in half-cells using reference electrodes (Hg/HgO) by periodically recording V- i curve and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. In addition, the cathodes were physically characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS).

  20. Development of highly active and stable hybrid cathode catalyst for PEMFCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Won Suk

    Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) are attractive power sources of the future for a variety of applications including portable electronics, stationary power, and automobile application. However, sluggish cathode kinetics, high Pt cost, and durability issues inhibit the commercialization of PEMFCs. To overcome these drawbacks, research has been focused on alloying Pt with transition metals since alloy catalysts show significantly improved catalytic properties like high activity, selectivity, and durability. However, Pt-alloy catalysts synthesized using the conventional impregnation method exhibit uneven particle size and poor particle distribution resulting in poor performance and/or durability in PEMFCs. In this dissertation, a novel catalyst synthesis methodology is developed and compared with catalysts prepared using impregnation method and commercial catalysts. Two approaches are investigated for the catalyst development. The catalyst durability was studied under U. S. DRIVE Fuel Cell Tech Team suggested protocols. In the first approach, the carbon composite catalyst (CCC) having active sites for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is employed as a support for the synthesis of Pt/CCC catalyst. The structural and electrochemical properties of Pt/CCC catalyst are investigated using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, while RDE and fuel cell testing are carried out to study the electrochemical properties. The synergistic effect of CCC and Pt is confirmed by the observed high activity towards ORR for the Pt/CCC catalyst. The second approach is the synthesis of Co-doped hybrid cathode catalysts (Co-doped Pt/CCC) by diffusing the Co metal present within the CCC support into the Pt nanoparticles during heat-treatment. The optimized Co-doped Pt/CCC catalyst performed better than the commercial catalysts and the catalyst prepared using the impregnation method in PEMFCs and showed high

  1. High performance, high durability non-precious metal fuel cell catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Wood, Thomas E.; Atanasoski, Radoslav; Schmoeckel, Alison K.

    2016-03-15

    This invention relates to non-precious metal fuel cell cathode catalysts, fuel cells that contain these catalysts, and methods of making the same. The fuel cell cathode catalysts are highly nitrogenated carbon materials that can contain a transition metal. The highly nitrogenated carbon materials can be supported on a nanoparticle substrate.

  2. Ex situ testing method to characterize cathode catalysts degradation under simulated start-up/shut-down conditions - A contribution to polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell benchmarking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcu, A.; Toth, G.; Kundu, S.; Colmenares, L. C.; Behm, R. J.

    2012-10-01

    The paper introduces a novel ex situ test procedure that was developed to quantify the ageing of catalyst layers under critical automotive fuel cell conditions during start-up/shut-down phases. It is based on liquid electrolyte measurements, using a thin film catalyst electrode. The overall degradation under start-up/shut-down conditions is assessed by the decay in electrochemically active surface area. Furthermore, contributions from different processes leading to catalyst degradation such as Pt dissolution and Pt particle growth/agglomeration can be separated. Finally, using a differential electrochemical mass spectrometry (DEMS) set-up, also the extent and role of carbon corrosion under these conditions is accessible. The potential of this, compared to in situ fuel cell stack tests, rather fast and less costly ex situ test procedure is demonstrated in measurements using a commercial, graphitized carbon-supported Pt catalyst. The results of the degradation test and in particular the contributions from different degradation processes such as Pt dissolution, Pt particle growth/agglomeration and carbon corrosion during different stages of catalyst ageing are discussed.

  3. Degradation characteristics of air cathode in zinc air fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ze; Pei, Pucheng; Wang, Keliang; Wang, Xizhong; Xu, Huachi; Liu, Yongfeng; peng, Guanlin

    2015-01-01

    The zinc air fuel cell (ZAFC) is a promising candidate for electrical energy storage and electric vehicle propulsion. However, its limited durability has become a major obstacle for its successful commercialization. In this study, 2-cell stacks, 25 cm² cells and three-electrode half-cells are constructed to experimentally investigate the degradation characteristics of the air cathode. The results of electrochemical tests reveal that the peak power density for the 25 cm2 cell with a new air cathode is 454 mW cm-2, which is twice as the value of the used air cathode. The electrochemical impedance analysis shows that both the charge transfer resistance and the mass transfer resistance of the used air cathodes have increased, suggesting that the catalyst surface area and gas diffusion coefficient have decreased significantly. Additionally, the microstructure and morphology of the catalytic layer (CL) and gas diffusion layer (GDL) are characterized by scanning electron microscopes (SEM). SEM results confirm that the micropores in CL and GDL of the used air cathode are seriously clogged, and many catalyst particles are lost. Therefore, the performance degradation is mainly due to the clogging of micropores and loss of catalyst particles. Furthermore, hypotheses of degradation mechanism and mitigation strategies for GDL and CL are discussed briefly.

  4. Effect of Particle Size and Operating Conditions on Pt3Co PEMFC Cathode Catalyst Durability

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gummalla, Mallika; Ball, Sarah; Condit, David; Rasouli, Somaye; Yu, Kang; Ferreira, Paulo; Myers, Deborah; Yang, Zhiwei

    2015-05-29

    The initial performance and decay trends of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) cathodes with Pt3Co catalysts of three mean particle sizes (4.9 nm, 8.1 nm, and 14.8 nm) with identical Pt loadings are compared. Even though the cathode based on 4.9 nm catalyst exhibited the highest initial electrochemical surface area (ECA) and mass activity, the cathode based on 8.1 nm catalyst showed better initial performance at high currents. Owing to the low mass activity of the large particles, the initial performance of the 14.8 nm Pt3Co-based electrode was the lowest. The performance decay rate of the electrodes with themore » smallest Pt3Co particle size was the highest and that of the largest Pt3Co particle size was lowest. Interestingly, with increasing number of decay cycles (0.6 to 1.0 V, 50 mV/s), the relative improvement in performance of the cathode based on 8.1 nm Pt3Co over the 4.9 nm Pt3Co increased, owing to better stability of the 8.1 nm catalyst. The electron microprobe analysis (EMPA) of the decayed membrane-electrode assembly (MEA) showed that the amount of Co in the membrane was lower for the larger particles, and the platinum loss into the membrane also decreased with increasing particle size. This suggests that the higher initial performance at high currents with 8.1 nm Pt3Co could be due to lower contamination of the ionomer in the electrode. Furthermore, lower loss of Co from the catalyst with increased particle size could be one of the factors contributing to the stability of ECA and mass activity of electrodes with larger cathode catalyst particles. To delineate the impact of particle size and alloy effects, these results are compared with prior work from our research group on size effects of pure platinum catalysts. The impact of PEMFC operating conditions, including upper potential, relative humidity, and temperature on the alloy catalyst decay trends, along with the EMPA analysis of the decayed MEAs, are reported.« less

  5. Durability and performance optimization of cathode materials for fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colon-Mercado, Hector Rafael

    The primary objective of this dissertation is to develop an accelerated durability test (ADT) for the evaluation of cathode materials for fuel cells. The work has been divided in two main categories, namely high temperature fuel cells with emphasis on the Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell (MCFC) cathode current collector corrosion problems and low temperature fuel cells in particular Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell (PEMFC) cathode catalyst corrosion. The high operating temperature of MCFC has given it benefits over other fuel cells. These include higher efficiencies (>50%), faster electrode kinetics, etc. At 650°C, the theoretical open circuit voltage is established, providing low electrode overpotentials without requiring any noble metal catalysts and permitting high electrochemical efficiency. The waste heat is generated at sufficiently high temperatures to make it useful as a co-product. However, in order to commercialize the MCFC, a lifetime of 40,000 hours of operation must be achieved. The major limiting factor in the MCFC is the corrosion of cathode materials, which include cathode electrode and cathode current collector. In the first part of this dissertation the corrosion characteristics of bare, heat-treated and cobalt coated titanium alloys were studied using an ADT and compared with that of state of the art current collector material, SS 316. PEMFCs are the best choice for a wide range of portable, stationary and automotive applications because of their high power density and relatively low-temperature operation. However, a major impediment in the commercialization of the fuel cell technology is the cost involved due to the large amount of platinum electrocatalyst used in the cathode catalyst. In an effort to increase the power and decrease the cathode cost in polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEMFC) systems, Pt-alloy catalysts were developed to increase its activity and stability. Extensive research has been conducted in the area of new alloy development and

  6. N-type Cu2O doped activated carbon as catalyst for improving power generation of air cathode microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xi; Li, Kexun; Yan, Pengyu; Liu, Ziqi; Pu, Liangtao

    2015-01-01

    A novel n-type Cu2O doped activated carbon (AC) air cathode (Cu/AC) was developed as an alternative to Pt electrode for oxygen reduction in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). The maximum power density of MFCs using this novel air cathode was as high as 1390±76mWm(-2), almost 59% higher than the bare AC air cathode. Specifically, the resistance including total resistance and charge transfer resistance significantly decreased comparing to the control. Tafel curve also showed the faster electro-transfer kinetics of Cu/AC with exchange current density of 1.03×10(-3)Acm(-2), which was 69% higher than the control. Ribbon-like Cu2O was deposited on the surface of AC with the mesopore surface area increasing. Cubic Cu2O crystals exclusively expose (111) planes with the interplanar crystal spacing of 2.48Å, which was the dominate active sites for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). N-type Cu2O with oxygen vacancies played crucial roles in electrochemical catalytic activity. PMID:25863207

  7. Catalyst and electrode research for phosphoric acid fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antoine, A. C.; King, R. B.

    1987-01-01

    An account is given of the development status of phosphoric acid fuel cells' high performance catalyst and electrode materials. Binary alloys have been identified which outperform the baseline platinum catalyst; it has also become apparent that pressurized operation is required to reach the desired efficiencies, calling in turn for the use of graphitized carbon blacks in the role of catalyst supports. Efforts to improve cell performance and reduce catalyst costs have led to the investigation of a class of organometallic cathode catalysts represented by the tetraazaannulenes, and a mixed catalyst which is a mixture of carbons catalyzed with an organometallic and a noble metal.

  8. Degradation of Ionic Pathway in PEM Fuel Cell Cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Seh Kyu; Shao, Yuyan; Wan, Haiying; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.; Towne, Silas A.; Rieke, Peter C.; Liu, Jun; Wang, Yong

    2011-11-12

    The degradation of the ionic pathway throughout the catalyst layer in proton exchange membrane fuel cells was studied under an accelerated stress test of catalyst support (potential hold at 1.2 V). Electrochemical behaviors of the cathode based on graphitic mesoporous carbon supported Pt catalyst were examined using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. Impedance data were plotted and expressed in the complex capacitance form to determine useful parameters in the transmission line model: the double-layer capacitance, peak frequency, and ionic resistance. Electrochemical surface area and hydrogen crossover current through the membrane were estimated from cyclic voltammogram, while cathode Faradaic resistance was compared with ionic resistance as a function of test time. It was observed that during an accelerated stress test of catalyst support, graphitic mesoporous carbon becomes hydrophilic which increases interfacial area between the ionomer and the catalyst up to 100 h. However, the ionic resistance in the catalyst layer drastically increases after 100 h with further carbon support oxidation. The underlying mechanism has been studied and it was found that significant degradation of ionic pathway throughout the catalyst layer due to catalyst support corrosion induces uneven hydration and mechanical stress in the ionomer.

  9. Cathode for aluminum producing electrolytic cell

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Craig W.

    2004-04-13

    A method of producing aluminum in an electrolytic cell comprising the steps of providing an anode in a cell, preferably a non-reactive anode, and also providing a cathode in the cell, the cathode comprised of a base material having low electrical conductivity reactive with molten aluminum to provide a highly electrically conductive layer on the base material. Electric current is passed from the anode to the cathode and alumina is reduced and aluminum is deposited at the cathode. The cathode base material is selected from boron carbide, and zirconium oxide.

  10. Cathodes for ceria-based fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Doshi, R.; Krumpelt, M.; Ricvhards, V.L.

    1997-08-01

    Work is underway to develop a solid oxide fuel cell that has a ceria-based electrolyte and operates at lower temperatures (500-600{degrees}C) than conventional zirconia-based cells. At present the performance of this ceria-based solid oxide fuel cell is limited by the polarization of conventional cathode materials. The performance of alternative cathodes was measured by impedance spectroscopy and dc polarization. The performance was found to improve by using a thin dense interface layer and by using two-phase cathodes with an electrolyte and an electronic phase. The cathode performance was also found to increase with increasing ionic conductivity for single phase cathodes.

  11. Cathodic oxygen reduction catalyzed by bacteria in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Rabaey, Korneel; Read, Suzanne T; Clauwaert, Peter; Freguia, Stefano; Bond, Philip L; Blackall, Linda L; Keller, Jurg

    2008-05-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have the potential to combine wastewater treatment efficiency with energetic efficiency. One of the major impediments to MFC implementation is the operation of the cathode compartment, as it employs environmentally unfriendly catalysts such as platinum. As recently shown, bacteria can facilitate sustainable and cost-effective cathode catalysis for nitrate and also oxygen. Here we describe a carbon cathode open to the air, on which attached bacteria catalyzed oxygen reduction. The bacteria present were able to reduce oxygen as the ultimate electron acceptor using electrons provided by the solid-phase cathode. Current densities of up to 2.2 A m(-2) cathode projected surface were obtained (0.303+/-0.017 W m(-2), 15 W m(-3) total reactor volume). The cathodic microbial community was dominated by Sphingobacterium, Acinetobacter and Acidovorax sp., according to 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis. Isolates of Sphingobacterium sp. and Acinetobacter sp. were obtained using H(2)/O(2) mixtures. Some of the pure culture isolates obtained from the cathode showed an increase in the power output of up to three-fold compared to a non-inoculated control, that is, from 0.015+/-0.001 to 0.049+/-0.025 W m(-2) cathode projected surface. The strong decrease in activation losses indicates that bacteria function as true catalysts for oxygen reduction. Owing to the high overpotential for non-catalyzed reduction, oxygen is only to a limited extent competitive toward the electron donor, that is, the cathode. Further research to refine the operational parameters and increase the current density by modifying the electrode surface and elucidating the bacterial metabolism is warranted. PMID:18288216

  12. Optimization of carbon-supported platinum cathode catalysts for DMFC operation.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Y.; Brosha, E. L.; Zelenay, P.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we describe performance and optimization of carbon-supported cathode catalysts at low platinum loading. We find that at a loading below 0.6 mg cm-2 carbon-supported platinum outperforms platinum black as a DMFC cathode catalyst. A catalyst with a 1:1 volume ratio of the dry NafionTM to the electronically conducting phase (platinum plus carbon support) provides the best performance in oxygen reduction reaction. Thanks to improved catalyst utilization, carbon-supported catalysts with a platinum content varying from 40 wt% to 80 wt% deliver very good DMFC performance, even at relatively modest precious metal loadings investigated in this work.

  13. Corrosion testing of candidates for the alkaline fuel cell cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, Joseph; Fielder, William L.

    1990-01-01

    Current/voltage data have been obtained for specially made corrosion electrodes of some oxides and of gold materials for the purpose of developing a screening test of catalysts and supports for use at the cathode of the alkaline fuel cell. The data consist of measurements of current at fixed potentials and cyclic voltammograms. These data will have to be correlated with longtime performance data in order to evaluate fully this approach to corrosion screening.

  14. Ruthenium nanocrystals as cathode catalysts for lithium-oxygen batteries with a superior performance

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Bing; Munroe, Paul; Wang, Guoxiu

    2013-01-01

    The key factor to improve the electrochemical performance of Li-O2 batteries is to find effective cathode catalysts to promote the oxygen reduction and oxygen evolution reactions. Herein, we report the synthesis of an effective cathode catalyst of ruthenium nanocrystals supported on carbon black substrate by a surfactant assisting method. The as-prepared ruthenium nanocrystals exhibited an excellent catalytic activity as cathodes in Li-O2 batteries with a high reversible capacity of about 9,800 mAh g−1, a low charge-discharge over-potential (about 0.37 V), and an outstanding cycle performance up to 150 cycles (with a curtaining capacity of 1,000 mAh g−1). The electrochemical testing shows that ruthenium nanocrystals can significantly reduce the charge potential comparing to carbon black catalysts, which demonstrated that ruthenium based nanomaterials could be effective cathode catalysts for high performance lithium- O2 batteries. PMID:23873349

  15. Impact of liquid water on oxygen reaction in cathode catalyst layer of proton exchange membrane fuel cell: A simple and physically sound model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoxian; Gao, Yuan

    2016-06-01

    When cells work at high current density, liquid water accumulates in their catalyst layer (CL) and the gaseous oxygen could dissolve into the water and the ionomer film simultaneously; their associated dissolved concentrations in equilibrium with the gaseous oxygen are also different. Based on a CL acquired using tomography, we present new methods in this paper to derive agglomerate models for partly saturated CL by viewing the movement and reaction of the dissolved oxygen in the two liquids (water and ionomer) and the agglomerate as two independent random processes. Oxygen dissolved in the water moves differently from oxygen dissolved in the ionomer, and to make the analysis tractable, we use an average distribution function to describe the average movement of all dissolved oxygen. A formula is proposed to describe this average distribution function, which, in combination with the exponential distribution assumed in the literature for oxygen reaction, leads to a simple yet physically sound agglomerate model. The model has three parameters which can be directly calculated from CL structure rather than by calibration. We explain how to calculate these parameters under different water contents for a given CL structure, and analyse the impact of liquid water on cell performance.

  16. Organometallic catalysts for primary phosphoric acid fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Fraser

    1987-01-01

    A continuing effort by the U.S. Department of Energy to improve the competitiveness of the phosphoric acid fuel cell by improving cell performance and/or reducing cell cost is discussed. Cathode improvement, both in performance and cost, available through the use of a class of organometallic cathode catalysts, the tetraazaannulenes (TAAs), was investigated. A new mixed catalyst was identified which provides improved cathode performance without the need for the use of a noble metal. This mixed catalyst was tested under load for 1000 hr. in full cell at 160 to 200 C in phosphoric acid H3PO4, and was shown to provide stable performance. The mixed catalyst contains an organometallic to catalyze electroreduction of oxygen to hydrogen peroxide and a metal to catalyze further electroreduction of the hydrogen peroxide to water. Cathodes containing an exemplar mixed catalyst (e.g., Co bisphenyl TAA/Mn) operate at approximately 650 mV vs DHE in 160 C, 85% H3PO4 with oxygen as reactant. In developing this mixed catalyst, a broad spectrum of TAAs were prepared, tested in half-cell and in a rotating ring-disk electrode system. TAAs found to facilitate the production of hydrogen peroxide in electroreduction were shown to be preferred TAAs for use in the mixed catalyst. Manganese (Mn) was identified as a preferred metal because it is capable of catalyzing hydrogen peroxide electroreduction, is lower in cost and is of less strategic importance than platinum, the cathode catalyst normally used in the fuel cell.

  17. Organometallic catalysts for primary phosphoric acid fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Fraser

    1987-03-01

    A continuing effort by the U.S. Department of Energy to improve the competitiveness of the phosphoric acid fuel cell by improving cell performance and/or reducing cell cost is discussed. Cathode improvement, both in performance and cost, available through the use of a class of organometallic cathode catalysts, the tetraazaannulenes (TAAs), was investigated. A new mixed catalyst was identified which provides improved cathode performance without the need for the use of a noble metal. This mixed catalyst was tested under load for 1000 hr. in full cell at 160 to 200 C in phosphoric acid H3PO4, and was shown to provide stable performance. The mixed catalyst contains an organometallic to catalyze electroreduction of oxygen to hydrogen peroxide and a metal to catalyze further electroreduction of the hydrogen peroxide to water. Cathodes containing an exemplar mixed catalyst (e.g., Co bisphenyl TAA/Mn) operate at approximately 650 mV vs DHE in 160 C, 85% H3PO4 with oxygen as reactant. In developing this mixed catalyst, a broad spectrum of TAAs were prepared, tested in half-cell and in a rotating ring-disk electrode system. TAAs found to facilitate the production of hydrogen peroxide in electroreduction were shown to be preferred TAAs for use in the mixed catalyst. Manganese (Mn) was identified as a preferred metal because it is capable of catalyzing hydrogen peroxide electroreduction, is lower in cost and is of less strategic importance than platinum, the cathode catalyst normally used in the fuel cell.

  18. Fuel cell development for transportation: Catalyst development

    SciTech Connect

    Doddapaneni, N.; Ingersoll, D.

    1996-12-31

    Fuel cells are being considered as alternative power sources for transportation and stationary applications. The degradation of commonly used electrode catalysts (e.g. Pt, Ag, and others) and corrosion of carbon substrates are making commercialization of fuel cells incorporating present day technologies economically problematic. Furthermore, due to the instability of the Pt catalyst, the performance of fuel cells declines on long-term operation. When methanol is used as the fuel, a voltage drop, as well as significant thermal management problems can be encountered, the later being due to chemical oxidation of methanol at the platinized carbon at the cathode. Though extensive work was conducted on platinized electrodes for both the oxidation and reduction reactions, due to the problems mentioned above, fuel cells have not been fully developed for widespread commercial use. Several investigators have previously evaluated metal macrocyclic complexes as alternative catalysts to Pt and Pt/Ru in fuel cells. Unfortunately, though they have demonstrated catalytic activity, these materials were found to be unstable on long term use in the fuel cell environment. In order to improve the long-term stability of metal macrocyclic complexes, we have chemically bonded these complexes to the carbon substrate, thereby enhancing their catalytic activity as well as their chemical stability in the fuel cell environment. We have designed, synthesized, and evaluated these catalysts for O{sub 2} reduction, H{sub 2} oxidation, and direct methanol oxidation in Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) and aqueous carbonate fuel cells. These catalysts exhibited good catalytic activity and long-term stability. In this paper we confine our discussion to the initial performance results of some of these catalysts in H{sub 2}/O{sub 2} PEM fuel cells, including their long-term performance characteristics as well as CO poisoning effects on these catalysts.

  19. Iron- and nitrogen-functionalized graphene as a non-precious metal catalyst for enhanced oxygen reduction in an air-cathode microbial fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Sizhe; Hu, Yongyou; Xu, Qian; Sun, Jian; Hou, Bin; Zhang, Yaping

    2012-09-01

    In this work, iron- and nitrogen-functionalized graphene (Fe-N-G) as a non-precious metal catalyst is synthesized via a facile method of thermal treatment of a mixture of Fe salt, graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) and chemically reduced graphene. The electrocatalytic activity of the prepared catalysts toward oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) evaluated by using linear sweep voltammetry tests shows that the Fe-N-G catalyst has more positive onset potential and increased reduction current densities as compared to the pristine graphene (P-G) catalyst, indicating an enhanced ORR activity of the Fe-N-G catalyst. More importantly, the Fe-N-G-MFC achieves the highest power density of 1149.8 mW m-2, which is ∼2.1 times of that generated with the Pt/C-MFC (561.1 mW m-2) and much higher than that of the P-G-MFC (109 mW m-2). These results demonstrate that the Fe-N-G catalyst can hold the promise of being an excellent alternative to the costly Pt catalyst for practical MFC applications.

  20. Cathode for molten carbonate fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.; Mrazek, Franklin C.

    1990-01-01

    A porous sintered cathode for a molten carbonate fuel cell and method of making same, the cathode including a skeletal structure of a first electronically conductive material slightly soluble in the electrolyte present in the molten carbonate fuel cell covered by fine particles of a second material of possibly lesser electronic conductivity insoluble in the electrolyte present in the molten carbonate fuel cell, the cathode having a porosity in the range of from about 60% to about 70% at steady-state cell operating conditions consisting of both macro-pores and micro-pores.

  1. Enhanced Oxygen and Hydroxide Transport in a Cathode Interface by Efficient Antibacterial Property of a Silver Nanoparticle-Modified, Activated Carbon Cathode in Microbial Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Da; Qu, Youpeng; Liu, Jia; Liu, Guohong; Zhang, Jie; Feng, Yujie

    2016-08-17

    A biofilm growing on an air cathode is responsible for the decreased performance of microbial fuel cells (MFCs). For the undesired biofilm to be minimized, silver nanoparticles were synthesized on activated carbon as the cathodic catalyst (Ag/AC) in MFCs. Ag/AC enhanced maximum power density by 14.6% compared to that of a bare activated carbon cathode (AC) due to the additional silver catalysis. After operating MFCs over five months, protein content on the Ag/AC cathode was only 38.3% of that on the AC cathode, which resulted in a higher oxygen concentration diffusing through the Ag/AC cathode. In addition, a lower pH increment (0.2 units) was obtained near the Ag/AC catalyst surface after biofouling compared to 0.8 units of the AC cathode, indicating that less biofilm on the Ag/AC cathode had a minor resistance on hydroxide transported from the catalyst layer interfaces to the bulk solution. Therefore, less decrements of the Ag/AC activity and MFC performance were obtained. This result indicated that accelerated transport of oxygen and hydroxide, benefitting from the antibacterial property of the cathode, could efficiently maintain higher cathode stability during long-term operation. PMID:27441786

  2. ETEM observation of Pt/C electrode catalysts in a moisturized cathode atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, K.; Zhang, X.; Tanaka, N.; Boyes, E. D.; Gai, P. L.

    2014-06-01

    There have been reports of challenges in designing platinum carbon (Pt/C) electrode catalysts for PEMFC. Pt/C electrode catalysts deactivate much faster on the cathode (in moisturized O2) than on the anode (in H2). To understand influences of moisture and oxygen on the deactivation of the Pt/C catalysts in proton-exchange-membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs), spherical-aberration-corrected environmental transmission electron microscopy (AC-ETEM) was applied with a high-speed CCD camera. Structural changes of the Pt/C electrode catalysts were dynamically recorded in moisturized nitrogen, oxygen and hydrogen. The mass spectrometry confirmed the moisture content (between 5 to 30 %) of nitrogen driving gas through a humidifier. Coalescence of platinum nanoparticles (D = 3.24 nm) was carefully evaluated in pure N2 and moisturized N2 atmosphere. The Pt/C showed considerable structural weakness in a moisturized N2 atmosphere. Comparable results obtained by AC-ETEM in different gas atmospheres also suggested ways to improve the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). In this paper, the deactivation process due to moisture (hydroxylation) of carbon supports is discussed using for comparison the movement of platinum nanoparticles measured in moisturized nitrogen and pure nitrogen atmospheres.

  3. Carbon support oxidation in PEM fuel cell cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maass, S.; Finsterwalder, F.; Frank, G.; Hartmann, R.; Merten, C.

    Oxidation of the cathode carbon catalyst support in polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEMFC) has been examined. For this purpose platinum supported electrodes and pure carbon electrodes were fabricated and tested in membrane-electrode-assemblies (MEAs) in air and nitrogen atmosphere. The in situ experiments account for the fuel cell environment characterized by the presence of a solid electrolyte and water in the gas and liquid phases. Cell potential transients occurring during automotive fuel cell operation were simulated by dynamic measurements. Corrosion rates were calculated from CO 2 and CO concentrations in the cathode exhaust measured by non-dispersive infrared spectroscopy (NDIR). Results from these potentiodynamic measurements indicate that different potential regimes relevant for carbon oxidation can be distinguished. Carbon corrosion rates were found to be higher under dynamic operation and to strongly depend on electrode history. These characteristics make it difficult to predict corrosion rates accurately in an automotive drive cycle.

  4. Functionally Graded Cathodes for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lei Yang; Ze Liu; Shizhone Wang; Jaewung Lee; Meilin Liu

    2008-04-30

    The main objective of this DOE project is to demonstrate that the performance and long-term stability of the state-of-the-art LSCF cathode can be enhanced by a catalytically active coating (e.g., LSM or SSC). We have successfully developed a methodology for reliably evaluating the intrinsic surface catalytic properties of cathode materials. One of the key components of the test cell is a dense LSCF film, which will function as the current collector for the electrode material under evaluation to eliminate the effect of ionic and electronic transport. Since it is dense, the effect of geometry would be eliminated as well. From the dependence of the electrode polarization resistance on the thickness of a dense LSCF electrode and on partial pressure of oxygen, we have confirmed that the surface catalytic activity of LSCF limits the performances of LSCF-based cathodes. Further, we have demonstrated, using test cells of different configurations, that the performance of LSCF-based electrodes can be significantly enhanced by infiltration of a thin film of LSM or SSC. In addition, the stability of LSCF-based cathodes was also improved by infiltration of LSM or SSC. While the concept feasibility of the electrode architecture is demonstrated, many details are yet to be determined. For example, it is not clear how the surface morphology, composition, and thickness of the coatings change under operating conditions over time, how these changes influence the electrochemical behavior of the cathodes, and how to control the microscopic details of the coatings in order to optimize the performance. The selection of the catalytic materials as well as the detailed microstructures of the porous LSCF and the catalyst layer may critically impact the performance of the proposed cathodes. Further, other fundamental questions still remain; it is not clear why the degradation rates of LSCF cathodes are relatively high, why a LSM coating improves the stability of LSCF cathodes, which catalysts

  5. Catalyst inks and method of application for direct methanol fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Zelenay, Piotr; Davey, John; Ren, Xiaoming; Gottesfeld, Shimshon; Thomas, Sharon C.

    2004-02-24

    Inks are formulated for forming anode and cathode catalyst layers and applied to anode and cathode sides of a membrane for a direct methanol fuel cell. The inks comprise a Pt catalyst for the cathode and a Pt--Ru catalyst for the anode, purified water in an amount 4 to 20 times that of the catalyst by weight, and a perfluorosulfonic acid ionomer in an amount effective to provide an ionomer content in the anode and cathode surfaces of 20% to 80% by volume. The inks are prepared in a two-step process while cooling and agitating the solutions. The final solution is placed in a cooler and continuously agitated while spraying the solution over the anode or cathode surface of the membrane as determined by the catalyst content.

  6. Cells having cathodes containing polycarbon disulfide materials

    DOEpatents

    Okamoto, Y.; Skotheim, T.A.; Lee, H.S.

    1995-08-15

    The present invention relates to an electric current producing cell which contains an anode, a cathode having as a cathode-active material one or more carbon-sulfur compounds of the formula (CS{sub x}){sub n}, in which x takes values from 1.2 to 2.3 and n is greater or equal to 2, and where the redox process does not involve polymerization and de-polymerization by forming and breaking S--S bonds in the polymer backbone. The cell also contains an electrolyte which is chemically inert with respect to the anode and the cathode. 5 figs.

  7. Cells having cathodes containing polycarbon disulfide materials

    DOEpatents

    Okamoto, Yoshi; Skotheim, Terje A.; Lee, Hung S.

    1995-08-15

    The present invention relates to an electric current producing cell which contains an anode, a cathode having as a cathode-active material one or more carbon-sulfur compounds of the formula (CS.sub.x).sub.n, in which x takes values from 1.2 to 2.3 and n is greater or equal to 2, and where the redox process does not involve polymerization and de-polymerization by forming and breaking S--S bonds in the polymer backbone. The cell also contains an electrolyte which is chemically inert with respect to the anode and the cathode.

  8. Effect of Particle Size and Operating Conditions on Pt3Co PEMFC Cathode Catalyst Durability

    SciTech Connect

    Gummalla, Mallika; Ball, Sarah; Condit, David; Rasouli, Somaye; Yu, Kang; Ferreira, Paulo; Myers, Deborah; Yang, Zhiwei

    2015-05-29

    The initial performance and decay trends of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) cathodes with Pt3Co catalysts of three mean particle sizes (4.9 nm, 8.1 nm, and 14.8 nm) with identical Pt loadings are compared. Even though the cathode based on 4.9 nm catalyst exhibited the highest initial electrochemical surface area (ECA) and mass activity, the cathode based on 8.1 nm catalyst showed better initial performance at high currents. Owing to the low mass activity of the large particles, the initial performance of the 14.8 nm Pt3Co-based electrode was the lowest. The performance decay rate of the electrodes with the smallest Pt3Co particle size was the highest and that of the largest Pt3Co particle size was lowest. Interestingly, with increasing number of decay cycles (0.6 to 1.0 V, 50 mV/s), the relative improvement in performance of the cathode based on 8.1 nm Pt3Co over the 4.9 nm Pt3Co increased, owing to better stability of the 8.1 nm catalyst. The electron microprobe analysis (EMPA) of the decayed membrane-electrode assembly (MEA) showed that the amount of Co in the membrane was lower for the larger particles, and the platinum loss into the membrane also decreased with increasing particle size. This suggests that the higher initial performance at high currents with 8.1 nm Pt3Co could be due to lower contamination of the ionomer in the electrode. Furthermore, lower loss of Co from the catalyst with increased particle size could be one of the factors contributing to the stability of ECA and mass activity of electrodes with larger cathode catalyst particles. To delineate the impact of particle size and alloy effects, these results are compared with prior work from our research group on size effects of pure platinum catalysts. The impact of PEMFC operating conditions, including upper potential, relative humidity, and temperature on the alloy catalyst decay trends, along with the EMPA analysis

  9. Cathodes for lithium-air battery cells with acid electrolytes

    DOEpatents

    Xing, Yangchuan; Huang, Kan; Li, Yunfeng

    2016-07-19

    In various embodiments, the present disclosure provides a layered metal-air cathode for a metal-air battery. Generally, the layered metal-air cathode comprises an active catalyst layer, a transition layer bonded to the active catalyst layer, and a backing layer bonded to the transition layer such that the transition layer is disposed between the active catalyst layer and the backing layer.

  10. Cell performance of Pd-Sn catalyst in passive direct methanol alkaline fuel cell using anion exchange membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jandee; Momma, Toshiyuki; Osaka, Tetsuya

    Direct methanol alkaline fuel cell (DMAFC) using anion exchange membrane (AEM) was operated in passive condition. Cell with AEM exhibits a higher open circuit voltage (OCV) and superior cell performance than those in cell using Nafion. From the concentration dependences of methanol, KOH in fuel and ionomer in anode catalyst layer, it is found that the key factors are to improve the ionic conductivity at the anode and to form a favorable ion conductive path in catalyst layer in order to enhance the cell performance. In addition, by using home-made Pd-Sn/C catalyst as a cathode catalyst on DMAFC, the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) using Pd-Sn/C catalyst as cathode exhibits the higher performance than the usual commercially available Pt/C catalyst in high methanol concentration. Therefore, the Pd-Sn/C catalyst with high tolerance for methanol is expected as the promising oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalyst in DMAFC.

  11. Improvement in high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells cathode performance with ammonium carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ying; Wei, Yu; Xu, Hui; Williams, Minkmas; Liu, Yuxiu; Bonville, Leonard J.; Russell Kunz, H.; Fenton, James M.

    Proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells with optimized cathode structures can provide high performance at higher temperature (120 °C). A "pore-forming" material, ammonium carbonate, applied in the unsupported Pt cathode catalyst layer of a high temperature membrane electrode assembly enhanced the catalyst activity and minimized the mass-transport limitations. The ammonium carbonate amount and Nafion ® loading in the cathode were optimized for performance at two conditions: 80 °C cell temperature with 100% anode/75% cathode R.H. and 120 °C cell temperature with 35% anode/35% cathode R.H., both under ambient pressure. A cell with 20 wt.% ammonium carbonate and 20 wt.% Nafion ® operating at 80 °C and 120 °C presented the maximum cell performance. Hydrogen/air cell voltages at a current density of 400 mA cm -2 using the Ionomem/UConn membrane as the electrolyte with a cathode platinum loading of 0.5 mg cm -2 were 0.70 V and 0.57 V at the two conditions, respectively. This was a 19% cell voltage increase over a cathode without the "pore-forming" ammonium carbonate at the 120 °C operating condition.

  12. Polyaniline-derived non-precious catalyst for the polymer electrolyte fuel cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Gang; Chen, Zhongwei; Garzon, Fernando; Zelenay, Piotr

    2008-01-01

    A novel polyaniline (PANI)-derived non-precious cathode catalyst was developed in this work, exhibiting remarkable activity (onset potential: 0.9 V, half-wave potential: 0.77 V) and selectivity (0.4 % H20 2 at 0.4 V). As a result, the generated current densities at high voltages associated with electrochemically kinetic activity can be achieved to 0.04 Acm-2 for 0.80V and 0.21 Acm-2 for 0.6 V, when air was used in fuel cell tests. MEA life test at a constant voltage of 0.4 V demonstrated a promising stability up to 450 hours, without obvious degradation. The current density during the test was measured around 0.32 A cm-2, a respectable performance for a cell with non-precious cathode, operated on air rather than oxygen. The possible active sites, related to pyridine- and pyrrole-like metal species were discussed according to presented XPS and XRD analysis.

  13. Improved Cathode Structure for a Direct Methanol Fuel Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valdez, Thomas; Narayanan, Sekharipuram

    2005-01-01

    An improved cathode structure on a membrane/electrode assembly has been developed for a direct methanol fuel cell, in a continuing effort to realize practical power systems containing such fuel cells. This cathode structure is intended particularly to afford better cell performance at a low airflow rate. A membrane/electrode assembly of the type for which the improved cathode structure was developed (see Figure 1) is fabricated in a process that includes brush painting and spray coating of catalyst layers onto a polymer-electrolyte membrane and onto gas-diffusion backings that also act as current collectors. The aforementioned layers are then dried and hot-pressed together. When completed, the membrane/electrode assembly contains (1) an anode containing a fine metal black of Pt/Ru alloy, (2) a membrane made of Nafion 117 or equivalent (a perfluorosulfonic acid-based hydrophilic, proton-conducting ion-exchange polymer), (3) a cathode structure (in the present case, the improved cathode structure described below), and (4) the electrically conductive gas-diffusion backing layers, which are made of Toray 060(TradeMark)(or equivalent) carbon paper containing between 5 and 6 weight percent of poly(tetrafluoroethylene). The need for an improved cathode structure arises for the following reasons: In the design and operation of a fuel-cell power system, the airflow rate is a critical parameter that determines the overall efficiency, cell voltage, and power density. It is desirable to operate at a low airflow rate in order to obtain thermal and water balance and to minimize the size and mass of the system. The performances of membrane/electrode assemblies of prior design are limited at low airflow rates. Methanol crossover increases the required airflow rate. Hence, one way to reduce the required airflow rate is to reduce the effect of methanol crossover. Improvement of the cathode structure - in particular, addition of hydrophobic particles to the cathode - has been

  14. Multi-variable mathematical models for the air-cathode microbial fuel cell system

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ou, Shiqi; Kashima, Hiroyuki; Aaron, Douglas S.; Regan, John M.; Mench, Matthew M.

    2016-03-10

    This research adopted the version control system into the model construction for the single chamber air-cathode microbial fuel cell (MFC) system, to understand the interrelation of biological, chemical, and electrochemical reactions. The anodic steady state model was used to consider the chemical species diffusion and electric migration influence to the MFC performance. In the cathodic steady state model, the mass transport and reactions in a multi-layer, abiotic cathode and multi-bacteria cathode biofilm were simulated. Transport of hydroxide was assumed for cathodic pH change. This assumption is an alternative to the typical notion of proton consumption during oxygen reduction to explainmore » elevated cathode pH. The cathodic steady state model provided the power density and polarization curve performance results that can be compared to an experimental MFC system. Another aspect we considered was the relative contributions of platinum catalyst and microbes on the cathode to the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). We found simulation results showed that the biocatalyst in a cathode that includes a Pt/C catalyst likely plays a minor role in ORR, contributing up to 8% of the total power calculated by the models.« less

  15. Multi-variable mathematical models for the air-cathode microbial fuel cell system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Shiqi; Kashima, Hiroyuki; Aaron, Douglas S.; Regan, John M.; Mench, Matthew M.

    2016-05-01

    This research adopted the version control system into the model construction for the single chamber air-cathode microbial fuel cell (MFC) system, to understand the interrelation of biological, chemical, and electrochemical reactions. The anodic steady state model was used to consider the chemical species diffusion and electric migration influence to the MFC performance. In the cathodic steady state model, the mass transport and reactions in a multi-layer, abiotic cathode and multi-bacteria cathode biofilm were simulated. Transport of hydroxide was assumed for cathodic pH change. This assumption is an alternative to the typical notion of proton consumption during oxygen reduction to explain elevated cathode pH. The cathodic steady state model provided the power density and polarization curve performance results that can be compared to an experimental MFC system. Another aspect considered was the relative contributions of platinum catalyst and microbes on the cathode to the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Simulation results showed that the biocatalyst in a cathode that includes a Pt/C catalyst likely plays a minor role in ORR, contributing up to 8% of the total power calculated by the models.

  16. Tandem cathode for proton exchange membrane fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Siahrostami, Samira; Björketun, Mårten E; Strasser, Peter; Greeley, Jeff; Rossmeisl, Jan

    2013-06-21

    The efficiency of proton exchange membrane fuel cells is limited mainly by the oxygen reduction reaction at the cathode. The large cathodic overpotential is caused by correlations between binding energies of reaction intermediates in the reduction of oxygen to water. This work introduces a novel tandem cathode design where the full oxygen reduction, involving four electron-transfer steps, is divided into formation (equilibrium potential 0.70 V) followed by reduction (equilibrium potential 1.76 V) of hydrogen peroxide. The two part reactions contain only two electron-transfer steps and one reaction intermediate each, and they occur on different catalyst surfaces. As a result they can be optimized independently and the fundamental problem associated with the four-electron catalysis is avoided. A combination of density functional theory calculations and published experimental data is used to identify potentially active and selective materials for both catalysts. Co-porphyrin is recommended for the first step, formation of hydrogen peroxide, and three different metal oxides - SrTiO3(100), CaTiO3(100) and WO3(100) - are suggested for the subsequent reduction step. PMID:23661187

  17. Alternative cathodes for molten carbonate fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bloom, I.; Lanagan, M.; Roche, M.F.; Krumpelt, M.

    1996-02-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is developing advanced cathodes for pressurized operation of the molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC). The present cathode, lithiated nickel oxide, tends to transport to the anode of the MCFC, where it is deposited as metallic nickel. The rate of transport increases with increasing CO{sub 2} pressure. This increase is due to an increased solubility of nickel oxide (NiO) in the molten carbonate electrolyte. An alternative cathode is lithium cobaltate (LiCoO{sub 2})-Solid solutions of LiCoO{sub 2} in LiFeO{sub 2} show promise for long-lived cathode materials. We have found that small additions of LiCoO{sub 2} to LiFeO{sub 2} markedly decrease the resistivity of the cathode material. Cells containing the LiCoO{sub 2}-LiFeO{sub 2} cathodes have stable performance for more than 2100 h of operation and display lower cobalt migration.

  18. A review on air cathodes for zinc-air fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neburchilov, Vladimir; Wang, Haijiang; Martin, Jonathan J.; Qu, Wei

    This paper reviews the compositions, design and methods of fabrication of air cathodes for alkali zinc-air fuel cells (ZAFCs), one of the few successfully commercialized fuel cells. The more promising compositions for air cathodes are based on individual oxides, or mixtures of such, with a spinel, perovskite, or pyrochlore structure: MnO 2, Ag, Co 3O 4, La 2O 3, LaNiO 3, NiCo 2O 4, LaMnO 3, LaNiO 3, etc. These compositions provide the optimal balance of ORR activity and chemical stability in an alkali electrolyte. The sol-gel and reverse micelle methods supply the most uniform distribution of the catalyst on carbon and the highest catalyst BET surface area. It is shown that the design of the air cathode, including types of carbon black, binding agents, current collectors, Teflon membranes, thermal treatment of the GDL, and catalyst layers, has a strong effect on performance.

  19. Following ORR intermediates adsorbed on a Pt cathode catalyst during break-in of a PEM fuel cell by in operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ramaker, D E; Korovina, A; Croze, V; Melke, J; Roth, C

    2014-07-21

    In operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy data using the Δμ X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectroscopy (XANES) analysis procedure is used to follow the ORR intermediate adsorbate coverage on a working catalyst in a PEMFC during initial activation and break-in. The adsorbate coverage and log i (Tafel) curves reveal a strong correlation, i.e., an increase in adsorbate intermediate coverage poisons Pt sites thereby decreasing the current. A decrease in Pt-O bond strength commensurate with decrease in potential causes a sequence of different dominant adsorbate volcano curves to exist, namely first O, then OH, and then OOH exactly as predicted by the different ORR kinetics mechanisms. During break-in, the incipient O coverage coming from exposure to air during storage and MEA preparation is rather quickly removed, compared to the slower and more subtle nanoparticle morphological changes, such as the rounding of the Pt nanoparticle edges/corners and smoothing of the planar surfaces, driven by the nanoparticle's tendency to lower its surface energy. These morphological changes increase the Pt-Pt average coordination number, decrease the average Pt-O bond strength, and thereby decrease the coverage of ORR intermediates, allowing increase in the current. PMID:24664398

  20. Cathode for an electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Bates, John B.; Dudney, Nancy J.; Gruzalski, Greg R.; Luck, Christopher F.

    2001-01-01

    Described is a thin-film battery, especially a thin-film microbattery, and a method for making same having application as a backup or primary integrated power source for electronic devices. The battery includes a novel electrolyte which is electrochemically stable and does not react with the lithium anode and a novel vanadium oxide cathode. Configured as a microbattery, the battery can be fabricated directly onto a semiconductor chip, onto the semiconductor die or onto any portion of the chip carrier. The battery can be fabricated to any specified size or shape to meet the requirements of a particular application. The battery is fabricated of solid state materials and is capable of operation between -15.degree. C. and 150.degree. C.

  1. On the actual cathode mixed potential in direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zago, M.; Bisello, A.; Baricci, A.; Rabissi, C.; Brightman, E.; Hinds, G.; Casalegno, A.

    2016-09-01

    Methanol crossover is one of the most critical issues hindering commercialization of direct methanol fuel cells since it leads to waste of fuel and significantly affects cathode potential, forming a so-called mixed potential. Unfortunately, due to the sluggish anode kinetics, it is not possible to obtain a reliable estimation of cathode potential by simply measuring the cell voltage. In this work we address this limitation, quantifying the mixed potential by means of innovative open circuit voltage (OCV) tests with a methanol-hydrogen mixture fed to the anode. Over a wide range of operating conditions, the resulting cathode overpotential is between 250 and 430 mV and is strongly influenced by methanol crossover. We show using combined experimental and modelling analysis of cathode impedance that the methanol oxidation at the cathode mainly follows an electrochemical pathway. Finally, reference electrode measurements at both cathode inlet and outlet provide a local measurement of cathode potential, confirming the reliability of the innovative OCV tests and permitting the evaluation of cathode potential up to typical operating current. At 0.25 A cm-2 the operating cathode potential is around 0.85 V and the Ohmic drop through the catalyst layer is almost 50 mV, which is comparable to that in the membrane.

  2. One-dimensional manganese-cobalt oxide nanofibres as bi-functional cathode catalysts for rechargeable metal-air batteries.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kyu-Nam; Hwang, Soo Min; Park, Min-Sik; Kim, Ki Jae; Kim, Jae-Geun; Dou, Shi Xue; Kim, Jung Ho; Lee, Jong-Won

    2015-01-01

    Rechargeable metal-air batteries are considered a promising energy storage solution owing to their high theoretical energy density. The major obstacles to realising this technology include the slow kinetics of oxygen reduction and evolution on the cathode (air electrode) upon battery discharging and charging, respectively. Here, we report non-precious metal oxide catalysts based on spinel-type manganese-cobalt oxide nanofibres fabricated by an electrospinning technique. The spinel oxide nanofibres exhibit high catalytic activity towards both oxygen reduction and evolution in an alkaline electrolyte. When incorporated as cathode catalysts in Zn-air batteries, the fibrous spinel oxides considerably reduce the discharge-charge voltage gaps (improve the round-trip efficiency) in comparison to the catalyst-free cathode. Moreover, the nanofibre catalysts remain stable over the course of repeated discharge-charge cycling; however, carbon corrosion in the catalyst/carbon composite cathode degrades the cycling performance of the batteries. PMID:25563733

  3. One-dimensional manganese-cobalt oxide nanofibres as bi-functional cathode catalysts for rechargeable metal-air batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Kyu-Nam; Hwang, Soo Min; Park, Min-Sik; Kim, Ki Jae; Kim, Jae-Geun; Dou, Shi Xue; Kim, Jung Ho; Lee, Jong-Won

    2015-01-01

    Rechargeable metal-air batteries are considered a promising energy storage solution owing to their high theoretical energy density. The major obstacles to realising this technology include the slow kinetics of oxygen reduction and evolution on the cathode (air electrode) upon battery discharging and charging, respectively. Here, we report non-precious metal oxide catalysts based on spinel-type manganese-cobalt oxide nanofibres fabricated by an electrospinning technique. The spinel oxide nanofibres exhibit high catalytic activity towards both oxygen reduction and evolution in an alkaline electrolyte. When incorporated as cathode catalysts in Zn-air batteries, the fibrous spinel oxides considerably reduce the discharge-charge voltage gaps (improve the round-trip efficiency) in comparison to the catalyst-free cathode. Moreover, the nanofibre catalysts remain stable over the course of repeated discharge-charge cycling; however, carbon corrosion in the catalyst/carbon composite cathode degrades the cycling performance of the batteries.

  4. One-dimensional manganese-cobalt oxide nanofibres as bi-functional cathode catalysts for rechargeable metal-air batteries

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Kyu-Nam; Hwang, Soo Min; Park, Min-Sik; Kim, Ki Jae; Kim, Jae-Geun; Dou, Shi Xue; Kim, Jung Ho; Lee, Jong-Won

    2015-01-01

    Rechargeable metal-air batteries are considered a promising energy storage solution owing to their high theoretical energy density. The major obstacles to realising this technology include the slow kinetics of oxygen reduction and evolution on the cathode (air electrode) upon battery discharging and charging, respectively. Here, we report non-precious metal oxide catalysts based on spinel-type manganese-cobalt oxide nanofibres fabricated by an electrospinning technique. The spinel oxide nanofibres exhibit high catalytic activity towards both oxygen reduction and evolution in an alkaline electrolyte. When incorporated as cathode catalysts in Zn-air batteries, the fibrous spinel oxides considerably reduce the discharge-charge voltage gaps (improve the round-trip efficiency) in comparison to the catalyst-free cathode. Moreover, the nanofibre catalysts remain stable over the course of repeated discharge-charge cycling; however, carbon corrosion in the catalyst/carbon composite cathode degrades the cycling performance of the batteries. PMID:25563733

  5. Low temperature aluminum reduction cell using hollow cathode

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Craig W.; Frizzle, Patrick B.

    2002-08-20

    A method of producing aluminum in an electrolytic cell containing alumina dissolved in an electrolyte. A plurality of non-consumable anodes are disposed substantially vertically in the electrolyte along with a plurality of monolithic hollow cathodes. Each cathode has a top and bottom and the cathodes are disposed vertically in the electrolyte and the anodes and the cathodes are arranged in alternating relationship. Each of the cathodes is comprised of a first side facing a first opposing anode and a second side facing a second opposing anode. The first and second sides are joined by ends to form a reservoir in the hollow cathode for collecting aluminum therein deposited at the cathode.

  6. Corrosion-resistant catalyst supports for phosphoric acid fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kosek, J.A.; Cropley, C.C.; LaConti, A.B.

    1990-01-01

    High-surface-area carbon blacks such as Vulcan XC-72 (Cabot Corp.) and graphitized carbon blacks such as 2700{degree}C heat-treated Black Pearls 2000 (HTBP) (Cabot Corp.) have found widespread applications as catalyst supports in phosphoric acid fuel cells (PAFCs). However, due to the operating temperatures and pressures being utilized in PAFCs currently under development, the carbon-based cathode catalyst supports suffer from corrosion, which decreases the performance and life span of a PAFC stack. The feasibility of using alternative, low-cost, corrosion-resistant catalyst support (CRCS) materials as replacements for the cathode carbon support materials was investigated. The objectives of the program were to prepare high-surface-area alternative supports and to evaluate the physical characteristics and the electrochemical stability of these materials. The O{sub 2} reduction activity of the platinized CRCS materials was also evaluated. 2 refs., 3 figs.

  7. 15N solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance study of pyrolyzed metal-polyaniline cathode catalysts for oxygen reduction in fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroki, Shigeki; Hosaka, Yo; Yamauchi, Chiharu; Nagata, Shinsuke; Sonoda, Mayu

    2015-09-01

    The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity of pyrolyzed metal-free and metal (Mn, Fe, Co, Ni and Cu)-containing polyaniline (PANI) in polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) was studied. The metal-free PANI800 shows quite poor ORR catalytic activity, whilst the metal-containing PANIMe800 display a better ORR activity. The 15N CP/MAS NMR spectra of PANINi800 and PANICu800 show one weak peak at 118 ppm and there is no peak observed in PANIFe800, against that of PANI800, PANIMn800, PANICo800 and PANINi800 show two peaks at 273 and 118 ppm assigned to the pyridinic and pyridinium nitrogens. It is because of the paramagnetic effect of metal ions. The 15N spin-echo NMR spectra of PANIMe800 with fast recycle delay show the peaks at 140 and 270 ppm assigned to the graphitic and pyridinic nitrogens, against that of PANI800 shows no peak. The spectra of PANIMn800, PANICo800, PANINi800 and PANICu600 also contain a very broaden peak at 430 ppm assigned to the nitrogen with Fermi-contact effect from metal ions. The spectra of PANIFe800 show some spinning side bands and the average Fe3+-15N distance can be calculated. The some amount of iron ion are relieved and average Fe3+-15N distance increase after acid washing and the ORR activity decreases.

  8. Fuel cell applications for novel metalloporphyrin catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Ryba, G.; Shelnutt, J.; Doddapaneni, N.; Zavadil, K.

    1997-04-01

    This project utilized Computer-Aided Molecular Design (CAMD) to develop a new class of metalloporphyrin materials for use as catalysts for two fuel cell reactions. The first reaction is the reduction of oxygen at the fuel cell cathode, and this reaction was the main focus of the research. The second reaction we attempted to catalyze was the oxidation of methanol at the anode. Two classes of novel metalloporphyrins were developed. The first class comprised the dodecaphenylporphyrins whose steric bulk forces them into a non-planar geometry having a pocket where oxygen or methanol is more tightly bound to the porphyrin than it is in the case of planar porphyrins. Significant improvements in the catalytic reduction of oxygen by the dodecaphenyl porphyrins were measured in electrochemical cells. The dodecaphenylporphyrins were further modified by fluorinating the peripheral phenyl groups to varying degrees. The fluorination strongly affected their redox potential, but no effect on their catalytic activity towards oxygen was observed. The second class of porphyrin catalysts was a series of hydrogen-bonding porphyrins whose interaction with oxygen is enhanced. Enhancements in the interaction of oxygen with the porphyrins having hydrogen bonding groups were observed spectroscopically. Computer modeling was performed using Molecular Simulations new CERIUS2 Version 1.6 and a research version of POLYGRAF from Bill Goddard`s research group at the California Institute of Technology. We reoptimized the force field because of an error that was in POLYGRAF and corrected a problem in treatment of the metal in early versions of the program. This improved force field was reported in a J. Am. Chem. Soc. manuscript. Experimental measurements made on the newly developed catalysts included the electrochemical testing in a fuel cell configuration and spectroscopic measurements (UV-Vis, Raman and XPS) to characterize the catalysts.

  9. Performance and stability of different cathode base materials for use in microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janicek, Anthony; Fan, Yanzhen; Liu, Hong

    2015-04-01

    Metal supporting materials are increasingly being used as base materials for microbial fuel cell (MFC) cathodes. However, the potential for corrosion may limit their use as base materials of MFCs during scale-up and long-term operation. In this study, the electrochemical performance, power generation in MFCs, hydrostatic pressure tolerance, and stability of activated carbon (catalyst) cathodes with carbon cloth or different size metal mesh as base materials are investigated. Electrochemical testing results show that the finest stainless steel mesh (250 × 250 openings per inch) outperforms carbon cloth cathodes by 10-40% at current densities ranging from 6 to 11.2 A m-2 over the typical cathode operating range of 0.1 V-0 V. When tested in MFCs, however, carbon cloth based cathodes out perform all stainless steel mesh cathodes by as much as 34%, reaching 1.72 W m-2; probably due to the corrosion and salt build-up on the surface of the stainless steel mesh cathodes. Carbon cloth cathodes also maintained high static pressure heads of 1.9 m. The high electrochemical performance, hydrostatic pressure tolerance, and corrosion resistance of carbon cloth suggest that carbon fiber based materials may be more suitable than metal based materials for use as MFC cathodes base material for some applications.

  10. Proton exchange membrane fuel cell cathode contamination - Acetylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Y.; St-Pierre, Jean

    2015-04-01

    Acetylene adsorption on PEMFC electrodes and contamination in single cells are investigated with 300 ppm acetylene at a cathode held at 80 °C. The results of adsorption experiments suggest that acetylene adsorbs readily on electrodes and is reduced to ethylene and ethane under an open circuit potential of H2/N2, as the adsorbates can be electro-oxidized at high potentials. The cell voltage response shows that 300 ppm acetylene results in a cell performance loss of approximately 88%. The voltage degradation curve is divided into two stages by an inflection point, which suggests that potential-dependent processes are involved in acetylene poisoning. These potential-dependent processes may include acetylene oxidation and reduction as well as accumulation of intermediates on the electrode surface. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy analysis suggests that acetylene affects the oxygen reduction reaction and may also affect mass transport processes. Acetylene also may be reduced in the steady poisoning state of the operating cell. After neat air operation, the cyclic voltammetry results imply that the cathode catalyst surface is almost completely restored, with no contaminant residues remaining in the MEA. Linear scanning voltammetry measurements show no change in hydrogen crossover caused by contamination, and polarization curves confirm complete recovery of cell performance.

  11. A SnO2-Based Cathode Catalyst for Lithium-Air Batteries.

    PubMed

    Mei, Delong; Yuan, Xianxia; Ma, Zhong; Wei, Ping; Yu, Xuebin; Yang, Jun; Ma, Zi-Feng

    2016-05-25

    SnO2 and SnO2@C have been successfully synthesized with a simple hydrothermal procedure combined with heat treatment, and their performance as cathode catalysts of Li-air batteries has been comparatively evaluated and discussed. The results show that both SnO2 and SnO2@C are capable of catalyzing oxygen reduction reactions (ORR) and oxygen evolution reactions (OER) at the cathode of Li-air batteries, but the battery with SnO2@C displays better performance due to its unique higher conductivity, larger surface area, complex pore distribution, and huge internal space. PMID:27152996

  12. Power generation by packed-bed air-cathode microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoyuan; Shi, Juan; Liang, Peng; Wei, Jincheng; Huang, Xia; Zhang, Chuanyi; Logan, Bruce E

    2013-08-01

    Catalysts and catalyst binders are significant portions of the cost of microbial fuel cell (MFC) cathodes. Many materials have been tested as aqueous cathodes, but air-cathodes are needed to avoid energy demands for water aeration. Packed-bed air-cathodes were constructed without expensive binders or diffusion layers using four inexpensive carbon-based materials. Cathodes made from activated carbon produced the largest maximum power density of 676 ± 93 mW/m(2), followed by semi-coke (376 ± 47 mW/m(2)), graphite (122 ± 14 mW/m(2)) and carbon felt (60 ± 43 mW/m(2)). Increasing the mass of activated carbon and semi-coke from 5 to ≥ 15 g significantly reduced power generation because of a reduction in oxygen transfer due to a thicker water layer in the cathode (∼3 or ∼6 cm). These results indicate that a thin packed layer of activated carbon or semi-coke can be used to make inexpensive air-cathodes for MFCs. PMID:23732924

  13. Layered charge transfer complex cathodes or solid electrolyte cells

    SciTech Connect

    Louzos, D.V.

    1981-05-12

    Layered charge transfer complex cathodes for use in solid electrolyte cells are described wherein one layer of the cathode contains an electronic conductor which is isolated from the cell's solid electrolyte by a second layer of the cathode that does not contain an electronic conductor.

  14. Bifunctional silver nanoparticle cathode in microbial fuel cells for microbial growth inhibition with comparable oxygen reduction reaction activity.

    PubMed

    An, Junyeong; Jeon, Hongrae; Lee, Jaeyoung; Chang, In Seop

    2011-06-15

    Organic contamination of water bodies in which benthic microbial fuel cells (benthic MFCs) are installed, and organic crossover from the anode to the cathode of membraneless MFCs, is a factor causing oxygen depletion and substrate loss in the cathode due to the growth of heterotrophic aerobic bacteria. This study examines the possible use of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) as a cathodic catalyst for MFCs suffering from organic contamination and oxygen depletion. Four treated cathodes (AgNPs-coated, Pt/C-coated, Pt/C+AgNPs-coated, and plain graphite cathodes) were prepared and tested under high levels of organics loading. During operation (fed with 50 mM acetate), the AgNPs-coated system showed the highest DO concentration (0.8 mg/L) in the cathode area as well as the highest current (ranging from 0.04 to 0.12 mA). Based on these results, we concluded that (1) the growth of oxygen-consuming heterotrophic microbes could be inhibited by AgNPs, (2) the function of AgNPs as a bacterial growth inhibitor resulted in a greater increase of DO concentration in the cathode than the other tested cathode systems, (3) AgNPs could be applied as a cathode catalyst for oxygen reduction, and as a result (4) the MFC with the AgNPs-coated cathode led to the highest current generation among the tested MFCs. PMID:21585217

  15. Effects of sulfide on microbial fuel cells with platinum and nitrogen-doped carbon powder cathodes.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yujie; Shi, Xinxin; Wang, Xin; Lee, He; Liu, Jia; Qu, Youpeng; He, Weihua; Kumar, S M Senthil; Kim, Byung Hong; Ren, Nanqi

    2012-05-15

    Because of the advantages of low cost, good electrical conductivity and high oxidation resistance, nitrogen-doped carbon (NDC) materials have a potential to replace noble metals in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) for wastewater treatment. In spite of a large volume of studies on NDC materials as catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction, the influence of sulfide on NDC materials has not yet been explicitly reported so far. In this communication, nitrogen-doped carbon powders (NDCP) were prepared by treating carbon powders in nitric acid under reflux condition. Sodium sulfide (Na(2)S) was added to the cathodic electrolyte to compare its effects on platinum (Pt) and NDCP cathodes. Cell voltages, power density and cathodic potentials were monitored without and with Na(2)S and after Na(2)S was removed. The maximum cell voltage of the MFCs with Pt cathode decreased by 10% in the presence of Na(2)S that did not change the performance of the MFC with NDCP cathode, and the maximum power density of the MFC with NDCP cathode was even 11.3% higher than that with Pt cathode (222.5 ± 8 mW m(-2) vs. 199.7 ± 4 mW m(-2)). PMID:22424752

  16. Design of graphene sheets-supported Pt catalyst layer in PEM fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Seh K.; Shao, Yuyan; Wan, Haiying; Rieke, Peter C.; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.; Towne, Silas A.; Saraf, Laxmikant V.; Liu, Jun; Lin, Yuehe; Wang, Yong

    2011-03-01

    A series of cathodes using Pt supported onto graphene sheets with different contents of carbon black in the catalyst layer were prepared and characterized. Carbon black was added as a spacer between two-dimensional graphene sheets in the catalyst layer to study its effect on the performances of proton exchange membrane fuel cell. Electrochemical properties and surface morphology of the cathodes with and without carbon black were characterized using cyclic voltammetry, ac-impedance spectroscopy, electrochemical polarization technique, and scanning electron microscopy. The results indicated that carbon black effectively modifies the array of graphene supports, resulting in more Pt nanoparticles available for electrochemical reaction and better mass transport in the catalyst layer.

  17. Structural and Electronic Transformations of Pt/C, Pd@Pt(1 ML)/C and Pd@Pt(2 ML)/C Cathode Catalysts in Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells during Potential-step Operating Processes Characterized by In-situ Time-resolved XAFS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagamatsu, Shin-ichi; Takao, Shinobu; Samjeské, Gabor; Nagasawa, Kensaku; Sekizawa, Oki; Kaneko, Takuma; Higashi, Kotaro; Uruga, Tomoya; Gayen, Sirshendu; Velaga, Srihari; Saniyal, Milan K.; Iwasawa, Yasuhiro

    2016-06-01

    The dynamic structural and electronic transformations of Pt/C, Pd@Pt(1 ML)/C, Pd@Pt(2 ML)/C cathode catalysts in polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) during the potential-step operating processes between 0.4 and 1.4 VRHE (potential vs RHE) were characterized by in-situ (operando) time-resolved Pt LIII-edge quick-XAFS at 100 ms time-resolution. Potential-dependent surface structures and oxidation states of Pt, Pd@Pt(1 ML) and Pd@Pt(2 ML) nanoparticles on carbon at 0.4 and 1.4 VRHE were also analyzed by in-situ Pt LIII-edge and Pd K-edge quick-XAFS. The Pt, Pd@Pt(1 ML) and Pd@Pt(2 ML) nanoparticle surfaces were restructured and disordered at 1.4 VRHE, which were induced by strong Pt-O bonds as well as alloying effects. The rate constants for the changes of Pt valence, CN(Pt-Pt), CN(Pt-Pd) and CN(Pt-O) (CN: coordination number) in the potential-step operating processes were also determined and discussed in relation to the origin of oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activities of the Pt/C, Pd@Pt(1 ML)/C and Pd@Pt(2 ML)/C cathode catalysts.

  18. MnCo2O4 nanowires anchored on reduced graphene oxide sheets as effective bifunctional catalysts for Li-O2 battery cathodes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong Guk; Kim, Youngmin; Noh, Yuseong; Kim, Won Bae

    2015-05-22

    A hybrid composite system of MnCo2 O4 nanowires (MCO NWs) anchored on reduced graphene oxide (RGO) nanosheets was prepared as the bifunctional catalyst of a Li-O2 battery cathode. The catalysts can be obtained from the hybridization of one-dimensional MCO NWs and two-dimensional RGO nanosheets. As O2 -cathode catalysts for Li-O2 cells, the MCO@RGO composites showed a high initial discharge capacity (ca. 11092.1 mAh gcarbon (-1) ) with a high rate performance. The Li-O2 cells could run for more than 35 cycles with high reversibility under a limited specific capacity of 1000 mAh gcarbon (-1) with a low potential polarization of 1.36 V, as compared with those of pure Ketjenblack and MCO NWs. The high cycling stability, low potential polarization, and rate capability suggest that the MCO@RGO composites prepared here are promising catalyst candidates for highly reversible Li-O2 battery cathodes. PMID:25908219

  19. Segmented cell testing for cathode parameter investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanasini, Pietro; Schuler, J. Andreas; Wuillemin, Zacharie; Ameur, Myriam L. Ben; Comninellis, Christos; Van herle, Jan

    The increasing quality and durability of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) state-of-the-art materials renders the long-term testing of fuel cells difficult since considerably long equipment times are needed to obtain valuable results. Moreover, reproducibility issues are common due to the high sensitivity of the performance and degradation on the testing conditions. An original segmented cell configuration has been adopted in order to carry out four tests in parallel, thus decreasing the total experimental time and ensuring the same operating conditions for the four segments. The investigation has been performed on both anode-supported cells and symmetrical Lanthanum-Strontium Manganite-Yttria-stabilized Zirconia (LSM-YSZ) electrolyte-supported cells. In separate tests, the influence of variables like cathode thickness, current density and cathode composition on performance and degradation have been explored on anode-supported cells. Furthermore, the effect of chromium poisoning has been studied on electrolyte-supported symmetric cells by contacting one segment with a chromium-iron interconnect material. Long-term polarization of the segments is controlled with a multi-channel galvanostatic device designed in-house. Electrochemical characterization has been performed through electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) at different H 2 partial pressures, temperatures and bias current, effectively demonstrating the direct impact of each studied variable on the cell performance and degradation behavior. Segmented cell testing has been proven to be an effective strategy to achieve better reproducibility for SOFC measurements since it avoids the inevitable fluctuations found in a series of successively run tests. Moreover, simultaneous testing increased n-fold the data output per experiment, implying a considerable economy of time.

  20. High Performance and Durable Low PGM Cathode Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yong; Liu, Jun; Shao, Yuyan; Cheng, Yingwen; Borup, Rodney L.; Rockward, Tommy; Brosha, Eric Lanich

    2015-08-17

    There is a strong need to decrease the amount of Pt electrocatalyst used in fuel cells and increase its durability for transportation application. Conventional strategies include Pt nanocrystals and Pt alloy with well-controlled structures, durable carbon support, non-carbon support, etc. We have developed the so-called “metal-metal oxide-carbon” triple junction concept to stabilize Pt and protect carbon from corrosion. It also improved the activity of Pt. The good performance was not achieved in fuel cell test mainly because of the transport issue due to the use of 2D graphene. In this project, our main goal is to demonstrate the concept in fuel cell device test using 3D porous graphene as support so that the transport issue could be addressed.

  1. Power generation using carbon mesh cathodes with different diffusion layers in microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yong; Zhang, Fang; Wei, Bin; Liu, Guangli; Zhang, Renduo; Logan, Bruce E.

    An inexpensive carbon material, carbon mesh, was examined to replace the more expensive carbon cloth usually used to make cathodes in air-cathode microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Three different diffusion layers were tested using carbon mesh: poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), and Goretex cloth. Carbon mesh with a mixture of PDMS and carbon black as a diffusion layer produced a maximum power density of 1355 ± 62 mW m -2 (normalized to the projected cathode area), which was similar to that obtained with a carbon cloth cathode (1390 ± 72 mW m -2). Carbon mesh with a PTFE diffusion layer produced only a slightly lower (6.6%) maximum power density (1303 ± 48 mW m -2). The Coulombic efficiencies were a function of current density, with the highest value for the carbon mesh and PDMS (79%) larger than that for carbon cloth (63%). The cost of the carbon mesh cathode with PDMS/Carbon or PTFE (excluding catalyst and binder costs) is only 2.5% of the cost of the carbon cloth cathode. These results show that low cost carbon materials such as carbon mesh can be used as the cathode in an MFC without reducing the performance compared to more expensive carbon cloth.

  2. Development of electrocatalysts for fuel cell cathodes: Experimental studies and mathematical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, Nalini Palaniappan

    The primary objective of this dissertation is to develop electrocatalysts for fuel cell cathodes and to understanding the performance of various cathode materials using mathematical modeling. Recent advances in Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFCs) have made them a promising alternative to internal combustion and gasoline driven vehicles. PEMFCs are the best choice for a wide range of portable, stationary and automotive applications because of their high power density and relatively low-temperature operation. However, a major impediment in the commercialization of the fuel cell technology is the cost involved due to the large amount of platinum electrocatalyst used for Oxygen Reduction Reaction (ORR). For example, PEMFCs today do not meet the Department of Energy (DOE) targets for transportation applications (which is 0.4 A/cm2 at 0.8 V and 0.1 A/cm2 at 0.85 V with an MEA cost under $10/kW). To achieve this, precious metal loadings must be reduced to less than 0.2 g/peak kW or 0.05 mg/cm2 of platinum. Platinum loading can be reduced by (i) increasing the utilization of platinum, (ii) alloying platinum with other transition metals, and (iii) developing platinum-free catalysts. In this dissertation, the third approach has been adopted, where a platinum-free cobalt-chelate catalyst supported on modified carbon black substrates has been developed. This catalyst shows less than 100 mV higher overpotential compared to commercial E-TEK 19.1% Pt/C. The modified carbon substrate used in this catalyst can itself act as an ORR catalyst. Here, a highly active metal-free carbon catalyst has been developed for ORR. The second approach to reducing platinum loading has also been adopted by developing 18.8% Pt2.5Co1 catalysts using electroless co-deposition, which showed a performance close to commercial E-TEK 20% Pt 3Co1/C. Finally, a three-phase homogeneous model has been developed for the cathode in a Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell (MCFC) to extract kinetic and conductivity

  3. Multiple cathodic reaction mechanisms in seawater cathodic biofilms operating in sediment microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Babauta, Jerome T; Hsu, Lewis; Atci, Erhan; Kagan, Jeff; Chadwick, Bart; Beyenal, Haluk

    2014-10-01

    In this study, multiple reaction mechanisms in cathodes of sediment microbial fuel cells (SMFCs) were characterized by using cyclic voltammetry and microelectrode measurements of dissolved oxygen and pH. The cathodes were acclimated in SMFCs with sediment and seawater from San Diego Bay. Two limiting current regions were observed with onset potentials of approximately +400 mVAg/AgCl for limiting current I and -120 mVAg/AgCl for limiting current II. The appearance of two catalytic waves suggests that multiple cathodic reaction mechanisms influence cathodic performance. Microscale oxygen concentration measurements showed a zero surface concentration at the electrode surface for limiting current II but not for limiting current I, which allowed us to distinguish limiting current II as the conventional oxygen reduction reaction and limiting current I as a currently unidentified cathodic reaction mechanism. Microscale pH measurements further confirmed these results. PMID:25154833

  4. Properties of cathode materials in alkaline cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salkind, A. J.; McBreen, J.; Freeman, R.; Parkhurst, W. A.

    1984-04-01

    Conventional and new cathode materials in primary and secondary alkaline cells were investigated for stability, structure, electrochemical reversibility and efficiency. Included were various forms of AgO for reserve type silver zinc batteries, a new material - AgNiO2 and several nickel electrodes for nickel cadmium and nickel hydrogen cells for aerospace applications. A comparative study was made of the stability of electroformed and chemically prepared AgO. Stability was correlated with impurities. After the first discharge AgNiO2 can be recharged to the monovalent level. The discharge product is predominantly silver. Plastic bonded nickel electrodes display a second plateau on discharge. Additions of Co(OH)2 largely eliminate this.

  5. Porous Perovskite LaNiO3 Nanocubes as Cathode Catalysts for Li-O2 Batteries with Low Charge Potential

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian; Zhao, Yubao; Zhao, Xiao; Liu, Zhaolin; Chen, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Developing efficient catalyst for oxygen evolution reaction (OER) is essential for rechargeable Li-O2 battery. In our present work, porous LaNiO3 nanocubes were employed as electrocatalyst in Li-O2 battery cell. The as-prepared battery showed excellent charging performance with significantly reduced overpotential (3.40 V). The synergistic effect of porous structure, large specific surface area and high electrocatalytic activity of porous LaNiO3 nanocubes ensured the Li-O2 battery with enchanced capacity and good cycle stability. Furthermore, it was found that the lithium anode corrosion and cathode passivation were responsible for the capacity fading of Li-O2 battery. Our results indicated that porous LaNiO3 nanocubes represent a promising cathode catalyst for Li-O2 battery. PMID:25103186

  6. Porous Perovskite LaNiO3 Nanocubes as Cathode Catalysts for Li-O2 Batteries with Low Charge Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian; Zhao, Yubao; Zhao, Xiao; Liu, Zhaolin; Chen, Wei

    2014-08-01

    Developing efficient catalyst for oxygen evolution reaction (OER) is essential for rechargeable Li-O2 battery. In our present work, porous LaNiO3 nanocubes were employed as electrocatalyst in Li-O2 battery cell. The as-prepared battery showed excellent charging performance with significantly reduced overpotential (3.40 V). The synergistic effect of porous structure, large specific surface area and high electrocatalytic activity of porous LaNiO3 nanocubes ensured the Li-O2 battery with enchanced capacity and good cycle stability. Furthermore, it was found that the lithium anode corrosion and cathode passivation were responsible for the capacity fading of Li-O2 battery. Our results indicated that porous LaNiO3 nanocubes represent a promising cathode catalyst for Li-O2 battery.

  7. Polymer coatings as separator layers for microbial fuel cell cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Valerie J.; Saito, Tomonori; Hickner, Michael A.; Logan, Bruce E.

    2011-03-01

    Membrane separators reduce oxygen flux from the cathode into the anolyte in microbial fuel cells (MFCs), but water accumulation and pH gradients between the separator and cathode reduces performance. Air cathodes were spray-coated (water-facing side) with anion exchange, cation exchange, and neutral polymer coatings of different thicknesses to incorporate the separator into the cathode. The anion exchange polymer coating resulted in greater power density (1167 ± 135 mW m-2) than a cation exchange coating (439 ± 2 mW m-2). This power output was similar to that produced by a Nafion-coated cathode (1114 ± 174 mW m-2), and slightly lower than the uncoated cathode (1384 ± 82 mW m-2). Thicker coatings reduced oxygen diffusion into the electrolyte and increased coulombic efficiency (CE = 56-64%) relative to an uncoated cathode (29 ± 8%), but decreased power production (255-574 mW m-2). Electrochemical characterization of the cathodes ex situ to the MFC showed that the cathodes with the lowest charge transfer resistance and the highest oxygen reduction activity produced the most power in MFC tests. The results on hydrophilic cathode separator layers revealed a trade off between power and CE. Cathodes coated with a thin coating of anion exchange polymer show promise for controlling oxygen transfer while minimally affecting power production.

  8. Improved Fabrication Of Cathodes For Solid-State Li Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagasubramanian, Ganesan

    1995-01-01

    Utilization of cathode material increased. Improved composite-cathode/polymer-electrolyte units for solid-state lithium secondary electrochemical cells fabricated in modified version of original method of fabrication. Further development of units may lead to increases in energy and power densities and in cycle lives of rechargeable lithium cells.

  9. Advanced Catalysts for Fuel Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanan, Sekharipuram R.; Whitacre, Jay; Valdez, T. I.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the development of catalyst for Fuel Cells. The objectives of the project are to reduce the cost of stack components and reduce the amount of precious metal used in fuel cell construction. A rapid combinatorial screening technique based on multi-electrode thin film array has been developed and validated for identifying catalysts for oxygen reduction; focus shifted from methanol oxidation in FY05 to oxygen reduction in FY06. Multi-electrode arrays of thin film catalysts of Pt-Ni and Pt-Ni-Zr have been deposited. Pt-Ni and have been characterized electrochemically and structurally. Pt-Ni-Zr and Pt-Ni films show higher current density and onset potential compared to Pt. Electrocatalytic activity and onset potential are found to be strong function of the lattice constant. Thin film Pt(59)Ni(39)Zr(2) can provide 10 times the current density of thin film Pt. Thin film Pt(59)Ni(39)Zr(2) also shows 65mV higher onset potential than Pt.

  10. Molten carbonate fuel cell cathode with mixed oxide coating

    DOEpatents

    Hilmi, Abdelkader; Yuh, Chao-Yi

    2013-05-07

    A molten carbonate fuel cell cathode having a cathode body and a coating of a mixed oxygen ion conductor materials. The mixed oxygen ion conductor materials are formed from ceria or doped ceria, such as gadolinium doped ceria or yttrium doped ceria. The coating is deposited on the cathode body using a sol-gel process, which utilizes as precursors organometallic compounds, organic and inorganic salts, hydroxides or alkoxides and which uses as the solvent water, organic solvent or a mixture of same.

  11. EFFECT OF PRETREATMENT ON PT-CO/C CATHODE CATALYSTS FOR THE OXYGEN-REDUCTION REACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, E.; Colon-Mercado, H.

    2010-01-19

    Carbon supported Pt and Pt-Co electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction in low temperature fuel cells were prepared by the reduction of the metal salts with sodium borohydride and sodium formate. The effect of surface treatment with nitric acid on the carbon surface and Co on the surface of carbon prior to the deposition of Pt was studied. The catalysts where Pt was deposited on treated carbon the ORR reaction preceded more through the two electron pathway and favored peroxide production, while the fresh carbon catalysts proceeded more through the four electron pathway to complete the oxygen reduction reaction. NaCOOH reduced Pt/C catalysts showed higher activity that NaBH{sub 4} reduced Pt/C catalysts. It was determined that the Co addition has a higher impact on catalyst activity and active surface area when used with NaBH{sub 4} as reducing agent as compared to NaCOOH.

  12. Fuel cells and fuel cell catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Masel, Richard I.; Rice, Cynthia A.; Waszczuk, Piotr; Wieckowski, Andrzej

    2006-11-07

    A direct organic fuel cell includes a formic acid fuel solution having between about 10% and about 95% formic acid. The formic acid is oxidized at an anode. The anode may include a Pt/Pd catalyst that promotes the direct oxidation of the formic acid via a direct reaction path that does not include formation of a CO intermediate.

  13. Electro-catalysts for the cathode(s) to enhance its activity to reduce socl2 in li/socl2 battery

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatasetty, H. V.

    1981-02-24

    In a lithium-thionyl chloride cell having a lithium anode, an electrolyte including thionyl chloride and a cathode with current collector, the improvement comprising a coating of a metal phthalocyanine complex on a said cathode. Particularly preferred are transition metal phthalocyanine complexes, such as copper and cobalt phthalocyanine.

  14. Parameters characterization and optimization of activated carbon (AC) cathodes for microbial fuel cell application.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Carlo; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Babanova, Sofia; Atanassov, Plamen; Ieropoulos, Ioannis; Grattieri, Matteo; Cristiani, Pierangela; Trasatti, Stefano; Li, Baikun; Schuler, Andrew J

    2014-07-01

    Activated carbon (AC) is employed as a cost-effective catalyst for cathodic oxygen reduction in microbial fuel cells (MFC). The fabrication protocols of AC-based cathodes are conducted at different applied pressures (175-3500 psi) and treatment temperatures (25-343°C). The effects of those parameters along with changes in the surface morphology and chemistry on the cathode performances are comprehensively examined. The cathodes are tested in a three-electrode setup and explored in single chamber membraneless MFCs (SCMFCs). The results show that the best performance of the AC-based cathode is achieved when a pressure of 1400 psi is applied followed by heat treatment of 150-200°C for 1h. The influence of the applied pressure and the temperature of the heat treatment on the electrodes and SCMFCs is demonstrated as the result of the variation in the transfer resistance, the surface morphology and surface chemistry of the AC-based cathodes tested. PMID:24787317

  15. Mesh optimization for microbial fuel cell cathodes constructed around stainless steel mesh current collectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fang; Merrill, Matthew D.; Tokash, Justin C.; Saito, Tomonori; Cheng, Shaoan; Hickner, Michael A.; Logan, Bruce E.

    Mesh current collectors made of stainless steel (SS) can be integrated into microbial fuel cell (MFC) cathodes constructed of a reactive carbon black and Pt catalyst mixture and a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) diffusion layer. It is shown here that the mesh properties of these cathodes can significantly affect performance. Cathodes made from the coarsest mesh (30-mesh) achieved the highest maximum power of 1616 ± 25 mW m -2 (normalized to cathode projected surface area; 47.1 ± 0.7 W m -3 based on liquid volume), while the finest mesh (120-mesh) had the lowest power density (599 ± 57 mW m -2). Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy showed that charge transfer and diffusion resistances decreased with increasing mesh opening size. In MFC tests, the cathode performance was primarily limited by reaction kinetics, and not mass transfer. Oxygen permeability increased with mesh opening size, accounting for the decreased diffusion resistance. At higher current densities, diffusion became a limiting factor, especially for fine mesh with low oxygen transfer coefficients. These results demonstrate the critical nature of the mesh size used for constructing MFC cathodes.

  16. Phthalocyanine cathode materials for secondary lithium cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tamaki, J.; Yamaji, A.

    1982-01-01

    Discharge and charge characteristics of various phthalocyanine cathodes coupled with lithium metal are studied. The best capacity based only on cathode active material weight is 1440 A-hr/kg in the lithium/iron phthalocyanine system, and the cycle life of the lithium/Cu phthalocyanine system is more than 100 times at the discharge depth of 157 A-hr/kg. The cathode reaction mechanism is supposed to be lithium intercalation between phthalocyanine molecules. The results indicate that these phthalocyanines are promising cathode active materials for lithium secondary batteries.

  17. Performance of Stainless Steel Mesh Cathode and PVDF-graphite Cathode in Microbial Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Liping; Tian, Ying; Li, Mingliang; He, Gaohong; Li, Zhikao

    2010-11-01

    Inexpensive and conductive materials termed as stainless steel mesh and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF)-graphite were currently used as the air cathode electrodes in MFCs for the investigation of power production. By loading PTFE (poly(tetrafluoroethylene)) on the surface of stainless steel mesh, electricity production reached 3 times as high as that of the naked stainless steel. A much high catalytic activity for oxygen reduction was exhibited by Pt based and PTFE loading stainless steel mesh cathode, with an electricity generation of 1144±44 mW/m2 (31±1 W/m3) and a Coulombic efficiency (CE) of 77±2%. When Pt was replaced by an inexpensive transition metal based catalyst (cobalt tetramethylphenylporphyrin, CoTMPP), power production and CE were 845±21 mW/m2 (23±1 W/m3) and 68±1%, respectively. Accordingly, power production from PVDF-graphite (hydrophobic) MFC and PVDF-graphite (hydrophile) MFC were 286±20 mW/m2(8±1 W/m3) and 158±13 mW/m2(4±0.4 W/m3), respectively using CoTMPP as catalyst. These results give us new insight into materials like stainless steel mesh and PVDF-graphite as low cost cathode for reducing the costs of MFCs for wastewater treatment applications.

  18. Effects of Humidity on Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, John S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Singh, Prabhakar; Mahapatra, Manoj K.; Wachsman, E. D.; Liu, Meilin; Gerdes, Kirk R.

    2015-03-17

    This report summarizes results from experimental studies performed by a team of researchers assembled on behalf of the Solid-state Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) Core Technology Program. Team participants employed a variety of techniques to evaluate and mitigate the effects of humidity in solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) cathode air streams on cathode chemistry, microstructure, and electrochemical performance.

  19. Microbial Fuel Cell Performance with a Pressurized Cathode Chamber

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) power densities are often constrained by the oxygen reduction reaction rate on the cathode electrode. One important factor for this is the normally low solubility of oxygen in the aqueous cathode solution creating mass transport limitations, which hinder oxygen reduction a...

  20. Nanofiber Scaffold for Cathode of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Zhi, Mingjia; Mariani, Nicholas; Gemmen, Randall; Gerdes, Kirk; Wu, Nianqiang

    2010-10-01

    A high performance solid oxide fuel cell cathode using the yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) nanofibers scaffold with the infiltrated La1-xSrxMnO3 (LSM) shows an enhanced catalytic activity toward oxygen reduction. Such a cathode offers a continuous path for charge transport and an increased number of triple-phase boundary sites.

  1. Performance of practical-sized membrane-electrode assemblies using titanium nitride-supported platinum catalysts mixed with acetylene black as the cathode catalyst layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shintani, Haruhiko; Kakinuma, Katsuyoshi; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Masahiro; Uchida, Makoto

    2015-04-01

    The performance of practical-sized membrane-electrode assemblies (MEAs) using titanium nitride-supported platinum (Pt/TiN) as the cathode catalysts was evaluated with the use of a practical single cell designed for microscale combined heat and power (CHP) applications. The performance can be controlled by adding acetylene black (AB), with the behavior being dominated by the percolation law. The electrical resistance of the MEAs drastically decreased for AB contents greater than 37 vol%. The Pt utilization percentage was close to 100% for Pt/TiN with percolated AB networks. It was also found that the percolated AB networks supplied effective gas transport pathways, which were not flooded by generated water, thus enhancing the oxygen mass transport. The practical-sized MEA using Pt/TiN + 47 vol% AB showed 1.5 times greater mass activity and a comparable performance under a practical operating condition for micro-CHP applications, compared with the MEA using a commercial graphitized carbon black-supported platinum catalyst.

  2. Electrochemical machining analysis on grid cathode composed of square cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yonghua; Liu, Kai; Zhao, Dongbiao

    2013-07-01

    During the electrochemical machining (ECM), the cathodes designed by the existing methods are mainly unitary cathodes, which can be only used to produce the workpieces with the same shapes. However, there are few researches on designing cathodes for machining the different workpieces with the different surfaces. This paper presents the grid cathode composed of the square cells to produce the workpieces with different shapes. Three types of the square cells, 2.5 mm×2.5 mm, 3 mm×3 mm, and 4 mm×4 mm, are utilized to construct the plane, the slant, and the blade cathode. The material of the cathode and the anode is CrNi18Ti9, and the ingredient of electrolyte is 15% NaCl and 15% NaNO3. The machining equilibrium machining current and time are acquired and analyzed, the machining process and the workpiece quality are compared between using the grid cathode and the unitary cathode. Moreover, the machining errors on the workpiece surface are measured and analyzed, and the error reasons are traced and discussed to obtain the better surface quality of the workpiece. The experiment and analysis results show that the grid cathode can be used to manufacture the workpieces with complex shapes in certain range of the error. The workpiece quality improves with the size of the square cell being reduced, and if the square element is small enough, the workpiece quality is almost equal to the one machined by the unitary cathode. The proposed research realizes a single cathode machining the different workpieces with the different surfaces.

  3. Electrorefining cell with parallel electrode/concentric cylinder cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Gay, E.C.; Miller, W.E.; Laidler, J.J.

    1995-12-31

    A cathode-anode arrangement for use in an electrolytic cell is adapted for electrochemically refining spent nuclear fuel from a nuclear reactor and recovering purified uranium and a mixture of uranium and plutonium for use as a fresh blanket and core fuel in a nuclear reactor. The arrangement includes a plurality of inner anodic dissolution baskets that are each attached to a respective support rod, are submerged in a molten lithium halide salt, and are rotationally displaced. An inner hollow cylindrical-shaped cathode is concentrically disposed about the inner anodic dissolution baskets. Concentrically disposed about the inner cathode in a spaced manner are a plurality of outer anodic dissolution baskets, while an outer hollow cylindrical-shaped cathode is disposed about the outer anodic dissolution baskets. Uranium is deposited from the anode baskets in a uniform cylindrical shape on the inner and outer cathode cylinders by rotating the anode baskets within the molten lithium halide salt. Scrapers located on each anode basket abrade and remove the spent fuel deposits on the surfaces of the inner and outer cathode cylinders, with the spent fuel falling to the bottom of the cell for removal. Cell resistance is reduced and uranium collection efficiency enhanced by increasing the electrode area and reducing the anode-cathode spacing for enhanced trapping and recovery of uranium dendrites scraped off of the cylindrical cathodes which may be greater in number than two.

  4. High surface area graphite as alternative support for proton exchange membrane fuel cell catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira-Aparicio, P.; Folgado, M. A.; Daza, L.

    The suitability of a high surface area graphite (HSAG) as proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) catalyst support has been evaluated and compared with that of the most popular carbon black: the Vulcan XC72. It has been observed that Pt is arranged on the graphite surface resulting in different structures which depend on the catalysts synthesis conditions. The influence that the metal particle size and the metal-support interaction exert on the catalysts degradation rate is analyzed. Temperature programmed oxidation (TPO) under oxygen containing streams has been shown to be a useful method to assess the resistance of PEMFC catalysts to carbon corrosion. The synthesized Pt/HSAG catalysts have been evaluated in single cell tests in the cathode catalytic layer. The obtained results show that HSAG can be a promising alternative to the traditionally used Vulcan XC72 carbon black when suitable catalysts synthesis conditions are used.

  5. Corrosion testing of candidates for the alkaline fuel cell cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, Joseph; Fielder, William L.

    1989-01-01

    Current/voltage data was obtained for specially made corrosion electrodes of some oxides and of gold materials for the purpose of developing a screening test of catalysts and supports for use at the cathode of the alkaline fuel cell. The data consists of measurements of current at fixed potentials and cyclic voltammograms. These data will have to be correlated with longtime performance data in order to fully evaluate this approach to corrosion screening. Corrosion test screening of candidates for the oxygen reduction electrode of the alkaline fuel cell was applied to two substances, the pyrochlore Pb2Ru2O6.5 and the spinel NiCo2O4. The substrate gold screen and a sample of the IFC Orbiter Pt-Au performance electrode were included as blanks. The pyrochlore data indicate relative stability, although nothing yet can be said about long term stability. The spinel was plainly unstable. For this type of testing to be validated, comparisons will have to be made with long term performance tests.

  6. Testing Metal Chlorides For Use In Sodium-Cell Cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugga, Ratnakumar V.; Attia, Alan I.; Halpert, Gerald

    1992-01-01

    Cyclic voltammetric curves of transition-metal wires in molten NaAlCl4 electrolyte used to eliminate suitability of transition metals as cathodes in sodium cells. Cyclic voltammetry used in conjunction with measurement of galvanostatic polarization curves determines whether given metal chloride suitable as cathode material in such cell. Cells useful in such high-energy-density and high-power-density applications as leveling loads on electric-power plants, supplying power to electric ground vehicles, and aerospace applications.

  7. Micro-nano structured Ni-MOFs as high-performance cathode catalyst for rechargeable Li-O2 batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xiaofei; Zhu, Zhiqiang; Cheng, Fangyi; Tao, Zhanliang; Chen, Jun

    2015-07-01

    Rechargeable Li-O2 batteries with high theoretical energy density urgently require efficient cathode catalysts to improve their electrochemical performance. Here we first demonstrated the application of Ni-based organic frameworks of Ni(4,4'-bipy)(H3BTC) (4,4'-bipy = 4,4'-bipyridine H3BTC = 1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylic acid) (Ni-MOFs) as high-performance cathode catalysts for rechargeable Li-O2 batteries. It is found that Ni-MOFs with a three-dimensional (3D) micro-nano structure, open catalytic sites and large specific surface area can guarantee the free transfer of O2 and effective contact between the electrolyte and the catalytic sites. Preliminary testing of Ni-MOFs showed that they possess an extremely high capacity of 9000 mA h g-1, a high round-trip efficiency of 80%, and a respectable cycling of 170 cycles without obvious voltage drop. Furthermore, plastic rechargeable Li-O2 batteries with Ni-MOFs as the cathode catalyst have been assembled, displaying an energy density of 478 Wh kg-1. This study leads to both fundamental and technological advances of Ni-MOFs as the cathode for rechargeable Li-O2 batteries.Rechargeable Li-O2 batteries with high theoretical energy density urgently require efficient cathode catalysts to improve their electrochemical performance. Here we first demonstrated the application of Ni-based organic frameworks of Ni(4,4'-bipy)(H3BTC) (4,4'-bipy = 4,4'-bipyridine H3BTC = 1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylic acid) (Ni-MOFs) as high-performance cathode catalysts for rechargeable Li-O2 batteries. It is found that Ni-MOFs with a three-dimensional (3D) micro-nano structure, open catalytic sites and large specific surface area can guarantee the free transfer of O2 and effective contact between the electrolyte and the catalytic sites. Preliminary testing of Ni-MOFs showed that they possess an extremely high capacity of 9000 mA h g-1, a high round-trip efficiency of 80%, and a respectable cycling of 170 cycles without obvious voltage drop. Furthermore

  8. Facile and Gram-scale Synthesis of Metal-free Catalysts: Toward Realistic Applications for Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ok-Hee; Cho, Yong-Hun; Chung, Dong Young; Kim, Min Jeong; Yoo, Ji Mun; Park, Ji Eun; Choe, Heeman; Sung, Yung-Eun

    2015-03-01

    Although numerous reports on nonprecious metal catalysts for replacing expensive Pt-based catalysts have been published, few of these studies have demonstrated their practical application in fuel cells. In this work, we report graphitic carbon nitride and carbon nanofiber hybrid materials synthesized by a facile and gram-scale method via liquid-based reactions, without the use of toxic materials or a high pressure-high temperature reactor, for use as fuel cell cathodes. The resulting materials exhibited remarkable methanol tolerance, selectivity, and stability even without a metal dopant. Furthermore, these completely metal-free catalysts exhibited outstanding performance as cathode materials in an actual fuel cell device: a membrane electrode assembly with both acidic and alkaline polymer electrolytes. The fabrication method and remarkable performance of the single cell produced in this study represent progressive steps toward the realistic application of metal-free cathode electrocatalysts in fuel cells.

  9. Facile and Gram-scale Synthesis of Metal-free Catalysts: Toward Realistic Applications for Fuel Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ok-Hee; Cho, Yong-Hun; Chung, Dong Young; Kim, Min Jeong; Yoo, Ji Mun; Park, Ji Eun; Choe, Heeman; Sung, Yung-Eun

    2015-01-01

    Although numerous reports on nonprecious metal catalysts for replacing expensive Pt-based catalysts have been published, few of these studies have demonstrated their practical application in fuel cells. In this work, we report graphitic carbon nitride and carbon nanofiber hybrid materials synthesized by a facile and gram-scale method via liquid-based reactions, without the use of toxic materials or a high pressure-high temperature reactor, for use as fuel cell cathodes. The resulting materials exhibited remarkable methanol tolerance, selectivity, and stability even without a metal dopant. Furthermore, these completely metal-free catalysts exhibited outstanding performance as cathode materials in an actual fuel cell device: a membrane electrode assembly with both acidic and alkaline polymer electrolytes. The fabrication method and remarkable performance of the single cell produced in this study represent progressive steps toward the realistic application of metal-free cathode electrocatalysts in fuel cells. PMID:25728910

  10. Copper Chloride Cathode For Liquid-Sodium Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugga, Ratnakumar V.; Distefano, Salvador; Nagasubramanian, Ganesan; Bankston, Clyde P.

    1990-01-01

    Rechargeable liquid-sodium cell with copper chloride cathode offers substantial increase in energy density over cells made with other cathode materials. Unit has theoretical maximum energy density of 1135 W.h/kg. Generates electricity by electrochemical reaction of molten sodium and solid copper chloride immersed in molten electrolyte, sodium tetrachloroaluminate at temperature of equal to or greater than 200 degrees C. Wall of alumina tube separates molten electrolyte from molten sodium anode. Copper chloride cathode embedded in pores of sintered nickel cylinder or directly sintered.

  11. Corrosion testing of candidates for the alkaline fuel cell cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, Joseph; Fielder, William L.

    1989-01-01

    It is desirable to employ a corrosion screening test for catalyst or support candidates for the fuel cell cathode before entering upon optimization of the candidate or of the catalytic electrode. To this end, corrosion test electrodes, intended for complete immersion and maximum wetting, have been made with 30 to 40 vol. pct Teflon; with perovskites this is about 10 to 15 pct. The candidates were synthesized by methods intended for single-phase product without special emphasis on high surface area, although the substances tested were no coarser than 2 m squared/g. A typical loading was 25 mg/cm sq of the pure substance, usually on gold screen, a few mm squared of which were left bare for contacting. Contact to the gold lead wire was made by welding with a micro-torch or a spot-welder. Corrosion testing consisted of obtaining current-voltage data under flowing inert gas in the potential region for reduction of O2. The electrode was immersed in 30 pct KOH. Observations were made at 20 C and 80 C, and the results compared with data from gold standards. Results with some perovskites, pyrochlores, spinels, and interstitial compounds will be discussed.

  12. Conducting polymer-doped polyprrrole as an effective cathode catalyst for Li-O{sub 2} batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jinqiang; Sun, Bing; Ahn, Hyo-Jun; Wang, Chengyin; Wang, Guoxiu

    2013-12-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Doped polypyrrole as cathode catalysts for Li-O{sub 2} batteries. • Polypyrrole has an excellent redox capability to activate oxygen reduction. • Chloride doped polypyrrole demonstrated an improved catalytic performance in Li-O{sub 2} batteries. - Abstract: Polypyrrole conducting polymers with different dopants have been synthesized and applied as the cathode catalyst in Li-O{sub 2} batteries. Polypyrrole polymers exhibited an effective catalytic activity towards oxygen reduction in lithium oxygen batteries. It was discovered that dopant significantly influenced the electrochemical performance of polypyrrole. The polypyrrole doped with Cl{sup −} demonstrated higher capacity and more stable cyclability than that doped with ClO{sub 4}{sup −}. Polypyrrole conducting polymers also exhibited higher capacity and better cycling performance than that of carbon black catalysts.

  13. Metal-air batteries: from oxygen reduction electrochemistry to cathode catalysts.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Fangyi; Chen, Jun

    2012-03-21

    Because of the remarkably high theoretical energy output, metal-air batteries represent one class of promising power sources for applications in next-generation electronics, electrified transportation and energy storage of smart grids. The most prominent feature of a metal-air battery is the combination of a metal anode with high energy density and an air electrode with open structure to draw cathode active materials (i.e., oxygen) from air. In this critical review, we present the fundamentals and recent advances related to the fields of metal-air batteries, with a focus on the electrochemistry and materials chemistry of air electrodes. The battery electrochemistry and catalytic mechanism of oxygen reduction reactions are discussed on the basis of aqueous and organic electrolytes. Four groups of extensively studied catalysts for the cathode oxygen reduction/evolution are selectively surveyed from materials chemistry to electrode properties and battery application: Pt and Pt-based alloys (e.g., PtAu nanoparticles), carbonaceous materials (e.g., graphene nanosheets), transition-metal oxides (e.g., Mn-based spinels and perovskites), and inorganic-organic composites (e.g., metal macrocycle derivatives). The design and optimization of air-electrode structure are also outlined. Furthermore, remarks on the challenges and perspectives of research directions are proposed for further development of metal-air batteries (219 references). PMID:22254234

  14. Electrorefining cell with parallel electrode/concentric cylinder cathode

    DOEpatents

    Gay, E.C.; Miller, W.E.; Laidler, J.J.

    1997-07-22

    A cathode-anode arrangement for use in an electrolytic cell is adapted for electrochemically refining spent nuclear fuel from a nuclear reactor and recovering purified uranium for further treatment and possible recycling as a fresh blanket or core fuel in a nuclear reactor. The arrangement includes a plurality of inner anodic dissolution baskets that are each attached to a respective support rod, are submerged in a molten lithium halide salt, and are rotationally displaced. An inner hollow cylindrical-shaped cathode is concentrically disposed about the inner anodic dissolution baskets. Concentrically disposed about the inner cathode in a spaced manner are a plurality of outer anodic dissolution baskets, while an outer hollow cylindrical-shaped is disposed about the outer anodic dissolution baskets. Uranium is transported from the anode baskets and deposited in a uniform cylindrical shape on the inner and outer cathode cylinders by rotating the anode baskets within the molten lithium halide salt. Scrapers located on each anode basket abrade and remove the spent fuel deposits on the surfaces of the inner and outer cathode cylinders, with the spent fuel falling to the bottom of the cell for removal. Cell resistance is reduced and uranium deposition rate enhanced by increasing the electrode area and reducing the anode-cathode spacing. Collection efficiency is enhanced by trapping and recovery of uranium dendrites scrapped off of the cylindrical cathodes which may be greater in number than two. 12 figs.

  15. Electrorefining cell with parallel electrode/concentric cylinder cathode

    DOEpatents

    Gay, Eddie C.; Miller, William E.; Laidler, James J.

    1997-01-01

    A cathode-anode arrangement for use in an electrolytic cell is adapted for electrochemically refining spent nuclear fuel from a nuclear reactor and recovering purified uranium for further treatment and possible recycling as a fresh blanket or core fuel in a nuclear reactor. The arrangement includes a plurality of inner anodic dissolution baskets that are each attached to a respective support rod, are submerged in a molten lithium halide salt, and are rotationally displaced. An inner hollow cylindrical-shaped cathode is concentrically disposed about the inner anodic dissolution baskets. Concentrically disposed about the inner cathode in a spaced manner are a plurality of outer anodic dissolution baskets, while an outer hollow cylindrical-shaped is disposed about the outer anodic dissolution baskets. Uranium is transported from the anode baskets and deposited in a uniform cylindrical shape on the inner and outer cathode cylinders by rotating the anode baskets within the molten lithium halide salt. Scrapers located on each anode basket abrade and remove the spent fuel deposits on the surfaces of the inner and outer cathode cylinders, with the spent fuel falling to the bottom of the cell for removal. Cell resistance is reduced and uranium deposition rate enhanced by increasing the electrode area and reducing the anode-cathode spacing. Collection efficiency is enhanced by trapping and recovery of uranium dendrites scrapped off of the cylindrical cathodes which may be greater in number than two.

  16. Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Nanoparticle-Carbon Nanofiber Composite as an Efficient Metal-Free Cathode Catalyst for Oxygen Reduction Reaction.

    PubMed

    Panomsuwan, Gasidit; Saito, Nagahiro; Ishizaki, Takahiro

    2016-03-23

    Metal-free nitrogen-doped carbon materials are currently considered at the forefront of potential alternative cathode catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in fuel cell technology. Despite numerous efforts in this area over the past decade, rational design and development of a new catalyst system based on nitrogen-doped carbon materials via an innovative approach still present intriguing challenges in ORR catalysis research. Herein, a new kind of nitrogen-doped carbon nanoparticle-carbon nanofiber (NCNP-CNF) composite with highly efficient and stable ORR catalytic activity has been developed via a new approach assisted by a solution plasma process. The integration of NCNPs and CNFs by the solution plasma process can lead to a unique morphological feature and modify physicochemical properties. The NCNP-CNF composite exhibits a significantly enhanced ORR activity through a dominant four-electron pathway in an alkaline solution. The enhancement in ORR activity of NCNP-CNF composite can be attributed to the synergistic effects of good electron transport from highly graphitized CNFs as well as abundance of exposed catalytic sites and meso/macroporosity from NCNPs. More importantly, NCNP-CNF composite reveals excellent long-term durability and high tolerance to methanol crossover compared with those of a commercial 20 wt % supported on Vulcan XC-72. We expect that NCNP-CNF composite prepared by this synthetic approach can be a promising metal-free cathode catalyst candidate for ORR in fuel cells and metal-air batteries. PMID:26908214

  17. Hybrid binuclear-cobalt-phthalocyanine as oxygen reduction reaction catalyst in single chamber microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Baitao; Zhou, Xiuxiu; Wang, Xiujun; Liu, Bingchuan; Li, Baikun

    2014-12-01

    A novel hybrid binuclear-cobalt-phthalocyanine (Bi-CoPc) is developed as the cathode catalyst to replace the costly platinum (Pt) in single chamber microbial fuel cells (SCMFCs). Bi-CoPc/C is integrated with metal oxides (NiO and CoO) to form macrocyclic complex for enhanced oxygen reduction rate (ORR). The characteristics of hybrid catalysts (Bi-CoPc/C-CoO and Bi-CoPc/C-NiO) are compared with Co-contained catalysts (CoPc/C and Bi-CoPc/C) and metal oxide catalysts (NiO and CoO). The increase in O and N functional groups indicates the benefits of NiO and CoO to the cathode catalysts. The cyclic voltammetry (CV) shows the reduction peak for Bi-CoPc/C-NiO and Bi-CoPc/C-CoO at -0.12 V and -0.22 V, respectively. The power densities (368 mW m-2 and 400 mW m-2) of SCMFCs with Bi-CoPc/C-CoO and Bi-CoPc-NiO/C are the highest among the cathodes tested, and close to that of Pt (450 mW m-2). This study demonstrates that hybrid Bi-CoPc/C with metal oxides has a great potential as a cost-effective catalyst in MFCs.

  18. Metal-catalyst-free carbohydrazide fuel cells with three-dimensional graphene anodes.

    PubMed

    Qi, Ji; Benipal, Neeva; Wang, Hui; Chadderdon, David J; Jiang, Yibo; Wei, Wei; Hu, Yun Hang; Li, Wenzhen

    2015-04-13

    As a potential solution to concerns on sustainable energy, the wide spread commercialization of fuel cell has long been hindered by limited reserves and relatively high costs of metal catalysts. 3D graphene, a carbon-only catalyst prepared by reduction of carbon monoxide with lithium oxide, is found to electrochemically catalyze carbohydrazide oxidation reaction efficiently. A prototype of a completely metal-catalyst-free anion exchange membrane fuel cell (AEMFC) with a 3D graphene anode catalyst and an N-doped CNT (N-CNT) cathode catalyst generate a peak power density of 24.9 mW cm(-2) . The average number of electrons electrochemically extracted from one carbohydrazide molecule is 4.9, indicating the existence of CN bond activation, which is a key factor contributing to high fuel utilization efficiency. PMID:25469500

  19. Performance and durability of anode-supported flat-tubular solid oxide fuel cells with Ag-infiltrated cathodes.

    PubMed

    Pi, Seuk-Hoon; Lee, Jong-Won; Lee, Seung-Bok; Lim, Tak-Hyoung; Park, Seok-Joo; Park, Chong-Ook; Song, Rak-Hyun

    2014-10-01

    An anode-supported flat-tubular solid oxide fuel cell is an advanced cell design, which offers many advantages including a high volumetric power density, a minimized sealing area and a high resistance to thermal cycling. Infiltration of nano-sized noble metal catalysts into a porous cathode is known to be an effective method to improve cathode performances at reduced temperatures, but the cathode stability is of potential concern. This study addresses the performance and durability of anode-supported flat-tubular solid oxide fuel cells with Ag-infiltrated cathodes. Uniformly dispersed Ag nanoparticles on the cathode are formed via a wet infiltration technique combined with subsequent heat-treatment. Although the Ag infiltration results in improved cell performance, the durability tests indicate that the cell performance degrades over time and that the degradation rate increases with increasing Ag loading in the cathode. The observed performance degradation is mainly attributed to formation of large-scale Ag agglomerates. A strategy based on an inter-dispersed composite of Ag and CeO2 nanoparticles is proposed to mitigate the performance degradation. PMID:25942845

  20. Functionally Graded Cathodes for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    YongMan Choi; Meilin Liu

    2006-09-30

    This DOE SECA project focused on both experimental and theoretical understanding of oxygen reduction processes in a porous mixed-conducting cathode in a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). Elucidation of the detailed oxygen reduction mechanism, especially the rate-limiting step(s), is critical to the development of low-temperature SOFCs (400 C to 700 C) and to cost reduction since much less expensive materials may be used for cell components. However, cell performance at low temperatures is limited primarily by the interfacial polarization resistances, specifically by those associated with oxygen reduction at the cathode, including transport of oxygen gas through the porous cathode, the adsorption of oxygen onto the cathode surface, the reduction and dissociation of the oxygen molecule (O{sub 2}) into the oxygen ion (O{sup 2-}), and the incorporation of the oxygen ion into the electrolyte. In order to most effectively enhance the performance of the cathode at low temperatures, we must understand the mechanism and kinetics of the elementary processes at the interfaces. Under the support of this DOE SECA project, our accomplishments included: (1) Experimental determination of the rate-limiting step in the oxygen reduction mechanism at the cathode using in situ FTIR and Raman spectroscopy, including surface- and tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS and TERS). (2) Fabrication and testing of micro-patterned cathodes to compare the relative activity of the TPB to the rest of the cathode surface. (3) Construction of a mathematical model to predict cathode performance based on different geometries and microstructures and analyze the kinetics of oxygen-reduction reactions occurring at charged mixed ionic-electronic conductors (MIECs) using two-dimensional finite volume models with ab initio calculations. (4) Fabrication of cathodes that are graded in composition and microstructure to generate large amounts of active surface area near the cathode/electrolyte interface using a

  1. Membrane catalyst layer for fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Mahlon S.

    1993-01-01

    A gas reaction fuel cell incorporates a thin catalyst layer between a solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) membrane and a porous electrode backing. The catalyst layer is preferably less than about 10 .mu.m in thickness with a carbon supported platinum catalyst loading less than about 0.35 mgPt/cm.sup.2. The film is formed as an ink that is spread and cured on a film release blank. The cured film is then transferred to the SPE membrane and hot pressed into the surface to form a catalyst layer having a controlled thickness and catalyst distribution. Alternatively, the catalyst layer is formed by applying a Na.sup.+ form of a perfluorosulfonate ionomer directly to the membrane, drying the film at a high temperature, and then converting the film back to the protonated form of the ionomer. The layer has adequate gas permeability so that cell performance is not affected and has a density and particle distribution effective to optimize proton access to the catalyst and electronic continuity for electron flow from the half-cell reaction occurring at the catalyst.

  2. Oxide Fiber Cathode Materials for Rechargeable Lithium Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, Catherine E.; Welker, Mark F.

    2008-01-01

    LiCoO2 and LiNiO2 fibers have been investigated as alternatives to LiCoO2 and LiNiO2 powders used as lithium-intercalation compounds in cathodes of rechargeable lithium-ion electrochemical cells. In making such a cathode, LiCoO2 or LiNiO2 powder is mixed with a binder [e.g., poly(vinylidene fluoride)] and an electrically conductive additive (usually carbon) and the mixture is pressed to form a disk. The binder and conductive additive contribute weight and volume, reducing the specific energy and energy density, respectively. In contrast, LiCoO2 or LiNiO2 fibers can be pressed and sintered to form a cathode, without need for a binder or a conductive additive. The inter-grain contacts of the fibers are stronger and have fewer defects than do those of powder particles. These characteristics translate to increased flexibility and greater resilience on cycling and, consequently, to reduced loss of capacity from cycle to cycle. Moreover, in comparison with a powder-based cathode, a fiber-based cathode is expected to exhibit significantly greater ionic and electronic conduction along the axes of the fibers. Results of preliminary charge/discharge-cycling tests suggest that energy densities of LiCoO2- and LiNiO2-fiber cathodes are approximately double those of the corresponding powder-based cathodes.

  3. Photoconductive Cathode Interlayer for Highly Efficient Inverted Polymer Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Nian, Li; Zhang, Wenqiang; Zhu, Na; Liu, Linlin; Xie, Zengqi; Wu, Hongbin; Würthner, Frank; Ma, Yuguang

    2015-06-10

    A highly photoconductive cathode interlayer was achieved by doping a 1 wt % light absorber, such as perylene bisimide, into a ZnO thin film, which absorbs a very small amount of light but shows highly increased conductivity of 4.50 × 10(-3) S/m under sunlight. Photovoltaic devices based on this kind of photoactive cathode interlayer exhibit significantly improved device performance, which is rather insensitive to the thickness of the cathode interlayer over a broad range. Moreover, a power conversion efficiency as high as 10.5% was obtained by incorporation of our photoconductive cathode interlayer with the PTB7-Th:PC71BM active layer, which is one of the best results for single-junction polymer solar cells. PMID:26016386

  4. Autotrophic nitrite removal in the cathode of microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Puig, Sebastià; Serra, Marc; Vilar-Sanz, Ariadna; Cabré, Marina; Bañeras, Lluís; Colprim, Jesús; Balaguer, M Dolors

    2011-03-01

    Nitrification to nitrite (nitritation process) followed by reduction to dinitrogen gas decreases the energy demand and the carbon requirements of the overall process of nitrogen removal. This work studies autotrophic nitrite removal in the cathode of microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Special attention was paid to determining whether nitrite is used as the electron acceptor by exoelectrogenic bacteria (biologic reaction) or by graphite electrodes (abiotic reaction). The results demonstrated that, after a nitrate pulse at the cathode, nitrite was initially accumulated; subsequently, nitrite was removed. Nitrite and nitrate can be used interchangeably as an electron acceptor by exoelectrogenic bacteria for nitrogen reduction from wastewater while producing bioelectricity. However, if oxygen is present in the cathode chamber, nitrite is oxidised via biological or electrochemical processes. The identification of a dominant bacterial member similar to Oligotropha carboxidovorans confirms that autotrophic denitrification is the main metabolism mechanism in the cathode of an MFC. PMID:21262566

  5. Cathode preparation method for molten carbonate fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Smith, James L.; Sim, James W.; Kucera, Eugenia H.

    1988-01-01

    A method of preparing a porous cathode structure for use in a molten carbonate fuel cell begins by providing a porous integral plaque of sintered nickel oxide particles. The nickel oxide plaque can be obtained by oxidizing a sintered plaque of nickel metal or by compacting and sintering finely divided nickel oxide particles to the desired pore structure. The porous sintered nickel oxide plaque is contacted with a lithium salt for a sufficient time to lithiate the nickel oxide structure and thus enhance its electronic conductivity. The lithiation can be carried out either within an operating fuel cell or prior to assembling the plaque as a cathode within the fuel cell.

  6. Magnetron cathodes in plasma electrode pockels cells

    DOEpatents

    Rhodes, Mark A.

    1995-01-01

    Magnetron cathodes, which produce high current discharges, form greatly improved plasma electrodes on each side of an electro-optic crystal. The plasma electrode has a low pressure gas region on both sides of the crystal. When the gas is ionized, e.g., by a glow discharge in the low pressure gas, the plasma formed is a good conductor. The gas electrode acts as a highly uniform conducting electrode. Since the plasma is transparent to a high energy laser beam passing through the crystal, the plasma is transparent. A crystal exposed from two sides to such a plasma can be charged up uniformly to any desired voltage. A typical configuration utilizes helium at 50 millitorr operating. pressure and 2 kA discharge current. The magnetron cathode produces a more uniform plasma and allows a reduced operating pressure which leads to lower plasma resistivity and a more uniform charge on the crystal.

  7. Magnetron cathodes in plasma electrode Pockels cells

    DOEpatents

    Rhodes, M.A.

    1995-04-25

    Magnetron cathodes, which produce high current discharges, form greatly improved plasma electrodes on each side of an electro-optic crystal. The plasma electrode has a low pressure gas region on both sides of the crystal. When the gas is ionized, e.g., by a glow discharge in the low pressure gas, the plasma formed is a good conductor. The gas electrode acts as a highly uniform conducting electrode. Since the plasma is transparent to a high energy laser beam passing through the crystal, the plasma is transparent. A crystal exposed from two sides to such a plasma can be charged up uniformly to any desired voltage. A typical configuration utilizes helium at 50 millitorr operating pressure and 2 kA discharge current. The magnetron cathode produces a more uniform plasma and allows a reduced operating pressure which leads to lower plasma resistivity and a more uniform charge on the crystal. 5 figs.

  8. Numerical study of the cathode electrode in the Microfluidic Fuel Cell using agglomerate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moein-Jahromi, M.; Movahed, S.; Kermani, M. J.

    2015-03-01

    Simulation of the cathode electrode of a Microfluidic Fuel Cell (hereafter MFC) is performed with focus on the electrochemical reaction. Oxygen transport phenomena are modeled from the microchannel inlet to the reaction sites surface (on the platinum particles) in the catalyst layer. The dissolved oxygen in sulfuric acid and the formic acid are considered as the oxidant and the fuel, respectively. The cathode catalyst layer is modeled using the agglomerate model versus the homogenous model which is incapable of predicting concentration loss at high current densities. The results are validated versus the experiments of Choban et al. published in 2004. A set of parametric study is performed to investigate the influence of operating and structural parameters on the cell performance; at the end, a sensitivity analysis is implemented to rank the studied parameters with rank 1 for the most influential parameters. The results indicate that oxygen concentration at the inlet of microchannel within the range 0.1 M-0.7 M is the most influential parameter, and the cell performance can enhance by 2.615 W m-2 at the studied range. The results could be used by the microfluidic fuel cell manufacturers to overcome the current drawbacks of the MFCs.

  9. Co3O4 nanoparticle-modified MnO2 nanotube bifunctional oxygen cathode catalysts for rechargeable zinc-air batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Guojun; Liu, Xiaogang; Zong, Yun; Hor, T. S. Andy; Yu, Aishui; Liu, Zhaolin

    2013-05-01

    We report the preparation of MnO2 nanotubes functionalized with Co3O4 nanoparticles and their use as bifunctional air cathode catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction and oxygen evolution reaction in rechargeable zinc-air batteries. These hybrid MnO2/Co3O4 nanomaterials exhibit enhanced catalytic reactivity toward oxygen evolution reaction under alkaline conditions compared with that in the presence of MnO2 nanotubes or Co3O4 nanoparticles alone.We report the preparation of MnO2 nanotubes functionalized with Co3O4 nanoparticles and their use as bifunctional air cathode catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction and oxygen evolution reaction in rechargeable zinc-air batteries. These hybrid MnO2/Co3O4 nanomaterials exhibit enhanced catalytic reactivity toward oxygen evolution reaction under alkaline conditions compared with that in the presence of MnO2 nanotubes or Co3O4 nanoparticles alone. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Zinc-air cell device, XPS survey scan and power density of the cell. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr00300k

  10. Extended Platinum Nanotubes as Fuel Cell Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Alia, S.; Pivovar, B. S.; Yan, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Energy consumption has relied principally on fossil fuels as an energy source; fuel cells, however, can provide a clean and sustainable alternative, an answer to the depletion and climate change concerns of fossil fuels. Within proton exchange membrane fuel cells, high catalyst cost and poor durability limit the commercial viability of the device. Recently, platinum nanotubes (PtNTs) were studied as durable, active catalysts, providing a platform to meet US Department of Energy vehicular activity targets.[1] Porous PtNTs were developed to increase nanotube surface area, improving mass activity for oxygen reduction without sacrificing durability.[2] Subsurface platinum was then replaced with palladium, forming platinum-coated palladium nanotubes.[3] By forming a core shell structure, platinum utilization was increased, reducing catalyst cost. Alternative substrates have also been examined, modifying platinum surface facets and increasing oxygen reduction specific activity. Through modification of the PtNT platform, catalyst limitations can be reduced, ensuring a commercially viable device.

  11. Cathode side hardware for carbonate fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Xu, Gengfu; Yuh, Chao-Yi

    2011-04-05

    Carbonate fuel cathode side hardware having a thin coating of a conductive ceramic formed from one of Perovskite AMeO.sub.3, wherein A is at least one of lanthanum and a combination of lanthanum and strontium and Me is one or more of transition metals, lithiated NiO (Li.sub.xNiO, where x is 0.1 to 1) and X-doped LiMeO.sub.2, wherein X is one of Mg, Ca, and Co.

  12. Functionally graded composite cathodes for solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, N. T.; Brandon, N. P.; Day, M. J.; Lapeña-Rey, N.

    Functionally graded solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) cathodes have been prepared from mixtures of strontium-doped lanthanum manganite (LSM) and gadolinia-doped ceria (CGO) using slurry spraying techniques. Similar samples were also prepared from mixtures of LSM and ytrria-stabilised zirconia (YSZ). A current collector comprising a mixture of LSM and strontium-doped lanthanum cobaltite (LSCO) was then applied to both cathode types. Samples were characterised using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Characterisation using EIS techniques showed that cathodes incorporating CGO into the structure gave improved performance over those fabricated using YSZ. These performance gains were most noticeable as the temperature was decreased towards 700 °C, and were maintained during the testing of three cell membrane electrode assemblies fabricated to the Rolls-Royce design.

  13. Fuel cell having dual electrode anode or cathode

    DOEpatents

    Findl, E.

    1984-04-10

    A fuel cell that is characterized by including a dual electrode anode that is operable to simultaneously electro-oxidize a gaseous fuel and a liquid fuel. In alternative embodiments, a fuel cell having a single electrode anode is provided with a dual electrode cathode that is operable to simultaneously reduce a gaseous oxidant and a liquid oxidant to electro-oxidize a fuel supplied to the cell.

  14. Fuel cell having dual electrode anode or cathode

    DOEpatents

    Findl, Eugene

    1985-01-01

    A fuel cell that is characterized by including a dual electrode anode that is operable to simultaneously electro-oxidize a gaseous fuel and a liquid fuel. In alternative embodiments, a fuel cell having a single electrode anode is provided with a dual electrode cathode that is operable to simultaneously reduce a gaseous oxidant and a liquid oxidant to electro-oxidize a fuel supplied to the cell.

  15. Catalysts compositions for use in fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, Steven S.C.

    2015-12-01

    The present invention generally relates to the generation of electrical energy from a solid-state fuel. In one embodiment, the present invention relates to a solid-oxide fuel cell for generating electrical energy from a carbon-based fuel, and to catalysts for use in a solid-oxide fuel cell.

  16. Influence of the cathode architecture in the frequency response of self-breathing proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira-Aparicio, P.; Chaparro, A. M.

    2014-12-01

    Self-breathing proton exchange membrane fuel cells are apparently simple devices, but efficient water management is critical for their performance. The cathode configuration should guarantee balanced rates between O2 accessibility from the circumventing air and H2O removal, and a good electric contact between catalyst layers and current collectors at the same time. By applying progressive modifications to the initial concept of a conventional PEMFC, the effect of the cathode architecture on cell performance has been analyzed. Frequency response analyses of the cell during steady-state potentiostatic stepping have yielded relevant information regarding limitations originated by the cathode impedance under high current load conditions. The primitive cell design has been optimized for self-breathing operation by means of this diagnostic tool. The thickness of the perforated plate in the cathode has been found to be one of the main factors contributing to limit oxygen accessibility when a high current load is demanded. Adequate cathode architecture is critical for reducing mass transport limitations in the catalytic layer and enhancing performance under self-breathing conditions.

  17. Molybdenum In Cathodes Of Sodium/Metal Chloride Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugga, Ratnakumar V.; Attia, Alan I.; Halpert, Gerald

    1992-01-01

    Cyclic voltammetric curves of molybdenum wire in NaAlCl4 melt indicate molybdenum chloride useful as cathode material in rechargeable sodium/metal chloride electrochemical cells. Batteries used in electric vehicles, for electric-power load leveling, and other applications involving high energy and power densities.

  18. Efficient Pt catalysts for polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fournier, J.; Gaubert, G.; Tilquin, J.Y.

    1996-12-31

    Commercialization of polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) requires an important decrease in their production cost. Cost reduction for the electrodes principally concerns the decrease in the amount of Pt catalyst necessary for the functioning of the PEFC without affecting cell performance. The first PEFCs used in the Gemini Space Program had a loading of 4-10 mg pt/cm{sup 2}. The cost of the electrodes was drastically reduced when pure colloidal Pt was replaced by Pt supported on carbon (Pt/C) with a Pt content of 0.4 Mg/cm{sup 2}. Since the occurrence of that breakthrough, many studies have been aimed at further lowering the Pt loading. Today, the lowest loadings reported for oxygen reduction are of the order of 0.05 mg pt/cm{sup 2}. The carbon support of commercial catalysts is Vulcan XC-72 from Cabot, a carbon black with a specific area of 254 m{sup 2}/g. Graphites with specific areas ranging from 20 to 305 m{sup 2}/g are now available from Lonza. The first aim of the present study was to determine the catalytic properties for 02 reduction of Pt supported on these high specific area graphites. The second aim was to use Pt inclusion synthesis on these high area graphites, and to measure the catalytic performances of these materials. Lastly, this same Pt-inclusion synthesis was extended even for use with Vulcan and Black Pearls as substrates (two carbon blacks from Cabot). All these catalysts have been labelled Pt-included materials to distinguish them from the Pt-supported ones. It will be shown that the reduced Pt content Pt-included materials obtained with high specific area substrates a are excellent catalysts for oxygen reduction, especially at high currents. Therefore, Pt inclusion synthesis appears to be a new method to decrease the cathodic Pt loading.

  19. Lithium ferrate and lithium cobaltate cathodes for molten carbonate fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Krumpelt, M.; Roche, M.; Bloom, I.; Indacochea, J.E.; Kucera, G.

    1994-08-01

    The objective of this research is to develop cathodes for the molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFC) having a performance approaching that of the lithiated nickel oxide cathode and a significantly greater life, particularly in pressurized MCFCs. To meet this objective, cathodes containing either doubly doped lithium ferrate or lithium cobaltate are being developed. In this project, the authors are optimizing the composition, microstructure, and loading density of the doubly doped lithium ferrate cathode and the lithium cobaltate cathodes.

  20. Fuel Cell Cathode Contamination: Comparison of Prevention Strategies and their Viability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tejaswi, Arjun

    Fuel cells are a major area of research in ongoing efforts to find alternate sources of energy. Today these efforts have become ever the more necessary in the face of spiraling costs of conventional sources of energy and concerns about global warming. Most fuel cells consume hydrogen to produce, for the most part, only water in their exhaust. They are also capable of achieving significantly higher efficiencies than conventional automobile internal combustion engines. Since cost still remains one of the most intractable challenges to the advent of fuel cells, it is imperative that every effort be made to lower the costs of fuel cell production, operation and maintenance as well as improving overall efficiency. The air circulation system of a fuel cell is designed to provide oxygen to the cathode of the fuel cell. Air taken from the surroundings, however, often contains pollutants including dust, SO2, NO 2 and various other gases. These gases may severely degrade various components of system, especially for polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) type fuel cells, including the catalyst, membrane electrode assembly and other components. Moreover, these pollutants may lead to specific behavior based on ambient air composition at the test site thereby confusing researchers. In order to address these issues, this study seeks to identify these pollutants and examine the mitigation strategies to mitigate them. Also discussed is whether these pollutants have an effect debilitating enough to justify the extra cost and potential parasitic losses associated with these mitigation strategies. Adsorptive filtration is identified as the most appropriate cathode side air quality system for fuel cells. Performance of cathode side fuel cell filters are examined under varying relative humidity, temperature, air flow rate and pollutant concentration conditions. An estimated filter survival time under realistic conditions is also suggested.

  1. Electrocatalysis for dioxygen reduction by a μ-oxo decavanadium complex in alkaline medium and its application to a cathode catalyst in air batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewi, Eniya Listiani; Oyaizu, Kenichi; Nishide, Hiroyuki; Tsuchida, Eishun

    The redox behavior of a decavanadium complex [(VO) 10(μ 2-O) 9(μ 3-O) 3(C 5H 7O 2) 6] ( 1) was studied using cyclic voltammetry under acidic and basic conditions. The reduction potential of V(V) was found at less positive potentials for higher pH electrolyte solutions. The oxygen reduction at complex 1 immobilized on a modified electrode was examined using cyclic voltammetry and rotating ring-disk electrode techniques in the 1 M KOH solutions. On the basis of measurements using a rotating disk electrode (RDE), the complex 1 was found to be highly active for the direct four-electron reduction of dioxygen at -0.2 V versus saturated calomel electrode (SCE). The complex 1 as a reduction catalyst of O 2 with a high selectivity was demonstrated using rotating ring-disk voltammograms in alkaline solutions. The application of complex 1 as an oxygen reduction catalyst at the cathode of zinc-air cell was also examined. The zinc-air cell with the modified electrode showed a stable discharge potential at approximately 1 V with discharge capacity of 80 mAh g -1 which was about five times larger than that obtained with the commonly used manganese dioxide catalyst.

  2. Inert Anode/Cathode Program: Fiscal Year 1986 annual report. [For Hall-Heroult cells

    SciTech Connect

    Brenden, B.B.; Davis, N.C.; Koski, O.H.; Marschman, S.C.; Pool, K.H.; Schilling, C.H.; Windisch, C.F.; Wrona, B.J.

    1987-06-01

    Purpose of the program is to develop long-lasting, energy-efficient anodes, cathodes, and ancillary equipment for Hall-Heroult cells used by the aluminum industry. The program is divided into four tasks: Inert Anode Development, Cathode Materials Evaluation, Cathode Bonding Development, and Sensor Development. To devise sensors to control the chemistry of Hall-Heroult cells using stable anodes and cathodes. This report highlights the major FY86 technical accomplishments, which are presented in the following sections: Management, Materials Development, Materials Evaluation, Thermodynamic Evaluation, Laboratory Cell Tests, Large-Scale Tests, Cathode Materials Evaluation, Cathode Bonding Development, and Sensor Development.

  3. Cells having cathodes with thiocyanogen-containing cathode-active materials

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, B.M.

    1980-03-11

    An electric current-producing cell which contains: (A) an anode metal higher than hydrogen in the electromotive series and having an atomic number no greater than 30; (B) a cathode material containing thiocyanogen, said material being selected from the group consisting of: (I) thiocyanogen of the formula: (ScN)/sub 2/ (II) parathiocyanogen of the formula: (ScN)/sub x/ wherein X is greater than 2; (III) halothiocyanogen of the formula: YScN wherein Y is a halogen selected from the group consisting of F, Cl, Br and I; (IV) parahalothiocyanogen of the formula: (YScN)/sub y/ wherein Y is as described above and wherein Y is equal to or greater than 2; (V) perthiocyanogen complex of an amine; (VI) perthiocyanogen complex of an ammonium ion; (VII) thiocyanogen complex of a metal cation which is the same as the metal cation in the anode; (VIII) thiocyanogen complex of a metal cation which is higher in the electromotive series than the metal cation in the anode; (IX) cathode intercalated material having halothiocyanogen of paragraph (III) above intercalated therein; (X) cathode intercalated material having parahalothiocyanogen of paragraph (IV) above intercalated therein; (XI) polymeric thiocyanogen-containing material obtained from oxidation of a polyvinyl thiocyanate; (XII) ammonium thiocyanate salt complex of thiocyanogen of paragraph (I) above; (XIII) ammonium thiocyanate salt complex of parathiocyanogen of paragraph (II) above; (XIV) ammonium thiocyanate salt complex of halothiocyanogen of paragraph (III) above; and (XV) ammonium thiocyanate salt complex of parahalothiocyanogen of paragraph (IV) above; and (C) an electrolyte which is chemically inert with respect to said anode and said cathode.

  4. TOPICAL REVIEW: Nanostructured catalysts in fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Chuan-Jian; Luo, Jin; Fang, Bin; Wanjala, Bridgid N.; Njoki, Peter N.; Loukrakpam, Rameshwori; Yin, Jun

    2010-02-01

    One of the most important challenges for the ultimate commercialization of fuel cells is the preparation of active, robust, and low-cost catalysts. This review highlights some findings of our investigations in the last few years in developing advanced approaches to nanostructured catalysts that address this challenge. Emphasis is placed on nanoengineering-based fabrication, processing, and characterization of multimetallic nanoparticles with controllable size (1-10 nm), shape, composition (e.g. MlnM2100-n, M1nM2mM3100-n-m, M1@M2, where M (1 or 2) = Pt, Co, Ni, V, Fe, Cu, Pd, W, Ag, Au etc) and morphology (e.g. alloy, core@shell etc). In addition to an overview of the fundamental issues and the recent progress in fuel cell catalysts, results from evaluations of the electrocatalytic performance of nanoengineered catalysts in fuel cell reactions are discussed. This approach differs from other traditional approaches to the preparation of supported catalysts in the ability to control the particle size, composition, phase, and surface properties. An understanding of how the nanoscale properties of the multimetallic nanoparticles differ from their bulk-scale counterparts, and how the interaction between the nanoparticles and the support materials relates to the size sintering or evolution in the thermal activation process, is also discussed. The fact that the bimetallic gold-platinum nanoparticle system displays a single-phase character different from the miscibility gap known for its bulk-scale counterpart serves as an important indication of the nanoscale manipulation of the structural properties, which is useful for refining the design and preparation of the bimetallic catalysts. The insight gained from probing how nanoparticle-nanoparticle and nanoparticle-substrate interactions relate to the size evolution in the activation process of nanoparticles on planar substrates serves as an important guiding principle in the control of nanoparticle sintering on different

  5. Effects of Membrane- and Catalyst-layer-thickness Nonuniformitiesin Polymer-electrolyte Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Adam Z.; Newman, John

    2006-09-01

    In this paper, results from mathematical, pseudo 2-D simulations are shown for four different along-the-channel thickness distributions of both the membrane and cathode catalyst layer. The results and subsequent analysis clearly demonstrate that for the membrane thickness distributions, cell performance is affected a few percent under low relative-humidity conditions and that the position along the gas channel is more important than the local thickness variations. However, for the catalyst-layer thickness distributions, global performance is not impacted, although for saturated conditions there is a large variability in the local temperature and performance depending on the thickness.

  6. Nanostructured Catalyst Systems for Fuel Cells: Synthesis and Characterization of Low Platinum Content Electrocatalysts for O{sub 2} Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Adzic, Radoslav

    2007-02-01

    The objective of this project is to synthesize and characterize new O{sub 2} reduction catalysts with enhanced activity and ultra low Pt loading, and to test them in membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) to determine their performance under fuel cell cathode operating conditions.

  7. Lithium-ferrate-based cathodes for molten carbonate fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lanagan, M.T.; Bloom, I.; Kaun, T.D.

    1996-12-31

    Argonne National Laboratory is developing advanced cathodes for pressurized operation of the molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) at {approximately}650{degrees}C. To be economically viable for stationary power generation, molten carbonate fuel cells must have lifetimes of more than 25,000 h while exhibiting superior cell performance. In the present technology, lithiated NiO is used as the cathode. Over the lifetime of the cell, however, N{sup 2+} ions tend to transport to the anode, where they are reduced to metallic Ni. With increased CO{sub 2} partial pressure, the transport of Ni increases because of the increased solubility of NiO in the carbonate electrolyte. Although this process is slow in MCFCs operated at 1 atm and a low CO{sub 2} partial pressure (about 0.1 atm), transport of nickel to the anode may be excessive at a higher pressure (e.g., 3 atm) and a high CO{sub 2} partial pressure (e.g., about 0.3 arm). This transport is expected to lead eventually to poor MCFC performance and/or short circuiting. Several alternative cathode compositions have been explored to reduce cathode solubility in the molten salt electrolyte. For example, LiCoO{sub 2} has been studied extensively as a potential cathode material. The LiCoO{sub 2} cathode has a low resistivity, about 10-cm, and can be used as a direct substitute for NiO. Argonne is developing advanced cathodes based on lithium ferrate (LiFeO{sub 2}), which is attractive because of its very low solubility in the molten (Li,K){sub 2}CO{sub 3} electrolyte. Because of its high resistivity (about 3000-cm), however, LiFeO{sub 2} cannot be used as a direct substitute for NiO. Cation substitution is, therefore, necessary to decrease resistivity. We determined the effect of cation substitution on the resistivity and deformation of LiFeO{sub 2}. The substituents were chosen because their respective oxides as well as LiFeO{sub 2} crystallize with the rock-salt structure.

  8. Model of cathode reaction resistance in molten carbonate fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, H.; Mugikura, Y.; Izaki, Y.; Watanabe, T.; Abe, T.

    1998-05-01

    A model of the performance of a molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) is required to estimate the efficiency of an MCFC power plant or to simulate the internal state of a stack. The model should provide an accurate representation of the performance under various operating conditions. However, the performance estimated by previous models has been found to deviate from the measured performance under low oxygen and carbon dioxide cathode partial pressures. To solve this problem, the authors carried out a systematic analysis of the performance of several bench-scale cells operated under various cathode gas conditions and investigated a model of cathode polarization according to the oxygen reduction mechanism in molten carbonate. As a result, it has been clarified that the behavior of cathode polarization under various conditions is described well by the dependence of mixed diffusion of superoxide ion O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} and CO{sub 2} in the melt on the assumed partial pressures at each total operating pressure.

  9. Pt-Ni and Pt-Co Catalyst Synthesis Route for Fuel Cell Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Firdosy, Samad A.; Ravi, Vilupanur A.; Valdez, Thomas I.; Kisor, Adam; Narayan, Sri R.

    2013-01-01

    Oxygen reduction reactions (ORRs) at the cathode are the rate-limiting step in fuel cell performance. The ORR is 100 times slower than the corresponding hydrogen oxidation at the anode. Speeding up the reaction at the cathode will improve fuel cell efficiency. The cathode material is generally Pt powder painted onto a substrate (e.g., graphite paper). Recent efforts in the fuel cell area have focused on replacing Pt with Pt-X alloys (where X = Co, Ni, Zr, etc.) in order to (a) reduce cost, and (b) increase ORR rates. One of these strategies is to increase ORR rates by reducing the powder size, which would result in an increase in the surface area, thereby facilitating faster reaction rates. In this work, a process has been developed that creates Pt-Ni or Pt-Co alloys that are finely divided (on the nano scale) and provide equivalent performance at lower Pt loadings. Lower Pt loadings will translate to lower cost. Precursor salts of the metals are dissolved in water and mixed. Next, the salt mixtures are dried on a hot plate. Finally, the dried salt mixture is heattreated in a furnace under flowing reducing gas. The catalyst powder is then used to fabricate a membrane electrode assembly (MEA) for electrochemical performance testing. The Pt- Co catalyst-based MEA showed comparable performance to an MEA fabri cated using a standard Pt black fuel cell catalyst. The main objective of this program has been to increase the overall efficiencies of fuel cell systems to support power for manned lunar bases. This work may also have an impact on terrestrial programs, possibly to support the effort to develop a carbon-free energy source. This catalyst can be used to fabricate high-efficiency fuel cell units that can be used in space as regenerative fuel cell systems, and terrestrially as primary fuel cells. Terrestrially, this technology will become increasingly important when transition to a hydrogen economy occurs.

  10. Method of depositing a catalyst on a fuel cell electrode

    DOEpatents

    Dearnaley, Geoffrey; Arps, James H.

    2000-01-01

    Fuel cell electrodes comprising a minimal load of catalyst having maximum catalytic activity and a method of forming such fuel cell electrodes. The method comprises vaporizing a catalyst, preferably platinum, in a vacuum to form a catalyst vapor. A catalytically effective amount of the catalyst vapor is deposited onto a carbon catalyst support on the fuel cell electrode. The electrode preferably is carbon cloth. The method reduces the amount of catalyst needed for a high performance fuel cell electrode to about 0.3 mg/cm.sup.2 or less.

  11. Nanoscale alloying effect of gold-platinum nanoparticles as cathode catalysts on the performance of a rechargeable lithium-oxygen battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Jun; Fang, Bin; Luo, Jin; Wanjala, Bridgid; Mott, Derrick; Loukrakpam, Rameshowri; Ng, Mei Shan; Li, Zheng; Hong, Jian; Whittingham, M. Stanley; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2012-08-01

    The understanding of nanoscale alloying or the phase segregation effect of alloy nanoparticles on the catalytic properties is important for a rational design of the desired catalysts for a specific reaction. This paper describes findings of an investigation into this type of structural effect for carbon-supported bimetallic gold-platinum nanoparticles as cathode catalysts in a rechargeable lithium-oxygen battery. The nanoscale structural characteristics in terms of size, alloying and phase segregation were shown to affect the catalytic properties of the catalysts in the Li-O2 battery. In addition to the composition effect, the catalysts with a fully alloyed phase structure were found to exhibit a smaller discharge-charge voltage difference and a higher discharge capacity than those with a partial phase segregation structure. This finding is significant for the design of alloy nanoparticles as air cathode catalysts in rechargeable lithium-air batteries, demonstrating the importance of the control of the nanoscale composition and phase properties.

  12. Tolerance of non-platinum group metals cathodes proton exchange membrane fuel cells to air contaminants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reshetenko, Tatyana; Serov, Alexey; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Matanovic, Ivana; Sarah Stariha; Atanassov, Plamen

    2016-08-01

    The effects of major airborne contaminants (SO2, NO2 and CO) on the spatial performance of Fe/N/C cathode membrane electrode assemblies were studied using a segmented cell system. The injection of 2-10 ppm SO2 in air stream did not cause any performance decrease and redistribution of local currents due to the lack of stably adsorbed SO2 molecules on Fe-Nx sites, as confirmed by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The introduction of 5-20 ppm of CO into the air stream also did not affect fuel cell performance. The exposure of Fe/N/C cathodes to 2 and 10 ppm NO2 resulted in performance losses of 30 and 70-75 mV, respectively. DFT results showed that the adsorption energies of NO2 and NO were greater than that of O2, which accounted for the observed voltage decrease and slight current redistribution. The cell performance partially recovered when the NO2 injection was stopped. The long-term operation of the fuel cells resulted in cell performance degradation. XPS analyses of Fe/N/C electrodes revealed that the performance decrease was due to catalyst degradation and ionomer oxidation. The latter was accelerated in the presence of air contaminants. The details of the spatial performance and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy results are presented and discussed.

  13. Characterization and optimization of cathodic conditions for H2O2 synthesis in microbial electrochemical cells

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cathode potential and O2 supply methods were investigated to improve H2O2 synthesis in an electrochemical cell, and optimal cathode conditions were applied for microbial electrochemical cells (MECs). Using aqueous O2 for the cathode significantly improved current density, but H2...

  14. Doped lanthanum nickelates with a layered perovskite structure as bifunctional cathode catalysts for rechargeable metal-air batteries.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kyu-Nam; Jung, Jong-Hyuk; Im, Won Bin; Yoon, Sukeun; Shin, Kyung-Hee; Lee, Jong-Won

    2013-10-23

    Rechargeable metal-air batteries have attracted a great interest in recent years because of their high energy density. The critical challenges facing these technologies include the sluggish kinetics of the oxygen reduction-evolution reactions on a cathode (air electrode). Here, we report doped lanthanum nickelates (La2NiO4) with a layered perovskite structure that serve as efficient bifunctional electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction and evolution in an aqueous alkaline electrolyte. Rechargeable lithium-air and zinc-air batteries assembled with these catalysts exhibit remarkably reduced discharge-charge voltage gaps (improved round-trip efficiency) as well as high stability during cycling. PMID:24053465

  15. Functionally Graded Cathodes for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Harry Abernathy; Meilin Liu

    2006-12-31

    One primary suspected cause of long-term performance degradation of solid oxide fuels (SOFCs) is the accumulation of chromium (Cr) species at or near the cathode/electrolyte interface due to reactive Cr molecules originating from Cr-containing components (such as the interconnect) in fuel cell stacks. To date, considerable efforts have been devoted to the characterization of cathodes exposed to Cr sources; however, little progress has been made because a detailed understanding of the chemistry and electrochemistry relevant to the Cr-poisoning processes is still lacking. This project applied multiple characterization methods - including various Raman spectroscopic techniques and various electrochemical performance measurement techniques - to elucidate and quantify the effect of Cr-related electrochemical degradation at the cathode/electrolyte interface. Using Raman microspectroscopy the identity and location of Cr contaminants (SrCrO{sub 4}, (Mn/Cr){sub 3}O{sub 4} spinel) have been observed in situ on an LSM cathode. These Cr contaminants were shown to form chemically (in the absence of current flowing through the cell) at temperatures as low as 625 C. While SrCrO{sub 4} and (Mn/Cr){sub 3}O{sub 4} spinel must preferentially form on LSM, since the LSM supplies the Sr and Mn cations necessary for these compounds, LSM was also shown to be an active site for the deposition of Ag{sub 2}CrO{sub 4} for samples that also contained silver. In contrast, Pt and YSZ do not appear to be active for formation of Cr-containing phases. The work presented here supports the theory that Cr contamination is predominantly chemically-driven and that in order to minimize the effect, cathode materials should be chosen that are free of cations/elements that could preferentially react with chromium, including silver, strontium, and manganese.

  16. Ruthenium oxide modified titanium dioxide nanotube arrays as carbon and binder free lithium-air battery cathode catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Guangyu; Niu, Yanning; Zhang, Li; Sun, Kening

    2014-12-01

    RuO2 modified TiO2 nanotube arrays, growing on Ti foams, are used as carbon and binder free cathodes for Li-O2 batteries. The micrometer pores in Ti foams and nanometer pores in TiO2 nanotubes supply facilitated transport channels for oxygen diffusing into/out of the catalysts in discharge and charge processes. The RuO2 catalyst exhibits outstanding catalytic active toward oxygen evolution reaction (OER), which leads the charge voltage maintaining around 3.7 V all through the battery cycling. The stability of TiO2/Ti support, abundant oxygen transport path and favorable catalytic activity of RuO2 toward OER enable the Li-O2 batteries exhibiting 130 cycle discharge/charge.

  17. Integrating NiCo Alloys with Their Oxides as Efficient Bifunctional Cathode Catalysts for Rechargeable Zinc-Air Batteries.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xien; Park, Minjoon; Kim, Min Gyu; Gupta, Shiva; Wu, Gang; Cho, Jaephil

    2015-08-10

    The lack of high-efficient, low-cost, and durable bifunctional electrocatalysts that act simultaneously for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) is currently one of the major obstacles to commercializing the electrical rechargeability of zinc-air batteries. A nanocomposite CoO-NiO-NiCo bifunctional electrocatalyst supported by nitrogen-doped multiwall carbon nanotubes (NCNT/CoO-NiO-NiCo) exhibits excellent activity and stability for the ORR/OER in alkaline media. More importantly, real air cathodes made from the bifunctional NCNT/CoO-NiO-NiCo catalysts further demonstrated superior performance to state-of-the-art Pt/C or Pt/C+IrO2 catalysts in primary and rechargeable zinc-air batteries. PMID:26118973

  18. Investigating Microbial Fuel Cell Bioanode Performance Under Different Cathode Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Borole, Abhijeet P; Hamilton, Choo Yieng; Aaron, D; Tsouris, Costas

    2009-01-01

    A compact, three-in-one, flow-through, porous, electrode design with minimal electrode spacing and minimal dead volume was implemented to develop a microbial fuel cell (MFC) with improved anode performance. A biofilm-dominated anode consortium enriched under a multimode, continuous-flow regime was used. The increase in the power density of the MFC was investigated by changing the cathode (type, as well as catholyte strength) to determine whether anode was limiting. The power density obtained with an air-breathing cathode was 56 W/m3 of net anode volume (590 mW/m2) and 203 W/m3 (2160 mW/m2) with a 50-mM ferricyanide- based cathode. Increasing the ferricyanide concentration and ionic strength further increased the power density, reaching 304 W/m3 (3220 mW/m2, with 200 mM ferricyanide and 200 mM buffer concentration). The increasing trend in the power density indicated that the anode was not limiting and that higher power densities could be obtained using cathodes capable of higher rates of oxidation. The internal solution resistance for the MFC was 5 6 X, which supported the improved performance of the anode design. A new parameter defined as the ratio of projected surface area to total anode volume is suggested as a design parameter to relate volumetric and area-based power densities and to enable comparison of various MFC configurations.

  19. Investigation of carbon supported Pd-Cu nanoparticles as anode catalysts for direct borohydride fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behmenyar, Gamze; Akın, Ayşe Nilgün

    2014-03-01

    Carbon supported Pd and bimetallic Pd-Cu nanoparticles with different compositions are prepared by a modified polyol method and used as anode catalysts for direct borohydride fuel cell (DBFC). The physical and electrochemical properties of the as-prepared electrocatalysts are investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), ICP-AES, cyclic voltammetry (CV), chronoamperometry (CA), and fuel cell experiments. The results show that the carbon supported Pd-Cu bimetallic catalysts have much higher catalytic activity for the direct oxidation of BH4- than the carbon supported pure nanosized Pd catalyst, especially the Pd50Cu50/C catalyst presents the highest catalytic activity among all as-prepared catalysts, and the DBFC using Pd50Cu50/C as anode catalyst and Pt/C as cathode catalyst gives the best performance, and the maximum power density is 98 mW cm-2 at a current density of 223 mA cm-2 at 60 °C.

  20. Galvanic Cells: Anodes, Cathodes, Signs and Charges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, Alan

    2011-01-01

    Electrochemistry is a difficult subject for students at school and beyond and even for their teachers. This article explores the difficult "truth" that, when a current flows from a galvanic cell, positive ions within the cell electrolyte move towards the electrode labelled positive. This seems to contravene the basic rule that like charges repel…

  1. Effect of catalyst layer defects on local membrane degradation in polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavassoli, Arash; Lim, Chan; Kolodziej, Joanna; Lauritzen, Michael; Knights, Shanna; Wang, G. Gary; Kjeang, Erik

    2016-08-01

    Aiming at durability issues of fuel cells, this research is dedicated to a novel experimental approach in the analysis of local membrane degradation phenomena in polymer electrolyte fuel cells, shedding light on the potential effects of manufacturing imperfections on this process. With a comprehensive review on historical failure analysis data from field operated fuel cells, local sources of iron oxide contaminants, catalyst layer cracks, and catalyst layer delamination are considered as potential candidates for initiating or accelerating the local membrane degradation phenomena. Customized membrane electrode assemblies with artificial defects are designed, fabricated, and subjected to membrane accelerated stress tests followed by extensive post-mortem analysis. The results reveal a significant accelerating effect of iron oxide contamination on the global chemical degradation of the membrane, but dismiss local traces of iron oxide as a potential stressor for local membrane degradation. Anode and cathode catalyst layer cracks are observed to have negligible impact on the membrane degradation phenomena. Notably however, distinct evidence is found that anode catalyst layer delamination can accelerate local membrane thinning, while cathode delamination has no apparent effect. Moreover, a substantial mitigating effect for platinum residuals on the site of delamination is observed.

  2. Electricity generation of microbial fuel cell with waterproof breathable membrane cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Defeng; Tang, Yu; Mei, Xiaoxue; Liu, Bingfeng

    2015-12-01

    Simplification of fabrication and reduction of capital cost are important for scale-up and application of microbial electrochemical systems (MES). A fast and inexpensive method of making cathode was developed via assembling stainless steel mesh (SSM) with waterproof breathable membrane (WBM). Three assemble types of cathodes were fabricated; Pt@SSM/WBM (SSM as cathode skeleton, WBM as diffusion layer, platinum (Pt) catalyst applied on SSM), SSM/Pt@WBM and Pt@WBM. SSM/Pt@WBM cathode showed relatively preferable with long-term stability and favorable power output (24.7 W/m3). Compared to conventional cathode fabrication, air-cathode was made for 0.5 h. The results indicated that the novel fabrication method could remarkably reduce capital cost and simplify fabrication procedures with a comparable power output, making MFC more prospective for future application.

  3. Fuel Cell Stations Automate Processes, Catalyst Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Glenn Research Center looks for ways to improve fuel cells, which are an important source of power for space missions, as well as the equipment used to test fuel cells. With Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) awards from Glenn, Lynntech Inc., of College Station, Texas, addressed a major limitation of fuel cell testing equipment. Five years later, the company obtained a patent and provided the equipment to the commercial world. Now offered through TesSol Inc., of Battle Ground, Washington, the technology is used for fuel cell work, catalyst testing, sensor testing, gas blending, and other applications. It can be found at universities, national laboratories, and businesses around the world.

  4. Graphene-Supported Platinum Catalyst-Based Membrane Electrode Assembly for PEM Fuel Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devrim, Yilser; Albostan, Ayhan

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study is the preparation and characterization of a graphene-supported platinum (Pt) catalyst for proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) applications. The graphene-supported Pt catalysts were prepared by chemical reduction of graphene and chloroplatinic acid (H2PtCl6) in ethylene glycol. X-ray powder diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and scanning electron microscopy have been used to analyze structure and surface morphology of the graphene-supported catalyst. The TGA results showed that the Pt loading of the graphene-supported catalyst was 31%. The proof of the Pt particles on the support surfaces was also verified by energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy analysis. The commercial carbon-supported catalyst and prepared Pt/graphene catalysts were used as both anode and cathode electrodes for PEMFC at ambient pressure and 70°C. The maximum power density was obtained for the Pt/graphene-based membrane electrode assembly (MEA) with H2/O2 reactant gases as 0.925 W cm2. The maximum current density of the Pt/graphene-based MEA can reach 1.267 and 0.43 A/cm2 at 0.6 V with H2/O2 and H2/air, respectively. The MEA prepared by the Pt/graphene catalyst shows good stability in long-term PEMFC durability tests. The PEMFC cell voltage was maintained at 0.6 V without apparent voltage drop when operated at 0.43 A/cm2 constant current density and 70°C for 400 h. As a result, PEMFC performance was found to be superlative for the graphene-supported Pt catalyst compared with the Pt/C commercial catalyst. The results indicate the graphene-supported Pt catalyst could be utilized as the electrocatalyst for PEMFC applications.

  5. Graphene-Supported Platinum Catalyst-Based Membrane Electrode Assembly for PEM Fuel Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devrim, Yilser; Albostan, Ayhan

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study is the preparation and characterization of a graphene-supported platinum (Pt) catalyst for proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) applications. The graphene-supported Pt catalysts were prepared by chemical reduction of graphene and chloroplatinic acid (H2PtCl6) in ethylene glycol. X-ray powder diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and scanning electron microscopy have been used to analyze structure and surface morphology of the graphene-supported catalyst. The TGA results showed that the Pt loading of the graphene-supported catalyst was 31%. The proof of the Pt particles on the support surfaces was also verified by energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy analysis. The commercial carbon-supported catalyst and prepared Pt/graphene catalysts were used as both anode and cathode electrodes for PEMFC at ambient pressure and 70°C. The maximum power density was obtained for the Pt/graphene-based membrane electrode assembly (MEA) with H2/O2 reactant gases as 0.925 W cm2. The maximum current density of the Pt/graphene-based MEA can reach 1.267 and 0.43 A/cm2 at 0.6 V with H2/O2 and H2/air, respectively. The MEA prepared by the Pt/graphene catalyst shows good stability in long-term PEMFC durability tests. The PEMFC cell voltage was maintained at 0.6 V without apparent voltage drop when operated at 0.43 A/cm2 constant current density and 70°C for 400 h. As a result, PEMFC performance was found to be superlative for the graphene-supported Pt catalyst compared with the Pt/C commercial catalyst. The results indicate the graphene-supported Pt catalyst could be utilized as the electrocatalyst for PEMFC applications.

  6. New Cathode Materials for Intermediate Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Allan J. Jacobson

    2005-11-17

    Operation of SOFCs at intermediate temperatures (500-800 C) requires new combinations of electrolyte and electrode materials that will provide both rapid ion transport across the electrolyte and electrode--electrolyte interfaces and efficient electrocatalysis of the oxygen reduction and fuel oxidation reactions. This project concentrates on materials and issues associated with cathode performance that are known to become limiting factors as the operating temperature is reduced. The specific objectives of the proposed research are to develop cathode materials that meet the electrode performance targets of 1.0 W/cm{sup 2} at 0.7 V in combination with YSZ at 700 C and with GDC, LSGM or bismuth oxide based electrolytes at 600 C. The performance targets imply an area specific resistance of {approx}0.5 {Omega}cm{sup 2} for the total cell. The research strategy is to investigate both established classes of materials and new candidates as cathodes, to determine fundamental performance parameters such as bulk diffusion, surface reactivity and interfacial transfer, and to couple these parameters to performance in single cell tests. In this report, the oxygen exchange kinetics of a P2 composition are described in detail. The oxygen exchange kinetics of the oxygen deficient double perovskite LnBaCo{sub 2}O{sub 5.5+{delta}} (Ln=Pr and Nd) have been determined by electrical conductivity relaxation. The high electronic conductivity and rapid diffusion and surface exchange kinetics of PBCO suggest its application as cathode material in intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells.

  7. Carbon Nanohorn-Derived Graphene Nanotubes as a Platinum-Free Fuel Cell Cathode.

    PubMed

    Unni, Sreekuttan M; Illathvalappil, Rajith; Bhange, Siddheshwar N; Puthenpediakkal, Hasna; Kurungot, Sreekumar

    2015-11-01

    Current low-temperature fuel cell research mainly focuses on the development of efficient nonprecious electrocatalysts for the reduction of dioxygen molecule due to the reasons like exorbitant cost and scarcity of the current state-of-the-art Pt-based catalysts. As a potential alternative to such costly electrocatalysts, we report here the preparation of an efficient graphene nanotube based oxygen reduction electrocatalyst which has been derived from single walled nanohorns, comprising a thin layer of graphene nanotubes and encapsulated iron oxide nanoparticles (FeGNT). FeGNT shows a surface area of 750 m(2)/g, which is the highest ever reported among the metal encapsulated nanotubes. Moreover, the graphene protected iron oxide nanoparticles assist the system to attain efficient distribution of Fe-Nx and quaternary nitrogen based active reaction centers, which provides better activity and stability toward the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in acidic as well as alkaline conditions. Single cell performance of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell by using FeGNT as the cathode catalyst delivered a maximum power density of 200 mW cm(-2) with Nafion as the proton exchange membrane at 60 °C. The facile synthesis strategy with iron oxide encapsulated graphitic carbon morphology opens up a new horizon of hope toward developing Pt-free fuel cells and metal-air batteries along with its applicability in other energy conversion and storage devices. PMID:26458554

  8. Measurement of effective gas diffusion coefficients of catalyst layers of PEM fuel cells with a Loschmidt diffusion cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jun; Zhou, Jianqin; Astrath, Nelson G. C.; Navessin, Titichai; Liu, Zhong-Sheng (Simon); Lei, Chao; Rohling, Jurandir H.; Bessarabov, Dmitri; Knights, Shanna; Ye, Siyu

    In this work, using an in-house made Loschmidt diffusion cell, we measure the effective coefficient of dry gas (O 2-N 2) diffusion in cathode catalyst layers of PEM fuel cells at 25 °C and 1 atmosphere. The thicknesses of the catalyst layers under investigation are from 6 to 29 μm. Each catalyst layer is deposited on an Al 2O 3 membrane substrate by an automated spray coater. Diffusion signal processing procedure is developed to deduce the effective diffusion coefficient, which is found to be (1.47 ± 0.05) × 10 -7 m 2 s -1 for the catalyst layers. Porosity and pore size distribution of the catalyst layers are also measured using Hg porosimetry. The diffusion resistance of the interface between the catalyst layer and the substrate is found to be negligible. The experimental results show that the O 2-N 2 diffusion in the catalyst layers is dominated by the Knudsen effect.

  9. Cathode materials for the molten carbonate fuel cell

    SciTech Connect

    Kucera, G.H.; Brown, A.P.; Roche, M.F.; Indacochea, E.J.; Krumpelt, M.; Myles, K.M.

    1993-08-01

    Both LiFeO{sub 2} and Li{sub 2},MnO{sub 3} were stable in the cathode environment, had low solubility, and were nonprecipitating in the anode environment. Dopants were employed to enhance the electronic conductivity of both materials. Cobalt-doped LiFeO{sub 2} was a factor of 30 more conductive than the undoped LiFeO{sub 2}; Nb-doped Li{sub 2}MnO{sub 3} was a factor of 60 more conductive than its undoped form. However, only the Co-doped LiFeO{sub 2} Li{sub 2} exhibited the desired p-type conduction. Half- and full-cell tests with Co-doped LiFeO{sub 2} as the cathode material showed that its performance strongly depended on the oxygen partial pressure. Under simulated high-pressure conditions, where the O{sub 2} partial pressure was 70 kPa, the performance was good. LiCoO{sub 2} had low solubility and was a good electronic conductor undoped. In addition, it exhibited p-type conduction, and, when used as a cathode material, gave good cell performance. It precipitated as cobalt metal under reducing conditions in anode. However, neither rate of deposition nor conditions influencing deposition and location are known.

  10. Highly Dispersed Metal Catalyst for Fuel Cell Electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    2009-03-01

    This factsheet describes a study that will bring industrial catalyst experience to fuel cell research. Specifically, industrial catalysts, such as those used in platforming, utilize precious metal platinum as an active component in a finely dispersed form.

  11. A reduced temperature solid oxide fuel cell with three-dimensionally ordered macroporous cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, B.; Suzuki, T.; Hamamoto, K.; Yamaguchi, T.; Sumi, H.; Fujishiro, Y.; Ingram, B. J.; Carter, J. D.

    2012-01-01

    Three-dimensionally ordered macroporous cathode was fabricated for a zirconia based micro-tubular solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Three different cathodes (cathode A, no pore former; cathode B, with pore former (1.5 {micro}m in diameter); cathode C, with pore former (0.8 {micro}m in diameter)) were compared to investigate how the microstructure of it affected the cell performance at various operating temperatures. Micro-sized pores were well distributed within cathode B and C. The total porosity of cathode A is 35%, while it respectively reached 42 and 50% for cathodes B and C. At the same time, the specific surface area of them was 28.8 and 52.0% larger than that of the cathode A. As a result, the peak power density of the zirconia based cell, with cathode C, was 0.25 and 0.56 W cm{sup -2} at 550 and 600 C, while the respective value was just 0.11 and 0.30 W cm{sup -2} for the cell with cathode A. Thus, optimizing microstructure of cathode should be one of the best approaches for lowering the operating temperature for SOFCs.

  12. Moderate temperature sodium cells. I - Transition metal disulfide cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abraham, K. M.; Pitts, L.; Schiff, R.

    1980-01-01

    TiS2, VS2, and Nb(1.1)S2 transition metal disulfides were evaluated as cathode materials for a moderate temperature rechargeable Na cell operating at 130 C. The 1st discharge of TiS2 results in a capacity of 0.85 eq/mole; approximately half of the Na in the 1st phase spanning the Na range from zero to 0.30 and almost all the Na in the 2nd phase spanning the 0.37 to 0.80 range are rechargeable. VS2 intercalates up to one mole of Na/mole of VS2 in the 1st discharge; the resulting Na(x)VS2 ternary consists of 3 phases in the 3 ranges of Na from zero to 1. Niobium disulfide undergoes a phase change in the 1st discharge; the average rechargeable capacity in extended cycling of this cathode is 0.50 eq/mole.

  13. Contribution of properties of composite cathode and cathode/electrolyte interface to cell performance in a planar solid oxide fuel cell stack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wei; Guan, Wanbing; Wang, Weiguo

    2015-04-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) with distinct cathode materials usually differ in output performance. In this study, 2 μm-thick Pt voltage probes are embedded into the cathode/electrolyte interface. The effects of the electrical properties and cathode/electrolyte interfaces of LSCF-GDC and LSM-YSZ composite cathodes on cell performance are investigated in situ for anode-supported planar SOFCs. Results show that the voltage and maximum output power density measured by the probes on both sides of the LSCF-GDC and LSM-YSZ composite cathodes are 7% and 4%, respectively, of those of the corresponding cell during instantaneous current-voltage testing. The enhanced LSCF cell performance is mainly attributed to the rough GDC/LSCF-GDC interface that is responsible for the three-dimensional contact between the GDC layer and LSCF-GDC cathode particles and increases the triple-phase boundary (TPB) length. The LSM-YSZ cathode performance degradation is attributed to the variation in polarization resistance caused by cathode particle growth. However, the primary factor for the degradation of LSCF-GDC cathode performance is structural instability, such as inner cracks.

  14. Highly Active and Redox-Stable Ce-Doped LaSrCrFeO-Based Cathode Catalyst for CO2 SOECs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ya-Qian; Li, Jian-Hui; Sun, Yi-Fei; Hua, Bin; Luo, Jing-Li

    2016-03-01

    Lanthanum chromate-based perovskite oxides have attracted great attention as the cathode materials in the high-temperature CO2 electrolysis because of its good redox stability. However, the unsatisfied electrochemical catalytic activity and insufficient adsorption of CO2 at operating temperature still hindered the further improvement of electrochemical performance and the Faraday efficiency of the electrolysis cell. In this work, the catalytic and redox active Ce was doped into A site of La0.7Sr0.3Cr0.5Fe0.5O3-δ (LSCrF) to promote the catalytic performance, and to introduce oxygen vacancies in the lattice in situ after reduction under the operational condition. The increased amount of oxygen vacancies not only facilitates the mobility of oxygen ions, but also provides favorable accommodation for chemical adsorption of CO2. The CO2 electrolysis tests demonstrated the superior electrochemical performances, higher Faraday efficiencies of the Ce-doped LSCrF cathode catalyst in comparison with that without Ce doping, indicating the perspective application of this functional material. PMID:26901862

  15. Poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) phase inversion coating as a diffusion layer to enhance the cathode performance in microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wulin; Zhang, Fang; He, Weihua; Liu, Jia; Hickner, Michael A.; Logan, Bruce E.

    2014-12-01

    A low cost poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) (PVDF-HFP) phase inversion coating was developed as a cathode diffusion layer to enhance the performance of microbial fuel cells (MFCs). A maximum power density of 1430 ± 90 mW m-2 was achieved at a PVDF-HFP loading of 4.4 mg cm-2 (4:1 polymer:carbon black), with activated carbon as the oxygen reduction cathode catalyst. This power density was 31% higher than that obtained with a more conventional platinum (Pt) catalyst on carbon cloth (Pt/C) cathode with a poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) diffusion layer (1090 ± 30 mW m-2). The improved performance was due in part to a larger oxygen mass transfer coefficient of 3 × 10-3 cm s-1 for the PVDF-HFP coated cathode, compared to 1.7 × 10-3 cm s-1 for the carbon cloth/PTFE-based cathode. The diffusion layer was resistant to electrolyte leakage up to water column heights of 41 ± 0.5 cm (4.4 mg cm-2 loading of 4:1 polymer:carbon black) to 70 ± 5 cm (8.8 mg cm-2 loading of 4:1 polymer:carbon black). This new type of PVDF-HFP/carbon black diffusion layer could reduce the cost of manufacturing cathodes for MFCs.

  16. The performance and mechanism of modified activated carbon air cathode by non-stoichiometric nano Fe3O4 in the microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Fu, Zhou; Yan, Litao; Li, Kexun; Ge, Baochao; Pu, Liangtao; Zhang, Xi

    2015-12-15

    Cathodic catalyst is one of the key materials in microbial fuel cell (MFC). The addition of non-stoichiometric nano Fe3O4 in activated carbon (NSFe3O4/AC) air cathode was beneficial to boosting the charge transfer of the cathode accompanying with the enhancement of power performance in MFC. The air cathode modified by NSFe3O4 (5%, Wt%) increased the maximum power density by 83.3% from 780 mW/m(2) to 1430 mW/m(2) compared with bare air cathode. The modified cathodes showed enhanced electrochemical properties and appeared the maximum exchange current density of 18.71×10(-4) A/cm(2) for oxygen reduction reaction. The mechanism of oxygen reduction for the NSFe3O4/AC catalyst was a 4-electron pathway. The oxygen vacancy of the NSFe3O4 played a crucial role in electrochemical catalytic activity. The great catalytic performance made NSFe3O4 have a promising outlook applied in MFC. PMID:26264265

  17. Efficient Oxygen Evolution Reaction Catalysts for Cell Reversal and Start/Stop Tolerance in Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Atanasoski, Radoslav; Atanasoska, Liliana; Cullen, David A

    2013-01-01

    Minute amounts of ruthenium and iridium on platinum nanostructured thin films have been evaluated in an effort to reduce carbon corrosion and Pt dissolution during transient conditions in proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Electrochemical tests showed the catalysts had a remarkable oxygen evolution reaction (OER) activity, even greater than that of bulk, metallic thin films. Stability tests within a fuel cell environment showed that rapid Ru dissolution could be managed with the addition of Ir. Membrane electrode assemblies containing a Ru to Ir atomic ratio of 1:9 were evaluated under startup/shutdown and cell reversal conditions for OER catalyst loadings ranging from 1 to 10 g/cm2. These tests affirmed that electrode potentials can be controlled through the addition of OER catalysts without impacting the oxygen reduction reaction on the cathode or the hydrogen oxidation reaction on the anode. The morphology and chemical structure of the thin OER layers were characterized by scanning transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy in an effort to establish a correlation between interfacial properties and electrochemical behavior.

  18. Temporal variations of cathode performance in air-cathode single-chamber microbial fuel cells with different separators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jinxing; Wang, Zhiwei; Suor, Denis; Liu, Shumeng; Li, Jiaqi; Wu, Zhichao

    2014-12-01

    An ideal separator is essential for efficient power production from air-cathode single-chamber microbial fuel cells (MFCs). In this study, we use different kinds of membranes as separators, including Nafion 117 proton exchange membrane, polyethersulfone and poly(vinylidene fluoride) microfiltration membranes. Temporal variations of cathode performance are monitored during the experiment. Results show that MFCs with microfiltration membranes present higher power output but deterioration is still observed after about 600-h operation. With the utilization of appropriate separators (e.g., polyethersulfone membrane), biofouling, cation fouling and chemical scale fouling of the cathodes are alleviated while reaction fouling seems inevitable. Moreover, it is found that Coulombic efficiency (CE) and energy efficiency (EE) are also related to the cathode performance. Despite relatively high oxygen diffusivity (1.49 × 10-5 cm2 s-1), CE and EE of the MFC with 0.1 μm pore-size polyethersulfone membrane can reach 92.8% and 13.7%, respectively, when its average power density registers 403.5 mW m-2. This phenomenon might be attributed to the finding that the overall substrate consumption rate due to oxygen reduction and respiration is almost constant in the air-cathode MFCs. Oxygen leakage into the electrolyte can be inhibited due to the efficient oxygen reduction reaction on the surface of the cathode.

  19. Sulfur-doped graphene as an efficient metal-free cathode catalyst for oxygen reduction.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhi; Yao, Zhen; Li, Guifa; Fang, Guoyong; Nie, Huagui; Liu, Zheng; Zhou, Xuemei; Chen, Xi'an; Huang, Shaoming

    2012-01-24

    Tailoring the electronic arrangement of graphene by doping is a practical strategy for producing significantly improved materials for the oxygen-reduction reaction (ORR) in fuel cells (FCs). Recent studies have proven that the carbon materials doped with the elements, which have the larger (N) or smaller (P, B) electronegative atoms than carbon such as N-doped carbon nanotubes (CNTs), P-doped graphite layers and B-doped CNTs, have also shown pronounced catalytic activity. Herein, we find that the graphenes doped with the elements, which have the similar electronegativity with carbon such as sulfur and selenium, can also exhibit better catalytic activity than the commercial Pt/C in alkaline media, indicating that these doped graphenes hold great potential for a substitute for Pt-based catalysts in FCs. The experimental results are believed to be significant because they not only give further insight into the ORR mechanism of these metal-free doped carbon materials, but also open a way to fabricate other new low-cost NPMCs with high electrocatalytic activity by a simple, economical, and scalable approach for real FC applications. PMID:22201338

  20. High pressure pyrolyzed non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts for alkaline polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Sanetuntikul, Jakkid; Shanmugam, Sangaraju

    2015-05-01

    Non-precious metal catalysts, such as metal-coordinated to nitrogen doped-carbon, have shown reasonable oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) performances in alkaline fuel cells. In this report, we present the development of a highly active, stable and low-cost non-precious metal ORR catalyst by direct synthesis under autogenic-pressure conditions. Transmission electron microscopy studies show highly porous Fe-N-C and Co-N-C structures, which were further confirmed by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area measurements. The surface areas of the Fe-N-C and Co-N-C catalysts were found to be 377.5 and 369.3 m(2) g(-1), respectively. XPS results show the possible existence of N-C and M-Nx structures, which are generally proposed to be the active sites in non-precious metal catalysts. The Fe-N-C electrocatalyst exhibits an ORR half-wave potential 20 mV higher than the reference Pt/C catalyst. The cycling durability test for Fe-N-C over 5000 cycles shows that the half-wave potential lost only 4 mV, whereas the half-wave potential of the Pt/C catalyst lost about 50 mV. The Fe-N-C catalyst exhibited an improved activity and stability compared to the reference Pt/C catalyst and it possesses a direct 4-electron transfer pathway for the ORR process. Further, the Fe-N-C catalyst produces extremely low HO2(-) content, as confirmed by the rotating ring-disk electrode measurements. In the alkaline fuel single cell tests, maximum power densities of 75 and 80 mW cm(-2) were observed for the Fe-N-C and Pt/C cathodes, respectively. Durability studies (100 h) showed that decay of the fuel cell current was more prominent for the Pt/C cathode catalyst compared to the Fe-N-C cathode catalyst. Therefore, the Fe-N-C catalyst appears to be a promising new class of non-precious metal catalysts prepared by an autogenic synthetic method. PMID:25833146

  1. Optimization of ink composition based on a non-platinum cathode for single membrane electrode assembly proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artyushkova, K.; Habel-Rodriguez, D.; Olson, T. S.; Atanassov, P.

    2013-03-01

    Non-Pt based oxygen reduction catalyst H2-air fuel cell performance is reported for various electrode compositions. Ink formulations for pyrolyzed Co porphyrin based cathode electrocatalysts were evaluated in a membrane electrode assembly (MEA) configuration and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was performed on the MEA catalyst layers. The effect of cooling time trajectories of the catalysts after pyrolysis as well as Nafion content in the ink formulation were studied. By building statistical structure-to-property relationships between XPS and MEA performance using multivariate analysis we have determined that the higher stability of fast-cooled containing inks is mainly associated with better preserved graphic carbon from the carbon black and C-F moieties of the Nafion, while better MEA performance is a result of the presence of these moieties as well as pyridinic nitrogen and nitrogen associated with metal in the pyropolymer. Optimal Nafion content is determined at 1:1 catalyst:Nafion weight ratio, while higher Nafion concentrations causes oxidation of the Nafion backbone itself as well as leaching of the CoxOy particles from the catalyst and formation of oxidized species of Co, O, C and F. Further, we report 1500 h of continuous fuel cell operation for two different non-platinum cathode catalysts in the optimized MEA.

  2. Performance Enhancement of Small Molecular Solar Cells by Bilayer Cathode Buffer.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qinjun; Zhao, Huanbin; Zhou, Miao; Gao, Liyan; Hao, Yuying

    2016-04-01

    An effective composite bilayer cathode buffer structure is proposed for use in small molecular solar cells. CsF was doped in Alq3 to form the first cathode buffer, leading to small serial resistances. BCP was used as the second cathode buffer to block the holes to the electrode. The optimized bilayer cathode buffer significantly increased the short circuit and fill factor of devices. By integrating this bilayer cathode buffer, the CuPc/C60 small molecular heterojunction cell exhibited a power conversion efficiency of up to 0.8%, which was an improvement of 56% compared to a device with only the Alq3 cathode buffer. Meanwhile, the bilayer cathode buffer still has a good protective effect on the performance of the device. PMID:27451719

  3. Anion-Intercalating Cathodes for High-Energy-Density Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, William

    2006-01-01

    A report discusses physicochemical issues affecting a fluoride-intercalating cathode that operates in conjunction with a lithium ion-intercalating anode in a rechargeable electrochemical cell described in a cited prior report. The instant report also discusses corresponding innovations made in solvent and electrolyte compositions since the prior report. The advantages of this cell, relative to other lithium-ion-based cells, are said to be greater potential (5 V vs. 4 V), and greater theoretical cathode specific capacity (0.9 to 2.2 A-h/g vs. about 0.18 A-h/g). The discussion addresses a need for the solvent to be unreactive toward the lithium anode and to resist anodic oxidation at potentials greater than about 4.5 V vs. lithium; the pertinent innovation is the selection of propylene carbonate (PC) as a solvent having significantly more stability, relative to other solvents that have been tried. The discussion also addresses the need for an electrolyte additive, denoted an anion receptor, to complex the fluoride ion; the pertinent innovation is the selection of tris(hexafluoroisopropyl) borate as a superior alternative to the prior anion receptor, which was tris(pentafluorophenyl) borate.

  4. Activated carbon nanofibers (ACNF) as cathode for single chamber microbial fuel cells (SCMFCs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santoro, Carlo; Stadlhofer, Astrid; Hacker, Viktor; Squadrito, Gaetano; Schröder, Uwe; Li, Baikun

    2013-12-01

    The suitability of carbon nanofibers (CNF) based cathodes as alternative to the platinum (Pt)-based cathode in single chamber microbial fuel cells (SCMFCs) were extensively studied over 3-month operational period. MFCs were fed with two solutions: synthetic wastewater (phosphate buffer (PBS) plus sodium acetate) and real wastewater (mixed liquor suspendedsolid (MLSS) solution). CNFs were chemically activated using HNO3 and then hot pressed on a carbon cloth support to increase surface area. The cathode polarization showed a better behavior of the clean Pt-based cathode in abiotic conditions. The activation of the nanofibers (ACNFs) gave an advantage to the cathode performances compared to the raw CNFs. The SCMFCs fed with PBS showed four times higher power generation compared to MLSS solution. All the cathodes showed a decrease in performances over time, and the advantage of the Pt over CNF/ACNF disappeared. CNF/ACNF cathodes showed more stability in performances in long time operations. Biofilm formation, salt precipitations on the cathode, and the presence of hydrogen sulfide decreased the activity of Pt cathodes. A degradation and Pt detachment were noticed on Pt cathodes over time. In contrast, CNF/ACNF cathodes exhibited less deterioration throughout the operational period, which demonstrated a great potential as cost-effective cathodes for long-term operation.

  5. Advanced electro-Fenton degradation of biologically-treated coking wastewater using anthraquinone cathode and Fe-Y catalyst.

    PubMed

    Li, Haitao; Li, Yuping; Cao, Hongbin; Li, Xingang; Zhang, Yi

    2011-01-01

    The electrocatalytic activity of bare and 2-ethyl anthraquinone-modified graphite felt (2-EAQ/GF) toward oxygen reduction was investigated using a cyclic voltammetry technique in a neutral solution. The prepared cathodes were tested for electrogeneration of H2O2 and electro-Fenton oxidation (EFO) treatment of neutral coking wastewater (CW) after biological process, using a graphite anode and Fezeolite Y catalyst. The results showed that (i) H2O2 yield and current efficiency greatly depended on cathodic potential and materials; (ii) hydroxyl radicals, generated from Fe-zeolite Y-catalyzed H2O2 decomposition, played a great role in EFO treatment, while anodic direct and indirect oxidation was insignificant; (iii) chemical oxygen demand, total organic carbon (TOC) and acute toxicity of wastewater decreased by 40-50, 30-40 and 50-60%, respectively, and biodegradability increased after 1 h of EFO treatment. Due to the free-pH adjustment, EFO presents a potential engineering application for advanced treatment of CW. PMID:22053459

  6. Effects of carbon supports on Pt distribution, ionomer coverage and cathode performance for polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Young-Chul; Tokiwa, Haruki; Kakinuma, Katsuyoshi; Watanabe, Masahiro; Uchida, Makoto

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the effects of the carbon supports on the Pt distribution, ionomer coverage and cathode performance of carbon-supported Pt catalysts, by using STEM observation, N2 adsorption analysis and electrochemical characterization. According to the STEM observation, the effective Pt surface area (S(e)Pt), which is determined by the location and size of the Pt particles on the supports, increases in the following order: c-Pt/CB < c-Pt/GCB < n-Pt/AB800 < n-Pt/AB250. The N2 adsorption analyses show that the Pt particles observed in the interior of the CB and AB800-supported Pt catalysts during the STEM observation could be ascribed to the hollow structures inside the carbon supports, which decrease their effective Pt surface areas. The S(e)Pt values are in good agreement with the cell performance in the high current density region. In spite of the highest Pt utilization (UPt) value (>90%) and uniform ionomer coverage, the c-Pt/CB catalyst shows the lowest cell performance due to the lower S(e)Pt value. On the other hand, the n-Pt/AB250 catalyst, for which all of the Pt particles exist only on the exterior surface, is found to be the most attractive in order to generate the large current densities required by actual fuel cell operation.

  7. Effects of carbon supports on Pt distribution, ionomer coverage and cathode performance for polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Young-Chul; Tokiwa, Haruki; Kakinuma, Katsuyoshi; Watanabe, Masahiro; Uchida, Makoto

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the effects of the carbon supports on the Pt distribution, ionomer coverage and cathode performance of carbon-supported Pt catalysts, by using STEM observation, N2 adsorption analysis and electrochemical characterization. According to the STEM observation, the effective Pt surface area (S(e)Pt), which is determined by the location and size of the Pt particles on the supports, increases in the following order: c-Pt/CB < c-Pt/GCB < n-Pt/AB800 < n-Pt/AB250. The N2 adsorption analyses show that the Pt particles observed in the interior of the CB and AB800-supported Pt catalysts during the STEM observation could be ascribed to the hollow structures inside the carbon supports, which decrease their effective Pt surface areas. The S(e)Pt values are in good agreement with the cell performance in the high current density region. In spite of the highest Pt utilization (UPt) value (>90%) and uniform ionomer coverage, the c-Pt/CB catalyst shows the lowest cell performance due to the lower S(e)Pt value. On the other hand, the n-Pt/AB250 catalyst, for which all of the Pt particles exist only on the exterior surface, is found to be the most attractive in order to generate the large current densities required by actual fuel cell operation.

  8. Enhanced hydrogen production in microbial electrolysis cell with 3D self-assembly nickel foam-graphene cathode.

    PubMed

    Cai, Weiwei; Liu, Wenzong; Han, Jinglong; Wang, Aijie

    2016-06-15

    In comparison to precious metal catalyst especially Platinum (Pt), nickel foam (NF) owned cheap cost and unique three-dimensional (3D) structure, however, it was scarcely applied as cathode material in microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) as the intrinsic laggard electrochemical activity for hydrogen recovery. In this study, a self-assembly 3D nickel foam-graphene (NF-G) cathode was fabricated by facile hydrothermal approach for hydrogen evolution in MECs. Electrochemical analysis (linear scan voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy) revealed the improved electrochemical activity and effective mass diffusion after coating with graphene. NF-G as cathode in MEC showed a significant enhancement in hydrogen production rate compared with nickel foam at a variety of biases. Noticeably, NF-G showed a comparable averaged hydrogen production rate (1.31 ± 0.07 mL H2 mL(-1) reactor d(-1)) to Platinum/carbon (Pt/C) (1.32 ± 0.07 mL H2 mL(-1) reactor d(-1)) at 0.8 V. Profitable energy recovery could be achieved by NF-G cathode at higher applied voltage, which performed the best hydrogen yield of 3.27 ± 0.16 mol H2 mol(-1) acetate at 0.8 V and highest energy efficiency of 185.92 ± 6.48% at 0.6 V. PMID:26807526

  9. Accelerated OH(-) transport in activated carbon air cathode by modification of quaternary ammonium for microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Feng, Cuijuan; Ding, Ning; Zhang, Qingrui; Li, Nan; Li, Xiaojing; Zhang, Yueyong; Zhou, Qixing

    2014-04-01

    Activated carbon (AC) is a promising catalyst for the air cathode of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) because of its high performance and low cost. To increase the performance of AC air cathodes, the acceleration of OH(-) transport is one of the most important methods, but it has not been widely investigated. Here we added quaternary ammonium to ACs by in situ anchoring of a quaternary ammonium/epoxide-reacting compound (QAE) or ex situ mixing with anion exchange resins in order to modify ACs from not only the external surface but also inside the pores. In 50 mM phosphate buffer solution (PBS), the in situ anchoring of QAE was a more effective way to increase the power. The highest power density of 2781 ± 36 mW/m(2), which is 10% higher than that of the control, was obtained using QAE-anchored AC cathodes. When the medium was switched to an unbuffered NaCl solution, the increase in maximum power density (885 ± 25 mW/m(2)) was in accordance with the anion exchange capacity (0.219 mmol/g). The highest power density of the anion exchange resin-mixed air cathode was 51% higher than that of the control, indicating that anion exchange is urgently needed in real wastewaters. Excess anchoring of QAE blocked both the mesopores and micropores, causing the power output to be inhibited. PMID:24597673

  10. Effect of ionic conductivity of zirconia electrolytes on the polarization behavior of various cathodes in solid oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Uchida, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Manabu; Watanabe, Masahiro

    1999-01-01

    The polarization behaviors of porous platinum and La(Sr)MnO{sub 3} (LSM) cathodes coupled with zirconia electrolytes with various ionic conductivities ({sigma}{sub ion}) were investigated. The exchange current density, j{sub 0}, on Pt cathode was not influenced by the {sigma}{sub ion} at 900 and 1,000 C, whereas j{sub 0} increased proportionally to {sigma}{sub ion} at a lower temperature of 800 C. However, the j{sub 0} on LSM cathodes increased in proportion to the {sigma}{sub ion} in the temperature region between 800 and 1,000 C. The dispersion of nanometer-sized Pt catalysts on LSM particles greatly enhanced the performance, the magnitude of which depended on the temperature, the {sigma}{sub ion}, and the microstructure of LSM. The observations are well explained kinetically, i.e., the cathode performance is controlled by the transport rate of O{sup 2{minus}} at the interface when the surface reaction rate is sufficiently high. Consequently, the use of high-performance electrodes in combination with the solid electrolyte having high {sigma}{sub ion} is very important for achieving the high performance of solid oxide fuel cells.

  11. Ultrasonic synthesis and evaluation of non-platinum catalysts for alkaline direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunazawa, Hideaki; Yamazaki, Yohtaro

    Ultrasonic synthesis was investigated as a synthesis method of non-platinum catalysts for alkaline direct methanol fuel cells (alkaline DMFCs) such as 20% mass Pd/C, Au/C, and PdAu/C. Among four kinds of solvents, ethylene glycol was demonstrated to be the optimum solvent for the synthesis of those catalysts. When ethylene glycol was used, the synthesized metal nanoparticles were highly dispersed on carbon particles. The synthesized Pd/C and PdAu/C showed the high oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity in alkaline condition (0.5 M NaOH aqueous solution), which was comparable to conventional Pt/C. Moreover, they showed lower methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) activity. Membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) containing the synthesized Pd/C cathode catalysts and alkaline ion exchange membranes were fabricated and evaluated by single cell tests. They showed high performance that was comparable to MEAs with Pt/C cathode. In addition, it was found that the synthesized Pd/C was relatively tolerant to methanol crossover.

  12. EFFECT OF PRETREATMENT ON PT-CO/C CATHODE CATALYSTS FOR THE OXYGEN-REDUCTION REACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, E.

    2009-05-13

    In order to reduce the precious metal loading without sacrificing activity and stability, a new method for the preparation of bimetallic catalysts is proposed. Currently, Pt-alloy particles, with 2 to 3 nm in diameter, are loaded on high surface area carbon supports. Of the Pt loaded, only the surface atoms interact with the reactants. In order to increase the Pt utilization per metal particle the new process for catalyst preparation will incorporate a non-noble transition metal core coated with a skin layer of Pt deposited on high surface area carbon. The effect of reducing agent strength during synthesis was also explored. It was determined that the Co addition has a higher impact on catalyst when used with NaBH4 as reducing agent as compared to NaCOOH.

  13. Bifunctional quaternary ammonium compounds to inhibit biofilm growth and enhance performance for activated carbon air-cathode in microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Nan; Liu, Yinan; An, Jingkun; Feng, Cuijuan; Wang, Xin

    2014-12-01

    The slow diffusion of hydroxyl out of the catalyst layer as well as the biofouling on the surface of cathode are two problems affecting power for membrane-less air-cathode microbial fuel cells (MFCs). In order to solve both of them simultaneously, here we simply modify activated carbon air-cathode using a bifunctional quaternary ammonium compound (QAC) by forced evaporation. The maximum power density reaches 1041 ± 12 mW m-2 in an unbuffered medium (0.5 g L-1 NaCl), which is 17% higher than the control, probably due to the accelerated anion transport in the catalyst layer. After 2 months, the protein content reduced by a factor of 26 and the power density increases by 33%, indicating that the QAC modification can effectively inhibit the growth of cathodic biofilm and improve the stability of performance. The addition of NaOH and QAC epoxy have a negative effect on power production due to the clogging of pores in catalyst layer.

  14. Discharge characteristics of lithium/molten nitrate thermal battery cells using silver salts as solid cathode materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McManis, G. E.; Miles, M. H.; Fletcher, A. N.

    1985-12-01

    Thermal battery cells using molten nitrate electrolytes and liquid lithium anodes have been evaluated using several silver salts with low solubility in molten nitrates as solid cathode materials. These cathode materials do not readily diffuse into the anolyte and, thus, do not have parasitic reactions with the lithium anode. Furthermore, the solid cathode materials have voltammetric characteristics as favorable as many soluble silver salt cathodes. This paper presents the effects of temperature, current density, and cathode material on cell discharge characteristics.

  15. Metal-free selenium doped carbon nanotube/graphene networks as a synergistically improved cathode catalyst for oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Zhiping; Nie, Huagui; Yang, Zhi; Zhang, Jing; Liu, Zheng; Xu, Xiangju; Huang, Shaoming

    2012-09-01

    The ongoing search for new non-precious-metal catalysts (NPMCs) with excellent electrocatalytic performance to replace Pt-based catalysts has been viewed as an important strategy to promote the development of fuel cells. Recent studies have proven that carbon materials doped with atoms which have a relatively small atomic size (e.g. N, B, P or S), have also shown pronounced catalytic activity. Herein, we demonstrate the successful fabrication of CNT/graphene doped with Se atoms, which has a relatively large atomic size, by a simple, economical, and scalable approach. The electrocatalytic performance of the resulting Se-doped CNT-graphene catalyst exhibits excellent catalytic activity, long-term stability, and a high methanol tolerance compared to commercial Pt/C catalysts. Our results confirmed that combining CNTs with graphene is an effective strategy to synergistically improve ORR activity. More importantly, it is also suggested that the development of graphite materials doped with Se or other heteroatoms of large size will open up a new route to obtain ideal NPMCs with realistic value for fuel cell applications.The ongoing search for new non-precious-metal catalysts (NPMCs) with excellent electrocatalytic performance to replace Pt-based catalysts has been viewed as an important strategy to promote the development of fuel cells. Recent studies have proven that carbon materials doped with atoms which have a relatively small atomic size (e.g. N, B, P or S), have also shown pronounced catalytic activity. Herein, we demonstrate the successful fabrication of CNT/graphene doped with Se atoms, which has a relatively large atomic size, by a simple, economical, and scalable approach. The electrocatalytic performance of the resulting Se-doped CNT-graphene catalyst exhibits excellent catalytic activity, long-term stability, and a high methanol tolerance compared to commercial Pt/C catalysts. Our results confirmed that combining CNTs with graphene is an effective strategy to

  16. Modeling Low-Platinum-Loading Effects in Fuel-Cell Catalyst Layers

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Wonseok; Weber, Adam Z.

    2011-01-20

    The cathode catalyst layer within a proton-exchange-membrane fuel cell is the most complex and critical, yet least understood, layer within the cell. The exact method and equations for modeling this layer are still being revised and will be discussed in this paper, including a 0.8 reaction order, existence of Pt oxides, possible non-isopotential agglomerates, and the impact of a film resistance towards oxygen transport. While the former assumptions are relatively straightforward to understand and implement, the latter film resistance is shown to be critically important in explaining increased mass-transport limitations with low Pt-loading catalyst layers. Model results demonstrate agreement with experimental data that the increased oxygen flux and/or diffusion pathway through the film can substantially decrease performance. Also, some scale-up concepts from the agglomerate scale to the more macroscopic porous-electrode scale are discussed and the resulting optimization scenarios investigated.

  17. La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O3 cathodes incorporated with Sm0.2Ce0.8O2 by three different methods for solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Fengyu; Lu, Kathy

    2015-11-01

    The incorporation of Sm0.2Ce0.8O2 (SDC) into La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O3 (LSCF) is carried out by three methods: mechanical mixing, infiltration, and dip coating. The effects of SDC on the electrochemical performance of the LSCF cathodes are studied by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) at 800 °C for 100 h. LSCF mechanically mixed with SDC as the cathode decreases the electrochemical performance of the half-cell; the LSCF cathode infiltrated with SDC offers faster activation and decreased resistance with thermal treatment time; and the LSCF cathode dip coated with SDC has the smallest polarization resistance. These cathodes also show clear microstructure differences at the cathode/interconnect interface after 100 h of thermal treatment. SrCrO4 phase forms on all the cathodes near the interconnect. Reactions between the mechanically mixed cathode and the YSZ electrolyte destroy the electrolyte. The influence of SDC catalyst on oxygen adsorption, dissociation, and incorporation is explained for each type of cathodes. Overall, dip coating method is recommended for incorporation of SDC into the LSCF cathode.

  18. Performance enhancement of low temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells by catalyst and support layer modifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Timothy David

    Possible enhancement of low temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) or direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC) was investigated by modifying catalyst and support layers. Platinum (Pt) and platinum cobalt (Pt xCo1-x) alloys were prepared by pulsed electrodeposition onto Toray carbon paper. Composite supports composed of either commercial multi-walled nanofiber (MWNF) mats or MWNF layers on a commercial backing were also investigated. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES), and energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) were used to characterize the surface structure, composition, and catalyst loading. Various electrochemical techniques with a wet electrochemical cell, a Nuvant multi-array system, and a Scribner fuel cell system were used to study and rank the effectiveness of the catalysts and supports toward both the methanol oxidation reaction and the oxygen reduction reaction. The activity toward methanol oxidation of the electrodeposited Pt catalyst was found to be dependent on the deposited mass. Further comparisons between commercial electrodes in the Nuvant system showed these deposits can yield activities comparable to those of commercially available electrodes. The structure of the Pt electrodeposits was highly non-uniform due to the H2 evolution during the deposition process blocking the cathodes surface. The activities of the planar structured PtxCo1-x deposits were insignificant for both oxygen reduction and methanol oxidation. The composition of the deposits ranged from 5 to 15 at% Pt. It was found by both the Nuvant and Scribner systems that the addition of a thin hydrophilic MWNF layer to a hydrophobic electrode would enhance the performance of a DMFC anode. In the Nuvant system, the addition of a thin hydrophilic MWNF layer to a hydrophobic electrode also enhanced the PEM cathode activity. This however was not corroborated by Scribner analysis, showing a

  19. New Cathode Materials for Intermediate Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Allan J. Jacobson

    2006-09-30

    Operation of SOFCs at intermediate temperatures (500-800 C) requires new combinations of electrolyte and electrode materials that will provide both rapid ion transport across the electrolyte and electrode-electrolyte interfaces and efficient electrocatalysis of the oxygen reduction and fuel oxidation reactions. This project concentrates on materials and issues associated with cathode performance that are known to become limiting factors as the operating temperature is reduced. The specific objectives of the proposed research are to develop cathode materials that meet the electrode performance targets of 1.0 W/cm{sup 2} at 0.7 V in combination with YSZ at 700 C and with GDC, LSGM or bismuth oxide based electrolytes at 600 C. The performance targets imply an area specific resistance of {approx}0.5 {Omega}cm{sup 2} for the total cell. The research strategy is to investigate both established classes of materials and new candidates as cathodes, to determine fundamental performance parameters such as bulk diffusion, surface reactivity and interfacial transfer, and to couple these parameters to performance in single cell tests. The initial choices for study were perovskite oxides based on substituted LaFeO{sub 3} (P1 compositions), where significant data in single cell tests exist at PNNL for example, for La{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}FeO{sub 3} cathodes on both YSZ and CSO/YSZ. The materials selection was then extended to La{sub 2}NiO{sub 4} compositions (K1 compositions), and then in a longer range task we evaluated the possibility of completely unexplored group of materials that are also perovskite related, the ABM{sub 2}O{sub 5+{delta}}. A key component of the research strategy was to evaluate for each cathode material composition, the key performance parameters, including ionic and electronic conductivity, surface exchange rates, stability with respect to the specific electrolyte choice, and thermal expansion coefficients. In the initial phase, we did this in parallel with

  20. Cellulose-derived nitrogen and phosphorus dual-doped carbon as high performance oxygen reduction catalyst in microbial fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qin; Zhou, Yan; Chen, Shuiliang; Wang, Zejie; Hou, Haoqing; Zhao, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) couple functions of waste removal and electricity generation. The future success of MFCs inevitably depends on the increase of performance at decrease of material cost. Therefore, the use of renewable and sustainable materials, e.g. cellulose, to prepare high performance materials for MFCs would be an inevitable trend. In this communication, nitrogen and phosphorus dual-doped carbons were prepared by pyrolysis of cellulose using ammonium phosphate as doping source and employed as oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalyst in air-cathode of MFCs. A maximum power density of 2293 ± 50 mW m-2 was generated by the air-cathode using the dual-doped carbon catalyst, which was higher than the air-cathode using Pt/C catalyst with Pt load of 0.5 mg cm-2 (1680 ± 32 mW m-2). This study provided a facile and sustainable way to prepare low-cost and high-efficient ORR catalyst for scaled-up MFC applications.

  1. Electrode surface modification for cathode catalysis in semi-fuel cells. End of the year report

    SciTech Connect

    Bessette, R.R.

    1998-07-07

    The program objective is to identify the optimum conditions for fabricating a stable electrocatalytic cathode of palladium and iridium that will: improve the cathode polarization potential, diminish the heterogeneous decomposition and direct chemical reactions and significantly improve (gain of 50%) the overall electrochemical cell efficiency. The second objective is to evaluate the electrochemical performance of the catalyzed cathode. The third objective is to characterize the structure and composition of the catalytic surface.

  2. A catalyst layer optimisation approach using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy for PEM fuel cells operated with pyrolysed transition metal-N-C catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malko, Daniel; Lopes, Thiago; Ticianelli, Edson A.; Kucernak, Anthony

    2016-08-01

    The effect of the ionomer to carbon (I/C) ratio on the performance of single cell polymer electrolyte fuel cells is investigated for three different types of non-precious metal cathodic catalysts. Polarisation curves as well as impedance spectra are recorded at different potentials in the presence of argon or oxygen at the cathode and hydrogen at the anode. It is found that a optimised ionomer content is a key factor for improving the performance of the catalyst. Non-optimal ionomer loading can be assessed by two different factors from the impedance spectra. Hence this observation could be used as a diagnostic element to determine the ideal ionomer content and distribution in newly developed catalyst-electrodes. An electrode morphology based on the presence of inhomogeneous resistance distribution within the porous structure is suggested to explain the observed phenomena. The back-pressure and relative humidity effect on this feature is also investigated and supports the above hypothesis. We give a simple flowchart to aid optimisation of electrodes with the minimum number of trials.

  3. Metal-free selenium doped carbon nanotube/graphene networks as a synergistically improved cathode catalyst for oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhiping; Nie, Huagui; Yang, Zhi; Zhang, Jing; Liu, Zheng; Xu, Xiangju; Huang, Shaoming

    2012-10-21

    The ongoing search for new non-precious-metal catalysts (NPMCs) with excellent electrocatalytic performance to replace Pt-based catalysts has been viewed as an important strategy to promote the development of fuel cells. Recent studies have proven that carbon materials doped with atoms which have a relatively small atomic size (e.g. N, B, P or S), have also shown pronounced catalytic activity. Herein, we demonstrate the successful fabrication of CNT/graphene doped with Se atoms, which has a relatively large atomic size, by a simple, economical, and scalable approach. The electrocatalytic performance of the resulting Se-doped CNT-graphene catalyst exhibits excellent catalytic activity, long-term stability, and a high methanol tolerance compared to commercial Pt/C catalysts. Our results confirmed that combining CNTs with graphene is an effective strategy to synergistically improve ORR activity. More importantly, it is also suggested that the development of graphite materials doped with Se or other heteroatoms of large size will open up a new route to obtain ideal NPMCs with realistic value for fuel cell applications. PMID:22955444

  4. Nanoscale alloying effect of gold-platinum nanoparticles as cathode catalysts on the performance of a rechargeable lithium-oxygen battery.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jun; Fang, Bin; Luo, Jin; Wanjala, Bridgid; Mott, Derrick; Loukrakpam, Rameshowri; Ng, Mei Shan; Li, Zheng; Hong, Jian; Whittingham, M Stanley; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2012-08-01

    The understanding of nanoscale alloying or the phase segregation effect of alloy nanoparticles on the catalytic properties is important for a rational design of the desired catalysts for a specific reaction. This paper describes findings of an investigation into this type of structural effect for carbon-supported bimetallic gold-platinum nanoparticles as cathode catalysts in a rechargeable lithium-oxygen battery. The nanoscale structural characteristics in terms of size, alloying and phase segregation were shown to affect the catalytic properties of the catalysts in the Li-O(2) battery. In addition to the composition effect, the catalysts with a fully alloyed phase structure were found to exhibit a smaller discharge-charge voltage difference and a higher discharge capacity than those with a partial phase segregation structure. This finding is significant for the design of alloy nanoparticles as air cathode catalysts in rechargeable lithium-air batteries, demonstrating the importance of the control of the nanoscale composition and phase properties. PMID:22781275

  5. Bipolar Electrochemistry for Concurrently Evaluating the Stability of Anode and Cathode Electrocatalysts and the Overall Cell Performance during Long-Term Water Electrolysis.

    PubMed

    Eßmann, Vera; Barwe, Stefan; Masa, Justus; Schuhmann, Wolfgang

    2016-09-01

    Electrochemical efficiency and stability are among the most important characteristics of electrocatalysts. These parameters are usually evaluated separately for the anodic and cathodic half-cell reactions in a three-electrode system or by measuring the overall cell voltage between the anode and cathode as a function of current or time. Here, we demonstrate how bipolar electrochemistry can be exploited to evaluate the efficiency of electrocatalysts for full electrochemical water splitting while simultaneously and independently monitoring the individual performance and stability of the half-cell electrocatalysts. Using a closed bipolar electrochemistry setup, all important parameters such as overvoltage, half-cell potential, and catalyst stability can be derived from a single galvanostatic experiment. In the proposed experiment, none of the half-reactions is limiting on the other, making it possible to precisely monitor the contribution of the individual half-cell reactions on the durability of the cell performance. The proposed approach was successfully employed to investigate the long-term performance of a bifunctional water splitting catalyst, specifically amorphous cobalt boride (Co2B), and the durability of the electrocatalyst at the anode and cathode during water electrolysis. Additionally, by periodically alternating the polarization applied to the bipolar electrode (BE) modified with a bifunctional oxygen electrocatalyst, it was possible to explicitly follow the contributions of the oxygen reduction (ORR) and the oxygen evolution (OER) half-reactions on the overall long-term durability of the bifunctional OER/ORR electrocatalyst. PMID:27469162

  6. Carbon and binder free rechargeable Li-O2 battery cathode with Pt/Co3O4 flake arrays as catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Guangyu; Lv, Jixian; Xu, Zhanming; Zhang, Li; Sun, Kening

    2014-02-01

    Pt nanoparticles modified Co3O4 flake arrays are prepared by an electrochemically assisted method and the subsequent cool sputtering, a carbon and binder free approach. When used as the cathode catalysts of Li-O2 batteries, these porous films supply the O2 transport adequate channels by the macropores surrounded by Co3O4 flakes, which endow the cathodes stable two-phase interface in discharge/charge processes. The superior ability of Pt catalyzing O2 evolution leads the batteries showing a much lower overpotential (3.2 V) in charge process compared with those using pristine Co3O4 arrays as catalysts (4.0 V). The enhancement of decomposing the discharging precipitate promotes the Li-O2 batteries' reversibility obviously, which realize more than 30 discharge/charge cycles.

  7. Electrochemical Performance and Stability of the Cathode for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells IV. On the Ohmic loss in anode supported button cells with LSM or LSCF cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Zigui; Zhou, Xiao Dong; Templeton, Jared W.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2010-05-08

    Anode-supported solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) with a variety of YSZ electrolyte thicknesses were fabricated by tape casting and lamination. The preparation of the YSZ electrolyte tapes with various thicknesses was accomplished by using doctor blades with different gaps between the precision machined, polished blade and the casting surface. The green tape was cut into discs, sintered at 1385°C for 2 h, and subsequently creep-flattened at 1350°C for 2 h. Either LSCF with an SDC interlayer or LSM+YSZ composite was used as the cathode material for the fuel cells. The ohmic resistances of these anode-supported fuel cells were characterized by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy at temperatures from 500°C to 750°C. A linear relationship was found between the ohmic resistance of the fuel cell and the YSZ electrolyte thickness at all the measuring temperatures for both LSCF and LSM+YSZ cathode fuel cells. The ionic conductivities of the YSZ electrolyte, derived for the fuel cells with LSM+YSZ or LSCF cathodes, were independent of the cathode material and cell configuration. The ionic conductivities of the YSZ electrolyte was slightly lower than that of the bulk material, possibly due to Ni-doping into the electrolyte. The fuel cell with a SDC interlayer and LSCF cathode showed larger intercept resistance than the fuel cell with LSM+YSZ cathode, which was possibly due to the imperfect contact between the SDC interlayer and the YSZ electrolyte and the migration of Zr into the SDC interlayer to form an insulating solid solution during cell fabrication. Calculations of the contribution of the YSZ electrolyte to the total ohmic resistance showed that YSZ was still a satisfactory electrolyte at temperatures above 650°C. Explorations should be directed to reduce the intercept resistance to achieve significant improvement in cell performance.

  8. Gold nanoparticles: novel catalyst for the preparation of direct methanol fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Kuralkar, Mayuri; Ingle, Avinash; Gaikwad, Swapnil; Gade, Aniket; Rai, Mahendra

    2015-04-01

    The authors report the biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles (Au-NPs) using plant pathogenic Phoma glomerata (MTCC 2210). The synthesis of nanoparticles was characterised by visual observation followed UV-visible spectrophotometric analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and nanoparticle tracking analysis. Later, direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) was constructed using two chambers (anodic chamber and cathodic chamber). These Au-NPs as catalysts have various advantages over the other catalysts that are used in the DMFC. Most importantly, it is cheaper as compared with other catalysts like platinum, and showed higher catalytic activity because of its effective surface structure. Being nano in size, it provides more surface area for the attachment of reactant molecules (methanol molecules). The DMFC catalysed by Au-NPs are found to be suitable to replace lithium ion battery technology in consumer electronics like cell phones, laptops and so on due to the fact that they can produce a high amount of energy in a small space. As long as fuel and air are supplied to the DMFC, it will continue to produce power, so it does not need to be recharged. The use of Au-NPs as catalyst in DMFC has not been reported in the past; it is reported here the first time. PMID:25829171

  9. Cathode for a hall-heroult type electrolytic cell for producing aluminum

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Craig W.

    2004-04-13

    A method of producing aluminum from alumina in an electrolytic cell including using a cathode comprised of a base material having low electrical conductivity and wettable with molten aluminum to form a reaction layer having a high electrical conductivity on said base layer and a cathode bar extending from said reaction layer through said base material to conduct electrical current from said reaction layer.

  10. Oxygen-hydrogen fuel cell with an iodine-iodide cathode - A concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Javet, P.

    1970-01-01

    Fuel cell uses a porous cathode through which is fed a solution of iodine in aqueous iodide solution, the anode is a hydrogen electrode. No activation polarization appears on the cathode because of the high exchange-current density of the iodine-iodide electrode.