Sample records for cell cervical cancer

  1. Veliparib, Topotecan Hydrochloride, and Filgrastim or Pegfilgrastim in Treating Patients With Persistent or Recurrent Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-16

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer

  2. Veliparib, Topotecan Hydrochloride, and Filgrastim or Pegfilgrastim in Treating Patients With Persistent or Recurrent Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-02

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer

  3. Bevacizumab, Radiation Therapy, and Cisplatin in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-22

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer

  4. Positron Emission Tomography Using Fluoromisonidazole F 18 and Fludeoxyglucose F 18 to Find Oxygen in Tumor Cells of Patients Undergoing Treatment for Newly Diagnosed Stage IB, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-10

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer

  5. MRI and PET Imaging in Predicting Treatment Response in Patients With Stage IB-IVA Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-05

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  6. AAC11 Overexpression Induces Invasion and Protects Cervical Cancer Cells from Apoptosis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jin Woo Kim; Hyun Suk Cho; Jeong Hyun Kim; Soo Young Hur; Tae Eung Kim; Joon Mo Lee; In-Kyung Kim; Sung Eun Namkoong

    2000-01-01

    To identify the genes involved in cervical carcinogenesis, we applied the mRNA differential display (DD) method to analyze normal cervical tissue, cervical cancer, metastatic lymph node, and cervical cancer cell line. We cloned a 491-bp cDNA fragment, CC231, which was present in metastatic tissue and cervical cancer cell line, but absent in normal cervical and cervical cancer tissues. The 491

  7. Radiation Therapy Plus Cisplatin and Gemcitabine in Treating Patients With Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-23

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  8. Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the place where a baby grows during pregnancy. Cervical cancer is caused by a virus called HPV. ... for a long time, or have HIV infection. Cervical cancer may not cause any symptoms at first. ...

  9. Cetuximab, Cisplatin, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage IB, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-29

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  10. Smoking and Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... been found in cervical mucus. These substances, called carcinogens, may damage the genes in cervical cells. Because ... www.smokefree.gov/ American Cancer ... Lung Association: http://www.ffsonline.org/ Centers for Disease ...

  11. Chemoradiation Therapy and Ipilimumab in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-10

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  12. Chemoradiation Therapy and Ipilimumab in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-02

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  13. R-Ras promotes metastasis of cervical cancer epithelial cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nancy Mora; Ricardo Rosales; Carlos Rosales

    2007-01-01

    Mutations in the small GTPase R-Ras that promote constitutive activation of this signaling molecule have been observed in\\u000a a variety of invasive cancer cell types. We previously reported that expression of an oncogenic form of R-Ras (R-Ras87L) in\\u000a a cell line of cervical cancer (C33A cells) augments cell growth in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo. Because increased tumorigenicity\\u000a in vivo

  14. Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Inside Knowledge: Get the Facts About Gynecologic Cancer campaign. The ... the facts about gynecologic cancer, providing important “inside knowledge” about their bodies and health. What is cervical ...

  15. Radiation Therapy and Cisplatin With or Without Epoetin Alfa in Treating Patients With Cervical Cancer and Anemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-29

    Anemia; Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Drug Toxicity; Radiation Toxicity; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  16. Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and chlamydia. HPV is the virus that can cause genital warts. It seems to be very closely connected with these changes. Risk factors for cervical cancer Starting to have sex early (before age 18) ...

  17. Enhanced Expression of Thymidylate Synthase Mediates Resistance of Uterine Cervical Cancer Cells to Radiation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yasushi Saga; Mitsuaki Suzuki; Hiroaki Mizukami; Masashi Urabe; Masakazu Fukushima; Keiya Ozawa; Ikuo Sato

    2002-01-01

    It has been shown that there is an inverse relationship between the level of thymidylate synthase (TS) and therapeutic outcomes in patients with malignancies including cervical cancer. To clarify the mechanism of the poor prognosis of cervical cancer with high TS expression, we introduced TS cDNA to the human uterine cervical cancer cell line SKG-II and evaluated the effect of

  18. Proteomic patterns of cervical cancer cell lines, a network perspective

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cervical cancer is a major mortality factor in the female population. This neoplastic is an excellent model for studying the mechanisms involved in cancer maintenance, because the Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) is the etiology factor in most cases. With the purpose of characterizing the effects of malignant transformation in cellular activity, proteomic studies constitute a reliable way to monitor the biological alterations induced by this disease. In this contextual scheme, a systemic description that enables the identification of the common events between cell lines of different origins, is required to distinguish the essence of carcinogenesis. Results With this study, we sought to achieve a systemic perspective of the common proteomic profile of six cervical cancer cell lines, both positive and negative for HPV, and which differ from the profile corresponding to the non-tumourgenic cell line, HaCaT. Our objectives were to identify common cellular events participating in cancer maintenance, as well as the establishment of a pipeline to work with proteomic-derived results. We analyzed by means of 2D SDS-PAGE and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry the protein extracts of six cervical cancer cell lines, from which we identified a consensus of 66 proteins. We call this group of proteins, the "central core of cervical cancer". Starting from this core set of proteins, we acquired a PPI network that pointed, through topological analysis, to some proteins that may well be playing a central role in the neoplastic process, such as 14-3-3?. In silico overrepresentation analysis of transcription factors pointed to the overexpression of c-Myc, Max and E2F1 as key transcription factors involved in orchestrating the neoplastic phenotype. Conclusions Our findings show that there is a "central core of cervical cancer" protein expression pattern, and suggest that 14-3-3? is key to determine if the cell proliferates or dies. In addition, our bioinformatics analysis suggests that the neoplastic phenotype is governed by a non-canonical regulatory pathway. PMID:21696634

  19. Detection of cancerous cervical cells using physical adhesion of fluorescent silica particles and centripetal force

    E-print Network

    Sokolov, Igor

    Here we describe a non-traditional method to identify cancerous human cervical epithelial cells of this disease. Theobjective of screeningfor cervical cancer is to prevent persistent human papillomavirus (HPV) smear and liquid-based cytology tests2,3 have proven to be the most successful methods of cervical

  20. A specific miRNA signature promotes radioresistance of human cervical cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The mechanisms responsible for cervical cancer radioresistance are still largely unexplored. The present study aimed to identify miRNAs associated with radioresistance of cervical cancer cells. Methods The radioresistant cervical cancer cell variants were established by repeated selection with irradiation. The miRNA profiles of radioresistant cells and their corresponding controls were analyzed and compared using microarray. Differentially expressed miRNAs were confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR. Cervical cancer cells were transfected with miRNA-specific mimics or inhibitors. Radiosensitivity of cervical cancer cells were determined using colony-forming assay. Results Among the differentially expressed miRNAs, 20 miRNAs showed the similar pattern of alteration (14 miRNAs were overexpressed whilst 6 were suppressed) in all three radioresistant cervical cancer cell variants compared to their controls. A miRNA signature consisting of 4 miRNAs (miR-630, miR-1246, miR-1290 and miR-3138) exhibited more than 5 folds of increase in radioresistant cells. Subsequent analysis revealed that these four miRNAs could be up-regulated in cervical cancer cells by radiation treatment in both time-dependent and dose-dependent manners. Ectopic expression of each of these 4 miRNAs can dramatically increase the survival fraction of irradiated cervical cancer cells. Moreover, inhibition of miR-630, one miRNA of the specific signature, could reverse radioresistance of cervical cancer cells. Conclusions The present study indicated that miRNA is involved in radioresistance of human cervical cancer cells and that a specific miRNA signature consisting of miR-630, miR-1246, miR-1290 and miR-3138 could promote radioresistance of cervical cancer cells. PMID:24283459

  1. Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy With or Without Triapine in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Stage IB-IVA Cervical Cancer or Stage II-IVA Vaginal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-28

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB2 Cervical Cancer; Stage II Vaginal Cancer; Stage IIA1 Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA2 Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Vaginal Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Vaginal Cancer; Vaginal Adenocarcinoma; Vaginal Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Vaginal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  2. Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy With or Without Triapine in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Stage IB-IVA Cervical Cancer or Stage II-IVA Vaginal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-25

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB2 Cervical Cancer; Stage II Vaginal Cancer; Stage IIA1 Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA2 Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Vaginal Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Vaginal Cancer; Vaginal Adenocarcinoma; Vaginal Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Vaginal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  3. Cervical Cancer Stage IIIA

    MedlinePLUS

    ... My Pictures Browse Search Quick Search Image Details Cervical Cancer Stage IIIA View/Download: Small: 612x612 View Download Add to My Pictures Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IIIA Description: Stage IIIA cervical cancer; ...

  4. Cervical Cancer Stage IVB

    MedlinePLUS

    ... My Pictures Browse Search Quick Search Image Details Cervical Cancer Stage IVB View/Download: Small: 594x640 View Download Add to My Pictures Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IVB Description: Stage IVB cervical cancer; ...

  5. Cervical Cancer Stage IA

    MedlinePLUS

    Cervical Cancer Stage IA View/Download: Small: 720x576 View Download Add to My Pictures Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IA Description: Stage IA1 and IA2 cervical cancer; drawing shows a cross-section of the ...

  6. Cervical Cancer Stage IVA

    MedlinePLUS

    ... My Pictures Browse Search Quick Search Image Details Cervical Cancer Stage IVA View/Download: Small: 756x576 View Download Add to My Pictures Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IVA Description: Stage IVA cervical cancer; ...

  7. Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy Followed by Paclitaxel and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Stage I, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-23

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  8. Methyl jasmonate induces cell death with mixed characteristics of apoptosis and necrosis in cervical cancer cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tatiana Kniazhanski; Anna Jackman; Alina Heyfets; Pinhas Gonen; Eliezer Flescher; Levana Sherman

    2008-01-01

    In the present study the effectiveness of methyl jasmonate (MJ) against cervical cancer cell lines was investigated. We show that MJ is cytotoxic to a range of cervical cancer lines including SiHa, CaSki and HeLa that carry human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA and wild type p53, and C33A that is negative for HPV and contains mutant p53. Primary human foreskin keratinocytes

  9. URI expression in cervical cancer cells is associated with higher invasion capacity and resistance to cisplatin

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Junxia; Liang, Yuting; Qiao, Longwei; Lu, Yaojuan; Hu, Xiaoxia; Luo, Dongwei; Li, Na; Zhang, Leilei; Chen, Yiyang; Du, Jialu; Zheng, Qiping

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer is a common and devastating female cancer worldwide. The etiology of cervical cancer has been largely attributed to human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and activation of the P13K/AKT/mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) pathway. However, the limited HPV-directed therapy, as well as therapeutic approach targeting P13K/AKT/mTOR pathway, has not yet been established or effective. A deeper understanding of cervical carcinogenesis and finding of novel candidate molecules for cervical cancer therapeutics is largely warranted. The unconventional prefoldin RPB5 interactor (URI or URI1), a known transcription factor involving the TOR signaling pathway, has recently been implicated a role in multiple tumorigenesis. We recently reported significant upregulation of URI in precancerous cervical intra-epithelial neoplasia (CIN) and invasive cervical cancer, suggesting its role in cervical carcinogenesis. However, the effect and underlying mechanism of URI in cervical cancer development have never been elucidated. Here, we aimed to investigate the in vitro effect of URI on cervical cancer using two cervical cancer cell lines CaSki and C33A, which are HPV-positive and HPV-negative respectively. We have shown that forced over-expression of URI in C33A and CaSki cells markedly promoted cell growth, while down-regulation of URI mediated by siRNA inhibited cell proliferation. We have found that URI over-expression enhanced resistance of cervical cancer cells to cisplatin. In contrast, knockdown of URI promoted apoptosis by influencing cell response to cisplatin, supporting URI as an oncogenic protein for cervical cancer cells. We have also shown that URI promoted the migration and invasive capacity of cervical cancer cells by up-regulation of Vimentin, a mesenchymal cell migration marker relating to the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) program. Our data support an important function of URI in the biological behavior of cervical cancer cells and provide novel mechanistic insights into the role of URI in cervical cancer progression and possibly, metastasis.

  10. Gallic acid reduces cell viability, proliferation, invasion and angiogenesis in human cervical cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, BING; HU, MENGCAI

    2013-01-01

    Gallic acid is a trihydroxybenzoic acid, also known as 3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoic acid, which is present in plants worldwide, including Chinese medicinal herbs. Gallic acid has been shown to have cytotoxic effects in certain cancer cells, without damaging normal cells. The objective of the present study was to determine whether gallic acid is able to inhibit human cervical cancer cell viability, proliferation and invasion and suppress cervical cancer cell-mediated angiogenesis. Treatment of HeLa and HTB-35 human cancer cells with gallic acid decreased cell viability in a dose-dependent manner. BrdU proliferation and tube formation assays indicated that gallic acid significantly decreased human cervical cancer cell proliferation and tube formation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells, respectively. Additionally, gallic acid decreased HeLa and HTB-35 cell invasion in vitro. Western blot analysis demonstrated that the expression of ADAM17, EGFR, p-Akt and p-Erk was suppressed by gallic acid in the HeLa and HTB-35 cell lines. These data indicate that the suppression of ADAM17 and the downregulation of the EGFR, Akt/p-Akt and Erk/p-Erk signaling pathways may contribute to the suppression of cancer progression by Gallic acid. Gallic acid may be a valuable candidate for the treatment of cervical cancer. PMID:24843386

  11. Drugs Approved for Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Questions to Ask Your Doctor about Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Cervical Cancer This page lists cancer ... Cervical Cancer Drug Combinations Used in Cervical Cancer Drugs Approved to Prevent Cervical Cancer Cervarix (Recombinant HPV ...

  12. Mechanism of ricin-induced apoptosis in human cervical cancer cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. V. Lakshmana Rao; R. Jayaraj; A. S. B. Bhaskar; Om Kumar; R. Bhattacharya; Parag Saxena; P. K. Dash; R. Vijayaraghavan

    2005-01-01

    The mechanism of ricin-induced apoptosis in human cervical cancer cell line HeLa was studied. The present study demonstrated that ricin induces apoptosis of human cervical cancer cells (HeLa) in a time dependent manner with an IC50 for cell viability of 1?g\\/ml. Ricin treatment resulted in a time dependent increase in LDH leakage, DNA fragmentation, percent apoptotic cells, generation of reactive

  13. Cervical Cancer Screening

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Cancer found early may be easier to treat. Cervical cancer screening is usually part of a woman's ... may do more tests, such as a biopsy. Cervical cancer screening has risks. The results can sometimes ...

  14. MicroRNA-145 contributes to enhancing radiosensitivity of cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ye, Chen; Sun, Ning-xia; Ma, Yan; Zhao, Qian; Zhang, Qing; Xu, Chen; Wang, Shao-bing; Sun, Shu-han; Wang, Fang; Li, Wen

    2015-03-12

    In our study, transcriptome microarrays are used to identify differentially expressed miRNAs and mRNAs in cervical cancer specimens. We find that microRNA-145 (miR-145) expression is significantly decreased in cervical cancer tissues and cell lines, and is associated with advanced cancer stages, large tumor size and moderate/poor differentiation. We show that miR-145 targets the DNA damage repair-associated gene Helicase-like transcription factor (HLTF), which is involved in radio-resistance. Moreover, miR-145 over-expression in cervical cancer cells enhances radiosensitivity in vitro and in vivo. These results indicate that targeting miR-145 may be a novel radiosensitizing strategy for cervical cancer. PMID:25666710

  15. Inhibition of Aurora A promotes chemosensitivity via inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in cervical cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jian-Ming; Yang, Li-Na; Xu, Han; Chang, Bin; Wang, Hua-Ying; Yang, Gong

    2015-01-01

    Aurora kinase A (AurA) regulates genomic instability and tumorigenesis in multiple cancer types. Although some studies have reported that Aur A may predict cervical cancer outcomes, its precise function and molecular mechanism in cervical cancer pathogenesis remain unclear. In this study, by overexpression or silencing of Aur A in cervical cancer cell lines, we found that overexpression of Aur A promoted cell proliferation through G1/S cell cycle transition and anti-apoptosis, xenograft tumor growth and chemoresistance to Taxol. We further found that inhibition of Aur A with its specific inhibitor VX-680 enhanced the antitumor effect of Taxol via inducing apoptosis. Moreover, the clinical analysis from tissue samples demonstrated that Aur A was overexpressed, and the expression of Aur A and pERK1/2 was negatively correlated in cervical cancer tissues. The above results may provide some potential insights in treatment of cervical cancer in clinic. PMID:26045992

  16. Proteomic patterns of cervical cancer cell lines, a network perspective

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Juan Carlos Higareda-Almaraz; del Rocío María Enríquez-Gasca; Magdalena Hernández-Ortiz; Osbaldo Resendis-Antonio; Sergio Encarnación-Guevara

    2011-01-01

    Background  Cervical cancer is a major mortality factor in the female population. This neoplastic is an excellent model for studying the\\u000a mechanisms involved in cancer maintenance, because the Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) is the etiology factor in most cases. With\\u000a the purpose of characterizing the effects of malignant transformation in cellular activity, proteomic studies constitute a\\u000a reliable way to monitor the

  17. Quantitative gene expression assessment identifies appropriate cell line models for individual cervical cancer pathways

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark W Carlson; Vishwanath R Iyer; Edward M Marcotte

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cell lines have been used to study cancer for decades, but truly quantitative assessment of their performance as models is often lacking. We used gene expression profiling to quantitatively assess the gene expression of nine cell line models of cervical cancer. RESULTS: We find a wide variation in the extent to which different cell culture models mimic late-stage invasive

  18. Novel functions and targets of miR-944 in human cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Xie, Hong; Lee, Linkiat; Scicluna, Patrick; Kavak, Ersen; Larsson, Catharina; Sandberg, Rickard; Lui, Weng-Onn

    2015-03-01

    Altered expression of specific microRNAs (miRNAs) has been observed in human cervical cancer. However, the biological functions of many of these miRNAs are yet to be discovered. We previously showed that miR-944 is significantly more abundant in cervical cancer tissues than their normal counterparts. In this study, we investigated the functions and targets of miR-944 in human cervical cancer cells. MiR-944 is located in the intron of the tumor protein p63 (TP63) gene, which is frequently overexpressed in cervical carcinomas. Using gain- and loss-of-function experiments in vitro, we demonstrate that miR-944 promotes cell proliferation, migration and invasion, but has no effect on apoptosis, in human cervical cancer cells. To identify the targets of miR-944, we performed photoactivatable-ribonucleoside-enhanced crosslinking and immunoprecipitation followed by deep sequencing. Among the candidate targets, we validated HECW2 (HECT domain ligase W2) and S100PBP (S100P binding protein) as direct targets of miR-944 using luciferase reporter assays and western blot analysis. Our findings reveal novel functions and targets of miR-944 in human cervical cancer cells, which may provide new insights of its role in cervical carcinogenesis. PMID:25156441

  19. Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... RAS Initiative Progress Annual Report to the Nation Snapshots of Specific Types of Cancer Milestones in Cancer ... Progress Annual Report to the Nation Cancer Portfolio Snapshots Milestones in Cancer Research & Discovery Stories of Discovery ...

  20. Vaccines against cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Kathrin U

    2004-11-01

    Cervical cancer and precancerous lesions of the genital tract are a major threat to women's health worldwide. Although the introduction of screening tests to detect cervical cancer and its precursor lesions has reduced overall cervical cancer rates in the developed world, the approach was largely unsuccessful for developing countries, primarily due to a lack of appropriate infrastructures and high costs. Annually, 470,000 cervical cancer cases are diagnosed worldwide, of which 80% occur in developing countries. Despite advances in treatment of cervical cancer, approximately half of the women afflicted with the disease will die. Over 20 years of dedicated research has provided conclusive evidence that a subset of human papillomaviruses are the aetiological agents for cervical cancer. Finding a viral origin for this disease provided the basis to fight cervical cancer using prophylactic or therapeutic vaccination. Both vaccine approaches are reviewed here, with an emphasis on recent clinical data. PMID:15500408

  1. Metformin impairs the growth of Liver Kinase B1-intact cervical cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Xuxian; He, Qiongqiong; Lu, Changming; Werle, Kaitlin D.; Zhao, Rui-Xun; Chen, Jianfeng; Davis, Ben C.; Cui, Rutao; Liang, Jiyong; Xu, Zhi-Xiang

    2012-01-01

    Objective Metformin is one of the most widely used drugs for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Recent investigations demonstrated that application of metformin reduces cancer risk. The present study aimed to determine the role of liver kinase B1 (LKB1) in the response of cervical cancer cells to metformin. Methods LKB1 expression and the integrity of LKB1-AMPK signaling were determined with immunoblot in 6 cervical cancer cell lines. Cellular sensitivity to metformin was analyzed with MTT assay. Results Metformin inhibited growth of cervical cancer cells, C33A, Me180, and CaSki, but was less effective against HeLa, HT-3, and MS751 cells. Analyzing the expression status and the integrity of LKB1-AMPK-mTOR signaling, we found that cervical cancer cells sensitive to metformin were LKB1 intact and exerted an integral AMPK-mTOR signaling response after the treatment. Ectopic expression of LKB1 with stable transduction system or inducible expression construct in endogenous LKB1 deficient cells improved the activation of AMPK, promoted the inhibition of mTOR, and prompted the sensitivity of cells to metformin. In contrast, knock-down of LKB1 compromised cellular response to metformin. Our further investigation demonstrated that metformin could induce both apoptosis and autophagy in cervical cancer cells when LKB1 is expressed. Conclusions Metformin is a potential drug for the treatment of cervical cancers, in particular to those with intact LKB1 expression. Administration of cell metabolism agonists may enhance LKB1 tumor suppression, inhibit cell growth, and reduce tumor cell viability via the activation of LKB1-AMPK signaling. PMID:22735790

  2. Cervical Cancer Other Characteristics

    Cancer.gov

    Skip to Main Content Search International Cancer Screening Network Sponsored by the National Cancer Institute Home | About ICSN | Collaborative Projects | Meetings | Cancer Sites | Publications | Contact Us Cervical Cancer: Mortality Rates | Organization

  3. Cervical Cancer Other Characteristics

    Cancer.gov

    Skip to Main Content Search International Cancer Screening Network Sponsored by the National Cancer Institute Home | About ICSN | Collaborative Projects | Meetings | Cancer Sites | Publications | Contact Us Cervical Cancer (Archived Tables): Home Other

  4. Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy With or Without Carboplatin and Paclitaxel in Patients With Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-17

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Chemotherapeutic Agent Toxicity; Cognitive Side Effects of Cancer Therapy; Psychological Impact of Cancer; Radiation Toxicity; Sexual Dysfunction and Infertility; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  5. Cervical Cancer Stage IIIB

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Cancer Stage IIIB Description: Stage IIIB cervical cancer; drawing shows cancer in the cervix, the vagina, and ... that connect the kidneys to the bladder). The drawing shows the ureter on the right blocked by ...

  6. Overexpression of TROP2 predicts poor prognosis of patients with cervical cancer and promotes the proliferation and invasion of cervical cancer cells by regulating ERK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ting; Liu, Yueyang; Bao, Xiangxiang; Tian, Jiguang; Liu, Yang; Yang, Xingsheng

    2013-01-01

    Overwhelming evidence has demonstrated that the aberrant expression of the human trophoblast cell-surface antigen (TROP2) was associated with tumor aggressiveness and poor prognosis in a variety of human cancers, however the roles of TROP2 in cervical cancer have not been investigated. The purpose of our study was to elucidate the prognostic significance of TROP2 expression in patients with cervical cancer and determine its effect on tumor progression. Immunohistochemistry assay showed that 88.7% (94/106 cases) of cervical cancer specimens were positively stained with TROP2, and the overexpression of TROP2 was closely related with FIGO stage, histological grades, lymphatic metastasis, invasive interstitial depth and high expression of Ki-67. Patients with TROP2-positive staining exhibited a significantly decreased overall survival and progression free survival; it was also an independent predictor for prognosis according to multivariate analysis. Moreover, down-regulation of TROP2 mediated by siRNA in Siha and CaSki cells resulted in a strong inhibition of proliferation and invasion, TROP2 abrogation also elevated the apoptotic ratio and caused G1 arrest. Conversely, enforced expression of TROP2 in HeLa and C33A cells remarkably promoted cell growth, migration and invasion. In addition, the tumorigenic function of TROP2 was associated with the increased expressions of cyclin D1, cyclin E, CDK2 and CDK4 but reduced expression of p27 and E-cadherin via the activation of Erk1/2 signaling pathway. Furthermore, the inhibition of TROP2 expression in cervical cancer cell lines enhances sensitivity to cisplatin. The present study suggest that overexpression of TROP2 may play crucial roles in the development and pathogenesis of human cervical cancer, therefore, TROP2 may represent a prospective prognostic indicator and a potential therapeutic target of cervical cancer. PMID:24086649

  7. Overexpression of TROP2 Predicts Poor Prognosis of Patients with Cervical Cancer and Promotes the Proliferation and Invasion of Cervical Cancer Cells by Regulating ERK Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ting; Liu, Yueyang; Bao, Xiangxiang; Tian, Jiguang; Liu, Yang; Yang, Xingsheng

    2013-01-01

    Overwhelming evidence has demonstrated that the aberrant expression of the human trophoblast cell-surface antigen (TROP2) was associated with tumor aggressiveness and poor prognosis in a variety of human cancers, however the roles of TROP2 in cervical cancer have not been investigated. The purpose of our study was to elucidate the prognostic significance of TROP2 expression in patients with cervical cancer and determine its effect on tumor progression. Immunohistochemistry assay showed that 88.7% (94/106 cases) of cervical cancer specimens were positively stained with TROP2, and the overexpression of TROP2 was closely related with FIGO stage, histological grades, lymphatic metastasis, invasive interstitial depth and high expression of Ki-67. Patients with TROP2-positive staining exhibited a significantly decreased overall survival and progression free survival; it was also an independent predictor for prognosis according to multivariate analysis. Moreover, down-regulation of TROP2 mediated by siRNA in Siha and CaSki cells resulted in a strong inhibition of proliferation and invasion, TROP2 abrogation also elevated the apoptotic ratio and caused G1 arrest. Conversely, enforced expression of TROP2 in HeLa and C33A cells remarkably promoted cell growth, migration and invasion. In addition, the tumorigenic function of TROP2 was associated with the increased expressions of cyclin D1, cyclin E, CDK2 and CDK4 but reduced expression of p27 and E-cadherin via the activation of Erk1/2 signaling pathway. Furthermore, the inhibition of TROP2 expression in cervical cancer cell lines enhances sensitivity to cisplatin. The present study suggest that overexpression of TROP2 may play crucial roles in the development and pathogenesis of human cervical cancer, therefore, TROP2 may represent a prospective prognostic indicator and a potential therapeutic target of cervical cancer. PMID:24086649

  8. Get Tested for Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Get Tested for Cervical Cancer Get Tested for Cervical Cancer The Basics Take Action! Ver en español ... tests) and follow-up care can help prevent cervical cancer. You can get a Pap test (sometimes ...

  9. Nitric oxide releasing photoresponsive nanohybrids as excellent therapeutic agent for cervical cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Sudhesh, Priya; Tamilarasan, Kaviyarasan; Arumugam, Palaniappan; Berchmans, Sheela

    2013-09-11

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) that can release nitric oxide (NO) on visible-light irradiation were prepared using 2-mercapto-5-nitro benzimidazole (MNBI) as stabilizer. These nanoparticles meet overall prerequisites for biomedical applications like small sizes, water solubility, and stability. It was found that even a very low dosage of MNBI-stabilized GNPs exhibit appreciable tumor cell mortality against cervical cancer cell lines, demonstrating the role of NO in killing cancer cells. PMID:23952053

  10. Curcumin and Emodin Down-Regulate TGF-? Signaling Pathway in Human Cervical Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Thacker, Pooja Chandrakant; Karunagaran, Devarajan

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the major cause of cancer related deaths in women, especially in developing countries and Human Papilloma Virus infection in conjunction with multiple deregulated signaling pathways leads to cervical carcinogenesis. TGF-? signaling in later stages of cancer is known to induce epithelial to mesenchymal transition promoting tumor growth. Phytochemicals, curcumin and emodin, are effective as chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic compounds against several cancers including cervical cancer. The main objective of this work was to study the effect of curcumin and emodin on TGF-? signaling pathway and its functional relevance to growth, migration and invasion in two cervical cancer cell lines, SiHa and HeLa. Since TGF-? and Wnt/?-catenin signaling pathways are known to cross talk having common downstream targets, we analyzed the effect of TGF-? on ?-catenin (an important player in Wnt/?-catenin signaling) and also studied whether curcumin and emodin modulate them. We observed that curcumin and emodin effectively down regulate TGF-? signaling pathway by decreasing the expression of TGF-? Receptor II, P-Smad3 and Smad4, and also counterbalance the tumorigenic effects of TGF-? by inhibiting the TGF-?-induced migration and invasion. Expression of downstream effectors of TGF-? signaling pathway, cyclinD1, p21 and Pin1, was inhibited along with the down regulation of key mesenchymal markers (Snail and Slug) upon curcumin and emodin treatment. Curcumin and emodin were also found to synergistically inhibit cell population and migration in SiHa and HeLa cells. Moreover, we found that TGF-? activates Wnt/?-catenin signaling pathway in HeLa cells, and curcumin and emodin down regulate the pathway by inhibiting ?-catenin. Taken together our data provide a mechanistic basis for the use of curcumin and emodin in the treatment of cervical cancer. PMID:25786122

  11. Fludeoxyglucose F 18 PET Scan, CT Scan, and Ferumoxtran-10 MRI Scan Before Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy in Finding Lymph Node Metastasis in Patients With Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer or High-Risk Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-10-31

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Endometrial Clear Cell Carcinoma; Endometrial Papillary Serous Carcinoma; Stage I Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage II Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage III Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  12. Xanthohumol induces growth inhibition and apoptosis in ca ski human cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yong, Wai Kuan; Abd Malek, Sri Nurestri

    2015-01-01

    We investigate induction of apoptosis by xanthohumol on Ca Ski cervical cancer cell line. Xanthohumol is a prenylated chalcone naturally found in hop plants, previously reported to be an effective anticancer agent in various cancer cell lines. The present study showed that xanthohumol was effective to inhibit proliferation of Ca Ski cells based on IC50 values using sulforhodamine B (SRB) assay. Furthermore, cellular and nuclear morphological changes were observed in the cells using phase contrast microscopy and Hoechst/PI fluorescent staining. In addition, 48-hour long treatment with xanthohumol triggered externalization of phosphatidylserine, changes in mitochondrial membrane potential, and DNA fragmentation in the cells. Additionally, xanthohumol mediated S phase arrest in cell cycle analysis and increased activities of caspase-3, caspase-8, and caspase-9. On the other hand, Western blot analysis showed that the expression levels of cleaved PARP, p53, and AIF increased, while Bcl-2 and XIAP decreased in a dose-dependent manner. Taken together, these findings indicate that xanthohumol-induced cell death might involve intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways, as well as downregulation of XIAP, upregulation of p53 proteins, and S phase cell cycle arrest in Ca Ski cervical cancer cells. This work suggests that xanthohumol is a potent chemotherapeutic candidate for cervical cancer. PMID:25949267

  13. Spaceflight alters the gene expression profile of cervical cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhi-Jie; Tong, Yong-Qing; Wang, Jia-Jia; Yang, Cheng; Zhou, Guo-Hua; Li, Yue-Hui; Xie, Ping-Li; Hu, Jin-Yue; Li, Guan-Cheng

    2011-01-01

    Our previous study revealed that spaceflight induced biological changes in human cervical carcinoma Caski cells. Here, we report that 48A9 cells, which were subcloned from Caski cells, experienced significant growth suppression and exhibited low tumorigenic ability after spaceflight. To further understand the potential mechanism at the transcriptional level, we compared gene expression between 48A9 cells and ground control Caski cells with suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) and reverse Northern blotting methods, and analyzed the relative gene network and molecular functions with the Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA) program. We found 5 genes, SUB1, SGEF, MALAT-1, MYL6, and MT-CO2, to be up-regulated and identified 3 new cDNAs, termed B4, B5, and C4, in 48A9 cells. In addition, we also identified the two most significant gene networks to indicate the function of these genes using the IPA program. To our knowledge, our results show for the first time that spaceflight can reduce the growth of tumor cells, and we also provide a new model for oncogenesis study. PMID:22098948

  14. NF-?B-modulated miR-130a targets TNF-? in cervical cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Nuclear factor-?B (NF-?B) induces a variety of biological processes through transcriptional gene control whose products are components in various signaling pathways. MicroRNAs are a small endogenous non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression and are involved in tumorigenesis. Using human cervical cancer cell lines, this study aimed to investigate whether NF-?B could regulate miR-130a expression and the functions and targets of miR-130a. Methods We used the HeLa and C33A cervical cancer cell lines that were transfected with NF-?B or miR-130a overexpression plasmids to evaluate their effects on cell growth. We utilized bioinformatics, a fluorescent reporter assay, qRT-PCR and Western blotting to identify downstream target genes. Results In HeLa and C33A cells, NF-?B and miR-130a overexpression promoted cell growth, but genetic knockdowns suppressed growth. TNF-? was identified as a target of miR-130a by binding in a 3’-untranslated region (3’UTR) EGFP reporter assay and by Western blot analysis. Furthermore, low TNF-? concentrations stimulated NF-?B activity and then induced miR-130a expression, and TNF-? overexpression rescued the effects of miR-130a on cervical cancer cells. Conclusions Our findings indicate that TNF-? can activate NF-?B activity, which can reduce miR-130a expression, and that miR-130a targets and downregulates TNF-? expression. Hence, we shed light on the negative feedback regulation of NF-?B/miR-130a/TNF-?/NF-?B in cervical cancer and may provide insight into the carcinogenesis of cervical cancer. PMID:24885472

  15. Rel\\/Nuclear factor-kappa B apoptosis pathways in human cervical cancer cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marlene F Shehata

    2005-01-01

    Cervical cancer is considered a common yet preventable cause of death in women. It has been estimated that about 420 women out of the 1400 women diagnosed with cervical cancer will die during 5 years from diagnosis. This review addresses the pathogenesis of cervical cancer in humans with a special emphasis on the human papilloma virus as a predominant cause

  16. Aesculetin-induced apoptosis through a ROS-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction pathway in human cervical cancer cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jin Yang; Yu-Ling Xiao; Xian-Ran He; Guo-Fu Qiu; Xian-Ming Hu

    2010-01-01

    Aesculetin (1) is an important coumarin found in various plant materials. It has been shown to have antiproliferative effects on several types of human cancer cells, but its effect on cervical cancer cells in vitro is unknown. In this study, we investigated that the cytotoxic effect of 1 on a non-cancer cell line (293) was smaller than on a tumor

  17. Adenosine uptake is the major effector of extracellular ATP toxicity in human cervical cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Mello, Paola de Andrade; Filippi-Chiela, Eduardo Cremonese; Nascimento, Jéssica; Beckenkamp, Aline; Santana, Danielle Bertodo; Kipper, Franciele; Casali, Emerson André; Nejar Bruno, Alessandra; Paccez, Juliano Domiraci; Zerbini, Luiz Fernando; Wink, Marcia Rosângela; Lenz, Guido; Buffon, Andréia

    2014-01-01

    In cervical cancer, HPV infection and disruption of mechanisms involving cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis are strictly linked with tumor progression and invasion. Tumor microenvironment is ATP and adenosine rich, suggesting a role for purinergic signaling in cancer cell growth and death. Here we investigate the effect of extracellular ATP on human cervical cancer cells. We find that extracellular ATP itself has a small cytotoxic effect, whereas adenosine formed from ATP degradation by ectonucleotidases is the main factor responsible for apoptosis induction. The level of P2×7 receptor seemed to define the main cytotoxic mechanism triggered by ATP, since ATP itself eliminated a small subpopulation of cells that express high P2×7 levels, probably through its activation. Corroborating these data, blockage or knockdown of P2×7 only slightly reduced ATP cytotoxicity. On the other hand, cell viability was almost totally recovered with dipyridamole, an adenosine transporter inhibitor. Moreover, ATP-induced apoptosis and signaling—p53 increase, AMPK activation, and PARP cleavage—as well as autophagy induction were also inhibited by dipyridamole. In addition, inhibition of adenosine conversion into AMP also blocked cell death, indicating that metabolization of intracellular adenosine originating from extracellular ATP is responsible for the main effects of the latter in human cervical cancer cells. PMID:25103241

  18. Gallic acid enhancement of gold nanoparticle anticancer activity in cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Daduang, Jureerut; Palasap, Adisak; Daduang, Sakda; Boonsiri, Patcharee; Suwannalert, Prasit; Limpaiboon, Temduang

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer (CxCa) is the most common cancer in women and a prominent cause of cancer mortality worldwide. The primary cause of CxCa is human papillomavirus (HPV). Radiation therapy and chemotherapy have been used as standard treatments, but they have undesirable side effects for patients. It was reported that gallic acid has antioxidant, antimicrobial, and anticancer activities. Gold nanoparticles are currently being used in medicine as biosensors and drug delivery agents. This study aimed to develop a drug delivery agent using gold nanoparticles conjugated with gallic acid. The study was performed in uninfected (C33A) cervical cancer cells, cervical cancer cells infected with HPV type 16 (CaSki) or 18 (HeLa), and normal Vero kidney cells. The results showed that GA inhibited the proliferation of cancer cells by inducing apoptosis. To enhance the efficacy of this anticancer activity, 15-nm spherical gold nanoparticles (GNPs) were used to deliver GA to cancer cells. The GNPs-GA complex had a reduced ability compared to unmodified GA to inhibit the growth of CxCa cells. It was interesting that high-concentration (150 ?M) GNPs-GA was not toxic to normal cells, whereas GA alone was cytotoxic. In conclusion, GNPs-GA could inhibit CxCa cell proliferation less efficiently than GA, but it was not cytotoxic to normal cells. Thus, gold nanoparticles have the potential to be used as phytochemical delivery agents for alternative cancer treatment to reduce the side effects of radiotherapy and chemotherapy. PMID:25640346

  19. Radiation Therapy and Cisplatin With or Without Triapine in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage IB2, II, or IIIB-IVA Cervical Cancer or Stage II-IVA Vaginal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-05

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB2 Cervical Cancer; Stage II Vaginal Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Vaginal Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Vaginal Cancer; Stage IVB Vaginal Cancer

  20. Induction of Aromatase Expression in Cervical Carcinomas: Effects of Endogenous Estrogen on Cervical Cancer Cell Proliferation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hareesh B. Nair; Roopa Luthra; Nameer Kirma; Ya-Guang Liu; Lisa Flowers; Dean Evans; Rajeshwar Rao Tekmal

    2005-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies have implicated estrogenic exposure as well as human papilloma virus (HPV) infection in cervical carcinogenesis, and some studies have suggested that estrogen and HPV may play synergistic roles in cervical tumorigenesis. In this study, we report a novel finding that f35% of cervical carcinomas tested (n = 19) express aromatase, the enzyme responsible for converting androgen to estrogen,

  1. Proteomic analysis of cervical cancer cells treated with suberonylanilide hydroxamic acid

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jianxiong He; Canhua Huang; Aiping Tong; Bin Chen; Zhi Zeng; Peng Zhang; Chunting Wang; Yuquan Wei

    2008-01-01

    Suberonylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) is an orally administered histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACI) that has shown significant\\u000a antitumour activity in a variety of tumour cells. To identify proteins involved in its antitumour activity, we utilized a\\u000a proteomic approach to reveal protein expression changes in the human cervical cancer cell line HeLa following SAHA treatment.\\u000a Protein expression profiles were analysed by 2-dimensional

  2. In vivo cervical cancer growth inhibition by genetically engineered cytotoxic T cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter Dall; Isabell Herrmann; Bettina Durst; Mariam A. Stoff-Khalili; Gerd Bauerschmitz; Bettina Hanstein; Dieter Niederacher

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The CD44 v7\\/8 splice variant that is frequently expressed in cervical carcinoma and rarely expressed in normal tissues displays promising properties as a target antigen for cancer immune therapy. In this study, cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) were genetically engineered to gain CD44v7\\/8 target specificity. Methods: Clone 96 (CI96), an established murine cytotoxic T-cell line, and naïve murine T cells

  3. Screening for Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 17 PM You are here: Home Recommendations for Primary Care Practice Published Recommendations Recommendation Summary Cervical Cancer: Screening ... are one-page documents that provide guidance to primary care clinicians for using recommendations in practice. This summary ...

  4. MAML1 regulates cell viability via the NF-?B pathway in cervical cancer cell lines

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yanin Kuncharin; Naunpun Sangphech; Patipark Kueanjinda; Parvapan Bhattarakosol; Tanapat Palaga

    2011-01-01

    The Notch signaling pathway plays important roles in tumorigenesis in a context-dependent manner. In human cervical cancer, alterations in Notch signaling have been reported, and both tumor-suppressing and tumor-promoting roles of Notch signaling have been proposed; however, the precise molecular mechanisms governing these roles in cervical cancer remain controversial. MAML is a transcriptional co-activator originally identified by its role in

  5. Aspirin inhibits ErbB2 to induce apoptosis in cervical cancer cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shuanglin Xiang; Zhenhua Sun; Qiongzhi He; Feng Yan; Yijun Wang; Jian Zhang

    2010-01-01

    The use of aspirin is associated with a lower risk of many cancer types. However, there are few reports about cervical cancer.\\u000a The proto-oncogene ErbB2 is overexpressed in cervical cancer, and considered as a therapeutic target. In the present study,\\u000a we investigated whether aspirin had therapeutic value in cervical cancer and examined the effects of aspirin on the amplification\\u000a and

  6. Indole-3-carbinol and diindolylmethane induce apoptosis of human cervical cancer cells and in murine HPV16-transgenic preneoplastic cervical epithelium.

    PubMed

    Chen, D Z; Qi, M; Auborn, K J; Carter, T H

    2001-12-01

    Dietary indole-3-carbinol (I3C) has clinical benefits for both cervical cancer and laryngeal papillomatosis, and causes apoptosis of breast cancer cells in vitro. We asked whether I3C and its major acid-catalyzed condensation product diindolylmethane (DIM), which is produced in the stomach after consumption of cruciferous vegetables, could induce apoptosis of cervical cancer cell lines. We also asked whether this effect could be observed in vivo. In vitro, both I3C and DIM caused accumulation of DNA strand breaks in three cervical cancer cell lines. Induction of apoptosis was confirmed by nuclear morphology, nucleosome leakage, altered cytoplasmic membrane permeability and caspase 3 activation. Neither I3C nor DIM caused apoptotic changes in normal human keratinocytes. In C33A cervical cancer cells, DIM was more potent than I3C [dose at which the number of viable cells was 50% of that in untreated cultures (LD(50)) = 50-60 micromol/L for DIM and 200 micromol/L for I3C in a mitochondrial function assay] and faster acting. Furthermore, I3C reduced Bcl-2 protein in a time- and dose-dependent manner. In HPV16-transgenic mice, which develop cervical cancer after chronic estradiol exposure, apoptotic cells were detected in cervical epithelium by TdT-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling staining and by immunohistochemical staining of active caspase 3 only in mice exposed to 17beta-estradiol (E2) and fed I3C. Rare apoptotic cells were also observed by hematoxylin and eosin staining in the spinous layer of the cervical epithelium in both control and transgenic mice. Estradiol reduced the percentage of these late-stage apoptotic cells in the cervical epithelium of transgenic, E2-treated mice, but this reduction was prevented by I3C. These data confirm the proapoptotic action of I3C on transformed cells in vitro, extend the observations to cervical cancer cells and to DIM and show for the first time that dietary I3C results in increased apoptosis in target tissues in vivo. PMID:11739883

  7. Knockdown of hTERT by siRNA inhibits cervical cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ying-Ai; Zhao, Qiang; Zhang, Li-Hong; Du, Wei; Wang, Xue-Yao; He, Xu; Wu, Shan; Li, Yu-Lin

    2014-09-01

    Human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) is the catalytic component of telomerase that facilitates tumor cell invasion and proliferation. It has been reported that telomerase and hTERT are significantly upregulated in majority of cancers including cervical cancer, thus, downregulation of hTERT is a promising target in malignant tumor treatment. We established a short interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting hTERT, and transfected it into HeLa cells (a cervical cancer cell line) to investi-gate the effect of cell proliferation, apoptosis, migration and invasion in cervical cancer cells. The results showed that siRNA targeting hTERT could effectively knock down hTERT expression, remarkably suppress telomerase activity, cell proliferation, migration and invasion, and induced cell apoptosis of cervical cancers cells in vitro. In addition, we evaluated whether siRNA targeting hTERT affects tumor growth in nude mice, and found that it dramatically inhibited tumorigenesis and growth of mice injected with siRNA targeting hTERT. Furthermore, we also found that knockdown of hTERT was able to significantly suppress constitutive phosphorylation of Akt, PI3K, which might imply that reduction of hTERT inhibited tumor growth via the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway to some extent. These results suggest that the suppression of hTERT expression by siRNA inhibits cervical cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo, and may provide a novel target for anticancer gene therapy. PMID:24920549

  8. The infiltration and functional regulation of eosinophils induced by TSLP promote the proliferation of cervical cancer cell.

    PubMed

    Xie, Feng; Liu, Li-Bing; Shang, Wen-Qing; Chang, Kai-Kai; Meng, Yu-Han; Mei, Jie; Yu, Jia-Jun; Li, Da-Jin; Li, Ming-Qing

    2015-08-10

    Cervical cancer is often associated with eosinophil (EOS) infiltration, but the source and the role of EOS are still largely unknown. Our previous work has established that thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) can stimulate the growth of cervical cancer cell in an autocrine manner. Here, we report that EOS infiltration of the lesion site increased gradually with the progression of cervical cancer. The increase in TSLP secretion in HeLa and SiHa cells induced by hypoxia led to a high level of chemokine CCL17 production by HeLa and SiHa cells, and recruited more EOS to the cancer lesion. In addition, TSLP derived from HeLa and SiHa cells promoted proliferation, up-regulated the levels of anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-10, IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13), and decreased the expression of CD80 and CD86 of EOS. Such educated EOS significantly promoted proliferation and restricted the apoptosis of cervical cancer cells, which was associated with the up-regulation of Ki-67, PCNA and Bcl-2, and the down-regulation of Fas and FasL in HeLa and SiHa cells. These results suggest that a high level of TSLP in cancer lesions mediated by hypoxia is an important regulator of the progression of cervical cancer by recruiting and licensing tumor-associated EOS to promote the growth of the cervical cancer cell itself. This provides a scientific basis on which potential therapeutic strategies could be targeted to cervical cancer, especially for patients with massive infiltrations of EOS. PMID:25979231

  9. Prevent Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... PDF [PDF-839KB] High-quality PDF for professional printing [PDF-2.7MB] Cancer Home “Prevent Cervical Cancer” ... PDF [PDF-839KB] High-quality PDF for professional printing [PDF-2.7MB] Language: English Español (Spanish) File ...

  10. Curcumin counteracts the proliferative effect of estradiol and induces apoptosis in cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Singh, Mayank; Singh, Neeta

    2011-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the most common cancer in Indian females and is associated with infection with high-risk Human papilloma viruses (HPVs) which encode viral oncoprotein E6 and E7. Estradiol has been established as a risk factor for cervical cancer and has been shown to play a synergistic role with viral oncoproteins. Curcumin (Diferuloyl methane), a chemopreventive agent, is a natural compound extracted from Curcuma longa that allows suppression and retardation of carcinogenesis in many types of cancer and is currently being tested in various human clinical trials as it has been found to be well tolerated at higher doses with a relatively well established safety profile. The objective of this study was to test the effect of curcumin on HPV-positive and negative cervical cancer cell lines HeLa, SiHa, CaSki, and C33A pretreated with estradiol. It was found that HPV-positive cells pretreated with estradiol show reduced apoptosis as compared to curcumin by itself. However, curcumin was able to counteract the proliferative response of estradiol, and induce apoptosis. There was no difference in percentage apoptosis as compared to estradiol pretreatment in HPV-negative cell line C33A. Molecular studies showed elevation of Telomerase, viral oncoproteins E6 and E7, PCNA, p16, Cyclin D1 in HPV-positive cell lines on treatment with estradiol but after treatment with curcumin the level of E7, PCNA, and Cyclin D1 was reduced but the level of E6, Telomerase, and p16 was unaltered. Furthermore, estradiol-pretreated HPV-negative cell line C33A showed reduction in level of Telomerase, PCNA, p16, and activation of both p53 and p73 tumor suppressor proteins, thus, demonstrating the importance of E6 in estradiol-mediated protective effect. PMID:20941532

  11. A proteomic investigation into the human cervical cancer cell line HeLa treated with dicitratoytterbium (III) complex

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Liming Shen; Qiong Liu; Jiazuan Ni; Guangyan Hong

    2009-01-01

    Lanthanides have been reported to induce apoptosis in cancer cell lines. Human cervical cancer cell line HeLa was found to be more sensitive to dicitratolanthanum (III) complex ([LaCit2]3?) than other cancer cell lines. However, the effect and mechanism of dicitratoytterbium (III) complex ([YbCit2]3?) on HeLa cells is unknown. Using biochemical and comparative proteomic analyses, [YbCit2]3? was found to inhibit HeLa

  12. Apoptotic potential role of Agave palmeri and Tulbaghia violacea extracts in cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Mthembu, Nonkululeko N; Motadi, Lesetja Raymond

    2014-09-01

    Cervical cancer, a gynaecological malignant disorder, is a common cause of death in females in Sub-Saharan Africa, striking nearly half a million of lives each year worldwide. Currently, more than 50 % of all modern drugs in clinical use are of natural products, many of which have an ability to control cancer cells (Madhuri and Pandey, Curr Sci 96:779-783, 2009; Richter, Traditional medicines and traditional healers in South Africa, 2003). In South Africa, plants used to treat cancer are rare even though majority of our population continue to put their trust in traditional medicine. In this study we aimed to screen Agave palmeri (AG) and Tulbaghia violacea (TV) for potential role in inducing cell death in cervical cancer cell lines HeLa and ME-180, and in normal human fibroblast cell line KMST-6 cell lines. To achieve this, AG and TV crude extracts were utilized to screen for apoptosis induction, inhibition of cell proliferation followed by elucidation of the role of Bax, Bcl-2, p53, Rb, RBBP and Mdm2 genes in cervical cancer. In brief, plant leaves and roots were collected, crushed and methanolic extracts obtained. Different concentrations of the stock extracts were used to treat cancer cells and measure cell death using the [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide] assay and flow cytometry. Western blot was applied to measure gene expression at protein level using RBBP6, p53, Mdm2, Rb, Bax, Bcl-2 and ?-actin mouse monoclonal primary antibodies (IgG) and goat anti mouse coupled with horseradish peroxidase secondary antibody from Santa Cruz Biotechnology and real time-PCR was used for mRNA expression level. Plant extracts of AG and TV were time (24 h) and dose (50, 100, 150 ?g/ml) dependent in their induction of cell death with an IC50 ~ 150 ?g/ml. A further mixed respond by several genes was observed following treatment with the two plant extracts where RBBP6 was seen to be spliced in cancer cells while Bax was induced and Bcl-2 was inhibited with the levels of p53 remaining the same. The two plant extracts do induce cell death, in a p53 independent manner. PMID:24993114

  13. Induction of mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis by Morinda citrifolia (Noni) in human cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rakesh Kumar; Banerjee, Ayan; Pathak, Suajta; Sharma, Chandresh; Singh, Neeta

    2013-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cause of cancer in women and has a high mortality rate. Cisplatin, an antitumor agent, is generally used for its treatment. However, the administration of cisplatin is associated with side effects and intrinsic resistance. Morinda citrifolia (Noni), a natural plant product, has been shown to have anti-cancer properties. In this study, we used Noni, cisplatin, and the two in combination to study their cytotoxic and apoptosis-inducing effects in cervical cancer HeLa and SiHa cell lines. We demonstrate here, that Noni/Cisplatin by themselves and their combination were able to induce apoptosis in both these cell lines. Cisplatin showed slightly higher cell killing as compared to Noni and their combination showed additive effects. The observed apoptosis appeared to be mediated particularly through the up-regulation of p53 and pro-apoptotic Bax proteins, as well as down- regulation of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2, Bcl-XL proteins and survivin. Augmentation in the activity of caspase-9 and -3 was also observed, suggesting the involvement of the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis for both Noni and Cisplatin in HeLa and SiHa cell lines. PMID:23534730

  14. RIPK3 expression in cervical cancer cells is required for PolyIC-induced necroptosis, IL-1? release, and efficient paracrine dendritic cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Susanne V.; Seibert, Stefanie; Walch-Rückheim, Barbara; Vicinus, Benjamin; Kamionka, Eva-Maria; Pahne-Zeppenfeld, Jennifer; Solomayer, Erich-Franz; Kim, Yoo-Jin; Bohle, Rainer M.; Smola, Sigrun

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that cervical cancer cells only release low levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines owing to infection with human papillomaviruses. This results in low immunogenicity of the cancer cells. The viral dsRNA analog PolyIC has been suggested as a promising adjuvant for cervical cancer immunotherapy. However, little is known about the molecular requirements resulting in successful immune activation. Here, we demonstrate that stimulation of cervical cancer cells with PolyIC induced necroptotic cell death, which was strictly dependent on the expression of the receptor-interacting protein kinase RIPK3. Necroptotic cancer cells released interleukin-1? (IL-1?), which was required for powerful activation of dendritic cells (DC) to produce IL-12, a cytokine critical for anti-tumor responses. Again both, IL-1? release and DC activation, were strictly dependent on RIPK3 expression in the tumor cells. Of note, our in situ analyses revealed heterogeneous RIPK3 expression patterns in cervical squamous cell carcinomas and adenocarcinomas. In summary, our study identified a novel RIPK3-dependent mechanism that explains how PolyIC-treatment of cervical cancer cells leads to potent DC activation. Our findings suggest that the RIPK3 expression status in cervical cancer cells might critically influence the outcome of PolyIC-based immunotherapeutic approaches and should therefore be assessed prior to immunotherapy. PMID:25888634

  15. Cervical Cancer HPV Vaccine Use

    Cancer.gov

    Skip to Main Content Search International Cancer Screening Network Sponsored by the National Cancer Institute Home | About ICSN | Collaborative Projects | Meetings | Cancer Sites | Publications | Contact Us Cervical Cancer: Mortality Rates | Organization

  16. Identification of NDRG1-regulated genes associated with invasive potential in cervical and ovarian cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Gang, E-mail: zhaog69@sjtu.edu.cn [Department of Pathology, The First People's Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai (China) [Department of Pathology, The First People's Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai (China); Department of Pathology, Tianjin Cancer Hospital, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin (China); Chen, Jiawei, E-mail: jiaweichen2000@gmail.com [Department of Pathology, The First People's Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai (China)] [Department of Pathology, The First People's Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai (China); Deng, Yanqiu [Pathophysiology Department, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin (China)] [Pathophysiology Department, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin (China); Gao, Feng [Department of Pathology, The First People's Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai (China)] [Department of Pathology, The First People's Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai (China); Zhu, Jiwei [Basic Medical College, Harbin Medical University, Harbin (China)] [Basic Medical College, Harbin Medical University, Harbin (China); Feng, Zhenzhong; Lv, Xiuhong [Department of Pathology, The First People's Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai (China)] [Department of Pathology, The First People's Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai (China); Zhao, Zheng [SAS Headquarters, S6013, 600 Research Drive, Cary, NC (United States)] [SAS Headquarters, S6013, 600 Research Drive, Cary, NC (United States)

    2011-04-29

    Highlights: {yields} NDRG1 was knockdown in cervical and ovarian cancer cell lines by shRNA technology. {yields} NDRG1 knockdown resulted in increased cell invasion activities. {yields} Ninety-six common deregulated genes in both cell lines were identified by cDNA microarray. {yields} Eleven common NDRG1-regulated genes might enhance cell invasive activity. {yields} Regulation of invasion by NDRG1 is an indirect and complicated process. -- Abstract: N-myc downstream regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) is an important gene regulating tumor invasion. In this study, shRNA technology was used to suppress NDRG1 expression in CaSki (a cervical cancer cell line) and HO-8910PM (an ovarian cancer cell line). In vitro assays showed that NDRG1 knockdown enhanced tumor cell adhesion, migration and invasion activities without affecting cell proliferation. cDNA microarray analysis revealed 96 deregulated genes with more than 2-fold changes in both cell lines after NDRG1 knockdown. Ten common upregulated genes (LPXN, DDR2, COL6A1, IL6, IL8, FYN, PTP4A3, PAPPA, ETV5 and CYGB) and one common downregulated gene (CLCA2) were considered to enhance tumor cell invasive activity. BisoGenet network analysis indicated that NDRG1 regulated these invasion effector genes/proteins in an indirect manner. Moreover, NDRG1 knockdown also reduced pro-invasion genes expression such as MMP7, TMPRSS4 and CTSK. These results suggest that regulation of invasion and metastasis by NDRG1 is a highly complicated process.

  17. Cervical Cancer Screening | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    Screening methods used to find cervical changes that may lead to cervical cancer include the Pap test and human papillomavirus (HPV) testing. Such screening tests may find cancers early, when they are most treatable. Women who have never been screened or who have not been screened in the past 5 years face a greater risk of developing invasive cervical cancer.

  18. IKK?/NF-?B mediated the low doses of bisphenol A induced migration of cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xue-Feng; Zhang, Jie; Shuai, Han-Lin; Guan, Bao-Zhang; Luo, Xin; Yan, Rui-Ling

    2015-05-01

    Cervical cancer is considered as the second most common female malignant disease. There is an urgent need to illustrate risk factors which can trigger the motility of cervical cancer cells. Our present study revealed that nanomolar concentration of bisphenol A (BPA) significantly promoted the in vitro migration and invasion of cervical cancer HeLa, SiHa, and C-33A cells. Further, BPA treatment increased the expression of metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and fibronectin (FN) in both HeLa and SiHa cells, while did not obviously change the expression of MMP-2, vimentin (Vim) or N-Cadherin (N-Cad). BAY 11-7082, the inhibitor of NF-?B, significantly abolished BPA induced up regulation of FN and MMP-9 in cervical cancer cells. While the inhibitors of PKA (H89), ERK1/2 (PD 98059), EGFR (AG1478), or PI3K/Akt (LY294002) had no effect on the expression of either FN or MMP-9. BPA treatment rapidly increased the phosphorylation of both I?B? and p65, stimulated nuclear translocation, and up regulated the promoter activities of NF-?B. The BPA induced up regulation of MMP-9 and FN and activation of NF-?B were mediated by phosphorylation of IKK? via PKC signals. Collectively, our study found for the first time that BPA stimulated the cervical cancer migration via IKK-?/NF-?B signals. PMID:25797437

  19. Effects of a Simulated CO2 Pneumoperitoneum Environment on the Proliferation, Apoptosis, and Metastasis of Cervical Cancer Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Fei; Pan, Linghui; Li, Li; Li, Danrong; Mo, Lingzhao

    2014-01-01

    Background This study aimed to investigate the growth curve, cell colony formation, cell cycle, apoptosis, anti-anoikis, and ability of invasion, adhesion, and migration of cervical cancer cells after exposure to a model of a simulated CO2 pneumoperitoneum environment with different pressures and at different times. Material/Methods The cervical cancer cells were cultured in groups with 8 and 16 mmHg of 100% CO2 for 1, 2, 3, and 4 h in a model of a simulated environment of CO2 pneumoperitoneum. The cells in the control group were cultured in a standard environment. The growth curve was drawn through constant survival cell counts for 7 days, and the group with most obvious change was selected for subsequent experiments to detect cell colony formation, cell cycle apoptosis, and anti-anoikis, and the ability of invasion, adhesion, and migration. Results After a brief inhibition, the proliferation of cervical cancer cells was markedly increased and had no relationship with different CO2 pressures. Compared with the control group, the early apoptosis rate in the experimental group was higher, and the ability of invasion, migration, and adhesion decreased significantly. Conclusions Cervical cancer cells stimulated by a CO2 pneumoperitoneum environment in vitro have an increased the ability to proliferate after a short period of inhibition and have reduced abilities of invasion, migration, and adhesion. PMID:25436974

  20. pRb-expressing adenovirus Ad5- Rb attenuates the p53-induced apoptosis in cervical cancer cell lines

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. M Ip; T.-G Huang; W. S. B Yeung; H. Y. S Ngan

    2001-01-01

    The retinoblastoma protein (pRb), the gene product of the first reported tumour suppressor gene, is functionally inactivated by the E7 protein of high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) found in most human cervical cancers. We have, in this study, constructed an adenoviral vector expressing wild-type pRb (Ad5-Rb) and used the constructed Ad5-Rb to transfect the osteosarcoma cell line Saos-2, and three cervical

  1. Cytotoxicity of Selected Medicinal and Nonmedicinal Plant Extracts to Microbial and Cervical Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Gary M.; Malmstrom, Robert D.; Kipp, Erica; Paul, Alexandra

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the cytotoxicity of 55 species of plants. Each plant was rated as medicinal, or nonmedicinal based on the existing literature. About 79% of the medicinal plants showed some cytotoxicity, while 75% of the nonmedicinal plants showed bioactivity. It appears that Asteraceae, Labiatae, Pinaceae, and Chenopodiaceae were particularly active against human cervical cancer cells. Based on the literature, only three of the 55 plants have been significantly investigated for cytotoxicity. It is clear that there is much toxicological work yet to be done with both medicinal and nonmedicinal plants. PMID:22500074

  2. Curcumin counteracts the proliferative effect of estradiol and induces apoptosis in cervical cancer cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mayank SinghNeeta Singh; Neeta Singh

    2011-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the most common cancer in Indian females and is associated with infection with high-risk Human papilloma\\u000a viruses (HPVs) which encode viral oncoprotein E6 and E7. Estradiol has been established as a risk factor for cervical cancer\\u000a and has been shown to play a synergistic role with viral oncoproteins. Curcumin (Diferuloyl methane), a chemopreventive agent,\\u000a is a natural

  3. Humic acid enhances the cytotoxic effects of arsenic trioxide on human cervical cancer cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hung-Chih Ting; Cheng-Chieh Yen; Wen-Kang Chen; Wen-Huei Chang; Ming-Chih Chou; Fung-Jou Lu

    2010-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the second leading cancer affecting women, and recent studies have demonstrated arsenic trioxide (As2O3) has therapeutic effects on cervical cancer by promoting apoptosis and inhibiting metastasis in vitro and in vivo. Humic acid (HA) possesses various pharmacologic properties, including anti-inflammatory, anti-neoplastic, and anti-proliferative effects by inducing apoptosis. We examined the growth inhibition properties and the combined effects

  4. Families of microRNAs Expressed in Clusters Regulate Cell Signaling in Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Servín-González, Luis Steven; Granados-López, Angelica Judith; López, Jesús Adrián

    2015-01-01

    Tumor cells have developed advantages to acquire hallmarks of cancer like apoptosis resistance, increased proliferation, migration, and invasion through cell signaling pathway misregulation. The sequential activation of genes in a pathway is regulated by miRNAs. Loss or gain of miRNA expression could activate or repress a particular cell axis. It is well known that aberrant miRNA expression is well recognized as an important step in the development of cancer. Individual miRNA expression is reported without considering that miRNAs are grouped in clusters and may have similar functions, such as the case of clusters with anti-oncomiRs (23b~27b~24-1, miR-29a~29b-1, miR-29b-2~29c, miR-99a~125b-2, miR-99b~125a, miR-100~125b-1, miR-199a-2~214, and miR-302s) or oncomiRs activity (miR-1-1~133a-2, miR-1-2~133a-1, miR-133b~206, miR-17~92, miR-106a~363, miR183~96~182, miR-181a-1~181b-1, and miR-181a-2~181b-2), which regulated mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase (PI3K), NOTCH, proteasome-culling rings, and apoptosis cell signaling. In this work we point out the pathways regulated by families of miRNAs grouped in 20 clusters involved in cervical cancer. Reviewing how miRNA families expressed in cluster-regulated cell path signaling will increase the knowledge of cervical cancer progression, providing important information for therapeutic, diagnostic, and prognostic methodology design. PMID:26057746

  5. Methylated Host Cell Gene Promoters and Human Papillomavirus Type 16 and 18 Predicting Cervical Lesions and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Milutin Gašperov, Nina; Sabol, Ivan; Planini?, Pavao; Grubiši?, Goran; Fistoni?, Ivan; ?oruši?, Ante; Grce, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    Change in the host and/or human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA methylation profile is probably one of the main factors responsible for the malignant progression of cervical lesions to cancer. To investigate those changes we studied 173 cervical samples with different grades of cervical lesion, from normal to cervical cancer. The methylation status of nine cellular gene promoters, CCNA1, CDH1, C13ORF18, DAPK1, HIC1, RAR?2, hTERT1, hTERT2 and TWIST1, was investigated by Methylation Specific Polymerase Chain Reaction (MSP). The methylation of HPV18 L1-gene was also investigated by MSP, while the methylated cytosines within four regions, L1, 5’LCR, enhancer, and promoter of the HPV16 genome covering 19 CpG sites were evaluated by bisulfite sequencing. Statistically significant methylation biomarkers distinguishing between cervical precursor lesions from normal cervix were primarily C13ORF18 and secondly CCNA1, and those distinguishing cervical cancer from normal or cervical precursor lesions were CCNA1, C13ORF18, hTERT1, hTERT2 and TWIST1. In addition, the methylation analysis of individual CpG sites of the HPV16 genome in different sample groups, notably the 7455 and 7694 sites, proved to be more important than the overall methylation frequency. The majority of HPV18 positive samples contained both methylated and unmethylated L1 gene, and samples with L1-gene methylated forms alone had better prognosis when correlated with the host cell gene promoters’ methylation profiles. In conclusion, both cellular and viral methylation biomarkers should be used for monitoring cervical lesion progression to prevent invasive cervical cancer. PMID:26057381

  6. Apoptosis induction of oroxylin A in human cervical cancer HeLa cell line in vitro and in vivo

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hua-Nan Li; Fei-Fei Nie; Wei Liu; Qin-Sheng Dai; Na Lu; Qi Qi; Zhi-Yu Li; Qi-Dong You; Qing-Long Guo

    2009-01-01

    Oroxylin A is a flavonoid that is found in the roots of Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi. Here, we investigated the antitumor effect of oroxylin A in human cervical cancer HeLa cell line in vitro and in vivo. We found that after inoculated with the HeLa cells the mice treated with oroxylin A showed a significant decrease of tumor volumes and tumor

  7. Radiation effects on DNA content of cervical cancer cells: A rapid evaluation of radiation sensitivity by laser scanning cytometry.

    PubMed

    Fujiyoshi, Naoki; Ushijima, Kimio; Kawano, Kouichiro; Fujiyoshi, Keizo; Yamaguchi, Tomohiko; Araki, Yuko; Kakuma, Tatsuyuki; Watanabe, Sumiko; Kaku, Tsunehisa; Nishida, Takashi; Kamura, Toshiharu

    2015-01-01

    Since uterine cervical cancer is regarded as a radiosensive tumor, ionizing radiation is the most frequently used treatment modality against the disease. Although the crucial end-point is radiation-induced cell death, the tumors are not equally sensitive to radiation. Determining the criteria that may be used to predict tumor radiosensitivity is of importance; however, little success has been achieved thus far. In radioresistant cases the therapeutic strategy should be changed, thereby avoiding ineffective or unnecessary treatment. Furthermore, identification of the underlying molecular processes leading to radioresistance may lead to novel radiosensitising strategies. Cervical smears were obtained from seven patients with locally advanced cervical cancer following each radiotherapy, and the radiation-induced damage of cancer tissue was examined by routine cytology. Since the formation of DNA double-strand breaks is considered critical for the cytocidal effect of radiation therapy, the molecular changes of the neoplastic cells were also assessed by laser scanning cytometry (LSC). Radiation-induced morphological changes of cancer cells were evident at a dose of 7.2 Gy, whereas increased DNA content (or DNA index) was observed prior to the onset of morphological changes. Molecular change was detected earlier than the morphological change of the irradiated cancer cells, indicating the feasibility of LSC in predicting the radiosensitivity of cervical cancer tissue. PMID:25469269

  8. Cytotoxicity of Trichoderma spp. cultural filtrate against human cervical and breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Abd El-Rahman, Atef Abd El-Mohsen; El-Shafei, Sally Mohamed Abd El-Aziz; Ivanova, Elena Vladimirovna; Fattakhova, Alfia Nurlimanovna; Pankova, Anna Victorovna; El-Shafei, Mohamed Abd El-Aziz; El-Morsi, El-Morsi Abu El-Fotouh; Alimova, Farida Kashifovna

    2014-01-01

    Trichoderma spp. are known as a rich source of secondary metabolites with biological activity belonging to a variety of classes of chemical compounds. These fungi also are well known for their ability to produce a wide range of antibiotic substances and to parasitize other fungi. In search for new substances, which might act as anticancer agents, the overall objective of this study was to investigate the cytotoxic effects of Trichoderma harzianum and Trichoderma asperellum cultural filtrates against human cervical and breast cancer cell lines (HeLa and MCF-7 cells respectively). To achieve this objective, cells were exposed to 20, 40, 60, 80 and 100 mg/ ml of both T. harzianum cultural filtrate (ThCF) and T. asperellum cultural filtrate (TaCF) for 24h, then the cell viability and the cytotoxic responses were assessed by using trypan blue and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2yl)- 2,5-biphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assays. Morphological changes in cells were investigated by phase contrast inverted microscopy. The results showed that ThCF and TaCF significantly reduce the cell viability, have cytotoxic effects and alter the cellular morphology of HeLa and MCF-7 cells in a concentration dependent manner. A concentration of 80 and 100mg/ml of ThCF resulted in a sharp decline in the cell viability percent of HeLa and MCF-7 respectively (25.2%, 26.5%) which was recorded by trypan blue assay. The half-maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC50) of ThCF and TaCF in HeLa and MCF-7 were recorded as 16.6, 12.0, 19.6 and 0.70 mg/ml respectively by MTT assay. These results revealed that ThCF and TaCF have a substantial ability to reduce the viability and proliferation of human cervical and breast cancer cells. PMID:25227819

  9. miR-21 modulates resistance of HR-HPV positive cervical cancer cells to radiation through targeting LATS1.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shikai; Song, Lili; Zhang, Liang; Zeng, Saitian; Gao, Fangyuan

    2015-04-17

    Although multiple miRNAs are found involved in radioresistance development in HR-HPV positive (+) cervical cancer, only limited studies explored the regulative mechanism of the miRNAs. miR-21 is one of the miRNAs significantly upregulated in HR-HPV (+) cervical cancer is also significantly associated with radioresistance. However, the detailed regulative network of miR-21 in radioresistance is still not clear. In this study, we confirmed that miR-21 overexpression was associated with higher level of radioresistance in HR-HPV (+) cervical cancer patients and thus decided to further explore its role. Findings of this study found miR-21 can negatively affect radiosensitivity of HR-HPV (+) cervical cancer cells and decrease radiation induced G2/M block and increase S phase accumulation. By using dual luciferase assay, we verified a binding site between miR-21 and 3'-UTR of large tumor suppressor kinase 1 (LATS1). Through direct binding, miR-21 can regulate LATS1 expression in cervical cancer cells. LATS1 overexpression can reverse miR-21 induced higher colony formation rate and also reduced miR-21 induced S phase accumulation and G2/M phase block reduction under radiation treatment. These results suggested that miR-21-LATS1 axis plays an important role in regulating radiosensitivity. PMID:25769949

  10. New Technologies for Cervical Cancer Screening

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Alaina J.; Trimble, Cornelia L.

    2013-01-01

    New technologies for cervical cancer screening seek to provide an accurate, efficient, and cost-effective way of identifying women at risk for cervical cancer. Current screening uses HPV DNA testing combined with cytology and requires multiple visits at a great cost to the patient and the society. New methods for screening include HPV diagnostics (detection of either the presence of HPV or integration of the virus into the host cell), proliferation, and detection of epigenetic changes, either in the host or virus. These methods show promise in changing the way that current cervical cancer screening is undertaken in both low and high-resource settings. PMID:22119058

  11. MicroRNA-491-5p suppresses cervical cancer cell growth by targeting hTERT.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qiang; Zhai, Ying-Xian; Liu, Huan-Qiu; Shi, Ying-Ai; Li, Xin-Bai

    2015-08-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that have been shown to regulate a variety of biological processes by targeting messenger RNA. MicroRNA-491-5p (miR-491-5p), an important miRNA, has been demonstrated to be involved in the processes of initiation and progression in several tumors. However, the precise biological function of miR-491-5p and its molecular mechanism in cervical cancer cells remain elusive. The present study was carried out to investigate the clinical significance and prognostic value of miR-491-5p expression in cervical cancer, and to evaluate the role of miR-491-5p and the underlying molecular mechanisms involved in cervical cancer. The results showed that miR-491-5p expression was significantly downregulated in cervical cancer tissues when compared with the corresponding adjacent normal tissues (P<0.001), and the value was negatively associated with advanced International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage, high histological grading and lymph node metastasis (P<0.01). The enforced expression of miR-491-5p in cervical cancer cells significantly inhibited proliferation, migration and invasion, induced cell apoptosis, and suppressed the tumor growth of the mouse model of HeLa cells. In addition, the dual-luciferase reporter assay revealed that human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) was identified as a novel target gene of miR-491-5p. Notably, it was found that miR-491-5p regulated the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway. These results suggested that targeting miR-491-5p is a strategy for blocking the development of cervical cancer. PMID:26034994

  12. Gene transfection efficacy assessment of human cervical cancer cells using dual-mode fluorescence microendoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Jaepyeong; Zhang, Jing; Gurbani, Saumya; Cheon, Gyeong Woo; Li, Min; Kang, Jin U.

    2012-01-01

    We report a novel approach to quantitatively assess gene transfection efficacy using dual-modality microendoscopy that can simultaneously monitor both laser scanning reflectance and fluorescence imaging. The system uses a 500-?m-diameter coherent fiber bundle and permits 3.5-?m lateral resolution. Both reflectance and fluorescence images obtained from two silicon avalanche photodetectors are displaying at 1 Hz and processed automatically to calculate gene transfection efficiency (the ratio of fluorescent cells among the total cells). To validate the system performance we examined the expression of cyan fluorescent protein using human cervical cancer cells (HeLa) in four commercially available reagents. The result was compared with that using a high-resolution bench-top microscope. PMID:23304654

  13. Recurrent Integration of Human Papillomaviruses 16, 45, and 67 Near Translocation Breakpoints in New Cervical Cancer Cell Lines1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Louise A. Koopman; Karoly Szuhai; Jaap D. H. van Eendenburg; Vladimir Bezrookove; Gemma G. Kenter; Ed Schuuring; Hans Tanke; Gert Jan Fleuren

    1999-01-01

    Progressive chromosomal changes and integration of human papillo- mavirus (HPV) sequences mark the development of invasive cervical cancer. Chromosomal localization of HPV integration is essential to the study of genomic regions involved in HPV-induced pathogenesis. Yet, the available information about HPV integration loci is still limited, especially with respect to different HPV types. We have established cell lines from five

  14. Expression of MICA, MICB and NKG2D in human leukemic myelomonocytic and cervical cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cancer cells are known to secrete the stress molecules MICA and MICB that activate cytotoxicity by lymphocytes and NK cells through their NKG2D receptor as a mechanism of immunological defense. This work was undertaken to evaluate if cancer cells can also express this receptor as a possible mechanisms of depletion of MIC molecules and thus interfere with their immune recognition. Methods Myelomonocytic leukemic (TPH-1 and U-937) and cervical cancer (CALO and INBL) cell lines were evaluated by Western Blot, ELISA, flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry to evaluate their capacity to express and secrete MICA and MICB and to be induced to proliferate by these molecules as well as to express their receptor NKG2D. Statistical analysis was performed by two-way ANOVA for time course analysis and Student's t-test for comparison between groups. Values were considered significantly different if p < 0.05. Results THP-1 and U-937 produce and secrete the stress MICA and MICB as shown by Western Blot of lysed cells and by ELISA of their conditioned media. By Western Blot and flow cytometry we found that these cells also express the receptor NKG2D. When THP-1 and U-937 were cultured with recombinant MICA and MICB they exhibited a dose dependent induction for their proliferation. CALO and INBL also produce MICA and MICB and were induced to proliferate by these stress molecules. By Western Blot, flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry we also found that these cells express NKG2D. Conclusions Our novel results that tumor cells can simultaneously secrete MIC molecules and express their receptor, and to be induced for proliferation by these stress molecules, and that tumor epithelial cells can also express the NKG2D receptor that was thought to be exclusive of NK and cytotoxic lymphocytes is discussed as a possible mechanism of immunological escape and of tumor growth induction. PMID:21477352

  15. MicroRNA-18a enhances the radiosensitivity of cervical cancer cells by promoting radiation-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sha; Pan, Xiaofen; Yang, Qin; Wen, Lu; Jiang, Yao; Zhao, Yingchao; Li, Guiling

    2015-06-01

    Evidence has demonstrated that microRNAs (miRNAs) are important in the regulation of cellular radiosensitivity of various types of human cancer. The aim of this study was to examine the role of miR-18a in regulating the radiosensitivity of cervical cancer, in order to understand the underlying mechanism and to assess the potential of miR-18a as a biomarker for predicting radiosensitivity. The expression of miR-18a was investigated in 48 cervical cancer patients. The results revealed that miR-18a expression was significantly higher in radiosensitive patients than in radioresistant patients by RT-qPCR (P<0.05). Transient transfection experiments showed that miR-18a was upregulated by the miR-18a mimic and downregulated by the miR-18a inhibitor in the SiHa and HeLa cells. Without irradiation treatment, a similar growth was observed in the cells with or without transfection of miR-18a. The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) and Hoechst staining assays showed that miR-18a had no effect on the proliferation and apoptosis of cervical cancer cells after transfection. However, the upregulation of miR-18a suppressed the level of ataxia-telangiectasia mutated and attenuated DNA double-strand break repair after irradiation, which re-sensitized the cervical cancer cells to radiotherapy by promoting apoptosis. Taken together, these results demonstrated that miR-18a is a potential molecule predictor of radiosensitivity in cervical cancer patients and played an important role in the response to radiotherapy. PMID:25963391

  16. Differential expression of Oct4 in HPV-positive and HPV-negative cervical cancer cells is not regulated by DNA methyltransferase 3A

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dongbo Liu; Peng Zhou; Li Zhang; Gengze Wu; Yingru Zheng; Fengtian He

    The colony-forming ability of cervical cancer is affected by many factors. Oct4, an important transcription factor, is highly\\u000a expressed in several tumors and promotes the colony-forming ability of cancer cells. Thus, it is considered a potential target\\u000a for the treatment of cancer. However, we know little about the expression level of Oct4 and its epigenetic regulatory mechanism\\u000a in cervical cancer

  17. Homozygous deletion of the STK11/LKB1 locus and the generation of novel fusion transcripts in cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    McCabe, Michael T; Powell, Doris R; Zhou, Wei; Vertino, Paula M

    2010-03-01

    The STK11/LKB1 gene encodes a ubiquitously expressed serine/threonine kinase that is mutated in multiple sporadic cancers including non-small cell lung carcinomas, pancreatic cancers, and melanomas. LKB1 plays a role in multiple cellular functions including cell growth, cell cycle progression, metabolism, cell polarity, and migration. To date, only a limited number of studies have assessed the status of LKB1 in cervical cancers. Herein, we investigate DNA methylation, DNA mutation, and transcription at the LKB1 locus in cervical cancer cell lines. We identified homozygous deletions of 25-85kb in the HeLa and SiHa cell lines. Deletion breakpoint analysis in HeLa cells revealed that the deletion resulted from an Alu-recombination-mediated deletion (ARMD) and generated a novel LKB1 fusion transcript driven by an uncharacterized CpG island promoter located approximately 11kb upstream of LKB1. Although the homozygous deletion in SiHa cells removes the entire LKB1 gene and portions of the neighboring genes SBNO2 and c19orf26, this deletion also generates a fusion transcript driven by the c19orf26 promoter and composed of both c19orf26 and SBNO2 sequences. Further analyses of public gene expression and mutation databases suggest that LKB1 and its neighboring genes are frequently dysregulated in primary cervical cancers. Thus, homozygous deletions affecting LKB1 in cervical cancers may generate multiple fusion transcripts involving LKB1, SBNO2, and c19orf26. PMID:20193846

  18. Tualang honey induces apoptosis and disrupts the mitochondrial membrane potential of human breast and cervical cancer cell lines

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Agustine Nengsih Fauzi; Mohd. Nor Norazmi; Nik Soriani Yaacob

    2011-01-01

    Honey is reported to contain various compounds such as phenols, vitamins and antioxidants. The present study investigates the anticancer potential of Tualang honey (Agromas) (TH) in human breast (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231) and cervical (HeLa) cancer cell lines; as well as in the normal breast epithelial cell line, MCF-10A. The cells were treated with increasing doses of TH (1–10%) for up

  19. Anticancer effect of aloe-emodin on cervical cancer cells involves G2\\/M arrest and induction of differentiation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jun-ming Guo; Bing-xiu Xiao; Qiong Liu; Shun Zhang; Dong-hai Liu; Zhao-hui Gong

    2007-01-01

    Aim:The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of aloe-emodin, a natural compound from the root and rhizome of Rheum palmatum, on the growth of human cervical cancer cells, HeLa.Methods:HeLa cells were treated with various concentrations of aloe-emodin for 1-5 d, and cell growth was measured by 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay. The long-term growth effect was

  20. Regulation of cell growth through cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in HPV 16 positive human cervical cancer cells by tea polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Singh, Madhulika; Tyagi, Shilpa; Bhui, Kulpreet; Prasad, Sahdeo; Shukla, Yogeshwer

    2010-06-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common malignant neoplasm in women, in terms of both incidence and mortality rates worldwide. The polyphenolic constituents of tea (Camellia sinensis) have gained considerable attention because of its anti-cancer properties against a variety of cancers. Here we studied the effects of green and black tea polyphenols (GTP and BTP), on cellular proliferation and cell death in the SiHa cells (human cervical cancer) expressing the human papilloma virus (HPV)-16. The result showed that both GTP and BTP inhibited proliferation of cells in dose and time dependent manner. Cell cycle analysis showed anti-proliferative effect of GTP which is associated with an increase in the G2/M phase and apoptotic effect of BTP in 24 h treated SiHa cells. Further, on increase of incubation time for 48 h, GTP caused induction of apoptosis up to 20% of SiHa cells. The role GTP and BTP in apoptosis was further confirmed by reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential and increased levels of membrane phosphatidylserine. Thus, our data suggests that tea polyphenols exhibit anti-cancer potential against cervical cancer by inhibition of cell growth and induction of apoptosis. PMID:19271153

  1. Isothiocyanates sensitize the effect of chemotherapeutic drugs via modulation of protein kinase C and telomerase in cervical cancer cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sutapa Mukherjee; Shubhabrata Dey; R. K. Bhattacharya; Madhumita Roy

    2009-01-01

    Isothiocyanates have potential chemopreventive and antitumor effects. In the present study, we examined the actions of PEITC\\u000a and sulphoraphane in modulating the activity of protein kinase C (PKC) and telomerase in cervical cancer cell line HeLa. These\\u000a tumor markers are highly activated in human cancers. These compound efficiently downregulated the antiapoptotic isoforms (PKC-?,\\u000a -?II, -?, and -?) as well as

  2. Gliotoxin Isolated from Marine Fungus Aspergillus sp. Induces Apoptosis of Human Cervical Cancer and Chondrosarcoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Van-Tinh; Lee, Jung Suck; Qian, Zhong-Ji; Li, Yong-Xin; Kim, Kil-Nam; Heo, Soo-Jin; Jeon, You-Jin; Park, Won Sun; Choi, Il-Whan; Je, Jae-Young; Jung, Won-Kyo

    2013-01-01

    Gliotoxin, a secondary metabolite produced by marine fungus Aspergillus sp., possesses various biological activities including anticancer activity. However, the mechanism underlying gliotoxin-induced cytotoxicity on human cervical cancer (Hela) and human chondrosarcoma (SW1353) cells remains unclear. In this study, we focused on the effect of gliotoxin induction on apoptosis, the activating expressions of caspase family enzymes in the cells. Apoptotic cell levels were measured through DAPI and Annexin V/Propidium Iodide (PI) double staining analysis. The apoptotic protein expression of Bcl-2 and caspase family was detected by Western blot in Hela and SW1353 cells. Our results showed that gliotoxin treatment inhibited cell proliferation and induced significant morphological changes. Gliotoxin induced apoptosis was further confirmed by DNA fragmentation, chromatin condensation and disrupted mitochondrial membrane potential. Gliotoxin-induced activation of caspase-3, caspase-8 and caspase-9, down-regulation of Bcl-2, up-regulation of Bax and cytochromec (cyt c) release showed evidence for the gliotoxin activity on apoptosis. These findings suggest that gliotoxin isolated from marine fungus Aspergillus sp. induced apoptosis in Hela and SW1353 cells via the mitochondrial pathway followed by downstream events leading to apoptotic mode of cell death. PMID:24368570

  3. I. Cervical dysplasia = abnormal tissue growth n Cervical cancer develops in the

    E-print Network

    Dever, Jennifer A.

    in flat, scaly surface cells that line the cervix (called squamous cell carcinomas). Approximately 10-15% of cases develop in glandular surface cells (called adenocarcinomas). Types of Cervical Cancer: Squamous Cell Carcinoma Adenocarcinoma Small Cell Carcinoma #12;11/12/12 2 B. Incidence & Prevelance n Cervical

  4. Targeting Pro-Apoptotic TRAIL Receptors Sensitizes HeLa Cervical Cancer Cells to Irradiation-Induced Apoptosis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John H. Maduro; Elisabeth G. E. de Vries; Gert-Jan Meersma; Brigitte M. T. Hougardy; Steven de Jong

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the potential of irradiation in combination with drugs targeting the tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) death receptor (DR)4 and DR5 and their mechanism of action in a cervical cancer cell line. Methods and Materials: Recombinant human TRAIL (rhTRAIL) and the agonistic antibodies against DR4 and DR5 were added to irradiated HeLa cells. The effect was evaluated

  5. Radiation Sensitivity, H2AX Phosphorylation, and Kinetics of Repair of DNA Strand Breaks in Irradiated Cervical Cancer Cell Lines

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Judit P. Banath; Susan H. MacPhail; Peggy L. Olive

    2004-01-01

    Six human cervical cancer cell lines (five human papillomavirus (HPV) positive, one HPV negative) for induction and rejoining of DNA strand breaks and for kinetics of formation and loss of serine 139 phosphorylated histone H2AX (H2AX). X-rays induced the same level of DNA breakage for all cell lines. By 8 hours after 20 Gy, <2% of the initial single-strand breaks

  6. Evidence of an Association between Human Papillomavirus and Impaired Chemotherapy-Induced Apoptosis in Cervical Cancer Cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Luis A. Padilla; Benjamin S. Leung; Linda F. Carson

    2002-01-01

    Objectives. The aim of this study was to determine cervical cancer cell sensitivity to chemotherapy-induced apoptosis based on human papillomavirus (HPV) status.Methods. CaSki (HPV-positive) and C33A (HPV-negative) cells were treated with camptothecin or cisplatin. Cellular viability was determined by trypan blue exclusion. Apoptotic indexes were determined by flow cytometric analysis of annexin V labeling and morphological changes. Mitochondrial release of

  7. Induction of FADD Expression and Caspase Cascades Involved in RC-RNase-Induced Apoptosis in Human Cervical Cancer Cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Huey-Chung Huang; You-Di Liao; Li-Li Chen; Tze-Sing Huang

    2007-01-01

    AIM: RC-RNase is a novel member of RNase A superfamily from Rana catesbeiana (bullfrog) oocytes. This study is to investigate the cytotoxic effect of RC-RNase on cancer cells. The cytotoxic mechanisms were investigated and discussed. METHODS: Cytotoxicity of RC-RNase to human cervical caner HeLa S3 cells was determined by microculture tetrazolium test and trypan blue exclusion assay. Apop- totic characteristics,

  8. Proteomic Investigation into Betulinic Acid-Induced Apoptosis of Human Cervical Cancer HeLa Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Tao; Pang, Qiuying; Zhou, Dong; Zhang, Aiqin; Luo, Shaman; Wang, Yang; Yan, Xiufeng

    2014-01-01

    Betulinic acid is a pentacyclic triterpenoid that exhibits anticancer functions in human cancer cells. This study provides evidence that betulinic acid is highly effective against the human cervical cancer cell line HeLa by inducing dose- and time-dependent apoptosis. The apoptotic process was further investigated using a proteomics approach to reveal protein expression changes in HeLa cells following betulinic acid treatment. Proteomic analysis revealed that there were six up- and thirty down-regulated proteins in betulinic acid-induced HeLa cells, and these proteins were then subjected to functional pathway analysis using multiple analysis software. UDP-glucose 6-dehydrogenase, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase decarboxylating, chain A Horf6-a novel human peroxidase enzyme that involved in redox process, was found to be down-regulated during the apoptosis process of the oxidative stress response pathway. Consistent with our results at the protein level, an increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species was observed in betulinic acid-treated cells. The proteins glucose-regulated protein and cargo-selection protein TIP47, which are involved in the endoplasmic reticulum pathway, were up-regulated by betulinic acid treatment. Meanwhile, 14-3-3 family proteins, including 14-3-3? and 14-3-3?, were down-regulated in response to betulinic acid treatment, which is consistent with the decrease in expression of the target genes 14-3-3? and 14-3-3?. Furthermore, it was found that the antiapoptotic bcl-2 gene was down-regulated while the proapoptotic bax gene was up-regulated after betulinic acid treatment in HeLa cells. These results suggest that betulinic acid induces apoptosis of HeLa cells by triggering both the endoplasmic reticulum pathway and the ROS-mediated mitochondrial pathway. PMID:25148076

  9. Lethality of PAK3 and SGK2 shRNAs to human papillomavirus positive cervical cancer cells is independent of PAK3 and SGK2 knockdown.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Nannan; Ding, Bo; Agler, Michele; Cockett, Mark; McPhee, Fiona

    2015-01-01

    The p21-activated kinase 3 (PAK3) and the serum and glucocorticoid-induced kinase 2 (SGK2) have been previously proposed as essential kinases for human papillomavirus positive (HPV+) cervical cancer cell survival. This was established using a shRNA knockdown approach. To validate PAK3 and SGK2 as potential targets for HPV+ cervical cancer therapy, the relationship between shRNA-induced phenotypes in HPV+ cervical cancer cells and PAK3 or SGK2 knockdown was carefully examined. We observed that the phenotypes of HPV+ cervical cancer cells induced by various PAK3 and SGK2 shRNAs could not be rescued by complement expression of respective cDNA constructs. A knockdown-deficient PAK3 shRNA with a single mismatch was sufficient to inhibit HeLa cell growth to a similar extent as wild-type PAK3 shRNA. The HPV+ cervical cancer cells were also susceptible to several non-human target shRNAs. The discrepancy between PAK3 and SGK2 shRNA-induced apoptosis and gene expression knockdown, as well as cell death stimulation, suggested that these shRNAs killed HeLa cells through different pathways that may not be target-specific. These data demonstrated that HPV+ cervical cancer cell death was not associated with RNAi-induced PAK3 and SGK2 knockdown but likely through off-target effects. PMID:25615606

  10. Berry extracts exert different antiproliferative effects against cervical and colon cancer cells grown in vitro.

    PubMed

    McDougall, Gordon J; Ross, Heather A; Ikeji, Magnus; Stewart, Derek

    2008-05-14

    Polyphenol-rich berry extracts were screened for their antiproliferative effectiveness using human cervical cancer (HeLa) cells grown in microtiter plates. Rowan berry, raspberry, lingonberry, cloudberry, arctic bramble, and strawberry extracts were effective but blueberry, sea buckthorn, and pomegranate extracts were considerably less effective. The most effective extracts (strawberry > arctic bramble > cloudberry > lingonberry) gave EC 50 values in the range of 25-40 microg/(mL of phenols). These extracts were also effective against human colon cancer (CaCo-2) cells, which were generally more sensitive at low concentrations but conversely less sensitive at higher concentrations. The strawberry, cloudberry, arctic bramble, and the raspberry extracts share common polyphenol constituents, especially the ellagitannins, which have been shown to be effective antiproliferative agents. However, the components underlying the effectiveness of the lingonberry extracts are not known. The lingonberry extracts were fractionated into anthocyanin-rich and tannin-rich fractions by chromatography on Sephadex LH-20. The anthocyanin-rich fraction was considerably less effective than the original extract, whereas the antiproliferative activity was retained in the tannin-rich fraction. The polyphenolic composition of the lingonberry extract was assessed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and was similar to previous reports. The tannin-rich fraction was almost entirely composed of procyanidins of linkage type A and B. Therefore, the antiproliferative activity of lingonberry was caused predominantly by procyanidins. PMID:18412361

  11. The combined treatment of aspirin and radiation induces apoptosis by the regulation of bcl-2 and caspase-3 in human cervical cancer cell

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kye Young Kim; Ji Yeon Seol; Geong-A Jeon; Myeong Jin Nam

    2003-01-01

    The antitumor mechanisms mediated by combined treatment of aspirin and radiation on human cervical cancer cells are unclear. In this paper, we studied whether aspirin and radiation induced apoptosis and whether the sensitivity to radiation was enhanced in aspirin-pretreated HeLa TG, human cervical cancer cells. We identified the regulation of apoptosis-responsive genes, bcl-2, caspase-3 and p53 after combined treatment. To

  12. The LKB1 tumor suppressor differentially affects anchorage independent growth of HPV positive cervical cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Mack, Hildegard I.D.; Munger, Karl

    2013-01-01

    Infection with high-risk human papillomaviruses is causally linked to cervical carcinogenesis. However, most lesions caused by high-risk HPV infections do not progress to cancer. Host cell mutations contribute to malignant progression but the molecular nature of such mutations is unknown. Based on a previous study that reported an association between liver kinase B1 (LKB1) tumor suppressor loss and poor outcome in cervical cancer, we sought to determine the molecular basis for this observation. LKB1-negative cervical and lung cancer cells were reconstituted with wild type or kinase defective LKB1 mutants and we examined the importance of LKB1 catalytic activity in known LKB1-regulated processes including inhibition of cell proliferation and elevated resistance to energy stress. Our studies revealed marked differences in the biological activities of two kinase defective LKB1 mutants in the various cell lines. Thus, our results suggest that LKB1 may be a cell-type specific tumor suppressor. PMID:24074562

  13. Effects of tatariside G isolated from Fagopyrum tataricum roots on apoptosis in human cervical cancer HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan; Wang, Su-Juan; Xia, Wei; Rahman, Khalid; Zhang, Yan; Peng, Hao; Zhang, Hong; Qin, Lu-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common female carcinoma. Current therapies are often unsatisfactory, especially for advanced stage patients. The aim of this study was to explore the effects of tatariside G (TG) on apoptosis in human cervical cancer HeLa cells and the possible mechanism of action involved. An MTT assay was employed to evaluate cell viability. Hoechst 33258 staining and flow cytometry (FCM) assays were used to detect cell apoptosis. The protein expression of phosphorylated JNK, P38, ERK and Akt and cleaved caspase-3 and caspase-9 was evaluated by western blot analysis. Additionally, the mRNA expression of caspase-3 and caspase-9 was measured by fluorescent quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (FQ-RT-PCR). TG notably inhibited cell viability, enhanced the percentage of apoptotic cells, facilitated the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and JNK proteins and caspase-3 and caspase-9 cracking, downregulated the phosphorylation level of Akt, and increased the loss of MMP and the mRNA expression of caspase-3 and caspase-9. TG-induced apoptosis is associated with activation of the mitochondrial death pathway. TG may be an effective candidate for chemotherapy against cervical cancer. PMID:25076146

  14. January Monthly Spotlight: Cervical Health and Cervical Cancer Disparities

    Cancer.gov

    In January, CRCHD joins the nation in raising awareness for Cervical Health and Cervical Cancer Disparities. This month we share a special focus on NCI/CRCHD research programs that are trying to reduce cervical cancer disparities in underserved communities and the people who are spreading the word about the importance of early detection.

  15. Drugs Approved for Cervical Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for cervical cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  16. Human telomerase reverse transcriptase regulates vascular endothelial growth factor expression via human papillomavirus oncogene E7 in HPV-18-positive cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Fang; Cui, Jinquan

    2015-07-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection induces chronic and precancerous lesions and results in invasive cervical cancer. Human telomerase as well as inflammatory and angiogenic factors such as telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) or vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) could play a role in regulating HPV-induced cervical cancer. This study investigated underlying molecular events in HPV-induced HPV-positive cervical cancer through hTERT and VEGF in vitro. Expressions of hTERT, a rate-limiting subunit of telomerase, and VEGF mRNA and proteins were, respectively, assessed by qRT-PCR, ELISA, and TRAP-ELISA in HPV-positive tissue samples and cervical cancer cell lines. To assess hTERT and VEGF secretion, hTERT overexpression and knockdown were conducted in HPV-18-positive Hela cells by hTERT cDNA and shRNA transfection, respectively. Then, the effect of HPV E6 and E7 on VEGF expressions was assessed in HPV-negative cervical cancer cells. Data have shown that VEGF expression levels are associated with hTERT expressions and telomerase activity in HPV-positive cervical cancer tissues and cells. Knockdown of hTERT expression down-regulated VEGF expressions, whereas overexpression of hTERT up-regulated VEGF expressions in HPV-18-positive Hela cells. Furthermore, HPV E7 oncoprotein was necessary for hTERT to up-regulate VEGF expressions in HPV-negative cervical cancer cells. Data from this current study indicate that HPV oncoproteins up-regulated hTERT and telomerase activity and in turn promoted VEGF expressions, which could be a key mechanism for HPV-induced cervical cancer development and progression. PMID:26067630

  17. Curcuma wenyujin Extract Induces Apoptosis and Inhibits Proliferation of Human Cervical Cancer Cells In Vitro and In Vivo

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chuan-Bian Lim; Nung Ky; Hui-Min Ng; Mohamed Sabry Hamza; Yan Zhao

    2010-01-01

    An essential oil extract, derived from the rhizome of Curcuma wenyujin (CWE), possesses antioxidative, antimicrobial, and anti-inflammatory properties. However, it remains unknown how exactly CWE inhibits tumor growth. In this study, using human cervical cancer HeLa cells, the authors postulated that CWE has the ability to inhibit tumor growth. The study shows that CWE dose-dependently suppressed colony formation and inhibited

  18. Cancer-derived immunoglobulin G promotes LPS-induced proinflammatory cytokine production via binding to TLR4 in cervical cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Hui; Shao, Jimin; Gu, Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies have shown that various cancer cells express immunoglobulin G (IgG). However, the function of cancer-derived IgG and the underlying mechanism remain unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that IgG expression was significantly altered after exposure to LPS in cervical cancer cells, suggesting that IgG was potentially involved in regulation of TLR4 signaling. Reduction of IgG attenuated LPS-induced proinflammatory cytokine production. The phosphorylation levels of NF-?B and MAPK were consistently suppressed by knockdown of IgG, which in turn impaired NF-?B nuclear translocation and the activity of NF-?B responsive element. Furthermore, we found that IgG was recruited to TLR4 in the cytoplasm after LPS stimulation, and IgG silencing inhibited LPS-initiated proinflammatory cytokine production through downregulating TLR4 expression. Similar results were obtained in a mouse model of endotoxemia and human tissues. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that IgG is a positive regulator of LPS-induced proinflammatory cytokine production by binding to TLR4 and enhancing its expression. TLR4 signaling plays a positive role in the development of many inflammation induced cancers such as cervical cancer. Our study strongly indicates that IgG may promote cervical cancer cell proliferation through enhancing TLR4 signaling. IgG may be a novel therapeutic target in treating inflammation mediated cancers. PMID:25179302

  19. Identification of peptides presented by HLA class I molecules on cervical cancer cells with HPV-18 infection.

    PubMed

    García, A M; Ortíz-Navarrete, V F; Mora-García, M L; Flores-Borja, F; Diaz-Quiñonez, A; Isibasi-Araujo, A; Trejo-Becerril, C; Chacón-Salinas, R; Hernández-Montes, J; Granados-Arreola, J; de Leo, C; Weiss-Steider, B

    1999-04-15

    In this work we eluted peptides from purified class I MHC molecules, isolated from a novel human cervical carcinoma cell line (INBL), generated in our laboratory and positive for HPV-18 infection. A fraction of these peptides was capable of stimulating T lymphocytes obtained from a donor matched for HLA-Cw4 and who was also HPV-18+. Direct N-terminal Edman degradation of these peptides, revealed the sequence (XQFPIFLQF) that matched 85% with the sequence NVFPIFLQM localized in between the 54 and 62 residues of the HPV-18 L1 protein. After stimulation with the synthetic peptide NVFPIFLQM, T lymphocytes from the donor were capable to lyse INBL cells. Our results provide evidence of the existence of naturally occurring viral epitopes presented on cervical cancer cells by the HLA-Cw4 allele, that could be useful for immunotherapy on this type of patient. PMID:10369123

  20. Radiosensitization of Human Cervical Cancer Cells by Inhibiting Ribonucleotide Reductase: Enhanced Radiation Response at Low-Dose Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Kunos, Charles A., E-mail: charles.kunos@UHhospitals.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals Case Medical Center and Case Western Reserve School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH (United States); Colussi, Valdir C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals Case Medical Center and Case Western Reserve School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH (United States); Pink, John [Department of General Medical Sciences, University Hospitals Case Medical Center and Case Western Reserve School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH (United States); Radivoyevitch, Tomas [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, University Hospitals Case Medical Center and Case Western Reserve School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH (United States); Oleinick, Nancy L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals Case Medical Center and Case Western Reserve School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To test whether pharmacologic inhibition of ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) by 3-aminopyridine-2-carboxaldehyde thiosemicarbazone (3-AP, NSC no. 663249) enhances radiation sensitivity during low-dose-rate ionizing radiation provided by a novel purpose-built iridium-192 cell irradiator. Methods and Materials: The cells were exposed to low-dose-rate radiation (11, 23, 37, 67 cGy/h) using a custom-fabricated cell irradiator or to high-dose-rate radiation (330 cGy/min) using a conventional cell irradiator. The radiation sensitivity of human cervical (CaSki, C33-a) cancer cells with or without RNR inhibition by 3-AP was evaluated using a clonogenic survival and an RNR activity assay. Alteration in the cell cycle distribution was monitored using flow cytometry. Results: Increasing radiation sensitivity of both CaSki and C33-a cells was observed with the incremental increase in radiation dose rates. 3-AP treatment led to enhanced radiation sensitivity in both cell lines, eliminating differences in cell cytotoxicity from the radiation dose rate. RNR blockade by 3-AP during low-dose-rate irradiation was associated with low RNR activity and extended G{sub 1}-phase cell cycle arrest. Conclusions: We conclude that RNR inhibition by 3-AP impedes DNA damage repair mechanisms that rely on deoxyribonucleotide production and thereby increases radiation sensitivity of human cervical cancers to low-dose-rate radiation.

  1. HPV vaccination and cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Szarewski, Anne

    2012-12-01

    Cervical cancer is the third most common cancer in women worldwide and often affects women under 40 years with young families. Vaccination against the human papillomavirus (HPV) is a major advance, since it offers primary prevention against the infectious agent that is the main cause of the disease. Two prophylactic vaccines have shown great promise in clinical trials. One of these (Gardasil(®)) contains all four HPV types, offering protection against genital warts (types 6 and 11) as well as cervical cancer (types 16 and 18). The other (Cervarix(®)) contains types 16 and 18, targeting cervical cancer alone, but also has a degree of cross-protection against types 31 and 45, which could significantly increase the level of protection. Adolescent girls remain the primary target of vaccination programmes, but the issues of vaccinating boys and older women are increasingly debated. PMID:22890794

  2. NIH Research Leads to Cervical Cancer Vaccine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Issues Sexually Transmitted Diseases NIH Research Leads to Cervical Cancer Vaccine Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of ... in women, the cause of the majority of cervical cancers. Photo courtesy of Judy Folkenberg, NLM Writer ...

  3. Cervical Cancer Prevention and Screening: Financial Issues

    MedlinePLUS

    ... with lower incomes and those without insurance. Federal law Coverage of cervical cancer screening tests is mandated ... says. They also are not covered by state laws, including those about cervical cancer screening. Women who ...

  4. Anti-TROP2 conjugated hollow gold nanospheres as a novel nanostructure for targeted photothermal destruction of cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ting; Tian, Jiguang; Chen, Zhaolong; Liang, Ying; Liu, Jiao; Liu, Si; Li, Huihui; Zhan, Jinhua; Yang, Xingsheng

    2014-08-29

    Photothermal ablation (PTA) is a promising avenue in the area of cancer therapeutics that destroys tumor cells through conversion of near-infrared (NIR) laser light to heat. Hollow gold nanospheres (HGNs) are one of the few materials that are capable of converting light to heat and have been previously used for photothermal ablation studies. Selective delivery of functional nanoparticles to the tumor site is considered as an effective therapeutic approach. In this paper, we demonstrated the anti-cancer potential of HGNs. HGNs were conjugated with monoclonal antibody (anti-TROP2) in order to target cervical cancer cells (HeLa) that contain abundant trophoblast cell surface antigen 2 (TROP2) on the cell surface. The efficient uptake and intracellular location of these functionalized HGNs were studied through application of inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Cytotoxicity induced by PTA was measured using CCK-8 assay. HeLa cells incubated with naked HGNs (0.3-3 nmol L(-1)) within 48 h did not show obvious cytotoxicity. Under laser irradiation at suitable power, anti-TROP2 conjugated HGNs achieved significant tumor cell growth inhibition in comparison to the effects of non-specific PEGylated HGNs (P < 0.05). ?H2AX assay results revealed higher occurrences of DNA-DSBs with anti-TROP2 conjugated HGNs plus laser radiation as compared to treatment with laser alone. Flow cytometry analysis showed that the amount of cell apoptosis was increased after laser irradiation with anti-TROP2 conjugated HGNs (P < 0.05). Anti-TROP2 conjugated HGNs resulted in down-regulation of Bcl-2 expression and up-regulation of Bax expression. Our study results confirmed that anti-TROP2 conjugated HGNs can selectively destroy cervical cancer cells through inducing its apoptosis and DNA damages. We propose that HGNs have the potentials to mediate targeted cancer treatment. PMID:25102337

  5. Knock-down of NDRG2 sensitizes cervical cancer Hela cells to cisplatin through suppressing Bcl-2 expression

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background NDRG2, a member of N-Myc downstream regulated gene family, plays some roles in cellular stress, cell differentiation and tumor suppression. We have found that NDRG2 expression in cervical cancer Hela cells increases significantly upon stimulation with cisplatin, the most popular chemotherapeutic agent currently used for the treatment of advanced cervical cancer. This interesting phenomenon drove us to evaluate the role of NDRG2 in chemosensitivity of Hela cells. Methods In the present study, RNA interference was employed to down-regulate NDRG2 expression in Hela cells. RT-PCR and Western blot were used to detect expression of NDRG2, Bcl-2 and Bax in cancer cells. Real-time PCR was applied to detect miR-15b and miR-16 expression levels. Drug sensitivity was determined with MTT assay. Cell cloning efficiency was evaluated by Colony-forming assay. Apoptotic cells were detected with annexin V staining and flow cytometry. Results In vitro drug sensitivity assay revealed that suppression of NDRG2 could sensitize Hela cells to cisplatin. Down-regulation of NDRG2 didn’t influence the colony-forming ability but promoted cisplatin-induced apoptosis of Hela cells. Inhibition of NDRG2 in Hela cells was accompanied by decreased Bcl-2 protein level. However, Bcl-2 mRNA level was not changed in Hela cells with down-regulation of NDRG2. Further study indicated that miR-15b and miR-16, two microRNAs targetting Bcl-2, were significantly up-regulated in NDRG2-suppressed Hela cells. Conclusions These data suggested that down-regulation of NDRG2 could enhance sensitivity of Hela cells to cisplatin through inhibiting Bcl-2 protein expression, which might be mediated by up-regulating miR-15b and miR-16. PMID:22920753

  6. Analysis of Human Papillomavirus Sequences in Cell Lines Recently Derived from Cervical Cancers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert P. Spence; Anne Murray; Lawrence Banks; Lloyd R. Kelland; Lionel Crawford

    The DNA and RNA from four cell lines recently derived from cervical carcinomas (HXlSlc, HXISSc, HX156c, and HX160c) were analyzed for the presence of human Papillomavirus DNA. Each contained HPV- 16 DNA in a multicopy integrated form of varying complexity. Each also expressed RNA transcripts of similar sizes to CaSki cell transcripts. The splice acceptor position within the K6 coding

  7. Effect of sun ginseng potentiation on epirubicin and paclitaxel-induced apoptosis in human cervical cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yingjia; Jiang, Dan; Li, Yang; Han, Xinye; Yu, Di; Park, Jeong Hill; Jin, Ying-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Background Sun ginseng (SG), a specific formulation of quality-controlled red ginseng, contains approximately equal amounts of three major ginsenosides (RK1, Rg3, and Rg5), which reportedly has antitumor-promoting activities in animal models. Methods MTT assay was used to assess whether SG can potentiate the anticancer activity of epirubicin or paclitaxel in human cervical adenocarcinoma HeLa cells, human colon cancer SW111C cells, and SW480 cells; apoptosis status was analyzed by annexin V-FITC and PI and analyzed by flow cytometry; and apoptosis pathway was studied by analysis of caspase-3, -8, and -9 activation, mitochondrial accumulation of Bax and Bak, and cytochrome c release. Results SG remarkably enhances cancer cell death induced by epirubicin or paclitaxel in human cervical adenocarcinoma HeLa cells, human colon cancer SW111C cells, and SW480 cells. Results of the mechanism study highlighted the cooperation between SG and epirubicin or paclitaxel in activating caspase-3 and -9 but not caspase-8. Moreover, SG significantly increased the mitochondrial accumulation of both Bax and Bak triggered by epirubicin or paclitaxel as well as the subsequent release of cytochrome c in the targeted cells. Conclusion SG significantly potentiated the anticancer activities of epirubicin and paclitaxel in a synergistic manner. These effects were associated with the increased mitochondrial accumulation of both Bax and Bak that led to an enhanced cytochrome c release, caspase-9/-3 activation, and apoptosis. Treating cancer cells by combining epirubicin and paclitaxel with SG may prove to be a novel strategy for enhancing the efficacy of the two drug types. PMID:25535473

  8. Expression of WNT genes in cervical cancer-derived cells: Implication of WNT7A in cell proliferation and migration.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Solano, Moisés; Meza-Canales, Ivan D; Torres-Reyes, Luis A; Alvarez-Zavala, Monserrat; Alvarado-Ruíz, Liliana; Rincon-Orozco, Bladimiro; Garcia-Chagollan, Mariel; Ochoa-Hernández, Alejandra B; Ortiz-Lazareno, Pablo C; Rösl, Frank; Gariglio, Patricio; Jave-Suárez, Luis F; Aguilar-Lemarroy, Adriana

    2015-07-01

    According to the multifactorial model of cervical cancer (CC) causation, it is now recognized that other modifications, in addition to Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, are necessary for the development of this neoplasia. Among these, it has been proposed that a dysregulation of the WNT pathway might favor malignant progression of HPV-immortalized keratinocytes. The aim of this study was to identify components of the WNT pathway differentially expressed in CC vs. non-tumorigenic, but immortalized human keratinocytes. Interestingly, WNT7A expression was found strongly downregulated in cell lines and biopsies derived from CC. Restoration of WNT7A in CC-derived cell lines using a lentiviral gene delivery system or after adding a recombinant human protein decreases cell proliferation. Likewise, WNT7A silencing in non-tumorigenic cells markedly accelerates proliferation. Decreased WNT7A expression was due to hypermethylation at particular CpG sites. To our knowledge, this is the first study reporting reduced WNT7A levels in CC-derived cells and that ectopic WNT7A restoration negatively affects cell proliferation and migration. PMID:25978974

  9. In vitro antiproliferative effect and induction of apoptosis by Retama monosperma L. extract in human cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Merghoub, N; Benbacer, L; El Btaouri, H; Ait Benhassou, H; Terryn, C; Attaleb, M; Madoulet, C; Benjouad, A; El Mzibri, M; Morjani, H; Amzazi, S

    2011-01-01

    The antiproliferative effect of different extracts obtained from Retama monosperma L. was investigated on human SiHa and HeLa cervical cancer cell lines using a MTT colorimetric assay. The Retama monosperma L. dichloromethane fraction (Rm-DF) was the most active extract, exhibiting a significant cytotoxic activity on both cell lines in a dose-dependent manner, after 72 h of treatment. IC50 values obtained were 14.57 ± 4.15 ?g/ml and 21.33 ± 7.88 ?g/ml, for SiHa and HeLa cell lines respectively. The morphological features assessment of apoptosis in Rm-DF-treated cells showed a condensation of chromatin and apoptotic bodies, accompanied by a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential (??m) and an increase in reactive oxygen species in both cell lines. The induction of apoptosis was further confirmed by Western blotting pro-caspase 3, Bcl2 and PARP; caspase 3 activity assay; and Annexin V labelling. Analysis of Rm-DF by CG/MS revealed the presence of five known quinolizidine alkaloids as well as, sparteine (10,97%), L-methyl cytisine (9.11%), 17-oxosparteine (3.49%), lupanine (0.93%) and anagyrine (39.63%). This study shows that Retama monosperma L. extract exhibits a potential anticancer activity against cervical cancer cell lines in vitro through the inhibition of proliferation and induction of apoptosis, which may involve a mitochondria-mediated signaling pathway. PMID:22000488

  10. Delivery of small interfering RNAs in human cervical cancer cells by polyethylenimine-functionalized carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are capable of penetrating the cell membrane and are widely considered as potential carriers for gene or drug delivery. Because the C-C and C=C bonds in carbon nanotubes are nonpolar, functionalization is required for carbon nanotubes to interact with genes or drugs as well as to improve their biocompatibility. In this study, polyethylenimine (PEI)-functionalized single-wall (PEI-NH-SWNTs) and multiwall carbon nanotubes (PEI-NH-MWNTs) were produced by direct amination method. PEI functionalization increased the positive charge on the surface of SWNTs and MWNTs, allowing carbon nanotubes to interact electrostatically with the negatively charged small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and to serve as nonviral gene delivery reagents. PEI-NH-MWNTs and PEI-NH-SWNTs had a better solubility in water than pristine carbon nanotubes, and further removal of large aggregates by centrifugation produced a stable suspension of reduced particle size and improved homogeneity and dispersity. The amount of grafted PEI estimated by thermogravimetric analysis was 5.08% (w/w) and 5.28% (w/w) for PEI-NH-SWNTs and PEI-NH-MWNTs, respectively. For the assessment of cytotoxicity, various concentrations of PEI-NH-SWNTs and PEI-NH-MWNTs were incubated with human cervical cancer cells, HeLa-S3, for 48 h. PEI-NH-SWNTs and PEI-NH-MWNTs induced cell deaths in a dose-dependent manner but were less cytotoxic compared to pure PEI. As determined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay, siRNAs directed against glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (siGAPDH) were completely associated with PEI-NH-SWNTs or PEI-NH-MWNTs at a PEI-NH-SWNT/siGAPDH or PEI-NH-MWNT/siGAPDH mass ratio of 80:1 or 160:1, respectively. Furthermore, PEI-NH-SWNTs and PEI-NH-MWNTs successfully delivered siGAPDH into HeLa-S3 cells at PEI-NH-SWNT/siGAPDH and PEI-NH-MWNT/siGAPDH mass ratios of 1:1 to 20:1, resulting in suppression of the mRNA level of GAPDH to an extent similar to that of DharmaFECT, a common transfection reagent for siRNAs. Our results indicate that the PEI-NH-SWNTs and PEI-NH-MWNTs produced in this study are capable of delivering siRNAs into HeLa-S3 cells to suppress gene expression and may therefore be considered as novel nonviral gene delivery reagents. PMID:23742156

  11. Transcriptome profiling of the cancer and adjacent nontumor tissues from cervical squamous cell carcinoma patients by RNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Peng, Guo; Dan, Wang; Jun, Wu; Junjun, Yang; Tong, Ren; Baoli, Zhu; Yang, Xiang

    2015-05-01

    Cervical cancer is the third most common cancer and the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths among women in the world. The discovery of vital diagnostic and therapeutic markers against cervical squamous cell carcinoma (CSCC) would broaden our understanding on the molecular basis of CSCC. In this study, we thoroughly analyzed the transcriptome of CSCC and matched adjacent nontumor (ATN) tissue. RNA sequencing was performed to screen the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) of three pairs of CSCC and ATN tissues. Functional enrichment analysis was used to uncover the biological functions of DEGs. Protein interaction network was carried out to reveal interaction of DEGs. Quantitative real-time PCR was conducted to validate the expression of DEGs. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect the relationship between clinicopathological parameters of CSCC and DEGs. There were a total of 347 significantly common DEGs in the three paired examples, including 104 consistent upregulated and 148 consistent downregulated DEGs. The 347 DEGs were categorized into 73 functional categories by Gene Ontology (GO) analysis. The Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway enrichment analysis suggested six significantly signal pathways. The protein interaction network uncovered three important DEGs, including retinol dehydrogenase 12 (RDH12), ubiquitin D (UBD), and serum amyloid A1 (SAA1). We found that RDH12 expression was decreased in 74.5 % of CSCC tissues. RDH12 expression was negatively associated with tumor size and depth of cervical invasion. The UBD was overexpressed in 61.7 % of CSCC tissues and was positively related with tumor size and lymphatic metastasis. The SAA1 protein was overexpressed in 57.4 % of CSCC tissues and was positively related with clinicopathological parameters of tumor size, lymphatic metastasis, and depth of cervical invasion. The RDH12, UBD, and SAA1 genes might participate in the progression of CSCC. PMID:25586346

  12. Lymphedema After Surgery in Patients With Endometrial Cancer, Cervical Cancer, or Vulvar Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-23

    Lymphedema; Stage IA Cervical Cancer; Stage IA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IB Vulvar Cancer; Stage II Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage II Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIB Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIC Vulvar Cancer; Stage IVB Vulvar Cancer

  13. Cervical Cancer Incidence and Mortality Rates

    Cancer.gov

    Skip to Main Content Search International Cancer Screening Network Sponsored by the National Cancer Institute Home | About ICSN | Collaborative Projects | Meetings | Cancer Sites | Publications | Contact Us Cervical Cancer: Mortality Rates | Organization

  14. Triggering of death receptor apoptotic signaling by human papillomavirus 16 E2 protein in cervical cancer cell lines is mediated by interaction with c-FLIP

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wei Wang; Yong Fang; Ni Sima; Yan Li; Wei Li; Li Li; Linfei Han; Shujie Liao; Zhiqiang Han; Qinglei Gao; Kezhen Li; Dongrui Deng; Li Meng; Jianfeng Zhou; Shixuan Wang; Ding Ma

    2011-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) E2 gene disruption is one of the key features of HPV-induced cervical malignant transformation. Though it is thought to prevent\\u000a progression of carcinogenesis, the pro-apoptotic function of E2 protein remains poorly understood. This study shows that expression\\u000a of HPV16 E2 induces apoptosis both in HPV-positive and -negative cervical cancer cell lines and leads to hyperactivation of\\u000a caspase-8

  15. A novel CD4 T-cell epitope described from one of the cervical cancer patients vaccinated with HPV 16 or 18 E7-pulsed dendritic cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xuelian Wang; Alessandro D. Santin; Stefania Bellone; Sushil Gupta; Mayumi Nakagawa

    2009-01-01

    Previously, safety and immunogenicity of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) or 18 E7-pulsed dendritic cells (DC) vaccinations\\u000a were demonstrated in a dose-escalation Phase I clinical trial which enrolled ten patients diagnosed with stage IB or IIA cervical\\u000a cancer (nine HPV 16-positive, one HPV 18-positive). The goal of the study was to define the T-cell epitopes of HPV 16 or 18

  16. S100A14, a mediator of epithelial-mesenchymal transition, regulates proliferation, migration and invasion of human cervical cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiangyu; Yang, Jing; Qian, Jingfeng; Liu, Zhihua; Chen, Hongyan; Cui, Zhumei

    2015-01-01

    S100A14 is an EF-hand calcium-binding protein that has been reported to exert its biological effects on different types of cells. However, the potential clinical significance and biological functions of S100A14 in cervical cancer has not yet been clarified. In this study, we firstly examined the correlation between S100A14 expression and clinical-pathological parameters in cervical cancers. Next, we observed the effect of S100A14 on cell cycle progression, cell proliferation, migration and invasion by employing lentiviral-mediated overexpression and knockdown of S100A14 in cervical cancer cells. Furthermore, we investigated the underlying mechanism of S100A14 affecting cell migration and invasion. Immunohistochemistry analysis demonstrated that S100A14 expression was associated with the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage (P = 0.025) and lymph node (LN) metastasis (P = 0.001). Functional assays showed that S100A14 overexpression increased the proportion of G2/M phase, promoted cell proliferation, migration, and invasion, whereas S100A14 knockdown exhibited adverse effect on above properties. Mechanistic investigation demonstrated that S100A14 can act as a mediator of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). And overexpression of S100A14 increased expression of N-cadherin and Vimentin while decreased expression of E-cadherin. The opposite results were observed in S100A14-silenced cells. Taken together, our data indicate that S100A14 has a crucial role in cervical cancer progression. This study significantly increases our understanding of S100A14 functional roles in cervical cancer, which may lead to the development of a novel therapeutic target for cervical cancer.

  17. Keratinocyte-specific POU transcription factor hSkn-1a represses the growth of cervical cancer cell lines

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yutaka Enomoto; Kikuko Enomoto; Tadaichi Kitamura; Tadahito Kanda

    2004-01-01

    The POU transcription factor human Skn-1a (hSkn-1a) specifically promotes the proliferation of keratinocytes and enhances their differentiation. We examined the effects of hSkn-1a on cervical cancer cell lines of epithelial origin, in which the differentiation program is interrupted. From HeLa\\/Tet-On, a clone that can be induced to make hSkn-1a by doxycycline (HeLa\\/hSkn-1a) was prepared and characterized. Shortly after the induction,

  18. Abrogation of Estrogen Receptor Signaling Augments Cytotoxicity of Anticancer Drugs on CaSki Cervical Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Moon Y.; Salama, Salama A.; Khatoon, Nilufar; Al-Hendy, Ayman; Au, William W.

    2015-01-01

    Background We have reported that a gene therapy approach, using a dominant-negative estrogen receptor blocker (DN) gene, can cause cell death in cervical cancer cells in vitro. We investigated the mechanisms for enhanced cell killing when DN was combined with cisplatin (CP) and paclitaxel (TX). Materials and Methods Cells were transduced with DN at 24 h and/or treated with drugs at 48 h, and harvested at 48 and 72 h after transduction. Effects were determined using the MTT cytotoxic, and TUNEL and caspase-3 activity apoptotic assays. Results Each agent induced cytotoxic and apoptotic effects, and activated caspase-3. In the combined treatments, significant synergistic effects were observed based on the MTT and TUNEL assays, but with antagonistic caspase-3 activation effect. Conclusion The enhanced cell killing effect was mediated by the initiation of new and multiple mechanisms, particularly via caspase-independent pathways. PMID:18751393

  19. Latex of Euphorbia Antiquorum Induces Apoptosis in Human Cervical Cancer Cells via c-Jun N-terminal Kinase Activation and Reactive Oxygen Species Production

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wen-Tsong Hsieh; Hui-Yi Lin; Jou-Hsuan Chen; Yueh-Hsiung Kuo; Ming-Jen Fan; Rick Sai-Chuan Wu; King-Chuen Wu; W. Gibson Wood; Jing-Gung Chung

    2011-01-01

    Latex of Euphorbia antiquorum (EA) has inhibitory effects on several different cancer cell lines. However, the molecular mechanism of EA inhibitory effects on human cervical cancer HeLa cell growth has not been explored. EA induced apoptosis, which was characterized by morphological change, DNA fragmentation, increased sub-G1 population, and alterations in levels of apoptosis-associated proteins. Treatment with EA increased cell death

  20. Gecko Proteins Exert Anti-Tumor Effect against Cervical Cancer Cells Via PI3-Kinase/Akt Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Ae-Jin; Chung, Chung-Nam; Kim, Hye-Jin; Bae, Kil Soo; Choi, Song; Jun, Woo Jin; Shim, Sang In; Kang, Tae-Hong; Leem, Sun-Hee

    2012-01-01

    Anti-tumor activity of the proteins from Gecko (GP) on cervical cancer cells, and its signaling mechanisms were assessed by viable cell counting, propidium iodide (PI) staining, and Western blot analysis. GP induced the cell death of HeLa cells in a dose-dependent manner while it did not affect the viability of normal cells. Western blot analysis showed that GP decreased the activation of Akt, and co-administration of GP and Akt inhibitors synergistically exerted anti-tumor activities on HeLa cells, suggesting the involvement of PI3-kinase/Akt pathway in GP-induced cell death of the cancer cells. Indeed, the cytotoxic effect of GP against HeLa cells was inhibited by overexpression of constituvely active form of Akt in HeLa cells. The candidates of the functional proteins in GP were analyzed by Mass-spectrum. Taken together, our results suggest that GP elicits anti-tumor activity against HeLa cells by inhibition of PI3-kinase/Akt pathway. PMID:23118562

  1. DCCPS: BRP: PCRB: Key Initiatives: HPV and Cervical Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    Although human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is a significant factor in the development of most cervical and vulvar cancers, large population-based studies have implied an inherited predisposition to these cancers. Cell-mediated immune mechanisms, including human leukocyte antigen (HLA) type 1 and 2 cytokines, determine an individual's response to HPV infection. Investigators propose to analyze associations of HLA class I and II alleles with the risk of cervical and vulvar cancers.

  2. The Inhibitory Effect of a Novel Polypeptide Fraction from Arca subcrenata on Cancer-Related Inflammation in Human Cervical Cancer HeLa Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yu; Hu, Xianjing; Song, Liyan; Zhu, Jianhua; Yu, Rongmin

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is known to be closely associated with the development of cancer. The study was launched in human cervical cancer HeLa cells to investigate the antitumor and anti-inflammatory effects of P2, a marine polypeptide fraction from an important fishery resource Arca subcrenata. The basic research showed that P2 could suppress the production of nitric oxide in LPS-induced RAW264.7 macrophage cells as well as the secretion of inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF-? in human cervical cancer HeLa cells. For the molecular mechanisms, P2 was shown to downregulate the gene expression of proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-8 and to inhibit the COX-2 and iNOS-related pathways in HeLa cells. In consequence, P2 might inhibit tumor development by blocking the interaction between tumor microenvironment and proinflammatory mediators. All findings indicate that P2 possesses the potential to be developed as a novel agent for cancer therapy. PMID:24683359

  3. Long (27-nucleotides) small inhibitory RNAs targeting E6 protein eradicate effectively the cervical cancer cells harboring human papilloma virus

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jun Sik; Lee, Shin-Wha; Kim, Yong-Man; Kim, Dongho; Kim, Dae-Yeon

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study was to identify small inhibitory RNAs (siRNAs) that are effective in inhibiting growth of cervical cancer cell lines harboring human papilloma virus (HPV) and to examine how siRNAs interact with interferon beta (IFN-?) and thimerosal. Methods The HPV18-positive HeLa and C-4I cell lines were used. Four types of siRNAs were designed according to their target (both E6 and E7 vs. E6 only) and sizes (21- vs. 27-nucleotides); Ex-18E6/21, Ex-18E6/27, Sp-18E6/21, and Sp-18E6/27. Each siRNA-transfected cells were cultured with or without IFN-b and thimerosal and their viability was measured. Results The viabilities of HPV18-positive tumor cells were reduced by 21- and 27-nucleotide siRNAs in proportion to the siRNA concentrations. Of the two types of siRNAs, the 27-nucleotide siRNA constructs showed greater inhibitory efficacy. Sp-18E6 siRNAs, which selectively downregulates E6 protein only, were more effective than the E6- and E7-targeting Ex-18E6 siRNAs. siRNAs and IFN-? showed the synergistic effect to inhibit HeLa cell survival and the effect was proportional to both siRNA and IFN-? concentrations. Thimerosal in the presence of siRNA exerted a dose-dependent inhibition of C-4I cell survival. Finally, co-treatment with siRNA, IFN-?, and thimerosal induced the most profound decrease in the viability of both cell lines. Conclusion Long (27-nucleotides) siRNAs targeting E6-E7 mRNAs effectively reduce the viability of HPV18-positive cervical cancer cells and show the synergistic effect in combination with IFN-b and thimerosal. It is necessary to find the rational design of siRNAs and effective co-factors to eradicate particular cervical cancer.

  4. What Are the Key Statistics about Cervical Cancer?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... factors for cervical cancer? What are the key statistics about cervical cancer? The American Cancer Society's estimates ... Symptoms of Cancer Treatments & Side Effects Cancer Facts & Statistics News About Cancer Expert Voices Blog Programs & Services ...

  5. A novel polysaccharide, isolated from Angelica sinensis (Oliv.) Diels induces the apoptosis of cervical cancer HeLa cells through an intrinsic apoptotic pathway

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. Cao; X.-Q. Li; X. Wang; H.-T. Fan; X.-N. Zhang; Y. Hou; S.-B. Liu; Q.-B. Mei

    2010-01-01

    A novel polysaccharide isolated from Angelica sinensis, named APS-1d showed cytotoxic activity towards several cancer cell lines in vitro. However, the precise antitumor mechanisms of this compound are unknown. In this study, we investigated the pro-apoptotic effects of APS-1d in human cervical cancer HeLa cells both in vitro and in vivo, and further elucidated the mechanisms of this action. Inhibition

  6. Human papillomavirus, cervical cancer and women's knowledge

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Azadeh Stark; Lucie Gregoire; Rebecca Pilarski; Allison Zarbo; Arthur Gaba; Wayne D. Lancaster

    2008-01-01

    Background: Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the major risk factor for cervical cancer. Methods: We implemented a retrospective case-series study to discern HPV knowledge accuracy among women diagnosed with and treated for cervical cancer. Cases (n=1174), identified from the Pathology database, were diagnosed and treated for cervical cancer at the same institution. Data were collected using self-administered questionnaires and by reviewing

  7. Cervical Cancer: Screening and Therapeutic Perspectives

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rengaswamy Sankaranarayanan; Somanathan Thara; Pulikottil Okkuru Esmy; Partha Basu

    2008-01-01

    Cervical cancer is a major cause of mortality and premature death among women in their most productive years in low- and medium-resourced countries in Asia, Africa and Latin America, despite the fact that it is an eminently preventable cancer. While cytology screening programmes have resulted in a substantial reduction of cervical cancer mortality in developed countries, they have been shown

  8. How will HPV vaccines affect cervical cancer?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard Roden; T.-C. Wu

    2006-01-01

    Cancer of the uterine cervix is the second largest cause of cancer deaths in women, and its toll is greatest in populations that lack screening programmes to detect precursor lesions. Persistent infection with 'high risk' genotypes of human papillomavirus (HPV) is necessary, although not sufficient, to cause cervical carcinoma. Therefore, HPV vaccination provides an opportunity to profoundly affect cervical cancer

  9. Effect of Pleurotus ferulae extracts on viability of human lung cancer and cervical cancer cell lines

    Microsoft Academic Search

    DuBok Choi; Wol-Suk Cha; Si-Hyung Kang; Byoung-Rai Lee

    2004-01-01

    When SiHa cells were incubated for varying periods of time with extracts of PFF and PFM, the cytotoxicity of the ethanol extracts\\u000a of PFF was higher than those of the other extracts. These results indicated that the extracts from fruiting bodies ofP. ferulae contain antitumor substances. When A549, SiHa and HeLa cells were incubated with different concentrations of PFF and

  10. Towards rapid cervical cancer diagnosis: automated detection and classification of pathologic cells in phase-contrast images.

    PubMed

    Schilling, T; Miroslaw, L; Glab, G; Smereka, M

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, a combination of two methods based on texture analysis, contour grouping, and pattern recognition techniques is presented to detect and classify pathologic cells in cervical vaginal smears using the phase-contrast microscopy. The first method applies statistical geometrical features to detect image regions that contain epithelial cells and hide those regions with medium and contamination. Sequential forward floating selection was used to identify the most representative features. A shape of cells was identified by applying an active contour model supported by some postprocessing techniques. The second method applies edge detection, ridge following, contour grouping, and Fisher linear discriminant to detect abnormal nuclei. Evaluation of the algorithms' performance and comparison with alternative approaches show that both methods are reliable and, when combined, improve the classification. By presenting only images or their parts that are diagnostically important, the method unburdens a physician from massive and messy data. It also indicates abnormalities marking atypical nuclei and, in that sense, supports diagnosis of cervical cancer. PMID:17291241

  11. Staurosporine-induced apoptosis of HPV positive and negative human cervical cancer cells from different points in the cell cycle

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B Bernard; T Fest; J-L Prétet; C Mougin

    2001-01-01

    In the present study, we compare the sensitivity of CaSki and HeLa cells (HPV positive, wild-type p53) and C33A cells (HPV negative, mutated p53) to a protein kinase inhibitor, the staurosporine (ST). We show that ST can reversibly arrest the three cervical-derived cell lines, either in G1 or in G2\\/M. Beyond certain ST concentrations or\\/and over 24 h exposure, the

  12. Cervical esophageal hemangioma combined with thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Cheol; Kim, Jeong Won; Lee, Yong Jik; Lee, Seong Rok; Park, Chang-Ryul; Jung, Jong-Pil

    2011-08-01

    Hemangiomas that arise in cervical esophagus are extremely rare, representing 3.3% of all benign esophageal tumors. Although endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) and potassium titanyl phosphate/yttrium aluminum garnet (KTP/YAG) laser therapy have been used with success for small tumors, the safety and efficacy in the case of large tumors remains uncertain. We report the successful resection of cervical esophageal hemangioma through a cervical esophagotomy in a patient with thyroid cancer who needed a cervical collar incision. PMID:22263178

  13. Conditionally replicating E1B-deleted adenovirus driven by the squamous cell carcinoma antigen 2 promoter for uterine cervical cancer therapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K-F Hsu; C-L Wu; S-C Huang; J-L Hsieh; Y-S Huang; Y-F Chen; M-R Shen; W-J Chung; C-Y Chou; A-L Shiau

    2008-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common type of malignant tumor among women worldwide. When the disease is confined locally, it can be controlled with surgical resection and radiotherapy. However, patients with recurrent or metastatic disease often have a poor prognosis. Measurement of serum levels of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) antigens has been widely used as serological markers for SCC

  14. Stages of Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... checked under a microscope for signs of cancer. Laparoscopy : A surgical procedure to look at the organs ... a laparoscope , the operation is called a total laparoscopic hysterectomy. Enlarge Hysterectomy. The uterus is surgically removed ...

  15. Advanced cervical cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Susan K. Gibbons; Henry M. Keys

    2000-01-01

    Opinion statement  Several large, prospectively randomized clinical trials run by multi-institutional cooperative groups have established that\\u000a the best treatment for advanced cancer of the cervix is primary radiotherapy with concurrent, cisplatin-based chemotherapy.\\u000a In fact, patients with earlier stage cervix cancer with poor prognostic indicators (large, bulky tumors, positive pelvic lymph\\u000a nodes, or unexpected parametrial disease at the time of surgery) also

  16. Coincidental detection of T-cell rich B-cell lymphoma in the paraaortic lymph nodes of a woman undergoing lymph node dissection for cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Abali, H; Eren, O O; Erman, M; Uner, A H; Kose, F; Guler, N

    2003-01-01

    The diagnosis of cervical squamous cell carcinoma with concurrent T-cell rich B-cell lymphoma in dissected lymph nodes has not been reported to our knowledge. We report such a case. The biopsy of an exophytic lesion at the uterine cervix showed squamous cell carcinoma in a 50-year-old woman presenting with postcoital bleeding. Type III hysterectomy, bilateral salpingo-oophorectemy, bilateral pelvic, paraaortic lymph node dissections were performed. Pathologic examination revealed a T-cell rich B-cell lymphoma in some lymph nodes beside squamous cell carcinoma in several of others. ELISA for human immuno-deficiency virus (HIV) was negative. The cervical carcinoma was staged as FIGO clinical stage IB1 and the lymphoma as Ann Arbor IIA. Six cycles of CHOP (cyclophosphamide, adriamycin, vincristine, and prednisone) chemotherapy for the lymphoma and concomitant pelvic chemo-radiotherapy with cisplatin for cervical cancer were given. In this rare coincidence; the best available therapy for each of the diseases should be considered individually. We also suggest that HIV screening test be carried out, because both diseases may be related to human immuno-deficiency virus, although our patient was HIV-negative. PMID:12911737

  17. HPV types and cofactors causing cervical cancer in Peru

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C Santos; N Muñoz; S Klug; M Almonte; I Guerrero; M Alvarez; C Velarde; O Galdos; M Castillo; J Walboomers; C Meijer; E Caceres

    2001-01-01

    We conducted a hospital-based case-control study in Peru of 198 women with histologically confirmed cervical cancer (173 squamous cell carcinomas and 25 cases of adenocarcinoma\\/adenosquamous carcinoma) and 196 control women. Information on risk factors was obtained by personal interview. Using PCR-based assays on exfoliated cervical cells and biopsy specimens, HPV DNA was detected in 95.3% of women with squamous cell

  18. Transcriptional regulation of human osteopontin promoter by histone deacetylase inhibitor, trichostatin A in cervical cancer cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Priyanka Sharma; Santosh Kumar; Gopal C Kundu

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Trichostatin A (TSA), a potent inhibitor of histone deacetylases exhibits strong anti-tumor and growth inhibitory activities, but its mechanism(s) of action is not completely understood. Osteopontin (OPN) is a secreted glycoprotein which has long been associated with tumor metastasis. Elevated OPN expression in various metastatic cancer cells and the surrounding stromal cells often correlates with enhanced tumor formation and

  19. Prognostic Significance of Peritumoral Lymphatic Vessel Density and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor 3 in Invasive Squamous Cell Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Botting, Shaleen K; Fouad, Hala; Elwell, Kyler; Rampy, Bill A; Salama, Salama A; Freeman, Daniel H; Diaz-Arrastia, Concepcion R

    2010-01-01

    Cervical cancer is known to metastasize primarily by the lymphatic system. Dissemination through lymphatic vessels represents an early step in regional tumor progression, and the presence of lymphatic metastasis is associated with a poor prognosis. In patients who have undergone a radical hysterectomy, lymphovascular space invasion (LVSI), assessed on hematoxylin and eosin-stained slides, is a major factor for adjuvant therapy in patients with cervical cancer. With the advent of a lymphatic endothelial cell-specific marker, such as D2-40, it is now possible to distinguish between blood and lymphatic space invasion (LSI). In this study, the utility of D2-40 was assessed for the detection of lymphatic vessel density (LVD) and identification of LSI. The expressions of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-3 (VEGFR-3), VEGF-C, tyrosine receptor kinase-2, and angiopoietin-1 were assessed by immunohistochemical methods on 50 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix. Clinicopathologic characteristics, including pelvic lymph node metastasis, were correlated with the above histochemical findings. We found that lymphangiogenesis, measured by an increase in peritumoral LVD, was significantly associated with positive lymph node status (P < .005). VEGFR-3 expression was significantly associated with LVD (P < .05). D2-40 staining verified LSI (P = .03) and surpassed that of hematoxylin and eosin-identified LVSI (P = .54). In conclusion, lymphangiogenic markers, specifically LVD quantified by D2-40 and VEGFR-3, are independently associated with LSI and lymph node metastasis in patients with early squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix treated with radical hysterectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy. PMID:20563258

  20. Microarray analysis of DNA damage repair gene expression profiles in cervical cancer cells radioresistant to 252Cf neutron and X-rays

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yi Qing; Xue-Qin Yang; Zhao-Yang Zhong; Xin Lei; Jia-Yin Xie; Meng-Xia Li; De-Bing Xiang; Zeng-Peng Li; Zhen-Zhou Yang; Ge Wang; Dong Wang

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of the study was to obtain stable radioresistant sub-lines from the human cervical cancer cell line HeLa by prolonged exposure to 252Cf neutron and X-rays. Radioresistance mechanisms were investigated in the resulting cells using microarray analysis of DNA damage repair genes. METHODS: HeLa cells were treated with fractionated 252Cf neutron and X-rays, with a cumulative dose of

  1. Effects and Mechanism of Baicalin on Apoptosis of Cervical Cancer HeLa Cells In-vitro

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yong; Fu, Zhan-zhao; Guo, Cong-Shan; Zhang, Yan-Xia; Di, Ya; Jiang, Bin; Li, Qing-Wang

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to observe the apoptosis-inducing effect and mechanism of baicalin on human cervical cancer HeLa cells. The inhibitory effect of baicalin on the growth of HeLa cells was measured by MTT assay, and cell proliferation and migration was analyzed by cell scratch assay. Morphological changes of apoptotic cells were viewed by the light microscope and electron microscope, and cell growth arrest was confirmed by flow cytometry. Moreover, Western blot was used for investigating the expression of apoptosis related proteins; spectrophotometry was used to examine Caspase-3 activation. Our results showed that baicalin could inhibit the proliferation of HeLa Cells via induction of apoptosis in a time and dose-dependent manner (P<0.01). Apoptotic signaling induced by baicalin was characterized by up-regulating Bax, Fas, FasL and Caspase-8 protein expression, and down-regulating of Bcl-2 protein expression. These results indicated that baicalin-induced apoptosis involved activation Caspase-3 in HeLa cells through the intracellular mitochondrial pathway and the surface death receptor pathway. PMID:25561931

  2. Autophagy promotes paclitaxel resistance of cervical cancer cells: involvement of Warburg effect activated hypoxia-induced factor 1-?-mediated signaling

    PubMed Central

    Peng, X; Gong, F; Chen, Y; Jiang, Y; Liu, J; Yu, M; Zhang, S; Wang, M; Xiao, G; Liao, H

    2014-01-01

    Paclitaxel is one of the most effective chemotherapy drugs for advanced cervical cancer. However, acquired resistance of paclitaxel represents a major barrier to successful anticancer treatment. In this study, paclitaxel-resistant HeLa sublines (HeLa-R cell lines) were established by continuous exposure and increased autophagy level was observed in HeLa-R cells. 3-Methyladenine or ATG7 siRNA, autophagy inhibitors, could restore sensitivity of HeLa-R cells to paclitaxel compared with parental HeLa cells. To determine the underlying molecular mechanism, differentially expressed proteins between HeLa and HeLa-R cells were identified by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis coupled with electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight MS/MS. We found glycolysis-associated proteins were upregulated in HeLa-R cell lines. Inhibition of glycolysis by 2-deoxy-D-glucose or koningic acid could decrease autophagy and enhance sensitivity of HeLa-R cells to paclitaxel. Moreover, glycolysis could activate HIF1-?. Downregulation of HIF1-? by specific siRNA could decrease autophagy and resensitize HeLa-R cells to paclitaxel. Taken together, a possible Warburg effect activated HIF1-?-mediated signaling-induced autophagic pathway is proposed, which may provide new insight into paclitaxel chemoresistance. PMID:25118927

  3. Anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects of 3,3'-diindolylmethane in human cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Junyong; Li, Yuan; Guan, Chao; Chen, Zuhua

    2012-09-01

    The antitumor effects of Indo-3-carbinol (I3C) have been proven in many human carcinoma cells. However, the roles of 3,3-diindolylmethane (DIM), an important polymer converted from I3C under pH 5.0-7.0, on the growth and proliferation of cervical cancer HeLa and SiHa cells still remain unrevealed. In the present study, we investigated the potential anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects of DIM on HeLa and SiHa cells. Cell proliferation was detected by Cell Counting kit-8 and apoptosis was analyzed by flow cytometry. In addition, morphological changes accompanying cell apoptosis were observed using an inverted microscope after Hoechst 33258 staining. In addition, expression changes of proteins involved in the MAPK and PI3K pathways were determined by western blotting. DIM treatment inhibited the proliferation and induced apoptosis of HeLa and SiHa cells significantly in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Moreover, SiHa cells were more sensitive to DIM treatment than HeLa cells (P<0.05). In addition, the expression of ERK, p38 and p-p38, which are involved in the MAPK pathway, was downregulated by DIM treatment. Another protein involved in the MAPK pathway, JNK, was upregulated. Furthermore, DIM treatment significantly suppressed the expression of Akt, p-Akt, PI3K p110?, PI3K p110?, PI3K class III, GSK3-?, p-PDK1 and p-c-Raf which are involved in the PI3K pathway. These results demonstrate that DIM exerts antitumor effects on HeLa and SiHa cells through its anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic roles, especially for SiHa cells. The molecular mechanism for these effects may be related to its regulatory effects on MAPK and PI3K pathway and apoptosis proteins. DIM may be a preventive and therapeutic agent against cervical cancer. PMID:22736073

  4. Berberine modulates AP-1 activity to suppress HPV transcription and downstream signaling to induce growth arrest and apoptosis in cervical cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background- Specific types of high risk Human papillomaviruses (HR-HPVs) particularly, HPV types 16 and 18 cause cervical cancer and while the two recently developed vaccines against these HPV types are prophylactic in nature, therapeutic options for treatment and management of already existing HPV infection are not available as yet. Because transcription factor, Activator Protein-1 (AP-1) plays a central role in HPV-mediated cervical carcinogenesis, we explored the possibility of its therapeutic targeting by berberine, a natural alkaloid derived from a medicinal plant species, Berberis which has been shown to possess anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties with no known toxicity; however, the effect of berberine against HPV has not been elucidated. Results- We studied the effect of berberine on HPV16-positive cervical cancer cell line, SiHa and HPV18-positive cervical cancer cell line, HeLa using electrophoretic mobility gel shift assays, western and northern blotting which showed that berberine could selectively inhibit constitutively activated AP-1 in a dose- and time-dependent manner and downregulates HPV oncogenes expression. Inhibition of AP-1 was also accompanied by changes in the composition of their DNA-binding complex. Berberine specifically downregulated expression of oncogenic c-Fos which was also absent in the AP-1 binding complex. Treatment with berberine resulted in repression of E6 and E7 levels and concomitant increase in p53 and Rb expression in both cell types. Berberine also suppressed expression of telomerase protein, hTERT, which translated into growth inhibition of cervical cancer cells. Interestingly, a higher concentration of berberine was found to reduce the cell viability through mitochondria-mediated pathway and induce apoptosis by activating caspase-3. Conclusion- These results indicate that berberine can effectively target both the host and viral factors responsible for development of cervical cancer through inhibition of AP-1 and blocking viral oncoproteins E6 and E7 expression. Inhibition of AP-1 activity by berberine may be one of the mechanisms responsible for the anti-HPV effect of berberine. We propose that berberine is a potentially promising compound for the treatment of cervical cancer infected with HPV. PMID:21496227

  5. HPV and the Prevention of Cervical Cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Martin C. Mahoney

    Summary Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection has many significant clinical outcomes, including the development of cervical cancer. The consequences of HPV infec- tion are costly in terms of both direct and indirect costs. A significant advance in the prevention of cervical cancer and other adverse outcomes from HPV has occurred with the introduction of a vaccine to prevent infection with the

  6. Cervical Cancer Screening

    MedlinePLUS

    ... open the vagina. This device gives a clear view of the cervix and upper vagina. For a Pap test, a small number of cells are removed from the cervix with a brush or other tool. The cells are put into a liquid and sent to a lab testing. For an HPV test, sometimes the same ...

  7. Flexitouch® Home Maintenance Therapy or Standard Home Maintenance Therapy in Treating Patients With Lower-Extremity Lymphedema Caused by Treatment for Cervical Cancer, Vulvar Cancer, or Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-29

    Lymphedema; Stage 0 Cervical Cancer; Stage 0 Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage 0 Vulvar Cancer; Stage I Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage I Vulvar Cancer; Stage IA Cervical Cancer; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage II Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage II Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage III Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage III Vulvar Cancer; Stage IV Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Vulvar Cancer

  8. Calcitriol increases Dicer expression and modifies the microRNAs signature in SiHa cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    González-Duarte, Ramiro José; Cázares-Ordoñez, Verna; Romero-Córdoba, Sandra; Díaz, Lorenza; Ortíz, Víctor; Freyre-González, Julio Augusto; Hidalgo-Miranda, Alfredo; Larrea, Fernando; Avila, Euclides

    2015-08-01

    MicroRNAs play important roles in cancer biology. Calcitriol, the hormonal form of vitamin D3, regulates microRNAs expression in tumor cells. In the present study we asked if calcitriol would modify some of the components of the microRNA processing machinery, namely, Drosha and Dicer, in calcitriol-responsive cervical cancer cells. We found that calcitriol treatment did not affect Drosha mRNA; however, it significantly increased Dicer mRNA and protein expression in VDR-positive SiHa and HeLa cells. In VDR-negative C33-A cells, calcitriol had no effect on Dicer mRNA. We also found a vitamin D response element in Dicer promoter that interacts in vitro to vitamin D and retinoid X receptors. To explore the biological plausibility of these results, we asked if calcitriol alters the microRNA expression profile in SiHa cells. Our results revealed that calcitriol regulates the expression of a subset of microRNAs with potential regulatory functions in cancer pathways, such as miR-22, miR-296-3p, and miR-498, which exert tumor-suppressive effects. In summary, the data indicate that in SiHa cells, calcitriol stimulates the expression of Dicer possibly through the vitamin D response element located in its promoter. This may explain the calcitriol-dependent modulation of microRNAs whose target mRNAs are related to anticancer pathways, further adding to the various anticancer mechanisms of calcitriol. PMID:26111345

  9. Radiosensitizing effect of gold nanoparticles in carbon ion irradiation of human cervical cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Harminder; Avasthi, D. K.; Pujari, Geetanjali; Sarma, Asitikantha

    2013-07-01

    Noble metal nanoparticles have received considerable attention in biotechnology for their role in bio sensing due to surface plasmon resonance, medical diagnostics due to better imaging contrast and therapy. The radiosensitization effect of gold nanoparticles (AuNP) has been gaining popularity in radiation therapy of cancer cells. The better depth dose profile of energetic ion beam proves its superiority over gamma radiation for fighting against cancer. In the present work, the glucose capped gold nanoparticles (Glu-AuNP) were synthesised and internalized in the HeLa cells. Transmission electron microscopic analysis of ultrathin sections of Glu-AuNP treated HeLa cells confirmed the internalization of Glu-AuNPs. Control HeLa cells and Glu-AuNp treated HeLa cells were irradiated at different doses of 62 MeV 12C ion beam (LET - 290keV/?m) at BIO beam line of using 15UD Pelletron accelerator at Inter University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi, India. The survival fraction was assessed by colony forming assay which revealed that the dose of carbon ion for 90% cell killing in Glu-AuNP treated HeLa cells and control HeLa cells are 2.3 and 3.2 Gy respectively. This observation shows ˜ 28% reduction of 12C6+ ion dose for Glu-AuNP treated HeLa cells as compared to control HeLa cells.

  10. The Role of Cdk5 in Retinoic Acid-Induced Apoptosis of Cervical Cancer Cell Line

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hung-Shou Kuo; Fu-Ning Hsu; Ming-Ching Chiang; Shuen-Chi You; Mei-Chih Chen; Ming-Jae Lo; Ho Lin

    2009-01-01

    Cdk5 is a small serine\\/threonine protein kinase which belongs to Cdk family. Unlike other Cdk members, so far Cdk5 is known to be irrelevant in cell cycle. Cdk5 kinase activity is regulated by binding with its activator, p35. Our previous results indicate that Cdk5 and p35 are involved in drugs-induced apoptosis of prostate cancer cells. Retinoic acid (RA) is one

  11. Human Papillomavirus Type 16 E7 Peptide-Directed CD8+ T Cells from Patients with Cervical Cancer Are Cross-Reactive with the Coronavirus NS2 Protein

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Katja Nilges; Hanni Hohn; Henryk Pilch; Claudia Neukirch; Kirsten Freitag; P. J. Talbot; Markus J. Maeurer

    2003-01-01

    Human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) E6 and E7 oncoproteins are required for cellular transformation and represent candidate targets for HPV-specific and major histocompatibility complex class I-restricted CD8-T-cell responses in patients with cervical cancer. Recent evidence suggests that cross-reactivity repre- sents the inherent nature of the T-cell repertoire. We identified HLA-A2 binding HPV16 E7 variant peptides from human, bacterial, or viral

  12. Inhibition of cervical cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo with lentiviral-vector delivered short hairpin RNA targeting human papillomavirus E6 and E7 oncogenes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W Gu; L Putral; K Hengst; K Minto; N A Saunders; G Leggatt; N A J McMillan

    2006-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the suppressive effect of a short hairpin RNA delivered by a lentiviral vector (LV-shRNA) against human papillomavirus (HPV) type 18 E6 on the expression of the oncogenes E6 and E7 in cervical cancer HeLa cells both in vitro and in vivo. The LV-shRNA effectively delivered the shRNA to HeLa cells and lead to a dose-dependent

  13. Pseudolaric acid B exerts antitumor activity via suppression of the Akt signaling pathway in HeLa cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingqun; Hong, Li

    2015-08-01

    Pseudolaric acid B (PAB) is a diterpene acid isolated from the bark of the root and trunk of Pseudolarix kaempferi Gordon (Pinaceae), which has demonstrated cytotoxic effects against various types of cancer. However, the mechanisms underlying the anticancer effects of PAB have remained to be elucidated. In the present study, the effects of PAB on the viability and apoptosis of HeLa cells were investigated by MTT assay, flow cytometric analysis of Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide staining, Rhodamine 123 staining and western blot analysis. The results demonstrated that PAB had antiproliferative and apoptosis-inducing effects on HeLa cells. PAB markedly inhibited HeLa cell viability in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Flow cytometric analysis indicated that PAB induced apoptosis in HeLa cells in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment with PAB suppressed the expression of anti-apoptotic factor B cell lymphoma-2, and promoted the expression of pro-apoptotic factor Bcl-2?associated X protein. In addition, PAB induced an increase in Caspase-3 activity and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, suggesting that this apoptosis may be mediated by mitochondrial pathways. Furthermore, the results of western blot analysis indicated that PAB was able to reduce Akt phosphorylation, thereby inhibiting the Akt pathway. These results suggested that PAB inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in HeLa cells, and that the anti-tumor effects of PAB were associated with inhibition of the Akt pathway. In conclusion, the results of the present study suggested that PAB may represent a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of human cervical cancer. However, additional studies are required to investigate the underlying apoptotic mechanisms. PMID:25891953

  14. Role of activating transcription factor 3 on TAp73 stability and apoptosis in paclitaxel-treated cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Oh, Yeo Kyoung; Lee, Hyun Jung; Jeong, Mi-Hee; Rhee, Marie; Mo, Ji-Won; Song, Eun Hyeon; Lim, Joong-Yeon; Choi, Kyung-Hee; Jo, Inho; Park, Sang Ick; Gao, Bin; Kwon, Yongil; Kim, Won-Ho

    2008-07-01

    Taxol (paclitaxel) is a potent anticancer drug that has been found to be effective against several tumor types, including cervical cancer. However, the exact mechanism underlying the antitumor effects of paclitaxel is poorly understood. Here, paclitaxel induced the apoptosis of cervical cancer HeLa cells and correlated with the enhanced activation of caspase-3 and TAp73, which was strongly inhibited by TAp73beta small interfering RNA (siRNA). In wild-type activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3)-overexpressed cells, paclitaxel enhanced apoptosis through increased alpha and beta isoform expression of TAp73; however, these events were attenuated in cells containing inactive COOH-terminal-deleted ATF3 [ATF3(DeltaC)] or ATF3 siRNA. In contrast, paclitaxel-induced ATF3 expression did not change in TAp73beta-overexpressed or TAp73beta siRNA-cotransfected cells. Furthermore, paclitaxel-induced ATF3 translocated into the nucleus where TAp73beta is expressed, but not in ATF3(DeltaC) or TAp73beta siRNA-transfected cells. As confirmed by the GST pull-down assay, ATF3 bound to the DNA-binding domain of p73, resulting in the activation of p21 or Bax transcription, a downstream target of p73. Overexpression of ATF3 prolonged the half-life of TAp73beta by inhibiting its ubiquitination and thereby enhancing its transactivation and proapoptotic activities. Additionally, ATF3 induced by paclitaxel potentiated the stability of TAp73beta, not its transcriptional level. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses show that TAp73beta and ATF3 are recruited directly to the p21 and Bax promoter. Collectively, these results reveal that overexpression of ATF3 potentiates paclitaxel-induced apoptosis of HeLa cells, at least in part, by enhancing TAp73beta's stability and its transcriptional activity. The investigation shows that ATF3 may function as a tumor-inhibiting factor through direct regulatory effects on TAp73beta, suggesting a functional link between ATF3 and TAp73beta. PMID:18644986

  15. IR microspectroscopy: potential applications in cervical cancer screening

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael J. Walsh; Matthew J. German; Maneesh Singh; Hubert M. Pollock; Azzedine Hammiche; Maria Kyrgiou; Helen F. Stringfellow; Evangelos Paraskevaidis; Pierre L. Martin-Hirsch; Francis L. Martin

    2007-01-01

    Screening exfoliative cytology for early dysplastic cells reduces incidence and mortality from squamous carcinoma of the cervix. In the developed world, screening programmes have adopted a 3–5 years recall system. In its absence, cervical cancer would be the second most common female cancer in these regions; instead, it is currently eleventh. However, there exist a number of limitations to the

  16. Cervical Cancer: paradigms at home and abroad

    Cancer.gov

    NCI funded a clinical trial that will have an impact on the treatment of late-stage cervical cancer, and also supported a screening trial in India using a network of community outreach workers offering low tech-screening by direct visualization of the cervix coated with dilute acetic acid (vinegar), a process known as VIA. Image depicts cervical cancer microvessel density which increases lethality of the cancer.

  17. Overexpression of Notch1 is associated with the progression of cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    SUN, YAN; ZHANG, RUI; ZHOU, SHUJUAN; JI, YUQIANG

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the third most common malignancy worldwide, accounting for 250,000 mortalities annually. Notch1, an important regulator of cell-fate decisions and differentiation, has been found to be overexpressed in certain types of cancer. However, the role of Notch1 in cervical carcinogenesis remains unclear. In the present study, immunohistochemical staining and western blot analysis revealed that Notch1 expression was significantly higher in cervical cancer tissues than that in normal cervical tissues. Furthermore, statistical analysis revealed that Notch1 expression was significantly associated with tumor differentiation and tumor stage. These findings indicated that Notch1 expression was associated with the progression of cervical cancer. The western blot assay also identified a positive correlation between Notch1 and Ki67 expression in cervical cancer tissues, which suggested that Notch1 expression may be associated with the proliferation of cervical cancer. In order to further evaluate the specific role of Notch1 in cervical cancer progression, its expression in SiHa and C33A cells was knocked down using small interfering RNA. It was revealed that the knockdown of Notch1 in SiHa and C33A cells resulted in significant inhibition of cell proliferation and colony formation in vitro. These results indicated that Notch1 was able to promote cell proliferation in cervical cancer. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicated that Notch1 may function as a promoter in cervical carcinogenesis.

  18. Green synthesis of bimetallic Au@Pt nanostructures and their application for proliferation inhibition and apoptosis induction in human cervical cancer cell.

    PubMed

    Alshatwi, Ali A; Athinarayanan, Jegan; Periasamy, Vaiyapuri Subbarayan

    2015-03-01

    Bimetallic Au@Pt nanostructures (Au@Pts) are potential candidates for optical, electrical, catalytic and biological applications. However, methods for the fabrication of Au@Pts using total tea polyphenols (TPPs), studies of the mechanism of action of Au@Pts on biological systems and studies on the application of Au@Pts in cancer diagnosis and therapy are sparse. In this study, we developed a simple, eco-friendly and low-cost method for the synthesis of Au@Pts to examine the cytotoxic effect of these Au@Pts on human cervical cancers in vitro. The gold and platinum ions were successfully reduced simultaneously using TPPs at room temperature. The prepared Au@Pts were characterized using UV-Vis spectrophotometery, X-ray diffractometery (XRD), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). EDS and XRD confirmed the formation of the Au@Pt. Formation of Au@Pts with a size of 5-20 nm was confirmed using TEM. The cytotoxic properties of the Au@Pts were evaluated in human cervical cancer cells (SiHa). The cell viability results revealed that Au@Pts induce cell death in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The morphological features of the Au@Pt-exposed SiHa cells were observed and indicated cell death via cell shrinkage, intranucleosomal DNA fragmentation and chromatin condensation. During progression of the different phases of the cell cycle, the proportion of cells in the G2/M phase of the treated SiHa cells was significantly increased, which strongly confirmed that the Au@Pts induced apoptosis through the G2/M phase check points. Our findings demonstrate the activity of Au@Pts against cervical cancer cells and reveal strategies for the development of highly active bimetallic nanostructures for cancer therapeutics. PMID:25764083

  19. Activation of p53 in Cervical Cancer Cells by Human Papillomavirus E6 RNA Interference Is Transient, but Can Be Sustained by Inhibiting Endogenous Nuclear Export-Dependent p53 Antagonists

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Riku Koivusalo; Antoine Mialon; Hanna Pitkanen; Jukka Westermarck

    2006-01-01

    p53 is degraded in cervical cancer cells by the human papillomavirus E6 and can be stabilized with short interfering RNA (siRNA) molecules targeting E6 mRNA.In this in vitro study, we show that E6 siRNA-induced p53 activation is transient in HeLa cervical cancer cells despite continuous suppression of E6 mRNA; activation can be sustained if the endogenous p53 antagonists COP1, MDM2,

  20. Development of therapeutic Au-methylene blue nanoparticles for targeted photodynamic therapy of cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jiashing; Hsu, Che-Hao; Huang, Chih-Chia; Chang, Po-Yang

    2015-01-14

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) involves the cellular uptake of a photosensitizer (PS) combined with oxygen molecules and light at a specific wavelength to be able to trigger cancer cell death via the apoptosis pathway, which is less harmful and has less inflammatory side effect than necrosis. However, the traditional PDT treatment has two main deficiencies: the dark toxicity of the PS and the poor selectivity of the cellular uptake of PS between the target cells and normal tissues. In this work, methylene blue (MB), a known effective PS, combined with Au nanoparticles (NPs) was prepared using an intermolecular interaction between a polystyrene-alt-maleic acid (PSMA) layer on the Au NPs and MB. The Au@polymer/MB NPs produced a high quantum yield of singlet oxygen molecules, over 50% as much as that of free MB, when they were excited by a dark red light source at 660 nm, but without significant dark toxicity. Furthermore, transferrin (Tf) was conjugated on the Au@polymer/MB NPs via an EDC/NHS reaction to enhance the selectivity to HeLa cells compared to 3T3 fibroblasts. With a hand-held single laser treatment (32 mW/cm) for 4 min, the new Au@polymer/MB-Tf NPs showed a 2-fold enhancement of PDT efficiency toward HeLa cells over the use of free MB at 4 times dosage. Cellular staining examinations showed that the HeLa cells reacted with Au@polymer/MB-Tf NPs and the 660 nm light excitation triggered PDT, which caused the cells to undergo apoptosis ("programmed" cell death). We propose that applying this therapeutic Au@polymer/MB-Tf nanoagent is facile and safe for delivery and cancer cell targeting to simultaneously minimize side effects and accomplish a significant enhancement in photodynamic therapeutic efficiency toward next-generation nanomedicine development. PMID:25494339

  1. Colposcopy and High Resolution Anoscopy in Screening For Anal Dysplasia in Patients With Cervical, Vaginal, or Vulvar Dysplasia or Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-06-08

    Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia Grade 1; Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia Grade 2; Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia Grade 3; Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Recurrent Vaginal Cancer; Recurrent Vulvar Cancer; Stage 0 Cervical Cancer; Stage 0 Vaginal Cancer; Stage 0 Vulvar Cancer; Stage I Vaginal Cancer; Stage I Vulvar Cancer; Stage IA Cervical Cancer; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage II Vaginal Cancer; Stage II Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage III Vaginal Cancer; Stage III Vulvar Cancer; Stage IV Vulvar Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Vaginal Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Vaginal Cancer

  2. DCCPS: BRP: PCRB: Key Initiatives: HPV and Cervical Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    This study seeks to develop sensitive, specific, and inexpensive approaches to cervical cancer screening as alternatives to the traditional Pap test and cervical human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA testing.

  3. Different cervical cancer screening approaches in a Chinese multicentre study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N Li; J-F Shi; S Franceschi; W-H Zhang; M Dai; B Liu; Y-Z Zhang; L-K Li; R-F Wu; H De Vuyst; M Plummer; Y-L Qiao; G Clifford

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate alternative cervical cancer screening methods, digital colposcopy and collection of cervical exfoliated cells for liquid-based cytology (LBC) and hybrid capture 2 (HC2) testing were performed among 2562 women aged 15–59 years in three study sites in the People's Republic of China (rural Shanxi province, Shenyang city in Liaoning province and Shenzhen city in Guangdong province). Visual inspection with

  4. Apoptosis Induction of Salvia chorassanica Root Extract on Human Cervical Cancer Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Parsaee, Heydar; Asili, Javad; Mousavi, Seyed Hadi; Soofi, Hojjat; Emami, Seyed Ahmad; Tayarani-Najaran, Zahra

    2013-01-01

    Salvia chorassanica Bunge is one of the Iranian endemic species of Salvia. There is not any reported literature on S. chorassanica. This study was designed to examine the in-vitro anti-proliferative and proapoptotic effects of the methanol extract of S. chorassanica and its fractions on HeLa cell line. Cells were cultured in EX-CELL®, an animal free medium specially designed for HeLa cell line and incubated with different concentrations of plant extracts. Cell viability was quantified by MTS assay. Apoptotic cells were determined using propidium iodide (PI) staining of DNA fragmentation by flow cytometry (sub-G1 peak). Activity of caspase -3, -8 and -9 was measured by the caspase colorimetric kit assay. S. chorassanica inhibited the growth of malignant cells and the CH2Cl2 fraction was determined as the most cytotoxic fraction in comparison with other fractions. The calculated IC50 values for methanol extract, n-hexane, CH2Cl2 and EtOAc fractions were 8.841, 5.45, 2.38, and 58.03 ?g/mL, respectively. S. chorassanica induced a sub-G1 peak in the flow cytometry histogram of treated cells compared to control cells indicating that the cytotoxic mechanism is characterized by apoptosis induction. The activity of caspase-3 and 8 proteins in treated HeLa cells was significantly higher than that of the control while caspase-9 activity did not change significantly. Based on the result obtained from our study, the apoptosis pathway involved in S. chorassanica-induced cell death may be through the extrinsic pathway and it can be a novel promising candidate in the treatment of cancer. PMID:24250574

  5. The aqueous extract of Ficus religiosa induces cell cycle arrest in human cervical cancer cell lines SiHa (HPV-16 Positive) and apoptosis in HeLa (HPV-18 positive).

    PubMed

    Choudhari, Amit S; Suryavanshi, Snehal A; Kaul-Ghanekar, Ruchika

    2013-01-01

    Natural products are being extensively explored for their potential to prevent as well as treat cancer due to their ability to target multiple molecular pathways. Ficus religiosa has been shown to exert diverse biological activities including apoptosis in breast cancer cell lines. In the present study, we report the anti-neoplastic potential of aqueous extract of F. religiosa (FRaq) bark in human cervical cancer cell lines, SiHa and HeLa. FRaq altered the growth kinetics of SiHa (HPV-16 positive) and HeLa (HPV-18 positive) cells in a dose-dependent manner. It blocked the cell cycle progression at G1/S phase in SiHa that was characterized by an increase in the expression of p53, p21 and pRb proteins with a simultaneous decrease in the expression of phospho Rb (ppRb) protein. On the other hand, in HeLa, FRaq induced apoptosis through an increase in intracellular Ca(2+) leading to loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, release of cytochrome-c and increase in the expression of caspase-3. Moreover, FRaq reduced the migration as well as invasion capability of both the cervical cancer cell lines accompanied with downregulation of MMP-2 and Her-2 expression. Interestingly, FRaq reduced the expression of viral oncoproteins E6 and E7 in both the cervical cancer cell lines. All these data suggest that F. religiosa could be explored for its chemopreventive potential in cervical cancer. PMID:23922932

  6. The Aqueous Extract of Ficus religiosa Induces Cell Cycle Arrest in Human Cervical Cancer Cell Lines SiHa (HPV-16 Positive) and Apoptosis in HeLa (HPV-18 Positive)

    PubMed Central

    Choudhari, Amit S.; Suryavanshi, Snehal A.; Kaul-Ghanekar, Ruchika

    2013-01-01

    Natural products are being extensively explored for their potential to prevent as well as treat cancer due to their ability to target multiple molecular pathways. Ficus religiosa has been shown to exert diverse biological activities including apoptosis in breast cancer cell lines. In the present study, we report the anti-neoplastic potential of aqueous extract of F. religiosa (FRaq) bark in human cervical cancer cell lines, SiHa and HeLa. FRaq altered the growth kinetics of SiHa (HPV-16 positive) and HeLa (HPV-18 positive) cells in a dose-dependent manner. It blocked the cell cycle progression at G1/S phase in SiHa that was characterized by an increase in the expression of p53, p21 and pRb proteins with a simultaneous decrease in the expression of phospho Rb (ppRb) protein. On the other hand, in HeLa, FRaq induced apoptosis through an increase in intracellular Ca2+ leading to loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, release of cytochrome-c and increase in the expression of caspase-3. Moreover, FRaq reduced the migration as well as invasion capability of both the cervical cancer cell lines accompanied with downregulation of MMP-2 and Her-2 expression. Interestingly, FRaq reduced the expression of viral oncoproteins E6 and E7 in both the cervical cancer cell lines. All these data suggest that F. religiosa could be explored for its chemopreventive potential in cervical cancer. PMID:23922932

  7. Mechanical trapping of the nucleus on micropillared surfaces inhibits the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells but not cervical cancer HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Nagayama, Kazuaki; Hamaji, Yumi; Sato, Yuji; Matsumoto, Takeo

    2015-07-16

    The interaction between cells and the extracellular matrix on a topographically patterned surface can result in changes in cell shape and many cellular functions. In the present study, we demonstrated the mechanical deformation and trapping of the intracellular nucleus using polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-based microfabricated substrates with an array of micropillars. We investigated the differential effects of nuclear deformation on the proliferation of healthy vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and cervical cancer HeLa cells. Both types of cell spread normally in the space between micropillars and completely invaded the extracellular microstructures, including parts of their cytoplasm and their nuclei. We found that the proliferation of SMCs but not HeLa cells was dramatically inhibited by cultivation on the micropillar substrates, even though remarkable deformation of nuclei was observed in both types of cells. Mechanical testing with an atomic force microscope and a detailed image analysis with confocal microscopy revealed that SMC nuclei had a thicker nuclear lamina and greater expression of lamin A/C than those of HeLa cells, which consequently increased the elastic modulus of the SMC nuclei and their nuclear mechanical resistance against extracellular microstructures. These results indicate that the inhibition of cell proliferation resulted from deformation of the mature lamin structures, which might be exposed to higher internal stress during nuclear deformation. This nuclear stress-induced inhibition of cell proliferation occurred rarely in cancer cells with deformable nuclei. PMID:26054426

  8. Prevaccination Distribution of Human Papillomavirus Types in Women Attending at Cervical Cancer Screening in Belgium

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marc Arbyn; Ina Benoy; Cindy Simoens; Johannes Bogers; Philippe Beutels; Christophe Depuydt

    Introduction: Before the introduction of vaccination against human papillomaviruses (HPV) as a new strategy of combating cervical cancer, it is required to describe the baseline prevalence of HPV infection as well as the distribution of the different HPV types in the population and among women with cervical lesions. Materials and Methods: Approximately 10,000 liquid cervical cell samples from women, resident

  9. Squamous Cell Carcinoma Antigen in Follow-Up of Cervical Cancer Treated With Radiotherapy: Evaluation of Cost-Effectiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Forni, Franca [Institute of Biochemistry and Clinical Biochemistry, Catholic University, Rome (Italy); Ferrandina, Gabriella [Gynecologic Oncology Unit, Catholic University, Rome (Italy); Department of Oncology, Catholic University, Campobasso (Italy); Deodato, Francesco [Department of Oncology, Catholic University, Campobasso (Italy); Macchia, Gabriella [Department of Oncology, Catholic University, Campobasso (Italy)], E-mail: gmacchia@rm.unicatt.it; Morganti, Alessio G. [Department of Oncology, Catholic University, Campobasso (Italy); Department of Radiotherapy, Catholic University, Rome (Italy); Smaniotto, Daniela; Luzi, Stefano; D'Agostino, Giuseppe; Valentini, Vincenzo; Cellini, Numa [Department of Radiotherapy, Catholic University, Rome (Italy); Giardina, Bruno [Institute of Biochemistry and Clinical Biochemistry, Catholic University, Rome (Italy); Scambia, Giovanni [Gynecologic Oncology Unit, Catholic University, Rome (Italy); Department of Oncology, Catholic University, Campobasso (Italy)

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: The squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) antigen is still considered the most accurate serologic tumor marker in cervical carcinoma. We assessed the contribution of the SCC assay to the detection of recurrences in patients treated with radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The pattern of recurrence and follow-up data were prospectively recorded for 135 patients. Of the 135 patients, 103 (76.3%) had primary cervical carcinoma and 32 (23.7%) had already experienced disease recurrence that had been successfully treated with surgery (n = 2), surgery plus radiotherapy (n = 2), radiotherapy (n = 5), or concomitant chemoradiotherapy (n = 23). The follow-up evaluations (chest X-ray, abdominopelvic magnetic resonance imaging, gynecologic examination with colposcopy, Papanicolaou smear, and SCC assay) were performed at 6-month intervals; the evaluation was done earlier if recurrent disease was suspected. The median follow-up time was 29 months (range, 6-131). The SCC serum levels were assayed, and a cost analysis was done. Results: A total of 481 SCC determinations were performed. Of the 135 patients, 43 (31.8%) experienced disease recurrence. The SCC levels were higher in those with recurrent disease than in the disease-free patients. Elevation of SCC was documented in 34 (79.1% sensitivity) of 43 recurrences before symptoms appeared. Of the 38 patients with serum SCC elevation, 34 developed a recurrence (positive predictive value, 89.5%). Of the 97 patients with negative SCC serum levels, 88 had negative findings at the clinicoradiologic evaluation (negative predictive value, 90.7%). A simplified approach (SCC plus gynecologic examination) was evaluated. Compared with the complete follow-up program, the rate of missed recurrence was 2.2%. The total projected cost per patient for 5 years of follow-up for the simplified procedure was approximately 12.2-fold lower than the standard approach. Conclusions: Our results have shown that a simplified diagnostic approach, including the SCC assay and gynecologic examination, can detect a high rate of recurrence from cervical cancer, with a very favorable cost-effective profile.

  10. Selective silencing of gene target expression by siRNA expression plasmids in human cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Peralta-Zaragoza, Oscar; De-la-O-Gómez, Faustino; Deas, Jessica; Fernández-Tilapa, Gloria; Fierros-Zárate, Geny Del Socorro; Gómez-Cerón, Claudia; Burguete-García, Ana; Torres-Poveda, Kirvis; Bermúdez-Morales, Victor Hugo; Rodríguez-Dorantes, Mauricio; Pérez-Plasencia, Carlos; Madrid-Marina, Vicente

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference is a natural mechanism to silence post-transcriptional gene expression in eukaryotic cells in which microRNAs act to cleave or halt the translation of target mRNAs at specific target sequences. Mature microRNAs, 19-25 nucleotides in length, mediate their effect at the mRNA level by inhibiting translation, or inducing cleavage of the mRNA target. This process is directed by the degree of complementary nucleotides between the microRNAs and the target mRNA; perfect complementary base pairing induces cleavage of mRNA, whereas several mismatches lead to translational arrest. Biological effects of microRNAs can be manipulated through the use of small interference RNAs (siRNAs) generated by chemical synthesis, or by cloning in molecular vectors. The cloning of a DNA insert in a molecular vector that will be transcribed into the corresponding siRNAs is an approach that has been developed using siRNA expression plasmids. These vectors contain DNA inserts designed with software to generate highly efficient siRNAs which will assemble into RNA-induced silencing complexes (RISC), and silence the target mRNA. In addition, the DNA inserts may be contained in cloning cassettes, and introduced in other molecular vectors. In this chapter we describe an attractive technology platform to silence cellular gene expression using specific siRNA expression plasmids, and evaluate its biological effect on target gene expression in human cervical cancer cells. PMID:25348304

  11. Effects of Difluoromethylornithine on Growth Inhibition and Apoptosis in Human Cervical Epithelial and Cancerous Cell Lines

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Changping Zou; Anne-Thérèse Vlastos; Li Yang; Jian Wang; Kenji Nishioka; Michele Follen

    2002-01-01

    Objective. Difluoromethylornithine(DFMO), an irreversible inhibitor of ornithine decarboxylase and an angiogenesis inhibitor, has been used in phase I cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) trials, producing a 50% regression of CIN 3 lesions. DFMO is currently in phase II trials. In the experiments reported here, DFMO's growth inhibition and apoptosis induction were explored in an in vitro model to elucidate mechanisms of

  12. The Future of Vaccines for Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huh, Warner K.; Roden, Richard B.S.

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer continues to cause significant morbidity and mortality worldwide, making prophylactic cervical cancer vaccines an important focus for cervical cancer prevention. The increasing accessibility of these vaccines worldwide has the potential to greatly decrease the incidence and burden of disease in the future. However, current prophylactic vaccines offer no therapeutic benefit for persons already infected with human papillomavirus types targeted by vaccines or persons with precancerous lesions or cervical cancer. The protection offered by current vaccines is primarily against human papillomavirus types used to derive the vaccine, although partial cross-protection for related virus types has been observed. Herein, we describe findings from preclinical and clinical studies that employ vaccine strategies that have the potential to shape the future of vaccines against cervical cancer. Modalities include prophylactic strategies to target more oncogenic virus types by using the minor capsid antigen L2 and/or by increasing the number of types used to derive virus-like particle vaccines. Therapeutic strategies include the development of vaccines against human papillomavirus early proteins (targets for cellular immunity) for the resolution of precancerous lesions and cervical cancer. Future applications of existing VLP-based vaccines are also discussed. PMID:18482559

  13. Treatment Option Overview (Cervical Cancer)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Situ (Stage 0) In carcinoma in situ (stage 0) , abnormal cells are found in the innermost lining of the cervix . These abnormal cells may become cancer and spread into nearby normal tissue . Enlarge Millimeters (mm). A sharp pencil point is about 1 mm, a new crayon point ...

  14. General Information about Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Situ (Stage 0) In carcinoma in situ (stage 0) , abnormal cells are found in the innermost lining of the cervix . These abnormal cells may become cancer and spread into nearby normal tissue . Enlarge Millimeters (mm). A sharp pencil point is about 1 mm, a new crayon point ...

  15. Integration of the full-length HPV16 genome in cervical cancer and Caski and Siha cell lines and the possible ways of HPV integration.

    PubMed

    Xu, Feng; Cao, Meng; Shi, Qinfeng; Chen, Hongwei; Wang, Yili; Li, Xu

    2015-04-01

    Integration of high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) into the host genome is a key event for cervical carcinogenesis. Different methods have been used to explore the physical states of the HPV genome to reveal the mechanisms for malignant transformation of the infected cells. Consensus has been reached that, although variable portions of the HPV genome are deleted in the integrated HPV sequences, common disruption of the viral E2 gene has been demonstrated in different studies. The head-to-tail concatemers of the full-length HPV16 genome is another typical integration pattern of HPV16, typically found in Caski cell lines, but its prevalence in cervical cancer has never been tested. Here, by introducing a modified PCR, we identified this head-to-tail concatemers of full-length HPV genomes in advanced cervical cancer with HPV16 single positive. Our results show that more than half of the cases contain this integrated head-to-tail concatemers of full-length HPV16 genomes. Further studies in two cervical cell lines, Caski cells and Siha cells, revealed a correlation between the prevalence of the spliced variants of integrated HPV16 sequences and the full-length transcription of the integrated head-to-tail concatemers of the full-length HPV16 genome. Based on these results, we propose that HPV16 integrated into host cells by two mechanisms: one mechanism is shared by other DNA virus and cause integration of the head-to-tail concatemers of the viral genome; another is related to the reverse transcription process, which the integrated HPV sequence is generated by the reverse transcription of the viral mRNA. PMID:25823917

  16. Hydralazine inhibits human cervical cancer cell growth in vitro in association with APC demethylation and re-expression

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yinhong Song; Changju Zhang

    2009-01-01

    Purpose  The tumor suppressor adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) is frequently silenced by promoter hypermethylation in human cervical\\u000a cancer. Clinically, it has been approved that DNA methylation inhibitors, such as 5-aza-2?-deoxycytidine (5-Aza-dC), can reverse\\u000a APC promoter methylation, but widespread clinical use of these inhibitors is limited by their toxicity and instability in\\u000a aqueous solution. Hydralazine is a stable DNA methylation inhibitor that

  17. HPV-related cervical disease and oropharyngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Lozza, Virginia; Pieralli, Annalisa; Corioni, Serena; Longinotti, Manuela; Bianchi, Claudia; Moncini, Daniela; Fallani, Maria Grazia

    2014-08-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV), especially HPV 16, is associated with the development of both cervical and oral cancer. We show the case of a woman affected by HPV-related cervical disease and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC). A 41-year-old woman arrived at our Colposcopy Center following an abnormal Pap smear result (ASC-H) and a diagnosis of moderate cervical dysplasia obtained by a cervical biopsy. She underwent a colposcopy that showed a cervical abnormal transformation zone grade 2. A laser conization was performed in November 2010. Histology reported a moderate/severe dysplasia. The cone resection margins were free. Follow-up colposcopy and cytology were negative. The HPV testing showed an infection by HPV 16. In October 2012, the patient presented to the Head-Neck ER after episodes of hemoptysis; a lesion was found in the left tonsillar lodge. A biopsy was performed with a result of squamous cell carcinoma with low-grade differentiation. The HPV testing detected a high-risk HPV and the immunohistochemical analysis was positive for p16. She was treated by chemotherapy and brachytherapy. She was followed at the head-neck center with monthly visits with oral visual inspection that showed complete absence of mucosal abnormalities. HPV-related OPSCC and cervical precancerous/cancerous lesions have significant similarities in terms of pathogenesis. They are both caused largely by HPV 16, as in the present case. In conclusion, because of this association found in literature and in our case, we think that women with HPV cervical lesions should have regular surveillance for oropharyngeal cancer, whereas women with OPSCC should be encouraged to have diligent cervical screening. PMID:24584479

  18. South Africa project provides cervical cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, L

    1997-01-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the five leading causes of death among women aged 45-59 years in the developing world, and the most common type of cancer among South African women, accounting for about 25% of all cancer-related mortality. The Philani Cervical Cancer Prevention Project, located in Site C of Khayelitsha, a settlement outside of Cape Town, is now screening women to prevent development of the disease. The Philani Project is a demonstration study for a larger cervical cancer prevention project. AVSC International is providing technical and management assistance as one of the project's five collaborators. Working out of a mobile clinic parked next to an outpatient treatment center, the project is comparing the use of Pap smears and four other screening approaches in a low-resource situation in order to develop protocols for similar programs. Now in its second year, the Philani project has enrolled 1600 previously unscreened women over age 35 years. Follow-up and treatment are provided. 80% of women identified with a problem through screening and in need of colposcopy return for follow-up and treatment. However, the number of women who return voluntarily for follow-up is continuously increasing due to the staff's attention to providing community education about cervical screening. About 9% of clients were found to have abnormalities of the cervix with the potential to progress to a malignancy, and 8 cases of outright cervical cancer have been detected. Community outreach, innovative programs, and coordinated efforts are discussed. PMID:12293924

  19. Pharmacologic inhibition of ATR and ATM offers clinically important distinctions to enhancing platinum or radiation response in ovarian, endometrial, and cervical cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Pang-ning; Bateman, Nicholas W.; Darcy, Kathleen M.; Hamilton, Chad A.; Maxwell, George Larry; Bakkenist, Christopher J.; Conrads, Thomas P.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Significant reductions in gynecologic (GYN) cancer mortality and morbidity require treatments that prevent and reverse resistance to chemotherapy and radiation. The objective of this study was to determine if pharmacologic inhibition of key DNA damage response kinases in GYN cancers would enhance cell killing by platinum-based chemotherapy and radiation. Methods A panel of human ovarian, endometrial and cervical cancer cell lines were treated with platinum drugs or ionizing radiation (IR) along with small molecule pharmacological kinase inhibitors of Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and ATM and Rad-3-related (ATR). Results Pharmacologic inhibition of ATR significantly enhanced platinum drug response in all GYN cancer cell lines tested, whereas inhibition of ATM did not enhance the response to platinum drugs. Co-inhibition of ATM and ATR did not enhance platinum kill beyond that observed by inhibition of ATR alone. By contrast, inhibiting either ATR or ATM enhanced the response to IR in all GYN cancer cells, with further enhancement achieved with co-inhibition. Conclusions These studies highlight actionable mechanisms operative in GYN cancer cells with potential to maximize response of platinum agents and radiation in newly diagnosed as well as recurrent gynecologic cancers. PMID:25560806

  20. A reusable localized surface plasmon resonance biosensor for quantitative detection of serum squamous cell carcinoma antigen in cervical cancer patients based on silver nanoparticles array.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qianying; Duan, Ruiqi; Yuan, Jialing; Quan, Yi; Yang, Huan; Xi, Mingrong

    2014-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCCa), as a tumor biomarker, plays an important role in adjuvant diagnosis, treatment evaluation, and prognosis prediction for cervical cancer patients. Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) technique based on noble metal nanoparticles bypasses the disadvantages of traditional testing strategies, in terms of free-labeling, short assay time, good sensitivity, and selectivity. Herein, we develop a novel and reusable LSPR biosensor for the detection of SCCa. First, a triangle-shaped silver nanoparticle array was fabricated using the nanosphere lithography method. Next, we investigated and verified the feasibility of amino coupling method using 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA) to form a functionalized chip surface with monoclonal anti-SCCa antibodies on the silver nanoparticles for distinct detection of SCCa. Different concentrations of SCCa were successfully tested in both buffer and human serum by the ultrasensitive and specific LSPR system, with a linear quantitative detection range of 0.1-1,000 pM under optimal conditions. With appropriate regeneration solution, for example 50 mM glycine-HCl (pH 2.0), the LSPR biosensor featured effective fabrication reproducibility, which reduced both production cost and testing time. Our study represents the first application of the LSPR biosensor in cervical cancer, and demonstrates that the rapid, simple, and reusable nanochip can serve as a potential alternative for clinical serological diagnosis of SCCa in cervical cancer patients. PMID:24591830

  1. A panel of regulated proteins in serum from patients with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Boichenko, Alexander P; Govorukhina, Natalia; Klip, Harry G; van der Zee, A G J; Güzel, Co?kun; Luider, Theo M; Bischoff, Rainer

    2014-11-01

    We developed a discovery-validation mass-spectrometry-based pipeline to identify a set of proteins that are regulated in serum of patients with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and squamous cell cervical cancer using iTRAQ, label-free shotgun, and targeted mass-spectrometric quantification. In the discovery stage we used a "pooling" strategy for the comparative analysis of immunodepleted serum and revealed 15 up- and 26 down-regulated proteins in patients with early- (CES) and late-stage (CLS) cervical cancer. The analysis of nondepleted serum samples from patients with CIN, CES, an CLS and healthy controls showed significant changes in abundance of alpha-1-acid glycoprotein 1, alpha-1-antitrypsin, serotransferrin, haptoglobin, alpha-2-HS-glycoprotein, and vitamin D-binding protein. We validated our findings using a fast UHPLC/MRM method in an independent set of serum samples from patients with cervical cancer or CIN and healthy controls as well as serum samples from patients with ovarian cancer (more than 400 samples in total). The panel of six proteins showed 67% sensitivity and 88% specificity for discrimination of patients with CIN from healthy controls, a stage of the disease where current protein-based biomarkers, for example, squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCCA), fail to show any discrimination. Additionally, combining the six-protein panel with SCCA improves the discrimination of patients with CES and CLS from healthy controls. PMID:25232869

  2. HPV - a vaccine against cervical cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. Desmond; H. Petousis-Harris; N. Turner

    2006-01-01

    Most cervical cancer is caused by Human papillomavirus (HPV). Protection against the major cancer-causing serotypes of this virus by vaccination is now a reality for New Zealand women. Internationally two manufacturers have candidate HPV vaccines: the bivalent Cervarix (GlaxoSmith Kline) and the tetravalent Gardasil (CSL and Merck & Co). This article focuses on Gardasil, as this vaccine is now available

  3. Preventing Cervical Cancer: The Development of HPV Vaccines

    Cancer.gov

    Cervical cancer can be prevented with HPV vaccines. NCI-supported researchers helped establish HPV as a cause of cervical cancer. They also helped create the first HPV vaccines, were involved in the vaccine trials, and contribute to ongoing studies.

  4. Quantitative DNA methylation analysis of candidate genes in cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Siegel, Erin M; Riggs, Bridget M; Delmas, Amber L; Koch, Abby; Hakam, Ardeshir; Brown, Kevin D

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant DNA methylation has been observed in cervical cancer; however, most studies have used non-quantitative approaches to measure DNA methylation. The objective of this study was to quantify methylation within a select panel of genes previously identified as targets for epigenetic silencing in cervical cancer and to identify genes with elevated methylation that can distinguish cancer from normal cervical tissues. We identified 49 women with invasive squamous cell cancer of the cervix and 22 women with normal cytology specimens. Bisulfite-modified genomic DNA was amplified and quantitative pyrosequencing completed for 10 genes (APC, CCNA, CDH1, CDH13, WIF1, TIMP3, DAPK1, RARB, FHIT, and SLIT2). A Methylation Index was calculated as the mean percent methylation across all CpG sites analyzed per gene (~4-9 CpG site) per sequence. A binary cut-point was defined at >15% methylation. Sensitivity, specificity and area under ROC curve (AUC) of methylation in individual genes or a panel was examined. The median methylation index was significantly higher in cases compared to controls in 8 genes, whereas there was no difference in median methylation for 2 genes. Compared to HPV and age, the combination of DNA methylation level of DAPK1, SLIT2, WIF1 and RARB with HPV and age significantly improved the AUC from 0.79 to 0.99 (95% CI: 0.97-1.00, p-value = 0.003). Pyrosequencing analysis confirmed that several genes are common targets for aberrant methylation in cervical cancer and DNA methylation level of four genes appears to increase specificity to identify cancer compared to HPV detection alone. Alterations in DNA methylation of specific genes in cervical cancers, such as DAPK1, RARB, WIF1, and SLIT2, may also occur early in cervical carcinogenesis and should be evaluated. PMID:25826459

  5. How protective is cervical cancer screening against cervical cancer mortality in developing countries? The Colombian case

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Cervical cancer is one of the top causes of cancer morbidity and mortality in Colombia despite the existence of a national preventive program. Screening coverage with cervical cytology does not explain the lack of success of the program in reducing incidence and mortality rates by cervical cancer. To address this problem an ecological analysis, at department level, was carried out in Colombia to assess the relationship between cervical screening characteristics and cervical cancer mortality rates. Methods Mortality rates by cervical cancer were estimated at the department level for the period 2000-2005. Levels of mortality rates were compared to cervical screening coverage and other characteristics of the program. A Poisson regression was used to estimate the effect of different dimensions of program performance on mortality by cervical cancer. Results Screening coverage ranged from 28.7% to 65.6% by department but increases on this variable were not related to decreases in mortality rates. A significant reduction in mortality was found in departments where a higher proportion of women looked for medical advice when abnormal findings were reported in Pap smears. Geographic areas where a higher proportion of women lack health insurance had higher rates of mortality by cervical cancer. Conclusions These results suggest that coverage is not adequate to prevent mortality due to cervical cancer if women with abnormal results are not provided with adequate follow up and treatment. The role of different dimensions of health care such as insurance coverage, quality of care, and barriers for accessing health care needs to be evaluated and addressed in future studies. PMID:20846446

  6. Development of Consensus Educational Materials on HPV & Cervical Cancer for Europe

    Cancer.gov

    1 Development of Development of Consensus Educational Materials Consensus Educational Materials on HPV & Cervical Cancer for Europe on HPV & Cervical Cancer for Europe Philip Davies Philip Davies European Cervical Cancer Association European Cervical

  7. Investigation of the influence of high-risk human papillomavirus on the biochemical composition of cervical cancer cells using vibrational spectroscopy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kamila Magdalena Ostrowska; Alison Malkin; Aidan Meade; John O'Leary; Cara Martin; Cathy Spillane; Hugh James Byrne; Fiona Maria Lyng

    2010-01-01

    The main aetiology of cervical cancer is infection with high risk human papillomavirus (HPV). Cervical cancer is almost 100% curable if detected in the early stages. Thus, information about the presence and levels of HPV in patient samples has high clinical value. As current screening methods, such as the Pap smear test, are highly subjective and in many cases show

  8. Conservative Treatment in Early Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Karimi-Zarchi, Mojgan; Mousavi, Azamsadat; Gilani, Mitra Modares; Barooti, Esmat; Miratashi-Yazdi, Ashrafosadat; Dehghani, Atefe

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review: The aim of this study was to describe fertility preservation methods to improve quality of life of early stages of cervical cancer. Recent finding: Although definite treatment of early stages of cervical cancer including stages IA,IB1 and IIA non-bulky is radial hysterectomy, this method is used in perimenopousal period in which fertility preservation is not important. Whenever fertility preservation is so important, some methods like radical trachelectomy and laparoscopic lymphadenectomy are used to rule out lymphatic metastases. Summary: If any visible lesion on cervix is found, pelvic MRI is helpful and during operation, trachelectomy samples are sent for frozen section and margin study. Radical trachelectomy is done vaginal or abdominal. Overall relapse rate of cervical cancer in radical trachelectomy and radical hysterectomy is the same. Complications of radical trachelectomy include chronic vaginal discharge, abnormal uterine bleeding, dysmenorrhea, inflammation and ulcer due to cercelage, amenorrhea, cervical stenosis and pregnancy complications following trachelectomy including 2nd trimester abortion and premature labor following cervical prematurity.The best and preferred method of labor is cesarean section. Neoadjuant chemotherapy followed by radical trachelectomy in large cervical lesions is a suitable treatment. Ultraconservative operations like large cold knife conization, simple trachelectomy with laparoscopic lymphadenectomy and sentinel lymph node mapping are suitable for very small lesions. PMID:24170987

  9. Tumor-Targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R in Combination with Trastuzumab Eradicates HER-2-Positive Cervical Cancer Cells in Patient-Derived Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Zhang, Yong; Zhao, Ming; Zhang, Nan; Murakami, Takashi; Maawy, Ali; Mii, Sumiyuki; Uehara, Fuminari; Yamamoto, Mako; Miwa, Shinji; Yano, Shuya; Momiyama, Masashi; Mori, Ryutaro; Matsuyama, Ryusei; Chishima, Takashi; Tanaka, Kuniya; Ichikawa, Yasushi; Bouvet, Michael; Endo, Itaru; Hoffman, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    We have previously developed mouse models of HER-2-positive cervical cancer. Tumors in nude mice had histological structures similar to the original tumor and were stained by anti-HER-2 antibody in the same pattern as the patient’s cancer. We have also previously developed tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R and have demonstrated its efficacy against patient-derived tumor mouse models, both alone and in combination. In the current study, we determined the efficacy of S. typhimurium A1-R in combination with trastuzumab on a patient-cancer nude-mouse model of HER-2 positive cervical cancer. Mice were randomized to 5 groups and treated as follows: (1) no treatment; (2) carboplatinum (30 mg/kg, ip, weekly, 5 weeks); (3) trastuzumab (20 mg/kg, ip, weekly, 5 weeks); (4) S. typhimurium A1-R (5 × 107 CFU/body, ip, weekly, 5 weeks); (5) S. typhimurium A1-R (5 × 107 CFU/body, ip, weekly, 5 weeks) + trastuzumab (20 mg/kg, ip, weekly, 5 weeks). All regimens had significant efficacy compared to the untreated mice. The relative tumor volume of S. typhimurium A1-R + trastuzumab-treated mice was smaller compared to trastuzumab alone (p = 0.007) and S. typhimurium A1-R alone (p = 0.039). No significant body weight loss was found compared to the no treatment group except for carboplatinum-treated mice (p = 0.021). Upon histological examination, viable tumor cells were not detected, and replaced by stromal cells in the tumors treated with S. typhimurium A1-R + trastuzumab. The results of the present study suggest that S. typhimurium A1-R and trastuzumab in combination are highly effective against HER-2-expressing cervical cancer. PMID:26047477

  10. Aberrant Expression of Oncogenic and Tumor-Suppressive MicroRNAs in Cervical Cancer Is Required for Cancer Cell Growth

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xiaohong Wang; Shuang Tang; Shu-Yun Le; Robert Lu; Janet S. Rader; Craig Meyers; Zhi-Ming Zheng; Dong-Yan Jin

    2008-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in cancer development. By cloning and sequencing of a HPV16+ CaSki cell small RNA library, we isolated 174 miRNAs (including the novel miR-193c) which could be grouped into 46 different miRNA species, with miR-21, miR-24, miR-27a, and miR-205 being most abundant. We chose for further study 10 miRNAs according to their cloning frequency and associated

  11. The Cytotoxicity Mechanism of 6-Shogaol-Treated HeLa Human Cervical Cancer Cells Revealed by Label-Free Shotgun Proteomics and Bioinformatics Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qun; Peng, Yong-Bo; Qi, Lian-Wen; Cheng, Xiao-Lan; Xu, Xiao-Jun; Liu, Le-Le; Liu, E-Hu; Li, Ping

    2012-01-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the most common cancers among women in the world. 6-Shogaol is a natural compound isolated from the rhizome of ginger (Zingiber officinale). In this paper, we demonstrated that 6-shogaol induced apoptosis and G2/M phase arrest in human cervical cancer HeLa cells. Endoplasmic reticulum stress and mitochondrial pathway were involved in 6-shogaol-mediated apoptosis. Proteomic analysis based on label-free strategy by liquid chromatography chip quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry was subsequently proposed to identify, in a non-target-biased manner, the molecular changes in cellular proteins in response to 6-shogaol treatment. A total of 287 proteins were differentially expressed in response to 24 h treatment with 15 ?M 6-shogaol in HeLa cells. Significantly changed proteins were subjected to functional pathway analysis by multiple analyzing software. Ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA) suggested that 14-3-3 signaling is a predominant canonical pathway involved in networks which may be significantly associated with the process of apoptosis and G2/M cell cycle arrest induced by 6-shogaol. In conclusion, this work developed an unbiased protein analysis strategy by shotgun proteomics and bioinformatics analysis. Data observed provide a comprehensive analysis of the 6-shogaol-treated HeLa cell proteome and reveal protein alterations that are associated with its anticancer mechanism. PMID:23243437

  12. Inotodiol inhabits proliferation and induces apoptosis through modulating expression of cyclinE, p27, bcl-2, and bax in human cervical cancer HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Li-Wei; Zhong, Xiu-Hong; Yang, Shu-Yan; Zhang, Yi-Zhong; Yang, Ning-Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Inonotus obliquus is a medicinal mushroom that has been used as an effective agent to treat various diseases such as diabetes, tuberculosis and cancer. Inotodiol, an included triterpenoid shows significant anti-tumor effect. However, the mechanisms have not been well documented. In this study, we aimed to explore the effect of inotodiol on proliferation and apoptosis in human cervical cancer HeLa cells and investigated the underlying molecular mechanisms. HeLa cells were treated with different concentrations of inotodiol. The MTT assay was used to evaluate cell proliferating ability, flow cytometry (FCM) was employed for cell cycle analysis and cell apoptosis, while expression of cyclinE, p27, bcl-2 and bax was detected by immunocytochemistry. Proliferation of HeLa cells was inhibited by inotodiolin a dose-dependent manner at 24h (r=0.9999, p<0.01). A sub-G1 peak (apoptotic cells) of HeLa cells was detected after treatment and the apoptosis rate with the concentration and longer incubation time (r=1.0, p<0.01), while the percentage of cells in S phase and G2/M phase decreased significantly. Immunocytochemistry assay showed that the expression of cyclin E and bcl-2 in the treated cells significantly decreased, while the expression of p27 and bax obviously increased, compared with the control group (p<0.05). The results of our research indicate that inotodiol isolated from Inonotus obliquus inhibited the proliferation of HeLa cells and induced apoptosis in vitro. The mechanisms may be related to promoting apoptosis through increasing the expression of bax and cutting bcl-2 and affecting the cell cycle by down-regulation the expression of cyclin E and up-regulation of p27. The results further indicate the potential value of inotodiol for treatment of human cervical cancer. PMID:24815470

  13. Screening of cervical cancer in Catalonia 2006–2012

    PubMed Central

    de Sanjosé, Silvia; Ibáñez, Raquel; Rodríguez-Salés, Vanesa; Peris, Mercè; Roura, Esther; Diaz, Mireia; Torné, Aureli; Costa, Dolors; Canet, Yolanda; Falguera, Gemma; Alejo, Maria; Espinàs, Josep Alfons; Bosch, F. Xavier

    2015-01-01

    The early detection of intraepithelial lesions of the cervix, through the periodic examination of cervical cells, has been fundamental for the prevention of invasive cervical cancer and its related mortality. In this report, we summarise the cervical cancer screening activities carried out in Catalonia, Spain, within the National Health System during 2008–2011. The study population covers over two million women resident in the area. The evaluation includes 758,690 cervical cytologies performed on a total of 595,868 women. The three-year coverage of cervical cytology among women aged between 25 and 65 years was 40.8%. About 50% of first screened women with negative results had not returned to the second screening round. The introduction of high-risk human papillomavirus DNA (HPV) detection, as a primary screening cotest with cytology among women over age 40 with a poor screening history, significantly improved the detection of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or worse (CIN2+), being far superior to cytology alone. Cotesting did not improve the detection of CIN2+. The use of the HPV test for the triage of atypical squamous cell undetermined significance (ASC-US) improved the selection of women at high risk of CIN2+. Sampling (both cytology and HPV test) was largely performed by midwives (66.7%), followed by obstetricians (23.8%) and nurses (7%). Over half of the centres (54.8%) had full use of online medical records. During the study period, educational activities for professionals and for women were carried out periodically. The organisation of screening as a population activity in which women are actively called to the screening visit and the introduction of HPV testing as a primary screening tool are strongly recommended to ensure the maximum population impact in the reduction of the cervical cancer burden. PMID:25987901

  14. Screening of cervical cancer in Catalonia 2006-2012.

    PubMed

    de Sanjosé, Silvia; Ibáñez, Raquel; Rodríguez-Salés, Vanesa; Peris, Mercè; Roura, Esther; Diaz, Mireia; Torné, Aureli; Costa, Dolors; Canet, Yolanda; Falguera, Gemma; Alejo, Maria; Espinàs, Josep Alfons; Bosch, F Xavier

    2015-01-01

    The early detection of intraepithelial lesions of the cervix, through the periodic examination of cervical cells, has been fundamental for the prevention of invasive cervical cancer and its related mortality. In this report, we summarise the cervical cancer screening activities carried out in Catalonia, Spain, within the National Health System during 2008-2011. The study population covers over two million women resident in the area. The evaluation includes 758,690 cervical cytologies performed on a total of 595,868 women. The three-year coverage of cervical cytology among women aged between 25 and 65 years was 40.8%. About 50% of first screened women with negative results had not returned to the second screening round. The introduction of high-risk human papillomavirus DNA (HPV) detection, as a primary screening cotest with cytology among women over age 40 with a poor screening history, significantly improved the detection of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or worse (CIN2+), being far superior to cytology alone. Cotesting did not improve the detection of CIN2+. The use of the HPV test for the triage of atypical squamous cell undetermined significance (ASC-US) improved the selection of women at high risk of CIN2+. Sampling (both cytology and HPV test) was largely performed by midwives (66.7%), followed by obstetricians (23.8%) and nurses (7%). Over half of the centres (54.8%) had full use of online medical records. During the study period, educational activities for professionals and for women were carried out periodically. The organisation of screening as a population activity in which women are actively called to the screening visit and the introduction of HPV testing as a primary screening tool are strongly recommended to ensure the maximum population impact in the reduction of the cervical cancer burden. PMID:25987901

  15. Cervical cancer prevention: immunization and screening 2015.

    PubMed

    Thaxton, Lauren; Waxman, Alan G

    2015-05-01

    Both primary and secondary prevention of cervical cancer are now available. Immunizations against human papillomavirus (HPV) types 16 and 18 have the potential to prevent 70% of cancers of the cervix plus a large percentage of other lower anogenital tract cancers. Screening guidelines were recently changed to recommend cotesting with cytology plus an HPV test. The addition of HPV testing increases the sensitivity and negative predictive value of screening over the Papanicolaou (Pap) test alone. PMID:25841595

  16. Effects of irradiation for cervical cancer on subsequent breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Harlan, L.C.M.

    1985-01-01

    Previous research suggests that cervical cancer patients have a lower risk of breast cancer than women in the general population. Possible explanations include opposing risk factors for cervical cancer and breast cancer, the effect of irradiation used to treat cervical cancer, or both. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between irradiation for cervical cancer and the subsequent development of breast cancer. There was no statistically significant relationship between radiation to the ovarian area and the risk of breast cancer in this study. However, the results were consistent with a 19% reduction in risk for women irradiated for cervical cancer when compared to nonirradiated women. In a dose-response analysis, there was a nonsignificant trend of decreased risk of breast cancer with increased radiation up to 1800 rad. There was no consistent pattern for higher doses. The trend, although nonsignificant, differed by age. Women <60 years of age at irradiation were generally at a lower risk of breast cancer than nonirradiated women. Women over 59 years were at an increased risk. There are some potentially important findings from this study which might influence medical care. These should be examined in the larger International Radiation Study.

  17. Human papillomavirus in false negative archival cervical smears: implications for screening for cervical cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J M Walboomers; A M de Roda Husman; P J Snijders; H V Stel; E K Risse; T J Helmerhorst; F J Voorhorst; C J Meijer

    1995-01-01

    AIM--To assess the value of detecting human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA in false negative archival cervical smears in population based screening programmes for cervical cancer. METHODS--Cytomorphologically classified false negative archival Pap smears (n = 27) taken from 18 women up to six years before cervical cancer was diagnosed were blindly mixed with 89 smears from hospital patients with a variety of

  18. Fabrication of genistein-loaded biodegradable TPGS-b-PCL nanoparticles for improved therapeutic effects in cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongling; Liu, Gan; Zeng, Xiaowei; Wu, Yanping; Yang, Chengming; Mei, Lin; Wang, Zhongyuan; Huang, Laiqiang

    2015-01-01

    Genistein is one of the most studied isoflavonoids with potential antitumor efficacy, but its poor water solubility limits its clinical application. Nanoparticles (NPs), especially biodegradable NPs, entrapping hydrophobic drugs have promising applications to improve the water solubility of hydrophobic drugs. In this work, TPGS-b-PCL copolymer was synthesized from ?-caprolactone initiated by d-?-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate (TPGS) through ring-opening polymerization and characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, gel permeation chromatography, and thermogravimetric analysis. The genistein-loaded NPs were prepared by a modified nanoprecipitation method and characterized in the aspects of particle size, surface charge, morphology, drug loading and encapsulation efficiency, in vitro drug release, and physical state of the entrapped drug. The TPGS-b-PCL NPs were found to have higher cellular uptake efficiency than PCL NPs. MTT and colony formation experiments indicated that genistein-loaded TPGS-b-PCL NPs achieved the highest level of cytotoxicity and tumor cell growth inhibition compared with pristine genistein and genistein-loaded PCL NPs. Furthermore, compared with pristine genistein and genistein-loaded PCL NPs, the genistein-loaded TPGS-b-PCL NPs at the same dose were more effective in inhibiting tumor growth in the subcutaneous HeLa xenograft tumor model in BALB/c nude mice. In conclusion, the results suggested that genistein-loaded biodegradable TPGS-b-PCL nanoparticles could enhance the anticancer effect of genistein both in vitro and in vivo, and may serve as a potential candidate in treating cervical cancer. PMID:25848264

  19. Expression of transcription factor grainyhead-like 2 is diminished in cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Reyes, Luis A; Alvarado-Ruiz, Liliana; Piña-Sánchez, Patricia; Martínez-Silva, María G; Ramos-Solano, Moisés; Olimón-Andalón, Vicente; Ortiz-Lazareno, Pablo C; Hernández-Flores, Georgina; Bravo-Cuellar, Alejandro; Aguilar-Lemarroy, Adriana; Jave-Suarez, Luis F

    2014-01-01

    The transcription factor grainyhead-like 2 (GRHL2) is evolutionarily conserved in many different species, and is involved in morphogenesis, epithelial differentiation, and the control of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition. It has also recently been implicated in carcinogenesis, but its role in this remains controversial. Expression of GRHL2 has not previously been reported in cervical cancer, so the present study aimed to characterize GRHL2 expression in cervical cancer-derived cell lines (CCCLs) and cervical tissues with different grades of lesions. Microarray analysis found that the expression of 58 genes was down-regulated in CCCLs compared to HaCaT cells (non-tumorigenic human epithelial cell line). The expression of eight of these genes was validated by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR), and GRHL2 was found to be the most down-regulated. Western blot assays corroborated that GRHL2 protein levels were strongly down-regulated in CCCLs. Cervical cells from women without cervical lesions were shown to express GRHL2, while immunohistochemistry found that positivity to GRHL2 decreased in cervical cancer tissues. In conclusion, a loss or strong reduction in GRHL2 expression appears to be a characteristic of cervical cancer, suggesting that GRHL2 down-regulation is a necessary step during cervical carcinogenesis. However, further studies are needed to delineate the role of GRHL2 in cervical cancer and during malignant progression. PMID:25550776

  20. (?)Anonaine induces apoptosis through Bax and caspase-dependent pathways in human cervical cancer (HeLa) cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chung-Yi Chen; Tsan-Zon Liu; Wei-Chang Tseng; Fung-Jou Lu; Ray-Ping Hung; Chi-Hung Chen; Ching-Hsein Chen

    2008-01-01

    (?)-Anonaine has been shown to have some anticancer activities, but the mechanisms of (?)-anonaine inducing cell death of human cancer cells is not fully understood. We investigated the mechanisms of apoptosis induced by (?)-anonaine in human HeLa cancer cells. Treatment with (?)-anonaine induces dose-dependent DNA damage that is correlated with increased intracellular nitric oxide, reactive oxygen species, glutathione depletion, disruptive

  1. DCCPS: BRP: PCRB: Key Initiatives: HPV and Cervical Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    This study explores the cervical cancer-related knowledge and behaviors of mothers and the potential of the mother-daughter relationship using daughter-initiated cervical cancer prevention in South Africa. The relationship has implications for effecting intergenerational prevention behavior for cervical cancer. This study will contribute formative data towards a better understanding of the potential of daughters to serve as advocates to promote cervical cancer screening with their mothers in order to develop effective and innovative methods to promote screening for cervical cancer.

  2. 20(s)-ginsenoside Rg3-loaded magnetic human serum albumin nanospheres applied to HeLa cervical cancer cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rui; Chen, Daozhen; Li, Mengfei; Miao, Fengqin; Liu, Peidang; Tang, Qiusha

    2014-01-01

    20(s)-ginsenoside Rg3 is extracted from traditional Chinese medicine, red ginseng. However, due to its poor aqueous solubility and low oral bioavailability, the use of 20(s)-Rg3 is limited. This study aimed to explore a method of preparing nano-sized 20(s)-ginsenoside Rg3 particle named 20(s)-ginsenoside Rg3-loaded magnetic human serum albumin nanospheres (20(s)-Rg3/HSAMNP) to change dosage form to improve its aqueous solubility and bioavailability. 20(s)-Rg3/HSAMNP were prepared by the desolvation-crosslinking method. The character of 20(s)-Rg3/HSAMNP was detected. An antiproliferative effect and cell apoptosis rates of 20(s)-Rg3/HSAMNP on human cervical cancer cells were determined by the MTT assay and flow cytometry, respectively. TEM analysis showed that 20(s)-Rg3/HSAMNP were approximately spherical and uniform in size. Thermodynamic testing showed that the corresponding magnetic fluid of a specific concentration rosed to a steady temperature of 42-65?C. Iron content was approximately 3 mg/mL. Drug encapsulation efficiency was approximately 70%. The potential of 20(s)-Rg3/HSAMNP combined with magnetic hyperthermia therapy to inhibit cell growth and induce apoptosis was much more prominent than that of the other groups. A new dosage form of 20(s)-Rg3 was prepared, which effectively induced apoptosis in HeLa cervical cancer cells in vitro when combined with hyperthermia. PMID:25226895

  3. A unified sample preparation protocol for proteomic and genomic profiling of cervical swabs to identify biomarkers for cervical cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    Rader, Janet S.; Malone, James P; Gross, Julia; Gilmore, Petra; Brooks, Rebecca A.; Nguyen, Loan; Crimmins, Dan L.; Feng, Sheng; Wright, Jason D.; Taylor, Nicolas; Zighelboim, Israel; Funk, Margo C; Huettner, Phyllis C.; Ladenson, Jack H.; Gius, David; Townsend, R. Reid

    2011-01-01

    Cervical cancer screening is ideally suited for the development of biomarkers due to the ease of tissue acquisition and the well-established histological transitions. Furthermore, cell and biologic fluid obtained from cervix samples undergo specific molecular changes that can be profiled. However, the ideal manner and techniques for preparing cervical samples remains to be determined. To address this critical issue a patient screening protein and nucleic acid collection protocol was established. RNAlater was used to collect the samples followed by proteomic methods to identify proteins that were differentially expressed in normal cervical epithelial versus cervical cancer cells. Three hundred ninety spots were identified via two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) that were expressed at either higher or lower levels (>3-fold) in cervical cancer samples. These proteomic results were compared to genes in a cDNA microarray analysis of microdissected neoplastic cervical specimens to identify overlapping patterns of expression. The most frequent pathways represented by the combined dataset were: cell cycle: G2/M DNA damage checkpoint regulation; aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling; p53 signaling; cell cycle: G1/S checkpoint regulation; and the endoplasmic reticulum stress pathway. HNRPA2B1 was identified as a biomarker candidate with increased expression in cancer compared to normal cervix and validated by Western blot. PMID:21136816

  4. Metastatic tumour cells favour the generation of a tolerogenic milieu in tumour draining lymph node in patients with early cervical cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alessandra Battaglia; Alexia Buzzonetti; Cinzia Baranello; Gabriella Ferrandina; Enrica Martinelli; Francesco Fanfani; Giovanni Scambia; Andrea Fattorossi

    2009-01-01

    Objective  We compared the immune system state in metastatic tumour draining lymph nodes (mTDLN) and metastasis free TDLN (mfTDLN) in\\u000a 53 early stage cervical cancer patients to assess whether the presence of metastatic tumour cells worsen the balance between\\u000a an efficacious anti-tumour and a tolerogenic microenvironment.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  The immune system state was measured by immunophenotypic and functional assessment of suppressor and effector

  5. Neem leaf glycoprotein partially rectifies suppressed dendritic cell functions and associated T cell efficacy in patients with stage IIIB cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Roy, Soumyabrata; Goswami, Shyamal; Bose, Anamika; Chakraborty, Krishnendu; Pal, Smarajit; Haldar, Atanu; Basu, Parthasarathi; Biswas, Jaydip; Baral, Rathindranath

    2011-04-01

    Myeloid-derived dendritic cells (DCs) generated from monocytes obtained from stage IIIB cervical cancer (CaCx IIIB) patients show dysfunctional maturation; thus, antitumor T cell functions are dysregulated. In an objective to optimize these dysregulated immune functions, the present study is focused on the ability of neem leaf glycoprotein (NLGP), a nontoxic preparation of the neem leaf, to induce optimum maturation of dendritic cells from CaCx IIIB patients. In vitro NLGP treatment of immature DCs (iDCs) obtained from CaCx IIIB patients results in upregulated expression of various cell surface markers (CD40, CD83, CD80, CD86, and HLA-ABC), which indicates DC maturation. Consequently, NLGP-matured DCs displayed balanced cytokine secretions, with type 1 bias and noteworthy functional properties. These DCs displayed substantial T cell allostimulatory capacity and promoted the generation of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). Although NLGP-matured DCs derived from CaCx monocytes are generally subdued compared to those with a healthy monocyte origin, considerable revival of the suppressed DC-based immune functions is noted in vitro at a fairly advanced stage of CaCx, and thus, further exploration of ex vivo and in vivo DC-based vaccines is proposed. Moreover, the DC maturating efficacy of NLGP might be much more effective in the earlier stages of CaCx, where the extent of immune dysregulation is less and, thus, the scope of further investigation may be explored. PMID:21307275

  6. Human Secreted Frizzled-Related Protein Is Down-regulated and Induces Apoptosis in Human Cervical Cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jesang Ko; Ki Sung Ryu; Young Han Lee; Doe Sun Na; Yoon Suk Kim; Young Mi Oh; In Sik Kim; Jin Woo Kim

    2002-01-01

    To identify genes involved in cervical carcinogenesis, the mRNA differential display method was used. A 220-bp cDNA fragment called CA11 was present in normal cervical tissue but not in primary cervical cancer tissue or cervical cancer cell lines. CA11 exhibited 98% homology with the recorded human secreted frizzled-related protein (hsFRP) sequence. A dominant hsFRP mRNA transcript of approximately 4.6 kb

  7. Mechanical characterization of cervical squamous carcinoma cells by atomic force microscopy at nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yong-xia; Cheng, Yuan; Sun, Quan-mei; Zhang, You-yi; You, Ke; Guo, Yan-li; Han, Dong; Geng, Li

    2015-03-01

    To investigate the nanoscale mechanical properties of exfoliated cervical epithelial cells from patients to further reveal the pathogenesis of cervical cancer and help early diagnose. Exfoliated cells were collected from nine patients with chronic cervicitis or CIN1(control group), 30 patients with CIN2-3 (CIN 2-3 group), and 13 patients with cervical cancer (cervical cancer group). Stiffness of the cells was determined by atomic force microscope (AFM). Expression of P16INK4A was studied by immunocytochemistry. Environmental scanning electron microscopy was performed to observe the surface microtopography of the exfoliated cells. Young's modulus was measured for cells exfoliated from control and patients with CIN 2-3 and cervical cancer by AFM. The results showed that with increasing cervical lesions, the Young's modulus of the exfoliated cervical cells increased (P < 0.05). The modulus of the exfoliated cells was significantly decreased in the three patients 1 year after the surgery compared with the value before the surgery. Expression of P16INK4A in the exfoliated cells had not been statistically significant. Squamous cells from cervical cancer group had dense and disordered microvilli without clear microridges compare to other groups. The Young's modulus is increased from the control group, to CIN2-3 and cervical cancer groups, suggesting that the stiffness of cervical epithelial cells increases gradually with increasing cervical lesions. The changes in the mechanical properties of the exfoliated cells occur earlier than the changes in cell morphology. Therefore, analysis of mechanical properties of the exfoliated cells may be used to aid early diagnosis of the cancer. PMID:25694045

  8. Neem leaf glycoprotein overcomes indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase mediated tolerance in dendritic cells by attenuating hyperactive regulatory T cells in cervical cancer stage IIIB patients.

    PubMed

    Roy, Soumyabrata; Barik, Subhasis; Banerjee, Saptak; Bhuniya, Avishek; Pal, Smarajit; Basu, Parthasarathi; Biswas, Jaydip; Goswami, Shyamal; Chakraborty, Tathagata; Bose, Anamika; Baral, Rathindranath

    2013-08-01

    Tolerogenic dendritic cells (DCs) are a subset of DCs characterized by abundant indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO) expressions. IDO may be co-operatively induced in DCs by regulatory T (Tregs) cells and various DC maturation agents. Tregs are markedly amplified in the physiological system of cancer patients, inducing over tolerance in DCs that leads to the hyper accumulation of immunosuppressive IDO in tumor microenvironment, thereby, hampering anti-tumor immunity. Consequently, a major focus of current immunotherapeutic strategies in cancer is to minimize IDO, which is possible by reducing Tregs and using various IDO inhibitors. Neem leaf glycoprotein (NLGP), a natural and nontoxic immunomodulator, demonstrated several unique immunoregulatory activities. Noteworthy activities of NLGP are to mature DCs and to inhibit Tregs. As Tregs are inducer of IDO in DCs and hyperactive Tregs is a hallmark of cancer, we anticipated that NLGP might abrogate IDO induction in DCs by inhibiting Tregs. Evidences are presented here that in a co-culture of DCs and Tregs isolated from cervical cancer stage IIIB (CaCx-IIIB) patients, NLGP does inhibit IDO induction in DCs by curtailing the over expression of Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte Antigen 4 (CTLA4) on Tregs and concomitantly induces optimal DC maturation. In contrast, in the presence of LPS as maturation agent the DCs displays a tolerogenic profile. This finding suggests the reduction of tolerogenecity of DCs in CaCx-IIIB patients by reducing the IDO pool using NLGP. Accordingly, this study sheds more light on the diverse immunomodulatory repertoire of NLGP. PMID:23628394

  9. Silencing MTA1 by RNAi reverses adhesion, migration and invasiveness of cervical cancer cells (SiHa) via altered expression of p53, and E-cadherin\\/?-catenin complex

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yumei Rao; Hongyan Wang; Liangsheng Fan; Gang Chen

    2011-01-01

    Summary  It has been reported that metastasis-associated gene 1 (Mta1) is overexpressed in many malignant tumors with high metastatic potential. In addition, some studies indicated that MTA1\\u000a participated in invasion, metastasis, and survival of cancer cells by regulating cell migration, adhesion and proliferation.\\u000a But the role of MTA1 is unclear in vitro in the development of cervical cancer cells. This study

  10. Director's Message 2 Cervical Cancer 4

    E-print Network

    George, Steven C.

    Director's Message 2 Cervical Cancer 4 Laser Eyelid Surgery 5 LASER B E C K M A N L A S E R I N on pg. 8) Rafiki, an iguana, has recovered fully from laser surgery. (Please see Veterinary Update on pg

  11. Cervical Cancer Screening and Perceived Information Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whynes, David K.; Clarke, Katherine; Philips, Zoe; Avis, Mark

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To identify women's sources of information about cervical cancer screening, information which women report receiving during Pap consultations, information they would like to receive, and the relationships between perceived information needs, personal characteristics and information sources. Design/methodology/approach: Logistic regression…

  12. Remote microscope control for cervical cancer telediagnostic

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Parra; J. Puentes; A. Herrera

    2003-01-01

    Despite the improvements to conveniently exchange digital cytological images and patient data forms, which facilitate and accelerate cervical cancer telediagnostic, some of the diagnosed cases require the expert cytologist to remotely acquire images of the slide being examined by a less experienced technician. This paper presents an interactive remote microscope control that permits to distantly be in command of the

  13. Should helical tomotherapy replace brachytherapy for cervical cancer? Case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) administered via a helical tomotherapy (HT) system is an effective modality for treating lung cancer and metastatic liver tumors. Whether SBRT delivered via HT is a feasible alternative to brachytherapy in treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer in patients with unusual anatomic configurations of the uterus has never been studied. Case Presentation A 46-year-old woman presented with an 8-month history of abnormal vaginal bleeding. Biopsy revealed squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a cervical tumor with direct invasion of the right parametrium, bilateral hydronephrosis, and multiple uterine myomas. International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage IIIB cervical cancer was diagnosed. Concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT) followed by SBRT delivered via HT was administered instead of brachytherapy because of the presence of multiple uterine myomas with bleeding tendency. Total abdominal hysterectomy was performed after 6 weeks of treatment because of the presence of multiple uterine myomas. Neither pelvic MRI nor results of histopathologic examination at X-month follow-up showed evidence of tumor recurrence. Only grade 1 nausea and vomiting during treatment were noted. Lower gastrointestinal bleeding was noted at 14-month follow-up. No fistula formation and no evidence of haematological, gastrointestinal or genitourinary toxicities were noted on the most recent follow-up. Conclusions CCRT followed by SBRT appears to be an effective and safe modality for treatment of cervical cancer. Larger-scale studies are warranted. PMID:21092235

  14. DCCPS: BRP: PCRB: Key Initiatives: HPV and Cervical Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    Risk for cervical cancer may depend on human papillomavirus (HPV) subtype, viral load in cervical tissue, and the persistence of infection. The risk of cervical cancer due to HPV infection may be modified by an individual's genetics, specifically, a group of alleles that code for the human leukocyte antigen (HLA).

  15. Chemoradiation of Cervical Cancer Cells: Targeting Human Papillomavirus E6 and p53 Leads to Either Augmented or Attenuated Apoptosis Depending on the Platinum Carrier Ligand1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Riku Koivusalo; Eberhard Krausz; Pertti Ruotsalainen; Hans Helenius; Sakari Hietanen

    2002-01-01

    Recent clinical trials comparing concurrent chemotherapy and radia- tion with radiation alone in cervical cancer have shown that chemoradia- tion reduces the risk of death by 30 -50%. Despite the clinical success, treatment responses at the cellular level are still inadequately explored. A key event in cervical carcinogenesis is the disruption of p53 tumor sup- pressor pathway by human papillomavirus

  16. The role of trachelectomy in cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Halaska, MJ; Robova, H; Pluta, M; Rob, L

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the most common cancers in women worldwide. Because it often affects women of childbearing age (19–45 years), fertility-sparing surgery is an important issue. The article reviews current viable fertility-sparing options with a special focus on trachelectomy, including vaginal radical trachelectomy, abdominal radical trachelectomy and simple trachelectomy. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy is also discussed. Finally, the decision to proceed with fertility-sparing treatment should be a patient-driven process. PMID:25729419

  17. Innovations in Cervical and Endometrial Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mallmann, P.; Beckmann, M. W.; Emons, G.

    2013-01-01

    The S2k guideline “Diagnostics and Therapy for Cervical Cancer” published in 2008 is currently being revised to the S3 level. Current developments in epidemiology, surgical therapy, radiochemotherapy and drug therapy will be presented. The S2k guideline “Diagnostics and Therapy for Endometrial Cancer” will also be up-dated this year. The revised recommendations on early diagnosis and diagnostics, therapy for precursors, surgical therapy, adjuvant therapy and therapy for recurrences and metastases will be presented. PMID:24771941

  18. Study to Understand Cervical Cancer Early Endpoints and Determinants (SUCCEED)

    Cancer.gov

    A study to comprehensively assess biomarkers of risk for progressive cervical neoplasia, and thus develop a new set of biomarkers that can distinguish those at highest risk of cervical cancer from those with benign infection

  19. Decreased expression of lncRNA GAS5 predicts a poor prognosis in cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Shihong; Liu, Weiliang; Li, Feng; Zhao, Weipin; Qin, Chuan

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Cervical cancer is the second leading cause of cancer morbidity and mortality for women around the world. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been investigated as a new class of regulators of cellular processes, such as cell growth, apoptosis, and carcinogenesis. Although downregulation of lncRNA GAS5 in several cancers has been studied, its role in cervical cancer remains unknown. The aim of this study is to investigate the expression, clinical significance and biological role in cervical cancer. Methods: Expression of GAS5 was analyzed in cervical cancer tissues by quantitative Real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). And its association with overall survival of patients was analyzed by statistical analysis. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) was used to suppress GAS5 expression in cervical cancer cells. In vitro assays were performed to further explore the biological functions of GAS5 in cervical cancer. Results: We found that GAS5 expression was markedly downregulated in cervical cancer tissues than in corresponding adjacent normal tissues. Decreased GAS5 expression was significantly correlated with FIGO stage, vascular invasion and lymph node metastasis. Moreover, cervical cancer patients with GAS5 lower expression have shown significantly poorer overall survival than those with higher GAS5 expression. And GAS5 expression was an independent prognostic marker of overall survival in a multivariate analysis. In vitro assays our data indicated that knockdown of GAS5 promoted cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. Conclusions: Our study presents that lncRNA GAS5 is a novel molecule involved in cervical cancer progression, which provide a potential prognostic biomarker and therapeutic target. PMID:25400758

  20. Honeybee venom possesses anticancer and antiviral effects by differential inhibition of HPV E6 and E7 expression on cervical cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-Wan; Chaturvedi, Pankaj Kumar; Chun, Sung Nam; Lee, Yang Gu; Ahn, Woong Shick

    2015-04-01

    Bee venom (BV) therapy is a type of alternative medical treatment used to treat various diseases in oriental medicine. The mechanisms underlying the effects of BV remain poorly understood. In the present study, we evaluated the antiviral effect of BV on cervical carcinoma cell lines (CaSki, HeLa, C33A and TC-1). BV treatments resulted in a more significant suppression of cell growth in HPV 16-infected cells (CaSki) and a lesser suppression in HPV 18-infected cells (HeLa). However, less suppression was observed in HPV-negative C33A cells. In 10 µg/ml BV-treated CaSki cells, the mRNA expression and protein levels of HPV16 E6 and E7 were significantly decreased by BV, while HPV18 E6 and E7 mRNA expression levels were not significantly altered by 10 µg/ml BV-treated HeLa cells. The antitumor effects of BV were in accordance with in vitro data, in restricting tumor growth in vivo and were much more effective on the suppression of tumor growth. Furthermore, the mRNA and protein expression levels of HPV16 E6 and E7 were decreased by BV in TC-1 tumors. These findings demonstrated the antiviral effects of BV in HPV-infected cervical cancer cells and the anticancer effects of BV in HPV16 E6/E7-expressed TC-1 tumors. Collectively, BV plays a differential role in suppressing HPV16-infected cells (CaSki cells) and HPV18-infected cells (HeLa cells) by the downregulation of E6/E7 protein of HPV16/18. PMID:25633640

  1. High and interrelated rates of PD-L1+CD14+ antigen-presenting cells and regulatory T cells mark the microenvironment of metastatic lymph nodes from patients with cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Heeren, A Marijne; Koster, Bas D; Samuels, Sanne; Ferns, Debbie M; Chondronasiou, Dafni; Kenter, Gemma G; Jordanova, Ekaterina S; de Gruijl, Tanja D

    2015-01-01

    A better understanding of the microenvironment in relation to lymph node metastasis is essential for the development of effective immunotherapeutic strategies against cervical cancer. In the present study, we investigated the microenvironment of tumor-draining lymph nodes of patients with cervical cancer by comprehensive flow cytometry-based phenotyping and enumeration of immune-cell subsets in tumor-negative (LN(-), n = 20) versus tumor-positive lymph nodes (LN(+), n = 8), and by the study of cytokine release profiles (n = 4 for both LN(-) and LN(+)). We found significantly lower CD4(+) and higher CD8(+) T-cell frequencies in LN(+) samples, accompanied by increased surface levels of activation markers (HLA-DR; ICOS; PD-1; CTLA-4) and the memory marker CD45RO. Furthermore, in LN(+), we found increased rates of a potentially regulatory antigen-presenting cell (APC) subset (CD11c(hi)CD14(+)PD-L1(+)) and of myeloid-derived suppressor cell subsets; the LN(+) APC subset correlated with significantly elevated frequencies of FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells (Treg). After in vitro stimulation with different Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands (PGN; Poly-IC; R848), we observed higher production levels of IL6, IL10, and TNF? but lower levels of IFN? in LN(+) samples. We conclude that, despite increased T-cell differentiation and activation, a switch to a profound immune-suppressive microenvironment in LN(+) of patients with cervical cancer will enable immune escape. Our data indicate that the CD14(+)PD-L1(+) APC/Treg axis is a particularly attractive and relevant therapeutic target to specifically tackle microenvironmental immune suppression and thus enhances the efficacy of immunotherapy in patients with metastasized cervical cancer. PMID:25361854

  2. [Papillomavirus and cervical cancer in Chile].

    PubMed

    O'Ryan, Miguel; Valenzuela, María Teresa

    2008-11-01

    Molecular, clinical and epidemiological studies have established beyond doubt that human papiloma viruses (HPV) cause cervical cancer. The virus is also associated with genital warts and other less common cancers in oropharynx, vulva, vagina and penis. Worldwide, VPH genotypes 16 and 18 are the most common high risk genotypes, detected in near 70% of women with cervical cancer. The discovery of a cause-effect relationship between several carcinogenic microorganisms and cancer open avenues for new diagnostic, treatment and prevention strategies. In this issue of Revista Médica de Chile, two papers on HPV are presented. Guzman and colleagues demonstrate that HPV can be detected in 66% to 77% of healthy male adolescents bypolymerase chain reaction and that positivity depends on the site of the penis that is sampled. These results support the role of male to female transmission of high risk HPVs in Chile and should lead to even more active educational campaigns. The second paper provides recommendations for HPV vaccine use in Chile, generated by the Immunization Advisory Committee of the Chilean Infectious Disease Society. To issue these recommendations, the Committee analyzes the epidemiological information available on HPV infection and cervical cancer in Chile, vaccine safety and effectiveness data, and describes cost-effectiveness studies. Taking into account that universal vaccination is controversial, the Committee favors vaccine use in Chile and it's incorporation into a national program. However, there is an indication that the country requires the implementation of an integrated surveillance approach including cross matching of data obtained from HPV genotype surveillance, monitoring of vaccination coverage, and surveillance of cervical cancer. The final decision of universal vaccine use in Chile should be based on a through analysis of information.ev Mid Chile PMID:19301766

  3. IMP3, a new biomarker to predict progression of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia into invasive cancer.

    PubMed

    Lu, Di; Yang, Xiaofang; Jiang, Naomi Y; Woda, Bruce A; Liu, Qin; Dresser, Karen; Mercurio, Arthur M; Rock, Kenneth L; Jiang, Zhong

    2011-11-01

    The expression of IMP3, an oncofetal protein, has been strongly associated with aggressive cancers. In this study, we investigated whether IMP3 can serve as a biomarker to predict invasive squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in patients with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) II and III. A total of 1249 patients with no dysplasia, CINs, or invasive SCC were studied for IMP3 expression. The 710 patients with CIN II and III in their cervical biopsies were further evaluated for invasive cancer-free survival analysis. The role of IMP3 in the regulation of cell proliferation and migration of HeLa cervical cancer cells was examined by modification of IMP3 expression with small interference RNA. Compared with CIN I or cervical tissues without dysplasia, IMP3 expression was significantly increased not only in invasive SCC but also most importantly in a subset of CIN III cases with concurrent invasive SCC. Importantly, invasive cancer was found only in patients with IMP3-positive CIN II and III, whereas no invasive cancer was detected in patients with IMP3-negative CIN II and III in their follow-up resections (P<0.0001). Reduction of IMP3 expression in cervical cancer cells significantly reduced cell migration without altering cell proliferation. IMP3 plays a critical role in the development of invasive SCC from cervical dysplasia. IMP3 can be used at the time of initial diagnosis of CIN to identify a group of patients with an increased chance of developing invasive cancer. PMID:21997684

  4. Update knowledge on cervical cancer incidence and prevalence in Asia.

    PubMed

    Daniyal, Muhammad; Akhtar, Naheed; Ahmad, Saeed; Fatima, Urooj; Akram, Muhammad; Asif, Hafiz Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cause of cancer-related death among women worldwide, with over 500,000 new cases diagnosed annually and 50% mortality rate in Asia. In the United States, approximately 10,370 new cases of cervical cancer are diagnosed annually, and estimated 3,710 deaths occur from the disease, making it the sixth most common cause of malignancy among American women. This study aims to provide awareness about cervical cancer as well as an updated knowledge about the prevalence and incidence of cervical cancer in Asia. PMID:25987011

  5. Long non-coding RNA HOTAIR is associated with human cervical cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Jung; Lee, Dae Woo; Yim, Ga Won; Nam, Eun Ji; Kim, Sunghoon; Kim, Sang Wun; Kim, Young Tae

    2015-02-01

    The functions of many long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in human cancers remain to be clarified. The lncRNA Hox transcript antisense intergenic RNA (HOTAIR) has been reported to reprogram chromatin organization and promote breast and colorectal cancer metastasis, the involvement of lncRNAs in cervical cancer is just beginning to be studied. In the present study, we examined the expression and the functional role of HOTAIR in cervical cancer. HOTAIR expression was determined in cervical cancer tissues (n=111) and corresponding normal tissues (n=40) by using real-time polymerase chain reaction, and its correlation with clinical parameters and prognosis were analyzed. To determine the effect of HOTAIR knockdown and overexpression in cervical cancer cell lines, we used the CCK-8 assay, wound healing migration and matrigel invasion assay. The expression level of HOTAIR in cervical cancer tissues was higher than that in corresponding non-cancerous tissues. High HOTAIR expression correlated with lymph node metastasis, and reduced overall survival. A multivariate analysis showed that HOTAIR was a prognostic factor for predicting cervical cancer recurrence. Knockdown of HOTAIR reduced cell proliferation, migration, and invasion in cervical cancer cell lines. Moreover, HOTAIR regulated the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor, matrix metalloproteinase-9 and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-related genes, which are important for cell motility and metastasis. Therefore, HOTAIR may promote tumor aggressiveness through the upregulation of VEGF and MMP-9 and EMT-related genes. These findings indicate that HOTAIR may represent a novel biomarker for predicting recurrence and prognosis and serve as a promising therapeutic target in cervical cancer. PMID:25405331

  6. Patterns of Known and Novel Small RNAs in Human Cervical Cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bruce K. Patterson; Andrew Fire

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that knowledge of differential expres- sion of microRNAs (miRNA) in cancer may have substantial diagnostic and prognostic value. Here,we use a direct sequencing method to characterize the profiles of miRNAs and other small RNA segments for six human cervical carcinoma cell lines and five normal cervical samples. Of 166 miRNAs expressed in normal cervix and cancer cell

  7. 77 FR 66469 - Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control Advisory Committee (BCCEDCAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-05

    ...Disease Control and Prevention Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control...aforementioned committee: Name: Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control...detection and control of breast and cervical cancer. The committee makes...

  8. 75 FR 7282 - Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control Advisory Committee (BCCEDCAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-18

    ...Disease Control and Prevention Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control...detection and control of breast and cervical cancer. The committee makes recommendations...Task Force guidelines for breast and cervical cancer screening; Impact of...

  9. 76 FR 30723 - Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control Advisory Committee (BCCEDCAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-26

    ...Disease Control and Prevention Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control...detection and control of breast and cervical cancer. The committee makes recommendations...Reform and its impact for breast and cervical cancer screening; updates on...

  10. CASP7 variants modify susceptibility to cervical cancer in Chinese women

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Ting-Yan; He, Jing; Wang, Meng-Yun; Zhu, Mei-Ling; Yu, Ke-Da; Shao, Zhi-Ming; Sun, Meng-Hong; Wu, Xiaohua; Cheng, Xi; Wei, Qingyi

    2015-01-01

    Polymorphisms in Caspase-7 (CASP7) may modulate the programmed cell death and thus contribute to cervical cancer risk. In this case-control study of 1,486 cervical cancer cases and 1,301 controls, we investigated associations between four potentially functional polymorphisms in CASP7 and cervical cancer risk and evaluated their locus-locus interaction effects on the risk. The genotype-phenotype correlation was performed by a generalized linear regression model. We found that the rs4353229 polymorphism was associated with cervical cancer risk (under a recessive model: crude OR = 1.20, 95% CI = 1.02–1.40). Compared with the TT genotype, the rs10787498GT genotype was associated with an increased cervical cancer risk (adjusted OR = 1.19, 95% CI = 1.00–1.41). Combination analysis showed that subjects with four putative risk genotypes had a 1.54-fold increased cancer risk, compared with those who carried three or less putative risk genotypes. We also observed significant locus-locus joint effects on the risk, which may be mediated by the polymorphisms regulating CASP7 mRNA expression. Subsequent multifactor dimensionality reduction and classification and regression tree analyses indicated that the CASP7 genotypes might have a locus-locus interaction effect that modulated cervical cancer risk. Out data suggest that CASP7 polymorphisms may interact to modify cervical cancer risk by a possible mechanism of regulating CASP7 mRNA expression. PMID:25784056

  11. Appropriate use of cervical cancer vaccine.

    PubMed

    Zimet, Gregory D; Shew, Marcia L; Kahn, Jessica A

    2008-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a necessary, though not sufficient, cause of cervical cancer. Two vaccines have been developed that prevent two HPV types associated with 70% of cervical cancers. One of the vaccines (a quadrivalent vaccine) also prevents two HPV types associated with 90% of genital warts. Both HPV vaccines have shown very good efficacy and safety. This review summarizes the guidelines for use of the quadrivalent vaccine published by the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, presents data on vaccine efficacy and safety, and gives an overview of the findings of cost-effectiveness studies. In addition, we summarize the research on the attitudes of parents and health care providers toward HPV vaccine and critically evaluate controversial and challenging issues surrounding HPV vaccination, including concerns about sexual disinhibition and potential obstacles to vaccine distribution and uptake. PMID:18186704

  12. Dendritic cell (DC) based therapy for cervical cancer: use of DC pulsed with tumour lysate and matured with a novel synthetic clinically non-toxic double stranded RNA analogue poly [I]:poly [C 12U] (Ampligen ®)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M Adams; H Navabi; B Jasani; S Man; A Fiander; A. S Evans; C Donninger; M Mason

    2003-01-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) found in 99.7% of cervical cancers represents an attractive immunotherapeutic target for novel adjuvant dendritic cell (DC) immunotherapy. DC primed with HPV antigens have been shown to be capable of inducing CTL responses powerful enough to eradicate established murine tumours expressing HPV16 antigen. The use of tumour lysate has been found to be an effective means

  13. Cervical cancer screening programmes and policies in 18 European countries

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A Anttila; G Ronco; G Clifford; F Bray; M Hakama; M Arbyn; E Weiderpass

    2004-01-01

    A questionnaire survey was conducted by the Epidemiology Working Group of the European Cervical Cancer Screening Network, and the International Agency for Research on Cancer, IARC, between August and December 2003 in 35 centres in 20 European countries with reliable cervical cancer incidence and\\/or mortality data in databanks held at IARC and WHO. The questionnaire was completed by 28 centres

  14. Suppression of HPV E6 and E7 expression by BAF53 depletion in cervical cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kiwon; Lee, Ah-Young [Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Hankuk University of Foreign Studies, Yongin 449-791 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Hankuk University of Foreign Studies, Yongin 449-791 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Yunhee Kim [Department of Life and Nanopharmaceutical Science and Department of Biology, Kyunghee University, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Life and Nanopharmaceutical Science and Department of Biology, Kyunghee University, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Hyockman, E-mail: hmkwon@hufs.ac.kr [Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Hankuk University of Foreign Studies, Yongin 449-791 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Hankuk University of Foreign Studies, Yongin 449-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-08-26

    Highlights: {yields} Integration of HPV into host genome critical for activation of E6 and E7 oncogenes. {yields} BAF53 is essential for higher-order chromatin structure. {yields} BAF53 knockdown suppresses E6 and E7 from HPV integrants, but not from episomal HPVs. {yields} BAF53 knockdown decreases H3K9Ac and H4K12Ac on P105 promoter of integrated HPV 18. {yields} BAF53 knockdown restores the p53-dependent signaling pathway in HeLa and SiHa cells. -- Abstract: Deregulation of the expression of human papillomavirus (HPV) oncogenes E6 and E7 plays a pivotal role in cervical carcinogenesis because the E6 and E7 proteins neutralize p53 and Rb tumor suppressor pathways, respectively. In approximately 90% of all cervical carcinomas, HPVs are found to be integrated into the host genome. Following integration, the core-enhancer element and P105 promoter that control expression of E6 and E7 adopt a chromatin structure that is different from that of episomal HPV, and this has been proposed to contribute to activation of E6 and E7 expression. However, the molecular basis underlying this chromatin structural change remains unknown. Previously, BAF53 has been shown to be essential for the integrity of higher-order chromatin structure and interchromosomal interactions. Here, we examined whether BAF53 is required for activated expression of E6 and E7 genes. We found that BAF53 knockdown led to suppression of expression of E6 and E7 genes from HPV integrants in cervical carcinoma cell lines HeLa and SiHa. Conversely, expression of transiently transfected HPV18-LCR-Luciferase was not suppressed by BAF53 knockdown. The level of the active histone marks H3K9Ac and H4K12Ac on the P105 promoter of integrated HPV 18 was decreased in BAF53 knockdown cells. BAF53 knockdown restored the p53-dependent signaling pathway in HeLa and SiHa cells. These results suggest that activated expression of the E6 and E7 genes of integrated HPV is dependent on BAF53-dependent higher-order chromatin structure or nuclear motor activity.

  15. Barriers to Cervical Cancer Screening Among Lesbians

    PubMed Central

    Lydecker, Alison D.; Ireland, Lynda

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Objective To evaluate cervical cancer screening practices and barriers to screening in a sample of lesbians. Methods Cross-sectional survey data were collected from 225 self-identified lesbians who completed an online questionnaire. Results Of the respondents, 71% reported receiving a Pap screening test in the past 24 months (routine screeners), and 29% reported receiving a Pap screening test >24 months ago or never (nonroutine screeners). Routine screeners were more likely to be older (p?cervical cancer. Conclusions Many lesbians do not screen for cervical cancer at recommended rates. Nonroutine screeners perceive fewer benefits, more barriers, and more discrimination and are less knowledgeable about screening guidelines than routine screeners. PMID:20095905

  16. Cervical cancer screening among vulnerable women

    PubMed Central

    Wiedmeyer, Mei-ling; Lofters, Aisha; Rashid, Meb

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective To see if refugee women at a community health centre (CHC) in Toronto, Ont, are appropriately screened for cervical cancer and if there are any demographic characteristics that affect whether they are screened. Design Chart review. Setting A CHC in downtown Toronto. Participants A total of 357 eligible refugee women attending the CHC. Main outcome measures Papanicolaou test received or documented reason for no Pap test. Results Ninety-two percent of women in the study sample were either appropriately screened for cervical cancer or had been approached for screening. Eighty percent of women were appropriately screened. Demographic variables including pregnancy, being uninsured, not speaking English, recent migration to Canada, and being a visible minority did not affect receipt of a Pap test after migration in multivariate analyses. Not speaking English was associated with a delay to receiving a first Pap test after migration. Conclusion The clients at our centre are demographically similar to women who are typically overlooked for Pap tests in the greater Toronto area. Despite belonging to a high-risk population, refugee women in this multidisciplinary CHC were screened for cervical cancer at a higher rate than the local population. PMID:22972744

  17. Human Papillomavirus type distribution in invasive cervical cancer in Uganda

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael Odida; Silvia de Sanjosé; Wim Quint; Xavier F Bosch; Joellen Klaustermeier; Elisabete Weiderpass

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We conducted a study aiming to describe Human Papillomavirus (HPV) type distribution in invasive cervical carcinoma in Uganda. METHODS: 191 archival cervical carcinoma samples diagnosed in the Department of Pathology, Makerere University in Kampala between 1968 and 1992 were analysed using a sensitive PCR-Reverse Hybridization Line Probe Assay. RESULTS: Out of the 186 cases of confirmed invasive cervical cancer

  18. Human Papillomavirus Induced Transformation in Cervical and Head and Neck Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Allie K.; Wise-Draper, Trisha M.; Wells, Susanne I.

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is one of the most widely publicized and researched pathogenic DNA viruses. For decades, HPV research has focused on transforming viral activities in cervical cancer. During the past 15 years, however, HPV has also emerged as a major etiological agent in cancers of the head and neck, in particular squamous cell carcinoma. Even with significant strides achieved towards the screening and treatment of cervical cancer, and preventive vaccines, cervical cancer remains the leading cause of cancer-associated deaths for women in developing countries. Furthermore, routine screens are not available for those at risk of head and neck cancer. The current expectation is that HPV vaccination will prevent not only cervical, but also head and neck cancers. In order to determine if previous cervical cancer models for HPV infection and transformation are directly applicable to head and neck cancer, clinical and molecular disease aspects must be carefully compared. In this review, we briefly discuss the cervical and head and neck cancer literature to highlight clinical and genomic commonalities. Differences in prognosis, staging and treatment, as well as comparisons of mutational profiles, viral integration patterns, and alterations in gene expression will be addressed. PMID:25226287

  19. Fisetin Inhibits Migration and Invasion of Human Cervical Cancer Cells by Down-Regulating Urokinase Plasminogen Activator Expression through Suppressing the p38 MAPK-Dependent NF-?B Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Ruey-Hwang; Hsieh, Shu-Ching; Yu, Yung-Luen; Huang, Min-Hsien; Huang, Yi-Chang; Hsieh, Yi-Hsien

    2013-01-01

    Fisetin (3,3’,4’,7-tetrahydroxyflavone), a naturally occurring flavonoid, has been reported to inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis in several cancer types. However, its effect on the anti-metastatic potential of cervical cancer cells remains unclear. In the present study, we found that fisetin inhibits the invasion and migration of cervical cancer cells. The expression and activity of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) was significantly suppressed by fisetin in a dose-dependent manner. We also demonstrated that fisetin reduces the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, but not that of ERK1/2, JNK1/2, or AKT. Addition of a p38 MAPK inhibitor, SB203580, further enhanced the inhibitory effect of fisetin on the expression and activity of uPA and the invasion and motility in cervical cancer cells. Fisetin suppressed the TPA (tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate)-induced activation of p38 MAPK and uPA, and inhibited the TPA-enhanced migratory and invasive abilities. Furthermore, the promoter activity of the uPA gene was dramatically repressed by fisetin, which disrupted the nuclear translocation of NF-?B and its binding amount on the promoter of the uPA gene, and these suppressive effects could be further enhanced by SB203580. This study provides strong evidence for the molecular mechanism of fisetin in inhibiting the aggressive phenotypes by repression of uPA via interruption of p38 MAPK-dependent NF-?B signaling pathway in cervical cancer cells and thus contributes insight to the potential of using fisetin as a therapeutic strategy against cervical cancer by inhibiting migration and invasion. PMID:23940799

  20. Lymphedema After Surgery in Patients With Endometrial Cancer, Cervical Cancer, or Vulvar Cancer | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    This clinical trial studies lymphedema after surgery in patients with endometrial cancer, cervical cancer, or vulvar cancer. Collecting information over time about how often lymphedema occurs in patients undergoing surgery and lymphadenectomy for endometrial cancer, cervical cancer, and vulvar cancer may help doctors learn more about the disease and plan the best treatment.

  1. [Cervical cancer even after recovery from preliminary stage].

    PubMed

    Burger, Matthé P M

    2013-01-01

    Patients with histologically confirmed cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) grade 1-3 who have completed a 2-year follow-up period with three negative cytological test results show an incidence of invasive carcinoma of 35.1 per 100,000 women years. Their risk for invasive cancer is 4-fold the risk in healthy women who had a negative primary test result. It has been proposed that this group should be kept in long-term, frequent follow-up. The author argues that if cervical cancer develops in these women, the treatment and diagnostics of CIN might have been incorrect. If the thickness of the electrosurgically excised tissue strips is insufficient, more deeply situated parts of the cervical crypts may be left behind in the stroma. After healing, cervical carcinoma may develop beneath a normal surface if these parts of the crypts contain intraepithelial neoplastic cells. This carcinoma is not amenable to early diagnosis. Before deciding on a more intense follow-up, we have to investigate the quality of the diagnostics and treatment in this group of women. PMID:23425720

  2. Functional Analysis of Bladder Cancer-Related Protein Gene: A Putative Cervical Cancer Tumor Suppressor Gene in Cervical Carcinoma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zehua Zuo; Min Zhao; Juan Liu; Guifang Gao; Xinxing Wu

    2006-01-01

    Our previous study has suggested thatthe bladder cancer-associated protein gene (BLCAP) was among the differentially expressed genes in cervical cancer. We confirm here that BLCAP is expressed in all noncancerous cervical tissues (10\\/10), but it is greatly lost in primary cervical cancer tissue (31\\/39). In order to further investigate the functional roles of BLCAP, we stably transfected BLCAP cDNA into

  3. Inhibition of Cervical Cancer Cell Growth through Activation of Upstream Kinases of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sandy Yee Man Yu; David Wai Chan; Vincent Wing Sun Liu; Hextan Yuen Sheung Ngan

    2009-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a critical energy-balancing sensor in the regulation of cellular metabolism in response to external stimuli. Emerging evidence has suggested that AMPK is a potential therapeutic target for human cancers. AICAR, one of the pharmacological AMPK activators, has been widely used to suppress cancer cell growth through activation of LKB1, an upstream kinase of AMPK. However,

  4. Sulforaphane Reverses the Expression of Various Tumor Suppressor Genes by Targeting DNMT3B and HDAC1 in Human Cervical Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ali Khan, Munawwar; Kedhari Sundaram, Madhumitha; Hamza, Amina; Quraishi, Uzma; Gunasekera, Dian; Ramesh, Laveena; Goala, Payal; Al Alami, Usama; Ansari, Mohammad Zeeshan; Rizvi, Tahir A.; Sharma, Chhavi; Hussain, Arif

    2015-01-01

    Sulforaphane (SFN) may hinder carcinogenesis by altering epigenetic events in the cells; however, its molecular mechanisms are unclear. The present study investigates the role of SFN in modifying epigenetic events in human cervical cancer cells, HeLa. HeLa cells were treated with SFN (2.5?µM) for a period of 0, 24, 48, and 72 hours for all experiments. After treatment, expressions of DNMT3B, HDAC1, RAR?, CDH1, DAPK1, and GSTP1 were studied using RT-PCR while promoter DNA methylation of tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) was studied using MS-PCR. Inhibition assays of DNA methyl transferases (DNMTs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs) were performed at varying time points. Molecular modeling and docking studies were performed to explore the possible interaction of SFN with HDAC1 and DNMT3B. Time-dependent exposure to SFN decreases the expression of DNMT3B and HDAC1 and significantly reduces the enzymatic activity of DNMTs and HDACs. Molecular modeling data suggests that SFN may interact directly with DNMT3B and HDAC1 which may explain the inhibitory action of SFN. Interestingly, time-dependent reactivation of the studied TSGs via reversal of methylation in SFN treated cells correlates well with its impact on the epigenetic alterations accumulated during cancer development. Thus, SFN may have significant implications for epigenetic based therapy. PMID:26161119

  5. Uterine cervical cancer with brain metastasis as the initial site of presentation.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yumi; Tanaka, Kei; Kobayashi, Yoichi; Shibuya, Hiromi; Nishigaya, Yoshiko; Momomura, Mai; Matsumoto, Hironori; Iwashita, Mitsutoshi

    2015-07-01

    Brain metastasis from uterine cervical cancer is rare, with an incidence of 0.5%, and usually occurs late in the course of the disease. We report a case of uterine cervical cancer with brain metastasis as the initial site of presentation. A 50-year-old woman with headache, vertigo, amnesia and loss of appetite was admitted for persistent vomiting. Contrast enhanced computed tomography showed a solitary right frontal cerebral lesion with ring enhancement and uterine cervical tumor. She was diagnosed with uterine cervical squamous cell carcinoma with parametrium invasion and no other distant affected organs were detected. The cerebral lesion was surgically removed and pathologically proved to be metastasis of uterine cervical squamous cell carcinoma. The patient underwent concurrent chemoradiotherapy, followed by cerebral radiation therapy, but multiple metastases to the liver and lung developed and the patient died 7?months after diagnosis of brain metastasis. PMID:25656985

  6. Cervical cancer prevented by screening: Long-term incidence trends by morphology in Norway.

    PubMed

    Lönnberg, Stefan; Hansen, Bo Terning; Haldorsen, Tor; Campbell, Suzanne; Schee, Kristina; Nygård, Mari

    2015-10-01

    Both major morphologic types of cervical cancer, squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and adenocarcinoma (AC), are causally related to persistent infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV), but screening has primarily been effective at preventing SCC. We analysed incidence trends of cervical cancer in Norway stratified by morphologies over 55 years, and projected SCC incidence in the absence of screening by assessing the changes in the incidence rate of AC. The Cancer Registry of Norway was used to identify all 19,530 malignancies in the cervix diagnosed in the period 1956-2010. The majority of these (82.9%) were classified as SCCs, 10.5% as ACs and the remaining 6.6% were of other or undefined morphology. By joint-point analyses of a period of more than five decades, the average annual percentage change in the age-standardised incidence was -1.0 (95%CI: -2.1-0.1) for cervical SCC, 1.5 (95%CI:1.1-1.9) for cervical AC and -0.9 (95%CI: -1.4 to -0.3) for cervical cancers of other or undefined morphology. The projected age-standardised incidence rate of cervical SCC in Norway, assuming no screening, was 28.6 per 100,000 woman-years in 2010, which compared with the observed SCC rate of 7.3 corresponds to an estimated 74% reduction in SCC or a 68% reduction due to screening in the total cervical cancer burden. Cytology screening has impacted cervical cancer burden more than suggested by the overall observed cervical cancer incidence reduction since its peak in the mid-1970s. The simultaneous substantial increase in cervical adenocarcinoma in Norway is presumably indicative of an increase in exposure to HPV over time. PMID:25833121

  7. [Cervical cancer screening: past--present--future].

    PubMed

    Breitenecker, G

    2009-12-01

    Despite the undisputed and impressive success which has been achieved since the 1960s by cervical cytology in the fight against cervical cancer and its precursor stages, during which the mortality rate in industrialized countries over the last 40 years has been reduced by two-thirds to three-quarters, a perfect and error-free screening procedure is still a long way off and will probably never be reached. There are two main reasons for this, the lack of adequate coverage and suboptimal quality and assessment of smears. Two screening procedures are in use Europe, an opportunistic and an organized system. Both systems have many advantages but also disadvantages. In organized programs the coverage is higher (up to 80%), although similar numbers are also achieved by non-organized programs over a 3-year cycle, even if they cannot be so exactly documented. The decision on which system is used depends on the health system of the country, public or non-public, and many other national circumstances. However, in both systems prerequisites for a satisfactory result is a high quality in the sampling technique, the processing and the assessment. Therefore, several guidelines have been introduced by state and medical societies for internal and external quality assurance. New technologies, such as thin-layer cytology or automation for replacement or support of conventional cytology liquid-based cytology proved not to be superior enough to justify the high costs of these systems. The recognition of the strong causal relationship between persistent infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) types and cervical cancer and its precursors has resulted in the development of comparably simple tests. Primary screening using HPV typing alone is not recommended in opportunistic screening due to the low specificity but high sensitivity because it leads to many clinically irrelevant results which place women under stress. In organized screening HPV testing is always and only possible in combination with cytology. Various models and approaches are in the testing phase and appear promising. HPV testing is on the other hand well accepted and recommended as a triage test to select women with equivocal smear results (Pap group III, ASCUS) if a biopsy is required or can be followed up and also for follow-up of patients after cone biopsy. However, vaccination of young girls against oncogenic HPV types which has now become widespread still leaves many questions open for the future because the observation period is too short. There is justified hope that this will become a valuable tool in cervical cancer control and may lead to a substantial reduction in the burden of cervical cancer in the future. However, as the current vaccines on the market do not cover all oncogenic virus types and the effects of vaccination will only be observed after many years, the necessity of a cytological screening will remain unrestricted. Therefore, cervical cytology will remain as the trusted, simple to use, economic and proven, like no other method for early cancer detection, efficient procedure even in the foreseeable future. If carried out with the highest quality demands it will play a central role in the early detection of cervical cancer. PMID:19756616

  8. Rapid induction of senescence in human cervical carcinoma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodwin, Edward C.; Yang, Eva; Lee, Chan-Jae; Lee, Han-Woong; Dimaio, Daniel; Hwang, Eun-Seong

    2000-09-01

    Expression of the bovine papillomavirus E2 regulatory protein in human cervical carcinoma cell lines repressed expression of the resident human papillomavirus E6 and E7 oncogenes and within a few days caused essentially all of the cells to synchronously display numerous phenotypic markers characteristic of cells undergoing replicative senescence. This process was accompanied by marked but in some cases transient alterations in the expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins and by decreased telomerase activity. We propose that the human papillomavirus E6 and E7 proteins actively prevent senescence from occurring in cervical carcinoma cells, and that once viral oncogene expression is extinguished, the senescence program is rapidly executed. Activation of endogenous senescence pathways in cancer cells may represent an alternative approach to treat human cancers.

  9. Human Papillomavirus Testing in the Prevention of Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wentzensen, Nicolas; Wacholder, Sholom; Kinney, Walter; Gage, Julia C.; Castle, Philip E.

    2011-01-01

    Strong evidence now supports the adoption of cervical cancer prevention strategies that explicitly focus on persistent infection with the causal agent, human papillomavirus (HPV). To inform an evidence-based transition to a new public health approach for cervical cancer screening, we summarize the natural history and cervical carcinogenicity of HPV and discuss the promise and uncertainties of currently available screening methods. New HPV infections acquired at any age are virtually always benign, but persistent infections with one of approximately 12 carcinogenic HPV types explain virtually all cases of cervical cancer. In the absence of an overtly persistent HPV infection, the risk of cervical cancer is extremely low. Thus, HPV test results predict the risk of cervical cancer and its precursors (cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 3) better and longer than cytological or colposcopic abnormalities, which are signs of HPV infection. The logical and inevitable move to HPV-based cervical cancer prevention strategies will require longer screening intervals that will disrupt current gynecologic and cytology laboratory practices built on frequent screening. A major challenge will be implementing programs that do not overtreat HPV-positive women who do not have obvious long-term persistence of HPV or treatable lesions at the time of initial evaluation. The greatest potential for reduction in cervical cancer rates from HPV screening is in low-resource regions that can implement infrequent rounds of low-cost HPV testing and treatment. PMID:21282563

  10. Activation of miR-9 by human papillomavirus in cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuhui; Schwarz, Julie K.; Chen, Jason J.; Grigsby, Perry W.; Wang, Xiaowei

    2014-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the third most common cancer in women worldwide, leading to about 300,000 deaths each year. Most cervical cancers are caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. However, persistent transcriptional activity of HPV oncogenes, which indicates active roles of HPV in cervical cancer maintenance and progression, has not been well characterized. Using our recently developed assays for comprehensive profiling of HPV E6/E7 transcripts, we have detected transcriptional activities of 10 high-risk HPV strains from 87 of the 101 cervical tumors included in the analysis. These HPV-positive patients had significantly better survival outcome compared with HPV-negative patients, indicating HPV transcriptional activity as a favorable prognostic marker for cervical cancer. Furthermore, we have determined microRNA (miRNA) expression changes that were correlated with tumor HPV status. Our profiling and functional analyses identified miR-9 as the most activated miRNA by HPV E6 in a p53-independent manner. Further target validation and functional studies showed that HPV-induced miR-9 activation led to significantly increased cell motility by downregulating multiple gene targets involved in cell migration. Thus, our work helps to understand the molecular mechanisms as well as identify potential therapeutic targets for cervical cancer and other HPV-induced cancers. PMID:25344913

  11. MiR-20a Promotes Cervical Cancer Proliferation and Metastasis In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Junying; Ding, Nan; Ren, Fei

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNAs that are critical regulators of various diseases. MicroRNA-20a (miR-20a) has previously significantly altered in a range of cancers. In this study, we detected the relationship between miR-20a and the development of cervical cancer by qRT-PCR, we found that the expression level of miR-20a was significantly higher in cervical cancer patients than in normal controls, the aberrant expression of miR-20a was correlated with lymph node metastasis, histological grade and tumor diameter. Then we successfully established the stable anti-miR-20a cervical cancer cell lines by lentivirus. Inhibited miR-20a prevented tumor progression by modulating cell cycle, apoptosis, and metastasis in vitro and in vivo. TIMP2 and ATG7 were proved to be direct targets of miR-20a, using luciferase assay and western blot. These results indicate that miR-20a suppresses the proliferation, migration and invasion of cervical cancer cell through targeting ATG7 and TIMP2. Our results support the involvement of miR-20a in cervical tumorigenesis, especially lymph node metastasis. We propose that miRNAs might be used as therapeutic agent for cervical cancer. PMID:25803820

  12. Cervical stump cancer: a study of 14 cases

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cléber S. Silva; Cristina O. Cardoso; Renato A. Menegaz; Sheila J. Adad; Luís F. R. Angotti; Eddie F. C. Murta

    2004-01-01

    Case report.  This is a report on 14 patients with cervical stump cancer, aged 30 to 68 years old (median = 53 years), seen in a public\\u000a university hospital. Over a 15-year period, 363 cases of cervical cancer were treated, of which fourteen (3.85%) were in the\\u000a cervical stump. The time interval between subtotal hysterectomy and the diagnosis of the neoplasm varied from

  13. Sub-chronic administration of LY294002 sensitizes cervical cancer cells to chemotherapy by enhancing mitochondrial JNK signaling.

    PubMed

    Chambers, Tara P; Portalatin, Gilda M; Paudel, Iru; Robbins, Charles J; Chambers, Jeremy W

    2015-08-01

    Chemo-sensitization is used to improve the efficacy of chemotherapeutic agents against cancers, and understanding the precise molecular mechanisms of chemo-sensitization could lead to safer and more effective approaches to treat cancer. We have previously demonstrated that mitochondrial c-Jun N-terminal Kinase (JNK) signaling is a critical component of cell death. Mitochondrial JNK signaling is coordinated on the scaffold protein Sab. In this work, we developed a sub-chronic chemo-sensitization model by exposing HeLa cells to low-dose (2 ?M) LY294002. We found that this treatment increased Sab expression on mitochondria, an effect not observed in acute exposures. To examine the role of Sab in chemo-sensitization, we ectopically expressed and silenced Sab in HeLa cells. We found that elevating Sab levels in HeLa cells increased the efficacy of chemotherapeutic agents, paclitaxel and cisplatin, while silencing Sab decreased the sensitivity of cells towards these agents. The effect of Sab-mediated signaling appeared to be dependent upon mitogen dependent protein kinases (MAPKs) as ablation of Sab's MAPK-binding motifs prevented chemo-sensitization. These results suggest that mitochondrial JNK signaling is an adaptable signaling pathway that can be enhanced or restored in cancer cells to improve therapeutic efficacy. PMID:26032505

  14. The causal relation between human papillomavirus and cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bosch, F X; Lorincz, A; Muñoz, N; Meijer, C J L M; Shah, K V

    2002-01-01

    The causal role of human papillomavirus infections in cervical cancer has been documented beyond reasonable doubt. The association is present in virtually all cervical cancer cases worldwide. It is the right time for medical societies and public health regulators to consider this evidence and to define its preventive and clinical implications. A comprehensive review of key studies and results is presented. PMID:11919208

  15. A review of californium-252 neutron brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yosh Maruyama; John R. van Nagell; Justine Yoneda; Elvis S. Donaldson; Holly H. Gallion; Deborah Powell; Richard J. Kryscio

    1991-01-01

    Since 1976 a clinical trial has been conducted to test the feasibility, the potential, and to develop methods for using the neutron-emitting radioactive isotope, californium-252 (Cf-252), for the treatment of cervical cancer. A total of 218 patients were treated in the initial study period from 1976 until 1983. The trials initially treated advanced cervical cancer patients using different doses and

  16. DCCPS: BRP: PCRB: Key Initiatives: HPV and Cervical Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Twitter Multimedia Home About Key Initiatives Funding Resources Tools Cancer Control & Population Sciences Home Behavioral Research Program Home Process of Care Research Branch Process of Care Research Branch (PCRB) Key Initiatives HPV and Cervical Cancer HPV

  17. Epidemiology and costs of cervical cancer screening and cervical dysplasia in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Paolo Giorgi; Ricciardi, Alessandro; Cohet, Catherine; Palazzo, Fabio; Furnari, Giacomo; Valle, Sabrina; Largeron, Nathalie; Federici, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Background We estimated the number of women undergoing cervical cancer screening annually in Italy, the rates of cervical abnormalities detected, and the costs of screening and management of abnormalities. Methods The annual number of screened women was estimated from National Health Interview data. Data from the Italian Group for Cervical Cancer Screening were used to estimate the number of positive, negative and unsatisfactory Pap smears. The incidence of CIN (cervical intra-epithelial neoplasia) was estimated from the Emilia Romagna Cancer Registry. Patterns of follow-up and treatment costs were estimated using a typical disease management approach based on national guidelines and data from the Italian Group for Cervical Cancer Screening. Treatment unit costs were obtained from Italian National Health Service and Hospital Information System of the Lazio Region. Results An estimated 6.4 million women aged 25–69 years undergo screening annually in Italy (1.2 million and 5.2 million through organized and opportunistic screening programs, respectively). Approximately 2.4% of tests have positive findings. There are approximately 21,000 cases of CIN1 and 7,000–17,000 cases of CIN2/3. Estimated costs to the healthcare service amount to €158.5 million for screening and €22.9 million for the management of cervical abnormalities. Conclusion Although some cervical abnormalities might have been underestimated, the total annual cost of cervical cancer prevention in Italy is approximately €181.5 million, of which 87% is attributable to screening. PMID:19243586

  18. Human Papillomavirus Type 16 Integration in Cervical Carcinoma In Situ and in Invasive Cervical Cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hugo Arias-Pulido; Cheri L. Peyton; Nancy E. Joste; Hernan Vargas; Cosette M. Wheeler

    2006-01-01

    Integration of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) into the host DNA has been proposed as a potential marker of cervical neoplastic progression. In this study, a quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) was used to examine the physical status of HPV-16 in 126 cervical carcinoma in situ and 92 invasive cervical cancers. Based on criteria applied to results from this qRT-PCR assay,

  19. Proteomic analysis of lanthanum citrate-induced apoptosis in human cervical carcinoma SiHa cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Liming ShenZiyao LanXiaohong Sun; Ziyao Lan; Xiaohong Sun; Lei Shi; Qiong Liu; Jiazuan Ni

    2010-01-01

    Lanthanides possess diverse biological effect and have been shown to promote cell proliferation and induce apoptosis. Our\\u000a previous studies showing that lanthanide citrate complex has significant antitumor activity in human cervical cancer HeLa\\u000a cells. This study aims at determining if [LaCit2]3? have the activity against another type of human cervical cancer cell line SiHa and the changes in protein expression

  20. Health Beliefs Associated with Cervical Cancer Screening Among Vietnamese Americans

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Wanzhen; Fang, Carolyn Y.; Tan, Yin; Feng, Ziding; Ge, Shaokui; Nguyen, Joseph An

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Vietnamese American women represent one of the ethnic subgroups at great risk for cervical cancer in the United States. The underutilization of cervical cancer screening and the vulnerability of Vietnamese American women to cervical cancer may be compounded by their health beliefs. Objective The objective of this study was to explore the associations between factors of the Health Belief Model (HBM) and cervical cancer screening among Vietnamese American women. Methods Vietnamese American women (n=1,450) were enrolled into the randomized controlled trial (RCT) study who were recruited from 30 Vietnamese community-based organizations located in Pennsylvania and New Jersey. Participants completed baseline assessments of demographic and acculturation variables, health care access factors, and constructs of the HBM, as well as health behaviors in either English or Vietnamese. Results The rate of those who had ever undergone cervical cancer screening was 53% (769/1450) among the participants. After adjusting for sociodemographic variables, the significant associated factors from HBM included: believing themselves at risk and more likely than average women to get cervical cancer; believing that cervical cancer changes life; believing a Pap test is important for staying healthy, not understanding what is done during a Pap test, being scared to know having cervical cancer; taking a Pap test is embarrassing; not being available by doctors at convenient times; having too much time for a test; believing no need for a Pap test when feeling well; and being confident in getting a test. Conclusion Understanding how health beliefs may be associated with cervical cancer screening among underserved Vietnamese American women is essential for identifying the subgroup of women who are most at risk for cervical cancer and would benefit from intervention programs to increase screening rates. PMID:23428284

  1. Advancing Cervical Cancer Prevention in India: Implementation Science Priorities

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, Emily; Porterfield, Deborah; Varghese, Beena

    2013-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality in India, accounting for 17% of all cancer deaths among women aged 30 to 69 years. At current incidence rates, the annual burden of new cases in India is projected to increase to 225,000 by 2025, but there are few large-scale, organized cervical cancer prevention programs in the country. We conducted a review of the cervical cancer prevention research literature and programmatic experiences in India to summarize the current state of knowledge and practices and recommend research priorities to address the gap in services. We found that research and programs in India have demonstrated the feasibility and acceptability of cervical cancer prevention efforts and that screening strategies requiring minimal additional human resources and laboratory infrastructure can reduce morbidity and mortality. However, additional evidence generated through implementation science research is needed to ensure that cervical cancer prevention efforts have the desired impact and are cost-effective. Specifically, implementation science research is needed to understand individual- and community-level barriers to screening and diagnostic and treatment services; to improve health care worker performance; to strengthen links among screening, diagnosis, and treatment; and to determine optimal program design, outcomes, and costs. With a quarter of the global burden of cervical cancer in India, there is no better time than now to translate research findings to practice. Implementation science can help ensure that investments in cervical cancer prevention and control result in the greatest impact. PMID:24217555

  2. Up-regulated miR155 reverses the epithelial-mesenchymal transition induced by EGF and increases chemo-sensitivity to cisplatin in human Caski cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lei, Cui; Wang, Yanlin; Huang, Yurong; Yu, Han; Huang, Yiling; Wu, Liting; Huang, Liming

    2012-01-01

    The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) induced by EGF promotes cervical cancer progression; however, the mechanisms underlying the EGF-induced EMT remain unclear. In this study, we reported that miR155 overexpression suppressed EGF-induced EMT, decreased migration/invasion capacities, inhibited cell proliferation and increased the chemo-sensitivity to DDP in human Caski cervical cancer cells. Further, the overexpression of miR155 increased TP53 expression but reduced SMAD2, and CCND1 expression levels. These data suggest that miR155 negatively regulates EGF-induced EMT. We conclude that miR155 does not act as an oncogene but as a tumour suppressor in Caski cells. PMID:23284982

  3. Human Papillomavirus 45 Genetic Variation and Cervical Cancer Risk Worldwide

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Alyce A.; Heideman, Daniëlle A. M.; Boon, Debby; Gheit, Tarik; Snijders, Peter J. F.; Tommasino, Massimo; Franceschi, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human papillomavirus 45 (HPV45) is a member of the HPV18-related alpha-7 species and accounts for approximately 5% of all cervical cancer cases worldwide. This study evaluated the genetic diversity of HPV45 and the association of HPV45 variants with the risk of cervical cancer by sequencing the entire E6 and E7 open reading frames of 300 HPV45-positive cervical samples from 36 countries. A total of 43 HPV45 sequence variants were identified that formed 5 phylogenetic sublineages, A1, A2, A3, B1, and B2, the distribution of which varied by geographical region. Among 192 cases of cervical cancer and 101 controls, the B2 sublineage was significantly overrepresented in cervical cancer, both overall and in Africa and Europe separately. We show that the sequence analysis of E6 and E7 allows the classification of HPV45 variants and that the risk of cervical cancer may differ by HPV45 variant sublineage. IMPORTANCE This work describes the largest study to date of human papillomavirus 45 (HPV45)-positive cervical samples and provides a comprehensive reference for phylogenetic classification for use in epidemiological studies of the carcinogenicity of HPV45 genetic variants, particularly as our findings suggest that the B2 sublineage of HPV45 is associated with a higher risk of cervical cancer. PMID:24501412

  4. Advanced composite of large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma: a case report of uterine cervical cancer in a virgin woman.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Ryusuke; Kou, Iemasa; Date, Kenjiro; Nakayama, Hirofumi

    2013-01-01

    Large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma (LCNEC) of the uterine cervix is very rare and aggressive. The prognosis is very poor despite multimodal treatment. We report a virgin woman with FIGO stage 4b LCNEC of uterine cervix coexisting with squamous cell carcinoma. An early thirties virgin woman presented with 2-month history of abdominal pain. A chest X-ray showed multiple lung metastatic tumors. A vaginal smear showed malignant cells, and a biopsy specimen had features of LCNEC. The tumor showed trabecular patterns. Tumor cells possessed a moderate amount of cytoplasm, prominent nucleoli, and large nuclei. The tumor cells are stained positive for synaptophysin, chromogranin A, and neuron specific enolase (NSE). The invasive tumor cells in connection with cervical squamous epithelium were focally positive for 34bE12. We made a diagnosis of composite LCNEC and nonkeratinizing squamous cell carcinoma. High-risk HPV test was negative with hybridized captured method 2. PMID:24062959

  5. Immunotherapy for Cervical Cancer: Research Status and Clinical Potential

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jun-Han; Wu, Anjui; Scotney, Elizabeth; Ma, Barbara; Monie, Archana; Hung, Chien-Fu; Wu, T.-C.

    2010-01-01

    The high-risk types of human papillomavirus (HPV) have been found to be associated with most cervical cancers and play an essential role in the pathogenesis of the disease. Despite recent advances in preventive HPV vaccine development, such preventive vaccines are unlikely to reduce the prevalence of HPV infections within the next few years, due to their cost and limited availability in developing countries. Furthermore, preventive HPV vaccines may not be capable of treating established HPV infections and HPV-associated lesions, which account for high morbidity and mortality worldwide. Thus, it is important to develop therapeutic HPV vaccines for the control of existing HPV infection and associated malignancies. Therapeutic vaccines are quite different from preventive vaccines in that they require the generation of cell-mediated immunity, particularly T cell-mediated immunity, instead of the generation of neutralizing antibodies. The HPV-encoded early proteins, E6 and E7 oncoproteins, form ideal targets for therapeutic HPV vaccines since they are consistently expressed in HPV-associated cervical cancer and its precursor lesions and thus play crucial roles in the generation and maintenance of HPV-associated disease. Our review will cover the various therapeutic HPV vaccines for cervical cancer, including live vector-based, peptide or protein-based, nucleic acid-based, and cell-based vaccines targeting the HPV E6 and/or E7 antigens. Furthermore, we will review the studies using therapeutic HPV vaccines in combination with other therapeutic modalities and review the latest clinical trials on therapeutic HPV vaccines. PMID:20199126

  6. Patient, Physician, and Nurse Factors Associated With Entry Onto Clinical Trials and Finishing Treatment in Patients With Primary or Recurrent Uterine, Endometrial, or Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-23

    Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Sarcoma; Stage I Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage I Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IA Cervical Cancer; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage II Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage II Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage III Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage III Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IV Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IV Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer

  7. Aqueous Cinnamon Extract (ACE-c) from the bark of Cinnamomum cassia causes apoptosis in human cervical cancer cell line (SiHa) through loss of mitochondrial membrane potential

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Chemoprevention, which includes the use of synthetic or natural agents (alone or in combination) to block the development of cancer in human beings, is an extremely promising strategy for cancer prevention. Cinnamon is one of the most widely used herbal medicines with diverse biological activities including anti-tumor activity. In the present study, we have reported the anti-neoplastic activity of cinnamon in cervical cancer cell line, SiHa. Methods The aqueous cinnamon extract (ACE-c) was analyzed for its cinnamaldehyde content by HPTLC analysis. The polyphenol content of ACE-c was measured by Folin-Ciocalteau method. Cytotoxicity analysis was performed by MTT assay. We studied the effect of cinnamon on growth kinetics by performing growth curve, colony formation and soft agar assays. The cells treated with ACE-c were analyzed for wound healing assay as well as for matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) expression at mRNA and protein level by RT-PCR and zymography, respectively. Her-2 protein expression was analyzed in the control and ACE-c treated samples by immunoblotting as well as confocal microscopy. Apoptosis studies and calcium signaling assays were analyzed by FACS. Loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (??m) in cinnamon treated cells was studied by JC-1 staining and analyzed by confocal microscopy as well as FACS. Results Cinnamon alters the growth kinetics of SiHa cells in a dose-dependent manner. Cells treated with ACE-c exhibited reduced number of colonies compared to the control cells. The treated cells exhibited reduced migration potential that could be explained due to downregulation of MMP-2 expression. Interestingly, the expression of Her-2 oncoprotein was significantly reduced in the presence of ACE-c. Cinnamon extract induced apoptosis in the cervical cancer cells through increase in intracellular calcium signaling as well as loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. Conclusion Cinnamon could be used as a potent chemopreventive drug in cervical cancer. PMID:20482751

  8. Primary strategies for HPV infection and cervical cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Harper, Diane M; Demars, Leslie R

    2014-06-01

    Counseling messages for tobacco cessation, condom use, circumcision, and selective choice in the number of sexual partners can help reduce the risk of cervical cancer. Other sexual behavioral and reproductive risk factors for cervical cancer are a younger age at first intercourse and at first full-term pregnancy as well as increasing duration of combined hormonal oral contraceptive use. Micronutrients and supplements can reduce the risk of human papillomavirus infection, persistence, progression, and regression. Some human papillomavirus infections can be prevented by vaccination. Cervical cancer is best prevented by screening. PMID:24686336

  9. Mapping HPV Vaccination and Cervical Cancer Screening Practice in the Pacific Region-Strengthening National and Regional Cervical Cancer Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Obel, J; McKenzie, J; Buenconsejo-Lum, LE; Durand, AM; Ekeroma, A; Souares, Y; Hoy, D; Baravilala, W; Garland, SM; Kjaer, SK; Roth, A

    2015-01-01

    Objective To provide background information for strengthening cervical cancer prevention in the Pacific by mapping current human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination and cervical cancer screening practices, as well as intent and barriers to the introduction and maintenance of national HPV vaccination programmes in the region. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional questionnaire-based survey among ministry of health officials from 21 Pacific Island countries and territories (n=21). Results Cervical cancer prevention was rated as highly important, but implementation of prevention programs were insufficient, with only two of 21 countries and territories having achieved coverage of cervical cancer screening above 40%. Ten of 21 countries and territories had included HPV vaccination in their immunization schedule, but only two countries reported coverage of HPV vaccination above 60% among the targeted population. Key barriers to the introduction and continuation of HPV vaccination were reported to be: (i) Lack of sustainable financing for HPV vaccine programs; (ii) Lack of visible government endorsement; (iii) Critical public perception of the value and safety of the HPV vaccine; and (iv) Lack of clear guidelines and policies for HPV vaccination. Conclusion Current practices to prevent cervical cancer in the Pacific Region do not match the high burden of disease from cervical cancer. A regional approach, including reducing vaccine prices by bulk purchase of vaccine, technical support for implementation of prevention programs, operational research and advocacy could strengthen political momentum for cervical cancer prevention and avoid risking the lives of many women in the Pacific. PMID:25921158

  10. Synergistic Anti-Tumor Effects of Combination of Photodynamic Therapy and Arsenic Compound in Cervical Cancer Cells: In Vivo and In Vitro Studies

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yong-Wan; Bae, Su Mi; Battogtokh, Gantumur; Bang, Hyo Joo; Ahn, Woong Shick

    2012-01-01

    The effects of As4O6 as adjuvant on photodynamic therapy (PDT) were studied. As4O6 is considered to have anticancer activity via several biological actions, such as free radical production and inhibition of VEGF expression. PDT or As4O6 significantly inhibited TC-1 cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner (P<0.05) by MTT assay. The anti-proliferative effect of the combination treatment was significantly higher than in TC-1 cells treated with either photodynamic therapy or As4O6 alone (62.4 and 52.5% decrease compared to vehicle-only treated TC-1 cells, respectively, P<0.05). In addition, cell proliferation in combination of photodynamic therapy and As4O6 treatment significantly decreased by 77.4% (P<0.05). Cell survival pathway (Naip1, Tert and Aip1) and p53-dependent pathway (Bax, p21Cip1, Fas, Gadd45, IGFBP-3 and Mdm-2) were markedly increased by combination treatment of photodynamic therapy and As4O6. In addition, the immune response in the NEAT pathway (Ly-12, CD178 and IL-2) was also modulated after combination treatment, suggesting improved antitumor effects by controlling unwanted growth-stimulatory pathways. The combination effect apparently reflected concordance with in vitro data, in restricting tumor growth in vivo and in relation to some common signaling pathways to those observed in vitro. These findings suggest the benefit of combinatory treatment with photodynamic therapy and As4O6 for inhibition of cervical cancer cell growth. PMID:22715393

  11. The Prevalence of Human Papillomavirus in Cervical Cancer in Iran

    Microsoft Academic Search

    SH Mortazavi; M Raoufi; M Nadji; P Kowsarian; A Nowroozi

    2002-01-01

    Background: The human papiloma virus (HPV), which is sexually transmitted, and most commonly causes genital warts, has been linked to cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and invasive carcinoma. Of ninety plus types of HPV, HPV-16 is the most prevalent in cervical cancer, followed by HPV-18, and HPV-33. As HPV's implication has not been assessed in the Middle East the main focus of

  12. Natural history and epidemiology of HPV infection and cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Castellsagué, Xavier

    2008-09-01

    Cervical cancer is the most common cancer affecting women in developing countries. It has been estimated to have been responsible for almost 260 000 deaths annually, of which about 80% occurred in developing countries. Persistent infection by certain oncogenic HPV types is firmly established as the necessary cause of most premalignant and malignant epithelial lesions of the cervix and of a variable fraction of neoplastic lesions of the vulva, vagina, anus, penis, and oropharynx. There are more than 100 known HPV genotypes, at least 15 of which can cause cancer of the cervix and other sites. HPV 16 and 18, the two most common oncogenic types, cause approximately 70% of all cervical cancers worldwide. HPV, especially genotypes 6 and 11, can also cause genital warts. HPV is highly transmissible and it is now considered the most common sexually transmitted infection in most populations. Although most women infected with the virus become negative within 2 years, women with persistent high-risk HPV infections are at greatest risk for developing cervical cancer. Since the identification of HPV as the necessary cause of cervical cancer, HPV-based technology has become the centre of novel primary and secondary cervical cancer prevention strategies by the introduction of HPV testing in screening and of HPV vaccines in preadolescent girls and young women. If implemented widely and wisely the deployment of these protocols has the potential to complete Papanicolaou's goal of cervical cancer eradication by extending the benefits of prevention to the developing populations of the world. PMID:18760711

  13. Cervical cancer prevention in the human papilloma virus vaccine era.

    PubMed

    Ghazal-Aswad, Saad

    2008-09-01

    Globally, cervical cancer is second only to breast cancer as the leading cause of cancer in women, with a global prevalence of 2.3 million. It is the third most common cause of female cancer-related mortality worldwide, and 82% of new cervical cancer cases occur in developing countries. As stated by WHO, "without screening programs, cervical cancer is detected too late and leads to death in almost all cases." However, even in Europe, the United States, and Canada, where most women have access to routine screening, approximately 30,000 women die each year. Infection with oncogenic types of HPV 16 and 18 is the most significant risk/causative factor in cervical cancer etiology, and worldwide HPV positivity in cervical carcinoma has been documented to be 99.7%. In 2006 Merck's quadrivalent vaccine was approved by FDA. It targets four HPV types (6, 11, 16, and 18) that are involved in cervical cancer, high and low grade squamous intraepithelial lesions, and anogenital warts. Results from combined Phase II/III studies show that the efficacy of vaccine was 95-100% against LGSIL and HGSIL related to HPV 16 and 18 and vaccine use led to a 99% reduction in the incidence of genital warts (related to HPV 6 and 11). Due to morbidity associated with infection with HPV types 6, 11, 16, and 18, a prophylactic quadrivalent HPV vaccine targeting these four HPV types is expected to substantially reduce the burden of HPV-related disease. PMID:18837904

  14. Enhancement of Cisplatin Sensitivity in Human Cervical Cancer: Epigallocatechin-3-Gallate

    PubMed Central

    Kilic, Ulkan; Sahin, Kazim; Tuzcu, Mehmet; Basak, Nazli; Orhan, Cemal; Elibol-Can, Birsen; Kilic, Ertugrul; Sahin, Fikrettin; Kucuk, Omer

    2015-01-01

    Cisplatin is one of the effective chemotherapeutics in the treatment of several types of cancers. However, in addition to the efforts against to its toxicity, the amelioration of cisplatin sensitivity is an important point in treatment of cervical cancer. To do so, additional substances such as epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), a polyphenol in green tea, have been used in combination with chemotherapeutics. We aimed to investigate the possible molecular pathways to potentiate cervical cancer cell (HeLa) growth inhibition by combination therapy of cisplatin and EGCG. HeLa cells were treated with EGCG (25??M), cisplatin (250?nM), and their combination for 24?h. Cell viability was determined by MTS Assay. We analyzed the expressions of NF-?B p65, COX-2, Nrf2, HO-1, p-mTOR, p-p70S6K1, p-4E-BP1, and p-Akt by Western blot analysis. Herein, we have demonstrated that EGCG works synergistic with cisplatin in inhibiting growth of cervical cancer cells. EGCG improved efficacy of cisplatin treatment in HeLa cells by regulating NF?B p65, COX-2, p-Akt, and p-mTOR pathways, whereas it increased the expression levels of Nrf2/HO-1 in combined therapy. Our observations revealed that EGCG increases the sensitization of cisplatin to cervical cancer cells by inhibiting cell survival and inducing apoptosis. PMID:25988128

  15. MicroRNA-218 increases cellular sensitivity to Rapamycin via targeting Rictor in cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Li, Xiaocui; Wang, Jingpu; Wang, Yuan; Qiu, Haifeng

    2015-07-01

    We previously reported that microRNA-218 was frequently lost in cervical cancer and restoration of microRNA-218 increased cellular radio-sensitivity via inhibiting. Herein, we aim to investigate the effects of microRNA-218 on cellular response to mTOR inhibition. The expression of microRNA-218 and Rictor were measured by Taqman PCR and real time PCR in a panel of 15 cervical cancer tissues. MicroRNA-218 was stably overexpressed in four cervical cancer cell lines and a series of in vitro and in vivo experiments were performed to investigate cellular sensitivity to Rapamycin. In primary cultured cervical cancer cells, the expression of microRNA-218 was negatively correlated with the mRNA level of Rictor, which predicted cellular sensitivity to Rapamycin (p = 0.002, R(2)  = 0.6810). In vitro, overexpression of microRNA-218 significantly reduced the level of Rictor and enhanced the growth-inhibition, cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis induced by Rapamycin. In vivo, overexpression of microRNA-218 further enhanced the suppressive effects of Rapamycin on tumor growth. In conclusion, we demonstrated that microRNA-218 could re-sensitize cervical cancer to Rapamycin through targeting Rictor. Moreover, patients with loss of microRNA-218 presented notable resistance to Rapamycin, indicating that microRNA-218 might be a valid marker for patients-stratification in future clinical trials. PMID:25908215

  16. Perceived Risk of Cervical Cancer in Appalachian Women

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Kimberly M.; Ferketich, Amy K.; Ruffin, Mack T.; Tatum, Cathy; Paskett, Electra D.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine perceptions of cervical cancer risk in elevated-risk Appalachians. Methods Appalachian women (n=571) completed interviews examining self-regulation model factors relevant to perceived risk of cervical cancer. Results Women with good/very good knowledge of cervical cancer, greater worry, and history of sexually transmitted infection had higher odds of rating their perceived risk as somewhat/much higher than did other women. Former smokers, compared to never smokers, had lower risk perceptions. Conclusions Self-regulation model factors are important to understanding perceptions of cervical cancer risk in underserved women. The relationship of smoking and worry to perceived risk may be a target for intervention. PMID:23026042

  17. ICSN Biennial Meeting - Copenhagen 2008 - Abstracts - Cervical Cancer Screening

    Cancer.gov

    ICSN Biennial Meeting 2008 Helsingør, Denmark Attendance Rate (2003-2005) of the Hungarian Organized, Nation-Wide Cervical Cancer Screening Program Authors: I Boncz, A Sebestyén Affiliation: Department of Health Economics, Policy & Management, University

  18. Image-Guided Radiotherapy and -Brachytherapy for Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Suresh; Nguyen, Nam Phong; Vock, Jacqueline; Kerr, Christine; Godinez, Juan; Bose, Satya; Jang, Siyoung; Chi, Alexander; Almeida, Fabio; Woods, William; Desai, Anand; David, Rick; Karlsson, Ulf Lennart; Altdorfer, Gabor

    2015-01-01

    Conventional radiotherapy for cervical cancer relies on clinical examination, 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), and 2-dimensional intracavitary brachytherapy. Excellent local control and survival have been obtained for small early stage cervical cancer with definitive radiotherapy. For bulky and locally advanced disease, the addition of chemotherapy has improved the prognosis but toxicity remains significant. New imaging technology such as positron-emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging has improved tumor delineation for radiotherapy planning. Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) may decrease treatment toxicity of whole pelvic radiation because of its potential for bone marrow, bowel, and bladder sparring. Tumor shrinkage during whole pelvic IGRT may optimize image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT), allowing for better local control and reduced toxicity for patients with cervical cancer. IGRT and IGBT should be integrated in future prospective studies for cervical cancer. PMID:25853092

  19. Factors Affecting Hispanic Women's Participation in Screening for Cervical Cancer.

    PubMed

    Moore de Peralta, Arelis; Holaday, Bonnie; McDonell, James R

    2015-06-01

    Hispanic women's cervical cancer rates are disproportionately high. The Health Belief Model (HBM) was used as a theoretical framework to explore beliefs, attitudes, socio-economic, and cultural factors influencing Hispanic women's decisions about cervical cancer screening. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among Hispanic women 18-65 years old (n = 205) in the Upstate of South Carolina. Generalized Linear Modeling was used. Across all models, perceived threats (susceptibility and severity), self-efficacy, and the interaction of benefits and barriers were significant predictors. Significant covariates included age, marital status, income, regular medical care, and familism. A modified HBM was a useful model for examining cervical cancer screening in this sample of Hispanic women. The inclusion of external, or social factors increased the strength of the HBM as an explanatory model. The HBM can be used as a framework to design culturally appropriate cervical cancer screening interventions. PMID:24578156

  20. Long-Term Survival After Local Resection of Cervical Esophageal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ali Mohammad, Farah Hanif; Go, Pauline; Ghanem, Tamer; Stachler, Robert; Hammoud, Zane

    2015-06-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus may be seen in patients with history of head and neck malignancies. Anatomic factors may limit management options. We present a case of second primary early cervical esophageal squamous cell cancer managed by local resection with reconstruction using a radial forearm flap. PMID:26046877

  1. DCCPS: BRP: PCRB: Key Initiatives: HPV and Cervical Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    Conducted in India, this study is evaluating the effectiveness of a well-planned health education breast and cervical cancer program in regions where there are limited resources. By using trained primary health workers to conduct low-cost screening methods, such as a clinical breast examination or visual inspection of the cervix painted with 4% acetic acid, the study hopes to reduce the incidence of cervical cancer and mortality.

  2. Knowledge, attitudes and practices regarding cervical cancer and screening among Haitian health care workers.

    PubMed

    Zahedi, Leilah; Sizemore, Emma; Malcolm, Stuart; Grossniklaus, Emily; Nwosu, Oguchi

    2014-11-01

    It is estimated that Haiti has the highest incidence of cervical cancer in the Western Hemisphere. There are currently no sustainable and affordable cervical cancer screening programs in Haiti. The current status of screening services and knowledge of health care professionals was assessed through a Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices survey on cervical cancer screening and prevention. It was distributed to Project Medishare for Haiti health care workers (n = 27) in the Central Plateau. The majority (22/27) of participants stated pre-cancerous cells could be detected through screening, however, only four had ever performed a pap smear. All of the participants felt a screening program should be started in their area. Our data establishes that knowledge is fairly lacking among healthcare workers and there is an opportunity to train them in simple, cost effective "screen-and-treat" programs that could have a great impact on the overall health of the population. PMID:25390794

  3. Survival rates of cervical cancer patients in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Muhamad, Nor Asiah; Kamaluddin, Muhammad Amir; Adon, Mohd Yusoff; Noh, Mohamed Asyraf; Bakhtiar, Mohammed Faizal; Ibrahim Tamim, Nor Saleha; Mahmud, Siti Haniza; Aris, Tahir

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the most common malignant cancer of the female reproductive organs worldwide. Currently, cervical cancer can be prevented by vaccination and detected at an early stage via various screening methods. Malaysia, as a developing country faces a heavy disease burden of cervical cancer as it is the second most common cancer among Malaysian women. This population based study was carried out to fulfil the primary aim of determining the survival rates of Malaysian women with cervical cancer and associated factors. Data were obtained from two different sources namely, the Malaysian National Cancer Registry (MNCR) and National Health Informatics Centre (NHIC) from 1st January 2000 to 31st December 2005. Kaplan Meier analyses were conducted to identify the overall survival rates and median survival time. Differences in survival among different ethnic and age group were compared using the log-rank test. A total of 5,859 patients were included. The median survival time for cervical cancer in this study was 65.8 months and the 5-year survival rate was 71.1%. The overall observed survival rates at 1, 3 and 5 years were 94.1%, 79.3% and 71.1% respectively. The log-rank test finding also showed that there were significant differences in the 5-year survival rate among different ethnic groups. Malays had the lowest survival rate of 59.2% followed by Indians (69.5%) and Chinese (73.8%). The overall 5-year survival rate among patients with cervical cancer in Malaysia is relatively good. Age and ethnic groups remain as significant determining factors for cervical cancer survival rate. PMID:25854407

  4. Defective dendritic cell generation from monocytes is a potential reason for poor therapeutic efficacy of interferon ?2b (IFN?2b) in cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Roy, Soumyabrata; Goswami, Shyamal; Bose, Anamika; Goswami, Kuntal Kanti; Sarkar, Koustav; Chakraborty, Krishnendu; Chakraborty, Tathagata; Pal, Smarajit; Haldar, Atanu; Basu, Parthasarathi; Biswas, Jaydip; Baral, Rathindranath

    2011-10-01

    Despite being a pleiotropic cytokine, the therapeutic potential of interferon ?2b (IFN?2b) is debatable. Thus, the need for identifying predictive marker(s) for patients who are most likely to benefit from the treatment is pivotal for avoiding the exposure of nonresponsive patients to the toxicity of the treatment. To account for the attenuated efficacy of the drug, we have verified its dendritic cell (DC) maturating ability from monocytes of cervical cancer stage IIIB (CaCx-IIIB) patients. First, we evaluated the status of monocytes from CaCx-IIIB and healthy women by conducting flow cytometric studies of various activation markers and a cytokine analysis by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and flow cytometry. Immature DCs were then generated from these monocytes and matured with low-dose IFN?2b (1500 units/mL). A functional and phenotypic comparative analysis of these matured DCs was performed by flow cytometric, proliferative, cytotoxic, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Our study shows that monocytes isolated from CaCx-IIIB are impaired, and in vitro maturation with IFN?2b did not significantly improve the functional repertoire of DCs generated from these monocytes in comparison with healthy controls. This impairment of monocytes might be a plausible reason for the attenuated efficacy of this drug alone in treating CaCx-IIIB patients, and this imbalance of immune parameters associated with the stage of malignancy might be considered an effective marker to design a proper therapeutic regimen. PMID:21925117

  5. MET receptor is a potential therapeutic target in high grade cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Miekus, Katarzyna; Pawlowska, Marta; Seku?a, Ma?gorzata; Drabik, Grazyna; Madeja, Zbigniew; Adamek, Dariusz; Majka, Marcin

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the leading causes of death among women suffering from tumors. Current treatment options are insufficient. Here, we investigated the MET receptor as a potential molecular target in advanced cervical cancer. Downregulation of MET receptor expression via RNA interference in different cervical carcinoma cell lines dramatically decreased tumor growth and forced tumor differentiation in vivo. MET receptor silencing also led to a dramatic decrease in cell size and a decrease in proliferation rate under normal and stress conditions. MET receptor downregulation also resulted in decreased cyclin D1 and c-myc levels but did not increase apoptosis. Subsequent experiments showed that downregulation of the MET receptor decreased the expression of a key regulator of the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, SLUG. and increased the expression of E-cadherin, a hallmark of the epithelial phenotype. Moreover, MET downregulation impairs expression and signaling of CXCR4 receptor, responsible for invasive phenotype. Taken together, our results strongly suggest that the MET receptor influences the oncogenic properties of cervical carcinoma cells in vitro and in vivo. These findings highlight a unique role of the MET receptor in cervical carcinoma cells and indicate the MET receptor as a potential therapeutic target for advanced cervical carcinoma. PMID:25888626

  6. Antiproliferative and Apoptotic Effects of Iron Chelators on Human Cervical Carcinoma Cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thierry Simonart; Johan R. Boelaert; Roger Mosselmans; Graciela Andrei; Jean-Christophe Noel; Erik De Clercq; Robert Snoeck

    2002-01-01

    Objective. Cervical carcinoma is a human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated cancer for which treatment options still mainly rely on surgical procedures, with or without adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy. As iron may participate in the pathogenesis of viral infections and cancer in several ways, the present study was designed to investigate the effect of iron chelation on HPV-16- and HPV-18-positive cervical carcinoma cell

  7. How does hypoxia inducible factor-1? participate in enhancing the glycolysis activity in cervical cancer?

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yanxiang; Chen, Gantao; Hong, Li; Zhou, Limei; Hu, Min; Li, Bingshu; Huang, Jinling; Xia, Liangbin; Li, Cuilan

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this study is to explore the role of hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) in glycolysis activity and its relationship with malignant biologic behaviors of cervical cancer. Immunohistochemistry was performed to study the protein expression and distribution of HIF-1? and glucose transport protein 1 (GLUT1) in cervical tissue of 158 cases, including 28 with normal cervical epithelium, 32 with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia, and 98 with invasive cervical cancer. Cobalt(II) chloride was used to induce hypoxia in Hela and Siha cells; the biologic behaviors of cells cultured in normal or hypoxic environments were monitored by colorimetric, Transwell, flow cytometry, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay; immunocytochemistry, Western blot, and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction were used to observe gene and protein expression of HIF-1?, GLUT1, and hexokinase II in cell lines during normoxia and hypoxia. The expression of HIF-1? and GLUT1 gradually increased from normal cervical tissue to cervical intraepithelial neoplasia, then to cervical cancer. There were significant differences among these groups (P < .05). HIF-1? was strongly associated with pathologic differentiation, clinic stage, magnitude of lesions, and patient age, whereas GLUT1 was associated with lymphatic metastasis (P < .05). HIF-1? was strongly associated with expression of GLUT1 (P < .05). In hypoxia, proliferation, invasion, resistance to apoptosis, and glycolysis of both Hela and Siha were enhanced compared with cells in normoxia (P < .05). Both gene and protein expressions of GLUT1 and hexokinase II were strengthened, whereas only the protein expression of HIF-1? was stronger in hypoxia than that in normoxia (P < .05). The results of Hela in normoxia and in hypoxia were similar to those of Siha (P > .05). HIF-1? plays a key role in cervical cancer both in vivo and in vitro. The role of HIF-1? can be implemented mainly by up-regulating its downstream gene, such as GLUT1, and the main mechanism may enhance glycolytic ability. Strong up-regulation and the role of HIF-1? suggest that HIF-1? could be an important factor in the onset and progression of cervical cancer and could be an attractive therapeutic molecular target for that type of cancer. PMID:23375385

  8. PRACTICE PATTERNS OF RADIOTHERAPY IN CERVICAL CANCER AMONG MEMBER GROUPS OF THE GYNECOLOGIC CANCER INTERGROUP (GCIG)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    DAVID K. GAFFNEY; ANDREAS DU BOIS; KAILASH NARAYAN; NICK REED; TAKAFUMI TOITA; SANDRO PIGNATA; PETER BLAKE; LORRAINE PORTELANCE; AZMAT SADOYZE; RICHARD PÖTTER; ALESSANDRO COLOMBO; MARCUS RANDALL; MANSOOR R. MIRZA; EDWARD L. TRIMBLE; Mario Negri

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to describe radiotherapeutic practice of the treatment of cervical cancer in member groups of the Gynecologic Cancer Intergroup (GCIG). Methods and Materials: A survey was developed and distributed to the members of the GCIG focusing on details of radiotherapy practice. Different scenarios were queried including advanced cervical cancer, postoperative patients, and para-aortic-positive lymph

  9. Practice Patterns of Radiotherapy in Cervical Cancer Among Member Groups of the Gynecologic Cancer Intergroup (GCIG)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David K.. Gaffney; Andreas Du Bois; Kailash Narayan; Nick Reed; Takafumi Toita; Sandro Pignata; Peter Blake; Lorraine Portelance; Azmat Sadoyze; Richard Poetter; Alessandro Colombo; Marcus Randall; Mansoor R. Mirza; Edward L. Trimble

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to describe radiotherapeutic practice of the treatment of cervical cancer in member groups of the Gynecologic Cancer Intergroup (GCIG). Methods and Materials: A survey was developed and distributed to the members of the GCIG focusing on details of radiotherapy practice. Different scenarios were queried including advanced cervical cancer, postoperative patients, and para-aortic-positive lymph

  10. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G and cervical cancer immunoediting: a candidate molecule for therapeutic intervention and prognostic biomarker?

    PubMed

    Gimenes, Fabrícia; Teixeira, Jorge Juarez Vieira; de Abreu, André Luelsdorf Pimenta; Souza, Raquel Pantarotto; Pereira, Monalisa Wolski; da Silva, Vânia Ramos Sela; Bôer, Cinthia Gandolfi; Maria-Engler, Silvya Stuchi; Bonini, Marcelo Gialluisi; Borelli, Sueli Donizete; Consolaro, Márcia Edilaine Lopes

    2014-12-01

    While persistent infection with oncogenic types of human Papillomavirus (HPV) is required for cervical epithelial cell transformation and cervical carcinogenesis, HPV infection alone is not sufficient to induce tumorigenesis. Only a minor fraction of HPV infections produce high-grade lesions and cervical cancer, suggesting complex host-virus interactions. Based on its pronounced immunoinhibitory properties, human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-G has been proposed as a possible prognostic biomarker and therapeutic target relevant in a wide variety of cancers and viral infections, but to date remains underexplored in cervical cancer. Given the possible influence of HLA-G on the clinical course of HPV infection, cervical lesions and cancer progression, a better understanding of HLA-G involvement in cervical carcinogenesis might contribute to two aspects of fundamental importance: 1. Characterization of a novel diagnostic/prognostic biomarker to identify cervical cancer and to monitor disease stage, critical for patient screening; 2. Identification of HLA-G-driven immune mechanisms involved in lesion development and cancer progression, leading to the development of strategies for modulating HLA-G expression for treatment purposes. Thus, this systematic review explores the potential involvement of HLA-G protein expression and polymorphisms in cervical carcinogenesis. PMID:25453366

  11. Dendritic cell (DC) based therapy for cervical cancer: use of DC pulsed with tumour lysate and matured with a novel synthetic clinically non-toxic double stranded RNA analogue poly [I]:poly [C(12)U] (Ampligen R).

    PubMed

    Adams, M; Navabi, H; Jasani, B; Man, S; Fiander, A; Evans, A S; Donninger, C; Mason, M

    2003-01-30

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) found in 99.7% of cervical cancers represents an attractive immunotherapeutic target for novel adjuvant dendritic cell (DC) immunotherapy. DC primed with HPV antigens have been shown to be capable of inducing CTL responses powerful enough to eradicate established murine tumours expressing HPV16 antigen. The use of tumour lysate has been found to be an effective means of priming DC with tumour associated antigens in animal models and in clinical trials leading to significant anti-tumour responses. Autologous DC primed with sonicated HPV expressing tumour lysate have been shown to be capable of inducing HPV specific classes I and II T-cell immunity in a pilot clinical study.Synthetic double stranded polyribonucleotides are effective in vitro activation/maturation agents capable of inducing a stable mature DC phenotype producing high levels of IL12. However, the prototype polymer poly [I]:poly [G] has proved to be clinically toxic. Preliminary in vitro data have demonstrated that a novel clinically non-toxic analogue polymer poly [I]:poly [C(12)U] (Ampligen R) can effectively induce in vitro maturation of human monocyte derived DC with sustained bioactive IL12 production. Human monocyte derived DC primed with tumour lysate and matured with synthetic dsRNA may therefore offer an effective way of optimising Th1 specific anti-cancer T-cell responses in cancer patients. This strategy is currently being tested in a clinical trial in patients with cervical cancer. PMID:12531360

  12. Epidemiology of cervical cancer with special focus on India

    PubMed Central

    Sreedevi, Aswathy; Javed, Reshma; Dinesh, Avani

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer is on the declining trend in India according to the population-based registries; yet it continues to be a major public health problem for women in India. Multifactorial causation, potential for prevention, and the sheer threat it poses make cervical cancer an important disease for in-depth studies, as has been attempted by this paper. This paper attempts to review the available knowledge regarding the epidemiology and pattern of cervical cancer; types of HPV (human papilloma virus) prevalent among cervical cancer patients and among women in general, high-risk groups such as commercial sex workers, and HIV (human immunodeficiency virus)-positive women; and the role of the national program on cancer in control efforts. The peak age of incidence of cervical cancer is 55–59 years, and a considerable proportion of women report in the late stages of disease. Specific types of oncogenic HPV-16, 18 have been identified in patients with cervical cancer. Other epidemiological risk factors are early age at marriage, multiple sexual partners, multiple pregnancies, poor genital hygiene, malnutrition, use of oral contraceptives, and lack of awareness. A multipronged approach is necessary which can target areas of high prevalence identified by registries with a combination of behavior change communication exercises and routine early screening with VIA. Sensitizing the people of the area, including menfolk, is necessary to increase uptake levels. Vaccination against types 16 and 18 can also be undertaken after taking into confidence all stakeholders, including the parents of adolescent girls. Preventing and treating cervical cancer and reducing the burden are possible by targeting resources to the areas with high prevalence. PMID:25931830

  13. Epidemiology of cervical cancer with special focus on India.

    PubMed

    Sreedevi, Aswathy; Javed, Reshma; Dinesh, Avani

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer is on the declining trend in India according to the population-based registries; yet it continues to be a major public health problem for women in India. Multifactorial causation, potential for prevention, and the sheer threat it poses make cervical cancer an important disease for in-depth studies, as has been attempted by this paper. This paper attempts to review the available knowledge regarding the epidemiology and pattern of cervical cancer; types of HPV (human papilloma virus) prevalent among cervical cancer patients and among women in general, high-risk groups such as commercial sex workers, and HIV (human immunodeficiency virus)-positive women; and the role of the national program on cancer in control efforts. The peak age of incidence of cervical cancer is 55-59 years, and a considerable proportion of women report in the late stages of disease. Specific types of oncogenic HPV-16, 18 have been identified in patients with cervical cancer. Other epidemiological risk factors are early age at marriage, multiple sexual partners, multiple pregnancies, poor genital hygiene, malnutrition, use of oral contraceptives, and lack of awareness. A multipronged approach is necessary which can target areas of high prevalence identified by registries with a combination of behavior change communication exercises and routine early screening with VIA. Sensitizing the people of the area, including menfolk, is necessary to increase uptake levels. Vaccination against types 16 and 18 can also be undertaken after taking into confidence all stakeholders, including the parents of adolescent girls. Preventing and treating cervical cancer and reducing the burden are possible by targeting resources to the areas with high prevalence. PMID:25931830

  14. Disparities in cervical and breast cancer mortality in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Girianelli, Vania Reis; Gamarra, Carmen Justina; Azevedo e Silva, Gulnar

    2014-06-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze cervical and breast cancer mortality in Brazil according to socioeconomic and welfare indicators. METHODS Data on breast and cervical cancer mortality covering a 30-year period (1980-2010) were analyzed. The data were obtained from the National Mortality Database, population data from the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics database, and socioeconomic and welfare information from the Institute of Applied Economic Research. Moving averages were calculated, disaggregated by capital city and municipality. The annual percent change in mortality rates was estimated by segmented linear regression using the joinpoint method. Pearson's correlation coefficients were conducted between average mortality rate at the end of the three-year period and selected indicators in the state capital and each Brazilian state. RESULTS There was a decline in cervical cancer mortality rates throughout the period studied, except in municipalities outside of the capitals in the North and Northeast. There was a decrease in breast cancer mortality in the capitals from the end of the 1990s onwards. Favorable socioeconomic indicators were inversely correlated with cervical cancer mortality. A strong direct correlation was found with favorable indicators and an inverse correlation with fertility rate and breast cancer mortality in inner cities. CONCLUSIONS There is an ongoing dynamic process of increased risk of cervical and breast cancer and attenuation of mortality because of increased, albeit unequal, access to and provision of screening, diagnosis and treatment.  PMID:25119941

  15. Disparities in cervical and breast cancer mortality in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Girianelli, Vania Reis; Gamarra, Carmen Justina; Azevedo e Silva, Gulnar

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze cervical and breast cancer mortality in Brazil according to socioeconomic and welfare indicators. METHODS Data on breast and cervical cancer mortality covering a 30-year period (1980-2010) were analyzed. The data were obtained from the National Mortality Database, population data from the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics database, and socioeconomic and welfare information from the Institute of Applied Economic Research. Moving averages were calculated, disaggregated by capital city and municipality. The annual percent change in mortality rates was estimated by segmented linear regression using the joinpoint method. Pearson’s correlation coefficients were conducted between average mortality rate at the end of the three-year period and selected indicators in the state capital and each Brazilian state. RESULTS There was a decline in cervical cancer mortality rates throughout the period studied, except in municipalities outside of the capitals in the North and Northeast. There was a decrease in breast cancer mortality in the capitals from the end of the 1990s onwards. Favorable socioeconomic indicators were inversely correlated with cervical cancer mortality. A strong direct correlation was found with favorable indicators and an inverse correlation with fertility rate and breast cancer mortality in inner cities. CONCLUSIONS There is an ongoing dynamic process of increased risk of cervical and breast cancer and attenuation of mortality because of increased, albeit unequal, access to and provision of screening, diagnosis and treatment.  PMID:25119941

  16. Cervical cancer screening in Thailand: an overview.

    PubMed

    Sriamporn, Supannee; Khuhaprema, Thiravud; Parkin, Max

    2006-01-01

    In Thailand, there have been no 'organized' programmes of screening for cervical cancer. For the most part, screening has been unsystematic or provided to women 'on demand'. In 2002, the Department of Medical Services of the Ministry of Public Health proposed the screening of the entire population of women in Thailand at 5-yearly intervals from the ages of 35 to 60 years. As a first step, measures to increase the capacity for obtaining and interpreting papanicolaou (Pap) smears have been put in place. Research studies have examined the effectiveness of screening with Pap smears in Thailand, and confirmed that, as elsewhere, protection is related to the number of previous tests and the time elapsed since the most recent one. Coverage of the population remains low. Other methods of screening are being investigated in Thailand, including visual inspection following acetic acid (VIA), followed by immediate treatment of observed lesions by cryotherapy ('see and treat'). Other research studies have examined the acceptability and performance of self-sampling as a means of obtaining Pap smears, and the use of mobile clinics to increase coverage of at-risk women in rural settings. Human papillomavirus (HPV) testing has been used to identify high-risk women, or to help decide which women with low-grade abnormality on cytology should undergo more intensive follow-up. Prevalence of HPV in normal women in Thailand is 9-20%, but HPV testing has not been used on any systematic basis to date. Current screening programmes in Thailand are not very effective. The national cancer control programme aims to increase the coverage of screening. The population-based cancer registry will provide an effective and economical method of evaluating the impact of early diagnosis and screening at community level. PMID:17227641

  17. Upregulation of URI/RMP gene expression in cervical cancer by high-throughput tissue microarray analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Junxia; Li, Xiaoyun; Liang, Yuting; Qiao, Longwei; Ran, Deyuan; Lu, Yaojuan; Li, Xingang; Wei, Wenxiang; Zheng, Qiping

    2013-01-01

    URI, or RMP, is a RNA polymerase II subunit RPB5-associated protein known to play essential roles in ubiquitination and transcription. Recently, we and others have shown that URI/RMP is also important for progression of hepatocellular carcinoma, ovarian, and prostate cancers. To identify the mechanistic basis of URI/RMP during multiple cellular processes, we investigated URI/RMP expression in a tissue microarray (TMA) containing multiple normal human tissues. The results showed that URI/RMP is ubiquitously but differentially expressed in these human tissues which partially explains its multiple cellular functions. To elucidate the role of URI/RMP during oncogenesis of multiple malignancies, especially the tumors of reproductive system, we analyzed URI/RMP expression in a TMA containing multiple reproductive system tumors. We did not observe significant difference of URI/RMP expression between cancerous and adjacent tissues of the prostate, breast, ovarian, and endometrial cancers. However, increased URI/RMP expression was observed in two of the three cases of cervical SCC (squamous cell carcinoma) cells compared to their adjacent epithelial cells. Moreover, we detected significantly upregulated URI/RMP expression not only in cervical cancers but also in pre-cancerous CINs (cervical intra-epithelial neoplasias) in a TMA that covers the whole spectrum of normal cervix, CINs, and cervical cancers. No difference of URI/RMP expression was observed between CINs and cervical cancers. Given the high risk of CINs (especially CIN3) turning into cervical cancer if left untreated, the increased URI/RMP expression in CINs as well as in cervical cancers suggest a clinical relevance of URI/RMP upon cervical cancer tumorigenesis and worth further investigation. PMID:23573313

  18. Transforming activity of human papillomavirus type 16 DNA sequence in a cervical cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Tsunokawa, Y; Takebe, N; Kasamatsu, T; Terada, M; Sugimura, T

    1986-01-01

    A genomic DNA sample from cervical cancer tissue, containing human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16, was found to induce malignant transformation of NIH 3T3 cells when it was tested by transfection assays using the calcium phosphate coprecipitation technique. The primary and secondary transformants contained the HPV type 16 DNA sequences and human specific Alu family sequences. To the best of our knowledge, it has not been reported previously that HPV type 16 DNA sequences in total genomic DNA from a cervical cancer have transforming activity. Images PMID:3008153

  19. DCCPS: BRP: PCRB: Key Initiatives: HPV and Cervical Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    The progression of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection to cervical neoplasia is likely influenced by the immune response. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) induce secretion of cytokines and activation of T cells that may play an important role in cervical immunity to HPV infection.

  20. Nominated Texture Based Cervical Cancer Classification

    PubMed Central

    Mariarputham, Edwin Jayasingh; Stephen, Allwin

    2015-01-01

    Accurate classification of Pap smear images becomes the challenging task in medical image processing. This can be improved in two ways. One way is by selecting suitable well defined specific features and the other is by selecting the best classifier. This paper presents a nominated texture based cervical cancer (NTCC) classification system which classifies the Pap smear images into any one of the seven classes. This can be achieved by extracting well defined texture features and selecting best classifier. Seven sets of texture features (24 features) are extracted which include relative size of nucleus and cytoplasm, dynamic range and first four moments of intensities of nucleus and cytoplasm, relative displacement of nucleus within the cytoplasm, gray level cooccurrence matrix, local binary pattern histogram, tamura features, and edge orientation histogram. Few types of support vector machine (SVM) and neural network (NN) classifiers are used for the classification. The performance of the NTCC algorithm is tested and compared to other algorithms on public image database of Herlev University Hospital, Denmark, with 917 Pap smear images. The output of SVM is found to be best for the most of the classes and better results for the remaining classes. PMID:25649913

  1. Should helical tomotherapy replace brachytherapy for cervical cancer? Case report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chen-Hsi Hsieh; Ming-Chow Wei; Yao-Peng Hsu; Ngot-Swan Chong; Yu-Jen Chen; Sheng-Mou Hsiao; Yen-Ping Hsieh; Li-Ying Wang; Pei-Wei Shueng

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) administered via a helical tomotherapy (HT) system is an effective modality for treating lung cancer and metastatic liver tumors. Whether SBRT delivered via HT is a feasible alternative to brachytherapy in treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer in patients with unusual anatomic configurations of the uterus has never been studied. CASE PRESENTATION: A 46-year-old

  2. Natural history and epidemiology of HPV infection and cervical cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xavier Castellsagué

    2008-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the most common cancer affecting women in developing countries. It has been estimated to have been responsible for almost 260 000 deaths annually, of which about 80% occurred in developing countries.Persistent infection by certain oncogenic HPV types is firmly established as the necessary cause of most premalignant and malignant epithelial lesions of the cervix and of a

  3. Variations in survival for invasive cervical cancer among European women, 1978–89

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gemma Gatta; Riccardo Capocaccia; Timo Hakulinen; Milena Sant; Arduino Verdecchia; Gianni De Angelis; Andrea Micheli; Franco Berrino

    1999-01-01

    Objectives: To analyze cervical cancer survival trends in 10 European countries using models that estimate the proportion of cured patients (having the same life expectancy as the general population) and the survival of fatal cases (who die from cervical cancer).

  4. Changes in Bone Density after Cancer Treatment in Patients with Cervical and Endometrial Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Young Lim; Yoon, Man Soo; Suh, Dong Soo; Kim, Ari; Kim, Min Joung; Lee, Ji Young; Song, Yong Jung; Ji, Yong Il; Kim, Ki Hyung; Chun, Sungwook

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to evaluate the impact of cancer treatment on bone mineral density (BMD) in the lumbar spine (LS) and femur in the postmenopausal women with cervical or endometrial cancer without bone metastasis compared to normal control postmenopausal women. METHODS: We retrospectively evaluated the BMD data in the LS, femur neck (FN) and trochanter (FT) by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and laboratory data of bone turnover markers at baseline and after one year in 130 patients with cervical cancer, 68 patients with endometrial cancer, and 225 healthy controls. RESULTS: There were no significant differences in the T-scores of basal BMD in LS and femur between patients with endometrial cancer and controls, and only T-score of basal BMD at the fourth lumbar vertebra (L4) was significantly lower in patients with cervical cancer compared to controls. One year later, T-scores of BMD at all LS sites and FN in patients with cervical cancer and T-scores of BMD at L3, L4, FN, and FT in those with endometrial cancer after cancer treatment were significantly lower compared to controls. Lower proportions of normal BMD at all skeletal sites except L2 in patients with endometrial cancer and those at L1, L4, and FN in patients with cervical cancer were observed compared to controls after cancer treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that cancer treatment increase bone loss in postmenopausal women with cervical and endometrial cancer. PMID:25553092

  5. Second cancers following radiation treatment for cervical cancer. An international collaboration among cancer registries

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. D. Jr. Boice; N. E. Day; A. Andersen; L. A. Brinton; R. Brown; N. W. Choi; E. A. Clarke; M. P. Coleman; R. E. Curtis; J. T. Flannery

    1985-01-01

    The numbers of second cancers among 182,040 women treated for cervical cancer that were reported to 15 cancer registries in 8 countries were compared to the numbers expected had the same risk prevailed as in the general population. A small 9% excess of second cancers (5,146 observed vs. 4,736 expected) occurred 1 or more years after treatment. Large radiation doses

  6. Multistep Model of Cervical Cancer: Participation of miRNAs and Coding Genes

    PubMed Central

    López, Angelica Judith Granados; López, Jesús Adrián

    2014-01-01

    Aberrant miRNA expression is well recognized as an important step in the development of cancer. Close to 70 microRNAs (miRNAs) have been implicated in cervical cancer up to now, nevertheless it is unknown if aberrant miRNA expression causes the onset of cervical cancer. One of the best ways to address this issue is through a multistep model of carcinogenesis. In the progression of cervical cancer there are three well-established steps to reach cancer that we used in the model proposed here. The first step of the model comprises the gene changes that occur in normal cells to be transformed into immortal cells (CIN 1), the second comprises immortal cell changes to tumorigenic cells (CIN 2), the third step includes cell changes to increase tumorigenic capacity (CIN 3), and the final step covers tumorigenic changes to carcinogenic cells. Altered miRNAs and their target genes are located in each one of the four steps of the multistep model of carcinogenesis. miRNA expression has shown discrepancies in different works; therefore, in this model we include miRNAs recording similar results in at least two studies. The present model is a useful insight into studying potential prognostic, diagnostic, and therapeutic miRNAs. PMID:25192291

  7. Molecular transitions from papillomavirus infection to cervical precancer and cancer: Role of stromal estrogen receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    den Boon, Johan A.; Pyeon, Dohun; Wang, Sophia S.; Horswill, Mark; Schiffman, Mark; Sherman, Mark; Zuna, Rosemary E.; Wang, Zhishi; Hewitt, Stephen M.; Pearson, Rachel; Schott, Meghan; Chung, Lisa; He, Qiuling; Lambert, Paul; Walker, Joan; Newton, Michael A.; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Ahlquist, Paul

    2015-01-01

    To study the multistep process of cervical cancer development, we analyzed 128 frozen cervical samples spanning normalcy, increasingly severe cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN1– CIN3), and cervical cancer (CxCa) from multiple perspectives, revealing a cascade of progressive changes. Compared with normal tissue, expression of many DNA replication/repair and cell proliferation genes was increased in CIN1/CIN2 lesions and further sustained in CIN3, consistent with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV)-induced tumor suppressor inactivation. The CIN3-to-CxCa transition showed metabolic shifts, including decreased expression of mitochondrial electron transport complex components and ribosomal protein genes. Significantly, despite clinical, epidemiological, and animal model results linking estrogen and estrogen receptor alpha (ER?) to CxCa, ER? expression declined >15-fold from normalcy to cancer, showing the strongest inverse correlation of any gene with the increasing expression of p16, a marker for HPV-linked cancers. This drop in ER? in CIN and tumor cells was confirmed at the protein level. However, ER? expression in stromal cells continued throughout CxCa development. Our further studies localized stromal ER? to FSP1+, CD34+, SMA? precursor fibrocytes adjacent to normal and precancerous CIN epithelium, and FSP1?, CD34?, SMA+ activated fibroblasts in CxCas. Moreover, rank correlations with ER? mRNA identified IL-8, CXCL12, CXCL14, their receptors, and other angiogenesis and immune cell infiltration and inflammatory factors as candidates for ER?-induced stroma–tumor signaling pathways. The results indicate that estrogen signaling in cervical cancer has dramatic differences from ER?+ breast cancers, and imply that estrogen signaling increasingly proceeds indirectly through ER? in tumor-associated stromal fibroblasts. PMID:26056290

  8. Molecular transitions from papillomavirus infection to cervical precancer and cancer: Role of stromal estrogen receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    den Boon, Johan A; Pyeon, Dohun; Wang, Sophia S; Horswill, Mark; Schiffman, Mark; Sherman, Mark; Zuna, Rosemary E; Wang, Zhishi; Hewitt, Stephen M; Pearson, Rachel; Schott, Meghan; Chung, Lisa; He, Qiuling; Lambert, Paul; Walker, Joan; Newton, Michael A; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Ahlquist, Paul

    2015-06-23

    To study the multistep process of cervical cancer development, we analyzed 128 frozen cervical samples spanning normalcy, increasingly severe cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN1- CIN3), and cervical cancer (CxCa) from multiple perspectives, revealing a cascade of progressive changes. Compared with normal tissue, expression of many DNA replication/repair and cell proliferation genes was increased in CIN1/CIN2 lesions and further sustained in CIN3, consistent with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV)-induced tumor suppressor inactivation. The CIN3-to-CxCa transition showed metabolic shifts, including decreased expression of mitochondrial electron transport complex components and ribosomal protein genes. Significantly, despite clinical, epidemiological, and animal model results linking estrogen and estrogen receptor alpha (ER?) to CxCa, ER? expression declined >15-fold from normalcy to cancer, showing the strongest inverse correlation of any gene with the increasing expression of p16, a marker for HPV-linked cancers. This drop in ER? in CIN and tumor cells was confirmed at the protein level. However, ER? expression in stromal cells continued throughout CxCa development. Our further studies localized stromal ER? to FSP1+, CD34+, SMA- precursor fibrocytes adjacent to normal and precancerous CIN epithelium, and FSP1-, CD34-, SMA+ activated fibroblasts in CxCas. Moreover, rank correlations with ER? mRNA identified IL-8, CXCL12, CXCL14, their receptors, and other angiogenesis and immune cell infiltration and inflammatory factors as candidates for ER?-induced stroma-tumor signaling pathways. The results indicate that estrogen signaling in cervical cancer has dramatic differences from ER?+ breast cancers, and imply that estrogen signaling increasingly proceeds indirectly through ER? in tumor-associated stromal fibroblasts. PMID:26056290

  9. Phase Ib Study of BKM120 With Cisplatin and XRT in High Risk Locally Advanced Squamous Cell Cancer of Head and Neck

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-14

    Carcinoma, Squamous Cell of Head and Neck; HPV Positive Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Hypopharyngeal Cancer; Early Invasive Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Carcinoma of Larynx; Cancer of Nasopharynx

  10. Eurycomanone Induces Apoptosis through the Up Regulation of p53 in Human Cervical Carcinoma Cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nurkhasanah Mahfudh; Azimahtol Hawariah; Lope Pihie

    2008-01-01

    AIM: Eurycomanone is a cytotoxic compound found in Eurycoma longifolia Jack. Previous studies had noted the cytotoxic effect against various cancer cell lines. The aim of this study is to investigate the cytotoxicity against human cervical carcinoma cells and the mode of action. METHODS: The cytotoxicity of eurycomanone was evaluated using methylene blue staining assay and the mode of cell

  11. High Prevalence of Multiple Human Papillomavirus Infection in Japanese Patients with Invasive Uterine Cervical Cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hidemichi Watari; Rie Michimata; Motoaki Yasuda; Akihiro Ishizu; Utano Tomaru; Ying Xiong; Mohamed K. Hassan; Noriaki Sakuragi

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Multiple human papillomavirus (HPV) infection of the uterine cervix has been suggested as a risk factor for persistent HPV infection, resulting in the development of invasive cervical cancer. The aim of this study was to reveal the actual state of multiple HPV infection in Japanese patients with invasive cervical cancer. Methods: Sixty fresh-frozen invasive cervical cancer tissues were examined

  12. Effective screening programmes for cervical cancer in low- and middle-income developing countries

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rengaswamy Sankaranarayanan; Atul Madhukar Budukh; Rajamanickam Rajkumar

    2001-01-01

    Cervical cancer is an important public health problem among adult women in developing countries in South and Central America, sub-Saharan Africa, and south and south-east Asia. Frequently repeated cytology screening programmes — either organized or opportunistic — have led to a large decline in cervical cancer incidence and mortality in developed countries. In contrast, cervical cancer remains largely uncontrolled in

  13. College Students' Knowledge of the Connection between HPV and Cervical Cancer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Applegate, Trent E.; Jones, Iesha K.

    2002-01-01

    Investigated college students' knowledge of the relationship between human papillomavirus (HPV) and cervical cancer. Few students knew what HPV was. Most of the females who had been screened knew that a Pap smear could detect HPV and cervical cancer. Over half of the students did not realize the link between HPV and cervical cancer. Students…

  14. A comprehensive review on host genetic susceptibility to human papillomavirus infection and progression to cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyay, Koushik

    2011-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer in women worldwide. This is caused by oncogenic types of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Although large numbers of young sexually active women get HPV-infected, only a small fraction develop cervical cancer. This points to different co-factors for regression of HPV infection or progression to cervical cancer. Host genetic factors play an important role in the outcome of such complex or multifactor diseases such as cervical cancer and are also known to regulate the rate of disease progression. The aim of this review is to compile the advances in the field of host genetics of cervical cancer. MEDLINE database was searched using the terms, ‘HPV’, ‘cervical’, ‘CIN’, ‘polymorphism(s)’, ‘cervical’+ *the name of the gene* and ‘HPV’+ *the name of the gene*. This review focuses on the major host genes reported to affect the progression to cervical cancer in HPV infected individuals. PMID:22345983

  15. Shanxi Province Cervical Cancer Screening Study: A Cross-Sectional Comparative Trial of Multiple Techniques to Detect Cervical Neoplasia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Belinson; Y. L. Qiao; R. Pretorius; W. H. Zhang; P. Elson; L. Li; Q. J. Pan; C. Fischer; A. Lorincz; D. Zahniser

    2001-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to design a cervical cancer screening algorithm for the developing world that is highly sensitive for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) II, III, and cancer and highly specific for CIN II and III, making it possible to ablate the transformation zone without histologic confirmation.Methods. In rural Shanxi Province, China, we examined 1997 women ages

  16. The epidemiology of hypopharynx and cervical esophagus cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bertesteanu, SVG; Mirea, D; Grigore, R; Ionescu, D; Popescu, B

    2010-01-01

    At the beginning of the 21st century hypopharynx and cervical esophagus cancer represents a major issue for all countries of the world. The epidemiology of the hypopharynx and cervical esophagus cancer deals with the spread of the disease in human population in regards to sex, age, profession, time and space, as well as risk factors that contribute to these phenomena. The main goal is to investigate the causes and the factors involved in the development of the tumors at the pharyngo–esophageal junction, knowledge that contributes to latest therapeutic assessment through interdisciplinary collaboration (E.N.T. surgeon, general surgeon, radiation oncologist, chemotherapist, nutritionist). The epidemiology of the hypopharynx and cervical esophagus cancer includes three major areas of interest: descriptive (the study of the spread in mass population), analytical (the study of causal risk factors on the disease) and experimental (that verifies by experiments on animals the prior identified hypothesis). PMID:21254737

  17. [An autopsy case of ovarian clear cell carcinoma 14 years after irradiation for uterine cervical carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Inoue, Y; Maeda, S; Yoshida, K; Fujihara, T; Matsuo, H; Sugiyama, T

    1984-04-01

    An autopsy case of a 46-year-old woman who developed right ovarian clear cell carcinoma 14 years after radiation treatment for uterine cervical cancer, is reported. The pathological characteristics of the clear cell carcinoma were solid, tubulo-cystic and papillary structures of clear, granular eosinophilic, hobnail , and vacuolated cells. A Review of the literature on ovarian clear cell carcinoma and multiple cancers is also presented. PMID:6727043

  18. Prevention and early detection of cervical cancer in the UK.

    PubMed

    Foran, Claire; Brennan, Arthur

    2015-05-27

    This literature review explores the prevention and early detection of cervical cancer in the UK. Current findings indicate that there is a risk for women under the age of 25 years, who may develop cervical cancer. There appears to be a gap in UK policy that may overlook these women, who are beneath the age for initial screening but exceed the age for vaccination. Despite the inextricable link between sexual activity and cervical cancer, cervical screening and sexual health promotion still appear to be disjointed, and the role of a sexually transmitted infection leading to the development of cervical cancer has not been emphasised enough in public health messages. Further training should be provided and its impact monitored, designed to address this anomaly in health promotion. There are many barriers to health promotion including, those of a societal, cultural and religious nature. Additional research is required to ascertain the types of educational and awareness interventions that would be most effective in promoting and encouraging positive sexual behaviours among young people, and to explore how these might be successfully implemented. PMID:26018178

  19. Dietary Intakes of Selected Nutrients and Food Groups and Risk of Cervical Cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chaitali Ghosh; Julie A. Baker; Kirsten B. Moysich; Ruqayyah Rivera; John R. Brasure; Susan E. McCann

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the relationships between intakes of selected dietary nutrients and food groups and risk of cervical cancer in a hospital-based, case-control study including 239 cases diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix and 979 hospital patients with nonneoplastic diagnoses who completed a self-administered questionnaire between 1982 and 1998 at Roswell Park Cancer Institute. Odds ratios (OR) and 95%

  20. Rotating-shield brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wenjun; Kim, Yusung; Wu, Xiaodong; Song, Qi; Liu, Yunlong; Bhatia, Sudershan K.; Sun, Wenqing; Flynn, Ryan T.

    2013-06-01

    In this treatment planning study, the potential benefits of a rotating shield brachytherapy (RSBT) technique based on a partially-shielded electronic brachytherapy source were assessed for treating cervical cancer. Conventional intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT), intracavitary plus supplementary interstitial (IS+ICBT), and RSBT treatment plans for azimuthal emission angles of 180° (RSBT-180) and 45° (RSBT-45) were generated for five patients. For each patient, high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2) (?/? = 10 Gy) was escalated until bladder, rectum, or sigmoid colon tolerance EQD2 values were reached. External beam radiotherapy dose (1.8 Gy × 25) was accounted for, and brachytherapy was assumed to have been delivered in 5 fractions. IS+ICBT provided a greater HR-CTV D90 (minimum EQD2 to the hottest 90%) than ICBT. D90 was greater for RSBT-45 than IS+ICBT for all five patients, and greater for RSBT-180 than IS+ICBT for two patients. When the RSBT-45/180 plan with the lowest HR-CTV D90 that was greater than the D90 the ICBT or IS+ICBT plan was selected, the average (range) of D90 increases for RSBT over ICBT and IS+ICBT were 16.2 (6.3-27.2)and 8.5 (0.03-20.16) Gy, respectively. The average (range) treatment time increase per fraction of RSBT was 34.56 (3.68-70.41) min over ICBT and 34.59 (3.57-70.13) min over IS+ICBT. RSBT can increase D90 over ICBT and IS+ICBT without compromising organ-at-risk sparing. The D90 and treatment time improvements from RSBT depend on the patient and shield emission angle.

  1. Abnormal Cervical Cancer Screening Test Results

    MedlinePLUS

    ... freeze abnormal cervical tissue, which then sloughs off. • Laser therapy—A focused beam of light is used ... tissue is removed from the cervix. Cryotherapy: A freezing technique used to destroy diseased tissue; also known ...

  2. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Signaling Pathways Is Involved in Trichosanthin-Induced Apoptosis in Human Cervical Cancer Cell Line Hela

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yiling Huang; Liming Huang; Chengcheng You; HuoJun Hu

    2010-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum stress(ERS)is a kind of sub-cellular pathological process which result from calcium disorderliness and protein improper folding. And endoplasmic reticulum stress induced apoptosis is a novel pathway which different from the mitochondria-initiated intrinsic pathway and the death receptor-triggered extrinsic pathway. Trichosanthin (TCS), a type I ribosome-inactivating protein, induces cell death in various cell types including several tumor cell lines.

  3. Expression Quantitative Trait Loci for CARD8 Contributes to Risk of Two Infection-Related Cancers—Hepatocellular Carcinoma and Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hang, Dong; Han, Jing; Jiang, Jie; Song, Ci; Liu, Yao; Liu, Jibin; Liu, Li; Zhu, Liguo; Chen, Jianguo; Zhai, Xiangjun; Xie, Shuanghua; Hu, Zhibin; Shen, Hongbing; Dai, Min; Li, Ni

    2015-01-01

    Caspase recruitment domain family, member 8 (CARD8) can coordinate innate and adaptive immune responses and sensitize cells to apoptosis, which may participate in tumorigenesis of virus-induced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and cervical cancer. By bioinformatics analyses, we identified several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within a new identified long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) as expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) for CARD8. In this study, we therefore hypothesized that CARD8 eQTLs SNPs within lncRNA may influence the risk of HCC and cervical cancer. We performed two independent case-control studies of 1,300 cases with HBV-positive HCC and 1,344 normal controls, together with 1,486 cervical cancer patients and 1,536 control subjects to test the association between eQTLs SNP (rs7248320) for CARD8 and the risk of HCC and cervical cancer. The variant genotype of rs7248320 was significantly associated with increased risk of HCC and cervical cancer [GG vs. AA/GA: adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 1.28, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.03–1.61, P = 0.028 for HCC; adjusted OR = 1.34, 95% CI = 1.09–1.66, P = 0.006 for cervical cancer]. Moreover, the effect of rs7248320 on cervical cancer risk was more prominent in premenopausal women. Further interactive analysis detected a significantly multiplicative interaction between rs7248320 and menopausal status on cervical cancer risk (P = 0.018). These findings suggest that CARD8 eQTLs SNP may serve as a susceptibility marker for virus-related HCC and cervical cancer. PMID:26147888

  4. miR-506 acts as a tumor suppressor by directly targeting the hedgehog pathway transcription factor Gli3 in human cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Wen, S-Y; Lin, Y; Yu, Y-Q; Cao, S-J; Zhang, R; Yang, X-M; Li, J; Zhang, Y-L; Wang, Y-H; Ma, M-Z; Sun, W-W; Lou, X-L; Wang, J-H; Teng, Y-C; Zhang, Z-G

    2015-02-01

    Although significant advances have recently been made in the diagnosis and treatment of cervical carcinoma, the long-term survival rate for advanced cervical cancer remains low. Therefore, an urgent need exists to both uncover the molecular mechanisms and identify potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of cervical cancer. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have important roles in cancer progression and could be used as either potential therapeutic agents or targets. miR-506 is a component of an X chromosome-linked miRNA cluster. The biological functions of miR-506 have not been well established. In this study, we found that miR-506 expression was downregulated in approximately 80% of the cervical cancer samples examined and inversely correlated with the expression of Ki-67, a marker of cell proliferation. Gain-of-function and loss-of-function studies in human cervical cancer, Caski and SiHa cells, demonstrated that miR-506 acts as a tumor suppressor by inhibiting cervical cancer growth in vitro and in vivo. Further studies showed that miR-506 induced cell cycle arrest at the G1/S transition, and enhanced apoptosis and chemosensitivity of cervical cancer cell. We subsequently identified Gli3, a hedgehog pathway transcription factor, as a direct target of miR-506 in cervical cancer. Furthermore, Gli3 silencing recapitulated the effects of miR-506, and reintroduction of Gli3 abrogated miR-506-induced cell growth arrest and apoptosis. Taken together, we conclude that miR-506 exerts its anti-proliferative function by directly targeting Gli3. This newly identified miR-506/Gli3 axis provides further insight into the pathogenesis of cervical cancer and indicates a potential novel therapeutic agent for the treatment of cervical cancer. PMID:24608427

  5. Brachytherapy in the treatment of cervical cancer: a review

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Robyn; Kamrava, Mitchell

    2014-01-01

    Dramatic advances have been made in brachytherapy for cervical cancer. Radiation treatment planning has evolved from two-dimensional to three-dimensional, incorporating magnetic resonance imaging and/or computed tomography into the treatment paradigm. This allows for better delineation and coverage of the tumor, as well as improved avoidance of surrounding organs. Consequently, advanced brachytherapy can achieve very high rates of local control with a reduction in morbidity, compared with historic approaches. This review provides an overview of state-of-the-art gynecologic brachytherapy, with a focus on recent advances and their implications for women with cervical cancer. PMID:24920937

  6. A Gompertzian model with random effects to cervical cancer growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazlan, Mazma Syahidatul Ayuni; Rosli, Norhayati

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, a Gompertzian model with random effects is introduced to describe the cervical cancer growth. The parameters values of the mathematical model are estimated via maximum likehood estimation. We apply 4-stage Runge-Kutta (SRK4) for solving the stochastic model numerically. The efficiency of mathematical model is measured by comparing the simulated result and the clinical data of the cervical cancer growth. Low values of root mean-square error (RMSE) of Gompertzian model with random effect indicate good fits.

  7. The use of cisplatin-loaded mucoadhesive nanofibers for local chemotherapy of cervical cancers in mice.

    PubMed

    Zong, Shan; Wang, Xue; Yang, Yongping; Wu, Wenbin; Li, Hongjun; Ma, Yue; Lin, Wenhai; Sun, Tingting; Huang, Yubin; Xie, Zhigang; Yue, Ying; Liu, Shi; Jing, Xiabin

    2015-06-01

    Polymer-based local drug delivery system may be suitable for the treatment of cervix cancer. A pilot study was carried out to examine the efficacy of cisplatin-loaded poly(ethylene oxide)/polylactide composite electrospun nanofibers as a local chemotherapy system against cervical cancer in mice via vaginal implantation. The nanofibers were proven to have good mucoadhesive property by in vitro mucoadhesion test and in vivo vaginal retention evaluation. An orthotopic cervical/vaginal cancer model was established by injecting murine cervical cancer U14 cells into the vaginal submucosa nearby the cervix. By inserting the nanofibers mat into the vagina of mice, the cisplatin released from the fiber-mat showed a much more accumulation in the vagina/cervix region than in the peripheral organs such as kidneys, liver, or blood, in contrary to the case of intravenous (i.v) injection. The in vivo trials showed that a better balance between anti-tumor efficacy and systemic safety was achieved in nanofibers group than that in i.v injection group at the equal drug dose. Therefore, electrospun nanofibers present a promising approach to the local drug delivery via vagina against cervical cancer. PMID:25843238

  8. Cervical screening and cervical cancer death among older women: a population-based, case-control study.

    PubMed

    Rustagi, Alison S; Kamineni, Aruna; Weinmann, Sheila; Reed, Susan D; Newcomb, Polly; Weiss, Noel S

    2014-05-01

    Recent research suggests that cervical screening of older women is associated with a considerable decrease in cervical cancer incidence. We sought to quantify the efficacy of cervical cytology screening to reduce death from this disease. Among enrollees of 2 US health plans, we compared Papanicolaou smear screening histories of women aged 55-79 years who died of cervical cancer during 1980-2010 (cases) to those of women at risk of cervical cancer (controls). Controls were matched 2:1 to cases on health plan, age, and enrollment duration. Cytology screening during the detectable preclinical phase, estimated as the 5-7 years before diagnosis during which cervical neoplasia is asymptomatic but cytologically detectable, was ascertained from medical records. A total of 39 cases and 80 controls were eligible. The odds ratio of cervical cancer death associated with screening during the presumed detectable preclinical phase was 0.26 (95% confidence interval: 0.10, 0.63) after adjustment for matching characteristics, smoking, marital status, and race/ethnicity using logistic regression. We estimate that cervical cytology screening of all women aged 55-79 years in the United States could avert 630 deaths annually. These results provide a minimum estimate of the efficacy of human papillomavirus DNA screening-a more sensitive test-to reduce cervical cancer death among older women. PMID:24685531

  9. TLR9 expression and its role in chemosensitivity to DDP in human cervical cancer cells in vitro

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yanjie Weng; Yongjun Wang; Ying Shi; Wenjuan Zhou; Hongyan Wang; Changyu Wang

    2011-01-01

    Summary  Inflammation and infection play an important role in the pathogenesis of many cancers. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are a class\\u000a of pattern recognition receptors that recognize conserved components of microbes and trigger the immune response against invading\\u000a microorganisms. Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) recognizes non-methylated cytosine-phosphateguanosine (CpG) DNA sequences which\\u000a are the surrogate for viral DNA. TLR9 may react to tumor development

  10. Hypermethylation of the tumor-suppressor cell adhesion molecule 1 in human papillomavirus-transformed cervical carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    WOO, HYUN JU; KIM, SUNG JIN; SONG, KYUNG-JOO; KIM, SUNG SOON; YOON, CHEOL-HEE; CHOI, BYEONG-SUN; RHEE, JEE EUN

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic modification at CpG islands located on the promoter regions of tumor-suppressor genes has been associated with tumor development in many human cancers. Our study showed that the cell adhesion molecule 1 (CADM1) is downregulated in human papillomavirus (HPV)-infected cervical cancer cell lines via its hypermethylation and demethylation using 5-aza-2?-deoxycyticine (5-aza-dC) restored the expression of CADM1 protein. Overexpression of CADM1 inhibited cell proliferation. p53 was involved in the regulation of CADM1. Our results demonstrate that epigenetic alteration of CADM1 was more frequent in HPV-positive cervical cancers and that restoration of CADM1 expression may be a potential strategy for cervical cancer therapy. PMID:25845528

  11. Differential effects of messages for breast and cervical cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Jibaja-Weiss, Maria L; Volk, Robert J; Smith, Quentin W; Holcomb, J David; Kingery, Paul

    2005-02-01

    The aim of this study was to compare responses to two interventions (personalized-form [PF] letter messages versus personalized-tailored [PT] letter messages) using medical record data for promoting appointment scheduling and screening for breast and cervical cancer among urban low-income women from three ethnic groups: African-American, Mexican-American, and non-Hispanic white women. The 1,574 women participating in the randomized controlled trial were assigned to one of three groups: (1) PF letter, (2) PT letter, (3) control (no letter). Logistic regression analyses show that (1) personalized-tailored letters containing individualized references to recipients' cancer risk factors failed to increase rates of recommended cancer screening behaviors, especially among non-Hispanic white women; and that (2) in contrast, a personalized-form letter with general breast and cervical cancer screening messages increased cancer screening rates in this population, especially among non-Hispanic white and Mexican-American women. PMID:15741708

  12. HPV Vaccine Promotion: Does Referring to Both Cervical Cancer and Genital Warts Affect Intended and Actual Vaccination Behavior?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ilona Juraskova; Royena Abdul Bari; Michaeley Therese O’Brien; Kirsten Jo McCaffery

    2011-01-01

    BackgroundYoung women have poor awareness that human papillomavirus (HPV) can cause both cervical cancer and genital warts, a sexually transmitted infection (STI). A newly developed HPV vaccine can provide protection against both cervical cancer and genital warts. This vaccine could be promoted by health authorities\\/professionals as preventing cervical cancer plus genital warts, or cervical cancer alone. Because stigma around STIs

  13. Trends of cervical cancer mortality in the member states of the European Union

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marc Arbyn; Amidu O. Raifu; Elisabete Weiderpass; Freddie Bray; Ahti Anttila

    2009-01-01

    BackgroundCervical cancer mortality can be avoided to a large extent by screening and treatment of screen-detected cervical lesions. However, in 2004, more than 16,000 women died from cervical cancer in the European Union (EU). In the current paper, we analyse cervical cancer mortality trends in the 27 member states since 1970 and, subsequently, try to explain how screening and other

  14. Are 20 human papillomavirus types causing cervical cancer?

    PubMed

    Arbyn, Marc; Tommasino, Massimo; Depuydt, Christophe; Dillner, Joakim

    2014-12-01

    In 2012, the International Agency for Research on Cancer concluded that there was consistent and sufficient epidemiological, experimental and mechanistic evidence of carcinogenicity to humans for 12 HPV types (HPV16, HPV18, HPV31, HPV33, HPV35, HPV39, HPV45, HPV51, HPV52, HPV56, HPV58 and HPV59) for cervical cancer. Therefore, these types were considered as 1A carcinogens. They all belong to the family of the ?-Papillomaviridae, in particular to the species ?5 (HPV51), ?6 (HPV56), ?7 (HPV18, HPV39, HPV45, HPV59) and ?9 (HPV16, HPV31, HPV33, HPV35, HPV52, HPV58). Less evidence is available for a thirteenth type (HPV68, ?7), which is classified as a 2A carcinogen (probably carcinogenic). Moreover, seven other phylogenetically related types (HPV26, HPV53, HPV66, HPV67, HPV68, HPV70 and HPV73) were identified as single HPV infections in certain rare cases of cervical cancer and were considered possibly carcinogenic (2B carcinogens). Recently, Halec et al [7] demonstrated that the molecular signature of HPV-induced carcinogenesis (presence of type-specific spliced E6*| mRNA; increased expression of p16; and decreased expression of cyclin D1, p53 and Rb) was similar in cervical cancers containing single infections with one of the eight afore-mentioned 2A or 2B carcinogens to those in cancers with single infections with group 1 carcinogens. Ninety six percent of cervical cancers are attributable to one of the 13 most common HPV types (groups 1 and 2A). Including the additional seven HPV types (group 2B) added 2.6%, to reach a total of 98.7% of all HPV-positive cervical cancers. From recently updated meta-analyses, it was shown that HPV68, HPV26, HPV66, HPV67, HPV73 and HPV82 were significantly more common in cancer cases than in women with normal cervical cytology, suggesting that for these HPV types, an upgrading of the carcinogen classification could be considered. However, there is no need to include them in HPV screening tests or vaccines, given their rarity in cervical cancers. PMID:25124771

  15. Galectin-1, -3 and -9 Expression and Clinical Significance in Squamous Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Punt, Simone; Thijssen, Victor L.; Vrolijk, Johannes; de Kroon, Cornelis D.; Gorter, Arko; Jordanova, Ekaterina S.

    2015-01-01

    Galectins are proteins that bind ?-galactoside sugars and provide a new type of potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets in cancer. Galectin-1, -3 and -9 have become the focus of different research groups, but their expression and function in cervical cancer is still unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the phenotype of galectin-1, -3 and -9 expressing cells and the association with clinico-pathological parameters in cervical cancer. Galectin expression was scored in tumor cells, tumor epithelium infiltrating immune cells and stromal cells in squamous cervical cancer (n = 160). Correlations with clinico-pathological parameters and survival were studied according to the REMARK recommendations. We additionally investigated whether the galectins were expressed by tumor cells, fibroblasts, macrophages and T cells. Galectin-1 and -9 were both expressed by tumor cells in 11% of samples, while 84% expressed galectin-3. Strong galectin-1 expression by tumor cells was an independent predictor for poor survival (hazard ratio: 8.02, p = 0.001) and correlated with increased tumor invasion (p = 0.032) and receiving post-operative radiotherapy (p = 0.020). Weak and positive tumor cell galectin-3 expression were correlated with increased and decreased tumor invasion, respectively (p = 0.012). Tumor cell expression of galectin-9 showed a trend toward improved survival (p = 0.087). The predominant immune cell type expressing galectin-1, -3 and -9 were CD163+ macrophages. Galectin-1 and -3 were expressed by a minor population of T cells. Galectin-1 was mainly expressed by fibroblasts in the tumor stroma. To conclude, while tumor cell expression of galectin-9 seemed to represent a beneficial response, galectin-1 expression might be used as a marker for a more aggressive anti-cancer treatment. PMID:26066796

  16. Selective suppression of cervical cancer Hela cells by 2-O--D-glucopyranosyl-L-ascorbic acid isolated

    E-print Network

    Engelhardt, John F.

    isolated from the fruit of Lycium barbarum L. Zhiping Zhang & Xiaoming Liu & Tao Wu & Junhong Liu & Xu Abstract Lycium barbarum fruit has been used as a Chinese traditional medicine and dietary supplement . Lycium barbarum fruit . Hela cell . Proteomics Introduction Lycium barbarum fruit is an important

  17. Automated Recommendation for Cervical Cancer Screening and Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Wagholikar, Kavishwar B; MacLaughlin, Kathy L; Casey, Petra M; Kastner, Thomas M; Henry, Michael R; Hankey, Ronald A; Peters, Steve G; Greenes, Robert A; Chute, Christopher G; Liu, Hongfang; Chaudhry, Rajeev

    2014-01-01

    Because of the complexity of cervical cancer prevention guidelines, clinicians often fail to follow best-practice recommendations. Moreover, existing clinical decision support (CDS) systems generally recommend a cervical cytology every three years for all female patients, which is inappropriate for patients with abnormal findings that require surveillance at shorter intervals. To address this problem, we developed a decision tree-based CDS system that integrates national guidelines to provide comprehensive guidance to clinicians. Validation was performed in several iterations by comparing recommendations generated by the system with those of clinicians for 333 patients. The CDS system extracted relevant patient information from the electronic health record and applied the guideline model with an overall accuracy of 87%. Providers without CDS assistance needed an average of 1 minute 39 seconds to decide on recommendations for management of abnormal findings. Overall, our work demonstrates the feasibility and potential utility of automated recommendation system for cervical cancer screening and surveillance. PMID:25368505

  18. Health and economic impact of HPV 16 and 18 vaccination and cervical cancer screening in India

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M Diaz; J J Kim; G Albero; S de Sanjosé; G Clifford; F X Bosch; S J Goldie

    2008-01-01

    Cervical cancer is a leading cause of cancer death among women in low-income countries, with ?25% of cases worldwide occurring in India. We estimated the potential health and economic impact of different cervical cancer prevention strategies. After empirically calibrating a cervical cancer model to country-specific epidemiologic data, we projected cancer incidence, life expectancy, and lifetime costs (I$2005), and calculated incremental

  19. FoxP3(+) and IL-17(+) cells are correlated with improved prognosis in cervical adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Punt, Simone; van Vliet, Marjolein E; Spaans, Vivian M; de Kroon, Cornelis D; Fleuren, Gert Jan; Gorter, Arko; Jordanova, Ekaterina S

    2015-06-01

    Cervical adenocarcinoma comprises approximately 15 % of cervical cancer cases. This histological subtype has different characteristics than cervical squamous cell carcinoma, which may influence disease progression. To study whether the infiltration of T cell subpopulations was correlated with cervical adenocarcinoma patient survival, similar to squamous cell carcinoma, the tumor-infiltrating T cells, Tregs, Th17 cells and IL-17(+) cell frequencies were analyzed in a cohort of cervical adenocarcinoma patients (n = 67). Intraepithelial, stromal and total cell frequencies were scored using triple immunofluorescence. The majority of Tregs were present in the tumor stroma, while other T cells and IL-17(+) cells infiltrated the tumor epithelium three times more frequently. A high total number of Tregs were significantly correlated with improved disease-specific and disease-free survival (p = 0.010, p = 0.007). Within the tumor epithelium, a high T cell frequency was significantly correlated with improved disease-free survival (p = 0.034). In particular, a low number of both Tregs and IL-17(+) cells were correlated with poor disease-specific survival (p = 0.007). A low number of Tregs combined with Th17 cells present were also correlated with poor survival (p = 0.018). An increased number of IL-17(+) cells were significantly correlated with the absence of vaso-invasion (p = 0.001), smaller tumor size (p = 0.030) and less infiltration depth (p = 0.021). These results suggest that Tregs and IL-17(+) cells represent a beneficial immune response, whereas Th17 cells might represent a poor response in cervical adenocarcinoma. This contrasts with the correlations described in squamous cell carcinoma, suggesting that the local immune response in cervical adenocarcinoma contributes differently to tumor growth than in squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:25795131

  20. 11-Keto-boswellic acid derived amides and monodesmosidic saponins induce apoptosis in breast and cervical cancers cells.

    PubMed

    Csuk, René; Barthel-Niesen, Anja; Barthel, Alexander; Schäfer, Renate; Al-Harrasi, Ahmed

    2015-07-15

    Beta-boswellic acids are considered the main bioactive components of frankincense. Their potential to act as cytotoxic agents, as well as that of their derivatives remained unexploited so far. In this study we were able to prepare derivatives of 11-keto-?-boswellic acid (KBA) that showed lower IC50 values as determined by a sulphorhodamine B (SRB) assay using several different human tumour cell lines. Monodesmosidic saponins of KBA are as cytotoxic as 3-acetyl-KBA. The presence of a free hydroxyl group at position C-3 seems to lower cytotoxicity while the presence of an amide function at C-24 improves cytotoxicity. The most active compound of this series gave IC50 values as low as 4.5 ?M. Cell death proceeded mainly via apoptosis. PMID:26073487

  1. Berberine alters epigenetic modifications, disrupts microtubule network, and modulates HPV-18 E6-E7 oncoproteins by targeting p53 in cervical cancer cell HeLa: a mechanistic study including molecular docking.

    PubMed

    Saha, Santu Kumar; Khuda-Bukhsh, Anisur Rahman

    2014-12-01

    Increased evidence of chemo-resistance, toxicity and carcinogenicity necessitates search for alternative approaches for determining next generation cancer therapeutics and targets. We therefore tested the efficacy of plant alkaloid berberine on human papilloma virus (HPV) -18 positive cervical cancer cell HeLa systematically-involving certain cellular, viral and epigenetic factors. We observed disruptions of microtubule network and changes in membrane topology due to berberine influx through confocal and atomic force microscopies (AFM). We examined nuclear uptake, internucleosomal DNA damages, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) alterations and cell migration assays to validate possible mode of cell death events. Analytical data on interactions of berberine with pBR322 through fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and gel migration assay strengthen berberine?s biologically significant DNA binding abilities. We measured cellular uptake, DNA ploidy and DNA strand-breaks through fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS). To elucidate epigenetic modifications, in support of DNA binding associated processes, if any, we conducted methylation-specific restriction enzyme (RE) assay, methylation specific-PCR (MSP) and expression studies of histone proteins. We also analyzed differential interactions and localization of cellular tumor suppressor p53 and viral oncoproteins HPV-18 E6-E7 through siRNA approach. We further made in-silico approaches to determine possible binding sites of berberine on histone proteins. Overall results indicated cellular uptake of berberine through cell membrane depolarization causing disruption of microtubule networks and its biological DNA binding abilities that probably contributed to epigenetic modifications. Results of modulation in p53 and viral oncoproteins HPV-18 E6-E7 by berberine further proved its potential as a promising chemotherapeutic agent in cervical cancer. PMID:25448308

  2. DCCPS: BRP: PCRB: Key Initiatives: HPV and Cervical Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    The overall goal of this study is to determine the association between serum biomarkers of oxidant load and cervical carcinogenesis among women from the Ludwig-McGill Cohort Study. The Ludgwig-McGill Cohort Study is a large prospective study which collected multiple measurements of relevant risk factors (e.g., smoking, presence of cervical inflammatory cells, dietary and circulatory concentrations of antioxidant nutrients) and endpoints (e.g., type-specific HPV persistence, viral load, and development of SIL).

  3. Human papillomavirus prevalence in paired urine and cervical samples in women invited for cervical cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Burroni, Elena; Bonanni, Paolo; Sani, Cristina; Lastrucci, Vieri; Carozzi, Francesca; Iossa, Anna; Andersson, Karin Louise; Brandigi, Livia; Di Pierro, Carmelina; Confortini, Massimo; Levi, Miriam; Boccalini, Sara; Indiani, Laura; Sala, Antonino; Tanini, Tommaso; Bechini, Angela; Azzari, Chiara

    2015-03-01

    With the introduction of Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination in young girls in 2007, it is important to monitor HPV infections and epidemiological changes in this target population. The present study has evaluated the detection of human papillomavirus DNA in paired cervical and urine samples to understand if HPV testing in urine could be used as non-invasive method to monitor HPV status in young women. The study enrolled 216 twenty five-year-old women, resident in Florence and invited for the first time to the cervical cancer Screening Program within a project evaluating the impact of HPV vaccination. HPV genotyping was performed on 216 paired urine and cervical samples. The overall concordance between cervix and urine samples, investigated by HPV genotyping (INNO-LiPA HPV Genotyping Extra), was: 85.6% (184/215), 84.6% (182/215), 80% (172/215) when the same HPV, at least the same HR HPV and all HR HPV, respectively, were detected. HPV type specific concordance in paired urine and cervical samples was observed in 85.8% (175/204) of women with normal cytology and in seven out of nine women with abnormal cytology. Urine seems to be a suitable and reliable biological material for HPV DNA detection as evidenced by the high concordance with HPV detected in cervical samples. These results suggest that urine could be a good noninvasive tool to monitor HPV infection in vaccinated women. PMID:25418873

  4. Making the case for cervical cancer prevention: what about equity?

    PubMed

    Tsu, Vivien D; Levin, Carol E

    2008-11-01

    Cervical cancer is a major cause of suffering and premature death among women in the developing world, yet it is largely prevented in most higher-income countries. From an equity perspective, cervical cancer is unequally distributed globally in ways that are unnecessary, avoidable and unjust. Although cost-effectiveness analyses demonstrate that prevention measures are justified in low-resource countries, affordability and lack of prioritization have contributed to a lack of progress. This paper describes the inequities in cervical cancer disease burden, barriers in access to and utilisation of services, and the underlying conditions of poverty and low socio-economic status that put women in a disadvantaged position. These social disadvantages are aggravated by the disease itself, with serious consequences for women, their families and communities. Remedies are available in the form of new prevention and treatment approaches, including vaccines against human papillomavirus (HPV), rapid HPV testing, visual inspection of the cervix with acetic acid (VIA) and cryotherapy. These technologies could help to overcome the social, economic, and political disadvantages that contribute to disparities in cervical cancer incidence and mortality through an optimal combination of vaccination, screening and treatment. In the long run, however, increasing women's access to care will also require societies to address structural barriers related to health systems and poverty. PMID:19027628

  5. Caudal epidural anesthesia during intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Isoyama-Shirakawa, Yuko; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Abe, Madoka; Kunitake, Naonobu; Matsumoto, Keiji; Ohga, Saiji; Sasaki, Tomonari; Uehara, Satoru; Okushima, Kazuhiro; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Honda, Hiroshi

    2015-05-01

    It has been suggested that pain control during intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer is insufficient in most hospitals in Japan. Our hospital began using caudal epidural anesthesia during high-dose-rate (HDR) intracavitary brachytherapy in 2011. The purpose of the present study was to retrospectively investigate the effects of caudal epidural anesthesia during HDR intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer patients. Caudal epidural anesthesia for 34 cervical cancer patients was performed during HDR intracavitary brachytherapy between October 2011 and August 2013. We used the patients' self-reported Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) score at the first session of HDR intracavitary brachytherapy as a subjective evaluation of pain. We compared NRS scores of the patients with anesthesia with those of 30 patients who underwent HDR intracavitary brachytherapy without sacral epidural anesthesia at our hospital between May 2010 and August 2011. Caudal epidural anesthesia succeeded in 33 patients (97%), and the NRS score was recorded in 30 patients. The mean NRS score of the anesthesia group was 5.17 ± 2.97, significantly lower than that of the control group's 6.80 ± 2.59 (P = 0.035). The caudal epidural block resulted in no side-effects. Caudal epidural anesthesia is an effective and safe anesthesia option during HDR intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer. PMID:25852151

  6. DCCPS: BRP: PCRB: Key Initiatives: HPV and Cervical Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    This study will explore human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in a large, representative sample of high-risk women in Costa Rica who have been enrolled and followed for approximately 7 years with regard to developing cervical cancer. This unique cohort is derived from an admixed population and provides a natural genetic heterogeneity of viral genomes.

  7. Treatment Regimen Extends Survival for Women with Cervical Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Patients with locally advanced cervical cancer who received gemcitabine (Gemzar®) both as part of initial treatment and as part of therapy following primary treatment had improved survival compared with patients whose treatment did not include gemcitabine, according to findings presented at the 2009 ASCO meeting in Orlando.

  8. Acceptability of Cervical Cancer Screening in Rural Mozambique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Audet, Carolyn M.; Matos, Carla Silva; Blevins, Meridith; Cardoso, Aventina; Moon, Troy D.; Sidat, Mohsin

    2012-01-01

    In Zambezia province, Mozambique, cervical cancer (CC) screening was introduced to rural communities in 2010. Our study sought to determine whether women would accept screening via pelvic examination and visual inspection with acetic acid (VIA) at two clinical sites near the onset of a new CC screening program. A cross-sectional descriptive study…

  9. Total Microlaparoscopic Radical Hysterectomy in Early Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gallotta, Valerio; Fagotti, Anna; Rossitto, Cristiano; Piovano, Elisa; Scambia, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objective: In less than 2 decades, laparoscopy has contributed to modification in the management of early cervical cancer patients, and all comparisons between open and laparoscopic-based radical operations showed an identical oncological outcome. The aim of this study is to describe surgical instrumentations and technique to perform total microlaparoscopy radical hysterectomy in early cervical cancer patients and report our preliminary results in terms of operative time and perioperative outcomes. Methods: Between January 1, 2012, and March 25, 2012, 4 consecutive early cervical cancer patients were enrolled in this study. Results: We performed 3 type B2 and 1 type C1-B2 total microlaparoscopy radical hysterectomy, and in all cases concomitant bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy were carried out. Median operative time was 165 minutes (range: 155 to 215) (mean: 186), and median estimated blood loss was 30 mL (range: 20 to 50). Median number of pelvic lymph nodes removed was 12 (range: 11 to 15). All procedures were completed without 5-mm port insertion and without conversion. No intraoperative or early postoperative complications were reported. Conclusions: This report suggests a role of microlaparoscopy in the surgical management of early cervical cancer with adequate oncological results, superimposable operative time, and perioperative outcomes with respect to standard laparoscopy. PMID:23743381

  10. Caudal epidural anesthesia during intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Isoyama-Shirakawa, Yuko; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Abe, Madoka; Kunitake, Naonobu; Matsumoto, Keiji; Ohga, Saiji; Sasaki, Tomonari; Uehara, Satoru; Okushima, Kazuhiro; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Honda, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested that pain control during intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer is insufficient in most hospitals in Japan. Our hospital began using caudal epidural anesthesia during high-dose-rate (HDR) intracavitary brachytherapy in 2011. The purpose of the present study was to retrospectively investigate the effects of caudal epidural anesthesia during HDR intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer patients. Caudal epidural anesthesia for 34 cervical cancer patients was performed during HDR intracavitary brachytherapy between October 2011 and August 2013. We used the patients' self-reported Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) score at the first session of HDR intracavitary brachytherapy as a subjective evaluation of pain. We compared NRS scores of the patients with anesthesia with those of 30 patients who underwent HDR intracavitary brachytherapy without sacral epidural anesthesia at our hospital between May 2010 and August 2011. Caudal epidural anesthesia succeeded in 33 patients (97%), and the NRS score was recorded in 30 patients. The mean NRS score of the anesthesia group was 5.17 ± 2.97, significantly lower than that of the control group's 6.80 ± 2.59 (P = 0.035). The caudal epidural block resulted in no side-effects. Caudal epidural anesthesia is an effective and safe anesthesia option during HDR intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer. PMID:25852151

  11. Early cervical cancer coexistent with idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, M.; Kalter, C.; Roberts, W.S.; Cavanagh, D.

    1989-07-01

    Early invasive carcinoma of the cervix may be treated by surgery or radiation therapy. Two patients with early cervical cancer are presented whose concomitant inflammatory bowel disease figured significantly in the selection of surgery as treatment. The use of radiotherapy in the face of inflammatory bowel disease, however, is not clearly addressed in the literature.

  12. Breast and cervical cancer screening among Korean American elderly women

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hee-Soon Juon; You Jeoung Seo; Miyong T Kim

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the prevalence and correlates of breast and cervical cancer screening tests among Korean American elderly women. This study examined the effects of individual socio-demographic background, acculturation level (e.g., proportion of life spent in the US, spoken English proficiency), health status and access to health care on uptake of mammography and Pap smear

  13. Mass screening for cervical cancer in Norway: evaluation of the pilot project

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tone Bjørge; Anne B. Gunbjørud; Olav A. Haugen; Gry B. Skare; Claes Tropé; Steinar Ø. Thoresen

    1995-01-01

    The Norwegian Department of Health and Social Affairs initiated a national screening program for cervical cancer in 1990, with all women aged 25 to 70 years to be offered cervical screening every three years. During the first three years of the program (November 1991–October 1994), all spontaneous cervical cytology in Norway was recorded at the Norwegian Cancer Registry. In addition,

  14. Patients with cervical cancer: why did screening not prevent these cases?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Roosmarie P. de Bie; Henke C. Vergers-Spooren; Leon F. A. G. Massuger; Albertus G. Siebers; Maria R. J. Salet-van der Pol; Judith E. M. Vedder; Willem J. G. Melchers; Johan Bulten; Ruud L. M. Bekkers

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to assess the screening history of women with cervical cancer and review normal cervical smears 5 years preceding the diagnosis. STUDY DESIGN: Cytological and histological results of 401 women treated for invasive cervical cancer between 1991 and 2008 at the Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center were studied. Ninety-eight normal smears were reviewed. RESULTS:

  15. [New guidelines in regard to cervical cancer screening].

    PubMed

    Vargas-Hernández, Víctor Manuel; Acosta-Altamirano, Gustavo; Moreno-Eutimio, Mario Adán; Vargas-Aguilar, Víctor Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Cancer screening programs have been successful in reducing the incidence and mortality due to cervical cancer. For more than a decade, the human papillomavirus test has been recommended as part of these programs, however, Pap tests is not currently recommended for women 65 years of age who participated adequately in screening programs, continuing with these screening programs is not needed. Screening programs will be different in special populations at greatest risk where tests are frequently needed or use of alternative methods. PMID:25167359

  16. Potential implications of GRP58 expression and susceptibility of cervical cancer to cisplatin and thymoquinone-based therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hafiza, Wan Abd Ghani Wan Nor; Latifah, Saiful Yazan

    2014-01-01

    A new therapeutic approach of looking at the expression of glucose-regulated protein (GRP) 58 as an indication of cisplatin sensitivity may eradicate fruitless treatment and side effects in patients with cervical cancer. Thymoquinone, the bioactive compound in Nigella sativa, has been reported to have an antiproliferative effect on cervical cancer cells. This study compared the cytotoxic effects of cisplatin, a drug commonly used in the treatment of cervical cancer, and thymoquinone in cervical cancer (HeLa and SiHa) cell lines by 3-(4,5-Dimethyl thiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, and measured GRP58 expression in the cells by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting. Cisplatin had higher antiproliferative activity towards the cervical cancer cell lines than thymoquinone in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. However, cisplatin was more toxic to normal 3T3 and Vero cell lines than thymoquinone. The half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of cisplatin in HeLa and SiHa cells at 72 hours was 13.3±2.52 ?M and 19.5±2.12 ?M, respectively. Meanwhile, the IC50 of thymoquinone in HeLa and SiHa cells was 29.57±5.81 ?M and 23.41±1.51 ?M, respectively (P<0.05). A significant correlation was found between the cytotoxicity of cisplatin and expression of GRP58, but this relationship was not significant for thymoquinone. Therefore, the response of cervical cancer cells to cisplatin can be predicted on the basis of GRP58 expression. PMID:25143744

  17. Cervical Cancer Cell Supernatants Induce a Phenotypic Switch from U937-Derived Macrophage-Activated M1 State into M2-Like Suppressor Phenotype with Change in Toll-Like Receptor Profile

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Reyes, Karina; Bravo-Cuellar, Alejandro; Hernández-Flores, Georgina; Lerma-Díaz, José Manuel; Jave-Suárez, Luis Felipe; Gómez-Lomelí, Paulina; de Celis, Ruth; Aguilar-Lemarroy, Adriana; Domínguez-Rodríguez, Jorge Ramiro; Ortiz-Lazareno, Pablo Cesar

    2014-01-01

    Cervical cancer (CC) is the second most common cancer among women worldwide. Infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) is the main risk factor for developing CC. Macrophages are important immune effector cells; they can be differentiated into two phenotypes, identified as M1 (classically activated) and M2 (alternatively activated). Macrophage polarization exerts profound effects on the Toll-like receptor (TLR) profile. In this study, we evaluated whether the supernatant of human CC cells HeLa, SiHa, and C-33A induces a shift of M1 macrophage toward M2 macrophage in U937-derived macrophages. Results. The results showed that soluble factors secreted by CC cells induce a change in the immunophenotype of macrophages from macrophage M1 into macrophage M2. U937-derived macrophages M1 released proinflammatory cytokines and nitric oxide; however, when these cells were treated with the supernatant of CC cell lines, we observed a turnover of M1 toward M2. These cells increased CD163 and IL-10 expression. The expression of TLR-3, -7, and -9 is increased when the macrophages were treated with the supernatant of CC cells. Conclusions. Our result strongly suggests that CC cells may, through the secretion of soluble factors, induce a change of immunophenotype M1 into M2 macrophages. PMID:25309919

  18. BORIS and CTCF are overexpressed in squamous intraepithelial lesions and cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Velázquez-Hernández, N; Reyes-Romero, M A; Barragán-Hernández, M; Guerrero-Romero, F; Rodríguez-Moran, M; Aguilar-Durán, M; Lazalde Medina, B

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the expression of Brother of Regulator of Imprinted Sites (BORIS) and CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) in squamous intraepithelial lesions and cervical cancer. To analyze BORIS and CTCF expression, an endocervical cytobrush sample was taken for total RNA isolation. CTCF and BORIS mRNA was quantified from total RNA using quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. A total of 71 samples were collected and classified according to the Bethesda Classification of squamous intraepithelial lesions. BORIS expression was observed in 9 (12.7%) samples; of these, 5.3, 5.9, 14.8, and 37.5% in the groups that were cytology negative for intraepithelial lesion or malignancy, low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL), high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL), and invasive cervical carcinoma, respectively. The expression level of BORIS was significantly higher in the group with invasive cervical carcinoma as compared with the groups negative for intraepithelial lesion or malignancy, LSIL, and HSIL (P < 0.0005). CTCF mRNA was expressed in all samples. CTCF expression was significantly higher in carcinoma groups compared with LSIL, HSIL, and negative for intraepithelial lesion or malignancy groups. We found that BORIS and CTCF expressions in the LSIL and invasive cervical carcinoma groups were higher than expression in cytological normal samples. Additional studies should be conducted to examine the function of transcription factors during different stages of the transformation of cervical cancer cells. PMID:26125810

  19. The cervical malignant cells display a down regulation of ER-? but retain the ER-? expression

    PubMed Central

    López-Romero, Ricardo; Garrido-Guerrero, Efraín; Rangel-López, Angélica; Manuel-Apolinar, Leticia; Piña-Sánchez, Patricia; Lazos-Ochoa, Minerva; Mantilla-Morales, Alejandra; Bandala, Cindy; Salcedo, Mauricio

    2013-01-01

    The human cervix is a tissue target of sex steroid hormones as estradiol (E2) which exerts its action through of the estrogen receptors alpha and beta (ER-? and ER-?). In this study we investigated the expression of ER-? and ER-? in human invasive cervical carcinomas using immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR analyses and compared with that observed in the corresponding normal tissue. The results show nuclear expression of ER-? mainly in the first third of normal cervical epithelium, however, decreased or absent expression were present in invasive cervical carcinoma, indicating that expression of ER-? is lost in cervical cancer. Nevertheless, by RT-PCR we were able to demonstrate mRNA expression of ER-? in invasive cervical tissues. These results suggest that loss of ER-? could be due to a mechanism of post-transcriptional and/or post-translational regulation of its gene during the progression to invasive carcinoma. On the other hand, ER-? was expressed in normal cervix with an expression pattern similar to ER-?. In addition to its nuclear localization, cytoplasmic immunoreaction of ER-? was present in the epithelium of invasive cervical carcinomas, suggesting an association between cytoplasmic ER-? expression and invasive phenotype in the cervical tumors. In summary, the results show that the cervical malignant cells tend to loss the ER-? but maintain the ER-? actively expressed. Loss of expression of ER-? in neoplastic tissue suggests that the estrogenic effects could be conducted through the ER-? in human neoplastic cervical tissue. More detailed studies are needed to confirm this suggestion and to determine the role of ER-? in cervical cancer. PMID:23923078

  20. Raloxifene suppress proliferation-promoting function of estrogen in CaSKi cervical cells

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jing-Quan; Wang, Xing-Hua; Tang, Li-Ping; Chen, Xiu-Wei; Lou, Ge

    2015-01-01

    Raloxifene has demonstrated anti-estrogen activity in reproductive organs and tissues, but there are very few related studies in cervical cells. The aims of this study is to explore the function of raloxifene in CaSKi cervical cells. We examined the effects of raloxifene on cervical cancer cells exposed to estrogen. The effect of Raloxifene on cell growth, apoptosis was detected. The human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 E6E7 transcription in cervical cell line CaSki cells exposed to 17-estradiol was also examined. Apoptosis was measured by endonucleolytic degradation of DNA. HPV 16 E6E7 was measured by northern analysis. The results indicated that raloxifine inhibits estrogenic promotion activity on growth of CaSki cells. Raloxifene suppresses the proliferation promotion activity of estradiol in CaSki cells. Raloxifene suppresses the stimulation effect of estradiol on HPV 16 E6E7 transcription in CaSki cells. In conclusion, raloxifene inhibit the CaSki cells proliferation induced by estradiol, which suggests that raloxifine also has anti-estrogen activity in cervical cells.

  1. Evaluation of serum human telomerase reverse transcriptase as a novel marker for cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Porika, Mahendar; Tippani, Radhika; Mohammad, Anwar; Bollam, Sekhar R; Panuganti, Sree D; Abbagani, Sadanandam

    2011-01-01

    Human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) is the catalytic subunit of human telomerase and its rate-limiting component. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the diagnostic value of hTERT in serum of cervical cancer patients. Preoperative values of hTERT, squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCC-ag) and cancer antigen 125 (CA 125) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in 192 patients with squamous cell carcinoma or adenocarcinoma of the uterine cervix and 38 healthy controls. Elevated pretreatment levels of hTERT were identified in 80.2% of squamous cell carcinoma and 73.8% of adenocarcinoma patients. The expression of serum hTERT was correlated with telomerase activity in cancer tissues of both histological types. Pretreatment serum hTERT levels showed a significant correlation with clinical stage, tumor size and lymph node metastasis, but not with age. Serum hTERT measurement was found to be useful in the diagnosis and assessment of clinical stage of cervical cancer, and to be superior to the conventional tumor markers. Therefore, serum hTERT is a novel and readily available marker for cervical malignancies. PMID:21319134

  2. Proteomics-based approach to elucidate the mechanism of antitumor effect of curcumin in cervical cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Krystal Madden; Lisa Flowers; Ritu Salani; Ira Horowitz; Sanjay Logan; Kevin Kowalski; Jun Xie; Sulma I. Mohammed

    2009-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death for women in the world. A potential target for preventing and treating cervical cancer is cyclooxygenase-2 (cox-2). Curcumin is an anti-inflammatory agent that is known to have anti-cox-2 activity. In this study we examined the expression of cox-2 in cervical cancer and its precursors by immunohistochemistry. The effect of curcumin

  3. Expression profiling of cervical cancers in Indian women at different stages to identify gene signatures during progression of the disease

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Asha; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Kannan, Sadhana; Deodhar, Kedar; Shrivastava, Shyam K; Kumar-Sinha, Chandan; Mulherkar, Rita

    2013-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer among women worldwide, with developing countries accounting for >80% of the disease burden. Although in the West, active screening has been instrumental in reducing the incidence of cervical cancer, disease management is hampered due to lack of biomarkers for disease progression and defined therapeutic targets. Here we carried out gene expression profiling of 29 cervical cancer tissues from Indian women, spanning International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stages of the disease from early lesion (IA and IIA) to progressive stages (IIB and IIIA–B), and identified distinct gene expression signatures. Overall, metabolic pathways, pathways in cancer and signaling pathways were found to be significantly upregulated, while focal adhesion, cytokine–cytokine receptor interaction and WNT signaling were downregulated. Additionally, we identified candidate biomarkers of disease progression such as SPP1, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), STK17A, and DUSP1 among others that were validated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) in the samples used for microarray studies as well in an independent set of 34 additional samples. Integrative analysis of our results with other cervical cancer profiling studies could facilitate the development of multiplex diagnostic markers of cervical cancer progression. PMID:24403257

  4. Global methylation silencing of clustered proto-cadherin genes in cervical cancer: serving as diagnostic markers comparable to HPV

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kai-Hung; Lin, Cuei-Jyuan; Liu, Chou-Jen; Liu, Dai-Wei; Huang, Rui-Lan; Ding, Dah-Ching; Weng, Ching-Feng; Chu, Tang-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic remodeling of cell adhesion genes is a common phenomenon in cancer invasion. This study aims to investigate global methylation of cell adhesion genes in cervical carcinogenesis and to apply them in early detection of cancer from cervical scraping. Genome-wide methylation array was performed on an investigation cohort, including 16 cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 3 (CIN3) and 20 cervical cancers (CA) versus 12 each of normal, inflammation and CIN1 as controls. Twelve members of clustered proto-cadherin (PCDH) genes were collectively methylated and silenced, which were validated in cancer cells of the cervix, endometrium, liver, head and neck, breast, and lung. In an independent cohort including 107 controls, 66 CIN1, 85 CIN2/3, and 38 CA, methylated PCDHA4 and PCDHA13 were detected in 2.8%, 24.2%, 52.9%, and 84.2% (P < 10?25), and 2.8%, 24.2%, 50.6%, and 94.7% (P < 10?29), respectively. In diagnosis of CIN2 or more severe lesion of the cervix, a combination test of methylated PCDHA4 or PCDHA13 from cervical scraping had a sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of 74.8%, 80.3%, 73%, and 81.8%, respectively. Testing of this combination from cervical scraping is equally sensitive but more specific than human papillomavirus (HPV) test in diagnosis of CIN2 or more severe lesions. The study disclosed a collective methylation of PCDH genes in cancer of cervix and other sites. At least two of them can be promising diagnostic markers for cervical cancer noninferior to HPV. PMID:25418975

  5. [Management of pregnant women with advanced cervical cancer].

    PubMed

    Vincens, C; Dupaigne, D; de Tayrac, R; Mares, P

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to update the management of pregnant women with advanced cervical cancer, thanks to a literature review indexed in Medline((R)) (from 1980 till 2006 using those keywords: advanced cervix cancer, neoadjuvant chemotherapy and pregnancy), ScienceDirect (from 1990 till 2006) and the French Encyclopédie Médico-Chirurgicale. It occurs that pregnancy is a privileged period to diagnose cervical cancer, particularly in early stages. We ought to beware of symptoms such as vaginal bleeding, which could be underestimated during pregnancy. Colposcopically selected biopsies are reference techniques to confirm the diagnostic. The assessment of extension includes an abdominal and pelvic MRI and echography and a radiography of the chest for locally advanced stages. The decision to interrupt pregnancy should be based on a collegial evaluation and depends on state and histology of disease, patient's desire for pregnancy, as well as gestational age and disease evolution. Cesarean is preferred to natural delivery even though survival rates are the same. The cesarean section prevents from short-term complications and recurrence on the episiotomy, but the hysterotomy type is controversial throughout literature. The prognosis of cervical cancer does not seem to be influenced by pregnancy. Management is the same, even though we have to adapt the treatment from the pregnancy state. No study could show the benefit and the safety of neoadjuvant chemotherapy during pregnancy, due to few cases, but it could be a solution with patients suffering from an advanced cancer and not willing to stop pregnancy. To conclude, the detection by cervical smears should be systematic during pregnancy. When cancer is diagnosed, cesarean section is the favourite way to deliver. Pregnancy does not modify disease's prognosis and the therapeutic choice depends on the stage of the disease. PMID:18378182

  6. The Prognostic Value of TRAIL and its Death Receptors in Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Maduro, John H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Medical Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)], E-mail: j.h.maduro@rt.umcg.nl; Noordhuis, Maartje G.; Hoor, Klaske A. ten [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Pras, Elisabeth [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Arts, Henriette J.G.; Eijsink, Jasper J.H. [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Hollema, Harry [Department of Pathology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Mom, Constantijne H. [Department of Medical Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Gynecologic Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Jong, Steven de; Vries, Elisabeth G.E. de [Department of Medical Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Bock, Geertruida H. de [Department of Epidemiology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Zee, Ate G.J. van der [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: Preclinical data indicate a synergistic effect on apoptosis between irradiation and recombinant human (rh) tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL), making the TRAIL death receptors (DR) interesting drug targets. The aim of our study was to analyze the expression of DR4, DR5, and TRAIL in cervical cancer and to determine their predictive and prognostic value. Methods and Materials: Tissue microarrays were constructed from tumors of 645 cervical cancer patients treated with surgery and/or (chemo-)radiation between 1980 and 2004. DR4, DR5, and TRAIL expression in the tumor was studied by immunohistochemistry and correlated to clinicopathological variables, response to radiotherapy, and disease-specific survival. Results: Cytoplasmatic DR4, DR5, and TRAIL immunostaining were observed in cervical tumors from 99%, 88%, and 81% of the patients, respectively. In patients treated primarily with radiotherapy, TRAIL-positive tumors less frequently obtained a pathological complete response than TRAIL-negative tumors (66.3% vs. 79.0 %; in multivariate analysis: odds ratio: 2.09, p {<=}0.05). DR4, DR5, and TRAIL expression were not prognostic for disease-specific survival. Conclusions: Immunostaining for DR4, DR5, and TRAIL is frequently observed in the cytoplasm of tumor cells in cervical cancer patients. Absence of TRAIL expression was associated with a higher pathological complete response rate to radiotherapy. DR4, DR5, or TRAIL were not prognostic for disease-specific survival.

  7. Screening for cervical cancer: new alternatives and research.

    PubMed

    Lörincz, Attila T

    2003-01-01

    Evidence for the clinical utility of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA testing has increased over the years and has now become very convincing. Some specific uses of HPV detection are a) triage of women with cytological determinations of atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASC-US) and related management strategies, b) as a marker for test of cure post-treatment, and c) most importantly, as an adjunct to cytology in routine cervical disease screening programs. There are many studies that support each of these applications and include 8 studies on ASC-US triage, 10 on test of cure and 13 on adjunctive or stand-alone HPV screening. The most notable investigation of ASC-US triage was ALTS, a randomized controlled trial of 3,488 women. With respect to routine HPV screening the combined studies included 77,000 women, providing as a histological endpoint more than 1,000 cases of high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) or cancer. Testing methods were either the Hybrid Capture 2 (HC2) test or the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test. HPV testing of women with ASC-US cytology had on average a higher sensitivity (90%) and specificity (70%) than repeating the cytological test (sensitivity 75%, specificity 60%) and was also more sensitive than colposcopy for follow-up. As an adjunct to the Papanicolaou (Pap) cytology test in routine screening, HPV DNA testing was a more sensitive indicator for prevalent high-grade CIN than either conventional or liquid cytology. A combination of HPV DNA and Papanicolaou testing had almost 100% sensitivity and negative predictive value. The specificity of the combined tests was slightly lower than the specificity of the Papanicolaou test. One "double-negative" HPV DNA and Papanicolaou test indicated a higher prognostic assurance against risk of future CIN 3 than three subsequent negative conventional Papanicolaou tests and may safely allow three-year or longer screening intervals for such low-risk women. It appears that HPV DNA testing is on the way to becoming a common testing strategy in cervical cancer prevention programs. Research continues into approaches for improving the performance and cost-effectiveness of HPV detection methods. Hybrid Capture 3 will offer improved HPV typing capabilities and the Rapid Capture machine allows for robot-assisted HPV DNA testing, permitting greater test throughput. PCR test improvements are expected to contribute to the growth of flexible accurate and cost-effective HPV DNA tests. It is likely that improved diagnostic technology along with HPV genotyping and quantitation may provide more value in future. A particularly promising approach is to combine HPV DNA testing with expression levels of other markers such as proliferative or cell cycle regulatory proteins to subdivide HPV-positive women into those who are at greater risk of cancer and those who can be safely followed by screening at longer intervals. This paper is available too at: http://www.insp.mx/salud/index.html. PMID:14746031

  8. Perspective for Prophylaxis and Treatment of Cervical Cancer: An Immunological Approach

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Marjorie; Chiriva-Internati, Maurizio; Mirandola, Leonardo; Tonroy, Catherine; Tedjarati, Sean S.; Davis, Nicole; D’Cunha, Nicholas; Tijani, Lukman; Hardwick, Fred; Nguyen, Diane; Kast, W. Martin; Cobos, Everardo

    2014-01-01

    As the second most common cause of cancer-related death in women, human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccines have been a major step in decreasing the morbidity and mortality associated with cervical cancer. An estimated 490,000 women are diagnosed with cervical cancer each year. Increasing knowledge of the HPV role in the etiology of cervical cancer has led to the development and introduction of HPV-based vaccines for active immunotherapy of cervical cancer. Immunotherapies directed at preventing HPV-persistent infections. These vaccines are already accessible for prophylaxis and in the near future, they will be available for the treatment of preexisting HPV-related neoplastic lesions. PMID:22251005

  9. Thermochemoradiotherapy using superselective intra-arterial infusion for N3 cervical lymph node metastases of tongue cancer.

    PubMed

    Hiroaki, Nishiguchi; Kenji, Mitsudo; Noriyuki, Yamamoto; Iwai, Tohnai

    2013-01-01

    A case of squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue with advanced N3 cervical lymph node metastases in an 80-year-old female is reported. The patient was treated with a combination of radiotherapy (2 Gy/day, total 60 Gy), superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy via a superficial temporal artery and a femoral artery (docetaxel, total 124 mg; cisplatin, total 135 mg), and four sessions of hyperthermia for cervical lymph node metastases. The tumor responded well to therapy, and 18-fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in both primary and neck lesions disappeared on positron emission tomography-computed tomography. The patient has shown no clinical or radiological evidence of local recurrence or distant metastases 6 years after the end of treatment. Advanced oral cancer patients with N3 cervical lymph node metastases are particularly difficult to treat and have a poor prognosis. This method of thermochemoradiotherapy seems a promising modality for patients with N3 cervical lymph node metastases of oral cancer. PMID:24518725

  10. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Cervical Node Squamous Cell Carcinoma Metastases From Unknown Head-and-Neck Primary Site: M. D. Anderson Cancer Center Outcomes and Patterns of Failure

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, Steven J., E-mail: sjfrank@mdanderson.or [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Rosenthal, David I.; Petsuksiri, Janjira; Ang, K. Kian; Morrison, William H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Weber, Randal S. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Glisson, Bonnie S. [Department of Thoracic /Head and Neck Medical Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Chao, K.S. Clifford; Schwartz, David L.; Chronowski, Gregory M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); El-Naggar, Adel K. [Department of Pathology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Garden, Adam S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: Conventional therapy for cervical node squamous cell carcinoma metastases from an unknown primary can cause considerable toxicity owing to the volume of tissues to be irradiated. In the present study, hypothesizing that using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) would provide effective treatment with minimal toxicity, we reviewed the outcomes and patterns of failure for head-and-neck unknown primary cancer at a single tertiary cancer center. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the records of 52 patients who had undergone IMRT for an unknown primary at M.D. Anderson Cancer Center between 1998 and 2005. The patient and treatment characteristics were extracted and the survival rates calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Of the 52 patients, 5 presented with Stage N1, 11 with Stage N2a, 23 with Stage N2b, 6 with Stage N2c, 4 with Stage N3, and 3 with Stage Nx disease. A total of 26 patients had undergone neck dissection, 13 before and 13 after IMRT; 14 patients had undergone excisional biopsy and presented for IMRT without evidence of disease. Finally, 14 patients had received systemic chemotherapy. All patients underwent IMRT to targets on both sides of the neck and pharyngeal axis. The median follow-up time for the surviving patients was 3.7 years. The 5-year actuarial rate of primary mucosal tumor control and regional control was 98% and 94%, respectively. Only 3 patients developed distant metastasis with locoregional control. The 5-year actuarial disease-free and overall survival rate was 88% and 89%, respectively. The most severe toxicity was Grade 3 dysphagia/esophageal stricture, experienced by 2 patients. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that IMRT can produce excellent outcomes for patients who present with cervical node squamous cell carcinoma metastases from an unknown head-and-neck primary tumor. Severe late complications were uncommon.

  11. Aminopeptidase N (APN)\\/CD13 inhibitor, Ubenimex, enhances radiation sensitivity in human cervical cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hirohisa Tsukamoto; Kiyosumi Shibata; Hiroaki Kajiyama; Mikio Terauchi; Akihiro Nawa; Fumitaka Kikkawa

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Radiotherapy can be used to treat all stages of cervical cancer. For improving local control via radiotherapy, it is important to use additional antitumor agents. Aminopeptidase N (APN)\\/CD13, a 150-kDa metalloproteinase, is a multifunctional cell surface aminopeptidase with ubiquitous expression. Recent studies have suggested that APN\\/CD13 plays an important role in tumor progression in several human malignancies. METHODS: We

  12. Cervical dysplasia - series (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    Cervical cancer is one of the most common cancers in women. It is a cancer of the ... smear is the screening procedure used to detect cervical cancer. Limited or early cervical cancer (carcinoma in ...

  13. Cervix cancer screening in Croatia within the European Cervical Cancer Prevention Week.

    PubMed

    Skopljanac-Macina, Lada; Mahovli?, Vesna; Ovanin-Raki?, Ana; Barisi?, Ana; Rajhvajn, Sanda; Juric, Danijela; Babi?, Damir; Corusi?, Ante; Oreskovi?, Slavko

    2010-06-01

    Croatia still has opportunistic screening and the organized national screening has been planned. The European Cervical Cancer Prevention Week was held twice in Croatia, in January 2008 and 2009. Within the first one in 2008, information campaign "For All Women" via mass media was held, and women were invited to the organized free gynecological examination and Papanicolaou test (Pap test) in the University Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Zagreb University Hospital Center. Following invitation 481 women attended the testing; the median age was 55 years. There were more women aged > or = 50 (n = 353), with the highest participation in the age group 55-59 years (n = 94). Some women came because of subjective symptoms (n = 10), but the majority of them came only for testing (n = 471). According to history of previous cytological testing, 400 women have had > or = 1 negative findings, 71 women have had > or = 1 positive findings, 9 women attended Pap test for the first time, and 1 woman does not know about previous testing. Cervical cytology was abnormal in 35 women (7.28%), the median age was 42 years with the highest proportion in the age group 30-34 years (n = 7); among all of them 21 women (60%) had no abnormal Pap test previously. The findings were: Atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance--ASC-US (n = 9), ASC cannot exclude high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion--ASC-H (n = 1), cervical intraepithelial neoplasia--CIN 1 (n = 13), CIN 2 (n = 1), CIN 3 (n = 6), carcinoma planocellulare (n = 2), atypical glandular cells--AGC-favor reactive endocervical cells (n = 3). Among women aged < or = 49 there were 20.47% abnormal findings and among those aged > or = 50, 2.55%. According to 21 positive Pap tests previously, among women aged < or = 49 there were 30.71% while among those aged > or = 50 there were 9.07%. Within the European Cervical Cancer Prevention Week in 2009, employed women from one national company were invited by internal information to the same procedure. A smaller group of younger asymptomatic women came for testing (n = 53), median age 39 years. According to history of previous cytological testing, 50 women have had > or = 1 negative findings, 3 women have had > or = 1 positive findings. In this study, Pap test was positive in 3.77% (n = 2). National screening programme should be focused on the participation of all personally invited women, especially younger age groups and under-screened women. Well designed information campaign should be implemented in national screening programme. PMID:20698138

  14. Up-regulation of HLA class-I antigen expression and antigen-specific CTL response in cervical cancer cells by the demethylating agent hydralazine and the histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid

    PubMed Central

    Mora-García, María de Lourdes; Duenas-González, Alfonso; Hernández-Montes, Jorge; De la Cruz-Hernández, Erick; Pérez-Cárdenas, Enrique; Weiss-Steider, Benny; Santiago-Osorio, Edelmiro; Ortíz-Navarrete, Vianney Francisco; Rosales, Víctor Hugo; Cantú, David; Lizano-Soberón, Marcela; Rojo-Aguilar, Martha Patricia; Monroy-García, Alberto

    2006-01-01

    Background DNA hypermethylation and histone deacetylation are epigenetic events that contribute to the absence or downregulated expression of different components of the tumor recognition complex. These events affect the processing and presentation of antigenic peptides to CTLs by HLA class-I molecules. In this work evaluated the effect of the DNA hypomethylating agent hydralazine and the histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid, on the expression of HLA class-I molecules and on the antigen-specific immune recognition of cervical cancer cells. Methods Cell lines C33A (HPV-), CaSki (HPV-16+) and MS751 (HPV-18+) were treated with hydralazine and valproic acid to assess the expression of HLA class-I molecules by flow cytometry and RT-PCR. Promoter methylation of HLA class-I -A, -B and C, was also evaluated by Methylation-Specific PCR. Primary cervical tumors of four HLA-A*0201 allele patients were typed for HPV and their CTL's stimulated in vitro with the T2 cell line previously loaded with 50 ?M of the HPV peptides. Cytotoxicity of stimulated CTL's was assayed against Caski and MS751 cells pre-treated with hydralazine and valproic acid. Results Valproic acid and hydralazine/valproic acid up-regulated the constitutive HLA class-I expression as evaluated by flow cytometry and RT-PCR despite constitutive promoter demethylation at these loci. Hydralazine and valproic acid in combination but no IFN-gamma hyperacetylated histone H4 as evaluated by ChiP assay. The antigenic immune recognition of CaSki and MS751 cells by CTLs specific to HPV-16/18 E6 and E7-derived epitopes, was increased by VA and H/VA and the combination of H/VA/IFN-gamma. Conclusion These results support the potential use of hydralazine and valproic acid as an adjuvant for immune intervention in cervical cancer patients whenever clinical protocols based on tumor antigen recognition is desirable, like in those cases where the application of E6 and E7 based therapeutic vaccines is used. PMID:17192185

  15. Scripted Sexual Health Informational Intervention in Improving Sexual Function in Patients With Gynecologic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-08

    Anxiety Disorder; Cervical Cancer; Endometrial Cancer; Female Reproductive Cancer; Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Sexual Dysfunction; Uterine Sarcoma; Vaginal Cancer; Vulvar Cancer

  16. Cervical cancer screening preferences among African American women in the Mississippi Delta.

    PubMed

    Litton, Allison G; Castle, Philip E; Partridge, Edward E; Scarinci, Isabel C

    2013-02-01

    Although cervical cancer screening rates have increased in the United States, there are still geographic areas that experience a high cervical cancer burden, including the Mississippi Delta. Human papillomavirus (HPV) self-collection may be a feasible alternative to traditional clinician-collection for cervical cancer screening for under-screened women. This study examined women's preferences for cervical cancer screening methods. Interviewer-administered questionnaires regarding cervical cancer screening preferences were completed by 524 African American women in the Mississippi Delta. Statistically significant differences were observed for age, employment status, and number of children across recruitment groups. Regardless of how women were recruited, the majority preferred self-sampling for HPV testing method to clinician-collection. Among women who preferred self-collected sampling for HPV testing, the most frequent reasons given were convenience, privacy, and comfort. Alternative strategies must be considered when targeting the under-screened to reduce the burden of cervical cancer. PMID:23377716

  17. Image-Based Brachytherapy for the Treatment of Cervical Cancer.

    PubMed

    Harkenrider, Matthew M; Alite, Fiori; Silva, Scott R; Small, William

    2015-07-15

    Cervical cancer is a disease that requires considerable multidisciplinary coordination of care and labor in order to maximize tumor control and survival while minimizing treatment-related toxicity. As with external beam radiation therapy, the use of advanced imaging and 3-dimensional treatment planning has generated a paradigm shift in the delivery of brachytherapy for the treatment of cervical cancer. The use of image-based brachytherapy, most commonly with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), requires additional attention and effort by the treating physician to prescribe dose to the proper volume and account for adjacent organs at risk. This represents a dramatic change from the classic Manchester approach of orthogonal radiographic images and prescribing dose to point A. We reviewed the history and currently evolving data and recommendations for the clinical use of image-based brachytherapy with an emphasis on MRI-based brachytherapy. PMID:26104944

  18. Advances in primary and secondary interventions for cervical cancer: human papillomavirus prophylactic vaccines and testing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cosette M Wheeler

    2007-01-01

    Cytologic screening has greatly reduced the incidence of invasive cervical cancer in many industrialized nations. State-of-the-art cervical cancer prevention is costly, however, and includes cytologic screening at repeat intervals, confirmation of abnormalities by colposcopic biopsy, and treatment of precancerous lesions. In resource-limited settings, accessibility to prevention programs for cervical cancer is often poor, or such programs are simply unavailable or

  19. Developing an HPV vaccine to prevent cervical cancer and genital warts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Janine T. Bryan

    2007-01-01

    The challenges of the journey from target identification through development of a prophylactic quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine have been met in Gardasil®. Cervical cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related death in women worldwide. Approximately 70% of cervical cancer is caused by infection with HPV types 16 and 18 and ?90% of genital warts are caused by HPV

  20. Chapter 1: Human Papillomavirus and Cervical Cancer—Burden and Assessment of Causality

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. Xavier Bosch; Silvia de Sanjosé

    Cervical cancer remains the second most common cancer in women worldwide and the most frequent in developing countries. Pre-neoplasic cervical lesions represent an addi- tional burden in countries where screening is widespread. The human papillomavirus (HPV) prevalence and type dis- tribution in normal smears and in cancer specimens are be- ing described and show relatively small international varia- tion. S

  1. Changes in knowledge of cervical cancer following introduction of human papillomavirus vaccine among women at high risk for cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stewart Massad, L.; Evans, Charlesnika T.; Weber, Kathleen M.; D'Souza, Gypsyamber; Hessol, Nancy A.; Wright, Rodney L.; Colie, Christine; Strickler, Howard D.; Wilson, Tracey E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To describe changes in knowledge of cervical cancer prevention, human papillomavirus (HPV), and HPV vaccination among women at high risk for cervical cancer in the first five years after introduction of HPV vaccination. Methods In 2007, 2008–9, and 2011, women in a multicenter U.S. cohort study completed 44-item self-report questionnaires assessing knowledge of cervical cancer prevention, HPV, and HPV vaccination. Results across time were assessed for individuals, and three study enrollment cohorts were compared. Knowledge scores were correlated with demographic variables, measures of education and attention, and medical factors. Associations were assessed in multivariable models. Results In all, 974 women completed three serial questionnaires; most were minority, low income, and current or former smokers. The group included 652 (67%) HIV infected and 322 (33%) uninfected. Summary knowledge scores (possible range 0–24) increased from 2007 (12.8, S.D. 5.8) to 2008–9 (13.9, S.D. 5.3, P < 0.001) and to 2011 (14.3, S.D. 5.2, P < 0.0001 vs 2007 and < 0.04 vs 2008–9). Higher knowledge scores at first and follow-up administration of questionnaires, higher income, and higher education level were associated with improved knowledge score at third administration. Women not previously surveyed had scores similar to those of the longitudinal group at baseline. Conclusion Substantial gaps in understanding of HPV and cervical cancer prevention exist despite years of health education. While more effective educational interventions may help, optimal cancer prevention may require opt-out vaccination programs that do not require nuanced understanding. PMID:25870859

  2. DCCPS: BRP: PCRB: Key Initiatives: HPV and Cervical Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    This study examines whether Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is a risk factor for decreased cervical cancer surveillance care among women. Behavioral factors such as avoidance are common in PTSD and may increase the likelihood that some women will postpone or avoid preventive gynecological care. This avoidance may be particularly pronounced among women whose PTSD was caused by the leading precipitant in women (i.e., sexual trauma) because invasive exams may trigger traumatic memories of a prior assault.

  3. Cervical cancer screening coverage in a high-incidence region

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Cibelli; da Fonseca, Allex Jardim; Sibajev, Alexander; Souza, Camila Iasmim de Andrade; Araújo, Daniela Souza; Teles, Daniele Aparecida de Freitas; de Carvalho, Stéphanie Gomes Lins; Cavalcante, Kyldery Wendell Moura; Rabelo, Wendell Lima

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the coverage of a cervical cancer screening program in a city with a high incidence of the disease in addition to the factors associated with non-adherence to the current preventive program. METHODS A cross-sectional study based on household surveys was conducted. The sample was composed of women between 25 and 59 years of age of the city of Boa Vista, RR, Northern Brazil who were covered by the cervical cancer screening program. The cluster sampling method was used. The dependent variable was participation in a women’s health program, defined as undergoing at least one Pap smear in the 36 months prior to the interview; the explanatory variables were extracted from individual data. A generalized linear model was used. RESULTS 603 women were analyzed, with an mean age of 38.2 years (SD = 10.2). Five hundred and seventeen women underwent the screening test, and the prevalence of adherence in the last three years was up to 85.7% (95%CI 82.5;88.5). A high per capita household income and recent medical consultation were associated with the lower rate of not being tested in multivariate analysis. Disease ignorance, causes, and prevention methods were correlated with chances of non-adherence to the screening system; 20.0% of the women were reported to have undergone opportunistic and non-routine screening. CONCLUSIONS The informed level of coverage is high, exceeding the level recommended for the control of cervical cancer. The preventive program appears to be opportunistic in nature, particularly for the most vulnerable women (with low income and little information on the disease). Studies on the diagnostic quality of cervicovaginal cytology and therapeutic schedules for positive cases are necessary for understanding the barriers to the control of cervical cancer. PMID:25741655

  4. Cervical cancer screening coverage in a high-incidence region.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Cibelli; Fonseca, Allex Jardim da; Sibajev, Alexander; Souza, Camila Iasmim de Andrade; Araújo, Daniela Souza; Teles, Daniele Aparecida de Freitas; Carvalho, Stéphanie Gomes Lins de; Cavalcante, Kyldery Wendell Moura; Rabelo, Wendell Lima

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the coverage of a cervical cancer screening program in a city with a high incidence of the disease in addition to the factors associated with non-adherence to the current preventive program. METHODS A cross-sectional study based on household surveys was conducted. The sample was composed of women between 25 and 59 years of age of the city of Boa Vista, RR, Northern Brazil who were covered by the cervical cancer screening program. The cluster sampling method was used. The dependent variable was participation in a women's health program, defined as undergoing at least one Pap smear in the 36 months prior to the interview; the explanatory variables were extracted from individual data. A generalized linear model was used. RESULTS 603 women were analyzed, with an mean age of 38.2 years (SD = 10.2). Five hundred and seventeen women underwent the screening test, and the prevalence of adherence in the last three years was up to 85.7% (95%CI 82.5;88.5). A high per capita household income and recent medical consultation were associated with the lower rate of not being tested in multivariate analysis. Disease ignorance, causes, and prevention methods were correlated with chances of non-adherence to the screening system; 20.0% of the women were reported to have undergone opportunistic and non-routine screening. CONCLUSIONS The informed level of coverage is high, exceeding the level recommended for the control of cervical cancer. The preventive program appears to be opportunistic in nature, particularly for the most vulnerable women (with low income and little information on the disease). Studies on the diagnostic quality of cervicovaginal cytology and therapeutic schedules for positive cases are necessary for understanding the barriers to the control of cervical cancer. PMID:25741655

  5. Automatic cervical cell segmentation and classification in Pap smears.

    PubMed

    Chankong, Thanatip; Theera-Umpon, Nipon; Auephanwiriyakul, Sansanee

    2014-02-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer death in females worldwide. The disease can be cured if the patient is diagnosed in the pre-cancerous lesion stage or earlier. A common physical examination technique widely used in the screening is Papanicolaou test or Pap test. In this research, a method for automatic cervical cancer cell segmentation and classification is proposed. A single-cell image is segmented into nucleus, cytoplasm, and background, using the fuzzy C-means (FCM) clustering technique. Four cell classes in the ERUDIT and LCH datasets, i.e., normal, low grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL), high grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL), and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), are considered. The 2-class problem can be achieved by grouping the last 3 classes as one abnormal class. Whereas, the Herlev dataset consists of 7 cell classes, i.e., superficial squamous, intermediate squamous, columnar, mild dysplasia, moderate dysplasia, severe dysplasia, and carcinoma in situ. These 7 classes can also be grouped to form a 2-class problem. These 3 datasets were tested on 5 classifiers including Bayesian classifier, linear discriminant analysis (LDA), K-nearest neighbor (KNN), artificial neural networks (ANN), and support vector machine (SVM). For the ERUDIT dataset, ANN with 5 nucleus-based features yielded the accuracies of 96.20% and 97.83% on the 4-class and 2-class problems, respectively. For the Herlev dataset, ANN with 9 cell-based features yielded the accuracies of 93.78% and 99.27% for the 7-class and 2-class problems, respectively. For the LCH dataset, ANN with 9 cell-based features yielded the accuracies of 95.00% and 97.00% for the 4-class and 2-class problems, respectively. The segmentation and classification performances of the proposed method were compared with that of the hard C-means clustering and watershed technique. The results show that the proposed automatic approach yields very good performance and is better than its counterparts. PMID:24433758

  6. Clinical observation of laparoscopic radical hysterectomy for cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Xiang-Hua; Wang, Zhong-Qin; Yang, Shi-Zhang; Jia, Hong-Yan; Shi, Min

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate safety, feasibility and the improvement of surgical method of laparoscopic extensive hysterectomy and pelvic lymph node dissection in patients with early-stage cervical cancer. Clinical data were prospectively collected from patients with IA2-IIA cervical cancer who underwent laparoscopic extensive hysterectomy (n1=22) and laparotomy (n2=23) in Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology in the Subei People’s Hospital from June 2010 to August 2013. The successful rates in two groups of operation were 100%. Blood loss, postoperative hospital stay, complication rate, postoperative recovery of gastrointestinal tract and bladder function of the laparoscopy group of the laparoscopic group were all better than those of the laparotomy group, and there were significant differences (all P < 0.05). But in the laparoscopy group, the operative time was longer than the laparotomy group with statistical significance (P < 0.05). There was no statistically significant difference in the number of excised lymph nodes and the duration time of postoperative urinary catheterization between the two groups (P > 0.05). Laparoscopic extensive hysterectomy and pelvic lymph node dissection can fully meet the requirement of laparotomy. It has the properties of minor trauma and rapid recovery. The clinical efficacy is superior to laparotomy surgery. The results indicated laparoscopic is an ideal method for the treatment of early cervical cancer. PMID:24995098

  7. Diagnostic performance of HPV E6/E7, hTERT, and Ki67 mRNA RT-qPCR assays on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded cervical tissue specimens from women with cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hye-Young; Kim, Geehyuk; Cho, Hyemi; Kim, Sunghyun; Lee, Dongsup; Park, Sunyoung; Park, Kwang Hwa; Lee, Hyeyoung

    2015-06-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a major cause of cervical cancer, which is the third most common cancer in women. Human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) and Ki67 are tumor cell markers indicating cancer cell proliferation in cancer patients, and activation of hTERT and Ki67 leads to progressive cervical carcinogenesis. In the present study, we evaluated the CervicGen HPVE6/E7 mRNA RT-qDx assay, which detects 16 HPV high-risk (HR) genotypes (HPV 16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52, 53, 56, 58, 59, 66, 68 and 69), and the CervicGen hTERT and Ki67 mRNA RT-qDx assay using 117 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) cervical cancer tissue samples. The diagnostic validity of the CervicGen HPV RT-qDx assay for detecting histologically proven prevalent squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) was 94% sensitivity, 100% specificity, 77.8% positive predictive value (PPV), and 78.9% negative predictive value (NPV). The most common HPV genotypes detected in FFPE cervical cancer tissue samples were HPV 16 (56%) and HPV 18 (10%). The positivity rate of hTERT and Ki67 mRNA expressions in FFPE cervical cancer tissue samples on RT-qPCR was 65% and 93% respectively. Moreover, the positivity rates were 92% for a combination of HPV E6/E7 and hTERT mRNA expressions, 97% for HPV E6/E7 and Ki67 mRNA expressions, and 99% (99/100) for the combination of HPV E6/E7, hTERT, and Ki67 mRNA expressions. These data showed that SSC FFPE cervical cancer tissue samples correlated more strongly with high Ki67 mRNA expressions than with hTERT mRNA expressions. Notably, hTERT and Ki67 mRNA expression level was increased in high-grade cervical lesions, but was very low in normal samples. Our findings suggest that the combination of HPV E6/E7, hTERT, and Ki67 mRNA expression levels could be used in a complementary manner in diagnosing high-grade cervical lesions. Further studies are required to evaluate these assays as a useful predictive tool for screening low-grade cervical lesions. PMID:25835783

  8. Clear cell adenocarcinoma of the bladder with intravesical cervical invasion.

    PubMed

    Marchalik, Daniel; Krishnan, Jayashree; Verghese, Mohan; Venkatesan, Krishnan

    2015-01-01

    A 26-year-old woman with a complicated urological and gynecological history with uterine didelphys with bilaterally inserting intravesical cervical oses presented with cyclical haematuria. Work up revealed a mass in the ectopic cervical os and adjacent bladder wall. Subsequent resection confirmed a clear cell adenocarcinoma of urological origin with invasion into neighbouring os. PMID:26109625

  9. Invasive Cervical Cancer and Screening: What are the Rates of Unscreened and Underscreened Women in the Modern Era?

    PubMed Central

    Subramaniam, A; Fauci, JM; Schneider, KE; Whitworth, JM; Erickson, BK; Kim, K; Huh, WK

    2015-01-01

    Objective It has been reported that approximately 50% of invasive cervical malignancies are diagnosed in patients that have never been screened and 10% of the remaining cervical cancer patients have not had a Pap smear in the five years prior to diagnosis. We sought to determine if this holds true amongst a university based gynecologic oncology patient population. Methods Following IRB approval, a retrospective chart review of women in a university based gynecologic oncology group with cervical cancer from 2002-2007 was conducted. Patient demographics, referral Pap smear, method of diagnosis, histology, clinical stage, treatment, and time since last Pap smear were collected. Descriptive statistics were used during data analysis. Results 419 women with cervical cancer were identified. 67% of patients were Caucasian, 18% Hispanic and 6% African-American. The most common referral Pap smear to our institution was HSIL (21%). Diagnosis was primarily made by cervical punch biopsy (47%). The most common histologic type was squamous cell carcinoma (70%). Clinical stage I disease was diagnosed in 80% of patients., Stage II cervical cancer 9%, and Stage III and IV were uncommon. The most common therapy was radical hysterectomy with lymph node dissection performed in 250 patients (60%). The length of time from last reported Pap smear to diagnosis of invasive cervical cancer ranged from 1-65 years with a median of 3 years. Stage IA1 patients ranged from 1- 12 years from last reported Pap with a median of 1 year (SD = 3.38); while Stage III/IV patients ranged from 1-20 years since last screening, with a median of 4 years (SD = 6.39). Regarding length of time since last reported Pap smear, 235 patients (56%) were unable to report the length of time since their last Pap smear. Of those who reported their last Pap smear, 4 patients (1%) reported never having a Pap smear, 39 patients (9%) reported last Pap smear greater than 10 years ago, and 10 patients (2%) reported a Pap smear greater than 20 years ago. 85 patients (20%) reported a Pap smear within 2 years. Of these 85 patients, 71 patients (84%) were diagnosed at Stage I, while more advanced stages were uncommon. Conclusions Traditionally, patients diagnosed with an invasive cervical malignancy are either unscreened or underscreened with cervical cytology. Our patient population was noncompliant with screening measures. A fraction of our patients were compliant with screening within the last 2 years, yet still developed a cervical malignancy – albeit early stage disease. As such, our data suggests that compliance continues to be an issue. However, even with adherence to screening guidelines, cervical cancer continues to develop. PMID:21263352

  10. Current Advances in the Application of Raman Spectroscopy for Molecular Diagnosis of Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Inês Raquel Martins; Malkin, Alison; Lyng, Fiona Mary

    2015-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy provides a unique biochemical fingerprint capable of identifying and characterizing the structure of molecules, cells, and tissues. In cervical cancer, it is acknowledged as a promising biochemical tool due to its ability to detect premalignancy and early malignancy stages. This review summarizes the key research in the area and the evidence compiled is very encouraging for ongoing and further research. In addition to the diagnostic potential, promising results for HPV detection and monitoring treatment response suggest more than just a diagnosis prospective. A greater body of evidence is however necessary before Raman spectroscopy is fully validated for clinical use and larger comprehensive studies are required to fully establish the role of Raman spectroscopy in the molecular diagnostics of cervical cancer. PMID:26180802

  11. Physical state & copy number of high risk human papillomavirus type 16 DNA in progression of cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Shirish; Mahata, Sutapa; Shishodia, Gauri; Pande, Shailja; Verma, Gaurav; Hedau, Suresh; Bhambhani, Suresh; Kumari, Archana; Batra, Swaraj; Basir, Seemi F.; Das, Bhudev C.; Bharti, Alok C.

    2014-01-01

    Background & objectives: High-risk human papilloma virus (HR-HPV) infection and its integration in host genome is a key event in malignant transformation of cervical cells. HPV16 being a dominant HR-HPV type, we undertook this study to analyze if viral load and physical state of the virus correlated with each other in the absence of other confounding variables and examined their potential as predictors of progressive cervical lesions. Methods: Both, viral load and integration status of HPV16 were determined by real time URR PCR and estimation of E2:E6 ratio in a total of 130 PGMY-RLB -confirmed, monotypic HPV16-infected cervical DNA samples from biopsies of cytology-confirmed low grade (LSIL, 30) and high grade (HSIL, 30), and invasive carcinoma, (squamous cell carcinoma SCC, 70) cases. Results: Investigation of DNA samples revealed a gradual increase in HPV16 viral load over several magnitudes and increased frequency of integration from LSIL to HSIL and HSIL to invasive cancer in relation to the severity of lesions in monotypic HPV16-infected cervical tissues. In a substantial number of precancer (11/60) and cancer cases (29/70), HPV16 was detected in concomitant mixed form. The concomitant form of HPV16 genome carried significantly higher viral load. Interpretation & conclusions: Overall, viral load and integration increased with disease severity and could be useful biomarkers in disease progression, at least, in HPV16-infected cervical pre-cancer and cancer lesions. PMID:24927339

  12. Direct Identification of an HPV-16 Tumor Antigen from Cervical Cancer Biopsy Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Keskin, Derin B.; Reinhold, Bruce; Lee, Sun Young; Zhang, Guanglan; Lank, Simon; O’Connor, David H.; Berkowitz, Ross S.; Brusic, Vladimir; Kim, Seung Jo; Reinherz, Ellis L.

    2011-01-01

    Persistent infection with high-risk human papilloma viruses (HPV) is the worldwide cause of many cancers, including cervical, anal, vulval, vaginal, penile, and oropharyngeal. Since T cells naturally eliminate the majority of chronic HPV infections by recognizing epitopes displayed on virally altered epithelium, we exploited Poisson detection mass spectrometry (MS3) to identify those epitopes and inform future T cell-based vaccine design. Nine cervical cancer biopsies from HPV-16 positive HLA-A*02 patients were obtained, histopathology determined, and E7 oncogene PCR-amplified from tumor DNA and sequenced. Conservation of E7 oncogene coding segments was found in all tumors. MS3 analysis of HLA-A*02 immunoprecipitates detected E711–19 peptide (YMLDLQPET) in seven of the nine tumor biopsies. The remaining two samples were E711–19 negative and lacked the HLA-A*02 binding GILT thioreductase peptide despite possessing binding-competent HLA-A*02 alleles. Thus, the conserved E711–19 peptide is a dominant HLA-A*02 binding tumor antigen in HPV-16 transformed cervical squamous and adenocarcinomas. Findings that a minority of HLA-A*02:01 tumors lack expression of both E711–19 and a peptide from a thioreductase important in processing of cysteine-rich proteins like E7 underscore the value of physical detection, define a potential additional tumor escape mechanism and have implications for therapeutic cancer vaccine development. PMID:22566864

  13. BANF1 Is Downregulated by IRF1-Regulated MicroRNA-203 in Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Langyong; Zhang, Yan; Mo, Wenjuan; Yu, Yao; Lu, Hong

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in various biological processes and are closely associated with the development of cancer. In fact, aberrant expression of miRNAs has been implicated in numerous cancers. In cervical cancer, miR-203 levels are decreased, although the cause of this aberrant expression remains unclear. In this study, we investigate the molecular mechanisms regulating miR-203 gene transcription. We identify the miR-203 transcription start site by 5’ rapid amplification of cDNA ends and subsequently identify the miR-203 promoter region. Promoter analysis revealed that IRF1, a transcription factor, regulates miR-203 transcription by binding to the miR-203 promoter. We also demonstrate that miR-203 targets the 3’ untranslated region of BANF1, thus downregulating its expression, whereas miR-203 expression is driven by IRF1. MiR-203 is involved in cell cycle regulation and overexpression of miR-203 suppresses cervical cancer cell proliferation, colony formation, migration and invasion. The inhibitory effect of miR-203 on the cancer cells is partially mediated by downregulating its target, BANF1, since knockdown of BANF1 also suppresses colony formation, migration and invasion. PMID:25658920

  14. [Pulsed-dose rate brachytherapy in cervical cancers: why, how?].

    PubMed

    Mazeron, R; Dumas, I; Martin, V; Martinetti, F; Benhabib-Boukhelif, W; Gensse, M-C; Chargari, C; Guemnie-Tafo, A; Haie-Méder, C

    2014-10-01

    The end of the production of 192 iridium wires terminates low dose rate brachytherapy and requires to move towards pulsed-dose rate or high-dose rate brachytherapy. In the case of gynecological cancers, technical alternatives exist, and many teams have already taken the step of pulsed-dose rate for scientific reasons. Using a projector source is indeed a prerequisite for 3D brachytherapy, which gradually installs as a standard treatment in the treatment of cervical cancers. For other centers, this change implies beyond investments in equipment and training, organizational consequences to ensure quality. PMID:25155782

  15. Comprehensive analysis of targetable oncogenic mutations in chinese cervical cancers

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Libing; Li, Jiajia; Jiang, Wei; Shen, Xuxia; Yang, Wentao; Wu, Xiaohua; Yang, Huijuan

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in 16 targetable oncogenic genes were examined using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and direct sequencing in 285 Chinese cervical cancers. Their clinicopathological relevance and prognostic significance was assessed. Ninety-two nonsynonymous somatic mutations were identified in 29.8% of the cancers. The mutation rates were as follows: PIK3CA (12.3%), KRAS (5.3%), HER2 (4.2%), FGFR3-TACC3 fusions (3.9%), PTEN (2.8%), FGFR2 (1.8%), FGFR3 (0.7%), NRAS (0.7%), HRAS (0.4%) and EGFR (0.4%). No mutations were detected in AKT1 or BRAF, and the fusions FGFR1-TACC1, EML4-ALK, CCDC6-RET and KIF5B-RET were not found in any of the cancers. RTK and RAS mutations were more common in non-squamous carcinomas than in squamous carcinomas (P=0.043 and P=0.042, respectively). RAS mutations were more common in young patients (<45 years) (13.7% vs. 7.7%, P=0.027). RTK mutations tended to be more common in young patients, whereas PIK3CA/PTEN/AKT mutations tended to be more common in old patients. RAS mutations were significantly associated with disease relapse. To our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive analysis of major targetable oncogenic mutations in a large cohort of cervical cancer cases. Our data reveal that a considerable proportion of patients with cervical cancers harbor known druggable mutations and might benefit from targeted therapy. PMID:25669975

  16. Comprehensive analysis of targetable oncogenic mutations in chinese cervical cancers.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Libing; Li, Jiajia; Jiang, Wei; Shen, Xuxia; Yang, Wentao; Wu, Xiaohua; Yang, Huijuan

    2015-03-10

    Mutations in 16 targetable oncogenic genes were examined using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and direct sequencing in 285 Chinese cervical cancers. Their clinicopathological relevance and prognostic significance was assessed. Ninety-two nonsynonymous somatic mutations were identified in 29.8% of the cancers. The mutation rates were as follows: PIK3CA (12.3%), KRAS (5.3%), HER2 (4.2%), FGFR3-TACC3 fusions (3.9%), PTEN (2.8%), FGFR2 (1.8%), FGFR3 (0.7%), NRAS (0.7%), HRAS (0.4%) and EGFR (0.4%). No mutations were detected in AKT1 or BRAF, and the fusions FGFR1-TACC1, EML4-ALK, CCDC6-RET and KIF5B-RET were not found in any of the cancers. RTK and RAS mutations were more common in non-squamous carcinomas than in squamous carcinomas (P=0.043 and P=0.042, respectively). RAS mutations were more common in young patients (<45 years) (13.7% vs. 7.7%, P=0.027). RTK mutations tended to be more common in young patients, whereas PIK3CA/PTEN/AKT mutations tended to be more common in old patients. RAS mutations were significantly associated with disease relapse. To our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive analysis of major targetable oncogenic mutations in a large cohort of cervical cancer cases. Our data reveal that a considerable proportion of patients with cervical cancers harbor known druggable mutations and might benefit from targeted therapy. PMID:25669975

  17. Prevalence of cervical neoplastic lesions and Human Papilloma Virus infection in Egypt: National Cervical Cancer Screening Project

    PubMed Central

    Abd El All, Howayda S; Refaat, Amany; Dandash, Khadiga

    2007-01-01

    Background Data from Egyptian studies provide widely varying estimates on the prevalence of pre-malignant and malignant cervical abnormalities and human papilloma virus (HPVs) infection. To define the prevalence and risk factors of pre-invasive and invasive cervical cancer (cacx), a community based full-scale cross sectional, household survey including 5453 women aged between 35 and 60 years was conducted. Methods The study period was between February 2000 and December 2002. Initially, conventional Papanicolaou (Pap) smears were evaluated using the Bethesda system (TBS), followed by colposcopic guided biopsy (CGB) for all epithelial abnormalities (EA). In a third step, HPV was tested on all EA by in-situ hybridization (ISH) using first the broad spectrum HPV probe recognizing HPVs 6, 11, 16, 18, 30, 31, 35, 45, 51 and 52 followed by subtyping with probes 6/11, 16/18 and 31/33. Lastly, unequivocal cases were immunostained for herpes simplex type-2 (HSV-2), cytomegalovirus (CMV), and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Results EA representing 7.8% (424/5453), were categorized into atypical squamous cell of undetermined significance (ASCUS) (34.4%), atypical glandular cell of undetermined significance (AGCUS) (15.3%), combined ASCUS and AGCUS (3.1%), low grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (SIL) (41.0%), high grade SIL (5.2%) and invasive lesions (1%). CGB of EA (n = 281) showed non neoplastic lesions (12.8%), atypical squamous metaplasia (ASM) (19.2%), cervical intraepithelial neoplasia I (CIN) (44.4%), CIN II (4.4%), CINIII (2.8%), endocervical lesions (5.2%), combined squamous and endocervical lesions (10.0%), invasive squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) (0.02%) and extranodal marginal zone B cell lymphoma (MZBCL) (0.02%). The overall predictive value of cytology was 87% while the predictive value for high grade lesions was 80%. On histological basis, HPVs were present in 94.3% of squamous lesions while it was difficult to be identified in endocervical ones. ISH revealed positivity for pan HPV in 65.9% of the studied biopsies (n = 217), with incorporation of the viral genome HPV 6/11, 16/18 and 31/33 in 11.1%, 33.3% and 17.1% respectively. Multiple HPVs infections were identified in 0.02%. Conclusion Pre-invasive high grade lesions and invasive cervical carcinoma represent 0.5% and 0.04% respectively in Egyptian women. HPV mostly 16/18 as a risk factor (p < 0.001), was frequently associated with mixed infections (p < 0.001) and bilharzial infestation (p < 0.001). PMID:17610742

  18. Epigenetics of cervical cancer. An overview and therapeutic perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Dueñas-González, Alfonso; Lizano, Marcela; Candelaria, Myrna; Cetina, Lucely; Arce, Claudia; Cervera, Eduardo

    2005-01-01

    Cervical cancer remains one of the greatest killers of women worldwide. It is difficult to foresee a dramatic increase in cure rate even with the most optimal combination of cytotoxic drugs, surgery, and radiation; therefore, testing of molecular targeted therapies against this malignancy is highly desirable. A number of epigenetic alterations occur during all stages of cervical carcinogenesis in both human papillomavirus and host cellular genomes, which include global DNA hypomethylation, hypermetylation of key tumor suppressor genes, and histone modifications. The reversible nature of epigenetic changes constitutes a target for transcriptional therapies, namely DNA methylation and histone deacetylase inhibitors. To date, studies in patients with cervical cancer have demonstrated the feasibility of reactivating the expression of hypermethylated and silenced tumor suppressor genes as well as the hyperacetylating and inhibitory effect upon histone deacetylase activity in tumor tissues after treatment with demethylating and histone deacetylase inhibitors. In addition, detection of epigenetic changes in cytological smears, serum DNA, and peripheral blood are of potential interest for development of novel biomolecular markers for early detection, prediction of response, and prognosis. PMID:16248899

  19. 76 FR 55915 - Request for Nominations of Candidates to Serve on the Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-09

    ...for Nominations of Candidates to Serve on the Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control Advisory Committee...the CDC on the early detection and control of breast and cervical cancer. The role of the BCCEDCAC is to provide...

  20. 77 FR 60703 - Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control Advisory Committee: Notice of Charter Renewal

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-04

    ...SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control Advisory Committee...L. 92-463) of October 6, 1972, that the Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control Advisory...

  1. Mechanistic basis of a combination D-penicillamine and platinum drugs synergistically inhibits tumor growth in oxaliplatin-resistant human cervical cancer cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chen, Szu-Jung; Kuo, Ching-Chuan; Pan, Hsin-Yi; Tsou, Tsui-Chun; Yeh, Szu-Ching; Chang, Jang-Yang

    2015-05-01

    The platinum-based regimen is the front-line treatment of chemotherapy. However, development of platinum resistance often causes therapeutic failure in this disease. We previously have generated an oxaliplatin-resistant subline, named S3, from human cervical carcinoma SiHa cells, and its resistant phenotype was well-characterized. In the present study, we aimed to identify the novel therapeutic strategy by combining copper chelator D-penicillamine with oxaliplatin, and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms for overcoming oxaliplatin resistance. As the result, D-penicillamine exerted synergistic killing effects only in S3 cells when combined with oxaliplatin and cisplatin by using Chou-Talalay method. Further study showed that the amounts of platinum DNA adduct formed were positively correlated to the percentage of cell death in S3 cells when co-treated D-penicillamine with oxaliplatin and cisplatin. D-penicillamine promoted copper influx transporter hCtr1 expression through upregulation of Sp1. Sp1 overexpression induced p53 translocation from nucleus to cytosol and caused p53 degradation through ubiquitination, which subsequently suppressed the expression of the copper efflux transporter ATP7A. Importantly, co-treatment of cisplatin with D-penicillamine enhanced oxaliplatin-elicited antitumor effect in the oxalipatin-resistant S3 xenograft tumors, but not found in SiHa xenograft model. Notably, Mice received D-penicillamine alone or in combination of D-penicillamine ad oxalipatin, increased hCtrl protein level in S3 xenograft tumor, however, the protein level of ATP7A was decreased. Taken together, this study provides insight into that the co-manipulation of hCtrl and ATP7A by D-penicillamine could increase the therapeutic efficacy of platinum drugs in oxaliplatin resistant tumors, especially in resistant phenotype with downexpression of hCtrl and overexpression of ATP7A. PMID:25801007

  2. MicroRNA-181 targets Yin Yang 1 expression and inhibits cervical cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wen-Yu; Chen, Jin-Chan; Jiao, Ting-Ting; Hui, Ning; Qi, Xuan

    2015-06-01

    Dysregulated expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) has been observed in numerous types of human cancer, including cervical cancer (CC). The present study aimed to elucidate the expression and roles of miR?181 in cervical cancer tissues and cells. HeLa cells with a stable overexpression of miR?181 were generated and injected subcutaneously into the front legs of nude mice. Functional assays revealed a reduced rate of proliferation and an enhanced rate of apoptosis following transfection of CC cells with miR?181 mimics. In addition, miR?181 also suppressed tumor growth in the nude mice. At the molecular level, it was found that Yin Yang 1, an oncogene in several types of human cancer, was negatively regulated by miR?181. Therefore, the findings of the present study suggest that exogenous overexpression of miR?181 may be a potential approach for the treatment of CC in the future. PMID:25672374

  3. Interventions for encouraging sexual behaviours intended to prevent cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Jonathan P; Frampton, Geoff K; Harris, Petra

    2014-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the key risk factor for cervical cancer. Continuing high rates of HPV and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in young people demonstrate the need for effective behavioural interventions. Objectives To assess the effectiveness of behavioural interventions for young women to encourage safer sexual behaviours to prevent transmission of STIs (including HPV) and cervical cancer. Search methods Systematic literature searches were performed on the following databases: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL Issue 4, 2009) Cochrane Gynaecological Cancer Review Group (CGCRG) Specialised Register, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsychINFO, Social Science Citation Index and Trials Register of Promoting Health Interventions (TRoPHI) up to the end of 2009. All references were screened for inclusion against selection criteria. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of behavioural interventions for young women up to the age of 25 years that included, amongst other things, information provision about the transmission and prevention of STIs. Trials had to measure behavioural outcomes (e.g. condom use) and/or biological outcomes (e.g. incidence of STIs, cervical cancer). Data collection and analysis A narrative synthesis was conducted. Meta-analysis was not considered appropriate due to heterogeneity between the interventions and trial populations. Main results A total of 5271 references were screened and of these 23 RCTs met the inclusion criteria. Most were conducted in the USA and in health-care clinics (e.g. family planning). The majority of interventions provided information about STIs and taught safer sex skills (e.g. communication), occasionally supplemented with provision of resources (e.g. free sexual health services). They were heterogeneous in duration, contact time, provider, behavioural aims and outcomes. A variety of STIs were addressed including HIV and chlamydia. None of the trials explicitly mentioned HPV or cervical cancer prevention. Statistically significant effects for behavioural outcomes (e.g. increasing condom use) were common, though not universal and varied according to the type of outcome. There were no statistically significant effects of abstaining from or reducing sexual activity. There were few statistically significant effects on biological (STI) outcomes. Considerable uncertainty exists in the risk of bias due to incomplete or ambiguous reporting. Authors’ conclusions Behavioural interventions for young women which aim to promote sexual behaviours protective of STI transmission can be effective, primarily at encouraging condom use. Future evaluations should include a greater focus on HPV and its link to cervical cancer, with long-term follow-up to assess impact on behaviour change, rates of HPV infection and progression to cervical cancer. Studies should use an RCT design where possible with integral process evaluation and cost-effectiveness analysis where appropriate. Given the predominance of USA studies in this systematic review evaluations conducted in other countries would be particularly useful. PMID:21491379

  4. Health Locus of Control and Assimilation of Cervical Cancer Information in Deaf Women

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Regina; Aldridge, Arianna A.; Malcarne, Vanessa L.; Choe, Sun; Branz, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    This study assessed the relationship between Deaf women's internal health locus of control (IHLC) and their cervical cancer knowledge acquisition and retention. A blind, randomized trial evaluated Deaf women's (N?=?130) baseline cancer knowledge and knowledge gained and retained from an educational intervention, in relation to their IHLC. The Multidimensional Health Locus of Control scales measured baseline IHLC, and a cervical cancer knowledge survey evaluated baseline to post-intervention knowledge change. Women's IHLC did not significantly predict greater cervical cancer knowledge at baseline or over time. IHLC does not appear to be a characteristic that must be considered when creating Deaf women's cancer education programs. PMID:20229077

  5. Improved Survival with Bevacizumab in Advanced Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tewari, Krishnansu S.; Sill, Michael W.; Long, Harry J.; Penson, Richard T.; Huang, Helen; Ramondetta, Lois M.; Landrum, Lisa M.; Oaknin, Ana; Reid, Thomas J.; Leitao, Mario M.; Michael, Helen E.; Monk, Bradley J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) promotes angiogenesis, a mediator of disease progression in cervical cancer. Bevacizumab, a humanized anti-VEGF monoclonal antibody, has single-agent activity in previously treated, recurrent disease. Most patients in whom recurrent cervical cancer develops have previously received cisplatin with radiation therapy, which reduces the effectiveness of cisplatin at the time of recurrence. We evaluated the effectiveness of bevacizumab and nonplatinum combination chemotherapy in patients with recurrent, persistent, or metastatic cervical cancer. Methods Using a 2-by-2 factorial design, we randomly assigned 452 patients to chemotherapy with or without bevacizumab at a dose of 15 mg per kilogram of body weight. Chemotherapy consisted of cisplatin at a dose of 50 mg per square meter of body-surface area, plus paclitaxel at a dose of 135 or 175 mg per square meter or topotecan at a dose of 0.75 mg per square meter on days 1 to 3, plus paclitaxel at a dose of 175 mg per square meter on day 1. Cycles were repeated every 21 days until disease progression, the development of unacceptable toxic effects, or a complete response was documented. The primary end point was overall survival; a reduction of 30% in the hazard ratio for death was considered clinically important. Results Groups were well balanced with respect to age, histologic findings, performance status, previous use or nonuse of a radiosensitizing platinum agent, and disease status. Topotecan–paclitaxel was not superior to cisplatin–paclitaxel (hazard ratio for death, 1.20). With the data for the two chemotherapy regimens combined, the addition of bevacizumab to chemotherapy was associated with increased overall survival (17.0 months vs. 13.3 months; hazard ratio for death, 0.71; 98% confidence interval, 0.54 to 0.95; P = 0.004 in a one-sided test) and higher response rates (48% vs. 36%, P = 0.008). Bevacizumab, as compared with chemotherapy alone, was associated with an increased incidence of hypertension of grade 2 or higher (25% vs. 2%), thromboembolic events of grade 3 or higher (8% vs. 1%), and gastrointestinal fistulas of grade 3 or higher (3% vs. 0%). Conclusions The addition of bevacizumab to combination chemotherapy in patients with recurrent, persistent, or metastatic cervical cancer was associated with an improvement of 3.7 months in median overall survival. (Funded by the National Cancer Institute; GOG 240 ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00803062.) PMID:24552320

  6. Committee Opinion No. 624: Cervical cancer screening in low-resource settings.

    PubMed

    2015-02-01

    Cytology-based cervical cancer screening programs require a number of elements to be successful. Certain low-resource settings, like the U.S. Affiliated Pacific Islands, lack these elements. Implementing alternative cervical cancer screening strategies in low-resource settings can provide consistent, accessible screening opportunities. PMID:25611643

  7. Perceptions of cervical cancer and pap smear screening behavior by women's sexual orientation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James H. Price; Alyssa N. Easton; Susan K. Telljohann; Patricia B. Wallace

    1996-01-01

    This study examined 330 adult females' perceptions and practices regarding cervical cancer by sexual orientation. Ninety-four percent of the respondents were unable to correctly identify all 5 risk factors associated with increased risk for cervical cancer (smoking, sexual intercourse with men, multiple male sexual partners, sexual intercourse before age 16, and having genital warts) regardless of sexual orientation. Furthermore, 20%

  8. Barriers to cervical cancer screening: A qualitative study with women in Serbia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Milica Markovic; Vesna Kesic; Lidija Topic; Bojana Matejic

    2005-01-01

    Serbia employs opportunistic approaches to cervical cancer screening, leading to inequitable health care access. To better understand the health care needs of women, we investigated their knowledge of and perceived barriers to cervical cancer screening. Data reported in the paper arise from nine focus group discussions with 62 women from diverse socio-economic backgrounds. They were recruited in two cities with

  9. Semi-automatic Cervical Cancer Segmentation Using Active Contours without Edges

    Microsoft Academic Search

    O. E. Meslouhi; M. Kardouchi; H. Allali; T. Gadi

    2009-01-01

    This work presents a digital imaging system able to assist physicians to track cervical cancer. The goal is to automatically extract the region where the cervical cancer starts to occur. This region called Acetowite Epithelium Zone (AEZ) is highlighted by physicians using a diluate acetic acid on the surface of the cervix. Recent digital images processing works suggested to extract

  10. BREAST AND CERVICAL CANCER EARLY DETECTION PROGRAM OR MINIMUM DATA ELEMENTS (MDE)

    EPA Science Inventory

    To help improve access to early detection screening for breast and cervical cancers for underserved women, Congress passed the Breast and Cervical Cancer Mortality Prevention Act of 1990, which created the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) National Breast and Cer...

  11. The Positive Experience of Screening Quality Among Users of a Cervical Cancer Detection Center

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eduardo César Lazcano-Ponce; Sue Moss; Aurelio Cruz-Valdez; Patricia Alonso de Ruíz; Carlos Javier Martínez-León; Salvador Casares-Queralt; Mauricio Hernández-Avila

    2002-01-01

    Background. Our objective was to determine the main factors associated with increased utilization of a cervical cancer screening program (CCSP) in a population with a high mortality rate due to cervical cancer. Methods. A population-based study was carried out in the Mexican state of Morelos, Mexico. The study population included 3,197 women between the ages of 15 and 49 years

  12. Actual versus Perceived Risk of Cervical Cancer among College Women Smokers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saules, Karen K.; Vannest, Neo O.; Mehringer, Ann M.; Pomerleau, Cynthia S.; Lee, Keleigh; Opipari, Anthony W.; Midgley, A. Rees; Kleinsmith, Lewis J.; Sen, Ananda; Snedecor, Sandy M.

    2007-01-01

    Cervical cancer is a well-established smoking-related illness, but many at-risk women are unaware of this link. Objective: The authors designed this study to (1) investigate the relationship of smoking behavior with the history of abnormal Pap test results, sexual history, and perceived risk of cervical cancer and (2) determine whether…

  13. Wnt5A expression is associated with the tumor metastasis and clinical survival in cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Li; Liu, Yaqiong; Zhao, Weihua; Sun, Bo; Chen, Qi

    2014-01-01

    Aims: To identify the clinical significance of Wnt5A expression in the development and progression of cervical cancer. Methods: Real-time PCR was performed in 8 pairs of surgically resected cervical cancer and adjacent normal cervical tissues. Immunohistochemistry was performed to examine Wnt5A expression in 94 paraffin-embedded cervical cancer samples. Associatio ns of Wnt5A expression with clinicopathological factors and clinical survival were analyzed. Results: Wnt5A expression was overexpressed in cervical cancer tissues compared with adjacent normal cervix. Wnt5A expression tended to be positively correlated with lymph nodes metastasis (P = 0.028) and recurrence (P = 0.009). Moreover, patients with higher Wnt5A expression in cancer tissues had better overall (P = 0.004) and recurrent-free survival (P = 0.012) than those with lower Wnt5A expression. Multivariate analysis revealed that Wnt5A was an independent prognostic factor (P = 0.026) for predicting overall survival of cervical cancer patients. Conclusion: Upregulation of Wnt5A was associated with metastasis and progression of cervical cancer. The results of our study unravel the significance of Wnt/Ca2+ signaling in cervical cancer. PMID:25337253

  14. Management of recurrent cervical papillary thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Rachna M; Jonklaas, Jacqueline; Burman, Kenneth D

    2014-06-01

    Papillary thyroid cancer is one of the most common endocrine malignancies, and it is often associated with an excellent prognosis. However, it has been shown to recur in the lymph nodes in the neck. The management of these lymph nodes remains controversial, and current treatment strategies include observation, surgery, radioactive iodine ablation, and percutaneous ethanol injection. These various treatment modalities are discussed in this article. PMID:24891178

  15. Evaluation of high-risk Human papillomaviruses type distribution in cervical cancer in Sichuan province of China

    Microsoft Academic Search

    En-qi Wu; Guo-nan Zhang; Xiang-hui Yu; Yuan Ren; Ying Fan; Yong-ge Wu; Wei Kong; Xiao Zha

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Infection with high-risk human papillomavirus is an important factor associated with cervical cancer, and the distribution of HPV types varies greatly worldwide. Determination of type-specific HPV prevalence constitutes an important step towards the development of vaccines for the prevention of cervical cancer. METHODS: The human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes in 190 cervical cancer specimens taken from the Sichuan province, the

  16. Modeling and analyzing spread of epidemic diseases: case study based on cervical cancer 

    E-print Network

    Parvin, Hoda

    2009-05-15

    In this thesis, health care policy issues for prevention and cure of cervical cancer have been considered. The cancer is typically caused by Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) for which individuals can be tested and also given vaccinations. Policymakers...

  17. Selective suppression of cervical cancer Hela cells by 2- O -?- d -glucopyranosyl- l -ascorbic acid isolated from the fruit of Lycium barbarum L

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zhiping Zhang; Xiaoming Liu; Tao Wu; Junhong Liu; Xu Zhang; Xueyun Yang; Michael J. Goodheart; John F. Engelhardt; Yujiong Wang

    2011-01-01

    Lycium barbarum fruit has been used as a Chinese traditional medicine and dietary supplement for centuries. 2-O-?-d-Glucopyranosyl-l-ascorbic acid (AA-2?G), a novel stable vitamin C analog, is one of the main biologically active components of the fruit.\\u000a In this report, we investigated the cytotoxic and antiproliferative effect of AA-2?G against cancer cells in vitro and identified\\u000a the proteins with significantly differential

  18. Methylation-mediated silencing and tumour suppressive function of hsa-miR-124 in cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background A substantial number of microRNAs (miRNAs) is subject to epigenetic silencing in cancer. Although epigenetic silencing of tumour suppressor genes is an important feature of cervical cancer, little is known about epigenetic silencing of miRNAs. Since DNA methylation-based silencing of hsa-miR-124 occurs in various human cancers, we studied the frequency and functional effects of hsa-miR-124 methylation in cervical carcinogenesis. Results Quantitative MSP analysis of all 3 loci encoding the mature hsa-miR-124 (hsa-miR-124-1/-2/-3) showed methylation in cervical cancer cell lines SiHa, CaSki and HeLa as well as in late passages of human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 or 18 immortalised keratinocytes. Treatment of SiHa cells with a demethylating agent reduced hsa-miR-124 methylation levels and induced hsa-miR-124 expression. In HPV-immortalised keratinocytes increased methylation levels were related to reduced hsa-miR-124 expression and higher mRNA expression of IGFBP7, a potential hsa-miR-124 target gene. Ectopic hsa-miR-124 expression in SiHa and CaSki cells decreased proliferation rates and migratory capacity. Combined hsa-miR-124-1 and/or hsa-miR-124-2 methylation analysis of 139 cervical tissue specimens showed an increasing methylation frequency from 0% in normal tissues up to 93% in cervical carcinomas. Increased methylation levels of hsa-miR-124-1 and hsa-miR-124-2 were significantly correlated with reduced hsa-miR-124 expression in cervical tissue specimens. Combined hsa-miR-124-1 and/or hsa-miR-124-2 methylation analysis of 43 cervical scrapes of high-risk HPV positive women was predictive of underlying high-grade lesions. Conclusions DNA methylation-based silencing of hsa-miR-124 is functionally involved in cervical carcinogenesis and may provide a valuable marker for improved detection of cervical cancer and its high-grade precursor lesions. PMID:20579385

  19. Evaluation of an educational program on cervical cancer for rural women in Mangalore, Southern India.

    PubMed

    Mary, Bright; D'Sa, Juliana Linnette

    2014-01-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer in women worldwide. One way by which the incidence of this malignant disease can be minimized is by imparting knowledge through health education. This study aimed at developing an educational package on cervical cancer (EPCC) and determining its effectiveness in terms of significant increase in knowledge of rural women regarding cervical cancer. A one group pre-test, post-test design was adopted. Thirty rural women were selected using a convenient sampling method. Data were collected using a demographic questionnaire and a structured knowledge questionnaire developed by the researchers. The EPCC was designed for a duration of one hour and 10 minutes. The structured knowledge questionnaire was first administered as the pre-test, following which knowledge on cervical cancer was imparted using the EPCC. On the 8th day, the post-test was administered. Data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. The mean post-test knowledge score of the women regarding cervical cancer was significantly higher than that of their mean pre-test score, indicating that the EPCC was effective in improving the knowledge of rural women on cervical cancer. The association between pre-test knowledge scores and selected demo-graphic variables were computed using chi-square test showed that pre-test knowledge score of the women regarding cervical cancer was independent of all the socio-demographic variables. It was concluded that the EPCC is effective in improving the knowledge of women, regarding cervical cancer. Since the prevalence of cervical cancer is high, there is an immediate need to educate women on prevention of cervical cancer. PMID:25169495

  20. Perception of Human Papillomavirus Infection, Cervical Cancer and HPV Vaccination in North Indian Population

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Showket; Nasare, Vilas; Kumari, Malasha; Sharma, Shashi; Khan, Mohammad Aijaz; Das, Bhudev C.; Bharadwaj, Mausumi

    2014-01-01

    Background Human Papillomavirus (HPV) -associated cervical cancer is the second-most common cancer in women worldwide but it is the most frequent gynaecological cancer and cancer associated death in India women. The objective of this study was to assess knowledge about cervical cancer, HPV, HPV vaccine, HPV vaccine acceptance among school and undergraduates students and their parent’s perception about acceptance of HPV vaccine in Northern part of India (Delhi and NCR regions). Materials and Methods A qualitative questionnaire based survey among 2500 urban/rural students aged 12–22 years was conducted. Results Overall, a low frequency (15%) of HPV and cervical cancer awareness was observed in students and their parents. However, the awareness was much higher in females belonging to urban setup compared to boys with a perception that HPV causes cervical cancer in women only. Additionally, only (13%) participants who were aware of cervical cancer and HPV) were willing to accept HPV vaccination. Apparently, parents of female students were two times more willing to accept HPV vaccination for their ward than male students (p<0.001; OR 95%CI?=?2.09 (1.58–2.76). Conclusion Cervical cancer and HPV awareness among school, undergraduate students and also to their parents was found to be very low in this part of India. The level of awareness and education appears to be insignificant determinants in rural compared to urban setup. Better health education will be needed to maximize public awareness for cervical cancer prevention. PMID:25386964

  1. Eliminating health disparities: innovative methods to improve cervical cancer screening in a medically underserved population.

    PubMed

    Bharel, Monica; Santiago, Emely R; Forgione, Sanju Nembang; León, Casey K; Weinreb, Linda

    2015-07-01

    Homeless women have disproportionately lower rates of cervical cancer screening and higher rates of cervical cancer. In 2008, only 19% of the homeless women seen by Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program (BHCHP) were screened for cervical cancer. To improve screening, BHCHP implemented a 6-part intervention that incorporates point-of-care service, multidisciplinary screening, improved health maintenance forms, population management, process improvement, and increased provider and patient education. This resulted in a significant increase in cervical cancer screening, from 19% in 2008 to 50% in 2013. When compared with national and local cervical cancer screening trends, BHCHP surpassed improvement rates seen in other vulnerable populations. Simple and innovative interventions proved to be the most effective and practical methods of improving screening. PMID:25905832

  2. Patterns of Regional Recurrence After Definitive Radiotherapy for Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Beadle, Beth M.; Jhingran, Anuja; Yom, Sue S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Ramirez, Pedro T. [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Eifel, Patricia J., E-mail: peifel@mdanderson.or [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To determine the patterns of regional recurrence in patients treated with definitive radiotherapy (RT) for cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: The records of 198 patients treated with definitive RT for cervical cancer between 1980 and 2000 who experienced a regional recurrence without a central or distal vaginal recurrence were reviewed. All patients received a combination of external-beam RT and intracavitary brachytherapy. In the 180 patients with a documented location of regional recurrence, the relationship between the recurrence and the radiation fields was determined. Results: The median time to regional recurrence was 13 months (range, 2-85 months). Of the 180 patients who had an evaluable regional recurrence, 119 (66%) had a component of marginal failure; 71 patients recurred above-the-field, 2 patients occurred in the inguinal nodes, and 2 patients recurred above-the-field and in the inguinal nodes. In addition, 105 patients (58%) had a component of in-field failure; 59 patients recurred in-field only, 39 patients recurred in-field and above-the-field, 2 patients recurred in-field, above-the-field, and in the inguinal nodes, and 5 patients recurred in-field and in the inguinal nodes. The median survival after regional recurrence was 8 months (range, 0-194 months). Conclusions: Most regional recurrences after definitive RT for cervical cancer include a component of marginal failure, usually immediately superior to the radiation field. These recurrences suggest a deficiency in target volume. Recurrences also occur in-field, suggesting a deficiency in dose. Developments in pretreatment staging, field delineation, dose escalation, and posttreatment surveillance may help to improve outcome in these patients.

  3. Human papillomavirus typing of invasive cervical cancers in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Del Mistro, Annarosa; Salamanca, Helena Frayle; Trevisan, Rossana; Bertorelle, Roberta; Parenti, Anna; Bonoldi, Emanuela; Zambon, Paola; Minucci, Daria

    2006-01-01

    Background Human papilloma viruses (HPV) are the necessary cause of invasive cervical cancer (ICC). Of the many different types identified so far, only a few of them account for the great majority of cases worldwide, with geographical differences in their distribution. Data on the local distribution are now of interest in view of the soon-to-come introduction of HPV type-specific prophylactic vaccines. Results We have investigated HPV type distribution in samples of 48 ICC cases occurred in women living in North-East Italy in the years 1997–1999. Cases were extracted from the Venetian Tumour Registry files, as incident cases whose specimens had been processed in two Pathology Departments. Search and typing were performed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using GP5+/GP6+ primers, followed by direct sequencing or reverse dot blot. Three cases were PCR negative using the housekeeping primers and hence excluded. One case was negative by all HPV tests used. HPV 16 was present in 32 (72.7%) cases, as single infection in 28, in mixed infection in 4. Of the 44 positive cases, HPV 16 and HPV 18 accounted for 33 (75%), as single or mixed infections. The other high risk HPV types accounted for 11 (25%) of the remaining infections. Of the 32 HPV 16 positive cases, sequencing of the E6 gene could be performed in 25; the prototype isolate was identified in 7, and the variant T350G in 18; in 4 cases one or more additional mutations were present. Conclusions Our results suggest that HPV 16 has a very high prevalence among women with invasive cervical cancer in Italy; therefore, the use of a prophylactic vaccine for HPV types 16 and 18 could prevent up to 75% of invasive cervical cancers in Italy. PMID:17192187

  4. Feature Quantification and Abnormal Detection on Cervical Squamous Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Mingzhu; Bian, Linjie; Yao, Chunyan; Zhang, Jianwei

    2015-01-01

    Feature analysis and classification detection of abnormal cells from images for pathological analysis are an important issue for the realization of computer assisted disease diagnosis. This paper studies a method for cervical squamous epithelial cells. Based on cervical cytological classification standard and expert diagnostic experience, expressive descriptors are extracted according to morphology, color, and texture features of cervical scales epithelial cells. Further, quantificational descriptors related to cytopathology are derived as well, including morphological difference degree, cell hyperkeratosis, and deeply stained degree. The relationship between quantified value and pathological feature can be established by these descriptors. Finally, an effective method is proposed for detecting abnormal cells based on feature quantification. Integrated with clinical experience, the method can realize fast abnormal cell detection and preliminary cell classification. PMID:25873991

  5. Neither One-Time Negative Screening Tests nor Negative Colposcopy Provides Absolute Reassurance against Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Castle, Philip E.; Rodríguez, Ana C.; Burk, Robert D.; Herrero, Rolando; Hildesheim, Allan; Solomon, Diane; Sherman, Mark E.; Jeronimo, Jose; Alfaro, Mario; Morales, Jorge; Guillén, Diego; Hutchinson, Martha L.; Wacholder, Sholom; Schiffman, Mark

    2009-01-01

    A population sample of 10,049 women living in Guanacaste, Costa Rica was recruited into a natural history of human papillomavirus (HPV) and cervical neoplasia study in 1993–4. At the enrollment visit, we applied multiple state-of-the-art cervical cancer screening methods to detect prevalent cervical cancer and to prevent subsequent cervical cancers by the timely detection and treatment of precancerous lesions. Women were screened at enrollment with 3 kinds of cytology (often reviewed by more than one pathologist), visual inspection, and Cervicography. Any positive screening test led to colposcopic referral and biopsy and/or excisional treatment of CIN2 or worse. We retrospectively tested stored specimens with an early HPV test (Hybrid Capture Tube Test) and for >40 HPV genotypes using a research PCR assay. We followed women typically 5–7 years and some up to 11 years. Nonetheless, sixteen cases of invasive cervical cancer were diagnosed during follow-up. Six cancer cases were failures at enrollment to detect abnormalities by cytology screening; three of the six were also negative at enrollment by sensitive HPV DNA testing. Seven cancers represent failures of colposcopy to diagnose cancer or a precancerous lesion in screen-positive women. Finally, three cases arose despite attempted excisional treatment of precancerous lesions. Based on this evidence, we suggest that no current secondary cervical cancer prevention technologies applied once in a previously under-screened population is likely to be 100% efficacious in preventing incident diagnoses of invasive cervical cancer. PMID:19569231

  6. A Comprehensive Review of Dysregulated miRNAs Involved in Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Garima; Dua, Pradeep; Agarwal, Subhash Mohan

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs(miRNAs) have become the center of interest in oncology. In recent years, various studies have demonstrated that miRNAs regulate gene expression by influencing important regulatory genes and thus are responsible for causing cervical cancer. Cervical cancer being the third most diagnosed cancer among the females worldwide, is the fourth leading cause of cancer related mortality. Prophylactic human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines and new HPV screening tests, combined with traditional Pap test screening have greatly reduced cervical cancer. Yet, thousands of women continue to be diagnosed with and die of this preventable disease annually. This has necessitated the scientists to ponder over ways of evolving new methods and chalk out novel treatment protocols/strategies. As miRNA deregulation plays a key role in malignant transformation of cervical cancer along with its targets that can be exploited for both prognostic and therapeutic strategies, we have collected and reviewed the role of miRNA in cervical cancer. A systematic search was performed using PubMed for articles that report aberrant expression of miRNA in cervical cancer. The present review provides comprehensive information for 246 differentially expressed miRNAs gathered from 51 published articles that have been implicated in cervical cancer progression. Of these, more than 40 miRNAs have been reported in the literature in several instances signifying their role in the regulation of cancer. We also identified 40 experimentally validated targets, studied the cause of miRNAs dysregulation along with its mechanism and role in different stages of cervical cancer. We also identified and analysed miRNA clusters and their expression pattern in cervical cancer. This review is expected to further enhance our understanding in this field and serve as a valuable reference resource. PMID:25132800

  7. E1A inhibits the proliferation of human cervical cancer cells (HeLa cells) by apoptosis induction through activation of HER2\\/Neu\\/Caspase3 pathway

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Liangfang Shen; Shan Zeng; Jia Chen; Meizuo Zhong; Huixiang Yang; Ruojing Yao; Hong Shen

    2008-01-01

    Objective    This study is to investigate the inhibitory effect of E1A gene on the cell proliferation of HeLa cells and its mechanism\\u000a related to apoptosis. Methods    MTT assay and soft agar colony formation assay were employed to justify the inhibition activity of E1A on the proliferation\\u000a of HeLa cells transfected with E1A gene. Western Blot, RT-PCR and Real-time quantitative RT-PCR were used

  8. Microanatomy of the cervical and anorectal squamocolumnar junctions: a proposed model for anatomical differences in HPV-related cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Yang, Eric J; Quick, Matthew C; Hanamornroongruang, Suchanan; Lai, Keith; Doyle, Leona A; McKeon, Frank D; Xian, Wa; Crum, Christopher P; Herfs, Michael

    2015-07-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) infection causes cancers and their precursors (high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions) near cervical and anal squamocolumnar junctions. Recently described cervical squamocolumnar junction cells are putative residual embryonic cells near the cervical transformation zone. These cells appear multipotential and share an identical immunophenotype (strongly CK7-positive) with over 90% of high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions and cervical carcinomas. However, because the number of new cervical cancers discovered yearly world wide is 17-fold that of anal cancer, we posed the hypothesis that this difference in cancer risk reflects differences in the transition zones at the two sites. The microanatomy of the normal anal transformation zone (n=37) and topography and immunophenotype of anal squamous neoplasms (n=97) were studied. A discrete anal transition zone was composed of multilayered CK7-positive/p63-negative superficial columnar cells and an uninterrupted layer of CK7-negative/p63-positive basal cells. The CK7-negative/p63-positive basal cells were continuous with-and identical in appearance to-the basal cells of the mature squamous epithelium. This was in contrast to the cervical squamocolumnar junction, which harbored a single-layered CK7-positive/p63-negative squamocolumnar junction cell population. Of the 97 anal intraepithelial neoplasia/squamous cell carcinomas evaluated, only 27% (26/97) appeared to originate near the anal transition zone and only 23% (22/97) were CK7-positive. This study thus reveals two fundamental differences between the anus and the cervix: (1) the anal transition zone does not harbor a single monolayer of residual undifferentiated embryonic cells and (2) the dominant tumor immunophenotype is in keeping with an origin in metaplastic (CK7-negative) squamous rather than squamocolumnar junction (CK7-positive) epithelium. The implication is that, at birth, the embryonic cells in the anal transition zone have already begun to differentiate, presenting a metaplasia that-similar to vaginal and vulvar epithelium-is less prone to HPV-directed carcinogenesis. This in turn underscores the link between cancer risk and a very small and discrete population of vulnerable squamocolumnar junction cells in the cervix. PMID:25975286

  9. Primary human cervical carcinoma cells require human papillomavirus E6 and E7 expression for ongoing proliferation.

    PubMed

    Magaldi, Thomas G; Almstead, Laura L; Bellone, Stefania; Prevatt, Edward G; Santin, Alessandro D; DiMaio, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Repression of human papillomavirus (HPV) E6 and E7 oncogenes in established cervical carcinoma cell lines causes senescence due to reactivation of cellular tumor suppressor pathways. Here, we determined whether ongoing expression of HPV16 or HPV18 oncogenes is required for the proliferation of primary human cervical carcinoma cells in serum-free conditions at low passage number after isolation from patients. We used an SV40 viral vector expressing the bovine papillomavirus E2 protein to repress E6 and E7 in these cells. To enable efficient SV40 infection and E2 gene delivery, we first incubated the primary cervical cancer cells with the ganglioside GM1, a cell-surface receptor for SV40 that is limiting in these cells. Repression of HPV in primary cervical carcinoma cells caused them to undergo senescence, but the E2 protein had little effect on HPV-negative primary cells. These data suggest that E6 and E7 dependence is an inherent property of human cervical cancer cells. PMID:22056390

  10. Primary human cervical carcinoma cells require human papillomavirus E6 and E7 expression for ongoing proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Magaldi, Thomas G.; Almstead, Laura L. [Department of Genetics, Yale School of Medicine, P.O. Box 208005, New Haven, CT 06520-8005 (United States)] [Department of Genetics, Yale School of Medicine, P.O. Box 208005, New Haven, CT 06520-8005 (United States); Bellone, Stefania [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, Yale School of Medicine, P.O. Box 208063, New Haven, CT 06520-8063 (United States)] [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, Yale School of Medicine, P.O. Box 208063, New Haven, CT 06520-8063 (United States); Prevatt, Edward G. [Department of Genetics, Yale School of Medicine, P.O. Box 208005, New Haven, CT 06520-8005 (United States)] [Department of Genetics, Yale School of Medicine, P.O. Box 208005, New Haven, CT 06520-8005 (United States); Santin, Alessandro D. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, Yale School of Medicine, P.O. Box 208063, New Haven, CT 06520-8063 (United States) [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, Yale School of Medicine, P.O. Box 208063, New Haven, CT 06520-8063 (United States); Yale Comprehensive Cancer Center, P.O. Box 208028, New Haven, CT 06520-8028 (United States); DiMaio, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.dimaio@yale.edu [Department of Genetics, Yale School of Medicine, P.O. Box 208005, New Haven, CT 06520-8005 (United States) [Department of Genetics, Yale School of Medicine, P.O. Box 208005, New Haven, CT 06520-8005 (United States); Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale School of Medicine, P.O. Box 208040, New Haven, CT 06520-8040 (United States); Department of Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry, Yale School of Medicine, P.O. Box 208024 (United States); Yale Comprehensive Cancer Center, P.O. Box 208028, New Haven, CT 06520-8028 (United States)

    2012-01-05

    Repression of human papillomavirus (HPV) E6 and E7 oncogenes in established cervical carcinoma cell lines causes senescence due to reactivation of cellular tumor suppressor pathways. Here, we determined whether ongoing expression of HPV16 or HPV18 oncogenes is required for the proliferation of primary human cervical carcinoma cells in serum-free conditions at low passage number after isolation from patients. We used an SV40 viral vector expressing the bovine papillomavirus E2 protein to repress E6 and E7 in these cells. To enable efficient SV40 infection and E2 gene delivery, we first incubated the primary cervical cancer cells with the ganglioside GM1, a cell-surface receptor for SV40 that is limiting in these cells. Repression of HPV in primary cervical carcinoma cells caused them to undergo senescence, but the E2 protein had little effect on HPV-negative primary cells. These data suggest that E6 and E7 dependence is an inherent property of human cervical cancer cells.

  11. [Contemporary views of the role of HPV infection in oncogenesis in cervical cancer].

    PubMed

    Wójcicki, Janusz

    2006-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer of the woman worldwide. Infection with some genotypes of human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most important risk factor associated to cervical cancer, particularly HPV type 16 and 18 and potentially 31 and 45. Till now specific treatment or vaccination is not available but recently published results can be the first step to produce specific vaccination and reduce the number of cervical cancer. HPV has an influence on oncogenesis, but there are also mechanisms not depending on HPV infection. Recently published Institute Pasteur' data concerning the HPV genom may be the first step to produce specific vaccination. PMID:17017492

  12. Bridging Links between Long Noncoding RNA HOTAIR and HPV Oncoprotein E7 in Cervical Cancer Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sweta; Mandal, Paramita; Sadhukhan, Tamal; Roy Chowdhury, Rahul; Ranjan Mondal, Nidhu; Chakravarty, Biman; Chatterjee, Tanmay; Roy, Sudipta; Sengupta, Sharmila

    2015-01-01

    Human Papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 oncoprotein E7 plays a major role in cervical carcinogenesis by interacting with and functionally inactivating various host regulatory molecules. Long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) HOTAIR is one such regulator that recruits chromatin remodelling complex PRC2, creating gene silencing H3K27?me3 marks. Hence, we hypothesized that HOTAIR could be a potential target of E7, in HPV16 related cervical cancers (CaCx). We identified significant linear trend of progressive HOTAIR down-regulation through HPV negative controls, HPV16 positive non-malignants and CaCx samples. Majority of CaCx cases portrayed HOTAIR down-regulation in comparison to HPV negative controls, with corresponding up-regulation of HOTAIR target, HOXD10, and enrichment of cancer related pathways. However, a small subset had significantly higher HOTAIR expression, concomitant with high E7 expression and enrichment of metastatic pathways. Expression of HOTAIR and PRC2-complex members (EZH2 and SUZ12), showed significant positive correlation with E7 expression in CaCx cases and E7 transfected C33A cell line, suggestive of interplay between E7 and HOTAIR. Functional inactivation of HOTAIR by direct interaction with E7 could also be predicted by in silico analysis and confirmed by RNA-Immunoprecipitation. Our study depicts one of the causal mechanisms of cervical carcinogenesis by HPV16 E7, through modulation of HOTAIR expression and function. PMID:26152361

  13. Bridging Links between Long Noncoding RNA HOTAIR and HPV Oncoprotein E7 in Cervical Cancer Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sweta; Mandal, Paramita; Sadhukhan, Tamal; Roy Chowdhury, Rahul; Ranjan Mondal, Nidhu; Chakravarty, Biman; Chatterjee, Tanmay; Roy, Sudipta; Sengupta, Sharmila

    2015-01-01

    Human Papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 oncoprotein E7 plays a major role in cervical carcinogenesis by interacting with and functionally inactivating various host regulatory molecules. Long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) HOTAIR is one such regulator that recruits chromatin remodelling complex PRC2, creating gene silencing H3K27?me3 marks. Hence, we hypothesized that HOTAIR could be a potential target of E7, in HPV16 related cervical cancers (CaCx). We identified significant linear trend of progressive HOTAIR down-regulation through HPV negative controls, HPV16 positive non-malignants and CaCx samples. Majority of CaCx cases portrayed HOTAIR down-regulation in comparison to HPV negative controls, with corresponding up-regulation of HOTAIR target, HOXD10, and enrichment of cancer related pathways. However, a small subset had significantly higher HOTAIR expression, concomitant with high E7 expression and enrichment of metastatic pathways. Expression of HOTAIR and PRC2-complex members (EZH2 and SUZ12), showed significant positive correlation with E7 expression in CaCx cases and E7 transfected C33A cell line, suggestive of interplay between E7 and HOTAIR. Functional inactivation of HOTAIR by direct interaction with E7 could also be predicted by in silico analysis and confirmed by RNA-Immunoprecipitation. Our study depicts one of the causal mechanisms of cervical carcinogenesis by HPV16 E7, through modulation of HOTAIR expression and function. PMID:26152361

  14. Radiotherapy and chemoradiation after surgery for early cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Linda; Siu, Shing Shun N; Luesley, David; Bryant, Andrew; Dickinson, Heather O

    2014-01-01

    Background This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review first published in Issue 4, 2009. There is an ongoing debate about the indications for, and value of, adjuvant pelvic radiotherapy after radical surgery in women with early cervical cancer. Certain combinations of pathological risk factors are thought to represent sufficient risk for recurrence, that they justify the use of postoperative pelvic radiotherapy, though this has never been shown to improve overall survival, and use of more than one type of treatment (surgery and radiotherapy) increases the risks of side effects and complications. Objectives To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of adjuvant therapies (radiotherapy, chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy, chemoradiation) after radical hysterectomy for early-stage cervical cancer (FIGO stages IB1, IB2 or IIA). Search methods For the original review, we searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Issue 4, 2008. The Cochrane Gynaecological Cancer Group Trials Register, MEDLINE (January 1950 to November 2008), EMBASE (1950 to November 2008). We also searched registers of clinical trials, abstracts of scientific meetings, reference lists of included studies and contacted experts in the field. For this update, we extended the database searches to September 2011 and searched the MetaRegister for ongoing trials. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that compared adjuvant therapies (radiotherapy, chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy, or chemoradiation) with no radiotherapy or chemoradiation, in women with a confirmed histological diagnosis of early cervical cancer who had undergone radical hysterectomy and dissection of the pelvic lymph nodes. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently abstracted data and assessed risk of bias. Information on grade 3 and 4 adverse events was collected from the trials. Results were pooled using random-effects meta-analyses. Main results Two RCTs, which compared adjuvant radiotherapy with no adjuvant radiotherapy, met the inclusion criteria; they randomised and assessed 397 women with stage IB cervical cancer. Meta-analysis of these two RCTs indicated no significant difference in survival at 5 years between women who received radiation and those who received no further treatment (risk ratio (RR) = 0.8; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.3 to 2.4). However, women who received radiation had a significantly lower risk of disease progression at 5 years (RR 0.6; 95% CI 0.4 to 0.9). Although the risk of serious adverse events was consistently higher if women received radiotherapy rather than no further treatment, these increased risks were not statistically significant, probably because the rate of adverse events was low. Authors’ conclusions We found evidence, of moderate quality, that radiation decreases the risk of disease progression compared with no further treatment, but little evidence that it might improve overall survival, in stage IB cervical cancer. The evidence on serious adverse events was equivocal. PMID:22592722

  15. Distribution of HPV genotypes in cervical intraepithelial lesions and cervical cancer in Tanzanian women

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) is associated with uterine cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and invasive cancers (ICC). Approximately 80% of ICC cases are diagnosed in under-developed countries. Vaccine development relies on knowledge of HPV genotypes characteristic of LSIL, HSIL and cancer; however, these genotypes remain poorly characterized in many African countries. To contribute to the characterization of HPV genotypes in Northeastern Tanzania, we recruited 215 women from the Reproductive Health Clinic at Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Centre. Cervical scrapes and biopsies were obtained for cytology and HPV DNA detection. Results 79 out of 215 (36.7%) enrolled participants tested positive for HPV DNA, with a large proportion being multiple infections (74%). The prevalence of HPV infection increased with lesion grade (14% in controls, 67% in CIN1 cases and 88% in CIN2-3). Among ICC cases, 89% had detectable HPV. Overall, 31 HPV genotypes were detected; the three most common HPV genotypes among ICC were HPV16, 35 and 45. In addition to these genotypes, co-infection with HPV18, 31, 33, 52, 58, 68 and 82 was found in 91% of ICC. Among women with CIN2-3, HPV53, 58 and 84/83 were the most common. HPV35, 45, 53/58/59 were the most common among CIN1 cases. Conclusions In women with no evidence of cytological abnormalities, the most prevalent genotypes were HPV58 with HPV16, 35, 52, 66 and 73 occurring equally. Although numerical constraints limit inference, findings that 91% of ICC harbor only a small number of HPV genotypes suggests that prevention efforts including vaccine development or adjuvant screening should focus on these genotypes. PMID:22081870

  16. Human Papillomavirus E6/E7-Specific siRNA Potentiates the Effect of Radiotherapy for Cervical Cancer in Vitro and in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hun Soon; Rajasekaran, Nirmal; Song, Sang Yong; Kim, Young Deug; Hong, Sungyoul; Choi, Hyuck Jae; Kim, Young Seok; Choi, Jong-Sun; Choi, Yoon-La; Shin, Young Kee

    2015-01-01

    The functional inactivation of TP53 and Rb tumor suppressor proteins by the HPV-derived E6 and E7 oncoproteins is likely an important step in cervical carcinogenesis. We have previously shown siRNA technology to selectively silence both E6/E7 oncogenes and demonstrated that the synthetic siRNAs could specifically block its expression in HPV-positive cervical cancer cells. Herein, we investigated the potentiality of E6/E7 siRNA candidates as radiosensitizers of radiotherapy for the human cervical carcinomas. HeLa and SiHa cells were transfected with HPV E6/E7 siRNA; the combined cytotoxic effect of E6/E7 siRNA and radiation was assessed by using the cell viability assay, flow cytometric analysis and the senescence-associated ?-galactosidase (SA-?-Gal) assay. In addition, we also investigated the effect of combined therapy with irradiation and E6/E7 siRNA intravenous injection in an in vivo xenograft model. Combination therapy with siRNA and irradiation efficiently retarded tumor growth in established tumors of human cervical cancer cell xenografted mice. In addition, the chemically-modified HPV16 and 18 E6/E7 pooled siRNA in combination with irradiation strongly inhibited the growth of cervical cancer cells. Our results indicated that simultaneous inhibition of HPV E6/E7 oncogene expression with radiotherapy can promote potent antitumor activity and radiosensitizing activity in human cervical carcinomas. PMID:26035754

  17. A quantitative analysis of the reduction in oxygen levels required to induce up-regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) mRNA in cervical cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Chiarotto, J A; Hill, R P

    1999-01-01

    The presence of hypoxia (low oxygen concentrations) in solid tumours correlates with poor prognosis, increased metastasis, and resistance to radiotherapy and some forms of chemotherapy. Malignant cells produce an angiogenesis factor, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which may increase metastatic ability and is up-regulated in the presence of hypoxia. Clinical data for cancers of the cervix and head and neck relate oxygen levels in the tumour to treatment outcome. This suggests the possibility that the presence of VEGF mRNA might be used as a marker for relevant levels of hypoxia. Suspension cultures of three human cervical cancer cell lines, SiHa, ME-180 and HeLa, were used to investigate up-regulation of VEGF mRNA levels following exposure to precisely defined oxygen concentrations for 2 or 4 h. An oxygen sensor was used to confirm the actual levels of dissolved oxygen present. The oxygen concentrations which caused half-maximal upregulation (the Km value) of VEGF mRNA level in the three cell lines were similar except for one instance (Km at 4 h: SiHa 27.0 ± 5.7 ?M, ME-180 16.8 ± 3.3 ?M, HeLa 13.0 ± 1.8 ?M, SiHa and HeLa P = 0.01). The Km values for the HeLa cell line as measured at 2 h (24.9 ± 0.8 ?M) and 4 h (13.0 ± 1.8 ?M) were significantly different (P < 0.0001). VEGF mRNA half-lives measured in air were consistent with values in the literature (SiHa 59.8 ± 5.8 min, ME-180 44.4 ± 7.2 min, HeLa 44.5 ± 6.3 min). Differences in oxygen consumption at low oxygen concentrations were noted between the different cell lines. Stirring in suspension culture was found to induce VEGF mRNA in SiHa cells. The presence of VEGF mRNA may be a marker for radiobiologic hypoxia. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10408392

  18. Human papillomavirus genotyping by multiplex pyrosequencing in cervical cancer patients from India

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cheryl M. Travasso; Mona Anand; Mansi Samarth; Aditi Deshpande; Chandan Kumar-Sinha

    2008-01-01

    Cervical cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths among women in India. Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is\\u000a the causative agent of cervical cancer; and infection with the high-risk genotypes, predominantly HPV16 and 18, is the biggest\\u000a risk factor. Vaccines targeting HPV16 and 18 have been found to confer protection in large-scale clinical trials. HPV genotyping\\u000a has traditionally been carried

  19. Negative HPV test result is better predictor of low cervical cancer risk than negative Pap test

    Cancer.gov

    Based on a study that included more than 1 million women, DCEG investigators and colleagues have determined that a negative test for human papillomavirus (HPV) infection compared to a negative Pap test provides greater safety, or assurance, against future risk of cervical cancer. That is, women who test negative on the HPV test have an extremely low risk of developing cervical cancer. The findings appeared online July 18, 2014, in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

  20. Early Detection of Cervical Cancer among Native American Women: A Qualitative Supplement to a Quantitative Study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lynne Messer; Allan Steckler; Mark Dignan

    1999-01-01

    The North Carolina Native American Cervical Cancer Prevention Project was a 5-year (1989-1995) National Cancer Institute–funded, community-based, early detection of cervical cancer intervention implemented among two Native American tribes in North Carolina: the eastern band of the Cherokee Indians and the Lumbee. The initial quantitative analysis of the intervention showed modest effects and found that the intervention had different effects

  1. The Nurse’s Role in the Prevention of Cervical Cancer Among Underserved and Minority Populations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Norma Martinez Rogers; Adelita G. Cantu

    2009-01-01

    Since the implementation of the Papanicolaou test, there has been a significant decline in the incidence of cervical cancer\\u000a over the last 50 years. Despite this reduction, each year there are approximately 11,000 women in the United States diagnosed\\u000a with cervical cancer, the second most common type of cancer in women worldwide. Infection with oncogenic human papillomavirus\\u000a (HPV) is necessary for

  2. Knowledge and views of secondary school students in Kuala Lumpur on cervical cancer and its prevention.

    PubMed

    Rashwan, Hesham; Ishak, Ismarulyusda; Sawalludin, Nurhidayah

    2013-01-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the most frequent cancers in women worldwide. Persistent infection with a human papillomavirus (HPV) is the main cause for cervical cancer. Vaccination and Pap smear screening are the best methods for prevention of the disease. The objective of this cross-sectional study was to assess the knowledge and views of upper secondary school female students in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, toward prevention of cervical cancer. This study was conducted from April 2009 to September 2009 in 8 schools in Kuala Lumpur area using pre-tested and validated questionnaires. Results indicated that the respondents had low knowledge of cervical cancer and its prevention although the majority of students (80.4%) had heard about the disease. The level of knowledge of cervical cancr and its prevention was significantly higher among students from the science stream (p<0.001) compared to students from the art stream. Most students (69.3%) agreed to take the vaccination if the service was available in schools. A high percentage of students (82.2%) agreed that the vaccination should be compulsory to the students. In conclusion, most students had low knowledge of cervical cancer and its prevention but they had positive attitude toward vaccination and agreed that vaccination should be compulsory. Therefore, suitable educational programmes should be developed to improve the knowledge of secondary school students on the prevention of cervical cancer. PMID:23725172

  3. Compliance with cervical cancer screening and human papillomavirus testing guidelines among insured young women

    PubMed Central

    HIRTH, Jacqueline M.; TAN, Alai; WILKINSON, Gregg S.; BERENSON, Abbey B.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives In December 2009, the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) recommended that women under 21 years old should not receive cervical cancer screening (Pap tests) or HPV tests. This study examined whether clinicians stopped administering Pap and HPV tests among women less than 21 years of age after new ACOG guidelines were issued. Study Design This study was a retrospective secondary data analysis of administrative claims data that included insurance enrollees from across the US that examined the frequency of Pap tests and HPV tests among 178,898 non-immunocompromised females 12–20 years old who had a paid claim for a well-woman visit in 2008, 2009, or 2010. Young women with well-woman exams in each observed year were examined longitudinally to determine whether past diagnoses of cervical cell abnormalities accounted for Pap testing in 2010. Results The proportion of women less than 21 years old that received a Pap test as part of her well-woman exam dropped from 77% in 2008 and 2009 to 57% by December of 2010, while HPV testing remained stable across time. A diagnosis of cervical cell abnormalities in 2009 was associated with Pap testing in 2010. However, a previous Pap test was more strongly associated with a Pap test in 2010. Conclusions These data show that some physicians are adjusting their practices among young women according to ACOG guidelines, but Pap and HPV testing among insured women less than 21 years of age still remains unnecessarily high. PMID:23727519

  4. Attribution of human papillomavirus types to cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and invasive cancers in Southern China.

    PubMed

    Chan, Paul K S; Cheung, Tak-Hong; Li, Wai-Hon; Yu, Mei Y; Chan, May Y M; Yim, So-Fan; Ho, Wendy C S; Yeung, Apple C M; Ho, King-Man; Ng, H K

    2012-08-01

    The attribution of individual human papillomavirus (HPV) types to cervical neoplasia, especially intraepithelial lesions, varies ethnogeographically. Population-specific data are required for vaccine cost-effectiveness assessment and type replacement monitoring. HPV was detected from 2,790 Chinese women (444 invasive cervical cancers [ICC], 772 cervical intraepithelial neoplasia [CIN] grade 3, 805 CIN2 and 769 CIN1. The attribution of each HPV type found in multiple-type infections was approximated by the fractional contribution approach. Multiple-type infection was common and correlated inversely with lesion severity (54.7% for CIN1, 48.7% for CIN2, 46.2% for CIN3, 27.5% for ICC). Vaccine-covered high-risk types (HPV16/18) attributed to 59.5% of squamous cell carcinoma, 78.6% of adenocarcinoma, 35.9% of CIN3, 18.4% of CIN2 and 7.4% of CIN1. Distinct features compared to worldwide were a higher attribution of HPV52 and HPV58, and a much lower attribution of HPV45. Inclusion of HPV52 and HPV58 in future vaccines would provide the highest marginal increase in coverage with 11.7% for squamous cell carcinoma, 14.4% for CIN3, 22.6% for CIN2 and 17.7% for CIN1. The attribution of HPV types in southern China is different from elsewhere, which should be considered in prioritizing HPV types for vaccine and screening assay development. PMID:21976212

  5. Breast and cervical cancer screening in Hispanic women: a literature review using the health belief model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    LaToya T Austin; Farah Ahmad; Mary-Jane McNally; Donna E Stewart

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to review published studies that examined factors influencing breast and cervical cancer screening behavior in Hispanic women, using the Health Belief Model (HBM). MEDLINE and PsycINFO databases and manual search were used to identify articles. Cancer screening barriers common among Hispanic women include fear of cancer, fatalistic views on cancer, linguistic barriers, and culturally

  6. Prognostic Significance of p16 Expression in Advanced Cervical Cancer Treated With Definitive Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, Julie K., E-mail: jschwarz@radonc.wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Department of Cell Biology and Physiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Lewis, James S. [Division of Anatomic and Molecular Pathology, Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States) [Division of Anatomic and Molecular Pathology, Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Department of Otolaryngology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Pfeifer, John [Division of Anatomic and Molecular Pathology, Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States) [Division of Anatomic and Molecular Pathology, Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Huettner, Phyllis [Division of Anatomic and Molecular Pathology, Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States) [Division of Anatomic and Molecular Pathology, Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Grigsby, Perry [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States) [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Division of Nuclear Medicine, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prognostic significance of p16 immunohistochemistry (IHC) in patients with advanced cervical cancer treated with radiation therapy. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective study of 126 patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics Stages Ib1-IVb cervical cancer treated with radiation. Concurrent cisplatin chemotherapy was given to 108 patients. A tissue microarray (TMA) was constructed from the paraffin-embedded diagnostic biopsy specimens. Immunoperoxidase staining was performed on the TMA and a p16 monoclonal antibody was utilized. IHC p16 extent was evaluated and scored in quartiles: 0 = no staining, 1 = 1-25% of cells staining, 2 = 26 to 50%, 3 = 51 to 75%, and 4 = 76 to 100%. Results: The p16 IHC score was 4 in 115 cases, 3 in 1, 2 in 3 and 0 in 7. There was no relationship between p16 score and tumor histology. Patients with p16-negative tumors were older (mean age at diagnosis 65 vs. 52 years for p16-positive tumors; p = 0.01). The 5-year cause-specific survivals were 33% for p16-negative cases (score = 0) compared with 63% for p16-positive cases (scores 1, 2, 3 or 4; p = 0.07). The 5-year recurrence-free survivals were 34% for those who were p16-negative vs. 57% for those who were p16-positive (p = 0.09). In addition, patients with p16-positive tumors (score > 0) were more likely to be complete metabolic responders as assessed by the 3-month posttherapy 18 [F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET)/computed tomograph compared with patients with p16-negative tumors (p = 0.03). Conclusion: p16 expression is predictive of improved survival outcome after chemoradiation therapy for advanced-stage invasive cervical carcinoma. Further testing will be needed to evaluate p16-negative cervical tumors.

  7. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma up-regulated factor expression is associated with disease-specific survival in cervical cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Choi, Chel Hun; Chung, Joon-Yong; Park, Ho-Seop; Jun, Minsik; Lee, Yoo-Young; Kim, Byung-Gie; Hewitt, Stephen M

    2015-06-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma up-regulated factor (PAUF) is a novel soluble protein involved in tumor development and metastases. This study was to investigate the PAUF expression and its prognostic value in cervical cancer patients. The expression of PAUF was immunohistochemically determined in 345 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded cervical cancer tissues and 107 normal cervical epitheliums. Subsequently, its associations with clinicopathological characteristics and patient survival were assessed. PAUF protein was expressed both in cytoplasm and nucleus, and cytoplasmic expression was more frequent in cancers than normal tissues (32% versus 17%, P = .002), and the difference was prominent in glandular cells. Notably, the expression was more frequent in adenocarcinoma than in squamous cell carcinoma (57% versus 25%, respectively; P < .001), and the differential expression was also seen at the messenger RNA level (P = .014). Cox regression analysis showed that the cytoplasmic expression of PAUF protein was independently associated with poor disease-free (hazard ratio = 2.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-4.3; P = .008) and overall survival (hazard ratio = 2.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-7.5; P = .020). Detection of PAUF expression may aid current evaluation of prognosis in cervical adenocarcinoma. PMID:25870121

  8. Socioeconomic disparity in cervical cancer screening among Korean women: 1998–2010

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cervical cancer is the sixth most common cause of cancer among Korean women and is one of the most preventable cancers in the world. This study aimed to investigate the change in cervical cancer screening rates, the level of socioeconomic disparities in cervical cancer screening participation, and whether there was a reduction in these disparities between 1998 and 2010. Methods Using the Korean Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, women 30?years or older without a history of cervical cancer and who completed a health questionnaire, physical examination, and nutritional survey were included (n?=?17,105). Information about participation in cervical cancer screening was collected using a self-administered questionnaire. Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to investigate the relationship between cervical cancer screening participation and the socioeconomic status of the women. Results The cervical cancer screening rate increased from 40.5% in 1998 to 52.5% in 2010. Socioeconomic disparities influenced participation, and women with lower educational levels and lower household income were less likely to be screened. Compared with the lowest educational level, the adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for screening in women with the highest educational level were 1.56 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.05–2.30) in 1998, and 1.44 (95% CI: 1.12–1.87) in 2010. Compared with women with the lowest household income level, the adjusted ORs for screening in women with the highest household income level were 1.80 (95% CI: 1.22–2.68), 2.82 (95% CI: 2.01–3.96), and 1.45 (95% CI: 1.08–1.94) in 2001, 2005, and 2010, respectively. Conclusion Although population-wide progress has been made in participation in cervical cancer screening over the 12-year period, socioeconomic status remained an important factor in reducing compliance with cancer screening. PMID:23742100

  9. Risk factors for and prevention of human papillomaviruses (HPV), genital warts and cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Chelimo, Carol; Wouldes, Trecia A; Cameron, Linda D; Elwood, J Mark

    2013-03-01

    Genital HPV infection is associated with development of cervical cancer, cervical neoplasia, anogenital warts, and other anogenital cancers. A number of reviews have primarily addressed the role of HPV infection in cervical carcinogenesis, and differences in human papillomavirus (HPV) subtypes found in cervical cancer cases by histology and geographical region. This review provides an informative summary of the broad body of literature on the burden of HPV, the risk factors for HPV infection, genital warts and cervical cancer, and preventive measures against these conditions in females. Studies have identified the main risk factors for genital HPV infection in females as follows: acquisition of new male partners; an increasing number of lifetime sexual partners both in females and their male partners; and having non-monogamous male partners. Cervical cancer screening and HPV vaccination are the primary measures currently recommended to prevent cervical cancer. There is also an ongoing debate and conflicting findings on whether male circumcision and condom use protect against HPV infection and subsequent development of HPV-related illnesses in females. PMID:23103285

  10. The cervical cancer screening program in Mexico: problems with access and coverage

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eduardo César Lazcano-Ponce; P. Najera-Aguilar; Eva Buiatti; Patricia Alonso-de-Ruiz; Pablo Kuri; Leticia Cantoral; M. Hernandez-Avila

    1997-01-01

    A cross-sectional study was carried out in two geographic regions of Mexico - Oaxaca (rural area) and Mexico City (urban area) - to determine the main factors for predicting participation in Cervical Cytology Screening Programs (CCSP), in populations with high mortality due to cervical cancer. We included 4,208 women aged between 15 and 49 years, randomly selected through a national

  11. Resistance of cervical adenocarcinoma cells (HeLa) to venom from the scorpion Centruroides limpidus limpidus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The venom of Centruroides limpidus limpidus (Cll) is a mixture of pharmacologically active principles. The most important of these are toxic proteins that interact both selectively and specifically with different cellular targets such as ion channels. Recently, anticancer properties of the venom from other scorpion species have been described. Studies in vitro have shown that scorpion venom induces cell death, inhibits proliferation and triggers the apoptotic pathway in different cancer cell lines. Herein, after treating human cervical adenocarcinoma (HeLa) cells with Cll crude venom, their cytotoxic activity and apoptosis induction were assessed. Results Cll crude venom induced cell death in normal macrophages in a dose-dependent manner. However, through viability assays, HeLa cells showed high survival rates after exposure to Cll venom. Also, Cll venom did not induce apoptosis after performing ethidium bromide/acridine orange assays, nor was there any evidence of chromatin condensation or DNA fragmentation. Conclusions Crude Cll venom exposure was not detrimental to HeLa cell cultures. This may be partially attributable to the absence of specific HeLa cell membrane targets for molecules present in the venom of Centruroides limpidus limpidus. Although these results might discourage additional studies exploring the potential of Cll venom to treat human papilloma cervical cancer, further research is required to explore positive effects of crude Cll venom on other cancer cell lines. PMID:24004568

  12. Integrative genomic approaches in cervical cancer: implications for molecular pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Narayan, Gopeshwar; Murty, Vundavalli V

    2010-10-01

    Cervical cancer (CC) as a single diagnostic entity exhibits differences in clinical behavior and poor outcomes in response to therapy in advanced tumors. Although infection of high-risk human papillomavirus is recognized as an important initiating event in cervical tumorigenesis, stratification of CC into subclasses for progression and response to treatment remains elusive. Existing knowledge of genetic, epigenetic and transcriptional alterations is inadequate in addressing the issues of diagnosis, progression and response to treatment. Recent technological advances in high-throughput genomics and the application of integrative approaches have greatly accelerated gene discovery, facilitating the identification of molecular targets. In this article, we discuss the results obtained by preliminary integrative analysis of DNA copy number increases and gene expression, utilizing the two most common copy number-gained regions of 5p and 20q in identifying gene targets in CC. These analyses provide insights into the roles of genes such as RNASEN, POLS and SKP2 on 5p, KIF3B, RALY and E2F1 at 20q11.2 and CSE1L, ZNF313 and B4GALT5 at 20q13.13. Future integrative applications using additional datasets, such as mutations, DNA methylation and clinical outcomes, will raise the promise of accomplishing the identification of biological pathways and molecular targets for therapies for patients with CC. PMID:21062161

  13. Human papillomavirus genotypes in Iranian patients with cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Shahsiah, Reza; Khademalhosseini, Morteza; Mehrdad, Nili; Ramezani, Fatemeh; Nadji, Seyed Alireza

    2011-12-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of HPV genotypes isolated from cervical intra-epithelial neoplasia grade III and invasive carcinomas of Iranian patients. A total of 94 cases were selected in five years from 2003 to 2007. After nucleic acid purification, real-time PCR was performed by means of GP5+/GP6+ primers. Subsequently, PCR products were sequenced, on the basis of which a phylogenetic tree was constructed. Negative samples and twelve randomly selected positive samples were also typed by reverse hybridization to increase the sensitivity and to confirm the results. Of 94 evaluated samples, 7 were negative for internal control gene and were excluded from the study. The overall genotyping results of phylogenetic analysis and hybridization methods were as follows: HPV 16: 75% (65/87); HPV 18: 3% (2/87); HPV 31: 1% (1/87); HPV 45: 1% (1/87). High frequency of HPV 16 and low frequency of HPV 18 were found in this study. Information about HPV genotype distribution is important in cervical cancer screening and prevention. PMID:22041132

  14. Adjuvant platinum-based chemotherapy for early stage cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Daniela D; Medeiros, Lídia RF; Edelweiss, Maria I; Pohlmann, Paula R; Stein, Airton T

    2014-01-01

    Background This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review published in The Cochrane Library 2009, Issue 3. Most women with early cervical cancer (stages I to IIA) are cured with surgery or radiotherapy, or both. We performed this review originally because it was unclear whether cisplatin-based chemotherapy after surgery, radiotherapy or both, in women with early stage disease with risk factors for recurrence, was associated with additional survival benefits or risks. Objectives To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of platinum-based chemotherapy after radical hysterectomy, radiotherapy, or both in the treatment of early stage cervical cancer. Search methods For the original 2009 review, we searched the Cochrane Gynaecological Cancer Group Trials Register, The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library 2009, Issue 1), MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, BIOLOGICAL ABSTRACTS and CancerLit, the National Research Register and Clinical Trials register, with no language restriction. We handsearched abstracts of scientific meetings and other relevant publications. We extended the database searches to November 2011 for this update. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing adjuvant cisplatin-based chemotherapy (after radical surgery, radiotherapy or both) with no adjuvant chemotherapy, in women with early stage cervical cancer (stage IA2-IIA) with at least one risk factor for recurrence. Data collection and analysis Two review authors extracted data independently. Meta-analysis was performed using a random-effects model, with death and disease progression as outcomes. Main results For this updated version, we identified three additional ongoing trials but no new studies for inclusion. Three trials including 368 evaluable women with early cervical cancer were included in the meta-analyses. The median follow-up period in these trials ranged from 29 to 42 months. All women had undergone surgery first. Two trials compared chemotherapy combined with radiotherapy to radiotherapy alone; and one trial compared chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy to radiotherapy alone. It was not possible to perform subgroup analyses by stage or tumour size. Compared with adjuvant radiotherapy, chemotherapy combined with radiotherapy significantly reduced the risk of death (two trials, 297 women; hazard ratio (HR) = 0.56, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.36 to 0.87) and disease progression (two trials, 297 women; HR = 0.47, 95% CI 0.30 to 0.74), with no heterogeneity between trials (I2 = 0% for both meta-analyses). Acute grade 4 toxicity occurred significantly more frequently in the chemotherapy plus radiotherapy group than in the radiotherapy group (risk ratio (RR) 5.66, 95% CI 2.14 to 14.98). We considered this evidence to be of a moderate quality due to small numbers and limited follow-up in the included studies. In addition, it was not possible to separate data for bulky early stage disease. In the one small trial that compared adjuvant chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy with adjuvant radiotherapy alone there was no significant difference in disease recurrence between the groups (HR = 1.34; 95% CI 0.24 to 7.66) and OS was not reported. We considered this evidence to be of a low quality. No trials compared adjuvant platinum-based chemotherapy with no adjuvant chemotherapy after surgery for early cervical cancer with risk factors for recurrence. Authors’ conclusions The addition of platinum-based chemotherapy to adjuvant radiotherapy (chemoradiation) may improve survival in women with early stage cervical cancer (IA2-IIA) and risk factors for recurrence. Adjuvant chemoradiation is associated with an increased risk of severe acute toxicity, although it is not clear whether this toxicity is significant in the long-term due to a lack of long-term data. This evidence is limited by the small numbers and poor methodological quality of included studies. We await the results of three ongoing trials, that are likely to have an important impact on our confidence in this evidence. PMID:22

  15. Doxycycline Induces Apoptosis and Inhibits Proliferation and Invasion of Human Cervical Carcinoma Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ai; Zhou, Aizhi; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Lanrong; Gao, Limin; Zang, Yuhua; Tang, Xiuhua; Sun, Liyan

    2015-01-01

    Background Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are proposed to be responsible for high recurrence rate in cervical carcinoma. Reagents that can suppress the proliferation and differentiation of CSCs would provide new opportunities to fight against tumor recurrence. Doxycycline has been reported as a potential anti-cancer compound. However, few studies investigated its inhibitory effect against cervical cancer stem cells. Methods HeLa cells were cultured in cancer stem cell conditional media in a poly-hema-treated dish. In this non-adhesive culture system, HeLa cells were treated with cisplatin until some cells survived and formed spheroids, which were then collected and injected into the immunodeficient mice. Cisplatin was administered every three days for five times. The tumor xenografts with CSC enrichment were cultured in cancer stem cell specific medium again to form tumorsphere, which we called HeLa-CSCs. Expression of cancer stem cell markers in HeLa-CSCs was measured by flow cytometry and qPCR. HeLa-CSCs were then treated with doxycycline. Proliferation and differentiation rates were determined by the size of spheres formed in vitro and tumor formed in vivo. Results We developed a new strategy to selectively enrich CSCs from human cervical carcinoma cell line HeLa, and these HeLa-CSCs are CD133+/CD49f+ cell populations with significantly enhanced expression of stem cell markers. When these HeLa-CSCs were treated with doxycycline, the colony formation, proliferation, migration and invasion, and differentiation were all suppressed. Meanwhile, stem cell markers SOX-2, OCT-4, NANOG, NOTCH and BMI-1 decreased in doxycycline treated cells, so as the surface markers CD133 and CD49f. Furthermore, proliferation markers Ki67 and PCNA were also decreased by doxycycline treatment in the in vivo xenograft mouse model. Conclusions Cancer stem cells are enriched from sphere-forming and chemoresistant HeLa-derived tumor xenografts in immunodeficient mice. Doxycycline inhibits proliferation, invasion, and differentiation, and also induces apoptosis of these HeLa-CSCs in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26111245

  16. Multiple adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system with automatic features extraction algorithm for cervical cancer recognition.

    PubMed

    Al-batah, Mohammad Subhi; Isa, Nor Ashidi Mat; Klaib, Mohammad Fadel; Al-Betar, Mohammed Azmi

    2014-01-01

    To date, cancer of uterine cervix is still a leading cause of cancer-related deaths in women worldwide. The current methods (i.e., Pap smear and liquid-based cytology (LBC)) to screen for cervical cancer are time-consuming and dependent on the skill of the cytopathologist and thus are rather subjective. Therefore, this paper presents an intelligent computer vision system to assist pathologists in overcoming these problems and, consequently, produce more accurate results. The developed system consists of two stages. In the first stage, the automatic features extraction (AFE) algorithm is performed. In the second stage, a neuro-fuzzy model called multiple adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (MANFIS) is proposed for recognition process. The MANFIS contains a set of ANFIS models which are arranged in parallel combination to produce a model with multi-input-multioutput structure. The system is capable of classifying cervical cell image into three groups, namely, normal, low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL) and high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL). The experimental results prove the capability of the AFE algorithm to be as effective as the manual extraction by human experts, while the proposed MANFIS produces a good classification performance with 94.2% accuracy. PMID:24707316

  17. Multiple Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System with Automatic Features Extraction Algorithm for Cervical Cancer Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Subhi Al-batah, Mohammad; Mat Isa, Nor Ashidi; Klaib, Mohammad Fadel; Al-Betar, Mohammed Azmi

    2014-01-01

    To date, cancer of uterine cervix is still a leading cause of cancer-related deaths in women worldwide. The current methods (i.e., Pap smear and liquid-based cytology (LBC)) to screen for cervical cancer are time-consuming and dependent on the skill of the cytopathologist and thus are rather subjective. Therefore, this paper presents an intelligent computer vision system to assist pathologists in overcoming these problems and, consequently, produce more accurate results. The developed system consists of two stages. In the first stage, the automatic features extraction (AFE) algorithm is performed. In the second stage, a neuro-fuzzy model called multiple adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (MANFIS) is proposed for recognition process. The MANFIS contains a set of ANFIS models which are arranged in parallel combination to produce a model with multi-input-multioutput structure. The system is capable of classifying cervical cell image into three groups, namely, normal, low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL) and high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL). The experimental results prove the capability of the AFE algorithm to be as effective as the manual extraction by human experts, while the proposed MANFIS produces a good classification performance with 94.2% accuracy. PMID:24707316

  18. Molecular mechanism of curcumin induced cytotoxicity in human cervical carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Singh, Mayank; Singh, Neeta

    2009-05-01

    Cervical cancer is the most common cancer in Indian females and is associated with infection with high risk Human papillomaviruses (HPVs). Curcumin (Diferuloyl methane), a chemopreventive agent, is a natural compound extracted from Curcuma longa that allows suppression of carcinogenesis. The objective of this study was to identify the molecular mechanism of curcumin induced apoptosis in HPV positive cervical cancer HeLa, SiHa and Ca Ski cells. Curcumin causes distinct inhibition of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) the catalytic core of telomerase thereby reducing proliferation of cancer cells. Curcumin mediated apoptosis in these cells appears to be due to upregulation of proapoptotic Bax, AIF, release of cytochrome c and down regulation of antiapoptotic Bcl-2, Bcl-XL in HeLa and SiHa. This was accompanied by an increase in caspase-3 and -9 activity, suggesting the role of mitochondria in curcumin mediated apoptotic cell death. Curcumin acts as an anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative agent by causing down regulation of COX-2, iNOS and cyclin D1 in all the three cell lines but to different extent. PMID:19191010

  19. Cervical cancer screening in Malaysia: Are targeted interventions necessary?

    PubMed

    Dunn, Richard A; Tan, Andrew K G

    2010-09-01

    This study examines the determinants of Papanicolaou Smear Test (PST) screening for cervical cancer among women in Malaysia. Attention is focused on the reasons different population subgroups give for non-screening. We find that Indian women are the least likely to have had a PST and also the least likely to know the reasons why one is screened. Malay women are less likely than Chinese women to have received a PST and are more likely to report embarrassment as the reason for not being tested. Urban women are less likely than rural women to have been tested and more likely to state lack of time as the reason. These results suggest targeted interventions may be necessary to increase screening rates in Malaysia. PMID:20685019

  20. Development of Cervical Cancer Control Interventions for Chinese Immigrants

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, J. Carey; Do, Hoai; Chitnarong, Kamolthip; Tu, Shin-Ping; Marchand, Ann; Hislop, Gregory; Taylor, Vicky

    2006-01-01

    The objective of the study was to develop a culturally relevant video and a pamphlet for use as a cervical cancer screening educational intervention among North-American Chinese women. The project conducted 87 qualitative interviews and nine focus groups to develop a culturally tailored intervention to improve Pap testing rates. The intervention consisted of an educational/motivational video, a pamphlet, and home visits. Less acculturated Chinese women draw on a rich tradition of herbal knowledge and folk practices historically based on Chinese medical theory, now mixed with new information from the media and popular culture. The video, the pamphlet, and the outreach workers knowledge base were designed using these results and combined with biomedical information to address potential obstacles to Pap testing. Culturally relevant information for reproductive health promotion was easily retrieved through qualitative interviews and used to create educational materials modeling the integration of Pap testing into Chinese women’s health practices. PMID:16228758

  1. The road ahead for cervical cancer prevention and control

    PubMed Central

    Tota, J.E.; Ramana–Kumar, A.V.; El-Khatib, Z.; Franco, E.L.

    2014-01-01

    Since the early 1950s, Papanicolaou (“Pap”) cytology screening has dramatically reduced cervical cancer mortality in most high-income settings. Currently, human papillomavirus (hpv) vaccination has the greatest potential to reduce the global burden of cervical cancer and precancerous lesions. However, as the prevalence of precancerous lesions declines, maintaining cytology as the primary screening test in settings with established programs might become less efficient. A reduction in test performance (sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value) would lead to an increase in unnecessary colposcopy referrals. Fortunately, hpv dna testing has emerged as a suitable candidate to replace cytology. Compared with the Pap test, hpv testing is less specific but much more sensitive in detecting high-grade precancerous lesions, less prone to human error, and more reproducible across settings. Linkage of hpv vaccination and screening registries could serve the added role of monitoring vaccine efficacy. As a triage test, cytology is expected to perform with sufficient accuracy because most hpv-positive smears would contain relevant abnormalities. This approach and others—for example, hpv testing followed by genotyping—are being evaluated in large population studies and have already been recommended in some settings. Other specific biomarkers that might perform well for screening and triage include hpv E6/E7 messenger rna testing, methylation of host or viral genes, and p16INK4a staining. Considering the rapid pace of major discoveries and the anticipated arrival of a nonavalent hpv vaccine (currently in phase iii trials), the evidence base in this field has become an elusive target and will continue to be an obstacle for policymakers. PMID:24764711

  2. Prognostic significance of cyclooxygenase-2 in cervical cancer: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Miaoling; Chen, Qing; Xiao, Jianpeng; Liu, Changhao; Zhao, Xiaomiao

    2013-01-15

    Published data on the prognostic value of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) overexpression in cervical cancer are conflicting and heterogeneous. We performed a meta-analysis to more precisely estimate its prognostic significance. The pooled hazard ratios (HRs) or odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to estimate the effects. Twenty-three studies with 1,477 cervical cancer patients were selected to evaluate the association between COX-2 and overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), response to chemoradiation (RC) and clinicopathological parameters. High COX-2 expression predicted poor OS (HR: 2.53, 95% CI: 1.54-4.18), DFS (HR: 2.41, 95% CI: 1.58-3.69) and RC (OR: 3.03, 95% CI: 1.97-4.64). Subgroup analyses showed that COX-2 overexpression was related significantly with poor OS in patients treated by chemoradiation or surgery, and in patients with squamous cell carcinoma, respectively. Besides, COX-2 overexpression was related significantly with poor DFS in chemoradiation subgroup. Furthermore, COX-2 overexpression was associated with poor RC in patients who received "FP" regimen or "P" regimen. Additionally, there were significant associations between COX-2 expression and all clinicopathological parameters except tumor grade. The pooled ORs (95% CI) were as follows: 1.49 (1.09-2.04) for age, 1.77 (1.22-2.56) for lymph node metastasis, 1.04 (0.74-1.47) for tumor grade, 1.71 (1.12-2.64) for tumor size, 2.38 (1.28-4.45) for FIGO stage, 3.96 (2.32-6.77) for histological type, 2.45(1.10-5.42) for parametrical involvement. This meta-analysis indicated that COX-2 overexpression might be an unfavorable prognostic and a chemoradiation resistance predictive factor for cervical cancer; it could potentially help to stratify patients further in clinical treatment. PMID:22729746

  3. Clinical Effect of Human Papillomavirus Genotypes in Patients With Cervical Cancer Undergoing Primary Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chun-Chieh [Department of Radiation Oncology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Science, Chang Gung University School of Medicine, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Lai, Chyong-Huey; Huang, Huei-Jean; Chao, Angel [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Chang, Chee-Jen [Graduate Institutes of Clinical Medical Sciences, Chang Gung University School of Medicine, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Chang, Ting-Chang; Chou, Hung-Hsueh [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Hong, Ji-Hong, E-mail: jihong@adm.cgmh.org.t [Department of Radiation Oncology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Science, Chang Gung University School of Medicine, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China)

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: To study the prognostic value of the human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes in cervical cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy. Patients and Methods: A total of 1,010 patients with cervical cancer after radiotherapy between 1993 and 2000 were eligible for this study. The HPV genotypes were determined by a genechip, which detects 38 types of HPV. The patient characteristics and treatment outcomes were analyzed using the Cox regression hazard model and classification and regression tree decision tree method. Results: A total of 25 genotypes of HPV were detected in 992 specimens (98.2%). The leading 8 types were HPV16, 58, 18, 33, 52, 39, 31, and 45. These types belong to two high-risk HPV species: alpha-7 (HPV18, 39, 45) and alpha-9 (HPV16, 31, 33, 52, 58). Three HPV-based risk groups, which were independent of established prognostic factors, such as International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage, age, pathologic features, squamous cell carcinoma antigen, and lymph node metastasis, were associated with the survival outcomes. The high-risk group consisted of the patients without HPV infection or the ones infected with the alpha-7 species only. Patients co-infected with the alpha-7 and alpha-9 species belonged to the medium-risk group, and the others were included in the low-risk group. Conclusion: The results of the present study have confirmed the prognostic value of HPV genotypes in cervical cancer treated with radiotherapy. The different effect of the alpha-7 and alpha-9 species on the radiation response deserves additional exploration.

  4. PrediQt-Cx: Post Treatment Health Related Quality of Life Prediction Model for Cervical Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Satwant; Rana, Madhu Lata; Verma, Khushboo; Singh, Narayanjeet; Sharma, Anil Kumar; Maria, Arun Kumar; Dhaliwal, Gobind Singh; Khaira, Harkiran Kaur; Saini, Sunil

    2014-01-01

    Background Cervical cancer is the third largest cause of cancer mortality in India. The objectives of the study were to compare the pre and the post treatment quality of life in cervical cancer patients and to develop a prediction model to provide an insight into the possibilities in the treatment modules. Methodology/Principal Findings A total of 198 patients were assessed with two structured questionnaires of Health Related Quality of Life (The European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer, EORTC QLQ C-30 and CX-24). The baseline observations were recorded when the patients first reported (T1) and second evaluation was done at 6 months post treatment (T2). The mean age of detection was 50.9 years with the literacy level being non-educated or less than high school. Majority of them were married/cohabiting 179 (90.4%). On histopathological examination (HPE) squamous cell carcinoma was found to be the most common cell type carcinoma 147 (74.2%) followed by Adenocarcinoma 31 (15.7%). Radical hysterectomy was the most common treatment modality 76 (38.4%), followed by Wertheims Hysterectomy 46 (23.2%) and Radiochemotherapy 59 (29.8%). The mean score of global health of cervical cancer patients post treatment was 77.90, which was significantly higher than the pre - treatment score (54.32). Mean “symptoms score” post treatment was 21.69 with an aggravation of 7.32 compared to pre treatment scores. Patients experienced substantial decrease in sexual activity post treatment. Conclusions/Significance The prediction model(PrediQt-Cx), based on Support Vector Machine(SVM) for predicting post treatment HRQoL in cervical cancer patients was developed and internally cross validated. After external validation PrediQt-Cx can be easily employed to support decision making by clinicians and patients from north India region, through openly made available for access at http://prediqt.org. PMID:24587074

  5. GLTSCR2 is an upstream negative regulator of nucleophosmin in cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jee-Youn; Cho, Young-Eun; An, Yong-Min; Kim, Sang-Hoon; Lee, Yong-Gwan; Park, Jae-Hoon; Lee, Sun

    2015-01-01

    Nucleophosmin (NPM)/B23, a multifunctional nucleolar phosphoprotein, plays an important role in ribosome biogenesis, cell cycle regulation, apoptosis and cancer pathogenesis. The role of NPM in cells is determined by several factors, including total expression level, oligomerization or phosphorylation status, and subcellular localization. In the nucleolus, NPM participates in rRNA maturation to enhance ribosomal biogenesis. Consistent with this finding, NPM expression is increased in rapidly proliferating cells and many types of human cancers. In response to ribosomal stress, NPM is redistributed to the nucleoplasm, where it inactivates mouse double minute 2 homologue to stabilize p53 and inhibit cell cycle progression. These observations indicate that nucleolus-nucleoplasmic mobilization of NPM is one of the key molecular mechanisms that determine the role of NPM within the cell. However, the regulatory molecule(s) that control(s) NPM stability and subcellular localization, crucial to the pluripotency of intercellular NPM, remain(s) unidentified. In this study, we showed that nucleolar protein GLTSCR2/Pict-1 induced nucleoplasmic translocation and enhanced the degradation of NPM via the proteasomal polyubiquitination pathway. In addition, we showed that GLTSCR2 expression decreased the transforming activity of cells mediated by NPM and that the expression of NPM is reciprocally related to that of GLTSCR2 in cervical cancer tissue. In this study, we demonstrated that GLTSCR2 is an upstream negative regulator of NPM. PMID:25818168

  6. cDNA Microarray Analysis of Serially Sampled Cervical Cancer Specimens From Patients Treated With Thermochemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Borkamo, Erling Dahl, E-mail: borkamo@gmail.co [Section of Oncology, Institute of Medicine, University of Bergen, Bergen (Norway); Center for Medical Genetics and Molecular Medicine, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway); Schem, Baard-Christian [Department of Oncology and Medical Physics, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway); Fluge, Oystein; Bruland, Ove [Center for Medical Genetics and Molecular Medicine, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway); Department of Oncology and Medical Physics, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway); Dahl, Olav; Mella, Olav [Section of Oncology, Institute of Medicine, University of Bergen, Bergen (Norway); Department of Oncology and Medical Physics, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway)

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: To elucidate changes in gene expression after treatment with regional thermochemoradiotherapy in locally advanced squamous cell cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Tru-Cut biopsy specimens were serially collected from 16 patients. Microarray gene expression levels before and 24 h after the first and second trimodality treatment sessions were compared. Pathway and network analyses were conducted by use of Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA; Ingenuity Systems, Redwood City, CA). Single gene expressions were analyzed by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Results: We detected 53 annotated genes that were differentially expressed after trimodality treatment. Central in the three top networks detected by IPA were interferon alfa, interferon beta, and interferon gamma receptor; nuclear factor kappaB; and tumor necrosis factor, respectively. These genes encode proteins that are important in regulation cell signaling, proliferation, gene expression, and immune stimulation. Biological processes over-represented among the 53 genes were fibrosis, tumorigenesis, and immune response. Conclusions: Microarrays showed minor changes in gene expression after thermochemoradiotherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer. We detected 53 differentially expressed genes, mainly involved in fibrosis, tumorigenesis, and immune response. A limitation with the use of serial biopsy specimens was low quality of ribonucleic acid from tumors that respond to highly effective therapy. Another 'key limitation' is timing of the post-treatment biopsy, because 24 h may be too late to adequately assess the impact of hyperthermia on gene expression.

  7. 77 FR 71193 - Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Federal Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-29

    ...DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Federal Advisory Committee Correction: This notice was published in the Federal Register...

  8. 75 FR 57472 - Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control Advisory Committee (BCCEDCAC): Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-21

    ...DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control Advisory Committee (BCCEDCAC): Notice of Charter Renewal This gives notice...

  9. Bone Density in Patients with Cervical Cancer or Endometrial Cancer in comparison with Healthy Control; According to the stages

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yubin; Kim, Ari; Kim, Heung Yeol; Eo, Wan Kyu; Lee, Eun Sil; Chun, Sungwook

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the bone mineral density (BMD) in the lumbar spine and femur in postmenopausal women with cervical cancer and endometrial cancer without bone metastasis in comparison with that in healthy control postmenopausal women, and to assess the loss of BMD according to the cancer stage. Materials and methods: We analyzed the BMD of the lumbar spine and femur using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) in 218 patients with cervical cancer, 85 patients with endometrial cancer, and 259 healthy controls. The serum levels of calcium (Ca), phosphorus (P), osteocalcin (OSC), and total alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and urine deoxypyridinoline(DPL) were measured in all participants. Results: Age, body mass index, parity, and time since menopause were not significantly different between the three groups. Serum Ca level was higher in the cervical cancer group (p = 0.000), however, urine DPL was lower in endometrial cancer group (p = 0.000). The T-scores of basal BMD at the second and fourth lumbar vertebra (L2, L4) were significantly lower in patients with cervical cancer (p = 0.038, 0.000, respectively) compared to those in the healthy control groups. Additionally, the incidence of osteoporosis and osteopenia basal status of bone mass was significantly higher in patients with cervical cancer compared to that in controls (p = 0.016). No differences in basal BMD of the lumbar spine and femur were observed between patients with cervical cancer according to their stages. Conclusion: Our results suggest that postmenopausal women with cervical cancer have a lower BMD and are at increased risk of osteoporosis in the lumbar spine before receiving anticancer treatment compared with postmenopausal women with endometrial cancer. PMID:26185529

  10. NFBD1\\/MDC1 is a protein of oncogenic potential in human cervical cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chengfu Yuan; Youquan Bu; Changdong Wang; Faping Yi; Zhengmei Yang; Xiuning Huang; Li Cheng; Geli Liu; Yong Wang; Fangzhou Song

    A large nuclear protein of 2089 amino acids, NFBD1\\/MDC1 has recently been implicated in tumorigenesis and tumor growth. In\\u000a this study, we investigated its expression in cervical cancers and explored its function using gene knockdown approaches.\\u000a We report here that NFBD1 expression is substantial increased in 24 of 39 cases (61.5%) of cervical cancer tissues at the\\u000a mRNA level and

  11. Cervical dysplasia and cancer and the use of hormonal contraceptives in Jamaican women

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Norma McFarlane-Anderson; Patience E Bazuaye; Maria D Jackson; Monica Smikle; Horace M Fletcher

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study was conducted to determine whether use of hormonal contraceptives is associated with cervical dysplasia and cancer in a population where there is widespread use of hormonal contraception and the rates of cervical cancer remain high at 27.5\\/100,000. METHODS: A case-control study was conducted among women visiting the colposcopy and gynaelogical clinics at a tertiary referral hospital. Two

  12. Prognostic value of histopathology and trends in cervical cancer: a SEER population study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vincent Vinh-Hung; Claire Bourgain; Georges Vlastos; Gábor Cserni; Mark De Ridder; Guy Storme; Anne-Thérèse Vlastos

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Histopathology is a cornerstone in the diagnosis of cervical cancer but the prognostic value is controversial. METHODS: Women under active follow-up for histologically confirmed primary invasive cervical cancer were selected from the United States Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) 9-registries public use data 1973–2002. Only histologies with at least 100 cases were retained. Registry area, age, marital status,

  13. Requirement for Estrogen Receptor A in a Mouse Model for Human Papillomavirus-Associated Cervical Cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sang-Hyuk Chung; Kerri Wiedmeyer; Anny Shai; Kenneth S. Korach; Paul F. Lambert

    2008-01-01

    The majority of human cervical cancers are associated with the high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPV), which encode the potent E6 and E7 oncogenes. On prolonged treatment with physiologic levels of exogenous estrogen, K14E7 transgenic mice expressing HPV-16 E7 oncoprotein in their squamous epithelia succumb to uterine cervical cancer. Furthermore, prolonged withdrawal of exogenous estrogen results in complete or partial regression of

  14. Simultaneous Nonrigid Registration, Segmentation, and Tumor Detection in MRI Guided Cervical Cancer Radiation Therapy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chao Lu; Sudhakar Chelikani; David A. Jaffray; Michael F. Milosevic; Lawrence H. Staib; James S. Duncan

    2012-01-01

    External beam radiation therapy (EBRT) for the treatment of cancer enables accurate placement of radiation dose on the cancerous region. However, the deformation of soft tissue during the course of treatment, such as in cervical cancer, presents significant challenges for the delineation of the target volume and other structures of interest. Furthermore, the presence and regression of pathologies such as

  15. Aberrant Expression of Disintegrin-Metalloprotease Proteins in the Formation and Progression of Uterine Cervical Cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mohammed Shaker; Yuhki Yokoyama; Seiji Mori; Masahiko Tsujimoto; Naomasa Kawaguchi; Tohru Kiyono; Toru Nakano; Nariaki Matsuura

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Dysregulated expression of disintegrin-metalloprotease proteins [a disintegrin and metalloproteases (ADAMs) and ADAMs with thrombospondin motif (ADAMTSs)] has been reported in many types of cancers and is believed to play an important role in cancer formation and metastasis. However, little is known about the expression of ADAMs and ADAMTSs in the development of human cervical cancer. Methods: Reverse transcriptase polymerase

  16. Human papillomavirus prevalence and type distribution in invasive cervical cancer in sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Denny, Lynette; Adewole, Isaac; Anorlu, Rose; Dreyer, Greta; Moodley, Manivasan; Smith, Trudy; Snyman, Leon; Wiredu, Edwin; Molijn, Anco; Quint, Wim; Ramakrishnan, Gunasekaran; Schmidt, Johannes

    2014-03-15

    In sub-Saharan Africa, invasive cervical cancer (ICC) incidence and mortality are among the highest in the world. This cross-sectional epidemiological study assessed human papillomavirus (HPV) prevalence and type distribution in women with ICC in Ghana, Nigeria, and South Africa. Cervical biopsy specimens were obtained from women aged ? 21 years with lesions clinically suggestive of ICC. Histopathological diagnosis of ICC was determined by light microscopy examination of hematoxylin and eosin stained sections of paraffin-embedded cervical specimens; samples with a confirmed histopathological diagnosis underwent HPV DNA testing by polymerase chain reaction. HPV-positive specimens were typed by reverse hybridization line probe assay. Between October 2007 and March 2010, cervical specimens from 659 women were collected (167 in Ghana, 192 in Nigeria and 300 in South Africa); 570 cases were histologically confirmed as ICC. The tumor type was identified in 551/570 women with ICC; squamous cell carcinoma was observed in 476/570 (83.5%) cases. The HPV-positivity rate in ICC cases was 90.4% (515/570). In ICC cases with single HPV infection (447/515 [86.8%]), the most commonly detected HPV types were HPV16 (51.2%), HPV18 (17.2%), HPV35 (8.7%), HPV45 (7.4%), HPV33 (4.0%) and HPV52 (2.2%). The prevalence of single and multiple HPV infections seemed higher among HIV-positive women and HPV type distribution appeared to differ according to tumor type and HIV status. In conclusion, HPV16, 18, 45 and 35 were the most common HPV types in sub-Saharan African women with ICC and HPV infections were more common in HIV-positive women. PMID:23929250

  17. Cervical Cancer: Community Perception and Preventive Practices in an Urban Neighborhood of Lagos (Nigeria)

    PubMed Central

    Wright, K. O.; Aiyedehin, O.; Akinyinka, M. R.; Ilozumba, O.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Cervical cancer prevention in developing countries is suboptimal compared with the developed world where there are fewer deaths and improved survival rates. This study describes the perception and preventive practices on cervical cancer by residents of an urban neighborhood of Lagos, Nigeria. Methods. A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted on 317 consecutively recruited consenting participants at a medical outreach using a pretested, interviewer-administered, semistructured questionnaire. Data analysis was done using statistical package for social sciences version 19. Tests of significance were performed using 95% confidence interval with level of significance set at P < 0.05. Results. The majority of respondents were within 30–49 years of age (46.7%) and female (62.1%) and 70.3% had secondary level education and above. About 37.2% of respondents had heard about cervical cancer with 84.5% of the participants willing to attend a cervical cancer health education program. Among the female respondents, 4.1% had received the HPV vaccine, while 5.1% had undergone a Pap test. Awareness about cervical cancer was significantly higher with increasing age in the total population (P < 0.05). Conclusion. There is a need to improve awareness of at-risk groups and the menfolk about cervical cancer based on the immense benefit of male involvement in reproductive health matters. PMID:24971196

  18. High-Grade Cervical Dysplasia following Radiation Therapy for Invasive Cervical Cancer: A Report of Four Cases

    PubMed Central

    Salcedo, Mila Pontremoli; Milbourne, Andrea M.; Jhingran, Anuja; Eifel, Patricia J.; Ramirez, Pedro T.; Schmeler, Kathleen M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The standard treatment for locally advanced cervical cancer is chemoradiation, with the majority of patients having a complete response to the therapy. The current surveillance recommendations from the Society of Gynecologic Oncology include annual cytology, with a small proportion of patients subsequently diagnosed with high-grade cervical dysplasia (CIN 2/3). To date, there is limited information regarding the optimal treatment and outcome for patients diagnosed with CIN 2/3. The current report describes the diagnosis, management and outcome of 4 patients diagnosed with CIN 2/3 following chemoradiation. Case Description We describe 4 patients who developed CIN 2/3 seven months to 8 years following radiation therapy for locally advanced cervical cancer. All 4 patients were asymptomatic and the abnormalities were first detected by a Pap test. Three of the patients were managed conservatively with observation, and the CIN 2/3 resolved without intervention. One patient underwent 2 cervical conizations followed by a hysterectomy with no residual dysplasia noted on the hysterectomy specimen. Conclusion The majority of patients with recurrent cervical cancer after chemoradiation are symptomatic, and most cases are detected by a physical examination. The role of cytology, colposcopy and biopsies may be of limited value. Furthermore, the significance of the diagnosis of CIN 2/3 in patients previously treated with radiation therapy was not associated with recurrent disease in the 4 patients described. Our results suggest that cytology may be of limited value in detecting recurrence in patients following radiation therapy, even when CIN 2/3 is detected.

  19. 3D Radiation Therapy or Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Recurrent and Metastatic Cervical Cancer: The Shanghai Cancer Hospital Experience

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Su-Ping Liu; Xiao Huang; Gui-Hao Ke; Xiao-Wei Huang

    2012-01-01

    We evaluate the outcomes of irradiation by using three-dimensional radiation therapy (3D-RT) or intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for recurrent and metastatic cervical cancer. Between 2007 and 2010, 50 patients with recurrent and metastatic cervical cancer were treated using 3D-RT or IMRT. The median time interval between the initial treatment and the start of irradiation was 12 (6–51) months. Salvage surgery was