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1

Cervical cancer  

MedlinePLUS

Cancer - cervix ... Worldwide, cervical cancer is the third most common type of cancer in women. It is much less common in the United ... of the routine use of Pap smears . Cervical cancer starts in the cells on the surface of ...

2

Cervical Cancer  

Cancer.gov

Cervical cancer is a disease in which cancer develops in the tissues of the cervix. The Cancer Genome Atlas is studying the two main types of cervical cancer. Squamous cell carcinoma develops in the thin, flat, squamous cells that line the vagina. Adenocarcinoma arises in the glandular cells in the vagina that secrete mucus. Risk factors for cervical cancer include smoking and human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. In the future, the HPV vaccine will lower the infection rate.

3

Bevacizumab, Radiation Therapy, and Cisplatin in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer

2014-09-22

4

ADXS11-001 High Dose HPV+ Cervical Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Effects of Immunotherapy; Metastatic/Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer

2014-06-16

5

MRI and PET Imaging in Predicting Treatment Response in Patients With Stage IB-IVA Cervical Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

2014-10-09

6

Cervical Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... the place where a baby grows during pregnancy. Cervical cancer is caused by a virus called HPV. The ... for a long time, or have HIV infection. Cervical cancer may not cause any symptoms at first. Later, ...

7

Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy With or Without Tirapazamine in Treating Patients With Cervical Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

2014-06-18

8

Cervical Cancer Facts  

E-print Network

What is cervical cancer? Cancer is a disease in which cells in the body grow out of control. Cancer is always named for the part of the body where it starts, even if it spreads to other body parts later. When cancer starts in the cervix, it is called cervical cancer. The cervix is the lower, narrow end of the uterus. The cervix connects the vagina (the birth canal) to the upper part of the uterus. The uterus (or the womb) is where a baby grows when a woman is pregnant. Cervical cancer is preventable with regular screening tests and followup. It also is highly curable when found and treated early. Although cervical cancer occurs most often in women over age 30, all women are at risk for cervical cancer. Each year approximately 12,000 women are diagnosed with cervical cancer and 4,000 women die from the disease. 1 Cervical cancer is the easiest

unknown authors

9

Vaccine Therapy in Treating Patients With Persistent or Recurrent Cervical Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer

2014-08-08

10

Nuclear expression of Rac1 in cervical premalignant lesions and cervical cancer cells  

PubMed Central

Background Abnormal expression of Rho-GTPases has been reported in several human cancers. However, the expression of these proteins in cervical cancer has been poorly investigated. In this study we analyzed the expression of the GTPases Rac1, RhoA, Cdc42, and the Rho-GEFs, Tiam1 and beta-Pix, in cervical pre-malignant lesions and cervical cancer cell lines. Methods Protein expression was analyzed by immunochemistry on 102 cervical paraffin-embedded biopsies: 20 without Squamous Intraepithelial Lesions (SIL), 51 Low- grade SIL, and 31 High-grade SIL; and in cervical cancer cell lines C33A and SiHa, and non-tumorigenic HaCat cells. Nuclear localization of Rac1 in HaCat, C33A and SiHa cells was assessed by cellular fractionation and Western blotting, in the presence or not of a chemical Rac1 inhibitor (NSC23766). Results Immunoreacivity for Rac1, RhoA, Tiam1 and beta-Pix was stronger in L-SIL and H-SIL, compared to samples without SIL, and it was significantly associated with the histological diagnosis. Nuclear expression of Rac1 was observed in 52.9% L-SIL and 48.4% H-SIL, but not in samples without SIL. Rac1 was found in the nucleus of C33A and SiHa cells but not in HaCat cells. Chemical inhibition of Rac1 resulted in reduced cell proliferation in HaCat, C33A and SiHa cells. Conclusion Rac1 is expressed in the nucleus of epithelial cells in SILs and cervical cancer cell lines, and chemical inhibition of Rac1 reduces cellular proliferation. Further studies are needed to better understand the role of Rho-GTPases in cervical cancer progression. PMID:22443139

2012-01-01

11

Cervical Cancer Screening  

MedlinePLUS

... have a history of moderate or severe cervical dysplasia or cervical cancer and if you have had ... under magnification with an instrument called a colposcope. Dysplasia: A noncancerous condition that occurs when normal cells ...

12

Tc17 Cells in Patients with Uterine Cervical Cancer  

PubMed Central

Background The existence of Tc17 cells was recently shown in several types of infectious and autoimmune diseases, but their distribution and functions in uterine cervical cancer (UCC) have not been fully elucidated. Methods The frequency of Tc17 cells in peripheral blood samples obtained from UCC patients, cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) patients and healthy controls was determined by flow cytometry. Besides, the prevalence of Tc17 cells and their relationships to Th17 cells and Foxp3-expressing T cells as well as microvessels in tissue samples of the patients were assessed by immunohistochemistry staining. Results Compared to controls, patients with UCC or CIN had a higher proportion of Tc17 cells in both peripheral blood and cervical tissues, but the level of Tc17 cells in UCC tissues was significantly higher than that in CIN tissues. Besides, the increased level of Tc17 in UCC patients was associated with the status of pelvic lymph node metastases and increased microvessel density. Finally, significant correlations of infiltration between Tc17 cells and Th17 cells or Foxp3-expressing T cells were observed in UCC and CIN tissues. Conclusions This study indicates that Tc17 cell infiltration in cervical cancers is associated with cancer progression accompanied by increased infiltrations of Th17 cells and regulatory T cells as well as promoted tumor vasculogenesis. PMID:24523865

Zhang, Yan; Hou, Fei; Liu, Xin; Ma, Daoxin; Zhang, Youzhong; Kong, Beihua; Cui, Baoxia

2014-01-01

13

Cervical Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a It is estimated that by the end of 1999 in the United States, 12,800 new cases of invasive cervical cancer will be diagnosed\\u000a and that 4800 women will die. Worldwide, cervical cancer is the second most common cancer among women and the leading cause\\u000a of death in many non-industrialized nations (Parkin, 1998). As is true generally for cancer, the burden

Colleen M. McBride; Delia Scholes

14

Tetraspanin 1 promotes invasiveness of cervical cancer cells.  

PubMed

Tetraspanins are a heterogeneous group of 4-transmembrane proteins that segregate into so-called tetraspanin-enriched microdomains (TEMs) along with other cell surface proteins such as integrins. TEMs of various types are reportedly involved in the regulation of cell growth, migration and invasion of several tumour cell types, both as suppressors or supporting structures. Tetraspanin 1 (Tspan1, NET-1), a member of the transmembrane 4 superfamily (TM4SF) of tetraspanins, is overexpressed in high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and terminal carcinomas but its precise function in the context of carcinoma of the cervix uteri is not known. Here, we present a comprehensive investigation of the role of tetraspanin 1 in the cervical cancer cell lines SiHa and HeLa. We document that tetraspanin 1 increases the invasive potential of cervical cancer cells, whereas proliferation, growth in soft agar and adhesion are largely unaffected. In line with the latter findings, our data exclude the participation of testraspanin in integrin-mediated activation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK), paxillin and phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) and in EGFR-dependent signalling to the Ras/Erk pathway. In conclusion, our data argue against a role for tetraspanin 1 as a genuine mediator of cell surface receptor signalling but rather document a role for tetraspanin 1 in the control of cervical cancer cell motility and invasion. PMID:23754316

Hölters, Sebastian; Anacker, Jelena; Jansen, Lars; Beer-Grondke, Katrin; Dürst, Matthias; Rubio, Ignacio

2013-08-01

15

Detection of cancerous cervical cells using physical adhesion of fluorescent silica particles and centripetal force  

E-print Network

) smear and liquid-based cytology tests2,3 have proven to be the most successful methods of cervical of cervical cancer, methods which could work with cells collected with cell cytology tests without tissue

Sokolov, Igor

16

Enhanced Expression of Thymidylate Synthase Mediates Resistance of Uterine Cervical Cancer Cells to Radiation  

Microsoft Academic Search

It has been shown that there is an inverse relationship between the level of thymidylate synthase (TS) and therapeutic outcomes in patients with malignancies including cervical cancer. To clarify the mechanism of the poor prognosis of cervical cancer with high TS expression, we introduced TS cDNA to the human uterine cervical cancer cell line SKG-II and evaluated the effect of

Yasushi Saga; Mitsuaki Suzuki; Hiroaki Mizukami; Masashi Urabe; Masakazu Fukushima; Keiya Ozawa; Ikuo Sato

2002-01-01

17

Hiwi facilitates chemoresistance as a cancer stem cell marker in cervical cancer.  

PubMed

Hiwi, also named PiwiL1, is a human homologue of the Piwi family which is associated with stem cells and is overexpressed in several types of cancers. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the role of Hiwi in cervical carcinogenesis. Immunochemical analysis showed a significantly higher frequency of Hiwi staining in high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSILs) and cervical cancer tissues when comparing with the frequency in normal cervices. Particularly, Hiwi staining was restricted to basal cells of the normal cervix and was associated with the progression of cervical cancer and chemotherapy resistance. We further found that ectopic Hiwi increased the chemical resistance in SiHa cells, and silencing of Hiwi in HeLa cells decreased the cell viability. In addition, as a cancer stem cell marker, Hiwi promoted the tumorsphere formation in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo and elevated the expression of several stem cell self-renewal-associated transcription factors, in spite of inhibited the proliferation. These results suggest that Hiwi may participate in the carcinogenesis of cervical cancer and may be a potential therapeutic target molecule for cervical cancers. PMID:25119492

Liu, Wei; Gao, Qing; Chen, Kunlun; Xue, Xiang; Li, Mu; Chen, Qian; Zhu, Gaixia; Gao, Ya

2014-11-01

18

High expression of prolactin receptor is associated with cell survival in cervical cancer cells  

PubMed Central

Background The altered expression of prolactin (PRL) and its receptor (PRLR) has been implicated in breast and other types of cancer. There are few studies that have focused on the analysis of PRL/PRLR in cervical cancer where the development of neoplastic lesions is influenced by the variation of the hormonal status. The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression of PRL/PRLR and the effect of PRL treatment on cell proliferation and apoptosis in cervical cancer cell lines. Results High expression of multiple PRLR forms and PRLvariants of 60–80 kDa were observed in cervical cancer cell lines compared with non-tumorigenic keratinocytes evaluated by Western blot, immunofluorecence and real time PCR. Treatment with PRL (200 ng/ml) increased cell proliferation in HeLa cells determined by the MTT assay at day 3 and after 1 day a protective effect against etoposide induced apoptosis in HeLa, SiHa and C-33A cervical cancer cell lines analyzed by the TUNEL assay. Conclusions Our data suggests that PRL/PRLR signaling could act as an important survival factor for cervical cancer. The use of an effective PRL antagonist may provide a better therapeutic intervention in cervical cancer. PMID:24148306

2013-01-01

19

Ubiquitin B in cervical cancer: critical for the maintenance of cancer stem-like cell characters.  

PubMed

Cervical cancer cells exhibit an increased requirement for ubiquitin-dependent protein degradation associated with an elevated metabolic turnover rate. Ubiquitin, which is a small, highly conserved protein expressed in all eukaryotic cells, can be covalently linked to certain target proteins to mark them for degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Previous studies highlight the essential role of Ubiquitin B (UbB) and UbB-dependent proteasomal protein degradation in histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) -induced tumor selectivity. We hypothesized that UbB plays a critical role in the function of cervical cancer stem cells. We measured endogenous UbB levels in mammospheres in vitro by real-time PCR and Western blotting. The function of UbB in cancer stem-like cells was assessed after knockdown of UbB expression in prolonged Trichostatin A-selected HeLa cells (HeLa/TSA) by measuring in vitro cell proliferation, cell apoptosis, invasion, and chemotherapy resistance as well as by measuring in vivo growth in an orthotopic model of cervical cancer. We also assessed the cancer stem cell frequency, tumorsphere formation, and in vivo growth of human cervical cancer xenografts after UbB silencing. We found that HeLa/TSA were resistant to chemotherapy, highly expressed the UbB gene and the stem cell markers Sox2, Oct4 and Nanog. These cells also displayed induced differentiation abilities, including enhanced migration/invasion/malignancy capabilities in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, an elevated expression of UbB was shown in the tumor samples of chemotherapy patients. Silencing of UbB inhibited tumorsphere formation, lowered the expression of stem cell markers and decreased cervical xenograft growth. Our results demonstrate that UbB was significantly increased in prolonged Trichostatin A-selected HeLa cells and it played a key role in the maintenance of cervical cancer stem-like cells. PMID:24367661

Tian, Yuan; Ding, Wencheng; Wang, Yingying; Ji, Teng; Sun, Shujuan; Mo, Qingqing; Chen, Pingbo; Fang, Yong; Liu, Jia; Wang, Beibei; Zhou, Jianfeng; Ma, Ding; Wu, Peng

2013-01-01

20

Tumor-associated macrophages induce lymphangiogenesis in cervical cancer via interaction with tumor cells.  

PubMed

Our studies were conducted to investigate the clinical and functional significance of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) in cervical tumor lymphatic metastasis. We found that the increase in macrophages in tumor stroma is significantly associated with lymphatic metastasis (p = 0.017), through performing immunohistochemical staining in 111 cervical samples (55 invasive squamous carcinomas of uterine cervix, 27 cervical intraepithelial neoplasms III, and 29 normal cervix). The human lymphatic endothelial cells (HLEC), which were cultured in conditioned medium of cervical cancer cell-macrophage coculture, formed more tube-like structures in vitro, when compared with those in conditioned mediums of LEC, normal cervical epithelium, single macrophage, and single cervical cancer cell (all p < 0.001). The mRNA expressions of IL-1? and IL-8 in cervical cancer cells cocultured with macrophages were increased, compared with those in cervical cancer cell cultured alone (pIL-1?  < 0.05 and pIL-8  < 0.01). Meanwhile, the mRNA expression of VEGF-C and VEGF-A was increased in macrophages cocultured with cervical cancer cells, compared with the expression in those macrophages cultured alone (both p < 0.05). Taken together, the results suggest that TAMs promote lymphangiogenesis mainly through interaction with surrounding cervical cancer cells. PMID:24698523

Ding, Hui; Cai, Jing; Mao, Min; Fang, Yan; Huang, Zaiju; Jia, Jinghui; Li, Tao; Xu, Linjuan; Wang, Junjie; Zhou, Jun; Yang, Qiang; Wang, Zehua

2014-11-01

21

ICSN - Cervical Cancer  

Cancer.gov

Skip to Main Content Search International Cancer Screening Network Sponsored by the National Cancer Institute Home | About ICSN | Collaborative Projects | Meetings | Cancer Sites | Publications | Contact Us Cervical Cancer (Archived Tables): Home Cervical

22

Hedgehog pathway regulators influence cervical cancer cell proliferation, survival and migration  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Unknown cellular mutations complement papillomavirus-induced carcinogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hedgehog pathway components are expressed by cervical cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hedgehog pathway activators and inhibitors regulate cervical cancer cell biology. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell immortalization by papillomavirus and activation of Hedgehog are independent. -- Abstract: Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is considered to be a primary hit that causes cervical cancer. However, infection with this agent, although needed, is not sufficient for a cancer to develop. Additional cellular changes are required to complement the action of HPV, but the precise nature of these changes is not clear. Here, we studied the function of the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway in cervical cancer. The Hh pathway can have a role in a number of cancers, including those of liver, lung and digestive tract. We found that components of the Hh pathway are expressed in several cervical cancer cell lines, indicating that there could exists an autocrine Hh signaling loop in these cells. Inhibition of Hh signaling reduces proliferation and survival of the cervical cancer cells and induces their apoptosis as seen by the up-regulation of the pro-apoptotic protein cleaved caspase 3. Our results indicate that Hh signaling is not induced directly by HPV-encoded proteins but rather that Hh-activating mutations are selected in cells initially immortalized by HPV. Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) ligand induces proliferation and promotes migration of the cervical cancer cells studied. Together, these results indicate pro-survival and protective roles of an activated Hh signaling pathway in cervical cancer-derived cells, and suggest that inhibition of this pathway may be a therapeutic option in fighting cervical cancer.

Samarzija, Ivana [Ecole Polytechnique Federale Lausanne (EPFL), Department of Life Sciences, Swiss Institute for Experimental Cancer Research (ISREC), 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)] [Ecole Polytechnique Federale Lausanne (EPFL), Department of Life Sciences, Swiss Institute for Experimental Cancer Research (ISREC), 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Beard, Peter, E-mail: peter.beard@epfl.ch [Ecole Polytechnique Federale Lausanne (EPFL), Department of Life Sciences, Swiss Institute for Experimental Cancer Research (ISREC), 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)] [Ecole Polytechnique Federale Lausanne (EPFL), Department of Life Sciences, Swiss Institute for Experimental Cancer Research (ISREC), 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

2012-08-17

23

Development of a new method for cervical cancer cells determination using light scattering spectrum  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Conventional methods for cervical cancer screening usually employ microscopic observations that may require fluorescence labeling of the cells, which could be time-consuming and expensive. Development of a novel method for cervical cancer cells determination in a rapid, label-free manner may significantly improve the cervical cancer screening technique. Here two-dimensional (2D) light scattering patterns are obtained from yeast cells on a CMOS chip, where laser light is used to excite single cells via fiber-coupling under a microscope. Good agreements between the experimental and Mie theory simulation results convey that 2D light scattering patterns from cervical cancer cells may be obtained upon the apparatus developed here. Mie theory simulations on simplified normal and cancerous cervical cells show that side scattering spectrum may be used for cervical cancer cells screening. Future experiments further convincing the 2D light scattering method proposed here may bring up a powerful technique that has profound applications in cervical cancer cell determination.

Yang, Yan; Jia, Rongfeng; Sun, Qiyong; Song, Kun; Kong, Beihua; Su, Xuantao

24

miR-205 Expression Promotes Cell Proliferation and Migration of Human Cervical Cancer Cells  

PubMed Central

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short non-coding RNA regulators that control gene expression mainly through post-transcriptional silencing. We previously identified miR-205 in a signature for human cervical cancer using a deep sequencing approach. In this study, we confirmed that miR-205 expression was frequently higher in human cervical cancer than their matched normal tissue samples. Functionally, we demonstrate that miR-205 promotes cell proliferation and migration in human cervical cancer cells. To further understand the biological roles of miR-205, we performed in vivo crosslinking and Argonaute 2 immunoprecipitation of miRNA ribonucleoprotein complexes followed by microarray analysis (CLIP-Chip) to identify its potential mRNA targets. Applying CLIP-Chip on gain- and loss-of-function experiments, we identified a set of transcripts as potential targets of miR-205. Several targets are functionally involved in cellular proliferation and migration. Two of them, CYR61 and CTGF, were further validated by Western blot analysis and quantification of mRNA enrichment in the Ago2 immunoprecipitates using qRT-PCR. Furthermore, both CYR61 and CTGF were downregulated in cervical cancer tissues. In summary, our findings reveal novel functional roles and targets of miR-205 in human cervical cancer, which may provide new insights about its role in cervical carcinogenesis and its potential value for clinical diagnosis. PMID:23056551

Xie, Hong; Zhao, Yungang; Caramuta, Stefano; Larsson, Catharina; Lui, Weng-Onn

2012-01-01

25

Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy With or Without Triapine in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Stage IB-IVA Cervical Cancer or Stage II-IVA Vaginal Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage II Vaginal Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Vaginal Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Vaginal Cancer; Vaginal Adenocarcinoma; Vaginal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

2014-10-30

26

Cervical Cancer Screening  

MedlinePLUS

... Cancer found early may be easier to treat. Cervical cancer screening is usually part of a woman's health ... may do more tests, such as a biopsy. Cervical cancer screening has risks. The results can sometimes be ...

27

Proteomic patterns of cervical cancer cell lines, a network perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Cervical cancer is a major mortality factor in the female population. This neoplastic is an excellent model for studying the\\u000a mechanisms involved in cancer maintenance, because the Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) is the etiology factor in most cases. With\\u000a the purpose of characterizing the effects of malignant transformation in cellular activity, proteomic studies constitute a\\u000a reliable way to monitor the

Juan Carlos Higareda-Almaraz; del Rocío María Enríquez-Gasca; Magdalena Hernández-Ortiz; Osbaldo Resendis-Antonio; Sergio Encarnación-Guevara

2011-01-01

28

WWOX induces apoptosis and inhibits proliferation in cervical cancer and cell lines.  

PubMed

Cervical cancer is the second most common gynecological malignancy, but the molecular events involved in its development remain unclear. The tumor?suppressor gene, WW domain-containing oxidoreductase (WWOX), has been found to be lost in various types of cancers. Few studies have been reported detailing the function of WWOX in human cervical cancer; therefore we aimed to investigate the role played by WWOX in human cervical cancer. Immunohistochemistry was used to study preinvasive and invasive primary cervical cancer. Full length cDNA was transfected into HeLa cells to overexpress WWOX, and short hairpin RNA (shRNA) was transfected into SiHa cells to deplete its expression, respectively. The cellular levels of WWOX RNA and protein were detected by real-time PCR and western immunoblotting. Proliferation rates were assessed by methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT), plate colony formation and soft agar colony assays. Cellular apoptosis was measured by flow cytometry and TdT-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay. The activity of caspase-3 and its protein levels were determined by caspase-3 activity assay and western blot analysis. Xenografts were established by injecting cells into nude mice. The results showed that WWOX expression was decreased in human cervical cancer and cervical cancer cell lines. Reconstitution of WWOX in HeLa cells inhibited their proliferation and induced apoptosis, while knockdown of WWOX in SiHa cells promoted proliferation and inhibited apoptosis. Xenografts in groups of mice verified the effect in vivo. These data suggest that underexpression of WWOX is associated with cervical cancer development. Modulation of WWOX expression may be an effective and novel method for the treatment of cervical cancer. PMID:23525362

Qu, Junjie; Lu, Wen; Li, Bilan; Lu, Cong; Wan, Xiaoping

2013-05-01

29

CDC's Cervical Cancer Study  

MedlinePLUS

... by Reducing Indoor Tanning Cervical Cancer Rates Among Young Women in the United States 2012 Increased Risk of Rare Cancer as DES Daughters Age Patterns of Colorectal Cancer Test ... and Young Adult Cancer Survivors HPV-Associated Cancers Doctors Who ...

30

Syzygium cumini inhibits growth and induces apoptosis in cervical cancer cell lines: a primary study  

PubMed Central

Cervical cancer is common among women in the Indian subcontinent and the incidences and death rates are gradually increasing over the years. Several dietary phytochemicals have been reported to have growth inhibitory and apoptotic effect on HeLa and other cervical cell lines. In this study, using Hoechst 33342 staining, MTT, Annexin V-FLUOS/PI and TUNEL assays we demonstrated that Syzygium cumini extract inhibits the growth and induces apoptosis in HeLa and SiHa cervical cancer cell lines in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The phytochemical, its mode of action and safety issues are yet to be determined. PMID:22275971

Barh, D; Viswanathan, G

2008-01-01

31

Radiation Therapy and Cisplatin With or Without Epoetin Alfa in Treating Patients With Cervical Cancer and Anemia  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Anemia; Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Drug/Agent Toxicity by Tissue/Organ; Radiation Toxicity; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

2014-02-12

32

Antiapoptotic effects of estrogen in normal and cancer human cervical epithelial cells.  

PubMed

The present study investigated the antiapoptotic effects of estrogen in normal and cancer human cervical cells and the mechanisms involved. Baseline apoptosis in human cervical epithelial cells is mediated predominantly by P2X7-receptor-induced, Ca(2+)-dependent activation of the mitochondrial (caspase-9) pathway. Treatment with 10 nM 17beta-estradiol blocked apoptosis induced by the P2X7-receptor ligands ATP and 2',3'-0-(4-benzoylbenzoyl)-ATP in normal human cervical epithelial cells (hECEs) and attenuated the effect in hECEs immortalized with human papillomavirus-16 (ECE16-1) and the cancer cervical cells HT3 and CaSki. Diethylstilbestrol and to a lesser degree estrone could mimic the effects of 17beta-estradiol, whereas actinomycin-D and cycloheximide attenuated the response. The antiapoptotic effect of estrogen did not depend on cell cycle phase, and in both normal and cancer cervical cells, it involved attenuation of activation of caspase-9 and the terminal caspase-3. However, involvement of cascades upstream to the caspase-9 differed in normal vs. cancer cervical cells. In the normal hECEs estrogen blocked P2X7-receptor-induced calcium influx. In contrast, in the cancer CaSki cells, estrogen up-regulated expression of Bcl-2 and attenuated Ca(2+)-induced mitochondrial swelling (i.e. formation of mitochondrial permeability transition pores). Estrogen had no effect on P2X7-receptor-induced apoptosis in the anaplastic SiHa and Hela cells. These results point to a novel antiapoptotic effect of estrogen in the cervix that is independent of its mitogenic function. The results also suggest that cancer cervical cells evolved antiapoptotic mechanisms that enable the cells to evade apoptosis and could therefore promote tumor progression. PMID:15319352

Wang, Qifang; Li, Xin; Wang, Liqin; Feng, Ying-Hong; Zeng, Robin; Gorodeski, George

2004-12-01

33

Vaccines against cervical cancer.  

PubMed

Cervical cancer and precancerous lesions of the genital tract are a major threat to women's health worldwide. Although the introduction of screening tests to detect cervical cancer and its precursor lesions has reduced overall cervical cancer rates in the developed world, the approach was largely unsuccessful for developing countries, primarily due to a lack of appropriate infrastructures and high costs. Annually, 470,000 cervical cancer cases are diagnosed worldwide, of which 80% occur in developing countries. Despite advances in treatment of cervical cancer, approximately half of the women afflicted with the disease will die. Over 20 years of dedicated research has provided conclusive evidence that a subset of human papillomaviruses are the aetiological agents for cervical cancer. Finding a viral origin for this disease provided the basis to fight cervical cancer using prophylactic or therapeutic vaccination. Both vaccine approaches are reviewed here, with an emphasis on recent clinical data. PMID:15500408

Jansen, Kathrin U

2004-11-01

34

Cervical Cancer Other Characteristics  

Cancer.gov

Skip to Main Content Search International Cancer Screening Network Sponsored by the National Cancer Institute Home | About ICSN | Collaborative Projects | Meetings | Cancer Sites | Publications | Contact Us Cervical Cancer (Archived Tables): Home Other

35

Cervical Cancer Screening Programs  

Cancer.gov

Skip to Main Content Search International Cancer Screening Network Sponsored by the National Cancer Institute Home | About ICSN | Collaborative Projects | Meetings | Cancer Sites | Publications | Contact Us Cervical Cancer (Archived Tables): Home Organization

36

Cervical Cancer Participation Rates  

Cancer.gov

Skip to Main Content Search International Cancer Screening Network Sponsored by the National Cancer Institute Home | About ICSN | Collaborative Projects | Meetings | Cancer Sites | Publications | Contact Us Cervical Cancer (Archived Tables): Home Participation

37

Cervical Cancer Screening Programs  

Cancer.gov

Skip to Main Content Search International Cancer Screening Network Sponsored by the National Cancer Institute Home | About ICSN | Collaborative Projects | Meetings | Cancer Sites | Publications | Contact Us Cervical Cancer: Mortality Rates | Organization

38

ICSN - Cervical Cancer  

Cancer.gov

Skip to Main Content Search International Cancer Screening Network Sponsored by the National Cancer Institute Home | About ICSN | Collaborative Projects | Meetings | Cancer Sites | Publications | Contact Us Cervical Cancer Incidence and Mortality Rates Organization

39

Visualization and characterization of cancer stem-like cells in cervical cancer.  

PubMed

Cancer stem cells (CSCs), defined by their differentiation capacity, self-renewal capacity, and maintenance of proliferation, have been identified in many tumors, including cervical cancer. Current studies identify CSCs by several specific biomarkers; however, it is difficult to monitor cervical CSCs in real-time in vitro and in vivo. Recent research reported the visualization of CSCs in breast cancer and gliomas using green fluorescent protein, ZsGreen, fused to a degron motif ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), which is destroyed by proteasomes. Accordingly, CSCs have low 26S proteasome activity, whereas non-CSCs have high 26S proteasome activity. Therefore, it is possible to observe CSCs by their accumulation of the fluorescent ZsGreen protein. In this study, we investigated optical imaging parameters to evaluate CSCs using two human cervical cancer cell lines: CaSki and HeLa. We defined populations as cell types having high- and low ZsGreen-cODC (high- and low-Zs, respectively) expression levels. The results of a sphere-forming assay revealed that the self-renewal ability of the high-Zs population was significantly higher than that of the low-Zs population. A tumorigenicity assay confirmed that the high-Zs population exhibited higher tumorigenic potential than the low-Zs population. The radioresistance of the high-Zs population of both HeLa and CaSki cells and the chemoresistance of the high-Zs population of CaSki cells were confirmed by a clonogenic survival assay and the tetrazolium dye assay, respectively. These results indicate that high-Zs populations of both the HeLa and CaSki cell lines possess CSC-like properties and therapeutic resistance. In conclusion, we successfully visualized CSC-like cells using a fluorescent protein system. PMID:25269542

Hayashi, Kazuhiko; Tamari, Keisuke; Ishii, Hideshi; Konno, Masamitsu; Nishida, Naohiro; Kawamoto, Koichi; Koseki, Jun; Fukusumi, Takahito; Kano, Yoshihiro; Nishikawa, Shimpei; Miyo, Masaaki; Noguchi, Kozo; Ogawa, Hisataka; Hamabe, Atsushi; Seo, Yuji; Doki, Yuichiro; Mori, Masaki; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

2014-12-01

40

miR-196a targets netrin 4 and regulates cell proliferation and migration of cervical cancer cells  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: •miR-196a was overexpressed in cervical cancer tissue compared to normal tissue. •miR-196a expression elevated proliferation and migration of cervical cancer cells. •miR-196a inhibited NTN4 expression by binding 3?-UTR region of NTN4 mRNA. •NTN4 inversely correlated with miR-196a expression in cervical tissue and cell line. •NTN4 expression was low in cervical cancer tissue compared to normal tissue. -- Abstract: Recent research has uncovered tumor-suppressive and oncogenic potential of miR-196a in various tumors. However, the expression and mechanism of its function in cervical cancer remains unclear. In this study, we assess relative expression of miR-196a in cervical premalignant lesions, cervical cancer tissues, and four cancer cell lines using quantitative real-time PCR. CaSki and HeLa cells were treated with miR-196a inhibitors, mimics, or pCDNA/miR-196a to investigate the role of miR-196a in cancer cell proliferation and migration. We demonstrated that miR-196a was overexpressed in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 2–3 and cervical cancer tissue. Moreover, its expression contributes to the proliferation and migration of cervical cancer cells, whereas inhibiting its expression led to a reduction in proliferation and migration. Five candidate targets of miR-196a chosen by computational prediction and Cervical Cancer Gene Database search were measured for their mRNA in both miR-196a-overexpressing and -depleted cancer cells. Only netrin 4 (NTN4) expression displayed an inverse association with miR-196a. Fluorescent reporter assays revealed that miR-196a inhibited NTN4 expression by targeting one binding site in the 3?-untranslated region (3?-UTR) of NTN4 mRNA. Furthermore, qPCR and Western blot assays verified NTN4 expression was downregulated in cervical cancer tissues compared to normal controls, and in vivo mRNA level of NTN4 inversely correlated with miR-196a expression. In summary, our findings provide new insights about the functional role of miR-196a in cervical carcinogenesis and suggested a potential use of miR-196a for clinical diagnosis and as a therapeutic target.

Zhang, Jie [Department of Pathology, Liaocheng People’s Hospital, Liaocheng 252000 (China)] [Department of Pathology, Liaocheng People’s Hospital, Liaocheng 252000 (China); Zheng, Fangxia [Department of Radiotherapy, Liaocheng People’s Hospital, Liaocheng 252000 (China)] [Department of Radiotherapy, Liaocheng People’s Hospital, Liaocheng 252000 (China); Yu, Gang [Department for Disease Control, Tumor Hospital of Liaocheng, Liaocheng 252000 (China)] [Department for Disease Control, Tumor Hospital of Liaocheng, Liaocheng 252000 (China); Yin, Yanhua, E-mail: yinyanhuablk@163.com [Department of Pathology, Liaocheng People’s Hospital, Liaocheng 252000 (China)] [Department of Pathology, Liaocheng People’s Hospital, Liaocheng 252000 (China); Lu, Qingyang [Department of Pathology, Liaocheng People’s Hospital, Liaocheng 252000 (China)] [Department of Pathology, Liaocheng People’s Hospital, Liaocheng 252000 (China)

2013-11-01

41

Cervical Cancer Stage IIIB  

MedlinePLUS

... Cancer Stage IIIB Description: Stage IIIB cervical cancer; drawing shows cancer in the cervix, the vagina, and ... that connect the kidneys to the bladder). The drawing shows the ureter on the right blocked by ...

42

Biomarker discovery for neuroendocrine cervical cancer.  

PubMed

Neuroendocrine cervical cancer is an aggressive but rare form of cervical cancer. The majority of neuroendocrine cervical cancer patients present with advanced-stage diseases. However, the limited numbers of neuroendocrine tumor markers are insufficient for clinical purposes. Thus, we used a proteomic approach combining lysine labeling 2D-DIGE and MALDI-TOF MS to investigate the biomarkers for neuroendocrine cervical cancer. By analyzing the global proteome alteration between the neuroendocrine cervical cancer line (HM-1) and non-neuroendocrine cervical cancer lines (CaSki cells, ME-180 cells, and Hela cells), we identified 82 proteins exhibiting marked changes between HM-1 and CaSki cells, and between ME-180 and Hela cells. Several proteins involved in protein folding, cytoskeleton, transcription control, signal transduction, glycolysis, and redox regulation exhibited significant changes in abundance. Proteomic and immunoblot analyses indicated respective 49.88-fold and 25-fold increased levels of transgelin in HM-1 cells compared with that in other non-neuroendocrine cervical cancer cell lines, implying that transgelin is a biomarker for neuroendocrine cervical cancer. In summary, we used a comprehensive neuroendocrine/non-neuroendocrine cervical cancer model based proteomic approach for identifying neuroendocrine cervical cancer markers, which might contribute to the prognosis and diagnosis of neuroendocrine cervical cancer. PMID:24723343

Lin, Li-Hsun; Chang, Shing-Jyh; Hu, Ren-Yu; Lin, Meng-Wei; Lin, Szu-Ting; Huang, Shun-Hong; Lyu, Ping-Chiang; Chou, Hsiu-Chuan; Lai, Zih-Yin; Chuang, Yung-Jen; Chan, Hong-Lin

2014-07-01

43

Reversal of resistance towards cisplatin by curcumin in cervical cancer cells.  

PubMed

Epigenetic regulators like histone deacetylases (1 and 2), and viral onco-proteins (E6/E7) are known to be overexpressed in cervical cancer cells. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of curcumin on HDACs (1 and 2) and HPV E6/E7 in the cervical cancer cell line SiHa and a drug resistant clone SiHaR (derived from SiHa). It was further intended to investigate whether curcumin could sensitize the cells towards cisplatin induced cell killing by modulation of multi drug resistant proteins like MRP1 and Pgp1. Curcumin inhibited HDACs, HPV expression and differentially increased acetylation and up-regulation of p53 in SiHa and SiHaR, leading to cell cycle arrest at G1-S phase. Up-regulation of pRb, p21, p27 and corresponding inhibition of cyclin D1 and CDK4 were observed. Cisplatin resistance in SiHaR due to over-expression of MRP1 and Pgp1 was overcome by curcumin. Curcumin also sensitized both the cervical cancer cells towards cisplatin induced cell killing. Inhibition of HDACs and HPVs led to cell cycle arrest at G1/S phase by alteration of cell cycle regulatory proteins. Suppression of MRP1 and Pgp1 by curcumin resulted in sensitization of cervical cancer cells, lowering the chemotherapeutic dose of the drug cisplatin. PMID:24606473

Roy, Madhumita; Mukherjee, Sutapa

2014-01-01

44

Down Regulation of FOXO1 Promotes Cell Proliferation in Cervical Cancer  

PubMed Central

The Forkhead transcription factor FOXO1, an important downstream target of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT signaling pathway, regulates cellular homeostasis by maintaining cell proliferation, apoptosis and viability in normal cells. Though, the function and regulation of FOXO1 is well documented in many cancers, the molecular mechanism of its regulation in cervical cancer is largely unknown. In the present study we have investigated the role of PI3K inhibition on FOXO1 regulation. Expression profiling of primary tumors and cell lines show over expression of PIK3CA and AKT1; and down regulation of FOXO1. Lack of FOXO1 promoter methylation and inability of hypomethylating drug 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine and HDAC inhibitor trichostatin A to reactivate FOXO1 expression suggest that loss of FOXO1 expression is due to mechanisms other than promoter methylation/acetylation. Inhibition of PI3K by LY294002 decreased the level of p-AKT1 and activated FOXO1 transcription factor. We demonstrate that activation of FOXO1 induces apoptosis, cell proliferation arrest, and decreased cell viability in cervical cancer cell lines. Our data suggest that frequent down regulation of FOXO1 and its functional inactivation may be due to post-translational modifications in cervical cancer. Together, these observations suggest that activation of FOXO1 and its nuclear sequestration is critical in the regulation of cell proliferation, cell viability and apoptosis in cervical cancer. Hence, PI3K/AKT pathway may be a potential molecular target for cervical cancer therapy. PMID:25157276

Prasad, Shyam Babu; Yadav, Suresh Singh; Das, Mitali; Govardhan, H. B.; Pandey, Lakshmi Kant; Singh, Sunita; Pradhan, Satyajit; Narayan, Gopeshwar

2014-01-01

45

Cervical Cancer Prevention  

MedlinePLUS

... risk of cervical cancer. Long-term use of oral contraceptives Women who have used oral contraceptives ("the Pill") for 5 years or more have ... cervical cancer than women who have never used oral contraceptives. The risk is higher after 10 years of ...

46

I. Cervical dysplasia = abnormal tissue growth n Cervical cancer develops in the  

E-print Network

11/12/12 1 I. Cervical dysplasia = abnormal tissue growth n Cervical cancer develops in the lining dysplasia to cancer A. Cancerous condition usually develops over time. q Normal cervical cells may gradually undergo changes to become precancerous and then cancerous q Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN

Dever, Jennifer A.

47

Microinvasive cervical cancer in pregnancy  

E-print Network

Cervical cancer is the most frequently diagnosed malignant disease in pregnancy. The clinical symptoms are scarce or none. The diagnosis is made primarily with a cervical smear, as well as a colposcopic examination and directed cervical biopsy. The treatment of cervical cancer depends on the stage of the disease, the gestation period, and a patient's wish to carry a pregnancy to term. The illustrated case is of a patient who with the diagnosed presence of microinvasive squamous cell cancer, due to cervical biopsy, in the 1st trimester of pregnancy. In the 2nd trimester, diagnostic conization was performed in order to exclude the presence of the invasive disease. The definite histopathologic findings indicated the presence of cancer in situ. The conization margins were negative and thus the patient was successfully cured. The patient had a cesarean birth in the 36th week of pregnancy and she gave birth to an alive female newborn. Women are given the chance to have cervical cancer diagnosed and treated in the early stages of pregnancy owing to the introduction of a cervical smear in the modern protocol of antenatal protection. 1

Arch Oncol; Ljiljana Mladenoviæ Segedi; Petar Novakoviæ; Olgica Mihajloviæ; Tatjana Ivkoviæ-kapicl

48

Cervical cancer...159 Chapter 14  

E-print Network

NICR/NCRI Cervical cancer...159 Chapter 14: Cervical cancer (C53) KEY FINDINGS - INCIDENCE diagnosed with cervical cancer during 1994-2004. - NORTH/SOUTH COMPARISONS o Incidence rates during 2000 1994-2004: A comprehensive report 160...Cervical cancer 14.1: Incidence During 2000-2004 there were

Paxton, Anthony T.

49

Dehydroepiandrosterone inhibits proliferation and suppresses migration of human cervical cancer cell lines.  

PubMed

Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), an adrenal steroid which is most abundant in human plasma, has a protective role against several types of cancer; however, its mechanisms of action are unknown. We evaluated the effect of DHEA on the proliferation and migration of three cell lines derived from cervical cancer. Cell proliferation was evaluated by crystal violet staining; migration by attachment, transwell and wound assays. DHEA inhibited the proliferation of InBl and SiHa cells, with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 30 ?M, whereas the proliferation of HeLa cells was inhibited with an IC50 of 70 ?M. DHEA at these IC50 inhibited attachment of cells to the plastic surface of the culture wells, and migration, was evaluated using transwells after 24 h of exposure. DHEA also reduced migration of the three cell lines into the wound area. These results suggest that a possible mechanism of DHEA in protecting against cervical cancer is the inhibition of proliferation and migration of tumor cells. DHEA could be useful in the prevention or treatment of cervical cancer. PMID:25075027

Ortega-Calderón, Yasmín Nansi; López-Marure, Rebeca

2014-08-01

50

Adenosine uptake is the major effector of extracellular ATP toxicity in human cervical cancer cells.  

PubMed

In cervical cancer, HPV infection and disruption of mechanisms involving cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis are strictly linked with tumor progression and invasion. Tumor microenvironment is ATP and adenosine rich, suggesting a role for purinergic signaling in cancer cell growth and death. Here we investigate the effect of extracellular ATP on human cervical cancer cells. We find that extracellular ATP itself has a small cytotoxic effect, whereas adenosine formed from ATP degradation by ectonucleotidases is the main factor responsible for apoptosis induction. The level of P2×7 receptor seemed to define the main cytotoxic mechanism triggered by ATP, since ATP itself eliminated a small subpopulation of cells that express high P2×7 levels, probably through its activation. Corroborating these data, blockage or knockdown of P2×7 only slightly reduced ATP cytotoxicity. On the other hand, cell viability was almost totally recovered with dipyridamole, an adenosine transporter inhibitor. Moreover, ATP-induced apoptosis and signaling-p53 increase, AMPK activation, and PARP cleavage-as well as autophagy induction were also inhibited by dipyridamole. In addition, inhibition of adenosine conversion into AMP also blocked cell death, indicating that metabolization of intracellular adenosine originating from extracellular ATP is responsible for the main effects of the latter in human cervical cancer cells. PMID:25103241

Mello, Paola de Andrade; Filippi-Chiela, Eduardo Cremonese; Nascimento, Jéssica; Beckenkamp, Aline; Santana, Danielle Bertodo; Kipper, Franciele; Casali, Emerson André; Nejar Bruno, Alessandra; Paccez, Juliano Domiraci; Zerbini, Luiz Fernando; Wink, Marcia Rosângela; Lenz, Guido; Buffon, Andréia

2014-10-01

51

Fludeoxyglucose F 18 PET Scan, CT Scan, and Ferumoxtran-10 MRI Scan Before Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy in Finding Lymph Node Metastasis in Patients With Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer or High-Risk Endometrial Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Endometrial Clear Cell Carcinoma; Endometrial Papillary Serous Carcinoma; Stage I Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage II Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage III Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

2014-10-02

52

Transcription of Human Papillomavirus Type 16 Early Genes in a Cervical Cancer and a Cancer-Derived Cell Line and Identification of the E7 Protein  

Microsoft Academic Search

Human papillomavirus type 16 DNA and RNA were characterized in the cervical cancer-derived CaSki cell line, which contains only integrated DNA, and in a cervical cancer, which contains predominantly plasmid DNA. In both, a major RNA can code for the early open reading frame E7 and a minor one can code for E6. The cervical cancer, but not the CaSki

David Smotkin; Felix O. Wettstein

1986-01-01

53

Sonoporation of Cervical Carcinoma Cells Affected with E6-Oncoprotein for the Treatment of Uterine Cancer  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Cervical cancer has been identified as the third leading cause of average years of life lost per person dying of cancer. Since essentially all cervical cancers contain copies of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA, we propose a treatment that targets HPV-infected cells using strategies that re-introduce normal functions into the infected cells while sparing healthy cells. We propose the use of focused ultrasound in combination with microbubbles as means to deliver antibodies against the E6 protein present only in HPV positive cells. We conducted in vitro studies with cell cultures of SiHa cervical carcinoma cells seeded into Opticell™ chambers. An in-house ultrasound excitation apparatus was used to control and explore the optimal acoustic parameters in order to maximize delivery. We first validated the possibility of delivering the EX-EGFP-M02 vector (Genecopoeia) into the cells; 1.2 ?L of activated microbubbles (Definity®) and 50 ?g of the vector were mixed in media and then injected into the Opticell™ chamber. We used 32 ?s pulses at a central frequency of 930 KHz with a repetition frequency of 1.5 kHz and total exposure duration of 30 s; six pressure values were tested (0 to 1 MPa). Fluorescence imaging was used to determine the levels of intracellular proteins and assess delivery. The delivery of an anti-?-Tubulin antibody was next tested and confirmed that the delivery into HPV16 positive cells was successful.

Curiel, Laura; Lee, Kyle; Pichardo, Samuel; Zehbe, Ingeborg

2010-03-01

54

Smoking and Cervical Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

Smoking and Cervical Cancer If you smoke, you have an increased chance of developing precancerous lesions of ... returning for follow-up appointments, and to Stop Smoking! Copyright © 2003, 2008 American Society for Colposcopy and ...

55

Cervical Cancer Stage IB  

MedlinePLUS

... Home About My Pictures Browse Search Quick Search Image Details Cervical Cancer Stage IB View/Download: Small: ... Added: 4/23/2012 Reuse Restrictions: Yes - This image is copyright protected. Any use of this image ...

56

Cervical Cancer Stage IVB  

MedlinePLUS

... Home About My Pictures Browse Search Quick Search Image Details Cervical Cancer Stage IVB View/Download: Small: ... Added: 4/23/2012 Reuse Restrictions: Yes - This image is copyright protected. Any use of this image ...

57

Cervical Cancer Stage IA  

MedlinePLUS

... Home About My Pictures Browse Search Quick Search Image Details Cervical Cancer Stage IA View/Download: Small: ... Added: 4/23/2012 Reuse Restrictions: Yes - This image is copyright protected. Any use of this image ...

58

Cervical Cancer Stage IVA  

MedlinePLUS

... Home About My Pictures Browse Search Quick Search Image Details Cervical Cancer Stage IVA View/Download: Small: ... Added: 4/23/2012 Reuse Restrictions: Yes - This image is copyright protected. Any use of this image ...

59

Cervical Cancer Stage IIIA  

MedlinePLUS

... Home About My Pictures Browse Search Quick Search Image Details Cervical Cancer Stage IIIA View/Download: Small: ... Added: 4/23/2012 Reuse Restrictions: Yes - This image is copyright protected. Any use of this image ...

60

Cervical Cancer Screening  

MedlinePLUS

... often in black women than in white women. Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the major risk factor for ... Although most women with cervical cancer have the human papillomavirus (HPV) infection , not all women with an HPV ...

61

Cervical cancer - screening and prevention  

MedlinePLUS

Cervical cancer is cancer that starts in the cervix. The cervix is the lower part of the uterus ( ... can do to decrease your chance of having cervical cancer. Also, tests done by your health care provider ...

62

Cervical cancer screening  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although primary prevention of human papillomavirus (HPV) infections that are causally associated with invasive cervical cancer\\u000a may be within our grasp, it is unlikely that these approaches will replace existing cervical cancer screening strategies for\\u000a many years. Experts agree and data support periodic cytology screening for young-adult women using one of several technologies.\\u000a Recent analyses of cost-effectiveness suggest that the

Dorothy J. Wiley; Bradley J. Monk; Emmanuel Masongsong; Kristina Morgan

2004-01-01

63

MAML1 regulates cell viability via the NF-?B pathway in cervical cancer cell lines  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Notch signaling pathway plays important roles in tumorigenesis in a context-dependent manner. In human cervical cancer, alterations in Notch signaling have been reported, and both tumor-suppressing and tumor-promoting roles of Notch signaling have been proposed; however, the precise molecular mechanisms governing these roles in cervical cancer remain controversial. MAML is a transcriptional co-activator originally identified by its role in

Yanin Kuncharin; Naunpun Sangphech; Patipark Kueanjinda; Parvapan Bhattarakosol; Tanapat Palaga

2011-01-01

64

Mullerian Inhibiting Substance inhibits cervical cancer cell growth via a pathway involving p130 and p107.  

PubMed

In addition to causing regression of the Mullerian duct in the male embryo, Mullerian Inhibiting Substance (MIS) inhibits the growth of epithelial ovarian cancer cells, which are known to be of Mullerian origin. Because the uterine cervix is derived from the same Mullerian duct precursor as the epithelium of the ovary, we tested the hypothesis that cervical cancer cells might also respond to MIS. A number of cervical cancer cell lines express the MIS type II receptor, and MIS inhibits the growth of both human papilloma virus-transformed and non-human papilloma virus-transformed cervical cell lines, with a more dramatic effect seen in the latter. As in the ovarian cancer cell line OVCAR8, suppression of growth of the C33A cervical cancer cell line by MIS is associated with induction of the p16 tumor suppressor protein. However, in contrast to OVCAR8 cells, induction of p130 and p107 appears to play an important role in the inhibition of growth of C33A cells by MIS. Finally, normal cervical tissue expresses the MIS type II receptor in vivo, supporting the idea that MIS could be a targeted therapy for cervical cancer. PMID:14671316

Barbie, Thanh U; Barbie, David A; MacLaughlin, David T; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Donahoe, Patricia K

2003-12-23

65

Mullerian Inhibiting Substance inhibits cervical cancer cell growth via a pathway involving p130 and p107  

PubMed Central

In addition to causing regression of the Mullerian duct in the male embryo, Mullerian Inhibiting Substance (MIS) inhibits the growth of epithelial ovarian cancer cells, which are known to be of Mullerian origin. Because the uterine cervix is derived from the same Mullerian duct precursor as the epithelium of the ovary, we tested the hypothesis that cervical cancer cells might also respond to MIS. A number of cervical cancer cell lines express the MIS type II receptor, and MIS inhibits the growth of both human papilloma virus-transformed and non-human papilloma virus-transformed cervical cell lines, with a more dramatic effect seen in the latter. As in the ovarian cancer cell line OVCAR8, suppression of growth of the C33A cervical cancer cell line by MIS is associated with induction of the p16 tumor suppressor protein. However, in contrast to OVCAR8 cells, induction of p130 and p107 appears to play an important role in the inhibition of growth of C33A cells by MIS. Finally, normal cervical tissue expresses the MIS type II receptor in vivo, supporting the idea that MIS could be a targeted therapy for cervical cancer. PMID:14671316

Barbie, Thanh U.; Barbie, David A.; MacLaughlin, David T.; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Donahoe, Patricia K.

2003-01-01

66

Sex steroids and cervical cancer.  

PubMed

During the 19th century, studies indicated that reproductive events were involved in cervical cancer. Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is a prerequisite for development of cancer, but co-factors, among them the action of sexual steroid hormones, are necessary. Childbirth has been an important risk factor but now probably plays a minor role in the industrialized world, where parity is low. Long-term oral contraceptive use has been thoroughly studied epidemiologically, and correlates to cervical cancer in most studies. In vitro studies on cervical cell lines transfected with HPV and animal studies indicate that sex steroid hormones are capable to induce cancer. In in vivo cervical cancer tissue studies there have been observations that endogenous progesterone in serum correlates to a negative pattern of expression of cellular and extracellular proteins, tumor markers. Immune response could be another mechanism. Estradiol might be associated with a positive pattern and high estradiol and low progesterone levels increase duration of survival in cervical cancer. Studies where treatment of compounds that influence sex steroid hormones have been given are rare and have been disappointing. PMID:22843872

Hellberg, Dan

2012-08-01

67

Stressing the ubiquitin-proteasome system without 20S proteolytic inhibition selectively kills cervical cancer cells.  

PubMed

Cervical cancer cells exhibit an increased requirement for ubiquitin-dependent protein degradation associated with an elevated metabolic turnover rate, and for specific signaling pathways, notably HPV E6-targeted degradation of p53 and PDZ proteins. Natural compounds with antioxidant properties including flavonoids and triterpenoids hold promise as anticancer agents by interfering with ubiquitin-dependent protein degradation. An increasing body of evidence indicates that their ?-? unsaturated carbonyl system is the molecular determinant for inhibition of ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation up-stream of the catalytic sites of the 20S proteasome. Herein we report the identification and characterization of a new class of chalcone-based, potent and cell permeable chemical inhibitors of ubiquitin-dependent protein degradation, and a lead compound RAMB1. RAMB1 inhibits ubiquitin-dependent protein degradation without compromising the catalytic activities of the 20S proteasome, a mechanism distinct from that of Bortezomib. Treatment of cervical cancer cells with RAMB1 triggers unfolded protein responses, including aggresome formation and Hsp90 stabilization, and increases p53 steady state levels. RAMB1 treatment results in activation of lysosomal-dependent degradation pathways as a mechanism to compensate for increasing levels of poly-ubiquitin enriched toxic aggregates. Importantly, RAMB1 synergistically triggers cell death of cervical cancer cells when combined with the lysosome inhibitor Chloroquine. PMID:21909374

Anchoori, Ravi K; Khan, Saeed R; Sueblinvong, Thanasak; Felthauser, Alicia; Iizuka, Yoshie; Gavioli, Riccardo; Destro, Federica; Isaksson Vogel, Rachel; Peng, Shiwen; Roden, Richard B S; Bazzaro, Martina

2011-01-01

68

Aberrant Expression of Oncogenic and Tumor- Suppressive MicroRNAs in Cervical Cancer Is Required for Cancer Cell Growth  

E-print Network

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in cancer development. By cloning and sequencing of a HPV16 + CaSki cell small RNA library, we isolated 174 miRNAs (including the novel miR-193c) which could be grouped into 46 different miRNA species, with miR-21, miR-24, miR-27a, and miR-205 being most abundant. We chose for further study 10 miRNAs according to their cloning frequency and associated their levels in 10 cervical cancer- or cervical intraepithelial neoplasia-derived cell lines. No correlation was observed between their expression with the presence or absence of an integrated or episomal HPV genome. All cell lines examined contained no detectable miR-143 and miR-145. HPV-infected cell lines expressed a different set of miRNAs when grown in organotypic raft cultured as compared to monolayer cell culture, including expression of miR-143 and miR-145. This suggests a correlation between miRNA expression and tissue differentiation. Using miRNA array analyses for age-matched normal cervix and cervical cancer tissues, in combination with northern blot verification, we identified significantly deregulated miRNAs in cervical cancer tissues, with miR-126, miR-143, and miR-145 downregulation and miR-15b, miR-16, miR-146a, and miR-155 upregulation. Functional studies showed that both miR-143 and miR-145 are suppressive to cell growth. When introduced into cell lines, miR-146a was found to promote cell proliferation. Collectively, our data indicate that downregulation of miR-143 and miR-145 and upregulation of miR-146a play a role in cervical

Xiaohong Wang; Shuang Tang; Shu-yun Le; Robert Lu; Janet S. Rader; Craig Meyers

69

Studying Biomarkers in Diagnosing Cervical Lesions in Patients With Abnormal Cervical Cells  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Atypical Endocervical Glandular Cell of Undetermined Significance; Atypical Endometrial Hyperplasia; Atypical Glandular Cell of Undetermined Significance; Cervical Cancer; Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia Grade 2; Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia Grade 3; Human Papilloma Virus Infection

2013-08-01

70

Univariate and multivariate methods for chemical mapping of cervical cancer cells  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Visualization of cells and subcellular organelles are currently carried out using available microscopy methods such as cryoelectron microscopy, and fluorescence microscopy. These methods require external labeling using fluorescent dyes and extensive sample preparations to access the subcellular structures. However, Raman micro-spectroscopy provides a non-invasive, label-free method for imaging the cells with chemical specificity at sub-micrometer spatial resolutions. The scope of this paper is to image the biochemical/molecular distributions in cells associated with cancerous changes. Raman map data sets were acquired from the human cervical carcinoma cell lines (HeLa) after fixation under 785 nm excitation wavelength. The individual spectrum was recorded by raster-scanning the laser beam over the sample with 1?m step size and 10s exposure time. Images revealing nucleic acids, lipids and proteins (phenylalanine, amide I) were reconstructed using univariate methods. In near future, the small pixel to pixel variations will also be imaged using different multivariate methods (PCA, clustering (HCA, K-means, FCM)) to determine the main cellular constitutions. The hyper-spectral image of cell was reconstructed utilizing the spectral contrast at different pixels of the cell (due to the variation in the biochemical distribution) without using fluorescent dyes. Normal cervical squamous cells will also be imaged in order to differentiate normal and cancer cells of cervix using the biochemical changes in different grades of cancer. Based on the information obtained from the pseudo-color maps, constructed from the hyper-spectral cubes, the primary cellular constituents of normal and cervical cancer cells were identified.

Duraipandian, Shiyamala; Zheng, Wei; Huang, Zhiwei

2012-01-01

71

Activated pregnane X receptor inhibits cervical cancer cell proliferation and tumorigenicity by inducing G2/M cell-cycle arrest.  

PubMed

Pregnane X receptor (PXR) regulates cell proliferation and carcinogenesis in female reproductive tissue. We showed that PXR was expressed in cervical cells and tissue samples. PXR were lower or greatly diminished in cancer tissues compared to normal control. Functionally, activation of human PXR by rifampicin or ectopic expression of constitutively-activated human VP-PXR inhibited cervical cell proliferation. Constitutively-activated VP-PXR attenuated CaSki and HeLa xenograft tumor growth in nude mice compared with control. The cellular proliferation inhibition of PXR by causing G2/M cell-cycle arrest is involved up-regulation of Cullin1-3, MAD2L1, and down-regulation of ANAPC2 and CDKN1A. Our data suggests that PXR signaling inhibits tumor cell proliferation in vitro and cervical carcinoma growth in vivo. PMID:24486740

Niu, Yongdong; Wang, Ziliang; Huang, Haihua; Zhong, Shuping; Cai, Wenfeng; Xie, Yangmin; Shi, Ganggang

2014-05-28

72

DNA Methylation-Independent Reversion of Gemcitabine Resistance by Hydralazine in Cervical Cancer Cells  

PubMed Central

Background Down regulation of genes coding for nucleoside transporters and drug metabolism responsible for uptake and metabolic activation of the nucleoside gemcitabine is related with acquired tumor resistance against this agent. Hydralazine has been shown to reverse doxorubicin resistance in a model of breast cancer. Here we wanted to investigate whether epigenetic mechanisms are responsible for acquiring resistance to gemcitabine and if hydralazine could restore gemcitabine sensitivity in cervical cancer cells. Methodology/Principal Findings The cervical cancer cell line CaLo cell line was cultured in the presence of increasing concentrations of gemcitabine. Down-regulation of hENT1 & dCK genes was observed in the resistant cells (CaLoGR) which was not associated with promoter methylation. Treatment with hydralazine reversed gemcitabine resistance and led to hENT1 and dCK gene reactivation in a DNA promoter methylation-independent manner. No changes in HDAC total activity nor in H3 and H4 acetylation at these promoters were observed. ChIP analysis showed H3K9m2 at hENT1 and dCK gene promoters which correlated with hyper-expression of G9A histone methyltransferase at RNA and protein level in the resistant cells. Hydralazine inhibited G9A methyltransferase activity in vitro and depletion of the G9A gene by iRNA restored gemcitabine sensitivity. Conclusions/Significance Our results demonstrate that acquired gemcitabine resistance is associated with DNA promoter methylation-independent hENT1 and dCK gene down-regulation and hyper-expression of G9A methyltransferase. Hydralazine reverts gemcitabine resistance in cervical cancer cells via inhibition of G9A histone methyltransferase. PMID:22427797

Candelaria, Myrna; de la Cruz-Hernandez, Erick; Taja-Chayeb, Lucia; Perez-Cardenas, Enrique; Trejo-Becerril, Catalina; Gonzalez-Fierro, Aurora; Chavez-Blanco, Alma; Soto-Reyes, Ernesto; Dominguez, Guadalupe; Trujillo, Jaenai E.; Diaz-Chavez, Jose; Duenas-Gonzalez, Alfonso

2012-01-01

73

Apoptotic potential role of Agave palmeri and Tulbaghia violacea extracts in cervical cancer cells.  

PubMed

Cervical cancer, a gynaecological malignant disorder, is a common cause of death in females in Sub-Saharan Africa, striking nearly half a million of lives each year worldwide. Currently, more than 50 % of all modern drugs in clinical use are of natural products, many of which have an ability to control cancer cells (Madhuri and Pandey, Curr Sci 96:779-783, 2009; Richter, Traditional medicines and traditional healers in South Africa, 2003). In South Africa, plants used to treat cancer are rare even though majority of our population continue to put their trust in traditional medicine. In this study we aimed to screen Agave palmeri (AG) and Tulbaghia violacea (TV) for potential role in inducing cell death in cervical cancer cell lines HeLa and ME-180, and in normal human fibroblast cell line KMST-6 cell lines. To achieve this, AG and TV crude extracts were utilized to screen for apoptosis induction, inhibition of cell proliferation followed by elucidation of the role of Bax, Bcl-2, p53, Rb, RBBP and Mdm2 genes in cervical cancer. In brief, plant leaves and roots were collected, crushed and methanolic extracts obtained. Different concentrations of the stock extracts were used to treat cancer cells and measure cell death using the [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide] assay and flow cytometry. Western blot was applied to measure gene expression at protein level using RBBP6, p53, Mdm2, Rb, Bax, Bcl-2 and ?-actin mouse monoclonal primary antibodies (IgG) and goat anti mouse coupled with horseradish peroxidase secondary antibody from Santa Cruz Biotechnology and real time-PCR was used for mRNA expression level. Plant extracts of AG and TV were time (24 h) and dose (50, 100, 150 ?g/ml) dependent in their induction of cell death with an IC50 ~ 150 ?g/ml. A further mixed respond by several genes was observed following treatment with the two plant extracts where RBBP6 was seen to be spliced in cancer cells while Bax was induced and Bcl-2 was inhibited with the levels of p53 remaining the same. The two plant extracts do induce cell death, in a p53 independent manner. PMID:24993114

Mthembu, Nonkululeko N; Motadi, Lesetja Raymond

2014-09-01

74

CCR5 expression is elevated in cervical cancer cells and is up-regulated by seminal plasma.  

PubMed

The interplay between inflammation, cervical cancer and HIV acquisition in women is poorly understood. We have previously shown that seminal plasma (SP) can promote cervical tumour cell growth in vitro and in vivo via the activation of potent inflammatory pathways. In this study, we investigated whether SP could regulate expression of chemokine receptors with known roles in HIV infection, in the cervix and in cervical cancer. The expression of CD4 and CCR5 was investigated by RT-PCR analysis and immunohistochemistry. CD4 and CCR5 expression was elevated in cervical cancer tissue compared with normal cervix. Ex vivo studies conducted on cervical tissues and HeLa cells showed that SP significantly increases the expression of CD4 and CCR5 transcripts. Furthermore, it was found that SP also up-regulates CCR5 protein in HeLa cells. The regulation of CCR5 expression was investigated following treatment of HeLa cells with SP in the presence/absence of chemical inhibitors of intracellular signalling, EP2 and EP4 antagonists, prostaglandin (PG) E2 and a cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 doxycycline-inducible expression system. These experiments demonstrated that the regulation of CCR5 expression by SP occurs via the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-COX-1-PGE2 pathway. This study provides a link between activation of inflammatory pathways and regulation of HIV receptor expression in cervical cancer cells. PMID:25103627

Sales, Kurt J; Adefuye, Anthonio; Nicholson, Lauren; Katz, Arieh A

2014-11-01

75

Artemisinin derivative artesunate induces radiosensitivity in cervical cancer cells in vitro and in vivo  

PubMed Central

Objective Cervical cancer is the third most common type of cancer in women worldwide and radiotherapy remains its predominant therapeutic treatment. Artesunate (ART), a derivative of artemisinin, has shown radiosensitization effect in previous studies. However, such effects of ART have not yet been revealed for cervical cancer cells. Methods The effect of ART on radiosensitivity of human cervical cancer cell lines HeLa and SiHa was assessed using the clonogenic assay. Cell cycle progression and apoptosis alterations were analyzed by flow cytometry. For in vivo study, HeLa or SiHa cells were inoculated into nude mice to establish tumors. Tissues from xenografts were obtained to detect the changes of microvessel density, apoptosis and cell cycle distribution. Microarray was used to analyze differentially expressed genes. Results ART increased the radiosensitivity of HeLa cells (SER =?1.43, P cells. Apoptosis and the G2-M phase transition induced by X-ray irradiation (IR) were enhanced by ART via increased Cyclin B1 expression in HeLa cells. Tumor growth of xenografts from HeLa but not SiHa cells was significantly inhibited by irradiation combined with ART (tumor volume reduction of 72.34% in IR?+?ART group vs. 41.22% in IR group in HeLa cells and 48.79% in IR?+?ART group vs. 44.03% in IR alone group in SiHa cells). Compared with the irradiated group, cell apoptosis was increased and the G2/M cell cycle arrest was enhanced in the group receiving irradiation combined with ART. Furthermore, compared with radiation alone, X-ray irradiation plus ART affected the expression of 203 genes that function in multiple pathways including RNA transport, the spliceosome, RNA degradation and p53 signaling. Conclusion ART potently abrogates the G2 checkpoint control in HeLa cells. ART can induce radiosensitivity of HeLa cells in vitro and in vivo. PMID:24666614

2014-01-01

76

Constitutively active Notch1 induces growth arrest of HPV-positive cervical cancer cells via separate signaling pathways  

SciTech Connect

Notch signaling plays a key role in cell-fate determination and differentiation in different organisms and cell types. Several reports suggest that Notch signaling may be involved in neoplastic transformation. However, in primary keratinocytes, Notch1 can function as a tumor suppressor. Similarly, in HPV-positive cervical cancer cells, constitutively active Notch1 signaling was found to cause growth suppression. Activated Notch1 in these cells represses viral E6/E7 expression through AP-1 down-modulation, resulting in increased p53 expression and a block of pRb hyperphosphorylation. Here we show that in cervical cancer cell lines in which Notch1 ability to repress AP-1 activity is impaired, Notch1-enforced expression elicits an alternative pathway leading to growth arrest. Indeed, activated Notch1 signaling suppresses activity of the helix-loop-helix transcription factor E47, via ERK1/2 activation, resulting in inhibition of cell cycle progression. Moreover, we found that RBP-J{kappa}-dependent Notch signaling is specifically repressed in cervical cancer cells and this repression could provide one such mechanism that needs to be activated for cervical carcinogenesis. Finally, we show that inhibition of endogenous Notch1 signaling, although results in a proliferative advantage, sensitizes cervical cancer cell lines to drug-induced apoptosis. Together, our results provide novel molecular insights into Notch1-dependent growth inhibitory effects, counteracting the transforming potential of HPV.

Talora, Claudio [Department of Experimental Medicine and Pathology, Laboratory of Molecular Pathology, University 'La Sapienza', Viale Regina Elena, 324, 00161 Rome (Italy); Cialfi, Samantha [Department of Experimental Medicine and Pathology, Laboratory of Molecular Pathology, University 'La Sapienza', Viale Regina Elena, 324, 00161 Rome (Italy); Segatto, Oreste [Regina Elena Cancer Institute, Via Delle Messi d'Oro, 156, Rome 00158 (Italy); Morrone, Stefania [Department of Experimental Medicine and Pathology, Laboratory of Molecular Pathology, University 'La Sapienza', Viale Regina Elena, 324, 00161 Rome (Italy); Kim Choi, John [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Frati, Luigi [Department of Experimental Medicine and Pathology, Laboratory of Molecular Pathology, University 'La Sapienza', Viale Regina Elena, 324, 00161 Rome (Italy); Institute of Biochemistry University of Lausanne Chemin de Bovaresses 155 CH-1066 Epalinges (Switzerland); Paolo Dotto, Gian [Institute of Biochemistry University of Lausanne Chemin de Bovaresses 155 CH-1066 Epalinges (Switzerland); Gulino, Alberto [Department of Experimental Medicine and Pathology, Laboratory of Molecular Pathology, University 'La Sapienza', Viale Regina Elena, 324, 00161 Rome (Italy); Neuromed Institute, Pozzilli (Italy); Screpanti, Isabella [Department of Experimental Medicine and Pathology, Laboratory of Molecular Pathology, University 'La Sapienza', Viale Regina Elena, 324, 00161 Rome (Italy) and Istituto Pasteur-Fondazione Cenci Bolognetti, University 'La Sapienza', 00161 Roma (Italy)]. E-mail: isabella.screpanti@uniroma1.it

2005-05-01

77

Disparities and Cervical Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Cervical cancer became a preventable disease with the introduction of the Papanicolaou smear (Pap smear) in the 1940s. Trend\\u000a data show that incidence rates have decreased steadily over the past several decades in both white and African American women\\u000a living in the United States (American Cancer Society 2007). Mortality rates have declined steadily over the past several decades\\u000a as well

Marcela del Carmen; Teresa Diaz-Montez

78

Apoptotic Activities of Thymoquinone, an Active Ingredient of Black Seed (Nigella sativa), in Cervical Cancer Cell Lines.  

PubMed

Thymoquinone (TQ) is the main constituent of black seed (Nigella sativa, spp) essential oil which shows promising in vitro and in vivo anti-neoplastic activities in different tumor cell lines. However, to date there are only a few reports regarding the apoptotic effects of TQ on cervical cancer cells. Here, we report that TQ stimulated distinct apoptotic pathways in two human cervical cell lines, Siha and C33A. TQ markedly induced apoptosis as demonstrated by cell cycle analysis in both cell lines. Moreover, quantitative PCR revealed that TQ induced apoptosis in Siha cells through p53-dependent pathway as shown by elevated level of p53-mediated apoptosis target genes, whereas apoptosis in C33A cells was mainly associated with the activation of caspase-3. These results support previous findings on TQ as a potential therapeutic agent for human cervical cancer. PMID:25241984

Ichwan, Solachuddin J A; Al-Ani, Imad M; Bilal, Hakim G; Suriyah, Wastuti H; Taher, Muhammad; Ikeda, Masa A

2014-10-31

79

How Are Cervical Cancers and Pre-Cancers Diagnosed?  

MedlinePLUS

... How is cervical cancer staged? How is cervical cancer diagnosed? The first step in finding cervical cancer ... systems. Tests for women with symptoms of cervical cancer or abnormal Pap results Medical history and physical ...

80

Identification of NDRG1-regulated genes associated with invasive potential in cervical and ovarian cancer cells  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: {yields} NDRG1 was knockdown in cervical and ovarian cancer cell lines by shRNA technology. {yields} NDRG1 knockdown resulted in increased cell invasion activities. {yields} Ninety-six common deregulated genes in both cell lines were identified by cDNA microarray. {yields} Eleven common NDRG1-regulated genes might enhance cell invasive activity. {yields} Regulation of invasion by NDRG1 is an indirect and complicated process. -- Abstract: N-myc downstream regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) is an important gene regulating tumor invasion. In this study, shRNA technology was used to suppress NDRG1 expression in CaSki (a cervical cancer cell line) and HO-8910PM (an ovarian cancer cell line). In vitro assays showed that NDRG1 knockdown enhanced tumor cell adhesion, migration and invasion activities without affecting cell proliferation. cDNA microarray analysis revealed 96 deregulated genes with more than 2-fold changes in both cell lines after NDRG1 knockdown. Ten common upregulated genes (LPXN, DDR2, COL6A1, IL6, IL8, FYN, PTP4A3, PAPPA, ETV5 and CYGB) and one common downregulated gene (CLCA2) were considered to enhance tumor cell invasive activity. BisoGenet network analysis indicated that NDRG1 regulated these invasion effector genes/proteins in an indirect manner. Moreover, NDRG1 knockdown also reduced pro-invasion genes expression such as MMP7, TMPRSS4 and CTSK. These results suggest that regulation of invasion and metastasis by NDRG1 is a highly complicated process.

Zhao, Gang, E-mail: zhaog69@sjtu.edu.cn [Department of Pathology, The First People's Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai (China) [Department of Pathology, The First People's Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai (China); Department of Pathology, Tianjin Cancer Hospital, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin (China); Chen, Jiawei, E-mail: jiaweichen2000@gmail.com [Department of Pathology, The First People's Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai (China)] [Department of Pathology, The First People's Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai (China); Deng, Yanqiu [Pathophysiology Department, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin (China)] [Pathophysiology Department, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin (China); Gao, Feng [Department of Pathology, The First People's Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai (China)] [Department of Pathology, The First People's Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai (China); Zhu, Jiwei [Basic Medical College, Harbin Medical University, Harbin (China)] [Basic Medical College, Harbin Medical University, Harbin (China); Feng, Zhenzhong; Lv, Xiuhong [Department of Pathology, The First People's Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai (China)] [Department of Pathology, The First People's Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai (China); Zhao, Zheng [SAS Headquarters, S6013, 600 Research Drive, Cary, NC (United States)] [SAS Headquarters, S6013, 600 Research Drive, Cary, NC (United States)

2011-04-29

81

(-)-Epigallocatechin-3-gallate induces apoptosis and inhibits invasion and migration of human cervical cancer cells.  

PubMed

Invasion and metastasis are the major causes of cancer-related death. Pharmacological or therapeutic interventions such as chemoprevention of the progression stages of neoplastic development could result in substantial reduction in the incidence of cancer mortality. (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), a promising chemopreventive agent, has attracted extensive interest for cancer therapy utilizing its antioxidant, anti- proliferative and inhibitory effects on angiogenesis and tumor cell invasion. In this study, we assessed the influence of EGCG on the proliferative potential of HeLa cells by cell viability assay and authenticated the results by nuclear morphological examination, DNA laddering assay and cell cycle analysis. Further we analyzed the anti-invasive properties of EGCG by wound migration assay and gene expression of MMP-9 and TIMP-1 in HeLa cells. Our results indicated that EGCG induced growth inhibition of HeLa cells in a dose- and time- dependent manner. It was observed that cell death mediated by EGCG was through apoptosis. Interestingly, EGCG effectively inhibited invasion and migration of HeLa cells and modulated the expression of related genes (MMP-9 and TIMP-1) . These results indicate that EGCG may effectively suppress promotion and progression stages of cervical cancer development. PMID:23167425

Sharma, Chhavi; Nusri, Qurrat El-Ain; Begum, Salema; Javed, Elham; Rizvi, Tahir A; Hussain, Arif

2012-01-01

82

Cell Surface as a Fractal: Normal and Cancerous Cervical Cells Demonstrate Different Fractal Behavior of Surface Adhesion Maps at the Nanoscale  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Here we show that the surface of human cervical epithelial cells demonstrates substantially different fractal behavior when the cell becomes cancerous. Analyzing the adhesion maps of individual cervical cells, which were obtained using the atomic force microscopy operating in the HarmoniX mode, we found that cancerous cells demonstrate simple fractal behavior, whereas normal cells can only be approximated at best as multifractal. Tested on ˜300 cells collected from 12 humans, the fractal dimensionality of cancerous cells is found to be unambiguously higher than that for normal cells.

Dokukin, M. E.; Guz, N. V.; Gaikwad, R. M.; Woodworth, C. D.; Sokolov, I.

2011-07-01

83

On physical changes on surface of human cervical epithelial cells during cancer transformations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Physical changes of the cell surface of cells during transformation from normal to cancerous state are rather poorly studied. Here we describe our recent studies of such changes done on human cervical epithelial cells during their transformation from normal through infected with human papillomavirus type-16 (HPV-16), immortalized (precancerous), to cancerous cells. The changes were studied with the help of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and through the measurement of physical adhesion of fluorescent silica beads to the cell surface. Based on the adhesion experiments, we clearly see the difference in nonspecific adhesion which occurs at the stage of immortalization of cells, precancerous cells. The analysis done with the help of AFM shows that the difference observed comes presumably from the alteration of the cellular ``brush,'' a layer that surrounds cells and which consists of mostly microvilli, microridges, and glycocalyx. Further AFM analysis reveals the emergence of fractal scaling behavior on the surface of cells when normal cells turn into cancerous. The possible causes and potential significance of these observations will be discussed.

Sokolov, Igor; Dokukin, Maxim; Guz, Nataliia; Woodworth, Craig

2013-03-01

84

Cytotoxicity of Selected Medicinal and Nonmedicinal Plant Extracts to Microbial and Cervical Cancer Cells  

PubMed Central

This study investigated the cytotoxicity of 55 species of plants. Each plant was rated as medicinal, or nonmedicinal based on the existing literature. About 79% of the medicinal plants showed some cytotoxicity, while 75% of the nonmedicinal plants showed bioactivity. It appears that Asteraceae, Labiatae, Pinaceae, and Chenopodiaceae were particularly active against human cervical cancer cells. Based on the literature, only three of the 55 plants have been significantly investigated for cytotoxicity. It is clear that there is much toxicological work yet to be done with both medicinal and nonmedicinal plants. PMID:22500074

Booth, Gary M.; Malmstrom, Robert D.; Kipp, Erica; Paul, Alexandra

2012-01-01

85

Gene network reconstruction reveals cell cycle and antiviral genes as major drivers of cervical cancer  

PubMed Central

Although human papillomavirus (HPV) was identified as an etiological factor in cervical cancer, the key human gene drivers of this disease remain unknown. Here we apply an unbiased approach integrating gene expression and chromosomal aberration data. In an independent group of patients, we reconstruct and validate a gene regulatory meta-network, and identify cell cycle and antiviral genes that constitute two major sub-networks up-regulated in tumour samples. These genes are located within the same regions as chromosomal amplifications, most frequently on 3q. We propose a model in which selected chromosomal gains drive activation of antiviral genes contributing to episomal virus elimination, which synergizes with cell cycle dysregulation. These findings may help to explain the paradox of episomal HPV decline in women with invasive cancer who were previously unable to clear the virus. PMID:23651994

Mine, Karina L.; Shulzhenko, Natalia; Yambartsev, Anatoly; Rochman, Mark; Sanson, Gerdine F. O.; Lando, Malin; Varma, Sudhir; Skinner, Jeff; Volfovsky, Natalia; Deng, Tao; Brenna, Sylvia M. F.; Carvalho, Carmen R. N.; Ribalta, Julisa C. L.; Bustin, Michael; Matzinger, Polly; Silva, Ismael D. C. G.; Lyng, Heidi; Gerbase-DeLima, Maria; Morgun, Andrey

2014-01-01

86

AKT Inhibitors Promote Cell Death in Cervical Cancer through Disruption of mTOR Signaling and Glucose Uptake  

PubMed Central

Background PI3K/AKT pathway alterations are associated with incomplete response to chemoradiation in human cervical cancer. This study was performed to test for mutations in the PI3K pathway and to evaluate the effects of AKT inhibitors on glucose uptake and cell viability. Experimental Design Mutational analysis of DNA from 140 pretreatment tumor biopsies and 8 human cervical cancer cell lines was performed. C33A cells (PIK3CAR88Q and PTENR233*) were treated with increasing concentrations of two allosteric AKT inhibitors (SC-66 and MK-2206) with or without the glucose analogue 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG). Cell viability and activation status of the AKT/mTOR pathway were determined in response to the treatment. Glucose uptake was evaluated by incubation with 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). Cell migration was assessed by scratch assay. Results Activating PIK3CA (E545K, E542K) and inactivating PTEN (R233*) mutations were identified in human cervical cancer. SC-66 effectively inhibited AKT, mTOR and mTOR substrates in C33A cells. SC-66 inhibited glucose uptake via reduced delivery of Glut1 and Glut4 to the cell membrane. SC-66 (1 µg/ml-56%) and MK-2206 (30 µM-49%) treatment decreased cell viability through a non-apoptotic mechanism. Decreases in cell viability were enhanced when AKT inhibitors were combined with 2-DG. The scratch assay showed a substantial reduction in cell migration upon SC-66 treatment. Conclusions The mutational spectrum of the PI3K/AKT pathway in cervical cancer is complex. AKT inhibitors effectively block mTORC1/2, decrease glucose uptake, glycolysis, and decrease cell viability in vitro. These results suggest that AKT inhibitors may improve response to chemoradiation in cervical cancer. PMID:24705275

Rashmi, Ramachandran; DeSelm, Carl; Helms, Cynthia; Bowcock, Anne; Rogers, Buck E.; Rader, Janet; Grigsby, Perry W.; Schwarz, Julie K.

2014-01-01

87

Upregulated expression of FGF13/FHF2 mediates resistance to platinum drugs in cervical cancer cells  

PubMed Central

Cancer cells often develop drug resistance. In cisplatin-resistant HeLa cisR cells, fibroblast growth factor 13 (FGF13/FHF2) gene and protein expression was strongly upregulated, and intracellular platinum concentrations were kept low. When the FGF13 expression was suppressed, both the cells' resistance to platinum drugs and their ability to keep intracellular platinum low were abolished. Overexpression of FGF13 in parent cells led to greater resistance to cisplatin and reductions in the intracellular platinum concentration. These cisplatin-resistant cells also showed increased resistance to copper. In preoperative cervical cancer biopsy samples from poor prognoses patients after cisplatin chemoradiotherapy, FGF13-positive cells were detected more abundantly than in the biopsy samples from patients with good prognoses. These results suggest that FGF13 plays a pivotal role in mediating resistance to platinum drugs, possibly via a mechanism shared by platinum and copper. Our results point to FGF13 as a novel target and useful prognostic guide for cancer therapy. PMID:24113164

Okada, Tomoko; Murata, Kazuhiro; Hirose, Ryoma; Matsuda, Chie; Komatsu, Tsunehiko; Ikekita, Masahiko; Nakawatari, Miyako; Nakayama, Fumiaki; Wakatsuki, Masaru; Ohno, Tatsuya; Kato, Shingo; Imai, Takashi; Imamura, Toru

2013-01-01

88

Polyphenol extract of Phyllanthus emblica (PEEP) induces inhibition of cell proliferation and triggers apoptosis in cervical cancer cells  

PubMed Central

Background The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of polyphenol extract from Phyllanthus emblica (PEEP) on cervical cancer cells and to explore the underlying mechanism. Methods MTT assay was used to measure inhibition of proliferation of cervical cancer (HeLa) cells after treatment with PEEP at concentrations of 0, 50, 100, 150, and 200 mg/ml for 48 hours. HeLa cells were treated with PEEP (150 mg/ml) for 48 hours in the following analysis. Karyomorphism was assessed by immunofluorescence using DAPI staining, and cell apoptosis and cell cycle were assessed using flow cytometry. Three apoptotic marker proteins, namely, Fas, FasL, and cleaved caspase-8, were assessed by western blotting. Results PEEP inhibited the growth of HeLa cells, and the optimum concentration of PEEP was 150 mg/ml. In addition, the karyomorphism of HeLa cells after treatment with PEEP was abnormal. Furthermore, PEEP induced arrest of the HeLa cell cycle at G2/M phase, and triggered apoptosis. PEEP also induced significant Fas and FasL activation, and cleavage of caspase-8. Conclusions Our study indicates that PEEP is effective in inhibiting HeLa cell proliferation by inducing cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase and inducing apoptosis. PMID:24245877

2013-01-01

89

Deficiency of Erbin induces resistance of cervical cancer cells to anoikis in a STAT3-dependent manner  

PubMed Central

Epithelial cell polarization and integration are essential to their function and loss of epithelial polarity and tissue architecture correlates with the development of aggressive tumors. Erbin is a basolateral membrane-associated protein. The roles of Erbin in establishing cell polarization and regulating cell adhesion have been suggested. Erbin is also a negative regulator in Ras-Raf-ERK (extracellular signal-regulated kinase) signaling pathway. However, the potential functions of Erbin in human cancer are basically unknown. In the present study, we show, for the first time, that loss of Erbin endows cervical cancer cells with resistance to anoikis both in vitro and in vivo and promotes the growth and metastasis of human cervical cancer xenografts in nude mice. We found that knockdown of Erbin induced the phosphorylation, nuclear translocation and transcriptional activities of signal transducer and activator of transcription factor 3 (STAT3) in cervical cancer cells. Overexpression of STAT3C or induction of endogenous STAT3 activation by interleukin (IL)-6 evidently inhibited anoikis of cervical cancer cells, whereas WP1066, a potent inhibitor of Janus-activated kinase 2 (Jak2)/STAT3, effectively blocked the effect of Erbin knockdown on cell survival under anchorage-independent conditions, indicating that loss of Erbin confers resistance of cervical cancer cells to anoikis in a STAT3-dependent manner. Interestingly, IL-6 induced STAT3 activation and Erbin expression simultaneously. Overexpression of STAT3C also significantly upregulated the level of Erbin, whereas the Jak2 inhibitor AG490 remarkably blocked not only STAT3 phosphorylation but also IL-6-induced Erbin expression. Knockdown of Erbin augmented the effects of IL-6 on STAT3 activation and anoikis resistance. In addition, by immunohistochemical analysis of Erbin expression, we demonstrate that the expression of Erbin is significantly decreased or even lost in cervical cancer tissues. These data reveal that Erbin is a novel negative regulator of STAT3, and the IL-6/STAT3/Erbin loop has a crucial role in cervical cancer progression and metastasis. PMID:23774064

Hu, Y; Chen, H; Duan, C; Liu, D; Qian, L; Yang, Z; Guo, L; Song, L; Yu, M; Hu, M; Shi, M; Guo, N

2013-01-01

90

Corticotropin-releasing factor induces immune escape of cervical cancer cells by downregulation of NKG2D.  

PubMed

Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), a coordinator of the body's responses to stress, is found in various cancer tissues and cell lines. However, the exact abilities of CRF to manipulate natural killer (NK) cells during immune response have not been studied. NKG2D is an activating receptor that is expressed on most NK and CD8+ T cells. MHC class I-related chain A (MICA) and UL16-binding protein (ULBP) 1, 2 and 3 are well-known ligands for NKG2D. In the present study, we reported our findings regarding the role of CRF in cervical cancer cell survival. Human cervical cancer cell line, HeLa cells, had significantly higher intracellular expression of UL16-binding protein 2 (ULBP2) following CRF treatment but had only slightly increased surface expression of ULBP2. Notably, MMPi (pan-metalloproteases inhibitor) blocked the release of ULBP2 molecules from the surface of HeLa cells. Furthermore, incubating NK cells with culture supernatants from CRF-treated HeLa cells, which contained soluble NKG2D ligand, reduced NK cell activity by decreasing surface expression of NKG2D. Collectively, downregulation of NKG2D by CRF-induced soluble NKG2D ligand provides a potential mechanism by which cervical cancer cells escape NKG2D-mediated attack under stress conditions. PMID:24841552

Song, Hyunkeun; Park, Hyunjin; Park, Gabin; Kim, Yeong Seok; Lee, Hyun-Kyung; Jin, Dong-Hoon; Kang, Hyung-Sik; Cho, Dae-Ho; Hur, Daeyoung

2014-07-01

91

Anticancer property of Bryophyllum pinnata (Lam.) Oken. leaf on human cervical cancer cells  

PubMed Central

Background Bryophyllum pinnata (B. pinnata) is a common medicinal plant used in traditional medicine of India and of other countries for curing various infections, bowel diseases, healing wounds and other ailments. However, its anticancer properties are poorly defined. In view of broad spectrum therapeutic potential of B. pinnata we designed a study to examine anti-cancer and anti-Human Papillomavirus (HPV) activities in its leaf extracts and tried to isolate its active principle. Methods A chloroform extract derived from a bulk of botanically well-characterized pulverized B. pinnata leaves was separated using column chromatography with step- gradient of petroleum ether and ethyl acetate. Fractions were characterized for phyto-chemical compounds by TLC, HPTLC and NMR and Biological activity of the fractions were examined by MTT-based cell viability assay, Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assay, Northern blotting and assay of apoptosis related proteins by immunoblotting in human cervical cancer cells. Results Results showed presence of growth inhibitory activity in the crude leaf extracts with IC50 at 552 ?g/ml which resolved to fraction F4 (Petroleum Ether: Ethyl Acetate:: 50:50) and showed IC50 at 91 ?g/ml. Investigations of anti-viral activity of the extract and its fraction revealed a specific anti-HPV activity on cervical cancer cells as evidenced by downregulation of constitutively active AP1 specific DNA binding activity and suppression of oncogenic c-Fos and c-Jun expression which was accompanied by inhibition of HPV18 transcription. In addition to inhibiting growth, fraction F4 strongly induced apoptosis as evidenced by an increased expression of the pro-apoptotic protein Bax, suppression of the anti-apoptotic molecules Bcl-2, and activation of caspase-3 and cleavage of PARP-1. Phytochemical analysis of fraction F4 by HPTLC and NMR indicated presence of activity that resembled Bryophyllin A. Conclusions Our study therefore demonstrates presence of anticancer and anti-HPV an activity in B. pinnata leaves that can be further exploited as a potential anticancer, anti-HPV therapeutic for treatment of HPV infection and cervical cancer. PMID:22405256

2012-01-01

92

Overexpression of RhoA promotes the proliferation and migration of cervical cancer cells.  

PubMed

The pro-oncogenic role of RhoA has been well identified in other cancers, but rarely in cervical cancer (CC), one of the main causes of cancer-related death in women. In the present study, we identified the overexpression of RhoA and its downstream effectors, ROCK-1 and ROCK-II, in CC specimens using western blotting. Then, we determined the effect of RhoA on the proliferation and migration of Hela cells, one of CC cell lines, by upregulating or downregulating the RhoA expression in Hela cells. We found that there was an overexpression of RhoA, ROCK-I/II in CC, which was associated with the progression of CC. And we confirmed that RhoA promoted the proliferation and migration of CC cells. In conclusion, we found a positive correlation among RhoA with the progression of CC by in vivo and in vitro evidences. A high RhoA expression in CC may predict a high metastatic potential of CC. PMID:25104222

Liu, Xiaojun; Chen, Dong; Liu, Guifeng

2014-11-01

93

MicroRNA-26a inhibits cell proliferation and invasion of cervical cancer cells by targeting protein tyrosine phosphatase type IVA 1.  

PubMed

The downregulation of microRNA?26a (miR?26a) has been reported in numerous types of cancer, but its detailed functional role in cervical cancer is not yet clear. In the present study, the expression of miR?26a in human cervical cancer was confirmed and its contribution to cervical cancer progression was investigated. The expression of miR?26a was determined by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction in human cervical tissues and cell lines. Cell growth and invasion were detected by cell counting kit?8, colony?forming assays and transwell assays following restoration of miR?26a expression. Protein tyrosine phosphatase type IVA 1 (PRL?1) was further validated as a target of miR?26a by a functional luciferase assay and western blot analysis. In addition, the overexpression of miR?26a in tumor formation in SCID mice was investigated in vivo, and the association between miR?26a and PRL?1 was assayed by Pearson's correlation coefficient. First, it was identified that miR?26a was significantly downregulated in cervical cancer compared with the paired adjacent tissues. Forced expression of miR?26a suppressed cell proliferation and invasion in vitro and inhibited the growth of tumor xenografts in vivo. PRL?1 was determined as a novel target for miR?26a and knockdown of PRL?1 partially phenocopied the effect of miR?26a restoration. In addition, PRL?1 expression was inversely correlated with miR?26a expression in cervical cancer tissues. In conclusion, the results demonstrated the role of miR?26a in cervical cancer pathogenesis and suggest it may be used as a potential novel therapeutic strategy for cervical cancer. PMID:24939702

Dong, Jing; Sui, Long; Wang, Qing; Chen, Mingjun; Sun, Hong

2014-09-01

94

Selective suppression of cervical cancer Hela cells by 2-O--D-glucopyranosyl-L-ascorbic acid isolated  

E-print Network

Selective suppression of cervical cancer Hela cells by 2-O--D-glucopyranosyl-L-ascorbic acid for centuries. 2-O--D-Glucopyranosyl-L-ascorbic acid (AA-2G), a novel stable vitamin C analog, is one, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA #12;Keywords 2-O--D-Glucopyranosyl-L-ascorbic acid . Apoptosis

Engelhardt, John F.

95

In vitro and in vivo growth suppression of human papillomavirus 16-positive cervical cancer cells by CRISPR/Cas9.  

PubMed

Deregulated expression of high-risk human papillomavirus oncogenes (E6 and E7) is a pivotal event for pathogenesis and progression in cervical cancer. Both viral oncogenes are therefore regarded as ideal therapeutic targets. In the hope of developing a gene-specific therapy for HPV-related cancer, we established CRISPR/Cas9 targeting promoter of HPV 16 E6/E7 and targeting E6, E7 transcript, transduced the CRISPR/Cas9 into cervical HPV-16-positive cell line SiHa. The results showed that CRISPR/Cas9 targeting promoter, as well as targeting E6 and E7 resulted in accumulation of p53 and p21 protein, and consequently remarkably reduced the abilities of proliferation of cervical cancer cells in vitro. Then we inoculated subcutaneously cells into nude mice to establish the transplanted tumor animal models, and found dramatically inhibited tumorigenesis and growth of mice incubated by cells with CRISPR/Cas9 targeting (promoter+E6+E7)-transcript. Our results may provide evidence for application of CRISPR/Cas9 targeting HR-HPV key oncogenes, as a new treatment strategy, in cervical and other HPV-associated cancer therapy. PMID:25044113

Zhen, Shuai; Hua, Ling; Takahashi, Y; Narita, S; Liu, Yun-Hui; Li, Yan

2014-08-01

96

Get Tested for Cervical Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... vagina with water or other liquid) Get help understanding your Pap test result . Lower your risk of cervical cancer. A major cause of cervical cancer is HPV (human papillomavirus). HPV is the most common STD (sexually transmitted disease). Some types of HPV can cause genital and ...

97

Breast and Cervical Cancer Legislation  

MedlinePLUS

... Near You About the Program The NBCCEDP Conceptual Framework Social Ecological Model Screening Program Data Screening Program ... and Resources Related Links Contact a Local Program Web Badges Cancer Home Breast and Cervical Cancer Legislation ...

98

Tualang honey induces apoptosis and disrupts the mitochondrial membrane potential of human breast and cervical cancer cell lines.  

PubMed

Honey is reported to contain various compounds such as phenols, vitamins and antioxidants. The present study investigates the anticancer potential of Tualang honey (Agromas) (TH) in human breast (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231) and cervical (HeLa) cancer cell lines; as well as in the normal breast epithelial cell line, MCF-10A. The cells were treated with increasing doses of TH (1-10%) for up to 72 h. Increase in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage from the cell membranes indicates that TH is cytotoxic to all three cancer cells with effective concentrations (EC(50)) of 2.4-2.8%. TH is however, not cytotoxic to the MCF-10A cells. Reactivity with annexin V fluorescence antibody and propidium iodide as analysed by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy shows that apoptosis occurred in these cancer cells. TH also reduced the mitochondrial membrane potential (??(m)) in the cancer cell lines after 24h of treatment. The activation of caspase-3/7 and -9 was observed in all TH-treated cancer cells indicating the involvement of mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. This study shows that TH has significant anticancer activity against human breast and cervical cancer cell lines. PMID:21167897

Fauzi, Agustine Nengsih; Norazmi, Mohd Nor; Yaacob, Nik Soriani

2011-04-01

99

Regulation of cell growth through cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in HPV 16 positive human cervical cancer cells by tea polyphenols.  

PubMed

Cervical cancer is the second most common malignant neoplasm in women, in terms of both incidence and mortality rates worldwide. The polyphenolic constituents of tea (Camellia sinensis) have gained considerable attention because of its anti-cancer properties against a variety of cancers. Here we studied the effects of green and black tea polyphenols (GTP and BTP), on cellular proliferation and cell death in the SiHa cells (human cervical cancer) expressing the human papilloma virus (HPV)-16. The result showed that both GTP and BTP inhibited proliferation of cells in dose and time dependent manner. Cell cycle analysis showed anti-proliferative effect of GTP which is associated with an increase in the G2/M phase and apoptotic effect of BTP in 24 h treated SiHa cells. Further, on increase of incubation time for 48 h, GTP caused induction of apoptosis up to 20% of SiHa cells. The role GTP and BTP in apoptosis was further confirmed by reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential and increased levels of membrane phosphatidylserine. Thus, our data suggests that tea polyphenols exhibit anti-cancer potential against cervical cancer by inhibition of cell growth and induction of apoptosis. PMID:19271153

Singh, Madhulika; Tyagi, Shilpa; Bhui, Kulpreet; Prasad, Sahdeo; Shukla, Yogeshwer

2010-06-01

100

MAML1 regulates cell viability via the NF-{kappa}B pathway in cervical cancer cell lines  

SciTech Connect

The Notch signaling pathway plays important roles in tumorigenesis in a context-dependent manner. In human cervical cancer, alterations in Notch signaling have been reported, and both tumor-suppressing and tumor-promoting roles of Notch signaling have been proposed; however, the precise molecular mechanisms governing these roles in cervical cancer remain controversial. MAML is a transcriptional co-activator originally identified by its role in Notch signaling. Recent evidence suggests that it also plays a role in other signaling pathways, such as the p53 and {beta}-catenin pathways. MAML is required for stable formation of Notch transcriptional complexes at the promoters of Notch target genes. Chromosomal translocations affecting MAML have been shown to promote tumorigenesis. In this study, we used a truncated dominant-negative MAML1 (DN-MAML) to investigate the role of MAML in HPV-positive cervical cancer cell lines. Three human cervical cancer cell lines (HeLa, SiHa and CaSki) expressed all Notch receptors and the Notch target genes Hes1 and MAML1. Among these 3 cell lines, constitutive appearance of cleaved Notch1 was found only in CaSki cells, which suggests that Notch1 is constitutively activated in this cell line. Gamma secretase inhibitor (GSI) treatment, which suppresses Notch receptor activation, completely abrogated this form of Notch1 but had no effect on cell viability. Overexpression of DN-MAML by retroviral transduction in CaSki cells resulted in significant decreases in the mRNA levels of Hes1 and Notch1 but had no effects on the levels of MAML1, p53 or HPV E6/E7. DN-MAML expression induced increased viability of CaSki cells without any effect on cell cycle progression or cell proliferation. In addition, clonogenic assay experiments revealed that overexpression of DN-MAML resulted in increased colony formation compared to the overexpression of the control vector. When the status of the NF-{kappa}B pathway was investigated, CaSki cells overexpressing DN-MAML exhibited loss of phospho-I{kappa}B{alpha}, decreased total I{kappa}B{alpha} and nuclear localization of NF-{kappa}B p65, which suggests that the NF-{kappa}B pathway is hyperactivated. Furthermore, increased level of cleaved Notch1 was detected when DN-MAML was expressed. When DN-MAML-overexpressing cells were treated with GSI, significantly decreased cell viability was observed, indicating that inhibition of Notch signaling using GSI treatment and DN-MAML expression negatively affects cell viability. Taken together, targeting Notch signaling using DN-MAML and GSI treatment may present a novel method to control cell viability in cervical cancer cells.

Kuncharin, Yanin [Medical Microbiology Interdisciplinary Program, Graduate School, Chulalongkorn University, Payathai Road, Pathumwan, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand)] [Medical Microbiology Interdisciplinary Program, Graduate School, Chulalongkorn University, Payathai Road, Pathumwan, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Sangphech, Naunpun [Biotechnology Program, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Payathai Road, Pathumwan, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand)] [Biotechnology Program, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Payathai Road, Pathumwan, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Kueanjinda, Patipark [Medical Microbiology Interdisciplinary Program, Graduate School, Chulalongkorn University, Payathai Road, Pathumwan, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand)] [Medical Microbiology Interdisciplinary Program, Graduate School, Chulalongkorn University, Payathai Road, Pathumwan, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Bhattarakosol, Parvapan [Medical Microbiology Interdisciplinary Program, Graduate School, Chulalongkorn University, Payathai Road, Pathumwan, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand) [Medical Microbiology Interdisciplinary Program, Graduate School, Chulalongkorn University, Payathai Road, Pathumwan, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Payathai Road, Pathumwan, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Palaga, Tanapat, E-mail: tanapat.p@chula.ac.th [Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Payathai Road, Pathumwan, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand)] [Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Payathai Road, Pathumwan, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand)

2011-08-01

101

In Vitro Evidence of the Presence of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Cervical Cancer and Their Role in Protecting Cancer Cells from Cytotoxic T Cell Activity  

PubMed Central

Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have been isolated from different tumors and it has been suggested that they support tumor growth through immunosuppression processes that favor tumor cell evasion from the immune system. To date, however, the presence of MSCs in cervical cancer (CeCa) and their possible role in tumor growth remains unknown. Herein we report on the presence of MSCs in cervical tissue, both in normal conditions (NCx-MSCs) and in CeCa (CeCa-MSCs), and described several biological properties of such cells. Our study showed similar patterns of cell surface antigen expression, but distinct differentiation potentials, when we compared both cervical MSC populations to MSCs from normal bone marrow (BM-MSCs, the gold standard). Interestingly, CeCa-MSCs were negative for the presence of human papiloma virus, indicating that these cells are not infected by such a viral agent. Also, interestingly, and in contrast to NCx-MSCs, CeCa-MSCs induced significant downregulation of surface HLA class I molecules (HLA-A*0201) on CaSki cells and other CeCa cell lines. We further observed that CeCa-MSCs inhibited antigen-specific T cell recognition of CaSki cells by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). HLA class I downregulation on CeCa cells correlated with the production of IL-10 in cell cocultures. Importantly, this cytokine strongly suppressed recognition of CeCa cells by CTLs. In summary, this study demonstrates the presence of MSCs in CeCa and suggests that tumor-derived MSCs may provide immune protection to tumor cells by inducing downregulation of HLA class I molecules. This mechanism may have important implications in tumor growth. PMID:23656504

Montesinos, Juan J.; Mora-Garcia, Maria de L.; Mayani, Hector; Flores-Figueroa, Eugenia; Garcia-Rocha, Rosario; Fajardo-Orduna, Guadalupe R.; Castro-Manrreza, Marta E.; Weiss-Steider, Benny

2013-01-01

102

Cancer-initiating cells derived from established cervical cell lines exhibit stem-cell markers and increased radioresistance  

PubMed Central

Background Cancer-initiating cells (CICs) are proposed to be responsible for the generation of metastasis and resistance to therapy. Accumulating evidences indicates CICs are found among different human cancers and cell lines derived from them. Few studies address the characteristics of CICs in cervical cancer. We identify biological features of CICs from four of the best-know human cell lines from uterine cervix tumors. (HeLa, SiHa, Ca Ski, C-4 I). Methods Cells were cultured as spheres under stem-cell conditions. Flow cytometry was used to detect expression of CD34, CD49f and CD133 antigens and Hoechst 33342 staining to identify side population (SP). Magnetic and fluorescence-activated cell sorting was applied to enrich and purify populations used to evaluate tumorigenicity in nude mice. cDNA microarray analysis and in vitro radioresistance assay were carried out under standard conditions. Results CICs, enriched as spheroids, were capable to generate reproducible tumor phenotypes in nu-nu mice and serial propagation. Injection of 1 × 103 dissociated spheroid cells induced tumors in the majority of animals, whereas injection of 1 × 105 monolayer cells remained nontumorigenic. Sphere-derived CICs expressed CD49f surface marker. Gene profiling analysis of HeLa and SiHa spheroid cells showed up-regulation of CICs markers characteristic of the female reproductive system. Importantly, epithelial to mesenchymal (EMT) transition-associated markers were found highly expressed in spheroid cells. More importantly, gene expression analysis indicated that genes required for radioresistance were also up-regulated, including components of the double-strand break (DSB) DNA repair machinery and the metabolism of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Dose-dependent radiation assay indicated indeed that CICs-enriched populations exhibit an increased resistance to ionizing radiation (IR). Conclusions We characterized a self-renewing subpopulation of CICs found among four well known human cancer-derived cell lines (HeLa, SiHa, Ca Ski and C-4 I) and found that they express characteristic markers of stem cell, EMT and radioresistance. The fact that CICs demonstrated a higher degree of resistance to radiation than differentiated cells suggests that specific detection and targeting of CICs could be highly valuable for the therapy of tumors from the uterine cervix. PMID:22284662

2012-01-01

103

First ayurvedic approach towards green drugs: anti cervical cancer-cell properties of Clerodendrum viscosum root extract.  

PubMed

The concept of Ayurvedic expert guided drug discovery and development is defined and put to test systematically for the first time in literature. Western Science has explored only ~5% of the approximately 25,000 species of higher plants for drug leads. The ancient medical science of Ayurveda has however employed a much larger spectrum of plants for clinical treatment. Clerodendrum viscosum (CV), a commonly growing weed in the Indian subcontinent has been employed by S. Nirmalananda (Ayurvedic expert) for the treatment of cervical cancer. Here we isolate and characterize a water extract fraction (Cv-AP) from the root of CV and evaluate its anticervical cancer cell bioactivity. Our results indicate that Cv-AP possesses pro-apoptotic, anti-proliferative, and anti-migratory activity in a dose-dependent fashion against cervical cancer cell lines. In contrast, primary fibroblasts (control healthy cells), when exposed to similar concentrations of this extract, fail to undergo apoptosis and remain relatively unaffected. These findings suggest that Clerodendrum viscosum (CV) is a readily available source of components with potent anti-cancer activity and selective bioactivity against cervical cancer cells. The major component in CV-AP was identified as a glycoprotein via SDS Page and Concanavalin-A binding studies. This study serves to illustrate that systematic collaboration with Ayurveda is a practical and powerful strategy in drug discovery and development. PMID:23387970

Sun, Chong; Nirmalananda, Swami; Jenkins, Charles E; Debnath, Shawon; Balambika, Rema; Fata, Jimmie E; Raja, Krishnaswami S

2013-12-01

104

Sine oculis homeobox homolog 1 promotes ?5?1-mediated invasive migration and metastasis of cervical cancer cells.  

PubMed

Sine oculis homeobox homolog 1 (SIX1) has been supposed to be correlated with the metastasis and poor prognosis of several malignancies. However, the effect of SIX1 on the metastatic phenotype of tumor cells and the underlying mechanisms were still unclear to date. Here we report that SIX1 can promote ?5?1-mediated metastatic capability of cervical cancer cells. SIX1 promoted the expression of ?5?1 integrin to enhance the adhesion capacity of tumor cells in vitro and tumor cell arrest in circulation in vivo. Moreover, higher expression of SIX1 in tumor cells resulted in the increased production of active MMP-2 and MMP-9, up-regulation of anti-apoptotic genes (BCL-XL and BCL2) and down-regulation of pro-apoptotic genes (BIM and BAX), thus promoting the invasive migration and anoikis-resistance of tumor cells. Importantly, blocking ?5?1 abrogated the regulatory effect of SIX1 on the expression of these genes, and also abolished the promotional effect of SIX1 on invasive capability of tumor cells. Furthermore, knock-down of ?5 could abolish the promoting effect of SIX1 on the development of metastatic lesions in both experimental and spontaneous metastasis model. Therefore, by up-regulating ?5?1 expression, SIX1 not only promoted the adhesion capacity, but also augmented ECM-?5?1-mediated regulation of gene expression to enhance the metastatic potential of cervical cancer cells. These results suggest that SIX1/?5?1 might be considered as valuable marker for metastatic potential of cervical cancer cells, or a therapeutic target in cervical cancer treatment. PMID:24613848

Liu, Dan; Zhang, Xiao-Xue; Wan, Dong-Yi; Xi, Bi-Xin; Ma, Ding; Wang, Hui; Gao, Qing-Lei

2014-04-01

105

Multifactorial Etiology of Cervical Cancer: A Hypothesis  

PubMed Central

Cancer of the cervix is the second most common life-threatening cancer among women worldwide, with incidence rates ranging from 4.8 per 100,000 women per year in the Middle East to 44.3 per 100,000 in East Africa. Epidemiologic and clinical data demonstrate that human papillomaviruses (HPV), especially HPV-16 and HPV-18, play at least a major if not a necessary role in the etiology of cervical cancer. However, many investigators acknowledge that HPV is not sufficient to induce cervical cancer and that a multifactorial etiology is likely. HPV can be found in a growing proportion of patients with cervical cancer, approaching 100%, but is not yet found in every patient with disease. Other factors, such as herpes simplex virus type 2 infections, cigarette smoking, vaginal douching, nutrition, and use of oral contraceptives, have been proposed as contributing factors. In the first half of the 20th century, Peyton Rous and colleagues demonstrated the joint action of tars and Shope papillomavirus to consistently induce squamous cell carcinomas in rabbits. Using the Rous model as a prototype, one might hypothesize that some cases of cervical cancer arise from an interaction between oncogenic viruses and cervical tar exposures. Cervical tar exposures include cigarette smoking, use of tar-based vaginal douches, and long years of inhaling smoke from wood- and coal-burning stoves in poorly ventilated kitchens. PMID:16614679

Haverkos, Harry W.

2005-01-01

106

MiR-124 represses vasculogenic mimicry and cell motility by targeting amotL1 in cervical cancer cells.  

PubMed

miRNAs have extensive functions in differentiation, metabolism, programmed cell death, and tumor metastasis by post-transcriptional regulation. Vasculogenic mimicry is an important pathway in tumor metastasis. Many factors can regulate vasculogenic mimicry, including miRNAs. In previous studies, miR-124 was found to repress proliferation and metastasis in different types of cancers, but whether it functions in cervical cancer remained unknown. Here, we demonstrate that miR-124 can repress vasculogenic mimicry, migration and invasion in HeLa and C33A cells in vitro. Furthermore, we reveal that the effect of miR-124 on vasculogenic mimicry, migration and invasion results from its interaction with AmotL1. MiR-124 regulates AmotL1 negatively by targeting its 3'untranslated region (3'UTR). We found that miR-124 can repress the EMT process. Together, these results improve our understanding of the function of miR-124 in tumor metastasis and will help to provide new potential target sites for cervical cancer treatment. PMID:25218344

Wan, Hai-Ying; Li, Qin-Qin; Zhang, Yan; Tian, Wei; Li, Ya-Nan; Liu, Min; Li, Xin; Tang, Hua

2014-12-01

107

HIF-1 and NDRG2 contribute to hypoxia-induced radioresistance of cervical cancer Hela cells  

SciTech Connect

Hypoxia inducible factor 1 (HIF-1), the key mediator of hypoxia signaling pathways, has been shown involved in hypoxia-induced radioresistance. However, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. The present study demonstrated that both hypoxia and hypoxia mimetic cobalt chloride could increase the radioresistance of human cervical cancer Hela cells. Meanwhile, ectopic expression of HIF-1 could enhance the resistance of Hela cells to radiation, whereas knocking-down of HIF-1 could increase the sensitivity of Hela cells to radiation in the presence of hypoxia. N-Myc downstream-regulated gene 2 (NDRG2), a new HIF-1 target gene identified in our lab, was found to be upregulated by hypoxia and radiation in a HIF-1-dependent manner. Overexpression of NDRG2 resulted in decreased sensitivity of Hela cells to radiation while silencing NDRG2 led to radiosensitization. Moreover, NDRG2 was proved to protect Hela cells from radiation-induced apoptosis and abolish radiation-induced upregulation of Bax. Taken together, these data suggest that both HIF-1 and NDRG2 contribute to hypoxia-induced tumor radioresistance and that NDRG2 acts downstream of HIF-1 to promote radioresistance through suppressing radiation-induced Bax expression. It would be meaningful to further explore the clinical application potential of HIF-1 and NDRG2 blockade as radiosensitizer for tumor therapy.

Liu, Junye [Department of Radiation Medicine, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an (China) [Department of Radiation Medicine, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an (China); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an (China); Zhang, Jing [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an (China)] [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an (China); Wang, Xiaowu [Department of Radiation Medicine, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an (China)] [Department of Radiation Medicine, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an (China); Li, Yan [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an (China)] [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an (China); Chen, Yongbin; Li, Kangchu [Department of Radiation Medicine, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an (China)] [Department of Radiation Medicine, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an (China); Zhang, Jian [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an (China)] [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an (China); Yao, Libo, E-mail: bioyao@fmmu.edu.cn [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an (China)] [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an (China); Guo, Guozhen, E-mail: guozhengg@hotmail.com [Department of Radiation Medicine, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an (China)] [Department of Radiation Medicine, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi'an (China)

2010-07-15

108

Restoration of microRNA?218 increases cellular chemosensitivity to cervical cancer by inhibiting cell?cycle progression.  

PubMed

We previously reported frequent loss of microRNA?218 (miR?218) in human cervical cancer, which was associated with tumor progression and poor prognosis. In this study, we investigated whether restoration of the miR?218 level is a valid strategy for the treatment of cervical cancer. The expression of miR?218 in cervical cancer samples and cell lines was quantified by reverse transcription TaqMan quantitative (RT?q)PCR. Overexpression of miR?218 was achieved by both transient and stable transfection, using a miR?218 mimic and a miR?218?expressing plasmid, respectively. Alterations in cellular proliferation and cell?cycle progression were measured by the MTT assay and flow cytometry analysis. Nude mice bearing SiHa xenografts were used to investigate the functions of miR?218 and carboplatin on tumor growth and weight. The expression of cycle?related proteins was detected by western blotting and immunohistochemical staining. In vitro, miR?218 significantly inhibited cellular growth in all four cell lines tested (P=0.021 for CaSki, P=0.009 for HeLa, P=0.016 for SiHa, and P=0.029 for C33A). Overexpression of miR?218 induced G1 phase arrest and reduced expression of cyclin D1 and CDK4. In vivo, restoration of miR?218 notably inhibited tumor growth and decreased tumor weight. In primary cultured samples, tumors with high levels of miR?218 were more sensitive to carboplatin (R2=0.3319, P=0.0026); consistently, miR?218 overexpression suppressed tumor growth, induced cell?cycle arrest, and reduced the cyclin D1 level. Based on these and previous results, we conclude that restoration of the miR?218 level inhibits the growth of cervical cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo; furthermore, overexpression of miR?218 sensitizes cervical cancer cells to carboplatin. Our findings suggest a novel therapy for cervical cancer based on miR?218, especially in patients with reduced levels of miR?218. PMID:25310186

Dong, Ruofan; Qiu, Haifeng; Du, Guiqiang; Wang, Yuan; Yu, Jinjin; Mao, Caiping

2014-12-01

109

The LKB1 tumor suppressor differentially affects anchorage independent growth of HPV positive cervical cancer cell lines  

PubMed Central

Infection with high-risk human papillomaviruses is causally linked to cervical carcinogenesis. However, most lesions caused by high-risk HPV infections do not progress to cancer. Host cell mutations contribute to malignant progression but the molecular nature of such mutations is unknown. Based on a previous study that reported an association between liver kinase B1 (LKB1) tumor suppressor loss and poor outcome in cervical cancer, we sought to determine the molecular basis for this observation. LKB1-negative cervical and lung cancer cells were reconstituted with wild type or kinase defective LKB1 mutants and we examined the importance of LKB1 catalytic activity in known LKB1-regulated processes including inhibition of cell proliferation and elevated resistance to energy stress. Our studies revealed marked differences in the biological activities of two kinase defective LKB1 mutants in the various cell lines. Thus, our results suggest that LKB1 may be a cell-type specific tumor suppressor. PMID:24074562

Mack, Hildegard I.D.; Munger, Karl

2013-01-01

110

Effects of tatariside G isolated from Fagopyrum tataricum roots on apoptosis in human cervical cancer HeLa cells.  

PubMed

Cervical cancer is the second most common female carcinoma. Current therapies are often unsatisfactory, especially for advanced stage patients. The aim of this study was to explore the effects of tatariside G (TG) on apoptosis in human cervical cancer HeLa cells and the possible mechanism of action involved. An MTT assay was employed to evaluate cell viability. Hoechst 33258 staining and flow cytometry (FCM) assays were used to detect cell apoptosis. The protein expression of phosphorylated JNK, P38, ERK and Akt and cleaved caspase-3 and caspase-9 was evaluated by western blot analysis. Additionally, the mRNA expression of caspase-3 and caspase-9 was measured by fluorescent quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (FQ-RT-PCR). TG notably inhibited cell viability, enhanced the percentage of apoptotic cells, facilitated the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and JNK proteins and caspase-3 and caspase-9 cracking, downregulated the phosphorylation level of Akt, and increased the loss of MMP and the mRNA expression of caspase-3 and caspase-9. TG-induced apoptosis is associated with activation of the mitochondrial death pathway. TG may be an effective candidate for chemotherapy against cervical cancer. PMID:25076146

Li, Yuan; Wang, Su-Juan; Xia, Wei; Rahman, Khalid; Zhang, Yan; Peng, Hao; Zhang, Hong; Qin, Lu-Ping

2014-01-01

111

General Information about Cervical Cancer  

MedlinePLUS

... the PDQ summary on Unusual Cancers of Childhood . Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the major risk factor for ... be at risk. Infection of the cervix with human papillomavirus (HPV) is almost always the cause of cervical ...

112

Drugs Approved for Cervical Cancer  

Cancer.gov

This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for cervical cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

113

Radiosensitization of Human Cervical Cancer Cells by Inhibiting Ribonucleotide Reductase: Enhanced Radiation Response at Low-Dose Rates  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To test whether pharmacologic inhibition of ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) by 3-aminopyridine-2-carboxaldehyde thiosemicarbazone (3-AP, NSC no. 663249) enhances radiation sensitivity during low-dose-rate ionizing radiation provided by a novel purpose-built iridium-192 cell irradiator. Methods and Materials: The cells were exposed to low-dose-rate radiation (11, 23, 37, 67 cGy/h) using a custom-fabricated cell irradiator or to high-dose-rate radiation (330 cGy/min) using a conventional cell irradiator. The radiation sensitivity of human cervical (CaSki, C33-a) cancer cells with or without RNR inhibition by 3-AP was evaluated using a clonogenic survival and an RNR activity assay. Alteration in the cell cycle distribution was monitored using flow cytometry. Results: Increasing radiation sensitivity of both CaSki and C33-a cells was observed with the incremental increase in radiation dose rates. 3-AP treatment led to enhanced radiation sensitivity in both cell lines, eliminating differences in cell cytotoxicity from the radiation dose rate. RNR blockade by 3-AP during low-dose-rate irradiation was associated with low RNR activity and extended G{sub 1}-phase cell cycle arrest. Conclusions: We conclude that RNR inhibition by 3-AP impedes DNA damage repair mechanisms that rely on deoxyribonucleotide production and thereby increases radiation sensitivity of human cervical cancers to low-dose-rate radiation.

Kunos, Charles A., E-mail: charles.kunos@UHhospitals.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals Case Medical Center and Case Western Reserve School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH (United States); Colussi, Valdir C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals Case Medical Center and Case Western Reserve School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH (United States); Pink, John [Department of General Medical Sciences, University Hospitals Case Medical Center and Case Western Reserve School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH (United States); Radivoyevitch, Tomas [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, University Hospitals Case Medical Center and Case Western Reserve School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH (United States); Oleinick, Nancy L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals Case Medical Center and Case Western Reserve School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH (United States)

2011-07-15

114

Transactivation of bad by vorinostat-induced acetylated p53 enhances doxorubicin-induced cytotoxicity in cervical cancer cells.  

PubMed

Vorinostat (VOR) has been reported to enhance the cytotoxic effects of doxorubicin (DOX) with fewer side effects because of the lower DOX dosage in breast cancer cells. In this study, we investigated the novel mechanism underlying the synergistic cytotoxic effects of VOR and DOX co-treatment in cervical cancer cells HeLa, CaSki and SiHa cells. Co-treatment with VOR and DOX at marginal doses led to the induction of apoptosis through caspase-3 activation, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage and DNA micronuclei. Notably, the synergistic growth inhibition induced by the co-treatment was attributed to the upregulation of the pro-apoptotic protein Bad, as the silencing of Bad expression using small interfering RNA (siRNA) abolished the phenomenon. As siRNA against p53 did not result in an increase in acetylated p53 and the consequent upregulation of Bad, the observed Bad upregulation was mediated by acetylated p53. Moreover, a chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis showed that the co-treatment of HeLa cells with VOR and DOX increased the recruitment of acetylated p53 to the bad promoter, with consequent bad transactivation. Conversely, C33A cervical cancer cells containing mutant p53 co-treated with VOR and DOX did not exhibit Bad upregulation, acetylated p53 induction or consequent synergistic growth inhibition. Together, the synergistic growth inhibition of cervical cancer cell lines induced by co-treatment with VOR and DOX can be attributed to the upregulation of Bad, which is induced by acetylated p53. These results show for the first time that the acetylation of p53, rather than histones, is a mechanism for the synergistic growth inhibition induced by VOR and DOX co-treatments. PMID:24525822

Lee, Sook-Jeong; Hwang, Sung-Ook; Noh, Eun Joo; Kim, Dong-Uk; Nam, Miyoung; Kim, Jong Hyeok; Nam, Joo Hyun; Hoe, Kwang-Lae

2014-01-01

115

IL-17A Promotes the Migration and Invasiveness of Cervical Cancer Cells by Coordinately Activating MMPs Expression via the p38/NF-?B Signal Pathway  

PubMed Central

Objective IL-17A plays an important role in many inflammatory diseases and cancers. We aimed to examine the effect of IL-17A on the invasion of cervical cancer cells and study its related mechanisms. Methods Wound healing and matrigel transwell assays were used to examine the effect of IL-17A on cervical cancer cell migration and invasion by a panel of cervical cancer cell lines. The levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) were investigated using western blotting. The activity of p38 and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-?B) signal pathway was detected too. Results Here, we showed that IL-17A could promote the migration and invasion of cervical cancer cells. Further molecular analysis showed that IL-17A could up-regulate the expressions and activities of MMP2 and MMP9, and down-regulate the expressions of TIMP-1 and TIMP-2. Furthermore, IL-17A also activates p38 signal pathway and increased p50 and p65 nuclear expression. In addition, treatment of cervical cancer cells with the pharmacological p38/NF-?B signal pathway inhibitors, SB203580 and PDTC, potently restored the roles of invasion and upregulation of MMPs induced by IL-17A. Conclusion IL-17A could promote the migration and invasion of cervical cancer cell via up-regulating MMP2 and MMP9 expression, and down-regulating TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 expression via p38/NF-?B signal pathway. IL-17A may be a potential target to improve the prognosis for patients with cervical cancer. PMID:25250801

Chen, Kunlun; Bian, Zhuoqiong; Jinfang Wu; Gao, Qing

2014-01-01

116

DNA probes for papillomavirus strains readied for cervical cancer screening  

SciTech Connect

New Papillomavirus tests are ready to come to the aid of the standard Papanicolauo test in screening for cervical cancer. The new tests, which detect the strains of human papillomavirus (HPV) most commonly associated with human cervical cancer, are designed to be used as an adjunct to rather than as a replacement for the Papanicolaou smears. Their developers say that they can be used to indicated a risk of developing cancer in women whose Papanicolaou smears indicate mild cervical dysplasia, and, eventually, to detect papillomavirus infection in normal Papanicolaou smears. The rationale for HPV testing is derived from a growing body of evidence that HPV is a major factor in the etiology of cervical cancer. Three HPV tests were described recently in Chicago at the Third International Conference on Human Papillomavirus and Squamous Cervical Cancer. Each relies on DNA probes to detect the presence of papillomavirus in cervical cells and/or to distinguish the strain of papillomavirus present.

Merz, B.

1988-11-18

117

Anti-TROP2 conjugated hollow gold nanospheres as a novel nanostructure for targeted photothermal destruction of cervical cancer cells  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Photothermal ablation (PTA) is a promising avenue in the area of cancer therapeutics that destroys tumor cells through conversion of near-infrared (NIR) laser light to heat. Hollow gold nanospheres (HGNs) are one of the few materials that are capable of converting light to heat and have been previously used for photothermal ablation studies. Selective delivery of functional nanoparticles to the tumor site is considered as an effective therapeutic approach. In this paper, we demonstrated the anti-cancer potential of HGNs. HGNs were conjugated with monoclonal antibody (anti-TROP2) in order to target cervical cancer cells (HeLa) that contain abundant trophoblast cell surface antigen 2 (TROP2) on the cell surface. The efficient uptake and intracellular location of these functionalized HGNs were studied through application of inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Cytotoxicity induced by PTA was measured using CCK-8 assay. HeLa cells incubated with naked HGNs (0.3-3 nmol L-1) within 48 h did not show obvious cytotoxicity. Under laser irradiation at suitable power, anti-TROP2 conjugated HGNs achieved significant tumor cell growth inhibition in comparison to the effects of non-specific PEGylated HGNs (P < 0.05). ?H2AX assay results revealed higher occurrences of DNA-DSBs with anti-TROP2 conjugated HGNs plus laser radiation as compared to treatment with laser alone. Flow cytometry analysis showed that the amount of cell apoptosis was increased after laser irradiation with anti-TROP2 conjugated HGNs (P < 0.05). Anti-TROP2 conjugated HGNs resulted in down-regulation of Bcl-2 expression and up-regulation of Bax expression. Our study results confirmed that anti-TROP2 conjugated HGNs can selectively destroy cervical cancer cells through inducing its apoptosis and DNA damages. We propose that HGNs have the potentials to mediate targeted cancer treatment.

Liu, Ting; Tian, Jiguang; Chen, Zhaolong; Liang, Ying; Liu, Jiao; Liu, Si; Li, Huihui; Zhan, Jinhua; Yang, Xingsheng

2014-08-01

118

Epidemiologic Classification of Human Papillomavirus Types Associated with Cervical Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

background Infection with human papilloma virus (HPV) is the main cause of cervical cancer, but the risk associated with the various HPV types has not been adequately assessed. methods We pooled data from 11 case-control studies from nine countries involving 1918 wom- en with histologically confirmed squamous-cell cervical cancer and 1928 control wom- en. A common protocol and questionnaire were

Nubia Muñoz; F. Xavier Bosch; Silvia de Sanjosé; Rolando Herrero; Xavier Castellsagué; Keerti V. Shah; Peter J. F. Snijders; Chris J. L. M. Meijer

2003-01-01

119

PIK3CA as an oncogene in cervical cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Amplification of chromosome arm 3q is the most consistent aberration in cervical cancer, and is implicated in the progression of dysplastic uterine cervical cells into invasive cancer. The present study employed the ‘positional candidate gene’ strategy to determine the contribution of PIK3CA, which is located in 3q26.3, in cervical tumorigenesis. PIK3CA is known to be involved in the PI 3-kinase\\/AKT

Yen-Ying Ma; Sung-Jen Wei; Yu-Chen Lin; Jia-Chyi Lung; Ting-Chang Chang; Jacqueline Whang-Peng; Jacqueline M Liu; Deng-Mei Yang; Wen K Yang; Chen-Yang Shen

2000-01-01

120

Delivery of small interfering RNAs in human cervical cancer cells by polyethylenimine-functionalized carbon nanotubes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Carbon nanotubes are capable of penetrating the cell membrane and are widely considered as potential carriers for gene or drug delivery. Because the C-C and C=C bonds in carbon nanotubes are nonpolar, functionalization is required for carbon nanotubes to interact with genes or drugs as well as to improve their biocompatibility. In this study, polyethylenimine (PEI)-functionalized single-wall (PEI-NH-SWNTs) and multiwall carbon nanotubes (PEI-NH-MWNTs) were produced by direct amination method. PEI functionalization increased the positive charge on the surface of SWNTs and MWNTs, allowing carbon nanotubes to interact electrostatically with the negatively charged small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and to serve as nonviral gene delivery reagents. PEI-NH-MWNTs and PEI-NH-SWNTs had a better solubility in water than pristine carbon nanotubes, and further removal of large aggregates by centrifugation produced a stable suspension of reduced particle size and improved homogeneity and dispersity. The amount of grafted PEI estimated by thermogravimetric analysis was 5.08% ( w/ w) and 5.28% ( w/ w) for PEI-NH-SWNTs and PEI-NH-MWNTs, respectively. For the assessment of cytotoxicity, various concentrations of PEI-NH-SWNTs and PEI-NH-MWNTs were incubated with human cervical cancer cells, HeLa-S3, for 48 h. PEI-NH-SWNTs and PEI-NH-MWNTs induced cell deaths in a dose-dependent manner but were less cytotoxic compared to pure PEI. As determined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay, siRNAs directed against glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (siGAPDH) were completely associated with PEI-NH-SWNTs or PEI-NH-MWNTs at a PEI-NH-SWNT/siGAPDH or PEI-NH-MWNT/siGAPDH mass ratio of 80:1 or 160:1, respectively. Furthermore, PEI-NH-SWNTs and PEI-NH-MWNTs successfully delivered siGAPDH into HeLa-S3 cells at PEI-NH-SWNT/siGAPDH and PEI-NH-MWNT/siGAPDH mass ratios of 1:1 to 20:1, resulting in suppression of the mRNA level of GAPDH to an extent similar to that of DharmaFECT, a common transfection reagent for siRNAs. Our results indicate that the PEI-NH-SWNTs and PEI-NH-MWNTs produced in this study are capable of delivering siRNAs into HeLa-S3 cells to suppress gene expression and may therefore be considered as novel nonviral gene delivery reagents.

Huang, Yuan-Pin; Lin, I.-Jou; Chen, Chih-Chen; Hsu, Yi-Chiang; Chang, Chi-Chang; Lee, Mon-Juan

2013-06-01

121

Leea indica Ethyl Acetate Fraction Induces Growth-Inhibitory Effect in Various Cancer Cell Lines and Apoptosis in Ca Ski Human Cervical Epidermoid Carcinoma Cells  

PubMed Central

The anticancer potential of Leea indica, a Chinese medicinal plant was investigated for the first time. The crude ethanol extract and fractions (ethyl acetate, hexane, and water) of Leea indica were evaluated their cytotoxicity on various cell lines (Ca Ski, MCF 7, MDA-MB-435, KB, HEP G2, WRL 68, and Vero) by MTT assay. Leea indica ethyl acetate fraction (LIEAF) was found showing the greatest cytotoxic effect against Ca Ski cervical cancer cells. Typical apoptotic morphological changes such as DNA fragmentation and chromatin condensation were observed in LIEAF-treated cells. Early signs of apoptosis such as externalization of phosphatidylserine and disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential indicated apoptosis induction. This was further substantiated by dose- and time-dependent accumulation of sub-G1 cells, depletion of intracellular glutathione, and activation of caspase-3. In conclusion, these results suggested that LIEAF inhibited cervical cancer cells growth by inducing apoptosis and could be developed as potential anticancer drugs. PMID:21423690

Yau Hsiung, Wong; Abdul Kadir, Habsah

2011-01-01

122

6 Common Cancers - Gynecologic Cancers Cervical, Endometrial, and Ovarian  

MedlinePLUS

... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Gynecologic Cancers Cervical, Endometrial, and Ovarian Past Issues / Spring 2007 ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Gynecologic Cancers Cervical, Endometrial, and Ovarian NCI estimates that endometrial, ...

123

EVALUATION OF A SELECTIVELY ONCOLYTIC ADENOVIRUS FOR LOCAL AND SYSTEMIC TREATMENT OF CERVICAL CANCER  

E-print Network

, Birmingham, AL, USA Treatment options for disseminated cervical cancer re- main inadequate. Here, we in cells defective in the Rb-p16 pathway, such as most cervical cancer cells. The viral fiber contains an v-independent infection. These integrins have been reported to be frequently upregulated in cervical cancer. Oncolysis

Hemminki, Akseli

124

T0070907, a PPAR ? Inhibitor, Induced G2/M Arrest Enhances the Effect of Radiation in Human Cervical Cancer Cells Through Mitotic Catastrophe.  

PubMed

Overexpression of peroxisome proliferator activator receptor ? (PPAR?) has been implicated in many types of cancer including cervical cancer. Radiation therapy remains the main nonsurgical modality for the treatment of cervical cancer. The present study reports the impact of pharmacological inhibition of PPAR? in enhancing the radiosensitization of cervical cancer cells in vitro. Three cervical cancer cell lines (HeLa, SiHa, and Me180) were treated with a PPAR? inhibitor, T0070907, and/or radiation. The changes in protein, cell cycle, DNA content, apoptosis, and cell survival were analyzed. The PPAR? is differentially expressed in cervical cancer cells with maximum expression in ME180 cells. T0070907 has significantly decreased the tubulin levels in a time-dependent manner in ME180 cells. The decrease in the tubulin levels after T0070907 in ME180 and SiHa cells was associated with significant increase in the cells at the G2/M phase. The changes in the tubulin and G2/M phase were not evident in HeLa cells. T0070907 reduced the protein levels of PPAR?; however, PPAR? silencing had no effect on the ?-tubulin level in ME180 cells suggesting the PPAR?-dependent and -independent actions of T0070907. To ascertain the impact of synergistic effect of T0070907 and radiation, HeLa and ME180 cells were pretreated with T0070907 and subjected to radiation (4 Gy). Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate analysis revealed increased apoptosis in cells treated with radiation and T0070907 when compared to control and individual treatment. In addition, T0070907 pretreatment enhanced radiation-induced tetraploidization reinforcing the additive effect of T0070907. Confocal analysis of tubulin confirmed the onset of mitotic catastrophe in cells treated with T0070907 and radiation. These results strongly suggest the radiosensitizing effects of T0070907 through G2/M arrest and mitotic catastrophe. PMID:24642720

An, Zhengzhe; Muthusami, Sridhar; Yu, Jae-Ran; Park, Woo-Yoon

2014-11-01

125

Comprehensive Analysis of HLA-A,-B, -C, -DRB1, and -DQB1 Loci and Squamous Cell Cervical Cancer Risk  

PubMed Central

Variation in human major histocompatibility genes may influence the risk of squamous cell cervical cancer (SCC) by altering the efficiency of the T cell mediated immune response to HPV antigens. We used high resolution methods to genotype HLA Class I (A, B, and Cw) and Class II (DRB1 and DQB1) loci in 544 women with SCC and 542 controls. Recognizing that HLA molecules are co-dominantly expressed, we focused on co-occurring alleles. Among 137 allele combinations present at >5% in the case or control groups, 36 were significantly associated with SCC risk. All but one of the 30 combinations that increased risk included DQB1*0301, and 23 included subsets of A*0201-B*4402-Cw*0501-DRB1*0401-DQB1*0301. Another combination, B*4402-DRB1*1101-DQB1*0301, conferred a strong risk of SCC (OR 10.0, 95% CI 3.0-33.3). Among the 6 combinations that conferred a decreased risk of SCC, 4 included Cw*0701 or DQB1*02. Most multilocus results were similar for SCC that contained HPV16; a notable exception was A*0101-B*0801-Cw*0701-DRB1*0301-DQB1*0201 and its subsets, which were associated with HPV16+ SCC (OR 0.5, 95% CI 0.3-0.9). The main multilocus associations were replicated in studies of cervical adenocarcinoma and vulvar cancer. These data confirm that T helper and cytotoxic T cell responses are both important cofactors with HPV in cervical cancer etiology, and indicate that co-occurring HLA alleles across loci appear to be more important than individual alleles. Thus, certain co-occurring alleles may be markers of disease risk that have clinical value as biomarkers for targeted screening or development of new therapies. PMID:18451182

Madeleine, Margaret M.; Johnson, Lisa G.; Smith, Anajane G.; Hansen, John A.; Nisperos, Brenda B.; Li, Sue; Zhao, Lue-Ping; Daling, Janet R.; Schwartz, Stephen M.; Galloway, Denise A.

2009-01-01

126

Tim-3 Expression in Cervical Cancer Promotes Tumor Metastasis  

PubMed Central

Background T cell immunoglobulin mucin-3 (Tim-3) has been identified as a negative regulator of anti-tumor immunity. Recent studies highlight the important role of Tim-3 in the CD8+ T cell exhaustion that takes place in both human and animal cancer models. However, the nature of Tim-3 expression in the tumor cell and the mechanism by which it inhibits anti-tumor immunity are unclear. This present study aims to determine Tim-3 is expressed in cervical cancer cells and to evaluate the role of Tim-3 in cervical cancer progression. Methodology A total of 85 cervical tissue specimens including 43 human cervical cancer, 22 cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and 20 chronic cervicitis were involved. Tim-3 expression in tumor cells was detected and was found to correlate with clinicopathological parameters. Meanwhile, expression of Tim-3 was assessed by RT-PCR, Western Blot and confocal microscopy in cervical cancer cell lines, HeLa and SiHa. The migration and invasion potential of Hela cells was evaluated after inhibiting Tim-3 expression by ADV-antisense Tim-3. Conclusions We found that Tim-3 was expressed at a higher level in the clinical cervical cancer cells compared to the CIN and chronic cervicitis controls. We supported this finding by confirming the presence of Tim-3 mRNA and protein in the cervical cell lines. Tim-3 expression in tumor cells correlated with clinicopathological parameters. Patients with high expression of Tim-3 had a significant metastatic potential, advanced cancer grades and shorter overall survival than those with lower expression. Multivariate analysis showed that Tim-3 expression was an independent factor for predicting the prognosis of cervical cancer. Significantly, down-regulating the expression of Tim-3 protein inhibited migration and invasion of Hela cells. Our study suggests that the expression of Tim-3 in tumor cells may be an independent prognostic factor for patients with cervical cancer. Moreover, Tim-3 expression may promote metastatic potential in cervical cancers. PMID:23335978

Cao, Yang; Zhou, Xiaoxi; Huang, Xiaoyuan; Li, Qinlu; Gao, Lili; Jiang, Lijun; Huang, Mei; Zhou, Jianfeng

2013-01-01

127

Cervical Cancer Incidence and Mortality Rates  

Cancer.gov

Skip to Main Content Search International Cancer Screening Network Sponsored by the National Cancer Institute Home | About ICSN | Collaborative Projects | Meetings | Cancer Sites | Publications | Contact Us Cervical Cancer: Mortality Rates | Organization

128

Effect of coating material on uptake of indocyanine green-loaded nanocapsules by HeLa cervical cancer cells  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Fluorescent molecular probes offer a potential for early cancer detection. Indocyanine green (ICG) is an FDAapproved near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent dye used in ophthalmic angiography and assessment of cardiac and hepatic functions. However, clinical applications of ICG remain very limited due to its rapid clearance from vascular circulation, unstable optical properties, non-specific interactions with plasma proteins, and inability for localized targeting. To overcome these limitations, we have encapsulated ICG within nanoconstructs composed of poly(allylamine) hydrochloride and disodium hydrogen phosphate salt. To understand the effects of coating materials on the cellular uptake of the nanocapsules, we have measured the uptake of ICG-loaded nanocapsules (ICG-NCs) with various coating materials by HeLa cancerous cervical epithelial cells in-vitro. Results of this study provide important information for the choice of appropriate coating materials that will result in maximal uptake of ICG-NCs in optical and phototherapy of cancerous tissue.

Jung, Bongsu; Lomeli, Eulieses; Anvari, Bahman

2010-02-01

129

Future trends in cervical cancer.  

PubMed

The identification of the close association of certain types of human papillomavirus with the development of cervical cancer should lead to an extensive revision of appropriate health policies. Having taken into account the drawbacks inherent in the existing data (stemming from the use of varying nomenclature, diagnostic methods and reliability, registration and screening practices) it is possible to conclude that the incidence of HPV infections, all premalignant and malignant stages of cervical cancer are, or will soon be, increasing in several countries. This rate of increase is fastest for the younger age groups and is despite the introduction of various forms of screening. These trends therefore indicate an urgent need to adopt policies to avert an unnecessary increase in fatalities due to cervical cancer. It is therefore recommended to: (1) establish a routine diagnostic method which can identify either the type of HPV present or the lesions which are progressing; (2) determine the incidence of HPV infections in the general population; (3) disseminate to medical personnel, teachers, and other members of society existing knowledge concerning the dangers associated with this virus and relevant to preventing its further spread; (4) introduce an effective population screening campaign for all sexually active women, preferably involving a yearly examination at a colposcopy clinic; (5) intensify basic and applied HPV research, especially that which could lead to a deeper understanding of viral transmission and infection, identification of cofactors which promote cervical lesion progression, or to the production of a vaccine. PMID:2841018

Larsen, P M; Vetner, M; Hansen, K; Fey, S J

1988-08-15

130

FTS (fused toes homolog) a novel oncoprotein involved in uterine cervical carcinogenesis and a potential diagnostic marker for cervical cancer.  

PubMed

The high incidence and fatality rate of uterine cervical cancer warrant effective diagnostic and therapeutic target identification for this disease. Here, we have found a novel oncoprotein FTS (Fused Toes Homolog), which is involved in cervical cancer pathogenesis. Immunohistochemical analysis of human cervical biopsy samples revealed that the expression of FTS is absent in normal cervical epithelium but progressively overexpressed in human cervical intraneoplastic lesions (CIN-I to CIN-III), this characteristic phenomenon put this protein, a potential diagnostic marker for the screening of early neoplastic changes of cervix. Using FTS-specific small hairpin RNA (shRNA) in cervical cancer cells, we determined a specific role for FTS protein in, cervical neoplasia. Targeted stable knock down of FTS in HeLa cells led to the growth inhibition, cell-cycle arrest, and apoptosis with concurrent increase in p21 protein. FTS effectively represses the p21 mRNA expression in dual luciferase assay which indicates that p21 is transcriptionally regulated by this oncoprotein which in turn affect the regular cell-cycle process and its components. Consistent with this we found a reciprocal association between these proteins in early cervical neoplastic tissues. These data unraveled the involvement of new oncoprotein FTS in cervical cancer which plays a central role in carcinogenesis. Targeted inhibition of FTS lead to the shutdown of key elemental characteristics of cervical cancer and could lead to an effective therapeutic strategy for cervical cancer. PMID:20945372

Cinghu, Senthilkumar; Anandharaj, Arunkumar; Lee, Ho-chang; Yu, Jae-Ran; Park, Woo-Yoon

2011-06-01

131

The combined treatment of aspirin and radiation induces apoptosis by the regulation of bcl-2 and caspase-3 in human cervical cancer cell.  

PubMed

The antitumor mechanisms mediated by combined treatment of aspirin and radiation on human cervical cancer cells are unclear. In this paper, we studied whether aspirin and radiation induced apoptosis and whether the sensitivity to radiation was enhanced in aspirin-pretreated HeLa TG, human cervical cancer cells. We identified the regulation of apoptosis-responsive genes, bcl-2, caspase-3 and p53 after combined treatment. To investigate the growth inhibitory effect on HeLa TG cells after treatment of various nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), we performed cell proliferation assay and colony-forming assay. In the presence of aspirin, sulindac and indomethacin, cell proliferation and colony formation were decreased in a time- and dose-dependent manner. According to flow cytometry analysis and Hoechst 33342 staining, we found that aspirin increased sub-G1 population and nuclear condensation of cervical cancer cells. Remarkably, the combined treatment decreased cell proliferation compared with treatment of 1 mM aspirin or 6 Gy radiation alone. Pretreatment of aspirin followed by irradiation also elevated the population of apoptotic cells. These results revealed that sensitivity to radiation was enhanced in aspirin-pretreated HeLa TG cells, and aspirin has the additive role for amplifying the radiotherapeutic effect in cervical cancer cells. Finally, combined treatment revealed bcl-2 repression and caspase-3 induction did not detect any change but p53 expression did. We have demonstrated that combined treatment of aspirin and radiation induces the antitumor effect mediated by bcl-2 and caspase-3 pathway in cervical cancer cells. PMID:12490308

Kim, Kye Young; Seol, Ji Yeon; Jeon, Geong-A; Nam, Myeong Jin

2003-01-28

132

Requirement of T-lymphokine-activated killer cell-originated protein kinase for TRAIL resistance of human HeLa cervical cancer cells  

SciTech Connect

T-lymphokine-activated killer cell-originated protein kinase (TOPK) appears to be highly expressed in various cancer cells and to play an important role in maintaining proliferation of cancer cells. However, the underlying mechanism by which TOPK regulates growth of cancer cells remains elusive. Here we report that upregulated endogenous TOPK augments resistance of cancer cells to apoptosis induced by tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL). Stable knocking down of TOPK markedly increased TRAIL-mediated apoptosis of human HeLa cervical cancer cells, as compared with control cells. Caspase 8 or caspase 3 activities in response to TRAIL were greatly incremented in TOPK-depleted cells. Ablation of TOPK negatively regulated TRAIL-mediated NF-{kappa}B activity. Furthermore, expression of NF-{kappa}B-dependent genes, FLICE-inhibitory protein (FLIP), inhibitor of apoptosis protein 1 (c-IAP1), or X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) was reduced in TOPK-depleted cells. Collectively, these findings demonstrated that TOPK contributed to TRAIL resistance of cancer cells via NF-{kappa}B activity, suggesting that TOPK might be a potential molecular target for successful cancer therapy using TRAIL.

Kwon, Hyeok-Ran [Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, Konyang University, 685 Gasuwon-dong, Seo-gu, Daejeon 302-718 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, Konyang University, 685 Gasuwon-dong, Seo-gu, Daejeon 302-718 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ki Won [Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Konkuk University, 1 Hwayang-dong, Gwangjin-gu, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Konkuk University, 1 Hwayang-dong, Gwangjin-gu, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of); Dong, Zigang [Hormel Institute, University of Minnesota, 801 16th Avenue NE, Austin, MN 55912 (United States)] [Hormel Institute, University of Minnesota, 801 16th Avenue NE, Austin, MN 55912 (United States); Lee, Kyung Bok [Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, Konyang University, 685 Gasuwon-dong, Seo-gu, Daejeon 302-718 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, Konyang University, 685 Gasuwon-dong, Seo-gu, Daejeon 302-718 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Sang-Muk, E-mail: sangmuk_oh@konyang.ac.kr [Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, Konyang University, 685 Gasuwon-dong, Seo-gu, Daejeon 302-718 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, Konyang University, 685 Gasuwon-dong, Seo-gu, Daejeon 302-718 (Korea, Republic of)

2010-01-01

133

Women's perspectives on illness when being screened for cervical cancer  

PubMed Central

Background In Greenland, the incidence of cervical cancer caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) is 25 per 100,000 women; 2.5 times the Danish rate. In Greenland, the disease is most frequent among women aged 30–40. Systematic screening can identify women with cervical cell changes, which if untreated may cause cervical cancer. In 2007, less than 40% of eligible women in Greenland participated in screening. Objective To examine Greenlandic women's perception of disease, their understanding of the connection between HPV and cervical cancer, and the knowledge that they deem necessary to decide whether to participate in cervical cancer screening. Study design The methods used to perform this research were 2 focus-group interviews with 5 Danish-speaking women and 2 individual interviews with Greenlandic-speaking women. The analysis involved a phenomenological-hermeneutic approach with 3 levels of analysis: naive reading, structural analysis and critical interpretation. Results These revealed that women were unprepared for screening results showing cervical cell changes, since they had no symptoms. When diagnosed, participants believed that they had early-stage cancer, leading to feelings of vulnerability and an increased need to care for themselves. Later on, an understanding of HPV as the basis for diagnosis and the realization that disease might not be accompanied by symptoms developed. The outcome for participants was a life experience, which they used to encourage others to participate in screening and to suggest ways that information about screening and HPV might reach a wider Greenlandic population. Conclusion Women living through the process of cervical disease, treatment and follow-up develop knowledge about HPV, cervical cell changes, cervical disease and their connection, which, if used to inform cervical screening programmes, will improve the quality of information about HPV, cervical cancer and screening participation. This includes that verbal and written information given at the point of screening and diagnosis needs to be complemented by visual imagery. PMID:23984277

Hounsgaard, Lise; Augustussen, Mikaela; M?ller, Helle; Bradley, Stephen K.; M?ller, Suzanne

2013-01-01

134

Cervical Cancer Prevention and Screening: Financial Issues  

MedlinePLUS

... cancers are treated Cervical cancer prevention and screening: Financial issues Additional resources References Previous Topic How women with abnormal Pap test results or pre-cancers are treated Next Topic Additional ...

135

Does Multispectral Texture Features Really Improve Cervical Cancer Detection?  

E-print Network

Does Multispectral Texture Features Really Improve Cervical Cancer Detection? Tong Zhao, Jiayong For cervical cancer detection, the performance of multispectral texture (MST) features extracted from information can achieve better classification results (ROC curves) for cervical cancer detection from

136

Cervical Cancer: Screening and Therapeutic Perspectives  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cervical cancer is a major cause of mortality and premature death among women in their most productive years in low- and medium-resourced countries in Asia, Africa and Latin America, despite the fact that it is an eminently preventable cancer. While cytology screening programmes have resulted in a substantial reduction of cervical cancer mortality in developed countries, they have been shown

Rengaswamy Sankaranarayanan; Somanathan Thara; Pulikottil Okkuru Esmy; Partha Basu

2008-01-01

137

Heterogeneity of microRNAs expression in cervical cancer cells: over-expression of miR-196a  

PubMed Central

In recent years, the study of microRNAs associated with neoplastic processes has increased. Patterns of microRNA expression in different cell lines and different kinds of tumors have been identified; however, little is known about the alterations in regulatory pathways and genes involved in aberrant set of microRNAs. The identification of these altered microRNAs in several cervical cancer cells and potentially deregulated pathways involved constitute the principal goals of the present study. In the present work, the expression profiles of cellular microRNAs in Cervical Cancer tissues and cell lines were explored using microRNA microarray, Affymetrix. The most over-expressed was miR-196a, which was evaluated by real time PCR, and HOXC8 protein as potential target by immunohistochemistry assay. One hundred and twenty three human microRNAs differentially expressed in the cell tumor, 64 (52%) over-expressed and 59 (48%) under-expressed were observed. Among the microRNAs over-expressed, we focused on miR-196a; at present this microRNA is poorly studied in CC. The expression of this microRNA was evaluated by qRT-PCR, and HOXC8 by immunohistochemistry assay. There is not a specific microRNA expression profile in the CC cells, neither a microRNA related to HPV presence. Furthermore, the miR-196a was over-expressed, while an absence of HOXC8 expression was observed. We suggest that miR-196a could be played as oncomiR in CC. PMID:24817935

Villegas-Ruiz, Vanessa; Juarez-Mendez, Sergio; Perez-Gonzalez, Oscar A; Arreola, Hugo; Paniagua-Garcia, Lucero; Parra-Melquiadez, Miriam; Peralta-Rodriguez, Raul; Lopez-Romero, Ricardo; Monroy-Garcia, Alberto; Mantilla-Morales, Alejandra; Gomez-Gutierrez, Guillermo; Roman-Bassaure, Edgar; Salcedo, Mauricio

2014-01-01

138

Ectopic Expression of the Coxsackievirus and Adenovirus Receptor Increases Susceptibility to Adenoviral Infection in the Human Cervical Cancer Cell Line, SiHa  

Microsoft Academic Search

The expression level of the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) gene in human cervical cancer cell lines (Hela, Caski, HT-3, and SiHa) appears to be correlated with their susceptibility to adenoviral vector-based gene transfer. Hela, Caski, and HT-3 cells, which express the CAR molecule on the cell surface, showed a higher susceptibility to infection of AdCMVGFP than SiHa cells with

Jong-Sik Kim; Seung-Hoon Lee; Yong-Suk Cho; Young Ho Kim; Je-Ho Lee

2001-01-01

139

Lymphedema After Surgery in Patients With Endometrial Cancer, Cervical Cancer, or Vulvar Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Lymphedema; Stage IA Cervical Cancer; Stage IA Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IB Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IB Vulvar Cancer; Stage II Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage II Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIB Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIC Vulvar Cancer; Stage IVB Vulvar Cancer

2014-03-07

140

Effects of HMGB1 expression suppressed by siRNA on cell cycle and proliferation of human cervical cancer cell line HeLa  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective  In this study, RNA interference was used to evaluate the effects of HMGB1 expression on cell cycle and proliferation of the\\u000a human cervical cancer cell line HeLa.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  We had previously constructed and screened effective eukaryotic expression vectors carrying PGCsi3.0-1\\/HMGB1 siRNA and PGCsi3.0-3\\/HMGB1\\u000a siRNA, then the vectors were transfected into HeLa cells. The expression of HMGB1 before and after transfection in

Yuan-yuan Qiu; Hui-yu Wang; Quan Hao

2010-01-01

141

Physical Status and Expression of HPV Genes in Cervical Cancers  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is known that E2 protein of oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) inhibits the expression of E6 and E7 genes from their major promotersin vitroand suppresses the proliferation of cervical cancer cells. This suggests that the loss of functional E2 gene may provide selective advantages in the development of cervical cancer. Investigation of the relationship between the disruption of HPV-16\\/18 E2

Jong Sup Park; Eun Seong Hwang; Sue Nie Park; Hee Kyung Ahn; Soo Jong Um; Chan Joo Kim; Seung Jo Kim; Sung Eun Namkoong

1997-01-01

142

HPV types and cofactors causing cervical cancer in Peru  

Microsoft Academic Search

We conducted a hospital-based case-control study in Peru of 198 women with histologically confirmed cervical cancer (173 squamous cell carcinomas and 25 cases of adenocarcinoma\\/adenosquamous carcinoma) and 196 control women. Information on risk factors was obtained by personal interview. Using PCR-based assays on exfoliated cervical cells and biopsy specimens, HPV DNA was detected in 95.3% of women with squamous cell

C Santos; N Muñoz; S Klug; M Almonte; I Guerrero; M Alvarez; C Velarde; O Galdos; M Castillo; J Walboomers; C Meijer; E Caceres

2001-01-01

143

Berberine Reverses Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition and Inhibits Metastasis and Tumor-Induced Angiogenesis in Human Cervical Cancer Cells.  

PubMed

Metastasis is the most common cause of cancer-related death in patients, and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is essential for cancer metastasis, which is a multistep complicated process that includes local invasion, intravasation, extravasation, and proliferation at distant sites. When cancer cells metastasize, angiogenesis is also required for metastatic dissemination, given that an increase in vascular density will allow easier access of tumor cells to circulation, and represents a rational target for therapeutic intervention. Berberine has several anti-inflammation and anticancer biologic effects. In this study, we provided molecular evidence that is associated with the antimetastatic effect of berberine by showing a nearly complete inhibition on invasion (P < 0.001) of highly metastatic SiHa cells via reduced transcriptional activities of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and urokinase-type plasminogen activator. Berberine reversed transforming growth factor-?1-induced EMT and caused upregulation of epithelial markers such as E-cadherin and inhibited mesenchymal markers such as N-cadherin and snail-1. Selective snail-1 inhibition by snail-1-specific small interfering RNA also showed increased E-cadherin expression in SiHa cells. Berberine also reduced tumor-induced angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Importantly, an in vivo BALB/c nude mice xenograft model and tail vein injection model showed that berberine treatment reduced tumor growth and lung metastasis by oral gavage, respectively. Taken together, these findings suggested that berberine could reduce metastasis and angiogenesis of cervical cancer cells, thereby constituting an adjuvant treatment of metastasis control. PMID:25217495

Chu, Shu-Chen; Yu, Cheng-Chia; Hsu, Li-Sung; Chen, Kuo-Shuen; Su, Mei-Yu; Chen, Pei-Ni

2014-12-01

144

Study finds genomic differences in types of cervical cancer  

Cancer.gov

A new study has revealed marked differences in the genomic terrain of the two most common types of cervical cancer, suggesting that patients might benefit from therapies geared to each type’s molecular idiosyncrasies. The study, published August 23, 2013 in the online version of the journal Cancer by researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH), is the first to compare the spectrum of cancer-related gene mutations in the two main subtypes of cervical cancer – adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma.

145

Induction of Apoptotic Effects of Antiproliferative Protein from the Seeds of Borreria hispida on Lung Cancer (A549) and Cervical Cancer (HeLa) Cell Lines  

PubMed Central

A 35 KDa protein referred to as F3 was purified from the seeds of Borreria hispida by precipitation with 80% ammonium sulphate and gel filtration on Sephadex G-100 column. RP-HPLC analysis of protein fraction (F3) on an analytical C-18 column produced a single peak, detected at 220?nm. F3 showed an apparent molecular weight of 35?KDa by SDS PAGE and MALDI-TOF-MS analyses. Peptide mass fingerprinting analysis of F3 showed the closest homology with the sequence of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase of Pyrococcus horikoshii. The protein (F3) exhibited significant cytotoxic activity against lung (A549) and cervical (HeLa) cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner at concentrations ranging from 10?µg to 1000?µg/mL, as revealed by the MTT assay. Cell cycle analysis revealed the increased growth of sub-G0 population in both cell lines exposed to a concentration of 1000?µg/mL of protein fraction F3 as examined from flow cytometry. This is the first report of a protein from the seeds of Borreria hispida with antiproliferative and apoptotic activity in lung (A549) and cervical (HeLa) cancer cells. PMID:24605320

Rupachandra, S.; Sarada, D. V. L.

2014-01-01

146

Berberine modulates AP-1 activity to suppress HPV transcription and downstream signaling to induce growth arrest and apoptosis in cervical cancer cells  

PubMed Central

Background- Specific types of high risk Human papillomaviruses (HR-HPVs) particularly, HPV types 16 and 18 cause cervical cancer and while the two recently developed vaccines against these HPV types are prophylactic in nature, therapeutic options for treatment and management of already existing HPV infection are not available as yet. Because transcription factor, Activator Protein-1 (AP-1) plays a central role in HPV-mediated cervical carcinogenesis, we explored the possibility of its therapeutic targeting by berberine, a natural alkaloid derived from a medicinal plant species, Berberis which has been shown to possess anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties with no known toxicity; however, the effect of berberine against HPV has not been elucidated. Results- We studied the effect of berberine on HPV16-positive cervical cancer cell line, SiHa and HPV18-positive cervical cancer cell line, HeLa using electrophoretic mobility gel shift assays, western and northern blotting which showed that berberine could selectively inhibit constitutively activated AP-1 in a dose- and time-dependent manner and downregulates HPV oncogenes expression. Inhibition of AP-1 was also accompanied by changes in the composition of their DNA-binding complex. Berberine specifically downregulated expression of oncogenic c-Fos which was also absent in the AP-1 binding complex. Treatment with berberine resulted in repression of E6 and E7 levels and concomitant increase in p53 and Rb expression in both cell types. Berberine also suppressed expression of telomerase protein, hTERT, which translated into growth inhibition of cervical cancer cells. Interestingly, a higher concentration of berberine was found to reduce the cell viability through mitochondria-mediated pathway and induce apoptosis by activating caspase-3. Conclusion- These results indicate that berberine can effectively target both the host and viral factors responsible for development of cervical cancer through inhibition of AP-1 and blocking viral oncoproteins E6 and E7 expression. Inhibition of AP-1 activity by berberine may be one of the mechanisms responsible for the anti-HPV effect of berberine. We propose that berberine is a potentially promising compound for the treatment of cervical cancer infected with HPV. PMID:21496227

2011-01-01

147

Down-regulation of HPV18 E6, E7, or VEGF expression attenuates malignant biological behavior of human cervical cancer cells.  

PubMed

To investigate the effect of down-regulation of VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) and HPV18 E6/E7 by hairpin RNA (shRNA) on cell proliferation, apoptosis, migration, invasion, and adhesion abilities of cervical carcinoma cells, recombinant plasmids including pS-E6 shRNA, pS-E7 shRNA, and pS-VEGF shRNA were constructed and transfected into HeLa cells. The levels of E6 mRNA, E7 mRNA, or VEGF mRNA were significantly reduced after transfection of pS-E6 shRNA (76.0%), pS-E7 shRNA (74.4%), and pS-VEGF shRNA (46.7%). VEGF expression was down-regulated by pS-E6 shRNA (55.1%) and pS-E7 shRNA (46.6%). The apoptosis of HeLa cells was increased, and the proliferation, invasion, and adhesion abilities were decreased significantly. For in vivo study, cancer cells that stably expressed the plasmids were cultured. Cells were transplanted subcutaneously into nude mice to establish xenograft tumor model. Finally, expression of E6 shRNA, E7 shRNA, and VEGF shRNA in cancer cells led to inhibition of the growth of xenograft. Hence, RNA interference could effectively suppress the expression of HPV18 E6/E7 and VEGF in human cervical cancer cells. This suppression attenuates malignant biological behavior of human cervical cancer cells. RNA interference of HPV E6/E7 or VEGF expression implies an effective anti-cervical cancer strategy. PMID:21222176

Chen, Li; Wu, Yuan-Yuan; Liu, Peigen; Wang, Jianli; Wang, Guilan; Qin, Jin; Zhou, Jiaming; Zhu, Jianwei

2011-12-01

148

Radiosensitizing effect of gold nanoparticles in carbon ion irradiation of human cervical cancer cells  

SciTech Connect

Noble metal nanoparticles have received considerable attention in biotechnology for their role in bio sensing due to surface plasmon resonance, medical diagnostics due to better imaging contrast and therapy. The radiosensitization effect of gold nanoparticles (AuNP) has been gaining popularity in radiation therapy of cancer cells. The better depth dose profile of energetic ion beam proves its superiority over gamma radiation for fighting against cancer. In the present work, the glucose capped gold nanoparticles (Glu-AuNP) were synthesised and internalized in the HeLa cells. Transmission electron microscopic analysis of ultrathin sections of Glu-AuNP treated HeLa cells confirmed the internalization of Glu-AuNPs. Control HeLa cells and Glu-AuNp treated HeLa cells were irradiated at different doses of 62 MeV 12C ion beam (LET - 290keV/{mu}m) at BIO beam line of using 15UD Pelletron accelerator at Inter University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi, India. The survival fraction was assessed by colony forming assay which revealed that the dose of carbon ion for 90% cell killing in Glu-AuNP treated HeLa cells and control HeLa cells are 2.3 and 3.2 Gy respectively. This observation shows {approx} 28% reduction of {sup 12}C{sup 6+} ion dose for Glu-AuNP treated HeLa cells as compared to control HeLa cells.

Kaur, Harminder; Avasthi, D. K.; Pujari, Geetanjali; Sarma, Asitikantha [Inter University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, Post box-10502, New Delhi-110067 (India)

2013-07-18

149

Medical Interventions: Vaccine to Prevent Cervical Cancer  

Cancer.gov

As recently as the 1940s, cervical cancer was a major cause of death among women of childbearing age in the U.S. but widespread introduction of the Pap test in the 1950s helped reduce cervical cancer incidence and mortality in this country by more than 70 percent.

150

[Molecular mechanism of ophiopogonin B induced cellular autophagy of human cervical cancer HeLa cells].  

PubMed

This study is to investigate the antitumor activity of ophiopogonin B (OP-B). MTT assay, flow cytometric analysis, acridine orange staining, Lyso-Tracker Red staining and HeLa-GFP-LC3 transfect cells assay were used to detect the proliferation activity, apoptosis and autophagy of HeLa cells. The results showed that OP-B exerted potent antiproliferative activity on HeLa cells, the cell growth inhibition effect of OP-B was not due to apoptosis and OP-B could induce autophagy of HeLa cells. OP-B also induced the protein expression up-regulation of Beclin-1 and promoted LC3 I transformation LC3 II, which were representative proteins of autophagy. Furthermore, 3-MA, an inhibitor of autophagy, not only inhibited OP-B-mediated autophagy but also almost completely reversed the antiproliferative effect of OP-B, suggesting that the growth inhibition effect of OP-B was autophagy dependent. Western blotting demonstrated that OP-B inhibited the phosphorylation of Akt and its' downstream vital protein, such as mTOR and p70S6K. In addition, OP-B also induced the protein expression up-regulation of PTEN, which is a negative regulation protein for Akt/mTOR signaling pathway. However, OP-B did not affect the protein expression of total Akt. Collectively, the antitumor effects of OP-B were autophagy-dependent via repression Akt/mTOR signaling pathway. Therefore, OP-B is a prospective inhibitor of Akt/mTOR and may be used as an alternative compound to treat cervical carcinoma. PMID:23984518

Xu, Qiu-Ju; Hou, Li-Li; Hu, Guo-Qiang; Xie, Song-Qiang

2013-06-01

151

Effects of paclitaxel in combination with radiation on human head and neck cancer cells (ZMK-1), cervical squamous cell carcinoma (CaSki), and breast adenocarcinoma cells (MCF7)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background and purpose  : The anticancer drug paclitaxel, a natural product from Taxus brevifolia, is a microtubule-stabilising agent, which has been shown to block different cells in the G2\\/M phase of the cell cycle and\\u000a so modulate their radioresponsiveness. We investigated the radiosensitizing potential of paclitaxel in human head and neck\\u000a cancer cells (ZMK-1), in cervical squamous cell carcinoma cells (CaSki)

Olivier Pradier; Margaret Rave-Fränk; Heinz Schmidberger; Michael Bömecke; Jörg Lehmann; Harald Meden; Clemens-F. Hess

1999-01-01

152

Human Papillomavirus Type 16 E7 Peptide-Directed CD8+ T Cells from Patients with Cervical Cancer Are Cross-Reactive with the Coronavirus NS2 Protein  

Microsoft Academic Search

Human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) E6 and E7 oncoproteins are required for cellular transformation and represent candidate targets for HPV-specific and major histocompatibility complex class I-restricted CD8-T-cell responses in patients with cervical cancer. Recent evidence suggests that cross-reactivity repre- sents the inherent nature of the T-cell repertoire. We identified HLA-A2 binding HPV16 E7 variant peptides from human, bacterial, or viral

Katja Nilges; Hanni Hohn; Henryk Pilch; Claudia Neukirch; Kirsten Freitag; P. J. Talbot; Markus J. Maeurer

2003-01-01

153

The Interactions between L-tyrosine based nanoparticles decorated with folic acid and cervical cancer cells under physiological flow.  

PubMed

Many anticancer drugs have been established clinically, but their efficacy can be compromised by nonspecific toxicity and an inability to reach the desired cancerous intracellular spaces. In order to address these issues, researchers have explored the use of folic acid as a targeted moiety to increase specificity of chemotherapeutic drugs. To expand upon such research, we have conjugated folic acid to functionalized poly(ethylene glycol) and subsequently decorated the surface of l-tyrosine polyphosphate (LTP) nanoparticles. These nanoparticles possess the appropriate size (100-500 nm) for internalization as shown by scanning electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. Under simulated physiological flow, LTP nanoparticles decorated with folic acid (targeted nanoparticles) show a 10-fold greater attachment to HeLa, a cervical cancer cell line, compared to control nanoparticles and to human dermal fibroblasts. The attachment of these targeted nanoparticles progresses at a linear rate, and the strength of this nanoparticle attachment is shown to withstand shear stresses of 3.0 dyn/cm(2). These interactions of the targeted nanoparticles to HeLa are likely a result of a receptor-ligand binding, as a competition study with free folic acid inhibits the nanoparticle attachment. Finally, the targeted nanoparticles encapsulated with a silver based drug show increased efficacy in comparison to nondecorated (plain) nanoparticles and drug alone against HeLa cells. Thus, targeted nanoparticles are a promising delivery platform for developing anticancer therapies that overexpress the folate receptors (FRs). PMID:22957928

Ditto, Andrew J; Shah, Kush N; Robishaw, Nikki K; Panzner, Matthew J; Youngs, Wiley J; Yun, Yang H

2012-11-01

154

What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Cervical Cancer?  

MedlinePLUS

... cancer? What should you ask your doctor about cervical cancer? It is important for you to have frank, ... are some questions to consider: What type of cervical cancer do I have? Has my cancer spread beyond ...

155

Current Management of Cervical Esophageal Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Pharyngo-laryngo-esophagectomy (PLE) has been regarded as a standard treatment for cervical esophageal cancer, but the morbidity\\u000a and mortality rates associated with PLE are substantial. Chemoradiation (CTRT) is widely used to treat esophageal cancer;\\u000a however, its role in managing cervical esophageal cancer has not been fully elucidated. It was hypothesized that up-front\\u000a CTRT could be an effective alternative treatment option to

Daniel King Hung Tong; Simon Law; Dora Lai Wan Kwong; William I. Wei; Raymond Wai Man Ng; Kam Ho Wong

2011-01-01

156

Cervical Cancer: paradigms at home and abroad  

Cancer.gov

NCI funded a clinical trial that will have an impact on the treatment of late-stage cervical cancer, and also supported a screening trial in India using a network of community outreach workers offering low tech-screening by direct visualization of the cervix coated with dilute acetic acid (vinegar), a process known as VIA. Image depicts cervical cancer microvessel density which increases lethality of the cancer.

157

Apoptosis Induction of Salvia chorassanica Root Extract on Human Cervical Cancer Cell Line  

PubMed Central

Salvia chorassanica Bunge is one of the Iranian endemic species of Salvia. There is not any reported literature on S. chorassanica. This study was designed to examine the in-vitro anti-proliferative and proapoptotic effects of the methanol extract of S. chorassanica and its fractions on HeLa cell line. Cells were cultured in EX-CELL®, an animal free medium specially designed for HeLa cell line and incubated with different concentrations of plant extracts. Cell viability was quantified by MTS assay. Apoptotic cells were determined using propidium iodide (PI) staining of DNA fragmentation by flow cytometry (sub-G1 peak). Activity of caspase -3, -8 and -9 was measured by the caspase colorimetric kit assay. S. chorassanica inhibited the growth of malignant cells and the CH2Cl2 fraction was determined as the most cytotoxic fraction in comparison with other fractions. The calculated IC50 values for methanol extract, n-hexane, CH2Cl2 and EtOAc fractions were 8.841, 5.45, 2.38, and 58.03 ?g/mL, respectively. S. chorassanica induced a sub-G1 peak in the flow cytometry histogram of treated cells compared to control cells indicating that the cytotoxic mechanism is characterized by apoptosis induction. The activity of caspase-3 and 8 proteins in treated HeLa cells was significantly higher than that of the control while caspase-9 activity did not change significantly. Based on the result obtained from our study, the apoptosis pathway involved in S. chorassanica-induced cell death may be through the extrinsic pathway and it can be a novel promising candidate in the treatment of cancer. PMID:24250574

Parsaee, Heydar; Asili, Javad; Mousavi, Seyed Hadi; Soofi, Hojjat; Emami, Seyed Ahmad; Tayarani-Najaran, Zahra

2013-01-01

158

Chlamydia trachomatis infection: implications for HPV status and cervical cancer.  

PubMed

Genital Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) infections have been identified as a major health problem concern. CT is associated with adverse effect on women reproduction and also associated with cervical hypertrophy and induction of squamous metaplasia, providing a possible relationship with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Infection by high-risk HPV types is crucial to the pathogenesis of invasive cervical cancer (ICC), but other co-variants/cofactors must be present for the development of malignancy. CT biological effect may damage the mucosal barrier, improving HPV infection, or may interfere in immune response and viral clearance supporting the persistence of HPV infection. Moreover, CT-related chronic cervical inflammation, decrease of lower genital tract antigen-presenting cells, inhibition of cell-mediated immunity, and anti-apoptotic capacity may influence the natural history of HPV infection, namely persistence progression or resolution. Although several epidemiological studies have stated a positive association involving CT and HPV-related cervical neoplastic lesions and/or cervical cancer (CC), the specific role of this bacterium in the pathogenesis of cervical neoplasia has not been completely clarified. The present review summarizes several studies on CT role in cervical cancer and suggests future research directions on HPV and CT interaction. PMID:24346121

Silva, Jani; Cerqueira, Fátima; Medeiros, Rui

2014-04-01

159

Radiosensitizers in cervical cancer. Cisplatin and beyond  

PubMed Central

Cervical cancer continues to be a significant health burden worldwide. Globally, the majority of cancers are locally advanced at diagnosis; hence, radiation remains the most frequently used therapeutical modality. Currently, the value of adding cisplatin or cisplatin-based chemotherapy to radiation for treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer is strongly supported by randomized studies and meta-analyses. Nevertheless, despite these significant achievements, therapeutic results are far from optimal; thus, novel therapies need to be assayed. A strategy currently being investigated is the use of newer radiosensitizers alone or in combination with platinum compounds. In the present work, we present preclinical information on known and newer cytotoxic agents as radiosensitizers on cervical cancer models, as well as the clinical information emanating from early phase trials that incorporate them to the cervical cancer management. In addition, we present the perspectives on the combined approach of radiation therapy and molecular target-based drugs with proven radiosensitizing capacity. PMID:16722549

Candelaria, Myrna; Garcia-Arias, Alicia; Cetina, Lucely; Duenas-Gonzalez, Alfonso

2006-01-01

160

Emodin induces apoptosis of human cervical cancer hela cells via intrinsic mitochondrial and extrinsic death receptor pathway  

PubMed Central

Background Emodin is a natural anthraquinone derivative isolated from the Rheum palmatum L. Aim: The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of emodin on the apoptosis of the human cervical cancer line HeLa and to identify the mechanisms involved. Methods Relative cell viability was assessed by MTT assay after treatment with emodin. Cell apoptosis was detected with TUNEL, Hoechst 33342 staining and quantified with flow cytometry using annexin FITC-PI staining. Results The percentage of apoptotic cells was 0.8, 8.2, 22.1, and 43.7%, respectively. The mRNA levels of Caspase-9, -8 and ?3 detected by Real-time PCR after treatment with emodin were significantly increased. Emodin increased the protein levels of Cytochome c, Apaf-1, Fas, FasL, and FADD but decreased the protein levels of Pro-caspase-9, Pro-caspase-8 and Pro-caspase-3. Conclusion We conclude that the emodin inhibited HeLa proliferation by inducing apoptosis through the intrinsic mitochondrial and extrinsic death receptor pathways. PMID:23866157

2013-01-01

161

The Aqueous Extract of Ficus religiosa Induces Cell Cycle Arrest in Human Cervical Cancer Cell Lines SiHa (HPV-16 Positive) and Apoptosis in HeLa (HPV-18 Positive)  

PubMed Central

Natural products are being extensively explored for their potential to prevent as well as treat cancer due to their ability to target multiple molecular pathways. Ficus religiosa has been shown to exert diverse biological activities including apoptosis in breast cancer cell lines. In the present study, we report the anti-neoplastic potential of aqueous extract of F. religiosa (FRaq) bark in human cervical cancer cell lines, SiHa and HeLa. FRaq altered the growth kinetics of SiHa (HPV-16 positive) and HeLa (HPV-18 positive) cells in a dose-dependent manner. It blocked the cell cycle progression at G1/S phase in SiHa that was characterized by an increase in the expression of p53, p21 and pRb proteins with a simultaneous decrease in the expression of phospho Rb (ppRb) protein. On the other hand, in HeLa, FRaq induced apoptosis through an increase in intracellular Ca2+ leading to loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, release of cytochrome-c and increase in the expression of caspase-3. Moreover, FRaq reduced the migration as well as invasion capability of both the cervical cancer cell lines accompanied with downregulation of MMP-2 and Her-2 expression. Interestingly, FRaq reduced the expression of viral oncoproteins E6 and E7 in both the cervical cancer cell lines. All these data suggest that F. religiosa could be explored for its chemopreventive potential in cervical cancer. PMID:23922932

Choudhari, Amit S.; Suryavanshi, Snehal A.; Kaul-Ghanekar, Ruchika

2013-01-01

162

The aqueous extract of Ficus religiosa induces cell cycle arrest in human cervical cancer cell lines SiHa (HPV-16 Positive) and apoptosis in HeLa (HPV-18 positive).  

PubMed

Natural products are being extensively explored for their potential to prevent as well as treat cancer due to their ability to target multiple molecular pathways. Ficus religiosa has been shown to exert diverse biological activities including apoptosis in breast cancer cell lines. In the present study, we report the anti-neoplastic potential of aqueous extract of F. religiosa (FRaq) bark in human cervical cancer cell lines, SiHa and HeLa. FRaq altered the growth kinetics of SiHa (HPV-16 positive) and HeLa (HPV-18 positive) cells in a dose-dependent manner. It blocked the cell cycle progression at G1/S phase in SiHa that was characterized by an increase in the expression of p53, p21 and pRb proteins with a simultaneous decrease in the expression of phospho Rb (ppRb) protein. On the other hand, in HeLa, FRaq induced apoptosis through an increase in intracellular Ca(2+) leading to loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, release of cytochrome-c and increase in the expression of caspase-3. Moreover, FRaq reduced the migration as well as invasion capability of both the cervical cancer cell lines accompanied with downregulation of MMP-2 and Her-2 expression. Interestingly, FRaq reduced the expression of viral oncoproteins E6 and E7 in both the cervical cancer cell lines. All these data suggest that F. religiosa could be explored for its chemopreventive potential in cervical cancer. PMID:23922932

Choudhari, Amit S; Suryavanshi, Snehal A; Kaul-Ghanekar, Ruchika

2013-01-01

163

Disruption of HPV16-E7 by CRISPR/Cas System Induces Apoptosis and Growth Inhibition in HPV16 Positive Human Cervical Cancer Cells  

PubMed Central

High-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) has been recognized as a major causative agent for cervical cancer. Upon HPV infection, early genes E6 and E7 play important roles in maintaining malignant phenotype of cervical cancer cells. By using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats- (CRISPR-) associated protein system (CRISPR/Cas system), a widely used genome editing tool in many organisms, to target HPV16-E7 DNA in HPV positive cell lines, we showed for the first time that the HPV16-E7 single-guide RNA (sgRNA) guided CRISPR/Cas system could disrupt HPV16-E7 DNA at specific sites, inducing apoptosis and growth inhibition in HPV positive SiHa and Caski cells, but not in HPV negative C33A and HEK293 cells. Moreover, disruption of E7 DNA directly leads to downregulation of E7 protein and upregulation of tumor suppressor protein pRb. Therefore, our results suggest that HPV16-E7 gRNA guided CRISPR/Cas system might be used as a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of cervical cancer. PMID:25136604

Hu, Zheng; Yu, Lan; Zhu, Da; Ding, Wencheng; Wang, Xiaoli; Zhang, Changlin; Wang, Liming; Jiang, Xiaohui; Shen, Hui; He, Dan; Li, Kezhen; Xi, Ling; Ma, Ding; Wang, Hui

2014-01-01

164

Laparoscopic Fertility Sparing Management of Cervical Cancer  

PubMed Central

Fertility can be preserved after conservative cervical surgery. We report on a 29-year-old woman who was obese, para 0, and diagnosed with cervical insufficiency at the first trimester of current pregnancy due to a previous trachelectomy. She underwent laparoscopic transabdominal cervical cerclage (LTCC) for cervical cancer. The surgery was successful and she was discharged two days later. The patient underwent a caesarean section at 38 weeks of gestation. Laparoscopic surgery is a minimally invasive approach associated with less pain and faster recovery, feasible even in obese women. PMID:24696772

Facchini, Chiara; Rapacchia, Giuseppina; Montanari, Giulia; Casadio, Paolo; Pilu, Gianluigi; Seracchioli, Renato

2014-01-01

165

Laparoscopic fertility sparing management of cervical cancer.  

PubMed

Fertility can be preserved after conservative cervical surgery. We report on a 29-year-old woman who was obese, para 0, and diagnosed with cervical insufficiency at the first trimester of current pregnancy due to a previous trachelectomy. She underwent laparoscopic transabdominal cervical cerclage (LTCC) for cervical cancer. The surgery was successful and she was discharged two days later. The patient underwent a caesarean section at 38 weeks of gestation. Laparoscopic surgery is a minimally invasive approach associated with less pain and faster recovery, feasible even in obese women. PMID:24696772

Facchini, Chiara; Rapacchia, Giuseppina; Montanari, Giulia; Casadio, Paolo; Pilu, Gianluigi; Seracchioli, Renato

2014-04-01

166

2-5A antisense therapy directed against human telomerase RNA inhibits telomerase activity and induces apoptosis without telomere impairment in cervical cancer cells  

Microsoft Academic Search

Human telomerase RNA (hTR), an important component of telomerase, is a possible target of telomerase-based cancer gene therapy. The present study was undertaken to assess the efficacy of antisense hTR therapy using newly developed 2-5A (5?-phosphorylated 2?-5?–linked oligoadenylate)–linked oligonucleotides against cervical cancer cells. ME180 and SiHa cells were treated with 2-5A–linked antisense hTR designed to complement the region of hTR

Noriyuki Yatabe; Satoru Kyo; Seiji Kondo; Taro Kanaya; Zhuo Wang; Yoshiko Maida; Masahiro Takakura; Mitsuhiro Nakamura; Masaaki Tanaka; Masaki Inoue

2002-01-01

167

Histopathology of cervical precursor lesions and cancer.  

PubMed

The most frequent types of cervical cancer are squamous-cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma, which develop from the distinctive precursor lesions cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) / squamous intraepithelial lesion (SIL), and adenocarcinoma in situ (AIS), respectively. Their tumorigenesis is HPV-related. High-risk HPV (e.g., types 16 and 18) is integrated into the genome and leads to tumor progression. Cytological screening leads to detection of precursors and their mimics. P16 and Ki-67 immunohistochemistry assists in the histological differential diagnosis of precursors to reactive and metaplastic epithelium. For invasive cervical carcinoma, stage is the strongest prognostic factor. Per definition, microinvasive (pT1a1 / pT1a2) carcinoma is diagnosed histologically on cone biopsies and treated less radically. The distinction between adenocarcinomas of the cervix and endometrial adenocarcinomas is important and can be supported by immunohistochemistry (e.g., ER, p16, CEA, and vimentin) and HPV in-situ hybridization. The rarer adenoid-basal and neuroendocrine carcinomas are less frequently HPV-related. PMID:22131112

Lax, Sigurd

2011-09-01

168

Colposcopy and High Resolution Anoscopy in Screening For Anal Dysplasia in Patients With Cervical, Vaginal, or Vulvar Dysplasia or Cancer  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia Grade 1; Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia Grade 2; Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia Grade 3; Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Recurrent Vaginal Cancer; Recurrent Vulvar Cancer; Stage 0 Cervical Cancer; Stage 0 Vaginal Cancer; Stage 0 Vulvar Cancer; Stage I Vaginal Cancer; Stage I Vulvar Cancer; Stage IA Cervical Cancer; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage II Vaginal Cancer; Stage II Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage III Vaginal Cancer; Stage III Vulvar Cancer; Stage IV Vulvar Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Vaginal Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Vaginal Cancer

2012-06-08

169

Squamous Cell Carcinoma Antigen in Follow-Up of Cervical Cancer Treated With Radiotherapy: Evaluation of Cost-Effectiveness  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) antigen is still considered the most accurate serologic tumor marker in cervical carcinoma. We assessed the contribution of the SCC assay to the detection of recurrences in patients treated with radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The pattern of recurrence and follow-up data were prospectively recorded for 135 patients. Of the 135 patients, 103 (76.3%) had primary cervical carcinoma and 32 (23.7%) had already experienced disease recurrence that had been successfully treated with surgery (n = 2), surgery plus radiotherapy (n = 2), radiotherapy (n = 5), or concomitant chemoradiotherapy (n = 23). The follow-up evaluations (chest X-ray, abdominopelvic magnetic resonance imaging, gynecologic examination with colposcopy, Papanicolaou smear, and SCC assay) were performed at 6-month intervals; the evaluation was done earlier if recurrent disease was suspected. The median follow-up time was 29 months (range, 6-131). The SCC serum levels were assayed, and a cost analysis was done. Results: A total of 481 SCC determinations were performed. Of the 135 patients, 43 (31.8%) experienced disease recurrence. The SCC levels were higher in those with recurrent disease than in the disease-free patients. Elevation of SCC was documented in 34 (79.1% sensitivity) of 43 recurrences before symptoms appeared. Of the 38 patients with serum SCC elevation, 34 developed a recurrence (positive predictive value, 89.5%). Of the 97 patients with negative SCC serum levels, 88 had negative findings at the clinicoradiologic evaluation (negative predictive value, 90.7%). A simplified approach (SCC plus gynecologic examination) was evaluated. Compared with the complete follow-up program, the rate of missed recurrence was 2.2%. The total projected cost per patient for 5 years of follow-up for the simplified procedure was approximately 12.2-fold lower than the standard approach. Conclusions: Our results have shown that a simplified diagnostic approach, including the SCC assay and gynecologic examination, can detect a high rate of recurrence from cervical cancer, with a very favorable cost-effective profile.

Forni, Franca [Institute of Biochemistry and Clinical Biochemistry, Catholic University, Rome (Italy); Ferrandina, Gabriella [Gynecologic Oncology Unit, Catholic University, Rome (Italy); Department of Oncology, Catholic University, Campobasso (Italy); Deodato, Francesco [Department of Oncology, Catholic University, Campobasso (Italy); Macchia, Gabriella [Department of Oncology, Catholic University, Campobasso (Italy)], E-mail: gmacchia@rm.unicatt.it; Morganti, Alessio G. [Department of Oncology, Catholic University, Campobasso (Italy); Department of Radiotherapy, Catholic University, Rome (Italy); Smaniotto, Daniela; Luzi, Stefano; D'Agostino, Giuseppe; Valentini, Vincenzo; Cellini, Numa [Department of Radiotherapy, Catholic University, Rome (Italy); Giardina, Bruno [Institute of Biochemistry and Clinical Biochemistry, Catholic University, Rome (Italy); Scambia, Giovanni [Gynecologic Oncology Unit, Catholic University, Rome (Italy); Department of Oncology, Catholic University, Campobasso (Italy)

2007-11-15

170

New Chemotherapy Drug for Advanced Cervical Cancer  

Cancer.gov

In this clinical trial, women with cervical cancer that has recurred or demonstrated resistance to previous chemotherapy and that cannot be treated surgically will be treated with the drug ixabepilone.

171

CDC Vital Signs: Cervical Cancer is Preventable  

MedlinePLUS

... No woman should die of cervical cancer. Doctors, nurses, and health systems can: Help women understand what ... Early Detection Program , Title X Family Planning Doctors, nurses, and health systems can Help women understand which ...

172

NIH Research Leads to Cervical Cancer Vaccine  

MedlinePLUS

Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Sexually Transmitted Diseases NIH Research Leads to Cervical Cancer Vaccine Past ... gov . What's New Community-wide treatment of ... of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID). The study was conducted in a rural ...

173

Antiproliferative property of n-hexane and chloroform extracts of Anisomeles malabarica (L). R. Br. in HPV16-positive human cervical cancer cells  

PubMed Central

Objectives: To find the efficacy of serial extracts of Anisomeles malabarica in inhibiting proliferation of and inducing apoptosis in human cervical cancer cells, SiHa and ME 180, that are HPV 16-positive. Materials and Methods: The whole plant was extracted in n-hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, n-butanol, methanol, and water. The cells were treated with the extracts at increasing concentrations to find the IC50, adopting MTT ([3-(4,5 dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide]) assay. Acridine orange (AO) and ethidium bromide (EB) and Hoechst 33258 staining were adopted to assess the mode of cell death, Annexin V-Cy3 staining to evaluate one of the early apoptotic features, JC-1 staining to assess the mitochondrial membrane depolarization, comet assay for DNA fragmentation, and cell cycle analysis for the distribution of cells after treatment. Results: n-Hexane and chloroform extracts were cytotoxic to the cervical cancer cells in dose- and duration-dependent manner. The cells that responded to the treatments revealed typical apoptotic features. Early features of apoptosis, phosphatidyl serine translocation and loss of mitochondrial trans-membrane potential, were observed in the treated cells, and comet assay revealed DNA damage. In the FACS analysis, the cells accumulated in the sub-G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle, except in n-hexane- and chloroform extract–treated SiHa cells at 24 h, which showed arrest in S- and G2/M phases. Conclusions: n-Hexane and chloroform extracts of A. malabarica inhibit proliferation of and induce death in HPV16-positive cervical cancer cells, mostly by apoptosis and to some extent by necrosis. PMID:22368413

Preethy, Christo Paul; Padmapriya, Ramamoorthy; Periasamy, Vaiyapuri Subbarayan; Riyasdeen, Anvarbatcha; Srinag, Suresh; Krishnamurthy, Hanumanthappa; Alshatwi, Ali Abdullah; Akbarsha, Mohammad Abdulkader

2012-01-01

174

Factors Underlying Disparities in Cervical Cancer Incidence, Screening, and Treatment in the  

E-print Network

Worldwide, an estimated 493,243, cases of invasive cervical cancer (ICC) occur each year and 273,505 women die of the disease. 1 There is a global disparity in the incidence of cervical cancer, with the burden of cases occurring in less developed countries (83%), where effective cervical cancer screening and treatment services have often been difficult to implement 1 (Fig 1). In more developed countries, such as the United States, the incidence of cervical cancer has decreased dramatically (?75%) since the 1940s, 2,3 largely as a result of the introduction of cervical cancer screening programs. An estimated 20,000 new cases of cervical cancer are diagnosed in the United States each year, and approximately 5000 women die from this preventable disease. 4 However, the incidence of cervical cancer and treatment of the disease show marked disparities based on socio-demographic and health care access characteristics. Papanicolaou (Pap) smears were designed to detect cervical changes which may represent premalignant forms of squamous cell cervical cancer, the most common type of cervical cancer. Squamous cell cervical cancer, hereafter called cervical cancer, results from infection with oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) types which are acquired through sexual intercourse. 5,6 Major risk factors for acquiring HPV include an early age at the onset of sexual activity, having multiple sexual partners, and having promiscuous male partners. Several cofactors may act in conjunction with HPV to increase the risk of cervical cancer, including cc-interferon with other sexually transmitted infections, 7,8 smoking, 9,10 multiparity, 11,12 oral contraceptive use, 10,13-15 immunodeficiency, 16,17 and dietary factors, such as low carotene, low vitamin C intake, or folate deficiency. 18-20

United States

175

Cervical cancer in India and HPV vaccination  

PubMed Central

Cervical cancer, mainly caused by Human Papillomavirus infection, is the leading cancer in Indian women and the second most common cancer in women worldwide. Though there are several methods of prevention of cervical cancer, prevention by vaccination is emerging as the most effective option, with the availability of two vaccines. Several studies have been published examining the vaccine's efficacy, immunogenicity and safety. Questions and controversy remain regarding mandatory vaccination, need for booster doses and cost-effectiveness, particularly in the Indian context. PMID:22754202

Kaarthigeyan, K.

2012-01-01

176

Induction of apoptosis by hydrogen peroxide in HPV 16 positive human cervical cancer cells: involvement of mitochondrial pathway  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cervical cancer is the second most common malignant neoplasm in women, in terms of incidence and mortality rates worldwide,\\u000a and is associated with excessive inflammation. This involves the expression of both pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins that\\u000a have varied effect on tumor growth and metastasis. The objective of the present study was to elucidate the effect of hydrogen\\u000a peroxide (H2O2) on

Mayank Singh; Neeta Singh

2008-01-01

177

TPX2 regulates tumor growth in human cervical carcinoma cells.  

PubMed

The targeting protein for the Xenopus kinesin-like protein 2 (TPX2), a microtubule-associated protein, has been utilized as a tool to evaluate, more precisely, the proliferative behavior of tumor cells. The abnormal expression of TPX2 in a variety of malignant tumor types has been reported, however less is known about its role in cervical cancer. In the present study, the association between TPX2 expression and the biological behavior of cervical cancer, was investigated. Immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR were used to detect the expression of TPX2 in cervical cancer tissues. The inhibitory effect of TPX2-siRNA on the growth of SiHa human cervical carcinoma cells was studied in vitro. TPX2 expression was identified as significantly higher in cervical carcinoma compared with the control, normal cervical tissues. TPX2 siRNA transfected into SiHa cells induced apoptosis and inhibited cell proliferation and invasion. Similar results were obtained by in vivo transplantation, as TPX2 siRNA transfection significantly reduced tumor growth of the xenograft in nude mice. The results demonstrated that TPX2 is important in the regulation of tumor growth in cervical cancer and therefore may be a potential therapeutic target as a novel treatment strategy. PMID:24718984

Jiang, Peiyue; Shen, Kexin; Wang, Xuerui; Song, Haiqin; Yue, Ying; Liu, Tongjun

2014-06-01

178

Risk factors for adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix in women aged 20-44 years: the UK National Case-Control Study of Cervical Cancer.  

PubMed

We report results on risk factors for invasive squamous cell and adenocarcinomas of the cervix in women aged 20-44 years from the UK National Case-Control Study of Cervical Cancer, including 180 women with adenocarcinoma, 391 women with squamous cell carcinoma and 923 population controls. The risk of both squamous cell and adenocarcinoma was strongly related to the lifetime number of sexual partners, and, independently, to age at first intercourse. The risk of both types of cervical cancer increased with increasing duration of use of oral contraceptives, and this effect was most marked in current and recent users of oral contraceptives. The risk of squamous cell carcinoma was associated with high parity and the risk of both squamous cell and adenocarcinoma increased with early age at first birth. Long duration smoking (20 or more years) was associated with a two-fold increase in the risk of squamous cell carcinoma, but smoking was not associated with the risk of adenocarcinoma. Further studies are needed to confirm the suggestion from this and other studies of differences in risk related to smoking between squamous cell and adenocarcinomas of the cervix. PMID:14647141

Green, J; Berrington de Gonzalez, A; Sweetland, S; Beral, V; Chilvers, C; Crossley, B; Deacon, J; Hermon, C; Jha, P; Mant, D; Peto, J; Pike, M; Vessey, M P

2003-12-01

179

A panel of regulated proteins in serum from patients with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and cervical cancer.  

PubMed

We developed a discovery-validation mass-spectrometry-based pipeline to identify a set of proteins that are regulated in serum of patients with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and squamous cell cervical cancer using iTRAQ, label-free shotgun, and targeted mass-spectrometric quantification. In the discovery stage we used a "pooling" strategy for the comparative analysis of immunodepleted serum and revealed 15 up- and 26 down-regulated proteins in patients with early- (CES) and late-stage (CLS) cervical cancer. The analysis of nondepleted serum samples from patients with CIN, CES, an CLS and healthy controls showed significant changes in abundance of alpha-1-acid glycoprotein 1, alpha-1-antitrypsin, serotransferrin, haptoglobin, alpha-2-HS-glycoprotein, and vitamin D-binding protein. We validated our findings using a fast UHPLC/MRM method in an independent set of serum samples from patients with cervical cancer or CIN and healthy controls as well as serum samples from patients with ovarian cancer (more than 400 samples in total). The panel of six proteins showed 67% sensitivity and 88% specificity for discrimination of patients with CIN from healthy controls, a stage of the disease where current protein-based biomarkers, for example, squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCCA), fail to show any discrimination. Additionally, combining the six-protein panel with SCCA improves the discrimination of patients with CES and CLS from healthy controls. PMID:25232869

Boichenko, Alexander P; Govorukhina, Natalia; Klip, Harry G; van der Zee, A G J; Güzel, Co?kun; Luider, Theo M; Bischoff, Rainer

2014-11-01

180

Preventing Cervical Cancer: The Development of HPV Vaccines  

Cancer.gov

Cervical cancer can be prevented with HPV vaccines. NCI-supported researchers helped establish HPV as a cause of cervical cancer. They also helped create the first HPV vaccines, were involved in the vaccine trials, and contribute to ongoing studies.

181

Conservative Treatment in Early Cervical Cancer  

PubMed Central

Purpose of review: The aim of this study was to describe fertility preservation methods to improve quality of life of early stages of cervical cancer. Recent finding: Although definite treatment of early stages of cervical cancer including stages IA,IB1 and IIA non-bulky is radial hysterectomy, this method is used in perimenopousal period in which fertility preservation is not important. Whenever fertility preservation is so important, some methods like radical trachelectomy and laparoscopic lymphadenectomy are used to rule out lymphatic metastases. Summary: If any visible lesion on cervix is found, pelvic MRI is helpful and during operation, trachelectomy samples are sent for frozen section and margin study. Radical trachelectomy is done vaginal or abdominal. Overall relapse rate of cervical cancer in radical trachelectomy and radical hysterectomy is the same. Complications of radical trachelectomy include chronic vaginal discharge, abnormal uterine bleeding, dysmenorrhea, inflammation and ulcer due to cercelage, amenorrhea, cervical stenosis and pregnancy complications following trachelectomy including 2nd trimester abortion and premature labor following cervical prematurity.The best and preferred method of labor is cesarean section. Neoadjuant chemotherapy followed by radical trachelectomy in large cervical lesions is a suitable treatment. Ultraconservative operations like large cold knife conization, simple trachelectomy with laparoscopic lymphadenectomy and sentinel lymph node mapping are suitable for very small lesions. PMID:24170987

Karimi-Zarchi, Mojgan; Mousavi, Azamsadat; Gilani, Mitra Modares; Barooti, Esmat; Miratashi-Yazdi, Ashrafosadat; Dehghani, Atefe

2013-01-01

182

Cervical Dysplasia  

MedlinePLUS

What is cervical dysplasia? Cervical dysplasia is abnormal cell growth on the surface lining of the cervix. With proper follow-up and treatment, ... cancer. Who is most likely to have cervical dysplasia? Although cervical dysplasia is most common in women ...

183

Inotodiol inhabits proliferation and induces apoptosis through modulating expression of cyclinE, p27, bcl-2, and bax in human cervical cancer HeLa cells.  

PubMed

Inonotus obliquus is a medicinal mushroom that has been used as an effective agent to treat various diseases such as diabetes, tuberculosis and cancer. Inotodiol, an included triterpenoid shows significant anti-tumor effect. However, the mechanisms have not been well documented. In this study, we aimed to explore the effect of inotodiol on proliferation and apoptosis in human cervical cancer HeLa cells and investigated the underlying molecular mechanisms. HeLa cells were treated with different concentrations of inotodiol. The MTT assay was used to evaluate cell proliferating ability, flow cytometry (FCM) was employed for cell cycle analysis and cell apoptosis, while expression of cyclinE, p27, bcl-2 and bax was detected by immunocytochemistry. Proliferation of HeLa cells was inhibited by inotodiolin a dose-dependent manner at 24h (r=0.9999, p<0.01). A sub-G1 peak (apoptotic cells) of HeLa cells was detected after treatment and the apoptosis rate with the concentration and longer incubation time (r=1.0, p<0.01), while the percentage of cells in S phase and G2/M phase decreased significantly. Immunocytochemistry assay showed that the expression of cyclin E and bcl-2 in the treated cells significantly decreased, while the expression of p27 and bax obviously increased, compared with the control group (p<0.05). The results of our research indicate that inotodiol isolated from Inonotus obliquus inhibited the proliferation of HeLa cells and induced apoptosis in vitro. The mechanisms may be related to promoting apoptosis through increasing the expression of bax and cutting bcl-2 and affecting the cell cycle by down-regulation the expression of cyclin E and up-regulation of p27. The results further indicate the potential value of inotodiol for treatment of human cervical cancer. PMID:24815470

Zhao, Li-Wei; Zhong, Xiu-Hong; Yang, Shu-Yan; Zhang, Yi-Zhong; Yang, Ning-Jiang

2014-01-01

184

Combination of proteasome and HDAC inhibitors for therapy of uterine cervical cancer  

PubMed Central

PURPOSE Cervical cancer cells are addicted to the expression of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) oncoproteins E6 and E7. The oncogencity of E6 is mediated in part by targeting p53 and PDZ-family tumor suppressor proteins for rapid proteasomal degradation, whereas E7 oncoprotein acts in part by co-opting histone deacetylases (HDAC)1/2. Here, we examine the hypothesis that inhibition of proteasome function and HDAC activity would synergistically and specifically trigger cervical cancer cell death by the interruption of E6 and E7 signaling. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN The sensitivity and molecular responses of keratinocytes and HPV-positive and negative cervical cancer cells and xenografts to combinations of proteasome and HDAC inhibitors were tested. The expression of HDAC1/2 in situ was examined in cervical cancer, its precursors and normal epithelium. RESULTS Cervical cancer cell lines exhibit greater sensitivity to proteasome inhibitors than HPV-negative cervical cancers or primary human keratinocytes. Treatment of cervical cancer cells with Bortezomib elevated the level of p53 but not hDlg, hScribble or hMAGI. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed elevated HDAC1/2 expression in CIN and cervical carcinoma versus normal cervical epithelium. The combination of Bortezomib and HDAC inhibitors Trichostatin A (TSA) or Vorinostat show synergistic killing of HPV-positive, but not HPV-negative, cervical cancer cell lines. Similarly, treatment of HeLa xenografts with the combination of Bortezomib and TSA retarded tumor growth significantly more effectively than either agent alone. CONCLUSIONS A combination of proteasome and HDAC inhibitors, including Bortezomib and Vorinostat respectively, warrants exploration for the treatment of cervical cancer. PMID:19147762

Lin, Zhenhua; Bazzaro, Martina; Wang, Mei-Cheng; Chan, Kwun C; Peng, Shiwen; Roden, Richard BS

2008-01-01

185

Measurement of erythrocyte lipids, lipid peroxidation, antioxidants and osmotic fragility in cervical cancer patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Our aim was to examine the structural integrity of red blood cells in cervical cancer patients by measuring the concentrations of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), antioxidant status, cholesterol\\/phospholipid (C\\/P) molar ratio, enzyme activity and osmotic fragility of erythrocytes. Methods: This study has been conducted on 32 adult female cervical cancer patients and an equal number of age- and

K. Kolanjiappan; S. Manoharan; M. Kayalvizhi

2002-01-01

186

Chapter 13: Primary Screening of Cervical Cancer With Human Papillomavirus Tests  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite its history of success in cancer screening, Pap cytol- ogy has important limitations, particularly its high false- negative rate, which carries important public health impli- cations. Since the mid-1990s, there has been substantial interest in the use of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA testing in cervical cancer screening under the premise that the testing of cervical cells for the causative

Eduardo L. Franco

187

Integrating Human Papillomavirus Vaccination in Cervical Cancer Control Programmes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Screening with Pap cytology has substantially reduced cervical cancer morbidity and mortality during the last 50 years in high-income countries. Unfortunately, in resource-poor countries, Pap screening has either not been effectively implemented or has failed to reduce cervical cancer rates. Cervical cancer in these countries thus remains a major public health problem. Infection with certain human papillomavirus (HPV) types is

Eduardo L. Franco; François Coutlée; Alex Ferenczy

2009-01-01

188

Systemic Therapy for Cervical Cancer with Potentially Regulatable Oncolytic Adenoviruses  

E-print Network

Systemic Therapy for Cervical Cancer with Potentially Regulatable Oncolytic Adenoviruses Anna cervical cancer, but the inhibitory effect of dexamethasone was not strong enough to provide significant for Cervical Cancer with Potentially Regulatable Oncolytic Adenoviruses. PLoS ONE 3(8): e2917. doi:10

Hemminki, Akseli

189

SVM Based Feature Screening Applied To Hierarchical Cervical Cancer Detection  

E-print Network

SVM Based Feature Screening Applied To Hierarchical Cervical Cancer Detection £ Jiayong Zhang to cervical cancer detection in multispectral PAP smear images that has been recently proposed by the authors Detection Region Merging Region Detection Cancerous Regions (c) Figure 1: A bottom-up approach to cervical

190

RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Cervical cancer prevention in reproductive health  

E-print Network

RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Cervical cancer prevention in reproductive health services: knowledge , François Dabis2,3 , Annie J Sasco2,3 and Didier K Ekouevi1,2,3 Abstract Background: Cervical cancer. Part of the solution could come from midwives by integrating cervical cancer prevention

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

191

Spectroscopic Detection of Cervical Pre-Cancer through Radial Basis  

E-print Network

Spectroscopic Detection of Cervical Pre-Cancer through Radial Basis Function Networks Kagan Tumer of Texas at Austin Abstract The mortality related to cervical cancer can be substantially re- duced through statistical algorithms. 1 Introduction Cervical carcinoma is the second most common cancer in women worldwide

Ghosh, Joydeep

192

MEETING ABSTRACTS Open Access Challenges in integrating cervical cancer  

E-print Network

MEETING ABSTRACTS Open Access Challenges in integrating cervical cancer screening in HIV care in women. Facing the particularly high burden of cervical cancer in sub-Saharan Africa, preventive measures describe here some of the operational aspects of a cervical cancer screening procedure based on visual

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

193

Risk factors for rapid-onset cervical cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: The current study was designed to elucidate risk factors associated with the development of cervical cancer during the course of routine Papanicolaou smear screening (rapid-onset cervical cancer). Study Design: Four hundred eighty-three women diagnosed with invasive cervical cancer, representing 73% of all such tumors diagnosed in Connecticut between 1985 and 1990, were studied. Papanicolaou smear screening and risk factor

Allan Hildesheim; Olympia Hadjimichael; Peter E. Schwartz; Cosette M. Wheeler; Willard Barnes; David M. Lowell; Jerry Willett; Mark Schiffman

1999-01-01

194

Dendritic cell-based tumor vaccine for cervical cancer I: in vitro stimulation with recombinant protein-pulsed dendritic cells induces specific T cells to HPV16 E7 or HPV18 E7  

Microsoft Academic Search

PurposeHuman papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 and 18 are the most prevalent genotypes in cervical cancers. The viral oncoproteins E6 and E7 are considered to be tumor-specific targets for immunotherapy. HPV E7 antigen-loaded dendritic cells (DC) were evaluated as cellular tumor vaccine.MethodsAutologous monocyte-derived DCs loaded with recombinant HPV16 or HPV18 E7 oncoprotein were used to induce in vitro a specific T

Marion Nonn; Manuela Schinz; Klaus Zumbach; Michael Pawlita; Achim Schneider; Matthias Dürst; Andreas M. Kaufmann

2003-01-01

195

Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma  

MedlinePLUS

... is an invasive tumor, the pathologist’s report should indicate the size of the tumor and how deeply the tumor extends into the cervix. After reviewing the test results and determining the stage of the cancer, the ...

196

The role of MALAT1 correlates with HPV in cervical cancer  

PubMed Central

Cervical cancer, the second most common type of cancer in women worldwide, is responsible for >275,100 mortalities each year and is associated with high-risk human papilloma virus (HR-HPV). HPVs have two important oncogenes, E6 and E7, which have crucial roles in malignant transformation in cervical cancer. Metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1) is a long non-coding RNA originally identified in non-small cell lung cancer. Previous studies have revealed that MALAT1 is expressed in numerous tissue types, and is significant in maintaining the normal function of the body. However, it also appeared to be notably upregulated in numerous carcinoma types compared with adjacent non-cancerous tissues. In the present study, it was identified that MALAT1 expression was upregulated in cervical cancer cell lines compared with normal cervical squamous cell samples. Further study into the effect of MALAT1 on cellular phenotype revealed that MALAT1 was able to promote cell migration and proliferation. Of note, it was revealed that the expression of MALAT1 was decreased with the knockdown of HPV16 E6/E7 in CaSki cells. Furthermore, the investigations in clinical samples also revealed that MALAT1 was expressed in HPV-positive cervical squamous cells, but not in HPV-negative normal cervical squamous cells. These results indicate that HPV correlates with MALAT1 deregulation in cervical cancer. PMID:24932303

JIANG, YAN; LI, YUEHUI; FANG, SHUJUAN; JIANG, BINYUAN; QIN, CHANGFEI; XIE, PINGLI; ZHOU, GUOHUA; LI, GUANCHENG

2014-01-01

197

Optoelectronic method for detection of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and cervical cancer  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The optoelectronic method is one of the most promising concepts of biophysical program of the diagnostics of CIN and cervical cancer. Objectives of the work are evaluation of sensitivity and specificity of the optoelectronic method in the detection of CIN and cervical cancer. The paper shows correlation between the pNOR number and sensitivity/specificity of the optoelectronic method. The study included 293 patients with abnormal cervical cytology result and the following examinations: examination with the use of the optoelectronic method — Truscreen, colposcopic examination, and histopathologic biopsy. Specificity of the optoelectronic method for LGSIL was estimated at 65.70%, for HGSIL and squamous cell carcinoma of cervix amounted to 90.38%. Specificity of the optoelectronic method used to confirm lack of cervical pathology was estimated at 78.89%. The field under the ROC curve for the optoelectronic method was estimated at 0.88 (95% CI, 0.84-0.92) which shows high diagnostic value of the test in the detection of HGSIL and squamous cell carcinoma. The optoelectronic method is characterised by high usefulness in the detection of CIN, present in the squamous epithelium and squamous cell carcinoma of cervix.

Pruski, D.; Przybylski, M.; K?dzia, W.; K?dzia, H.; Jagielska-Pruska, J.; Spaczy?ski, M.

2011-12-01

198

Cervical cancer: Can it be prevented?  

PubMed

Cervical cancer prevention requires a multipronged approach involving primary, secondary and tertiary prevention. The key element under primary prevention is human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccination. So far, only prophylactic HPV vaccines which prevent HPV infection by one or more subtypes are commercially available. Therapeutic HPV vaccines which aid in clearing established infection are still under trial. Secondary prevention entails early detection of precancerous lesions and its success is determined by the population coverage and the efficacy of the screening technique. A number of techniques are in use, including cytology, visual inspection (using the naked eye, magnivisualizer, acetic acid and Lugol's iodine), HPV testing and a combination of these methods. Updated screening guidelines have been advocated by the American Cancer Society in light of the role of HPV on cervical carcinogenesis. Recent research has also focussed on novel biomarkers that can predict progression to cancer in screen positive women and help to differentiate those who need treatment from those who can be left for follow-up. Last but not the least, effective treatment of precancerous lesions can help to reduce the incidence of invasive cervical cancer and this constitutes tertiary prevention. A combination of these approaches can help to prevent the burden of cervical cancer and its antecedent morbidity and mortality, but all of these are not feasible in all settings due to resource and allocation constraints. Thus, all countries, especially low and middle income ones, have to determine their own cocktail of approaches that work before we can say with certainty that yes, cervical cancer can be prevented. PMID:25302177

Aggarwal, Pakhee

2014-10-10

199

Cervical cancer: Can it be prevented?  

PubMed Central

Cervical cancer prevention requires a multipronged approach involving primary, secondary and tertiary prevention. The key element under primary prevention is human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccination. So far, only prophylactic HPV vaccines which prevent HPV infection by one or more subtypes are commercially available. Therapeutic HPV vaccines which aid in clearing established infection are still under trial. Secondary prevention entails early detection of precancerous lesions and its success is determined by the population coverage and the efficacy of the screening technique. A number of techniques are in use, including cytology, visual inspection (using the naked eye, magnivisualizer, acetic acid and Lugol’s iodine), HPV testing and a combination of these methods. Updated screening guidelines have been advocated by the American Cancer Society in light of the role of HPV on cervical carcinogenesis. Recent research has also focussed on novel biomarkers that can predict progression to cancer in screen positive women and help to differentiate those who need treatment from those who can be left for follow-up. Last but not the least, effective treatment of precancerous lesions can help to reduce the incidence of invasive cervical cancer and this constitutes tertiary prevention. A combination of these approaches can help to prevent the burden of cervical cancer and its antecedent morbidity and mortality, but all of these are not feasible in all settings due to resource and allocation constraints. Thus, all countries, especially low and middle income ones, have to determine their own cocktail of approaches that work before we can say with certainty that yes, cervical cancer can be prevented. PMID:25302177

Aggarwal, Pakhee

2014-01-01

200

Improving Cervical Cancer Screening in Hospital Settings  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Identifying opportunities to offer cervical cancer screening to underscreened women is important for increasing early detection. Maryland law mandates offering Pap tests during hospital admissions. We examined organizational and physician attitudes and practices regarding inpatient screening, to identify mechanisms for increasing the law's effectiveness.Methods: We analyzed state admission data, a hospital administrators telephone survey, and a mailed survey of

Ann Klassen; Allyson Hall; Janice Bowie; Carol S. Weisman

2000-01-01

201

Cervical Cancer Screening and Perceived Information Needs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: To identify women's sources of information about cervical cancer screening, information which women report receiving during Pap consultations, information they would like to receive, and the relationships between perceived information needs, personal characteristics and information sources. Design/methodology/approach: Logistic regression…

Whynes, David K.; Clarke, Katherine; Philips, Zoe; Avis, Mark

2005-01-01

202

Phosphorylation of I?B? at Serine 32 by T-lymphokine-activated Killer Cell-originated Protein Kinase Is Essential for Chemoresistance against Doxorubicin in Cervical Cancer Cells*  

PubMed Central

T-lymphokine-activated killer cell-originated protein kinase (TOPK) is known to be up-regulated in cancer cells and appears to contribute to cancer cell proliferation and survival. However, the molecular mechanism by which TOPK regulates cancer cell survival still remains elusive. Here we show that TOPK directly interacted with and phosphorylated I?B? at Ser-32, leading to p65 nuclear translocation and NF-?B activation. We also revealed that doxorubicin promoted the interaction between nonphosphorylated or phosphorylated TOPK and I?B? and that TOPK-mediated I?B? phosphorylation was enhanced in response to doxorubicin. Also, exogenously overexpressed TOPK augmented transcriptional activity driven by either NF-?B or inhibitor of apoptosis protein 2 (cIAP2) promoters. On the other hand, NF-?B activity including I?B? phosphorylation and p65 nuclear translocation, as well as cIAP2 gene expression, was markedly diminished in TOPK knockdown HeLa cervical cancer cells. Moreover, doxorubicin-mediated apoptosis was noticeably increased in TOPK knockdown HeLa cells, compared with control cells, which resulted from caspase-dependent signaling pathways. These results demonstrate that TOPK is a molecular target of doxorubicin and mediates doxorubicin chemoresistance of HeLa cells, suggesting a novel mechanism for TOPK barrier of doxorubicin-mediated cervical cancer cell apoptosis. PMID:23250755

Park, Jung-Hwan; Yoon, Dae-Sung; Choi, Hye-Jin; Hahm, Dae-Hyun; Oh, Sang-Muk

2013-01-01

203

Segmentation of Cervical Cell Images Asli Kale, Selim Aksoy  

E-print Network

of a computer-assisted screening system that aims early diagnosis of cervical cancer is the accurate procedure used to detect cervical cancer or precancerous changes in an uterine cervix by grading cervical-assisted screening system for Pap smear tests will be very beneficial to prevent cervical cancer if it increases

Aksoy, Selim

204

Augmented serum level of major histocompatibility complex class I-related chain A (MICA) protein and reduced NKG2D expression on NK and T cells in patients with cervical cancer and precursor lesions  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer in women worldwide. NK and cytotoxic T cells play an important role in the elimination of virus-infected and tumor cells through NKG2D activating receptors, which can promote the lysis of target cells by binding to the major histocompatibility complex class I-related chain A (MICA) proteins. Increased serum levels of MICA have

Naela A Arreygue-Garcia; Adrian Daneri-Navarro; Alicia del Toro-Arreola; Angel Cid-Arregui; Oscar Gonzalez-Ramella; Luis F Jave-Suarez; Adriana Aguilar-Lemarroy; Rogelio Troyo-Sanroman; Alejandro Bravo-Cuellar; Vidal Delgado-Rizo; Trinidad Garcia-Iglesias; Georgina Hernandez-Flores; Susana del Toro-Arreola

2008-01-01

205

Cervical Cancer Detection Using SVM Based Feature Screening  

E-print Network

Cervical Cancer Detection Using SVM Based Feature Screening Jiayong Zhang and Yanxi Liu the proposed method to a bottom-up approach for automatic cervical cancer detection in multispectral cervical screening extract morphometric/photometric features at the cellular level in accordance

206

[Is early first intercourse a risk factor for cervical cancer?].  

PubMed

Sexual behavior has long been known to be a risk factor for cervical carcinoma. Certain sexual risk factors are related to an increased risk of chronic infection of the cervical transformation zone with high-risk human papilloma viruses (HPVs). Numerous retrospective analyses consider early first intercourse a probable risk factor for later development of cervical carcinoma. Since risk factors are associated, it is unclear whether early first intercourse is an independent risk factor for cervical neoplasia. Few comprehensive retrospective studies are available. It is possible that the cervical transformation zone is particularly vulnerable to infection between menarche and the age of sixteen. During this phase there are a large number of undifferentiated cells at the periphery of the metaplasia, practically at the surface of the cervix. It seems that this area is particularly susceptible to HPV infection. There are also indications that there is no secondary immune response to HPV at the time of early first intercourse, making the immune response to HPV less efficient. Other possible risk factors for cervical cancer include genetic predisposition, nutrition, smoking, Chlamydia or HSV-2 infections, drug abuse, oral contraception, immune suppression and early first pregnancy. Education appears important to encourage responsible sexual behaviour in young people. PMID:16205092

Reich, O

2005-10-01

207

Frequencies and role of regulatory T cells in patients with (pre)malignant cervical neoplasia  

PubMed Central

Oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV)-infection is crucial for developing cervical cancer and its precursor lesions [cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN)]. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) might be involved in the failure of the immune system to control the development of HPV-induced cancer. We investigated frequencies, phenotype and activity of Tregs in patients with cervical neoplasia. CIN and cervical cancer patients showed increased CD4+/CD25high T cell frequencies in peripheral blood and CD4+ T cell fraction. These CD4+/CD25high T cells represent Tregs as demonstrated by their low proliferation rate, low interferon (IFN)-?/interleukin (IL)-10 ratio, high expression of CD45RO, GITR, CTLA-4, forkhead box P3 (FoxP3) and low CD45RA expression. Moreover, in HPV16+ cervical cancer patients, in-vitro depletion of CD25+ T cells resulted in increased IFN-? T cell responses against HPV16 E6- and E7 peptides. Thus, increased frequencies of Tregs in cervical cancer patients may indeed suppress HPV-specific immunity. Longitudinal analysis of CD4+/CD25high T cell frequencies in patients showed a modest decline 1 year after curative surgery or chemoradiation. This study demonstrates increased frequencies and suppressive activity of Tregs in cervical cancer. These results imply that Tregs may suppress the immune control of cervical neoplasia and furthermore that suppression of immunity by Tregs will be another hurdle to overcome in therapeutic immunization strategies against cervical neoplasia. PMID:17937675

Visser, J; Nijman, H W; Hoogenboom, B-N; Jager, P; van Baarle, D; Schuuring, E; Abdulahad, W; Miedema, F; van der Zee, A G; Daemen, T

2007-01-01

208

Posttreatment cut-off levels of squamous cell carcinoma antigen as a prognostic factor in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer treated with radiotherapy  

PubMed Central

Objective The aim of the present study was to assess prognostic factors for patients with locally advanced cervical cancer treated with radiotherapy as the primary treatment and to assess the posttreatment cut-off levels of squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCC-Ag) to predict three-year overall survival (OS) rates. Methods One hundred and twenty-eight patients with cervical squamous cell carcinoma (International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics [FIGO] stage IIB-IVA) treated using radiotherapy or concurrent chemoradiotherapy were identified. Of these patients, 116 who had SCC-Ag levels >1.5 ng/mL prior to treatment were analyzed retrospectively. Results Median age was 68 years (range, 27 to 79 years). The complete response rate was 70.7% and the three-year OS rate was 61.1%. The median levels of pretreatment and posttreatment SCC-Ag were 11.5 ng/mL (range, 1.6 to 310.0 ng/mL) and 0.9 ng/mL (range, 0.4 to 41.0 ng/mL), respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that pretreatment anemia (p=0.041), pelvic lymph node metastasis (p=0.016) and posttreatment SCC-Ag levels (p=0.001) were independent prognostic factors for three-year OS. The SCC-Ag level cut-off point for three-year OS rates, calculated using a receiver operating characteristic curve, was 1.15 ng/mL (sensitivity, 80.0%; specificity, 74.0%). Conclusion Pretreatment anemia and pelvic lymph node metastasis are poor prognostic factors in locally advanced cervical cancer. Furthermore, posttreatment SCC-Ag levels <1.15 ng/mL predicted better three-year OS rates. PMID:24167666

Furukawa, Naoto; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Asakawa, Isao

2013-01-01

209

Evaluation of FDG PET in Patients with Cervical Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although many human cancers can be imaged by 2-(18F)-fluoro- 2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) and PET,there is little clinical experi ence with FDG PET in cervical cancer. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of FDG PET scans on patients with cervical cancer. Methods: FDG PET scans were performed on 21 patients with histologically proven uterine cervical cancer (17 newly

Yoshifumi Sugawara; Avraham Eisbruch; Shigeru Kosuda; Betty E. Recker; Paul V. Kison; Richard L. Wahl

210

HPV16 E6 gene variations in invasive cervical squamous cell carcinoma and cancer in situ from Russian patients  

PubMed Central

HPV16 is frequently seen in invasive cervical cancer (ICC) and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). Its E6 gene has frequent sequence variations. Although some E6 variants have been reported to have different biochemical or biological properties, they do not show geographical identity. Moreover, the definition of ‘variant’ has been a source of confusion because it has been based on all departures from the ‘prototype’ once isolated randomly from an ICC case. We amplified the HPV16 E6 gene by PCR from fresh-frozen tissue of 104 cases of ICC and CIN from Russian patients and sequenced it in positive cases. We found that 32 of 55 (58.2%) ICC cases and 18 of 49 (36.7%) CIN cases were HPV 16-positive and we could identify 3 groups of E6 variants: group A was characterized by G at nt 350 where group B had T, and group M was a heterogeneous mixture of unique E6 variants; no significant difference existed in the distribution of the different groups between ICC and CIN; the clinically malignant (as defined by FIGO stage) order between the groups was M > A > B in ICC; in the cases with a single HPV16 E6 sequence, coexisting ICC, CIN and normal epithelium in the same patient shared the E6 variant; and 4 cases of ICC had double/multiple E6 variants. The results did not show any importance of E6 variants for ICC progression in Russian women. The results also indicated that the original HPV16 variant persisted during ICC progression, and that at a low frequency, double infections and/or mutation of variants might occur. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11259093

Hu, X; Pang, T; Guo, Z; Mazurenko, N; Kisseljov, F; Ponten, J; Nister, M

2001-01-01

211

CD83 Polymorphisms and Cervical Cancer Risk  

PubMed Central

Objectives Studies have suggested that polymorphisms in genes involved in immune recognition and antigen presentation are associated with cervical cancer risk. We sought to replicate a recent study which reported an association between specific SNPs on CD83 and cervical cancer and to further explore whether effects varied by age, clinical stage (in situ versus invasive), and histology (squamous carcinomas versus adenocarcinomas). Methods We evaluated the association between SNPs on CD83 and cervical cancer in a multicenter case-control study of cervical cancer conducted in the Eastern United States (263 cases, 307 controls), focusing on the five SNPs (RS9296925, RS853360, RS9230, RS9370729, RS750749) previously found to be associated with cervical cancer. We also pooled data from the Eastern U.S. (263 cases) with those from the original report (377 cases) to assess the effects of CD83 on the age at diagnosis, disease stage, and histology. Risk estimates (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals were estimated using logistic regression; trend tests were performed under an additive model. Results Consistent with the original report, carriers of the CT or CC genotypes for one of the five CD83 SNPs evaluated (rs750749) demonstrated a 30% and 50% reduction in disease risk, relative to carriers of the more common TT genotype (p-trend = 0.02). Two additional SNPs also resulted in consistent findings (rs9296925: p-trend = 0.07 and rs9370729: p-trend = 0.08), although the effects observed did not reach statistical significance at the 0.05 level. Pooled evaluation of cases from the two aforementioned studies suggested differences in the distribution of susceptibility alleles by histology; adenocarcinoma cases were more likely to be carriers of the susceptibility alleles for SNP rs9370729 (p-trend = 0.02) and SNP rs750749 (p-trend = 0.09). No differences were observed in the age or stage of diagnosis of carriers for CD83 susceptibility alleles relative to non-carriers. Conclusions We confirm an association between CD83 polymorphisms and cervical cancer and suggest the possibility that CD83-disease associations might be heterogenous by tumor histology. PMID:19446866

Yu, Kelly J.; Rader, Janet S.; Borecki, Ingrid; Zhang, Zhengyan; Hildesheim, Allan

2009-01-01

212

Expression of human telomerase subunits and correlation with telomerase activity in cervical cancer. Cancer Res  

E-print Network

Activation of telomerase and stabilization of telomeres are thought to be required for both cellular immortality and oncogenesis. Three major components of human telomerase, human telomerase RNA (hTR), telomerase-associated protein (TP1/TLP1), and human telomerase catalytic subunit (hTRT/hEST2), have been identified recently. However, it re mains unclear what roles these subunits play in the regulation of telom erase activity. In the present study, a total of 25 cervical cancers and 14 normal cervices as well as various cell lines derived from cervical cancer were examined for the expression of hTR, TP1 inKNA. and hl K I mRNA, and the correlations between expression of these and telomerase activity were evaluated in 23 cancers and 14 normal cervices. Reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed that hTR and TP1 mRNA were commonly expressed in cancers and noncancerous tissues. However, hTRT mRNA was observed only in cervical cancers and cell lines, and more than 80%

Masahiro Takakura; Satoru Kyo; Taro Kanaya; Et Al; Contact The Aacr Publications; Masahiro Takakura; Satoru Kyo; Taro Kanaya; Masaaki Tanaka; Masaki Inoue

1998-01-01

213

Paraneoplastic SIADH and Dermatomyositis in Cervical Cancer: A Case Report and Literature Review  

PubMed Central

We present the first known case of a patient with cervical squamous cell carcinoma complicated by paraneoplastic syndromes of both dermatomyositis and inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH). The patient in this case presented with generalized body pain and vaginal bleeding. Her cervical cancer was diagnosed as stage IIB by physical exam, imaging, and cervical biopsy, her dermatomyositis was confirmed by muscle and skin biopsy, and her SIADH was diagnosed based on laboratory findings. PMID:20737038

Jones, Guy; Razdan, Dolly; Cracchiolo, Bernadette; Houck, Karen; Sharer, Leroy

2009-01-01

214

Mechanisms of Human Papillomavirus E2-Mediated Repression of Viral Oncogene Expression and Cervical Cancer Cell Growth Inhibition  

PubMed Central

The papillomavirus E2 gene product plays a pivotal role in viral replication. E2 has multiple functions, including (i) transcriptional activation and repression of viral promoters and (ii) the enhancement of viral DNA replication. It was previously reported that E2 suppressed the growth of papillomavirus-positive cervical carcinoma cell lines. In the present study, we investigated the mechanisms of E2 growth inhibition. We found that the transcriptional activation function of E2 is required for inhibition of the growth of HeLa cells as well as for transcriptional repression of the viral E6/E7 promoter. It had been previously postulated that transcriptional repression of the E6/E7 promoter results from E2 binding its cognate sites proximal to the E6/E7 promoter and displacing other cellular transcriptional factors. In this study, we report a requirement for the transcription activation function for the binding of E2 to transcriptionally active templates. PMID:10729150

Nishimura, Akiko; Ono, Takeshi; Ishimoto, Akinori; Dowhanick, Jennifer J.; Frizzell, Margaret A.; Howley, Peter M.; Sakai, Hiroyuki

2000-01-01

215

Suppression of HPV E6 and E7 expression by BAF53 depletion in cervical cancer cells  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: {yields} Integration of HPV into host genome critical for activation of E6 and E7 oncogenes. {yields} BAF53 is essential for higher-order chromatin structure. {yields} BAF53 knockdown suppresses E6 and E7 from HPV integrants, but not from episomal HPVs. {yields} BAF53 knockdown decreases H3K9Ac and H4K12Ac on P105 promoter of integrated HPV 18. {yields} BAF53 knockdown restores the p53-dependent signaling pathway in HeLa and SiHa cells. -- Abstract: Deregulation of the expression of human papillomavirus (HPV) oncogenes E6 and E7 plays a pivotal role in cervical carcinogenesis because the E6 and E7 proteins neutralize p53 and Rb tumor suppressor pathways, respectively. In approximately 90% of all cervical carcinomas, HPVs are found to be integrated into the host genome. Following integration, the core-enhancer element and P105 promoter that control expression of E6 and E7 adopt a chromatin structure that is different from that of episomal HPV, and this has been proposed to contribute to activation of E6 and E7 expression. However, the molecular basis underlying this chromatin structural change remains unknown. Previously, BAF53 has been shown to be essential for the integrity of higher-order chromatin structure and interchromosomal interactions. Here, we examined whether BAF53 is required for activated expression of E6 and E7 genes. We found that BAF53 knockdown led to suppression of expression of E6 and E7 genes from HPV integrants in cervical carcinoma cell lines HeLa and SiHa. Conversely, expression of transiently transfected HPV18-LCR-Luciferase was not suppressed by BAF53 knockdown. The level of the active histone marks H3K9Ac and H4K12Ac on the P105 promoter of integrated HPV 18 was decreased in BAF53 knockdown cells. BAF53 knockdown restored the p53-dependent signaling pathway in HeLa and SiHa cells. These results suggest that activated expression of the E6 and E7 genes of integrated HPV is dependent on BAF53-dependent higher-order chromatin structure or nuclear motor activity.

Lee, Kiwon; Lee, Ah-Young [Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Hankuk University of Foreign Studies, Yongin 449-791 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Hankuk University of Foreign Studies, Yongin 449-791 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Yunhee Kim [Department of Life and Nanopharmaceutical Science and Department of Biology, Kyunghee University, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Life and Nanopharmaceutical Science and Department of Biology, Kyunghee University, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Hyockman, E-mail: hmkwon@hufs.ac.kr [Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Hankuk University of Foreign Studies, Yongin 449-791 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Hankuk University of Foreign Studies, Yongin 449-791 (Korea, Republic of)

2011-08-26

216

Cervical cancer screening among vulnerable women  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objective To see if refugee women at a community health centre (CHC) in Toronto, Ont, are appropriately screened for cervical cancer and if there are any demographic characteristics that affect whether they are screened. Design Chart review. Setting A CHC in downtown Toronto. Participants A total of 357 eligible refugee women attending the CHC. Main outcome measures Papanicolaou test received or documented reason for no Pap test. Results Ninety-two percent of women in the study sample were either appropriately screened for cervical cancer or had been approached for screening. Eighty percent of women were appropriately screened. Demographic variables including pregnancy, being uninsured, not speaking English, recent migration to Canada, and being a visible minority did not affect receipt of a Pap test after migration in multivariate analyses. Not speaking English was associated with a delay to receiving a first Pap test after migration. Conclusion The clients at our centre are demographically similar to women who are typically overlooked for Pap tests in the greater Toronto area. Despite belonging to a high-risk population, refugee women in this multidisciplinary CHC were screened for cervical cancer at a higher rate than the local population. PMID:22972744

Wiedmeyer, Mei-ling; Lofters, Aisha; Rashid, Meb

2012-01-01

217

Risk factors for invasive cervical cancer in Latino women  

Microsoft Academic Search

Most invasive cervical cancer research in the United States has been conducted on non-Latino-White (NLW) and African-American women. Incidence, mortality, stage at diagnosis and survival indicators for invasive cervical cancer in Latino women in California are compared to NLW and African-American women. A model is presented which depicts structural, behavioral, genetic and biological risk factors for invasive cervical cancer. A

Anna Nápoles-Springer; Eugene Washington

1996-01-01

218

75 FR 7282 - Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control Advisory Committee (BCCEDCAC)  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Disease Control and Prevention Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control...detection and control of breast and cervical cancer. The committee makes recommendations...Task Force guidelines for breast and cervical cancer screening; Impact of...

2010-02-18

219

76 FR 30723 - Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control Advisory Committee (BCCEDCAC)  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Disease Control and Prevention Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control...detection and control of breast and cervical cancer. The committee makes recommendations...Reform and its impact for breast and cervical cancer screening; updates on...

2011-05-26

220

77 FR 66469 - Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control Advisory Committee (BCCEDCAC)  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Disease Control and Prevention Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control...aforementioned committee: Name: Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control...detection and control of breast and cervical cancer. The committee makes...

2012-11-05

221

The Overexpression of Scaffolding Protein NEDD9 Promotes Migration and Invasion in Cervical Cancer via Tyrosine Phosphorylated FAK and SRC  

PubMed Central

NEDD9, a focal adhesion scaffolding protein, has been recently proposed to regulate invasion and metastasis in some cancer types, but unknown in cervical cancer. The aim of this study was to determine if NEDD9 was involved in the progression and metastasis of cervical cancer. The experimental results showed NEDD9 protein was overexpressed in cervical cancer compared with normal cervical epithelium tissues. Overexpression of NEDD9 was correlated with histological grading, lymph node metastasis, and FIGO stage of cervical cancer. Silencing NEDD9 resulted in tyrosine dephosphorylation of FAK and SRC oncoproteins, and decreased cell migration and invasion in the cervical carcinoma SiHa and HeLa cells. Overexpression of NEDD9 led to tyrosine phosphorylation of FAK and SRC oncoproteins, and increased cell migration and invasion. Moreover, tyrosine phosphorylation of NEDD9 was significantly decreased via suppressing tyrosine phosphorylation of FAK or SRC, suggesting a positive feedback loop of tyrosine phosphorylation between NEDD9 and FAK or SRC. In addition, our data showed that silencing NEDD9 decreased Vimentin expression and increased E-cadherin expression in cervical cancer cells, and vice versa. E-cadherin was subject to regulation of NEDD9, FAK and SRC, but altered neither tyrosine-phosphorylated nor total NEDD9. Our findings suggest that NEDD9 is overexpressed in cervical cancer tissues and cells, and overexpressed NEDD9 promotes migration and invasion in cervical carcinoma cells, probably via a positive feedback loop of tyrosine phosphorylation between NEDD9 and FAK or SRC. PMID:24058594

Ye, Feng; Ma, Ding; Xie, Xing; Lu, Weiguo

2013-01-01

222

CpG Methylation of Human Papillomavirus Type 16 DNA in Cervical Cancer Cell Lines and in Clinical Specimens: Genomic Hypomethylation Correlates with Carcinogenic Progression  

PubMed Central

Infection with genital human papillomaviruses (HPVs) is the primary cause of cervical cancer. The infection is widespread, and little is known about the secondary factors associated with progression from subclinical infection to invasive carcinoma. Here we report that HPV genomes are efficiently targeted in vivo by CpG methylation, a well-known mechanism of transcriptional repression. Indeed, it has been shown previously that in vitro-methylated HPV type 16 (HPV-16) DNA is transcriptionally repressed after transfection into cell cultures. By using a scan with the restriction enzyme McrBC, we observed a conserved profile of CpG hyper- and hypomethylation throughout the HPV-16 genomes of the tumor-derived cell lines SiHa and CaSki. Methylation is particularly high in genomic segments overlying the late genes, while the long control region (LCR) and the oncogenes are unmethylated in the single HPV-16 copy in SiHa cells. In 81 patients from two different cohorts, the LCR and the E6 gene of HPV-16 DNA were found to be hypermethylated in 52% of asymptomatic smears, 21.7% of precursor lesions, and 6.1% of invasive carcinomas. This suggests that neoplastic transformation may be suppressed by CpG methylation, while demethylation occurs as the cause of or concomitant with neoplastic progression. These prevalences of hyper- and hypomethylation also indicate that CpG methylation plays an important role in the papillomavirus life cycle, which takes place in asymptomatic infections and precursor lesions but not in carcinomas. Bisulfite modification revealed that in most of the HPV-16 genomes of CaSki cells and of asymptomatic patients, all 11 CpG dinucleotides that overlap with the enhancer and the promoter were methylated, while in SiHa cells and cervical lesions, the same 11 or a subset of CpGs remained unmethylated. Our report introduces papillomaviruses as models to study the mechanism of CpG methylation, opens research on the importance of this mechanism during the viral life cycle, and provides a marker relevant for the etiology and diagnosis of cervical cancer. PMID:12743279

Badal, Vinay; Chuang, Linda S. H.; Tan, Eileen Hwee-Hong; Badal, Sushma; Villa, Luisa L.; Wheeler, Cosette M.; Li, Benjamin F. L.; Bernard, Hans-Ulrich

2003-01-01

223

Fisetin inhibits migration and invasion of human cervical cancer cells by down-regulating urokinase plasminogen activator expression through suppressing the p38 MAPK-dependent NF-?B signaling pathway.  

PubMed

Fisetin (3,3',4',7-tetrahydroxyflavone), a naturally occurring flavonoid, has been reported to inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis in several cancer types. However, its effect on the anti-metastatic potential of cervical cancer cells remains unclear. In the present study, we found that fisetin inhibits the invasion and migration of cervical cancer cells. The expression and activity of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) was significantly suppressed by fisetin in a dose-dependent manner. We also demonstrated that fisetin reduces the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, but not that of ERK1/2, JNK1/2, or AKT. Addition of a p38 MAPK inhibitor, SB203580, further enhanced the inhibitory effect of fisetin on the expression and activity of uPA and the invasion and motility in cervical cancer cells. Fisetin suppressed the TPA (tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate)-induced activation of p38 MAPK and uPA, and inhibited the TPA-enhanced migratory and invasive abilities. Furthermore, the promoter activity of the uPA gene was dramatically repressed by fisetin, which disrupted the nuclear translocation of NF-?B and its binding amount on the promoter of the uPA gene, and these suppressive effects could be further enhanced by SB203580. This study provides strong evidence for the molecular mechanism of fisetin in inhibiting the aggressive phenotypes by repression of uPA via interruption of p38 MAPK-dependent NF-?B signaling pathway in cervical cancer cells and thus contributes insight to the potential of using fisetin as a therapeutic strategy against cervical cancer by inhibiting migration and invasion. PMID:23940799

Chou, Ruey-Hwang; Hsieh, Shu-Ching; Yu, Yung-Luen; Huang, Min-Hsien; Huang, Yi-Chang; Hsieh, Yi-Hsien

2013-01-01

224

Fisetin Inhibits Migration and Invasion of Human Cervical Cancer Cells by Down-Regulating Urokinase Plasminogen Activator Expression through Suppressing the p38 MAPK-Dependent NF-?B Signaling Pathway  

PubMed Central

Fisetin (3,3’,4’,7-tetrahydroxyflavone), a naturally occurring flavonoid, has been reported to inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis in several cancer types. However, its effect on the anti-metastatic potential of cervical cancer cells remains unclear. In the present study, we found that fisetin inhibits the invasion and migration of cervical cancer cells. The expression and activity of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) was significantly suppressed by fisetin in a dose-dependent manner. We also demonstrated that fisetin reduces the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, but not that of ERK1/2, JNK1/2, or AKT. Addition of a p38 MAPK inhibitor, SB203580, further enhanced the inhibitory effect of fisetin on the expression and activity of uPA and the invasion and motility in cervical cancer cells. Fisetin suppressed the TPA (tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate)-induced activation of p38 MAPK and uPA, and inhibited the TPA-enhanced migratory and invasive abilities. Furthermore, the promoter activity of the uPA gene was dramatically repressed by fisetin, which disrupted the nuclear translocation of NF-?B and its binding amount on the promoter of the uPA gene, and these suppressive effects could be further enhanced by SB203580. This study provides strong evidence for the molecular mechanism of fisetin in inhibiting the aggressive phenotypes by repression of uPA via interruption of p38 MAPK-dependent NF-?B signaling pathway in cervical cancer cells and thus contributes insight to the potential of using fisetin as a therapeutic strategy against cervical cancer by inhibiting migration and invasion. PMID:23940799

Chou, Ruey-Hwang; Hsieh, Shu-Ching; Yu, Yung-Luen; Huang, Min-Hsien; Huang, Yi-Chang; Hsieh, Yi-Hsien

2013-01-01

225

Small intestine metastasis from cervical cancer with acute abdomen: A case report  

PubMed Central

Cervical cancer metastasis to the small intestine is a rare occurrence that is easily misdiagnosed as a small bowel obstruction. The present study reports the case of a 46-year-old cervical cancer patient with metastasis to the small intestine, which presented as an acute abdomen due to intestinal obstruction. Enteroscopy revealed no primary intestinal tumors. The patient underwent exploratory laparotomy and resection of the tumor of the small intestine. Pathology revealed the mass to be squamous cell carcinoma, limited to the outer muscular layer and serosa. This case demonstrates that small intestine seeding must be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute abdomen in patients with cervical cancer.

QIU, HUI; YUAN, LIMEI; OU, YANGWEN; ZHU, YAN; XIE, CONGHUA; ZHANG, GONG

2015-01-01

226

Cervical cancer risk levels in Turkey and compliance to the national cervical cancer screening standard.  

PubMed

Cervical cancer screening with Pap smear test is a cost-effective method. The Ministry of Health in Turkey recommends that it be performed once every five years after age 35. The purpose of this study was to determine the cervical cancer risk levels of women between 35 and 69, and the intervals they have the Pap smear test, and to investigate the relation between the two. This study was performed on 227 women aged between 35 and 69 living in Balçova District of ?zmir province. Using the cervical cancer risk index program of Harvard School of Public Health, the cervical cancer risk level of 70% of the women was found below average, 22.1% average, and 7.9% above average. Only 52% of the women have had Pap smear test at least once in their lives. The percentage screening regularly in conformity with the national screening standard was 39.2%. Women in the 40-49 age group, were married, conformed significantly more (p<0.05) to the national screening standard. Compliance also increased with the level of education and decreased with the cervical cancer risk level (p<0.05). A logistic regression model was constructed including age, education level, menstruation state of the women and the economic level of the family. Not having the Pap smear test in conformity with the national cervical cancer screening standard in 35-39 age group was 2.52 times more than 40-49 age group, while it was 3.26 times more in 60-69 age group (p< 0.05). Not having Pap smear test in 35-39 age group more than other groups might result from lack of information on the cervical cancer national screening standard and the necessity of having Pap smear test. As for 60-69 age group, the low education level might cause not having Pap smear test. Under these circumstances, the cervical cancer risk levels should be determined and the individuals should be informed. Providing Pap smear test screening service to individuals in the target group of national screening standard, as a public service may resolve the inequalities due to age and educational differences. PMID:21790227

Açikgöz, Ayla; Ergör, Gül

2011-01-01

227

Human papillomavirus infection, cervical dysplasia and invasive cervical cancer in Honduras: a case-control study.  

PubMed

A substantial body of evidence has confirmed human papillomavirus (HPV) infection as the central etiological agent in human cervical carcinogenesis. In Honduras, cervical cancer is the most common cancer among women, with a high annual incidence. We conducted a population-based, case-control study of 229 patients with different grades of CIN and invasive cervical cancer and 438 matched controls. A structured questionnaire was used to investigate known and probable risk factors for cervical cancer. Cervical scrapes were tested for the presence of different HPV types using a general primer-mediated PCR followed by PCR-based sequencing. HPV DNA was detected in 87% of all cancer in situ and invasive cancer cases, and 95% of invasive cases could be attributed to high-risk types. In control women, 39% were positive for HPV DNA sequences. HPV 16 prevalence ranked highest in all stages of cervical dysplasias, invasive cancers and controls. A statistically significant association with HPV was observed for CIN II, CIN III and invasive cancer, showing an upward trend to more severe lesions and being more pronounced for HPV 16 and related types. The OR for HPV 16- and 18-related invasive cancer cases was 14.88 (95% CI 5.12-43.25) and 74.66 (95% CI 7.77-717.62), respectively. Our results confirm a central role of HPV as the cause of cervical cancer in Honduras and provide information as to the type distribution of HPVs in the country. PMID:10446444

Ferrera, A; Velema, J P; Figueroa, M; Bulnes, R; Toro, L A; Claros, J M; De Barahona, O; Melchers, W J

1999-09-01

228

Human Papillomavirus Induced Transformation in Cervical and Head and Neck Cancers  

PubMed Central

Human papillomavirus (HPV) is one of the most widely publicized and researched pathogenic DNA viruses. For decades, HPV research has focused on transforming viral activities in cervical cancer. During the past 15 years, however, HPV has also emerged as a major etiological agent in cancers of the head and neck, in particular squamous cell carcinoma. Even with significant strides achieved towards the screening and treatment of cervical cancer, and preventive vaccines, cervical cancer remains the leading cause of cancer-associated deaths for women in developing countries. Furthermore, routine screens are not available for those at risk of head and neck cancer. The current expectation is that HPV vaccination will prevent not only cervical, but also head and neck cancers. In order to determine if previous cervical cancer models for HPV infection and transformation are directly applicable to head and neck cancer, clinical and molecular disease aspects must be carefully compared. In this review, we briefly discuss the cervical and head and neck cancer literature to highlight clinical and genomic commonalities. Differences in prognosis, staging and treatment, as well as comparisons of mutational profiles, viral integration patterns, and alterations in gene expression will be addressed. PMID:25226287

Adams, Allie K.; Wise-Draper, Trisha M.; Wells, Susanne I.

2014-01-01

229

Functional Analysis of Bladder Cancer-Related Protein Gene: A Putative Cervical Cancer Tumor Suppressor Gene in Cervical Carcinoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Our previous study has suggested thatthe bladder cancer-associated protein gene (BLCAP) was among the differentially expressed genes in cervical cancer. We confirm here that BLCAP is expressed in all noncancerous cervical tissues (10\\/10), but it is greatly lost in primary cervical cancer tissue (31\\/39). In order to further investigate the functional roles of BLCAP, we stably transfected BLCAP cDNA into

Zehua Zuo; Min Zhao; Juan Liu; Guifang Gao; Xinxing Wu

2006-01-01

230

Effect of a heat shock protein 90-specific inhibitor on the proliferation and apoptosis induced by VEGF-C in cervical cancer cells  

PubMed Central

The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90)-specific inhibitor geldanamycin (GA) on the proliferation and apoptosis induced by vascular endothelial growth factor-C (VEGF-C) in cervical cancer cells. HeLa cells (1×106/ml) in the logarithmic growth phase were incubated without serum for 24 h. The cells were pretreated with kinase insert domain receptor antibody (KDR)-Ab (20 ?g/ml), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor LY294002 (3 ?mol/l), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitor PD98059 (30 ?mol/l) or Hsp90-specific inhibitor GA (10 ?mol/l) for 30 min, and then treated with VEGF-C (50 ng/?l) for a further 24 h. The cells were harvested for MTT analysis, annexin V-FITC/propidium iodide double staining for early apoptosis and SDS-PAGE and western blot analysis in order to determine Hsp90, B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax) and cyclin D1 expression. Treatment with VEGF-C alone induced Hsp90 protein expression in HeLa cells at all time-points. Hsp90 expression was increased 3.31-fold in VEGF-C treated HeLa cells, and this increase was attenuated in the treatment groups (2.17-, 1.69-, 1.82-fold in VEGF-C + KDR-Ab, VEGF-C + PD98059 and VEGF-C + LY294002, respectively). The proliferation of the VEGF-C-treated HeLa cells was increased ~2.13-fold, while that of the VEGF-C + GA-treated HeLa cells decreased 0.87-fold (P<0.05). Even low concentrations of GA (0.02 ?mol/l) were found to inhibit the Bcl-2 and cyclin D1 protein expression induced by VEGF-C. Therefore, the results indicate that the Hsp90-specific inhibitor GA has a critical role in the proliferation and apoptosis induced by VEGF-C in cervical cancer cells. PMID:25289059

DU, XUE; LI, YONGMEI; JING, XU; ZHAO, LINA

2014-01-01

231

MicroRNA-218 Enhances the Radiosensitivity of Human Cervical Cancer via Promoting Radiation Induced Apoptosis  

PubMed Central

We previously reported frequent loss of microRNA-218 (miR-218) in cervical cancer, which was associated with tumor progression and poor prognosis. As microRNAs were found invovled in the regulation of radiosensitivity in various human cancers, we therefore aim to investigate the effects of miR-218 on radiosensitivity of cervical cancer in the present study. The clonogenic survival assay demonstrated that loss of miR-218 could predict radioresistance in the primary cervical cancer cells (R2=0.6516, P<0.001). In vitro, abundant miR-218 increased the radiosensitivity in cervical cancer cells (P<0.001 for HeLa, P=0.009 for SiHa, P=0.016 for C33A and P=0.01 for CaSki). Upregulation of miR-218 significantly enhanced the radiation-induced apoptosis, which was further enhanced by the combination of miR-218 overexpression and radiation In xenograft growth assay, combination of miR-218 overexpression and radiation notably induced cellular apoptosis and suppressed tumor growth. In conclusion, we demonstrated that miR-218 resensitized cervical cancer cells to radiation via promoting cellular apoptosis. Moreover, we proved that miR-218 as a potent predictor of radiosensitivity in cervical cancer, especially for those patients with loss of miR-218. PMID:24843318

Yuan, Wang; Xiaoyun, Han; Haifeng, Qiu; Jing, Li; Weixu, Hu; Ruofan, Dong; Jinjin, Yu; Zongji, Shen

2014-01-01

232

Rapid induction of senescence in human cervical carcinoma cells  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Expression of the bovine papillomavirus E2 regulatory protein in human cervical carcinoma cell lines repressed expression of the resident human papillomavirus E6 and E7 oncogenes and within a few days caused essentially all of the cells to synchronously display numerous phenotypic markers characteristic of cells undergoing replicative senescence. This process was accompanied by marked but in some cases transient alterations in the expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins and by decreased telomerase activity. We propose that the human papillomavirus E6 and E7 proteins actively prevent senescence from occurring in cervical carcinoma cells, and that once viral oncogene expression is extinguished, the senescence program is rapidly executed. Activation of endogenous senescence pathways in cancer cells may represent an alternative approach to treat human cancers.

Goodwin, Edward C.; Yang, Eva; Lee, Chan-Jae; Lee, Han-Woong; Dimaio, Daniel; Hwang, Eun-Seong

2000-09-01

233

Characterization of LMX-1A as a metastasis suppressor in cervical cancer.  

PubMed

DNA methylation is important in cancer development and is a promising biomarker for cancer detection. An epigenomic approach used in our previous work showed that LMX-1A is methylation-silenced in cervical cancer. LMX-1A, a LIM-homeobox gene, is known to participate in developmental events; however, there are at present no data on the role of LMX-1A in cancers. In this study, we characterized the function of this transcription factor by examining cell lines, animal models and human cervical neoplastic tissues, and found that over-expression of LMX-1A does not affect cell proliferation or the cell cycle of cervical cancer cell lines but significantly inhibits colony formation and invasion in vitro. Analysis of changes in epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers, such as CDH1, CDH2, VIMENTIN, SNAIL, SLUG and TWIST, revealed involvement of the EMT in LMX-1A-mediated cancer invasion; this result was validated in a stable transfectant over-expressing LMX-1A with RNA interference. Xenograft studies using immunocompromised mice confirmed the suppressor effects of LMX-1A on tumour formation and distant metastasis in cervical cancer cell lines. LMX-1A immunohistochemical staining of tissue arrays containing the full spectrum of cervical neoplasms, including normal cervix, low-grade cervical intra-epithelial neoplasia (CIN), high-grade CIN, locally invasive and distant metastatic cancers, demonstrated the critical role of LMX-1A in invasion and metastasis. Furthermore, we found by analysing TGFbeta-BMP signalling that BMP4 and BMP6 are down-regulated by LMX-1A. The results of this study suggest that LMX-1A suppresses cancer invasion and metastasis in cervical cancer through an incomplete EMT. PMID:19644956

Liu, Chin-Yu; Chao, Tai-Kuang; Su, Po-Hsuan; Lee, Hsin-Yi; Shih, Yu-Lueng; Su, Her-Young; Chu, Tang-Yuan; Yu, Mu-Hsien; Lin, Ya-Wen; Lai, Hung-Cheng

2009-10-01

234

Evaluation of Expectation Maximization for the Segmentation of Cervical Cell Nuclei  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a As cervical cancer is one of the most common cancers worldwide, screening programs have been established. For that task stained\\u000a slides of cervical cells are visually assessed under a microscope for dysplastic or malignant cells. To support this challenge,\\u000a image processing methods offer advantages for objective classification. As the cell nuclei carry a high extent visual information,\\u000a all depicted cell

Alexander Ihlow; Christian Held; Christoph Rothaug; Claudia Dach; Thomas Wittenberg; Dirk Steckhan

235

Apoptosis induction in Jurkat cells and sCD95 levels in women's sera are related with the risk of developing cervical cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Currently, there is clear evidence that apoptosis plays an important role in the development and progression of tumors. One of the best characterized apoptosis triggering systems is the CD95\\/Fas\\/APO-1 pathway; previous reports have demonstrated high levels of soluble CD95 (sCD95) in serum of patients with some types of cancer. Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer among women

Adriana Aguilar-Lemarroy; Jose E Romero-Ramos; Vicente Olimon-Andalon; Georgina Hernandez-Flores; Jose M Lerma-Diaz; Pablo C Ortiz-Lazareno; Gilberto Morgan-Villela; Susana del Toro-Arreola; Alejandro Bravo-Cuellar; Luis F Jave-Suarez

2008-01-01

236

Physico-chemical characteristics of ZnO nanoparticles-based discs and toxic effect on human cervical cancer HeLa cells  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this study, we investigated physico-chemical properties of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs)-based discs and their toxicity on human cervical cancer HeLa cell lines. ZnO NPs (80 nm) were produced by the conventional ceramic processing method. FESEM analysis indicated dominant structure of nanorods with dimensions 100-500 nm in length, and 20-100 nm in diameter. The high content of ZnO nanorods in the discs probably played significant role in toxicity towards HeLa cells. Structural defects (oxygen vacancies and zinc/oxygen interstitials) were revealed by PL spectra peaks at 370-376 nm and 519-533 nm for the ZnO discs. The structural, optical and electrical properties of prepared sample have influenced the toxicological effects of ZnO discs towards HeLa cell lines via the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), internalization, membrane damage, and eventually cell death. The larger surface to volume area of the ZnO nanorods, combined with defects, stimulated enhanced toxicity via ROS generation hydrogen peroxide, hydroxyl radicals, and superoxide anion. The preliminary results confirmed the ZnO-disc toxicity on HeLa cells was significantly associated with the unique physicochemical properties of ZnO NPs and to our knowledge, this is the first cellular study for treatment of HeLa cells with ZnO discs made from 80 nm ZnO particles.

Sirelkhatim, Amna; Mahmud, Shahrom; Seeni, Azman; Kaus, Noor Haida Mohd.; Sendi, Rabab

2014-10-01

237

Gynecologic examination and cervical biopsies after (chemo) radiation for cervical cancer to identify patients eligible for salvage surgery  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate efficacy of gynecologic examination under general anesthesia with cervical biopsies after (chemo) radiation for cervical cancer to identify patients with residual disease who may benefit from salvage surgery. Methods and Materials: In a retrospective cohort study data of all cervical cancer patients with the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) Stage IB1 to IVA treated with (chemo) radiation between 1994 and 2001 were analyzed. Patients underwent gynecologic examination under anesthesia 8 to 10 weeks after completion of treatment. Cervical biopsy samples were taken from patients judged to be operable. In case of residual cancer, salvage surgery was performed. Results: Between 1994 and 2001, 169 consecutive cervical cancer patients received primary (chemo) radiation, of whom 4 were lost to follow-up. Median age was 56 years (interquartile range [IQR], 44-71) and median follow-up was 3.5 years (IQR, 1.5-5.9). In each of 111 patients a biopsy sample was taken, of which 90 (81%) showed no residual tumor. Vital tumor cells were found in 21 of 111 patients (19%). Salvage surgery was performed in 13 of 21 (62%) patients; of these patients, 5 (38%) achieved long-term, complete remission after salvage surgery (median follow-up, 5.2 years; range, 3.9-8.8 years). All patients with residual disease who did not undergo operation (8/21) died of progressive disease. Locoregional control was more often obtained in patients who underwent operation (7 of 13) than in patients who were not selected for salvage surgery (0 of 8 patients) (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Gynecologic examination under anesthesia 8 to 10 weeks after (chemo) radiation with cervical biopsies allows identification of those cervical cancer patients who have residual local disease, of whom a small but significant proportion may be salvaged by surgery.

Nijhuis, Esther R. [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, University Medical Centre Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Zee, Ate G.J. van der [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, University Medical Centre Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Hout, Bertha A. in 't [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, University Medical Centre Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Boomgaard, Jantine J. [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, University Medical Centre Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Hullu, Joanne A. de [Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Pras, Elisabeth [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Centre Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Hollema, Harry [Department of Pathology, University Medical Centre Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Aalders, Jan G. [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, University Medical Centre Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Nijman, Hans W. [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, University Medical Centre Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Willemse, Pax H.B. [Department of Medical Oncology, University Medical Centre Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Mourits, Marian J.E. [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, University Medical Centre Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)]. E-mail: m.j.e.mourits@og.umcg.nl

2006-11-01

238

Vaccine to Prevent Cervical Cancer  

Cancer.gov

Researchers are testing a vaccine in women infected with HPV-16 who have cell changes associated with HPV infection (LSIL or ASCUS) to determine whether the vaccine will help develop the appropriate immune response to resolve the cell changes and clear the viral infection.

239

Cervical cancer screening among Michigan women: 'The Special Cancer Behavioral Risk Factor Survey', 2004-2008.  

PubMed

The burden of cervical cancer remains greater among minority women. The purpose of this study was to evaluate racial/ethnic disparities in cervical cancer screening among minority women in Michigan. Data from 8,023 women (? 40 years) surveyed in the 2004-2008 Michigan Special Cancer Behavioral Risk Factor Survey were used to assess racial/ethnic differences in cervical cancer screening, knowledge and beliefs. Unexpectedly, African-American and Hispanic women reported being screened for cervical cancer at rates similar to, or higher than, Whites. Women demonstrated limited knowledge of cervical cancer risk factors and its signs/symptoms. Most minority women were more likely than Whites to believe in the importance of cervical screening, with Hispanic women more likely to support HPV vaccination. Differential utilisation of screening does not explain the disproportionately high rates of cervical cancer among minorities. Future research should examine disparities in the follow-up of abnormal cervical results and receipt of treatment. PMID:23919863

Pierce Campbell, C M; Darwish-Yassine, M; Harlow, S D; Johnston, C M; Curado, M P; Cho, K R; Soliman, A S

2013-08-01

240

Phthalocyanine-mediated photodynamic therapy induces cell death and a G /G{sub 1} cell cycle arrest in cervical cancer cells  

SciTech Connect

We have developed a series of novel photosensitizers which have potential for anticancer photodynamic therapy (PDT). Photosensitizers include zinc phthalocyanine tetra-sulphonic acid and a family of derivatives with amino acid substituents of varying alkyl chain length and degree of branching. Subcellular localization of these photosensitizers at the phototoxic IC{sub 5} concentration in human cervical carcinoma cells (SiHa Cells) was similar to that of the lysosomal dye Lucifer Yellow. Subsequent nuclear relocalization was observed following irradiation with 665 nm laser light. The PDT response was characterized using the Sulforhodamine B cytotoxicity assay. Flow cytometry was used for both DNA cell cycle and dual Annexin V-FITC/propidium iodide analysis. Phototoxicity of the derivatives was of the same order of magnitude as for tetrasulphonated phthalocyanine but with an overall trend of increased phototoxicity with increasing amino acid chain length. Our results demonstrate cell death, inhibition of cell growth, and G /G{sub 1} cell cycle arrest during the phthalocyanine PDT-mediated response.

Haywood-Small, S.L. [Centre for Photobiology and Photodynamic Therapy, School of Biochemistry and Microbiology, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: s.l.hankin@sheffield.ac.uk; Vernon, D.I. [Centre for Photobiology and Photodynamic Therapy, School of Biochemistry and Microbiology, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Griffiths, J. [Centre for Photobiology and Photodynamic Therapy, Department of Color Chemistry, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Schofield, J. [Centre for Photobiology and Photodynamic Therapy, Department of Color Chemistry, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Brown, S.B. [Centre for Photobiology and Photodynamic Therapy, School of Biochemistry and Microbiology, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)

2006-01-13

241

The disparity of cervical cancer in diverse populations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Significant disparities in cervical cancer incidence and mortality rates among minority groups have been documented in the United States, despite an overall decline in these rates for the population as a whole. Differences in cervical cancer screening practices have been suggested as an explanation for these disparities, as have differences in treatment among various racial and ethnic groups. A number

Levi S. Downs; Jennifer S. Smith; Isabel Scarinci; Lisa Flowers; Groesbeck Parham

2008-01-01

242

Experimental Cervical Cancer Vaccine Looks Promising in Trial  

MedlinePLUS

... features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Experimental Cervical Cancer Vaccine Looks Promising in Trial Research suggests the ... Preidt Wednesday, October 1, 2014 Related MedlinePlus Pages Cervical Cancer HPV WEDNESDAY, Oct. 1, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- An ...

243

Sentinel Lymph Node Detection in Patients with Cervical Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose. We investigated the validity of sentinel lymph node (SLN) detection after radioactive isotope and\\/or blue dye injection in patients with cervical cancer.Patients and methods. Between December 1998 and May 2000, 50 patients (mean age 44 years) with cervical cancer FIGO stage I (n = 32), stage II (n = 16), or stage IV (n = 2) underwent SLN detection

Sabine Malur; Norman Krause; Christhardt Köhler; Achim Schneider

2001-01-01

244

Social Construction of Cervical Cancer Screening among Panamanian Women  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Understanding how "health issues" are socially constructed may be useful for creating culturally relevant programs for Hispanic/Latino populations. Purpose: We explored the constructed meanings of cervical cancer and cervical cancer screening among Panamanian women, as well as socio-cultural factors that deter or encourage screening…

Calvo, Arlene; Brown, Kelli McCormack; McDermott, Robert J.; Bryant, Carol A.; Coreil, Jeanine; Loseke, Donileen

2012-01-01

245

Targeting angiogenesis in advanced cervical cancer  

PubMed Central

Patients with advanced stage or recurrent cervical cancer represent a population with limited chemotherapeutic options. More specifically, patients with recurrent disease have a poor salvage rate, with a 5-year survival rate of less than 10%. This year, the first prospective phase III clinical trial exploring the anti-angiogenic agent, bevacizumab, was published, meeting its primary endpoint, with a significant improvement in overall survival. As such, a review of anti-angiogenic therapy in the treatment of this disease is warranted. PMID:25364393

Eskander, Ramez N.

2014-01-01

246

Modulation of specificity protein 1 by mithramycin A as a novel therapeutic strategy for cervical cancer.  

PubMed

Cervical cancer is the third most common cancer and the third leading cause of death among women. However, the standard treatment for cervical cancer includes cisplatin, which can cause side effects such as hematological damage or renal toxicity. New innovations in cervical cancer treatment focus on developing more effective and better-tolerated therapies such as Sp1-targeting drugs. Previous studies suggested that mithramycin A (Mith) inhibits the growth of various cancers by decreasing Sp1 protein. However, how Sp1 protein is decreased by Mith is not clear. Few studies have investigated the regulation of Sp1 protein by proteasome-dependent degradation as a possible control mechanism for the regulation of Sp1 in cancer cells. Here, we show that Mith decreased Sp1 protein by inducing proteasome-dependent degradation, thereby suppressing cervical cancer growth through a DR5/caspase-8/Bid signaling pathway. We found that prolonged Mith treatment was well tolerated after systemic administration to mice carrying cervical cancer cells. Reduction of body weight was minimal, indicating that Mith was a good therapeutic candidate for treatment of cancers in which Sp1 is involved in promoting and developing disease. PMID:25418289

Choi, Eun-Sun; Nam, Jeong-Seok; Jung, Ji-Youn; Cho, Nam-Pyo; Cho, Sung-Dae

2014-01-01

247

Modulation of specificity protein 1 by mithramycin A as a novel therapeutic strategy for cervical cancer  

PubMed Central

Cervical cancer is the third most common cancer and the third leading cause of death among women. However, the standard treatment for cervical cancer includes cisplatin, which can cause side effects such as hematological damage or renal toxicity. New innovations in cervical cancer treatment focus on developing more effective and better-tolerated therapies such as Sp1-targeting drugs. Previous studies suggested that mithramycin A (Mith) inhibits the growth of various cancers by decreasing Sp1 protein. However, how Sp1 protein is decreased by Mith is not clear. Few studies have investigated the regulation of Sp1 protein by proteasome-dependent degradation as a possible control mechanism for the regulation of Sp1 in cancer cells. Here, we show that Mith decreased Sp1 protein by inducing proteasome-dependent degradation, thereby suppressing cervical cancer growth through a DR5/caspase-8/Bid signaling pathway. We found that prolonged Mith treatment was well tolerated after systemic administration to mice carrying cervical cancer cells. Reduction of body weight was minimal, indicating that Mith was a good therapeutic candidate for treatment of cancers in which Sp1 is involved in promoting and developing disease.

Choi, Eun-Sun; Nam, Jeong-Seok; Jung, Ji-Youn; Cho, Nam-Pyo; Cho, Sung-Dae

2014-01-01

248

Less Radical Surgery for Patient With Early-Stage Cervical Cancer  

PubMed Central

Introduction Surgery in cervical cancer should be used with intention of cure. Radical abdominal trachelectomy is a feasible operation for selected patients with stage I?-1? cervical cancer which fertility can be preserved. Case Report A 30-years-old woman with squamous cell cervical cancer stage (1 A II) diagnosed at September 2011 expressed a wish for fertility-sparing treatment. Radical abdominal hysterectomy and pelvic and para-aortic lymphadenectomy were performed which showed no evidence of lymphatic metastasis. Subsequently, at last follow-up (5 months post-surgery), good oncologic outcomes were found after this procedure. This was the first case of fertility-sparing radical trachelectomy procedures performed at our institution. Conclusions Trachelectomy represents a valuable conservative surgical approach for early stage invasive cervical cancer. PMID:24396586

Yousefi, Zohreh; Kazemianfar, Zahra; Kadghodayan, Sima; Hasanzade, Malieheh; Kalantari, Mahmoudreza; Mottaghi, Mansoureh

2013-01-01

249

Cervical cancer prevention: new tools and old barriers.  

PubMed

Cervical cancer is the second most common female tumor worldwide, and its incidence is disproportionately high (>80%) in the developing world. In the United States, in which Papanicolaou (Pap) tests have reduced the annual incidence to approximately 11,000 cervical cancers, >60% of cases are reported to occur in medically underserved populations as part of a complex of diseases linked to poverty, race/ethnicity, and/or health disparities. Because carcinogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) infections cause virtually all cervical cancer, 2 new approaches for cervical cancer prevention have emerged: 1) HPV vaccination to prevent infections in younger women (aged < or =18 years) and 2) carcinogenic HPV detection in older women (aged > or =30 years). Together, HPV vaccination and testing, if used in an age-appropriate manner, have the potential to transform cervical cancer prevention, particularly among underserved populations. Nevertheless, significant barriers of access, acceptability, and adoption to any cervical cancer prevention strategy remain. Without understanding and addressing these obstacles, these promising new tools for cervical cancer prevention may be futile. In the current study, the delivery of cervical cancer prevention strategies to these US populations that experience a high cervical cancer burden (African-American women in South Carolina, Alabama, and Mississippi; Haitian immigrant women in Miami; Hispanic women in the US-Mexico Border; Sioux/Native American women in the Northern Plains; white women in the Appalachia; and Vietnamese-American women in Pennsylvania and New Jersey) is reviewed. The goal was to inform future research and outreach efforts to reduce the burden of cervical cancer in underserved populations. PMID:20310056

Scarinci, Isabel C; Garcia, Francisco A R; Kobetz, Erin; Partridge, Edward E; Brandt, Heather M; Bell, Maria C; Dignan, Mark; Ma, Grace X; Daye, Jane L; Castle, Philip E

2010-06-01

250

Human Papillomavirus 45 Genetic Variation and Cervical Cancer Risk Worldwide  

PubMed Central

ABSTRACT Human papillomavirus 45 (HPV45) is a member of the HPV18-related alpha-7 species and accounts for approximately 5% of all cervical cancer cases worldwide. This study evaluated the genetic diversity of HPV45 and the association of HPV45 variants with the risk of cervical cancer by sequencing the entire E6 and E7 open reading frames of 300 HPV45-positive cervical samples from 36 countries. A total of 43 HPV45 sequence variants were identified that formed 5 phylogenetic sublineages, A1, A2, A3, B1, and B2, the distribution of which varied by geographical region. Among 192 cases of cervical cancer and 101 controls, the B2 sublineage was significantly overrepresented in cervical cancer, both overall and in Africa and Europe separately. We show that the sequence analysis of E6 and E7 allows the classification of HPV45 variants and that the risk of cervical cancer may differ by HPV45 variant sublineage. IMPORTANCE This work describes the largest study to date of human papillomavirus 45 (HPV45)-positive cervical samples and provides a comprehensive reference for phylogenetic classification for use in epidemiological studies of the carcinogenicity of HPV45 genetic variants, particularly as our findings suggest that the B2 sublineage of HPV45 is associated with a higher risk of cervical cancer. PMID:24501412

Chen, Alyce A.; Heideman, Danielle A. M.; Boon, Debby; Gheit, Tarik; Snijders, Peter J. F.; Tommasino, Massimo; Franceschi, Silvia

2014-01-01

251

The invasive cervical cancer review: psychological issues surrounding disclosure.  

PubMed

An audit of the screening history of all new cervical cancer cases has been a requirement since April 2007. While NHS cervical screening programmes (NHSCSP) guidance requires that women diagnosed with cervical cancer are offered the findings of the audit, as yet there has been no research to investigate the psychological impact that meeting to discuss the findings might have on patients. This is in spite of the fact that cytological under-call may play a role in as many as 20% of cervical cancer cases. This review draws on the literature concerning breaking bad news, discussing cancer and disclosing medical errors, in order to gain insight into both the negative and positive consequences that may accompany a cervical screening review meeting. We conclude that while patients are likely to experience some distress at disclosure, there are also likely to be positive aspects, such as greater trust and improved perception of care. PMID:23506198

Sherman, S M; Moss, E; Redman, C W E

2013-04-01

252

Detection of Human Papillomavirus in Chronic Cervicitis, Cervical Adenocarcinoma, Intraepithelial Neoplasia and Squamus Cell Carcinoma  

PubMed Central

Background: Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer in women worldwide. Recent studies show that human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA is present in all cervical carcinomas and in some cervicitis cases, with some geographical variation in viral subtypes. Therefore determination of the presence of HPV in the general population of each region can help reveal the role of these viruses in tumors. Objectives: This study aimed to estimate the frequency of infection with HPV in cervicitis, cervical adenocarcinoma, intraepithelial neoplasia and squamus cell carcinoma samples from the Isfahan Province, Iran. Patients and Methods: One hundred and twenty two formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissue samples of crevicitis cases and different cervix tumors including cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) (I, II, III), squamus cell carcinoma (SCC) and adenocarcinoma were collected from histopathological files of Al-Zahra Hospital in Isfahan. Data about histopathological changes were collected by reexamination of the hematoxylin and eosin stained sections. DNA was extracted and subjected to Nested PCR using consensus primers, MY09/MY11 and GP5+/GP6+, designed for amplification of a conserved region of the genome coding for L1 protein. Results: In total 74.5% of the tested samples were positive for HPV. Amongst the tested tumors 8 out of 20 (40%) of CIN (I, II, III), 5 out of 21 (23.8%) of adenocarcinoma cases and 78 out of 79 chronic cervicitis cases were positive for HPV. Conclusions: The rate of different carcinomas and also the rate of HPV infection in each case were lower than other reports from different countries. This could be correlated with the social behavior of women in the area, where they mostly have only one partner throughout their life, and also the rate of smoking behavior of women in the studied population. On the other hand the rate of HPV infection in chronic cervicitis cases was much higher than cases reported by previous studies. This necessitates more attention to the role of human papillomaviruses in the their induction in the studied area. PMID:25147721

Mirzaie-Kashani, Elahe; Bouzari, Majid; Talebi, Ardeshir; Arbabzadeh-Zavareh, Farahnaz

2014-01-01

253

Is 58% sensitivity for detection of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 3 and invasive cervical cancer optimal for cervical screening?  

PubMed Central

Recent Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of a Roche cobas human papillomavirus (HPV) test application as a first line primary cervical screening tool in women 25 and older introduces a new era of complex cervical screening choices. Perhaps the most surprising findings in Roche's supporting ATHENA trial data were the unexpectedly low verification bias-adjusted CIN3+ sensitivities documented by the FDA for both the proposed cobas HPV testing algorithm (58.26%) and Pap testing algorithm (42.63%). These unexpectedly low sensitivity estimates suggest intuitively that there is still considerable room for improvement in cervical screening, and available data from large systems point to routine cytology and HPV co-testing as offering the greatest protection against development of cervical cancer. Observational studies of large populations screened over time remain essential to document actual protection from development of cervical cancer with any new cervical screening options, as natural history studies and available data from large systems indicate that most CIN2/3 cases detected in short term clinical trials would not progress to invasive cervical cancer. Interpretation of ATHENA trial data and its application to routine clinical practice is further limited by published studies which document that a significant proportion of CIN2/3 biopsy diagnoses in the ATHENA trial could not be confirmed as accurate when evaluated with p16 immunohistochemistry and that cytology laboratory performance in the trial was notably suboptimal. PMID:24987445

Austin, R. Marshall; Zhao, Chengquan

2014-01-01

254

Limoniastrum guyonianum aqueous gall extract induces apoptosis in human cervical cancer cells involving p16INK4A re-expression related to UHRF1 and DNMT1 down-regulation  

PubMed Central

Several reports have described the potential effects of natural compounds as anti-cancer agents in vitro as well as in vivo. The aim of this study was to evaluate the anti-cancer effect of Limoniastrum guyonianum aqueous gall extract (G extract) and luteolin in the human cervical cancer HeLa cell line, and, if so, to clarify the underlying mechanism. Our results show that G extract and luteolin inhibited cell proliferation and induced G2/M cell cycle arrest in a concentration and time-dependent manner. Both natural products induced programmed cell death as confirmed by the presence of hypodiploid G0/G1 cells. These effects are associated with an up-regulation of the expression of the tumor suppressor gene p16INK4A and a down-regulation of the expression of the anti-apoptotic actor UHRF1 and its main partner DNMT1. Moreover, G extract- and luteolin-induced UHRF1 and DNMT1 down-regulation is accompanied with a global DNA hypomethylation in HeLa cell line. Altogether our results show that G extract mediates its growth inhibitory effects on human cervical cancer HeLa cell line likely via the activation of a p16INK4A -dependent cell cycle checkpoint signalling pathway orchestrated by UHRF1 and DNMT1 down-regulation. PMID:23688286

2013-01-01

255

Aqueous Cinnamon Extract (ACE-c) from the bark of Cinnamomum cassia causes apoptosis in human cervical cancer cell line (SiHa) through loss of mitochondrial membrane potential  

PubMed Central

Background Chemoprevention, which includes the use of synthetic or natural agents (alone or in combination) to block the development of cancer in human beings, is an extremely promising strategy for cancer prevention. Cinnamon is one of the most widely used herbal medicines with diverse biological activities including anti-tumor activity. In the present study, we have reported the anti-neoplastic activity of cinnamon in cervical cancer cell line, SiHa. Methods The aqueous cinnamon extract (ACE-c) was analyzed for its cinnamaldehyde content by HPTLC analysis. The polyphenol content of ACE-c was measured by Folin-Ciocalteau method. Cytotoxicity analysis was performed by MTT assay. We studied the effect of cinnamon on growth kinetics by performing growth curve, colony formation and soft agar assays. The cells treated with ACE-c were analyzed for wound healing assay as well as for matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) expression at mRNA and protein level by RT-PCR and zymography, respectively. Her-2 protein expression was analyzed in the control and ACE-c treated samples by immunoblotting as well as confocal microscopy. Apoptosis studies and calcium signaling assays were analyzed by FACS. Loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (??m) in cinnamon treated cells was studied by JC-1 staining and analyzed by confocal microscopy as well as FACS. Results Cinnamon alters the growth kinetics of SiHa cells in a dose-dependent manner. Cells treated with ACE-c exhibited reduced number of colonies compared to the control cells. The treated cells exhibited reduced migration potential that could be explained due to downregulation of MMP-2 expression. Interestingly, the expression of Her-2 oncoprotein was significantly reduced in the presence of ACE-c. Cinnamon extract induced apoptosis in the cervical cancer cells through increase in intracellular calcium signaling as well as loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. Conclusion Cinnamon could be used as a potent chemopreventive drug in cervical cancer. PMID:20482751

2010-01-01

256

Update on prevention and screening of cervical cancer.  

PubMed

Cervical cancer is the third most common cause of cancer in women in the world. During the past few decades tremendous strides have been made toward decreasing the incidence and mortality of cervical cancer with the implementation of various prevention and screening strategies. The causative agent linked to cervical cancer development and its precursors is the human papillomavirus (HPV). Prevention and screening measures for cervical cancer are paramount because the ability to identify and treat the illness at its premature stage often disrupts the process of neoplasia. Cervical carcinogenesis can be the result of infections from multiple high-risk HPV types that act synergistically. This imposes a level of complexity to identifying and vaccinating against the actual causative agent. Additionally, most HPV infections spontaneously clear. Therefore, screening strategies should optimally weigh the benefits and risks of screening to avoid the discovery and needless treatment of transient HPV infections. This article provides an update of the preventative and screening methods for cervical cancer, mainly HPV vaccination, screening with Pap smear cytology, and HPV testing. It also provides a discussion of the newest United States 2012 guidelines for cervical cancer screening, which changed the age to begin and end screening and lengthened the screening intervals. PMID:25302174

McGraw, Shaniqua L; Ferrante, Jeanne M

2014-10-10

257

Update on prevention and screening of cervical cancer  

PubMed Central

Cervical cancer is the third most common cause of cancer in women in the world. During the past few decades tremendous strides have been made toward decreasing the incidence and mortality of cervical cancer with the implementation of various prevention and screening strategies. The causative agent linked to cervical cancer development and its precursors is the human papillomavirus (HPV). Prevention and screening measures for cervical cancer are paramount because the ability to identify and treat the illness at its premature stage often disrupts the process of neoplasia. Cervical carcinogenesis can be the result of infections from multiple high-risk HPV types that act synergistically. This imposes a level of complexity to identifying and vaccinating against the actual causative agent. Additionally, most HPV infections spontaneously clear. Therefore, screening strategies should optimally weigh the benefits and risks of screening to avoid the discovery and needless treatment of transient HPV infections. This article provides an update of the preventative and screening methods for cervical cancer, mainly HPV vaccination, screening with Pap smear cytology, and HPV testing. It also provides a discussion of the newest United States 2012 guidelines for cervical cancer screening, which changed the age to begin and end screening and lengthened the screening intervals. PMID:25302174

McGraw, Shaniqua L; Ferrante, Jeanne M

2014-01-01

258

Cervical Adenocarcinoma  

MedlinePLUS

... The most common subtype of cervical cancer, called squamous cell carcinoma, arises from the surface lining of the ectocervix, ... successful at decreasing the number of patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix, it has not yet been ...

259

Comparison of Linear Array and Line Blot Assay for Detection of Human Papillomavirus and Diagnosis of Cervical Precancer and Cancer in the Atypical Squamous Cell of Undetermined Significance and Low-Grade Squamous Intraepithelial Lesion Triage Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

We evaluated Linear Array (LA), a newly commercialized PGMY09\\/11 L1 consensus primer PCR test that detects 37 human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes by reverse line blot hybridization, for the detection of individual HPV genotypes and carcinogenic HPV and its clinical performance for detecting 2-year cumulative cervical precancer and cancer using archived specimens from the Atypical Squamous Cell of Undetermined Significance (ASCUS)

Philip E. Castle; Patti E. Gravitt; Diane Solomon; Cosette M. Wheeler; Mark Schiffman

2008-01-01

260

[Prevention and screening of cervical cancer].  

PubMed

Cervical cancer may be prevented by human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination and the treatment of intraepithelial lesions diagnosed using cervical pap smears. HPV vaccines are effective for the prevention of CIN2/3 related to HPV 16, 18 and some other oncogenic HPV subtypes in HPV-naïve women. They are very well tolerated and to date, no increase in the incidence of auto-immune diseases has been reported. HPV vaccines primarily target girls aged 11-14 years old and catch-up programs include girls aged 15-19 years old. Vaccination coverage is below 40% in France, which is insufficient to induce herd immunity. Screening via pap smears is performed every three years in women between 25 and 65 years old, after two normal annual smears. However, screening is an individualised decision and is only performed in 57% of women. Abnormal smears require subsequent diagnostic investigations. Apart from high grade intra-epithelial lesions which generally require treatment, these abnormalities may be observed as they often undergo spontaneous regression due to viral clearance. PMID:25090760

Rakotomahenina, Hajanirina; Garrigue, Isabelle; Marty, Marion; Brun, Jean-Luc

2014-06-01

261

[Human papillomavirus detection in cervical cancer prevention].  

PubMed

Cervical cancer (CC), which is strongly associated to high-risk human papillomavirus (hr-HPV) infection, continues being a significant health problem in Latin America. The use of conventional cytology to detect precancerous cervical lesions has had no major impact on reducing CC incidence and mortality rates, which are still high in the region. New screening tools to detect precancerous lesions became available, which provide great opportunities for CC prevention, as do highly efficacious HPV vaccines able to prevent nearly all lesions associated with HPV-16 and -18 when applied before viral exposure. Currently, hr-HPV testing represents an invaluable component of clinical guidelines for screening, management and treatment of CC and their precursor lesions. Many testing strategies have been developed that can detect a broad spectrum of hr-HPV types in a single assay; however, only a small subset of them has documented clinical performance for any of the standard HPV testing indications. HPV tests that have not been validated and lack proof of reliability, reproducibility and accuracy should not be used in clinical management. Once incorporated into the lab, it is essential to submit the whole procedure of HPV testing to continuous and rigorous quality assurance to avoid sub-optimal, potentially harmful practices. Recent progress and current status of these methods are discussed in this article. PMID:24356274

Picconi, María Alejandra

2013-01-01

262

Pathways of cervical cancer screening among Chinese women  

PubMed Central

Background The purpose of this community-based study was to develop a structural equation model for factors contributing to cervical cancer screening among Chinese American women. Methods A cross-sectional design included a sample of 573 Chinese American women aged 18 years and older. The initial step involved use of confirmatory factor analysis, that included the following variables: access to and satisfaction with health care, and enabling and predisposing cultural and health beliefs. Structural equation model analyses were conducted on factors related to cervical cancer screening. Results Age, marital status, employment, household income, and having health insurance, but not educational level, were significantly related to cervical screening status. Predisposing and enabling factors were positively associated with cervical cancer screening. The cultural factor was significantly related to the enabling factor or the satisfaction with health care factor. Conclusion This model highlights the significance of sociocultural factors in relation to cervical cancer screening. These factors were significant, with cultural, predisposing, enabling, and health belief factors and access to and satisfaction with health care reinforcing the need to assist Chinese American women with poor English fluency in translation and awareness of the importance of cervical cancer screening. Community organizations may play a role in assisting Chinese American women, which could enhance cervical cancer screening rates. PMID:23843708

Ma, Grace X; Wang, Min Qi; Ma, Xiang S; Shive, Steven E; Tan, Yin; Toubbeh, Jamil I

2013-01-01

263

Virus Isolation and Identification in Cervical Cancer Patients.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

7 strains of viruses were isolated from cervical specimens of cervical cancer patients. The viral isolates were herpes simplex viruses according to the morphologic, biologic as well as serologic characteristics. 5 of the 7 strains were typed and 3 were he...

J. Xiang, J. Feng, P. Huang, W. Chen, J. Wu

1982-01-01

264

A single-codon mutation converts HPV16 E6 oncoprotein into a potential tumor suppressor, which induces p53-dependent senescence of HPV-positive HeLa cervical cancer cells.  

PubMed

High-risk mucosal human papillomaviruses (HPV), mainly HPV16 and HPV18, are implicated in cervical carcinogenesis. HPV16 E6 oncoprotein binds and often targets for degradation numerous cell proteins, including the tumor suppressor p53 and several PDZ domain proteins. Here, we show that a single-point mutation, F47R, is sufficient to convert the HPV16 E6 oncoprotein into a suppressor of HPV-positive HeLa cervical cancer cells proliferation. The E6 F47R mutant is defective for polyubiquitination and subsequent degradation of p53. When expressed in HPV-positive cervical cancer cells, E6 F47R acts as a dominant negative mutant by counteracting the p53 degradation activity of endogenous E6 and restoring high p53 protein levels. Moreover, the prolonged expression of E6 F47R leads to suppression of HeLa cells proliferation through the induction of premature senescence. This phenotype is independent on the PDZ-binding activity of E6. F47R-senescent HeLa cells exhibit a sustained expression of p53, hMDM2 and p21(CIP) proteins and a reduced expression of endogenous HPV18 E6 protein. Finally, small interfering RNAs directed against p53 counteract the effect of E6 F47R expression, indicating that E6 F47R-induced cellular senescence is strongly dependent on p53 signaling pathway. PMID:19015633

Ristriani, T; Fournane, S; Orfanoudakis, G; Travé, G; Masson, M

2009-02-01

265

The Association between Race, Ethnicity, and Socioeconomic Status and Cervical Cancer Screening Rates and Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia in Monroe County.  

E-print Network

??Background/Significance: More research is needed to determine the association between contextual socioeconomic status (SES), racial/ethnic clustering and cervical cancer screenings and/or cervical precancer rates. If… (more)

Licon, Denisse B.

2013-01-01

266

Epidemiology, prevention and treatment of cervical cancer in the Philippines  

PubMed Central

Cervical cancer remains to be one of the leading malignancies among Filipino women. High-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) types, such as 16 and 18, are consistently identified in Filipino women with cervical cancer. Factors identified to increase the likelihood of HPV infection and subsequent development of cervical cancer include young age at first intercourse, low socioeconomic status, high parity, smoking, use of oral contraception and risky sexual behaviors. Cancer screening programs presently available in the Philippines include Pap smears, single visit approach utilizing visual inspection with acetic acid followed by cryotherapy, as well as colposcopy. However, the uptake of screening remains low and is further compounded by the lack of basic knowledge women have regarding screening as an opportunity for prevention of cervical cancer. Prophylactic HPV vaccination of both quadrivalent and bivalent vaccines has already been approved in the Philippines and is gaining popularity among the Filipinos. However, there has been no national or government vaccination policy implemented as of yet. The standard of treatment of cervical cancer is radiotherapy concurrent with chemotherapy. Current researches are directed towards improving availability of both preventive and curative measures of cervical cancer management. PMID:19471671

Dy Echo, Ana Victoria V.

2009-01-01

267

Outcome of treatment of human HeLa cervical cancer cells with roscovitine strongly depends on the dosage and cell cycle status prior to the treatment.  

PubMed

Exposure of asynchronously growing human HeLa cervical carcinoma cells to roscovitine (ROSC), a selective cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) inhibitor, arrests their progression at the transition between G(2)/M and/or induces apoptosis. The outcome depends on the ROSC concentration. At higher dose ROSC represses HPV-encoded E7 oncoprotein and initiates caspase-dependent apoptosis. Inhibition of the site-specific phosphorylation of survivin and Bad, occurring at high-dose ROSC treatment, precedes the onset of apoptosis and seems to be a prerequisite for cell death. Considering the fact that in HeLa cells the G(1)/S restriction checkpoint is abolished by E7, we addressed the question whether the inhibition of CDKs by pharmacological inhibitors in synchronized cells would be able to block the cell-cycle in G(1) phase. For this purpose, we attempted to synchronize cells by serum withdrawal or by blocking of the mitotic apparatus using nocodazole. Unlike human MCF-7 cells, HeLa cells do not undergo G(1) block after serum starvation, but respond with a slight increase of the ratio of G(1) population. Exposure of G(1)-enriched HeLa cells to ROSC after re-feeding does not block their cell-cycle progression at G(1)-phase, but increases the ratio of S- and G(2)-phase, thereby mimicking the effect on asynchronously growing cells. A quite different impact is observed after treatment of HeLa cells released from mitotic block. ROSC prevents their cell cycle progression and cells transiently accumulate in G(1)-phase. These results show that inhibition of CDKs by ROSC in cells lacking the G(1)/S restriction checkpoint has different outcomes depending on the cell-cycle status prior to the onset of treatment. PMID:19180585

Wesierska-Gadek, Józefa; Borza, Andreea; Walzi, Eva; Krystof, Vladimir; Maurer, Margarita; Komina, Oxana; Wandl, Stefanie

2009-04-01

268

Recurrence of cervical cancer in mice after selective estrogen receptor modulator therapy.  

PubMed

Estrogen and its nuclear receptor, estrogen receptor ?, are necessary cofactors in the initiation and multistage progression of carcinogenesis in the K14E6/E7 transgenic mouse model of human papillomavirus-associated cervical cancer. Recently, our laboratory reported that raloxifene, a selective estrogen receptor modulator, promoted regression of high-grade dysplasia and cancer that arose in the cervix of K14E6/E7 transgenic mice treated long-term with estrogen. Herein, we evaluated the recurrence of cervical cancer after raloxifene therapy in our preclinical model of human papillomavirus-associated cervical carcinogenesis. We observed recurrence of cervical cancer in mice re-exposed to estrogen after raloxifene treatment, despite evidence suggesting the antagonistic effects of raloxifene persisted in the reproductive tract after treatment had ceased. We also observed recurrence of neoplastic disease in mice that were not retreated with exogenous estrogen, although the severity of disease was less. Recurrent neoplastic disease and cancers retained functional estrogen receptor ? and responded to retreatment with raloxifene. Moreover, continuous treatment of mice with raloxifene prevented the emergence of recurrent disease seen in mice in which raloxifene was discontinued. These data suggest that cervical cancer cells are not completely eradicated by raloxifene and rapidly expand if raloxifene treatment is ceased. These findings indicate that a prolonged treatment period with raloxifene might be required to prevent recurrence of neoplastic disease and lower reproductive tract cancers. PMID:24418098

Spurgeon, Megan E; Chung, Sang-Hyuk; Lambert, Paul F

2014-02-01

269

NACB: Practice Guidelines And Recommendations For Use Of Tumor Markers In The Clinic Cervical Cancer (Section 3J) 1 National Academy of Clinical Biochemistry Guidelines for the Use of Tumor Markers in Cervical Cancer  

E-print Network

evidence; MRI, magnetic resonance imaging; SCC, squamous cell carcinoma antigen; TPA, tissue polypeptide antigen; TPS, tissue polypeptide specific antigen. NACB: Practice Guidelines And Recommendations For Use Of Tumor Markers In The Clinic Cervical Cancer (Section 3J) 2

Katja N. Gaarenstroom; Johannes M. G. Bonfrer

270

The Th17/Treg balance and the expression of related cytokines in Uygur cervical cancer patients  

PubMed Central

Background The fine balance of Th17/Treg is crucial for maintenance of immune homeostasis. The objective of this study was to investigate the balance of Th17/Treg and the expression of related cytokines in Uighur cervical cancer patients. Methods Peripheral blood was collected from 65 cases of cervical cancer patients, 42 cases of cervical CIN patients and 40 healthy people. Flow cytometry was used to detect the percentages of T cell subsets, including CD3+ T cells, CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells, Treg cells and Th17 cells. ELISA assay was conducted to detect expression levels of TGF-?, IL-6, IL-10, IL-17, IL-23 and IFN-?. Results There were no significant difference in the levels of CD3+ T cells, CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells, and the ratio of CD4+/CD8+ among the cervical cancer group, the CIN group and the healthy control group. However, compared with the healthy control group, the percentages of CD4+ CD25+ Treg, CD4+CD25+CD127- Treg, CD4+IL17+ Th17, CD4+CD25+Foxp3+, CD4+CD25- Foxp3+, CD8+CD25+CD127-Treg and CD8+CD25+Foxp3 were significantly higher in the cervical cancer group and the CIN group. Similar results were also found in the Th17/Treg ratio and the related cytokines. There was no significant difference between the cervical cancer group and the CIN group. Additionally, Th17 cell levels were positively correlated with IL-6, IL-23 and IL-17. Also, Treg cell levels were positively correlated with TGF-?, IL-10 and IL-6. Contrarily, Treg cell levels and IFN-? were negatively correlated. Conclusions Our data indicated that the Th17/Treg balance was broken in peripheral blood of cervical cancer patients. Analysis of Th17/Treg balance may have a significant implication in diagnosing cervical cancer. Virtual slides The virtual slide for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1813823795931511 PMID:23587428

2013-01-01

271

Distribution of HPV Genotypes and Involvement of Risk Factors in Cervical Lesions and Invasive Cervical Cancer: A Study in an Indian Population.  

PubMed

Human papilloma virus (HPV) is considered as the main sexually transmitted etiological agent for the cause and progression of preneoplastic cervical lesions to cervical cancer. This study is discussing the prevalence of HPV and its genotypes in cervical lesions and invasive cervical cancer tissues and their association with various risk factors in women from Varanasi and its adjoining areas in India. A total of 122 cervical biopsy samples were collected from SS Hospital and Indian Railways Cancer Institute and Research Centre, Varanasi and were screened for HPV infection by PCR using primers from L1 consensus region of the viral genome. HPV positive samples were genotyped by type-specific PCR and sequencing. The association of different risk factors with HPV infection in various grades of cervical lesion was evaluated by chi-square test. A total of 10 different HPV genotypes were observed in women with cervicitis, CIN, invasive squamous cell cervical carcinoma and adenocarcinoma. Increased frequency of HPV infection with increasing lesion grade (p=0.002) was observed. HPV16 being the predominant type was found significantly associated with severity of the disease (p=0.03). Various socio- demographic factors other than HPV including high parity (p<0.0001), rural residential area (p<0.0001), elder age (p<0.0001), low socio-economic status (p<0.0001) and women in postmenopausal group (p<0.0001) were also observed to be associated with cervical cancer.These findings show HPV as a direct cause of cervical cancer suggesting urgent need of screening programs and HPV vaccination in women with low socio-economic status and those residing in rural areas. PMID:25035855

Srivastava, Shikha; Shahi, U P; Dibya, Arti; Gupta, Sadhana; Roy, Jagat K

2014-01-01

272

Perceived Risk of Cervical Cancer in Appalachian Women  

PubMed Central

Objective To examine perceptions of cervical cancer risk in elevated-risk Appalachians. Methods Appalachian women (n=571) completed interviews examining self-regulation model factors relevant to perceived risk of cervical cancer. Results Women with good/very good knowledge of cervical cancer, greater worry, and history of sexually transmitted infection had higher odds of rating their perceived risk as somewhat/much higher than did other women. Former smokers, compared to never smokers, had lower risk perceptions. Conclusions Self-regulation model factors are important to understanding perceptions of cervical cancer risk in underserved women. The relationship of smoking and worry to perceived risk may be a target for intervention. PMID:23026042

Kelly, Kimberly M.; Ferketich, Amy K.; Ruffin, Mack T.; Tatum, Cathy; Paskett, Electra D.

2013-01-01

273

Fluorescence spectra of blood and urine for cervical cancer detection  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the current study, the fluorescence emission spectra (FES) and Stokes shift spectra (SSS) of blood and urine samples of cervical cancer patients were obtained and compared to those of normal controls. Both spectra showed that the relative intensity of biomolecules such as porphyrin, collagen, Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, and flavin were quite out of proportion in cervical cancer patients. The biochemical mechanism for the elevation of these fluorophores is not yet definitive; nevertheless, these biomolecules could serve as tumor markers for diagnosis, screening, and follow-up of cervical cancers. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on FES and SSS of blood and urine of cervical cancer patients to give a sensitivity of 80% and specificity of 78%.

Masilamani, Vadivel; AlSalhi, Mohamad Saleh; Vijmasi, Trinka; Govindarajan, Kanaganaj; Rathan Rai, Ram; Atif, Muhammad; Prasad, Saradh; Aldwayyan, Abdullah S.

2012-09-01

274

What's New in Cervical Cancer Research and Treatment?  

MedlinePLUS

... injecting indocyanine green (ICG) dye into the cervix. HPV vaccines Vaccines have been developed to prevent infection with some of the HPV types associated with cervical cancer. Currently available vaccines ...

275

ICSN Biennial Meeting - Copenhagen 2008 - Abstracts - Cervical Cancer Screening  

Cancer.gov

ICSN Biennial Meeting 2008 Helsingør, Denmark Attendance Rate (2003-2005) of the Hungarian Organized, Nation-Wide Cervical Cancer Screening Program Authors: I Boncz, A Sebestyén Affiliation: Department of Health Economics, Policy & Management, University

276

Cervical Cancer: An Overview With Suggested Practice and Policy Goals year, the American Cancer  

E-print Network

of invasive cervical cancer would be diagnosed and 3,670 women in the United States would die from the disease (American Cancer Society [ACS], 2006b). While the incidence of cervical cancer in the United States has decreased significantly in the last 50 years, primarily due to effective screening programs, many women still suffer and die unnecessarily. However, the past couple of years have marked a turning point in the fight against cervical cancer. The availability of a test for the human papillomavirus (HPV), the cause of virtually all cases of cervical cancer, and development of an HPV vaccine bring powerful new

Society Predicted

277

Violence against Women Raises Risk of Cervical Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: An emerging literature suggests that violence against women (VAW), particularly sexual violence, may increase the risk of acquiring a sexually transmitted infection (STI) and, therefore, may be associated with cervical cancer development. The purpose of this cross-sectional analysis was to determine if women who had experienced violence had higher prevalence rates of invasive cervical cancer.\\u000aMethods: Women aged 18–88

Ann L. Coker; Claudia Hopenhayn; Christopher P. DeSimone; Heather M. Bush; Leslie Crofford

2008-01-01

278

Human Papillomavirus Vaccine: A New Chance to Prevent Cervical Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a significant source of morbidity and mortality throughout the world and is the most common\\u000a sexually transmitted infection in the United States. HPV is the primary etiologic agent of cervical cancer and dysplasia.\\u000a Thus, cervical cancer and other HPV-associated malignancies might be prevented or treated by HPV vaccines. Recent research\\u000a on the safety and efficacy of

Bradley J. Monk; Ali Mahdavi

279

Berberine modulates AP1 activity to suppress HPV transcription and downstream signaling to induce growth arrest and apoptosis in cervical cancer cells  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background-  Specific types of high risk Human papillomaviruses (HR-HPVs) particularly, HPV types 16 and 18 cause cervical cancer and while\\u000a the two recently developed vaccines against these HPV types are prophylactic in nature, therapeutic options for treatment\\u000a and management of already existing HPV infection are not available as yet. Because transcription factor, Activator Protein-1\\u000a (AP-1) plays a central role in HPV-mediated

Sutapa Mahata; Alok C Bharti; Shirish Shukla; Abhishek Tyagi; Syed A Husain; Bhudev C Das

2011-01-01

280

Cancer Control P.L.A.N.E.T. - Cervical Cancer Screening  

Cancer.gov

Skip to content Links to comprehensive cancer control resources for public health professionals Home | About This Site | FAQ | Sponsors Cervical Cancer Learn why these resources are important Data State Cancer Profiles (CDC, NCI) - Statistics for prioritizing

281

National Cancer Institute Research on Human Papillomavirus and Cervical Cancer - March 11, 2004  

Cancer.gov

National Cancer Institute Research on Human Papillomavirus and Cervical Cancer Statement of Edward L. Trimble M.D., M.P.H National Cancer Institute National Institutes of Health Department of Health and Human Services Before the House Committee

282

Objective Diagnosis of Cervical Cancer by Tissue Protein Profile Analysis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Protein profiles of homogenized normal cervical tissue samples from hysterectomy subjects and cancerous cervical tissues from biopsy samples collected from patients with different stages of cervical cancer were recorded using High Performance Liquid Chromatography coupled with Laser Induced Fluorescence (HPLC-LIF). The Protein profiles were subjected to Principle Component Analysis to derive statistically significant parameters. Diagnosis of sample types were carried out by matching three parameters—scores of factors, squared residuals, and Mahalanobis Distance. ROC and Youden's Index curves for calibration standards were used for objective estimation of the optimum threshold for decision making and performance.

Patil, Ajeetkumar; Bhat, Sujatha; Rai, Lavanya; Kartha, V. B.; Chidangil, Santhosh

2011-07-01

283

Socioecological perspectives on cervical cancer and cervical cancer screening among asian american women.  

PubMed

Although cervical cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers among Vietnamese American women (VAW) and Korean American women (KAW), both groups consistently report much lower rates of cervical cancer screening compared with other Asian ethnic subgroups and non-Hispanic Whites. This study aimed to explore multilevel factors that may underlie low screening rates among VAW and KAW living in a city where their ethnic communities are relatively small. The socioecological model was used as a conceptual framework. Thirty participants were conveniently recruited from ethnic beauty salons run by VA and KA cosmetologists in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The participants' average age was 44.6 years (SD = .50; range = 21-60). Most participants were married (80 %) and employed (73.3 %), and had health insurance (83.3 %). A qualitative interview was conducted in Vietnamese or Korean and transcribed verbatim. A thematic content analysis was used to identify major codes, categories, and patterns across the transcripts. The study identified several factors at the individual (e.g., pregnancy, poverty, personality), interpersonal (e.g., family responsibility, mother as influential referent), and community (e.g., lack of availability, community size) levels. The study sheds light on four major areas that must be taken into consideration in the development of culturally appropriate, community-based interventions aimed to reduce disparities in cervical cancer screening among ethnic minority women in the United States: (1) ethnic community size and geographic location; (2) cross-cultural similarities and dissimilarities; (3) targeting of not only unmarried young women, but also close referents; and (4) utilization of trusted resources within social networks. PMID:24863746

Lee, Jongwon; Carvallo, Mauricio

2014-10-01

284

Methylation Patterns of the IFN-? Gene in Cervical Cancer Tissues  

PubMed Central

Objective: To explore the relationship between methylation of interferon gamma (IFN-?) gene and tumorigenesis in cervical cancer tissues, the biopsy specimens of cervical cancer and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) (I-III) patients as well as normal controls were collected and analyzed. Methods: The methylation of the IFN-? gene was verified by using methylation-specific PCR and DNA sequencing analysis, and the expression levels of IFN-? mRNA were detected using quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Results: The methylation rates of the IFN-? gene were significantly higher in cervical cancer tissues (15/43, 34.9%) than those in CIN (3/23, 13.0% of CIN I; 6/39, 15.4% of CIN II/III) and normal cervical tissues (2/43, 4.7%) (P < 0.01). Furthermore, the mRNA expression of IFN-? in cervical tumors with methylation (0.71 ± 0.13, n = 8) was lower than that in those without methylation (1.58 ± 0.32, n = 27) (P < 0.05). Likewise, the IFN-? expression levels in CIN II/III tissues with methylation (0.87 ± 0.16, n = 5) were significantly (P < 0.01) lower compared to those without methylation (2.12 ± 0.27, n = 32). Conclusion: The hypermethylation of IFN-? gene may be related with tumorigenesis of cervical cancer. PMID:25208560

Ma, Dong; Jiang, Chunyang; Hu, Xiaoli; Li, Qingzhao; Li, Tingting; Yang, Yanyan; Li, Ou

2014-01-01

285

Knowledge about Cervical Cancer and Barriers of Screening Program among Women in Wufeng County, a High-Incidence Region of Cervical Cancer in China  

PubMed Central

Purpose Cervical cancer screening is an effective method for reducing the incidence and mortality of cervical cancer, but the screening attendance rate in developing countries is far from satisfactory, especially in rural areas. Wufeng is a region of high cervical cancer incidence in China. This study aimed to investigate the issues that concern cervical cancer and screening and the factors that affect women’s willingness to undergo cervical cancer screening in the Wufeng area. Participants and Methods A cross-sectional survey of women was conducted to determine their knowledge about cervical cancer and screening, demographic characteristics and the barriers to screening. Results Women who were willing to undergo screenings had higher knowledge levels. “Anxious feeling once the disease was diagnosed” (47.6%), “No symptoms/discomfort” (34.1%) and “Do not know the benefits of cervical cancer screening” (13.4%) were the top three reasons for refusing cervical cancer screening. Women who were younger than 45 years old or who had lower incomes, positive family histories of cancer, secondary or higher levels of education, higher levels of knowledge and fewer barriers to screening were more willing to participate in cervical cancer screenings than women without these characteristics. Conclusion Efforts are needed to increase women’s knowledge about cervical cancer, especially the screening methods, and to improve their perceptions of the screening process for early detection to reduce cervical cancer incidence and mortality rates. PMID:23843976

Zhou, Hang; Xiang, Qunying; Hu, Ting; Zhang, Qinghua; Chen, Zhilan; Ma, Ding; Feng, Ling

2013-01-01

286

Disparities in cervical and breast cancer mortality in Brazil.  

PubMed

OBJECTIVE To analyze cervical and breast cancer mortality in Brazil according to socioeconomic and welfare indicators. METHODS Data on breast and cervical cancer mortality covering a 30-year period (1980-2010) were analyzed. The data were obtained from the National Mortality Database, population data from the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics database, and socioeconomic and welfare information from the Institute of Applied Economic Research. Moving averages were calculated, disaggregated by capital city and municipality. The annual percent change in mortality rates was estimated by segmented linear regression using the joinpoint method. Pearson's correlation coefficients were conducted between average mortality rate at the end of the three-year period and selected indicators in the state capital and each Brazilian state. RESULTS There was a decline in cervical cancer mortality rates throughout the period studied, except in municipalities outside of the capitals in the North and Northeast. There was a decrease in breast cancer mortality in the capitals from the end of the 1990s onwards. Favorable socioeconomic indicators were inversely correlated with cervical cancer mortality. A strong direct correlation was found with favorable indicators and an inverse correlation with fertility rate and breast cancer mortality in inner cities. CONCLUSIONS There is an ongoing dynamic process of increased risk of cervical and breast cancer and attenuation of mortality because of increased, albeit unequal, access to and provision of screening, diagnosis and treatment.  PMID:25119941

Girianelli, Vania Reis; Gamarra, Carmen Justina; Azevedo e Silva, Gulnar

2014-06-01

287

Combined E7-dendritic cell-based immunotherapy and human sodium/iodide symporter radioiodine gene therapy with monitoring of antitumor effects by bioluminescent imaging in a mouse model of uterine cervical cancer.  

PubMed

Using a uterine cervical cancer cell line expressing human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 E7 antigen and bioluminescent imaging (BLI), we evaluated the therapeutic potential of combined immunotherapy using transfected dendritic cells (DC-E7) and human sodium/iodide symporter (hNIS) radioiodine gene therapy in a xenograft animal cancer model. Dendritic cells expressing either E7 antigen (DC-E7) or no-insert (DC-no insert) were made for immunization materials, and murine uterine cervical cancer cell line coexpressing E7, firefly luciferase, hNIS, and EGFP genes (TC-1/FNG) were prepared for the animal tumor model. C57BL/6 mice were divided into five therapy groups (phosphate-buffered saline [PBS], DC-no insert, DC-E7, I-131, and DC-E7+I-131 groups). Single therapy with either DC-E7 or I-131 induced greater retardation in tumor growth compared with PBS or DC-no insert groups, and it resulted in some tumor-free mice (DC-E7 and I-131 groups, 40% and 20%, respectively). Combination therapy with DC-E7 and I-131 dramatically inhibited tumor growth, thus causing complete disappearance of tumors in all mice, and these effects were further confirmed by BLI in vivo. In conclusion, complete disappearance of the tumor was achieved with combined DC-E7 vaccination and hNIS radioiodine gene therapy in a mouse model with E7-expressing uterine cervical cancer, and serial BLIs successfully demonstrated antitumor effects in vivo. PMID:22091632

Jeon, Yong Hyun; Lee, Ho Won; Lee, You La; Kim, Jung Eun; Hwang, Mi-Hye; Jeong, Shin Young; Lee, Sang-Woo; Ahn, Byeong-Cheol; Ha, Jeoung-Hee; Lee, Jaetae

2011-12-01

288

A Study on Cervical Cancer Screening Amongst Nurses  

E-print Network

# The Author(s) 2011. This article is published with open access at Springerlink.com Abstract Cancer of the cervix is the commonest genital tract malignancy in the female, and it has been ranked second to breast cancer. It has positive association with infection of human papillomavirus. Cervical cancer incidence and mortality have declined substantially in western countries following the introduction of screening programmes. This present study investigated the knowledge, attitude and practice of nurses in Lagos University Teaching Hospital (LUTH) towards cervical cancer screening as they are important health personnel that are suppose to educate women on the need for cervical cancer screening. The study is a descriptive cross-sectional survey

V. Kwashi; O. Awodele; A. A. A. Adeyomoye; D. F. Awodele; V. Kwashi; I. O. Awodele; D. C. Dolapo

2011-01-01

289

Breast and cervical cancer screening behaviours among colorectal cancer survivors in Nova Scotia  

PubMed Central

Purpose We analyzed patterns and factors associated with receipt of breast and cervical cancer screening in a cohort of colorectal cancer survivors. Methods Individuals diagnosed with colorectal cancer in Nova Scotia between January 2001 and December 2005 were eligible for inclusion. Receipt of breast and cervical cancer screening was determined using administrative data. General-population age restrictions were used in the analysis (breast: 40–69 years; cervical: 21–75 years). Kaplan–Meier and Cox proportional hazards models were used to assess time to first screen. Results Of 318 and 443 colorectal cancer survivors eligible for the breast and cervical cancer screening analysis respectively, 30.1% [95% confidence interval (ci): 21.2% to 39.0%] never received screening mammography, and 47.9% (95% ci: 37.8% to 58.0%) never received cervical cancer screening during the study period. Receipt of screening before the colorectal cancer diagnosis was strongly associated with receipt of screening after diagnosis (hazard ratio for breast cancer screening: 4.71; 95% ci: 3.42 to 6.51; hazard ratio for cervical cancer screening: 6.83; 95% ci: 4.58 to 10.16). Conclusions Many colorectal cancer survivors within general-population screening age recommendations did not receive breast and cervical cancer screening. Future research should focus on survivors who meet age recommendations for population-based cancer screening. PMID:25302037

Corkum, M.; Urquhart, R.; Kephart, G.; Hayden, J.A.; Porter, G.

2014-01-01

290

What School Nurses Need to Know about Cervical Cancer, HPV, and the New Vaccine  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

At least 12,000 women are diagnosed with cervical cancer each year in the United States, accounting for at least 4,000 deaths. Worldwide, cervical cancer is the second most common type of cancer among women. The human papilloma virus (HPV) has been linked to at least 70% of all cervical cancer. HPV can be divided into 2 categories: (a) low risk,…

Ehrhardt, Jeanie

2007-01-01

291

Promotion of cell proliferation and inhibition of ADCC by cancerous immunoglobulin expressed in cancer cell lines  

Microsoft Academic Search

To explore the significance of cancerous immunoglobulin (Ig) in cancer cell growth, HeLa cervical cancer cells were stably transfected with small interfering RNA (siRNA) that specifically, efficiently and consistently silences the expression of heavy chain genes of all immunoglobulin isotypes. This stable cell line was used to examine cell viability, colony formation and tumor growth in athymic nude mice. The

Ming Li; Hui Zheng; Zhi Duan; Haidan Liu; Duosha Hu; Ann Bode; Zigang Dong; Ya Cao

2012-01-01

292

miR-375 Mediated Acquired Chemo-Resistance in Cervical Cancer by Facilitating EMT  

PubMed Central

Acquired chemo-resistance is one of the key causal factors in cancer death. Emerging evidences suggest that miRNA and epithelial–mesenchymal transition play critical roles in the chemo-resistance in cancers. Here, we showed the association of paclitaxel-resistance with miR-375 over-expression and epithelial–mesenchymal transition inducement in cervical cancer. Using different cervical cancer cell models, we found that paclitaxel transiently induced up-regulation of miR-375 expression, proliferation inhibition, transition from epithelial to mesenchymal phenotype, and consequently impaired paclitaxel sensitivity. Forced over-expression of miR-375 may suppress Ecadherin expression by a directly targeting pathway, which led to paclitaxel resistance. Contrarily, re-expression of Ecadherin partly reversed epithelial–mesenchymal transition phenotype and miR-375 induced paclitaxel-resistance. Our findings suggest that paclitaxel-induced miR-375 over-expression facilitates epithelial–mesenchymal transition process via directly targeting Ecadherin, proliferation inhibition, and consequently results in chemo-resistance in cervical cancer cells. A reversion of miR-375 or Ecadherin expression may be a novel therapeutic approach for overcoming chemo-resistance in cervical cancer. PMID:25330011

Shen, Yuanming; Zhou, Jiansong; Li, Yang; Ye, Feng; Wan, Xiaoyun; Lu, Weiguo; Xie, Xing; Cheng, Xiaodong

2014-01-01

293

Screening for HPV Outperforms Pap Test for Cervical Cancer Published on Cancer Network (http://www.cancernetwork.com)  

E-print Network

invasive cervical cancer compared with the Papanicolaou (Pap) test, a cytology-based screening method cervical cancer compared with a cytology-based test. The results of the individual trials showed that women with cytology in detecting high-grade cervical lesion precursors, classified as cervical intraepithelial

Serfling, Robert

294

Transforming activity of human papillomavirus type 16 DNA sequence in a cervical cancer.  

PubMed Central

A genomic DNA sample from cervical cancer tissue, containing human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16, was found to induce malignant transformation of NIH 3T3 cells when it was tested by transfection assays using the calcium phosphate coprecipitation technique. The primary and secondary transformants contained the HPV type 16 DNA sequences and human specific Alu family sequences. To the best of our knowledge, it has not been reported previously that HPV type 16 DNA sequences in total genomic DNA from a cervical cancer have transforming activity. Images PMID:3008153

Tsunokawa, Y; Takebe, N; Kasamatsu, T; Terada, M; Sugimura, T

1986-01-01

295

[A tumor-associated antigen of cervical cancer].  

PubMed

The tumour-associated antigen was identified with the aid of antisera obtained from rabbits immunized with 3 M KCl extract of pool human cervical carcinoma cells. The antigen was found in 92.5% specimens of human cervical squamous cell carcinoma, in 4.7% specimens of other localization of the tumours. The antigen was absent from sets of normal human tissues. The tumour-associated antigen was not identical with CEA, alpha-fetoprotein, SP1, EPA and lactoferrin and it was localized in cytoplasm of cervical carcinoma cells. PMID:3084195

Ermoshina, N V; Ievleva, E S; Ageenko, A I; Kogan, I Ia; Tsukerman, B G

1986-01-01

296

Preventing cervical cancer : overviews of the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program and 2 US immunization programs.  

PubMed

Three federal programs with the potential to reduce cervical cancer incidence, morbidity, and mortality, especially among underserved populations, are administered by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC): the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP), the Vaccines for Children (VFC) Program, and the Section 317 immunization grant program. The NBCCEDP provides breast and cervical cancer screening and diagnostic services to uninsured and underinsured women. The VFC program and the Section 317 immunization grant program provide vaccines, including human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, to targeted populations at no cost for these vaccines. This article describes the programs, their histories, populations served, services offered, and roles in preventing cervical cancer through HPV vaccination and cervical cancer screening. Potential long-term reduction in healthcare costs resulting from HPV vaccination is also discussed. As an example of an initiative to vaccinate uninsured women aged 19-26 years through a cancer services program, a state-based effort that was recently launched in New York, is highlighted. PMID:18980296

Khan, Kris; Curtis, C Robinette; Ekwueme, Donatus U; Stokley, Shannon; Walker, Chastity; Roland, Katherine; Benard, Vicki; Saraiya, Mona

2008-11-15

297

MHC class I-related chain A and B ligands are differentially expressed in human cervical cancer cell lines  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Natural killer (NK) cells are an important resource of the innate immune system directly involved in the spontaneous recognition\\u000a and lysis of virus-infected and tumor cells. An exquisite balance of inhibitory and activating receptors tightly controls\\u000a the NK cell activity. At present, one of the best-characterized activating receptors is NKG2D, which promotes the NK-mediated\\u000a lysis of target cells by binding

Susana del Toro-Arreola; Naela Arreygue-Garcia; Adriana Aguilar-Lemarroy; Angel Cid-Arregui; Miriam Jimenez-Perez; Jesse Haramati; Patricio Barros-Nuñez; Oscar Gonzalez-Ramella; Alicia del Toro-Arreola; Pablo Ortiz-Lazareno; Georgina Hernandez-Flores; Alejandro Bravo-Cuellar; Adrian Daneri-Navarro; Luis F Jave-Suarez

2011-01-01

298

Variations in survival for invasive cervical cancer among European women, 1978–89  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: To analyze cervical cancer survival trends in 10 European countries using models that estimate the proportion of cured patients (having the same life expectancy as the general population) and the survival of fatal cases (who die from cervical cancer).

Gemma Gatta; Riccardo Capocaccia; Timo Hakulinen; Milena Sant; Arduino Verdecchia; Gianni De Angelis; Andrea Micheli; Franco Berrino

1999-01-01

299

Human papillomavirus types in invasive cervical cancer worldwide: a meta-analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigated regional variations in the contribution made by different human papilloma (HPV) types to invasive cervical cancer (ICC). A total of 85 studies using polymerase chain reaction to estimate HPV prevalence in ICC were identified. Data on HPV prevalence were extracted separately for squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and for adeno- and adenosquamous-carcinoma (ADC). A total of 10 058

GM Clifford; JS Smith; M Plummer; N Munoz; S Franceschi

2003-01-01

300

From cancer to sexually transmitted infection: Explorations of social stigma among cervical cancer survivors  

Microsoft Academic Search

This research project aims to examine the idea of stigma attached to cervical cancer in light of its association with HPV, a sexually transmitted infection (STI). The public recognition of this relationship appears to be increasing due to the current media attention surrounding HPV's causative role in the development of cervical cancer, and the newly-released HPV vaccine. Thus, this study

Karen E Dyer

2008-01-01

301

The IARC Commitment to Cancer Prevention: The Example of Papillomavirus and Cervical Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Every year approximately half a million women worldwide develop cervical cancer (CC) of whom 80% live in poor countries where population-based screening programmes are virtually non-existent. The role of sexually transmitted agents in the aetiology of cervical cancer has been suspected for more than a century, but knowledge in this field has rapidly expanded only in the last 20 years,

Silvia Franceschi

302

CD38 is highly expressed and affects the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway in cervical cancer.  

PubMed

Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer and the fifth most deadly malignancy in females worldwide, affecting 500,000 individuals each year. It is the leading cause of cancer mortality among women in developing countries. Dysregulated activation of genes, such as CD44, SOX9 and SKP2, plays a role in cervical cancer. CD38 is known to be involved in activities typical of cell surface receptors, such as signaling for activation and proliferation events and heterotypic cell adhesion. CD38 contributes to disease progression and relapse in certain tumors, such as acute myeloid and chronic lymphocytic leukemia. To the best of our knowledge, there is currently no report on the relationship between CD38 and cervical cancer. Using qPCR, immunohistochemistry, and western blot analysis, the expression levels of CD38 were investigated and found to be upregulated in cervical cancer. CD38 was correlated with dysregulation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway in cervical cancer tissues in vitro. At the same time, CD38 overexpression affected the expression of PI3K, Akt, MDM2 and p53 in vivo. The results of the present study suggested that CD38 is highly expressed in cervical carcinoma tissues and play an important role in dysregulation of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. PMID:25310288

Liao, Shan; Xiao, Songshu; Zhu, Guangchao; Zheng, Danwei; He, Junyu; Pei, Zhen; Li, Guiyuan; Zhou, Yanhong

2014-12-01

303

Multistep Model of Cervical Cancer: Participation of miRNAs and Coding Genes  

PubMed Central

Aberrant miRNA expression is well recognized as an important step in the development of cancer. Close to 70 microRNAs (miRNAs) have been implicated in cervical cancer up to now, nevertheless it is unknown if aberrant miRNA expression causes the onset of cervical cancer. One of the best ways to address this issue is through a multistep model of carcinogenesis. In the progression of cervical cancer there are three well-established steps to reach cancer that we used in the model proposed here. The first step of the model comprises the gene changes that occur in normal cells to be transformed into immortal cells (CIN 1), the second comprises immortal cell changes to tumorigenic cells (CIN 2), the third step includes cell changes to increase tumorigenic capacity (CIN 3), and the final step covers tumorigenic changes to carcinogenic cells. Altered miRNAs and their target genes are located in each one of the four steps of the multistep model of carcinogenesis. miRNA expression has shown discrepancies in different works; therefore, in this model we include miRNAs recording similar results in at least two studies. The present model is a useful insight into studying potential prognostic, diagnostic, and therapeutic miRNAs. PMID:25192291

Lopez, Angelica Judith Granados; Lopez, Jesus Adrian

2014-01-01

304

Rotating-shield brachytherapy for cervical cancer  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this treatment planning study, the potential benefits of a rotating shield brachytherapy (RSBT) technique based on a partially-shielded electronic brachytherapy source were assessed for treating cervical cancer. Conventional intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT), intracavitary plus supplementary interstitial (IS+ICBT), and RSBT treatment plans for azimuthal emission angles of 180° (RSBT-180) and 45° (RSBT-45) were generated for five patients. For each patient, high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2) (?/? = 10 Gy) was escalated until bladder, rectum, or sigmoid colon tolerance EQD2 values were reached. External beam radiotherapy dose (1.8 Gy × 25) was accounted for, and brachytherapy was assumed to have been delivered in 5 fractions. IS+ICBT provided a greater HR-CTV D90 (minimum EQD2 to the hottest 90%) than ICBT. D90 was greater for RSBT-45 than IS+ICBT for all five patients, and greater for RSBT-180 than IS+ICBT for two patients. When the RSBT-45/180 plan with the lowest HR-CTV D90 that was greater than the D90 the ICBT or IS+ICBT plan was selected, the average (range) of D90 increases for RSBT over ICBT and IS+ICBT were 16.2 (6.3-27.2)and 8.5 (0.03-20.16) Gy, respectively. The average (range) treatment time increase per fraction of RSBT was 34.56 (3.68-70.41) min over ICBT and 34.59 (3.57-70.13) min over IS+ICBT. RSBT can increase D90 over ICBT and IS+ICBT without compromising organ-at-risk sparing. The D90 and treatment time improvements from RSBT depend on the patient and shield emission angle.

Yang, Wenjun; Kim, Yusung; Wu, Xiaodong; Song, Qi; Liu, Yunlong; Bhatia, Sudershan K.; Sun, Wenqing; Flynn, Ryan T.

2013-06-01

305

Preprocessing: A Step in Automating Early Detection of Cervical Cancer  

E-print Network

Uterine Cervical Cancer is one of the most common forms of cancer in women worldwide. Most cases of cervical cancer can be prevented through screening programs aimed at detecting precancerous lesions. During Digital Colposcopy, colposcopic images or cervigrams are acquired in raw form. They contain specular reflections which appear as bright spots heavily saturated with white light and occur due to the presence of moisture on the uneven cervix surface and. The cervix region occupies about half of the raw cervigram image. Other parts of the image contain irrelevant information, such as equipment, frames, text and non-cervix tissues. This irrelevant information can confuse automatic identification of the tissues within the cervix. Therefore we focus on the cervical borders, so that we have a geometric boundary on the relevant image area. Our novel technique eliminates the SR, identifies the region of interest and makes the cervigram ready for segmentation algorithms.

Das, Abhishek; Bhattacharyya, Debasis

2011-01-01

306

Preprocessing for Automating Early Detection of Cervical Cancer  

E-print Network

Uterine Cervical Cancer is one of the most common forms of cancer in women worldwide. Most cases of cervical cancer can be prevented through screening programs aimed at detecting precancerous lesions. During Digital Colposcopy, colposcopic images or cervigrams are acquired in raw form. They contain specular reflections which appear as bright spots heavily saturated with white light and occur due to the presence of moisture on the uneven cervix surface and. The cervix region occupies about half of the raw cervigram image. Other parts of the image contain irrelevant information, such as equipment, frames, text and non-cervix tissues. This irrelevant information can confuse automatic identification of the tissues within the cervix. Therefore we focus on the cervical borders, so that we have a geometric boundary on the relevant image area. Our novel technique eliminates the SR, identifies the region of interest and makes the cervigram ready for segmentation algorithms.

Das, Abhishek; Bhattacharyya, Debasis

2011-01-01

307

Understanding the Disparities in Cervical Cancer Screening for Economically Disadvantaged Women  

E-print Network

cervical cancer screening among underserved Hispanic and African-American women.cervical cancer screening among low-income HIV- positive African American women.cervical cancer screening [26, 237, 258-260]. Datta and colleagues used 1995 survey of African American women

Gatchell, Melissa Sue

2012-01-01

308

Clinical study of quantitative diagnosis of early cervical cancer based on the classification of acetowhitening  

E-print Network

Clinical study of quantitative diagnosis of early cervical cancer based on the classification for the diagnosis of early cervical cancer is evaluated in a clinical study. This imaging technology based on 3-D and diagnostic information for early detection of cervical cancer. © 2010 Society of Photo

Qu, Jianan

309

Women Be Healthy: Increasing Cervical and Breast Cancer Screening for Women with Intellectual Disabilities  

E-print Network

March 2012 Women Be Healthy: Increasing Cervical and Breast Cancer Screening for Women with Intellectual Disabilities Issue Cervical and breast cancer are both treatable if detected early. However, women with intellectual disabilities receive screening for cervical and breast cancer at lower rates than their peers

Fraden, Seth

310

Ensembles of Radial Basis Function Networks for Spectroscopic Detection of Cervical Pre-Cancer  

E-print Network

Ensembles of Radial Basis Function Networks for Spectroscopic Detection of Cervical Pre-Cancer on Biomedical Engineering, Vol. 45, No. 8, pp. 953-961, 1998 Abstract The mortality related to cervical cancer algorithms. 1 Introduction Cervical carcinoma is the second most common cancer in women worldwide, exceeded

Tumer, Kagan

311

Effective screening programmes for cervical cancer in low- and middle-income developing countries  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cervical cancer is an important public health problem among adult women in developing countries in South and Central America, sub-Saharan Africa, and south and south-east Asia. Frequently repeated cytology screening programmes — either organized or opportunistic — have led to a large decline in cervical cancer incidence and mortality in developed countries. In contrast, cervical cancer remains largely uncontrolled in

Rengaswamy Sankaranarayanan; Atul Madhukar Budukh; Rajamanickam Rajkumar

2001-01-01

312

Cervical Cancer Screening Interventions for U.S. Latinas: A Systematic Review  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The high cervical cancer mortality rate among Latinas compared with other ethnic groups in the United States is of major concern. Latina women are almost twice as likely to die from cervical cancer as non-Hispanic white women. To improve Latina cervical cancer screening rates, interventions have been developed and tested. This systematic review…

Corcoran, Jacqueline; Dattalo, Patrick; Crowley, Meghan

2012-01-01

313

Linking Cervical Cancer to the Human Papillomavirus: Findings from a Qualitative Study with Mexican Women  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cervical cancer is an important cause of mortality for women in developing countries. Researchers have established a link between cervical cancer and the human papillomavirus (HPV). We explored Mexican women's beliefs about cervical cancer and sexually transmitted infections (STIs), including HPV, to better understand the social implications of this linkage. We conducted eight focus groups with middle-aged and young women

Sandra G. Garcia; Davida Becker; Carrie Tatum; Tess Aldrich; Araceli Fernández-c

2007-01-01

314

College Students' Knowledge of the Connection between HPV and Cervical Cancer.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Investigated college students' knowledge of the relationship between human papillomavirus (HPV) and cervical cancer. Few students knew what HPV was. Most of the females who had been screened knew that a Pap smear could detect HPV and cervical cancer. Over half of the students did not realize the link between HPV and cervical cancer. Students…

Applegate, Trent E.; Jones, Iesha K.

2002-01-01

315

Methylomics analysis identifies epigenetically silenced genes and implies an activation of ?-catenin signaling in cervical cancer.  

PubMed

Using DNA methylation biomarkers in cancer detection is a potential direction in clinical testing. Some methylated genes have been proposed for cervical cancer detection; however, more reliable methylation markers are needed. To identify new hypermethylated genes in the discovery phase, we compared the methylome between a pool of DNA from normal cervical epithelium (n?=?19) and a pool of DNA from cervical cancer tissues (n?=?38) using a methylation bead array. We integrated the differentially methylated genes with public gene expression databases, which resulted in 91 candidate genes. Based on gene expression after demethylation treatment in cell lines, we confirmed 61 genes for further validation. In the validation phase, quantitative MSP and bisulfite pyrosequencing were used to examine their methylation level in an independent set of clinical samples. Fourteen genes, including ADRA1D, AJAP1, COL6A2, EDN3, EPO, HS3ST2, MAGI2, POU4F3, PTGDR, SOX8, SOX17, ST6GAL2, SYT9, and ZNF614, were significantly hypermethylated in CIN3+ lesions. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of POU4F3 for detecting CIN3+ lesions were 0.88, 0.82, and 0.85, respectively. A bioinformatics function analysis revealed that AJAP1, EDN3, EPO, MAGI2, and SOX17 were potentially implicated in ?-catenin signaling, suggesting the epigenetic dysregulation of this signaling pathway during cervical cancer development. The concurrent methylation of multiple genes in cancers and in subsets of precancerous lesions suggests the presence of a driver of methylation phenotype in cervical carcinogenesis. Further validation of these new genes as biomarkers for cervical cancer screening in a larger population-based study is warranted. PMID:24310984

Chen, Yu-Chih; Huang, Rui-Lan; Huang, Yung-Kai; Liao, Yu-Ping; Su, Po-Hsuan; Wang, Hui-Chen; Chang, Cheng-Chang; Lin, Ya-Wen; Yu, Mu-Hsien; Chu, Tang-Yuan; Lai, Hung-Cheng

2014-07-01

316

Structure and transcription of human papillomavirus sequences in cervical carcinoma cells  

Microsoft Academic Search

DNA of human papillomavirus (HPV) types 16 and 18 has been found closely associated with human genital cancer1,2, supporting the concept that members of this virus group are key factors in the aetiology of genital cancer3. HPV 18 DNA sequences were also detected in cell lines derived from cervical cancer2. We have now analysed these cell lines, HeLa, C4-1 and

Elisabeth Schwarz; Ulrich Karl Freese; Lutz Gissmann; Wolfgang Mayer; Birgit Roggenbuck; Armin Stremlau; Harald Zur Hausen

1985-01-01

317

Brachytherapy in the treatment of cervical cancer: a review  

PubMed Central

Dramatic advances have been made in brachytherapy for cervical cancer. Radiation treatment planning has evolved from two-dimensional to three-dimensional, incorporating magnetic resonance imaging and/or computed tomography into the treatment paradigm. This allows for better delineation and coverage of the tumor, as well as improved avoidance of surrounding organs. Consequently, advanced brachytherapy can achieve very high rates of local control with a reduction in morbidity, compared with historic approaches. This review provides an overview of state-of-the-art gynecologic brachytherapy, with a focus on recent advances and their implications for women with cervical cancer. PMID:24920937

Banerjee, Robyn; Kamrava, Mitchell

2014-01-01

318

Phase Ib Study of BKM120 With Cisplatin and XRT in High Risk Locally Advanced Squamous Cell Cancer of Head and Neck  

ClinicalTrials.gov

Carcinoma, Squamous Cell of Head and Neck; HPV Positive Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Hypopharyngeal Cancer; Early Invasive Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Carcinoma of Larynx; Cancer of Nasopharynx

2014-10-06

319

Discovery of DNA methylation markers in cervical cancer using relaxation ranking  

PubMed Central

Background To discover cancer specific DNA methylation markers, large-scale screening methods are widely used. The pharmacological unmasking expression microarray approach is an elegant method to enrich for genes that are silenced and re-expressed during functional reversal of DNA methylation upon treatment with demethylation agents. However, such experiments are performed in in vitro (cancer) cell lines, mostly with poor relevance when extrapolating to primary cancers. To overcome this problem, we incorporated data from primary cancer samples in the experimental design. A strategy to combine and rank data from these different data sources is essential to minimize the experimental work in the validation steps. Aim To apply a new relaxation ranking algorithm to enrich DNA methylation markers in cervical cancer. Results The application of a new sorting methodology allowed us to sort high-throughput microarray data from both cervical cancer cell lines and primary cervical cancer samples. The performance of the sorting was analyzed in silico. Pathway and gene ontology analysis was performed on the top-selection and gives a strong indication that the ranking methodology is able to enrich towards genes that might be methylated. Terms like regulation of progression through cell cycle, positive regulation of programmed cell death as well as organ development and embryonic development are overrepresented. Combined with the highly enriched number of imprinted and X-chromosome located genes, and increased prevalence of known methylation markers selected from cervical (the highest-ranking known gene is CCNA1) as well as from other cancer types, the use of the ranking algorithm seems to be powerful in enriching towards methylated genes. Verification of the DNA methylation state of the 10 highest-ranking genes revealed that 7/9 (78%) gene promoters showed DNA methylation in cervical carcinomas. Of these 7 genes, 3 (SST, HTRA3 and NPTX1) are not methylated in normal cervix tissue. Conclusion The application of this new relaxation ranking methodology allowed us to significantly enrich towards methylation genes in cancer. This enrichment is both shown in silico and by experimental validation, and revealed novel methylation markers as proof-of-concept that might be useful in early cancer detection in cervical scrapings. PMID:19025626

Ongenaert, Maté; Wisman, G Bea A; Volders, Haukeline H; Koning, Alice J; Zee, Ate GJ van der; van Criekinge, Wim; Schuuring, Ed

2008-01-01

320

Cervical screening and cervical cancer death among older women: a population-based, case-control study.  

PubMed

Recent research suggests that cervical screening of older women is associated with a considerable decrease in cervical cancer incidence. We sought to quantify the efficacy of cervical cytology screening to reduce death from this disease. Among enrollees of 2 US health plans, we compared Papanicolaou smear screening histories of women aged 55-79 years who died of cervical cancer during 1980-2010 (cases) to those of women at risk of cervical cancer (controls). Controls were matched 2:1 to cases on health plan, age, and enrollment duration. Cytology screening during the detectable preclinical phase, estimated as the 5-7 years before diagnosis during which cervical neoplasia is asymptomatic but cytologically detectable, was ascertained from medical records. A total of 39 cases and 80 controls were eligible. The odds ratio of cervical cancer death associated with screening during the presumed detectable preclinical phase was 0.26 (95% confidence interval: 0.10, 0.63) after adjustment for matching characteristics, smoking, marital status, and race/ethnicity using logistic regression. We estimate that cervical cytology screening of all women aged 55-79 years in the United States could avert 630 deaths annually. These results provide a minimum estimate of the efficacy of human papillomavirus DNA screening-a more sensitive test-to reduce cervical cancer death among older women. PMID:24685531

Rustagi, Alison S; Kamineni, Aruna; Weinmann, Sheila; Reed, Susan D; Newcomb, Polly; Weiss, Noel S

2014-05-01

321

Significance of SHP-1 and SHP-2 Expression in Human Papillomavirus Infected Condyloma acuminatum and Cervical Cancer  

PubMed Central

Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are a group of DNA viruses that infect the skin and mucous membranes. Type HPV6/11 is closely related to Condyloma acuminatum, while HPV16/18 is the principal cause of cervical cancer. In this study, we examined the expression of protein tyrosine phosphatases SHP-1 and SHP-2 in Condyloma acuminatum, cervical cancer and the relationship between SHP-1/SHP2 expression and HPV infection. Forty Condyloma acuminatum cases, 20 cervical cancer cases and 20 normal human foreskins were examined for HPV infection by in situ hybridization and the expression of SHP-1 and SHP-2 were examined by immunohistochemistry. Results demonstrated that positive expression rates of HPV6/11, HPV16/18, and HPV31/33 were 98%, 10%, and 7.5% in Condyloma acuminatum, 10%, 85%, and 25% in cervical cancer. Only one normal foreskin demonstrated positive staining for HPV16/18. Positive expression rates of SHP-1 and SHP-2 were 80% and 85% in Condyloma acuminatum, 85% and 90% in cervical cancer. The SHP-1 and SHP-2 expressions were mainly distributed in the prickle layer of Condyloma acuminatum and were diffusely distributed in cervical cancer cells. Only 35% and 30% of foreskins demonstrated weak staining in the basal layer cells. There were statistically significant correlations among the infection of HPV and the expression of SHP-1 and SHP-2 in both Condyloma acuminatum and cervical cancer (P<0.05). SHP-1 expression has a positive correlation with SHP-2 expression. Our results demonstrate putative roles of SHP-1 and SHP-2 in the progression of both Condyloma acuminatum and cervical cancer after HPV infection. PMID:18543080

Tao, Xiao-hua; Shen, Jian-gen; Pan, Wei-li; Dong, Yu-e; Meng, Qun; Honn, Kenneth V.

2014-01-01

322

Cervical cancer: incidence and survival in migrants within Spain.  

PubMed Central

STUDY OBJECTIVE--This study examined the incidence of cervical cancer and survival rates according to migrant experience of women from different regions of Spain to Girona, Catalonia (Spain). DESIGN--Using data from the population based cancer registry of Girona for the period 1980-89, crude and age adjusted incidence rates were calculated for local-born and first generation migrants from other Spanish regions. The age standardised rate ratio (SRR) was calculated and Cox's regression model was used to adjust survival according to migrant status for age and stage at diagnosis. MAIN RESULTS--The incidence of cervical cancer was significantly higher in first generation Spanish migrants compared with locally born women (SRR: 2.02; 95% CI 1.40:2.92). The stage at diagnosis was more advanced among migrants. Survival probability was significantly associated with stage at diagnosis, but age and region of birth were not. CONCLUSIONS--Migrants from the southern Spanish regions show a twofold excess in the incidence of cervical cancer compared with the Girona-born female population. Cases of cervical cancer in migrants are diagnosed at a more advanced stage and as a consequence have a poorer prognosis. PMID:7798043

Borràs, J M; Sánchez, V; Moreno, V; Izquierdo, A; Viladiu, P

1995-01-01

323

Automated Recommendation for Cervical Cancer Screening and Surveillance  

PubMed Central

Because of the complexity of cervical cancer prevention guidelines, clinicians often fail to follow best-practice recommendations. Moreover, existing clinical decision support (CDS) systems generally recommend a cervical cytology every three years for all female patients, which is inappropriate for patients with abnormal findings that require surveillance at shorter intervals. To address this problem, we developed a decision tree-based CDS system that integrates national guidelines to provide comprehensive guidance to clinicians. Validation was performed in several iterations by comparing recommendations generated by the system with those of clinicians for 333 patients. The CDS system extracted relevant patient information from the electronic health record and applied the guideline model with an overall accuracy of 87%. Providers without CDS assistance needed an average of 1 minute 39 seconds to decide on recommendations for management of abnormal findings. Overall, our work demonstrates the feasibility and potential utility of automated recommendation system for cervical cancer screening and surveillance. PMID:25368505

Wagholikar, Kavishwar B; MacLaughlin, Kathy L; Casey, Petra M; Kastner, Thomas M; Henry, Michael R; Hankey, Ronald A; Peters, Steve G; Greenes, Robert A; Chute, Christopher G; Liu, Hongfang; Chaudhry, Rajeev

2014-01-01

324

Immunologic treatments for precancerous lesions and uterine cervical cancer.  

PubMed

Development of HPV-associated cancers not only depends on efficient negative regulation of cell cycle control that supports the accumulation of genetic damage, but also relies on immune evasion that enable the virus to go undetected for long periods of time. In this way, HPV-related tumors usually present MHC class I down-regulation, impaired antigen-processing ability, avoidance of T-cell mediated killing, increased immunosuppression due to Treg infiltration and secrete immunosuppressive cytokines. Thus, these are the main obstacles that immunotherapy has to face in the treatment of HPV-related pathologies where a number of different strategies have been developed to overcome them including new adjuvants. Although antigen-specific immunotherapy induced by therapeutic HPV vaccines was proved extremely efficacious in pre-clinical models, its progression through clinical trials suffered poor responses in the initial trials. Later attempts seem to have been more promising, particularly against the well-defined precursors of cervical, anal or vulvar cancer, where the local immunosuppressive milieu is less active. This review focuses on the advances made in these fields, highlighting several new technologies (such as mRNA vaccine, plant-derived vaccine). The most promising immunotherapies used in clinical trials are also summarized, along with integrated strategies, particularly promising in controlling tumor metastasis and in eliminating cancer cells altogether.After the early promising clinical results, the development of therapeutic HPV vaccines need to be implemented and applied to the users in order to eradicate HPV-associated malignancies, eradicating existing perception (after the effectiveness of commercial preventive vaccines) that we have already solved the problem. PMID:24667138

Vici, Patrizia; Mariani, Luciano; Pizzuti, Laura; Sergi, Domenico; Di Lauro, Luigi; Vizza, Enrico; Tomao, Federica; Tomao, Silverio; Cavallotti, Claudia; Paolini, Francesca; Venuti, Aldo

2014-01-01

325

Immunologic treatments for precancerous lesions and uterine cervical cancer  

PubMed Central

Development of HPV-associated cancers not only depends on efficient negative regulation of cell cycle control that supports the accumulation of genetic damage, but also relies on immune evasion that enable the virus to go undetected for long periods of time. In this way, HPV-related tumors usually present MHC class I down-regulation, impaired antigen-processing ability, avoidance of T-cell mediated killing, increased immunosuppression due to Treg infiltration and secrete immunosuppressive cytokines. Thus, these are the main obstacles that immunotherapy has to face in the treatment of HPV-related pathologies where a number of different strategies have been developed to overcome them including new adjuvants. Although antigen-specific immunotherapy induced by therapeutic HPV vaccines was proved extremely efficacious in pre-clinical models, its progression through clinical trials suffered poor responses in the initial trials. Later attempts seem to have been more promising, particularly against the well-defined precursors of cervical, anal or vulvar cancer, where the local immunosuppressive milieu is less active. This review focuses on the advances made in these fields, highlighting several new technologies (such as mRNA vaccine, plant-derived vaccine). The most promising immunotherapies used in clinical trials are also summarized, along with integrated strategies, particularly promising in controlling tumor metastasis and in eliminating cancer cells altogether. After the early promising clinical results, the development of therapeutic HPV vaccines need to be implemented and applied to the users in order to eradicate HPV-associated malignancies, eradicating existing perception (after the effectiveness of commercial preventive vaccines) that we have already solved the problem. PMID:24667138

2014-01-01

326

Concurrent chemotherapy and radiation for advanced cervical cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

While surgery remains the primary mode of treat- ment for most patients with early stage cervical cancer, efforts to improve survival among women with advanced stage di- sease have turned to the combination of radiation and chemo- therapy. To date, studies investigating the use of neoadjuvant chemotherapy prior to radiation have been disappointing; although tumor volume has been noted to

MARC J. KLEINBERG; J. MICHAEL STRAUGHN JR.; RONALD D. ALVAREZ

327

Total Microlaparoscopic Radical Hysterectomy in Early Cervical Cancer  

PubMed Central

Background and Objective: In less than 2 decades, laparoscopy has contributed to modification in the management of early cervical cancer patients, and all comparisons between open and laparoscopic-based radical operations showed an identical oncological outcome. The aim of this study is to describe surgical instrumentations and technique to perform total microlaparoscopy radical hysterectomy in early cervical cancer patients and report our preliminary results in terms of operative time and perioperative outcomes. Methods: Between January 1, 2012, and March 25, 2012, 4 consecutive early cervical cancer patients were enrolled in this study. Results: We performed 3 type B2 and 1 type C1-B2 total microlaparoscopy radical hysterectomy, and in all cases concomitant bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy were carried out. Median operative time was 165 minutes (range: 155 to 215) (mean: 186), and median estimated blood loss was 30 mL (range: 20 to 50). Median number of pelvic lymph nodes removed was 12 (range: 11 to 15). All procedures were completed without 5-mm port insertion and without conversion. No intraoperative or early postoperative complications were reported. Conclusions: This report suggests a role of microlaparoscopy in the surgical management of early cervical cancer with adequate oncological results, superimposable operative time, and perioperative outcomes with respect to standard laparoscopy. PMID:23743381

Gallotta, Valerio; Fagotti, Anna; Rossitto, Cristiano; Piovano, Elisa; Scambia, Giovanni

2013-01-01

328

Cervical Cancer: A Review of the Psychosocial Factors Following Treatment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Cervical cancer is a diagnosis that has a profound psychosocial impact, constituting a physical and emotional crisis for patients as well as family. In general, research indicates that the choice of treatment and the stage of the disease are instrumental in determining the psychosocial adjustment. Disruptions are likely to occur in self-esteem,…

Gilliland, Kevin Clark

329

Acceptability of Cervical Cancer Screening in Rural Mozambique  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In Zambezia province, Mozambique, cervical cancer (CC) screening was introduced to rural communities in 2010. Our study sought to determine whether women would accept screening via pelvic examination and visual inspection with acetic acid (VIA) at two clinical sites near the onset of a new CC screening program. A cross-sectional descriptive study…

Audet, Carolyn M.; Matos, Carla Silva; Blevins, Meridith; Cardoso, Aventina; Moon, Troy D.; Sidat, Mohsin

2012-01-01

330

HPV prevalence and genetic predisposition to cervical cancer in Saudi Arabia  

PubMed Central

Background Cervical cancer incidence is low in Saudi Arabian women, suggesting low prevalence to HPV infection due to environmental, cultural and genetic differences. Therefore, we investigated HPV prevalence and genotype distribution in cervical cancer as well as the association with 9 genetic single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs): CDKN1A (p21) C31A, TP53 C72G, ATM G1853A, HDM2 promoter T309G, HDM2 A110G, LIG4 A591G, XRCC1 G399A, XRCC3 C241T and TGF?1 T10C, presumed to predispose to cancer. Methods One hundred cervical cancer patients (90 squamous cell carcinoma and 10 adenocarcinoma) and 100 age/sex-matched controls were enrolled. SNPs were genotyped by direct sequencing and HPV was detected and typed in tumors using the HPV Linear Array Test. Results Eighty-two cases (82%) were positive for HPV sequences. Seven HPV genotypes were present as single infections (16, 18, 31, 45, 56, 59, 73) and five double infections (16/18, 16/39, 16/70, 35/52, 45/59) were detected. Most common genotypes were HPV-16 (71%), 31 (7%), and 18, 45, 73 (4% each). Only XRCC1 SNP was significantly associated with cervical cancer (P=0.02, OD=1.69; 95% CI= 1.06–2.66). However, nested analysis revealed a preponderance of HPV-positivity in patients harboring the presumed risk allele TP53 G (P=0.06). Both XRCC1 and TP53 SNPs tended to deviate from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE; P=0.03-0.07). Conclusions HPV prevalence (82%) in cervical cancer is at the lower range of the worldwide estimation (85 - 99%). While XRCC1 G399A was significantly associated with cervical cancer, TP53 G72C showed borderline association only in HPV-positive patients. Deviation from HWE in HPV-positive patients indicates co-selection, hence implicating the combination of HPV and SNPs in cancer predisposition. Thus, SNPs could be more relevant biomarkers of susceptibility to cervical cancer when associated with HPV infection. PMID:23642098

2013-01-01

331

Incidence of cervical dysplasia and cervical cancer in women living with HIV in Denmark: comparison with the general population  

PubMed Central

Introduction Women living with HIV (WLWH) are reportedly at increased risk of invasive cervical cancer (ICC). WLWH in Denmark attend the National ICC screening program less often than women in the general population. We aimed to estimate the incidence of cervical dysplasia and ICC in WLWH in Denmark. Methods We studied a nationwide cohort of WLWH and a cohort of age-matched females from the general population in the period 1999–2010. Pathology samples were obtained from The Danish Pathology Data Bank containing nationwide records of all pathology specimens. The cumulative incidence and hazard ratios (HRs) for time from inclusion to first cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN)/ICC and time from first normal cervical cytology to first CIN/ICC were estimated. Sensitivity analyses were performed to include prior screening outcome, screening intensity and treatment of CIN/ICC in the interpretation of results. Results We followed 1,143 WLWH and 17,145 controls with no prior history of ICC for 9,509 and 157,362 person-years. Compared to controls, the overall incidence of CIN1 or worse (CIN1+), CIN2+ and CIN3+ was higher in WLWH and predicted by young age and CD4 count <200 cells/µL. In women with normal baseline cytology, incidences of CIN1+ and CIN2+ were higher in WLWH. However, incidences were comparable between WLWH and controls adherent to the National ICC screening program. Conclusions Overall, WLWH develop more cervical disease than controls. However, incidences of CIN are comparable amongst WLWH and controls adherent to the National ICC screening program and with a normal baseline cytology. PMID:25394150

Thorsteinsson, Kristina; Ladelund, Steen; Jensen-Fangel, S?ren; Lea Katzenstein, Terese; Somuncu Johansen, Isik; Pedersen, Gitte; Junge, Jette; Helleberg, Marie; Storgaard, Merete; Obel, Niels; Lebech, Anne-Mette

2014-01-01

332

The potential of vibrational spectroscopy in the early detection of cervical cancer: an exciting emerging field  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The application of vibrational spectroscopy to disease diagnosis is a relatively new, rapidly evolving scientific field. Techniques such as Raman and infrared spectroscopy have shown great promise in this regard over the past number of years. This study directly compared Raman spectroscopy and synchrotron infrared (SR-IR) spectroscopy on parallel cervical cancer samples. Both frozen and dewaxed formalin fixed paraffin preserved tissue sections were examined. Both tissue types produced good quality Raman and SR-IR spectra, although the lesser processed, frozen tissue sections displayed the most detailed spectra. Spectroscopy was shown capable of discriminating between different cell types in normal cervical tissue. Spectra recorded from invasive carcinoma showed a marked difference from those recorded from normal cervical epithelial cells. Spectral differences identified with the onset of carcinogenesis include increased nucleic acid contributions and decreased glycogen levels. These investigations pave the way for an enlarged study into this exciting new diagnostic field.

O Faolain, Eoghan; Hunter, Mary B.; Byrne, Joe M.; Kelehan, Peter; Byrne, Hugh J.; Lyng, Fiona M.

2005-06-01

333

Conformal Brachytherapy Planning for Cervical Cancer Using Transabdominal Ultrasound  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: To determine if transabdominal ultrasound (US) can be used for conformal brachytherapy in cervical cancer patients. Materials and Methods: Seventy-one patients with locoregionally advanced cervix cancer treated with chemoradiation and brachytherapy were included in this study. The protocol consisted of US-assisted tandem insertion and conformal US-based planning. Orthogonal films for applicator reconstruction were also taken. A standard plan was

Sylvia Van Dyk; Kailash Narayan; Richard Fisher; David Bernshaw

2009-01-01

334

The Pre and Postoperative Value of Endocervical Curettage in the Detection of Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia and Invasive Cervical Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective.The study was conducted to evaluate the pre- and postoperative value of endocervical curettage (ECC) in the detection of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and invasive cervical cancer.Methods.Patients undergoing cervical conization were studied retrospectively to evaluate the correlation of grade of preoperative endocervical curettage and the grade of dysplasia in the conization specimen. The role of routine preoperative ECC in satisfactory and

Bruce A. Fine; Glen I. Feinstein; Vincenzo Sabella

1998-01-01

335

High expression of ezrin predicts poor prognosis in uterine cervical cancer  

PubMed Central

Background Ezrin, a member of the ezrin/radixin/moesin (ERM) protein family, plays a pivotal role in tumor invasion and metastasis. This study is aimed to investigate the clinicopathological significance of upregulated ezrin protein expression in uterine cervical cancers. Methods Immunohistochemical staining of ezrin protein was performed on uterine cervical cancer specimens from 235 patients. For comparison, 239 cases of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), 17 cases of cervical glandular intraepithelial neoplasia (CGIN) and 52 normal cervix samples were also included. qRT-PCR was performed on fresh tissues to detect ezrin mRNA expression levels. HPV infection statuses were genotyped by oligonucleotide microarray, and 10-year survival rates were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method for 109 cervical cancer patients. Results Apical membranous distribution of ezrin protein was only observed in normal cervical glands, while perinuclear staining was only observed in cervical cancers. Strong cytoplasmic and diffuse localization of ezrin were frequently seen in the cervical cancers compared with the normal counterparts. Furthermore, this strongly positive ezrin expression was significantly higher in cervical cancers than in CIN, CGIN, and normal cervical epithelia. Ezrin overexpression was closely related with poor differentiation, late stage, and lymph node metastasis. Additionally, ezrin overexpression was associated with lower 10-year survival rate for patients with early stage cervical cancer, but not for patients with advanced stage. Conclusions Aberrant localization and overexpression of ezrin might be an independent effective biomarker for prognostic evaluation of cervical cancers. PMID:24182314

2013-01-01

336

Cervical Cancer Cell Supernatants Induce a Phenotypic Switch from U937-Derived Macrophage-Activated M1 State into M2-Like Suppressor Phenotype with Change in Toll-Like Receptor Profile  

PubMed Central

Cervical cancer (CC) is the second most common cancer among women worldwide. Infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) is the main risk factor for developing CC. Macrophages are important immune effector cells; they can be differentiated into two phenotypes, identified as M1 (classically activated) and M2 (alternatively activated). Macrophage polarization exerts profound effects on the Toll-like receptor (TLR) profile. In this study, we evaluated whether the supernatant of human CC cells HeLa, SiHa, and C-33A induces a shift of M1 macrophage toward M2 macrophage in U937-derived macrophages. Results. The results showed that soluble factors secreted by CC cells induce a change in the immunophenotype of macrophages from macrophage M1 into macrophage M2. U937-derived macrophages M1 released proinflammatory cytokines and nitric oxide; however, when these cells were treated with the supernatant of CC cell lines, we observed a turnover of M1 toward M2. These cells increased CD163 and IL-10 expression. The expression of TLR-3, -7, and -9 is increased when the macrophages were treated with the supernatant of CC cells. Conclusions. Our result strongly suggests that CC cells may, through the secretion of soluble factors, induce a change of immunophenotype M1 into M2 macrophages. PMID:25309919

Sanchez-Reyes, Karina; Bravo-Cuellar, Alejandro; Hernandez-Flores, Georgina; Lerma-Diaz, Jose Manuel; Jave-Suarez, Luis Felipe; Gomez-Lomeli, Paulina; de Celis, Ruth; Aguilar-Lemarroy, Adriana; Dominguez-Rodriguez, Jorge Ramiro; Ortiz-Lazareno, Pablo Cesar

2014-01-01

337

Contribution of Diffusion-Weighted Imaging to Diagnosis and Staging of Cervical Cancer  

PubMed Central

Background: Cervical cancer is the second most common female malignancy worldwide. Although its incidence has decreased in developed countries due to screening with Papanicolaou test, it is still the leading cause of cancer-related female death in developing countries. Aims: The aim of this study was to determine whether the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measurements calculated from diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) images had any contribution in differentiation of normal cervical tissue from malignant lesions preoperatively, and whether there was a correlation between the mean ADC values and tumor type, grade, or stage in malignant lesions. Study Design: Case-control study. Methods: Mean ADC values in 25 patients who had cervical cancer proved histopathologically, and 20 patients with otherwise normal uterus were compared. Also in the study group, mean ADC values were compared between histopathologic subtypes, tumor grades, and stages. Results: In the study group the mean ADC values (0.96±0.15×10?3 mm2/s) were statistically lower than that of the control group (1.67±0.17×10?3 mm2/s) (p<0.05). According to histopathologic sub-types there was no significant difference between mean ADC values of squamous cell cancer and adenocarcinoma (0.95×10?3 mm2/s and 0.91×10?3 mm2/s, respectively) (p>0.05). There was also no significant difference between the mean ADC values of the tumor grades (p>0.05). The mean ADC values in early stage cervical cancer (0.86±0.05×10?3 mm2/s) were significantly lower than the mean ADC values in late stage disease (0.98±0.06×10?3 mm2/s) (p<0.05). Conclusion: ADC value measurements may provide useful information in diagnosis of cervical cancer as well as in preoperative assessment of the tumor stage. PMID:25207188

Demirbas, Tuna; Cimilli, Tan; Bayramoglu, Sibel; Guner, Nurten Turan; Hocaoglu, Elif; Inci, Ercan

2014-01-01

338

Potential opportunities to reduce cervical cancer by addressing risk factors other than HPV.  

PubMed

Cervical cancer is the most common cancer in developing world and 80% of global burden is reported from these nations. Human papillomavirus along with poverty, illiteracy/lower education level and standards, multi-parity, tobacco, malnutrition and poor genital hygiene may act synergistically to cause cervical cancer. Risk factor of cervical cancer may in itself be the reason for non-viability of cervical cancer vaccine program in this part of the world. Interventions to address these risk factors in addition to vaccination of girls before their sexual debut may hold promises of reducing the morbidity and mortality of female genital cancers. PMID:24167663

Kumar, Ramaiah Vinay; Bhasker, Suman

2013-10-01

339

Vascular endothelial growth factor C promotes cervical cancer metastasis via up-regulation and activation of RhoA/ROCK-2/moesin cascade  

PubMed Central

Background The elevated expression of vascular endothelial growth factor C (VEGF-C) is correlated with clinical cervical cancer metastasis and patient survival, which is interpreted by VEGF-C functions to stimulate angiogenesis and lymphatic genesis. However, the direct impact of VEGF-C on cervical cancer cell motility remains largely unknown. Methods In this study, we investigated the effects of VEGF-C on actin cytoskeleton remodeling and on cervical cancer cell migration and invasion and how the actin-regulatory protein, moesin regulated these effects through RhoA/ROCK-2 signaling pathway. Results On cervical carcinoma cell line SiHa cells, exposure of VEGF-C triggered remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton and the formation of membrane ruffles, which was required for cell movement. VEGF-C significantly enhanced SiHa cells horizontal migration and three-dimensional invasion into matrices. These actions were dependent on increased expression and phosphorylation of the actin-regulatory protein moesin and specific moesin siRNA severely impaired VEGF-C stimulated-cell migration. The extracellular small GTPase RhoA/ROCK-2 cascade mediated the increased moesin expression and phosphorylation, which was discovered by the use of Y-27632, a specific inhibitor of Rho kinase and by transfected constitutively active, dominant-negative RhoA as well as ROCK-2 SiRNA. Furthermore, in the surgical cervical specimen from the patients with FIGO stage at cervical intra-epithelial neoplasia and I-II cervical squamous cell carcinoma, the expression levels of moesin were found to be significantly correlated with tumor malignancy and metastasis. Conclusions These results implied that VEGF-C promoted cervical cancer metastasis by upregulation and activation of moesin protein through RhoA/ROCK-2 pathway. Our findings offer new insight into the role of VEGF-C on cervical cancer progression and may provide potential targets for cervical cancer therapy. PMID:20429915

2010-01-01

340

Increased Exosomal MicroRNA-21 and MicroRNA-146a Levels in the Cervicovaginal Lavage Specimens of Patients with Cervical Cancer  

PubMed Central

Well-run screening programs for cervical cancer in the population at risk have been shown to result in a sharp decrease in the incidence and mortality of cervical cancer in a number of large populations. Expression patterns of a recently identified biomarker family, microRNA, appear to be characteristic of tumor type and developmental origin. Several tumors have been reported to actively release exosomes carrying microRNAs. The present study has determined the association of microRNAs with cervical cancer-derived exosomes. The cervical cancer-derived exosomes were enriched in the cervicovaginal lavages specimens and the abundance of exosomes and exosomal microRNAs was detected by electron microscopy, western blot analysis, RT-qPCR and microRNA target reporter vector. The microRNA-21 and microRNA-146a, which were up-regulated in cervical cancer patients, were associated with the high levels of cervical cancer-derived exosomes. In conclusion, we demonstrated the abundance of exosomes in the cervicovaginal lavage specimens of women with cervical cancer. Furthermore, our results indicated that abnormally high levels of microRNA-21 and microRNA-146a existed in the cervical cancer-derived exosomes and the two microRNAs were functional in 293T cells. PMID:24406730

Liu, Jie; Sun, Hong; Wang, Xiaoli; Yu, Qun; Li, Shuhong; Yu, Xiaoyan; Gong, Wenwen

2014-01-01

341

Human papillomavirus type distribution in invasive cervical cancer and high-grade cervical lesions: A meta-analysis update  

Microsoft Academic Search

using the following MeSH terms: ''cervical cancer'', ''cervical intraepithelial neoplasia'', ''HPV'', ''human'', ''female'' and ''po- lymerase chain reaction''. Additional relevant references cited in retrieved articles were also evaluated. Included studies had to meet all of the following criteria: (i) use of polymerase chain reac- tion (PCR)-based technology to detect HPV DNA, (ii) inclusion of at least 20 cases of ICC

Jennifer S. Smith; Lisa Lindsay; Brooke Hoots; Jessica Keys; Silvia Franceschi; Rachel Winer; Gary M. Clifford

2007-01-01

342

The combination of the antiviral agent cidofovir and anti-EGFR antibody cetuximab exerts an antiproliferative effect on HPV-positive cervical cancer cell lines' in-vitro and in-vivo xenografts.  

PubMed

Cervical carcinoma remains a leading cause of female mortality worldwide and over 90% of these tumors contain the human papillomavirus (HPV) genome. Cross-talk between the epidermal growth factor receptor and HPV has been reported and is implicated in tumor progression. The combination of the antiviral compound cidofovir (Cd) with the monoclonal antibody antiepidermal growth factor receptor cetuximab (Cx) was evaluated. HPV-positive (HeLa and Me180) and HPV-negative (C33A, H460 and A549) human cancer cell lines were incubated with Cd (1-10 ?g/ml) and/or Cx (10 or 50 ?g/ml). The antitumor effect of the combination was assessed in vitro using a clonogenic survival assay, cell cycle analysis, and phospho-H2AX level. Tumor growth delay was assayed in vivo using xenograft models. A pan-genomic analysis was carried out to identify the genes expressed differentially in untreated HeLa HPV-positive cells versus cells treated by the Cd-Cx combination. The Cd-Cx combination inhibited proliferation in all the cell lines tested. The association of Cd and Cx exerted a synergistic activity on HPV-positive but not on HPV-negative cell lines. The combination delayed tumor growth of HPV-positive tumors in vivo; however, no efficacy was reported on HPV-negative C33A xenografts nor on cell lines treated by single-drug therapy. The combination induced an S-phase arrest associated with an enhanced level of the double-strand break in Me180 and HeLa cell lines. Gene profiling assays showed a significant differential modulation of genes in HeLa cell lines treated with the combination involving the EGR-1 transcription factor. The current data support a synergistic antiproliferative action of the Cd-Cx combination on HPV-related cervical tumors. PMID:23698251

Deberne, Mélanie; Levy, Antonin; Mondini, Michele; Dessen, Philippe; Vivet, Sonia; Supiramaniam, Ajitha; Vozenin, Marie-Catherine; Deutsch, Eric

2013-07-01

343

Cervical cancer screening in a rural population of Zimbabwe.  

PubMed

In Zimbabwe, where cervical cancer is the leading female malignancy, no systematic cervical screening program has been introduced. However, selective or opportunistic screening has been performed since the late 1980s at family planning clinics, various central and district government hospitals, and in private practice. The initial results of a cervical cancer screening program introduced in a district hospital (Salvation Army Howard Hospital) in the Chiweshe rural community in 1994 were investigated. The aim is for every mother to receive a Pap smear at her 6-week postpartum visit. By May 1996, a total of 419 Pap smears--representing less than 20% of the hospital's postnatal population--had been performed at this facility. If all postnatal visits included a Pap smear, there would have been 2500 screenings. 58.7% of smears were classified as inadequate, primarily because of the coexistence of sexually transmitted infections. A total of 173 slides (41.3%) were normal. Of the abnormal smears, 158 (37.7%) had inflammation. Abnormal cytology was reported in 65 cases (15.5%); 15 of these cases (3.6%) were high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions. Factors contributing to the low number of Pap smears actually performed included a high default rate for the postpartum visit, shortages of test-related supplies, and the rapid turnover of trained staff. Cervical cancer screening efforts in Zimbabwe require physical resources to perform smears, well-trained personnel, transport and laboratory services, and adequate patient follow up and treatment. Finally, since cervical cancer primarily affects older women, young women of reproductive age may not be the most appropriate target population for screening efforts. PMID:9509642

Thistle, P J; Chirenje, Z M

1997-09-01

344

The role of PET/CT in cervical cancer  

PubMed Central

In locally advanced cervical cancer, 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography – computed tomography (PET/CT) has become important in the initial evaluation of disease extent. It is superior to other imaging modalities for lymph node status and distant metastasis. PET-defined cervical tumor volume predicts progression-free and overall survival. Higher FDG uptake in both primary and regional lymph nodes is strongly predictive of worse outcome. FDG-PET is useful for assessing treatment response 3 months after completing concurrent chemo-radiotherapy (CRT) and predicting long-term survival, and in suspected disease recurrence. In the era of image-guided adaptive radiotherapy, accurately defining disease areas is critical to avoid irradiating normal tissue. Based on additional information provided by FDG-PET, radiation treatment volumes can be modified and higher doses to FDG-positive lymph nodes safely delivered. FDG-PET/CT has been used for image-guided brachytherapy of FDG-avid tumor volume, while respecting low doses to bladder and rectum. Despite survival improvements due to CRT in cervical cancer, disease recurrences continue to be a major problem. Biological rationale exists for combining novel non-cytotoxic agents with CRT, and drugs targeting specific molecular pathways are under clinical development. The integration of these targeted therapies in clinical trials, and the need for accurate predictors of radio-curability is essential. New molecular imaging tracers may help identifying more aggressive tumors. 64Cu-labeled diacetyl-di(N(4)-methylthiosemicarbazone) is taken up by hypoxic tissues, which may be valuable for prognostication and radiation treatment planning. PET/CT imaging with novel radiopharmaceuticals could further impact cervical cancer treatment as surrogate markers of drug activity at the tumor microenvironment level. The present article reviews the current and emerging role of PET/CT in the management of cervical cancer. PMID:23549376

Herrera, Fernanda G.; Prior, John O.

2013-01-01

345

miR-107 Activates ATR/Chk1 Pathway and Suppress Cervical Cancer Invasion by Targeting MCL1  

PubMed Central

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of single-stranded, non-coding RNAs of about 22 nucleotides in length. Increasing evidence implicates miRNAs may function as oncogenes or tumor suppressors. Here we showed that miR-107 directly targeted MCL1 and activated ATR/Chk1 pathway to inhibit proliferation, migration and invasiveness of cervical cancer cells. Moreover, we found that MCL1 was frequently up-regulated in cervical cancer, and knockdown of MCL1 markedly inhibited cancer cell proliferation, migration and invasion, whereas ectopic expression of MCL1 significantly enhances these properties. The restoration of MCL1 expression can counteract the effect of miR-107 on the cancer cells. Together, miR-107 is a new regulator of MCL1, and both miR-107 and MCL1 play important roles in the pathogenesis of cervical cancer. We have therefore identified a mechanism for ATR/Chk1 pathway which involves an increase in miR-107 leading to a decrease in MCL1. Correspondingly, our results revealed that miR-107 affected ATR/Chk1 signalling and gene expression, and implicated miR-107 as a therapeutic target in human cervical cancer. We also demonstrated that taxol attenuated migration and invasion in cervical cancer cells by activating the miR-107, in which miR-107 play an important role in regulating the expression of MCL1. Elucidation of this discovered MCL1 was directly regulated by miR-107 will greatly enhance our understanding of the mechanisms responsible for cervical cancer and will provide an additional arm for the development of anticancer therapies. PMID:25386925

Zhou, Chengyan; Li, Gang; Zhou, Jingjing; Han, Na; Liu, Zhihui; Yin, Jun

2014-01-01

346

Photodynamic effects of Photodithazine on cervical cancer model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been reported to be effective for treating various tumors and induce apoptosis in many tumor cells. In this study, we examined a biological significance of PDT with a new photosensitizer, Photodithazine, in a cervical cancer model using TC-1 cells. Also, to see the accumulation level of Photodithazine in tumours, we measured the concentration of Photodithazine at indicated time points in tumours of the mice injected with Photodithazine. When the tumor bearing mice were exposed to varied doses of Photodithazine with laser irradiation (300 J/cm2), retarded tumor growth was significant in mice treated with PDT, as compared to the control group. On the other hand, in the uptake of Photodithazine experiments showed that the highest accumulation of Photodithazine in tumors was shown at 0Â.5 hr after injection and its concentration was decreased. Photodithazine keeps high concentration values during the first day, Photodithazine showed a rapid clearance from sera as it is relatively long kept by tumor tissue. Taken together, we propose that PDT after the application of Photodithazine may be effective in the mice system.

Han, Sei Jun; Wen, Lan Ying; Bae, Su Mi; Hong, Young-Seon; Jang, Hong-Seok; Lee, Jeong Whan; Ahn, Woong Shick

2009-06-01

347

Expression profiling of cervical cancers in Indian women at different stages to identify gene signatures during progression of the disease  

PubMed Central

Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer among women worldwide, with developing countries accounting for >80% of the disease burden. Although in the West, active screening has been instrumental in reducing the incidence of cervical cancer, disease management is hampered due to lack of biomarkers for disease progression and defined therapeutic targets. Here we carried out gene expression profiling of 29 cervical cancer tissues from Indian women, spanning International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stages of the disease from early lesion (IA and IIA) to progressive stages (IIB and IIIA–B), and identified distinct gene expression signatures. Overall, metabolic pathways, pathways in cancer and signaling pathways were found to be significantly upregulated, while focal adhesion, cytokine–cytokine receptor interaction and WNT signaling were downregulated. Additionally, we identified candidate biomarkers of disease progression such as SPP1, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), STK17A, and DUSP1 among others that were validated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) in the samples used for microarray studies as well in an independent set of 34 additional samples. Integrative analysis of our results with other cervical cancer profiling studies could facilitate the development of multiplex diagnostic markers of cervical cancer progression. PMID:24403257

Thomas, Asha; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Kannan, Sadhana; Deodhar, Kedar; Shrivastava, Shyam K; Kumar-Sinha, Chandan; Mulherkar, Rita

2013-01-01

348

The Pima County Cervical Cancer Prevention Partnership (PCCCPP) The Pima County Cervical Cancer Prevention Partnership (PCCCPP) is a community-campus partnership  

E-print Network

facing Mexican-American women residing in Pima County with the mission of increasing knowledge cervical cancer disparities for Mexican American Women the REACH Pima Count Cervical Cancer Prevention data on abnormal pap results and improve outcomes for women with abnormal pap results. Marana Community

Arizona, University of

349

The Prognostic Value of TRAIL and its Death Receptors in Cervical Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Preclinical data indicate a synergistic effect on apoptosis between irradiation and recombinant human (rh) tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL), making the TRAIL death receptors (DR) interesting drug targets. The aim of our study was to analyze the expression of DR4, DR5, and TRAIL in cervical cancer and to determine their predictive and prognostic value. Methods and Materials: Tissue microarrays were constructed from tumors of 645 cervical cancer patients treated with surgery and/or (chemo-)radiation between 1980 and 2004. DR4, DR5, and TRAIL expression in the tumor was studied by immunohistochemistry and correlated to clinicopathological variables, response to radiotherapy, and disease-specific survival. Results: Cytoplasmatic DR4, DR5, and TRAIL immunostaining were observed in cervical tumors from 99%, 88%, and 81% of the patients, respectively. In patients treated primarily with radiotherapy, TRAIL-positive tumors less frequently obtained a pathological complete response than TRAIL-negative tumors (66.3% vs. 79.0 %; in multivariate analysis: odds ratio: 2.09, p {<=}0.05). DR4, DR5, and TRAIL expression were not prognostic for disease-specific survival. Conclusions: Immunostaining for DR4, DR5, and TRAIL is frequently observed in the cytoplasm of tumor cells in cervical cancer patients. Absence of TRAIL expression was associated with a higher pathological complete response rate to radiotherapy. DR4, DR5, or TRAIL were not prognostic for disease-specific survival.

Maduro, John H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Medical Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)], E-mail: j.h.maduro@rt.umcg.nl; Noordhuis, Maartje G.; Hoor, Klaske A. ten [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Pras, Elisabeth [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Arts, Henriette J.G.; Eijsink, Jasper J.H. [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Hollema, Harry [Department of Pathology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Mom, Constantijne H. [Department of Medical Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Gynecologic Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Jong, Steven de; Vries, Elisabeth G.E. de [Department of Medical Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Bock, Geertruida H. de [Department of Epidemiology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Zee, Ate G.J. van der [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

2009-09-01

350

From Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Detection to Cervical Cancer Prevention in Clinical Practice.  

PubMed

The newly gained knowledge of the viral etiology in cervical carcinogenesis has prompted industrial interests in developing virology-based tools for cervical cancer prevention. Due to the long incubation period from viral infection to developing an invasive cancer, a process whose outcome is influenced by numerous life-style and genetic factors, the true efficacy of the genotype-specific human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines in cervical cancer prevention cannot be determined for another 30 years. Most HPV DNA test kits designed to replace the traditional Papanicolaou (Pap) smears for precancer detection lack the analytical sensitivity and specificity to comprehensively detect all potentially carcinogenic HPVs and to perform reliable genotyping. The authors implemented the classic nested PCR and Sanger DNA-sequencing technology for routine HPV testing. The results showed a true negative HPV PCR invariably indicates the absence of precancerous cells in the cytology samples. However, 80.5% of single positive HPV-16 tests and 97.3% of single positive HPV-18 tests were associated with a negative or a largely self-reversible Pap cytology. Routine sensitive and reliable HPV type-specific or perhaps even variant-specific methods are needed to address the issues of persistence of HPV infection if a virology-based primary cervical screen is used to replace the Pap cytology screening paradigm. PMID:25279452

Lee, Sin Hang; Vigliotti, Jessica S; Vigliotti, Veronica S; Jones, William

2014-01-01

351

The use of a human papillomavirus 18 promoter for tissue-specific expression in cervical carcinoma cells  

Microsoft Academic Search

The use of tissue-specific promoter elements in the treatment of cervical cancer has been explored in this paper. The P105 promoter of human papillomavirus 18 (HPV18) was utilised to direct tissue-specific expression in a number of cell types.\\u000a Expression was examined in three cervical carcinoma cell lines: HeLa (HPV18 positive), SiHa (HPV16 positive), and C33A cells\\u000a (HPV negative); the epithelial

Mandy S. Y. Lung; Wendy M. Mak; Vincent Murray

2011-01-01

352

Characterization of Metastasis Formation and Virotherapy in the Human C33A Cervical Cancer Model  

PubMed Central

More than 90% of cancer mortalities are due to cancer that has metastasized. Therefore, it is crucial to intensify research on metastasis formation and therapy. Here, we describe for the first time the metastasizing ability of the human cervical cancer cell line C33A in athymic nude mice after subcutaneous implantation of tumor cells. In this model, we demonstrated a steady progression of lumbar and renal lymph node metastases during tumor development. Besides predominantly occurring lymphatic metastases, we visualized the formation of hematogenous metastases utilizing red fluorescent protein (RFP) expressing C33A-RFP cells. RFP positive cancer cells were found migrating in blood vessels and forming micrometastases in lungs of tumor-bearing mice. Next, we set out to analyze the influence of oncolytic virotherapy in the C33A-RFP model and demonstrated an efficient virus-mediated reduction of tumor size and metastatic burden. These results suggest the C33A-RFP cervical cancer model as a new platform to analyze cancer metastases as well as to test novel treatment options to combat metastases. PMID:24887184

Hess, Michael; Hartl, Barbara; Kober, Christina; Langbein-Laugwitz, Johanna; Stritzker, Jochen; Chen, Nanhai G.; Aguilar, Richard J.; Weibel, Stephanie; Szalay, Aladar A.

2014-01-01

353

Characterization of metastasis formation and virotherapy in the human C33A cervical cancer model.  

PubMed

More than 90% of cancer mortalities are due to cancer that has metastasized. Therefore, it is crucial to intensify research on metastasis formation and therapy. Here, we describe for the first time the metastasizing ability of the human cervical cancer cell line C33A in athymic nude mice after subcutaneous implantation of tumor cells. In this model, we demonstrated a steady progression of lumbar and renal lymph node metastases during tumor development. Besides predominantly occurring lymphatic metastases, we visualized the formation of hematogenous metastases utilizing red fluorescent protein (RFP) expressing C33A-RFP cells. RFP positive cancer cells were found migrating in blood vessels and forming micrometastases in lungs of tumor-bearing mice. Next, we set out to analyze the influence of oncolytic virotherapy in the C33A-RFP model and demonstrated an efficient virus-mediated reduction of tumor size and metastatic burden. These results suggest the C33A-RFP cervical cancer model as a new platform to analyze cancer metastases as well as to test novel treatment options to combat metastases. PMID:24887184

Donat, Ulrike; Rother, Juliane; Schäfer, Simon; Hess, Michael; Härtl, Barbara; Kober, Christina; Langbein-Laugwitz, Johanna; Stritzker, Jochen; Chen, Nanhai G; Aguilar, Richard J; Weibel, Stephanie; Szalay, Aladar A

2014-01-01

354

Perspective for Prophylaxis and Treatment of Cervical Cancer: An Immunological Approach  

PubMed Central

As the second most common cause of cancer-related death in women, human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccines have been a major step in decreasing the morbidity and mortality associated with cervical cancer. An estimated 490,000 women are diagnosed with cervical cancer each year. Increasing knowledge of the HPV role in the etiology of cervical cancer has led to the development and introduction of HPV-based vaccines for active immunotherapy of cervical cancer. Immunotherapies directed at preventing HPV-persistent infections. These vaccines are already accessible for prophylaxis and in the near future, they will be available for the treatment of preexisting HPV-related neoplastic lesions. PMID:22251005

Jenkins, Marjorie; Chiriva-Internati, Maurizio; Mirandola, Leonardo; Tonroy, Catherine; Tedjarati, Sean S.; Davis, Nicole; D'Cunha, Nicholas; Tijani, Lukman; Hardwick, Fred; Nguyen, Diane; Kast, W. Martin; Cobos, Everardo

2014-01-01

355

Aberrant expression and constitutive activation of STAT3 in cervical carcinogenesis: implications in high-risk human papillomavirus infection  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Recent observations indicate potential role of transcription factor STAT3 in cervical cancer development but its role specifically with respect to HPV infection is not known. Present study has been designed to investigate expression and activation of STAT3 in cervical precancer and cancer in relation to HPV infection during cervical carcinogenesis. Established cervical cancer cell lines and prospectively-collected cervical precancer

Shirish Shukla; Gauri Shishodia; Sutapa Mahata; Suresh Hedau; Arvind Pandey; Suresh Bhambhani; Swaraj Batra; Seemi F Basir; Bhudev C Das; Alok C Bharti

2010-01-01

356

Viral and Cellular Biomarkers in the Diagnosis of Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia and Cancer  

PubMed Central

Cervical cancer arises from cells localized in the ectoendocervical squamocolumnar junction of the cervix persistently infected with one of about 13 human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes. The majority of HPV infections induces low grade squamous epithelial lesions that in more than 90% of cases spontaneously regress and in about 10% eventually progress to high grade lesions and even less frequently evolve to invasive cancer. Tumor progression is characterized by (1) increased expression of E6 and E7 genes of high risk HPVs, known to bind to and inactivate p53 and pRb oncosuppressors, respectively; (2) integration of viral DNA into host genome, with disruption of E2 viral genes and host chromosomal loci; and (3) molecular alterations of key regulators of cell cycle. Molecular markers with high sensitivity and specificity in differentiating viral infections associated with cellular abnormalities with high risk of progression are strongly needed for cervical cancer screening and triage. This review will focus on the analysis of clinical validated or candidate biomarkers, such as HPV DNA, HPV E6/E7 mRNA, HPV proteins, p16(INK4a) and Ki67, TOP2A and MCM2 cellular factors, and DNA methylation profiles, which will likely improve the identification of premalignant lesions that have a high risk to evolve into invasive cervical cancer. PMID:24383054

Buonaguro, Luigi; Giorgi-Rossi, Paolo; Buonaguro, Franco M.

2013-01-01

357

[Targeted therapy in locally and metastatic recurrent cervical cancers].  

PubMed

Doublet chemotherapy with cisplatin is the reference for the treatment of recurrent cervical cancer. However, those tumors are little chemo-sensitive and overall survival remains poor. Moreover, because of pelvic irradiation, toxicities, especially hematologic toxicities, are increased and require a drug dose reduction. Finally, these treatments are rarely effective in radiation areas. Given all these elements, the development of new therapies is a prominent issue. This article reviews the results of the major targeted therapies in cervical cancer. Anti-EGFRs are disappointing despite of a strong biological rational. On the other hand, bevacizumab is the first targeted therapy to show a significant increase of overall survival. A major effort must be made in translational research for a better understanding of tumor biology of these tumors. PMID:25091657

Geiss, Romain; De La Motte Rouge, Thibault; Dubot, Coraline; Leary, Alexandra; Lhommé, Catherine; Pautier, Patricia; Scholl, Suzy; Rodrigues, Manuel Jorge

2014-01-01

358

Sex, drugs, and politics: the HPV vaccine for cervical cancer.  

PubMed

HPV is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the world. While most strains are relatively harmless, some increase a woman's risk of developing cervical cancer. This article explores the intimate, contested relationships among etiologies of cervical cancer, development and use of the new HPV vaccine, and contested notions of sexuality. We particularly focus on shifts in US health care and sexual politics, where the vaccine has animated longstanding concerns about vaccination (e.g. parental rights, cost, specialisation) and young women's bodies and behaviour. We conclude that vaccines are a distinctive kind of pharmaceutical, invoking notions of contagion and containment, and that politics shape every aspect of the pharmaceutical life course. PMID:18761509

Casper, Monica J; Carpenter, Laura M

2008-09-01

359

Cervical cancer screening and older Mexican American women.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to explore an older Mexican American woman's decision-making process to engage in cervical cancer screening. A qualitative single case study design was used along with a purposive, typical case sampling strategy. The participant, a 52-year-old Mexican American woman, was interviewed using a semi-structured format. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyze the data. The analytic process revealed three concepts and motivators that influenced the participant's behavior regarding cervical cancer screening practices: knowledge, family history, and sexual history. As such, these findings are useful for crafting subsequent investigations. Although the study participant's experience is instructive regarding facilitators or motivators for engaging in screening practices, further exploration of barriers faced by older Mexican American women who decline to be screened is warranted. PMID:21210574

Flores, Bertha Penny; Volker, Deborah L

2011-01-01

360

Cervical cancer screening preferences among African American women in the Mississippi Delta.  

PubMed

Although cervical cancer screening rates have increased in the United States, there are still geographic areas that experience a high cervical cancer burden, including the Mississippi Delta. Human papillomavirus (HPV) self-collection may be a feasible alternative to traditional clinician-collection for cervical cancer screening for under-screened women. This study examined women's preferences for cervical cancer screening methods. Interviewer-administered questionnaires regarding cervical cancer screening preferences were completed by 524 African American women in the Mississippi Delta. Statistically significant differences were observed for age, employment status, and number of children across recruitment groups. Regardless of how women were recruited, the majority preferred self-sampling for HPV testing method to clinician-collection. Among women who preferred self-collected sampling for HPV testing, the most frequent reasons given were convenience, privacy, and comfort. Alternative strategies must be considered when targeting the under-screened to reduce the burden of cervical cancer. PMID:23377716

Litton, Allison G; Castle, Philip E; Partridge, Edward E; Scarinci, Isabel C

2013-02-01

361

Differential Effects of Messages for Breast and Cervical Cancer Screening  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to compare responses to two interventions (personalized- form (PF) letter messages versus personalized-tailored (PT) letter messages) using medical record data for promoting appointment scheduling and screening for breast and cervical cancer among urban low-income women from three ethnic groups: African-American, Mexican-American, and non-Hispanic white women. The 1,574 women participating in the randomized controlled trial

Maria L. Jibaja-Weiss; Robert J. Volk; Quentin W. Smith; J. David Holcomb

2005-01-01

362

Sustaining a Safety Net Breast and Cervical Cancer Detection Program  

Microsoft Academic Search

For the past six years, the Chicago-area faith-based Reach Out Consortium has mobilized low-income uninsured and underinsured African American women and Latinas to seek screening for breast and cervical cancer. The funding history for this program illustrates how funds for a small community-based program were leveraged into a broader program, and that grew to serve low-income women across the state.

Linda Diamond Shapiro; Donna Thompson; Elizabeth Calhoun

2006-01-01

363

The nurse's role in preventing cervical cancer: A cultural framework  

PubMed Central

This article proposes an innovative, theoretically-driven intervention to reduce risk from human papillomavirus (HPV). This lessening of HPV risk would lead to a reduction in the rate of cervical cancer. Aims of this article are to introduce a culturally appropriate model (PEN-3) that may facilitate vaccine uptake among vulnerable populations and to ascertain whether culturally appropriate health education delivered by nurses could be included in vaccine education programs.

Johnson-Mallard, Versie; Thomas, Tami L.; Kostas-Polston, Elizabeth A.; Barta, Michelle; Lengacher, Cecile A.; Rivers, Desiree

2013-01-01

364

Histone Deacetylase (HDAC) 10 Suppresses Cervical Cancer Metastasis through Inhibition of Matrix Metalloproteinase (MMP) 2 and 9 Expression*  

PubMed Central

Aberrant expression of histone deacetylases (HDACs) is associated with carcinogenesis. Some HDAC inhibitors are widely considered as promising anticancer therapeutics. A major obstacle for development of HDAC inhibitors as highly safe and effective anticancer therapeutics is that our current knowledge on the contributions of different HDACs in various cancer types remains scant. Here we report that the expression level of HDAC10 was significantly lower in patients exhibiting lymph node metastasis compared with that in patients lacking lymph node metastasis in human cervical squamous cell carcinoma. Forced expression of HDAC10 in cervical cancer cells significantly inhibited cell motility and invasiveness in vitro and metastasis in vivo. Mechanistically, HDAC10 suppresses expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 2 and 9 genes, which are known to be critical for cancer cell invasion and metastasis. At the molecular level, HDAC10 binds to MMP2 and -9 promoter regions, reduces the histone acetylation level, and inhibits the binding of RNA polymerase II to these regions. Furthermore, an HDAC10 mutant lacking histone deacetylase activity failed to mimic the functions of full-length protein. These results identify a critical role of HDAC10 in suppression of cervical cancer metastasis, underscoring the importance of developing isoform-specific HDAC inhibitors for treatment of certain cancer types such as cervical squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:23897811

Song, Chenlin; Zhu, Songcheng; Wu, Chuanyue; Kang, Jiuhong

2013-01-01

365

Progress in the Development of a Cervical Cancer Vaccine  

PubMed Central

Persistent infection by ‘high risk’ genotypes of human papilloma virus (HPV) is necessary but not sufficient for the development of over 98% of cervical cancers. Thus the development of vaccines that prevent HPV transmission represent an important opportunity to prevent cervical cancer. There are several prophylactic HPV vaccine formulations based upon L1 virus-like particles (VLPs) currently in phase III trials and recently released data are extremely promising. However, many practical issues surrounding implementation of these vaccines need to be addressed including, who and when to vaccinate, duration of protection, and integration with current screening programs. The vaccines currently being evaluated target the two most prevalent high risk HPV types which are responsible for approximately 70% of cervical cancers. To increase the breadth of protection, it is likely that L1 VLPs of other viral subtypes must be included, although vaccines targeting the conserved regions of the L2 minor capsid protein warrant further exploration in this regard. In addition the vaccines nearing licensing will not combat established HPV-related disease and a therapeutic vaccine, of which there are several candidates in early stages of development, would be desirable. This review discusses the background to and progress in vaccine development and the issues surrounding the introduction of HPV vaccines. PMID:18360601

Winters, Ursula; Roden, Richard; Kitchener, Henry; Stern, Peter

2006-01-01

366

Cervical cancer mortality trends in Brazil: 1980-2009.  

PubMed

The objective was to describe time trends in cervical cancer mortality rates in Brazil as a whole and in the country's major geographic regions and States from 1980 to 2009. This was an ecological time series study using data recorded in the Mortality Information System (SIM) and census data collected by the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics (IBGE). Analysis of mortality trends was performed using Poisson regression. Cervical cancer mortality rates in Brazil tended to stabilize. In the geographic regions, a downward trend was observed in the South (-4.1%), Southeast (-3.3%), and Central-West (-1%) and an upward trend in the Northeast (3.5%) and North (2.7%). The largest decreases were observed in the States of São Paulo (-5.1%), Rio Grande do Sul, Espírito Santo, and Paraná (-4.0%). The largest increases in mortality trends occurred in Paraíba (12.4%), Maranhão (9.8%), and Tocantins (8.9%). Cervical cancer mortality rates stabilized in the country as a whole, but there was a downward trend in three geographic regions and 10 States, while two geographic regions and another 10 States showed increasing rates. PMID:23532294

Gonzaga, Carolina Maciel Reis; Freitas-Junior, Ruffo; Barbaresco, Aline Almeida; Martins, Edesio; Bernardes, Bruno Teixeira; Resende, Ana Paula Magalhães

2013-03-01

367

TNFalpha increases in vitro migration of human HPV18-positive SW756 cervical carcinoma cells.  

PubMed

TNFalpha has been associated with both, tumor survival and apoptosis. This cytokine is also involved in promoting cell migration during wound healing and tumorigenesis. SW756 is a HPV18-positive cervical carcinoma cell line, which has been used to study different mechanisms of cervical cancer progression. An in vitro assay of scratch wound healing onto monolayers of SW756 cells was used to assess the effect of TNFalpha on cell migration into a wound space. It was found that SW756 cells have the ability to migrate, but not proliferate in response to scratch wounding in a serum-free medium supplemented with TNFalpha. RT-PCR analysis showed that SW756 cells express TNFalpha mRNA when incubated in medium with and without serum. Wound closure and migration rate of SW756 cells were significantly increased in the presence of serum-free media supplemented with TNFalpha (10 ng/mL) as compared to serum-free media, and media supplemented with either anti-TNFalpha antibody or both TNFalpha and anti-TNFalpha antibody (p < 0.05). The results showed a stimulatory effect of TNFalpha on the migration of SW756 cervical carcinoma cells, suggesting a novel and important role for TNFalpha in cervical cancer progression. PMID:16524252

Hidalgo, K; Rojas, I G; Penissi, A B; Rudolph, M I

2005-12-01

368

Detection of nuclei clusters from cervical cancer microscopic imagery using C4.5  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer among women. At the same time, cervical cancer could be largely preventable and curable with regular Pap tests. This test can find nuclei changes in the cervix. Accurate nuclei detection is extremely critical as it is the previous step of analysing nuclei changes and diagnosis afterwards. In recent years, automatic nuclei segmentation

Yu Peng; Mira Park; Min Xu; Suhuai Luo; J. S. Jin; Yue Cui; W. S. F. Wong

2010-01-01

369

Cervical cancer screening in Hispanic women as compared with other ethnic groups on an urban campus  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although Pap screening has decreased morbidity and mortality from cervical cancer, reported statistics indicate that among ethnic groups, Hispanic women are one of the least likely to follow screening guidelines. Human papillomavirus (HPV), a major risk factor for cervical cancer, as well as pre-cancerous lesions, may be detected by early Pap screening. With a reported 43% prevalence of HPV infection

Marilyn E Tompkins

2003-01-01

370

The social context of cervical cancer knowledge and prevention among Haitian immigrant women  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cervical cancer is the primary cause of cancer deaths among Haitian women; however, the social context of cervical cancer among Haitian immigrant women has not been systematically examined. The ways in which women assign meaning to this disease, understand its causality and situate it within the broader context of gynecological health are poorly understood. Further, Haitian immigrant women's perceptions of

Janelle Marie Menard

2008-01-01

371

Human papillomavirus and the value of screening: young women's knowledge of cervical cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

The study reports a questionnaire survey of female university students intended (1) to delin- eate their knowledge of cervical cancer and screening, and (2) to impute their valuation of the introduction of human papillomavirus (HPV) testing. It was found that almost 80% of respondents thought cervical cancer was a leading cause of cancer death amongst women. Most subjects consistently over-estimated

Stacy Johnson; Mark Avis; David K. Whynes

2003-01-01

372

Predictors of Cervical Cancer Screening in Mexican American Women of Reproductive Age  

Microsoft Academic Search

Several barriers impede cancer prevention in the Mexican American population. This study identified sociocultural factors that could be used to increase screening rates for cervical cancer in women of reproductive age. A survey was conducted in 1991 of 366 Mexican American women ages 18 to 40 in Tucson, Arizona, to assess current compliance with cervical cancer screening guidelines and several

David Buller

1998-01-01

373

Chapter 1: Human Papillomavirus and Cervical Cancer—Burden and Assessment of Causality  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cervical cancer remains the second most common cancer in women worldwide and the most frequent in developing countries. Pre-neoplasic cervical lesions represent an addi- tional burden in countries where screening is widespread. The human papillomavirus (HPV) prevalence and type dis- tribution in normal smears and in cancer specimens are be- ing described and show relatively small international varia- tion. S

F. Xavier Bosch; Silvia de Sanjosé

374

Predictors of Cervical Cancer Screening in Mexican American Women of Reproductive Age  

Microsoft Academic Search

:Several barriers impede cancer prevention in the Mexican American population. This study identified sociocultural factors that could be used to increase screening rates for cervical cancer in women of reproductive age. A survey was conducted in 1991 of 366 Mexican American women ages 18 to 40 in Tucson, Arizona, to assess current compliance with cervical cancer screening guidelines and several

David Buller; Manuel R. Modiano; Jill Guernsey de Zapien; Joel Meister; Sallie Saltzman; Frank Hunsaker

1998-01-01

375

The state of the p53 and retinoblastoma genes in human cervical carcinoma cell lines  

SciTech Connect

Human cervical carcinoma cell lines that were either positive or negative for human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA sequences were analyzed for evidence of mutation of the p53 and retinoblastoma genes. Each of five HPV-positive cervical cancer cell lines expressed normal pRB and low levels of wild-type p53 proteins, which are presumed to be altered in function as a consequence of association with HPV E7 and E6 oncoproteins, respectively. In contrast, mutations were identified in the p53 and RB genes expressed in the C-33A and HT-3 cervical cancer cell lines, which lack HPV DNA sequences. Mutations in the p53 genes mapped to codon 273 and codon 245 in the C33-A and HT-3 cell lines, respectively, located in the highly conserved regions of p53, where mutations appear in a variety of human cancers. Mutations in RB occurred at splice junctions, resulting in in-frame deletions, affecting exons 13 and 20 in the HT-3 and C-33A cell lines, respectively. These mutations resulted in aberrant proteins that were not phosphorylated and were unable to complex with the adenovirus E1A oncoprotein. These results support the hypothesis that the inactivation of the normal functions of the tumor-suppressor proteins pRB and p53 are important steps in human cervical carcinogenesis, either by mutation or from complex formation with the HPV E6 and E7 oncoproteins.

Scheffner, M.; Muenger, K.; Byrne, J.C.; Howley, P.M. (National Cancer Inst., Bethesda, MD (United States))

1991-07-01

376

Frequency of Precancerous Changes and Cervical Cancer Recorded in Three Health Centres in Tuzla Canton in Period 2010-2011  

PubMed Central

Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer in the world and the leading cause of death. Frequency and mortality are significantly reduced thanks to cytological Papanicolau test (PAP). Regular PAP test can reduce approximately 80% of cases of this cancer Aim of the study: To examine frequency of cervical cancer and changes of cervix, the age of risk for the changes and effect of frequency of PAP test. Materials and methods: 3383 PAP (cytological) findings have been retrospectively ana lysed in three Health Centres of Tuzla Canton: Tuzla, Srebrenik and Sapna. During 2010 and 2011 protocols of Health Centers have been analyzed. Results: Analysis of 3383 smears detected the following: abnormal PAP tests in 20.8% (705) and without abnormalities in 79.1% (2678). Normal findings in 9.1% (311), inflammatory changes in 69.6% (2357), ASCUS in 12.9% (438), ASC-H in 0.3% (11), LSIL in 5.4% (183), HSIL in 1.4% (49) and Squamous cell carcinoma in 0.7% (24). Cervical cancer has mostly been found in women from Srebrenik 1.1% (15) and least in women from Tuzla 0.3%(4).The highest number of abnormal findings (ASCUS, ASC-H , LSIL, H SIL and Cc) was also found in women from Srebrenik 39.5% (279). The average age of the examinees with the cancer was 41.7. In 62.5% (15) of women PAP test was performed for the first time and they were diagnosed with cervical cancer. Cervical cancer hasn’t been found in women who had PAP test once a year or more. Conclusion: Women with the abnormal findings in their first PAP test and should be persuaded to accept the treatment in order to prevent development of cervical cancer. PMID:24511270

Jahic, Mahira; Mulavdic, Mirsada; Dautbasic, Fatima; Fejzic, Mara; Jahic, Elmir

2013-01-01

377

Human papillomavirus type 16 variants in cervical cancer from an admixtured population in Brazil  

Microsoft Academic Search

Several studies indicate that molecular variants of HPV-16 have different geographic distribution and risk associated with persistent infection and development of high-grade cervical lesions. In the present study, the frequency of HPV-16 variants was determined in 81 biopsies from women with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade III or invasive cervical cancer from the city of Belem, Northern Brazil. Host DNAs were

Katiana Junes-Gill; Laura Sichero; Paulo Cesar Maciag; Wyller Mello; Vânia Noronha; Luisa Lina Villa

2008-01-01

378

Participant recruitment and motivation for participation in optical technology for cervical cancer screening research trials  

Microsoft Academic Search

In order to improve recruitment for cervical cancer screening trials, it is necessary to analyze the effectiveness of recruitment strategies used in current trials. A trial to test optical spectroscopy for the diagnosis of cervical neoplasia recruited 1000 women from the community; the trial evaluated the emerging technology against Pap smears and colposcopically directed biopsies for cervical dysplasia. We have

Olga M. Shuhatovich; Mathilde P. Sharman; Yvette N. Mirabal; Nan R. Earle; Michele Follen; Karen Basen-Engquist

2005-01-01

379

Chromosomal gains measured in cytology samples from women with abnormal cervical cancer screening results  

PubMed Central

Objective Chromosomal gains at 3q26, 5p15 and 20q13 have been described in cervical precancer and cancer. We evaluated a novel fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) assay that detects gains at these three loci simultaneously as a possible biomarker for detecting cervical precancer. Methods Chromosomal copy numbers at 3q26 (3q), 5p15 (5p), 20q13 (20q) and the centromere of chromosome7 (cen7) in liquid-based cytology specimens from 168 women enrolled in the Biopsy Study were determined by FISH. The number of cells with ?3 or ?4 signals for a genomic locus was enumerated and diagnostic test performance measures were calculated using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analyses. Sensitivity and specificity values were determined for the detection of CIN2+ and/or HSIL. Results The median number of cells with ?3 signals increased with the severity of cervical lesion for each genomic locus (p-trend<0.02 for each locus). ROC analysis for the number of cells with ?3 signals resulted in area under the curve values of 0.70 (95% CI: 0.54-0.86), 0.67 (0.52-0.83), 0.67 (0.51-0.83) and 0.78 (0.64-0.92) for 3q, 5p, 20q and cen7, respectively, for the detection of CIN2+ and/or HSIL. Positivity for gains at multiple loci resulted in only slightly better test performance measures than those for the individual probes for four distinct combinations of probes. Conclusions Chromosomal gains at 3q, 5p, 20q and cen7 are associated with severity of cervical lesions. Further studies are required to quantify risk stratification of FISH assays for cervical cancer screening. PMID:23769811

Luhn, Patricia; Houldsworth, Jane; Cahill, Lynnette; Schiffman, Mark; Castle, Philip E.; Zuna, Rosemary E.; Dunn, S. Terence; Gold, Michael A.; Walker, Joan; Wentzensen, Nicolas

2013-01-01

380

Neck dissection with cervical sensory preservation in thyroid cancer  

PubMed Central

Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine malignancy. Recently, controversy has focused on the management of lymph node metastases, which represent approximately 90% of disease recurrences and may require considerable time, effort, and resources to diagnose and treat. Neck dissections play an essential role in the management of head and neck cancer. A modified radical neck dissection (MND) refers to resection of the lymph nodes in levels II through V and often including the central nodes in level VI. When performing modified neck dissection, we recommend to protect more reserved cervical plexus. The purpose is to better protect patient’s neck skin feeling. PMID:25083485

Xue, Shuai; Wang, Peisong

2013-01-01

381

[Pulsed-dose rate brachytherapy in cervical cancers: Why, how?].  

PubMed

The end of the production of 192 iridium wires terminates low dose rate brachytherapy and requires to move towards pulsed-dose rate or high-dose rate brachytherapy. In the case of gynecological cancers, technical alternatives exist, and many teams have already taken the step of pulsed-dose rate for scientific reasons. Using a projector source is indeed a prerequisite for 3D brachytherapy, which gradually installs as a standard treatment in the treatment of cervical cancers. For other centers, this change implies beyond investments in equipment and training, organizational consequences to ensure quality. PMID:25155782

Mazeron, R; Dumas, I; Martin, V; Martinetti, F; Benhabib-Boukhelif, W; Gensse, M-C; Chargari, C; Guemnie-Tafo, A; Haie-Méder, C

2014-10-01

382

[Diagnosis of cervical and endometrial cancer].  

PubMed

Updated French guidelines for clinical practice have been published by the National Cancer Institute in 2010, concerning the diagnosis and the treatment of cervix and endometrial cancers. The diagnosis of cervix cancer, suspected when a cervix tumour is observed in a patient presenting with vaginal bleeding, especially in women with risk factors (previous cervix dysplasia, HIV infection, tobacco use). The diagnosis is confirmed by pathology of cervix biopsy (macroscopic cervix tumour or microscopic lesions detected by screening). The diagnosis of endometrial cancer should be evoked in post-menopausal women presenting with vaginal bleeding, especially in high risk populations (obese, long exposure to estrogens). The diagnosis is based on histologic examination of endometrial biopsy. The assessment of pelvic extension must include clinical examination and pelvic and lombo-aortic MRI imaging. PMID:25090762

Trichot, Caroline; Barthier, Sophie; Rivain, Anne-Laure; Prevot, Sophie; Demoulin, Géraldine; Kai, Guillaume Ssi Yan; Thubert, Thibault; Deffieux, Xavier

2014-06-01

383

Seminal Plasma Enhances Cervical Adenocarcinoma Cell Proliferation and Tumour Growth In Vivo  

PubMed Central

Cervical cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death in women in sub-Saharan Africa. Extensive evidence has shown that cervical cancer and its precursor lesions are caused by Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Although the vast majority of HPV infections are naturally resolved, failure to eradicate infected cells has been shown to promote viral persistence and tumorigenesis. Furthermore, following neoplastic transformation, exposure of cervical epithelial cells to inflammatory mediators either directly or via the systemic circulation may enhance progression of the disease. It is well recognised that seminal plasma contains an abundance of inflammatory mediators, which are identified as regulators of tumour growth. Here we investigated the role of seminal plasma in regulating neoplastic cervical epithelial cell growth and tumorigenesis. Using HeLa cervical adenocarcinoma cells, we found that seminal plasma (SP) induced the expression of the inflammatory enzymes, prostaglandin endoperoxide synthase (PTGS1 and PTGS2), cytokines interleukin (IL) -6, and -11 and vascular endothelial growth factor-A(VEGF-A). To investigate the role of SP on tumour cell growth in vivo, we xenografted HeLa cells subcutaneously into the dorsal flank of nude mice. Intra-peritoneal administration of SP rapidly and significantly enhanced the tumour growth rate and size of HeLa cell xenografts in nude mice. As observed in vitro, we found that SP induced expression of inflammatory PTGS enzymes, cytokines and VEGF-A in vivo. Furthermore we found that SP enhances blood vessel size in HeLa cell xenografts. Finally we show that SP-induced cytokine production, VEGF-A expression and cell proliferation are mediated via the induction of the inflammatory PTGS pathway. PMID:22442729

Sutherland, Jason R.; Sales, Kurt J.; Jabbour, Henry N.; Katz, Arieh A.

2012-01-01

384

[Serotypes of herpes simplex virus and their association with cervical cancer].  

PubMed

Comparative studies of some properties of Herpes simplex viruses type I and II and their ability to reproduce latent infection in vitro revealed no essential differences between them. Virus-neutralizing and hemagglutinating antibodies to the virus type II are detected reliably more frequently in cervical cancer patients than in healthy ones. Forty six per cent of cervical cancer patients and thirty nine per cent of healthy females along with antibodies against the virus of serotype II showed a specific cellular response, which was demonstrated in the reaction of leucocyte migration inhibition. In patients with dissemination of the disease there is an inhibited cell immunity to Herpes virus without changing of the humoral resistance. PMID:6256973

Kamalian, L A; Makhmurian, T D; Movsesian, E A; Nadzharian, N U; Gevorkian, V I

1980-01-01

385

Physical state & copy number of high risk human papillomavirus type 16 DNA in progression of cervical cancer  

PubMed Central

Background & objectives: High-risk human papilloma virus (HR-HPV) infection and its integration in host genome is a key event in malignant transformation of cervical cells. HPV16 being a dominant HR-HPV type, we undertook this study to analyze if viral load and physical state of the virus correlated with each other in the absence of other confounding variables and examined their potential as predictors of progressive cervical lesions. Methods: Both, viral load and integration status of HPV16 were determined by real time URR PCR and estimation of E2:E6 ratio in a total of 130 PGMY-RLB -confirmed, monotypic HPV16-infected cervical DNA samples from biopsies of cytology-confirmed low grade (LSIL, 30) and high grade (HSIL, 30), and invasive carcinoma, (squamous cell carcinoma SCC, 70) cases. Results: Investigation of DNA samples revealed a gradual increase in HPV16 viral load over several magnitudes and increased frequency of integration from LSIL to HSIL and HSIL to invasive cancer in relation to the severity of lesions in monotypic HPV16-infected cervical tissues. In a substantial number of precancer (11/60) and cancer cases (29/70), HPV16 was detected in concomitant mixed form. The concomitant form of HPV16 genome carried significantly higher viral load. Interpretation & conclusions: Overall, viral load and integration increased with disease severity and could be useful biomarkers in disease progression, at least, in HPV16-infected cervical pre-cancer and cancer lesions. PMID:24927339

Shukla, Shirish; Mahata, Sutapa; Shishodia, Gauri; Pande, Shailja; Verma, Gaurav; Hedau, Suresh; Bhambhani, Suresh; Kumari, Archana; Batra, Swaraj; Basir, Seemi F.; Das, Bhudev C.; Bharti, Alok C.

2014-01-01

386

Naringin inhibits growth and induces apoptosis by a mechanism dependent on reduced activation of NF??B/COX?2?caspase-1 pathway in HeLa cervical cancer cells.  

PubMed

Naringin (NRG), a bioflavonoid found in citrus fruit extracts, has been pharmacologically evaluated as a potential anticancer agent. This study confirmed a novel mechanism of the anticancer effects of NRG in the human cervical cancer HeLa cell line (HeLa cells). Exposure of HeLa cells to NRG resulted in growth inhibition, as evidenced by a decrease in cell viability. In addition, NRG treatment induced apoptosis, as indicated by the increased apoptotic percentage and the cleaved caspase-3 expression. Importantly, exposure of the cells to NRG attenuated the expression levels of phosphorylated (p) nuclear factor ?B (NF-?B) p65 subunit, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and cysteinyl aspartate proteinase-1 (caspase-1). Treatment with PDTC (an inhibitor of NF-?B) or NS-398 (an inhibitor of COX-2) or SC-3069 (an inhibitor of caspase-1) markedly induced growth inhibition and apoptosis. Treatment with PDTC or NS-398 also reduced caspase-1 expression. Interestingly, PDTC treatment blocked the expression of COX-2 and NS-398 reduced the p-NF-?B p65 expression. Taken together, this study provides novel evidence that NRG induces growth inhibition and apoptosis by inhibiting the NF-?B/COX-2-caspase-1 pathway and that a positive interaction between NF-?B and COX-2 pathway contributes to the growth and antiapoptotic effect in HeLa cells. PMID:25174821

Zeng, Lan; Zhen, Yulan; Chen, Yiming; Zou, Lin; Zhang, Ying; Hu, Fen; Feng, Jianqiang; Shen, Jianhua; Wei, Bing

2014-11-01

387

Survival analysis of endometrial cancer patients with cervical stromal involvement  

PubMed Central

Objective Stage II endometrial cancer is relatively uncommon. There is no consensus for appropriate adjuvant therapy in endometrial cancer patients with cervical stromal involvement (International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics [FIGO] stage II). This study investigates how adjuvant treatments and tumor characteristics influence overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) in stage II patients in order to establish better treatment guidelines. Methods This multi-institution, Institutional Review Board approved, study is a retrospective review of 40 endometrial cancer patients with cervical stromal involvement treated from 1993 to 2009. Kaplan-Meier estimates were used to evaluate OS and DFS. Results OS was 85% at three years and 67% at five years. There were no significant differences in age, histology, depth of invasion, comorbid conditions, surgical staging or recurrence between patients who received radiation therapy (RT) and those who did not. However, patients with FIGO grade 1 cancers were less likely to receive RT (p=0.007). Patients treated with RT had a similar 5 year OS (n=33, 69%) to those treated with surgery only (n=7, 60%, p=0.746). There were no OS differences when evaluating by grade, histology, or depth of invasion between patients who did and did not receive RT. Four patients recurred: three were locoregional failures only, and one failed locally and distant. Conclusion Patients receiving RT had higher grade tumors. Despite this, OS was comparable between the RT and the no RT cohorts. Local failure was the predominant pattern of failure. Endometrial cancer patients with cervical stromal involvement likely receive better locoregional control with the addition of adjuvant RT and we continue to advocate for RT in most cases. PMID:24761213

Frandsen, Jonathan E.; Sause, William T.; Dodson, Mark K.; Soisson, Andrew P.; Belnap, Thomas W.

2014-01-01

388

Viruses, Cancer Warts and All: The HPV Vaccine for Cervical Cancer  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

FASEB Breakthroughs in Bioscience article. Scientist Peyton Rous used Plymouth Rock chickens to make his Nobel Prize winning discovery that viruses can cause cancer. Chickens, rabbits, and mice were among the animal models that made invaluable contributions to the development of the HPV vaccine to protect against cervical cancer.

2010-07-12

389

Epigenetics of cervical cancer. An overview and therapeutic perspectives  

PubMed Central

Cervical cancer remains one of the greatest killers of women worldwide. It is difficult to foresee a dramatic increase in cure rate even with the most optimal combination of cytotoxic drugs, surgery, and radiation; therefore, testing of molecular targeted therapies against this malignancy is highly desirable. A number of epigenetic alterations occur during all stages of cervical carcinogenesis in both human papillomavirus and host cellular genomes, which include global DNA hypomethylation, hypermetylation of key tumor suppressor genes, and histone modifications. The reversible nature of epigenetic changes constitutes a target for transcriptional therapies, namely DNA methylation and histone deacetylase inhibitors. To date, studies in patients with cervical cancer have demonstrated the feasibility of reactivating the expression of hypermethylated and silenced tumor suppressor genes as well as the hyperacetylating and inhibitory effect upon histone deacetylase activity in tumor tissues after treatment with demethylating and histone deacetylase inhibitors. In addition, detection of epigenetic changes in cytological smears, serum DNA, and peripheral blood are of potential interest for development of novel biomolecular markers for early detection, prediction of response, and prognosis. PMID:16248899

Duenas-Gonzalez, Alfonso; Lizano, Marcela; Candelaria, Myrna; Cetina, Lucely; Arce, Claudia; Cervera, Eduardo

2005-01-01