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Sample records for cell colony formation

  1. Study of budding yeast colony formation and its characterizations by using circular granular cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aprianti, D.; Haryanto, F.; Purqon, A.; Khotimah, S. N.; Viridi, S.

    2016-03-01

    Budding yeast can exhibit colony formation in solid substrate. The colony of pathogenic budding yeast can colonize various surfaces of the human body and medical devices. Furthermore, it can form biofilm that resists drug effective therapy. The formation of the colony is affected by the interaction between cells and with its growth media. The cell budding pattern holds an important role in colony expansion. To study this colony growth, the molecular dynamic method was chosen to simulate the interaction between budding yeast cells. Every cell was modelled by circular granular cells, which can grow and produce buds. Cohesion force, contact force, and Stokes force govern this model to mimic the interaction between cells and with the growth substrate. Characterization was determined by the maximum (L max) and minimum (L min) distances between two cells within the colony and whether two lines that connect the two cells in the maximum and minimum distances intersect each other. Therefore, it can be recognized the colony shape in circular, oval, and irregular shapes. Simulation resulted that colony formation are mostly in oval shape with little branch. It also shows that greater cohesion strength obtains more compact colony formation.

  2. Scatter factor influences the formation of prostate epithelial cell colonies on bone marrow stroma in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lang, S H; Clarke, N W; George, N J; Testa, N G

    1999-06-01

    Prostate cancer metastases form selectively in the bone marrow. Previously we demonstrated motility was important for the formation of primary prostatic epithelial cell colonies in bone marrow stroma (BMS) co-culture. In this study we looked at the influence of motility factors on the colony formation of epithelial cells derived from benign (bPEC) or malignant (mPEC) prostate tissue. After 7 days co-culture we found that anti-scatter factor consistently inhibited prostate epithelial cell colony formation on BMS (7/7 mPEC and 4/7 bPEC samples showed significant inhibition). Antibodies against bFGF and 5T4 did not significantly affect colony formation. Addition of fibroblast conditioned media (derived from benign prostates) to co-cultures stimulated the colony formation of bPEC (170%) and mPEC (252%). This stimulation was eliminated by depletion of SF from the conditioned media. Immunohistochemical staining found c-Met expression in 5/6 bPEC cultures and 7/9 mPEC cultures. When grown in BMS co-culture expression of c-Met was positive in 3/6 bPEC and 2/7 mPEC samples. In conclusion, scatter factor influences the in vitro formation of prostate epithelial cell colonies on BMS co-culture. PMID:10545020

  3. Colony formation and interleukin 2 production by leukaemic human T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Krajewski, A S; Dewar, A E; Seidelin, P H; Murray, R

    1983-01-01

    PHA-induced colony formation and interleukin 2 (IL-2) production were studied in four patients with T cell leukaemia (three cases OKT4+/T helper and one case OKT8+/T cytotoxic suppressor). Cases of T helper cell leukaemia showed colony formation that was comparable to normal purified blood T cells and was not dependent on the addition of conditioned medium, containing IL-2 activity, to cultures. In contrast the T suppressor cell leukaemia formed colonies only when cultures were supplemented with IL-2 containing medium. When IL-2 production by PHA stimulated cells was measured culture supernatants from the three T helper cell leukaemias all showed normal or high levels of activity, when compared to normal blood mononuclear cells, whereas the T suppressor cell leukaemia showed no activity. PMID:6604606

  4. Arsenic promotes centrosome abnormalities and cell colony formation in p53 compromised human lung cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liao Weiting; Lin Pinpin; Cheng, T.-S.; Yu, H.-S.; Chang, Louis W.

    2007-12-01

    Epidemiological evidence indicated that residents, especially cigarette smokers, in arseniasis areas had significantly higher lung cancer risk than those living in non-arseniasis areas. Thus, an interaction between arsenic and cigarette smoking in lung carcinogenesis was suspected. p53 dysfunction or mutation in lung epithelial cells was frequently observed in cigarette smokers. Our present study was to explore the differential effects by arsenic on H1355 cells (human lung adenocarcinoma cell line with mutation in p53), BEAS-2B (immortalized lung epithelial cell with functional p53) and pifithrin-{alpha}-treated BEAS-2B cells (p53-inhibited cells). These cells were treated with different doses of sodium arsenite (0, 0.1, 1, 5 and 10 {mu}M) for 48 h. A greater reduction in cell viability was observed in the BEAS-2B cells vs. p53 compromised cells (H1355 or p53-inhibited BEAS-2B). Similar observation was also made on 7-day cell survival (growth) study. TUNEL analysis confirmed that there was indeed a significantly reduced arsenite-induced apoptosis found in p53-compromised cells. Centrosomal abnormality has been attributed to eventual chromosomal missegregation, aneuploidy and tumorigenesis. In our present study, reduced p21 and Gadd45a expressions and increased centrosomal abnormality (atopic and multiple centrosomes) were observed in both arsenite-treated H1355 and p53-inhibited BEAS-2B cells as compared with similarly treated BEAS-2B cells. Increased anchorage-independent growth (colony formation) of BEAS-2B cells co-treated with pifithrin-{alpha} and 5 {mu}M sodium arsenite was also observed in soft agar. Our present investigation demonstrated that arsenic would act specifically on p53 compromised cells (either with p53 dysfunction or inhibited) to induce centrosomal abnormality and colony formation. These findings provided strong evidence on the carcinogenic promotional role of arsenic, especially under the condition of p53 dysfunction.

  5. Biophysical Properties of Scaffolds Modulate Human Blood Vessel Formation from Circulating Endothelial Colony-Forming Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Critser, Paul J.; Yoder, Mervin C.

    A functional vascular system forms early in development and is continually remodeled throughout the life of the organism. Impairment to the regeneration or repair of this system leads to tissue ischemia, dysfunction, and disease. The process of vascular formation and remodeling is complex, relying on local microenvironmental cues, cytokine signaling, and multiple cell types to function properly. Tissue engineering strategies have attempted to exploit these mechanisms to develop functional vascular networks for the generation of artificial tissues and therapeutic strategies to restore tissue homeostasis. The success of these strategies requires the isolation of appropriate progenitor cell sources which are straightforward to obtain, display high proliferative potential, and demonstrate an ability to form functional vessels. Several populations are of interest including endothelial colony-forming cells, a subpopulation of endothelial progenitor cells. Additionally, the development of scaffolds to deliver and support progenitor cell survival and function is crucial for the formation of functional vascular networks. The composition and biophysical properties of these scaffolds have been shown to modulate endothelial cell behavior and vessel formation. However, further investigation is needed to better understand how these mechanical properties and biophysical properties impact vessel formation. Additionally, several other cell populations are involved in neoangiogenesis and formation of tissue parenchyma and an understanding of the potential impact of these cell populations on the biophysical properties of scaffolds will also be needed to advance these strategies. This chapter examines how the biophysical properties of matrix scaffolds can influence vessel formation and remodeling and, in particular, the impact on in vivo human endothelial progenitor cell vessel formation.

  6. Formation and dissolution of bacterial colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Christoph A.; Lin, Yen Ting; Biais, Nicolas; Zaburdaev, Vasily

    2015-09-01

    Many organisms form colonies for a transient period of time to withstand environmental pressure. Bacterial biofilms are a prototypical example of such behavior. Despite significant interest across disciplines, physical mechanisms governing the formation and dissolution of bacterial colonies are still poorly understood. Starting from a kinetic description of motile and interacting cells we derive a hydrodynamic equation for their density on a surface, where most of the kinetic coefficients are estimated from experimental data for N. gonorrhoeae bacteria. We use it to describe the formation of multiple colonies with sizes consistent with experimental observations. Finally, we show how the changes in the cell-to-cell interactions lead to the dissolution of the bacterial colonies. The successful application of kinetic theory to a complex far from equilibrium system such as formation and dissolution of living bacterial colonies potentially paves the way for the physical quantification of the initial stages of biofilm formation.

  7. Formation and dissolution of bacterial colonies.

    PubMed

    Weber, Christoph A; Lin, Yen Ting; Biais, Nicolas; Zaburdaev, Vasily

    2015-09-01

    Many organisms form colonies for a transient period of time to withstand environmental pressure. Bacterial biofilms are a prototypical example of such behavior. Despite significant interest across disciplines, physical mechanisms governing the formation and dissolution of bacterial colonies are still poorly understood. Starting from a kinetic description of motile and interacting cells we derive a hydrodynamic equation for their density on a surface, where most of the kinetic coefficients are estimated from experimental data for N. gonorrhoeae bacteria. We use it to describe the formation of multiple colonies with sizes consistent with experimental observations. Finally, we show how the changes in the cell-to-cell interactions lead to the dissolution of the bacterial colonies. The successful application of kinetic theory to a complex far from equilibrium system such as formation and dissolution of living bacterial colonies potentially paves the way for the physical quantification of the initial stages of biofilm formation. PMID:26465495

  8. Cells capable of colony formation in the peripheral blood of man.

    PubMed

    McCredie, K B; Hersh, E M; Freireich, E J

    1971-01-22

    Colony-forming cells have been found in the peripheral blood of man and have been grown in vitro by use of a soft agar gel technique. It has been possible to collect these cells with a blood-cell separator in numbers similar to those found in the peripheral circulation. Repeat leukapheresis of the same donor does not reduce the number of circulating colony-forming cells. PMID:5538844

  9. Disrupting the PIKE-A/Akt interaction inhibits glioblastoma cell survival, migration, invasion and colony formation

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Q; He, K; Liu, X; Pham, C; Meyerkord, C; Fu, H; Ye, K

    2013-01-01

    The cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) amplicon is frequently amplified in numerous human cancers including gliomas. PIKE-A, a proto-oncogene that is one of the important components of the CDK4 amplicon, binds to and enhances the kinase activity of Akt, thereby promoting cancer progression. To define the roles of the PIKE-A/Akt interaction in glioblastoma multiform (GBM) progression, we used biochemical protein/protein interaction (PPI) assays and live cell fluorescence-based protein complementation assays to search for small peptide antagonist from these proteins that were able to block their interaction. Here, we show that disruption of the interaction between PIKE-A and Akt by the small peptides significantly reduces glioblastoma cell proliferation, colony formation, migration and invasion. Disruption of PIKE-A/Akt association potently suppressed GBM cell proliferation and sensitized the cells to two clinical drugs that are currently used to treat GBM. Interestingly, GBM cells containing the CDK4 amplicon were more responsive to the inhibition of the PIKE-A/Akt interaction than GBM cells lacking this amplicon. Taken together, our findings provide proof-of-principle that blocking a PPI that is essential for cancer progression provides a valuable strategy for therapeutic discovery. PMID:22450747

  10. Enhancement of committed hematopoietic stem cell colony formation by nandrolone decanoate after sublethal whole body irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Gallicchio, V.S.; Chen, M.G.; Watts, T.D.

    1984-11-01

    The ability of an anabolic steroid, nandrolone decanoate, to increase committed topoietic stem cell (CFU-gm, CFU-e, and BFU-e) colony formation after sublethal irradiation was evaluated. Immediately after receiving whole body irradiation and on the next two days, each mouse was injected intraperitoneally with nandrolone decanoate (1.25 mg) in propylene glycol. Irradiated control mice received only propylene glycol. Compared to controls, drug-treated mice showed marked peripheral blood leukocytosis and more stable packed red cell volume. Drug-treated mice also demonstrated increased erythropoiesis, as CFU-e/BFU-e concentrations from both marrow (9% to 581%) and spleen (15% to 797%) were elevated. Granulopoiesis was increased similarly, as CFU-gm concentrations from marrow (38% to 685%) and spleen (9% to 373%) were elevated. These results demonstrate that nandrolone decanoate enhances hematopoietic stem cell recovery after sublethal whole body irradiation. This suggests that following hematopoietic suppression, nandrolone decanoate may stimulate the recovery of hematopoiesis at the stem cell level and in peripheral blood.

  11. Abiotic factors in colony formation: effects of nutrition and light on extracellular polysaccharide production and cell aggregates of Microcystis aeruginosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhen; Kong, Fanxiang

    2013-07-01

    Colony morphology is important for Microcystis to sustain a competitive advantage in eutrophic lakes. The mechanism of colony formation in Microcystis is currently unclear. Extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) has been reported to play an important role in cell aggregate formation of some phytoplankton. Microcystis aeruginosa was cultivated under varied abiotic conditions, including different nutrient, light, and temperature conditions, to investigate their effects on EPS production and morphological change. The results show that nutrient concentration and light intensity have great effects on EPS productionin M. aeruginosa. There was a considerable increase in EPS production after M. aeruginosa was cultivated in adjusted culture conditions similar to those present in the field (28.9 mg C/L, 1.98 mg N/L, 0.65 mg P/L, light intensity: 100 μmol/(m2 · s)). These results indicate that abiotic factors might be one of the triggers for colony formation in Microcystis.

  12. Convergence of bone morphogenetic protein and laminin-1 signaling pathways promotes proliferation and colony formation by fetal mouse pancreatic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Fangxu . E-mail: jiang@wehi.edu.au; Harrison, Leonard C.

    2005-08-01

    We previously reported that bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), members of the transforming growth factor superfamily, together with the basement membrane glycoprotein laminin-1 (Ln-1), promote proliferation of fetal pancreatic cells and formation of colonies containing peripheral insulin-positive cells. Here, we further investigate the cross-talk between BMP and Ln-1 signals. By RT-PCR, receptors for BMP (BMPR) (excepting BMPR-1B) and Ln-1 were expressed in the fetal pancreas between E13.5 and E17.5. Specific blocking antibodies to BMP-4 and -6 and selective BMP antagonists partially inhibited colony formation by fetal pancreas cells. Colony formation induced by BMP-6 and Ln-1 was completely abolished in a dose-dependent manner by blocking Ln-1 binding to its {alpha}{sub 6} integrin and {alpha}-dystroglycan receptors or by blocking the Ln-1 signaling molecules, phosphatidyl-inositol-3-kinase (P13K) and MAP kinase kinase-1. These results demonstrate a convergence of BMP and Ln-1 signaling through P13K and MAP kinase pathways to induce proliferation and colony formation in E15.5 fetal mouse pancreatic cells.

  13. Substrate Stiffness Affects Human Keratinocyte Colony Formation

    PubMed Central

    Zarkoob, Hoda; Bodduluri, Sandeep; Ponnaluri, Sailahari V.; Selby, John C.; Sander, Edward A.

    2015-01-01

    Restoration of epidermal organization and function in response to a variety of pathophysiological insults is critically dependent on coordinated keratinocyte migration, proliferation, and stratification during the process of wound healing. These processes are mediated by the reconfiguration of both cell-cell (desmosomes, adherens junctions) and cell-matrix (focal adhesions, hemidesmosomes) junctions and the cytoskeletal filament networks that they serve to interconnect. In this study, we investigated the role of substrate elasticity (stiffness) on keratinocyte colony formation in vitro during the process of nascent epithelial sheet formation as triggered by the calcium switch model of keratinocyte culture. Keratinocytes cultured on pepsin digested type I collagen coated soft (nominal E = 1.2 kPa) polyacrylamide gels embedded with fluorescent microspheres exhibited (i) smaller spread contact areas, (ii) increased migration velocities, and (iii) increased rates of colony formation with more cells per colony than did keratinocytes cultured on stiff (nominal E = 24 kPa) polyacrylamide gels. As assessed by tracking of embedded microsphere displacements, keratinocytes cultured on soft substrates generated large local substrate deformations that appeared to recruit adjacent keratinocytes into joining an evolving colony. Together with the observed differences in keratinocyte kinematics and substrate deformations, we developed two ad hoc analyses, termed distance rank (DR) and radius of cooperativity (RC), that help to objectively ascribe what we perceive as increasingly cooperative behavior of keratinocytes cultured on soft versus stiff gels during the process of colony formation. We hypothesize that the differences in keratinocyte colony formation observed in our experiments could be due to cell-cell mechanical signaling generated via local substrate deformations that appear to be correlated with the increased expression of β4 integrin within keratinocytes positioned

  14. Inhibition of colony formation in agarose of metastatic human breast carcinoma and melanoma cells by synthetic glycoamine analogs.

    PubMed

    Glinsky, G V; Mossine, V V; Price, J E; Bielenberg, D; Glinsky, V V; Ananthaswamy, H N; Feather, M S

    1996-05-01

    We studied the influence of 10 synthetic glycoamine analogs on colony formation in 0.3 and 0.9% agarose by metastatic human breast carcinoma (MDA-MB-435) and melanoma (TXM-13) cells. Nine synthetic analogs significantly inhibited the colony formation in 0.9% agarose of MDA-MB-435 human breast carcinoma cells; five compounds caused a 73-83% reduction of colony formation. Seven synthetic glycoamines caused a significant inhibition of colony formation in 0.9% agarose by TXM-13 melanoma cells with the inhibitory effect ranging from 71 to 87%. The 50% inhibition (I50) doses and relative activity rank of the compounds were similar for both breast carcinoma and melanoma cell lines. The murine B16 melanoma cell aggregation assay was employed to elucidate the potential mechanism(s) of the inhibitory activity of synthetic glycoamines. The relative activity ranks of the compounds based on the independently determined I50 doses for both cell aggregation and clonogenic growth assays were very similar for the four most active synthetic analogs and clearly indicated the importance of hydrophobic amino acid in mediating the bioactivity of synthetic glycoamines. In both experimental systems (clonogenic growth in agarose and cell aggregation assay) the leading compound was N-(1-deoxy-D-fructos-1-yl)-D-leucine (Fru-D-Leu) and the least active analog was N-(l-deoxy-D-fructos-1-yl)-glycine (Fru-Gly). These results show that synthetic glycoamines may act by competing for specific carbohydrate-lectin interactions, particularly those involving beta-galactoside-specific lectins expressed on metastatic cells. PMID:8674280

  15. Freeze-Drying of Mononuclear Cells Derived from Umbilical Cord Blood Followed by Colony Formation

    PubMed Central

    Natan, Dity; Nagler, Arnon; Arav, Amir

    2009-01-01

    Background We recently showed that freeze-dried cells stored for 3 years at room temperature can direct embryonic development following cloning. However, viability, as evaluated by membrane integrity of the cells after freeze-drying, was very low; and it was mainly the DNA integrity that was preserved. In the present study, we improved the cells' viability and functionality after freeze-drying. Methodology/Principal Findings We optimized the conditions of directional freezing, i.e. interface velocity and cell concentration, and we added the antioxidant EGCG to the freezing solution. The study was performed on mononuclear cells (MNCs) derived from human umbilical cord blood. After freeze-drying, we tested the viability, number of CD34+-presenting cells and ability of the rehydrated hematopoietic stem cells to differentiate into different blood cells in culture. The viability of the MNCs after freeze-drying and rehydration with pure water was 88%–91%. The total number of CD34+-presenting cells and the number of colonies did not change significantly when evaluated before freezing, after freeze-thawing, and after freeze-drying (5.4×104±4.7, 3.49×104±6 and 6.31×104±12.27 cells, respectively, and 31±25.15, 47±45.8 and 23.44±13.3 colonies, respectively). Conclusions This is the first report of nucleated cells which have been dried and then rehydrated with double-distilled water remaining viable, and of hematopoietic stem cells retaining their ability to differentiate into different blood cells. PMID:19381290

  16. Formation of Osteogenic Colonies on Well-Defined Adhesion Peptides by Freshly-Isolated Human Marrow Cells

    PubMed Central

    Au, Ada; Boehm, Cynthia A.; Mayes, Anne M.; Muschler, George F.; Griffith, Linda G.

    2007-01-01

    Bone graft performance can be enhanced by addition of connective tissue progenitors (CTPs) from fresh bone marrow in a manner that concentrates the CTP cell population within the graft. Here, we used small peptide adhesion ligands presented against an otherwise adhesion-resistant synthetic polymer background in order to illuminate the molecular basis for the attachment and colony formation by osteogenic CTPs from fresh human marrow, and contrast the behavior of fresh marrow to many commonly-used osteogenic cell sources. The linear GRGDSPY ligand was as effective as tissue culture polystyrene in fostering attachment of culture-expanded porcine CTPs. Although this GRGDSPY peptide was more effective than control peptides in fostering alkaline phosphatase-positive (AP) colony formation from primary human marrow in 5 of the 7 patients tested, GRGDSPY was as effective as the control glass substrate in only one patient of 7. Thus, the peptide appears capable of enabling osteoblastic development from only a subpopulation of CTPs in marrow. The bone sialoprotein-derived peptide FHRRIKA was ineffective in fostering attachment of primary culture-expanded pig CTPs, although it was as effective as GRGDSPY in fostering AP-positive colonies from fresh human marrow. This study provides insights into integrin-mediated behaviors of CTPs and highlights differences between freshly-isolated marrow and culture-expanded cells. PMID:17222453

  17. Loss of suppression of normal bone marrow colony formation by leukemic cell lines after differentiation is induced by chemical agents.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, H N; Tsiftsoglou, A S; Robinson, S H

    1985-01-01

    The human leukemic cell lines K562 and HL-60 were cocultured with normal bone marrow (BM) cells. Coculture with 10(4) K562 or HL-60 cells results in 50% inhibition of normal CFU-E and BFU-E colony formation. However, when the same number of K562 and HL-60 cells is first treated for two to five days with agents that induce their differentiation, a gradual loss in their capacity to inhibit CFU-E and BFU-E colony formation is observed. The inhibitory material in K562 cells is soluble and present in conditioned medium from cultures of these cells. The degree to which leukemic cell suppression of CFU-E and BFU-E growth is reversed is correlated with the time of exposure to the inducing agent. Suppression is no longer evident after five days of prior treatment with inducers. In fact, up to a 90% stimulation of CFU-E growth is observed in cocultures with K562 cells that have been pretreated with 30 to 70 mumol/L hemin for five days. K562 cells treated with concentrations of hemin as low as 30 mumol/L demonstrate increased hemoglobin synthesis and grow normally, but no longer have an inhibitory effect on CFU-E growth. Hence, reversal of normal BM growth inhibition must be caused by the more differentiated state of the K562 cells and not by a decrease in the number of these cells with treatment. Thus, induction of differentiation in cultured leukemic cells not only alters the malignant cell phenotype but also permits improved growth of accompanying normal marrow progenitor cells. Both are desired effects of chemotherapy. PMID:3838080

  18. Downregulation of ROS-FIG inhibits cell proliferation, colony-formation, cell cycle progression, migration and invasion, while inducing apoptosis in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    DENG, GANG; HU, CHENGHUAN; ZHU, LEI; HUANG, FEIZHOU; HUANG, WEI; XU, HONGBO; NIE, WANPIN

    2014-01-01

    Intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC) is the second most common primary liver cancer with poor responsiveness to existing drug therapies. Therefore, novel treatment strategies against ICC are required to improve survival. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the role of fused-in-glioblastoma-c-ros-oncogene1 (FIG-ROS) fusion gene in ICC. ROS was positively expressed in ICC tissues and HUCCT1 cells. Plasmids expressing ROS- and FIG-specific shRNAs were constructed and transfected into HUCCT1 cells. The results showed that single transfection of ROS- or FIG-specific shRNA inhibited HUCCT1 cell proliferation, colony formation, cell cycle progression, migration and invasion, while inducing apoptosis. Moreover, the co-inhibition of ROS- and FIG-specific shRNA exhibited stronger effects on HUCCT1 cell proliferation, apoptosis, colony formation, cell cycle progression, migration and invasion, when compared to single inhibition of ROS and FIG. Furthermore, findings of this study suggested that the AKT signaling pathway was involved in the ROS-FIG-mediated biological processes of HUCCT1 cells. In summary, the results suggest that FIG-ROS plays an oncogenic role in ICC. Additionally, ROS1-6290 and FIG-363 segments may become effective therapeutic targets for ICC harboring ROS-FIG fusion protein. PMID:24968753

  19. Ferulic acid decreases cell viability and colony formation while inhibiting migration of MIA PaCa-2 human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Fahrioğlu, Umut; Dodurga, Yavuz; Elmas, Levent; Seçme, Mücahit

    2016-01-15

    Novel and combinatorial treatment methods are becoming sought after entities in cancer treatment and these treatments are even more valuable for pancreatic cancer. The scientists are always on the lookout for new chemicals to help them in their fight against cancer. In this study, we examine the effects of ferulic acid (FA), a phenolic compound, on gene expression, viability, colony formation and migration/invasion in the cultured MIA PaCa-2 human pancreatic cancer cell. Cytotoxic effects of FA were determined by using trypan blue dye exclusion test and Cell TiterGlo (CTG) assay. IC50 dose in MIA PaCa-2 cells was detected as 500μM/ml at the 72nd hour. Expression profiles of certain cell cycle and apoptosis genes such as CCND1 (cyclin D1),CDK4, CDK6, RB, p21, p16, p53, caspase-3, caspase-9, caspase-8, caspase-10, Bcl-2, BCL-XL,BID, DR4,DR5,FADD,TRADD,PARP, APAF, Bax, Akt, PTEN, PUMA, NOXA, MMP2, MMP9, TIMP1 and TIMP2 were determined by real-time PCR. The effect of FA on cell viability was determined by CellTiter-Glo® Luminescent Cell Viability Assay. Additionally, effects of FA on colony formation and invasion were also investigated. It was observed that FA caused a significant decrease in the expression of CCND1, CDK 4/6, Bcl2 and caspase 8 and 10 in the MIA PaCa-2 cells while causing an increase in the expression of p53, Bax, PTEN caspase 3 and 9. FA was observed to decrease colony formation while inhibiting cell invasion and migration as observed by the BioCoat Matrigel Invasion Chamber guide and colony formation assays. In conclusion, FA is thought to behave as an anti-cancer agent by affecting cell cycle, apoptotic, invasion and colony formation behavior of MIA PaCa-2 cells. Therefore, FA is placed as a strong candidate for further studies aimed at finding a better, more effective treatment approach for pancreatic cancer. PMID:26516023

  20. Soft agar colony formation of bladder cells during carcinogenesis induced by N-butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine and application to detection of bladder cancer promoters.

    PubMed

    Hashimura, T; Kanamaru, H; Yoshida, O

    1987-05-01

    N-Butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine (BBN) was given to male Fischer 344 rats at a dose of 0.05% in drinking water for 2, 4, 6 and 12 weeks, and double soft agar colony formation of the uroepithelial cells was determined periodically, during and after this administration. In the group administered BBN for 2 weeks, no significant colony growth was observed until week 8. In the group given BBN for 4 weeks, colony growth was observed at week 4 and the numbers of colonies remained constant until week 8. In the group given BBN for 6 weeks, significant colony growth was observed at weeks 6 and 8. In the group on BBN for 12 weeks, colonies grew from week 4 and significant numbers of colonies were observed from week 6, increasing up to week 10. Colony formation preceded papilloma development in the rat bladder, and was dependent on the duration of BBN administration. The effect of amino acids and sodium saccharin on colony formation was also evaluated. The rats were given 0.05% BBN for 3 weeks, followed immediately by the administration for 9 weeks of 2% L-tryptophan, 1% D-tryptophan, 2% L-leucine, 2% D-leucine, 2% DL-leucine, 2% L-isoleucine, 2% DL-isoleucine or 5% sodium saccharin in the diet. At week 12, the numbers of colonies were significantly higher in the groups given sodium saccharin, L-leucine, DL-leucine, L-isoleucine, DL-isoleucine and D-tryptophan. This method provides a potentially useful approach toward analyzing the early events in bladder carcinogenesis and may be applicable to detect new bladder carcinogens and promoters. PMID:3112059

  1. Matrix rigidity regulates spatiotemporal dynamics of Cdc42 activity and vacuole formation kinetics of endothelial colony forming cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seung Joon; Wan, Qiaoqiao; Cho, Eunhye; Han, Bumsoo; Yoder, Mervin C.; Voytik-Harbin, Sherry L.; Na, Sungsoo

    2014-01-01

    Recent evidence has shown that endothelial colony forming cells (ECFCs) may serve as a cell therapy for improving blood vessel formation in subjects with vascular injury, largely due to their robust vasculogenic potential. The Rho family GTPase Cdc42 is known to play a primary role in this vasculogenesis process, but little is known about how extracellular matrix (ECM) rigidity affects Cdc42 activity during the process. In this study, we addressed two questions: Does matrix rigidity affect Cdc42 activity in ECFC undergoing early vacuole formation? How is the spatiotemporal activation of Cdc42 related to ECFC vacuole formation? A fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based Cdc42 biosensor was used to examine the effects of the rigidity of three-dimensional (3D) collagen matrices on spatiotemporal activity of Cdc42 in ECFCs. Collagen matrix stiffness was modulated by varying the collagen concentration and therefore fibril density. The results showed that soft (150 Pa) matrices induced an increased level of Cdc42 activity compared to stiff (1 kPa) matrices. Time-course imaging and colocalization analysis of Cdc42 activity and vacuole formation revealed that Cdc42 activity was colocalized to the periphery of cytoplasmic vacuoles. Moreover, soft matrices generated faster and larger vacuoles than stiff matrices. The matrix-driven vacuole formation was enhanced by a constitutively active Cdc42 mutant, but significantly inhibited by a dominant-negative Cdc42 mutant. Collectively, the results suggest that matrix rigidity is a strong regulator of Cdc42 activity and vacuole formation kinetics, and that enhanced activity of Cdc42 is an important step in early vacuole formation in ECFCs. PMID:24393843

  2. Utilization of the Soft Agar Colony Formation Assay to Identify Inhibitors of Tumorigenicity in Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Horibata, Sachi; Vo, Tommy V; Subramanian, Venkataraman; Thompson, Paul R; Coonrod, Scott A

    2015-01-01

    Given the inherent difficulties in investigating the mechanisms of tumor progression in vivo, cell-based assays such as the soft agar colony formation assay (hereafter called soft agar assay), which measures the ability of cells to proliferate in semi-solid matrices, remain a hallmark of cancer research. A key advantage of this technique over conventional 2D monolayer or 3D spheroid cell culture assays is the close mimicry of the 3D cellular environment to that seen in vivo. Importantly, the soft agar assay also provides an ideal tool to rigorously test the effects of novel compounds or treatment conditions on cell proliferation and migration. Additionally, this assay enables the quantitative assessment of cell transformation potential within the context of genetic perturbations. We recently identified peptidylarginine deiminase 2 (PADI2) as a potential breast cancer biomarker and therapeutic target. Here we highlight the utility of the soft agar assay for preclinical anti-cancer studies by testing the effects of the PADI inhibitor, BB-Cl-amidine (BB-CLA), on the tumorigenicity of human ductal carcinoma in situ (MCF10DCIS) cells. PMID:26067809

  3. Increased Potency of the PHSCN Dendrimer as an Inhibitor of Human Prostate Cancer Cell Invasion, Extravasation, and Lung Colony Formation

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Hongren; Zeng, Zhao-Zhu; Fay, Kevin S.; Staszewski, Evan D.; Veine, Donna M.; Livant, Donna L.

    2011-01-01

    Background Activated α5β1 integrin occurs specifically on tumor cells and on endothelial cells of tumor–associated vasculature, and plays a key role in invasion and metastasis. The PHSCN peptide (Ac-PHSCN-NH2) preferentially binds activated α5β1, to block invasion in vitro, and inhibit growth, metastasis and tumor recurrence in preclinical models of prostate cancer. In Phase I clinical trial, systemic Ac-PHSCN-NH2 monotherapy was well tolerated, and metastatic disease progression was prevented for 4–14 months in one third of treated patients. Results We have developed a significantly more potent derivative, the PHSCN-polylysine dendrimer (Ac-PHSCNGGK-MAP). Using in vitro invasion assays with naturally serum-free basement membranes, we observed that the PHSCN dendrimer was 130– to 1900–fold more potent than the PHSCN peptide at blocking α5β1–mediated invasion by DU 145 and PC-3 human prostate cancer cells, whether invasion was induced by serum, or by the Ac-PHSRN-NH2 peptide, under serum-free conditions. The PHSCN dendrimer was also approximately 800 times more effective than PHSCN peptide at preventing DU 145 and PC-3 extravasation in the lungs of athymic mice. Chou-Talalay analysis suggested that inhibition of both invasion in vitro and extravasation in vivo by the PHSCN dendrimer are highly synergistic. We found that many extravasated DU 145 and PC-3 cells go on to develop into metastatic colonies, and that a single pretreatment with the PHSCN dendrimer was 100–fold more affective than the PHSCN peptide at reducing lung colony formation. Conclusions Since many patients newly diagnosed with prostate cancer already have locally advanced or metastatic disease, the availability of a well-tolerated, nontoxic systemic therapy, like the PHSCN dendrimer, which prevents metastatic progression by inhibiting invasion, could be very beneficial. PMID:20339907

  4. The mycotoxin zearalenone enhances cell proliferation, colony formation and promotes cell migration in the human colon carcinoma cell line HCT116.

    PubMed

    Abassi, Haila; Ayed-Boussema, Imen; Shirley, Sarah; Abid, Salwa; Bacha, Hassen; Micheau, Olivier

    2016-07-01

    Zearalenone (ZEN) and Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) are fungal secondary metabolites produced by Fusarium and Aspergillus genera, respectively. These mycotoxins are found world-wide as corn and wheat contaminants. AFB1 is probably the most toxic and carcinogenic mycotoxin. It has been demonstrated to be mutagenic, genotoxic, and hepatocarcinogenic. ZEN is a non-steroidal estrogenic mycotoxin that displays hepatotoxicity, immunotoxicity and genotoxicity. Its mutagenic and carcinogenic properties have so far remained controversial and questionable. Using the colon carcinoma cell line HCT116, we will show here that ZEN, at low concentrations, enhances cell proliferation, increases colony formation and fastens cell migration after wound healing. The highest effect of ZEN was observed at a concentration 10 times lower as compared to AFB1. Our findings suggest thus that this mycotoxin exhibits carcinogenesis-like properties in HCT116 cells. PMID:27084041

  5. Mesenchymal stromal cells, colony-forming unit fibroblasts, from bone marrow of untreated advanced breast and lung cancer patients suppress fibroblast colony formation from healthy marrow.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Erica Leonor; Labovsky, Vivian; La Russa, Vincent; Vallone, Valeria Fernández; Honegger, Alba Elizabeth; Belloc, Carlos Gabriel; Wen, Huei Chi; Bordenave, Raúl Horacio; Bullorsky, Eduardo Oscar; Feldman, Leonardo; Chasseing, Norma Alejandra

    2010-03-01

    We have shown that bone marrow (BM) from untreated advanced lung and breast cancer patients (LCP and BCP) have a reduced number of colony-forming unit fibroblasts (CFU-Fs) or mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Factors that regulate the proliferation and differentiation of CFU-F are produced by the patients' BM microenvironment. We have now examined whether conditioned media (CM) from patients' CFU-F-derived stromal cells also inhibits the colony-forming efficiency (CFE) of CFU-F in primary cultures from healthy volunteers (HV)-BM. Thus the number and proliferation potential of HV-CFU-F were also found to be decreased and similar to colony numbers and colony size of patients' CFU-F. Stromal cells from both of these types of colonies appeared relatively larger and lacked the characteristic spindle morphology typically seen in healthy stromal cells. We developed an arbitrary mesenchymal stromal cell maturational index by taking three measures consisting of stromal cell surface area, longitudinal and horizontal axis. All stromal indices derived from HV-CFU-F grown in patients' CM were similar to those from stromal elements derived from patients' CFU-F. These indices were markedly higher than stromal indices typical of HV-CFU-F cultured in healthy CM or standard medium [alpha-medium plus 20% heat-inactivated fetal bovine serum (FBS)]. Patients' CM had increased concentrations of the CFU-F inhibitor, GM-CSF, and low levels of bFGF and Dkk-1, strong promoters of self-renewal of MSCs, compared to the levels quantified in CM from HV-CFU-F. Moreover, the majority of patients' MSCs were unresponsive in standard medium and healthy CM to give CFU-F, indicating that the majority of mesenchymal stromal cells from patients' CFU-F are locked in maturational arrest. These results show that alterations of GM-CSF, bFGF, and Dkk-1 are associated with deficient cloning and maturation arrest of CFU-F. Defective autocrine and paracrine mechanisms may be involved in the BM microenvironments of

  6. Robust conversion of marrow cells to skeletal muscle with formation of marrow-derived muscle cell colonies: A multifactorial process

    SciTech Connect

    Abedi, Mehrdad; Greer, Deborah A.; Colvin, Gerald A.; Demers, Delia A.; Dooner, Mark S.; Harpel, Jasha A.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Lambert, Jean-Francois; Quesenberry, Peter J.

    2004-01-10

    Murine marrow cells are capable of repopulating skeletal muscle fibers. A point of concern has been the robustness of such conversions. We have investigated the impact of type of cell delivery, muscle injury, nature of delivered cell, and stem cell mobilizations on marrow to muscle conversion. We transplanted GFP transgenic marrow into irradiated C57BL/6 mice and then injured anterior tibialis muscle by cardiotoxin. One month after injury, sections were analyzed by standard and deconvolutional microscopy for expression of muscle and hematopietic markers. Irradiation was essential to conversion although whether by injury or induction of chimerism is not clear. Cardiotoxin and to a lesser extent PBS injected muscles showed significant number of GFP+ muscle fibers while uninjected muscles showed only rare GFP+ cells. Marrow conversion to muscle was increased by two cycles of G-CSF mobilization and to a lesser extent with G-CSF and steel or GM-CSF. Transplantation of female GFP to male C57 BL/6 and GFP to Rosa26 mice showed fusion of donor cells to recipient muscle. High numbers of donor derived muscle colonies and up to12 percent GFP positive muscle cells were seen after mobilization or direct injection. These levels of donor muscle chimerism approach levels which could be clinically significant in developing strategies for the treatment of muscular dystrophies. In summary, the conversion of marrow to skeletal muscle cells is based on cell fusion and is critically dependent on injury. This conversion is also numerically significant and increases with mobilization.

  7. COLONY FORMATION ENHANCEMENT OF RAT TRACHEAL AND NASAL EPITHELIAL CELLS BY POLYACETATE, INDOLE ALKALOID, AND PHORBOL ESTER TUMOR PROMOTERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The phorbol ester 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), teleocidin, and two polyacetate tumor promoters (aplysiatoxin and debromoaplysiatoxin) have been tested for their effect on colony forming efficiency (CFE) of rat tracheal and nasal turbinate epithelial cells. In rat t...

  8. A novel small molecule STAT3 inhibitor, LY5, inhibits cell viability, colony formation, and migration of colon and liver cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chongqiang; Wang, Wenlong; Yu, Wenying; Jou, David; Wang, Yina; Ma, Haiyan; Xiao, Hui; Qin, Hua; Zhang, Cuntai; Lü, Jiagao; Li, Sheng; Li, Chenglong; Lin, Jiayuh; Lin, Li

    2016-03-15

    Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (STAT3) is persistently activated in human liver and colon cancer cells and is required for cancer cell viability, survival and migration. Therefore, inhibition of STAT3 signaling may be a viable therapeutic approach for these two cancers. We recently designed a non-peptide small molecule STAT3 inhibitor, LY5, using in silico site-directed Fragment-based drug design (FBDD). The inhibitory effect on STAT3 phosphorylation, cell viability, migration and colony forming ability by LY5 were examined in human liver and colon cancer cells. We demonstrated that LY5 inhibited constitutive Interleukin-6 (IL-6)-induced STAT3 phosphorylation, STAT3 nuclear translocation, decreased STAT3 downstream targeted gene expression and induced apoptosis in liver and colon cancer cells. LY5 had little effect on STAT1 phosphorylation mediated by IFN-γ. Inhibition of persistent STAT3 phosphorylation by LY5 also inhibited colony formation, cell migration, and decreased the viability of liver cancer and colon cancer cells. Furthermore, LY5 inhibited STAT3 phosphorylation and suppressed colon tumor growth in a mouse model in vivo. Our results suggest that LY5 is a potent STAT3 inhibitor and may be a potential drug candidate for liver and colon cancer therapy. PMID:26883202

  9. A novel small molecule STAT3 inhibitor, LY5, inhibits cell viability, colony formation, and migration of colon and liver cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Wenying; Jou, David; Wang, Yina; Ma, Haiyan; Xiao, Hui; Qin, Hua; Zhang, Cuntai; Lü, Jiagao; Li, Sheng; Li, Chenglong; Lin, Jiayuh; Lin, Li

    2016-01-01

    Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (STAT3) is persistently activated in human liver and colon cancer cells and is required for cancer cell viability, survival and migration. Therefore, inhibition of STAT3 signaling may be a viable therapeutic approach for these two cancers. We recently designed a non-peptide small molecule STAT3 inhibitor, LY5, using in silico site-directed Fragment-based drug design (FBDD). The inhibitory effect on STAT3 phosphorylation, cell viability, migration and colony forming ability by LY5 were examined in human liver and colon cancer cells. We demonstrated that LY5 inhibited constitutive Interleukin-6 (IL-6)-induced STAT3 phosphorylation, STAT3 nuclear translocation, decreased STAT3 downstream targeted gene expression and induced apoptosis in liver and colon cancer cells. LY5 had little effect on STAT1 phosphorylation mediated by IFN-γ. Inhibition of persistent STAT3 phosphorylation by LY5 also inhibited colony formation, cell migration, and decreased the viability of liver cancer and colon cancer cells. Furthermore, LY5 inhibited STAT3 phosphorylation and suppressed colon tumor growth in a mouse model in vivo. Our results suggest that LY5 is a potent STAT3 inhibitor and may be a potential drug candidate for liver and colon cancer therapy. PMID:26883202

  10. NR4A1 promotes PDGF-BB-induced cell colony formation in soft agar.

    PubMed

    Eger, Glenda; Papadopoulos, Natalia; Lennartsson, Johan; Heldin, Carl-Henrik

    2014-01-01

    The fibroblast mitogen platelet-derived growth factor -BB (PDGF-BB) induces a transient expression of the orphan nuclear receptor NR4A1 (also named Nur77, TR3 or NGFIB). The aim of the present study was to investigate the pathways through which NR4A1 is induced by PDGF-BB and its functional role. We demonstrate that in PDGF-BB stimulated NIH3T3 cells, the MEK1/2 inhibitor CI-1040 strongly represses NR4A1 expression, whereas Erk5 downregulation delays the expression, but does not block it. Moreover, we report that treatment with the NF-κB inhibitor BAY11-7082 suppresses NR4A1 mRNA and protein expression. The majority of NR4A1 in NIH3T3 was found to be localized in the cytoplasm and only a fraction was translocated to the nucleus after continued PDGF-BB treatment. Silencing NR4A1 slightly increased the proliferation rate of NIH3T3 cells; however, it did not affect the chemotactic or survival abilities conferred by PDGF-BB. Moreover, overexpression of NR4A1 promoted anchorage-independent growth of NIH3T3 cells and the glioblastoma cell lines U-105MG and U-251MG. Thus, whereas NR4A1, induced by PDGF-BB, suppresses cell growth on a solid surface, it increases anchorage-independent growth. PMID:25269081

  11. NR4A1 Promotes PDGF-BB-Induced Cell Colony Formation in Soft Agar

    PubMed Central

    Eger, Glenda; Papadopoulos, Natalia; Lennartsson, Johan; Heldin, Carl-Henrik

    2014-01-01

    The fibroblast mitogen platelet-derived growth factor -BB (PDGF-BB) induces a transient expression of the orphan nuclear receptor NR4A1 (also named Nur77, TR3 or NGFIB). The aim of the present study was to investigate the pathways through which NR4A1 is induced by PDGF-BB and its functional role. We demonstrate that in PDGF-BB stimulated NIH3T3 cells, the MEK1/2 inhibitor CI-1040 strongly represses NR4A1 expression, whereas Erk5 downregulation delays the expression, but does not block it. Moreover, we report that treatment with the NF-κB inhibitor BAY11-7082 suppresses NR4A1 mRNA and protein expression. The majority of NR4A1 in NIH3T3 was found to be localized in the cytoplasm and only a fraction was translocated to the nucleus after continued PDGF-BB treatment. Silencing NR4A1 slightly increased the proliferation rate of NIH3T3 cells; however, it did not affect the chemotactic or survival abilities conferred by PDGF-BB. Moreover, overexpression of NR4A1 promoted anchorage-independent growth of NIH3T3 cells and the glioblastoma cell lines U-105MG and U-251MG. Thus, whereas NR4A1, induced by PDGF-BB, suppresses cell growth on a solid surface, it increases anchorage-independent growth. PMID:25269081

  12. The Stem Cell Marker CD133 Associates with Enhanced Colony Formation and Cell Motility in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Elsaba, Tarek M. A.; Martinez-Pomares, Luisa; Robins, Adrian R.; Crook, Simon; Seth, Rashmi; Jackson, Darryl; McCart, Amy; Silver, Andrew R.; Tomlinson, Ian P. M.; Ilyas, Mohammad

    2010-01-01

    CD133 is a membrane molecule that has been, controversially, reported as a CSC marker in colorectal cancer (CRC). In this study, we sought to clarify the expression and role of CD133 in CRC. Initially the size of the CD133−expressing (CD133+) population in eight well-described CRC cell lines was measured by flow cytometry and was found to range from 0% to >95%. The cell line HT29 has a CD133+ population of >95% and was chosen for functional evaluation of CD133 after gene knockdown by RNA interference. A time course assay showed that CD133 inhibition had no significant effect on cell proliferation or apoptosis. However, CD133 knockdown did result in greater susceptibility to staurosporine-induced apoptosis (p = 0.01) and reduction in cell motility (p<0.04). Since gene knockdown may cause “off-target” effects, the cell line SW480 (which has a CD133+ population of 40%) was sorted into pure CD133+ and CD133− populations to allow functional comparison of isogenic populations separated only by CD133 expression. In concordance with the knockdown experiments, a time course assay showed no significant proliferative differences between the CD133+/CD133− populations. Also greater resistance to staurosporine-induced apoptosis (p = 0.008), greater cell motility (p = 0.03) and greater colony forming efficiency was seen in the CD133+ population than the CD133− population in both 2D and 3D culture (p<0.0001 and p<0.003 respectively). Finally, the plasticity of CD133 expression in tumour cells was tested. Quantitative PCR analysis showed there was transcriptional repression in the CD133− population of SW480. Prolonged culture of a pure CD133− population resulted in re-emergence of CD133+ cells. We conclude that CD133 expression in CRCs is associated with some features attributable to stemness and that there is plasticity of CD133 expression. Further studies are necessary to delineate the mechanistic basis of these features. PMID:20502714

  13. Prolonged Proteasome Inhibition Cyclically Upregulates Oct3/4 and Nanog Gene Expression, but Reduces Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Colony Formation

    PubMed Central

    Floyd, Elizabeth Z.; Staszkiewicz, Jaroslaw; Power, Rachel A.; Kilroy, Gail; Kirk-Ballard, Heather; Barnes, Christian W.; Strickler, Karen L.; Rim, Jong S.; Harkins, Lettie L.; Gao, Ru; Kim, Jeong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract There is ample evidence that the ubiquitin–proteasome system is an important regulator of transcription and its activity is necessary for maintaining pluripotency and promoting cellular reprogramming. Moreover, proteasome activity contributes to maintaining the open chromatin structure found in pluripotent stem cells, acting as a transcriptional inhibitor at specific gene loci generally associated with differentiation. The current study was designed to understand further the role of proteasome inhibition in reprogramming and its ability to modulate endogenous expression of pluripotency-related genes and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) colony formation. Herein, we demonstrate that acute combinatorial treatment with the proteasome inhibitors MG101 or MG132 and the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor valproic acid (VPA) increases gene expression of the pluripotency marker Oct3/4, and that MG101 alone is as effective as VPA in the induction of Oct3/4 mRNA expression in fibroblasts. Prolonged proteasome inhibition cyclically upregulates gene expression of Oct3/4 and Nanog, but reduces colony formation in the presence of the iPSC induction cocktail. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that the 26S proteasome is an essential modulator in the reprogramming process. Its inhibition enhances expression of pluripotency-related genes; however, efficient colony formation requires proteasome activity. Therefore, discovery of small molecules that increase proteasome activity might lead to more efficient cell reprogramming and generation of pluripotent cells. PMID:25826722

  14. Ultra-sensitive detection of tumorigenic cellular impurities in human cell-processed therapeutic products by digital analysis of soft agar colony formation.

    PubMed

    Kusakawa, Shinji; Yasuda, Satoshi; Kuroda, Takuya; Kawamata, Shin; Sato, Yoji

    2015-01-01

    Contamination with tumorigenic cellular impurities is one of the most pressing concerns for human cell-processed therapeutic products (hCTPs). The soft agar colony formation (SACF) assay, which is a well-known in vitro assay for the detection of malignant transformed cells, is applicable for the quality assessment of hCTPs. Here we established an image-based screening system for the SACF assay using a high-content cell analyzer termed the digital SACF assay. Dual fluorescence staining of formed colonies and the dissolution of soft agar led to accurate detection of transformed cells with the imaging cytometer. Partitioning a cell sample into multiple wells of culture plates enabled digital readout of the presence of colonies and elevated the sensitivity for their detection. In practice, the digital SACF assay detected impurity levels as low as 0.00001% of the hCTPs, i.e. only one HeLa cell contained in 10,000,000 human mesenchymal stem cells, within 30 days. The digital SACF assay saves time, is more sensitive than in vivo tumorigenicity tests, and would be useful for the quality control of hCTPs in the manufacturing process. PMID:26644244

  15. Inhibition of MEK and GSK3 supports ES cell-like domed colony formation from avian and reptile embryos.

    PubMed

    Nakanoh, Shota; Okazaki, Kenji; Agata, Kiyokazu

    2013-07-01

    As amniotes diversified, mammals may have modified mechanisms of cellular pluripotency along with the acquisition of a placenta. What then defined pluripotent states in the ancestral amniotes? To study the evolutionary background of pluripotency in amniotes, we tested the effects of extracellular effectors on primary culture cells from avian and reptile embryos in serum-free medium. When treated with a combination of a MEK inhibitor and a GSK3 inhibitor (2i condition), chicken early embryos formed domed colonies (DCs), which were morphologically indistinguishable from the colonies formed by mouse and rat naïve embryonic stem cells. However, no DCs formed when cells from further-developed embryos were cultured in the 2i condition, indicating that there is a clear boundary of DC-forming ability at around the stage of primitive streak elongation. Quail embryos at the blastoderm and cleavage stages also formed DCs in the 2i condition, which is consistent with the notion that the appearance of DCs corresponds with the presence of pluripotent cells in embryos. Gecko blastoderms also formed DCs in the 2i condition, but gastrulas did not. ERK activation by bFGF caused an effect opposite to that of the 2i condition, namely, it dispersed colonies of cells even from early embryos in all species examined. These results suggest that the regulation of pluripotency by FGF/ERK signaling may date back at least to the common ancestor of mammals, birds, and reptiles. However, gene expression analysis indicated the possibility that mammalian pluripotency transcription factors function differently in non-mammalian amniotes. PMID:23829214

  16. Evaluation of the effects of cryopreservation on viability, proliferation and colony formation of human spermatogonial stem cells in vitro culture.

    PubMed

    Mirzapour, T; Movahedin, M; Tengku Ibrahim, T A; Haron, A W; Nowroozi, M R

    2013-02-01

    Proliferation of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) in vitro system is very important. It can enhance SSCs numbers for success of transplantation and treatment of infertility in cancer patients. In this study, testicular cells that obtained from azoospermia patients (n=8) by enzymatic digestion were cryopreserved at the beginning and after 2 weeks of culture. Then, frozen-thawed SSCs were co-cultured on fresh Sertoli cells (experimental group 1), and frozen-thawed Sertoli cells (experimental group 2) for another 3 weeks. In control group, fresh SSCs were co-cultured on fresh Sertoli cells. Viability rate after enzymatic digestion was 93.4%±5.0. Frozen-thawed testicular cells after 2 weeks of culture had a significantly (P<0.05) higher percentage of living cells compared to frozen-thawed testicular cells at the beginning of culture (59.2±7.05 and 46.3±8.40 respectively). The number of colonies in the experimental group 1 was significantly higher than experimental group 2 (19.6±2.8 and 8.33±1.5, respectively, P<0.05). The diameter of the colonies in the experimental group 1 was significantly higher than control and experimental group 2 (P<0.05) after 3 weeks of culture (269.7±52.1, 204.34±24.1 and 112.52±23.5 μm, respectively). Cryopreservation technique will raise the possibility of banking SSCs for men who have a cancer-related illness and waiting for radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy. PMID:22621173

  17. Radial and Spiral Stream Formation in Proteus mirabilis Colonies

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Chuan; Budrene, Elena O.; Othmer, Hans G.

    2011-01-01

    The enteric bacterium Proteus mirabilis, which is a pathogen that forms biofilms in vivo, can swarm over hard surfaces and form a variety of spatial patterns in colonies. Colony formation involves two distinct cell types: swarmer cells that dominate near the surface and the leading edge, and swimmer cells that prefer a less viscous medium, but the mechanisms underlying pattern formation are not understood. New experimental investigations reported here show that swimmer cells in the center of the colony stream inward toward the inoculation site and in the process form many complex patterns, including radial and spiral streams, in addition to previously-reported concentric rings. These new observations suggest that swimmers are motile and that indirect interactions between them are essential in the pattern formation. To explain these observations we develop a hybrid model comprising cell-based and continuum components that incorporates a chemotactic response of swimmers to a chemical they produce. The model predicts that formation of radial streams can be explained as the modulation of the local attractant concentration by the cells, and that the chirality of the spiral streams results from a swimming bias of the cells near the surface of the substrate. The spatial patterns generated from the model are in qualitative agreement with the experimental observations. PMID:22219724

  18. Chiral pattern formation in compact microbial colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korolev, Kirill; Bino George, Ashish

    Chirality is ubiquitous in biology from single molecules to entire populations. Yet, we are still lacking a detailed understanding of how chiral patterns emerge from cell competition and growth, even in simple microbial colonies. Although many microbes grow as dense colonies with no apparent chirality, recent experiments with Escherichia coli have demonstrated that internal dynamics in such populations can be in fact chiral. We show that there is a unique way to extend the commonly-used reaction-diffusion models of colony growth to account for the emergent chirality. This new model connects microscopic and macroscopic chirality and explains the origin of logarithmic spirals separating different sub-populations in a colony. We also show that chirality is substantially enhanced by the cooperation among the cells at the expansion frontier. In heterogeneous populations composed of strains with different chiralities and growth rates, our model predicts a very rich set of possible dynamics. For example, different chiralities can result in either sharp boundaries between the strains or promote their intermixing depending on the preferred twisting directions of the strains.

  19. MicroRNA-31 Is Overexpressed in Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Regulates Cell Motility and Colony Formation Ability of Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Meisgen, Florian; Lohcharoenkal, Warangkana; Ståhle, Mona; Sonkoly, Enikö; Pivarcsi, Andor

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC) is a malignancy of epidermal keratinocytes that is responsible for approximately 20% of skin cancer-related death yearly. We have previously compared the microRNA (miRNA) expression profile of cSCC to healthy skin and found the dysregulation of miRNAs in human cSCC. In this study we show that miR-31 is overexpressed in cSCC (n = 68) compared to healthy skin (n = 34) and precancerous skin lesions (actinic keratosis, n = 12). LNA in situ hybridization revealed that miR-31 was specifically up-regulated in tumor cells. Mechanistic studies of inhibition of endogenous miR-31 in human metastatic cSCC cells revealed suppressed migration, invasion and colony forming ability, whereas overexpression of miR-31 induced these phenotypes. These results indicate that miR-31 regulates cancer-associated phenotypes of cSCC and identify miR-31 as a potential target for cSCC treatment. PMID:25068518

  20. Maintenance and induction of murine embryonic stem cell differentiation using E-cadherin-Fc substrata without colony formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qing-Yuan; Akaike, Toshihiro

    2013-03-01

    Induced embryonic stem (ES) cells are expected to be promising cell resources for the observation of the cell behaviors in developmental biology as well as the implantation in cell treatments in human diseases. A recombinant E-cadherin substratum was developed as a cell recognizable substratum to maintain the ES cells' self-renewal and pluripotency at single cell level. Furthermore, the generation of various cell lineages in different germ layers, including hepatic or neural cells, was achieved on the chimeric protein layer precisely and effectively. The induction and isolation of specific cell population was carried out with the enhancing effect of other artificial extracellular matrices (ECMs) in enzyme-free process. The murine ES cell-derived cells showed highly morphological similarities and functional expressions to matured hepatocytes or neural progenitor cells.

  1. Colony formation and morphology in Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed

    Kurtti, T J; Munderloh, U G; Johnson, R C; Ahlstrand, G G

    1987-11-01

    Two strains of Borrelia burgdorferi, B31 and 297, formed colonies when plated onto Barbour-Stoenner-Kelly medium solidified with agarose (1.3%) and incubated in a candle jar at 34 degrees C. Colonies differing in morphology were observed in both strains after 2 to 3 weeks of incubation. Strain B31 colonies were either compact, round (mean diameter, 0.43 mm), and restricted to the surface of the agarose medium or diffuse (mean diameter, 1.80 mm) and penetrating into the solid medium. Strain 297 colonies (mean diameter, 1.43 mm) either showed a raised center surrounded by a diffuse ring of spirochetes or consisted of numerous small spirochetal aggregates. Both colony types expanded into the agarose medium. Scanning electron and light microscopy confirmed that the colonies were formed by spirochetes. Twisted tangles of intertwined spirochetes were visible on the surface, with numerous spherical bodies among them, especially in the central regions. At the periphery, the borreliae were more loosely packed, and individual coils were discernible. PMID:3693538

  2. Formation of complex bacterial colonies via self-generated vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czirók, András; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Cohen, Inon; Vicsek, Tamás

    1996-08-01

    Depending on the environmental conditions bacterial colonies growing on agar surfaces can exhibit complex colony formation and various types of collective motion. Experimental results are presented concerning the hydrodynamics (vortices, migration of bacteria in clusters) and colony formation of a morphotype of Bacillus subtilis. Some of these features are not specific to this morphotype but also have been observed in several other bacterial strains, suggesting the presence of universal effects. A simple model of self-propelled particles is proposed, which is capable of describing the hydrodynamics on the intermediate level, including the experimentally observed rotating disks of bacteria. The colony formation is captured by a complex generic model taking into account nutrient diffusion, reproduction, and sporulation of bacteria, extracellular slime deposition, chemoregulation, and inhomogeneous population. Our model also sheds light on some possible biological benefits of this ``multicellular behavior.''

  3. Diffusion-limited growth in bacterial colony formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushita, Mitsugu; Fujikawa, Hiroshi

    1990-09-01

    Colonies of bacterial species called Bacillus subtilis have been found to grow two-dimensionally and self-similarly on agar plates through diffusion-limited processes in a nutrient concentration field. We obtained a fractal dimension of the colony patterns of D=1.73±0.02, very close to that of the two-dimensional DLA model, and confirmed the existence of the screening effect of protruding main branches against inner ones in a colony, the repulsion between two neighboring colonies and the tendency to grow toward nutrient. These effects are all characteristic of the pattern formation in a Laplacian field. This finding implies the importance of physical properties of the environment for the morphology of bacterial colonies in general.

  4. 17β-Estradiol regulates cell proliferation, colony formation, migration, invasion and promotes apoptosis by upregulating miR-9 and thus degrades MALAT-1 in osteosarcoma cell MG-63 in an estrogen receptor-independent manner

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Dengfeng; Yang, Hui; Lin, Jing; Teng, Yi; Jiang, Yingying; Chen, Jiao; Li, Yu

    2015-02-20

    In bone, different concentration of estrogen leads to various of physiological processes in osteoblast, such as the proliferation, migration, and apoptosis in an estrogen receptor-dependent manner. But little was known about the estrogen effects on osteosarcoma (OS). In this study, OS cell MG-63 was treated with low (1 nM) or high (100 nM) dose of 17β-Estradiol (E2) with the presence or absence of estrogen receptor α (ERα), for evaluating the E2 effects on proliferation, migration, invasion, colony formation and apoptosis. Consistent with a previous study, high dose of E2 treatment dramatically downregulated expressing level of long non-coding RNA metastasis associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT-1). The observation of upregulation of miR-9 after a high dose of E2 treatment indicated the cause of MALAT-1 reduction. Downregulation of MALAT-1 promoted the combination of SFPQ/PTBP2 complex. It was also observed that the proliferation, migration, invasion, colony formation and apoptosis of OS cells were remarkably affected by high dose of E2 treatment, but not by low dose, in an ERα independent manner. Furthermore, the abolishment of the effects on these physiological processes caused by ectopic expression of miR-9 ASOs suggested the necessity of miR-9 in MALAT-1 regulation. Here we found that the high dose of E2 treatment upregulated miR-9 thus posttranscriptionally regulated MALAT-1 RNA level in OS cells, and then the downregulation of MALAT-1 inhibited cell proliferation, migration, invasion and epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) processes in the E2-dose dependent and ER-independent ways. - Highlights: • E2 affects osteosarcoma cell MG-63 in an Estrogen receptor-independent way. • High dose of E2 treatment upregulates miR-9 which target to MALAT-1 RNA. • Upregulated miR-9 degrades MALAT-1 and thus affects combination of SFPQ/PTBP2. • E2 treatment block cell proliferation, colony formation, mobility, and enhance apoptosis.

  5. Stage-dependent reduction in T colony formation in Hodgkin's disease. Coincidence with monocyte synthesis of prostaglandins.

    PubMed Central

    Bockman, R S

    1980-01-01

    Prostaglandin synthesis and T lymphocyte colony formation have been examined in previously untreated patients with Hodgkin's disease. Mononuclear cells have been isolated from peripheral blood and spleens of these patients. Significant augmentation in prostaglandin E levels were noted in the mononuclear cell cutures from Hodgkin's disease patients compared with controls (1.64 +/- 0.29 vs. 0.39 +/- 0.09 ng/10(6) cells, P < 0.005). Measured prostaglandin E levels increased with advancing stage of disease. Virtually all of the prostaglandins were synthesized by the adherent monocyte cell population. Prostaglandin E was the major product. Clonal expansion of a T lymphocyte precursor cell, which gives rise to colonies > 50 cells, was determined by a layered soft agar method. T colony formation was significantly reduced in patients with stage II, III, and IV disease. There were progressively reduced colony numbers seen with advancing stage of disease (609 +/- 209, 416 +/- 158, 207 +/- 58 compared with normals 2,274 +/- 360 colonies/10(6) cells plated; P < 0.005). The addition of inhibitors of endogenous prostaglandin synthesis resulted in significant augmentation of T colony number. However, a consistent relative decrease in T colony number was seen even when endogenous prostaglandin E synthesis was blocked. It would appear that both the prostaglandin-dependent and independent T colony precursor cells are lost with progressive stage of disease. A causative role of augmented prostaglandin synthesis in this stage-dependent reduction of T colony formation could not be established. PMID:6967491

  6. Lymphocyte culture: induction of colonies by conditioned medium from human lymphoid cell lines.

    PubMed

    Galbraith, R M; Goust, J M; Fudenberg, H H

    1977-12-01

    The presence of phytohemagglutinin or pokeweed mitogen in cultures of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in agar is known to stimulate the formation of lymphoid colonies. We now report that similar colonies can be induced in the absence of plant lectins upon addition of filtered and ultracentrifuged conditioned medium (CM) obtained from certain human lymphoblastoid cell lines. Colony formation required at least 6 X 10(5) mononuclear cells per milliliter, and optimum results were obtained at concentrations of 1 X 10(6) cells/ml in the presence of 20% CM (50-500 colonies per 10(6) cells cultured). Individual cells within colonies displayed uniform morphological characteristics of lymphoid cells, and the majority formed rosettes with sheep erythrocytes, suggesting that they were of T-cell type. PMID:303689

  7. Studies of sector formation in expanding bacterial colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golding, I.; Cohen, I.; Ben-Jacob, E.

    1999-12-01

    We study sector formation in expanding bacterial colonies grown on a substrate with low level of nutrient. Bursts of sectors are observed both during compact growth on soft agar and during branching growth on semi-solid agar. For theoretical studies of these bursts we employ two mathematical models we have used successfully in the past to study patterning of bacterial colonies: a discrete model and a continuous reaction-diffusion model. Using these models we investigate the amount of segregation achieved by a neutral mutation, as well as by mutations having some advantage over the wild type. We also study the effect of chemotaxis signaling on the sector formation.

  8. The PIM inhibitor AZD1208 synergizes with ruxolitinib to induce apoptosis of ruxolitinib sensitive and resistant JAK2-V617F-driven cells and inhibit colony formation of primary MPN cells

    PubMed Central

    Mazzacurati, Lucia; Lambert, Que T.; Pradhan, Anuradha; Griner, Lori N.; Huszar, Dennis; Reuther, Gary W.

    2015-01-01

    Classical myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) are hematopoietic stem cell disorders that exhibit excess mature myeloid cells, bone marrow fibrosis, and risk of leukemic transformation. Aberrant JAK2 signaling plays an etiological role in MPN formation. Because neoplastic cells in patients are largely insensitive to current anti-JAK2 therapies, effective therapies remain needed. Members of the PIM family of serine/threonine kinases are induced by JAK/STAT signaling, regulate hematopoietic stem cell growth, protect hematopoietic cells from apoptosis, and exhibit hematopoietic cell transforming properties. We hypothesized that PIM kinases may offer a therapeutic target for MPNs. We treated JAK2-V617F-dependent MPN model cells as well as primary MPN patient cells with the PIM kinase inhibitors SGI-1776 and AZD1208 and the JAK2 inhibitor ruxolitinib. While MPN model cells were rather insensitive to PIM inhibitors, combination of PIM inhibitors with ruxolitinib led to a synergistic effect on MPN cell growth due to enhanced apoptosis. Importantly, PIM inhibitor mono-therapy inhibited, and AZD1208/ruxolitinib combination therapy synergistically suppressed, colony formation of primary MPN cells. Enhanced apoptosis by combination therapy was associated with activation of BAD, inhibition of downstream components of the mTOR pathway, including p70S6K and S6 protein, and activation of 4EBP1. Importantly, PIM inhibitors re-sensitized ruxolitinib-resistant MPN cells to ruxolitinib by inducing apoptosis. Finally, exogenous expression of PIM1 induced ruxolitinib resistance in MPN model cells. These data indicate that PIMs may play a role in MPNs and that combining PIM and JAK2 kinase inhibitors may offer a more efficacious therapeutic approach for MPNs over JAK2 inhibitor mono-therapy. PMID:26472029

  9. Colony-Stimulating Factor-1 Signaling Suppresses Renal Crystal Formation

    PubMed Central

    Taguchi, Kazumi; Kitamura, Hiroshi; Yasui, Takahiro; Naiki, Taku; Hamamoto, Shuzo; Ando, Ryosuke; Mizuno, Kentaro; Kawai, Noriyasu; Tozawa, Keiichi; Asano, Kenichi; Tanaka, Masato; Miyoshi, Ichiro; Kohri, Kenjiro

    2014-01-01

    We recently reported evidence suggesting that migrating macrophages (Mϕs) eliminate renal crystals in hyperoxaluric mice. Mϕs can be inflammatory (M1) or anti-inflammatory (M2), and colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1) mediates polarization to the M2Mϕ phenotype. M2Mϕs promote renal tissue repair and regeneration, but it is not clear whether these cells are involved in suppressing renal crystal formation. We investigated the role of M2Mϕs in renal crystal formation during hyperoxaluria using CSF-1–deficient mice, which lack M2Mϕs. Compared with wild-type mice, CSF-1–deficient mice had significantly higher amounts of renal calcium oxalate crystal deposition. Treatment with recombinant human CSF-1 increased the expression of M2-related genes and markedly decreased the number of renal crystals in both CSF-1–deficient and wild-type mice. Flow cytometry of sorted renal Mϕs showed that CSF-1 deficiency resulted in a smaller population of CD11b+F4/80+CD163+CD206hi cells, which represent M2-like Mϕs. Additionally, transfusion of M2Mϕs into CSF-1–deficient mice suppressed renal crystal deposition. In vitro phagocytosis assays with calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals showed a higher rate of crystal phagocytosis by M2-polarized Mϕs than M1-polarized Mϕs or renal tubular cells. Gene array profiling showed that CSF-1 deficiency resulted in disordered M2- and stone-related gene expressions. Collectively, our results provide compelling evidence for a suppressive role of CSF-1 signaling in renal crystal formation. PMID:24578130

  10. Monoclonal origin of B lymphocyte colony-forming cells in spleen colonies formed by multipotential hemopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Lala, PK; Johnson, GR

    1978-01-01

    Spleen colonies produced by transplanting lethally irradiated mice with either 12 day fetal liver or adult bone marrow cells were found to contain B- lymphocyte colony-forming cells (BL-CFC) . The proportion of BL-CFC positive spleen colonies did not increase substantially between 8 and 14 days after transplantation, the range being 18-45 percent. However, the absolute number of BL-CFC per spleen colony varied considerably (between 1 and 10,318), although the majority of colonies contained less than 200 BL-CFC. Irrespective of the time after transplantation, smaller spleen colonies were found to have a higher frequency of BL-CFC than larger spleen colonies. To determine the possible clonal origin of BL-CFC from spleen colony- forming unit (CFU-S), CBA mice were injected with equal numbers of CBA and CBA T(6)/T(6) fetal liver or adult bone marrow cells. Analysis of 7-15-day spleen colonies demonstrated that 90 percent were either exclusively T(6) positive or T(6) negative and approximately equal numbers ofboth colony types were observed. B-lymphocyte colonies were grown and successfully karyotyped from 19 spleen colonies. When compared with the original spleen colony karyotype the B-lymphocyte colony cells karyotype was identical in all 19 cases. In 3 of the 19 colonies analyzed a mixture of T(6) positive and T(6) negative karyotypes was present and identical proportions of the karyotypes were present in the pooled B-lymphocyte colony cells and spleen colony cells. The data indicate that the B-lymphocyte colony-forming cells detected in spleen colonies are genuine members of the hemopoietic clone derived from the initiating hemopoietic stem cell (CFU-S). PMID:309918

  11. Periodic Colony Formation by Bacterial Species Bacillus subtilis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakita, Jun-ichi; Shimada, Hirotoshi; Itoh, Hiroto; Matsuyama, Tohey; Matsushita, Mitsugu

    2001-03-01

    We have investigated the periodic colony growth of bacterial species Bacillus subtilis. A colony grows cyclically with the interface repeating an advance (migration phase) and a rest (consolidation phase) alternately on a surface of semi-solid agar plate under appropriate environmental conditions, resulting in a concentric ring-like colony. It was found from macroscopic observations that the characteristic quantities for the periodic growth such as the migration time, the consolidation time and the terrace spacing do not depend so much on nutrient concentration Cn, but do on agar concentration Ca. The consolidation time was a weakly increasing function of Ca, while the migration time and the terrace spacing were, respectively, weakly and strongly decreasing function of Ca. Overall, the cycle (migration-plus-consolidation) time seems to be constant, and does not depend so much on both Cn and Ca. Microscopically, bacterial cells inside the growing front of a colony keep increasing their population during both migration and consolidation phases. It was also confirmed that their secreting surfactant called surfactin does not affect their periodic growth qualitatively, i.e., mutant cells which cannot secrete surfactin produce a concentric ring-like colony. All these results suggest that the diffusion of the nutrient and the surfactin are irrelevant to their periodic growth.

  12. The Rim101p/PacC pathway and alkaline pH regulate pattern formation in yeast colonies.

    PubMed

    Piccirillo, Sarah; White, Melissa G; Murphy, Jeffrey C; Law, Douglas J; Honigberg, Saul M

    2010-03-01

    Multicellular organisms utilize cell-to-cell signals to build patterns of cell types within embryos, but the ability of fungi to form organized communities has been largely unexplored. Here we report that colonies of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae formed sharply divided layers of sporulating and nonsporulating cells. Sporulation initiated in the colony's interior, and this region expanded upward as the colony matured. Two key activators of sporulation, IME1 and IME2, were initially transcribed in overlapping regions of the colony, and this overlap corresponded to the initial sporulation region. The development of colony sporulation patterns depended on cell-to-cell signals, as demonstrated by chimeric colonies, which contain a mixture of two strains. One such signal is alkaline pH, mediated through the Rim101p/PacC pathway. Meiotic-arrest mutants that increased alkali production stimulated expression of an early meiotic gene in neighboring cells, whereas a mutant that decreased alkali production (cit1Delta) decreased this expression. Addition of alkali to colonies accelerated the expansion of the interior region of sporulation, whereas inactivation of the Rim101p pathway inhibited this expansion. Thus, the Rim101 pathway mediates colony patterning by responding to cell-to-cell pH signals. Cell-to-cell signals coupled with nutrient gradients may allow efficient spore formation and spore dispersal in natural environments. PMID:20038633

  13. Scaling of Traction Stresses with Size of Cohesive Cell Colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertz, Aaron F.; Banerjee, Shiladitya; Che, Yonglu; Marchetti, M. Christina; Horsley, Valerie; Dufresne, Eric R.

    2012-02-01

    We explore the mechanical properties of colonies of cohesive cells adherent on soft substrates. Specifically, we image the spatial distribution of traction stresses exerted by colonies of primary mouse keratinocytes on fibronectin-coated silicone gels. These cells have strong cell-cell adhesions mediated by E-cadherin. We observe that the work performed by a colony on its substrate is concentrated at the colony's periphery. The total work is strongly correlated to the geometrical size of the colony but not to number of cells. In other words, the mechanical output of a large single cell mimics that of a cohesive colony with the same overall size. We compare our findings to a recent theoretical model that treats the cohesive colony as an active gel.

  14. Active mechanics and geometry of adherent cells and cell colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Shiladitya

    2014-03-01

    Measurements of traction stresses exerted by adherent cells or cell colonies on elastic substrates have yielded new insight on how the mechanical and geometrical properties of the substrate regulate cellular force distribution, mechanical energy, spreading, morphology or stress ber architecture. We have developed a generic mechanical model of adherent cells as an active contractile gel mechanically coupled to an elastic substrate and to neighboring cells in a tissue. The contractile gel model accurately predicts the distribution of cellular and traction stresses as observed in single cell experiments, and captures the dependence of cell shape, traction stresses and stress ber polarization on the substrate's mechanical and geometrical properties. The model further predicts that the total strain energy of an adherent cell is solely regulated by its spread area, in agreement with recent experiments on micropatterned substrates with controlled geometry. When used to describe the behavior of colonies of adherent epithelial cells, the model demonstrates the crucial role of the mechanical cross-talk between intercellular and extracellular adhesion in regulating traction force distribution. Strong intercellular mechanical coupling organizes traction forces to the colony periphery, whereas weaker intercellular coupling leads to the build up of traction stresses at intercellular junctions. Furthermore, in agreement with experiments on large cohesive keratinocyte colonies, the model predicts a linear scaling of traction forces with the colony size. This scaling suggests the emergence of an effective surface tension as a scale-free material property of the adherent tissue, originating from actomyosin contractility.

  15. The induction of human peripheral blood lymphoid colonies by conditioned media from human tumour cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Vesole, D H; Moore, G E

    1980-01-01

    Conditioned medium (CM) from 29 human tumour cell lines and 3 malignant pleural fluids were tested for their ability to stimulate lymphoid colony formation in semi-solid agar; 9 of 14 malignant melanomas, 3 of 6 colonic carcinomas, 2 of 5 ovarian carcinomas, 3 of 4 breast carcinomas and 1 of 3 pleural fluids from breast cancer patients contained colony-stimulating activity (CSA) for human peripheral blood lymphoid cells (PBL) in semi-solid agar. Conditioned media also stimulated PBL proliferation in liquid medium; these effects were dose dependent. With the exception of one pleural fluid, extensive dialysis of CM did not significantly increase colony formation; CM from two tumour cell lines demonstrated a significant decrease in the induction of colony formation after dialysis. PMID:6970165

  16. Two-Dimensionality of Yeast Colony Expansion Accompanied by Pattern Formation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lin; Noorbakhsh, Javad; Adams, Rhys M.; Samaniego-Evans, Joseph; Agollah, Germaine; Nevozhay, Dmitry; Kuzdzal-Fick, Jennie; Mehta, Pankaj; Balázsi, Gábor

    2014-01-01

    Yeasts can form multicellular patterns as they expand on agar plates, a phenotype that requires a functional copy of the FLO11 gene. Although the biochemical and molecular requirements for such patterns have been examined, the mechanisms underlying their formation are not entirely clear. Here we develop quantitative methods to accurately characterize the size, shape, and surface patterns of yeast colonies for various combinations of agar and sugar concentrations. We combine these measurements with mathematical and physical models and find that FLO11 gene constrains cells to grow near the agar surface, causing the formation of larger and more irregular colonies that undergo hierarchical wrinkling. Head-to-head competition assays on agar plates indicate that two-dimensional constraint on the expansion of FLO11 wild type (FLO11) cells confers a fitness advantage over FLO11 knockout (flo11Δ) cells on the agar surface. PMID:25504059

  17. Modeling cell-matrix traction forces in Keratinocyte colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Shiladitya

    2013-03-01

    Crosstalk between cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesions plays an essential role in the mechanical function of tissues. The traction forces exerted by cohesive keratinocyte colonies with strong cell-cell adhesions are mostly concentrated at the colony periphery. In contrast, for weak cadherin-based intercellular adhesions, individual cells in a colony interact with their matrix independently, with a disorganized distribution of traction forces extending throughout the colony. In this talk I will present a minimal physical model of the colony as contractile elastic media linked by springs and coupled to an elastic substrate. The model captures the spatial distribution of traction forces seen in experiments. For cell colonies with strong cell-cell adhesions, the total traction force of the colony measured in experiments is found to scale with the colony's geometrical size. This scaling suggests the emergence of an effective surface tension of magnitude comparable to that measured for non-adherent, three-dimensional cell aggregates. The physical model supports the scaling and indicates that the surface tension may be controlled by acto-myosin contractility. Supported by the NSF through grant DMR-1004789. This work was done in collaboration with Aaron F. Mertz, Eric R. Dufresne and Valerie Horsley (Yale University) and M. Cristina Marchetti (Syracuse University).

  18. Expression of the transcriptional repressor Gfi-1 is regulated by C/EBPα and is involved in its proliferation and colony formation inhibitory effects in p210BCR/ABL-expressing cells

    PubMed Central

    Lidonnici, Maria Rosa; Audia, Alessandra; Soliera, Angela Rachele; Prisco, Marco; Ferrari-Amorotti, Giovanna; Waldron, Todd; Donato, Nick; Zhang, Ying; Martinez, Robert V.; Holyoake, Tessa L.; Calabretta, Bruno

    2010-01-01

    Ectopic expression of C/EBPα in p210BCR/ABL-expressing cells induces granulocytic differentiation, inhibits proliferation and suppresses leukemogenesis. To dissect the molecular mechanisms underlying these biological effects, C/EBPα-regulated genes were identified by microarray analysis in 32D-p210BCR/ABL cells. One of the genes whose expression was activated by C/EBPα in a DNA binding-dependent manner in BCR/ABL-expressing cells is the transcriptional repressor Gfi-1. We show here that C/EBPα interacts with a functional C/EBP binding site in the Gfi-1 5′ flanking region and enhances the promoter activity of Gfi-1. Moreover, in K562 cells, RNAi-mediated downregulation of Gfi-1 expression partially rescued the proliferation inhibitory but not the differentiation inducing effect of C/EBPα. Ectopic expression of wild type Gfi-1 but not of a transcriptional repressor mutant (Gfi-1P2A) inhibited proliferation and markedly suppressed colony formation but did not induce granulocytic differentiation of BCR/ABL-expressing cells. By contrast, Gfi-1 shRNA-tranduced CD34+ CML cells were markedly more clonogenic than the scramble-transduced counterpart. Together, these studies indicate that Gfi-1 is a direct target of C/EBPα required for its proliferation and survival inhibitory effects in BCR/ABL-expressing cells. PMID:20924107

  19. Large area magnetic micropallet arrays for cell colony sorting.

    PubMed

    Cox-Muranami, Wesley A; Nelson, Edward L; Li, G P; Bachman, Mark

    2016-01-01

    A new micropallet array platform for adherent cell colony sorting has been developed. The platform consisted of thousands of square plastic pallets, 270 μm by 270 μm on each side, large enough to hold a single colony of cells. Each pallet included a magnetic core, allowing them to be collected with a magnet after being released using a microscope mounted laser system. The micropallets were patterned from 1002F epoxy resist and were fabricated on translucent, gold coated microscope slides. The gold layer was used as seed for electroplating the ferromagnetic cores within every individual pallet. The gold layer also facilitated the release of each micropallet during laser release. This array allows for individual observation, sorting and collection of isolated cell colonies for biological cell colony research. In addition to consistent release and recovery of individual colonies, we demonstrated stable biocompatibility and minimal loss in imaging quality compared to previously developed micropallet arrays. PMID:26606460

  20. Melanoma Cell Colony Expansion Parameters Revealed by Approximate Bayesian Computation

    PubMed Central

    Vo, Brenda N.; Drovandi, Christopher C.; Pettitt, Anthony N.; Pettet, Graeme J.

    2015-01-01

    In vitro studies and mathematical models are now being widely used to study the underlying mechanisms driving the expansion of cell colonies. This can improve our understanding of cancer formation and progression. Although much progress has been made in terms of developing and analysing mathematical models, far less progress has been made in terms of understanding how to estimate model parameters using experimental in vitro image-based data. To address this issue, a new approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) algorithm is proposed to estimate key parameters governing the expansion of melanoma cell (MM127) colonies, including cell diffusivity, D, cell proliferation rate, λ, and cell-to-cell adhesion, q, in two experimental scenarios, namely with and without a chemical treatment to suppress cell proliferation. Even when little prior biological knowledge about the parameters is assumed, all parameters are precisely inferred with a small posterior coefficient of variation, approximately 2–12%. The ABC analyses reveal that the posterior distributions of D and q depend on the experimental elapsed time, whereas the posterior distribution of λ does not. The posterior mean values of D and q are in the ranges 226–268 µm2h−1, 311–351 µm2h−1 and 0.23–0.39, 0.32–0.61 for the experimental periods of 0–24 h and 24–48 h, respectively. Furthermore, we found that the posterior distribution of q also depends on the initial cell density, whereas the posterior distributions of D and λ do not. The ABC approach also enables information from the two experiments to be combined, resulting in greater precision for all estimates of D and λ. PMID:26642072

  1. Melanoma Cell Colony Expansion Parameters Revealed by Approximate Bayesian Computation.

    PubMed

    Vo, Brenda N; Drovandi, Christopher C; Pettitt, Anthony N; Pettet, Graeme J

    2015-12-01

    In vitro studies and mathematical models are now being widely used to study the underlying mechanisms driving the expansion of cell colonies. This can improve our understanding of cancer formation and progression. Although much progress has been made in terms of developing and analysing mathematical models, far less progress has been made in terms of understanding how to estimate model parameters using experimental in vitro image-based data. To address this issue, a new approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) algorithm is proposed to estimate key parameters governing the expansion of melanoma cell (MM127) colonies, including cell diffusivity, D, cell proliferation rate, λ, and cell-to-cell adhesion, q, in two experimental scenarios, namely with and without a chemical treatment to suppress cell proliferation. Even when little prior biological knowledge about the parameters is assumed, all parameters are precisely inferred with a small posterior coefficient of variation, approximately 2-12%. The ABC analyses reveal that the posterior distributions of D and q depend on the experimental elapsed time, whereas the posterior distribution of λ does not. The posterior mean values of D and q are in the ranges 226-268 µm2h-1, 311-351 µm2h-1 and 0.23-0.39, 0.32-0.61 for the experimental periods of 0-24 h and 24-48 h, respectively. Furthermore, we found that the posterior distribution of q also depends on the initial cell density, whereas the posterior distributions of D and λ do not. The ABC approach also enables information from the two experiments to be combined, resulting in greater precision for all estimates of D and λ. PMID:26642072

  2. Phenotypic plasticity within yeast colonies: differential partitioning of cell fates.

    PubMed

    Piccirillo, Sarah; Kapros, Tamas; Honigberg, Saul M

    2016-05-01

    Across many phyla, a common aspect of multicellularity is the organization of different cell types into spatial patterns. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, after diploid colonies have completed growth, they differentiate to form alternating layers of sporulating cells and feeder cells. In the current study, we found that as yeast colonies developed, the feeder cell layer was initially separated from the sporulating cell layer. Furthermore, the spatial pattern of sporulation in colonies depended on the colony's nutrient environment; in two environments in which overall colony sporulation efficiency was very similar, the pattern of feeder and sporulating cells within the colony was very different. As noted previously, under moderately suboptimal conditions for sporulation-low acetate concentration or high temperature-the number of feeder cells increases as does the dependence of sporulation on the feeder-cell transcription factor, Rlm1. Here we report that even under a condition that is completely blocked sporulation, the number of feeder cells still increased. These results suggest broader implications to our recently proposed "Differential Partitioning provides Environmental Buffering" or DPEB hypothesis. PMID:26743103

  3. High-Throughput Method for Automated Colony and Cell Counting by Digital Image Analysis Based on Edge Detection

    PubMed Central

    Choudhry, Priya

    2016-01-01

    Counting cells and colonies is an integral part of high-throughput screens and quantitative cellular assays. Due to its subjective and time-intensive nature, manual counting has hindered the adoption of cellular assays such as tumor spheroid formation in high-throughput screens. The objective of this study was to develop an automated method for quick and reliable counting of cells and colonies from digital images. For this purpose, I developed an ImageJ macro Cell Colony Edge and a CellProfiler Pipeline Cell Colony Counting, and compared them to other open-source digital methods and manual counts. The ImageJ macro Cell Colony Edge is valuable in counting cells and colonies, and measuring their area, volume, morphology, and intensity. In this study, I demonstrate that Cell Colony Edge is superior to other open-source methods, in speed, accuracy and applicability to diverse cellular assays. It can fulfill the need to automate colony/cell counting in high-throughput screens, colony forming assays, and cellular assays. PMID:26848849

  4. Human tumor clonogenic assay for carcinoma of the lung. II. Factors that influence colony formation in soft agar.

    PubMed

    Kanzawa, F; Matsushima, Y; Hamburger, A W; Ishihara, J; Sasaki, Y; Shimizu, E; Eguchi, K; Shinkai, T; Saijo, N; Miyazawa, N

    1987-01-01

    The human tumor clonogenic assay (HTCA) has potential value for studies of both the chemosensitivity and biology of human tumors. However, many technical problems including low plating efficiencies and the preparation of sufficient numbers of viable cells remain. In this study, an improved method for disaggregation of solid tumors increased the yield of single cells. Consequently, more than 10 anticancer drugs could be tested in 94 of 168 specimens (56%). Removal of peripheral blood lymphocytes from cell suspensions derived from effusions also improved colony formation. Adequate growth for sensitivity testing (greater than 30 colonies/plate) was obtained in 122 cases (73%), inadequate growth for drug evaluation (5-29 colonies/plate) in 29 cases (17%), and no colony formation (less than 5 colonies/plate) in 17 cases (10%) of the 168 viable samples. The cloning efficiencies of cells derived from primary tumors (median 0.015%) were higher than those of cells derived from metastatic tumors (0.012%), and they varied with the location of the metastatic site. Cloning efficiencies varied markedly from specimen to specimen, and were unaffected by tumor histology, grade of differentiation, patient age, stage of disease, or prior chemotherapy. The HTCA is promising as a potential tool for studying the biology of tumors. PMID:3601316

  5. Defect-Mediated Morphologies in Growing Cell Colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doostmohammadi, Amin; Thampi, Sumesh P.; Yeomans, Julia M.

    2016-07-01

    Morphological trends in growing colonies of living cells are at the core of physiological and evolutionary processes. Using active gel equations, which include cell division, we show that shape changes during the growth can be regulated by the dynamics of topological defects in the orientation of cells. The friction between the dividing cells and underlying substrate drives anisotropic colony shapes toward more isotropic morphologies, by mediating the number density and velocity of topological defects. We show that the defects interact with the interface at a specific interaction range, set by the vorticity length scale of flows within the colony, and that the cells predominantly reorient parallel to the interface due to division-induced active stresses.

  6. Whole Cell Modeling: From Single Cells to Colonies

    PubMed Central

    Cole, John A.

    2015-01-01

    A great deal of research over the last several years has focused on how the inherent randomness in movements and reactivity of biomolecules can give rise to unexpected large-scale differences in the behavior of otherwise identical cells. Our own research has approached this problem from two vantage points – a microscopic kinetic view of the individual molecules (nucleic acids, proteins, etc.) diffusing and interacting in a crowded cellular environment; and a broader systems-level view of how enzyme variability can give rise to well-defined metabolic phenotypes. The former led to the development of the Lattice Microbes software – a GPU-accelerated stochastic simulator for reaction-diffusion processes in models of whole cells; the latter to the development of a method we call population flux balance analysis (FBA). The first part of this article reviews the Lattice Microbes methodology, and two recent technical advances that extend the capabilities of Lattice Microbes to enable simulations of larger organisms and colonies. The second part of this article focuses on our recent population FBA study of Escherichia coli, which predicted variability in the usage of different metabolic pathways resulting from heterogeneity in protein expression. Finally, we discuss exciting early work using a new hybrid methodology that integrates FBA with spatially resolved kinetic simulations to study how cells compete and cooperate within dense colonies and consortia. PMID:26989262

  7. Random mitotic activities across human embryonic stem cell colonies.

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Q.; Duggan, R.; Dasa, S.; Li, F.; Chen, L.

    2010-08-01

    A systemic and quantitative study was performed to examine whether different levels of mitotic activities, assessed by the percentage of S-phase cells at any given time point, existed at different physical regions of human embryonic stem (hES) cell colonies at 2, 4, 6 days after cell passaging. Mitotically active cells were identified by the positive incorporation of 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) within their newly synthesized DNA. Our data indicated that mitotically active cells were often distributed as clusters randomly across the colonies within the examined growth period, presumably resulting from local deposition of newly divided cells. This latter notion was further demonstrated by the confined growth of enhanced green florescence protein (EGFP) expressing cells amongst non-GFP expressing cells. Furthermore, the overall percentage of mitotically active cells remained constantly at about 50% throughout the 6-day culture period, indicating mitotic activities of hES cell cultures were time-independent under current growth conditions.

  8. Pattern Formation of Bacterial Colonies by Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokita, Rie; Katoh, Takaki; Maeda, Yusuke; Wakita, Jun-ichi; Sano, Masaki; Matsuyama, Tohey; Matsushita, Mitsugu

    2009-07-01

    We have studied the morphological diversity and change in bacterial colonies, using the bacterial species Escherichia coli, as a function of both agar concentration Ca and nutrient concentration Cn. We observed various colony patterns, classified them into four types by pattern characteristics and established a morphological diagram by dividing it into four regions. They are regions A [diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA)-like], B (Eden-like), C (concentric-ring), and D (fluid-spreading). In particular, we have observed a concentric-ring colony growth for E. coli. We focused on the periodic growth in region C and obtained the following results: (i) A colony grows cyclically with the growing front repeating an advance (migration phase) and a momentary rest (consolidation phase) alternately. (ii) The growth width L and the bulge width W in one cycle decrease asymptotically to certain values, when Ca is increased. (iii) L does not depend on Cn, while W is an increasing function of Cn. Plausible mechanisms are proposed to explain the experimental results, by comparing them with those obtained for other bacterial species such as Proteus mirabilis and Bacillus subtilis.

  9. Interrelationships between Colonies, Biofilms, and Planktonic Cells of Pseudomonas aeruginosa▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Mikkelsen, H.; Duck, Z.; Lilley, K. S.; Welch, M.

    2007-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a gram-negative bacterium and an opportunistic human pathogen that causes chronic infections in immunocompromised individuals. These infections are hard to treat, partly due to the high intrinsic resistance of the bacterium to clinically used antibiotics and partly due to the formation of antibiotic-tolerant biofilms. The three most common ways of growing bacteria in vitro are as planktonic cultures, colonies on agar plates, and biofilms in continuous-flow systems. Biofilms are known to express genes different from those of planktonic cells, and biofilm cells are generally believed to closely resemble planktonic cells in stationary phase. However, few, if any, studies have examined global gene expression in colonies. We used a proteomic approach to investigate the interrelationships between planktonic cells, colonies, and biofilms under comparable conditions. Our results show that protein profiles in colonies resemble those of planktonic cells. Furthermore, contrary to what has been reported previously, the protein profiles of biofilms were found to more closely resemble those of exponentially growing planktonic cells than those of planktonic cells in the stationary phase. These findings raise some intriguing questions about the true nature of biofilms. PMID:17220232

  10. Role of gas vesicles and intra-colony spaces during the process of algal bloom formation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongsheng; Zheng, Binghui; Jiang, Xia; Zheng, Hao

    2013-06-01

    Aggregation morphology, vertical distribution, and algal density were analyzed during the algal cell floating process in three environments. The role of gas vesicles and intra-colony spaces was distinguished by algal blooms treated with ultrasonic waves and high pressure. Results demonstrated that the two buoyancy providers jointly provide buoyancy for floating algal cells. The results were also confirmed by force analysis. In the simulation experiment, the buoyancy acting on algal cells was greater than its gravity at sample ports 2 and 3 of a columnar-cultivated cell vessel, and intra-colony spaces were not detected. In Taihu Lake, gas vesicle buoyancy was notably less than total algal cell gravity. Buoyancy provided by intra-colony spaces exceeded total algal cell gravity at the water surface, but not at other water depths. In the Daning River, total buoyancies provided by the two buoyancy providers were less than total algal cell gravity at different water depths. PMID:23833817

  11. Colony Stimulating Factor-1 exerts direct effects on the proliferation and invasiveness of endometrial epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Aligeti, Sabitha; Kirma, Nameer B.; Binkely, Peter A; Schenken, Robert S.; Tekmal, Rajeshwar Rao

    2011-01-01

    Although macrophage colony stimulating factor (CSF-1) has been suggested to play a role in part in maintaining the chronic inflammatory response in endometriosis, our previous data suggest that CSF-1 may also play a role in early endometriosis lesion formation. In the current studies, we have examined this possibility and have shown that CSF-1, in an autocrine fashion, has a direct effect on endometrial epithelial cell proliferation and attachment to peritoneal mesothelial cells, early steps in endometriosis lesion formation on the peritoneum. PMID:21481374

  12. Burkholderia cenocepacia ShvR-regulated genes that influence colony morphology, biofilm formation, and virulence.

    PubMed

    Subramoni, Sujatha; Nguyen, David T; Sokol, Pamela A

    2011-08-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia is an opportunistic pathogen that primarily infects cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Previously, we reported that ShvR, a LysR regulator, influences colony morphology, virulence, and biofilm formation and regulates the expression of an adjacent 24-kb genomic region encoding 24 genes. In this study, we report the functional characterization of selected genes in this region. A Tn5 mutant with shiny colony morphology was identified with a polar mutation in BCAS0208, predicted to encode an acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase. Mutagenesis of BCAS0208 and complementation analyses revealed that BCAS0208 is required for rough colony morphology, biofilm formation, and virulence on alfalfa seedlings. It was not possible to complement with BCAS0208 containing a mutation in the catalytic site. BCAS0201, encoding a putative flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-dependent oxidoreductase, and BCAS0207, encoding a putative citrate synthase, do not influence colony morphology but are required for optimum levels of biofilm formation and virulence. Both BCAS0208 and BCAS0201 contribute to pellicle formation, although individual mutations in each of these genes had no appreciable effect on pellicle formation. A mutant with a polar insertion in BCAS0208 was significantly less virulent in a rat model of chronic lung infection as well as in the alfalfa model. Genes in this region were shown to influence utilization of branched-chain fatty acids, tricarboxylic acid cycle substrates, l-arabinose, and branched-chain amino acids. Together, our data show that the ShvR-regulated genes BCAS0208 to BCAS0201 are required for the rough colony morphotype, biofilm and pellicle formation, and virulence in B. cenocepacia. PMID:21690240

  13. The isolation and culture of endothelial colony-forming cells from human and rat lungs.

    PubMed

    Alphonse, Rajesh S; Vadivel, Arul; Zhong, Shumei; Zong, Shumei; McConaghy, Suzanne; Ohls, Robin; Yoder, Mervin C; Thébaud, Bernard

    2015-11-01

    Blood vessels are crucial for the normal development, lifelong repair and homeostasis of tissues. Recently, vascular progenitor cell-driven 'postnatal vasculogenesis' has been suggested as an important mechanism that contributes to new blood vessel formation and organ repair. Among several described progenitor cell types that contribute to blood vessel formation, endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) have received widespread attention as lineage-specific 'true' vascular progenitors. Here we describe a protocol for the isolation of pulmonary microvascular ECFCs from human and rat lung tissue. Our technique takes advantage of an earlier protocol for the isolation of circulating ECFCs from the mononuclear cellular fraction of peripheral blood. We adapted the earlier protocol to isolate resident ECFCs from the distal lung tissue. After enzymatic dispersion of rat or human lung samples into a cellular suspension, CD31-expressing cells are positively selected using magnetic-activated cell sorting and plated in endothelial-specific growth conditions. The colonies arising after 1-2 weeks in culture are carefully separated and expanded to yield pure ECFC cultures after a further 2-3 weeks. The resulting cells demonstrate the defining characteristics of ECFCs such as (i) 'cobblestone' morphology of cultured cell monolayers; (ii) acetylated low-density lipoprotein uptake and Ulex europaeus lectin binding; (iii) tube-like network formation in Matrigel; (iv) expression of endothelial cell-specific surface markers and the absence of hematopoietic or myeloid surface antigens; (v) self-renewal potential displayed by the most proliferative cells; and (vi) contribution to de novo vessel formation in an in vivo mouse implant model. Assuming typical initial cell adhesion and proliferation rates, the entire procedure can be completed within 4 weeks. Isolation and culture of lung vascular ECFCs will allow assessment of the functional state of these cells in experimental and human

  14. Agent Based Modelling Helps in Understanding the Rules by Which Fibroblasts Support Keratinocyte Colony Formation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Tao; McMinn, Phil; Holcombe, Mike; Smallwood, Rod; MacNeil, Sheila

    2008-01-01

    Background Autologous keratincoytes are routinely expanded using irradiated mouse fibroblasts and bovine serum for clinical use. With growing concerns about the safety of these xenobiotic materials, it is desirable to culture keratinocytes in media without animal derived products. An improved understanding of epithelial/mesenchymal interactions could assist in this. Methodology/Principal Findings A keratincyte/fibroblast o-culture model was developed by extending an agent-based keratinocyte colony formation model to include the response of keratinocytes to both fibroblasts and serum. The model was validated by comparison of the in virtuo and in vitro multicellular behaviour of keratinocytes and fibroblasts in single and co-culture in Greens medium. To test the robustness of the model, several properties of the fibroblasts were changed to investigate their influence on the multicellular morphogenesis of keratinocyes and fibroblasts. The model was then used to generate hypotheses to explore the interactions of both proliferative and growth arrested fibroblasts with keratinocytes. The key predictions arising from the model which were confirmed by in vitro experiments were that 1) the ratio of fibroblasts to keratinocytes would critically influence keratinocyte colony expansion, 2) this ratio needed to be optimum at the beginning of the co-culture, 3) proliferative fibroblasts would be more effective than irradiated cells in expanding keratinocytes and 4) in the presence of an adequate number of fibroblasts, keratinocyte expansion would be independent of serum. Conclusions A closely associated computational and biological approach is a powerful tool for understanding complex biological systems such as the interactions between keratinocytes and fibroblasts. The key outcome of this study is the finding that the early addition of a critical ratio of proliferative fibroblasts can give rapid keratinocyte expansion without the use of irradiated mouse fibroblasts and bovine

  15. Microtable Arrays for Culture and Isolation of Cell Colonies

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Jeng-Hao; Xu, Wei; Sims, Christopher E.; Allbritton, Nancy L.

    2010-01-01

    Cell microarrays with culture sites composed of individually removable microstructures or micropallets have proven benefits for isolation of cells from a mixed population. The laser energy required to selectively remove these micropallets with attached cells from the array depends on the microstructure surface area in contact with the substrate. Laser energies sufficient to release micropallets greater than 100 μm resulted in loss of cell viability. A new 3-dimensional culture site similar in appearance to a table was designed and fabricated using a simple process that relied on a differential sensitivity of two photoresists to UV-mediated photopolymerization. With this design, the larger culture area rests on four small supports to minimize the surface area in contact with the substrate. Microtables up to 250 × 250 μm were consistently released with single 10 μJ pulses to each of the 4 support structures. In contrast, microstructures with a 150 × 150 μm surface area in contact with the substrate could not be reliably released at pulse energies up to 212 μJ. Cassie-Baxter wetting is required to provide a barrier of air to localize and sequester cells to the culture sites. A second asset of the design was an increased retention of this air barrier under conditions of decreased surface tension and after prolonged culture of cells. The improved air retention was due to the hydrophobic cavity created beneath the table and above the substrate which entrapped air when an aqueous solution was added to the array. The microtables proved an efficient method for isolating colonies from the array with 100% of selected colonies competent to expand following release from the array. PMID:20644916

  16. High nutrient concentration and temperature alleviated formation of large colonies of Microcystis: Evidence from field investigations and laboratory experiments.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei; Zhou, Xiaohua; Chen, Huaimin; Gao, Li; Xiao, Man; Li, Ming

    2016-09-15

    Correlations between Microcystis colony size and environmental factors were investigated in Meiliang Bay and Gonghu Bay of Lake Taihu (China) from 2011 to 2013. Compared with Gonghu Bay, both nutrient concentrations and Microcystis colony sizes were greater in Meiliang Bay. The median colony size (D50: 50% of the total mass of particles smaller than this size) increased from April to August and then decreased until November. In both bays, the average D50 of Microcystis colonies were <100 μm in spring, but colonies within moderate-size (100-500 μm) dominated in summer. The differences in colony size in Meiliang Bay and Gonghu Bay were probably due to horizontal drift driven by the prevailing south wind in summer. Redundancy analysis (RDA) of field data indicated that colony size was negatively related to nutrient concentrations but positively related to air temperature, suggesting that low nutrient concentrations and high air temperature promoted formation of large colonies. To validate the field survey, Microcystis colonies collected from Lake Taihu were cultured at different temperatures (15, 20, 25 and 30 °C) under high and low nutrient concentrations for 9 days. The size of Microcystis colonies significantly decreased when temperature was above 20 °C but had no significant change at 15 °C. The differences in temperature effects on colony formation shown from field and laboratory suggested that the larger colonies in summer were probably due to the longer growth period rather than the higher air temperature and light intensity. In addition, colony size decreased more significantly at high nutrient levels. Therefore, it could be concluded that high nutrient concentration and temperature may alleviate formation of large colonies of Microcystis. PMID:27262121

  17. Characteristics of rat megakaryocyte colonies and their progenitors in agar culture

    SciTech Connect

    Kellar, K.L.; Rolovic, Z.; Evatt, B.L.; Sewell, E.T.

    1985-11-01

    The characteristics of megakaryocyte colonies that develop from megakaryocyte progenitors of rat bone marrow stimulated by rat spleen-conditioned medium (SCM) in agar culture were investigated. Colony frequency was optimal on day 7 and increased relative to both the number of cells plated and the concentration of SCM used. Colonies were categorized as small cell and big cell. Small-cell colonies had a greater proliferative potential, with a mean of 25 cells/colony. Big-cell colonies averaged 15 cells/colony. The ratio of big-cell to small-cell colonies was 0.69 +/- 0.29. Granulocyte-macrophage colonies, which were also stimulated by SCM, accounted for 70% +/- 15% of the total colonies in the cultures. Cytocidal experiments with tritiated thymidine reduced megakaryocyte colony formation by 45% and granulocyte-macrophage colony formation by 21%. The properties of rat, mouse, and human megakaryocyte progenitors as assayed in vitro are compared.

  18. Heterogeneity in proliferative potential of ovine mesenchymal stem cell colonies.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, N P; Srivastava, J K; Smith, R F; Longinotti, C

    2004-04-01

    Bone marrow biopsies were taken from the iliac crest of 28 individual sheep from three different breeds, ranging in age from 4 months to 8 years and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) isolated using selection due to plastic adherence. Cells were cultured in medium that had been selected for its effect on observed MSC proliferation, until populations of greater than 50 million had been obtained from each biopsy. The identity of the isolated cell populations as progenitors of the mesenchymal lineage was verified by deriving both osteoblastic and chondrocytic phenotypes when cultured in osteogenic and chondrogenic medium supplements, respectively. The rate of cell proliferation for each marrow biopsy was measured at each passage and the number of initial stem cells in each sample estimated. There was no statistically significant correlation between the age of the sheep and MSC proliferative potential, or age and estimated initial MSC number. There was no apparent significant difference between proliferation rate and sheep breed and colonies established from frozen cells grew at similar rates to pre-frozen cells. Counter intuitively, there appeared to be a negatively correlated trend between proliferation rate and MSC concentration in the samples. It is concluded that no initial descriptive statistics of the marrow biopsies can assist in estimating the proliferative potential, and therefore the timing of future surgeries, of MSCs sampled for the purposes of tissue engineering. PMID:15332606

  19. The role of gravity in the nutrition and formation of Bacillus colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puzyr, A.; Tirranen, L.; Krylova, T.

    The soil-like substrate is used to cultivate higher plants in man-made closed ecosystems. It allows increasing the closeness of the systems and decreasing the plant solid residues and human wastes. Unusual funnel-shaped bacterial colonies of Bacillus species have been observed during analysis of microflora of plant nutritional solution. The colonies have the following characteristics: a) the diameter of "funnel socket" (the biomass contacting with nutritional agar) is 10.0-15.0 mm; b) the thickness of "funnel socket" is 0.5-2.5 mm; c) the diameter of the middle part of the "funnel spout" (the biomass contacting with the gas phase) is 1,0-1,5 mm; d) the length of the "funnel spout" is 10.0-15.0 mm. In the socket and the middle part of the "funnel spout" there is a gas cavity which is most probably formed by bacterial gas metabolites. It has been shown that: i) the surface of these funnel-shaped colonies of Bacillus species is hydrophobic, as is the surface of other Bacillus species ( . brevis, B. cellulomonos, B. flavus, B.B formosus, B. subtilis); ii) the forms of colonies can be changed by varying the position of the growing biomass in relation to the gravitation forces. The experiment proved that the form of the "funnel sockets" and the length of the "funnel spouts" of the colonies are determined by hydrophobic air-contacting surface layer, which does not leak and stretches under the weight of accumulated water. A hypothesis has been suggested that the gravity force plays the role of a "pump" supplying and holding water within the colony. Thus, the water that comes under the gravity force contains dissolved nutrients and bacterial cells in the hydrophobic layer. These cells that are situated far away from the nutrient agar have no nutrient deficiency. The water accumulated by the colonies might be free water of agar media or it can be produced by metabolic disruption of medium fat. Hence, when growing a colony in agar media the water-soluble nutrient substances

  20. Accumulation of neutral mutations in growing cell colonies with competition

    PubMed Central

    Sorace, Ron; Komarova, Natalia L.

    2012-01-01

    Neutral mutations play an important role in many biological processes including cancer initiation and progression, the generation of drug resistance in bacterial and viral diseases as well as cancers, and the development of organs in multicellular organisms. In this paper we study how neutral mutants are accumulated in nonlinearly-growing colonies of cells subject to growth constraints such as crowding or lack of resources. We investigate different types of growth control which range from “division-controlled” to “death-controlled” growth (and various mixtures of both). In division-controlled growth, the burden of handling overcrowding lies with the process of cell-divisions, the divisions slow down as the carrying capacity is approached. In death-controlled growth, it is death rate that increases to slow down expansion. We show that division-controlled growth minimizes the number of accumulated mutations, and death-controlled growth corresponds to the maximum number of mutants. We check that these results hold in both deterministic and stochastic settings. We further develop a general (deterministic) theory of neutral mutations and achieve an analytical understanding of the mutant accumulation in colonies of a given size in the absence of back-mutations. The long-term dynamics of mutants in the presence of back-mutations is also addressed. In particular, with equal forward-and back-mutation rates, if division-controlled and a death-controlled types are competing for space and nutrients, cells obeying division-controlled growth will dominate the population. PMID:22940236

  1. Simple method for a cell count of the colonial Cyanobacterium, Microcystis sp.

    PubMed

    Joung, Seung-Hyun; Kim, Choong-Jae; Ahn, Chi-Yong; Jang, Kam-Yong; Boo, Sung Min; Oh, Hee-Mock

    2006-10-01

    The cell counting of colonial Microcystis spp. is a rather difficult and error-prone proposition, as this genus forms irregularly-shaped and irregularly-sized colonies, which are packed with cells. Thus, in order to facilitate a cell count, four methods of dividing the colonies into single cells were compared, including vortexing, sonication, TiO2 treatment, and boiling. As a result, the boiling method was determined to generate the greatest number of single cells from a colony, and all colonies were found to have divided completely after only 6 min of treatment. Furthermore, no significant cell destruction, which might alter the actual cell density, was detected in conjunction with the boiling method (P = 0.158). In order to compute the cell number more simply, the relationship between the colony size and the cell number was determined, via the boiling method. The colony volume, rather than the area or diameter was correlated more closely with the cell number (r2 = 0.727), thereby suggesting that the cell numbers of colonial Microcystis sp. can also be estimated effectively from their volumes. PMID:17082751

  2. A simple colony-formation assay in liquid medium, termed 'tadpoling', provides a sensitive measure of Saccharomyces cerevisiae culture viability.

    PubMed

    Welch, Aaron Z; Koshland, Douglas E

    2013-12-01

    Here we describe the first high-throughput amenable method of quantifying Saccharomyces cerevisiae culture viability. Current high-throughput methods of assessing yeast cell viability, such as flow cytometry and SGA analysis, do not measure the percentage viability of a culture but instead measure cell vitality or colony fitness, respectively. We developed a method, called tadpoling, to quantify the percentage viability of a yeast culture, with the ability to detect as few as one viable cell amongst ~10(8) dead cells. The most important feature of this assay is the exploitation of yeast colony formation in liquid medium. Utilizing a microtiter dish, we are able to observe a range of viability of 100% to 0.0001%. Comparison of tadpoling to the traditional plating method to measure yeast culture viability reveals that, for the majority of Saccharomyces species analyzed there is no significant difference between the two methods. In comparison to flow cytometry using propidium iodide, the high-throughput method of measuring yeast culture viability, tadpoling is much more accurate at culture viabilities < 1%. Thus, we show that tadpoling provides an easy, inexpensive, space-saving method, amenable to high-throughput screens, for accurately measuring yeast cell viability. PMID:24185677

  3. Pattern formation in a growing bacterial colony facilitated by extra-cellular polymeric substances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Pushpita; Mondal, Jagannath; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Levine, Herbert

    2015-03-01

    Self-organization in bacterial colony is quite pervasive and diverse phenomena. Bacteria are known to self-organize into multicellular communities, commonly known as biofilms, in which microbial cells live in close association with a solid surface and are embedded in a self-produced extracellular polymeric substances(EPS). In such dense systems mechanical interactions among the structural components can be expected to significantly contribute to the morphological properties. By a simple particle-based simulation model of nonmotile rod-shaped bacterial cells and EPS secreted in a growing colony, we investigate how the combined mechanical effects can give rise naturally spatial heterogeneity observed in a biofilm. In our individual-based simulation model all the components interact mechanically via repulsive forces by pushing each other away as bacterial cells grow and divide consuming diffusing nutrient and produce EPS. We show that mechanical interactions control the collective behavior of the system, particularly, we show that the presence of non-adsorbing EPS leads spontaneous aggregation of bacterial cells by depletion attraction and generates phase separated patterns in a nonequilibrium growing colony.

  4. Involvement of allelopathy in the formation of monospecific colonies of ferns.

    PubMed

    Kato-Noguchi, Hisashi

    2015-05-01

    Some fern species often dominate plant communities by forming large monospecific colonies. However, the potential mechanism for this domination of the ferns remains obscure. Many plants secrete a wide range of compounds into the rhizosphere and change the chemical and physical properties of the rhizosphere soil. Through the secretion of compounds, such as allelopathic substances, plants inhibit the germination and growth of neighboring plants to compete more effectively for the resources. Ferns contain a variety of secondary metabolites and some of those compounds are released from the ferns into the rhizosphere soil, either as exudates from living ferns or by decomposition of fern residues in sufficient quantities to affect the germination and growth of neighboring plants as allelopathic substances. Therefore, allelopathic chemical interaction of the ferns with neighboring plants may play an important role in the formation of the monospecific colonies of the ferns. PMID:26058163

  5. Cooperation between human fibrocytes and endothelial colony forming cells increases angiogenesis via CXCR4 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Smadja, David M.; Dorfmüller, Peter; Bieche, Ivan; Guerin, Coralie; Badoual, Cécile; Boscolo, Elisa; Kambouchner, Marianne; Cazes, Aurélie; Mercier, Olaf; Humbert, Marc; Gaussem, Pascale; Bischoff, Joyce; Israël-Biet, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Background Fibrotic diseases of the lung are associated with a vascular remodeling process. Fibrocytes (Fy) are a distinct population of blood-borne cells that coexpress hematopoietic cell antigens and fibroblast markers, which have been shown to contribute to organ fibrosis. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that Fy might cooperate with endothelial colony forming cells to induce angiogenesis. Methods/Results We successfully isolated Fy from blood of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) patients, which were further characterized by flow cytometry, Reverse Transcriptase quantitative-PCR (RTQ-PCR), and confocal analysis. We investigated the interaction between Fy and cord blood derived endothelial colony forming cells (ECFC) angiogenic potential in vitro and in vivo in a Matrigel implant model. Compared to fibroblast culture media, secreted media from Fy increase ECFC proliferation and their differentiation ability via SDF-1/CXCR4 pathway. IPF-Fy co-implanted with human ECFC in a matrigel plug in immunodeficient mice formed functional microvascular beds, whereas fibroblasts did not. Evaluation of implants after 2 weeks revealed an extensive network of blood vessels containing erythrocytes. CXCR4 blockade significantly inhibited blood vessel formation in the implants. The clinical relevance of these data was confirmed by the high expression level of CXCR4 in vessels close to fibrotic areas in biopsy specimens from patients with IPF, in contrast to control lungs. Conclusions Circulating Fy might be contribute to the intense remodeling of the pulmonary vasculature in patients with IPF. PMID:25103869

  6. Sorting and Expansion of Murine Embryonic Stem Cell Colonies using Micropallet Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Shadpour, Hamed; Sims, Christopher E.; Thresher, Randy J.; Allbritton, Nancy L.

    2008-01-01

    Background Isolation of cell colonies is an essential task in most stem cell studies. Conventional techniques for colony selection and isolation require significant time, labor, and consumption of expensive reagents. New microengineered technologies hold the promise for improving colony manipulation by reducing the required manpower and reagent consumption. Methods Murine embryonic stem cells were cultured on arrays composed of releasable elements termed micropallets created from a biocompatible photoresist. Micropallets containing undifferentiated colonies were released using a laser-based technique followed by cell collection and expansion in culture. Results The micropallet arrays provided a biocompatible substrate for maintaining undifferentiated murine stem cells in culture. A surface coating of 0.025% gelatin was shown to be optimal for cell culture and collection. Arrays composed of surface roughened micropallets provided further improvements in culture and isolation. Colonies of viable stem cells were efficiently isolated and collected. Colonies sorted in this manner were shown to remain undifferentiated even after collection and further expansion in culture. Conclusions Qualitative and quantitative analyses of sorting, collection efficiency and cell viability after release and expansion of stem cell colonies demonstrated that the micropallet array technology is a promising alternative to conventional sorting methods for stem cell applications. PMID:19012319

  7. Manufacture of Clinical-Grade Human Clonal Mesenchymal Stem Cell Products from Single Colony Forming Unit-Derived Colonies Based on the Subfractionation Culturing Method.

    PubMed

    Yi, TacGhee; Kim, Si-na; Lee, Hyun-Joo; Kim, Junghee; Cho, Yun-Kyoung; Shin, Dong-Hee; Tak, Sun-Ji; Moon, Sun-Hwa; Kang, Ji-Eun; Ji, In-Mi; Lim, Huyn-Ja; Lee, Dong-Soon; Jeon, Myung-Shin; Song, Sun U

    2015-12-01

    Stem cell products derived from mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been widely used in clinical trials, and a few products have been already commercialized. However, the therapeutic effects of clinical-grade MSCs are still controversial owing to mixed results from recent clinical trials. A potential solution to overcome this hurdle may be to use clonal stem cells as the starting cell material to increase the homogeneity of the final stem cell products. We have previously developed an alternative isolation and culture protocol for establishing a population of clonal MSCs (cMSCs) from single colony forming unit (CFU)-derived colonies. In this study, we established a good manufacturing practice (GMP)-compatible procedure for the clinical-grade production of human bone marrow-derived cMSCs based on the subfractionation culturing method. We optimized the culture procedures to expand and obtain a clonal population of final MSC products from single CFU-derived colonies in a GMP facility. The characterization results of the final cMSC products met our preset criteria. Animal toxicity tests were performed in a good laboratory practice facility, and showed no toxicity or tumor formation in vivo. These tests include single injection toxicity, multiple injection toxicity, biodistribution analysis, and tumorigenicity tests in vivo. No chromosomal abnormalities were detected by in situ karyotyping using oligo-fluorescence in situ hydridization (oligo-FISH), providing evidence of genetic stability of the clinical-grade cMSC products. The manufacture and quality control results indicated that our GMP methodology could produce sufficient clonal population of MSC products from a small amount of bone marrow aspirate to treat a number of patients. PMID:26421757

  8. Are self-ligating brackets related to less formation of Streptococcus mutans colonies? A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    do Nascimento, Leonard Euler Andrade Gomes; de Souza, Margareth Maria Gomes; Azevedo, Angela Rita Pontes; Maia, Lucianne Cople

    2014-01-01

    Objective To verify, by means of a systematic review, whether the design of brackets (conventional or self-ligating) influences adhesion and formation of Streptococcus mutans colonies. Methods Search strategy: four databases (Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Ovid ALL EMB Reviews, PubMed and BIREME) were selected to search relevant articles covering the period from January 1965 to December 2012. Selection Criteria: in first consensus by reading the title and abstract. The full text was obtained from publications that met the inclusion criteria. Data collection and analysis: Two reviewers independently extracted data using the keywords: conventional, self-ligating, biofilm, Streptococcus mutans, and systematic review; and independently evaluated the quality of the studies. In case of divergence, the technique of consensus was adopted. Results The search strategy resulted in 1,401 articles. The classification of scientific relevance revealed the high quality of the 6 eligible articles of which outcomes were not unanimous in reporting not only the influence of the design of the brackets (conventional or self-ligating) over adhesion and formation of colonies of Streptococcus mutans, but also that other factors such as the quality of the bracket type, the level of individual oral hygiene, bonding and age may have greater influence. Statistical analysis was not feasible because of the heterogeneous methodological design. Conclusions Within the limitations of this study, it was concluded that there is no evidence for a possible influence of the design of the brackets (conventional or self-ligating) over colony formation and adhesion of Streptococcus mutans. PMID:24713561

  9. Continuum Model of Collective Cell Migration in Wound Healing and Colony Expansion

    PubMed Central

    Arciero, Julia C.; Mi, Qi; Branca, Maria F.; Hackam, David J.; Swigon, David

    2011-01-01

    Collective cell migration plays an important role during wound healing and embryo development. Although the exact mechanisms that coordinate such migration are still unknown, experimental studies of moving cell layers have shown that the primary interactions governing the motion of the layer are the force of lamellipodia, the adhesion of cells to the substrate, and the adhesion of cells to each other. Here, we derive a two-dimensional continuum mechanical model of cell-layer migration that is based on a novel assumption of elastic deformation of the layer and incorporates basic mechanical interactions of cells as well as cell proliferation and apoptosis. The evolution equations are solved numerically using a level set method. The model successfully reproduces data from two types of experiments: 1), the contraction of an enterocyte cell layer during wound healing; and 2), the expansion of a radially symmetric colony of MDCK cells, both in the edge migration velocity and in cell-layer density. In accord with experimental observations, and in contrast to reaction-diffusion models, this model predicts a partial wound closure if lamellipod formation is inhibited at the wound edge and gives implications of the effect of spatially restricted proliferation. PMID:21281567

  10. Proliferation and colony-forming ability of peritoneal exudate cells in liquid culture.

    PubMed

    Stewart, C C; Lin, H S; Adles, C

    1975-05-01

    Peritoneal exudate cells, obtained from mice injected with thioglycollate medium and cultured in medium containing L-cell-conditioned medium, will proliferate in an exponential fashion for 18 days with a doubling time of 68 h. After a 2 h pulse of tritiated thymidine, labeled adherent cells increased to a maximum of 22-34% during the 1st and 2nd wk of culture. Increasing the cell concentration from 2 times 10-3 to 2 times 10-5 cells/culture reduced exponential growth to 10 days and the doubling time was increased to 81.6 h. Under these culture conditions, peritoneal exudate cells were shown to form colonies on the surface of culture dishes when plated at low density. The cells within the colony were shown to be macrophages using yeast and antibody-coated sheep erythrocytes as a test for phagocytic function. The plating efficiolonies arose from a single precursor cell. The adherent cell population contains the colony-forming precursors. These precursors can be stimulated to form colonies for at least 2 wk by the addition of conditioned medium to cultures at various times after plating. While very few colony-forming cells could be demonstrated in the unstimulated peritoneal lavage, their numbers begin to increase in the exudate 4 h after injection of thioglycollate medium and reach a maximum by day 3 and then decrease. Isolated colonies may be useful in studying the function of macrophages. PMID:1092793

  11. Impact of chlorine on the cell integrity and toxin release and degradation of colonial Microcystis.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jiajia; Rao, La; Chiu, Yi-Ting; Lin, Tsair-Fuh

    2016-10-01

    The occurrence of toxic cyanobacteria in drinking water sources is problematic for water authorities as they can impair drinking water quality. Chlorine as a commonly used oxidant in water treatment plants has shown the potential to lyse cyanobacterial cells, resulting in the release of secondary metabolites which are hard to be removed during conventional water treatment processes. The majority of cyanobacterial species such as Microcystis, often occur in colonial forms under natural conditions. However, previous studies have mainly focused on the influence of chlorination on individual cyanobacterial cells due to technique limitations. A syringe dispersion method combined with a fluorescence technique (SYTOX Green stain with flow cytometry), was successfully developed for the evaluation of cell integrity of colonial Microcystis. Chlorination of Microcystis-laden water was conducted at different chlorine dosages for different colonial sizes (<37, 37-270 and 270-550 μm). The results indicated that colonial Microcystis cells were more resistant to chlorine oxidation than individual cells, which may be attributed to protection from the cell-bound mucilage. There was a lag phase before cell rupture occurred and a Delayed Chick Watson Model describes the experimental data very well for the kinetics of cyanobacterial cell rupture. The growing colonial size caused increases in the lag phases but decreases in the cell lysis rates. Chlorination also induced the release of microcystins (MCs) from colonial Microcystis cells. In particular, increased levels of dissolved MCs were observed in Cheng Kung Lake (CKL) water. In summary, the reaction of chlorine with colonial cyanobacteria is more complicated than with individual cells. The efficiency of chlorine oxidation could be reduced by the cell-bound mucilage and natural water matrix. These observations may provide insights for water authorities to assess the risk to drinking water quality posed by chlorination under

  12. Early Developmental Program Shapes Colony Morphology in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Mamou, Gideon; Malli Mohan, Ganesh Babu; Rouvinski, Alex; Rosenberg, Alex; Ben-Yehuda, Sigal

    2016-01-01

    Summary When grown on a solid surface, bacteria form highly organized colonies, yet little is known about the earliest stages of colony establishment. Following Bacillus subtilis colony development from a single progenitor cell, a sequence of highly ordered spatiotemporal events was revealed. Colony was initiated by the formation of leading-cell chains, deriving from the colony center and extending in multiple directions, typically in a “Y-shaped” structure. By eradicating particular cells during these early stages, we could influence the shape of the resulting colony and demonstrate that Y-arm extension defines colony size. A mutant in ymdB encoding a phosphodiesterase displayed unordered developmental patterns, indicating a role in guiding these initial events. Finally, we provide evidence that intercellular nanotubes contribute to proper colony formation. In summary, we reveal a “construction plan” for building a colony and provide the initial molecular basis for this process. PMID:26904951

  13. Hepatic differentiation of human embryonic stem cells as microscaled multilayered colonies leading to enhanced homogeneity and maturation.

    PubMed

    Yao, Rui; Wang, Jingyu; Li, Xiaokang; Jung Jung, Da; Qi, Hao; Kee, Keh Kooi; Du, Yanan

    2014-11-12

    Directed differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) towards hepatocyte-like cells on planar tissue culture plates has been extensively investigated with great promise to provide alternative cell sources for drug metabolism/toxicity testing. Recently, hepatic differentiation of hESCs in 3D configuration with better mimicry of embryonic liver development represents incremental efforts to improve the differentiation efficiency and cellular maturation. However, most of the present 3D differentiation configurations involved interruptive operations during the multi-staged differentiation process, which might impose unwanted influence on cellular differentiation. Most of the current researches resulted in generation of hepatocytes with high expression of AFP, which is minimally expressed in primary hepatocytes. Here, off-the-shelf micro-stencil arrays are developed to generate adherent multilayered colonies composed of hESCs-derived cells. Uninterrupted cellular differentiation and proliferation is achieved to recapitulate the continuous and multi-stage liver development. Compared with conventional 2D format, the micro-scaled multilayered colonies with uniform and defined sizes constrained within the microwells are composed of more homogenous and mature hepatocyte-like cells with significantly lowered AFP expression and elevated hepatic functions. The multilayered colonies as novel 3D configuration for hepatic differentiation of hESCs represent a significant step toward efficient generation of functional hepatocytes for regenerative medicine and drug discovery. PMID:25059765

  14. Automated Identification and Location Analysis of Marked Stem Cells Colonies in Optical Microscopy Images

    PubMed Central

    Paduano, Vincenzo; Tagliaferri, Daniela; Falco, Geppino; Ceccarelli, Michele

    2013-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are characterized by two remarkable peculiarities: the capacity to propagate as undifferentiated cells (self-renewal) and the ability to differentiate in ectoderm, endoderm, and mesoderm derivatives (pluripotency). Although the majority of ESCs divide without losing the pluripotency, it has become evident that ESC cultures consists of multiple cell populations highlighted by the expression of early germ lineage markers during spontaneous differentiation. Hence, the identification and characterization of ESCs subpopulations represents an efficient approach to improve the comprehension of correlation between gene expression and cell specification status. To study markers of ESCs heterogeneity, we developed an analysis pipeline which can automatically process images of stem cell colonies in optical microscopy. The question we try to address is to find out the statistically significant preferred locations of the marked cells. We tested our algorithm on a set of images of stem cell colonies to analyze the expression pattern of the Zscan4 gene, which was an elite candidate gene to be studied because it is specifically expressed in subpopulation of ESCs. To validate the proposed method we analyzed the behavior of control genes whose pattern had been associated to biological status such as differentiation (EndoA), pluripotency (Pou5f1), and pluripotency fluctuation (Nanog). We found that Zscan4 is not uniformly expressed inside a stem cell colony, and that it tends to be expressed towards the center of the colony, moreover cells expressing Zscan4 cluster each other. This is of significant importance because it allows us to hypothesize a biological status where the cells expressing Zscan4 are preferably associated to the inner of colonies suggesting pluripotent cell status features, and the clustering between themselves suggests either a colony paracrine effect or an early phase of cell specification through proliferation. Also, the analysis on

  15. Automated identification and location analysis of marked stem cells colonies in optical microscopy images.

    PubMed

    Paduano, Vincenzo; Tagliaferri, Daniela; Falco, Geppino; Ceccarelli, Michele

    2013-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are characterized by two remarkable peculiarities: the capacity to propagate as undifferentiated cells (self-renewal) and the ability to differentiate in ectoderm, endoderm, and mesoderm derivatives (pluripotency). Although the majority of ESCs divide without losing the pluripotency, it has become evident that ESC cultures consists of multiple cell populations highlighted by the expression of early germ lineage markers during spontaneous differentiation. Hence, the identification and characterization of ESCs subpopulations represents an efficient approach to improve the comprehension of correlation between gene expression and cell specification status. To study markers of ESCs heterogeneity, we developed an analysis pipeline which can automatically process images of stem cell colonies in optical microscopy. The question we try to address is to find out the statistically significant preferred locations of the marked cells. We tested our algorithm on a set of images of stem cell colonies to analyze the expression pattern of the Zscan4 gene, which was an elite candidate gene to be studied because it is specifically expressed in subpopulation of ESCs. To validate the proposed method we analyzed the behavior of control genes whose pattern had been associated to biological status such as differentiation (EndoA), pluripotency (Pou5f1), and pluripotency fluctuation (Nanog). We found that Zscan4 is not uniformly expressed inside a stem cell colony, and that it tends to be expressed towards the center of the colony, moreover cells expressing Zscan4 cluster each other. This is of significant importance because it allows us to hypothesize a biological status where the cells expressing Zscan4 are preferably associated to the inner of colonies suggesting pluripotent cell status features, and the clustering between themselves suggests either a colony paracrine effect or an early phase of cell specification through proliferation. Also, the analysis on

  16. Decreased level of cord blood circulating endothelial colony-forming cells in preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Hernandez, Rocio; Miranda, Maria L; Stiefel, Pablo; Lin, Ruei-Zeng; Praena-Fernández, Juan M; Dominguez-Simeon, Maria J; Villar, Jose; Moreno-Luna, Rafael; Melero-Martin, Juan M

    2014-07-01

    Preeclampsia is a pregnancy-related disorder associated with increased cardiovascular risk for the offspring. Endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) are a subset of circulating endothelial progenitor cells that participate in the formation of vasculature during development. However, the effect of preeclampsia on fetal levels of ECFCs is largely unknown. In this study, we sought to determine whether cord blood ECFC abundance and function are altered in preeclampsia. We conducted a prospective cohort study that included women with normal (n=35) and preeclamptic (n=15) pregnancies. We measured ECFC levels in the umbilical cord blood of neonates and characterized ECFC phenotype, cloning-forming ability, proliferation, and migration toward vascular endothelial growth factor-A and fibroblast growth factor-2, in vitro formation of capillary-like structures, and in vivo vasculogenic ability in immunodeficient mice. We found that the level of cord blood ECFCs was statistically lower in preeclampsia than in control pregnancies (P=0.04), a reduction that was independent of other obstetric factors. In addition, cord blood ECFCs from preeclamptic pregnancies required more time to emerge in culture than control ECFCs. However, once derived in culture, ECFC function was deemed normal and highly similar between preeclampsia and control, including the ability to form vascular networks in vivo. This study demonstrates that preeclampsia affects ECFC abundance in neonates. A reduced level of ECFCs during preeclamptic pregnancies may contribute to an increased risk of developing future cardiovascular events. PMID:24752434

  17. DECREASED LEVEL OF CORD BLOOD CIRCULATING ENDOTHELIAL COLONY-FORMING CELLS IN PREECLAMPSIA

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Hernandez, Rocio; Miranda, Maria L.; Stiefel, Pablo; Lin, Ruei-Zeng; Praena-Fernández, Juan M.; Dominguez-Simeon, Maria J.; Villar, Jose; Moreno-Luna, Rafael; Melero-Martin, Juan M.

    2014-01-01

    Preeclampsia is a pregnancy-related disorder associated with increased cardiovascular risk for the offspring. Endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) are a subset of circulating endothelial progenitor cells that participate in the formation of vasculature during development. However, the effect of preeclampsia on fetal levels of ECFCs is largely unknown. In this study, we sought to determine whether cord blood ECFC abundance and function are altered in preeclampsia. We conducted a prospective cohort study that included women with normal (n=35) and preeclamptic (n=15) pregnancies. We measured ECFC levels in the umbilical cord blood of neonates and characterized ECFC phenotype, cloning-forming ability, proliferation and migration towards VEGF-A and FGF-2, in vitro formation of capillary-like structures, and in vivo vasculogenic ability in immunodeficient mice. We found that the level of cord blood ECFCs was statistically lower in preeclampsia than in control pregnancies (P = .04), a reduction that was independent of other obstetric factors. In addition, cord blood ECFCs from preeclamptic pregnancies required more time to emerge in culture than control ECFCs. However, once derived in culture, ECFC function was deemed normal and highly similar between preeclampsia and control, including the ability to form vascular networks in vivo. This study demonstrates that preeclampsia affects ECFC abundance in neonates. A reduced level of ECFCs during preeclamptic pregnancies may contribute to an increased risk of developing future cardiovascular events. PMID:24752434

  18. Role of gravity in the formation of bacterial colonies with a hydrophobic surface layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puzyr, A. P.; Tirranen, L. K.; Krylova, T. Y.; Borodina, E. V.

    A simple technique for determining hydrophobic-hydrophilic properties of bacterial colonies surface, which involves putting a drop of liquid with known properties (e.g. water, oil) on their surface, has been described. This technique allows quick estimate of wettability of bacterial colony surface, i.e. its hydrophobic-hydrophilic properties. The behaviour of water drops on colonies of bacteria Bacillus five strains (of different types) has been studied. It was revealed that 1) orientation in the Earth gravity field during bacterial growth can define the form of colonies with hydrophobic surface; 2) the form and size of the colony are dependent on the extention ability, most probably, of the hydrophobic layer; 3) the Earth gravity field (gravity) serves as a 'pump' providing and keeping water within the colony. We suppose that at growing colonies on agar media the inflow of water-soluble nutrient materials takes place both due to diffusion processes and directed water current produced by the gravity. The revealed effect probably should be taken into consideration while constructing the models of colonies growing on dense nutrient media. The easily determined hydrophobic properties of colonies surface can become a systematic feature after collecting more extensive data on the surface hydrophobic-hydrophilic properties of microorganism colonies of other types and species.

  19. Influence of Gelatin-Thrombin Matrix Tissue Sealant on Bacterial Colony Formation and Risk of Pelvic Infection.

    PubMed

    Jarrett, Michael J; Vázquez-Torres, Andres; Frank, Daniel N; McCollister, Bruce D; Henthorn, Patrick K; Ir, Diana; Sheeder, Jeanelle; Guy, Michael S; Anwar, Hiba Q; Behbakht, Kian

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Gelatin-thrombin matrix (GTM) tissue sealant use was previously identified as an independent predictor of pelvic infection following hysterectomies. We aim to elucidate contributing factors by assessing influence of GTM on bacterial colony formation and characterizing bacteria present at the vaginal cuff. Methods. Escherichia coli was incubated in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and pelvic washings with and without GTM to assess influence on colony formation. Pelvic washings of the vaginal cuff were collected from hysterectomies occurring from June through October 2015. In vitro techniques, 16S rRNA gene qPCR, and 16S amplicon sequencing were performed with washings to characterize bacteria at the vaginal cuff. Results. Mean bacterial colony formation in PBS was greater for E. coli incubated in the presence of GTM (1.48 × 10(7) CFU/mL) versus without (9.95 × 10(5) CFU/mL) following 20-hour incubation (p = 0.001). Out of 61 pelvic washings samples, 3 were culture positive (≥5000 CFU/mL) with Enterococcus faecalis. Conclusion. In vitro experiments support a facilitating role of GTM on colony formation of E. coli in PBS. However, given the negative results of surgical site washings following adequate disinfection, the role of GTM in promoting posthysterectomy pelvic infections may be limited. Analysis of pelvic washings revealed presence of E. faecalis, but results were inconclusive. Further studies are recommended. PMID:27199534

  20. Influence of Gelatin-Thrombin Matrix Tissue Sealant on Bacterial Colony Formation and Risk of Pelvic Infection

    PubMed Central

    Jarrett, Michael J.; Vázquez-Torres, Andres; Frank, Daniel N.; McCollister, Bruce D.; Henthorn, Patrick K.; Ir, Diana; Sheeder, Jeanelle; Guy, Michael S.; Anwar, Hiba Q.; Behbakht, Kian

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Gelatin-thrombin matrix (GTM) tissue sealant use was previously identified as an independent predictor of pelvic infection following hysterectomies. We aim to elucidate contributing factors by assessing influence of GTM on bacterial colony formation and characterizing bacteria present at the vaginal cuff. Methods. Escherichia coli was incubated in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and pelvic washings with and without GTM to assess influence on colony formation. Pelvic washings of the vaginal cuff were collected from hysterectomies occurring from June through October 2015. In vitro techniques, 16S rRNA gene qPCR, and 16S amplicon sequencing were performed with washings to characterize bacteria at the vaginal cuff. Results. Mean bacterial colony formation in PBS was greater for E. coli incubated in the presence of GTM (1.48 × 107 CFU/mL) versus without (9.95 × 105 CFU/mL) following 20-hour incubation (p = 0.001). Out of 61 pelvic washings samples, 3 were culture positive (≥5000 CFU/mL) with Enterococcus faecalis. Conclusion. In vitro experiments support a facilitating role of GTM on colony formation of E. coli in PBS. However, given the negative results of surgical site washings following adequate disinfection, the role of GTM in promoting posthysterectomy pelvic infections may be limited. Analysis of pelvic washings revealed presence of E. faecalis, but results were inconclusive. Further studies are recommended. PMID:27199534

  1. Establishment of a cell line of gallbladder carcinoma (GBK-1) producing human colony stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Egami, H; Sakamoto, K; Yoshimura, R; Kikuchi, H; Akagi, M

    1986-02-01

    A cell line designated GBK-1 was established from a patient with anaplastic carcinoma of the gallbladder, marked neutrophilia and fever, and has been propagated for the past 18 months. The cells grew as a monolayer sheet with a doubling time of 43 hr. The GBK-1 cells were of a pleomorphic polygonal epitheloid shape and they were transplantable into nude mice. Mice bearing the tumor developed marked granulocytosis. In the culture supernatant of GBK-1 cells, high colony stimulating factor (CSF) activity was evident with both human bone marrow cells and C57BL mouse bone marrow cells, and granulocytic colonies, macrophage colonies or granulocyte-macrophage mixed colonies were produced. The CSF activity was distributed in the molecular weight range of 25,000 to 60,000 with two distinct peaks at molecular weights of approximately 50,000 and 30,000. CSF activity was inactivated by heat treatment at 70 degrees for 30 min. GBK-1 is a new human cell line that produces heat-labile human GM-CSF. PMID:3082828

  2. Treprostinil indirectly regulates endothelial colony forming cell angiogenic properties by increasing VEGF-A produced by mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Smadja, David M; Levy, Marilyne; Huang, Lan; Rossi, Elisa; Blandinières, Adeline; Israel-Biet, Dominique; Gaussem, Pascale; Bischoff, Joyce

    2015-10-01

    Pulmonary vasodilators and prostacyclin therapy in particular, have markedly improved the outcome of patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH). Endothelial dysfunction is a key feature of PH, and we previously reported that treprostinil therapy increases number and proliferative potential of endothelial colony forming cells (ECFC) isolated from PH patients' blood. In the present study, the objective was to determine how treprostinil contributes to the proangiogenic functions of ECFC. We examined the effect of treprostinil on ECFC obtained from cord blood in terms of colony numbers, proliferative and clonogenic properties in vitro, as well as in vivo vasculogenic properties. Surprisingly, treprostinil inhibited viability of cultured ECFC but did not modify their clonogenic properties or the endothelial differentiation potential from cord blood stem cells. Treprostinil treatment significantly increased the vessel-forming ability of ECFC combined with mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) in Matrigel implanted in nude mice. In vitro, ECFC proliferation was stimulated by conditioned media from treprostinil-pretreated MSC, and this effect was inhibited either by the use of VEGF-A blocking antibodies or siRNA VEGF-A in MSC. Silencing VEGF-A gene in MSC also blocked the pro-angiogenic effect of treprostinil in vivo. In conclusion, increased VEGF-A produced by MSC can account for the increased vessel formation observed during treprostinil treatment. The clinical relevance of these data was confirmed by the high level of VEGF-A detected in plasma from patients with paediatric PH who had been treated with treprostinil. Moreover, our results suggest that VEGF-A level in patients could be a surrogate biomarker of treprostinil efficacy. PMID:26062754

  3. Identification and enrichment of colony-forming cells from the adult murine pituitary

    SciTech Connect

    Lepore, D.A.; Roeszler, K.; Wagner, J.; Ross, S.A.; Bauer, K.; Thomas, P.Q. , E-Mail: paul.thomas@mcri.edu.au

    2005-08-01

    Stem and progenitor cells have been identified in many adult tissues including bone marrow, the central nervous system, and skin. While there is direct evidence to indicate the activity of a progenitor cell population in the pituitary gland, this putative subpopulation has not yet been identified. Herein we describe the isolation and characterization of a novel clonogenic cell type in the adult murine pituitary, which we have termed Pituitary Colony-Forming Cells (PCFCs). PCFCs constitute 0.2% of pituitary cells, and generate heterogeneous colonies from single cells. PCFCs exhibit variable proliferative potential, and may exceed 11 population doublings in 14 days. Enrichment of PCFCs to 61.5-fold with 100% recovery can be obtained through the active uptake of the fluorescent dipeptide, {beta}-Ala-Lys-N{epsilon}-AMCA. PCFCs are mostly contained within the large, agranular subpopulation of AMCA{sup +} cells, and constitute 28% of this fraction, corresponding to 140.5-fold enrichment. Interestingly, the AMCA{sup +} population contains rare cells that are GH{sup +} or PRL{sup +}. GH{sup +} cells were also identified in PCFC single cell colonies, suggesting that PCFCs have the potential to differentiate into GH{sup +} cells. Together, these data show that the pituitary contains a rare clonogenic population which may correspond to the somatotrope/lactotrope progenitors suggested by previous experiments.

  4. Smooth muscle progenitor cells from peripheral blood promote the neovascularization of endothelial colony-forming cells

    SciTech Connect

    Joo, Hyung Joon; Seo, Ha-Rim; Jeong, Hyo Eun; Choi, Seung-Cheol; Park, Jae Hyung; Yu, Cheol Woong; Hong, Soon Jun; Chung, Seok; Lim, Do-Sun

    2014-07-11

    Highlights: • Two distinct vascular progenitor cells are induced from adult peripheral blood. • ECFCs induce vascular structures in vitro and in vivo. • SMPCs augment the in vitro and in vivo angiogenic potential of ECFCs. • Both cell types have synergistic therapeutic potential in ischemic hindlimb model. - Abstract: Proangiogenic cell therapy using autologous progenitors is a promising strategy for treating ischemic disease. Considering that neovascularization is a harmonized cellular process that involves both endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells, peripheral blood-originating endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) and smooth muscle progenitor cells (SMPCs), which are similar to mature endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells, could be attractive cellular candidates to achieve therapeutic neovascularization. We successfully induced populations of two different vascular progenitor cells (ECFCs and SMPCs) from adult peripheral blood. Both progenitor cell types expressed endothelial-specific or smooth muscle-specific genes and markers, respectively. In a protein array focused on angiogenic cytokines, SMPCs demonstrated significantly higher expression of bFGF, EGF, TIMP2, ENA78, and TIMP1 compared to ECFCs. Conditioned medium from SMPCs and co-culture with SMPCs revealed that SMPCs promoted cell proliferation, migration, and the in vitro angiogenesis of ECFCs. Finally, co-transplantation of ECFCs and SMPCs induced robust in vivo neovascularization, as well as improved blood perfusion and tissue repair, in a mouse ischemic hindlimb model. Taken together, we have provided the first evidence of a cell therapy strategy for therapeutic neovascularization using two different types of autologous progenitors (ECFCs and SMPCs) derived from adult peripheral blood.

  5. Acceptance of mated Queens and Queen Cells in Colonies of Russian and Italian Honey Bees

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Requeening colonies is a standard beekeeping practice with both mated queens and queen cells. More beekeepers are requeening with Russian honey bees queens because of their significantly higher resistance to varroa and tracheal mites, their good honey production and their overwintering abilities. ...

  6. Suppression of the Formation of Polygenotypic Recombinant Colonies by a maf Mutation in Mating with Hfrh

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Jonathan T.; Kuo, Li-Mei

    1979-01-01

    W3011, a Cavalli-type Hfr (HfrC), was mated with F-KY9474, maf-1, which cannot maintain F or F-like plasmids, and with F-OU9474, Maf+, a spontaneous revertant of KY9474. The recombinant colonies obtained were 100% monogenotypic from KY9474 and 90% monogenotypic from OU9474. On the other hand, in matings with OU11, a Hayes-type Hfr (HfrH), and these two F- strains, recombinant colonies derived from KY9474 showed only 22% polygenotypic recombinant colonies; whereas, those derived from OU9474 showed a high production rate (57%) of polygenotypic recombinant colonies. Among the polygenotypic recombinant colonies derived from KY9474 maf-1, 50% contained three or more recombinant types. These were probably derived from a small fraction of Maf+ revertants in the KY9474 population, as suggested by the results of mating this strain with M80, an F' strain that contains an amber mutation in traH. These results support the hypothesis that the donor DNA fragments derived from an HfrH can undergo a limited replication in the recipient to produce polygenotypic recombinant colonies, whereas those derived from HfrC cannot. PMID:395025

  7. Colonial cell disaggregation and intracellular microcystin release following chlorination of naturally occurring Microcystis.

    PubMed

    He, Xuexiang; Wert, Eric C

    2016-09-15

    Colonial cell disaggregation and release of intracellular microcystin were evaluated following chlorine treatment of naturally occurring Microcystis. Microscopic observations of water samples collected from Lake Mead, Nevada, USA, confirmed the presence of colonial Microcystis with cells protected by an outer sheath up to 30 μm thick. During chlorination, two stages of cell decomposition were observed, stage 1: colonial cell disaggregation, and stage 2: unicellular degradation. Following a [Cl2]0:DOC0 ratio of 0.15 (t = 20 min, pH = 8.2-8.5) in unfiltered Lake Havasu samples, total particle count increased from (1.0 ± 0.11) × 10(5) to 4.2 × 10(5) particles/mL and fluorescent particle count increased from (1.2 ± 0.50) × 10(4) to 1.2 × 10(5) particles/mL, illustrating colonial cell disaggregation. Although total and fluorescent particles increased, the concentration of chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) decreased from 81 μg/L to 72 μg/L, and continued to decrease at higher [Cl2]0:DOC0 ratios. The preliminary second order rate constant for the reaction between Microcystis and chlorine in natural waters was estimated using either Chl-a (k = 15 M(-1) s(-1)) or fluorescence particle count (k = 38 M(-1) s(-1)) as an indicator of cell damage following colonial disaggregation (i.e., at [Cl2]0:DOC0 ratio ≥0.15). Complete release of intracellular microcystin-LR (MC-LR) was observed in both Lake Havasu and Lake Mead samples when applying a [Cl2]0:DOC0 ratio of 0.30 (t = 20 min), which was equivalent to a chlorine exposure of 8 min-mg/L for Lake Havasu samples. With chlorination, DOC increased by 3-18% indicating release of either colony-bound or cell-bound DOC. The results demonstrated the ability of chlorine to disaggregate/inactivate natural Microcystis colonies, and identified oxidation conditions resulting in complete release of intracellular MC-LR. PMID:27240297

  8. Maternal Body-Mass Index and Cord Blood Circulating Endothelial Colony-Forming Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ruei-Zeng; Miranda, Maria L.; Vallejo-Vaz, Antonio J.; Stiefel, Pablo; Praena-Fernández, Juan M.; Bernal-Bermejo, Jose; Jimenez-Jimenez, Luis M.; Villar, Jose; Melero-Martin, Juan M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) are a subset of circulating endothelial progenitor cells that are particularly abundant in umbilical cord blood. We sought to determine whether ECFC abundance in cord blood is associated with maternal body-mass index (BMI) in non-pathological pregnancies. Study design We measured the level of ECFCs in the cord blood of neonates (n=27) born from non-obese healthy mothers with non-pathological pregnancies and examined whether ECFC abundance correlated with maternal BMI. We also examined the effect of maternal BMI on ECFC phenotype and function using angiogenic and vasculogenic assays. Results We observed variation in ECFC abundance among subjects and found a positive correlation between pre-pregnancy maternal BMI and ECFC content (r=0.51, P=0.007), which was independent of other obstetric factors. Despite this variation, ECFC phenotype and functionality were deemed normal and highly similar between subjects with maternal BMI <25 kg/m2 and BMI between 25–30 kg/m2, including the ability to form vascular networks in vivo. Conclusions This study underlines the need to consider maternal BMI as a potential confounding factor for cord blood levels of ECFCs in future comparative studies between healthy and pathological pregnancies. Endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) are a subset of progenitor cells that circulate in peripheral blood and can give rise to endothelial cells (1,2), contributing to the formation of new vasculature and the maintenance of vascular integrity (3–5). The mechanisms that regulate the abundance of these cells in vivo remain poorly understood. ECFCs are rare in adult peripheral blood (1,2,10). In contrast, there is an elevated number of these cells in fetal blood during the third trimester of pregnancy (11–13). Emerging evidence indicates that deleterious conditions during fetal life can impair ECFC content and function. For instance, offspring of diabetic mothers have been shown to have

  9. [Effect of prodigiozan, levamisole and methyluracil on endogenous colony formation and absorptive function of the reticuloendothelial system].

    PubMed

    Riabchinskaia, L A

    1985-06-01

    The effect of prodigiosan, levamisole and methyluracil on the number of endogenic colonies in the spleen and absorptive function of the reticuloendothelial system (RES) was studied comparatively in intact mice and mice treated with prednisolone, cyclophosphamide and chloramphenicol. It was shown that prodigiosan stimulated the endogenic colony formation with all the administration schemes in both the intact animals and the animals treated with chloramphenicol. The stimulating effect of methyluracil was observed, when it was used prophylactically. The effect of levamisole was not consistent. A significant stimulating effect of prodigiosan on absorptive function of the RES in the intact animals and the animals treated with prednisolone was shown. Methyluracil increased absorption of staphylococci by the macrophages in the intact animals. The effect of levamisole on the intact animals was not observed, while in the animals treated with prednisolone and cyclophosphamide it stimulated the absorptive capacity of the RES. Levamisole did not change the effect of prodigiosan and methyluracil on endogenous colony formation when used therapeutically, prevented the prodigiosan effect and potentiated the effect of methyluracil on absorptive function of the RES. PMID:4062270

  10. Differences in estimates of cisplatin-induced cell kill in vitro between colorimetric and cell count/colony assays.

    PubMed

    Henriksson, Eva; Kjellén, Elisabeth; Wahlberg, Peter; Wennerberg, Johan; Kjellström, Johan H

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate some bioassays that are different in principle: cell counting, colony forming assay, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT), sulforhodamine B (SRB), crystal violet, and alamarBlue, with respect to their ability to measure cisplatin-induced cell death of in vitro-cultivated squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Cisplatin was applied in concentrations of 1.0, 5.0, 10.0, 50.0, and 100 microM. The cells were incubated for 1 h, and the cell survival was measured 5 d after treatment. We found the colorimetric assays and cell counting to be comparable. The colony forming assay indicated a higher degree of cell kill compared with the other techniques. Measurement of cell survival after treatment with cisplatin can be done by use of any of the above tested assays. However, the majority of SCCHN cell lines available do not form colonies easily, or at all. Therefore, comparing the chemosensitivity between such cell lines is limited to alternative assays. In this respect, any of the tested colorimetric assays can be used. However, they seem to underestimate cell kill. Cell counting is also an alternative. This technique, however, is time consuming and operator dependent, as in the case of manual counting, or relatively expensive when counting is performed electronically, compared with the colorimetric assays. PMID:17316066

  11. Colony stimulating factor 1 is an extrinsic stimulator of mouse spermatogonial stem cell self-renewal

    PubMed Central

    Oatley, Jon M.; Oatley, Melissa J.; Avarbock, Mary R.; Tobias, John W.; Brinster, Ralph L.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Self-renewal and differentiation of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) provide the foundation for testis homeostasis, yet mechanisms that control their functions in mammals are poorly defined. We used microarray transcript profiling to identify specific genes whose expressions are augmented in the SSC-enriched Thy1+ germ cell fraction of mouse pup testes. Comparisons of gene expression in the Thy1+ germ cell fraction with the Thy1-depleted testis cell population identified 202 genes that are expressed 10-fold or higher in Thy1+ cells. This database provided a mining tool to investigate specific characteristics of SSCs and identify novel mechanisms that potentially influence their functions. These analyses revealed that colony stimulating factor 1 receptor (Csf1r) gene expression is enriched in Thy1+ germ cells. Addition of recombinant colony stimulating factor 1 (Csf1), the specific ligand for Csf1r, to culture media significantly enhanced the self-renewal of SSCs in heterogeneous Thy1+ spermatogonial cultures over a 63-day period without affecting total germ cell expansion. In vivo, expression of Csf1 in both pre-pubertal and adult testes was localized to clusters of Leydig cells and select peritubular myoid cells. Collectively, these results identify Csf1 as an extrinsic stimulator of SSC self-renewal and implicate Leydig and myoid cells as contributors of the testicular stem cell niche in mammals. PMID:19270176

  12. Curcumin Veto the Effects of Osteopontin (OPN) Specific Inhibitor on Leukemic Stem Cell Colony Forming Potential via Promotion of OPN Overexpression

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Saeed; Ghaffari, Seyed H.; Shaiegan, Mojgan; Nikogoftar Zarif, Mahin; Nikbakht, Mohsen; Alimoghaddam, Kamran; Ghavamzadeh, Ardeshir

    2016-01-01

    Background: Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an immunophenotypically heterogeneous malignant disease, in which CD34 positivity is associated with poor prognosis. Osteopontin (OPN) plays different roles in physiologic and pathologic conditions like: survival, metastasis and cell protection from cytotoxic and apoptotic stimuli. Due to anti-apoptotic effect of OPN in normal and malignant cells, silencing of OPN leads to elevation of sensitivity towards chemotherapeutic agents and attenuates cancer cells migration and invasion. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate OPN roles in modulating curcumin-mediated growth inhibitory on leukemic stem cells (LSCs) colony forming potential and survival in AML cell lines and primary CD34+/CD38- bone marrow-derived AML cells. Materials and Methods: Primary human CD34+/CD38- cells were isolated from bone marrow mononuclear cells of 10 AML patients at initial state of diagnosis, using a CD34 Multi sort kit. The growth inhibitory effects of curcumin (CUR) were evaluated by MTT and colony-formation assays. Apoptosis was analyzed by 7AAD assay in CD34+ KG-1, U937 cell lines and primary isolated cells. Short interfering RNA (siRNA) against OPN was used for OPN silencing in both cell lines and primary AML cells. Then, transfected cells were incubated with/without curcumin. The change in OPN gene expression was examined by Real-time PCR. Results: CUR inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis in both KG-1 and U937 cells and also primary isolated AML cells. OPN silencing by siRNA increased the susceptibility of KG-1, U937 and primary CD34+/CD38- AML cells to apoptosis. Moreover, soft agar colony assays revealed that silencing of OPN with siRNA significantly decreased colony numbers in LSCs compared with the non-targeting group. Furthermore, CD34+/CD38- populations as a main LSCs compartment through OPN overexpression towards CUR treatment might be nullified the inhibitory effects of OPN siRNA on their survival and colony forming

  13. Colony Expansion of Socially Motile Myxococcus xanthus Cells Is Driven by Growth, Motility, and Exopolysaccharide Production

    PubMed Central

    Patra, Pintu; Kissoon, Kimberley; Cornejo, Isabel; Kaplan, Heidi B.; Igoshin, Oleg A.

    2016-01-01

    Myxococcus xanthus, a model organism for studies of multicellular behavior in bacteria, moves exclusively on solid surfaces using two distinct but coordinated motility mechanisms. One of these, social (S) motility is powered by the extension and retraction of type IV pili and requires the presence of exopolysaccharides (EPS) produced by neighboring cells. As a result, S motility requires close cell-to-cell proximity and isolated cells do not translocate. Previous studies measuring S motility by observing the colony expansion of cells deposited on agar have shown that the expansion rate increases with initial cell density, but the biophysical mechanisms involved remain largely unknown. To understand the dynamics of S motility-driven colony expansion, we developed a reaction-diffusion model describing the effects of cell density, EPS deposition and nutrient exposure on the expansion rate. Our results show that at steady state the population expands as a traveling wave with a speed determined by the interplay of cell motility and growth, a well-known characteristic of Fisher’s equation. The model explains the density-dependence of the colony expansion by demonstrating the presence of a lag phase–a transient period of very slow expansion with a duration dependent on the initial cell density. We propose that at a low initial density, more time is required for the cells to accumulate enough EPS to activate S-motility resulting in a longer lag period. Furthermore, our model makes the novel prediction that following the lag phase the population expands at a constant rate independent of the cell density. These predictions were confirmed by S motility experiments capturing long-term expansion dynamics. PMID:27362260

  14. Micronucleus formation induced by dielectric barrier discharge plasma exposure in brain cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaushik, Nagendra K.; Uhm, Hansup; Ha Choi, Eun

    2012-02-01

    Induction of micronucleus formation (cytogenetic damage) in brain cancer cells upon exposure of dielectric barrier discharge plasma has been investigated. We have investigated the influence of exposure and incubation times on T98G brain cancer cells by using growth kinetic, clonogenic, and micronucleus formation assay. We found that micronucleus formation rate directly depends on the plasma exposure time. It is also shown that colony formation capacity of cells has been inhibited by the treatment of plasma at all doses. Cell death and micronucleus formation are shown to be significantly elevated by 120 and 240 s exposure of dielectric barrier discharge plasma.

  15. Pre-B Cell Colony Enhancing Factor (PBEF), a Cytokine with Multiple Physiological Functions

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhongjie; Lei, Han; Zhang, Zhonge

    2013-01-01

    Pre-B cell colony enhancing factor (PBEF) is regarded as a proinflammatory cytokine. Named for its first discovered function as a pre-B cell colony enhancing factor, it has since been found to have many other functions relating to cell metabolism, inflammation, and immune modulation. It has also been found to have intracellular and extracellular forms, with the two overlapping in function. Most of the intracellular functions of PBEF are due to its role as a nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (Nampt). It has been found in human endothelial cells, where it is able to induce angiogenesis through upregulation of VEGF and VEGFR and secretion of MCP-1. In human umbilical endothelial cells, PBEF increases levels of the protease MMP 2/9. PBEF has also been found in a variety of immune cells other than B cells and has been shown to inhibit apoptosis of macrophages. Extracellular PBEF has been shown to increase inflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-16, and TGF-β1, and the chemokine receptor CCR3. PBEF also increases the production of IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-1β in CD14+ monocyctes, macrophages, and dendritic cells, enhances the effectiveness of T cells, and is vital to the development of both B and T lymphocytes. The purpose of this review is to summarize the recent advances in PBEF research. PMID:23787158

  16. Collection and expansion of single cells and colonies released from a micropallet array.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuli; Young, Grace; Bachman, Mark; Sims, Christopher E; Li, G P; Allbritton, Nancy L

    2007-03-15

    The ability to selectively grow out individual cells possessing unique characteristics from within a mixed population is of widespread importance for biomedical investigations. Generation of genetically engineered cell lines, transformation studies, cell-based assays, and stem cell studies are examples where single-cell cloning is of immense value. The vast majority of mammalian cells grow adherent to a surface; therefore, positive selection followed by cloning of cells while the cells remain adherent to their growth surface is an important goal. We recently demonstrated a microfabricated cell array combined with laser-based release of individual array elements for positive selection of single cells. In the current work, a strategy to collect single cells for clonal expansion is described. The system enabled cloning of individual cells with 80-90% efficiency. Single cells were selected and cloned from small populations of fewer than 10,000 cells. Strategies used by cells to migrate from the pallets to form colonies on the surface of the collection device were examined. Implementation of encoded array elements made it possible to follow specific cells throughout the selection, collection, and cloning procedure. Thus, a particular cell can be identified by any number of imaging techniques, isolated, and clonally expanded to generate a homogeneous cell line or a pure sample for genetic or biochemical analysis. PMID:17288466

  17. Establishment and characterization of a human thyroid carcinoma cell line (HOTHC) producing colony stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Ishiwata, Isamu; Ono, Isao; Kiguchi, Kazushige; Ishiwata, Chieko; Soma, Masayuki; Ishikawa, Hiroshi

    2005-09-01

    A cell line designated HOTHC was established from an anaplastic carcinoma (giant cell type) of the thyroid gland of 80-year-old woman. The HOTHC line grew rapidly in multilayer without contact inhibition, and more than 120 serial passages were made within 27 months. The cells were spindle or polygonal in shape and revealed neoplastic and pleomorphic features. These cells were characterized as containing coloid droplets and poorly developed rough-endoplasmic reticulum in the cytoplasm. Doubling time was about 24 hours and plating efficiency was about 70%. The karyotype exhibits hyperploidy and marker chromosomes, and the modal chromosome number ranged between 77-90. The HOTHC cells were transplanted into the subcutis of BALB/c nude mice and produced anaplatic carcinomas (giant cell type) resembling the original tumor. The HOTHC cells produced colony stimulating factor (CSF) and caused granulocytosis in the mice. PMID:17022149

  18. Machine Learning Approach to Automated Quality Identification of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Colony Images

    PubMed Central

    Haponen, Markus; Rasku, Jyrki

    2016-01-01

    The focus of this research is on automated identification of the quality of human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) colony images. iPS cell technology is a contemporary method by which the patient's cells are reprogrammed back to stem cells and are differentiated to any cell type wanted. iPS cell technology will be used in future to patient specific drug screening, disease modeling, and tissue repairing, for instance. However, there are technical challenges before iPS cell technology can be used in practice and one of them is quality control of growing iPSC colonies which is currently done manually but is unfeasible solution in large-scale cultures. The monitoring problem returns to image analysis and classification problem. In this paper, we tackle this problem using machine learning methods such as multiclass Support Vector Machines and several baseline methods together with Scaled Invariant Feature Transformation based features. We perform over 80 test arrangements and do a thorough parameter value search. The best accuracy (62.4%) for classification was obtained by using a k-NN classifier showing improved accuracy compared to earlier studies. PMID:27493680

  19. A Novel Combinatorial Therapy With Pulp Stem Cells and Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor for Total Pulp Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Iohara, Koichiro; Murakami, Masashi; Takeuchi, Norio; Osako, Yohei; Ito, Masataka; Ishizaka, Ryo; Utunomiya, Shinji; Nakamura, Hiroshi; Matsushita, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    Treatment of deep caries with pulpitis is a major challenge in dentistry. Stem cell therapy represents a potential strategy to regenerate the dentin-pulp complex, enabling conservation and restoration of teeth. The objective of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of pulp stem cell transplantation as a prelude for the impending clinical trials. Clinical-grade pulp stem cells were isolated and expanded according to good manufacturing practice conditions. The absence of contamination, abnormalities/aberrations in karyotype, and tumor formation after transplantation in an immunodeficient mouse ensured excellent quality control. After autologous transplantation of pulp stem cells with granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) in a dog pulpectomized tooth, regenerated pulp tissue including vasculature and innervation completely filled in the root canal, and regenerated dentin was formed in the coronal part and prevented microleakage up to day 180. Transplantation of pulp stem cells with G-CSF yielded a significantly larger amount of regenerated dentin-pulp complex compared with transplantation of G-CSF or stem cells alone. Also noteworthy was the reduction in the number of inflammatory cells and apoptotic cells and the significant increase in neurite outgrowth compared with results without G-CSF. The transplanted stem cells expressed angiogenic/neurotrophic factors. It is significant that G-CSF together with conditioned medium of pulp stem cells stimulated cell migration and neurite outgrowth, prevented cell death, and promoted immunosuppression in vitro. Furthermore, there was no evidence of toxicity or adverse events. In conclusion, the combinatorial trophic effects of pulp stem cells and G-CSF are of immediate utility for pulp/dentin regeneration, demonstrating the prerequisites of safety and efficacy critical for clinical applications. PMID:23761108

  20. Altered Proteome of Burkholderia pseudomallei Colony Variants Induced by Exposure to Human Lung Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Al-Maleki, Anis Rageh; Mariappan, Vanitha; Vellasamy, Kumutha Malar; Tay, Sun Tee; Vadivelu, Jamuna

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei primary diagnostic cultures demonstrate colony morphology variation associated with expression of virulence and adaptation proteins. This study aims to examine the ability of B. pseudomallei colony variants (wild type [WT] and small colony variant [SCV]) to survive and replicate intracellularly in A549 cells and to identify the alterations in the protein expression of these variants, post-exposure to the A549 cells. Intracellular survival and cytotoxicity assays were performed followed by proteomics analysis using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. B. pseudomallei SCV survive longer than the WT. During post-exposure, among 259 and 260 protein spots of SCV and WT, respectively, 19 were differentially expressed. Among SCV post-exposure up-regulated proteins, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, fructose-bisphosphate aldolase (CbbA) and betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase were associated with adhesion and virulence. Among the down-regulated proteins, enolase (Eno) is implicated in adhesion and virulence. Additionally, post-exposure expression profiles of both variants were compared with pre-exposure. In WT pre- vs post-exposure, 36 proteins were differentially expressed. Of the up-regulated proteins, translocator protein, Eno, nucleoside diphosphate kinase (Ndk), ferritin Dps-family DNA binding protein and peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase B were implicated in invasion and virulence. In SCV pre- vs post-exposure, 27 proteins were differentially expressed. Among the up-regulated proteins, flagellin, Eno, CbbA, Ndk and phenylacetate-coenzyme A ligase have similarly been implicated in adhesion, invasion. Protein profiles differences post-exposure provide insights into association between morphotypic and phenotypic characteristics of colony variants, strengthening the role of B. pseudomallei morphotypes in pathogenesis of melioidosis. PMID:25996927

  1. Radiosensitivity of CD4 or CD8 positive human T-lymphocytes by an in vitro colony formation assay

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, N.; Kusunoki, Y.; Akiyama, M. )

    1990-08-01

    The recent development of an in vitro lymphocyte colony assay makes it possible to examine variations in the radiosensitivity of humans using peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) instead of the skin fibroblast assay. Our recent study showed that most of the colonies consisted of lymphocytes bearing CD4 or CD8 antigens. Since the fraction of CD4+ and CD8+ cells in PBL differs among individuals, we suspected that individual radiosensitivity might be biased by the different subset frequencies if the dose-survival curves of the CD4+ and CD8+ cells were different from each other. In the present study, CD4+ (helper/inducer T) and CD8+ (suppressor/cytotoxic T) lymphocytes were isolated from PBL and their dose-survival curves were determined. The results showed that the D10 (dose required to reduce the surviving fraction to 10%) was similar for these two types of cells (3.13 +/- 0.10 Gy (mean +/- SD) for CD4+, 3.34 +/- 0.50 Gy for CD8+ and 3.14 +/- 0.17 Gy for the unsorted cells), supporting the use of the whole PBL population for the screening of individuals with altered radiosensitivity.

  2. Subculture of Germ Cell-Derived Colonies with GATA4-Positive Feeder Cells from Neonatal Pig Testes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyung Hoon; Lee, Won Young; Kim, Jin Hoi; Park, Chan Kyu; Do, Jeong Tae; Kim, Jae Hwan; Choi, Young Suk; Kim, Nam Hyung; Song, Hyuk

    2016-01-01

    Enrichment of spermatogonial stem cells is important for studying their self-renewal and differentiation. Although germ cell-derived colonies (GDCs) have been successfully cultured from neonatal pig testicular cells under 31°C conditions, the short period of in vitro maintenance (<2 months) limited their application to further investigations. To develop a culture method that allows for in vitro maintenance of GDCs for long periods, we subcultured the GDCs with freshly prepared somatic cells from neonatal pig testes as feeder cells. The subcultured GDCs were maintained up to passage 13 with the fresh feeder cells (FFCs) and then frozen. Eight months later, the frozen GDCs could again form the colonies on FFCs as shown in passages 1 to 13. Immunocytochemistry data revealed that the FFCs expressed GATA-binding protein 4 (GATA4), which is also detected in the cells of neonatal testes and total testicular cells, and that the expression of GATA4 was decreased in used old feeder cells. The subcultured GDCs in each passage had germ and stem cell characteristics, and flow cytometric analyses revealed that ~60% of these cells were GFRα-1 positive. In conclusion, neonatal pig testes-derived GDCs can be maintained for long periods with GATA4-expressing testicular somatic cells. PMID:26880974

  3. Computational image analysis of colony and nuclear morphology to evaluate human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Tokunaga, Kazuaki; Saitoh, Noriko; Goldberg, Ilya G; Sakamoto, Chiyomi; Yasuda, Yoko; Yoshida, Yoshinori; Yamanaka, Shinya; Nakao, Mitsuyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Non-invasive evaluation of cell reprogramming by advanced image analysis is required to maintain the quality of cells intended for regenerative medicine. Here, we constructed living and unlabelled colony image libraries of various human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines for supervised machine learning pattern recognition to accurately distinguish bona fide iPSCs from improperly reprogrammed cells. Furthermore, we found that image features for efficient discrimination reside in cellular components. In fact, extensive analysis of nuclear morphologies revealed dynamic and characteristic signatures, including the linear form of the promyelocytic leukaemia (PML)-defined structure in iPSCs, which was reversed to a regular sphere upon differentiation. Our data revealed that iPSCs have a markedly different overall nuclear architecture that may contribute to highly accurate discrimination based on the cell reprogramming status. PMID:25385348

  4. Identification of a murine high-proliferative-potential colony-forming cell (HPP-CFC) capable of producing a number of megakaryocytes and replating for secondary HPP-CFCs in culture.

    PubMed

    Han, Z C

    1994-04-01

    The high-proliferative-potential colony-forming cell (HPP-CFC) has been shown to be clearly heterogeneous. Hierarchical subpopulations can be identified by analyzing the kinetics of cell regeneration and the specific cellular requirement for cytokines. In this study, a new type of HPP-CFC, termed high-proliferative potential mixed colony-forming unit-megakaryocyte (HPP-mCFU-MK), was detected in murine bone marrow cell cultures. The HPP-mCFU-MK was able to form macroscopic colonies that fit the criteria of the HPP-CFC colony but contained a number of megakaryocytes. Its growth was stimulated by either aplastic anemia serum (AAS) or a combination of three or more recombinant hematopoietic growth factors but was not inhibited by transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) and platelet factor 4 (PF4) in vitro. The recloning of the 12-day-old HPP-mCFU-MK colonies picked up from AAS-stimulated primary cultures caused secondary formation of HPP-CFC colonies. These data suggest that HPP-mCFC-MK is a new subset of stem cell characterized by its ability to produce directly a number of megakaryocytes in response to multifactor stimulation, to generate a secondary set of HPP-CFC in replating culture, and to be unaffected by TGF-beta 1 and PF4 treatment. PMID:8145010

  5. Hypothalamic proline-rich polypeptide enhances bone marrow colony-forming cell proliferation and stromal progenitor cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Galoyan, A A; Korochkin, L I; Rybalkina, E J; Pavlova, G V; Saburina, I N; Zaraiski, E I; Galoyan, N A; Davtyan, T K; Bezirganyan, K B; Revishchin, A V

    2008-01-01

    The AGAPEPAEPAQPGVY proline-rich peptide (PRP-1) was isolated from neurosecretory granules of the bovine neurohypophysis; it is produced by N. supraopticus and N. paraventricularis. It has been shown that PRP-1 has many potentially beneficial biological effects, including immunoregulatory, hematopoietic, antimicrobial, and antineurodegenerative properties. Here we showed that PRP increased colony-forming cell (CFC) proliferation in rat bone marrow (BM) cells in vivo. In PRP-treated rat BM, the CFU number at day 7 and day 14 was considerably increased in comparison with untreated rat BM and no difference was found at day 21 and day 28. The related peptide [arg8]vasopressin did not reveal CFC proliferation. PRP failed to farther increase CFC proliferation in vitro in BM obtained from PRP-treated or untreated rats. After 3-4 days of human BM stromal cell cultivation in the presence of 2-20 microg/ml PRP the appearance of cells expressing CD15, CD10, CD11a, CD11b, CD3, CD4, and CD16 surface antigens did not differ from the untreated cells. PRP increased the appearance of CD14-positive cells upon 3-4-day incubation with both adult and fetal BM stromal cells. Our results suggest a previously undescribed role for the hypothalamic peptide within neurosecretory hypothalamus-bone marrow humoral axis, because PRP enhances BM colony-forming cell proliferation and stromal cell differentiation. PMID:19177842

  6. Human Granulocyte Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Enhances Antibiotic Susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Persister Cells.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Geetika S; Yao, Xiangyu; Wang, Jing; Peng, Bo; Bader, Rebecca A; Ren, Dacheng

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial persister cells are highly tolerant to antibiotics and cause chronic infections. However, little is known about the interaction between host immune systems with this subpopulation of metabolically inactive cells, and direct effects of host immune factors (in the absence of immune cells) on persister cells have not been studied. Here we report that human granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) can sensitize the persister cells of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and PDO300 to multiple antibiotics including ciprofloxacin, tobramycin, tetracycline, and gentamicin. GM-CSF also sensitized the biofilm cells of P. aeruginosa PAO1 and PDO300 to tobramycin in the presence of biofilm matrix degrading enzymes. The DNA microarray and qPCR results indicated that GM-CSF induced the genes for flagellar motility and pyocin production in the persister cells, but not the normal cells of P. aeruginosa PAO1. Consistently, the supernatants from GM-CSF treated P. aeruginosa PAO1 persister cell suspensions were found cidal to the pyocin sensitive strain P. aeruginosa PAK. Collectively, these findings suggest that host immune factors and bacterial persisters may directly interact, leading to enhanced susceptibility of persister cells to antibiotics. PMID:26616387

  7. Human Granulocyte Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Enhances Antibiotic Susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Persister Cells

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, Geetika S.; Yao, Xiangyu; Wang, Jing; Peng, Bo; Bader, Rebecca A.; Ren, Dacheng

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial persister cells are highly tolerant to antibiotics and cause chronic infections. However, little is known about the interaction between host immune systems with this subpopulation of metabolically inactive cells, and direct effects of host immune factors (in the absence of immune cells) on persister cells have not been studied. Here we report that human granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) can sensitize the persister cells of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and PDO300 to multiple antibiotics including ciprofloxacin, tobramycin, tetracycline, and gentamicin. GM-CSF also sensitized the biofilm cells of P. aeruginosa PAO1 and PDO300 to tobramycin in the presence of biofilm matrix degrading enzymes. The DNA microarray and qPCR results indicated that GM-CSF induced the genes for flagellar motility and pyocin production in the persister cells, but not the normal cells of P. aeruginosa PAO1. Consistently, the supernatants from GM-CSF treated P. aeruginosa PAO1 persister cell suspensions were found cidal to the pyocin sensitive strain P. aeruginosa PAK. Collectively, these findings suggest that host immune factors and bacterial persisters may directly interact, leading to enhanced susceptibility of persister cells to antibiotics. PMID:26616387

  8. Increase in Bacterial Colony Formation from a Permafrost Ice Wedge Dosed with a Tomitella biformata Recombinant Resuscitation-Promoting Factor Protein.

    PubMed

    Puspita, Indun Dewi; Kitagawa, Wataru; Kamagata, Yoichi; Tanaka, Michiko; Nakatsu, Cindy H

    2015-01-01

    Resuscitation-promoting factor (Rpf) is a protein that has been found in a number of different Actinobacteria species and has been shown to promote the growth of active cells and resuscitate dormant (non-dividing) cells. We previously reported the biological activity of an Rpf protein in Tomitella biformata AHU 1821(T), an Actinobacteria isolated from a permafrost ice wedge. This protein is excreted outside the cell; however, few studies have investigated its contribution in environmental samples to the growth or resuscitation of bacteria other than the original host. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine whether Rpf from T. biformata impacted the cultivation of other bacteria from the permafrost ice wedge from which it was originally isolated. All experiments used recombinant Rpf proteins produced using a Rhodococcus erythropolis expression system. Dilutions of melted surface sterilized ice wedge samples mixed with different doses of the purified recombinant Rpf (rRpf) protein indicated that the highest concentration tested, 1250 pM, had a significantly (p <0.05) higher number of CFUs on agar plates after 8 d, approximately 14-fold higher than that on control plates without rRpf. 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that all the colonies on plates were mainly related to Brevibacterium antiquum strain VKM Ac-2118 (AY243344), with 98-99% sequence identity. This species is also a member of the phylum Actinobacteria and was originally isolated from Siberian permafrost sediments. The results of the present study demonstrated that rRpf not only promoted the growth of T. biformata from which it was isolated, but also enhanced colony formation by another Actinobacteria in an environmental sample. PMID:25843055

  9. Acute leukemia after radiotherapy in a patient with Turcot's syndrome. Impaired colony formation in skin fibroblast cultures after irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, F.P.; Little, J.B.; Bech-Hansen, N.T.; Paterson, M.C.; Arlett, C.; Garnick, M.B.; Mayer, R.J.

    1983-02-01

    Colonic polyposis and carcinoma developed in a woman with Turcot's syndrome at the age of 31 years; astrocytoma developed when she was 37. Her brother and sister had died of astrocytoma at the ages of 18 and 33 years, respectively. Progressive neutropenia developed in the patient three months after radiotherapy for her brain tumor and acute myelomonocytic leukemia 19 months after treatment. Three laboratories independently evaluated cultures of her skin fibroblasts for in vitro sensitivity to cell killing (loss of colony-forming ability) by x-rays. Survival assays consistently revealed slight but significant radiosensitivity in an early-passage (six to 10 doublings) fibroblast subculture. A later subculture (21 to 29 doublings) showed no abnormality, a possible effect of selective in vitro loss of radiosensitive cells.

  10. Bionomics and Formation of “Bonsai” Colonies With Long-Term Rearing of Coptotermes formosanus (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae).

    PubMed

    Osbrink, W L A; Cornelius, M L; Showler, A T

    2016-04-01

    This laboratory study reports the ability of Formosan subterranean termite, Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki, colonies to survive for at least 9 yr while restricted to a sweater box. Colonies survived by limiting queen size and worker numbers, allowing these bonsai colonies to thrive. Queen physogastry appeared to plateau with 9-yr-old queens not larger than 6-yr-old queens, but nearly triple the size of 2-yr-old queens. Nine-year-old colony worker numbers were not greater than 6-yr-old colonies, but worker numbers were greater than in 2-yr-old colonies. Such colony survival under conditions of restricted resources provides a mechanism for re-infestation of areas following extensive area-wide control efforts. “Bonsai” colonies are relevant to the ability of marginalized colonies to avoid detection and then expand and invade into areas once the large, mature colonies are eliminated, and their potential to produce alates to start new C. formosanus colonies in areas which have been subjected to colony elimination programs impacts termite management strategies. PMID:26662736

  11. Exercise-induced norepinephrine decreases circulating hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell colony-forming capacity.

    PubMed

    Kröpfl, Julia M; Stelzer, Ingeborg; Mangge, Harald; Pekovits, Karin; Fuchs, Robert; Allard, Nathalie; Schinagl, Lukas; Hofmann, Peter; Dohr, Gottfried; Wallner-Liebmann, Sandra; Domej, Wolfgang; Müller, Wolfram

    2014-01-01

    A recent study showed that ergometry increased circulating hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (CPC) numbers, but reduced hematopoietic colony forming capacity/functionality under normoxia and normobaric hypoxia. Herein we investigated whether an exercise-induced elevated plasma free/bound norepinephrine (NE) concentration could be responsible for directly influencing CPC functionality. Venous blood was taken from ten healthy male subjects (25.3+/-4.4 yrs) before and 4 times after ergometry under normoxia and normobaric hypoxia (FiO2<0.15). The circulating hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell numbers were correlated with free/bound NE, free/bound epinephrine (EPI), cortisol (Co) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). Additionally, the influence of exercise-induced NE and blood lactate (La) on CPC functionality was analyzed in a randomly selected group of subjects (n = 6) in vitro under normoxia by secondary colony-forming unit granulocyte macrophage assays. Concentrations of free NE, EPI, Co and IL-6 were significantly increased post-exercise under normoxia/hypoxia. Ergometry-induced free NE concentrations found in vivo showed a significant impairment of CPC functionality in vitro under normoxia. Thus, ergometry-induced free NE was thought to trigger CPC mobilization 10 minutes post-exercise, but as previously shown impairs CPC proliferative capacity/functionality at the same time. The obtained results suggest that an ergometry-induced free NE concentration has a direct negative effect on CPC functionality. Cortisol may further influence CPC dynamics and functionality. PMID:25180783

  12. Exercise-Induced Norepinephrine Decreases Circulating Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cell Colony-Forming Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Mangge, Harald; Pekovits, Karin; Fuchs, Robert; Allard, Nathalie; Schinagl, Lukas; Hofmann, Peter; Dohr, Gottfried; Wallner-Liebmann, Sandra; Domej, Wolfgang; Müller, Wolfram

    2014-01-01

    A recent study showed that ergometry increased circulating hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (CPC) numbers, but reduced hematopoietic colony forming capacity/functionality under normoxia and normobaric hypoxia. Herein we investigated whether an exercise-induced elevated plasma free/bound norepinephrine (NE) concentration could be responsible for directly influencing CPC functionality. Venous blood was taken from ten healthy male subjects (25.3+/−4.4 yrs) before and 4 times after ergometry under normoxia and normobaric hypoxia (FiO2<0.15). The circulating hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell numbers were correlated with free/bound NE, free/bound epinephrine (EPI), cortisol (Co) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). Additionally, the influence of exercise-induced NE and blood lactate (La) on CPC functionality was analyzed in a randomly selected group of subjects (n = 6) in vitro under normoxia by secondary colony-forming unit granulocyte macrophage assays. Concentrations of free NE, EPI, Co and IL-6 were significantly increased post-exercise under normoxia/hypoxia. Ergometry-induced free NE concentrations found in vivo showed a significant impairment of CPC functionality in vitro under normoxia. Thus, ergometry-induced free NE was thought to trigger CPC mobilization 10 minutes post-exercise, but as previously shown impairs CPC proliferative capacity/functionality at the same time. The obtained results suggest that an ergometry-induced free NE concentration has a direct negative effect on CPC functionality. Cortisol may further influence CPC dynamics and functionality. PMID:25180783

  13. Prolonged growth of a clinical Staphylococcus aureus strain selects for a stable small-colony-variant cell type.

    PubMed

    Bui, Long M G; Hoffmann, Peter; Turnidge, John D; Zilm, Peter S; Kidd, Stephen P

    2015-02-01

    An undetermined feature of Staphylococcus aureus pathogenesis is its persistence and then relapse of disease. This has been explained by its switch to alternative lifestyles, mainly as biofilm or small-colony variants (SCVs). Studying the native characteristics of SCVs has been problematic due to their reversion to the parental lifestyle. We have observed that for a number of S. aureus strains as they switch to an SCV lifestyle, there is the formation of an extracellular matrix. We focused our analysis on one strain, WCH-SK2. For bacterial survival in the host, the combination of low nutrients and the prolonged time frame forms a stress that selects for a specific cell type from the population. In this context, we used steady-state growth conditions with low nutrients and a controlled low growth rate for a prolonged time and with methylglyoxal. These conditions induced S. aureus WCH-SK2 into a stable SCV cell type; the cells did not revert after subculturing. Analysis revealed these cells possessed a metabolic and surface profile that was different from those of previously described SCVs or biofilm cells. The extracellular matrix was protein and extracellular DNA but not polysaccharide. The SCV cells induced expression of certain surface proteins (such as Ebh) and synthesis of lantibiotics while downregulating factors that stimulate the immune response (leucocidin, capsule, and carotenoid). Our data reveal cell heterogeneity within an S. aureus population and under conditions that resemble long-term survival in the host have identified a previously unnoticed S. aureus cell type with a distinctive metabolic and molecular profile. PMID:25385795

  14. Large-scale time-lapse microscopy of Oct4 expression in human embryonic stem cell colonies.

    PubMed

    Bhadriraju, Kiran; Halter, Michael; Amelot, Julien; Bajcsy, Peter; Chalfoun, Joe; Vandecreme, Antoine; Mallon, Barbara S; Park, Kye-Yoon; Sista, Subhash; Elliott, John T; Plant, Anne L

    2016-07-01

    Identification and quantification of the characteristics of stem cell preparations is critical for understanding stem cell biology and for the development and manufacturing of stem cell based therapies. We have developed image analysis and visualization software that allows effective use of time-lapse microscopy to provide spatial and dynamic information from large numbers of human embryonic stem cell colonies. To achieve statistically relevant sampling, we examined >680 colonies from 3 different preparations of cells over 5days each, generating a total experimental dataset of 0.9 terabyte (TB). The 0.5 Giga-pixel images at each time point were represented by multi-resolution pyramids and visualized using the Deep Zoom Javascript library extended to support viewing Giga-pixel images over time and extracting data on individual colonies. We present a methodology that enables quantification of variations in nominally-identical preparations and between colonies, correlation of colony characteristics with Oct4 expression, and identification of rare events. PMID:27286574

  15. Cooperation between human fibrocytes and endothelial colony-forming cells increases angiogenesis via the CXCR4 pathway.

    PubMed

    Smadja, David M; Dorfmüller, Peter; Guerin, Coralie L; Bieche, Ivan; Badoual, Cécile; Boscolo, Elisa; Kambouchner, Marianne; Cazes, Aurélie; Mercier, Olaf; Humbert, Marc; Gaussem, Pascale; Bischoff, Joyce; Israël-Biet, Dominique

    2014-11-01

    Fibrotic diseases of the lung are associated with a vascular remodelling process. Fibrocytes (Fy) are a distinct population of blood-borne cells that co-express haematopoietic cell antigens and fibroblast markers, and have been shown to contribute to organ fibrosis. The purpose of this study was to determine whether fibrocytes cooperate with endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFC) to induce angiogenesis. We isolated fibrocytes from blood of patient with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and characterised them by flow cytometry, quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (RTQ-PCR), and confocal microscopy. We then investigated the angiogenic interaction between fibrocytes and cord-blood-derived ECFC, both in vitro and in an in vivo Matrigel implant model. Compared to fibroblast culture medium, fibrocyte culture medium increased ECFC proliferation and differentiation via the SDF-1/CXCR4 pathway. IPF-Fy co-implanted with human ECFC in Matrigel plugs in immunodeficient mice formed functional microvascular beds, whereas fibroblasts did not. Evaluation of implants after two weeks revealed an extensive network of erythrocyte-containing blood vessels. CXCR4 blockade significantly inhibited this blood vessel formation. The clinical relevance of these data was confirmed by strong CXCR4 expression in vessels close to fibrotic areas in biopsy specimens from patients with IPF, by comparison with control lungs. In conclusion, circulating fibrocytes might contribute to the intense remodelling of the pulmonary vasculature in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:25103869

  16. Human papillomavirus 16 E5 induces bi-nucleated cell formation by cell-cell fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Lulin; Plafker, Kendra; Vorozhko, Valeriya; Zuna, Rosemary E.; Hanigan, Marie H.; Gorbsky, Gary J.; Plafker, Scott M.; Angeletti, Peter C.; Ceresa, Brian P.

    2009-02-05

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) 16 is a DNA virus encoding three oncogenes - E5, E6, and E7. The E6 and E7 proteins have well-established roles as inhibitors of tumor suppression, but the contribution of E5 to malignant transformation is controversial. Using spontaneously immortalized human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells), we demonstrate that expression of HPV16 E5 is necessary and sufficient for the formation of bi-nucleated cells, a common characteristic of precancerous cervical lesions. Expression of E5 from non-carcinogenic HPV6b does not produce bi-nucleate cells. Video microscopy and biochemical analyses reveal that bi-nucleates arise through cell-cell fusion. Although most E5-induced bi-nucleates fail to propagate, co-expression of HPV16 E6/E7 enhances the proliferation of these cells. Expression of HPV16 E6/E7 also increases bi-nucleated cell colony formation. These findings identify a new role for HPV16 E5 and support a model in which complementary roles of the HPV16 oncogenes lead to the induction of carcinogenesis.

  17. Identification of vitamin B1 metabolism as a tumor-specific radiosensitizing pathway using a high-throughput colony formation screen

    PubMed Central

    Buffa, Francesca M.; Yu, Sheng; Ebner, Daniel V.; Howarth, Alison; Folkes, Lisa K.; Budwal, Balam; Chu, Kwun-Ye; Durrant, Lisa; Muschel, Ruth J.; McKenna, W. Gillies; Higgins, Geoff S.

    2015-01-01

    Colony formation is the gold standard assay for determining reproductive cell death after radiation treatment, since effects on proliferation often do not reflect survival. We have developed a high-throughput radiosensitivity screening method based on clonogenicity and screened a siRNA library against kinases. Thiamine pyrophosphokinase-1 (TPK1), a key component of Vitamin B1/thiamine metabolism, was identified as a target for radiosensitization. TPK1 knockdown caused significant radiosensitization in cancer but not normal tissue cell lines. Other means of blocking this pathway, knockdown of thiamine transporter-1 (THTR1) or treatment with the thiamine analogue pyrithiamine hydrobromide (PyrH) caused significant tumor specific radiosensitization. There was persistent DNA damage in cells irradiated after TPK1 and THTR1 knockdown or PyrH treatment. Thus this screen allowed the identification of thiamine metabolism as a novel radiosensitization target that affects DNA repair. Short-term modulation of thiamine metabolism could be a clinically exploitable strategy to achieve tumor specific radiosensitization. PMID:25788274

  18. Growth of a radiation-transformed clone of C3H 1OT1/2 cells into melanin-producing colonies

    SciTech Connect

    Szekely, J.G.; Raaphorst, G.P.; Lobreau, A.U.; Azzam, E.I.; Vadasz, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    When R25, a radiation-transformed clone of C3H 1OT1/2 cells, was plated in soft agarose, a fraction of the colonies became pigmented. The morphologies of the white and dark colonies and their cells were compared by optical, transmission and scanning electron microscopy. The transformed R25 cells had apparently differentiated into melanin-producing cells in the soft agarose, with the white colonies containing actively growing cells having only a few melanosomes, and the dark colonies being made up of stationary-phase cells filled with electronopaque melanosomes. Exposure of the R25 cells to 4.0 Gy of X-rays decreased the percentage of dark colonies, while exposure to 1% DMSO had no effect.

  19. Peptidoglycolipid nature of the superficial cell wall sheath of smooth-colony-forming mycobacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Barrow, W W; Ullom, B P; Brennan, P J

    1980-01-01

    The most superficial cell wall layer present in smooth-colony-forming mycobacteria was isolated from serovar 20 of the Mycobacterium avium-Mycobacterium intracellulare-Mycobacterium scrofulaceum (MAIS) serocomplex and examined chemically and by electron microscopy. Most (70 to 80%) of the fibrillar material consisted of an array of serologically active, acetylated C-myosidic peptidoglycoplipids with the basic structure (formula, see text) but in which the location of acetyl groups and the arrangement of monosaccharides have not been defined. Apparently, all serovars within the MAIS complex are characterized by structurally related superficies in which the monoglycosyl-lipopeptide portion is invariable but the oligosaccharide attachment is peculiar to each serovar. These unique inert structures may be an important factor in shielding the pathogen within phagolysosomes from lysosomal enzymes. Images PMID:7430072

  20. Growth of human hemopoietic colonies in response to recombinant gibbon interleukin 3: comparison with human recombinant granulocyte and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor

    SciTech Connect

    Messner, H.A.; Yamasaki, K.; Jamal, N.; Minden, M.M.; Yang, Y.C.; Wong, G.G.; Clark, S.C.

    1987-10-01

    Supernatants of COS-1 cells transfected with gibbon cDNA encoding interleukin 3 (IL-3) with homology to sequences for human IL-3 were tested for ability to promote growth of various human hemopoietic progenitors. The effect of these supernatants as a source of recombinant IL-3 was compared to that of recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) as well as to that of medium conditioned by phytohemagglutinin-stimulated leukocytes. The frequency of multilineage colonies, erythroid bursts, and megakaryocyte colonies in cultures containing the COS-1 cell supernatant was equivalent to the frequency observed in the controls and significantly higher than found in cultures plated with recombinant GM-CSF. G-CSF did not support the formation of multilineage colonies, erythroid bursts, and megakaryocyte colonies. In contrast, growth of granulocyte-macrophage colonies was best supported with GM-CSF, while recombinant IL-3 yielded colonies at lower or at best equivalent frequency. The simultaneous addition of higher concentrations of GM-CSF to cultures containing IL-3 in optimal amounts did not enhance the formation of multilineage colonies, erythroid bursts, and megakaryocyte colonies. However, the frequency of such colonies and bursts increased with GM-CSF when cultures were plated with suboptimal concentrations of IL-3. Growth of colonies within the granulocyte-macrophage lineage is optimally supported by GM-CSF and does not increase with further addition of IL-3.

  1. YfiBNR Mediates Cyclic di-GMP Dependent Small Colony Variant Formation and Persistence in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Malone, Jacob G.; Jaeger, Tina; Spangler, Christian; Ritz, Daniel; Spang, Anne; Arrieumerlou, Cécile; Kaever, Volkhard; Landmann, Regine; Jenal, Urs

    2010-01-01

    During long-term cystic fibrosis lung infections, Pseudomonas aeruginosa undergoes genetic adaptation resulting in progressively increased persistence and the generation of adaptive colony morphotypes. This includes small colony variants (SCVs), auto-aggregative, hyper-adherent cells whose appearance correlates with poor lung function and persistence of infection. The SCV morphotype is strongly linked to elevated levels of cyclic-di-GMP, a ubiquitous bacterial second messenger that regulates the transition between motile and sessile, cooperative lifestyles. A genetic screen in PA01 for SCV-related loci identified the yfiBNR operon, encoding a tripartite signaling module that regulates c-di-GMP levels in P. aeruginosa. Subsequent analysis determined that YfiN is a membrane-integral diguanylate cyclase whose activity is tightly controlled by YfiR, a small periplasmic protein, and the OmpA/Pal-like outer-membrane lipoprotein YfiB. Exopolysaccharide synthesis was identified as the principal downstream target for YfiBNR, with increased production of Pel and Psl exopolysaccharides responsible for many characteristic SCV behaviors. An yfi-dependent SCV was isolated from the sputum of a CF patient. Consequently, the effect of the SCV morphology on persistence of infection was analyzed in vitro and in vivo using the YfiN-mediated SCV as a representative strain. The SCV strain exhibited strong, exopolysaccharide-dependent resistance to nematode scavenging and macrophage phagocytosis. Furthermore, the SCV strain effectively persisted over many weeks in mouse infection models, despite exhibiting a marked fitness disadvantage in vitro. Exposure to sub-inhibitory concentrations of antibiotics significantly decreased both the number of suppressors arising, and the relative fitness disadvantage of the SCV mutant in vitro, suggesting that the SCV persistence phenotype may play a more important role during antimicrobial chemotherapy. This study establishes YfiBNR as an important

  2. Colony aggregation and biofilm formation in xylem chemistry-based media for Xylella fastidiosa.

    PubMed

    Leite, Breno; Andersen, Peter Craig; Ishida, Maria Lucia

    2004-01-30

    Two chemically defined media based on xylem fluid chemistry were developed for Xylella fastidiosa. These media were tested and compared to chemically defined media XDM2, XDM4 and XF-26. New media were evaluated for the Pierce's disease (PD) strain UCLA-PD. Our media either was similar to the concentration of some amino acids found in the xylem fluid of the PD-susceptible Vitis vinifera cv. Chardonnay (medium CHARD2) or incorporated the tripeptide glutathione found in xylem fluid composition (medium 3G10-R). CHARD2 and 3G10-R are among the simplest chemically defined media available. Xylem fluid chemistry-based media supported X. fastidiosa growth and especially stimulated aggregation and biofilm formation. PMID:14757251

  3. Enhanced Viability of Endothelial Colony Forming Cells in Fibrin Microbeads for Sensor Vascularization

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Jarel K.; Zivkovic, Lada; Fisher, John P.; Yoder, Mervin C.; Brey, Eric M.

    2015-01-01

    Enhanced vascularization at sensor interfaces can improve long-term function. Fibrin, a natural polymer, has shown promise as a biomaterial for sensor coating due to its ability to sustain endothelial cell growth and promote local vascularization. However, the culture of cells, particularly endothelial cells (EC), within 3D scaffolds for more than a few days is challenging due to rapid loss of EC viability. In this manuscript, a robust method for developing fibrin microbead scaffolds for long-term culture of encapsulated ECs is described. Fibrin microbeads are formed using sodium alginate as a structural template. The size, swelling and structural properties of the microbeads were varied with needle gauge and composition and concentration of the pre-gel solution. Endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) were suspended in the fibrin beads and cultured within a perfusion bioreactor system. The perfusion bioreactor enhanced ECFCs viability and genome stability in fibrin beads relative to static culture. Perfusion bioreactors enable 3D culture of ECs within fibrin beads for potential application as a sensor coating. PMID:26393602

  4. CD34 expression modulates tube-forming capacity and barrier properties of peripheral blood-derived endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs).

    PubMed

    Tasev, Dimitar; Konijnenberg, Lara S F; Amado-Azevedo, Joana; van Wijhe, Michiel H; Koolwijk, Pieter; van Hinsbergh, Victor W M

    2016-07-01

    Endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFC) are grown from circulating CD34(+) progenitors present in adult peripheral blood, but during in vitro expansion part of the cells lose CD34. To evaluate whether the regulation of CD34 characterizes the angiogenic phenotypical features of PB-ECFCs, we investigated the properties of CD34(+) and CD34(-) ECFCs with respect to their ability to form capillary-like tubes in 3D fibrin matrices, tip-cell gene expression, and barrier integrity. Selection of CD34(+) and CD34(-) ECFCs from subcultured ECFCs was accomplished by magnetic sorting (FACS: CD34(+): 95 % pos; CD34(-): 99 % neg). Both fractions proliferated at same rate, while CD34(+) ECFCs exhibited higher tube-forming capacity and tip-cell gene expression than CD3(4-) cells. However, during cell culture CD34(-) cells re-expressed CD34. Cell-seeding density, cell-cell contact formation, and serum supplements modulated CD34 expression. CD34 expression in ECFCs was strongly suppressed by newborn calf serum. Stimulation with FGF-2, VEGF, or HGF prepared in medium supplemented with 3 % albumin did not change CD34 mRNA or surface expression. Silencing of CD34 with siRNA resulted in strengthening of cell-cell contacts and increased barrier function of ECFC monolayers as measured by ECIS. Furthermore, CD34 siRNA reduced tube formation by ECFC, but did not affect tip-cell gene expression. These findings demonstrate that CD34(+) and CD34(-) cells are different phenotypes of similar cells and that CD34 (1) can be regulated in ECFC; (2) is positively involved in capillary-like sprout formation; (3) is associated but not causally related to tip-cell gene expression; and (4) can affect endothelial barrier function. PMID:27043316

  5. T-lymphocyte colonies in the lymphoproliferative disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Dao, C; Marie, J P; Bernadou, A; Bilski-Pasquier, G

    1978-01-01

    Human lymphocytes from peripheral blood, bone marrow spleen and lymph nodes were cultured. Continuous phytoheamagglutinin (PHA) stimulation was used, first during a 24 h liquid preincubation, then during a 5 day culture in methylcellulose. In normal donors a rapid colony formation took place, with a mean of 124+/-82 colonies per 1 times 10(5) preincubated lymphocytes. Cells from such colonies were studied by cytology, scanning electron microscopy and rosette formation techniques; arguments favour the hypothesis that these could be T lymphocytes. Neither granulocytes nor macrophages could be grown, and no lymphoid colony formation occurred without PHA stimulation. The same technique was applied to patients with various lymphoproliferative disorders. Significant colony suppression was observed in nearly every case of chronic lymphatic leukaemia; the number of colonies was reduced in some patients with acute lymphatic leukaemia, lymphosarcoma, dysglobulinaemia and Hodgkin's disease. This lymphoid culture method should be applied to a larger number of patients to determine whether it has a classification value and/or prognostic significance. When colonies were grown in pathological states, rosette formation was identical to that of normal donors; colony formation could be due to persisting normal lymphocytes. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:309852

  6. Expression of Genes Related to Germ Cell Lineage and Pluripotency in Single Cells and Colonies of Human Adult Germ Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Sabine; Azizi, Hossein; Hatami, Maryam; Kubista, Mikael; Bonin, Michael; Hennenlotter, Jörg; Sievert, Karl-Dietrich; Skutella, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the molecular status of single human adult germ stem cells (haGSCs) and haGSC colonies, which spontaneously developed from the CD49f MACS and matrix- (collagen-/laminin+ binding-) selected fraction of enriched spermatogonia. Single-cell transcriptional profiling by Fluidigm BioMark system of a long-term cultured haGSCs cluster in comparison to human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and human fibroblasts (hFibs) revealed that haGSCs showed a characteristic germ- and pluripotency-associated gene expression profile with some similarities to hESCs and with a significant distinction from somatic hFibs. Genome-wide comparisons with microarray analysis confirmed that different haGSC colonies exhibited gene expression heterogeneity with more or less pluripotency. The results of this study confirm that haGSCs are adult stem cells with a specific molecular gene expression profile in vitro, related but not identical to true pluripotent stem cells. Under ES-cell conditions haGSC colonies could be selected and maintained in a partial pluripotent state at the molecular level, which may be related to their cell plasticity and potential to differentiate into cells of all germ layers. PMID:26649052

  7. Expression of Genes Related to Germ Cell Lineage and Pluripotency in Single Cells and Colonies of Human Adult Germ Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, Sabine; Azizi, Hossein; Hatami, Maryam; Kubista, Mikael; Bonin, Michael; Hennenlotter, Jörg; Sievert, Karl-Dietrich; Skutella, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the molecular status of single human adult germ stem cells (haGSCs) and haGSC colonies, which spontaneously developed from the CD49f MACS and matrix- (collagen−/laminin+ binding-) selected fraction of enriched spermatogonia. Single-cell transcriptional profiling by Fluidigm BioMark system of a long-term cultured haGSCs cluster in comparison to human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and human fibroblasts (hFibs) revealed that haGSCs showed a characteristic germ- and pluripotency-associated gene expression profile with some similarities to hESCs and with a significant distinction from somatic hFibs. Genome-wide comparisons with microarray analysis confirmed that different haGSC colonies exhibited gene expression heterogeneity with more or less pluripotency. The results of this study confirm that haGSCs are adult stem cells with a specific molecular gene expression profile in vitro, related but not identical to true pluripotent stem cells. Under ES-cell conditions haGSC colonies could be selected and maintained in a partial pluripotent state at the molecular level, which may be related to their cell plasticity and potential to differentiate into cells of all germ layers. PMID:26649052

  8. Granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor and the intestinal innate immune cell homeostasis in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Däbritz, Jan

    2014-03-01

    Current literature consolidates the view of Crohn's disease (CD) as a form of immunodeficiency highlighting dysregulation of intestinal innate immunity in the pathogenesis of CD. Intestinal macrophages derived from blood monocytes play a key role in sustaining the innate immune homeostasis in the intestine, suggesting that the monocyte/macrophage compartment might be an attractive therapeutic target for the management of CD. Granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a hematopoietic growth factor that also promotes myeloid cell activation, proliferation, and differentiation. GM-CSF has a protective effect in human CD and mouse models of colitis. However, the role of GM-CSF in immune and inflammatory reactions in the intestine is not well defined. Beneficial effects exerted by GM-CSF during intestinal inflammation could relate to modulation of the mucosal barrier function in the intestine, including epithelial cell proliferation, survival, restitution, and immunomodulatory actions. The aim of this review is to summarize potential mechanistic roles of GM-CSF in intestinal innate immune cell homeostasis and to highlight its central role in maintenance of the intestinal immune barrier in the context of immunodeficiency in CD. PMID:24503766

  9. Conidial germination, infection structure formation, and early colony development of powdery mildew on poinsettia.

    PubMed

    Celio, G J; Hausbeck, M K

    1998-02-01

    ABSTRACT Powdery mildew disease on poinsettias (Euphorbia pulcherrima) growing in commercial greenhouses was first observed in the United States in 1990 and has become an economically significant problem for poinsettia growers in the Midwest and northern United States since 1992. The temporal development of infection structures produced by conidial germ tubes of the pathogen (Oidium sp.) and the effect of high temperature on their development were investigated using poinsettia leaf disks placed in humidity chambers. Observations were made using light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. At 20 degrees C (85% relative humidity), conidia germinated and formed an appressorium within 6 h of inoculation. Germination over time followed a monomolecular curve (r(2) = 0.77, P cells. When the incubation temperature was 30 degrees C, conidial germination and development of secondary germ tubes and a haustorium were reduced. PMID:18944978

  10. Endoplasmic Reticulum Ca(2+) Handling and Apoptotic Resistance in Tumor-Derived Endothelial Colony Forming Cells.

    PubMed

    Poletto, Valentina; Dragoni, Silvia; Lim, Dmitry; Biggiogera, Marco; Aronica, Adele; Cinelli, Mariapia; De Luca, Antonio; Rosti, Vittorio; Porta, Camillo; Guerra, Germano; Moccia, Francesco

    2016-10-01

    Truly endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) can be mobilized from bone marrow to support the vascular network of growing tumors, thereby sustaining the metastatic switch. Endothelial colony forming cells (ECFCs) are the only EPC subtype belonging to the endothelial phenotype and capable of incorporating within neovessels. The intracellular Ca(2+) machinery plays a key role in ECFC activation and is remodeled in renal cellular carcinoma-derived ECFCs (RCC-ECFCs). Particularly, RCC-ECFCs seems to undergo a drop in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+) ]ER ). This feature is remarkable when considering that inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3 )-dependent ER-to-mitochondria Ca(2+) transfer regulates the intrinsic apoptosis pathway. Herein, we sought to assess whether: (1) the [Ca(2+) ]ER and the InsP3 -induced ER-mitochondria Ca(2+) shuttle are reduced in RCC-ECFCs; and (2) the dysregulation of ER Ca(2+) handling leads to apoptosis resistance in tumor-derived cells. RCC-ECFCs displayed a reduction both in [Ca(2+) ]ER and in the InsP3 -dependent mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake, while they expressed normal levels of Bcl-2 and Bak. The decrease in [Ca(2+) ]ER was associated to a remarkable ER expansion in RCC-ECFCs, which is a hallmark of ER stress, and did not depend on the remodeling of the Ca(2+) -transporting and the ER Ca(2+) -storing systems. As expected, RCC-ECFCs were less sensitive to rapamycin- and thapsigargin-induced apoptosis; however, buffering intracellular Ca(2+) levels with BAPTA dampened apoptosis in both cell types. Finally, store-operated Ca(2+) entry was seemingly uncoupled from the apoptotic machinery in RCC-ECFCs. Thus, the chronic underfilling of the ER Ca(2+) pool could confer a survival advantage to RCC-ECFCs and underpin RCC resistance to pharmacological treatment. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2260-2271, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26917354

  11. Inhibition of CD26 enzyme activity with pro-boropro stimulates rat granulocyte/macrophage colony formation and thymocyte proliferation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bristol, L A; Bachovchin, W; Takács, L

    1995-06-15

    CD26 dipeptidyl peptidase (DPPIV) is involved in the regulation of proliferation of some hematopoietic and T-lineage cells. Here, we show that Pro-boropro a potent inhibitor of DPP activity has a costimulating effect in hematopoietic colony assays for macrophage and, to a lesser extent, for granulocyte colonies and has a stimulating effect in organ cultures of immature thymocytes. Based on these and other evidences, we propose that the mechanism by which CD26 regulates proliferation is associated with its DPP activity. PMID:7780144

  12. In Vitro Colony Assays for Characterizing Tri-potent Progenitor Cells Isolated from the Adult Murine Pancreas.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Jacob R; LeBon, Jeanne M; Luo, Angela; Quijano, Janine C; Wedeken, Lena; Jou, Kevin; Riggs, Arthur D; Tirrell, David A; Ku, H Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Stem and progenitor cells from the adult pancreas could be a potential source of therapeutic beta-like cells for treating patients with type 1 diabetes. However, it is still unknown whether stem and progenitor cells exist in the adult pancreas. Research strategies using cre-lox lineage-tracing in adult mice have yielded results that either support or refute the idea that beta cells can be generated from the ducts, the presumed location where adult pancreatic progenitors may reside. These in vivo cre-lox lineage-tracing methods, however, cannot answer the questions of self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation-two criteria necessary to define a stem cell. To begin addressing this technical gap, we devised 3-dimensional colony assays for pancreatic progenitors. Soon after our initial publication, other laboratories independently developed a similar, but not identical, method called the organoid assay. Compared to the organoid assay, our method employs methylcellulose, which forms viscous solutions that allow the inclusion of extracellular matrix proteins at low concentrations. The methylcellulose-containing assays permit easier detection and analyses of progenitor cells at the single-cell level, which are critical when progenitors constitute a small sub-population, as is the case for many adult organ stem cells. Together, results from several laboratories demonstrate in vitro self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation of pancreatic progenitor-like cells from mice. The current protocols describe two methylcellulose-based colony assays to characterize mouse pancreatic progenitors; one contains a commercial preparation of murine extracellular matrix proteins and the other an artificial extracellular matrix protein known as a laminin hydrogel. The techniques shown here are 1) dissociation of the pancreas and sorting of CD133(+)Sox9/EGFP(+) ductal cells from adult mice, 2) single cell manipulation of the sorted cells, 3) single colony analyses using microfluidic q

  13. Cord blood-derived endothelial colony-forming cell function is disrupted in congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

    PubMed

    Fujinaga, Hideshi; Fujinaga, Hiroko; Watanabe, Nobuyuki; Kato, Tomoko; Tamano, Moe; Terao, Miho; Takada, Shuji; Ito, Yushi; Umezawa, Akihiro; Kuroda, Masahiko

    2016-06-01

    Vascular growth is necessary for normal lung development. Although endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) play an important role in vascularization, little is known about EPC function in congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH), a severe neonatal condition that is associated with pulmonary hypoplasia. We hypothesized that the function of endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs), a type of EPC, is impaired in CDH. Cord blood (CB) was collected from full-term CDH patients and healthy controls. We assessed CB progenitor cell populations as well as plasma vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and stromal cell-derived factor 1α (SDF1α) levels. CB ECFC clonogenicity; growth kinetics; migration; production of VEGF, SDF1α, and nitric oxide (NO); vasculogenic capacity; and mRNA expression of VEGF-A, fms-related tyrosine kinase 1 (FLT1), kinase insert domain receptor (KDR), nitric oxide synthase (NOS) 1-3, SDF1, and chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 4 (CXCR4) were also assessed. Compared with controls, CB ECFCs were decreased in CDH. CDH ECFCs had reduced potential for self-renewal, clonogenicity, proliferation, and migration. Their capacity for NO production was enhanced but their response to VEGF was blunted in CDH ECFCs. In vivo potential for de novo vasculogenesis was reduced in CDH ECFCs. There was no difference in CB plasma VEGF and SDF1α concentrations, VEGF and SDF1α production by ECFCs, and ECFC mRNA expression of VEGF-A, FLT1, KDR, NOS1-3, SDF1, and CXCR4 between CDH and control subjects. In conclusion, CB ECFC function is disrupted in CDH, but these changes may be caused by mechanisms other than alteration of VEGF-NO and SDF1-CXCR4 signaling. PMID:27130531

  14. Correlation between cell-cell contact formation and activation of protein kinase C in a human squamous cell carcinoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Nagao, S; Kitajima, Y; Nagata, K; Inoue, S; Yaoita, H; Nozawa, Y

    1989-02-01

    Formation of desmosomal cell-cell contact associated with reorganization of keratin intermediate filaments (KIFs) was observed when cultured cells of a cell line of human skin squamous cell carcinoma were transferred from low (0.07 mM) calcium to high (1.87 mM) calcium medium. At low calcium, cells were dispersed without desmosomal cell-cell contact and the KIFs were mostly concentrated around the nucleus. After 15 min of the transfer, cells contacted each other and formed small colonies and the KIFs initiated to show a radial arrangement. In addition to the cell-cell contact formation and rearrangement of KIFs, the transfer induced fourfold increase of particulate-associated protein kinase C (C-kinase) activity. When 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (PMA), which specifically activates C-kinase, was added to the cells grown at low calcium medium, cell-cell contact formation and radial arrangement of KIF bundles almost identical to those induced by the transfer to high calcium medium were observed. These data suggest a correlation between an increase in C-kinase activity and formation of cell-cell contacts associated with rearrangements of KIFs. PMID:2465349

  15. Relationship between phase variation in colony morphology, intrastrain variation in cell wall physiology, and nasopharyngeal colonization by Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Weiser, J N; Markiewicz, Z; Tuomanen, E I; Wani, J H

    1996-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae undergoes phase variation in colony morphology, which has been implicated as a factor in the pathogenesis of pneumococcal disease. Phenotypic differences between opaque and transparent colony forms correlate with differences in rates of autolysis. This study examined whether differences in autolysis are caused by differences in expression of the major amidase, LytA, or the structure of its peptidoglycan substrate. No significant difference was detected by high-pressure liquid chromatography analysis of stem peptides released after treatment of purified peptidoglycan with amidase. Differences in the rate of digestion of purified cell walls, furthermore, did not correlate with susceptibility to autolysis. Lower levels of autolysis in opaque variants, however, was associated with decreased levels of immunodetectable LytA on colony immunoblots and Western blots (immunoblots). Diminished cell-surface-associated LytA in opaque variants was also demonstrated by whole-cell inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Since transparent variants have been shown both to colonize the nasopharynx more efficiently in an animal model and to express more surface-exposed LytA, it was determined whether LytA contributes to colonization in a neonatal rat model of pneumococcal carriage. Defined mutants in the lytA gene were used to show that there was no significant contribution by LytA to nasopharyngeal colonization in this model. Although the expression of LytA was shown to undergo phase variation in association with colony morphology, lytA mutants are still capable of phenotypic variation in colony morphology, which suggests that other factors are responsible for intrastrain differences which affect colonization. PMID:8675333

  16. Role of Stem Cell Factor and Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor in Remodeling during Liver Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Fanyin; Francis, Heather; Glaser, Shannon; Han, Yuyan; DeMorrow, Sharon; Stokes, Allison; Staloch, Dustin; Venter, Julie; White, Melanie; Ueno, Yoshiyuki; Reid, Lola M.; Alpini, Gianfranco

    2011-01-01

    Functional pluripotent characteristics have been observed in specific subpopulations of hepatic cells that express some of the known cholangiocyte markers. Although evidence indicates that specific cytokines, granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factors (GM-CSF) and stem cell factor (SCF) may be candidate treatments for liver injury, the role of these cytokines in intrahepatic biliary epithelium remodeling is unknown. Thus, our aim was to characterize the specific cytokines that regulate the remodeling potentials of cholangiocytes after 70% partial hepatectomy (PH). The expression of the cytokines and their downstream signaling molecules was studied in rats after 70% PH by immunoblots, and in small and large murine cholangiocyte cultures (SMCCs and LMCCs) by immunocytochemistry and real-time PCR. There was a significant and stable increase in SCF and GM-CSF levels until 7 days after PH. Real-time PCR analysis revealed significant increases of key remodeling molecules, such as S100A4 and miR-181b after SCF plus GM-CSF administration in SMCCs. SMCCs produced significant amounts of soluble and bound SCF and GM-CSF in response to TGF-β. When SMCCs were incubated with TGF-β plus anti–SCF and GM-CSF antibodies, there was a significant decrease in S100A4 expression. Furthermore, treatment of SMCCs with SCF + GM-CSF significantly increased matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-2 and MMP-9) mRNA as well as miR-181b expression along with a reduction of metalloproteinase inhibitor 3 (TIMP-3). The levels of MMP-2, MMP-9 and miR-181b were also up-regulated in rat liver and isolated cholangiocytes after PH. CONCLUSION Our data suggest that altered expression of SCF and GM-CSF following PH can contribute to biliary remodeling (for example post-transplantation) by functional deregulation of activity of key signaling intermediates involved in cell expansion and multipotent differentiation. PMID:21932404

  17. Bioluminescence imaging of transplanted human endothelial colony-forming cells in an ischemic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jie; Zhao, Zhen; Wang, Chao; Wang, Cong-Xiao; Li, Pei-Cheng; Qian, Cheng; Teng, Gao-Jun

    2016-07-01

    Ischemic strokes are devastating events responsible for high mortality and morbidity worldwide each year. Endothelial colony-forming cell (ECFC) therapy holds promise for stroke treatment; however, grafted ECFCs need to be monitored better understand their biological behavior in vivo, so as to evaluate their safety and successful delivery. The objectives of this study are to visualize the fate of infused human cord blood derived ECFCs via bioluminescence imaging (BLI) in an ischemic stroke mouse model and to determine the therapeutic effects of ECFC transplantation. ECFCs derived from human umbilical cord blood were infected with lentivirus carrying enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) and firefly luciferase (Luc2) double fusion reporter gene. Labeled ECFCs were grafted into a photothrombotic ischemic stroke mouse model via intra-arterial injection though the left cardiac ventricle. The homing of infused cells and functional recovery of stroke mice were evaluated using BLI, neurological scoring, and immunohistochemistry. Significantly, BLI signals were highest in the brain on day 1 and decreased steadily until day 14. GFP-positive cells were also found surrounding infarct border zones in brain sections using immunohistochemical staining, suggesting that ECFCs properly homed to the ischemic brain tissue. Using a modified neurological severity score assay and histological analysis of brain slices with CD31 immunostaining in brain tissue, double cortin analysis, and the TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay, we demonstrated functional restoration, improved angiogenesis, neurogenesis, and decreased apoptosis in ischemic mice after ECFC infusion. Collectively, our data support that ECFCs may be a promising therapeutic agent for stroke. PMID:27038754

  18. Characterization of the Maize Stalk Rot Pathogens Fusarium subglutinans and F. temperatum and the Effect of Fungicides on Their Mycelial Growth and Colony Formation

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jong-Hwan; Han, Joon-Hee; Lee, Ju Kyong; Kim, Kyoung Su

    2014-01-01

    Maize is a socioeconomically important crop in many countries. Recently, a high incidence of stalk rot disease has been reported in several maize fields in Gangwon province. In this report, we show that maize stalk rot is associated with the fungal pathogens Fusarium subglutinans and F. temperatum. Since no fungicides are available to control these pathogens on maize plants, we selected six fungicides (tebuconazole, difenoconazole, fluquinconazole, azoxystrobin, prochloraz and kresoxim-methyl) and examined their effectiveness against the two pathogens. The in vitro antifungal effects of the six fungicides on mycelial growth and colony formation were investigated. Based on the inhibition of mycelial growth, the most toxic fungicide was tebuconazole with 50% effective concentrations (EC50) of <0.1 μg/ml and EC90 values of 0.9 μg/ml for both pathogens, while the least toxic fungicide was azoxystrobin with EC50 values of 0.7 and 0.5 μg/ml for F. subglutinans and F. temperatum, respectively, and EC90 values of >3,000 μg/ml for both pathogens. Based on the inhibition of colony formation by the two pathogens, kresoxim-methyl was the most toxic fungicide with complete inhibition of colony formation at concentrations of 0.1 and 0.01 μg/ml for F. subglutinans and F. temperatum, respectively, whereas azoxystrobin was the least toxic fungicide with complete inhibition of colony formation at concentrations >3,000 μg/ml for both pathogens. PMID:25506304

  19. Characterization of the Maize Stalk Rot Pathogens Fusarium subglutinans and F. temperatum and the Effect of Fungicides on Their Mycelial Growth and Colony Formation.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jong-Hwan; Han, Joon-Hee; Lee, Ju Kyong; Kim, Kyoung Su

    2014-12-01

    Maize is a socioeconomically important crop in many countries. Recently, a high incidence of stalk rot disease has been reported in several maize fields in Gangwon province. In this report, we show that maize stalk rot is associated with the fungal pathogens Fusarium subglutinans and F. temperatum. Since no fungicides are available to control these pathogens on maize plants, we selected six fungicides (tebuconazole, difenoconazole, fluquinconazole, azoxystrobin, prochloraz and kresoxim-methyl) and examined their effectiveness against the two pathogens. The in vitro antifungal effects of the six fungicides on mycelial growth and colony formation were investigated. Based on the inhibition of mycelial growth, the most toxic fungicide was tebuconazole with 50% effective concentrations (EC50) of <0.1 μg/ml and EC90 values of 0.9 μg/ml for both pathogens, while the least toxic fungicide was azoxystrobin with EC50 values of 0.7 and 0.5 μg/ml for F. subglutinans and F. temperatum, respectively, and EC90 values of >3,000 μg/ml for both pathogens. Based on the inhibition of colony formation by the two pathogens, kresoxim-methyl was the most toxic fungicide with complete inhibition of colony formation at concentrations of 0.1 and 0.01 μg/ml for F. subglutinans and F. temperatum, respectively, whereas azoxystrobin was the least toxic fungicide with complete inhibition of colony formation at concentrations >3,000 μg/ml for both pathogens. PMID:25506304

  20. Expression of DDX27 contributes to colony-forming ability of gastric cancer cells and correlates with poor prognosis in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tsukamoto, Yoshiyuki; Fumoto, Shoichi; Noguchi, Tsuyoshi; Yanagihara, Kazuyoshi; Hirashita, Yuka; Nakada, Chisato; Hijiya, Naoki; Uchida, Tomohisa; Matsuura, Keiko; Hamanaka, Ryoji; Murakami, Kazunari; Seto, Masao; Inomata, Masafumi; Moriyama, Masatsugu

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we have reported that gain at chromosome 20q13 is the most common genomic copy number aberration in gastric cancer (GC) (29/30 cases), and that among the genes located in this region, we have identified DDX27, whose expression level shows the highest correlation with genomic copy number, as a candidate therapeutic target for GC. Here, we analyzed the clinicopathological significance of DDX27 using immunohistochemistry and studied its functions using knockdown assays. We found that DDX27 was frequently upregulated in GC tissues (98 of 140 cases, 70%), and significantly associated with venous invasion and liver metastasis. Furthermore, multivariate analysis of GC patients showed that high expression of DDX27 was independently associated with poorer prognosis. In functional assays, knockdown of DDX27 reduced the ability of GC cells to form colonies both on conventional plates and soft agar, but had little effect on their invasiveness. We also found that knockdown of DDX27 reduced the viability of GC cells through inhibition of cell cycle progression independently of apoptosis. Interestingly, DDX27 depletion induced accumulation of TP53 in a TP53 wild-type cell line, AGS, but not in a TP53-deleted cell line, 44As3, although DDX27 knockdown commonly reduced the viability of both, indicating the TP53-dependent and independent cell cycle control of DDX27. Thus, our results suggest that expression of DDX27 contributes to colony formation by GC cells through cell cycle control and may be a potential therapeutic target for GC patients with chromosome gain at 20q13. PMID:26693055

  1. Ionizing Radiation Induces Macrophage Foam Cell Formation and Aggregation Through JNK-Dependent Activation of CD36 Scavenger Receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Katayama, Ikuo; Hotokezaka, Yuka; Matsuyama, Toshifumi; Sumi, Tadateru; Nakamura, Takashi

    2008-03-01

    Purpose: Irradiated arteries of cancer patients can be associated with atherosclerosis-like lesions containing cholesterol-laden macrophages (foam cells). Endothelial cell damage by irradiation does not completely explain the foam cell formation. We investigated the possible underlying mechanisms for ionizing radiation (IR)-induced foam cell formation. Methods and Materials: Human peripheral blood monocytes were activated by macrophage colony-stimulating factor and then treated with varying doses of IR in vitro in the absence of endothelial cells. Scavenger receptor expression and foam cell formation of IR-treated macrophages were investigated in the presence or absence of oxidized low-density lipoprotein. We also assessed the importance of mitogen-activated protein kinase activity in the macrophage colony-stimulating factor-activated human monocytes (macrophages) for the foam cell formation. Results: We found that IR treatment of macrophage colony-stimulating factor-activated human peripheral blood monocytes resulted in the enhanced expression of CD36 scavenger receptors and that cholesterol accumulated in the irradiated macrophages with resultant foam cell formation in the presence of oxidized low-density lipoprotein. Furthermore, when cultured on collagen gels, human macrophages formed large foam cell aggregates in response to IR. Antibodies against CD36 inhibited the IR-induced foam cell formation and aggregation, indicating that the IR-induced foam cell formation and the subsequent aggregation are dependent on functional CD36. In addition, we found that IR of human macrophages resulted in c-Jun N-terminal kinase activation and that c-Jun N-terminal kinase inhibition suppressed IR-induced CD36 expression and the subsequent foam cell formation and aggregation. Conclusion: Taken together, these results suggest that IR-induced foam cell formation is mediated by c-Jun N-terminal kinase-dependent CD36 activation.

  2. Granulocyte/Macrophage Colony-stimulating Factor-dependent Dendritic Cells Restrain Lean Adipose Tissue Expansion.

    PubMed

    Pamir, Nathalie; Liu, Ning-Chun; Irwin, Angela; Becker, Lev; Peng, YuFeng; Ronsein, Graziella E; Bornfeldt, Karin E; Duffield, Jeremy S; Heinecke, Jay W

    2015-06-01

    The physiological roles of macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) in lean white adipose tissue homeostasis have received little attention. Because DCs are generated from bone marrow progenitors in the presence of granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), we used GM-CSF-deficient (Csf2(-/-)) mice fed a low fat diet to test the hypothesis that adipose tissue DCs regulate the development of adipose tissue. At 4 weeks of age, Csf2(-/-) mice had 75% fewer CD45(+)Cd11b(+)Cd11c(+)MHCII(+) F4/80(-) DCs in white adipose tissue than did wild-type controls. Furthermore, the Csf2(-/-) mice showed a 30% increase in whole body adiposity, which persisted to adulthood. Adipocytes from Csf2(-/-) mice were 50% larger by volume and contained higher levels of adipogenesis gene transcripts, indicating enhanced adipocyte differentiation. In contrast, adipogenesis/adipocyte lipid accumulation was inhibited when preadipocytes were co-cultured with CD45(+)Cd11b(+)Cd11c(+)MHCII(+)F4/80(-) DCs. Medium conditioned by DCs, but not by macrophages, also inhibited adipocyte lipid accumulation. Proteomic analysis revealed that matrix metalloproteinase 12 and fibronectin 1 were greatly enriched in the medium conditioned by DCs compared with that conditioned by macrophages. Silencing fibronectin or genetic deletion of matrix metalloproteinase 12 in DCs partially reversed the inhibition of adipocyte lipid accumulation. Our observations indicate that DCs residing in adipose tissue play a critical role in suppressing normal adipose tissue expansion. PMID:25931125

  3. Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Priming plus Papillomavirus E6 DNA Vaccination: Effects on Papilloma Formation and Regression in the Cottontail Rabbit Papillomavirus-Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Leachman, Sancy A.; Tigelaar, Robert E.; Shlyankevich, Mark; Slade, Martin D.; Irwin, Michele; Chang, Ed; Wu, T. C.; Xiao, Wei; Pazhani, Sundaram; Zelterman, Daniel; Brandsma, Janet L.

    2000-01-01

    A cottontail rabbit papillomavirus (CRPV) E6 DNA vaccine that induces significant protection against CRPV challenge was used in a superior vaccination regimen in which the cutaneous sites of vaccination were primed with an expression vector encoding granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), a cytokine that induces differentiation and local recruitment of professional antigen-presenting cells. This treatment induced a massive influx of major histocompatibility complex class II-positive cells. In a vaccination-challenge experiment, rabbit groups were treated by E6 DNA vaccination, GM-CSF DNA inoculation, or a combination of both treatments. After two immunizations, rabbits were challenged with CRPV at low, moderate, and high stringencies and monitored for papilloma formation. As expected, all clinical outcomes were monotonically related to the stringency of the viral challenge. The results demonstrate that GM-CSF priming greatly augmented the effects of CRPV E6 vaccination. First, challenge sites in control rabbits (at the moderate challenge stringency) had a 0% probability of remaining disease free, versus a 50% probability in E6-vaccinated rabbits, and whereas GM-CSF alone had no effect, the interaction between GM-CSF priming and E6 vaccination increased disease-free survival to 67%. Second, the incubation period before papilloma onset was lengthened by E6 DNA vaccination alone or to some extent by GM-CSF DNA inoculation alone, and the combination of treatments induced additive effects. Third, the rate of papilloma growth was reduced by E6 vaccination and, to a lesser extent, by GM-CSF treatment. In addition, the interaction between the E6 and GM-CSF treatments was synergistic and yielded more than a 99% reduction in papilloma volume. Finally, regression occurred among the papillomas that formed in rabbits treated with the E6 vaccine and/or with GM-CSF, with the highest regression frequency occurring in rabbits that received the combination

  4. Cationic star copolymers based on β-cyclodextrins for efficient gene delivery to mouse embryonic stem cell colonies.

    PubMed

    Loh, Xian Jun; Wu, Yun-Long

    2015-07-11

    A cationic star copolymer with a β-cyclodextrin core was developed for nonviral gene transfer to mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). The copolymer comprises poly(2-dimethyl aminoethyl methacrylate) as the cationic component and poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) as the non-toxic stealth component. These materials have very low toxicity and show highly efficient transfection to mESC colonies. PMID:26040469

  5. Order and instabilities in dense bacterial colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsimring, Lev

    2012-02-01

    The structure of cell colonies is governed by the interplay of many physical and biological factors, ranging from properties of surrounding media to cell-cell communication and gene expression in individual cells. The biomechanical interactions arising from the growth and division of individual cells in confined environments are ubiquitous, yet little work has focused on this fundamental aspect of colony formation. By combining experimental observations of growing monolayers of non-motile strain of bacteria Escherichia coli in a shallow microfluidic chemostat with discrete-element simulations and continuous theory, we demonstrate that expansion of a dense colony leads to rapid orientational alignment of rod-like cells. However, in larger colonies, anisotropic compression may lead to buckling instability which breaks perfect nematic order. Furthermore, we found that in shallow cavities feedback between cell growth and mobility in a confined environment leads to a novel cell streaming instability. Joint work with W. Mather, D. Volfson, O. Mondrag'on-Palomino, T. Danino, S. Cookson, and J. Hasty (UCSD) and D. Boyer, S. Orozco-Fuentes (UNAM, Mexico).

  6. Divergent branches of mitochondrial signaling regulate specific genes and the viability of specialized cell types of differentiated yeast colonies

    PubMed Central

    Rešetárová, Stanislava; Kučerová, Helena; Hlaváček, Otakar; Váchová, Libuše; Palková, Zdena

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial retrograde signaling mediates communication from altered mitochondria to the nucleus and is involved in many normal and pathophysiological changes, including cell metabolic reprogramming linked to cancer development and progression in mammals. The major mitochondrial retrograde pathway described in yeast includes three activators, Rtg1p, Rtg2p and Rtg3p, and repressors, Mks1p and Bmh1p/Bmh2p. Using differentiated yeast colonies, we show that Mks1p-Rtg pathway regulation is complex and includes three branches that divergently regulate the properties and fate of three specifically localized cell subpopulations via signals from differently altered mitochondria. The newly identified RTG pathway-regulated genes ATO1/ATO2 are expressed in colonial upper (U) cells, the cells with active TORC1 that metabolically resemble tumor cells, while CIT2 is a typical target induced in one subpopulation of starving lower (L) cells. The viability of the second L cell subpopulation is strictly dependent on RTG signaling. Additional co-activators of Rtg1p-Rtg3p specific to particular gene targets of each branch are required to regulate cell differentiation. PMID:26992228

  7. Radiation promotes invasiveness of non-small-cell lung cancer cells through granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor.

    PubMed

    Cui, Y-H; Suh, Y; Lee, H-J; Yoo, K-C; Uddin, N; Jeong, Y-J; Lee, J-S; Hwang, S-G; Nam, S-Y; Kim, M-J; Lee, S-J

    2015-10-16

    Despite ionizing radiation (IR) is being widely used as a standard treatment for lung cancer, many evidences suggest that IR paradoxically promotes cancer malignancy. However, its molecular mechanisms underlying radiation-induced cancer progression remain obscure. Here, we report that exposure to fractionated radiation (2 Gy per day for 3 days) induces the secretion of granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) that has been commonly used in cancer therapies to ameliorate neutropenia. Intriguingly, radiation-induced G-CSF promoted the migratory and invasive properties by triggering the epithelial-mesenchymal cell transition (EMT) in non-small-cell lung cancer cells (NSCLCs). By irradiation, G-CSF was upregulated transcriptionally by β-catenin/TCF4 complex that binds to the promoter region of G-CSF as a transcription factor. Importantly, irradiation increased the stability of β-catenin through the activation of PI3K/AKT (phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/AKT), thereby upregulating the expression of G-CSF. Radiation-induced G-CSF is recognized by G-CSFR and transduced its intracellular signaling JAK/STAT3 (Janus kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription), thereby triggering EMT program in NSCLCs. Taken together, our findings suggest that the application of G-CSF in cancer therapies to ameliorate neutropenia should be reconsidered owing to its effect on cancer progression, and G-CSF could be a novel therapeutic target to mitigate the harmful effect of radiotherapy for the treatment of NSCLC. PMID:25639867

  8. Granulocyte/Macrophage Colony-stimulating Factor-dependent Dendritic Cells Restrain Lean Adipose Tissue Expansion*

    PubMed Central

    Pamir, Nathalie; Liu, Ning-Chun; Irwin, Angela; Becker, Lev; Peng, YuFeng; Ronsein, Graziella E.; Bornfeldt, Karin E.; Duffield, Jeremy S.; Heinecke, Jay W.

    2015-01-01

    The physiological roles of macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) in lean white adipose tissue homeostasis have received little attention. Because DCs are generated from bone marrow progenitors in the presence of granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), we used GM-CSF-deficient (Csf2−/−) mice fed a low fat diet to test the hypothesis that adipose tissue DCs regulate the development of adipose tissue. At 4 weeks of age, Csf2−/− mice had 75% fewer CD45+Cd11b+Cd11c+MHCII+ F4/80− DCs in white adipose tissue than did wild-type controls. Furthermore, the Csf2−/− mice showed a 30% increase in whole body adiposity, which persisted to adulthood. Adipocytes from Csf2−/− mice were 50% larger by volume and contained higher levels of adipogenesis gene transcripts, indicating enhanced adipocyte differentiation. In contrast, adipogenesis/adipocyte lipid accumulation was inhibited when preadipocytes were co-cultured with CD45+Cd11b+Cd11c+MHCII+F4/80− DCs. Medium conditioned by DCs, but not by macrophages, also inhibited adipocyte lipid accumulation. Proteomic analysis revealed that matrix metalloproteinase 12 and fibronectin 1 were greatly enriched in the medium conditioned by DCs compared with that conditioned by macrophages. Silencing fibronectin or genetic deletion of matrix metalloproteinase 12 in DCs partially reversed the inhibition of adipocyte lipid accumulation. Our observations indicate that DCs residing in adipose tissue play a critical role in suppressing normal adipose tissue expansion. PMID:25931125

  9. Dynamics of Superoxide Production and Decay in Natural Trichodesmium Colonies from the Sargasso Sea: Implications for Cell Signaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansel, C. M.; Buchwald, C.; Diaz, J. M.; Dyhrman, S.; Van Mooy, B. A. S.

    2014-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are key players in the biogeochemistry of the ocean, where they serve a critical role in the cycling of carbon and metals. Research in the past decade has introduced phytoplankton and, most recently, heterotrophic bacteria as significant sources of ROS, including superoxide, within both photic and aphotic regions of the ocean. ROS are both beneficial and detrimental to life. For instance, superoxide is a vital inter- and intra-cellular signaling molecule, yet at high concentrations it induces lipid peroxidation and initiates programmed cell death (PCD). In fact, superoxide has been implicated in PCD in the nitrogen-fixing diazotroph Trichodesmium, presumably leading to the demise of blooms within oligotrophic marine systems. Here, we explore the rates of superoxide production and decay by natural Trichodesmium populations obtained from various surface waters in the Sargasso Sea. We investigate also the role of light and colony density and morphology (puff v. raft) on superoxide fluxes. We find that Trichodesmium colonies produce extracellular superoxide at extremely high rates in the dark that are on par with those of the toxic raphidophyte Chattonella. The rates of superoxide production, however, rapidly decline with increasing cell density pointing to a role for superoxide in cell signaling in these organisms. We also find extremely rapid extracellular superoxide degradation by Trichodesmium. Together, this likely reflects a need for these organisms to maintain ROS at levels that will support signaling but below the threshold level that triggers PCD or oxidative damage. We also show differences in the effect of light on superoxide fluxes as a function of Trichodesmium colony morphology, suggesting differences in either colony physiology or associated bacterial symbionts. These findings point to complex physiological, ecological, and physical influences on ROS dynamics in phytoplankton that require further exploration.

  10. Interleukin 3 perfusion in W/Wv mice allows the development of macroscopic hematopoietic spleen colonies and restores cutaneous mast cell number

    SciTech Connect

    Ody, C.; Kindler, V.; Vassalli, P. )

    1990-07-01

    The genetically anemic W/Wv mice are characterized by the inability of their bone marrow cells to form macroscopic pluripotent hematopoietic colonies in the spleen of irradiated recipients upon transfer (colony-forming units). Furthermore, they almost totally lack mast cells, notably in the skin. In the present study, we have tested the effect of recombinant murine interleukin 3 (rmIL-3) on W/Wv mice hematopoiesis. Transfer of W/Wv bone marrow cells into lethally irradiated recipients perfused with rmIL-3 is followed by the appearance of macroscopic spleen colonies. Moreover, perfusion of rmIL-3 in W/Wv mice: (a) restores almost normal total numbers of hematopoietic precursors (colony-forming cells), but without modification of anemia; and (b) leads to the appearance of a normal number of mastocytes in the skin.

  11. Overexpression of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor induces pulmonary granulation tissue formation and fibrosis by induction of transforming growth factor-beta 1 and myofibroblast accumulation.

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Z.; Tremblay, G. M.; Sime, P. J.; Gauldie, J.

    1997-01-01

    We have previously reported that transfer to rat lung of the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) gene leads to high expression of GM-CSF between days 1 and 4 and granulation tissue formation followed by an irreversible fibrotic response starting from day 12 onward. In the current study, we investigated the underlying mechanisms. We found that GM-CSF overexpression did not enhance production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha in a significant manner at any time after GM-CSF gene transfer. However, the content of transforming growth factor-beta 1 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was markedly induced at day 4 and appeared to be maximal around day 7 and remained high at day 12. Macrophages purified from bronchoalveolar lavage fluid 7 days after GM-CSF gene transfer spontaneously released significant quantities of transforming growth factor-beta 1 protein in vitro. After peak transforming growth factor-beta 1 production was the emergence of alpha-smooth muscle actin-rich myofibroblasts. Accumulation of these cells was most prominent at day 12 within the granulation tissues and they were still present in fibrotic areas between days 12 and 24 and diminished markedly afterward. Thus, we provide the first in vivo evidence that tumor necrosis factor-alpha may be dissociated from participation in a fibrotic process in the lung and GM-CSF may play a more direct role in pulmonary fibrogenesis at least in part through its capability to induce transforming growth factor-beta 1 in macrophages and the subsequent emergence of myofibroblast phenotypes. This GM-CSF transgene lung model is useful for a stepwise dissection of both cellular and molecular events involved in pulmonary fibrosis. Images Figure 2 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9006322

  12. Colonial America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Web Feet K-8, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Presents resources for grades K-8, on the subject of Colonial America. Describes Web sites; CD-ROMs and software; videos; books; audios; magazines; and professional resources. Includes two articles, "Native Americans in the Colonies," and "The Golden Age of Pirates," which also highlight resources. Presents a Web activity focusing on daily life in…

  13. Cooperatively Generated Stresslet Flows Supply Fresh Fluid to Multicellular Choanoflagellate Colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roper, Marcus; Dayel, Mark J.; Pepper, Rachel E.; Koehl, M. A. R.

    2013-05-01

    The flagellated protozoan Salpingoeca rosetta is one of the closest relatives of multicellular animals. Unicellular S. rosetta can be induced to form multicellular colonies, but colonies swim more slowly than individual cells so the advantages conferred by colony formation are uncertain. Here we use theoretical models to show that hydrodynamic cooperation between cells can increase the fluid supply to the colony, an important predictor of feeding rate. Our results suggest that hydrodynamic benefits may have been an important selective factor in the evolution of early multicellular animals.

  14. Colony Size of Phaeocystis Antarctica (Prymnesiophyceae) as Influenced by Zooplankton Grazers

    EPA Science Inventory

    The haptophyte Phaeocystis antarctica is a dominant phytoplankton species in the Ross Sea, Antarctica, and exists as solitary cells and mucilaginous colonies that differ by several orders of magnitude in size. Recent studies with P. globosa suggested that colony formation and enl...

  15. Dynamic scaling analysis of two-dimensional cell colony fronts in a gel medium: a biological system approaching a quenched Kardar-Parisi-Zhang universality.

    PubMed

    Huergo, M A C; Muzzio, N E; Pasquale, M A; Pedro González, P H; Bolzán, A E; Arvia, A J

    2014-08-01

    The interfacial two-dimensional spreading dynamics of quasilinear Vero cell colony fronts in methylcellulose (MC)-containing culture medium, under a constant average front displacement velocity regime, was investigated. Under comparable experimental conditions, the average colony front displacement velocity becomes lower than that reported for a standard culture medium. Initially, the presence of MC in the medium hinders both the colony spreading, due to a gradual change in the average size and shape of cells and their distribution in the colony, and the cell motility in the gelled medium. Furthermore, at longer culture times enlarged cells appear at random in the border region of the colony. These cells behave as obstacles (pinning sites) for the displacement of smaller cells towards the colony front. The dynamic scaling analysis of rough fronts yields the set of exponents α=0.63±0.04,β=0.75±0.05, and z=0.84±0.05, which is close to that expected for a quenched Kardar-Parisi-Zhang model. PMID:25215757

  16. Dynamic scaling analysis of two-dimensional cell colony fronts in a gel medium: A biological system approaching a quenched Kardar-Parisi-Zhang universality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huergo, M. A. C.; Muzzio, N. E.; Pasquale, M. A.; González, P. H. Pedro; Bolzán, A. E.; Arvia, A. J.

    2014-08-01

    The interfacial two-dimensional spreading dynamics of quasilinear Vero cell colony fronts in methylcellulose (MC)-containing culture medium, under a constant average front displacement velocity regime, was investigated. Under comparable experimental conditions, the average colony front displacement velocity becomes lower than that reported for a standard culture medium. Initially, the presence of MC in the medium hinders both the colony spreading, due to a gradual change in the average size and shape of cells and their distribution in the colony, and the cell motility in the gelled medium. Furthermore, at longer culture times enlarged cells appear at random in the border region of the colony. These cells behave as obstacles (pinning sites) for the displacement of smaller cells towards the colony front. The dynamic scaling analysis of rough fronts yields the set of exponents α =0.63±0.04,β =0.75±0.05, and z =0.84±0.05, which is close to that expected for a quenched Kardar-Parisi-Zhang model.

  17. Growing Yeast into Cylindrical Colonies

    PubMed Central

    Vulin, Clément; Di Meglio, Jean-Marc; Lindner, Ariel B.; Daerr, Adrian; Murray, Andrew; Hersen, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    Microorganisms often form complex multicellular assemblies such as biofilms and colonies. Understanding the interplay between assembly expansion, metabolic yield, and nutrient diffusion within a freely growing colony remains a challenge. Most available data on microorganisms are from planktonic cultures, due to the lack of experimental tools to control the growth of multicellular assemblies. Here, we propose a method to constrain the growth of yeast colonies into simple geometric shapes such as cylinders. To this end, we designed a simple, versatile culture system to control the location of nutrient delivery below a growing colony. Under such culture conditions, yeast colonies grow vertically and only at the locations where nutrients are delivered. Colonies increase in height at a steady growth rate that is inversely proportional to the cylinder radius. We show that the vertical growth rate of cylindrical colonies is not defined by the single-cell division rate, but rather by the colony metabolic yield. This contrasts with cells in liquid culture, in which the single-cell division rate is the only parameter that defines the population growth rate. This method also provides a direct, simple method to estimate the metabolic yield of a colony. Our study further demonstrates the importance of the shape of colonies on setting their expansion. We anticipate that our approach will be a starting point for elaborate studies of the population dynamics, evolution, and ecology of microbial colonies in complex landscapes. PMID:24853750

  18. Information use in colonial living.

    PubMed

    Evans, Julian C; Votier, Stephen C; Dall, Sasha R X

    2016-08-01

    Despite the fact that many animals live in groups, there is still no clear consensus about the ecological or evolutionary mechanisms underlying colonial living. Recently, research has suggested that colonies may be important as sources of social information. The ready availability of information from conspecifics allows animals to make better decisions about avoiding predators, reducing brood parasitism, migratory phenology, mate choice, habitat choice and foraging. These choices can play a large part in the development and maintenance of colonies. Here we review the types of information provided by colonial animals and examine the different ways in which decision-making in colonies can be enhanced by social information. We discuss what roles information might take in the evolution, formation and maintenance of colonies. In the process, we illustrate that information use permeates all aspects of colonial living. PMID:25882618

  19. Direct formate fuel cells: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, L.; Chen, R.

    2016-07-01

    Direct formate fuel cells (DFFC), which convert the chemical energy stored in formate directly into electricity, are recently attracting more attention, primarily because of the use of the carbon-neutral fuel and the low-cost electrocatalytic and membrane materials. As an emerging energy technology, the DFFC has made a rapid progress in recent years (currently, the state-of-the-art power density is 591 mW cm-2 at 60 °C). This article provides a review of past research on the development of this type of fuel cell, including the working principle, mechanisms and materials of the electrocatalytic oxidation of formate, singe-cell designs and performance, as well as innovative system designs. In addition, future perspectives with regard to the development of this fuel cell system are also highlighted.

  20. Human endothelial colony-forming cells serve as trophic mediators for mesenchymal stem cell engraftment via paracrine signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ruei-Zeng; Moreno-Luna, Rafael; Li, Dan; Jaminet, Shou-Ching; Greene, Arin K.; Melero-Martin, Juan M.

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) are endothelial precursors that circulate in peripheral blood. Studies have demonstrated that human ECFCs have robust vasculogenic properties. However, whether ECFCs can exert trophic functions in support of specific stem cells in vivo remains largely unknown. Here, we sought to determine whether human ECFCs can function as paracrine mediators before the establishment of blood perfusion. We used two xenograft models of human mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) transplantation and studied how the presence of ECFCs modulates MSC engraftment and regenerative capacity in vivo. Human MSCs were isolated from white adipose tissue and bone marrow aspirates and were s.c. implanted into immunodeficient mice in the presence or absence of cord blood-derived ECFCs. MSC engraftment was regulated by ECFC-derived paracrine factors via platelet-derived growth factor BB (PDGF-BB)/platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR)-β signaling. Cotransplanting ECFCs significantly enhanced MSC engraftment by reducing early apoptosis and preserving stemness-related properties of PDGFR-β+ MSCs, including the ability to repopulate secondary grafts. MSC engraftment was negligible in the absence of ECFCs and completely impaired in the presence of Tyrphostin AG1296, an inhibitor of PDGFR kinase. Additionally, transplanted MSCs displayed fate-restricted potential in vivo, with adipose tissue-derived and bone marrow-derived MSCs contributing exclusive differentiation along adipogenic and osteogenic lineages, respectively. This work demonstrates that blood-derived ECFCs can serve as paracrine mediators and regulate the regenerative potential of MSCs via PDGF-BB/PDGFR-β signaling. Our data suggest the systematic use of ECFCs as a means to improve MSC transplantation. PMID:24982174

  1. Diatom Cell Size, Coloniality and Motility: Trade-Offs between Temperature, Salinity and Nutrient Supply with Climate Change

    PubMed Central

    Svensson, Filip; Norberg, Jon; Snoeijs, Pauline

    2014-01-01

    Reduction in body size has been proposed as a universal response of organisms, both to warming and to decreased salinity. However, it is still controversial if size reduction is caused by temperature or salinity on their own, or if other factors interfere as well. We used natural benthic diatom communities to explore how “body size” (cells and colonies) and motility change along temperature (2–26°C) and salinity (0.5–7.8) gradients in the brackish Baltic Sea. Fourth-corner analysis confirmed that small cell and colony sizes were associated with high temperature in summer. Average community cell volume decreased linearly with 2.2% per °C. However, cells were larger with artificial warming when nutrient concentrations were high in the cold season. Average community cell volume increased by 5.2% per °C of artificial warming from 0 to 8.5°C and simultaneously there was a selection for motility, which probably helped to optimize growth rates by trade-offs between nutrient supply and irradiation. Along the Baltic Sea salinity gradient cell size decreased with decreasing salinity, apparently mediated by nutrient stoichiometry. Altogether, our results suggest that climate change in this century may polarize seasonality by creating two new niches, with elevated temperature at high nutrient concentrations in the cold season (increasing cell size) and elevated temperature at low nutrient concentrations in the warm season (decreasing cell size). Higher temperature in summer and lower salinity by increased land-runoff are expected to decrease the average cell size of primary producers, which is likely to affect the transfer of energy to higher trophic levels. PMID:25279720

  2. Bone marrow cell mobilization by the systemic use of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (GCSF) improves wound bed preparation.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Satori; Lin, Xiaofeng; Ramirez, Ron; Carson, Polly; Fiore, David; Goodrich, Jane; Yufit, Tatyana; Falanga, Vincent

    2013-12-01

    Innovative approaches are needed to accelerate the healing of human chronic wounds not responding to conventional therapies. An evolving and promising treatment is the use of stem cells. Our group has previously described the use of expanded (in vitro) autologous stem cells aspirated from human bone marrow and applied topically in a fibrin spray to human acute and chronic wounds. More recently, we have sought ways to mobilize stem cells directly from the bone marrow, without in vitro expansion. In this report, we show that systemic injections of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (GCSF) can mobilize stem cells from bone marrow into the peripheral blood and then to the wound site. Our objectives were to optimize parameters for this method by using mouse models and proof of principle in a human chronic wound situation. Mice were injected for 5 days with 2 different formulations of GCSF and compared to control saline. To monitor stem cell mobilization, flow cytometric measurements of Sca-1 and c-Kit and colony-forming cell assays were performed. Full-thickness tail wounds in mice were created and monitored for healing, and polyvinyl alcohol sponges were implanted dorsally to assess collagen accumulation. To determine bone marrow stem cell homing to the wound site, chimeric mice transplanted with Green Fluorescent Protein bone marrow cells were scanned by live imaging. Additionally, as proof of principle, we tested the systemic GCSF approach in a patient with a nonhealing venous ulcer. Our findings lay the ground work and indicate that the systemic administration of GCSF is effective in mobilizing bone marrow stem cells into the peripheral blood and to the wound site. These findings are associated with an increased accumulation of collagen and promising results in terms of wound bed preparation and healing. PMID:24275756

  3. Mast cells mediate malignant pleural effusion formation

    PubMed Central

    Giannou, Anastasios D.; Marazioti, Antonia; Spella, Magda; Kanellakis, Nikolaos I.; Apostolopoulou, Hara; Psallidas, Ioannis; Prijovich, Zeljko M.; Vreka, Malamati; Zazara, Dimitra E.; Lilis, Ioannis; Papaleonidopoulos, Vassilios; Kairi, Chrysoula A.; Patmanidi, Alexandra L.; Giopanou, Ioanna; Spiropoulou, Nikolitsa; Harokopos, Vaggelis; Aidinis, Vassilis; Spyratos, Dionisios; Teliousi, Stamatia; Papadaki, Helen; Taraviras, Stavros; Snyder, Linda A.; Eickelberg, Oliver; Kardamakis, Dimitrios; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Feyerabend, Thorsten B.; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer; Kalomenidis, Ioannis; Blackwell, Timothy S.; Agalioti, Theodora; Stathopoulos, Georgios T.

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) have been identified in various tumors; however, the role of these cells in tumorigenesis remains controversial. Here, we quantified MCs in human and murine malignant pleural effusions (MPEs) and evaluated the fate and function of these cells in MPE development. Evaluation of murine MPE-competent lung and colon adenocarcinomas revealed that these tumors actively attract and subsequently degranulate MCs in the pleural space by elaborating CCL2 and osteopontin. MCs were required for effusion development, as MPEs did not form in mice lacking MCs, and pleural infusion of MCs with MPE-incompetent cells promoted MPE formation. Once homed to the pleural space, MCs released tryptase AB1 and IL-1β, which in turn induced pleural vasculature leakiness and triggered NF-κB activation in pleural tumor cells, thereby fostering pleural fluid accumulation and tumor growth. Evaluation of human effusions revealed that MCs are elevated in MPEs compared with benign effusions. Moreover, MC abundance correlated with MPE formation in a human cancer cell–induced effusion model. Treatment of mice with the c-KIT inhibitor imatinib mesylate limited effusion precipitation by mouse and human adenocarcinoma cells. Together, the results of this study indicate that MCs are required for MPE formation and suggest that MC-dependent effusion formation is therapeutically addressable. PMID:25915587

  4. Influence of receptor activator of nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB ligand (RANKL), macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) and fetal calf serum on human osteoclast formation and activity.

    PubMed

    Kreja, Ludwika; Liedert, Astrid; Schmidt, Carla; Claes, Lutz; Ignatius, Anita

    2007-10-01

    Human osteoclast (OC) formation and activity was studied in cultures of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNC) from six healthy donors after stimulation with fetal calf serum (FCS), under the influence of the receptor activator of nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB ligand (RANKL) and the macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF). The results showed that selected FCS could stimulate OC formation without any medium supplementation with osteoclastogenic factors. The OC formation, investigated by quantification of multinucleated tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive cells (TRAP+ cells), and the sensitivity of OC progenitors to RANKL and M-CSF, varied widely between individual donors. The OC resorption activity, measured in the "pit-assay" on dentine, was strictly dependent on the presence of RANKL and M-CSF in the medium and was also donor dependent. The considerable donor variability should be considered in culture studies investigating, e.g. the interactions of OC with biomaterials or the influence of cytokines, growth factors and drugs on osteoclastogenesis. PMID:18161075

  5. Hormonal regulation of secondary cell wall formation.

    PubMed

    Didi, Vojtěch; Jackson, Phil; Hejátko, Jan

    2015-08-01

    Secondary cell walls (SCWs) have critical functional importance but also constitute a high proportion of the plant biomass and have high application potential. This is true mainly for the lignocellulosic constituents of the SCWs in xylem vessels and fibres, which form a structured layer between the plasma membrane and the primary cell wall (PCW). Specific patterning of the SCW thickenings contributes to the mechanical properties of the different xylem cell types, providing the plant with mechanical support and facilitating the transport of solutes via vessels. In the last decade, our knowledge of the basic molecular mechanisms controlling SCW formation has increased substantially. Several members of the multi-layered regulatory cascade participating in the initiation and transcriptional regulation of SCW formation have been described, and the first cellular components determining the pattern of SCW at the subcellular resolution are being uncovered. The essential regulatory role of phytohormones in xylem development is well known and the molecular mechanisms that link hormonal signals to SCW formation are emerging. Here, we review recent knowledge about the role of individual plant hormones and hormonal crosstalk in the control over the regulatory cascades guiding SCW formation and patterning. Based on the analogy between many of the mechanisms operating during PCW and SCW formation, recently identified mechanisms underlying the hormonal control of PCW remodelling are discussed as potentially novel mechanisms mediating hormonal regulatory inputs in SCW formation. PMID:26002972

  6. OpenCFU, a New Free and Open-Source Software to Count Cell Colonies and Other Circular Objects

    PubMed Central

    Geissmann, Quentin

    2013-01-01

    Counting circular objects such as cell colonies is an important source of information for biologists. Although this task is often time-consuming and subjective, it is still predominantly performed manually. The aim of the present work is to provide a new tool to enumerate circular objects from digital pictures and video streams. Here, I demonstrate that the created program, OpenCFU, is very robust, accurate and fast. In addition, it provides control over the processing parameters and is implemented in an intuitive and modern interface. OpenCFU is a cross-platform and open-source software freely available at http://opencfu.sourceforge.net. PMID:23457446

  7. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide induces osteoclast formation in RAW 264.7 macrophage cells

    SciTech Connect

    Islam, Shamima; Hassan, Ferdaus; Tumurkhuu, Gantsetseg; Dagvadorj, Jargalsaikhan; Koide, Naoki; Naiki, Yoshikazu; Mori, Isamu; Yoshida, Tomoaki; Yokochi, Takashi . E-mail: yokochi@aichi-med-u.ac.jp

    2007-08-24

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a potent bone resorbing factor. The effect of LPS on osteoclast formation was examined by using murine RAW 264.7 macrophage cells. LPS-induced the formation of multinucleated giant cells (MGC) in RAW 264.7 cells 3 days after the exposure. MGCs were positive for tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) activity. Further, MGC formed resorption pits on calcium-phosphate thin film that is a substrate for osteoclasts. Therefore, LPS was suggested to induce osteoclast formation in RAW 264.7 cells. LPS-induced osteoclast formation was abolished by anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha} antibody, but not antibodies to macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) and receptor activator of nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B ligand (RANKL). TNF-{alpha} might play a critical role in LPS-induced osteoclast formation in RAW 264.7 cells. Inhibitors of NF-{kappa}B and stress activated protein kinase (SAPK/JNK) prevented the LPS-induced osteoclast formation. The detailed mechanism of LPS-induced osteoclast formation is discussed.

  8. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor reprograms bone marrow stromal cells to actively suppress B lymphopoiesis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Day, Ryan B.; Bhattacharya, Deepta; Nagasawa, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms that mediate the shift from lymphopoiesis to myelopoiesis in response to infectious stress are largely unknown. We show that treatment with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), which is often induced during infection, results in marked suppression of B lymphopoiesis at multiple stages of B-cell development. Mesenchymal-lineage stromal cells in the bone marrow, including CXCL12-abundant reticular (CAR) cells and osteoblasts, constitutively support B lymphopoiesis through the production of multiple B trophic factors. G-CSF acting through a monocytic cell intermediate reprograms these stromal cells, altering their capacity to support B lymphopoiesis. G-CSF treatment is associated with an expansion of CAR cells and a shift toward osteogenic lineage commitment. It markedly suppresses the production of multiple B-cell trophic factors by CAR cells and osteoblasts, including CXCL12, kit ligand, interleukin-6, interleukin-7, and insulin-like growth factor-1. Targeting bone marrow stromal cells is one mechanism by which inflammatory cytokines such as G-CSF actively suppress lymphopoiesis. PMID:25814527

  9. Commensal Microbiota and CD8+ T Cells Shape the Formation of Invariant NKT Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Bo; Wingender, Gerhard; Fujiwara, Daisuke; Chen, Diana YuHui; McPherson, Michael; Brewer, Sarah; Borneman, James; Kronenberg, Mitchell; Braun, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Commensal bacteria play an important role in formation of the immune system, but the mechanisms involved are incompletely understood. In this study, we analyze CD1d-restricted invariant NKT (iNKT) cells in germfree mice and in two colonies of C57BL/6 mice termed conventional flora and restricted flora (RF), stably bearing commensal microbial communities of diverse but distinct composition. In germfree mice, iNKT cells were moderately reduced, suggesting that commensal microbiota were partially required for the antigenic drive in maintaining systemic iNKT cells. Surprisingly, even greater depletion of iNKT cell population occurred in RF mice. This was in part attributable to reduced RF levels of intestinal microbial taxa (Sphingomonas spp.) known to express antigenic glycosphingolipid products. However, memory and activated CD8+ T cells were also expanded in RF mice, prompting us to test whether CD8+ T cell activity might be further depleting iNKT cells. Indeed, iNKT cell numbers were restored in RF mice bearing the CD8α−/− genotype or in adult wild-type RF mice acutely depleted with anti-CD8 Ab. Moreover, iNKT cells were restored in RF mice bearing the Prf1−/− phenotype, a key component of cytolytic function. These findings indicate that commensal microbiota, through positive (antigenic drive) and negative (cytolytic depletion by CD8+ T cells) mechanisms, profoundly shape the iNKT cell compartment. Because individuals greatly vary in the composition of their microbial communities, enteric microbiota may play an important epigenetic role in the striking differences in iNKT cell abundance in humans and therefore in their potential contribution to host immune status. PMID:20048124

  10. A hypothesis of target cell formation in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Wong, P

    2016-08-01

    A fraction of erythrocytes appear as target cells in stained blood smears in sickle cell disease, due to a inheritance of the hemoglobin variant Hb S, polymerizing upon deoxygenation. These cells appear in a three dimension as thin cups. A process of their formation in this disease is proposed based on a band 3-based mechanism of the erythrocyte shape control, able to explain the erythrocyte echinocytosis by glucose depletion. It indicates that their formation is due to a stomatocytogenic slow outward transport of the dibasic form of endogenous Pi with an H(+) by band 3, promoted by the decrease of the Donnan ratio, which decreases cell pH and volume, attributed by a decrease of cell KCl concentration by the higher efflux of K(+)Cl(-) cotransport and Ca(2+) activation of the Gardos channel. Its implications are briefly discussed with respect to target cells per se, target cell formation in other hemoglobinopathies, acquired and inherited disorders of the lipid metabolism and dehydrated hereditary stomatocytosis as well as a stomatocyte presence in a double heterozygote of Hb S and Hb C and of an involvement of the process of target cell formation in acanthocytosis in acquired and inherited disorders. PMID:27372866

  11. Microfluidic Capture of Endothelial Colony-Forming Cells from Human Adult Peripheral Blood: Phenotypic and Functional Validation In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ruei-Zeng; Hatch, Adam; Antontsev, Victor G.; Murthy, Shashi K.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) are endothelial progenitors that circulate in peripheral blood and are currently the subject of intensive investigation due to their therapeutic potential. However, in adults, ECFCs comprise a very small subset among circulating cells, which makes their isolation a challenge. Materials and Methods: Currently, the standard method for ECFC isolation relies on the separation of mononuclear cells and erythrocyte lysis, steps that are time consuming and known to increase cell loss. Alternatively, we previously developed a novel disposable microfluidic platform containing antibody-functionalized degradable hydrogel coatings that is ideally suited for capturing low-abundance circulating cells from unprocessed blood. In this study, we reasoned that this microfluidic approach could effectively isolate rare ECFCs by virtue of their CD34 expression. Results: We conducted preclinical experiments with peripheral blood from four adult volunteers and demonstrated that the actual microfluidic capture of circulating CD34+ cells from unprocessed blood was compatible with the subsequent differentiation of these cells into ECFCs. Moreover, the ECFC yield obtained with the microfluidic system was comparable to that of the standard method. Importantly, we unequivocally validated the phenotypical and functional properties of the captured ECFCs, including the ability to form microvascular networks following transplantation into immunodeficient mice. Discussion: We showed that the simplicity and versatility of our microfluidic system could be very instrumental for ECFC isolation while preserving their therapeutic potential. We anticipate our results will facilitate additional development of clinically suitable microfluidic devices by the vascular therapeutic and diagnostic industry. PMID:25091645

  12. Granulocyte–Colony Stimulating Factor Promotes Liver Repair and Induces Oval Cell Migration and Proliferation in Rats

    PubMed Central

    PISCAGLIA, ANNA C.; SHUPE, THOMAS D.; OH, SEH–HOON; GASBARRINI, ANTONIO; PETERSEN, BRYON E.

    2011-01-01

    Background & Aims Hepatic regeneration is a heterogeneous phenomenon involving several cell populations. Oval cells are considered liver stem cells, a portion of which derive from bone marrow (BM). Recent studies have shown that granulocyte–colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) may be effective in facilitating liver repair. However, it remains unclear if G-CSF acts by mobilizing BM cells, or if it acts locally within the liver microenvironment to facilitate the endogenous restoration program. In the present study, we assessed the involvement of G-CSF during oval cell activation. Methods Dipeptidyl-peptidase-IV–deficient female rats received BM transplants from wild-type male donors. Four weeks later, rats were subjected to the 2-acetylaminofluorene/partial hepatectomy model of oval cell–mediated liver regeneration, followed by administration of either nonpegylated G-CSF or pegylated G-CSF. Control animals did not receive further treatments after surgery. The magnitude of oval cell reaction, the entity of BM contribution to liver repopulation, as well as the G-CSF/G-CSF–receptor expression levels were evaluated. In addition, in vitro proliferation and migration assays were performed on freshly isolated oval cells. Results Oval cells were found to express G-CSF receptor and G-CSF was produced within the regenerating liver. G-CSF administration significantly increased both the magnitude of the oval cell reaction, and the contribution of BM to liver repair. Finally, G-CSF acted as a chemoattractant and a mitogen for oval cells in vitro. Conclusions We have shown that G-CSF facilitates hepatic regeneration by increasing the migration of BM-derived progenitors to the liver, as well as enhancing the endogenous oval cell reaction. PMID:17681181

  13. Expression of human granulocyte colony stimulating factor (hG-CSF) in colon adenocarcinoma cell line (Caco-2).

    PubMed

    Jana, Snehasis; Patel, Hitesh

    2012-10-01

    Growth and progression of many cancer cells are mediated by alterations in the microenvironment often caused by an aberrant expression of growth factors and receptors. There is no report on expression of growth factor granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in the experimental model, colon adenocarcinoma cell line (Caco2), that is commonly used in drug permeability assays. We hypothesize that in vitro, the Caco2 model is associated with a constitutive neo-expression of the hematopoietic G-CSF thereby causing an autocrine stimulation of Caco2 growth and proliferation in vitro. To test our hypothesis, we analyzed mRNA and protein expression of G-CSF in Caco2 cells using reverse transcriptase-PCR and SDS-PAGE. G-CSF mRNA and protein were detected in Caco2 cells. Expression of G-CSF protein was similar at different passages of this cell line. The expression of G-CSF has a significant role in the autocrine regulation of Caco2 cell growth and proliferation. PMID:22714276

  14. Solar cell contact formation using laser ablation

    DOEpatents

    Harley, Gabriel; Smith, David D.; Cousins, Peter John

    2014-07-22

    The formation of solar cell contacts using a laser is described. A method of fabricating a back-contact solar cell includes forming a poly-crystalline material layer above a single-crystalline substrate. The method also includes forming a dielectric material stack above the poly-crystalline material layer. The method also includes forming, by laser ablation, a plurality of contacts holes in the dielectric material stack, each of the contact holes exposing a portion of the poly-crystalline materiat layer; and forming conductive contacts in the plurality of contact holes.

  15. Solar cell contact formation using laser ablation

    DOEpatents

    Harley, Gabriel; Smith, David D.; Cousins, Peter John

    2015-07-21

    The formation of solar cell contacts using a laser is described. A method of fabricating a back-contact solar cell includes forming a poly-crystalline material layer above a single-crystalline substrate. The method also includes forming a dielectric material stack above the poly-crystalline material layer. The method also includes forming, by laser ablation, a plurality of contacts holes in the dielectric material stack, each of the contact holes exposing a portion of the poly-crystalline material layer; and forming conductive contacts in the plurality of contact holes.

  16. Solar cell contact formation using laser ablation

    DOEpatents

    Harley, Gabriel; Smith, David; Cousins, Peter

    2012-12-04

    The formation of solar cell contacts using a laser is described. A method of fabricating a back-contact solar cell includes forming a poly-crystalline material layer above a single-crystalline substrate. The method also includes forming a dielectric material stack above the poly-crystalline material layer. The method also includes forming, by laser ablation, a plurality of contacts holes in the dielectric material stack, each of the contact holes exposing a portion of the poly-crystalline material layer; and forming conductive contacts in the plurality of contact holes.

  17. Intravenous Administration of Endothelial Colony-Forming Cells Overexpressing Integrin β1 Augments Angiogenesis in Ischemic Legs.

    PubMed

    Goto, Kazuko; Takemura, Genzou; Takahashi, Tomoyuki; Okada, Hideshi; Kanamori, Hiromitsu; Kawamura, Itta; Watanabe, Takatomo; Morishita, Kentaro; Tsujimoto, Akiko; Miyazaki, Nagisa; Ushikoshi, Hiroaki; Kawasaki, Masanori; Mikami, Atsushi; Kosai, Ken-ichiro; Minatoguchi, Shinya

    2016-02-01

    When injected directly into ischemic tissue in patients with peripheral artery disease, the reparative capacity of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) appears to be limited by their poor survival. We, therefore, attempted to improve the survival of transplanted EPCs through intravenous injection and gene modification. We anticipated that overexpression of integrin β1 will enable injected EPCs to home to ischemic tissue, which abundantly express extracellular matrix proteins, the ligands for integrins. In addition, integrin β1 has an independent angiogenesis-stimulating function. Human endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs; late-outgrowth EPCs) were transduced using a lentiviral vector encoding integrin β1 (ITGB1) or enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP). We then locally or systemically injected phosphate-buffered saline or the genetically modified ECFCs (GFP-ECFCs or ITGB1-ECFCs; 1 × 10(5) cells each) into NOD/Shi-scid, IL-2Rγnull mice whose right femoral arteries had been occluded 24 hours earlier. Upregulation of extracellular matrix proteins, including fibronectin, was apparent in the ischemic legs. Four weeks later, blood perfusion of the ischemic limb was significantly augmented only in the ITGB1-ECFC group. Scanning electron microscopy of vascular casts revealed increases in the perfused blood vessels in the ischemic legs of mice in the ITGB1-ECFC group and significant increases in the density of both capillaries and arterioles. Transplanted ECFC-derived vessels accounted for 28% ± 4.2% of the vessels in the ITGB1-ECFC group, with no cell fusion. Intravenous administration of ECFCs engineered to home to ischemic tissue appears to efficiently mediate therapeutic angiogenesis in a mouse model of peripheral artery disease. Significance: The intravenous administration of endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) genetically modified to overexpress integrin β1 effectively stimulated angiogenesis in ischemic mouse hindlimbs. Transplanted ECFCs were

  18. Coupled Positive and Negative Feedbacks Produce Diverse Gene Expression Patterns in Colonies

    PubMed Central

    Mitarai, Namiko; Jensen, Mogens Høgh

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Formation of patterns is a common feature in the development of multicellular organism as well as of microbial communities. To investigate the formation of gene expression patterns in colonies, we build a mathematical model of two-dimensional colony growth, where cells carry a coupled positive-and-negative-feedback circuit. We demonstrate that the model can produce sectored, target (concentric), uniform, and scattered expression patterns of regulators, depending on gene expression dynamics and nutrient diffusion. We reconstructed the same regulatory structure in Escherichia coli cells and found gene expression patterns on the surface of colonies similar to the ones produced by the computer simulations. By comparing computer simulations and experimental results, we observed that very simple rules of gene expression can yield a spectrum of well-defined patterns in a growing colony. Our results suggest that variations of the protein content among cells lead to a high level of heterogeneity in colonies. Importance Formation of patterns is a common feature in the development of microbial communities. In this work, we show that a simple genetic circuit composed of a positive-feedback loop and a negative-feedback loop can produce diverse expression patterns in colonies. We obtained similar sets of gene expression patterns in the simulations and in the experiments. Because the combination of positive feedback and negative feedback is common in intracellular molecular networks, our results suggest that the protein content of cells is highly diversified in colonies. PMID:25852158

  19. Colony Polymerase Chain Reaction with Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Murray, Johanne M; Watson, Adam T; Carr, Antony M

    2016-01-01

    When screening a large number of individual Schizosaccharomyces pombe strains by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), a rapid "colony PCR" approach may be used. Numerous colony PCR protocols are available, and fundamental to them all is that the colony must be fresh (grown overnight) and that as few cells as possible are used. In this protocol, we present three reliable methods for preparing S. pombe cells for colony PCR. PMID:27140919

  20. Collagen-IV supported embryoid bodies formation and differentiation from buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) embryonic stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Taru Sharma, G.; Dubey, Pawan K.; Verma, Om Prakash; Pratheesh, M.D.; Nath, Amar; Sai Kumar, G.

    2012-08-03

    Graphical abstract: EBs formation, characterization and expression of germinal layers marker genes of in vivo developed teratoma using four different types of extracellular matrices. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Collagen-IV matrix is found cytocompatible for EBs formation and differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Established 3D microenvironment for ES cells development and differentiation into three germ layers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Collagen-IV may be useful as promising candidate for ES cells based therapeutic applications. -- Abstract: Embryoid bodies (EBs) are used as in vitro model to study early extraembryonic tissue formation and differentiation. In this study, a novel method using three dimensional extracellular matrices for in vitro generation of EBs from buffalo embryonic stem (ES) cells and its differentiation potential by teratoma formation was successfully established. In vitro derived inner cell masses (ICMs) of hatched buffalo blastocyst were cultured on buffalo fetal fibroblast feeder layer for primary cell colony formation. For generation of EBs, pluripotent ES cells were seeded onto four different types of extracellular matrices viz; collagen-IV, laminin, fibronectin and matrigel using undifferentiating ES cell culture medium. After 5 days of culture, ESCs gradually grew into aggregates and formed simple EBs having circular structures. Twenty-six days later, they formed cystic EBs over collagen matrix with higher EBs formation and greater proliferation rate as compared to other extracellular matrices. Studies involving histological observations, fluorescence microscopy and RT-PCR analysis of the in vivo developed teratoma revealed that presence of all the three germ layer derivatives viz. ectoderm (NCAM), mesoderm (Flk-1) and endoderm (AFP). In conclusion, the method described here demonstrates a simple and cost-effective way of generating EBs from buffalo ES cells. Collagen-IV matrix was found cytocompatible as it

  1. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) administration in individuals with sickle cell disease: time for a moratorium?

    PubMed

    Fitzhugh, Courtney D; Hsieh, Matthew M; Bolan, Charles D; Saenz, Carla; Tisdale, John F

    2009-01-01

    Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is used commonly in an attempt to reduce the duration of neutropenia and hospitalization in patients undergoing chemotherapy and to obtain hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) for transplantation applications. Despite the relative safety of administration of G-CSF in most individuals, including subjects with sickle cell trait, severe and life-threatening complications have been reported when used in individuals with sickle cell disease (SCD), including those who were asymptomatic and undiagnosed prior to administration. The administration of G-CSF has now been reported in a total of 11 individuals with SCD. Seven developed severe adverse events, including vaso-occlusive episodes, acute chest syndrome, multi-organ system failure and death. Precautions, including minimizing the peak white blood cell count, dividing or reducing the G-CSF dose and red blood cell transfusions to reduce sickle hemoglobin (HbS) levels, have been employed with no consistent benefit. These reported data indicate that administration of G-CSF in individuals with SCD should be undertaken only in the absence of alternatives and after full disclosure of the risks involved. Unless further data demonstrate safety, routine usage of G-CSF in individuals with SCD should be avoided. PMID:19513902

  2. Studies of chloroplast development in Euglena XV. Factors influencing the decay of photoreactivability of green colony formation.

    PubMed

    Hill, H Z; Schiff, J A; Epstein, H T

    1966-07-01

    When UV-treated cells of Euglena gracilis var. bacillaris are incubated in the dark in a nutrient medium which permits cell division, they lose the ability to be photoreactivated. The rate of this loss increases with the UV dose. For any given UV dose, the rate of decay increases with increasing growth rate. The same phenomena are observed in light-grown and in dark-grown cells, although the sensitivity to UV of the light-grown cells is smaller by a factor of 1.7. The kinetics of photoreactivation (PR) change during the decay of photoreactivability only if the cells are incubated in growth medium. A UV-inactivation curve for cells photoreactivated only after appreciable PR shows the same slope as that for untreated cells (number of UV-sensitive targets). These results are discussed from the point of view of possible models. PMID:19210965

  3. Macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor marks and regulates a fetal myeloid-primed B-cell progenitor in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zriwil, Alya; Böiers, Charlotta; Wittmann, Lilian; Green, Joanna C. A.; Woll, Petter S.; Jacobsen, Sten Eirik W.

    2016-01-01

    Although it is well established that unique B-cell lineages develop through distinct regulatory mechanisms during embryonic development, much less is understood about the differences between embryonic and adult B-cell progenitor cells, likely to underpin the genetics and biology of infant and childhood PreB acute lymphoblastic leukemia (PreB-ALL), initiated by distinct leukemia-initiating translocations during embryonic development. Herein, we establish that a distinct subset of the earliest CD19+ B-cell progenitors emerging in the E13.5 mouse fetal liver express the colony-stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF1R), previously thought to be expressed, and play a lineage-restricted role in development of myeloid lineages, and macrophages in particular. These early embryonic CSF1R+CD19+ ProB cells also express multiple other myeloid genes and, in line with this, possess residual myeloid as well as B-cell, but not T-cell lineage potential. Notably, these CSF1R+ myeloid-primed ProB cells are uniquely present in a narrow window of embryonic fetal liver hematopoiesis and do not persist in adult bone marrow. Moreover, analysis of CSF1R-deficient mice establishes a distinct role of CSF1R in fetal B-lymphopoiesis. CSF1R+ myeloid-primed embryonic ProB cells are relevant for infant and childhood PreB-ALLs, which frequently have a bi-phenotypic B-myeloid phenotype, and in which CSF1R-rearrangements have recently been reported. PMID:27207794

  4. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor impairs CD8(+) T cell functionality by interfering with central activation elements.

    PubMed

    Bunse, C E; Tischer, S; Lahrberg, J; Oelke, M; Figueiredo, C; Blasczyk, R; Eiz-Vesper, B

    2016-07-01

    Besides mobilizing stem cells into the periphery, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) has been shown to influence various types of innate and adaptive immune cells. For example, it impairs the effector function of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). It is assumed that this effect is mediated indirectly by monocytes, regulatory T cells and immunomodulatory cytokines influenced by G-CSF. In this study, isolated G-CSF-treated CD8(+) T cells were stimulated antigen-dependently with peptide-major histocompatibility complex (pMHC)-coupled artificial antigen-presenting cells (aAPCs) or stimulated antigen-independently with anti-CD3/CD28 stimulator beads. By measuring the changes in interferon (IFN)-γ and granzyme B expression at the mRNA and protein level, we showed for the first time that G-CSF has a direct effect on CD8(+) CTLs, which was confirmed based on the reduced production of IFN-γ and granzyme B by the cytotoxic T cell line TALL-104 after G-CSF treatment. By investigating further elements affected by G-CSF in CTLs from stem cell donors and untreated controls, we found a decreased phosphorylation of extracellular-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2, lymphocyte-specific protein tyrosine kinase (Lck) and CD3ζ after G-CSF treatment. Additionally, miRNA-155 and activation marker expression levels were reduced. In summary, our results show that G-CSF directly influences the effector function of cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells and affects various elements of T cell activation. PMID:26990855

  5. Macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor marks and regulates a fetal myeloid-primed B-cell progenitor in mice.

    PubMed

    Zriwil, Alya; Böiers, Charlotta; Wittmann, Lilian; Green, Joanna C A; Woll, Petter S; Jacobsen, Sten Eirik W; Sitnicka, Ewa

    2016-07-14

    Although it is well established that unique B-cell lineages develop through distinct regulatory mechanisms during embryonic development, much less is understood about the differences between embryonic and adult B-cell progenitor cells, likely to underpin the genetics and biology of infant and childhood PreB acute lymphoblastic leukemia (PreB-ALL), initiated by distinct leukemia-initiating translocations during embryonic development. Herein, we establish that a distinct subset of the earliest CD19(+) B-cell progenitors emerging in the E13.5 mouse fetal liver express the colony-stimulating factor-1 receptor (CSF1R), previously thought to be expressed, and play a lineage-restricted role in development of myeloid lineages, and macrophages in particular. These early embryonic CSF1R(+)CD19(+) ProB cells also express multiple other myeloid genes and, in line with this, possess residual myeloid as well as B-cell, but not T-cell lineage potential. Notably, these CSF1R(+) myeloid-primed ProB cells are uniquely present in a narrow window of embryonic fetal liver hematopoiesis and do not persist in adult bone marrow. Moreover, analysis of CSF1R-deficient mice establishes a distinct role of CSF1R in fetal B-lymphopoiesis. CSF1R(+) myeloid-primed embryonic ProB cells are relevant for infant and childhood PreB-ALLs, which frequently have a bi-phenotypic B-myeloid phenotype, and in which CSF1R-rearrangements have recently been reported. PMID:27207794

  6. Giant Cell Arteritis which Developed after the Administration of Granulocyte-colony Stimulating Factor for Cyclic Neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Umeda, Masataka; Ikenaga, Jin; Koga, Tomohiro; Michitsuji, Toru; Shimizu, Toshimasa; Fukui, Shoichi; Nishino, Ayako; Nakasima, Yoshikazu; Kawashiri, Sin-Ya; Iwamoto, Naoki; Ichinose, Kunihiro; Hirai, Yasuko; Tamai, Mami; Nakamura, Hideki; Origuchi, Tomoki; Kawakami, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    A 78-year-old woman diagnosed with cyclic neutropenia 5 years previously had been treated with recombinant granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF). She developed fever, tenderness and distension of temporal arteries after the treatment with G-CSF. Magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography revealed wall thickening of the temporal arteries. She was therefore diagnosed with giant cell arteritis (GCA). Small vessel vasculitis has been reported as a complication of G-CSF. However, the development of large vessel vasculitis after G-CSF treatment is quite rare. To our knowledge, the present case is the first report of GCA suspected to be associated with coexisting cyclic neutropenia and G-CSF treatment. PMID:27523011

  7. Organochlorine formation in magnesium electrowinning cells.

    PubMed

    Deutscher, R L; Cathro, K J

    2001-04-01

    The formation of organochlorines during the electrolytic production of magnesium was investigated using a laboratory-scale electrolytic cell having a graphite anode, a liquid aluminium alloy cathode, and a molten chloride electrolyte. The cell was operated at current densities ranging from 3000 to 10,000 A m(-2) and at temperatures ranging from 660 degrees C to 750 degrees C. Organochlorines were adsorbed from the cell off-gases onto silica gel, extracted with hexane, and determined by gas chromatography. All compounds identified were fully chlorinated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, the major components being hexachlorobutadiene, hexachlorobenzene, hexachloroethylene, and octachlorostyrene. The total amount of organochlorines per tonne of magnesium produced decreased with electrolysis time and with current density and increased with operating temperature; it was also dependent on the type of graphite employed. The output of organochlorines varied from 5 to 20 g t(-1) of magnesium. PMID:11297394

  8. Stromal cell-derived factor-1 enhances pro-angiogenic effect of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yaohong; Shao, Hongwei; Eton, Darwin; Yang, Zhe; Alonso-Diaz, Luis; Zhang, Hongkun; Schulick, Andrew; Livingstone, Alan S.; Yu, Hong

    2008-01-01

    Objective Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) mobilizes bone marrow mononuclear cells into the peripheral circulation. Stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) enhances the homing of progenitor cells mobilized from the bone marrow and augments neovascularization in ischemic tissue. We hypothesize that SDF-1 will boost the pro-angiogenic effect of G-CSF. Methods and results NIH 3T3 cells retrovirally transduced with SDF-1α gene (NIH 3T3/SDF-1) were used to deliver SDF-1 in vitro and in vivo. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) co-cultured with NIH 3T3/SDF-1 cells using cell culture inserts migrated faster and were less apoptotic compared to those not exposed to SDF-1. NIH 3T3/SDF-1 (106 cells) were injected into the ischemic muscles immediately after resection of the left femoral artery and vein of C57BL/6J mice. G-CSF (25 μg/kg/day) was injected intraperitioneally daily for 3 days after surgery. Blood perfusion was examined using a laser Doppler perfusion imaging system. The perfusion ratio of ischemic/non-ischemic limb increased to 0.57±0.03 and 0.50±0.06 with the treatment of either SDF-1 or G-CSF only, respectively, 3 weeks after surgery, which was significantly higher than the saline-injected control group (0.41±0.01, P<0.05). Combined treatment with both SDF-1 and G-CSF resulted in an even better perfusion ratio of 0.69±0.08 (P<0.05 versus the single treatment groups). Mice were sacrificed 21 days after surgery. Immunostaining and Western blot assay of the tissue lysates showed that the injected NIH 3T3/SDF-1 survived and expressed SDF-1. CD34+ cells were detected with immunostaining, capillary density was assessed with alkaline phosphatase staining, and the apoptosis of muscle cells was viewed using an in situ cell death detection kit. More CD34+ cells, increased capillary density, and less apoptotic muscle cells were found in both G-CSF and SDF-1 treated group (P<0.05 versus other groups). Conclusion Combination of G-CSF-mediated progenitor cell

  9. An optimized colony forming assay for low-dose-radiation cell survival measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu J.; Sutherland B.; Hu W.; Ding N.; Ye C.; Usikalu M.; Li S.; Hu B.; Zhou G.

    2011-11-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a simple and reliable method to quantify the cell survival of low-dose irradiations. Two crucial factors were considered, the same number of cells plated in each flask and an appropriate interval between cell plating and irradiation. For the former, we optimized cell harvest with trypsin, diluted cells in one container, and directly seeded cells on the bottom of flasks in a low density before irradiation. Reproducible plating efficiency was obtained. For the latter, we plated cells on the bottom of flasks and then monitored the processing of attachment, cell cycle variations, and the plating efficiency after exposure to 20 cGy of X-rays. The results showed that a period of 4.5 h to 7.5 h after plating was suitable for further treatment. In order to confirm the reliability and feasibility of our method, we also measured the survival curves of these M059K and M059J glioma cell lines by following the optimized protocol and obtained consistent results reported by others with cell sorting system. In conclusion, we successfully developed a reliable and simple way to measure the survival fractions of human cells exposed to low dose irradiation, which might be helpful for the studies on low-dose radiation biology.

  10. Accumulated lipids rather than the rigid cell walls impede the extraction of genetic materials for effective colony PCRs in Chlorella vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Failure of colony PCRs in green microalga Chlorella vulgaris is typically attributed to the difficulty in disrupting its notoriously rigid cell walls for releasing the genetic materials and therefore the development of an effective colony PCR procedure in C. vulgaris presents a challenge. Results Here we identified that colony PCR results were significantly affected by the accumulated lipids rather than the rigid cell walls of C. vulgaris. The higher lipids accumulated in C. vulgaris negatively affects the effective amplification by DNA polymerase. Based on these findings, we established a simple and extremely effective colony PCR procedure in C. vulgaris. By simply pipetting/votexing the pellets of C. vulgaris in 10 ul of either TE (10 mM Tris/1 mM EDTA) or 0.2% SDS buffer at room temperature, followed by the addition of 10 ul of either hexane or Phenol:Chloroform:Isoamyl Alcohol in the same PCR tube for extraction. The resulting aqueous phase was readily PCR-amplified as genomic DNA templates as demonstrated by successful amplification of the nuclear 18S rRNA and the chloroplast rbcL gene. This colony PCR protocol is effective and robust in C. vulgaris and also demonstrates its effectiveness in other Chlorella species. Conclusions The accumulated lipids rather than the rigid cell walls of C. vulgaris significantly impede the extraction of genetic materials and subsequently the effective colony PCRs. The finding has the potential to aid the isolation of high-quality total RNAs and mRNAs for transcriptomic studies in addition to the genomic DNA isolation in Chlorella. PMID:24219401

  11. Glucose induced fractal colony pattern of Bacillus thuringiensis.

    PubMed

    Roy, Manas K; Banerjee, Paromita; Sengupta, Tapas K; Dattagupta, Sushanta

    2010-08-01

    Growing colonies of bacteria on the surface of thin agar plates exhibit fractal patterns as a result of nonlinear response to environmental conditions, such as nutrients, solidity of the agar medium and temperature. Here, we examine the effect of glucose on pattern formation by growing colonies of Bacillus thuringiensis isolate KPWP1. We also present the theoretical modeling of the colony growth of KPWP1 and the associated spatio-temporal patterns. Our experimental results are in excellent agreement with simulations based on a reaction-diffusion model that describes diffusion-limited aggregation and branching, in which individual cells move actively in the periphery, but become immotile in the inner regions of the growing colony. We obtain the Hausdorff fractal dimension of the colony patterns: D(H.Expt)=1.1969 and D(H, R.D.=)1.1965, for experiment and reaction-diffusion model, respectively. Results of our experiments and modeling clearly show how glucose at higher concentration can prove to be inhibitory for motility of growing colonies of B. thuringiensis cells on semisolid support and be responsible for changes in the growth pattern. PMID:20553734

  12. Spontaneous emergence of large-scale cell cycle synchronization in amoeba colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segota, Igor; Boulet, Laurent; Franck, David; Franck, Carl

    2014-06-01

    Unicellular eukaryotic amoebae Dictyostelium discoideum are generally believed to grow in their vegetative state as single cells until starvation, when their collective aspect emerges and they differentiate to form a multicellular slime mold. While major efforts continue to be aimed at their starvation-induced social aspect, our understanding of population dynamics and cell cycle in the vegetative growth phase has remained incomplete. Here we show that cell populations grown on a substrate spontaneously synchronize their cell cycles within several hours. These collective population-wide cell cycle oscillations span millimeter length scales and can be completely suppressed by washing away putative cell-secreted signals, implying signaling by means of a diffusible growth factor or mitogen. These observations give strong evidence for collective proliferation behavior in the vegetative state.

  13. Spontaneous emergence of large-scale cell cycle synchronization in amoeba colonies.

    PubMed

    Segota, Igor; Boulet, Laurent; Franck, David; Franck, Carl

    2014-06-01

    Unicellular eukaryotic amoebae Dictyostelium discoideum are generally believed to grow in their vegetative state as single cells until starvation, when their collective aspect emerges and they differentiate to form a multicellular slime mold. While major efforts continue to be aimed at their starvation-induced social aspect, our understanding of population dynamics and cell cycle in the vegetative growth phase has remained incomplete. Here we show that cell populations grown on a substrate spontaneously synchronize their cell cycles within several hours. These collective population-wide cell cycle oscillations span millimeter length scales and can be completely suppressed by washing away putative cell-secreted signals, implying signaling by means of a diffusible growth factor or mitogen. These observations give strong evidence for collective proliferation behavior in the vegetative state. PMID:24732749

  14. Regulation of surface expression of the granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor in normal human myeloid cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cannistra, S.A.; Groshek, P.; Griffin, J.D. ); Garlick, R.; Miller, J. )

    1990-01-01

    Recombinant human granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) exerts stimulatory effects on hematopoietic cells through binding to specific, high-affinity receptors. By using radiolabeled GM-CSF with high specific activity, the authors have investigated the factors and mechanisms that regulate GM-CSF receptor expression in normal human neutrophils, monocytes, and partially purified bone marrow myeloid progenitor cells. The neutrophil GM-CSF receptor was found to rapidly internalize in the presence of ligand through a mechanism that required endocytosis. Out of a large panel of naturally occurring humoral factors tested, only GM-CSF itself, tumor necrosis factor, and formyl-Met-Leu-Phe were found to down-regulate neutrophil GM-CSF receptor expression after a 2-hr exposure at biologically active concentrations. Since formyl-Met-Leu-Phe is known to stimulate neutrophil protein kinase C activity, they also tested the ability of protein kinase C agonists to modulate GM-CSF receptor expression. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, bryostatin-1, and 1,2-dioctanoylglycerol were found to induce rapid down-regulation of the GM-CSF receptor in neutrophils, monocytes, and partially purified myeloid progenitor cells, suggesting that this effect may be at least partially mediated by protein kinase C. These data suggest that certain activators of neutrophil function may negatively regulate their biological effects by inducing down-regulation of the GM-CSF receptor.

  15. Radioprotection of mice with interleukin-1: Relationship to the number of erythroid and granulocyte-macrophage colony-forming cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, G.N.; Patchen, M.L.; Neta, R.; MacVittie, T.J.

    1990-01-01

    This report presents the results of an investigation of changes in the number of erythroid and granulocyte-macrophage colony forming cells (GM-CFC) that had occurred in tissues of normal B6D2F1 mice 20 h after administration of a radioprotective dose (150 ng) of human recombinant interleukin-1 (rIL-1). Neutrophilia in the peripheral blood and changes in the tissue distribution of GM-CFC demonstrated that cells were mobilized from the bone marrow in response to rIL-1 injection. For example, 20 h after rIL-1 injection marrow GM-CFC numbers were 80% of the numbers in bone marrow from saline-injected mice. Associated with this decrease there was a twofold increase in the number of peripheral blood and splenic GM-CFC. Also, as determined by hydroxyurea injection, there was an increase in the number of GM-CFC in S phase of the cell cycle in the spleen, but not in the bone marrow. Data in this report suggest that when compared to the spleen, stimulation of granulopoiesis after rIL-1 injection is delayed in the bone marrow.

  16. Mobilization and collection of CD34+ cells for autologous transplantation of peripheral blood hematopoietic progenitor cells in children: analysis of two different granulocyte-colony stimulating factor doses

    PubMed Central

    Eid, Kátia Aparecida de Brito; Miranda, Eliana Cristina Martins; Aguiar, Simone dos Santos

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The use of peripheral hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) is the cell choice in autologous transplantation. The classic dose of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) for mobilization is a single daily dose of 10 μg/kg of patient body weight. There is a theory that higher doses of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor applied twice daily could increase the number of CD34+ cells collected in fewer leukapheresis procedures. Objective The aim of this study was to compare a fractionated dose of 15 μg G-CSF/kg of body weight and the conventional dose of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor in respect to the number of leukapheresis procedures required to achieve a minimum collection of 3 × 106 CD34+ cells/kg body weight. Methods Patients were divided into two groups: Group 10 – patients who received a single daily dose of 10 μg G-CSF/kg body weight and Group 15 – patients who received a fractioned dose of 15 μg G-CSF/kg body weight daily. The leukapheresis procedure was carried out in an automated cell separator. The autologous transplantation was carried out when a minimum number of 3 × 106 CD34+ cells/kg body weight was achieved. Results Group 10 comprised 39 patients and Group 15 comprised 26 patients. A total of 146 apheresis procedures were performed: 110 (75.3%) for Group 10 and 36 (24.7%) for Group 15. For Group 10, a median of three (range: 1–7) leukapheresis procedures and a mean of 8.89 × 106 CD34+ cells/kg body weight (±9.59) were collected whereas for Group 15 the corresponding values were one (range: 1–3) and 5.29 × 106 cells/kg body weight (±4.95). A statistically significant difference was found in relation to the number of apheresis procedures (p-value <0.0001). Conclusions To collect a minimum target of 3 × 106 CD34+ cells/kg body weight, the administration of a fractionated dose of 15 μg G-CSF/kg body weight significantly decreased the number of leukapheresis procedures performed. PMID:26041417

  17. A novel function of colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor in hTERT immortalization of human epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Li, N F; Kocher, H M; Salako, M A; Obermueller, E; Sandle, J; Balkwill, F

    2009-02-01

    The receptor for macrophage colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R) is a product of the proto-oncogene c-fms and a member of the class III transmembrane tyrosine kinase receptor family. Earlier, we described increased mRNA expression of CSF1R in human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) immortalized human ovarian surface epithelial (IOSE) cell lines derived from a single donor. Here, we further describe that CSF1R is upregulated at both the mRNA and protein level in hTERT immortalized human normal OSE cells from two different donors and in hTERT immortalized human pancreatic ductal epithelial cells. CSF1R was not upregulated in hTERT immortalized epithelial clones that subsequently underwent senescence or in immortalized fibroblasts. Upon stimulation by the CSF1R ligand CSF1, the immortalized epithelial cell lines showed rapid internalization of CSF1R with concomitant down-modulation and colocalization of phosphorylated NFkappaBp65 with hTERT protein, hTERT translocation into the nucleus and the binding of c-Myc to the hTERT promoter region. Reducing the expression of CSF1R using short hairpin interfering RNA abolished these effects and also decreased cell survival and the number of population doublings under suboptimal culture conditions. The telomerase inhibitor GRN163L confirmed a role for telomerase in the cleavage of the intracellular domain of CSF1R. On the basis of these findings, we suggest that CSF1R may be a critical factor facilitating hTERT immortalization of epithelial cells. PMID:18997822

  18. Spatio-temporal morphology changes in and quenching effects on the 2D spreading dynamics of cell colonies in both plain and methylcellulose-containing culture media.

    PubMed

    Muzzio, N E; Pasquale, M A; Huergo, M A C; Bolzán, A E; González, P H; Arvia, A J

    2016-06-01

    To deal with complex systems, microscopic and global approaches become of particular interest. Our previous results from the dynamics of large cell colonies indicated that their 2D front roughness dynamics is compatible with the standard Kardar-Parisi-Zhang (KPZ) or the quenched KPZ equations either in plain or methylcellulose (MC)-containing gel culture media, respectively. In both cases, the influence of a non-uniform distribution of the colony constituents was significant. These results encouraged us to investigate the overall dynamics of those systems considering the morphology and size, the duplication rate, and the motility of single cells. For this purpose, colonies with different cell populations (N) exhibiting quasi-circular and quasi-linear growth fronts in plain and MC-containing culture media are investigated. For small N, the average radial front velocity and its change with time depend on MC concentration. MC in the medium interferes with cell mitosis, contributes to the local enlargement of cells, and increases the distribution of spatio-temporal cell density heterogeneities. Colony spreading in MC-containing media proceeds under two main quenching effects, I and II; the former mainly depending on the culture medium composition and structure and the latter caused by the distribution of enlarged local cell domains. For large N, colony spreading occurs at constant velocity. The characteristics of cell motility, assessed by measuring their trajectories and the corresponding velocity field, reflect the effect of enlarged, slow-moving cells and the structure of the medium. Local average cell size distribution and individual cell motility data from plain and MC-containing media are qualitatively consistent with the predictions of both the extended cellular Potts models and the observed transition of the front roughness dynamics from a standard KPZ to a quenched KPZ. In this case, quenching effects I and II cooperate and give rise to the quenched

  19. Branching instability in expanding bacterial colonies

    PubMed Central

    Giverso, Chiara; Verani, Marco; Ciarletta, Pasquale

    2015-01-01

    Self-organization in developing living organisms relies on the capability of cells to duplicate and perform a collective motion inside the surrounding environment. Chemical and mechanical interactions coordinate such a cooperative behaviour, driving the dynamical evolution of the macroscopic system. In this work, we perform an analytical and computational analysis to study pattern formation during the spreading of an initially circular bacterial colony on a Petri dish. The continuous mathematical model addresses the growth and the chemotactic migration of the living monolayer, together with the diffusion and consumption of nutrients in the agar. The governing equations contain four dimensionless parameters, accounting for the interplay among the chemotactic response, the bacteria–substrate interaction and the experimental geometry. The spreading colony is found to be always linearly unstable to perturbations of the interface, whereas branching instability arises in finite-element numerical simulations. The typical length scales of such fingers, which align in the radial direction and later undergo further branching, are controlled by the size parameters of the problem, whereas the emergence of branching is favoured if the diffusion is dominant on the chemotaxis. The model is able to predict the experimental morphologies, confirming that compact (resp. branched) patterns arise for fast (resp. slow) expanding colonies. Such results, while providing new insights into pattern selection in bacterial colonies, may finally have important applications for designing controlled patterns. PMID:25652464

  20. Organic Tandem Solar Cells: Design and Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chun-Chao

    polyelectrolyte layer functioning as the surface dipole formation layer to provide better electrical contact with the photoactive layer. Due to the effectiveness of the conjugated polyelectrolyte layer, performance improvement was also observed. Furthermore, other issues regarding the semi-transparent tandem solar cells (e.g., photocurrent matching, exterior color tuning, and transparency tuning) are all explored to optimize best performance. In Chapter 5 and 6, the architectures of double- and triple-junction tandem solar cells are explored. Theoretically, triple-junction tandem solar cells with three photoactive absorbers with cascaded energy bandgaps have the potential to achieve higher performance, in comparison with double-junction tandem solar cells. Such expectations can be ascribed to the minimized carrier thermalization loss and further improved light absorption. However, the design of triple-junction solar cells often involves sophisticated multiple layer deposition as well as substantial optimization. Therefore, there is a lack of successful demonstrations of triple-junction solar cells outperforming the double-junction counterparts. To solve the incompatible issues related to the layer deposition in the fabrication, we proposed a novel architecture of inverted-structure tandem solar cells with newly designed interconnecting layers. Our design of interconnecting layers does not only focus on maintaining the orthogonal solution processing advantages, but also provides an excellent compatibility in the energy level alignment to allow different absorber materials to be used. Furthermore, we also explored the light management inside the double- and triple-junction tandem solar cells. The study of light management was carried out through optical simulation method based transfer matrix formalism. The intention is to obtain a balanced photocurrent output from each subcells inside the tandem solar cell, thus the minimal recombination loss at the contact of interconnecting

  1. A gene in the Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato Hrp pathogenicity island conserved effector locus, hopPtoA1, contributes to efficient formation of bacterial colonies in planta and is duplicated elsewhere in the genome.

    PubMed

    Badel, J L; Charkowski, A O; Deng, W L; Collmer, A

    2002-10-01

    The ability of Pseudomonas syringae to grow in planta is thought to be dependent upon the Hrp (type III secretion) system and multiple effector proteins that this system injects into plant cells. ORF5 in the conserved effector locus of the P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000 Hrp pathogenicity island was shown to encode a Hrp-secreted protein and to have a similarly secreted homolog encoded in an effector-rich pathogenicity island located elsewhere in the genome. These putative effector genes were designated hopPtoA1 and hopPtoA2, respectively. DNA gel blot analysis revealed that sequences hybridizing with hopPtoA1 were widespread among P. syringae pathovars, and some strains, like DC3000, appear to have two copies of the gene. uidA transcriptional fusions revealed that expression of hopPtoA1 and hopPtoA2 can be activated by the HrpL alternative sigma factor. hopPtoA1 and hopPtoA1/hopPtoA2 double mutants were not obviously different from wild-type P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000 in their ability to produce symptoms or to increase their total population size in host tomato and Arabidopsis leaves. However, confocal laser-scanning microscopy of GFP (green fluorescent protein)-labeled bacteria in Arabidopsis leaves 2 days after inoculation revealed that the frequency of undeveloped individual colonies was higher in the hopPtoA1 mutant and even higher in the hopPtoA1/hopPtoA2 double mutant. These results suggest that hopPtoA1 and hopPtoA2 contribute redundantly to the formation of P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000 colonies in Arabidopsis leaves. PMID:12437299

  2. Dysregulation of VEGF-induced proangiogenic Ca2+ oscillations in primary myelofibrosis-derived endothelial colony-forming cells.

    PubMed

    Dragoni, Silvia; Reforgiato, Marta; Zuccolo, Estella; Poletto, Valentina; Lodola, Francesco; Ruffinatti, Federico Alessandro; Bonetti, Elisa; Guerra, Germano; Barosi, Giovanni; Rosti, Vittorio; Moccia, Francesco

    2015-12-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells could be implicated in the aberrant neoangiogenesis that occurs in bone marrow and spleen in patients with primary myelofibrosis (PMF). However, antivascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) monotherapy had only a modest and transient effect in these individuals. Recently it was found that VEGF-induced proangiogenic intracellular Ca(2+) oscillations could be impaired in endothelial progenitor cells of subjects with malignancies. Therefore, we employed Ca(2+) imaging, wavelet analysis, and functional assays to assess whether and how VEGF-induced Ca(2+) oscillations are altered in PMF-derived endothelial progenitor cells. We focused on endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs), which are the only endothelial progenitor cell subtype capable of forming neovessels both in vivo and in vitro. VEGF triggers repetitive Ca(2+) spikes in both normal ECFCs (N-ECFCs) and ECFCs obtained from PMF patients (PMF-ECFCs). However, the spiking response to VEGF is significantly weaker in PMF-ECFCs. VEGF-elicited Ca(2+) oscillations are patterned by the interaction between inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate-dependent Ca(2+) mobilization and store-operated Ca(2+) entry. However, in most PMF-ECFCs, Ca(2+) oscillations are triggered by a store-independent Ca(2+) entry pathway. We found that diacylglycerol gates transient receptor potential canonical 1 channel to trigger VEGF-dependent Ca(2+) spikes by recruiting the phospholipase C/inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate signaling pathway, reflected as a decrease in endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) content. Finally, we found that, apart from being less robust and dysregulated as compared with N-ECFCs, VEGF-induced Ca(2+) oscillations modestly stimulate PMF-ECFC growth and in vitro angiogenesis. These results may explain the modest effect of anti-VEGF therapies in PMF. PMID:26432919

  3. Lipid nanocarriers containing sorafenib inhibit colonies formation in human hepatocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Bondì, Maria Luisa; Botto, Chiara; Amore, Erika; Emma, Maria Rita; Augello, Giuseppa; Craparo, Emanuela Fabiola; Cervello, Melchiorre

    2015-09-30

    Here, the potential of two nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC) for controlled release of sorafenib was evaluated. The obtained systems showed characteristics suitable as drug delivery systems for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) through parenteral administration. The use of a mixture between a solid lipid (tripalmitin) with a liquid lipid (Captex 355 EP/NF or Miglyol 812) to prepare NLC systems could give a higher drug loading capacity and a longer term stability during storage than that obtained by using only solid lipids. The obtained nanoparticles showed a nanometer size and high negative zeta potential values. Scansion electron microscopy (SEM) of the sorafenib loaded NLC revealed a spherical shape with a diameter <300 nm. In vitro biological studies demonstrated that sorafenib loaded into NLC had enhanced anti-tumor activity compared to that of free drug. This finding raises hope in terms of future drug delivery strategy of sorafenib loaded NLC, that can be useful for therapeutic application in HCC. PMID:26211902

  4. CORONETTE KERATINOCYTE COLONY FORMATION IS SUPPORTED BY EPIDERMAL-DERMAL CELL INTERACTIONS IN THE BOVINE CLAW

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Delineating factors that orchestrate keratinocyte growth and differentiation in the claw is pivotal to understanding the quality of hoof horn production in health and disease. The specific objectives of this investigation were to establish an in vitro culture system for bovine coronette keratinocyt...

  5. Pre-B-cell colony-enhancing factor protects against apoptotic neuronal death and mitochondrial damage in ischemia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaowan; Li, Hailong; Ding, Shinghua

    2016-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that Pre-B-cell colony-enhancing factor (PBEF), also known as nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), the rate-limiting enzyme in mammalian NAD(+) biosynthesis pathway, plays a brain and neuronal protective role in ischemic stroke. In this study, we further investigated the mechanism of its neuroprotective effect after ischemia in the primary cultured mouse cortical neurons. Using apoptotic cell death assay, fluorescent imaging, molecular biology, mitochondrial biogenesis measurements and Western blotting analysis, our results show that the overexpression of PBEF in neurons can significantly promote neuronal survival, reduce the translocation of apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) from mitochondria to nuclei and inhibit the activation of capase-3 after glutamate-induced excitotoxicity. We further found that the overexpression of PBEF can suppress glutamate-induced mitochondrial fragmentation, the loss of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content and the reduction of PGC-1 and NRF-1 expressions. Furthermore, these beneficial effects by PBEF are dependent on its enzymatic activity of NAD(+) synthesis. In summary, our study demonstrated that PBEF ameliorates ischemia-induced neuronal death through inhibiting caspase-dependent and independent apoptotic signaling pathways and suppressing mitochondrial damage and dysfunction. Our study provides novel insights into the mechanisms underlying the neuroprotective effect of PBEF, and helps to identify potential targets for ischemic stroke therapy. PMID:27576732

  6. Pre-B-cell colony-enhancing factor protects against apoptotic neuronal death and mitochondrial damage in ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaowan; Li, Hailong; Ding, Shinghua

    2016-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that Pre-B-cell colony-enhancing factor (PBEF), also known as nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), the rate-limiting enzyme in mammalian NAD+ biosynthesis pathway, plays a brain and neuronal protective role in ischemic stroke. In this study, we further investigated the mechanism of its neuroprotective effect after ischemia in the primary cultured mouse cortical neurons. Using apoptotic cell death assay, fluorescent imaging, molecular biology, mitochondrial biogenesis measurements and Western blotting analysis, our results show that the overexpression of PBEF in neurons can significantly promote neuronal survival, reduce the translocation of apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) from mitochondria to nuclei and inhibit the activation of capase-3 after glutamate-induced excitotoxicity. We further found that the overexpression of PBEF can suppress glutamate-induced mitochondrial fragmentation, the loss of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content and the reduction of PGC-1 and NRF-1 expressions. Furthermore, these beneficial effects by PBEF are dependent on its enzymatic activity of NAD+ synthesis. In summary, our study demonstrated that PBEF ameliorates ischemia-induced neuronal death through inhibiting caspase-dependent and independent apoptotic signaling pathways and suppressing mitochondrial damage and dysfunction. Our study provides novel insights into the mechanisms underlying the neuroprotective effect of PBEF, and helps to identify potential targets for ischemic stroke therapy. PMID:27576732

  7. Colony-stimulating factors and peripheral blood progenitor cell transplantation. Benefits and costs.

    PubMed

    Uyl-de Groot, C A; Huijgens, P C; Rutten, F F

    1996-07-01

    High dosage chemo- or radiotherapy followed by the administration of autologous bone marrow-derived stem cells [i.e. autologous bone marrow transplantation (ABMT)] is an established protocol for treating acute myeloid leukaemia and malignant lymphoma. The approach is also under investigation in the treatment of acute lymphocytic leukaemia, multiple myeloma and solid tumours. In all of these diseases, the optimisation of indications, conditioning schemes, stem cell harvest techniques and supportive care with growth factors is subject to continuous preclinical research and clinical phase II and III studies. Recently, the administration of peripheral blood stem cell preparations to cancer patients as rescue therapy after high dosage antitumour therapy has been received with much enthusiasm. At first glance, the technique looks rather easy to perform. The faster recovery of haemopoiesis, compared with ABMT, leads to shorter durations of hospitalisation. Moreover, in most studies, peripheral blood progenitor cell transplantation (PBPCT) resulted in fewer septic episodes, fewer intensive care admissions, fewer red blood cell and platelet transfusions, reduced use of anti-infectives and parenteral nutrition, and reduced hospital costs compared with ABMT. The overall conclusion is that the treatment costs of PBPCT are 15 to 30% lower than the treatment costs of ABMT. However, a formal comparison between PBPCT and ABMT, assessing the differences in toxicity, costs and quality of life, is still awaited. PMID:10160468

  8. Changes in different parameters, lymphocyte proliferation and hematopoietic progenitor colony formation in EAE mice treated with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Doronin, Vasilii B; Parkhomenko, Taisiya A; Korablev, Alexey; Toporkova, Ludmila B; Lopatnikova, Julia A; Alshevskaja, Alina A; Sennikov, Sergei V; Buneva, Valentina N; Budde, Thomas; Meuth, Sven G; Orlovskaya, Irina A; Popova, Nelly A; Nevinsky, Georgy A

    2016-01-01

    Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) is an antigen of the myelin sheath, which may trigger immune cell responses and the production of auto-antibodies in multiple sclerosis (MS). In this study, we used MOG(35-55) -induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a model of human MS, to assess the production of catalytically active immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies or abzymes which have been shown to be present in sera of patients with several autoimmune diseases. Here, we show that IgGs from the sera of control C57BL/6 mice are catalytically inactive. During development of EAE, a specific reorganization of the immune system of mice occurred leading to a condition which was associated with the generation of catalytically active IgGs hydrolysing DNA, myelin basic protein (MBP) and MOG which was associated with increased proteinuria, changes in differentiation of mice bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and an increase in proliferation of lymphocytes in bone marrow, spleen and thymus as well as a significant suppression of cell apoptosis in these organs. The strongest alterations were found in the early disease phase (18-24 days after immunization) and were less pronounced in later EAE stages (40 days after EAE induction). We conclude that a significant increase in DNase and proteolytic activities of antibodies may be considered the earliest statistically significant marker of MOG-induced EAE in mice. The possible differences in immune system reorganizations during preclinical phases of the disease, acute and late EAE, leading to production of different auto-antibodies and abzymes as well other changes are discussed. PMID:26493273

  9. Stem cells are units of natural selection for tissue formation, for germline development, and in cancer development.

    PubMed

    Weissman, Irving L

    2015-07-21

    It is obvious that natural selection operates at the level of individuals and collections of individuals. Nearly two decades ago we showed that in multi-individual colonies of protochordate colonial tunicates sharing a blood circulation, there exists an exchange of somatic stem cells and germline stem cells, resulting in somatic chimeras and stem cell competitions for gonadal niches. Stem cells are unlike other cells in the body in that they alone self-renew, so that they form clones that are perpetuated for the life of the organism. Stem cell competitions have allowed the emergence of competitive somatic and germline stem cell clones. Highly successful germline stem cells usually outcompete less successful competitors both in the gonads of the genotype partner from which they arise and in the gonads of the natural parabiotic partners. Therefore, natural selection also operates at the level of germline stem cell clones. In the colonial tunicate Botryllus schlosseri the formation of natural parabionts is prevented by a single-locus highly polymorphic histocompatibility gene called Botryllus histocompatibility factor. This limits germline stem cell predation to kin, as the locus has hundreds of alleles. We show that in mice germline stem cells compete for gonad niches, and in mice and humans, blood-forming stem cells also compete for bone marrow niches. We show that the clonal progression from blood-forming stem cells to acute leukemias by successive genetic and epigenetic events in blood stem cells also involves competition and selection between clones and propose that this is a general theme in cancer. PMID:26195745

  10. Stem cells are units of natural selection for tissue formation, for germline development, and in cancer development

    PubMed Central

    Weissman, Irving L.

    2015-01-01

    It is obvious that natural selection operates at the level of individuals and collections of individuals. Nearly two decades ago we showed that in multi-individual colonies of protochordate colonial tunicates sharing a blood circulation, there exists an exchange of somatic stem cells and germline stem cells, resulting in somatic chimeras and stem cell competitions for gonadal niches. Stem cells are unlike other cells in the body in that they alone self-renew, so that they form clones that are perpetuated for the life of the organism. Stem cell competitions have allowed the emergence of competitive somatic and germline stem cell clones. Highly successful germline stem cells usually outcompete less successful competitors both in the gonads of the genotype partner from which they arise and in the gonads of the natural parabiotic partners. Therefore, natural selection also operates at the level of germline stem cell clones. In the colonial tunicate Botryllus schlosseri the formation of natural parabionts is prevented by a single-locus highly polymorphic histocompatibility gene called Botryllus histocompatibility factor. This limits germline stem cell predation to kin, as the locus has hundreds of alleles. We show that in mice germline stem cells compete for gonad niches, and in mice and humans, blood-forming stem cells also compete for bone marrow niches. We show that the clonal progression from blood-forming stem cells to acute leukemias by successive genetic and epigenetic events in blood stem cells also involves competition and selection between clones and propose that this is a general theme in cancer. PMID:26195745

  11. Chemotactic-based adaptive self-organization during colonial development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Inon; Czirók, Andras; Ben-Jacob, Eshel

    1996-02-01

    Bacterial colonies have developed sophisticated modes of cooperative behavior which enable them to respond to adverse growth conditions. It has been shown that such behavior can be manifested in the development of complex colonial patterns. Certain bacterial species exhibit formation of branching patterns during colony development. Here we present a generic model to describe such patterning of swimming (tumbling) bacteria on agar surfaces. The model incorporates: (1) food diffusion, (2) reproduction and sporulation of the cells, (3) movement of the bacterial cells within a self-produced wetting fluid and (4) chemotactic signaling. As a plausible explanation for transitions between different branching morphologies, we propose an interplay between chemotaxis towards food, self-produced short range chemoattractant and long range chemorepellent.

  12. Structural and functional domains of the myb oncogene: requirements for nuclear transport, myeloid transformation, and colony formation.

    PubMed Central

    Ibanez, C E; Lipsick, J S

    1988-01-01

    The v-myb oncogene of avian myeloblastosis virus causes acute myelomonocytic leukemia in vivo and transforms only myeloid cells in vitro. Its product, p48v-myb, is a nuclear protein of unknown function. To determine structure-function relationships for this protein, we constructed a series of deletion mutants of v-myb, expressed them in retroviral vectors, and studied their biochemical and biological properties. We used these mutants to identify two separate domains of p48v-myb which had distinct roles in its accumulation in the cell nucleus. We showed that the viral sequences which normally encode both termini of p48v-myb were dispensible for transformation. In contrast, both copies of the highly conserved v-myb amino-terminal repeat were required for transformation. We also identified a carboxyl-terminal domain of p48v-myb which was required for the growth of v-myb-transformed myeloblasts in soft agar but not for morphological transformation. Images PMID:2835503

  13. Sox9 is a β-catenin-regulated transcription factor that enhances the colony-forming activity of squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Xue Mei; Piao, Yong Jun; Sohn, Kyung-Cheol; Ha, Jeong-Min; Im, Myung; Seo, Young-Joon; Whang, Kyu Uang; Lee, Jeung-Hoon; Lee, Young; Kim, Chang Deok

    2016-07-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is a common skin cancer, of which the incidence is relatively high, ranking second among the non‑melanoma skin cancers. It is known that numerous intracellular signal regulators are involved in the pathogenesis of SCC. The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway serves an important role in cancer development. However, the downstream effectors of β‑catenin remain to be clearly elucidated yet. The present study investigated the functional importance of Wnt/β‑catenin signaling in cutaneous SCC. β‑catenin expression was reduced using recombinant adenovirus expressing specific microRNA (miR). Knockdown of β‑catenin resulted in a marked reduction of the colony-forming activity of the SCC cells, SCC12. In an attempt to identify the β‑catenin downstream genes, it was found that Sox9 was regulated by β‑catenin in SCC12 cells. Overexpression of a constitutively active form of β‑catenin led to the induction of Sox9, while knockdown of β‑catenin resulted in downregulation of Sox9. When the expression of Sox9 was reduced using specific miR, colony-forming activity of the SCC12 cells was significantly reduced. When Sox9 was overexpressed in cells where β‑catenin was knocked down, it partially restored the colony‑forming potential. Taken together, the present results suggested that Sox9 is a β-catenin downstream transcription factor and is positively involved in SCC development. PMID:27151141

  14. Lignin Formation in Wheat Coleoptile Cell Walls

    PubMed Central

    Whitmore, F. W.

    1971-01-01

    Four growth-influencing compounds—hydroxyproline, 2,2′-dipyridyl, 2-chloroethylphosphonic acid, and indoleacetic acid—were used to examine the relationship between lignin formation and growth of wheat coleoptile sections. Hydroxyproline and 2-chloroethylphosphonic acid, at low concentrations, inhibited growth and increased lignin content. Dipyridyl, which promoted coleoptile elongation, decreased lignin content. Indoleacetic acid caused a 300% increase in growth at 0.1 mm but resulted in lignin content no different from controls with no auxin. Chemical and anatomical evidence is given which indicates that lignin is present in the epidermal cell walls of the wheat coleoptile. It is thus possible that bonding between lignin and hemicellulose may have some influence on coleoptile growth. Images PMID:16657843

  15. Contact formation in gallium arsenide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weizer, Victor G.; Fatemi, Navid S.

    1988-01-01

    Gold and gold-based alloys, commonly used as solar cell contact materials, are known to react readily with gallium arsenide. Experiments were performed to identify the mechanisms involved in these GaAs-metal interactions. It is shown that the reaction of GaAs with gold takes place via a dissociative diffusion process. It is shown further that the GaAs-metal reaction rate is controlled to a very great extent by the condition of the free surface of the contact metal, an interesting example of which is the previously unexplained increase in the reaction rate that has been observed for samples annealed in a vacuum environment as compared to those annealed in a gaseous ambient. A number of other hard-to-explain observations, such as the low-temperature formation of voids in the gold lattice and crystallite growth on the gold surface, are explained by invoking this mechanism.

  16. Theoretical size controls of the giant Phaeocystis globosa colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao; Smith, Walker O.; Tang, Kam W.; Doan, Nhu Hai; Nguyen, Ngoc Lam

    2015-06-01

    An unusual characteristic of the cosmopolitan haptophyte Phaeocystis globosa is its ability to form colonies of strikingly large size-up to 3 cm in diameter. The large size and the presence of a mucoid envelope are believed to contribute to the formation of dense blooms in Southeast Asia. We collected colonies of different sizes in shallow coastal waters of Viet Nam and conducted a series of measurements and experiments on individual colonies. Using these empirical data, we developed a simple carbon-based model to predict the growth and maximal size of P. globosa colonies. Our model suggests that growth of a colony from 0.2 cm to 1.4 cm (the maximal size in our samples) would take 16 days. This number, however, is strongly influenced by the maximal photosynthetic rate and other physiological parameters used in the model. The model also returns a specific growth rate of 0.30 d-1 for colonial cells, comparable to satellite estimates, but lower than have been measured for unicellular P. globosa in batch culture at similar temperatures. We attribute this low growth rate to not only the model uncertainties, but factors such as self-shading and diffusive limitation of nutrient uptake.

  17. Plerixafor and abbreviated-course granulocyte colony-stimulating factor for mobilizing hematopoietic progenitor cells in light chain amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Dhakal, Binod; Strouse, Christopher; D'Souza, Anita; Arce-Lara, Carlos; Esselman, Jeanie; Eastwood, Daniel; Pasquini, Marcelo; Saber, Wael; Drobyski, William; Rizzo, J Douglas; Hari, Parameswaran N; Hamadani, Mehdi

    2014-12-01

    Cytokine-based mobilization in light chain (AL) amyloidosis is frequently complicated by fluid overload, weight gain, cardiac arrhythmias, and peri-mobilization mortality. We analyzed hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC) mobilization outcomes in 49 consecutive AL amyloidosis patients at our institution between 2004 and 2013 with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G) (10 μg/kg/day) (n = 25) versus an institutional protocol to limit G exposure using plerixafor (P) (.24 mg/kg s.c. starting day 3 of G 10 μg/kg) (n = 24). G+P strategy yielded higher total CD34(+) cells/kg (12.8 × 10(6) versus 6.3 × 10(6); P < .001) and CD34(+) cells/kg collected on day 1 (10.8 × 10(6) versus 4.9 × 10(6), P = .004) compared with the G cohort. More G+P patients collected ≥5 × 10(6) CD34(+) HPCs/kg (22 versus 16, P = .02) and ≥ 10 × 10(6) CD34(+) HPCs/kg (13 versus 5, P = .01). Four patients (16%) had mobilization failure with G; none with G+P. Peri-mobilization weight gain was lower with G+P strategy (median weight gain 1 versus 7 pounds, P = .009). Numbers of apheresis sessions (median, 1 versus 1, P = .52), number of hospitalization days (median, 1.1 versus 1.6, P = .52), transfusions, use of intravenous antibiotics, and cardiac arrhythmias were similar. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that upfront use of G+P as a mobilization strategy results in superior HPC collection, no mobilization failures, and less weight gain than G alone. PMID:25111581

  18. Promoting the selection and maintenance of fetal liver stem/progenitor cell colonies by layer-by-layer polypeptide tethered supported lipid bilayer.

    PubMed

    Lee, I-Chi; Liu, Yung-Chiang; Tsai, Hsuan-Ang; Shen, Chia-Ning; Chang, Ying-Chih

    2014-12-10

    In this study, we designed and constructed a series of layer-by-layer polypeptide adsorbed supported lipid bilayer (SLB) films as a novel and label-free platform for the isolation and maintenance of rare populated stem cells. In particular, four alternative layers of anionic poly-l-glutamic acid and cationic poly-l-lysine were sequentially deposited on an anionic SLB. We found that the fetal liver stem/progenitor cells from the primary culture were selected and formed colonies on all layer-by-layer polypeptide adsorbed SLB surfaces, regardless of the number of alternative layers and the net charges on those layers. Interestingly, these isolated stem/progenitor cells formed colonies which were maintained for an 8 day observation period. Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation measurements showed that all SLB-polypeptide films were protein resistant with serum levels significantly lower than those on the polypeptide multilayer films without an underlying SLB. We suggest the fluidic SLB promotes selective binding while minimizing the cell-surface interaction due to its nonfouling nature, thus limiting stem cell colonies from spreading. PMID:25243588

  19. Vitrified canine testicular cells allow the formation of spermatogonial stem cells and seminiferous tubules following their xenotransplantation into nude mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung Hoon; Lee, Won Young; Kim, Dong Hoon; Lee, Seung Hoon; Do, Jung Tae; Park, Chankyu; Kim, Jae Hwan; Choi, Young Suk; Song, Hyuk

    2016-01-01

    Belgian Malinois (BM), one of the excellent military dog breeds in South Korea, is usually castrated before sexual maturation. Therefore, the transfer of their genetic features to the next generation is difficult. To overcome this, testicular cells from 4-month-old BMs were frozen. Testicular cells were thawed after 3 months and cultured in StemPro-34 medium. Spermatogonial stem cell (SSC) characteristics were determined by the transplantation of the cultured germ cell-derived colonies (GDCs) into empty testes, containing only several endogenous SSCs and Sertoli cells, of immunodeficient mice, 4 weeks after busulfan treatment. Following the implantation, the transplanted cells localized in the basement membrane of the seminiferous tubules, and ultimately colonized the recipient testes. Xenotransplantation of GDCs together with testicular somatic cells conjugated with extracellular matrix (ECM), led to the formation of de novo seminiferous tubules. These seminiferous tubules were mostly composed of Sertoli cells. Some germ cells were localized in the basement membrane of seminiferous tubules. This study revealed that BM-derived SSCs, obtained from the castrated testes, might be a valuable tool for the transfer of BM genetic features to the next generation. PMID:26907750

  20. Vitrified canine testicular cells allow the formation of spermatogonial stem cells and seminiferous tubules following their xenotransplantation into nude mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyung Hoon; Lee, Won Young; Kim, Dong Hoon; Lee, Seung Hoon; Do, Jung Tae; Park, Chankyu; Kim, Jae Hwan; Choi, Young Suk; Song, Hyuk

    2016-01-01

    Belgian Malinois (BM), one of the excellent military dog breeds in South Korea, is usually castrated before sexual maturation. Therefore, the transfer of their genetic features to the next generation is difficult. To overcome this, testicular cells from 4-month-old BMs were frozen. Testicular cells were thawed after 3 months and cultured in StemPro-34 medium. Spermatogonial stem cell (SSC) characteristics were determined by the transplantation of the cultured germ cell-derived colonies (GDCs) into empty testes, containing only several endogenous SSCs and Sertoli cells, of immunodeficient mice, 4 weeks after busulfan treatment. Following the implantation, the transplanted cells localized in the basement membrane of the seminiferous tubules, and ultimately colonized the recipient testes. Xenotransplantation of GDCs together with testicular somatic cells conjugated with extracellular matrix (ECM), led to the formation of de novo seminiferous tubules. These seminiferous tubules were mostly composed of Sertoli cells. Some germ cells were localized in the basement membrane of seminiferous tubules. This study revealed that BM-derived SSCs, obtained from the castrated testes, might be a valuable tool for the transfer of BM genetic features to the next generation. PMID:26907750

  1. Deadly competition between sibling bacterial colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Be'Er, Avraham

    2011-03-01

    As a result of stress due to nutrient limitation or antibiotics, competing individual bacteria within a single colony may lyse sibling cells to release nutrients (cannibalism) or DNA (fratricide). However, we have recently shown that competition is not limited to individuals, but can occur at the colony level [A. Be'er et al., PNAS 106, 428 (2009); A. Be'er et al., PNAS 107, 6258 (2010).] In response to the presence of an encroaching sibling colony, Paenibacillus dendritiformis bacteria secrete a lethal protein, lysing cells at the interface between the colonies. Analysis of the proteins secreted by these competing sibling colonies, combined with a mathematical model, shows how colonies maintain their growth by self-regulating the secretion of two proteins: subtilisin (a well-known growth promoter), and Slf (a previously unknown protein, which is lethal). The results also explain why a single colony is not inhibited by its own secretions.

  2. Cell-cell interactions impacts on the rate of swarm expansion and the edge shape of a colony swarming Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiri, Aboutaleb; Tierra, Giordano; Xu, Zhiliang; Shrout, Joshua; Alber, Mark

    Collective motion has been observed by several bacterial species including the pathogenic bacterium P. aeruginosa. A flagellum at the pole is known to generate a self-propulsion motion. However, the role of type IV pili (TFP), distributed on the cell membrane, during swarming needs to be investigated in more details. In this work we introduce a model that combines the hydrodynamic and biophysical interactions in order to study the impact of the TFP interactions on swarming behavior of the colony. The model describes the motion and interactions of rod-shaped self propelled bacteria inside a thin liquid film. It also includes the equations describing the production and diffusion of surfactant rhamnolipids that is responsible for extraction of water from substrate, and Marangoni driven expansion of the thin liquid film by altering the surface tension. We show that TFP interactions are responsible for slower expansion rate of colonies of TFP deficient mutants compared to wild type. Experimental observations were used to calibrate the model and verify the model assumptions and predictions.

  3. The Alternative Role of Enterobactin as an Oxidative Stress Protector Allows Escherichia coli Colony Development

    PubMed Central

    Peralta, Daiana R.; Pomares, María Fernanda; de Cristóbal, Ricardo E.; Vincent, Paula A.

    2014-01-01

    Numerous bacteria have evolved different iron uptake systems with the ability to make use of their own and heterologous siderophores. However, there is growing evidence attributing alternative roles for siderophores that might explain the potential adaptive advantages of microorganisms having multiple siderophore systems. In this work, we show the requirement of the siderophore enterobactin for Escherichia coli colony development in minimal media. We observed that a strain impaired in enterobactin production (entE mutant) was unable to form colonies on M9 agar medium meanwhile its growth was normal on LB agar medium. Given that, neither iron nor citrate supplementation restored colony growth, the role of enterobactin as an iron uptake-facilitator would not explain its requirement for colony development. The absence of colony development was reverted either by addition of enterobactin, the reducing agent ascorbic acid or by incubating in anaerobic culture conditions with no additives. Then, we associated the enterobactin requirement for colony development with its ability to reduce oxidative stress, which we found to be higher in media where the colony development was impaired (M9) compared with media where the strain was able to form colonies (LB). Since oxyR and soxS mutants (two major stress response regulators) formed colonies in M9 agar medium, we hypothesize that enterobactin could be an important piece in the oxidative stress response repertoire, particularly required in the context of colony formation. In addition, we show that enterobactin has to be hydrolyzed after reaching the cell cytoplasm in order to enable colony development. By favoring iron release, hydrolysis of the enterobactin-iron complex, not only would assure covering iron needs, but would also provide the cell with a molecule with exposed hydroxyl groups (hydrolyzed enterobactin). This molecule would be able to scavenge radicals and therefore reduce oxidative stress. PMID:24392154

  4. Biological role of granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) on cells of the myeloid lineage.

    PubMed

    Ushach, Irina; Zlotnik, Albert

    2016-09-01

    M-CSF and GM-CSF are 2 important cytokines that regulate macrophage numbers and function. Here, we review their known effects on cells of the macrophage-monocyte lineage. Important clues to their function come from their expression patterns. M-CSF exhibits a mostly homeostatic expression pattern, whereas GM-CSF is a product of cells activated during inflammatory or pathologic conditions. Accordingly, M-CSF regulates the numbers of various tissue macrophage and monocyte populations without altering their "activation" status. Conversely, GM-CSF induces activation of monocytes/macrophages and also mediates differentiation to other states that participate in immune responses [i.e., dendritic cells (DCs)]. Further insights into their function have come from analyses of mice deficient in either cytokine. M-CSF signals through its receptor (CSF-1R). Interestingly, mice deficient in CSF-1R expression exhibit a more significant phenotype than mice deficient in M-CSF. This observation was explained by the discovery of a novel cytokine (IL-34) that represents a second ligand of CSF-1R. Information about the function of these ligands/receptor system is still developing, but its complexity is intriguing and strongly suggests that more interesting biology remains to be elucidated. Based on our current knowledge, several therapeutic molecules targeting either the M-CSF or the GM-CSF pathways have been developed and are currently being tested in clinical trials targeting either autoimmune diseases or cancer. It is intriguing to consider how evolution has directed these pathways to develop; their complexity likely mirrors the multiple functions in which cells of the monocyte/macrophage system are involved. PMID:27354413

  5. Pre-B cell colony enhancing factor induces Nampt-dependent translocation of the insulin receptor out of lipid microdomains in A549 lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Peng, Qianyi; Jia, Song Hui; Parodo, Jean; Ai, Yuhang; Marshall, John C

    2015-02-15

    Pre-B cell colony-enhancing factor (PBEF) is a highly conserved pleiotropic protein reported to be an alternate ligand for the insulin receptor (IR). We sought to clarify the relationship between PBEF and insulin signaling by evaluating the effects of PBEF on the localization of the IRβ chain to lipid rafts in A549 epithelial cells. We isolated lipid rafts from A549 cells and detected the IR by immunoprecipitation from raft fractions or whole cell lysates. Cells were treated with rPBEF, its enzymatic product nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD), or the Nampt inhibitor daporinad to study the effect of PBEF on IRβ movement. We used coimmunoprecipitation studies in cells transfected with PBEF and IRβ constructs to detect interactions between PBEF, the IRβ, and caveolin-1 (Cav-1). PBEF was present in both lipid raft and nonraft fractions, whereas the IR was found only in lipid raft fractions of resting A549 cells. The IR-, PBEF-, and Cav-1-coimmunoprecipitated rPBEF treatment resulted in the movement of IRβ- and tyrosine-phosphorylated Cav-1 from lipid rafts to nonrafts, an effect that could be blocked by daporinad, suggesting that this effect was facilitated by the Nampt activity of PBEF. The addition of PBEF to insulin-treated cells resulted in reduced Akt phosphorylation of both Ser⁴⁷³ and Thr³⁰⁸. We conclude that PBEF can inhibit insulin signaling through the IR by Nampt-dependent promotion of IR translocation into the nonraft domains of A549 epithelial cells. PBEF-induced alterations in the spatial geometry of the IR provide a mechanistic explanation for insulin resistance in inflammatory states associated with upregulation of PBEF. PMID:25516545

  6. Augmentation of erythroid burst formation by the addition of thymocytes and other myelo-lymphoid cells.

    PubMed

    Kanamaru, A; Durban, E; Gallagher, M T; Miller, S C; Trentin, J J

    1980-08-01

    Bone marrow from barrier-sustained specific pathogen-free (SPF) CBA and C57BL/6 mice gave relatively low numbers of BFU-E colonies in methylcellulose culture, as compared to conventional mice. Addition of thymocytes to the marrow cultures increased the yield of BFU-E colonies more than fourfold in SPF mice but only 1.5-fold in conventional mice. Colony size was also increased. Increased yield of BFU-E colonies was also obtained by co-culture of bone marrow with lymph node cells or with bone marrow or spleen cells from 900R whole-body irradiated mice. The effect appeared to be cellular rather than humoral. It was not reproduced by conditioned medium from thymus or pokeweed mitogen stimulated spleen cells. The helper effect of thymus cells was eliminated or reduced by freezing and thawing, or by 48 hours of incubation after irradiation. Treatment of bone marrow cells in vitro with anti-theta serum and complement did not decrease the number of BFU-E colonies. The putative helper cells appear not to be T cells, were non-adherent to the plastic culture dish, and were cortisone resistant and radioresistant. The low BFU-E colony yield from SPF mouse marrow is presumed to be largely the result of deficiency of these non-T helper cells in SPF bone marrow, rather than of BFU-E progenitor cells. PMID:6447706

  7. Antibodies binding granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor produced by cord blood-derived B cell lines immortalized by Epstein-Barr virus in vitro.

    PubMed

    Revoltella, R P; Laricchia Robbio, L; Liberati, A M; Reato, G; Foa, R; Funaro, A; Vinante, F; Pizzolo, G

    2000-09-15

    We detected natural antibodies (auto-Abs) binding human granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in umbilical cord blood (CB) (23 of 94 samples screened) and peripheral blood of women at the end of pregnancy (6 of 42 samples tested). To demonstrate that Abs detected in CB were produced by the fetus, CB mononuclear cells were infected with Epstein-Barr virus in vitro. Ten cell lines producing constitutively anti-recombinant human GM-CSF (rhGM-CSF) Abs were isolated and characterized. These cells displayed a male karyotype, an early activated B cell phenotype, coexpressed surface IgM and IgD, and secreted only IgM with prevailing lambda clonal restriction. Specific cell surface binding of biotinylated rhGM-CSF and high-level anti-rhGM-CSF IgM Ab production were typical features of early cell cultures. In late cell passages the frequency of more undifferentiated B cells increased. Serum Abs of either maternal or fetal origin or Abs produced in culture did not affect the granulocyte and macrophage colony stimulating activity of rhGM-CSF from bone marrow progenitors in soft agar, suggesting that the Abs produced were nonneutralizing. PMID:11069719

  8. Focal Adhesion Kinase regulates cell-cell contact formation in epithelial cells via modulation of Rho

    SciTech Connect

    Playford, Martin P.; Vadali, Kavita; Cai Xinming; Burridge, Keith; Schaller, Michael D.

    2008-10-15

    Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) is a non-receptor tyrosine kinase that plays a key role in cellular processes such as cell adhesion, migration, proliferation and survival. Recent studies have also implicated FAK in the regulation of cell-cell adhesion. Here, evidence is presented showing that siRNA-mediated suppression of FAK levels in NBT-II cells and expression of dominant negative mutants of FAK caused loss of epithelial cell morphology and inhibited the formation of cell-cell adhesions. Rac and Rho have been implicated in the regulation of cell-cell adhesions and can be regulated by FAK signaling. Expression of active Rac or Rho in NBT-II cells disrupted formation of cell-cell contacts, thus promoting a phenotype similar to FAK-depleted cells. The loss of intercellular contacts in FAK-depleted cells is prevented upon expression of a dominant negative Rho mutant, but not a dominant negative Rac mutant. Inhibition of FAK decreased tyrosine phosphorylation of p190RhoGAP and elevated the level of GTP-bound Rho. This suggests that FAK regulates cell-cell contact formation by regulation of Rho.

  9. Enhancement of the grafting efficiency of transplanted marrow cells by preincubation with interleukin-3 and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor

    SciTech Connect

    Tavassoli, M.; Konno, M.; Shiota, Y.; Omoto, E.; Minguell, J.J.; Zanjani, E.D.

    1991-04-01

    To improve the grafting efficiency of transplanted murine hematopoietic progenitors, we briefly preincubated mouse bone marrow cells with interleukin-3 (IL-3) or granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) ex vivo before their transplantation into irradiated recipients. This treatment was translated into an increase in the seeding efficiency of colony-forming unit-spleen (CFU-S) and CFU-GM after transplantation. Not only was the concentration of CFU-S in the tibia increased 2 and 24 hours after transplantation, but the total cell number and CFU-S and CFU-GM concentrations were persistently higher in IL-3- and GM-CSF-treated groups 1 to 3 weeks after transplantation. In addition, the survival of animals as a function of transplanted cell number was persistently higher in IL-3- and GM-CSF-treated groups compared with controls. The data indicate that the pretreatment of marrow cells with IL-3 and GM-CSF before transplantation increases the seeding efficiency of hematopoietic stem cells and probably other progenitor cells after transplantation. This increased efficiency may be mediated by upward modulation of homing receptors. Therefore, ex vivo preincubation of donor marrow cells with IL-3 and GM-CSF may be a useful tactic in bone marrow transplantation.

  10. Changes in numbers and types of mast cell colony-forming cells in the peritoneal cavity of mice after injection of distilled water: evidence that mast cells suppress differentiation of bone marrow-derived precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Kanakura, Y.; Kuriu, A.; Waki, N.; Nakano, T.; Asai, H.; Yonezawa, T.; Kitamura, Y.

    1988-03-01

    Two different types of cells in the peritoneal cavity of mice produce mast cell colonies in methylcellulose. Large mast cell colonies are produced by bone marrow-derived precursors resembling lymphoid cells by light microscopy (L-CFU-Mast), whereas medium and small mast cell colonies are produced by morphologically identifiable mast cells (M-CFU-Mast and S-CFU-Mast, respectively). In the present study we eradicated peritoneal mast cells by intraperitoneal (IP) injection of distilled water. The regeneration process was investigated to clarify the relationship between L-CFU-Mast, M-CFU-Mast, and S-CFU-Mast. After injection of distilled water, M-CFU-Mast and S-CFU-Mast disappeared, but L-CFU-Mast increased, and then M-CFU-Mast and S-CFU-Mast appeared, suggesting the presence of a hierarchic relationship. When purified peritoneal mast cells were injected two days after the water injection, the L-CFU-Mast did not increase. In the peritoneal cavity of WBB6F1-+/+ mice that had been lethally irradiated and rescued by bone marrow cells of C57BL/6-bgJ/bgJ (beige, Chediak-Higashi syndrome) mice, L-CFU-Mast were of bgJ/bgJ type, but M-CFU-Mast and S-CFU-Mast were of +/+ type. The injection of distilled water to the radiation chimeras resulted in the development of bgJ/bgJ-type M-CFU-Mast and then S-CFU-Mast. The presence of mast cells appeared to suppress the recruitment of L-CFU-Mast from the bloodstream and to inhibit the differentiation of L-CFU-Mast to M-CFU-Mast.